header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-10-24 OGGO 50

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Colleagues, thank you for your attendance. For most of my colleagues, it's kind of like Groundhog Day—we're seeing you again. I didn't think we'd see each other this soon, but welcome back.

Welcome, Mr. Graham, Mr. Ayoub, and Mr. Grewal. It's good to see you back at the table again.

Welcome, Minister. I know we have only an hour, so I will, without further ado, turn it over to you and perhaps you can brief our colleagues around this table as to the purpose of your visit, and get right into your presentation.

Hon. Scott Brison (President of the Treasury Board):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

This is actually my twelfth appearance at either a Senate or a House parliamentary committee since the swearing-in of the new government last November. I'm delighted to be here.[Translation]

I am pleased to have with me from my department Yaprak Baltacioglu, the secretary of the Treasury Board; Brian Pagan, the assistant secretary of the Expenditure Management Sector; Marcia Santiago, from the Treasury Board Secretariat; and my colleague Joyce Murray, Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board, from our department.[English]

To have the opportunity to be here again is great. Since we last met, there has been significant progress made, as evidenced in the paper provided to you.

This committee has played an important role in budget and estimates reform for some time, going back to 2012, with the report “Strengthening Parliamentary Scrutiny of Estimates and Supply”, which provided a very thoughtful analysis and recommendations that have helped serve as a road map on estimates reform. In fact, a number of the steps already taken have been in response to that report and its recommendations. These included the creation of a searchable online database known as InfoBase, which has been recognized by the PBO as the authoritative source of government expenditure information; a pilot project with Transport Canada to test a new program-based vote structure; and the identification in estimates documents of all new funding according to the associated budget document to make it easier for parliamentarians to follow that.

We continue to move forward with this agenda, most notably on the question of budget and estimates timing and alignment, and I want to speak with you briefly on that this morning.

The ability to exercise oversight over government spending is the most important role that we as parliamentarians can play in representing Canadians.[Translation]

However, the current practice makes it difficult for MPs to carry out that function. Having been an MP for many years, I too have been dissatisfied with the various elements of the estimates process.[English]

The other night in a briefing, which some of you attended, I noted that on June 2 I will have been a member of Parliament for 20 years. By that time, I will have been three and a half years in government, and 16 and a half in opposition, so my perspective on some of these things is shaped not simply by having been a member of a government but also a member of Parliament. That's one of the reasons I'm excited to discuss with you the government's vision for estimates reform.

Change in this area is not easy. In fact, Robert Marleau, former Clerk of the House, noted that the form and content of the main estimates has been modified on only four occasions since Confederation, most recently in 1997. Clearly, there's a lot of work to be done in terms of strengthening the ability for Parliament to hold government to account.

I firmly believe the vision we're proposing will help address the many issues raised over the ineffectiveness of the estimates process in Canada. These include concerns of the Auditor General, who underlined the importance of better timing between the budget and estimates.

Our vision includes four areas that are currently the source of a lot of frustration for parliamentarians. To make things manageable and to achieve early progress, I would propose that we focus our attention on the first area right away. It deals with the timing of the main estimates in the budget and would require a simple change to the Standing Orders.

Once this important reform is implemented, we could take the necessary time to study and consider the other areas. I'd like to go through each area with the committee.

As I said, the first is in the area of timing of the main estimates and budget. Currently, the main estimates for the upcoming year need to be tabled in Parliament by March 1. In practice, this means that the main estimates can only reflect Treasury Board decisions as of January roughly, well before the budget actually comes out.

(1105)



This timing affects parliamentarians, because the main estimates, which MPs are meant to scrutinize and to vote on, end up not reflecting the government's plans and priorities as outlined in the budget for the same year.

The other thing is that all the work that goes into Parliament's scrutiny of the main estimates is rendered basically irrelevant when the budget comes out. Wasting Parliament's time doing irrelevant work is not my idea of a priority. We need to fix that and make sure Parliament is engaged in meaningful work, including holding governments to account.

Therefore, we propose that the main estimates be tabled by May 1, instead of March 1, so that the main estimates can include budget items.[Translation]

The second challenge is the differences in scope and accounting methods between the budget and the estimates. [English]

The challenge here is more than accounting concepts. The budget represents the entire universe of federal spending. This includes consolidated accounts—for example, EI, and tax expenditures such as the new Canada child benefit. The estimates, meanwhile, support the more limited appropriation requirements of departments and agencies.

Nonetheless, parliamentarians need to be able to compare items in the budget and the estimates. The government will build on recent efforts to improve accrual planning in departments and reconciliation to cash appropriations in the estimates. There has been some work done on that in terms of reconciliation between accrual and cash accounting. We want to deepen that and expand it. [Translation]

The third area is the difficulty MPs have in connecting the money we vote for with the program it will be used for. [English]

Departments get their expenditure authority from Parliament on the basis of votes in the appropriation acts. These describe how funds are spent on items such as capital, operating, and grants and contributions. We'd like to focus more on why we're spending, and strengthen the link between the votes and the actual, specific programs they fund.[Translation]

Lastly, many departmental reports are neither meaningful nor informative. [English]

Every department within government has a lot of people writing reports that aren't that useful in terms of the quality of information and that not a whole lot of people read. In the same way that I said I don't think it's a good idea to waste parliamentarians' time unnecessarily, I think we're wasting a lot of good public servants' time writing reports that people aren't using because they're not formatted in a way that they're useful.

Our new Treasury Board policy on results will simplify how government reports on the resources it uses and the results it achieves. Reports will now tell people what departments do, what they are trying to achieve, and how they measure success, with an increased focus on metrics and measuring results and delivery, so that ministers, Parliament, and ultimately Canadians can hold government to account and have an understanding of the effectiveness of programs. ln addition, detailed information on program spending and the number of FTEs or people working will be provided in a user-friendly online database.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, these are the broad outlines of our vision for fundamentally changing the estimates process so that MPs are better able to hold the government to account.

(1110)

[English]

With that goal in mind, I look forward to the committee's engagement in driving the reform of estimates to benefit all of parliamentarians. I look forward to engaging, in the short term, on the alignment of budget and estimates timing.

Thank you very much.

I'd like to turn it over to Brian, who will go through a more detailed presentation of the proposed reforms.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Go ahead, Mr. Pagan. [Translation]

Mr. Brian Pagan (Assistant Secretary, Expenditure Management, Treasury Board Secretariat):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As the president of the Treasury Board mentioned, the purpose of today's presentation is to explain to you the government's vision for estimates reform. We also want to explain how we plan to support parliamentarians more effectively by providing the best possible information for the purpose of approving government spending.[English]

I have several slides to go through. I propose quite quickly to go through the four pillars as presented by the estimates. I'll present pillar one, the question of timing, and then perhaps pause for questions around that crucial element of timing.

As we see here in the outline, the proposed approach of the four pillars builds on recommendations from this committee, the 2012 study of OGGO on the estimates process, as well as our initial briefing with this very committee in February of last year, where we laid out the challenges around timing.

We believe that once we have the timing properly sequenced, we will be able to move forward with a better understanding of needs and requirements around scope and accounting, the vote structure of appropriations, and results and reporting. [Translation]

The estimates are clearly essential to the proper operation of government. They form the basis of parliamentary oversight and control, reflect the government's spending priorities, and serve as the principal mechanism for establishing reports on plans and results.

However, parliamentarians have said on many occasions they are unable to perform their role of examining the estimates to ensure adequate control. That situation is attributable to the incoherent nature of the budgetary process, as a result of which budget initiatives are not included in the main estimates. Estimates funds are hard to understand and reconcile, and reports are neither relevant nor instructive.[English]

Accordingly, the government sets out a four-pillar approach to fundamental change, beginning with the first step of changing the timing of the main estimates. As the president mentioned, taking this step will present a more coherent document and allow for the inclusion of budget estimates.[Translation]

Then we can more easily reconcile the differences in scope and accounting methods between the budget and the estimates, ensure that vote structures for all departments reach parliamentarians, and reform the departments' annual reports so that parliamentarians are better informed about planned expenditures, expected outcomes, and actual outcomes.

Now I will discuss each pillar in detail.[English]

The issue of estimates timing is very critical to any comprehension of the government's aspirations related to the budget and Parliament's understanding and control of departmental expenditures.

According to existing Standing Order 84(1), the government must table on or before the 1st of March the main estimates for the year. In reality, to be able to do this by the 1st of March, we need to prepare a document that reflects Treasury Board decisions up until the end of January. We know that in a typical year the government will table its budget somewhere between mid-February and mid-March, so evidently locking down the main estimates by the end of January precludes any ability to reflect budget items in the main estimates.

As the president has mentioned, this presents the scenario where we are presenting to Parliament the certainty of program expenditures that do not reflect the new plans of government, the new priorities of government, as they are articulated in the budget that's tabled in February and March. This in itself presents a fundamental challenge and incoherence in terms of understanding the budget and estimates process.

To remedy this, the government is proposing that the main estimates be tabled on or before the 1st of May, instead of on or before the 1st of March. At this point the budget would have been presented, and we would have an opportunity to include budget items in the estimates for Parliament's scrutiny.

(1115)



This change would include a number of benefits, not the least of which is a more coherent sequencing of the documents, a timelier implementation of budget initiatives, the ability to reconcile the estimates back to the budget that was tabled in February or March, and the possibility of eliminating a supplementary exercise. Currently we have the main estimates and three supplementary estimates. We would be simplifying the process and presenting fewer documents to Parliament and therefore less confusion.

I would emphasize that in terms of beginning the fiscal year and the approval of interim supply, nothing would change. As was clear in the document, we would present an interim estimates and an interim supply bill that would be based on a continuation of the current-year existing authorities that would allow departments to begin the year, and then introduce full supply in June, according to the current supply calendar.

Before pausing for questions on the issue of timing, I would present this in a visual form where we see in the period now, October-November, the government preparing its fiscal and economic update. That becomes the basis for planning the budget. We understand that the government would be intending to present a budget to Parliament in the February-March time frame. We would introduce interim supply for the 1st of March, allowing departments to begin the fiscal year in April with authorities, and then we would follow up with main estimates that reflect budget priorities and a reconciliation to the budget in May for Parliament's consideration of full supply in June.

Mr. Chair, at this time I think it might be appropriate to pause and allow committee members to digest this issue of timing and perhaps ask questions on this very critical step.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Pagan.

Thank you, Minister, for your presentation. Before we turn it over to questions and answers, perhaps you'll permit me to make an observation or two.

I haven't been in Parliament as long as you, Minister. Outside of you, however, I believe I'm the longest-serving parliamentarian at this table. I agree with your assessment that the budgetary process, in terms of parliamentary oversight, has been, in my view at least, and I've been saying this for well over 12 years, almost a bit of a joke. We simply didn't have the ability to delve into the numbers effectively and to give the scrutiny that we have been charged with doing. I applaud you in your efforts to try to simplify this and try to streamline the process so that all parliamentarians at least have an opportunity to observe and make comment on a literally multibillion-dollar functioning of Parliament. I applaud you on that.

My question for you is this. In the last Parliament, I was charged with the review of the Standing Orders. As you know, each year a new Parliament sits, there is a finite period of time for Standing Orders to be reviewed. As a matter of fact, there was a debate in Parliament just a week or so ago when we were on the road.

The approach I took with the all-party committee studying changes to the Standing Orders—we made a few minor ones—was that I suggested we needed unanimity to make sure, since Standing Orders are really the backbone of what we do and how we operate in this institution.

Have you, Minister, considered Standing Order changes requiring unanimous consent, or exactly how did you plan to approach that?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

First of all, the change to the Standing Orders that is required for this would be moving the deadline for the main estimates from March 1 to May 1. This committee has the ability, as a committee, to recommend to Parliament a change. We will work on this with members of Parliament from all parties.

On the timing of it, really, in order to have this change apply to the next main estimates and budget, it would require something basically sometime in November. I would hate to see us lose a year in terms of this significant improvement. I view any change like this as part of an evergreening approach. We as Parliament should always look at ways we can strengthen parliamentary governance and good governance broadly on an ongoing basis.

In other words, from a change that we make now in terms of the Standing Orders, the next budget and estimates process will see a more logical sequencing of the budget and estimates, with the main estimates actually reflecting what's in the budget. Then, as time goes on....

I look at the Australia model, for instance, where the budget and main estimates appear almost at the same time, or even in Ontario, where it's about 12 days after. As the departments become accustomed to this new timing and sequencing, there will be a tightening of budget and estimates timing over time that will operationalize as a result of greater efficiency. I view this as the start. Over time you'll see a tightening of budget and estimates timing so that they're more coincident.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you.

I apologize to the committee for taking up some of your valuable time.

We'll start with a seven-minute round of questioning.

Madam Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair. And it's your privilege to ask a question.

Minister, thank you, and thank you for taking the initiative. I've been in Parliament—from 2004 to 2011—and I understand, even as a financial person and as an accountant, it was really difficult to bring coherence and transparency.

In terms of the alignment between the estimates and the budget, what sort of co-operation will you need? The estimates are prepared by Treasury Board and the budget by Finance. What sort of collaboration currently exists, and what would you like to see going forward?

Hon. Scott Brison:

There is a great level of collaboration between Treasury Board and Finance. I think in recent years there's been an increased collaboration. In fact last year, in terms of items in the budget, 70% were in the supplementary (A)s, as an example.

In terms cash and accrual accounting, we are already doing more reconciliation in terms of tables to reconcile the cash and accrual accounting such that parliamentarians can easily reconcile the two. There are advantages to both systems. The Australians found that in moving to accrual there were some challenges.

I think you actually engaged with some of the Australians at this committee.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes, we did.

Hon. Scott Brison:

What we want to do is more reconciliation over time. We are open to this committee's recommendation on movement towards accrual. Again, there are advantages to both, and having reconciliation—

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

But you haven't faced challenges in collaboration. You have been working as a department very well. Alignment of the budget to the main estimates really makes for coherence. It is a strategy that is really important.

In your four pillars that you've presented, which is the first one you would like to approve? Is it a step-by-step process or is it a one-shot deal?

Hon. Scott Brison:

They're all really important. I'm enthusiastic about all of them. The one that requires a change to the Standing Orders is that of the first one, the budget and estimates timing. Again, over time, we have the May 1 date, which provides flexibility in the first couple of budget cycles. As departments, when you're changing these kinds of things, these are big departments. Government itself is a large, complex group of organizations. These are significant changes, so initially it will take some time. It will take a couple of budget cycles to get towards the full potential of this.

Again, in terms of the objective, I want to see a close alignment and a tightening of budget and main estimates timing.

(1125)

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu (Secretary of the Treasury Board Secretariat, Treasury Board Secretariat):

I'll add a bit to what the minister said.

Out of the four pillars, the results policy, making sure that departmental results and plans are meaningful to parliamentarians and also for government itself, has been approved by Treasury Board. We're rolling it out. The first better results documents will come this fall, and hopefully all of the departments by next fall.

On accrual and cash, more work needs to be done by us. Every year we're getting better at making sure that's reflected. Of the four pillars, the first one is the one that requires Parliament's approval. With the other ones, I think, with the committee's concurrence, we can just proceed and make the progress.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

My second question is on what the chair asked, on needing unanimous consent for the Standing Orders. Do you see any challenges? You're out there educating the parliamentarians. Do you find there will be any challenges or gaps in understanding that they may have?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thanks, Yasmin. The chair, Tom, has been involved in government in terms of procedural issues, and there are different ways you can accomplish this.

It's my strong view that everything we're doing is strengthening Parliament's ability to hold governments to account, not just our government but future governments. Are there changes in the future that we can do as we operationalize these changes? I believe there are, and we can consider those in the future.

I think it would be a mistake to let perfection be the enemy of the good—

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No problem.

Hon. Scott Brison:

—when we actually have the capacity to get some good things done.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So my next question is quite interesting. In the U.K., the treasury function and the financial function are in one minister. It's not that I want you out of your job or anything.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I thought you were talking about Minister Morneau.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, no. But what would be the challenges in a place like Canada? Would that function work? Would it make anything better? We've been hearing so many things. Perhaps you can give a quick answer on that.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Look, in Canada the Treasury Board role is not just in terms of government spending but also a challenge function on operational effectiveness across department and agency. It's not just in terms of financial results, but are the results consistent with those intended by the government, particularly in a new results and delivery framework that is a priority of the government?

The other thing is the regulatory: we have a role in terms of scrutinizing and approving regulatory changes, which are becoming more prominent now with the regulatory co-operation council with the Americans.

Our system itself in Treasury Board is the only permanent committee of cabinet going back to Confederation. It works really well, and there is a good relationship with Finance. Finance has been a good partner working with us even through these changes. There's a good collaborative relationship.

The Chair:

Mr. McCauley, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you for joining us. It's always a pleasure. I think we can all agree that aligning the estimates and the budget process is a very good thing.

I have a quick question for you. The 2012 OGGO report suggested March 31. You're suggesting May 1.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think in time, as you go through a couple of budget cycles, we can operationalize this and strengthen and narrow that significantly.

(1130)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

What's the thinking behind May 1, though, instead of what OGGO said in 2012?

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's flexibility initially, as we operationalize this, because it will take a significant change in terms of the working of departments to do this. I want to see in time that we can have the main estimates by April 1. I want to see that, but I also want to ensure that as we move towards that, departments are able to respond. In time—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Do you think something has changed since a couple of years ago, or was the OGGO 2012 version just incorrect; they hadn't thought it through?

Hon. Scott Brison:

No, I think the OGGO report was actually very instructive.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

One of the issues we have about May 1, of course, is that we have to have by May 1 the two suggested departments for the committee as a whole, so we lose out on that. The whole purpose is expanded transparency, and we're losing a lot of time to review before our June cut-off.

I understand the need, but we seem to be going step-forward, step-backwards.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's May 1 that we're proposing, and that is to provide flexibility in terms of government being able to ensure that the first couple of budget cycles are fine. I actually think we can do it earlier. I would hope that we can deliver main estimates by April 1. The priority for government to do that is one that I take seriously, but this is to provide some flexibility in the first couple of budget cycles as we move toward a narrowing of budget and estimates timing.

I hold Australia up as a model in terms of having the budget and estimates almost coincident. That's the gold standard.

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

The reason we are suggesting May 1 at the latest is to give that flexibility. If you apply it practically to this year, for example, we almost have to—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Right. But how do you address the concerns of, again, we introduce...and, by the way, the same day, opposition, give us your two departments for committee as a whole? I understand flexibility, but how do you address our concerns about a shortened period of time for us to review costs? It goes back to Westminster. That was the reason a parliament was put together, to review spending—

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

We totally agree with you, but currently Parliament really doesn't get the real accounts. It gets it in many, many pieces. For departments, for departmental managers, an expenditure can show up in the budget and may not get authority for 18 months. We're trying to find a sweet spot where we can actually implement this. As the minister said, ideally it should be no later than April 1.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I think we agree with the 2012 OGGO report. I understand, but I think we probably can get it done by then.

Have we looked at a fixed budget date, to move up the budget to, let's say, February? The Australians do a phenomenal job. I don't think they legislated it, but it is their tradition. I think it's the second Monday of May.

We hear, well, there are issues with minority governments, and this and that. But in Canada, both Liberal and Conservative governments, minority or not, every year going back 17 years, have done it within a period of a couple of weeks, except for one year. Could we not just move...?

Hon. Scott Brison:

The timing of the estimates is in the Standing Orders, but the timing of the budget is the purview of Finance.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

But you get along so well with Finance.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Over the years there have been times, post-9/11 and different times, when in fact Finance saw fit, appropriately, to bring in a budget or a significant economic statement that contained a lot of budgetary measures.

In terms of what we're tabling today, I'm going to ask Brian to speak to budget tabling dates from 2006 to 2016, to give some perspective.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

We're short on time, so you'll have to be fast.

Hon. Scott Brison:

What we are proposing will significantly improve the sequencing and alignment. It is what I can, as Treasury Board president.... These four have required a significant level of engagement with Finance and across government. They are a significant step forward. I think the sequencing one is very important in terms of changing the Standing Orders, but I don't view this as the last thing, Kelly. I think this is a first significant step, but we can do more.

If we have a moment, Brian can speak to the last 10 years.

(1135)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I agree, but I think moving up the estimates but also considering a fixed date for the budget...because we seem to be accomplishing it anyway, except for 2006.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'm not certain the 2012 OGGO report addressed the fixed budget date. There was some reference to it. In the same way that this committee has had an influence on the work we're doing now, it will continue to have an influence on it.

The other thing is that, going forward, on an iterative level we will be able to evaluate how things are going and how we can improve things. This is a partnership.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Mr. Pagan, before you go, because we're running out of time here, I think we will have to eventually decide again about some of the issues, if it is May 1, shortening our ability to review and scrutinize, but also some of the issues, with May 1 being the cut-off, in our ability to name the two departments.

The Chair:

The reply of Mr. Pagan will have to wait until perhaps the next intervention.

We have to go to Mr. Weir now for seven minutes.

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thanks.

We've had the discussion about May 1 versus April 1 as deadlines for the estimates. The other side of the sequencing question is when the budget happens, so I do want to pick up on this matter of a fixed budget date. We're kind of assuming that the federal government usually tables a budget in February or March, but of course there's no requirement for that. There was even a year, I believe 2002, when the federal government didn't put forward a budget.

I wonder why, in trying to fix this timing question, Mr. Minister, you're not proposing either a fixed budget date or a set range of dates for the budget.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, Erin.

Again, what we're proposing today is a significant improvement in terms of sequencing a budget and estimates. This is something that will be a major improvement. Currently the budget is exclusively the purview of the Minister of Finance, whereas the estimates are subject to the Standing Orders. Changing the dates of that, of the Standing Orders, to better enable logical sequencing with the budget is something that as Treasury Board president I can propose, and it's in my purview to do that in conjunction with Parliament.

This will be a significant improvement over that which exists now in terms of the practice, but in reality, as you said, there is a custom in terms of budget introduction.

If I may, Brian has in fact budget tabling dates from 2006 to 2016 to put it into some perspective.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Minister.

As the minister said, we absolutely are working very closely with Finance to lessen the time or shorten the gap between the tabling of the budget and presentation of the main estimates. The fact remains, however, that there are instances when the Department of Finance needs some flexibility in terms of the timing of the budget. In the fall of 2008, there was a global economic recession, so the government of the day worked very hard to bring forward a budget quite quickly in the cycle to provide assurances to markets and to Canadians to take advantage of that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Yes, that would be fair enough where there was a need to present the budget early, but, I suppose, why not present a deadline for the budget in the same way we're suggesting a deadline for the estimates?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Right. As the minister said, what we have tried to do is reflect the spirit of the 2012 report from OGGO in which they requested a specific fixed budget date. But the reality is there is nothing in the Standing Orders, in the Financial Administration Act, or our Constitution about budgets, and therefore we are not in a position to specify what that tabling date is.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Mr. Minister, would your recommendation to the Minister of Finance be that there should be a fixed budget date, a set range of dates for the budget, a deadline by which a budget must be presented every year?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think, first of all, we are going to accomplish, through the changes we're proposing here today, a better alignment of the budget and estimates process. That doesn't obviate the need to continue to consider improvements, including potentially in the future an earlier deadline on estimates, and a discussion. We're open to discussions. As we go through this change, as we evaluate the impact of these changes, I would be interested in the input of the committee. But again, perfection being the enemy of the good, I'd like to proceed with an improvement that makes a significant change in terms of accountability to Parliament and Parliament's ability to scrutinize.

(1140)

Mr. Erin Weir:

Just for—

Hon. Scott Brison:

With regard to the estimates Parliament scrutinizes right now, you spend a lot of time on those. To a large extent your time is wasted, because we come out with a budget shortly after, and a lot of that work, a lot of that analysis, is wasted. It's rendered irrelevant. What we want to do is make sure the work of parliamentarians is meaningful and impactful and holds government to account on the things that really matter.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Right. And in terms of that work, I do want to congratulate you, Mr. Minister, on your keen ability to have moved between the Liberal and Conservative parties to remain on the opposition benches for a maximum amount of time. You clearly do appreciate the importance of effective opposition.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It was the Progressive Conservatives; Progressive.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Indeed.

Mr. Kelly McCauley: We want you to make that point as well.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Well, thanks. I'm happy to facilitate that point.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I was actually born as a Liberal; I just came out in 2003.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Erin Weir:

You mentioned that these reforms might ultimately remove the need for supplementary estimates. While we certainly would value a more streamlined process, part of the importance of supplementary estimates is they provide an opportunity for scrutiny by the opposition to have ministers such as you before this committee.

So I wonder, in potentially eliminating supplementary estimates, what would be the replacement to ensure adequate opportunities over the course of the year for parliamentarians to scrutinize the budget.

Hon. Scott Brison:

There are a couple of things. I think over time the degree to which budget initiatives can be incorporated into main estimates will reduce the reliance on supplementary estimates. I don't see them being eliminated. I see our reliance on them being reduced over time.

You know, supplementary (A)s are actually more important, in some ways, than the main estimates. Last year 70% of the budget initiatives were delivered in supplementary (A)s, so in some ways you could argue that supplementary (A)s were more pertinent than the main estimates.

The big thing around here—I'm saying broadly Parliament—is that there are people who have been here a long time as members of Parliament who don't really understand the estimate and budget processes. It's not really their fault. If you were to design intentionally a system, and the objective was to design a system that was hard to understand, you would not do better than the one we have right now. But nobody wants to put their hand up and say they don't understand this.

Sometimes when you're doing something, it's hard to explain what it will look like after. This is one of the few changes, Erin, when it's actually easier to explain how the system will work after the change than what it is now. I can't explain—

Mr. Erin Weir:

In terms of how it would look—

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, we're out of time.

I will point out, Mr. Weir and Mr. McCauley, with your questioning about a fixed budget date, that in the 2012 OGGO report there was a recommendation that the budget be presented no later than February 1. It certainly would be within the purview of this committee to make such a recommendation again, should we wish.

Mr. Whalen, you're up for seven minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, guys, for coming. As a new MP, it's interesting to see how the department's thinking on these four pillars of realigning the budget and the estimates process has evolved over the course of the last year. One of the first things we received when we came in November, whenever you were called last year, was a big stack of documents on estimates (B) and (C), which were almost indecipherable. Over time we learned how to figure them out, and now we're talking about changing them.

Just to follow up a little bit on Mr. Weir's question, do you see estimate (A)s being combined into the mains, and then only having estimates (A) and (B) and no need for a (C), or only in very rare circumstances? Or do we still see all three extra sets of estimates in addition to interim supply and in addition to the mains?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'll start, and then I'll get Brian to reply, because he has more of an institutional memory on this from Treasury Board's perspective.

I see that the reliance on supplementary estimates (A) and (B), as an example, will be less than it is right now. As you sequence the main estimates after the budget, the main estimates I think will take on a more important role, as they ought to, but this will take time. Again, some of the changes to operationalize within government will take at least a couple of budget cycles to get it closer to the full potential.

Brian, would you like to continue?

(1145)

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you, Mr. Whalen, for the question. Just to be clear, what we are proposing with this vision is not to eliminate supplementary estimates. It's to render the process more coherent and sequential, so that the main estimates tabled after the budget in fact reflect budget priorities.

In that scenario, as mentioned, last year we brought forward approximately 70% of the budget in supplementary estimates (A). We would replace that spring supplementary estimates with the main estimates that would have the budget initiatives. Then we would bring forward the remaining budget priorities in a fall supplementary estimate, which would become the first supplementaries of the year, with supplementary (A)s in the fall, and then a cleanup of accounts in the winter in supplementary (B)s. We would continue to have an estimates document in each supply period, which would encourage committees to continue to call on departments and continue their scrutiny of government expenditure plans.

I would also mention, just in terms of history, that we introduced the spring supplementaries in 2007 as a way of facilitating a more timely implementation of budget initiatives. That has proven to be helpful, as we saw last year, but we can make the process more efficient by simply presenting a better main estimates. That's the heart of the proposal.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

In the concern over whether or not there's a need for a fixed budget date to have this process aligned, what do you envision would happen if the first week of April rolls around and the government in the future is not ready to present its budget? Would the department then be forced to carry two sets of main estimates it's working on, one that reflects the old process and one that reflects a new process? How difficult and taxing would that be on the department to try to triage a situation like that?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for the question.

We have seen over the last 10 years a wide variation in terms of budget tabling. We've seen something as early as January, in 2009, in response to the global economic crisis. As recently as 2015, we had a different problem in the energy market and a precipitous drop in energy prices, which had all kinds of impacts and implications for the government's ability to forecast and project requirements. We saw a budget on April 21 of that year.

So because we do not have a fixed budget date, because the government will want to avail itself of the flexibility to take advantage of the best available information in setting its economic forecasts, a tabling date of May 1 would encompass anything we've seen over the last 10 years, and it should provide the government with the ability to, at the very least, table the estimates after the budget so that we can reconcile to the budget.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thanks, Mr. Pagan.

Mr. Brison, when we look at the different pillars, it seems the department is very close now on pillar one. It seems some of the changes that are being proposed also include certain aspects of pillar four, which is departmental reports, plans, and priorities.

Can you speak a little about how ready you feel the department is in implementing the changes of having those plans and priorities presented in a more coherent fashion on May 1 of next year, or sooner, along with the main estimates?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Actually, in Treasury Board policy, in terms of departmental reports, as part of a broader results and delivery approach for our government, we're already doing that, and we're moving toward that. Even in terms of the format of Treasury Board submissions and the degree to which departments and agencies...as they present submissions to Treasury Board—we are pushing and getting metrics and a commitment to a results and delivery model so that we understand, not just with regard to committing funds but actually establishing objectives or goals in terms of what they're going to accomplish.

That part of it we are doing at Treasury Board, as a central agency, already. In some of the other areas, we're doing more reconciliation between cash and accrual accounting, as part of what we're doing already. With program-based expenditure reportage, we've done that with Transport Canada, and we'll be doing more—

(1150)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Sorry, Mr. Brison, I have a very short question. We haven't seen a copy of any proposed text for what the new standing order would look like. Has the department advanced its thinking that far as to what the standing order would look like?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Well, it would involve changing the date. I don't want to assume, because the committee would—

The Chair:

Minister, perhaps I could interject.

Having some knowledge in this, Mr. Whalen, I can say that our committee could certainly propose the text.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Yes, that's right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Before the minister has to leave, we have two final interventions of five minutes each.

Mr. Clarke, you're up for five. [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. [English]

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think I can stay a little bit longer, if you folks are all right.

The Chair:

All right. Well, we'll try to complete an entire round of questioning.

Thank you for that, Minister.[Translation]

Mr. Clarke, you have five minutes.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for this candid approach. We are very pleased you can stay longer. Thank you for being here with us today. It is much appreciated.

For Her Majesty's official opposition, this is a very interesting reform. Of course we would like to see a reform that guarantees the well-being of all Canadians. We are considering this reform very seriously and have questions that are serious as well. First of all, we think it entirely laudable to provide more coherence in order to improve the estimates review process that members carry out on behalf of Canadians.

I would like to continue along the lines of what my colleague Mr. McCauley was saying. You seemed to be saying we need an adjustment period. We think it might be a good idea to do what they are doing in Australia and to publish the budget and main estimates on the same day. Your departmental colleague mentioned that adjustments would have to be made to ensure greater flexibility. Could you tell us what those adjustments are that would have to be spread over a number of years?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, Mr. Clarke. I very much appreciate your question.

When significant changes are made to the departments' activities, departments that work together obviously need time to implement those changes. My objective is to arrive at a process in which the budget and main estimates are—

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Published simultaneously?

Hon. Scott Brison:

—presented at approximately the same time. My model is that of Australia. I have expressed my interest in that model for a long time, but it takes time to make changes. I think we may need two more years for the departments to adjust to those changes. I believe, just as you do, that the new model may possibly be an improvement.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Minister, that leads me to another question.

The official opposition wants to ensure that the period traditionally allotted to members to evaluate the budget will not be shortened. We understand the concepts of flexibility, adjustments, and so on. That brings me to another point.

You feel it will take two or three years for the adjustments to be made. To demonstrate your goodwill, would it not be a good idea to take this opportunity to include a clause in the act providing that, within two or three years, the budget and main estimates will be presented on the same day?

Do you consider that a good idea and would you agree to explore it?

(1155)

Hon. Scott Brison:

It is the prerogative of the committee and of Parliament to consider the possibility of amending the regulations. I am amenable to improvements being made on an ongoing basis. We call that an evergreen process. If we amend our process today, in a few months or years—perhaps two years or two budget cycles—we will have a better understanding of the changes and the possibility of making more of them. This is an important step. I am entirely amenable to the idea of other improvements being made in future.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Minister. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you so much.

Mr. Graham, welcome back to the committee, sir. You have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Minister, I want to build on something you said at the beginning of your comments, and that was alluded to rather explicitly by Mr. Weir, that you have the most experience of any government caucus member in opposition and that you therefore have a tremendous amount of experience in reading the main estimates and the supplementaries.

I remember, as a staffer, going to your office and getting, from your staff, translation of the estimates into plain English, as I found them dissected on every horizontal and vertical surface of your office.

With this experience in that role, in concrete terms, how would this have changed your life if this had been the case over the last 10 years?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Well, we had to work awfully hard in opposition. I had a tremendous person—Tisha Ashton—who still works with me. In terms of budget and estimates work, there's been a handful of us over the years who have spent a lot of time on this.

You shouldn't have to work that hard, as a member of Parliament, or as a staff person of a member of Parliament, simply to understand what is fundamental to your job—that is, government spending and being able to hold the government to account. It is asinine that so much work goes into translating government documents and processes into an understandable format that we can scrutinize. It didn't make sense for me in opposition and it doesn't make sense to me in government.

To the credit of Treasury Board, I can say that a lot of good work was done there in the past. In fact I spoke to Tony Clement last week about some of this, and he told me that at that time he was aware of some of this work and understood the importance of it. This has been percolating within the public service for some time. I happen to feel very strongly about it.

As a member of Parliament, you don't want to admit that you don't understand this. There are ministers in any cabinet, however, who don't have a lot of parliamentary experience. There are people who have been around Parliament for a long time. As it is now, this is not a system that is designed to be understood. We want to change that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are people who don't do their own taxes who have to understand this stuff.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: In the same vein, are there other subtle improvements around the edges that you would want to see and that we have not addressed?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I really want to get some of these changes done and moved forward. The part that we have to spend a lot of time on is the departmental report. This morning we're not talking much about the departmental reports, but I think that's a big item. I think program-based budgeting for members of Parliament, parliamentarians....

I say “members of Parliament”, but I'm also talking about Senators. There is a lot of expertise in the Senate on budget estimates processes, particularly on the Senate finance committee.

It's my view that Parliament better engaged, parliamentary committees better engaged, Parliament as a whole better engaged, can help contribute to the analysis of budget items and measure the effectiveness of them. There should be some things we can agree on, on a non-partisan basis; one consists of measures that will clearly improve the ability of Parliament to do its job.

(1200)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the few seconds I have left, Mr. Whalen has one quick follow-up question.

Thank you, Minister.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, David.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Minister Brison, on the approach you're proposing to align the estimates with the budget now, but then to continue to examine the accounting methods, the votes, and the continuous improvement of departmental reports, I feel this aligns with what our committee has heard. I don't think we've heard enough yet on accounts and votes, accruals and different cost measures. We've engaged our study, but with respect to this first change, it sounds like it's something the department is able and ready to do.

If we were to recommend something, are we ready yet to put a date—like, no more than x days after the budget is tabled and no later than May 1? Would that be a more helpful formulation, or are we not quite ready for that type of restriction?

The Chair:

Please give a quick answer.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'll have a better idea of this over the next year or so. I'm being candid with you: what we're doing here is quite a fundamental change. We will be pushing to have a closer alignment of the budget and estimates, sequentially the main estimates after the budget. We'll have a better idea after the main estimates and budget process of 2017.

Any time this committee invites me, I'll gladly be here, and of course I will be here to defend estimates. One of the things we can talk about, in addition to those estimates specifically, is this process. We'll have a better idea then. It does take a while to operationalize these things.

Yaprak has a—

The Chair:

Unfortunately, we're....

Please go ahead.

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

I have a small explanation to maybe answer the question of why it is going to take us a few years.

It's because what's in the budget and what goes into estimates are completely different details of a program. For estimates we make sure that the full detail and the design is done. That is where we need the time. So when budget and estimates come, ideally where we want to be, hopefully in a few years, is where the budget makes the commitment and we give the green light to a program to be on the ground the day the main estimates are approved. That's what we're aiming for, but it's a little soon for the whole machine to turn that way.

The Chair:

Thank you for the clarification.

Minister, if we finish this round, it'll be about 15 minutes or just a little less, if you can spare the time. We thank you for that.

Mr. McCauley, you have five minutes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Very quickly, on pillar one, when it talks about alignment, again we're comparing ourselves to Australia. And you're right, they do everything great—although everything God created that can kill you and crawls is there.

It talks about Australia taking a very short period of time between policy and implementation of policy, and of course we're lagging behind at 19 months. Perhaps Yaprak could give us an idea of why it's like that.

Then it talks about how recent success demonstrates that such an internal alignment is possible for the Government of Canada. I'm just wondering if you could talk about what you're considering recent success.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'll say a couple of things, and then I'll ask Yaprak to reply. Again, Brian, Yaprak, and Marcia in our department have seen more of this. I was on the Treasury Board cabinet committee in the previous government, but it's different being President of the Treasury Board. You get to see it from a different perspective.

There is a closer alignment now in terms of collaboration between Treasury Board and Finance than I think existed in the past. There's a very close collaborative relationship and engagement throughout the budget process, stronger than in the past. So there has been some progress made.

As Yaprak said, the details involved in the main estimates are far greater than those in the budget. A budget gives a general view and a perspective. For instance, you could say we're going to invest so much money into indigenous education, but the details come out—

(1205)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

But a 19-month lag; is that all just the details?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I know; that's exactly the point, Kelly. Currently there is up to an 18-month lag. We're seeking to shorten that dramatically in terms of budget and estimates alignment process to get it closer together.

You've cited actually a key reason why we're saying May 1 initially. It's like that old country music song, “Give me 40 acres and I'll turn this rig around”. We're going to need a little time to work this through.

Go ahead, Yaprak.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I'm not familiar with that song, but maybe another time.

I have one more question, so please be brief, if you don't mind.

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Absolutely—and I can't help with the country music song.

The way the Australians do it is that when the budget cycle starts, Treasury and Finance both work at the same time, not only in terms of the policy but also determining what a program could look like. Because it starts from the get-go, they can table it at the same time. That's where we should be. May 1 may sound like a long way away for designing all of these programs. Basically we are going to have to start from the beginning and design it at the same time. That's what we're aiming to do.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay. That's great.

I'll just bounce over to pillar three. Again, we're here about transparency and accountability, and one of the suggestions seems to be kind of the opposite. It says give higher votes but let the departments have more flexibility to use the money without parliamentary approval. That seems to be going backwards from what we're trying to do here.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. McCauley.

What we have learned in looking at other jurisdictions is that they do introduce what we call “purpose-based” votes so that parliamentarians have a better sense of how the resources are supporting specific programs. In doing that, in moving from a single operating vote in a department to three, four, or five purpose-based votes, you're necessarily—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Do you think the answer is just giving them a higher amount of money without any oversight?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

It's not a question of oversight—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Or without parliamentary approval to move it around...?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

For instance, in Quebec what they do with their supply bill is that they have purpose-based votes, but the supply bill allows departments to transfer up to 10% of funds between votes, and it's not done without full reporting by departments. There is transparency in the reporting. Other jurisdictions introduce either multi-year appropriations or enhanced carry-forward—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I want to quote you. This says that the balance could be achieved by establishing votes “at a relatively high level”—not moderate, but relatively high—and then allowing organizations to move monies without additional approval of Parliament.

Again, it seems to be the opposite of what we're trying to achieve. We're going to give a relatively high amount of money and then take away any ability for Parliament to approve—

Hon. Scott Brison:

If I may cut in, what we have now is that within a department you can move money around without really any—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Right, but this really doesn't seem to be helping that.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It is a step, and you can look at the work done at Transport in terms of the pilot. Again, when funding is approved by Parliament for a specific program, on the ability within a ministry to move it from there to somewhere else, you can have up to 10%, which provides.... Particularly to avoid lapsing in a particular area, it would make sense, but it's significantly improved over what exists now, and moving in this direction—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

It's a step, not a—

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's a step—

Mr. Kelly McCauley: Okay.

Hon. Scott Brison: —but all improvement begins with a step. You see how it works, and then say, can we move further? I'm open to that. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Ayoub, you have the floor for five minutes.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you, Minister, for being with us today. Thanks as well to the witnesses who are with you.

I am going to ask a more technical question about the Treasury Board Secretariat.

A pilot project is under way in cooperation with Transport Canada. You must have achieved results or received feedback on the subject. I would like you to tell me about that briefly. What have been the observed results, advantages, or disadvantages, and how will this help you plan other changes in the near future?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much. I appreciate the question.

Transport Canada's pilot project is an opportunity for us to consider taking the same approach to the changes with other departments. There have been positive results thus far, and perhaps Mr. Pagan can tell you about them and also address the other applications that could be tested in future using the same approach.

(1210)

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for your question.

In 2015-2016, the Department of Transport had a single vote of approximately $600 million for grants. In this pilot project, we are working with the department to test the way votes are used for ports of entry and corridors, transportation infrastructure, and so on. The idea is to separate votes based on the terms and conditions of each grant program. This is one way to give Parliament a clearer idea of exactly how the resources supporting certain programs are being used. Obviously, the fiscal year is under way, and we therefore have no final results for the moment. However, this way of doing things clearly poses no problems for the departments and provides parliamentarians with a better instrument for gauging the way these resources are used.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Am I mistaken in saying the Department of Transport has managed simultaneously to absorb this change, achieve results, and function? I suppose it has had to do both, that is to say continue using the old method while testing the new one?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

That is correct.

Consider the example of the nearly $600 million vote. In future, the department will be able to separate those resources and report results specific to each vote. Thus there will be one vote for corridors and another for transportation infrastructure. That will provide a more specific overview that focuses more on those programs.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Has any particular approach been taken to address preparation, training within the department, and employee training? How much time did it take to prepare before this pilot project was put in place?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

This pilot project stems from a report that this committee prepared in 2012. Since then, we have worked with the department to prepare the pilot project. There was no particular training and there were no problems with the financial system. We simply had to identify the best example and work with the department to demonstrate the benefits of this approach.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Were cost estimates established for the pilot project's large-scale implementation across all departments? The aim is to make changes to increase efficiency and transparency. What are the costs associated with those changes? Do you have any estimates of future costs? Is the pilot project providing that kind of information?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

For the moment, this is a pilot project involving a single department. In the next phase, it will be extended to include other votes and especially other operating votes to gain a clearer understanding of the costs and benefits of this approach.

Hon. Scott Brison:

There is another benefit to this approach. We are going to extend it to other programs. It will be easier for Parliament to measure results and thus to consider the objectives of this process and program. That will represent major change in overall government efficiency.

(1215)

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Our final intervention will come from Mr. Weir.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you, Mr. Minister, for sticking around.

I want to return to the theme of effective opposition. I'm wondering whether you could clarify if the proposed reforms would change the number of supply days in the House.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I don't have the answer to that, Mr. Weir, in terms of the impact on the number of supply days. I'll get back to you on that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay: so you can't provide any assurance that the number of supply days would not be reduced as a result of these changes?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Brian, do you have something...?

We'll get you an exact answer.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

I can tell you, Mr. Weir, that there is no intention to impact that in any way. The number of supply periods would remain the same. Supply days are negotiated by the government and opposition. There's no correlation here.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I don't see why there would be an impact, but I just want to make sure of that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay. If you could come back just a little more concretely on that one, I would appreciate it.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Yes, absolutely. But beyond that, the objective here is to improve committee scrutiny of the government in terms of expenditures.

Mr. Erin Weir:

We appreciate that. In terms of those expenditures, the majority of estimates for most departments would be to pay those departments' employees. This committee's been looking at the Phoenix payroll system. I appreciate that you're not the minister directly responsible, but the Treasury Board does provide the employer function for the federal government.

We've been told that the backlog in Phoenix will be cleared up by the end of October, which is a week away. I'm just wondering if you and Treasury Board have confidence that this will happen and the government will be properly paying its employees by the end of the month.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I believe last week the deputy minister at Public Services and Procurement Canada did an update on that and a briefing and addressed this situation. As the employer, we at Treasury Board work closely with Public Services and Procurement Canada, where the Phoenix system is housed. It is absolutely fundamental to the employer-employee relationship that people are paid on time and accurately. We're fixing this. I know that my colleague, Minister Foote, her deputy Marie Lemay—

Mr. Erin Weir:

Are you fixing it by October 31?

Hon. Scott Brison:

There was an update last week by the deputy minister at Public Services and Procurement Canada that described where it's at now. There have been a lot of additional resources applied in terms of people being brought in to address this. It's a lesson to government, both our government and the previous government. It's a lesson to any government. When you're doing enterprise-wide IT transformation, whether you're in a government or a business, it is very complex. It is fraught with challenges.

Those are not reasons not to do these things. The pay system needed to be modernized. But we would do things differently if given the opportunity. This was introduced by the previous government. We were brought in at a particular point in time. There are lessons to be learned from the implementation of the Phoenix pay system that would mean that any government in the future would do it differently.

The Chair:

Minister, once again, thank you for coming here today and for spending a little bit more time than you'd originally budgeted for.

To the committee, as I've said before and will say again for the record, I think this is an extremely, extremely important study that we're about to commence, for no other reason than this. Again I will go back to my 12 years' experience here and say that if we can get this right—and I think, Minister, you are on the right track—it would finally, and I mean finally, after generations, give the responsibility and the authority for the expenditures of monies away from the public service and into the hands of the parliamentarians. As far as I was concerned when I was first elected, that's what we were here to do.

Once again, thank you for your efforts. We will hopefully see you once again. You said you've made about 12 appearances. Hopefully you won't mind making it a baker's dozen if we invite you back here again sometime in the near future.

Thanks once again. We will suspend.

(1215)

(1220)

The Chair:

Colleagues, since we only have this room until one o'clock, the remainder of this meeting, questions and answers, will be somewhat truncated.

Mr. Pagan, I believe you have about five minutes more in your presentation. You have a few more slides.

Then, colleagues, we'll go into I think one round of seven-minute interventions so that we'll get every party involved. By then it should be close to one o'clock.

Mr. Pagan, without any further ado, I'll turn the floor over to you.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As presented, this is a four-pillar approach to estimates reform. We've just spent some time talking about the very critical element of timing. I'll quickly walk you through the three remaining pillars.

Once we can fix the timing of the estimates, there are other sources of incoherence and coordination that must be addressed. These include the scope and accounting, the nature of control, and reporting.

Pillar two is about scope and accounting, or what we refer to as the “universe” of the estimates. The problem is quite simple. The budget presents a complete and full picture of the totality of government spending, including crown corporations; consolidated accounts, such as employment insurance; and programs through the tax system, such as the Canada child benefit. In contrast, the estimates are simply a more narrow subset of government spending, and they're focused on the expenditures that must be authorized through an appropriation. That is the universe.

Then, of course, we have accounting differences. The budget is on an accrual basis; the estimates are on a cash basis. The problem has I think been oversimplified by talking about cash and accrual, and it's much broader than that.

What we see in slide 8 are the benefits of reconciling these accounting and universe challenges if we can table the main estimates after the budget. The president mentioned our interest in deepening the reconciliation between the two documents.

The federal budget last year presented an expense forecast of $317.1 billion. Supplementary estimates (A) provided authority to spend $251.4 billion. That's a $65.7-billion gap. The universe accounts for about $60 billion of that—that is to say, consolidated specified purpose accounts, such as employment insurance; expenditures through the tax system, such as the Canada child benefit; and then other expenses of government, such as consolidated crown corporations. That's about $60 billion. The actual accounting difference—the difference between accrual and cash—represents about $4.8 billion. This difference is explained by things like capital amortization, bad debt allowances, and interest on future obligations.

Finally, to complete the reconciliation, there would be items that are in the budget but have not yet been brought forward for approval. As we saw in supplementary estimates (A) last year, that was about $4.9 billion.

This is an example of how, if we can table the estimates after the budget, we would be able to provide a reconciliation to the budget and thus eliminate some of the confusion and frustration that parliamentarians and committees experience.

Quickly, in terms of vote structure—we did touch on this in the previous round—the objective here is to improve Parliament's line of sight on program costs and results. We are currently doing a pilot project with Transport Canada for their grants and contributions vote. The idea would be to expand that across all departmental operations and provide committees with a better line-of-sight relationship between resources and programs.

For example, as mentioned by the president, the Treasury Board Secretariat is the employer; we're the expenditure authority and we're the regulatory authority. Rather than having a single operating vote, perhaps we might want to experiment with votes related to each of those core responsibilities.

Mr. McCauley, that's what we mean by that high level related to our core responsibilities. We could do that for any other department.

Global Affairs, for instance, has a single operating vote, but we know that they have responsibilities for development, diplomacy, and trade. We can disaggregate that at almost any level, but of course there are costs and challenges. There are some jurisdictions that have as many as 12,000 votes. I would argue that they're not the best-run jurisdictions, but that's something we could study and work on with the committee.

(1225)



Finally, we have our last pillar around results and reporting. As was mentioned in the introduction, we have a new Treasury Board results policy. It came into effect on July 1. We are working with a handful of departments now to operationalize this and present new departmental results frameworks and new reports to Parliament that we would see in the spring cycle. This policy will be fully operational by all departments by November 2017.

Before I conclude, I'll say a word—a plug, if you will—for TBS InfoBase. As was mentioned in the introduction, in 2012 the committee recommended the creation of an accessible online database. We've made great strides in making this a reality. If members are not familiar with InfoBase, I would commend this to them as a way of facilitating an awareness and study of departmental operations.

The graphic presented here is simply a snapshot of the types of information that are available through InfoBase that include all kinds of indicators around actual costs, projected costs, FTE utilization, the distribution of FTEs across the country, demographic information, etc. As the minister mentioned, we have plans moving forward to deepen this and enrich the information available to committees.

(1230)

[Translation]

In conclusion, many complex issues must still be considered before we go ahead, particularly the accounting frameworks and the withdrawal of votes from the main estimates. Changes of that scope will require Parliament to change the way it operates and the way the departments publish their information.

We propose moving ahead by small steps in order to avoid large-scale failures. We recommend starting by changing the deadline for the main estimates and then working with the committee to develop options for the other aspects as that change is integrated into the process.[English]

Mr. Chair, that concludes the presentation. Madam Santiago and I would be very happy to respond to additional questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll start that line of questioning with Mr. Grewal. You have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, sir, for coming today to share your testimony. Coming from the private sector as a former corporate lawyer and a financial analyst, it's really surprising to me that the budget and the estimates process is done like this in government. It just basically makes no sense, in my humble opinion.

My concern is that we're looking at other models. We're looking at the Australian and the U.K. models. Are we prepared, once we implement the changes, for this not to fall apart in the interim period? Can you please give some colour as to how we're going to make sure that everything is accounted for in the transition period?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Grewal. You're absolutely right that the current process does not make much sense. It's very difficult to explain in its present sense. It's easier to describe what we want to do than how we're currently doing business.

That's very much the reason we propose a four-pillar approach: get the timing right, and in getting the timing right, bring greater clarity on some of the other interests and needs of committees, including accounting and universe and the control structure through the vote framework.

If we can proceed in an orderly fashion in that way, then yes, I do believe we are lined up to succeed. The change of Standing Orders is the prerogative of the House, but we understand it to be a fairly simple and straightforward question of simply changing on or before “March 1” to on or before “May 1”.

We are working very closely with the Department of Finance to deepen the coordination of the budget and TB approvals. Last year's success in bringing forward almost 70% of the budget in our supplementary estimates (A), tabled on May 10, suggests that we can succeed here in bringing forward budget items into the main estimates tabled on or before May 1.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you.

My next question is from a planning perspective. How much will the government and MPs benefit from the changes that we're about to implement?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

It's really a question of coherence and comprehension. Tabling main estimates last year in advance of the budget—everyone knew there was an important budget coming because of the platform commitments around infrastructure, environment, and aboriginals—made absolutely no sense. We put in front of Parliament a document that was of very little utility to committees. Then we had to race, to work very, very hard, to bring forward those budget items in the supplementary estimates.

By changing the process so that the estimates are presented after the budget, we are presenting a much more coherent picture to parliamentarians and rendering their study of the estimates, I believe, much more fruitful and useful. I make the point that we would also be simplifying processes so that in that June supply period, you would have a single supply bill for main estimates, as opposed to now where we have full supply for main estimates and supplementary estimates. It's somewhat confusing to have two appropriation acts presented on the same day. Then we would focus the supply periods in December and March on what would then become supplementaries (A) and (B).

Committees would be thereby engaged throughout the year in a continuous study of estimates. As the minister said, there is a commitment that if departments table estimates, ministers will appear and speak to and explain their estimate requirements.

(1235)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

How much is this transition going to cost internally?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

In terms of timing, we believe costs are negligible. It's simply a question of better sequencing the work in departments. In fact, by not having to produce spring supplementaries, which basically duplicate the main estimates, there would be very minor savings of some efforts.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you.

I think my colleague has a question to ask.

The Chair: Monsieur Poissant. [Translation]

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (La Prairie, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Good morning, everyone.

Mr. Pagan, I would like to hear you say a little more about transparency.

On June 14 last, representatives of Her Majesty's Treasury, in London, told the committee that harmonizing the budget and main estimates had helped improve transparency and facilitate monitoring of their spending plan.

What is the federal government doing to maximize the transparency of its finances? I would like us to discuss transparency at greater length.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for your question.

First of all, the process has to be simplified and made easier for the committees to understand. Overlaps between the estimates and supplementary estimates currently make the process more complicated than it ideally should be.

Minister Brison mentioned it is important to adopt a better, results-based approach and to present figures more clearly so that resources are aligned with results. Of course, we can move ahead with a new policy, but we can also look at votes based on program objectives.

So these are two measures that would make the process more comprehensible. The timing has to be clarified and votes aligned with program objectives.

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant:

I have a brief question for you.

What should the role of the Parliamentary Budget Officer be in ensuring transparency and accountability in the federal government's finances?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

I think the PBO's role is very clear. He must work with MPs and the committee to make the process more comprehensible in order to answer the questions identified by members. Since last year, we have worked closely with the PBO to identify parliamentarians' problems and needs and to move ahead with our programs.

As I also mentioned, the PBO noted that we had made an improvement. We included an annex in the supplementary estimates (C) providing for the identification of lapsed funds. He mentioned that the presentation of that information put MPs on the same level as the executive branch.

(1240)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Clarke, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thanks to the witnesses for being with us today.

Mr. Pagan, how long has Australia had its current budgetary cycle? It is in fact the one that Canada wants to adopt, according to this report on the adoption of a reform. Is that still the case in Australia or is it something recent?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for your question.

You are right in saying that we view the Australian system as a model, but Quebec and Ontario also have processes comparable to Australia's. I think the Australian system was adopted in 2006. It is more or less the same in Ontario.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Do you know whether there were adjustment periods in Quebec, Ontario, and Australia, as we anticipate here?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Yes, that was the case, particularly with regard to the accounting system, that is cash-basis accounting instead of accruals-basis accounting.

There are no major complications involved in presenting the budget and tabling the main estimates at the same time. We will have a certain amount of time, as the minister mentioned, but there is no problem as regards training.

Accounting is another matter altogether. The accruals-basis accounting system is complex and much more difficult than the cash-basis accounting system. We will have to train public service managers and parliamentarians so that they can have a clear understanding of the differences involved in the cash-basis accounting system.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I would like to clarify—

Mr. Brian Pagan:

After adopting the cash-basis accounting system, Ontario and Australia experienced some problems in monitoring the allocation of votes within departments.[English]

They exceeded their parliamentary authorities, or in common parlance, they blew their votes. [Translation]

That was related to training problems and to the complex nature of that accounting system.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you for everything you are saying, but I would like to get a precise answer.

Were Australia's budget and main estimates presented on the same date starting in the first year?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Yes.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

All right.

I also read the following in the report:[English]

“...a program-based vote structure would reduce departmental flexibility to reallocate funding....” [Translation]

Based on that logic, do you expect we will establish a maximum for these inter-program transfers?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

We will have to have that examined by the committee and the departments. In Ontario, for example, votes are associated with the programs. Under legislation on votes, it is possible to transfer votes without statutory approval. In Quebec, vote transfers are limited to a maximum of 10%.

The departments must therefore understand the limits of flexibility and identify ways to ensure transparency while allowing a degree of flexibility in order to deliver programs and services.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

The document provides no specific figures such as 10% in Quebec, for example. Do we expect to establish a threshold?

(1245)

Mr. Brian Pagan:

We do not plan to propose a specific way to set limits. However, that is one thing that should be examined. We would like to work with the committee and the department to identify the best approach to adopt in this regard.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you once again for your answer.

Further on, the same report contains the following sentence:[English]

“This flexibility allows departments to minimize the amount of lapsed funding.” [Translation]

However, my Conservative Party colleagues on this committee and I are afraid that flexibility will be used[English] to mask true program costs and also to move money around in a less transparent way. [Translation]

What do you think of that?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

That is a good question.

For us, it is matter of establishing a clear understanding and aligning resources with programs.

Earlier I discussed the Department of Foreign Affairs. It currently has only one operating vote. In future, we may be able to consider an approach under which specific votes would be provided for development, diplomacy, and trade. That is one example of what is called[English]purpose-based votes.[Translation]

A larger number of votes obviously complicates matters for the departments. There are more likely to be lapsed votes because they will not have the flexibility to transfer them. We would like to look at the possibilities and identify a balanced approach between transparency and flexibility.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

All right. Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, seven minutes.

Mr. Erin Weir:

In terms of presenting the estimates by May 1, there would still be a need for interim supply for departments during the initial months in a fiscal year. I'm wondering if you could give us a sense of how that would work under the proposed reforms.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Weir.

In fact, in the discussion paper, there is an annex that presents an illustration of what interim estimates could look like. We would envision it being very much similar to the present case, where we would present interim estimates on or before the 1st of March. However, these would be based on a continuation of the current-year authorities rather than future-year, which we don't know yet because of the budget.

In our mind, this would have the advantage of avoiding some situations that we've seen in the past. This committee may remember the case of Marine Atlantic in 2015-16, where continuation of certain funding was contingent on a budget decision. Because the main estimates were presented before the budget, there was a fairly significant decrease in the main estimates for Marine Atlantic that year. It was assumed to be some sort of cut, and in fact it wasn't a cut; it was simply the fact that the continuation of the funding was ad referendum the budget.

By presenting interim estimates that would be based on a continuation of existing authorities, there would be no reductions unless those reductions were announced in the budget, and the interim main estimates would continue to be based on a fraction. We talk about “twelfths”. Interim supply is usually 3/12ths of a department's overall requirements.

That would continue to be the basis of interim supply, but we would work with departments. They could identify specific needs very early in the year. They would get incremental fractions to reflect that authority. For instance, grants and contributions that are made to aboriginal bands right at the beginning of the year would justify a higher—

Mr. Erin Weir:

That was one of the points I wanted to hit on. It does strike me that one of the potential pitfalls of basing interim supply on the current year is that you might have departments that actually need to spend more money for a legitimate reason right near the start of the fiscal year. I guess you're acknowledging that there would have to be some kind of special allowance for that.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Absolutely. I believe the interim document does present that possibility.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay. Excellent.

I have another question about the kind of overall system and the reforms proposed. Currently Treasury Board doesn't really get involved until after the budget is tabled. Would you envision, or should our committee be considering, the possibility of Treasury Board getting involved in the budget-making process at an earlier stage?

(1250)

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Weir, for the question. That's in fact at the heart of the issue of timing and our recommendation for a May 1 tabling of main estimates.

The development of the budget is the responsibility and prerogative of the Minister of Finance, so we have to be very mindful of that responsibility. At the same time, for a number of years now we have worked very closely with the Department of Finance, in advance of the tabling of the budget, to get a sense of those initiatives that are likely to be supported, so that we can begin working with departments to pre-position Treasury Board submissions and proposals to Treasury Board ministers for their approval.

As the minister was saying, we intend on deepening that relationship so that we can work ever more closely and lessen the gap between the budget and the presentation of main estimates.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay.

We had a fair bit of discussion about the Department of Transport as an example. It just reminded me to follow up with you on something that I asked you and the minister about at a previous meeting. It was about the Global Transportation Hub, which is a crown corporation in Saskatchewan that receives significant federal money. It has also spent millions of dollars buying land at grossly inflated prices from businessmen with close connections to the governing SaskParty.

The initial response to this was that you and the minister would look into it. The response subsequently was that it had been referred to the provincial Auditor General. The provincial Auditor General has now reported and confirms that there was vast overspending on this land.

In this work the Treasury Board has been doing with the Department of Transport, has there been any recourse with the federal money that's tied up in that project?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Weir. I'm not familiar with recent reports from the Auditor General or any response from the department. We would have to go back and look at that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I appreciate that. The provincial Auditor General has reported, so I'd be very interested to know the federal government's stance regarding the millions of dollars it has put into the Global Transportation Hub. If you could come back to us at a later date on that, it would be greatly appreciated.

The Chair:

You have about a minute left.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay.

Mr. Pagan, it struck me that there was some information you were hoping to present about budget timing that you hadn't had a chance to do due to the time constraints earlier. If you'd like to take a minute for that, you'd be most welcome.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you.

I mentioned that over the last 10 years budgets have been presented as early as the end of January or as late as the 21st of April. There are good and valid reasons for that.

In 2009, the global economic crisis, it was very important for the government to send signals to Canadians and the Canadian marketplace about its ability to invest and support employment and the functioning of credit markets. That is an example of the government's acting early.

More recently, in 2015, with the dramatic drop in the energy market there was some confusion as to whether this was a temporary dip and was going to rebound quickly or if it was a more permanent feature that would impact underlying economic environment, capital investment, employment levels, etc. In that year the government actually delayed the budget, looking for the best information possible before presenting its plans.

Those two extremes, if you will, point to the benefits of some flexibility in the tabling of budgets. Our proposal of May 1 would accommodate either scenario and would present the main estimates after the budget, which would render the documents more coherent and reconcilable.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I have no one else on my list, unless—

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi: Can I ask a brief question?

The Chair: Go ahead, Ms. Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Thank you, because I'm a little confused about something.

There was a question asked to you about the ability of parliamentarians to “study”. At the moment, we study the main estimates—we really don't study the budget, but we study the main estimates—and sometimes those main estimates are not in line with the budget. Help me understand: if you align it, how much time will parliamentarians have to study what the government is actually spending?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for the question, Ms. Ratansi.

The issue of the first pillar, of timing, is very important, I believe, to all of us, because it would present a main estimates, or at least the possibility of a main estimates document, that is more useful, more reconciled to the budget. That in itself is a benefit. Nothing about the proposal is meant in any way to diminish the number of supply days or the ability of committees to examine the estimates on an ongoing basis.

There would continue to be three supply periods. We would be presenting estimates documents in each of the supply periods; therefore, committees would have the ability to call witnesses and hear from ministers and staff about not only the main estimates but also the ongoing operations of departments.

Bob Marleau, who the minister mentioned in the introduction, has underlined the fact that committees should be encouraged to look at the estimates on an ongoing basis rather than just episodically in the spring. We would support that.

(1255)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Pagan and Ms. Santiago. Thank you for your appearance here again today.

Committee members, we are back in this same room at 3:30 this afternoon for a continuing study on Canada Post.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Chers collègues, merci d'être venus. Pour la plupart d'entre vous, c'est comme le film Un jour sans fin, nous nous revoyons encore une fois. Je ne pensais pas que ce serait aussi tôt, mais je vous souhaite la bienvenue néanmoins.

Monsieur Graham, monsieur Ayoub, et monsieur Grewal, soyez les bienvenus également. Quel plaisir de vous revoir ici.

Monsieur le ministre, bonjour. Je sais que nous n'avons qu'une heure, donc sans plus tarder, je vais vous céder la parole afin que vous puissiez parler à nos collègues ici présents de l'objectif de votre visite et faire votre exposé.

L'hon. Scott Brison (président du Conseil du Trésor):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'en suis à ma douzième comparution devant un comité parlementaire, que ce soit du Sénat ou de la Chambre, depuis l'investiture du nouveau gouvernement en novembre dernier. Je suis ravi d'être ici.[Français]

J'ai le plaisir d'être accompagné aujourd'hui de Yaprak Baltacioglu, secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor du Canada; de Brian Pagan, secrétaire adjoint de la Gestion des dépenses de mon ministère; de Marcia Santiago, du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, et de ma collègue Joyce Murray, secrétaire parlementaire de notre ministère.[Traduction]

Quel plaisir de revenir. Depuis notre dernière rencontre, nous avons réalisé des progrès considérables, comme le montre bien le document que je vous ai remis.

Votre comité joue un rôle important pour ce qui est de la réforme des budgets et des prévisions budgétaires depuis un certain temps déjà, depuis 2012 en fait, lorsque vous avez déposé le rapport intitulé Renforcer l'examen parlementaire des prévisions budgétaires et des crédits, soit une analyse en profondeur et des recommandations qui ont servi de feuille de route à la réforme budgétaire. En fait, bon nombre des mesures déjà prises découlent de ce rapport et des recommandations qui y figuraient. Cela comprend notamment la création d'une base de données en ligne, soit InfoBase, qui peut être consultée et qui a été reconnue par le directeur parlementaire du budget comme étant la source de renseignements sur les dépenses gouvernementales. Il y a également un projet pilote mené avec Transports Canada afin d'essayer une nouvelle structure de crédits axée sur les programmes, et l'identification, dans le budget des dépenses, de tous les nouveaux crédits accordés dans les documents budgétaires connexes afin de rendre la consultation plus aisée pour les parlementaires.

Nous continuons à avancer dans le programme, notamment sur la question de l'échéancier et de l'alignement du budget et du budget des dépenses, et je voulais vous en parler rapidement ce matin.

Notre rôle le plus important, en notre qualité de parlementaires qui représentent les Canadiens, est d'assurer la surveillance des dépenses gouvernementales.[Français]

Toutefois, le processus actuel fait en sorte qu'il est difficile pour les députés d'assumer cette fonction. Étant député depuis de nombreuses années, moi aussi j'ai été mécontent de divers éléments du processus des prévisions budgétaires.[Traduction]

L'autre soir, lors d'une séance d'information à laquelle certains d'entre vous ont assisté, j'ai fait remarquer que le 2 juin prochain, j'aurai été député parlementaire depuis 20 ans. J'aurai siégé en qualité de député du parti ministériel pendant 3 ans et demi, et passé 16 ans dans l'opposition, donc ma perspective a été façonnée non simplement pour avoir été député du parti ministériel mais également député parlementaire. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je suis heureux de discuter avec vous de la vision du gouvernement quant à la réforme budgétaire.

Il n'est pas facile d'apporter des changements dans ce domaine. En fait, Robert Marleau, l'ancien greffier de la Chambre, a fait remarquer que la présentation et le contenu du Budget principal des dépenses n'a été modifiée que quatre fois depuis la Confédération, le plus récemment en 1997. Il y a donc amplement de travail à faire pour ce qui est de renforcer la capacité du Parlement d'exiger des comptes du gouvernement.

Je suis convaincu que la vision que nous proposons nous aidera à régler les nombreux problèmes liés à l'inefficacité du processus budgétaire au Canada. Cela comprend les préoccupations du vérificateur général, qui a souligné la nécessité de mieux aligner le budget et le budget des dépenses.

Notre vision comprend quatre domaines qui constituent actuellement une grande source de frustration pour les parlementaires. Afin de rendre les choses plus gérables et pour réaliser des progrès dès le départ, je propose que nous examinions le premier domaine tout de suite. Il porte sur le moment où le Budget principal des dépenses est déposé et nécessiterait une petite modification du Règlement.

Une fois que cette réforme importante aura été apportée, nous pourrions prendre le temps qu'il faudra pour étudier les autres domaines. J'aimerais passer en revue chaque domaine avec le Comité.

Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, le premier domaine concerne l'alignement du Budget principal des dépenses et du budget. À l'heure actuelle, le Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice prochain doit être déposé au Parlement au plus tard le 1er mars. Dans la pratique, cela veut dire que le Budget principal des dépenses ne peut tenir compte des décisions prises par le Conseil du Trésor après janvier environ, bien avant la parution du budget.

(1105)



L'alignement concerne les parlementaires, car le Budget principal des dépenses, que les parlementaires doivent examiner et ensuite voter, est un document qui ne tient pas compte finalement des plans et priorités décrits dans le budget du même exercice.

L'autre problème, c'est que tout le travail consacré à l'examen par le Parlement du Budget principal des dépenses devient essentiellement inutile lorsque le budget est déposé. Moi, je n'ai pas comme priorité de faire perdre du temps au Parlement en lui demandant de faire du travail qui n'est pas utile. Nous devons régler le problème et nous assurer que le Parlement a du travail important, comme le fait d'exiger des comptes du gouvernement.

Nous proposons donc que le Budget principal des dépenses soit déposé au plus tard le 1er mai plutôt que le 1er mars, afin que ce document puisse contenir les postes budgétaires. [Français]

Le deuxième défi à relever est lié aux différences de portée et de méthodes comptables entre le budget et le Budget des dépenses.[Traduction]

Le problème ne concerne pas seulement des concepts comptables. Le budget présente l'ensemble des dépenses du gouvernement fédéral. Cela comprend des comptes consolidés, comme le compte de l'assurance-emploi, et des dépenses fiscales telles que la nouvelle Allocation canadienne pour enfants. Le budget des dépenses, quant à lui, renferme les demandes de crédit plus limitées des ministères et organismes.

Néanmoins, les parlementaires doivent pouvoir comparer les éléments du budget et du budget des dépenses. Le gouvernement misera sur les efforts déployés récemment pour améliorer la planification selon la comptabilité d'exercice dans les ministères et le rapprochement avec les crédits selon la comptabilité de caisse dans le budget des dépenses. Nous avons travaillé sur le rapprochement de la comptabilité d'exercice et de la comptabilité de caisse. Nous voulons poursuivre et même intensifier nos efforts.[Français]

Le troisième point concerne le fait que les députés ont de la difficulté à établir un lien entre les fonds que nous votons et les programmes auxquels ils serviront.[Traduction]

Le Parlement autorise les ministères à effectuer des dépenses en fonction des crédits prévus dans les lois de crédits. Ces lois décrivent comment les fonds sont dépensés sur des postes comme les immobilisations, le fonctionnement et les subventions et contributions. Nous aimerions plutôt mettre l'accent sur les raisons pour lesquelles nous prévoyons des dépenses et renforcer le lien entre les crédits et les programmes ainsi financés.[Français]

Finalement, beaucoup de rapports ministériels ne sont ni pertinents ni informatifs.[Traduction]

Chaque ministère dispose d'une grande équipe chargée de rédiger des rapports qui ne sont pas utiles en ce qui concerne la qualité de l'information présentée et qui ne sont pas grandement consultés. Ainsi, lorsque je vous ai dit qu'il n'est pas utile de faire perdre le temps des parlementaires, parallèlement, nous faisons perdre beaucoup de temps aux fonctionnaires chargés de rédiger ces rapports que les gens ne consultent pas puisqu'ils ne sont pas présentés d'une façon utile.

La nouvelle politique sur les résultats du Conseil du Trésor simplifiera la façon dont le gouvernement rend compte des ressources utilisées et des résultats obtenus. Les rapports renseigneront désormais les gens sur ce que font les ministères, ce qu'ils tentent de faire et comment ils mesurent leurs réussites. On accordera davantage d'importance aux méthodes utilisées pour mesurer les résultats et la prestation des services, afin que les ministres, le Parlement et au final, les Canadiens, puissent exiger des comptes du gouvernement et comprendre l'efficacité des programmes. De plus, nous fournirons des renseignements détaillés sur les dépenses liées aux programmes et au nombre d'employés à temps plein dans une base de données mise en ligne et conviviale. [Français]

Monsieur le président, ce sont les grandes lignes de notre vision pour changer fondamentalement le processus du Budget des dépenses afin que les députés puissent plus facilement obliger le gouvernement à rendre des comptes.

(1110)

[Traduction]

C'est notre objectif, et j'espère pouvoir compter sur l'appui de votre comité pour faire avancer la réforme budgétaire au profit de tous les parlementaires. À court terme, j'ai hâte de travailler avec vous pour ce qui est de l'alignement du budget et du budget des dépenses.

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Brian, qui vous décrira de façon plus détaillée les réformes proposées.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Pagan, je vous en prie. [Français]

M. Brian Pagan (secrétaire adjoint, Gestion des dépenses, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme le mentionnait le président du Conseil du Trésor, la présentation d'aujourd'hui vise à vous expliquer la vision du gouvernement en ce qui a trait à la réforme du Budget des dépenses. Nous voulons aussi vous expliquer comment nous prévoyons mieux appuyer les parlementaires avec la meilleure information possible quand vient le temps d'approuver les dépenses du gouvernement.[Traduction]

J'ai beaucoup de diapositives. Je vous propose de revoir rapidement les quatre piliers liés au budget. Je vais présenter le premier pilier qui concerne l'alignement, et ensuite faire une pause pour les questions sur cet élément essentiel.

Comme nous voyons ici dans l'aperçu, l'approche proposée des quatre piliers fait fond sur les recommandations avancées par votre comité dans l'étude effectuée en 2012 sur le processus budgétaire, ainsi que notre mémoire préliminaire déposé auprès de votre comité en février dernier, lorsque nous avons décrit les défis entourant l'alignement.

Nous croyons qu'une fois que les divers éléments seront alignés correctement, nous comprendrons davantage les besoins et les exigences pour ce qui est de la portée, de la comptabilité, de la structure des crédits, des résultats et des rapports.[Français]

Il est évident que les Budgets des dépenses sont essentiels au bon fonctionnement du gouvernement. Les Budgets des dépenses constituent la base de la surveillance et du contrôle parlementaires, ils reflètent les priorités du gouvernement en matière de dépenses et ils servent de mécanisme principal pour l'établissement de rapports sur les plans et résultats.

Cependant, les parlementaires ont mentionné à maintes reprises qu'ils ne sont pas en mesure de remplir leur rôle qui consiste à examiner les prévisions budgétaires afin d'assurer un contrôle suffisant. Cette situation est attribuable à l'incohérence du processus budgétaire qui fait que les initiatives du budget ne sont pas incluses dans le Budget principal des dépenses. Les fonds de dépenses sont difficiles à comprendre et à rapprocher, et les rapports ne sont ni pertinents ni instructifs. [Traduction]

Ainsi, le gouvernement a prévu une approche axée sur quatre piliers pour apporter des changements en profondeur, en commençant par le moment du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses. Comme le président l'a indiqué, cette mesure nous permettra de déposer un document plus cohérent et nous permettra d'y insérer les prévisions budgétaires.[Français]

Par la suite, on peut plus facilement concilier les différences de portée de la méthode comptable entre le budget et le Budget des dépenses, s'assurer que les structures des crédits votés pour chaque ministère rejoignent les parlementaires et réformer le rapport annuel des ministères de manière à ce que les parlementaires soient mieux informés sur les dépenses prévues, les résultats attendus et les résultats obtenus.

Je vais maintenant parler en détail de chaque pilier. [Traduction]

Le moment du dépôt des prévisions budgétaires est un élément critique pour ce qui est de prendre connaissance des intentions du gouvernement en ce qui concerne le Budget et de la compréhension et du contrôle des dépenses ministérielles par le Parlement.

Conformément à l'article 84(1) du Règlement, le gouvernement doit déposer au plus tard le 1er mars le Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice. Dans la réalité, afin de pouvoir respecter cette date butoir, nous devons préparer un document qui tient compte des décisions prises par le Conseil du Trésor jusqu'à la fin janvier. Nous savons que dans un exercice typique, le gouvernement déposera son Budget entre la mi-février et la mi-mars, et le fait de finaliser le Budget principal des dépenses à la fin janvier exclut toute possibilité de tenir compte des postes budgétaires dans le document.

Comme le président l'a indiqué, nous sommes donc confrontés à un scénario selon lequel nous présentons au Parlement la certitude de dépenses liées à des programmes qui ne tiennent pas compte des nouveaux plans du gouvernement, ni de ses nouvelles priorités, telles qu'elles sont exprimées dans le Budget déposé en février ou en mars. Cela crée donc un défi et des incohérences de taille pour ce qui est de comprendre le processus du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses.

Pour y remédier, le gouvernement propose que le Budget principal des dépenses soit déposé au plus tard le 1er mai, plutôt que le 1er mars. À ce moment-là, le Budget aura été déposé, et nous aurons la possibilité d'inclure les postes budgétaires dans le Budget principal des dépenses soumis à l'examen du Parlement.

(1115)



Ce changement comporterait de nombreux avantages, y compris l'alignement plus cohérent des documents, la mise en oeuvre plus rapide des initiatives prévues dans le Budget, la capacité de rapprocher le Budget principal des dépenses avec le Budget déposé en février ou en mars, et la possibilité d'éliminer un budget supplémentaire. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons le Budget principal des dépenses et trois budgets supplémentaires. Nous pourrons simplifier le processus et déposer moins de documents au Parlement, ce qui réduira la confusion.

Je souligne le fait que rien ne changera par rapport au début de l'exercice et à l'approbation des crédits provisoires. Comme il est indiqué clairement dans le document, nous présenterions un budget provisoire accompagné d'un projet de loi des crédits provisoires qui serait fondé sur la prolongation des autorisations existantes pour l'exercice en cours et qui permettrait aux ministères de commencer l'exercice. Le budget principal serait ensuite déposé en juin, conformément au calendrier des crédits actuel.

Avant de faire une pause pour répondre à vos questions sur l'alignement, j'aimerais vous montrer un graphique où nous voyons la période actuelle, soit octobre-novembre, lorsque le gouvernement prépare sa mise à jour économique et financière. Ce document est utilisé pour planifier le Budget. Nous comprenons que le gouvernement aura l'intention de déposer son Budget auprès du Parlement pendant la période de février-mars. Nous déposerions des crédits provisoires au 1er mars, ce qui permet aux ministères de commencer l'exercice en avril dotés des autorisations nécessaires, et ensuite nous déposerions le Budget principal des dépenses qui tient compte des priorités budgétaires et fait le rapprochement avec le budget déposé en mai aux fins d'examen par le Parlement du projet de loi pour la dotation totale en juin.

Monsieur le président, je crois qu'il vaut mieux que je m'arrête maintenant pour permettre aux membres du Comité de digérer ces renseignements concernant l'alignement et peut-être poser des questions sur cette étape, qui est d'une importance critique.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Pagan.

Monsieur le ministre, merci pour votre exposé. Avant de commencer la série de questions, permettez-moi de faire quelques observations.

Monsieur le ministre, je ne siège pas au Parlement depuis aussi longtemps que vous. Or, mis à part vous-même, je crois que je suis le doyen de la table. Je suis d'accord avec votre évaluation du processus budgétaire et de la surveillance parlementaire. À mon avis du moins, et je le dis depuis plus de 12 ans, c'est presque risible. Nous n'avions tout simplement pas la capacité d'étudier les chiffres efficacement et de procéder à un examen comme il se doit. Je vous félicite de vos efforts visant à simplifier le processus et à le rationaliser afin que tous les parlementaires puissent au moins avoir la possibilité d'observer et de commenter le fonctionnement du Parlement, qui représente des milliards de dollars. Je vous en félicite.

J'ai une question pour vous. Au cours de la dernière législature, on m'a mandaté d'effectuer un examen du Règlement. Comme vous le savez, à chaque année de la législature, il y a une période délimitée pour l'examen du Règlement. En fait, lorsque nous étions en déplacement il y a une semaine ou deux, la Chambre a tenu un débat au Parlement à ce propos.

L'approche que j'ai retenue dans le cadre des travaux effectués par le comité multipartite chargé d'examiner le Règlement, c'était qu'il fallait prendre des décisions à l'unanimité parce que le Règlement constitue le fondement de nos travaux et du fonctionnement de notre établissement. Nous avons apporté quelques changements mineurs.

Monsieur le ministre, avez-vous songé à apporter des changements au Règlement moyennant l'approbation de tous, ou comment pensez-vous procéder?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, il faudra modifier le Règlement pour reporter la date limite du dépôt du budget principal du 1er mars au 1er mai. Votre comité peut recommander un tel changement au Parlement. Nous travaillerons là-dessus avec les députés parlementaires de tous les partis.

En ce qui concerne l'échéancier, afin de pouvoir apporter des changements au cycle budgétaire, il faudrait le faire en novembre. Je ne voudrais pas que nous perdions toute une année pour apporter une telle amélioration importante. Je perçois tout changement de ce genre comme faisant partie d'une approche de renouvellement continu. Le Parlement devrait toujours chercher des façons de renforcer la gouvernance parlementaire responsable sur une base permanente.

En d'autres termes, si nous apportons un changement maintenant au Règlement, le prochain cycle financier sera plus logique pour ce qui est de l'agencement du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses, et ce dernier document tiendra véritablement compte du Budget. Ensuite, au fur et à mesure que nous avançons...

Si l'on prend le modèle australien, par exemple, le budget et le budget principal des dépenses paraissent presque en même temps, et même en Ontario, c'est avec un écart de 12 jours. Au fur et à mesure que les ministères s'habitueront au nouvel échéancier et à la nouvelle façon de faire, on pourra resserrer les délais et obtenir des gains d'efficacité avec le temps. Ce n'est que le début, à mon avis. Au fil du temps, le budget principal et les prévisions se rapprocheront et seront plus cohérents.

(1120)

Le président:

Merci.

Je m'excuse auprès du Comité, car j'ai pris un peu de votre temps précieux.

Nous commencerons par une série de questions de sept minutes.

À vous la parole, madame Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Vous avez bien le droit de poser une question.

Monsieur le ministre, merci d'être venu et d'avoir pris l'initiative. J'ai siégé au Parlement de 2004 à 2011, et moi-même, qui ai étudié les finances et suis comptable, je sais à quel point il a été difficile d'améliorer la cohérence et la transparence du processus.

Pour ce qui est de l'alignement du Budget principal des dépenses et du Budget, de quel genre de coopération aurez-vous besoin? Le Budget principal des dépenses est dressé par le Conseil du Trésor et le Budget par le ministère des Finances. Quelle collaboration a lieu actuellement, et que souhaiteriez-vous voir à l'avenir?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il y a énormément de collaboration entre le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances. Au cours des dernières années, cette collaboration s'est intensifiée. En fait, l'année dernière, 70 % du Budget paraissait dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), par exemple.

Pour ce qui est de la comptabilité de caisse et la comptabilité d'exercice, nous effectuons de plus en plus de rapprochement au moyen de tableaux, afin que les parlementaires puissent facilement comprendre les deux méthodes. Les deux comportent des avantages. Les Australiens ont trouvé, lorsqu'ils ont adopté la comptabilité d'exercice, qu'elle était accompagnée de certains défis.

Il me semble que vous avez consulté les Australiens ici.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui, nous l'avons fait.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Nous voulons intensifier le rapprochement avec le temps. Nous sommes réceptifs à la recommandation de votre Comité concernant l'adoption de la comptabilité d'exercice. Je le répète, les deux méthodes comptables comportent des avantages, et le rapprochement...

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Mais vous n'avez pas éprouvé de difficultés pour ce qui est de la collaboration. Le ministère fonctionne très bien. Le rapprochement du Budget et du Budget principal améliore énormément la cohérence. C'est une stratégie qui est vraiment importante.

Parmi les quatre piliers que vous avez présentés, lequel voudriez-vous faire approuver d'abord? Est-ce un processus comportant des étapes distinctes, ou un ensemble?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Tous les piliers sont importants. Je tiens à la réussite de chacun d'entre eux. Le premier pilier exige la modification du Règlement pour ce qui est de l'alignement du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses. Au fil du temps, nous aurons la date butoir du 1er mai, qui fournira une certaine souplesse pendant les premiers cycles budgétaires. Les ministères sont grands et ils doivent modifier leur façon de faire. Le gouvernement est une énorme structure complexe constituée d'organisations. Ce sont des changements de taille qui prendront du temps. Il faudra passer par quelques cycles budgétaires pour en tirer tous les avantages.

Pour ce qui est de notre objectif, j'aimerais voir un meilleur alignement et un resserrement de l'échéancier du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses.

(1125)

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu (secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor du Canada, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Permettez-moi d'ajouter un complément d'information à ce qu'a dit le ministre.

L'un des quatre piliers, à savoir la politique sur les résultats, qui vise à s'assurer que les résultats et les plans ministériels viennent rejoindre les intentions des parlementaires et du gouvernement, a été approuvé par le Conseil du Trésor. Nous le mettons en oeuvre. Les premiers documents améliorés sur les résultats seront déposés cet automne, et nous espérons que tous les ministères emboîteront le pas d'ici l'automne prochain.

Nous devons travailler davantage sur le rapprochement de la comptabilité d'exercice et la comptabilité de caisse. Nous nous améliorons à chaque exercice. Parmi les quatre piliers, c'est le premier qui nécessite l'approbation du Parlement. Si le Comité est d'accord, nous pourrons mettre en oeuvre les trois autres piliers.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Ma deuxième question donne suite à celle du président au sujet du consentement unanime pour modifier le Règlement. Y voyez-vous des difficultés? Vous tentez de renseigner les parlementaires. Pensez-vous qu'il va y avoir des difficultés ou des lacunes pour ce qui est de la compréhension de ces derniers?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, Yasmin. Le président, Tom, est au courant des questions de procédure. Il y a différentes façons d'atteindre l'objectif.

Je crois fermement que tout ce que nous faisons contribue à accroître la capacité du Parlement d'amener le gouvernement à rendre des comptes, et pas seulement notre gouvernement, mais les gouvernements futurs. Lorsque nous aurons mis en application ces changements, est-ce que nous pourrons en apporter d'autres? Je crois que oui, et nous nous pencherons là-dessus ultérieurement.

Je crois que ce serait une erreur de laisser la perfection être l'ennemi du bien...

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'accord.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

... alors que nous sommes en mesure d'effectuer de bons changements.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Ma prochaine question est assez intéressante. Au Royaume-Uni, le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances relèvent d'un seul ministre. Je ne dis pas que je veux vous évincer de votre poste.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je croyais que vous aviez en tête le ministre Morneau.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, pas du tout, mais quel problème cela poserait-il au Canada? Est-ce que cela fonctionnerait? Est-ce que cela améliorerait les choses? Nous avons entendu bien des commentaires. Peut-être que vous pourriez répondre brièvement à cela.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Au Canada, le rôle du Conseil du Trésor concerne non seulement les dépenses gouvernementales, mais aussi l'efficacité des activités de l'ensemble des ministères et des organismes. Il n'y a pas que les résultats financiers en tant que tels qui importent; il faut aussi savoir si les résultats correspondent à ceux attendus par le gouvernement, d'autant plus qu'un nouveau cadre des résultats et de prestation des services est devenu une priorité pour le gouvernement.

L'autre aspect concerne les règlements. Nous devons étudier et approuver les modifications réglementaires, qui sont davantage au premier plan depuis la mise sur pied du conseil Canada-États-Unis de coopération en matière de réglementation.

Le Conseil du Trésor est le seul comité permanent du cabinet qui existe depuis la Confédération. Il fonctionne très bien et il entretient une bonne relation avec le ministère des Finances. Nous avons bien travaillé en partenariat avec ce ministère malgré tous les changements. Nous avons une bonne relation de collaboration.

Le président:

Monsieur McCauley, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de votre présence. Nous sommes toujours ravis de vous recevoir. Je crois que nous convenons tous que c'est une très bonne chose de faire concorder le budget et le budget principal des dépenses.

J'ai une question rapide à vous poser. Dans le rapport de 2012 du Comité, on proposait le 31 mars, mais vous proposez le 1er mai.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois que, lorsque nous aurons vécu quelques cycles budgétaires, nous pourrons réduire l'écart considérablement.

(1130)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Pourquoi proposer le 1er mai plutôt que la date suggérée dans le rapport de 2012 du Comité?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est pour donner une marge de manoeuvre, car ce changement nécessitera beaucoup d'adaptation de la part des ministères. En temps et lieu, j'aimerais que nous présentions le budget principal des dépenses le 1er avril. C'est ce que je vise, mais je veux m'assurer qu'à mesure que nous progressons vers cet objectif, les ministères soient en mesure de s'adapter. Avec le temps...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Croyez-vous que quelque chose a changé au cours des dernières années, ou pensez-vous que le rapport de 2012 du Comité n'était pas valable; que le Comité n'avait pas réfléchi suffisamment?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Non, je crois que le rapport du Comité était très instructif.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Le problème que pose notamment la date du 1er mai, c'est qu'il faut entendre les deux ministères en question en comité plénier avant le 1er mai, ce qui nous enlève du temps. L'objectif global est d'accroître la transparence, mais nous avons beaucoup moins de temps pour procéder à l'examen avant le délai du mois de juin.

Je comprends le besoin, mais nous semblons faire un pas en avant puis un pas en arrière.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Nous proposons le 1er mai pour permettre au gouvernement de s'assurer que les premiers cycles budgétaires se déroulent bien. Je crois en fait que ce pourrait être plus tôt. J'aimerais qu'on puisse présenter le budget principal des dépenses le 1er avril. C'est l'une des priorités du gouvernement, que je prends au sérieux, mais la date du 1er mai vise à offrir une certaine marge de manoeuvre au cours des premiers cycles budgétaires, alors que nous progresserons vers un rapprochement des dates du budget et du budget principal des dépenses.

Je prends exemple sur l'Australie, où le budget et le budget principal des dépenses sont présentés à peu près en même temps. C'est le modèle d'excellence.

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Nous proposons le 1er mai, au plus tard, pour offrir une certaine marge de manoeuvre. Si on applique ce changement pour l'année en cours, par exemple, nous avons pratiquement...

M. Kelly McCauley:

D'accord, mais qu'en est-il des préoccupations? Je le répète, on présente, ... et, soit dit en passant, le même jour, on demande à l'opposition de nommer les deux ministères pour le comité plénier. Je comprends qu'il faut donner une marge de manoeuvre, mais qu'en est-il de la période écourtée pour examiner les coûts? Il faut penser à Westminster. C'est la raison pour laquelle le Parlement a été créé, c'est-à-dire pour examiner les dépenses...

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord avec vous, mais actuellement, le Parlement n'obtient pas les comptes réels. Il les obtient dans de nombreux documents différents. Une dépense pour un ministère peut se retrouver dans le budget mais être approuvée seulement 18 mois plus tard. Nous essayons de trouver un moment idéal pour faire cela. Comme le ministre l'a dit, on ne devrait pas dépasser la date du 1er avril.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je crois que nous sommes d'accord en ce qui concerne le rapport de 2012 du Comité. Je comprends, mais je crois que nous pouvons y arriver d'ici là.

Avons-nous envisagé de fixer une date pour le budget, pour qu'il soit présenté disons en février? Les Australiens font très bien à cet égard. Je ne crois pas que c'est dans la loi, mais c'est dans leur tradition. Je pense que c'est le deuxième lundi de mai.

On nous dit que ce n'est pas facile lorsqu'il y a des gouvernements minoritaires, mais au Canada, les gouvernements libéraux et conservateurs, qu'ils aient été minoritaires ou non, depuis les 17 dernières années, l'ont fait en l'espace de quelques semaines, à l'exception d'une année. Ne pourrions-nous pas simplement?...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

La date de présentation du budget principal des dépenses est établie dans le Règlement, mais celle de la présentation du budget est décidée par le ministère des Finances.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Mais vous vous entendez tellement bien avec le ministère des Finances.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Au fil des ans, par exemple après les événements du 11 septembre et à d'autres moments, le ministère des Finances a effectivement jugé approprié de présenter un budget ou un énoncé économique comportant de nombreuses mesures budgétaires.

Pour ce qui est des dates de dépôt du budget, je vais demander à Brian d'en parler pour la période allant de 2006 à 2016, pour vous donner une idée.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Le temps est restreint, alors vous devez être bref.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Ce que nous proposons contribuera à améliorer considérablement l'ordre de présentation et la concordance. C'est ce que je peux faire en tant que président du Conseil du Trésor... Ces quatre piliers exigent une grande collaboration de la part du ministère des Finances et de tous les autres ministères. Ils constituent un grand pas en avant. Je crois que l'ordre des dépôts est un aspect très important en ce qui a trait aux changements à apporter au Règlement, mais je ne considère pas que ce soit la dernière chose à faire, Kelly. Je crois que c'est un pas important, mais nous pouvons faire davantage.

Si c'est possible, Brian pourrait parler des 10 dernières années.

(1135)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je suis d'accord, mais reporter le dépôt du budget principal des dépenses et envisager de fixer une date pour le budget... parce qu'on semble l'avoir fait de toute façon, sauf en 2006.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je ne suis pas certain que le rapport de 2012 du Comité abordait la question d'une date fixe pour le dépôt du budget. On y faisait seulement référence. Le Comité a eu une influence sur le travail que nous effectuons maintenant, et il continuera d'en avoir une.

Par ailleurs, nous allons être en mesure d'évaluer comment les choses se déroulent et comment nous pouvons les améliorer. C'est un partenariat.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Monsieur Pagan, le temps file, et je crois que nous devrons déterminer ce que nous allons faire à propos de certains des problèmes que nous aurons si la date du 1er mai est retenue, notamment la période écourtée pour procéder à l'examen et convoquer les deux ministères.

Le président:

M. Pagan devra attendre votre prochaine intervention pour répondre.

La parole est maintenant à M. Weir pour sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Je vous remercie.

Nous avons discuté de la date du 1er mai par rapport à la date du 1er avril pour le dépôt du budget principal des dépenses. L'autre aspect est la date de dépôt du budget, alors j'aimerais qu'on parle de la question de la date fixe pour la présentation du budget. Nous assumons que le gouvernement fédéral dépose habituellement un budget en février ou en mars, mais rien ne l'exige. Il y a même eu une année, je crois que c'était en 2002, où le gouvernement fédéral n'a pas présenté de budget.

Je me demande, monsieur le ministre, puisqu'on essaie de régler cette question du calendrier, pourquoi vous ne proposez pas une date fixe pour le dépôt du budget ou une fourchette de dates.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vous remercie, Erin.

Je le répète, ce que nous proposons aujourd'hui représente une amélioration considérable en ce qui concerne l'ordre des dépôts du budget et du budget principal des dépenses. Cela représentera une nette amélioration. Actuellement, la date de dépôt du budget relève exclusivement du ministre des Finances, tandis que la date de dépôt du budget principal des dépenses est établie dans le Règlement. Modifier la date établie dans le Règlement pour que l'ordre soit plus logique est un changement que je peux proposer à titre de président du Conseil du Trésor en collaboration avec le Parlement.

Il s'agira d'une amélioration importante par rapport à la pratique actuelle, mais dans la réalité, comme vous l'avez dit, le dépôt du budget procède d'une coutume.

Si vous le permettez, Brian peut vous donner les dates de dépôt du budget pour la période allant de 2006 à 2016, pour mettre les choses en perspective.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Comme le ministre l'a dit, nous travaillons très étroitement avec le ministère des Finances pour réduire l'écart entre le dépôt du budget et la présentation du budget principal des dépenses. Toutefois, il peut arriver que le ministère des Finances ait besoin d'une certaine marge de manoeuvre en ce qui concerne le dépôt du budget. À l'automne 2008, nous avons été confrontés à une récession mondiale, alors le gouvernement de l'époque a travaillé très fort pour présenter très rapidement un budget afin de rassurer les marchés et les Canadiens.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui, je comprends lorsqu'il faut présenter un budget plus tôt, mais pourquoi ne pas fixer un délai pour la présentation du budget comme nous proposons de le faire pour la présentation du budget principal des dépenses?

M. Brian Pagan:

Comme le ministre l'a dit, nous avons essayé de tenir compte du rapport de 2012 du Comité, qui proposait qu'on établisse une date fixe pour le budget. Toutefois, comme on ne précise rien à propos du dépôt du budget dans le Règlement, dans la Loi sur la gestion des finances publiques ou la Constitution, nous ne sommes pas en mesure de fixer une date pour le dépôt du budget.

M. Erin Weir:

Monsieur le ministre, est-ce que vous recommanderiez au ministre des Finances de fixer une date pour le dépôt du budget ou une fourchette de dates, bref, de fixer une date à laquelle un budget doit être présenté tous les ans?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois tout d'abord que, grâce aux changements que nous proposons aujourd'hui, il y aura une meilleure concordance entre le budget et le budget principal des dépenses. Cela ne nous empêche pas de continuer à envisager d'autres changements, notamment peut-être devancer le délai pour le budget principal des dépenses. Nous sommes prêts à en discuter. À mesure que les changements vont s'opérer et que nous évaluerons leurs répercussions, il serait intéressant que le Comité formule des commentaires. Mais je le répète, puisque la perfection est l'ennemi du bien, j'aimerais d'abord aller de l'avant avec des changements qui modifient considérablement la reddition des comptes au Parlement et sa capacité d'examiner minutieusement les dépenses.

(1140)

M. Erin Weir:

Simplement pour...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Vous passez beaucoup de temps à l'heure actuelle à examiner le budget principal des dépenses. Dans une large mesure, vous perdez votre temps, car nous présentons un budget peu de temps après, ce qui signifie qu'une grande partie du travail et de l'analyse que vous effectuez est inutile. Ce n'est plus pertinent. Nous voulons faire en sorte que le travail des parlementaires ait une incidence et permette de demander des comptes au gouvernement à propos des aspects qui importent vraiment.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui, et au sujet de ce travail, je tiens à vous féliciter, monsieur le ministre, d'avoir réussi, en passant des conservateurs aux libéraux, à demeurer dans l'opposition le plus longtemps possible. Il est clair que vous comprenez l'importance d'une opposition efficace.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il s'agissait du Parti progressiste-conservateur, j'insiste sur progressiste.

M. Erin Weir:

En effet.

M. Kelly McCauley: Nous voulons faire valoir ce point également.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci, je suis ravi que vous souligniez cela également.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je suis en fait un libéral depuis ma naissance, mais je suis sorti du placard seulement en 2003.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Erin Weir:

Vous avez mentionné que ces changements pourraient au bout du compte éliminer la nécessité de présenter des budgets supplémentaires des dépenses. Même si nous souhaitons un processus simplifié, les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses sont importants parce qu'ils offrent à l'opposition une occasion d'examiner les dépenses, car des ministres comme vous comparaissent devant le Comité au sujet de ces budgets.

Alors, je me demande, si on élimine les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses, comment ferait-on pour s'assurer qu'il y ait suffisamment d'occasions durant l'année pour les parlementaires d'examiner le budget?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vais faire quelques observations. Je crois qu'au fil du temps, à mesure que les initiatives budgétaires seront incluses dans le budget principal des dépenses, on aura moins besoin des budgets supplémentaires des dépenses. Je ne crois pas qu'ils seront éliminés, mais je crois seulement que nous en aurons de moins en moins besoin.

Vous savez, le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) est plus important, à certains égards, que le budget principal des dépenses. L'année dernière, 70 % des initiatives budgétaires figuraient dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), alors, d'une certaine façon, on peut dire que ce budget est plus pertinent que le budget principal des dépenses.

Le principal problème — et je parle du Parlement dans son ensemble — c'est qu'il y a des députés de longue date qui ne comprennent pas vraiment les processus entourant le budget et les prévisions budgétaires. Ce n'est pas vraiment de leur faute. Si nous avions pour objectif de concevoir un système qui est difficile à comprendre, le système actuel en serait un exemple parfait. Toutefois, personne ne veut avouer qu'il ne le comprend pas.

Parfois, lorsqu'on apporte des changements, il est difficile d'expliquer le résultat final. Dans le cas des changements que nous voulons apporter, Erin, il est plus facile d'expliquer comment le système fonctionnera après la mise en oeuvre de ces changements que d'expliquer son fonctionnement actuel. Je ne peux pas expliquer...

M. Erin Weir:

S'agissant de la façon dont il fonctionnerait...

Le président:

Monsieur Weir, votre temps est écoulé.

Pour ce qui est de vos questions, monsieur Weir et monsieur McCauley, au sujet d'une date fixe pour le budget, je peux vous dire qu'on recommandait dans le rapport de 2012 du Comité que le budget soit présenté au plus tard le 1er février. Si le Comité le souhaite, il a tout à fait le droit de formuler à nouveau une telle recommandation.

Monsieur Whalen, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous pour votre présence. Comme je suis un nouveau député, je trouve intéressant de voir comment la vision du ministère en ce qui concerne cette approche à quatre piliers visant à faire concorder le budget et le budget principal des dépenses a évolué au cours de la dernière année. Ce qu'on nous a remis en premier lieu lorsque nous avons entamé nos travaux en novembre, ce sont les budgets des dépenses (B) et (C), qui étaient pratiquement incompréhensibles. Avec le temps, nous avons appris à les comprendre, et maintenant nous proposons de les modifier.

Pour poursuivre un peu dans la même veine que M. Weir, je vais vous demander si vous envisagez de combiner le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) au budget principal des dépenses, de sorte que nous ayons uniquement les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (A) et (B) et que le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) soit éliminé, de façon permanente ou seulement lors de très rares occasions. Ou bien est-ce que les trois budgets supplémentaires des dépenses seront maintenus en plus du budget des dépenses provisoire et du budget principal des dépenses?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vais commencer et ensuite je vais demander à Brian de poursuivre, car il possède la mémoire institutionnelle nécessaire pour vous répondre du point de vue du Conseil du Trésor.

Je crois qu'on aura moins besoin qu'à l'heure actuelle des budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (A) et (B), par exemple. Si le budget principal des dépenses est présenté après le budget, le budget principal des dépenses aura davantage d'importance, comme ce devrait être le cas, mais cela prendra du temps. Je le répète, la mise en oeuvre de certains des changements au sein du gouvernement s'effectuera sur quelques cycles budgétaires.

Brian, voulez-vous continuer?

(1145)

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Whalen, je vous remercie de votre question. Je tiens à préciser que ce que nous proposons dans le cadre de notre vision n'est pas d'éliminer les budgets supplémentaires. L'objectif est plutôt de rendre le processus uniforme et séquentiel, de sorte que le Budget principal des dépenses qui suit le dépôt du budget reflète bel et bien les priorités budgétaires.

Comme il a été mentionné, environ 70 % du budget se trouvait dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) au dernier exercice. Nous voulons remplacer le budget supplémentaire du printemps par un budget principal des dépenses qui comprendrait les initiatives budgétaires. Nous présenterions ensuite les autres priorités budgétaires dans un budget supplémentaire de l'automne, qui deviendrait le premier budget supplémentaire de l'année. Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) viendrait à l'automne, puis le nettoyage des comptes se ferait en hiver dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B). Il y aurait encore un document budgétaire pour chaque période de crédits, ce qui encouragerait les comités à soumettre encore des demandes aux ministères et à continuer d'examiner les plans de dépenses du gouvernement.

Je voudrais également vous rappeler que nous avons introduit le budget supplémentaire du printemps en 2007 afin de pouvoir mettre en oeuvre rapidement les initiatives budgétaires. L'outil s'est avéré utile, comme nous l'avons constaté l'année dernière, mais nous pourrions améliorer l'efficacité du processus budgétaire en soumettant tout bonnement un meilleur budget principal des dépenses. Voilà l'essence de notre proposition.

M. Nick Whalen:

Pour ce qui est de déterminer s'il faut fixer la date de dépôt du budget afin d'harmoniser le processus, qu'arriverait-il si le gouvernement n'était pas prêt à présenter son budget la première semaine d'avril? Le ministère serait-il alors tenu de soumettre deux séries de budgets principaux des dépenses, l'un qui refléterait l'ancien processus budgétaire, et l'autre le nouveau? Dans quelle mesure serait-il difficile et exigeant pour le ministère de composer avec une situation semblable?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Ces 10 dernières années, nous avons constaté que la date de dépôt du budget variait grandement. En 2009, il avait été soumis dès janvier en réaction à la crise économique mondiale. Pas plus tard qu'en 2015, nous étions aux prises avec un tout autre problème concernant le marché de l'énergie et la chute spectaculaire des prix de l'énergie, ce qui a eu toutes sortes de répercussions sur la capacité du gouvernement à prévoir ses besoins. Le budget avait été déposé le 21 avril cette année-là.

Par conséquent, étant donné que nous n'avons pas de date fixe pour le dépôt du budget, et que le gouvernement souhaitera avoir toute la souplesse voulue pour tirer parti des meilleures informations disponibles afin d'établir ses prévisions économiques, une date de dépôt du 1er mai engloberait toutes les situations observées ces 10 dernières années. Voilà qui devrait à tout le moins permettre au gouvernement de déposer ses prévisions budgétaires après le budget, pour que nous puissions harmoniser nos travaux avec le budget.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci, monsieur Pagan.

Monsieur Brison, pour ce qui est des différents piliers, le ministère semble être sur le point d'atteindre le premier objectif. Certains des changements proposés comprennent aussi des aspects du quatrième pilier, qui porte sur les rapports ministériels, les plans et les priorités.

Pouvez-vous nous dire brièvement à quel point le ministère est prêt à opérer les changements pour que ces plans et priorités soient présentés avec plus de cohérence le 1er mai prochain, ou même plus tôt, lors du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

À vrai dire, conformément à la politique du Conseil du Trésor concernant les rapports ministériels, nous allons déjà dans ce sens, dans une démarche générale relative aux résultats et à la prestation de services de notre gouvernement. Même en ce qui a trait au format des présentations au Conseil du Trésor et à la mesure dans laquelle les ministères et les organismes... Lorsqu'ils soumettent leurs présentations au Conseil du Trésor, nous leur demandons de soumettre des critères et de s'engager à suivre un modèle que nous comprendrons relatif aux résultats et à la prestation des services. Je parle non seulement d'engager des fonds, mais aussi de fixer des objectifs ou des buts conformes à ce qu'ils souhaitent accomplir.

En tant qu'organisme central, le Conseil du Trésor le fait déjà. Dans d'autres domaines, nous nous occupons davantage du rapprochement entre la comptabilité de caisse et d'exercice dans le cadre de nos fonctions. Pour ce qui est des rapports sur les dépenses par programme, nous avons procédé ainsi dans le cas de Transports Canada, et nous allons en faire plus...

(1150)

M. Nick Whalen:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Brison, mais j'ai une question très brève. Nous n'avons pas vu la proposition de libellé du nouveau règlement. Le ministère a-t-il poussé sa réflexion à ce sujet?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Eh bien, le libellé portera sur le changement de date. Je ne veux pas émettre de supposition, étant donné que le Comité...

Le président:

Permettez-moi d'intervenir, monsieur le ministre.

Puisque j'ai une certaine connaissance de la question, monsieur Whalen, je peux dire que notre Comité pourra bel et bien proposer un libellé.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Oui, c'est exact. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Avant que le ministre nous quitte, il nous reste deux dernières interventions de cinq minutes chacune.

Monsieur Clarke, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. [Traduction]

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je pense que je peux rester un peu plus longtemps, si vous êtes d'accord.

Le président:

Très bien. Nous allons donc essayer de faire un tour complet.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.[Français]

Monsieur Clarke, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre de cette approche candide. Nous sommes très heureux que vous puissiez rester plus longtemps. Je vous remercie d'être avec nous aujourd'hui. C'est très apprécié.

Pour l'opposition officielle de Sa Majesté, cette réforme semble très intéressante. Bien entendu, nous souhaitons une réforme qui assure le bien-être de tous les Canadiens. Nous considérons cette réforme d'une façon très sérieuse et nous avons des questions qui sont sérieuses également. D'abord, il nous apparaît tout à fait louable d'apporter davantage de cohérence dans le but d'améliorer le processus d'étude des dépenses budgétaires que suivent les députés pour le compte des Canadiens.

J'aimerais poursuivre sur ce que disait mon collègue M. McCauley. Vous sembliez dire que nous avons besoin d'une période d'ajustement. Nous pensons que ce pourrait être intéressant de faire comme en Australie, c'est-à-dire que soient publiés le même jour le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses. Votre collègue du ministère a mentionné que des ajustements devaient être apportés pour assurer une plus grande flexibilité. Est-ce que vous pourriez nous dire quels sont ces ajustements qui devraient s'échelonner sur quelques années?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, monsieur Clarke. J'apprécie beaucoup votre question.

Lorsque des changements importants sont apportés aux activités des ministères, il est évident que les ministères qui travaillent ensemble ont besoin de temps pour appliquer les changements. Mon objectif est d'arriver à un processus où le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses seront... .

M. Alupa Clarke:

Publiés en même temps?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

...présentés approximativement en même temps. Mon modèle est celui de l'Australie. J'exprime depuis longtemps mon intérêt pour ce modèle, mais il faut du temps pour apporter les changements. À mon avis, il faudra peut-être encore deux ans avant que les ministères s'adaptent à ces changements. Tout comme vous, je crois que le nouveau modèle constituera possiblement une amélioration.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Cela m'amène, monsieur le ministre, à vous poser une autre question.

L'opposition officielle veut s'assurer que la période traditionnellement allouée aux députés pour évaluer un budget ne sera pas écourtée. Nous comprenons très bien les notions de flexibilité, d'ajustements et autres. Cela m'amène à un autre point.

Vous estimez que cela prendra deux ou trois ans avant que tous les ajustements soient apportés. Pour démontrer votre bonne volonté, ne serait-il pas intéressant de profiter de l'occasion pour inclure dans la loi une clause établissant que, d'ici deux ou trois ans, le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses seront présentés le même jour?

Cette avenue vous semble-t-elle intéressante et acceptez-vous de l'explorer?

(1155)

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est la prérogative du Comité et du Parlement de considérer la possibilité d'apporter des modifications au Règlement. Je suis ouvert à ce que des améliorations soient apportées sur une base continue. En anglais, on parle d'un processus evergreen. Si nous modifions aujourd'hui notre processus, nous aurons après quelques mois ou quelques années — peut-être deux ans ou deux cycles budgétaires — une meilleure compréhension des changements et la possibilité d'en apporter d'autres. Il s'agit d'une étape importante. Je suis complètement ouvert à ce que d'autres améliorations soient apportées dans l'avenir.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham, je vous souhaite bon retour au sein de notre Comité. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, j'aimerais revenir sur une chose que vous avez dite au début de votre exposé, et à laquelle M. Weir a fait allusion assez explicitement. En fait, vous avez plus d'expérience de l'opposition que tout autre membre du caucus gouvernemental, de sorte que vous avez l'habitude d'interpréter le budget principal des dépenses et les budgets supplémentaires.

Lorsque j'étais membre du personnel, je me souviens être allé à votre bureau et avoir reçu de votre personnel une transcription du budget en anglais ordinaire. Le document était disséqué sur chaque surface horizontale et verticale de votre bureau.

Compte tenu de votre expérience dans ce rôle, dans quelle mesure votre proposition aurait-elle changé votre vie, concrètement, si elle avait été appliquée ces 10 dernières années?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Eh bien, nous devions travailler très fort dans l'opposition. J'avais une alliée formidable, Tisha Ashton, qui travaille toujours avec moi d'ailleurs. En ce qui a trait au travail entourant le budget et les prévisions budgétaires, nous sommes quelques-uns à y avoir consacré beaucoup de temps au fil des ans.

Un député ou un membre du personnel d'un député ne devrait pas devoir travailler si fort simplement pour comprendre un document essentiel à son travail — en l'occurrence, les dépenses gouvernementales et la capacité de demander des comptes au gouvernement. Il est stupide de consacrer autant d'efforts à transcrire des documents gouvernementaux et des processus budgétaires dans un format intelligible que nous pouvons ensuite examiner. Cette pratique me paraissait illogique lorsque j'étais dans l'opposition, et elle l'est encore maintenant que je suis au gouvernement.

Il faut reconnaître que le Conseil du Trésor a fait beaucoup de travail à ce chapitre dans le passé. J'en ai d'ailleurs parlé à Tony Clement la semaine dernière, et il m'a dit qu'il était conscient de ces travaux à l'époque, et qu'il en comprenait l'importance. C'est une pratique qui s'infiltre dans la fonction publique depuis un certain temps. La question me tient énormément à coeur.

En tant que députés, vous ne pouvez pas dire que vous ne comprenez pas. Il y a toutefois des ministres du Cabinet qui n'ont pas beaucoup d'expérience parlementaire. D'autres sont au Parlement depuis longtemps. À l'heure actuelle, le système n'est pas conçu pour être compris, et nous voulons changer la donne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Des gens qui ne font même pas leurs propres impôts doivent comprendre ces documents.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Dans le même ordre d'idées, aimeriez-vous apporter d'autres améliorations légères que nous n'avons pas abordées?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je veux vraiment que des changements soient mis en place. Nous devons consacrer beaucoup de temps aux rapports ministériels. Nous n'en parlons pas beaucoup ce matin, mais je trouve ce volet important. Je pense que la budgétisation par programme à l'intention des députés et des parlementaires...

Quand je dis « députés », j'englobe aussi les sénateurs. Il y a une grande expertise au Sénat relative aux processus budgétaires, en particulier au sein du Comité sénatorial des finances nationales.

À mon avis, si le Parlement, les comités parlementaires et l'ensemble de la Colline participent davantage, ils pourront contribuer à analyser les postes budgétaires et à en évaluer l'efficacité. Il y a des choses sur lesquelles nous pouvons nous entendre de façon non partisane, notamment l'adoption de mesures qui permettent d'améliorer nettement la capacité du Parlement à faire son travail.

(1200)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais céder les quelques secondes qui me restent à M. Whalen, qui souhaite poser une petite question de suivi.

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, David.

Le président:

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen:

Ministre Brison, je trouve que votre proposition est conforme à ce que notre Comité a entendu, en ce qui a trait à l'harmonisation des prévisions budgétaires et du budget, à la vérification continue des méthodes comptables et des crédits, et à l'amélioration continuelle des rapports ministériels. Je doute que nous ayons suffisamment entendu parler de comptes, de votes, d'ajustements et d'évaluations différentes des coûts. Nous avons lancé notre étude, mais on dirait que le ministère est prêt à aller de l'avant en ce qui concerne le premier changement.

Si nous devions faire une recommandation, serions-nous prêts à fixer une date — par exemple, pas plus de x jours après le dépôt du budget, et au plus tard le 1er mai? Cette formulation serait-elle plus utile, ou ne sommes-nous pas encore prêts à déterminer ce genre de restriction?

Le président:

Veuillez répondre brièvement.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

J'aurai une meilleure idée de la situation au cours de la prochaine année. Pour être franc, notre proposition est plutôt fondamentale. Nous allons faire en sorte que le budget et les prévisions budgétaires soient mieux harmonisés, et que le budget principal des dépenses vienne après le budget. Nous aurons donc une meilleure idée après le Budget principal des dépenses et le processus budgétaire de 2017.

Je serai ravi de venir chaque fois que le Comité souhaitera m'inviter, et je viendrai bien sûr défendre les prévisions budgétaires. Nous pourrons d'ailleurs parler du processus en plus de ces prévisions budgétaires. Nous aurons alors une meilleure idée de la situation. Il faut un certain temps pour opérationnaliser ce genre de choses.

Yaprak a un...

Le président:

Malheureusement, nous...

Allez-y.

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

J'ai une petite explication qui pourrait répondre à la question et dire pourquoi il nous faudra quelques années.

En fait, les particularités d'un programme qui se trouvent dans le budget et celles qui vont dans les prévisions budgétaires sont complètement différentes. Dans les prévisions budgétaires, nous nous assurons d'avoir terminé tous les détails de la conception. C'est d'ailleurs ce qui nous prendra beaucoup de temps. Par conséquent, ce que nous aimerions qu'il arrive d'ici quelques années lors du dépôt du budget et des prévisions budgétaires, c'est que le budget prenne un engagement et que nous donnions le feu vert à un programme le jour de l'approbation du budget principal des dépenses. C'est notre objectif, mais il est encore tôt pour que toute la machine fonctionne ainsi.

Le président:

Je vous remercie de cette précision.

Si vous avez le temps, monsieur le ministre, il nous faudrait environ 15 minutes, ou même un peu moins pour terminer le tour. Nous vous en remercions.

Monsieur McCauley, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Kelly McCauley:

J'aimerais très brièvement parler du premier pilier. Lorsqu'il est question d'harmonisation, notre pays est encore une fois comparé à l'Australie. Et vous avez raison de le faire, car l'Australie fait les choses correctement — même si on y trouve toutes les créatures rampantes et mortelles que Dieu a créées.

En Australie, il semble s'écouler très peu de temps entre le dépôt d'une politique et sa mise en œuvre, alors que nous accusons un retard de 19 mois à ce chapitre. Yaprak pourra peut-être nous expliquer pourquoi.

On dit ensuite que les réussites récentes démontrent qu'une telle harmonisation interne est possible au sein du gouvernement canadien. J'aimerais simplement que vous expliquiez ce que vous entendez par « réussite récente ».

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vais vous dire deux ou trois choses, après quoi je demanderai à Yaprak de répondre. Au sein de notre ministère, Brian, Yaprak et Marcia sont plus au courant, encore une fois. Je siégeais au Comité du Cabinet sur le Conseil du Trésor lors du gouvernement précédent, mais être président du Conseil du Trésor est différent et permet de voir les choses autrement.

Je crois qu'il y a désormais une meilleure harmonisation grâce à la collaboration entre le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances. La collaboration et la participation sont plus fortes qu'auparavant tout au long du processus budgétaire. Des progrès ont donc été réalisés.

Comme Yaprak l'a dit, les détails présentés dans le Budget principal des dépenses sont beaucoup plus précis que ceux du budget. Un budget donne une vue d'ensemble et une perspective. Par exemple, on pourrait y apprendre qu'un montant donné sera investi dans l'éducation des Autochtones, mais les détails viendront...

(1205)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Mais il est question d'un retard de 19 mois; est-il entièrement attribuable aux détails?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je sais, et c'est justement là où je veux en venir, Kelly. À l'heure actuelle, le retard peut atteindre 18 mois, mais nous cherchons à le réduire considérablement grâce à une meilleure harmonisation du budget et des prévisions budgétaires.

En fait, vous avez énoncé une des principales raisons pour lesquelles nous proposons d'emblée le 1er mai. Comme le dit une vieille chanson de musique country, « Donnez-moi 40 acres, et je vais changer les choses ». Nous aurons besoin d'un peu de temps pour trouver une solution.

Allez-y, Yaprak.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je ne connais pas la chanson, mais je l'écouterai peut-être une autre fois.

Puisque j'ai une autre question, je vous serais reconnaissant de bien vouloir répondre brièvement.

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Sans problème... et je ne peux pas faire autrement avec la chanson country.

Voici comment les Australiens s'y prennent. Au tout début du cycle budgétaire, le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances travaillent ensemble, non seulement pour formuler la politique, mais aussi pour établir à quoi le programme pourrait ressembler. Puisque la réflexion commence dès le départ, les documents peuvent être déposés en même temps. Voilà ce que nous devrions faire. Le 1er mai peut sembler loin pour la conception de tous ces programmes. Au fond, nous allons devoir entamer le processus dès le début et concevoir les programmes parallèlement. C'est notre objectif.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Très bien. C'est excellent.

Je vais maintenant passer au troisième pilier. Encore une fois, nous sommes ici pour parler de transparence et de reddition de comptes, et une des suggestions semble en quelque sorte aller dans le sens contraire. Il est question d'accorder plus de crédits, mais de laisser plus de souplesse aux ministères pour qu'ils puissent utiliser l'argent sans l'approbation du Parlement. Cette proposition semble aller à l'encontre de ce que nous essayons de faire ici.

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur McCauley.

Ce que nous avons appris en regardant d'autres administrations, c'est qu'ils adoptent des crédits « fondés sur un but » pour que les parlementaires aient une meilleure idée de la façon dont les ressources financent des programmes précis. En procédant ainsi, en passant d'un crédit unique pour dépenses de fonctionnement d'un ministère à trois, quatre ou cinq crédits fondés sur un but, vous avez nécessairement...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Pensez-vous que la solution est tout simplement de leur donner un plus grand montant d'argent sans qu'aucune surveillance ne soit exercée?

M. Brian Pagan:

Ce n'est pas une question de surveillance...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Ou sans approbation du Parlement pour décider du transfert...

M. Brian Pagan:

À titre d'exemple, au Québec, le projet de loi de crédits comprend des crédits fondés sur le but, mais les ministères peuvent transférer jusqu'à 10 % des fonds entre crédits, et ils ne transfèrent pas les fonds sans en faire pleinement rapport. C'est transparent grâce aux rapports. D'autres administrations ont recours à des crédits pluriannuels ou à des dispositions améliorées de report...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je vais vous citer. Il est écrit ici que l'équilibre pourrait être obtenu en approuvant des crédits « à une échelle plus globale » et en permettant ensuite aux organismes de réaffecter l'argent sans qu'il soit nécessaire d'obtenir une autre approbation du Parlement.

Encore une fois, cela semble être le contraire de ce que nous essayons de faire. Nous donnerions un montant d'argent relativement élevé et nous empêcherions ensuite le Parlement d'approuver...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Si je peux me permettre de vous interrompre, à l'heure actuelle, on peut réaffecter de l'argent au sein d'un ministère sans vraiment...

M. Kelly McCauley:

En effet, mais cela ne semble pas aider.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est un pas dans la bonne direction, et vous pouvez regarder le travail fait au ministère des Transports dans le cadre du projet pilote. Une fois de plus, lorsque le financement d'un programme est approuvé par le Parlement, pour ce qui est de la capacité d'un ministère de réaffecter de l'argent ailleurs, on peut en transférer jusqu'à 10 %, ce qui permet... Ce serait logique, surtout pour éviter la non-utilisation de fonds dans un domaine donné, mais cette façon de faire constitue une amélioration considérable par rapport à la situation actuelle, et s'engager dans cette voie...

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est un pas dans la bonne direction, pas une...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est un pas dans la bonne direction...

M. Kelly McCauley: Bien.

L'hon. Scott Brison: ... et toute amélioration commence par un premier pas. On regarde comment cela fonctionne, et on se demande ensuite s'il faut aller plus loin. Je suis ouvert à cela. [Français]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Ayoub, vous avez la parole et vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui. Je remercie également les témoins qui vous accompagnent.

Je vais poser une question plus technique au sujet du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor.

Un projet pilote, en collaboration avec Transports Canada, est en cours de réalisation. Vous devez déjà avoir obtenu des résultats ou de la rétroaction à ce sujet. J'aimerais que vous m'en parliez brièvement. Quels ont été les résultats, les inconvénients ou les avantages observés et comment cela va-t-il vous aider à planifier d'autres changements dans un avenir rapproché?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup. J'apprécie la question.

Le projet pilote de Transports Canada représente une occasion pour nous de considérer la même approche auprès des autres ministères en ce qui a trait aux changements. Il y eu des résultats positifs jusqu'à maintenant et peut-être que M. Pagan peut vous en parler et aborder également les autres applications qui pourraient être mises à l'essai à l'avenir en utilisant la même approche.

(1210)

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Merci.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

En 2015-2016, le ministère des Transports a obtenu un seul crédit d'un montant d'environ 600 millions de dollars pour les subventions. Dans le cadre de ce projet pilote, nous travaillons avec le ministère pour tester l'utilisation des crédits pour les portes d'entrée et les corridors, pour les infrastructures de transport et ainsi de suite. Il s'agit de séparer les crédits selon les termes et les conditions de chaque programme de subvention. C'est une façon de donner au Parlement une meilleure idée de l'utilisation exacte des ressources qui viennent appuyer certains programmes. Évidemment, l'année financière est en cours et nous n'avons donc pas de résultat final en ce moment. Cependant, de toute évidence, cette façon de faire ne pose aucun problème pour les ministères et cela donne aux parlementaires une meilleure mesure de l'utilisation de ces ressources.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Est-ce que je me trompe en disant que le ministère des Transports a pu absorber ce changement, apporter des résultats et fonctionner en parallèle? Je suppose qu'il a dû faire les deux, c'est-à-dire continuer à se servir de l'ancienne méthode tout en testant la nouvelle?

M. Brian Pagan:

C'est exact.

Prenons l'exemple de ce crédit de presque 600 millions de dollars. À l'avenir, le ministère pourra séparer ces ressources et présenter des résultats spécifiques à chaque crédit. Il y aura donc un crédit pour des corridors et un autre pour les infrastructures de transport. De cette manière, cela donnera un aperçu plus spécifique et plus axé sur ces programmes.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

En ce qui concerne la préparation, la formation au sein du ministère et la formation des employés, y a-t-il eu une démarche particulière qui a été entreprise? Combien de temps a duré cette préparation avant de pouvoir mettre en place ce projet pilote?

M. Brian Pagan:

Ce projet pilote découle d'un rapport de ce comité qui a été produit en 2012. Depuis ce temps, nous avons travaillé avec le ministère afin de préparer le projet pilote. Il n'y a eu aucune formation particulière et aucun problème du côté du système financier. Il s'agissait simplement d'identifier le meilleur exemple et de travailler avec ce ministère pour démontrer les bénéfices de cette approche.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Des prévisions de coûts ont-elles été établies relativement à l'implantation à grande échelle du projet pilote dans l'ensemble des ministères. Le but est d'effectuer des changements afin d'être plus efficaces et plus transparents. Quels sont les coûts liés à ces changements? Avez-vous des estimations à cet égard en ce qui concerne l'avenir? Est-ce que le projet pilote fournit ce genre d'informations?

M. Brian Pagan:

À l'heure actuelle, c'est un projet pilote avec un seul ministère. La prochaine étape est de l'étendre à d'autres crédits et surtout aux crédits opérationnels pour mieux comprendre les coûts et les bénéfices d'une telle approche.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il y a un autre avantage à cette approche. Nous allons l'étendre à d'autres programmes. Ce sera plus facile pour le Parlement de mesurer les résultats et donc de considérer les objectifs de ce processus et de ce programme. Cela va représenter un changement important en ce qui concerne l'efficacité du gouvernement en général.

(1215)

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Notre dernier intervenant sera M. Weir.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci d'être resté, monsieur le ministre.

Je veux revenir au thème de l'opposition efficace. Pouvez-vous nous dire si les réformes proposées changeraient le nombre de jours désignés à la Chambre.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je n'ai pas la réponse à cette question, monsieur Weir, concernant l'incidence sur le nombre de jours désignés. Je vais vous revenir là-dessus.

M. Erin Weir:

Bien. Vous ne pouvez donc pas garantir que ces modifications ne réduiraient pas le nombre de jours désignés.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Brian, avez-vous quelque chose...

Nous allons vous donner une réponse exacte.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je peux vous dire, monsieur Weir, qu'on n'a aucunement l'intention de modifier le nombre de jours. Le nombre de périodes des subsides demeurerait le même. Le nombre de jours désignés fait l'objet d'une négociation entre le gouvernement et l'opposition. Il n'y a aucune corrélation.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je ne vois pas pourquoi il y aurait une incidence, mais je tiens juste à m'en assurer.

M. Erin Weir:

Bien. Je vous serais reconnaissant de nous faire parvenir une réponse un peu plus concrète à ce sujet.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Oui, tout à fait, mais au-delà de cette question, l'objectif est d'améliorer l'examen des dépenses du gouvernement par les comités.

M. Erin Weir:

Nous en sommes conscients. Pour ce qui est des dépenses, le paiement des employés représente la majorité des prévisions budgétaires de la plupart des ministères. Notre Comité s'est penché sur le système de paye Phénix. Je sais que vous n'êtes pas le ministre directement responsable, mais le Conseil du Trésor assume la fonction d'employeur dans l'administration fédérale.

On nous a dit que l'arriéré dans Phénix sera réglé d'ici la fin d'octobre, c'est-à-dire dans une semaine. Je me demande seulement si le Conseil du Trésor et vous êtes convaincus que ce sera fait, si le gouvernement paiera ses employés comme il se doit d'ici la fin du mois.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois que la sous-ministre de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a fait le point à ce sujet lors d'une séance d'information la semaine dernière. En tant qu'employeur, le Conseil du Trésor travaille étroitement avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, qui est responsable du système Phénix. Il est absolument essentiel à la relation employeur-employé que les gens soient payés à temps et correctement. Nous réglons le problème. Je sais que ma collègue, la ministre Foote, sa sous-ministre, Marie Lemay...

M. Erin Weir:

Allez-vous le régler d'ici le 31 octobre?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

La semaine dernière, la sous-ministre de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a fait le point sur la situation. Beaucoup de ressources humaines supplémentaires ont été déployées pour s'attaquer au problème. C'est une leçon pour le gouvernement, tant pour le gouvernement actuel que le précédent. C'est une leçon pour tous les gouvernements. Il est très complexe de réaliser une transformation des TI à l'échelle d'une organisation, qu'il s'agisse d'une administration ou d'une entreprise. Cela comporte de nombreux défis.

Ce n'est pas une raison de ne pas faire ces choses. Le système de paye devait être modernisé, mais nous procéderions autrement si nous en avions l'occasion. Ce système a été mis en place par le gouvernement précédent. Nous avons pris le pouvoir au moment de sa mise en oeuvre. Il y a des leçons à apprendre de la mise en oeuvre du système de paye Phénix, et tous les gouvernements procéderaient différemment à l'avenir.

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, encore une fois, merci d'être ici aujourd'hui et de rester un peu plus longtemps que ce que vous aviez prévu au départ.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, et je vais le répéter pour le compte rendu, le Comité s'apprête à commencer une étude extrêmement importante, pour cette seule raison. Je vais une fois de plus faire allusion à mes 12 années d'expérience ici et dire que si nous pouvons bien faire les choses — et je pense que vous êtes sur la bonne voie, monsieur le ministre —, nous pourrions enfin — et j'insiste là-dessus —, après des générations, transférer la responsabilité et l'autorité en matière de dépenses de la fonction publique aux parlementaires. En ce qui me concerne, quand j'ai été élu pour la première fois, c'est ce que nous devions faire ici.

Je vous remercie une fois de plus de vos efforts. Espérons que nous allons vous revoir. Vous dites que vous avez comparu 12 fois. J'espère que nous pourrons vous voir une treizième fois en vous invitant de nouveau dans un proche avenir.

Merci encore. Nous allons suspendre la séance.

(1215)

(1220)

Le président:

Chers collègues, comme la réservation de la salle prendra fin à 13 heures, le reste de la séance, de la période de questions et de réponses, sera un peu écourté.

Monsieur Pagan, je pense qu'il reste plus de cinq minutes à votre exposé. Vous avez quelques diapositives supplémentaires.

Par la suite, chers collègues, je pense que nous commencerons une série de questions de sept minutes afin que tous les partis puissent intervenir. Il ne devrait pas être loin de 13 heures lorsque nous aurons terminé.

Monsieur Pagan, sans plus tarder, je vous donne la parole.

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme il a été dit, il s'agit d'une approche de réforme du processus budgétaire fondée sur quatre piliers. Nous venons tout juste de parler de l'alignement, qui fait partie intégrante de l'approche. Je vais rapidement passer en revue les trois autres piliers.

Une fois que nous serons en mesure de régler la question de l'alignement du budget des dépenses, nous devrons nous attaquer à d'autres sources d'incohérence et de coordination, y compris la portée et la méthode comptable, la nature du contrôle et la production de rapports.

Le deuxième pilier concerne la portée et la méthode comptable, ou ce que nous appelons l'« univers » du budget des dépenses. Le problème est plutôt simple. Le budget présente une vue d'ensemble complète de la totalité des dépenses gouvernementales, y compris pour ce qui est des sociétés d'État; des comptes consolidés; comme l'assurance-emploi; et des programmes offerts au moyen du régime fiscal, comme l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants. En revanche, le budget des dépenses est tout simplement une sous-catégorie plus restreinte de dépenses gouvernementales, qui met l'accent sur les dépenses qui doivent être approuvées au moyen d'un crédit. Voilà l'univers dont nous parlons.

Bien entendu, nous avons ensuite les différentes méthodes comptables. Le budget est présenté selon la méthode de comptabilité d'exercice, tandis que le budget des dépenses l'est selon la comptabilité de caisse. Je pense qu'on a trop simplifié le problème en parlant de comptabilité de caisse et de comptabilité d'exercice, car il est plus vaste.

À la huitième diapositive, nous voyons les avantages du rapprochement de ces méthodes et de l'univers du budget des dépenses en déposant le budget principal des dépenses après le budget. Le président a d'ailleurs mentionné que nous voulons accentuer le rapprochement entre les deux documents.

Dans le budget fédéral de l'année dernière, les dépenses prévues se chiffraient à 317,1 milliards de dollars. Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) a autorisé des dépenses de 251,4 milliards de dollars. La différence se chiffre à 65,7 milliards de dollars. L'univers du budget des dépenses représente environ 60 milliards de dollars de ce montant — c'est-à-dire les comptes à fins déterminées consolidés, comme pour l'assurance-emploi; les dépenses engagées par l'entremise du régime fiscal, comme pour l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants; et les autres dépenses gouvernementales, comme celles engagées pour les sociétés d'État consolidées. La différence entre les méthodes comptables — entre la comptabilité d'exercice et la comptabilité de caisse — est d'environ 4,8 milliards de dollars. Cette différence s'explique par des choses comme l'amortissement des immobilisations, la provision pour créances douteuses et les intérêts sur les obligations futures.

Enfin, pour compléter le rapprochement, il y aurait des postes budgétaires qui n'ont pas encore été soumis aux fins d'approbation. Comme nous l'avons vu l'année dernière dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), ce montant était d'environ 4,9 milliards de dollars.

C'est un exemple de la façon, si nous déposons le budget des dépenses après le budget, dont nous pouvons rapprocher les deux documents et éliminer ainsi une partie de la confusion et de la frustration éprouvées par les parlementaires et les comités.

Brièvement, pour ce qui est de la structure des crédits — il en a été question dans la dernière série de questions —, l'objectif est de permettre au Parlement de porter un meilleur regard sur les coûts et les résultats des programmes. Nous menons actuellement avec Transports Canada un projet pilote portant sur le crédit pour les subventions et les contributions du ministère. L'idée serait d'en faire autant pour l'ensemble des activités ministérielles et de permettre ainsi aux comités de porter un meilleur regard sur le lien entre les ressources et les programmes.

Par exemple, comme le président l'a mentionné, le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor assume la fonction d'employeur; nous approuvons les dépenses et possédons un pouvoir de réglementation. Plutôt que d'avoir un seul crédit pour dépenses de fonctionnement, nous pourrions peut-être faire l'essai de crédits liés à chacune des responsabilités essentielles.

Monsieur McCauley, voilà ce que nous entendons par une approbation à une « échelle plus globale » pour ce qui est des responsabilités essentielles. Nous pourrions en faire autant pour tous les ministères.

Affaires mondiales, par exemple, n'a qu'un seul crédit pour dépenses de fonctionnement, mais nous savons que le ministère assume des responsabilités en matière de développement, de diplomatie et de commerce. Nous pouvons diviser ces responsabilités à presque tous les niveaux, mais il y a évidemment des coûts et des difficultés. Certaines administrations utilisent jusqu'à 12 000 crédits. Je dirais que ce ne sont pas les administrations les mieux dirigées, mais c'est une chose que nous pourrions étudier et examiner avec le Comité.

(1225)



Enfin, nous avons notre dernier pilier qui porte sur les résultats et les rapports. Comme il a été dit dans l'introduction, le Conseil du Trésor a une nouvelle politique en matière de résultats. Elle est entrée en vigueur le 1er juillet. Nous travaillons maintenant avec une poignée de ministères pour la mettre en oeuvre et présenter de nouveaux cadres ministériels des résultats et de nouveaux rapports au Parlement que nous devrions voir au cycle du printemps. Cette politique sera pleinement opérationnelle dans tous les ministères d'ici novembre 2017.

Avant de conclure, je vais dire un mot — une annonce, si vous voulez — concernant l'InfoBase du SCT. Comme on l'a mentionné dans l'introduction, le Comité a recommandé en 2012 la création d'une base de données accessible en ligne. Nous avons réalisé de grands progrès pour que cela se concrétise. Je recommande aux députés qui ne connaissent pas InfoBase de s'en servir pour mieux connaître les activités ministérielles et faciliter leur étude.

Le graphique présenté ici est tout simplement un instantané du genre de renseignements disponibles grâce à Infobase, y compris toutes sortes d'indicateurs liés aux dépenses réelles et prévues, à l'utilisation des ETP et à leur distribution au pays, à des renseignements démographiques et ainsi de suite. Comme le ministre l'a mentionné, nous prévoyons élargir la base de données et enrichir l'information à la disposition des comités.

(1230)

[Français]

En conclusion, pour aller de l'avant, il reste encore de nombreuses questions complexes à considérer, notamment en ce qui concerne les cadres comptables et le retrait des crédits du Budget principal des dépenses. Des changements de cette ampleur obligeront le Parlement à modifier sa manière de fonctionner ainsi que la façon dont les ministères publient leurs informations.

Nous proposons d'y aller par petites étapes afin d'éviter des échecs à grande échelle. Nous recommandons de commencer par un changement de la date d'échéance du Budget principal des dépenses et par la suite, au fur et à mesure que ce changement sera intégré dans le processus, de travailler avec le Comité pour développer des options pour les autres aspects.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, voilà qui conclut l'exposé. Madame Santiago et moi serons très heureux de répondre à d'autres questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons commencer cette série de questions par M. Grewal. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Raj Grewal (Brampton-Est, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur, d'être venu témoigner. Je viens du secteur privé, où j'ai été avocat spécialisé en droit des sociétés et analyste financier, et je trouve très surprenant que le processus budgétaire du gouvernement fonctionne ainsi. À mon humble avis, cela n'a essentiellement aucun sens.

Ce que je veux, c'est que nous examinions d'autres modèles. Nous nous penchons sur le modèle de l'Australie et celui du Royaume-Uni. Sommes-nous prêts, une fois que les modifications seront apportées, à faire en sorte que cela ne tombe pas en morceaux entre-temps? Pouvez-vous nous aider à y voir plus clair concernant la façon dont nous allons nous y prendre pour être certains que tout sera comptabilisé pendant la période de transition?

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur Grewal. Vous avez tout à fait raison lorsque vous dites que le processus actuel n'est pas très sensé. Il est très difficile d'expliquer ce qu'il a de logique. Il est plus facile d'expliquer ce que nous voulons faire que notre façon actuelle de procéder.

C'est précisément pour cette raison que nous proposons une approche à quatre piliers, qui consiste à bien aligner le budget des dépenses et, pendant ce temps, à apporter des éclaircissements concernant certains des autres intérêts et des autres besoins des comités, notamment en ce qui a trait à la méthode comptable et à l'univers budgétaire ainsi qu'à la structure de contrôle au moyen du cadre des crédits.

Si nous arrivons à procéder ainsi de façon ordonnée, je crois alors que nous réussirons. La modification du Règlement est la prérogative de la Chambre, mais nous savons que c'est une question plutôt simple et directe qui consiste tout simplement à substituer « au plus tard le 1er mai » à « au plus tard le 1er mars ».

Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le ministère des Finances pour renforcer la coordination entre le budget et les approbations du Conseil du Trésor. L'année dernière, nous avons réussi à présenter près de 70 % du budget dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), qui a été déposé le 10 mai, ce qui laisse croire que nous pouvons réussir à présenter des postes budgétaires dans le Budget principal des dépenses déposé au plus tard le 1er mai.

M. Raj Grewal:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question concerne la planification. Dans quelle mesure le gouvernement et les députés profiteront-ils des modifications que nous nous apprêtons à apporter?

M. Brian Pagan:

C'est en fait une question de cohérence et de compréhension. Déposer le Budget principal des dépenses l'année passée avant le budget — parce que tout le monde savait qu'il y aurait bientôt un important budget en raison des engagements du programme relatifs à l'infrastructure, à l'environnement et aux Autochtones — n'avait absolument aucun sens. Nous avons présenté au Parlement un document qui avait très peu d'utilité pour les comités. Puis nous avons dû courir — travailler très très fort — pour faire figurer ces postes budgétaires dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

En changeant le processus pour que le Budget principal des dépenses soit présenté après le budget, nous brossons pour les parlementaires un tableau beaucoup plus cohérent et rendons leur étude du Budget principal des dépenses beaucoup plus fructueuse et utile, je pense. J'insiste pour dire que nous simplifierions aussi le processus de sorte que pendant la période des crédits de juin, vous ayez un seul projet de loi de crédits portant sur le Budget principal des dépenses, plutôt que d'avoir comme maintenant la totalité des crédits pour le Budget principal des dépenses et pour le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. La présentation des deux lois de crédits le même jour cause un peu de confusion. Nous concentrions ensuite les périodes des crédits de décembre et mars sur ce qui deviendrait alors les Budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (A) et (B).

Les comités feraient par conséquent toute l'année l'étude en continu des prévisions budgétaires. Comme le ministre l'a dit, selon l'engagement, si les ministères soumettent un budget, les ministres vont comparaître pour parler de leurs besoins et les expliquer.

(1235)

M. Raj Grewal:

Combien cette transition coûtera-t-elle à l'interne?

M. Brian Pagan:

En ce qui concerne le moment, nous croyons que les coûts sont négligeables. Il s'agit simplement de mieux ordonner le travail au sein des ministères. En fait, s'il n'est plus nécessaire de produire le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du printemps, qui ne fait que répéter le Budget principal des dépenses, il y aurait de très modestes économies sur le plan des efforts à déployer.

M. Raj Grewal:

Merci.

Je pense que mon collègue a une question à poser.

Le président: Monsieur Poissant. [Français]

M. Jean-Claude Poissant (La Prairie, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Bonjour à toutes et à tous.

Monsieur Pagan, j'aimerais vous entendre parler un peu plus de la transparence.

Le 14 juin 2016, des représentants de Her Majesty's Treasury, à Londres, ont dit au Comité que l’harmonisation du budget et du Budget de dépenses contribuait à améliorer la transparence et à faciliter le suivi de leur plan des dépenses.

Que fait le gouvernement fédéral pour optimiser la transparence de ses finances? J'aimerais qu'on parle davantage de la question de la transparence.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Tout d'abord, il faut simplifier le processus et le rendre plus facile à comprendre pour les comités. À l'heure actuelle, les chevauchements entre le Budget des dépenses et le Budget des dépenses supplémentaires rendent le processus plus complexe qu'il ne devrait l'être idéalement.

Le ministre Brison a mentionné l'importance d'une meilleure approche axée sur les résultats et de mieux présenter les chiffres de façon à ce que les ressources soient alignées sur les résultats obtenus. On peut bien sûr aller en avant avec une nouvelle politique, mais on peut aussi regarder les crédits qui sont axés sur les objectifs des programmes.

Ce sont donc deux mesures qui rendraient le processus plus compréhensible. Il faut clarifier le synchronisme et aligner les crédits sur les objectifs des programmes.

M. Jean-Claude Poissant:

J'ai une brève question à vous poser.

Quel devrait être le rôle du directeur parlementaire du budget pour assurer la transparence et la responsabilisation à l'égard des finances du gouvernement fédéral?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je pense que le rôle du DPB est très clair. Il doit travailler avec les députés et le Comité pour rendre le processus plus compréhensible afin de pouvoir répondre aux questions identifiées par les députés. Depuis l'année dernière, nous travaillons étroitement avec le DPB afin d'identifier les problèmes et les besoins des parlementaires et d'aller en avant avec nos programmes.

J'ai aussi mentionné que le DPB a souligné que nous avions apporté une amélioration. Ainsi, on a inclus dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) une annexe qui prévoit l'identification des fonds inutilisés. Il a mentionné qu'avec la présentation de cette information, on a mis les députés sur le même pied que le pouvoir exécutif.

(1240)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Clarke, vous avez la parole et vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie les témoins d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Pagan, depuis quand le cycle budgétaire actuel en Australie existe-t-il? C'est en fait celui que le Canada veut adopter selon ce rapport pour l'adoption d'une réforme? En a-t-il toujours été ainsi en Australie ou est-ce quelque chose de récent?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Vous avez raison de dire que nous prenons le système australien comme modèle, mais le Québec et l'Ontario ont aussi des processus assez comparables à celui qui existe en Australie. Je pense que le système australien a été adopté en 2006. C'est plus ou moins la même chose en Ontario.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Savez-vous s'il y a eu des périodes d'ajustement au Québec, en Ontario ou en Australie, comme on le prévoit ici?

M. Brian Pagan:

Oui, ce fut le cas, surtout en ce qui concerne le système de comptabilité, soit la comptabilité de caisse au lieu de la comptabilité d'exercice.

En ce qui concerne le fait de présenter le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses en même temps, il n'y a pas de complications majeures. On aura un certain temps, comme le ministre l'a mentionné, mais il n'y a aucun problème en ce qui concerne la formation.

En ce qui concerne la comptabilité, c'est une autre paire de manches. Le système de comptabilité d'exercice est complexe, c'est beaucoup plus difficile que le système de comptabilité de caisse. On devra former les gestionnaires de la fonction publique et les parlementaires afin qu'ils comprennent mieux les différences qu'implique le système de comptabilité de caisse.

M. Alupa Clarke:

J'aimerais préciser...

M. Brian Pagan:

Après l'adoption du système de comptabilité de caisse, l'Ontario et l'Australie ont connu certains problèmes en ce qui concerne le contrôle de l'affectation des crédits au sein de ministères.[Traduction]

Ils ont dépassé leurs autorisations parlementaires ou, comme on dit, ils ont excédé leurs crédits.[Français]

C'était lié aux problèmes de formation et à la complexité de ce système de comptabilité.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je vous remercie de tout ce que vous nous dites, mais j'aimerais avoir une réponse précise.

En Australie, dès la première année, le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses étaient-ils présentés à la même date?

M. Brian Pagan:

Oui.

M. Alupa Clarke:

D'accord.

Dans le document, je lis aussi ce qui suit:[Traduction]

« ... qu’une structure de crédits fondée sur les programmes restreindrait la latitude des ministères en ce qui concerne la réaffectation, dans un même crédit, de fonds d’un programme à l’autre... »[Français]

En vertu de cette logique, prévoyez-vous qu'on établira un maximum pour ces transferts d'un programme à l'autre?

M. Brian Pagan:

Il faut faire examiner cela par le Comité et les ministères. En Ontario, par exemple, les crédits sont liés aux programmes. Une loi sur les crédits a permis le transfert de crédits sans qu'il y ait une approbation législative. Au Québec, il y a un maximum de transferts des crédits de 10 %.

Il faut donc que les ministères comprennent les limites de la flexibilité et il faut identifier des façons d'assurer la transparence tout en permettant une certaine flexibilité pour livrer les programmes et les services.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Dans le document, il n'y a pas de chiffres précis comme, par exemple, les 10 % au Québec. Prévoit-on établir un seuil?

(1245)

M. Brian Pagan:

On ne prévoit pas proposer une façon spécifique de déterminer les limites. C'est toutefois une chose à examiner. On voudrait travailler avec le Comité et le ministère pour identifier la meilleure approche à adopter à ce sujet.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je vous remercie encore une fois de la réponse.

Dans le même document, il y a une phrase plus loin qui se lit comme suit:[Traduction]

« Cette latitude permet aux ministères de réduire les fonds inutilisés. »[Français]

Toutefois, mes collègues du Parti conservateur qui siège au sein de ce comité et moi craignons que cette flexibilité ne soit utilisée[Traduction]

pour masquer les coûts réels des programmes et réaffecter les fonds d'une façon moins transparente.[Français]

Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Brian Pagan:

C'est une bonne question.

Pour nous, c'est une question de bien comprendre et d'aligner les ressources sur les programmes.

J'ai parlé plus tôt du ministère des Affaires étrangères. Présentement, il n'a qu'un seul crédit opérationnel. Dans le futur, il est possible d'envisager une approche où il y aurait des crédits spécifiques dans les domaines du développement, de la diplomatie et des échanges. C'est un exemple de ce qu'on appelle[Traduction]

des crédits fondés sur l'objet des crédits.[Français]

Évidemment, avec un plus grand nombre de crédits, c'est plus complexe pour les ministères. Il y a plus de chances qu'il y ait des fonds inutilisés parce qu'ils n'auront pas la flexibilité de faire des transferts de crédits. On voudrait examiner les possibilités et identifier une approche équilibrée entre la transparence et la flexibilité.

M. Alupa Clarke:

D'accord. Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

C'est au tour de M. Weir, pour sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir:

Si le Budget principal des dépenses est présenté pour le 1er mai, il faudrait quand même aux ministères des crédits provisoires pour les premiers mois de l'exercice. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de la façon dont cela fonctionnerait avec les réformes proposées?

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur Weir.

En fait, dans le document de discussion, il y a une annexe qui présente une illustration du budget des dépenses provisoire. Ce serait très semblable à ce qui existe en ce moment; nous présenterions le budget des dépenses provisoire au plus tard le 1er mars. Cependant, il se fonderait sur les autorisations de l'exercice en cours plutôt que sur celles de l'exercice à venir, qui sont encore inconnues en raison du budget.

D'après nous, cela aurait l'avantage d'éviter certaines situations que nous avons connues dans le passé. Le Comité se rappellera peut-être le cas de Marine Atlantique en 2015-2016, alors que le maintien de certains fonds dépendait d'une décision qui allait être prise dans le budget. Étant donné que le Budget principal des dépenses avait été présenté avant le budget, il y a eu une diminution assez importante des fonds dans le Budget principal des dépenses pour Marine Atlantique, cette année-là. On avait présumé qu'il y avait une réduction, alors qu'en fait il n'y en avait pas; le maintien des fonds dépendait tout simplement de la décision finale donnée dans le budget.

En présentant un budget des dépenses provisoire fondé sur le maintien des autorisations existantes, il n'y aurait aucune réduction, sauf celles qui ont été annoncées dans le budget, et le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses continuerait de se fonder sur une fraction. Nous parlons de « douzièmes ». Les crédits provisoires correspondent habituellement à trois douzièmes des besoins globaux d'un ministère.

Cela demeurerait la base des crédits provisoires, mais nous travaillerions avec les ministères. Ils pourraient cerner les besoins particuliers très tôt dans l'année. Ils obtiendraient des fractions croissantes en fonction de cette autorisation. Par exemple, les subventions et les contributions qui sont versées aux bandes autochtones dès le début de l'année justifieraient un...

M. Erin Weir:

C'est un des points dont je voulais parler. D'après moi, si l'on fonde les crédits provisoires sur l'exercice en cours, entre autres problèmes possibles, il pourrait y avoir des ministères qui ont en fait besoin de dépenser plus d'argent pour une raison légitime au début de l'exercice financier. J'imagine que vous reconnaissez qu'il pourrait y avoir un genre d'affectation spéciale pour cela.

M. Brian Pagan:

Absolument. Je crois que le document provisoire présente cette possibilité.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord. Excellent.

J'ai une autre question à propos du type de système général et des réformes proposées. En ce moment, le Conseil du Trésor n'intervient pas vraiment tant que le budget n'est pas déposé. Envisageriez-vous, ou le Comité devrait-il envisager la possibilité que le Conseil du Trésor intervienne plus tôt dans le processus de préparation du budget?

(1250)

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de votre question, monsieur Weir. C'est en fait au coeur de la question du moment choisi et de notre recommandation de déposer le Budget principal des dépenses le 1er mai.

La préparation du budget incombe au ministre des Finances et c'est à lui qu'il appartient de décider, alors nous sommes bien conscients de cette responsabilité. En même temps, depuis plusieurs années maintenant, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le ministère des Finances avant le dépôt du budget afin d'avoir une idée des initiatives qui seront vraisemblablement financées, de manière à pouvoir commencer à travailler avec les ministères pour prépositionner les présentations au Conseil du Trésor et les propositions aux membres du Conseil du Trésor pour approbation.

Comme le ministre le disait, nous avons l'intention d'approfondir cette relation de manière à travailler encore plus étroitement et à réduire l'écart entre le budget et la présentation du Budget principal des dépenses.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord.

Nous avons beaucoup discuté du ministère des Transports, par exemple. Je me suis souvenu de faire un suivi avec vous sur quelque chose que je vous ai demandé, au ministre et à vous, à une réunion antérieure. Il était question du Global Transportation Hub — la plaque tournante mondiale de transport —, une société d'État de la Saskatchewan qui reçoit d'importants fonds fédéraux. Cette société a aussi dépensé des millions de dollars pour acheter des terrains à des prix grossièrement exagérés auprès de gens d'affaires ayant des liens étroits avec le SaskParty, qui est au pouvoir.

La réponse initiale, c'était que le ministre et vous alliez vous pencher là-dessus. La réponse qui a suivi était que le vérificateur général de la province avait été saisi de la question. Le vérificateur général de la province a présenté son rapport dans lequel il confirme que les sommes consacrées à ces terrains étaient excessives.

Dans le cadre du travail réalisé par le Conseil du Trésor avec le ministère des Transports, est-ce qu'il y a eu un recours concernant les fonds fédéraux qui sont pris dans ce projet?

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur Weir. Je ne suis pas au courant des derniers rapports du vérificateur général ou de quelque réponse que ce soit du ministère. Il nous faudra regarder cela.

M. Erin Weir:

Je comprends. Le vérificateur général de la province a produit un rapport, alors j'aimerais beaucoup connaître la position du gouvernement fédéral concernant les millions de dollars qu'il a consacrés au Global Transportation Hub. Nous vous saurions gré de bien vouloir faire le point pour nous à ce sujet à une date ultérieure.

Le président:

Il vous reste à peu près une minute.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord.

Monsieur Pagan, j'ai réalisé que vous espériez nous donner de l'information à propos du moment du dépôt du budget, mais vous n'avez pas pu à cause du manque de temps tout à l'heure. Si vous voulez prendre une minute pour le faire, ce serait fort apprécié.

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci.

J'ai mentionné que les budgets des 10 dernières années avaient été présentés parfois très tôt, en janvier, ou très tard — une fois le 21 avril. Il y a de bonnes raisons pour cela.

En 2009, avec la crise économique mondiale, il était très important pour le gouvernement de montrer aux Canadiens et au marché canadien qu'il était capable d'investir dans l'emploi et dans le fonctionnement des marchés du crédit et d'en assurer le soutien. Dans cet exemple, le gouvernement a agi rapidement.

Plus récemment, en 2015, la chute marquée du marché de l'énergie a causé de la confusion. On ne savait pas s'il s'agissait d'une baisse temporaire qui serait suivie d'une remontée rapide, ou d'une situation permanente qui aurait des incidences sur le contexte économique sous-jacent, sur les investissements en immobilisations, sur les niveaux d'emplois, etc. Cette année-là, le gouvernement a en fait repoussé la présentation du budget et a cherché la meilleure information possible avant de présenter ses plans.

Ces deux situations extrêmes montrent bien les avantages d'une certaine latitude pour le dépôt des budgets. Notre proposition de présenter le budget le 1er mai conviendrait aux deux scénarios, et le Budget principal des dépenses serait présenté après le budget, ce qui se traduirait par des documents plus cohérents et pouvant être rapprochés.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je n'ai plus personne sur ma liste, à moins que...

Mme Yasmin Ratansi: Puis-je poser une question rapide?

Le président: Allez-y, madame Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je vous remercie, parce qu'il y a quelque chose que je ne comprends pas très bien.

Quelqu'un vous a posé une question sur la capacité des parlementaires à faire des « études ». En ce moment, nous étudions le Budget principal des dépenses — nous n'étudions pas vraiment le budget, mais nous étudions le Budget principal des dépenses —, et il arrive que le Budget principal des dépenses ne corresponde pas au budget. Aidez-moi à comprendre: si vous harmonisez cela, combien de temps les parlementaires auront-ils pour étudier les dépenses réelles du gouvernement?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de votre question, madame Ratansi.

Le premier pilier, celui du moment choisi pour déposer le budget, est très important pour nous tous, je crois, parce que cela signifie que le Budget principal des dépenses qui sera présenté sera, ou risque d'être plus utile, mieux harmonisé au budget. C'est en soi un avantage. Rien dans la proposition ne vise la diminution du nombre de jours désignés ou de la capacité des comités d'examiner les documents budgétaires de façon continue.

Il y aurait toujours trois périodes de subsides. Nous présenterions des documents budgétaires à chacune des périodes de subsides; par conséquent, les comités seraient en mesure de convoquer des témoins et d'entendre les ministres et le personnel parler du Budget principal des dépenses, mais aussi des activités en cours des ministères.

Bob Marleau, que le ministre a mentionné dans sa déclaration liminaire, a souligné qu'il faut encourager les comités à examiner les documents budgétaires de façon continue plutôt que de ne le faire qu'épisodiquement au printemps. Nous sommes d'accord avec lui.

(1255)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Pagan et madame Santiago. Merci d'avoir comparu devant nous aujourd'hui.

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, nous nous retrouverons dans cette même pièce à 15 h 30 aujourd'hui pour poursuivre notre étude sur Postes Canada.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on October 24, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.