header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-04 INDU 166

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0915)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good morning, everybody.

Good morning, Mr. Allison. Welcome to our committee.

Mr. Dean Allison (Niagara West, CPC):

It's good to be here.

The Chair:

And Ms. Rudd, welcome to our committee.

Ms. Kim Rudd (Northumberland—Peterborough South, Lib.):

Thank you.

The Chair:

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 166 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, May 8, we're continuing our study of M-208 on rural digital infrastructure.

We have with us by video conference, from Left, John Lyotier, co-founder and chief executive officer of RightMesh Project; Chris Jensen, co-founder and chief executive officer of RightMesh Project; and Jason Ernst, chief networking scientist and chief technology officer, RightMesh Project.

Welcome, gentlemen, from my home town.

Dr. Jason Ernst (Chief Networking Scientist and Chief Technology Officer, RightMesh Project, Left):

Good morning.

The Chair:

You can hear us. Right?

Dr. Jason Ernst:

We can.

The Chair:

Excellent.

From Xplornet we have Christine J. Prudham, executive vice-president and general counsel.

Do you hear us, Christine?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham (Executive Vice-President, General Counsel, Xplornet Communications Inc.):

Yes. Good morning.

The Chair:

Good morning. Great, that's two for two.[Translation]

We also have Mr. André Nepton, coordinator at the Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications.

Good morning, Mr. Nepton. How are you?

Mr. André Nepton (Coordinator, Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications):

I'm fine, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We're going to get started. We basically have five-minute presentations and then we'll get into our round of questioning.

We're going to start with Jason from Left.

Sir, you have the floor.

Mr. Chris Jensen (Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, RightMesh Project, Left):

Actually, it's going to be Chris from Left, but very similar.

Thank you for inviting us. We refer back to the mandate of this committee where you said that reliable and accessible digital infrastructure from broadband Internet to wireless telecommunications and beyond is essential. We're focused on the beyond part and John will tell you why.

Mr. John Lyotier (Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, RightMesh Project, Left):

I grew up in a small town in northern B.C., one of your classic rural communities. I was very fortunate to discover technology at an early age, which brings me here today. For the last several years I've been working on technology called RightMesh, which is mobile mesh networking technology focused on connectivity decisions around the world.

In large parts of the world, including Canada, connectivity is not sufficient. Our focus is on helping to bridge the digital divide. We know that 5G technology is not going to be sufficient in the future to address the needs of the population. There are large parts of the world where 5G will be inadequate due to cost structures, network infrastructure densities and other reasons.

We have been working on a project up in northern Canada in a town called Rigolet in northern Labrador for the last few years. Jason will talk a bit more about that.

Dr. Jason Ernst:

In Rigolet there are no cellphone towers and the throughput of the network there when we first started going there was about one megabit per second. It's now usually around two to four megabits per second, and there are still many people in the town who aren't connected. About 300 people live there and there are about a hundred houses. Many of the people don't actually have a direct connection to the Internet. So they gave us a map of everyone in the town showing the houses that have connections and the houses that are sharing with other people and the houses that aren't connected at all.

They've built this app to try to document the climate change that's going on there. They're monitoring the environment. They're documenting their experiences, but the problem is that it doesn't work very well because the Internet is so limited up there. They invited us in to try to use some of the technology we're building to be able to improve the connectivity in the town. So rather than going up through the Internet for everything, they're able to share from phone to phone to phone and offload some of the traffic from the Internet.

Some of the work that we're doing that supports this is through a Mitacs grant. We received this grant about six months ago now. It was a $2.13 million grant supporting 15 or 16 Ph.D. students and four post-docs over the next three to five years. That's mainly to help with the really technical challenges for some of this stuff, but it's also to support [Technical difficulty--Editor] within the community, doing trials and doing pilot projects up in the north.

We've also had a lot of interest from other communities in the north. This is just our first community up in Rigolet, but many of the other places in Nunatsiavut have also been interested, places like Nain. The other partner in the project, Dan Gillis from the University of Guelph—that's the main university we're working with—has also been meeting with people in Nunavut. We've also partnered with a bunch of the other universities involved in the project. The app they're building is called eNuk. It involves Memorial University and the University of Alberta. We're also working with UBC. This grant is really the way we've been bringing together universities across Canada to solve this problem in a unique way that doesn't necessarily depend on infrastructure.

We know about the types of initiatives where you can throw a lot of money out the window, build a lot of expensive infrastructure, but there are also unique ways to solve the problem using the things that people already have, the funds they already have. We're coming at it with that type of approach.

(0920)

Mr. John Lyotier:

Really from a technology standpoint, what we've created is a mesh networking software protocol that allows phones to talk to each other; so it's phone-to-phone communication. Should one person have connectivity, the entire network can have connectivity from that one person.

We're bringing this technology around the world. I'm flying next week to Columbia to meet with different government and industry officials who are looking at solutions, whether it's in Bangladesh or in Africa—really all around the world.

We know there is a growing digital divide and that it's being felt here at home as well. We want to do whatever we can to help the local communities as much as we can help the international community.

Mr. Chris Jensen:

Thank you for giving us a chance to present. The message we really wanted to get across was that it's not just about big pipe infrastructure. At the end of that pipe, you have to get the message out to the people and allow people to connect within their community and do things within it that are important and vital to them in times of need and times when the world is otherwise slipping by them. That's what RightMesh is about.

The Chair:

My apology, John. It said “Jason” for some reason on the notice of meeting, and I read it, but it's actually “John”. Thank you for your presentation.

We're going to move to Xplornet Communications with Christine Prudham. You have five minutes.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Thank you.

Good morning and thank you for the invitation to join you today. My apologies that I could not be there in person.

My name is actually C. J. Prudham, and I'm the executive vice-president and general counsel at Xplornet Communications.

I'm pleased to have the chance to put Xplornet's expertise at your disposal in this very important discussion. It's a subject we know very well.

Xplornet is Canada's largest rural-focused Internet service provider, connecting over 370,000 homes, or nearly 1 million Canadians. We're truly national, serving Canadians in every province and territory. We proudly serve those Canadians who choose to live outside of the cities.

Conquering our country's vast geography by bringing fast affordable Internet to rural Canada is more than just our business; it's our purpose. We've invested over $1.5 billion in our facilities and in our network, expanding coverage while increasing both speeds and data for our customers.

Recently, we were excited to announce a new investment of a further half a billion dollars to bring 5G services to rural Canadians. Starting later this year, Xplornet will double the download speeds we offer to 50 megabytes per second. Next year, we'll double them again, making 100 megabytes per second available to our customers.

To do so, we're using the same technology being deployed in Canadian cities—fibre, micro-cells and fixed wireless technology—to ensure that rural Canadians enjoy access to the same speed and data.

Through innovation and private investment, Xplornet is already hard at work to exceed the Government of Canada's target for broadband connectivity in 2030, well ahead of schedule.

It is against that backdrop that we thank the committee for allowing us to comment on motion 208 on rural digital infrastructure. The motion outlines a number of important measures the government can do to incent further investment.

While the Government of Canada does have a role to play, we would caution that there needs to be coordination and balance taken in financial investments. Otherwise, there is a risk of multiple well-meaning government agencies rushing to fund projects and crowding out sustainable private investment.

However, private investment and targeted financial support from government are only two of three key factors that lead to real improvements in Internet services for rural Canadians.

The third is access to spectrum. Spectrum is the oxygen that our wireless network needs to breathe. More literally, it's the radio waves that carry data between our customers and the Internet.

While data consumption by Canadians has exploded in recent years, all significant spectrum allocations by the Government of Canada in the last five years have focused exclusively on mobile needs. Rural Canada needs access to spectrum in order to keep pace.

We note that providing access to spectrum is regrettably absent in M-208, and we therefore propose that the committee consider an amendment to ensure that this essential ingredient is included in the motion.

Specifically, Mr. Chair, the committee may be aware of the 3500 megahertz spectrum band and the consultation currently under way via Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. This spectrum band is absolutely critical to serving rural Canadians. The decision, which we understand is imminent, will be the single biggest decision in a decade impacting rural broadband.

If either of the options proposed in the consultation is implemented, rural Canadians will be disconnected. They will lose access to Internet services that we all agree are vital. Instead of moving forward as the motion strives to do, rural broadband connectivity would be set back a decade.

Xplornet continues to have positive discussions with the Government of Canada, and we are hopeful for a solution that does not negatively impact rural Canadians.

Thank you once again, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity to speak to the committee. I'd be pleased to answer questions.

(0925)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We've had a bit of a technical difficulty with our translator.[Translation]

Mr. Nepton, you have five minutes to make your presentation. You can do it in French or English, as you wish.

Mr. André Nepton:

I'm going to speak in French. [English]

The Chair:

Sorry, I'm looking for the thumbs-up.

We're having technical difficulties.[Translation]

Please do not speak too quickly and that will be fine.

You may begin. You have five minutes.

Mr. André Nepton:

Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, good morning.

AIDE-TIC, which I have been coordinating since 2009, is a non-profit organization dedicated to the development of information technologies in rural Quebec. We work at the request of communities to establish partnership agreements with large corporations so that people in rural areas have access to services of the same quality and at the same cost as people in urban areas.

By next December, in collaboration with large corporations, AIDE-TIC will have set up 40 projects to develop large telecommunications sites, that is to say 300-foot telecommunications towers serving villages and LTE technology road access. Of the 47 sites that have been developed since 2009, 28 belong to us, on behalf of the communities that requested them. According to its model, AIDE-TIC develops the built infrastructure, and carriers use it on a colocation basis. Thirteen million was invested to provide service to 36 rural communities in Quebec that were without service, and to build five interregional access roads to them.

For the industry, cellular telephony and LTE high-speed Internet, and soon 5G, will require substantial changes that will oppose two needs. On the one hand, the major telecom operators obviously want to increase the number of these towers in view of the 5G technology, which is carried by much lower frequencies. On the other hand, rural communities are increasingly demanding access to equipment and technologies similar to those in urban areas, both on access roads for safety reasons and in the heart of the village.

While AIDE-TIC recognizes that carriers need to increase site density, it is concerned that the significant capital investment required will be at the expense of the last rural networks yet to be developed.

On the eve of 2020, we are talking about safety on our roads, but also about the competitiveness of rural businesses. Motion M-208 eloquently explains the issue of occupying Canada's vast territory. AIDE-TIC believes that this time, we cannot simply leave it to the carriers to set priorities. It is important that the communities with whom we work on a daily basis can also, as beneficiaries, set their priorities in the municipalities where services must be put in place.

We cannot continue to have programs that leave it up to the carriers to define their own priorities. When we call a telecom operator, they mention 100 municipalities they would like to serve. AIDE-TIC wants to intervene, but probably with regard to the hundredth, which is very far from the profitability line, because it is the one that should benefit more from government support and collective intervention. We continue to believe that communities must be involved in program development and that this should not be left to the carriers.

We are very satisfied with the motion that has been proposed. The evolution of wireless technologies means that equipment replacement takes place every 12 to 18 months, which is a very rapid physical obsolescence when it comes to meeting demand.

On two occasions, regarding the 2017 and 2018 budgets, AIDE-TIC argued to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance that an accelerated capital cost allowance, but strictly on large telecommunications sites covering access roads and unserviced rural villages, could be a major incentive for carriers to invest more in rural municipalities.

(0930)



In closing, allow me to thank you, on behalf of the company I represent, for allowing us to share with you part of our vision and to assure you, at the outset, that motion M-208 fully meets our expectations in this regard.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We're going to jump right into questions because of our shortened schedule. We're going to start off with five-minute segments in the question period.

Mr. Longfield, you have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to everybody who has joined us on short notice and using technology.

It's good to see you again, John. We saw each other at the Pint of Science in Guelph a few weeks ago. Dan Gillis put on great events across Guelph where we learned about some of these new technologies.

The presentation that you gave that night, is that something you could send in to our clerk, so that we could include some of those details in our report?

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes, sure. I'd be happy to.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Terrific.

One of the main purposes of this study is looking at how we get cellphone coverage into rural areas.

It's an underlying purpose, I should say. How do we get cellphone coverage into areas experiencing floods, forest fires and disasters, where you need to communicate between teams of people to coordinate things like sandbags or water delivery?

When I saw what you've done in Rigolet, it seems that it's something that can be deployed quite quickly. Is that true, in terms of dropping in Android devices into an area and having them connect to each other?

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes, you could do something like that. I think when it comes to a disaster situation when the cellphone towers might be down, that's probably one of the best options. I still think that, in situations where you can use infrastructure, that's definitely going to be the best. This is a good alternative if there is no option like it.

For example, in California when the wildfires were spreading so fast that they were was taking down the cellphone towers faster than people could get the warning messages, that might be a situation where something like this might be useful.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

There are some technology limitations. You mentioned in the presentation in Guelph that some makes of phone don't communicate very well with others. They don't have very good access unless you have certain pass codes. Androids seem to be one of the main focus points for you.

(0935)

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes.

IOS, for example, is very locked down when it comes to how you can control the connectivity between phones. You can make some small, limited meshes. I think they are making efforts to sort of lock this down so they can control the entire thing. But on Android it's more open, and you can have networks that self-form and self-heal much easier than on other devices.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In terms of deployment, if we looked at hitting areas that, let's say, are experiencing some kind of climate change disasters, you could deploy into that area and then leave the infrastructure behind so that those communities would then have access. I'm thinking of communities around lakes.

We had a study on rural broadband a few years ago. Again, the University of Guelph was here talking about the SWIFT network in southern Ontario and the way density is calculated. Quite often there are dense populations around a lake, and then through the whole rest of the area there isn't any requirement for broadband. Then those areas don't get served properly.

It seems to me this could be something that could complement our broadband hard infrastructure into some areas where we have density pockets.

Mr. John Lyotier:

I think that Rigolet really shows off that type of use case. There are 300 people there. If you look at the broader area, it's not a very dense place, but the town itself is so dense that you could actually cover it with a mesh of cellphones. We figure with 300 people, we could probably cover the whole town with about 50 phones. We did some tests just walking around with the phones that we brought with us, and with about 10 or so you could reach from one side of town to the other. Then it's just a matter of filling out the rest of the town with the phones.

You could use some actual hardware, some hardware off the shelf, and in addition to that you could make some longer links for the phones—maybe you don't reach as far. This type of strategy, I think, is really a low-cost and effective way you can combine that with maybe one fast Internet connection into town.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Finally from me, has Rigolet developed to a point where you could then scale it to other communities?

Could you take, let's say, the learning from Rigolet and apply it to other northern communities and then maybe some other communities, let's say, in southern Ontario that don't have access?

Mr. John Lyotier:

That's pretty much our plan right now, and beyond even Ontario and Canada, we're looking at places in India and Bangladesh and parts of the developing world as well. The challenges are a bit different in some of those places. The density is not so much a problem in those places.

We have learned a lot in Rigolet. With a lot of the interest that we've been generating at some of the events we've been going to, there are definitely other communities interested.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Terrific. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes, sir.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all the witnesses for taking the time out of your schedules to be with us and to share your expertise.

First, to the Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l’information et des communications, in a brief that you submitted to the finance committee in 2016 you were advocating prioritizing mobile wireless in your government's rural broadband funding programs. In a world with obviously limited money, do you still think focusing on mobile coverage is of higher priority than home broadband? [Translation]

The Chair:

Did you hear the question, Mr. Nepton?

Mr. André Nepton:

Yes, absolutely.

When we call on elected officials in our municipalities, the priority is cell phones. Indeed, since the advent of LTE technology, both Internet access and telephony can be offered. It is clear that for the Internet, costs are a little higher, but telephony is the basis of security, especially on our access roads.

Elected officials are constantly asking us for more than affordable access to the Internet. However, various technologies, including the advent of satellite transmission, have so far made it possible to meet current standards. As a result, the priority remains bandwidth, despite urban sprawl and low population densities. [English]

Mr. Dan Albas:

I certainly agree that safety is a priority, but as my colleague Mr. Chong has said a number of times, it's not just a question of accessibility; it's accessibility to make sure there's safety, but also affordability. When I hear from people in rural areas, I hear concerns about mobile coverage as well as home broadband. However, when most people don't have access to affordable Internet in their homes, that seems to be a top priority. Mobile data is inherently more expensive than land-line data. Is this not a concern when prioritizing mobile data over fibre to the home?

(0940)

[Translation]

Mr. André Nepton:

The industry is in the process of adjusting its pricing, which you can see.

Indeed, the residential fixed wireless industry is constantly reducing its prices and increasing its performance. In my opinion, to meet the competition, the residential fixed wireless industry will adjust in the medium term. [English]

Mr. Dan Albas:

No, I can appreciate that argument, but again, for many people, if there's no capacity to pay what the going premium is, it can be very difficult. I do thank you for the answer, and I do hope that the price differential does resolve itself.

Moving over to Xplornet, how many of your rural customers are currently on a fixed wireless solution?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Almost 60% of our customers.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I have been watching closely, but I still have not seen a decision from government on how much of the 3,500 megahertz spectrum they plan to claw back. According to your brief to ISED about this clawback, you indicated that it would negatively impact your business. Do you have any sense of how the government will proceed upon hearing that?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Upon hearing that it will negatively affect our business?

Mr. Dan Albas: Yes.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham: Well, they have certainly been concerned, obviously, about the potential impact of this. I think they have listened carefully to what we've had to say. We've been very transparent with them. We've mapped out all of our customers and indicated exactly the areas where there is potential for impact. When I say we've been trying to work towards a solution, we've certainly done everything we can to provide the information. At the end of the day, it will be up to the minister and the department.

Mr. Dan Albas:

If the government went with option one, how many of your customers would lose service?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

A significant percentage.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Can you put a rough estimate to it, approximately?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

I'm afraid we'd have to go through and revive those calculations. I think I'd prefer not to say on the public record, to be perfectly honest, but—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Would “significant” be over 50%?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Probably.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have five minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today.

I'll quickly go around the table. We're running out of time.

What would be your number one priority for the government to act on if there were a regulatory change that could take place right now? I know that narrows it down quickly, but the current Parliament has a short runway, and regulations can take place right away.

The minister has already said that motion 208 will not be implemented through any type of legislation, so it's basically a lame duck, and anything that would be required will need some type of renewal, but there are regulatory changes that can take place, especially given the fact that the minister has already identified that the motion will not have any type of statutory movement.

Mr. John Lyotier:

For me, I think anything that increases competition and anything that opens up spectrum are the biggest issues in Canada.

Anyone else can add to that.

Dr. Jason Ernst:

I'll add to that. I think the biggest thing is that it's easy for the big telecoms to focus on the average revenue per user, and they can make a lot of money from the urban consumer. However, those in the northern markets or those in rural communities have a lot to offer, but right now we're at risk of leaving them behind.

As a pure action item, keep on talking to groups like us. Talk to the witnesses you have here. We all want to make sure that the rest of Canada is connected. The best thing to do is keep on talking about it. There will be solutions come out other than from the big telecom companies.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

We're running out of time.

With that, Mr. Longfield brought up some interesting aspects with regard to emergency services. So I'm going to move the following motion: That the Committee immediately hold two meetings for the purpose of understanding the current mobile phone services for Canadians during times of emergencies.

I can speak to the motion at the appropriate time, but I have moved the motion now, especially given the fact that we've had problems in the past with services, including in the Ottawa region.

(0945)

The Chair:

Because the motion is in line with our subject matter today, it is a moveable motion. It will be up for debate.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I would just like to say that I agree in principle about what you want to do. That is the half of M-208 that SECU was supposed to deal with, and SECU is starting to deal with it.

I propose that we discuss it at the end of the meeting so that we don't lose our time with our witnesses, but I do want to discuss that further. It is what SECU was supposed to be dealing with, as it's half of the M-208 motion.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I will speak, and you can call the question on the motion when you can, Mr. Chair.

We have a chance to have two meetings. Given the emergency situations that we've had.... This committee passed on an earlier opportunity to study cellphone coverage services during the tornado this region faced before, and we've subsequently had other problems. We have enough time to have two meetings to have the large telcos and other service providers provide some testimony to educate Canadians about what they and their families should receive during times of emergencies and also potential cracks, stresses or problems in the current system that we have.

There's no doubt that there is a lot of misinformation. There are also concerns related to the fact that people can't even get the coverage they thought they would get. Also, there's the planning aspect for municipal, provincial and federal services that have to coordinate.

Having two meetings, I think, is a responsible and a meaningful attempt to at least provide that basic sense of information so that there would be some great clarity with regard to what takes place during times of emergencies.

Also, more importantly, we use this opportunity so that people can plan appropriately and the government can respond. This Parliament is going to be wrapping up soon. Without that direction, we will be leaving Canadians in a grey zone with regard to coverage for half a year at least before Parliament resumes after the election.

I think that having two meetings is appropriate, and we have a time frame wherein we can do that. It would provide an opportunity to at least place some expectations for service delivery.

Last, Mr. Chair, is the opportunity to raise concerns about those services for the greater public.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have Mr. Longfield and then Mr. Chong.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I move that the debate now be adjourned.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Can we have the vote, then? We can have the vote and go from there. The vote will only take a second. Can we have the vote on the motion?

The Chair:

It is a non-debatable motion, so we will adjourn that motion, and we'll go back to our witnesses.

Yes, we'll go to a vote.

Mr. Brian Masse:

What are we voting on? I'll ask for a recorded vote.

So we're not going to have a discussion on—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Not with the witnesses here.

The Chair:

The motion is to adjourn the debate.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Before that, though, I called the question for the vote, so I called for the question to be.... Maybe you have an explanation of why, when I called the question before that, the debate was to adjourn.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's not procedurally valid.

The Chair:

Please, you gave up the floor. You can't call for a vote. Everybody has their chance. Mr. Longfield has asked to adjourn the debate, which is in line, so that's what we will do, and we'll put that up to.... Did I hear a request for a recorded vote?

(0950)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll have a recorded vote, please.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 8; nays 1)

The Chair: We're going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you to the witnesses. I would like to apologize to you for that little delay. This is what we're talking about, how to deal with these services. I think that's already the purpose of what we're doing here.

I just have a couple of quick questions and then I'll hand it off to others, because I know a lot of people want to ask questions today.

Xplornet, you have a lot of LTE antennas in my riding and a lot all across the country, as you discussed with Mr. Albas a minute ago.

C.J., what is the possibility in the long term of using the fixed mobile services infrastructure for mobile service as well? Is that a possibility, or are they two totally different worlds?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

It is a possibility. The 5G [Technical difficulty--Editor]

Sorry, there is tremendous feedback on the line.

The 5G technology will see a merging of the fixed wireless and mobile configurations. It's expected that the radius will be substantially similar, if not identical, so the ability to do exactly that is highly, highly likely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, that's wonderful.

For RightMesh, I'm going to ask the same type of question. I was surprised to be in Manawan last year, a reserve north of my riding, where everyone had cellphone service through WiFi on the reserve, but there is no actual cellphone service per se.

Using your technology and your systems, could we go so far as to stick mobile phones on top of a tower and have repeaters around an area that way to create a network?

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes, I suppose you could do something like that. I think maybe another use case we could do in that type of situation is to extend out the WiFi beyond the coverage it currently has.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would have a lot more—

Sorry, go ahead.

Mr. John Lyotier:

Sorry, I wasn't sure if you could hear me there for a second.

Yes, you could extend the WiFi coverage beyond what was possible there. Rather than being within a one-hop range of the WiFi network, you may be able to be four or five hops away, a few phones away rather than right in the town.

I suppose you could stick it on top of a tower, but I think at that point you might as well make use of antennas and things that are designed for that type of thing. There is off-the-shelf hardware that you can use that's probably cheaper than going all the way to a cellphone tower, but you could use some hardware for that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair enough.

I have a lot more questions, but I don't have a lot of time, so I'll pass some of my time to Mr. Massé. [Translation]

Mr. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. Nepton, in your presentation, you mentioned that the carriers should not be the only ones to designate the locations to be served. You said that perhaps elected officials should be involved in this process. I would like to hear your comments on the CRTC's strategy, which has established a map with hexagons to determine which areas are served and which are not.

According to you, is this map appropriate to try to specify the areas to be served and the funds needed to provide these areas with infrastructure or technology?

Mr. André Nepton:

That is a relevant question.

Since we have conducted very exhaustive studies, mainly in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, on Internet and cellular coverage for speeds of 50 to 10 megabits per second, I can tell you that the CRTC's maps, like those produced by Industry Canada, unfortunately have some shortcomings. The design of these maps is based on voluntary declarations by the carriers. For the very large players, the map is quite accurate. When it comes to providing information, companies such as Rogers, Telus, Vidéotron and Cogeco are very rigorous. Unfortunately, for smaller players, it is also in some cases a strategic element aimed at limiting a competitor's development capacity in a given territory. Since the player must declare what speed he is offering in given places, it can happen that the lead of his pencil is a little thicker.

We noted in our area, particularly on the last CRTC map, that about 20% of municipalities designated as already well served were not, in fact. A lot of in-depth work must therefore be done to demonstrate that the map is not entirely accurate. The CRTC's position is that we must demonstrate that the territories are not well served. It will then request a new assessment from the carriers concerned. This basis is an excellent element for decision-making, but needs to be refined from local results.

(0955)

Mr. Rémi Massé:

Thank you. Your feedback was greatly appreciated. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you again, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to go back to Xplornet. In my previous questioning, I asked you for your opinion on option one and how many customers would lose service, and I do understand there's some reluctance to share exact information, but I'd also like to ask how many customers would potentially lose service with option two.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Our concern is not only who loses service, which is obviously extremely concerning if you're completely cut off, but with the reduction they are proposing, the net result would be a diminished service for those who [Technical difficulty--Editor] to be connected. You not only have the folks who are losing service, but you'd also have virtually everyone being impacted by diminished service.

Mr. Dan Albas:

As spectrum is very, very important when I speak to industry representatives, this obviously will harm rural areas, because people want to be able to access the economy and make use of different health initiatives. I know the Province of British Columbia has invested quite a bit in rural health initiatives via Internet. That would be an issue if the government proceeded with option two, correct?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Very definitely. The one key thing to understand is that, in urban areas, spectrum only carries the one to two gigs that the average person uses with cellphones. In rural areas, it carries 160 gigabytes per month, so it's magnified more than 150 times what the urban situation is in terms of per person usage.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I appreciate your pointing that out.

As the 3,500 megahertz spectrum has been used for rural deployment of fixed wireless, it is now very desirable for 5G coverage. In your opinion, should the government find new spectrum and set it aside for fixed wireless?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

There is. The international band being designated, which is referred to as “the 3,500” actually goes from 3,400 megahertz up to 3,800 megahertz. Currently, we're using only 175 megahertz of that. They don't need to actually displace the existing licensees. They can look at what the government has already identified as 75 megahertz below the existing band that could be made available, and 100 megahertz of what is currently referred to as the “C band”—3,700 megahertz to 3,800 megahertz—and make that available. It's currently used for satellite, but it is not fully utilized, and arguably could be shifted up into the 3,800 megahertz to 4,200 megahertz range.

Mr. Dan Albas:

So there are other options than what's on the table. Is that correct?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Absolutely. As I said, 175 megahertz is available today. There is approximately 175 megahertz that could be made available, literally, tomorrow.

Mr. Dan Albas:

When that is raised, what is the response?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

The government was very thoughtful and has taken that away.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

What is your opinion on the current consultation around smaller tier areas for spectrum auctions? Do you think that flexible spectrum and separating urban from rural areas could help alleviate the problem?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

It could certainly help a great deal. Xplornet is supportive of that. If you're familiar with the current tier-four areas, you know that Calgary and everything through to the Rocky Mountains right up to the B.C. border is within one tier known as Calgary. That makes for a tremendous number of people who are definitely in rural Alberta who are trapped within the urban licence of Calgary.

(1000)

Mr. Dan Albas:

I've seen the same issue when it comes to Montreal. If you look at the amount of space, it incorporates a number of small outlying communities, and not just Montreal itself. This is something that's present right across the country.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Absolutely. It's a huge issue in the greater Toronto area.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we're going to move to Mr. Amos.

You have five minutes, sir. [Translation]

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I thank the committee for this opportunity. I also thank the witnesses for their participation.

For my part, I would like to focus the discussion with Mr. Nepton on the role of our municipalities in the development of wireless cellular coverage. When I talk to the mayors—and there are more than 40 in the Pontiac riding—the feeling expressed is one of lack of control and frustration with the network and the relationships with the companies, which are not necessarily there to involve our municipalities directly and closely. If they do so, it is rather because it is in their own interest and not in the public interest.

In your opinion, how can we best involve our municipalities in the decision-making process regarding wireless telecommunications, first, and broadband Internet service, secondly?

Mr. André Nepton:

AIDE-TIC works directly with mayors, RCMs, governments and the departments involved. We always approach the issue in the same way.

For example, when we meet a group of mayors from the same RCM to discuss the construction of cell sites, we ask them which ones to prioritize in order to serve the population, for safety reasons or to provide adequate coverage to tourists, the latter being a concern that recurs on a regular basis.

Once we have established contact with the mayors, they take responsibility and become aware that the priorities also determine the development periods. We also make it clear to them that this site development project is often the beginning of regional coverage. In this context, I would say that these groups of mayors are systematically aware of the most pressing local concerns and therefore want to prioritize them.

On the other hand, current programs generally require that any development project be endorsed by a municipal resolution. No mayor will refuse this resolution to a company if it wishes to improve its network. However, previous programs always talked about the Internet, but never about cell phones. Allowing a company to offer Internet access at a download speed of five megabits per second therefore prevented the development of any other technology in the territory.

Because we work closely with the Fédération québécoise des municipalités, we see that mayors—particularly in Quebec—now want to be involved in setting these priorities. Again, if the decision were left to large companies, these priorities would depend on the size of the population and the number of vehicles passing through. We must therefore remember local concerns and involve our mayors, since they are accountable and want to establish their local priorities.

Mr. William Amos:

Does this also apply to municipalities in western Quebec and the Outaouais?

Mr. André Nepton:

We are starting to work a little more on the western Quebec side; we operate on demand.

You will understand that AIDE-TIC is not the watchdog for the interests of the major carriers. If one of these companies approaches us, it is because the site they want to develop is profitable. We will therefore not intervene, and the company will develop this site itself if it decides to do so. It is the environment that takes care of it.

We have projects in James Bay, the Lower St. Lawrence and the Laurentians, but we have not yet been approached in the Outaouais.

(1005)

Mr. William Amos:

I have one last question in the 40 seconds I have left.

I am particularly interested in how, in our government's future programs, we could better support our municipalities and allow them to participate in this process. For example, should we consider providing them with the services of engineers or specialists to save them these costs?

Mr. André Nepton:

Under the current model we have developed, municipalities give us the mandate to build telecommunications towers, offer them to major carriers and manage them on their behalf. We have proven that our installation costs are much lower than those of these companies. So that's the kind of support we could also provide to municipalities.

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you, Mr. Nepton.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Unfortunately, I hear bells for a vote. Can we get unanimous consent to stay 10 minutes further to finish off?

Some hon. members: No.

The Chair: No? Well, on that note, I'd like to thank all of our witnesses for being here today. Unfortunately, we are being cut off because we're being called to the House for a vote.

Thank you very much. We look forward to seeing the end result of our study.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0915)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour, tout le monde.

Bonjour, monsieur Allison. Bienvenue au Comité.

M. Dean Allison (Niagara-Ouest, PCC):

Je suis heureux d'être ici.

Le président:

Madame Rudd, bienvenue au Comité.

Mme Kim Rudd (Northumberland—Peterborough-Sud, Lib.):

Merci.

Le président:

Soyez tous les bienvenus à cette 166e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 8 mai 2019, nous poursuivons notre étude de M-208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale.

Nous accueillons par vidéoconférence, de gauche à droite, John Lyotier, cofondateur et directeur général du RightMesh Project; Chris Jensen, également cofondateur et directeur général du RightMesh Project; et Jason Ernst, scientifique et dirigeant principal de la Technologie au RightMesh Project.

Messieurs, soyez les bienvenus. Vous nous parvenez de ma ville natale.

M. Jason Ernst (scientifique et dirigeant principal de la Technologie, RightMesh Project, Left):

Bonjour.

Le président:

Vous pouvez nous entendre, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jason Ernst:

Nous vous entendons.

Le président:

Très bien.

De Xplornet, nous accueillons Christine J. Prudham, vice-présidente exécutive et avocate générale.

Madame Prudham, nous entendez-vous?

Mme Christine J. Prudham (vice-présidente exécutive, avocate générale, Xplornet Communications inc.):

Oui. Bonjour.

Le président:

Bonjour. Formidable. Ça fait deux sur deux.[Français]

Nous recevons également M. André Nepton, coordonnateur à l'Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications.

Bonjour, monsieur Nepton. Vous allez bien?

M. André Nepton (coordonnateur, Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications):

Ça va bien, merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons commencer. Il y aura d'abord des exposés d'une durée de cinq minutes, puis nous passerons aux questions des membres du Comité.

Nous allons commencer par Jason, de la gauche.

Monsieur, vous avez la parole.

M. Chris Jensen (co-fondateur et directeur général, RightMesh Project, Left):

En fait, de la gauche, ce serait Chris, mais c'est à peu près la même chose.

Merci de nous avoir invités. Nous partons du mandat de votre comité, mandat qui soutient que « des infrastructures numériques fiables et accessibles, qu’il s’agisse du service Internet à large bande, des télécommunications sans fil ou d’autres avenues, sont essentielles ». Nous nous concentrons sur ces autres avenues, et M. Lyotier va vous expliquer pourquoi.

M. John Lyotier (co-fondateur et directeur général, RightMesh Project, Left):

J'ai grandi dans une petite ville du nord de la Colombie-Britannique, une localité rurale on ne peut plus typique. Dès un très jeune âge, j'ai eu la chance de m'intéresser à la technologie, ce qui m'amène ici aujourd'hui. Au cours des dernières années, j'ai travaillé sur la technologie RightMesh, une technologie de réseau maillé mobile focalisée sur les décisions en matière de connectivité qui se prennent partout dans le monde.

Dans de grandes parties du monde, y compris au Canada, la connectivité n'est pas à la hauteur. Notre objectif est d'aider à combler le fossé numérique. Nous savons que la technologie 5G n'arrivera pas à répondre aux besoins de la population. Il y a de grandes parties du monde où la 5G sera inadéquate à cause des structures de coûts, de la densité de l'infrastructure du réseau et d'autres raisons.

Depuis quelques années, nous travaillons à un projet dans le nord du Canada — dans le nord du Labrador, en fait —, dans une ville appelée Rigolet. M. Ersnt va vous en parler un peu plus.

M. Jason Ernst:

À Rigolet, il n'y a pas de tours de téléphonie cellulaire et, lorsque nous avons commencé à y aller, le débit du réseau était d'environ un mégabit par seconde. Le débit est maintenant d'environ deux à quatre mégabits par seconde, et il y a encore beaucoup de gens dans la ville qui ne sont pas connectés. Rigolet compte environ 300 personnes et une centaine de maisons. Beaucoup de gens n'ont pas de connexion directe à Internet. On nous a remis une carte qui couvre l'ensemble de la population et qui montre les maisons qui ont une connexion, celles qui partagent une connexion avec d'autres personnes et celles qui ne sont pas connectées du tout.

Les gens de l'endroit ont mis au point une application pour essayer de documenter les changements climatiques dans cette région. Ils surveillent l'environnement et documentent comment les choses se passent. Le problème, c'est qu'en raison des grandes limitations de l'Internet, cela ne fonctionne pas très bien. Ils nous ont invités pour que nous essayions d'utiliser une partie de notre technologie afin d'améliorer la connectivité dans la localité. Plutôt que de passer par Internet pour tout, ils peuvent partager la communication d'un téléphone à l'autre et ainsi libérer l'Internet d'une partie de son trafic.

Une partie du travail que nous faisons dans le cadre de ce projet a été rendu possible grâce à une subvention de Mitacs. Nous avons reçu cette subvention il y a environ six mois. Le montant de la subvention était de 2,13 millions de dollars pour 15 ou 16 étudiants au doctorat et quatre post-doctorants au cours des trois à cinq prochaines années. L'objectif principal est d'aider à relever les défis vraiment techniques que posent certaines de ces situations, mais aussi d'appuyer [Difficultés techniques] au sein de la collectivité, en effectuant des essais et des projets pilotes dans le Nord.

D'autres collectivités du Nord ont manifesté leur grand intérêt. Rigolet est notre première collectivité, mais beaucoup d'autres endroits au Nunatsiavut se sont montrés intéressés, comme Nain. L'autre partenaire du projet, Dan Gillis, de l'Université de Guelph — c'est la principale université avec laquelle nous travaillons — a également rencontré des gens du Nunavut. Nous avons également établi des partenariats avec un certain nombre d'autres universités participant au projet. L'application qu'ils sont en train de mettre au point s'appelle eNuk. La Memorial University et l'Université de l'Alberta y participent. Nous travaillons aussi avec l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique. C'est vraiment grâce à cette subvention que nous avons pu réunir ces universités d'un peu partout au Canada afin de résoudre ce problème d'une façon originale qui ne dépend pas nécessairement de l'infrastructure.

Nous connaissons ces initiatives qui font jeter beaucoup d'argent par les fenêtres, qui nécessitent la construction d'infrastructures coûteuses et nombreuses. Or, il existe d'autres façons inédites de résoudre le problème en utilisant ce que les gens ont déjà, les ressources dont ils disposent déjà. C'est ce genre d'approche que nous préconisons.

(0920)

M. John Lyotier:

Du point de vue strictement technologique, disons que nous avons créé un protocole logiciel de réseau maillé qui permet aux téléphones de communiquer entre eux. Il s'agit donc d'une communication de téléphone à téléphone. Si une personne est connectée, l'ensemble du réseau peut l'être aussi à partir de cette seule connexion.

Nous faisons connaître cette technologie dans le monde entier. Je me rends la semaine prochaine en Colombie pour rencontrer différents représentants du gouvernement et de l'industrie qui cherchent des solutions. Que ce soit au Bangladesh ou en Afrique, nous avons vraiment des intéressés partout dans le monde.

Nous savons que dans le monde du numérique, y compris ici même au pays, il y a une fracture qui va en s'élargissant. Nous voulons faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour aider les communautés locales autant que nous pouvons aider la communauté internationale.

M. Chris Jensen:

Merci de nous donner l'occasion de témoigner. Le message que nous voulons vraiment faire passer, c'est que tout cela ne dépend pas uniquement de l'infrastructure des grands réseaux. Au bout de la canalisation, il faut acheminer le message aux gens et permettre à ces gens de se brancher avec leur collectivité et d'y faire des choses qui sont importantes et vitales pour eux en période de besoin et dans ces moments où, autrement, ils resteraient coupés du monde. C'est l'objectif de RightMesh.

Le président:

Mes excuses, monsieur Lyotier. Pour une raison quelconque, il était écrit « Jason » sur l'avis de convocation, et c'est ce que j'ai lu, mais c'est en fait « John ». Je vous remercie de votre exposé.

Nous allons passer à Xplornet Communications avec Mme Christine Prudham. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Merci.

Bonjour. Merci de m'avoir invitée à me joindre à vous aujourd'hui. Je m'excuse de ne pas être là en personne.

En fait, mon nom est C. J. Prudham, et je suis vice-présidente exécutive et avocate générale chez Xplornet Communications.

Je suis ravie de cette chance qui m'est donnée de mettre le savoir-faire d'Xplornet à votre disposition dans le cadre de cette très importante discussion. C'est un sujet que nous connaissons très bien.

Xplornet est le plus important fournisseur de services Internet en milieu rural au Canada. Notre réseau rejoint plus de 370 000 foyers, soit près d'un million de Canadiens. Notre entreprise est vraiment nationale, car nos services sont utilisés par des Canadiens de toutes les provinces et de tous les territoires. Nous sommes fiers de servir les Canadiens qui choisissent de vivre à l'extérieur des villes.

Harnacher l'immensité territoriale de notre pays en offrant un accès rapide et abordable à Internet dans les régions rurales du Canada, ce n'est pas seulement l'objet de nos activités: c'est notre objectif. Nous avons investi plus de 1,5 milliard de dollars dans nos installations et dans notre réseau, ce qui nous a permis d'étendre la couverture tout en améliorant la vitesse et les données pour nos clients.

Récemment, nous avons eu le bonheur d'annoncer un nouvel investissement d'un demi-milliard de dollars supplémentaires pour offrir les services 5G aux Canadiens des régions rurales. À compter de cette année, Xplornet doublera la vitesse de téléchargement offerte pour la porter à 50 mégaoctets par seconde. L'année prochaine, nous la doublerons à nouveau, ce qui permettra à nos clients de bénéficier de 100 mégaoctets par seconde.

Pour ce faire, nous utilisons la même technologie que celle qui est déployée dans les villes canadiennes, c'est-à-dire la fibre optique, les microcellules et la technologie sans fil fixe. Nous cherchons à faire en sorte que les Canadiens des régions rurales aient accès au même débit et aux mêmes données que dans les villes.

Grâce à l'innovation et aux investissements privés, Xplornet est déjà à pied d'œuvre pour dépasser l'objectif de 2030 du gouvernement du Canada en matière de connectivité à large bande. Nous sommes bien en avance sur le calendrier prévu à cette fin.

C'est dans ce contexte que nous remercions le Comité de nous permettre de commenter la motion 208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale. La motion décrit un certain nombre de mesures importantes que le gouvernement peut prendre pour attirer d'autres investissements.

Bien que le gouvernement du Canada ait un rôle à jouer, nous tenons à souligner que la coordination et l'équilibre des investissements financiers doivent être assurés, sans quoi il y a un risque que de nombreux organismes gouvernementaux bien intentionnés se précipitent pour financer des projets et évincent en ce faisant les investissements privés durables.

Toutefois, l'investissement privé et le soutien financier ciblé du gouvernement ne sont que deux des trois facteurs clés qui mènent à de réelles améliorations des services Internet pour les Canadiens des régions rurales.

Le troisième aspect est l'accès au spectre. Le spectre est l'oxygène de notre réseau sans fil. Plus littéralement, disons que ce sont les ondes radio qui transmettent les données entre nos clients et Internet.

Bien que la consommation de données par les Canadiens ait explosé au cours des dernières années, toutes les attributions importantes de fréquences par le gouvernement du Canada au cours des cinq dernières années ont été axées exclusivement sur les besoins mobiles. Or, le Canada rural doit avoir accès au spectre pour suivre le rythme.

Nous constatons que l'accès au spectre est malheureusement absent de la motion M-208, et nous proposons donc que le Comité étudie un amendement visant à garantir que cet ingrédient essentiel soit inclus dans la motion.

Plus précisément, monsieur le président, le Comité est peut-être au courant de l'existence de la bande de fréquences de 3 500 mégahertz et de la consultation en cours par l'intermédiaire d'Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada. Cette bande de fréquences est absolument essentielle pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens des régions rurales. Cette décision, que nous croyons imminente, sera la plus déterminante de la décennie en ce qui concerne le sort de l'accès à large bande en milieu rural.

Si l'une ou l'autre des options proposées dans la consultation est mise en œuvre, les Canadiens des régions rurales seront déconnectés. Ils perdront l'accès aux services Internet, ces services qui, convenons-en, sont tout à fait essentiels. Au lieu de progresser comme le voudrait la motion, la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales reculera de 10 ans.

Xplornet continue d'avoir des discussions de bonne tenue avec le gouvernement du Canada, et nous espérons trouver une solution qui n'aura pas de répercussions négatives sur les Canadiens des régions rurales.

Merci encore une fois, monsieur le président, de me donner l'occasion de m'adresser au Comité. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

(0925)

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Nous avons eu quelques difficultés techniques avec notre traducteur.[Français]

Monsieur Nepton, vous avez cinq minutes pour faire votre présentation. Vous pouvez la faire en français ou en anglais, à votre choix.

M. André Nepton:

Je vais parler en français. [Traduction]

Le président:

Désolé, je cherche le pouce levé.

Nous avons des problèmes techniques.[Français]

Je vous prie de ne pas parler trop vite et ce sera correct.

Vous pouvez commencer. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. André Nepton:

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, bonjour.

L'AIDE-TIC, que je coordonne depuis 2009, est un organisme sans but lucratif voué au développement des technologies de l'information dans le monde rural québécois. Nous intervenons à la demande des milieux pour établir des ententes de partenariat avec la grande entreprise, afin que les gens en milieu rural aient accès à des services de même qualité et au même coût que les gens en milieu urbain.

D'ici décembre prochain, en collaboration avec la grande entreprise, l'AIDE-TIC aura mis sur pied 40 projets de développement de grands sites de télécommunications, soit des tours de télécommunications de plus de 300 pieds qui desservent des villages et des accès routiers en technologie LTE. Des 47 sites qui ont été développés depuis 2009, 28 nous appartiennent, au nom des milieux qui en font la demande. Selon son modèle, l'AIDE-TIC développe l'infrastructure bâtie, et les télécommunicateurs l'utilisent sur une base de colocation. Une somme de 13 millions de dollars a été investie pour offrir un service à 36 communautés rurales du Québec qui étaient sans service, et cinq routes interrégionales d'accès à ces dernières.

Pour l'industrie, la téléphonie cellulaire et l'Internet haute vitesse LTE, et bientôt 5G, nécessiteront des modifications substantielles qui vont opposer deux besoins. D'un côté, les grands télécommunicateurs désirent, évidemment, densifier le nombre de ces tours compte tenu de la technologie 5G, qui est portée par des fréquences beaucoup plus faibles. De l'autre côté, les communautés rurales demandent de plus en plus à avoir accès à des équipements et des technologies similaires à celles en milieu urbain, tant sur les routes d'accès pour des questions de sécurité qu'au cœur du village.

Si l'AIDE-TIC reconnaît que les télécommunicateurs ont besoin de densifier les sites, elle s'inquiète que l'investissement de capitaux importants que cela nécessitera se fasse au détriment des derniers réseaux ruraux qu'il reste à développer.

À la veille de 2020, on parle de sécurité sur nos routes, mais également de compétitivité des entreprises rurales. La motion M-208 explique de façon éloquente l'enjeu lié à l'occupation de l'immense territoire canadien. L'AIDE-TIC est d'avis que, cette fois-ci, on ne peut pas simplement laisser aux télécommunicateurs le soin d'établir les priorités. Il est important que les milieux avec qui nous travaillons au quotidien puissent aussi, à titre de bénéficiaires, établir leurs priorités dans les municipalités où des services doivent être mis en place.

On ne peut pas continuer à avoir des programmes qui laissent aux télécommunicateurs le soin de définir leur propre ordre de priorité. Quand nous interpellons un télécommunicateur, il nous présente 100 municipalités qu'il voudrait desservir. L'AIDE-TIC veut intervenir, mais probablement en ce qui a trait à la centième, celle qui est très loin de la base de rentabilité, parce que c'est elle qui devrait bénéficier davantage du soutien de l'État et de l'intervention collective. Nous continuons à penser que les milieux doivent s'impliquer dans l'élaboration des programmes et qu'il ne faut pas laisser cela aux télécommunicateurs.

Nous sommes très satisfaits de la motion qui a été proposée. L'évolution des technologies du sans-fil fait que la rotation des équipements varie de 12 à 18 mois, ce qui est une obsolescence matérielle très rapide quand on veut répondre à la demande.

À deux reprises, lors du budget de 2017 et de celui de 2018, l'AIDE-TIC a fait valoir au Comité permanent des finances de la Chambre des communes qu'un mode d'amortissement accéléré sur les immobilisations, mais strictement sur les grands sites de télécommunications couvrant les routes d'accès et les villages ruraux sans service, pourrait être un incitatif de premier ordre pour décider les télécommunicateurs à investir davantage dans les municipalités rurales.

(0930)



En terminant, permettez-moi de vous remercier, au nom de la société que je représente, de nous avoir permis de vous faire part d'une partie de notre vision et de vous assurer, d'entrée de jeu, que la motion M-208 répond entièrement à nos attentes à cet égard.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Comme le temps que nous avions a été raccourci, nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par des segments de cinq minutes.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous ceux qui, en tirant parti de la technologie, ont pu se joindre à nous malgré le court préavis.

C'est bon de vous revoir, monsieur Lyotier. Nous nous sommes vus au Pint of Science, à Guelph, il y a quelques semaines. Dan Gillis a organisé des activités formidables à Guelph, à l'occasion desquelles nous avons appris à connaître certaines de ces nouvelles technologies.

Pourriez envoyer la présentation que vous avez faite ce soir-là à notre greffier afin que nous puissions inclure certains aspects de vos propos dans notre rapport?

M. John Lyotier:

Oui, bien sûr. J'en serais ravi.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est formidable.

L'un des principaux objectifs de cette étude est d'examiner comment assurer la couverture de téléphonie cellulaire dans les régions rurales.

C'est un objectif sous-jacent, je devrais dire. Comment pouvons-nous garantir l'accès par téléphone cellulaire des régions touchées par des inondations, des feux de forêt ou d'autres catastrophes, et ainsi être en mesure de coordonner des choses comme la gestion des sacs de sable ou l'acheminement de l'eau?

Quand j'ai vu ce que vous avez fait à Rigolet, je me suis dit que c'était quelque chose qui pourrait être déployé assez rapidement. Ai-je raison de penser cela? Est-il possible d'équiper une zone d'appareils Android et de faire en sorte que ces appareils se connectent les uns aux autres?

M. John Lyotier:

Oui, vous pourriez faire quelque chose comme cela. Je pense que dans une situation de catastrophe où les tours de téléphonie cellulaire seraient peut-être en panne, ce serait probablement l'une des meilleures options. Je pense toujours que, dans les situations où vous pouvez utiliser l'infrastructure, cette voie reste assurément la meilleure solution. En l'absence de cette option, c'est une bonne alternative.

Par exemple, en Californie, lorsque les feux de forêt se propageaient si rapidement qu'ils pulvérisaient les tours de téléphonie cellulaire avant même que les gens aient pu recevoir les messages d'avertissement, cela aurait pu être une solution utile.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

Il y a certaines limites technologiques. Vous avez mentionné dans votre exposé à Guelph que certaines marques de téléphone ne communiquent pas très bien avec les autres. À moins d'avoir certains codes, leur accès est restreint. Les appareils Android semblent être parmi ceux qui vous intéressent le plus.

(0935)

M. John Lyotier:

Oui.

Par exemple, le système d'opération des iPhone est très fermé quand il s'agit de comprendre comment contrôler la connectivité entre les téléphones. Vous pouvez fabriquer de petites mailles limitées. Je pense qu'ils s'appliquent à verrouiller tout cela afin de pouvoir tout contrôler. Sur Android, c'est plus ouvert, et vous pouvez avoir des réseaux qui s'autoforment et s'autoguérissent beaucoup plus facilement qu'avec d'autres appareils.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Pour ce qui est du déploiement, si nous nous penchions sur des zones qui, disons, subissent des catastrophes liées aux changements climatiques. Nous pourrions nous déployer dans ces zones et laisser l'infrastructure derrière afin que ces collectivités puissent avoir un accès. Je pense aux collectivités situées autour des lacs.

Il y a quelques années, nous avons mené une étude sur les services à large bande en milieu rural. Encore une fois, l'Université de Guelph a parlé du réseau SWIFT dans le sud de l'Ontario et de la façon dont la densité est calculée. Très souvent, le tour des lacs est densément peuplé, mais le reste de la région ne se qualifie pas pour la large bande. Dans ce cas, ces zones ne sont pas desservies correctement.

Il me semble que cela pourrait compléter notre infrastructure matérielle à large bande dans certaines régions où nous avons des îlots de densité.

M. John Lyotier:

Je pense que le projet de Rigolet fait clairement valoir ce type d'utilisation. Cette collectivité compte 300 personnes et, si vous examinez la région en général, vous constaterez que sa densité est très faible. Par contre, la densité de la ville elle-même est tellement forte que vous pourriez, en fait, offrir une couverture complète au moyen d'un réseau maillé de téléphones cellulaires. Nous estimons qu'étant donné qu'il n'y a que 300 habitants là-bas, nous pourrions probablement couvrir la ville en entier avec environ 50 téléphones cellulaires. Nous avons mené quelques essais simplement en nous déplaçant à pied avec les téléphones que nous avions apportés. Et nous avons constaté qu'avec quelque 10 téléphones cellulaires, il était possible de joindre les deux côtés de la ville. Ensuite, il ne reste plus qu'à couvrir le reste de la ville avec les téléphones.

En fait, vous pourriez utiliser du matériel disponible sur le marché. De plus, vous pourriez établir des connexions un peu plus longues pour les téléphones — ce faisant, il se peut que votre couverture s'en trouve réduite. Selon moi, ce type de stratégie est une façon très économique et efficace d'offrir un accès à Internet, que vous pourriez combiner à l'installation en ville d'une éventuelle connexion Internet rapide.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Enfin, je vous pose la question suivante. Le projet de Rigolet a-t-il atteint un stade qui vous permettrait de déployer la technologie dans d'autres collectivités de diverses dimensions?

Pourriez-vous prendre, disons, les enseignements tirés de Rigolet et les appliquer à d'autres collectivités du Nord, pour ensuite les appliquer à d'autres collectivités, disons, du Sud de l'Ontario qui n'ont pas accès à Internet?

M. John Lyotier:

C'est pas mal notre plan pour le moment, et nous envisageons de la déployer même à l'extérieur de l'Ontario et du Canada. Nous examinons des endroits en Inde, au Bangladesh ainsi que dans certains pays en développement. Les défis à relever sont légèrement différents dans certains de ces endroits. La densité n'est pas tellement un problème dans ces lieux.

Nous avons appris beaucoup de choses à Rigolet. Compte tenu du grand intérêt que nous avons suscité au cours de certaines des activités auxquelles nous avons participé, je dirais qu'il y a assurément d'autres collectivités intéressées.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Formidable. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins d'avoir pris le temps de comparaître devant nous et de nous transmettre leurs connaissances.

Je m'adresse premièrement à l'Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l’information et des communications. Dans un mémoire que vous avez présenté au Comité des finances en 2016, vous préconisiez que l'on accorde la priorité aux services sans fil mobiles dans le cadre de vos programmes gouvernementaux de financement du service à large bande rural. Dans un monde où les fonds sont évidemment limités, pensez-vous encore qu'il est plus prioritaire de mettre l'accent sur la couverture mobile que sur un service à large bande résidentiel? [Français]

Le président:

Monsieur Nepton, avez-vous entendu la question?

M. André Nepton:

Oui, tout à fait.

Lorsqu'on interpelle les élus dans nos municipalités, la priorité est la téléphonie cellulaire. En effet, depuis l'avènement de la technologie LTE, on peut offrir à la fois l'accès à l'Internet et la téléphonie. Il est clair que, pour l'Internet, les coûts sont un peu plus élevés, mais la mobilité est la base de la sécurité, particulièrement sur nos routes d'accès.

Les élus nous demandent constamment un accès plus qu'abordable à l'Internet. Or, différentes technologies, dont l'avènement de la transmission satellitaire, permettent pour le moment de répondre aux normes actuelles. En fonction de cela, la priorité demeure la largeur de la bande passante, et ce, malgré l'étalement urbain et les faibles densités de population. [Traduction]

M. Dan Albas:

Je conviens assurément que la sécurité est une priorité, mais, comme mon collègue M. Chong l'a déclaré à plusieurs reprises, ce n'est pas simplement une question d'accessibilité; l'accessibilité permet d'assurer la sécurité, mais aussi l'abordabilité. Lorsque j'entends des habitants des régions rurales parler, j'entends des préoccupations au sujet de la couverture mobile ainsi qu'au sujet des services à large bande résidentiels. Toutefois, lorsque la plupart des gens n'ont pas accès à des services Internet résidentiels abordables, cela me semble être prioritaire. Les données mobiles sont foncièrement plus coûteuses que les données transmises par ligne terrestre. Cette question n'est-elle pas préoccupante lorsqu'on accorde une plus grande priorité aux données mobiles qu'à la fibre optique jusqu'au domicile?

(0940)

[Français]

M. André Nepton:

L'industrie est en train d'ajuster sa tarification, ce dont vous pourriez faire le constat.

En effet, l'industrie du sans-fil fixe résidentiel ne cesse de diminuer ses prix et d'augmenter ses performances. Selon moi, pour répondre à la concurrence, l'industrie du sans-fil fixe résidentiel va s'ajuster à moyen terme. [Traduction]

M. Dan Albas:

Non, je peux comprendre cet argument, mais, je le répète, la situation peut être très difficile pour bon nombre de gens qui n'ont pas la capacité de payer le tarif courant. Cependant, je vous remercie de votre réponse, et j'espère que l'écart de prix se résorbera.

Passons à Xplornet. Combien de vos clients ruraux sont actuellement abonnés à une solution sans fil fixe?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Près de 60 % de nos clients.

M. Dan Albas:

J'ai surveillé attentivement, mais je n'ai pas encore vu le gouvernement prendre une décision à propos du pourcentage du spectre de 3 500 mégahertz qu'il planifie de récupérer. Dans le mémoire que vous avez présenté à ISDE à propos de cette récupération, vous avez indiqué qu'elle aurait une incidence négative sur votre entreprise. Avez-vous une idée de la façon dont le gouvernement procédera après avoir entendu ces commentaires?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Après avoir entendu dire que cela aurait une incidence négative sur notre entreprise?

M. Dan Albas: Oui.

Mme Christine J. Prudham: Eh bien, ils sont évidemment préoccupés par l'incidence que cela pourrait avoir. Je pense qu'ils ont écouté attentivement ce que nous avions à dire. Nous avons été complètement transparents avec eux. Nous avons défini sur une carte où se trouvent tous nos clients, et nous avons indiqué exactement les régions où cette récupération pourrait avoir des répercussions. Lorsque je dis que nous nous efforçons de trouver une solution, je veux dire que nous avons certainement fait tout en notre pouvoir pour fournir l'information au gouvernement. Au bout du compte, cette décision reviendra au ministre et au ministère.

M. Dan Albas:

Si le gouvernement choisit l'option 1, combien de vos clients perdront leur service?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Un pourcentage important d'entre eux.

M. Dan Albas:

Pouvez-vous nous fournir un chiffre approximatif?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

J'ai bien peur que nous soyons forcés de refaire ou revoir ces calculs. Pour être parfaitement honnête, je pense que je préférerais ne pas mentionner ce chiffre publiquement, mais...

M. Dan Albas:

Est-ce que ce pourcentage « important » dépasserait 50 %?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Probablement.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leur participation à la séance d'aujourd'hui.

Je vais faire un tour de table rapide. Nous manquons de temps.

Si la réglementation pouvait être modifiée en ce moment, quelle devrait être la priorité du gouvernement, selon vous? Je sais que cela vous limite énormément, mais la réglementation peut être modifiée immédiatement, même si la législature actuelle tire à sa fin.

Le ministre a déjà déclaré qu'aucune mesure législative ne serait utilisée pour mettre en œuvre la motion M-208. Cette motion est donc essentiellement une sorte de canard boiteux, et toute mesure qui s'imposerait nécessiterait un genre de renouvellement. Toutefois, des modifications pourraient être apportées à la réglementation, en particulier compte tenu du fait que le ministre a déjà affirmé que la motion n'entraînerait aucun type de mesure législative.

M. John Lyotier:

Selon moi, les plus importants enjeux au Canada sont liés à n'importe quelle mesure qui accroît la concurrence ou qui vise à vendre une partie du spectre.

N'importe qui d'autre peut formuler des observations à ce sujet.

M. Jason Ernst:

Je vais ajouter quelque chose à cet égard. À mon avis, le principal point, c'est qu'il est facile pour les grandes entreprises de télécommunication de se concentrer sur leurs revenus moyens par utilisateur, et elles peuvent réaliser d'importants profits grâce aux consommateurs des centres urbains. Cependant, les entreprises qui exercent leurs activités dans les collectivités du Nord ou les collectivités rurales ont beaucoup à offrir, mais, en ce moment, nous risquons de laisser ces collectivités de côté.

Comme action pure, je recommande que vous continuiez de parler à des groupes comme les nôtres. Parlez aux témoins que vous accueillez aujourd'hui. Nous voulons tous nous assurer que le reste du Canada est branché. La meilleure chose à faire est de continuer à parler de cet enjeu. Des intervenants autres que les grandes entreprises de télécommunication trouveront des solutions.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Nous manquons de temps.

Cela dit, M. Longfield a soulevé quelques questions intéressantes à propos des services d'urgence. Je vais donc présenter la motion suivante: Que le Comité organise immédiatement deux séances dans le but de comprendre les services de téléphonie cellulaire qui sont actuellement offerts aux Canadiens dans des situations d'urgence.

Je peux parler de la motion au moment approprié, mais je l'ai présentée maintenant, en particulier en raison du fait que ces services ont connu des problèmes dans le passé, en particulier dans la région d'Ottawa.

(0945)

Le président:

Étant donné que la motion cadre avec le sujet que nous abordons aujourd'hui, la motion est recevable, et elle sera débattue.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'aimerais simplement dire que j'approuve en principe ce que vous souhaitez faire. C'est la moitié de la motion M-208 que le Comité de la sécurité publique et nationale était censé étudier et qu'il commence maintenant à étudier.

Je propose que nous discutions de la motion à la fin de la séance, afin de ne pas abréger le temps dont nous disposons pour interroger nos témoins, mais je souhaite discuter plus à fond de cette motion. C'était la partie de la motion M-208 que le Comité de la sécurité publique et nationale était censé étudier.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vais parler de la motion, et vous pourrez la mettre aux voix quand vous serez en mesure de le faire, monsieur le président.

Nous avons la chance d’avoir deux séances. Compte tenu des situations d’urgence que nous avons vécues… Notre comité a manqué précédemment une occasion d’étudier la couverture des services de téléphonie cellulaire offerts pendant la tornade qui a frappé la région auparavant et pendant d’autres problèmes que nous avons traversés par la suite. Nous disposons de suffisamment de temps pour organiser deux séances et faire comparaître les grandes entreprises de télécommunication et d’autres fournisseurs de services afin d’obtenir quelques témoignages pour éduquer les Canadiens sur les services qu’eux et leur famille devraient recevoir pendant les situations d’urgence, ainsi que sur les failles et les lacunes potentielles du système dont nous disposons actuellement.

Il ne fait aucun doute que de nombreux renseignements erronés circulent à ce sujet. De plus, les gens sont préoccupés par le fait qu’ils n’obtiennent même pas la couverture qu’ils pensaient obtenir. En outre, il y a la question de la planification des services municipaux, provinciaux et fédéraux qui doivent être coordonnés.

À mon avis, l’organisation de deux séances représenterait une tentative constructive et responsable d’obtenir au moins des renseignements de base qui clarifiera grandement ce qui survient pendant les situations d’urgence.

Et, ce qui importe encore plus, c’est que nous utiliserons cette occasion pour permettre aux gens de planifier ces situations d’une façon appropriée et pour permettre au gouvernement d’intervenir. Le Parlement suspendra bientôt ses travaux et, sans cette orientation, nous laisserons les Canadiens dans une zone d’ombre en ce qui concerne la couverture des services de téléphonie cellulaire pendant au moins six mois, jusqu’à la reprise des travaux parlementaires après les élections.

Je pense qu’il est approprié d’organiser deux séances, et notre calendrier nous permet de le faire. Cela nous donnera au moins une occasion de définir certaines attentes en matière de prestation des services.

Enfin, monsieur le président, cela nous donnera l’occasion de soulever des préoccupations à propos de ces services au nom du grand public.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Le prochain intervenant est M. Longfield, qui est suivi de M. Chong.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je propose que le débat soit maintenant ajourné.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Brian Masse:

Pouvons-nous voter, alors? Nous pouvons voter, puis poursuivre la séance. Le vote prendra seulement quelques secondes. Pouvons-nous mettre la motion aux voix?

Le président:

Cette motion ne peut pas faire l’objet d’un débat. Par conséquent, nous allons ajourner le débat et recommencer à entendre nos témoins.

Oui, nous allons mettre la motion aux voix.

M. Brian Masse:

Sur quoi votons-nous? Je vais demander un vote par appel nominal.

Donc, nous n'aurons pas de discussion sur...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pas tant que les témoins sont ici.

Le président:

La motion vise à ajourner le débat.

M. Brian Masse:

Toutefois, avant cela, j'ai demandé que ma motion soit mise aux voix. J'ai donc demandé la mise aux voix... vous pouvez peut-être expliquer la raison pour laquelle, lorsque j'ai demandé que ma motion soit mise aux voix, le débat a porté sur la motion d'ajournement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est pas valide d'un point de vue procédural.

Le président:

Vous aviez cédé la parole. Vous ne pouviez donc pas demander la mise aux voix de la motion. Tous les membres du comité ont l'occasion d'intervenir. M. Longfield a demandé d'ajourner le débat, ce qui est approprié. C'est donc ce que nous ferons, et nous mettrons aux voix... Ai-je entendu quelqu'un demander un vote par appel nominal?

(0950)

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

Le président:

D'accord, nous aurons un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est adoptée par 8 voix contre 1.)

Le président: Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Graham.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je remercie les témoins de leur participation. J'aimerais vous présenter nos excuses pour ce léger retard. La façon de gérer ces services est ce dont nous parlons en ce moment. Je pense que c'est déjà le but de nos délibérations.

J'ai simplement deux ou trois brèves questions à vous poser. Ensuite, je céderai la parole aux autres membres du comité, parce que je sais que bon nombre d'entre eux souhaitent poser des questions aujourd'hui.

Je m'adresse maintenant à la représentante de Xplornet. Vous avez de nombreuses antennes LTE dans ma circonscription et partout au pays, comme vous l'avez mentionné à M. Albas il y a une minute.

Madame Prudham, quelle est la possibilité à long terme d'utiliser l'infrastructure des services sans fil fixes pour offrir également des services sans fil mobiles? Est-ce une possibilité, ou s'agit-il de deux univers complètement différents?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

C'est une possibilité. La technologie 5G [Difficultés techniques]

Pardonnez-moi, il y a beaucoup d'écho sur la ligne.

La technologie 5G permettra de fusionner les configurations sans fil fixes et les configurations sans fil mobiles. On s'attend à ce que leur rayon soit très semblable, voire identique. Il est donc très probable que cette capacité existe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, c'est merveilleux.

Je vais maintenant poser le même genre de questions aux représentants de RightMesh. Alors que, l'année dernière, j'étais à Manawan, une réserve au nord de ma circonscription, j'ai été étonné de constater que tous les habitants de la réserve bénéficiaient d'un service de téléphonie cellulaire grâce à l'accès WiFi de la réserve, et ce, même si un véritable service de téléphonie cellulaire n'était pas offert là-bas.

À l'aide de votre technologie et de vos systèmes, pourrions-nous aller jusqu'à installer des téléphones cellulaires au sommet d'une tour et des répéteurs dans une région afin de créer un réseau?

M. John Lyotier:

Oui, je suppose que vous pourriez faire quelque chose de ce genre. Je pense que, dans ce genre de situation, un autre type d'utilisation pourrait consister à élargir le WiFi au-delà de sa couverture actuelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais beaucoup d'autres...

Désolé, poursuivez.

M. John Lyotier:

Désolé. Pendant une seconde, je n'étais pas certain que vous pouviez m'entendre.

Oui, vous pourriez élargir la couverture du WiFi au-delà de ce qui est possible là-bas. Au lieu d'être à un bond du réseau WiFi, vous pourriez vous trouver à quatre ou cinq bonds du réseau, c'est-à-dire à quelques téléphones de distance plutôt qu'au milieu de la ville.

Je suppose que vous pourriez installer les téléphones au sommet d'une tour, mais, à ce moment-là, vous feriez aussi bien d'utiliser des antennes et du matériel conçu pour ce genre d'application. Il y a du matériel vendu sur le marché que vous pourriez utiliser et qui serait probablement moins coûteux que de communiquer avec une tour de téléphonie cellulaire éloignée. Toutefois, vous pourriez utiliser du matériel à cet effet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fort bien.

J'ai bien d'autres questions, mais je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. Je céderai donc une partie de mon temps à M. Massé. [Français]

M. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur de Burgh Graham.

Monsieur Nepton, dans votre présentation, vous avez mentionné que les télécommunicateurs ne devraient pas être les seuls à désigner les endroits devant être desservis. Vous avez dit que les élus devraient peut-être participer à ce processus. J'aimerais entendre vos commentaires sur la stratégie du CRTC, qui a établi une carte comportant des hexagones et visant à déterminer les endroits qui sont desservis et ceux qui ne le sont pas.

Selon vous, cette carte est-elle appropriée pour tenter de préciser les zones à desservir et les fonds nécessaires pour doter ces endroits d'infrastructures ou de technologies?

M. André Nepton:

C'est une question pertinente.

Comme nous avons mené des études très exhaustives, principalement au Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean, sur la couverture Internet et cellulaire pour des vitesses de 50 à 10  mégabits par seconde, je peux vous dire que les cartes du CRTC, tout comme celles qui étaient produites par Industrie Canada, comportent malheureusement certaines défaillances. En effet, la conception de ces cartes repose à la base sur des déclarations volontaires des télécommunicateurs. Pour les très grands joueurs, la carte est assez juste. En matière de déclarations, des compagnies comme Rogers, Telus, Vidéotron et Cogeco font preuve de beaucoup de rigueur. Malheureusement, pour les joueurs de plus petite taille, c'est aussi dans certains cas un élément stratégique visant à limiter la capacité de développement d'un concurrent sur un territoire d'application. Étant donné que le joueur doit déclarer quelle vitesse il offre à des endroits donnés, il peut arriver que la mine de son crayon soit un peu plus épaisse.

Nous avons noté chez nous, particulièrement sur la dernière carte du CRTC, qu'à peu près 20 % des municipalités désignées comme étant déjà bien desservies ne l'étaient pas, en réalité. Tout un travail de fond doit donc être réalisé pour démontrer que la carte n'est pas entièrement juste. La position du CRTC est que nous devons faire la preuve que les territoires ne sont pas bien desservis. Il va alors demander une nouvelle évaluation aux télécommunicateurs concernés. Cette base est un excellent élément pour la prise de décisions, mais qui doit être raffiné à partir des résultats locaux.

(0955)

M. Rémi Massé:

Merci. Votre commentaire a été fort apprécié. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Albas, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie encore, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir à Xplornet. Lors de mon intervention précédente, je vous ai demandé quel était votre avis sur la première option et combien de personnes perdraient le service. Je comprends que vous soyez réticente à fournir l'information exacte, mais je voudrais aussi vous demander combien de clients pourraient perdre le service avec la deuxième option.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous nous soucions non seulement des clients qui perdraient le service — un problème qui serait évidemment extrêmement préoccupant si les gens sont complètement privés de service —, mais aussi du fait que la réduction proposée aurait pour résultat net de réduire le service pour ceux qui [Difficultés techniques] être connectés. Non seulement des clients perdront le service, mais pratiquement tout le monde subira une diminution de service.

M. Dan Albas:

Comme le spectre est extrêmement important pour les représentants de l'industrie, ces mesures seront manifestement néfastes pour les régions rurales, car les gens veulent pouvoir accéder à l'économie et se prévaloir des diverses initiatives en matière de santé. Je sais que la Colombie-Britannique a investi des sommes substantielles dans des initiatives de santé offertes en région rurale par l'entremise d'Internet. Voilà qui poserait un problème si le gouvernement mettait la deuxième option en œuvre, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Certainement. L'une des principales choses qu'il faut comprendre, c'est que dans les régions urbaines, le spectre ne transmet que les un ou deux gigaoctets que la personne moyenne utilise avec son téléphone cellulaire. Dans les régions rurales, il transporte 160 gigaoctets par mois; c'est donc 150 fois le nombre de gigaoctets utilisés par personne en région urbaine.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie d'avoir apporté cette précision.

Comme la bande de 3 500 mégahertz a été utilisée pour le déploiement du service sans fil fixe en région rurale, elle présente maintenant un très grand intérêt pour le service 5G. À votre avis, le gouvernement devrait-il réserver une nouvelle bande pour le service sans fil fixe?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Sachez que la bande de fréquences internationale désignée sous l'appellation « 3 500 mégahertz » englobe en fait les fréquences allant de 3 400 à 3 800 mégahertz. À l'heure actuelle, nous utilisons seulement 175 mégahertz de cette bande. On n'a pas besoin de déplacer les titulaires de licence. On peut envisager d'utiliser 75 mégahertz de spectre que le gouvernement a déjà identifiés en dessous de la bande existante qui pourrait être rendue disponible, et 100 mégahertz de ce qui est actuellement appelé la « bande C » — soit les fréquences de 3 700 à 3 800 mégahertz — et les rendre disponibles. Ces fréquences sont actuellement utilisées pour les satellites, mais elles ne sont pas entièrement utilisées. On pourrait sans doute effectuer un transfert vers la bande de fréquences de 3 800 à 4 200 mégahertz.

M. Dan Albas:

D'autres options sont donc envisageables, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Absolument. Comme je l'ai indiqué, il y a approximativement 175 mégahertz libres qui pourraient littéralement être mis en disponibilité demain.

M. Dan Albas:

Quand vous avez soulevé la question, quelle a été la réponse?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Le gouvernement était très songeur et il a pris note de la proposition.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Que pensez-vous de la consultation actuelle sur les zones de service réduites pour les enchères du spectre? Considérez-vous que le spectre souple et la séparation des régions urbaines et rurales pourraient permettre d'atténuer le problème?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Cela aiderait certainement beaucoup. Xplornet considère cette solution d'un oeil favorable. Si vous connaissez les zones de niveau 4 actuelles, vous savez que Calgary et tout le territoire qui se trouvent entre cette ville et les Rocheuses, jusqu'à la frontière de la Colombie-Britannique, font partie de la zone de Calgary. Cette zone englobe un grand nombre de personnes qui vivent incontestablement dans les régions rurales de l'Alberta et qui sont coincées dans la région de licence urbaine de Calgary.

(1000)

M. Dan Albas:

J'ai observé le même problème à Montréal. Si on examine la superficie couverte, on constate qu'elle inclut un certain nombre de petites communautés périphériques et pas seulement Montréal. C'est un phénomène présent dans l'ensemble du pays.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Absolument. C'est un problème de taille dans la région de Toronto.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant accorder la parole à M. Amos.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes, monsieur. [Français]

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le Comité de m'offrir cette occasion. Je remercie également les témoins de leur participation.

Pour ma part, je voudrais concentrer la discussion avec M. Nepton sur le rôle de nos municipalités à l'égard du développement de la couverture cellulaire sans fil. Quand je discute avec les maires — et il y en a plus de 40 dans la circonscription de Pontiac —, le sentiment exprimé concerne le manque de contrôle ainsi que la frustration face au réseau et aux relations avec les compagnies, qui ne sont pas nécessairement là pour faire participer nos municipalités de façon directe et étroite. Si elles le font, c'est plutôt parce que c'est dans leur propre intérêt et non dans l'intérêt public.

À votre avis, quelle est la meilleure façon de faire participer nos municipalités au processus décisionnel concernant la télécommunication sans fil, d'abord, et le service Internet à large bande, ensuite?

M. André Nepton:

L'AIDE-TIC travaille directement avec les maires, les MRC, les gouvernements et les ministères impliqués. Nous abordons toujours la question de la même façon.

Par exemple, lorsque nous rencontrons un groupe de maires d'une même MRC pour discuter de la construction de sites cellulaires, nous leur demandons lesquels établir en priorité pour desservir la population, pour des questions de sécurité ou pour offrir une couverture adéquate à la clientèle touristique, cette dernière préoccupation en étant une qui revient régulièrement.

Une fois que nous avons établi le contact avec les maires, ils se responsabilisent et prennent conscience du fait que cet ordre de priorité détermine aussi les périodes de développement. Nous leur faisons également bien comprendre que ce projet d'établissement de sites est souvent l'amorce d'une couverture régionale. Dans ce contexte, je vous dirais que ces groupes de maires sont systématiquement conscients des préoccupations locales les plus pressantes et veulent donc établir cet ordre de priorité.

Par contre, les programmes actuels demandent généralement que tout projet de développement soit avalisé par une résolution municipale. Aucun maire ne refusera cette résolution à une compagnie si cette dernière souhaite améliorer son réseau. Cependant, les programmes antérieurs parlaient toujours de l'Internet, mais jamais de téléphonie cellulaire. Le fait d'autoriser une compagnie à offrir un accès à l'Internet à une vitesse de téléchargement de cinq mégabits par seconde empêchait donc le développement de toute autre technologie sur le territoire.

Parce que nous collaborons étroitement avec la Fédération québécoise des municipalités, nous constatons que les maires — particulièrement au Québec — veulent désormais s'impliquer dans l'établissement de ces priorités. Encore une fois, si la décision en était laissée aux grandes entreprises, ces priorités seraient fonction de la taille de la population et du nombre de véhicules de passage. Il faut donc se rappeler les préoccupations locales et impliquer nos maires, puisque ces derniers sont capables d'assumer leurs responsabilités et d'établir leurs priorités locales.

M. William Amos:

Cela vaut-il aussi pour les municipalités de l'ouest du Québec et de l'Outaouais?

M. André Nepton:

Nous commençons à travailler un peu plus du côté de l'ouest du Québec; nous fonctionnons à la demande.

Vous comprendrez que l'AIDE-TIC n'est pas le chien de garde des intérêts des grands télécommunicateurs. Si l'une de ces entreprises nous aborde, c'est parce que le site qu'elle souhaite voir développer est rentable. Nous n'interviendrons donc pas, et l'entreprise pourra développer elle-même ce site si elle le décide. C'est le milieu qui s'en charge.

Nous avons des projets à la Baie-James, dans le Bas-Saint-Laurent et dans les Laurentides, mais nous n'avons pas encore été sollicités en Outaouais.

(1005)

M. William Amos:

J'ai une dernière question dans les 40 secondes qu'il me reste.

Je m'intéresse tout particulièrement à la façon dont, dans les futurs programmes de notre gouvernement, nous pourrions davantage appuyer nos municipalités et leur permettre de participer à ce processus. Devrions-nous par exemple songer à leur fournir les services d'ingénieurs ou de spécialistes afin de leur épargner ces coûts?

M. André Nepton:

Selon le modèle actuel que nous avons mis sur pied, les municipalités nous confient le mandat d'ériger les tours de télécommunications, de les offrir aux grands télécommunicateurs et d'en faire la gestion en leur nom. Nous avons fait la preuve que nos coûts d'installation sont largement inférieurs à ceux de ces entreprises. C'est donc le genre d'appui que nous pourrions aussi offrir aux municipalités.

M. William Amos:

Merci, monsieur Nepton.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Malheureusement, j'entends la sonnerie qui nous appelle à aller voter. Pouvons-nous obtenir le consentement unanime pour continuer encore 10 minutes afin de terminer la séance?

Des députés: Non.

Le président: Non? Eh bien, sur cette note, je voudrais remercier nos témoins d'avoir comparu aujourd'hui. La séance est malheureusement écourtée parce que nous sommes appelés à aller voter à la Chambre.

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes impatients de voir le résultat final de notre étude.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 04, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.