header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-16 ETHI 150

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

(1545)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)):

We'll call the meeting to order. This is the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, meeting 150.

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(4), we are considering the main estimates 2019-20, vote 1 under Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying, vote 1 under the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, vote 1 under the Office of the Senate Ethics Officer and votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 under the Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada, referred to the committee on Thursday, April 11, 2019.

With us today we have, from the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Mr. Mario Dion. With the commissioner, we have Sandy Tremblay, director of corporate management.

In the second hour, we're going to have the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying. With us will be Nancy Bélanger, Commissioner of Lobbying, and Charles Dutrisac, director of finance and chief financial officer.

Mr. Dion, it's good to see you. You have 10 minutes.

Mr. Mario Dion (Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner):

Thank you, Chair.[Translation]

Mr. Chair and honourable members of the Committee, first of all I would like to thank you for inviting me to appear before you today as the Committee considers my Office's budgetary submission for the 2019-2020 Main Estimates.

As the Chair said, with me is Sandy Tremblay, our Director of Corporate Management.

As you know, the purpose of my appearance today is to discuss the current budgetary requirements of the Office. For context, I will begin by reviewing some of the projects and activities we undertook last year, as well as some of the activities planned for this fiscal year.

I will start with our mission, because it is key; it is the basis of everything we do. The Office established a mission a little more than a year ago, and it describes what we do.

Our Office provides independent, rigorous and consistent direction and advice to Members of Parliament and federal public office holders. That is the first thing. Second, it conducts investigations. And third, where necessary, it makes use of appropriate sanctions in order to ensure full compliance with the Conflict of lnterest Code for Members of the House of Commons and the Conflict of Interest Act.

Last year, we implemented a rolling three-year strategic plan to guide our projects and activities in support of our mission. It identified three key priorities, those being to improve communications and outreach, to modernize technology and information management structures, and to maintain operational excellence. It also identified how we would achieve them.

One key priority is to build and improve communications and outreach processes to help Members and public office holders understand and meet their obligations under the Code and the Act.

Education and outreach have been a key focus of my approach as Commissioner for a year and a half now. We strive to ensure that Members and public office holders are fully aware of their obligations. As for the methods used to do that, I intend to go beyond the traditional classroom approach and instead leverage new media technology for presentations and other educational uses.

We looked at all of the educational materials that our Office has issued over the past 12 years, in fact since it was established, to explain how the rules of the Code and the Act apply. The goal was to simplify that material and make it a more effective source of information for Members and public office holders.

Last year, we revised and updated 12 of those documents, condensing their content into seven new information notices that explain various requirements of the Act. This year, we will focus on modernizing and simplifying the instruments that relate to the code governing the conduct of members.

Our new educational tools included two webinars about gifts that I hosted with my colleague the Lobbying Commissioner, who will be appearing immediately after me. We adopted a more proactive approach with our use of Twitter to communicate directly with Members and public office holders. We also produced a few short videos to provide additional channels to reach our stakeholders.

(1550)

[English]

That was it on the communications and outreach side of things.

A second priority in our strategic plan was to modernize technology and information management structures. Last November we launched a new version of our case management system. All the information from our old system was migrated to the new one. Our upgraded information technology infrastructure is compatible with existing systems and allows the office to explore new technology options for delivering our mandate. We are still dealing with technical and procedural issues but I am confident that they will be resolved by the end of this fiscal year.

We're also presently working on the development of a new website that will make it a more effective source of information for members of Parliament and public office holders. It will be mobile-friendly, which is not the case now, so that it better reaches our busy stakeholders on the device platforms available today. We're planning to launch our new website before the October 2019 election.

Our third key priority identified in our strategic plan is to maintain operational excellence with a focus on our people and on the tools we have at our disposal. In my first year I took steps to ensure that our office invested in employee training and professional development, and provided the tools and equipment employees needed to perform their jobs. I also acted to ensure that we offered a respectful, diverse and inclusive workplace.

I was asked last year whether I'd be making recommendations in my annual reports to strengthen the regimes that we administer. At this time last year, with only a few months of experience, I did not feel ready to do so in the annual reports. I did express the hope last year that the committee would invite me to present my thoughts on possible amendments last fall. Otherwise, I would include something in this year's annual reports.

Indeed that is what we'll do shortly. Next month, June, the office will be tabling its two annual reports: one under the act and one under the code. We have drafted some potential amendments that would strengthen the operation of the act in the event that there is another review of the legislation, and we will include some of those key points in our annual report under the act.

Our strategic plan also provides my organization with a guiding document. It's used to align our priorities as we deliver on our mission to provide independent, rigorous and consistent direction and advice, and I will report on our achievements under the strategic plan in future annual reports to Parliament.

Investigations continues to be an area where there is a lot of interest on the part of the public and parliamentarians. We've been very active in relation to investigations. In 2018-19, we issued eight investigation reports: five under the act and three under the code. There are currently four matters that I have yet to report on, and our investigation team must balance confidentiality, integrity and procedural fairness with work that is very complex and time sensitive. [Translation]

Our Office conducts its operations in support of its mission with a total of 49 full-time positions. The Advisory and Compliance Division accounts for over one-third of our staff resources. This total is reflective of their daily interactions with those individuals-over 3,000 who fall under the Act or Code. Those interactions form the majority of the work the Office undertakes in compliance, accounting for over 2,000 calls or inquiries last year.

The remainder of the Office falls into three broad categories: corporate services, which Ms. Tremblay directs, communications, directed by Ms. Rushworth, and investigations and legal services. A daily demonstration of rigour, professionalism and guidance on compliance matters is what we are aiming for.

I have complete confidence in the quality of work and the integrity of all members of my senior management team and indeed in all the Office staff. [English]

Unless there are unexpected increases in the demands on our resources, I expect our office will be able to implement its mission in this upcoming fiscal year with a budget of $7.1 million. It represents a slight increase of 4% from the last fiscal year. The base budget has been unchanged in the 12 years of existence of the office. This is the first actual increase of 4%, and it's needed this year to enable our office to prepare for the election while continuing to ensure operational excellence.

There has traditionally been a significant increase in the workload whenever there is a general election, and we wanted to be ready and to prepare for it. Election readiness is a key focus of our activity already at this point in time. We've started to hire term employees to help with the increased workload. We're also updating letters and information kits for, potentially, new members of Parliament, for people who, in the future, will be joining offices, ministerial offices, and so on and so forth. All of these elements flow from our strategic plan and will enable the office to better serve its stakeholders in a busy election year.

As part of this planning we always have a reserve. We have $100,000 that we do not allocate in order to face, in a nimble way, important changes and what the needs would be.

I am confident that we'll be able, with this budget that is before you, to operate efficiently, effectively and also economically in carrying out our mission.

Mr. Chair, this concludes my opening statement. I'll now be happy to discuss any questions the committee may have. Thank you.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you, Commissioner.

Just for the sake of the committee, too, we did have an amended agenda. The agenda before you is incorrect. We're going until 4:15 p.m. It gives us enough time. I'm going to try to get us through the first four questioners—Ms. Fortier, Mr. Kent, Mr. Cullen and Mr. Erskine-Smith—and then we'll move to the next commissioner. That's all the time we have. Just to clarify again, the agenda is amended. It will take us to about 4:20 p.m., or so. Thanks.

Go ahead, Madam Fortier. [Translation]

Mrs. Mona Fortier (Ottawa—Vanier, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Mr. Dion and Ms. Tremblay, thank you for being here today.

We know you work very hard. You had a chance to prepare a presentation, and I would like to ask you a few questions about the challenges your office is facing. I understand the strategic planning and your priorities. Would you please tell us about your current challenges and the steps you're taking to address them?

Mr. Mario Dion:

We're still facing a challenge associated with timelines, as I mentioned earlier. By that I mean we are required provide our services on a timely basis. We have service standards regarding the first contact we make, and that always creates pressure.

We also have service standards for responding to media representatives and members of the public who communicate with us. We are always under pressure, even if no service standards or timeframes are prescribed by the act when we investigate a matter. We're always under pressure to do things punctually, promptly, so that our report is relevant when it becomes available. That's one of our challenges, but we always have to operate with a sense that things have to move, and move quickly.

It has to be done in a consistent manner: we have to provide similar answers from one case to the next where the facts are the same. I think members and public office holders appreciate a bit of predictability. So we need to have tools to ensure that the advice we give is consistent.

We also have to have a professional team. By that I mean that the workplace must be stimulating. The only resource we have is the workers, the professionals who provide our services. We want to retain them because the learning curve is quite steep. Things must be done rigorously. Consistency and rigour aren't entirely the same thing. We try to be rigorous in everything we do.

Mrs. Mona Fortier:

If my understanding is correct, you're currently managing all that pressure, and nothing will prevent you from carrying out your mandate.

Mr. Mario Dion:

That's been true to date, except where our workload has increased and become unmanageable. In the current state of affairs, however, we're dealing with all the aspects I mentioned without too much difficulty. It works.

Mrs. Mona Fortier:

Since I'm sharing my speaking time with my colleague, I'm going to ask you one final question.

At the end of your presentation, you mentioned that there will be an election soon. We're all aware it's coming. What impact is that having on your workload? Is it happening in the short term? Could you tell us about your election-related workload?

Mr. Mario Dion:

It will really start happening after October 21, depending on the election results. There will necessarily be new members. How many? No one knows. We'll have to contact the new members within three days of confirmation of their election. That adds to our workload.

We'll also have to do some outreach work with the people who've been elected for the first time and who don't know much about the Conflict of Interest Code for Members. We'll have to familiarize them with the code.

As I said earlier, if changes are ever made to the composition of the cabinet, or another party forms the next government, there will potentially be hundreds of new employees in the ministers' offices, and they'll also be public office holders within the meaning of the act.

That's what our workload consists of. We're preparing to deal with hundreds of people who'll be newly subject to the act on the morning of October 22.

(1600)

Mrs. Mona Fortier:

Thank you.

I'm going to give the rest of my speaking time to my colleague Mr. Saini.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

Good afternoon, Mr. Dion and Ms. Tremblay. I have a question for you.[English]

I read with great interest that last month you signed a memorandum of understanding with the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying to do education and outreach, which I think is an excellent idea. I think that by combining this activity, the more outreach and education you do, especially for MPs, the more dramatically you will reduce the questions and some of the investigations that you may undertake.

Is there an efficiency subset to this process? The more you educate and the more outreach you're doing, the more you should see the number of questions and cases drop.

Mr. Mario Dion:

There is. In the long term, I am convinced that this will produce a better adherence to the code and the act. Therefore, it will produce less work for us in terms of having to order things or investigate things, but it's not our objective. I think the objective is based on the desire to make sure that we put into the hands of the people who are governed by the code and the act the necessary knowledge so that they can actually ensure that they abide by these things on an ongoing basis. That's the goal.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Have you developed any programs so far with the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying?

Mr. Mario Dion:

Yes. We did a webinar, one in French and one in English, a few months ago. About 130 people attended the webinars. We were focusing on the area of overlap between the Lobbying Act, the Conflict of Interest Act and the code for members of the House of Commons.

We were happy with the registration, and we intend to repeat the experience in the coming year.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Now that you've developed these programs, do you think that the collaboration between your office and the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying will result in more enhanced information and more enhanced tools for new MPs after the next election?

Mr. Mario Dion:

I am convinced. It's only a question of the degree, but we will have a much better...both qualitatively and in terms of the supports that we'll be using. We'll use technology. We'll communicate in a way that's consistent with the 21st century and not only with words on paper, with legalese on paper. We're trying to move to plain language and real-time access, 24-7, wherever you may be on the planet.

Mr. Raj Saini:

I noticed that in your strategic plan for 2018 to 2021, the second point is to modernize technology and information management structures.

Are you talking about just upgrading the technology from one generation to the next generation, or are you talking about a wholesale change in the software and the technology itself?

Mr. Mario Dion:

We're talking about upgrading, essentially, at this point, vis-à-vis the case management system, but we are slowly starting to explore other possibilities, for instance, using AI in terms of carrying out our mandate.

We have a wealth of information. We do not essentially use the information to the maximum extent that we could use it in order to prevent or identify potential conflicts of interest. We're trying to inform ourselves about AI and whether it could be put to use in future years in any way to carry out our mission. That's an example of an additional technological measure that we're looking at.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Saini.

Up next for seven minutes is Mr. Kent.

Hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Commissioner, and Ms. Tremblay, for appearing before committee today.

Commissioner, it's good to have you with us again. I hope your health issues have been resolved.

I'd like to ask questions starting with the four matters that are still currently under investigation.

When you began the investigation into the allegations that Prime Minister Trudeau or staff in his office unduly pressured the former attorney general, Jody Wilson-Raybould, to intervene in a criminal prosecution of the Quebec company SNC-Lavalin, you said you believed that the grounds for the investigation would be a possible violation of section 9.

In carrying out that investigation—I know you haven't reported yet, and we must be discreet in our questions—was there more than one member or office holder involved?

(1605)

Mr. Mario Dion:

Of course, as the member has pointed out, I am quite limited in what I can share with the committee, or anyone else for that matter, in relation to an ongoing investigation. When we launched it on our own volition under section 45 of the act back in February, the focus was on the Prime Minister, but the member is right that there are several other public officer holders who are being interviewed, or will be interviewed, to essentially review the facts that were largely reported in the public domain. Political aides who allegedly also played a role have been or will be interviewed too.

Hon. Peter Kent:

The former clerk of the Privy Council said, and this was some months ago now, and this is a quote, “I think the Ethics Commissioner could get to the bottom of this fairly quickly.”

Will you be able to advise the committee as to whether you will be able to report before the House rises in June?

Mr. Mario Dion:

In fact, I can inform the committee this afternoon that there will not be a report by mid-June. I expect the House to rise in mid-June or in the third week of June, and we will not have a report. I can assure you of that.

Hon. Peter Kent:

What about before October 21?

Mr. Mario Dion:

We are working hard to produce a report within the next few months.

Hon. Peter Kent:

With regard to the other three matters, one of them, I assume, is member Vandenbeld. The other two matters are of what nature, sir? Please refresh—

Mr. Mario Dion:

According to our research, they are not currently in the public domain. One of them is not in the public domain, but the report will be issued in a couple of weeks, so you'll find out two weeks from now what the third matter is. The fourth matter is the situation involving MP Grewal, and that is in the public domain.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Right.

Jumping back just a bit now to the allegations regarding the Prime Minister or others in his office or in other ministerial offices, has the Prime Minister been co-operative? I recall that for your predecessor, in the investigation of the illegal vacation on the Aga Khan's island, it took some months for the Prime Minister to make himself available for conversations. Has he been more available in this situation?

Mr. Mario Dion:

I think it's fair to say that we are very pleased with both the speed and the extent of the co-operation at this point in time.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Okay, thank you.

Moving now to the discussion earlier of the work you've been doing with the lobbying commissioner and the webinars, I think the webinars were very helpful, very informative. Surely you're aware of the Federal Court's direction to the current lobbying commissioner to reopen the investigation of the other side of the Trudeau report with regard to the illegal gift, on one hand, accepted by the Prime Minister and the fact that the lobbying commissioner's predecessor found nothing wrong with the lobbying side of that relationship.

Have you had a chance to talk with the new lobbying commissioner about the fact that this is exactly the sort of situation where if wrongdoing is found on one side of an officer of a Parliament and a lobbyist, there must be wrongdoing on the other side?

Mr. Mario Dion:

First of all, I think I would like to use this occasion, Mr. Chair, to point out that the lobbying commissioner and I never discuss, of course, any ongoing investigation we may be carrying out. It's a bit premature to conclude what the result of the new investigation into the Aga Khan she will be launching will be, but I understand the member's question. I spoke about an overlap. There are rules in the code concerning lobbyists concerning gifts they make to either members of Parliament or public office holders.

There are rules in the act and in the code. There is an obvious connection between these provisions. The lobbying commissioner and I are simply trying to explain to our constituents, if you wish, or the stakeholders, our interpretation of these rules and how they.... Our interpretations are not inconsistent, by the way. They are quite consistent, if not completely consistent. We're trying to emphasize to people that it's actually possible to respect both sets of rules at the same time and, as the member pointed out, it's actually possible to violate both sets of rules at the same time.

(1610)

Hon. Peter Kent:

Would you think a more explicit definition of “gift or benefit” would be helpful? I'm thinking back now to the Supreme Court judgment written by Madam Justice L'Heureux-Dubé, in which she had a number of very precise definitions that I don't believe are actually written into either your act or the Lobbying Act.

Mr. Mario Dion:

I hesitate to answer this question on the spur of the moment. The definition of “gift” is quite extensive in our act and in the code as well. It's any advantage, any benefit received by a member, but I would like to take this one under advisement, if the chair agrees, because it's tough. I do not recall the judgment that the member's referring to as well.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you, Commissioner.

The Chair:

Thank you, Commissioner and Mr. Kent.

Next up for seven minutes, we have a visitor.

Welcome back, Mr. Cullen. Go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

A visitor, that sounds so “stranger in the House” and somehow intimidating.

Commissioner, it's nice to see you. I'm glad you have returned and I hope your health is well.

Mr. Mario Dion:

It's very well.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You have important work to do on behalf of Canadians, but we are people too and I'm glad to see you back and on the job.

Mr. Mario Dion:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I had some similar questions as to the outstanding reports. I guess three out of the four have been identified. We will wait with bated breath to find out what the fourth one was.

I have one small question. Has your senior counsel had to recuse herself—I believe her name is Ms. Richard—from one of the ongoing investigations?

Mr. Mario Dion:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can you remind me of section 9? This was the focus of the report and the potential violation that your office detailed when—

Mr. Mario Dion:

I have it right in front of me. I will quickly read it. It says, “No public office holder shall use his or her position as a public office holder to seek to influence a decision of another person” so as to further the private interests of somebody in his family “or to improperly further another person's private interests.”

That's the section. It's about using your position to seek to influence a decision in order to improperly further another person's private interests. That's the focus of our investigation in the Trudeau matter.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, because in that matter of Trudeau, the question of inappropriate pressure has been sometimes at the heart of other conversations. Section 9 doesn't really deal with that aspect or any interpretation of what is inappropriate. It's simply the seeking to influence. Is that right?

Mr. Mario Dion:

That's right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Can you explain something? Some Canadians have asked me about dealing with ethics and violations of the ethics act under a scenario in which someone, say Mr. Erskine-Smith, received a lovely painting from somebody who was seeking to influence him and it was deemed by your office to be inappropriate.

Would a normal recourse be for an MP in that position to return the gift that was deemed inappropriate or in violation of the ethics act?

Mr. Mario Dion:

That's right. That would be the normal recourse. Most of the time we suggest that people do that and they are doing that—returning it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I would never suggest that Mr. Erskine-Smith would ever even receive such a thing, but let's go further.

If somebody having dealings with the government were then to offer travel and it had some monetary value, expensive travel as was the case with the Aga Khan, I'm not understanding why.... There is no return of the gift because you can't. It's an experience, a trip, but certainly there's the value of the gift if the office holder had gone out and simply purchased that gift, purchased that travel, which would have been more appropriate, rather than receiving a gift.

Why do we not have within the act the notion that, as in the case of the painting that was received illegally, for a gift in the form of a sponsored trip that was also deemed to be inappropriate or illegal, the value of that trip would also have to be compensated for?

Am I making myself clear? I know it may be a too commonsensical kind of approach, but what's the difference?

Mr. Mario Dion:

First of all, I would like to complete my earlier answer by saying that we only intervene when the gift is actually disclosed. There are several disclosures each month, but I'm convinced there could be gifts that are not always disclosed. Of course, we cannot do anything if they are not being disclosed.

If disclosed, we suggest that the gift be returned. Sometimes we suggest that the gift be reimbursed as well when it's not actually possible to return it because it was a show or a public event that has already taken place.

I have no power to order. We simply provide advice to people who disclose a gift. In the example of a trip for instance, the advice may be given that somebody should reimburse the cost of the trip, but I don't have any tools in the act to actually force the execution of my advice.

(1615)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In the first example I used, if an MP were to receive a painting or some gift that you can foresee, you can advise them that they should return the gift if it was received inappropriately. You can't order it. Is that correct?

Mr. Mario Dion:

That's right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Did you at any point advise Mr. Trudeau that he should compensate for the travel that was sponsored and that was deemed to be unethical or illegal?

Mr. Mario Dion:

I did not. I do not know if my predecessor did, because this matter was finished prior to my assuming the duties on January 9, 2018, so I—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

For Canadians—

Mr. Mario Dion:

Quite frankly, I did not raise—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You can understand where Canadians get confused. If something was given illegally or unethically, say in the form of a trip, it just would seem to make common sense that if it was done inappropriately, whether it was disclosed or not, but it was eventually found out.... What's the difference between a $10,000 sponsored trip or someone just giving you $10,000 to take a trip? If somebody handed a politician an envelope with $10,000 in it—heaven forbid—to try to win some influence with them, and then they use that money to take their family on vacation, what's the difference? Under the code, is there any difference between those two scenarios?

Mr. Mario Dion:

I would prefer not to try to hypothesize on those situations, but I guess you know what the prohibitions are. It's not giving the gift that might be prohibited. It's receiving the gift, accepting the gift. That's what the code and the act governs. It's the acceptance of a gift.

Once you've accepted a gift, you've done something that is only partly reversible. We provide advice as to how to reverse the situation. Sometimes it's not possible to reverse the situation.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes.

Mr. Mario Dion:

We do not have the power to order any specific action on the part of the office holder who has accepted a gift that he or she should not have accepted.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Understood.

Again, I go back to your timeline on the current investigation. I think you responded to a colleague's question that it would not be by mid-June but within the next few months. That places it sometime within the summer range, give or take. I know you can't be specific with the date and you said you have some outstanding interviews to conduct.

Mr. Mario Dion:

Yes, we still have some interviews to conduct. There can always be a number of surprise elements, if you wish. We want to also produce a report that is at least of the same quality as previous reports have been. It does take time, but I am confident that within the next few months we will complete this report, barring something completely unforeseen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You said you were getting ready for the election. Is there any particular area, in terms of the act or the code, that you foresee being a focal point for your work as we go into the election cycle?

Mr. Mario Dion:

No, there's nothing in particular. We know what the prevalent problems are and we will assume that in the future, it will be quite similar to what it is now. The issue of gifts is always number one on the list.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Mr. Mario Dion:

We also have the issue of the initial declarations, the time frame in which they should be returned. We will review our forms, as well, with this goal of their being in plain language, user-friendly as much as possible, including for the use of technology.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cullen.

Last up is Mr. Erskine-Smith for seven minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Thanks very much.

Based on the information we have, there are 49 full-time positions. About a third are advisory and compliance. What are the other two-thirds of the positions? What are they for?

Mr. Mario Dion:

It's more than one-third. In fact, 18 are advisory and compliance out of the 49. We have 11 in corporate services, which deals with HR, IM and IT, finance, all the obligations we have as a public sector entity that has a number of laws it has to abide with.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

How many are in corporate and HR?

Mr. Mario Dion:

There are 11 FTEs. We have eight in outreach and communications, media relations and so on and so forth. We have eight in legal and investigations.

(1620)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay. Am I right, then? You had 2,000 inquiries and calls in the last year, and would that be the 18 people who are dealing with that?

Mr. Mario Dion:

That's right.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

That would be less than 100—

Mr. Mario Dion:

I'm sorry; it's less than the 18. We have eight advisers. Of the 18, eight are professional advisers. We also have staff who are of a more clerical nature to make sure the annual reviews, for instance, go out on time—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I see.

Mr. Mario Dion:

—and for all the mechanics, if you wish, of both the act and the code.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay. I'm just trying to wrap my head around the caseload. The caseload seems to me.... If you have eight people plus some legal counsel who might get involved in some of these where it gets escalated, you have a little over 200 inquiries, calls, per employee. That seems like an incredibly modest amount. Just having practised law previously, if you told me I had 200 calls and inquiries a year to deal with, I would say, you mean I don't have 10 times that amount?

Given we're dealing with estimates today, it doesn't seem to me that each individual has the fullest of loads, but maybe I have that wrong.

Mr. Mario Dion:

I think, Mr. Chairman, that the member raised the same issue last year.

I can assure you that nobody is twiddling their thumbs. There are some very complex matters when sometimes a public office holder makes a call about an issue, and sometimes it will take weeks or months to resolve the issue. Some of them are very complex. They're not all simple, and they require some follow-up.

There are several instances, as you pointed out, when legal advisers are consulted because there is a new or somewhat complex legal matter that arises.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

Mr. Mario Dion:

That's the caseload and that's the number of employees, and I guess you'll have to take my word for it.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

That's fair. That's why you're here.

Every time you're here, and every time the lobbying commissioner is here.... I see that 18 employees are doing the core work, and there are supporting employees otherwise who do outreach, communications and HR. Every single time both offices are here before me, it seems there's massive duplication for small offices in HR, and there's so much coordination otherwise that is useful and necessary for the offices.

Are you of the view that it would make sense to combine the offices?

Mr. Mario Dion:

The mandates are quite different. The group that we've added is different. It's conceivable that they could be merged. I have never really addressed my mind to it.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Just on HR and outreach alone, there are probably significant savings, no?

Mr. Mario Dion:

I was an ADM of corporate services a long time ago and of course there could be economies of scale. It's obvious.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much. I appreciate that.

Mr. Mario Dion:

Thank you.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

In your view, do you have a sufficient mandate to do your job? I know part of the question that we're speaking about here with the estimates is about resources. Do you have the resources in your current mandate? As you approach different investigations over a not insignificant time in your office, do you feel that you have the appropriate mandate?

Mr. Mario Dion:

I wish I had more authority to recommend something as an investigation is completed. All I have under the act is the power to analyze the facts and share that analysis with the Prime Minister. I do not have the power to even recommend anything under the act.

I wish I had that power because I think it could make a difference in the effectiveness, if you wish, of the process. In the code, the situation is different because there's an explicit power to recommend a sanction. I wish I had the same authority under the act.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I appreciate that. Where you would make a finding of impropriety, you would make a recommendation to cure that in some fashion. Is that the idea?

Mr. Mario Dion:

That includes some measures possibly to make sure it doesn't happen again within government, as I did in my former mandate as the public sector integrity commissioner. I've done that on a few occasions because I had the latitude to do that under the statute. I don't in this one.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

You would only make comments like that, the idea would be, when some improper conduct has been done.

Mr. Mario Dion:

Of course. Even if a contravention is not found, you can still have observed something that would cause you to make a recommendation. It's still possible.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I've not had many dealings with your office, probably thankfully. I haven't received many paintings. I don't think I've received any paintings. In fact, it's funny Mr. Cullen suggested that example. If my parents were watching, they would say, “Oh no, our son's not cultured enough to receive paintings.”

I have had one dealing with your office, and I returned the gift on your advice, but I disagreed with your advice. I think it continues to be wrong at law, and I've talked to some of my colleagues who have, in identical instances, received different advice from your office, which is of concern to me. I appreciate you have different employees and different decisions will be made and, of course, you won't make the perfect or right decision all the time. I think most of the time you will, but mistakes happen to the best of us.

When a mistake does happen, and a member of Parliament disagrees with the interpretation or a cabinet minister disagrees with the interpretation, do they have any recourse?

(1625)

Mr. Mario Dion:

Under the act there is a very narrow window for judicial review. Under the code there is no recourse outside of the House of Commons. Of course, the member has the possibility of raising it within the House of Commons and using processes within the House of Commons.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

To that end, if you issue a report outside of sitting weeks and there's something wrong in that report, there wouldn't be that same recourse.

Mr. Mario Dion:

If I issue a report under the code, I can only do so when the House is sitting.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay.

Mr. Mario Dion:

It says that I shall “report to the Speaker, who shall present the report to the House when it next sits.” I can send it to the Speaker. It's tabled in the House as soon as possible, and there is a right on the part of the member whose conduct has been examined in the report to ask to speak after question period for up to 20 minutes to explain his or her situation.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Fair enough. Thanks very much. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

As mentioned, Commissioner, we wish you good health from our committee and we would like to see you again soon. Thanks for appearing today.

Mr. Mario Dion:

Thank you for the good wishes, Mr. Chair. It was a pleasure.

The Chair:

We'll suspend until we have the other commissioner come in.

(1625)

(1625)

The Chair:

I call the meeting back to order.

I won't go over what I read before, but we welcome, from the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying, Nancy Bélanger, the Commissioner; and Charles Dutrisac, Director of Finance and Chief Financial Officer.

I apologize to everybody. We had votes that shortened our time even more than we had already shortened it.

Go ahead, Ms. Bélanger, for 10 minutes.

(1630)

[Translation]

Ms. Nancy Bélanger (Commissioner of Lobbying, Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the Committee.

I would like to start by acknowledging that we are meeting today on the traditional territory of the Algonquin nation.

I am very pleased to have the opportunity to discuss with you the Main Estimates, our accomplishments of the past year and our ongoing priorities. I am joined by Charles Dutrisac, Director of Finance and Chief Financial Officer.[English]

It has been an extremely busy year for us. Just this week, we moved to a new location, designed as an activity-based workplace. This move was a demanding endeavour and would not have been possible without the incredible dedication of members of my team and the professional expertise of employees of Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada. I sincerely thank them for their commitment in ensuring the success of this project.

To mark this success, we are planning an open house in June, so you can soon expect an invitation to visit our new office.[Translation]

The Lobbying Act mandates that I maintain our Registry of Lobbyists, ensure compliance with the Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct and foster awareness of both the Act and the Code. To carry out this mandate, we developed last year a three-year strategic plan that included four key results areas. I will set out some of our accomplishments and current priorities for each of them.

The first key result is A Modern Lobbyists Registration system. The Registry enables transparency by giving Canadians access to information about federal lobbying activities. On any given day, there are about 5,500 active lobbyists registered. This past year, lobbyists used our system to report details of more than 27,000 communications with designated public office holders.

To make it easier and faster for lobbyists to register, we have streamlined the registration process for new registrants. In the next year, we will improve the system to make it more user- and mobile-friendly for the registrant. This will assist in information becoming public more quickly.

We will also continue to benefit from the recommendations following the evaluation of our client services. Overall, the evaluation concluded that our approach with clients is effective and contributes to increasing compliance. Some recommendations related to the Registry and outreach activities will need to be assessed.[English]

The second key area is effective compliance and enforcement activities. I have streamlined the investigation process to address allegations of non-compliance while continuing to ensure that decisions are fair and impartial and meet the necessary procedural fairness requirements.

Allegations of non-compliance are now dealt with in two steps. First, a preliminary assessment is undertaken to evaluate the nature of the alleged contravention, to obtain initial information and determine whether the subject matter falls within my mandate. Following this assessment, and when necessary to ensure compliance with either the act or the code, an investigation is commenced. ln the last year, 21 preliminary assessments were closed, of which four led to investigations. There are currently 11 ongoing preliminary assessments.

With respect to investigations, I recently tabled a report to Parliament related to sponsored travel provided by 19 different corporations and organizations. I also suspended and referred three investigations to the RCMP, as I had reasonable grounds to believe that an offence had occurred under the act. Thirteen other investigations were ceased, and as of today there are a total of 15 investigations in our active caseload.

Finally, with respect to the five-year prohibition on lobbying, we are developing an online tool to simplify applications for exemptions by former designated public office holders.

(1635)

[Translation]

The third area is an Enhanced Outreach and Communications for Canadians.

This past year, we provided 70 presentations to lobbyists, public office holders and other stakeholders in addition to the webinars offered in cooperation with the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner. We also updated our guidance on the rules pertaining to the code.

The priorities for this year will include updating and redesigning our website to make it easier for visitors to find information. We will also use the data on information requests that we receive to analyze needs. That will enable us to develop targeted communication products and tools .

I will continue to develop recommendations for the next statutory review of the Act to enhance the federal framework for lobbying.[English]

Our last but certainly not least key area is an exceptional workplace. It is important to me that the employees of my office feel valued, understand the importance of their work and that they be proud of working at the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying.

The results of the public service employee survey certainly indicate that we are in the right direction to be an employer of choice. When it comes to employee satisfaction with their workplace, the 2018 survey results placed the office among the top five of all federal departments and agencies.

We implemented and will continue to support our mental health strategy. We are also creating a career development program tailored to the reality of a small office.

The office delivers on its mandate through the invaluable work of 27 dedicated employees.

The 2019-20 main estimates for the office are about $4.8 million. With the exception of $350,000 dedicated to the relocation simply for this year, this is essentially the same amount since the creation of the previous office in 2005. Personnel costs represent about 70% of the expenditures, so $3.4 million. The remaining $1.1 million operating budget is used to acquire program support and corporate services, including HR, finance, IT and contracting services, as well as to cover miscellaneous costs. Fifty-five per cent of the $1.1 million is to obtain services from other government institutions. This approach provides access to a wide range of expertise in a cost-effective manner.

Looking ahead, I have concerns about the current budget envelope. Our fiscal reality is attempting to operate with a budget established in 2005. The amount of $4.5 million may have been sufficient at that time, but today it means there is practically no flexibility to reallocate financial resources, hire additional human resources or to make the necessary investments in systems with today's price tags.

The registry is a statutory requirement and is vital for transparency. Constant investments are required to ensure that the registry remains up to date with evolving IT standards and to enhance the accessibility of the information.

The work that is being performed by the office has also evolved in complexity, litigiousness and level of scrutiny.

I am therefore studying the cost implications and will make the necessary funding requests in the fall to ensure that we can adequately meet our mandate.[Translation]

The Lobbying Act continues to be an important and relevant piece of legislation. Ultimately, it is essential to me that the work of the Office is done in such a way as to provide value-for-money to Canadians and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of our operations.

I want to end by recognizing the unwavering engagement and resolve of the employees of the Office who, more often than not, are asked to go well beyond what is required of their position. I so very much appreciate their input and support in assisting me to enhance the accessibility, transparency and accountability of the federal lobbying regime.[English]

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, I thank you for your attention and welcome your questions.

(1640)

The Chair:

Thank you, Commissioner.

We will start off with Mr. Graham, for seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'll get straight into it and I'll put it this way. I don't have a lot of patience for professional lobbyists. As far as I can tell, they bill clients based on how many meetings they get, multiplied by how many people are at them, rather than what they actually achieve at those meetings. I generally refuse to meet with them, unless they're from my riding or in my riding. Basically, if people have enough resources to tell me what to think, I probably don't want to hear from them.

Are you aware of how much professional lobbyists bill and are paid and does it matter for your purposes?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

I do not know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You have no idea how they're paid or what the pay structures are, and there's no impact.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

No, and it is not a requirement of our current regime to ask how much lobbyists are being paid. It is a requirement in the U.S., and so it's quite a popular thing. In Canada it's not a requirement. Quite frankly, I have not seen the need for it so far.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When I was elected in 2015, your predecessor, Ms. Shepherd, gave me an introduction to your office at my MP orientation. I asked her a simple question: What is the difference between lobbying and influence peddling? She gave me the simple answer that influence peddling is illegal, which was partly what I was looking for.

In my experience, a lot of former MPs and staffers go on to become lobbyists. I guess it's better money for fewer hours. What is it they're selling? Is it the fact that they are well known and well respected, and if they call, everyone takes the call, and based on their connections and reputations they can therefore get more meetings? Are they offering process knowledge on how the House works and subject matter knowledge to policy-makers? One of those, I think, is influence peddling and one is lobbying. Where do you draw the line between the two?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

That's an interesting question.

First of all, lobbying, as defined in the Lobbying Act, is considered a legitimate activity. Influence peddling is a different story. If you're a former designated public office holder, you're not allowed to lobby for five years, so with the scenario you have given me, I'm not sure where we'd draw the line with respect to the facts, either.

I can only apply the law as it is written, and it recognizes that lobbying is a legitimate activity. In fact, I appreciate your opinion, but I have also met a number of public office holders who don't share your opinion and who actually believe that lobbying is a legitimate activity, and professionals in government relations actually provide them with information they need to make the decisions that are in the public interest.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When they provide information, I find that useful. When they say, “You should do this because of who I am”, I find that less useful.

I'm wondering if you have any way of measuring if they're in compliance with the act, when it is still considered to be lobbying and when it ceases to be considered lobbying, regardless of the five-year cooling-off period. Not all of them were ministers or staff at that level.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

What I can say is that under the code of conduct there are rules for which lobbyists are not entitled to put you, public office holders, in a situation where it puts you in a conflict of interest or demonstrates that it's preferential access or preferential treatment. If there is a previous relationship that exists for whatever reason, that would be improper. Beyond having fact-specific cases, I can't go beyond that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

In what circumstances would you provide an exemption to the five-year cooling-off period?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

The Lobbying Act provides that I can give an exemption for those who have been there for a very short period of time, who had administrative duties, possibly in an acting position for a very short period of time. In the last year we had 11 requests, and one that came from last year, so we had 12. Three withdrew. Of the nine requests, I granted four and declined five. The four were all because the individuals had been there for administrative support and/or were summer students, for example.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

I'd like to give the remaining time I have to Mr. Erskine-Smith. Thank you.

The Chair:

You have three minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

I take note of your concerns about the current budget envelope. We just had Mr. Dion here. He had no such concerns. I won't comment on the workload, but it does occur to me that combining the offices would.... You have complementary functions.

With the Information Commissioner, with which you have significant experience, to some extent there are complementary functions with the Privacy Commissioner, but oftentimes they are at odds, in the sense that sometimes access to information is at odds with privacy. They view their respective jurisdictions—and rightly, I think—as wanting to protect privacy if they're the Privacy Commissioner, and wanting to protect access to information if they're the Information Commissioner. In a way, I can understand not combining those offices, although there are probably efficiencies to be found.

In the case of the Commissioner of Lobbying and the Ethics Commissioner, I'm a bit baffled that they are not one office. What do you think about that?

(1645)

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

For sure if there's consideration to join the two offices, there should be a study to look at whether or not there could be some efficiencies in costs. We have no one who does HR. Our server is held by OPC. We have the Canadian Human Rights Commission, which offers us all its services and contracting in HR. We use the outside. I don't have enough people, 27, so we do have a contract.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Yet the Ethics Commissioner is sitting there with HR and...?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

I don't have that luxury.

I do believe there are cost efficiencies that could happen. Whether it's worth amalgamating, I don't know because I have not done the study.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I see.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

What I would recommend the committee do, if it's something that you are considering, is approach our provincial counterparts. Both information and privacy are joined in the provinces. On lobbying, my colleague in Ontario holds about seven hats. It might be interesting for you to speak to them.

The issue becomes institutional bias. How can you be requested something from the lobbyists, knowing possibly what a member of Parliament has disclosed to you? It's how you manage or create the walls to ensure that one set of information doesn't influence the other, although having the full picture sometimes might help.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

The last comment I will make is to encourage you to turn your attention to this, at the very least, if you haven't already.

In our democracy, we have very strict election finance rules. In part, I think the idea is that if someone donates to my campaign, to Mr. Kent's campaign or to Ms. Mathyssen's campaign, and donates up to $1,600, there's very little influence. It's a de minimis amount, in many ways, in contrast to what we see in other jurisdictions, including the United States.

I would say the extent to which they thereafter could exert influence on us in our roles as elected officials is nil, yet we start to see now parallel campaigns being run by third party organizations, very closely in parallel with political parties, and they receive significant sums of corporate dollars that are not in any way de minimis.

The extent to which those companies and individuals then can exert influence thereafter is of great concern to me. If you and your offices haven't turned your mind to that idea, I would encourage you to do so.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you. We have to move on.

Mr. Kent, you have seven minutes.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Commissioner, for appearing before us again.

As my colleague said, we had an interesting conversation with the Ethics Commissioner in the last hour. We talked to a certain extent about the enhanced outreach and the communications, the webinars and the meetings that have been going on with your offices. Commissioner Dion made it clear that you don't talk about specific cases.

However, with regard to the Federal Court order to you regarding a decision made, which I believe was termed a “reviewable error” of the previous commissioner, I asked the Ethics Commissioner how there could be a finding of wrongdoing and an illegal gift on one side of the equation when there seems to be a different application of the definition of “benefit or gift” on the other side.

What are your thoughts on that? Could you tell us whether you have proceeded to comply with the Federal Court order or whether you're waiting? We understand there may be a government appeal.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

I can confirm that the appeal has been filed.

I will answer your question to the best of my ability, knowing that there is an appeal before the court.

Hon. Peter Kent:

I understand.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

First of all, I have the greatest respect for the Federal Court. I articled there; I worked there, and I will always abide by a decision of a judge. You will never hear me criticize or comment on the decisions in a negative way. Therefore, I will abide by the decision of the Federal Court of Appeal.

In this particular decision, however, to clarify your point, I don't think the issue was on the different definition of a “gift”. It was whether the Aga Khan was subject to the lobbying rules in light of the fact that he is someone who does not get paid and therefore, that was the issue.

I will wait for the decision of the Federal Court of Appeal. I have not started. In my experience as a lawyer, I always await the 30-day appeal period before I start anything. I've always had that practice, so I will await the decision and I will abide by it.

(1650)

Hon. Peter Kent:

This is a hypothetical question, but one that is quite simple. Were you to actually launch an investigation, what type of timeline would you expect it to take? Would you start at the beginning or would you narrow it down to the question at hand?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

People who have worked with me would know that I would likely start at the beginning. I would like to personally get to the bottom of the story. However, I would also take advantage of the fact that the facts are out there already, so I will use what is out there to advance it as quickly as possible.

I have also told my team that if and when we start this investigation—it wasn't an investigation, actually; the court has told us to start the review again because it was not at the stage of an investigation—I would likely do a report to Parliament on that, in order for everyone to understand what was my interpretation of the matter.

Hon. Peter Kent:

With regard to the 15 investigations and the three investigations referred to the RCMP, there is a difference between your office and the Ethics Commissioner's office in terms of announcing investigations or referrals of incidents in the public domain.

Can you tell us anything about the three investigations referred to the RCMP?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

I can't, and I don't confirm and I don't deny exactly for that reason: not to jeopardize any type of investigation that the RCMP will be doing.

It's a weird situation. The way our act is written, if it's an offence, in other words if it's unregistered lobbying or lobbying while prohibited, when I have reasonable grounds to believe that's happened, I have to suspend. I don't finish those investigations. They go to the RCMP. Very often it's possible that I don't even talk to the person who is alleged because it's all about self-incrimination, so I don't go there.

If I do investigations only under the code, those will lead to a report to Parliament, unless I cease them.

Hon. Peter Kent:

There are two stories in the public domain relating with great probability to your office.

One of the unanswered questions in the SNC-Lavalin scandal is regarding the phone call from the former clerk of the Privy Council, now the chair of SNC-Lavalin, to the then clerk of the Privy Council, which lasted some 10 minutes. Was that, in your mind, and again just on the evidence that is in the public domain already, an offence under the act?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

What's in the public domain probably doesn't include enough information for me to make a finding, and I will leave it at that for that particular file.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Would it be improper to assume an investigation is under way?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

I can't comment.

Hon. Peter Kent:

The other case is the matter of a big dollar Liberal fundraising event at which an American citizen with an interest in lobbying the Prime Minister and the infrastructure minister was gifted a ticket to that event, either by a Liberal or by a lobbyist. Many people would think that would justify investigation.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Again, I can't comment.

Hon. Peter Kent:

All right.

Coming back to Mr. Erskine-Smith's questions, I wonder if we could talk about merging some of the elements of the office with regard to investigation.

There was the investigation, the Trudeau report, for example, which involved both sides of a situation. Would there have been benefit there in the sharing of information of that fairly extensive and aggressive investigation while it was still being considered by your predecessor?

(1655)

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Obviously when it's a common issue and it's the flip side of the same issue, it would be interesting to do these interviews at the same time, but right now, we can't even talk to each other. Obviously he makes public that he investigates, so I'm aware of what he's doing—for most, or for some; I don't think he makes everything public—but he doesn't know what I'm seized of.

Interestingly, when the Privacy Commissioner issued a report a few weeks ago with the B.C. commissioner, the first thing I asked was, “ How did you do this?” I guess there is a section in their respective legislation that allows them to do investigations jointly. It does exist. There's a precedent for it.

Hon. Peter Kent:

One final question, would you recommend the same practice be followed in your case?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Certainly, if that is the will of Parliament, we will abide by that, yes.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Kent.

Next up for seven minutes is Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here, Commissioner. It's lovely to have a chance to meet you.

I'm going to be following up with some questions, some of which will just be me thinking out loud, if you can't answer, but wherever you can answer, I would truly appreciate it.

Recently, your office issued a report on sponsored travel and unregistered lobbying that could be happening on these trips. I guess Captain Renault from Casablanca is one of those situations. At any rate, how would you monitor unregistered lobbying on these trips? How did you find that and how do you respond? Can you tell us?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

The first thing I will clarify is that I did not find that there was some unregistered lobbying that occurred on these trips. This was extremely complex. It had been going on for a number of years, with 19 organizations, going back for a period of seven years.

The investigative team spoke to the heads of each of these organizations. We, as well, confirmed with members of Parliament whether or not lobbying had occurred on these trips. When it did, the organizations filled in their monthly communication report as they should, and when they didn't lobby, well then, they did not put in the monthly communication report.

How do I monitor? We investigate if there is an allegation. Otherwise it is the goodwill of lobbyists to put in their monthly communication report in the registry. And they do. There were 27,500 of them in the past year.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

That's a lot to investigate.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Yes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I understand your problems in regard to budgeting in that particular term.

The statutory review of the Lobbying Act is years overdue at this point. In your opinion, should Parliament direct this committee to have a review and examine the legislation as soon as possible?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

That again is the will of Parliament to decide if the Lobbying Act needs to be reviewed. It works quite well, I think, although it has some issues that I would like to see resolved. I am prepared and I continue to get prepared to come before you if the review ever starts.

When I came the last time, I had four months under my belt in this position, and now I have about a year and a half. Every day there are situations that come up and I think, “My goodness, I wish that this could possibly be in the law.”

As I move along, I adjust the recommendations that I will make if I'm invited to speak on them.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Obviously, it would be a good thing if this committee were to invite you to speak since you have a number of issues that you could provide good, sound recommendations for.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Absolutely.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Mr. Chair, I hope that that is duly noted. Thank you.

The Chair:

Yes, got it.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

My colleague, Mr. Angus, requested an investigation about SNC-Lavalin's lobbying practices. Are you going to act on that request? When we saw information in that regard we saw numerous lobbying attempts, as it were. Did that raise any red flags with you? Are you able to go ahead on Mr. Angus' request?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

I will repeat what I've said. I can't comment on whether there is an investigation or not.

I do want to reassure the committee that very often when I get letters, I know what's going on already. We're really on top of...we observe what's in the media. We listen to what's going on in the House. We're extremely proactive. We do not sit and wait to see what comes on our desk from members of the public, from members of Parliament or from senators.

That's really all I can comment on that.

(1700)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Now I'm into the thinking out loud. I'm interested in what you said in regard to the court's ruling on the Aga Khan. It seems to me that in regard to a benefit, the holiday may have been a benefit, but there was also the concern about the Aga Khan Foundation receiving funding. Is there not a benefit then to at least the Aga Khan through his foundation and wouldn't that raise some issues and cause a need to look?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Again, I think I will wait for the decision of the Court of Appeal to proceed.

What I can say to this committee is that if the decision remains, if the Court of Appeal does not overturn the Federal Court decision, it will mean that, yes, I will look at the matter again. It will also mean that the office will likely require resources, because it will mean that more people will be subject to the legislation. It will also mean that I may have to investigate a lot more files, so there might be some resource implications there.

Again, I will wait to see what the court says and I will abide by it.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

Very quickly, you talked about a mental health strategy. It seems to me that obviously, with all of the work your office does, your staff is under stress. I'm interested in the strategy. How are you going to cope with burnout and stress?

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

I personally am extremely demanding. I know that and I tell my staff that. But I also give them, every day, a big thank you. In the office I have a champion responsible for mental health. A committee sends us emails and sends us tools. We do activities. We have speakers. We very much accommodate people who we may feel are under stress.

We also do it with humour. I always tell people that we don't do heart surgery. What we do is extremely important. It's important for democracy. We take it extremely seriously. But at the end of the day, their health is primary to me and to them. Then we go about our day, and so far, so good.

The Chair:

Next up is Mr. Erskine-Smith for seven minutes or less.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I put my questions to the commissioner and I got the answers.

I will just say thanks for being here, and keep up the good work.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Commissioner, that brings us to the end of our questions.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

That was fast.

The Chair:

Yes, it did go by fast. You weren't just dreaming; it did go fast.

Ms. Nancy Bélanger:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we suspend, we have to vote on the estimates. OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF LOBBYING ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$4,406,633

(Vote 1 agreed to) OFFICE OF THE CONFLICT OF INTEREST AND ETHICS COMMISSIONER ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$6,355,513

(Vote 1 agreed to) OFFICE OF THE SENATE ETHICS OFFICER ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$1,231,278

(Vote 1 agreed to) OFFICES OF THE INFORMATION AND PRIVACY COMMISSIONERS OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Program expenditures—Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada..........$10,209,556 ç Vote 5—Program expenditures—Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada..........$21,968,802 ç Vote 10—Support for Access to Information—Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada..........$3,032,615 ç Vote 15—Protecting the Privacy of Canadians—Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada..........$5,100,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the chair report the main estimates 2019-20, less the amounts voted in interim supply, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Good. I will do that.

We'll now go into committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique

(1545)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, PCC)):

La séance est ouverte. Il s’agit de la 150e séance du Comité permanent de l’accès à l’information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l’éthique.

Conformément à l'article 81(4) du Règlement, nous examinons le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020: crédit 1 sous la rubrique Bureau du commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, crédit 1 sous la rubrique Bureau du conseiller sénatorial en éthique, crédit 1 sous la rubrique Commissariat au lobbying et crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sous la rubrique Commissariats à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, renvoyés au Comité le jeudi 11 avril 2019.

Nous accueillons aujourd’hui M. Mario Dion, du Commissariat aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique. Le commissaire est accompagné de Sandy Tremblay, directrice de la Gestion corporative.

Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous entendrons les représentants du Commissariat au lobbying. Nous accueillerons Nancy Bélanger, commissaire au lobbying, et Charles Dutrisac, directeur des finances et dirigeant principal des finances.

Monsieur Dion, je suis heureux de vous voir. Vous avez 10 minutes.

M. Mario Dion (commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, Commissariat aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Monsieur le président et honorables membres du Comité, j'aimerais d'abord vous remercier de m'avoir invité à comparaître aujourd'hui devant vous pour l'examen de la présentation budgétaire du Commissariat dans le cadre du Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020.

Comme le disait le président, je suis accompagné de Mme Sandy Tremblay, qui est notre directrice de la Gestion corporative.

Comme vous le savez, je suis ici pour discuter des besoins budgétaires actuels du Commissariat. Pour mettre les choses en contexte, j'aimerais passer en revue certains projets et activités que nous avons entrepris l'an dernier, ainsi que des projets et activités prévus pour le présent exercice.

Je vais commencer par parler de notre mission puisqu'elle est essentielle; elle est le fondement de tout ce que nous faisons. Le Commissariat s'est donné une mission il y a maintenant un peu plus d'un an, qui décrit ce que nous faisons.

Le Commissariat encadre et conseille, de façon indépendante, avec rigueur et cohérence, les députés et les titulaires de charge publique fédéraux. C'est le premier élément de notre mission. Deuxièmement, nous menons des enquêtes. Troisièmement, nous avons recours, au besoin, à des sanctions appropriées en vue d'assurer le respect intégral du Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés et de la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts.

L'an dernier, nous avons mis en œuvre un plan stratégique triennal qui guide les projets et les activités en fonction de notre mission. Trois priorités ont été définies: améliorer les communications et la sensibilisation, moderniser les structures de gestion de l'information et la technologie, et maintenir l'excellence opérationnelle. Le plan décrit également les moyens que nous prendrons pour réaliser ces priorités.

La première grande priorité est d'établir et d'améliorer les processus de communication et de sensibilisation, afin d'aider les députés et les titulaires de charge publique à comprendre et à être en mesure de respecter leurs obligations en vertu du Code et de la Loi.

L'éducation et la sensibilisation sont au cœur de mon approche depuis que je suis en poste, soit un an et demi maintenant. Nous visons à éduquer les titulaires de charge publique et les députés pour qu'ils soient pleinement conscients de leurs obligations. Concernant les moyens utilisés pour ce faire, j'ai l'intention d'aller au-delà de l'approche traditionnelle en salle de cours et d'utiliser plutôt la technologie des nouveaux médias pour les exposés et les autres usages éducatifs.

Nous avons regardé l'ensemble du matériel éducatif que le Commissariat a publié depuis 12 ans, en fait, depuis sa création, pour expliquer l'application des règles du Code et de la Loi. L'objectif était de simplifier ce matériel afin d'en faire une source d'information plus efficace pour les députés et les titulaires de charge publique.

Nous avons mis à jour 12 de ces documents et avons condensé leur contenu en sept nouveaux avis d'information qui expliquent les exigences de la Loi. Cette année, nous allons nous attacher à moderniser et à simplifier les instruments qui se rapportent au code régissant la conduite des députés.

En fait de nouveaux moyens, nous avons organisé deux webinaires sur les cadeaux, conjointement avec la commissaire au lobbying, qui va comparaître immédiatement après moi. Nous avons aussi mis en œuvre une approche plus dynamique de l'utilisation de Twitter pour communiquer directement avec les députés et les titulaires de charge publique. Enfin, nous avons fait quelques courtes vidéos afin de sensibiliser les intervenants.

(1550)

[Traduction]

C’était tout pour ce qui est des communications et de la sensibilisation.

Une deuxième priorité de notre plan stratégique consistait à moderniser les structures de gestion de l’information et de la technologie. Nous avons lancé en novembre dernier une nouvelle version de notre système de gestion des cas. Toute l’information provenant de notre ancien système a été transférée au nouveau. Notre infrastructure de technologie de l’information améliorée est compatible avec les systèmes existants et permet au commissariat d’explorer de nouvelles options technologiques pour s'acquitter de son mandat. Nous continuons de composer avec certains problèmes techniques et procéduraux, mais je suis convaincu qu’ils seront réglés d’ici la fin de l’exercice.

Nous travaillons également à l’élaboration d’un nouveau site web qui en fera une source d’information plus efficace pour les députés et les titulaires de charge publique. Il sera adapté aux appareils mobiles, ce qui n’est pas le cas à l’heure actuelle, de sorte qu’il rejoindra mieux nos intervenants occupés sur les plateformes disponibles aujourd’hui. Nous prévoyons lancer notre nouveau site web avant les élections d’octobre 2019.

La troisième grande priorité énoncée dans notre plan stratégique consiste à maintenir l’excellence opérationnelle en mettant l’accent sur nos employés et sur les outils dont nous disposons. Au cours de ma première année en poste, j’ai pris des mesures pour veiller à ce que notre commissariat investisse dans la formation et le perfectionnement professionnel des employés et fournisse les outils et l’équipement dont les employés avaient besoin pour faire leur travail. J’ai également veillé à offrir un milieu de travail respectueux, diversifié et inclusif.

On m’a demandé l’an dernier si je ferais des recommandations dans mes rapports annuels pour renforcer les régimes que nous administrons. À la même époque l’année dernière, avec seulement quelques mois d’expérience, je ne me sentais pas prêt à le faire dans les rapports annuels. J’avais exprimé l’espoir, l’an dernier, que le comité m’invite à présenter mes réflexions sur d’éventuelles modifications l’automne dernier. Sinon, j’allais les inclure dans les rapports annuels de cette année.

Or, c’est effectivement ce que nous ferons sous peu. Le mois prochain, en juin, le Commissariat déposera ses deux rapports annuels: un en vertu de la loi et l'autre en vertu du code. Nous avons rédigé des modifications qui renforceraient l’application de la loi dans l'éventualité où il y aurait un autre examen de la loi, et nous inclurons certains de ces points clés dans notre rapport annuel en vertu de la loi.

Notre plan stratégique constitue également pour mon organisation un document d’orientation. Nous nous en servons pour harmoniser nos priorités alors que nous nous acquittons de notre mission, c’est-à-dire fournir une orientation et des conseils indépendants, rigoureux et cohérents, et je rendrai compte de nos réalisations dans le cadre du plan stratégique dans les prochains rapports annuels au Parlement.

Les enquêtes continuent de susciter beaucoup d’intérêt de la part du public et des parlementaires. Nous avons été très actifs en ce qui concerne les enquêtes. En 2018-2019, nous avons publié huit rapports d’enquête, soit cinq en vertu de la loi et trois en vertu du code. Il y a actuellement quatre dossiers relativement auxquels je n’ai pas encore fait rapport, et notre équipe d’enquête doit établir un équilibre entre le souci de confidentialité, d’intégrité et d’équité procédurale et la complexité ainsi que l'urgence des dossiers. [Français]

Le Commissariat accomplit sa mission avec un total de 49 postes à temps plein. La division Conseils et conformité compte plus du tiers du personnel, puisque c'est la division chargée d'interagir quotidiennement avec les 3 000 personnes visées par la Loi ou par le Code. Ces interactions représentent la majeure partie du travail du Commissariat en ce qui concerne la conformité. Nous avons répondu à plus de 2 000 appels ou demandes de renseignements l'an dernier.

Le reste du Commissariat est divisé en trois grandes catégories: la gestion corporative, que Mme Tremblay dirige, les communications, dirigées par Mme Rushworth, et les enquêtes et services juridiques. Notre objectif est de faire preuve quotidiennement de rigueur et de professionnalisme, et de donner des conseils en matière de conformité.

J'ai entièrement confiance dans la qualité du travail et dans l'intégrité de tous les membres de mon équipe de direction et de tous les employés en général.[Traduction]

À moins qu’il y ait une augmentation inattendue de nos besoins en ressources, je m’attends à ce que notre commissariat soit en mesure de réaliser sa mission au cours du prochain exercice financier avec un budget de 7,1 millions de dollars. Cela représente une légère augmentation de 4 % par rapport au dernier exercice. Le budget de base n’a pas changé au cours des 12 années d’existence du Commissariat. Il s’agit de la première augmentation réelle de 4 %, et elle est nécessaire cette année pour permettre à notre commissariat de se préparer aux élections tout en continuant d’assurer l’excellence opérationnelle.

Il y a normalement une augmentation importante de la charge de travail chaque fois qu’il y a une élection générale, et nous voulions être prêts et nous y préparer. La préparation aux élections est l’un des principaux volets de notre activité en ce moment. Nous avons commencé à embaucher des employés nommés pour une période déterminée afin de nous aider à faire face à l’augmentation de la charge de travail. Nous mettons également à jour des lettres et des trousses d’information pour, éventuellement, de nouveaux députés, pour les personnes qui, à l’avenir, se joindront à des bureaux, à des cabinets ministériels, et ainsi de suite. Tous ces éléments découlent de notre plan stratégique et permettront au commissariat de mieux servir ses intervenants au cours d’une année électorale occupée.

Dans le cadre de cette planification, nous avons toujours une réserve. Nous avons 100 000 $ que nous n’affectons pas pour faire face efficacement, à des changements importants et aux besoins qui en résulteraient.

Je suis convaincu que nous serons en mesure, grâce au budget que vous avez sous les yeux, de mener à bien notre mission de façon efficiente, efficace et économique.

Monsieur le président, voilà qui conclut ma déclaration préliminaire. Je serai maintenant heureux de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité. Merci.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le commissaire.

Pour la gouverne du Comité, notre ordre du jour a été modifié. L’ordre du jour que vous avez devant vous est erroné. Nous allons poursuivre jusqu’à 16 h 15. Cela nous donne suffisamment de temps. Je vais essayer de donner la parole aux quatre premiers intervenants — Mme Fortier, M. Kent, M. Cullen et M. Erskine-Smith —, puis nous passerons au prochain commissaire. C’est tout le temps que nous avons. Je précise encore une fois que l’ordre du jour est modifié. Cela nous mènera à environ 16 h 20. Merci.

Madame Fortier, la parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Mona Fortier (Ottawa—Vanier, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Dion et madame Tremblay, je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Nous savons que vous travaillez très fort. Vous avez eu l'occasion de préparer une présentation, et j'aimerais vous poser quelques questions au sujet des défis que votre bureau doit relever. Je comprends bien la planification stratégique et vos priorités. Pourriez-vous nous faire part de vos défis actuels et des mesures que vous prenez en vue de les relever?

M. Mario Dion:

Nous avons toujours un défi lié aux délais comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, c'est-à-dire qu'il faut fournir nos services en temps opportun. Nous avons des normes de service entourant le premier contact que nous établissons. Cela crée toujours une pression.

Nous avons aussi des normes de service pour répondre aux représentants des médias et aux membres du public qui communiquent avec nous. Nous avons toujours une pression, même s'il n'y a pas de normes de service ou de délais prévus par la loi lorsque nous sommes en train d'enquêter sur une question. Il y a toujours une pression pour que les choses se fassent de façon ponctuelle, avec célérité, afin que le rapport soit pertinent au moment où il devient accessible. C'est l'un de nos défis, de toujours fonctionner avec le sentiment qu'il faut que cela bouge et que cela bouge vite.

Il faut faire cela de façon cohérente: nous devons fournir des réponses similaires d'un cas à l'autre quand les faits sont les mêmes. Je pense que les députés et les titulaires de charge publique apprécient un peu de prévisibilité. Nous avons donc besoin d'avoir des outils afin de nous assurer que les conseils que nous donnons sont cohérents.

Il faut aussi avoir une équipe professionnelle, c'est-à-dire que le milieu de travail doit demeurer stimulant. La seule ressource dont nous disposons, ce sont les travailleurs, les professionnels, qui fournissent les services. Nous voulons les garder, puisque la courbe d'apprentissage est assez importante. Il faut de la rigueur. La cohérence et la rigueur ne sont pas tout à fait la même chose. Nous essayons de faire preuve de beaucoup de rigueur dans tout ce que nous faisons.

Mme Mona Fortier:

Si je comprends bien, présentement, vous gérez toute cette pression et rien ne vous arrêtera quant à la réalisation de votre mandat.

M. Mario Dion:

Jusqu'à maintenant, c'est le cas, à moins que ne survienne une augmentation de la charge impossible à gérer. Toutefois, dans l'ordre actuel des choses, nous jonglons sans trop de difficulté avec toutes les dimensions que j'ai mentionnées. Cela fonctionne.

Mme Mona Fortier:

Étant donné que je partage mon temps de parole avec mon collègue, je vais vous poser une dernière question.

À la fin de votre présentation, vous avez mentionné qu'il y aura bientôt des élections. Nous sommes tous au courant que cela s'en vient. Quels sont les répercussions sur le volume de travail? Cela se passe-t-il à court terme? Pourriez-vous nous parler du volume de travail en ce qui concerne les élections?

M. Mario Dion:

Cela va surtout se passer après le 21 octobre, selon le résultat du vote. Il va nécessairement y avoir de nouveaux députés. Combien y en aura-t-il? Personne ne le sait. Nous devrons communiquer avec les nouveaux députés dans les trois jours suivant la confirmation de leur élection. Cela contribue à notre volume de travail.

Il nous faudra également faire du travail de sensibilisation auprès des gens qui sont élus pour la première fois et qui ne connaissent pas grand-chose au Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés. Nous allons devoir les familiariser avec le Code.

Comme je le disais tout à l'heure, si jamais il y a des changements dans la composition du Cabinet ou si jamais un autre parti forme le prochain gouvernement, il y aura potentiellement des centaines de nouveaux employés dans les bureaux de ministres, et ces derniers sont également des titulaires de charge publique au sens de la loi.

Voilà en quoi consiste notre volume de travail. Nous nous préparons à faire face à des centaines de nouveaux administrés dès le matin du 22 octobre prochain.

(1600)

Mme Mona Fortier:

Merci.

Je vais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à mon collègue M. Saini.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Bonjour, monsieur Dion et madame Tremblay. J'ai une question pour vous.[Traduction]

J’ai lu avec beaucoup d’intérêt que le mois dernier, vous avez signé un protocole d’entente avec le Commissariat au lobbying pour faire de l’éducation et de la sensibilisation, ce qui, à mon avis, est une excellente idée. Je pense qu’en combinant cette activité, plus vous faites de sensibilisation et d’éducation, surtout auprès des députés, plus vous réduirez de façon spectaculaire le nombre de questions et d'enquêtes qui vous seront soumises.

Y a-t-il une sous-composante d’efficience derrière ce processus? Plus vous informez les gens et plus vous les sensibilisez, plus vous devriez voir le nombre de questions et de cas diminuer.

M. Mario Dion:

C’est le cas. À long terme, je suis convaincu que cela permettra de mieux respecter le code et la loi. En conséquence, nous aurons moins de travail à faire pour commander ou faire enquête, mais ce n’est pas notre objectif. L’objectif est fondé sur le désir de bien informer les gens qui sont régis par le code et la loi pour qu’ils puissent réellement s’assurer de les observer de façon continue. C’est l’objectif.

M. Raj Saini:

Avez-vous élaboré des programmes en collaboration avec le Commissariat au lobbying jusqu’à maintenant?

M. Mario Dion:

Oui. Nous avons organisé il y a quelques mois un webinaire en français et un autre en anglais. Environ 130 personnes y ont assisté. Nous nous sommes concentrés sur le chevauchement entre la Loi sur le lobbying, la Loi sur les conflits d’intérêts et le Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés.

Nous sommes satisfaits du taux de participation et nous avons l’intention de répéter l’expérience au cours de la prochaine année.

M. Raj Saini:

Maintenant que vous avez élaboré ces programmes, croyez-vous que la collaboration entre votre commissariat et le Commissariat au lobbying permettra d’améliorer l’information et les outils offerts aux nouveaux députés après les prochaines élections?

M. Mario Dion:

J’en suis convaincu. Ce n’est qu’une question de degré, mais nous aurons un bien meilleur... tant sur le plan qualitatif que sur le plan du soutien que nous utiliserons. Nous allons utiliser la technologie. Nous communiquerons d’une manière qui est conforme au XXIe siècle et pas seulement avec des mots couchés sur le papier, avec du jargon juridique sur papier. Nous essayons d’adopter un langage simple et un accès en temps réel, jour et nuit, 7 jours sur 7, où que vous soyez sur la planète.

M. Raj Saini:

J’ai remarqué que dans votre plan stratégique pour 2018 à 2021, le deuxième point est la modernisation des structures de gestion de l’information et de la technologie.

Parlez-vous simplement de la mise à niveau de la technologie d’une génération à la suivante, ou parlez-vous d’un changement global dans le logiciel et la technologie en soi?

M. Mario Dion:

Pour l’instant, il s’agit essentiellement de mettre à niveau le système de gestion des cas, mais nous commençons lentement à explorer d’autres possibilités, comme l’utilisation de l’intelligence artificielle, pour nous acquitter de notre mandat.

Nous détenons une mine de renseignements. Essentiellement, nous n’utilisons pas l’information au maximum comme nous le pourrions afin de prévenir ou d’identifier les conflits d’intérêts potentiels. Nous essayons de nous informer au sujet de l’IA et de savoir si elle pourrait être utilisée dans les années à venir de quelque façon que ce soit pour réaliser notre mission. C’est un exemple de mesure technologique supplémentaire que nous envisageons.

M. Raj Saini:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Saini.

C’est maintenant au tour de M. Kent, pour sept minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le commissaire et madame Tremblay, de témoigner devant le Comité aujourd’hui.

Monsieur le commissaire, nous sommes heureux de vous revoir. J’espère que vos problèmes de santé ont été réglés.

J’aimerais poser des questions en commençant par les quatre dossiers qui font toujours l’objet d’une enquête.

Lorsque vous avez commencé l’enquête sur les allégations selon lesquelles le premier ministre Trudeau ou le personnel de son cabinet avait exercé des pressions indues sur l’ex-procureure générale, Jody Wilson-Raybould, pour qu’elle intervienne dans une poursuite criminelle contre la société québécoise SNC-Lavalin, vous avez dit croire qu'une violation possible de l’article 9 pourrait constituer un motif d’enquête.

Dans le cadre de cette enquête — je sais que vous n’avez pas encore fait rapport, et nous devons être discrets dans nos questions —, y avait-il plus d’un député ou d’un titulaire de charge publique en cause?

(1605)

M. Mario Dion:

Bien sûr, comme le député l’a souligné, je suis très limité dans ce que je peux dire au Comité, ou à qui que ce soit d’autre, au sujet d’une enquête en cours. Lorsque nous l’avons lancée de notre propre chef en vertu de l’article 45 de la loi en février dernier, l’accent était mis sur le premier ministre, mais le député a raison de dire qu’il y a plusieurs autres titulaires de charge publique qui sont interviewés, ou qui le seront, pour examiner essentiellement les faits qui ont été largement rendus publics. Les adjoints politiques qui auraient également joué un rôle ont également été interviewés ou le seront.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

L’ex-greffier du Conseil privé a dit, il y a quelques mois, et je cite: « Je pense que le commissaire à l’éthique pourrait faire toute la lumière sur cette affaire assez rapidement. »

Pourriez-vous dire au Comité si vous serez en mesure de faire rapport avant l’ajournement de la Chambre en juin?

M. Mario Dion:

En fait, je peux informer le Comité cet après-midi qu’il n’y aura pas de rapport d’ici la mi-juin. Je m’attends à ce que la Chambre ajourne à la mi-juin ou à la troisième semaine de juin, et notre rapport ne sera pas prêt. Je peux vous l’assurer.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Et le sera-t-il avant le 21 octobre?

M. Mario Dion:

Nous travaillons fort pour produire un rapport au cours des prochains mois.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

En ce qui concerne les trois autres rapports, je suppose que l’un d'eux concerne madame Vandenbeld. Les deux autres rapports sont de quelle nature, monsieur? Veuillez rafraîchir...

M. Mario Dion:

Selon nos recherches, elles ne sont pas du domaine public pour le moment. L’une d’elles n’est pas du domaine public, mais le rapport sera publié dans quelques semaines, alors vous saurez dans deux semaines sur quoi porte le troisième rapport. Le quatrième, qui porte sur monsieur Grewal, est du domaine public.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

D’accord.

Pour revenir un peu aux allégations concernant le premier ministre ou d’autres membres de son cabinet ou d’autres cabinets ministériels, le premier ministre s'est-il montré coopératif? Je me souviens que pour votre prédécesseur, dans le cadre de l’enquête sur les vacances illégales sur l’île de l’Aga Khan, il a fallu quelques mois au premier ministre pour se rendre disponible. A-t-il été plus disponible dans cette situation?

M. Mario Dion:

Je pense qu’il est juste de dire que nous sommes très satisfaits de la rapidité et de l’ampleur de la collaboration à ce stade-ci.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

D’accord, merci.

Passons maintenant à ce dont vous avez parlé plus tôt au sujet de la collaboration avec la commissaire au lobbying et des webinaires. Je pense que les webinaires ont été très utiles, très instructifs. Vous êtes sûrement au courant de la directive que la Cour fédérale a donnée à l’actuelle commissaire au lobbying de rouvrir l’enquête sur l’autre aspect du rapport Trudeau en ce qui concerne le don illégal, d’une part, accepté par le premier ministre et le fait que le prédécesseur de la commissaire au lobbying n’a rien trouvé de mal à l’aspect lobbying de cette relation.

Avez-vous eu l’occasion de discuter avec la nouvelle commissaire au lobbying du fait que c’est exactement le genre de situation où, si l’on découvre un acte répréhensible du côté d’un agent du Parlement et d’un lobbyiste, un acte répréhensible doit aussi avoir été commis par l'autre partie?

M. Mario Dion:

Tout d’abord, j’aimerais profiter de l’occasion, monsieur le président, pour souligner que la commissaire au lobbying et moi-même ne discutons jamais, bien sûr, de toute enquête en cours. Il est un peu prématuré de conclure quel sera le résultat de la nouvelle enquête sur l’Aga Khan, mais je comprends la question du député. J’ai parlé d’un chevauchement. Il y a des règles dans le code de déontologie au sujet des lobbyistes qui font des dons à des députés ou à des titulaires de charge publique.

Il y a des règles dans la loi et dans le code. Il y a un lien évident entre ces dispositions. La commissaire au lobbying et moi-même essayons simplement d’expliquer à nos commettants, si je peux dire, ou aux intervenants, notre interprétation de ces règles et comment elles... En passant, nos interprétations ne sont pas incompatibles. Elles sont assez cohérentes, voire tout à fait cohérentes. Nous essayons de faire comprendre aux gens qu’il est en fait possible de respecter les deux séries de règles en même temps et, comme le député l’a souligné, qu’il est aussi possible de violer les deux séries de règles en même temps.

(1610)

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Pensez-vous qu’il y aurait lieu de préciser la définition de « cadeaux ou avantages »? Je repense maintenant au jugement de la Cour suprême rédigé par Mme la juge L’Heureux-Dubé, dans lequel elle présentait un certain nombre de définitions très précises qui, selon moi, ne figurent ni dans votre loi ni dans la Loi sur le lobbying.

M. Mario Dion:

J’hésite à répondre à cette question spontanément. La définition de « cadeau » est très vaste dans notre loi et dans le code également. Elle englobe tout avantage reçu par un député, mais j’aimerais prendre cette question en délibéré, si le président est d’accord, parce que c’est difficile d'y répondre tout de suite. Je ne me souviens pas non plus du jugement dont parle le député.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci, monsieur le commissaire.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le commissaire et monsieur Kent.

Nous avons maintenant un visiteur qui dispose de sept minutes.

Re-bienvenue, monsieur Cullen. C'est à vous.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Un visiteur, j'ai l'impression d'être comme un étranger à la Chambre et cela m’intimide.

Monsieur le commissaire, c’est un plaisir de vous voir. Je suis heureux que vous soyez de retour et j’espère que vous vous portez bien.

M. Mario Dion:

Très bien, merci.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez un travail important à faire pour les Canadiens, mais nous sommes aussi des êtres humains, et je suis heureux de vous revoir en santé et au travail.

M. Mario Dion:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’avais des questions semblables au sujet des rapports en suspens. Je suppose que trois des quatre ont été identifiés. Nous allons retenir notre souffle en attendant la divulgation de l'identité du quatrième.

J’ai une petite question. Votre avocate principale — je crois qu’elle s’appelle Mme Richard — a-t-elle dû se récuser de l’une des enquêtes en cours?

M. Mario Dion:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvez-vous me rappeler l’article 9? C’était l’objet du rapport et l’infraction potentielle que votre bureau a décrite lorsque...

M. Mario Dion:

Je l’ai sous les yeux. Je vais le lire rapidement: « Il est interdit au titulaire d’une charge publique de se prévaloir de ses fonctions officielles pour tenter d’influencer la décision d’une autre personne dans le but de favoriser son intérêt personnel ou celui d’un parent ou d’un ami ou de favoriser de façon irrégulière celui de toute autre personne ».

Voilà ce que dit l’article. Il traite de l'utiliser de sa fonction pour tenter d’influencer une décision afin de favoriser indûment les intérêts personnels de quelqu'un d'autre. C’est l’objet de notre enquête dans l’affaire Trudeau.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord, parce que dans l'affaire Trudeau, la question des pressions inappropriées a parfois été au coeur d’autres conversations. L’article 9 ne traite pas vraiment de cet aspect ni de l’interprétation de ce qui est inapproprié. On y parle simplement d'un tentative d'exercer une influence. Est-ce exact?

M. Mario Dion:

C’est cela.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord.

Pouvez-vous m'expliquer une chose? Des Canadiens m’ont posé des questions au sujet de l’éthique et des infractions à la Loi sur l’éthique dans le cadre d’un scénario où quelqu’un, disons M. Erskine-Smith, aurait reçu un joli tableau d'une personne désireuse de l’influencer, cadeau que votre bureau aurait jugé inapproprié.

Serait-il normal pour le député en poste de rendre le cadeau jugé inapproprié ou contraire à la Loi sur l’éthique?

M. Mario Dion:

Oui. Ce serait la chose à faire normalement. La plupart du temps, nous suggérons aux gens de le faire et c’est ce qu’ils font, ils le rendent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je n'irai jamais jusqu'à dire que M. Erskine-Smith recevrait un tel cadeau, mais poussons le raisonnement.

Si une personne transigeant avec le gouvernement offrait des voyages d'une valeur non négligeable, des voyages coûteux, comme l'a fait l’Aga Khan, je ne comprends pas pourquoi... Un tel cadeau ne peut être rendu parce que c’est impossible. C’est une expérience, un voyage, mais le cadeau à bien évidemment de la valeur du cadeau, une valeur pour laquelle le titulaire de la charge publique aurait payé s'il avait acheté ce cadeau, acheté ce voyage, ce qui aurait été plus approprié, plutôt que de le recevoir en cadeau.

Pourquoi ne trouve-t-on pas dans la loi, comme pour un tableau reçu illégalement, une exigence de remboursement de la valeur d'un cadeau tel un voyage également jugé inapproprié ou illégal?

Est-ce que je me fais bien comprendre? C’est peut-être une proposition trop logique, mais quelle est la différence?

M. Mario Dion:

Tout d’abord, j’aimerais terminer ma réponse de tout à l’heure en disant que nous n’intervenons que lorsque le cadeau est effectivement divulgué. Nous recevons plusieurs divulgations par mois, mais je suis convaincu que tous les cadeaux ne sont pas toujours divulgués. Bien sûr, nous ne pouvons rien faire s'ils ne le sont pas.

Quand une cadeau est divulgué, nous suggérons de le retourner. Parfois, nous suggérons aussi qu'il soit remboursé, quand il n’est pas vraiment possible de le rendre, comme dans le cas d'un un spectacle ou d’un événement public ayant déjà eu lieu.

Je n’ai pas le pouvoir d'imposer la restitution. Nous conseillons simplement les gens qui dévoilent avoir reçu un cadeau. Dans le cas d’un voyage, par exemple, on peut conseiller à quelqu’un d'en rembourser le coût, mais je n’ai aucun outil dans la loi pour forcer l’exécution de mes conseils.

(1615)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour en revenir à mon premier exemple, si vous savez d'avance qu'un député va recevoir une peinture ou un autre cadeau, vous pouvez l’aviser qu’il devra le rendre si celui-ci est reçu de façon inappropriée, mais vous ne pouvez rien ordonner. Est-ce exact?

M. Mario Dion:

C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avez-vous, à un moment donné, conseillé à M. Trudeau de rembourser le voyage qu'on lui avait offert et qui a été jugé contraire à l’éthique ou illégal?

M. Mario Dion:

Je ne l’ai pas fait. Je ne sais pas si mon prédécesseur l’a fait, parce que cette affaire s'est terminée avant mon entrée en fonction, le 9 janvier 2018, alors je...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Au nom des Canadiens...

M. Mario Dion:

Franchement, je n’ai pas soulevé la question...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous pouvez comprendre pourquoi les Canadiens sont confus. Si quelque chose a été donné illégalement ou de façon contraire à l’éthique, comme un voyage, il semblerait logique que si cela a été fait de façon inappropriée, que le cadeau ait été divulgué ou non, mais qu’il ait finalement été découvert... Quelle est la différence entre un voyage de 10 000 $ reçu en cadeau et un simple don de 10 000 $ pour permettre l'achat d'un voyage? Si quelqu’un remet à un politicien une enveloppe de 10 000 $ — Dieu nous en garde — pour essayer d’exercer sur lui une certaine influence, et que le politicien s'en sert pour emmener sa famille en vacances, quelle est la différence? En vertu du Code, y a-t-il une différence entre ces deux scénarios?

M. Mario Dion:

Je préférerais ne pas avoir à me perdre en conjectures sur de telles situations, mais je suppose que vous connaissez les interdits. Ce n'est pas le fait de donner un cadeau qui est interdit. C’est le fait de le recevoir le cadeau, de l’accepter. C’est ce que le Code et la loi régissent. C’est l’acceptation d’un cadeau.

Une fois que vous avez accepté un cadeau, vous avez fait quelque chose qui n’est que partiellement réversible. Nous donnons des conseils sur la façon de renverser la situation. Parfois, cela n’est pas possible.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Effectivement.

M. Mario Dion:

Nous n’avons pas le pouvoir d’ordonner quoi que ce soit à un titulaire de charge publique qui a accepté un cadeau qu’il n’aurait pas dû accepter.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Compris.

Encore une fois, je reviens à votre échéancier pour l’enquête en cours. Je pense que vous avez répondu à une question que vous n'en ferez pas rapport avant la mi-juin, mais dans les prochains mois. Cela nous place plus ou moins en plein milieu de la saison estivale. Je sais que vous ne pouvez pas être précis quant à la date et avez dit que vous aviez encore d’excellentes rencontres à avoir.

M. Mario Dion:

Oui, nous avons encore des interviews à faire. Il peut toujours y avoir un certain nombre d’éléments de surprise, si vous voulez. Nous voulons également produire un rapport de qualité au moins égale à celle des rapports précédents. Cela prend du temps, mais je suis convaincu qu’au cours des prochains mois, nous allons terminer ce rapport, à moins que quelque chose de complètement imprévu ne survienne.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez dit que vous vous prépariez pour les élections. En ce qui concerne la loi ou le Code, sur quel aspect envisagez-vous de vous attarder plus particulièrement à l’approche de la campagne électorale?

M. Mario Dion:

Rien en particulier. Nous savons quels sont les problèmes les plus courants et nous présumerons qu’à l’avenir, ils seront assez semblables à ce qu’ils sont maintenant. La question des cadeaux est toujours en tête de liste.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord.

M. Mario Dion:

Il y a aussi la question des déclarations initiales, du délai de restitution. Nous examinerons également nos formulaires afin de les rendre aussi simples et conviviaux que possible, y compris en ce qui a trait à l’utilisation de la technologie.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cullen.

Le dernier intervenant est M. Erskine-Smith, pour sept minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

D'après ce que nous savons, il y a 49 postes à temps plein. Environ un tiers sont affectés aux conseils et à la conformité. Quels font les titulaires des deux autres tiers? À quoi servent ces gens-là?

M. Mario Dion:

C’est plus du tiers. En fait, sur les 49, il y en a 18 qui sont spécialisés en conseils et conformité. Nous en avons 11 dans les services ministériels, qui traitent des RH, de la GI et de la TI, des finances, de toutes les obligations que nous avons en tant qu’entité du secteur public qui doit respecter un certain nombre de lois.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Combien y en a-t-il aux services centraux et aux RH?

M. Mario Dion:

Il y a 11 ETP. Nous en avons huit dans les domaines de la sensibilisation et des communications, des relations avec les médias et ainsi de suite. Nous en avons huit en droit et enquêtes.

(1620)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord. Dites-moi si j'ai raison. Vous avez reçu 2 000 demandes de renseignements et appels au cours de la dernière année, et est-ce que ce sont ces 18 personnes qui s’en occupent?

M. Mario Dion:

C’est exact.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Cela fait moins de 100...

M. Mario Dion:

Je suis désolé; c’est moins que 18. Nous avons huit conseillers. Sur les 18, huit sont des conseillers professionnels. Nous avons également du personnel qui s’occupe davantage de tâches administratives pour s’assurer que les examens annuels, par exemple, sont effectués à temps...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je vois.

M. Mario Dion:

... et qui s'occupent de tous les mécanismes en place, associés à la loi et au Code.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord. J’essaie simplement de comprendre la charge de travail, qui me semble... Si vous avez huit personnes et un conseiller juridique qui peuvent intervenir dans le cas des dossiers qui remontent, cela fait un peu plus de 200 demandes de renseignements ou appels par employé, ce qui me semble incroyablement modeste. J’ai pratiqué le droit, et si vous m'aviez dit que j’avais 200 appels ou demandes de renseignements à traiter par an, je me serais étonné de ne pas en avoir eu 10 fois plus.

Comme nous sommes sur le sujet du budget des dépenses, je n'ai pas l'impression que chacun de vos employés est occupé à pleine capacité, mais je me trompe peut-être.

M. Mario Dion:

Monsieur le président, je pense que le député a soulevé la même question l’an dernier.

Je peux vous garantir que personne ne se tourne les pouces. Des questions très complexes se posent quand un titulaire de charge publique téléphone pour parler d’un problème dont le règlement peut nécessiter des semaines, voire des mois. Certaines questions sont très complexes. Elles ne sont pas toutes simples, et elles exigent un suivi.

Fréquemment, comme vous l’avez souligné, les conseillers juridiques sont consultés parce qu’une nouvelle question juridique ou une question juridique relativement complexe se pose.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Mario Dion:

C’est la charge de travail et le nombre d’employés, et je suppose que vous devrez me croire sur parole.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C’est juste. C’est pourquoi vous êtes ici.

Ce sera ainsi chaque fois que vous serez ici, et chaque fois que la commissaire au lobbying sera ici... Je vois que 18 employés font le travail de base, et il y a des employés qui, par ailleurs, s'occupent de sensibilisation, de communications et des RH. Chaque fois que les deux bureaux comparaissent devant moi, il semble qu’il y ait un dédoublement massif pour les petits services de RH, et il y a tellement de coordination par ailleurs qui est utile et nécessaire pour les bureaux.

Êtes-vous d’avis qu’il serait logique de fusionner les bureaux?

M. Mario Dion:

Les mandats sont très différents. Le groupe que nous avons ajouté est différent. La fusion est, certes, concevable, mais je n’y ai jamais vraiment réfléchi.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

En ce qui concerne les ressources humaines et la sensibilisation seulement, il y a probablement des économies importantes à réaliser, non?

M. Mario Dion:

Le sous-ministre adjoint, Services intégrés, que j'ai été il y a longtemps vous concède qu'il pourrait bien sûr y avoir des économies d’échelle. C’est évident.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup. C'est apprécié.

M. Mario Dion:

Merci.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Estimez-vous votre mandat suffisant pour faire votre travail? Je sais que, dans le cadre de nos discussions sur le budget des dépenses, intervient la question des ressources. Disposez-vous des ressources dont vous avez besoin en fonction de votre mandat actuel? Tandis que vous entreprenez différentes enquêtes en cette période qui n'est pas anodine pour votre bureau, estimez-vous avoir le mandat approprié?

M. Mario Dion:

J’aimerais avoir, en plus, le pouvoir de faire des recommandations à l'issue d'une enquête. Or, tout ce qui m'est permis en vertu de la loi, c’est d’analyser les faits et de partager les fruits de mon analyse avec le premier ministre. Aux termes de la loi, je n’ai même pas le pouvoir de recommander quoi que ce soit.

J’aimerais bien avoir ce pouvoir parce que je pense qu'il permettrait de changer les choses sur le plan de l’efficacité du processus, pourrait-on dire. En vertu du Code, la situation est différente, parce qu’il existe un pouvoir explicite de recommander une sanction. J’aimerais avoir le même pouvoir aux termes de la loi.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je comprends. Quand vous concluez à une irrégularité, vous recommandez de remédier à la situation d’une façon ou d’une autre. C'est l’idée?

M. Mario Dion:

Je pense à l'application de certaines mesures visant à faire en sorte que cela ne se reproduise plus au sein du gouvernement, comme je le faisais dans mon ancien mandat à titre de commissaire à l’intégrité du secteur public. Je l’ai fait à quelques reprises parce que j’avais la latitude de le faire en vertu de la loi. Ce n’est pas le cas ici.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous ne feriez que des commentaires de ce genre, en cas de constat de conduite inappropriée.

M. Mario Dion:

Bien sûr. Même en l'absence d’infraction, on peut quand même avoir observé quelque chose qui appelle une recommandation. C’est encore possible.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

J’ai rarement dû être en contact avec votre bureau, et c'est sans doute heureux. On ne m'a pas offert beaucoup de tableaux. Je ne pense pas en avoir reçu un seul. En fait, c’est drôle que M. Cullen ait songé à cet exemple. Si mes parents regardaient, ils diraient: « Oh non, notre fils n’est pas assez cultivé pour qu'on lui offre des peintures. »

En fait, j'ai contacté votre bureau une fois pour me faire conseiller de rendre le cadeau, ce avec quoi je n'étais pas d'accord. Je pense que cela continue d’être inacceptable en droit, et j’ai parlé à certains de mes collègues qui, dans des cas identiques, ont reçu des conseils différents de votre bureau, ce qui me préoccupe. Je comprends que tous vous employés ne se ressemblent pas et que des décisions différentes puissent être prises et, bien sûr, que ce n'est pas toujours la bonne ou la meilleure décision qi est prise. Je pense que les bonnes décisions sont prises la plupart du temps, mais tout le monde fait des erreurs.

En cas de décision erronée et quand un député ou un ministre n’est pas d’accord avec l’interprétation donnée, existe-t-il un recours?

(1625)

M. Mario Dion:

La loi prévoit la possibilité d'un contrôle judiciaire, mais c'est très limité. Le Code ne prévoit aucun recours en dehors de l'appareil de la Chambre des communes. Bien sûr, le député a toujours la possibilité de soulever la question à la Chambre des communes et de passer par les processus de la Chambre.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Justement, si vous publiez un rapport quand la Chambre fait relâche et que ce rapport signale un problème, le député n’aurait pas le même recours.

M. Mario Dion:

Un rapport en vertu du Code, ne peut être déposé que lorsque la Chambre siège.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord.

M. Mario Dion:

Il m'est imposé de faire rapport au Président, qui soumettra mon document à la Chambre dès que celle-ci reprendra ses travaux. Je peux l’adresser au Président qui déposera le rapport à la Chambre à la première occasion. Le député dont la conduite est mise en cause dans le rapport a alors le droit de demander à prendre la parole, après la période des questions et pour un maximum de 20 minutes, afin d'expliquer sa situation.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Très bien. Merci beaucoup. Je l’apprécie.

Le président:

Comme je l’ai mentionné, monsieur le commissaire, nous vous souhaitons bonne santé et nous souhaitons vous revoir bientôt. Merci d’être venu aujourd’hui.

M. Mario Dion:

Merci de vos bons voeux, monsieur le président. Ce fut un plaisir.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance jusqu’à ce que l’autre commissaire arrive.

(1625)

(1625)

Le président:

Nous reprenons.

Je ne vais pas répéter ce que j’ai déjà lu, mais nous accueillons, du Commissariat au lobbying, Nancy Bélanger, la commissaire; et Charles Dutrisac, directeur des finances et dirigeant principal des finances.

Je présente mes excuses à tout le monde. Nous avons eu des votes qui ont encore plus raccourci notre temps que nous ne l’avions déjà fait.

Madame Bélanger, vous avez 10 minutes.

(1630)

[Français]

Mme Nancy Bélanger (commissaire au lobbying, Commissariat au lobbying):

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, bonjour.

J'aimerais tout d'abord souligner que notre rencontre d'aujourd'hui a lieu sur le territoire traditionnel de la nation algonquine.

Je suis très heureuse d'avoir l'occasion de discuter avec vous du budget principal des dépenses, de nos réalisations au cours de la dernière année et de nos priorités. Je suis accompagnée de Charles Dutrisac, directeur des finances et dirigeant principal des finances.[Traduction]

L'année a été extrêmement chargée pour nous. Cette semaine, nous avons déménagé dans de nouveaux locaux qui sont un lieu de travail axé sur les activités. Ce déménagement a été exigeant et n'aurait pas été possible sans le dévouement incroyable des membres de mon équipe et l'expérience professionnelle des employés de Services publics et Approvisionnements Canada et de Services partagés Canada. Je les remercie sincèrement pour leur engagement à mener à bien ce projet.

Afin de souligner ce succès, nous organisons des portes ouvertes en juin, alors attendez-vous à recevoir bientôt une invitation à visiter notre nouveau bureau.[Français]

Selon la Loi sur le lobbying, j'ai le mandat de tenir à jour un registre des lobbyistes, d'assurer l'application de la Loi et du Code de déontologie des lobbyistes et de sensibiliser le public aux exigences de la Loi et du Code. Afin de remplir cette mission, nous avons élaboré l'an dernier un plan stratégique triennal qui fixait quatre secteurs de résultats clés. Je vais faire état de nos réalisations et de nos priorités actuelles pour chacun.

Le premier secteur de résultats est un registre de lobbyistes moderne. Le registre favorise la transparence en donnant à la population canadienne accès à l'information sur les activités de lobbying auprès du gouvernement fédéral. En un jour donné, il y a près de 5 500 lobbyistes actifs enregistrés. L'an dernier, les lobbyistes ont utilisé notre système pour soumettre les détails de plus de 27 500 communications avec les titulaires d'une charge publique désignée.

Afin de rendre l'enregistrement d'un lobbyiste plus facile et plus rapide, nous avons simplifié le processus d'enregistrement pour les nouveaux déclarants. Au cours de la prochaine année, nous allons améliorer le système afin de le rendre plus convivial pour les déclarants et de l'adapter aux appareils mobiles. Cela nous aidera à rendre l'information publique plus rapidement.

Nous continuerons également de profiter des recommandations découlant d'une évaluation de nos services à la clientèle. Cette évaluation a permis de conclure que notre approche à l'égard des clients est efficace et qu'elle contribue à accroître la conformité. Certaines recommandations concernant le registre et les activités de sensibilisation devront être évaluées.[Traduction]

Le deuxième domaine clé est constitué par des activités efficaces de conformité et d'exécution de la Loi. J'ai simplifie le processus d'enquête pour donner suite à des allégations de non-conformité tout en continuant de veiller à ce que les décisions soient justes et impartiales et respectent les exigences nécessaires en matière d'équipe procédurale.

Les allégations de non-conformité sont gérées en deux étapes. Dans un premier temps, elles font l'objet d'une évaluation préliminaire afin d'évaluer la nature de l'infraction alléguée, d'obtenir des renseignements, et de déterminer si l'objet relevé de mon mandat. Ensuite, si nécessaire pour assurer la conformité à la Loi ou au Code, une enquête est ouverte. Au cours de la dernière année, 21 évaluations préliminaires ont été conclues dont quatre ont donné lieu à l'ouverture d'une enquête. II y a 11 évaluations préliminaires en cours.

Quant aux enquêtes, j'ai récemment déposé un rapport au Parlement concernant des déplacements parrainés par 19 entreprises et organisations. J'ai aussi suspendu et envoyé trois enquêtes à la GRC parce que j'avais des motifs raisonnables de croire qu'une infraction à la Loi avait été commise. Treize enquêtes n'ont pas été poursuivies. À ce jour, il y a un total de 15 enquêtes en cours.

Enfin, en ce qui concerne l'interdiction quinquennale d'exercer des activités de lobbying, nous mettons au point un outil en ligne pour simplifier les demandes d'exemption présentées par les anciens titulaires d'une charge publique désignée.

(1635)

[Français]

Le troisième secteur de résultats est l'amélioration de la sensibilisation et des communications à l'égard des Canadiens et des Canadiennes.

Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons fait 70 présentations devant des lobbyistes, des titulaires d'une charge publique et d'autres parties prenantes, en plus des webinaires mis sur pied en collaboration avec le commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique. Nous avons également mis à jour les lignes directrices concernant les règles de conduite.

La priorité, cette année, sera de mettre à jour et de restructurer notre site Web de façon à faciliter la recherche d'information. Nous allons aussi utiliser les données sur les demandes de renseignements que nous recevons afin d'analyser les besoins. Cela nous permettra de mettre au point des produits et des outils de communication ciblés.

Je vais continuer de formuler des recommandations à propos du prochain examen de la Loi, afin d'améliorer le cadre fédéral du lobbying.[Traduction]

Notre dernier domaine clé, mais certainement pas le moindre, touche à l’instauration d’un milieu de travail exceptionnel. Il est important pour moi que les employés du Commissariat se sentent valorisés, comprennent l'importance de leur travail et soient fiers de travailler au Commissariat au Lobbying.

Les résultats du sondage auprès des fonctionnaires indiquent sans aucun doute que nous sommes sur la bonne voie pour devenir un employeur de choix. En ce qui concerne la satisfaction des employés à l'égard de leur milieu de travail, les résultats du sondage de 2018 ont placé le Commissariat parmi les cinq premiers ministères et organismes fédéraux.

Nous avons mis en œuvre notre stratégie en matière de santé mentale et nous continuerons de l'appuyer. Nous sommes également en train de créer un programme de perfectionnement professionnel adapté à la réalité d'un petit bureau.

Le Commissariat s'acquitte de son mandat grâce au travail inestimable de 27 employés dévoués.

Le budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020 du Commissariat s'élève à environ 4,8 millions $. À l’exception des 350 000 $ consacrés à la réinstallation pour cette année seulement, il s'agit essentiellement du même montant depuis la création de l'ancien bureau, qui remonte à 2005. Le coût en personnel représente environ 70 % des dépenses ou 3,4 millions $. Le montant résiduel d'environ 1,1 millions $ sert à l'acquisition de services de soutien des programmes et de services généraux, y compris les RH, les finances, la Tl, les services de passation de marchés, de même qu'à couvrir des frais divers. Cinquante-cinq pour cent du 1,1 million $ sert à obtenir les services d'autres institutions gouvernementales et cela nous donne accès à un vaste éventail de connaissances de façon rentable.

L'enveloppe budgétaire qui nous est accordée est préoccupante pour l’avenir. La réalité est que nous tentons de fonctionner avec un budget qui a été établi en 2005. Le montant de 4,5 millions $ était peut-être suffisant à l'époque, mais aujourd'hui, cela signifie qu'il n'y a pratiquement aucune latitude pour réaffecter les ressources financières, pour employer des ressources supplémentaires ou pour faire les investissements nécessaires dans des systèmes aux prix d'aujourd'hui.

Le Registre est une obligation statutaire et il est essentiel à la transparence. Des investissements constants sont nécessaires pour s'assurer que le Registre suit l'évolution des normes de TI et pour améliorer l'accessibilité de l'information.

Le travail du Commissariat a également évolué en matière de complexité, de judiciarisation et de niveau de surveillance.

Par conséquent, j'étudie les répercussions sur les coûts et je présenterai les demandes de financement nécessaires à l'automne afin de m'assurer que nous pouvons remplir adéquatement notre mandat.[Français]

La Loi sur le lobbying continue d'être une loi importante et pertinente. En fin de compte, il est primordial pour moi que le travail du Commissariat soit effectué de manière à optimiser les ressources pour la population canadienne et à améliorer l'efficacité et l'efficience de nos activités.

Enfin, je tiens à reconnaître l'engagement inébranlable et la résilience des employés du Commissariat qui, le plus souvent, sont appelés à aller bien au-delà des exigences de leur poste. Je leur suis reconnaissante de leur apport et de leur soutien, alors qu'ils m'aident à améliorer l'accessibilité, la transparence et la responsabilisation du système de lobbying.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie de votre attention. Je répondrai avec plaisir à vos questions.

(1640)

Le président:

Merci, commissaire.

Nous allons commencer par M. Graham, qui a sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais entrer directement dans le vif du sujet. Je ne suis pas très patient envers les lobbyistes professionnels. Pour autant que je sache, ils facturent les clients en fonction du nombre de réunions auxquelles ils participent, multiplié par le nombre de personnes qui y assistent, plutôt qu'en fonction de ce qu’ils obtiennent réellement lors de ces réunions. Je refuse généralement de les rencontrer, à moins qu’ils ne viennent de ma circonscription ou y soient installés. En fin de compte, si les gens ont suffisamment de ressources pour me dire quoi penser, je n'ai probablement pas envie de les entendre.

Savez-vous combien de lobbyistes professionnels facturent des clients et sont payés, et cette donnée est-elle importante pour vos besoins?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Je ne le sais pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous n’avez aucune idée de la façon dont ils sont payés ou de leur modèle de rémunération, et cela est sans importance.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Non, et notre régime ne nous impose pas de demander combien les lobbyistes sont payés. C’est une exigence aux États-Unis, et c’est très populaire. Au Canada, ce n’est pas une exigence. Franchement, je n’en ai pas encore vu la nécessité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque j’ai été élu, en 2015, votre prédécesseure, Mme Shepherd, m’a présenté votre bureau à l’occasion d'une séance d’orientation des députés. Je lui ai simplement demandé qu'elle est la différence entre lobbying et trafic d’influence? Elle m’a répondu que le trafic d’influence est illégal, sans plus; c'est en partie la réponse que j'attendais.

À l'expérience, j'ai constaté que beaucoup d’anciens députés et membres du personnel politique deviennent lobbyistes. Je suppose que cela paye plus pour moins d’heures de travail. Que vendent-ils ces gens-là? Obtiennent-ils plus de rendez-vous que d'autres parce qu'ils sont connus et respectés, que s’ils appellent, tout le monde leur répond et qu'ils jouissent de bonnes relations et d'une certaine réputation? Renseignent-ils les décideurs sur les processus et le fonctionnement de la Chambre et sur certains sujets? Dans un cas, ce serait du trafic d’influence et dans l’autre du lobbying. Où tracez-vous la ligne entre les deux?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

C’est une question intéressante.

Tout d’abord, le lobbying, tel qu’il est défini dans la Loi sur le lobbying, est considéré comme une activité légitime. Le trafic d’influence est une autre histoire. Un ancien titulaire de charge publique désignée n'a pas le droit de faire du lobbying dans les cinq années suivant son départ, ainsi, d'après le scénario que vous m’avez présenté, je ne suis pas plus certaine de là où placer la limite dans les faits.

Je ne peux qu’appliquer la loi telle qu’elle est rédigée, et elle reconnaît que le lobbying est une activité légitime. En fait, je comprends votre opinion, mais j’ai aussi rencontré un certain nombre de titulaires de charge publique qui ne partagent pas votre avis et qui croient vraiment que le lobbying est une activité légitime, jugeant que les spécialistes en relations gouvernementales leur fournissent l’information dont ils ont besoin pour prendre les décisions qui sont dans l’intérêt public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand ils m'informent, je les trouve utiles, mais c'est beaucoup moins le cas quand ils me disent: « Vous devriez faire ceci ou cela et m'écouter pour qui je suis ».

Je me demande si vous avez un moyen de déterminer s’ils se conforment à la loi, quand ils font effectivement du lobbying et quand ils passent à autre chose, peu importe la période de restriction de cinq ans. Il ne s'agit pas que de ministres ou de personnel politique.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Je peux vous dire qu’aux termes du code de déontologie, les lobbyistes n’ont pas le droit de mettre les titulaires de charge publique, comme vous, dans une situation s'apparentant à un conflit d’intérêts ou établissant qu’il y a eu un accès ou un traitement préférentiel. Un contact entre deux personnes ayant eu une relation antérieure serait inapproprié. Au-delà de cas spécifiques, je ne peux pas en dire plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai compris.

Dans quelles circonstances accorderiez-vous une exemption à la période de restriction de cinq ans?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

La Loi sur le lobbying prévoit que je peux accorder une exemption aux personnes ayant occupé leur charge pendant très peu de temps, dans des fonctions administratives, éventuellement dans un poste intérimaire pour une très courte période. Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons reçu 11 demandes, dont une de l’année dernière, donc 12 en tout. Trois ont été retirées. Sur les neuf demandes, j’en ai accordé quatre et j’en ai refusé cinq. Les quatre personnes dont j'ai approuvé les demandes avaient toutes occupé des postes de soutien administratif ou des emplois d’été pour étudiants, par exemple.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai compris.

J’aimerais céder le temps qu’il me reste à M. Erskine-Smith. Merci.

Le président:

Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Je prends note de vos préoccupations au sujet de l'actuelle enveloppe budgétaire. M. Dion, qui était ici tout à l'heure, n’a pas exprimé les mêmes préoccupations. Je ne parlerai pas de la charge de travail, mais il me semble que le regroupement de vos deux bureaux... Vous avez des fonctions complémentaires.

Certaines fonctions du Commissariat à l’information, que vous connaissez très bien, sont complémentaires à celles du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée, mais beaucoup de ces fonctions s'opposent, en ce sens que, parfois, l’accès à l’information est en contradiction avec la protection de la vie privée. Chacun veut travailler dans le sens de sa mission, ce qui est justifié: pour protéger la vie privée dans le cas du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée, et pour protéger l’accès à l’information dans celui du Commissariat à l’information. D’une certaine façon, je peux comprendre qu’on ne fusionne pas ces bureaux, bien qu’il y aurait probablement des gains d’efficacité à réaliser.

Dans le cas du Commissariat au lobbying et du Commissariat à l’éthique, je suis un peu perplexe de voir qu’il n’y a pas qu’un seul bureau. Qu’en pensez-vous?

(1645)

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Évidemment, si l’on envisage de fusionner les deux bureaux, il faudrait d'abord faire une étude pour déterminer s’il sera possible de réaliser des économies d'échelle. Personne chez nous ne s’occupe des ressources humaines. Notre serveur se trouve chez le CPVP. La Commission canadienne des droits de la personne nous fait bénéficier de tous ses services et de ses contrats en ressources humaines. Nous avons recours à des services externes. Comme mon effectif est trop peu nombreux — 27 personnes —, nous avons un contrat.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Pourtant, le commissaire à l’éthique est assis là avec quelqu'un des RH et...?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Je n’ai pas ce luxe.

Je suis convaincue qu'on pourrait réaliser des économies de coûts. Je ne sais pas s’il vaut la peine de fusionner nos services, car je n’ai pas fait l’étude.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je vois.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Si c'est ce que vous envisagez, je vous recommanderais d’approcher nos homologues provinciaux. La protection des renseignements et la protection de la vie privée sont des services intégrés dans les provinces. En ce qui concerne le lobbying, mon collègue de l’Ontario porte quelque chose comme sept casquettes. Il serait peut-être intéressant que vous lui parliez.

La question devient un biais institutionnel. Comment un lobbyiste peut-il vous demander de lui révéler ce que vous aurez éventuellement appris d'un député? Tout cela se ramène à la façon de gérer les cloisons ou d'en ériger des cloisons pour s’assurer qu’un ensemble d’informations n’influence pas l’autre, bien que le fait d’avoir une vue d’ensemble puisse parfois aider.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Pour terminer, je vais vous inviter à vous pencher sur une question, si vous ne l'avez est déjà fait.

Dans notre démocratie, les règles encadrant le financement électoral sont très strictes. Je pense que l’idée est en partie due au fait est que si quelqu’un fait un don à ma campagne, à celle de M. Kent ou à celle de Mme Mathyssen, jusqu’à concurrence de 1 600 $, son influence sera potentiellement très faible. C’est un montant minime à bien des égards, par rapport à ce que nous voyons dans d’autres pays, notamment aux États-Unis.

Je dirais que la mesure dans laquelle un tel donateur pourrait, par la suite, exercer une influence sur nous, dans nos rôles de représentants élus, est nulle, mais nous commençons à voir des campagnes parallèles menées par des organisations tierces, travaillant main dans la main avec des partis politiques, et qui reçoivent des sommes importantes d'entreprises privées sans rapport avec la règle de minimis.

La mesure dans laquelle ces personnes morales et physiques peuvent ensuite exercer une influence me préoccupe beaucoup. Si vous et vos bureaux n’avez pas réfléchi à cette idée, je vous encourage à le faire.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci. Nous devons poursuivre.

Monsieur Kent, vous avez sept minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la commissaire, pour cette nouvelle visite au Comité.

Comme mon collègue l’a dit, nous avons eu une conversation intéressante avec le commissaire à l’éthique au cours de la dernière heure. Nous avons parlé jusqu'à un certain point de l’amélioration de la sensibilisation et des communications, des webinaires et des réunions organisés par vos bureaux. Le commissaire Dion a dit clairement que vous ne parliez pas de cas particuliers.

Toutefois, en ce qui concerne l’ordonnance que la Cour fédérale vous a adressée à la suite d'une décision, ordonnance que l’ancien commissaire a, je crois, qualifié d’« erreur susceptible de faire l'objet d'un examen », j’ai demandé au commissaire à l’éthique comment on avait pu, d'un côté, conclure à un acte répréhensible et à un cadeau illégal et, d'un autre côté, tirer une conclusion différente au sujet de la définition d'avantage ou de cadeau?

Qu’en pensez-vous? Pourriez-vous nous dire si vous vous êtes déjà conformée à l’ordonnance de la Cour fédérale ou si vous attendez? Nous comprenons qu’il pourrait y avoir un appel du gouvernement.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Je peux confirmer que l’appel a été interjeté.

Je vais répondre à votre question du mieux que je peux, sachant qu’il y a un appel devant la Cour.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je comprends.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Tout d’abord, j’ai le plus grand respect pour la Cour fédérale. C'est là que j'ai fait mon stage. J’y ai travaillé et je respecterai toujours la décision d’un juge. Vous ne m’entendrez jamais critiquer ou commenter les décisions de façon négative. Je respecterai donc la décision de la Cour d’appel fédérale.

Dans cette décision particulière, cependant, pour préciser ce dont vous parlez, je ne pense pas que la question portait sur une définition différente donnée au mot « cadeau ». Il s’agissait de savoir si l’Aga Khan était assujetti aux règles sur le lobbying étant donné qu’il n’est pas payé. C'était donc là le problème.

Je vais attendre la décision de la Cour d’appel fédérale. Je n’ai pas commencé. Je me fie à mon expérience d’avocate pour attendre systématiquement l'expiration du délai d’appel de 30 jours avant d'entamer quoi que ce soit. J’ai toujours fait ainsi, alors j’attendrai la décision et je la respecterai.

(1650)

L'hon. Peter Kent:

C’est une question hypothétique, mais très simple. Si vous deviez lancer une enquête, selon quel échéancier le feriez-vous? Commenceriez-vous par le début ou vous limiteriez-vous à la question soulevée?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Les gens qui ont travaillé avec moi savent que je commencerais probablement par le début. Personnellement, j’aimerais aller au fond des choses. Toutefois, je profiterais aussi du fait que les faits sont déjà connus, alors j'utiliserais ce qui existe pour faire avancer les choses le plus rapidement possible.

J’ai également dit à mon équipe que, si nous entreprenions une telle enquête — pas une enquête, en fait, car la Cour nous a demandé de recommencer l’examen étant donné que le dossier n'était pas encore à l’étape de l’enquête — je ferais probablement un rapport au Parlement à ce sujet, afin que tout le monde comprenne mon interprétation de la question.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

En ce qui concerne les 15 enquêtes et les trois qui ont été renvoyées à la GRC, il existe une différence entre votre bureau et le Commissariat à l’éthique dans l'annonce des enquêtes ou des renvois d’incidents dans le domaine public.

Pouvez-vous nous parler des trois enquêtes qui ont été confiées à la GRC?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Je ne peux pas, je ne confirme et je ne nie pas non plus, précisément pour cette raison, pour ne pas compromettre une éventuelle enquête par la GRC.

C’est une situation bizarre. Selon le libellé de la loi qui nous régit, s’il s’agit d’une infraction, en d’autres termes s’il s’agit d'une activité de lobbying non enregistrée ou effectuée durant la période d'interdiction, si j’ai des motifs raisonnables de croire que tel a été le cas, je dois suspendre l'enquête. Je ne termine pas ce genre d'enquêtes et je les renvoie à la GRC. Très souvent, il est même possible que je ne parle même pas à la personne mise en cause parce qu’il s’agit d’auto-incrimination, alors je ne m'engage pas sur cette voie.

Toute enquête ne concernant que les dispositions du code fait l'objet d'un rapport au Parlement, à moins que je n'y mette un terme en cours de route.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Il y a deux causes dans le domaine public qui se rapportent fort probablement à votre bureau.

L’une des questions sans réponse dans le scandale de SNC-Lavalin concerne l’appel téléphonique de l’ancien greffier du Conseil privé, maintenant président de SNC-Lavalin, au greffier du Conseil privé de l’époque, qui a duré une dizaine de minutes. À votre avis, s’agissait-il d’une infraction à la loi, je le rappelle sur la foi d'éléments de preuve étant du domaine public?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Ce qui est du domaine public ne contient probablement pas assez d’information pour que je puisse parvenir à une conclusion, et je m’en tiendrai à cela pour ce dossier particulier.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Serait-il inapproprié de supposer qu’une enquête est en cours?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Je ne peux pas faire de commentaire.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

L’autre cas est celui d’une importante activité de financement libérale pour laquelle un citoyen américain souhaitant faire du lobbying auprès du premier ministre et du ministre de l’Infrastructure s’est fait offrir un billet, soit par un libéral, soit par un lobbyiste. Beaucoup pourraient estimer que cela justifie une enquête.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Encore une fois, je ne peux pas faire de commentaires.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

D’accord.

Pour revenir aux questions de M. Erskine-Smith, je me demande si nous pourrions parler de la fusion de certains éléments des deux bureaux pour ce qui touche aux enquêtes.

Il y a eu l’enquête, le rapport Trudeau, par exemple, qui a illustré les deux côtés d’une même situation. Vous deux bureaux auraient-ils eu avantage à échanger des renseignements dans le cadre de cette enquête assez approfondie et dynamique pendant qu’elle était encore dans les main de votre prédécesseur?

(1655)

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Évidemment, quand il s’agit d’un problème commun et que vous avez les deux côtés de la médaille, il serait intéressant de faire ces entrevues en même temps, mais pour l’instant, nous ne pouvons même pas nous en parler entre nous. Évidemment, comme l'autre commissaire déclare publiquement qu'il fait enquête, je sais ce qu’il fait — pour la plus grande partie ou pour une partie seulement, parce que je ne pense pas qu’il rende tout public —, mais lui ne sait pas de quoi je suis saisie.

Fait intéressant, quand le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a publié un rapport il y a quelques semaines, conjointement avec le commissaire de la Colombie-Britannique, ma première question a consisté à demander: « Comment avez-vous fait cela? » Je suppose qu’il y a un article dans leur loi respective qui leur permet de mener des enquêtes conjointes. Il existe bel et bien. Il existe un précédent.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Une dernière question. Recommanderiez-vous que la même pratique soit suivie dans votre cas?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Si c’est la volonté du Parlement, nous nous y conformerons, oui.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Kent.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Mathyssen, pour sept minutes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d’être ici, monsieur le commissaire. C’est un plaisir d’avoir l’occasion de vous rencontrer.

Je vais enchaîner avec quelques questions, dont certaines ne seront guère que des réflexions à voix haute, quand vous ne pourrez y répondre, mais sachez que j’apprécierais vraiment que vous y répondiez.

Récemment, votre bureau a publié un rapport sur les déplacements parrainés et le lobbying non enregistré auquel pourraient donner lieu ces voyages. Dans des situations comme celle du capitaine Renault dans Casablanca, je suppose. Quoi qu’il en soit, comment se manifeste le lobbying non enregistré lors de ces voyages? Comment l'avez-vous constaté et comment réagissez-vous? Pouvez-vous nous en parler?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Tout d'abord, je tiens à préciser que je n’ai pas remarqué que ces voyages aient donné lieu à des activités de lobbying non enregistrées. L'enquête a été extrêmement complexe. Elle durait depuis des années et visait 19 organisations sur une période remontant sept ans en arrière.

L’équipe d’enquête a parlé aux dirigeants de chacune de ces organisations. Nous avons également vérifié auprès des députés s’ils avaient été contactés dans le cadre d'activités de lobbying lors de ces voyages. Quand tel fut le cas, nous avons constaté que les organisations avaient dûment rempli leur rapport de communication mensuel, ce qu'elles n'avaient bien sûr pas fait dans le cas contraire.

Comment assurer la surveillance? S’il y a une allégation, on enquête. Sinon, c’est au bon vouloir des lobbyistes de verser leur rapport mensuel de communication au registre. Et ils le font. Il y en a eu 27 500 l'année dernière.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C’est beaucoup à examiner.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Oui.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je comprends vos problèmes en ce qui concerne la budgétisation au cours de cette période.

L’examen législatif de la Loi sur le lobbying se fait attendre depuis des années. À votre avis, le Parlement devrait-il ordonner à ce comité d’examiner la loi le plus tôt possible?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Encore une fois, c’est au Parlement de décider si la Loi sur le lobbying doit être révisée. Elle fonctionne très bien, je pense, même si elle soulève des questions que j’aimerais voir résolues. Je suis et reste prête à comparaître devant vous si cet examen devait être entrepris.

Lorsque j'ai comparu la dernière fois, j’avais quatre mois d'expérience dans ce poste; aujourd'hui, environ un an et demi. Chaque jour, des situations se présentent où je me dis: « Mon Dieu, j’aimerais que cela puisse être inscrit dans la loi. »

Au fur et à mesure, j’adapte les recommandations que je ferai si on m'invite à en parler.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

De toute évidence, ce serait une bonne chose que le Comité vous invite à prendre la parole puisque vous pourriez formuler de bonnes recommandations sur un certain nombre de questions.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Absolument.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Monsieur le président, j’espère qu'il en est pris bonne note. Merci.

Le président:

Oui, j’ai compris.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Mon collègue, M. Angus, a demandé une enquête sur les pratiques de lobbying de SNC-Lavalin. Allez-vous donner suite à cette demande? D'après les informations à notre disposition, il semble qu'il y ait eu de nombreuses tentatives de lobbying. Cela vous a-t-il alertée? Êtes-vous en mesure de répondre à la demande de M. Angus?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Je vais répéter ce que j’ai dit. Je ne peux pas dire s’il y a une enquête ou non.

Je tiens à rassurer le Comité que, très souvent, lorsque je reçois des lettres, je sais déjà ce qui se passe. On est vraiment au courant de... On suit les médias. On suit les débats de la Chambre. On est extrêmement proactif. On n’attend pas que le public, les députés ou les sénateurs nous écrivent.

C’est tout ce que je peux dire à ce sujet.

(1700)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je pense à voix haute maintenant. Ce que vous disiez de la décision de la cour concernant l’Aga Khan me semble intéressant. À propos d'avantage, le congé a peut-être bien été un avantage, mais on s'inquiétait aussi de savoir si la Fondation Aga Khan recevait un financement. N’y a-t-il donc pas un avantage pour l’Aga Khan du moins, par l’entremise de sa fondation, et n'y a-t-il pas la matière à examen?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Ici aussi, j'attendrai la décision de la Cour d’appel avant d'aller plus loin, je pense.

Ce que je peux dire au Comité, c’est que si l'arrêt de la Cour fédérale est maintenu, si la Cour d’appel ne le renverse pas, alors, oui, je réexaminerai la question. Cela signifie également que le bureau aura probablement besoin de ressources, parce qu’un plus grand nombre de personnes seront assujetties à la loi; et que je devrai peut-être enquêter sur beaucoup d’autres dossiers, ce qui exigerait des ressources supplémentaires.

Là aussi, j’attendrai de voir ce que la cour dira et je m’y conformerai.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Très rapidement, vous avez parlé d’une stratégie en matière de santé mentale. Il me semble évident qu’avec tout le travail que fait votre bureau, votre personnel est stressé. Je m’intéresse à la stratégie. Comment allez-vous faire face à l’épuisement professionnel et au stress?

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Personnellement, je suis extrêmement exigeante. Je le sais et je le dis à mon personnel. Mais je leur dis aussi, chaque jour, un grand merci. Au bureau, j’ai un champion responsable de la santé mentale. Un comité nous envoie des courriels et des outils. On fait des activités. On a des intervenants. On est très accommodant à l’égard des gens qui nous paraissent stressés.

On recourt aussi à l'humour. Je dis toujours aux gens qu'on ne fait pas de chirurgie cardiaque. Ce que l'on fait est extrêmement important. C’est important pour la démocratie. On prend cela très au sérieux. Mais au bout du compte, leur santé est primordiale pour moi et pour eux. Ensuite, chacun fait ce qu'il a à faire et on est parti du bon pied.

Le président:

C’est maintenant au tour de M. Erskine-Smith, pour sept minutes ou moins.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

J’ai posé mes questions au commissaire et j’ai obtenu les réponses.

Je tiens simplement à vous remercier d’être ici et à poursuivre votre bon travail.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur le commissaire, cela met fin à nos questions.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

C’était rapide.

Le président:

Oui, ça s’est passé vite. Vous ne faisiez pas que rêver; les choses allaient vite.

Mme Nancy Bélanger:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de suspendre la séance, nous devons voter sur le budget. COMMISSARIAT AU LOBBYING ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme..........4 406 633 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté.) COMMISSARIAT AUX CONFLITS D’INTÉRÊTS ET À L’ÉTHIQUE ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme..........6 355 513 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté.) BUREAU DU CONSEILLER SÉNATORIAL EN ÉTHIQUE ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme..........1 231 278 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté.) BUREAUX DES COMMISSAIRES À L’INFORMATION ET À LA PROTECTION DE LA VIE PRIVÉE DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme — Commissariat à l’information du Canada..........10 209 556 $ ç Crédit 5 — Dépenses du programme — Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada..........21 968 802 $ ç Crédit 10 — Soutien à l’accès à l’information — Commissariat à l’information du Canada..........3 032 615 $ ç Crédit 15 — Protection de la vie privée des Canadiens — Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada..........5 100 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sont adoptés.)

Le président: Le président doit-il faire rapport à la Chambre du Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020, moins les sommes votées au titre des crédits provisoires?

Des députés: D’accord.

Le président: Bien. C’est ce que je vais faire.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux travaux du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 16, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.