header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-16 INDU 163

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody. Thank you for being here today.

Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, May 8, 2019, the committee is studying M-208, on rural digital infrastructure.

Today, we have with us the Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Rural Economic Development, along with her officials, from the Office of Infrastructure of Canada, Kelly Gillis, Deputy Minister, Infrastructure and Communities; and from the Department of Industry, Lisa Setlakwe, Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategy and Innovation Policy.

Minister, you have 10 minutes.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan (Minister of Rural Economic Development):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to acknowledge that we are gathered here on the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin peoples.

As you said, Mr. Chair, I am joined by Kelly Gillis, my deputy minister, and Lisa...I never say it right. Sorry.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe (Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategy and Innovation Policy Sector, Department of Industry):

Setlakwe.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Setlakwe.

Thank you. Sorry.

Lisa Setlakwe is senior ADM of strategy and innovation policy at ISED.

I'd like to thank the distinguished members of this committee for the opportunity to update them on our government's efforts to bring high-speed Internet service and mobile wireless service to the millions of Canadians who live in rural and remote regions.

First, I want to acknowledge the valuable work that the committee has contributed and is contributing to our understanding of this complex and vitally important issue.

From day one, our government has been working to ensure that all Canadians have an equal opportunity to succeed no matter where they live. I know this committee shares that goal, as do all members of Parliament. The unanimous support that this House has given to Mr. Amos' motion shows government and private sector partners who are working together to address the Internet and wireless deficit across the country that there is a real commitment to get this important work done.

Since January, when I was appointed Canada's first Minister of Rural Economic Development, I have met and spoken with Canadians from all walks of life in rural and remote communities from coast to coast to coast.

From my own personal experience of living in rural Nova Scotia, I have seen how rural Canadians make our country a more vibrant and prosperous place to live and work.

Though small in population, rural communities account for roughly 30% of our country's gross domestic product. They are the drivers of Canada's natural resource and agricultural sectors, and they are supported by dedicated workers who are deeply committed to their communities.

In his mandate letter to me, the Prime Minister asked me to develop a rural economic development strategy.

Since I started travelling across this country in January, I have listened and learned, and while each community is unique and faces different challenges, the number one on most of their lists is the need to be connected.

Our rural economic development strategy is in its final stages of development, and I can assure you that it will fully reflect the concerns about broadband and wireless that I have heard repeatedly throughout my travels. We know that, when it comes to digital infrastructure, there is an urban-rural divide, and I'd like to take a moment to look at some of these disparities.

Although more than nine of 10 urban households have access to high-speed Internet service, only one in three rural households have the same access. Lack of high-speed service means that these communities lack the essential services that urban Canadians take for granted. It means that Canadians cannot sell their products and services online. They must resort to accessing government services over the phone instead of online. Many farmers with multi-million dollar agribusinesses still rely on phones and fax machines to run their operations. These realities are having a real impact on people in rural Canada and, in some cases, are leaving them behind.

It's incumbent upon us as the federal government to work with provincial, territorial and private sector partners to bridge that divide.

The divide that we're talking about shouldn't be limited specifically to the communities in rural and remote areas of our country. It exists on our roads and highways where there is no mobile wireless coverage. This lack of connectivity is a significant challenge for those working in the transportation industry, such as truckers, for example, and it is a risk to public safety, particularly for rural Canadians, who need to be able to communicate along remote roadways, fields and natural areas.

Wireless coverage is also essential to the national public alerting system, which relies on wireless service to deliver emergency alerts to Canadians.

On a more basic level, rural wireless mobile services are as important to rural communities as they are to urban communities in terms of economic development, as well as personal use. That is why we announced the accelerated capital cost allowance, which is helping telecommunications companies make investments in rural Canada. As announced by Bell, Rogers, Shaw, Telus and Xplornet, this change will connect thousands of people in their homes and provide cell coverage along unserved highway corridors across the country.

With respect to both broadband and mobile wireless access, this digital divide holds back rural Canadians from participating fully in the global and digital world. Through the connect to innovate program, we are extending high-speed Internet access to 900 rural and remote communities and an estimated 380,000 households, with more to come. That includes 190 indigenous communities across Canada. This program sets the stage for increased investments coast to coast to coast.

Since launching the connect to innovate program in budget 2016, the government has leveraged $554 million from the private sector and other levels of government for about 180 projects. These projects will improve Internet connectivity to those 380,000 households and 900 communities, more than tripling the 300 communities initially targeted. ln total, through the connect to innovate program, 20,000 kilometres of fibre network will be installed across this country.

(0850)



We are connecting households and business, schools and hospitals, as well as supporting mobile wireless networks. We are establishing fibre optic connections in the farthest point north in all of Canada.

These investments show that our government recognizes that access to high-speed Internet and mobile wireless service is not a luxury; it is a necessity. We're not finished making these investments.

ln budget 2019, our government has made an ambitious new commitment to ensure that, over time, every single household and business in Canada has high-speed connectivity. As you know, we anticipate having 95% of the country connected by 2026, and 100% of the country connected by 2030.

We are investing in tomorrow's technologies, such as 5G and low earth orbit satellite capacity, today. The budget announced $1.7 billion in new broadband investments, including a new universal broadband fund and a top-up for the connect to innovate program that will focus on extending backbone infrastructure to underserved communities. For the most difficult to reach communities, funding may also support last-mile connections to individual homes and businesses.

The Canada Infrastructure Bank will seek to invest up to $1 billion over the next 10 years and leverage at least $2 billion in private capital to increase broadband access for Canadians. The CRTC's $750-million broadband fund, launched last fall, will help to improve connectivity services across the country, including wireless mobile services. Broadband infrastructure projects are also eligible for funding under the $2-billion rural and northern communities stream of the investing in Canada infrastructure program.

We understand that our success depends not only on our government's commitment to invest, but also that of our provincial, territorial and private sector partners. That's the reason we created the Canada Infrastructure Bank, which is currently exploring opportunities to attract private sector investments in high-speed Internet infrastructure for unserved and underserved communities.

Overall, budget 2019 is proposing a new, co-ordinated plan that would deliver $5 billion to $6 billion in investments in rural broadband over the next 10 years to help build a fully connected Canada.

To ensure maximum efficiency and coordination and to bring maximum benefit to underserved Canadians, officials are currently drafting a national connectivity strategy that promotes collaboration and effective investments of public dollars. This strategy will outline clear objectives and targets against which progress can be measured; provide a tool to guide efforts and improve outcomes for all Canadian homes, businesses, public institutions and indigenous peoples; and create accountability and responsibility for all levels of government to contribute towards eliminating the digital divide.

I'm proud to be part of a government that recognizes that building our nation's high-speed Internet is as important as building our nation's roads. That's how we will ensure that all Canadians have equal opportunities to succeed, regardless of where they live.

Thank you for the opportunity to address the committee. I'm happy to take your questions.

(0855)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

We're going to get right into questions, starting with Mr. Longfield, for seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Minister Jordan, it's great to have you here representing rural Canada.

I'm picturing Nova Scotia's challenges. Rural Canada also extends beyond the land onto the sea, when people are trying to communicate from ship to shore.

I'm thinking of rural Ontario. I was managing a business in Welland. I was trying to get high-speed Internet into that business and it was going to cost me $75,000 to get the last part of the line done. I was connecting to our office in Germany and our offices across the States, upgrading our technology and hiring people, and then I had this limit to growth. So we know that it's there.

Could you could speak to what working with other orders of government might provide? We have the SWIFT project that we studied here at the committee, where Ontario, the Government of Canada and private industry are trying to reach out to rural Canada. How important is it that we have willing partners at the table from other orders of government?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Longfield.

You've made some very valid points with regard to how important it is for businesses to have good connectivity in order to grow. I come from a fishing community, and we know that access to international markets is extremely important, the same as it is for agriculture. We know that in rural Canada access to broadband is extremely critical in order for businesses to continue to grow and be able to compete on the world stage.

With regard to how we achieve that, we need to have all partners at the table. This would include the federal government and our provincial and territorial partners, as well as stakeholder groups. In some cases, municipalities are stepping up because they realize how important it is for them to have that connectivity. It's not going to be a one-size-fits-all solution. I think every area has to be looked at independently, but also in recognizing that this has to be done with a whole-of-government and a whole-of-country approach.

We have been very fortunate. As I've travelled across the country since being appointed in January, meeting with communities from coast to coast to coast, no matter where I've gone, no matter where I am in the country, this is the number one priority that we're hearing about. I will also say that in engagement with my provincial and territorial partners, it's their number one priority. Everyone recognizes that this is something that needs to be done, and I'm happy to say that in most cases all of our partners are on board with this and want to see us make sure that we connect 100% of Canadians.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

You mentioned the municipal partners. I'm thinking of my driving route from Welland back to Guelph: 131 kilometres to work every day. I had time in the car for hands-free calls, and I knew that as soon as I hit a certain bridge on Highway 20 that it was going to cut out, so I would have to interrupt my conversation and say, “I'm going to call you back when I get to the barn on the other side of the creek.”

I've now visited some of the farms in that area. We have egg farms that are doing amazing work with data in measuring thickness and composition of shell that relates to the feed the chickens are using, and for animal welfare in terms of watering and keeping the hens happy as they're laying eggs, but really connecting to the outside world.

The municipal partners often don't have funds. It's a small community. Just to pick a name, Grimsby, Ontario, is going to be different from Toronto, Ontario, so again, there's support back to us and our provincial partners. Could you speak to capacity-building within these small communities?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

You're right. There are some small communities that just don't have the capacity to build it on their own, but there are other small communities that have definitely made this a priority and are budgeting accordingly. I will say that we've been very fortunate, in that the rural and northern communities fund, which is a fund under Infrastructure Canada, has allowed connectivity to be one of the areas where they can apply for funding. We've also made it easier for smaller communities to access those funds by lowering the cost of their contribution.

These are all things that I think are really important when we listen to rural communities, because it's an expensive venture to connect people, and they know how important it is for them to stay sustainable. We also need to make sure that our provincial counterparts are at the table with us. In a lot of cases, they already are. There have been budget allocations in different provinces to make sure that broadband is one of the things that they see developing. The other thing, of course, is our stakeholder telco companies. They are also stepping up, as is the CRTC. There are a lot of different funds.

I think this is one of those things where right across the country and right across the spectrum everybody is on board in making sure that we do connect rural Canada.

(0900)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

In terms of your strategy development and working with other ministers, you have a new ministry, and we also have Minister Ng in a new position, a new ministry, with small business and export promotion. Minister Bains, of course, is in this area, as is Minister Bibeau, with agriculture. How do the ministers work together on developing strategies?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

That's a very good question.

Since I was first appointed, we have been very active in going across the country and talking to our provincial and municipal counterparts, but we also recognize that this is a whole-of-government approach. Twenty-one different departments have been involved in developing our strategy and in working on national connectivity. We recognize that it's not just one area that's affected—all areas are. It doesn't matter if it's natural resources, agriculture, fishing, business development, exports or tourism. We definitely have a number of departments that have to be involved in making sure that as we build this plan for national connectivity, we build it in the right way and we make sure that we hit all of the targets we're striving for.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

As well, we have limited time. Right now we have limited time, but we also have a very limited schedule ahead of us. Hopefully we can get to a break point where that can be picked up in the future Parliament.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

We've always been committed to connectivity, first of all with the connect to innovate program, which was announced in budget 2016. This is going to be able to connect to 900 communities, which is three times the number that we had originally anticipated. It's going to be 380,000 households.

We also have a top-up on the connect to innovate budget in 2019. Of course, the universal broadband fund that we're developing now will be used as we go forward.

Thank you.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We're going to Mr. Chong.

You have seven minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for appearing in front of us today to talk about this important issue. I think our ridings of South Shore—St. Margarets and rural Wellington County and the rural Halton region are very similar.

I would encourage the government to focus not only on accessible Internet for rural areas, but also affordable Internet. When we say that only a third of Canadians in rural areas have access to high-speed Internet, I think that's better and more accurately termed as a third of Canadians in rural areas have access to affordable high-speed Internet. Many more than that have access to Internet, but they choose not to put it in place because it is far too expensive.

I mentioned this in the last committee meeting and I'll emphasize it again. If you're living in the city of Guelph, you can get 100 gigabytes of high-speed Internet a month for $49.99. You can get unlimited high-speed Internet in the city of Guelph for $69.99. If you live a mile outside the city of Guelph in rural Wellington County, if you want 100 gigabytes of high-speed data, it will cost you about $300 per month. If you want 200 gigabytes of high-speed data, which is not unreasonable for a family of four with kids in high school who need to access online resources to do their homework, you're paying $500, $600 or $700 a month for that. Obviously, that's too expensive and out of reach for most rural families so they choose not to put it in place, because who's going to pay $600 a month for 200 gigabytes of data? That's $7,200 a year plus tax. It's far too expensive.

I think that is the bigger issue than actual accessibility to Internet in rural areas. It's the number one complaint that I've heard in the north Halton region and in southern Wellington County. They say that yes, they can get Internet, but how are they supposed to pay a monthly bill of $500. Especially, as you know, in the Maritimes you don't have access to natural gas, and neither do we, and you're paying $1,000 a month for oil heat. The marketplace isn't working for those rural customers.

Unfortunately, we didn't do what western Canadians did and roll out natural gas across all the Prairies to every single rural residence, and we didn't do what Bell telephone did and roll out Internet access, high-speed Internet, to every single rural household when we were rolling it out in cities. Now we have this problem where most rural families don't have access to affordable high-speed Internet. As I said, who's going to pay $600 a month, plus tax, for 200 gigabytes' worth of high-speed Internet access?

I think that is just as big an issue as making sure high speed is available. I bring that to your attention because I really think that's just as important, if not more important, than actually having access to high-speed Internet.

(0905)

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Chong, you're absolutely right. We've heard that across the country. It's not only a matter of accessing high-speed Internet; it's being able to afford it, and rural Canada is disadvantaged when it comes to costs in terms of how payments are initiated.

Before I turn to Lisa to comment on this, I will say that Minister Bains has actually directed the CRTC to look at the competitiveness of telcos, and with that we would hope with better competition there would be better pricing.

I'm going to ask Lisa if she would make some comments on where that process is right now.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

Specifically on the policy direction, as you know, the minister is looking to issue a direction to the CRTC. It is in large part in response to what you've just talked about, which is affordability and competition. What we're asking them to do, as they are going to be making decisions on a variety of policy areas, is that they consider it through a consumer lens first. That's looking at affordability, consumer rights, encouraging competition and also encouraging innovation. That is in process now. We are welcoming comments on that.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Sure, and I'll add to that.

People say that there is more affordable Internet for 200 gigabytes a month than paying $600. The problem is that it's not low-latency, high-speed Internet access. The problem with satellite technology is that there's a great deal of latency in the service. The problem with direct line-of-sight radio frequency Internet access is that it's not as reliable.

Really, if you want reliable high-speed Internet access, the technology that's best suited for a lot of these rural areas is cellular high-speed mobile Internet access, which is often marketed under branded products like Turbo Hub for Bell or Rocket Hub for Rogers. That is actually reliable high-speed Internet access with low latency. The problem is, as I mentioned before, that those plans are prohibitively expensive.

Most rural customers I know, if they can't get Internet access right now through those services, are more than willing to pay $500 to $1,000 for a one-time installation fee to put up a big aerial antenna with a Yagi antenna at the top to boost the signal through a coax cable down to the Turbo Hub or Rocket Hub provided by Bell or Rogers. They're more than willing to pay that one-time fee. The challenge is that nobody's willing to pay an ongoing fee of $600-plus a month just to get some basic 200 gigabytes of data.

The affordability is the issue, then. The vast majority of households are within range of a cell tower, and if the signal isn't strong enough, they would be more than willing to pay the one-time $500 charge to get somebody to install a booster antenna on their roof. The issue is that paying an ongoing cost of $600 or $700 a month for 200 gigabytes of data is out of reach for the vast majority of families.

We can roll out more cell towers and do all that kind of stuff, but if the pricing of these plans is at that level, nobody's going to be able to afford it.

The Chair:

Please give a very brief answer.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I have a couple of comments with regard to that.

First of all, we know that there's no one-size-fits-all solution in connectivity, but making sure things are affordable and reliable is extremely important.

We are looking at things like the low earth orbit, LEO, satellites. We're looking at fibre. We're looking at the towers. How you get connected is going to depend on where you are.

Also, in co-operation with the CRTC and what they've been directed to do, we're hoping we can bring together better affordability and better access to all Canadians.

(0910)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Minister, for being here.

The 700 megahertz band mobile spectrum option was probably one of the most successful spectrum options in Canadian history. Brand names like Telus paid over $1 billion. SaskTel paid nearly $1 billion and Rogers paid over $3 billion. In total there was $5 billion, with $300 million allocated to the government. How much of that money, that $5 billion-plus the government received, has been directed to expanding broadband?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Masse, the money that is brought in from auction goes into general revenues, which actually pays for a lot of different programs. Of course, we're investing significantly in broadband and in high-speed Internet coverage.

We have $1.7 billion allocated in this budget that will be going to high-speed broadband.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's for this budget, but I'm asking about the previous money your government received, the $5 billion. That $1.7 billion is actually over 13 years and it's actually legacy for another government, be it yours or someone else's.

What did your government do with the 2015 spectrum auction, which netted a sum of $2.1 billion? Where did that $2.1 billion go? Did any of that go to rural broadband?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Money that comes from spectrum auctions goes into general revenues. General revenues would, of course, take into account broadband as well as other services and programs that the government provides. The money would go into the general revenues.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That also, then, includes the other 2015 auction, the 2,500 megahertz band, which is another $1 billion. There was the residential spectrum licences for the remaining 700 megahertz as well.

In total, Canadians have received from their government over $14 billion with regard to spectrum auctions in recent history, so it's hard to believe we've ended up with a revenue stream of $14 billion and some of the highest prices and some of the least coverage in rural areas. Why do you think that's the case? We've received record amounts of unaccounted-for money in terms of it being required for anything.

With the spectrum auction, for those who aren't aware, you're selling off land rights and air rights. That's like water. It's something that there is no cost to do for the Canadian government, so it's pure revenue for the government.

Why do you think there's been no allocation of these resources to rural broadband, especially given the high prices we have?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

We've invested in rural broadband significantly since we've been elected. The money that comes from the spectrum auction goes into general revenues, which pays for a lot of different programs. Rural broadband would probably be one of them.

We're making significant investments as well as commitments to making sure that we connect this country. We've already committed to connecting over 900 communities through the connect to innovate fund. We're looking at topping up that fund, as well as the universal broadband fund that's going to be rolling out shortly. We know that the money is necessary in order to connect communities across this country. It is something we are extremely committed to doing.

When you talk about the spectrum auction specifically, there's been a carve-out spectrum for rural communities. We know it's critical for rural areas to get that connectivity. We're making sure we're going to do it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Given that, right now, you have two spectrum auctions under way, are you able to commit the revenues from those spectrum auctions, which will be in the billions, to broadband services?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Revenues from spectrum auctions go to the general revenues that pay for a number of different government programs, one of which may be broadband. We have committed to making sure that this country is connected. We've made sure that we're putting that money in the budget.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'll take that as a no.

Those are future budgets. Future revenues will come in. There are future spectrum auctions on top of that. There's an excessive amount of money being generated here. I know that you're seeking partners for the Canada Infrastructure Bank to the tune of $2 billion. At the same time, you're expecting Bell Mobility, Telus, Vidéotron, SaskTel and Rogers to spend billions of dollars on a spectrum auction.

I want to move towards consumer protection. The recent CRTC decision acknowledges that consumers in this country have been abused by predatory pricing practices and the telcos' behaviour toward customers. The decision is going to take a full year to put penalties on those companies for such behaviour.

Is that acceptable to you and the minister?

(0915)

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

As we talked about earlier, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development has already given a directive to the CRTC to look at the pricing of the telcos.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is about their behaviour. There was an inquiry with regard to their behaviour and predatory practices with consumers, be it marketing, soliciting of business or moving customers to different elements. There is a ruling specifically identifying that they're guilty.

The CRTC has said they will take a year to bring consequences for that. Is that acceptable to you and the minister, that it would take a year to rebate or compensate Canadian consumers for behaviour the CRTC has ruled was inappropriate?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'm going to ask Lisa to comment on that, since she is the person who deals mostly with ISED. She can maybe bring a little more to that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm really asking you. It's going to take a year. I want to know whether you find that acceptable for the CRTC, after they have issued a guilty decision. The penalty is not going to take a matter of days, weeks or months. It's going to take a year. There's been dead silence related to that. I want to know whether you find it acceptable that for abusive practices identified and acknowledged by the CRTC, the penalties and consequences will take a full year to benefit consumers.

Do you think that's appropriate for the CRTC to take that length of time?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Masse, as you are aware, the CRTC is an arm's-length organization of government. We have had a directive from the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development to ask the CRTC to look at the practices of the telcos and how they are doing.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You have had a directive letter, exactly.

You can have public comment with regard to whether or not it's acceptable for them to take that long—

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

—if the minister issued an actual directive to them—

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

—as you have acknowledged and expressed here.

The Chair:

Your time's up.

I would just remind everyone that ministers bring their deputy ministers and agents with them in order that they may help ministers answer questions. If ministers want to refer to them, that's well within their right.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Ms. Jordan, for being here for this. This is a very important issue we're discussing. I know we've talked about the Internet an awful lot, but I think cellphones are really what we're trying to get to here.

I'll continue with Brian's point for a bit. How do we get small companies, such as the ones in my riding, to get involved in cellphones, when it costs them $1 billion to get into the market?

Are we going to look at moving to a post-auction world for wireless spectrum?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Graham, thank you so much for all of your advocacy for cellphone and Internet coverage in rural communities. I know it's something that you've been extremely dedicated to since you were first elected here.

With regard to smaller companies being able to access spectrum, there was actually a carve-out in the spectrum auction for rural and smaller communities. I think that's one of the ways we are able to help address the smaller companies that want to get into the marketplace.

It's something that we've heard about across the country, in terms of making sure that those companies have the ability to compete. We know that sometimes in rural communities, they are the people who have the vested interest in making sure that they are able to be part of the planning and the go-forward and making sure we provide good cellphone coverage and connectivity.

As we've said many times, this is not going to be a one-size-fits-all solution, but we do know that small companies have a huge role to play.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

I can add one thing to that. What we do hear from smaller companies when we are selling off spectrum is that we sell it in blocks that sometimes are not affordable for them. We are actually in the process of consulting on a smaller block size, so that these kinds of service providers can participate in spectrum acquisition.

(0920)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

By smaller blocks, do you mean narrower band or a narrow geographic area?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

Narrow geographic area.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's helpful. We have an Internet service co-operative in my riding and it would be wonderful if they could bid on cellphones to provide it to that county, as opposed to having to do the province or the country. That's what I'd like to get to.

You mentioned in your opening comments, Minister, about the stakeholder telcos stepping up. With respect to that, it has not been my experience with the stakeholder telcos. They have been remarkably reluctant to invest in rural areas if it is not profitable.

If you as a community or an individual wanted them to install infrastructure in your area—for example, one of my communities that has no cellphone service, and I'll get back to that in a second—and went to one of the larger telco companies, they might say sure they'll install a tower for you if you pay 100% of it. There isn't even a cost-sharing option. When they start making money off that tower, because there are 1,000 residents around it, there is no revenue sharing back to the community that brought it in.

It's the same thing with Internet service. If I want to bring in a fibre optic line three kilometres down the road from where I am to the nearest connection of any sort, it would cost me about $75,000. If the 20 or so houses between us start connecting, then all the revenues go back to the original company. There's no revenue sharing once you force the private to invest.

I don't agree that stakeholders are stepping up. I think they're actually quite frustrating and slowing us down, not accelerating us.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'd like to comment on that if I could.

As I've said, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. I would like to comment that in the fall economic statement, we allowed for the accelerated capital cost allowance, which has given the telcos the ability to invest money that they're basically saving because of that. We have actually seen a number of them stepping up and making sure that they are connecting rural communities because of that accelerated capital cost allowance.

I believe that one company has said it is going from 800,000 to 1.2 million connections because of it. Another one has already announced that it will be providing cellphone coverage on highways in British Columbia, as well as Nova Scotia, and that it has more rolling out.

So, we do see that the telcos are actually investing in rural communities because of that provision that we put in the fall economic statement. But, to your point earlier, I think the smaller companies have a large role to play as well. We see that as part of our go-forward plan for sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

One of the things about your appointment as minister is that you are under infrastructure. I think it's really important to put Internet and cellphone service as infrastructure instead of as service and I wanted to thank you for that.

The first Internet as an infrastructure project last year was in my riding, so I'm very proud of that fact.

I want to come back to Michael Chong's point from earlier. He talked about having access and affordability. Everyone has access to a Porsche, but not everybody can afford a Porsche. We have to be careful in what words we use. When we say everyone has access, it's really quite not true for huge communities that have nominal access to Internet. When you actually look at it, as I said, it's not realistic.

When we are telling the CRTC that competition is the be-all and end-all, I don't agree that it's necessarily the case. When we're telling them competition will solve all the problems, it won't. If you don't have any service at all, competition doesn't fix it.

What we need to get to—and again, this is more of a comment, but you're welcome to comment on it—is a paradigm where Internet costs the same in downtown Montreal or downtown Toronto as it does at the end of dirt roads, just like electricity does. We did this generations ago. There's no argument that it is 3.9¢ a kilowatt hour, or whatever it is where you are, here and in the country. As long as you have a hydro pole, you pay the same.

Can we get there for Internet and cellphone service? Can we get to where the service, the infrastructure, is what you're paying for, regardless of where you are?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

It's imperative that we make sure that high-speed Internet is affordable as well as available.

Right now, we're building the national strategy on connectivity. We will take all those things into consideration as we go forward with that, recognizing that rural Canadians should have the same access to the same services as people who live in urban Canada. You shouldn't be disadvantaged for living in a rural community. I believe that's one of the reasons I was appointed, because we recognize that there is a divide between rural and urban, and not just in connectivity but a lot of different things.

We need to make sure that people who want to live, work, grow businesses and raise families in rural Canada are able to do so just as easily as people who want to live in urban areas. I'm quite passionate about rural specifically, because I am from rural Canada myself and I can't imagine living anywhere else. I know we have to make sure that we can keep our young people there and that people who want to live in the area are able to do so.

(0925)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, and good luck.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd, for five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Minister and your department, for being here.

There's a saying that all politics is local, so I'll start out with a bit of local advocacy here.

Parkland County, which I represent a large swath of, was recently a finalist in the smart cities challenge by Infrastructure Canada. Also, in 2018, they were listed as an ICF Smart21 community in relation to its advances towards increasing rural connectivity and broadband.

In anticipation of this meeting, I messaged my local mayor, Rod Shaigec of Parkland County, and asked whether the federal government has been supportive through the connect to innovate program. His answer was that, so far, the federal government has not been supportive through the program. To quote him exactly, “It has been limited.”

They have made huge investments in building cellular towers throughout the community in trying to advance rural broadband for their area. I know this is an issue for places that are adjacent to cities across the country. You don't have to be somewhere north of 60 or far outside an urban area to have digital broadband access problems. As my colleague Michael Chong said, you could be right next to a thriving metropolis with adequate and affordable high-speed Internet, yet still have a dead zone equivalent to being near the North Pole. That's my local advocacy piece.

My next piece is that we had spoken to this motion in the previous committee. I brought up a similar motion last fall in the wake of the Ottawa tornadoes. There are a lot of things we can laud in the wake of this natural disaster in the Ottawa area, such as the effectiveness of our emergency alert management system. That's hugely important for all Canadians, but particularly rural Canadians who don't always get their local newspaper or don't have access to cable TV all the time. How do they get these essential warnings or alerts?

Perhaps you, in your capacity as minister, or your department can answer. Is there any movement on this and do you believe the government should set a minimum standard to ensure that cellular infrastructure can be powered independently in case of a natural disaster for a minimum standard period of time?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Actually, I met some of the people from your community at the smart cities challenge reception the other night. We had a good conversation and I look forward to continuing that with them.

With regard to their connectivity specifically, the program was a $500-million commitment that we leveraged dollar for dollar with stakeholders. Unfortunately, it was an oversubscribed program. We do have the top-up that was announced in budget 2019. We know there is no one-size-fits-all solution for everybody, but we are working very hard to make sure that we do connect all Canadians. Hopefully we can continue to work with Parkland County to make sure that this is something we can go forward with.

With regard to the cellphone and emergency signal specifically, it's funny, because somebody was saying that when they drive, they hit an area and then they have to stop. It's so much more than being able to talk hands-free. We know that it's critical infrastructure during emergencies such as fires and floods. We saw it with the tornado here in Ottawa. Making sure that it is available to people is critical.

We're building the infrastructure now to help mitigate that, to make sure that we have that ability to connect people. We know that ISED works closely with national security whenever there is a crisis, so that they can get things up and running as soon as possible, working with the military and working with public safety so that—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

If I could briefly interrupt, in the case of the Ottawa tornadoes, we had areas that do have adequate cellular access, but when an electrical station is hit—and there are independent generators at these stations—they only run for a short time. People were in areas that previously had cellphone access but because the electrical stations weren't up and running quickly, these cellphones weren't up to snuff.

Is the government looking at having a minimum standard to ensure that these cellular stations can run for a reasonable amount of time to ensure that our electricity system can get back up and running?

(0930)

The Chair:

Reply very briefly, please.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'm not aware of minimum standards at this point. It is up to telcos to make sure their infrastructure is up and running. However, as we go forward with the national connectivity strategy, that could be part of it. Thank you for the suggestion. We've written it down.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Amos.

You have five minutes, please.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to committee members for allowing me to join these proceedings.

Thank you, Minister, and the hard-working public servants who support you.

I know that the good people of Pontiac, hundreds of whom are evacuated right now, many of whom are supporting family members, community members who are in the direst of straits, are thinking about the immediate term, about cleaning up and getting their house back to normal.

The conversations have already started around what we can do to make sure that next year or the year after if it happens again we won't be in a situation where we can't pick up our phone and call our mayor or our neighbour and get a sandbag or get some clean water or...you can imagine the scenario. This conversation has been repeated several times, and I appreciate that we can't change the lack of action, lack of investment from previous governments and the private sector overnight. It takes time.

What confidence can we give rural Canada that when it comes to ensuring that critical infrastructure is available, particularly cellphone infrastructure in those places where there isn't access, the investments we're making are going to help us to build that up?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Amos, and thank you for your emotion as well.

Thank you to all members for supporting it.

It's extremely important to all of us across the country that we make sure that adequate cellphone coverage is available in situations like we've had recently with the flooding, the tornadoes, the fires. We've seen right across the country what's happening in the extreme weather events we're having. It's important that Canadians are able to feel they have access to being able to make those calls that you said are so important, even about how to get sandbags.

We're making sure as we build this infrastructure that connects Canadians that we're building it for the future, that the investments we're making are going to be for critical infrastructure. People in urban areas don't understand the difference between having coverage and not having coverage until you put it down to something as critical as making sure you're able to make that 911 call if you have to.

Some of the investments we've already made in the telcos will be making a difference to cellphone coverage, investing in different highway systems, making sure they're connected. The infrastructure we're building for connect to innovate will help with our wireless component to make sure that cellphones are covered. We need to make sure we're aware of this as we go forward when we build the national connectivity strategy.

We're committed to making sure that Canadians have access to the services they need. It's very tough when you're in a situation like that and you're not able to get out that 911 call or the help you need. We know we have to continue to work to provide the service that most Canadians need and we've said right from the start that we're committed to making sure we get 100% coverage.

Mr. William Amos:

I really appreciate your saying that. I know that many rural communities across Canada right now are just wondering how this is going to help. In a similar vein, small communities, for example, like my small community of Waltham or the municipality of Pontiac have far fewer than 5,000 residents. They don't have the expertise necessarily to figure out how they can advance their local needs. If the big private telecom companies aren't willing to go there, they need the help to drive their own process forward. Thankfully, the Government of Canada has, through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, flowed funding so that municipalities can apply to have environmental assessments done, technical assessments so that they have the support necessary to inform infrastructure decisions.

Could it be contemplated that there would be flow-through funding to small municipalities that don't have that capacity or the technical expertise so that they can help advance their own cellular infrastructure and Internet infrastructure building agenda?

(0935)

The Chair:

A very brief answer, please.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

One thing we've done to help the small municipalities has been with the top-up of the gas tax fund. This year we doubled it so that they are able to access more money and they can use that for infrastructure in their communities no matter what that infrastructure is. There is also the $60 million that was given to FCM for asset management help so that people in rural communities, or all communities, can make sure that they know what needs to be done in terms of maintaining their infrastructure; that they have good-quality infrastructure not only for what they are building but also for what is existing. These are all things that we've been doing. By recognizing also that small municipalities have oftentimes a more difficult challenge with accessing funds because of the application process, we're trying to help them in different ways with that as well.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will move to Mr. Albas.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and officials, for the work you do.

We know through the Auditor General's report last fall that the connect to innovate program has been a disaster. He found specifically that there was not good value for the money spent. Now we see that of the 892 applicants applying for the money under this program, 532 have not even heard back.

Minister, the application process closed two years ago. How is it possible that 532 applicants have still not been contacted to let them know their status?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

First of all, thank you, Mr. Albas.

We accepted the Auditor General's report as well as the recommendations and thanked them for that. The program itself, connect to innovate, is going to be connecting 900 communities, which is three times the number that we had originally anticipated. We were able to also double the investment in the connect to innovate program, dollar for dollar, so we were actually able to do a lot more than we had planned.

With regard to the program itself, we learn from things that we do. It's always a learning process. We also saw that in budget 2019 there was a top-up of that fund—

Mr. Dan Albas:

But, Minister, none of that is new money—

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Excuse me, if I can—

Mr. Dan Albas:

The question I specifically asked is regarding 532 people who have not been told. Minister, yes, the people who were successful I'm sure are very happy with that, but by the same token, 532 people, two years out, have not been told.

Are you going to be able to apologize on behalf of the government because many of them may have gone on their own and are still waiting to hear from you as to whether or not they can go forward?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

The connect to innovate program was extremely popular with people. It was oversubscribed. That's one of the reasons we put new money in the budget, to make sure that we could top up that fund. We know there are people who need to be connected. That's one of the reasons we've committed to ambitious targets: 90% by 2021, 95% by 2026 and 100% by 2030. We know that Canadians need to be connected. There is no one-size-fits-all or one program that's going to do that. That's the reason we're making sure that we're looking at a lot of different options to connect Canadians. It will be our vision as we go forward.

Mr. Dan Albas:

My colleague asked earlier about what the status of the program was, and I have to say, Mr. Chair, the results were incredible. The information from your government shows that under 10%—10% of the funding for approved projects—has actually been paid. Now, Minister, many of these projects had start dates in 2017 and yet no money has been paid. Again, how is that even possible?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

On the program itself, once the approval process is completed, there is a lot of engineering work and planning that needs to be done. You don't build infrastructure quickly, as I'm sure you're aware. We know that 85% of the projects will have shovels in the ground this summer. We know that it has sometimes been a little bit longer than people would like to see, but it also takes time to make the designs for these communities.

We're making sure that we're not just building band-aid solutions. We're building this for the future. We want to make sure that the programs and the infrastructure that we build are scalable and able to meet the needs as we go forward.

Quite frankly, far too often, there have been band-aid solutions to things, and we don't want to see that anymore. We want to make sure when we're building this infrastructure that it's something we can use well into the future and meets the target of 50/10.

(0940)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Minister, people see that there's $17.7 million for projects in the County of Kings in Nova Scotia, and the project start date was supposed to be May 1, 2017, but the actual amount of funding provided to date is zero. I can refer to a whole host of different projects in Newfoundland, in Inuvik, and elsewhere.

I think it's very clear. You said earlier that you plan to have more of these things done in the summer. Your government wanted to announce these projects initially, and then you waited to spend the money so that you could reannounce them before the upcoming election. I think, Minister, that the Canadian public will see through that ruse.

Will the Liberals be making any announcements in the media around already announced projects?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

The contribution agreements that have been signed with these companies are when the programs start. They have to build the plans for this. They have to hire the people. They have to make sure that they have the plan in place. They have contribution agreements that they have to meet milestones with.

The agreements that have been signed are rolling out. When you look at every application, they are different, and they do have to meet milestones along the way in order to do that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

And after announcements, Minister, that's very politically convenient.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister, and congratulations on your appointment as the first Minister of Rural Economic Development for Canada. I think that underlines and highlights the commitment to the people of rural Canada. Obviously you're right in there, rolling up your sleeves. I appreciate that.

To Will Amos, the member for Pontiac, congratulations on your motion.

I would be remiss, Minister, not to mention the member for Nickel Belt, who was appointed as your parliamentary secretary.

I am from Sault Ste. Marie, in northern Ontario. Northern Ontario is 90% of the land mass of Ontario, and there are a number of geographical issues and a number of remoteness issues, but I'm not going to delve into those. I am going to specifically talk about first nations.

There was an announcement recently under the previous program. Matawa First Nations Management connects four or five remote first nations in the Ring of Fire. It was important to do that for education, health care and remoteness. You know that there are first nations that deal with high rates of suicide because of their remoteness, and one of the things we've read about is the ability to connect people. The ability for people to support one other is important.

Bernadette, with that, I want to also talk about something you alluded to about the private-public sector partnership, because the private sector is involved up there. This is just a general statement. How important is it to you philosophically for the private sector to be involved, not only the big ones but the small and medium-sized enterprises across Canada and in northern Ontario?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Sheehan.

With regard to indigenous communities, 190 of the connect to innovate program approvals were for indigenous communities. I think that's quite a significant amount and it's something I'm happy to see. Like you said, we know that in some of our more remote regions specifically, there are a lot of challenges. People there rely on the Internet for things like health care and support, so it's extremely important.

With regard to your question about small and medium-sized companies, I've seen such great, innovative programs coming out of smaller areas from these small companies. It's because they have a vested interest in their communities and they want to make sure that their communities are connected. Sometimes it's things like co-operatives. Other times it's municipalities that have started their own ISPs. I think it's extremely important to have them at the table as part of the conversations we are having with regard to connectivity.

I know that we have to look at...as I've said many times already today, there's no one-size-fits-all solution. Sometimes the best service will come from those smaller organizations. Sometimes it's going to come from the bigger companies. No matter how it comes about, though, it has to happen. I think that's the main thing I'd like to say: No matter who is connecting, we have to connect.

This isn't about a luxury anymore. This isn't about people binge-watching Netflix, although if that's what they want to do, that's great. This is about health care. This is about education. This is about banking. It's about growing businesses. It's about not having to go into a store. I was recently in a place in a rural area and I went to use my debit card. They said “Let's hope the phone doesn't ring.” They were still on dial-up. I mean, how do you grow a business when you don't have access to good-quality high-speed Internet? It's about safety.

All of the things you are saying are correct in terms of making sure we have all different partners at the table. We look at all different options when it comes to connecting people, but the ultimate goal is to connect them.

(0945)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

I'm going to share my time with the parliamentary secretary for innovation.

The Chair:

You have about a minute left. [Translation]

Mr. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

I, myself, am an example of someone in a rural area who has Internet connectivity issues. I have to be in a specific spot in my home in order to get cell phone service, and thus make and receive calls. In the mornings, if I want to check La Presse for the news, and one of my four sons is online doing homework, I have to tell him, or yell out to him, to get off the Internet so that I can access La Presse. It's a problem.

Now, there's light at the end of the tunnel. The $500 million that we've invested in the Connect to Innovate program is going to ensure all 58 municipalities in my riding have access to high-speed Internet at 50 megabytes per second. The installation work has already begun and will continue until next year. Now, we have ambitious goals.

Given all the funding that is now available, specifically, for infrastructure and the CRTC, how is everything coming together to continue the expansion of high-speed Internet connectivity further to your vision? [English]

The Chair:

Very briefly, please.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

With regard to the national connectivity strategy, we're working right now with all our partners to make sure that we look at all of the options available for funding. We want to make sure that we don't develop programs in silos, and that we look at umbrellas and at how we can best serve all members and what program is best for each area.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you.

For the final two minutes, we'll go to Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Amos' motion was a good motion. I'm happy to support it.

Motions can become law in regulation. My motion on microbeads did that and the previous government actually made it law.

How much of Mr. Amos' motion are you making law, and which sections, if not all?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Masse.

You're right, motions can become law. I had one myself that became the abandoned and derelict vessels law—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, and I worked with Sheila Malcolmson on that.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

—and I was very happy to see that happen.

With regard to Mr. Amos' motion, right now, we're looking at a broad range of ways we can address concerns with cellphone coverage and specifically with broadband.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Are you making it law? That's what I want to know.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I personally do not have any legislation in the works at the moment.

Mr. Brian Masse:

What about through regulation?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

That does not mean to say that it can't be. That does not mean to say that as we go forward with a national connectivity strategy and how we develop our cellphone coverage that we wouldn't look at how that would go.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Why wouldn't the government make this law? What would be holding it up, especially section (c)?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'm sorry. Section (c)?

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm sorry. Section (c) is about equality for “rural and remote” areas. You shouldn't be expected to know exactly what.... It's rural and remote connectivity, that's what it is, and it's about equality for those two. Why not make that law?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

We've actually committed to making sure that we look at rural and remote connectivity. It's something that we've committed to financially. It's something that we've committed to with a minister to look after it. I think it's obvious that as a government we take this very seriously and that we're making sure when we roll out programs we look at them and make sure connectivity is part of that—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Has there been analysis about making it law, though? Has the department done an analysis of that?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

At this point I would say no, but that's not to say that it can't happen.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay. Thanks. I'm just trying to drill down into that.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan: Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister, to you and to your officials for being here today with us to talk about M-208.

We are going to suspend for a quick two minutes because we have a lot of work to come back to.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0845)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Soyez tous les bienvenus. Je vous remercie de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 8 mai 2019, le Comité étudie le projet de loi M-208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons l'honorable Bernadette Jordan, ministre du Développement économique rural, ainsi que ses hauts fonctionnaires. La représentante du Bureau de l'infrastructure du Canada est Mme Kelly Gillis, sous-ministre, Infrastructure et collectivités, et la représentante du ministère de l'Industrie est Mme Lisa Setlakwe, sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation.

Madame la ministre, la parole est à vous pendant 10 minutes.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan (ministre du Développement économique rural):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais d'abord souligner que nous sommes rassemblés sur le territoire traditionnel non cédé du peuple algonquin.

Comme vous l'avez dit, monsieur le président, je suis accompagnée de Mme Kelly Gillis, ma sous-ministre, et de Mme Lisa... Pardon, je ne prononce jamais votre nom correctement.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe (sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation, ministère de l'Industrie):

Setlakwe.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Setlakwe.

Merci. Pardon.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe est sous-ministre principale, Stratégie et Innovation, à ISDE.

J'aimerais remercier les distingués membres du Comité de me donner l'occasion de les informer des efforts déployés par notre gouvernement pour offrir un service Internet haute vitesse et un service mobile sans fil aux millions de Canadiens qui vivent dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

Je tiens tout d'abord à souligner le travail précieux que le Comité a réalisé, et qu'il continue de réaliser, pour nous aider à mieux comprendre cette question complexe et d'une importance vitale.

Depuis le premier jour, le gouvernement travaille pour faire en sorte que tous les Canadiens aient des chances égales de réussir, peu importe où ils vivent. Et je sais que le Comité partage cet objectif, tout comme l'ensemble des députés. L'appui unanime que la Chambre a accordé à la motion de M. Amos démontre aux partenaires du gouvernement et du secteur privé qui travaillent ensemble pour combler le déficit en matière de services Internet et sans-fil dans l'ensemble du pays qu'il existe une réelle détermination à atteindre cet important objectif.

Depuis janvier, moment où je suis devenue la toute première ministre du Développement économique rural du Canada, j'ai rencontré des Canadiens de tous les horizons dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées de tout le pays, et j'ai discuté avec eux.

Ayant moi-même fait l'expérience de la vie en milieu rural en Nouvelle-Écosse, j'ai vu comment les Canadiens des régions rurales font de notre pays un endroit plus dynamique et plus prospère où il fait bon vivre et travailler.

Même si elles sont peu peuplées, les collectivités rurales représentent environ 30 % du produit intérieur brut du pays. Elles sont les moteurs des secteurs des ressources naturelles et de l'agriculture du Canada, et elles sont soutenues par des travailleurs dévoués qui sont profondément engagés envers leurs collectivités.

Dans la lettre de mandat qu'il m'a adressée, le premier ministre m'a demandé d'élaborer une stratégie de développement économique rural.

Depuis que j'ai commencé à voyager dans tout le pays en janvier, j'ai écouté et appris, et bien que chaque collectivité soit unique et confrontée à des défis différents, le besoin d'être branché est la priorité numéro un qui figure sur la plupart de leurs listes.

On en est aux dernières étapes de l'élaboration de notre Stratégie de développement économique rural, et je peux vous assurer qu'elle tiendra pleinement compte des préoccupations que j'ai entendues à maintes reprises au cours de mes voyages au sujet des services à large bande et sans-fil. Nous savons qu'en ce qui concerne les infrastructures numériques, il existe de grandes disparités dans notre pays entre le monde rural et le monde urbain. Et j'aimerais prendre quelques instants pour examiner certaines de ces disparités.

Alors que neuf ménages urbains sur 10 ont accès à un service Internet haute vitesse, seulement un ménage rural sur trois dispose d'un même accès. L'absence de services haute vitesse a pour conséquence que les collectivités rurales n'ont pas accès aux services essentiels que les Canadiens des milieux urbains tiennent pour acquis. Cela signifie que des Canadiens ne peuvent pas vendre leurs produits et services en ligne. Ils doivent avoir recours aux services gouvernementaux par téléphone plutôt qu'en ligne. De nombreux agriculteurs qui ont des entreprises agricoles de plusieurs millions de dollars dépendent encore des téléphones et des télécopieurs pour mener leurs activités. Ces réalités ont une réelle incidence sur les résidents du Canada rural et, dans certains cas, ils sont laissés pour compte.

Il nous incombe, à titre de gouvernement fédéral, de travailler avec nos partenaires provinciaux, territoriaux et du secteur privé en vue de combler le fossé.

Le fossé dont nous parlons n'existe pas uniquement dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées. Il existe également sur certaines de nos routes et autoroutes qui ne sont pas desservies par le service mobile sans fil. Ce manque de connectivité sur les routes est un défi de taille pour ceux qui travaillent dans l'industrie du transport, comme les camionneurs, et représente un risque pour la sécurité publique, particulièrement pour les Canadiens des régions rurales, qui doivent pouvoir communiquer le long des routes, sur les terres et dans les zones naturelles éloignées.

La couverture sans fil est également essentielle au Système national d'alertes au public, qui dépend des services sans fil pour transmettre les alertes d'urgence aux Canadiens.

Sur un plan plus général, les services mobiles sans fil sont aussi importants pour les collectivités rurales que pour les collectivités urbaines, tant pour le développement économique que pour l'utilisation personnelle. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons annoncé la Déduction pour amortissement accéléré, qui aide les entreprises de télécommunications à investir dans les régions rurales du Canada. Comme l'ont annoncé Bell, Rogers, Shaw, Telus et Xplornet, ce changement permettra de connecter des milliers de personnes chez eux, et d'offrir une couverture cellulaire le long des axes routiers du pays où il n'y en a pas pour l'instant.

En ce qui concerne l'accès à large bande et l'accès sans fil mobile, ce fossé numérique empêche les Canadiens des régions rurales de participer pleinement au monde numérique et mondialisé. Dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover, nous étendons l'accès Internet haute vitesse à 900 collectivités rurales et éloignées et à environ 380 000 ménages, pour commencer. Cela comprend 190 collectivités autochtones partout au Canada. Ce programme ouvre la voie à des investissements accrus d'un océan à l'autre.

Depuis le lancement du programme Brancher pour innover dans le budget de 2016, le gouvernement a obtenu 554 millions de dollars du secteur privé et d'autres ordres de gouvernement pour environ 180 projets. Ces projets amélioreront la connectivité Internet pour ces 380 000 ménages et 900 collectivités, soit plus du triple des 300 collectivités initialement ciblées. Au total, 20 000 kilomètres de réseau de fibre optique seront installés dans tout le Canada au titre du programme Brancher pour innover.

(0850)



Nous connectons les ménages et les entreprises, les écoles et les hôpitaux, et nous soutenons les réseaux mobiles sans fil. Nous sommes en train d'établir des connexions par fibre optique au point le plus au nord de tout le Canada.

Ces investissements montrent que notre gouvernement reconnaît que l'accès à Internet haute vitesse et au service mobile sans fil n'est pas un luxe, mais une nécessité. Ces investissements se poursuivront.

Dans le budget de 2019, notre gouvernement a pris un nouvel engagement ambitieux pour s'assurer qu'au fil du temps, tous les ménages et toutes les entreprises du Canada auront accès à la connectivité haute vitesse. Comme vous le savez, nous prévoyons que 95 p. 100 du pays sera connecté d'ici 2026, et que d'ici 2030, nous atteindrons les 100 p. cent.

Nous investissons aujourd'hui dans les technologies de demain, comme le 5G et la capacité des satellites en orbite basse. Le budget a annoncé de nouveaux investissements de 1,7 milliard de dollars dans les services à large bande, ce qui comprend un nouveau Fonds pour la large bande universelle et un complément au programme Brancher pour innover qui sera axé sur la mise en place d'infrastructures de base dans les collectivités mal desservies. Dans le cas des collectivités les plus difficiles à joindre, le financement peut être utilisé pour permettre les raccordements de dernier kilomètre à des résidences et entreprises individuelles.

La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada cherchera à investir jusqu'à un milliard de dollars au cours des dix prochaines années et à mobiliser au moins deux milliards de dollars en capitaux privés pour accroître l'accès à large bande pour les Canadiens. Le Régime de financement de la large bande de 750 millions de dollars du CRTC — régime qui a été lancé l'automne dernier — permettra d'améliorer les services de connectivité partout au pays, y compris les services mobiles sans fil. Les projets d'infrastructure à large bande sont également admissibles à un financement dans le cadre du volet Collectivités rurales et nordiques du programme d'infrastructure Investir dans le Canada. L'enveloppe de ce volet est de 2 milliards de dollars.

Nous comprenons que notre succès dépend non seulement de l'engagement de notre gouvernement à investir, mais aussi de celui de nos partenaires provinciaux, territoriaux et du secteur privé. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons créé la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, qui sonde actuellement les possibilités d'attirer des investissements du secteur privé dans des projets d'infrastructure Internet haute vitesse pour les collectivités non desservies et mal desservies.

Dans l'ensemble, le budget de 2019 propose un nouveau plan coordonné qui prévoit des investissements de 5 à 6 milliards de dollars dans les services à large bande en milieu rural au cours des 10 prochaines années pour aider à bâtir un Canada entièrement branché.

Afin d'assurer une efficacité et une coordination maximales et d'offrir le maximum d'avantages aux Canadiens mal desservis, les fonctionnaires sont en train de rédiger une stratégie nationale de connectivité qui favorise la collaboration et l'investissement efficace des fonds publics. Cette stratégie définira des objectifs et des cibles clairs par rapport auxquels les progrès pourront être mesurés; elle fournira un outil pour orienter les efforts et améliorer les résultats pour l'ensemble des foyers, des entreprises, des institutions publiques et des peuples autochtones du Canada; et elle établira un mécanisme de reddition de comptes et de responsabilité pour tous les ordres de gouvernement afin d'assurer qu'ils contribueront à éliminer le fossé numérique.

Je suis fière de faire partie d'un gouvernement qui reconnaît que l'édification de notre réseau Internet haute vitesse national est aussi importante que la construction de nos routes. C'est ainsi que nous veillerons à ce que tous les Canadiens aient des chances égales de réussir, quel que soit l'endroit où ils vivent.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de prendre la parole devant le Comité. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

(0855)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par M. Longfield, pour sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre Jordan, c'est un plaisir de vous voir ici pour représenter le Canada rural.

J'imagine les problèmes auxquels la Nouvelle-Écosse doit faire face. Le Canada rural, c'est aussi les zones maritimes situées au large des terres. On n'a qu'à penser aux gens à bord des navires qui essaient de communiquer avec la côte.

Je pense à l'Ontario rural. Je dirigeais une entreprise à Welland. J'essayais de faire en sorte que l'Internet haute vitesse arrive jusqu'à mon entreprise et le dernier bout de ligne m'aurait coûté 75 000 $. Je me connectais à notre bureau en Allemagne et à nos bureaux aux États-Unis, je mettais à niveau notre technologie et j'embauchais du personnel. Sauf que j'avais cet obstacle qui limitait la croissance. Nous savons que c'est bien réel.

Pourriez-vous nous parler de ce que la collaboration avec d'autres ordres de gouvernement pourrait fournir? Il y a le projet SWIFT, que nous avons étudié ici, au Comité, au moyen duquel l'Ontario, le gouvernement du Canada et l'industrie privée tentent de rejoindre le Canada rural. Dans quelle mesure est-il important que nous ayons des partenaires d'autres ordres de gouvernement disposés à s'asseoir à la table?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Longfield.

Vous avez fait valoir des arguments pertinents quant à l'importance pour les entreprises d'avoir une bonne connexion. Leur croissance en dépend. Je viens d'une collectivité de pêcheurs, et nous savons que l'accès aux marchés internationaux est extrêmement important. C'est la même chose pour l'agriculture. Nous savons que, dans les régions rurales du Canada, l'accès aux services à large bande est absolument essentiel pour permettre aux entreprises de continuer à croître et d'être concurrentielles sur la scène mondiale.

Pour ce qui est de la façon d'y parvenir, nous avons besoin de tous les partenaires autour de la table. Cela comprendrait le gouvernement fédéral et nos partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux, ainsi que les regroupements de parties concernées. Dans certains cas, les municipalités intensifient leurs efforts parce qu'elles réalisent à quel point il est important pour elles d'avoir cette connectivité. Il n'y a pas de solution universelle. Je pense que chaque région doit être examinée individuellement, mais aussi en reconnaissant que cela doit se faire dans le cadre d'une approche pangouvernementale et pancanadienne.

Nous avons eu beaucoup de chance. Depuis ma nomination en janvier dernier, j'ai voyagé d'un bout à l'autre du pays et j'ai rencontré des représentants de collectivités d'un océan à l'autre. Or, peu importe où je vais, peu importe où je me trouve au pays, c'est la priorité numéro un dont on nous parle. Dans mes collaborations avec mes partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux, c'est aussi la priorité numéro un. Tout le monde reconnaît que c'est quelque chose qui doit être fait, et je suis heureux de dire que, dans la plupart des cas, nos partenaires sont d'accord. Ils veulent que nous nous assurions de brancher tous les Canadiens sans exception.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Vous avez parlé des partenaires municipaux. Je pense au trajet que je devais faire de Welland à Guelph: 131 kilomètres par jour pour aller travailler. J'avais du temps dans la voiture pour des appels mains libres, mais je savais que dès que j'atteindrais un certain pont sur la route 20, mon signal allait couper. Je devais donc interrompre ma conversation et dire: « Je vous rappellerai quand j'arriverai à la grange de l'autre côté de la crique. »

J'ai visité certaines des fermes de la région. Il y a des fermes de production d'oeufs qui font un travail incroyable sur le plan des données. Elles mesurent l'épaisseur et la composition de la coquille en fonction des aliments que les poules consomment et elles veillent au bien-être de leurs animaux en contrôlant l'abreuvement et l'état des poules pendant la ponte. Pour ces entreprises, le contact avec le monde extérieur est primordial.

Souvent, les partenaires municipaux n'ont pas de ressources. Ce sont de petites collectivités. Pour ne choisir qu'un exemple, disons que Grimsby, en Ontario, ce n'est pas la même chose que Toronto. Alors, encore une fois, il faut qu'il y ait un appui pour nous et pour nos partenaires provinciaux. Pourriez-vous nous parler du renforcement des capacités au sein de ces petites collectivités?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Vous avez raison. Il y a des petites municipalités qui n'en ont tout simplement pas les moyens, mais il y en a d'autres qui en font une priorité et qui montent leur budget en conséquence. Je vous dirais que nous avons beaucoup de chance parce que le Fonds des collectivités rurales et nordiques, qui fait partie du portefeuille d'Infrastructure Canada, s'applique aux projets de connectivité. Nous avons également facilité l'accès de ce fonds pour les petites collectivités en abaissant le coût de leur contribution.

Ce sont des choses que j'estime très importantes pour nous mettre à l'écoute des collectivités rurales, parce que la connectivité coûte cher, mais les dirigeants des municipalités sont conscients de son importance pour leur viabilité. Nous devons aussi veiller à ce que nos homologues des provinces fassent leur bout de chemin. Bien souvent, ils le font déjà. Dans diverses provinces, il y a des crédits budgétaires pour le développement des services à large bande. Ensuite, bien sûr, il y a toute la question des sociétés de télécommunication. Elles sont là, elles aussi, tout comme le CRTC. Il y différents fonds offerts.

Je pense que partout au pays, dans toutes les sphères, tout le monde veut assurer la connectivité des collectivités rurales au Canada.

(0900)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Pour ce qui est de la stratégie que vous êtes en train d'élaborer et de votre collaboration avec les autres ministres, vous avez un nouveau ministère, et nous avons aussi une nouvelle ministre, la ministre Ng, à la tête du nouveau ministère de la Petite Entreprise et de la Promotion des exportations. Cela touche également le ministre Bains, bien sûr, de même que la ministre Bibeau, à l'Agriculture. Comment les ministres collaborent-ils à l'élaboration de stratégies?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

C'est une très bonne question.

Depuis ma nomination, je me suis beaucoup appliquée à parcourir le pays pour aller discuter avec nos homologues des provinces et des municipalités, mais nous reconnaissons aussi qu'il doit y avoir une approche pangouvernementale. Il y a 21 ministères différents qui ont participé à l'élaboration de notre stratégie et qui travaillent à la connectivité nationale. Nous reconnaissons qu'il n'y a pas qu'un portefeuille qui est touché, qu'ils le sont tous. On peut penser aux ressources naturelles, à l'agriculture, aux pêches, au développement économique, aux exportations, au Tourisme. Il y a vraiment beaucoup de ministères qui doivent être mis à contribution pour établir un plan national de connectivité qui tienne la route et pour que nous puissions atteindre toutes les cibles que nous nous serons fixées.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

De même, le temps est compté. Il l'est aujourd'hui, mais il nous reste aussi très peu de temps devant nous. J'espère que nous pourrons parvenir à quelque chose avant la fin de la législature, pour que le prochain gouvernement puisse continuer le travail amorcé.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Nous avons toujours été déterminés à accroître la connectivité. Cela a commencé par le programme Brancher pour innover annoncé dans le budget de 2016. Celui-ci permettra de brancher 900 collectivités, soit trois fois plus que le nombre prévu au départ. On parle de 380 000 ménages.

Il y a également un financement complémentaire qui a été annoncé pour ce programme en 2019. Bien sûr, le fonds pour la large bande universelle que nous sommes en train de mettre sur pied contribuera aussi à l'atteinte de l'objectif.

Merci.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Passons à M. Chong.

Vous avez sept minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui pour parler de cet enjeu important. Je pense que nos circonscriptions de South Shore—St. Margarets et des régions rurales du comté de Wellington et de Halton se ressemblent beaucoup.

J'inviterais le gouvernement à viser non seulement à assurer l'accessibilité à Internet dans les régions rurales, mais également à veiller à ce que les services offerts soient abordables. Quand on dit que seulement le tiers des Canadiens ont accès à Internet haute vitesse en région rurale, je pense qu'il serait plus exact de dire que le tiers des Canadiens a accès à Internet haute vitesse à prix abordable en région rurale. Ils sont beaucoup plus nombreux à avoir accès à Internet, mais ils choisissent de ne pas le faire installer parce qu'il coûte beaucoup trop cher.

Je l'ai mentionné lors de la dernière réunion du Comité, et je le répéterai. Un habitant de la ville de Guelph peut obtenir 100 gigaoctets de services Internet haute vitesse pour 49,99 $ par mois. Il peut obtenir l'accès illimité à Internet haute vitesse pour 69,99 $. En revanche, à deux kilomètres de la ville, dans le comté rural de Wellington, il faut payer 300 $ par mois pour obtenir 100 gigaoctets de données avec Internet haute vitesse. Pour 200 gigaoctets en haute vitesse, ce qui n'est pas déraisonnable pour une famille de quatre enfants d'âge secondaire qui ont besoin des ressources en ligne pour faire leurs devoirs, il en coûtera 500 $, 600 $ ou 700 $ par mois. C'est évidemment bien trop cher et même hors de prix pour la plupart des familles rurales, si bien qu'elles choisissent de ne pas prendre le service, parce que qui paiera 600 $ par mois pour 200 gigaoctets de données? Cela fait 7 200 $ par année, plus taxes. C'est exorbitant.

Je pense que c'est le grand problème, encore plus que l'accès à Internet en région rurale. C'est la principale plainte que j'entends dans le Nord de la région de Halton et dans le Sud du comté de Wellington. Les gens me disent qu'effectivement, ils pourraient avoir accès à Internet, mais comment sont-ils censés pouvoir payer une facture de 500 $ par mois. C'est encore plus vrai quand on sait que dans les Maritimes, les gens n'ont pas accès au gaz naturel, pas plus que chez nous, d'ailleurs, et qu'il en coûte 1 000 $ par mois pour se chauffer au mazout. Le marché ne fonctionne pas pour ces consommateurs des régions rurales.

Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas fait comme les Canadiens de l'Ouest, qui ont rendu le gaz naturel accessible dans toutes les Prairies, toutes les résidences rurales, et nous n'avons pas fait ce que Bell a fait pour le le téléphone en offrant l'accès à Internet haute vitesse à tous les ménages ruraux lorsque nous avons commencé à offrir le service dans les villes. C'est ce qui explique qu'aujourd'hui, la plupart des familles des régions rurales n'ont pas accès à Internet haute vitesse à prix abordable. Comme je l'ai dit, qui paiera 600 $ par mois, plus taxes, pour 200 gigaoctets de données en haute vitesse?

Je pense que c'est un enjeu tout aussi important que l'accès à la haute vitesse. Je porte la question à votre attention, parce que cela me semble tout aussi important, voire plus, que d'assurer l'accès à Internet haute vitesse.

(0905)

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Chong, vous avez absolument raison. Nous avons entendu la même chose partout au pays. Il ne suffit pas d'avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse, il faut pouvoir se payer les services, et les habitants du Canada rural sont désavantagés sur le plan des coûts et du mode de paiement.

Avant de laisser la parole à Lisa sur cette question, je vous dirai que le ministre Bains a demandé au CRTC de se pencher sur la compétitivité des entreprises de télécommunications, et nous espérons qu'en améliorant la concurrence dans ce domaine, nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix.

J'aimerais demander à Lisa de vous parler un peu de l'état de la situation.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Concernant la directive stratégique, comme vous le savez, le ministre souhaite émettre une directive à l'intention du CRTC. C'est en grande partie pour répondre aux besoins que vous venez d'exposer, soit la concurrence et l'abordabilité. Nous demandons au CRTC d'examiner les questions qui relèvent de sa compétence du point de vue des consommateurs avant tout lorsqu'il doit prendre des décisions stratégiques. Cela signifie de tenir compte de l'abordabilité, des droits des consommateurs, puis de favoriser la concurrence et l'innovation. Le processus est lancé. Nous sommes ouverts aux commentaires à ce sujet.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Certainement, j'ajouterai une chose.

Certains prétendent qu'on peut payer moins cher que 600 $ par mois pour 200 gigaoctets. Le problème, c'est que ce n'est pas pour un accès Internet à faible latence et haute vitesse. Le problème des technologies satellites, c'est leur grande latence. Le problème de l'accès Internet par faisceaux hertziens en visibilité directe, c'est qu'il n'est pas aussi fiable.

Vraiment, pour bénéficier d'un accès à Internet haute vitesse fiable, la meilleure technologie en région rurale est l'accès mobile à haute vitesse, soit les services cellulaires, des produits souvent offerts sous des noms comme la station Turbo chez Bell ou la Centrale sans fil chez Rogers. Ces technologies donnent accès à des services Internet haute vitesse fiables à faible latence. Le problème, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, c'est qu'elles coûtent excessivement cher.

La plupart des consommateurs des régions rurales que je connais, s'ils ne peuvent avoir accès à Internet grâce à ces services à l'heure actuelle, préféreraient de loin payer entre 500 $ et 1 000 $ une fois pour l'installation d'une grosse antenne munie d'une antenne Yagi pour amplifier le signal au moyen d'un câble coaxial relié à la station Turbo ou à la Centrale sans fil de Bell ou de Rogers. Ils préféreraient de loin payer des frais uniques d'installation. Le problème, c'est que personne ne veut payer des frais mensuels de 600 $ et plus pour un maigre 200 gigaoctets de données de base.

C'est l'abordabilité, le problème. La vaste majorité des ménages vit dans le rayon d'une station de base, et si le signal n'est pas assez fort, ces gens seraient tout à fait prêts à payer des frais ponctuels de 500 $ pour l'installation d'une antenne d'amplification sur leur toit. Par contre, des frais récurrents de 600 ou 700 $ par mois pour 200 gigaoctets de données sont hors de prix pour la grande majorité des familles.

Nous pourrions installer un plus grand nombre de stations de base, par exemple, mais tant que les prix de ces forfaits seront si hauts, personne ne pourra se les permettre.

Le président:

Je vous prierais de répondre brièvement à cela.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Je ferai quelques observations.

Premièrement, nous savons qu'il n'y a pas de solution unique pour tous en matière de connectivité, mais qu'il est extrêmement important de nous assurer l'accès à des services abordables et fiables.

Nous étudions des technologies comme celles des satellites en orbite basse (les satellites LEO), de la fibre optique, des stations de base. La façon de se brancher au réseau dépendra de l'endroit où la personne se trouve.

De même, en collaboration avec le CRTC, compte tenu de la tâche qui lui a été confiée, nous espérons pouvoir offrir à tous les Canadiens un meilleur accès à Internet à un coût plus abordable.

(0910)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Masse.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Merci, madame la ministre, d'être ici aujourd'hui.

La mise aux enchères dans la bande de 700 mégahertz pour les services mobiles est probablement l'une de celles qui a connu le plus de succès dans l'histoire canadienne. Des entreprises comme Telus ont payé plus d'un milliard de dollars pour obtenir leur part du gâteau. SaskTel a payé près d'un milliard de dollars et Rogers, plus de 3 milliards. En tout, elle a rapporté 5 milliards de dollars, dont 300 millions ont été attribués au gouvernement. Quelle part de cet argent, des plus de 5 milliards que le gouvernement a reçus, a servi à l'expansion du réseau à large bande?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Masse, les sommes tirées des mises aux enchères font partie des recettes générales du gouvernement, qui servent à payer beaucoup de programmes différents. Bien sûr, nous investissons beaucoup dans la large bande et Internet haute vitesse.

Le budget de cette année prévoit 1,7 milliard de dollars pour la large bande à haute vitesse.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous parlez du budget de cette année, mais je vous interroge sur les sommes perçues par votre gouvernement avant cela, sur les 5 milliards de dollars. Vous avez annoncé 1,7 milliard de dollars sur 13 ans, en fait, et c'est un autre gouvernement qui en héritera, le vôtre ou un autre.

Que votre gouvernement a-t-il fait des produits de la mise aux enchères de 2015, qui a rapporté une somme nette de 2,1 milliards de dollars? Où sont allés ces 2,1 milliards de dollars? Y en a-t-il une partie qui a servi à financer la large bande en région rurale?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

L'argent recueilli lors de mises aux enchères fait partie de nos recettes générales. Les recettes générales servent, bien sûr, à financer la large bande, entre autres, de même que toutes sortes d'autres services et de programmes du gouvernement. Cet argent fait partie des recettes générales.

M. Brian Masse:

Elles comprennent donc les fruits de l'autre mise aux enchères faite en 2015, les enchères du spectre de la bande de 2 500 mégahertz, qui a rapporté 1 milliard de dollars elle aussi. Il y a également eu les enchères des licences de spectre restantes dans les bandes de 700 mégahertz.

Au total, les Canadiens ont reçu de leur gouvernement plus de 14 milliards de dollars grâce aux enchères du spectre au cours des dernières années. Il est donc incroyable que malgré une entrée de revenus de 14 milliards de dollars, nous ayons toujours des prix exorbitants et une couverture médiocre dans les régions rurales. Pourquoi est-ce ainsi, d'après vous? Nous avons reçu des sommes records d'argent imprévu, qui n'était affecté à rien de particulier.

Pour ceux qui ne le savent pas, lorsqu'on tient des enchères du spectre, on se trouve à vendre des droits de propriété terrestres et aériens. C'est comme pour l'eau. C'est à coût nul pour le gouvernement canadien, donc ce sont purement des revenus pour lui.

Pourquoi croyez-vous que ces ressources n'ont pas été affectées à la large bande en région rurale, surtout compte tenu des prix élevés auxquels nous faisons face?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Nous avons investi beaucoup dans la large bande en région rurale depuis notre élection. Les revenus tirés des enchères du spectre font partie des recettes générales, qui servent à payer beaucoup de programmes différents. La large bande en région rurale fait probablement partie des programmes visés.

Nous investissons beaucoup également dans nos engagements pour assurer la connectivité au Canada. Nous nous sommes déjà engagés à brancher plus de 900 collectivités au réseau grâce au fonds Brancher pour innover. Nous songeons à investir encore davantage dans ce fonds, de même que dans celui sur la large bande universelle qui sera annoncé sous peu. Nous savons que cet argent sera nécessaire pour brancher les collectivités de partout au pays au réseau. Nous sommes absolument déterminés à le faire.

Quand vous parlez des enchères du spectre, en particulier, il faut mentionner qu'il y a une partie du spectre qui a été réservée pour les collectivités rurales. Nous savons qu'il est essentiel d'assurer leur connectivité. Nous prenons donc des moyens pour y arriver.

M. Brian Masse:

Comme il y a actuellement deux mises aux enchères du spectre en cours, pouvez-vous vous engager à investir les revenus que vous en tirerez, qui se compteront en milliards de dollars, dans les services à large bande?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Les revenus tirés des enchères du spectre font partie des recettes générales qui servent à payer différents programmes gouvernementaux, qui peuvent comprendre les services à large bande. Nous nous sommes engagés à assurer le connectivité au Canada. Nous nous sommes assurés de prévoir de l'argent pour cela dans le budget.

M. Brian Masse:

Je le prendrai comme un non.

Ce sera pour des budgets futurs. Il y a d'autres revenus et d'autres enchères du spectre. Toutes ces mises aux enchères génèrent énormément de revenus. Je sais que vous cherchez des partenaires pour investir environ 2 milliards de dollars avec la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. En même temps, vous vous attendez à ce que Bell Mobilité, Telus, Vidéotron, SaskTel et Rogers dépensent des milliards de dollars dans les enchères du spectre.

J'aimerais parler aussi un peu de la protection des consommateurs. Selon une décision rendue dernièrement par le CRTC, les consommateurs canadiens ont fait l'objet d'une tarification et de comportements abusifs de la part des sociétés de télécommunications. Il faudra encore une bonne année avant que des peines soient imposées aux entreprises responsables de ces comportements.

Cela vous semble-t-il acceptable, à vous et au ministre?

(0915)

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Comme nous en avons déjà parlé, le ministre de l'Innovation des Sciences et du Développement économique a déjà transmis une directive au CRTC pour qu'il se penche sur la tarification des entreprises de télécommunications.

M. Brian Masse:

Je parle de leurs comportements. Il y a eu une enquête sur leurs comportements et leurs pratiques abusives à l'endroit des consommateurs, par le marketing, la sollicitation ou la réorientation de clients. Il vient d'y avoir une décision qui les rend coupables de ces actes.

Le CRTC a dit qu'il lui faudra un an avant que cette décision porte à conséquence. Est-ce que cela vous semble acceptable, à vous et au ministre, qu'il prenne un an pour indemniser les consommateurs canadiens pour des comportements que le CRTC juge inappropriés?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Je demanderai à Lisa de répondre à cette question, puisque c'est elle qui s'occupe le plus de nos rapports avec ISDE. Elle peut peut-être vous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est vraiment à vous que je pose la question. Cela prendra un an. J'aimerais savoir si vous trouvez cela acceptable de la part du CRTC, après qu'il ait rendu une décision de culpabilité. Il ne lui faudra pas quelques jours, quelques semaines, ni quelques mois pour imposer des peines aux coupables, mais un an. C'est le silence radio à ce sujet. J'aimerais savoir si vous trouvez acceptable qu'il faille un an au CRTC, après avoir reconnu qu'il s'agissait de pratiques abusives, pour imposer des peines et des conséquences aux coupables pour indemniser les consommateurs.

Trouvez-vous approprié qu'il lui faille tant de temps?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Masse, comme vous le savez, le CRTC est une organisation indépendante du gouvernement. Le ministre de l'Innovation des Sciences et du Développement économique a émis une directive afin de demander au CRTC de se pencher sur les façons de faire des entreprises des télécommunications.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous lui avez fait parvenir une lettre directive, exactement.

Vous pouvez dire publiquement si vous trouvez que c'est acceptable ou non qu'il prenne tant de temps...

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

... puisque le ministre a émis une directive à l'endroit du CRTC...

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

... comme vous l'avez vous-même reconnu ici.

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

J'aimerais rappeler à tous que les ministres sont accompagnés de leurs sous-ministres et de fonctionnaires pour les aider à répondre aux questions. Si les ministres souhaitent leur demander de répondre à une question, c'est leur plein droit.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame Jordan, d'être parmi nous. La question dont nous discutons aujourd'hui est très importante. Je sais que nous avons parlé énormément d'Internet, mais je pense que c'est vraiment sur la téléphonie cellulaire que nous voulons nous concentrer.

Je creuserai un peu la question soulevée par Brian. Comment pouvons-nous convaincre les petites entreprises comme celles présentes dans ma circonscription de tenter leur chance dans le domaine de la téléphonie cellulaire s'il en coûte un milliard de dollars pour avoir accès au marché?

Réfléchissons-nous à ce qui succédera au système des enchères pour le spectre sans fil?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Graham, je vous remercie infiniment de tout ce que vous faites pour promouvoir la couverture cellulaire et l'accès à Internet dans les collectivités rurales. Je sais que vous vous êtes entièrement dévoué à ce dossier depuis que vous avez été élu pour la première fois ici.

En ce qui concerne l'accès au spectre pour les petites entreprises, une exception a été prévue dans les enchères du spectre pour les collectivités rurales et les petites collectivités. Je pense que c'est l'un des moyens par lesquels nous sommes en mesure d'aider les petites entreprises qui souhaitent pénétrer le marché.

Nous avons également entendu parler, d'un bout à l'autre du pays, de l'importance d'aider ces entreprises à être concurrentielles. Nous savons que parfois, dans les collectivités rurales, ces entreprises ont tout intérêt à s'assurer de pouvoir participer à la planification et aux activités qui visent à nous permettre d'offrir une connectivité et un accès adéquats au réseau de téléphonie cellulaire.

Comme nous l'avons dit à de nombreuses reprises, ce ne sera pas une solution universelle, mais nous savons que les petites entreprises ont un très grand rôle à jouer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

J'aimerais ajouter quelque chose. Les petites entreprises nous disent effectivement que lorsque nous vendons des parties du spectre, ces parties sont parfois trop chères pour elles. En fait, nous menons actuellement des consultations en vue de réduire la taille de ces parties du spectre, afin que ces types de fournisseurs de services puissent les acquérir.

(0920)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque vous parlez de réduire la taille des parties du spectre, parlez-vous d'une bande plus étroite ou d'une zone géographique plus restreinte?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Je parle d'une zone géographique restreinte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Dans ma circonscription, nous avons une coopérative de services Internet et ce serait merveilleux si elle pouvait présenter des soumissions pour offrir des services de téléphone cellulaire dans le comté, au lieu de devoir le faire à l'échelle de la province ou du pays. C'est ce que j'aimerais qu'on accomplisse.

Madame la ministre, dans votre déclaration, vous avez mentionné que les entreprises de télécommunications intensifiaient leurs efforts à cet égard. Toutefois, ce n'est pas ce que j'ai observé. En effet, ces entreprises sont extrêmement réticentes à investir dans les régions rurales si ce n'est pas rentable.

Si une collectivité ou une personne souhaitait que ces entreprises installent l'infrastructure nécessaire dans une région donnée — par exemple, l'une de mes collectivités qui n'a pas accès à un service de téléphone cellulaire, et je reviendrai sur ce point dans quelques secondes — et qu'elle s'adressait à l'une des grandes entreprises de télécommunications, il se peut que les représentants de cette entreprise répondent qu'ils installeront une tour si la collectivité ou la personne paie la totalité des frais liés à ce projet. Il n'y a même pas d'option de partage des coûts. De plus, lorsque cette tour commencera à engendrer des profits pour l'entreprise, car 1 000 personnes habitent dans les environs, ces revenus ne sont pas partagés avec la collectivité qui a installé la tour.

C'est la même chose pour les services Internet. Si je souhaitais prolonger la ligne de transmission à fibres optiques de trois kilomètres le long de la route où j'habite pour me brancher au point de raccordement le plus près, je devrais débourser environ 75 000 $. Si les 20 maisons situées sur cette ligne commençaient à s'y connecter aussi, l'entreprise initiale recevrait tous les revenus engendrés. Il n'y a aucun partage de revenus lorsque les particuliers sont obligés d'investir.

Je ne pense pas que ces entreprises intensifient leurs efforts. Je crois plutôt qu'elles engendrent une grande frustration et qu'elles ralentissent nos progrès au lieu de les accélérer.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais formuler des commentaires à cet égard.

Comme je l'ai dit, il n'y a pas de solution universelle. J'aimerais préciser que dans l'énoncé économique de l'automne, nous avions prévu une déduction pour amortissement accéléré, ce qui a permis aux entreprises de télécommunications d'investir l'argent épargné grâce à cette déduction. Nous avons effectivement observé qu'à la suite de cette déduction, plusieurs entreprises avaient intensifié leurs efforts pour veiller à connecter des collectivités rurales au réseau.

Je crois que les représentants d'une entreprise ont affirmé que cela leur avait permis de passer de 800 000 à 1,2 million de connexions. Une autre entreprise a déjà annoncé qu'elle offrira un réseau cellulaire le long de certaines routes de la Colombie-Britannique et de la Nouvelle-Écosse, et qu'elle élargira encore son réseau.

Nous observons donc que les entreprises de télécommunications investissent dans les collectivités rurales en raison de la disposition que nous avons ajoutée à l'énoncé économique de l'automne. Toutefois, pour revenir au point que vous avez fait valoir plus tôt, je pense que les petites entreprises ont également un grand rôle à jouer. Cela fait certainement partie de notre plan pour l'avenir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

L'une des caractéristiques de votre nomination au poste de ministre, c'est que vous vous occupez de l'infrastructure. Je pense qu'il est très important de mettre les services de téléphone cellulaire et d'Internet dans la catégorie de l'infrastructure plutôt que dans celle des services, et je tenais à vous en remercier.

Le premier projet qui mettait les services Internet dans la catégorie de l'infrastructure a été lancé l'an dernier dans ma circonscription, et j'en suis très fier.

J'aimerais revenir sur un point soulevé plus tôt par M. Chong. Il a parlé d'accessibilité et de prix abordables. Tout le monde a accès à une Porsche, mais tout le monde ne peut pas se payer une Porsche. Nous devons donc faire attention aux mots que nous utilisons. Lorsque nous disons que tout le monde a accès à quelque chose, ce n'est pas nécessairement vrai dans le cas de très grandes collectivités qui ont un accès limité à Internet. Comme je l'ai dit, lorsqu'on examine les faits, cette affirmation n'est pas réaliste.

Lorsque nous disons au CRTC que la concurrence est la solution à tous les problèmes, je ne crois pas que ce soit nécessairement vrai. Lorsque nous disons que la concurrence permettra de résoudre tous les problèmes, ce n'est pas le cas. En effet, si aucun service n'est offert, ce n'est pas la concurrence qui réglera le problème.

Il faut arriver à une situation — encore une fois, il s'agit surtout d'un commentaire, mais n'hésitez pas à donner votre avis à cet égard — dans laquelle les services Internet coûtent le même prix au bout des petites routes de terre qu'au centre-ville de Montréal ou de Toronto, comme c'est le cas pour l'électricité depuis plusieurs générations. Nul ne conteste que l'électricité coûte 3,9 ¢ le kilowattheure, peu importe l'endroit où l'on se trouve, que ce soit ici ou à la campagne. Pourvu qu'on soit connecté à un poteau électrique, on paie le même prix.

Pouvons-nous faire la même chose pour les services de téléphone cellulaire et d'Internet? Pouvons-nous faire en sorte qu'on paie le même prix pour le service ou l'infrastructure, peu importe l'endroit?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Il est impératif de faire en sorte que les services d'Internet haute vitesse soient abordables et accessibles.

Nous élaborons actuellement une stratégie nationale sur la connectivité. Nous tiendrons compte de tous ces éléments dans nos travaux à cet égard, en reconnaissant que les Canadiens qui vivent dans les régions rurales devraient avoir le même accès aux mêmes services que ceux qui vivent dans les régions urbaines du Canada. Les habitants des collectivités rurales ne devraient pas être désavantagés à cet égard. Je crois que c'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles j'ai été nommée à ce poste, car nous reconnaissons qu'il existe un écart entre les régions rurales et les régions urbaines, non seulement sur le plan de la connectivité, mais aussi sur de nombreux autres plans.

Nous devons veiller à ce que les gens qui souhaitent vivre, travailler, exploiter une entreprise et fonder une famille dans les régions rurales du Canada soient en mesure de le faire aussi facilement que les gens qui souhaitent vivre dans les régions urbaines. La question des régions rurales me tient beaucoup à cœur, car je viens moi-même d'une région rurale du Canada et je ne peux imaginer vivre ailleurs. Je sais que nous devons veiller à pouvoir permettre aux jeunes de rester dans ces régions et à ce que les personnes qui souhaitent y habiter puissent le faire.

(0925)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci et bonne chance.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à M. Lloyd. Il a cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Je tiens à remercier la ministre et les représentants ministériels d'être ici aujourd'hui.

On dit que toute politique est locale, et je commencerai donc par promouvoir quelques intérêts locaux.

Le comté de Parkland, dont je représente une grande partie, s'est récemment classé parmi les finalistes du Défi des villes intelligentes organisé par Infrastructure Canada. De plus, en 2018, le comté a fait partie de la liste des collectivités Smart21, un concours sur les collectivités ingénieuses organisé par l’Intelligent Community Forum, en raison de ses progrès dans l'amélioration de la connectivité et de l'accès à la large bande dans les régions rurales.

En prévision de cette réunion, j'ai communiqué avec Rod Shaigec, le maire du comté de Parkland, pour lui demander si le gouvernement fédéral avait offert son soutien dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover. Il a répondu qu'à ce jour, le gouvernement fédéral avait offert un soutien « limité » par l'entremise de ce programme.

Les intervenants locaux ont investi massivement dans la construction de tours de téléphonie cellulaire à l'échelle de la collectivité, afin d'améliorer l'accès à la large bande dans leur région rurale. Je sais que c'est un problème pour d'autres collectivités qui se trouvent à proximité d'une ville partout au pays. En effet, il n'est pas nécessaire de se trouver au nord du 60e parallèle ou loin d'une région urbaine pour éprouver des problèmes d'accès à la large bande numérique. Comme le disait mon collègue, M. Chong, vous pourriez habiter tout près d'un grand centre urbain offrant des services d'Internet haute vitesse adéquats à prix abordable, et tout de même vous retrouver dans une zone qui n'offre pas un meilleur accès que si vous étiez près du pôle Nord. C'est donc le point que je voulais faire valoir en ce qui concerne la sphère locale.

Maintenant, j'aimerais aborder le fait que nous avons parlé de cette motion dans le comité précédent. En effet, j'ai présenté une motion semblable l'automne dernier, à la suite des tornades d'Ottawa. Nous pouvons reconnaître que de nombreuses choses ont bien fonctionné après cette catastrophe naturelle dans la région d'Ottawa, par exemple notre système de gestion des alertes d'urgence. C'est extrêmement important pour tous les Canadiens, mais surtout pour les Canadiens des régions rurales qui n'ont pas toujours un journal local ou qui n'ont pas accès à la télévision par câble en tout temps. Comment ces gens peuvent-ils recevoir ces avertissements ou ces messages d'alerte essentiels?

En votre qualité de ministre, vous pouvez peut-être répondre à cette question. Les représentants de votre ministère peuvent également répondre. Fait-on quelque chose à cet égard et croyez-vous que le gouvernement devrait établir une norme minimale pour veiller à ce que l'infrastructure de téléphone cellulaire puisse profiter d'une alimentation indépendante pendant une certaine période minimale en cas de catastrophe naturelle?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

En fait, l'autre soir, j'ai rencontré quelques représentants de votre collectivité à la réception organisée dans le cadre du Défi des villes intelligentes. Nous avons eu une conversation intéressante et j'ai hâte de poursuivre cette discussion avec eux.

En ce qui concerne plus précisément la connectivité, le programme prévoyait un engagement de 500 millions de dollars, et les parties intéressées devaient verser un financement correspondant. Malheureusement, le programme a reçu un nombre trop élevé de demandes. Nous disposons toutefois du financement supplémentaire qui a été annoncé dans le budget de 2019. Nous savons qu'il n'existe pas de solution universelle, mais nous travaillons très fort pour veiller à ce que tous les Canadiens puissent se connecter au réseau. Nous espérons que nous pourrons continuer de travailler avec le comté de Parkland pour veiller à poursuivre ces efforts.

En ce qui concerne les services de téléphone cellulaire et le signal d'urgence, c'est drôle, parce que quelqu'un disait que lorsqu'il parle en conduisant, il doit s'arrêter lorsqu'il arrive à un certain endroit. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de pouvoir parler en mode mains libres; nous savons également qu'il s'agit d'une infrastructure essentielle en situation d'urgence, par exemple un incendie ou une inondation. Nous l'avons constaté lorsque des tornades ont frappé Ottawa. Il est donc essentiel de veiller à ce que ces services soient accessibles.

Nous bâtissons maintenant l'infrastructure nécessaire pour aider à réduire ces risques et à renforcer la capacité d'offrir l'accès au réseau aux gens. Nous savons qu'ISDE collabore étroitement avec les organismes de sécurité nationale en situation de crise, afin que ces systèmes soient fonctionnels le plus tôt possible, et qu'ils travaillent avec l'armée et les intervenants en matière de sécurité publique afin que...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais vous interrompre brièvement, car dans le cas des tornades d'Ottawa, certaines régions ont habituellement un accès adéquat aux services de téléphone cellulaire, mais lorsqu'une centrale électrique est touchée — et ces centrales sont munies de générateurs indépendants —, elle fonctionne seulement pendant un temps limité. Dans ces régions, les gens avaient donc accès à des services de téléphone cellulaire, mais ils ne fonctionnaient plus correctement, car les centrales électriques n'avaient pas pu être remises en état assez rapidement.

Le gouvernement envisage-t-il d'établir une norme minimale pour veiller à ce que les services de téléphone cellulaire puissent fonctionner pendant une période raisonnable, afin de pouvoir attendre que le réseau électrique soit remis en état de fonctionnement?

(0930)

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Je ne suis pas au courant de l'établissement de normes minimales pour le moment. Il incombe aux entreprises de télécommunications de veiller à ce que leur infrastructure soit en état de fonctionner. Toutefois, cela pourrait faire partie de la stratégie nationale sur la connectivité. Je vous remercie de cette suggestion. Nous l'avons notée.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Amos.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier les membres du comité de m'avoir permis de participer à ces délibérations.

J'aimerais remercier la ministre et les fonctionnaires dévoués qui l'appuient.

Je sais que les citoyens de Ponctiac, dont plusieurs centaines sont en cours d'évacuation et de nombreux autres appuient des membres de leur famille ou de leur collectivité qui vivent des moments extrêmement difficiles, pensent en termes immédiats, c'est-à-dire qu'ils pensent à nettoyer leur maison et à la remettre en état.

On a déjà entamé des discussions sur ce que nous pouvons faire pour veiller à ce que si un tel évènement se reproduit l'année prochaine ou l'année suivante, nous ne nous retrouverons pas dans une situation dans laquelle nous ne pouvons pas utiliser notre téléphone cellulaire pour appeler notre maire ou notre voisin pour obtenir des sacs de sable ou de l'eau potable ou... vous pouvez imaginer le scénario. Cette discussion a été répétée à plusieurs reprises, et je comprends que nous ne pouvons pas changer, du jour au lendemain, l'inaction et le manque d'investissement des gouvernements précédents et du secteur privé. Cela prend du temps.

Comment pouvons-nous rassurer les habitants des régions rurales du Canada sur le fait que les investissements que nous effectuons actuellement nous aideront à rendre l'infrastructure essentielle et surtout l'infrastructure de téléphone cellulaire accessibles dans les endroits où elles sont actuellement inaccessibles?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Amos. J'aimerais également vous remercier de la passion que vous manifestez.

Je tiens également à remercier tous les députés d'appuyer cet enjeu.

Il est extrêmement important pour tous les habitants du pays que nous veillions à ce qu'un réseau cellulaire soit accessible lors de situations comme celles que nous avons vécues récemment, par exemple des inondations, des tornades et des incendies. Nous avons observé les conséquences des évènements météorologiques extrêmes que nous subissons à l'échelle du pays. Il est important que les Canadiens sentent qu'ils ont la capacité de faire ces appels très importants, comme vous l'avez dit, même ceux qui servent à obtenir des sacs de sable.

Nous bâtissons cette infrastructure qui permet aux Canadiens d'avoir accès au réseau en tenant compte de l'avenir, afin que les investissements que nous effectuons servent à bâtir une infrastructure essentielle. Les gens qui habitent dans les régions urbaines ne comprennent pas la différence entre avoir accès et ne pas avoir accès au réseau avant de vivre une situation dans laquelle il est nécessaire de pouvoir appeler le 911 au besoin.

Certains des investissements que nous avons déjà effectués dans les entreprises de télécommunications apporteront des changements concrets en ce qui concerne l'accessibilité au réseau cellulaire, car nous avons investi dans des systèmes d'inforoute pour veiller à ce qu'ils soient connectés au réseau. L'infrastructure que nous bâtissons dans le cadre de Brancher pour innover aidera notre secteur sans fil à veiller à offrir un accès adéquat au réseau cellulaire. Nous devons veiller à garder cela à l'esprit au cours de l'élaboration de la stratégie nationale sur la connectivité.

Nous nous sommes engagés à veiller à ce que les Canadiens aient accès aux services dont ils ont besoin. Il est très difficile de se retrouver dans une telle situation et de ne pas être en mesure d'appeler le 911 ou d'obtenir l'aide nécessaire. Nous savons que nous devons continuer de nous efforcer d'offrir les services dont ont besoin les Canadiens et nous avons dit dès le départ que nous nous engagions à veiller à offrir à tous l'accès au réseau.

M. William Amos:

Je suis vraiment heureux de vous l'entendre dire. Je sais que de nombreuses collectivités rurales du Canada se demandent en quoi cela leur sera utile. Dans la même veine, les petites communautés, par exemple ma petite communauté de Waltham ou la municipalité de Pontiac, comptent bien moins de 5 000 habitants. Elles n'ont pas nécessairement l'expertise nécessaire pour déterminer comment répondre à leurs propres besoins. Si les grandes sociétés privées de télécommunications ne sont pas prêtes à s'y rendre, il faut aider les petites communautés à le faire elles-mêmes. Heureusement, le gouvernement du Canada a versé des fonds aux municipalités par l'intermédiaire de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités pour qu'elles puissent demander une évaluation environnementale et une évaluation technique. Cela les aidera à prendre des décisions éclairées en matière d'infrastructure.

Pourrait-on envisager d'offrir du financement accréditif aux petites municipalités qui n'ont pas la capacité ou l'expertise technique nécessaire pour qu'elles puissent contribuer à la mise en oeuvre de leurs propres programmes de développement de l'infrastructure de téléphonie cellulaire et de l'infrastructure Internet?

(0935)

Le président:

Veuillez répondre brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Pour aider les petites municipalités, nous avons majoré le Fonds de la taxe sur l'essence. Cette année, nous l'avons doublé pour que les municipalités aient accès à des fonds supplémentaires à utiliser pour les infrastructures dans leurs collectivités. Cela s'applique à toute forme d'infrastructure. À cela s'ajoutent les 60 millions de dollars accordés à la FCM pour l'appui à la gestion des biens. Ainsi, les gens des communautés rurales — toutes les collectivités — pourront déterminer les mesures à prendre en matière d'entretien des infrastructures et avoir des infrastructures de qualité, et ce, tant pour les nouvelles infrastructures que pour les infrastructures existantes. Ce sont toutes des mesures que nous avons prises. Nous essayons de les aider de différentes façons, car nous reconnaissons également que les petites municipalités ont souvent plus de difficulté à obtenir des fonds en raison du processus de demande.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Albas.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie la ministre et les fonctionnaires de leur travail.

Le rapport du vérificateur général de l'automne dernier nous a appris que le programme Brancher pour innover a été un désastre. Plus particulièrement, le vérificateur général a constaté que l'argent n'était pas utilisé à bon escient. On constate maintenant que 532 des 892 demandeurs qui ont présenté une demande de financement dans le cadre de ce programme n'ont même pas eu de nouvelles.

Madame la ministre, le processus de présentation des demandes a pris fin il y a deux ans. Comment se fait-il que 532 demandeurs attendent toujours une réponse quant au statut de leur demande et n'aient même pas été contactés?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci de la question, monsieur Albas.

Nous avons accepté le rapport du vérificateur général ainsi que les recommandations, et nous avons transmis nos remerciements au BVG. Dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover, 900 collectivités seront connectées. C'est trois fois plus que ce que nous avions prévu au départ. Nous avons également pu doubler l'investissement à financement égal dans le programme Brancher pour innover. Nous avons donc été en mesure de faire beaucoup plus de choses que prévu.

Quant au programme lui-même, nous tirons des leçons de nos activités. C'est un apprentissage continu. En outre, dans le budget de 2019, le fonds était majoré...

M. Dan Albas:

Toutefois, madame la ministre, il n'y a pas de nouveaux fonds...

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Excusez-moi; j'aimerais...

M. Dan Albas:

Ma question porte sur les 532 personnes qui n'ont pas été informées. Madame la ministre, je suis certain que ceux qui ont réussi en sont très heureux, mais en même temps, 532 personnes n'ont eu aucune réponse après deux ans.

Pourrez-vous présenter des excuses au nom du gouvernement? Bon nombre de ces personnes ont peut-être décidé de se débrouiller seules, mais attendent toujours une réponse du ministère pour savoir s'ils peuvent aller de l'avant ou non.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Le programme Brancher pour innover a été extrêmement populaire auprès des gens; les demandes ont excédé les fonds disponibles. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles le budget comprend de nouveaux fonds, pour majorer le programme. Nous savons que des gens ont besoin d'une connexion. Cela fait partie des raisons pour lesquelles nous sommes déterminés à atteindre des objectifs ambitieux, soit 90 % d'ici 2021, 95 % d'ici 2026 et 100 % d'ici 2030. Nous savons que les Canadiens ont besoin d'être branchés et il n'y a pas de programme universel ou unique pour y arriver. Voilà pourquoi nous veillons à examiner une multitude d'options différentes pour connecter les Canadiens. Ce sera notre vision pour l'avenir.

M. Dan Albas:

Plus tôt, mon collègue a cherché à savoir où en était le programme. Je dois avouer, monsieur le président, que les résultats étaient stupéfiants. Selon les renseignements fournis par votre gouvernement, moins de 10 % des fonds ont été versés. Il s'agit de 10 % du financement des projets approuvés. Or, madame la ministre, beaucoup de ces projets devaient être lancés en 2017, et pourtant, aucune somme d'argent n'a été versée. La même question se pose: comment est-ce possible?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Concernant le programme lui-même, il y a beaucoup de travail d'ingénierie et de planification à faire après la fin du processus d'approbation. Comme vous le savez, j'en suis certaine, il faut du temps pour construire des infrastructures. Nous savons que 85 % des projets seront mis en œuvre cet été. Nous sommes conscients que c'est parfois plus long que ce que les gens espèrent, mais préparer les plans pour ces communautés prend du temps.

Nous veillons à mettre en place des solutions qui ne sont pas temporaires. Nous bâtissons pour l'avenir. Nous voulons nous assurer de mettre en place des programmes et des infrastructures évolutifs qui pourront être adaptés aux besoins futurs.

Très franchement, on a trop souvent eu recours à des solutions temporaires, et nous n'en voulons plus. Pour la construction de cette infrastructure, nos objectifs sont qu'elle puisse servir à l'avenir tout en permettant d'atteindre nos cibles de 50 Mo/s et 10 Mo/s.

(0940)

M. Dan Albas:

Madame la ministre, les gens voient qu'un montant de 17,7 millions de dollars est réservé pour des projets dans le comté de Kings, en Nouvelle-Écosse, et que le projet devait débuter le 1er mai 2017, mais qu'en réalité, aucun financement n'a été versé jusqu'à maintenant. Je peux citer une multitude de projets différents à Terre-Neuve, à Inuvik et ailleurs.

Je pense que c'est très clair. Tout à l'heure, vous avez indiqué avoir l'intention d'intensifier les activités au cours de l'été. À l'origine, votre gouvernement voulait annoncer ces projets, puis vous avez attendu pour dépenser l'argent afin de pouvoir annoncer les projets de nouveau avant les prochaines élections. Madame la ministre, je pense que la population canadienne verra clair dans ce jeu.

Les libéraux feront-ils dans les médias de nouvelles annonces pour des projets déjà annoncés?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Les programmes commencent après la signature des accords de contribution avec les entreprises. Ensuite, elles doivent préparer les plans et embaucher des gens. Elles doivent s'assurer d'avoir un plan. Les entreprises sont tenues de respecter les jalons des accords de contribution.

Les accords qui ont été signés sont à l'étape de la mise en œuvre. Si vous examinez les demandes, vous constaterez qu'elles sont toutes différentes, et il y a diverses étapes importantes à franchir pour qu'elles se concrétisent.

M. Dan Albas:

Et lorsque cela arrive après les annonces, madame la ministre, c'est très commode sur le plan politique.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Sheehan.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre. Je vous félicite de votre nomination à titre de première ministre du Développement économique rural du Canada. Je pense que cela témoigne de l'engagement envers les populations des régions rurales du pays. Vous vous êtes manifestement mise au travail sans tarder. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Je tiens à féliciter M. Will Amos, le député de Pontiac, de sa motion.

Madame la ministre, je m'en voudrais de ne pas mentionner le député de Nickel Belt, votre secrétaire parlementaire.

Je viens de Sault Ste-Marie, dans le nord de l'Ontario, une région qui représente 90 % de la masse terrestre de la province. Il y a un certain nombre de problèmes liés à la géographie et à éloignement, mais je ne m'y attarderai pas. Je vais parler plus précisément des Premières Nations.

Une annonce a été faite récemment dans le cadre du programme précédent. La Matawa First Nations Management regroupe quatre ou cinq Premières Nations du Cercle de feu, en région éloignée. C'était quelque chose d'important en raison d'enjeux liés à l'éducation, aux soins de santé et à l'éloignement. Vous savez que dans certaines Premières Nations, il y a une corrélation entre les taux de suicide élevés et l'éloignement. Nous avons notamment lu qu'une des solutions consiste à établir des liens entre les gens. L'entraide est un facteur important.

Cela dit, madame la ministre, je veux aussi parler d'un aspect auquel vous avez fait allusion par rapport aux partenariats public-privé, car le secteur privé est présent dans le Nord. C'est un commentaire général. Pour vous, d'un point de vue philosophique, dans quelle mesure la participation du secteur privé est-elle importante? Je ne parle pas seulement des grandes entreprises, mais aussi des PME canadiennes, notamment celles du nord de l'Ontario.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Sheehan.

Concernant les communautés autochtones, je dirais que parmi les demandes du programme Brancher pour innover qui ont été approuvées, 190 demandes provenaient de ces communautés. C'est un nombre assez important, à mon avis, et je m'en réjouis. Comme vous l'avez dit, nous savons que les défis sont nombreux, en particulier dans certaines de nos régions les plus éloignées. Les gens dépendent d'Internet pour des choses comme les soins de santé et les services de soutien. Donc, c'est extrêmement important.

Pour ce qui est de votre question sur les PME, j'ai constaté qu'elles ont présenté de bonnes initiatives novatrices. Elles ont des intérêts directs dans leur collectivité. Elles veulent donc s'assurer que leurs collectivités sont reliées. Il s'agit parfois de coopératives, ou encore de municipalités qui ont lancé leur propre entreprise de services Internet. Je pense qu'il est extrêmement important qu'ils participent aux discussions sur la connectivité.

Je sais que nous devons examiner... Comme je l'ai indiqué à maintes reprises aujourd'hui, il n'y a pas de solution universelle. Le meilleur service sera tantôt offert par ces petites entreprises, tantôt par les grandes entreprises. Quoi qu'il en soit, une chose est certaine: il faut que cela se concrétise. Je pense que c'est le principal point à retenir. Peu importe qui s'en charge, il faut établir la connexion.

Ce n'est plus un luxe. On ne parle pas de gens qui écoutent des séries en rafale sur Netflix. Si c'est ce qu'ils veulent, soit, mais nous parlons de soins de santé, d'éducation, de transactions bancaires, de la croissance des entreprises, de ne pas être obligé d'aller dans un magasin pour faire des achats. Récemment, j'étais en milieu rural et j'ai utilisé ma carte de débit. On m'a dit: « Espérons que le téléphone ne sonnera pas. » Ils utilisaient toujours une ligne commutée. Comment peut-on faire croître une entreprise sans accès à un service Internet haute vitesse de bonne qualité? C'est aussi une question de sécurité.

Tout ce que vous avez dit est exact. Il faut s'assurer de la présence de tous les partenaires à la table. Nous examinons toutes les différentes options pour que les gens soient branchés, mais le but ultime, c'est d'y parvenir.

(0945)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Je vais partager mon temps avec le secrétaire parlementaire à l'innovation.

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute. [Français]

M. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Merci, madame la ministre, d'être avec nous.

Je suis un exemple qui illustre la réalité du problème de l'accès à Internet en milieu rural. À la maison, je dois me déplacer à un endroit précis pour capter la téléphonie cellulaire et être en mesure d'appeler ainsi que recevoir des appels. Si je veux télécharger La Presse, le matin, et que l'un de mes quatre garçons est en ligne pour faire ses travaux, je dois lui dire, ou crier dans la maison, de se déconnecter d'Internet pour que je puisse avoir accès à La Presse. C'est un problème.

Maintenant, il y a de la lumière au bout du tunnel. Les 500 millions de dollars que nous avons attribués au programme Brancher pour innover vont permettre à l'ensemble des 58 municipalités de ma circonscription d'être branchées à Internet haute vitesse, soit à une vitesse de 50 mégabits par seconde. Les travaux d'installation ont déjà commencé et se poursuivront jusqu'à l'année prochaine. Maintenant, nous avons des objectifs ambitieux.

Compte tenu de l'ensemble des fonds maintenant disponibles, notamment les fonds en infrastructure et les fonds au CRTC, comment est-ce que tout cela s'organise pour qu'on puisse poursuivre le développement de l'accès à Internet haute vitesse en fonction de votre vision? [Traduction]

Le président:

Très brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Concernant la Stratégie nationale de connectivité, nous travaillons actuellement avec tous nos partenaires pour veiller à examiner toutes les options de financement. L'objectif est d'éviter d'élaborer les programmes en vase clos. Nous voulons aussi examiner les solutions générales, trouver la meilleure façon de servir l'ensemble de la population et choisir le programme le mieux adapté pour chaque région.

Merci.

Le président:

Excellent. Merci.

Nous passons à M. Masse pour les deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La motion de M. Amos était une bonne motion et je suis heureux de l'appuyer.

Les motions peuvent devenir loi par règlement. C'est d'ailleurs le cas de ma motion sur les microbilles. Le gouvernement précédent en a fait une loi.

Dans quelle mesure ferez-vous de la motion de M. Amos une loi? Quels points choisiriez-vous, si vous ne les acceptiez pas tous?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Masse.

Vous avez raison, les motions peuvent devenir des lois. Une de mes motions est devenue une loi sur les navires abandonnés et négligés...

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, et j'ai travaillé avec Mme Sheila Malcolmson sur ce dossier.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

... et j'en étais très heureuse.

En ce qui concerne la motion de M. Amos, nous examinons actuellement une multitude de solutions pour régler les problèmes liés à la couverture du réseau de téléphonie cellulaire et plus particulièrement aux services à large bande.

M. Brian Masse:

En faites-vous une loi? C'est ce que je veux savoir.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Personnellement, je n'ai pas préparé de projet de loi à cet égard pour le moment.

M. Brian Masse:

Et par voie de règlement?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Cela ne veut pas dire que c'est impossible ou que nous n'examinerions pas des solutions possibles pendant la mise en oeuvre de la Stratégie nationale de connectivité et l'élargissement de la couverture du réseau de téléphonie cellulaire.

M. Brian Masse:

Pourquoi le gouvernement ne légiférerait-il pas? Qu'est-ce qui l'en empêche, notamment par rapport au point (c)?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Pardon, vous dites le point (c)?

M. Brian Masse:

Je suis désolé. Le point (c) traite de l'égalité des chances pour les régions rurales et éloignées. On ne devrait pas s'attendre à ce que vous sachiez exactement ce que... C'est lié à la connectivité en régions rurales et éloignées. Voilà de quoi il s'agit. C'est une question d'égalité entre les deux. Pourquoi n'en fait-on pas une loi?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Nous nous sommes engagés à examiner l'enjeu de la connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées. Notre engagement s'est traduit en investissement. La nomination d'une ministre témoigne de cet engagement. Je pense qu'il est évident que le gouvernement accorde une grande importance à cet enjeu. Lorsque nous mettons en oeuvre des programmes, nous faisons un suivi pour nous assurer que la connectivité en fait partie...

M. Brian Masse:

A-t-on envisagé d'en faire une loi? Le ministère a-t-il fait une analyse à ce sujet?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Pour l'instant, je dirais non, mais cela ne veut pas dire que cela ne peut pas arriver.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord. Merci. J'essaie juste d'approfondir la question.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan: Merci.

Le président:

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie, vous et vos fonctionnaires, de vous être joints à nous aujourd'hui pour parler de la motion M-208.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour deux minutes seulement, parce que nous avons beaucoup de travail à faire.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 16, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.