header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-05 INDU 136

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 136, as we continue our statutory review of the Copyright Act. Is there a hockey player with the number 136? No, there are no hockey players with the number 136—too bad.

Today we have with us, from the Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright, Gerald Kerr-Wilson, partner, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP. We have, from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Scott Smith, senior director, intellectual property and innovation policy.

It's good to see you again, sir.

We have, from the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, David Fewer, director. Finally, from the Public Interest Advocacy Centre, we have John Lawford, executive director and general counsel.

We will start. You'll each have up to seven minutes. We'll do a round of questions, and I believe we'll be leaving some time at the end for debating a motion that will be on the floor. That should leave us about half an hour to debate the motion, and we'll go from there.

Why don't we start with you, Mr. Wilson? You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson (Partner, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP, Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.

Good afternoon, members of the committee.

My name is Jay Kerr-Wilson. I'm a partner with Fasken Martineau and am appearing today on behalf of the Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright, or BCBC.

The members of BCBC include Bell Canada, Rogers, Shaw, Telus, Cogeco, Vidéotron and the Canadian Communication Systems Alliance. BCBC's members support a copyright regime that rewards and protects creators, facilitates access to creative content, encourages investment in technology and supports education and research.

The exceptions that were added to the Copyright Act in 2012 were necessary to eliminate uncertainty that would restrict or inhibit the development of innovative new products and services. Reducing or eliminating these exceptions will put at risk hundreds of millions of dollars in investments. It will cause disruptions in the rollout of legitimate new services that would otherwise provide copyright owners more opportunity to earn revenue by giving Canadians more access to more content.

The coalition does not believe that new copyright levies should be imposed on ISPs or other intermediaries in an attempt to create new sources of revenue for Canadian creators and artists.

First, requiring ISPs to make content-specific payments is a clear violation of the principle of network neutrality.

Second, and more important, the Copyright Act is not the appropriate statute for promoting Canadian cultural industries. Canada's obligations under international treaties require that any benefit that is granted to Canadian copyright owners must also be provided to non-Canadians when their works are used in Canada. As a result, most of the money collected from Canadians would go to the U.S.

Third, copyright owners are already paid for lawful online activities through commercial licence agreements, and in the case of SOCAN, tariffs approved by the Copyright Board. Forcing Canadians to pay another fee for receiving these same lawful services is a form of double-dipping, a practice that was rejected by the Supreme Court in ESA v. SOCAN.

The government has other, far more appropriate policy tools at its disposal to promote Canadian cultural content and Canadian creators. Using these tools enables measures to be specifically targeted to Canadian creators in a way that the Copyright Act cannot.

The BCBC supports the addition of a new exception for information analytics. A human being can access and read a document without having to make a new copy or reproduction. Automated processes need to make technical copies in order to read and analyze the content of documents. Just as Parliament recognized the need in 2012 to create exceptions to apply to the reproductions that are required to operate the Internet, the BCBC believes that a new exception is required to eliminate any uncertainty regarding the making of reproductions for automated information analysis.

The BCBC recommends an additional improvement to the existing “notice and notice” regime. In Bill C-86, the budget implementation act, the government introduced amendments to prohibit the inclusion of settlement demands and infringement notices. The BCBC strongly supports this proposal but believes additional amendments are necessary to protect consumers and to give ISPs the tools they need to stop these settlement notices.

Bill C-86 makes clear that ISPs are not required to forward settlement demands to subscribers; however, it contains no useful deterrent to dissuade rights holders or other claimants from including settlement demands in copyright notices. We believe the onus for excluding settlement demands from copyright notices must rest solely with the rights owner, not the ISPs, who currently face liability for failing to forward compliant notices.

The other needed change is to adopt regulations establishing a common standard for infringement notices. Canadian ISPs and the motion picture industry co-operated on the development of a standard format known as the Automated Copyright Notice System, or ACNS, which is freely available at no charge and reflects Canadian requirements. The government should enact regulations establishing the form and content of notices based on ACNS.

The BCBC is aware that the ministers have written to this committee and the heritage committee with respect to the changes to the Copyright Board and collective management of copyright. The BCBC supports many of the changes that have been introduced to improve the efficiency of Copyright Board proceedings.

The coalition is concerned that some of the changes will eliminate important protections for licensees and could result in monopoly copyright licensing practices that are no longer transparent or subject to regulatory oversight.

(1535)



The coalition strongly supports amendments that will make it easier for copyright owners to effectively enforce their rights. The act should allow for injunctive relief against all of the intermediaries that form part of the online infrastructure distributing infringing content. For example, it should be explicit that courts can issue a blocking order requiring an ISP to disable access to infringing content available on preloaded set-top boxes or an order prohibiting credit card companies from processing payments for infringing services.

The BCBC recommends that the Copyright Act be amended to eliminate a potential conflict between a court order for ISPs to block access to infringing services and the CRTC, using its authority under section 36 of the Telecommunications Act, to prohibit that blocking.

The BCBC finds it unacceptable that an Internet service provider could be ordered by a court to block access to an infringing Internet service and prohibited by the CRTC from complying with that court order. This conflict must be resolved in favour of the court order.

Finally, the BCBC warns the committee against unfounded claims of a value gap between the music industry and Internet services. The claims made by the music industry and the amendment they're demanding ignore how rights are cleared through commercial transactions. If adopted, these measures would disrupt well-established commercial relationships and would ultimately result in substantial net outflow of money from Canadians to U.S. record companies. For example, the music industry wants the definition of “sound recording” revised so that record companies and performers get paid public performance royalties when sound recordings are used in soundtracks in film and television programs.

The music industry appears to suggest performers and record labels aren't paid for the use of recorded performances in soundtracks. This is simply false.

Record companies are free to negotiate the terms of using recorded music and soundtracks with the movie producer. Performers have to agree to the use of their performances in soundtracks and are entitled to demand payment through their agreements with the record labels. Furthermore, the Copyright Act already provides detailed provisions protecting the rights of performers to be paid for the use of their performances. Revising the definition of “sound recording” as suggested would result in record labels and performers getting paid twice for the same use.

If the committee is concerned about improving the financial fortune of performers, it could recommend that the division of royalties between record companies and performers in subsection 19(3) be adjusted. The simple change would immediately put more money in the pocket of every performer who's performance is played on the radio, streamed online, or played in bars and restaurants.

Thank you. Those are my comments. I look forward to your questions.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move right to the Chamber of Commerce. Scott Smith, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Scott Smith (Senior Director, Intellectual Property and Innovation Policy, Canadian Chamber of Commerce):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee, for the opportunity to address you today.

I'm actually here for the Canadian intellectual property council, which is a special council within the Canadian Chamber of Commerce—the national voice of business, representing over 200,000 businesses across Canada.

The CIPC is dedicated to improving the intellectual property rights regime in Canada and has broad-based participation from a variety of industries, including manufacturers, the entertainment industry, information and communications technologies companies, telecommunications and logistics firms, legal professions, retailers, importers and exporters, pharmaceutical and life science companies, and business associations.

The leaders of the CIPC are senior executives from corporations and associations who have a strong understanding of their industries' challenges and recognize the need for the protection of IPR in Canada. The mandate of the council is to promote an improved environment in Canada for businesses interested in innovation and intellectual property, by raising the profile of IPR among key policy-makers in the government and the general public.

I'd like to start by thanking the government for efforts to recognize the link between innovation and intellectual property rights in its intellectual property strategy.

Our counterparts at the Global Innovation Policy Center, GIPC, undertake a systematic evaluation of the strength of the IPR regimes in 45 economies. This year, Canada ranked 18, but the score has improved from previous years. Measures such as digital rights management and the enablement provisions introduced in the last update of the Copyright Act are important tools to help protect the significant investments made by creators in Canada. We would like to see those measures preserved going forward.

I'd also note that we are pleased to see that many of the suggestions put forward by the CIPC regarding changes to the Copyright Board have been reflected in Bill C-86, announced last week.

We believe it's important to have a consistent, timely and predictable board, and one that supports and encourages new and existing businesses operating in Canada's cultural industries, through a more efficient and productive tariff-setting process; through provisions to enact reforms by way of regulation, particularly as it pertains to delays; through the provision to support independently negotiated tariffs; and through the adoption of clear decision-making criteria.

We look forward to seeing these provisions come into force in the spring of 2019.

I'd like to focus the balance of my comments today on two issues: addressing online piracy, and keeping the door open to research and innovation for artificial intelligence.

I'll start with a pervasive problem: the significant threat of online piracy that now includes new forms that were not dominant the last time the Copyright Act was reviewed. This includes the commercial operation of illegal online streaming platforms and set-top boxes preloaded with illegal add-ons that provide users with unauthorized access to entertainment content.

According to the MUSO piracy insight report, Canada is now one of the highest consumers of global web streaming piracy. In fact, this same report finds that Canada has moved up to eighth in the global country rank by piracy visits, totalling 1.88 billion visits to all piracy sites in 2016. That web streaming is now the most popular type of piracy in Canada.

In the Government of Canada's own study on online consumption of copyrighted content that was issued in May 2018, one quarter of all Canadians self-reported as having consumed illegal content online. Sandvine also estimates that 10% of Canadian households use illegal subscription services.

The economic harm caused by online piracy is all too real. According to research by Frontier Economics, the commercial value of digital piracy of film in 2015 alone was estimated at $160 billion worldwide. In Canada, where the film and television industry alone accounted for over 170,000 jobs in 2016 and 2017, and generated $12 billion in GDP for the Canadian economy, the impact of online piracy is significant.

Unfortunately, the current tools available in the Copyright Act are insufficient to deal with these new threats. While there is no single solution to piracy, the Copyright Act should be modernized and leverage tools proven to be effective in helping to reduce online piracy, including those available in Europe.

CIPC encourages the government to enact provisions that expressly allow rights holders to obtain injunctive relief from competent authorities, such as site blocking and de-indexing orders against intermediaries whose services are used to infringe copyright.

(1545)



Illegal content is accessed through Internet intermediaries, and they are best placed to reduce the harm caused by online piracy. This principle has long been recognized throughout Europe where article 8(3) of the EU copyright directive has provided the foundation for copyright owners to obtain injunctive relief against intermediaries whose services are used by third parties to infringe copyright.

The need for modern and effective tools to help address online piracy has been supported by the broadest range of Canadian stakeholders, including Canada's largest Internet service providers, all of whom have recognized the harm caused by international piracy sites that harm Canada's creative economy.

Even the CRTC has acknowledged the harms caused by piracy in considering the application filed by the FairPlay Canada coalition earlier this year, but ultimately pointed to the current review of the Copyright Act as the appropriate forum to address this pressing issue. Building on precedents that already exist in Canada, the Copyright Act should be amended to expressly allow rights holders to obtain injunctive relief against intermediaries by site blocking and de-indexing orders of infringing sites.

I'll conclude with preserving an opportunity, and I'm going back to data here. Data, and the techniques and technologies employed to collect and analyze it, will allow Canada and the world to solve some of the world's most pressing economic, social and environmental problems. Data is now the engine of economic growth and prosperity. Countries that promote data's availability and use for society's good and economic development will lead the fourth industrial revolution and give their citizens a better quality of life.

Machine-learning frequently necessitates the use of incidental copying of copyrighted works that have been lawfully acquired. Works are used, analyzed for patterns, facts and insights, and those copies are used for data verification. To avoid the risk of blocking this activity, we suggest that any legislation that deals with the applicability of copyright infringement liability rules should examine carefully how these rules apply to all stakeholders in the digital network environment as part of ensuring the overall effectiveness of a copyright protection framework.

Thank you for the opportunity to present to you today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we move on, you mentioned in your opening statement the MUSO piracy insight report. Would you be able to submit that to the clerk?

Mr. Scott Smith:

Yes, I certainly can.

The Chair:

That would be great. Thank you very much.

We're going to move on to the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic and David Fewer.

Mr. David Fewer (Director, Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, members of the committee. My name is David Fewer. I'm the director of CIPPIC, which is the Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic at the centre for law, technology and society at the University of Ottawa.

We are Canada's first and only public interest technology law clinic. We're based in the university. We essentially bring lawyers with expertise in technology law issues together with students to advocate on behalf of the public interest on technology law issues.

Our work resides at the heart of Canada's innovation policy agenda. We work on everything from privacy to data governance and artificial intelligence, network neutrality, state surveillance, smart cities policies and, of course, copyright policy. Our work essentially is to ensure respect for Canadians' rights on technology policy, as governments and courts respond to Canadians' use of ever-changing, new technologies.

I want to start with two background comments with respect to approaching copyright policy. Number one is the concept of balance. It's been long settled now in Canadian copyright policy that balance is essential to the overall scheme and objective of the act. That means Canadian copyright policy must be directed towards achieving a balance between providing a just reward for creators and owners of copyright works and the public interest in the dissemination of works more broadly. This guiding principle is basically the touchstone of copyright policy and should be central to any review of the Copyright Act.

That brings me to my second background point, which is the USMCA. The recent conclusion of the renegotiated NAFTA agreement upsets the balance in Canadian copyright law policy. This is not the place to go through an extensive review of the changes to copyright law that will be required by the legislation, but three that jump out to me were a copyright term extension, the enhanced digital lock provisions which were further unsettling a troubling area of Canadian copyright policy, and the new customs enforcement rights, revamping an area of law that we had just within the last two years upgraded.

These are just some of the benefits to copyright owners that are promised in this trade agreement. We would ask the committee to engage in these hearings with a view to resolving or restoring the balance that's at the heart of Canadian copyright policy.

Substantively, I want to talk about three specific points. One is digital locks. To the extent that this can be done by Canadian copyright policy, we should be looking to roll back the overprotection of the digital lock provisions. There's an incredible imbalance between the rights that copyright owners enjoy with respect to digital locks versus the rights they enjoy with respect to the content itself. The content itself respects a healthy balance. It has a nod towards future creativity and innovation policies. The digital lock provisions do not.

Many provisions of the Canadian Copyright Act intended to benefit future creators and innovators are locked out where a digital lock is used, and it's difficult to justify that on any kind of reasoned analysis of Canadian copyright policy.

We would ask that the USMCA provisions be studied with a view to determining how best to maintain fair and flexible dealings with content in the face of digital locks. Essentially we say that draconian digital lock provisions deter and undermine Canadian innovation policy, and they undermine digital security. This is not just a user issue. It's an innovation issue. Creators such as documentary filmmakers and new forms of artists—appropriation artists, for example—encounter difficulties in the face of digital locks. That content is beyond their reach.

We would also ask that we look to the extent to which we can restrict criminal circumvention to commercial activity because of the tremendous disincentive of criminal prosecution for innovation and artistic work in the face of digital locks.

(1550)



Second, I want to turn to fair dealing. CIPPIC has long asked that Canada look to make the list of fair-dealing purposes illustrative, rather than exhaustive. If the dealing is fair, it ought to be legal. That's the bottom line. Failing that, CIPPIC would support extending fair dealing to transformative dealings, to recognize different kinds of authors, such as appropriation artists and documentary filmmakers. Transformative dealings aren't covered well, within the existing fair dealing paradigm.

We would also echo the repeated calls that this committee has heard to extend fair dealing to what I'll call AI activities. We would look for a specific exception for informational analysis.

Finally, related to fair dealing, CIPPIC would call for no contractual overrides of fair dealing. We've talked about privacy already. Our privacy rights have a very difficult time with terms of use, which have privacy policies that no consumer or user ever sees, thereby stripping our privacy rights away. Copyright, which is an innovation policy, should not suffer from the same burden.

Other jurisdictions have done this, particularly within the context of the data mining exception, in jurisdictions such as Britain. Canada should be looking to this too.

Finally, I have a brief comment on the notice and notice system. CIPPIC supports the changes to the system that were recently tabled in Bill C-86 to curb abuses of that system, but we would actually echo Mr. Kerr-Wilson's comments about the need for adverse consequences for reckless or deliberate misuse of that system.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, from the Public Interest Advocacy Centre, John Lawford. You have up to seven minutes, sir.

Mr. John Lawford (Executive Director and General Counsel, Public Interest Advocacy Centre):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you very much for having me, committee members.

The Public Interest Advocacy Centre is a national non-profit organization and registered charity that provides legal and research services on behalf of consumer interests, in particular vulnerable consumer interests, concerning the provision of important public services.

PIAC has been active on copyright, from a consumer perspective, since the mid-2000s. In particular, we were heavily involved in the creation of the balance between creator and public rights achieved in the major overhaul that led to the Copyright Modernization Act.

Our message today is simple. The present Copyright Act has generally helped Canadian consumers to enjoy copyrighted works, as they should, without excessive strictures that do not align with the realities of how consumers watch, listen to or interact with copyrighted works.

Shaw Communications, when they appeared before this committee, said: Overall, our Copyright Act already strikes an effective balance, subject to a few provisions that would benefit from targeted amendments. Extensive changes are neither necessary nor in the public interest. They would upset Canada's carefully balanced regime, and jeopardize policy objectives of other acts of Parliament that coexist with copyright as part of a broader framework that includes the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act.

We agree.

However, the FairPlay coalition application recently brought in CRTC, and now brought to this committee by several vertically integrated media and telecommunications companies, substantially misrepresents the context in which this committee's report must be made.

In reality, first, expedient judicial relief is available against intermediaries. Secondly, administrative censorship is not common around the world. Third, little online copyright infringement may actually be occurring. Fourth, online copyright infringement appears to be declining. Fifth, Canada's broadcasting industry is profitable and growing. Sixth, blocking is not very effective at reducing privacy. Seventh, blocking piracy services generates little additional revenue for broadcasters; pirated programming is predominantly not Canadian. Next, increased revenues for broadcasters may not necessarily increase the quantity or quality of content produced and finally the proposed regime will result in the blocking of legal sites.

PIAC believes that the committee should not recommend the implementation of FairPlay-type proposals. The courts are better positioned to enforce copyright, and balance enforcement against the public interest in freedom of expression, innovation and competition, and net neutrality. Secondly, technical protection measures already exist and are available to protect the interest of content owners. Lastly, the blessing of any Internet censorship in this domain will likely spread to other areas of government activity. These considerations, we feel, weigh strongly against implementing the proposed regime.

As noted above, judicial relief is already available against intermediaries under the Copyright Act, and it's actually subsections 27(2.3) and (2.4). They address the enablement of copyright infringement “by means of the Internet or another digital network”.

In other words, the FairPlay coalition members wish to replace the present judicial enforcement regime with an additional administrative regime. What matters about an administrative process, besides its duplicative nature, is that the process would be handled likely by the CRTC, which the FairPlay coalition members apparently hope through its general jurisdiction over telecom would be able to use a blanket blocking order on many alleged infringing sites on all telecommunications service providers, not just providing the right of one ISP to block one website. That is why they are so keen on enshrining this belt-and-suspenders type of remedy.

To move to fair dealing, PIAC believes that fair dealing exemptions in the Copyright Act generally have facilitated fair use by the public that benefit the public interest. We would resist calls to reduce this, whether in the educational field or elsewhere. Ideally, Canadian fair dealing should also encompass transformative uses, such as remixes of songs and other creative endeavours, including documentary filmmaking. However, we recognize that this was not in the previous act revision.

The iPod or smartphone levy has also been proposed by some in this committee, and has been rightly rejected as inappropriate on many occasions, including in the Federal Court. This recycled idea is no better today. It denies the use of such devices' full capabilities, raises prices on a staple of consumerism and makes the person who uses only licensed content pay twice: once for a licensed copy of the content, and again for others who are presumed to violate the act. This unfairness should be obvious and conclusive.

(1555)



Lastly, PIAC also opposes the idea of an ISP levy or Internet tax. Such an idea does violence to the very concept of common carriage by telecommunications providers and very likely would raise prices for Internet service. This is a bad idea when Canadians, and in particular low-income Canadians, are struggling to afford broadband Internet for economic and social purposes.

PIAC thanks the committee very much. I look forward to your questions.

(1600)

The Chair:

Thank you all very much for your presentations.

We're going to move to Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair, and thanks, everybody, for coming today.

I'm trying to put myself in the position of a small business person. I'm going to start with the Chamber of Commerce. I'm thinking about the mining of artificial intelligence to try to develop a business.

Thanks, by the way, for involving me in the recent meetings with the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, where I was able to talk to a lot of your members who were involved in digital technology and digital businesses. I left that meeting thinking that these people could give other businesses a lot of intelligence.

In respect of getting access to the information through AI and protections or payments for AI services, does the Chamber of Commerce have a position on how the legislation should compensate for the use of AI when you're drilling into copyrighted material?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I think our position is fairly straightforward. Any material that is copyrighted needs to be legally acquired first, so you have to pay the appropriate fees, royalties or what have you. Once it moves beyond that, and there is a requirement to have copies for verification and machine learning, there would be an exception within the Copyright Act.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right, so we're looking at a new series of exceptions around data for AI.

Mr. Scott Smith:

I would keep that fairly narrow. This is one new exception.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Things are already changing. By the time this act comes back around for review, I'm sure we will be looking back at this and realizing that we're just getting started in the AI adventure, especially when you look at quantum computing and how the Copyright Act might interact with manufacturers or other creators.

Mr. Scott Smith:

I think it's incumbent on this committee to be somewhat prescient, to figure out what the world is going to look like and keep this technology as neutral as possible.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right. That is what we're trying to do.

Let me stick with you on this. A few years ago, you introduced us to the American chamber of commerce, which came up and made some presentations to some of us. Are you seeing a difference between how Canadians and Americans are approaching this? They have an intellectual property group there. Are they studying some of the same things around digital copyright? Is there anything we can learn from the American chamber of commerce?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I think the U.S. focuses more on some of the issues around piracy and infringement, and they are more aggressive in how they approach the infringements. There's more in the way of criminal proceedings that go along with that. They have a “notice and take down” regime. There are questions as to whether that's a sufficient approach. I think the “notice and notice” regime in Canada is effective as a public awareness tool and an education tool. Some refer to it now as “notice and keep down” regime, looking at the market accounts of infringing content and going after the market accounts as opposed to the websites, which are very difficult to stay on top of. It's very easy to create a new website.

I think looking at the financial “follow the money” is probably a more appropriate approach.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Good. Thank you.

Mr. Fewer, regarding “notice and notice”, “notice and take down”, two words that came through all of the witnesses today were “balance” and “piracy”. Hearing that Canada's at the top of the charts in piracy, is that something that the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic has looked at in terms of what makes Canada more susceptible to piracy and what we might do to combat it?

Mr. David Fewer:

We're always skeptical about claims that Canada is unique or is at the top of the charts in accessing illegal content. I always look at the source. I'm sorry, but I haven't seen the report that Mr. Smith brought to your attention.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield: Okay.

Mr. David Fewer: Other times when we have done that, we've found that things aren't always what the report claims.

In looking at piracy in general, our take is that the best way to address piracy issues is with a good marketplace framework: a regulatory environment that allows services to come to consumers and that will make piracy unattractive and difficult. Piracy is work. It's hard to do. It does cost. You have to pay for your Internet, you have to pay for your computing and you have to put the resources into finding unlawful content and acquiring it. We always think that a healthy marketplace is the best deterrent to piracy.

(1605)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

In terms of a healthy marketplace, you mentioned regulatory issues. The act is what it is. It's a legislative framework. When it comes to regulatory issues, is Canada responsive in terms of developing regulations for a digital marketplace or is that somewhere we need to look, apart from the act, in looking at our regulatory regime?

Mr. David Fewer:

That's a good question. The law always lags behind technological developments. It's just a feature and it's probably right. We wouldn't want to be sprinting ahead in trying to constrain or direct innovation in a particular way. We want the marketplace to react as it will and we want innovators to innovate. The law I think has to look at what's happening in the marketplace, at how rights holders are reacting and how users are getting access to content, and respond in that way.

Where does Canada stand on this? I think, to be honest, we're not that bad. We have a pretty good regulatory framework in place. There was a great deal of criticism of Canada for being slow to respond to the WIPO treaties and bringing about the changes that ultimately came to pass six years ago now, but the reality is that they did a pretty good job. Had we rushed in, we probably would not have done as good a job. I think Canada should give itself a bit of credit for how it did respond to the emergence of digital issues in the early part of the century.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Seven minutes goes by very quickly. I have more questions, but I appreciate your comments.

The Chair:

You counted it down pretty good.

We're going to move to you, Mr. Albas, for seven minutes, please.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Also, thank you for all the expertise that is here today and for some very educated briefs.

I'll start with you, Mr. Fewer. Your group has stood against the FairPlay website-blocking proposal, in part by arguing that the CRTC lacked the authority to undertake such a program. Would your group be opposed to a transparent legal procedure such as using the Federal Court, where a rights holder could attain a site-blocking order if they demonstrate that copyright infringement is occurring?

Mr. David Fewer:

Our position is that the Federal Court is the place for copyright to be enforced—the Federal Court or the provincial courts. We're highly skeptical of the efficacy and the “strategic-ness”, let's call it, of any kind of site-blocking mechanism to really address these kinds of issues.

We already have significant provisions in the Copyright Act to allow copyright owners to go after businesses that are predicated upon copyright infringement, and we would encourage copyright owners to use those mechanisms.

Mr. Dan Albas:

We've had a number of groups here saying that they have no recourse when these situations happen. What would your group advocate that they use, then?

Mr. David Fewer:

When you say, “no recourse”, I think the challenge is jurisdictional issues. Is that what's being implied? That these places are in other jurisdictions...? It's true that they're in other jurisdictions, but the truth is that those other jurisdictions have copyright laws as well.

Part of the grand vision of copyright policy, which was true 15 years ago—when I first came to the clinic and started to talk about copyright policy—and is true today is to push unlawful content to the dark corners of the Internet, the dark corners of the world.

Fifteen years ago, we would have said that Canada should not be a site or a host for businesses intent on infringing copyright and built upon those kinds of destructive capacities, and that to the extent that those businesses exist, they should be offshore. They should be elsewhere. I think the recourse really is to bring pressure to bear internationally on the countries that are hosting these businesses to go after them and enforce copyright laws in those jurisdictions.

(1610)

Mr. Dan Albas:

We've heard some suggestions by testimony. I believe the lawyer for Shaw said that some clarification regarding what the Federal Court and its authority is in these kinds of matters would be important. Do you feel that the Federal Court has, right now...? Is it absolutely clear that they can hear these cases and order remedial action?

Mr. David Fewer:

Is it absolutely clear? I mean, the court has very broad remedial discretion under the Copyright Act. Considering their injunctive powers under equitable remedies, they have very broad powers. I would like to see the failure of these provisions before we go in and say that they're inadequate to the task. I think we need to give them a shot.

I'm highly skeptical, in any event, that filtering solutions are going to address this. It's just too easy to circumvent filtering. Filtering is always both overinclusive and underinclusive, so I'm skeptical.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you very much.

I'm going to go over to Mr. Lawford.

Mr. Lawford, you claim in your brief that the cultural industries are thriving. We've heard testimony and seen data that, while overall spending in some sectors is up, creators and artists are suffering.

Are you aware of this information? What do you think the problem is?

Mr. John Lawford:

Not to split hairs, but I didn't say that creators were doing better. I said that the broadcast industry is doing better. The question that raises is how artists are being compensated and what the deal is among broadcasters, broadcasting distributors and artists. We encourage you to look at whether those sorts of deals need to be regulated or not, if Canadian culture industries are truly being starved.

The industries themselves are doing very well. All of the sectors are growing. The only place where you have some contraction is in BDU services where they have pay television channels that may be having slight audience reductions.

Overall, the industry is growing and the pie is getting larger. Whether it's trickling down to creators is a different question.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Your brief specifically referenced something called “second window” rights. Can you elaborate on that concept, please?

Mr. John Lawford:

I'm not sure where that is in our brief, but second window rights would be when the first blush goes through and you sell your content to whatever platform it is. Then that either leaves space for another windowing, or after that time, you can then pass it on to another platform and it will show up later in time.

If you're referring perhaps to something that we wrote in another submission, I think at one point we were suggesting that Canadian content could be second window free, and that would be a way to get Canadian content to Canadians without having to make them pay for it. That might be a good place to have more Canadian content supported. Finding money for that would be a different question.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Again, I'd like to know a little bit more about the second window, but it may have been another.... When you read these things, they kind of blur together.

You also refer to expanding Canadian content rules to online services. We've heard the concern that if we put CanCon rules on streaming services, they won't add Canadian content. They'll just remove other content until the ratio is reached. This doesn't help, obviously, Canadian creators and ultimately doesn't give consumers choice.

Is this a concern that's shared by your group?

Mr. John Lawford:

I'm not sure we've gotten that deeply into the analysis of it.

We've recently revised our position so that we would consider changing the Canadian ownership directive so that Netflix and Amazon Prime and these sorts of things could have to contribute Canadian content. That would be in place of an ISP levy.

(1615)

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

I'll start with the Copyright Board. Does anybody have any positions on the Copyright Board in terms of the current situation?

If you check—I did this really quickly to update myself—they call it “What's New”. There are two appointments in September on their website. They have a couple of hearings that they mention. One of them is in 2019, and another one is in 2020.

We have heard something about the Copyright Board's speed and support. Does anyone have any comments about the Copyright Board?

It's one of the things that can be done without legislative changes.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

I'll start. I do spend quite a bit of time appearing before the Copyright Board.

Speed and retroactivity of decisions were a large concern for a number of users of the Copyright Board, on both the collective side and the licensee side. The measures put in place, or proposed in Bill C-86, the budget implementation act, go a long way. They certainly give the government the tools to set deadlines for the Copyright Board to issue decisions. They make it clear that tariffs have to be proposed further in advance and for a greater number of years. If all these measures are acted upon and regulations are put in place, we could actually dramatically reduce the problems we've seen in the past with the timeliness of decisions and long retroactivity.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm getting the sense that some people will like the fact that they get a quicker decision. Some people may not like the decision, or whatever, but at least, whatever it is, there seems to be pent up interest to get to the result sooner rather than later, as opposed to lurking about in limbo for long periods of time.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

That was an issue where there was almost unanimity amongst users of the Copyright Board. In every decision, you're going to have someone who's happier than someone else, but everyone agreed that decisions had to get out more quickly.

We were dealing with situations where the board was setting prices to be paid for music five years ago. No one knew what the price to be paid today was. If the government follows through on the regulatory authority that it's proposing under Bill C-86, that problem, at least, will be substantially resolved.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Smith, do you have any comments on that?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I'll echo those comments. I'll also add that having the clear decision-making criteria was important, but also the ability to negotiate tariffs independently, basically taking a contractual approach that the Copyright Board would not intervene in those cases.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Fewer.

Mr. David Fewer:

I'd echo those comments as well. Speed and efficiency were a huge concern with the Copyright Board.

One thing that I would raise that runs slightly contrary to that is the inability of interveners to participate before the Copyright Board. We found it a problem. Our organization spends a good deal of its time sticking its nose into copyright and other matters at the Supreme Court of Canada, where we're a productive participant whose participation is valued by the members of the court.

I'd like to think we could offer a similar role to the Copyright Board, a different perspective on a narrow issue. However, there is no way for us to do that before the Copyright Board.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I didn't know that. Then you'll be locked out of the process at the Copyright Board, but regarding the decision that the Copyright Board can make, obviously we've had them in the Supreme Court and that's when you'd find your participation, at that point in time, as opposed to before.

Mr. David Fewer:

That's exactly it.

We've acted for parties who were properly participants before the Copyright Board as well. Their objective was to be interveners, to bring in a nuanced perspective, a unique perspective different from that of the other participants before the board, but they were told they had to be objectors.

You're either all in with the interrogatories...and let's be frank, they're fairly expensive. It's very expensive to participate at the Copyright Board.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

Mr. David Fewer:

With the interrogatories, you're either all in or you're out.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Really...?

Mr. David Fewer:

They were in long enough to make their point, and then they had to get out, because these organizations are not funded to be battlers before the Copyright Board. Nonetheless, they had valid perspectives, important things to say. They wanted to say things that the board was not going to hear otherwise, so there ought to have a been a mechanism to allow them to participate.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Lawford.

Mr. John Lawford:

I'd echo David's concerns that perhaps this committee could even get quite creative and say there should be a cost regime such as we have in the CRTC and the Ontario Energy Board, to allow public interest intervenors to participate in major policy proceedings.

That's all I want to say on that matter.

(1620)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Smith, one of the distinguishing things is that there's a balance that you hear in terms of piracy. In Windsor, where I'm from, we had a lot of piracy in the past over DirecTV. It was an American provision of service, but it was so easy to hack it, it became what they called a “football card”.

In an assembly line, you could buy a little box and then you would just reprogram the card. That's what they did at all the different plants. That's why I said assembly line, at whatever plant. It was reprogrammed and they got DirecTV for free. Finally, they had a small innovation and eliminated all that.

Where are we in terms of direct streaming? Is it still almost too easy? Is there any control we can do here, whether it's in terms of innovation or whether we have to go directly to the Internet service providers?

It's not an excuse, but when there's almost no barrier, when it becomes so easy, it becomes easier to get it than it is to sign up for some of the actual services.

Mr. Scott Smith:

It's a fair point and an interesting analogy. It's certainly more difficult to put technological locks on websites that are producing this material.

I want to go back to some of the questions that were asked earlier in this session around whether or not Canada should have some kind of tool to be able to block sites—de-indexing and what have you. What we often lose sight of is that we live in an international community. Online is everywhere. It's global. If we are going to do something about pirated websites, very often they are offshore, but we can have a tool domestically that can deal with those offshore sites. We don't necessarily need to go through the courts in the backwaters of the world. We can deal with it right here through our court system and allow our ISPs, which direct the traffic of the Internet, to manage that problem on our behalf.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you. Good.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Okay. I'll use them.

Mr. Kerr-Wilson, were you here on the 26th of September for Shaw at the time?

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Yes, I was.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Just for clarity, because your name tag said Gerald starting with a “J”, last time. I just want to make it clear for the record that you're the same person.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

My name is Gerald. I often go by Jay, and I'm known as Jay, so it's sort of a Stephen-Steve issue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No worries...just so you're on the record as the same person. I'm just trying to make sure of that.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have any differences in your position today versus under that client?

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

No. Shaw is a member of the BCBC. Shaw's position was Shaw's position in this. I'm here for BCBC, but there are no differences.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. That's all I need to know from there.

Mr. Smith, you talked a lot about piracy, or privacy, as we've discussed a bit today. You talk about $160 billion in consumer-pirated content around the world. I'm going to assume that is based on everything pirated having full market value. How fluffed are those numbers?

Mr. Scott Smith:

You're asking me to comment on the veracity of a report that has come out, and I don't have the background to be able to pronounce on that. I'm quoting a study.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would you agree that those numbers tend to be based on the full market value or full consumer price for each product that was pirated?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I expect that there was an analysis done that likely looked at what the market value was in various jurisdictions, and came up with a number. I can't tell you off the top of my head. I don't know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood. Have we done a lot of studying of why people pirate in the first place?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I think that's somewhat self-explanatory. There's certainly a lot of literature in the marketplace about why people buy counterfeits, or why people pirate goods.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But in the case of content, at least in the Canadian example.... We're hearing that Canada has a higher rate of piracy than other countries, but it also has, I heard somebody say, a lower rate of consumer-available content. There's a lot of Canadian-made content that you can't get in Canada. I've heard this point a number of times before. Is that a cause of piracy? Is that something we can address?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I would say that's an element of it, but I would also say that accessibility is. If you can get it for free, why would you pay for it?

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure.

Do you support FairPlay?

Mr. Scott Smith:

We did have a submission supporting FairPlay, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final question. This is a general question really, for everybody.

Should copyright be proactively registered by copyright holders, or should everything that is copyrightable be automatically copyrighted?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I think you're asking to change—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a philosophical question.

Mr. Scott Smith:

—centuries of jurisprudence by changing that, and enforcing any idea that you would have to register copyright. There is an advantage to doing so, but, no, I don't think that you would need to register copyright in order to have it in force.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Now I'll move on to Mr. Fewer for a few minutes.

You talked about rolling back overprotection on digital locks, which is an interesting point. Have we ever defined exactly what the limit of a digital lock is?

Mr. David Fewer:

I beg your pardon. What a—?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What is the limit of a digital lock? If I have an iPad in front of me and I have to unlock it to use it, everything on there is, technically, digitally locked. Where is the limit of what is digitally locked and what isn't?

Mr. David Fewer:

We've had a little bit of judicial interpretation of the provisions, one of which was absolutely horrific, where a court, a lower-level court, thankfully, said that merely getting content that is behind a paywall for a third party—say John is a subscriber and I ask John to shoot me a copy of an article about me—is a circumvention of a digital lock.

We would say that plainly is not a circumvention of a digital lock. How you ought to be incurring liability within any circumvention provisions is by defeating them, tackling the technology and defeating the technology to access the content. That was the intent, plainly.

It may be that there is room for clarifying the legislation in that direction. We would also suggest looking at all the exceptions that are permissible under the trade agreement, and saying, what are the interpretations available to us and how can we craft those interpretations in a way that will safeguard Canadian innovation and creators who need to access this content to create?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A couple of days ago, we had witnesses representing the blind. They indicated that, while the TPM circumvention rules permit them to circumvent for the purpose of accessibility, the fact that the TPMs are there make it a practical impossibility. Do you have any comments on that?

Mr. David Fewer:

Yes, I will share those.

I'll put my cards on the table. I have constitutional concerns with the anti-circumvention provisions. I've written about this for 25 years. Copyright attaches to expression. It's built into the law. You don't get a copyright on ideas. You get a copyright on expression. Expression is also, obviously, the domain of freedom of expression, subsection 2(b) of the charter. Any kind of limitation on accessing that content, accessing expression, has to be demonstrably justifiable in a free and democratic society.

How on earth current versions of the anti-circumvention laws meet that test is beyond me. I think in the appropriate case, perhaps the sort of case you're talking about, we'll see a court agree with my view of the constitutionality of those provisions, but it's going to take us a while to get there. I think it's open to this committee to take a look at those provisions and see what we can do before we force those organizations to go to court.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

You mentioned appropriate consequences for misuse of notice and notice. I guess we could call that “notice and notice and notice”. What would those consequences be, in your summation? What would actually work?

Mr. David Fewer:

We've seen in the United States, with the notice and take down system, which was kind of the first of these sorts of systems in the United States, that consequences, basically penalties, lie for being reckless or knowingly misusing the system. We don't have that in Canada. My organization had asked for such consequences in the legislation when it was initially drafted, but we did not get that. I think we've seen that, in how the system has been misused, it might help.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have 10 seconds or something like that.

Mr. Lawford, here's a very quick question for you.

If a device levy—we talked about this a lot—were to be brought in, would that not legitimize piracy? If we're charging someone a piracy charge for their device, doesn't that mean all your anti-piracy activities then have to cease because we've now legitimized the piracy actions?

Mr. John Lawford:

I think if you're a reasonable consumer, you could come to that reasonable conclusion, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you.

I guess I'm going to pick on you, Mr. Fewer, because everyone seems to be doing that today.

You noted in your testimony that, if the marketplace is operating properly, then there shouldn't be a problem with piracy. I was wondering if you could illustrate what that healthy marketplace would be. It seems the content would have to be free for people to not pirate it. What is a healthy marketplace where it's not free, in your mind?

(1630)

Mr. David Fewer:

We live in a free and democratic society, so there's always going to be a little bit of background unlawfulness. We still have the Criminal Code despite living in a free and democratic society. It's the same with copyright. There's always going to be copyright infringement unless we change the laws in such a draconian way that—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

How do we change the marketplace to be more adaptive?

Mr. David Fewer:

First of all, you have to have the structures in place that incentivize platforms, that incentivize content to engage in those platforms, so that there is confidence that if you go that way, if you offer innovative digital services, you'll be able to make a return. I think it's always useful to take a look at what's actually going on in the content industry. Are they making money, or is this an industry where people are going bankrupt and nobody will invest in them, where nobody invests in them in the stock market because they get below-average returns and they're unable to turn a profit?

I think it's fair to say that's not the case. The content industry is a profitable industry. They do not suffer from low returns. What is their return on investment? It still seems to be attractive. Bell is still a cornerstone company in lots of very conservative holdings. That's a good thing to look at: When the content industry is saying that they can't make money, is that true?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

You said that you don't believe that fair dealing should be exhaustive; it should be illustrative. I was wondering if you could unpack that idea a little further.

Mr. David Fewer:

The way fair dealing is structured, before you even get into any analysis of whether a dealing is fair, it has to be for one of the enumerated purposes in the act. I would have said this was a real problem 20 years ago when courts narrowly construed exceptions as basically derogations from a grant.

That approach has been turned on its head. We now understand that the exceptions fulfill a purpose. They're there to fulfill a policy purpose of Parliament. They're remedial in nature, and they should be given the generous interpretation that remedial legislation deserves. That's the approach the court has taken. That has done a good deal to cover lots of useful, innovative and creative dealings that in past would not have occurred because of the fear of infringement.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

My next question is for Mr. Smith. In your capacity, are there any recommendations from other countries on how they've dealt with the issues that you've raised today? Would you have any recommendations from what you've seen abroad, in terms of what has been effective at protecting your stakeholders?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I refer to it in my testimony, so you can go back and look at those specific reports. I think the European Union and Australia are both good examples of where the site blocking and the de-indexing approach have had some success.

I wouldn't want to limit the idea that we only need one tool in the quiver. I think there are multiple approaches to this. Having as many tools as possible to manage the problem is what's going to solve the problem.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

One of the other recommendations was opening up the CRTC for more people to be involved. What's your view on opening up the CRTC? Do you think that would be harmful or helpful for the process?

Mr. Wilson, you can also jump in on that if you want.

Mr. Scott Smith:

In terms of how we've approached this, the FairPlay submission asked the CRTC to be an arbitrator of online content. That was rejected and has moved back to this forum.

We're suggesting a competent authority now. Obviously, that is the courts.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Can I get some clarification? Do you mean opening up the Copyright Board process?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes, I mean opening it up to more litigants and groups like public interest groups.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

I think the challenge is that the Copyright Board was conceived as a replacement for market negotiations. You have a monopoly. You can't have a market negotiation, so you bring the buyer and the seller together in a regulated price. There really wasn't any room for public interest intervenors in what was really a buyer-to-seller transaction, because the board wasn't supposed to do policy. It was just an economic rate-setting tribunal.

I think we've seen that the board now does policy. It is the tribunal first instance for a lot of important copyright questions.

I actually agree with David. I think there is a role for more input from a broader range of groups on issues of public policy. I don't think you necessarily want to have groups weighing in on every price-setting mechanism—on whether the price per square foot for background music is fair or unfair—but where the board's interpreting copyright law for the first time, other perspectives are useful.

(1635)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Jowhari, you have five minutes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses. It's good to see some of you coming back here, and welcome to the rest.

I'm going to start with Mr. Smith. In your testimony you talked about piracy site-blocking tools available that could deal with some of these offshore sites. You talked about multiple approaches.

Can you share one of those leading approaches that's being used to effectively deal with piracy through site blocking?

Mr. Scott Smith:

Do you mean one with site blocking that is working? Australia's a good example.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

What is the tool, specifically?

Mr. Scott Smith:

Essentially, where there is an order going to an ISP to block a site coming through their systems....

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Is that order through legislation? What is the criteria for the ISP to—

Mr. Scott Smith:

It's a demand order.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Is that demand order given through the legislation?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I think it's an injunction through the courts.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Someone makes the complaint to the court. The court gives an injunction to the ISP provider and the ISP provider blocks it.

Mr. Scott Smith:

The ISP executes it.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Let me go to Mr. Lawford. What are your thoughts on that one? I understand you object to site blocking.

Mr. John Lawford:

Right.

You could do what you're suggesting in the Federal Court. You could have a site-blocking order. I think the reason it was brought into CRTC was that there was this idea that if they did it in CRTC, the CRTC could issue an order to block all ISPs, whether that ISP came and asked to be able to block or not. In Canada, if Bell comes and asks to block, you can be pretty sure TekSavvy's going to not want to come and block.

Do we want that blanket regime—which I think is what is being proposed, although I'm not quite sure from what people are saying today—or do we want to have it in court? In court, generally, you can't get that kind of across-the-industry order. I think what's going on with this administrative version is that they want to have a wide net. That's my theory.

You could do it. It is being done in other countries where there is a blocking order. I know they tried to institute it in the U.K. and backed off from it. Now they just use the copyright law.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

In general, how long does it take to get a blocking order?

Mr. John Lawford:

I don't know exactly how long it takes to get a blocking order. I've seen that there are a couple of cases where Bell Canada has gotten them in Canada. I believe one of the witnesses came and said it took two years in one case. I think that would be on the long end.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Mr. Lawford, in your testimony you suggested that piracy is being driven by broadcasting market power. Can you expand on that?

Mr. John Lawford:

Sure. The theory is that if content on the traditional platforms is priced at a fairly high level because the companies are vertically integrated and there's not much competition, Canadians are just frankly fed up with paying so much. That makes it more tempting to cut some of your costs by pirating a bit here and there. I believe some Canadians fall into that group. They're paying prices that are probably due to market power in that sector, and they may be too high and it's their protest vote, if you will.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

It's interesting you talked about vertical integration. A number of our ISP providers are vertically integrated, so are you suggesting, or am I reading, that because of their vertical integration they have a lot more flexibility to be able to charge extra?

Mr. John Lawford:

Yes, I think that's fair.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay.

This is my last question. Back to you, Mr. Lawford, you suggested that the evidence suggests online piracy is very small and shrinking. Could you submit that evidence to the committee? I think Mr. Smith was saying it's a big issue and it's growing.

Mr. John Lawford:

Absolutely, and it is probably easiest for me to submit to the committee afterwards.

(1640)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Yes, I'd appreciate it if both Mr. Smith and Mr. Lawford could submit, if you want to make any further comments.

Mr. John Lawford:

Sure. My information is coming from our submission in the FairPlay before CRTC. We went through the MUSO study and found certain assumptions in there. The MUSO study is based on site visits and that may not reflect actual downloading. There are many site visits, but you may not be spending enough time there to download something, so it's a proxy. That's a weakness.

The same thing with the Sandvine report. There are certain weaknesses in it, and also Sandvine stands to make money, of course. If you pass a similar law to what's being proposed, they are going to sell the blocking equipment.

I'd like to submit that to the committee. These arguments were fairly technical and they were in the CRTC—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you.

I think my time is up.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Back to you, Mr. Albas. You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Lawford, just to confirm, it does say on page 3 of the brief that you or your organization submitted to the committee that PIAC is “concerned about the affordability of Canadian content”. Specifically, PIAC believes that Canada should—and your first recommendation is—“Task the Canada Media Fund with acquiring 'second-window rights' to compelling Canadian content for free distribution, so that everyone who is interested in that content can access it on the platform of their choice.”

Mr. John Lawford:

Right.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Maybe it wasn't top of mind before, so could you elaborate a little more on that concept, specifically to this recommendation?

Mr. John Lawford:

Sure. I recall it was in the written brief in either June or July.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes.

Mr. John Lawford:

The idea is that you get, as a copyright owner, first chance to make money from your Canadian content, by running it on CTV or whatever, but because it's Canadian content and because it's funded by the Canada Media Fund, which is really a proxy for taxing Canadians to produce Canadian content, it would be fair for those Canadians who wanted to see the content because of the national cohesiveness value of it, to get a chance to see it even if they could not afford a BDU subscription, for example.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you very much. I just wanted to get that on the record.

Mr. John Lawford:

Thank you for the question.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'd like to go to the Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright.

Some members have come to this committee and there was a demonstration on the Hill a little while ago about how some of these infringing technologies work, the Kodi boxes. They showed us a box that had links to web servers' content for rights holders. Clearly it's organized theft and it's a problem we need to look at.

I'd like your thoughts on what constitutes a market failure or a legal or government failure, especially in terms of what Mr. Fewer said. The significant amount of content they showed us was in a huge number of languages from all over the world, and much of that content is legally unavailable in Canada. In their brief the Public Interest Advocacy Centre referred to expanding the definition of piracy so that it covers accessibility and foreign language content.

Should content that is not legally available be considered pirated content? Obviously, for many consumers who want to have access to those stations in the language of their choice, that's their only option. Could you give us your group's opinion on it?

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Sure, and I think the first response is that if there's no Canadian licensee for the content, then there's no Canadian plaintiff to bring an infringement action. If programming is produced in a third country, it's entitled to copyright protection in Canada and the copyright owner can always bring an action in Canadian courts for Canadian infringements, but if no one in Canada has licensed the rights to that programming, it's not going to result in any infringement proceedings, anyway.

What we're talking about is—

Mr. Dan Albas:

It's a bit of a grey area. Are you talking about a situation where someone is pirating content, such as the latest Game of Thrones, through a Kodi box and isn't actually paying to receive that service by legal means?

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

That's correct.

The problem we have is that these boxes are very sophisticated, so many consumers will see an interface that looks very professional. It looks like the menu from a legitimate service and they enter their credit card information. They can be misled into thinking they're actually subscribing to a lawful service. These things are promoted as free programming, even though they're not free because you still have to pay for the box and the service.

It's just where Canadian rights are being infringed, and Canadian creators or licensees are being deprived of that economic activity, that a Canadian court action would result.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'd like to go back to Mr. Fewer's earlier statement that the best defence against piracy is having a competitive environment where consumers can that with reasonable costs. I didn't paraphrase your statement very well, sir.

If you go to the United States, you can get HBO's streaming service for $20 U.S.—no, $15 U.S. Bell has just recently announced that you can get it through their CraveTV but you have to get the addition to it, so it's $20 Canadian. Even then, you can only use a low-definition format, unlike in the U.S.

How do Canadian consumers take that? My understanding is that Game of Thrones is one of the most pirated shows around. Do you feel that's more of a market failure? Are we not allowing a proper venue in Canada for consumers to pay for their content?

(1645)

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

I would be very cautious about defining a market that includes unauthorized and illegal sources as part of that market, because you're distorting—

Mr. Dan Albas:

No, what I'm saying, sir, is that if the only way that someone who's paid $3,000 for a high-definition television can get Game of Thrones in high-definition is by utilizing illegal content, or through a Kodi box or whatnot, can you see how some people are going to say, “Well, if they won't give me the option here in Canada legally, I'll continue to do this until they give me that option”?

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

I disagree with the premise, because Game of Thrones is available in Canada from a Canadian licensee.

The entire market of content, whether it's Canadian content or foreign content, is—

Mr. Dan Albas:

You can get it if you go through the full cable service, or whatnot, and Bell has recently just launched an offer where you can get it on their streaming service through CraveTV, but again, at an additional price, and again, at a lower definition than is available in most places.

Do you understand what I mean?

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

I guess. Could you restate the question?

Mr. Dan Albas:

The question is this: Are we encouraging, by not having.... Is it a market failure, that we are...because we are driving people to seek the content they want in the format they want, but it's not available unless they apply for these other services.

Mr. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

I think players operating in a legitimate market, without unauthorized and illegal alternatives or competitors, will have to respond to consumer demand. Any licensee will have to respond to consumer demand or they risk not getting a return. If you can't sell enough subscriptions or sign up enough subscribers, then you're not going to get a return, and you have to rethink your marketing, but if every product and every service is marketed based on that supply and demand mechanism, what's the alternative?

You don't artificially constrain a pricing system because there's unauthorized or illegal alternatives in the market. That's a distortion.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I think the music industry certainly has.... If you look at piracy, that's no longer an issue, because they've easily—

The Chair:

We're going to move on.

Mr. Dan Albas:

That was a seven-minute one.

The Chair:

We're really over time on that one. Amazing how that happens.

Mr. Sheehan, you have somewhere in the neighbourhood of five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I appreciate the testimony, and it's great going towards the end because we have an opportunity to discuss some things that perhaps we haven't discussed.

The first question will be for the Chamber of Commerce. I'm from Sault Ste. Marie and we have a very large chamber of commerce, with a diversity of membership and cultural mediums of every kind. We have the IT players and there's always a great discussion around copyright. One of the discussions—and it's poured into this committee and also into the heritage committee—is about compensating those in the cultural trade in our community. In particular, I think of the visual works of art and resale rights that would allow creators to receive a percentage of subsequent sales of their work.

Do you have any comments or a perspective on that? Let's say a painter sells a painting once, and then the painting is resold but the original artist does not receive compensation. In other cultural industries, they do receive some sort of royalty or compensation. Have you guys explored that?

Mr. Scott Smith:

We don't have very many members in the visual arts space, so it's a difficult one for me to comment on, other than if there were contractual arrangements when the artist sold the painting, for instance, that any future copies made of that painting...and copyright should follow the work. If there are prints made of it in the future, yes, there should be some kind of royalty for that.

(1650)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Some other things were brought up, like a revisionary right that would bring the copyright holder's work back to an artist after a set amount of time, regardless of any contracts to the contrary. Then, of course, there's granting journalists a remuneration right for the use of their works on digital platforms, such as news aggregators. Have you guys explored any of those changes to copyright that would be able to compensate those creators?

Mr. Scott Smith:

Compensating journalists for...?

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

It's something that has come up over a few testimonies. We heard it in Vancouver. We heard it in different places. It's granting journalists a remuneration right for the use of their works on digital platforms, such as news aggregators. Are you familiar with any of that?

Mr. Scott Smith:

We haven't explored that at all.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Overall, though, in a general sense, I'm trying to figure out how you feel. How do we balance Canada's innovation agenda, which is encouraging people to explore and use new technologies in the marketplace, versus people—and we've heard from both sides—from the cultural community who want to see fair and just compensation? Any suggestions on how we deal with that or strike that balance, whether a copyright law or something outside of the copyright regime?

Mr. Scott Smith:

I think a lot of that balance already exists in copyright law. I know the last round has addressed a number of concerns that you're referencing. In terms of compensation back to rights holders and the ability to enforce their rights against infringement, it has much more to do with the relationship between businesses and consumers than it does with researchers. The fair dealing in Canada is fairly robust in terms of the ability for researchers to access the material they need.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

To Mr. Fewer, you were talking about it during your testimony. You felt that subjecting digital locks to the fair dealing regime would be a sufficient balancing of rights and user rights. Could you comment on that?

Mr. David Fewer:

It would be a sufficient balancing. Looking at the anti-circumvention provisions themselves, I think it's useful. Is it sufficient? Probably not.

If you take a look at the legislation, there are ample, specific exemptions for libraries, archives, museums. These are institutions. They are not piracy sites. These are organizations that operate in the public interest, by definition, and they rely on fair dealing, but they also have other exemptions built into the act that benefit them to deal with their specific issues.

Why should those be stripped away in the digital context, merely because the content is distributed on a DVD with regional coding?

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Referring to some of the comments that were made in questions earlier about piracy, most of us around the table remember when Napster and BearShare were there. There was a lot of piracy. With the new platforms out there, whether it's Spotify or Netflix, have we seen a decline in piracy as a result of these new platforms?

Mr. David Fewer:

Both privacy and piracy, I would say both. Was that question for me?

I'll answer quickly, and I'll refer to John's submissions that he has promised to give the committee on the FairPlay proceedings. Yes, it makes sense. Provide consumers with useful, affordable services that give them the content they want, and they'll pay for it. It's common sense.

Mr. John Lawford:

The evidence that we have isn't conclusive that we're in this top category of infringers and that Canadians are using this to the extent it's being alleged, either in the reports or by the coalition, whichever coalition it is. That's the first thing for the committee to consider. What's really the hard evidence? That's hard to get.

Honestly, a reality check, of course, is that some people will always pirate. The goal is to keep it to a very low background noise.

(1655)

The Chair:

You're way over. Thank you.

Mr. Masse, you have the final round.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I know we've been talking about piracy. It reminds me of the 10 years that I've spent trying to get single-event sports betting to this country. On this phone, I can bet on a legal game, right here, yet our government practices here provide all the barriers necessary to keep it as an organized criminal activity. Basically, the technology that we have and that's out there, I mean, we have to look to close the gaps.

I don't really have any questions at the end of it, I just wanted to prove a point, though. When we look at these issues, we have to start looking at what's really out there, at least. Aside from the fact that we seem to be an outlier still on this, the government's almost irrelevant in this debate and organized crime and others benefit from it.

I would say they are the same thing, when you look at piracy and other types of activities with it. There's some type of a balance somewhere in there, but the technology's changed and that requires us to do something different from before.

At any rate, I'll leave it at that.

The Chair:

Okay.

That takes us to the end of our session. I'd like to extend a thank you to our panellists for giving us many things to think about, as we continue on this journey.

We're going to suspend for one quick minute. You could say your hellos and then we're going to get back into what we were doing.

(1655)

(1655)

The Chair:

At the last meeting, we were prepared to continue the debate on this motion. Unfortunately, we got held up by votes, so here's where we are today.

(1700)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. Thank you, Mr. Chair. Now that it's been received, I'm sure the clerk will find it in order, so we can have a debate on this. That the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology study Statistics Canada's plans to collect “individual-level financial transactions data” to develop a “new institutional personal information bank” and invite Statistics Canada officials, the Privacy Commissioner, representatives of the Canadian Bankers Association among other witnesses and report its findings to the House of Commons and that the Government provide a response to the report.

I so move.

The Chair:

Go ahead, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't really object to the motion, which might surprise you, but I would like to propose an amendment, if I could.

I don't know the right way.... If I wanted to delete two discrete clauses, what's the best way of moving that amendment?

The Chair:

Sorry, can you say that again?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I wanted to delete two discrete clauses, what's the best way of proposing that? To reread it, changing the words after that or to say what I'm....

The Chair:

Why don't you read it out first and then we'll see how complicated it is?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's me, so it's complicated. Trust me.

In that case, I'll read the motion, as I would amend it, so just follow along. I can read it again slowly, if you need me to. It's that the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology invite the chief statistician of Statistics Canada to appear before the committee to discuss the financial pilot project for one hour and that the meeting be televised.

In order to get it in a form that can be used, how would you like me to do that?

The Chair:

Hold on a second, I just want to get my clerk back here.

Did you have a question?

Mr. Brian Masse:

That sounds like a major substantive change, so we just need a ruling on that.

The Chair:

First of all, regarding the amendment, I don't know if it's exactly what you want to say, so it's a debate right now on the potential amendment.

At this point, it's hard for me to rule because I don't know what your side is saying versus what they're saying.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It called for a one-hour.... At any rate, it's up for you to decide, but it called for a one-hour witness testimony and that's it. I would just question whether that's a substantive or not substantive amendment. I would say that's substantive, personally, so that determines whether it's in order or not.

The Chair:

What we have here is the original motion to study Statistics Canada's plan to collect individual-level financial transactions data to develop a new institutional personal information bank, and invite Statistics Canada officials. You also have the Privacy Commissioner, representatives of the Canadian Bankers, among others.

I don't see it at this point as a substantive change because it is inviting one witness versus a few other witnesses, so far. That's how I'm seeing it right now.

You're next, Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

On a point of order, first, what is the amendment?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Michel Marcotte):

I'll try to explain it as I see it.

We keep the first line, “That the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology”. We stop at “study”. We skip about three lines and we keep “invite the chief statistician of Statistics Canada”. There's a new end. The end would say, “to appear before the committee to discuss the financial data pilot project.”

Basically, it removes the title of the Privacy Commissioner and all the other witnesses, but keeps the beginning, the middle and the idea.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Chair, would you please read out the amendment in its entirety so I understand. I still don't know what the amendment is.

The Chair:

From what I can see, it reads that the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology invite the chief statistician of Statistics Canada to appear before the committee to discuss the financial data pilot project for one hour, and that the meeting be televised.

Hon. Michael Chong:

In my view, that's a complete change to the motion, because the original motion is worded as compelling the committee to study, which is a very specific parliamentary word.

The amendment would replace the word “study” with “invite” and would strike the word “study” entirely from the motion. Now, unless I'm misunderstanding the amendment, replacing a study with an invitation to appear are two very different rubrics of a committee.

That's my view, if I understand the amendment correctly.

(1705)

The Chair:

Okay, I see hands all over the place.

Before we jump to that, I just want to go back to David.

You can respond to that, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The objective of both the motion and the amendment is to invite the chief statistician to testify for the reasons we're all familiar with, and this seems to achieve that. Let's get him in here. We can get him in here as early as Wednesday.

Hon. Michael Chong:

On the same point of order, I respectfully disagree, Mr. Chair.

A study allows a committee to issue a report and recommendations that can be tabled in the House of Commons. A motion that does not mention the word “study” and simply mentions an invitation for a witness will not allow the committee, as I understand it, to issue a report with recommendations in the House of Commons.

The Chair:

Just give me one moment, please.

Mr. Masse is next on the list, but right now I am trying to speak to the point of order that Michael has put forward.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I also have a comment on the exact same point of order.

The Chair:

Then that's not going to change anything right now.

Mr. Dan Albas:

It's on the substance of the motion and whether you can view it as in order or not. I think that's the discussion you're having with the clerk, and I'd like to make sure my voice is heard on this.

The Chair:

Okay, go ahead.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I submitted this last week, or even before then. Mr. Chong has said that “study” is very important, but there was no mention even by the government of a pilot project until last Friday, so this gives exactly what we'd be asking questions on. It also says that we want to actually study, table something and report its findings to the House of Commons, and then have the government respond to it. That has been effectively taken out.

Not only that, there would be only one person, who wasn't even listed originally in my motion, the chief statistician. I asked for Statistics Canada officials, but I also asked for the Privacy Commissioner, representatives of the Canadian Bankers Association, and other witnesses.

I would imagine that if he had made a motion to maybe delete one or to add another, that would be fine. But to actually be saying that this committee will just invite and have one done in an hour, with no report and no response from the government, I think is a substantial change, Mr. Chair.

I understand Mr. Graham has things that he wants to do, but then he should propose his own motion, versus making major changes to the structure of this one.

The Chair:

We're going to stick to that point of order.

Do you want to speak to that point of order?

(1710)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, just really quickly. They don't even have “chief statistician” in the original motion. He's suggesting somebody come who is not even in the original motion, and Michael is right with regard to the issue of “study” and so forth. At any rate, whether it can be in order or not, we've had a lot of time with this motion before today. It's been in our packages for over a week. We're talking about one hour with somebody who's not even in the original motion. I don't even know how it gets on the floor.

The Chair:

Does anybody else want to speak to the point of order that's been put forward?

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'm trying to make sure it's on the point of order. There were substantial changes. If we're looking at two different things, I think what we're trying to get on the table is what Statistics Canada is doing, and, right now, they're working on something with the Privacy Commissioner, from what I've heard in the House, regarding what form this pilot would take, when it would be initiated and all of that.

I'm not sure that a study would get to that if it's something that's currently in process. I don't think we're in a position to do a study on something that hasn't been brought back to us yet.

The Chair:

Okay.

With the motion you submitted and what you've put forward, it is probably a little bit of a stretch in that. I understand that you're trying to find that compromise, but given the challenge of trying to amend the motion so that it works, it doesn't seem to work here. At this point, I don't think I can rule in favour of your amendment because it is a bit of a substantial change.

Michael.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Are you done with the point of order?

The Chair:

Having said that, I rule the amendment out of order at that point. Thank you.

It's your turn.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Chair, thank you.

I'd like to move an amendment to the motion that after the word “invite” would add the words “the chief statistician”.

The Chair:

The chief statistician is not in there. Do you want to add it in?

Hon. Michael Chong:

Yes, add “the chief statistician”, so that the first part of the amendment would be to add those three words after the word “invite”. After the comma, after the word “officials”, add “former Ontario privacy commissioner Ann Cavoukian”. The third part of the amendment would be to add, in front of the words “the chief statistician and”, “Minister Bains”. It would read, “invite Minister Bains, the chief statistician and Statistics Canada officials, and former Ontario privacy commissioner Ann Cavoukian”.

That's my amendment, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Is there any debate on this proposed amendment?

Mr. Dan Albas:

I just want to show my support for it simply because, if you look at it, among other witnesses, he's just added someone who has been active on this. I think you mean Ms. Cavoukian from Ryerson. Is that right? She's been speaking out quite publicly on this, and there's a lot of interest in this.

I would hope that all members would support this, not just our role in terms of accountability by having the minister in but also in terms of the concerns that are out there in the public that should be addressed. This committee is uniquely positioned to do that. I hope all members will vote in favour. I've received a number of phone calls and emails from people who are very concerned about this project.

(1715)

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on the amendment?

Brian.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I am supporting it in the main motion. The amendment is important because it does bridge the intent of what was made earlier and it makes a lot of sense.

Other witnesses as well would be the former chief statisticians and others who would be germane to this, so it is a great opportunity for us to get something to the House.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Okay.

Is there any further debate?

The vote is on the amendment first.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'd like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

The amendment is defeated, and we're now back to the original motion.

Is there any debate on the original motion?

Mr. Dan Albas:

I just would encourage all members. There are a lot of people, I'm sure, in each of our ridings who are concerned. This is a way for us to carry out our parliamentary functions.

It's obviously too bad that we're not inviting the minister, because I know from his attention to this in the House that this is something I'm sure he would love to speak to. That being said, the witness list that we have here is still consistent and would bring forward a number of voices that need to be heard.

The Chair:

Celina.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

With that said, there are still ongoing conversations with the Privacy Commissioner and Statistics Canada, and I totally understand the level of interest in this particular file from all of our constituents. However, in this course of studying a particular initiative that's happening, we should let the process run its course with the Privacy Commissioner and Statistics Canada before we go ahead with anything further.

That sums up where I'm going.

The Chair:

Brian.

Mr. Brian Masse:

We would abdicate our responsibility if we didn't look at it. If the same logic applied, then we would fold our tent on our copyright study, because the USMCA has been signed, and it has compromised our copyright review.

As well, the minister has pronounced some changes to the Copyright Board, so we have things that are in the mix of our process that we're currently doing right now. Having the motion in front of us is a reasonable approach to dealing with some of the things that have changed. We saw legislation that was passed three years ago that mandated a different way of data collection. That was some of the debate that took place with regard to the bill, and it's coming home to roost right now, because what was debated quite earnestly at that time was the fact that Shared Services Canada was going to do some of the data collection and, in that process, use third party agreements, including from the banks, as part of the changes that took place with Statistics Canada.

What's happening now is that the process of moving from the long-form census problems with the previous government in terms of its response rate diminishing and the changes that have been brought about for data collection through the digital age have required a better oversight process. This motion only brings light to all those different issues.

One of two things will happen. Either Canadians will be further enlightened about the current situation, and they'll have officials from Statistics Canada and others who would come forth, and they would also have privacy ones who can sort out the changes that have taken place.

We have legislation that really is just coming into the moving parts of its body right now that shocked Canadians, and that's the bottom line. It's something that's appropriate for this committee to do.

The committee can do one of two things at this point in time. We can almost self-declare our irrelevancy. We've kind of been doing that in the last little bit by defeating motions that had to do with emergency preparedness, the CRTC and other things we've had that are quite reasonable. They haven't been long. They haven't been ways we could define or destroy the work we are doing on copyright.

Again, this is a reasonable approach to try to get to some answers. I don't think there is any reason not to do this.

(1720)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Jowhari.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to go back to the spirit that I understood from the point that Mr. Graham brought. This is trying to get an understanding of what this initiative, whether it's called a pilot project or study, is all about. This is why, I think, if we actually ask the chief statistician to come and explain to us what was behind this, then we're going to be in a much better position to go back to Mr. Albas's motion. We would be able to make sure that, now that we understand what the scope or the intent is, we could then say these are the extra witnesses we want, and now we want to study, and the study should be x number of sessions, etc.

Honestly, I don't want to reject this, but what I also need, as a member, to make sure I'm doing the job that I need to do for my constituents, is to try to understand what it is that drove Statistics Canada to initiate this initiative, whether it's a pilot or whether it came on a Friday afternoon. What is the driver behind it? Once we understand that, then it's most logical for us to go back to this study and say, “Let's do a study for that.” That's all I wanted to add to the record.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Is there any further debate? If there's no further debate, then we will vote.

A voice: Are we in camera?

The Chair: No, we are public.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In that case, I'd like to be on the record for one second.

The Chair:

Did you want to add something?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, just very quickly, I'll put this motion on notice right now while I'm here.

I'll do that right now so that it's taken care of. I can give it orally.

The Chair:

Okay, you can give notice.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As I've already given it, as I've already read it, do you want me to read it again?

A voice: No.

The Chair:

Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Don't we have to finish this business first before we proceed with other business, Mr. Chair?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we're in committee business we can move it right away. If we're only at a specific motion, I have to wait for two more days.

The Chair:

We are public, and you can put a notice of motion through. I mean, I've never stopped you guys from putting a notice of motion through. If you want to do that, then I suggest you put it through quickly so we can go on to our vote.

Hon. Michael Chong:

On a point of order, just to clarify, there's nothing untoward about giving a notice of motion, but the motion that Mr. Albas moved is still live on the floor, notwithstanding the notice of motion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, absolutely. That's true. It doesn't in any way pre-empt it. It's just saying that once we get past that, then we can discuss this other point.

Mr. Dan Albas:

You're not going to discuss it. You're going to give notice of motion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm giving notice of motion, and then the next time we can discuss it.

The Chair:

He wants to give his notice of motion right now, and he's entitled to do that. We're running out of time, so please, let's go ahead.

Read it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. You've already heard it, so I'll read it quickly. I will be putting on notice the motion that the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology invite the chief statistician of Statistics Canada to appear before the committee to discuss the financial data pilot project for one hour, and that the meeting be televised.

That's it.

The Chair:

Can we just remove the words “pilot project”? I don't know that it's an official term.

(1725)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

That's what I had proposed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure, if it makes it easier. What do you want to call it, then?

The Chair:

It would be, “to discuss the financial”...exactly what's in there.

All right, thank you. Notice has been received. We're going to go to the vote on the motion.

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

I just want to do one more quick thing before we go.

Wednesday is the official apology for the MS St. Louis in the House. The committee is not cancelled. We will still have our committee meeting. We'll still have our witnesses. I just want to let you guys know that's where we stand. For the St. Louis apology, the Prime Minister is doing a speech. I would imagine all the leaders are as well, so that's going to take about 45 minutes, but we will still have committee.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Will we have the committee meeting after the apology?

The Chair:

No, it will be during the apology. We won't postpone our committee, because we do have some witnesses here and housekeeping to do.

Mr. Brian Masse:

We don't have the motion in front of us and I just want to make it clear, for the record. We don't have the motion in front of us and it's not in both official languages—

The Chair:

That's not what we were just talking about. He read it into the record, and it will get translated and what have you.

I'm talking about Wednesday's meeting.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay, I thought his motion was for Wednesday's meeting too. Sorry, I apologize.

The Chair:

No. Wednesday's meeting is during the St. Louis apology. We are not cancelling our committee.

Michael.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Chair, through you, maybe we could be informed by Mr. de Burgh Graham when he intends to move his motion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At the next non-interrupting opportunity, I'll put it that way. I don't know. I don't think it will take very long.

Michael, let's try this.

Do we have unanimous consent right now to invite him for one hour at the earliest opportunity?

The Chair:

Seeing as how I'm the chair....

Thank you. If we have unanimous support, we could extend an invitation to the chief statistician to appear in the second hour on Wednesday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be for one hour, televised.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: My motion is now moved, so thank you.

The Chair:

No, your motion's not moved.

What we'll do is, on Wednesday, again, because we have the apology, we will not be interrupted. We'll have an hour with our first witnesses, and I will be keeping special time to make sure that we don't fall behind, because I think we all want a full hour with the chief statistician. If there's a desire to extend it, I understand that we will need to get out of here at 5:30 p.m. because there will be another meeting being set up. We'll have to keep it tight.

All right, I'm glad to see we're all cordial and working together.

Thank you. We're adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous à la 136e réunion du Comité. Nous poursuivons notre examen prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Y a-t-il un joueur de hockey qui porte le numéro 136? Non, pas de joueur de hockey qui porte le numéro 136... C'est dommage.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui Gerald Kerr-Wilson, associé, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin S.E.N.C.R.L., de la Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright, et Scott Smith, directeur, Propriété intellectuelle et politique d'innovation, de la Chambre de commerce du Canada.

Je suis heureux de vous revoir, monsieur.

Nous accueillons aussi David Fewer, directeur de la Clinique d'intérêt public et de politique d'Internet du Canada, et John Lawford, directeur exécutif et avocat général du Centre pour la défense de l'intérêt public.

Commençons. Vous avez chacun jusqu'à sept minutes. Nous allons faire un tour de questions, et je crois que nous nous gardons un peu de temps à la fin pour débattre d'une motion qui sera présentée. Cela devrait nous laisser environ une demi-heure pour débattre de la motion, et nous verrons où nous en sommes une fois que nous serons rendus là.

Pourquoi ne pas commencer par vous, monsieur Wilson? Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson (associé, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP, Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour aux membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Jay Kerr-Wilson. Je suis associé chez Fasken Martineau et je comparais aujourd'hui au nom de la Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright, la BCBC.

Les membres de la BCBC incluent Bell Canada, Rogers, Shaw, Telus, Cogeco, Vidéotron et la Canadian Communication Systems Alliance. Les membres de la BCBC appuient un régime de droits d'auteur qui récompense et protège les créateurs, facilite l'accès au contenu créatif, encourage les investissements dans la technologie et soutient l'éducation et la recherche.

Les exceptions qui ont été ajoutées à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur en 2012 étaient nécessaires afin d'éliminer l'incertitude qui limitait ou empêchait l'élaboration de nouveaux produits et services novateurs. Le fait de réduire ou d'éliminer ces exceptions mettrait en péril des centaines de millions de dollars d'investissements et causera des perturbations dans le cadre de la mise en oeuvre de nouveaux services légitimes qui, sinon, seraient à même de fournir aux titulaires de droits d'auteur plus de possibilités de gagner des revenus et d'offrir aux Canadiens accès à plus de contenu.

La coalition ne croit pas que de nouveaux droits d'auteur devraient être imposés aux FSI ou à d'autres intermédiaires afin de tenter de créer de nouvelles sources de revenus pour les créateurs et artistes canadiens.

Premièrement, le fait d'obliger les FSI à effectuer des paiements propres au contenu est une violation flagrante du principe de neutralité du réseau.

Deuxièmement, et c'est encore plus important, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur n'est pas la loi appropriée pour promouvoir les industries culturelles canadiennes. Les obligations canadiennes en vertu de traités internationaux exigent que tout avantage accordé aux propriétaires de droits d'auteur canadiens soit aussi accordé aux non-Canadiens lorsque leurs oeuvres sont utilisées au Canada. Par conséquent, la plupart des fonds recueillis auprès des Canadiens iraient aux États-Unis.

Troisièmement, les titulaires de droits d'auteur sont déjà rémunérés pour les activités en ligne licites au moyen d'ententes de permis commerciaux et, dans le cas de la SOCAN, au moyen des tarifs approuvés par la Commission du droit d'auteur. Le fait de forcer les Canadiens à payer d'autres frais pour recevoir ces mêmes services licites est une forme de double facturation, une pratique qui a été rejetée par la Cour suprême dans l'arrêt Esa c. SOCAN.

Le gouvernement a d'autres outils stratégiques beaucoup plus appropriés à sa disposition pour promouvoir le contenu culturel et les créateurs canadiens. L'utilisation de ces outils permet de prendre des mesures qui ciblent précisément les créateurs canadiens d'une façon que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ne peut pas le faire.

La BCBC soutient l'ajout d'une nouvelle exemption pour l'analyse de l'information. Un humain peut avoir accès à un document et le lire sans avoir à en faire une nouvelle copie ou à le reproduire. Des processus automatisés doivent reproduire des exemplaires techniques afin de lire et d'analyser le contenu. Tout comme le Parlement a reconnu le besoin en 2012 de créer des exemptions quant aux reproductions requises pour exploiter Internet, la BCBC croit qu'une nouvelle exception est requise pour éliminer toute incertitude concernant la reproduction aux fins d'analyse automatisée de l'information.

La BCBC recommande une amélioration supplémentaire du régime actuel « d'avis et avis ». Dans le projet de loi C-86, la Loi d'exécution du budget, le gouvernement a présenté des modifications pour interdire l'inclusion de demandes de règlements et les avis de violation. La BCBC soutient fortement cette proposition, mais croit que des modifications supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour protéger les consommateurs et donner aux FSI les outils dont ils ont besoin pour mettre fin à ces avis de règlement.

Le projet de loi C-86 indique clairement que les FSI ne sont pas tenus de transmettre des demandes de règlement à leurs abonnés. Cependant, il ne contient aucun élément dissuasif utile empêchant les titulaires de droit et autres demandeurs d'inclure des demandes de règlement dans les avis de droits d'auteur. Nous croyons que le fardeau lié à l'exclusion des demandes de règlement des avis de droits d'auteur doit incomber uniquement aux titulaires des droits d'auteur, pas aux FSI, qui, en fait, peuvent être tenus responsables de ne pas envoyer des avis conformes.

L'autre changement nécessaire consiste à adopter des règlements établissant une norme commune pour les avis de violation. Les FSI canadiens et l'industrie cinématographique ont élaboré en collaboration un format standard appelé l'Automated Copyright Notice System, ou ACNS, un système disponible gratuitement qui reflète les exigences canadiennes. Le gouvernement devrait adopter un règlement pour définir la forme et le contenu des avis conformément à l'ACNS.

La BCBC sait que les ministres ont écrit au Comité et au Comité du patrimoine relativement aux modifications apportées à la Commission du droit d'auteur et à la gestion collective du droit d'auteur. La BCBC soutient bon nombre des changements qui ont été présentés afin d'améliorer l'efficience des procédures de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

La Coalition est préoccupée par le fait que certains des changements élimineront d'importantes protections dont bénéficiaient les titulaires et pourraient entraîner un monopole en ce qui concerne les pratiques d'attribution des licences de droits d'auteur qui ne seraient plus transparents ni assujettis à une surveillance réglementaire.

(1535)



La coalition soutient fortement les modifications qui feront en sorte qu'il sera plus facile pour les titulaires de droits d'auteur de faire respecter plus efficacement leurs droits. La Loi devrait prévoir une injonction contre tous les intermédiaires qui participent à l'infrastructure de distribution en ligne de contenu illégal. Par exemple, on devrait dire explicitement que les tribunaux peuvent émettre une ordonnance de blocage exigeant d'un FSI qu'il désactive l'accès au contenu volé accessible au moyen de terminaux numériques préchargés ou une ordonnance interdisant à des compagnies de cartes de crédit de traiter des paiements liés à des services illégaux.

La BCBC recommande qu'on modifie la Loi sur le droit d'auteur de façon à éliminer un conflit potentiel entre l'ordonnance d'un tribunal exigeant d'un FSI qu'il bloque l'accès à des services illégaux et la possibilité que le CRTC utilise son pouvoir au titre de l'article 36 de la Loi sur les télécommunications pour interdire un tel blocage.

La BCBC juge inacceptable qu'un FSI puisse se voir ordonner par un tribunal de bloquer l'accès à un service illégal sur Internet pour ensuite se faire dire par le CRTC qu'il ne doit pas se conformer à l'ordonnance. Il faut régler ce conflit et donner préséance à l'ordonnance du tribunal.

Enfin, la BCBC met en garde le Comité contre les allégations d'écart de valeurs entre l'industrie de la musique et les services Internet. Les revendications de l'industrie de la musique et les modifications qu'elle demande font fi de la façon dont les droits sont compensés dans le cadre de transactions commerciales. Si les modifications sont adoptées, ces mesures perturberaient les relations commerciales bien établies et, au bout du compte, les Canadiens perdraient au change au profit des maisons de disque américaines. Par exemple, l'industrie de la musique veut revoir la définition d'« enregistrement sonore » de façon à ce que les maisons de disque et les artistes-interprètes reçoivent des redevances d'interprétation publique lorsque des enregistrements sonores sont utilisés dans des trames sonores de films et des émissions de télévision.

L'industrie de la musique semble laisser entendre que les artistes-interprètes et les maisons de disque ne sont pas payés lorsque les enregistrements sonores sont utilisés dans des trames sonores, ce qui est tout simplement faux.

Les maisons de disque sont libres de négocier avec les producteurs de films les modalités d'utilisation de la musique enregistrée et des bandes sonores. Les artistes-interprètes doivent accepter l'utilisation de leur travail dans des trames sonores et ils ont le droit de demander une rémunération connexe dans le cadre de leurs ententes avec les maisons de disque. En outre, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur contient déjà des dispositions détaillées qui protègent le droit des artistes-interprètes d'être rémunérés pour l'utilisation de leurs oeuvres. La révision de la définition d'« enregistrement sonore » suggérée ferait en sorte que les maisons de disque et les artistes-interprètes seraient rémunérés deux fois pour la même utilisation.

Si le Comité veut améliorer la situation financière des artistes-interprètes, il pourrait recommander le rajustement de la répartition des redevances entre les maisons de disque et les artistes-interprètes au paragraphe 19(3). Ce simple changement ferait immédiatement en sorte que tous les artistes-interprètes auraient plus d'argent en poche lorsque leurs oeuvres passent à la radio, sont diffusées en continu sur Internet ou jouées dans des bars et des restaurants.

Merci. Voilà qui met fin à mes commentaires. Je serais heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer tout de suite à la Chambre de commerce. Scott Smith, vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. Scott Smith (directeur principal, Propriété intellectuelle et politique d'innovation, Chambre de commerce du Canada):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président, et merci aux membres du Comité de me donner l'occasion de m'adresser à vous aujourd'hui.

Je représente en fait le Conseil canadien de la propriété intellectuelle, un conseil spécial au sein de la Chambre de commerce du Canada, la voix nationale des entreprises, qui représente plus de 200 000 entreprises à l'échelle du Canada.

Le CCPI est voué à l'amélioration du régime des droits de propriété intellectuelle au Canada et il bénéficie d'une vaste participation d'une diversité d'industries, y compris des manufacturiers, le secteur du divertissement, des compagnies des technologies d'information et des communications, des sociétés de télécommunication et de logistique, des représentants des professions juridiques, des détaillants, des importateurs et des exportateurs, des sociétés pharmaceutiques et d'autres liées aux sciences de la vie et des associations commerciales.

Les dirigeants du CCPI sont des cadres supérieurs de sociétés et d'associations qui comprennent bien les défis de leur industrie et reconnaissent le besoin de protéger les droits de propriété intellectuelle au Canada. Le mandat du Conseil consiste à promouvoir et à améliorer l'environnement au Canada pour les entreprises qui s'intéressent à l'innovation et à la propriété intellectuelle, en rehaussant le profil des DPI parmi les principaux décideurs du gouvernement et au sein du grand public.

J'aimerais commencer par remercier le gouvernement de ses efforts pour reconnaître le lien entre l'innovation et les droits de propriété intellectuelle dans sa Stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle.

Nos homologues du Global Innovation Policy Center, le GIPC, réalisent une évaluation systématique des forces des régimes de DPI dans 45 économies. Cette année, le Canada s'est classé au 18e rang, ce qui constitue tout de même une amélioration comparativement aux années précédentes. Des mesures comme la gestion des droits numériques et les dispositions habilitantes, qui ont été ajoutées dans le cadre de la dernière mise à jour de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, constituent des outils importants pour aider à protéger les investissements importants faits par les créateurs au Canada. Nous aimerions que ces mesures soient préservées à l'avenir.

Je tiens aussi à souligner que nous sommes heureux de voir que bon nombre des suggestions formulées par le CCPI au sujet des changements à apporter à la Commission du droit d'auteur figurent dans le projet de loi C-86 annoncé la semaine dernière.

Selon nous, il est important de compter sur une Commission dont le travail est uniforme, rapide et prévisible, une Commission qui soutient et encourage les entreprises nouvelles et actuelles au sein des industries culturelles canadiennes, grâce à un processus d'établissement des tarifs plus efficient et productif, à des dispositions pour procéder à des réformes réglementaires, particulièrement au sujet des retards, à la disposition visant à soutenir la négociation indépendante de tarifs et à l'adoption de critères décisionnels clairs.

Nous avons hâte que ces dispositions entrent en vigueur au printemps 2019.

Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais concentrer le reste de mes commentaires sur deux enjeux: la lutte contre le piratage en ligne et le besoin de permettre la recherche et l'innovation en matière d'intelligence artificielle.

Je vais commencer par un problème généralisé, soit la menace du piratage en ligne qui inclut maintenant de nouvelles formes de menace qui n'étaient pas dominantes au moment du dernier examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Ces menaces incluent l'exploitation commerciale de plateformes de diffusion en continu en ligne illégales et les boîtiers de décodage préchargés d'ajouts illégaux, qui donnent aux utilisateurs un accès non autorisé à du contenu de divertissement.

Selon le rapport d'information sur le piratage de MUSO, le Canada est maintenant l'un des principaux consommateurs de contenu piraté diffusé en continu sur le Web. En fait, selon le même rapport, le Canada est passé au 8e rang mondial au chapitre de la consultation de contenu piraté, ce qui représente un total de 1,88 milliard de consultations pour l'ensemble des sites piratés en 2016. Ce type de diffusion en continu est maintenant le type de piratage le plus populaire au Canada.

Dans le cadre de l'étude réalisée par le gouvernement du Canada sur la consommation en ligne de contenu protégé par le droit d'auteur publiée en mai 2018, le quart des Canadiens ont eux-mêmes déclaré avoir consommé du contenu illégalement en ligne. Sandvine estime aussi que 10 % des ménages canadiens utilisent des services d'abonnement illégaux.

Le préjudice économique causé par le piratage en ligne est bien trop réel. Selon des recherches réalisées par Frontier Economics, la valeur commerciale du piratage numérique de film en 2015 seulement est estimée à 160 milliards de dollars à l'échelle internationale. Au Canada, où l'industrie cinématographique et télévisuelle représentait à elle seule plus de 170 000 emplois en 2016 et 2017 et a généré 12 milliards de dollars du PIB au profit de l'économie canadienne, l'impact du piratage en ligne est important.

Malheureusement, les outils actuellement accessibles dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur sont insuffisants pour lutter contre ces nouvelles menaces. Même s'il n'y a pas de solution unique au piratage, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur devrait être modernisée et devrait tirer parti des outils qui ont fait leurs preuves pour aider à réduire le piratage en ligne, y compris les outils accessibles en Europe.

Le CCPI encourage le gouvernement à adopter des dispositions qui permettent expressément aux détenteurs de droits d'obtenir une injonction auprès des autorités compétentes, comme le fait de bloquer des sites ou des ordonnances de désindexation contre les intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés pour violer le droit d'auteur.

(1545)



Le contenu illégal est accessible par des intermédiaires Internet, et ce sont eux qui sont le mieux placés pour réduire les préjudices causés par le piratage en ligne. Ce principe est reconnu depuis longtemps partout en Europe, où le paragraphe 8(3) de la Directive européenne sur le droit d'auteur a jeté les bases de façon à permettre aux propriétaires de droits d'auteur d'obtenir une injonction contre les intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés par des tiers pour enfreindre le droit d'auteur.

Le besoin d'outils modernes et efficaces pour aider à lutter contre le piratage en ligne a été soutenu par un très large éventail d'intervenants canadiens, y compris les principaux fournisseurs de services Internet canadiens, qui ont tous reconnu les préjudices causés par les sites internationaux de piratage qui nuisent à l'économie créative canadienne.

Même le CRTC a reconnu les préjudices causés par le piratage en examinant la demande déposée par Franc-Jeu Canada plus tôt cette année, mais, au bout du compte, il a jugé que la révision actuelle de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur était une tribune appropriée pour s'attaquer à cet enjeu pressant. En s'appuyant sur des précédents qui existent déjà au Canada, il faudrait modifier la Loi sur le droit d'auteur afin de permettre expressément aux titulaires de droit d'obtenir une injonction contre les intermédiaires au moyen d'ordonnances qui permettraient de bloquer ou de désindexer les sites illégaux.

Je vais conclure en parlant de la préservation d'une occasion, et je vais revenir ici à la question des données. Les données — de même que les techniques et les technologies utilisées pour les recueillir et les analyser — permettront au Canada et au monde de régler certains des principaux problèmes économiques, sociaux et environnementaux mondiaux actuels. Les données sont maintenant le moteur de la croissance et de la prospérité économiques. Les pays qui promeuvent l'accessibilité et l'utilisation des données pour le bien de la société et le développement économique mèneront la quatrième révolution industrielle et donneront à leurs citoyens une meilleure qualité de vie.

L'apprentissage automatique exige souvent l'utilisation de la reproduction accessoire de travaux protégés par le droit d'auteur acquis légalement. Les oeuvres sont utilisées, analysées pour qu'on puisse en cerner les tendances, les faits et les apprentissages, et les copies sont utilisées aux fins de vérification de données. Pour éviter le risque d'interdire cette activité, nous suggérons que toute loi qui porte sur l'applicabilité des règles de responsabilité en matière de violation du droit d'auteur tienne bien compte de la façon dont ces règles s'appliquent à tous les intervenants du réseau numérique afin de garantir l'efficacité générale du cadre de protection du droit d'auteur.

Merci de m'avoir donné l'occasion de m'adresser à vous aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant que nous ne poursuivions, vous avez mentionné dans votre déclaration préliminaire un rapport de MUSO contenant des renseignements sur le piratage. Pouvez-vous fournir ce rapport au greffier?

M. Scott Smith:

Oui, certainement.

Le président:

Ce serait parfait. Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à la Clinique d'intérêt public et de politique d'Internet du Canada et David Fewer.

M. David Fewer (directeur, Clinique d'intérêt public et de politique d'Internet du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je m'appelle David Fewer. Je suis le directeur de la Clinique d'intérêt public et de politique d'Internet du Canada Samuelson-Glushko, la CIPPIC, du Centre de recherche en droit, technologie et société de l'Université d'Ottawa.

Nous sommes la première et la seule clinique de droit technologique d'intérêt public au Canada. Nos bureaux se trouvent sur le campus de l'Université. Essentiellement, nous réunissons des avocats qui possèdent une expertise relativement aux enjeux juridiques liés aux technologies et des étudiants afin de promouvoir les enjeux liés au droit des technologies au nom de l'intérêt public.

Notre travail est au coeur du programme stratégique d'innovation canadien. Nous travaillons sur tous les dossiers, de la protection des renseignements personnels à la gouvernance des données en passant par l'intelligence artificielle, la neutralité du net, la surveillance étatique, les politiques sur les villes intelligentes et, bien sûr, les politiques sur le droit d'auteur. Essentiellement, notre travail consiste à veiller au respect des droits des Canadiens relativement aux politiques sur les technologies, tandis que les gouvernements et les tribunaux réagissent à l'utilisation par les Canadiens des nouvelles technologies en constante évolution.

Je tiens à commencer en formulant deux commentaires contextuels liés à la façon d'aborder la politique sur le droit d'auteur. Le premier commentaire concerne la notion d'équilibre. La politique canadienne sur le droit d'auteur a établi depuis longtemps qu'un équilibre est essentiel dans le cadre général et au vu de l'objectif de la Loi, ce qui signifie que la politique canadienne en matière de droit d'auteur doit tenter de trouver un juste équilibre entre le fait d'offrir une juste récompense aux créateurs et aux propriétaires des oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur et l'intérêt public liés à l'égard de la diffusion plus générale des oeuvres. Ce principe directeur est, essentiellement, la pierre de touche de la politique sur le droit d'auteur et doit être au centre de tout examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Cela m'amène au deuxième point que je veux souligner en guise de contexte, soit l'AEUMC. La récente conclusion de la renégociation de l'ALENA a bouleversé l'équilibre de la politique canadienne concernant la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Ce n'est pas l'endroit où procéder à un examen approfondi des modifications de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur qui seront requises, mais trois des éléments qui m'ont sauté aux yeux sont la prolongation de la durée du droit d'auteur, les dispositions accrues concernant les mesures de protection technologiques — qui ont déstabilisé davantage un aspect déjà complexe de la politique canadienne sur le droit d'auteur — et de nouveaux droits d'application de la loi en matière de douanes, entraînant le remaniement d'un domaine du droit que nous venions tout juste de moderniser au cours des deux dernières années.

Ce ne sont là que certains des avantages pour les titulaires des droits d'auteur découlant de cet accord commercial. Nous demandons au Comité de mener les audiences actuelles en ayant pour objectif de régler le problème ou de rétablir l'équilibre qui est au coeur de la politique canadienne sur le droit d'auteur.

Sur le fond, je veux parler de trois choses précises, dont les mesures de protection technologiques. Dans la mesure où on peut le faire au moyen de la politique canadienne sur le droit d'auteur, nous devrions envisager d'éliminer la surprotection découlant des dispositions sur les mesures de protection technologiques. Il y a un incroyable déséquilibre entre les droits dont bénéficient les titulaires de droits à cet égard et ceux dont ils bénéficient relativement au contenu en tant que tel. Dans le cas du contenu proprement dit, il y a là un juste équilibre, et le régime ne ferme pas la porte à de futures politiques en matière de créativité et d'innovation, ce qui n'est pas le cas des dispositions sur les mesures de protection technologiques.

Bon nombre de dispositions de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada qui visaient à soutenir les futurs créateurs et novateurs sont caducs lorsqu'on prend une mesure de protection technologique, et c'est difficile de justifier une telle situation, et ce, quelle que soit l'analyse raisonnée qu'on fait de la politique canadienne en matière de droit d'auteur.

Nous demandons l'étude des dispositions de l'AEUMC afin qu'il soit possible de déterminer quelle est la meilleure façon de maintenir des interactions justes et souples relativement au contenu à la lumière des mesures de protection technologiques. Essentiellement, nous affirmons que des dispositions draconiennes à ce chapitre découragent et minent la politique canadienne d'innovation et sont préjudiciables aussi pour la sécurité numérique. Ce n'est pas seulement là un problème pour les utilisateurs; c'est un problème en matière d'innovation. Les créateurs, comme les documentaristes et les nouvelles formes d'artistes — les artistes pratiquant l'appropriation artistique, par exemple —, se butent aux mesures de protection technologiques, et le contenu visé est hors de leur portée.

Nous vous demandons également d'examiner dans quelle mesure nous pouvons restreindre le contournement criminel dans le cadre des activités commerciales en raison de l'énorme effet dissuasif des poursuites criminelles sur l'innovation et le travail artistique qui découlent des mesures de protection technologiques.

(1550)



Deuxièmement, je veux parler de l'utilisation équitable. La CIPPIC demande depuis longtemps au Canada de dresser une liste des fins d'utilisation équitable qui est représentative plutôt qu'exhaustive. Si l'utilisation est équitable, elle devrait être légale, un point c'est tout, faute de quoi la CIPPIC soutiendrait l'élargissement des dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable aux utilisations transformatrices pour reconnaître les différents types d'auteurs, comme les artistes pratiquant l'appropriation artistique et les documentaristes. Les utilisations transformatrices ne sont absolument pas visées par le paradigme actuel sur l'utilisation équitable.

Nous nous ferions également l'écho des appels répétés que le Comité a entendus quant à l'application élargie de la notion d'utilisation équitable à ce que j'appellerais les activités liées à l'intelligence artificielle. Il devrait y avoir une exception précise pour l'analyse informationnelle.

Enfin, toujours au sujet de l'utilisation équitable, la CIPPIC demanderait qu'il n'y ait pas de dérogation contractuelle possible à une telle utilisation. Nous avons déjà parlé de protection des renseignements personnels. Les modalités d'utilisation causent bien des maux en ce qui concerne nos droits en matière de protection des renseignements personnels parce qu'elles sont assorties de politiques en matière de protection des renseignements personnels qu'aucun consommateur ni utilisateur ne voit jamais, ce qui nous prive de nos droits à la vie privée. La politique sur le droit d'auteur, qui est une politique d'innovation, ne devrait pas traîner le même boulet.

D'autres administrations ont procédé ainsi, particulièrement dans le contexte d'une exemption pour l'exploration de données. C'est ce qui a été fait dans des administrations comme la Grande-Bretagne. Le Canada devrait envisager lui aussi de le faire.

Enfin, je veux formuler un bref commentaire sur les avis et le système d'avis. La CIPPIC soutient les changements apportés au système récemment prévus dans le projet de loi C-86 pour réduire les abus du système, mais, en fait, nous tenons à réitérer les commentaires de M. Kerr-Wilson au sujet du besoin de prévoir des conséquences négatives en cas d'utilisation irresponsable ou délibérée du système.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pour terminer, nous allons passer à John Lawford, du Centre pour la défense de l'intérêt public. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes, monsieur.

M. John Lawford (directeur exécutif et avocat général, Centre pour la défense de l'intérêt public):

Merci, monsieur le président. Merci beaucoup aux membres du Comité de m'accueillir.

Le Centre pour la défense de l'intérêt public est une organisation nationale sans but lucratif et un organisme de bienfaisance enregistré qui fournit des services juridiques et de recherche au profit de l'intérêt des consommateurs, et plus particulièrement de ceux qui sont vulnérables, concernant la prestation d'importants services publics.

Le CDIP se penche activement sur la question du droit d'auteur du point de vue du consommateur depuis le milieu des années 2000. Plus particulièrement, nous avons beaucoup participé à l'établissement d'un juste équilibre entre les droits des créateurs et les droits du public rendu possible par la refonte majeure ayant mené à la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur.

Notre message aujourd'hui est simple. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur actuelle a, de façon générale, aidé les consommateurs canadiens à profiter des oeuvres visées par le droit d'auteur, comme ce devrait être le cas, sans restriction excessive non conforme à la façon concrète dont les consommateurs regardent ou écoutent les oeuvres protégées ou interagissent avec elles.

Lorsqu'elle a comparu devant le Comité, la société Shaw Communications a dit ce qui suit: Dans l'ensemble, notre Loi sur le droit d'auteur atteint un équilibre efficace, sous réserve de quelques dispositions qui profiteraient de modifications ciblées. Des changements majeurs ne sont ni nécessaires ni dans l'intérêt du public. Ils viendraient perturber le régime soigneusement équilibré du Canada et mettraient en péril les objectifs stratégiques d'autres lois du Parlement qui coexistent avec le droit d'auteur au sein d'un cadre élargi qui englobe la radiodiffusion et la Loi sur les télécommunications.

Nous sommes d'accord.

Cependant, la demande de la coalition Franc-Jeu récemment présentée au CRTC, qui est maintenant soumise au Comité par plusieurs entreprises des médias et des télécommunications intégrées verticalement, déforme considérablement le contexte dans lequel le Comité doit produire son rapport.

En réalité, premièrement, un recours judiciaire rapide peut être exercé contre les intermédiaires. Deuxièmement, la censure administrative n'est pas chose courante dans le monde entier. Troisièmement, il y a peut-être peu de violations du droit d'auteur en ligne. Quatrièmement, la violation des droits d'auteur en ligne semble sur le déclin. Cinquièmement, l'industrie canadienne de la radiodiffusion est rentable et en croissance. Sixièmement, le blocage n'est pas très efficace pour réduire les problèmes liés à la protection de la vie privée. Septièmement, le fait de bloquer les services de piratage génère peu de revenus supplémentaires pour les radiodiffuseurs. De façon générale, les émissions piratées ne sont pas des émissions canadiennes. Ensuite, l'augmentation des revenus pour les télédiffuseurs n'entraînera pas nécessairement une augmentation de la quantité et de la qualité de contenu produit et, pour terminer, le régime proposé entraînera le blocage de sites légaux.

Le CDIP croit que le Comité ne devrait pas recommander la mise en oeuvre des propositions de type Franc-Jeu. Premièrement, les tribunaux sont mieux placés pour faire respecter le droit d'auteur, et trouver un juste équilibre entre l'application de la loi et l'intérêt public à l'égard de la liberté d'expression, de l'innovation et de la concurrence et de la neutralité du Net. Deuxièmement, des mesures de protection technologiques existent déjà et sont accessibles pour protéger l'intérêt des propriétaires de contenu. Enfin, l'acceptation de tout type de censure sur Internet dans ce domaine s'étendra probablement à d'autres secteurs d'activité gouvernementaux. Selon nous, ces considérations militent fortement contre la mise en oeuvre du régime proposé.

Comme on l'a mentionné ci-dessus, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur prévoit déjà des recours judiciaires contre les intermédiaires, soit les paragraphes 27(2.3) et 27(2.4). Ces dispositions visent déjà la violation du droit d'auteur « sur Internet ou tout autre réseau numérique ».

En d'autres mots, les membres de la coalition Franc-Jeu veulent remplacer le régime d'application de la loi judiciaire actuelle par un régime administratif supplémentaire. Ce qu'il ne faut pas oublier au sujet d'un tel processus administratif — à part sa nature redondante —, c'est qu'il serait probablement géré par le CRTC, que les membres de la coalition Franc-Jeu espèrent apparemment voir imposer — grâce à sa compétence générale dans le domaine des télécommunications — une ordonnance générale de blocage de nombreux sites illégaux présumés, ordonnance qui viserait tous les fournisseurs de services de télécommunication, et non pas fournir à un seul FSI le droit de bloquer un site Web précis. C'est la raison pour laquelle ils tiennent tant à intégrer ce genre de recours blindé.

Pour ce qui est de l'utilisation équitable, le CDP croit que les exemptions à cet égard prévues dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ont généralement facilité l'utilisation équitable par le public, ce qui est dans l'intérêt du public. Nous résisterions aux appels à réduire ces exemptions, que ce soit dans le domaine de l'éducation ou ailleurs. Idéalement, l'utilisation équitable au Canada devrait aussi inclure les utilisations transformatrices, comme le remixage des chansons et d'autres projets créatifs, y compris la production de documentaires. Cependant, nous reconnaissons que cela ne figurait pas dans la révision précédente de la Loi.

Certains témoins ont aussi proposé au Comité une redevance sur les iPods ou les téléphones intelligents. De telles demandes ont été rejetées comme il se doit comme étant inappropriées, et ce, à plusieurs occasions, y compris devant la Cour fédérale. L'idée recyclée qu'on soulève actuellement n'est pas mieux. Elle nie l'utilisation complète des capacités de tels appareils, augmente les prix d'un produit de consommation courant et exige de la personne qui utilise seulement du contenu autorisé de payer deux fois: une fois pour une copie sous licence du contenu, et à nouveau pour les autres dont on présume qu'elles violent la loi. Cette injustice devrait être évidente et concluante.

(1555)



Pour terminer, le CDIP s'oppose aussi à l'idée d'une redevance liée aux FSI ou d'une taxe sur Internet. Une telle idée viole la notion même de transport commun par les fournisseurs de télécommunications et est très susceptible d'entraîner une augmentation des prix de l'accès à Internet. C'est une mauvaise idée alors que les Canadiens, et plus particulièrement les Canadiens à faible revenu, ont de la difficulté à se payer des services Internet à large bande utilisés à des fins économiques et sociales.

Le CDIP remercie beaucoup le Comité. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1600)

Le président:

Merci à vous tous de vos exposés.

Nous allons passer à M. Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous tous d'être là aujourd'hui.

J'essaie de me mettre à la place d'un petit entrepreneur. Je vais commencer par la Chambre de commerce. Je pense à l'utilisation de l'intelligence artificielle pour explorer des données afin de créer une entreprise.

Soit dit en passant, merci de m'avoir permis de participer aux récentes réunions de la Chambre de commerce du Canada. J'ai eu l'occasion de parler à bon nombre de vos membres qui ont des entreprises dans le secteur des technologies numériques et du numérique. J'ai quitté la réunion en me disant que ces gens pouvaient donner beaucoup de renseignements à d'autres entreprises.

Pour ce qui est d'avoir accès à des renseignements grâce à l'intelligence artificielle et des protections ou des paiements liés aux services d'intelligence artificielle, est-ce que la Chambre de commerce a une position quant à la façon dont la loi devrait prévoir une indemnisation pour l'utilisation de l'intelligence artificielle dans le but d'explorer du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur?

M. Scott Smith:

Je pense que notre position est assez simple: tout matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur doit être d'abord acquis légalement, de sorte qu'il faut payer les droits appropriés, les redevances ou quoi que ce soit. Ensuite, s'il faut faire des copies aux fins de vérification et d'apprentissage machine, il y aurait une exception prévue dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui. Donc on envisage une nouvelle série d'exceptions liées aux données et à l'intelligence artificielle.

M. Scott Smith:

Je m'en tiendrais à quelque chose de très limité. C'est une nouvelle exception.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Les choses changent déjà. D'ici à ce que la Loi soit réexaminée, je suis sûr que, en rétrospective, on constatera qu'on ne faisait que commencer l'aventure de l'intelligence artificielle, surtout lorsqu'on pense à l'informatique quantique et à la façon dont la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pourra s'appliquer aux fabricants ou à d'autres créateurs.

M. Scott Smith:

Je crois qu'il revient au Comité de faire preuve d'une certaine clairvoyance, de déterminer ce à quoi ressemblera le monde et de garder cette technologie le plus neutre possible.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Exactement. C'est ce que nous tentons de faire.

Je vais continuer avec vous. Il y a quelques années, vous nous avez présenté la Chambre de commerce américaine, qui est venue ici présenter des exposés à certains d'entre nous. Voyez-vous une différence entre la façon dont les Canadiens et les Américains traitent ce dossier? Il y a un groupe responsable de la propriété intellectuelle là-bas. Les responsables étudient-ils certaines des mêmes choses que nous en ce qui concerne les droits d'auteur numériques? Y a-t-il quoi que ce soit que nous pouvons apprendre de la Chambre de commerce américaine?

M. Scott Smith:

Je crois que les États-Unis mettent davantage l'accent sur les enjeux liés au piratage et à la violation et qu'ils s'attaquent de façon plus agressive aux violations. Ils en font plus au sujet des procédures criminelles qui accompagnent tout cela. Ils ont un régime d'« avis et suppression ». Certains se demandent si cette approche est suffisante. Je crois que le régime d'avis et avis canadien est efficace comme outil de sensibilisation publique et outil pédagogique. Certains l'appellent maintenant un régime d'« avis et de maintien de la suppression », dans le cadre duquel on se concentre sur les comptes où il y a violation du contenu au sein du marché et on s'en prend à ces comptes plutôt qu'aux sites Web, qui sont très difficiles à maîtriser. C'est très facile de créer un nouveau site Web.

Je crois qu'il serait probablement plus approprié d'adopter une approche financière consistant à « suivre l'argent ».

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Bien. Merci.

Monsieur Fewer, en ce qui concerne les régimes d'« avis et avis » et d'« avis et suppression », deux notions ont été soulevées par tous les témoins aujourd'hui, soit l'« équilibre » et le « piratage ». Sachant que le Canada arrive au premier rang en ce qui a trait au piratage, est-ce quelque chose que la Clinique d'intérêt public et de politique d'Internet du Canada a examiné afin de comprendre les raisons pour lesquelles le Canada est plus exposé au piratage et de déterminer ce qu'on pourrait faire pour combattre ce fléau?

M. David Fewer:

Nous sommes toujours sceptiques lorsque des gens disent que le Canada est unique ou qu'il trône en tête de liste en ce qui a trait à la consommation de contenu illégal. Je regarde toujours la source. Je suis désolé, mais je n'ai pas vu le rapport dont M. Smith vous a parlé.

M. Lloyd Longfield: D'accord.

M. David Fewer: Souvent, lorsque nous examinons ces affirmations, nous constatons que la situation n'est pas toujours telle qu'on la présente dans les rapports.

Lorsqu'on pense au piratage de façon générale, selon nous, la meilleure façon de s'attaquer à ce problème, c'est grâce à un bon encadrement du marché: un environnement réglementaire qui permet la prestation des services aux consommateurs et qui rend le piratage moins attrayant et plus difficile. Le piratage exige des efforts. Ce n'est pas facile à faire. Il y a des coûts. Il faut payer pour Internet, se procurer un ordinateur et consacrer des ressources à la recherche de contenu illégal et à son acquisition. Nous avons toujours pensé qu'un marché sain est le meilleur moyen de dissuader le piratage.

(1605)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Exactement.

Pour ce qui est d'un marché sain, vous avez mentionné des enjeux réglementaires. La loi est ce qu'elle est. C'est un cadre législatif. Pour ce qui est des enjeux réglementaires, le Canada est-il réactif lorsque vient le temps d'élaborer des règlements pour le marché numérique ou est-ce quelque chose sur quoi il faut se pencher dans le cadre de notre régime de réglementation, et ce, de façon distincte de la loi?

M. David Fewer:

C'est une bonne question. La loi est toujours à la traîne des progrès technologiques. C'est un fait, et c'est probablement une bonne chose. Il ne faut pas essayer de prendre de l'avance et d'essayer de limiter ou d'aiguiller l'innovation d'une façon précise. Il faut que le marché réagisse à sa façon, et nous voulons que les innovateurs innovent. Selon moi, la loi doit refléter ce qui se passe sur le marché, tenir compte de la façon dont les détenteurs de droits réagissent et de la façon dont les utilisateurs ont accès au contenu pour ensuite y réagir.

Quelle est la position du Canada dans tout ça? Selon moi, honnêtement, nous ne faisons pas du si mauvais travail que ça. Nous avons un assez bon cadre réglementaire en place. Il y a eu beaucoup de critiques selon lesquelles le Canada a réagi lentement aux traités de l'OMPI et il a fallu beaucoup de temps pour apporter les changements qui, au bout du compte, l'ont été il y a maintenant six ans. Cependant, en réalité, on a fait de l'assez bon travail. Si nous nous étions précipités, nous ne nous en serions probablement pas tirés aussi bien. Je crois que le Canada doit être fier, dans une certaine mesure, de la façon dont il a réagi à l'émergence des enjeux numériques au début du siècle.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Sept minutes passent très vite. J'ai d'autres questions, mais je vous remercie de vos commentaires.

Le président:

Vous avez assez bien compté.

Nous allons maintenant passer à vous, monsieur Albas, pour sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aussi à vous tous de l'expertise dont vous nous faites bénéficier aujourd'hui et de vos mémoires très éclairés.

Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Fewer. Votre groupe s'est opposé à la proposition de blocage de sites Web de la coalition Franc-Jeu, et ce, en partie, en faisant valoir que le CRTC n'a pas le pouvoir de réaliser un tel programme. Votre groupe s'opposerait-il à une procédure juridique transparente, comme le recours à la Cour fédérale, devant laquelle un titulaire de droit pourrait obtenir une ordonnance de blocage d'un site s'il peut prouver qu'il viole un droit d'auteur?

M. David Fewer:

Notre position, c'est que la Cour fédérale est l'endroit où faire appliquer le droit d'auteur... la Cour fédérale ou les tribunaux provinciaux. Nous sommes extrêmement sceptiques quant à l'efficacité et au « caractère stratégique », pourrait-on dire, de tout type de mécanisme de blocage de sites visant à s'attaquer à ces genres de problèmes.

Il y a déjà d'importantes dispositions dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur qui permettent aux titulaires de droits de poursuivre des entreprises qui misent sur la violation du droit d'auteur, et nous encourageons les titulaires de droits d'auteurs à utiliser ces mécanismes.

M. Dan Albas:

Nous avons reçu un certain nombre de groupes, ici, qui nous ont dit n'avoir aucun recours lorsque ce genre de situation se présente. Qu'est-ce que votre groupe leur conseillerait de faire alors?

M. David Fewer:

Lorsque vous dites « aucun recours », je crois que le problème en est un de compétence. Est-ce ce qui est sous-entendu? Que les fautifs se trouvent dans d'autres administrations? C'est vrai que les contrevenants se trouvent dans d'autres administrations, mais ce l'est aussi qu'il y a des lois sur le droit d'auteur dans ces endroits.

Une des composantes de la vision générale de la politique sur le droit d'auteur, et c'était vrai il y a 15 ans — lorsque je suis arrivé pour la première fois à la Clinique et que j'ai commencé à parler de politiques sur le droit d'auteur — et ce l'est encore aujourd'hui, c'est qu'il faut repousser le contenu illicite dans les coins sombres d'Internet, dans les coins sombres du monde.

Il y a 15 ans, nous aurions dit que le Canada ne doit pas accueillir ni héberger des entreprises qui ont l'intention de violer le droit d'auteur et que, dans la mesure ou de telles entreprises existent, elles devaient se trouver à l'étranger. Elles devaient être ailleurs. Je pense que le recours consiste vraiment à exercer des pressions à l'échelle internationale sur les pays qui hébergent de telles entreprises pour qu'ils les poursuivent et qu'ils appliquent leurs lois en matière de droit d'auteur.

(1610)

M. Dan Albas:

Nous avons entendu certaines suggestions dans le cas des témoignages. Je crois que l'avocat de Shaw a dit qu'il serait important de fournir certaines précisions concernant ce que la Cour fédérale peut faire et ses pouvoirs dans ces genres de dossiers. Croyez-vous que la Cour fédérale possède, actuellement... Est-il absolument clair qu'elle peut entendre ces cas et ordonner la prise de mesures correctives?

M. David Fewer:

Est-ce que c'est absolument clair? Vous savez, la Cour a un très vaste pouvoir discrétionnaire en matière de mesures correctives au titre de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Vu ses pouvoirs d'injonction au titre des recours équitables, elle possède de très vastes pouvoirs. J'aimerais bien qu'on constate l'échec de ces dispositions avant de dire qu'elles sont inadéquates et qu'elles ont failli à la tâche. Je crois que nous devons leur donner une chance.

Quoi qu'il en soit, je suis extrêmement sceptique à l'idée que des solutions de filtrage vont permettre de régler le problème. C'est tout simplement trop facile de contourner le filtrage. En outre, le processus de filtrage est toujours à la fois trop et pas assez inclusif, alors je suis sceptique.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Lawford.

Monsieur Lawford, dans votre mémoire vous affirmez que les industries culturelles sont florissantes. Nous avons entendu des témoignages et vu des données selon lesquelles, même si les dépenses globales sont à la hausse dans certains secteurs, les créateurs et les artistes souffrent.

Êtes-vous au courant de cette information? Quel est le problème, selon vous?

M. John Lawford:

Je ne veux pas qu'on coupe les cheveux en quatre, mais je n'ai pas dit que les créateurs se portaient mieux. J'ai dit que l'industrie de la télédiffusion se portait mieux. La question qu'on peut donc se poser tient à la façon dont les artistes sont rémunérés et à la nature de l'entente entre les radiodiffuseurs, les distributeurs de radiodiffusion et les artistes. Nous vous encourageons à vous demander si ces genres d'ententes devraient être réglementés ou non, si les industries culturelles canadiennes sont vraiment en train de mourir de faim.

Les industries en tant que telles vont très bien. Tous les secteurs affichent des hausses. Le seul endroit où on constate une certaine contraction, c'est dans le cas des services des EDR, dont les auditoires des chaînes de télévision payantes ont peut-être légèrement diminué.

De façon générale, l'industrie croît, et il y a de plus en plus d'argent. Quant à savoir si tout cela se répercute sur les créateurs, c'est une autre question.

M. Dan Albas:

Dans votre mémoire, vous mentionnez précisément les droits liés à la « deuxième diffusion ». Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet, s'il vous plaît?

M. John Lawford:

Je ne sais pas où cela apparaît dans notre mémoire, mais les droits de deuxième diffusion s'appliqueraient à partir du moment où la première diffusion a lieu et que vous vendez votre contenu à quelque plateforme que ce soit. Cela vous laisse de l'espace pour diffuser une fois de plus le contenu, ou, après ce moment, vous pouvez l'envoyer vers une autre plateforme, et il apparaîtra plus tard.

Si vous vous reportez à quelque chose que nous avons écrit dans un autre mémoire, je crois que nous disions, à un moment, que le contenu canadien pourrait être exempt de droits de deuxième diffusion, et ce serait une façon d'amener du contenu canadien aux Canadiens sans les faire payer pour ce contenu. Ce serait peut-être un bon endroit pour financer plus de contenu canadien. Ça serait une autre affaire de trouver l'argent pour le faire.

M. Dan Albas:

Encore une fois, j'aimerais en savoir un peu plus au sujet de la deuxième diffusion, mais c'était peut-être un autre... Lorsque vous lisez ces choses, elles finissent par se confondre en quelque sorte.

Vous mentionnez aussi l'élargissement des règles touchant le contenu canadien pour qu'elles s'appliquent aux services en ligne. Nous avons entendu la préoccupation selon laquelle si nous imposons des règles en matière de contenu canadien aux services de diffusion en continu, ils ne vont pas ajouter de contenu canadien. Ils vont juste éliminer d'autre contenu jusqu'à ce que le ratio soit atteint. Manifestement, cela n'aide pas les créateurs canadiens et, au final, cela ne donne pas de choix aux consommateurs.

Est-ce une préoccupation partagée par votre groupe?

M. John Lawford:

Je ne crois pas que nous ayons analysé la question de façon aussi approfondie.

Nous avons récemment révisé notre position: nous pourrions envisager de changer la directive sur la propriété canadienne de façon à ce que Netflix, Amazon Prime et ce genre de plateformes soient forcées de contribuer au contenu canadien. Cela remplacerait une redevance imposée aux FSI.

(1615)

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Je vais commencer par la Commission du droit d'auteur. Y en a-t-il parmi vous qui ont des positions concernant la situation actuelle de la Commission du droit d'auteur?

Si vous regardez sur le site Web — je l'ai fait très rapidement pour me mettre à jour —, il y a une section qui s'appelle « Quoi de neuf ». On voit deux rendez-vous en septembre. On fait mention de quelques audiences. L'une d'elles aura lieu en 2019, et une autre, en 2020.

Nous avons entendu parler de la rapidité et du soutien de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Y en a-t-il parmi vous qui ont des commentaires au sujet de la Commission du droit d'auteur?

C'est une des choses que l'on peut faire sans apporter de changement législatif.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Je vais commencer. Je comparais assez souvent devant la Commission du droit d'auteur.

La rapidité et la rétroactivité des décisions étaient une grande préoccupation pour un certain nombre d'instances qui recourent à la Commission du droit d'auteur, tant en ce qui concerne l'aspect collectif que les titulaires de permis. Les mesures mises en place ou proposées dans le projet de loi C-86, la Loi d'exécution du budget, apportent une grande contribution. Elles donnent certainement au gouvernement les outils pour établir des dates limites en ce qui concerne les décisions rendues par la Commission du droit d'auteur. Elles expriment clairement que les tarifs doivent être proposés plus à l'avance et pour un plus grand nombre d'années. Si toutes les mesures sont mises à exécution et que les règlements sont mis en place, nous pourrions en fait réduire de façon radicale les problèmes que nous avons vus dans le passé en ce qui a trait à la rapidité des décisions et la longue rétroactivité.

M. Brian Masse:

J'ai l'impression que certaines personnes seront heureuses de recevoir une décision plus rapidement. Certains pourraient ne pas aimer la décision, ou que sais-je, mais au moins, peu importe ce que c'est, il semble y avoir une manifestation d'intérêt pour obtenir le résultat plus tôt que tard, plutôt que d'errer dans les limbes très longtemps.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

C'est un enjeu qui faisait presque l'unanimité parmi ceux qui recourent à la Commission du droit d'auteur. Dans chaque décision, vous aurez une personne plus heureuse qu'une autre, mais tout le monde s'entend pour dire que les décisions doivent sortir plus rapidement.

Nous avions affaire à des situations où la Commission établissait des prix à payer pour de la musique il y a cinq ans. Personne ne savait quel était le prix à payer aujourd'hui. Si le gouvernement donne suite au pouvoir réglementaire proposé en vertu du projet de loi C-86, ce problème, à tout le moins, sera en grande partie réglé.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Smith, avez-vous des commentaires à ajouter?

M. Scott Smith:

Je me ferai l'écho de ces commentaires. Je vais aussi ajouter qu'il était important d'avoir des critères décisionnels clairs, tout comme la capacité de négocier des tarifs de façon indépendante, d'adopter essentiellement une approche contractuelle selon laquelle la Commission du droit d'auteur n'interviendrait pas dans ces cas.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Fewer.

M. David Fewer:

Je reprendrai également ces commentaires. La rapidité et l'efficacité étaient une énorme préoccupation en ce qui touche la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Une chose que je mentionnerais qui va légèrement à l'encontre de cela, c'est l'incapacité des intervenants de comparaître devant la Commission du droit d'auteur. Pour nous, c'était un problème. Notre organisation passe énormément de temps à mettre son nez dans le droit d'auteur et dans d'autres affaires à la Cour suprême du Canada, où nous sommes un participant productif dont la participation est valorisée par les membres de la Cour.

J'aime à penser que nous pourrions offrir un rôle semblable à la Commission du droit d'auteur, une perspective différente sur une question précise. Toutefois, nous n'avons pas les moyens de le faire devant la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Brian Masse:

Je l'ignorais. Vous serez donc exclus du processus à la Commission du droit d'auteur, mais en ce qui concerne la décision que peut rendre la Commission du droit d'auteur... manifestement, ce genre de décision s'est retrouvé devant la Cour suprême, et c'est à ce moment-là que vous serez appelés à participer, et non plus tôt au cours du processus.

M. David Fewer:

C'est tout à fait cela.

Nous avons agi pour des parties qui étaient aussi, comme il se doit, des participants devant la Commission du droit d'auteur. Ils avaient pour but d'intervenir, d'apporter un point de vue nuancé, une perspective unique différente de celle des autres participants devant la Commission, mais on leur a dit qu'ils devaient être des opposants.

Dans le cas des interrogatoires, ou bien vous participez pleinement... et, soyons francs, ils sont assez chers. C'est très cher de participer à la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

M. David Fewer:

Dans le cas des interrogatoires, vous participez ou bien pleinement ou bien pas du tout.

M. Brian Masse:

Vraiment...?

M. David Fewer:

Elles ont été là assez longtemps pour faire valoir leur point de vue, puis, elles ont dû sortir, parce que ces organisations ne sont pas financées pour se batailler devant la Commission du droit d'auteur. Néanmoins, elles avaient des points de vue valides, des choses importantes à dire. Elles voulaient dire des choses que la Commission n'allait autrement pas entendre, et il devrait donc y avoir un mécanisme qui leur permet de participer.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Lawford.

M. John Lawford:

Je me ferai l'écho des préoccupations de David selon lesquelles le Comité pourrait peut-être même devenir assez créatif et dire qu'il devrait y avoir un régime des coûts, comme celui que nous avons au CRTC et à la Commission de l'énergie de l'Ontario, pour permettre aux intervenants défendant l'intérêt public de participer à des délibérations stratégiques majeures.

C'est tout ce que je voulais dire sur cette question.

(1620)

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Smith, une des choses qui ressortent, c'est qu'on entend parler d'un équilibre en ce qui concerne le piratage. À Windsor, d'où je viens, nous avons connu beaucoup de piratage dans le passé sur DirecTV. C'est un fournisseur de services américain, mais c'était tellement facile de le pirater, que c'est devenu ce qu'on a appelé une « carte de football ».

Dans une chaîne de montage, vous pourriez acheter une petite boîte, puis vous pourriez juste reprogrammer la carte. C'est ce que toutes les usines différentes ont fait. C'est pourquoi j'ai parlé d'une chaîne de montage, dans n'importe quelle usine. Cela a été reprogrammé, et on a obtenu DirecTV gratuitement. Enfin, on a apporté une petite innovation et éliminé tout cela.

Où en sommes-nous en ce qui concerne la diffusion de contenu en direct? Est-ce que c'est presque trop facile? Y a-t-il des mesures de contrôle que nous pouvons utiliser ici, que ce soit au chapitre de l'innovation ou du fait de se tourner directement vers les fournisseurs de services Internet?

Ce n'est pas une excuse, mais quand il n'y a presque pas d'obstacle, quand cela devient très facile, cela devient plus facile de le faire que de s'abonner à certains des services réels.

M. Scott Smith:

C'est un bon point et une analogie intéressante. C'est certainement plus difficile d'installer des verrous technologiques sur des sites Web qui produisent ce matériel.

J'aimerais revenir à certaines des questions qui ont été posées plus tôt au cours de la séance: le Canada devrait-il détenir un certain type d'outils pour pouvoir verrouiller les sites — les désindexer et que sais-je encore. Ce que nous perdons souvent de vue, c'est que nous vivons dans une communauté internationale. Les services en ligne sont partout. C'est mondial. Si nous voulons faire quelque chose par rapport aux sites Web piratés, très souvent, ceux-ci se trouvent à l'étranger, mais nous pouvons avoir au pays un outil qui peut s'occuper de ces sites à l'étranger. Nous n'avons pas nécessairement besoin de nous adresser aux tribunaux de tous les pays, même les plus reculés. Nous pouvons nous en occuper ici, par l'intermédiaire de notre système judiciaire, et permettre à nos FSI, qui dirigent le trafic d'Internet, de gérer ce problème en notre nom.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci. C'est bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

D'accord. Je vais les utiliser.

Monsieur Kerr-Wilson, étiez-vous ici le 26 septembre pour Shaw?

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Oui, je l'étais.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Juste à titre de précision, parce qu'il était écrit Gerald avec un « J » sur votre porte-nom la dernière fois, je veux juste dire clairement aux fins du compte rendu que vous êtes la même personne.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Je m'appelle Gerald. On m'appelle souvent Jay, et je suis connu sous ce nom, donc ça revient un peu au même que Stephen et Steve.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pas de souci... C'est juste pour qu'on sache, sur le compte rendu, que vous êtes la même personne. J'essaie juste de m'en assurer.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il des différences entre le poste que vous occupez aujourd'hui et celui que vous occupiez auprès de ce client?

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Non. Shaw est membre de la Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright. Le point de vue de Shaw était son point de vue à ce sujet. Je suis ici pour représenter la BCBC, mais il n'y a pas de différence.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. C'est tout ce que je dois savoir.

Monsieur Smith, vous avez beaucoup parlé de piratage, ou de protection de la vie privée, comme nous en avons un peu parlé aujourd'hui. Vous parlez de 160 milliards de dollars en contenu piraté par les consommateurs de partout dans le monde. Je vais présumer que cela tient compte de tout ce qui est piraté à la pleine valeur marchande. À quel point ces chiffres sont-ils gonflés?

M. Scott Smith:

Vous me demandez de me prononcer sur la véracité d'un rapport qui est paru, et je n'ai pas l'information qui me permet de le faire. Je cite une étude.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Seriez-vous d'accord pour dire que ces chiffres ont tendance à reposer sur la pleine valeur marchande ou le plein prix à la consommation de chaque produit qui a été piraté?

M. Scott Smith:

J'imagine qu'on a fait une analyse qui a probablement étudié la valeur marchande dans diverses administrations avant de fournir un chiffre. Je ne peux pas vous répondre à brûle-pourpoint. Je ne le sais pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est compris. Avons-nous fait beaucoup d'études pour savoir pourquoi les gens font du piratage au départ?

M. Scott Smith:

Je crois que cela va de soi. Il y a certainement sur le marché beaucoup de littérature sur les raisons qui expliquent pourquoi les gens achètent des produits de contrefaçon ou pourquoi ils piratent des biens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais dans le cas du contenu, du moins dans l'exemple canadien... Nous entendons dire que le Canada a un taux de piratage supérieur à celui d'autres pays, mais il a aussi, comme j'ai entendu quelqu'un le dire, un taux inférieur de contenu accessible aux consommateurs. Beaucoup de contenu produit au Canada est inaccessible au pays. Je l'ai entendu dire un certain nombre de fois auparavant. Est-ce une cause de piratage? Est-ce quelque chose que nous pouvons régler?

M. Scott Smith:

Je dirais que c'est un des éléments, mais l'accessibilité en fait aussi partie. Si vous pouvez l'obtenir gratuitement, pourquoi voudriez-vous payer pour ce contenu?

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr.

Appuyez-vous Franc-Jeu?

M. Scott Smith:

Nous avions un mémoire à l'appui de Franc-Jeu, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question. C'est vraiment une question générale qui s'adresse à tout le monde.

Le droit d'auteur devrait-il être proactivement enregistré par les titulaires de droit d'auteur ou est-ce que tout ce qui est protégeable devrait automatiquement l'être par le droit d'auteur?

M. Scott Smith:

Je crois que, ce faisant, vous demandez de changer...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une question philosophique.

M. Scott Smith:

... des siècles de jurisprudence et d'appliquer toute idée selon laquelle vous devriez enregistrer le droit d'auteur. Il y a un avantage à le faire, mais non, je ne crois pas que vous ayez besoin d'enregistrer le droit d'auteur pour le faire appliquer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Je vais maintenant passer à M. Fewer, pour quelques minutes.

Vous avez parlé de mesures de protection technologiques, qui est un point intéressant. Avons-nous déjà défini exactement la limite d'un verrou numérique?

M. David Fewer:

Je m'excuse. Qu'est-ce qu'un...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle est la limite d'un verrou numérique? Si j'ai devant moi un iPad et que je dois le déverrouiller pour l'utiliser, tout ce qui s'y trouve, techniquement, est verrouillé numériquement. Quelle est la limite de ce qui est verrouillé numériquement et de ce qui ne l'est pas?

M. David Fewer:

Nous avons reçu quelques interprétations judiciaires des dispositions, dont une était absolument horrible; dans ce cas, un tribunal de première instance, heureusement, a dit que le fait d'obtenir purement du contenu qui se trouve derrière un verrou d'accès payant pour un tiers — disons que Jean est un abonné et que je lui demande de m'envoyer une copie d'un article à mon sujet — est un contournement d'un verrou numérique.

Nous dirions que, évidemment, ce n'est pas le cas. Pour assumer une responsabilité à l'égard des dispositions sur le contournement, vous devez les contrer et vous attaquer à la technologie pour accéder au contenu. C'était évidemment l'intention.

On pourrait peut-être clarifier la législation en ce sens. Nous proposerions aussi d'examiner toutes les exceptions qui sont permises en vertu de l'accord commercial et de dire quelles sont les interprétations qui nous sont accessibles et comment nous pouvons formuler ces interprétations d'une façon qui permette de protéger l'innovation et les créateurs canadiens qui doivent accéder à ce contenu afin de créer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a quelques jours, nous avons reçu des témoins qui représentaient les personnes aveugles. Ils ont fait savoir que, même si les règles de contournement des mesures techniques de protection, ou MTP, leur permettent de les contourner aux fins de l'accessibilité, le fait que les MTP existent fait en sorte qu'il s'agit d'une impossibilité pratique. Avez-vous des commentaires à ce sujet?

M. David Fewer:

Oui, je vais vous en faire part.

J'ai mis cartes sur table. J'ai des préoccupations constitutionnelles par rapport aux dispositions anti-contournement. Cela fait 25 ans que j'écris des choses à ce sujet. Le droit d'auteur est lié à l'expression. C'est enchâssé dans la loi. Vous n'obtenez pas de droit d'auteur par rapport à des idées. Vous obtenez un droit d'auteur relativement à l'expression. Évidemment, l'expression est aussi le domaine de la liberté d'expression, l'alinéa 2b) de la Charte. Tout type de limitation en ce qui a trait à l'accès à ce contenu, à l'accès à l'expression, doit être manifestement justifiable dans une société libre et démocratique.

Le fait que les versions actuelles des lois anti-contournement satisfont à ce critère me dépasse. Je crois que, dans le cas approprié, peut-être le type de cas dont vous parlez, nous verrons un tribunal adopter mon point de vue de la constitutionnalité de ces dispositions, mais il nous faudra un certain temps avant d'y arriver. Je pense que le Comité a le loisir d'examiner ces dispositions et de voir ce que nous pouvons faire avant de forcer ces organisations à se rendre dans les tribunaux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Vous avez parlé des conséquences appropriées pour la mauvaise utilisation du régime d'avis et avis. Je crois que nous pourrions appeler cela « avis et avis et avis ». Quelles seraient ces conséquences, dans votre résumé? Qu'est-ce qui fonctionnerait en réalité?

M. David Fewer:

Aux États-Unis, nous avons vu avec le système d'avis et de retrait, qui était en quelque sorte le premier des systèmes de ce genre dans ce pays, que des conséquences, essentiellement des sanctions, sont prévues pour l'imprudence ou la mauvaise utilisation délibérée du système. Nous n'avons pas cela au Canada. Mon organisation a demandé que de telles conséquences soient prévues dans la législation, lorsqu'elle a été élaborée au départ, mais nous n'avons pas obtenu cela. Je crois que nous avons vu que cela pourrait aider, compte tenu de la façon dont le système a été mal utilisé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai 10 secondes environ.

Monsieur Lawford, voici une question très rapide pour vous.

Si une redevance sur les appareils — nous en avons beaucoup parlé — devait être proposée, cela ne légitimerait-il pas le piratage? Si nous facturons à une personne des frais pour le piratage de son appareil, cela ne signifie-t-il pas que toutes vos activités antipiratage devront alors cesser, parce que nous aurons maintenant légitimé les actions de piratage?

M. John Lawford:

Je pense que, si vous êtes un consommateur raisonnable, vous pourriez parvenir à cette conclusion raisonnable, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Passons maintenant à M. Lloyd.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci.

Je crois que je vais m'en prendre à vous, monsieur Fewer, parce que c'est ce que tout le monde semble faire aujourd'hui.

Vous avez signalé dans votre témoignage que, si le marché fonctionne correctement, il ne devrait pas y avoir de problème de piratage. Je me demandais si vous pourriez illustrer à quoi ressemblerait ce marché sain. Il semble que le contenu devrait être gratuit pour que les gens ne le piratent pas. À quoi ressemble un marché sain quand ce n'est pas gratuit, à votre avis?

(1630)

M. David Fewer:

Nous vivons dans une société libre et démocratique, et il y aura donc toujours un peu d'illégalité en arrière-plan. Le Code criminel existe toujours, même si nous vivons dans une société libre et démocratique. C'est la même chose avec le droit d'auteur. Les violations du droit d'auteur se produiront toujours, à moins que nous ne changions les lois de façon si draconienne que...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Comment changeons-nous le marché pour pouvoir nous adapter davantage?

M. David Fewer:

D'abord, vous devez avoir les structures en place qui encouragent la mise en place des plateformes, qui encouragent la création de contenu pour qu'il se retrouve sur ces plateformes, pour qu'il y ait lieu de croire que, si vous allez en ce sens, si vous offrez des services numériques novateurs, vous pourrez en tirer un rendement. Je crois que c'est toujours utile d'examiner ce qui se passe en réalité dans l'industrie du contenu. Fait-elle de l'argent ou est-ce une industrie où les gens font faillite et dans laquelle personne n'investit, où personne n'investit sur le marché boursier parce qu'il obtient un rendement inférieur à la moyenne et qu'il est incapable de réaliser un profit?

Je crois qu'il est juste de dire que ce n'est pas le cas. L'industrie du contenu est profitable. Elle ne souffre pas de faibles rendements. Quel est son rendement du capital investi? Il semble encore attirant. Bell demeure une société fondamentale dans nombre de plateformes très conservatrices. C'est une bonne chose à examiner. Quand l'industrie du contenu dit qu'elle ne peut faire d'argent, est-ce vrai?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Vous avez dit que vous ne croyez pas que l'utilisation équitable devrait être exhaustive: elle devrait servir d'illustration. Je me demandais si vous pourriez décortiquer cette idée un peu plus.

M. David Fewer:

Selon la façon dont l'utilisation équitable est structurée, avant même qu'on fasse une analyse pour savoir si une utilisation est équitable, elle doit viser un des objectifs énumérés dans la loi. J'aurais dit que c'était un réel problème il y a 20 ans, quand les tribunaux interprétaient de façon restrictive des exceptions comme étant essentiellement des dérogations.

Cette approche a été entièrement repensée. Nous comprenons maintenant que les exceptions visent un objectif. Elles sont là pour satisfaire à un objectif stratégique du législateur. Elles sont de nature corrective, et on devrait leur accorder l'interprétation généreuse que la législation corrective mérite. C'est l'approche que la cour a adoptée. Cela a beaucoup contribué à englober une quantité d'utilisations utiles, novatrices et créatives qui n'auraient pas été couvertes dans le passé en raison de la peur de la violation.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je comprends, merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à M. Smith. En votre qualité, pouvez-vous nous donner des recommandations d'autres pays quant à la façon dont ils ont abordé les enjeux que vous avez soulevés aujourd'hui? Auriez-vous des recommandations par rapport à ce que vous avez vu à l'étranger; qu'est-ce qui est efficace pour protéger les parties intéressées?

M. Scott Smith:

J'en parle dans mon témoignage, donc vous pouvez aller examiner ce rapport particulier. Je crois que l'Union européenne et l'Australie sont deux bons exemples d'une certaine réussite relativement à l'approche de blocage de sites et de désindexation.

Je ne voudrais pas émettre l'idée que nous n'avons besoin que d'un outil dans notre coffre. Je crois qu'il y a plusieurs approches à examiner. Le fait d'avoir le plus d'outils possible pour gérer le problème est ce qui va permettre de régler ce problème.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Une des autres recommandations, c'était d'ouvrir le CRTC pour qu'un plus grand nombre de gens puissent participer. Que pensez-vous de l'ouverture du CRTC? Croyez-vous que cela serait nuisible ou utile au processus?

Monsieur Wilson, vous pouvez aussi intervenir à ce sujet si vous le voulez.

M. Scott Smith:

Par rapport à l'approche que nous avons adoptée... le mémoire de Franc-Jeu demandait au CRTC d'être un arbitre du contenu en ligne. Cette proposition a été rejetée et a été renvoyée à la présente tribune.

Nous proposons maintenant une autorité compétente. Évidemment, ce sont les tribunaux.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Puis-je obtenir quelques éclaircissements? Parlez-vous d'ouvrir le processus de la Commission du droit d'auteur?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui, je parle de l'ouvrir à un plus grand nombre de plaideurs et de groupes comme des groupes défendant l'intérêt public.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Je crois que la difficulté, c'est que la Commission du droit d'auteur a été conçue pour remplacer les négociations relatives au marché. Vous avez un monopole. Vous ne pouvez pas avoir de négociation sur le marché, donc vous réunissez l'acheteur et le vendeur au moment d'établir un prix réglementé. Il n'y avait pas vraiment de place pour des intervenants qui représentent l'intérêt public dans ce qui était réellement une transaction entre un acheteur et un vendeur, parce que la Commission n'était pas censée formuler des politiques. C'était juste un tribunal chargé de fixer des taux économiques.

Je crois que nous avons vu que la Commission formule maintenant des politiques. C'est le tribunal de première instance pour beaucoup de questions importantes touchant le droit d'auteur.

En fait, je suis d'accord avec David. Je crois qu'un éventail élargi de groupes pourraient avoir le rôle de fournir plus de commentaires sur des questions de politiques publiques. Je ne crois pas que vous vouliez nécessairement des groupes qui interviennent dans chaque mécanisme de fixation des prix — pour ce qui est de savoir si le prix par pied carré de musique de fond est juste ou injuste — mais quand la Commission interprète la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour la première fois, il est utile d'avoir d'autres perspectives.

(1635)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je comprends, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Jowhari, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins. Je suis heureux de voir certains d'entre vous qui reviennent, et bienvenue aux autres.

Je vais commencer par M. Smith. Dans votre témoignage, vous avez parlé d'outils de blocage de sites de piratage accessibles qui pourraient régler le cas de certains de ces sites à l'étranger. Vous avez parlé d'approches multiples.

Pourriez-vous nous faire part d'une de ces principales approches qui sont utilisées pour gérer efficacement le piratage au moyen du blocage de sites?

M. Scott Smith:

Parlez-vous d'une approche à l'égard du blocage de sites qui fonctionne? L'Australie est un bon exemple.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Quel est l'outil, précisément?

M. Scott Smith:

Essentiellement, quand une ordonnance est transmise à un FSI pour qu'il bloque un site utilisant ses systèmes...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Cette ordonnance est-elle prévue dans la législation? Quel est le critère pour que le FSI...

M. Scott Smith:

C'est une ordonnance.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Est-ce une ordonnance prévue par la législation?

M. Scott Smith:

Je crois que c'est une injonction des tribunaux.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Quelqu'un dépose la plainte au tribunal. Le tribunal impose une injonction au FSI, et celui-ci le bloque.

M. Scott Smith:

Le FSI l'exécute.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Permettez-moi de m'adresser à M. Lawford. Que pensez-vous de cela? Je crois comprendre que vous vous opposez au blocage de sites.

M. John Lawford:

C'est exact.

Vous pourriez faire ce que vous proposez à la Cour fédérale. Vous pourriez obtenir une ordonnance de blocage de sites. Je crois que la raison pour laquelle cela a été amené au CRTC, c'est qu'on avait cette idée que si le CRTC le faisait, il pourrait émettre une ordonnance pour bloquer tous les FSI, peu importe si ce FSI venait demander à les bloquer ou non. Au Canada, si Bell vient demander de bloquer des sites, vous pouvez être assuré que TekSavvy ne voudra pas venir bloquer des sites.

Voulons-nous ce régime d'application générale — qui est, je crois, ce qui est proposé, même si je ne suis pas bien sûr de savoir ce que les gens disent aujourd'hui — ou voulons-nous porter cela devant les tribunaux? Généralement, dans les tribunaux, vous ne pouvez obtenir ce type d'ordonnance qui s'applique à l'échelle de l'industrie. Je crois que, ce qui se passe avec cette version administrative, c'est qu'on veut ratisser large. C'est ma théorie.

Vous pourriez le faire. C'est fait dans d'autres pays où on a une ordonnance de blocage. Je sais qu'on a essayé de l'instituer au Royaume-Uni, et les gens s'en sont abstenus. Maintenant, ils utilisent juste la loi sur le droit d'auteur.

M. Majid Jowhari:

En général, combien de temps faut-il pour obtenir une ordonnance de blocage?

M. John Lawford:

Je ne sais pas exactement combien de temps il faut pour obtenir une ordonnance de blocage. J'ai vu quelques cas où Bell Canada en a obtenu au Canada. Je crois qu'un des témoins a dit qu'il avait fallu deux ans dans un cas. Je crois que ce serait parmi les cas les plus longs.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Monsieur Lawford, dans votre témoignage, vous avez laissé entendre que le piratage est stimulé par le pouvoir du marché de la radiodiffusion. Pourriez-vous expliquer davantage ce point?

M. John Lawford:

Bien sûr. La théorie, c'est que si le contenu sur les plateformes traditionnelles coûte assez cher, parce que les entreprises sont intégrées verticalement et qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup de compétition, les Canadiens sont juste fatigués, bien franchement, de payer autant. C'est plus tentant de couper certains de vos coûts en faisant du piratage ici et là. Je crois que certains Canadiens font partie de ce groupe. Ils paient des prix qui sont probablement attribuables au pouvoir du marché dans ce secteur et qui sont peut-être trop élevés, et c'est leur vote de protestation, si vous voulez.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Je trouve intéressant que vous ayez parlé d'intégration verticale. Un certain nombre de nos FSI sont intégrés verticalement, donc laissez-vous entendre ou est-ce que je dois comprendre que, en raison de leur intégration verticale, ils ont beaucoup plus de souplesse pour facturer des frais supplémentaires?

M. John Lawford:

Oui, je crois que c'est juste.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D'accord.

Voici ma dernière question. Je reviens à vous, monsieur Lawford: vous avez dit que tout indique que le piratage en ligne est très faible et qu'il diminue. Pouvez-vous présenter ces preuves au Comité? Je crois que M. Smith disait que c'est un grand problème et qu'il augmente.

M. John Lawford:

Absolument, et c'est probablement plus facile pour moi de les soumettre au Comité plus tard.

(1640)

M. Majid Jowhari:

Oui, j'aimerais bien que M. Smith et M. Lawford puissent soumettre ces preuves, si vous voulez faire d'autres commentaires.

M. John Lawford:

Bien sûr. Mes renseignements proviennent de notre mémoire de Franc-Jeu présenté au CRTC. Nous avons parcouru l'étude de la firme MUSO et y avons découvert certaines hypothèses. L'étude de cette firme est fondée sur des visites de sites, et cela pourrait ne pas refléter les téléchargements réels. Les visites de sites sont nombreuses, mais vous ne passez peut-être pas assez de temps sur ces sites pour télécharger quelque chose, donc c'est une approximation. C'est une faiblesse.

On voit la même chose avec le rapport de l'entreprise Sandvine. On y retrouve certaines faiblesses, et de plus, Sandvine a intérêt à faire de l'argent, bien sûr. Si vous adoptez une loi semblable à ce qui est proposé, elle va vendre du matériel de blocage.

J'aimerais le soumettre au Comité. Ces arguments étaient assez techniques et ils étaient au CRTC...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci.

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

De retour à vous, monsieur Albas. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Lawford, juste pour confirmer, à la page 3 du mémoire que vous ou votre organisation avez soumis au Comité, il est indiqué que le PIAC est « préoccupé quant à l'abordabilité du contenu canadien ». Plus précisément, le PIAC croit que le Canada devrait — et c'est votre première recommandation — « demander au Fonds des médias du Canada d’acquérir des « droits de second écran » pour le contenu canadien de premier plan afin que tous puissent y accéder gratuitement sur un autre appareil ».

M. John Lawford:

C'est exact.

M. Dan Albas:

Ce n'était peut-être pas en tête des préoccupations auparavant, donc pourriez-vous expliquer un peu plus ce concept, particulièrement par rapport à cette recommandation?

M. John Lawford:

Bien sûr. Je me rappelle que c'était dans le mémoire écrit soumis en juin ou en juillet.

M. Dan Albas:

Oui.

M. John Lawford:

L'idée, en tant que titulaire du droit d'auteur, c'est qu'il s'agit de votre première chance de faire de l'argent avec votre contenu canadien, en le diffusant sur CTV ou quoi que ce soit d'autre, mais parce que c'est du contenu canadien et que c'est financé par le Fonds des médias du Canada, qui est vraiment une taxe indirecte imposée aux Canadiens pour ce qu'ils produisent du contenu canadien, il serait juste que ces Canadiens qui voulaient voir le contenu, en raison de sa valeur de cohésion nationale, puissent le voir même s'ils n'ont pas pu se permettre l'abonnement à une entreprise de distribution de radiodiffusion, ou EDR, par exemple.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci beaucoup. Je voulais juste l'entendre aux fins du compte rendu.

M. John Lawford:

Merci de poser la question.

M. Dan Albas:

J'aimerais m'adresser à la Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright.

Certains membres sont venus au Comité, et il y a eu récemment une manifestation sur la Colline par rapport à la façon dont certaines de ces technologies permettant la violation fonctionnent, les boîtiers Kodi. On nous a montré un boîtier qui était relié à des serveurs Web qui donnaient accès à du contenu protégé par des droits d'auteur. De toute évidence, c'est du vol organisé, et c'est un problème que nous devons examiner.

J'aimerais connaître votre opinion sur ce qui constitue un échec du marché ou un échec juridique ou gouvernemental, particulièrement par rapport à ce que M. Fewer a dit. La quantité considérable de contenu qu'on nous a montré était présenté dans un grand nombre de langues de partout dans le monde, et une bonne partie de ce contenu est légalement inaccessible au Canada. Dans son mémoire, le Centre pour la défense de l'intérêt public a fait allusion à l'élargissement de la définition du piratage pour qu'elle englobe l'accessibilité et le contenu en langue étrangère.

Le contenu qui n'est pas accessible légalement devrait-il être considéré comme du contenu piraté? Évidemment, pour de nombreux clients qui veulent avoir accès à ces stations dans la langue de leur choix, c'est leur seule option. Pouvez-vous nous donner l'opinion de votre groupe à ce sujet?

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Bien sûr, et je crois que la première réponse, c'est qu'il n'y a pas de titulaire de permis canadien pour le contenu, puis il n'y a pas de plaignants canadiens pour intenter une action en contrefaçon. Si des émissions sont produites dans un tiers pays, elles sont admissibles à une protection du droit d'auteur au Canada, et le titulaire du droit d'auteur peut toujours intenter une action dans des tribunaux canadiens pour des violations canadiennes, mais si personne au Canada n'a donné de permis pour les droits de ces émissions, cela ne va pas déboucher sur des procédures d'infraction, de toute façon.

Ce dont nous parlons, c'est...

M. Dan Albas:

C'est un peu une zone grise. Parlez-vous de la situation où une personne pirate du contenu, comme les derniers épisodes de Game of Thrones, à l'aide d'un boîtier Kodi, et ne paie en fait rien pour recevoir ce service par des moyens légaux?

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

C'est exact.

Le problème, c'est que ces boîtiers sont très perfectionnés, donc de nombreux clients verront une interface qui a l'air très professionnel. On dirait le menu d'un service légitime, et ils vont entrer les renseignements de leur carte de crédit. Ils peuvent être induits en erreur et penser qu'ils s'abonnent en réalité à un service légitime. Ces choses sont promues comme des programmes gratuits, même s'ils ne le sont pas, parce que vous devez tout de même payer pour le boîtier et le service.

C'est juste quand les droits canadiens sont violés, et que les créateurs et les titulaires de permis canadiens sont privés de cette activité économique, que des poursuites judiciaires canadiennes seraient intentées.

M. Dan Albas:

J'aimerais revenir à ce que M. Fewer a dit plus tôt, soit que la meilleure défense contre le piratage est un environnement concurrentiel où les consommateurs peuvent faire cela à un coût raisonnable. Je n'ai pas très bien paraphrasé ce que vous avez dit, monsieur.

Si vous allez aux États-Unis, vous pouvez obtenir le service de diffusion en continu de HBO pour 20 $ américains — non, 15 $ américains. Bell vient juste d'annoncer récemment que vous pouvez l'obtenir par l'intermédiaire de son produit CraveTV, mais vous devez obtenir l'ajout, donc il en coûte 20 $ canadiens. Même dans ce cas, vous ne pouvez utiliser qu'un format de basse définition, contrairement à ce qui est offert aux États-Unis.

Comment les consommateurs canadiens prennent-ils cela? Selon ce que je comprends, Game of Thrones est une des émissions les plus piratées qui soient. Croyez-vous que c'est un autre exemple d'échec du marché? Ne permettez-vous pas une avenue appropriée au Canada pour que les consommateurs paient pour leur contenu?

(1645)

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Je me garderais bien de définir un marché qui comprend des sources non autorisées et illégales comme composantes, parce que vous déformez...

M. Dan Albas:

Non, ce que je dis, monsieur, c'est que si la seule façon, pour une personne qui a payé 3 000 $ pour une télévision haute définition, d'obtenir Game of Thrones en haute définition est d'utiliser du contenu illégal, ou un boîtier Kodi ou quoi que ce soit d'autre, pouvez-vous voir pourquoi certaines personnes diront: « Eh bien, si on ne me donne pas ici une option légale, au Canada, je vais continuer de le faire jusqu'à ce qu'on me donne cette option »?

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec la prémisse, parce que Game of Thrones est disponible au Canada auprès d'un titulaire de permis canadien.

Tout le marché du contenu, que ce soit du contenu canadien ou du contenu étranger, est...

M. Dan Albas:

Vous pouvez l'obtenir si vous passez par le service de câble complet, ou Dien sait quoi, et Bell a récemment lancé une offre où vous pouvez l'obtenir sur son service de diffusion en continu par l'intermédiaire de CraveTV, mais encore une fois, à un coût supplémentaire, et, je le répète, à une définition plus basse que ce qui est offert dans la plupart des lieux.

Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire?

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Je crois. Pourriez-vous reformuler la question?

M. Dan Albas:

La question est la suivante: encourageons-nous, en n'ayant pas... s'agit-il d'un échec du marché, que nous soyons... car nous encourageons les gens à aller chercher le contenu qu'ils veulent dans le format qu'ils veulent, mais ce n'est pas disponible à moins qu'ils demandent ces autres services.

M. Gerald Kerr-Wilson:

Je crois que les joueurs qui exercent leurs activités dans un marché légitime, sans solutions de rechange non autorisées et illégales ni compétiteurs, devront répondre à la demande des consommateurs. Tous les titulaires de permis devront répondre à la demande des consommateurs, sinon ils risquent de ne pas obtenir de rendement. Si vous ne pouvez pas vendre assez d'abonnements ou abonner assez de personnes, vous n'obtiendrez pas de rendement, et vous devrez revoir vos stratégies de marketing, mais si chaque produit et chaque service est commercialisé en fonction de ce mécanisme d'offre et de demande, quelle est la solution de rechange?

Vous ne limitez pas artificiellement un système de tarification parce qu'il y a des solutions de rechange non autorisées ou illégales sur le marché. C'est une déformation.

M. Dan Albas:

Je crois que l'industrie de la musique a certainement... Si vous regardez le piratage, ce n'est plus un problème, car elle a facilement...

Le président:

Nous allons poursuivre.

M. Dan Albas:

C'était une série de questions de sept minutes.

Le président:

Nous avons vraiment dépassé le temps alloué. Étonnant comme le temps passe.

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez environ cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

J'apprécie les témoignages et je suis ravi d'arriver à la fin parce que nous avons l'occasion de discuter de choses que nous n'avons peut-être pas abordées.

La première question sera pour la Chambre de commerce. Je viens de Sault Ste. Marie, et nous avons une très grande chambre de commerce, avec une diversité de membres et de médias culturels de toutes sortes. Nous avons les acteurs dans le domaine des technologies de l'information, et il y a toujours une bonne discussion sur le droit d'auteur. L'une des discussions — et le sujet s'est retrouvé devant le Comité ainsi que devant le Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien — a trait à l'indemnisation de ceux qui évoluent dans le commerce culturel au sein de notre collectivité. Plus précisément, je pense aux oeuvres d'art visuel et aux droits de suite qui permettraient aux créateurs de recevoir un pourcentage des ventes ultérieures de leurs oeuvres.

Avez-vous des commentaires ou un point de vue à ce sujet? Supposons qu'un peintre vend un tableau une fois, puis le tableau est revendu, mais l'artiste d'origine ne reçoit aucune indemnisation. Dans d'autres industries culturelles, il reçoit une sorte de redevance ou d'indemnisation. Avez-vous étudié cet aspect?

M. Scott Smith:

Nous n'avons pas beaucoup de membres dans le domaine des arts visuels. Il est donc difficile pour moi de faire un commentaire à ce sujet, sauf en cas de modalités contractuelles lorsque l'artiste vend le tableau, par exemple des copies de cette peinture... le droit d'auteur devrait suivre l'oeuvre. Si des copies sont faites ultérieurement, oui, il devrait y avoir une sorte de redevance pour cela.

(1650)

M. Terry Sheehan:

D'autres points ont été évoqués, comme un droit réversif qui restituerait le droit d'auteur à l'artiste à l'expiration d'une période donnée, indépendamment de toute clause contraire d'un contrat. Ensuite, bien sûr, il y a un droit de rémunération à l'intention des journalistes pour l'utilisation de leurs textes sur des plateformes numériques telles que les regroupeurs de nouvelles. Alors, messieurs, vous êtes-vous penchés sur l'une de ces modifications du droit d'auteur qui pourraient indemniser ces créateurs?

M. Scott Smith:

Rémunérer les journalistes pour...?

M. Terry Sheehan:

C'est une possibilité qui est ressortie au cours de quelques témoignages. Nous l'avons entendu à Vancouver. Nous l'avons entendu à différents endroits. Il s'agit d'un droit de rémunération à l'intention des journalistes pour l'utilisation de leurs textes sur des plateformes numériques, comme les regroupeurs de nouvelles. Êtes-vous au courant de cela?

M. Scott Smith:

Nous n'avons pas du tout examiné cet aspect.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Mais dans l'ensemble, de façon générale, j'essaie de comprendre comment vous voyez les choses. Comment trouver un équilibre entre le programme d'innovation du Canada, qui encourage les gens à explorer et à utiliser de nouvelles technologies sur le marché, et les gens — et nous avons entendu les commentaires de part et d'autre — du milieu culturel qui veulent voir une indemnisation juste et équitable? Avez-vous des suggestions sur la manière de gérer cet équilibre, qu'il s'agisse d'une loi sur le droit d'auteur ou de quelque chose en dehors du régime du droit d'auteur?

M. Scott Smith:

Je pense qu'une grande partie de cet équilibre existe déjà dans le droit d'auteur. Je sais que la dernière série de questions a abordé un certain nombre de préoccupations auxquelles vous faites référence. Pour ce qui est de restituer le droit d'auteur à l'artiste et de la capacité de faire valoir ses droits contre toute violation, cela a beaucoup plus à voir avec les relations entre les entreprises et les consommateurs qu'avec les chercheurs. L'utilisation équitable au Canada est assez robuste quant à la possibilité pour les chercheurs d'accéder au matériel dont ils ont besoin.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Monsieur Fewer, vous en avez parlé pendant votre témoignage. Vous avez estimé que le fait de soumettre des verrous numériques au régime d'utilisation équitable constituerait un équilibre suffisant entre droits et droits d'utilisation. Pourriez-vous nous en parler?

M. David Fewer:

Ce serait un équilibre suffisant. En regardant les dispositions anticontournement elles-mêmes, je pense que c'est utile. Est-ce suffisant? Probablement pas.

Si vous regardez la législation, il y a de nombreuses exemptions pour les bibliothèques, les archives et les musées. Ce sont des institutions. Ce ne sont pas des sites de piratage. Ce sont des organisations qui fonctionnent dans l'intérêt public, par définition, et elles reposent sur l'équité; toutefois, la loi contient également d'autres exemptions qui leur permettent de régler leurs problèmes particuliers.

Pourquoi ces éléments devraient-ils être supprimés dans le contexte numérique, simplement parce que le contenu est distribué sur un DVD avec un codage régional?

M. Terry Sheehan:

En ce qui concerne certaines des remarques formulées précédemment au sujet du piratage, la plupart d'entre nous autour de la table se souviennent de l'époque où Napster et BearShare étaient présents. Il y avait beaucoup de piratage. Avec les nouvelles plateformes disponibles, que ce soit Spotify ou Netflix, avons-nous constaté une baisse du piratage à la suite de ces nouvelles plateformes?

M. David Fewer:

La protection des renseignements personnels et le piratage, je dirais les deux. Cette question m'était-elle adressée?

Je vais répondre rapidement en évoquant les observations de John qu'il a promis de transmettre au Comité concernant le dossier de FrancJeu. Oui, c'est logique. Fournissez aux consommateurs des services utiles et abordables qui leur donnent le contenu qu'ils souhaitent, et ils en paieront le coût. C'est le simple bon sens.

M. John Lawford:

Les éléments de preuve dont nous disposons ne permettent pas de conclure que nous faisons partie de cette catégorie principale de contrevenants et que les Canadiens y ont recours dans la mesure alléguée, que ce soit dans les rapports ou par la coalition, quelle que soit la coalition. C'est la première chose dont le Comité doit tenir compte. Quelle est vraiment la preuve tangible? C'est difficile à obtenir.

Honnêtement, en réalité, bien sûr, certaines personnes s'adonneront toujours au piratage. L'objectif consiste à faire en sorte qu'il reste un bruit de fond très discret.

(1655)

Le président:

Vous avez largement dépassé votre temps. Merci.

Monsieur Masse, le dernier tour est à vous.

M. Brian Masse:

Je sais que nous avons parlé du piratage. Cela me rappelle les 10 années que j'ai passées à essayer d'obtenir des paris sur une seule épreuve sportive dans notre pays. Sur mon téléphone, je peux faire un pari sur un jeu légal, ici même. Cependant, les pratiques de notre gouvernement ici prévoient tous les obstacles nécessaires pour le maintenir en tant qu'activité liée au crime organisé. Essentiellement, en ce qui concerne la technologie que nous avons et qui existe... nous devons chercher à combler les lacunes.

Je n'ai pas vraiment de question au bout du compte; je voulais seulement prouver un point, cependant. Lorsque nous examinons ces questions, nous devons au moins commencer à regarder ce qui se passe réellement. Mis à part le fait que nous semblons toujours être un cas isolé, le gouvernement n'a presque aucune importance dans ce débat, et le crime organisé et d'autres en bénéficient.

Je dirais que c'est la même chose quand on pense au piratage et à d'autres types d'activités. Il y a une sorte d'équilibre quelque part là-dedans, mais la technologie a changé, et cela nous oblige à faire quelque chose de différent d'avant.

De toute façon, je vais en rester là.

Le président:

D'accord.

C'est là-dessus que se termine notre séance. J'aimerais remercier nos témoins de nous avoir donné beaucoup de matière à réflexion pendant que nous poursuivons notre étude.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour une minute. Vous pourrez dire bonjour, et nous reviendrons ensuite à ce que nous faisions.

(1655)

(1655)

Le président:

À la dernière séance, nous étions prêts à poursuivre le débat sur cette motion. Malheureusement, nous avons été bloqués par les votes, alors voici où nous en sommes aujourd'hui.

(1700)

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord. Merci, monsieur le président. Maintenant que le document a été reçu, je suis sûr que le greffier le jugera conforme, de sorte que nous puissions en débattre. Que le Comité permanent de l’industrie, des sciences et de la technologie se penche sur le projet de Statistique Canada de recueillir « des renseignements personnels financiers » pour établir un « nouveau fichier de renseignements personnels organisationnel »; qu’il sollicite à cette fin les témoignages de fonctionnaires de Statistique Canada, du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et de représentants de l’Association des banquiers canadiens, entre autres; qu’il fasse rapport de ses conclusions à la Chambre des communes; et que le gouvernement soit tenu de répondre au rapport.

J'en fais la proposition.

Le président:

Allez-y, David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne m'oppose pas vraiment à la motion, ce qui pourrait vous étonner, mais j'aimerais proposer un amendement, si je peux me permettre.

Je ne connais pas la bonne façon... Si je voulais supprimer deux articles distincts, quel est le meilleur moyen de proposer cet amendement?

Le président:

Désolé, pouvez-vous répéter cela?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si je voulais supprimer deux articles distincts, quel est le meilleur moyen de le proposer? Pour le relire, changer les mots après cela ou pour dire que je suis...

Le président:

Pourquoi ne la lisez-vous pas en premier, puis nous verrons à quel point c'est compliqué?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est moi, alors c'est compliqué. Croyez-moi.

Dans ce cas, je lirai la motion, comme je la modifierais, alors vous n'avez qu'à suivre. Je peux la relire lentement, si je dois le faire: Que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie sollicite le témoignage du statisticien en chef de Statistique Canada pour discuter du projet pilote sur les données financières pendant une heure et que la séance soit télévisée.

Comment devrais-je la présenter sous une forme utilisable?

Le président:

Attendez un instant, je veux juste que mon greffier revienne ici.

Aviez-vous une question?

M. Brian Masse:

Cela ressemble à un changement de fond majeur. Nous avons donc besoin d'une décision à ce sujet.

Le président:

Tout d'abord, en ce qui concerne l'amendement, je ne sais pas si c'est exactement ce que vous voulez dire. C'est donc un débat en ce moment sur l'amendement éventuel.

À ce stade, il m'est difficile de trancher, car je ne sais pas ce qu'on dit de votre côté par rapport à ce qu'ils disent.

M. Brian Masse:

On demande d'accorder une heure... Quoi qu'il en soit, c'est à vous de décider, mais on demandait une heure de témoignage, et c'est tout. Je demanderais simplement s'il s'agit d'un amendement de fond ou non. Je dirais qu'il s'agit d'un amendement de fond, personnellement, ce qui permet de déterminer si c'est recevable ou non.

Le président:

Nous avons ici la motion initiale, soit de nous pencher sur le projet de Statistique Canada de recueillir des renseignements personnels financiers pour établir un nouveau fichier de renseignements personnels organisationnel et de solliciter à cette fin les témoignages de fonctionnaires de Statistique Canada. Vous avez également le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et des représentants de l'Association des banquiers canadiens, entre autres.

Pour le moment, je ne vois pas cela comme un amendement de fond, car il invite un seul témoin au lieu de quelques autres, jusqu'à présent. C'est comme ça que je le vois maintenant.

Vous êtes le suivant, monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

J'invoque le Règlement. D'abord, quel est l'amendement?

Le greffier du comité (M. Michel Marcotte):

Je vais essayer de l'expliquer tel que je le vois.

Nous conservons la première ligne, « Que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie ». Nous arrêtons à « se penche ». nous passons environ trois lignes et nous gardons « sollicite le témoignage du statisticien en chef de Statistique Canada ». La fin est différente. La fin serait ainsi rédigée: « pour discuter du projet pilote sur les données financières ».

Essentiellement, on supprime le titre du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et tous les autres témoins, mais le début, le milieu et l'idée sont conservés.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Monsieur le président, veuillez s'il vous plaît lire l'amendement dans son intégralité pour que je comprenne bien. Je ne sais toujours pas quel est l'amendement.

Le président:

D'après ce que je peux voir, il est indiqué que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie sollicite le témoignage du statisticien en chef de Statistique Canada pour discuter du projet pilote sur les données financières pendant une heure et que la séance soit télévisée.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

À mon avis, il s'agit d'un changement complet apporté à la motion, puisque, selon son libellé original, elle oblige le Comité à mener une étude, ce qui a une signification très particulière au Parlement.

L'amendement remplacerait la notion d'étudier — se penche — par une simple invitation et supprimerait complètement le concept d'étude de la motion. À moins que je comprenne mal l'amendement, en remplaçant une étude par une invitation à comparaître, on change complètement de volet au chapitre des activités d'un comité.

C'est mon avis, si je comprends bien l'amendement.

(1705)

Le président:

D'accord, je vois beaucoup de mains levées.

Avant d'aborder le sujet, j'aimerais que l'on revienne à David.

Vous pouvez répondre, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La motion et l'amendement ont pour objectif d'inviter le statisticien en chef à témoigner pour les raisons que nous connaissons déjà, et ils semblent permettre l'atteinte de ce but. Nous devrions le faire venir ici. Ce serait possible de le faire venir aussi tôt que mercredi.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

J'invoque de nouveau le Règlement. Je suis respectueusement en désaccord, monsieur le président.

Une étude permet à un comité de produire un rapport et des recommandations qui peuvent être présentés à la Chambre des communes. Une motion qui ne comprend pas la notion d'étude et qui ne mentionne que l'invitation d'un témoin ne permettra pas au Comité, si je comprends bien, de publier un rapport comportant des recommandations à l'intention de la Chambre des communes.

Le président:

Donnez-moi un moment, s'il vous plaît.

M. Masse est le prochain sur la liste, mais j'aimerais maintenant parler du rappel au Règlement fait par Michael.

M. Dan Albas:

Je souhaiterais m'exprimer à ce même sujet.

Le président:

Cela ne changera rien pour le moment.

M. Dan Albas:

C'est au sujet de la motion et de la question de savoir si elle est recevable ou non. Je crois qu'il s'agit de la discussion que vous avez avec le greffier, et j'aimerais m'assurer de pouvoir être entendu sur ce sujet.

Le président:

D'accord, allez-y.

M. Dan Albas:

J'ai présenté cette motion la semaine dernière ou même avant. M. Chong a affirmé que la notion d'étude est importante, mais il n'y a eu aucune mention, pas même par le gouvernement, d'un projet pilote avant vendredi dernier. La motion précise donc ce sur quoi porteront les questions que nous poserions et indique également que nous souhaitons effectivement mener une étude, déposer un rapport et communiquer nos conclusions à la Chambre des communes, pour que le gouvernement y réagisse. Toutes ces notions ont été supprimées.

Par ailleurs, il ne s'agirait que d'une seule personne, et elle ne figurerait même pas dans la motion originale, soit le statisticien en chef. J'ai demandé qu'on invite des fonctionnaires de Statistique Canada, mais également le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, des représentants de l'Association des banquiers canadiens ainsi que d'autres témoins.

J'imagine que si un amendement avait été proposé pour supprimer un élément ou en ajouter un autre, cela serait acceptable. Mais de dire que ce comité n'invitera qu'un seul témoin et aura terminé en une heure, sans publier de rapport et sans recevoir de réponse de la part du gouvernement, constitue une modification importante selon moi, monsieur le président.

Je comprends que M. Graham souhaite faire certaines choses, mais il devrait alors proposer sa propre motion au lieu de vouloir apporter des changements importants à la structure de la motion actuellement débattue.

Le président:

Nous allons nous en tenir au rappel au Règlement.

Souhaitez-vous prendre la parole à ce sujet?

(1710)

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, rapidement. On ne fait pas mention du « statisticien en chef » dans la motion d'origine. Il est suggéré qu'une personne qui n'est même pas mentionnée dans la motion originale comparaisse, et j'estime que Michael a raison en ce qui concerne la notion d'étude et tout le reste. Quoi qu'il en soit, que la motion soit recevable ou non, nous avons eu beaucoup de temps pour l'examiner avant aujourd'hui. Elle figure dans la liasse depuis plus d'une semaine. On parle ici d'une heure complète avec quelqu'un qui ne figure même pas dans la motion originale. Je ne comprends même pas pourquoi on en parle.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre souhaite prendre la parole au sujet du rappel au Règlement qui a été fait?

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je veux m'assurer que cela concerne le rappel au Règlement. Il s'agissait de changements importants. Si nous examinons deux éléments différents, je crois que ce que l'on cherche à aborder c'est ce que fait Statistique Canada et, actuellement, il collabore avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, selon ce que j'ai entendu à la Chambre des communes, en ce qui a trait à la forme que prendra le projet pilote, lorsqu'il sera entamé, et ainsi de suite.

Je ne suis pas certain qu'une étude nous permette de le faire s'il s'agit de quelque chose qui est en cours. Je ne pense pas que nous soyons en position de faire une étude sur quelque chose qui ne nous a pas été renvoyé.

Le président:

D'accord.

Vu la motion et les éléments que vous avez présentés, c'est probablement un peu tiré par les cheveux. Je comprends que vous tentez de trouver un compromis, mais étant donné le défi que constitue le fait d'amender cette motion et de faire en sorte qu'elle fonctionne... cela ne semble pas fonctionner. À ce stade-ci, je ne pense pas être en mesure d'admettre votre amendement puisqu'il s'agit d'un changement important.

Michael.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Avez-vous terminé de parler du rappel au Règlement?

Le président:

Cela dit, je conclus que l'amendement est irrecevable. Merci.

C'est à vous.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais proposer un amendement à la motion faisant en sorte que les mots « les témoignages » soient suivis de l'expression « du statisticien en chef ».

Le président:

Le statisticien en chef n'y est pas mentionné. Vous souhaitez l'ajouter?

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Oui, je souhaite ajouter « du statisticien en chef pour faire en sorte que la première partie de cet amendement porte sur l'ajout de ces mots à la suite des termes les témoignages ». La deuxième partie consiste à ajouter, après la virgule, après le terme « Statistique Canada », « de l'ancienne commissaire à la protection de la vie privée de l'Ontario Ann Cavoukian ». La troisième partie de cet amendement ajouterait, avant les termes « du statisticien en chef », « du ministre Bains ». Cette partie se lirait alors comme suit: « qu'il sollicite à cette fin les témoignages du ministre Bains, du statisticien en chef, de fonctionnaires de Statistique Canada et de l'ancienne commissaire à la protection de la vie privée de l'Ontario Ann Cavoukian ».

Voilà mon amendement, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un souhaite discuter de l'amendement proposé?

M. Dan Albas:

J'aimerais simplement manifester mon appui à ce sujet parce que, si vous examinez cet amendement, parmi les autres témoins, il n'a fait qu'ajouter quelqu'un qui participe activement au projet. Je crois que vous voulez parler de Mme Cavoukian, de l'Université Ryerson. Est-ce exact? Elle s'est exprimée publiquement à ce sujet et cette question suscite beaucoup d'intérêt.

Je souhaite que tous les membres appuient cet amendement, non pas pour la simple raison qu'inviter le ministre s'inscrit dans notre rôle en matière de responsabilisation, mais également en raison des préoccupations du public sur lesquelles nous devrions nous pencher. Ce comité est en mesure de faire cela, et j'espère que tous les membres voteront en faveur de cet amendement. J'ai reçu un certain nombre d'appels téléphoniques et de courriels de personnes très préoccupées par ce projet.

(1715)

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre voudrait discuter de cet amendement?

Brian.

M. Brian Masse:

Je suis en faveur de la motion principale. Cet amendement est important, car il rend bien l'intention de ce qui a été fait plus tôt et qu'il est tout à fait logique.

L'ancien statisticien en chef et d'autres personnes liées au projet constitueraient d'autres témoins intéressants et il s'agit d'une bonne occasion pour nous de présenter quelque chose à la Chambre des communes.

Merci.

Le président:

D'accord.

Y a-t-il une autre intervention?

Le vote portera sur l'amendement en premier.

M. Dan Albas:

Je réclame un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

L'amendement est rejeté. Passons maintenant à la motion originale.

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il discuter de la motion originale?

M. Dan Albas:

Je souhaite juste encourager tous les membres à voter en faveur. Je suis certain qu'il y a beaucoup de personnes dans chacune de nos circonscriptions qui ont des préoccupations à ce sujet. Il s'agit pour nous d'exercer nos fonctions parlementaires.

C'est certainement dommage que nous n'invitions pas le ministre, car je sais, en raison de l'attention qu'il porte à ce sujet à la Chambre, qu'il s'agit de quelque chose dont il aimerait discuter. Cela dit, la liste des témoins que nous avons ici est toujours pertinente et fera comparaître un certain nombre de personnes qui doivent être entendues.

Le président:

Celina.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.)

À ce sujet, des conversations sont en cours avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et avec Statistique Canada, et je comprends totalement l'intérêt pour ce dossier en particulier de la part de tous nos électeurs. Cependant, pour ce qui est d'étudier une initiative en particulier qui est en cours, nous devrions laisser le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et Statistique Canada faire leur travail avant de passer à la prochaine étape.

Voilà qui résume ma position.

Le président:

Brian.

M. Brian Masse:

Nous renonçons à notre responsabilité si nous ne nous penchons pas sur la question. Si nous appliquons la même logique, nous devrons alors abandonner notre étude sur le droit d'auteur, puisque l'AEUMC a été signé, ce qui compromet notre étude de la question.

De plus, le ministre a apporté quelques changements à la Commission du droit d'auteur; il y a donc certains éléments qui viennent se mêler au processus que nous menons actuellement. La motion devant nous aujourd'hui constitue une approche raisonnable à adopter quant à certains des éléments qui ont été modifiés. Nous avons pu voir un projet de loi être adopté il y a trois ans, et il exigeait une nouvelle méthode pour la collecte des données. Il s'agit là d'une partie du débat qui a eu lieu par rapport à ce projet de loi, et on peut commencer à en sentir les effets actuellement, puisque ce qui avait été débattu sérieusement à l'époque, c'était le fait que Services partagés Canada allait effectuer une partie de la collecte des données et, dans le cadre de ce processus, utiliser des accords avec des tiers, y compris avec des banques, en raison des changements qui ont eu lieu à Statistique Canada.

Ce qui arrive actuellement, c'est que le processus amorcé par l'ancien gouvernement dans le but de délaisser le questionnaire détaillé de recensement, ce qui a entraîné une diminution du taux de réponse, ainsi que les changements apportés aux pratiques de collecte de données à l'ère numérique font en sorte qu'il faut mettre en place un meilleur processus de surveillance. Cette motion ne fait que mettre en lumière ces différents problèmes.

Deux options sont possibles. Il est possible de faire en sorte que les Canadiens soient plus au courant de la situation actuelle, et qu'il y ait des fonctionnaires de Statistique Canada et d'autres intervenants qui prennent la parole, ainsi que d'autres représentants du domaine de la protection de la vie privée qui peuvent démêler les changements adoptés.

Nous avons ici un projet de loi qui commence à peine à s'attaquer à certains éléments en évolution, lesquels ont secoué les Canadiens, et c'est l'essentiel. Il s'agit d'une question qui peut être examinée par ce comité.

Le Comité peut faire deux choses à ce moment-ci. Nous pouvons presque déclarer notre propre manque de pertinence. C'est à peu près ce que nous avons fait dans les derniers temps en rejetant des motions qui concernaient l'état de préparation aux situations d'urgence, le CRTC et d'autres éléments plutôt raisonnables. Cela n'a pas pris de temps. Il ne s'agissait pas de façons pour nous de définir ou de défaire le travail que nous accomplissons en matière de droit d'auteur.

Encore une fois, il s'agit d'une approche raisonnable afin d'obtenir des réponses. Je ne pense pas qu'il n'y ait de raison pour ne pas aller de l'avant.

(1720)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais revenir sur l'idée que je me suis faite du point soulevé par M. Graham. Il s'agit de tenter de comprendre en quoi consiste cette initiative, qu'on l'appelle projet pilote ou étude. C'est pourquoi je pense que si nous demandons au statisticien en chef de venir nous expliquer ce qui était à l'origine de l'initiative, nous serons alors en meilleure posture pour revenir à la motion présentée par M. Albas. Nous pourrions nous assurer, maintenant que nous saisissons la portée ou l'intention, d'avoir la possibilité de demander à entendre d'autres témoins et de décider du moment où on commence l'étude et du nombre de séances qu'elle devrait durer, etc.

En toute honnêteté, je ne veux pas rejeter cette possibilité, mais j'ai également besoin de m'assurer, en tant que député, que j'effectue le travail que je dois faire pour mes électeurs; je dois tenter de comprendre ce qui a poussé Statistique Canada à entreprendre cette initiative, qu'il s'agisse d'un projet pilote ou d'une idée lancée un vendredi après-midi. Quel est l'élément moteur de cette initiative? Une fois que nous obtiendrons la réponse à cette question, il sera plus logique que nous revenions à cette étude et déterminions son but. C'est tout ce que je souhaitais ajouter au compte rendu.

Le président:

Merci.

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter? Si ce n'est pas le cas, nous allons donc passer au vote.

Une voix: Sommes-nous à huis clos?

Le président: Non, la séance se déroule en public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce cas, j'aimerais intervenir un instant aux fins du compte rendu.

Le président:

Souhaitiez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, j'aimerais très rapidement donner avis de cette motion pendant que je suis ici.

Je vais le faire maintenant pour que ce soit réglé. Je vais le faire à l'oral.

Le président:

D'accord, vous pouvez y aller.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme je l'ai déjà remise et que je l'ai déjà lue, voulez-vous que je la lise une fois de plus?

Une voix: Non.

Le président:

Monsieur Albas.

M. Dan Albas:

Ne devrions-nous pas terminer de régler cette question avant de passer à un autre sujet, monsieur le président?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous en sommes aux travaux du Comité, nous pouvons la proposer maintenant. Si nous débattons seulement d'une motion précise, je devrai attendre deux jours de plus.

Le président:

La séance se déroule en public, et vous pouvez présenter un avis de motion. Je ne vous ai jamais empêché de présenter un avis de motion. Si vous souhaitez le faire, je vous suggère de le présenter rapidement pour que nous puissions passer au vote.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

J'invoque le Règlement. Il n'y a rien d'inconvenant à déposer un avis de motion, mais nous sommes encore saisis de la motion proposée par M. Albas, en dépit de l'avis de motion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, absolument. C'est vrai. Cela n'empêche aucunement la présentation d'un avis de motion. C'est simplement qu'une fois que nous aurons réglé cette question, nous pourrons aborder cet autre point.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous n'allez pas en discuter. Vous allez déposer un avis de motion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais présenter un avis de motion et, ensuite, nous pourrons en discuter la prochaine fois.

Le président:

Il veut déposer son avis de motion maintenant, et il a droit de le faire. Nous manquons de temps, alors poursuivons s'il vous plaît.

Lisez votre motion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Vous l'avez déjà entendue, je serai donc bref. Je vais présenter un avis de motion pour que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie invite le statisticien en chef de Statistique Canada à se présenter devant le Comité pour discuter durant une heure des données financières relatives au projet pilote, dans le cadre d'une séance télévisée.

C'est tout.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous simplement retirer les mots « projet pilote »? Je ne suis pas certain que ce soit un terme officiel.

(1725)

M. Majid Jowhari:

C'est ce que j'avais proposé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr, si cela peut faciliter les choses. Quel terme voulez-vous alors utiliser?

Le président:

Ce serait, « pour discuter des données financières »... exactement ce qu'il y a là.

Très bien, merci. L'avis a été reçu. Nous allons maintenant voter au sujet de la motion.

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

Je veux seulement ajouter quelque chose rapidement avant que nous poursuivions.

Mercredi, des excuses officielles seront présentées aux passagers du MS St. Louis à la Chambre. La séance du Comité n'est pas annulée. Nous allons quand même tenir notre séance et entendre nos témoins. Je veux simplement que vous sachiez où nous en sommes. Pour ce qui est des excuses présentées aux passagers du MS St. Louis, le premier ministre prononcera un discours. Je présume que tous les leaders en feront un, et que cela prendra environ 45 minutes, mais nous tiendrons tout de même une séance.

M. Dan Albas:

Tiendrons-nous la séance du Comité après la présentation des excuses?

Le président:

Non. La séance aura lieu durant la présentation des excuses. Nous ne reporterons pas la séance de notre comité, car nous devons entendre certains témoins ici et nous devons aborder des questions d'ordre administratif.

M. Brian Masse:

Nous n'avons pas la motion sous nos yeux, et je veux simplement faire une précision aux fins du compte rendu. Nous n'avons pas la motion devant nous, et elle n'est pas rédigée dans les deux langues officielles...

Le président:

Ce n'est pas ce dont nous étions en train de parler. Il l'a consignée au compte rendu, et elle sera traduite et que sais-je.

Je parle de la séance de mercredi.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord, je croyais que sa motion serait abordée lors de la séance de mercredi également. Je suis désolé.

Le président:

Non. La séance de mercredi aura lieu durant les excuses présentées aux passagers du MS St. Louis. Nous n'allons pas annuler la séance de notre comité.

Michael.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Monsieur le président, pourrions-nous savoir, par votre entremise, quand M. de Burgh Graham a l'intention de présenter sa motion?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À la prochaine occasion où il n'y aura pas d'interruption, si je puis dire. Je ne sais pas. Je ne crois pas que cela prendra beaucoup de temps.

Michael, faisons un essai.

Avons-nous un consentement unanime maintenant pour l'inviter à discuter durant une heure dès que possible?

Le président:

Étant donné que je suis le président...

Merci. Si nous obtenons un soutien unanime, nous pourrions lancer une invitation au statisticien en chef à se présenter devant le Comité durant la deuxième heure mercredi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La discussion durerait une heure et serait diffusée à la télévision.

Des députés: D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Ma motion est maintenant présentée, donc merci.

Le président:

Non, votre motion n'est pas présentée.

Ce que nous allons faire ce mercredi, une fois de plus... puisque les excuses seront présentées, nous ne serons pas interrompus. Nous entendrons nos premiers témoins durant une heure, et je vais prévoir du temps afin que nous ne prenions pas de retard, car je crois que nous voulons tous discuter durant une bonne heure avec le statisticien en chef. Si nous souhaitons prolonger la discussion, sachez que nous devons sortir d'ici au plus tard à 17 h 30, car une autre séance est prévue. Nous devrons respecter l'horaire.

Très bien, je suis heureux de constater que nous entretenons tous des rapports cordiaux et que nous travaillons de concert.

Merci. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 05, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.