header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-01 PROC 129

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1125)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome to the 129th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue to study the question of privilege related to the matter of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police publications respecting Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms.

We are pleased to be joined by the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. He is accompanied by officials from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, namely, Jennifer Strachan, Deputy Commissioner, Specialized Policing Services; and Rob O'Reilly, Director, Firearms Regulatory Services, Canadian Firearms Program.

Thank you all for coming today.

Just before we start, we have some short committee business from Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you so much, Chair.

I had an opportunity to talk to colleagues in both other caucuses and the government members. Mr. Bittle in particular was good enough to take the message the last time about asking the minister to come to talk about the new debate commission. My understanding is that Mr. Bittle has been successful in getting a message to the minister, and now back to us, that she is willing to meet with us at her earliest possibility.

Maybe, Chair, you could assume that there's unanimous support for us to organize that, and the clerk can work with the minister's office to arrange that at the earliest possible time. I thank both Mr. Nater and Mr. Bittle for letting us get past the issue of whether the minister should come or not—it's a side issue—and now we can focus on the substantive matters at hand. I thank Mr. Bittle for his efforts on his behalf.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

It's time for your opening statement, Mr. Goodale.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. Thank you for the opportunity to appear on this subject matter today, the question of privilege raised by Mr. Motz.

As you pointed out, Mr. Chair, I'm accompanied by Deputy Commissioner Strachan and Mr. Rob O'Reilly, Director of Firearms Regulatory Services within the Canadian Firearms Program.

I'm sorry our time is a bit constrained this morning because of the vote in the House, but the House is the House.

For me as Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, my key priority is ensuring the safety of all Canadians, and their confidence in the integrity of the government agencies that fall under my authority as minister. This includes the accurate use of departmental platforms to communicate information about all legislation, but in particular for the purposes of today, about Bill C-71. The subject matter is something that's important to me, Mr. Chair, because, as you will recall, in my previous roles, I have been a House leader in both the opposition and the government side, so procedure matters.

As outlined in the document entitled “Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector”, government agencies have a fundamental role in serving Canadians, their communities and the public interest under the direction of the elected government and in accordance with the law.

Government agencies are to operate with the knowledge that legislation comes from Parliament and no other authority in Canada. That being the case, it is essential that these organizations continue to accede to the legislative process. All government agencies, including the Canadian firearms program and the RCMP, are expected to demonstrate respect for Parliament's privileges and to act with integrity. Integrity alongside transparency and accountability are the cornerstones of good governance and democracy.

I would like to take this opportunity to reaffirm categorically that the Canadian firearms program and the RCMP fully respect the authority of Parliament and the legislative process.

The mission of the Canadian firearms program is to enhance public safety by reducing the risk of harm from the misuse of firearms. To support these objectives, the Canadian firearms program uses online bulletins and website updates to communicate any changes in requirements to stakeholders as well as the general public.

Web updates are posted to inform about topics such as changes to the firearms licensing regime, modifications to the transfer process, revisions to classifications, changes to requirements for business and much more. These online updates are important to increase awareness among legal firearms owners and to increase compliance with the Firearms Act and the associated regulations.

On May 8, 2018, updates were made to the CFP website to inform individual owners and businesses in possession of certain Swiss arms or Ceská Zbrojovka model 858 firearms that classification changes had been proposed under Bill C-71.

As only certain Swiss arms and CZ858 firearms would be impacted by the proposed classification changes, the Canadian firearms program included information on the website to assist clients in determining whether their firearm would be impacted by the bill as introduced in the House, presuming that the legislation was finally enacted by Parliament.

The focus of the information was to provide an explanation of actions that would need to be taken by individuals by June 30, 2018, in order to be eligible for the proposed grandfathering provisions that were outlined in the draft bill. Information was also posted for Canadian businesses, as the regime proposed by Bill C-71 would have an impact on businesses that had firearms in their business inventory after June 30, 2018.

The objective was to allow these individuals and these businesses to be prepared and to avoid anyone inadvertently finding themselves in contravention of the law once it was passed. The updates related to Bill C-71 were done in good faith, and they were intended to encourage awareness and to educate stakeholders.

Following the publication of the information, concerns were flagged to the Canadian firearms program by the media and by other concerned citizens pertaining to the language that had been used in the web content to describe the status of Bill C-71. To immediately address those concerns, the Canadian firearms program consulted with relevant stakeholders and made revisions to the web content on May 30, 2018.

Following the question that was raised by the member for Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner in the House, a further review of the website was undertaken and a complete set of edits was posted on July 3, 2018.

The language of the initial web content on Bill C-71 was not intended to assume the passage of the legislation, contravene the legislative process, or undermine the authorities of Parliament. The revised web content removed potentially misleading language and clarified the status of Bill C-71.

Mr. Chair, I believe the RCMP made good faith efforts to inform Canadians about the impacts of the legislation should Parliament pass it in its current form. Those impacts needed to be outlined for Canadians before the legislation was actually passed, as decisions would have to be made by those Canadians before the bill received royal assent. However, the website's original postings did not sufficiently convey the fact that Parliament was still considering Bill C-71 and that changes could be made to it.

We can see from the first update that the answers to the Q & A were changed to reflect what would happen if Bill C-71 were to be passed in its current form. In the second update, you can see that the questions in the Q & A were also revised and corrected.

Just as an example of this, Mr. Chair, in the original posting, the website asks how Bill C-71 affected individuals, and it answered that Bill C-71 would affect your CZ model 858 firearms in one of three ways. The second iteration of that same point contained a question from an individual trying to determine if his Swiss Arms or CZ model 858 would be affected by Bill C-71. In answer, the website stated that the information there was intended to provide guidance to firearms owners should Bill C-71 become law.

The final version, Mr. Chair, read as follows: How would Bill C-71 affect individual owners of Ceská Zbrojovka (CZ) and Swiss Arms (SA) firearms? Bill C-71 proposes changes that would impact some firearm owners in Canada. The information outlined below is intended to provide guidance to CZ/SA firearm owners should Bill C-71, as introduced in the House of Commons on March 20, 2018, become law.

You can see through those quotations the evolution of the language.

In endeavouring to keep Canadians as up to date as possible about the implications of legislation before Parliament, the RCMP did not sufficiently advise them that Parliament had yet to pass those changes. I believe, Mr. Chair, that it was an honest error and one that the RCMP corrected through the two updates to the site that I have referenced.

We apologize for the mistake and for any misunderstanding that resulted. We continue to be committed to providing Canadians with important information related to the requirements for firearms ownership in Canada. We commit to ensuring that this information will use clear language and accurately reflect the legislative process.

(1130)



Finally, I would like to acknowledge the members present here today who brought this issue to the attention of the House and who spoke to the issue as parliamentarians. You have defended the legislative process and emphasized the continuing importance of transparency and accountability in government agencies. I thank you very much for that.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Minister.

We'll go on to the first round with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister and your officials, for coming.

The other day when we had Mr. Motz here for his testimony—it's his motion as you know—I started my line of questioning by offering an opinion. Shocking, I know.

My opinion was essentially about the fact that I'm very interested in measuring one's intent as opposed to one's actions. I'll preface that by saying that we deal a lot with Elections Canada here. If Elections Canada did not go through the motions of what was pending, then we would be in quite a bind if, preceding that election, working our way up to it.... There's a lot of groundwork to be done.

This particular situation is not divorced from that. I have a lot of gun owners in my riding, and the laws change. They go from registry to no registry, amnesty to no amnesty, and so on. Sometimes it's hard to keep up.

I appreciate the fact that you exercised due diligence to get this information out as quickly as possible so that people will be ready for it. I agree with you that the language used was insinuating something that did not exist. That's why I'm trying to think about the intent of this.

Mr. O'Reilly, could you talk about my comments? Was there an intention to do this? When was it brought to your attention that there is a method by which we pass legislation in this country and therefore we should defer to that when we're communicating what we do?

At the same time, I want you talk about the work you've done before Bill C-71 to get to that point.

Mr. Rob O'Reilly (Director, Firearms Regulatory Services, Canadian Firearms Program, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

As you can appreciate, there are many facets to Bill C-71. It is not the program's normal practice to speak to legislation that is before the House or the Senate. One element of Bill C-71 had the potential to impact firearms owners because of the date of June 30 that was written into the legislation.

Almost immediately after the minister rose in the House on March 20 and spoke to Bill C-71, the program started to receive telephone calls from firearms owners and individuals who were interested—if I can use that word—in these two particular firearms, the Swiss Arms and the Ceská Zbrojovka, as my Polish colleagues tell me it is pronounced—and that is the last time I'll use that—the CZ.

We almost immediately started to receive calls after the March 20 date, and felt at that point that it was important to start providing some information to Canadian owners.

We started working on a—

Mr. Scott Simms:

And you were cognizant of the coming into force part of the bill as well?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I was, yes, absolutely.

The program had been fairly involved with Public Safety in some of the early drafting of this legislation. I had appeared before parliamentarians with the minister on the night the bill was introduced. I was preparing for my appearance before SECU on this.

I was intimately aware of the evolutionary nature of the legislation, but we were faced with a growing need to provide some information that was increasingly starting to come into the program.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Ms. Strachan, do you care to comment?

Deputy Commissioner Jennifer Strachan (Deputy Commissioner, Specialized Policing Services, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

I'll preface this by saying that I've been working with the program since September. A lot of dedicated colleagues there strive to provide 24-7 information for Canadians. Not everybody can call. Their goodwill and honest intent are to provide information, and to do so under maybe a bit of a time crunch, recognizing in their haste to get the message out, that perhaps the language wasn't as tight as it needed to be.

I think we're very regretful. The irony of that is that the whole intent of the efforts by the staff was to assist Canadians, not cause any confusion.

(1140)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Simms, I just ask to make a point. This is not the first time that a government has stumbled over the issue we're discussing today, and this applies to governments of all political stripes.

Maybe it would be useful if this committee could offer some technical guidance as to how public servants, when they're preparing public information that could anticipate legislation that has not received final approval by the House of Commons, should phrase themselves to make sure they are in fact being absolutely, precisely accurate.

Is there a form of wording that the committee would recommend for providing information in advance that public servants should use, to make it abundantly clear to Canadians that this is what would happen if the pending legislation were adopted? Maybe even through the use of technology there's some sort of coding that appears on a website that says something like “This information pertains to legislation that has not yet been enacted by the Parliament of Canada.”

It's not just with this issue, but with many issues that have stretched back many years through several parliaments and several governments. Is there a way you would recommend that public servants should all be guided by the same sorts of principles, to make sure the public is accurately informed?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Speaking of which, I'd love to, but apparently I'm out of time.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go on to Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair.

Thank you very much, Minister, for being here today.

Minister, you elaborated quite significantly in regard to the “what”, and I feel as a committee we have been very well briefed on what happened. I think the reason we're here today is to get to the “how” and “why” this happened. You indicated in your summary that you believe this was an honest error, and I would say—and I think my colleagues would agree—that when an error occurs, certainly we all feel sorry about things, but I think it's more important that we learn why, and most important that we ensure that these things never happen again.

I've certainly heard you say this, but can you confirm, please? Are you personally concerned with what has happened here?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I want Canadians to be accurately informed about everything the government does, and I am indeed concerned when there has been confusion. Yes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

With that concern, would you say that you agree and that you support our getting to the bottom of this issue and, in doing so, putting forward advice to prevent this from ever happening again?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I would certainly welcome that advice, as I just indicated to Mr. Simms.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Excellent. What personal actions did you take, Minister, after the question of privilege was first raised in the House?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Obviously, I recognized, once Mr. Motz had raised his point, that there would be a parliamentary procedure that would follow. This is part of that parliamentary procedure, and I am very anxious, through that process, to devise ways in which this kind of problem, which has affected many governments over many years, can be avoided in the future.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Now, after the Speaker's finding of the prima facie contempt, the Government House leader's parliamentary secretary, Monsieur Lamoureux, told the House, “the government regrets that the situation took place and has taken steps to rectify it.”

Can you elaborate in terms of the steps that were taken?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I believe Mr. Lamoureux was referring to the revisions on the website that took place between the beginning of May and the first part of July, I believe it was, which I referred to in my remarks.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You did. Thank you.

Were steps taken by any other department or central agency as a part of the effort to rectify the situation?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I think what departments and agencies would be waiting for, in fact, would be the deliberations of this committee and any recommendations that you would make of a broad governmental nature, so that circumstances like this can be avoided in the future.

(1145)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What role do you personally play, Minister, in government publications with regard to legislative proposals you are sponsoring?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The minister's office is obviously responsible for what the minister says and does. There's a very ample number of checks and rechecks in the system to ensure that when a news release is prepared, a speech is given or an answer is offered in the House of Commons, the minister is accurately reflecting the facts and accurately reflecting the position of the government.

In terms of the agencies within my portfolio, there is a huge volume of communication that those agencies do on their own responsibility and their own initiative. It's not possible for the minister to edit or control the content or the volume of that material; it is simply too voluminous. But it is important—and this is really, I think, the subject of the conversation today—not only for the minister to be sensitive to legislative proprieties but for all of the agencies to understand those proprieties as well and to govern themselves accordingly.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Did you or your personal staff play any role in this government publication specifically, in addition to other bills before Parliament? Maybe you could comment on government publications in general and the role that you and your personal staff play on bills before Parliament, but also on this specific information that was improperly published.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I know of no role that my staff or my office played in relation to this particular publication.

If you just understand the volume here, I think that in terms of the websites, for example, for the RCMP in conveying public information about a whole variety of things, there would be at any given moment in time 100,000 pages of material. It would not be physically possible, nor would it be appropriate, for a minister of the Crown to presume to edit the communications of the RCMP.

The RCMP is a very special agency that needs to have that degree of independence and the ability to communicate with Canadians directly without going through the filter of the minister.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay. Then you deny absolutely that you or your staff had any role in reviewing or approving the RCMP documents that have brought us here today.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I know of no such role—none.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Do your public safety department officials play any role in reviewing portfolio agencies' publications about your legislative initiatives, Minister?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

When a communication is expressed in the name of the government or the ministry, then the minister has a very important role to play, but when the RCMP is speaking for the RCMP, that is their function, and the government doesn't presume to muzzle them or edit them or control their communications.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go on to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, Commissioner and Mr. O'Reilly, for being here.

If you'll indulge me, Chair, being in my last year—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I have for years, Mr. Christopherson.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

After 35 years in public life, I'm now into my last year. A lot of things that I'm doing now are for the last time ever, and I'm grabbing those moments so that I don't let them go by. I want to take a moment and compliment Mr. Goodale on his role in politics.

You are a highly regarded, well-respected parliamentarian here and provincially. I've served provincially too. Aside from the role you're in today, you really are one of those who make Canada look good. I have a great deal of respect. You've been around a long time. I know what it's like to try to keep your head above water, the ethical lines to constantly, day after day.... You've done an excellent job in that regard. I admire your career. I respect you, sir, and I thank you for your service.

Now, having said that—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: —this is usually my favourite part, where I get to pivot and start firing.

(1150)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Yes: Apart from that, Mrs. Lincoln....

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have to tell you it's your lucky day. You should buy a lottery ticket today, Ralph, because I've sat exactly where you have, but provincially, at Queen's Park. In the day, you were titled the Solicitor General of Canada. As the Solicitor General of Ontario, I sat exactly there. I had exactly the same relationship with the OPP as you have with the RCMP. I was listening intently to see if there was anything that just didn't wash in terms of my own experience, having walked down that road.

I have to tell you, colleagues, I'm open to it. I'm wide open to seeing whether there's something wrong—like, really wrong—but beyond the mistake, as it looks like it was.... I'll end where the minister ended—that is, where we go forward. I don't see anything showing that anybody was trying to do anything other than their job. If there's anything different from anyone, I want to hear it. I'm more than willing to pull that thread, because this is important. I have to say, though, that having now gone through this for the second go-round, I'm not seeing anything that would have us go any further.

Minister, again, I think at the last meeting I said we needed to see the appropriate bowing and scraping and hear that it won't happen again. You've done that, and that's appropriate. It's most appropriate that the executive recognize that Parliament is paramount. When the executive has violated the rights of Parliament, it's Parliament that has to hold the executive to account. In a proper democracy, that executive recognizes that they've been slapped on the wrist, by Parliament, and promise not to do it again. That's what happened, so as far as I'm concerned, I'm seeing a conclusion coming to this. If somebody can find areas where we should go on, though, I'm open.

I am interested in pursuing this idea. I was thinking about it, Minister, as you were going through this.

And, Commissioner, I was thinking about your role in all of this. There is that business of where the government sets out what they're going to do. The government then has a right to give an argument about what they're doing. Then there's the politics of things, where you're spinning things and there's all the stuff we do as politicians. It's perfectly legit. That's part of the process. But they're very distinct, and in this case those lines have crossed over.

So how do we do that? We've been here before. I've been here with this federally, as some of our colleagues have. I've been through this provincially. We've run into the same sort of thing, and the Speaker has come down, but I've never heard anybody offer a fix. Maybe we should take the minister's idea and at some point see if we can help suss it out: How does a government do that? How do they do those three things? There's the government that says what they're going to do; there's the bureaucracy that explains things and tells people; and then there's the politics of things.

If I had any concerns, it was with this idea or assumption that the legislation would go through unamended. That's not necessarily the case. That's getting a little risky. That's why the idea of how much spinning and explanation, and where that happens, is really important, because it's only the beginning of the process. It's not the law just because the Prime Minister and minister say so. It has to go through, and it may not be the same thing at the end of the day. Given that Parliament is a free entity, it may not carry. You never know, even though there's full expectation there.

On that business of going forward, if you're explaining, how do you acknowledge—I'm now going down the sort of rabbit hole that you suggested we jump into, Minister—or how do you then start advocating for something as a bureaucracy when it could still be amended, which could take it into a whole other discussion? I think there's merit in pursuing this a little further, even if we just provide some dialogue, some language, or anything at all to further the ability to keep these things separate.

I don't have even one good table-pounding point to make, Chair, because the minister covered it all.

Having said all of that, I'm listening to colleagues, but I for one think we've come to the end of the road on this one. Other than following up on the suggestion of the minister, is there anything we can do to help Parliament and government prevent this from happening again?

Thank you, sir.

(1155)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Minister, do you have any response?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

First, Mr. Christopherson, thank you for your generous comments. I would return the compliment with respect to your career as you serve out the final months of your term in this Parliament.

I would just pursue the last point you were making. One suggestion would be to take advantage of technology. We're talking here about something that appeared on a website. Is there a way in which the website itself could signal, to anybody reading that particular page, that this has to do with pending legislation that has not been passed by Parliament? Maybe you include, on that website, an automatic invitation: “If you have comments to make, make them. Here's how you submit your views to Parliament. This is still an open matter. The law has not yet been passed. The rules have not yet been changed.”

There may be something in a technological way. Maybe it's a different-coloured page that says you're dealing with legislation that has not yet been enacted.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I'm going to keep my eye on the time, and I know Minister Goodale has to leave soon. I'd like to ask a couple of questions and then move on to the opposition so that they get more time, given the votes that have happened.

You mention the RCMP as a special agency. Is that with respect to its independence, between your office and the RCMP, and if so, could you touch on that a bit, please?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, you can, I'm sure, make an argument about the specialness of almost every department and agency of the Government of Canada.

But certainly when you're talking about the national police force, a police force that is national, federal, international, provincial, municipal and indigenous, you're talking about one of the most complicated organizations in the whole apparatus of the Government of Canada.

Clearly, the independence of the police is an exceedingly important principle that has served our democracy very well. Ministers do not tell the police how to do their business. They do it, and they are accountable for how they do it. If the government, if the people, are not satisfied with the result, then you deal with the leadership of the force in terms of changing the commissioner at the top.

But that's the important principle about the RCMP. They are a police force. Canadians need to know that they function independently and that they enjoy the public's complete and absolute trust.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

This will likely be my final question.

At the last meeting we heard from Mr. Motz, and I was a bit troubled, and I questioned him a great deal on it. There was the possibility that this was an honest mistake. Then Mr. Motz talked about the suspicion out there that something nefarious had happened.

I can only take from this that there could be two options in what the Conservatives believe happened: this was an honest mistake by the RCMP; or there was a vast conspiracy involving your office, top-down, directing the RCMP to change the website. It would involve, I imagine, dozens of individuals to make this couple of changes to the website.

Ironically enough, parliamentary privilege was used to make these allegations in a protected manner, while arguing a case of parliamentary privilege.

Would you like to comment on those allegations at all?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It's just completely not true. I know of nothing in these facts that indicates anything other than a sincere desire on the part of the RCMP and the firearms program to communicate important information to Canadians to make sure they were informed of certain consequences.

It is an error, an honest mistake, to not say that this is all contingent upon the legislation actually being adopted, and that until the legislation is adopted, this is a proposal, not a change in the law.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

(1200)

The Chair:

Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister and officials, for being here today.

Just so you are aware, Mr. Minister, the comments of Mr. Bittle don't reflect my testimony on Tuesday. I did not suggest for a moment that there was any nefarious plan, or a wilful intent, or a “conspiracy”, as the word has been used by Mr. Bittle. Those are his words. Those words did not emanate from me.

The concern that was raised to me by the public was about the confusion it caused. It was confusing. There was legislation proposed to government, which was being studied—at that time at the committee level—and then an agency you are responsible for, the RCMP, put out proactive communication, which is appropriate. However, it's that no one from your department would have any sort of mechanism whereby direction would be given to the RCMP to ensure that the language was appropriate. That's the concern.

You answered definitively that no one from your office that you're aware of—from Public Safety—provided any direction to the RCMP to proceed this way or on what language to use. That was your testimony, and I believe, to the best of your knowledge, that's not what happened.

With the bills that come through your department, is there a mechanism now that has cautions in place, that has the opportunity...so that the role of Parliament isn't presumed in proposed legislation? Because that's exactly what happened here. As acknowledged, there were individuals who were under the belief that now this was the law. That was because of the language that was being used.

I am curious. This committee is charged with the responsibility to ensure—as you've requested of them—that this doesn't happen again, and to provide a mechanism whereby that doesn't happen again.

Do you employ anything in your department to ensure that the public servants within your service understand the role of Parliament and that of the departments that answer to you?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Motz, I'm seized of that very issue right now and thinking my way through it.

There probably does need to be standing advice—and this committee may offer some input into that—that goes from the minister to all agencies under their jurisdiction, which reminds their communications sections in particular that when they are communicating to the public with respect to legislation that is in process but not yet done, they need to make that point abundantly clear. There may even be a suggestion of a form of words that they need to use in every case to make that clear to the public.

We'll probably have to renew that advisory every now and then to make sure that it's current.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Fair enough.

You indicated in your opening remarks, sir, that this was not the first time that something like this has happened, regardless of political persuasion. All parties have been responsible for it.

In those circumstances, is it possible that public servants—especially in cases of majorities—are completely unaware in some circumstances of the role of Parliament? The presumption from public servants could be that the legislation that's proposed could be as is, without amendment, long before it becomes law.

Is there an educational component that needs to occur here rather than just guidance?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I think it would be useful for the communication sections of ministers' offices, but also for departments and agencies, to be reminded of the legislative prerogatives of Parliament, and that a law isn't a law until royal assent happens. And that follows all of the House of Commons and the Senate having their say and making the determination.

There are in our process, as you know, some examples where it works the other way around. On a ways and means motion, for example, once the Minister of Finance stands in the House and tables a ways and means motion, even before the legislation is introduced and ultimately passed, the convention under our system is that the Department of Finance functions on the basis of the ways and means motion having been accepted.

(1205)

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'll have to take your word for it, because I'm certainly no—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is that the case even in a minority?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Yes, it is the case even in a minority.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'm not an expert on procedure.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There are examples where it goes both ways, but clarity is a very good thing. We should try to get it.

The Chair:

We're out of time. Do you have one short question?

Mr. Glen Motz:

From the very beginning, the issue for me was never about the legislation itself, but about the breach of the process. The whole intent behind this is to ensure that—and there could be a multitude of other ones that have happened—there is no presumption. The committee is charged with doing that.

This is the bill that it happened on. The hope is that it doesn't happen again.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

My hope is exactly the same, Mr. Motz. I hope that we can develop the kind of safeguard mechanisms in the communications process to make sure that the legislative prerogatives of the Parliament of Canada are always known, understood and respected.

The Chair:

Thank you, everyone, for a very positive and constructive first hour.

We'll suspend for a couple of minutes and then come back.

(1205)

(1215)

The Chair:

Good afternoon. Welcome back to the 129th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This meeting is being held in public. It's great to have Deputy Commissioner Strachan back with Mr. O'Reilly.

I understand that you didn't have any opening comments. Do you have any more comments?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

No, I'm ready to go.

Whatever you have to ask, hopefully we can give you the answers you're looking for.

The Chair:

Okay, great.

We'll go to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

The RCMP's website has—I checked online—about a 100,000 pages. Is that right? What's the process for maintaining and editing those pages? How much oversight is there...how independent are the communications teams? Can you make sense of that?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

My previous experience has been that they try to keep it updated. I would suggest to you that even coming into this program, it was one of the first things I did. I'm recognizing that some of the material on the various programs that I work for and with is not up to date. There is a continuous evolution to try to stay on top of changing material.

We have a national communications program that takes care of the strategic side. Then the individual programs have their own sort of tactical communications employees.

Yes, there is a ton of web content. I would suggest to you that we need to be a little bit more forward-leaning—I'm speaking on behalf of another area of my organization—in bringing some of that content down.

You're right. There is a lot of content there.

(1220)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On an average page being edited, how high up in management actually approves the final content, as opposed to the intent?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I can't speak for other programs.

In some of my past experience, depending on what the content was, there would be various levels of oversight. In this case, it rested with the firearms program at that time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would that go all the way up to asking the deputy commissioner to approve this wording?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

In this case, it did not.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does it happen often?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I'm a brand new deputy commissioner. I was a commanding officer before.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As a commanding officer, did you have people regularly come up to you saying, "Hey CO, I need to change a comment," and asking for permission?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

There's usually a conversation around the spirit of changing communication. Then it's left to the communications folks, who have that expertise, to develop that material. It wouldn't have been something I might have reviewed in the last instance.

I would understand the spirit of why they were changing that communication, for sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What you do is pass the intent down and ask them to deal with it.

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

At a certain level,...and in this case it was—I'll speak to this situation that I'm here before you to discuss today—at the firearms program level.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you ever personally edited a web page on the RCMP site?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I have not, no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Ms. Strachan.

I'll pass it on to Mr. Simms to continue.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

Mr. O'Reilly, I want to pick up where we left off earlier.

The issue I want to explore is preparatory work for pending legislation. The situation we have now and the honest mistake that was made put you in a situation where it could be an all-for-naught kind of scenario.

Granted, in the case of majority governments, they usually get it in the end. Nevertheless, you do have to do that preparatory work.

Over the years now, with changes to firearms policy, registries, no registries, amnesties and so on...when you communicate with people, is that the prime importance of why you really have to do a lot of this work, because you do get these calls asking, "What happened here?" All of a sudden what they're carrying now is far more restricted than it used to be, or it is not, or their licensing is different.

I'm just trying to understand how you handle tabled legislation that comes out affecting regulations.

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Okay.

Thank you very much for the question.

As you can appreciate, there have been three firearms bills since 2012, Bill C-19, Bill C-42 and Bill C-71. The program has been and remains intimately involved in the preparation of some cases and in early consultation on those bills. We are very aware of and attempt to respect the parliamentary process. Many of the documents we are asked to review and provide input on are subject to cabinet confidence. We are very versed in the handling of those documents, and the breadth of consultations we can or cannot have as a consequence of that particular privilege.

When it comes to legislation like this, we also are in a position of anticipating what are going to be areas of inquiry. As I mentioned in my first statement, we are not in the habit of speaking on pending legislation. There are many elements to Bill C-71. In this case, it would probably have been our preference to not provide any commentary at all.

Unfortunately, and we've seen this historically, the minute new legislation is proposed or even being talked about in the media or the public context, we immediately get calls.

We don't have the luxury of saying we're not going to prepare Q and As for a particular issue, because the fact of the matter is we have hundreds of employees who have to answer those phones. If we don't have answers prepared to be able to inform those Canadians, they can rightly be more confused or more upset.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. That's interesting. You're saying that the reason you feel it's incumbent upon you to put information out, regarding legislation that hasn't been passed, is primarily for a communications exercise with the public, so that they are well informed. It's not so much about how your employees would administer these regulations; it's more about the communications, so the people are aware before it comes into force.

(1225)

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I believe so. Within the Canadian firearms program, I don't think anyone is under any belief that this particular legislation was, or is, law. As I said, we've been working with the machinations of Bill C-71 now, for let's say, almost two years. We're very alive to that, but our first concern, apart from public safety, is providing accurate, timely and clear information to our client base, who are the Canadian firearms owners right now.

Mr. Scott Simms:

There's a certain amount of confidentiality. I understand that too, but for the front-line people, who pick up the phone with the average gun owner and have to answer those questions, how far down the chain do you go? Is it down to the employees, given the fact that this legislation hasn't passed yet?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Information that is subject to cabinet confidence doesn't go beyond the management team and those who have the appropriate security clearances to look at that information. It is at that level that the strategic communications messaging is crafted, in terms of, to paraphrase the deputy, the high-level messages. However, we then engage our communications staff to say that we want to communicate on this issue, for example, the CZ and Swiss Arms, what we are hearing from our client groups, in terms of the communications, so please go ahead and prepare some packages for us for ultimate review. They're not given the specifics; they're just given the direction, in terms of what to create.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now, we'll go on to Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you very much again, Deputy Commissioner and Director, for being here today.

Who drafted the publications that have brought us here today?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Unfortunately, I am not able to answer that question specifically. I can tell you that the communications product itself really has two parts. One part is the information package that we prepared for individuals to self-identify whether or not the firearm they own might be affected. Our firearms technicians, the real experts on firearms identification and classification, prepared that document.

Ultimately, the messaging that appeared on our website was written by internal communications staff, at the direction of the management team.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay. Who approves the text of those publications?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

In this case, the text would have been preliminarily approved by me, as one of the directors, and then ultimately, by the director general of the Canadian firearms program.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, Director, who was the most senior official director to approve the publications?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

It would be the director general of the Canadian firearms program, in this particular instance. As the deputy mentioned earlier, there may be times when we are communicating something that is at a much more strategic level or for which we might be aligned with other departments. Let's say that it's missing children or firearms thefts, which may be related to organized crime and so on, in which case, those messages are strategic and they would go up to the deputy's level for consultation and ultimately for approval.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay. Is this always the most senior level at which special business bulletins are signed off?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Special business bulletins, in reference to the Canadian firearms program, would be approved at the director general level, but depending on the nature of those bulletins, for example, if we anticipated a reaction and if we were saying something that we would acknowledge might not be particularly positively received by the entire firearms community, we would certainly provide awareness up through the chain of command to make sure that nobody was being blindsided by something that might appear on the news the next day.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Is this the usual approval process for publications about pending legislation and if not, what would the usual approval process for publications about pending legislation be?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I don't think we have an approval process for pending legislation, because, as far as I am aware, this is the first time we've actually commented on aspects of pending legislation. Once a bill has become law, we will often speak to the differences between what royal assent may mean and what coming into force may mean. In the case of Bill C-71, there are certain elements that may come into force upon royal assent and some that may come into force at a later date. At that point, we may communicate on those aspects to provide clarity, but it is not our practice to communicate on legislation that is currently before the House.

(1230)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

Do you need to consult your minister's office before issuing publications about pending legislation that the minister responsible for your organization is sponsoring?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

Again, the spirit of why this communication was being drafted to support Canadian firearms owners was discussed with staff at the minister's office, but I would suggest to you that I was able to look back and find that the actual lines that went up were not run by the staff at the minister's office.

In the spirit of why we sought to do that, there was consultation with staff at the ministry, and they understood that it was in order to better educate Canadians due to the tight timelines that were upcoming in relation to the date of implementation, which would have been the end of June.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

So there was some consultation with the ministerial staff, you would say, with regard to the information that was published.

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

Yes, in relation to what it was that the firearms program wanted to do to better support Canadians and why we were seeking to do that, but the actual lines in the media that were put on the website never went over to the minister's office.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, thank you.

Do you need to consult the Privy Council Office before issuing publications about pending legislation?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I would suggest that, much as Rob mentioned, it's not common practice to be commenting about pending legislation, and this was an extremely unique case. I will be honest with you. I would want to ensure that there was conversation with the minister's office and then seek their advice in relation to the way forward, but, as has already been pointed out, this is a very rare situation for us.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Would you agree to provide the committee with all drafts of the expunged publications, the incorrect publications?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

Absolutely.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

Would you agree to provide the committee with all emails and memos in an unredacted state concerning the approvals of those drafts?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

Absolutely.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

Respecting the changes to the publications on May 30 after Mr. Motz's May 29 question of privilege, can you walk us through, please, what prompted the changes?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I am going to allow my colleague Rob to do that. My apologies.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Deputy Commissioner.

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

As I mentioned earlier, when the bill was first tabled on March 20, we began to receive inquiries and realized that there was a need to provide some information. Therefore, discussions started fairly early in late March around the need to provide communications. We reached out to our internal national communications groups at that point, alerting them to the fact that we would, in the future, need to be able to provide some new content online.

In early April we consulted with our colleagues at Public Safety on the policy side there, too, to alert them to the fact that we were starting to receive inquiries about this one element of Bill C-71. We also were conscious of the fact that the SECU committee dates were coming forward, and there might rightly be questions as to what we were doing to communicate about this singular issue regarding Bill C-71.

On May 8 we published the first version of the web content that spoke to what we believed was important information to convey around the significance of the June 30 date. I'm happy to elaborate on that if the committee so desires.

Shortly after May 8, we received—I believe it was actually on May 10—an inquiry from a journalist asking to better understand the rationale for instructing people to comply with the June 30 date. It became evident, upon review of the website, that there could be some confusion caused by the content that we had provided.

At that point, we immediately began to work on another version of the website that would do two things: first, provide the necessary clarity around this being pending legislation, and, second, better structure the web content. You will notice that whereas the first version was kind of a long narrative, the second version attempted to very quickly say that if are you an individual, here is where you go to find the information for an individual. It also determined whether you were a business, because that was the other thing we became conscious of, that there were different individuals potentially impacted by that. The approval of that content, I believe, ultimately occurred on May 25. Our content was finalized, if you want to call it that, on May 25 and ultimately published on May 30.

The July 3 content that was published was principally necessary because everything we had posted prior to that spoke about an impending date of June 30 and things you needed to be aware of should you wish to continue to own this particular firearm. The fact that June 30 had passed necessitated our changing the content to basically reflect the fact that we were past June 30 and therefore, here were the new realities that you might need to be aware of going forward.

(1235)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Director, and thank you, Deputy Commissioner.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Kusie.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

First, I want to thank you for your fulsome answers, especially the RCMP. They're critically important.

I very much appreciated hearing the minister emphasize that again, with some experience in this area, an understanding of how the police can easily find themselves on the wrong side of the perspective of the community, and that means we've failed totally.

It all comes from accountability and transparency as the keys, and you've been providing both. I've been very impressed. There's been no dodging, nothing, no sense that you're doing anything other than being here, and completely forthright, honest, and concise. That's what we expect, and that's what Canadians expect, so thank you for that.

Building on the comments that the minister made, what are your thoughts about how we, Parliament, might go forward to avoid this? What sorts of things could we do to equip you, so we can all avoid this?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I'll comment on that, because Mr. Motz had some really good ideas in relation to that. I'm the new kid on the block if you want to call it that, so this is an extremely beneficial learning opportunity for me, and the value that this committee has in protecting Parliament is not lost on me.

This is obviously a table of very experienced parliamentarians. I do believe that when I look at the colleagues I work with at the firearms program, they are really passionate about the clients they serve across Canada, and any kinds of caveats. I come from the operational world, and we call them caveats. When you're talking about intelligence, we call them third party disclaimers, and they're on every piece of operational intelligence that we provide on the national security side and the organized crime side.

Therefore, for me, being new in the position, I thought that conversation was brilliant. Again, putting forward information on a bill that hasn't gone through Parliament is very rare, but to be honest, having some sort of a process or guidance that would come to us to ensure that we stay in our lane and are respectful of Parliament would be very welcome.

I'm saying it like a third party caveat, and that's what we do on the operational side, to be careful about how we use evidence and intelligence. That's my responsibility now coming in to work with this program, to allow my public service colleagues to really keep serving Canadians. It's my responsibility to keep them safe in what they do, and to keep you as parliamentarians confident that we take that very seriously. I would be very open to some guidance on that, which would come from this committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. O'Reilly.

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I would echo what the deputy commissioner said. I can tell you from a program perspective.... First, on behalf of the program, I want to apologize to the House and to Canadians who may have been confused by the information that we put online. It certainly was not our intent. The deputy is correct that most people who work on the program are, in fact, very passionate about what we do, and believe very strongly in serving Canadians and the firearms community.

When this occurred, it did give us pause. It made us reflect a little bit more carefully on what we do. Sometimes it's very easy, in our haste to provide information, to not fully reflect on all aspects of what we are trying to say. I can give you every assurance that my colleagues and I will double-check everything that we do going forward, and ensure that from a program perspective, we are fully compliant and do things better.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm satisfied and have concluded my questions. Thank you, Chair. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you.

It's now Ms. Lapointe's turn.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being with us today. This is very interesting.

Mr. O'Reilly, you said earlier that this was the third time since 2012 that there has been a bill to amend the Firearms Act. Have you been in your position this whole time?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Yes. I started working for the predecessor of the current Assistant Commissioner, Ms. Strachan. So I took part in the consultations on Bill C-19. I forget at this very moment what year I started the Canadian firearms program, but I was part of the team when Bill C-42 and Bill C-71 were drafted.

(1240)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Has being in office when Bill C-19 and Bill C-42 were passed allowed you to see opportunities to change information for Canadians?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Yes, certainly.

As already mentioned, during the consultation period on a bill, a lot can change. That's what we saw during consultations held by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security on this bill: amendments were suggested.

At the Canadian firearms program, we are used to seeing changes along the way. That is part of the reason why we don't like to share information about a bill that is evolving during the process.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

However, the information that has been provided was meant to alert Canadians that there would be changes. Is that what you wanted to do?

I'm talking about Bill C-71.

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Yes. In this case, Bill C-71 had consequences, and Canadians had to be informed of the June 30 date. Our only intention was to inform them so that they could make good decisions about the firearms affected by this bill.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The minister said earlier, and you mentioned it too, that suggestions were made on how to use what happened in June and May 2017 to do better next time. You're talking about consultations.

What would you suggest about the information on the website? I know you have to check the accuracy of a terrible amount of information. However, what could be done next time to make it better?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

On our side, in the program, I would say that the more people who review a document, the better. We try to work closely with the people at the Department of Public Safety, our lawyers and our various communication teams. This would be our practice from now on.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The minister mentioned earlier that, if necessary, the potential impact of a bill should be explained, but always by specifying that nothing is certain, since the bill still has to go through all stages: amendments can be made, Parliament must pass it, and then it must obtain royal assent.

Do you want people to submit their suggestions to you?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

Absolutely. We invite people to submit their suggestions. There is an email address on our website that Canadians can use to write to us directly.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

How would you track these emails? They should be sent to parliamentarians.

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

We can find a way to make sure these suggestions are sent to your committee.

Currently, we have people who check this email inbox every day and who handle requests and concerns from people on a daily basis.

We're open to hearing any suggestions you may have about how to forward them to you.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay. Thank you.

Ms. Strachan, thank you for being here.

Earlier, you mentioned the intention of the communication. Why do you want to change that?

You also said that the case we are currently handling is unique. I would like to hear your comments on that. You said that consultation would be needed to better educate Canadians. At least, I think that was your objective.

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I think this was a conversation between the Canadian firearms program team and the Department of Public Safety team. I don't know if a document was submitted at that time. The reason the team wanted to add comments to the communication was related to the calls and questions that Canadian firearms program people had received so far.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Instead, questions and answers should have been prepared. You should try to anticipate the problems that may arise, rather than reacting a little late.

(1245)

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I can answer that question.

We had some internal discussions. The first choice was to say nothing and just let the bill move forward. If the bill were to pass, we would have waited until the provisions came into force to receive calls from Canadians wishing to register their firearms. In this case, the people who would not have been informed of certain aspects of the bill, such as the June 30 date, would most likely not have qualified and would not have been able to register their firearms.

In short, we had two choices: say nothing, wait two years and then tell people that it was too bad for them, or communicate the information in advance. We wanted to give them this information so they could make good choices.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, you have the floor.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.[English]

I will speak in English.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

But you were with me on the official languages.

Mr. John Nater:

I know and I wish I was still back there. I need that immersion again. I need that daily interaction. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That's good. [English]

Mr. John Nater:

Maybe next week I'll use French.

Again, thank you, Deputy Commissioner and Director, for joining us today.

I want to follow up very briefly.

I believe it was you, Deputy Commissioner, who mentioned the national communications program. Is there a policy that goes with that to determine how that type of communication is exercised and how it's put out? Is there a policy that governs that?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I don't think I can answer that, but maybe he can.

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

No, no. It's just that my mike went off.

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

Pardon me.

There is a policy that national communications have, but I can't say it's definitive with regard to how we post information on the web. I can find that out for you. Certainly, I can provide that.

Mr. John Nater:

Sure. If it would be possible to share the policy....

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

Absolutely.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Mr. O'Reilly, you mentioned that this type of communication was out of the norm in terms of providing information before the parliamentary process comes into place. You mentioned a little bit about the approval process going up to the director general level. I find it interesting that along this process no one flagged the initial communications document regarding the fact that the bill was still before Parliament. Is there a concern within the firearms program or within the RCMP that there is not enough knowledge or not enough awareness of the parliamentary process, that there are not sufficient people in that process who are aware that Parliament has to do its job and that the appropriate stages of the legislation are adhered to?

Is there a concern that the department doesn't have that internal knowledge when it comes to this type of communication?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I would say no. As was probably evidenced in the first version of the website dated May 8, there was very much an intention to speak about the future state of the legislation. There are many parts of that document in which the future state of the legislation is spoken to. There was certainly an inconsistency, and I suspect we probably fell back on focusing too much on the technicality of the content rather than, necessarily, on the verb tenses, in some cases, speaking about the legislation in the future tense. I can assure you that everyone who works in the Canadian firearms program and who had a hand in working on this piece of communication and all communications related to this bill is very firmly aware of the parliamentary process and the privilege that comes with that.

Mr. John Nater:

Immediately after the point of privilege was found to be a prima facie point of privilege in the House of Commons, the RCMP had some holding lines that were delivered to the media that the force was assessing the ruling. Was there a formal assessment of the prima facie ruling and, if that was so, what information could be provided to this committee if there was a formal document, a formal review.

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

Can you repeat the question?

Mr. John Nater:

Sure. There were documents released by the PCO through the Access to Information Act. About 90 minutes after the Speaker's ruling, the RCMP had holding lines for the media that said the force was assessing the ruling. I was just curious as to what that assessment was and whether there was a formal document that came out of that assessment.

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I know that on May 9 Public Safety did ask for media lines in relation to what was going on the web. I can't speak to what you're asking, but I would certainly indulge you to come back with that information, if that's okay.

(1250)

Mr. John Nater:

I would appreciate that. If that information could be sent to the clerk, that would be appreciated.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We've been through this quite thoroughly at this point, I think, but, Deputy Commissioner, at the beginning you indicated that what you would generally talk about would be the spirit of the legislation or of whatever action you wanted to convey or message you wanted to convey on the website.

In your conversations with the ministry and in your conversations internally, can you describe a little bit about what the spirit was at that point? You said this happens in very rare circumstances, when you're actually communicating stuff about legislation. Why, in this case, did you feel the need to communicate and what were those internal conversations about the spirit?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I would ask my colleague, because, as I mentioned, I just started in the job on September 7, so it's third party in this context. I wasn't necessarily in those conversations.

Were you, Rob?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I was not at the level that you have suggested. As I said earlier, we were feeling the need to respond to some of the inquiries we were starting to receive via our website and we wanted to provide accurate and, hopefully, clear information on what we knew to be a particularly complex issue. The intent and the spirit of that were to inform our client base in what has always been a non-partisan fashion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What risk do you face in not doing so? What were the particular inquiries—some examples—that you were getting? What did you fear would happen had you not provided information to them?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

As I probably mangled in French a little earlier, the concern in not communicating on this particular issue is that some individuals may have inadvertently acquired these firearms after the June 30 date, and should the legislation pass as written, those individuals would be ineligible to register those firearms. They would have potentially bought them in good faith on July 1 of this year. Assuming the bill passes as it is currently written, fast-forward two years from now when they would go to register this firearm and in doing so would acknowledge that they had acquired it past the June 30 date, and then in fact would be ineligible for registration. We knew that was certainly the potential.

Also, because the legislation does not grandfather businesses, there was a need to communicate to businesses that firearms that were in their inventory past the June 30 date, if they remained in their inventory, could also be adversely affected if the legislation passed as it is currently written. We do not know the exact numbers of the firearms, but there has been speculation that they could be in the tens of thousands, so we felt it very important to inform individuals at the earliest opportunity about the decisions that we felt they should be aware of and that they would need to make going forward.

June 30 has come and gone and nothing has changed, but individuals who are going to decide to register these firearms in the future, if the bill is passed as it is written, need to upgrade their licence. They will also need to take the appropriate level of safety training. Some individuals may choose not to do that, so we felt it important to communicate the significance of the June 30 date in the pending legislation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In our previous meeting, there were comments made and questions asked to the effect that this information on the website created fear in people, the fear of becoming a criminal overnight, or that it was done with the intent to confuse them about legislation that might not in fact pass. How would you reply to that?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

I would reply that it goes completely contrary to what the Canadian firearms program attempts to do. We serve our client base of 2.1 million firearms licence-holders, and confusing them is absolutely the last thing we want to do. These things tend to have a ripple effect, and misinformation at the outset can tend to escalate going down the chain.

No, our intention was to inform Canadian firearms owners.

(1255)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Commissioner and Mr. O'Reilly, for being here.

Is there a mechanism—you briefly described it previously—within your departments regarding how you actually communicate these? You explained it briefly, and I wouldn't mind your explaining again how, when you're doing this sort of publication or ministerial or government legislation like this, you follow a process. You meet with officials from the department. You have a leadership team that reviews them. You may have someone who actually writes the content, and it's approved. Can you explain how you did that previously and if you've made any internal changes to that moving forward?

D/Commr Jennifer Strachan:

I did some research coming into this committee, mindful that I wasn't in the seat at the time and wanting to learn and support my colleagues in a better way forward, potentially, so that all of us don't end up here again.

I think in this case, as was mentioned by Rob, due to the haste because of the date, we were talking with Public Safety about why we were seeking to create web content. In our colleagues' haste to try to get it out well before that June 30 date, since it was a month and a half away—I believe it was April 8—the oversight wasn't applied above and beyond the firearms program. As mentioned, there's not a process per se, because this is such a rarity in relation to our wanting to comment on any bill that's before Parliament.

But I would suggest to you, sir, that going forward, as long as I'm in.... And I have a lot of unique programs—DNA, criminal records, some really critical programs for Canadians—which do often involve bills that are forthcoming, so I can learn a lot from this. That process, going forward, I would suggest to you, will come to my chair, at the very least.

I think you make a really good point that there's still the value of consultation. I can say in this case—I don't think it's been mentioned yet—that we did consult with our Department of Justice colleagues as well, just in relation to the appropriateness of our putting messaging out to better support Canadians, mindful that the bill was still moving through the process.

Your points about having a better system regarding who has had the opportunity to review the material and who's been part of the conversations are well taken. Again, not being in the chair, I'm not sure exactly with whom at Public Safety the conversation was had, but I do not believe the lines, as they were going forward on May 9, were reviewed distinctly by them. It was strictly within the firearms program.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I think earlier, Mr. O'Reilly, you briefly explained the process for how you have deal with publications. Can you just remind me of that briefly again and then say specifically in this case how it may have happened?

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

As I mentioned, sometimes what the program is posting on its website may cause a reaction, a negative reaction. If we're posting a bulletin on a determination of classification around something, not only are we internally dialoguing around the clarity of the messaging and ensuring that what we are saying is factually correct, but if there is some sensitivity around what we are saying, we often do communicate that for awareness simply so that the deputy commissioner—or even the commissioner, for that matter—isn't seeing something for the very first time reading the morning news clippings.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That being said, though, in this circumstance, you don't want to be in a position where you're commenting or putting information out while a bill is still being discussed, and I understand that. Here, again, because of the sensitivity of the timing and the impacts of a date that was set in legislation—which we tried to amend, by the way to avoid this exact issue, right? We said this is exactly what would happen, folks, and we advised people not to get stuck on this date. Would you have Public Safety communication specialists, or somebody, who you would go back and forth with on something like this?

(1300)

Mr. Rob O'Reilly:

In this particular instance, no. Our dialogue with Public Safety at the outset, which occurred from late March through April, was simply on our intentions, rather than saying nothing, to post something online and strategically provide a self-identification guide, let's call it, rather than having individuals contacting me saying, “I have my CZ in front of me. Is my CZ impacted?” We communicated early on our intentions to put such a publication online and to outline the process of identification and the potential impacts, but at no point did we ever speak to the language around the impending or the tenuous nature of the legislation itself.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Thank you both for coming, and thank you for your forthright answers.

I think it has been a very informative session for all of us.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1125)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Bienvenue à la 129e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons notre étude de la question de privilège concernant la question des publications de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada au sujet du projet de loi C-71, Loi modifiant certaines lois et un règlement relatifs aux armes à feu.

Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir l'honorable Ralph Goodale, ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile. Il est accompagné de représentants de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, soit Mme Jennifer Strachan, sous-commissaire aux Services de police spécialisés, et M. Rob O'Reilly, directeur des Services de réglementation sur les armes à feu, au Programme canadien des armes à feu.

Merci à tous d'être venus aujourd'hui.

Avant de commencer, nous devons traiter brièvement des travaux du Comité avec M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'ai eu l'occasion de discuter avec des collègues des deux autres caucus et du parti ministériel. La dernière fois, M. Bittle a eu la gentillesse d'accepter de transmettre à la ministre notre invitation à comparaître au Comité pour discuter de la nouvelle commission chargée des débats. M. Bittle a réussi à transmettre le message à la ministre; il nous informe qu'elle est prête à nous rencontrer dès que possible.

Monsieur le président, vous pourriez considérer qu'il y a consentement unanime pour organiser cette rencontre. Le greffier pourrait communiquer avec le cabinet de la ministre pour trouver une date, le plus tôt possible. Je remercie M. Nater et M. Bittle de nous avoir permis d'aller au-delà de la question — secondaire — de savoir si la comparution de la ministre était pertinente ou non. Nous pouvons maintenant nous concentrer sur les questions de fond. Je remercie M. Bittle de ses efforts en son nom.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Vous pouvez maintenant faire votre déclaration préliminaire, monsieur Goodale.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Merci. Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de comparaître aujourd'hui pour discuter de la question de privilège soulevée par M. Motz.

Comme vous l'avez indiqué, monsieur le président, je suis accompagné de la sous-commissaire Strachan et de M. Rob O'Reilly, le directeur des Services de réglementation sur les armes à feu au Programme canadien des armes à feu.

Je suis désolé que nous ayons moins de temps ce matin en raison du vote à la Chambre, mais c'est ainsi que les choses se passent à la Chambre.

À titre de ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, ma principale priorité est d'assurer la sécurité de tous les Canadiens et de veiller au maintien de leur confiance en l'intégrité des organismes gouvernementaux qui relèvent de ma compétence. Cela comprend l'utilisation judicieuse des plateformes ministérielles pour la communication de renseignements sur toute mesure législative et surtout, aux fins de la discussion d'aujourd'hui, sur le projet de loi C-71. Le sujet à l'étude est important pour moi, monsieur le président, car dans mes fonctions antérieures, comme vous vous en souviendrez, j'ai été leader parlementaire dans l'opposition et au gouvernement. Donc, la procédure est importante.

Comme il est indiqué dans le document intitulé Code de valeurs et d'éthique du secteur public, les organismes gouvernementaux jouent un rôle fondamental pour servir la population canadienne, les collectivités et l'intérêt public, sous l'autorité du gouvernement élu et en vertu de la loi.

Dans l'exécution de leur mandat, les organismes gouvernementaux doivent reconnaître que les lois émanent du Parlement et d'aucune autre autorité au Canada. Cela dit, il est essentiel que ces organismes continuent de respecter le processus législatif. Tous les organismes gouvernementaux, y compris le Programme canadien des armes à feu et la GRC, sont tenus de respecter les privilèges du Parlement et d'agir avec intégrité. L'intégrité, la transparence et la reddition de comptes sont les pierres angulaires d'une bonne gouvernance et d'une saine démocratie.

Je saisis cette occasion pour réaffirmer avec vigueur que le Programme canadien des armes à feu et la GRC respectent pleinement l'autorité du Parlement et le processus législatif.

Le Programme canadien des armes à feu vise à renforcer la sécurité publique en réduisant le risque de préjudices causés par la mauvaise utilisation d'une arme à feu. Pour atteindre ses objectifs, le Programme canadien des armes à feu publie des bulletins et des mises à jour sur son site Web pour informer les parties prenantes et le grand public de toute modification des exigences.

Les mises à jour du site Web servent à diffuser des renseignements sur une multitude de sujets, notamment le régime de délivrance des permis d'armes à feu, les modifications du processus de transfert, les changements de classe, la modification des exigences relatives aux entreprises, et beaucoup plus. Ces mises à jour sont importantes; elles visent à sensibiliser davantage des propriétaires légitimes d'armes à feu et à accroître la conformité à la Loi sur les armes à feu et son règlement d'application.

Le 8 mai 2018, des mises à jour ont été publiées sur le site Web du PCAF pour informer les propriétaires et les entreprises en possession d'armes à feu Swiss Arms ou Ceská Zbrojovka modèle 858 d'un changement de classe proposé dans le projet de loi C-71.

Comme les changements de classe proposés ne visaient que certaines armes à feu Swiss Arms et CZ858, le Programme canadien des armes à feu a publié des informations sur son site Web pour aider ses clients à déterminer si leur arme à feu était visée par le projet de loi tel que présenté à la Chambre, supposant ainsi que la mesure législative avait enfin été promulguée par le Parlement.

Les informations visaient à donner aux particuliers des explications sur les mesures à prendre avant le 30 juin 2018 pour se conformer aux dispositions relatives aux droits acquis proposées dans l'ébauche du projet de loi. On a aussi publié des informations destinées aux entreprises canadiennes, puisque le régime proposé dans le projet de loi C-71 aurait une incidence sur les entreprises en possession d'armes à feu avant le 30 juin 2018.

L'objectif était d'aider les particuliers et les entreprises à se préparer et d'éviter que quiconque se retrouve par inadvertance à contrevenir à la loi, après son entrée en vigueur. Les mises à jour sur le projet de loi C-71 ont été publiées de bonne foi et visaient à accroître la sensibilisation et informer les intervenants.

Après la publication des renseignements, les médias et des citoyens concernés ont signalé au Programme canadien des armes à feu les problèmes liés aux termes utilisés sur le site Web pour décrire le statut du projet de loi C-71. Afin de régler rapidement ces problèmes, les responsables du Programme canadien des armes à feu ont consulté les intervenants concernés et ont modifié le contenu du site Web le 30 mai 2018.

Après la question de privilège soulevée à la Chambre par le député de Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, un examen plus approfondi du site Web a été entrepris. Une série de modifications a été publiée le 3 juillet 2018.

Les termes utilisés dans les premières informations diffusées en ligne sur le projet de loi C-71 ne visaient pas à laisser entendre que la mesure législative était adoptée, à nuire au processus législatif ou à miner les pouvoirs du Parlement. Le contenu Web révisé éliminait toute ambiguïté possible et clarifiait le statut du projet de loi C-71.

Monsieur le président, je suis convaincu que la GRC a agi de bonne foi pour informer les Canadiens sur les répercussions qu'aurait le projet de loi s'il était adopté par le Parlement dans sa forme actuelle. Les Canadiens devaient être mis au courant des effets du projet de loi avant son adoption, étant donné qu'ils auraient des décisions à prendre avant la sanction royale. Toutefois, les publications initiales sur le site Web ne permettaient pas de conclure que le projet de loi C-71 était toujours à l'étude au Parlement et qu'il pourrait être modifié.

On constate que lors de la première mise à jour, les réponses de la foire aux questions ont été modifiées pour refléter les effets qu'aurait l'adoption de la version actuelle du projet de loi C-71. Pour ce qui est de la deuxième mise à jour, on voit que les questions de la FAQ ont aussi été révisées et corrigées.

À titre d'exemple, monsieur le président, la question initiale qui figurait sur le site Web était la suivante: « Quelle sera l'incidence du projet de loi C-71 pour les particuliers? » La réponse était que le projet de loi toucherait les armes à feu CZ modèle 858 de l'une de trois façons. Pour la deuxième version de ce même point, cela était présenté sous forme de question d'un particulier qui tente de déterminer si son arme à feu Swiss Arms ou CZ modèle 858 serait touchée par le projet de loi C-71. Dans la réponse, on indiquait que les informations présentées visaient à guider les propriétaires d'armes à feu advenant l'adoption du projet de loi.

Monsieur le président, la dernière version se lit comme suit: Quelles seraient les répercussions du projet de loi C-71 pour les propriétaires d'armes à feu Ceská Zbrojovka (CZ) et Swiss Arms? Le projet de loi C-71 propose des modifications qui auront des répercussions pour certains propriétaires d'armes à feu au Canada. Les renseignements fournis ci-dessous visent à guider les propriétaires d'armes à feu CZ/SA advenant l'adoption de ce projet de loi, tel qu'il a été présenté à la Chambre des communes le 20 mars 2018.

Ces citations démontrent l'évolution des termes utilisés.

Dans ses efforts pour tenir les Canadiens à jour le plus possible sur les effets d'une mesure législative à l'étude au Parlement, la GRC n'a pas pris toutes les mesures nécessaires pour aviser la population que le Parlement n'avait pas encore adopté ces changements. Monsieur le président, je crois que c'était une erreur de bonne foi, que la GRC a ensuite corrigée en publiant sur son site Web les deux mises à jour dont j'ai parlé.

Nous présentons nos excuses pour cette erreur et nous regrettons tout malentendu que cela peut avoir entraîné. Nous sommes toujours déterminés à fournir aux Canadiens des renseignements importants sur les exigences relatives à la possession d'une arme à feu au Canada. Nous nous engageons à utiliser un langage clair et à refléter le processus législatif avec précision.

(1130)



Enfin, je tiens à souligner le travail des députés qui sont ici aujourd'hui, qui ont saisi la Chambre de cet enjeu et qui en ont débattu à titre de parlementaires. Vous avez défendu le processus législatif et souligné l'importance continue de la transparence et de la reddition de comptes au sein des organismes gouvernementaux. Je vous en remercie.

(1135)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous passons à la première série de questions, avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie, vous et vos fonctionnaires, d'être venus.

L'autre jour, lorsque M. Motz est venu témoigner — c'est sa motion, comme vous le savez —, j'ai commencé mon intervention en donnant mon opinion. C'est choquant, j'en conviens.

J'ai essentiellement fait valoir que je m'intéresse davantage aux intentions plutôt qu'aux actions d'une personne. Je dirais d'entrée de jeu que le Comité a souvent affaire avec Élections Canada. Si les gens d'Élections Canada n'étaient pas préparés à mettre en oeuvre les futures mesures, nous serions vraiment dans une impasse si, avant l'élection, nous devions essayer de... Il y a beaucoup de travail à faire sur le terrain.

La situation présente n'est pas très différente. Il y a beaucoup de propriétaires d'armes à feu dans ma circonscription et les lois changent. Il y a un registre, puis il est aboli; il y a une amnistie, puis pas d'amnistie, etc. C'est parfois difficile à suivre.

Je suis conscient que vous avez fait preuve de diligence pour diffuser ces informations le plus rapidement possible pour que les gens puissent se préparer. Je conviens avec vous que les termes utilisés laissaient entendre quelque chose qui n'existait pas. Voilà pourquoi j'essaie de savoir quelle était l'intention.

Monsieur O'Reilly, j'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez de mes propos. Y avait-il une intention derrière cela? Quand vous a-t-on informé qu'il existe au pays un processus pour l'adoption des lois et qu'il faut par conséquent s'en remettre à cela dans les communications?

J'aimerais aussi que vous parliez du travail que vous avez fait avant le projet de loi C-71 pour en arriver là.

M. Rob O'Reilly (directeur, Services de réglementation sur les armes à feu, Programme canadien des armes à feu, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Comme vous le savez, le projet de loi C-71 comporte de multiples facettes. Nous n'avons pas l'habitude de traiter des mesures législatives à l'étude à la Chambre ou au Sénat. Un élément du projet de loi C-71 pouvait avoir une incidence sur les propriétaires d'armes à feu, puisque la date du 30 juin figurait dans le projet de loi.

Presque immédiatement après que le ministre se soit levé à la Chambre, le 20 mars, pour présenter le projet de loi C-71, nous avons commencé à recevoir des appels de propriétaires d'armes à feu et de particuliers qui s'intéressaient, si je peux employer ce terme, à deux armes à feu précises: le Swiss Arms et le Ceská Zbrojovka, comme cela se prononce, d'après ce que m'ont dit mes collègues polonais — c'est la dernière fois que j'emploierai ce terme —, aussi appelé CZ.

Dès le 20 mars, ou presque, nous avons commencé à recevoir des appels et nous avons alors jugé qu'il serait important de commencer à fournir des renseignements aux propriétaires d'armes à feu canadiens.

Nous avons commencé à travailler sur...

M. Scott Simms:

Et vous étiez aussi conscient de la question de l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Oui, tout à fait.

Le programme a collaboré assez étroitement avec le ministère de la Sécurité publique dans les premières étapes de la rédaction de la mesure législative. J'ai comparu devant des parlementaires en compagnie du ministre le soir où le projet de loi a été présenté. Je me préparais à comparaître devant le comité SECU à ce sujet.

J'étais très conscient de la nature évolutive du projet de loi, mais il devenait pressant de fournir des renseignements en raison de l'augmentation du volume d'appels au programme.

M. Scott Simms:

Madame Strachan, avez-vous un commentaire?

Sous-commissaire Jennifer Strachan (sous-commissaire, Services de police spécialisés, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Tout d'abord, je travaille au programme depuis septembre. J'ai beaucoup de collègues dévoués qui s'affairent à fournir des renseignements aux Canadiens, et ce, en tout temps. Ce n'est pas tout le monde qui peut appeler. Ils cherchent à fournir des renseignements de bonne foi et en toute honnêteté, en composant parfois avec des contraintes de temps. Ils reconnaissent que dans leur empressement à diffuser les informations, les termes employés n'étaient peut-être pas aussi précis qu'ils auraient dû l'être.

Nous regrettons ce qui s'est passé. Ironiquement, les efforts déployés par le personnel visaient à aider les Canadiens et non à susciter la confusion.

(1140)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Simms, j'aimerais ajouter quelque chose. Ce n'est pas la première fois qu'un gouvernement se heurte à la question que nous examinons aujourd'hui; c'est arrivé à des gouvernements de toutes les allégeances politiques.

Ce serait peut-être utile que votre comité offre des conseils techniques aux fonctionnaires sur la manière de formuler les informations qu'ils préparent dans le but de renseigner d'avance la population sur des dispositions législatives n'ayant pas encore reçu l'approbation finale de la Chambre des communes, pour veiller à ce que ces informations soient parfaitement exactes.

Y a-t-il une formulation que le Comité pourrait recommander aux fonctionnaires d'utiliser pour fournir de l'information par anticipation, de manière à ce qu'il soit très clair pour la population canadienne que l'information présente, ce qui arriverait si le projet de loi était adopté? Peut-être, y a-t-il même une façon, au moyen de la technologie, de programmer un message qui apparaîtrait sur les sites Web et qui dirait quelque chose comme: « L'information présentée concerne un projet de loi qui n'a pas encore été mis en application par le Parlement du Canada. »

Le dossier dont nous sommes saisis n'est pas le premier en son genre; il y a en a eu beaucoup d'autres au fil des années, des législatures et des gouvernements. Pourriez-vous recommander que les fonctionnaires suivent tous des principes semblables, pour veiller à ce que la population reçoive de l'information exacte?

M. Scott Simms:

Je serais ravi de le faire, mais il semblerait que mon temps de parole est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci.

Je donne la parole à Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez décrit par le détail ce qui est arrivé; à mon avis, le Comité a très bien été mis au courant de la situation. Je pense que la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici aujourd'hui, c'est pour comprendre comment et pourquoi c'est arrivé. Vous avez affirmé dans votre résumé que d'après vous, il s'agit d'une erreur de bonne foi. Je dirais — et je pense que mes collègues seraient d'accord avec moi — que lorsqu'une erreur est commise, nous sommes certainement tous désolés, mais le plus important est de découvrir pourquoi c'est arrivé et de faire en sorte qu'une pareille erreur ne se reproduise plus jamais.

Je vous ai certainement entendu le dire, mais je vous demanderais de confirmer, s'il vous plaît, si la situation qui nous occupe vous inquiète personnellement.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je tiens à ce que la population canadienne reçoive de l'information exacte sur toutes les mesures que le gouvernement prend, et le fait qu'il y a eu de la confusion m'inquiète certainement. Oui.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci pour votre réponse.

Compte tenu de votre inquiétude, appuyez-vous l'idée que nous allions au fond de l'affaire et, du même coup, que nous fournissions des conseils pour éviter qu'une telle situation se reproduise?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je serais certainement heureux de recevoir vos conseils, comme je viens de le dire à M. Simms.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Excellent. Qu'avez-vous fait personnellement, monsieur le ministre, après que la question de privilège a été soulevée pour la première fois à la Chambre?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Évidemment, une fois que M. Motz a soulevé la question, j'ai reconnu qu'il faudrait suivre une procédure parlementaire. La séance actuelle en fait partie, et je tiens absolument à ce que cette procédure mène à la mise en place de mécanismes qui permettront d'éviter que ce genre de problème se répète, un problème qui a touché de nombreux gouvernements au fil des années.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Après que le Président a jugé l'outrage fondé de prime abord, le secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, M. Lamoureux, a dit à la Chambre: « le gouvernement regrette que cette situation se soit produite et a pris des mesures pour la rectifier. »

Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur les mesures qui ont été prises?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je pense que M. Lamoureux parlait des modifications qui ont été apportées sur le site Web entre le début de mai et le début de juillet, je crois; j'en ai parlé dans ma déclaration préliminaire.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, merci.

D'autres ministères ou d'autres organismes centraux ont-ils pris des mesures pour tenter de rectifier la situation?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

D'après moi, les ministères et les organismes attendent, en fait, les délibérations de votre comité et les recommandations que vous formulerez à l'intention de l'ensemble du gouvernement, en vue d'éviter qu'une situation comme celle-ci se reproduise.

(1145)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Quel rôle jouez-vous personnellement, monsieur le ministre, dans les publications gouvernementales concernant les projets de loi que vous parrainez?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Évidemment, le cabinet du ministre est responsable des paroles et des actions du ministre. Le système prévoit un grand nombre de vérifications et de revérifications qui visent à faire en sorte que le ministre présente les faits exacts et qu'il reflète précisément la position du gouvernement dans ses communiqués de presse, ses discours et les réponses qu'il donne à la Chambre des communes.

Les organismes qui font partie de mon portefeuille produisent de leur propre initiative une quantité énorme de communications dont ils sont responsables. Ce n'est pas possible pour le ministre de réviser ou de contrôler le contenu de leurs publications; il y en a tout simplement trop. Or, c'est important — et d'après moi, c'est là le sujet réel de la conversation d'aujourd'hui — non seulement pour le ministre de tenir compte des convenances liées aux mesures législatives, mais aussi pour tous les organismes de comprendre les convenances et de les respecter.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous ou votre personnel avez-vous joué un rôle dans la publication gouvernementale qui nous occupe, ainsi que dans d'autres publications afférentes à d'autres projets de loi à l'étude au Parlement? Pouvez-vous nous parler, de façon générale, des publications gouvernementales et du rôle que votre personnel et vous jouez relativement aux projets de loi à l'étude au Parlement, ainsi que des informations qui ont été mal communiquées dans ce cas-ci?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

À ma connaissance, mon personnel et mon cabinet n'ont joué aucun rôle par rapport à la publication en question.

Il faut comprendre la quantité de documents en jeu. Prenons l'exemple des sites Web. La GRC transmet des renseignements à la population sur une grande variété de sujets, et je pense qu'il y aurait, à tout moment donné, l'équivalent de 100 000 pages de documents. Ce serait physiquement impossible pour un ministre fédéral de réviser les communications de la GRC, en plus d'être inapproprié d'avoir la prétention de le faire.

La GRC est un organisme très spécial qui doit jouir d'une grande autonomie et qui doit être en mesure de communiquer directement avec la population canadienne, sans que ses communications soient filtrées par le ministre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Vous niez donc catégoriquement que vous ou votre personnel avez joué un rôle dans la révision ou l'approbation des documents de la GRC qui nous amènent ici aujourd'hui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

À ma connaissance, nous n'avons joué aucun rôle — aucun.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Les fonctionnaires du ministère de la Sécurité publique jouent-ils un rôle dans la révision des publications des organismes de votre portefeuille concernant vos mesures législatives, monsieur le ministre?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Quand une communication est faite au nom du gouvernement ou du ministère, le ministre a un rôle très important à jouer, mais quand la GRC s'exprime au nom de la GRC, cela fait partie de ses fonctions à elle, et le gouvernement n'a pas la prétention de la museler ou encore de réviser ou de contrôler ses communications.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

Merci.

Je donne la parole à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'être ici, monsieur le ministre, madame la sous-commissaire, monsieur O'Reilly.

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, puisque c'est ma dernière année...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je le fais depuis des années, monsieur Christopherson.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David Christopherson:

Après 35 ans de vie publique, j'en suis maintenant à ma dernière année. Dorénavant, une grande partie de ce que je fais, je le fais pour la dernière fois; je saisis donc les occasions pour ne pas les perdre. J'aimerais prendre un instant pour complimenter M. Goodale pour son rôle dans le domaine politique.

Vous êtes un parlementaire hautement estimé et respecté, tant au fédéral qu'au provincial. J'ai aussi été député provincial. Au-delà du rôle que vous jouez aujourd'hui, vous faites vraiment partie des gens qui contribuent à la bonne réputation du Canada. J'ai beaucoup de respect pour vous. Vous êtes là depuis longtemps. Je sais ce que c'est que de tenter de se maintenir à flot; je connais les limites éthiques qu'il faut quotidiennement... Vous avez fait un travail remarquable à cet égard. Votre carrière est admirable. Je vous respecte, monsieur, et je vous remercie pour votre service.

Maintenant, cela étant dit...

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David Christopherson: ... habituellement, c'est la partie que je préfère: quand je me retourne et je commence à lancer mes questions.

(1150)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Oui: à part cela, Mme Lincoln....

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson:

Je dois dire que c'est votre jour de chance. Vous devriez acheter un billet de loterie, Ralph, parce que j'ai été dans la même situation que vous, mais au niveau provincial, à Queen's Park. À l'époque, on parlait du solliciteur général du Canada. En tant que solliciteur général de l'Ontario, j'étais exactement dans la même situation. J'avais exactement la même relation avec la Police provinciale de l'Ontario que vous avez avec la GRC. J'écoutais attentivement en me demandant si quelque chose ne correspondait pas à ma propre expérience, étant donné que je suis passé par là.

Chers collègues, je dois vous dire que je suis ouvert, tout à fait ouvert à l'idée de vérifier s'il y a un problème — un vrai problème —, mais outre l'erreur, comme cela semble avoir été le cas… je vais m'arrêter là où le ministre s'est arrêté, c'est-à-dire aux mesures à prendre maintenant. Je vois seulement des gens qui s'efforçaient de faire leur travail. Si quelqu'un pense autrement, j'aimerais le savoir. Je suis tout à fait disposé à poursuivre le débat, car c'est important, mais je dois dire, comme il s'agit de la deuxième fois que nous en discutons, que je ne vois rien qui justifierait que nous poussions plus loin la question.

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai dit, et je pense que c'était lors de la dernière réunion, qu'il fallait qu'il y ait quelques courbettes et qu'on entende dire que cela ne se reproduira plus. C'est ce que vous avez fait, et c'est bien. Il est tout à fait opportun que l'exécutif reconnaisse la primauté du Parlement. Lorsque l'exécutif viole les droits du Parlement, c'est le Parlement qui doit demander à l'exécutif de rendre des comptes. Dans une vraie démocratie, l'exécutif reconnaît que le Parlement l'a rappelé à l'ordre et promet que l'erreur ne se reproduira pas. En ce qui me concerne, c'est ce qui s'est produit, et l'affaire arrive à son terme. Mais si quelqu'un croit qu'il faut fouiller davantage la question, je n'ai rien contre.

Je voudrais discuter de l'idée. J'y réfléchissais, monsieur le ministre, pendant que vous parliez.

Et, commissaire, je réfléchissais aussi à votre rôle dans tout cela. Il y a la partie où le gouvernement établit ce qu'il va faire. Le gouvernement a ensuite le droit d'expliquer ce qu'il fait. Puis il y a les jeux politiques, où les politiciens comme nous vantent les mérites de ce qu'ils veulent faire. C'est tout à fait légitime. Cela fait partie du processus. Mais ce sont des éléments distincts, et dans ce cas, il y a eu des chevauchements.

Comment réglons-nous le problème? Ce n'est pas une première. J'ai vu cela au niveau fédéral, tout comme certains de nos collègues. J'ai vu cela au niveau provincial. La même chose s'est produite, et le président a sévi, mais personne n'a jamais proposé de solution. Nous pourrions adopter l'idée du ministre, et voir si avec le temps, nous arrivons à comprendre: comment doit procéder le gouvernement? Comment fait-on ces trois choses? Il y a d'abord le gouvernement qui dit ce qu'il veut faire; il y a ensuite les fonctionnaires qui expliquent aux gens ce que le gouvernement veut faire; puis il y a les jeux politiques.

Ce qui m'inquiétait, c'était l'idée ou l'hypothèse voulant que le projet de loi allait procéder sans être amendé. Ce n'est pas forcément le cas. C'est un peu risqué, et c'est pourquoi les explications, et où elles sont fournies, sont si importantes, car on n'en est qu'au début du processus. Un projet de loi ne devient pas loi par la volonté du premier ministre ou du ministre. Il y a tout un processus à suivre, et il se pourrait bien qu'à la fin il soit différent. Le Parlement étant une entité libre, il se peut qu'il ne soit pas adopté. C'est toujours possible, même si on est convaincu du contraire.

Pour ce qui est de la façon de procéder, si on veut expliquer — et je m'aventure en terrain inconnu comme vous l'avez suggéré, monsieur le ministre —, si les fonctionnaires veulent commencer à parler d'un projet de loi quand il a encore des chances d'être amendé et que cela pouvait l'amener complètement ailleurs, comment peuvent-ils procéder? Je pense que cela vaut la peine d'examiner un peu plus la question, même si c'est juste pour en parler, y mettre des mots, ou quoi que ce soit d'autre pour pouvoir bien séparer ces éléments.

Monsieur le président, je n'ai absolument rien à redire, car le ministre a couvert tous les points.

Cela étant dit, je vais écouter les idées de mes collègues, mais je pense que nous sommes arrivés au bout du tunnel. Peut-on faire autre chose que ce que le ministre a proposé de faire pour aider le Parlement et le gouvernement à éviter que cela se reproduise?

Merci, monsieur.

(1155)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, aimeriez-vous répondre?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Christopherson, j'aimerais tout d'abord vous remercier de vos bons mots. Je vous retourne le compliment au sujet de votre carrière et des derniers mois de votre mandat pendant la présente législature.

J'aimerais simplement dire quelques mots au sujet de votre dernier point. On pourrait tirer avantage de la technologie. On parle d'information qui a été publiée sur un site Web. Y aurait-il une façon de procéder pour que le site Web signale lui-même au lecteur que l'information porte sur un projet de loi qui n'a pas encore été adopté par le Parlement? On pourrait inclure sur le site une invitation qui apparaîtrait automatiquement à l'écran et qui dirait par exemple « Si vous avez des commentaires à formuler à ce sujet, voici comment les soumettre au Parlement. Le projet de loi est encore l'étude et n'a pas encore été adopté. Les règles n'ont pas encore changé. »

La technologie pourrait nous aider. On pourrait avoir une page d'une couleur différente qui signalerait qu'il s'agit d'une mesure législative qui n'a pas encore été adoptée.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous passons à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je surveille l'horloge, car je sais que le ministre doit nous quitter bientôt. J'aimerais poser quelques questions, puis céder la parole aux députés de l'opposition pour qu'ils aient plus de temps de parole, compte tenu des votes qui ont eu lieu.

Vous avez dit que la GRC était un organisme spécial. Est-ce en raison de son indépendance, de l'indépendance entre votre bureau et la GRC, et si c'est le cas, pourriez-vous nous en parler un peu s'il vous plaît?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, on pourrait, j'en suis convaincu, en dire autant de presque tous les ministères et organismes du gouvernement.

C'est assurément le cas, toutefois, quand on parle de notre force de police nationale, une force de police qui est à la fois nationale, fédérale, internationale, provinciale, municipale et autochtone, soit un des organismes les plus complexes de tout l'appareil gouvernemental.

De toute évidence, l'indépendance de la police est un principe extrêmement important qui sert très bien notre démocratie. Les ministres ne disent pas aux policiers quoi faire. Les policiers font ce qu'ils ont à faire et ils sont responsables de leurs actes. Si le gouvernement ou la population ne sont pas satisfaits des résultats, la tête dirigeante, le commissaire, est remplacée.

C'est un principe important. La GRC est une force de police et il faut que les Canadiens sachent qu'elle fonctionne de façon indépendante et qu'elle bénéficie de la confiance totale et absolue de la population.

M. Chris Bittle:

Ce sera sans doute ma dernière question.

Lors de la dernière réunion, nous avons entendu le témoignage de M. Motz, qui m'a un peu troublé, et je lui ai posé beaucoup de questions. Il était possible qu'il s'agisse d'une simple erreur. Mais M. Motz a ensuite parlé des soupçons voulant qu'un geste répréhensible ait été commis.

Je ne peux donc en déduire que les conservateurs croient que de deux choses l'une: soit il s'agissait d'une simple erreur de la GRC, soit il s'agissait d'une vaste machination impliquant votre cabinet, jusqu'en bas, ordonnant à la GRC de modifier son site Web. Des dizaines de personnes seraient concernées, je présume, pour effectuer ces quelques changements au site Web.

Ce qui est ironique, c'est qu'on a eu recours au privilège parlementaire pour formuler ces allégations, à l'abri, tout en faisant valoir qu'il y avait atteinte au privilège parlementaire.

Aimeriez-vous nous parler de ces allégations?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce n'est absolument pas vrai. Rien dans les faits n'indique qu'il s'agisse d'autre chose que d'un désir sincère de la part de la GRC et des responsables du Programme des armes à feu de diffuser des renseignements importants aux Canadiens pour les informer de certaines conséquences.

Il s'agit d'une erreur, d'une simple erreur, de ne pas avoir mentionné que le tout était assujetti à l'adoption du projet de loi, qu'il s'agissait d'une proposition, et que la loi ne serait pas modifiée tant que le projet de loi ne serait pas adopté.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1200)

Le président:

Monsieur Motz.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le ministre et les témoins d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais simplement mentionner, monsieur le ministre, que les propos de M. Bittle ne reflètent pas ce que j'ai dit mardi. Je n'ai jamais parlé d'un plan répréhensible, d'une intention délibérée, ou même d'une « machination », pour reprendre le mot qu'il vient d'utiliser. Ce sont ses mots, et non pas les miens.

Les gens m'ont fait part de leurs préoccupations au sujet de la confusion que l'information créait. Un projet de loi avait été proposé, et était à l'étude — en comité à ce moment —, puis un organisme dont vous êtes responsable, la GRC, a diffusé proactivement de l'information, ce qui est une bonne chose. Là où le bât blesse, toutefois, c'est que personne au sein de votre ministère n'ait pu donner de directives à la GRC, par un mécanisme quelconque, pour veiller à ce que le bon libellé soit utilisé.

À cela vous avez répondu qu'effectivement personne, à votre connaissance, au sein de votre bureau — à la Sécurité publique — n'a donné de directives à la GRC sur la façon de procéder ou sur le libellé à utiliser. C'est ce que vous avez dit, et je crois qu'à votre connaissance, ce n'est pas ce qui s'est passé.

Lorsque des projets de loi émanent de votre ministère, y a-t-il un mécanisme en place maintenant pour éviter… qu'on tienne pour acquis le rôle du Parlement dans ces projets de loi? C'est exactement ce qui s'est produit dans cette situation. Comme cela a été reconnu, certaines personnes croyaient en raison des termes utilisés que la loi avait été adoptée.

Je suis curieux. Vous avez confié au Comité la responsabilité de s'assurer que cette situation ne se reproduise plus et de lui fournir un mécanisme pour ce faire.

Y a-t-il quelque chose en place au sein de votre ministère pour que les fonctionnaires comprennent le rôle du Parlement et celui des organismes qui relèvent de vous?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Motz, je m'occupe de ce dossier en ce moment et j'examine les solutions.

Il y a probablement lieu d'avoir des directives permanentes — et le Comité pourrait nous donner son avis à ce sujet — que le ministre diffuse à tous les organismes qui relèvent de son portefeuille, et en particulier à leurs services des communications, à savoir qu'ils doivent veiller, en diffusant de l'information à la population au sujet d'un projet de loi, à indiquer clairement que rien n'a encore été adopté. On pourrait même suggérer un libellé qu'il faudrait utiliser dans tous les cas pour s'assurer que c'est très clair pour la population.

Il faudra sans doute que la directive soit mise à jour de temps à autre pour s'assurer qu'elle demeure d'actualité.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien.

Vous avez mentionné dans votre déclaration préliminaire, monsieur, que ce n'était pas la première fois qu'une telle situation se produisait, indépendamment des allégeances politiques. Tous les partis politiques l'ont fait.

Dans ces circonstances, serait-il possible que les fonctionnaires — en particulier dans le cas d'un gouvernement majoritaire — ne soient absolument pas au courant, dans certaines circonstances, du rôle du Parlement? Ils pourraient présumer qu'un projet de loi va être adopté tel quel, sans modification, bien avant qu'il ne devienne loi.

Y aurait-il une certaine forme d'éducation nécessaire ici, au lieu de simplement émettre une directive?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je pense qu'il serait utile de rappeler aux services des communications des cabinets des ministres, mais aussi aux ministères et organismes, les prérogatives législatives du Parlement, et qu'une loi n'en est pas une tant qu'elle n'a pas reçu la sanction royale, et que cela ne peut se produire qu'après que la Chambre des communes et le Sénat aient eu leur mot à dire et pris leur décision.

Comme vous le savez, dans certains cas, la situation est inverse. Dans le cas d'une motion de voies et moyens, par exemple, à partir du moment où le ministre des Finances se présente à la Chambre des communes pour déposer une motion de ce genre, et ce, même avant que le projet de loi soit déposé et adopté, la convention veut que le ministère des Finances agisse comme si la motion avait été adoptée.

(1205)

M. Glen Motz:

Je vais devoir vous croire sur parole parce que je ne suis absolument pas…

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce le cas même lorsque le gouvernement est minoritaire?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Oui, c'est le cas même lorsque le gouvernement est minoritaire.

M. Glen Motz:

Je ne suis pas un expert en procédure.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il y a des exemples où cela va dans les deux sens, mais il est toujours bon que les choses soient claires. Nous allons nous y employer.

Le président:

Il ne reste plus de temps. Avez-vous une courte question?

M. Glen Motz:

Depuis le tout début, le problème pour moi n'a jamais été le projet de loi en soi, mais le non-respect du processus. Le but était de veiller à ce que — et il se pourrait bien que cela se soit produit à maintes reprises — rien ne soit tenu pour acquis. Le Comité a été chargé de s'en occuper.

La situation s'est produite dans le cas de ce projet de loi, et on souhaite que cela ne se reproduise pas.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est exactement ce que je souhaite, monsieur Motz. J'espère que nous pourrons mettre en place un mécanisme de protection dans le processus de communications qui fera en sorte que les prérogatives législatives du Parlement du Canada sont connues, comprises, et respectées.

Le président:

Merci à tous. Nous avons eu une première heure très positive et constructive.

Nous allons suspendre la séance quelques minutes, puis nous reprendrons.

(1205)

(1215)

Le président:

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 121e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

La réunion est publique. Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir à nouveau la sous-commissaire Strachan et M. O'Reilly.

Je crois que vous n'avez pas de déclaration préliminaire. Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Non, je suis prête à répondre à vos questions.

J'espère que nous pourrons vous fournir les réponses à vos questions.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est parfait.

Nous allons passer à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Le site Web de la GRC — j'ai vérifié en ligne — contient environ 100 000 pages. Est-ce exact? Comment procédez-vous pour modifier et tenir à jour ces pages? Quel genre de surveillance y a-t-il? À quel point les équipes de communications travaillent-elles de manière indépendante? Pouvez-vous nous expliquer cela?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Selon mon expérience passée, les équipes tentent de tenir l'information à jour. Je vous dirai qu'à mon arrivée au programme, c'est l'une des premières choses que j'ai faites. J'admets que l'information sur les divers programmes sur lesquels je travaille n'est pas toujours à jour. La situation évolue continuellement, et il faut toujours s'efforcer de tenir l'information à jour.

Nous avons les responsables du programme de communications national qui s'occupent des enjeux stratégiques. Puis chaque programme possède sa propre équipe tactique, en quelque sorte, de communications.

Oui, le contenu Web est très abondant. Je dirais que nous devons être tournés un peu plus vers l'avenir — je parle au nom d'un autre secteur de notre organisme — et éliminer une partie du contenu.

Vous avez raison. Il y a beaucoup de contenu sur le site.

(1220)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand une page moyenne est révisée, quel échelon de la direction en approuve le contenu final, contrairement à l'intention?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je ne peux pas parler des autres programmes.

Par le passé, j'ai constaté que, selon le contenu, les textes étaient soumis à l'approbation de directeurs à divers échelons. Dans ce cas, la responsabilité relevait du programme des armes à feu à l'époque.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Allait-on jusqu'à demander au sous-commissaire d'approuver la formulation?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Pas dans ce cas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cela se produit souvent?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je viens d'être nommée sous-commissaire. J'étais commandante avant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À titre de commandante, venait-on vous voir régulièrement pour vous dire qu'on avait besoin de modifier un commentaire et vous demander la permission?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

On discute généralement de la justification pour modifier les communications. Ensuite, il revient aux responsables des communications d'élaborer le matériel puisque ce sont eux les spécialistes. Dans le dernier cas, ce ne serait pas quelque chose que j'aurais examiné.

Je comprendrais la justification de leur modification, c'est clair.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous leur transmettez l'intention et leur demandez de s'en occuper.

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

À un certain niveau... et dans ce cas, c'était — je vais parler de la situation dont je suis venue discuter avec vous aujourd'hui — à l'échelon du programme des armes à feu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous déjà personnellement modifié une page Web sur le site de la GRC?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je ne l'ai jamais fait, non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, madame Strachan.

Nous allons maintenant continuer avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Monsieur O'Reilly, j'aimerais reprendre où nous étions tout à l'heure.

La question que je veux aborder est celle du travail préparatoire pour un projet de loi à l'étude. La situation que nous avons maintenant et l'erreur de bonne foi qui a été commise vous a placé dans une situation où tous vos efforts pourraient avoir été en vain.

Je vous l'accorde, les gouvernements majoritaires finissent par faire adopter leurs projets de loi au bout du compte. Quoi qu'il en soit, vous devez faire le travail préparatoire.

Au fil des ans, avec les modifications apportées à la politique sur les armes à feu, les registres, l'absence de registres, les amnisties, etc... la principale raison pour laquelle vous avez vraiment à faire une bonne partie de ce travail est-elle qu'on vous appelle pour vous demander ce qui s'est passé? Soudainement, les armes que portent certaines personnes sont maintenant beaucoup plus restreintes qu'elles l'étaient, ou elles ne le sont pas, ou elles requièrent différents permis.

J'essaie simplement de comprendre comment vous gérez les projets de loi qui influent sur la réglementation.

M. Rob O'Reilly:

D'accord.

Merci beaucoup d'avoir posé cette question.

Comme vous le savez, trois projets de loi sur les armes à feu ont été présentés depuis 2012, soit le projet de loi C-19, le projet de loi C-42 et le projet de loi C-71. Le programme a participé et continue de participer étroitement à la préparation de certaines affaires et aux consultations préliminaires sur ces projets de loi. Nous connaissons bien le processus parlementaire et essayons de le respecter. Nombre des documents qu'on nous demande d'examiner et de commenter tombent sous le sceau du secret du Cabinet. Nous connaissons très bien la façon de traiter ces documents ainsi que l'ampleur des consultations que nous pouvons ou non tenir compte tenu de ce privilège particulier.

Lorsqu'il est question de mesures législatives du genre, nous sommes aussi en mesure de deviner les secteurs sur lesquels on posera des questions. Comme je l'ai mentionné dans ma première déclaration, nous n'avons pas l'habitude de nous prononcer sur des projets de loi à l'étude. Le projet de loi C-71 compte bien des éléments. Dans ce cas, nous aurions probablement préféré ne pas formuler le moindre commentaire.

Malheureusement, et nous l'avons vu par le passé, dès qu'un nouveau projet de loi est déposé ou qu'il en est question dans les médias ou le contexte public, on nous appelle immédiatement.

Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de dire que nous n'allons pas préparer de questions et de réponses pour un sujet en particulier, car le fait est que nous avons des centaines d'employés qui doivent répondre à ces appels. Si nous n'avons préparé aucune réponse pour informer les Canadiens qui le demandent, il est normal qu'ils soient plus confus ou vexés.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. C'est intéressant. Vous dites que la raison principale pour laquelle vous estimez qu'il vous incombe de diffuser l'information concernant une mesure législative qui n'a pas été adoptée est celle de garder le public bien informé. C'est plus une question de communiquer l'information aux gens avant l'entrée en vigueur de la loi que de déterminer comment vos employés géreraient cette réglementation.

(1225)

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je crois, oui. Dans le contexte du programme canadien des armes à feu, je ne pense pas que quiconque croyait que cette mesure législative donnée avait force de loi ou qu'elle l'a maintenant. Comme je l'ai dit, nous composons avec les manoeuvres du projet de loi C-71 depuis maintenant près de deux ans. Nous en sommes très conscients, mais notre première préoccupation, à part la sécurité publique, est d'offrir, en temps opportun, des renseignements exacts et clairs à notre clientèle, qui sont les propriétaires d'armes à feu canadiens.

M. Scott Simms:

Il y a un certain nombre de renseignements confidentiels. Je le comprends aussi, mais pour les personnes de première ligne qui doivent répondre aux questions du propriétaire d'armes à feu moyen lorsqu'il appelle, jusqu'où vous rendez-vous au bas de la chaîne? Jusqu'aux employés étant donné que la mesure législative n'a pas encore été adoptée?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Les seules personnes qui ont accès aux renseignements qui tombent sous le sceau du secret du Cabinet sont les membres de l'équipe de gestion et les personnes dotées des habilitations de sécurité appropriées pour y avoir accès. C'est à cet échelon que les messages stratégiques sont rédigés — pour paraphraser ce qu'a dit la sous-commissaire, il s'agit des messages de haut niveau. Cependant, nous donnons ensuite pour consigne à notre personnel des communications de dire que nous voulons communiquer sur une question donnée, par exemple, les fusils CZ et Swiss Arms, pour répondre à nos groupes de clients. Nous leur demandons de rédiger des produits de communication à nous soumettre pour examen. Nous ne leur donnons pas de détails précis sur ce qu'ils doivent rédiger, seulement des consignes pour les orienter.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup encore une fois à la sous-commissaire et au directeur d'être venus aujourd'hui.

Qui a rédigé les publications qui nous ont amenés ici aujourd'hui?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Malheureusement, je ne suis pas en mesure de répondre à cette question en particulier. Je peux vous dire que le produit de communication en tant que tel compte vraiment deux volets. Le premier est celui que nous avons préparé pour les personnes qui déterminent elles-mêmes si l'arme à feu dont elles sont propriétaires pourrait être visée. Ce sont nos techniciens en armes à feu, les véritables experts de l'identification et de la classification des armes à feu, qui ont rédigé ce document.

Au bout du compte, les messages qui ont été publiés sur notre site Web ont été rédigés par le personnel des communications internes, à la demande de l'équipe de gestion.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Qui approuve le libellé de ces publications?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Dans ce cas, le libellé aurait reçu mon approbation préliminaire, car je fais partie des directeurs, pour ensuite être approuvé par le directeur général du Programme canadien des armes à feu.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Monsieur O'Reilly, qui a été le directeur officiel le plus haut placé qui ait approuvé les publications?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Dans ce cas en particulier, ce serait le directeur général du Programme canadien des armes à feu. Comme la sous-commissaire l'a mentionné plus tôt, il pourrait arriver qu'on communique quelque chose à un niveau beaucoup plus stratégique ou pour lequel nous coordonnons nos efforts avec d'autres ministères. Disons qu'il s'agit d'enfants disparus ou de vols d'armes à feu, qui pourraient se rapporter au crime organisé, etc., auquel cas les messages seraient stratégiques et feraient l'objet de consultations à l'échelon de la sous-commissaire où ils finiraient par être approuvés.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Est-ce toujours l'échelon le plus élevé auquel les bulletins spéciaux à l'intention des entreprises sont approuvés?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Dans le contexte du Programme canadien des armes à feu, les bulletins spéciaux à l'intention des entreprises seraient approuvés à l'échelon du directeur général, mais selon la nature de ces bulletins, par exemple, si nous nous attendions à une réaction et nous disions une chose qui, selon nous, pourrait ne pas être bien accueillie par la communauté des armes à feu dans son entièreté, nous informerions les personnes dans la chaîne de commandement pour nous assurer que personne ne soit pris de court par des informations qui pourraient être mentionnées aux nouvelles le lendemain.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce le processus d'approbation habituel des publications concernant des projets de loi? Sinon, quel serait-il?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je ne pense pas que nous ayons un processus d'approbation pour les projets de loi parce que, pour autant que je sache, c'est la première fois que nous nous sommes prononcés sur des aspects d'une mesure législative à l'étude. Une fois qu'un projet de loi a force de loi, il nous arrivera souvent de parler des différences entre ce que la sanction royale et l'entrée en vigueur pourraient signifier. Dans le cas du projet de loi C-71, certains éléments pourraient entrer en vigueur une fois qu'il aura reçu la sanction royale et d'autres, à une date ultérieure. À ce stade, il est possible que nous envoyions des communications sur ces aspects pour clarifier les choses, mais nous n'avons pas coutume de nous prononcer sur des projets de loi actuellement à l'étude à la Chambre.

(1230)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Avez-vous besoin de consulter le cabinet de votre ministre avant de diffuser des publications concernant un projet de loi dont le ministre responsable de votre organisme est le parrain?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Encore une fois, on a discuté de l'esprit dans lequel cette communication a été rédigée à l'intention des propriétaires d'armes à feu canadiens avec le personnel au cabinet du ministre, mais je vous dirais que j'ai appris que le message qui a été publié n'a pas été soumis à l'examen du personnel au cabinet du ministre.

Compte tenu de la raison pour laquelle nous avons cherché à faire cela, nous avons consulté le personnel du ministère, qui a compris que c'était pour mieux informer les Canadiens en raison des délais serrés concernant la date de mise en oeuvre, qui aurait été fin juin.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Donc vous diriez qu'on a tenu des consultations auprès du personnel ministériel concernant l'information qui a été publiée.

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Oui, concernant ce que le programme des armes à feu voulait faire pour mieux appuyer les Canadiens et la raison pour laquelle nous cherchions à le faire, mais le message en tant que tel qui a été publié sur le site Web ne s'est jamais rendu au cabinet du ministre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord, merci.

Devez-vous consulter le Bureau du Conseil privé avant de diffuser des publications concernant des projets de loi?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je dirais que, comme Rob l'a mentionné, il n'est pas monnaie courante de se prononcer sur des projets de loi, et c'était un cas extrêmement unique. Je serai honnête avec vous. Je voudrais m'assurer qu'on discute avec le personnel du cabinet du ministre et qu'on lui demande ensuite son avis concernant la façon de procéder mais, comme on l'a déjà indiqué, il s'agit d'une situation très rare pour nous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Seriez-vous d'accord pour fournir au Comité toutes les ébauches des publications expurgées, des publications incorrectes?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Absolument.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Seriez-vous d'accord pour fournir au Comité l'ensemble des courriels et des notes de service non modifiés concernant les approbations de ces ébauches?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Absolument.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Concernant les modifications apportées aux publications le 30 mai après la question de privilège soulevée par M. Motz le 29 mai, pouvez-vous nous expliquer ce qui a suscité les modifications?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je vais laisser mon collègue Rob le faire. Je m'excuse.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, madame la sous-commissaire.

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, lorsque le projet de loi a été présenté le 20 mars, nous avons commencé à recevoir des demandes et constaté qu'il fallait fournir des renseignements. En conséquence, nous avons entamé des discussions assez tôt à la fin mars sur le besoin de publier des messages. À ce stade, nous avons fait appel à nos groupes de communications nationales internes pour les avertir que nous allions, à l'avenir, avoir besoin de publier du nouveau contenu en ligne.

Début avril, nous avons consulté nos collègues de Sécurité publique du côté des politiques pour les avertir que nous commencions à recevoir des demandes concernant cet élément particulier du projet de loi C-71. Nous étions aussi conscients du fait que les dates de réunion du comité SECU arrivaient et qu'on pourrait, à juste titre, nous poser des questions sur les mesures que nous prenions pour transmettre des renseignements concernant cette question particulière au sujet du projet de loi C-71.

Le 8 mai, nous avons publié la première version du contenu Web concernant ce que nous estimions être des renseignements importants à transmettre quant à la signification de la date du 30 juin. Je serai ravi de vous en dire plus à ce sujet si vous le souhaitez.

Peu après le 8 mai, nous avons reçu — je crois que c'était, en fait, le 10 mai — une demande d'un journaliste qui demandait à mieux comprendre pourquoi on disait aux gens de se conformer à la date du 30 juin. Après examen du site Web, il est apparu évident que le contenu fourni pourrait porter à confusion.

À ce stade, nous avons immédiatement commencé à travailler à une autre version du site Web ayant deux objectifs: celui de préciser qu'il s'agit d'un projet de loi et celui de mieux structurer le contenu Web. Vous remarquerez que, alors que la première version était une sorte de longue description, la seconde version tentait de dire très brièvement que si vous êtes un particulier, voilà où il vous faut aller pour trouver les renseignements qui vous concernent. Elle déterminait aussi si vous étiez une entreprise, car nous avons aussi compris que différentes personnes pourraient être touchées. Je crois que ce contenu a fini par être approuvé le 25 mai. On a mis la dernière main à notre contenu, si vous voulez l'appeler ainsi, le 25 mai et on a fini par le publier le 30 mai.

Le contenu du 3 juillet qui a été publié était principalement nécessaire parce que tout ce que nous avions affiché au préalable mentionnait la date imminente du 30 juin et les choses que vous deviez savoir si vous vouliez rester propriétaire d'une arme à feu en particulier. Comme le 30 juin était passé, nous avons dû modifier le contenu pour refléter, en gros, le fait que nous avions dépassé la date et que, par conséquent, vous auriez peut-être besoin de tenir compte de nouvelles réalités à l'avenir.

(1235)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur O'Reilly et merci, madame Strachan.

Le président:

Merci, madame Kusie.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Premièrement, je tiens à vous remercier pour vos réponses exhaustives, surtout la GRC. Elles sont d'une importance cruciale.

J'ai beaucoup aimé que le ministre insiste sur le fait, une fois de plus, qu'on a constaté que la police peut facilement se retrouver du mauvais côté de l'opinion publique, ce qui signifie que nous avons échoué complètement.

Tout est une question de responsabilité et de transparence, et vous avez fait preuve des deux. J'ai été très impressionné. Vous n'avez évité aucune question et vous avez été directs, honnêtes et concis. C'est ce à quoi nous nous attendons, et c'est ce à quoi les Canadiens s'attendent, alors je vous en remercie.

Si on part des commentaires qu'a formulés le ministre, que pensez-vous des mesures que nous, au Parlement, devrions prendre pour éviter cela? Quels types de choses pourrions-nous faire pour vous outiller de façon à pouvoir éviter tout cela?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je vais répondre, car M. Motz a de vraiment bonnes idées à ce sujet. Je suis la petite nouvelle, si vous voulez m'appeler ainsi; il s'agit donc pour moi d'une occasion d'apprentissage extrêmement bénéfique, et le mérite qu'a le Comité en protégeant le Parlement ne m'échappe pas.

Vous êtes de toute évidence des parlementaires très expérimentés. Je pense que les collègues avec lesquels je travaille dans le cadre du Programme canadien des armes à feu sont très passionnés lorsqu'il est question des clients qu'ils servent au pays et sont très sensibles aux diverses mises en garde. Je viens du secteur opérationnel, où nous parlons d'avertissements. Quand il est question de renseignement, nous parlons d'avertissements relatifs aux tierces parties. Ces avertissements figurent sur tous les documents opérationnels que nous fournissons au sujet de la sécurité nationale et du crime organisé.

Ainsi, pour ma part, étant nouvelle dans mes fonctions, j'ai trouvé la discussion brillante. Ici encore, la communication de renseignements sur un projet de loi qui n'a pas encore été adopté par le Parlement est rarissime, mais, pour être honnête, il serait très utile de disposer d'un processus ou d'une orientation qui nous aiderait à faire les choses dans les règles de l'art et à respecter le Parlement.

Je considère que c'est comme un avertissement relatif aux tierces parties que nous utilisons dans le cadre de nos opérations afin de porter attention à la manière dont nous utilisons les preuves et les renseignements. Alors que je commence à travailler dans le cadre de ce programme, il m'incombe de permettre à mes collègues de la fonction publique de vraiment continuer de servir la population canadienne. Il est de ma responsabilité d'assurer leur sécurité dans leur travail et de vous garantir, à titre de parlementaires, que nous prenons la question avec le plus grand sérieux. Je recevrais donc avec plaisir toute orientation que le Comité pourrait me donner à ce sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur O'Reilly.

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je ferais écho aux propos de la sous-commissaire. Je peux vous dire que du point de vue du programme... Tout d'abord, au nom du programme, je veux présenter nos excuses à la Chambre et aux Canadiens chez qui les renseignements publiés en ligne ont peut-être semé la confusion. Ce n'était certainement pas là notre intention. La sous-commissaire a fait remarquer avec justesse que la plupart des gens qui travaillent dans le cadre du programme sont passionnés par leur travail et sont déterminés à servir la population canadienne et le secteur des armes à feu.

Quand cette erreur s'est produite, cela nous a poussés à réfléchir un peu plus attentivement à ce que nous faisons. Parfois, il est très facile, dans notre hâte de fournir de l'information, de ne pas réfléchir à tous les aspects du message que nous cherchons à transmettre. Je peux vous garantir que mes collègues et moi-même revérifierons tout ce que nous ferons dans l'avenir et veillerons à nous conformer entièrement aux directives et à mieux faire les choses dans le cadre du programme.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis satisfait et je n'ai plus de questions. Merci, monsieur le président. [Français]

Le président:

Merci.

C'est maintenant le tour de Mme Lapointe.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui. C'est très intéressant.

Monsieur O'Reilly, vous avez dit tantôt que c'était la troisième fois depuis 2012 qu'il y avait un projet de loi visant à modifier la Loi sur les armes à feu. Êtes-vous en poste depuis tout ce temps?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Oui. J'ai commencé à travailler pour le prédécesseur de la commissaire adjointe actuelle, Mme Strachan. J'ai donc participé aux consultations entourant le projet de loi C-19. J'oublie à cet instant précis en quelle année j'ai commencé au Programme canadien des armes à feu, mais je faisais partie de l'équipe au moment de l'élaboration du projet de loi C-42 et du projet de loi C-71.

(1240)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le fait d'avoir été en poste lors de l'adoption des projets de loi C-19 et C-42 vous a-t-il permis de voir des occasions de modifier des informations à l'intention des Canadiens?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Oui, certainement.

Comme cela a déjà été mentionné, durant la période de consultations au sujet d'un projet de loi, beaucoup de choses peuvent changer. C'est ce que nous avons vu lors des consultations tenues par le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale au sujet de ce projet de loi: des amendements ont été suggérés.

Au Programme canadien des armes à feu, nous sommes habitués de voir survenir des changements en cours de route. C'est en partie pour cette raison que nous n'aimons pas communiquer des informations au sujet d'un projet de loi qui évolue au cours du processus.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Cependant, l'information qui avait été communiquée visait à avertir les Canadiens qu'il y aurait des changements. Est-ce bien ce que vous vouliez faire?

Je parle du projet de loi C-71.

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Oui. Dans ce cas-ci, le projet de loi C-71 comportait des conséquences, et il fallait que les Canadiens soient informés de la date du 30 juin. Notre seule intention était de les informer pour qu'ils puissent prendre de bonnes décisions concernant les armes à feu touchées par ce projet de loi.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le ministre a dit plus tôt, et vous l'avez mentionné aussi, qu'on avait fait des suggestions quant aux façons de se servir de ce qui s'était passé aux mois de juin et mai 2017 pour mieux agir la prochaine fois. Vous parlez de consultations.

Quelles seraient vos suggestions en ce qui concerne l'information qu'on retrouve sur le site Web? Je sais que vous avez à vérifier l'exactitude d'un volume épouvantable d'information. Toutefois, que pourrait-on faire la prochaine fois pour que cela soit mieux fait?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

De notre côté, au Programme, je dirais que plus il y a de personnes qui examinent un document, le mieux c'est. Nous essayons de travailler étroitement avec les gens du ministère de la Sécurité publique, nos avocats et nos différentes équipes de communication. Cela constituerait notre pratique dorénavant.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Tantôt, M. le ministre a mentionné qu'il faudrait s'assurer, le cas échéant, d'expliquer les répercussions possibles d'un projet de loi, mais toujours en précisant que rien n'est sûr, puisque le projet de loi doit encore passer par toutes les étapes: des amendements pourront y être apportés, le Parlement devra l'adopter, puis il devra obtenir la sanction royale.

Désirez-vous que les gens vous soumettent leurs suggestions?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Absolument. Nous invitons les gens à soumettre leurs suggestions. Nous avons sur notre site Web une adresse courriel que les Canadiens peuvent utiliser pour nous écrire directement.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

De quelle façon assureriez-vous le suivi de ces courriels? Il faudrait les faire parvenir aux parlementaires.

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Nous pouvons trouver un moyen de nous assurer que ces suggestions seront envoyées à votre comité.

Présentement, nous avons des personnes qui vérifient cette boîte de courriel chaque jour et qui traitent quotidiennement les demandes et les préoccupations provenant des gens.

Si vous avez des suggestions quant à la manière de vous les transmettre, nous sommes prêts à les entendre.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord, merci.

Madame Strachan, merci de votre présence.

Vous avez parlé tantôt de l'intention de la communication. Pourquoi voulez-vous changer cela?

Vous disiez aussi que le cas que nous traitons actuellement était unique. J'aimerais vous entendre en parler. Vous avez dit qu'il faudrait de la consultation pour mieux éduquer les Canadiens. Je crois que, de toute évidence, c'était votre objectif.

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

D'après moi, il s'agissait d'une conversation entre l'équipe du Programme canadien des armes à feu et l'équipe du ministère de la Sécurité publique. Je ne sais pas si un document a été remis à ce moment. La raison pour laquelle l'équipe voulait ajouter des commentaires dans la communication était liée aux appels et aux questions que les gens du Programme canadien des armes à feu avaient reçus jusque-là.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il aurait plutôt fallu préparer des questions et réponses. Vous devez essayer de prévoir les problèmes qu'il pourrait y avoir, plutôt que de réagir un peu tard.

(1245)

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je peux répondre à cette question.

Nous avons eu quelques discussions à l'interne. Le premier choix était de ne rien dire et de simplement laisser le projet de loi progresser. En cas d'adoption du projet de loi, nous aurions attendu l'entrée en vigueur des dispositions pour recevoir les appels des Canadiens désirant enregistrer leurs armes à feu. Dans ce cas, les personnes qui n'auraient pas été informées de certains aspects du projet de loi, comme la date du 30 juin, ne se seraient fort probablement pas qualifiées et n'auraient pas pu enregistrer leurs armes à feu.

En somme, nous avions deux choix: ne rien dire, attendre deux ans et ensuite dire aux gens que c'était tant pis pour eux, ou encore communiquer les informations à l'avance. Notre désir était de leur donner ces informations pour qu'ils puissent faire de bons choix.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous avez la parole.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Je pensais parler anglais.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Mais vous faisiez partie du comité des langues officielles avec moi.

M. John Nater:

Je sais et je voudrais toujours en faire partie. J'ai besoin d'une nouvelle immersion et d'une interaction quotidienne. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est bon. [Traduction]

M. John Nater:

Peut-être que j'utiliserai l'autre langue la semaine prochaine.

Je remercie de nouveau la sous-commissaire et le directeur de témoigner aujourd'hui.

Je veux donner suite très brièvement à la discussion.

Je pense que c'est vous, madame la sous-commissaire, qui avez évoqué le Programme national de communications. Ce dernier s'accompagne-t-il d'une politique sur la manière d'effectuer ce genre de communications et de publier l'information? Est-ce qu'une politique régit ces activités?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je ne pense pas pouvoir répondre à cette question, mais il le peut peut-être.

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Non, non. C'est juste que mon micro a cessé de fonctionner.

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Pardonnez-moi.

Le Programme national de communications comprend une politique, mais je ne peux dire avec certitude si elle concerne la manière dont nous publions l'information en ligne. Je peux toutefois certainement vous fournir ces renseignements.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. Si vous pouviez nous transmettre la politique...

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Volontiers.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Monsieur O'Reilly, vous avez indiqué que ce genre de communication s'écartait de la norme, car vous avez publié de l'information avant que le processus parlementaire ne soit achevé. Vous avez brièvement traité du processus d'approbation, indiquant qu'il se rend jusqu'au directeur général. Je trouve intéressant que tout au long de ce processus, personne n'ait sonné l'alarme concernant le document initial parce que le projet de loi était toujours devant le Parlement. Le Programme canadien des armes à feu ou la GRC s'inquiètent-ils du manque de connaissances quant au processus parlementaire ou du fait qu'il n'y a pas suffisamment de gens dans ce programme qui savent que le Parlement doit accomplir son travail conformément aux étapes appropriées du processus législatif?

S'inquiète-t-on que le personnel du ministère ne dispose pas de ces connaissances quand vient le temps de faire ce genre de communication?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je dirais que non. Comme le montre probablement la première version du document sur le site Web, laquelle est datée du 8 mai, l'intention consistait vraiment à parler de l'état futur du projet de loi. À bien des endroits dans ce document, il est question de l'état futur du projet de loi. Le document contenait certainement des incohérences, et je me doute que nous avons probablement fini par mettre trop l'accent sur l'aspect technique du contenu plutôt que de porter nécessairement attention aux temps de verbe dans certains cas afin de parler du projet de loi au futur. Je peux vous assurer que tous ceux qui travaillent pour le Programme canadien des armes à feu qui ont travaillé à ce document et à tous ceux que concernent ce projet de loi connaissent bien le processus parlementaire et le privilège qui l'accompagne.

M. John Nater:

Immédiatement après que la question de privilège eut été jugée fondée de prime abord à la Chambre des communes, la GRC a publié, à l'intention des médias, une infocapsule où elle indiquait que la force évaluait la décision. Avez-vous effectué une évaluation officielle de cette décision et, dans l'affirmative, quelle information pourriez-vous fournir au Comité s'il existe un document officiel ou s'il y a eu un examen officiel?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Pourriez-vous répéter la question?

M. John Nater:

Bien sûr. Le Bureau du Conseil privé a publié des documents en vertu de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information. Environ 90 minutes après que le Président eut rendu sa décision, la GRC publiait, à l'intention des médias, une infocapsule où elle indiquait que la force évaluait cette décision. Je me demandais simplement en quoi consistait cette évaluation et si elle a donné lieu à la rédaction d'un document officiel.

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je sais que le 9 mai, le ministère de la Sécurité publique a réclamé des infocapsules destinées aux médias sur ce qu'il se passait sur le Web. Je ne peux répondre à votre question, mais je pourrais certainement vous fournir l'information ultérieurement si cela vous convient.

(1250)

M. John Nater:

Je vous serais reconnaissant de le faire. Auriez-vous l'obligeance de transmettre l'information au greffier?

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je pense que nous avons pas mal fait le tour de la question. J'ai toutefois remarqué qu'au début, madame la sous-commissaire, vous avez indiqué que vous parliez de manière générale de l'esprit du projet de loi ou de toute mesure ou message que vous vouliez transmettre sur le site Web.

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer brièvement quel était l'esprit lorsque vous discutiez avec le ministère ou au sein de votre organisation? Vous avez indiqué que cela s'était passé dans des circonstances très rares. Dans ce cas, pourquoi avez-vous ressenti le besoin de communiquer et quels échanges internes avez-vous eus à propos de l'esprit?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

Je demanderais à mon collègue de vous répondre, car, comme je l'ai indiqué, je ne suis entrée en fonction que le 7 septembre. C'est donc une tierce partie qui aurait discuté de la question. Je n'ai pas nécessairement pris part à ces échanges.

Et vous, Rob?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je n'étais pas au niveau que vous avez évoqué. Comme je l'ai souligné plus tôt, nous avons ressenti le besoin de réagir à certaines demandes d'information que nous commencions à recevoir par l'entremise de notre site Web et voulions fournir des renseignements justes et, espérions-nous, clairs sur ce qui constituait, nous le savions, une question particulièrement complexe. L'intention et l'esprit de notre intervention ont toujours consisté à informer notre clientèle d'une manière toujours non partisane.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

À quel risque vous exposiez-vous si vous n'agissiez pas? Quelles demandes d'information aviez-vous reçues? Donnez-nous des exemples. Que craigniez-vous qu'il arrive si vous ne fournissiez pas de renseignements?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je me suis probablement mal exprimé plus tôt. Ce que nous craignions en ne communiquant pas d'information à ce sujet, c'est que des gens acquièrent par inadvertance des armes après le 30 juin et qu'ils ne puissent les enregistrer si le projet de loi est adopté dans sa forme actuelle. Ils les auraient achetées de bonne foi le 1er juillet dernier. En supposant que le projet de loi soit adopté dans sa forme actuelle, si ces personnes cherchent à enregistrer leur arme dans deux ans et, ce faisant, admettent qu'elles l'ont achetée après le 30 juin, elles ne pourront la faire enregistrer. Nous savions que c'était certainement une possibilité.

En outre, comme le projet de loi n'accorde pas de droits acquis aux entreprises, il fallait informer ces dernières que le projet de loi, s'il était adopté dans sa forme actuelle, pourrait poser des problèmes quant à leurs armes à feu si elles demeuraient dans leur inventaire après le 30 juin. Nous ne connaissons pas le nombre exact d'armes à feu, mais il pourrait y en avoir des dizaines de milliers. Nous avons donc jugé qu'il était très important d'informer les gens le plus tôt possible au sujet des décisions que nous pensions qu'ils devaient connaître et qu'ils devraient prendre dans l'avenir.

Le 30 juin est maintenant derrière nous et rien n'a changé, mais si le projet de loi est adopté dans sa forme actuelle, les gens qui décideront d'enregistrer leurs armes dans l'avenir devront mettre leur permis à niveau et suivre une formation de niveau approprié en matière de sécurité. Certains décideront peut-être de ne pas le faire; nous avons donc considéré qu'il importait de communiquer le fait que la date du 30 juin était importante dans le projet de loi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Lors de nos séances précédentes, nous avons entendu des remarques et des questions concernant le fait que les informations publiées sur le site Web ont suscité chez les gens la crainte de devenir criminel du jour au lendemain ou donné l'impression que vous aviez agi dans l'intention de semer la confusion au sujet d'un projet de loi qui pourrait ne même pas être adopté. Que répondriez-vous à cela?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Je répondrais que cette intention va complètement à l'encontre de ce que le Programme canadien des armes à feu cherche à accomplir. Nous servons une clientèle de 2,1 millions de titulaires de permis d'arme à feu, et la dernière chose que nous voulons faire, c'est certainement de semer la confusion parmi eux. Ces affirmations tendent à avoir un effet cascade, et les informations erronées diffusées au début tendent à s'amplifier à mesure qu'elles sont communiquées.

Non, notre intention consistait à informer les propriétaires d'arme à feu.

(1255)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous accorderons maintenant la parole à M. Motz.

M. Glen Motz:

Je remercie la commissaire et M. O'Reilly de comparaître.

Votre ministère dispose-t-il d'un mécanisme — comme celui dont vous avez donné une brève description plus tôt — régissant la manière dont vous communiquez les renseignements? Vous avez brièvement expliqué ce dont il s'agissait, et j'aimerais que vous nous expliquiez de nouveau comment vous suivez le processus quand vous faites ce genre de publications au sujet de mesures législatives des ministères ou du gouvernement comme celle-ci. Vous rencontrez des fonctionnaires du ministère et confiez l'examen des documents à une équipe de direction. Vous demandez peut-être à quelqu'un de rédiger le contenu, lequel est ensuite approuvé. Pouvez-vous expliquer comment vous procédiez autrefois et nous dire si vous avez apporté des modifications à vos procédures internes?

S.-comm. Jennifer Strachan:

J'ai effectué quelques recherches avant de comparaître, consciente du fait que je n'étais pas en poste à l'époque, et voulant apprendre et aider mes collègues à mieux s'y prendre dans l'avenir pour éviter que nous ne nous retrouvions tous ici de nouveau.

Je pense que dans le cas présent, comme Rob l'a souligné, étant donné que nous avons agi dans la hâte en raison de la date, nous avons parlé avec le ministère de la Sécurité publique des raisons pour lesquelles nous voulions créer du contenu Web. Dans leur hâte de publier l'information bien avant le 30 juin — puisqu'on était le 8 avril, je crois, soit un mois et demi avant la date butoir —, la surveillance n'a pas été appliquée au-delà du Programme canadien des armes à feu. Comme nous l'avons indiqué, il n'existe pas de processus proprement dit, car il est très rare que nous voulions formuler des observations sur un projet de loi dont le Parlement est saisi.

Je proposerais toutefois que dans l'avenir, monsieur, tant que je suis en... Je suis responsable de nombreux programmes particuliers, qui concernent notamment l'ADN et les casiers judiciaires, et d'autres programmes d'une importance cruciale pour les Canadiens et qui concernent souvent des projets de loi en cours d'examen; je peux donc apprendre beaucoup de cette affaire. Je vous assure que ce processus se rendra au moins jusqu'à moi dans l'avenir.

Je pense que vous avez présenté un excellent argument en faisant valoir que la consultation est toujours utile. Je peux dire que dans le cas présent — et c'est un fait qui n'a pas encore été mentionné —, nous avons consulté nos collègues du ministère de la Justice également, simplement pour nous assurer qu'il convenait que nous publiions notre message afin de mieux soutenir les Canadiens, conscients que le projet de loi était encore à l'étude.

Nous prenons acte de vos remarques sur le fait que nous devrions disposer d'un meilleur système permettant de savoir qui a eu l'occasion d'examiner le document et qui a participé aux discussions. Ici encore, comme je n'étais pas en poste, je ne sais pas exactement avec qui mes collègues ont discuté de la question au ministère de la Sécurité publique, mais je ne pense pas que ces personnes aient expressément examiné le document, étant donné que le 9 mai approchait. L'examen s'est strictement limité au Programme canadien des armes à feu.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur O'Reilly, je pense que plus tôt, vous avez brièvement expliqué le processus de traitement des publications. Pouvez-vous me rappeler brièvement en quoi il consiste et m'indiquer comment les choses se sont passées dans le cas qui nous intéresse?

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Comme je l'ai indiqué, les publications figurant sur le site Web du programme peuvent parfois susciter des réactions négatives. Si nous publions un bulletin sur la détermination d'une classification sur quelque chose, non seulement nous discuterons entre nous de la clarté du message et veillerons à ce que nos informations soient justes, mais s'il s'agit d'une question délicate, nous communiquons souvent pour informer les intéressés pour que la sous-commissaire, voire le commissaire, ne voie pas quelque chose pour la première fois dans les coupures de presse du matin.

M. Glen Motz:

Cela étant dit, toutefois, dans les circonstances, vous ne voulez pas formuler de commentaires ou publier d'information alors qu'un projet de loi est encore à l'étude, et je le comprends. Dans le cas présent, une fois encore, le temps pressait et la date prévue dans le projet de loi avait une incidence. Soit dit en passant, nous avons tenté de la modifier, exactement pour éviter ce problème, n'est-ce pas? Nous avons dit que c'est exactement ce qu'il se passerait et nous avons conseillé aux gens de ne pas s'attarder à la date. Faites-vous appel à des spécialistes des communications du ministère de la Sécurité publique ou à quelqu'un avec qui vous collaboreriez dans un dossier comme celui-ci?

(1300)

M. Rob O'Reilly:

Dans ce cas précis, non. Nous avons dialogué avec le ministère de la Sécurité publique d'entrée de jeu, c'est-à-dire à partir de la fin mars et pendant le mois d'avril, simplement pour lui faire part de nos intentions de publier quelque chose en ligne au lieu de ne rien dire. Nous voulions publier stratégiquement ce qu'on pourrait qualifier de guide d'autodétermination au lieu de laisser les gens communiquer avec moi pour me demander si leur CZ est visé. Nous avons tôt fait de communiquer nos intentions de publier un tel document en ligne et d'expliquer le processus d'identification et les répercussions potentielles, mais jamais nous n'avons évoqué la nature imminente ou précaire du projet de loi proprement dit.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Nous vous remercions tous les deux d'avoir comparu et de nous avoir fourni des réponses franches.

Je pense que la séance a été instructive pour tout le monde.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 01, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.