header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-06-19 INDU 124

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1610)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 124 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, as we continue our five-year review of the Copyright Act.

I'd like to welcome our new member Mr. Mike Lake as well as Mr. Pierre Nantel to our committee.

Before we get started, Mr. Jeneroux, you have a quick notice of motion?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

I sure do, and thank you, Mr. Chair. I'll be as quick as I can here.

We're not moving the motion today, just the notice of motion. The notice says: Given that the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development has been explicitly tasked in his mandate letter from the Prime Minister to “work closely with the Minister of International Trade to help Canadian firms compete successfully in export markets,” and given that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has raised concerns over Canada’s ability to compete with changes in the United States’ tax regime, that the Committee undertake a study of four meetings to review, among other things: i) the impact of any U.S.-imposed trade restrictions on the affected industries, ii) the impact of Canada’s tax regime on Canadian companies’ ability to compete with foreign-owned companies in Canada and abroad, and iii) the state of private sector investor confidence in Canada.

This is also rather timely today, Mr. Chair, due to the comments by the President of the United States. I hope to move this motion in the future.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We have received your notice of motion, and we are going to move on.

We have very tight time today, but we have some witnesses. From the Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency, we have Caroline Rioux, President. From the Motion Picture Association - Canada, we have Wendy Noss, President of the Starship Enterprise, apparently. From the Writers Guild of Canada, we have Maureen Parker, Executive Director; and Neal McDougall, Director of Policy. From the Society for Reproduction Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers in Canada, we have Alain Lauzon, General Manager; and Martin Lavallée, Director of Licensing and Legal Affairs. Finally, from Canadian Media Producers Association, we have Erin Finlay, Chief Legal Officer; and Stephen Stohn, President of SkyStone Media.

We're going to get started with Caroline Rioux.

You have five minutes. Go ahead, please.

Ms. Caroline Rioux (President, Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency Ltd.):

Good afternoon. My name is Caroline Rioux. I am President of the Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency, CMRRA. I thank the committee for the opportunity to share our experiences and recommendations for amendments to the Copyright Act. I have prepared a few brief slides to assist you in following my presentation.

CMRRA is a collective that licenses the reproduction of musical works on behalf of more than 6,000 music publisher and songwriter clients. Together they represent more than 80,000 music catalogues, which comprise a large majority of the songs sold, broadcast, and streamed in Canada. CMRRA grants licences to authorize the copying of these songs to record companies that release sound recordings on the marketplace, such as CDs; online music services, such as iTunes, Spotify, and YouTube; and Canadian radio and television broadcasters.

Reproductions of musical works may be licensed under a tariff certified by the Copyright Board or by direct agreement with users. Pursuant to those licences, CMRRA collects and distributes royalties to rights holders after having carefully matched the usage data received from those users to the copyright ownership information in our database.

I am here today to talk to you about certain exceptions to copyright liability that were introduced in 2012. In the interests of time, I will describe the impact of only two of these exceptions. Unfortunately, there is insufficient time to cover the third item from my initial presentation, technological neutrality and the impact of the most recent Copyright Board decision on the rates applicable to online streaming services. This issue will nonetheless be covered in our written submission, because it is of critical importance to us.

With regard to backup copies, in 2012 a broad exception for backup copies was introduced. As a result, in 2016 the Copyright Board applied a large blanket discount on the established rate, reducing royalties payable since 2012 by 23.31%. In doing so, the board effectively took an estimated $5.6 million away from rights holders to subsidize already profitable radio stations. We firmly believe that rights holders should be compensated for these valuable copies. CMRRA recommends that the Copyright Act be amended to clarify that the exception for backup copies should be limited to copies made for non-commercial purposes only, consistent with other exceptions under the act, such as for user-generated content and time-shifting.

The second exception is “ephemeral copies”. Radio stations make copies of musical works for many purposes. Copies intended to exist for no more than 30 days are known as ephemeral copies. Until 2012 the ephemeral copies exception effectively addressed the concerns of both rights holders and broadcasters. Rights holders rightly wanted to be compensated for the reproduction of their works, while broadcasters wanted to minimize the onerous task of seeking licences from countless individual rights holders. Crucially, the exception did not apply where the right was otherwise available via a collective licence.

Following lobbying by broadcasters, the collective exception clause was repealed in 2012, giving the exception very broad application—but only to broadcasters. As a result, the Copyright Board reduced the royalties payable by up to an additional 27.8%, worth up to $7 million per year, provided that broadcasters could somehow prove they met the conditions of the exception. Ironically, the exercise of proving or disproving which reproductions actually qualify for the exception has introduced a significant administrative and enforcement burden on rights holders, resulting in the further erosion of the value of the right.

There is no reason why commercial broadcasters should not compensate rights holders when they themselves benefit so greatly from the copies at hand. CMRRA recommends that subsection 30.9(6) be reintroduced, in keeping with the original intention. That one user group or technology should benefit from an exception over another is not technologically neutral, and represents an unfair advantage to broadcasters.

In conclusion, given the ongoing difficulties caused by the exceptions introduced in 2012, we ask Parliament to refrain from introducing any further exceptions to copyright, but instead focus on addressing the erosion of copyright that has been caused by the existing exceptions. Traditional revenue streams have declined, but a robust copyright law protects against the pace of change by adhering to a principle of technological neutrality.

The exceptions outlined in this submission compromise that principle, and in so doing further erode the value of music and the value of creation. In addition to these recommendations, CMRRA asks that you improve the efficiency of the Copyright Board. We recognize that this has already been identified as a priority, and we appreciate Minister Bains' recently announced innovation strategy.

(1615)



We also ask that you make the private copying regime technologically neutral, address the value gap by amending the hosting services exception, and extend the term of copyright for musical works to life plus 70.

Thank you.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We're going to move to Ms. Wendy Noss.

You have five minutes.

Ms. Wendy Noss (President, Motion Picture Association-Canada):

Thank you.

I'm Wendy Noss, with the Motion Picture Association-Canada. We are the voice of the major producers and distributors of movies, home entertainment, and television who are members of the MPAA. The studios we represent, including Disney, Paramount, Sony, Fox, Universal, and Warner Bros., are significant investors in the Canadian economy, supporting creators, talent and technical artists, and businesses large and small across the country.

We bring jobs and economic opportunity and create compelling entertainment in Canada that is enjoyed by audiences around the world. Last year, film and television producers spent over $8.3 billion in total in Canada and supported over 171,000 jobs. Over $3.75 billion of that total was generated by production projects from foreign producers, of which our American producers represented the vast majority.

From Suits to Star Trek, from X-Men in Montreal to Deadpool in Pitt Meadows, and from the inflatable green screen technology that created the Planet of the Apes to the lines of code used to simulate the flight of the Millennium Falcon, our studios support the development of talent and provide good middle-class jobs for tens of thousands of Canadians.

We appreciate the opportunity to appear before you, as the study before this committee is essential to both future creation in Canada and the innovative distribution models that deliver content to consumers on the device they want, at the time they want, and the way they want.

We have a range of concerns that touch upon fundamental copyright issues: the term of protection itself, as you've heard from many others, and the need for Canada to provide copyright owners with the same global standard that already exists in more than 90 countries. Given the limited time we have, our focus today is on a single priority: the need for modernizing the act to address the most significant threats of online piracy, including those that were not dominant at the last round of Copyright Act amendments.

You've already heard from others about the research that quantifies the piracy problem. While measurements of different aspects may vary, the one constant is that piracy causes loss to legitimate businesses and is a threat to the Canadians whose livelihoods depend upon a healthy film and television industry.

We propose two primary amendments.

First, allow rights holders to obtain injunctive relief against online intermediary service providers. Internet intermediaries that facilitate access to illegal content are best placed to reduce the harm caused by online piracy.

This principle has been long recognized throughout Europe, where article 8.3 of the EU copyright directive has provided the foundation for copyright owners to obtain injunctive relief against intermediaries whose services are used by third parties to infringe copyright. Building upon precedents that already exist in Canada in the physical world, the act should be amended to expressly allow copyright owners to obtain injunctions, including site-blocking and de-indexing orders, against intermediaries whose services are used to infringe copyright.

This recommendation is supported by an overwhelming consensus on the need for site-blocking from the broadest range of Canadian stakeholders—French and English, and, notably, even ISPs themselves. Moreover, there is now more than a decade of experience in over 40 countries around the world that demonstrates site-blocking is a significant, proven, and effective tool to reduce online piracy.

Second, narrow the scope of the safe harbour provisions. The Copyright Act contains safe harbour provisions that shield intermediary service providers from liability, even when those intermediaries knowingly have their systems used for infringing purposes.

In every other sector of the economy, the public rightfully expects companies to behave responsibly and to undertake reasonable efforts to prevent foreseeable harms associated with their products and services. For two decades, the Internet has lived under a different set of rules and expectations, stemming largely from immunities and safe harbours put in place when the Internet was in its infancy and looked nothing like it does today.

The act should therefore be amended in a manner consistent with the European Union to ensure that safe harbours only apply where the service provider is acting in a passive or neutral manner, and that overly broad exceptions do not shield intermediaries when they have knowledge that their systems are being used for infringing purposes but take no steps to stop it. While there is no single solution to piracy, there is a new public dialogue about restoring accountability on the Internet, and in Canada there is a need for modern, common-sense policy solutions in line with proven international best practices.

We are grateful for the work of the committee in your consideration of these important issues and would be pleased to address your questions.

(1625)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Maureen Parker from the Writers Guild of Canada. You have five minutes.

Ms. Maureen Parker (Executive Director, Writers Guild of Canada):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair, vice-chairs, and members of the committee.

My name is Maureen Parker, and I am the Executive Director of the Writers Guild of Canada. With me today is my colleague Neal McDougall, the WGC's Director of Policy. We would like to thank the committee for the invitation to appear today.

The Writers Guild of Canada is the national association representing over 2,200 professional screenwriters working in English language film, television, animation, radio, and digital media production. These WGC members are the creative force behind Canada's successful TV shows, movies, and web series.

Every powerful show, movie, or web series requires an equally powerful script, and every powerful script requires a skilful and talented screenwriter. They start with a blank page and end up creating an entire world. WGC members Mark Ellis and Stephanie Morgenstern developed an idea about a police squad sniper into a prime time TV hit called Flashpoint. They started with a concept and created an entire world. That's what authors do.

Our request today is for a simple clarification in the Copyright Act. We ask that the act be amended to clarify that screenwriters and directors are jointly the authors of the cinematographic work.

Authorship is a central concept in the Canadian Copyright Act. The act acknowledges that authors generally create copyrightable works and states the general rule that the author of a work shall be the first owner of the copyright therein. The authors of the cinematographic works are jointly the screenwriter and director. Screenwriters and directors are the individuals who exercise the skill and judgment that result in the expression of cinematographic works in material form. They start with the blank page or screen, respectively, and a world of possibilities from which they make countless creative choices. Screenwriters create a world, choose the specific place and time in that world to begin and end the story, set the mood and themes, create characters with histories and personalities, write dialogue, and map out the plot. Directors direct actors, choose shots and camera positions, and make choices that determine tone, style, rhythm, and meaning as rendered in a film or television production.

Producers are not authors. Producers are the people with the financial and administrative responsibility for a production, but while raising financing and arranging for distribution are important aspects of filmmaking, it is not creative in the artistic sense and it is not authorship. Moreover, copyright protects the expression of ideas, not the ideas themselves, so while producers may on occasion provide screenwriters and directors with ideas and concepts, it is screenwriters and directors who in turn express these ideas and concepts in a copyrightable form.

A Canadian court has already determined that the joint screenwriter and director were the authors of a film. The court held that the individual producer could not be considered to be the author of the film since the role was not creative. Other international jurisdictions already recognize screenwriters and directors as authors of audiovisual works. The U.S. is the primary anomaly, something that is partly explained by their studio system, which is not the international or Canadian model. As such, our proposal does not change the law or the reality in Canada; it simply clarifies it. Why is this important?

For one thing, the act defines the term of copyright based on the life of the author. If the life of the author is uncertain, then the term of copyright is uncertain, and therefore, there can be uncertainty about whether a given work is still under copyright protection or is in the public domain.

Further, recognizing screenwriters and directors as joint authors provides support for creators and the role they play in the Canadian creative economy. It gives them a strong position in which to bargain and enter into contracts with others in the content value chain. Since this clarification would not alter the legal reality in Canada, it poses no threat to existing business models.

Producers and others seeking to engage creators for their work would simply contract for the rights in that work, the same as they always have. Nobody argues that novelists are not the authors of their novels or composers are not the authors of their music, and certainly no one argues that publishers somehow can't sell books or recording companies can't sell music because these authors are the first owners of their works. Indeed, nobody argues that screenwriters aren't the authors of their screenplays, and producers already contract for the rights to adapt those screenplays into a production as a matter of course. This is not a disturbance of the business status quo; it is the business status quo.

(1630)



Finally, in this fast-changing environment, in which disruption is the rule and not the exception, clarifying screenwriters' and directors' positions as authors offers the potential for further tools, such as equitable remuneration as is available in other jurisdictions like Europe, if and when that policy option needs to be considered.

Thank you for your time. We look forward to any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to the Society for Reproduction Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers.[Translation]

Mr. Lauzon, you have five minutes.

Mr. Alain Lauzon (General Manager, Society for Reproduction Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers in Canada):

We are before you today on behalf of SODRAC, a collective rights organization that manages its members' reproduction rights and copyrights. Our members are creators of artistic works: authors, composers and music publishers. We make it easier for users to use our repertoire of works on all streaming platforms, in order to fairly compensate our members for their work.

Our main recommendation to the committee is to introduce the droit de suite in Canada for creators of visual arts and crafts. However, we are speaking to you today on behalf of our members who are authors, composers and music publishers. As such, we are representing their songs and audiovisual works.

Users need two rights to use music: the right to the work and the right to the sound recording. We represent the right to reproduce the work.

Our organization has been managing collective rights for more than 33 years. We issue transactional licences and blanket licences to users doing business in Canada, or with Canadian consumers. We collect royalties from these licences, and we redistribute them, as soon as possible, to our members and to collective rights organizations outside Canada.

SODRAC is a member of BIEM and CISAC. The latter is the world's largest network of authors' and composers' societies.

We firmly believe that the Copyright Act should allow all rights holders to monitor the economic life of their works, no matter how they are used, and to benefit from the potential economic gains that ensue from the use of their work. We are against contracting practices that require paying lump sums, because they undermine the notion of property and dispossess creators, which goes against the fundamental principles of copyright.

In parallel with your review of the act, we participated in a consultation related to the Copyright Board of Canada. Today, we wish to testify on the essential role the board plays.

SODRAC is a member of CPCC. As such, we support its recommendations to have a technologically neutral private copying system and an interim compensatory fund in the meantime. We are also in favour of including audiovisual and artistic works in the private copying system.

That brings us to the more specific points we would like to submit to you. On that note, I'll give the floor to Mr. Lavallée.

Mr. Martin Lavallée (Director, Licensing and Legal Affairs, Society for Reproduction Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers in Canada):

We would like to go into further detail on five points.

The first point is the exceptions for reproduction rights in the act in general.

Starting from the exceptions for reproducing backup copies, ephemeral copies and technological copies, we maintain that many exceptions in the Copyright Act simply do not comply with the three-step test of the Berne Convention. For reasons of convenience, and to save time, we will simply refer you to the brief of the Coalition for Culture and Media, which was presented to you in Montreal on May 8, 2018, and which we support.

The second point is the copyright term.

SODRAC recommends extending the term of protection to 70 years after the death of the creators. Most of Canada's major trading partners already recognize this term, which has become the norm in the following countries, listed alphabetically as examples: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, France, Israel, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Russia, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States.

The third point is accountability and the value gap, which we talked about earlier.

On one hand, the act allows users to use the works as part of the content they generate, and, on the other hand, the network services are exempt from all responsibility. But people who use digital streaming platforms that chiefly provide this type of content and that market it should not be able to argue the defence stated in section 31.1 of the act.

Rather, we believe that introducing a mandatory licence agreement between the digital streaming platforms and a group of rights holders would be significantly more efficient than forcing those rights holders to make claims with each individual who uploads protected works on the Internet.

The fourth point concerns binding arbitration.

When the Copyright Board of Canada, an administrative tribunal accessible to collectives, renders an arbitration decision, that decision is usually deemed to be binding. However, the Supreme Court recently ruled that licences issued by the board should not be considered as necessarily binding for users. If the intent of Parliament were to implement a procedure to provide royalties for individual cases, its intent was certainly not to allow parties to retain the right to exempt themselves from decisions they do not like. Therefore, an amendment to section 70.4 of the act is required.

The last point concerns foreign servers.

The territorial nature of the interpretation of the act comes up against a reality that knows no borders. Therefore, SODRAC is proposing, much like with communication rights, that Canadian reproduction rights holders have the right, beyond any doubt, to royalties when online services serving Canadians are provided with servers located outside Canada.

The Parliament of Canada has the power to pass extraterritorial legislation. For example, if most of an online target audience is located in Canada, the link could be that final user.

In closing, I would like to mention that SODRAC will submit a brief soon that will list and propose simple amendments to certain sections of the Copyright Act, in order to correct the problems we have raised in our presentation today.

(1635)

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

How do we bring users, who, increasingly, are from outside Canada, to the negotiating table, if the right we're defending isn't clear and has been weakened by a plethora of exceptions in terms of users' rights? How can we think that authors alone can negotiate the conditions of use for their works? This situation creates an imbalance that is detrimental to the cultural economy, and makes the system a matter of law, instead of providing a free, level playing field for negotiations.

At the end of its study, your committee should ideally provide Parliament with proposed amendments to the act that take into account the solutions presented today.

Thank you for your attention. It will be our pleasure to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Finally we’re going to move to the Canadian Media Producers Association with Erin Finlay, as well as Stephen Stohn. You have up to five minutes please.

Ms. Erin Finlay (Chief Legal Officer, Canadian Media Producers Association):

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, my name is Erin Finlay. I'm the Chief Legal Officer of the Canadian Media Producers Association. With me today is Stephen Stohn, President of SkyStone Media and Executive Producer of the hit television series Degrassi: Next Class—and all previous versions of that great hit show.

The CMPA represents hundreds of Canadian independent producers engaged in the development, production, and distribution of English-language content made for television, cinema, and digital media. Our goal is to ensure the continued success of the domestic independent production sector and a future for content that is made by Canadians for both Canadian and international audiences.

Do you have a favourite Canadian TV show like Degrassi? Chances are one of our members produced it. What about those Canadian films that are getting all the hype on the festival circuit? Again, it's more than likely you're hearing about our members' work.

In addition to Degrassi, which Stephen will talk about shortly, some recent examples of work by CMPA members include the Academy Award nominated feature film The Breadwinner; the adaptation of Margaret Atwood's Alias Grace on Netflix and CBC; Letterkenny, an homage to small-town life that began as a series of YouTube shorts, garnering more than 15 million views and becoming the first original series commissioned by Bell's CraveTV; and Murdoch Mysteries, one of Canada's most successful and longest-running dramas, averaging 1.3 million viewers per episode.

Canadian film and television is an $8-billion industry. Last year, $3.3 billion in independent film and television production volume in Canada generated work for 67,800 full-time equivalent jobs across all regions of the country and contributed $4.7 billion to the national GDP. The Canadians who work in these high-value jobs make the programs that provide audiences with a Canadian perspective on our country, our world, and our place in it.

The CMPA would like to briefly touch on two issues with the current Copyright Act that are negatively impacting independent producers and their ability to commercialize the great content that they create.

First, piracy remains a significant problem in this country. The current tools available under the Copyright Act are ineffective against large-scale commercial piracy. We ask that the Copyright Act be amended to expressly allow rights holders to obtain injunctive relief against intermediaries, including by site-blocking and de-indexing orders.

Second, contrary to what you just heard from Maureen, the producer must be recognized as the author of the cinematographic or audio visual work. A producer's copyright is the foundation for all private and public funding sources for film and television projects in this country. It is this economic value that banks lend against, and what broadcasters and exhibitors license to bring a project to audiences. Put simply, authorship and ownership of copyright in the cinematographic work is what allows the producer to commercialize the intellectual property in a film or television show.

I'll turn it over to Stephen.

(1640)

Mr. Stephen Stohn (President, SkyStone Media, Canadian Media Producers Association):

Television and filmmaking are a collaborative endeavour. The producers bring together all the creative elements to move a project from concept to screen.

We producers hire and work closely with all the creative work. We love our screenwriters. Over the years we've hired dozens of them to work on Degrassi. We also love our directors who help turn the scripts into projects, and we've worked with dozens of them over the years. Also crucial to the production is the actors. We work with hundreds of them, the most famous of whom is undoubtedly Drake, but people like Nina Dobrev, Shenae Grimes, and Jake Epstein, and as I say, hundreds of others. They're vital to the final product, as are the production designers, the art designers, the lighting directors, the composers and musicians, the editors, the crews, and the gaffers. They're all vital to helping shape the project and bring our collective vision to the screen. After all, television programs and feature films are the ultimate collective works.

To date we've produced 525 episodes in the various Degrassi franchises. When we start producing episode number 526, we'll hire a director and a team of screenwriters to work on that episode. To suggest that this director or those writers, who worked on one episode of Degrassi long after the characters, the settings, the format, the scenes, the plot, the storylines, and the theme music have all been put in place, ought to be considered the authors of that episode is simply wrong, and it doesn't work commercially. However talented they may be, they are working off a foundation and creating a product that was built up over the years. In addition, they're working together with a whole series of other incredibly talented crew, actors, and cast to make that project come true.

As producers, we pull together those people. We hire them. We pull together all sorts of partners to invest in our projects. We develop them, we manage the production, and we ultimately work to protect, manage, and then commercialize the copyright in our shows.

To reinforce what Wendy and Erin have said, strong enforcement tools help to ensure that we retain the value in our intellectual property. Degrassi is nearly in its 40th year. It's available in 237 countries and 17 languages around the world. It amazes me that on a Friday night just past midnight someone pushes a button or clicks a mouse somewhere in cyberspace and suddenly the entire season is available in 17 languages throughout the world, except in four countries: Syria, North Korea, China—which they're working on—and one other that I forget. This is amazing to me. It's a real success story.

Despite this availability there are over 1,300 torrents and 3,000 illegal links to Degrassi on popular BitTorrent and linking sites just in Canada, each of which can be used to illegally access our content thousands and thousands of times. On one such site, Degrassi has been viewed 50,000 times. I'm not an accountant, so I won't estimate the number at 50,000 times 1,300 or 50,000 times 3,000 or both. Whatever it is, it's an unfathomably large amount of piracy. It's undeniable that piracy remains a serious problem in this country that negatively impacts our ability to grow Canada's production sector to its full capacity.

Copyright owners need effective enforcement tools to plug pipes to illegal content, to prevent free-riding off the backs of creators, and to retain the value in our intellectual property so that we can continue to build off and reinvest in our great Canadian shows.

Finally, the protection, retention, and commercialization of copyright by Canadians is a key part of the government's innovation strategy. To fulfill our key creative and business roles, independent producers need a modernized Copyright Act that provides for strong copyright protections, and an efficient marketplace framework that supports ongoing investment in Canada's innovative creative products. A modernized act will ensure that all our partners in the industry can continue to make great shows that are distributed across multiple platforms for the enjoyment of Canadians and audiences around the world.

(1645)



Thank you for the opportunity to discuss these issues with the committee. We'd be pleased to answer any questions you might have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

One would probably be Drake's phone number, I suspect. However, we're going to go right to Mr. Sheehan.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

I'm not going to ask that question, but I know it will come.

Thanks a lot for that great testimony. We've been listening to great testimony here in Ottawa, and we've travelled across the country. We're hearing quite a bit and we're trying to figure out exactly how creators use copyright to negotiate a better deal for themselves. We've seen revenues for the overall industry going up, but they're saying that in many cases the amount of money the individual creator is making is going down—I could go into the stats but I won't—so maybe you just want to give a comment on that.

The other issue is piracy, and I agree it's a problem. It was an extreme problem, I think, a few years back. I can remember when we had the peer-to-peer sharing networks that were rampant. Now, with the advent of Spotify and Netflix, how have those changed the industry? We've heard testimony that some people aren't quite as satisfied with Spotify as a way to compensate, probably because of the licensing agreements, as opposed to Netflix, on which we've heard some fairly positive feedback.

Maybe I'll start with Stephen, and then maybe someone else can—

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

I certainly am positive about Netflix because that's where Degrassi is broadcast now. Spotify, yes, has two methods of streaming, one of which incurs the value gap that has been talked about before.

I do want to say, though, that we have had some progress, and I think you've put your finger right on it. In the early days of peer-to-peer sharing, a lot of content was simply not available. That led to people saying, “If I can't get it legally, I'll get it any way I can.” That problem has largely been solved with the Netflixes and the Spotifys and technology around the world, so things are better. But there still is a problem. There are some relatively easy ways—I think Wendy has talked about them, and Erin may want to talk about some more—to really reinforce the value in the copyright by protecting against piracy. I think that's what you were driving at in your question when you asked what could be done so that the individual creators would get more.

I'll just quickly say how piracy hurts Degrassi. When there's piracy, Netflix has fewer people watching Degrassi because there are a lot of people who view it illegally. That means they make less money. That means that when it comes time to renegotiate the licence fee, they don't give us as much as we could be receiving. When I say “we”, it's not just the producers. It's everyone in the value chain who we represent, because it all trickles down. It's a wonderful export opportunity, and strengthening the copyright and entering these provisions that have been talked about will really help to do that.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Sure.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

May I address your first point about how we can strengthen the creative structure?

Mr. Terry Sheehan: Yes.

Ms. Maureen Parker: We are the creators. Screenwriters and directors are the creators. With all due respect, this represents a long-standing difference of opinion between the CMPA and us, but producers are not the creators. A creator is the person who starts with the blank page at home, in their office, maybe in their pyjamas, with a coffee. The point is that they are the creator of the cinematic graphic work.

It's very true what you just said about our income declining. It absolutely is. I think it's very important for the committee to differentiate between service production, which is what Wendy represents, and Canadian content production, like Degrassi and what my members work on. In service production, those scripts are written by Americans in the United States. Canadian content production is written by Canadians, who are authors of the audiovisual work. Rules for content creation in the U.S. are different from the rules in Canada and Europe. In Canada, we have failed to address the issue of who the author of the work is. We have because it just hasn't been addressed. There's no consensus. There will never be consensus on who the author of the audiovisual work is. You'll have to make a decision. The right decision is the person who actually does the creation, not who may.... By the way, screenwriters are now also showrunners, and they hire directors and actors. The model Stephen is referring to is a very old model. It's not currently what exists.

I just encourage you that there are individuals who are creating, and they're hurting, and you need to address authorship.

Thank you.

(1650)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We're going to move on because we are tight for time.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have five minutes. I'm sure everybody is going to have a chance to jump in.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Wonderful. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to everybody for being here in this tight room we have today.

Mr. Stohn, many members of this committee have been insistent on Drake's attendance here, so I feel I'm speaking on their behalf. Anything you can do to help out would be great.

You are welcome, everybody, for that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

That's leadership right there.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

That's right.

I want to ask about some of the comments that were raised by both Erin and you with regard to piracy. You mentioned large-scale commercial piracy. I'm curious as to what exactly that means. Is that YouTube and others, or is that something else that we're not aware of?

Ms. Erin Finlay:

Yes, I referenced commercial piracy. We're talking about pirate sites, the sites that are wilfully engaged in making money from selling pirated content through various means. That's really the target of the discussion.

YouTube has various business models, but I don't think we're talking about YouTube anymore, because the content that's been put up on YouTube has largely been commercialized. For the most part, some revenues are flowing back to creators and producers on YouTube.

There is a question of whether it's enough money. I know the value gap is real, and we've heard a lot about the value gap between YouTube and other services. The targets of our biggest concerns about pirate sites, though, are the kinds of blatant pirate sites that are commercializing infringement.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Sorry, do you mind going into just a bit more detail on what websites these are?

Ms. Erin Finlay:

The Pirate Bay is the best example. It's an older example, but that's a prime example. I know you've heard of a few others over the last few weeks.

The Pirate Bay, as far as I know, has been largely shut down, but Wendy certainly has the stats on all of those for you.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Maybe I'll knit together some of the comments from your friend as well.

Our position is that really, we try to do three things.

First is to give consumers the access they want, when they want, in the business model they want. You might want a subscription model, you might want to download, and so on. We want to get our content to consumers.

Second, we want to help consumers understand the impact of piracy. That's the impact Stephen has so articulately described to you, but it's also the impact on consumers. Various research has been done. One in three piracy sites contains malware. We've done research on sites that Canadians access. The vast majority of these have high-risk advertisements, scams, porn, and links to sites where your privacy can be compromised. That's what we try to do to ensure that consumers are aware as well.

The third part is to address those sites and services that, as Erin said, operate on a commercial scale.

If we think of it as a pie chart, right now in Canada, or at the end of 2017, 70% of the people who were accessing pirate sites in Canada were doing so through hosting and linking sites. Only 30% of that, at the end of 2017, was P2P, peer to peer, so you can see there has been a change and a shift in the piracy models Canadians are using.

Secondly, one of the largest growing threats is Kodi boxes that have illegal access to IPTV sites and illegal IPTV streams, or illegal hosting and linking sites on the Internet.

Again, we're seeing different kinds of piracy threats, and that's part of the reason we need different tools.

The Departments of Canadian Heritage and Industry, or ISED—sorry, I'm showing my age by calling it Industry—just commissioned a study and found that 26% of Canadians either accessed an illegal stream, downloaded, or somehow looked at or used pirate sites. The majority of those—36%—were movies, and 34% of those were television shows.

(1655)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Is that research public? Can we get some of that research?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Do you mean the departments' research? Absolutely.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

No, not the department's research, the initial research that you mentioned.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Yes. We have a little fact sheet we use about piracy and I'm happy to share that with the committee.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Again, also, not that we need to go into it here but it gives you the three most popular P2P, three most popular hosting, and three most popular linking sites that Canadians use.

The Chair:

Thank you, and if you can forward that to the committee it would be wonderful.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Absolutely.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Mr. Nantel, you have five minutes.

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP):

Thank you.

My first question is for you, Ms. Rioux.

I would like to return to one thing in your presentation.[English]

You talked about hosting services exception to protect against value gap.[Translation]

Can you explain what that means? Your wording is a little confusing to me. [English]

Ms. Caroline Rioux:

Because of the limitation of time I didn't actually orally address that matter. In our written submission you'll be able to read a little bit more about it. When we defined the value gap, our experience in that has been that there are certain platforms that qualify, or self-qualify, themselves as benefiting from the hosting exception, where we don't believe that they would qualify under the exception because we don't think that they're merely a dumb pipe.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Could you name a brand, or a company?

Ms. Caroline Rioux:

I would rather not name names because we do enter into negotiations over time with some of these types of services. Generally we're talking about user-generated content types of services, but what happens is that our negotiations become much more difficult to try to secure some favourable rates for our rights holders because these services will take the position that they're not really convinced that they really have to pay us any royalties, and that they really do feel that they qualify under the hosting exception.

What we would like to see in the Copyright Act is a change to clarify that the hosting exception does not apply to services that are content providers, effectively, and that offer music in terms of suggesting or optimizing the choice that consumers can see and play an active role in that process. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you.

Ms. Parker and Ms. Finlay, you have correctly defined the need to protect Canadian content. Clearly, Ms. Noss is not arguing the same point. That said, everyone agrees that we must protect productions, whether they are Canadian or American. By the way, American productions also create jobs here, that's quite obvious. All three of you are seeking to obtain greater protection vis-à-vis Internet service providers. The notice and notice regime seems much too burdensome to you. You would probably prefer that Internet service providers become more accountable, and even that we implement a notice and takedown system.

Have I correctly assessed your wishes, Ms. Noss, Ms. Parker and Ms. Finlay? [English]

Ms. Erin Finlay:

I can speak to that briefly. We're not saying notice and notice is too onerous. I think that's the ISPs' position on the notice and notice regime. We would say it is useful as an education piece to users, consumers, who aren't aware that they are infringing content, so the notice and notice regime should remain in place. We're not seeking a notice and take down regime. I think around the table and the consistent testimony you've heard is that the notice and take down regime is not very effective. I think that's what our friends in the U.S. would say.

What we are seeking is the ability to seek de-indexing and site-blocking orders with respect to ISP search engines and hosting services.

(1700)

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Yes, I would agree. Notice and notice was something the ISPs had asked for during the last round of reform. It is an educational tool and it is designed only for people who are using P2P sites. As you can see, that's a small component now of the piracy problem, and in addition, simply sending somebody a notice and then saying if they don't stop it you'll send them another notice is not the most effective tool. However, again, it is a tool that the government gave us and we did use to try to educate people about privacy risk of their computers and the impact on the Canadian marketplace.

I think the French implementation of 8.3—and je suis désolée, I'll say it in English—is really a simple but effective way of articulating it, which is giving the right to order any measure to prevent or to put an end to such an infringement of a copyright, or a related right, against any person who can contribute to remedying the situation, and that's what these intermediaries can do. They can contribute to remedying the situation.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Especially with the “destination” concept, meaning that where the person is located, that's where the rules and laws should apply. Am I right?

Can I ask all of you about the Copyright Board...? Am I done?

Sorry about that. If there is any comment on the Copyright Board review, please send it forward because I think we're working on two pieces and they have to fit. I'm afraid that the government is going to come up with a very nice surprise with the Copyright Board: “Oh, this is how we do it.” Then we'll see where we are sitting with this law and this Copyright Board.

Thank you, Mr. Ruimy.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I don't think that's the way we work here in this committee, but thank you very much.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

It's so casual.

The Chair:

We're going to move on to Mr. Graham.

You have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Ms. Noss, what's the relationship between the MPAC and MPAA?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

We represent the MPAA companies here in Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Basically the MPAC and MPAA are the same organization.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What is the MPAA's and the MPAC's position on net neutrality?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

On the net neutrality position, I think Minister Bains said it well. It is only dealing with legal content. It has nothing to do with illegal content. From our perspective, the position that we're taking in terms of seeking new tools to fight piracy has nothing to do with net neutrality.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Who operates as the judge, jury, and executioner in your case? If you're saying that there's a site that you allege is a copyright infringer and you have that site taken down, what authority is saying that you are correct?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

These are to give you the relief in the act to seek injunctions from a court, so the court determines.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You need a court order for each and every take down and removal of a link.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

No, we're not talking about notice and take down. We're talking about—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're talking about delisting. It's effectively the same thing on the Internet.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

We're talking about injunctions against intermediaries and those are obtained from a court. What we're seeking in the legislation is the same thing that they have throughout Europe. It is the French implementation I just read to you, which is the ability to get injunctions against third parties that are in a position to reduce piracy. It's not saying that these third parties, be it the ISP, which is providing connectivity, or the search engine, have liability. It's saying, “You're in a position to help reduce piracy.” We would go to a court, apply for an injunction, and the court would determine the scope of the injunction.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A number of years ago, the MPAA and RIAA, the recording industry association, went after individuals who were using P2P sites and suing the pants off these poor families. How did that go, what happened, and does that still happen?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

I'm not sure where you're getting that information, but that's not a position of our company. As I indicated in my statement and reinforced there, and as you heard from Erin, we're looking to address commercial-scale piracy by people who enable infringement in a way that hurts Canadian jobs, Canadian businesses, and the full scope of the creative process.

(1705)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I could discuss this for quite a while, but I have more questions to offer others.

You mentioned that you have a lot of content by a lot of creators in Canada. That's very useful information to know. I used this example a couple of times in the House and committee. One of my favourite TV shows is called Mayday, made here in Canada. It's available in 144 countries, and it is effectively impossible to get in this country. Can you tell me why? It's a great show if you have a Bell account, but if you don't have a Bell account, you can't get it. It's simply not legal. There's no way to do it.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

I'm sure the producers and creators of Mayday would be thrilled if it were available everywhere, every place that's possible. I can't speak to what the exact example is there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's interesting because you can buy it in Europe and have it shipped to Canada, but then you end up with another problem, which is region-encoded DVDs. If I buy a DVD overseas, it won't work in North American DVD players. If I buy a DVD here, it won't work in a European DVD player. Is that in any way ethical? I ask that openly.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

Is it ethical that you can't...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it ethical to buy something that is deliberately blocked from working based on where you are?

Ms. Erin Finlay:

Is it ethical to buy something...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: To sell something....

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

If I can say, and I don't want to overstep my bounds here. There are different numbers of scan rates and line rates in European television sets—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It has nothing to do with that. It's encoding.

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

Yes, which require different encoding for DVDs in the zone 2 regions from the zone 1 regions, is my understanding.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not about standards.

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

Clearly, I think all of us would say that we would love one single standard. That would be the ideal.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not a standards issue. It's a cryptographic issue.

There are eight different codes. You put it on a different code for this region. If it's NTSC or PAL, which are just two standards—not eight standards—algorithmically, they can be converted very easily. There's no technical reason to do that. It is a pure copyright TPM protection system. If I sold a bottle of water, for example, and said that you could drink it only in Europe and not in America, would that be ethical?

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

It doesn't make any commercial sense to me. I would think that people would be quite happy to sell in either territory and have a single standard.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That sounds wonderful, but it's not actually the case.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

I think we have to be realistic about how rights are managed around the world. Certain buyers and distributors acquire rights for certain territories. That's the way it currently works. Again, every producer and every creator would be happy to have their content available all around the world provided they're able to negotiate that.

As to your question about whether it's ethical or not, I think where you got to was whether it's an infringement of copyright and the breaking of the TPM. I think that's perhaps what we're talking about.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I had more time, we could get into it more.

The Chair:

Unfortunately, you don't.

Thank you very much.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

We'll do it in our written submission.

The Chair:

Mr. Lloyd, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. My first question will be between Ms. Noss and Ms. Finlay.

In regard to piracy, it's been several years since I've seen commercials on television about piracy, about how downloading a movie or recording a movie in a theatre is theft. If this committee were to recommend that the government engage with further activity on the piracy front, what areas would you suggest we focus on?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

As I said, we're seeking new tools and are certainly happy to provide any further information to this committee in terms of the legislative tools that we think are important.

We also think that educating the public is important. As I said, we consider that part of what we'd like to do in terms of helping to reduce the problem, so certainly anything the government could do to participate in that.... I know that the U.K. government, for example, has put a great deal of time and money into trying to educate the public there about the importance of—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Do you know how much that campaign cost the U.K. government?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

I don't offhand, but I'd be happy to provide you with.... There is an online link. It's called “Get It Right from a Genuine Site” or something like that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Do you know if there was an industry partner in that project financially, or was it purely the government?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

There are a bunch of different ones. Again, I'm using that as an example, but what I'm happy to do is to provide you with a couple of different examples of education campaigns that have been undertaken by the public authorities. The U.K. IP office has another of their own. Again, we think that's an important piece, particularly because the risks to the privacy of consumers are so great.

Legislative tools are really key. I think one instructive example would be the camcording problem you referenced. It was not that many years ago that there was a problem with illegal camcording in Canada. The laws weren't clear, and you had a lot of people who said, “Don't do anything.” They said there was no proof that it was a real problem and no proof that piracy was having an impact on people in Canada. They said that making a law wasn't going to change anything and that people would still do it.

Guess what. In the committee of the whole, the Conservatives, the Liberals, the NDP, and the Bloc all supported legislation that provided a clear rule that when you camcord illegally in a movie theatre it is against the law, and there was an immediate and long-standing impact. Previously, Canadian camcorders were the illegal source of between 20% and 24% of movies that were still in the theatres. Two years subsequent to the enactment of that legislation in Canada, it's been less than 1% every year.

(1710)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. That's important information for our committee.

My next question is more for you, Ms. Finlay, or Mr. Stohn. In regard to the copyright provisions and whether the screenwriters or the producers are the creators, I hope you can give me as balanced an answer as possible on this. How do you think it would affect the business model if we were to recommend that screenwriters be treated more as creators and have further copyright protections under the act?

Ms. Erin Finlay:

Perhaps I'll start with the broader perspective, and then Stephen can talk about the business model specifically.

Here's something to keep in mind. The suggestion that recognizing the directors and screenwriters as authors or first owners of copyright wouldn't upend the market, I find troubling. These arrangements have been negotiated in collective agreements for years—decades—by very strong and effective unions like the one Maureen works for. All of the ownership and the assignments and the exclusive licences are covered by those collective agreements, including all of the royalty streams flowing back through to screenwriters, directors, actors, and everyone else.

I wanted to start from that sort of high-level perspective. Maybe Stephen can talk about how it would affect his business model.

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

Our financiers and our distributors want to deal with the copyright owner.

The producer is the one who has taken the initial economic risk. It was colourful, Maureen, what you said about going downstairs in your dressing gown and writing a script, but years before that, the producer had an idea, was hiring people to develop that, taking the economic risk, approaching a broadcaster or distributor to get some seed money to get them invested in the project, and carrying that through until there was an ultimate product that could be marketed.

That product can only be marketed by the copyright owner. Our biggest single market, of course, is the United States, and our American friends just don't understand any concept other than dealing with the copyright owner and the producer owning the copyright.

It is true that the screenwriters in Canada own the copyright in their screenplays. There's a certain logic to it. We may agree or disagree on that, but they have gone downstairs in their slippers and created that screenplay. However, the producer has worked over the years to turn that—and to work with hundreds of other people—into creating a product that is commercialized by the copyright owner. That's really what we drive at.

If for some reason it was decided that it was important to convey copyright ownership on someone who didn't do all that work, we'd have to somehow as an industry get around that by entering into contracts that convey the copyright to the producer. Otherwise, how is the producer going to commercialize the product in the end? It just doesn't make any sense.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

Can I address the end of that question, please?

The Chair:

We still have some time, but I need to get the questions moving.

Mr. Baylis, you have five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

I'll follow up on that and continue with that line of questioning.

If I'm writing a brand new screenplay, a new movie that doesn't exist, I get that there's a lot more of the copyright that would go to the director and the screenplay. We can use Mr. Stohn's example of Degrassi. The screenwriter of an episode will not develop the backstory. They won't develop the characters, the sets, or the setting. The people who develop those are as much part of the creative process, if not more so, that someone who just writes one episode. Would you agree or not?

(1715)

Ms. Maureen Parker:

I don't agree because it's actually an incorrect premise.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You don't agree. In your case, the person who came up with the backstory—

Ms. Maureen Parker:

That is a writer. That was not Mr. Stohn. That was created by a writer.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I get that, but that person who wrote one episode took all that work to write that one episode.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

That's right, and that writer therefore was the author of that episode. It is a collaborative business—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

But he wasn't the author alone. He used other characters. He used the names—

Ms. Maureen Parker:

Sure. We build on series in—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

No. You said that he started with a “blank” sheet of paper. He didn't. These are the names, this is the name of the school, this is the name of the teacher, this is their character, this is the type of words they would say, and this is the language they speak. That person was not in any way the sole creator.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

May I say that it's a very big business model? Right now, we do have screenwriters who are the ones who develop script material, who create characters, and who've created the setting. In an ongoing series like a Degrassi, yes, obviously there are pre-existing concepts and pre-existing settings, but those are created and worked with in an individual script. The dialogue is individual. The plot is individual. It is—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I understand that, but someone would own the characters, for example, and if it was—

Ms. Maureen Parker:

Right, and that would be the writer of the first script.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. You would then have to direct and cut a deal with the writer of the first script to write the story for Mr. Stohn...?

Ms. Maureen Parker:

There are character royalties. You'd pay certain royalties, etc. The problem with not defining authorship—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's stay with Degrassi as an example. There are 500 that have been written and, over the years, the 500 screenwriters who have written each episode have advanced the characters. Are those 500 going to have to be dealt with individually to be able to...?

Ms. Maureen Parker:

Television doesn't work that way. There were probably maybe 50 screenwriters, or maybe 30. Companies go back to the same writers. They use story departments.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's say there are 50 writers.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

Okay. To your point that there are multiples, absolutely, because there are multiple creators, but each episode is a copyrighted work in and of itself. When Mr. Stohn or a producer like him sells a series, he is selling a group of episodes that are individually copyrighted. When you talk about piracy, you're talking about each individual episode, which may be seen without any compensation.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I have one last question, then.

When you write the actual screenplay for any movie, the ownership and copyright of the screenplay itself remains with the writer. Is that correct?

Ms. Maureen Parker:

That's correct.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, you just want to expand it, so that it's more than that. You want to own more than just the screenplay.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

No, we're not expanding it. The current business model—and I cited that in my presentation—and in the only court case that has ever been heard on the topic, the screenwriter and director are the authors. It is the producers who are coming in from a different place.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I understand that.

We're tight on time, but thank you.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

Thank you.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Ms. Noss, I just have one question for you. You mentioned narrowing the definition of safe harbour. Can you expand on that, please?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

Sure. It's built on what we've seen in Europe that has been impactful. When the act was last amended, the piracy threats that existed at that time did not operate in the way that piracy threats of today operate.

This would take the best practices we've seen that have been working around the world, so that if an intermediary, such as an Internet service provider or a search engine, has knowledge that its services are being used to infringe copyright, that intermediary will no longer have the safe harbour. That provides an encouragement to all intermediaries in the system to act responsibly.

The issue today, where global piracy has an operator in one jurisdiction, a hosting site in a second jurisdiction, and a business model that's propped up by a payment processor or an ad network in a third jurisdiction, really has to be addressed in every country effectively. Again, I would point to tools that the government has instituted in the past that have been effective.

Last time, we asked for the enablement provision, so that those who enable infringement would be liable for infringement. What we saw is that with a global piracy problem like Popcorn Time, at the time, there was action in New Zealand and action in Canada based on the enablement provision, and that allowed you to effectively address the problem writ large.

(1720)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we're going to move on to Mr. Lake. You have five minutes.

Hon. Mike Lake (Edmonton—Wetaskiwin, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

This is a little bit of déjà vu for me. I spent eight years as the parliamentary secretary to the industry minister. It sounds as if we're having pretty much the same meeting that we would have had three or four years ago.

I want to thank you, Ms. Finlay, because any time a witness says, “contrary to what you just heard from” and then names another witness, that makes the meetings much more interesting.

Ms. Parker, in response to that, you talked about us as government, I guess, in a sense, failing to address the question regarding authorship. Is it really a matter of failing to address it, or is it fair to say that it has not been addressed the way your organization would like?

Ms. Maureen Parker:

Actually, it has not been addressed, period.

Right now, the way it works is that screenwriters and directors, in the only court case that has ever been brought forward, are considered authors of the audiovisual work. It's actually a problem for you and for copyright holders, because authorship is tied to the life of the author. If you don't define who the author is, whose life is it tied to?

We have heard from many entertainment lawyers. It's a very ambiguous area. Disney, for example, would certainly never let that happen. They would address the copyright term of a character. In Canada, that has not been addressed, so there is confusion. The author is an individual, and we totally appreciate that producers commercially exploit the production, and that is their job, to finance and distribute the production, but they do not create it. I think it's a real flaw in the system to not address authorship.

Hon. Mike Lake:

As members of Parliament, we often don't agree on things. What I found during the last round with copyright was that we do agree that we all want to see fantastic content created. We all want to enjoy that content. We want to see our creators properly compensated for the content they create. There is some difference in opinion among witnesses in terms of what that looks like.

As members of Parliament, oftentimes we find that the experts are the ones who follow these issues, but I'd like to try to point my constituents to some of the conversations. What would you say to the average Canadian who doesn't live in this world other than by being an enjoyer of the content? How would you explain to them how screenwriters, directors, and producers are compensated for the work they do right now? What is the logistical reality around that now?

I'll go to you, Ms. Parker.

Then if Ms. Finlay or Mr. Stohn want to answer that as well, I'd like to hear from each of you.

Ms. Maureen Parker:

I'll say just quickly that screenwriters do live in your communities. They're creators. They do pay taxes. They support families. They need revenue and income to do so.

Currently, there are different modes of compensation. Yes, we bargain collectively, but collective bargaining does not cover such things as secondary use. We're hearing a lot about piracy. That's a big business problem, absolutely, but at the core of our industry are individuals who create, and they are not properly compensated for all the secondary uses that are now coming into play through new technology.

In terms of what authorship grants, it's determining not just the life of the author but equitable remuneration and how that will play out. I believe my colleague spoke about that as well. That is another means for artists to be compensated. Again, that work allows individuals to become creators. It supports them and supports the telling of our stories.

Hon. Mike Lake:

Just to clarify, though, in this case I'm not looking for how we grow the pie, necessarily, with this question. I'm talking about how we divide the pie between the three entities we're talking about and what the current situation is right now.

Maybe I'll let Ms. Finlay or Mr. Stohn speak to that.

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

Perhaps I can jump in here.

It's really governed by some very good and effective collective bargaining. ACTRA, the Writers Guild, and the Directors Guild all have extensive meetings. I've been in some of those meetings. You do not want to be part of the extended meetings well into the night, going back and forth on exactly these issues—i.e., secondary use. They get resolved. We work together, hand in hand. You were talking about dividing the pie. That is really dealt with through the collective bargaining process, and I can't think of a better way to deal with it.

I do have an answer to your first question about the overall pie, but I won't go into it in great detail because it's not a copyright answer. We face a crisis in Canada with the influx of over-the-top services that are coming in not subject to Canadian content rules and not subject to CRTC regulation. That is a crisis in our industry that really will affect the pie itself.

(1725)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'll just let everybody know that we'll go a little bit past 5:30 p.m., probably to a maximum of 15 minutes, because I know that members still have questions they want to ask.

Mr. Longfield, you have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thank you.

It's a great conversation we're having. It's great to get diverse views. Thanks to all of you for preparing to get here and for getting us the information we need for this study.

Perhaps this is a question for Caroline. I want to focus on something that we haven't touched on too much in looking at the music industry. We've had advocacy on having the definition of “sound recording” looked at and on the soundtrack of a cinematic work being a sound recording. The argument we've heard is that making this amendment would allow performers and makers of sound recordings to receive compensation for the use of their performance and recordings in television and film productions beyond the initial fee they get, as a union rate, for creating the sound recording. Unless it's live, they don't get paid.

How did this develop? Why did we exclude soundtracks?

Then, maybe for everybody, what would the impact be on the industry if we compensated musicians for the sound they produce for movies?

Ms. Caroline Rioux:

I thank you for asking that, but I'm afraid I can't respond on this question. It's not the area I happen to work in. I think you've heard from other collectives on that matter in the past.

Some of my colleagues here might be able to advance an answer, but it's just not the area I'm in. I was trying to paint that quadrant earlier with my slide. That's the other quadrant or piece of the pie.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Those are different reproduction rights that we're talking about.

Ms. Caroline Rioux:

Yes, that's right.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay. Thank you.

Alain or anybody, can you help with that?

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

If I may, I'm totally in agreement with Caroline. As I mentioned in my speech, we're on the side of the works. We're not on the side of sound recordings. We don't know the details related to that.

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

Perhaps I could just leap in, because we do agree on something here. That is, generally speaking, producers agree with our friends at Music Canada and the sound recording industry that this would be an expansion of copyright and a potential source of remuneration, good remuneration, for those creators, the performers and record companies, in sound recording.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

How would that affect those late negotiations that you get involved with?

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

When the pie gets bigger, the negotiations get easier.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

It depends on which part of the pie you're looking at. The costs go up, because performers will be paid, so there won't be as much profit in the production, potentially.

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

From the producers' perspective, we're neutral on that. If the licensees of the broadcasters need to pay a small fraction of their revenues—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

Mr. Stephen Stohn:

We are generally supportive of stronger copyright, with our friends.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's good to hear, because we're trying to benefit the creators as much as we can as we look at this legislation.

When we look at blocking non-infringing uses.... We had a little bit of a discussion about CDs, but is there anything else in terms of locks on the Internet or something we need to look at in terms of the act, which isn't included in the act, that could protect against illegal streaming or illegal use of what's on the net?

(1730)

Ms. Erin Finlay:

We've touched on our main requests, but we'll certainly flesh that out in our written submissions, because it is quite detailed, and we'll give some suggestions as to what should happen there.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

It seems to me there is something technical there, and there is also some education, because when I'm streaming, I don't know whether I'm doing it in a way that the people who created the music or movie are getting paid for it. As a consumer, I have no idea.

Yes, Mr. Lauzon.

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

I remember back in 2012 when we wanted to have notice and take down and all that, but things evolve. You have to look in Canada at streaming. In 2014 Spotify came in, so it's kind of new in relation to that. The problem in the past was that, if there was no legal service available, people would go where they could find it, so they had obviously more services and all that. The problem is—and this was the first question that was asked on the value—in digital, the value is lowering, whether it's for sound recordings or for us, the works. That's one of the things the value gap is looking at.

Obviously, I think personally there are not enough studies that are followed. If I look at other countries, the U.K., France, etc., there are a lot of studies that have been done on piracy, following that, and so on.

A way to increase remuneration besides the legal licenses that we do for downloads and Spotify is to have a regime that compensates for reproductions that are done when people don't know if they are legal or illegal.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. [Translation]

Mr. Nantel, you have five minutes.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you very much.[English]

I see two big things, first the piracy thing. Stealing is stealing. How do we enforce this?

I know for many rights holders there's an impression that legislators like us tend to think this piracy thing is over, and then we start hearing about stream rippers. A regular person would think the easiest thing is to get a subscription to Apple Music, to Netflix, or whatever. Apparently not.

Let's put this aside, because we're talking about fair compensation. Would you say the “destination” concept in Europe is something that we should take into consideration?

Mr. Stohn, you talked about the Netflixes of this world that are acting like they are not behaving as broadcasters in this territory, where we pushed so much to create Canadian content, maybe The Beachcombers or your stuff. What example of best practices we should apply, according to you?

This is for Mr. Stohn or Mr. Lauzon—

Ms. Erin Finlay:

I'll hand it over to Wendy, but article 8.3 in the InfoSoc Directive out of the EU is the best example, and Wendy has already spoken about that, so that's what we're modelling our request after. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Mr. Lauzon, Mr. Lavallée, do you have anything to add on this topic?

A few weeks ago, the committee heard from David Bussières, from the Regroupement des artisans de la musique. He demonstrated that, even if Canada were equipped with a legal and policy framework to support content creators, and even if we mandated broadcast quotas for a variety of platforms to increase the discoverability of our culture, artists would still have a hard time making a living from their art. In the old days, some artists were able to live off their music, even if they did very few shows.

What do you think, Mr. Lauzon?

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

In Mr. Stohn's case, we are talking about audiovisual. I can come back to that. This is about audio. The value has definitely decreased. The 2012 amendments to the act have cost us an incredible amount of money in many areas. I'm thinking of commercial radio and digital, for example, which we talked about. When we used to sell albums on tangible media, we had figures. In the case of downloads, it's very low.

So there are a lot of changes. You were talking about quotas. That isn't what we're discussing here, but it's important. It's also about exemptions and value. In terms of value, it isn't normal that the rate for downloads and streaming is between 13% and 15% in Europe, while it is 7% in Canada. I don't blame the board, but there must be other ways of looking at the market.

When online music services began to be offered, other countries took Canada as a model. Indeed, the first rate we set was the highest in the world. However, it's now one of the lowest. Something's not working.

I would like to make a brief comment about audiovisual. I don't know much about screenwriters, but when it comes to people who commission music, I want to say that they don't have to give up all their rights to producers and broadcasters if they want to increase their remuneration. That is the current audiovisual business model.

Mr. Stohn talked about his negotiations with the United States. Indeed, that is how they work. However, this isn't the case in Europe. There, the creators give all the exploitation rights to the producers, but no copyright is given to the producers, whose role is to collect royalties.

I, for one, am a member of the International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers, and I know that Canada has one of the lowest per capita collections in the world. In Europe, everyone contributes to this, especially in the digital world. We're not just talking about Netflix and all the networks, but secondary uses.

According to the current audiovisual model, the creator is paid very little. Everything goes to the producer, who assumes a risk. I'm aware of that, but there is a nuance to be made. Let's say that digital brings us to think about this business model.

(1735)

[English]

The Chair:

Mr. Sheehan, you have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

I'll share some time with Frank as well.

I'm trying to understand the current system. We've heard testimony about other systems that perhaps would be better than the current system. Under the current system, a letter is sent and then the industry, which is fairly well resourced, hires lawyers and the lawyers then engage with them.

What obstacles are there right now, and what's your success rate under the current system? Perhaps answer on the success rate first and then on the obstacles.

I'll start with Erin.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

Thank you.

You're talking about suing infringing sites in Canada?

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Yes. I'm talking about piracy and going after the pirates.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

Piracy, specifically, I haven't done for many years. I've been fortunate enough not to be in private practice, so I can't speak to the success rate. I can tell you a bit about the process typically.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I just want to know about the obstacles. I know what the process is.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

One of the obstacles is that currently under our present system we would have to sue, for example, Google, to seek some sort of an injunction, a Mareva injunction or something like that. Google would then defend itself as any defendant would by saying it's not liable. The challenge with that is that instead of working together and coming up with a solution together, you end up having very opposed views because you're in a court case dealing with it.

The other issue is that there's always a debate over whether the injunction is actually available.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

You'd like the government to have Google under—

Ms. Erin Finlay:

I never should have said “Google”. It's a search engine.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

You want the government to enact some legislation to make it mandatory for the service providers to work with you.

Ms. Erin Finlay:

Not mandatory—and Wendy, absolutely you can jump in—but there are a number of options available. The problem is that we have a very long court process. There's a debate right at the beginning of the court process on whether these are even available to rights holders, so you wind up in a tussle over that. It takes years and years.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I'll let Wendy chip in. Is there any success that you know of? I need to understand this.

(1740)

Ms. Wendy Noss:

I think the difficulty is that we're conflating.... We're sort of talking at each other as opposed to having a common understanding. I think what you were getting at earlier was the notice and notice system.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Yes.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

That's what I thought. You can tell I'm used to translating Canadian into American for Americans. Under the notice and notice system, a notice goes to a user of a P2P site—an individual who's been accessing a BitTorrent site. The notices that we send, for example, really are educational devices. They tell the user, “Hey, you may not know that your network isn't secured” or “Hey, you may not know somebody else in your home is accessing this BitTorrent site”.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Wouldn't it be introduced in some sort of court proceeding that the letter was sent?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

No. Again, I can speak only for my members and our studios. These are educational tools that are going to the individuals who are accessing the BitTorrent sites. That's only for P2P, and it's only an educational tool. I think that's what your original question was.

Then, sort of at the back end, you were talking about success rate.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Yes, go ahead.

Ms. Wendy Noss:

The different tool that we're talking about today is being able to get injunctive relief, such as site-blocking, against intermediaries. The reason we're quite different from when we were before Mr. Lake before is that we now have close to a decade of experience in the EU and 40 countries around the world where they have site-blocking in place. The research has proven, first of all, that it has reduced users' accessing the site that's blocked. That's obvious, but the research has also shown two very important things. Number one, in those jurisdictions where you have site-blocking there is an uptick in users' accessing legal means more, so they are accessing all the legal over-the-top services and download services more. Number two is that there is a reduced overall usage of piracy.

There definitely is research in other jurisdictions where they have these tools that shows it's both technologically advanced and extremely effective.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much. I'm going to turn over some time, because those are excellent answers.

The Chair:

Make it very brief. [Translation]

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I have a question for Mr. Lavallée.

The fifth point addressed in your presentation was the location of servers. You mentioned servers that weren't located in Canada, but I didn't really understand what you meant. Could you explain the challenge this represents for you?

Mr. Martin Lavallée:

More specifically, we are talking here about reproduction rights. In the digital world, the value of the work is associated with the server where the copy was originally made. The Copyright Act is unclear in this regard. A person could succeed by arguing that because the reproduction was made in another country, Canadian law does not apply.

We should simply introduce a notion of technological neutrality into the Copyright Act. The current version of the act includes a section on copyright infringement at a later stage, when a copy of a work is produced. If, for example, books are printed elsewhere and imported into Canada, and the authorization was not originally given by the Canadian owner in the other country, that importation is considered copyright infringement. In this case, the word “copy” should simply be replaced by “digital copy”. Suppose a reproduction is placed on a server in a cloud, and the Canadian holder has not given permission at the outset. Since this service primarily serves Canadian consumers, the same recourse should be available. We should be able to argue that Canadian law applies, since the recipients are Canadians. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Noss, again you referenced piracy going down. Is that part of the report you're going to be forwarding to us?

Ms. Wendy Noss:

What I have for you today in French and English is about what we know about piracy. I would be happy to provide a compendium of some of the research that has come out of Europe and those other jurisdictions and provide that to the committee as well.

The Chair:

Excellent. The goal here is to get stuff on record. Once we have that, our wonderful analysts can do a fantastic job and guide us through this quagmire.

For the final five minutes, we go to Mr. Lake.

Hon. Mike Lake:

I'm sure your analysts will have no shortage of material to work through with this study.

Mr. Lauzon, you talked about the private copying regime. What specifically is your organization advocating for in that regard?

(1745)

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

SODRAC is a member of the private copying regime, and I think last week in front of you the people at the copyright regime, CPCC, came here and explained to you what we wanted related to that. Remember that in 1997 the law for the copyright regime was introduced in Canada.

Hon. Mike Lake:

Mr. Lauzon, I'll break in for a second. This is my first meeting as a member of this committee, so could you quickly tell me what that looks like from your side.

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

I'll go in French, okay?[Translation]

The private copying regime applies to reproductions that are made by consumers but that we cannot control.

In Canada, the private copying regime was introduced in 1997 and targeted physical media, DVDs and cassettes. Subsequently, some people argued that the private copying regime should be technologically neutral, that is, that it should now apply to copies made using telephones or tablets, but the court decided otherwise. Technological neutrality wasn't introduced into the act when it was modernized in 2012 either. All we are asking is that this regime be technologically neutral, so that it also applies to digital media.

Since the act won't be amended for some time, we ask that a compensation fund be created in the interim.

The private copying regime represented $40 million for rights holders. Today, DVD reproductions are down, so that this scheme now represents about $2 million. It is a place where we could truly compensate the loss of income of the rights holders. Over the past six or seven years, rights holders have lost $38 million a year. [English]

Hon. Mike Lake:

This is that $40 million a year that I was reading about from...?

Mr. Alain Lauzon: Yes.

Hon. Mike Lake: Okay.

In answer to an earlier question, you talked about compensating for things people do that they don't know whether they're right or wrong. Is that...?

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

No. In the CPCC brief that was filed on it, we were only talking about compensated copies that are legal. You have to understand, CMRRA and us, we have a joint venture called CSI. We issued licences for legal....

Hon. Mike Lake:

The $40 million is to compensate for illegal copying, right?

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

It's not illegal copies. It's for copies done by the consumer that we are not able to control. The source is not illegal. The source is legal.

Hon. Mike Lake:

If I buy a CD, let's say, at a flea market or something, and I make a copy on my computer, you're saying that I should have to pay an additional fee for that copy?

Mr. Alain Lauzon:

Absolutely. In the licence that we issue to iTunes, if you download a song, it will be covered by your licence, and it's not on the computer, it's on the mobiles and the iPads.

What we're looking for is say someone rips a copy or someone takes a copy on the net and downloads it, whether it's a legal source or not, it becomes a copy that is done for which we are not able to issue licences. That's the reason. There's a value related to that, and the private regime is something that is well recognized around all the countries. I can file a study that has been done with the private copying all around the world by CISAC, explaining exactly in each jurisdiction how the law is done, how it's evaluated, and the money that's earned by the copyright owners.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That's all she wrote, folks.

I'd like to thank everybody for coming in today. Again, it's very complex. It's not the easiest subject to talk about. There are lots of emotions. The point of this is to get as much as we can on the record. I would like to thank our witnesses for being here today.

For the rest of us, I have great news. We're going to sit during the summertime.

Some hon. members: Oh, no!

The Chair: I'm kidding.

I want to let you know that when we come back on September 17, we're going to get a summary from the analysts of what was presented so far on education, publishing, music, film, broadcasting, and TV. We're also going to get a critical analysis of data presented to the committee by the last 100-plus witnesses. We'll spend that first meeting just recapturing everything that we've done.

A voice: It's summer homework.

The Chair: We don't have the homework; they have the homework.

Thank you all very much. We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1610)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous à la réunion 124 du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, tandis que nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à notre nouveau membre, M. Mike Lake, ainsi qu'à M. Pierre Nantel.

Avant de commencer, monsieur Jeneroux, vous avez un bref avis de motion?

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Certainement, et je vous remercie monsieur le président. J'essaierai d'être le plus bref possible.

Nous ne présentons pas la motion aujourd'hui, simplement l'avis de motion, qui se lit ainsi: Étant donné que le ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique s’est explicitement vu confier, dans la lettre de mandat qu’il a reçue du premier ministre, de collaborer « étroitement avec le ministre du Commerce international afin d’aider les entreprises canadiennes à accroître leur compétitivité dans les marchés d’exportation » et que le Fonds monétaire international (FMI) s’est dit préoccupé par la capacité du Canada de composer avec les changements apportés au régime fiscal des États-Unis, que le Comité entreprenne une étude à laquelle il consacrera quatre réunions et au cours de laquelle il examinera, notamment : i) les répercussions de toute restriction au commerce imposée par les États-Unis sur les industries touchées; ii) les répercussions du régime fiscal canadien sur la capacité des entreprises canadiennes de rivaliser avec des entreprises étrangères présentes au Canada et à l’étranger; iii) le niveau de confiance des investisseurs du secteur privé au Canada.

Cela tombe également à point nommé aujourd'hui, monsieur le président, vu les commentaires formulés par le président des États-Unis. J'espère faire adopter cette motion ultérieurement.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous accusons réception de votre avis de motion, et nous allons poursuivre.

Nous avons très peu de temps aujourd'hui, mais nous accueillons certains témoins. Nous sommes en compagnie de Caroline Rioux, présidente de l'Agence canadienne des droits de reproduction musicaux. De l'Association cinématographique-Canada, nous accueillons Wendy Noss, qui, paraîtrait-il, est la présidente du Starship Enterprise. Nous avons Maureen Parker, directrice générale, de même que Neal McDougall, directeur de la politique de la Writers Guild of Canada. De la Société du droit de reproduction des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs au Canada, nous avons Alain Lauzon, directeur général, et Martin Lavallée, directeur, Licences et affaires juridiques. Enfin, nous sommes avec Erin Finlay, conseillère juridique principale de la Canadian Media Producers Association, et Stephen Stohn, président de SkyStone Media.

Nous allons commencer par Caroline Rioux.

Vous avez cinq minutes. Allez-y.

Mme Caroline Rioux (présidente, Agence canadienne des droits de reproduction musicaux Ltée):

Bonjour, je m'appelle Caroline Rioux. Je suis présidente de l'Agence canadienne des droits de reproduction musicaux, la CMRRA. Je remercie le Comité de me donner l'occasion de lui faire part de notre expérience et de formuler des recommandations de modifications de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. J'ai préparé quelques courtes diapositives pour vous aider à suivre mon exposé.

La CMRRA est un collectif qui accorde des droits de reproduction d'oeuvres musicales au nom de plus de 6 000 éditeurs de musique et compositeurs. Ensemble, ils représentent plus de 80 000 catalogues musicaux, lesquels représentent une grande majorité des chansons vendues, diffusées et transmises en continu au Canada. La CMRRA accorde des licences pour autoriser la copie de ces chansons à des maisons de disque qui diffusent des enregistrements sonores sur le marché, comme des disques compacts; à des services de musique en ligne, comme iTunes, Spotify et YouTube; et à des radiodiffuseurs et télédiffuseurs canadiens.

La reproduction d'oeuvres musicales peut être autorisée en fonction de tarifs homologués par la Commission du droit d'auteur ou par des ententes directes avec les utilisateurs. Selon ces licences, la CMRRA perçoit et distribue des redevances aux titulaires de droits après avoir attentivement comparé les données d'utilisation reçues de ces utilisateurs avec l'information sur la propriété du droit d'auteur qui figure dans sa base de données.

Je suis ici aujourd'hui pour vous parler de certaines exceptions à l'assujettissement au droit d'auteur qui ont été introduites en 2012. Compte tenu du peu de temps dont nous disposons, je vais décrire les répercussions de deux de ces exceptions uniquement. Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas assez de temps pour aborder le troisième élément de mon exposé initial, soit la neutralité technologique et l'incidence de la plus récente décision de la Commission du droit d'auteur à propos des taux applicables aux services de diffusion en continu. Ce problème va tout de même être abordé dans notre mémoire, car il est d'une importance cruciale pour nous.

En ce qui a trait aux copies de sauvegarde, une exception générale a été introduite en 2012 à cet égard. Ainsi, en 2016, la Commission du droit d'auteur a appliqué un vaste escompte général sur le taux établi, ce qui a fait diminuer de 23,31 % les redevances payables depuis 2012. En agissant ainsi, la Commission a en réalité privé les titulaires de droits d'environ 5,6 millions de dollars pour subventionner les stations de radio qui étaient déjà rentables. Nous croyons fermement que les titulaires de droits devraient être indemnisés pour ces précieuses copies. La CMRRA recommande que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur soit modifiée de sorte à préciser que l'exception relative aux copies de sauvegarde devrait se limiter aux copies réalisées à des fins non commerciales seulement, conformément aux autres exceptions prévues dans la loi, notamment à l'égard du contenu généré par l'utilisateur et de l'écoute en différé.

La deuxième exception concerne les enregistrements éphémères. Les stations de radio font des copies d'oeuvres musicales pour de nombreuses raisons. Les copies destinées à servir pour 30 jours tout au plus sont appelées des enregistrements éphémères. Jusqu'en 2012, l'exception relative aux enregistrements éphémères permettait de dissiper efficacement les préoccupations des titulaires de droits et des radiodiffuseurs. Les titulaires de droits voulaient, à juste titre, être rémunérés pour la reproduction de leurs oeuvres, tandis que les radiodiffuseurs voulaient alléger la lourde tâche que représente l'obtention de licences auprès des innombrables titulaires de droits. Fait essentiel, l'exception ne s'appliquait pas si le droit était autrement accessible à l'aide d'une licence collective.

À la suite d'une campagne de lobbying menée par les radiodiffuseurs, la clause d'exception collective a été abrogée en 2012, permettant une application très vaste de l'exception, mais seulement aux radiodiffuseurs. Par conséquent, la Commission du droit d'auteur a réduit les redevances payables d'une proportion pouvant aller jusqu'à 27,8 %, une perte allant jusqu'à 7 millions de dollars par année, pourvu que les radiodiffuseurs pouvaient prouver de quelque manière que ce soit qu'ils satisfaisaient aux conditions de l'exception. Ironiquement, le fait de prouver quelles reproductions pouvaient en fait bénéficier de l'exception ou d'apporter la preuve du contraire a imposé un important fardeau sur le plan de l'administration et de l'exécution de la loi aux titulaires de droits, ce qui a érodé encore davantage la valeur du droit.

Il n'existe aucune raison pour laquelle les radiodiffuseurs commerciaux ne devraient pas rémunérer les titulaires de droits alors qu'ils profitent eux-mêmes grandement des copies dont ils disposent. La CMRRA recommande que le paragraphe 30.9(6) soit réintroduit, et que l'on garde l'intention initiale. Qu'un groupe d'utilisateurs ou une technologie bénéficie d'une exception plutôt qu'un autre n'est pas neutre sur le plan technologique et représente un avantage injuste pour les radiodiffuseurs.

En conclusion, compte tenu des difficultés permanentes causées par les exceptions introduites en 2012, nous demandons au Parlement de s'abstenir d'introduire toute autre exception au droit d'auteur, et de plutôt se pencher sur le problème de l'érosion du droit d'auteur causé par les exceptions existantes. Les sources de revenus traditionnelles ont diminué, mais une Loi sur le droit d'auteur rigoureuse qui adhère au principe de neutralité technologique protège contre le rythme du changement.

Les exceptions énoncées dans ce mémoire compromettent ce principe, et par le fait même minent encore davantage la valeur de la musique et de la création. En plus de ces recommandations, la CMRRA vous demande d'améliorer l'efficience de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Nous reconnaissons que cet élément a déjà été jugé prioritaire, et nous sommes conscients que le ministre Bains a récemment fait l'annonce de la stratégie d'innovation.

(1615)



Nous vous demandons aussi d'assurer la neutralité technologique du régime de copie privée, de combler l'écart de valeur en modifiant l'exception relative aux services de stockage et d'étendre la durée du droit d'auteur sur les oeuvres musicales à la durée de la vie plus 70 ans.

Merci.

(1620)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous allons entendre Mme Wendy Noss.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Wendy Noss (présidente, Association cinématographique-Canada):

Merci.

Je suis Wendy Noss de l'Association cinématographique-Canada. Nous sommes la voix des principaux producteurs et distributeurs de films, de divertissement au foyer et de télévision qui sont membres de la Motion Picture Association of America, la MPAA. Les studios que nous représentons, incluant Disney, Paramount, Sony, Fox, Universal et Warner Bros., sont d'importants investisseurs dans l'économie canadienne et ils soutiennent les créateurs, le talent et les artistes techniques de même que les petites et les grandes entreprises à l'échelle du pays.

Nous offrons des emplois et des possibilités économiques et créons au Canada du divertissement passionnant qui est apprécié par le public partout dans le monde. L'année dernière, les producteurs de films et de télévision ont dépensé plus de 8,3 milliards de dollars en tout au Canada et soutenu plus de 171 000 emplois. Plus de 3,75 milliards de dollars de cette somme ont été générés par des projets de production de producteurs étrangers, pour la plupart américains.

De Suits à Star Trek, de X-Men à Montréal à Deadpool à Pitt Meadows, de la technologie d'écran vert gonflable qui a servi à créer La Planète des singes aux lignes de code utilisées pour simuler le vol du Millennium Falcon, notre studio soutient le perfectionnement des talents et offre de bons emplois de classe moyenne à des dizaines de milliers de Canadiens.

Nous sommes ravis d'avoir la possibilité de comparaître devant vous, puisque l'étude du Comité est essentielle pour l'avenir de la création au Canada et pour les modèles novateurs de diffusion qui offrent aux consommateurs du contenu sur l'appareil de leur choix quand et comme ils le veulent.

Nous nourrissons un éventail de préoccupations concernant les enjeux fondamentaux du droit d'auteur: la durée de protection en soi, comme vous l'avez entendu de nombreuses autres personnes, et la nécessité pour le Canada d'offrir aux titulaires d'un droit d'auteur la même norme mondiale qui existe déjà dans plus de 90 pays. Comme nous avons peu de temps, nous nous concentrerons aujourd'hui sur une seule priorité, soit la nécessité de moderniser la loi de manière à lutter contre les menaces les plus importantes que pose le piratage en ligne, y compris celles qui n'étaient pas dominantes lors de la dernière série de modifications de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

D'autres vous ont déjà parlé de la recherche qui quantifie le problème de piratage. Même si la mesure des différents aspects peut varier, ce qui est constant, c'est que le piratage entraîne des pertes pour les entreprises légitimes et constitue une menace pour les Canadiens dont le gagne-pain repose sur une industrie cinématographique et télévisuelle prospère.

Nous proposons deux principales modifications.

D'abord, il faut permettre aux titulaires de droits d'obtenir une injonction contre les fournisseurs de services intermédiaires en ligne. Les intermédiaires Internet qui facilitent l'accès au contenu illégal sont les mieux placés pour réduire le tort causé par le piratage en ligne.

Ce principe est reconnu depuis longtemps en Europe, où l'article 8.3 de la directive sur le droit d'auteur de l'Union européenne a servi de fondement pour permettre aux titulaires de droit d'auteur d'obtenir une injonction contre les intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés par des tiers pour violer le droit d'auteur. En nous appuyant sur les précédents qui existent déjà au Canada dans le monde physique, nous devrions modifier la loi pour permettre expressément aux titulaires de droit d'auteur d'obtenir des injonctions, y compris le blocage de sites Internet et des ordonnances de désindexation, contre les intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés pour violer le droit d'auteur.

Cette recommandation est appuyée par un vaste consensus sur la nécessité de bloquer les sites Internet, lequel se dégage d'une grande diversité d'intervenants canadiens — francophones et anglophones, et même des fournisseurs de services Internet eux-mêmes. En outre, depuis plus de 10 ans dans plus de 40 pays, on démontre que le blocage de sites est une méthode significative, éprouvée et efficace pour diminuer le piratage en ligne.

Ensuite, il faut restreindre la portée des dispositions d'exonération. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur contient des dispositions d'exonération qui protègent les fournisseurs de services intermédiaires contre toute responsabilité, même lorsqu'ils voient leurs systèmes utilisés à des fins de violation en toute connaissance de cause.

Dans tous les autres secteurs de l'économie, le public s'attend, à juste titre, à ce que les entreprises agissent de manière responsable et déploient des efforts raisonnables pour prévenir les dommages prévisibles associés à leurs produits et services. Depuis deux décennies, Internet est assujetti à un ensemble différent de règles et d'attentes, découlant principalement des immunités et des exonérations mises en place lorsqu'Internet en était encore à ses balbutiements et qu'il ne ressemblait en rien à ce qu'il est aujourd'hui.

La loi devrait donc être modifiée conformément à ce qui se fait dans l'Union européenne pour que les dispositions d'exonération ne s'appliquent que lorsque le fournisseur de services agit de manière passive ou neutre, et que les exceptions trop larges ne protègent pas les intermédiaires lorsqu'ils savent que leurs systèmes sont utilisés pour violer le droit d'auteur, mais qu'ils ne prennent pas de mesures pour y mettre fin. Même s'il n'existe pas de panacée au piratage, un nouveau dialogue public a été engagé au sujet du rétablissement de la responsabilisation sur Internet, et au Canada, il est nécessaire d'adopter des solutions stratégiques modernes et sensées qui s'harmonisent avec les pratiques exemplaires internationales éprouvées.

Nous sommes reconnaissants des travaux du Comité dans le cadre de son examen de ces enjeux importants et nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

(1625)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons écouter Maureen Parker de la Writers Guild of Canada. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Maureen Parker (directrice générale, Writers Guild of Canada):

Bonjour, monsieur le président, messieurs les vice-présidents, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Maureen Parker, et je suis la directrice générale de la Writers Guild of Canada. Je suis accompagnée de Neal McDougall, directeur de la politique de la Writers Guild of Canada. Nous aimerions remercier le Comité de nous avoir invités à comparaître aujourd'hui.

La Writers Guild of Canada est l'association nationale qui représente plus de 2 200 scénaristes professionnels qui travaillent dans le domaine des films, de la télévision, de l'animation, de la radio et de la production de médias numériques en anglais. Ces membres de la WGC sont la force créatrice derrière les émissions de télévision, les films et les séries Web à succès du Canada.

Chaque émission, série Web ou film à succès nécessite un scénario exceptionnel, et chaque scénario exceptionnel requiert un scénariste habile et talentueux. Les scénaristes commencent avec une page blanche et finissent par créer tout un monde. Mark Ellis et Stephanie Morgenstern, tous deux membres de la WGC, ont fait cheminer une idée concernant un tireur d'élite au sein d'une brigade de police dans le succès télévisuel appelé Flashpoint, diffusé aux heures de grande écoute. Ils ont commencé avec un concept et ont créé un univers. C'est ce que font les auteurs.

Ce que nous demandons aujourd'hui, c'est une simple clarification de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Nous demandons que la Loi soit modifiée de sorte que les scénaristes et les réalisateurs soient conjointement les auteurs d'une oeuvre cinématographique.

La paternité d'une oeuvre est un concept central dans la Loi canadienne sur le droit d'auteur. La Loi reconnaît que les auteurs créent généralement des oeuvres protégeables et énonce la règle générale selon laquelle l'auteur d'une oeuvre est le premier titulaire du droit d'auteur sur cette oeuvre. Les auteurs des oeuvres cinématographiques sont conjointement le scénariste et le réalisateur. Les scénaristes et les réalisateurs sont les personnes qui mettent à profit des compétences et un jugement qui se traduisent par l'expression d'une oeuvre cinématographique sous forme matérielle. Ils commencent avec une page blanche ou un écran vide, respectivement, et tout un univers de possibilités dans lequel ils font d'innombrables choix créatifs. Les scénaristes créent un univers, choisissent un lieu et un moment spécifiques dans ce monde pour commencer et terminer l'histoire, définissent l'ambiance et les thèmes, inventent des personnages ayant des histoires et des personnalités, écrivent un dialogue et nouent une intrigue. Les réalisateurs dirigent les acteurs, choisissent les points de vue et la position des caméras et déterminent le ton, le style, le rythme et la signification d'un film ou d'une production télévisuelle.

Les producteurs ne sont pas des auteurs. Les producteurs sont les personnes qui assument les responsabilités financières et administratives d'une production; même si la recherche de fonds et la prise de dispositions pour la distribution sont des aspects importants de la production cinématographique, ces activités ne sont pas créatives au sens artistique et il n'est pas question de paternité d'une oeuvre. En outre, le droit d'auteur protège l'expression des idées, pas les idées en soi, alors même si les producteurs peuvent à l'occasion donner des idées et des concepts aux scénaristes et aux réalisateurs, ce sont ces deux derniers qui transforment ces idées et ces concepts en format protégeable.

Un tribunal canadien a déjà déterminé que le scénariste et le réalisateur étaient les coauteurs d'un film. Le tribunal a statué que le producteur ne pouvait être considéré comme l'auteur du film, puisque son rôle n'était pas créatif. D'autres administrations internationales reconnaissant déjà que les scénaristes et les réalisateurs sont les auteurs des oeuvres audiovisuelles. Les États-Unis constituent la principale anomalie, ce qui s'explique en partie par leur système de studios, qui se distingue du modèle international ou canadien. Ainsi, notre proposition ne change ni la loi ni la réalité au Canada; elle ne fait que la préciser. Pourquoi est-ce important?

D'une part, la Loi définit la durée du droit d'auteur en fonction de la durée de la vie de l'auteur. Si celle-ci est incertaine, la durée du droit d'auteur est alors incertaine et, par conséquent, il peut être difficile de déterminer avec certitude si une oeuvre donnée est toujours sous la protection du droit d'auteur ou si elle appartient au domaine public.

D'autre part, le fait de reconnaître les scénaristes et les réalisateurs comme les coauteurs soutient les créateurs et le rôle qu'ils jouent au sein de l'économie créative canadienne. Cela les place en bonne posture pour négocier et conclure des contrats avec d'autres acteurs de la chaîne de valeur de contenus. Puisque cette précision ne modifierait nullement la réalité juridique au Canada, elle ne pose aucune menace aux modèles commerciaux existants.

Les producteurs et les autres personnes qui cherchent à engager des créateurs pour leur oeuvre ne feraient que conclure un contrat pour les droits dans cette oeuvre, comme ils l'ont toujours fait. Personne ne prétend que les romanciers ne sont pas les auteurs de leurs romans ou que les compositeurs ne sont pas les auteurs de leur musique, et il est certain que personne ne soutient que les éditeurs ne peuvent vendre de livres ou que les maisons de disques ne peuvent vendre de la musique parce que les auteurs sont les premiers titulaires de leurs oeuvres. En effet, personne ne soutient que les scénaristes ne sont pas les auteurs de leurs scénarios, et les producteurs concluent déjà d'office des contrats pour les droits afin d'adapter ces scénarios dans une production. Ce n'est pas une perturbation du statu quo commercial; c'est le statu quo commercial.

(1630)



Enfin, dans ce contexte qui évolue rapidement, où la perturbation est la règle et non l'exception, le fait de préciser que les scénaristes et les réalisateurs sont des auteurs rend possible d'autres mesures, notamment la rémunération équitable comme c'est le cas dans d'autres administrations, en Europe, par exemple, quand cette option stratégique doit être envisagée.

Merci de votre temps. Nous serons heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à la Société du droit de reproduction des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs au Canada. [Français]

Monsieur Lauzon, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Alain Lauzon (directeur général, Société du droit de reproduction des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs au Canada):

Nous sommes devant vous aujourd'hui au nom de la SODRAC, une organisation de gestion collective gérant le droit de reproduction de ses membres qui sont des auteurs, des compositeurs ou des éditeurs de musique et gérant l'ensemble des droits d'auteur pour ses membres qui sont des créateurs d'oeuvres artistiques. Ce faisant, nous facilitons l'usage de notre répertoire d'oeuvres auprès des utilisateurs sur toutes les plateformes de diffusion, dans le but de rétribuer équitablement le travail de nos membres.

Pour les créateurs en arts visuels et en métiers d'art, nous recommandons principalement au Comité l'introduction du droit de suite au Canada. Cependant, nous nous adressons aujourd'hui à vous au nom de nos membres auteurs et compositeurs et de leurs éditeurs en musique. À ce titre, nous les représentons en oeuvres de chanson et en oeuvres audiovisuelles.

Pour qu'un utilisateur puisse exploiter la musique, il a besoin de deux droits: le droit sur l'oeuvre et le droit sur l'enregistrement sonore. Nous représentons le droit de reproduction sur l'oeuvre.

À titre d'organisation de gestion collective depuis plus de 33 ans, nous émettons des licences à la pièce et des licences générales aux utilisateurs faisant affaire au Canada ou avec les consommateurs canadiens. Nous en percevons les redevances et nous répartissons les sommes ainsi perçues à nos membres et aux organisations de gestion collective étrangères. La répartition se fait aussitôt que possible.

La SODRAC est membre des regroupements du BIEM et de la CISAC, laquelle est le premier réseau mondial des sociétés d'auteurs et compositeurs.

Nous croyons fermement que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur devrait permettre à tout ayant droit de suivre la vie économique de ses oeuvres, peu importe leur utilisation, et de bénéficier des retombées économiques potentielles découlant de l'exploitation de ses oeuvres. Nous sommes contre les pratiques contractuelles qui impliquent le paiement d'une rémunération forfaitaire, car elles fragilisent la propriété et exproprient les créateurs, ce qui va à l'encontre des principes fondamentaux du droit d'auteur.

Parallèlement à votre examen de révision de la Loi, il y a eu une consultation à laquelle nous avons participé et qui concerne la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada. Nous voulons témoigner ici du rôle essentiel que joue la Commission.

La SODRAC est membre de la SCPCP. À ce titre, nous appuyons ses recommandations voulant que le régime de la copie privée soit technologiquement neutre et que, entretemps, il y ait un fonds compensatoire intérimaire. Nous sommes également favorables à ce que le régime de la copie privée s'applique à l'audiovisuel et aux oeuvres artistiques.

Cela nous amène aux points plus précis que nous voulons vous soumettre. À ce sujet, je passe la parole à Me Lavallée.

Me Martin Lavallée (directeur, Licences et affaires juridiques, Société du droit de reproduction des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs au Canada):

Nous aimerions couvrir cinq points plus en détail.

Le premier point, ce sont les exceptions en droit de reproduction dans la Loi en général.

Partant des exceptions de reproduction pour copies de sauvegarde, de copies éphémères ou de copies technologiques, nous maintenons que de multiples exceptions dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ne respectent tout simplement pas le test en trois étapes de la Convention de Berne. Pour des raisons de commodité et de temps, nous vous renvoyons simplement au mémoire de la Coalition pour la culture et les médias, que nous soutenons et qui vous a été présenté à Montréal le 8 mai dernier.

Le deuxième point est la durée du droit d'auteur.

La SODRAC recommande d'étendre la durée de protection jusqu'à 70 ans après la mort du créateur. En effet, les plus importants partenaires commerciaux du Canada accordent déjà cette durée, qui est devenue la norme dans les pays suivants, à titre d'exemple, par ordre alphabétique: Australie, Belgique, Brésil, Espagne, États-Unis, France, Israël, Italie, Mexique, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Royaume-Uni et Russie.

Le troisième point concerne la responsabilisation et l'écart de valeur, dont nous avons parlé plus tôt.

D'un côté, la Loi permet l'utilisation des oeuvres dans les contenus générés par les utilisateurs, et, d'un autre côté, les services réseau sont exemptés de toute responsabilité. Or, un exploitant de plateforme de diffusion numérique dont la matière première est ce type de contenu et qui le commercialise ne devrait pas être en mesure de se prévaloir de la défense décrite à l'article 31.1 de la Loi.

Nous croyons plutôt que l'introduction d'une obligation d'entente de licence entre les plateformes de diffusion numérique et un regroupement d'ayants droit serait nettement plus efficace que de contraindre ces ayants droit à effectuer des réclamations auprès de chaque individu qui téléverse des oeuvres protégées sur Internet.

Le quatrième point est l'arbitrage obligatoire.

Lorsque la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada, un tribunal administratif ouvert aux sociétés de gestion, rend une décision dans un arbitrage, une telle décision est habituellement réputée avoir un caractère exécutoire. Or, la Cour suprême a récemment trouvé que les licences fixées par la Commission ne devraient pas être considérées comme ayant obligatoirement un caractère exécutoire pour les utilisateurs. Si l'intention du Parlement était de mettre sur pied un processus pour établir des redevances dans des dossiers individuels, son intention n'était certainement pas de permettre aux parties de se réserver le droit de se soustraire à une décision qui ne leur plaît pas. Une modification à l'article 70.4 de la Loi est donc requise.

Le dernier point concerne les serveurs étrangers.

La territorialité de l'interprétation de la Loi se frappe à une réalité qui ne connaît pas de frontières. La SODRAC propose donc, à l'instar du droit de communication, que les titulaires canadiens de droits de reproduction puissent avoir droit, hors de tout doute, à des redevances lors de l'exploitation de services en ligne desservant des Canadiens, mais dont les serveurs ne sont pas situés au Canada.

Le Parlement du Canada a le pouvoir d'adopter une loi ayant une portée extraterritoriale. Si, par exemple, la majeure partie d'un public cible d'un service en ligne se trouvait au Canada, le facteur de rattachement pourrait être cet utilisateur final.

En guise de conclusion, j'aimerais mentionner que la SODRAC déposera sous peu un mémoire qui énumérera et proposera des modifications simples à certains articles de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur afin de corriger les lacunes soulevées dans notre présentation d'aujourd'hui.

(1635)

M. Alain Lauzon:

Comment amener l'utilisateur, de surcroît étranger, à la table de négociations, si le droit que l'on défend n'est pas clair et qu'il est affaibli par une pléthore d'exceptions dans un contexte de droit des utilisateurs? Comment penser qu'un auteur seul peut négocier des conditions d'utilisation de ses oeuvres? Cette situation crée un déséquilibre qui est néfaste à l'économie culturelle, en plus de judiciariser le système, au lieu de permettre une libre négociation d'égal à égal.

Au terme de son examen, votre comité devrait idéalement proposer au Parlement des amendements à la Loi tenant compte des solutions qui lui sont présentées aujourd'hui.

Nous vous remercions de votre écoute. Nous nous ferons un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Enfin, nous allons entendre Erin Finlay ainsi que Stephen Stohn de la Canadian Media Producers Association. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Erin Finlay (conseillère juridique principale, Canadian Media Producers Association):

Merci.

Monsieur le président, je m'appelle Erin Finlay, et je suis la conseillère juridique principale de la Canadian Media Producers Association. Je suis en compagnie de Stephen Stohn, président de SkyStone Media et producteur exécutif de la série télévisée à succès Degrassi: La nouvelle classe — ainsi que toutes les versions antérieures de cette excellente émission culte.

La CMPA représente des centaines de producteurs canadiens indépendants qui prennent part à la conception, à la production et à la distribution de contenu anglophone adapté pour la télévision, le cinéma et les médias numériques. Notre objectif est d'assurer le succès continu du secteur national de la production indépendante et un avenir pour le contenu réalisé par des Canadiens pour les publics canadien et international.

Avez-vous une émission télévisée canadienne favorite comme Degrassi? Il y a de fortes chances que l'un de nos membres l'ait produite. Qu'en est-il de ces films canadiens qui attirent tout le battage médiatique dans les festivals? Encore une fois, il est fort probable que ce soit l'oeuvre d'un de nos membres.

En plus de Degrassi, dont Stephen parlera sous peu, on compte parmi les récents exemples de travaux des membres de la CMPA le long métrage Parvana, une enfance en Afghanistan, mis en nomination aux Academy Awards; Captive, une adaptation du roman de Margaret Atwood sur Netflix et CBC; Letterkenny, un hommage à la vie de banlieue qui a commencé comme une série de courts métrages sur YouTube ayant récolté plus de 15 millions de vues et devenue la première série originale commandée par CraveTV de Bell; et Les Enquêtes de Murdoch, qui est une des émissions dramatiques diffusées depuis le plus longtemps au Canada et qui compte parmi les plus visionnées avec une moyenne de 1,3 million de téléspectateurs par épisode.

La valeur de l'industrie canadienne du film et de la télévision s'élève à 8 milliards de dollars. L'année dernière, le volume de la production cinématographique et télévisuelle indépendante au Canada s'est élevé à 3,3 milliards de dollars, a créé 67 800 emplois à plein temps dans toutes les régions du pays et a contribué 4,7 milliards de dollars au PIB national. Les Canadiens qui occupent ces emplois à valeur élevée réalisent des émissions qui offrent aux auditoires un point de vue canadien sur notre pays, notre monde et notre place en son sein.

La CMPA aimerait aborder brièvement deux problèmes relatifs à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur actuelle qui ont une incidence négative sur les producteurs indépendants et sur leur capacité de commercialiser l'excellent contenu qu'ils créent.

Premièrement, le piratage demeure un problème considérable au pays. Les outils actuellement disponibles en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur sont inefficaces contre le piratage commercial à grande échelle. Nous demandons que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur soit modifiée afin de permettre expressément aux titulaires de droits d'obtenir une injonction contre les intermédiaires, notamment des ordonnances de blocage de sites et de désindexation.

Deuxièmement, contrairement à ce que vient tout juste de vous dire Maureen, le producteur doit être reconnu comme l'auteur d'une oeuvre cinématographique ou audiovisuelle. Le droit d'auteur d'un producteur est le fondement de toutes les sources de financement privées et publiques pour les projets cinématographiques et télévisuels au pays. C'est en fonction de cette valeur économique que les banques consentent des prêts et c'est à cet égard que les diffuseurs et les exploitants octroient des licences pour qu'un projet soit présenté à des auditoires. Autrement dit, la paternité d'une oeuvre et la possession du droit d'auteur à l'égard d'une oeuvre cinématographique est ce qui permet au producteur de commercialiser la propriété intellectuelle d'un film ou d'une émission télévisée.

Je vais céder la parole à Stephen.

(1640)

M. Stephen Stohn (président, SkyStone Media, Canadian Media Producers Association):

La télévision et le cinéma sont un effort de collaboration. Les producteurs rassemblent tous les éléments créatifs pour faire passer un projet du concept à la diffusion.

En tant que producteurs, nous embauchons les créateurs et nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec eux. Nous aimons nos scénaristes. Au fil des ans, nous en avons embauché des dizaines pour travailler sur Degrassi. Nous apprécions aussi nos réalisateurs, qui nous aident à transformer les scénarios en projets, et nous avons travaillé avec des dizaines d'entre eux au fil des ans. Les acteurs jouent aussi un rôle crucial au chapitre de la production. Nous travaillons avec des centaines d'acteurs, dont le plus célèbre est sans aucun doute Drake, mais aussi des gens comme Nina Dobrev, Shenae Grimes et Jake Epstein, et, comme je l'ai dit, des centaines d'autres. Ils sont indispensables au produit final, au même titre que les concepteurs de la production, les graphistes, les directeurs de l'éclairage, les compositeurs et les musiciens, les équipes de prises de vues et les chefs électriciens. Ils sont tous indispensables pour façonner le projet et porter à l'écran notre vision collective. Après tout, les émissions de télévision et les longs métrages sont des oeuvres qui résultent d'efforts collectifs.

À ce jour, nous avons produit 525 épisodes dans les diverses franchises de Degrassi. Lorsque nous commencerons la production du 526e épisode, nous embaucherons un réalisateur et une équipe de scénaristes pour travailler sur cet épisode. De dire que ce réalisateur ou ces auteurs, qui ont travaillé sur un épisode de Degrassi longtemps après que les personnages, le décor, le format, les scènes, l'intrigue, les scénarios et le thème musical ont tous été mis en place, devraient être considérés comme les auteurs de cet épisode est simplement faux, et cela ne fonctionne pas sur le plan commercial. Peu importe leur talent, ils travaillent à partir d'une base et créent un produit qui s'est élaboré au fil du temps. En outre, ils collaborent avec d'autres équipes de tournage, acteurs et membres de la distribution incroyablement talentueux pour permettre à ce projet de se concrétiser.

En tant que producteurs, nous rassemblons ces gens. Nous les embauchons. Nous réunissons toutes sortes de partenaires qui investissent dans nos projets. Nous les élaborons, nous gérons la production et, en fin de compte, nous travaillons pour protéger, gérer et puis commercialiser les droits d'auteur de nos émissions.

Pour renforcer ce que Wendy et Erin ont dit, de solides outils d'application de la loi peuvent nous permettre de conserver la valeur de notre propriété intellectuelle. Degrassi en est presque à sa 40e année. La série est disponible dans 237 pays et en 17 langues. Cela me fascine de savoir qu'un vendredi soir, un peu après minuit, quelqu'un appuie sur un bouton ou clique sur une souris quelque part dans le cyberespace et, tout à coup, toute la saison est disponible en 17 langues à l'échelle mondiale, sauf dans 4 pays: la Syrie, la Corée du Nord, la Chine — qui y travaille — et un autre que j'ai oublié. Cela m'étonne. C'est une véritable histoire de réussite.

Malgré cette disponibilité, il y a plus de 1 300 torrents et 3 000 liens illégaux menant vers Degrassi sur le site populaire BitTorrent et des sites liés au Canada seulement, dont chacun peut être utilisé pour accéder illégalement à notre contenu des milliers et des milliers de fois. Sur un seul de ces sites, Degrassi a été visionné 50 000 fois. Je ne suis pas comptable, donc je ne vais pas calculer combien font 50 000 fois 1 300 ou 50 000 fois 3 000 ou les deux. Peu importe le nombre, le piratage prend des proportions incommensurables. Il est incontestable que le piratage demeure un problème grave au pays qui influe de manière négative sur notre capacité de faire fonctionner le secteur de la production au Canada à plein régime.

Les titulaires de droits d'auteur ont besoin d'outils d'application de la loi efficaces pour éliminer le contenu illégal, éviter que certains bénéficient d'une franchise au détriment des créateurs et préserver la valeur de notre propriété intellectuelle afin que nous puissions continuer de miser sur nos excellentes émissions canadiennes et de réinvestir à cet égard.

Enfin, la protection, la conservation et la commercialisation des droits d'auteur par les Canadiens sont des aspects clés de la stratégie d'innovation du gouvernement. Pour s'acquitter de leurs principales fonctions créatives et administratives, les producteurs indépendants ont besoin d'une Loi sur le droit d'auteur modernisée qui procure de solides protections des droits d'auteur et un cadre de marché efficient qui soutient l'investissement continu dans les produits créatifs novateurs du Canada. Une loi plus moderne fera en sorte que tous nos partenaires de l'industrie pourront continuer de réaliser d'excellentes émissions qui sont distribuées à l'aide de diverses plateformes pour le plaisir des Canadiens et des auditoires du monde entier.

(1645)



Merci de nous avoir donné la possibilité d'aborder ces enjeux devant le Comité. Nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je présume qu'une des questions sera probablement le numéro de téléphone de Drake. Toutefois, nous allons passer directement à M. Sheehan.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Je ne vais pas poser cette question, mais je sais que quelqu'un s'en chargera.

Merci beaucoup de votre excellent témoignage. Nous avons entendu de formidables témoins ici à Ottawa, et nous avons parcouru le pays. On nous dit beaucoup de choses, et nous essayons de comprendre exactement la façon dont les créateurs utilisent le droit d'auteur pour négocier une meilleure entente pour eux-mêmes. Les revenus de l'ensemble de l'industrie ont augmenté, mais on dit que, dans nombre de cas, les créateurs font moins d'argent — je pourrais présenter des statistiques, mais je ne le ferai pas —, alors vous pourriez peut-être ajouter quelque chose à cet égard.

L'autre problème, c'est le piratage, et je conviens que cela constitue un problème. C'était un grave problème, à mon avis, il y a quelques années. Je me souviens lorsqu'il y avait de très nombreux réseaux de partage pair-à-pair. Aujourd'hui, comment les nouvelles plateformes Spotify et Netflix ont-elles changé l'industrie? Certains témoins nous ont dit que les gens ne sont pas très satisfaits de la rémunération découlant de Spotify, probablement en raison des contrats de licence, contrairement à celle de Netflix, pour lequel nous avons entendu des commentaires assez positifs.

Je crois que je vais commencer par Stephen, puis peut-être que quelqu'un d'autre peut...

M. Stephen Stohn:

J'ai certainement une opinion positive sur Netflix parce qu'on y diffuse maintenant Degrassi. Spotify, oui, a deux méthodes de diffusion en continu dont une entraîne l'écart de valeur qui a été mentionné plus tôt.

Je veux absolument dire, cependant, que nous avons réalisé des progrès, et je crois que vous avez mis le doigt directement sur le problème. Au début du partage pair-à-pair, une grande partie du contenu n'était tout simplement pas accessible. Certains se disaient: « Si je ne peux pas y accéder de manière légale, je vais y arriver d'une façon ou d'une autre. » Ce problème a largement été réglé par les plateformes Netflix et Spotify et les technologies de partout dans le monde; la situation s'est donc améliorée. Mais il y a encore un problème. Il existe des façons relativement faciles — je crois que Wendy en a parlé et qu'Erin veut peut-être revenir là-dessus — de vraiment renforcer la valeur du droit d'auteur en le protégeant contre le piratage. Je crois que c'est là où vous vouliez en venir avec votre question sur ce qui pourrait être fait afin que chaque créateur obtienne plus d'argent.

Je vais vous expliquer rapidement comment le piratage nuit à Degrassi. Lorsqu'il y a du piratage, moins de gens regardent Degrassi sur Netflix parce qu'il y en a beaucoup qui regarde l'émission illégalement. Cela signifie que Netflix fait moins d'argent et que, lorsque vient le temps de renégocier le droit de licence, il ne nous donne pas autant que ce que nous pourrions recevoir. Lorsque je dis « nous », ce n'est pas seulement les producteurs. C'est tout le monde dans la chaîne de valeur que nous représentons, car cela a des retombées sur tous. Il s'agit d'une merveilleuse possibilité d'exportation, et le renforcement du droit d'auteur et l'adoption des dispositions dont nous avons parlé aideraient vraiment à faire cela.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Certainement.

Mme Maureen Parker:

Puis-je revenir sur votre premier point sur la façon dont nous pouvons renforcer la structure de création?

M. Terry Sheehan: Oui.

Mme Maureen Parker: Nous sommes les créateurs. Les scénaristes et les réalisateurs sont les créateurs. Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, cela représente une différence d'opinions de longue date entre la CMPA et nous, mais les producteurs ne sont pas les créateurs. Le créateur est la personne qui commence avec une page blanche, chez elle, dans son bureau, peut-être en pyjama en buvant un café. C'est cette personne qui est le créateur de l'oeuvre cinématographique.

Ce que vous avez dit à propos du déclin de nos revenus est très juste. C'est tout à fait le cas. Je crois qu'il est très important pour le Comité de faire une distinction entre la production de services, ce que représente Wendy, et la production de contenu canadien, comme Degrassi et ce sur quoi mes membres travaillent. Dans la production de services, les scénarios sont écrits par des Américains aux États-Unis. Dans la production de contenu canadien, ce sont des Canadiens qui sont les auteurs de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Les règles régissant la création de contenu aux États-Unis sont différentes de celles du Canada et de l'Europe. Au Canada, nous n'avons pas réglé la question de déterminer qui est l'auteur de l'oeuvre. Nous éprouvons ce problème parce qu'il n'a pas été réglé. Il n'y a aucun consensus. Il n'y aura jamais de consensus sur qui est l'auteur de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Vous devrez prendre une décision. La bonne décision, c'est la personne qui a en réalité créé l'oeuvre, non pas la personne qui a peut-être... En passant, les scénaristes sont maintenant aussi des scénaristes-producteurs, et ils embauchent des réalisateurs et des acteurs. Le modèle dont Stephen parlait est un très vieux modèle. Ce n'est pas ce qui existe à l'heure actuelle.

Je vous assure qu'il y a des personnes qui créent des oeuvres et qui souffrent, et vous devez vous pencher sur la paternité de l'oeuvre.

Merci.

(1650)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous allons continuer parce que nous n'avons pas beaucoup de temps.

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous avez cinq minutes. Je suis certain que tout le monde aura l'occasion d'intervenir.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merveilleux. Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d'être ici dans cette petite salle que nous avons à notre disposition aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Stohn, nombre de membres de notre comité ont insisté sur le fait de recevoir Drake ici devant le Comité, alors je sens que je parle en leur nom. Tout ce que vous pourriez faire pour nous aider serait très utile.

Alors, je vous en remercie tous.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Ça, c'est du leadership.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Tout à fait.

Je veux revenir sur certains commentaires que vous et Erin avez faits concernant le piratage. Vous avez mentionné le piratage commercial à grande échelle. Je suis curieux de savoir exactement ce que cela signifie. Est-ce YouTube et d'autres, ou s'agit-il d'autre chose dont nous ne sommes pas au courant?

Mme Erin Finlay:

Oui, j'ai parlé de piratage commercial. Nous parlions de sites de piratage, c'est-à-dire les sites qui s'engagent volontairement à faire de l'argent en vendant du contenu piraté par différents moyens. C'est vraiment le point central de la discussion.

YouTube possède divers modèles d'affaires, mais je crois que nous ne parlons plus de YouTube parce que le contenu qui y est diffusé a été largement commercialisé. Dans la plupart des cas, une partie des revenus revient aux créateurs et aux producteurs sur YouTube.

La question est de savoir si cela suffit. Je sais que l'écart de valeur est réel, et nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de l'écart de valeur entre YouTube et d'autres services. Cependant, nos plus grandes inquiétudes concernant les sites de piratage sont les types de sites de piratage qui commercialisent de manière flagrante des oeuvres en violant le droit d'auteur.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je suis désolé, pourriez-vous nos dire plus précisément quels sont ces sites Web?

Mme Erin Finlay:

Le site The Pirate Bay est le meilleur exemple. C'est un vieil exemple, mais il est excellent. Je sais que vous avez entendu parler d'autres sites au cours des dernières semaines.

The Pirate Bay, à ma connaissance, a été en grande partie fermé, mais Wendy a certainement des statistiques sur tous ces sites pour vous.

Mme Wendy Noss:

Je vais peut-être également faire un lien avec certains des commentaires de votre ami.

Notre position est que nous tentons vraiment de faire trois choses.

Premièrement, nous voulons donner aux consommateurs l'accès qu'ils désirent, lorsqu'ils le veulent et selon le modèle d'affaires de leur choix. Peut-être que le consommateur veut un modèle d'abonnement ou qu'il souhaite faire du téléchargement, etc. Nous désirons offrir notre contenu aux consommateurs.

Deuxièmement, nous voulons aider les consommateurs à comprendre l'effet du piratage. C'est l'effet que Stephen vous a si bien décrit, mais c'est également les répercussions sur les consommateurs. On a réalisé diverses recherches. Un site de piratage sur trois contient des maliciels. Nous avons effectué une recherche sur des sites auxquels accèdent les Canadiens. La grande majorité de ces sites ont des publicités à risque élevé, des escroqueries, de la pornographie et des liens vers des sites qui peuvent être une menace pour votre vie privée. C'est ce que nous tentons de faire afin de nous assurer que les consommateurs soient également au courant.

Troisièmement, nous voulons nous pencher sur ces sites et ces services qui, comme Erin l'a dit, fonctionnent à une échelle commerciale.

Proportionnellement parlant, à l'heure actuelle ou vers la fin de 2017, au Canada, 70 % des gens qui accédaient à des sites de piratage le faisaient par l'intermédiaire de sites d'hébergement et de liens. Seulement 30 % de ces gens, à la fin de 2017, accédaient à des sites pair-à-pair, alors vous pouvez voir qu'il y a un changement dans les modèles de piratage que les Canadiens utilisent.

Ensuite, une des menaces de plus en plus importantes, c'est les convertisseurs Kodi, qui permettent un accès illégal à des diffusions en continu et à des sites de télévision par IP ou à des sites illégaux d'hébergement et de liens sur Internet.

Encore une fois, nous voyons différents types de menaces de piratage, et c'est en partie la raison pour laquelle nous avons besoin d'outils différents.

Des représentants des ministères du Patrimoine canadien et de l'Industrie, ou ISED — désolée, je trahis mon âge en l'appelant Industrie —, viennent de commander une étude, laquelle a permis de constater que 26 % des Canadiens ont accédé à une diffusion en continu illégale, téléchargé du contenu sur un site de piratage ou consulté ou utilisé des sites de piratage. La plus grande partie de ce contenu illégal — 36 % — était des films, et 34 %, des émissions de télévision.

(1655)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Est-ce que cette recherche est publique? Pouvons-nous l'obtenir?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Parlez-vous de la recherche des ministères? Absolument.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Non, pas celle du ministère, la recherche initiale que vous avez mentionnée.

Mme Wendy Noss:

Oui. Nous utilisons une petite fiche de renseignements sur le piratage, et je suis heureuse de la transmettre au Comité.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord.

Mme Wendy Noss:

Encore une fois, également, brièvement, elle vous donne les trois sites pair-à-pair, les trois sites d'hébergement et les trois sites de liens que les Canadiens utilisent le plus.

Le président:

Merci, et si vous pouvez la transmettre au Comité, ce serait merveilleux.

Mme Wendy Noss:

Absolument.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur Nantel, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NPD):

Je vous remercie.

Ma première question s'adresse à vous, madame Rioux.

J'aimerais revenir sur un élément de votre présentation.[Traduction]

Vous avez parlé d'une exception s'appliquant aux services de stockage afin d'offrir une protection contre l'écart de valeur.[Français]

Pourriez-vous m'expliquer ce que cela signifie? Je suis un peu perdu dans votre langage. [Traduction]

Mme Caroline Rioux:

En raison des contraintes de temps, je n'ai pas vraiment abordé cette question dans mon exposé. Dans notre mémoire, vous pourrez en lire un peu plus sur ce sujet. Lorsque nous avons défini l'écart de valeur, nous avons constaté qu'il y avait certaines plateformes qui se disent elles-mêmes admissibles à bénéficier de l'exception visant le stockage, mais selon nous, ces plateformes ne seraient pas admissibles à l'exception parce que nous ne croyons pas qu'elles sont seulement un canal.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Pourriez-vous nous nommer une marque ou une entreprise?

Mme Caroline Rioux:

Je préférerais ne pas mentionner de noms parce que nous tenons des négociations au fil du temps avec certains de ces types de services. En général, nous parlons de types de services offrant du contenu généré par les utilisateurs, mais ce qui se produit, c'est que, dans nos négociations, il devient beaucoup plus difficile de tenter d'obtenir des taux favorables pour nos titulaires de droits parce que ces services diront qu'ils ne sont pas vraiment convaincus de devoir nous verser des redevances et qu'ils croient fermement qu'ils sont admissibles à l'exception visant le stockage.

Ce que nous aimerions voir dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, c'est une modification efficace pour préciser que l'exception visant le stockage ne s'applique pas aux services qui sont en fait offerts par des fournisseurs de contenu et qui offrent de la musique en proposant ou optimisant des choix aux consommateurs, et ainsi jouer un rôle actif dans ce processus. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je vous remercie.

Mesdames Parker et Finlay, vous avez bien établi la nécessité de protéger le contenu canadien. Évidemment, Mme Noss ne soutient pas la même chose. Cela dit, tout le monde s'entend sur le fait qu'il faut protéger les productions, qu'elles soient canadiennes ou américaines. Soit dit en passant, les productions américaines créent aussi de l'emploi chez nous, c'est bien évident. Toutes les trois, vous cherchez à obtenir une meilleure protection du côté des fournisseurs d'accès aux services Internet. Le régime d’avis et avis vous semble beaucoup trop lourd. Vous préféreriez probablement qu'on responsabilise davantage les fournisseurs d'accès Internet, et même qu'il y ait un système d'avis et retrait.

Est-ce que je comprends bien votre volonté, mesdames Noss, Parker et Finlay? [Traduction]

Mme Erin Finlay:

Je peux en parler brièvement. Nous ne disons pas que le régime d'avis et avis est trop lourd. Je crois que c'est la position des FSI sur ce régime. Nous dirions qu'il est utile pour sensibiliser les utilisateurs et les consommateurs qui ne savent pas qu'ils violent le droit d'auteur du contenu, alors le régime d'avis et avis devrait demeurer en place. Nous ne cherchons pas un régime d'avis et retrait. Je crois que, autour de la table et dans les témoignages cohérents que vous avez entendus, le régime d'avis et retrait n'est pas très efficace. Je crois que c'est ce que nos amis américains diraient.

Ce que nous cherchons, c'est la capacité d'avoir recours à des ordonnances sur la désindexation et le blocage de sites concernant les moteurs de recherche et les services d'hébergement de FSI.

(1700)

Mme Wendy Noss:

Oui, je serais d'accord avec vous. L'avis et avis était quelque chose que les FSI avaient demandé lors de la dernière réforme. Il s'agit d'un outil pédagogique, et il est conçu seulement pour les gens qui utilisent des sites pair-à-pair. Comme vous pouvez le voir, c'est maintenant une petite composante du problème de piratage; en outre, le simple fait d'envoyer un avis à une personne pour lui dire que, si elle ne cesse pas d'utiliser ces sites, elle recevra un autre avis n'est pas l'outil le plus efficace. Cependant, encore une fois, c'est un outil que le gouvernement nous a donné, et nous l'utilisons afin de sensibiliser les gens au risque d'atteinte à la vie privée auquel leur ordinateur est exposé et aux répercussions sur le marché canadien.

Je crois que la façon dont la France applique l'article 8.3 est vraiment simple, mais efficace; il accorde le droit d'ordonner toute mesure pour empêcher la violation d'un droit d'auteur ou d'un droit voisin, ou d'y mettre fin, à l'encontre de toute personne pouvant contribuer à corriger la situation. C'est ce que ces intermédiaires peuvent faire. Ils peuvent contribuer à corriger la situation.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Particulièrement avec le concept de la « destination », qui signifie que les règles et les lois de l'endroit où se trouve la personne sont celles qui devraient s'appliquer. N'est-ce pas?

Puis-je vous demander à tous de me parler de la Commission du droit d'auteur? Ai-je terminé?

Je suis désolé. Si vous avez des commentaires sur l'examen de la Commission du droit d'auteur, veuillez nous les transmettre parce que je crois que nous travaillons sur deux éléments qui doivent être mis en correspondance. Je crains que le gouvernement nous fasse une très belle surprise avec la Commission du droit d'auteur en nous disant: « Oh, voilà comment nous allons procéder. » Nous allons voir par la suite où nous allons nous retrouver avec cette loi et la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Merci, monsieur Ruimy.

Le président:

Merci.

Je ne crois pas que ce soit la façon dont notre comité fonctionne, mais merci beaucoup.

M. Pierre Nantel:

L'ambiance est tellement détendue.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Graham.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Madame Noss, quelle est la relation entre l'ACC et la MPAA?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Nous représentons les entreprises de la MPAA ici au Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'ACC et la MPAA sont essentiellement la même organisation.

Mme Wendy Noss:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle est la position de la MPAA et de l'ACC sur la neutralité du Net?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Pour ce qui est de notre position sur la neutralité du Net, je crois que le ministre Bains l'a bien expliquée. La neutralité du Net concerne seulement le contenu légal. Elle n'a rien à voir avec le contenu illégal. Notre position selon laquelle il faut trouver de nouveaux outils pour lutter contre le piratage n'a rien à voir avec la neutralité du Net.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans votre cas, qui agit comme juge, jury et bourreau? Si vous dites qu'il y a un site qui viole le droit d'auteur et que vous le faites fermer, quel pouvoir vous permet-il d'agir ainsi?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Il s'agit d'ajouter à la loi la possibilité d'obtenir une injonction d'un tribunal, alors c'est ce dernier qui tranche.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez besoin d'une ordonnance du tribunal pour chaque retrait de lien.

Mme Wendy Noss:

Non, nous ne parlons pas d'avis et de retrait. Nous parlons de...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous parlez de désindexation. C'est effectivement la même chose sur Internet.

Mme Wendy Noss:

Nous parlons d'injonctions à l'encontre d'intermédiaires, et celles-ci sont obtenues d'un tribunal. Ce que nous voulons ajouter au projet de loi, c'est la même chose qu'on retrouve partout en Europe. C'est l'application par la France de la disposition que je viens de vous lire, qui concerne la capacité d'obtenir une injonction à l'encontre de tiers qui sont en mesure de réduire le piratage. On ne dit pas que la responsabilité revient à ces tiers, que ce soit le FSI, qui fournit la connectivité, ou le moteur de recherche. On dit: « Vous êtes en mesure d'aider à réduire le piratage. » Nous irions devant un tribunal pour demander une injonction, et le tribunal en déterminerait la portée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a un certain nombre d'années, la MPAA et la RIAA, l'association de l'industrie de l'enregistrement, ont poursuivi en justice des personnes qui utilisaient des sites pair-à-pair et ont ruiné ces pauvres familles. Comment cela s'est-il déroulé, que s'est-il passé, et est-ce que cela se produit encore aujourd'hui?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Je ne sais pas d'où vous tenez cette information, mais ce n'est pas la position de notre entreprise. Comme je l'ai soutenu dans ma déclaration liminaire, et comme Erin l'a dit, nous tentons d'enrayer le piratage commercial fait par des gens qui facilitent la violation du droit d'auteur d'une manière qui nuit aux entreprises et aux emplois canadiens et à l'ensemble du processus créatif.

(1705)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pourrais en parler encore longtemps, mais j'ai des questions à poser aux autres témoins.

Vous avez mentionné que vous avez beaucoup de contenu provenant de nombre de créateurs au Canada. C'est de l'information très utile. J'ai utilisé cet exemple deux ou trois fois à la Chambre et au Comité. Une de mes émissions de télévision préférée est Mayday, réalisée ici au Canada. Elle est diffusée dans 144 pays, et il est pratiquement impossible de l'obtenir ici. Pouvez-vous me dire pourquoi? C'est une excellente émission que vous pouvez suivre si vous avez un compte Bell, mais si vous n'en avez pas, vous ne pouvez pas avoir l'émission. C'est tout simplement illégal. Il n'y a aucune façon de l'acquérir.

Mme Erin Finlay:

Je suis certaine que les producteurs et les créateurs de Mayday seraient absolument ravis si l'émission était accessible partout où c'est possible. Je ne peux pas parler de cet exemple précis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est intéressant parce que vous pouvez l'acheter en Europe et l'envoyer au Canada, mais vous finissez par faire face à un autre problème: les DVD codés par région. Si vous achetez un DVD à l'étranger, il ne fonctionnera pas dans les lecteurs DVD nord-américains. Si vous achetez un DVD ici, il ne fonctionnera pas dans les lecteurs DVD européens. Est-ce que c'est éthique? Je pose la question ouvertement.

Mme Erin Finlay:

Est-ce éthique de ne pas pouvoir...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce éthique d'acheter quelque chose dont le fonctionnement est délibérément bloqué selon l'endroit où l'on se trouve?

Mme Erin Finlay:

Est-ce éthique d'acheter quelque chose...?

M. David de Burgh Graham: De vendre quelque chose...

M. Stephen Stohn:

Si vous me permettez de répondre et je ne veux pas dépasser mes limites ici. Il y a différentes vitesses de balayage et différents nombres de lignes dans les téléviseurs européens...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela n'a rien à voir. C'est de l'encodage.

M. Stephen Stohn:

Oui, cela exige un encodage des DVD des régions de la zone 2 différent de celui des régions de la zone 1, selon ce que je crois comprendre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous ne parlons pas de normes.

M. Stephen Stohn:

À mon avis, il est évident que nous voulons tous une seule norme. Cela serait l'idéal.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est pas une question de normes, mais plutôt de cryptographie.

Il existe huit codes différents. Chaque région a un code différent. Si on applique la norme NTSC ou la norme PAL, qui sont seulement deux normes — non pas huit — de façon algorithmique, on peut faire la conversion très facilement. Il n'y a aucune raison technique de faire cela. Il s'agit simplement d'un système de mesures techniques de protection du droit d'auteur. Si je vends une bouteille d'eau, par exemple, et que je dis que vous ne pouvez la boire qu'en Europe, non pas en Amérique, est-ce que ce serait éthique?

M. Stephen Stohn:

À mon avis, ce n'est pas logique sur le plan commercial. Je dirais que les gens seraient très heureux de vendre leur produit partout selon une seule norme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ça semble merveilleux, mais ce n'est pas ce qui se passe en réalité.

Mme Erin Finlay:

Je crois que nous devons être réalistes concernant la façon dont les droits sont gérés partout dans le monde. Certains acheteurs et certains distributeurs acquièrent des droits pour des territoires donnés. C'est la façon dont cela fonctionne actuellement. Encore une fois, chaque producteur et chaque créateur serait heureux que son contenu soit accessible partout sur la planète, pourvu qu'il soit en mesure de négocier cela.

Quant à votre question de savoir si c'est éthique ou pas, je crois que vous vous demandiez s'il s'agissait d'une violation du droit d'auteur et d'un non-respect des mesures techniques de protection. Je crois que c'est peut-être ce dont nous parlons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si j'avais plus de temps, nous pourrions continuer à en discuter davantage.

Le président:

Malheureusement, vous n'avez plus de temps.

Merci beaucoup.

Mme Erin Finlay:

Nous le ferons dans notre mémoire.

Le président:

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Ma première question s'adresse à Mmes Noss et Finlay.

En ce qui concerne le piratage, je n'ai pas vu, depuis plusieurs années, de publicités à la télévision sur le piratage qui expliquent que télécharger un film ou l'enregistrer au cinéma est du vol. Si ce comité recommandait que le gouvernement s'attaque davantage au piratage, quels seraient les secteurs sur lesquels nous devrions nous concentrer, selon vous?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous cherchons de nouveaux outils et nous sommes certainement heureux de fournir plus d'information au Comité en ce qui concerne les outils législatifs qui nous semblent importants.

Nous croyons également que la sensibilisation du public est importante. Je le répète, nous pensons que c'est une partie de ce que nous voulons faire pour aider à réduire le problème, alors tout ce que le gouvernement pourrait faire pour participer à nos efforts... Par exemple, je sais que, au Royaume-Uni, le gouvernement a consacré beaucoup de temps et d'argent pour sensibiliser le public à l'importance de...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Savez-vous combien cette campagne a coûté au gouvernement du Royaume-Uni?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Spontanément, je ne le sais pas, mais je serais heureuse de vous fournir... Il y a un lien en ligne, où il est question de bien faire les choses à partir d'un site authentique ou quelque chose du genre.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Savez-vous s'il y avait un partenaire financier dans l'industrie dans le cadre de ce projet, ou s'agissait-il uniquement du gouvernement?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Il y en a plusieurs. Encore une fois, j'utilise ce lien à titre d'exemple, mais je serais heureuse de vous fournir deux ou trois exemples de campagnes de sensibilisation menées par des autorités publiques. Le bureau de la propriété intellectuelle du Royaume-Uni a aussi lancé sa propre campagne. Nous croyons que c'est un élément important, particulièrement parce que les risques d'atteinte à la vie privée des consommateurs sont extrêmement élevés.

Les outils législatifs sont vraiment importants. Un exemple instructif serait le problème de l'enregistrement par caméscope dont vous avez parlé. Il n'y a pas si longtemps, le Canada faisait face à un problème d'enregistrement illégal par caméscope. Les lois n'étaient pas claires, et nombre de personnes disaient: « Ne faites rien. » Elles affirmaient que rien ne permettait de conclure qu'il s'agissait d'un véritable problème et que le piratage avait un effet sur les Canadiens. Elles soutenaient que légiférer n'allait rien changer et que les gens continueraient de faire des enregistrements illégaux.

Vous savez ce qui est arrivé? En comité plénier, soit les conservateurs, les libéraux, le NPD et le Bloc ont tous appuyé le projet de loi qui prévoyait une règle claire selon laquelle il était illégal d'enregistrer par caméscope un film au cinéma; il y a eu un effet immédiat et durable. Auparavant, au Canada, on enregistrait illégalement par caméscope de 20 à 24 % des films qui étaient encore au cinéma. Deux ans après l'adoption du projet de loi au Canada, c'était moins de 1 % chaque année.

(1710)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Le Comité a vraiment besoin de ce genre d'information.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à Mme Finlay ou à M. Stohn. C'est à propos des dispositions relatives au droit d'auteur et de la question de savoir si les scénaristes et les producteurs sont des créateurs, et j'espère que vous pourrez me donner une réponse nuancée. Selon vous, quel serait l'impact sur le modèle économique si nous recommandions que les scénaristes soient traités davantage comme des créateurs et bénéficient d'une protection plus grande du droit d'auteur en vertu de la loi?

Mme Erin Finlay:

Peut-être pourrais-je commencer par répondre de façon générale, puis Stephen pourra vous parler du modèle économique précisément.

Voici ce qu'il faut garder à l'esprit: on croit que le fait de traiter les réalisateurs et les scénaristes comme des auteurs ou comme les premiers titulaires du droit d'auteur ne perturberait pas le marché; je trouve cela préoccupant. Pendant des années — des décennies —, des syndicats très puissants et efficaces, comme celui de Maureen, ont négocié ces ententes dans des conventions collectives. Ces conventions collectives englobent tout ce qui a rapport à la titularité, aux cessions et aux licences exclusives, y compris les droits d'auteur redistribués aux scénaristes, aux réalisateurs, aux acteurs, etc.

Je voulais commencer par situer le contexte global, et peut-être que Stephen pourrait vous dire quel impact cela pourrait avoir sur son modèle économique.

M. Stephen Stohn:

Nos financiers et nos distributeurs veulent traiter avec le titulaire du droit d'auteur.

Le producteur a assumé le risque économique initial. J'ai trouvé amusante votre description, Maureen, lorsque vous avez dit que vous descendiez en robe de chambre pour écrire votre scénario. Mais rappelez-vous que, des années plus tôt, un producteur a eu une idée, a embauché des gens pour élaborer son projet, a assumé un risque économique, a approché un télédiffuseur ou un distributeur pour obtenir un capital de départ et pour qu'ils s'investissent dans le projet. Le producteur a poursuivi ses démarches jusqu'à ce qu'il ait un produit final à commercialiser.

Seul le titulaire du droit d'auteur peut commercialiser son produit. Les États-Unis sont, bien sûr, notre plus gros marché, et nos voisins du Sud veulent seulement traiter avec le titulaire du droit d'auteur et le producteur qui détient le droit d'auteur; ils ne connaissent aucune autre façon de faire.

Oui, au Canada, les scénaristes détiennent les droits d'auteur liés à leurs scénarios. C'est logique, d'une certaine façon. Que vous soyez d'accord ou non, il demeure que les scénaristes descendent en pantoufles pour écrire leur scénario. Cependant, le producteur travaille depuis des années — avec des centaines d'autres personnes — à créer un produit que le titulaire du droit d'auteur peut commercialiser. Vous voyez où je veux vraiment en venir.

Si, pour une raison ou pour une autre, on décidait qu'il était important d'accorder un droit d'auteur à quelqu'un qui ne fait pas tout le travail, l'industrie devra trouver une voie de contournement en établissant des contrats qui accordent le droit d'auteur au producteur. Sinon, comment le producteur pourra-t-il commercialiser le produit final? Ce ne serait pas logique.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Maureen Parker:

Pourrais-je réagir au dernier élément de la question, s'il vous plaît?

Le président:

Il nous reste encore du temps, mais nous devons passer au prochain intervenant.

Monsieur Baylis, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Je vais poursuivre dans le même ordre d'idées.

Disons que je suis en train d'écrire un tout nouveau scénario ou un tout nouveau film qui n'existe pas. Je comprends que le droit d'auteur va en majeure partie au réalisateur et au scénario. Prenons l'exemple de Degrassi que M. Stohn a donné. La personne qui écrit le scénario d'un épisode n'élabore pas toute l'histoire. Elle ne crée pas les personnages, ni les décors, ni le contexte. Les personnes qui s'en sont chargées font tout autant partie du processus créatif, peut-être même davantage, que le scénariste d'un unique épisode. Êtes-vous d'accord?

(1715)

Mme Maureen Parker:

Non, parce que vous vous fondez sur une fausse prémisse.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous n'êtes pas d'accord. Dans votre cas, la personne qui a conçu l'histoire...

Mme Maureen Parker:

C'est un scénariste, pas M. Stohn. L'histoire est créée par un scénariste.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je comprends cela, mais la personne qui écrit un épisode s'est fondée sur toute l'histoire antérieure pour cela.

Mme Maureen Parker:

C'est exact, et le scénariste est donc l'auteur de l'épisode. C'est un processus collaboratif...

M. Frank Baylis:

Mais il n'est pas le seul auteur. Il a utilisé d'autres personnages, il a utilisé des noms...

Mme Maureen Parker:

Oui, bien sûr. La série se construit sur...

M. Frank Baylis:

Non. Vous avez dit que le scénariste commence sur une page « blanche ». Ce n'est pas le cas quand il s'agit d'un épisode. Les noms, le nom de l'école, le nom de l'enseignant, les traits de caractère du personnage, son vocabulaire et sa façon de s'exprimer sont déjà établis. L'auteur d'un épisode n'est donc pas l'unique créateur.

Mme Maureen Parker:

Puis-je préciser que le modèle économique est très vaste? Présentement, certains de nos scénaristes sont effectivement ceux qui conçoivent les scénarios, qui créent les personnages ainsi que les lieux. Dans une longue série comme Degrassi, il va évidemment y avoir des concepts et des lieux prédéfinis, mais ils seront créés et adaptés pour chaque épisode. Le dialogue est propre à chaque épisode, tout comme l'intrigue. C'est...

M. Frank Baylis:

Je comprends cela, mais il y a quelqu'un qui détient les droits sur les personnages, par exemple, et si c'était...

Mme Maureen Parker:

Exact, ce serait l'auteur du premier scénario.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord. Vous devriez donc trouver l'auteur du premier scénario et conclure une entente avec lui afin qu'il écrive une histoire pour M. Stohn...

Mme Maureen Parker:

Les personnages sont protégés par le droit d'auteur, et il faut payer des droits pour les utiliser, etc. Le problème, lorsqu'on ne définit pas la paternité...

M. Frank Baylis:

Continuons d'utiliser Degrassi comme exemple. Il y a eu 500 scénaristes au fil des années, et chacun de ces 500 scénaristes a écrit un épisode qui a fait progresser l'histoire des personnages. Va-t-on devoir traiter avec chacune de ces 500 personnes pour être en mesure de...?

Mme Maureen Parker:

Ce n'est pas ce qui se fait dans le domaine télévisuel. Il y a probablement eu 50 scénaristes, ou peut-être 30. Les entreprises utilisent les mêmes scénaristes. Elles engagent des équipes de scénarisation.

M. Frank Baylis:

Disons qu'il y a 50 scénaristes.

Mme Maureen Parker:

D'accord. Pour répondre à votre question, oui, il y a effectivement plus d'un scénariste et il y a plus d'un créateur, mais chaque épisode est une oeuvre unique protégée par le droit d'auteur. Quand M. Stohn ou un autre producteur vend une série, il vend un ensemble d'épisodes, chacun protégé par le droit d'auteur. Lorsqu'on parle de piratage, on parle d'épisodes qui sont piratés individuellement et qui ne génèrent probablement aucun revenu.

M. Frank Baylis:

J'ai une dernière question, dans ce cas.

La personne qui écrit un scénario pour un film, le scénariste, est l'auteur du scénario et il en détient les droits. Est-ce exact?

Mme Maureen Parker:

C'est exact.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord, et vous voulez simplement élargir ce droit pour qu'il soit plus que cela. Vous voulez détenir plus que le seul droit sur le scénario.

Mme Maureen Parker:

Non, nous ne voulons pas l'élargir. Dans le modèle économique actuel — que j'ai mentionné dans mon exposé —, et dans le seul jugement qui ait jamais été rendu à ce sujet, le scénariste et le réalisateur sont les auteurs. Ce ne sont pas les producteurs, car leurs activités appartiennent à un autre domaine.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je comprends.

Nous manquons de temps, mais merci.

Mme Maureen Parker:

Merci.

M. Frank Baylis:

Madame Noss, j'ai une seule question pour vous. Vous avez proposé de restreindre la définition des exonérations. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Bien sûr. Nous nous sommes appuyés sur ce qui fonctionne en Europe. Les menaces de piratage qui existaient à l'époque où la loi a été modifiée la dernière fois ne sont pas du tout celles d'aujourd'hui.

Il nous faut donc adopter les pratiques exemplaires qui donnent des résultats dans d'autres pays. Par exemple, si un intermédiaire comme un fournisseur d'accès Internet ou un moteur de recherche sait qu'une tierce partie utilise ses services pour violer le droit d'auteur, les dispositions relatives à l'exonération ne s'appliqueront plus à cet intermédiaire. Cela encourage l'ensemble des intermédiaires du système à agir de manière responsable.

De nos jours, le problème du piratage à l'échelle mondiale, c'est qu'il y a un exploitant dans un pays, un site d'hébergement dans un autre et un modèle économique reposant sur un service de traitement des paiements ou un réseau publicitaire dans un troisième pays. En conséquence, tous les pays doivent lutter efficacement contre ce problème. À nouveau, j'aimerais mettre en relief les outils que le gouvernement a mis en place dans le passé et qui se sont avérés efficaces.

La dernière fois, nous avons demandé des dispositions d'application qui feraient en sorte que ceux qui permettent les infractions s'exposeraient à des poursuites judiciaires. Nous savons qu'il est possible de lutter contre le piratage à l'échelle mondiale lorsque des pays — par exemple la Nouvelle-Zélande et le Canada dans le cas de Popcorn Time — prennent des mesures concertées découlant des dispositions d'application. Cela a permis de lutter efficacement contre le problème dans son ensemble.

(1720)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole va à M. Lake pour cinq minutes.

L'hon. Mike Lake (Edmonton—Wetaskiwin, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai un peu une impression de déjà-vu. Pendant huit ans, j'ai été secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de l'Industrie. Il me semble que nous avons tenu à peu près les mêmes propos il y a trois ou quatre ans.

Je veux aussi remercier Mme Finlay. Chaque fois qu'un témoin dit « contrairement à ce que vient tout juste de vous dire », suivi du nom d'un autre témoin, les séances deviennent beaucoup plus intéressantes.

Madame Parker, en réaction, vous nous avez dit que le gouvernement, d'une certaine façon, j'imagine, avait omis de régler la question de la paternité d'une oeuvre. Est-ce réellement que le gouvernement a omis de régler la question, ou est-ce plutôt que la question n'a pas été réglée d'une façon qui convient à votre organisation?

Mme Maureen Parker:

À dire vrai, la question n'a pas été traitée, point à ligne.

De la façon dont les choses fonctionnent présentement, conformément au seul jugement rendu sur la question, les scénaristes et les réalisateurs sont considérés comme étant les auteurs des oeuvres audiovisuelles. C'est un problème pour vous et pour les détenteurs du droit d'auteur, parce que le droit est lié à la vie de l'auteur. Comment peut-on savoir à quelle vie le droit est lié si on ne détermine pas qui est l'auteur?

De nombreux avocats en droit du divertissement se sont prononcés sur le sujet. C'est une zone très grise. Disney, par exemple, s'assurerait que cela n'arrive jamais. Il verrait à ce que la durée du droit d'auteur sur un personnage soit claire. Au Canada, la question n'est pas réglée, ce qui crée de la confusion. L'auteur est une personne, et nous sommes très reconnaissants du travail que font les producteurs afin d'exploiter une production à des fins commerciales; ils financent et distribuent l'oeuvre, mais ils n'en sont pas les créateurs. Le fait que la paternité d'une oeuvre n'est pas définie dans le régime actuel est une vraie lacune.

L'hon. Mike Lake:

Les députés sont souvent en désaccord. Mais j'ai constaté pendant le dernier tour que, en ce qui a trait au droit d'auteur, nous nous entendons tous sur un point: nous voulons que les gens créent des oeuvres excellentes. Nous voulons tous pouvoir en profiter. Nous voulons que nos créateurs soient rémunérés adéquatement en fonction du contenu qu'ils créent, mais les témoins que nous avons reçus ne s'entendent pas sur la forme que cela devrait prendre.

Nous, les députés, nous rendons souvent compte que les experts sont ceux qui surveillent ces questions de près, mais j'aimerais pouvoir expliquer ce genre de choses aux gens de ma circonscription. Que diriez-vous à un Canadien ordinaire qui ne fait pas partie de ce milieu, qui ne fait que consommer le contenu? Comment lui expliqueriez-vous de quelle façon les scénaristes, les réalisateurs et les producteurs sont rémunérés pour le travail qu'ils accomplissent actuellement? D'un point de vue logistique, comment tout cela fonctionne-t-il, actuellement?

Je vous invite à commencer, madame Parker.

Ensuite, Mme Finlay ou M. Stohn pourront répondre. J'aimerais avoir l'opinion de tout le monde.

Mme Maureen Parker:

J'aimerais préciser rapidement qu'il y a des scénaristes qui vivent dans vos collectivités. Ce sont des créateurs. Ils paient des impôts. Ils soutiennent leur famille, et pour cela, ils ont besoin d'un revenu, de gagner leur vie.

Il existe présentement différentes méthodes de rémunération. Oui, nous menons des négociations collectives, mais cela n'englobe pas certaines choses comme l'usage secondaire. Nous entendons beaucoup parler de piratage. C'est un énorme problème commercial, bien sûr, mais il demeure que les créateurs sont le moteur de notre industrie, et ils ne sont pas rémunérés adéquatement, compte tenu de tous les usages secondaires qui sont maintenant possibles grâce aux nouvelles technologies.

La paternité d'une oeuvre n'a pas une incidence seulement sur la vie d'un auteur; elle assure une rémunération équitable et détermine la suite des choses. Je crois que le sujet a déjà été abordé. C'est une autre forme de rémunération pour les artistes. Encore une fois, c'est de cette façon que les gens deviennent des créateurs. C'est comme cela qu'ils peuvent gagner leur vie et que nous pouvons continuer à raconter nos histoires.

L'hon. Mike Lake:

Pour préciser, dans ce cas, je ne demandais pas nécessairement comment nous pourrions agrandir la tarte. Je me demandais comment nous pourrions séparer la tarte entre les trois entités dont nous venons de discuter et quelle est la situation actuelle.

Peut-être que Mme Finlay ou M. Stohn pourraient répondre.

M. Stephen Stohn:

Je pourrais peut-être essayer.

Tout cela relève réellement de négociations collectives très rigoureuses et efficaces. L'ACTRA, la Writers Guild et la Guilde canadienne des réalisateurs ont toutes tenu des réunions très longues. J'ai participé à certaines d'entre elles; vous ne voulez pas assister à ces réunions qui se poursuivent jusque tard dans la nuit et où on discute en long et en large des sujets que nous étudions justement ici, par exemple en ce qui a trait à l'usage secondaire. Mais nous réglons les questions et nous travaillons ensemble, main dans la main. Vous parliez de séparer la tarte. C'est le genre de choses que nous réglons pendant nos négociations collectives, et je ne vois pas de meilleure façon de procéder.

Je peux toutefois répondre à votre première question sur l'ensemble de la tarte, mais je ne m'aventurerai pas dans le détail parce que cela ne concerne pas le droit d'auteur. Nous traversons une crise au Canada due à l'arrivée de services chevauchants qui sont accessibles sans être assujettis aux règles relatives au contenu canadien ou à la réglementation du CRTC. Cette crise que vit notre industrie va avoir un impact réel sur la tarte elle-même.

(1725)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

J'avise tout le monde que nous allons rester un peu après 17 h 30 — probablement 15 minutes de plus, au maximum —, parce que je sais que les membres ont encore des questions à poser.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci.

Nous avons une discussion très intéressante. C'est une bonne chose de pouvoir obtenir différents points de vue. Merci à vous tous d'être ici et de nous fournir l'information dont nous avons besoin pour notre étude.

Je crois que je vais poser ma question à Caroline. J'aimerais approfondir un sujet dont nous n'avons pas beaucoup discuté, l'industrie de la musique. Certaines personnes nous ont demandé d'examiner la définition d'« enregistrement sonore » et de faire en sorte que la trame sonore d'une oeuvre cinématographique soit considérée comme un enregistrement sonore. Selon ce que nous avons entendu, une modification en ce sens permettrait aux artistes et aux créateurs d'enregistrements sonores d'être rémunérés pour l'utilisation de leurs prestations et enregistrements sonores dans des productions télévisuelles et cinématographiques, au-delà des droits initiaux qui leur sont versés — au tarif syndical — pour l'enregistrement sonore qu'ils ont créé. Si la prestation n'est pas en direct, ils ne sont pas rémunérés.

Comment cela est-il arrivé? Pourquoi avons-nous exclu les trames sonores?

J'aimerais aussi savoir — je pose la question à tous — quel serait l'impact sur l'industrie si les musiciens étaient rémunérés pour les enregistrements sonores qu'ils produisent à des fins cinématographiques.

Mme Caroline Rioux:

Merci de poser la question, mais j'ai peur de ne pas pouvoir y répondre. Ce n'est pas vraiment mon domaine d'expertise. Je crois que d'autres groupes ont déjà abordé la question dans le passé.

Peut-être que certains de mes collègues ici présents pourront s'aventurer à répondre, mais ce n'est pas mon domaine d'expertise. Plus tôt, dans ma diapositive, j'ai tenté de vous expliquer les quadrants. Votre question concerne l'autre quadrant, une autre partie de la tarte.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Il ne s'agit pas des mêmes droits de reproduction.

Mme Caroline Rioux:

Oui, exactement.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord. Merci.

Alain — ou n'importe qui d'autre —, pouvez-vous répondre?

M. Alain Lauzon:

Si vous me le permettez, je suis totalement d'accord avec Caroline. Comme je l'ai mentionné dans mon exposé, notre domaine d'expertise concerne les oeuvres, pas les enregistrements sonores. Nous n'avons pas de détails à ce sujet.

M. Stephen Stohn:

Pourrais-je intervenir? Il semble que nous sommes effectivement d'accord sur ce point. Je veux dire, dans l'ensemble, que les producteurs sont d'accord avec leurs amis de Music Canada et de l'industrie de l'enregistrement sonore sur le fait que ce serait un élargissement du droit d'auteur et même une source de revenus — de bons revenus — pour les créateurs, les artistes et les maisons de disque dans le domaine de l'enregistrement sonore.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Quelle incidence cela aurait-il sur vos si longues négociations?

M. Stephen Stohn:

Plus la tarte est grande, plus les négociations sont faciles.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Tout dépend de la partie de la tarte dont il est question. Les prix vont augmenter, car les artistes devront être payés, alors les producteurs ne réaliseront pas autant de profits, peut-être.

M. Stephen Stohn:

Les producteurs ne penchent ni d'un côté ni de l'autre quant à cette question. Si les titulaires attachés aux télédiffuseurs doivent verser une petite part de leurs revenus...

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

M. Stephen Stohn:

Nos amis et nous, de façon générale, sommes en faveur d'un renforcement du droit d'auteur.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est bon à savoir, parce que nous voulons que l'examen de la loi serve à avantager le plus possible les créateurs.

En ce qui concerne la restriction des utilisations ne portant pas atteinte au droit d'auteur... Nous avons discuté un peu des disques compacts, mais y a-t-il autre chose qu'il faudrait bloquer sur Internet ou qu'il faudrait étudier dans le cadre de notre examen de la loi, quelque chose qui ne se trouve pas dans la loi et qui servirait à lutter contre la diffusion en continu ou l'utilisation illégale de ce qui est sur le Net?

(1730)

Mme Erin Finlay:

Nous avons effleuré le sujet dans nos demandes principales, mais nous allons entrer dans le détail dans nos observations écrites, parce que c'est un sujet complexe, et nous allons aussi formuler des recommandations à propos de ce qui pourrait être fait.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je crois qu'il y a aussi un aspect technique ici. Il faudrait faire un peu de sensibilisation, parce que quand j'écoute quelque chose en diffusion en continu, je ne sais pas si ce que je fais permet aux créateurs de la musique ou du film d'être rémunérés. Je n'en ai aucune idée en tant que consommateur.

Oui, monsieur Lauzon.

M. Alain Lauzon:

Je me rappelle, en 2012, que nous voulions recevoir des avis afin de pouvoir mettre un terme à tout cela, mais les choses changent. Il faut voir ce qui se passe au Canada par rapport à la diffusion en continu. En 2014, Spotify est arrivé et a un peu changé les choses. Le problème, c'était que, dans le passé, aucun service n'était légalement accessible, alors les gens allaient où ils pouvaient trouver leur contenu; évidemment, ils avaient accès à davantage de services et tout le reste. Le problème — et c'est aussi la première question qui a été posée à propos de la valeur — c'est que, dans le monde numérique, la valeur des oeuvres est en train de diminuer, que ce soit dans l'industrie de l'enregistrement sonore ou de notre côté, les oeuvres. C'est l'une des choses dont on tient compte quand on s'intéresse à l'écart de valeur.

Je crois que nous ne donnons manifestement pas suffisamment suite aux études sur le sujet. D'autres pays comme le Royaume-Uni, la France, etc., ont mené de nombreuses études sur le piratage et y ont donné suite, avec tout ce que cela veut dire.

Une façon d'accroître la rémunération — autre que l'octroi de licences pour les téléchargements et Spotify — serait de mettre en place un régime selon lequel les créateurs seraient rémunérés lorsque les gens ne savent pas si les reproductions qu'ils font sont légales ou non.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. [Français]

Monsieur Nantel, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Il y a deux principaux sujets que je veux aborder. Commençons par le piratage. Un vol, c'est un vol. Comment pouvons-nous faire respecter la loi?

Je sais qu'un grand nombre de titulaires de droits ont l'impression que les législateurs comme nous ont tendance à penser que le piratage est chose du passé, ou qu'il l'a été du moins jusqu'à l'apparition des logiciels permettant d'enregistrer une diffusion en continu. Les gens ordinaires croient qu'il est tellement plus simple de s'abonner à Apple Music, à Netflix ou à quoi que ce soit d'autre. Il semble que ce n'est pas le cas.

Mettons cette question de côté pour l'instant et parlons de rémunération équitable. Selon vous, devrions-nous examiner le concept européen de la « destination »?

Monsieur Stohn, vous avez dit que les Netflix de ce monde ne se comportent pas comme des télédiffuseurs canadiens. Nous avons énormément poussé nos télédiffuseurs à créer du contenu canadien, comme The Beachcombers ou une autre de vos émissions. Quelles pratiques exemplaires devrions-nous adopter selon vous?

Je pose la question à M. Stohn ou à M. Lauzon...

Mme Erin Finlay:

Je vais laisser Wendy répondre, mais je crois que l'article 8.3 de la directive, de l'Union européenne, sur le droit d'auteur dans la société de l'information est le meilleur exemple. Wendy vous en a déjà parlé, et nous fondons nos demandes sur ce modèle. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Monsieur Lauzon ou monsieur Lavallée, avez-vous des choses à nous dire à ce sujet?

Il y a quelques semaines, le Comité a entendu M. David Bussières, du Regroupement des artisans de la musique. Il a démontré que, même si le Canada est doté d'un cadre légal et de politiques pour soutenir les créateurs de contenu et qu'il exige des quotas de diffusion de la part des différentes plateformes pour augmenter la découvrabilité de notre culture, les artistes ont de la difficulté à vivre de leur art. Autrefois, certains artistes, même s'ils donnaient très peu de spectacles, pouvaient vivre de leur musique.

Qu'en pensez-vous, monsieur Lauzon?

M. Alain Lauzon:

Dans le cas de M. Stohn, on parle de l'audiovisuel. Je pourrai y revenir. Ici, il est question d'audio. La valeur a diminué, c'est certain. Les modifications apportées à la Loi en 2012 nous ont fait perdre des sommes incroyables dans de nombreux domaines. Je pense entre autres à la radio commerciale et au numérique, dont nous avons parlé. Lorsqu'on vendait autrefois des albums sur des supports tangibles, on avait des chiffres. Dans le cas des téléchargements, c'est très bas.

Il y a donc une panoplie de changements. Vous parliez des quotas. Ce n'est pas ce dont nous discutons ici, mais c'est important. Il est aussi question d'exemptions et de valeur. Pour ce qui est de la valeur, il n'est pas normal qu'en Europe, le taux pour les téléchargements et la diffusion en continu se situe entre 13 et 15 %, alors qu'il se chiffre à 7 % au Canada. Je ne blâme pas la Commission, mais il doit y avoir d'autres façons d'envisager le marché.

Lorsque le service de musique en ligne a commencé à être offert, les autres pays ont pris le Canada comme modèle. En effet, le premier taux que nous avons établi était le plus élevé au monde. Or, il est maintenant un des plus bas. Quelque chose ne fonctionne pas.

J'aimerais émettre un bref commentaire au sujet de l'audiovisuel. Je ne sais pas grand-chose des scénaristes, mais, en ce qui a trait aux gens qui réalisent des oeuvres de commande dans le domaine musical, je tiens à dire qu'ils ne doivent pas céder tous leurs droits aux producteurs et aux diffuseurs, s'ils veulent augmenter leur rémunération. Or, c'est le modèle d'affaires en audiovisuel, actuellement.

M. Stohn parle de ses négociations avec les États-Unis. En effet, c'est la façon dont ils fonctionnent. En revanche, ce n'est pas le cas en Europe. Là-bas, les créateurs donnent tous les droits d'exploitation aux producteurs, par contre aucun droit d'auteur n'est donné aux producteurs, dont le rôle est de percevoir des droits.

Pour ma part, je suis membre de la CISAC, et je sais que le Canada est l'un des pays où les perceptions sont, par habitant, les moins élevées au monde. En Europe, tous contribuent à cela, particulièrement dans le monde numérique. On ne parle pas uniquement de Netflix et de tous les réseaux, mais bien des usages secondaires.

Selon le modèle actuel de l'audiovisuel, le créateur est très peu rémunéré. Tout va au producteur. Celui-ci assume un risque, j'en suis conscient, mais il y a une nuance à faire. Disons que le numérique nous amène à réfléchir à ce modèle d'affaires.

(1735)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Je partagerai mon temps avec Frank.

J'essaie de comprendre le régime actuel. Selon certains témoignages, il existe d'autres régimes qui, peut-être, fonctionneraient mieux que le nôtre. Dans le régime actuel, on envoie une lettre, puis l'industrie, qui dispose de beaucoup de ressources, embauche des avocats qui se chargent des procédures.

Quels sont les obstacles, présentement, et quel est votre taux de réussite dans le régime actuel? Pouvez-vous nous parler, d'abord, de votre taux de réussite, puis des obstacles?

Allez-y, Erin.

Mme Erin Finlay:

Merci.

Parlez-vous des poursuites en justice contre les sites au Canada qui enfreignent la loi?

M. Terry Sheehan:

Oui. Ma question porte sur le piratage et les mesures que nous pouvons prendre contre les pirates.

Mme Erin Finlay:

Je ne me suis pas penchée sur la question du piratage depuis de nombreuses années. J'ai eu la chance de ne pas pratiquer dans le privé, alors je ne peux pas vraiment vous parler du taux de réussite. Je peux vous dire un peu comment se déroule le processus, habituellement.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je veux seulement savoir quels sont les obstacles. Je suis au courant du processus.

Mme Erin Finlay:

L'un des obstacles tient au fait que, dans le régime actuel, nous devrions par exemple poursuivre Google pour obtenir une injonction, soit une injonction Mareva ou quelque chose du genre. Google utiliserait alors la même défense que n'importe quelle partie défenderesse: l'entreprise dirait qu'elle n'est pas responsable. Le problème, dans cette situation, c'est qu'au lieu de travailler ensemble pour trouver une solution, chacun campe sur ses positions, lesquelles s'opposent, devant le tribunal.

Un autre problème est que la possibilité d'obtenir une injonction fait toujours l'objet d'un débat.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Vous aimeriez que le gouvernement oblige Google à...

Mme Erin Finlay:

Je n'aurais jamais dû dire « Google ». Il peut s'agir de n'importe quel moteur de recherche.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Vous voulez que le gouvernement adopte une loi qui obligerait les fournisseurs de services à collaborer avec vous.

Mme Erin Finlay:

Pas pour les obliger — Wendy, ne vous gênez pas si vous voulez intervenir —, mais il y a toutes sortes d'options. Le problème est que le processus judiciaire est très long. Dès le début du processus judiciaire, on débat de la question de savoir si les titulaires de droits peuvent obtenir ce genre de choses, et ce débat cause bien des tiraillements. Cela prend des années et des années.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Vous pouvez parler, Wendy. Y a-t-il eu une histoire de réussite qui vous vient à l'esprit? J'ai besoin de comprendre.

(1740)

Mme Wendy Noss:

Je crois qu'une difficulté tient au fait que nous mélangeons les choses... Nous nous en tenons chacun à notre monologue, au lieu d'essayer de nous entendre. Plus tôt, je crois que vous vouliez parler de la méthode d'avis et avis.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Oui.

Mme Wendy Noss:

C'est bien ce que je pensais. Vous voyez comme je suis habituée à traduire du canadien à l'américain pour nos voisins du sud. Avec la méthode d'avis et avis, un avis est envoyé à l'utilisateur d'un site de téléchargements P2P, c'est-à-dire une personne qui accède à un site de BitTorrent. Les avis que nous envoyons, par exemple, sont surtout axés sur la sensibilisation. Nous disons à l'utilisateur: « Attention: vous ne savez peut-être pas que votre réseau n'est pas sécurisé » ou « Attention: vous ne savez peut-être pas que quelqu'un chez vous accède à un site de BitTorrent. »

M. Terry Sheehan:

L'envoi de la lettre s'inscrit-il dans une quelconque procédure judiciaire?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Non. Encore une fois, je peux seulement parler au nom de nos membres et de nos studios. Nos avis ont un but de sensibilisation, et nous les envoyons aux gens qui accèdent à des sites de BitTorrent. Ils concernent seulement les services de P2P, et visent seulement la sensibilisation. Je crois que c'est ce que vous vouliez savoir avec votre première question.

Ensuite, vers la fin, vous avez parlé de notre taux de réussite.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Oui, allez-y.

Mme Wendy Noss:

L'autre outil dont il a été question aujourd'hui est la capacité d'obtenir une injonction, par exemple pour bloquer un site, contre les intermédiaires. La raison pour laquelle la situation est différente de celle dont a parlé M. Lake plus tôt, c'est que nous avons aujourd'hui près d'une décennie d'expérience, dans l'Union européenne et dans 40 autres pays qui ont recours au blocage de sites. Les études ont montré, tout d'abord, que les utilisateurs ont moins souvent accès aux sites qui sont bloqués. Cela va de soi, mais il y a aussi deux conclusions très importantes que nous pouvons tirer des études. Premièrement, dans les pays qui ont recours au blocage de sites, le nombre d'utilisateurs qui accèdent légalement à du contenu augmente; les utilisateurs accèdent davantage aux autres services chevauchants et aux services de téléchargements légaux. Deuxièmement, les cas de piratage diminuent globalement.

Il y a des études dans ces autres pays qui montrent clairement que les outils de blocage sont avancés sur le plan technologique et très efficaces.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup. Je vais céder le reste de mon temps, car vous avez très bien su répondre.

Le président:

Soyez bref. [Français]

M. Frank Baylis:

J'ai une question pour M. Lavallée.

Le cinquième point abordé dans votre présentation portait sur l'emplacement des serveurs. Vous avez parlé des serveurs qui n'étaient pas situés au Canada, mais je n'ai pas vraiment compris ce que vous vouliez dire. Pouvez-vous m'expliquer le défi que cela représente pour vous?

Me Martin Lavallée:

Il est question ici plus précisément du droit de reproduction. Dans le monde numérique, la valeur de l'oeuvre est associée au serveur où la copie a été effectuée initialement. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur est floue à cet égard. Une personne pourrait avoir gain de cause en faisant valoir que, comme la reproduction a été faite dans un autre pays, la loi canadienne ne s'applique pas.

Il faudrait simplement introduire une notion de neutralité technologique dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. La version actuelle de la Loi comporte un article sur la violation du droit d'auteur à une étape ultérieure, c'est-à-dire quand on produit un exemplaire d'une oeuvre. Si, par exemple, des livres sont imprimés ailleurs et importés au Canada, et que l'autorisation n'a pas été donnée au départ par le titulaire canadien dans l'autre pays, cette importation est considérée comme une violation du droit d'auteur. Dans le cas qui nous occupe, il faudrait simplement remplacer le mot « exemplaire » par « copie numérique ». Supposons qu'une reproduction soit placée sur un serveur dans un nuage quelconque et que le titulaire canadien n'ait pas donné son autorisation au départ. Comme ce service dessert principalement des consommateurs canadiens, le même recours devrait être possible. Il faudrait qu'on puisse faire valoir que la loi canadienne s'applique, étant donné que les destinataires sont des Canadiens. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Noss, vous avez dit que les cas de piratage diminuaient. Cela va-t-il être abordé dans le rapport que vous nous ferez parvenir?

Mme Wendy Noss:

Le document que j'ai pour vous aujourd'hui — en français et en anglais — explique ce que nous savons du piratage. Je me ferai un plaisir de fournir également au Comité un recueil de certaines études d'Europe ou d'ailleurs.

Le président:

Excellent. Notre objectif est d'obtenir de l'information, aux fins du compte rendu. Une fois que ce sera fait, nos merveilleux analystes trouveront le moyen de démêler tout cela.

Les cinq dernières minutes vont à M. Lake.

L'hon. Mike Lake:

Je suis certain que nos analystes ne manqueront pas d'information à analyser dans le cadre de cette étude.

Monsieur Lauzon, vous avez parlé du régime de copie pour usage privé. Quelle position votre organisation défend-elle, précisément, à ce sujet?

(1745)

M. Alain Lauzon:

La SODRAC est partie au régime de copie pour usage privé, et je crois que vous avez reçu la semaine dernière les représentantes de la Société canadienne de la perception de la copie privée, du régime du droit d'auteur, et qu'elles vous ont expliqué ce que nous voulions par rapport à cela. Si vous vous souvenez, c'est en 1997 que les dispositions législatives sur le régime du droit d'auteur sont entrées en vigueur au Canada.

L'hon. Mike Lake:

Monsieur Lauzon, je dois vous interrompre un instant. Je siège au Comité pour la première fois aujourd'hui, et je me demandais si vous pouviez rapidement nous dire comment cela se passe de votre côté.

M. Alain Lauzon:

D'accord.[Français]

Le régime de la copie privée vise les reproductions qui sont faites par les consommateurs, mais que nous ne pouvons pas contrôler.

Au Canada, le régime de la copie privée a été introduit en 1997 et il visait les supports physiques, soit les DVD et les cassettes. Par la suite, certaines personnes ont plaidé pour que le régime de la copie privée soit technologiquement neutre, c'est-à-dire pour qu'il s'applique dorénavant aux copies faites au moyen de téléphones ou de tablettes, mais la cour en a décidé autrement. Le caractère de neutralité technologique n'a pas non plus été introduit dans la Loi lors de sa modernisation en 2012. Tout ce que nous demandons, c'est que ce régime soit technologiquement neutre, afin qu'il s'applique également aux supports numériques.

Comme la Loi ne sera pas modifiée avant un certain temps, nous demandons qu'un fonds compensatoire soit créé, dans l'intervalle.

Le régime de la copie privée représentait 40 millions de dollars pour les ayants droit. Aujourd'hui, les reproductions sur DVD sont en baisse, de telle sorte que ce régime représente maintenant environ 2 millions de dollars. Il s'agit d'un endroit où l'on pourrait véritablement compenser les pertes de revenus des ayants droit. Depuis six ou sept ans, les ayants droit ont perdu 38 millions de dollars par année. [Traduction]

L'hon. Mike Lake:

Vous parlez des 40 millions de dollars par année dont il était question dans...

M. Alain Lauzon: Oui.

L'hon. Mike Lake: D'accord.

Plus tôt, vous avez dit, en réponse à une question, qu'une rémunération serait possible lorsque les gens font des choses sans savoir si c'est légal ou pas. Est-ce...?

M. Alain Lauzon:

Non. Dans le mémoire de la Société canadienne de perception de la copie privée qui a été déposé, il était seulement question de rémunération pour les copies obtenues légalement. Vous devez savoir que nous exploitons avec la CMRRA une coentreprise du nom de CSI. Nous délivrons des licences de...

L'hon. Mike Lake:

Les 40 millions de dollars servent à compenser les copies illégales, est-ce bien cela?

M. Alain Lauzon:

Il ne s'agit pas de copies illégales. Il s'agit de copies produites par un consommateur que nous ne contrôlons pas. La source n'est pas illégale, au contraire.

L'hon. Mike Lake:

Disons que j'achète un disque compact au marché aux puces ou ailleurs, et que j'en fais une copie sur mon ordinateur; vous dites que je devrais payer des frais supplémentaires pour cette copie?

M. Alain Lauzon:

Absolument. Nous délivrons des licences pour iTunes, et, si vous téléchargez une chanson, la licence s'applique aussi, mais pas sur votre ordinateur, sur vos appareils mobiles ou vos iPad.

Ce qui nous intéresse ce sont les cas où une personne fait une copie ou télécharge une copie à partir d'Internet — que ce soit d'une source légale ou non —, parce que nous ne pouvons pas délivrer de licences pour cette copie. Voilà la raison. Cela a de la valeur, et le régime de copie pour usage privé est bien reconnu dans tous les pays. Je pourrais vous transmettre une étude de la CISAC sur les régimes de copie pour usage privé du monde entier qui décrit exactement la loi de chaque pays, comment les choses sont évaluées et combien d'argent touchent les titulaires des droits d'auteur.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Le rideau tombe, mesdames et messieurs.

Je vous remercie tous d'être venus aujourd'hui. Je me répète, mais c'est un sujet très complexe. C'est loin d'être simple d'en discuter, parce que cela suscite beaucoup d'émotions. Notre objectif est d'obtenir le plus d'information possible aux fins du compte rendu. Je veux remercier nos témoins d'avoir été parmi nous aujourd'hui.

J'ai aussi une grande nouvelle pour les membres du Comité. Nous allons continuer à siéger pendant l'été.

Des députés: Oh, non!

Le président: Je plaisante.

Je vous informe qu'à notre retour, le 17 septembre, nos analystes nous fourniront un résumé de tout ce que nous avons appris jusqu'ici par rapport à la sensibilisation, à l'édition, à la musique, aux films, à la radiodiffusion et à la télédiffusion. Nous recevrons également une analyse critique des données qui ont été présentées au Comité par la centaine de témoins — plus que 100 — que nous avons accueillis. Nous allons prendre la première séance pour passer en revue tout ce que nous avons fait.

Une voix: C'est notre devoir pour l'été.

Le président: Ce n'est pas notre devoir, c'est le leur.

Merci beaucoup. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 19, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.