header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-22 SMEM 18

Subcommittee on Private Members' Business of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1315)

[Translation]

The Chair (Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.)):

Welcome to the 18th meeting of the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, which concerns the determination of non-votable items pursuant to Standing Order 91.1(1).

We can consult the chart of items in the order of precedence.

Ms. Blaney, do you have the document? [English]

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP):

Yes, I've read it. Can you pass it on?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'd like to make a motion to dispense. Can I move for now to dispense with the 10 items that I have no problems with right away? They are M-111, M-206, M-203, M-207, Bill C-278, M-174, Bill C-417—

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

Whoa. I was at M-207. Now you may continue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sorry about that.

It was Bill C-278, M-174—I'm waiting for somebody to say, “Bingo”—Bill C-417, M-201, Bill C-415, and M-208. I have no problems with any of these, nor do the analysts, from what I can tell. [Translation]

The Chair:

Did you list Bill C-415?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, and I listed Bill C-208. I think there are 10 of them in the list.

The Chair:

Which ones are left?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Bills C-331, C-419, C-420, C-421 and C-266.

The Chair:

Are there four left?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are five.

The Chair:

Right. So Bills C-331, C-419, C-420, C-421 and C-266 remain.

Does everyone follow? [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you okay with letting those first 10 be done, and we'll just discuss the other five?

I move: That all items, except for Bills C-331, An Act to amend the Federal Courts Act (international promotion and protection of human rights), C-419, An Act to amend the Bank Act, the Trust and Loan Companies Act, the Insurance Companies Act and the Cooperative Credit Associations Act (credit cards), C-420, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code, the Official Languages Act and the Canada Business Corporations Act, C-421, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (adequate knowledge of French in Quebec), and C-266, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (increasing parole ineligibility), not be designated non-votable.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings]) [Translation]

The Chair:

We're going to start with Bill C-331. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you want me to very briefly identify the concern that we have?

The issue on Bill C-331 is that the bill legislates exterior to Canada, and there have been some concerns raised that the law would have no force or effect and is therefore outside of the authority of Parliament. I want to get the analyst's opinion on that matter.

Mr. David Groves (Committee Researcher):

As always, my analysis is non-binding on you. You can disagree with me as much as you'd like. Ultimately, it's your decision.

With Bill C-331, I did not assess there to be an issue on the level of constitutionality, and that's for the reason that Parliament is capable of legislating extraterritorially, outside of its borders. The provincial legislatures are not, but the federal Parliament can legislate across the planet. If you look in the Criminal Code, you see there are actually several provisions that deem actions that take place outside Canada to be a crime within Canada. [Translation]

The Chair:

Does anyone have any comments? [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have any thoughts on that?

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

I think that makes sense. In that case it's nothing new, so I agree with you.

I move: That Bill C-331, An Act to amend the Federal Courts Act (international promotion and protection of human rights), not be designated non-votable.

Mr. David Groves:

All right. That's one. [Translation]

The Chair:

Shall I proceed to the vote?

Shall we set aside Bill C-331? [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let it go on division if you want.

(Motion agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Are we on Bill C-419? [Translation]

The Chair:

We are now moving on to Bill C-419. [English]

Mr. David Groves:

Bill C-419, an act to amend the Bank Act, the Trust and Loan Companies Act, the Insurance Companies Act and the Cooperative Credit Associations Act with regard to credit cards would make a series of amendments to those acts around credit cards. It would, for example, regulate how banks allocate payments across different credit accounts with different interest rates, require that a credit card provider seek express consent before increasing a credit limit, and require that the credit card advertisements include information on fees and rates.

I have noted the bill in my analysis because of some overlap in substance with Bill C-86, a second act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures. Division 10 of that bill, which is entitled “Financial Consumer Protection Framework”, would make a series of amendments to the Bank Act, some of which touch on credit cards as well. It would, for example, amend the Bank Act to add proposed section 627.35, which would regulate the allocation of payments across credit accounts with different interest rates, just like Bill C-419. It would also include a requirement that bank advertising be “accurate, clear and not misleading”, and would require that express consent before providing any product or service.

To summarize, both bills would regulate, among other things, the ways in which banks administer, offer and advertise credit card accounts. However, while Bill C-419 extends to cover credit card providers that are regulated under four acts—the Bank Act, the Trust and Loan Companies Act, the Insurance Companies Act and the Cooperative Credit Associations Act, Bill C-86 only amends the Bank Act.

One condition that this committee considers in assessing the votability of private members' items is that an item—this is the quote—“must not concern questions that are currently on the Order Paper or Notice Paper as items of government business”. In this case we have a situation of some degree of overlap between Bill C-419 and Bill C-86, which is on the Order Paper and is a piece of government business, but there are differences in scope. Bill C-419 has a broader statutory ambit. It would extend its provision to three other acts and to the institutions that would ultimately be covered under those acts.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a very quick question, because I don't want to take all day with it.

When we had the issue with the derelict vessels act, there was a much greater overlap than there is here.

Mr. David Groves:

I believe so. I would have to refresh my memory specifically on that, but yes, there was a great deal of overlap there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The objective doesn't overlap; there just happens to be overlap.

Mr. David Groves:

Yes. If I could categorize it this way, the objective of this act would be to cover a much broader array of institutions around credit cards, regulating the way they use credit cards, whereas the government's bill is only focused on the Bank Act and on institutions in the Bank Act.

You're right that the subject matter is distinct.

(1320)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you guys want it to go forward?

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I agree with the analyst's analysis.

I move: That Bill C-419, An Act to amend the Bank Act, the Trust and Loan Companies Act, the Insurance Companies Act and the Cooperative Credit Associations Act (credit cards), not be designated non-votable.

Mr. David Groves:

Thank you. Good. I appreciate it. It was not a recommendation.

Thank you for speeding me along. If I am taking time, just wave your hands.

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

You're doing a good job. Carry on.

Mr. David Groves:

Should we move on to...? [Translation]

The Chair:

Bill C-419 is deemed votable.

(Motion agreed to. [See Minutes of Proceedings])

We will now move on to Bill C-420. [English]

Mr. David Groves:

Bill C-420, an act to amend the Canada Labour Code, the Official Languages Act and the Canada Business Corporations Act, seeks to make three amendments that, from my analysis, I understand to be distinct in terms of subject matter.

First, it would amend the Canada Labour Code to prevent employers from hiring replacement workers during a strike.

Second, it would amend the Canada Labour Code to allow for the incorporation of provincial law into federal law for occupational health and safety issues involving pregnant and nursing employees.

Third, it would make amendments to a few statutes to incorporate the Charter of the French Language, which is a Québécois act, into federal law in some respects, and it would apply to Quebec only.

In my briefing note, I flagged two issues. The first is that the language in Bill C-420 that addresses the hiring of replacement workers, the first subject I mentioned, is with minor exceptions identical to the language of Bill C-234, a bill that was previously considered by the House and defeated at second reading on September 28, 2016.

The second issue is that the language in Bill C-420 that addresses occupational health and safety, the second of the three subject matters that I laid out, is, again with minor exceptions, identical to the language of Bill C-345. That bill was considered by the House and defeated at second reading.

The issue here is thus that there is an open question as to whether Bill C-420, in the words of the votability criteria, concerns “questions that are substantially the same as ones already voted on by the House of Commons in the current session of Parliament”.

As I said before in my assessment, the bill has three distinct goals or questions, as the language of the provision allows. Two of them, in both substance and means, are extremely similar to bills the House has previously considered and rejected.

I've spoken a bit with the clerk. She can correct me if I misunderstood, but if I understood her correctly, the position of the House of Commons in regard to the admissibility of a motion, amendment or bill is that so long as it is not more or less verbatim a repeat of something upon which the House has already deliberated, it is admissible. As such, the inclusion of new subject matter in this bill and the change in the wording would make this bill admissible.

That said, I interpret—and I want to reiterate again that my interpretations are not binding—that this criterion of votability is broader than admissibility. I say that because, were that the case, the criterion itself would be redundant. It would require this committee to do work that the House of Commons would already be doing. However, again, that's my assessment; it's not binding.

Go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are also other issues in this bill. As I understand it, as you've mentioned, the act would incorporate provincial legislation into federal law, which would bind the federal government to a piece of provincial legislation.

Are there jurisdictional issues on the other point of—

Mr. David Groves:

There is a provision. I don't want to dig up this big book and go through it—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Rachel will kill me if you do.

Mr. David Groves:

Yes...there are some issues around what's referred to as “interdelegation”, but the federal government is entitled to incorporate by reference provincial acts into federal statutes. That is a power that's available in both directions. In some instances, you could even do it with statutes that come from outside of Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the provincial act changes, does the federal act necessarily change with it, or does it follow the version that existed at that time?

Mr. David Groves:

If I'm correct on that, it would follow the version that is in force.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then if it changes, it would have to follow that.

Mr. David Groves:

Yes.

Putting aside the issue on that first criterion, which is whether it concerns a question that has already been voted on, Mr. Graham flagged another issue for me that he wanted me to discuss. I apologize that I didn't include it in my note. I did consider it.

There are some constitutional issues raised by this bill, specifically the portion that is substantially new, the portion about importing the Charter of the French Language into federal law. The issue here is essentially whether or not this bill would be in compliance with two provisions of the charter. The first is section 16(1), which I'll read quickly: English and French are the official languages of Canada and have equality of status and equal rights and privileges as to their use in all institutions of the Parliament and government of Canada.

The second is section 20(1), which says: Any member of the public in Canada has the right to communicate with, and to receive available services from, any head or central office of an institution of the Parliament or government of Canada in English or French....

It continues on from there.

Bill C-420 would, as I said, incorporate the Charter of the French Language into federal law, in regard to Quebec in particular. Of note is that it would amend the Official Languages Act to require that the federal government undertake not to obstruct the application of the Charter of the French Language, and that every federal institution has the duty to ensure that positive measures are taken for the implementation of that undertaking not to obstruct the charter.

The Charter of the French Language is quite long, but it contains a number of provisions around the status of language in Quebec, including requirements that the civil administration and the government shall use French in their written communications with each other and with legal persons. The issue here would be whether those provisions of the charter would be affected by importing the Charter of the French Language into federal law and requiring—potentially—that federal entities engaging with legal persons or internally in Quebec would be obliged to use written communications in French only.

The criterion at issue here—I just want to flag this really quickly—is that bills and motions must not clearly violate the Constitutions Act, 1867 to 1982, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. I stress the word “clearly” there because constitutionality is a fuzzy subject, even for bills that receive the full vetting of the government, its drafters and its lawyers. I am only one small cog compared to all of that. I understand that “clearly” has been inserted here so that in “unclear” cases, Parliament has the opportunity to debate the issue fully. Everyone can speak as to how they interpret its relationship to the charter.

As such, when I analyze bills under these criteria, I ask myself whether a plausible case could be made, at the level of basic principles, that the bill complies with the charter. I say “basic principles” because these are frequently highly technical contexts, in which even trained experts would disagree. I would never want to hold myself out as a technical expert on every subject that might appear before the subcommittee.

(1325)



When it comes to language rights under the charter, it is worth noting that section 16(3) states: Nothing in this Charter limits the authority of Parliament or a legislature to advance the equality of status or use of English and French.

Courts have also recognized that the protection and promotion of the French language in Quebec is a “pressing and substantial objective”, and as a result it may allow for some balancing vis-à-vis other charter rights. It could thus be argued that this act reflects a permissible intrusion on the rights of Quebeckers who wish to receive services in English. That said—and again, this is purely a plausible interpretation that I'm offering—I might also add that it may be possible to read this bill so that it doesn't impose any restrictions on the federal government's provision of services in Quebec.

The Charter of the French Language often refers to the government, the government departments and other agencies of the civil administration, but these could—could—be understood to be references to the provincial government only, to which section 20 of the charter does not apply. As a result, it may be possible to read this bill to simply require that the federal government not obstruct the provincial government's operations in French.

I want to reiterate, as I understand it, the “clearly violates” standard allows a bill that has raised clear and complex constitutional issues to not be found non-votable, but my standard would be, in my assessment, that this is the case and that this does not clearly violate, as those words are meant in the provision, the charter. However, my standard, as always, is not the standard that matters here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm particularly sensitive to constitutional issues, given that I am from Quebec—

The Chair:

I am too.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—as is the chair. My opinion and my vote on this would be to make it non-votable on the basis of constitutional issues, so I move: That Bill C-420, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (adequate knowledge of French in Quebec), be designated as a non-votable item.

However, this is a consensus committee, and I leave it to your opinions.

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

Of course, I take it as a great compliment that two of our members' bills were thrown in this, with some minor changes. It's nice to know that they support us, but some of the language is a little concerning, and from your assessment—your analysis—it's not your recommendation.

It sounds as though it's a little bit hard to know what the impact's going to be on the ground in terms of implementation. I'm pretty neutral on this one, unfortunately.

(1330)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I need a deciding vote.

Mr. John Nater:

I guess I would err on the side of letting it go to the House and letting the House deal with it. If the will of Parliament is to vote it down, I think that would be an even more effective way to deal with it.

Let it go to the House. That would be my opinion, but....

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

I always love an opportunity to talk about the great work that my colleagues have done, so yes, I'm fine with it going to the House. It will give everybody an opportunity to talk about the work that the folks in my party have done.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think there's enough to go on division.[Translation]

The vote needs to be called, but it will be carried on division, in any case.

The Chair:

Right.

(Motion agreed to on division. [See Minutes of Proceedings])

We will now move on to Bill C-421. [English]

Mr. David Groves:

This is another bill that would raise the same criteria, that bills and motions must not clearly violate the charter. It would be presumably the same provisions of the charter—section 16 and section 20.

Bill C-421, an act to amend the Citizenship Act on adequate knowledge of French in Quebec, would amend the Citizenship Act to require that permanent residents who reside in Quebec would, in applying for citizenship, be required to demonstrate an adequate knowledge of French. Typically, under the act, permanent residents are allowed to demonstrate an adequate knowledge of either French or English.

I would first note that as with my comments with Bill C-420, subsection 16(3) of the charter allows for laws that “advance the equality of status or use of English and French”, and that courts in the past have found that the promotion and protection of French—which is arguably the purpose behind this bill—is substantial and pressing. I would also note that Quebec has a great deal more control over immigration than other provinces and so has some unique powers in that regard.

Of course, immigration and citizenship are not necessarily the same, but it's to say that this is a slightly different relationship between the federal and provincial governments. As such, it could—could, again—be argued that this presents a minimal and justifiable intrusion into the section 20 rights of permanent residents who would then be applying for citizenship.

It could—could—also be argued—and again this is hypothetical and simply being offered for this analysis—that the intrusion is particularly minimal since it does not bar a citizen who took the test in English in Ontario or elsewhere from subsequently moving to Quebec. Section 6 of the charter is about how once you become a citizen you can move within the country freely, and that would be untouched by this bill.

As with Bill C-420, there are complex constitutional issues raised by this bill. I would nonetheless, in my assessment, assess that it could be determined not non-votable, but as always, that standard is not mine to interpret or apply. [Translation]

The Chair:

Any comments? [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This raises an issue that we had in the last one. [Translation]

The Chair:

There are citizens in Quebec who speak English and who have permanent resident status. I know many of them. Does this mean that these people could no longer be permanent residents? [English]

Mr. David Groves:

It would apply to—

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

Permanent residents.

Mr. David Groves:

Yes, they could be permanent residents. Yes. They wouldn't be allowed to apply for citizenship and then ask that their demonstration of competence in language be done in English. When you apply for citizenship, you have to demonstrate competence in a language, and then I also believe you have to demonstrate knowledge of Canadian civics. [Translation]

The Chair:

There are permanent residents in my riding who would like to apply to become Canadian citizens, but they speak English. That would mean that they wouldn't be entitled to.

(1335)

[English]

Mr. David Groves:

Yes, that's right, unless they were to move or learn French. They would have to move to a different province.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would like to make a point on that.

My wife speaks five languages. French is not one of them. When she got her Canadian citizenship, we had just moved to Quebec. I had already lived there; she came to Quebec with me. She would have had to return to Ontario or stay in Ontario to get her citizenship, and I think that's against the values of our Constitution, our charter. I cannot support that on constitutional grounds. I cannot vote to allow this to be votable.

I therefore move: That Bill C-421, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (adequate knowledge of French in Quebec), be designated as a non-votable item.

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

As a person who ran an organization that served newcomers to Canada for many years, I remember helping people in our very anglophone part of the world, in B.C., who spoke only French, and they would still be able to get their citizenship by using the French language, so I am not going to vote in support of moving forward with this, because it simply is not...well, I don't think it's constitutional, and it totally undermines the fact that Canada is a multilingual country. That's something we should all be proud of. [Translation]

The Chair:

So this would be non-votable?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Exactly, and this gives the mover a right of appeal.

The Chair:

Okay. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's non-votable, yes.

(Motion agreed to) [Translation]

The Chair:

Bill C-266 remains.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have no objection to this bill, but I think the analyst has some comments. [English]

Mr. David Groves:

It's the last one, as far as I know.

Bill C-266, an act to amend the Criminal Code with regard to increasing parole ineligibility, seeks to amend the Criminal Code so that a person who has been convicted of abducting, sexually assaulting and murdering someone is ineligible for parole for at least 25 and at most 40 years. This would raise the period of parole ineligibility for individuals who commit this pattern of crimes from where it sits now.

Bill C-229, an act to amend the Criminal Code and the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts with regard to life sentences would, among other things, have amended the Criminal Code to make parole entirely unavailable for individuals who are convicted of certain types of crime. This would have included individuals who are convicted of abducting, sexually assaulting and murdering someone. Bill C-229 was considered by the House and defeated at second reading on September 21, 2016.

To summarize, Bill C-266 would extend the period of parole ineligibility that would apply to someone convicted of abduction, sexual assault and murder. Bill C-229, among other things, would have prevented someone who is convicted of sexual assault and murder or abduction and murder in respect of a single individual from parole eligibility entirely.

The reason I'm flagging these two is for the same reason that I've flagged others today: it's because private members' items must not concern questions that are substantially the same as ones already voted on by the House of Commons in the current session of Parliament. There's a possibility, then, a question that Bill C-266 concerns a question substantially similar to the question contained in Bill C-229, on which the House has already voted. Both would reduce parole eligibility for a certain type of offender.

There are, however, differences. Bill C-229 would have covered a much broader array of crimes and would have removed parole eligibility entirely. Bill C-266 is more targeted to a specific type of crime and would provide for an extended period of ineligibility to be determined at the discretion of a judge.

The mechanisms are different in that one would have been automatic and would have lasted for life, while the other is an extension that has some flexibility within it at the discretion of the judge, after considering submissions from a jury, if they would like to make those submissions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I won't support the bill, but I don't have a problem with it being votable, if I can put it that way.

I therefore move: That Bill C-266, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (increasing parole ineligibility), not be designated non-votable.

Mr. John Nater:

I concur. Well, I support the bill; I concur with your analysis of letting it be votable. I don't want Mr. Bezan tracking me down on this one.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There would be minimum sentence for him; don't worry.

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

I concur as well. [Translation]

The Chair:

So it would be votable.

(Motion agreed to. [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Madam Chair, I move:



That the Subcommittee present a report listing those items that it has determined should not be designated non-votable and recommending that they should not be considered by the House.

(Motion agreed to. [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

The following motion is moved:



That the Chair report the findings of the Subcommittee of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as soon as possible.

(Motion agreed to. [See Minutes of Proceedings]) [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If there's an appeal, it goes to PROC, not to us, right? It's not to us. [Translation]

The Chair:

The meeting is adjourned.

Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1315)

[Français]

La présidente (Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.)):

Soyez les bienvenus à la 18e rencontre du Sous-Comité des affaires émanant des députés du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui porte sur la détermination des affaires non votables, conformément à l'article 91.1(1) du Règlement.

Nous pouvons consulter le tableau des affaires inscrites à l'ordre des priorités.

Madame Blaney, avez-vous le document? [Traduction]

Mme Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NPD):

Oui, je l'ai lu. Pouvez-vous le faire circuler?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'aimerais proposer une motion nous dispensant de l'étude. Puis-je proposer que nous soyons dispensés d'étudier les 10 mesures avec lesquelles je n'ai aucun problème? Ce sont le M-111, le M-206, le M-203, le M-207, le projet de loi C-278, le M-174, le projet de loi C-417...

Mme Rachel Blaney:

Un instant. J'étais au M-207. Vous pouvez maintenant continuer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Désolé.

C'était le projet de loi C-278, le M-174 — je m'attends à ce que quelqu'un dise « Bingo » —, le projet de loi C-417, le M-201, le projet de loi C-415 et le M-208. Je peux affirmer que je n'ai aucun problème avec aucune de ces mesures législatives, et il en va de même avec les analystes, si je ne m'abuse. [Français]

La présidente:

Avez-vous nommé le projet de loi C-415?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, et j'ai nommé le projet de loi C-208. Je pense qu'il y en a 10 dans la liste.

La présidente:

Quels sont ceux qui restent?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sont les projets de loi C-331, C-419, C-420, C-421 et C-266.

La présidente:

En reste-t-il quatre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il en reste cinq.

La présidente:

D'accord. Il reste donc les projets de loi C-331, C-419, C-420, C-421 et C-266.

Est-ce que tout le monde suit? [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Êtes-vous d'accord pour que nous reportions l'étude de ces 10 premières mesures et que nous discutions des cinq autres?

Je propose: Que toutes les mesures, sauf le projet de loi C-331, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les Cours fédérales (promotion et protection des droits de la personne à l'échelle internationale), le projet de loi C-419, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les banques, la Loi sur les sociétés de fiducie de prêt, la Loi sur les sociétés d'assurances et la Loi sur les associations coopératives de crédit (cartes de crédit), le projet de loi C-420, Loi modifiant le Code canadien du travail, la Loi sur les langues officielles et la Loi canadienne sur les sociétés par actions, le projet de loi C-421, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la citoyenneté (connaissance suffisante de la langue française au Québec), et le projet de loi C-266, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (prolongation du délai préalable à la libération conditionnelle), ne soient pas désignés comme ne pouvant pas faire l'objet d'un vote.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal]) [Français]

La présidente:

Nous allons commencer par le projet de loi C-331. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voulez-vous que j'explique brièvement la préoccupation que nous avons?

Le problème avec le projet de loi C-331, c'est qu'il légifère à l'extérieur du Canada, et des préoccupations ont été soulevées selon lesquelles la mesure législative ne serait pas exécutoire et ne relève donc pas du Parlement. Je veux entendre l'opinion de l'attaché de recherche sur le sujet.

M. David Groves (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Comme toujours, mon opinion ne vous lie à rien. Vous pouvez être en désaccord avec moi autant que vous le voulez. C'est votre décision, en bout de ligne.

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-331, je n'estime pas qu'il y a un problème de constitutionnalité, et je parle de la capacité du Parlement de légiférer en dehors du pays, à l'étranger. Les assemblées législatives provinciales ne peuvent pas le faire, mais le Parlement fédéral peut légiférer à l'étranger. Si on regarde le Code criminel, on peut voir plusieurs dispositions qui prévoient que certains actes qui sont commis à l'extérieur du Canada sont considérés comme étant des crimes au Canada. [Français]

La présidente:

Quelqu'un a-t-il des commentaires à faire? [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous une opinion à ce sujet?

Mme Rachel Blaney:

Je pense que c'est logique. Il n'y a rien de nouveau, alors je suis d'accord avec vous.

Je propose: Que le projet de loi C-331, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les Cours fédérales (promotion et protection des droits de la personne à l'échelle internationale), ne devrait pas être désigné non votable.

M. David Groves:

Très bien. Un point de réglé. [Français]

La présidente:

Est-ce que je passe au vote?

Est-ce qu'on met de côté le projet de loi C-331? [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Adoptons la motion avec dissidence, si vous le voulez bien.

(La motion est adoptée avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Sommes-nous saisis du projet de loi C-419?  [Français]

La présidente:

Nous passons maintenant au projet de loi C-419. [Traduction]

M. David Groves:

Le projet de loi C-419, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les banques, la Loi sur les sociétés de fiducie et de prêt, la Loi sur les sociétés d'assurances et la Loi sur les associations coopératives de crédit en lien avec les cartes de crédit, apporterait une série de modifications à ces lois en ce qui a trait aux cartes de crédit. Par exemple, il réglementerait comment les banques répartissent les paiements dans différents comptes avec différents taux d'intérêt, exigerait qu'un fournisseur de cartes de crédit obtienne un consentement explicite avant d'augmenter la limite de crédit et exigerait que les publicités de cartes de crédit incluent des renseignements sur les frais et les taux.

J'ai noté le projet de loi dans mon analyse parce qu'il y a certain chevauchement avec la teneur du projet de loi  C-86, Loi no 2 portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février 2018 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures. La section 10 de ce projet de loi, qui s'intitule « Régime de protection des consommateurs en matière financière », apporterait une série de modifications à la Loi sur les banques, dont certaines porteraient sur les cartes de crédit également. Par exemple, il modifierait la Loi sur les banques pour ajouter l'article 627.35 proposé, qui réglementerait la répartition des paiements dans les comptes de crédit avec différents taux d'intérêt, comme le fait le projet de loi C-419. Il inclurait également une exigence selon laquelle la publicité faite par les banques doit être « exacte et claire et ne pas induire en erreur » et qu'il faut le consentement explicite avant de fournir un produit ou un service.

Pour résumer, les deux projets de loi réglementeraient, entre autres choses, la façon dont les banques administrent et offrent les comptes de carte de crédit, ainsi que la façon dont elles en font la promotion. Cependant, bien que le projet de loi C-419 couvre les fournisseurs de cartes de crédit qui sont assujettis à quatre lois — Loi sur les banques, Loi sur les sociétés de fiducie et de prêt, Loi sur les sociétés d'assurances et Loi sur les associations coopératives de crédit —, le projet de loi C-86 ne modifie que la Loi sur les banques.

Une condition que ce comité envisage lorsqu'il évalue si les affaires émanant des députés peuvent faire l'objet d'un vote — et je cite —, c'est que les projets de loi « ne doivent pas porter sur des questions actuellement inscrites au Feuilleton ou au Feuilleton des avis sous la rubrique ‘Affaires émanant du gouvernement’ ». Dans ce cas-ci, nous avons une situation où il y a un certain chevauchement entre le projet de loi C-419 et le projet de loi C-86, qui est au Feuilleton et qui est un document émanant du gouvernement, mais il y a des différences dans la portée. Le projet de loi C-419 a une portée législative plus vaste. Il s'appliquerait à trois autres lois et aux institutions qui seraient couvertes par ces lois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai juste une question très rapide, car je ne veux pas m'éterniser sur ce sujet.

Lorsque nous avions eu le problème avec la loi sur les navires abandonnés, le chevauchement était encore plus important.

M. David Groves:

Je crois que oui. Il faudrait que je me rafraîchisse la mémoire, mais oui, le chevauchement était énorme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'objectif ne se chevauche pas; il y a tout simplement des chevauchements.

M. David Groves:

Oui. Si je peux l'expliquer ainsi, l'objectif de cette mesure législative serait de couvrir un éventail plus vaste d'institutions concernant les cartes de crédit, de réglementer la façon dont elles utilisent les cartes de crédit, tandis que le projet de loi du gouvernement met seulement l'accent sur la Loi sur les banques et sur les institutions visées par la Loi sur les banques.

Vous avez raison de dire que le sujet est différent.

(1320)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voulez-vous qu'il soit adopté?

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Je suis d'accord avec l'analyse de l'attaché de recherche.

Je propose: Que le projet de loi C-419, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les banques, la Loi sur les sociétés de fiducie et de prêt, la Loi sur les sociétés d'assurances et la Loi sur les associations coopératives de crédit (cartes de crédit), ne soit pas désigné non votable.

M. David Groves:

Merci. C'est bien. Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Ce n'était pas notre recommandation.

Merci de me pousser à accélérer les choses. Si je prends trop de temps, faites-moi signe de la main.

Mme Rachel Blaney:

Vous faites du bon travail. Continuez.

M. David Groves:

Devrions-nous passer à...? [Français]

La présidente:

Le projet de loi C-419 peut faire l'objet d'un vote.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Nous passons maintenant au projet de loi C-420. [Traduction]

M. David Groves:

Le projet de loi C-420, Loi modifiant le Code canadien du travail, la Loi sur les langues officielles et la Loi canadienne sur les sociétés par actions, vise à apporter trois modifications qui, d'après mon analyse, portent sur des sujets distincts.

Premièrement, il modifierait le Code canadien du travail pour empêcher les employeurs d'embaucher des travailleurs de remplacement durant une grève.

Deuxièmement, il modifierait le Code canadien du travail pour permettre d'incorporer la loi provinciale dans la loi fédérale pour les questions de santé et de sécurité au travail mettant en cause des employées enceintes ou allaitantes.

Troisièmement, il apporterait des modifications à quelques lois pour incorporer la Charte de la langue française, qui est une loi québécoise, dans la loi fédérale à certains égards, et elle s'appliquerait au Québec.

Dans mon mémoire, j'ai soulevé deux problèmes. Le premier, c'est que le libellé dans le projet de loi  C-420 qui porte sur l'embauche de travailleurs de remplacement — le premier sujet que j'ai abordé — est, à quelques petites exceptions près, identique au libellé du projet de loi C-234, un projet de loi qui a été étudié précédemment à la Chambre et qui a été rejeté à l'étape de la deuxième lecture le 28 septembre 2016.

Le deuxième problème, c'est que le libellé du projet de loi C-420 qui porte sur la santé et la sécurité au travail — le deuxième sujet des trois que j'ai mentionnés — est, encore une fois à quelques petites exceptions près, identique au libellé du projet de loi C-345. Ce projet de loi a été étudié par la Chambre et a été rejeté à la deuxième lecture.

Le problème ici, c'est qu'il y a une question ouverte pour déterminer si le projet de loi C-420, conformément au libellé du critère relatif aux affaires votables, porte sur « des affaires qui sont essentiellement les mêmes que celles qui ont déjà été soumises à la Chambre des communes au cours de la même session de législature ».

Comme je l'ai dit précédemment dans mon évaluation, le projet de loi a trois objectifs ou sujets distincts, comme le prévoit le libellé. Deux d'entre eux, dans la substance et les moyens, sont très semblables aux projets de loi que la Chambre a étudiés et rejetés dans le passé.

J'ai discuté un peu avec la greffière. Elle peut me corriger si je fais fausse route, mais si j'ai bien compris ce qu'elle m'a dit, la position de la Chambre des communes concernant la recevabilité d'une motion, un amendement ou un projet de loi est que tant et aussi longtemps que ce n'est pas une répétition mot pour mot d'une mesure sur laquelle la Chambre a déjà délibéré, elle est recevable. Par conséquent, l'inclusion d'un nouveau sujet dans ce projet de loi et le changement de libellé rendraient ce projet de loi recevable.

Cela dit, j'interprète — et je veux répéter que vous n'êtes pas liés à mes interprétations — que ce critère relatif au caractère votable est plus vaste que la recevabilité. Je dis cela parce que si c'était le cas, le critère en soi serait redondant. Il exigerait de ce comité de faire des travaux que la Chambre ferait déjà. Cependant, je répète que c'est mon interprétation; vous n'y êtes pas liés.

Allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a aussi d'autres problèmes dans ce projet de loi. D'après ce que je comprends, comme vous l'avez mentionné, la loi incorporerait la loi provinciale dans la loi fédérale, ce qui lierait le gouvernement fédéral à une mesure législative provinciale.

Y a-t-il des problèmes de compétence sur l'autre point...

M. David Groves:

Il y a une disposition. Je ne veux pas sortir cet ouvrage volumineux et le passer en revue...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Rachel me tuerait si je le faisais.

M. David Groves:

Oui... il y a des problèmes entourant ce que l'on appelle l'« interdélégation », mais le gouvernement fédéral a le droit d'incorporer par renvoi des lois provinciales dans des lois fédérales. C'est un pouvoir qui est disponible dans les deux sens. Dans certains cas, on pourrait même le faire avec des lois qui proviennent de l'extérieur du Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si la loi provinciale change, la loi fédérale doit-elle forcément changer, ou est-ce qu'elle suit la version qui existait à l'époque?

M. David Groves:

Si je ne m'abuse, elle suivrait la version qui est en vigueur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, si des changements sont apportés, elle suivrait ces changements.

M. David Groves:

Oui.

Pour mettre de côté la question sur ce premier critère, à savoir si la mesure porte sur une question qui a déjà fait l'objet d'un vote, M. Graham a soulevé un autre problème qu'il voulait que j'aborde. Je m'excuse de ne pas l'avoir inclus dans ma note. Je l'ai examiné.

Il y a quelques problèmes d'ordre constitutionnel que ce projet de loi soulève, plus particulièrement la partie qui est sensiblement nouvelle, qui porte sur le concept d'importer la Charte de la langue française dans la loi fédérale. Le problème ici est essentiellement de savoir si ce projet de loi serait conforme à deux dispositions de la Charte. La première disposition est le paragraphe 16(1), que je vais lire rapidement: Le français et l'anglais sont les langues officielles du Canada; ils ont un statut et des droits et privilèges égaux quant à leur usage dans les organisations du Parlement et du gouvernement du Canada.

La deuxième disposition est le paragraphe 20(1), qui se lit comme suit: Le public a, au Canada, droit à l'emploi du français ou de l'anglais pour communiquer avec le siège ou l'administration centrale des organisations du Parlement ou du gouvernement [...]

Il se poursuit.

Comme je l'ai dit, le projet de loi C-420 incorporerait la Charte de la langue française dans la loi fédérale concernant le Québec plus particulièrement. Il convient de noter qu'il modifierait la Loi sur les langues officielles pour exiger que le gouvernement fédéral s'engage à ne pas nuire à l'application de la Charte de la langue française et que chaque institution fédérale ait le devoir de s'assurer que des mesures positives sont prises pour la mise en oeuvre de cet engagement à ne pas entraver la Charte.

La Charte de la langue française est très longue, mais renferme un certain nombre de dispositions sur le statut de la langue au Québec, y compris des exigences selon lesquelles l'administration civile et le gouvernement doivent utiliser le français dans leurs communications écrites entre eux et avec des personnes morales. Le problème serait de savoir si ces dispositions de la Charte seraient touchées si l'on importe la Charte de la langue française dans la loi fédérale et si l'on exige — potentiellement — que les entités fédérales qui communiquent avec des personnes morales ou à l'interne au Québec utilisent seulement le français dans leurs communications écrites.

Le critère qui est en jeu ici — et je veux juste le souligner très rapidement —, c'est que les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas transgresser clairement la Loi constitutionnelle, 1867 à 1982, y compris la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. J'insiste sur le mot « clairement », car la constitutionnalité est un sujet nébuleux, même pour les projets de loi qui reçoivent l'approbation complète du gouvernement, de ses rédacteurs et de ses avocats. Je ne suis qu'un petit maillon de la chaîne dans tout cela. Je comprends qu'on ait ajouté le terme « clairement » pour que dans les cas nébuleux, le Parlement ait l'occasion de débattre pleinement de la question. Tout le monde peut dire comment il interprète sa relation avec la Charte.

Par conséquent, lorsque j'analyse des projets de loi en fonction de ces critères, je me demande si des arguments plausibles pourraient être soulevés, au niveau des principes de base, selon lesquels le projet de loi est conforme à la Charte. Je parle de « principes de base », car ce sont souvent des contextes très techniques, où même des experts formés ne s'entendraient pas. Je n'oserais jamais me considérer comme étant un expert technique sur tous les sujets dont le sous-comité est saisi.

(1325)



En ce qui concerne les droits linguistiques en vertu de la charte, il convient de souligner que le paragraphe 16(3) prévoit ce qui suit: La présente charte ne limite pas le pouvoir du Parlement et des législatures de favoriser la progression vers l'égalité de statut ou d'usage du français et de l'anglais.

Les tribunaux ont également reconnu que la protection et la promotion de la langue française au Québec constituent un « objectif urgent et réel » qui, par conséquent, peut permettre d'atteindre un équilibre par rapport aux autres droits garantis par la Charte. On pourrait soutenir que cette loi est une atteinte admissible aux droits des Québécois qui souhaitent recevoir des services en anglais. Cela dit — et là encore, c'est purement une interprétation plausible —, j'ajouterais qu'il peut être possible d'interpréter ce projet de loi de manière à ce qu'il n'impose aucune restriction à la prestation des services du gouvernement fédéral au Québec.

La Charte de la langue française fait souvent référence au gouvernement, aux ministères gouvernementaux et à d'autres organismes de l'administration civile, mais ces renvois pourraient, et je dis bien pourraient, être considérés comme étant des renvois au gouvernement provincial seulement, pour lequel l'article 20 de la charte ne s'applique pas. Par conséquent, il peut être possible d'interpréter ce projet de loi de manière à ce qu'il exige simplement que le gouvernement fédéral n'entrave pas les opérations du gouvernement provincial en français.

Je veux répéter, d'après ce que je comprends, que la norme de violation flagrante permet qu'un projet de loi qui a soulevé des problèmes constitutionnels évidents et complexes soit réputé non votable, mais je suis d'avis qu'il ne viole pas la charte, conformément au libellé de la disposition. Cependant, comme toujours, ce n'est pas ce qui importe ici.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis particulièrement sensible aux questions d'ordre constitutionnel, puisque je viens du Québec...

La présidente:

Moi aussi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... comme la présidente. Je pense donc que nous devrions déclarer le projet de loi non votable pour des raisons d'ordre constitutionnel, si bien que je propose ce qui suit: Que le projet de loi C-420, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la citoyenneté (connaissance suffisante de la langue française au Québec), soit désigné non votable.

Cependant, c'est un comité consensuel, alors je vais m'en remettre à vos opinions.

Mme Rachel Blaney:

Bien entendu, j'estime que c'est un grand compliment que deux projets de loi de nos membres ont été inclus ici, avec quelques amendements mineurs. Il est bien de savoir qu'ils nous appuient, mais une partie du libellé est un peu inquiétant, et d'après votre examen — votre analyse —, ce n'est pas ce que vous recommandez.

J'ai l'impression qu'il est un peu difficile de savoir quelles seront les répercussions sur le terrain pour ce qui est de la mise en oeuvre. Je suis assez neutre à ce sujet, malheureusement.

(1330)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai besoin d'un vote prépondérant.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que je ferais preuve de prudence et que je saisirais la Chambre de cela. Si la volonté du Parlement est de le rejeter, je pense que ce serait une façon encore plus efficace de traiter de la question.

Laissons la Chambre s'en occuper. C'est mon opinion, mais...

Mme Rachel Blaney:

Je suis toujours ravie d'avoir l'occasion de parler du formidable travail que mes collègues ont accompli, alors oui, je ne vois pas de problème à en saisir la Chambre. Tout le monde aura ainsi l'occasion de parler du travail que les gens de mon parti ont accompli.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que cela peut être adopté avec dissidence.[Français]

Il faut demander le vote, mais ce sera adopté avec dissidence, de toute façon.

La présidente:

D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Nous passons maintenant au projet de loi C-421. [Traduction]

M. David Groves:

C'est un autre projet de loi pour lequel le même critère est évoqué, soit que les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas clairement enfreindre la Charte. Il s'agirait présumément des mêmes dispositions de la Charte — les articles 16 et 20.

Le projet de loi C-421, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la citoyenneté (connaissance suffisante de la langue française au Québec), modifierait la Loi sur la citoyenneté afin d'exiger que les résidents permanents qui résident habituellement au Québec démontrent qu'ils possèdent une connaissance suffisante de la langue française pour pouvoir obtenir la citoyenneté. Généralement, en vertu de la loi, les résidents permanents doivent démontrer qu'ils possèdent une connaissance suffisante du français ou de l'anglais.

Je soulignerais pour commencer, comme pour le projet de loi C-420, que le paragraphe 16(3) de la Charte permet l'adoption de lois visant à « favoriser la progression vers l'égalité de statut ou d'usage du français et de l'anglais », et que les tribunaux ont dans le passé conclu que la nécessité de promouvoir et de protéger le français — probablement le but de ce projet de loi — est réelle et urgente. Je dirais aussi que le Québec exerce beaucoup plus de contrôle sur l'immigration que d'autres provinces et qu'il a par conséquent des pouvoirs uniques sur ce plan.

Bien entendu l'immigration et la citoyenneté ne sont pas nécessairement la même chose, mais je signale simplement par là que c'est une relation légèrement différente entre le gouvernement fédéral et les gouvernements provinciaux. Comme tel, on pourrait soutenir — je dis qu'on pourrait, encore — que cela représente une intrusion minime et justifiable dans les droits prévus à l'article 20 des résidents permanents qui présenteraient alors une demande de citoyenneté.

On pourrait soutenir — j'insiste encore sur le fait qu'on pourrait, car c'est hypothétique et que ce n'est que pour l'analyse actuelle — que l'intrusion est particulièrement minime étant donné qu'elle n'empêche pas un citoyen qui a subi le test en anglais en Ontario ou ailleurs au Canada de déménager au Québec ultérieurement. L'article 6 de la Charte permet aux personnes qui ont obtenu la citoyenneté de se déplacer librement dans tout le pays, et ce projet de loi ne changera rien à cela.

Comme le projet de loi C-420, ce projet de loi soulève des enjeux constitutionnels complexes. Cela ne m'empêche pas d'estimer qu'il ne pourrait pas être jugé non votable, mais comme toujours, il ne m'appartient pas d'interpréter ou d'appliquer cette norme. [Français]

La présidente:

Est-ce qu'il y a des commentaires? [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela soulève une question que nous avions aussi dans le cas précédent. [Français]

La présidente:

Il y a des citoyens, au Québec, qui parlent anglais et qui ont un statut de résident permanent. J'en connais plusieurs. Est-ce à dire que ces gens-là ne pourraient plus être résidents permanents? [Traduction]

M. David Groves:

Cela s'appliquerait aux...

Mme Rachel Blaney:

Résidents permanents.

M. David Groves:

Oui, il pourrait s'agir de résidents permanents. Oui. Ils n'auraient pas le droit de demander la citoyenneté pour ensuite demander de pouvoir démontrer qu'ils possèdent des connaissances suffisantes de l'anglais. Quand vous demandez la citoyenneté, vous devez démontrer que vous possédez des connaissances suffisantes d'une langue, et je crois que vous devez aussi démontrer que vous avez des connaissances suffisantes des moeurs canadiennes. [Français]

La présidente:

Dans ma circonscription, il y a des résidents permanents qui aimeraient faire une demande pour devenir citoyens canadiens, mais ils parlent anglais. Cela voudrait dire qu'ils n'y auraient pas droit.

(1335)

[Traduction]

M. David Groves:

Oui, c'est juste, à moins qu'ils déménagent ou apprennent le français. Il faudrait qu'ils aillent dans une autre province.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais soulever quelque chose à ce sujet.

Ma femme parle cinq langues, mais pas le français. Quand elle a eu sa citoyenneté canadienne, nous venions de déménager au Québec. J'y avais déjà vécu; elle est venue au Québec avec moi. Elle aurait été obligée de retourner en Ontario ou d'y rester pour obtenir sa citoyenneté, et je pense que cela va à l'encontre des valeurs de notre Constitution et de notre Charte. Je ne peux appuyer cela pour des motifs d'ordre constitutionnel. Je ne peux pas voter pour que cela soit votable.

Je propose par conséquent: Que le projet de loi C-421, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la citoyenneté (connaissance suffisante de la langue française au Québec), soit désigné comme une affaire ne faisant pas l'objet d'un vote.

Mme Rachel Blaney:

J'ai dirigé une organisation qui offrait des services aux nouveaux venus au Canada pendant des années, et je me souviens avoir aidé des gens dans notre partie très anglophone du monde, la Colombie-Britannique, qui ne parlaient que le français. Ces gens pouvaient quand même obtenir leur citoyenneté en se servant du français, alors je ne vais pas voter pour cela, parce que ce n'est tout simplement pas... eh bien, je ne pense pas que ce soit constitutionnel, et cela va complètement à l'encontre du fait que le Canada est un pays bilingue. C'est une chose dont nous devrions tous être fiers. [Français]

La présidente:

Ce serait donc non votable?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Exactement, et cela donne un droit d'appel au proposeur.

La présidente:

D'accord. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une affaire non votable, en effet.

(La motion est adoptée.) [Français]

La présidente:

Il reste le projet de loi C-266.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas d'objection concernant ce projet de loi, mais je crois que l'analyste a des commentaires à faire. [Traduction]

M. David Groves:

C'est le dernier, à ma connaissance.

Le projet de loi C-266, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (prolongation du délai préalable à la libération conditionnelle), vise à modifier le Code criminel afin de prévoir qu'une personne déclarée coupable de l’enlèvement, de l’agression sexuelle et du meurtre de quelqu'un ne peut bénéficier d'une libération conditionnelle avant d’avoir purgé de 25 à 40 ans de sa peine. Cela prolongerait la période d'inadmissibilité à la libération conditionnelle des personnes coupables de ce type de crime, par rapport à la situation actuelle.

Le projet de loi C-229, Loi modifiant le Code criminel et la Loi sur le système correctionnel et la mise en liberté sous condition et apportant des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d’autres lois (emprisonnement à perpétuité), aurait entre autres modifié le Code criminel pour enlever toute possibilité de libération conditionnelle aux personnes coupables de certains crimes, notamment l'enlèvement, l'agression sexuelle et le meurtre d'une personne. Le projet de loi C-229 a été examiné à la Chambre puis rejeté en deuxième lecture le 21 septembre 2016.

En résumé, le projet de loi C-266 prolongerait la période d'inadmissibilité à la libération conditionnelle s'appliquant à une personne trouvée coupable de l'enlèvement, de l'agression sexuelle et du meurtre d'une personne. Le projet de loi C-229 aurait, entre autres, enlevé toute possibilité de libération conditionnelle à une personne déclarée coupable de l'agression sexuelle et du meurtre d'une personne, ou de l'enlèvement et du meurtre d'une personne.

La raison pour laquelle je signale ces deux cas est la même que pour d'autres affaires que j'ai signalées aujourd'hui: les affaires émanant des députés ne doivent pas porter sur des questions qui sont essentiellement les mêmes que celles sur lesquelles la Chambre des communes s’est déjà prononcée au cours de la même session de la législature. Il est possible qu'une question visée par le projet de loi C-266 soit essentiellement la même qu'une question visée par le projet de loi C-229 et sur laquelle la Chambre s'est déjà prononcée. Dans les deux cas, l'admissibilité à la libération conditionnelle serait réduite pour un type donné de contrevenant.

Il y a cependant des différences. Le projet de loi C-229 aurait couvert un bien plus vaste éventail de crimes et aurait éliminé complètement toute possibilité de libération conditionnelle. Le projet de loi C-266 cible plus précisément un type de crime particulier et prévoit la prolongation de la période d'inadmissibilité à la libération conditionnelle à la discrétion d'un juge.

Les mécanismes sont différents, dans le sens que, dans un cas, ce serait automatique et pour toute la vie, alors que dans l'autre cas, c'est une prolongation qui laisse de la latitude puisqu'elle est déterminée selon la décision du juge qui préside le procès après considération de toute recommandation formulée par le jury, si celui-ci veut faire des recommandations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'appuierai pas le projet de loi, mais je ne vois pas de problème à le désigner votable, si je puis dire.

Je propose donc: Que le projet de loi C-266, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (prolongation du délai préalable à la libération conditionnelle), ne soit pas désigné non votable.

M. John Nater:

Je suis d'accord. En fait, je suis pour le projet de loi; je suis d'accord avec votre justification de le désigner votable. Je ne veux pas me faire traquer par M. Bezan à cause de cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il écoperait d'une peine minimale, vous pouvez en être sûr.

Mme Rachel Blaney:

Je suis aussi d'accord. [Français]

La présidente:

Ce serait donc votable.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Madame la présidente, je propose:

Que le Sous-comité présente un rapport énumérant les affaires qui, selon lui, ne devraient pas être désignées non votables et recommandant à la Chambre de les examiner.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

La présidente:

La motion suivante est proposée:

Que la présidence fasse rapport dès que possible des conclusions du Sous-comité au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal]) [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il y a un appel, c'est PROC qui en est saisi, n'est-ce pas? Pas nous. [Français]

La présidente:

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 22, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.