header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-04-24 INDU 102

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody, to meeting number 102 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology.

Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, December 13, 2017, and section 92 of the Copyright Act, we are continuing our review of the Copyright Act.

Today we have with us, from the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations, Michael McDonald, Executive Director. From the Canadian Association of Research Libraries or CARL, we have Susan Haigh, Executive Director, and Mark Swartz, Program Officer. From the Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois we have Suzanne Aubry, President, and Laurent Dubois, General Manager. From the Canadian Research Knowledge Network, we have Carol Shepstone, Past Vice-Chair and Chief Librarian at Ryerson University.

We will start with the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations.

You have seven minutes, sir—or is it five?

Mr. Michael McDonald (Executive Director, Canadian Alliance of Student Associations):

I'll take seven. That's a great trade.

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair, esteemed committee members, fellow witnesses, and members of the gallery.

My name is Michael McDonald. I'm the Executive Director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations, otherwise known as CASA. CASA is a non-partisan organization that represents over 250,000 students at colleges, universities, and polytechnics from across the country. We advocate for a post-secondary education system that is affordable, accessible, innovative, and of the highest quality for all.

Thank you for the invitation to speak today about the Copyright Act. Copyright law has a profound impact on students in Canada. We believe the statutory review presents an excellent opportunity to reflect on what has worked, and to address what has not.

Students purchase, study, and create copyrighted material daily. It will surprise no one at this hearing to learn that students are seeing first-hand the rapid shift towards digital content delivery and the adoption of new learning tools. For example, open access journals are ensuring that more content than ever before is available freely. In many academic fields, including the STEM fields, these journals are now becoming the primary way through which new research is shared.

Open educational resources are also reshaping the academic materials landscape. These high-quality, open-source materials allow for content, such as textbooks, to be available to students and educators for free. Such materials have immense potential to be adapted to meet the needs of diverse students and diverse audiences. British Columbia and Ontario have already committed to providing funding for the creation of OER textbooks, and the savings students have seen for these programs have been growing daily.

Both open access and open educational resources are modern innovations whose returns for students, in both cost savings and quality improvements, are only just being realized. While we understand this is outside of the Copyright Act itself, we believe it is crucial to understand what educational content will look like in the years to come when reviewing the act and the arguments presented here today. They also present a valuable opportunity for the federal government to foster further innovation and learning.

A further facet of the modern learning environment has been fair dealing. The official inclusion of education as a component of fair dealing in 2012 clarified the rights articulated by the Supreme Court. While this right has helped reduce some of the transactional costs for students associated with accessing content, we think it is important to give special attention to how fair dealing has improved the quality of the post-secondary education experience provided here in Canada. The inclusion of education as a component of fair dealing creates a mechanism that facilitates the legitimate exchange of small amounts of information. This encourages a diversity of sources and perspectives to be used. In an academic setting, to use a metaphor, this is an intellectual lubricant. This can be content delivered by professors in classrooms, but it can also be through the peer-to-peer learning experiences fostered in study groups and group presentations. This is the organic teaching that is so hard to quantify, and we think is so precious to protect.

CASA believes that fair dealing for educational provisions in the Copyright Act must remain intact. We also recommend that, to further strengthen the system, the committee examine any punishments for bypassing digital lock systems and consider their removal, since these restrict users' ability to exercise their legal rights over that content.

It is critical to note that, throughout this era of digital disruptions, students, professors, and post-secondary institutions continue to pay for academic materials. According to household survey data from Statistics Canada, average household spending on textbooks alone was over $650 in 2015 for university texts and $430 for college texts. These expenditures are clear evidence of the continued use and purchase of effective published materials.

This leads us to discuss the Copyright Board. CASA believes that the current regime overseen by the Copyright Board does have some flaws. Transparency, openness to feedback, and honesty are values that we would expect from Facebook, and these are values that we would expect also from our tariff system. While post-secondary education tariffs are presented as an agreement between rights holders and the post-secondary education institutions, we believe that it's important that the primary consumer of these materials—students—be considered. Students pay for these tariffs, either directly, through ancillary fees administered by provincial ancillary fee structures, or indirectly, through operations budgets. It is the cost they are expected to bear and one that we do not believe is being adequately considered. CASA believes that any fee assessed on students must clearly be explained and justified. This is something we would ask at an institution and it's something we expect from the federal government as well.

Access Copyright fees, so far, have lacked many of the attributes that we would expect from normal service provision. First, these fees sometimes seem to be determined at random. The fees for university students were $45 in 2011 to 2013, and were adjusted to $35 in 2014 and 2017, while the fee offered on the website was $26.

Students are concerned about what kind of product they have this kind of variability. The attempts that have been made to more clearly understand this fee have been met by opposition from Access Copyright, when requests for this transparency have been made by the Copyright Board.

At it stands, there's no clear rationale why these fees apply to all students equally, especially considering the different licensing needs of faculties. We believe that university administrations are excellent decision-makers when deciding what kind of content to purchase in these environments.

We're also extremely concerned that the fees proposed in other sectors by Access Copyright have so far been found to be much higher than deemed appropriate by the Copyright Board. This is deeply troubling, and we're calling on the committee to ensure that the Copyright Board provides clear, public rationale for why fees exist and to demand public accounting for those who wish to operate tariffs.

CASA hopes that the committee, through it's consultations and deliberations, keeps in mind the importance of preserving flexible, adaptable copyright systems that serve the needs of both creators and users.

Students appreciate the committee's dedicated work on this complex subject.

I look forward to answering your questions.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are now going to move on to the Canadian Association of Research Libraries, and Susan Haigh, the executive director. [Translation]

Ms. Susan Haigh (Executive Director, Canadian Association of Research Libraries):

Hello. My name is Susan Haigh and I am the Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries.[English]

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries, or CARL, is the national voice of Canada's 31 largest research libraries, 29 of which are located in Canada's most research-intensive universities.

With me today is Mark Swartz, a visiting program officer at CARL, and copyright manager at Queen's University.

Research libraries are deeply committed to enabling access and use of information, to fostering knowledge creation, and to ensuring a sustainable and open Canadian scholarly publishing system.

Our remarks today will focus largely on fair dealing.

The use of fair dealing in the post-secondary context follows an extensive body of Supreme Court guidance on its correct interpretation. Since 2004, the Supreme Court of Canada has made it clear that fair dealing is a user's right, and that this right must be given a “large and liberal interpretation”.

With three supportive Supreme Court decisions on fair dealing since 2004, and the 2012 changes to the Copyright Act, Canada has achieved well-balanced legislation and jurisprudence, landing between the more restrictive version of fair dealing in the U.K. and the more permissive fair use approach of the U.S. The U.S. approach, in place since 1976, applies explicitly to purposes such as, and here I quote, “teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, [and] research”.

In the interest of maximum flexibility and future-proofing, we think Canada could look to add the words “such as” to the fair-dealing purposes given in section 29 of our act.

We wish to stress to the committee that the current application of fair dealing in the post-secondary context is responsible, informed, and is working.

Canada's university libraries recognize that educational fair dealing is a right to be respected, used, and managed effectively. Universities have invested substantially in copyright infrastructure. They have expert staff dedicated to copyright compliance and to actively educating faculty, staff, and students on their rights and responsibilities under the act.

The Supreme Court ruled in 2015 that Copyright Board tariffs are not mandatory, and university libraries are working under this assumption. I note that the Federal Court's controversial 2017 decision in the Access Copyright v. York University case appears to be contrary to the Supreme Court's ruling. However, the York decision is under appeal, and will hopefully be reversed.

Research libraries are often responsible for administering copyright clearances on campus. Increasingly, the works copyright offices deal with are open access scholarly content, in the public domain, openly available on the web, or already library-licensed for use in learning management systems. This leaves a relatively small portion of works that will either be shared under fair dealing or will require a one-time licence. We routinely seek such licences when the test for fairness is not met.

It is clear that mandatory tariffs are not necessary to good copyright management. Choice is important to us. For some institutions, blanket licences, assuming they're based on reasonable rates, are practical. For others, active local management with transactional licensing as needed is the preferred route.

Some parties are portraying fair dealing as the cause of diminishing revenues for creators. This is a fallacy. The shift from paper to electronic delivery of educational content over the last 20 years has fundamentally changed the way that works are accessed and used, and such shifts inevitably impact how rights holders are compensated. They don't necessarily impact how much rights holders are compensated. Despite these pressures, Statistics Canada reported last month that the profit margin of the Canadian publishing industry is a healthy 10.2%.

We believe that direct support outside of the copyright system, such as grants to creators and publishers, is more appropriate in this time of transition. The public lending right program administered by Canada Council is one example of an alternative form of support.

Our final point is that there are forward-thinking changes that should be considered in this review.

We urge you to clarify that technical protection measures can be circumvented for non-infringing purposes. Likewise, we urge you to add language so that contracts may not override the provisions of the act and prevent legal uses.

These, and suggestions related to crown copyright, indigenous knowledge, and some other areas, will be included in our forthcoming brief.

In conclusion, research libraries support the concept of balance in copyright, which dates right back to the original Statute of Anne in 1709.

Fair dealing in the Copyright Act is serving its intended purpose, enabling fair portions from works of creativity or scholarship to be drawn upon within learning environments, thereby stimulating innovation and the creation of new knowledge.

Merci. We look forward to your questions.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are now going to move to the Canadian Research Knowledge Network. Ms. Shepstone, you have up to seven minutes.

Ms. Carol Shepstone (Past Vice-Chair, Chief Librarian, Ryerson University, Canadian Research Knowledge Network):

Thank you for the opportunity to join you today. On behalf of the members of the Canadian Research Knowledge Network, I want to thank each of you for your work on this important statutory review. My name is Carol Shepstone, and I am past vice-chair of the board of the Canadian Research Knowledge Network or CRKN.

CRKN is a partnership of Canadian university libraries from across 10 provinces and encompassing two official languages. The 75 institutions that currently participate in CRKN include all research universities as well as the vast majority of teaching universities. We collectively serve over one million students and 42,000 faculty. Twenty-nine of CRKN's members are also members of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries, and all our members are also member institutions of Universities Canada.

Through the coordinated leadership of librarians, researchers, administrators, and other stakeholders in the research community, CRKN undertakes large-scale content acquisition and licensing initiatives in order to build knowledge and infrastructure as well as research and teaching capacity in Canada's universities. As such, CRKN provides an important voice in understanding the evolving scholarly creation and communication landscape within higher education in Canada.

The members of CRKN support a balanced copyright law that recognizes both the rights of copyright owners and the fair-dealing rights of our users. We are pleased to add our voice to other higher education sector stakeholders, including Universities Canada and CARL, in supporting the preservation of fair dealing, particularly as it pertains to educational uses.

Leveraging the purchasing power of all universities in Canada, CRKN negotiates and manages licences for digital scholarly content on behalf of its member libraries at an annual value of $125 million. The vast majority of this scholarly journal content is authored by faculty as part of their academic research expectations. In the current scholarly publishing model, faculty as creators typically provide these research outputs to journals for no financial compensation, and then journal publishers sell this research output back to universities through library subscriptions such as those licensed through CRKN.

CRKN negotiates licences that ensure access and terms of use that are valuable to students and faculty, including the ability for universities to use this material in course packs and e-reserve systems, as well as permitted uses that fall within the Canadian Copyright Act.

As the national licensing consortium in Canada, CRKN facilitates investment in key Canadian scholarly publications across a variety of disciplines. Through subscriptions to journals and purchases of e-books, CRKN members provide faculty and students with valuable Canadian content. An annual investment of $1.3 million includes a subscription to Canadian Science Publishing journals and access to the e-books of the Association of Canadian University Presses. In addition, CRKN members have made one-time investments of more than $11 million to secure perpetual access to the Canadian Electronic Library e-book collection, and $1.5 million for access to digital, historical Globe and Mail content.

CRKN also partners with Canadian publishers to advance new models of open access scholarly publishing. Through our long-term relationship with the Érudit Consortium, which began in 2008, students and faculty have access to Canadian French scholarly content. This has evolved into a collaborative partnership including both Érudit and the Public Knowledge Project, and in 2018 the Coalition Publi.ca initiative was launched as a model of sustainable Canadian scholarly production. CRKN members have committed more than $6.7 million to support this initiative over the next five years.

Through our support of and now merger with Canadiana.org, CRKN members have also facilitated the digitization, access, and preservation of Canadian heritage materials. Members currently invest nearly $1.3 million annually, and have made one-time investments totalling $1.8 million to support this unique historic content.

Overall, CRKN university members are annually committing $2.9 million to Canadian content licences, and over CRKN's 19-year history have made $15 million worth of one-time investment in purchasing Canadian content.

These investments demonstrate a commitment to Canadian scholarly publishing and to a robust and healthy research infrastructure in Canada. CRKN members support scholars as creators and authors, respect the rights of copyright owners, and at the same time ensure that students and researchers, as users, have access to essential international scholarly content.

Thank you, and I look forward to your questions.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

The last presentation will be by Mr. Dubois, of the Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois.

Mr. Laurent Dubois (General Manager, Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois (UNEQ)):

I will give my presentation in French.

Mr. Chair, vice-chairs, members of the committee, to begin we would like to thank you for the opportunity to address you today and present the brief prepared by our association, which represents 1,650 writers in Quebec.

My name is Laurent Dubois and I am the General Manager of our association. With me is Ms. Suzanne Aubry, who in addition to being our association's President is also a writer and scriptwriter herself.

We will use the five minutes allotted to talk about the economic situation of professional writers in Canada, which we consider alarming. We will also alert you to how the situation has worsened as a result of the introduction of numerous exceptions in the 2012 Act.

In the brief we have submitted and that was provided to you, we make recommendations for the act to evolve in everyone's interest in the coming years. At the end of our presentation, we will of course be pleased to answer any questions you may have.

In our opinion, a copyright law should not be limited to technical aspects. It should above all be part of a clear political vision with specific goals. We would like the committee to use this opportunity to answer the questions that are on our minds.

Does the government want to foster Canadian cultural expression, encourage creativity, and offer its citizens access to a rich, diverse culture that enhances the quality of life of Canadians, their independence of thought, and their understanding of the world?

Or would the government rather reduce the quality of writing to the lowest common denominator, and let Canadians believe that they can access all cultural content free of charge, modify it as they wish, and allow the Hollywood and Silicon Valley steamroller to dictate their commercial laws to us while impoverishing local artists? We hope these questions will inform you in the difficult task that awaits you over the coming months.

It is important to remember that the concept of copyright is not merely an economic one. There is copyright and the economic right to royalties, but there is also the idea of moral rights that we would like to put on the table today. This concept seems to be missing from the current act. We would like to discuss it.

Moral rights refer to the idea that an artist has the right to grant or withhold permission for their work to be used, disseminated or even altered. With its many exceptions, the 2012 act has stripped many artists and writers of their income.

I do not want to be more dramatic than necessary, but I will just give you some figures. In Canada, the average annual income of a professional writer is $12,879. In Quebec, the median income was $2,450 in 2008, and about the same right now. As a result, professional writers in Canada could be an endangered species.

Ms. Suzanne Aubry (President, Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois (UNEQ)):

Thank you, Mr. Dubois.

I would like to mention first that my father was the head of the Ottawa Public Library for roughly 30 years. If he were here today, we would have a good discussion because we obviously do not share the libraries' position, and I will now explain why.

Writers provide a significant part of the raw material for the education system, raw material that Stephen Harper's Conservative government wanted to make available to users, free of charge, based on so-called “fair dealing” as defined by the Supreme Court in 2014. The absence of a clear requirement for educational institutions to pay authors for the use of their works has been unprecedented. Under section 29 of the act, it is legal to use a copyrighted work provided that it is used for one of the purposes mentioned in this section. I do not want to put you to sleep, so I will not list all the uses mentioned in this article, but there is no definition of the portion of a work that may be used without copyright violation.

As expected, this vague wording has led to litigation involving the relationship between creators and users. The number of court cases has multiplied in recent years, including the Université Laval case, which decided of its own accord and without approval from the courts or the act that fair dealing allowed them to reproduce a short excerpt of up to 10% of a work or an entire chapter. Its policy states that “every time one intends to use a short excerpt, it is important to take the greatest advantage of the possibilities on offer.”

These multiple, vague exceptions have reduced collective management revenues for writers and publishers by $30 million since 2012. Payments from secondary licences accounted for up to 20% of writers' income before the educational exception was introduced.

These exceptions are numerous and very prominent in the 2012 act. They have significantly reduced revenues for creators.

While the introduction of specific measures for the education sector seems commendable to us, and we certainly support education and access to works, that access must be clearly defined. The integrity of works is no longer guaranteed, artists' moral rights are violated, and piracy is encouraged in a sense, through section 29.21, for instance, which allows users to use or modify copyrighted content for non-commercial purposes. Further, the act's sanctions for violations are so weak that they are not a deterrent.

I will let Mr. Dubois finish up.

(1555)

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

In closing, as you may expect, we hope that this review will be an opportunity to put forward a clear policy that defines copyright and the way the government wants society to evolve in this regard in the years ahead.

Thank you for your attention. We will be pleased to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will start with you, Mr. Longfield. You have seven minutes. [English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, everybody, for coming. We have a large panel today. We're trying different formats in this study to get as many diverse opinions in front of us as we can, and sometimes on the same panel, as we've seen today.

I have some questions. I'm going to start with Ms. Shepstone, because you were talking about new forms of delivering material. I've been looking at the copyright review that was just completed in Germany. Australia is in the process of completing a similar review. They're comparing themselves to other countries.

Something that comes up again and again is the new delivery format and whether current legislation is changing quickly enough to address that. In a previous meeting I asked about Cengage as one of the forms of delivery. Could you maybe speak to what new forms of delivery we need to look at in our study and how we could try to make sure we cover the proper legislation around that?

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

I could do my best.

What might be really valuable is to continue to consider a very flexible act that can adapt to changing technology and changing forms of delivery. I think that would add some longevity, most certainly.

If I recall correctly, your question was regarding Cengage, wasn't it?

(1600)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, Cengage.

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

I think that's a really interesting model. As I understand it, it's a way for students to access directly a whole collection of textbooks. I think some of the challenges within our institutions or within universities are around the assignment of those textbooks. It would need to be in a fairly collaborative model, I think, with our faculty instructors certainly.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Along those lines of having the policy of proving that you have purchased course material in order to get your mark statements, Michael, you might have an opinion on that or anybody else cross the table.

Mr. Michael McDonald:

Indeed, I would have an opinion on that. As it's currently laid out, and this includes textbooks, you have no mandate to have to purchase that textbook. There are models that individuals can adopt, whether that be shared or working with another colleague, or going to the library and very often checking out a textbook, that we think are essential for ensuring, again, that post-secondary education remains accessible to anybody from whatever income background they may have.

Broadening the question to something like a Cengage model, if you're improving educational outcomes, and especially when the content is delivered in a more effective fashion, then we're definitely interested in going down those kinds of routes.

Where we have some concerns are with bundling policies, where you end up in a situation where a textbook and the course materials to be used in an instructional way become tied together, which increases the prices of the materials. Very often this prevents the resale of a textbook that might exist.

These are problematic and we think, again, it's a mechanism that is trying to prop up a textbook that may not be as valuable anymore because some of the intellectual material in it may have been reproduced in an open educational resource. We do think those other options must remain at the disposal of any kind of professor or instructor who's determining those courses.

But this is promising. We think there is good new content.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great. Thank you.

It strikes me that we have librarians in the room or people who represent librarians, and that there are studies out there that might help to inform our study. When we talk about the U.K. model, you have mentioned some of the differences in restrictions.

Are there some graphics, like some Venn diagrams or something like that, we could ask the universities for to show us where we are at, and the difference between Canada and some of our trading partners, and some ideas of where we could be in the future?

Ms. Susan Haigh:

My sense would be that we would be very happy to provide such a thing. We can certainly do our best to research it and provide it, because I think the clarity of where we fit in the international picture is very important for the committee for sure.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great.

There was a report published in Australia in March 2018 that started off with that. I found that very helpful, but one of the missing pieces was Canada, of course, because we weren't part of their study.

Going back to Ms. Aubry, you were talking about being specific in our language of exemptions. Germany was also facing that question and said that they have to be very specific on percentages of use before someone has to pay for use, the types of use, and exactly what types of people would have access to that.

When we're developing legislation, we need to keep in mind the creators and to make sure they are compensated and that the rules are fair. Do you have anything you could expand on when you were talking about being specific? [Translation]

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

Thank you for your question.

We have very carefully worded the exceptions currently in the 2012 act.

I could read them out to you, but our brief provides all the details, section by section, along with our requests to clarify and repeal certain sections. That is all clearly laid out in our brief. It has also been translated into English. You received the English version at the same time as the French version.

Would you like me to say anything further in this regard? [English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I just thought you might have something you wanted to add to what you have given us. There was a lot information in a short period of time, but I'm trying to get an overview of where the worst parts are for us.

Mr. Dubois or anybody else. [Translation]

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

I will read out the recommendations because they are very specific and they will probably give you a very clear idea of the approach we would like you to take in your review of the act.

Our first recommendation, roughly translated, is as follows: That Canadian Heritage define in advance precisely under which political and social project the act falls and that it measure the impacts.

(1605)

[English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

The heritage piece was something that flashed for me, because we do have to make sure we're protecting Canadian heritage. I think you both said that.

I'm going to turn it back to the chair. There was some French language stuff that I'd like to bring forward, but maybe next time.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Mr. Bernier, go ahead for five minutes.

Hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My question is for Mr. Dubois.

Thank you for joining us today, Mr. Dubois.

Can you tell us what percentage of copyright fees authors normally receive for their content and publications?

Do you think percentages should be established in the legislation, or does the free market work very well?

What percentage do authors receive from the sale of a book compared to what is received by various distribution chain stakeholders such as publishers?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

Thank you for your question, Mr. Bernier.

Under a publishing agreement, an author receives 10% of the copyright fees from the sale of a book. That should be the standard contract. Unfortunately, nothing in the Status of the Artist Act requires publishers to negotiate with writers. There is no collective agreement, so every case is handled differently by publishers.

As for copyright fees that are part of exceptions, the one related to fair dealing leaves much to the imagination and creativity of the two parties, but it is rarely to the benefit of writers.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Okay.

Does new technology, such as content digitalization, have repercussions, either positive or negative, on authors' revenues?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

That is still difficult to measure because the situation is evolving. The good old paper book is still a sure bet. However, there will definitely be an impact over the short or the long term.

Currently, that impact is felt mainly in the way people use excerpts. I am thinking of plagiarism, forms of satire or the commercial use of an excerpt used in an advertisement. We have seen all that. Technology does magnify those issues and makes it much more complicated to monitor the use of content.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Thank you.

A few days ago, we heard from student representatives. They said they were happy with the current system and, if changes were made to it, that could lead to an increase in the cost of their studies. They think that would have a negative impact on learning, which is why they are rising against any changes in this area.

How do you see all that? Should students absorb additional costs to have access to quality material produced by authors?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

I don't know whether students should be absorbing those costs, but I don't think so. In any case, our recommendation is not directed toward that.

We represent writers, who agree with students on this issue. We want the material used in educational establishment to be regulated, with a specific cost attached to it, which cannot be the same as commercial costs. More than ever, we need literature to spread in schools and universities, and to be used by teachers and students.

On the other hand, we are asking that the oversight be precisely defined in the legislation and taken into account when the legislation is reviewed. We would like the legislation to define the terms “education” and “fair dealing”. Our intention is not at all to make the content cost more. What is needed is better regulation of content to prevent prosecutions like the ones currently before the courts, whose sole goal is not to pay writers royalties. It is as if it was forgotten that the author is the source of the book. Without authors, writing content is much more complicated.

(1610)

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

So you feel that we should amend the legislation to better regulate exceptions, as you mentioned in your brief. Do you think there are no solutions that could include negotiations with universities or something like that?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

Of course, we are very open to coming to the table to negotiate. I'm sure that the Collectives Access Copyright and Copibec, in Quebec, are just as willing to come to the table to open up discussions.

For the time being, owing to the uncertainty in the law, the most likely action seems to involve the legal aspect. We would like that to be replaced with a political route and a negotiation option between user and creator partners who are not in disagreement. All creators want their content to be used, and all users want access to content. I think that is the reality. We just have to work together to find the best way to achieve it.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

So the exceptions contained in the legislation should be amended or restricted, which would have an impact on the jurisprudence. If I understand correctly, you somewhat disagree with the jurisprudence established through the 2012 legislation.

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

That's exactly right. We agree that, by definition, an exception is exceptional in nature. When we see the list of exceptions in the current legislation, we feel that they do not look like exceptions. Let's say that they have lost some of that exceptional dimension.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Thank you.

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

Mr. Bernier, in closing, I would like to say that the term “education” in section 29 should be better defined, so as to prevent the misuse of content. That is one of our recommendations.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Great. Your report is very concise and explicit, and it will help us a great deal in our work. Thank you.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and my thanks to the delegations for being here today.

It is interesting that one of the positions the government and the minister could take at the end of the day is to do nothing. This is just a statutory review. There have been no proposed amendments to the legislation. No regulatory changes have been made. There are some court challenges right now to a couple of cases.

Mr. Swartz, what happens in your field, or just as a general thing, if nothing changes and we continue the status quo, aside from maybe court interventions? What are the pros and cons of those situations? This is one of the potential outcomes of all of this work. Even if there is an intent to make some changes, our time frame in Parliament is starting to become constrained, although we don't have an election directly looming. It takes time to do this review. Ministers will evaluate that review and then submit legislation. So if it's outside the regulatory framework.... That they has to pass in the House of Commons and the Senate prior to the next election.

Mr. Mark Swartz (Program Officer, Canadian Association of Research Libraries):

From my perspective, if nothing changes, universities will continue to manage copyright effectively and responsibly. We will continue to use the fair-dealing guidelines and policies we have in place, the 10% guideline you are familiar with, and continue to offer services to aid instructors in the responsible management of copyright. Many institutions now offer what are called “syllabus services”, which within libraries are called “electronic reserve services”. With those services, individual faculty members or instructors submit their reading lists to staff, and each item is vetted and then made available to students. Frequently, library licences are responsible for a big chunk of the stuff being made available to students.

In his remarks, Michael mentioned open educational resources. Anything that's available by open access, or even openly available on the web, is made available in that way. We also apply fair dealing, and if anything falls outside of it, we'll purchase it in e-book form in our library or we'll buy a transactional licence. There is also still print reserve, so if you can't purchase a transactional licence and it doesn't fall under fair dealing, we will put it on print reserve and students will have to come to check it out of the library. From our perspective, that's what we would continue to do. That is the good part.

As for the things we would change, there are a lot of things that are causing issues for libraries in relation to digital disruption. As mentioned, a lot of the stuff we're collecting has shifted from individual purchases of items to licences. Most of the things in a library are governed by licensing agreements. We don't have a lot of the exceptions that we would like to be available for those things. In our forthcoming brief, hopefully we will be able to discuss a few of those ideas.

(1615)

Mr. Michael McDonald:

For us fundamentally, again, there is probably going to be a legal decision that will have an impact on the nature of how fair dealing gets interpreted currently. This obviously has a significant impact on how this act will be interpreted into the future. Without a statutory decision, there is still going to be some action that will have an impact on how everyone on this side of the table will be interpreting their rights, moving forward.

On the positive side, we do think we are in a situation that has been generally beneficial to the educational material that's being provided to students. Real growth in places such as open educational resources across the country is something that you're going to see more investment in, and I do stress this. You just saw the investments in eCampusOntario this year. These are places that provide direct supports to creators to make materials that are going to be in an open format. These are things that you're seeing pioneered. Other jurisdictions are going to consider this. Open access journals, especially in a lot of the STEM fields, are dominant in discussions.

It's important also to take from this that it will have a different impact on the different content. We might be talking about, at times, a poem, but we might also be talking about scientific research or legal research. This does have significantly different impacts in all those different cases. We think it's something that overall is going to have a trend towards the positive, and in the instances where, and we fundamentally agree, creators need to be compensated, other mechanisms can be found to do so. We really support that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Ms. Shepstone.

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

From the perspective of CRKN, we would continue to license material where possible and to move forward with open access collaborations and initiatives and really invest time and energy in that work.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Ms. Aubry, I'm not sure who wants to answer on your behalf. [Translation]

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

May I ask you to rephrase your question? I think I lost something in the interpretation. [English]

Mr. Brian Masse:

Right now, we're doing a review. The review might not have any changes. What will transpire for you from that, or what's at risk if there aren't any changes? There's a high probability that there will not be any changes. It might just be left to some legal cases and some regulatory alterations. [Translation]

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

If no changes were made and everything was resolved in court, it is clear to us that the profession of writer would become very difficult to exercise in our country. The risks related to that concern cultural diversity. Do we want all cultural products to come from abroad? Do we want available books to come from Europe, and more likely from the United States?

It is important to understand that, if authors of books cannot be properly compensated, that profession could no longer interest anyone. There will always be academics, researchers and people with several professions who will continue to write and contribute to a general database, but artistic and creative writers who throw themselves into a literary work are likely to disappear.

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

I would like to complete the answer.

The spirit of the Copyright Act is to defend creators; it is a piece of legislation on authors' rights. In 2012, with all the exceptions that were introduced, it became a piece of legislation that favours users.

Once again, we have nothing against users. On the contrary, we want our work to be known and read. That's very important. However, we want that to be done fairly.

Here's what I would add. A speaker said that grants could be used to compensate authors for their work. However, we know that grants are not given to all authors, since only a third of them receive grants. To earn a decent living with their pen, writers cannot rely solely on grants.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Mr. Baylis, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

One of the points that has been brought up about the change in fair use in 2012 has been that it has improved education. You seem to think it has really helped the libraries and the students, and all of that. What are you doing today that you weren't doing in 2012?

Michael, I'll start with you.

(1620)

Mr. Michael McDonald:

I will defer in part to my library compatriots. You have seen a major uptick in the number of copyright experts in post-secondary institutions who are making the assessments about these things. Across the university sector, copyright offices have assumed significant roles within those institutions. They are providing the kinds of instructional education both to faculty and to students that determine the parameters they can operate under. This was an understanding, especially on the part of institutions, that they needed to be able to explain what they actually were doing with this material. This is becoming a more important request for students in general. The challenge is that intellectual property, the whole gamut of it, is becoming so incredibly important for anybody's livelihood and for the production of that.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Are you using more of it? If the law hadn't come in in 2012, you wouldn't be using something, and now you're taking access, which is helping improve your education. Is that happening because you have fair dealing there?

Mr. Michael McDonald:

I think you are in an environment where there is more comfort and ability to access sources, to quote from sources, to be able to use them to say that this is something you should be able to experience in context.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Then you are using more?

Mr. Michael McDonald:

I would say yes, but I'd also say that's a demonstration of the modern content-generating era, too. In the last five years, we have significantly more content that's being brought forward in every digital space.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

For the libraries, how has that change impacted your ability to operate?

Mr. Mark Swartz:

While you point to the change made after the last review, it actually dates from earlier than that because the Supreme Court has been providing jurisprudence on the use of fair dealing since 2004. It just took a bit of time for universities to adapt to those changes.

For us in universities and university libraries, there are a variety of benefits to having a very a liberal fair-dealing exception. For one, it really helps instructors in the way they compile course materials. They can take materials from a variety of different places and compile them all together; they can use materials on the fly; and they can build a course that really works. As we mentioned, universities have been putting together a variety of systems to help instructors do that. That's a real way it has benefited us.

A liberal fair-dealing exception also benefits researchers in a variety of ways. They can use and reuse copyrighted material in their research. In addition, we use it in the library in a number of ways as well, and inter-library loans is one.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Since 2004, you've been on this trend, if you will, to be using it more. You've been getting from the courts the interpretation that allows you to have broader use. In 2012 it was put into law. That's what I understand. Are you going in that direction?

Mr. Mark Swartz:

Fair dealing did exist beforehand. In 2004, it was the CCH and law society case, which was a very significant case that started helping to establish fair dealing as a user right in Canadian law. Then there have been a number of other court cases. There were a number in 2012 as well that helped establish that.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If I'm looking at the writers, and [Translation]

I will get to them soon,[English]

We're in Canada, and we're interested in helping Canadian industry and our Canadian writers. How much has been taken out of their pocket? You're a purchaser of data for all students from around the world. Do you have any idea of how much you're saving from Canadian content? For example, if the government—and I don't speak for the government—were we to say, “Here's an extra chunk of money that you can only use to buy Canadian content”, how much would you need to buffer up what you're taking, or what they perceive to be taken from them, without getting paid?

Mr. Mark Swartz:

I can't speak for sectors other than the university sector, but for most of the courses that we process, most of the content that we're providing is scholarly content. A lot of it is from a variety of different places. The amount of Canadian content is fairly small, but it is still very significant. We get some of it through the licences from organizations like the Canadian Research Knowledge Network and others.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Would it be possible for you to go back and look to give us an idea? You don't need to answer right now, but for example, since 2004 we've used about 5%, and now it's down to 2%, or we used 5% and we paid for 5%, or now we're only paying for 1% due to fair dealings. Could we get an assessment or an idea from the universities only for Canadians?

(1625)

Mr. Mark Swartz:

Only Canadian content?

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Yes, so we can try to get an idea of the impact of that. Could you provide that, please?

Mr. Mark Swartz:

Yes, we can work on that.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you.[Translation]

I now turn to you, Mr. Dubois and Ms. Aubry.

As far as I have understood, you find that the regulations in your operating environment are unclear. It is very difficult for you to know what kind of royalties you can expect. Is that correct?

You raised another point by saying that there were too many exceptions.

Did I understand the two points you raised correctly?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

Mr. Baylis, you have understood our two points perfectly.

Thank you for the question you asked before that one. We have noted an increase in the use of content by educational institutions, but at the same time, since 2012, copyright collectives have lost $30 million in revenues.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So the writers you represent have lost $30 million.

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

I am talking about copyright collectives that pay royalties to writers.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Is that the case only in Quebec or throughout Canada?

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

Throughout Canada.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That involves writers, university publications. Who is that $30 million intended for?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

Sorry, but I did not understand you very well.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You said that $30 million in royalties has been lost. Who exactly has lost that $30 million?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

Publishers and writers; in other words, the collectives that register licenses with Access Copyright or Copibec. Those license holders have lost $30 million in revenue, and that revenue represents the royalties paid out to publishers and writers.

I think you will actually be hearing from Copibec and Access Copyright representatives later.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I would like to quickly put another question to you.

I will ask you the same question I put to the witnesses representing universities and libraries. I would like to know how your royalties have changed since 2004, year by year. That would give us a good idea.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux, you have seven minutes and 20 seconds.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair: Oh, that should be five minutes and 20 seconds.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux: Oh, well, I'll go with the seven minutes and 20 seconds.

Thank you all for being here and for taking the time.

I have a couple questions in those five minutes, and I may interject to keep some of the answers brief.

In February 2015 an open access policy was implemented that essentially, after 12 months, made SSHRC, NSERC, and CIHR publications freely accessible to the public. How was your organization affected by this policy? Also, would your organization support an expansion of this policy to apply to all publicly funded research—essentially research funds that are disbursed outside the tri-council?

Ms. Susan Haigh:

At this point, the open access policy applies to journal articles. The CARL has a system of open repositories within the library sector that have been developed, institutional repositories, over the course of the last many years. Basically, we were very supportive of that policy because it gives an alternative. It allows the appropriate return on research that we believe should be possible for publicly funded research. So we're very supportive of the policy, and we were able to support the implementation of the policy because we have these institutional repositories. It's always good when a government policy can be followed, right?

In terms of expanding that, we certainly have been very active in trying to say the same thing should be true for research data, as an example. Yes, we would say that all the outputs of research that are publicly funded, if possible, should be openly accessible as soon as possible, and openly at the beginning is always an option for the creator to take. We see a creator choice in there that allows them to declare it open right at the beginning, or sometimes there's a desire that they publish in some of these high-profile journals.

When the policy is in place, it really moves the market; it changes things. It's very important. Absolutely, we would be behind and supportive and helpful in the implementation of such policy.

(1630)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Mr. McDonald, do you have comments?

Mr. Michael McDonald:

We were absolutely in support of the previous government's work of building a forward and open access policy for the tri-agencies. That was something we stood on very actively and we saluted them when it was fully implemented.

Moving forward, in general terms, yes, we would be supportive across the board. Mentioning things like expanding the datasets that are shared allows for greater metadata analysis, which creates really interesting projects and has a lot of potential.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Ms. Shepstone.

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

Yes, CRKN would also be in favour. Most of our members are members of CARL or Universities Canada, so this is a positive move and a step forward, I think, in fostering innovation and research expansion.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Are there any comments? [Translation]

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

Yes, Mr. Baylis.

I don't know whether I will surprise you by saying that we may have some reservations regarding such a policy.

If it was possible to guarantee a choice for the creator, that would be a potential option. We also don't want writers or the industry we represent to feel that we are against progress. On the contrary, we want to move forward and we want things to open up. Solutions like this one may potentially be implemented.

It will be a matter of clarifying the regulation of what could be implemented, if such a policy had to be developed. We encourage you to regulate all that as precisely as possible in order to guarantee, most importantly, the moral right of writers to refuse, if they wish to do so, their content being made available on those types of platforms. [English]

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Quickly then, I do want to talk about TPMs, or digital locks, given that they're somewhat controversial within the education sector. How does your organization suggest that Canada reconcile its obligations in favour of TMs, while ensuring that educational institutions can fully exercise their rights under fair dealing? [Translation]

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

In most cases, protection techniques are ineffective. For a number of years, content has been pirated a lot. That is a major problem for which we don't have a simple solution. This will have to be carefully considered because, unfortunately, many authors are being deprived of their rights. Their work is copied and pirated by users who don't always have bad intentions. They don't realize what impact their actions may have.

Once again, it is important to regulate all this. The main thing is try to find effective ways to fight piracy. [English]

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

If you can fit it in within the line of questioning that would be good. If we get one more that would be fantastic.

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

CRKN members would be in favour of being able to circumvent TPMs for non-infringing purposes.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Ms. Ng. You have five minutes.

Ms. Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

I will be sharing my time with my colleague Dave Lametti.

Thank you, everybody, for coming and sharing this information.

I hear from the content creators and the writers, and I hear from everyone else, about having a regime that allows for greater access for young people for learning and so forth. Maybe I'll open this up, but do you have any thoughts for us, as I think about the writers and the content creators in an evolving world of innovation and further creation? The creators' work is part one, as I would call it, and other works get created from original content.

Perhaps those in the university and learning sector can talk to us about how you provide accessibility for your students in this regime, particularly when they want to be able to take, use, and create new material, essentially innovating from original content. I'd love to hear from the writers as well around how you see that use in this context.

(1635)

Mr. Mark Swartz:

For the university sector, those new exceptions that were mentioned, like the mash-up exception, the user-generated content exception, and fair dealing allow students specifically to take different works, mash them together, and create new works. These can be used, particularly with the user-generated content exception, which is really useful for student assignments, because they can create and submit new works for non-commercial purposes.

We really encourage those types of things. Mashing works together in creating new things is incredibly important for research as well, because research is built on other research. We encourage those types of exceptions that allow for those types of uses, for sure.

Mr. Michael McDonald:

We obviously think this is part of the ability to be innovative in a modern economy. A lot of content generation—you can search YouTube or go pretty much to any kind of material circulated widely on the web—relies on the ability to have a frame of reference that people understand and the ability to recreate and reimagine those things. That can be in the critical.... That can be in the reimagined. We understand that in the academic setting—and this is important—that is a non-commercial setting, one that the person understands is a learning environment in which they can practice this kind of effort. This is much of what modern content creation is. This is much of what, in a field like music, is the dominant form of being able to exchange new ideas. We think this is the kind of thing that needs to be practised. We also think that it does need to come with clear instructional purposes about what kinds of rules surround it. We do think that, when it comes to IP creation, better instruction and more information being available to will be key for them to be successful in a modern economy. That's really what we'd also stress through this, that we're really happy to have more learning about this kind of stuff as well. [Translation]

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

We could say that, in a way, we agree with what we just heard in terms of sharing ideas to create content, to move ahead, to be a modern society. We agree on that, but when an idea is shared with someone and a decision is made jointly to carry out a project, both are in agreement to move ahead.

Once again, we believe that section 29.21 of the Copyright Act—if I have understood your question correctly, we are talking about that provision—does not respect the moral right. In my opinion, taking someone's work without their approval and modifying it to create content, creative as it may be, does not respect the moral right.

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

You raised the issue of moral, and not financial, rights. You are telling us, I believe, that destination rights should be part of Canadian law.

Fair dealing does not affect authors' economic rights. In addition, the integrity of their work is not at issue. According to Canadian law, once the author has sold their work, they are not entitled to decide on its destination. That practice was rejected in the Supreme Court's decision in Théberge v. Galerie d'Art du Petit Champlain inc.. Integrity and authorship are the only moral rights covered in Canadian law.

What do you think about that? Do you want a destination right to be added?

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

That is your interpretation and I respect it, Mr. Lametti, but I completely disagree with that. Our moral rights are recognized.

When I sign a publishing agreement, I loan my work to the publisher and I get an advance. The work does not belong to the publisher; it is a license I negotiate with them.

Mr. David Lametti:

Yes, but we are talking about an economic right here, Ms. Aubry.

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

It is the moral right....

Mr. David Lametti:

With all due respect to you, I will say that most experts in the country agree with me. In Canada, moral rights are added only for integrity and authorship. There is no destination right. The Supreme Court clearly indicated as much in its Théberge ruling. When the work is sold, the economic rights are already acquired by the author, and it's done.

You are telling us that a destination right should be added to the legislation, but that has already been rejected. The idea is very innovative, but it is inapplicable in this case.

(1640)

[English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry. We're out of time. Perhaps we can come back to that.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you for coming out today. It's been very interesting to listen to the very informed points of view.

My first question will be directed to Ms. Haigh.

For your stakeholders, what has been the trend line in spending on copyrighted licensing and materials since 2012? Has it been going up or down, or has it been steady? What have you been observing?

Ms. Susan Haigh:

In terms of the purchase of licensed material?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes, what has been your budget for those things?

Ms. Susan Haigh:

For the CARL, the total annual university spending is $370 million. Our figure for our 29 academic libraries is $338 million in 2016-17. This is a CARL statistic; it's reliable. This compares to 2011-12 when it was $280.5 million. It's been a steady increase.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

There has been an increase, and we're hearing from the publisher and the creator side that they're seeing less benefit because of these policies.

To what do you attribute the increase in spending? Is it that you're using more products or that it's more expensive to use these products? What is the reason that prices have gone up?

Ms. Susan Haigh:

Well, prices go up. I think the licence costs have gone up over that time.

If there's a change that's been seen, from the collectives' perspective, it has to do more with the changing marketplace and the fact there is other open access content. There are other types of things happening that are much bigger than just the regular print-based price-setting kind of relationship that was there in the past. It's all changing.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

I'll pose the same question to Monsieur Dubois.

From your perspective, what would you say about the comments made previously? How is this affecting you? They say they're spending more, but your stakeholders don't seem to be seeing the benefit of this. Where's the loss happening? [Translation]

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

That is an obvious paradox. With us being paid much less—and we gave you very concrete figures earlier—and with increased university spending on Canadian content, which we are talking about here, where is the money going? [English]

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

So from your perspective, you are unaware of where that money is going.

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

Well, it's not in our pockets.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

My question then would be, and this is open to the floor, what is the impact of piracy? How significant is the impact of piracy on the price and the costs and losses you have suffered? [Translation]

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

That is a good question, but it is extremely difficult to answer right now because some websites operate without following with the rules. Publishers are trying to get them shut down, but they pop up elsewhere.

It is difficult to measure their impact, but writers tell us about them. They see their work being copied, pirated by users who are difficult to catch, especially since those platforms are accessible from any country. It is not easy. That is why piracy should be considered very seriously in policies, which should find ways to fight it. The damage should be measured. [English]

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

There were some comments made earlier by other witnesses that we're living in a much more content-heavy world. There's a lot more content production.

Would you say that the increase in competition among content producers could be one reason your stakeholders might be realizing lower prices for their products? [Translation]

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

You raise a good point.

It could in fact be assumed that, individually, revenue and income are being shared among more creators. That is possible. The fact remains that, in the issues we have been discussing since earlier, we are talking about the overall envelope. What we just told you is that there is an overall envelope related to royalties in terms of education, and that envelope has gotten smaller. So it is not just a matter of distribution. As for the book industry, it is indeed possible that having more creators means less revenue for each of them—which I am fully prepared to accept—but in terms of collective management, the overall envelope has been reduced since 2012.

(1645)

[English]

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I think this is an excellent start to our study.

At our last session, at meeting 101, we heard some very interesting testimony, which is being covered off here today. I want to thank you for creating some sort of juxtaposition to it. It will help us to think.

Michael, you talked about some of the new emerging technologies that people are using. You referenced YouTube and things of that nature.

One of the things I find interesting, which was never around when I was at school nor when I taught at college—it was probably just emerging then—is the other technologies out there, in particular the 3D printing, augmented virtual reality, big data, and artificial intelligence. These are all very big things right now.

Do we need to amend the act to better support innovation and technologies of the fourth industrial revolution?

I'll start with you, Michael.

Mr. Michael McDonald:

From a student perspective, we would stress that this is the kind of thing you need to make sure is flexible and adjustable and that individuals not be caught in a significant amount of red tape in what they're going to be doing, and giving some ability, especially to students, who are going to be some of the leading innovators.... They're going to be trying out new things in these environments. Making sure they are able to access content to be able to re-imagine that content is at the core of that philosophical question about what innovation is. Again, you want your political science majors to be hanging out with your welders, because it is a weird thing and they might come up with a really cool idea. This is the kind of thing you want to be able to promote, and anything that restricts that pool of information will make it more difficult for those kinds of things to occur.

I can't tell you what the next innovative new thing is going to be. If I could, I'd probably be sitting somewhere else, but we do know that it will be a result of neat ideas coming together. Anything that restricts that is something we would be concerned about.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That's very interesting testimony. Does anybody else what to chip in there?

Carol?

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

Sure. One of the comments I would make in regards to CRKN is that in our licences, we have been doing more work to allow data and text mining of the resources, which is very critical for AI. I think that would be an area where additional efforts.... We can see that impacting AI development very positively.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Mr. Chair, I'm splitting some of my time with Lloyd Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you for sharing your time.

I had one question that I didn't get out last time.

For the libraries, concerning the investment in the French language online streaming open access to journals, the Érudit system, is this something we need to pay more attention to? Is there enough funding to get access to French language content? This question is for anybody at the table.

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

I'll respond to that. As the Érudit project or partnership with PKP in the launch of Coalition Publi.ca is in partnership with CRKN, I guess I would start by saying that there is always room for some additional investment in ensuring that we have French content, particularly French scholarly content.

That's a rather broad answer, but I think this project is a really interesting model and a transitional program that's taking scholarly content that was in subscription form and moving or transitioning that over into open access in a sustainable and supportive way. Absolutely. This was also funded through CFI and SSHRC as well, so that was really beneficial in making this shift.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Does current legislation cover that?

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

It was a partnership that was enabled; it wasn't hindered or advanced, I would say, by the legislation.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In beginner's courses, we get access to information, and it gets harder and harder the further you get in, because publishers aren't covering the research and the costs of producing more scholarly journals, so we're taking American journals into beginners' courses and not having access to Canadian information as you get further along.

Do any of you have comments on that?

(1650)

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

It is certainly true that, of that $125 million, about $122 million is spent on international journals, if you will. However, I would add that many of those international journals include Canadian scholarly content. It's a really challenging analysis to pull out or parse out Canadian scholarly content in those international journals and to still balance Canadian scholarly content produced here in Canada.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I want to follow up on that, because it was one of the questions I was thinking about. How has the response been from international journalists having been exposed to maybe a different system than elsewhere, especially with open access? Is there still an interest in getting into the Canadian market, or has it waned a little bit if there is more sharing? Has there been any response at all? We have changed our copyright in the last number of years, so what has been the response from the international community?

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

In terms of international scholarly journals?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

I would say that, via CRKN and other research institutions, we will purchase whatever scholarly content we can afford and is needed, regardless of where it's produced, as long as it's supporting the research enterprise. Obviously, there's a need to support Canadian-produced scholarly content as well, but we do purchase it regardless of its origin, as long as it's affordable, if I'm understanding your question.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You are kind of not a trapped customer, but you're—

Ms. Carol Shepstone:

A little bit....

Mr. Brian Masse:

I didn't want to say it, I guess.

I want to follow with Mr. McDonald with regard to the divergence of platforms that's taken place. What has been your experience from those who are now taking advantage of more openness in terms of actually trying to get remuneration or some of types of supports for—I guess—the compromise. You may have a different business model from what you had before.

Mr. Michael McDonald:

We think that, depending on the open format you're talking about, this is going to be a changing business format. For something like an open educational resources environment, this is something that's relatively new that generally is provincially supported. It's something that, depending on the model its been based on, has been up to a few million dollars a year based on course books that were in high demand. So, if you were in a 101 course in British Columbia—a base-level course—that had high enrolment, they were going to create a textbook in that kind of environment.

The one thing about these kinds of processes is that they do snowball. The interesting thing about any kind of open format is that the next time the funding comes forward, maybe the project is to translate that textbook, or maybe the process is to make this textbook more regionally specific to interior British Columbia. These are the kinds of things this base content allows for and then you can build off in those granting models. We think that can be a very successful way of delivering really innovative content and Canada-centric content.

One of the big benefits of this material is that it can be very easily tailored. Right now, every one of us can go on the Open BCcampus site and grab those textbooks, and you'd be able to bring those forward. If professors take that, bring it into their course plan, amend it, and get approval from their department, that's delivered, and it's delivered in a really clear way to the individuals involved.

We do think that in some models there are places we are concerned about. When it comes to some of the open access discussions, we're strong supporters of it, but we do think the one thing that needs to be ensured is that especially young researchers and the emerging researchers don't have to pay the upfront fees. They're very often expected to still get published in that kind of a format, which can sometimes range up to $1,000.

Those kinds of things can be a burden and might not be expected on that original research grant, and we think those things need to be considered in those environments as well.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

We have a little bit of time left, so we're going to do five minutes and, I believe, five minutes on this side as well.

Mr. Baylis, you have five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Mr. Chair, I have a simple question, and then I'll be passing it on to Mr. Graham.

From a library's perspective, it's an interesting question. Can you tell us how you think we might be able, as a government, to help you help our Canadian creators?

(1655)

Ms. Susan Haigh:

We have been in discussions with the Canadian journals and others recently. It relates to Érudit to some degree, as well. We're very interested, because we support and host journals. Canadian research libraries host more than 400 Canadian journals. We want them to survive and thrive. We're trying to figure out ways. We've had committees that have involved all of us to try to sort it out.

I think the fundamental issue is that, whilst you can do collective platforms so that you're reducing the costs of production, there are a lot of things like that. That, in some ways, is what the government is investing in with Érudit, as well; so a collective platform is a very good idea.

However, there is some cost to the production of content, and it gets a little tricky to know how best to support it. I believe that's where the government can step in. We have been talking with SSHRC about the aid to journals program and how it's reshaping itself a little bit too fast in the open access direction and to help the journals as they're transitioning. I think that's the right kind of investment from the government, because it's helpful to keep the content generating.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you, Ms. Haigh.

Go ahead, David. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Dubois, Ms. Aubry, I have a few questions for you.

You talked about a loss of $30 million in royalties for writers who use collectives. I assume you are talking about an annual loss for all of Canada. However, the amounts universities and others spend are on the rise. You are trying to explain that paradox.

Is it possible that the reason is found in digital content and among authors who do not use collectives?

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

What we know is that it's less money for copyright holders—publishers and writers.

We specified that there may indeed be more copyright holders, which might partly explain an increase in university spending, but we don't have precise data on that. We could try to obtain it in response to your question, but we don't have it right now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

However, it is known that publishers make more money now than before. Do you have an explanation for that? The drop in revenues concerns those who use collectives, and not content producers. Do you agree with that?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

The question should be put to the Association nationale des éditeurs de livres. We are unable to provide you with specific figures from the publishing industry.

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

We would really like to have those figures.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Pardon?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

We would also very much like to have the figures because that would have a direct impact on how much our writers make, but the question should be put to publishers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you think software or content pirates would accept to pay for those products if access to them was sufficiently controlled? Would they instead choose to forego them?

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

I think they would accept to pay for them, but I have a feeling you don't agree with me. You are asking for my opinion, and I am giving it to you. Unfortunately, I don't have more specific arguments.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you aware of the fact that the fair dealing exception for content exempts the user from requesting the author's permission?

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

Copibec could potentially answer those questions.

Generally speaking, Copibec negotiates agreements and licenses with educational institutions. When the content is used, it means that the author has given their permission because they delegated to Copibec the responsibility of negotiating that license. As long as the content is covered by a license, authors are deemed to have agreed through that license, and there is no issue.

Does that answer your question?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That is the beginning of an answer, yes.[English]

Are you cutting me off?

The Chair:

I believe that Mr. Jowhari had questions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Okay. Sure.

Majid.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

I just want to share an observation that we've made on this side. I want to get your perspective and to help us fill in the blanks.

We've noticed that the revenue or income for creators looks like it's on a downward slope. If we have a graph with timelines and revenue, what we've noticed is that creators' revenue is trending downward. It looks like expenses for libraries are going up. We talked about the $200 million and the $370 million. I've done some searching around student's expenses as they relate to the material, and I would say that these expenses are on an incline. It might be with a different slope.

I'd like your opinion on the other stakeholder group, which in my mind would be the publisher. Where would you say that revenues or costs are trending for publishers, and how would it fit in the diagram?

Michael, do you want to start?

(1700)

Mr. Michael McDonald:

I would say that, overall, the post-secondary education sector to a degree is similar to the health care sector. It just experiences a higher inflation rate. The material and inputs that go into post-secondary rise at a higher rate than general inflation. This includes any kind of academic and literature materials, and this includes a lot of the inputs that are expected at a post-secondary institution, like any kind of machinery and that kind of material. A lot of what's necessary to produce even that academic content becomes more expensive and comes through. I don't have knowledge of the publishing sector to a degree that I would feel comfortable giving you an informed answer. However, it does seem that, in an instance, both sides of this discussion are clearly feeling the pinch in this. I think this is something that is a global discussion. You are seeing these same kind of cost pushes in a variety of other markets.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Mark, do you want to comment on that?

Mr. Mark Swartz:

To understand where the library money is going, you have to understand the shifting landscape by digital disruption. There has been a profound shift in the types of contents that are being used in and purchased by libraries. One good analogy is that it's very similar to the transition that the music industry went through a couple of year ago. In the music industry, you used to buy individual MP3s and CDs, and now a lot of people are buying monthly subscriptions and getting all their music in that way, from Apple Music and Spotify. Libraries have also gone through that profound shift. Most of the money spent by university libraries isn't going to individual purchases of individual books; they're going to large corporations, and these corporations aren't often publishing scholarly works, literary works or textbooks.

Most of that money is going to five major corporations—Elsevier, Springer, Taylor & Francis, Wiley, and SAGE. They're really dominating the scholarly journal market, and they're pushing up price subscriptions. This is a major issue for academia, but it's not necessarily directly related to copyright. We feel the government can help in that regard. We'd encourage you to continue to promote open access, openly available materials. Open government initiative for crown materials is another great example of how you can keep providing support. Enhance the capacity of Canadian scholars to publish in locally run journals. Other ways that we would consider helpful, because so much of our content is licensed now, would be any ways we can use the exceptions in the act for licensed material. If we have a contract that protects works, it would be useful if we could have an override or legal ways of accessing information, like fair dealing. Or if those works are protected by technical protection measures, it would be useful if circumvention were allowed for legal purposes like fair dealing.

The Chair:

Thank you.[Translation]

Ms. Aubry, do you want to add anything? You have 30 seconds.

Ms. Suzanne Aubry:

I would just like to make a general comment on innovation and creation.

Authors should not be forced to sacrifice royalties because, over the short or the long term, content will disappear with no creators to write it.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you very much.[English]

The final question of the day goes to Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'll be splitting my time with my colleague Mr. Jeneroux.

One observation that I've made throughout this process is what somebody once said to me, that the better the system you have, the more expensive that system will be. If we want better health care, it's going to be more expensive. I think Canada has one of the best education systems in the world, and we see that cost reflected in rising tuition rates and rising textbook rates. It seems that we're not willing to accept sub-par textbooks, and even in my time in university, textbooks were not just textbooks, but you had websites associated with them and CDs came with them. It's just amazing that there's so much more than what we were used to have in the past. That cost needs to be reflected.

Mr. McDonald, you mentioned that the education sector has higher inflation than other sectors. Can you explain what you think the causes are of that higher inflation in the education sector?

(1705)

Mr. Michael McDonald:

Obviously, the additional demands in the educational sector where you are trying to push the bounds of knowledge lead you to invest in significant machinery: the updating of buildings and of course materials, and hiring good people who are exceptionally good teachers and exceptionally good researchers to staff these facilities. All these are fought over right now in the international community. These are precious commodities and things that you are trying to be right on the leading edge of at all times, which, as in any sector, will make it more expensive.

It's also one of the reasons there are significant pushes for cost efficiencies throughout the post-secondary education sector. Governments and the public have demanded that. If these textbooks are good, are there other models? Something like an open educational resources model has demonstrated there are other really effective means by which to produce some content. So if a calculus 101 book, which has very consistent content, can be built on in a public environment, it can be very successful. It will be rated just as good as the textbooks purchased in other situations.

We think, again, that this is part and parcel of operating in a public environment and something in which, overall, we think all of the actors want make sure they are getting the most bang for their buck—and that includes the public. That is one we understand. We also understand that we will all still need to look to those kinds of efficiencies to make this both effective and affordable for everyone.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

In your response to an earlier question, you had alluded to alternative mechanisms for compensating creators. Could you maybe tell the committee of some examples you can think of?

Mr. Michael McDonald:

This is also different depending on the creator. When discussing this, I also think it is incredibly important to recognize that different creators in different spheres will need different mechanisms. Obviously, in some forms of research, tri-agency funding and real commitment to scientific research in the country is key and making sure that's well supported. When it comes to things like a public lending right, other mechanisms by which we can provide compensation could include grants to create certain kinds of textbooks. Again, provinces are doing this right now, and these are mechanisms that could be used. These are going to be different, depending on the sphere they're going to be working in, and we think they need to be best tailored to those environments.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

That last question goes to you.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Monsieur Dubois and Madame Aubry, you answered a question on the technological protection measures and gave your position on those. How do you reconcile your position when this falls under the WIPO and the Berne convention—those international agreements? I'm hoping you can clarify your position on those.

There's a dramatic pause. [Translation]

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

Could you repeat the question? I'm sorry, but I did not understand it. [English]

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

In an earlier question you were asked about technological protection measures. You stated your position on that. I am just hoping that you can reconcile that position, that we fall under WIPO and under the Berne convention—the international agreements. How do you reconcile your position on TPMs, digital locks, under those agreements? [Translation]

Mr. Laurent Dubois:

I cannot answer you right now because your question concerns technical considerations for which we have no answer.

(1710)

[English]

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay, sure.

The Chair:

On that note, I would like to thank all of our witnesses for coming in. As we said, it will be a long study. I thought that the information provided today was very valuable. When I see my analysts busy writing notes, it means that good information is coming through. And they're smiling, which is a good thing.

On that note, I wish to thank you all very much for coming. We will adjourn for the day.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. Bienvenue à cette 102e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie.

Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 13 décembre 2017, et à l'article 92 de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, nous poursuivons notre examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui Michael McDonald, directeur exécutif, Alliance canadienne des associations étudiantes; Suzan Haigh, directrice générale et Mark Swartz, agent de programme, Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada; Suzanne Aubry, présidente et Laurent Dubois, directeur général, Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois; et Carol Shepstone, vice-présidente sortante, bibliothécaire en chef, Ryerson University, Réseau canadien de documentation pour la recherche.

Nous entendrons d'abord le représentant de l'Alliance canadienne des associations étudiantes.

Monsieur, vous disposez de sept minutes — ou est-ce cinq minutes?

M. Michael McDonald (directeur exécutif, Alliance canadienne des associations étudiantes):

Je vais prendre sept minutes. C'est un bon échange.

Monsieur le président, distingués membres du Comité, témoins et membres du public, bonjour.

Mon nom est Michael McDonald. Je suis le directeur exécutif de l'Alliance canadienne des associations étudiantes, connue également sous le sigle ACAE. L'ACAE est une organisation non partisane représentant plus de 250 000 étudiants qui fréquente des collèges, universités et écoles polytechniques de partout au pays. Notre organisation défend un système d'éducation postsecondaire abordable, accessible, novateur et de grande qualité pour tous.

Merci de nous avoir invités à comparaître aujourd'hui pour discuter de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur a une incidence profonde sur les étudiants au pays. À notre avis, l'examen prévu par la loi constitue une excellente occasion de réfléchir à ce qui fonctionne et de régler ce qui ne fonctionne pas.

Chaque jour, les étudiants achètent, créent et consultent du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur. Vous ne serez pas surpris d'apprendre que les étudiants voient concrètement le virage vers la prestation de contenu numérique et l'adoption de nouveaux outils d'apprentissage. Par exemple, grâce aux journaux à accès libre, il y a plus de contenu que jamais offert gratuitement. Dans bon nombre de domaines académiques, y compris les STIM, ces journaux sont en voie de devenir le principal moyen de partager les nouvelles recherches.

Les ressources pédagogiques libres entraînent également une restructuration du paysage du matériel pédagogique. Grâce à ce matériel de source ouverte de grande qualité, comme les manuels de cours, les étudiants et enseignants ont accès gratuitement à du contenu. Ce matériel renferme un potentiel immense, car il peut être adapté de façon à satisfaire aux besoins des divers étudiants et publics. La Colombie-Britannique et l'Ontario se sont déjà engagés à financer la création de manuels de cours offerts à titre de RPL. Depuis, les étudiants de ces programmes font chaque jour de plus en plus d'économies.

Les ressources pédagogiques libres et de sources ouvertes sont des innovations pour lesquelles les économies de coûts et l'amélioration de la qualité pour les étudiants ne font que commencer à être connues. Nous sommes conscients que cette question n'est pas abordée dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Toutefois, nous croyons qu'il est essentiel de comprendre la forme que prendra le contenu pédagogique au cours des prochaines années au moment d'examiner la Loi et de prendre en considération les arguments qui vous seront présentés aujourd'hui. Il s'agit également d'une occasion importante pour le gouvernement fédéral d'encourager l'innovation et l'apprentissage.

L'utilisation équitable est un autre volet de l'environnement d'apprentissage moderne. L'inclusion officielle de l'éducation à titre de composante de l'utilisation équitable, en 2012, est venue préciser les droits exprimés par la Cour suprême. Bien que ce droit ait permis de réduire certains des coûts transactionnels des étudiants relativement à l'accès au contenu, nous croyons qu'il est important de prêter une attention particulière à la façon dont l'utilisation équitable a permis d'améliorer la qualité de l'expérience d'enseignement postsecondaire au pays. L'inclusion de l'éducation à titre de composante de l'utilisation équitable crée un mécanisme qui facilite le partage légitime de petites quantités d'information, ce qui encourage la diversité des sources et des perspectives d'utilisation. Dans le contexte universitaire, pour utiliser une métaphore, il s'agit d'un lubrifiant intellectuel. Il peut s'agir de contenu offert en classe par les enseignants, mais aussi par l'entremise d'expériences de l'apprentissage entre pairs dans le cadre de groupes d'études et de présentations. Cette méthode d'enseignement organique est difficile à quantifier et nous croyons qu'il est essentiel de la protéger.

L'ACAE est d'avis que les dispositions de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur concernant l'utilisation équitable à des fins pédagogiques ne doivent pas être modifiées. Afin de renforcer le système, nous recommandons également au Comité de se pencher sur les peines pour ceux qui contournent les systèmes de verrous numériques et étudier la possibilité d'éliminer ces verrous, puisqu'ils limitent la capacité des utilisateurs à exercer leurs droits légaux relativement au contenu.

Il est important de noter que dans cette ère de perturbations numériques, les étudiants, enseignants et établissements d'études postsecondaires continuent de payer pour du matériel pédagogique. Selon l'Enquête sur les ménages de Statistique Canada, en 2015, le ménage moyen a dépensé plus de 650 $ pour des manuels de cours universitaires, et 430 $ pour des manuels de cours collégiaux. Ces dépenses montrent clairement que les gens continuent d'utiliser et d'acheter le matériel publié lorsque celui-ci est efficace.

Cela nous mène à la Commission du droit d'auteur. L'ACAE est d'avis que le système actuel régi par la Commission du droit d'auteur comporte certaines lacunes. La transparence, la réceptivité à la rétroaction et l'honnêteté sont des valeurs auxquelles nous pourrions nous attendre de Facebook, mais également de notre système tarifaire. Bien que les tarifs pour l'éducation postsecondaire soient présentés comme étant un accord entre les propriétaires de droits et les établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire, nous croyons qu'il est important de prendre en considération les principaux consommateurs de ce matériel, soit les étudiants. Ce sont les étudiants qui paient ces tarifs, soit directement par l'entremise de frais afférents administrés par la province, ou indirectement par l'entremise des budgets d'exploitation. C'est un coût auquel ils doivent s'attendre, mais nous croyons que celui-ci n'est pas considéré de façon adéquate. L'ACAE est d'avis que tous les frais imposés aux étudiants doivent être clairement expliqués et justifiés. C'est une chose que nous demanderions d'un établissement et que nous attendons également de la part du gouvernement fédéral.

Jusqu'à maintenant, les frais imposés par Access Copyright ne cadrent pas avec les nombreux attributs auxquels nous pourrions nous attendre d'un fournisseur de service. Premièrement, ces frais semblent parfois être fixés au hasard. De 2011 à 2013, les frais imposés aux étudiants universitaires s'élevaient à 45 $. En 2014 et 2017, ces frais ont été ajustés à 35 $, alors que sur le site Web, ils sont fixés à 26 $.

Les étudiants se préoccupent des types de produits qui présentent ces variations. Les tentatives qui ont été faites pour mieux comprendre ce coût ont fait l'objet de résistance de la part d'Access Copyright, lorsque des demandes pour obtenir cette transparence ont été présentées par la Commission du droit d'auteur.

À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a aucune justification qui explique clairement pourquoi ces frais s'appliquent à tous les étudiants, surtout compte tenu des besoins différents en matière de licences des facultés. Nous croyons que les administrations universitaires sont d'excellents décideurs pour déterminer le type de contenu à acheter dans ces environnements.

Nous sommes aussi extrêmement inquiets que les frais proposés dans d'autres secteurs par Access Copyright sont jusqu'ici beaucoup plus élevés que ce que la Commission du droit d'auteur juge approprié. C'est très inquiétant, et nous demandons au Comité de veiller à ce que la Commission du droit d'auteur communique publiquement une justification claire pour expliquer les frais et demande des comptes à ceux qui souhaitent imposer ces tarifs.

L'ACAE espère que le Comité, dans le cadre de ses consultations et délibérations, garde à l'esprit l'importance de préserver des systèmes de droit d'auteur flexibles et adaptables qui répondent aux besoins des créateurs et des utilisateurs.

Les étudiants sont reconnaissants du travail dévoué que fait le Comité dans ce dossier complexe.

Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à l'Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada; Susan Haigh, directrice générale, fera la déclaration. [Français]

Mme Susan Haigh (directrice générale, Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Susan Haigh et je suis la directrice générale de l'Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada.[Traduction]

L'Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada, l'ABRC, est le porte-parole national des 31 plus importantes bibliothèques de recherche au Canada, dont 29 font partie des plus grandes universités de recherche au Canada.

Je suis accompagnée aujourd'hui par Mark Swartz, agent de programme visiteur à l'ABRC et gestionnaire du droit d'auteur à l'Université Queen's.

Les universités de recherche sont fermement résolues à offrir l'accès à l'information et à son utilisation, à favoriser la création de connaissances et à veiller à ce qu'un système de publication universitaire canadien viable et ouvert soit en place.

Nos remarques aujourd'hui porteront principalement sur l'utilisation équitable.

L'utilisation équitable dans le contexte postsecondaire respecte un vaste éventail de directives de la Cour suprême sur son interprétation appropriée. Depuis 2004, la Cour suprême du Canada fait clairement savoir que l'utilisation équitable est un droit de l'utilisateur, et ce droit doit être interprété de façon large et libérale.

Avec trois décisions favorables rendues par la Cour suprême sur l'utilisation équitable depuis 2004, et les changements de 2012 apportés à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, le Canada a une loi et une jurisprudence bien équilibrées, qui se situent entre la version d'utilisation équitable plus restrictive au Royaume-Uni et l'approche plus permissive à l'égard de l'utilisation appropriée des États-Unis. L'approche américaine, qui est en place depuis 1976, s'applique expressément à des fins telles que — et je cite — l'enseignement (y compris la production de multiples copies à l'usage des salles de classe), les bourses d'études et la recherche.

Par souci de flexibilité et de protection, nous pensons que le Canada devrait envisager la possibilité d'ajouter les termes « telles que » aux fins d'utilisation équitable énumérées à l'article 29 de notre loi.

Nous tenons à souligner au Comité que l'application actuelle de l'utilisation équitable dans le contexte postsecondaire est responsable, éclairée et efficace.

Les bibliothèques universitaires canadiennes reconnaissent que l'utilisation équitable à des fins éducatives est un droit qui doit être respecté, utilisé et géré efficacement. Les universités ont investi massivement dans l'infrastructure des droits d'auteur. Elles ont des experts qui se consacrent au respect du droit d'auteur et qui éduquent activement les professeurs, les membres du personnel et les étudiants sur leurs droits et leurs responsabilités en vertu de la Loi.

La Cour suprême a statué en 2005 que les tarifs de la Commission du droit d'auteur ne sont pas obligatoires et que les bibliothèques universitaires exercent leurs activités dans cette perspective. Je signale que la décision controversée rendue par la Cour fédérale en 2017 dans l'affaire Access Copyright c. l'Université York semble aller à l'encontre de la décision de la Cour suprême. Cependant, cette décision fait actuellement l'objet d'un appel, et nous espérons qu'elle sera renversée.

Les bibliothèques universitaires sont souvent responsables d'administrer des affranchissements des droits d'auteur sur les campus. De plus en plus, les bureaux de droits d'auteur doivent composer avec du contenu universitaire à accès libre, du domaine public, accessible sur le Web ou déjà visé par une licence de la bibliothèque en vue d'être utilisé dans les systèmes de gestion de l'apprentissage. Il reste alors relativement peu de documents qui seront communiqués en vertu de l'utilisation équitable ou qui nécessiteront une licence ponctuelle. Nous demandons régulièrement des licences lorsque le critère d'équité n'est pas respecté.

Il est évident que les tarifs obligatoires ne sont pas nécessaires pour assurer une bonne gestion des droits d'auteur. Le choix est important pour nous. Pour certains établissements, les licences générales, à condition qu'elles soient abordables, sont pratiques. Pour d'autres, une gestion locale active avec des licences transactionnelles, au besoin, est l'option privilégiée.

Certaines parties décrivent l'utilisation équitable comme étant la cause de réduction des revenus pour les créateurs. C'est faux. Le passage du format papier au format électronique au cours des 20 dernières années a fondamentalement changé la façon dont on a accès aux documents et les utilise, et des transitions de la sorte ont inévitablement une incidence sur la façon dont les titulaires de droits sont rémunérés. Ces transitions n'ont pas forcément une incidence sur les montants versés aux détenteurs de droits. Malgré ces pressions, Statistique Canada a rapporté le mois dernier que la marge bénéficiaire de l'industrie canadienne de l'édition est à un taux vigoureux de 10,2 %.

Nous croyons que l'appui direct en dehors du système de droit d'auteur tel que des subventions accordées aux créateurs et aux éditeurs est plus approprié à ce moment-ci de la transition. Le programme de droit de prêt public administré par le Conseil des arts du Canada est un exemple de forme de soutien de rechange.

Pour terminer, nous tenons à signaler que des changements avant-gardistes devraient être envisagés dans le cadre de cette étude.

Nous vous exhortons à clarifier que les mesures de protection techniques peuvent être contournées à des fins ne constituant pas une violation. Par ailleurs, nous vous exhortons à ajouter une mention pour veiller à ce que les contrats ne puissent pas avoir préséance sur les dispositions de la Loi et empêcher des utilisations légales.

Ces recommandations, et les suggestions liées aux droits d'auteur de la Couronne, au savoir autochtone et à d'autres secteurs, seront incluses dans notre prochain mémoire.

Pour conclure, les bibliothèques universitaires appuient la notion d'équilibre en matière de droit d'auteur, qui remonte au Statut d'Anne initial en 1709.

L'utilisation équitable dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur atteint l'objectif visé, en autorisant que des quantités assez importantes de contenu créatif ou universitaire soient utilisées dans des environnements d'apprentissage, favorisant ainsi l'innovation et la création de nouvelles connaissances.

Merci. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre la représentante du Réseau canadien de documentation pour la recherche. Madame Shepstone, vous avez un maximum de sept minutes.

Mme Carol Shepstone (vice-présidente sortante, bibliothécaire en chef, Ryerson University, Réseau canadien de documentation pour la recherche):

Merci de me donner l'occasion de me joindre à vous aujourd'hui. Au nom des membres du Réseau canadien de documentation pour la recherche, je tiens à remercier chacun de vous du travail que vous effectuez dans le cadre de cet examen législatif important. Je suis Carol Shepstone, vice-présidente sortante du conseil d'administration du Réseau canadien de documentation pour la recherche, ou RCDR.

Le RCDR est un partenariat de bibliothèques universitaires canadiennes réparties dans les 10 provinces qui offrent des services dans deux langues officielles. Les 75 établissements qui participent actuellement au RCDR comprennent toutes les universités de recherche et la grande majorité des établissements d'enseignement universitaire. Nous offrons collectivement des services à plus d'un million d'étudiants et à 42 000 professeurs. Vingt-neuf des membres du RCDR sont également membres de l'Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada, et tous nos membres font partie d'Universités Canada.

Grâce au leadership concerté de bibliothécaires, de chercheurs, d'administrateurs et d'autres intervenants dans la communauté de la recherche, le RCDR mène des initiatives à grande échelle d'acquisition de contenu numérique et d'octroi de licences pour enrichir les connaissances, bâtir des infrastructures et renforcer les capacités en matière de recherche et d'enseignement dans les universités du Canada. Par conséquent, le RCDR offre une voix importante pour comprendre le contexte de la création de contenu universitaire et des communications en évolution dans les établissements d'enseignement supérieur au Canada.

Les membres du RCDR appuient une loi sur le droit d'auteur équilibré qui reconnaît les droits des titulaires de droits d'auteur et les droits d'utilisation équitable. Nous sommes ravis de joindre notre voix à celle d'autres intervenants du secteur de l'enseignement supérieur, y compris Universités Canada et l'ABRC, pour soutenir la préservation de l'utilisation équitable, et plus particulièrement à des fins éducatives.

En optimisant le pouvoir d'achat de toutes les universités au Canada, le RCDR négocie et gère les licences pour le contenu universitaire numérique au nom de ses bibliothèques membres, dont la valeur annuelle s'élève à 125 millions de dollars. La grande majorité de ce contenu de journal universitaire est rédigé par des professeurs pour respecter les attentes auxquelles ils doivent satisfaire dans le cadre de leurs recherches. Dans le modèle actuel de publication de contenu universitaire, les professeurs en tant que créateurs publient habituellement les résultats de recherche dans des revues en contrepartie d'aucune rémunération, et les éditeurs de ces revues vendent ces résultats de recherche aux universités par l'entremise d'abonnements aux bibliothèques telles que celles qui ont une licence par l'entremise du RCDR.

Le RCDR négocie les licences pour assurer l'accès et l'utilisation qui sont indispensables aux étudiants et aux professeurs, y compris la capacité des universités d'utiliser ces documents dans les recueils de cours et les systèmes de réservation en ligne, de même que les utilisations permises qui sont visées par la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

En tant que consortium national d'octroi de licences au Canada, le RCDR facilite les investissements dans des publications universitaires dans une variété de disciplines. Par l'entremise de ces abonnements à des revues et de l'achat de livres électroniques, les membres du RCDR fournissent aux professeurs et aux étudiants un contenu canadien important. Un investissement annuel de 1,3 million de dollars englobe un abonnement aux revues de Canadian Science Publishing et un accès aux livres électroniques de l'Association des presses universitaires canadiennes. De plus, les membres du RCDR ont effectué des investissements ponctuels de plus de 11 millions de dollars pour garantir un accès permanent à la collection de livres électroniques de la Bibliothèque numérique canadienne, et ont versé 1,5 million de dollars pour avoir accès au contenu numérique et historique du Globe and Mail.

Le RCDR s'associe avec des éditeurs canadiens pour mettre de l'avant de nouveaux modèles d'accès libre aux publications universitaires. Par l'entremise de notre relation à long terme avec le Consortium Érudit, qui a commencé en 2008, les étudiants et les professeurs ont accès au contenu universitaire canadien français. Cette relation est devenue un partenariat de collaboration avec Érudit et le Public Knowledge Project et, en 2018, l'initiative Coalition Publi.ca a été lancée comme modèle de production durable de contenu universitaire canadien. Les membres du RCDR se sont engagés à verser plus de 6,7 millions de dollars pour appuyer cette initiative au cours des cinq prochaines années.

Grâce à notre appui et maintenant à notre fusion avec Canadiana.org, les membres du RCDR ont également facilité la numérisation des documents canadiens à valeur patrimoniale, leur accès et leur préservation. Les membres investissent actuellement près de 1,3 million de dollars par année et ont effectué des investissements ponctuels totalisant 1,8 million de dollars pour appuyer ce contenu historique unique.

De façon générale, les universités membres du RCDR versent annuellement 2,9 millions de dollars pour des licences de contenu canadien, et en 19 ans, le RCDR a versé 15 millions de dollars en investissements ponctuels pour l'achat de contenu canadien.

Ces investissements démontrent un engagement à l'égard de la publication d'ouvrages universitaires canadiens et d'une infrastructure de recherche robuste et saine au Canada. Les membres du RCDR appuient les universitaires en tant que créateurs et auteurs, respectent les droits des titulaires de droits d'auteur et veillent à ce que les étudiants et les chercheurs, en tant qu'utilisateurs, aient accès à du contenu universitaire international essentiel.

Merci. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

La dernière présentation sera faite par M. Dubois, de l'Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois.

M. Laurent Dubois (directeur général, Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois (UNEQ)):

Je ferai ma présentation en français.

Monsieur le président, messieurs les vices-présidents, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, nous vous remercions tout d'abord de nous permettre de porter aujourd'hui devant vous la parole et le mémoire rédigé par notre association, qui représente au Québec 1 650 écrivaines et écrivains.

Je m'appelle Laurent Dubois et j'en suis le directeur général. Je suis accompagné de la présidente, Mme Suzanne Aubry, qui, en plus d'être présidente de notre organisation, est elle-même écrivaine et scénariste.

Nous allons profiter de ces cinq minutes qui nous sont allouées pour vous parler de la situation économique des écrivains professionnels au Canada, qui, selon nous, est alarmante. Nous vous alerterons également à propos de l'aggravation de la situation à la suite de l'introduction de nombreuses exceptions dans la loi de 2012.

Dans le mémoire que nous avons d'ores et déjà déposé et que vous avez pu recevoir, nous vous faisons des recommandations pour que la loi puisse évoluer dans l'intérêt de chacun au cours des années à venir. Évidemment, à la fin de cette présentation, nous serons heureux de répondre aux questions que vous pourriez avoir envie de nous poser.

À notre avis, une loi sur le droit d'auteur ne doit pas se limiter à des aspects techniques. C'est d'abord une loi qui doit s'inscrire dans une vision politique claire avec des finalités précises. Nous aimerions que le Comité puisse saisir cette occasion pour répondre aux questions que nous nous posons.

Le gouvernement veut-il favoriser l'expression culturelle canadienne, encourager la créativité, proposer à ses citoyens d'accéder à une culture diversifiée et riche de propositions créatives, libres et variées, une culture qui contribue à rehausser la qualité de vie des Canadiens, leur autonomie de pensée et leur compréhension du monde?

Ou alors, à l'opposé, le gouvernement veut-il plutôt renforcer une logique de consommation au plus bas coût, laisser croire aux Canadiens qu'il est possible d'accéder dorénavant presque gratuitement à tout contenu culturel et de le modifier à loisir, et laisser le rouleau compresseur d'Hollywood et de la Silicon Valley nous dicter leurs lois commerciales en appauvrissant les artistes d'ici? Nous espérons que ces questions pourront alimenter le lourd travail qui vous attend au cours des nombreux mois à venir.

Il nous paraît essentiel de rappeler également que le concept de droit d'auteur ne se limite pas à une dimension économique. Effectivement, il y a le droit d'auteur et le droit économique pour payer des redevances, mais il y a également la question du droit moral, que nous souhaitons mettre sur la table aujourd'hui. Cette question nous paraît un peu absente de la loi dans sa version actuelle. Nous souhaiterions qu'on puisse en débattre.

La loi morale est cette idée qu'un artiste est en droit de décider de donner ou non l'autorisation à ce que son oeuvre soit utilisée, diffusée ou déformée éventuellement. Avec ses nombreuses exceptions, la loi de 2012 a privé de rémunération bon nombre d'artistes et d'écrivains.

Je ne veux pas dramatiser qu'il ne le faut, mais je vais simplement vous donner quelques chiffres. Le revenu annuel moyen d'un écrivain professionnel canadien est de 12 879 $. Au Québec, le revenu médian d'un écrivain était de 2 450 $ en 2008, et c'est à peu près la même chose au moment où l'on se parle. Cette situation fait que les écrivains professionnels et les écrivains de métier au Canada sont peut-être une espèce en voie de disparition.

Mme Suzanne Aubry (présidente, Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois (UNEQ)):

Merci, monsieur Dubois.

Je voudrais d'abord dire que mon père a été le chef de la Bibliothèque publique d'Ottawa pendant une trentaine d'années. S'il était ici aujourd'hui, nous aurions une bonne discussion, parce qu'évidemment, notre position n'est pas celle des bibliothèques, pour les raisons que nous vous expliquons en ce moment.

Les écrivains fournissent une part importante de la matière première du système d'éducation, une matière première dont le gouvernement conservateur de Stephen Harper voulait rendre l'accès gratuit en s'appuyant sur l'utilisation dite équitable au sens défini par la Cour suprême, en 2014. L'absence d'obligation claire pour les établissements d'enseignement de rémunérer les auteurs pour l'utilisation de leurs oeuvres a constitué un préjudice sans précédent. Selon l'article 29 de la loi, il est légal d'utiliser une oeuvre protégée, à condition que l'usage soit destiné à l'une des fins citées dans l'article. Je ne veux pas vous endormir, alors je ne vous nommerai pas toutes les fins prévues à cet article. Toutefois, c'est la portion de l'oeuvre qui peut utilisée sans qu'il y ait de violation du droit d'auteur qui n'a pas été définie.

Ce flou a provoqué, comme prévu, une judiciarisation des rapports entre les créateurs et les utilisateurs. On a vu les causes en cour se multiplier ces dernières années, dont celle de l'Université Laval, qui a décidé de son propre chef et sans l'approbation des tribunaux ou de la Loi que l'utilisation équitable permettait de reproduire un court extrait allant jusqu'à 10 % de l'oeuvre ou à un chapitre entier, précisant dans sa politique: « Dans chaque cas où l'on envisage d'utiliser un court extrait, il importe de se prévaloir de la plus avantageuse des possibilités offertes. »

Ces trop nombreuses et imprécises exceptions ont eu comme effet de réduire de 30 millions de dollars, depuis 2012, les revenus des écrivains et des éditeurs provenant de la gestion collective. Ces paiements provenant de licences secondaires représentaient jusqu'à 20 % des revenus des écrivains avant l'introduction de l'exception pédagogique.

Ces exceptions sont très nombreuses et très présentes dans la loi de 2012. Elles ont multiplié de manière considérable les pertes de revenus pour les créateurs.

Si ces liens à l'éducation nous paraissent louables parce que nous sommes absolument pour l'éducation et l'accès aux oeuvres, il faut quand même définir précisément cet accès. L'intégrité des oeuvres n'est plus garantie, le droit moral d'un artiste est bafoué et le piratage est encouragé d'une certaine manière, par exemple par l'article 29.21, qui confère une exception d'utilisation de contenus protégés par des usagers qui souhaitent s'en servir ou les modifier à des fins non commerciales. De plus, les sanctions prévues par la loi en cas de violation sont si faibles qu'elles sont loin d'être dissuasives.

Je vais laisser M. Dubois conclure.

(1555)

M. Laurent Dubois:

En conclusion, vous l'aurez compris, le voeu que nous formulons, c'est que cette révision soit une occasion de poser une politique claire sur ce qu'est le droit d'auteur et sur la façon dont le gouvernement souhaite que la société évolue à cet égard dans les années à venir.

Je vous remercie de votre écoute. Nous sommes à votre disposition pour répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons commencer par vous, monsieur Longfield. Vous disposez de sept minutes. [Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d'être venus. Nous avons un groupe important de témoins aujourd'hui. Nous essayons différents formats dans le cadre de cette étude pour recueillir le plus d'opinions possibles, et parfois dans une même séance, comme c'est le cas aujourd'hui.

J'ai quelques questions. Je vais commencer avec Mme Shepstone, car vous parliez des nouvelles façons de transmettre des documents. J'ai examiné l'étude sur les droits d'auteur qui vient d'être terminée en Allemagne. L'Australie est en train de mener une étude semblable. Elle se compare à d'autres pays.

On soulève sans cesse le nouveau format de communication et on se demande si la législation actuelle change assez rapidement. À une réunion précédente, j'ai demandé si Cengage pourrait être l'un des modes de distribution. Pourriez-vous nous parler des nouveaux formats de communication que nous devons examiner dans le cadre de notre étude et de la façon dont nous pourrions nous assurer de mettre en place la législation appropriée?

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Je vais faire de mon mieux.

Ce qui pourrait être utile, c'est de continuer à envisager une loi très flexible qui peut s'adapter à l'évolution de la technologie et des modes de distribution. Je pense que cette mesure ajouterait assurément une certaine longévité.

Si je me souviens bien, votre question portait sur Cengage, n'est-ce pas?

(1600)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, Cengage.

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Je pense que c'est un modèle très intéressant. D'après ce que je comprends, c'est une façon pour les étudiants d'avoir un accès direct à toute une collection de manuels. Je pense que certains des défis auxquels nous sommes confrontés dans nos établissements ou nos universités portent sur l'attribution de ces manuels. Il faudrait un modèle fondé sur la collaboration, je pense, avec nos professeurs.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

En ce qui concerne le fait d'avoir une politique pour prouver que vous avez acheté le matériel de cours afin d'obtenir vos relevés de notes, vous, Michael, ou un autre témoin ici présent, avez peut-être une opinion à ce sujet.

M. Michael McDonald:

J'ai certainement une opinion à ce sujet. À l'heure actuelle, vous n'êtes pas tenu d'acheter les manuels. Il y a des modèles que les gens peuvent adopter, que ce soit de partager ou de collaborer avec un collègue ou de se rendre à la bibliothèque pour consulter fréquemment un manuel, qui sont essentiels, à mon avis, pour veiller à ce que l'éducation postsecondaire demeure accessible à tous, peu importe le milieu dont ils sont issus.

En élargissant la question à un modèle comme Cengage, si vous améliorez les résultats en éducation, et surtout lorsque le contenu est présenté de manière plus efficace, nous serons certainement intéressés à adopter des mesures de la sorte.

Ce qui est préoccupant, c'est que l'on se retrouve dans une situation où un manuel ou des documents de cours sont regroupés à des fins éducatives, ce qui fait augmenter les coûts du matériel. Très souvent, on ne peut pas revendre un manuel.

C'est problématique, et nous pensons que c'est un mécanisme en vertu duquel un manuel perd de sa valeur parce qu'une partie du matériel intellectuel qu'il renferme a été reproduit à des fins éducatives. Nous croyons que ces autres options doivent demeurer à la disposition des professeurs qui offrent ces cours.

C'est prometteur. Nous pensons qu'il y a du nouveau contenu de qualité.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Excellent. Merci.

Il y a des bibliothécaires dans la salle ou des gens qui représentent les bibliothécaires, et des études ont été menées qui pourraient vous éclairer dans le cadre de votre étude. Lorsque nous parlons du modèle du Royaume-Uni, vous avez mentionné quelques-unes des différences dans les restrictions.

Y a-t-il des graphiques, comme des diagrammes de Venn ou autres, que nous pourrions demander aux universités de nous fournir pour que nous puissions savoir où nous en sommes, connaître la différence entre le Canada et quelques-uns de nos partenaires commerciaux et avoir une idée de notre avenir?

Mme Susan Haigh:

Nous nous ferons un plaisir de vous fournir ces renseignements. Nous pouvons certainement faire de notre mieux pour effectuer des recherches et vous les fournir, car je pense qu'il est très important pour le Comité de savoir où nous nous situons par rapport aux autres pays.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Excellent.

Un rapport qui a été rendu public en Australie en mars 2018 renfermait ces données. Je l'ai trouvé très utile, mais l'un des éléments manquants était bien entendu le Canada, car nous ne faisions pas partie de l'étude.

Pour revenir à Mme Aubry, vous avez parlé de préciser le libellé des exemptions. L'Allemagne fait aussi face à cette question et a dit qu'elle précisera en détail les pourcentages d'utilisation avant que quelqu'un ait à payer pour l'utilisation, les types d'utilisation et les gens qui ont accès au matériel.

Lorsque nous rédigeons la loi, nous ne devons pas perdre de vue les créateurs et nous devons nous assurer qu'ils sont rémunérés et que les règles sont équitables. Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus sur la clarté du libellé? [Français]

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Nous avons libellé très précisément les exceptions qui figurent actuellement dans la loi datant de 2012.

Je pourrais vous en faire la lecture, mais vous retrouverez dans notre mémoire chaque précision, article par article, ainsi que nos demandes de précision et d'abolition de certains articles. Tout cela est très clairement indiqué dans notre mémoire. D'ailleurs celui-ci a été traduit en anglais. Vous avez eu la version anglaise en même temps que la version française.

Voulez-vous que j'en dise davantage à ce sujet? [Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je pensais que vous auriez peut-être quelque chose à ajouter sur les renseignements que vous nous avez fournis. Un grand nombre de renseignements ont été fournis en peu de temps, mais je tente d'avoir une vue d'ensemble des pires parties pour nous.

Monsieur Dubois ou un autre témoin? [Français]

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Je vais vous lire les recommandations, parce qu'elles sont très précises et qu'elles vont probablement vous donner une indication très claire quant au chemin que nous aimerions voir emprunter le processus de révision de la loi.

Notre première recommandation est la suivante: Que Patrimoine canadien, en amont, définisse précisément dans quel projet politique et de société s'inscrit la Loi et en mesure les impacts.

(1605)

[Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

L'élément sur le patrimoine m'a sauté aux yeux, car nous devons réellement veiller à protéger le patrimoine canadien. Je crois que vous l'avez mentionné tous les deux.

J'aimerais redonner la parole au président. Il y a quelques points liés au libellé en français que j'aimerais soulever, mais peut-être la prochaine fois.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur Bernier, vous avez la parole pour cinq minutes.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Dubois.

Je vous remercie, monsieur Dubois, d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Pouvez-vous nous dire quel pourcentage de droits d'auteur les auteurs touchent normalement sur leurs oeuvres et leurs publications?

Selon vous, y aurait-il lieu d'établir des pourcentages dans la loi ou le libre accès fait-il très bien l'affaire?

Quel pourcentage les auteurs touchent-ils sur la vente d'une oeuvre comparativement à celui qui est versé aux divers intervenants de la chaîne de distribution — comme les éditeurs?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Je vous remercie de votre question, monsieur Bernier.

Dans le contexte d'un contrat d'édition, un auteur reçoit 10 % des droits d'auteur sur la vente d'un livre. C'est ce qui devrait être le modèle type. Malheureusement, rien dans la Loi sur le statut de l'artiste n'oblige les éditeurs à négocier avec les écrivains. Il n'y a pas d'entente collective, et chaque éditeur agit au cas par cas.

Pour ce qui est des autres droits d'auteur faisant partie des exceptions, celle relative à l'utilisation équitable laisse beaucoup de place à l'imagination et à la créativité des deux parties, mais c'est rarement à l'avantage des écrivains.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

D'accord.

Les nouveaux moyens technologiques, dont la numérisation des oeuvres, ont-ils des répercussions, positives ou négatives, sur les revenus que reçoivent les auteurs?

M. Laurent Dubois:

C'est encore difficile à mesurer puisqu'il s'agit d'un phénomène en évolution. Le bon vieux livre en papier reste la valeur sûre. Toutefois, c'est certain que, à court ou à long terme, il y aura des répercussions.

Présentement, cela se manifeste surtout dans la façon dont les gens utilisent un extrait. Je pense au plagiat, aux formes de satire ou encore à l'utilisation à des fins commerciales d'un extrait qui servira d'appui à une publicité. On a vu tout cela. Effectivement, les technologies amplifient ces phénomènes et rendent vraiment plus compliquée la surveillance liée à l'utilisation d'une oeuvre.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Je vous remercie.

Il y a quelques jours, nous avons reçu des représentants des étudiants. Ils nous ont dit que le système actuel les satisfaisait et que, si on le changeait, cela pouvait entraîner une augmentation des coûts liés à leurs études. Ils croient que cela aurait un effet néfaste sur l'apprentissage, et c'est pourquoi ils s'élèvent contre tout changement dans ce domaine.

Comment voyez-vous cela? Les étudiants devront-ils assumer des frais supplémentaires pour avoir accès à du matériel de qualité produit par les auteurs?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Je ne sais pas si c'est aux étudiants de les assumer, mais je ne le crois pas. Dans tous les cas, notre recommandation ne va pas dans ce sens.

Nous représentons des écrivains, qui sont d'accord avec les étudiants sur ce point. Effectivement, nous voulons que la matière première qui circule dans les établissements d'enseignement bénéficie d'un encadrement et qu'un coût spécifique y soit rattaché, qui ne peut pas être le même que celui appliqué dans le commerce. Plus que jamais, on a besoin que la littérature soit diffusée dans les écoles ainsi que dans les universités et qu'elle soit utilisée par les enseignants et les étudiants.

En revanche, ce que nous demandons, c'est que l'encadrement soit précisé dans la loi et qu'on en tienne compte au moment de la réviser. On aimerait que la loi encadre à la fois les termes « éducation » et « utilisation équitable ». Notre volonté n'est pas du tout de faire en sorte que cela coûte plus cher. Ce qu'il faut, c'est de mieux surveiller l'utilisation des oeuvres pour empêcher des poursuites comme celles qui sont actuellement devant des tribunaux, qui ont pour unique but de ne pas payer de redevances aux écrivains. C'est comme si on oubliait que l'auteur est à la base du livre. Sans auteurs, la rédaction d'un ouvrage est beaucoup plus compliquée.

(1610)

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Votre position est donc qu'il nous faut modifier la loi afin de mieux encadrer les exceptions, comme vous l'avez dit dans votre mémoire. Selon vous, n'y a-t-il pas de solutions qui pourraient comprendre des négociations avec les universités ou quoi que ce soit d'autre?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Bien sûr, nous sommes tout à fait disposés à venir à la table pour y négocier. Les sociétés de gestion Access Copyright et Copibec, au Québec, le sont tout autant, j'en suis certain, à s'asseoir à la table pour ouvrir les discussions.

Pour l'instant, le flou dans la loi fait que l'action la plus évidente semble être la voie juridique. Nous aimerions que ce soit et une voie politique et une voie de négociation entre des partenaires utilisateurs et créateurs qui ne sont pas en opposition. Tout créateur a envie que son oeuvre soit utilisée et tout utilisateur a envie de pouvoir accéder à des oeuvres. Je pense que c'est la réalité. Il faut simplement trouver ensemble le meilleur moyen d'y arriver.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

On devrait donc modifier ou restreindre les exceptions contenues dans la loi, ce qui aurait un effet sur la jurisprudence. Si je comprends bien, vous êtes un peu en désaccord sur la jurisprudence qui a été établie créée par la loi de 2012.

M. Laurent Dubois:

C'est exactement cela. On s'entend que, par définition, une exception présente un caractère exceptionnel. Quand on voit la liste d'exceptions qui figurent dans la loi actuelle, on se dit que cela ne ressemble pas à des exceptions. Disons que cela a un peu perdu de cette dimension exceptionnelle.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Je vous remercie.

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Monsieur Bernier, pour terminer, j'aimerais dire qu'il faudrait mieux définir le terme « éducation » à l'article 29, afin qu'il ne permette pas une utilisation abusive des oeuvres. Cela fait partie de nos recommandations.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

C'est parfait. Votre rapport est très concis et explicite, et il sera très utile pour nos travaux. Je vous remercie.

J'ai terminé, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais également remercier les délégations qui sont ici aujourd'hui.

Il est intéressant que l'une des positions que le gouvernement et le ministre pourraient adopter au bout du compte, c'est de ne rien faire. Il s'agit seulement d'un examen législatif. On n'a proposé aucun amendement à la loi. Aucun changement n'a été apporté à la réglementation. Quelques cas de contestation sont actuellement devant les tribunaux.

Monsieur Swartz, que se produira-t-il dans votre domaine, ou en général, si rien ne change et que nous nous en tenons au statu quo, à l'exception peut-être des interventions du tribunal? Quels sont les avantages et les inconvénients dans ces situations? C'est l'un des résultats potentiels de tout ce travail. Même si on a l'intention d'apporter quelques changements, l'échéance au Parlement commence à se resserrer, même si les élections ne sont pas imminentes. Il faut du temps pour mener cet examen. Les ministres évalueront cet examen et proposeront ensuite des mesures législatives. Donc, si c'est à l'extérieur du cadre réglementaire... Il faut que ce soit adopté à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat avant les prochaines élections.

M. Mark Swartz (agent de programme, Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada):

À mon avis, si rien ne change, les universités continueront de gérer le droit d'auteur de façon efficace et responsable. Nous continuerons d'utiliser les lignes directrices et les politiques relatives à l'utilisation équitable déjà en oeuvre, la ligne directrice de 10 % que vous connaissez déjà, et nous continuerons d'offrir des services aux chargés de cours pour la gestion responsable du droit d'auteur. De nombreux établissements offrent maintenant ce qu'on appelle des « services de programme de cours », qu'on appelle des « services de réserve électronique » dans les bibliothèques. Grâce à ces services, des membres du corps professoral ou des chargés de cours soumettent leurs listes de lecture au personnel, chaque publication est approuvée et ensuite rendue accessible aux étudiants. Souvent, les licences des bibliothèques représentent une grande partie des documents auxquels ont accès les étudiants.

Dans son exposé, Michael a mentionné les ressources éducatives ouvertes. Tout ce qui est diffusé par accès ouvert, ou même tout ce qui est ouvertement accessible sur le Web, est rendu accessible de cette façon. Nous avons également recours à l'utilisation équitable, et si un document n'est pas visé par cette pratique, nous l'achèterons en format électronique pour notre bibliothèque ou nous achèterons une licence transactionnelle. Il y a également la réserve des documents, ce qui signifie que si on ne peut pas acheter une licence transactionnelle et que le document n'est pas couvert par l'utilisation équitable, nous le mettrons dans cette réserve de documents et les étudiants devront le consulter à la bibliothèque. C'est ce que nous continuerons de faire. C'est la bonne partie.

En ce qui concerne les changements que nous apporterions, beaucoup de choses liées à la perturbation numérique causent des difficultés aux bibliothèques. Comme il a été mentionné, une grande partie de notre collection est passée de l'achat d'articles individuels aux licences. En effet, la plus grande partie des articles contenus dans une bibliothèque sont régis par des contrats de licence. Nous n'avons pas le nombre d'exceptions que nous souhaiterions pour ces articles. Nous espérons que nous pourrons discuter de quelques-unes de ces idées dans notre mémoire.

(1615)

M. Michael McDonald:

Fondamentalement, encore une fois, il y aura probablement une décision judiciaire qui aura des répercussions sur l'interprétation actuelle de la notion d'utilisation équitable. Cela a manifestement de grandes répercussions sur la façon dont cette loi sera interprétée à l'avenir. En l'absence d'une décision législative, il y aura tout de même certaines choses qui auront des répercussions sur la façon dont les gens de ce côté de la table interpréteront leurs droits.

Sur une note positive, nous croyons que nous sommes dans une situation qui, en général, a été avantageuse pour les documents didactiques fournis aux étudiants. Je crois qu'on observera plus d'investissements dans la croissance de choses comme les ressources didactiques ouvertes d'un bout à l'autre du pays, et j'aimerais insister sur ce point. On vient tout juste de voir les investissements effectués dans eCampusOntario cette année. Ce sont des milieux qui fournissent des soutiens directs aux créateurs, afin de les aider à rédiger des documents qui seront offerts en format ouvert. C'est le type d'innovations qu'on peut observer. D'autres pays envisageront de faire la même chose. Les revues à accès libre, surtout dans un grand nombre de domaines des STIM, dominent ces discussions.

Il est également important de retenir que cela aura différentes répercussions sur différents contenus. On parlera parfois d'un poème, mais on pourrait également parler d'une recherche scientifique ou d'une recherche juridique. Il y a des répercussions très différentes dans chaque cas. Nous croyons que dans l'ensemble, ce sera positif. Dans les cas où — et nous sommes parfaitement d'accord — les créateurs doivent être rémunérés, on peut créer d'autres mécanismes pour le faire. Nous soutenons vraiment cela.

M. Brian Masse:

Madame Shepstone.

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Le RCDR continuerait d'utiliser des licences pour les documents lorsque c'est possible et commencerait à participer à des collaborations et à des initiatives en matière d'accès ouvert et à réellement investir du temps et de l'énergie dans ce domaine.

M. Brian Masse:

Madame Aubry, je ne sais pas qui souhaite répondre en votre nom. [Français]

M. Laurent Dubois:

Puis-je vous demander de reformuler votre question? Je pense que j'en ai manqué un peu en raison de l'interprétation. [Traduction]

M. Brian Masse:

Nous menons actuellement un examen, et il se peut qu'il n'entraîne aucun changement. Qu'est-ce que cela signifiera pour vous ou qu'est-ce qui est à risque s'il n'y a aucun changement? Il est très probable qu'aucun changement ne soit apporté, et qu'on compte sur certaines affaires judiciaires et des changements réglementaires. [Français]

M. Laurent Dubois:

S'il n'y a pas de changements et si tout se règle au tribunal, il est évident pour nous que le métier d'écrivain va devenir vraiment difficile à exercer dans notre pays. Les risques associés à cela concernent la diversité culturelle. Veut-on que tous les produits culturels viennent de l'étranger? Veut-on que les livres offerts viennent d'Europe et plus probablement des États-Unis?

Il faut comprendre que, si on ne peut pas rémunérer correctement les auteurs des livres, ce métier ne pourra plus intéresser personne. Il y aura toujours des universitaires, des chercheurs et des gens cumulant plusieurs professions qui continueront à écrire et à alimenter une banque générale, mais des écrivains artistes et créateurs qui se lancent dans une oeuvre littéraire, cela risque forcément de disparaître.

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Je me permets de compléter la réponse.

L'esprit de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, c'est de défendre les créateurs; c'est une loi du droit d'auteur. En 2012, avec toutes les exceptions qui ont été introduites, c'est devenu une loi qui favorise les utilisateurs.

Encore une fois, nous n'avons rien contre les utilisateurs. Au contraire, nous voulons que nos oeuvres soient connues et qu'elles soient lues. C'est très important. Cependant, nous voulons que ce soit fait de façon équitable.

J'ajouterais ceci. Un intervenant a dit que des subventions pourraient servir à compenser les auteurs pour leurs oeuvres. Or on sait bien que les subventions ne sont pas données à tous les auteurs; seulement le tiers d'entre eux en obtiennent. Pour gagner honorablement sa vie avec sa plume, un écrivain ne peut pas compter uniquement sur les subventions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Monsieur Baylis, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

L'un des points qui ont été soulevés au sujet des changements apportés à l'utilisation équitable en 2012, c'est qu'ils ont amélioré l'éducation. Vous semblez penser que cela a vraiment aidé les bibliothèques, les étudiants, etc. Que faites-vous aujourd'hui que vous ne faisiez pas en 2012?

Michael, j'aimerais d'abord entendre votre réponse.

(1620)

M. Michael McDonald:

Je m'en remettrai en partie à mes collègues des bibliothèques. On a observé une grande augmentation du nombre d'experts en droit d'auteur qui évaluent ces choses dans les établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire. Dans le milieu universitaire, des bureaux du droit d'auteur ont assumé des rôles importants au sein de ces établissements. Ils fournissent aux membres du corps professoral et aux étudiants les types de formation qui déterminent les paramètres dans lesquels ils peuvent fonctionner. Il était entendu, surtout du côté des établissements, qu'il leur fallait être en mesure d'expliquer ce qu'ils faisaient avec ces documents. Cela devient une demande plus importante pour les étudiants en général. Le défi, c'est que la propriété intellectuelle et l'ensemble de ce domaine deviennent extrêmement importants en ce qui concerne les moyens de subsistance de tout un chacun, ainsi que la production.

M. Frank Baylis:

L'utilisez-vous davantage? Si la loi n'avait pas été adoptée en 2012, vous n'utiliseriez pas une certaine chose, mais maintenant vous y avez accès, ce qui vous aide à améliorer l'éducation. Est-ce parce que vous appliquez l'utilisation équitable là-bas?

M. Michael McDonald:

Je crois qu'il s'agit d'un milieu où on est plus à l'aise et plus en mesure d'avoir accès à des sources, de citer des sources, et d'être en mesure de les utiliser pour dire que c'est quelque chose dont on devrait pouvoir faire l'expérience dans le contexte approprié.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous l'utilisez donc davantage?

M. Michael McDonald:

Je dirais que oui, mais j'ajouterais que cela démontre que nous sommes dans l'ère moderne de production de contenu. En effet, ces cinq dernières années, une quantité beaucoup plus importante de contenu a été présentée dans tous les milieux numériques.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cette question s'adresse aux représentants des bibliothèques. Quelles répercussions ce changement a-t-il eues sur votre capacité de fonctionnement?

M. Mark Swartz:

Même si vous parlez du changement qui a été apporté après le dernier examen, il est arrivé plus tôt, car la Cour suprême fournit de la jurisprudence sur l'utilisation équitable depuis 2004. Il a seulement fallu un peu de temps pour que les universités s'adaptent à ces changements.

Les universités et les bibliothèques universitaires retirent plusieurs avantages de l'exception très libérale en matière d'utilisation équitable. Tout d'abord, elle aide beaucoup les chargés de cours à compiler des documents pour leurs cours. En effet, ils peuvent choisir des documents dans différents endroits et les réunir; ils peuvent utiliser des documents de façon spontanée et ils peuvent monter un cours qui fonctionne réellement. Comme nous l'avons mentionné, les universités ont créé plusieurs systèmes pour permettre aux chargés de cours de faire cela. C'est l'un des avantages réels.

Une exception libérale liée à l'utilisation équitable profite également aux chercheurs de plusieurs façons. Par exemple, ils peuvent utiliser et réutiliser des documents protégés par le droit d'auteur dans leurs recherches. De plus, les bibliothèques utilisent également cette exception de plusieurs façons, par exemple pour les prêts entre bibliothèques.

M. Frank Baylis:

Depuis 2004, on a tendance à l'utiliser davantage. Les tribunaux vous ont fourni une interprétation qui vous permet d'en faire une utilisation plus étendue. En 2012, cela a été inscrit dans la loi. C'est ce que je comprends. Allez-vous dans cette direction?

M. Mark Swartz:

L'utilisation équitable existait avant cela. En 2004, il y a eu l'affaire de la CCH et du Barreau, une affaire très importante qui a contribué à faire en sorte que l'utilisation équitable devienne un droit pour les utilisateurs dans la loi canadienne. Il y a eu ensuite d'autres affaires judiciaires. Certaines affaires judiciaires qui se sont déroulées en 2012 ont également contribué à établir cela.

M. Frank Baylis:

Si je tiens compte des auteurs, et...[Français] je vais m'adresser à eux bientôt,[Traduction]

Nous sommes au Canada, et nous souhaitons aider l'industrie canadienne et nos auteurs canadiens. Combien d'argent leur a été enlevé? Vous êtes un acheteur de données pour tous les étudiants à l'échelle mondiale. Avez-vous une idée de l'argent que vous épargnez sur le contenu canadien? Par exemple, si le gouvernement — et je ne parle pas au nom du gouvernement — vous offrait une certaine somme que vous pourriez seulement dépenser pour acheter du contenu canadien, combien d'argent vous faudrait-il pour arriver à ce que vous prenez, ou à ce qu'ils perçoivent qu'on leur prend sans se faire payer?

M. Mark Swartz:

Je ne peux pas parler pour les autres milieux, je peux seulement parler pour le milieu universitaire, mais dans la plupart des cours que nous traitons, la plus grande partie du contenu que nous fournissons est du contenu universitaire. Une grande partie de ce contenu provient de différents endroits. La quantité de contenu canadien est assez petite, mais elle est tout de même très importante. Nous en obtenons une partie par l'entremise des licences d'organismes tel le Réseau canadien de documentation pour la recherche et d'autres organismes.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous serait-il possible de revenir en arrière et d'examiner les données pour nous donner un aperçu? Vous n'avez pas à répondre maintenant, mais vous pourriez nous dire, par exemple, que depuis 2004, vous avez utilisé environ 5 %, et que vous utilisez maintenant seulement 2 %, ou que vous utilisiez 5 % et que vous payiez pour 5 %, ou que vous payez seulement pour 1 % maintenant grâce à l'utilisation équitable. Pourrions-nous obtenir une évaluation ou une vue d'ensemble des universités, seulement en ce qui concerne les Canadiens?

(1625)

M. Mark Swartz:

Seulement le contenu canadien?

M. Frank Baylis:

Oui, afin que nous puissions nous faire une idée des répercussions de tout cela. Pourriez-vous nous fournir ces renseignements, s'il vous plaît?

M. Mark Swartz:

Oui, nous pouvons travailler là-dessus.

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci.[Français]

Je me tourne maintenant vers vous, monsieur Dubois et madame Aubry.

D'après ce que j'ai compris, vous trouvez que l'encadrement du milieu dans lequel vous évoluez n'est pas clair. Il vous est très difficile de savoir à quelles redevances vous pouvez vous attendre. Est-ce bien cela?

Vous avez soulevé un autre point en disant qu'il y avait trop d'exceptions.

Ai-je bien compris les deux points que vous avez soulevés?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Monsieur le député, vous avez tout à fait compris les deux points que nous avons abordés.

Je vous remercie de la question que vous avez posée juste avant celle-ci. Selon ce qu'on constate, l'utilisation des oeuvres par le système de l'enseignement et de l'éducation a augmenté, mais en même temps, depuis 2012, les sociétés de gestion de ces droits ont perdu des revenus 30 millions de dollars.

M. Frank Baylis:

Les écrivains que vous représentez ont donc perdu 30 millions de dollars.

M. Laurent Dubois:

Je parlais des sociétés de gestion qui reversent les droits aux écrivains.

M. Frank Baylis:

Est-ce uniquement au Québec ou dans l'ensemble du Canada?

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

C'est dans l'ensemble du Canada.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cela représente les écrivains, les publications pour les universités. Cela représente qui, ces 30 millions de dollars?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Excusez-moi, mais je ne vous ai pas très bien compris.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez dit que des redevances de l'ordre de 30 millions de dollars ont été perdus. Qui exactement a perdu ces 30 millions de dollars?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Ce sont les éditeurs et les écrivains, c'est-à-dire les sociétés de gestion qui passent des licences avec Access Copyright ou Copibec. Ces détenteurs de licence sont perdu des revenus de 30 millions de dollars, et ces revenus représentent les droits qui sont reversés aux éditeurs et aux écrivains.

Je pense que vous allez justement entendre plus tard des représentants de Copibec et d'Access Copyright.

M. Frank Baylis:

J'aimerais vous poser rapidement une autre question.

Je vais vous demander la même chose que j'ai demandée aux témoins qui représentent les universités et les bibliothèques. J'aimerais savoir comment vos redevances ont changé depuis 2004, année par année. Cela nous donnerait une bonne idée.

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous avez sept minutes et 20 secondes.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président: Oh, j'aurais dû dire cinq minutes et 20 secondes.

M. Matt Jeneroux: Oh, eh bien, je prendrai les sept minutes et 20 secondes.

J'aimerais remercier les témoins d'être ici et de prendre le temps de comparaître.

J'ai quelques questions à poser dans ces cinq minutes, et il se peut que je vous interrompe pour abréger quelques réponses.

En février 2015, on a mis en oeuvre une politique en matière d'accès ouvert qui rendait essentiellement accessible au public, gratuitement et après 12 mois, les publications du CRSH, du CRSNG, et des IRSC. Comment votre organisme a-t-il été touché par cette politique? De plus, votre organisme appuierait-il l'élargissement de la portée de cette politique pour englober toutes les recherches financées par des fonds publics — essentiellement des fonds de recherche qui sont déboursés à l'extérieur des trois conseils?

Mme Susan Haigh:

En ce moment, la politique en matière d'accès ouvert s'applique aux articles de revues. L'ABRC a un système de dépôt ouvert, c'est-à-dire de dépôts institutionnels au sein du secteur des bibliothèques, qui a été élaboré au cours des dernières années. Essentiellement, nous avons réellement appuyé cette politique, car elle offre une autre solution. En effet, elle permet le type de rendement des investissements dans la recherche qui, selon nous, devrait être possible pour les recherches financées avec des fonds publics. Nous appuyons donc grandement la politique, et nous avons été en mesure d'appuyer sa mise en oeuvre, car nous avons ces dépôts institutionnels. C'est toujours une bonne chose lorsqu'une politique du gouvernement peut être respectée, n'est-ce pas?

En ce qui concerne l'élargissement de la portée de cette politique, nous avons certainement activement tenté d'affirmer que la même notion devrait s'appliquer aux données de recherche, par exemple. Oui, nous sommes d'avis que tous les résultats de recherches financées avec des fonds publics devraient être ouvertement accessibles aussitôt que possible, dans la mesure du possible, et que les créateurs peuvent toujours choisir l'option d'ouverture dès le départ. Nous croyons que les créateurs devraient avoir le choix de déclarer que la recherche est ouverte dès le début, ou parfois il est souhaitable qu'ils les publient dans des revues de renom.

Lorsque la politique est en oeuvre, elle fait vraiment bouger le marché et elle change des choses. C'est très important. Nous appuierions certainement la mise en oeuvre d'une telle politique.

(1630)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Monsieur McDonald, avez-vous des commentaires?

M. Michael McDonald:

Nous avons absolument appuyé les travaux du gouvernement précédent visant à établir une politique en matière d'accès ouvert pour les trois organismes. Nous avons activement appuyé cette initiative et nous avons offert nos félicitations lorsqu'elle a été complètement mise en oeuvre.

En général, oui, nous appuierions une telle initiative sans réserve. Mentionner des choses comme l'élargissement des ensembles de données partagées permet d'effectuer de meilleures analyses des métadonnées, ce qui crée des projets très intéressants et offre un grand potentiel.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame Shepstone.

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Oui, le RCDR appuierait aussi une telle initiative. La plupart de nos membres sont également membres de l'ABRC ou d'Universités Canada, et il s'agit donc d'un changement positif et d'un pas en avant, selon moi, pour favoriser l'innovation et l'élargissement de la recherche.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires? [Français]

M. Laurent Dubois:

Oui, monsieur le député.

Je ne sais pas si je vais vous surprendre en vous disant que nous aurons peut-être quelques réserves à émettre sur une telle politique.

Si l'on peut garantir que le créateur a le choix, alors c'est une option possible. Nous n'avons pas envie non plus que les écrivains et le milieu que nous représentons aient l'impression que nous sommes contre le progrès. Au contraire, nous avons envie de progresser et que les choses s'ouvrent. Il est probable que des solutions comme celle-là pourront être mises en place.

La question sera forcément de ne pas rester flou dans l'encadrement de ce qui pourrait être mis en place, si une telle politique devait être élaborée. Nous vous encouragerons alors à encadrer tout cela le plus précisément possible, afin qu'on puisse, surtout, garantir le droit moral des écrivains à refuser, s'ils le souhaitent, que leurs oeuvres soient mises sur ce genre de plateforme. [Traduction]

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Dans ce cas, j'aimerais brièvement parler des mesures de protection technologiques ou des serrures numériques, étant donné qu'elles soulèvent la controverse dans le secteur de l'éducation. Comment votre organisme propose-t-il que le Canada respecte ses obligations à l'égard des marques de commerce tout en veillant à ce que les établissements d'enseignement puissent exercer pleinement leurs droits liés à l'utilisation équitable? [Français]

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Dans la plupart des cas, les techniques de protection sont inefficaces. On assiste depuis plusieurs années à beaucoup de piratage des oeuvres. C'est un problème important auquel nous n'avons pas de solution simple à apporter. Il faudrait vraiment faire une réflexion approfondie là-dessus, parce que, malheureusement, beaucoup d'auteurs sont spoliés de leurs droits. Leurs oeuvres sont copiées et piratées par des utilisateurs qui, parfois, ne le font pas en voulant mal faire. Ils ne se rendent pas compte des répercussions que cela peut avoir.

Encore une fois, il est important d'encadrer tout cela. Il faut surtout essayer de trouver des façons efficaces de contrer le piratage. [Traduction]

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Si votre réponse pouvait respecter le sujet des questions, ce serait très bien. Si nous pouvons obtenir une réponse de plus, ce serait fantastique.

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Les membres du RCDR appuieraient la possibilité de pouvoir se soustraire aux mesures de protection technologiques à des fins ne constituant pas une violation.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Ng. Elle a cinq minutes.

Mme Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

Je vais céder une partie de mon temps à mon collègue, Dave Lametti.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence et de l'information que vous nous fournissez.

Les créateurs et les écrivains, et tous les autres, parlent d'un régime offrant aux jeunes un meilleur accès favorisant l'apprentissage, etc. Je vais peut-être élargir le débat, mais avez-vous d'autres réflexions, si je pense aux écrivains et aux créateurs de contenu dans un monde d'innovation et de création en constante évolution? Le travail des créateurs constitue le premier volet, si je peux dire, et d'autres oeuvres sont créées à partir du contenu original.

Peut-être que les gens qui représentent le milieu universitaire et le secteur de l'apprentissage peuvent nous dire comment, dans ce régime, ils assurent l'accessibilité pour les jeunes, en particulier lorsqu'ils veulent pouvoir utiliser et créer du nouveau matériel, essentiellement innover à partir d'un contenu original. J'aimerais vraiment aussi connaître le point de vue des écrivains sur cette forme d'utilisation dans ce contexte.

(1635)

M. Mark Swartz:

Pour le secteur universitaire, les nouvelles exceptions qui ont été mentionnées, comme l'exception relative au mixage, l'exception relative au contenu généré par l'utilisateur et l'utilisation équitable permettent aux étudiants de prendre différentes oeuvres, de les rassembler et de créer de nouvelles oeuvres. Elles peuvent être utilisées, particulièrement grâce à l'exception relative au contenu généré par l'utilisateur, ce qui est vraiment utile pour les travaux des étudiants, car ils peuvent créer et présenter de nouvelles oeuvres à des fins non commerciales.

Nous encourageons vraiment ce type de choses. Créant de nouvelles choses en utilisant des oeuvres, c'est extrêmement important pour la recherche également, car la recherche s'appuie sur d'autres recherches. Nous encourageons certainement ces types d'exception qui permettent ce genre d'utilisation.

M. Michael McDonald:

Évidemment, nous pensons que cela fait partie de la capacité d'innover dans une économie moderne. Une bonne partie de la création de contenu — on peut chercher sur YouTube ou consulter à peu près tout matériel qui est grandement diffusé sur le Web — repose sur la capacité d'avoir un cadre de référence que les gens comprennent et la capacité de réinventer, de repenser ces choses. Cela peut être dans... Il peut s'agir de les repenser. Nous comprenons que dans le milieu universitaire — et c'est important —, c'est un contexte non commercial, un contexte où la personne comprend que c'est un milieu d'apprentissage dans lequel ce genre de choses est possible. Cela correspond en grande partie à ce qu'est la création de contenu moderne et à ce qu'est, dans un domaine comme la musique, ce qui correspond principalement à la capacité d'échanger de nouvelles idées. Nous pensons que c'est le type de choses qui doit être pratiqué. Nous pensons également que cela ne doit pas nécessairement s'accompagner d'objectifs didactiques clairs quant aux types de règles à cet égard. Nous croyons que, lorsqu'il s'agit de la création de propriété intellectuelle, un meilleur accès à de l'information sera essentiel pour réussir dans une économie moderne. C'est vraiment ce que nous voulons souligner également, soit que nous sommes très heureux d'avoir davantage de connaissances sur ce type de choses. [Français]

M. Laurent Dubois:

Nous pourrions dire que, d'une certaine manière, nous sommes d'accord sur ce que nous venons d'entendre. On parle de partager des idées pour créer du contenu, pour avancer, pour être une société moderne. Nous sommes d'accord sur cela, mais quand on partage une idée avec une personne et qu'on décide ensemble de réaliser un projet, on est tous les deux d'accord pour avancer.

Encore une fois, nous croyons que l'article 29.21 de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur — si j'ai bien compris votre question, c'est en effet de cet article qu'il s'agit — ne respecte pas le droit moral. Le fait de prendre le travail d'une personne sans son autorisation et de le déformer pour créer un contenu, aussi créatif soit-il, ne respecte pas le droit moral, selon moi.

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Vous avez justement soulevé la question des droits moraux, non pécuniaires, non monétaires. Vous êtes en train de nous dire, je crois, qu'il faudrait intégrer le droit de destination au droit canadien.

En effet, l'utilisation équitable n'affecte pas les droits économiques de l'auteur. En outre, l'intégrité de son oeuvre n'est pas en cause. Selon le droit canadien, une fois que l'auteur a vendu son oeuvre, il n'a pas le droit de lui donner une destination. Cette pratique a été rejetée par la cour Suprême dans sa décision dans l'affaire Théberge c. Galerie d'Art du Petit Champlain inc.. L'intégrité et la paternité sont les seuls droits moraux que comporte le droit canadien.

Qu'en pensez-vous? Voulez-vous qu'on ajoute un droit de destination?

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

C'est votre interprétation et je la respecte, monsieur Lametti, mais je suis absolument en désaccord sur cela. Nos droits moraux sont reconnus.

Quand je signe un contrat d'édition, je prête mon oeuvre à l'éditeur et je reçois un à-valoir. L'oeuvre n'appartient pas à l'éditeur; il s'agit d'une licence que je négocie avec lui.

M. David Lametti:

Oui, mais on parle ici d'un droit économique, madame Aubry.

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

C'est le droit moral...

M. David Lametti:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je dirai que la plupart des experts au pays seront d'accord avec moi. Au Canada, les droits moraux sont ajoutés uniquement pour l'intégrité et la paternité de l'oeuvre. Il n'y a pas de droit de destination. La Cour suprême l'a clairement indiqué dans sa décision dans l'affaire Théberge. Quand l'oeuvre est vendue, les droits économiques sont déjà acquis par l'auteur, et c'est terminé.

Vous êtes en train de nous dire que nous devrions ajouter un droit de destination dans la loi, mais cela a déjà été rejeté. C'est une question très novatrice, mais elle ne s'applique pas dans le cas présent.

(1640)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Excusez-moi. Le temps est écoulé. Nous pourrons peut-être y revenir.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Lloyd.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Je vous remercie de votre présence. C'est très intéressant d'entendre vos points de vue très éclairés.

Ma première question s'adresse à Mme Haigh.

Concernant les dépenses de vos intervenants, quelle est la tendance pour les objets protégés par un droit d'auteur depuis 2012? Leurs dépenses ont-elles augmenté, diminué ou sont-elles restées stables? Que constatez-vous?

Mme Susan Haigh:

Parlez-vous de l'achat de matériel sous licence?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui. Quel est votre budget pour ces choses?

Mme Susan Haigh:

Pour notre association, le total des dépenses universitaires annuelles est de 370 millions de dollars. Pour nos 29 bibliothèques universitaires, elles se sont élevées à 338 millions de dollars en 2016-2017. Il s'agit de données de notre association; c'est fiable. À titre comparatif, elles étaient de 280,5 millions de dollars en 2011-2012. Elles augmentent de façon constante.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Elles ont augmenté, et les éditeurs et les créateurs disent que c'est moins avantageux en raison de ces politiques.

À quoi attribuez-vous l'augmentation des dépenses? Est-ce que c'est parce que vous utilisez plus de produits ou bien que l'utilisation de ces produits coûte plus cher? Qu'est-ce qui explique l'augmentation des prix?

Mme Susan Haigh:

Eh bien, les prix augmentent. Je crois que les coûts de licence ont augmenté au cours de cette période.

Si l'on a vu un changement, du point de vue de la gestion collective, cela a davantage à voir avec le marché changeant et le fait qu'il y a d'autres contenus à accès libre. Il y a d'autres types de choses qui se produisent qui dépassent largement le seul lien entre, en quelque sorte, l'établissement des coûts et les produits imprimés qui existait dans le passé. Tout change.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Je vais poser la même question à M. Dubois.

Que diriez-vous au sujet des observations qui ont été faites précédemment ? Comment cela vous touche-t-il? Ils disent que leurs dépenses sont plus élevées, mais vos intervenants ne semblent pas en voir des avantages? Où se produit la perte? [Français]

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

C'est un paradoxe, visiblement. Si nous sommes beaucoup moins payés — et nous vous avons donné des chiffres très concrets tantôt — et que les dépenses augmentent dans les universités pour l'achat de contenu canadien, ce dont nous parlons ici, où donc va l'argent? [Traduction]

M. Dane Lloyd:

Alors, vous ignorez où va l'argent.

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Eh bien, elle n'est pas dans nos poches.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord.

Alors je poserai la question suivante, à laquelle vous pouvez tous répondre: Quelles sont les répercussions du piratage? Dans quelle mesure le piratage a-t-il des répercussions sur le prix, les coûts et les pertes que vous subissez? [Français]

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

C'est une bonne question, mais il est extrêmement difficile d'y répondre en ce moment parce qu'il y a des sites qui ouvrent sans se conformer aux règles. Les éditeurs essaient de les faire fermer, mais ils rouvrent ailleurs.

Il est difficile d'en mesurer les répercussions, mais les écrivains nous en parlent. Ils voient leurs oeuvres être copiées, piratées par des utilisateurs qu'il est difficile d'attraper, surtout que ces plateformes sont accessibles de n'importe quel pays. Ce n'est pas facile. C'est pour cela que le piratage devrait être étudié de façon très sérieuse par les politiques, qui devraient trouver des façons de le contrer. Il faut mesurer les dommages. [Traduction]

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'autres témoins ont dit que nous vivons dans un monde dans lequel il y a plus de contenu. La production de contenu est beaucoup plus importante.

Diriez-vous que l'augmentation de la concurrence du côté des producteurs de contenu pourrait en partie expliquer le fait que vos intervenants obtiennent moins de revenus pour leurs produits? [Français]

M. Laurent Dubois:

Vous soulevez un bon point.

On pourrait effectivement imaginer que, individuellement, il y a un partage des revenus et des recettes entre plus de créateurs. C'est possible. N'empêche que dans les questions dont nous discutons depuis tout à l'heure, nous parlons d'enveloppe globale. Nous, ce que nous venons vous dire, c'est qu'il y a une enveloppe globale liée aux redevances dans la question de l'enseignement, et que cette enveloppe a baissé. Ce n'est donc pas uniquement une question de répartition. Pour ce qui est de l'industrie du livre, il est effectivement possible que le fait d'avoir plus de créateurs signifie moins de revenus pour chacun — cela, je veux bien l'accepter —, mais sur la question de la gestion collective, c'est l'enveloppe générale qui a baissé depuis 2012.

(1645)

[Traduction]

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Sheehan.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je pense que c'est une excellente façon de commencer notre étude.

Lors de notre dernière séance, la 101e séance, nous avons entendu des témoignages très intéressants, qui sont couverts aujourd'hui. Je veux vous remercier de faire des rapprochements en quelque sorte. Cela nous aidera dans notre réflexion.

Michael, vous avez parlé de certaines des technologies émergentes que les gens utilisent. Vous avez parlé de YouTube et d'autres choses du genre.

Ce que je trouve intéressant, entre autres, et je n'y avais jamais accès lorsque j'étais à l'école ou quand j'enseignais au collège — cela venait probablement tout juste d'apparaître —, ce sont les autres technologies, en particulier l'impression 3D, la réalité virtuelle augmentée, les mégadonnées et l'intelligence artificielle. Ce sont des éléments très présents maintenant.

Devons-nous modifier la loi pour mieux appuyer l'innovation et les technologies de la quatrième révolution industrielle?

J'aimerais vous entendre tout d'abord là-dessus, Michael.

M. Michael McDonald:

Du point de vue d'un étudiant, nous dirions qu'il faut s'assurer que ce type de chose est souple et adaptable et que les gens ne sont pas pris dans des dédales administratifs. De plus, il faut donner la capacité, surtout aux étudiants, qui seront à l'avant-garde... Ils essayeront de nouvelles choses dans ces environnements. S'assurer qu'ils peuvent accéder au contenu pour pouvoir repenser ce contenu est au coeur de la question philosophique sur ce qu'est l'innovation. Encore une fois, on veut que les étudiants en science politique côtoient les soudeurs parce qu'ils pourraient trouver une idée vraiment géniale. C'est le genre de chose qu'on veut pouvoir favoriser, et tout ce qui limite la communication d'information fera en sorte qu'il y aura moins de chance que cela se produise.

Je ne peux vous dire quelle sera la prochaine innovation. Si je le pouvais, je ne serais probablement pas ici, mais nous savons qu'elle résultera du regroupement d'idées nouvelles. Tout ce qui empêche cela nous préoccuperait.

M. Terry Sheehan:

C'est un témoignage très intéressant. Quelqu'un d'autre veut intervenir?

Carol?

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Certainement. L'une des observations que je ferais concernant notre réseau, c'est que concernant nos licences, nous travaillons davantage pour favoriser l'exploration des données et de texte, ce qui est vraiment essentiel pour l'intelligence artificielle. Je crois que c'est un volet où des efforts supplémentaires... Il peut y avoir des répercussions très positives sur le développement de l'intelligence artificielle.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Monsieur le président, je vais céder une partie de mon temps à Lloyd Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous en remercie.

Il y a une question que je n'ai pas posée la dernière fois.

Pour les bibliothèques, concernant l'investissement dans le libre accès continu en ligne au contenu français pour les revues, le système d'Érudit, nous faut-il y porter davantage attention? Y a-t-il assez de fonds pour l'accès au contenu français? N'importe qui d'entre vous peut répondre à cette question.

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Je vais y répondre. Comme le projet d'Érudit ou le partenariat avec le Public Knowledge dans le lancement de Coalition Publi.ca se font en partenariat avec notre réseau, je dirais d'abord qu'il y a toujours moyen de faire des investissements supplémentaires pour faire en sorte que nous avons du contenu en français, en particulier du contenu savant français.

C'est une réponse plutôt générale, mais je crois que ce projet est un modèle très intéressant et un programme de transition faisant en sorte que le contenu savant qui était vendu par des abonnements devient du contenu à accès libre d'une façon viable et utile. Absolument. Cela a également été financé par la Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation et le CRSH, de sorte que c'était vraiment bénéfique.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Est-ce couvert par la loi actuelle?

Mme Carol Shepstone:

C'est un partenariat qui a été rendu possible; il n'a été ni entravé ni favorisé, je dirais, par la loi.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Dans les cours pour débutants, nous obtenons l'accès à l'information, et plus on avance, plus c'est difficile, car les éditeurs ne couvrent pas la recherche et les coûts liés à la production d'autres revues savantes, de sorte que nous utilisons des publications américaines dans les cours de débutants et nous n'avons pas accès à l'information canadienne.

Avez-vous des commentaires là-dessus?

(1650)

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Certes, sur ce montant de 125 millions de dollars, environ 122 millions sont consacrés aux revues internationales, si l'on veut. Toutefois, j'ajouterais que bon nombre de ces revues internationales incluent du contenu savant canadien. Il est vraiment difficile de déterminer quel est le contenu canadien dans ces revues et de maintenir un équilibre quant au contenu savant produit au Canada.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse:

J'aimerais enchaîner là-dessus, car c'est l'une des questions à laquelle je pensais. Quelle a été la réaction des journalistes internationaux qui ont été exposés à un système peut-être différent, surtout concernant le libre accès? Souhaite-t-on toujours entrer dans le marché canadien, ou l'intérêt a-t-il diminué un peu s'il y a plus de partage? Y a-t-il eu une réaction quelconque? Puisque nous avons apporté des changements sur le plan du droit d'auteur ces dernières années, quelle a été la réaction de la communauté internationale?

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Pour ce qui est des revues savantes internationales?

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Je dirais que par notre réseau et d'autres établissements de recherche, nous achèterons tout contenu savant que nous pouvons selon nos moyens et nos besoins, peu importe où il est produit, tant qu'il aide à la recherche. Évidemment, il faut appuyer le contenu savant produit au Canada également, mais nous achetons du contenu, peu importe son origine, tant qu'il est abordable, si j'ai bien compris votre question.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous n'êtes pas un client coincé en quelque sorte, mais...

Mme Carol Shepstone:

Un peu...

M. Brian Masse:

J'imagine que je ne voulais pas le dire.

Je veux poser une question à M. McDonald sur les différences concernant les plateformes. Quelle est votre expérience par rapport à ceux qui profitent d'une plus grande ouverture pour ce qui est d'avoir une rémunération ou un type d'appui pour — j'imagine — le compromis? Le modèle opérationnel a peut-être changé.

M. Michael McDonald:

Tout dépendant du type de format ouvert dont vous parlez, nous pensons que cela va changer le modèle d'affaires. Pour une plateforme ouverte de ressources pédagogiques, notamment, c'est quelque chose de relativement nouveau et généralement financé au niveau provincial. Selon le modèle de référence, cela pourrait représenter quelques millions de dollars par année en manuels de cours en grande demande. Autrement dit, pour un cours 101 comptant un grand nombre d'inscrits en Colombie-Britannique, par exemple, on utilisait ce genre d'environnement pour créer un manuel scolaire.

Ce type d'initiative fait généralement boule de neige. Ce qui est intéressant avec le format ouvert, c'est que la prochaine fois qu'on obtient du financement, peut-être que l'objectif sera de faire traduire le manuel scolaire ou de l'adapter aux réalités propres à la Colombie-Britannique. Le contenu de base permet d'aller plus loin, et il est possible de miser sur ce contenu avec les modèles de subventions. Cela peut être une façon très efficace de créer du contenu vraiment innovateur et du contenu axé sur le Canada.

Un des grands avantages du contenu ouvert est qu'il peut facilement être adapté. En ce moment, tout le monde peut aller sur la plateforme ouverte BCcampus et utiliser les manuels qui s'y trouvent. Les professeurs peuvent aller chercher du contenu, l'ajouter à leur plan de cours, le modifier et faire approuver le tout par leur département. C'est communiqué très clairement aux parties concernées.

Par contre, certaines préoccupations demeurent. Pour ce qui est des discussions en libre accès, bien que nous soyons tout à fait pour cela, il est important que les nouveaux et les jeunes chercheurs, surtout, n'aient pas à payer les frais initiaux. Souvent, on s'attend à ce qu'ils publient tout de même leurs recherches dans ce type de format, ce qui peut coûter jusqu'à 1 000 $.

Ces exigences peuvent devenir un fardeau, et ce n'est pas nécessairement une attente claire de la subvention de recherche originale. Il faut aussi penser à ce genre de choses dans les environnements ouverts.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Il nous reste un peu de temps, alors allons-y avec une intervention de cinq minutes, et cinq minutes aussi de l'autre côté, je crois bien.

Monsieur Baylis, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis:

Monsieur le président, j'ai seulement une petite question à poser. Je vais ensuite céder la parole à M. Graham.

C'est une idée intéressante pour les bibliothèques. Comment le gouvernement peut-il vous aider à aider les créateurs canadiens?

(1655)

Mme Susan Haigh:

Nous avons récemment entamé des discussions avec des revues canadiennes et d'autres. Il y a aussi un certain lien à faire avec Érudit. C'est très intéressant, car nous soutenons et hébergeons des revues scientifiques; nous hébergeons plus de 400 revues canadiennes. Nous voulons assurer leur survie et leur prospérité. Nous tentons de trouver des moyens pour y arriver. Des comités mettant à contribution toutes les parties s'affairent à trouver des solutions.

Au fond, c'est bien d'opter pour des plateformes partagées afin de réduire les coûts de production, mais il y en a beaucoup. C'est en quelque sorte ce que fait le gouvernement en investissant dans Érudit. Alors, une plateforme partagée est une très bonne idée.

Cependant, la production de contenu a un prix, et c'est un peu difficile de trouver la meilleure façon de soutenir tout cela. Je crois que c'est à ce niveau que le gouvernement peut intervenir. Nous sommes en discussions avec le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines au sujet du programme d'aide aux revues, qui prend un peu trop rapidement le virage du libre accès. Nous tentons aussi de déterminer avec lui comment aider les revues à faire cette transition. Je crois que c'est un bon endroit pour investir, car le gouvernement soutiendrait ainsi la production continue de contenu.

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci, madame Haigh.

Allez-y, David. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Dubois, madame Aubry, j'ai quelques questions à vous poser.

Vous avez parlé d'une perte de 30 millions de dollars de redevances pour les écrivains recourant à la gestion collective. J'imagine qu'il s'agit d'une perte annuelle qui vaut pour tout le Canada. Pourtant, les sommes que dépensent les universités et d'autres sont en hausse. Vous cherchez à expliquer ce paradoxe.

Est-ce possible que la raison s'en trouve dans le numérique et chez les auteurs qui ne recourent pas à la gestion collective?

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Ce que nous savons, c'est que c'est de l'argent en moins pour les ayants droit que sont les éditeurs et les écrivains.

Nous avons précisé qu'il pouvait effectivement y avoir plus d'ayants droit, et que cela pourrait expliquer en partie une augmentation des dépenses des universités, mais nous n'avons pas de données précises à ce sujet. Nous pourrions essayer de les obtenir en réponse à votre question, mais nous ne les avons pas présentement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

On sait cependant que les éditeurs font plus d'argent maintenant qu'avant: avez-vous une explication à cela? La baisse de revenus concerne ceux qui recourent à la gestion collective, pas les producteurs de matériel. Êtes-vous d'accord là-dessus?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Il faudra poser la question à l'Association nationale des éditeurs de livres. Pour notre part, nous ne sommes pas en mesure de vous donner les chiffres précis du milieu de l'édition.

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Nous aimerions bien les avoir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pardon?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Nous aimerions bien connaître ces chiffres nous aussi parce que cela aurait un impact direct sur la rémunération de nos écrivains, mais il faudra poser la question aux éditeurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'après vous, ceux qui piratent des logiciels ou du contenu accepteraient-ils de payer ces produits si l'accès y était suffisamment contrôlé? Choisiraient-ils plutôt de s'en passer?

M. Laurent Dubois:

Je pense qu'ils accepteraient de les payer, mais j'ai l'impression que vous n'êtes pas d'accord avec moi. Vous me demandez mon avis, je vous le donne. Je n'ai malheureusement pas d'argumentaire plus précis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Êtes-vous au courant du fait que l'exception d'utilisation équitable d'une oeuvre dispense l'utilisateur de demander la permission de l'auteur?

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

En fait, c'est Copibec qui pourrait éventuellement répondre à ces questions.

En règle générale, Copibec négocie des ententes et des licences avec les maisons d'enseignement. Quand une oeuvre est utilisée, cela signifie que l'auteur a donné sa permission puisqu'il a délégué à Copibec la responsabilité de négocier cette licence. Tant que le contenu est couvert par une licence, les auteurs sont donc réputés avoir donné leur accord par le biais de cette dernière et il n'y a pas de problème.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est un début de réponse, oui.[Traduction]

Dois-je m'arrêter?

Le président:

Je crois que M. Jowhari a des questions à poser.

M. David de Burgh Graham: D'accord. Bien sûr.

Majid.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Mes collègues et moi avons constaté quelque chose, et j'aimerais avoir vos commentaires à ce sujet. Cela pourrait nous aider à comprendre ce qui se passe.

Nous avons remarqué que le revenu des créateurs suit une pente descendante. Un graphique des revenus au fil du temps l'illustre bien. Il semble par ailleurs que les dépenses des bibliothèques sont à la hausse. Il a été question des 200 millions de dollars et des 370 millions de dollars. J'ai fait quelques recherches, et je dirais que les dépenses des étudiants en matériel sont à la hausse. La pente n'est pas la même.

À mon avis, il y a un autre groupe dans cette équation, et il s'agit des éditeurs. Qu'en est-il des recettes et des coûts pour les éditeurs? Où se situent-ils dans tout cela?

Michael, voulez-vous commencer?

(1700)

M. Michael McDonald:

Je vous dirais que le secteur de l'éducation postsecondaire est semblable à celui de la santé. Il est seulement assujetti à un taux d'inflation plus élevé. Les coûts liés au matériel et à tout ce qui concerne l'éducation postsecondaire augmentent à un taux supérieur au taux d'inflation en général. Cela comprend toutes les ressources académiques et littéraires, et tout ce qu'on s'attend à trouver dans un établissement d'enseignement postsecondaire, l'équipement et tout le reste. Tout ce qui entre dans la production du contenu académique coûte de plus en plus cher. Je ne connais pas assez bien le secteur de l'édition pour répondre adéquatement à votre question. Cependant, j'ai cru comprendre que la situation est ardue des deux côtés. Je crois que la discussion ne se limite pas à cela. Bien d'autres marchés ressentent les mêmes pressions financières.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Mark, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Mark Swartz:

Pour comprendre où va l'argent des bibliothèques, il faut comprendre l'évolution du secteur, remué par l'avènement du numérique. Le contenu acheté et utilisé par les bibliothèques a énormément changé. C'est une transition tout à fait comparable à celle de l'industrie de la musique, il y a quelques années. Autrefois, on achetait des CD et des MP3, et maintenant, beaucoup de gens se procurent leur musique exclusivement par l'entremise de services d'abonnement mensuel, comme Apple Music et Spotify. Les bibliothèques sont confrontées à la même réalité. L'argent dépensé par les bibliothèques universitaires ne va pas, généralement, à l'achat de livres à l'unité; il va à de grandes sociétés, et ces sociétés ne publient pas beaucoup d'ouvrages académiques ou littéraires ni de manuels scolaires.

C'est cinq grandes sociétés qui se partagent le gros de cet argent, soit Elsevier, Springer, Taylor & Francis, Wiley et SAGE. Elles dominent véritablement le marché des revues savantes, et elles forcent l'augmentation des frais d'abonnement. C'est très problématique pour le milieu universitaire, mais ce n'est pas directement lié aux droits d'auteur. Nous pensons que le gouvernement pourrait intervenir de ce côté. Nous vous encourageons à continuer à promouvoir le contenu en accès libre. L'initiative de gouvernement ouvert, pour les documents de la Couronne, est un autre excellent exemple du type de mesure que peut prendre le gouvernement pour nous aider. Il pourrait aussi aider les universitaires canadiens à se faire publier dans les revues locales. Aussi, parce qu'une grande partie de notre contenu est sous licence, il pourrait être utile de bénéficier de certaines exemptions législatives. Si un contrat ou des mesures de protection techniques protègent le contenu, ce serait bien de pouvoir recourir à une exemption ou à des moyens légaux d'accéder aux informations, en invoquant par exemple une utilisation équitable.

Le président:

Merci.[Français]

Madame Aubry, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose? Vous disposez de 30 secondes.

Mme Suzanne Aubry:

Je voudrais simplement faire un commentaire général sur l'innovation et la création.

Cela ne devrait pas entraîner le sacrifice des redevances des auteurs, car, à court ou à long terme, il n'y aura plus de contenu puisqu'il n'y aura plus de créateurs pour l'écrire.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

La dernière question revient à M. Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Jeneroux.

Quelqu'un m'a déjà dit que plus le système est efficace, plus il coûte cher, et c'est ce que je répète depuis le début du processus. Si on veut un meilleur système de santé, il faut investir davantage. Je crois que le Canada a l'un des meilleurs systèmes d'éducation au monde, et cela se reflète dans la hausse des frais de scolarité et du coût des manuels scolaires. Nous ne voulons pas nous contenter de manuels médiocres. Du temps que j'étais à l'université, déjà, les manuels scolaires n'étaient pas que cela: ils venaient accompagnés de sites Web et de CD. C'est fantastique tout ce qu'on offre aujourd'hui, et c'est beaucoup plus que ce que nous avions à l'époque. Cela va inévitablement se répercuter sur les coûts.

Monsieur McDonald, vous avez dit que le secteur de l'éducation était assujetti à un taux d'inflation supérieur aux autres. Êtes-vous en mesure d'expliquer pourquoi?

(1705)

M. Michael McDonald:

Évidemment, quand on vise à repousser les limites du savoir, on s'attend à investir en conséquence: la réhabilitation des édifices, la mise à jour du matériel de cours, et l'embauche de professeurs et de chercheurs de grand talent; de là les pressions financières additionnelles sur le secteur de l'éducation. Tous les établissements du monde font la course à cet égard. Ce sont des atouts précieux et tous veulent offrir un milieu à la fine pointe en tout temps, ce qui fait évidemment grimper les coûts, et ce, peu importe le secteur.

C'est aussi pourquoi le secteur de l'enseignement postsecondaire cherche à tout prix à rentabiliser ses activités. C'est ce à quoi s'attendent les gouvernements et le public. Si ces manuels sont satisfaisants, y a-t-il d'autres modèles? Le modèle de plateforme partagée de ressources pédagogiques a démontré qu'il existait d'autres manières efficaces de produire du contenu. Il est possible de construire un excellent manuel de mathématiques 101 — dont le contenu n'est pas vraiment appelé à changer — dans un environnement ouvert. Ce manuel pourrait être aussi bien coté que ceux achetés dans d'autres circonstances.

Dans une plateforme ouverte, et en général, toutes les parties concernées veulent en avoir pour leur argent, et j'inclus à cela la population. C'est compréhensible. Nous savons aussi qu'il nous faudra tendre vers ce genre d'économies pour que ce soit efficace et abordable pour tout le monde.

M. Dane Lloyd:

En réponse à une question précédente, vous avez fait allusion à des mécanismes de rechange pour rémunérer les créateurs. Pourriez-vous donner quelques exemples de cela au Comité?

M. Michael McDonald:

C'est différent selon le créateur. Il est vraiment important de reconnaître que différents créateurs, selon leur sphère, auront besoin de mécanismes différents. Pour certaines formes de recherche, le financement des trois organismes et un réel engagement envers la recherche scientifique au pays sont primordiaux. Pour ce qui est du droit de prêt au public, entre autres, la rémunération pourrait se faire sous forme de subventions permettant de créer certains types de manuels scolaires. Les provinces le font à l'heure actuelle, mais ce sont des mécanismes qui pourraient être utilisés. Les mécanismes vont varier selon la sphère des créateurs, et il est important de les adapter en conséquence.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord.

La dernière question vous revient.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Monsieur Dubois et madame Aubry, vous avez répondu à une question sur les mesures de protection technologiques et vous nous avez donné votre position à ce sujet. Diriez-vous la même chose en ce qui a trait au traité de l'OMPI et à la Convention de Berne — les traités internationaux? J'aimerais que vous clarifiiez votre position à cet égard.

Voilà une pause dramatique. [Français]

M. Laurent Dubois:

Vous serait-il possible de répéter la question? Je ne l'ai pas comprise, pardonnez-moi. [Traduction]

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Tout à l'heure, on vous a posé une question sur les mesures de protection technologiques. Vous nous avez donné votre point de vue à ce sujet. J'aimerais simplement savoir si vous voyez les choses de la même façon en ce qui a trait au traité de l'OMPI et à la Convention de Berne — les traités internationaux. Que pensez-vous des mesures de protection technologiques, les serrures numériques, relativement à ces ententes? [Français]

M. Laurent Dubois:

Je ne suis pas en mesure de vous répondre immédiatement parce que votre question touche à des considérations techniques auxquelles nous n'avons pas les réponses.

(1710)

[Traduction]

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord, bien sûr.

Le président:

Sur ce, je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence. Ce sera une longue étude. Les témoignages entendus aujourd'hui nous seront très utiles. Quand je vois les analystes prendre des notes à ce rythme, je sais que l'information est pertinente. Et ils sourient; c'est bon signe.

Là-dessus, merci beaucoup à vous tous de votre présence. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 24, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.