header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-26 INDU 139

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order. We are going to get started. We have a busy meeting ahead of us.

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 139, as we continue our legislative five-year review of the Copyright Act.

Today we have with us, as an individual, Jeff Price, chief executive officer and founder of Audiam Inc. We have, from Facebook, Kevin Chan, head of public policy, and Probir Mehta, head of global intellectual property policy—say that five times fast. We have, from Google Canada, Jason J. Kee, public policy and government relations counsel. Finally, from Spotify, we have Darren Schmidt, senior counsel.

Welcome, everybody. You will each have seven minutes to make your presentations. We'll go through all the presentations, and then we'll get into our questioning.

Just so all of our members are aware, Mr. Schmidt, from Spotify, will leave at five o'clock. If you have questions for Spotify, front-load them. Is that fair enough? Excellent.

We're going to start off with Mr. Price. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Jeff Price (Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Audiam Inc., As an Individual):

Oops. I didn't even get my timer going.

The Chair:

It's okay. I will cut you off.

Mr. Jeff Price:

I assumed as much.

Thanks for having me.

My name is Jeff Price. I ran a record label called spinART Records for about 17 years, releasing bands like the Pixies, Echo and the Bunnymen, Ron Sexsmith, and even a Gordon Lightfoot record.

In 2005 I launched a company called TuneCore that quickly became the largest music distribution company in the world. I changed the global music industry business model. What I did was allow any artist anywhere in the world who recorded music to have access to distribute music and put it onto the shelf of digital music services where people would go to buy the music. Upon the sale of the music, I also changed how they were paid. I gave them 100% of the money. There was no record label between the artist and the retail shop. They were the record label. Anything that we were paid flowed through to them.

In addition, I allowed them to keep ownership of their own copyrights. The traditional music industry had to first editorially decide they were going to let you in, and then upon being let in, you would assign ownership of your copyrights to them, and then they would pay you about 12% of the money.

We democratized the music industry and let everybody in to put their music onto the digital shelves. When the music sold, they would get all of the money and they would keep ownership of their copyrights.

The company grew very rapidly. Within about a three-year period, the clients of TuneCore sold over $800 million in gross music sales of their music—the “everybody else”. All of this money flowed through and went back to them. TuneCore was paid a simple upfront flat fee for its service, so we commoditized distribution while democratizing it.

A number of years into running the company, a very strange thing happened. We were distributing, every single month, between 100,000 to 150,000 new recordings. To provide some perspective on that, the Warner Music Group, in its heyday, was distributing about 3,600 new recordings a year. We were distributing 100,000 to 150,000 new copyrights every single month. We were distributing 50 years in the music industry in a month. These days it's over 250,000 new recordings a month coming from these do-it-yourselfers, these people who own their own copyrights and get all of their money coming back to them.

Four years into running the company, I began to think about the second separate royalty these people got, because it turns out they were two things. Here's an example: Sony records hired Whitney Houston to sing the song I Will Always Love You, which I will sing at the end of this—no, I won't—but Dolly Parton wrote the lyric and the melody. Those are the two separate and distinct copyrights. Every time that recording streamed or was downloaded, there were two separate licences and two separate distinct payments that had to be made, one to Sony for the recording and one to Dolly for the lyric and the melody. It turns out that the clients of TuneCore—the do-it-yourselfers—were both Sony records and Dolly Parton at the same time. Every time there's a download or a stream, there are two licences and two payments. TuneCore was only collecting the payment for the recordings, not for the lyric and melody, and it began to embark on a curious adventure. Where is the second royalty?

I discovered over $100 million had been generated in the second royalty that they had never been paid because of inefficiencies in the system. There were no pipelines, no way to do this, and we began to recover that money.

Along the way, as we got to the end of my TuneCore tenure, I launched a second company in 2012. I left TuneCore and launched a company called Audiam. The $100 million that hadn't been paid to the Dolly Partons of the world, the songwriters, never left my mind.

When Audiam was born—my new company—I thought we really needed to go to work for the Dolly Partons of the world, or the people who work for the Dolly Partons of the world, and ensure their music is licensed and being paid for by the streaming and other digital music services. That's what Audiam now does—it licenses and collects money for Bob Dylan, Metallica, Red Hot Chili Peppers, the people who wrote the songs, who sometimes are the same people who did the recording.

We discovered, in the United States and in Canada, massive infringement. The digital music services were using these compositions, these lyrics and melodies, without licences, and they were doing it without any payments either. We embarked on a way to help remove that friction in licence and work with many of the people I'm sitting here with.

But the thing that has really stuck with me that I want to drive home to you as a committee is that the majority of copyrights that are being produced, created, distributed today in music come from the “everybody else”. They come from outside of that traditional industry. Their market share is growing as far as revenue and market share are concerned, while the major music record labels' market share is declining. It's these people who are being impacted by what's happening today, because they're getting the larger market share. As you go forward in time, the volume of copyrights that is being created will continue to be propagated from the diaspora, the “everybody else”.

(1535)



The really important point is that traditionally you would have a multinational corporation like Sony, one entity with three million copyrights; now you have three million individuals, each with one copyright. The way these people are impacted is contingent upon rulings, regulations, rates and so forth—copyright, and what should and shouldn't be licensed—but remember now it's about the individual as opposed to a multinational corporation, in many respects.

Two kids in their bedroom came to TuneCore, as one example of thousands. They wrote a song about sexting and sold over one million copies of this song around the world with no idea that they had earned these royalties. Their money ultimately was taken and given to the large music publishing companies—Universal, Warner and Sony—based on their market share, because they didn't even have the information to know that they earned it.

That's a quick summation of me and my company, and I suspect that's why I'm here today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Facebook and Mr. Chan.

Mr. Kevin Chan (Head of Public Policy, Facebook Inc.):

Thank you very much, sir.

Before I begin, I apologize. I thought I had eight minutes, so I probably will go a little long.

The Chair:

He was six minutes, so we might allow for one minute over. [Translation]

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair and members of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, on behalf of Facebook, I want to thank you for giving us the opportunity to speak to you today.

My name is Kevin Chan, and I'm the head of public policy at Facebook Canada. I'm joined by Probir Mehta, the head of global intellectual property policy.

At Facebook, we encourage creativity and the spread of culture online. We believe that, through Facebook, content creators from all walks of life, including musicians, sports leagues, publishers and television or film studios, are given new ways to share their content, attract the offline audience and promote their creativity.

Facebook also gives rights holders tools to protect and promote their content, while protecting the right to freedom of expression for all users.[English]

I want to start by sharing some concrete examples of how we're working with artists, creators and cultural institutions across the country to promote and empower their work.

Many copyright holders have Facebook pages and use our tools to promote and expand the reach of their content. At Facebook Canada we have a partnerships team whose mandate is to work with publishers, artists and creators to help them maximize the value of the Facebook platform by reaching new audiences, engaging directly with fans and promoting their work here in Canada and around the world.

For the last two years, this team has led a partnership with the National Arts Centre, helping it fulfill its mandate of being an arts centre for all Canadians across the country. For the recent Canada 150 celebrations, Facebook was proud to have been the NAC's digital partner as its musicians and artists travelled across the country connecting with Canadians both physically and online.

To give you just one example, with respect to the NAC English Theatre's recent Tartuffe tour to Newfoundland, the sharing of some of the tour's content on Facebook allowed the NAC to greatly expand their footprint in the province, reaching over 395,000 Newfoundlanders online, or about 75% of the province's population.

We're also focused on supporting emerging creators, helping them engage and grow their community, manage their presence and build a business on Facebook. For three years we have supported emerging Canadian music artists through the Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences master class program, participating as mentors on how to reach new audiences on Facebook.

Finally, many cultural institutions are non-profit organizations with charitable status, and earlier this month we were very excited to have launched several new ways for charities in Canada to fundraise directly on Facebook. We make this service available without charging any fees and are thrilled that around the world over $1 billion has already been raised in this way directly on Facebook. We are looking forward to having an equally positive impact in Canada.

(1540)

[Translation]

Facebook takes the protection of rights holders' intellectual property seriously. To that end, Facebook has implemented a number of measures to help rights holders protect their rights through a rigorous global program to combat copyright infringement.[English]

We have three pillars to our intellectual property program.

First, our terms of service and community standards are the foundation our platform is built on. They expressly prohibit users from posting content that infringes any third parties' IP rights or otherwise violates the law, and they state that users who post infringing content will face penalties up to and including having their accounts disabled.

Second, our global IP protection program provides rights holders with opportunities to report content that they believe is infringing. We have dedicated channels for rights holders to report instances of infringement, including via our online reporting forms available through our intellectual property help centre. Reports can be submitted for a variety of content types, including individual posts, videos, advertisements and even entire profiles and pages. These reports are processed by our IP operations team, which is a global team of specially trained IP professionals who provide 24-7 coverage in multiple languages, including English and French.

If a rights holder's report is complete and valid, the reported content is promptly removed, often within a few hours. We also implement a comprehensive repeat infringer policy, under which we disable Facebook profiles and pages that repeatedly or blatantly post infringing content. Users who have their content removed in response to a report are notified of that removal at the time it occurs. These users are also provided information regarding the report, including the name and email address of the rights holder that submitted the report in case the parties wish to resolve the matter directly.

Third, we continue to invest heavily in state-of-the-art tools that allow us to protect copyright at scale across our platform, even if no rights holder has reported any specific instances of infringement.

We have developed our own content management tool, Rights Manager, to help rights holders protect their copyrights on Facebook. Participating rights holders can upload reference files, and when a match is found can decide what actions to take: blocking the video and thereby eliminating the need to continuously report matches as infringing, monitoring video metrics for the match, or reporting the video for removal.

For many years, we have also used Audible Magic, a third party service that maintains a database of audio content owned by content creators, to proactively detect content that contains the copyrighted material of third parties, including songs, movies and television shows. If a match is detected, that content is blocked, and the user that uploaded the content is notified of the block and given the opportunity to appeal if the user has the necessary rights.

In our transparency report released just a few weeks ago, we highlighted data covering the volume and nature of copyright reports we received, as well as the amount of content affected by those reports. During the first half of 2018, on Facebook and Instagram we took down nearly three million pieces of content based on nearly half a million copyright reports.

(1545)

[Translation]

Lastly, Facebook believes that the copyright regime should represent everyone's interests. Regimes such as the one in Canada are flexible, and they promote innovation while protecting the intellectual property of rights holders.

Facebook hopes that the committee will continue to maintain the innovation-friendly regime of the Copyright Act, in order to promote the development of new content options and new ways for creators to launch their business and build a name for themselves.[English]

Thank you again for the opportunity to appear before you. We would be pleased to take your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Google Canada, with Jason Kee. You have up to seven minutes, please.

Mr. Jason Kee (Public Policy and Government Relations Counsel, Google Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. We appreciate the opportunity to participate in your review.

Google has over 1,000 employees across four offices in Canada, including over 600 engineers working on products used by billions of people worldwide, and ads and cloud teams helping Canadian businesses make the most of digital technology.

Canadian businesses and creators of all kinds use our products and services to connect with consumers and monetize their audiences. According to a recent economic impact study published by Deloitte, which I believe has been distributed to the committee, businesses, publishers and creators generated up to $21 billion in economic activity last year alone, supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs.

The essence of Google’s remuneration and revenue models is a partnership model. Creators such as publishers, producers and developers supply content, while we provide distribution and monetization, technical infrastructure, sales, payment systems, business support and other resources. We then share the resulting revenue, the majority of which goes to the creator every time.

Partnership means that we only earn revenue when our partners earn revenue. It is in our interests to ensure our partners’ success and sustainability. This is why we invest significantly in technology, tools and resources to prevent piracy on our platforms. The Internet has enabled creators to connect, create and distribute their work like never before to build global audiences and sustainable revenue streams, but this new creative economy must ensure that creators can both share their content and make money from it, including cutting off those who would pirate that content.

Five key principles guide our substantial investments in fighting piracy: create more legitimate alternatives; follow the money; be efficient, effective and scalable; guard against abuse; and provide transparency.

The first principle is to create more and better legitimate alternatives. Piracy often arises when it is difficult for consumers to access legitimate content. By developing products that make that easy to do, Google helps to both drive revenue for creative industries and give consumers choice. For instance, the music industry has earned over $6 billion in ad revenue from YouTube, including $1.8 billion in the last year alone.

To do this, we offer a variety of services: ad-supported services like YouTube, subscriptions like Google Play Music and YouTube Premium, and transaction-based services like Google Play Movies & TV. We also support emerging forms of monetization, such as in-app purchases in Google Play Games, and YouTube memberships and Super Chat, which allow users to directly support their favourite creators. Also, we’re finding new ways to allow creators to develop other revenue streams, such as merchandising, ticketing and brand sponsorships.

We want creators to diversify revenue and reduce dependence on ads or subscriptions. This not only helps them build sustainable creative businesses but also insulates them against the negative impacts of piracy.

The second principle is to follow the money. Sites dedicated to online piracy are trying to make money. We need to cut off that supply. Google enforces rigorous policies to prevent these bad actors from exploiting our ads and monetization systems. In 2017 we disapproved more than 10 million ads that we suspected of copyright infringement and removed some 7,000 websites from our AdSense program for copyright violations.

Third is to provide enforcement tools that are efficient, effective, and scalable. In Search, we have streamlined processes to allow rights holders to submit removal notices. Since launching this tool, we’ve removed over three billion infringing URLs. We also factor in the volume of valid removal notices in our ranking of search results.

On YouTube, we’ve invested more than $100 million in Content ID, our industry-leading copyright management system. Content ID allows rights holders to upload reference files and automatically compares those files against every upload on YouTube. When Content ID finds a match, the rights holder can block the video from being viewed, monetize the video by running ads against it or leave the video up and track its viewership statistics.

Over 9,000 partners use Content ID. They choose to monetize over 90% of the claims—and 95% in the case of music—and we’ve paid out over $3 billion to these partners. Content ID is highly effective, managing over 98% of copyright issues on YouTube and 99.5% in the case of sound recordings.

These are just a few of the enforcement tools that we make available for creators and rights holders.

Principles four and five are to guard against abuse and provide transparency. Unfortunately, some do abuse our tools, making false claims in order to remove content they simply don't like. We invest substantial resources to address this and publish information on removal requests in our transparency report.

Google is generating more revenue for creators and rights holders and doing more to fight back against online piracy than it ever has before. Intermediary “safe harbours”, such as the measures clarifying liability of network and hosting services, introduced in 2012, are essential to this.

Indeed, such protections are central to the very operation of the open Internet. If online services are liable for the activities of their users, then open platforms simply cannot function. The risk of liability would severely restrict their ability to allow user content onto their systems.

(1550)



This would have profound effects on open communication online, severely impacting the emerging class of digital creators who rely on these platforms for their livelihood and curtailing the broad economic benefits that intermediaries generate.

Similarly, limitations and exceptions in the act, such as fair dealing, provide critical balancing by limiting the exclusive rights granted so as to encourage access to copyrighted works and allow for reasonable uses.

One of these uses is information analytics, also referred to as text and data mining. In order for machine learning systems to learn, they need data-based training examples, and it is often necessary for the data sets to be copied, processed and repurposed. In some cases, these data sets may include material protected by copyright, like training an automated text translation system using a corpus of books translated into multiple languages. Unless there is an exception to allow this technical copying, processing and storage, machine learning could infringe copyright, even though the algorithm is merely learning from the data and not interfering with any market for that data or impacting the use by the authors.

It is unclear whether this activity would fall within existing exceptions, putting the Canadian government's substantial investments in artificial intelligence and Canada's significant competitive advantage in this field at risk. We strongly recommend the inclusion of a flexible copyright exception that would permit these types of processes and give much-needed certainty.

I'm happy to discuss these issues with you in more detail and I look forward to your questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, we go to Spotify. Mr. Schmidt, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Darren Schmidt (Senior Counsel, Spotify):

Thank you for inviting Spotify to contribute to this committee's statutory review. My name is Darren Schmidt. I'm senior counsel at Spotify, responsible for content licensing in Canada and globally.

I'm delighted to talk to you about Spotify, and particularly about the benefits of our service to recording artists and songwriters, as well as their fans.

We've also been requested by this committee, as well as the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, to explain generally the various ways that we pay royalties to rights holders, recording artists and musicians.

First, let me introduce the company.

Spotify is a Swedish company that was created in Stockholm in 2006. Our service launched for the first time in 2008, and it was made available in Canada in 2014. Our mission was, and remains, “to unlock the potential of human creativity—by giving a million creative artists the opportunity to live off their art and billions of fans the opportunity to enjoy and be inspired” by these creators.

Spotify is now available in 78 markets, and it has more than 191 million active users every month and 87 million paying subscribers. Through August 2018, it has paid over 10 billion euros back to rights holders around the world.

Spotify has heavily invested in the Canadian music industry, and it supports the creators of music, whether they are songwriters, composers, recording artists or performers. Spotify has given Canadian artists great exposure via its playlists. Some of Canada's most popular weekly playlists on Spotify are Hot Hits Canada, with half a million followers, and New Music Friday Canada, with 250,000 followers. In fact, even Prime Minister Trudeau released a playlist on Spotify.

More than 10,000 unique Canadian artists have been promoted through Spotify's editorial and algorithmic programming in the past month alone. Spotify has identified over 400 Canadian artists with over a million streams just in this year to date, three-quarters of which also have what could be described as a hit song—that is, one track that has produced over a million global streams since Spotify launched.

In 2017, the Government of Canada and Spotify celebrated Canada's 150th anniversary with a focus on Canadian music, promoting influential Canadians' playlists across digital outlets. We inspired Canadians to celebrate this nation's birthday with music. The campaign was complemented with substantial advertising, digital media and on-platform support.

Just this fall, we launched a campaign specifically targeted at growing our francophone hip-hop audience, and it includes marketing and editorial partnerships with prominent blogs in Quebec.

While Spotify does not typically have a direct financial relationship with recording artists and songwriters, as I'll describe shortly, it knows that the music industry as a whole is growing again after a terrible run in the early 2000s. Canada, like many markets, entered a steep decline in revenues as piracy sites like Napster, Grokster and others took off. Broadly speaking, recorded music revenues nearly halved since their peak in the late 1990s, and in Canada it was no different.

However, things have changed much for the better. Not only is the global music industry back to growth, but so is music in Canada, and 2017 was the first year that revenue from music streaming accounted for over half of the overall music market. The IFPI—that's the global organization representing record companies—has reported that the music industry in Canada has had three successive years of growth. This is a remarkable achievement, given that revenue from streaming was negligible just five years ago. Spotify, since launching, has been a big part of that comeback story.

I want to turn now to providing some detail for this committee about how Spotify licenses its music and how those licenses result in payments to rights holders and creators.

By its nature, Spotify's service is one that relies on licenses from rights holders in order to get content on its service, rather than on user-generated content. As I believe the committee is aware, music has two separate copyrights associated with it, one for the composition and a separate one for the sound recording. The copyrights to the songs are typically held by music publishers, while the sound recordings are typically owned by record labels. Spotify obtains its licenses from both sides of this divide.

For the sound recordings, it obtains global rights from large and small record companies, as well as from—although rarely—some recording artists directly, to the extent that they control the rights on their own recordings.

With regard to the music publishing side—that is, for the songs underlying the recordings—the world is much more fragmented and difficult. This fragmentation has two primary causes.

First, unlike sound recordings, it's relatively common for a musical composition to be owned by several different entities. Consider the track In My Feelings by recording artist Drake. The copyright for that track is controlled by a single record label, Cash Money Records, distributed by Universal Music Group, my former employer. However, the song underlying that track has 16 different credited songwriters, along with five different music publishers, each controlling a different percentage of those rights. Here we have an example of per-work ownership fragmentation.

(1555)



Second, depending on the territory, different kinds of entities or royalty collection societies control different kinds of rights. Canada is a good example. In Canada, Spotify has a licence with SOCAN for the public performance rights of the compositions, but the reproduction right, or the mechanical right, for those same compositions comes from other entities, primarily CSI, which is itself a joint venture between CMRRA and SODRAC, for now, along with some others.

Spotify pays SOCAN, CSI and others, and those entities in turn are responsible for distributing those royalties to rights holders, songwriters and music publishers. I should note that I’m leaving a lot out for the sake of brevity—primarily about how in Canada, unlike in some other territories, there is no blanket mechanical licence, which would be very helpful. It is my understanding that certain statutory changes are under consideration today, or will soon be under consideration, that could effectively remove the existing blanket licence for public performance. These issues, and the resulting increase in fragmentation they represent, make it more difficult to ensure that songwriters are identified and appropriately paid for their contributions.

There are a lot of other changes forthcoming in the market. For example, SODRAC has been acquired by SOCAN. These changes may substantially change the licensing landscape. In any event, the fact that Spotify pays entities who then distribute royalties to their members means that Spotify does not generally have visibility into the amount that an individual creator receives for their creative contribution. This is true in Canada and also in the rest of the world.

In summary, Spotify was a late entrant into Canada due to our determination to respect copyright and seek licences rather than rely on copyright safe harbours. Since launching in late 2014, our story, and that of Canadian music, has been one of success.

Today, millions of Canadians are choosing not to pirate music but to access it legally. This encapsulates the origins of Spotify. We had an innate belief that if we built a legal and superior alternative to stealing, artists and songwriters would thrive. That work has begun, and we still have a long way to grow.

Thank you for letting us contribute to this study. We look forward to answering your questions.

(1600)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump right into our questions. I remind you that Mr. Schmidt has to leave in an hour, so if you have a specific question for him, make sure to ask him up front.

We're going to start off with Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair, and thank you all for coming to talk with us about this important study. We're primarily trying to figure out a way for the market to work so that creators get adequately compensated.

I'm really interested in Mr. Price's model. You mentioned flat fees, and then Mr. Schmidt also mentioned flat fees as a way of compensating creators. Having 100% going back to the creator was an interesting idea, but it made me wonder how your company gets paid in the process. Could you maybe drill in a bit about what a flat fee looks like?

Mr. Jeff Price:

Sure.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

How do you survive on your revenue stream? Tell us so we can follow.

Mr. Jeff Price:

Well, I'm no longer with TuneCore. I left six years ago. I think of TuneCore or other entities like it as a kind of Federal Express, in that you pay them a fee to deliver a package. TuneCore generates its revenue just like Federal Express. They get paid a fee for a service that would distribute and place the music onto the services of Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Simfy, and others. It's a fee-for-service model, much like buying a pack of guitar strings.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

Mr. Jeff Price:

What I find fascinating is that there has never been more revenue generated from music than there is today, but less of it is going back to the creators.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Mr. Jeff Price:

Some numbers have been bandied about up here, and I want to provide perspective on those.

A million streams on Spotify generates in the United States—and this is somewhat commensurate in Canada—somewhere in the neighbourhood of $200. That does not make a living.

What's interesting is the value of getting a million streams. It means you probably have at least 100,000 people streaming your music. How much would you pay as a technology company to hire someone to bring you 100,000 users? What is the financial value of that to an investor or an IPO?

This is unfortunately where we have a diverging of interests. Pandora has never made money. Spotify, with market capital over $25 billion, has never made money. YouTube, before it was acquired for $1 billion, never made money. The value of those entities was predicated on their market share. It's the musicians' music that attracted the users to utilize the technology, which was rewarded by finance and Wall Street in the form of IPOs and sales, and there's nothing wrong with that.

What I do have an issue with is when I hear these companies getting upwards of a trillion-dollar market cap, or a half-trillion-dollar market cap, who have aggregated the world under the umbrellas that we're sitting with here. Facebook Google, Spotify—all wonderful companies—have hundreds of millions, billions, of users aggregated under those umbrellas with market caps up in the tens or hundreds of billions, yet they're turning around and giving someone—this is a real royalty rate in the United States—$0.0001 U.S. per stream on their ad-supported platform. Something's not right.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, that's what we're hearing. That's why we wanted to get everybody to the table today. This is one of our most critical sessions, I think, to try to follow that money stream.

With regard to Google, we're talking about transparency. We're also saying that it's hard to find out how much artists are actually getting paid in terms of the revenue stream that goes to legitimate legal companies that are promoting them, through ad revenue and through a business model, and that doesn't get to the people who are creating the content in order to drive ad revenue.

Mr. Kee, in terms of transparency, how far do you go into the value chain?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Essentially, we're based on a partnership model. I'll use the YouTube platform as an example, where essentially there's a clear revenue split. The individual channel owner—basically the creator—receives very detailed analytics around the specific performance of the individual video they posted, including where the revenue with respect to the advertising comes from and how that flows to them.

Part of the challenge we have with respect to transparency writ large is that if there's an individual creator, an individual musician, an individual who basically is creating a video, they may have access to that. If it's aggregated under another service where they're actually engaging that service to do this on their behalf, that information isn't necessarily flowing.

Part of the challenge we have collectively, I think, as an industry is that oftentimes there are large sums of money, basically streams, that are flowing into the music industry writ large, which is where I get these large numbers from, but then they're essentially transferring into a very complicated and opaque web of music licensing agreements that certainly we don't have visibility into, and frankly, neither does anybody else. We're into a particular situation where artists only see what they get at the far end of that process, which doesn't necessarily accord with what they're hearing from us.

(1605)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes. They get good transparency on a fraction of the revenue stream that isn't enough for them to be in the middle class and support themselves without having other revenue streams.

In terms of recommendations for us, I'll go back to you, Mr. Price. What do you see as an opportunity for us? I'm very interested in that, and in getting the bigger picture in terms of the split revenue between the creators of melodies and music and the performers who generate that revenue. Can you give us a global picture? How can we set up some type of regulatory system so that people get paid for what they're doing?

Mr. Jeff Price:

First, to clarify, I certainly am impassioned with my feelings and my thoughts, but...these are not the enemy.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

No, no.

Mr. Jeff Price:

No, this is from me, because I can be very aggressive about that. I think what they've created is wonderful. The ubiquitousness of music creates a rare opportunity not only for consumers but also for technology companies and the creators themselves.

What I have a problem with is this free assumption that creators were put on this planet to create content for technology companies to utilize in order to achieve their business goals. The concept that we have to make it easier for them at the expense of the artists just doesn't resonate with me. I think the approach we need to take is an “artist first” approach. For example, let's extend that copyright to 70 years to get in line with the rest of the world, because now we're dealing with fathers to grandfathers to great-grandfathers through the accession of rights. Let's rule more quickly on what the rates are so that when these companies have to put together their P and Ls and people are determining how they can make a living doing this, they're able to figure out how much money they're making more quickly, ahead of time, as opposed to waiting five, six, or seven years before a ruling will come down.

I'm a big fan of the free market. I think government should remove itself from regulating music and allow there to be a true and straight-up negotiation. Frankly, that creates a symbiotic relationship, because they need them as much as the reverse. Through that balance you end up with the right tension, which will then allow for the right royalty rates to emerge.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

To the witnesses, excuse me, but I am briefly putting forward a motion. I'll certainly come back to you as quickly as possible.

Mr. Chair, I am putting forward and seeking unanimous consent for the following motion: That the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), undertake a study of no less than 4 meetings to investigate the impacts of the announced closure of the General Motors plant in Oshawa, and its impacts on the wider economy and province of Ontario.

I'd like you to test and see whether there's unanimous consent for us to see that motion move forward.

The Chair:

Just to be clear, generally you require 48 hours, so this is a notice of motion. You're—

Mr. Dan Albas:

No. I am asking for unanimous consent now.

The Chair:

I'm explaining that. Generally it's 48 hours. That would be a notice of motion. However, you are asking for unanimous consent to do what, exactly, right now?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Again, it's to to undertake a study of no less than four meetings to investigate the impacts of the announced closure of the General Motors plant in Oshawa.

The Chair:

You're asking for unanimous consent to move the motion. That's where we stand.

Is there any debate?

Go ahead, Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I wouldn't support it, since we're just about to start an emergency debate in the House tonight. We don't know the results of that debate or even, frankly, what we're dealing with yet. I wouldn't support it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Dan Albas:

In that case, I will move a formal notice of motion: That the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), undertake a study of no less than 4 meetings to investigate the impacts of the announced closure of the General Motors plant in Oshawa and its impacts on the wider economy and province of Ontario.

The Chair:

I'll pass that in with the notice of motion, and you can go ahead with your time.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you again to the witnesses for coming in and being part of our study.

I'd like to start with you, Mr. Schmidt.

Obviously, we've heard from many witnesses that they make so little money from Spotify royalties that it may as well be nothing. The claim is that only the biggest artists make any money from Spotify. Does your platform pay a standard per-stream royalty to all artists?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

There is no standard royalty. As I described in my opening statement, we have licence agreements with rights holders, which means rights holders on the sound recording side of the spectrum and the music publishing side of the spectrum.

(1610)

Mr. Dan Albas:

In your opening comments, you also mentioned that a particular song may have multiple different rights holders, particularly on the composition side. Again, without having an example in mind, originally I wrote down that Drake makes more money because more people listen to his music. Is that fundamentally still the case?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

Without talking about Drake in particular, I think it's fair to say that if lots more people are listening to some piece of music versus another, the first one would make more money. That's correct.

Mr. Dan Albas:

If you were to raise the per-stream royalties to increase what smaller artists get, it would radically increase what the larger artists would get as well. Is that correct?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

I think there's a misunderstanding here in the idea that we have a per-stream royalty at all. For the most part, that's not true.

We have hundreds of licence agreements. I have to generalize somewhat because they're all somewhat different, but there are certain commonalities in that for the most part, we're talking about revenue-sharing agreements that don't typically include per-stream rates. When people talk about per-stream rates, they're usually backing into that rate after the fact: They see that there are a number of streams on the service, they see a payout, and they do a simple calculation as if that's the per-stream rate. That isn't how we do it.

It really is a function of how much revenue we're bringing in, both on our premium service, which obviously brings in a lot more revenue, and our free service, which brings in less. About 90% of our revenue comes in from our premium service. I think it's reported in the Financial Press that we pay out 65%-70% of our gross revenue to rights holders. That's one reason, as Mr. Price mentioned, that at present Spotify is not profitable.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I know you have to generalize in some cases, because there are a lot of complexities to your business. Would an increase in royalty payouts generally make you have to increase the subscription cost for Canadian consumers? That's the point I'm trying to get to: Would changing that model cost more for Canadian consumers?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

Could you restate the question a little bit? I'm not sure I follow the if and then.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I do recognize that there are different rights holders, and you might have a collective that might collect more in a certain case or an artist who made a direct contract with you, which isn't often. What I'm trying to say is, if you have a higher stream cost for a particular song, does that inevitably mean...? If we were to give more to a smaller artist, that would also mean that the larger artist would demand more income as well and therefore increase the cost.

We keep hearing over and over that—and Mr. Price referenced it earlier—there's more money to be made in this space, but it seems the people, the artists themselves, are getting less.

Again, I'm trying to ask...if we suggest smaller artists be remunerated more in some way, will there be a greater cost to the final consumer in that case? I don't see the big producers or the ones who receive more revenues wanting to see their revenues go to someone else.

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

It is possible that what you're talking about would result in greater cost to consumers. We don't tend to look at it that way.

The way we look at it is that despite having 87 million paying subscribers on the service today, we're in the very beginning of what's happening. More money coming into the revenue share pool, as I call it, means more subscribers to the service. If you have more subscribers to the service and the same number of artists for that money to be split among, that's more money to the artists.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

I'd like to go to Mr. Kee.

Many witness have specifically suggested that we should remove the safe harbour provisions in order to force companies like yours to be liable for having infringing content on your platform.

In a world where 65 years of content are uploaded to YouTube every single day, could your business operate without safe harbour?

Mr. Jason Kee:

No.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

I understand the liability for content that a platform itself uploads, but anyone can create a YouTube account and upload any music video or any other infringing product. Your Content ID system will probably flag that, but we know that system has problems. I've heard about them.

Is the concept of user-driven content incompatible with platform liability?

(1615)

Mr. Jason Kee:

I wouldn't agree with that.

Number one, it's worth noting that on the music side, we're actually a licence platform. We have thousands of licence agreements with collectives, publishers and labels worldwide. They feed what we call “YouTube main”, the general online video platform, as well as some of the specific music-related services we have, such as Google Play Music or YouTube Music. We're operating in a licensed environment there.

Second, with respect to the broader user-generated content, despite the fact that we had the benefit of the safe harbour, which allowed us to operate the business, it still didn't stop us from implementing our Content ID system in order to basically manage that content.

I think it's one of the most powerful copyright management tools on the the planet. It allows all rights holders of any class, whether music or any other type, to monetize content uploaded by users and make revenue, or, if they choose, they can block it and take it off the platform if they want to drive revenue to other platforms. They can do that as well. That certainly didn't stop us from introducing it and working with partners so they could monetize.

User-generated content aspects are critical to an open Internet. This is the whole point. We have any number of very successful music artists—lately it's been Shawn Mendes—who essentially made their mark on the platform, and if it weren't for open platforms like this, they might never have been discovered. Justin Bieber is another classic example.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Mr. Nantel, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I wanted to ask Mr. Price a question, first and foremost, since we're talking about copyright. It would be good to discuss the topic with a creator, then to move on to user rights. Since Mr. Schmidt must leave before 5 p.m., I want to make sure that I can talk to him.

When I was part of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, I had the opportunity to hear you speak by video conference from New York. I don't know whether you can answer my question. It concerned figures shared by an artist, songwriter and producer who was well aware of the value of these things. I'm referring to the brother of Pascale Bussières, David Bussières, a member of Alfa Rococo. He had a very successful piece that was played extensively on the radio. I don't have the exact figures on hand, but I know that he earned about $17,000. The piece was a hit about three years ago. I was wondering about the fees paid by Spotify. The fees amounted to $11, as opposed to $17,000 for commercial radio. That's a very clear example. How can this be explained when it was the same piece and about the same period?

Streaming platforms such as Spotify are the dominant model. That's the issue, as Mr. Price said. Everyone here is wonderful. All your products are wonderful. My girlfriend has just subscribed to Spotify, and she loves it. She finds it much better than Apple Music. That's not the issue. As Mr. Price pointed out, the issue is that the people who provide content can no longer make a living off it. I don't know whether you see how clearly these two amounts illustrate the issue. It's the same period, the same type of success and the same type of listeners. In Quebec, on the radio, he earned $17,000, whereas on Spotify, he earned $11.

How can you explain this? [English]

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

To start with, I want to apologize if you did not get a response to this question after our first committee hearing. We sent a letter to the committee. I don't know if you saw it. We sent a detailed response to this question, among others. I don't have that response handy, that letter, but we do have that—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Okay.

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

—so now, I'm sorry to say, I need to operate on some memory about what was said—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Just like me, and I hope yours is better than mine.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

I want to stress that I don't know the mechanics, unfortunately, of how radio airplay gets paid in Canada. All I know is how Spotify pays. Also, I should say that we don't typically have relationships directly.... I know this is frustrating to hear. I don't know what happens in the value chain from when we pay the rights holder, the copyright owner—in this case, it might have been a record label or some other entity—and they then pay the artist.

That artist might have an unrecouped advance. That often happens in the record label—

(1620)

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I can tell you right away that this is not the case. As I told you, this is a very articulate, well-managed team. He has his own publishing and he has his manager, but the deal is clearly not there. When we're comparing $11 and $17,000, I guess we've made the point.

I would probably put this to Mr. Price. This situation can be less dramatic for bigger artists with bigger markets who can still make a living out of it, and probably a very good living, but even an artist like the one who sang Happy in the Despicable Me movie....

What's his name again?

Mr. Jeff Price:

It's Pharrell. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you.[English]It's Pharrell. Pharrell Wilson...?

Mr. Jeff Price: I just know him as Pharrell.

Mr. Pierre Nantel: Anyway, he complained so much about getting, in my approximation, about $300,000 for that song. It is ridiculous.

Twenty years ago that same type of worldwide hit, which made everybody dance in the street and feel happy, would have brought in something like $3 million for him, which should be very normal, because he enlightened the lives of everyone, which is the beauty of music.

Let me make it clear. I will check out that submission that you sent on this question. I can't wait to see it, because clearly this is something that....

You're tough to hate, because you have a great product. It's the same for Facebook and the same for Google. We all know that Google is in the top five of the most loved brands in the States, on both the Republican and Democratic sides. You can't be against Google. I use it all the time, but the reality is that in some markets, as I've said many times to you, we are not a northern domestic market; we are a bubble of France for whom copyright is super-important, just as it is in France.

I need to make sure that Mr. Price gets to say something, because in Quebec we have a very articulated industry where we know each other very well and we have a large importance for local content in our consumption of television or music. For us, we see the big difference.

Mr. Price, as an American artist composing and being so involved everywhere, would you agree that there's a mystery deal that has been done in the micro-pennies that are paid to artists? How on earth can a publishing house sign such deals with the streaming services?

The Chair:

You have about 30 seconds left.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

You'll stay. He won't.

Mr. Jeff Price:

The short version is that it's because of regulations from the government and the acceptance by the traditional music industry. It's created a flawed system. That is combined with the fact that—forgive me—the product isn't being sold at the right price point. I'm sorry, but $10 a month for 35 million songs...? Most people don't want 35 million songs, and it's too low a price.

Is that bad for consumers? Maybe it is for those who want to pay less money to have access to music, but you can't squeeze blood from a rock. If you want to have more money, you need to charge the appropriate price for the product.

Everybody wins then. They'll be profitable and the artists will make more money. Sure, you'll have a smaller consumer base utilizing the service, but so what?

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we move on to our next questioner, Mr. Schmidt, we all have a burning desire to see this letter, so if you could forward this letter to our clerk, that would be great.

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

I will, absolutely.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Chan, it's nice to see you again. I know we had you at PROC this spring because we were discussing Facebook's impact on elections, and now you're here discussing Facebook's impact on the creative economy writ large. I guess Facebook has quite a bit of impact in general.

I want to talk a lot about Content ID and Facebook's equivalent. In September, a pianist named James Rhodes uploaded to Facebook a video of himself playing Bach. Facebook's copyright filters triggered the content, and it was removed. He had a great deal of difficulty getting it restored. Even at life plus 70 years, the Bach he had played would have been out of copyright by about 198 years. I'm wondering what we can do to avoid abuses, and what you are doing to avoid abuses in the system. As far as I can tell, it's a system that assumes guilt, and then you have to prove innocence.

That applies to Mr. Kee as well, for the Content ID system.

(1625)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I'm sorry, but I just want to confirm, sir. You're referring to a piece of Bach that was uploaded, and then—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right. James Rhodes played Bach on his piano and uploaded the video to Facebook, and Facebook's Content ID equivalent—I don't know what you call it—

Mr. Kevin Chan:

It's Rights Manager.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—triggered and said, “I'm sorry; Sony owns the copyright on Bach,” which is patently false.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

That's interesting. I'm not familiar with that particular example. I think you are right that—well, grosso modo, how it works is that for any reported piece of content, as I mentioned in the opening statement, certainly an individual at Facebook would review that report and ensure that, first, the information's complete for the reporting, and then that it's a legitimate or a valid request for removal.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many reports do these people have to go through in a day?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

As I said, we had close to half a million reports, I think it was, in the first half of 2018, and that resulted in about three million copyright takedowns globally. I think there are some other things that we do have to complement that, which are our automated systems. Potentially, again, not knowing the specific case, I couldn't say, but—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's just an example. I've seen this kind of case many times, coming across my Facebook feed, of all places.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Right. Potentially, this could be an automated system example. I would obviously also want to add—and I'll turn it over to Probir in case you have something to add, Probir—that the concern for us is always, as you point out, sir, false positives. We want to be tough to ensure that we are protecting the rights of rights holders, but on the flip side—and that's why I mentioned it—as a platform, we always want to be careful about how we balance this. You don't want to be so aggressive that you accidentally take down something legitimate. I would never say that we're perfect, but again, not knowing the specific case, I couldn't give you a satisfying answer on this one.

I don't know, Probir, if you have some thoughts on it.

Mr. Probir Mehta (Head of Global Intellectual Property Policy, Facebook Inc.):

Thanks very much.

I would add that with every system, we're always looking to make it better. The engineers and the personnel who work on our systems are constantly sitting down with rights holders and users to try to....

Again, if I understand this correctly, if it was Rights Manager, this is a system that relies on input and feedback. I'm not familiar with the specific case, but again, as with everything, we're constantly trying to make it better.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can anybody in the world, and this applies, again, to Mr. Kee....

I don't know if you have any comments, Mr. Kee, on the previous question before I go to the next one.

Mr. Jason Kee:

I would like to just quickly comment on that.

You actually highlight a challenge that we have when we implement systems like this. They certainly go well above and beyond our minimum requirements under United States, European or even Canadian copyright law. We have a court challenge in terms of balancing those rights. In the case of Content ID, that's actually why we have an appeal system, the idea being that if something gets claimed that shouldn't be claimed, you appeal it, and then ideally the claim will be released.

In this case, it should never have been claimed in the first instance—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But it's still a “guilty until proven innocent” system for both companies.

Mr. Jason Kee:

In terms of the assumption that was being made because a match was being made, that's correct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can anybody in the world upload their...?

Mr. Chen, does Facebook have a name for Content ID, so I don't have to keep referring to Content ID?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

It's Rights Manager.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Rights Manager, Content ID—great; I have two terms. Thank you.

Can anybody in the world upload their content to these two systems, or is it only companies or larger copyright holders that can do so?

Mr. Jason Kee:

I'll start.

Actually, only larger companies can, because it is an extraordinarily powerful tool. It requires quite a bit of proactive management. We actually have 9,000 Content ID partners. Generally these are larger entities that have large libraries of content that require this kind of protection, and they also have the dedicated resources to manage it properly, especially because you can control the way the system manages for each individual territory in a very nuanced kind of way.

We also have other tools that are available at other levels and are available for other creators—for example, independent creators—or they can work through, frankly, Audiam, for example, which can actually manage the Content ID system on their behalf.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

By having only 9,000 creators—and I'm assuming it's fairly similar for you, Mr. Chan, from what you said here—if it's only 9,000 creators who are permitted to submit to the system, does that not necessarily hurt the smaller producers?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, if I may, I'll just refer to my colleagues. We have a slight nuance for rights management.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We like nuance.

Mr. Probir Mehta:

It's application-based, to enter into the Rights Manager system. It's typically large, commercially minded rights holder groups, but also we have recently been testing for smaller creators as well. However, again, ultimately it's a needs-based assessment.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do these systems currently handle Canadian fair dealing exceptions in their enforcement?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Essentially, no, effectively because fair dealing is a contextual test that requires analysis on each individual case. On any automated system, no matter how good the algorithm, no matter how sophisticated the machine learning that we're applying—and we are doing that—basically, we'll never be able to ascertain that. This is why it's critically important that it has an appeal system: it's so if a video that is a clear case of fair dealing is allowed and then gets caught by the system, they can appeal that decision. It will basically be determined and released.

(1630)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then in both of your situations, why isn't the system set up to say, “You have had a flag; please respond within 24 hours, and then we'll take it down”, to make it a system where one is innocent until proven guilty instead of guilty until proven innocent?

Mr. Jason Kee:

In some instances, that does happen. It depends on what policy the rights holder has chosen to enact and how they've selected to do so.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Yes. I would bring you back, sir, to what I mentioned earlier in the opening statement about how we have individuals who review all the reports, and that's precisely to try to get the balance right.

I think, though, this concept runs into challenges when we're talking about something that's at scale. When you have a service that is global in nature and you have millions of pieces of content, if not more, being uploaded on a daily basis, then you do want to make sure you're doing things to better protect rights holders. This is a way for us to kind of get at the simplest or easiest things to engage with.

I agree with you that context is important, and that's why we have individuals who review every report that's sent to us.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm out of time. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas. You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you. I'm actually going to take up the line of questioning of MP Graham. I'm going to start with Mr. Kee.

Mr. Kee, there is a group of people who do reaction videos. They film their reaction to a new music video that comes out, or a new movie or whatnot. There are quite a few people who like to hear and see these reaction videos, but obviously the Content ID system that YouTube employs often will flag that content and take it down. Obviously, these things are allowed under the Copyright Modernization Act that happened here in Canada in 2012, under which reaction videos were allowed.

In regard to how YouTube—and Google itself, I guess—flags and takes these down, doesn't that raise questions about whether the system you're utilizing is complying with the law or in fact just taking down content that people are spontaneously generating themselves?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Well, number one, I would be reticent to say any individual example is a clear case of fair dealing, because that would be a case-by-case instance. For example, it's theoretically possible that a react video may use a sizeable portion of the original content. As a consequence, it may not actually be an example of fair dealing.

However, you raise a fair point with respect to how we balance those individual rights. This is again why the appeals process is critically important. What happens is this: If it is appealed and if the rights holder decides they are not going to release this claim, then the individual user who got flagged incorrectly can then reject that, in which case the video is permitted and the rights holder would have to file a formal takedown notice to remove that video. At that point it goes to a counter-notice provision, because we therefore have a dispute between two rights holders that we actually have to let them sort out between themselves.

Mr. Dan Albas:

It's interesting that you talk about this appeal process, because my office has been reaching out to content creators to hear their concerns, and some of the feedback we've had is contrary.

We heard from a creator who paid for a licensed audio clip to use in a video. They used the clip legally with a licence and got a copyright strike. Another creator, a music label, had used the same sound clip in another work, and the system detected the same sound and took down the video for infringement. They appealed but were told their only recourse was to sue the label. They paid for the proper royalties, did things right and were still unable to upload their video unless they sued a major corporation.

If we're going to believe that your automatic system functions well, you have to address these kinds of instances. Why is there no actual person you can appeal to in these kinds of cases, or is this just a case of people not understanding your system?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Again, it is difficult to comment on a specific example. I am a bit surprised by the outcome, simply because to get to that, you have to go through a formal counter-notice whereby you are provided the opportunity to formally submit a response saying that the takedown request is incorrect, at which point the default goes to the claimant and it would be restored without the necessity of engaging in a lawsuit.

Again, it's hard to comment on that theoretically or hypothetically.

(1635)

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would point out that when people are operating in the space and know their business quite well and are paying out all the costs and whatnot, including making sure their tariff is covered, the expectation is that they would be able to meaningfully deal with this.

To simply dismiss as a hypothetical that these things are happening.... I recognize the issue, but perhaps I could talk to the individuals in question and maybe encourage them to raise it to you, because a lot of content creators are not making it through your systems, and that needs to be addressed.

Mr. Jason Kee:

I think it's a fair system.

To the point that Kevin raised, we're dealing with these issues at scale—again, 400 hours of content are uploaded to YouTube every minute—and as a result it's a massive system that needs to be dealt with on an automated basis at the front end.

That said, once you've gone through an appeals process, there are opportunities to interact with individuals, especially through the appeals, so please, as I said, I invite you to put them in touch, because I'd like to understand the specifics that happened here.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, that's fair. Thank you.

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have five seconds.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, then I have a quick one for Mr. Kee.

We've heard from many witnesses that they make very little from views of ad-supported content on YouTube. There are stories of needing millions of views just to get $150.

I don't expect you'll tell us your ad rates, but are you receiving much more per view from advertisers and only paying pennies, or are the per-view ad rates equivalently small?

Mr. Jason Kee:

We're on a purely revenue-sharing basis.  Essentially there's a proportional share that happens between the creator and the platform, so we're receiving only a proportion of what they are receiving.

It isn't on a per-view basis, because not every video will have an ad shown against it, and depending on the specifics of where their ad is being seen—it also works through an auction system—there is a high degree of variability in the actual rate they'll see.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan. You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you to all of you for the presentations.

On May 8, 2018, the Fédération nationale des communications, FNC, which represents workers in Canadian communication and cultural industries, stated that Facebook and Google absorb a large majority of advertising revenues that previously went to newspapers and other news outlets, which has deprived the news industry of helping to sustain itself.

Along similar lines, News Media Canada referred to news aggregators, or your company operators, as free riders.

As part of their submission, FNC suggested creating a new category of copyright work, a journalistic work, which would provide journalists a collective administered right for remuneration for the dissemination of their works on the Internet.

If such a right existed, would it oblige Google, Facebook and other online service providers to pay royalties for news articles? How might this affect your operation?

Article 11 of the European Union's proposed directive on copyright in the digital single market would affirm the copyright of publishers for digital use of press publications. Would this include the publication or distribution of publications on Facebook and Google News? How would we ensure compliance with this new law? It was proposed.

I don't know if you're familiar with it, but it certainly would elevate and perhaps help the news agencies that are being shared on your platforms.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I'm happy to take that, sir. Thank you.

I actually did, in fact, spend a day with the FNC, with their president and a few other people, at a recent conference in Montreal with respect to misinformation and digital literacy, and that proposal was in fact shared with me.

The conversation we had about it for us boils down to there being a misunderstanding of the way that published content—in this case, let's say news articles—is shared on Facebook.

As you probably know, Facebook itself is not putting news articles onto Facebook. It gets on Facebook in one of two ways. One is that the publisher itself—let's say it's La Presse or Radio-Canada or The Globe and Mail or the CBC—chooses to put published content on Facebook, or an individual, a user, decides to share something onto the platform. What I shared with colleagues in Montreal was that I'm at a bit of a loss as to how such a mechanism would work if, at the end of the day, platforms are not the ones that are actually putting individual pieces of content on the platform, and that it's actually individuals or publishers. You can imagine very quickly that if the system is based on how much somebody happens to put on a particular service, then it just seems as though we would not be—

(1640)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I get that—sorry to interrupt—but in earlier testimony, you mentioned that other people also put things on your platform, which you sometimes flag and take down. I'm just saying that as an example.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Okay, I see, sir.

That's right. I think for the content we're talking about, rights holder content, if it shouldn't be on Facebook—we've talked a lot about music this afternoon—it would be taken down.

Obviously if a publisher had, let's say, a firewall around their content on the website, and then somehow somebody nonetheless was able to share their content on Facebook, we would obviously want to make sure we were in compliance and we would take down that content. In this case, when people are able to share news articles on Facebook, what I'm saying is that they have allowed for that sharing. They've allowed for people to take a hyperlink or a URL and put that somewhere else—for example, on Facebook. That actually, incidentally, sir, drives a lot of traffic to their sites.

I do want to say one other thing, if I may. We do take our responsibility seriously with respect to the news ecosystem. We know that many Canadians do, in fact, get at least some of their news from Facebook, so we are investing in partnerships. For example, we have a partnership with Ryerson University, with their School of Journalism, as well as with the Digital Media Zone, in which we're working with entrepreneurs to see what kind of innovative business models may emerge for the news ecosystem. That's the kind of work we're engaged with. We just finished with the graduating class of 2018. There are five start-ups that I think are going to make a really good run of it as businesses.

Those are the things we're looking at. I think the challenge with the proposal that I've heard is that it kind of relies on publishers and users to decide how much a particular piece of content is shared. Any kind of business model that's based on that would be at odds, I think, with how sharing actually works.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move back to Mr. Albas for seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you again, Mr. Chairman.

Thank you to all the witnesses.

Mr. Kee, I'm going to keep going back, because it seems a lot of the feedback I've had from people is mainly about YouTube.

Obviously, we're reviewing the Copyright Act. Many people will video themselves playing a video game and then stream that, and there seems to be a bit of a grey zone. Do you believe it would be helpful for Parliament to put an exemption in for that kind of activity? There currently exists one for mash-ups and for content creators to put their mash-ups out. Do you think that is something that would give a little bit more certainty to that practice?

Mr. Jason Kee:

To be honest, I wouldn't necessarily want to comment on it. There would be certain classes of creators that would benefit from that, primarily game creators. On the other hand, you would have video game companies that may feel very differently about it. My understanding is that—and bear in mind, as Mr. Nantel will know, that I actually used to work for the video game industry—they have, generally speaking, a fairly permissive attitude towards this particular type of activity, largely because when a video game creator is making a video of them playing the game, it's not competing with the actual game itself, and they actually view it as marketing.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'm not asking about video game developers, though. As a platform, what is your perspective? People are taking their content—the video game they play, their reactions to it, their friends playing on it—and then loading it up onto your YouTube system. Do you think platform certainty would be helpful with regard to the practice?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Basically, Google doesn't have a view on it, simply because it's a question of whether or not there's an exception that allows gaming creators to benefit from utilizing that class of work themselves versus whether or not you're removing the ability of the games industry itself to benefit from this activity.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Chan, do you have any suggestions on this?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

No, sir, we don't really have a comment on it.

Mr. Dan Albas:

In that case, I'd like to ask about the new European rules that make platforms liable for infringement.

Could either Facebook, through Mr. Chan, or Google, through Mr. Kee, point out some of these new rules and whether or not your platforms can operate under those conditions? We've had a number of witnesses come forward to this committee asking for similar provisions. I believe the CEO or someone quite high up at YouTube suggested that it's a very difficult environment to be working under.

Mr. Chan, maybe you can go first.

(1645)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I would just say, once again, that our enforcement of any kind of illicit or infringing content is pretty good where it stands. You'll know, sir, that in terms of music content, at this point we are removing that content when it is detected or when people report it and it's a valid request.

If your question is with respect to ideas about undoing intermediary liability protections, I think that is indeed challenging. I think it's challenging because without those kinds of protections in place, platforms that are able to host a myriad of content—not just rights holder content, but including people's free speech—would be at risk. I think that is just not the type of tradition from which we approach these things here in Canada. If these sorts of things were to be pushed to their logical end, I think you would find that platforms of scale would be very challenged and would in fact reduce the ability for, in this case, artists and rights holders to be able to reach large audiences.

Mr. Jason Kee:

We would share that view. We've certainly been flagging some of the challenges with the current articulation of article 13.

It's worthwhile noting that the specifics of article 13 itself are still in the process of being determined. Negotiations are happening between the three areas of the European Union. It's more in terms of what the potential implications are. That is actually what motivated Susan Wojcicki to write an op-ed. It was mostly to alert the creative community to the concerns.

Primarily from a YouTube perspective in particular, the challenge would be that if the platform is liable for all content on the platform, we can only host content that we are absolutely assured is completely cleared. For the vast majority of YouTube creators, that's very difficult to assure.

You raised a number of good examples, during the course of this discussion, of the many different copyright elements that can exist in terms of the video and in terms of who actually has copyright ownership over what. Even in the case of music, sometimes the ownership is not necessarily clear. There could be any number of songwriters involved, and so forth. That would make it very, very challenging for us to operate. It would certainly adversely impact the small and emerging creators, who don't have large legal teams and can't provide the assurances of legal clearance, more than it would affect the larger operators.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Caesar-Chavannes, you have five minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I'll focus my questions on Google and Spotify.

First I'll go to you, Mr. Schmidt, because I'm a premium Spotify user. A few months ago, my subscription went up two dollars. I'm sure a lot of people's subscriptions went up two dollars. Do the two dollars go toward paying royalties to Canadian creators?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

What territory is this in?

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Ontario.

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

Well, first of all, I wasn't aware that it went up two dollars. You just told me something I didn't know.

When prices go up, as they do in various territories around the world at various times due to inflation and other reasons, that revenue is accounted for in our licence agreements as part of the revenue pool. The answer to your question is yes, a portion of any current price increase ends up going to creators. More accurately, though, it goes to the rights holders with whom we have licence agreements. We have to assume that some of that goes down to creators, but they have those relationships with those creators; we don't.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Okay.

You said that you started in Canada in 2014, right? Why did it take so long?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

I wasn't at Spotify then, but I do know anecdotally that the licensing landscape in Canada was difficult at the time, particularly—

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can you explain what that means?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

—on the music publishing side of things. I think I talked in my opening statement about the issue of fragmentation of rights.

On the mechanical rights side in particular, it's difficult in Canada to get a full coverage of rights when you're licensing from an entity like CSI which, I think practically speaking, only controls perhaps 70% or 80% of the market. It's that long tail that becomes your problem. You need to find who controls what and get licensing agreements in place, to the extent that you can.

Sometimes it's unknown whom you should approach to get licences, because there's a matching problem. How do you know, for any particular musical composition, which sound recording it matches to? It's a much more difficult problem than people realize. It's a worldwide problem, and it's been a big problem in the U.S. as well.

I think that explains, for the most part, what took us so long to get into Canada.

(1650)

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

We've had some testimony from previous witnesses who said that the royalty rate for semi-interactive and non-interactive webcasting for copyrighted works in Canada is almost 11 times lower than the equivalent rate in the United States.

To Google or to Spotify, does the Canadian rate constitute fair and equitable compensation for creators?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

I'll go.

That surprises me. I'm not sure I understand that data point. Did you say it's 11 times lower than the equivalent rate in the U.S.?

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

The royalty rate is, yes.

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

I think you might be talking about Re:Sound, which we don't utilize.

Mr. Jason Kee:

My understanding is that specifically was a tariff rate. I believe it's tariff 8 that set that rate.

For us, in part because of the challenges we experienced with respect to the Copyright Board, we didn't necessarily rely on the tariff rates very frequently. We would negotiate our own arrangements with the collectives. As a consequence, that actual rate didn't apply to the majority of our services. My understanding is that it certainly doesn't at this point.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Is it the same with...?

Mr. Darren Schmidt:

It's the same with Spotify.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

At the beginning, Mr. Price said a number of points, which he gave all companies across the board some credit for. He said that you guys have really good companies, but the percentage that was allocated to creators was 0.000-something; I can't remember how many zeroes he used.

Do you have any rebuttals or comments to some of the statements that Mr. Price made? Were they fair, accurate?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Well, I think he flagged a great number of the many challenges that artists are facing. Some of this has to do with fundamental changes that have happened to the underlying economics of the music industry over the past 20 years.

Jeff raised a very fair point with respect to the sustainability, given the price point. The reason that the price point is what it is—actually, right now it's the market rate—is that was a response to ongoing piracy from 20 years ago, when no one was paying anything. This led to the development of the download economy, primarily driven by Apple, which led to the emergence of the streaming economy and so on.

We're in a situation in which there's been a great deal of consumer surplus, where consumers benefit from access to these massive libraries of music, but that's now the consumer expectation. Moving away from that too aggressively would be a real challenge, and essentially we have a much greater number of artists who are taking from a smaller pot. That's creating some challenges.

One of the things we are very focused on with YouTube in particular is ensuring that we can activate alternative revenue streams for artists, recognizing that sometimes royalty rates alone are not necessarily going to help them. This is by means of things like—and this is the bulk of the revenue, frankly, that YouTube creators tend to make—what we call “off-platform”. They're doing brand sponsorship deals. They will have a brand that will sponsor their videos and they will do, say, a series of six videos. It's very much more lucrative for them than the advertising revenue.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Do you help them with that?

Mr. Jason Kee:

A lot of them will do it on their own.

We've actually now deployed a system that we call FameBit, which is a brand matchmaking service. We'll match the creators with brands—many of whom are our clients on the advertising side—to basically help them with that.

We're also deploying things like memberships, whereby individual users can simply do a monthly subscription to a creator to give them monthly support. We're implementing merchandising and ticketing options that will automatically display if they have a show coming up so that there are tickets available to that show. Creators can diversify their revenue streams so that they're no longer reliant on a single stream but have a multitude of streams to help build sustainable businesses.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. [Translation]

Mr. Nantel, you have two minutes.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I'll ask Mr. Chan a question about Facebook.

When a television show or report is broadcast on Facebook, clearly the media that paid to produce it doesn't receive any advertising revenue. It's seen as a form of sharing by the user. At least, that's how I explain it.

Don't you think that the media that share content on your platforms would like to receive a portion of the advertising revenue that you generate?

(1655)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you for the question.[English]Do you mean that when a broadcaster puts a show of their own volition on Facebook, should we not think about ways to compensate them for that?

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Since the audience is there and since they may feel that they want to be seen like that demo guy who plays a song and wants to be discovered by an L.A. producer.... Then we have CBC putting a series on your thing and there would be zero revenue.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Without alluding to too many specifics of the future, I think you're right that what we want to do is find new ways of compensating various entities that have presences on Facebook. I think around the world we have experimented with things like ad breaks for videos, almost like a digital version of a commercial break. I think over time as we refine this model, this experiment, we certainly hope to be able to present a more robust suite of compensation options for producers.

I don't know, Probir, if you have anything to add on that.

Mr. Probir Mehta:

I would also point out that one of the functionalities of Facebook is to complement these offline business models. I think my colleague from Google mentioned this. In a lot of ways you find users connecting and sharing around a shared viewing event on TV, whether it's sports, whether it's an awards night. It actually, in many cases, has increased engagement offline. I wouldn't look at it as a zero-sum game; I would look at it as a win-win opportunity.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Yes, but on the other hand we know that if it was just sharing, it's sharing and it's visibility, but you also sell advertising and so you're eating the pie.

On this, didn't you voluntarily agree that in mid-2019, you're going to add GST to your transactions, even though you're not forced to do it by the government?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

That's correct. What we have indicated is that by the end of 2019 we will move to what's called “a local reseller model”, where we are going to have a base of operations in Canada such that the taxes that we pay, based on revenue that we make in Canada from the sales team in Canada, will be transparent and people will know exactly what we take in and what taxes we pay.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Would all advertising bought in Canada be going through this advertising sales team in Canada?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I'd have to check on the precise mechanics of it, but certainly the sales team in Toronto—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

It will be adding GST.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Yes. Because we're moving to this model, it means that it becomes subject to a value-added tax like the HST or the PST. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We still have some time, so we're going to go to the second round.

Mr. Longfield, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you. I'll share some of my time with Mr. Graham.

I want to start off with Facebook. As I'm listening to this conversation, which has been excellent, I'm going back in time to when I used to buy records in the 1970s and 1960s. We knew that to buy content, you went to the record store and you purchased what you wanted. You might share it with a good friend and you'd put your name on it so that you knew it was yours, and you would chase your friend to get the album back. Sometimes you got it back and sometimes you didn't.

The sale was for a particular piece. Now we have the Internet taking the place of the record store. We have a business model that's very different.

Mr. Price asked a very good question at the end of one of his testimonies. If we clamp down on this, we would limit the distribution of content, but so what? People would have to purchase. The business model would go back to the way it used to work. I could be cynical and say it didn't work that well for creators back then either, because they got ripped off on contracts and they had management.... The creators have always been on the last end of the stick.

In terms of the business model, as we look at how we get money to the creators through this existing business model, we looked at the EU and they've been doing some things around legislation. We've looked at Australia. They're doing some things around legislation. You're a global company and it's a global problem. Is there anything you can suggest to us in terms of recommendations on how we get value to the creators for the products we consume?

(1700)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think first and foremost, as I alluded to at the beginning, Facebook is a platform where largely people can get discovered and they can find fans, new fans, and that actually is of tremendous value not just to artists and creators but to NGOs, including also politicians, as you may know, on the platform.

Far be it from us to say what the committee should do on these sorts of questions, but I can say that for us on the platform, we do recognize the need to build new tools to allow for artists and creators to be able to monetize. Right now in Canada, in music, basically our issue with how we deal with it is largely on the enforcement side. If there is copyrighted content on the platform, we will take it down. We want to get to a space where we're able to help artists get remunerated for that sort of stuff, but that is, I think, down the line.

Probir, do you want to talk a bit about that?

Mr. Probir Mehta:

I think what's animating our view is to first understand all the aspects of the music ecosystem. You have some here today. You've heard from others.

Really, the marketplace is shifting in such great ways. For example, what the European Union is doing is based on an assessment three or four years ago, and the world has changed in a lot of positive ways. From our perspective, any new regulation or rule you look at should take into account all the different pieces of the ecosystem, but it should also look to enshrine voluntary approaches whereby different parts of the ecosystem are coming together to promote content, figure out new technologies to smooth out the transaction costs, and things like that.

That's what I think is at greatest risk when you have regulatory processes: not allowing for these types of flexible approaches. Right now Canada has a flexible but robust system that we certainly support.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, and you mentioned the democratic aspect of the platform. It's a great way for us to showcase our communities and the work that's going on in our communities. You're not the bad guys here. It's just that we'd like to see how we can support our artists so they can get paid fair value for what they produce.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With two minutes left in this round, I wanted to tie up some loose ends from earlier when I talked to Mr. Kee, Mr. Chan and Mr. Mehta about the content management systems you have.

You talked about having IP experts who review all the requests that come in. I'd like to get a sense of the quantity. How many people are processing how many requests per day? Are these people taking the time to look at two or three requests in a day, or do they have 400 and they have to get through to the end of the whole collection before they leave?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Again, in our transparency report that we just published a few weeks ago, we do spell out in detail the number of requests we're getting. I think you can see it at facebook.com/transparency. I think that's the URL. It's something like that.

Globally, we had about half a million requests, and that led to about three million pieces of copyright—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How did half a million requests result in three million...?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

It could be multiple requests, or one request where we find multiple copies on the platform.

Mr. Probir Mehta:

Yes. In fact, as Kevin noted in his opening remarks, you can report multiple posts. You can report groups, videos, texts. We want to make it as user-friendly and frictionless as possible, so in one report you can have multiple listings. Again, that is something that all gets processed by our global IP team.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Mr. Kee, you mentioned that you had found three billion infringing URLs earlier. That's across how many domains? Do you have any idea? One domain can have millions of URLs.

Mr. Jason Kee:

I'd have to double-check on that. It's quite a number, but it's basically several hundred thousand domains.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think I'm out of time.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a very quick one for you that I will let you think about, but you might not get a chance to answer.

For Google and Facebook especially, when HTML 4.01 transitional was the standard for the Internet, everything more or less worked across platforms. Now a lot of the social media companies and Google are no longer platform-independent, so when you go to Facebook on a BlackBerry or on an iPhone, you get a completely different experience in each place. Are we going to come back to a standards-based system, or are we going to keep having this diversion of capacity, depending on what device you're using?

(1705)

The Chair:

Be very quick.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We will double-check on our end, but I have to admit that one of our strengths actually has been that we have sort of a one-interface process at Facebook. Regardless of whether you access it on an iPad or a phone or your desktop, it is going to be the same experience for the user or for the page across our platform.

If you mean interoperability between various platforms, certainly we've invested a lot of time and energy to allow for individuals to be able to download all their information and take it with them elsewhere if they see fit.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

With regard to some of the comments Mr. Kee made earlier today about the difficulties of contextualizing, I guess through your Content ID filters into fair dealing, you referenced that it's very difficult for that system, so even though we create laws, the system itself is the one that's going to have to recognize and adapt. That may involve appeals and whatnot. It might involve technological review, but also perhaps personal review.

Mr. Kee, what are some things this committee can do to make life better for those content creators so they can upload the content they have made that's original or that they have paid for through various tariffs, so we can see more of that content being supported and not bound up either in appeals or through those technological guards? What things can we do to make the system better for them?

Mr. Jason Kee:

To be honest, this is really a matter of how the platforms operate individually. Your line of questioning is highlighting the tension that inherently exists, since on the one hand we invest literally hundreds of millions of dollars in effective enforcement so that rights holders can properly administer their copyright across our platforms, while on the other hand we also have other classes of creators who are basically more in the user class, who utilize other people's copyright in the course of creating their own. Essentially, we have to manage all of this.

Copyright is an extremely complex beast. Again, Jeff alluded to this in his opening remarks with respect to the number of creators. Every single time you create something, you vest a copyright in that whether or not you're actually utilizing somebody else's copyright in that process. Navigating this extremely complex web is extremely challenging and requires a balancing of the various interests. On the one hand, we have a copyright management system; on the other hand, we have an appeals process to balance off those kinds of issues.

Essentially, from a legislative standpoint, this is something that's very much between the individual platforms and the users and creators who utilize those platforms. The best thing the committee can do is to look at things to ensure we have a competitive environment with a number of competing platforms in order to exert discipline on all of the platforms so that if one platform has a copyright management system that is being overly aggressive, there will be alternatives for them to look to.

Mr. Dan Albas:

How do you create that space when you have Googles and Facebooks that are dominating in their size and scope? I don't want to incriminate or anything, but that's one of the arguments I hear: that they have become so big that no one can compete with them.

Mr. Jason Kee:

There are actually quite a number of competitors that exist out there when we consider that Dailymotion and others are looking to compete in the space in their own individualized ways.

To be honest with you, Facebook and Google are actually fierce competitors in this space, especially as each of us is expanding into different kinds of related areas, such as Instagram TV, etc., etc., where basically creators have a number of different options available to them, which also is what helps the platform stay healthy.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I haven't heard of Dailymotion, but when you give one example, and then say “etc., etc.”, are there other ones?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Yes. To be honest with you, I'm blanking at the moment. I would be happy to provide you with more examples of platforms that exist in a number of different territories.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. That's fair.

Mr. Price, my line of questioning has been mainly towards some of the other witnesses. My first question is very tough: Old Pixies or new Pixies?

Mr. Jeff Price:

Old.

Mr. Dan Albas:

You and I are in the same.... I have to say that. I'm pleased to hear that.

We've heard at this committee, and it was in one of the analyst's reports, that one of the main complaints is that Spotify will contract directly with the money for labels to access catalogues, and then none of that money goes back to artists.

Isn't that an issue that artists have with labels themselves? Isn't your own experience proof of that?

(1710)

Mr. Jeff Price:

Yes, which is why the disintermediation of the label is so fascinating.

One of the biggest challenges I've had sitting here is being quiet. To be honest, there were so many times I wanted to jump in and say, “Wait.”

Remember from the do-it-yourself perspective that these are artists who are their own record labels. There is no middleman between them and their money in regard to the revenue for the sound recording.

With all due respect, the statement that there is no direct licence between some of the digital services and Canadian songwriters is patently false, depending upon what country you're in. In the United States, the DSPs—digital service providers—are required to go directly to the owners of the lyric and melody to get a licence with them directly and pay them directly every single month on the 20th of the month for the revenue they earned from the previous month.

There are plenty of mechanisms in place to assure they can figure out who has what split. The number one way they can do this is by saying, “We won't make the sound recording live until you tell us, record label”, and I can assure you that the record label will move heaven and earth to figure out who's supposed to get what money, because they need that sound recording live because it's their whole economic ecosystem.

In order to get artists paid—I've been thinking a lot about this—frankly, number one, artists need education. They don't understand what rights they have and what rights they don't have. They don't understand the difference between a sound recording and a musical composition. Let's start there.

Now let's move to the idea that you can't escheat someone's money, that you can't take someone's money and give it to somebody else who doesn't own the copyright; we just passed a law in the United States that now allows that to happen to Canadian citizens. If you're unaware of the Music Modernization Act, it says that your revenue can now sit in the United States in a newly formed organization called the mechanical licensing collective. If you don't understand in Canada and you become a member of that organization, your money can now be legally taken from you. You can't have black boxes anymore.

We just landed a rover on Mars today, for God's sake, and we can't figure out who owns copyrights? Come on.

When you move into how difficult it is to license, I agree—it is difficult. You know what? The music industry is hard. It's hard to learn how to play an instrument. It's hard to learn how to market and promote yourself and tour. It's hard to build Google. It's hard to build Facebook. This is a difficult industry, but that doesn't mean that we should turn around and take the people who create the stuff and say, “We're going to make you our employees so that we can accomplish our goals.”

I'm sorry, I'm getting off on a little bit of a tangent. It's just that some of the things I've been hearing I fundamentally disagree with.

So remove the black boxes, hold onto the money till the copyright holder is found, educate the artist community so they understand what rights they possess and where they can go to enforce those rights to collect their money, and then ensure that the DSPs using the music follow the laws. If you don't have the licence, don't use the music, and if you don't know whether you have the licence, you don't have one, so don't use it.

Thank you.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'm glad we let you loose.[Translation]

Mr. Nantel, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you.[English]

Thank you.

I think it is super-important that we hear the creators' point of view. We all know there are consumers. In French, we say droit d'auteur and in English it is the right to copy, and the droit d'auteur is completely the opposite.

I want to clarify something here, because in reading the analysts' document, your position right now.... I'm going to switch to French. [Translation]

You've just told us how it should work and reminded us that we need a licence to use copyrighted content.

If a song is played on YouTube or Spotify, it's understood that the song involves a recording, a producer or a company, a label or an artist. In other words, the song is associated with a phonographic copyright symbol and another intellectual property symbol on the packaging, a “P & C” in musical jargon. It costs money to use the master tape. Once the money has been paid, will the owner of the master tape pay the copyright fees to the people who composed and wrote the song? [English]

Mr. Jeff Price:

I now know what you sound like as a French woman, by the way.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jeff Price: To answer that question—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

It's much better, I guess.

Mr. Jeff Price:

—in the United States, we did have something like that. It's called the pass-through. The burden was on the record label or the distributor. They would be required to get the licence from the Dolly Partons and then also to remit payment to them.

The music publishing community in the States pushed heavily against that because it was a layer between them and the money, and they had no way to audit that sort of middleman. We pushed aggressively to remove that middleman with streaming services in the United States. The U.S., as you're aware, is very different, for some reason, from the rest of the world, even with mechanical royalties, these Dolly Parton royalties. I'm a big proponent of not having the pass-through. I believe that if you're going to use someone else's stuff to make money, which is totally fine, you have to know whose stuff you're using, get a licence, and make a payment.

(1715)

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

In this case it means songwriter, composer and production owner of the master tape?

Mr. Jeff Price:

Yes, it's the birth of the sound recording to the music services—Spotify, Google Play and even Facebook. Facebook is not, by the way, a music service; Google Play is, Spotify is, but Facebook is not. It's a distribution. The place that sends the sound recording to the Spotifys of the world or the Google Plays or the Apple Musics has the unique opportunity to provide the suite of information necessary, because that's its birth.

Frankly, the digital services, in my opinion, should make a requirement in the technical specifications that when the information is sent to them, they should include not only the information around the sound recording—for instance, it's the Beatles recording Let It Be off the Let It Be album—but they should also simultaneously include who wrote it: John Lennon, Paul McCartney and the name of the entity that works for them if they hired one to do it. Now you have the full suite of information right there. If it doesn't come in, then don't make the recording live.

I'll hearken back to the political talking point that will solve about 90% of these problems that I keep hearing about—which, frankly, are not true. If you ask somebody if they know what songs you wrote—Bob Dylan's my client—he says these are the songs he wrote. If you go to the kid in Toronto, they will tell you what songs they wrote. They know; it's just no one's asked them for it.

There is a benefit to collection agencies working on behalf, because it reduces friction to licensing for these organization. It allows scale, and I'm a big fan of that.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you, Mr. Price.[Translation]

Mr. Chan, you mentioned earlier that you have a local team at the advertising sales office in Toronto. I'm sure that many people who know about public finances—which isn't the case for me—reacted strongly when they clearly heard that Canadian companies were required to collect taxes, but American companies weren't required to do so. It's still heresy, but it isn't your fault. It's our fault. It's up to us, the government, to resolve the situation.

Mr. Kee, Mr. Sheehan mentioned earlier that the Fédération nationale des communications, journalists' associations and cultural groups were complaining that your company now collects 50% to 80% of online advertising sales revenue. We're talking only about the information industry here. This situation has led to the loss of several thousand jobs.

I had a great-grandfather who worked in the ice box business. When the refrigerators and freezers arrived, he wasn't happy. He wanted us to continue chopping ice in the river and placing it in ice boxes. He lost his business. That's normal.

Our current news media may be less trendy and less modern than your company. However, in the past, advertising sales have enabled these media companies to hire many people. About 130,000 people work in the media industry in the area of advertising sales. If you've claimed 50% of these sales, how many jobs have you created in Canada? [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

I don't think I can answer the question.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I'll ask you in English.

Mr. Chan said he now has a sales team to advertise in Canada. He has employees and an office with people in it. Overall, the Coalition for Culture and Media is totally right. You are now grabbing at least 50% of the advertising money on the Internet; some say 80%. If all these jobs are jeopardized by this lack of revenue....

My grandfather said he was not selling any more ice because the guys working for you and your ice box and stuff are now working for a refrigerator company. It's okay; times change.

How about you? By your presence and your very useful tools, you are grabbing 50% of the advertising market on the web. Are you creating that many jobs in Canada?

(1720)

Mr. Jason Kee:

Our systems don't work in direct employment. I can't comment on the revenue, the relative market share, but we have a wide variety of advertising tools available. A number of publishers like The Globe and Mail and the National Post and so forth use our advertising infrastructure. They have a revenue share of 70%-80%—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

You're so good at it, Mr. Kee. You're so good at it.

Mr. Jason Kee:

They actually—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

My question is not that.

Mr. Jason Kee:

What I'm saying is that they actually earn revenue from us, and we also are deploying a number of different programs, including the Google News initiative—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I want to have a clearer conversation. Some say that you grab—and I've seen this many times—80% of the Internet advertising sales, you and Facebook. I've seen that. Maybe they are going too far. Let's say it's 50%. I think we can agree on this minimum.

In this new consumer tendency to go and check the Internet advertising and check on Facebook—“Oh, I see that”—we consumers are reacting. You are not forcing anyone, but you are changing the habits of advertisers.

What I'm wondering is whether you are creating a good number of jobs as important as the losses of jobs we see in the old world—in the newspaper world and the regular TV world. How many jobs has Google created in Canada over the last 10 years?

The Chair:

I'm going to have to jump in, because you're way over time.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you.

The Chair:

If you have a five-second answer, let's go for that.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Can we ask for an answer in writing?

Mr. Jason Kee:

I'm happy to provide the full Deloitte economic impact report, which says it's several hundred thousand jobs we've created through these systems.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you, Mr. Kee.

The Chair:

If you can submit that to the clerk, that would be—

Mr. Jason Kee:

I think it's already been circulated, but I'll send it again.

The Chair:

That's the link we sent to everybody? Okay, great. We already sent it.

For the final question, we have Mr. Sheehan.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much.

We're undertaking a statutory review of copyright, which happens every five years. It's a very important review. We gather information and send our report to the minister. The minister then responds.

Going last, I would frame the question in this way. What recommendations could this committee make to the minister that will support small—call them small—and medium-sized content creators in Canada, artists in Canada, and at the same time make sure that we are not doing anything to harm the innovative economy, which has been growing by leaps and bounds in the last five years as part of our innovation agenda?

Does anybody want to go first? Facebook?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I guess it's going to be me.

As I concluded in the opening statement, we do appreciate the fact that Canada actually has a pretty robust and balanced copyright system. We think that the balance is struck pretty well between rights holders and users and folks who want to innovate with content, and we would urge the committee to continue down the path of having a flexible system.

Beyond the specifics of the framework, in terms of the smaller emerging artists, I think one of the biggest challenges they have faced, from what I understand, is this question of discovery and being able to find new audiences or to find people who discover them because they like what they're doing. Sometimes it can be very niche and very specific. A platform like Facebook, which is a discovery platform, actually enables that. The ability of creators and artists to have a presence on Facebook and be able to connect directly with people is a very powerful thing. For the Internet writ large, this is how that ecosystem has worked. Being able to continue to have frameworks that allow for an open and innovative Internet is a very good thing for emerging creators.

I don't know, Probir, if you have some thoughts on that....

(1725)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

Mr. Jason Kee:

I basically support that. I flagged in my opening remarks specific information with respect to the exception around artificial intelligence or machine learning, just because it's not clear in the current act if that's permitted.

A number of companies and the Canadian government itself have invested hundreds of millions of dollars into basically developing that area and making sure that we as Canadians have a substantial competitive advantage in that area. To basically maintain that against the extent that it's potentially hampered by copyright is something that I think the committee needs to look at.

I think one of the biggest challenges that you have as a committee—and this touches on a lot of the issues that Jeff was talking about—is that I don't necessarily see copyright as the primary vehicle to resolve these. It's actually a bit of a cumbersome tool that allows you.... The discussions are about taking away intermediary liability or not, and there are profound consequences by actually engaging in those.

A lot of the discussion is about how we don't actually have accurate information with respect to the rights holders. How can we administer that? How are we actually setting the royalty rates, and how are people being paid? How are the platforms engaging in this process?

In my own view, it's actually an issue better addressed through collaborative and co-operative approaches, with the various stakeholders sitting at a table and working through it, often facilitated by the government. It's not something that a legislative response is necessarily going to assist without invoking tremendous unintended consequences and causing tremendous collateral damage.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Jeff, do you have any last words?

Mr. Jeff Price:

Number one, we have to get away from the philosophy of black boxes and guesstimates. We live in a world of technology; the information can be known. Money that is generated should be held until given to the appropriate copyright owner and should no longer be split up and handed out based on market share.

Number two, there has to be education for the creators. They have to understand the value of what they're creating and how to monetize that.

The third one is a bit of a radical statement, and it's based on my experience: Copyright owners need to have a lever that they can use to enforce their rights in the event that their rights are infringed upon. In the United States, we have statutory damages, which still persist despite the passage of the MMA. That leverage enables a copyright holder to stand up to a multi-billion-dollar corporate behemoth and say, “You can't do that.” If you take away the right of those who create—copyright holders—to pursue that damage, then there's no recourse for them. It is a bit of a radical statement, and it flies against some of the statements made here, which would like less regulation and more blanket licensing.

However, I keep falling back on this: None of us would be here if not for the creation of the content that is driving people to these megacompanies. That's okay, but get a license and make a payment or don't use it.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I want to thank you all for that great testimony. There's a lot for us to think about.

The Chair:

Did you want to add something?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I just want to say that I misspoke about the URL for the transparency report. Just for the record, it's transparency.facebook.com. There you'll find the latest copyright data.

The Chair:

That takes us to the conclusion of today. I wish we had more time; it would have been quite useful.

I want to thank our panel for coming in today, being patient, answering our questions and certainly giving us a lot to think about.

On that note, thank you, everybody. The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte. Commençons. La séance sera chargée.

Bienvenue à tous à cette 139e séance, alors que nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui Jeff Price, directeur général et fondateur d'Audiam Inc., à titre personnel; Kevin Chan, directeur des politiques publiques, et Probir Mehta, directeur des politiques globales de propriété intellectuelle — essayez de dire cela rapidement cinq fois de suite — tous deux de Facebook; Jason J. Kee, conseiller en politiques publiques et relations gouvernementales, de Google Canada; et enfin, Darren Schmidt, avocat principal de Spotify.

Bienvenue à tous, vous aurez chacun sept minutes pour présenter votre exposé. Nous allons écouter tous les exposés, puis nous passerons à la période de questions.

Pour que tous nos membres soient au courant, je tiens à préciser que M. Schmidt, de Spotify, nous quittera à 17 heures. Si vous avez des questions à lui adresser, posez-les en premier. Cela vous convient? Excellent.

Nous allons commencer par M. Price. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Jeff Price (directeur général et fondateur, Audiam Inc., à titre personnel):

Oups, je n'ai même pas activé ma minuterie.

Le président:

C'est bon. Je vous arrêterai.

M. Jeff Price:

C'est bien ce que je pensais.

Merci de me recevoir.

Je m'appelle Jeff Price. J'ai exploité une maison de disques appelée SpinART Records pendant environ 17 ans. Elle a distribué des albums d'artistes comme Pixies, Echo and the Bunnymen, Ron Sexsmith, et même un album de Gordon Lightfoot.

En 2005, j'ai fondé une entreprise appelée TuneCore, qui est rapidement devenue la plus grande entreprise de distribution de musique au monde. J'ai changé le modèle commercial de l'industrie mondiale de la musique. Ce que j'ai fait, c'est permettre à tout artiste dans le monde ayant enregistré de la musique d'en faire la distribution et la vente sur des services de musique numériques où les gens peuvent acheter de la musique. J'ai également changé la façon dont les artistes sont payés après la vente d'un enregistrement musical. Je leur donnais tout l'argent. Il n'y avait pas de maison de disque entre l'artiste et le commerce de détail. Les artistes étaient la maison de disque. Tout l'argent qu'on percevait leur était versé.

En plus, je leur permettais de conserver la propriété de leurs propres droits d'auteur. Sur le plan éditorial, les entités de l'industrie de la musique traditionnelle devaient d'abord décider si elles voulaient de vous, et si c'était le cas, vous deviez lui céder la propriété de vos droits d'auteur, puis on vous payait environ 12 % de l'argent amassé.

Nous avons démocratisé l'industrie de la musique, et nous avons laissé tous les artistes diffuser leur musique sur des plateformes numériques. Quand une chanson se vendait, les artistes touchaient tout l'argent et pouvaient conserver la propriété de leurs droits d'auteur.

L'entreprise a grandi très rapidement. En trois ans, les clients de TuneCore ont généré plus de 800 millions de dollars de recettes brutes en vendant leur musique... « tout un chacun ». Tout cet argent a été versé et leur est revenu. TuneCore touchait de simples frais fixes pour l'accès au service; nous avons donc fait de la distribution un produit tout en la démocratisant.

Quelques années après la création de l'entreprise, quelque chose de très étrange s'est produit. Chaque mois, on distribuait entre 100 000 et 150 000 nouveaux enregistrements. Pour mettre les choses en perspective, le Warner Music Group, à son apogée, distribuait environ 3 600 nouveaux enregistrements par année. On en distribuait entre 100 000 et 150 000 chaque mois. En un mois, on distribuait ce que l'industrie de la musique pouvait distribuer en 50 ans. De nos jours, plus de 250 000 nouveaux enregistrements par mois viennent de gens qui font tout eux-mêmes, qui détiennent leurs propres droits d'auteur et qui récoltent tout l'argent qui leur revient.

Après quatre années à exploiter l'entreprise, j'ai commencé à réfléchir à la deuxième redevance distincte que touchent ces gens, car il se trouve qu'ils jouaient deux rôles. Voici un exemple: Sony Records a embauché Whitney Houston pour qu'elle chante I will always love you, que je vais chanter à la fin de mon exposé — non, je ne vais pas le faire —, mais Dolly Parton a écrit les paroles et la mélodie. Ce sont deux droits d'auteur distincts. Chaque fois que l'enregistrement est diffusé en continu ou téléchargé, il est question de deux droits distincts, et deux paiements distincts doivent être versés: un à Sony pour l'enregistrement, et un à Dolly, pour les paroles et la mélodie. Il se trouve que les clients de TuneCore — ceux qui font tout par eux-mêmes — représentaient à la fois Sony Records et Dolly Parton. Chaque fois qu'une chanson est téléchargée ou diffusée en continu, elle est soumise à deux droits, et deux paiements sont versés. TuneCore ne perçoit le paiement que pour les enregistrements, pas pour les paroles ni la mélodie, et l'entreprise s'est lancée dans des recherches. Qu'en est-il de la deuxième redevance?

En ce qui concerne la deuxième redevance, j'ai découvert que plus de 100 millions de dollars avaient été générés, mais n'avaient jamais été payés en raison de lacunes dans le système. Il n'y avait aucune structure, aucune manière de le faire, et nous avons commencé à récupérer cet argent.

En cours de route, alors que nous arrivions à la fin de mon mandat à TuneCore, j'ai lancé une deuxième entreprise en 2012. J'ai quitté TuneCore et j'ai mis sur pied une entreprise appelée Audiam. Je n'ai jamais oublié les 100 millions de dollars qui n'ont pas été payés à toutes les Dolly Parton de ce monde, à tous les auteurs-compositeurs.

Quand Audiam a vu le jour — ma nouvelle entreprise —, je me suis dit qu'il fallait réellement travailler pour les Dolly Parton de ce monde, ou les gens qui travaillent pour ces personnes, et faire en sorte que leur musique soit assortie de droits et qu'ils soient rémunérés pour la diffusion continue et les autres services de musique numériques. C'est maintenant ce que fait Audiam: elle octroie des licences et perçoit de l'argent pour Bob Dylan, Metallica, Red Hot Chili Peppers, les gens qui écrivent les chansons et qui sont parfois les mêmes personnes qui réalisent l'enregistrement.

Nous avons découvert qu'il y avait de graves violations du droit d'auteur aux États-Unis et au Canada. Des services de musique numériques utilisaient ces compositions, ces paroles et ces mélodies, sans licences, et sans verser de redevances. Nous avons entrepris des démarches pour aider à éliminer cette friction en ce qui concerne les licences et pour travailler avec bon nombre de gens qui sont assis à mes côtés aujourd'hui.

Mais la chose qui m'a vraiment frappé, et que je tiens à vous faire comprendre, c'est que la majorité des oeuvres musicales protégées par des droits d'auteur qui sont produites, créées et distribuées de nos jours viennent de « tout un chacun ». Elles viennent de l'extérieur de cette industrie traditionnelle. Ces artistes prennent de l'importance en ce qui concerne le revenu et les parts de marché, puisque les parts de marché des grandes maisons de disques diminuent. Ce sont ces personnes qui sont touchées par ce qui se passe aujourd'hui, puisqu'elles détiennent la plus grande part du marché. Plus le temps avance, plus les oeuvres protégées par les droits d'auteur seront créées et distribuées par « tout un chacun ».

(1535)



Le plus important à retenir, c'est que par le passé, il y avait une société multinationale comme Sony, une entité qui possédait 3 millions de droits d'auteur; maintenant, il y a 3 millions de personnes, et chacune d'elles est propriétaire d'un droit d'auteur. La façon dont ces personnes sont touchées dépend des décisions, de la réglementation, des taux et ainsi de suite — le droit d'auteur, et ce qui devrait ou ne devrait pas faire l'objet d'une licence —, mais il ne faut pas oublier qu'à l'heure actuelle, il s'agit de personnes plutôt que d'une société multinationale, à bien des égards.

Pour donner un exemple parmi des milliers d'autres, deux jeunes se sont adressés à TuneCore à partir de leur chambre à coucher. Ils ont écrit une chanson à propos du sextage et ont vendu plus d'un million de copies de cette chanson dans le monde sans savoir qu'ils avaient gagné ces redevances. En fin de compte, on a pris leur argent et on l'a donné à de grandes entreprises d'édition musicale — Universal, Warner et Sony — en fonction de leur part de marché, car ils n'avaient même pas l'information nécessaire pour savoir qu'ils avaient gagné cet argent.

C'est un court résumé à propos de mon entreprise et de moi-même, et je suppose que c'est pour cette raison que je suis ici aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons écouter M. Chan, de Facebook.

M. Kevin Chan (directeur des politiques publiques, Facebook Inc.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Avant de commencer, je tiens à m'excuser. Je croyais disposer de huit minutes, je vais donc probablement dépasser un peu mon temps.

Le président:

Il a parlé pendant six minutes, donc nous pourrions vous accorder une minute de plus. [Français]

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, au nom de Facebook, je vous remercie de nous donner la possibilité de prendre la parole devant vous aujourd'hui.

Je m'appelle Kevin Chan et je suis le directeur des politiques publiques chez Facebook Canada. Je suis accompagné de Probir Mehta, le directeur des politiques mondiales en matière de propriété intellectuelle.

Chez Facebook, nous encourageons la créativité et la diffusion de la culture en ligne. Nous croyons que Facebook confère aux créateurs de contenu de tous horizons, qu'il s'agisse de musiciens, de ligues sportives, d'éditeurs ou de studios de télévision ou de cinéma, de nouveaux canaux pour diffuser leur contenu, attirer le public hors ligne et promouvoir leur créativité.

Par ailleurs, Facebook fournit aux détenteurs de droits des outils pour protéger et promouvoir leur contenu, tout en protégeant le droit à la liberté d'expression de tous les utilisateurs.[Traduction]

J'aimerais commencer en vous donnant quelques exemples concrets de la façon dont nous travaillons avec les artistes, les créateurs et les institutions culturelles à l'échelle du pays pour promouvoir leur travail et renforcer leur autonomie.

Nombre de titulaires de droits d'auteur ont des pages Facebook et utilisent nos outils pour promouvoir leur contenu et en étendre la portée. Chez Facebook Canada, nous avons une équipe chargée des partenariats dont le mandat est de travailler avec les éditeurs, les artistes et les créateurs pour les aider à maximiser la valeur de la plateforme Facebook en rejoignant de nouveaux auditoires, en mobilisant directement les amateurs et en faisant la promotion de leur travail au Canada et dans le monde.

Depuis les deux dernières années, cette équipe travaille en partenariat avec le Centre national des Arts, le CNA, en l'aidant à remplir son mandat de centre d'arts pour tous les Canadiens à l'échelle du pays. Dans le cadre des récentes célébrations du 150e anniversaire du Canada, Facebook était fier d'être le partenaire numérique du CNA: ses musiciens et artistes voyageaient dans tout le pays pour rejoindre les Canadiens, tant en personne qu'en ligne.

Pour vous donner un exemple, en ce qui concerne la récente tournée de la pièce Tartuffe du théâtre anglais du CNA à Terre-Neuve, le fait de publier sur Facebook du contenu concernant la tournée a permis au CNA d'étendre considérablement son empreinte dans la province, en rejoignant plus de 395 000 Terre-Neuviens en ligne, soit environ 75 % de la population de la province.

Nous concentrons également nos efforts pour soutenir les nouveaux créateurs en les aidant à mobiliser et à accroître leur communauté, à gérer leur présence et à créer une entreprise sur Facebook. Pendant trois ans, nous avons appuyé les nouveaux artistes musicaux canadiens, grâce au programme de classe de maître de l'Académie canadienne des arts et des sciences de l'enregistrement, dans le cadre duquel des mentors donnent des conseils quant à la façon de rejoindre de nouveaux auditoires sur Facebook.

Enfin, de nombreuses institutions culturelles ont le statut d'organismes de bienfaisance et, plus tôt ce mois-ci, nous étions ravis d'avoir lancé plusieurs nouvelles stratégies au Canada pour permettre à ces organismes d'amasser des fonds directement sur Facebook. Nous offrons gratuitement ce service, et nous sommes ravis de voir que plus de 1 milliard de dollars ont déjà été amassés directement sur Facebook à l'échelle mondiale. Nous sommes impatients d'observer des effets aussi positifs au Canada.

(1540)

[Français]

Facebook prend au sérieux la protection de la propriété intellectuelle des détenteurs de droits. À ce titre, Facebook a mis en place plusieurs mesures qui visent à aider les détenteurs de droits à protéger leurs droits au moyen d'un programme mondial rigoureux de lutte contre la violation des droits d'auteur.[Traduction]

Notre programme de lutte contre la violation de la propriété intellectuelle repose sur trois piliers.

Premièrement, nos conditions d'utilisation et nos normes sociales sont le fondement de notre plateforme. Elles interdisent précisément aux utilisateurs d'afficher du contenu qui contrevient aux droits associés à la propriété intellectuelle de tiers ou qui enfreint la loi, et elles précisent que les utilisateurs qui publient du contenu illicite se verront exposer à des pénalités et à la suspension de leur compte.

Deuxièmement, notre programme mondial de lutte contre la violation de la propriété intellectuelle donne aux titulaires de droits la possibilité de signaler tout contenu qu'ils jugent illicite. Nous mettons à la disposition des titulaires de droits des voies de communication dédiées au signalement de violations, notamment à l'aide de nos formulaires électroniques de signalement disponibles par l'entremise de notre centre d'aide à la propriété intellectuelle. Des signalements peuvent être soumis pour divers types de contenu, y compris des publications personnelles, des vidéos, des publicités et même des profils et des pages en entier. Ces signalements sont traités par notre équipe responsable de la propriété intellectuelle; il s'agit d'une équipe mondiale de professionnels spécialement formés, qui offre un service jour et nuit dans plusieurs langues, y compris en anglais et en français.

Si le signalement d'un détenteur de droits est complet et valide, le contenu visé est rapidement supprimé, bien souvent dans les heures qui suivent. Nous avons également mis en oeuvre une vaste politique contre les récidivistes, en vertu de laquelle nous désactivons les profils et les pages Facebook sur lesquels du contenu illicite est publié à répétition ou ouvertement. Les utilisateurs dont le contenu est retiré à la suite d'un signalement reçoivent un avis de retrait au moment où cela se produit. Ces utilisateurs reçoivent également de l'information au sujet du signalement, y compris le nom et l'adresse courriel du détenteur de droits qui a signalé le contenu, dans l'éventualité où les parties souhaiteraient résoudre l'affaire directement.

Troisièmement, nous continuons d'investir massivement dans des outils à la fine pointe de la technologie qui nous permettent de protéger le droit d'auteur à l'échelle de notre plateforme, même si aucun détenteur de droit n'a signalé de cas précis de violation.

Nous avons élaboré notre propre outil de gestion du contenu, Rights Manager, pour aider les titulaires à protéger leurs droits d'auteur sur Facebook. Les titulaires de droits participants peuvent téléverser des fichiers de référence, et, si une correspondance est trouvée, ils peuvent choisir quelles mesures prendre: bloquer la vidéo et, par conséquent, éliminer la nécessité de continuellement signaler des cas de violation du droit d'auteur, surveiller les mesures vidéo pour la correspondance ou signaler la vidéo à des fins de retrait.

Depuis de nombreuses années, nous utilisons également Audible Magic, un service de tiers qui tient à jour une base de données de contenu audio appartenant aux créateurs de contenu, afin de détecter de manière proactive le contenu qui contient une oeuvre protégée par le droit d'auteur d'un tiers, y compris des chansons, des films et des émissions télévisées. Si une correspondance est détectée, le contenu est bloqué, et l'utilisateur qui a téléchargé le contenu en est avisé et peut contester la décision s'il possède les droits nécessaires.

Dans notre rapport sur la transparence publié il y a à peine quelques semaines, nous mettons en relief des données au sujet du nombre de signalements, concernant le contenu protégé par droit d'auteur, que nous avons reçus et leur nature, ainsi que le volume de contenu touché. Durant le premier semestre de 2018, sur Facebook et Instagram, nous avons retiré près de trois millions d'éléments de contenu en nous appuyant sur près d'un demi-million de signalements concernant du contenu protégé par droit d'auteur.

(1545)

[Français]

Pour terminer, Facebook croit que le régime de droits d'auteur devrait représenter les intérêts de tous. Les régimes de ce type, comme celui du Canada, sont flexibles et favorisent l'innovation, tout en protégeant la propriété intellectuelle des détenteurs de droits.

Facebook espère que le Comité continuera, à l'avenir, de maintenir le régime favorable à l'innovation de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, afin de favoriser la conception de nouvelles options de contenu et de nouvelles façons pour les créateurs de lancer leur entreprise et de se bâtir un nom.[Traduction]

Merci encore de m'avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître devant vous. Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant écouter Jason Kee, de Google Canada. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Jason Kee (conseiller en politiques publiques et relations gouvernementales, Google Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de nous donner l'occasion de participer à votre examen.

Google compte plus de 1 000 employés dans ses quatre bureaux au Canada, y compris plus de 600 ingénieurs qui travaillent sur des produits utilisés par des milliards de personnes dans le monde, et des équipes responsables des publicités et du nuage qui aident les entreprises canadiennes à tirer le meilleur parti de la technologie numérique.

Les entreprises et les créateurs canadiens de tous les secteurs utilisent nos produits et services pour rejoindre les consommateurs et monétiser leurs auditoires. D'après une récente étude d'impact économique publiée par Deloitte, qui, je pense, a été distribuée aux membres du Comité, les entreprises, les éditeurs et les créateurs ont généré plus de 21 milliards de dollars en retombées économiques l'année dernière seulement, soutenant ainsi des centaines de milliers d'emplois.

Les modèles de rémunération et de revenus de Google se fondent essentiellement sur un modèle de partenariat. Les créateurs, comme les éditeurs, les producteurs et les concepteurs fournissent du contenu, tandis que nous offrons la distribution et la monétisation, l'infrastructure technique, les ventes, les systèmes de paiement, le soutien opérationnel et d'autres ressources. Puis, nous partageons les revenus qui en découlent, dont la majorité va toujours au créateur.

Comme nous travaillons en partenariat, nous touchons uniquement des revenus lorsque nos partenaires touchent des revenus. Il est dans notre intérêt d'assurer la réussite et la viabilité de nos partenaires. C'est pourquoi nous investissons des sommes importantes dans la technologie, les outils et les ressources pour prévenir le piratage sur nos plateformes. Internet a permis aux créateurs de se brancher, de créer et de distribuer leurs oeuvres comme jamais auparavant de manière à créer un public mondial et des sources de revenus durables, mais nous devons faire en sorte que cette nouvelle économie créative permette aux créateurs à la fois d'échanger leur contenu et d'en tirer de l'argent, notamment en éliminant ceux qui piratent ce contenu.

Cinq principes clés guident nos investissements considérables dans la lutte au piratage: la création de plus de solutions de rechange légitimes; le suivi de l'argent; la mise en place d'outils efficients, efficaces et à géométrie variable; la protection contre les abus; et la transparence.

Le premier principe consiste à créer des solutions de rechange légitimes plus nombreuses et de meilleure qualité. Le piratage survient souvent lorsqu'il est difficile pour les consommateurs d'accéder à du contenu légitime. En concevant des produits qui facilitent l'accès, Google génère des revenus pour les industries créatives et donne un choix aux consommateurs. Par exemple, l'industrie de la musique a généré plus de 6 milliards de dollars en recettes publicitaires sur YouTube, dont 1,8 milliard de dollars au cours de la dernière année seulement.

Pour ce faire, nous offrons une variété de services: des services financés par la publicité comme YouTube, des services à abonnement comme Google Play Musique et YouTube Premium et des services transactionnels comme Google Play Films et séries. Nous appuyons également de nouvelles formes de monétisation, comme les achats à même les applications dans Google Play Jeux, les adhésions à YouTube et la fonction Super Chat, qui permettent aux utilisateurs de soutenir directement leurs créateurs favoris. En outre, nous trouvons de nouvelles façons de permettre aux créateurs de trouver d'autres sources de revenus, comme les produits dérivés, la vente de billets et les commandites.

Nous voulons que les créateurs diversifient leurs revenus et diminuent leur dépendance aux publicités ou aux abonnements. Cela leur permet non seulement de bâtir des entreprises créatives durables, mais aussi de se protéger contre les effets négatifs du piratage.

Le deuxième principe consiste à suivre l'argent. Des sites consacrés au piratage en ligne essaient de générer des recettes. Nous devons couper cette source. Google applique des politiques rigoureuses pour empêcher ces entités malveillantes d'exploiter ses systèmes de publicité et de monétisation. En 2017, nous avons refusé plus de 10 millions de publicités que l'on soupçonnait illicites et retiré quelque 7 000 sites Web de notre programme AdSense pour violation de droit d'auteur.

Le troisième principe consiste à offrir des outils d'application de la loi qui sont efficients, efficaces et à géométrie variable. Dans notre moteur de recherche, nous avons des processus simplifiés pour permettre aux titulaires de droits de soumettre des avis de retrait. Depuis le lancement de cet outil, nous avons retiré près de trois milliards d'adresses URL illicites. Nous tenons aussi compte du volume d'avis de retrait valides dans notre classement des résultats de recherche.

Sur YouTube, nous avons investi plus de 100 millions de dollars dans Content ID, notre système de pointe de gestion des droits d'auteur. Content ID permet aux titulaires de droits de téléverser des fichiers de référence, et compare automatiquement ces fichiers avec tout ce qui est téléversé sur YouTube. Quand Content ID trouve une correspondance, le titulaire de droits peut bloquer la vidéo de sorte que personne ne puisse la regarder, monétiser la vidéo en y ajoutant des annonces ou laisser la vidéo en ligne et suivre les statistiques relatives aux visionnements.

Plus de 9 000 partenaires utilisent Content ID. Ils choisissent de monétiser le contenu dans plus de 90 % des cas — et 95 %, pour la musique —, et nous avons versé plus de 3 milliards de dollars à ces partenaires. Content ID est très efficace; il permet de régler plus de 98 % des problèmes de droit d'auteur sur YouTube, et ce chiffre monte à 99,5 % dans le cas des enregistrements sonores.

Ce ne sont que quelques-uns des outils d'application de la loi que nous mettons à la disposition des créateurs et des titulaires de droits.

Les quatrième et cinquième principes visent à lutter contre l'abus et à accroître la transparence. Malheureusement, certains abusent de nos outils et présentent de fausses revendications afin d'éliminer du contenu qu'ils n'aiment tout simplement pas. Nous investissons des ressources considérables pour aborder ce problème et publier l'information concernant les demandes de retrait dans notre rapport de transparence.

Plus que jamais, Google génère des revenus pour les créateurs et les titulaires de droits et prend des mesures pour lutter contre le piratage en ligne. Les exonérations pour les intermédiaires, comme les mesures clarifiant les responsabilités des réseaux et des services d'hébergement, qui ont été introduites en 2012, sont essentielles à l'atteinte de cet objectif.

En effet, de telles protections sont au centre du fonctionnement même d'Internet ouvert. Si les services en ligne sont responsables des activités de leurs utilisateurs, les plateformes ouvertes ne peuvent tout simplement pas fonctionner. Le risque que leur responsabilité soit engagée limiterait considérablement leur capacité d'autoriser le contenu des utilisateurs téléversé dans leurs systèmes.

(1550)



Cela aurait une profonde incidence sur les communications ouvertes en ligne, toucherait gravement la nouvelle classe de créateurs numériques qui dépendent de ces plateformes pour assurer leur subsistance et limiterait les retombées économiques considérables que génèrent les intermédiaires.

Parallèlement, les limites et les exceptions prévues dans la loi, comme l'utilisation équitable, assurent cet équilibre essentiel en limitant les droits exclusifs accordés de manière à encourager l'accès aux œuvres protégées et à permettre les utilisations raisonnables

L'une de ces utilisations est l'analyse de l'information, que l'on appelle également l'exploration de textes et de données. Les systèmes d'acquisition de connaissances ont besoin d'exemples fondés sur des données pour apprendre, et il est souvent nécessaire que ces ensembles de données soient copiés, traités et reconvertis. Dans certains cas, ces ensembles de données peuvent inclure du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur, notamment lorsqu'on alimente un système automatisé de traduction de textes à l'aide d'un corpus de livres traduits dans plusieurs langues. À moins qu'il y ait une exception autorisant ce genre de copie technique, de traitement et d'emmagasinage, l'apprentissage machine pourrait violer le droit d'auteur, même si l'algorithme acquiert des connaissances à partir des données et qu'il n'interfère avec aucun marché ni ne nuit à l'utilisation par les auteurs.

Nous ne savons pas si cette activité pourrait être visée par les exceptions actuelles. Le contraire mettrait à risque les investissements considérables du gouvernement canadien dans l'intelligence artificielle et l'avantage concurrentiel significatif du Canada dans ce domaine. Nous recommandons fortement l'inclusion d'une exception flexible au droit d'auteur qui autoriserait ces types de processus et offrirait une certitude dont nous avons grandement besoin.

Je me ferai un plaisir d'aborder ces questions plus en détail, et je suis impatient de répondre à vos questions.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Enfin, nous allons entendre M. Schmidt, de Spotify, pendant sept minutes.

M. Darren Schmidt (avocat principal, Spotify):

Merci d'inviter Spotify à contribuer à l'examen prévu par la loi du Comité. Je m'appelle Darren Schmidt. Je suis avocat principal chez Spotify, et je suis responsable des licences de contenu au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde.

Je suis enchanté de vous parler de Spotify, et particulièrement des avantages que procure notre service aux artistes de studios d'enregistrement et aux auteurs-compositeurs, de même qu'à tous les amateurs de musique.

Tout comme le Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien, le Comité nous a demandé d'expliquer de manière générale les différentes manières de verser des redevances aux titulaires de droits, aux artistes de studios d'enregistrement et aux musiciens.

D'abord, laissez-moi présenter l'entreprise.

Spotify est une entreprise suédoise qui a été créée à Stockholm en 2006. Notre service a été lancé pour la première fois en 2008, et il est accessible au Canada depuis 2014. Notre mission était et demeure de libérer le potentiel de la créativité humaine en donnant à des millions d'artistes créateurs la possibilité de vivre de leur art et en permettant à des milliards d'amateurs d'apprécier l'oeuvre de ces créateurs et de s'en inspirer.

Spotify est maintenant accessible dans 78 marchés et possède plus de 191 millions d'utilisateurs actifs chaque mois, et 87 millions d'abonnés payants. Au cours du mois d'août 2018, l'entreprise a payé plus de 10 milliards d'euros à des titulaires de droits partout dans le monde.

Spotify investit massivement dans l'industrie de la musique canadienne et appuie les créateurs de musique, qu'ils soient des auteurs-compositeurs, des compositeurs, des artistes de studios d'enregistrement ou des interprètes. Spotify a donné beaucoup de visibilité aux artistes canadiens grâce à ses listes de diffusion. Parmi les listes de diffusion hebdomadaire, les plus populaires au Canada sur Spotify, il y a Hot Hits Canada, avec un demi-million d'abonnés, et New Music Friday Canada, avec 250 000 abonnés. En fait, le premier ministre Trudeau lui-même a publié une liste de diffusion sur Spotify.

La programmation algorithmique et éditoriale de Spotify a fait la promotion de plus de 10 000 artistes canadiens uniques seulement au cours du dernier mois. Spotify a ciblé plus de 400 artistes canadiens ayant plus d'un million d'écoutes cette année seulement, dont les trois quarts ont produit ce qu'on pourrait décrire comme une chanson à succès — c'est-à-dire une chanson qui a généré plus d'un million d'écoutes à l'échelle mondiale depuis le lancement de Spotify.

En 2017, le gouvernement de Canada et Spotify ont célébré le 150e anniversaire du Canada en mettant l'accent sur la musique canadienne, grâce à la promotion sur des médias numériques de listes de diffusion de Canadiens influents. Nous avons inspiré les Canadiens à célébrer l'anniversaire de la nation en écoutant de la musique. La campagne était assortie d'un important soutien au chapitre de la publicité, des médias numériques et de la plateforme.

Cet automne, nous avons lancé une campagne visant précisément à accroître notre public de hip-hop francophone, et elle comporte des partenariats en matière de marketing et de publicité écrite avec des blogues bien en vue au Québec.

Même si Spotify n'a habituellement pas de relation financière directe avec les artistes de studios d'enregistrement et les auteurs-compositeurs, comme je vais le décrire brièvement, l'entreprise sait que l'industrie de la musique en général croît de nouveau après avoir traversé une très mauvaise période au début des années 2000. L'industrie au Canada, comme dans nombre de marchés, a connu un déclin rapide de ses revenus en raison de la mise en ligne de sites de piratage comme Napster, Grokster et d'autres. De façon générale, les revenus découlant de la musique enregistrée ont presque diminué de moitié depuis leur sommet vers la fin des années 1990, et ce n'était pas différent au Canada.

Toutefois, les choses se sont améliorées. L'industrie mondiale de la musique connaît de nouveau une croissance, tout comme celle du Canada, et l'année 2017 a été la première année où les revenus provenant de services de diffusion de musique en continu comptaient pour plus de la moitié de l'ensemble du marché de la musique. L'IFPI — c'est l'organisme mondial qui représente les maisons de disques — a déclaré que l'industrie de la musique au Canada avait connu trois années de croissance successives. Il s'agit d'une réalisation remarquable étant donné que les revenus de cette part de marché étaient négligeables il y a à peine cinq ans. Depuis son lancement, Spotify a joué un grand rôle dans ce retour en force.

J'aimerais maintenant fournir des détails au Comité sur la façon dont Spotify octroie des licences pour sa musique et la façon dont ces licences permettent le paiement de redevances aux titulaires de droits et aux créateurs.

Par sa nature, pour obtenir du contenu, le service de Spotify dépend des licences octroyées aux titulaires de droits, et non pas de la création de contenu par les utilisateurs. Comme les membres du Comité le savent sûrement déjà, il y a deux types de droits d'auteur distincts pour la musique: un pour la composition musicale et un autre pour l'enregistrement sonore. Les droits d'auteur des chansons sont habituellement détenus par les éditeurs de musique, alors que les droits d'auteur pour les enregistrements sonores sont normalement détenus par des maisons de disques. Spotify obtient des licences des deux côtés.

En ce qui a trait aux enregistrements sonores, les droits mondiaux que nous obtenons viennent de grandes et petites maisons de disques et aussi directement de certains artistes de studios d'enregistrement — bien que ce soit rare —, dans la mesure où ils contrôlent les droits sur leurs propres enregistrements.

Du côté de l'édition musicale — pour les chansons sous-jacentes aux enregistrements sonores —, le monde est beaucoup plus fragmenté et complexe. Cela s'explique par deux causes principales.

Premièrement, contrairement au monde de l'enregistrement sonore, il est relativement courant que plusieurs entités différentes possèdent une composition musicale. Prenez par exemple la chanson In My Feelings, par l'artiste canadien Drake. Une seule maison de disques détient les droits d'auteur de cet enregistrement sonore, soit Cash Money Records, mais la distribution est assurée par Universal Music Group, mon ancien employeur. Toutefois, 16 auteurs-compositeurs reconnus possèdent les droits de composition musicale, ainsi que cinq éditeurs de musique, et chacun détient un pourcentage différent de ces droits. Nous avons ici un exemple de fragmentation de la propriété par oeuvre.

(1555)



Deuxièmement, selon le territoire, divers types d'entités ou de sociétés de perception de redevances contrôlent divers types de droits. Le Canada est un bon exemple. Au pays, Spotify détient une licence de la SOCAN pour les droits de représentation publique des compositions, mais le droit de reproduction — ou le droit mécanique — des mêmes compositions provient d'autres entités, principalement CSI, qui, en soi, est une entreprise conjointe de la CMRRA et de la SODRAC, pour l'instant, ainsi que certaines autres.

Spotify paie la SOCAN, CSI et d'autres organismes, et ces entités sont pour leur part responsables de la distribution de ces redevances aux titulaires de droits, aux auteurs et aux éditeurs de musique. Je devrais souligner qu'il y a beaucoup de choses que je ne dis pas dans le but d'être bref, principalement au sujet du fait que, contrairement à certains autres territoires, au Canada, il n'y a pas de licence de reproduction mécanique générale, ce qui serait très utile. Je crois savoir que certaines modifications législatives sont à l'étude actuellement, ou qu'elles le seront bientôt, et qu'elles pourraient effectivement retirer la licence générale existante pour la représentation publique. Ces problèmes, et l'augmentation de la fragmentation qu'ils représentent, font qu'il est plus difficile de s'assurer que les auteurs sont identifiés et payés adéquatement pour leur contribution.

Beaucoup d'autres changements sont à venir sur le marché. Par exemple, la SODRAC a été achetée par la SOCAN. Ces changements pourraient modifier considérablement le paysage de l'octroi de licences. Quoi qu'il en soit, le fait que Spotify paie des entités qui, ensuite, distribuent les redevances à leurs membres signifie que Spotify n'est généralement pas au courant de la somme que touche chaque créateur pour sa contribution créative. C'est le cas au Canada ainsi que dans le reste du monde.

En résumé, Spotify est arrivé tardivement au Canada en raison de sa détermination à respecter le droit d'auteur et à obtenir des licences au lieu de compter sur des exonérations en la matière. Depuis notre lancement à la fin de 2014, notre histoire, ainsi que celle de la musique canadienne, est marquée par le succès.

Aujourd'hui, des millions de Canadiens choisissent non pas de pirater la musique, mais d'y accéder légalement. Voilà qui résume les origines de Spotify. Nous avions la profonde conviction que, si nous établissions une solution de rechange légale et supérieure au vol, les artistes et les auteurs prospéreraient. Ce travail a commencé, et notre croissance se poursuivra pendant longtemps.

Merci de nous laisser contribuer à cette étude. Nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(1600)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer directement à nos questions. Je vous rappelle que M. Schmidt doit partir dans une heure, alors, si vous avez une question particulière à lui adresser, assurez-vous de la lui poser dès le départ.

Nous allons commencer par M. Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous d'être venus discuter avec nous de ce sujet important. Nous tentons principalement de découvrir un moyen de faire fonctionner le marché de manière à ce que les créateurs soient rémunérés adéquatement.

Je m'intéresse vraiment au modèle de M. Price. Vous avez mentionné les frais fixes, puis M. Schmidt a aussi parlé de ces frais comme moyen de rémunérer les créateurs. Le fait de remettre la totalité de l'argent aux créateurs était une idée intéressante, mais elle m'a fait me demander comment votre entreprise se fait payer dans le processus. Pourriez-vous peut-être approfondir un peu la question des frais fixes?

M. Jeff Price:

Bien sûr.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Comment survivez-vous grâce à votre flux de rentrées? Dites-le-nous afin que nous puissions suivre.

M. Jeff Price:

Eh bien, je ne travaille plus pour TuneCore. Je suis parti il y a six ans. Je considère cette entreprise ou d'autres entités semblables comme un genre de service de messagerie qu'on paierait pour qu'il livre un colis. TuneCore génère ses recettes tout comme Federal Express. Elle touche des frais en échange d'un service qui distribue et place la musique sur les plateformes de service d'Apple Music, de Spotify, de Deezer, de Simfy et d'autres. Il s'agit d'un modèle de paiement à l'acte, tout comme l'achat d'un paquet de cordes de guitare.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

M. Jeff Price:

Ce que je trouve fascinant, c'est que jamais autant de revenus n'ont été générés à partir de la musique qu'aujourd'hui, mais qu'une moins grande part revient aux créateurs.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Exact.

M. Jeff Price:

Certains chiffres ont été lancés en l'air, et je veux les mettre en perspective.

Un million de diffusions en continu sur Spotify génèrent aux États-Unis — et ces chiffres sont pas mal comparables au Canada — environ 200 $. Ce n'est pas de quoi gagner sa vie.

Ce qui est intéressant, c'est la valeur du fait d'obtenir un million de diffusions en continu. Cela veut dire qu'il y a probablement au moins 100 000 personnes qui écoutent votre musique en continu. En tant qu'entreprise technologique, combien paieriez-vous pour embaucher une personne afin qu'elle vous apporte 100 000 utilisateurs? Quelle est la valeur financière de cette réalité pour un investisseur ou advenant un PAPE?

C'est malheureusement là que nos intérêts divergent. Pandora n'a jamais fait d'argent. Spotify n'en a jamais fait, malgré ses capitaux de marché de plus de 25 milliards de dollars. Avant d'être acheté pour 1 milliard de dollars, YouTube n'avait jamais fait d'argent. La valeur de ces entités repose sur leur part du marché. C'est l'oeuvre des musiciens qui a attiré les utilisateurs et les a amenés à utiliser la technologie, et cela a été récompensé par le milieu des finances et Wall Street sous la forme de PAPE et de ventes, et il n'y a rien de mal à cela.

Ce qui me pose problème, c'est quand j'entends dire que ces entreprises obtiennent une capitalisation boursière supérieure à 1 billion de dollars, ou une capitalisation boursière d'un demi-billion de dollars; le monde est regroupé en fonction de diverses bannières représentées par les gens avec qui nous siégeons ici. Facebook, Google, Spotify — toutes des entreprises merveilleuses — ont des centaines de millions, des milliards, d'utilisateurs regroupés sous la bannière de ces entreprises dont la capitalisation boursière s'élève à des dizaines ou à des centaines de milliards; pourtant, elles ne versent — il s'agit d'un taux de redevance réel aux États-Unis — que 0,0001 $US par diffusion en continu sur leur plateforme financée par des publicités. Il y a quelque chose qui ne va pas.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, c'est ce que nous entendons dire. Voilà pourquoi nous voulions amener tout le monde à comparaître aujourd'hui. Il s'agit de l'une de nos séances les plus cruciales, selon moi, pour ce qui est de tenter de suivre ce flux d'argent.

En ce qui concerne Google, il est question de transparence. Nous affirmons également qu'il est difficile de découvrir combien les artistes se font vraiment payer relativement aux recettes que touchent les entreprises légales et légitimes qui en font la promotion, grâce aux revenus publicitaires et à leur modèle d'affaires... cet argent ne se rend pas jusqu'aux personnes qui créent le contenu dans le but de stimuler les revenus publicitaires.

Monsieur Kee, en ce qui concerne la transparence, jusqu'où allez-vous dans la chaîne de valeur?

M. Jason Kee:

Essentiellement, nous sommes fondés sur un modèle de partenariat. En guise d'exemple, j'utiliserai la plateforme YouTube, où, essentiellement, il y a un partage clair des revenus. Chaque propriétaire de chaîne — essentiellement, le créateur — reçoit une analyse très détaillée relativement au rendement particulier de la vidéo qu'il a affichée, y compris la provenance des revenus associés à la publicité et la façon dont ils lui sont versés.

Une partie du problème que nous avons en ce qui a trait à la transparence en général tient au fait qu'un créateur, un musicien ou une personne qui, essentiellement, produit une vidéo pourrait avoir accès à ces renseignements. Si cette information est regroupée sous la rubrique d'un autre service auquel la personne fait appel pour qu'il s'en occupe en son nom, cette information ne circule pas nécessairement.

Selon moi, le problème que nous avons, collectivement, en tant qu'industrie, tient en partie au fait que, souvent, de grosses sommes d'argent — essentiellement, des flux — sont versées à l'industrie de la musique dans son ensemble, et c'est de là que je tiens ces chiffres importants, mais, ensuite, ces sommes se retrouvent essentiellement dans un système très complexe et opaque de licences conventionnelles de musique qui n'est assurément pas transparent pour nous ni, honnêtement, pour qui que ce soit d'autre. Nous sommes dans une situation particulière, où les artistes ne voient que ce qu'ils obtiennent à la toute fin du processus, ce qui ne correspond pas nécessairement à ce qu'ils nous entendent dire.

(1605)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui. Ils obtiennent une bonne transparence à l'égard d'une fraction du flux de rentrées, et cela ne leur suffit pas à faire partie de la classe moyenne et à subvenir à leurs besoins sans disposer d'autres flux de rentrée.

Pour ce qui est des recommandations à notre intention, je m'adresserai de nouveau à vous, monsieur Price. Selon vous, quelles occasions s'offrent à nous? Je suis très intéressé par cette question, et je souhaite obtenir le tableau d'ensemble en ce qui concerne le partage des revenus entre les créateurs de mélodies et de musique et les interprètes qui génèrent ces revenus. Pouvez-vous nous brosser un tableau global? Comment pouvons-nous établir un certain type de système réglementaire afin que les gens soient payés pour ce qu'ils font?

M. Jeff Price:

Premièrement, pour préciser, il est certain que mes sentiments et mes pensées font de moi une personne passionnée, mais... Ils ne sont pas l'ennemi.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Non, non.

M. Jeff Price:

Non, c'est moi qui le dis, parce que je peux être très passionné à ce sujet. Je pense qu'on a créé quelque chose de merveilleux. L'omniprésence de la musique crée une occasion rare non seulement pour les consommateurs, mais aussi pour les entreprises de technologie et pour les créateurs eux-mêmes.

Ce qui me pose problème, c'est cette présomption gratuite, selon laquelle les créateurs sont sur cette planète pour créer du contenu afin que les entreprises technologiques l'utilisent dans le but d'atteindre leurs objectifs commerciaux. La notion selon laquelle nous devons leur faciliter la tâche aux dépens des artistes ne m'interpelle tout simplement pas. Je pense que l'approche que nous devons adopter doit accorder la priorité aux artistes. Par exemple, prolongeons la durée de ces droits d'auteur à 70 ans afin de nous aligner sur le reste du monde, car, actuellement, nous avons affaire à des droits qui passent à d'arrières-grands-pères à des grands-pères à des pères. Rendons plus rapidement nos décisions concernant les taux afin qu'une fois que ces entreprises auront établi leurs états financiers et que les gens détermineront comment ils pourront gagner leur vie ainsi, ils puissent savoir combien d'argent ils vont toucher plus rapidement, à l'avance, au lieu d'attendre cinq, six ou sept ans avant qu'une décision soit rendue.

Je suis un grand adepte du libre marché. Je pense que le gouvernement devrait se retirer de la réglementation de la musique et permettre la tenue de négociations véritables et directes. Honnêtement, ces négociations créent une relation symbolique, car le besoin est réciproque. Grâce à cet équilibre, on se retrouve avec la bonne tension, ce qui permettra ensuite aux bons taux de redevance d'être établis.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Albas, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Chers témoins, veuillez m'excuser, mais je présente brièvement une motion. Je vous reviendrai certainement le plus rapidement possible.

Monsieur le président, je présente la motion suivante et souhaite obtenir un consentement unanime à son égard: Que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, conformément à l’article 108(2) du Règlement, entreprenne une étude sur l’impact de la fermeture annoncée de l’usine de General Motors à Oshawa, et sur ses répercussions à l’échelle de l’économie générale et de la province de l’Ontario, et que cette étude s’échelonne sur au moins quatre réunions.

Je voudrais que vous vérifiiez pour voir si nous consentons à l'unanimité à ce que la motion soit adoptée.

Le président:

Simplement pour que ce soit clair, en général, on exige 48 heures de préavis, alors il s'agit d'un avis de motion. Vous êtes...

M. Dan Albas:

Non. Je demande un consentement unanime maintenant.

Le président:

C'est ce que je suis en train d'expliquer. Généralement, c'est 48 heures. Il s'agirait d'un avis de motion. Toutefois, vous demandez un consentement unanime pour faire quoi, exactement, tout de suite?

M. Dan Albas:

Encore une fois, il s'agit d'entreprendre une étude sur l'impact de la fermeture annoncée de l'usine de General Motors à Oshawa, laquelle s'échelonnerait sur au moins quatre réunions.

Le président:

Vous demandez un consentement unanime pour présenter la motion. Voilà où nous en sommes.

Y a-t-il un débat?

Allez-y, monsieur Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je n'appuierais pas la motion, puisque nous sommes sur le point de commencer un débat d'urgence à la Chambre, ce soir. Nous ne connaissons pas les résultats de ce débat ni même encore, honnêtement, ce à quoi nous avons affaire. Je ne l'appuierais pas.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Dan Albas:

Dans ce cas, je vais présenter un avis de motion officiel: Que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, conformément à l’article 108(2) du Règlement, entreprenne une étude sur l’impact de la fermeture annoncée de l’usine de General Motors à Oshawa, et sur ses répercussions à l’échelle de l’économie générale et de la province de l’Ontario, et que cette étude s’échelonne sur au moins quatre réunions.

Le président:

Nous avons reçu l'avis de motion. Vous pouvez poursuivre.

M. Dan Albas:

À nouveau, je remercie les témoins d'être ici et de nous aider dans le cadre de notre étude.

J'aimerais commencer par vous, monsieur Schmidt.

Une chose est claire: un grand nombre de témoins nous ont dit qu'ils touchent si peu de redevances de Spotify qu'ils pourraient aussi bien ne rien gagner du tout. Ils affirment que seuls les artistes les plus connus peuvent faire de l'argent grâce à Spotify. Versez-vous des redevances de base par diffusion sur votre plateforme à tous les artistes?

M. Darren Schmidt:

Il n'y a pas de redevances de base. Comme je l'ai dit dans mon exposé, nous concluons des contrats de licence avec les titulaires de droits, autant ceux du côté de l'enregistrement sonore que ceux du côté de l'édition musicale.

(1610)

M. Dan Albas:

Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez aussi mentionné qu'il peut y avoir plus d'un titulaire de droits pour une chanson donnée, surtout du côté de la composition. Encore une fois, je n'ai pas d'exemple en tête, mais j'avais écrit au départ que si Drake fait beaucoup plus d'argent, c'est parce qu'il y a beaucoup plus de gens qui écoutent sa musique. Est-ce toujours le cas, essentiellement?

M. Darren Schmidt:

Sans parler de Drake en particulier, je ne crois pas me tromper en disant que si vous avez deux morceaux de musique, le plus écouté rapportera effectivement plus d'argent.

M. Dan Albas:

Disons que vous augmentez les redevances par diffusion qui sont versées aux artistes moins connus, cela aurait pour effet d'augmenter considérablement ce qui est versé aux artistes connus également, n'est-ce pas?

M. Darren Schmidt:

Je crois qu'il y a un malentendu à propos des redevances par diffusion, dans l'ensemble. Dans la plupart des cas, il n'y en a pas.

Nous avons des centaines de contrats de licence. Si je généralise un peu, c'est parce que tous les contrats sont différents d'une façon ou d'une autre, mais il y a certaines clauses qui se recoupent et, la plupart du temps, les ententes sur le partage des revenus ne comprennent habituellement pas de redevances à verser par diffusion. Les gens ont tendance à tirer des conclusions à propos des taux pour la diffusion en continu en s'appuyant sur des données qu'ils observent après coup: ils prennent le nombre d'écoutes sur le service, puis font un calcul simple en fonction des montants versés et concluent qu'il s'agit du taux par diffusion, alors que ce n'est pas du tout comme cela que nous procédons.

De fait, tout cela dépend vraiment des revenus que nous tirons de Spotify Premium, notre service supérieur, et de notre service gratuit. Évidemment, Spotify Premium génère beaucoup plus de revenus que le service gratuit. Nous tirons environ 90 % de notre revenu de Spotify Premium. Selon ce qui est rapporté dans la presse financière, nous versons entre 65 et 70 % de notre revenu brut aux titulaires de droits. Comme l'a dit M. Price, c'est l'une des raisons pour laquelle Spotify n'est pas rentable pour le moment.

M. Dan Albas:

Je comprends que vous devez généraliser dans certains cas, puisque votre secteur est très complexe, mais, de façon générale, est-ce qu'une augmentation des redevances versées se traduirait nécessairement par une montée des frais d'inscription pour les consommateurs canadiens? C'est vraiment ce que je veux savoir: les consommateurs canadiens vont-ils devoir payer plus si nous modifions le modèle?

M. Darren Schmidt:

Pourriez-vous reformuler un peu votre question? Je ne suis pas sûr de suivre votre raisonnement.

M. Dan Albas:

Il y a différents titulaires de droits. Je comprends cela. Il arrive aussi qu'une société de gestion collective perçoive davantage de redevances dans un certain cas ou qu'un artiste communique directement avec vous, même si c'est rare. Voici ce que je veux savoir: si vous augmentez le taux par diffusion pour une chanson donnée, est-ce que cela veut inévitablement dire que...? Disons que vous versez davantage de redevances à un artiste peu connu, cela veut-il dire que des artistes très connus vont également demander de toucher plus de redevances, ce qui, par conséquent, entraînera une montée des prix?

On entend constamment dire — et M. Price en a aussi parlé plus tôt — que même si ce domaine semble très rentable, les gens, les artistes eux-mêmes, ne touchent apparemment pas grand-chose.

Encore une fois, ce que je veux savoir... Si nous voulons que les artistes moins connus touchent davantage de revenus, est-ce que le consommateur final va devoir assumer une facture plus élevée? Je doute que les grands producteurs ou ceux qui touchent une grande part des revenus veuillent que leur argent aille à quelqu'un d'autre.

M. Darren Schmidt:

Il est possible que ce que vous supposez entraînerait une augmentation des coûts pour le consommateur, mais nous n'avons pas tendance à voir les choses ainsi.

Nous considérons plutôt que, même si nous comptons aujourd'hui 87 millions d'abonnés payants inscrits au service, nous en sommes encore à nos débuts. Plus il y a d'abonnés au service, plus il y a d'argent à partager, pour ainsi dire. S'il y a plus d'abonnés et le même nombre d'artistes qui se partagent l'argent, cela veut dire qu'il y a davantage d'argent pour les artistes.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

J'aimerais m'adresser à M. Kee.

De nombreux témoins nous ont explicitement demandé d'abroger les dispositions d'utilisation équitable pour faire en sorte que les entreprises comme la vôtre puissent être tenues responsables si du contenu illicite était diffusé sur leur plateforme.

De nos jours, l'équivalent de 65 ans de contenu est mis en ligne quotidiennement sur YouTube. Dans ce contexte, votre entreprise pourrait-elle survivre sans les dispositions d'utilisation équitable?

M. Jason Kee:

Non.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Je comprends qu'une plateforme doit être responsable du contenu qu'elle met en ligne elle-même, mais n'importe qui peut créer un compte YouTube et téléverser un clip vidéo ou d'autre type de contenu illicite. Votre système d'identification du contenu, Content ID, vous le signalera probablement, mais nous savons que ce système n'est pas sans failles. J'en ai déjà entendu parler.

Le concept de contenu généré par les utilisateurs et celui de la responsabilité de la plateforme sont-ils incompatibles?

(1615)

M. Jason Kee:

Je ne dirais pas cela.

Premièrement, je dois souligner que notre plateforme repose en fait sur les licences, pour ce qui est de l'édition musicale. Nous avons conclu des milliers de contrats de licence avec des sociétés de gestion collective, des éditeurs et des maisons de disques des quatre coins du monde. Ils alimentent ce que nous appelons le site principal de YouTube, la plateforme globale de vidéos en ligne, ainsi que certains de nos services voués spécifiquement à la musique, comme Google Play Music ou YouTube Music. Nous exploitons un système qui repose sur l'octroi de licences.

Deuxièmement, pour ce qui est du contenu généré par les utilisateurs en général, même si les dispositions d'utilisation équitable nous permettent d'exploiter l'entreprise, cela ne nous a pas empêchés de mettre en oeuvre le système Content ID pour gérer le contenu dans l'ensemble.

Selon moi, c'est l'un des plus puissants outils de gestion du droit d'auteur de la planète. Grâce à cet outil, les titulaires de droit, toutes catégories confondues, qu'on parle de musique ou d'autre chose, peuvent monétiser le contenu mis en ligne par les utilisateurs pour toucher un revenu. Ils peuvent également, si c'est leur choix, bloquer le contenu et le retirer d'une plateforme au profit d'une autre. C'est également libre à eux. Mais cela ne nous a certainement pas empêchés de mettre cela en oeuvre et de collaborer avec nos partenaires pour leur permettre de monétiser le contenu.

Le concept de contenu généré par l'utilisateur est essentiel à l'Internet ouvert. C'est sa raison d'être. Il y a un certain nombre d'artistes musicaux qui ont très bien réussi — dernièrement, il y a eu Shawn Mendes —, qui ont vraiment marqué la plateforme, et, qui, sans une plateforme ouverte comme celles-ci n'auraient peut-être jamais été connus. Justin Bieber est un autre exemple classique.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur Nantel, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'aurais voulu poser une question à M. Price, d'abord et avant tout, étant donné que nous parlons du droit d'auteur. Traiter de ce sujet avec un auteur et passer ensuite au droit d'utilisation doit être intéressant. Comme M. Schmidt doit partir avant 17 heures, je veux m'assurer de pouvoir lui parler.

Dans le cadre du Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien, j'ai eu l'occasion de vous entendre en vidéoconférence à partir de New York. Je ne sais pas si vous avez une réponse à ma question. Il s'agissait de chiffres dont nous a fait part un artiste, auteur-compositeur et producteur bien au fait de la valeur de ces choses. Je parle ici du frère de Mme Pascale Bussières, M. David Bussières, du groupe Alfa Rococo. Il a connu beaucoup de succès avec une pièce qui a abondamment joué à la radio. Je n'ai pas les chiffres exacts sous la main, mais je sais que cela lui a rapporté environ 17 000 $. C'était un succès populaire il y a à peu près trois ans. Or la question que je vous posais concernait les droits qui lui ont été versés par Spotify. Ces droits se chiffraient à 11 $ tandis qu'ils étaient de 17 000 $ dans le cas de la radio commerciale. C'est un exemple très éloquent. Comment peut-on expliquer cela alors qu'il s'agissait de la même pièce et à peu près de la même période?

Les plateformes de diffusion en continu comme Spotify sont le modèle dominant. C'est d'ailleurs le problème, comme le disait bien M. Price. Tout le monde est formidable, ici. Tous vos produits le sont. Ma blonde vient de s'abonner à Spotify et elle adore cela. Elle trouve cela bien meilleur qu'Apple Music. Or là n'est pas la question. Le problème, comme le précisait M. Price, est que les gens qui fournissent du contenu ne peuvent plus en vivre. Je ne sais pas si vous voyez à quel point ces deux montants illustrent clairement le problème. Il s'agit de la même période, du même type de succès et du même type d'auditoire. Au Québec, à la radio, cela lui a rapporté 17 000 $ alors que, sur Spotify, cela lui a donné 11 $.

Comment expliquez-vous cela? [Traduction]

M. Darren Schmidt:

Avant tout, je tiens à m'excuser si vous n'avez pas reçu la réponse à votre question après notre premier témoignage. Nous avons envoyé une lettre au Comité. Je ne sais pas si vous l'avez vue. Nous avons envoyé une réponse détaillée à cette question, parmi d'autres. Je n'ai pas notre lettre avec la réponse sous la main, mais nous avons effectivement...

M. Pierre Nantel:

D'accord.

M. Darren Schmidt:

... je suis désolé, mais je vais donc devoir essayer de me souvenir de ce qui était écrit...

M. Pierre Nantel:

Moi aussi. J'espère que votre mémoire est meilleure que la mienne.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Darren Schmidt:

Je veux insister sur le fait que je ne sais malheureusement pas par quels mécanismes les artistes sont rémunérés au Canada lorsque leur contenu est diffusé à la radio. Je sais seulement comment Spotify procède. Je devrais aussi ajouter que nous n'avons habituellement pas de lien direct avec... Je sais que c'est frustrant à entendre. Je ne sais pas ce qui se passe dans la chaîne de valeurs entre le moment où nous payons le titulaire des droits, le propriétaire du droit d'auteur — dans votre exemple, il s'agirait probablement d'une maison de disques ou d'une autre entité — et le moment où celle-ci paye l'artiste.

L'artiste a peut-être reçu une avance qu'il n'a pas à rembourser. Les maisons de disques font souvent cela...

(1620)

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je peux vous dire tout de suite que ce n'est pas le cas. Comme je vous l'ai dit, son équipe fonctionne très bien; elle est très bien gérée. Il s'occupe lui-même de l'édition, et il a aussi un gestionnaire, mais il y a clairement quelque chose qui manque. La différence entre 11 $ et 17 000 $ parle d'elle-même.

Je crois que je vais demander à M. Price de répondre. La situation est probablement moins dramatique dans les grands marchés pour les artistes très connus, qui peuvent tout de même vivre de leur art, et probablement vivre très bien, mais même l'artiste qui a chanté Happy dans le film Détestable moi...

Je ne me rappelle plus de son nom.

M. Jeff Price:

Pharrell. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]C'est Pharrell. Pharrell Wilson, je crois...

M. Jeff Price: Je l'appelle seulement Pharrell.

M. Pierre Nantel: Peu importe. Il s'est plaint en long et en large du fait qu'il n'a touché, selon mes calculs, que 300 000 $ pour cette chanson. C'est ridicule.

Il y a 20 ans, pour un succès mondial de ce genre, qui donne le goût de danser et de la joie de vivre à tout le monde, l'artiste aurait touché quelque chose comme 3 millions de dollars, ce qui est tout à fait approprié, puisqu'il ensoleille la vie des gens. C'est la beauté de la musique.

Je veux que ce soit clair. Je vais examiner le document que vous avez envoyé pour répondre à cette question. J'ai vraiment hâte de le lire, parce que manifestement...

C'est difficile de vous en vouloir, parce que votre produit est vraiment génial. C'est la même chose pour Facebook et Google. Nous savons tous que Google figure parmi les cinq marques les plus aimées aux États-Unis, et cela est vrai autant chez les républicains que chez les démocrates. Vous ne pouvez pas être contre Google. Je l'utilise tout le temps. Malgré tout, par rapport à certains marchés, le fait est que nous ne sommes pas, comme je vous l'ai dit plus d'une fois, un marché nord-américain; nous sommes une petite partie du marché français, et c'est pourquoi le droit d'auteur est si important ici, comme il l'est en France.

Je veux être sûr que M. Price puisse dire quelque chose, étant donné que l'industrie québécoise est très bien articulée; tous les intervenants se connaissent très bien, et nous misons énormément sur la consommation de contenu télévisuel ou musical local. Pour nous, la différence est évidente.

Monsieur Price, disons que vous êtes un auteur-compositeur américain et que vous touchez à tout. Diriez-vous qu'il semble y avoir une entente occulte qui explique pourquoi on verse à peine quelques cents aux artistes? J'aimerais vraiment savoir comment il se peut qu'une maison de disques accepte de conclure ce genre d'entente avec des services de diffusion en continu.

Le président:

Il vous reste environ 30 secondes.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Vous allez rester, pas lui.

M. Jeff Price:

Pour répondre rapidement, la réglementation imposée par le gouvernement et le consentement de l'industrie musicale traditionnelle ont donné un système imparfait. En outre, il y a aussi le fait — excusez-moi — que le niveau de prix du produit n'est pas adéquat. Je suis désolé, mais 10 $ par mois pour 35 millions de chansons...? La plupart des gens ne veulent pas 35 millions de chansons et le prix est trop faible.

Est-ce une mauvaise chose pour les consommateurs? Ce l'est probablement pour ceux qui veulent payer moins pour accéder à de la musique, mais il y a une limite à presser le citron. Si on veut avoir plus d'argent, il faut commencer par fixer un prix convenable pour ce produit.

Si on fait cela, tout le monde gagne. Les plateformes seront rentables et les artistes feront plus d'argent. D'accord, il y aura peut-être moins de consommateurs qui utiliseront le service. Et alors?

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de passer au prochain intervenant, nous brûlons tous de voir cette lettre, monsieur Schmidt, alors nous vous saurions gré de bien vouloir l'envoyer à notre greffier.

M. Darren Schmidt:

Je n'y manquerai pas.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Chan, c'est un plaisir de vous revoir. Je sais que vous êtes venu témoigner devant le comité de la procédure au printemps, lorsque nous avons étudié l'incidence de Facebook sur les élections, et maintenant, vous êtes ici pour témoigner à propos de l'incidence de Facebook sur l'économie créative dans son ensemble. On dirait que Facebook a une grande influence en général.

J'aimerais surtout parler du système Content ID et de son équivalent sur Facebook. En septembre, le pianiste James Rhodes a publié sur Facebook une vidéo de lui en train de jouer du Bach. Les filtres de droits d'auteur de Facebook ont repéré le contenu et l'ont retiré. L'artiste a eu énormément de difficulté à renverser la décision. Même avec une protection de 70 ans après la mort de l'artiste, le droit d'auteur de la pièce de Bach qu'il a jouée aurait expiré il y a environ 198 ans. Je me demandais comment il serait possible de prévenir les dérives. Que faites-vous pour empêcher que le système ne fasse du zèle? D'après ce que je constate, le système tient pour acquis que vous êtes coupable, et c'est à vous de prouver votre innocence.

La question s'adresse aussi à M. Kee, par rapport au système Content ID.

(1625)

M. Kevin Chan:

Excusez-moi, monsieur, mais je veux confirmer: vous dites qu'une pièce de musique de Bach a été mise en ligne, puis...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exact. James Rhodes jouait une pièce de Bach sur son piano, et a mis la vidéo en ligne sur Facebook, puis le système d'identification de contenu de Facebook... Je ne sais pas comment vous l'appelez...

M. Kevin Chan:

Le système Rights Manager.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... a repéré le contenu et a dit: « Désolé, Sony est le propriétaire des droits d'auteur sur les oeuvres de Bach. » Cela est carrément faux.

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est intéressant. Je ne suis pas au courant de ce cas en particulier. Je crois que vous avez raison. Pour résumer le fonctionnement du système, lorsqu'un contenu est signalé — comme je l'ai mentionné dans ma déclaration préliminaire —, il y a à coup sûr quelqu'un chez Facebook qui examine le signalement et s'assure, premièrement, que le signalement comprend toute l'information nécessaire, et ensuite qu'il s'agit d'une demande de retrait valide ou légitime.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de signalements ces personnes doivent-elles examiner chaque jour?

M. Kevin Chan:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons reçu près d'un demi-million de signalements — je crois — pendant la première moitié de 2018, qui ont débouché sur en tout environ trois millions de retraits pour violation du droit d'auteur. Nos systèmes automatisés font le reste du travail, effectivement. Encore une fois, je ne connais pas les détails de l'exemple que vous avez donné, alors je ne pourrais pas me prononcer, mais peut-être...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est qu'un exemple, mais j'ai vu de nombreux cas similaires sur mon fil Facebook, imaginez-vous.

M. Kevin Chan:

D'accord. Dans ce cas, il s'agit peut-être bien du système automatisé. Mais, évidemment, j'ajouterai aussi — et je vais demander à Probir de poursuivre s'il a quelque chose à ajouter — que nous nous préoccupons toujours, comme vous l'avez dit, monsieur, des faux positifs. Nous voulons prendre des mesures rigoureuses pour faire en sorte que les droits des titulaires de droits soient protégés, mais d'un autre côté — et c'est pourquoi j'ai abordé le sujet —, nous devons toujours veiller à trouver un juste milieu pour notre plateforme. Si nous sommes trop agressifs, nous risquons de retirer un contenu légal, ce que nous voulons éviter. Je n'insinuerais jamais que nous sommes parfaits, mais, encore une fois, sans connaître les détails de l'affaire, je ne pourrai pas vous donner une réponse satisfaisante.

Probir, avez-vous des commentaires à faire?

M. Probir Mehta (directeur des politiques globales de propriété intellectuelle, Facebook Inc.):

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais ajouter que nous cherchons toujours à perfectionner les systèmes. Les ingénieurs et le personnel qui travaillent sur nos systèmes consultent abondamment les titulaires de droits et les utilisateurs pour essayer de...

Donc, si je vous ai bien compris, il s'agissait du système Rights Manager. Ce système se fie aux observations et aux rétroactions des gens. Je ne connais pas les détails de l'exemple que vous avez donné, mais, encore une fois, nous essayons constamment d'améliorer les choses.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que n'importe qui dans le monde, et, encore une fois, je pose la question à M. Kee...

Avant de passer à la prochaine question, monsieur Kee, avez-vous des commentaires à faire en réponse à la question précédente?

M. Jason Kee:

Rapidement, j'aimerais faire un commentaire.

Vous avez mis en relief le fait qu'il peut être difficile de mettre en oeuvre ce genre de système. Manifestement, nous dépassons les exigences minimales prévues dans les lois américaines, européennes ou même canadiennes en matière de droits d'auteur. Il y a eu une contestation judiciaire, alors qu'on essayait de trouver un juste milieu par rapport aux droits. Relativement au système Content ID, et c'est d'ailleurs pourquoi nous avons un mécanisme de contestation: s'il y a une revendication injustifiée du droit d'auteur, vous pouvez interjeter appel, et, idéalement, la revendication sera éteinte.

Dans le cas qui nous occupe, il n'y aurait pas dû avoir de revendication en premier lieu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais le système utilisé par les deux entreprises dit tout de même « coupable jusqu'à preuve du contraire ».

M. Jason Kee:

Lorsqu'il y a un signalement parce que le système a trouvé du contenu intéressant, c'est exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que n'importe qui dans le monde peut mettre en ligne son...

Monsieur Chen, Facebook a-t-il donné un nom à son système d'identification du contenu? Je ne veux pas continuer à dire Content ID.

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est le système Rights Manager.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Rights Manager, Content ID... Parfait, j'ai le nom des deux systèmes. Merci.

Est-ce que n'importe qui dans le monde peut téléverser son contenu sur ces deux systèmes, ou est-ce seulement les grandes entreprises ou les grands titulaires de droits qui y ont accès?

M. Jason Kee:

Je vais commencer.

À dire vrai, seules les grandes entreprises y ont accès, puisqu'il s'agit d'un outil extrêmement puissant. Il nécessite une gestion très proactive. Nous avons 9 000 partenaires pour l'identification du contenu. Il s'agit la plupart du temps de grandes organisations qui ont de vastes collections de contenu exigeant ce genre de protection, et elles disposent de ressources qui servent spécifiquement à gérer tout cela convenablement. Elles peuvent d'ailleurs adapter la gestion du contenu à chaque région. Le système permet de tenir compte d'un grand nombre de nuances.

À d'autres échelons, nous avons d'autres outils dont les créateurs peuvent se servir, par exemple les créateurs indépendants. Les créateurs peuvent aussi choisir d'utiliser un intermédiaire comme Audiam, par exemple, pour gérer le système Content ID pour leur compte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais si vous n'avez que 9 000 créateurs — et je tiens pour acquis qu'il y en a environ autant de votre côté, monsieur Chan, d'après ce que vous avez dit — qui peuvent utiliser ce système, cela ne défavorise-t-il pas, logiquement, les petits producteurs?

M. Kevin Chan:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur, je vais demander à mes collègues de répondre. La gestion des droits d'auteur est quelque chose de très nuancé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous aimons ça, les nuances.

M. Probir Mehta:

Le système Rights Manager fonctionne par demande. En général, ce sont les grandes organisations commerciales de titulaires de droits d'auteur qui présentent des demandes, mais récemment, nous avons également fait l'essai avec des créateurs moins importants. Au bout du compte, cependant, comme je l'ai dit, l'évaluation se fait au besoin.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les systèmes tiennent-ils présentement compte de l'exception relative à l'utilisation équitable prévue dans la loi canadienne?

M. Jason Kee:

Essentiellement, non, étant donné que l'utilisation équitable repose sur un critère contextuel et qu'il faut analyser chaque cas individuellement. Un système automatisé, peu importe la qualité de l'algorithme ou le niveau de perfectionnement de l'apprentissage machine — et nous déployons des efforts de ce côté-là — ne sera jamais, en gros, capable d'établir qu'il s'agit bien d'une utilisation équitable. C'est pourquoi un mécanisme de contestation est si important: si quelqu'un met en ligne une vidéo et qu'il s'agit clairement d'un cas d'utilisation équitable, mais que le système la signale tout de même, la personne peut contester la décision. Une décision sera rendue, et le signalement sera éteint.

(1630)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, pour les deux systèmes, pourquoi n'avez-vous pas mis en place quelque chose du genre: « Du contenu que vous avez mis en ligne a déclenché un signalement; veuillez communiquer avec nous dans les 24 heures, ou le contenu sera retiré. » Avec ce système, vous êtes innocent jusqu'à preuve du contraire, et non l'inverse.

M. Jason Kee:

Dans certains cas, c'est bien ce qui se passe. Tout dépend de la politique du titulaire des droits et de la façon dont il a choisi de l'appliquer dans le système.

M. Kevin Chan:

Oui. Pour revenir à ce que j'ai dit plus tôt dans ma déclaration préliminaire. Monsieur, à propos des gens qui examinent les signalements, c'est exactement par ce moyen que nous essayons d'atteindre un juste milieu.

Cependant, je crois que c'est difficile à mettre en oeuvre, à cette échelle. Nous offrons un service aux quatre coins du monde, et des millions d'utilisateurs, sinon plus, publient du contenu chaque jour. Dans ce contexte, nous devons nous assurer que nous faisons tout en notre pouvoir pour protéger les titulaires de droits. C'est pourquoi nous essayons d'utiliser la méthode d'interaction la plus simple ou la plus facile.

Je suis d'accord avec vous: le contexte est important, et c'est pourquoi nous avons des gens qui examinent tous les signalements.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est épuisé. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole va à M. Albas. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci. Je vais poursuivre sur la lancée de M. Graham et m'adresser d'abord à M. Kee.

Monsieur Kee, certaines personnes font des vidéos de réaction. Elles filment leurs réactions à un nouveau vidéoclip, à un nouveau film, des choses du genre. Il y a tout de même beaucoup de personnes qui aiment écouter et regarder ce genre de vidéos, mais, évidemment, le système Content ID de YouTube signale ces vidéos et les retire, généralement. Il est clairement indiqué dans la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur qui a été adoptée au Canada en 2012 que les vidéos de réaction sont permises.

Donc, on est en droit de se demander si le système utilisé par YouTube — et par Google, par extension — pour signaler et retirer ce genre de contenu est vraiment là pour appliquer la loi ou s'il ne fait en vérité que retirer du contenu que des gens créent eux-mêmes spontanément?

M. Jason Kee:

Eh bien, pour commencer, il faudrait pouvoir évaluer chaque exemple individuellement pour dire s'il s'agit d'une utilisation équitable, alors j'hésite à me prononcer. Par exemple, il est théoriquement possible qu'une vidéo de réaction utilise une grande portion de contenu original. En conséquence, il ne s'agit peut-être pas dans ce cas d'utilisation équitable.

Vous soulevez cependant un bon point en ce qui concerne la façon dont nous assurons un juste équilibre par rapport à ces droits. Encore une fois, cela met en relief à quel point le processus de consultation est important. Voici comment les choses fonctionnent: s'il y a contestation et que le titulaire de droits décide de ne pas éteindre la revendication, alors l'utilisateur concerné peut rejeter le signalement. Dans ce cas, la vidéo est remise en ligne, et le titulaire de droits doit présenter un avis de retrait officiel pour que la vidéo soit retirée. Ensuite, on entre dans les contre-avis; lorsqu'il y a un différend entre deux titulaires de droits, nous les laissons régler cela entre eux.

M. Dan Albas:

C'est intéressant que vous parliez de ce processus d'appel, car mon bureau a communiqué avec les créateurs de contenu pour connaître leurs préoccupations, et selon ce que certains ont dit, c'est plutôt le contraire.

Nous avons communiqué avec un créateur qui a payé pour pouvoir utiliser un audioclip autorisé sous licence dans une vidéo. Ils s'est servi du clip légalement, au moyen d'une licence, et le titulaire du droit d'auteur a sévi. Un autre créateur, une maison de disques de musique, avait utilisé le même clip audio dans une autre oeuvre, et le système a détecté le même enregistrement sonore et a retiré la vidéo pour violation du droit d'auteur. Le créateur a porté l'affaire en appel, mais on lui a dit que son unique recours était de poursuivre la maison de disques en justice. Il avait payé les redevances exigées et procédé de la bonne manière, mais n'était toujours pas en mesure de télécharger sa vidéo à moins de poursuivre en justice une grande société.

Si vous voulez nous convaincre que votre système automatique fonctionne bien, vous devez régler ce genre de problèmes. Pourquoi n'y a-t-il pas une personne en chair et en os à qui vous pouvez en appeler dans ce genre de situation? Se peut-il tout simplement que les gens ne comprennent pas votre système?

M. Jason Kee:

Encore une fois, il est difficile de faire des commentaires sur un exemple en particulier. Je suis un peu surpris de l'issue de l'affaire, simplement parce que, avant d'en arriver là, on doit faire l'objet d'un contre-avis formel, lequel vous permet de présenter officiellement une réponse indiquant que la demande de retrait n'est pas fondée, après quoi la balle retourne dans le camp du demandeur, et la vidéo sera restaurée sans qu'il soit nécessaire d'entamer une poursuite judiciaire.

Une fois de plus, il est difficile de commenter une situation théorique ou hypothétique.

(1635)

M. Dan Albas:

Je tiens à souligner que, lorsque des personnes qui travaillent dans le domaine et connaissent leur affaire payent tous les coûts connexes, y compris le tarif prévu, elles s'attendent à pouvoir vraiment régler ce genre de situation.

Le simple fait de considérer comme hypothétique ce genre de choses... Je suis conscient du problème, mais je pourrais parler peut-être aux personnes concernées et les inviter à vous faire part de leurs préoccupations, étant donné qu'un bon nombre de créateurs de contenu n'arrivent pas à tirer leur épingle du jeu avec vos systèmes, et ce problème doit être réglé.

M. Jason Kee:

Je crois que c'est un système équitable.

Pour ce qui est du point soulevé par Kevin, nous faisons face à des problèmes de grande envergure — rappelons que 400 heures de contenu sont téléchargées sur YouTube chaque minute —, ce qui fait que l'on doit gérer ce système massif de manière automatisée dès le départ.

Cela dit, au bout du processus d'appel, il est possible d'interagir avec des personnes, tout particulièrement par le truchement des appels; donc je vous en prie, comme je l'ai dit, demandez à ces personnes de prendre contact avec moi, car j'aimerais comprendre en détail ce qui se passe ici.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord, c'est juste. Merci.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il vous reste cinq secondes.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord, je poserai donc une question brève à M. Kee.

Bon nombre de témoins nous ont dit qu'ils gagnent très peu d'argent avec les visionnements de contenu financé par des publicités sur YouTube. Souvent, il faut des millions de visionnements pour gagner seulement 150 $.

Je ne m'attends pas à ce que vous nous donniez le montant de vos tarifs publicitaires, mais recevez-vous des annonceurs beaucoup plus par visionnement que ce que vous versez, ou est-ce que les tarifs publicitaires par visionnement sont tous également bas?

M. Jason Kee:

Il s'agit strictement de partage des recettes. Essentiellement, les recettes sont partagées de façon proportionnelle entre le créateur et la plateforme, nous recevons donc uniquement une partie de ce qu'ils reçoivent.

Il ne s'agit pas d'un tarif par visionnement, car il n'y a pas nécessairement de publicité avec toutes les vidéos et, en fonction du moment où la publicité est visionnée — cela fonctionne toujours par l'intermédiaire d'un système d'enchères —, le tarif publicitaire peut grandement varier.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Sheehan. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci à tous pour vos exposés.

Le 8 mai 2018, la Fédération nationale des communications, la FNC, qui représente des travailleurs des industries canadiennes des communications et de la culture, a déclaré que Facebook et Google prennent une très grande part des revenus publicitaires qui revenaient auparavant aux journaux et aux autres agences de presse, de sorte que ces médias sont privés de ressources nécessaires à leur survie.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, les représentants de Médias d'Info Canada ont qualifié de profiteurs les agrégateurs de nouvelles ou vos sociétés qui les gèrent.

Dans ses observations, la FNC a proposé la création d'une nouvelle catégorie d'oeuvres protégées par des droits d'auteur pour le travail journalistique, ce qui donnerait aux journalistes droit à une rémunération gérée collectivement pour la diffusion de leur travail sur Internet.

Si un tel droit existait, cela obligerait-il Google, Facebook et d'autres fournisseurs de services en ligne à payer des redevances pour les nouveaux articles publiés en ligne? Quelles conséquences cela pourrait-il avoir sur vos activités?

L'article 11 du projet de Directive sur le droit d'auteur dans un marché unique numérique de l'Union européenne institue le droit d'auteur au profit des éditeurs de presse pour l'utilisation numérique de leurs publications. Cela inclut-il la diffusion ou la distribution de publications sur Facebook et Google News? Comment allons-nous veiller à la conformité avec cette nouvelle loi? Cela a été proposé.

J'ignore si vous savez en quoi cette directive consiste, mais elle pourrait certainement aider les agences de presse qui transmettent leurs nouvelles sur vos plateformes et améliorer leur sort.

M. Kevin Chan:

Il me fera plaisir de répondre à cette question, monsieur. Merci.

J'ai, en fait, passé une journée avec le président et quelques autres employés de la FNC lors d'une conférence sur la désinformation et la littératie numérique qui a récemment eu lieu à Montréal, et on m'a effectivement fait part de cette proposition.

La conversation que nous avons eue à ce sujet, en résumé, a mis en relief le fait qu'il y a une mauvaise compréhension de la manière dont le contenu publié — dans ce cas, disons des articles — est diffusé sur Facebook.

Comme vous le savez probablement, ce n'est pas Facebook proprement dit qui publie des articles sur sa plateforme. Le contenu se retrouve sur Facebook de deux façons. Soit le diffuseur lui-même — disons la Presse, Radio-Canada, The Globe and Mail ou CBC — choisit de publier son contenu sur Facebook, soit une personne, un utilisateur, décide de partager quelque chose sur la plateforme. J'ai dit à mes collègues de Montréal que je comprenais mal le fonctionnement de ce mécanisme si, en fin de compte, ce ne sont pas les responsables des plateformes qui publient les différents contenus sur leur support, mais que ce sont en fait des personnes ou des diffuseurs. Vous pouvez très bien vous imaginer que, si le système est fondé sur la quantité de contenu publié par une personne sur une plateforme en particulier, j'ai alors l'impression que nous ne pourrions pas...

(1640)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je comprends cela — désolé de vous interrompre —, mais vous avez mentionné plus tôt dans votre témoignage que d'autres personnes publient également du contenu sur votre plateforme que vous devez parfois signaler et retirer. Je ne dis cela qu'à titre d'exemple.

M. Kevin Chan:

D'accord, je vois, monsieur.

Effectivement. Je crois que pour ce qui est du contenu dont nous avons parlé, si le contenu du titulaire de droits ne devait pas se retrouver sur Facebook — nous avons beaucoup parlé de musique cet après-midi —, il devrait être retiré.

De toute évidence, si un diffuseur avait, disons, installé un pare-feu pour protéger le contenu de son site Web, et que quelqu'un réussissait néanmoins à partager le contenu sur Facebook d'une quelconque manière, nous voudrions bien entendu nous assurer que nous étions en conformité et nous retirerions ce contenu. Maintenant, si des gens sont en mesure de publier des articles sur Facebook, c'est qu'on leur a permis de le faire. On leur a permis de copier un hyperlien ou une adresse URL et de les coller ailleurs, par exemple, sur Facebook. Soit dit en passant, cela génère en fait beaucoup de trafic sur leurs sites, monsieur.

J'aimerais ajouter une chose, si je puis. Nous prenons au sérieux notre responsabilité à l'égard de l'écosystème des nouvelles. Nous savons que de nombreux Canadiens reçoivent, en effet, certaines nouvelles par Facebook, et nous sommes donc en train d'investir dans des partenariats. Par exemple, nous avons établi un partenariat avec l'école de journalisme de l'Université Ryerson, ainsi qu'avec Digital Media Zone, son incubateur d'entreprises, entité au sein de laquelle nous travaillons avec des entrepreneurs pour déterminer le type de modèles d'affaires innovateurs pouvant le mieux convenir à l'écosystème des nouvelles. C'est le genre de travail auquel nous prenons part. Nous venons tout juste de terminer de collaborer avec le groupe de diplômés de 2018. Il y a cinq entreprises en démarrage qui, selon moi, vont très bien fonctionner.

Nous nous intéressons à ces choses. Je crois que l'inconvénient de la proposition que j'ai entendue, c'est que la fréquence de partage d'un élément de contenu dépend en quelque sorte des diffuseurs et des utilisateurs. Tout modèle d'affaires fondé sur cela serait en conflit, selon moi, avec le fonctionnement véritable de la publication de contenu.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons redonner la parole à M. Albas pour sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci une fois de plus, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous les témoins.

Monsieur Kee, je vais continuer d'y revenir, car il semble qu'un bon nombre des commentaires que j'ai reçus portaient essentiellement sur YouTube.

Évidemment, nous sommes en train de revoir la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Un grand nombre de personnes vont se filmer en train de jouer à un jeu vidéo et diffuseront ensuite la vidéo, et il semble qu'il y ait une certaine zone grise. Croyez-vous qu'il serait utile pour le Parlement de créer une franchise pour ce genre d'activité? À l'heure actuelle, il en existe une pour les applications composites et pour les créateurs de contenu, ce qui leur permet de diffuser leurs mixages. Pensez-vous que cela apporterait davantage de certitude quant à cette pratique?

M. Jason Kee:

En toute honnêteté, je ne voudrais pas nécessairement commenter. Certaines catégories de créateurs pourraient en bénéficier, surtout les créateurs de jeux vidéo. Par ailleurs, certaines entreprises de jeux vidéo pourraient avoir une opinion tout à fait différente à cet égard. Selon ce que je comprends — et gardez à l'esprit que, comme M. Nantel le saura, j'ai déjà travaillé dans l'industrie du jeu vidéo —, les entreprises, de façon générale, adoptent une attitude plutôt permissive envers ce type d'activités en particulier, en grande partie parce que, lorsqu'un créateur de jeux vidéos se filme en train de jouer à un jeu, cela ne fait pas concurrence au jeu en tant que tel, et les entreprises considèrent plutôt cela comme du marketing.

M. Dan Albas:

Je ne pose pas une question sur les créateurs de jeux vidéo, par contre. Quel est le point de vue de Google? Les gens vont chercher leur contenu — le jeu vidéo auquel ils jouent, leurs réactions à celui-ci, leurs amis qui y jouent — et le télécharger dans votre système YouTube. À votre avis, une certitude à l'égard de l'utilisation d'une plateforme serait-elle utile en ce qui a trait à la pratique?

M. Jason Kee:

Essentiellement, Google n'a pas d'opinion sur la question. Il s'agit de savoir s'il faut créer ou non une franchise qui permet aux concepteurs de jeux de bénéficier eux-mêmes de l'utilisation de cette catégorie d'oeuvres ou s'il faut enlever à l'industrie des jeux vidéo la possibilité de bénéficier elle-même de cette activité.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Chan, avez-vous des suggestions à ce sujet?

M. Kevin Chan:

Non, monsieur, nous n'avons pas de commentaires à faire à ce propos.

M. Dan Albas:

Dans ce cas, j'aimerais poser une question sur les nouvelles règles européennes qui rendent les gestionnaires de plateformes responsables en cas de violation du droit d'auteur.

Est-ce que Facebook, par la bouche de M. Chan, ou Google, par la bouche de M. Kee, pourraient parler de certaines des nouvelles règles et dire si vos plateformes peuvent fonctionner dans ces conditions? Le Comité a reçu un certain nombre de témoins qui demandaient des dispositions similaires. Je crois que la PDG de YouTube ou quelqu'un de haut placé dans l'entreprise a laissé entendre que ce sont des conditions de travail très difficiles.

Monsieur Chan, vous pourriez peut-être répondre en premier.

(1645)

M. Kevin Chan:

Je dirais seulement, encore une fois, que notre application des règles relativement à tout type de contenu illicite ou illégal est assez bonne à l'heure actuelle. Sachez, monsieur, que, en ce moment, pour ce qui est du contenu musical, nous le retirons lorsqu'il est détecté ou lorsque les gens le signalent et qu'il s'agit d'une requête légitime.

Si votre question concerne l'élimination des protections de responsabilité des intermédiaires, je crois que ce serait en effet difficile. Cela poserait problème parce que sans ces types de protections en place, des plateformes qui sont en mesure d'héberger une multitude de contenus — non pas seulement le contenu de titulaires de droits, mais également celui relatif à la liberté d'expression des gens — seraient à risque. À mon avis, traditionnellement, ce n'est pas la façon dont le Canada aborde les choses. Si on pousse la logique en ce qui concerne ces genres de choses, on constaterait que des plateformes d'envergure se heurteraient à des problèmes importants, et cela, en l'occurrence, réduirait en fait la capacité des artistes et des titulaires de droits d'atteindre un large auditoire.

M. Jason Kee:

Nous partageons ce point de vue. Nous avons certainement signalé certaines des difficultés que pose la formulation actuelle de l'article 13.

Il convient de remarquer qu'on est encore en train de régler les détails de l'article 13 en soi. Des négociations sont menées actuellement entre les trois secteurs de l'Union européenne. Elles portent davantage sur la nature des répercussions potentielles. C'est ce qui a motivé en réalité Susan Wojcicki à rédiger un éditorial. Il visait principalement à alerter la communauté des créateurs quant aux préoccupations.

Essentiellement, du point de vue de YouTube en particulier, le défi serait que, si la plateforme est responsable de l'ensemble du contenu qu'elle contient, elle pourrait seulement héberger le contenu qu'elle sait être autorisé. Pour la grande majorité des créateurs de YouTube, c'est une garantie très difficile à donner.

Vous avez donné un certain nombre de bons exemples, au cours de la discussion, des nombreux éléments liés au droit d'auteur qui peuvent exister relativement à la vidéo et à la personne qui détient en réalité les droits d'auteur, ainsi que ce sur quoi portent ces droits d'auteur. Même dans le cas de la musique, parfois la propriété n'est pas nécessairement claire. Un certain nombre d'auteurs-compositeurs pourraient être concernés, et ainsi de suite. Ce serait vraiment très difficile pour nous de fonctionner. Cela nuirait certainement aux petits créateurs et aux créateurs émergents, qui ne possèdent pas de grandes équipes juridiques et qui ne peuvent pas garantir l'autorisation juridique, que les grands exploitants.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Caesar-Chavannes, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Mes questions vont s'adresser à Google et à Spotify.

Je vais d'abord commencer par vous, monsieur Schmidt, parce que je suis une utilisatrice de Spotify Premium. Il y a quelques mois, mon abonnement a augmenté de deux dollars. Je suis certaine que l'abonnement de beaucoup de gens a connu cette même augmentation. Cette hausse a-t-elle servi à payer des redevances aux créateurs canadiens?

M. Darren Schmidt:

À quel endroit était-ce?

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

En Ontario.

M. Darren Schmidt:

Eh bien, tout d'abord, je ne savais pas que l'abonnement avait augmenté de deux dollars. Vous venez tout juste de m'apprendre quelque chose.

Lorsque les prix augmentent, comme ils le font à différents endroits dans le monde et à divers moments en raison de l'inflation et d'autres raisons, ces revenus sont comptabilisés, dans le cadre de nos contrats de licence, dans l'ensemble des recettes. La réponse à votre question est oui, une partie de toute augmentation des prix actuels finit par être versée aux créateurs. Plus précisément, cependant, l'argent est versé aux titulaires de droits avec qui nous avons signé un contrat de licence. Nous devons supposer qu'une partie de l'argent se rend aux créateurs, mais ce sont les titulaires de droits qui entretiennent une relation avec les créateurs, pas nous.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit que Spotify est arrivé au Canada en 2014, n'est-ce pas? Pourquoi avez-vous mis tant de temps?

M. Darren Schmidt:

Je ne travaillais pas chez Spotify à l'époque, mais je sais que la situation des licences était difficile à ce moment-là, particulièrement...

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Pouvez-vous expliquer ce que cela signifie?

M. Darren Schmidt:

... du côté de l'édition musicale. Je crois que j'ai parlé dans ma déclaration liminaire de la question de la fragmentation des droits.

Quant aux droits mécaniques en particulier, il est difficile au Canada d'obtenir une couverture complète des droits lorsque vous obtenez une licence d'une entité comme CSI qui, sur le plan pratique, à mon avis, ne domine peut-être que 70 ou 80 % du marché. C'est cette longue traîne qui pose problème. On doit trouver qui domine quoi et signer des contrats de licence, dans la mesure du possible.

Parfois, on ne sait pas vers qui se tourner pour obtenir une licence parce qu'il y a un problème de correspondance. Comment savoir, pour une composition musicale donnée, quel enregistrement sonore lui correspond? C'est un problème beaucoup plus difficile que les gens le croient. C'est un problème mondial, et ça s'est avéré une difficulté importante aux États-Unis également.

Je pense que cela explique essentiellement la raison pour laquelle il nous a fallu autant de temps pour nous établir au Canada.

(1650)

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Des témoins précédents ont dit que le taux des redevances pour la Webdiffusion semi-interactive et non interactive d'oeuvres protégées par des droits d'auteur au Canada est presque 11 fois inférieur à celui en vigueur aux États-Unis.

À Google ou à Spotify, le taux appliqué au Canada permet-il d'offrir une compensation juste et équitable aux créateurs?

M. Darren Schmidt:

Je vais répondre.

Cela me surprend. Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre ce point de données. Avez-vous dit 11 fois inférieur au taux en vigueur aux États-Unis?

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Oui, pour ce qui est du taux des redevances.

M. Darren Schmidt:

Je crois que vous parlez peut-être de Ré:Sonne, que nous n'utilisons pas.

M. Jason Kee:

Je crois comprendre qu'il s'agissait précisément d'un taux tarifaire. Je crois que c'est le tarif 8 qui l'établit.

Pour nous, en partie à cause des défis auxquels nous avons fait face avec la Commission du droit d'auteur, nous ne comptions pas nécessairement sur ces taux tarifaires très souvent. Nous négocions nos propres ententes avec des sociétés de gestion collective. Par conséquent, ce taux ne s'appliquait pas à la majorité de nos services. Je pense qu'il ne s'applique certainement pas à l'heure actuelle.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Est-ce la même chose pour...

M. Darren Schmidt:

C'est la même chose pour Spotify.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Au début, M. Price a énuméré un certain nombre de choses pour lesquelles il a accordé une partie du mérite à toutes les entreprises. Il a dit que vous êtes d'excellentes sociétés, mais le pourcentage accordé aux créateurs était d'environ 0,000-quelque chose; je ne me souviens pas du nombre de zéros qu'il a dit.

Avez-vous des objections ou des commentaires relativement aux déclarations qu'a faites M. Price? Étaient-elles justes et exactes?

M. Jason Kee:

Eh bien, je crois qu'il a signalé un grand nombre de difficultés auxquelles les artistes se heurtent. Cela concerne en partie les changements fondamentaux des aspects économiques sous-jacents de l'industrie de la musique au cours des 20 dernières années.

Jeff a soulevé un très bon point concernant la durabilité compte tenu du prix. La raison pour laquelle le prix est ce qu'il est — en réalité, c'est actuellement le taux du marché —, c'est qu'il s'agit d'une réaction au piratage continu d'il y a 20 ans, lorsqu'aucun droit n'était versé par quiconque. Cela a entraîné la création de l'économie du téléchargement, principalement menée par Apple, qui a donné lieu par la suite à l'émergence de l'économie de la diffusion en continu et ainsi de suite.

Nous nous trouvons dans une situation où il y a eu beaucoup de surplus du consommateur et où les consommateurs profitent de l'accès à d'énormes bibliothèques de musique, mais c'est maintenant ce à quoi ils s'attendent. Il serait difficile de s'écarter brusquement de ce modèle, et il y a essentiellement un nombre beaucoup plus grand d'artistes qui se partagent une plus petite cagnotte. Cela crée des difficultés.

Une des choses sur lesquelles nous mettons l'accent avec YouTube en particulier, c'est de nous assurer de trouver des sources de revenus de rechange pour les artistes en reconnaissant que, parfois, les taux de redevances seuls ne vont pas nécessairement les aider. C'est au moyen d'initiatives comme — et c'est la majeure partie des revenus, honnêtement, que les créateurs de YouTube ont tendance à gagner — ce que nous appelons un « système hors plateforme ». Les créateurs signent des contrats de commandite avec des marques. Une marque parrainera leurs vidéos, et les créateurs feront, par exemple, une série de six vidéos. C'est beaucoup plus lucratif pour eux que les recettes publicitaires.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Est-ce que vous les aidez à cet égard?

M. Jason Kee:

Nombre d'entre eux le font par eux-mêmes.

Nous avons maintenant mis au point un système que nous appelons FameBit, qui est un service de jumelage de marques. Nous jumelons des créateurs à des marques — dont nombre sont nos clients dans le domaine de la publicité — afin de les aider sur ce plan.

Nous avons également mis en place des choses comme des abonnements, où chaque utilisateur peut simplement s'abonner à un créateur de manière mensuelle afin de lui fournir du soutien chaque mois. Nous offrons des options de produits dérivés et de vente de billets qui apparaîtront automatiquement sur la page si le créateur présente un spectacle prochainement. Les créateurs peuvent diversifier leurs sources de revenus; ainsi ils ne dépendent plus d'une seule source, mais peuvent tirer profit de plusieurs, ce qui les aide à créer une entreprise viable.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. [Français]

Monsieur Nantel, vous disposez de deux minutes.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je vais poser une question à M. Chan au sujet de Facebook.

Quand une émission de télé ou un reportage est diffusé sur Facebook, il est clair que le média qui a payé pour sa production ne reçoit pas de revenus publicitaires. C'est un peu perçu comme un partage que fait l'usager. C'est du moins ainsi que je me l'explique.

Ne croyez-vous pas que les médias qui partagent du contenu sur vos plateformes voudraient recevoir une part des revenus publicitaires que vous générez?

(1655)

M. Kevin Chan:

Je vous remercie de cette question.[Traduction]Demandez-vous si, lorsqu'un créateur met en ligne lui-même un spectacle sur Facebook, nous ne devrions pas trouver des façons de le rémunérer pour ce spectacle?

M. Pierre Nantel:

Comme le public est là et comme le créateur veut peut-être être vu comme un gars qui joue une maquette d'essai pour se faire découvrir par un producteur de Los Angeles... Nous avons ensuite Radio-Canada qui met en ligne une série sur votre plateforme, et il n'y aurait aucun revenu.

M. Kevin Chan:

Sans trop entrer dans des détails concernant l'avenir, je pense que vous avez raison: ce que nous voulons faire, c'est trouver de nouvelles façons pour rémunérer diverses entités qui ont une présence sur Facebook. Nous avons expérimenté des choses partout dans le monde, comme des publicités pendant les vidéos, un peu comme une version numérique d'une pause publicitaire. Au fil du temps, à mesure que nous perfectionnerons ce modèle et cette expérience, nous espérons certainement pouvoir offrir aux créateurs une série d'options de rémunération plus solide.

Je ne sais pas, Probir, si vous voulez ajouter quelque chose à cela.

M. Probir Mehta:

J'aimerais également signaler qu'un des objectifs de Facebook, c'est de compléter ces modèles opérationnels hors ligne. Je crois que mon collègue de Google l'a mentionné. De nombreuses façons, les utilisateurs communiquent entre eux et se parlent d'un événement qu'ils ont vu à la télévision, que ce soit un événement sportif ou une soirée de remise de prix. Dans nombre de cas, cela a en réalité augmenté la participation hors ligne. Je ne dirais pas qu'il s'agit d'une situation gagnant-perdant; je dirais qu'il s'agit plutôt d'une situation gagnante sur les deux tableaux.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Oui, mais, par ailleurs, nous savons que, si c'était seulement le partage et la visibilité... mais vous vendez également de la publicité et vous en tirez profit.

Là-dessus, n'avez-vous pas volontairement convenu d'ajouter la TPS à vos transactions dès le milieu de l'année 2019, même si le gouvernement ne vous a pas forcé à le faire?

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est exact. Ce que nous avons dit, c'est que, d'ici la fin de 2019, nous passerons à ce qui est appelé « un modèle de revendeur local », dans le cadre duquel nous aurons un centre d'opérations au Canada, de sorte que les impôts que nous payons, selon les recettes que nous générons au Canada grâce à notre équipe des ventes ici, soient transparents, et les gens sauront exactement les recettes que nous encaissons et les impôts que nous payons.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Est-ce que toutes les publicités achetées au pays le seront par cette équipe des ventes de publicité établie au Canada?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je dois vérifier le mécanisme exact de l'équipe, mais, certainement, l'équipe des ventes à Toronto...

M. Pierre Nantel:

Facebook ajoutera la TPS.

M. Kevin Chan:

Oui. Étant donné que Facebook s'en va vers ce modèle, cela signifie qu'il est assujetti à une taxe sur la valeur ajoutée comme la TVH ou la TVP. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Il nous reste encore du temps, alors nous allons passer à une deuxième série de questions.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci. Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Graham.

Je vais commencer par Facebook. Cette excellente discussion me ramène à la période où j'achetais des disques dans les années 1970 et 1960. Nous savions que, pour acheter du contenu, nous devions aller au magasin de disques pour nous procurer ce que nous voulions. Nous inscrivions notre nom sur le disque pour montrer que c'était bien le nôtre et le prêtions peut-être à un bon ami; ensuite, il fallait lui courir après pour qu'il nous le rende. Parfois, nous le récupérions, d'autres fois pas.

Il s'agissait de la vente d'un article en particulier. Maintenant, Internet remplace le magasin de disques. Nous avons un modèle de gestion très différent.

M. Price a posé une très bonne question à la fin d'une de ses interventions. Si nous mettions un frein à cela, nous limiterions la distribution du contenu, et alors? Les gens seraient obligés d'acheter. Le modèle reviendrait à ce qu'il était auparavant. Je pourrais faire preuve de cynisme et dire qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'un si bon modèle pour les créateurs à l'époque non plus parce que ces derniers se faisaient voler dans le cadre de contrats, et ils avaient des gérants... Les créateurs ont toujours eu le petit bout du bâton.

Pour ce qui est du modèle de gestion, dans le cadre de notre examen de la façon de verser de l'argent aux créateurs avec le modèle actuel, nous nous sommes penchés sur ce que faisait l'Union européenne qui a légiféré à certains égards. Nous avons regardé l'Australie, qui a aussi pris des mesures législatives. Vous êtes une multinationale, et il s'agit d'un problème mondial. Pouvez-vous nous faire des recommandations sur la façon d'ajouter une valeur aux produits offerts par les créateurs et que nous consommons?

(1700)

M. Kevin Chan:

D'abord et avant tout, comme je l'ai dit au début, Facebook est une plateforme où essentiellement les gens peuvent être découverts; ils peuvent trouver des admirateurs, de nouveaux admirateurs, et c'est en réalité d'une valeur inestimable, non seulement pour les artistes et les créateurs, mais également pour les ONG, y compris les politiciens, comme vous le savez peut-être.

Nous ne voulons pas du tout dire au Comité ce qu'il devrait faire concernant ces questions, mais je peux dire que, pour nous, sur la plateforme, nous reconnaissons la nécessité de créer de nouveaux outils qui permettront aux artistes et aux créateurs de monétiser leur contenu. Actuellement, au Canada, dans le domaine de la musique, notre difficulté quant à la façon de régler le problème, est principalement au chapitre de l'application de la loi. Si du contenu protégé par des droits d'auteur se trouve sur la plateforme, nous allons le retirer. Nous voulons être en mesure d'aider les artistes à être rémunérés pour ce type de choses, mais c'est, à mon avis, pour plus tard.

Probir, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Probir Mehta:

Ce qui nous anime, c'est d'abord de comprendre tous les aspects de l'écosystème musical. Vous en avez entendu certains ici aujourd'hui. Vous avez entendu parler d'autres.

Le marché évolue vraiment de manière très intéressante. Par exemple, ce que fait l'Union européenne est fondé sur une évaluation qui a été réalisée il y a trois ou quatre ans, et le monde a changé de bien des façons positives. De notre point de vue, toute nouvelle réglementation ou toute nouvelle règle que vous examinez devrait tenir compte de tous les éléments de l'écosystème, mais également intégrer des approches volontaires dans le cadre desquelles différentes parties de l'écosystème se regroupent pour faire la promotion du contenu et trouver de nouvelles technologies afin de réduire les coûts de transaction et des choses du genre.

À mon avis, c'est là le plus grand risque que posent les processus réglementaires: ne pas permettre ces types d'approches souples. À l'heure actuelle, le Canada possède un système souple, mais rigoureux que nous appuyons certainement.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, et vous avez mentionné l'aspect démocratique de la plateforme. C'est une excellente façon pour nous de mettre en valeur nos collectivités et le travail qui s'y fait. Vous n'êtes pas les méchants ici. Nous voulons simplement savoir comment nous pouvons appuyer nos artistes afin qu'ils puissent être rémunérés de manière juste pour ce qu'ils produisent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avec les deux minutes qu'il reste, j'aimerais préciser certains détails concernant des choses dont j'ai parlé plus tôt avec M. Kee, M. Chan et M. Mehta à propos des systèmes de gestion du contenu.

Vous avez mentionné le fait qu'il y ait des experts en PI qui examinent toutes les demandes qui sont présentées. J'aimerais avoir une idée de la quantité. Combien de personnes traitent combien de demandes par jour? Est-ce qu'elles prennent le temps d'examiner deux ou trois demandes quotidiennement, ou en traitent-elles 400 parce qu'elles doivent s'occuper de toute la pile qui se trouve sur leur bureau avant la fin de la journée?

M. Kevin Chan:

Encore une fois, dans le rapport sur la transparence que nous venons de publier il y a quelques semaines, nous indiquons en détail le nombre de demandes que nous recevons. Je crois que vous pouvez y avoir accès à l'adresse facebook.com/transparency. Je crois que c'est l'adresse URL. C'est quelque chose du genre.

À l'échelle mondiale, nous avons reçu environ un demi-million de demandes, et cela a mené à grosso modo trois millions d'éléments visés par des droits d'auteur...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment un demi-million de demandes a-t-il pu mener à trois millions... ?

M. Kevin Chan:

Il peut s'agir de demandes multiples, ou d'une demande dans laquelle nous trouvons plusieurs copies sur la plateforme.

M. Probir Mehta:

Oui. En fait, comme l'a mentionné Kevin dans sa déclaration liminaire, on peut signaler nombre de publications. On peut signaler des groupes, des vidéos et des textes. Nous voulons nous assurer le plus possible que le processus est convivial et exempt de désaccords, alors un signalement peut comporter plusieurs listes. Encore une fois, ces demandes sont traitées par notre équipe de PI mondiale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Monsieur Kee, vous avez mentionné plus tôt que vous aviez trouvé trois milliards d'adresses URL illicites. C'est dans combien de domaines? En avez-vous une idée? Un domaine peut compter des millions d'adresses URL.

M. Jason Kee:

Je vais devoir vérifier cela. C'est un nombre important, mais il s'agit essentiellement de plusieurs centaines de milliers de domaines.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que je n'ai plus de temps.

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question très rapide pour vous; je vais vous laisser du temps pour y réfléchir, mais vous n'aurez peut-être pas l'occasion d'y répondre.

Pour Google et Facebook en particulier, lorsque la norme de transition HTML 4.01 était la norme pour Internet, tout fonctionnait plus ou moins dans les plateformes. Maintenant, nombre d'entreprises de médias sociaux et Google ne sont plus indépendantes des plateformes, alors lorsqu'on va sur Facebook avec un BlackBerry ou un iPhone, on vit une expérience complètement différente à chaque endroit. Allons-nous revenir à un système normalisé, ou allons-nous continuer d'avoir cette divergence selon l'appareil utilisé?

(1705)

Le président:

Soyez bref.

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous allons vérifier de notre côté, mais je dois admettre qu'une de nos forces en réalité est d'avoir une sorte de processus à interface unique chez Facebook. Peu importe si vous y accédez sur un iPad, un téléphone ou un ordinateur de bureau, vous vivrez la même expérience, peu importe la page sur l'ensemble de notre plateforme.

Si vous parlez de l'interopérabilité entre diverses plateformes, nous avons certainement consacré beaucoup de temps et d'énergie à permettre aux personnes de télécharger toute leur information et de l'emporter ailleurs, au besoin.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir sur certains commentaires qu'a faits M. Kee plus tôt aujourd'hui concernant les difficultés que pose la contextualisation. Compte tenu de vos filtres du système Content ID liés à l'utilisation équitable, j'imagine, vous avez dit que c'est très difficile pour ce système; par conséquent, même si nous adoptons des lois, c'est le système qui devra reconnaître les problèmes et s'adapter. Cela peut supposer des appels et d'autres choses du genre. Il pourrait également y avoir un examen technologique, mais peut-être également un examen personnel.

Monsieur Kee, que pourrait faire ce comité pour faciliter la vie aux créateurs de contenu afin qu'ils puissent télécharger le contenu original qu'ils ont créé ou celui qu'ils ont acheté après avoir payé divers tarifs pour que davantage de contenu soit pris en charge et pour que ce contenu ne fasse pas l'objet d'appels ou ne se heurte pas à des protections technologiques? Que pouvons-nous faire pour améliorer le système pour les créateurs?

M. Jason Kee:

Pour être honnête, c'est vraiment une question qui touche le fonctionnement de chaque plateforme. Vos questions soulignent la tension inhérente qui existe, puisque, d'une part, nous investissons littéralement des centaines de millions de dollars dans une application de la loi efficace pour que les titulaires de droits puissent administrer adéquatement leurs droits d'auteur sur toutes nos plateformes, et que, d'autre part, nous avons également d'autres catégories de créateurs qui font essentiellement davantage partie de la catégorie des utilisateurs, qui utilisent l'oeuvre d'autrui pour créer la leur. Fondamentalement, nous devons gérer tout cela.

Le droit d'auteur est un concept extrêmement compliqué. Encore une fois, Jeff en a parlé pendant sa déclaration liminaire pour ce qui est du nombre de créateurs. Chaque fois qu'une oeuvre est créée, on accorde un droit d'auteur à son créateur, que ce dernier ait utilisé ou non en réalité le droit d'auteur d'autrui dans ce processus. Il est extrêmement difficile de s'y retrouver dans ce labyrinthe, et cela exige de trouver un équilibre entre les divers intérêts. Nous avons d'un côté le système de gestion du droit d'auteur et de l'autre, le processus d'appel qui tranche ces types de questions.

Essentiellement, d'un point de vue législatif, c'est quelque chose qui se trouve entre les plateformes et les utilisateurs et les créateurs qui utilisent ces plateformes. La meilleure chose que le Comité peut faire, c'est d'examiner ces aspects pour s'assurer que nous disposons d'un environnement concurrentiel comptant un certain nombre de plateformes concurrentes afin d'imposer une discipline à toutes les plateformes pour que, si une plateforme a un système de gestion du droit d'auteur qui est trop agressif, des solutions de rechange lui soient proposées.

M. Dan Albas:

Comment y arriver lorsqu'on a Google et Facebook qui dominent le marché en raison de leur taille et de leur portée? Je n'accuse personne, mais c'est un des arguments que j'entends: ces entités sont tellement énormes que personne ne peut leur faire concurrence.

M. Jason Kee:

Il existe en fait beaucoup de concurrents; prenons par exemple Dailymotion et d'autres qui cherchent à faire concurrence aux gros joueurs de leur propre façon.

Pour être honnête avec vous, Facebook et Google sont vraiment des concurrents féroces dans ce secteur, particulièrement à mesure que chacun d'entre nous élargit son champ d'action dans différents types de secteurs connexes, comme Instagram TV, etc., où différentes options sont à la disposition des créateurs, ce qui aide également la plateforme à demeurer en santé.

M. Dan Albas:

Je n'ai jamais entendu parler de Dailymotion, mais lorsque vous me donnez un exemple et que vous dites ensuite « etc. », y en a-t-il d'autres?

M. Jason Kee:

Oui. Bien honnêtement, je n'arrive pas à me les rappeler. Je serais heureux de vous faire part plus tard d'autres exemples de plateformes qui existent ailleurs.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord, très bien.

Monsieur Price, mes questions s'adressaient principalement aux autres témoins. Ma première est très difficile: les vieux Pixies ou les nouveaux Pixies?

M. Jeff Price:

Les vieux.

M. Dan Albas:

Nous sommes sur la même longueur d'onde... je dois l'admettre. Je suis heureux de l'entendre.

Des témoins nous ont dit, et c'était dans un des rapports des analystes, qu'une des principales plaintes, c'est que Spotify recevra directement l'argent grâce à des contrats signés avec des maisons de disques pour accéder aux catalogues sans que l'argent ne soit versé aux artistes.

N'est-ce pas un problème auquel les artistes font face avec les maisons de disques elles-mêmes? Votre propre expérience n'en est-elle pas la preuve?

(1710)

M. Jeff Price:

Oui, et c'est pourquoi la désintermédiation de la maison de disques est tellement fascinante.

Ce que j'ai trouvé le plus difficile ici, c'est de rester silencieux. Pour être honnête, bien des fois j'ai voulu intervenir et dire: « Attendez. »

N'oubliez pas que, du point de vue de l'autonomie, il s'agit d'artistes qui sont leur propre maison de disques. Il n'y a pas d'intermédiaire entre eux et l'argent qu'ils obtiennent des revenus de l'enregistrement sonore.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, lorsqu'on dit qu'il n'y a pas de licence directe entre certains services numériques et les auteurs-compositeurs canadiens, c'est complètement faux, selon le pays où on se trouve. Aux États-Unis, les FSN — les fournisseurs de services numériques — doivent s'adresser directement aux propriétaires des paroles et de la mélodie pour obtenir une licence et leur verser sans intermédiaire tous les 20 du mois l'argent qu'ils ont perçu au cours du mois précédent.

Il y a beaucoup de mécanismes en place pour savoir qui touche quoi et quel est le partage. La meilleure façon d'y arriver, c'est de dire que nous n'allons pas faire jouer l'enregistrement sonore avant que la maison de disques nous dise qui obtient quoi, et je vous assure que la maison de disques remuera ciel et terre pour savoir qui est censé obtenir quel montant parce qu'elle a besoin que cet enregistrement sonore soit diffusé; c'est ce sur quoi repose son écosystème économique.

Pour que les artistes soient rémunérés — j'ai beaucoup réfléchi à la question —, honnêtement, d'abord, les artistes ont besoin d'être sensibilisés. Ils ne comprennent pas les droits qu'ils possèdent et ceux qu'ils n'ont pas. Ils ne comprennent pas la différence entre un enregistrement sonore et une oeuvre musicale. Commençons là.

Maintenant, passons à l'idée qu'on ne peut pas prendre l'argent de quelqu'un et le donner à quelqu'un d'autre qui ne possède pas le droit d'auteur; les États-Unis viennent d'adopter une loi qui permet que cela arrive à des citoyens canadiens. Si vous ne connaissez pas la Music Modernization Act, elle prévoit que le revenu peut demeurer aux États-Unis dans une organisation nouvellement créée appelée la société de gestion collective des licences de reproduction mécanique. Si vous, au Canada, ne comprenez pas ce que fait cette société et que vous en devenez membre, votre argent peut maintenant vous être retiré de manière légale. Vous ne pouvez plus avoir de boîtes noires.

Aujourd'hui, nous avons fait se poser une astromobile sur Mars, pour l'amour de Dieu, et nous ne pouvons pas comprendre qui possède les droits d'auteur? Voyons donc.

Je conviens que la question des licences est difficile. Vous savez quoi? L'industrie de la musique est difficile. Il est difficile d'apprendre à jouer d'un instrument de musique. Il est difficile d'apprendre à commercialiser votre produit, de faire votre promotion et des tournées. C'est difficile de bâtir Google. C'est difficile de bâtir Facebook. C'est une industrie difficile, mais cela ne signifie pas que nous devons dire aux créateurs: « Vous allez être nos employés afin que nous puissions réaliser nos objectifs. »

Je suis désolé, je m'écarte un peu du sujet. C'est juste que je suis fondamentalement en désaccord avec certaines choses que j'ai entendues.

Alors il faut retirer les boîtes noires, conserver l'argent jusqu'à ce qu'on trouve le titulaire des droits d'auteur et éduquer la communauté artistique afin qu'elle connaisse les droits qu'elle possède et sache où aller pour les faire respecter afin de recueillir l'argent; ensuite, il faut s'assurer que les FSN qui utilisent la musique respectent les lois. Si vous n'avez pas de licence, n'utilisez pas la musique, et si vous ne savez pas si vous en avez une, vous n'en avez pas, alors n'utilisez pas la musique.

Merci.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Je suis heureux de vous avoir libéré.[Français]

Monsieur Nantel, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Merci.

Je pense qu'il est extrêmement important d'entendre le point de vue des créateurs. Nous savons tous qu'il y a des consommateurs. En français, nous disons droit d'auteur, mais en anglais, c'est copyright, ce qui veut dire « droit de copier »; le droit d'auteur est donc complètement l'opposé.

Je veux préciser quelque chose ici, parce que, en lisant le document préparé par les analystes, j'ai constaté que votre position actuelle... je vais le dire dans ma langue maternelle. [Français]

Vous venez de nous faire part de la manière dont cela devrait fonctionner et de nous rappeler qu'il faut avoir une licence avant d'utiliser du contenu visé par un droit d'auteur.

Si une chanson passe sur Youtube ou Spotify, il est entendu que cette chanson repose sur un enregistrement, un producteur ou une compagnie, une étiquette ou un artiste. Autrement dit, sont rattachés à cette chanson un symbole de droit d'auteur phonographique et un autre de propriété intellectuelle de l'emballage, un « P & C » dans le jargon musical. L'utilisation de la bande maîtresse coûte des sous. Une fois que ce montant est versé, est-ce le propriétaire de la bande maîtresse qui va verser les droits d'auteur aux gens qui ont composé et écrit cette chanson? [Traduction]

M. Jeff Price:

En passant, je connais maintenant votre voix de femme dans l'autre langue.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Jeff Price: Pour répondre à la question...

M. Pierre Nantel:

Elle sonne beaucoup mieux, j'imagine.

M. Jeff Price:

... aux États-Unis, il y avait quelque chose du genre. Il s'agit des frais imputables. Le fardeau incombe à la maison de disques ou au distributeur. Ils seraient tenus d'obtenir la licence auprès de Dolly Parton, par exemple, et de lui verser ensuite l'argent.

La communauté des éditeurs de musique aux États-Unis s'est vivement opposée à cela parce qu'il s'agissait d'une couche entre elle et l'argent, et elle n'avait aucun moyen de vérifier ce genre d'intermédiaire. Nous avons beaucoup milité pour retirer cet intermédiaire avec les services de diffusion continue aux États-Unis. Ce pays, comme vous le savez, est très différent, pour quelque raison que ce soit, du reste du monde, même en ce qui concerne les droits mécaniques, ces redevances de l'exemple de Dolly Parton. Je suis fortement en faveur qu'il n'y ait pas ces frais imputables. Je crois que, si on utilise l'oeuvre d'autrui pour faire de l'argent, ce qui est tout à fait correct, on doit savoir à qui appartient cette oeuvre, obtenir une licence et verser de l'argent.

(1715)

M. Pierre Nantel:

Dans le cas présent, cela veut-il dire l'auteur-compositeur, le compositeur et le propriétaire de la bande maîtresse?

M. Jeff Price:

Oui, c'est l'origine de l'enregistrement sonore pour les services de musique — Spotify, Google Play et même Facebook. Facebook n'est pas, en passant, un service de musique; Google Play en est un, tout comme Spotify, mais ce n'est pas le cas de Facebook. Il s'agit d'un service de distribution. Celui qui envoie l'enregistrement sonore à Spotify, à Google Play ou à Apple Music, par exemple, a l'occasion unique de fournir toute l'information nécessaire parce que c'est l'origine de l'enregistrement.

Honnêtement, les services numériques, à mon sens, devraient imposer une exigence dans les caractéristiques techniques, qui précise que l'information qui leur est envoyée ne devrait pas seulement comporter l'information sur l'enregistrement sonore — par exemple, c'est l'enregistrement de Let it Be tiré de l'album Let It Be des Beatles —, mais aussi les auteurs: John Lennon, Paul McCartney et le nom de l'entité qui travaille pour eux, le cas échéant. Tous les renseignements se retrouvent au même endroit. Si les services numériques ne les reçoivent pas, ils ne font pas jouer l'enregistrement sonore.

Je reviens aux arguments politiques que j'entends constamment, selon lesquels cela résoudra environ 90 % des problèmes — objectivement, ils ne tiennent pas la route. Si vous demandez à quelqu'un s'il sait quelles chansons il a écrites — Bob Dylan est mon client —, il dira les chansons qu'il a composées. Si vous allez voir un jeune à Toronto, il sera en mesure de vous énumérer les chansons dont il est l'auteur. Les artistes le savent; c'est juste que personne ne leur pose la question.

Il y a un avantage à ce que les sociétés de gestion collective travaillent au nom de l'artiste parce que cela réduit les désaccords en matière de licences pour ces organisations. Cela permet des économies d'échelle, et je suis très en faveur de cela.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci, monsieur Price. [Français]

Monsieur Chan, tout à l'heure, vous avez indiqué que vous aviez une équipe locale au bureau de ventes publicitaires à Toronto. Je suis sûr que beaucoup de gens qui s'y connaissent en finances publiques — ce qui n'est pas mon cas — ont vivement réagi lorsqu'ils ont clairement entendu que les compagnies canadiennes étaient tenues de percevoir les taxes, mais pas les compagnies américaines. C'est quand même une hérésie, mais ce n'est pas votre faute. C'est notre faute, et c'est à nous, au gouvernement, de corriger cette situation.

Monsieur Kee, M. Sheehan faisait tout à l'heure allusion au fait que la Fédération nationale des communications, les associations journalistiques et les groupes culturels se plaignaient que votre entreprise accaparait désormais de 50 % à 80 % des revenus de ventes de publicité en ligne. Nous ne parlons ici que du milieu de l'information. Cette situation a causé la perte de plusieurs milliers d'emplois.

J'avais un arrière-grand-père qui était dans le secteur des glacières. Quand les frigidaires et les congélateurs sont arrivés, il n'était pas content. Il aurait voulu que l'on continue à scier de la glace dans le fleuve pour la mettre dans les glacières. Il a perdu son commerce; c'est normal.

Il se peut que nos médias d'information actuels soient moins tendance, moins modernes que votre compagnie. Par contre, par le passé, les ventes de publicité ont permis à ces entreprises de presse d'engager beaucoup de gens. Il y a à peu près 130 000 personnes qui travaillent dans le milieu des médias en lien avec les ventes de publicité. Si vous avez récupéré 50 % de ces ventes, combien d'emplois avez-vous créés au Canada? [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Je ne crois pas pouvoir répondre à la question.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je vais vous la poser dans votre langue.

M. Chan a dit que Facebook a maintenant une équipe des ventes qui s'occupe de la publicité au Canada. La société a des employés et un bureau ici au pays. Globalement, la Coalition pour la culture et les médias a tout à fait raison. Vous obtenez maintenant au moins 50 % de l'argent provenant de la publicité sur Internet; certains disent 80 %. Si tous ces emplois sont menacés par le manque de revenu...

Mon grand-père disait qu'il ne pouvait plus vendre de glace parce que les gens qui travaillaient pour lui et sa glacière travaillent maintenant pour une entreprise de réfrigérateurs. C'est très bien, les temps changent.

Qu'en est-il de vous? Grâce à votre présence et à vos outils très utiles, vous obtenez 50 % du marché publicitaire sur le Web. Créez-vous autant d'emplois au Canada?

(1720)

M. Jason Kee:

Nos systèmes ne créent pas directement des emplois. Je ne peux pas parler des revenus et de la part de marché relative, mais nous offrons un large éventail d'outils de publicité. Un certain nombre d'éditeurs comme le Globe and Mail et le National Post et ainsi de suite utilisent notre infrastructure publicitaire. Ils ont une part des recettes de l'ordre de 70 à 80 %...

M. Pierre Nantel:

Vous excellez dans ce que vous faites, monsieur Kee. Vous êtes très bon.

M. Jason Kee:

En réalité, ils...

M. Pierre Nantel:

Ce n'est pas ma question.

M. Jason Kee:

Ce que je dis, c'est qu'ils perçoivent des revenus de nous, et nous mettons également en place un certain nombre de programmes, y compris l'initiative Google Actualités...

M. Pierre Nantel:

J'aimerais tenir une discussion plus claire. Certains diront que vous allez chercher — et j'ai vu cela à de nombreuses reprises — 80 % des ventes publicitaires sur Internet, vous et Facebook. J'ai vu cela. Peut-être que ce chiffre est trop important. Disons 50 %. Je crois que nous pouvons convenir de ce moment minimum.

Avec cette nouvelle tendance d'aller voir les publicités sur Internet et sur Facebook — « Oh, je vois telle ou telle publicité » —, nous, comme consommateurs, réagissons à ces publicités. Vous ne forcez personne, mais vous changez les habitudes des annonceurs.

Ce que je me demande, c'est si vous créez autant d'emplois que les pertes que nous constatons dans l'ancien monde — dans le monde des journaux et de la télévision conventionnelle. Combien d'emplois Google a-t-elle créés au Canada au cours des 10 dernières années?

Le président:

Je vais devoir intervenir parce que vous n'avez plus de temps.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci.

Le président:

Si vous pouvez répondre en cinq secondes, allez-y.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Pourrions-nous demander pour une réponse par écrit?

M. Jason Kee:

Je serai heureux de fournir le rapport complet de Deloitte sur l'incidence économique, selon lequel nous avons permis de créer plusieurs centaines de milliers d'emplois grâce à ces systèmes.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci, monsieur Kee.

Le président:

Si vous pouviez présenter ce document au greffier, ce serait...

M. Jason Kee:

Je pense qu'il a déjà été distribué, mais je vais l'envoyer de nouveau.

Le président:

S'agit-il du lien que nous avons envoyé à tout le monde? Très bien. Nous l'avons déjà envoyé.

Pour la dernière question, nous avons M. Sheehan.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous procédons actuellement à l'examen législatif du droit d'auteur, qui a lieu tous les cinq ans. Il s'agit d'un examen très important. Nous recueillons des renseignements puis nous envoyons notre rapport au ministre, qui y répond par la suite.

Puisque je passe en dernier, je vais formuler ma question de cette manière. Quelles recommandations le comité pourrait-il présenter au ministre pour soutenir les créateurs de contenu de petites et de moyennes tailles au Canada, ainsi que les artistes, tout en s'assurant que nous ne fassions rien qui puisse nuire à l'économie axée sur l'innovation, laquelle a progressé très rapidement au cours des cinq dernières années dans le cadre du programme d'innovation?

Quelqu'un veut-il se lancer en premier? Facebook?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je crois bien que ce sera moi.

Comme je l'ai dit à la fin de ma déclaration préliminaire, nous comprenons que le Canada a un régime de droit d'auteur plutôt robuste et équilibré. Nous estimons que cet équilibre se situe entre les détenteurs de droits, les utilisateurs et les gens qui veulent innover avec le contenu, et nous incitons vivement le Comité à continuer avec un système souple.

Au-delà des détails relatifs au cadre, l'une des plus grandes difficultés des petits artistes émergents, d'après ce que je comprends, c'est d'être découverts par le public et de chercher de nouveaux auditeurs qui apprécient leur travail. Parfois, ce peut être un créneau très précis. Une plateforme comme Facebook, qui est une plateforme de découvertes, permet ce genre de chose. La capacité pour les créateurs et les artistes d'être présents sur Facebook et d'entrer en contact directement avec les gens est quelque chose de très important. C'est la façon dont Internet fonctionne en général. Le fait de continuer à avoir des mesures qui permettent une utilisation d'Internet qui soit ouverte et novatrice est très positif pour les créateurs émergents.

Je ne sais pas, Probir, si vous aviez quelque chose à dire par rapport à cela...

(1725)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

M. Jason Kee:

Essentiellement, je suis en faveur de cela. J'ai signalé dans ma déclaration préliminaire des renseignements précis concernant l'exception relative à l'intelligence artificielle ou l'apprentissage machine, simplement parce qu'il n'est pas clair si cela est prévu par la loi actuellement en vigueur.

Un certain nombre d'entreprises, ainsi que le gouvernement canadien lui-même, ont investi des centaines de millions de dollars pour faire progresser ce domaine et pour s'assurer que les Canadiens ont un avantage concurrentiel dans ce domaine. Le maintien de cet avantage malgré le fait que le droit d'auteur le freine est une chose sur laquelle le Comité devrait se pencher, selon moi.

J'estime que l'un des défis les plus importants que vous ayez à relever en tant que comité — et cela concerne bon nombre des problèmes que Jeff a soulignés — , c'est que je ne perçois pas nécessairement le droit d'auteur comme le moyen principal pour régler ce problème. Il s'agit plutôt d'un instrument encombrant qui vous permet... Les discussions portent sur le fait d'éliminer ou non la responsabilité des intermédiaires, et c'est assorti de conséquences importantes.

Dans bon nombre de discussions, il est question du fait que nous n'avons pas de renseignements précis en ce qui a trait aux détenteurs de droits. Comment pouvons-nous gérer cela? Comment pouvons-nous fixer le taux des redevances, et de quelle façon les gens seront-ils payés? De quelle façon les plateformes s'investissent-elles dans ce processus?

À mon humble avis, c'est une question qui gagne à être abordée de façon collaborative et coopérative, avec les différents intervenants regroupés autour d'une même table qui travaillent sur le dossier, et le gouvernement qui, souvent, mène la marche. Une réponse législative ne pourra pas faciliter les choses sans qu'il n'y ait d'importantes conséquences imprévues et d'énormes dommages collatéraux.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Jeff, avez-vous quelques mots pour terminer?

M. Jeff Price:

Premièrement, nous devons nous éloigner de la philosophie des boîtes noires et des approximations. Nous vivons dans un monde où la technologie règne; l'information circule. L'argent qui est produit devrait être conservé jusqu'à ce qu'il soit remis au propriétaire du droit d'auteur concerné et ne devrait plus être divisé puis distribué en fonction des parts du marché.

Deuxièmement, il faut sensibiliser les créateurs. Ils doivent comprendre la valeur de ce qu'ils créent et savoir comment le monétiser.

Troisièmement, il s'agit d'une déclaration quelque peu radicale, et elle est fondée sur mon expérience. Les détenteurs de droits d'auteur devraient pouvoir bénéficier d'un levier pour renforcer leurs droits dans l'éventualité où on porterait atteinte à ces droits. Aux États-Unis, les dommages-intérêts préétablis persistent, malgré l'adoption du Music Modernization Act. Ce levier permet à un titulaire du droit d'auteur de tenir tête à une énorme entreprise de plusieurs milliards de dollars et de dire: « Vous ne pouvez pas faire cela. » Si vous enlevez aux créateurs — les titulaires du droit d'auteur — le droit de réclamer des dommages-intérêts, alors ils n'auront plus de recours. Il s'agit d'une déclaration quelque peu radicale, et cela contredit certaines des déclarations qui ont été faites ici, qui réclament moins de réglementation et plus de licences générales.

Cependant, je ne cesse de me heurter à ceci: aucun de nous ne serait ici si ce n'était grâce à la création du contenu qui conduit les gens vers ces mégasociétés. C'est bien, mais soit on obtient une licence et on paie sa part, soit on ne l'utilise pas.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci à tous pour cet excellent témoignage. Il y a beaucoup de matière à réflexion.

Le président:

Souhaitiez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je voulais juste ajouter que je me suis trompé par rapport au lien URL du rapport sur la transparence. Pour le compte rendu, le bon lien est transparency.facebook.com. Vous y trouverez les dernières données en matière de droit d'auteur.

Le président:

Voilà qui conclut la séance d'aujourd'hui. J'aurais aimé que nous ayons plus de temps; cela aurait été très utile.

Je tiens à remercier les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui, de leur patience et des réponses à nos questions, lesquelles nous donneront certainement matière à réflexion.

Sur ce, merci à tous. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 26, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.