header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-06-19 SMEM 15

Subcommittee on Private Members' Business of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1315)

[English]

The Chair (Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everyone. I'm pleased to call to order the 15th meeting of SMEM.

Before we begin, I want to make sure that everyone here is okay with the fact that I'm chairing this meeting today while recognizing that I also have a motion listed on the agenda.

Is everyone okay that I chair the meeting notwithstanding that I have an item listed on the agenda?

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Yes, and my respect for raising that. Obviously, it's something that I don't think you had to do, but you're just being completely above board on that. We appreciate it.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP):

I agree.

The Chair:

Thank you, Rachel.

You've all received a copy of the items?

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

On a point of order, there are two I'd like discussion on. I haven't landed on a decision about them, and maybe you guys would like to approve everything else and come back to these two. It's Bill C-405 and Bill C-406 that I have some questions about.

The Chair:

Are other members okay with doing that?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not sure which of the two....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you guys are okay with approving everything else, we can come back and talk about these two.

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

Okay.

The Chair:

That's fine with me.

Mr. Richards, are you okay with that?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't have problems with any of the other items, or the two that have been referenced either.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm not sure if I have problems with them. I just want to talk to the analyst about them before I go anywhere.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm okay with approving the rest of them, I guess, and hopefully we can approve the other two as well.

The Chair:

Okay, very good.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do I dive straight into that or...?

Okay. I'll wait for Blake to come back.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We haven't landed on anything. I just want to bring up a discussion on them. The concern that we have is that Bill C-405 risks conflicting with Bill C-27, and Bill C-406 risks conflicting with Bill C-76. I gave David, the analyst, a heads-up that I'd bring this up, so if he'd like to give us his analysis, then we can see if there's any merit to my concern or if we should just leave them the way they are.

Mr. David Groves (Committee Researcher):

As you can see from the document I distributed, it is my assessment that there isn't an issue. I'm going to go through my assessment.

The potential issue with Bill C-405 revolves around whether it concerns a question that is currently on the Order Paper, an item of government business. Specifically, Bill C-405 amends section 29 of the Pension Benefits Standards Act, the same section of the PBSA that Bill C-27 amends.

However, Bill C-405 and Bill C-27 amend different subsections of that section, so there's no formal overlap, and the substance of their proposed amendments differ. Bill C-405 amends the PBSA to allow pension plan administrators to sell off pieces of plans they are managing. Bill C-27 proposes amendments to allow the regulation of target benefit plans. I apologize, but I don't know enough about pension benefit plans to know what that is, but it's unrelated. It's a type of plan that involves fixed contributions.

As for Bill C-406, the same rule is potentially at issue, whether it concerns a question that is on the Order Paper as government business. Bill C-76 and Bill C-406 both amend the Canada Elections Act, and both deal with issues of political financing. They do not amend the same sections of the CEA, however, so there's no formal overlap, and in terms of substance, they also deal with different issues. Bill C-406 places a prohibition on foreign contributions by third parties who engage in certain types of political spending. Bill C-76 amends the Canada Elections Act to provide an expanded list of the kinds of activities that third parties cannot engage in, using unknown contributions, as opposed to foreign ones. But it also changes the definition of what a foreign entity is.

In my assessment, there is no direct formal overlap, and they deal with different substance. However, Bill C-76 provides a new definition for foreign entity, which means it would have an effect on Bill C-406. Moreover, Bill C-406 includes a coordinating amendment, so if Bill C-76 were to pass, the language inserted by Bill C-406 would change as well.

We are returning to the same criterion that has been before this committee twice already this spring. The criterion is that bills and motions must not concern questions that are currently on the Order Paper or Notice Paper as items of government business.

Unfortunately, from the rule, as I said in an earlier meeting, it's not clear what is meant by “question”, and it's not clear what is meant by “concern”. However, judging by decisions made by this committee already—it has come up twice before in the last couple of months—there was a private member's bill that SMEM found non-votable because it sought to establish a national strategy for dealing with abandoned vessels while a government bill on the Order Paper would establish a federal framework for abandoned vessels. Furthermore, SMEM found another private member's bill non-votable because it would have extended protections to a series of bodies of water in British Columbia that would, under a government bill on the Order Paper, have received very similar levels of protection. In both cases, the determination that the committee made was that the private member's bill and the government bill addressed the same issue and dealt with it in a similar enough way that, were the two bills to advance at the same time, one would be redundant.

The way I have been interpreting the words “concern” and “question” is to see their being about preventing a few problems. One is pure duplication: two bills that exist to do the exact same thing in the exact same way. Another is conflict: two bills trying to achieve two opposing goals using the same section of an existing act, so they could not exist at the same time. The last is redundancy: two bills trying to achieve a similar enough objective that, should they pass, one or the other would be of little additional value.

The reason we care about these three criteria—duplication, conflict, and redundancy—as I understand them, is that this committee is interested in providing members the fullest opportunity possible to use their private members' time effectively, so that if the bill or the motion would have little or no effect, they should be given the opportunity to replace it.

In the two cases before the committee, I do not see duplication, conflict, or redundancy to be significant concerns. Each bill is concerned with a particular subject that the relevant government legislation has not addressed, and they do not overlap formally.

It's important to note, too, that SMEM in the recent past has permitted PMBs to move forward even if they touched on the same legislation as a pending government bill would, since they addressed different subjects within the ambit of that bill. Typically it has been Elections Act-related bills that we permitted to move forward on that basis.

It is my assessment that these bills do not trigger that rule and, therefore, that they can be declared not non-votable.

(1320)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Madam Chair, having heard the advice we just received, I would move that we not find Bill C-405 or Bill C-406 to be items that would need to be deemed non-votable.

The Chair:

Is everyone in agreement?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, David, for that deep analysis. I really appreciate it. I will agree with Blake on this. It's fine. I just wanted to know for sure.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I assume that's the correct form.

The Chair:

Yes, it was good. It's a double negative.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor] is correct.

The Chair:

We're all in agreement. Thank you very much.

This will be the last meeting, so I hope everyone has a wonderful summer.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have to do the motions to send this to the House?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Excellent.

Thank you, guys.

The Chair:

Very good.

The meeting is adjourned.

Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1315)

[Traduction]

La présidente (Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. Bonjour et bienvenue à la 15e séance du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés.

Avant que nous commencions, je tiens à m'assurer que tout le monde ici accepte le fait que je préside la séance d'aujourd'hui tout en ayant une motion inscrite à l'ordre du jour.

Est-ce que vous acceptez tous que je préside la séance, même si j'ai une affaire inscrite à l'ordre du jour?

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Oui, et je vous remercie de l'avoir mentionné. Vous n'étiez manifestement pas obligée de le faire. Vous agissez d'une manière irréprochable, et nous vous en remercions.

La présidente:

Très bien, merci.

Mme Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NPD):

Je suis d'accord.

La présidente:

Merci, Rachel.

Avez-vous tous reçu un exemplaire des affaires?

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement. Il y en a deux pour lesquelles j'aimerais que nous tenions une discussion. Je ne suis pas arrivé à une décision à ce sujet, et vous aimeriez peut-être approuver tout le reste et revenir ensuite à ces deux affaires. Mes questions concernent les projets de loi C-405 et C-406.

La présidente:

Les autres membres sont-ils d'accord?

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne sais pas lequel des deux...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous acceptez d'approuver tout le reste, nous pouvons revenir à ces deux projets de loi et en discuter.

Mme Rachel Blaney:

D'accord.

La présidente:

Cela me va.

Monsieur Richards, cela vous convient-il?

M. Blake Richards:

Aucune des autres affaires ne me pose problème, ni les deux dont il est question, d'ailleurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne suis pas certain qu'elles me posent problème. Je veux simplement en parler avec l'analyste avant d'aller plus loin.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis d'accord pour approuver tout le reste, je suppose, et j'espère que nous pourrons approuver les deux autres également.

La présidente:

Très bien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que je passe directement à cela ou...?

D'accord, je vais attendre que Blake revienne.

La présidente:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous ne sommes arrivés à rien. Je veux simplement que nous en discutions. Ce qui nous préoccupe, c'est que le projet de loi C-405 risque d'être en conflit avec le projet de loi C-27, et que le projet de loi C-406 risque d'être en conflit avec le projet de loi C-76. J'ai averti David, notre analyste, que je soulèverais cette question; s'il veut nous faire part de son analyse, nous pourrons ensuite voir si mes préoccupations sont fondées ou si nous devons tout simplement laisser les choses comme elles sont.

M. David Groves (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Comme vous pouvez le voir dans le document que je vous ai distribué, selon mon analyse, cela ne pose pas de problème. Je vais passer en revue mon évaluation.

Le problème qui pourrait se poser avec le projet de loi C-405 se résume à savoir s'il concerne une question actuellement inscrite au Feuilleton sous la rubrique « Affaires émanant du gouvernement ». Plus précisément, le projet de loi C-405 modifie l'article 29 de la Loi sur les normes de prestation de pension, et le projet de loi C-27 modifie le même article de la même loi.

Toutefois, le projet de loi C-405 et le projet de loi C-27 modifient des paragraphes différents de cet article; officiellement, il n'y a donc aucun chevauchement, et la teneur des modifications proposées diffère. Le projet de loi C-405 modifie la Loi sur les normes de prestation de pension afin de permettre aux administrateurs de régime de pension de vendre des éléments des régimes qu'ils gèrent. Le projet de loi C-27, quant à lui, propose des modifications afin de prévoir la réglementation des régimes à prestations cibles. Je suis désolé, mais je ne connais pas suffisamment les régimes de prestations de retraite pour savoir de quoi il s'agit, mais cela n'a rien à voir. C'est un type de régime à cotisations fixes.

Pour ce qui est du projet de loi C-406, la même règle pourrait être en cause, selon qu'il s'agit d'une question inscrite au Feuilleton sous la rubrique « Affaires émanant du gouvernement ». Le projet de loi C-76 et le projet de loi C-406 modifient tous les deux la Loi électorale du Canada et ils portent tous les deux sur des questions de financement politique. Ils ne modifient pas, cependant, les mêmes articles de la Loi électorale du Canada; il n'y a donc aucun chevauchement à proprement parler, et la teneur des modifications diffère également. Le projet de loi C-406 interdit que des contributions de l'étranger soient apportées à des tiers qui se livrent à certains types de dépenses politiques. Le projet de loi C-76 modifie la Loi électorale du Canada afin de prévoir une liste élargie des activités auxquelles des tiers ne peuvent pas se livrer, en utilisant des contributions inconnues, comparativement à des contributions de l'étranger. Il modifie également la définition d'entité étrangère.

Selon mon évaluation, il n'y a pas de chevauchement direct, et la teneur des modifications est différente. Cependant, le projet de loi C-76 prévoit une nouvelle définition du terme « entité étrangère », ce qui signifie que cela aurait une incidence sur le projet de loi C-406. Qui plus est, le projet de loi C-406 comporte une disposition de coordination; ainsi, si le projet de loi C-76 était adopté, le langage inséré par le projet de loi C-406 changerait également.

Nous revenons au même critère qui a déjà été soulevé à deux occasions au Comité ce printemps, soit que les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas porter sur des questions actuellement inscrites au Feuilleton ou au Feuilleton des avis sous la rubrique « Affaires émanant du gouvernement ».

Malheureusement, selon la règle, comme je l'ai dit au cours d'une réunion antérieure, ce qu'on entend par « question » et par « porter  » n'est pas clair. Toutefois, dans les décisions qu'a déjà prises le Comité — c'est arrivé à deux reprises au cours des derniers mois —, le Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés a jugé qu'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire ne pouvait pas faire l'objet d'un vote parce qu'il visait à établir une stratégie nationale sur les navires abandonnés, alors qu'un projet de loi du gouvernement inscrit au Feuilleton établissait un cadre fédéral pour les navires abandonnés. De plus, le Sous-comité a jugé qu'un autre projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire ne pouvait pas faire l'objet d'un vote parce qu'il aurait étendu les protections à une série de cours d'eau, en Colombie-Britannique, qui auraient reçu, selon un projet de loi du gouvernement inscrit au Feuilleton, des niveaux de protection très semblables. Dans les deux cas, le Comité a déterminé que le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire et le projet de loi du gouvernement traitaient du même problème et s'y attaquaient d'une façon suffisamment semblable pour que l'un d'entre eux soit redondant s'ils passaient tous les deux à la prochaine étape.

Selon mon interprétation des mots « porter » et « question », ils visent à prévenir quelques problèmes. Le premier problème est le double emploi: deux projets de loi qui visent à faire exactement la même chose, exactement de la même manière. Le deuxième est le conflit: deux projets de loi qui visent l'atteinte de deux buts contradictoires au moyen du même article d'une loi existante, de sorte qu'ils ne pourraient exister en même temps. Le troisième est la redondance: deux projets de loi qui visent l'atteinte d'un objectif suffisamment semblable pour que, s'ils étaient adoptés, l'un ou l'autre n'apporterait que peu d'avantages additionnels.

La raison pour laquelle nous tenons compte de ces trois critères — le double emploi, le conflit et la redondance —, c'est que le Comité cherche à offrir aux députés toutes les chances possibles d'utiliser efficacement le temps réservé aux affaires émanant des députés, afin que si le projet de loi ou la motion n'avait que peu ou pas d'effet, ils aient la possibilité de le ou la remplacer.

En ce qui concerne les deux cas qui sont présentés au Comité, je ne considère pas que le double emploi, le conflit ou la redondance sont des problèmes importants. Chaque projet de loi porte sur un sujet précis que le projet de loi du gouvernement n'aborde pas, et il n'y a pas de chevauchement.

Il est important de souligner également que le Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés a permis récemment que des projets de loi émanant d'un député aillent de l'avant, même s'ils portaient sur la même mesure législative qu'un projet de loi présenté par le gouvernement, étant donné qu'ils visaient des sujets différents, et ce sont en général des projets de loi sur la Loi électorale qui ont pu aller de l'avant en ce sens.

Selon mon évaluation, la règle ne s'applique pas à ces projets de loi et, par conséquent, ils ne devraient pas être désignés non votables.

(1320)

M. Blake Richards:

Madame la présidente, compte tenu de l'avis que nous venons de recevoir, je propose que nous ne déclarions pas que les projets de loi C-405 et C-406 doivent être considérés comme des affaires non votables.

La présidente:

Êtes-vous tous d'accord?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, David, de cette analyse approfondie. Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Je suis d'accord avec Blake là-dessus. Tout est bien. Je voulais simplement m'en assurer.

La présidente:

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

Je présume que la formulation est correcte.

La présidente:

Oui, elle l'est. C'est une double négation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] est correct.

La présidente:

Nous sommes tous d'accord. Merci beaucoup.

C'est notre dernière réunion. J'espère que tout le monde passera un très bel été.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Devez-vous proposer les motions pour le renvoi à la Chambre?

La présidente:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Excellent.

Merci à tous.

La présidente:

Très bien.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 19, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.