header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-16 PROC 156

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. I call the meeting to order.

Welcome to the 156th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being televised.

Our first order of business today is consideration of the main estimates under the Leaders' Debates Commission.

We are pleased to have with us the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions.

She is joined by officials from the Privy Council Office. They are Allen Sutherland, Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government and Democratic Institutions; and Matthew Shea, Assistant Deputy Minister of Corporate Services.

Thank you for being here. I'll now turn the floor over to the minister for her opening statement.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the committee for inviting me back here today. I am pleased to be here to discuss the main estimates of 2019-20 for the independent Leaders' Debates Commission.

I am grateful to be joined by Mr. Al Sutherland, Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government and Democratic Institutions, as well as Mr. Matthew Shea, Assistant Deputy Minister for Corporate Services.[Translation]

During my February 19 appearance before this committee, I reiterated the essential role that leaders' debates play in Canada's democracy, and I emphasized that such debates should be organized in a manner that puts the public interest first.[English]

The commission is exercising its independence and impartiality in executing its primary mandate, which is to organize two leaders debates, one in each official language, in advance of the 2019 general election, and in related spending. Through these estimates, the commission is requesting $4.6 million to organize these debates. [Translation]

The commission, led by the Right Honourable David Johnston, has established a small secretariat made up of Michel Cormier, Executive Director, Stephen Wallace, Senior Advisor, and four other staff members. [English]

On March 22, 2019, the members of its advisory board were announced, and on March 25 it held its first in-person meeting with the commissioner and the executive director. The board will provide advice to the commissioner on how to carry out its mandate. It is composed of seven individuals who reflect gender balance, Canada's diversity, and a broad swath of political affiliations and expertise.

The commission has established a web presence, and on April 4 it launched a request for interest related to debates production, which informed a full request for proposals that was issued earlier this week.[Translation]

Additional costs are expected for the contracting of a production entity to produce and broadcast the debates, the ongoing operation of the advisory board, awareness raising and engagement of Canadians, and administrative costs.

As the members around the table will know, the commission has the independence to determine how best to spend the operating funds it has been allocated while remaining within the funding envelope.[English]

In his recent appearance before this committee on May 2, 2019, the debates commissioner, the Right Honourable David Johnston, reiterated his intention and duty to use funding in a responsible manner. Furthermore, he emphasized that the funding being sought is an “up to” amount and that the commission will ensure it operates cost-effectively in all of its work.[Translation]

Finally, the Order in Council setting the mandate of the commission is clear: the Leaders’ Debates Commission is to be guided by the pursuit of the public interest and by the principles of independence, impartiality and cost-effectiveness.

The commission provides a unique opportunity for Canadians to hear from those looking to lead the country, from reliable, impartial sources.[English]

As we know, online disinformation is something we will all contend with leading up to the next election.[Translation]

The leaders' debates become even more important this year as they provide a venue to communicate clear and reliable information that is accessible to everyone at the same time.

I am pleased to answer any questions members may have on this topic.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister. Thanks for coming. You come here a lot.

I'd like to welcome Bob Bratina to the committee.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll open the questioning with Madam Lapointe.[Translation]

Thank you.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I'm trying to start up my computer. Yesterday, I visited the commission's website. We have been told that the commission is on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. I was looking at the financial aspect in particular. I don't know if you have checked out the commission's site, but there is no link to Instagram. The site only indicates which platforms the commission is using.

Are you aware of this?

(1110)

Hon. Karina Gould:

No.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You didn't check it out? Yesterday, I checked it out.

That was my first question. I am trying to start up my computer but it is not co-operating.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I know that my staff looked everywhere today and found the link to Instagram. It may be easier to access from the app than from the computer.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

No. I tried it.

Hon. Karina Gould:

We could show you how to do it.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Both you and Debates Commissioner David L. Johnston have already appeared before the committee on this matter. How is he making out with his preparations? There is a process to be followed. The website gives the timeline. For example, it shows what is to be accomplished by March and by May. Has he completed what he had to do within the timeframe? [English]

Mr. Matthew Shea (Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services, Privy Council Office):

Similar to the last time we appeared, I'd underscore the fact that they're arm's length. We provide support to the debates commissioner as needed, from a corporate perspective.

As far as them getting along, we're helping them to get contracts in place. They have an RFP out right now, and we're working with them on that. They have space set up. If they have IT requirements, we help them.

As far as tracking their progress, that's not our role. In fact, for most questions you'll have that are really detailed about the work they're doing, we're not involved. That's a very purposeful decision we've taken to ensure that we are at arm's length here. It's no different from what we do with the commission of inquiry for MMIWG or for the new special adviser to the Prime Minister. We absolutely make sure that there's an arm's-length relationship and independence. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It is an entity unto itself. These people report to the commissioner. Ultimately, the minister is supervising this. Is that correct?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It is not a supervisory relationship. We—

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You are accountable to the government.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, as the independent commissioner, Mr. Johnston is required to report to Parliament. During the process, we ensured that the commission would have the independence required to make its own decisions and that there would be no political or government influence. As stated in the Order in Council, after the election the commission is to table a report in Parliament providing its advice on this matter.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You spoke about cost-effectiveness. There will be a leaders' debate in French and one in English. As we know, the leaders will be asked to participate. Do you know if all television networks purchase the rights? I am thinking in particular of Radio-Canada, TVA and CPAC.

Hon. Karina Gould:

No. The Order in Council states the following.[English]

The feed has to be free. It has to be made available to any organization free of charge. That was done specifically and purposefully. One of the things we heard through the consultations is that these debates should be accessible to any Canadian who is interested in them, and they should be made easily available. Making the feed free of charge will accomplish that goal. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The commission's main mandate is to make the debate accessible to everyone, including members of minority language communities and members of the linguistic majority, whether English or French. Not all people will necessarily have access to electronic tools. I imagine they will ensure that the debate will be on the radio.

Hon. Karina Gould:

That is the objective.[English]

The dissemination of the debates themselves will be available. The only requirement, as listed in the order in council, is to ensure the integrity of the debates. Otherwise, the feed will be made available.

That's really up to Canadian entities, organizations and broadcasters as to how they choose to use that. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

All right.

You said that there will be a report at the end. Have you at least specified what kind of report you want and what you want it to cover? For example, will the commission determine if it managed to reach young people as expected? We know that it is more difficult to reach young voters. Is that one of the issues that you want to see in the report that will be tabled after the election?

(1115)

Hon. Karina Gould:

We have yet to work out all those details, but you can see in section 10 of the order what we hope to get from this report.

Of course, next time you see the commissioner I think it would be a good idea to ask him those very questions if you want to know what happened after the election. I encourage parliamentarians to do that.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I started by talking about social media because I tried to connect to each platform last night.

We need to raise awareness. I know that it's part of the commissioner's mandate to raise awareness and to reach as many electors as possible to inform them of upcoming debates and encourage them to get out and vote. Is that something you would like the commissioner to do?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The mandate includes a component on public awareness of the debates. The goal is not necessarily to encourage people to go out and vote. At the very least we have to ensure that all Canadians are aware of the leaders' debates and know how to view them.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay, thank you very much.

My computer is still not working.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mrs. Kusie has the floor.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Hello, Minister. It's lovely to see you, and you did a great job again last night at Politics and the Pen. You did just a lovely job.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Minister Gould, you referred to the independence of the debates commission. I would say that it is not truly independent, because if it were, you wouldn't be here today for the estimates. Our committee has already heard from the Chief Electoral Officer and from the administration of the House of Commons on the main estimates. Both of them, I will point out, did not have a minister appearing on their behalf, so evidently you're here today.

Why did you not create a debates commission that was entirely independent, instead of one within your own department, where the government in power could have both political and financial control over the commission?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Just for clarification with regard to the Chief Electoral Officer, the Chief Electoral Officer is, of course, an independent officer of Parliament, but they do report their main estimates through me as a minister as well. I would strongly argue that they are very independent in their actions and activities. I think that's an important clarification to make.

With regard to the debates commission, the way it has been set up is really to ensure that they have the resources necessary to fulfill their mandate, but without any direction or conversation between the commissioner and the government once they've been established.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

From your appearance here today for the main estimates, it seems evident to me that your department does in fact have the ultimate authority over the budget of the debates commissioner. Is that true?

Hon. Karina Gould:

In fact, one of the things that I did as minister was sign authority so that the commission can make all of those decisions—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, but you did provide that signed authority.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—because anything that is going through government spending has to have ministerial accountability, but all of those decisions are taken by themselves.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure, but even if you claim that you're not interfering in the budgetary decisions of the commission, ultimately you as the minister and the government of the day do have that authority. Is that not true?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Can I just jump in?

You talk about Minister Gould's department, but we are here as PCO. It's important to note that unlike a commission of inquiry, for example, which is supported by PCO, although at arm's length, this is actually a separate entity, with its own estimates and with its own deputy head, and it has the ability to make all of those decisions.

With regard to finances, I am the arm's-length service provider for them. They chose that, although they had every opportunity to go to other options and they looked at other options.

In my role, my team supports them in HR, IT, finance and all those areas. They don't brief me on that. I don't brief the minister and I don't brief Mr. Sutherland, so there is no interference whatsoever in the process. There is no interference in any of their spending whatsoever.

Our only goal as a service provider will be to make sure that they do things that follow policy and that are legal, which I think is in everyone's best interest.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I am kind of concerned about the term “arm's length”. It's still very clear to me that the minister and the government do control the budget, so I'm wondering why you would place something so critical to our democratic institutions as a leaders debate under your department, thus compromising the commission's independent integrity by controlling the budget, rather than making it an entirely independent organization like Elections Canada.

(1120)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I am so delighted to hear from the Conservatives how important you think leaders debates are. That is really a wonderful change of tone, and I'm glad, because I hope it means that there will be full participation in this election within them.

One of the reasons we created the leaders debates and the independence of this process was to ensure that all Canadians would be able to access these debates and know that this is done in the public interest, not in backroom deals whereby previous prime ministers try to dictate the terms and conditions of how these debates take place.

I am just absolutely thrilled to hear the Conservative position on this.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's kind of disappointing commentary to me. It's starting to sound a little more marginal than an actual response. I feel that if you genuinely thought that something like this was so important for Canadians and was so democratic, Minister, then at least you would have provided the opportunity to have the creation of the debates commission discussed in the House of Commons. You didn't even extend that courtesy, not to mention turning down many of the recommendations that this committee gave to you in regard to the debates commission. The House of Commons didn't have an opportunity to feed into this conversation about the debates commission.

I would certainly say that we support democratic processes, but to me this serves as an example of one case in which your ministry did not.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think all the members of Parliament here would agree with me that this committee, as a committee of the House of Commons, in fact did a very robust study on leaders debates and fed into this process, along with the public consultations and the round tables that we held with stakeholders.

One of the outcomes of this process is that following this upcoming election, the current commissioner will report back to Parliament, and specifically to this committee, within six months of the election to talk about the process, to talk about what can be improved, and to talk about whether this should be established in statute or not.

I am really quite grateful for the input and the involvement of the House of Commons, and notably the members of this committee.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You're making that statement even though the debates commission wasn't even debated in the House of Commons.

These reflect the recommendations that you did not take that were made by the house procedure committee. The office of the debates commissioner is under the ministry of democratic institutions and not under Elections Canada; the government chose the participation criteria, rather than the debates commissioner in consultation with the advisory panel; and the Liberal government unilaterally chose the debates commissioner, as I've gone over several times with you and with the debates commissioner himself, without any consultation with the other political parties or a fair process as set out in the recommendations.

It just sounds to me that for someone who purports to hold this as a key component and institution of the democratic process, so far it has not been installed and implemented very democratically, Minister.

Thank you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Do I have a chance to respond?

The Chair:

You have 15 seconds.

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I've said many times—and I believe this is the fourth time I've appeared, in fact, on this very topic—we've had lots of engagement on this issue, and I've very much appreciated all the feedback, all the advice given, and all the challenges from this committee. I think that that has led to the appointment of a very illustrious, trusted Canadian to take on this mandate, someone who I think will be able to deliver for Canadians a debate that's in the public interest and that all Canadians will have access to.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister. It's good to see you again.

You're right that we've been around this a few times. I have to tell you that I even leaned over to Tyler and said, “I'm running out of questions,” because we have gone around a lot of times.

I will reiterate, because it needs to be said, that the only thing on which I agree with my colleagues from the Conservative caucus is that the process was ham-fisted. There wasn't as much respect paid to this committee and the work we did as was promised in the election, and the name was chosen unilaterally. Those are all legitimate criticisms that the government has to wear.

However, I am in full alignment with the desire to make this so credible that the price to be paid by any political leader for not attending the leaders debate would be greater than any benefit from hiding and not having to be accountable and not facing scrutiny. I'm going to draw a very distinct line at criticizing the government on some of the missteps on the way to getting here. Those criticisms are not, in my opinion, enough to delegitimize the existence of the commission, particularly in the choice of Mr. Johnston. You had to go a long way to find a Canadian that no one could lay a glove on politically in any way, but you found him, and it matters.

I have to tell you that the inquisition-style questioning that was put upon Mr. Johnston from the official opposition was almost becoming a little embarrassing. He finally turned and said, in my paraphrased words, “You want assurances that this position is going to be filled with integrity? My name is on the line and my reputation is on the line. That's where the credibility is going to come from.”

You know what? For me, and I think for the overwhelming majority of Canadians, given Mr. Johnston's track record as a servant of Canada and as a servant of the public interest, that's good enough for me, as long as it's linked with public accountability at the end.

I did ask him about that, drilling down to make sure that the review was going to be as vigorous as it needs to be, and again I was satisfied. If I were returning to the next Parliament, which I am not, I would feel satisfied that I was going to have in front of me the analysis that I need to go back and determine whether we achieved the objectives in the way that we wanted, particularly in terms of accountability.

I could take more time asking questions, but I don't want to take away from joining with you in being surprised and pleased that we now have on record that the Conservatives believe that this is important and that it matters. Now what we need to do is make sure that there's so much credibility around this process that never again does a leader from any party dodge national debates when he or she wants to be the prime minister of this country.

If I have any time left, Minister, you're welcome to it to reinforce something, or we can just move on, but that was the most important thing. I don't have any questions now. I think the really important questions are going to come after the fact, when we review how well it worked and where we can make improvements.

Quite frankly, as a last thought, the proof of the pudding is going to be on the night of the debates. Are all the seats full? If they are, then we collectively, in the majority, were successful. If there's even one empty seat, then we failed. We've failed to create the political climate where you couldn't afford to pay that price. History is going to tell us the tale.

Thanks very much, Chair.

Thank you again, Minister.

(1125)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I will just say thank you, Mr. Christopherson, for those comments. I take the whole of them, both the critique and the support.

I think that's where going through this process will be important. Having that review at the end and having that accountability for what worked, what didn't, what we can do better, and how we can make this a long-term proposal are vitally and critically important.

I know that we both share a deep passion for public service and accountability, as well as for the importance of leaders debates as Canadians make up their minds as to who they want to be led by in the future.

Thank you for your comments.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Just to reiterate, the minister is here because the committee asked her to be here. She didn't necessarily have to be here.

We'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Again, picking up on that point, I don't think we've ever put up a fight in terms of asking a minister to come. I think we work well as a committee, and when these requests have been made, I know Minister Gould has been here four times on this issue and many other times on many other issues. I don't understand the criticism at the beginning of Ms. Kusie's statement, but that said, I would like to build a little on what Mr. Christopherson said.

This is about what has happened over the last couple of months on this committee. Again, we work very well together, and there tends to be a very respectful tone in this committee, but when we had a series of witnesses, starting with the Clerk of the House, we saw the whip from the official opposition come down and question his integrity.

Then when we had the Chief Electoral Officer, who has been before this committee many times and has worked very well with this committee, Mr. Poilievre questioned his integrity, going so far as to suggest, in the absence of any evidence, that Elections Canada is a Liberal lapdog. He had no qualms about doing it and took delight in doing it, even correcting me when I got the quote wrong on his statement.

Then it went one step further.

Mr. Christopherson's comments described the integrity of David Johnston very well. Within Canada there are few individuals who have such unassailable credibility, and you would think they would be able to come before this committee. I agree with Mr. Christopherson that we can disagree on the process by which individuals were selected and how this commission came to be, and those are fair comments. The opposition is well within its rights in questioning the government on its role and its decisions and the difference between the recommendations of this committee and what actually happened, and it should be asking those questions. That's the type of debate I'm used to in this committee.

However, to then hear the opposition question the personal credibility of David Johnston to the extent that he had to stand up and defend himself by pointing to his own body of work is shocking.

Can you comment on that and your impression of...I would call him “Your Excellency”, but there's a rule that you have to put five dollars in the pot towards his charity. Can you comment on the credibility of David Johnston and your conversations that you have had so far?

(1130)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Certainly.

First of all, I think it's a challenge when the credibility of very credible people is challenged, particularly when they are making it very clear that they are acting independently and that there has been no opportunity for interference or pressure. I believe we should take them at their word, particularly in the case of someone like Mr. Johnston, who has served Canadians for decades. He has made a career and a life of serving Canadians and has not been partisan in any way whatsoever.

This was someone who was appointed by Prime Minister Harper to be Governor General, and then we appointed him as the debates commissioner. He has been tremendous in being above partisanship and always thinking about the Canadian spirit.

That's a characteristic we were looking for when we were looking for the person who could manage what is a very political and very partisan issue. Really, since leaders debates have begun, they have been decided in back rooms. There has been political manoeuvring. Whoever was the leader of the day often had more say and authority in terms of when and where these debates would be held. We saw that in clear abundance in 2015, when the former prime minister basically dictated where, when, how and who would be participating in the debates.

That's why we were specifically looking for someone who could rise above all of that, someone Canadians could trust because they would know there would not be any inkling of partisanship, that this would not be political and would be purely about public service and serving the Canadian interest.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

Maybe I will ask more directly about the attack on the credibility of Elections Canada and the Chief Electoral Officer.

I guess I look perhaps to our friends to the south and at attempts by politicians to score political points against institutions, especially independent institutions, that are involved in the democratic process. For me, it's troubling to see that happen here, to see it happen with delight from the opposition, and it worries me going into an election that in the absence of any evidence there is a gleeful willingness to attack the Chief Electoral Officer and Elections Canada, which is one of the most respected electoral bodies in the world.

Can you comment on that as well?

(1135)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Elections are based on two things in my opinion: trust in the process and trust in the outcome. In order to have those, you need to have trust in the impartial independent administrator of those elections. I believe that Elections Canada since its inception has been a shining example around the world of that impartiality and that independence.

It has administered the elections legislation created by this Parliament, and numerous parliaments before it, effectively and in a way that Canadians can have confidence and trust in. I think it is a particularly dangerous path to go down to flirt with questioning the independence, the integrity and the impartiality of our independent officers of Parliament.

Although on many sides we may not always agree with its findings or directions, the fact is that we have granted it that authority as Parliament and we need to respect it. We can disagree with it, but we should not question the motives behind it.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I want to congratulate you on last night and your amazing ability to play the cowbell. That's a wonderful talent. Congratulations on that.

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's one of my few talents, playing the cowbell.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Bittle.

Now to Ms. Kusie. [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

The irony of this is that you've mentioned over and over again the character and integrity of the individual who was chosen, Mr. David Johnston. The sadness and the irony of this is that, if you had submitted to a fair and transparent process in an effort to choose him, you wouldn't have had the opportunity to question, not him, but the procedure of how he was chosen. I think that's truly a disservice to him. I find what we're discussing incredibly ironic. There's no doubt as to the integrity and the experience and the resumé of Mr. Johnston. It's the process, and that was your process. Really, it's your process that has created this unfortunate conversation.

I want to turn to the producer. It will be a producer organizing the debates rather than the commission, and it's likely to be a media consortium. Your government essentially created the debates commission and funded it with $5.5 million in a year where we have a fourth consecutive deficit, a year when the budget was supposed to be balanced, according to the Prime Minister. Yet how can we be sure that it will not be significantly different from previous debates that have been held, if there is in fact this consortium?

I see media in the room here today. I'm going to ask if you think it should be the role of the commission and thus the government, your government, to participate in your organization and broadcasting.

Hon. Karina Gould:

On your first question with regard to the $5.5 million, it's important to note that this is a ceiling amount. That is an up-to amount. One of the important things we wanted to ensure was that the commission had sufficient resources to produce a debate that was of high quality, that reached journalistic standards, and that was available and accessible to Canadians.

Something we heard throughout the consultation process was that it was necessary to ensure that sufficient resources were made available. Additionally, it's also to ensure that the feed can also be public and free to anyone who wants to use it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Was this because you didn't trust the media? Was it because you didn't think they were capable of doing something they've done for years?

Hon. Karina Gould:

No, that is absolutely not the case. In fact, I have reiterated on numerous occasions the very important role that media play in our democracy, particularly our traditional mainstream medium. We would not have this wonderful democracy we have without the incredible journalists across the country who hold governments to account.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yet it would seem that you're trying to control them through the use of this commission.

Hon. Karina Gould:

That is not the case at all. That may be your take on things, but this commission is created to ensure that these debates are widely available. The primary purpose of this, Ms. Kusie, as I have reiterated on countless occasions, is to ensure that the public interest is the primary driver behind all of this. It's to ensure that it is as widely disseminated as possible.

We saw in 2015 how one political leader was able to change, for political advantage, the nature of the debates, where they were disseminated, and where they were broadcast.

The fact of the matter is that Canadians have come to rely on leaders debates as an important political moment where they make decisions, where they look at their political leaders in spontaneous moments, where they get to see how they interact. They get to make decisions as to who they want to lead them.

(1140)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

But if it's a producer and ultimately a consortium, aren't you concerned that smaller media organizations are likely to be left out?

There are so many smaller media organizations, platforms, and there is very much the possibility of them not being a part of this democratic process as a result of this motion.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would point you to the RFP that was released, and I would note that this was created by the commission.

The point, and what's in the order in council, is specifically to bring as many diverse participants in as possible. They're going to make that decision. The commissioner will make that decision, based on advice from the advisory council that he has put in place. It is specifically to ensure that this as accessible and inclusive a process as possible.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

By controlling the process? That's ridiculous. That's completely unreasonable that you would allow for freedom of the media in developing a commission under the ministry—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Ms. Kusie, one thing that I would point to—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

—which decides the producer, which decides the members of the consortium to implement the debates commission. It's completely contrary to—

Hon. Karina Gould:

If you'll allow me, in the order in council, it specifically encourages the debates commission and commissioner to work with partners across the country if they wish to hold other debates as well.

The commissioner is mandated to ensure that there is one debate in English and one debate in French. It is not by any means to limit the number of debates that are going on, but to support others who wish to engage in this process and to create some innovations in this process.

Going to the heart of your question, it is about accessibility, about inclusivity and it is about reaching those markets that have been underserved in the past.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

And thanks for welcoming the media, Althia Raj, etc.

Now we'll go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My first question is around the amount of funding that has been allocated.

What led you to decide that this amount—the ceiling amount or the actual amount that is now identified—would be appropriate, considering there are so many unknown variables to how these debates are going to occur?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We wanted to ensure that we had sufficient resources to produce two high-quality debates in both official languages. It was also to ensure that there was sufficient remuneration for both the commissioner and also the technical secretariat that would be put in place. This would be an 18-month process, and it was to ensure that it was going to have sufficient resources. It's not only about producing the debates, but it's also about informing Canadians that these debates will be taking place as well. So it's to ensure that they have the resources to actually fulfill their mandate.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What makes you think that this is enough?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

We did our best analysis at the time that we did the funding proposal. We did err on the side of putting in more money. We put money in for professional services, knowing that they would want to have some type of contract in place to run the debates. They would need communication services. They would need personnel. They'd need back-office support.

We've done this before, as far as setting up independent organizations is concerned. We have recent experience with things like commissions of inquiry, so it gave us some sense of the types of costs. When you start a new organization, there are always start-up costs. That's one of the challenges with having a short-term organization.

I can't go into the spending from last year because the books aren't officially closed and public accounts are not released, but I feel comfortable saying that they will spend, and we will spend, less in the last fiscal year than was anticipated. In particular, the support from PCO in setting them up was much less than what we anticipated.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh, really.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

The main reason is that the debates commissioner, from day one, made clear to me that he wanted to spend as little money as possible, to be as efficient as possible. We looked at existing space, existing material. He asked for very few changes to the office to try to make it as cost effective as possible. I know that for our spending, it's been much less than anticipated.

I have no reason to believe that they won't be able to live within the amount they have here.

I can't get into certain things for privacy reasons, but some of the members of the advisory committee, even though they're entitled to collect per diems, have chosen not to do that. The debates commissioner himself has already indicated that he will donate the money he receives to charity.

Ultimately, there are many ways they are trying to reduce costs, so we have no reason to believe that this will not be enough. In fact, it's likely overstated.

(1145)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's good to hear.

The commissioner, the secretariat and the advisers were offered salaries comparable to what other commissioners would have.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Absolutely. There is a cost for personnel; please don't misunderstand. I'll make it clear that the debates commissioner himself is being paid but is donating that money to charity. There was no way for him to just not be paid, because of the type of position he's in. There are other staff. They have about five FTEs this fiscal year. We do anticipate that they will be spending on salary. These people are entitled to salary for the hard work they're doing. I'm more saying that the debates commissioner has gone out of his way to try to minimize those costs.

One of the reasons they outsourced their administrative support to us was that they didn't want to create their own corporate services shop when we do this for independent organizations all the time. We gave him a menu of the type of stuff we can do. We're doing almost all of that back-office support for him. My anticipation is that we will spend much less than we anticipated at PCO as well.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just want to switch gears a little bit. We've gone through the debates commissioner quite a bit, we had him before us recently, and there's not so much that you can say because of the arm's-length relationship.

Madame Lapointe pointed out a question about Facebook. Earlier this week, Facebook put up a new edition to their user agreement about making sure that those who boost posts or have job posts don't discriminate by gender or by any other ways as to who their advertising targets are. Do you have any similar thoughts as to what can be done through Facebook and other social media platforms when it comes to political advertising or the micro-targeting that has been occurring in campaigns, local or national, so that the electorate isn't excluded from what parties are putting out in their platforms and other communications?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think the ad registry that this committee brought forward in Bill C-76 will play a very important role in that. Facebook has stated that it will have an ad registry for the pre-writ and writ period. I think that's a really important measure, because Canadians will be able to see all of the advertisements that political actors are putting forward during that period. I think that is very important.

I also think you raise an interesting point with regard to micro-targeting. It's an ongoing conversation we're having. It's one that I imagine will also come up during the grand committee event that will happen in a couple of weeks about what that means in terms of different political actors using that and not having a full picture. One of the interesting things I always think about is that if you're advertising through more traditional means, whether it's on the radio, on TV or in newspapers, you are going to see all of the different political ads, because that's the one venue you have to look at it. On social media, you may see only one party's ads, for example, because maybe you're not part of the target demographic. That's certainly something that I think we need to reflect on further in terms of whether or not that fits within the spirit of our elections legislation.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and guests, for joining us this afternoon.

I want to follow up very briefly on a response that was given to Ms. Sahota. It was mentioned that five FTEs are part of the commission. Are these indeterminate employees of the Government of Canada or are they on contract?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Just to clarify, it's a separate organization within the government, so they're all technically government employees from that perspective. The majority of them are there on short-term contracts or term employment arrangements. I believe that one they've hired is on secondment from a government department. It's a mix. There are some part-time employees who are part of that as well.

Mr. John Nater:

Generally when will that employment cease?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

I don't have the exact date, but it will be post-election, obviously.

A voice: March 20, 2020.

Mr. Matthew Shea: Okay: March 20.

(1150)

Mr. John Nater:

Great. Thank you for that clarification.

I was reviewing the request for proposal that was submitted earlier this week. Paragraph 4.1(c) states: “An evaluation team composed of representatives of Canada will evaluate the bids.” Who will be those representatives?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

That is the debates commission entirely. I'll maybe comment really quickly on the RFP. Beyond that would be inappropriate, given that there's an active RFP.

The debates commission did an information request to potential applicants for this procurement before actually posting it. Part of the reason...and I wanted it to round back when there was some talk that it would be a media consortium that wins it. Part of the goal was actually to give an opportunity for potential bidders to ask questions to try to clarify the contract to make it so that it was as accessible as possible.

The request for proposal is currently out. It doesn't close until May 30, and that's why I think it's inappropriate for me to comment further, other than to say that I know the goal is to have multiple bidders. That's always the goal when we do these types of things, because it gives us the most choices and it is the most efficient way of doing it. The actual choice, to go back to the question that's come up a few times, is entirely delegated to the debates commissioner and his team. If they ask us for advice on process, we're happy to do that, but even in the case of this contract, they have worked directly with Public Works, and not through us, for some of these steps.

Mr. John Nater:

So, PCO had no input on the RFP that went out early this week.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Absolutely not.

Mr. John Nater:

This was entirely through Public Works.

Section M.2, which lists some of the requirements for the media consortium or whatever we want to call it—

Hon. Karina Gould:

The bidder.

Mr. John Nater:

—for the proposed bidder, is rather extensive and does tend to appear, at least, to skew towards the three large media companies: CTV, CBC and Global.

I'm looking for an opinion, Minister. Would you be concerned if the only successful bidder was the consortium of CBC, CTV and Global?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I don't think that it would be appropriate for me to comment on the bidding process at this time.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay.

Would you have concerns if newer media or smaller media entities like APTN, print journalists, HuffPost Canada, CPAC and Maclean's were not part of the process?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, I don't think it would be appropriate to comment, as there is an ongoing and existing RFP, but the intent, as I have stated before, is to make this as inclusive and successful as possible.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm going to rephrase this. Would you be disappointed if this actually just became a media consortium debate as we've seen in previous elections?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Because there's an ongoing RFP at the moment and because this is an independent process, I wouldn't want to make a comment that would prejudice either decision.

Mr. John Nater:

I see that I have about a minute left. I'm just going to make a brief comment and then provide Ms. Kusie with a chance to ask a final question.

I would be concerned if we were in a situation where we spent a significant amount of money creating this commission and then saw a diversity of media opinions being left out of the actual debate process. Right or wrong, there were five debates last time—a variety of groups. There was some controversy—I'm not going to deny that—but there was a variety of debates, and I'd be exceptionally disappointed if newer media and diversity of media were not part of this process.

I have 34 seconds left, so I'll throw it to Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

With regard to litigation for the debates commission, if the debates commission is involved in litigation, will it be you instructing the lawyers or the debates commissioner himself?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

We'd want to confirm the exact legalities. Normally it's the department, which would be the debates commissioner, but I think we can confirm that. I think that what we could say with confidence would be the fact that we would respect the independence of the organization and that every step would be done at arm's length as much as possible.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Would they have the opportunity to seek outside counsel if they wished, or would they need to use lawyers who answer to the Attorney General?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

I would need to get back to you on the ins and outs of that. I apologize.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Matthew Shea: Do you know, Allen?

Mr. Allen Sutherland (Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government and Democratic Institutions, Privy Council Office):

Presumably, it would depend on the nature of the litigation.

The Chair:

We have several minutes left, so I'll give Mr. Graham and Mr. Christopherson, if they want, some very short time.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

That's fine. I don't need a lot. I just want to build on one of John Nater's points.

Would you be disappointed if a party leader declined to send a leader to a debate organized by the commission?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, at this point in time, I think it's very clear why we put the debates commission in place, and it is specifically to address some of the unfortunate circumstances that arose in 2015. However, while 2015 was a moment where it became very clear why the process wasn't working, it's still clear that there were issues with how leaders debates came about previously. This is trying to address some of those challenges and to really state, as I've said on numerous occasions, that this is about the public interest.

I would hope that no leaders would feel like they didn't have to present themselves to Canadians if they were truly seeking to become the prime minister. I think it's a really important piece of how our democracy works and how Canadians engage with political leaders.

(1155)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there anything preventing a future government that says that this whole debates thing is just entirely too democratic from coming along and killing it?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We did put in place a first step here so that we could evaluate how this process works. The idea is that the commissioner will report back on how it works, how it can be improved and how to make it a more permanent process.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

I'm going to take a moment to again be absolutely as crystal clear as I can possibly be on my behalf and on behalf of my caucus and party. The process left a bit to be desired. I have held the government to account as best I can—repeatedly, forcefully and legitimately, I believe. As concurred by Mr. Bittle, it's at least a point of legitimate debate.

We are where we are. The commissioner is acceptable to us and the rules of engagement are acceptable to us. We had no more input as the NDP than the Conservatives did, but we believe this is an important element of our democracy. We were not, as a country, well-served by the processes and antics, and I'm not suggesting that my party is without blame, either.

It behooves all of us to do everything we can to respect and support the debates commission, because it's an important part of our democracy. We've got the example from the U.S. where for the longest time now, it has had an independent commission that conducts its debates. The Americans fight about everything, but I haven't heard anybody suggest that there's unfairness or partisan advantage in their system and process.

My hope is that the commission be successful, that all the party leaders turn out, that Canadians get what they need from the process. I have every confidence that the next Parliament will do its due diligence in terms of holding the government and the commissioner to account for the money they spend, the decisions they make and the procedures they follow.

It would be very disheartening for me—and I'll end on this statement while watching the election unfold that I won't be involved in, at least as a candidate—as one of the debates is whether there's legitimacy around the commission as it provides an exit strategy for one of the party leaders or any of them who don't want to be held to account and be held to the kind of scrutiny that those debates will offer.

We wish the commission well. We look forward to its success. Notwithstanding and subject to some details that could arise, we have every intention of being supportive and participating. This committee's done a good job.

I have one last point. I hope there's a good analysis between what this committee proposed.... We spent a lot of time, we worked hard on our report, and it was disappointing to see the way a lot of that work was set aside by the government after it promised to do things differently.

Being where we are now, it behooves all of us to see this be successful, in my view, and I say that as a small “d” democrat, not just a large “D” democrat. There's nothing more precious than our democracy, and this is an important part of strengthening that democracy.

(1200)

The Chair:

Thank you, David. That was very eloquent, as usual.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I felt the problem with previous debates was not that leaders did not want to participate, but on the contrary, leaders who did want to participate were excluded. That seems not to have come up today. Will it be the case that the leader of the Green Party will be included in the debates that are under the purview of the debates commission in the 2019 election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Ultimately, all the decisions will be made by the debates commissioner himself. However, given the criteria that was established, a party leader would have to meet two of the three. First, being elected to the House under the party that he or she is leading, or having a member there; second, running candidates in 90% of all electoral districts; and third, having a sufficient chance to have a member elected to the House, given ongoing polling and public context.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The third one is obviously the most difficult to determine, so it does raise the question, have any criteria been provided to us that will cause us to know in advance of the writ period as opposed to discovering partway through what is going to determine who gets in or who gets out?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That will be a decision for the commissioner.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, I would request that the committee write to the debates commissioner to ask him the answer to this question. I did raise it with him when he was here in person and he seemed conscientiously seized with the thought that he ought to provide us with the response. It might be time to write to him and make that request, so we can know how he's going to interpret that criterion.

The Chair:

You want to write to the debates commissioner.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Write to him to ask a question.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to ask about what he takes that third criterion to mean.

The Chair:

Sure. I'll do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Shall vote 1, under “Leaders' Debates Commission”, carry? LEADERS' DEBATES COMMISSION

ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$4,520,775

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Now that we've done the debates commission, the House of Commons, PPS and the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, shall I report the votes in the main estimates to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you very much and thank you for coming. It's great to have you again.

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's always a pleasure.

The Chair:

We will suspend for a few minutes while we get ready for committee business.

(1200)

(1215)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 156th meeting of the committee. I would like to remind members we're still being televised.

There are just a couple of things on the agenda. We have Mr. Christopherson's proposed motion for a study on the Standing Orders, and also, potentially, Mr. Reid's motion. Now that we've done a study, hopefully we can finalize his motion sometime soon.

There is another committee coming in here, so we will end exactly at 1:00. I'd like to go in camera for a very minor thing right at the end, at five minutes to 1:00.

Mr. Christopherson, your motion is on the floor. You've already introduced it. I see you've submitted two documents to the committee, though, that help clarify and simplify it. It's a very large package, so this is a good summary. The floor is yours.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Thank you, Chair. I appreciate that.

Just to pick up on where Ms. Sahota left off, we could be done in 10 minutes. My sense of this is it could go either of two ways. One is we're going to be done in 10 minutes, and everybody will say yes, we'll study it and give some respect to the people who did all this work. We could decide how much of a study that is and so on, once we make that decision.

If we're not going to say that, then there's a distinct possibility this discussion will go on for a period of time. It seems unreasonable for us not to give this group of colleagues the opportunity to at least be heard.

This is running parallel to another motion in the House that has similar effects. We just have to let those two paths unfold as they will. The issue for us is whether we want to study it right now. Whether we'll be done or not and how extensive our study will be are details we can deal with after the fact.

Chair, I think I ended my brief remarks last time almost on the same note, in that I'm looking to get a sense of where colleagues are. Either this is going to be real quick, and we'll decide we're going to do it and just need to talk details, or we're into a different world where.... Well, I'll be optimistic and hope we don't enter that world. There's no need to describe a world that I'm optimistic we won't enter.

Again, I would just plead—literally plead—with colleagues. There's frustration on the part of a lot of backbenchers about the continued sense of backbench involvement in decision-making being watered down. More and more power over the decades has accrued in the PMO. There have been presidents in the United States who have said publicly they would give anything to have the amount of direct power that a majority prime minister has in our system. It's understandable. I'm speaking to the leadership of all the caucuses in the House when I say that at the very least, if this safety valve is not triggered, these frustrations aren't going away. They're only going to get stronger.

I've described publicly a couple of times what I think is going to happen going forward. As the public demands democratic reform because they don't see it responding to their current needs, they're going to elect people who have a mandate to go and fix things. This is not going anywhere. It has to be dealt with. Either it's going to be dealt with by the majority of members opening their arms to change and being fair-minded, or we're going to be facing blockages and thwarted attempts to be heard. That's just going to lead to greater and more extreme actions on the part of future MPs. I don't see how it could not result in that.

Again, I want to remain optimistic. I haven't had any indication from colleagues on where we're going on this motion, either privately or publicly.

I would ask that my name be put back on the list as I relinquish the floor. I would be very interested to hear from colleagues. Again, in my view we could be out of here in a few minutes, or we're going to be wrestling with this for far more time than we ever thought.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Kusie, then Mr. Graham, then Madame Lapointe.

Did you have your hand up, too, Ms. Sahota?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I did, but don't put it down yet. We'll see what everyone says. It might not be needed.

The Chair:

Madam Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I have to be very sincere and say that certainly some of my colleagues even here contributed to this study. As well, some of my Conservative caucus members who have been members of the Conservative caucus for many years and even ran for the leadership are in support of the consideration of changes such as these.

I think it would be inaccurate for me to say that there is not an interest for some of these ideas within my caucus. That would not be true. There is an interest because certainly our membership, as is clearly indicated for the membership of the NDP and the Liberals, also have an appetite for the reconsideration of—for lack of a better term—powers.

I do feel there is an interest and an appetite in the consideration of the proposed ideas within this motion, but perhaps I'll just move a friendly amendment that the motion be amended by adding the following: provided that the Committee shall not report any recommendation to the House without the unanimous agreement of this Committee.

I know that there has been the indication previously of the importance of some of the members, if not all the members—well, some of the members, better I leave it at that—of this committee to have unanimous agreement of items such as this, so I think that this amendment is in keeping with the spirit and the genre of that desire of other members of this committee. As I mentioned, it would be inaccurate for me to say that there's not an interest within our caucus in the discussion and the exploration of these ideas.

I will move this friendly amendment.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

I'm going to go to Mr. Graham, but just before I do, could I get a one-word answer from Mr. Christopherson as to whether he accepts that as a friendly amendment?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Could I hear that again, please?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We'll distribute them, Chair, and pardon me for not doing that previously. My apologies; that was my fault.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's okay. It's not a requirement.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll go to Mr. Graham, and then we'll get back to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is just a quick comment. Ms. Kusie, I don't oppose your amendment at all. My one concern, my one request—and I say this very sincerely—is that no member obstruct any recommendation for the purpose of obstructing a recommendation, so that they're considered honestly and in good faith, so we don't have a situation where we say, yes, we're going to go on the consensus model, and then one person sits there and says, “No, no, no”, because that would be really unfortunate.

I want to make sure that we have an assurance from you on the record saying that will not be the case, that the consensus model will be sincere, and that everything will be considered. If that's the case, I'm very happy to support that amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Would you like me to respond?

Perhaps I don't understand exactly what you.... I would say that, if you are making reference to the.... I guess the only word I can think of is the “spite” of an individual member to withhold something. Obviously this would require assurance from all members of the committee, not just from me.

I see no reason to spite any of these proposed changes specifically. I don't think it's a secret or unknown that I will have to stay in communication with my caucus in regard to the items discussed and the direction of the study, but as I said, there is a sincere interest that I have seen in the exploration of these ideas. If my caucus is committed to the consideration of this, as their shadow minister for democratic institutions, so am I.

(1225)

The Chair:

Okay.

On the amendment, Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do I have to talk about the amendment or can I make the comments I wanted to make?

The Chair:

We are talking about the amendment.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Very good.

I would be okay with unanimous recommendations. [English]

The Chair:

Okay.

On the amendment, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I was in favour of it until I heard Ms. Kusie's explanation, which could have been an easy “yes, we will genuinely consider all of these proposals”, but we then got a pretzel answer.

I guess I'd like to hear from Mr. Christopherson before I make my decision on the amendment.

The Chair:

Before that, though, we have Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I'll be very brief.

I think we could genuinely work on a consensus model.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I agree.

Mr. John Nater:

I've spoken with Mr. Baylis on this. His suggestion in our conversation—I'm not telling tales out of school—was that we work on a consensus basis on this.

From our official opposition standpoint as a party, there's a lot of information in here that we would genuinely like to study. There are going to be elements that we may not agree with on the overall direction. Mr. Christopherson may not agree with it, the Liberals may not agree. There may be hills that we may be willing to die on and we may not be.

However, regarding the approach, I'm genuinely interested in this.

I would go one step further. I hope we can also, in parallel, finalize our second chamber study as well. I would like to see that hopefully reported to the House. There is some overlap here, but I don't want to see that study not go forward, because I think we've done some good work and research on that one as well.

The Chair:

Right now, reviewing the second chamber draft report that the researcher has done is on the first Tuesday that we get back.

Ruby Sahota, did you want to speak on the amendment? You were originally on the list.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: No.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

I have two things.

One, it's always been our preference that any changes to the Standing Orders, just like election laws, would have agreement of all the parties. That's the first point. That is sort of our default position.

Two, this is new, and it potentially changes the power structure. It's not going to go easy, and it's not going to be straightforward. At this point, I would take just about anything that is not wildly unacceptable as an amendment, if we can get a unanimous consent to have this heard. To me, that's the key thing.

Those are the two points: one, the preference that any changes like this, or election laws, where we're talking about the referee's rules, should have, in an ideal situation, the support of all the parties involved, including the independents for that matter, given that they're affected by these things too.

Two, it's really important that this be heard, that it be given the light of day. As much as possible, I think we should be bending over backwards to accommodate that. Quite frankly, if that's the only amendment that it takes for us to get unanimity in sending the message that we want this to be heard and we want to provide a venue for our colleagues to express their concerns and recommendations, then by all means, I accept the friendly amendment and appreciate the sincerity with which I believe it was put forward.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Christopherson, to your point, I'd like to apologize to Mr. Bittle. With regard to the spirit that my response to Mr. Graham was in, I would have felt it to be more insincere for me just to say yes. My intention was greater sincerity, if you will, in qualifying that.

Mr. Christopherson, you're right. I believe in completing the study. I believe this is how information is largely disseminated to the media and to social media. These ideas are heard, and this study will allow them to be heard. There is the possibility for these ideas to go into the public and into Canadian society, just in being heard here.

Thank you for your recognition of that.

(1230)

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on the amendment?

(Amendment agreed to)

The Chair: Now we'll go back to the main motion.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I obviously support this motion very strongly. I think it's very important that we go through this.

Nobody is asking us to take the entire text of the changes and approve it in bulk. It's very important for all of us to look at each item one at a time and ask whether it make sense. It's having those proper discussions without wasting time, but really considering each one properly and trying to get this thing back on time to have it adopted by the House, so that when we come back next year—hoping that most of us do—we are able to have those rules in place.

The Chair:

Ms. Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

There is a very wide range of things being proposed. As far as establishing a parallel debating chamber is concerned, we conducted a study on that. I believe we are reporting on it and that will address that aspect.

People need to come talk to us about it. For example, we are talking about the power of the Speaker and I would like to hear from witnesses on that topic. We are talking about committees. I would like to hear from people who have experienced this and might be able to relay the advantages and disadvantages.

It is one thing to do a clause-by-clause study of the motion. Personally, I need to hear people talk about different topics. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think we're all singing from the same page. I'm not going to say anything that might derail that. I think we're in a good place, and I hope it carries.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is a meaty motion, to put it mildly, at 19 pages. I think we have to assume that we are committing ourselves to saying that most of the remainder of the time we have before this Parliament comes to an end will be devoted to this subject. In order to make sure we don't waste any of that time, I wonder if it's possible for representatives of the various parties to chat with each other and with you, Mr. Chair, about how we're going to structure that time to make sure we use it effectively.

The Chair:

I would never commit our future time. So many things come up in this committee—questions of privilege, etc. Obviously, right now it's in the forefront. Any discussions that happen would be great.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It would be nice to be off and running as soon as we get back from the break week.

The Chair:

Any further discussion on the motion to study this?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David Christopherson:

Was that unanimous?

The Chair:

Yes.

We'll put that on the agenda as soon as we can.

Now we go to Mr. Reid's motion. We had a study. There are three ways we can proceed. First of all, we approved his motion, so we could just send it to the House. Second, we had some great witnesses and a lot of information. We could ask our researcher to do a report, to which we would attach the motion as a recommendation. Third, we could modify the motion. I'll just mention one small concern I had with it, and there may be more. It's a very technical motion. I think we all agree with the concept that PROC should study this and continue to study it. That's the idea of the motion.

It seemed to me that the way it was written we would have to get consent every year to have that part of PROC's mandate. It's hard enough to get consent from the House in procedures and get things done on our committee, because we're so busy. If we're going to agree it's in the committee, I would suggest that we just put it in the committee if the House agrees to that.

I'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, if you want to remove that particular provision...the purpose of that is just to make sure that part of the standing order comes to an end when the Centre Block renovations are complete. That's the logic. In all fairness, maybe that's far in the future, and we shouldn't worry about it.

It would be a simple matter to have that removed from the Standing Orders. I think that particular provision could be excised with these. I know as chair you're not supposed to propose amendments, but if someone else wanted to suggest that amendment, I would certainly be completely open to it. We could then go and see—

(1235)

The Chair:

We've already passed your motion so we can't amend it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Why not?

The Chair:

We can do another one.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We can move another motion.

The Chair:

To follow up, I'm not sure it's good to end that mandate, because the West Block is finished but we're still commenting on things that could be changed here. They're then going to do the Confederation Building and all these other buildings. Centre Block is only the beginning. I think we should leave it to later PROCs to decide whether to get it out of their mandate. I think it's good that we're looking at the parliamentary precinct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're correct in that the LTVP is a very long-term plan, and it started many years ago. West Block wasn't the first, and Centre Block won't be the last. When we finally finish going through all the buildings, it will probably be time to do the first one again.

This is an ongoing and permanent mandate to oversee the structure and function of the Hill.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I take your point. I think I've already relayed the story of how, when I was a teenager, I was involved in working at an engineering firm—Clemann Large Patterson consulting engineers—when they were involved in the final stages of the renovations to the East Block, which is now due for renovations, so there you are.

The Chair:

The clerk said that, if the committee is willing, he could come back next meeting with some wording.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would make sense to me.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll do that.

We'll come back with an improved motion. Do you want that to be part of a report, so we get on the record everything we heard from those witnesses for future discussions, or do you just want to approve a motion and send that to the House?

Mr. Scott Reid:

My inclination would be to just send the.... You know what, I'm not sure of the answer to that, because there are two things to think about here. One is that we're making a motion that would be a change to the Standing Orders. Presumably that should be kind of a stand-alone. It'd be odd to have anything else in there.

On the other hand.... Thank you for passing out the latest Hill Times. I think Rob Wright summed up really well the thing I had been struggling to say. I think it would be helpful for our committee to say this—I don't know if it would be in the same report or in a separate report—in a way in which the House can concur in it prior to September, when they block off half the front lawn for an indefinite period of time.

What I have here is the headline “'Appetite suppressant' needed for Centre Block wish lists, says PSPC”. Truer words have never been spoken. I kept asking in earlier meetings who the parliamentary partners were. Well, now I know what they meant. The Senate as a whole, the House of Commons as a whole and the Library of Parliament as a whole have submitted the following items on their wish lists. Everybody says, “We would like to have these things”, and everybody says, “It would be really nice if our thing could be right there in Centre Block.” As a former Centre Block office resident, I fully understand why people would like that. However, we now know that accommodating all those things involves digging a hole in the front lawn big enough that you can literally take Centre Block and drop it in. Have a look at the map—it's actually true.

We've given them.... Even a snake that can unhinge its jaws can only eat so much. We've given them too much, and we need to get back the message, “Hey, we all need to start paring down our asks of PSPC, because they are impracticable.”

(1240)

The Chair:

What about this? We do your motion separately, hopefully very shortly in an upcoming meeting, so that your motion doesn't get derailed, and then we ask the researcher to do a report based on the witnesses we may or may not get to. That way we'd get your motion done, and it's up to the committee whether we get to the report.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. Because you were looking at me, you weren't in a position to see the expression on our analyst's face as we assign him that task, but—

The Chair:

Could you do it again?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

Maybe I could just ask our analyst.

Andre, what challenges would be involved in doing that?

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

The Library is here to serve the committee. There's no doubt about that.

We are in the midst of trying to fry several fish for the committee. We could find someone to write a witness summary, if that's what the committee would like. I would like to be involved in it, but I probably wouldn't have the time.

I would have some concerns, but we could get it done. If that's the will of the committee, we certainly would get it done.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't know how to respond to that.

The Chair:

That's up to you, Mr. Reid.

An hon. member: What's the downside of not including it?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Everybody now knows what the problem is. That is now out in the public domain. I'm hoping our friends, the media, will take some of that material, which some of them are collecting, and say, “Here's the practical problem we face.”

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hear your quandary. I just looked at it and thought, “Well, what's the downside of not having the report?”

The efficient thing is to let the motion go alone. Is there anything lost? I'm not sure there is. As long as we maintain that information within our considerations, that's where it needs to be right now. It seems to me that speed is of the essence. In terms of anything anybody wants from the House, you had better get your dibs in early.

Those are just some thoughts, Scott.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If the committee is agreeable, maybe the pared-down approach is the better one.

The Chair:

Okay. Can you come back next meeting with some wording we can discuss?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That sounds good to me.

The Chair:

We'll try to get that done. As David said, anything.... This is a doable thing in the time remaining.

At our next meeting, we're looking at the parallel chambers report, and then at Mr. Christopherson's motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, if I may, do we want to start the study before we even begin the process, or anything else, and invite the delegation in to give us their presentation, so that we can understand exactly how big the project is? From there, we can make a plan of attack. Normally, we do it the other way around, but in this case, given that it's being driven by MPs, it seems to me to make sense to give them a chance to come in, be heard and make their case. Then we can decide what the process is. We are going to break it down. I can imagine some of the long discussions we're going to have. It'll be interesting, but we'll break that down piece by piece, and go through it.

We could do it ahead of time, but, again, anything that delays it.... Time is our enemy right now, so I'm constantly thinking that if we have options that allow us to get things done and moving, that is really the prime consideration.

I'm not married to that, colleagues. I just throw that out as a thought, in terms of how we might begin.

The Chair:

What names were you thinking of? Mr. Baylis, obviously....

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would maybe ask Mr. Baylis if he wants to bring a representative delegation of the people involved, and let him decide who that is, how many, their presentation.... Give them their day in court. Let them take as long as they want, because it's a complex report, and then outline what they hope to get from us. Then we are equipped to make some decisions: What's our time frame? How are we going to bite this off? What information do we need? Is there any research we're going to do? Can we get that under way early, so that it's ready for us?

I'm open to better ideas, Chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was going to suggest that perhaps the idea would be to advise Mr. Baylis, and everyone involved with writing that motion, of the fact that we're getting the study under way, and say that they are always welcome to come to our committee and be part of the discussion. They're all part of writing it. That becomes an ongoing involvement, instead of a one-off involvement.

I think that would ensure that anybody involved in the creation of this has their opportunity all the way throughout to do it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think that is an excellent idea, but I, for one, would probably.... As I've said, I'm one of those who contributed, but I'm not a major contributor. There are others—

(1245)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I did one paragraph.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. It was more because I'm on this committee, and I was willing to provide the vehicle.

I hear what you're saying. That could flow from what we hear. Then we can decide not only what we're going to do, but who's going to be involved in doing it.

It's such a disparate subject, and so vast. You've got multiple parties, and we have unanimity—we're actually there. If we can just hold that together, and give them a chance to come in and make their pitch as to what they hope to see, and what they realistically hope we can do in the remainder of this Parliament, we can be seized of that. If one of the things we want to talk about is who is part of this, the way we did with some other files we've had, I'd be open to that, at that time.

I still think that, right now, it makes sense to bring them in as early as possible. There is some media interest. This is what they want more than anything—a chance to get these ideas out there. If they did have hope that we were going to conclude it in this Parliament, let's hear that. Some of them are veterans who understand what's entailed in the process of trying to get it done. They may offer us some ideas that we otherwise wouldn't think of, as we set about our work plan.

Again, with the greatest of respect—and I'm not married to the idea—it still seems to make sense to me that our first step, right now, would be to invite them to come in, and give them as much time as they need to make their pitch. From there, we're well equipped to set out our work plan, and the objectives we think we can achieve, in the time available.

The Chair:

To make this a little more concrete, I'll say that on the 30th we could ask Mr. Baylis and whoever he'd like to bring with him to come to committee. Do you have thoughts on that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

The only thing different from our usual rules, Chair, is that I would suggest we give them the courtesy of as much time as they want to make a fulsome and complete presentation, respecting the amount of work that they've put into it.

The Chair:

Yes, it's a bit longer than 10 minutes would cover. As Mr. Reid said, this is very complex. There are all sorts of issues, and I'm sure not everyone is going to agree on everything, so we'll do that.

The meeting is suspended.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bienvenue à la 156e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette réunion est télévisée.

Le premier point à l'ordre du jour est l'examen du Budget principal des dépenses sous la rubrique Commission aux débats des chefs.

Nous avons le plaisir de recevoir l'honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques.

Elle est accompagnée de représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé. Il s'agit d'Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint au Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et Institutions démocratiques; et de Matthew Shea, sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels.

Je vous remercie de votre présence. Je laisserai maintenant la parole à la ministre pour sa déclaration préliminaire.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je remercie le Comité de m'avoir invitée à revenir aujourd'hui. C'est un plaisir de venir discuter du budget des dépenses de 2019-2020 de la Commission des débats des chefs, qui est indépendante.

Je remercie M. Al Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint au Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et Institutions démocratiques; et de Matthew Shea, sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels, de bien avoir voulu m'accompagner.[Français]

Lors de ma comparution du 19 février dernier devant ce comité, j'ai rappelé le rôle fondamental que jouent les débats des chefs dans la démocratie canadienne et j'ai souligné qu'il fallait accorder la priorité à l'intérêt public dans l'organisation de ces débats.[Traduction]

La Commission est indépendante et impartiale dans l’exécution de son mandat principal, qui est d'organiser deux débats des chefs, un dans chaque langue officielle, pour les élections générales de 2019, ainsi que dans la gestion des dépenses connexes. Dans le budget des dépenses, la Commission demande 4,6 millions de dollars pour organiser ces débats.[Français]

La Commission, dirigée par le très honorable David Johnston, a établi un petit secrétariat composé de Michel Cormier, directeur général, de Stephen Wallace, conseiller principal, et de quatre autres personnes.[Traduction]

Le 22 mars 2019, les membres du comité consultatif (le comité) ont été annoncés, et le 25 mars, le commissaire et le directeur général ont eu leur première réunion en personne. Le comité va guider la Commission dans l’exercice de son mandat. Il est composé de sept membres et sa composition tient compte de la parité entre les sexes et de la diversité de la population canadienne, ainsi que d'un large éventail d’allégeances politiques et de compétences.

La Commission a établi sa présence sur le Web et, le 4 avril, elle a lancé un appel à manifestation d’intérêt concernant la production des débats qui a servi à orienter la demande de propositions lancée cette semaine.[Français]

Des dépenses supplémentaires sont prévues pour couvrir l'octroi d'un contrat à une entreprise de production qui produira et diffusera les débats, les activités courantes du Conseil consultatif, la sensibilisation et la mobilisation des Canadiens, et les coûts administratifs.

Comme les députés ici présents le savent, la Commission jouit de l'indépendance nécessaire pour décider de la meilleure façon de dépenser les fonds de fonctionnement qui lui ont été accordés dans les limites de l'enveloppe budgétaire approuvée.[Traduction]

Lors de sa récente comparution devant le Comité, le 2 mai 2019, le commissaire aux débats, le très honorable David Johnston, a réaffirmé qu’il avait l’intention et le devoir d’utiliser les fonds de façon responsable. De plus, il a souligné que les fonds demandés représentent un montant « maximal » et que la Commission veillera à fonctionner de manière économique dans toutes ses activités.[Français]

Finalement, le décret définissant le mandat de la Commission est clair: la Commission aux débats des chefs est guidée par la poursuite de l'intérêt public et par les principes d'indépendance, d'impartialité et d'efficacité financière.

La Commission offre une occasion unique aux Canadiens d'entendre de sources fiables et impartiales ce qu'ont à dire ceux qui cherchent à diriger le pays.[Traduction]

Comme nous le savons, nous devrons tous composer avec la désinformation en ligne d'ici les prochaines élections. [Français]

Les débats des chefs seront encore plus importants cette année, car ils fourniront un lieu pour communiquer l'information de manière claire, fiable et accessible à tous en même temps.

Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions à ce sujet.

Merci, monsieur le président. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre. Merci de votre présence. Vous êtes souvent des nôtres.

Je souhaite la bienvenue au Comité à Bob Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Nous commencerons les questions par Mme Lapointe.[Français]

Merci.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'essaie d'ouvrir mon ordinateur. Hier, je suis allée sur le site Internet de la Commission. On nous explique que la Commission est déjà présente sur Facebook, Instagram et Twitter. Je regardais l'aspect financier, notamment. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes allée vérifier sur le site de la Commission, mais il n'y a pas de lien vers Instagram. On nous dit sur quelles plateformes se trouve ou non la Commission.

Êtes-vous au courant de cela?

(1110)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous n'êtes pas allée vérifier cela? Hier, je l'ai fait.

C'était ma première question. J'essaie d'ouvrir mon ordinateur, mais il ne collabore pas.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je sais qu'aujourd'hui mes employés ont cherché à tous les endroits et ont trouvé le lien vers Instagram. Il est peut-être plus facile d'y accéder par l'entremise de l'application que de l'ordinateur.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Non. J'ai essayé de le faire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous pourrions vous montrer comment le faire.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Vous avez déjà comparu devant notre comité à ce sujet, de même que le commissaire aux débats, M. Johnston. Où en est-il dans ses préparatifs? Des choses devaient être faites pour suivre le processus. Sur le site Internet, on indique des délais, par exemple on dit où il doit en être rendu en mars ou encore en mai. Est-ce qu'il a accompli le travail qu'il devait faire dans les délais? [Traduction]

M. Matthew Shea (sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Comme lors de notre dernière comparution, je soulignerai que la Commission est indépendante. Nous fournissons, au besoin, au commissaire aux débats un soutien, du point de vue des services ministériels.

Pour ce qui est de savoir où en est la Commission, nous l'aidons à mettre en place des contrats. Elle a lancé une demande de propositions, une DP, et nous travaillons dessus avec elle. Ses bureaux sont installés. Si elle a des besoins en TI, nous l'aidons.

Quant à surveiller ses progrès, ce n'est pas notre rôle. En fait, pour la plupart des questions que vous aurez sur les détails du travail qu'elle effectue, nous ne sommes pas concernés. Nous avons très délibérément décidé qu'il en soit ainsi pour garantir son indépendance. C'est la même chose qu'avec la Commission d'enquête sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées ou le nouveau conseiller spécial auprès du premier ministre. Nous veillons scrupuleusement à avoir des relations d'indépendance. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est une entité en soi. Ces gens relèvent du commissaire. Ultimement, c'est la ministre qui supervise cela. Est-ce exact?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce n'est même pas une relation qui implique une supervision. Nous avons...

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous avez des comptes à rendre au gouvernement.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, à titre de commissaire indépendant, M. Johnston a l'obligation de rendre des comptes devant le Parlement. Lors du processus, nous nous sommes assurés que la Commission aurait l'indépendance nécessaire pour prendre ses propres décisions et qu'il n'y aurait pas d'influence politique ou gouvernementale. Comme le précise le décret, après les élections, la Commission aura pour mandat de soumettre un rapport au Parlement faisant état de ses conseils à ce sujet.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous avez parlé d'efficacité financière. Il y aura un débat des chefs en français et un en anglais. Comme nous le savons, les chefs seront invités à y participer. Est-ce que toutes les chaînes de télévision achètent des droits? Êtes-vous au courant de cela? Je pense notamment à Radio-Canada, à TVA et à CPAC.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non. Voici ce qui est précisé dans le décret.[Traduction]

La retransmission doit être gratuite. Elle doit être accordée à toute organisation sans frais. Il s'agit d'une décision expresse et délibérée. Ce que nous avons notamment entendu pendant les consultations, c'est que ces débats devraient être accessibles à tout Canadien qui s'y intéresse et qu'il devrait être facile de les suivre. La gratuité de la retransmission servira cet objectif. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

La mission du commissaire est notamment de rendre le débat accessible à tous, qu'il s'agisse de communautés linguistiques en situation minoritaire ou de gens de la majorité linguistique, que ce soit en anglais ou en français. Or les gens n'auront pas nécessairement tous accès à des outils électroniques. J'imagine qu'il va même faire en sorte que ce soit diffusé à la radio.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est l'objectif.[Traduction]

La diffusion des débats eux-mêmes sera possible. La seule exigence, comme le précise le décret, est de garantir l'intégrité des débats. Autrement, la retransmission sera possible.

Il appartient aux entités, aux organisations et aux radiodiffuseurs de décider d'utiliser cette possibilité. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Vous dites qu'il y aura un rapport à la fin. Avez-vous à tout le moins précisé quel genre de rapport vous souhaitez et les sujets que vous désirez qu'il couvre? Par exemple, va-t-on vérifier si l'on a réussi à atteindre les jeunes autant qu'on le souhaitait? On sait qu'il est plus difficile de joindre les jeunes électeurs. Est-ce un des enjeux que vous voulez voir figurer dans le rapport qui suivra les élections?

(1115)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous n'avons pas encore précisé tous ces détails, mais vous pouvez voir, à l'article 10 du décret, ce que nous espérons de ce rapport.

Bien sûr, je crois qu'il serait bon, la prochaine fois que vous verrez le commissaire, de lui poser ces questions précises, étant donné que vous voulez savoir, après les élections, comment les choses se sont passées. Ce serait une excellente idée que les parlementaires le fassent.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Tantôt, j'ai commencé par parler des médias sociaux parce que j'ai essayé de me connecter à chacun d'eux, hier soir.

Il faudra sensibiliser les gens. Je sais qu'il fait partie du mandat du commissaire de sensibiliser et de toucher le plus d'électeurs possible, afin qu'ils soient au courant de la tenue des débats et de les encourager à aller voter. Est-ce quelque chose que vous souhaitez que le commissaire accomplisse?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le mandat comporte un volet d'information du public au sujet des débats. Le but n'est pas nécessairement d'encourager les gens à aller voter. Il faut au moins s'assurer que tous les Canadiens sont au courant de la tenue des débats des chefs et qu'ils sauront comment y avoir accès.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord, merci beaucoup.

Mon ordinateur ne fonctionne toujours pas.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Bonjour, madame la ministre. C'est un plaisir de vous voir, et une fois de plus, vous étiez très bien hier soir à Politics et The Pen. Vraiment, bravo.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Madame la ministre, vous avez parlé de l'indépendance de la Commission des débats. Je dirais qu'elle n'est pas vraiment indépendante, car si elle l'était, vous ne seriez pas ici aujourd'hui au sujet du budget des dépenses. Le Comité a déjà entendu le directeur général des élections et l'administration de la Chambre des communes au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses. Ni l'un ni l'autre, je tiens à le souligner, ne se sont fait représenter par un ministre, alors que vous êtes présente aujourd'hui.

Pourquoi n'avez-vous pas créé une Commission des débats entièrement indépendante, au lieu d'une commission au sein de votre propre ministère, ce qui permet au gouvernement en place d'exercer dessus un contrôle à la fois politique et financier?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'aimerais préciser que le directeur général des élections est, évidemment, un mandataire indépendant du Parlement, mais qu'il présente son Budget principal des dépenses par mon intermédiaire en qualité de ministre aussi. Je suis intimement convaincue qu'il est très indépendant dans ses actions et ses activités. Je pense qu'il est important de le préciser.

En ce qui concerne la Commission des débats, elle a été créée de manière à disposer des ressources nécessaires pour remplir son mandat, mais sans directive ou conversation entre le commissaire et le gouvernement une fois qu'elle a été établie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Votre présence devant le Comité aujourd'hui au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses me donne à penser que votre ministère a, en fait, le pouvoir ultime sur le budget de la Commission des débats. N'est-ce pas vrai?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En fait, une des choses que j'ai faites en tant que ministre a été de signer une autorisation qui permet à la Commission de prendre toutes les décisions...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord, mais avez-vous fourni cette autorisation signée?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... parce que les ministères doivent rendre compte de toute dépense publique, mais c'est la Commission qui prend toutes les décisions.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certes, mais même si vous affirmez ne pas vous ingérer dans les décisions budgétaires de la Commission, en fin de compte, c'est vous, en qualité de ministre, et le gouvernement en place qui avez ce pouvoir. Est-ce que ce n'est pas vrai?

M. Matthew Shea:

Puis-je intervenir?

Vous parlez du ministère de la ministre Gould, mais nous sommes ici en tant que BCP. Il est important de souligner que, contrairement à une commission d'enquête, par exemple, qui a le soutien du BCP, tout en étant indépendante, il s'agit d'une entité qui est, en fait, séparée, avec son propre budget des dépenses et son propre administrateur général, et elle est habilitée à prendre toutes ces décisions.

En ce qui concerne les finances, je suis son fournisseur de services indépendant. Elle en a fait le choix, alors qu'elle avait toute possibilité de choisir d'autres options et qu'elle a examiné d'autres options.

Pour ma part, mon équipe la soutient du point de vue des ressources humaines, des TI, des finances et dans les domaines connexes. Elle ne m'informe pas à ce sujet. Je n'informe pas la ministre et je n'informe pas M. Sutherland. Il n'y a donc aucune ingérence dans le processus. Il n'y a aucune ingérence dans aucune de ses dépenses.

Notre seul but, en tant que fournisseur de services, sera de veiller à ce qu'elle fasse les choses dans le respect de la politique et de la loi, ce qui est, me semble-t-il, dans l'intérêt de tous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le terme « indépendant » me soucie. Il reste très clair pour moi que la ministre et le gouvernement contrôlent bien le budget. Je me demande donc pourquoi vous feriez relever de votre ministère quelque chose d'aussi essentiel pour les institutions démocratiques qu'un débat des chefs et compromettriez l'indépendance et l'intégrité de la Commission en contrôlant son budget, au lieu d'en faire une organisation entièrement indépendante, comme Élections Canada.

(1120)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis ravie d'entendre les conservateurs souligner combien les débats des chefs sont importants à leurs yeux. C'est un changement de ton merveilleux et j'en suis heureuse, car j'espère que cela signifie qu'ils participeront pleinement à ces élections.

Si nous avons créé les débats des chefs et opté pour l'indépendance de ce processus, c'est en partie pour faire en sorte que tous les Canadiens puissent suivre ces débats et savoir qu'ils sont organisés dans l'intérêt public, pas avec des ententes en coulisse par lesquelles d'anciens premiers ministres essayaient de dicter les conditions dans lesquelles ces débats se dérouleraient.

Je suis enchantée d'entendre la position des conservateurs à cet égard.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je trouve votre commentaire décevant. On est loin d'une vraie réponse. Il me semble que si vous pensiez réellement que ce genre de chose est tellement important pour les Canadiens et tellement démocratique, madame la ministre, vous auriez au moins donné l'occasion de discuter de la création de la Commission des débats des chefs à la Chambre des communes. Vous n'avez même pas eu cette courtoisie, sans parler des nombreuses recommandations du Comité à propos de la Commission des débats que vous avez rejetées.La Chambre des communes n'a pas eu l'occasion de participer à cette conversation sur la Commission des débats.

Je dirais certainement que nous soutenons les processus démocratiques, mais, selon moi, nous avons ici un exemple de cas où votre ministère n'en a pas fait autant.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que tous les députés présents conviendront avec moi que le Comité, en tant que comité de la Chambre des communes, a fait une étude très solide sur les débats des chefs et participé à ce processus, parallèlement aux consultations publiques et aux tables rondes que nous avons organisées avec les parties intéressées.

Ce processus a notamment pour résultat qu'après les prochaines élections, le commissaire actuel rendra compte au Parlement et, plus particulièrement, au Comité, dans les six mois qui suivront les élections afin de parler du processus, de ce qui peut être amélioré, et de voir si la Commission devrait faire l'objet d'une loi.

Je suis reconnaissante à la Chambre des communes et, notamment, aux membres du Comité de leurs commentaires et de leur participation.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous déclarez cela, alors que la Commission des débats n'a même pas été débattue à la Chambre des communes.

Ceci reflète les recommandations du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre dont vous n'avez pas voulu. La fonction de commissaire aux débats relève du ministère des Institutions démocratiques et pas d'Élections Canada. Autrement dit, le gouvernement a choisi les critères de participation, au lieu que ce soit le commissaire en consultation avec le comité consultatif, et le gouvernement libéral a choisi unilatéralement le commissaire aux débats, sans consultation avec les autres partis politiques ni processus équitable, comme nous le recommandions.

J'ai l'impression que pour quelqu'un qui prétend qu'il s'agit d'un élément et d'une institution clés du processus démocratique, pour l'instant, vous n'avez pas créé et mis en place la Commission de manière très démocratique, madame la ministre.

Je vous remercie.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Puis-je répondre?

Le président:

Vous avez 15 secondes.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je l'ai dit à de nombreuses reprises — et je crois qu'il s'agit de ma quatrième comparution sur ce même sujet —, nous avons donné plein d'occasions de participer sur ce sujet même et je suis très reconnaissante de tous les commentaires, de tous les conseils donnés, de même que de toutes les questions posées par le Comité. Je pense que cela a conduit à la nomination d'un très illustre Canadien de confiance, de quelqu'un qui, à mon sens, sera capable de remplir ce mandat et de proposer aux Canadiens un débat qui sera dans l'intérêt public et auquel tous les Canadiens auront accès.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci,

La parole est maintenant à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre. C'est un plaisir de vous revoir.

Vous avez raison de dire que nous sommes revenus sur le sujet plusieurs fois. Je dois vous dire que j'ai même glissé à Tyler que je n'avais plus de questions tellement nous avons passé de temps dessus.

Je rappellerai, parce qu'il le faut, que la seule chose sur laquelle je suis d'accord avec mes collègues du caucus conservateur est que le processus a été maladroit. On n'a pas montré au Comité et au travail qu'il a fait autant de respect qu'il avait été promis lors des élections, et le nom a été choisi unilatéralement. Ce sont autant de reproches légitimes que le gouvernement doit entendre.

Cependant, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec la volonté de rendre la Commission tellement crédible que le prix à payer pour tout dirigeant politique qui ne participerait pas au débat des chefs serait plus grand que tout avantage à ne pas se montrer pour ne pas rendre de comptes et ne pas s'exposer à un examen. Je serai, toutefois, très clair dans mes critiques au gouvernement à propos de certaines maladresses qu'il a commises dans sa démarche et préciserai que ces critiques ne suffisent pas, à mon sens, à délégitimer l'existence de la Commission ni le choix de M. Johnston, en particulier. Il était difficile de trouver un Canadien qui soit inattaquable politiquement, mais vous l'avez trouvé et c'est important.

Je dois dire que l'interrogatoire serré auquel l'opposition officielle a soumis M. Johnston devenait presque embarrassant. Il a fini par déclarer, et je paraphrase, « Vous voulez avoir l'assurance que je m'acquitterai de cette fonction avec intégrité? Il y va de mon nom et de ma réputation. C'est de là que je tire ma crédibilité. »

Vous savez quoi? Pour moi, et je pense pour l'immense majorité des Canadiens, étant donné la carrière de M. Johnston au service du Canada et de l'intérêt public, c'est suffisant, du moment que le tout est lié à une reddition de comptes à la fin.

Je l'ai interrogé à ce sujet, j'ai insisté pour être certain que l'examen serait aussi vigoureux qu'il le doit, et là encore, j'ai été convaincu. Si je revenais à la prochaine législature, ce qui n'est pas le cas, je serais convaincu d'avoir devant moi l'analyse dont j'ai besoin pour déterminer si nous avons atteint les objectifs comme nous le voulions, notamment en matière de reddition de comptes.

Je pourrais prendre plus de temps et poser des questions, mais je préfère rester sur la surprise et le plaisir, que je partage avec vous, d'avoir entendu les conservateurs déclarer publiquement qu'ils pensent que c'est important et que cela compte. À présent, nous devons faire en sorte que ce processus soit tellement crédible que plus jamais un chef de parti ne se soustraira aux débats nationaux quand il ou elle aspire à devenir premier ministre de ce pays.

S'il me reste du temps, madame la ministre, sentez-vous libre de l'utiliser pour revenir sur quelque chose, sinon, nous pouvons passer à la suite, mais c'était le plus important. Je n'ai pas de question pour l'instant. Je crois que les questions vraiment importantes viendront après les faits, quand nous examinerons comment tout s'est déroulé et chercherons à déterminer ce qui peut être amélioré.

Très franchement, pour conclure, c'est le soir des débats qu'on aura la preuve. Toutes les places sont-elles occupées? Si elles le sont, nous saurons collectivement, dans la majorité, que nous avons réussi. S'il n'y a ne serait-ce qu'une place inoccupée, nous aurons échoué. Nous aurons échoué à créer le climat politique où on ne peut pas se permettre de payer ce prix. L'histoire nous dira ce qu'il en est.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Encore merci, madame la ministre.

(1125)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je tiens à vous remercier, monsieur Christopherson, de vos observations. Je prends note de toutes, des critiques comme du soutien.

Je crois que c'est en cela qu'il est important de passer par ce processus. Il est tout à fait essentiel d'avoir cet examen à la fin et cette reddition de comptes sur ce qui a fonctionné, ce qui n'a pas fonctionné, ce qui peut être amélioré, et de déterminer ce que nous pouvons faire pour faire de la Commission une solution à long terme.

Je sais que nous sommes tous deux très attachés au service public et à la responsabilisation, et que nous sommes convaincus de l'importance des débats des chefs au moment où les Canadiens choisissent la personne qu'ils veulent voir diriger le pays à l'avenir.

Je vous remercie de vos observations.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le président:

Je tiens à rappeler que la ministre se trouve ici parce que le Comité lui a demandé de venir. Elle n'était pas nécessairement obligée de venir.

Monsieur Bittle, vous avez la parole.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Pour revenir, encore, sur ce point, je ne crois pas que nous nous soyons jamais battus au sujet de la comparution d'un ministre devant le Comité. Il me semble que nous travaillons en bonne entente et, lorsque ces demandes sont faites, je sais que la ministre Gould a comparu quatre fois devant nous sur ce sujet et de nombreuses autres fois sur de nombreux autres sujets. Je ne comprends pas la critique formulée par Mme Kusie au début de son intervention, mais cela dit, j'aimerais ajouter quelque chose aux propos de M. Christopherson.

Il s'agit de ce qui s'est passé ces deux derniers mois au Comité. Je me répète, nous travaillons très bien ensemble et le ton est généralement respectueux au Comité. Cependant, quand nous avons reçu une série de témoins, à commencer par le greffier de la Chambre, nous avons vu le whip de l'opposition officielle contester son intégrité.

Ensuite, nous avons reçu le directeur général des élections, qui a comparu de nombreuses fois devant le Comité et qui collabore très bien avec lui. M. Poilievre a remis en question son intégrité et est allé jusqu'à laisser entendre, sans avancer aucune preuve, qu'Élections Canada est aux ordres des libéraux. Il n'a eu aucun scrupule à le faire et y a pris plaisir. Il est même allé jusqu'à me corriger quand j'ai fait une erreur en citant ses propos.

Puis on a franchi une autre étape.

M. Christopherson a très bien parlé de l'intégrité de M. Johnston. Peu de personnes au Canada ont une crédibilité aussi inattaquable, et on penserait qu'elles pourraient se présenter devant le Comité. Comme M. Christopherson, je pense qu'on peut ne pas s'entendre sur le processus de sélection des personnes et sur la façon dont la Commission a été créée, et ce sont des commentaires honnêtes. L'opposition a tout à fait le droit d'interroger le gouvernement sur son rôle et ses décisions, de même que sur la différence entre les recommandations du Comité et ce qui est, en fait, arrivé, et elle devrait poser ces questions. C'est le type de débat auquel je suis habitué au Comité.

Il est, cependant, choquant d'entendre ensuite l'opposition remettre en question la crédibilité personnelle de David Johnston à tel point qu'il a dû se défendre en soulignant l'ensemble de son travail.

Qu'en pensez-vous et quelle est votre impression au sujet de... je l'appellerais « Son Excellence », mais la règle est qu'on mette cinq dollars dans le pot pour un organisme de bienfaisance. Pouvez-vous parler de la crédibilité de David Johnston et des conversations que vous avez eues jusqu'ici?

(1130)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Certainement.

Tout d'abord, il est problématique, à mon sens, de voir la crédibilité de personnes très crédibles attaquée, en particulier lorsqu'elles font savoir très clairement qu'elles agissent en toute indépendance et qu'il n'existe aucune possibilité d'ingérence ou de pression. Selon moi, nous devrions les croire sur parole, surtout dans le cas de quelqu'un comme M. Johnston qui sert les Canadiens depuis des décennies. Toute sa carrière et sa vie ont été au service des Canadiens et il n'a jamais manifesté aucun esprit partisan.

Voilà quelqu'un qui a été nommé gouverneur général sur la recommandation du premier ministre Harper et qui a ensuite été nommé commissaire aux débats. Il est incroyablement impartial et toujours animé de l'esprit canadien.

C'est une caractéristique que nous recherchions chez la personne qui serait capable de gérer une question très politique et très partisane. En réalité, depuis que les débats des chefs existent, ils sont décidés en coulisse. Il y avait des manoeuvres politiques. Qui que ce soit qui dirigeait le pays à ce moment-là avait davantage voix au chapitre et plus de pouvoir pour ce qui est de décider où et quand les débats auraient lieu. Nous l'avons vu très clairement en 2015 quand le premier ministre d'alors a, au fond, dicté où et quand auraient lieu les débats et qui y participerait.

C'est pourquoi nous cherchions précisément quelqu'un qui pouvait se hisser au-dessus de la mêlée, quelqu'un en qui les Canadiens pourraient avoir confiance parce qu'ils sauraient qu'il n'y aurait pas l'ombre d'un esprit partisan, que ce ne serait pas politique et qu'il s'agirait purement de service public et de servir l'intérêt du Canada.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous remercie.

Peut-être vais-je vous poser des questions plus directement sur l'attaque contre la crédibilité d'Élections Canada et du directeur général des élections.

Je pense à ce qui se passe aux États-Unis et aux politiciens qui cherchent à marquer des points contre les institutions, en particulier les institutions indépendantes, qui font partie du processus démocratique. Je suis inquiet de voir que cela arrive ici, de voir que l'opposition se livre avec un malin plaisir à ce petit jeu, et je suis inquiet de voir qu'à la veille d'élections et en l'absence de toute preuve, on s'attaque avec jubilation au directeur général des élections et à Élections Canada, qui est un des organismes électoraux les plus respectés du monde.

Que pouvez-vous nous dire à ce sujet également?

(1135)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les élections reposent sur deux choses, selon moi, la confiance dans le processus et la confiance dans les résultats. Pour avoir les deux, il faut avoir confiance dans l'administrateur indépendant et impartial des élections. Il me semble que depuis sa création, Élections Canada est un parfait exemple dans le monde entier de cette impartialité et de cette indépendance.

Il veille à l'application de la loi électorale adoptée par le Parlement actuel, et de nombreux autres avant lui, de manière efficace et digne de confiance, pour les Canadiens. Il est, à mon sens, particulièrement dangereux de s'aventurer à contester l'indépendance, l'intégrité et l'impartialité de nos agents du Parlement indépendants.

Bien qu'à de nombreux égards, nous ne nous entendions pas toujours sur ses constatations ou ses directives, le fait est que nous lui avons, en tant que Parlement, accordé ce pouvoir et que nous devons le respecter. Nous pouvons ne pas être d'accord avec lui, mais nous ne devrions pas remettre en question ses motivations.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je tiens à vous féliciter de votre prestation hier soir et de votre étonnante capacité à jouer le jeu. C'est un merveilleux talent et je vous en félicite.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est un de mes rares talents, jouer le jeu.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Bittle.

La parole est à présent à Mme Kusie. [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Il est paradoxal que vous ne cessiez de mentionner la réputation et l'intégrité de la personne que vous avez choisie, M. David Johnston. La triste ironie de tout cela, c'est que, si vous vous étiez soumis à un processus équitable et transparent afin de le choisir, vous n'auriez pas eu l'occasion de remettre en question, non pas lui, mais la procédure employée pour le choisir. Je suis d'avis que c'est vraiment dommage pour lui. Je trouve notre discussion tout à fait paradoxale. Il n'y a aucun doute sur l'intégrité, l'expérience et le curriculum de M. Johnston, mais sur le processus, sur votre processus. En réalité, c'est votre processus qui est à l'origine de cette regrettable conversation.

J'aimerais passer au producteur. Il y aura un producteur qui organisera les débats pour la Commission et il s'agira probablement d'un consortium de médias. Au fond, le gouvernement a créé la Commission des débats et lui a donné un budget de 5,5 millions de dollars au cours d'une année où nous enregistrons un quatrième déficit consécutif, d'une année où le budget était censé être équilibré, d'après le premier ministre. Toutefois, comment pouvons-nous savoir que ces débats seront très différents des débats précédents, si c'est, en fait, ce consortium qui les organise?

Je vois les médias dans la salle aujourd'hui. Je vais vous demander si vous pensez que c'est le rôle de la Commission, et donc du gouvernement, de participer à votre organisation et à votre radiodiffusion.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En réponse à votre première question sur les 5,5 millions de dollars, il est important de souligner qu'il s'agit d'un montant maximal. D'un plafond. Nous voulions nous assurer, entre autres, que la Commission dispose d'assez de ressources pour produire un débat de qualité, à la hauteur des normes journalistiques et accessible à tous les Canadiens qui souhaitent le suivre.

Nous avons notamment entendu tout au long des consultations qu'il fallait veiller à ce que la Commission dispose de suffisamment de ressources. De plus, cela permet aussi de garantir une retransmission publique et gratuite pour quiconque veut la suivre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce que c'est parce que vous ne faisiez pas confiance aux médias? Parce que vous ne les pensiez pas capables de faire quelque chose qu'ils font depuis des années?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non, ce n'est pas du tout le cas. En fait, j'ai rappelé à maintes occasions le rôle important des médias dans notre démocratie, en particulier de notre média traditionnel. Nous n'aurions pas cette belle démocratie sans les journalistes extraordinaires qui, dans tout le pays, obligent les gouvernements à rendre des comptes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pourtant, vous donnez l'impression d'essayer de les contrôler en recourant à cette commission.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce n'est pas du tout le cas. C'est peut-être comme cela que vous voyez les choses, mais la Commission est créée pour que les débats soient largement accessibles. Le principal objectif, comme je ne cesse de la rappeler, madame Kusie, est de faire en sorte que l'intérêt public prime en ce qui concerne les débats. Il s'agit de faire en sorte qu'ils soient diffusés le plus largement possible.

Nous avons vu en 2015 comment un dirigeant politique a pu à lui seul changer, par intérêt politique, la nature des débats et l'ampleur de leur diffusion.

Le fait est que les Canadiens en sont arrivés à considérer les débats des chefs comme un moment politique important où ils prennent des décisions, observent les réactions spontanées de leurs dirigeants politiques et voient comment ils interagissent. Ils peuvent décider de qui ils veulent voir à la tête du pays.

(1140)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mais si c'est un producteur et, pour finir, un consortium, ne craignez-vous pas que des petites organisations médiatiques soient laissées de côté?

Il existe tellement de petites organisations médiatiques, de plateformes, et il est fort possible qu'elles ne fassent pas partie de ce processus démocratique à cause de cette motion.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'attirerai l'attention sur la demande de propositions, la DP, qui a été publiée et je soulignerai qu'elle a été créée par la Commission.

L'idée, et la teneur du décret, est justement de réunir le plus de participants possible. La décision lui revient. Le commissaire prendra cette décision en se fondant sur l'avis du comité consultatif qui a été mis en place. Le but est expressément de rendre le processus aussi accessible et inclusif que possible.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En contrôlant le processus? C'est ridicule. Il est complètement insensé de dire que vous favorisez la liberté des médias en créant une commission qui relève du ministère...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Madame Kusie, j'aimerais souligner que...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

... qui choisit le producteur et les membres du consortium pour mettre en oeuvre la Commission des débats. C'est totalement contraire à...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Si vous le permettez, le décret encourage expressément la Commission des débats et le commissaire à travailler en collaboration avec des partenaires dans tout le pays s'ils souhaitent également organiser d'autres débats.

Le commissaire doit veiller à ce qu'il y ait un débat en anglais et un débat en français. Il n'est en rien habilité à limiter le nombre de débats organisés. Au contraire, il doit soutenir les personnes qui souhaitent participer au processus et innover dans ce processus.

Pour aller à l'essentiel de votre question, il s'agit d'accessibilité, d'inclusion et de toucher les marchés mal desservis dans le passé.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Et merci d'avoir salué les médias, Althia Raje, etc.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Ma première question concerne le montant alloué à la Commission.

Comment avez-vous décidé que ce montant — le montant maximal ou le montant réel maintenant mentionné — serait approprié, étant donné les nombreuses variables inconnues dans l'organisation de ces débats?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous voulions nous assurer d'avoir des ressources suffisantes pour produire deux débats de qualité dans les deux langues officielles. Nous voulions aussi être certains d'avoir suffisamment pour rémunérer le commissaire et le secrétariat technique qui sera créé. Il s'agit d'un processus de 18 mois et il fallait veiller à ce qu'il ait des ressources suffisantes. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de produire les débats, mais aussi d'informer les Canadiens de ce qu'ils ont lieu. Il faut donc veiller à ce que la Commission dispose des ressources nécessaires pour remplir son mandat.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Qu'est-ce qui vous donne à penser que c'est suffisant?

M. Matthew Shea:

Nous avons fait la meilleure analyse possible quand nous avons fait la proposition de financement. Nous avons préféré prévoir plus d'argent. Nous avons prévu des fonds pour les services professionnels, étant donné qu'il faudrait conclure un contrat pour le déroulement des débats. Des services de communication seront nécessaires. Il faudra du personnel et un soutien administratif.

Nous avons déjà mis sur pied des organismes indépendants. Nous avons une expérience récente des commissions d'enquête, par exemple, ce qui nous a donné une idée des coûts. Quand on crée un organisme, il y a toujours des coûts de démarrage. C'est une des difficultés des organismes provisoires.

Je ne peux pas parler des dépenses de l'an dernier parce que les comptes ne sont pas officiellement clos et que les comptes publics ne sont pas publiés, mais je peux m'avancer à dire qu'elle aura, et que nous aurons, moins dépensé que prévu au cours du dernier exercice. En particulier, le soutien apporté par le BCP pour la création de la Commission a coûté nettement moins que prévu.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh, vraiment.

M. Matthew Shea:

La principale raison en est que le commissaire aux débats m'a clairement fait comprendre, dès le premier jour, qu'il voulait dépenser le moins possible et être le plus efficace possible. Nous avons examiné des locaux existants, du matériel existant. Par souci d'économie, il a demandé très peu de changements au bureau. Je sais que, du point de vue de nos dépenses, c'est beaucoup moins que prévu.

Je n'ai aucune raison de croire que la Commission ne s'en tiendra pas au budget qui lui a été alloué.

Je ne peux pas parler de certains détails pour des raisons de confidentialité, mais certains membres du comité consultatif, quand bien même ils ont droit à une indemnité journalière, ont choisi de ne pas en percevoir. Le commissaire aux débats lui-même a déjà fait savoir qu'il ferait don de sa rémunération à des organismes de bienfaisance.

Enfin, la Commission essaie de réduire les coûts de nombreuses façons, ce qui fait que nous n'avons aucune raison de croire que ce montant ne suffira pas. En fait, il restera probablement de l'argent.

(1145)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela fait plaisir à entendre.

Le commissaire, le secrétariat et les conseillers se sont vus offrir des salaires comparables à ceux d'autres commissaires.

M. Matthew Shea:

Tout à fait. Il y a un coût en personnel, comprenez-moi bien. Soyons clairs, le commissaire aux débats lui-même est payé, mais il fait don de cet argent à des organismes de bienfaisance. Il était impossible de ne pas le rémunérer, étant donné sa fonction. Il y a d'autres employés, soit environ cinq ETP pour cet exercice. Nous prévoyons qu'il y aura des dépenses salariales. Ces personnes ont droit à un salaire pour le travail assidu qu'elles accomplissent. Ce que je dis surtout, c'est que le commissaire aux débats ne ménage pas sa peine pour réduire les coûts au minimum.

Si la Commission nous confie ses tâches administratives, c'est en partie parce qu'elle ne voulait pas créer sa propre unité de services ministériels, alors que nous offrons couramment ce type de soutien à des organismes indépendants. Nous avons remis au commissaire une liste de ce que nous pouvions faire. Nous nous occupons de pratiquement tout son soutien administratif. Je pense que nous dépenserons aussi nettement moins que prévu au BCP aussi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais passer à autre chose. Nous avons parlé assez longuement du commissaire aux débats, nous l'avons reçu au Comité récemment et vous ne pouvez guère en dire plus à cause de l'indépendance de la Commission.

Mme Lapointe a posé une question au sujet de Facebook. En début de semaine, Facebook a mis en place une nouvelle version de son contrat d'utilisation afin de s'assurer que les personnes qui encouragent des messages ou publient des annonces d'emploi ne fassent pas de discrimination fondée sur le sexe ou de quelque autre manière que ce soit à l'égard des cibles de leur publicité. Avez-vous des idées similaires quant à ce qui peut être fait sur Facebook et sur d'autres plateformes de médias sociaux par rapport aux publicités politiques ou au micro-ciblage qu'on voit dans les campagnes, locales ou nationales, afin que l'électorat ne soit pas exclu de ce que les partis mettent sur leurs plateformes et dans leurs autres communications?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que le registre des publicités proposé par le Comité dans le projet de loi C-76 jouera un rôle très important en l'espèce. Facebook a déclaré qu'il allait créer un registre des publicités pour la période pré-électorale et électorale. Je pense que c'est une mesure vraiment importante parce que les Canadiens pourront voir toutes les publicités que les acteurs politiques diffusent au cours de cette période. C'est, selon moi, très important.

Je pense aussi que vous soulevez un point intéressant au sujet du micro-ciblage. C'est une conversation continue que nous avons. Je crois qu'il en sera aussi question pendant la réunion du Grand Comité qui aura lieu dans quelques semaines, par rapport à ce que signifie ce micro-ciblage auquel différents acteurs politiques recourent et au fait qu'on n'ait pas de vue d'ensemble. Ce qui est intéressant, entre autres, à mes yeux, c'est que si on fait de la publicité par des moyens plus traditionnels, comme la radio, la télévision ou les journaux, on voit toutes les différentes publicités politiques parce que ce sont des supports qu'on regarde. Dans les médias sociaux, on ne verra peut-être que les publicités d'un seul parti, par exemple, parce qu'on ne fait peut-être pas partie de la population ciblée. Il me semble que c'est une chose à laquelle nous devons réfléchir davantage afin de déterminer si cela correspond ou pas à l'esprit de notre loi électorale.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre, et mesdames et messieurs, de vous être joints à nous cet après-midi.

J'aimerais revenir très brièvement sur une réponse qui a été faite à Mme Sahota. On a indiqué que cinq équivalents temps plein font partie de la Commission. S'agit-il d'employés pour une période indéterminée du gouvernement du Canada ou de contractuels?

M. Matthew Shea:

Permettez-moi d'apporter quelques précisions; il s'agit d'un organisme distinct à l'intérieur du gouvernement, donc, de ce point de vue, et techniquement, ce sont tous des employés du gouvernement. La majorité d'entre eux sont engagés dans le cadre de contrats de courte durée ou pour une période déterminée. Je pense que l'un d'entre eux est en détachement d'un autre ministère. La composition de l'effectif est mixte. Il y a également quelques employés à temps partiel.

M. John Nater:

De manière générale, quand ces emplois prendront-ils fin?

M. Matthew Shea:

Je ne connais pas la date exacte, mais ce sera après les élections, évidemment.

Une voix: Le 20 mars 2020.

M. Matthew Shea: Très bien, le 20 mars.

(1150)

M. John Nater:

Super. Merci pour ces précisions.

Je regardais Ia demande de propositions qui a été soumise plus tôt cette semaine. L'alinéa 4.1c) se lit comme suit: « Une équipe d’évaluation composée de représentants du Canada évaluera les soumissions. » Qui seront ces représentants?

M. Matthew Shea:

Cette question est laissée à l'entière discrétion de la Commission. Je pourrais peut-être vous parler brièvement de la DDP. Mais il serait inapproprié de ma part d'aller plus loin, étant donné que la DDP est en cours.

La Commission des débats a transmis une demande d'information à des soumissionnaires potentiels pour cette acquisition avant de publier la DDP. Cela s'explique en partie... et je souhaitais attendre son retour, lorsque l'on a commencé à dire que ce serait un consortium des médias qui l'emporterait. L'objectif consistait, en partie, à offrir à des soumissionnaires potentiels la possibilité de poser des questions et d'obtenir des précisions sur le contrat afin de le rendre aussi accessible que possible.

La demande de propositions est en cours. La date de clôture est le 30 mai, et c'est pourquoi je pense que je ne devrais pas formuler d'autres commentaires à ce sujet, sauf pour dire que je sais que l'objectif visé est d'inciter de nombreux soumissionnaires à soumettre une proposition. C'est toujours l'objectif lorsque nous faisons ce genre d'exercice, parce que cela nous donne un plus grand choix et que c'est la façon la plus efficace de procéder. Pour ce qui est du choix proprement dit, pour revenir à la question qui a été posée à quelques reprises, il repose entièrement entre les mains du commissaire aux débats et de son équipe. Si on nous demande notre avis concernant le processus, nous serons ravis de les aider, mais même dans le cas de ce contrat, ils ont fait appel directement à Services publics, et non à nous, pour certaines étapes.

M. John Nater:

Donc, le Bureau du Conseil privé n'a eu aucun mot à dire sur la DDP qui a été publiée cette semaine.

M. Matthew Shea:

Absolument aucun.

M. John Nater:

L'exercice a relevé entièrement de Services publics.

La section M.2, qui indique certaines des exigences que le consortium des médias ou peu importe le nom que nous allons lui donner...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le soumissionnaire.

M. John Nater:

... que le soumissionnaire proposé, devra respecter est assez détaillée et ne semble pas, du moins, pencher en faveur des trois grandes sociétés de télédiffuseurs: CTV, CBC ou la Société Radio-Canada et Global.

J'aimerais avoir votre opinion, madame la ministre. Est-ce que cela vous inquiéterait si le seul soumissionnaire retenu était le consortium de CBC ou la Société Radio-Canada, CTV et Global?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne pense pas qu'il soit approprié pour moi de formuler des commentaires sur le processus de demande de propositions en ce moment.

M. John Nater:

D'accord.

Est-ce que cela vous inquiéterait si les nouveaux médias ou les plus petits médias comme APTN, la presse écrite, HuffPost Canada, CPAC et Maclean's ne participaient pas au processus?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, je ne pense pas qu'il soit opportun que je fasse des commentaires, étant donné que la DDP est en cours, mais le but visé, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, est que le processus soit aussi inclusif et fructueux que possible.

M. John Nater:

Je vais reformuler ma question. Seriez-vous déçue si, au final, le débat ne concernait que le consortium des médias, comme ce fut le cas lors des élections précédentes?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Compte tenu du fait que la DDP est actuellement active, et qu'il s'agit d'un processus indépendant, je ne voudrais pas faire de commentaire susceptible d'être préjudiciable à la décision, quelle qu'elle soit.

M. John Nater:

Je vois qu'il me reste environ une minute. Je vais faire un bref commentaire, et donner la chance ensuite à Mme Kusie de poser une dernière question.

Je serais préoccupé si nous nous retrouvions dans la situation d'investir une somme considérable dans la création de cette commission pour constater par la suite qu'une gamme d'opinions médiatiques sont mises à l'écart du processus de débat proprement dit. Que ce soit bon ou mauvais, il y a eu cinq débats la dernière fois — organisés par divers groupes. Ils ont suscité la controverse — je n'ai pas l'intention de le nier — mais il y a eu une variété de débats, et je serais exceptionnellement déçu si les nouveaux médias et la diversité des médias ne participaient pas à ce processus.

II me reste 34 secondes, je vais laisser Mme Kusie en profiter.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certainement.

En ce qui a trait aux litiges qui toucheraient la Commission des débats, autrement dit, si la Commission était visée par un litige, est-ce que ce sera vous qui donnerez des instructions aux avocats ou le commissaire aux débats lui-même?

M. Matthew Shea:

Il faudrait confirmer le cadre juridique exact. Normalement, ce serait le ministère, en l'occurrence, le Commissaire aux débats, mais je pense que ça reste à confirmer. Je pense que ce que l'on peut dire avec certitude, c'est que nous allons respecter l'indépendance de l'organisme, et que toutes les mesures seront prises sans lien de dépendance, autant que possible.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

La Commission aura-t-elle la possibilité de faire appel à des conseillers juridiques externes, si elle le souhaite, ou devra-t-elle se tourner vers les avocats qui relèvent du procureur général?

M. Matthew Shea:

Je vous fais toutes mes excuses, mais je vais devoir vous revenir pour les tenants et aboutissants de cette question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Très bien.

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Matthew Sea: Connaissez-vous la réponse, Allen?

M. Allen Sutherland (secrétaire adjoint au Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et Institutions démocratiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Je suppose que cela dépendrait de la nature du différend.

Le président:

Il nous reste encore sept minutes. Je vais donc accorder à M. Graham et à M. Christopherson, un tout petit peu de temps, s'ils le souhaitent.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

C'est très bien. Je n'ai pas besoin de beaucoup de temps. Je voulais simplement revenir sur l'un des points qu'a mentionnés John Nater.

Seriez-vous déçue si un chef de parti refusait de participer à un débat organisé par la Commission?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, pour le moment, je pense que les raisons pour lesquelles nous mettons la Commission des débats en place sont très claires. Elles visent particulièrement à éviter les circonstances malheureuses qui se sont produites en 2015. Cependant, bien que 2015 ait marqué un moment où l'on a été à même de constater clairement les raisons pour lesquelles le processus ne fonctionnait pas, il est encore clair aujourd'hui que la manière dont les débats étaient organisés posait des problèmes. Notre initiative vise donc à corriger ces problèmes et à affirmer, comme je l'ai dit à maintes reprises, que nous travaillons à promouvoir l'intérêt public.

Il est à espérer qu'aucun chef de parti n'en vienne à penser qu'il peut se dispenser de se présenter devant les Canadiens s'il cherche vraiment à devenir premier ministre. Je pense que c'est un élément vraiment important des rouages de notre démocratie et de la manière dont les Canadiens nouent le dialogue avec les chefs des partis politiques.

(1155)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Existe-t-il des mesures visant à empêcher un futur gouvernement de déclarer que toute cette histoire de débats est vraiment trop démocratique pour qu'on y donne suite, et d'y mettre fin?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous avons effectivement mis en place une première étape nous permettant d'évaluer le déroulement du processus. L'idée est que le commissaire présentera un rapport faisant état de ses conclusions sur le déroulement du processus, sur les améliorations éventuelles et ses recommandations en vue d'en faire un processus conçu pour durer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais prendre un moment, encore une fois, pour réaffirmer notre position le plus clairement possible, en mon nom personnel, en celui de mon caucus et en celui de mon parti. Le processus a laissé un peu à désirer. J'ai fait mon possible pour que le gouvernement rende des comptes à ce sujet — de façon répétée, avec force et légitimité, selon moi. Comme l'a indiqué M. Bittle, il s'agit au moins d'un point dont il est légitime de débattre.

Voilà où nous en sommes. La nomination d'un commissaire est acceptable pour nous, et les règles de fonctionnement le sont également. Au NPD, nous n'avons pas eu notre mot à dire plus que les conservateurs, mais nous croyons qu'il s'agit d'un élément important de notre démocratie. Nous n'étions pas, en tant que pays, bien servis par les processus et les tactiques antérieures, et je ne suis pas en train de dire que mon parti est blanc comme neige à cet égard.

Il nous incombe à tous de faire le nécessaire pour respecter et appuyer la Commission des débats, parce qu'il s'agit d'un volet important de notre démocratie. Nous avons l'exemple des États-Unis où depuis très longtemps maintenant, il existe une commission indépendante qui mène ces débats. Les Américains se disputent à tout propos, mais je n'ai entendu personne suggérer que leur système et leur processus étaient inéquitables ou servaient à des fins partisanes.

J'espère que la Commission obtiendra du succès, que tous les chefs de parti se présenteront aux débats, et que les Canadiens obtiendront ce dont ils ont besoin dans le cadre de ce processus. Je suis persuadé que le prochain Parlement fera preuve de toute la diligence requise pour ce qui est d'exiger que le gouvernement et le commissaire rendent des comptes concernant l'argent dépensé, les décisions prises et les procédures suivies.

Je trouverais très démoralisant — et je vais conclure sur cet énoncé, en regardant les élections se dérouler sans moi, du moins en tant que candidat — que l'on remette en question la légitimité de la Commission, et que l'on se serve de ce prétexte pour offrir une stratégie de sortie à l'un des chefs de parti ou à quiconque voudrait se dispenser de rendre des comptes ou de se prêter à l'examen dont ces débats fournissent l'occasion.

Nous souhaitons bonne chance à la Commission. Nous espérons qu'elle aura du succès. Malgré tout, et sous réserve d'incidents qui pourraient survenir, nous sommes déterminés à participer et à la soutenir. Ce Comité a fait du bon travail.

J'aimerais faire valoir un dernier point. J'espère qu'il y a eu une bonne analyse des propositions qu'a faites ce Comité... Nous avons passé beaucoup de temps, nous avons travaillé fort à l'élaboration de notre rapport, et nous avons été déçus de voir qu'une bonne partie de notre travail avait été mise de côté par le gouvernement, alors même qu'il avait promis de faire les choses différemment.

À ce point-ci, il nous incombe à tous de faire en sorte que cette Commission remporte du succès, selon moi, et je le dis en tant que démocrate avec un « d » minuscule, et pas seulement en tant que démocrate avec un « D » majuscule. Rien n'est plus précieux que notre démocratie, et voici un moyen important de renforcer cette démocratie.

(1200)

Le président:

Merci, David. C'était très éloquent, comme d'habitude.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Selon moi, le problème avec les anciens débats ne tenait pas au fait que les chefs ne voulaient pas participer, mais au contraire, au fait que certains chefs souhaitaient participer, mais étaient exclus. Cette question ne semble pas avoir fait surface aujourd'hui. Sera-ce le cas, et est-ce que la chef du Parti vert sera incluse dans les débats qui relèveront de la Commission des débats lors des élections de 2019?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En bout de ligne, toutes les décisions seront prises par le commissaire aux débats lui-même. Cependant, compte tenu des critères ayant été établis, les chefs de partis politiques doivent répondre à deux des trois critères. Premièrement, avoir été élu à titre de député à la Chambre pour le parti qu'il ou elle dirige, ou compter un député élu; deuxièmement, soutenir des candidats dans 90 % de toutes les circonscriptions; et troisièmement, avoir une véritable possibilité d'être élu à la Chambre, compte tenu des sondages d'opinion et du contexte politique.

M. Scott Reid:

Le troisième critère est, évidemment, le plus difficile à déterminer, alors il soulève la question suivante, est-ce que l'on nous a soumis des critères qui nous permettront de savoir avant la période électorale plutôt qu'à mi-chemin quel chef sera admissible ou non?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Cette décision appartient au commissaire.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais demander que le Comité écrive au commissaire aux débats pour lui demander la réponse à cette question. Je la lui ai déjà posée lorsqu'il s'est présenté ici, et il semblait convaincu de devoir fournir une réponse à cette question. Le moment est peut-être venu de lui écrire et de lui présenter cette demande, afin que nous sachions comment il va interpréter ce critère.

Le président:

Vous voulez écrire au commissaire aux débats.

M. David Christopherson:

Lui écrire pour lui poser une question.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux lui demander de nous fournir des précisions sur la signification du troisième critère.

Le président:

Certainement. Je vais le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Le crédit 1, sous la rubrique « Commission aux Débats des Chefs » est-il adopté? COMMISSION AUX DÉBATS DES CHEFS

ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme.....4 520 775 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence)

Le président: Maintenant que nous avons réglé le cas de la Commission aux débats, de la Chambre des communes, du Service de protection parlementaire et du Bureau du directeur des élections, devrais-je faire rapport du Budget principal des dépenses à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président:Merci beaucoup et merci d'être venue. C'est toujours un plaisir de vous voir.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Pour moi aussi.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la réunion pendant quelques minutes pendant que nous nous préparons à nous occuper des affaires du Comité.

(1200)

(1215)

Le président:

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 156e réunion du Comité. Je rappelle aux députés que la réunion est télédiffusée.

Il n'y a que deux ou trois points à l'ordre du jour. D'abord, la motion proposée par M. Christopherson pour que l'on modifie le Règlement, et également, potentiellement, la motion de M. Reid. Maintenant que nous avons achevé une étude, avec un peu de chance, nous parviendrons à finaliser sa motion avant peu.

Un autre comité vient tenir une réunion dans cette salle, donc nous allons terminer à 13 heures pile. J'aimerais poursuivre à huis clos pour une question vraiment mineure à la fin, soit cinq minutes avant 13 heures.

Monsieur Christopherson, votre motion est maintenant à l'étude. Vous l'avez déjà présentée. Je vois que vous avez soumis deux documents au Comité, cependant, qui contribuent à la préciser et à la simplifier. Il s'agit d'une documentation assez imposante, dont vous avez fait un bon résumé. Vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci, monsieur le président. J'apprécie vos observations.

Pour reprendre à partir du moment où Mme Sahota a fini, nous pourrions avoir achevé le tout en l'espace de 10 minutes. À mon avis, les choses peuvent se passer de deux manières. Selon la première, nous aurons fini en l'espace de 10 minutes, et tout le monde dira oui, nous allons nous pencher sur cette question et témoigner un peu de respect aux personnes qui ont accompli tout ce travail. Nous pourrions déterminer l'ampleur que nous souhaitons donner à cette étude, une fois que nous aurons pris cette décision.

En revanche, si nous n'acceptons pas, il existe une autre possibilité que cette discussion se poursuive pendant un assez long laps de temps. Il me semble déraisonnable de notre part de ne pas offrir à ce groupe de collègues la possibilité d'être au moins entendus.

Cette motion se présente en parallèle avec une autre motion déposée à la Chambre qui entraîne des effets comparables. Nous n'aurons qu'à laisser ces deux motions suivre leur cours comme il se doit. La question, en ce qui nous concerne, consiste à décider si nous sommes prêts à en faire l'étude dès maintenant. Quand nous en aurons terminé ou pas, et l'ampleur que nous voulons donner à notre étude sont des détails qui peuvent être réglés après le fait.

Monsieur le président, je pense que j'ai terminé mes brèves observations la dernière fois pratiquement sur la même note, en ce sens que j'essaie d'établir quel est le sentiment de mes collègues à ce sujet. Soit tout ira très vite, et nous décidons d'aller de l'avant avec l'étude et il ne restera qu'à régler les détails, soit nous nous engageons dans un tout autre monde où... Je vais me montrer optimiste, et espérer que nous n'entrerons pas dans ce monde. Il est inutile d'expliquer ce que je veux dire par ce monde dans lequel j'ai bon espoir de ne pas aller.

Encore une fois, j'implore — littéralement, je les implore — mes collègues. Les députés d'arrière-ban éprouvent passablement de frustration en raison du sentiment permanent de ne pas participer pleinement au processus décisionnel. Depuis des décennies, le Cabinet du premier ministre accroît ses pouvoirs. Certains présidents des États-Unis ont déclaré publiquement être prêts à donner n'importe quoi pour posséder la somme de pouvoir direct dont un premier ministre majoritaire dispose dans notre système. C'est compréhensible. Je m'adresse au leadership de tous les caucus de la Chambre lorsque je dis cela à tout le moins; si cette soupape de sûreté n'est pas déclenchée, ces frustrations ne vont pas disparaître. Elles ne feront que s'accumuler.

J'ai décrit publiquement à quelques reprises ce qui, selon moi, va se produire dans le futur. Comme le grand public exige une réforme du système démocratique parce qu'il constate qu'il ne répond pas à ses besoins actuels, il va élire des personnes qui auront pour mandat d'aller corriger des problèmes. Cela ne mène nulle part. Il faut s'occuper de la situation. Soit c'est la majorité des députés qui accueilleront à bras ouverts le changement et se montreront équitables, ou alors nous devrons faire face à des blocages et à des tentatives contrariées de se faire entendre. Cette situation ne fera qu'entraîner des actions de plus en plus extrêmes et vastes de la part des futurs députés. Je ne vois pas comment il pourrait en être autrement.

Encore une fois, je veux demeurer optimiste. Je n'ai obtenu de mes collègues aucune indication, que ce soit en privé ou en public, de la direction que nous allons prendre concernant cette motion.

Je demanderais à ce que mon nom soit remis sur la liste lorsque je céderai la parole. J'ai très envie d'entendre ce que mes collègues ont à dire à ce sujet. Encore une fois, selon moi, nous pourrions sortir d'ici dans quelques minutes, ou alors nous lancer dans un débat sur cette question qui pourrait s'éterniser beaucoup plus longtemps que nous l'aurions jamais cru.

(1220)

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Kusie, puis M. Graham, et ensuite Mme Lapointe.

Aviez-vous levé la main, vous aussi, madame Sahota?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, mais n'inscrivez pas mon nom tout de suite. Je vais écouter ce que les autres ont à dire. Peut-être que ce ne sera pas nécessaire.

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je dois me montrer très sincère et reconnaître que certains de mes collègues, même ici, ont participé à cette étude. Par ailleurs, certains membres du caucus conservateur qui en font partie depuis de nombreuses années et qui se sont même portés candidats à la direction sont favorables à ce que l'on étudie la possibilité d'apporter de tels changements.

Je mentirais si je vous disais que certaines de ces idées ne suscitent aucun intérêt au sein de mon caucus. Ce serait faux. L'intérêt existe parce que nos membres, au même titre que ceux du NPD et du Parti libéral, souhaitent eux aussi que l'on reconsidère — faute d'un meilleur terme — les pouvoirs.

Je sens effectivement un intérêt et une envie de se pencher sur les idées proposées dans cette motion, mais peut-être que je me contenterai de présenter un amendement favorable demandant que la motion soit modifiée par l'ajout du texte suivant: pourvu que le Comité ne fasse aucun rapport des recommandations à la Chambre sans avoir obtenu le consentement unanime de ce Comité.

Je sais que certains membres du Comité, sinon tous les membres — disons, certains membres, il est préférable de le formuler ainsi — de ce Comité ont fait savoir qu'ils trouvaient important d'obtenir le consentement unanime sur des points comme celui-ci, c'est pourquoi je pense que cet amendement préserve l'esprit et la lettre de ce souhait des autres membres du Comité. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, je mentirais si je disais que personne au sein de notre caucus ne s'intéresse à la discussion et à l'exploration de ces idées.

Je propose cet amendement favorable.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Graham, mais juste avant, pourrais-je obtenir une réponse d'un seul mot de la part de M. Christopherson pour savoir s'il accepte cette proposition à titre d'amendement favorable?

M. David Christopherson:

Pourriez-vous le répéter, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous allons en faire la distribution, monsieur le président, pardonnez-moi de ne pas l'avoir fait auparavant. Je vous fais toutes mes excuses; c'est de ma faute.

M. David Christopherson:

Ne vous en faites pas. Ce n'est pas obligatoire.

Le président:

Très bien, la parole est à M. Graham, et puis nous reviendrons à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai qu'un bref commentaire. Madame Kusie, je ne m'oppose pas du tout à votre amendement. Ma seule préoccupation, ma seule demande — et je le dis en toute sincérité — c'est qu'aucun député ne s'oppose à une recommandation simplement pour s'y opposer, afin que les recommandations soient prises en considération honnêtement et de bonne foi; ainsi, nous pouvons éviter ce genre de situation où l'on dit, oui, nous allons adopter le modèle consensuel, jusqu'à ce quelqu'un s'insurge et proteste en disant, « Non, non, non », parce que ce serait vraiment dommage.

Je veux que vous nous donniez l'assurance, pour le compte rendu, que ce ne sera pas le cas, et que le modèle consensuel sera sincère, et que tous les points seront pris en considération. Si c'est le cas, c'est avec grand plaisir que j'appuie cet amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Voulez-vous que je réponde?

Peut-être que je ne comprends pas exactement ce à quoi vous... Je dirais seulement que, si vous faites référence à... Le seul mot qui me vient à l'esprit est la « malveillance » d'un député qui voudrait cacher quelque chose. Évidemment, il faudrait que vous obteniez la même assurance de la part de tous les autres membres du Comité, et pas seulement de ma part.

Je ne vois aucune raison de contrarier ces changements proposés spécifiquement. Ce n'est un secret pour personne que je reste en contact avec mon caucus au sujet de tous les points qui seront abordés et de l'orientation de l'étude, mais comme je viens de le dire, j'ai senti un intérêt sincère pour l'étude de ces idées. Si mon caucus est favorable à ce que l'on étudie ces questions, en tant que porte-parole de l'opposition en matière d'institutions démocratiques, je le suis aussi.

(1225)

Le président:

Très bien.

Sur l'amendement, madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Dois-je parler de l'amendement ou puis-je faire les commentaires que je voulais faire?

Le président:

Il est question de l'amendement.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Très bien.

Je serais plutôt d'accord pour que ce soit des recommandations unanimes. [Traduction]

Le président:

Très bien.

Sur l'amendement, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'étais favorable à l'amendement jusqu'à ce que j'entende l'explication de Mme Kusie, qui aurait pu se résumer facilement à « oui, nous allons étudier véritablement chacune de ces propositions », au lieu de quoi, nous avons obtenu une réponse emberlificotée.

Je pense que j'aimerais bien entendre ce qu'a à dire M. Christopherson avant de prendre ma décision concernant l'amendement.

Le président:

Mais avant, il faut entendre M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je serai très bref.

Je pense que nous pourrions véritablement travailler selon un mode consensuel.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, je suis d'accord.

M. John Nater:

J'en ai parlé avec M. Baylis. Lors de notre conversation, il m'avait suggéré — et je ne suis pas en train de raconter ce que l'on devrait taire — de travailler selon un mode consensuel.

De notre point de vue, en tant que parti de l'opposition officielle, il y a une quantité d'information que nous souhaiterions vraiment étudier. Il y aura des éléments dont nous n'approuverons peut-être pas l'orientation générale. D'autres avec lesquels M. Christopherson, ou les libéraux, pourraient ne pas être d'accord. Il y aura peut-être des arguments auxquels nous tiendrons à tout prix, ou peut-être pas.

Cependant, en ce qui concerne l'approche, elle m'intéresse vraiment.

J'irais même un peu plus loin. J'espère que nous pourrons également, en parallèle, mettre également un point final à notre étude de la deuxième chambre. J'aimerais que l'on fasse rapport des résultats de cette étude aussi à la Chambre des communes. Il y a un peu de chevauchement, mais je ne voudrais surtout pas que cette étude n'aille pas de l'avant, parce qu'à mon avis, nous avons fait du bon travail et de solides recherches dans ce cas aussi.

Le président:

Pour le moment, l'examen du rapport préliminaire sur la deuxième Chambre que l'attaché de recherche a rédigé est fixé au premier mardi après notre retour.

Ruby Sahota, vouliez-vous vous exprimer sur l'amendement? Vous étiez inscrite sur la liste au départ.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Non.

Le président: Très bien.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais aborder deux points.

Premièrement, nous avons toujours préféré que tout changement apporté au Règlement, tout comme aux lois électorales, obtienne l'approbation de tous les partis. C'est mon premier point. C'est en quelque sorte, notre position implicite.

Deuxièmement, c'est nouveau, et cela pourrait potentiellement modifier la structure du pouvoir. Ce ne sera pas facile, et ce ne sera pas simple. À ce moment-ci, j'accepterais pratiquement n'importe quel amendement, pourvu qu'il ne soit pas carrément inacceptable, si nous pouvons obtenir le consentement unanime d'étudier ce que je propose dans la motion. En ce qui me concerne, c'est le principal.

Voici ces deux points: premièrement, la préférence que tout changement de ce genre, ou à des lois électorales, alors qu'il est question de modifier les règles imposées par l'arbitre, doive bénéficier, dans une situation idéale, de l'appui de tous les partis en cause, y compris les indépendants, d'ailleurs, étant donné que ces questions les touchent eux aussi.

Deuxièmement, il est vraiment important que cela soit entendu, que cela soit exposé au grand jour. Dans la mesure du possible, je pense que nous devrions faire des pieds et des mains pour que cela se produise. Bien franchement, si c'est le seul amendement qu'il nous faut pour obtenir le consensus, et envoyer le message que nous voulons que ce soit entendu et que nous voulons fournir à nos collègues un endroit pour venir exprimer leurs préoccupations et formuler leurs recommandations, dans ce cas, j'accepte bien sûr l'amendement favorable et j'apprécie la sincérité avec laquelle il a été présenté.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Christopherson, pour revenir à point, j'aimerais présenter mes excuses à M. Bittle. En ce qui concerne l'esprit dans lequel j'ai formulé ma réponse à M. Graham, j'aurais trouvé moins sincère de ma part de répondre simplement par oui. Mon intention était d'apporter plus de sincérité, si vous voulez, à ma réponse.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez raison. Je suis convaincue qu'il faut réaliser cette étude. Je crois que c'est ainsi que l'information est diffusée largement dans les médias et les médias sociaux. Ces idées sont entendues, et cette étude fera en sorte qu'elles se répandent. La possibilité existe que ces idées fassent leur chemin jusqu'au grand public et dans la société canadienne, simplement après avoir été entendues ici.

Merci de le reconnaître.

(1230)

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un a quelque chose à ajouter au sujet de l'amendement?

(L'amendement est adopté.)

Le président: Maintenant, revenons à la motion principale.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Évidemment, j'appuie très fortement cette motion. Je pense qu'il est très important de passer en revue ces modifications.

Personne ne nous demande d'approuver en bloc la totalité des changements proposés. Mais il est très important d'examiner chacun des points, un par un, et de se demander s'ils ont du sens. Il s'agit d'en discuter comme il se doit, sans perte de temps, mais en étudiant chaque point convenablement et en essayant de terminer cette étude dans les délais pour qu'elle soit adoptée à la Chambre, de sorte que lorsque nous reviendrons, l'an prochain — en espérant que la majorité d'entre nous reviendront — nous pourrons faire en sorte de mettre ces règles en vigueur.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Dans ce qui est proposé, il y a des sections très différentes les unes des autres. Pour ce qui est d'établir une seconde chambre de débat, nous avons fait une étude là-dessus. Je crois que nous allons faire le rapport, alors cela viendrait en quelque sorte combler cet aspect.

Il faudrait que des gens viennent nous en parler. Par exemple, on parle du pouvoir du Président, et j'aimerais entendre des témoins à ce sujet. On parle des comités; j'aimerais entendre des gens qui ont déjà vécu cela et qui pourraient nous dire quels avantages et désavantages ils ont pu voir par la suite.

Étudier la motion article par article, c'est une chose. Personnellement, il faudra que j'entende des gens parler des différents sujets. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je pense que nous sommes tous sur la même longueur d'ondes. Je ne dirai rien qui pourrait faire dérailler ce processus. À mon avis, nous sommes en bonne position, et j'espère que la motion sera adoptée.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Il s'agit d'une motion pour le moins volumineuse, avec ses 19 pages. Je suppose que nous nous engageons à dire que la majorité du temps qui nous reste avant la fin de cette législature sera consacrée à ce sujet. Afin de nous assurer de tirer le meilleur parti de ce temps, je me demande s'il serait possible pour les représentants des divers partis de se parler et de discuter avec vous, monsieur le président, de la manière dont nous allons structurer ce temps pour qu'il soit utilisé le plus efficacement possible.

Le président:

Jamais je ne m'engagerai sur l'utilisation future de notre temps. Il se produit tellement de choses dans ce Comité — questions de privilège, etc. De toute évidence, actuellement, cette question se situe au premier plan. Cependant, toute discussion est la bienvenue.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait bien de pouvoir commencer dès que nous rentrerons de la semaine de relâche.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter concernant la motion visant à ce que l'on étudie ce document?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David Christopherson:

Était-ce à l'unanimité?

Le président:

Oui.

Nous mettrons cette étude à l'ordre du jour dès que possible.

Maintenant, passons à la motion de M. Reid. Nous en avons fait l'étude. Nous pouvons procéder de trois manières différentes. Premièrement, nous avons approuvé cette motion, aussi nous pourrions tout simplement la transmettre à la Chambre. Deuxièmement, nous avons entendu des témoins fort intéressants et avons recueilli beaucoup d'information. Nous pourrions demander à notre attaché de recherche de rédiger un rapport, auquel nous pourrions joindre la motion à titre de recommandation. Troisièmement, nous pourrions modifier la motion. Je vais vous faire part d'un sujet de préoccupation qui m'est venu à son sujet, et il pourrait y en avoir d'autres. Il s'agit d'une motion très technique. Je pense que nous sommes tous d'accord sur le principe que le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre devrait étudier ceci, et continuer de le faire. C'est le sens de cette motion.

Il m'a semblé que dans sa formulation actuelle, il faudrait obtenir le consentement de la Chambre chaque année pour que cette étude fasse partie du mandat du Comité. C'est déjà suffisamment difficile d'obtenir le consentement de la Chambre pour les procédures et les affaires qui concernent notre Comité, parce que nous sommes très occupés. Si nous nous mettons d'accord pour que cela relève du Comité, je suggérerais d'attendre que la Chambre l'approuve avant de l'indiquer dans la formulation.

Je cède la parole à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, si vous voulez supprimer cette condition particulière... elle visait uniquement à faire en sorte que cette partie du Règlement prenne fin une fois que les rénovations de l'édifice du Centre seront achevées. C'est la logique que j'ai suivie. En toute justice, peut-être que c'est loin dans le futur, et que nous ne devrions pas nous en préoccuper.

Ce serait assez simple de supprimer cette condition dans le Règlement. Je pense que cette condition particulière pourrait être supprimée. Je sais qu'en tant que président, vous n'êtes pas censé proposer des amendements, mais si quelqu'un d'autre souhaite suggérer cet amendement, je suis tout à fait disposé à l'accepter. Nous pourrions ensuite aller voir...

(1235)

Le président:

Nous avons déjà adopté votre motion, aussi nous ne pouvons pas lui apporter d'amendement.

M. David Christopherson:

Pourquoi pas?

Le président:

Mais nous pouvons présenter une autre motion.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, nous pouvons adopter une autre motion.

Le président:

Pour poursuivre, je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit une bonne idée de mettre fin à ce mandat, parce que l'édifice de l'Ouest, mais on entend encore des commentaires sur les choses qui pourraient être modifiées ici. Ensuite, ils vont se tourner vers l'édifice de la Confédération et tous ces autres édifices. L'édifice du Centre n'est que le début. Je pense que nous devrions laisser aux futurs Comités de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre la décision de retirer cette surveillance de leur mandat. Je pense que c'est une bonne chose que nous nous intéressions à la cité parlementaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez raison de dire que la Vision et plan à long terme est un plan à très long terme, et cela a commencé il y a de nombreuses années. L'édifice de l'Ouest n'a pas été le premier, et l'édifice du Centre ne sera pas le dernier. Lorsque nous aurons terminé la réfection de tous les édifices, il sera probablement temps de recommencer avec le premier.

Il s'agit d'un mandat continu et permanent de surveiller la structure et le fonctionnement de la Colline du Parlement.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends votre point. Je pense avoir déjà raconté que lorsque j'étais adolescent, j'avais travaillé pour une firme d'ingénierie — Clemann Large Patterson consulting engineers — alors qu'ils en étaient arrivés aux dernières étapes de la rénovation de l'édifice de l'Est. Aujourd'hui, cet édifice a besoin de rénovations, alors vous voyez ce que je veux dire.

Le président:

Le greffier me dit que si le Comité est d'accord, il pourrait revenir à la prochaine réunion avec une nouvelle formulation.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d'accord.

Le président:

Très bien, alors, c'est ce que nous ferons.

Nous reviendrons avec une motion améliorée. Souhaitez-vous que cela fasse partie d'un rapport, afin que nous puissions inscrire au compte rendu tout ce que nous avons entendu de nos témoins aux fins de futures discussions, ou voulez-vous simplement faire approuver la motion et la transmettre à la Chambre?

M. Scott Reid:

J'aurais tendance à dire de seulement transmettre la.... Finalement, je ne suis pas certain de savoir quoi répondre, parce qu'il faut tenir compte de deux éléments. Premièrement, nous présentons une motion qui vise à modifier le Règlement. Je suppose que cela devrait être présenté de façon indépendante. Cela pourrait paraître étrange d'inclure quoi que ce soit d'autre dans cette motion.

Par contre... Merci d'avoir fait circuler le dernier numéro du Hill Times. Je pense que Rob Wright a vraiment bien résumé ce que je m'efforçais de dire. Je pense qu'il serait utile que notre Comité en parle — je ne sais si ce devrait être dans le même rapport ou dans un rapport séparé — de manière à ce que la Chambre puisse l'approuver avant septembre, lorsqu'ils vont commencer à bloquer la moitié de la pelouse en avant pendant une période indéterminée.

J'ai ici un article intitulé « 'Appetite suppressant' needed for Centre Block wish lists, says PSPC ». On n'a jamais dit aussi vrai. Lors de précédentes réunions, j'ai demandé à plusieurs reprises qui étaient les partenaires parlementaires. Eh bien, maintenant, je sais ce qu'ils voulaient dire. Le Sénat dans son ensemble, la Chambre des communes dans son ensemble, et la Bibliothèque du Parlement dans son ensemble ont transmis les éléments suivants sur leurs listes de souhaits. Tout le monde dit, « Nous aimerions avoir telle et telle chose », et tout le monde dit, « Ce serait vraiment bien si notre truc pouvait se trouver juste ici, dans l'édifice du Centre ». En tant qu'ancien locataire d'un bureau dans l'édifice du Centre, je comprends parfaitement pourquoi les gens voudraient obtenir telle et telle chose. Cependant, nous savons désormais que pour permettre d'installer toutes ces choses, il faut creuser un trou dans la pelouse du Parlement. Un trou tellement énorme que l'on pourrait littéralement y jeter l'édifice du Centre. Jetez un coup d’oeil à la carte — vous verrez que c'est vrai.

Nous leur avons donné... Même un serpent capable de se décrocher la mâchoire ne peut manger plus qu'à sa faim. Nous leur avons ouvert la porte trop large, et il faut revenir au message, « Écoutez, il faut commencer à restreindre nos demandes auprès de SPAC, parce que cela devient irréalisable. »

(1240)

Le président:

Que pensez-vous de ceci? Nous nous occupons de votre motion séparément, avec un peu de chance, lors d'une prochaine réunion, afin d'éviter qu'elle n'échoue, et ensuite nous demandons à l'attaché de recherche de préparer un rapport en fonction des témoins que nous parviendrons à rencontrer. Ainsi, nous aurons réussi à faire adopter la motion, et il appartiendra au Comité de déterminer si nous préparons un rapport.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Parce que, étant donné que vous me regardiez, vous ne pouviez pas voir l'expression du visage de notre analyste lorsqu'il a été question de lui attribuer cette tâche, mais...

Le président:

Pourriez-vous le refaire?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Peut-être que je pourrais demander à notre analyste.

Andre, quelles seraient les difficultés liées à ce travail?

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Le rôle de la Bibliothèque est de répondre aux besoins du Comité. Cela ne fait aucun doute.

Nous sommes en train de réaliser plusieurs tâches différentes pour le Comité. Nous pourrions trouver quelqu'un pour rédiger une synthèse des témoignages, si c'est ce que le Comité souhaite. J'aimerais y participer, mais je n'aurai probablement pas le temps de le faire.

J'ai certaines réserves, mais nous pourrions y arriver. Si c'est ce que le Comité veut, nous ferons en sorte d'y parvenir.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne sais pas comment répondre à ça.

Le président:

À vous de décider, monsieur Reid.

Une voix: Quelle serait l'incidence négative de ne pas l'inclure?

M. Scott Reid:

Tout le monde sait quel est le problème. C'est public maintenant. J'espère que nos amis les médias s'inspireront de ces renseignements, que certains d'entre eux recueillent, et disent: « Voici le problème pratique qui se présente ».

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends votre dilemme. J'ai simplement jeté un coup d'oeil et pensé: « Eh bien, quelles seraient les conséquences de ne pas avoir le rapport? »

Pour être efficace, il faudrait traiter la motion seule. Perd-on quelque chose? Je n'en suis pas sûr. Dans la mesure où nous gardons cette information à l'esprit, c'est là où elle doit être présentement. Il me semble qu'il n'y a pas de temps à perdre. Si l'on veut quoi que ce soit de la Chambre, il faut faire vite.

Ce ne sont là que quelques idées, Scott.

M. Scott Reid:

Si le Comité est d'accord, l'approche plus restreinte me semble la meilleure.

Le président:

Bon. Pouvez-vous revenir à la prochaine réunion avec une formulation dont nous pourrons discuter?

M. Scott Reid:

Ça me semble possible.

Le président:

Nous essaierons d'accomplir cela. Comme David l'a dit, quoi que ce soit... C'est faisable dans le temps qui reste.

À notre prochaine réunion, nous étudierons le rapport sur les chambres parallèles, puis la motion de M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, si nous entreprenions l'étude avant même de commencer le processus, ou quoi que ce soit d'autre, et invitions la délégation à nous présenter leurs idées, pour que nous puissions comprendre exactement l'ampleur du projet? À partir de là, nous pourrons formuler un plan d'attaque. Normalement, nous faisons les choses inversement, mais dans le cas présent, comme c'est conduit par les députés, il me semble logique de leur offrir la possibilité de venir présenter leur cas. Ensuite, nous pourrons décider comment procéder. Nous allons le décortiquer. Je peux imaginer les longues discussions que nous aurons. Ce sera intéressant, mais il faudra le décortiquer petit bout par petit bout et le passer au peigne fin.

Nous pourrions le faire avant, mais là encore, n'importe quoi qui retarde... Nous sommes dans une course contre la montre présentement, et je ne cesse de penser que si nous avons des options qui nous permettent de faire les choses et d'avancer, c'est vraiment la considération première.

Je n'y tiens pas mordicus, chers collègues. Ce sont juste des idées que je lance sur la façon dont nous pourrions commencer.

Le président:

À qui pensez-vous? M. Baylis, bien sûr,...

M. David Christopherson:

Je demanderais peut-être à M. Baylis d'amener une délégation représentative des personnes ayant participé et le laissant choisir qui, combien et quoi présenter... Donnons-leur l'occasion de faire valoir leur point de vue. Qu'ils prennent tout le temps dont ils ont besoin, parce que c'est un rapport complexe, puis nous disent ce qu'ils attendent de nous. Nous serons ensuite équipés pour prendre des décisions: Quel est notre échéancier? Comment allons-nous attaquer cela? Quels sont les renseignements dont nous avons besoin? Va-t-on faire des recherches? Pouvons-nous lancer cela suffisamment tôt pour que ce soit prêt pour nous?

Je suis ouvert à d'autres idées, monsieur le président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'allais proposer que nous disions à M. Baylis et à tous ceux ayant participé à la rédaction de cette motion que nous entreprenons l'étude et leur disions qu'ils sont les bienvenus au Comité pour participer à la discussion. Ils ont tous contribué à la rédaction. Ainsi, cela devient une participation continue plutôt qu'une participation ponctuelle.

Et ainsi, je crois que quiconque a participé à la création de cette motion aura l'occasion de la suivre jusqu'au bout.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est une excellente idée, mais, pour ma part, il est probable que je... Comme je l'ai dit, je suis un de ceux qui ont contribué, mais pas un contributeur important. Il y a d'autres...

(1245)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai produit un paragraphe.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. C'était plus parce que je fais partie de ce comité et que j'étais disposé à offrir les moyens.

Je comprends ce que vous dites. Ce que nous entendons pourra nous donner un élan. Ensuite, nous pourrons décider de ce que nous allons faire, et qui y participera.

C'est un sujet si disparate et si vaste. Il a plusieurs partis, et nous sommes unanimes — nous y sommes presque. Si nous pouvons maintenir la vapeur et leur donner l'occasion de nous présenter leur point de vue quant à ce qu'ils espèrent voir, et ce qu'ils peuvent s'attendre réalistiquement à ce que nous fassions dans le temps qui reste de cette législature, nous pourrons nous pencher sur la question. Si une des choses dont nous voulons parler porte sur la question de savoir qui fait partie de cela, comme nous l'avons fait dans d'autres dossiers, je serais ouvert à cette possibilité à ce moment-là.

Je maintiens que, à l'heure actuelle, la chose la plus logique à faire est de les entendre le plus vite possible. Les médias manifestent un certain intérêt. C'est ce qu'ils veulent le plus — la possibilité de diffuser ces idées. S'ils espéraient vraiment que nous pouvons mener à bien cela au cours de cette législature, qu'ils nous le disent. Certains d'entre eux sont des vétérans qui savent ce que cela représente de tenter de le faire. Ils pourraient nous donner des idées auxquelles nous n'aurions pas pensé pour notre plan de travail.

Une fois de plus, je répète avec le plus grand respect — quoique je ne sois pas attaché outre mesure à l'idée — que la première étape la plus logique présentement, à mon sens, serait de les inviter à venir et de leur donner tout le temps dont ils ont besoin pour présenter leurs arguments. À partir de là, nous serons bien équipés pour établir notre plan de travail et les objectifs que nous pensons pouvoir atteindre dans le temps qui reste.

Le président:

Pour que cela soit un peu plus concret, je dirais que nous inviterons, le 30, M. Baylis et quiconque qu'il aimerait amener avec lui au Comité. Que dites-vous de cela?

M. David Christopherson:

La seule chose différente par rapport à nos règles habituelles, monsieur le président, serait, à mon avis, de leur accorder la courtoisie de prendre tout le temps dont ils ont besoin pour faire un exposé complet, par souci de considération envers le travail que cela a représenté pour eux.

Le président:

Oui, cela prendrait un peu plus que 10 minutes. Comme l'a dit M. Reid, c'est très complexe. Il y a toutes sortes d'enjeux, et je suis sûr que nous ne serons pas toujours d'accord sur tous les points. Faisons donc ça.

La séance est suspendue.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 16, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.