header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-04-24 PROC 98

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning everyone. Welcome to the 98th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Our business today deals with the main estimates for 2018-19.

In the first hour, we will consider vote 1 under the House of Commons, and vote 1 under Parliamentary Protective Service, followed by vote 1 under the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer in the second hour.

We are pleased to have with us today the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House of Commons. He's accompanied by Charles Robert, Clerk of the House of Commons; Michel Patrice, deputy clerk, administration; and Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer.

From the Parliamentary Protective Service, we have Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy, Director, and Robert Graham, Administration and Personnel Officer.

Thank you all for being here. Near the end, as in the past, if there are items related to Parliamentary Protective Service that have to be done in camera, please raise that at that point.

I'll now turn it over to you, Mr. Speaker. I know you're very busy, and thank you for being here.

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Colleagues, nice to see you this morning. Members of the committee and distinguished guests, thank you for welcoming us back.[Translation]

As Speaker of the House of Commons, I am pleased to present the main estimates for fiscal year 2018-19 for the House of Commons and the Parliamentary Protective Service.

Since you have already introduced the people joining me, Mr. Chair, I will begin my presentation right away.[English]

I'll begin by presenting the key elements of the 2018-19 main estimates for the House of Commons.

These estimates total $507 million. This represents a net decrease of $4 million compared to the total estimates for 2017-18, which include both the main estimates and the supplementary estimates. These have been reviewed, and approved by the Board of Internal Economy in a public meeting. [Translation]

The main estimates will be presented along six major themes, corresponding to the handout that you received. The financial impact associated with these themes represents the year-over-year changes from the 2017-18 main estimates.[English]

The six themes are: continued investment and support for the long-term vision and plan; major investments; conferences, associations and assemblies; committee activities, cost-of-living increases; and employee benefit plans.

I'll start with the funding of $10.6 million that is required for the continued investments and support of the long-term vision and plan, or LTVP. We're nearing considerable milestones as you know: the move into a renovated West Block and the restoration of Centre Block. A restored West Block will be the first major construction project of this scale to be completed on Parliament Hill under the LTVP.

I'd like to stress that the House is working hand-in-hand with Public Services and Procurement Canada toward the goal of moving into the new West Block. In June, before the House rises, the Board of Internal Economy will be informed of the progress of this endeavour. At that time, a decision will be made on whether the move will take place this summer.

Our common objective is to ensure that the new facility is functioning as intended, and of course, avoid disruptions to House proceedings. That's fundamentally important.

As reviewed and approved by the board, the funding for our continued investment and support for the LTVP in these main estimates is required to sustain evolving campus-wide operations, and to support IT systems and facility assets.

(1105)

[Translation]

The rehabilitation of the parliamentary precinct currently underway will have a significant impact on the human and financial resources of the House. Members must continue to receive the services they need during this period of incredible growth and change. While existing resources will be deployed to where they are needed most, additional resources are required to sustain critical operations for members, their staff, and the administration that supports them.

Additionally, the transfer to West Block and the opening of the visitor welcome centre will result in a direct increase in House of Commons operating expenses. These are expenses to record, safeguard, maintain, and life-cycle the related assets that will be transferred to the House of Commons from Public Services and Procurement Canada. By 2019, the House will have taken ownership of over $200 million in new assets.[English]

It is essential that all buildings in the parliamentary precinct be equipped with information technology and related infrastructures for access to information services, both for continued modernization and for the effective functioning of Parliament.

I'll now move to the funding of $11.7 million approved by the board in support of major House of Commons investments.[Translation]

We are at a critical juncture, one where the House of Commons must invest in the information technology solutions and systems that will enable it to meet the rapidly changing needs of members, their employees, and the House administration. This also means expanding access to parliamentary information through social media and a modernized online presence.

In light of the renewal of many parliamentary spaces, investments are also needed to deliver support services to members.

To this end, the modernization and optimization of food services focuses on the client experience while supporting the transition of production to the off-site food production facility for the relocation to West Block. [English]

Pay and benefits is another key service offered to members and the administration. Funding is required for this group to ensure that adequate staffing levels are in place to satisfy current demands and mitigate system challenges.

Funding is also needed to ensure appropriate security enhancements for the West Block. While security reasons prevent me from going into the details, the House of Commons and its security partners continue to collaborate on an enhanced emergency management and security approach to ensure a safe and secure Parliament.

Another investment accounted for in the main estimates is for the disclosure of expenses incurred by House officers and national caucuses research offices. In keeping with the board's commitment to transparency and accountability, the first annual House officers expenditures report will be published on ourcommons.ca this June. Quarterly reporting, aligned with the schedule set for the members' expenditures report, will follow.[Translation]

Let us now turn to parliamentary diplomacy.

Funding of $1.1 million is required for this important work that seeks to foster mutual understanding and trust, enhances cooperation, and builds goodwill among legislators.

As part of these commitments, Canada will host three important events in 2018-19.

(1110)

[English]

The 56th Regional Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Conference will take place in Ottawa this July, as many members will know. This conference enables parliamentarians and their staff to identify benchmarks of good governance and implement the enduring values of the Commonwealth.

The 15th annual Plenary Assembly of ParlAmericas will be held in Victoria, British Columbia in September 2018.

Finally, the 64th Annual Session of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly, which provides a unique specialized forum for members from across the Atlantic alliance to discuss and influence decisions on alliance security, will take place in Halifax, Nova Scotia, so lucky them, right? The member for Halifax agrees. The member for St. Catharines is not so sure.

I will now proceed to the funding of $1.7 million required in support of committee activities. Each year parliamentary committees undertake a number of studies on issues that matter to Canadians. These committees study and amend legislation, examine government spending, conduct inquiries, and receive input from subject matter experts and citizens.

Committees use their funding primarily for witness expenses, video conferences, travel, working meals, and preparing reports for the House of Commons on the issues they study. The Liaison Committee rigorously manages the global envelope allocated by the Board of Internal Economy for committee activities.

I'll now proceed to the funding of $4.6 million that is required for cost-of-living increases. This covers requirements for the House administration as well as the budgets for members and House officers. For the House administration, this funding provides for the economic increases of approximately 1,600 House administration employees. The salary increases will help ensure staff retention, and provide competitive salaries to attract new hires. [Translation]

I will now move on to funding required for members' and house officers' budgets, supplements, and salaries.

The board has determined that office budgets for members, house officers, and research offices will be adjusted annually according to the consumer price index.[English]

Funding is also allocated in support of increases to members' office budget supplements. These, of course, recognize the challenges inherent in serving larger, more populated, or remote constituencies. The board also approved an increase to the travel status expenses account, which members may use to charge their accommodations and meal expenses when they are in travel status.

Additionally, in accordance with the Parliament of Canada Act, members' sessional allowances and additional salaries are adjusted every year on April 1 based on the index of the average percentage increase in base-rate wages for the calendar year in Canada resulting from major settlements negotiated in the private sector.[Translation]

The final item included in the House of Commons' main estimates is a funding requirement of $1.2 million for employee benefit plans.

In accordance with Treasury Board directives, this non-discretionary statutory expense covers costs to the employer for the Public Service Superannuation Plan, the Canada Pension Plan and the Quebec Pension Plan, death benefits, and the employment insurance account.[English]

I would now like to present the 2018-19 main estimates for the Parliamentary Protective Service, PPS.

This June marks the third year of operations for PPS since the unification of the former House of Commons and Senate protective services under the operational command of Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy. This entity was created by an act of Parliament to unify and better coordinate the physical security of Parliament under one mandate.

As Speaker of the House of Commons, I am jointly responsible for the PPS with the Speaker of the Senate. They report to us on matters regularly. Let me begin by providing members with a brief synopsis of the evolution of this organization over the past three years, particularly as it relates to the main estimates.

In its first nine months, the PPS operated with a pro-rated budget of $40 million. During this transition period, the House of Commons provided the newly created organization with corporate support through a charge-back model. This interim measure enabled PPS to focus on unifying security operations and completing interoperability. It also allowed it to plan requirements over two years to become self-sufficient in its corporate services.

(1115)

[Translation]

In 2016-17, following its first submission of Main Estimates, PPS operated with $62.1 million in funding, which significantly improved unification efforts through the standardization of uniforms and equipment and the upgrading of facilities.

This past year, the organization was appropriated $68.3 million, which helped implement numerous security initiatives on Parliament Hill, including the hiring of additional security personnel for the 180 Wellington Building and the establishment of an integrated mobile response team.[English]

Today, the organization is beginning to stabilize and make important headway towards building an effective corporate administration that supports security operations. This fiscal year, PPS aims to deliver its mandate with a budget of $83.5 million. The increase in funding earmarks $7 million in permanent requirements, $7.6 million in temporary security initiatives, and $600,000 in statutory funds.

While PPS is an autonomous organization and a separate parliamentary employer, it has several service-level agreements with the House of Commons for assistance in finance, payroll, and IT. These arrangements will continue in the short term while the organization progressively builds capacity to lessen its dependence on the House for administrative support.[Translation]

For this reason, the permanent funding request includes: $4.5  million allocated for positions within finance, human resources, and facilities departments; $1.9 million reserved to stabilize key functions within information services, assets, and major events, and physical infrastructure and emergency planning; and $600,000 budgeted for the training of protection personnel.[English]

Funding for temporary security initiatives include $5.7 million to perform necessary maintenance and upgrades to security infrastructure, such as replacing and upgrading external cameras and crash barriers at the vehicle screening facility—because some of these upgrades are security-sensitive my officials and I would be pleased to address any questions or concerns in camera, if the committee wishes—$1.1 million over three years to bring our protective personnel to the same minimum-level security clearance as all federal security agencies, another key measure to improve communications and allow for a seamless exchange of information with external partners; and $775,000 for temporary corporate initiatives and support, such as the hiring of consultants, the development of an internal website, and the acquisition of a document management system.

The funding sought in these estimates provides for the steady growth of this organization and ensures that its workforce remains supported and adequately equipped to deliver on its security mandate.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, this concludes my overview of the 2018-19 Main Estimates for the House of Commons and the Parliamentary Protective Service. My officials and I would be pleased to answer questions.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

We will now move on to Mr. Graham. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I have a couple of quick comments before I get into any of your questions. First of all, Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the House administration for being very responsive when I have requests regarding ourcommons.ca. I've asked for changes to the XML format and so forth that have been responded to very quickly, so thank you for that. You guys have a great team.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'd say I did all that, but that's not true.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You weren't even copied on the chain.

In the Chamber, at the end of every question period, the public gallery, the gallery above you, Mr. Speaker, is emptied just before three o'clock, regardless of what's going on, regardless of the desire to leave. Although it's nominally voluntary, there's nothing really voluntary about it. Can you explain why this is done?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'm glad you asked that because a few members have raised this with me. I believe it has to do with budgets and the cost of having folks doing some screening in the north corridor.

I wonder if that's one for Mr. Graham. Who can deal with this for us? Who can answer this question? Do you know what the issues are, why that's closed down, and people are asked to leave before the end of QP?

Maybe we haven't talked about this before, so it's time we did.

This is more for the corporate security officer. The Sergeant-at-Arms is going to come forward and take all the blame, right?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I thought this would be an easy question.

Mr. Patrick McDonell (Deputy Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer, House of Commons):

The reason for closing the gallery at three o'clock goes back many years before I arrived in my role inside the Chamber, and it was a cost-saving measure implemented by the Sergeant-at-Arms at the time. Shutting it at three reduces the requirement for guards in the north gallery, and also reduces the requirement for scanners.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are those visitors immediately invited to sit in what they used to call the ladies' gallery at the other end? Have we changed the name of that yet?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Yes, we now call it the south gallery, the public gallery.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

People in the north gallery are then ushered to the south gallery or are told to leave?

Mr. Patrick McDonell:

Usually the group in the north gallery is part of a larger tour, as you witness every day. They leave the Chamber and the galleries once they exit the north gallery.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Mr. McDonell. I appreciate it.

Let me get to the next question. I've heard recently that there is a new program starting, in which contractors will be escorted through buildings by outside security. I wonder if I can get more information on this, on whether these people will be trained by the House of Commons on privilege and on what accesses they will have or not have.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration, House of Commons):

This program was put in place in partnership with the PPS, and also PSPC. It's in relation to the renovation of the buildings and the need to repair things in the facilities in the buildings. It is done under the responsibility of PSPC.

A third party firm was hired, essentially to provide an escort service for contractors. The third party firm is accredited through our CSO, through our normal accreditation process, and assigned for the contractor firms that are also doing the work on the buildings and the facilities. This program is made to alleviate pressure and to give a better response time, in terms of the things that need to be done to the facilities.

I should point out though, that in terms of MP offices, if there are repairs, renovations, or things that need to be done there, the escort will still be provided by PPS members.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The outside security will not have access to any MPs' offices. Is that correct?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That's right.

The contractors will maintain the same program we had before. PPS members will escort the contractors into an MP's office and remain there while the repair is being done.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Ms. MacLatchy, I have a question for you.

When you came to us in February, you said there were 46 operational vacancies. How are we doing on that?

(1125)

Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy (Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

We just hired a group of new employees, but I'm going to allow my Administration and Personnel Officer, Mr. Graham, to answer on the specifics.

Mr. Robert Graham (Administration and Personnel Officer, Parliamentary Protective Service):

Yes. We currently have zero operational vacancies. We're fully staffed on the operations side.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you give a sense of real operational cost savings, with the integration of PPS versus with the preceding system? Do we have any?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I do not have those statistics.

Mr. Robert Graham:

Do you want me to look that up and get back to you?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Absolutely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure.

Mr. Speaker, you mentioned the cameras. I did want to ask about that, but we can take it in camera if we have time, later.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker and our witnesses, for joining us here today.

I want to begin with a more general question about some of the vacancies we see in the House of Commons. As we know, our Sergeant-at-Arms has been in an acting position since January 2015.

Have you, as Speaker, been consulted in terms of the appointments process, or about candidates for some of these vacancies, including that of Sergeant-at-Arms?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Generally speaking, I am consulted. I'm trying to recall offhand whether I've been consulted in relation to that position. I don't recall it offhand. I have in the past been consulted in relation to similar positions.

Mr. John Nater:

Do you have any concerns that some of these positions are, at this point, three-plus years in acting positions?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You're probably asking me to get into an area that the Speaker shouldn't get into to comment on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Go ahead.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I want to thank Mr. Cullen for his kind offer that I should go ahead and wade into dangerous waters.

I think members like to see positions filled in a reasonably expeditious fashion.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

At this point in time, do you have any anticipation of coming back to Parliament with supplementary estimates, either for the House of Commons or for PPS?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'm going to ask Michel to—

Mr. Michel Patrice:

In relation to the House of Commons resource requirements, it is the intention, other than the carry-forward that comes as a matter of course, not to come for supplementary estimates. We feel that the budget that's been approved by the board will be sufficient for us to carry forward to the next month.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You saw me touching—

Mr. John Nater:

I saw that, yes. I'll hold you to that word “touching”.

And PPS?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

We are reviewing the LTVP requirements. We've just completed a posture review using an outside expert to allow us to fully analyze the numbers we need going forward, particularly during the transition from Centre Block into West Block and GCC. We're still reviewing that. It is possible that we will be coming forward with further requirements, but I can't confirm that will be the case at this point.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Mr. Speaker, it was mentioned in your opening comments about the new disclosures for House officers and caucus services research offices.

Do you have an anticipation of what these disclosures will look like? Will they be similar to what is currently in place for members' offices? If not, what are the differences in those disclosures?

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette (Chief Financial Officer, House of Commons):

They will be similar in fashion...having that summary level. The look and feel may be evolving because we're evolving the technology we're using. I think we'll be able to have a little easier access on the ourcommons.ca website for the drill-down when we get into the details for the hospitality and travel.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Speaker, you recently ruled on a point of privilege raised by my colleague Luc Berthold about access to the gallery during the budget process. You mentioned in your ruling that there was going to be work done to improve communications and processes for these types of large events.

Would you be able to provide an update on whether any of those changes have been implemented, or what plans are in place to deal with those types of issues?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I've given that direction, but I'll ask the Sergeant-at-Arms if he has any news for us on that front.

We're looking forward to next year's budget, which is what we're talking about, so that's a ways off at this point.

Mr. McDonell.

Mr. Patrick McDonell:

There was a miscommunication on that day to a guest of Mr. Berthold.

In reviewing and discussing it with Chief Superintendent MacLatchy, I think we can make improvements on the communication between the Sergeant-at-Arms' office and her on-ground personnel, the operational personnel, on days of major events such as a budget day.

(1130)

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Now, as has been touched on, we will hopefully be moving to the West Block this fall—I think is the anticipation—and with that, the new visitor welcome centre.

I potentially have a few questions. I'm not sure how much time I have to get into this, so I may defer to colleagues in future rounds. At this point, looking at the new visitor welcome centre that will be operational with the West Block, will there be changes in procedures in terms of how members' offices and guests of members are processed and dealt with going through the visitor welcome centre, or will it be similar to what is currently the case here in Centre Block?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

We're still developing our standard operating procedures based on the new facility. However, what I can tell you is that the level of screening will remain the same. The actual process, the flow patterns, are something we are working on, and we will be sure to advise this committee and all parliamentarians when we have that standard process developed.

Mr. John Nater:

If it becomes the situation that the move into West Block is delayed, am I right to assume then that the use of the new visitor welcome centre will be delayed, that the welcome centre won't be used unless we are physically moved into West Block?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'm told that's correct.

Mr. John Nater:

I have a question more generally about the West Block. In doing a tour last year, we were told that the parliamentary press gallery would be moved, rather than above the Speaker, to facing the Speaker.

Is that the case?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Mr. Cullen said “FaceTime”. Poor them.

It's the same place. It's not changing. So the good news is they don't have to look at my face.

Mr. John Nater:

The bad news is that they'll see the rest of us more clearly.

That's great.

In terms of the go or no-go decision, will there be additional costs anticipated if the decision is made to delay past September 2018 to a further date? Will there be an anticipation of additional costs, either from a PPS perspective or a House administration cost perspective?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think that the cost would be more associated with Centre Block. Of course, when you plan to start renovations at one date and it changes, that can have an impact.

My preoccupation, I want to make very clear—and I think the preoccupation of the members of the Board of Internal Economy—is that we want to be confident that the House can operate fully and normally in the West Block, and there's a myriad of details that have to be absolutely ready for that to happen. We're optimistic. We're looking forward to the June report, and then the board will have to make its decision of whether it's entirely satisfied that that's the case. If there are some other things that remain, we'd have to look at what the options are.

Sorry, the rest of your question was on—?

Mr. John Nater:

The costs.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The costs, whether there are any PPS costs or other costs to administration for a delay in the move.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Not from a House of Commons perspective, as the Speaker has mentioned. It would be more deferred costs as opposed to the expenditure. It would not occur related to the move, it would happen a bit later.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I'd now like to welcome to the committee the member from the second most beautiful riding in the country, Nathan Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

There you go, point of privilege again, Chair. You'll be hearing from me later this afternoon, don't worry.

Thank you for coming, and thank you to all your officials for being here.

Mr. Speaker, I'm going to focus a bit on the PPS and the current state of affairs. I don't think there's much we often all agree on as parliamentarians, with perhaps a few exceptions, but one of them is the quality and professionalism of the security that keeps us and the public who visit the House of Commons safe every day.

I'm thinking of this in serious terms. We're all reminded of the importance of security just with the unbelievably tragic events yesterday in Toronto. The Prime Minister just spoke to the need for good security, as best as we can, in a complicated city. We have a complicated place here with media and public presence.

You and I were both here in October of 2014. I was actually in this room. There's a bullet hole in that door. I was trying to leave the room that morning to make a call during caucus. One of our security professionals came through the door the other way and physically shut the door, preventing me from going out. That's where the bullet lodged—one of our own, actually, as it turned out—in that door. It made it through one door and got lodged in the second, right by his head, as it turns out.

I saw Mr. Son this morning. He's working detail in front of the House of Commons. He got shot in the leg that day.

We welcomed the same security force into the House of Commons. I don't know if you were in the chair that day. I don't think you were; I think it was Mr. Scheer. We saluted them to thank them. I've seen a lot of people, great people, saluted in the House of Commons with applause. I'm not sure I've ever seen applause of such duration and such warmth as that day we had our security officials in front of us to thank them for what they do, for the risks they take for us and the public. I find it difficult that same feeling doesn't transpire over when we're sitting down with those same professionals to negotiate a fair contract.

We all, as MPs, pass by our security officials every day. They're wearing their caps, asking for respect. It's not a lot to ask for, yet it's been more than a year since the House of Commons security has had a contract, similarly on the Senate side, and it's more than three, almost four years, I think, since the people who work at the scanners have had a contract.

You and the Speaker of the Senate are, as you said, responsible for PPS. With all respect, why are we in this situation? Why have we not been able to break the impasse and negotiate in good faith with the people who keep us safe every day?

(1135)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You'll recall that the PPS is by law an autonomous organization. By law, the director of the PPS is a member of the RCMP. Yes, she reports on aspects of her work to the Speaker. She reports to us. She doesn't take our.... We don't direct her. That's a very important distinction. She also, obviously, works with the RCMP on operational matters.

I'm going to let her respond to the other matters.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Absolutely. Thanks for the question, Mr. Cullen.

First off, I would like to say that I fully agree with your description, your depiction, of the security force that makes up the Parliamentary Protective Service. I'm impressed every day with the professionalism and the competence of the folks who work within this service, and that goes across all categories of employees who are part of this organization.

That being said, when the Parliamentary Protective Service, the PPS, was created, under the legislation that created it, there was an allowance within that legislation for any of the parties to make an application to the PSLREB, the Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board, now the FPSLREB, to rule on how many bargaining units would make up the uniforms within PPS.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it the intention of PPS to have just one bargaining unit between the House of Commons, the Senate, and the folks working at the screening?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

That's correct. We see one bargaining unit as completely in alignment with the unification of PPS integration, the interoperability. From my perspective going forward, when I look at this organization 10 to 20 years down the road, I think it would be very valuable to have one solid bargaining unit that covers all aspects of PPS.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To get back to that admiration we all share for this security force that keeps us safe, they have filed a bad faith negotiation. If it's not toward the Speaker and the Board of Internal Economy, then it's toward you, not you personally, but the bargaining that's coming from the RCMP.

I understand you want to unify, but there's resistance to that unification, and in the absence of the unification, we have not had a substantive hour of good faith negotiations with the people who keep us safe. I don't understand why.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

For starters, respectfully, I would have to disagree in terms of the allegations of bargaining in bad faith. We have been working extremely hard to try to find an avenue to move forward with our bargaining units as they exist right now. We're honouring the previous collective agreements. All of the legal advice I've been given is that until the labour board makes its ruling on how many bargaining units we will go forward with, I'm not in a position to enter collective bargaining with any of those units.

(1140)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's look at the status quo, then. We have officers working in this place 60, 70, sometimes 80 hours a week. Overtime is voluntary until the shifts aren't filled, then the overtime becomes mandatory.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

It can be.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It can be, and this is one of the complaints. My concern is that, according to the status quo, until these issues are resolved we will have people working 80 hours on their feet, on shift, to keep us safe. That doesn't seem to be a healthy or good working space for people whose work we both require and greatly respect.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

You are correct. We are working very hard to try to find a way to address the overtime issue. We are seeing folks working far more overtime than I would like to see them working. I'm very interested in ensuring that all of our employees have access to adequate leave, time off, and work-life balance. We've gone through a whole hiring process. Over the last year, we've hired 114 new protection officers and, I believe, 57 detection specialists to try to alleviate some of those—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't want to put words in your mouth, but would you say the overtime being served, the extra stress on family, remains a concern?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Absolutely. One of the other pieces we're going forward on is an employee wellness program within PPS. We are hiring a wellness coordinator to start working towards finding avenues to address employee wellness across the PPS.

I don't know if you have anything to add to that, Mr. Graham?

Mr. Robert Graham:

The other aspect is that, as Chief Superintendent MacLatchy mentioned, we have filled all of our operational vacancies. The other side of the equation is a review of our posture in every post throughout the precinct to examine whether that post is, in fact, needed. There may be areas where we can reduce the need for shifts and posts, but the priority needs to remain ensuring security.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Ms. MacLatchy, let's continue with that for just a moment. With the hires you've just said you've done, you have a full complement now of full-time staff. Is that correct?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

All of our operational positions are filled. However, we do have a certain vacancy rate based on long-term illness and various...I think it's about 8% right now based on “mat and pat”, things like that.

Mr. Robert Graham:

Yes, it's related to accommodated individuals. We're accommodating them for health reasons, people who are on long-term leave. It's about 8% of the operational working force.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This includes high stress rates, is that correct? Stress is one of the major factors?

Mr. Robert Graham:

Yes, it's based on a doctor's note. I don't have the details of the breakdown, but that may be one of them.

Mr. Scott Simms:

In that environment now with the full complement you talked about earlier—except for the 8% you just discussed—this is going to continue to be a less stressful workplace. But are there other factors? You mentioned the wellness program.

Is that a part of this package, saying that you recognize that there's a high level of stress amongst the employees at PPS?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I think it's inherent in any type of protective function to have a stress level that can be exaggerated, depending on the threat being faced on a day-to-day basis. It's a job that is very routine the vast majority of the time, but we have to be vigilant at all times, and the nature of the work does increase the stress levels. That being said, I think what we've come to recognize across protective policing intelligence functions is that stress is a definite issue, and the organization needs to address it and find ways to help its employees.

We have resources in place right now for our employees to access from a wellness perspective. We do have 24-7 assistance available to them. When we did have a tragic event recently, we made sure we had counsellors available on site for our members. That's all part of the wellness piece that I'm speaking of, but we are engaging a full-time individual to work on exactly that aspect, the health and wellness piece.

(1145)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Certainly, the need has arisen in the past three, four years.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

We see across multiple organizations that it really is a requirement. I see it no differently here. The Parliamentary Protective Service is made up of some really committed and professional people who are going to come to work regardless, so we have to make sure we take care of them.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you for that.

Just quickly, I don't mean to belabour the point, but why is one bargaining unit better than two?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

There are a number of reasons for that. From my perspective, the most important, and it's one of the things that we're trying to build within PPS right now—and I grant you, it's a challenge at this point—is that unified spirit amongst all the uniforms that make up the organization—across the protective officers, the detection specialists, and the RCMP members who assist us in the exterior positions.

The RCMP would be—

Mr. Scott Simms:

But do they not have different functionalities?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Yes, they do, absolutely, and the RCMP is a separate service supplier. We're looking at them as a separate entity, obviously. But in terms of PPS itself, that solid, unified service is incredibly important, both for esprit de corps and for the interoperability piece across the board. It crosses a bunch of different aspects in terms of training and scheduling and benefits. If we can get everybody within the same group, I think we would really enhance the organization as one service going forward, and there's no doubt the actual day-to-day logistic pieces, in terms of scheduling, etc., would be easier.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Easier for you.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Well, for the organization, absolutely; it simplifies the entire logistics piece. But the idea of one bargaining unit going forward for a unified PPS goes far beyond the conveniences that would entail.

It's that esprit de corps piece that I think we're missing. We need to be a unified, solid, proud force, all for one. I don't want to be throwing adages out there, but I personally feel in my bones that one bargaining unit would be best for this organization going forward.

Mr. Scott Simms:

So it's a team-building exercise. I'm sorry. I don't mean to put words in your mouth.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Yes, to build a team, absolutely.

Mr. Scott Simms:

To me, that's what esprit de corps means.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

It's to be able to embrace the pride as one organization. It doesn't matter what category of employee you are within the service, it's that you're all part of the same team—to use your expression. I think that's the most important piece involved in this, and that makes for a far more professional and capable service.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

I have a quick question to end with. We are moving into West Block shortly, within months or so. God forbid we should delay things, but shouldn't we have waited till after the next election?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That's a rhetorical question, right?

Mr. Scott Simms:

You see? Geoff...oh, sorry, Mr. Speaker, you expected no less.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Well, look, the Board of Internal Economy, as I said, will receive a report in June on the state of things, and it will make decision at that time. There will be a number of options, obviously. One is to proceed this summer. One, of course, would be during the break in December-January. Of course, it will be a decision for the board to make.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

[Inaudible—Editor] You didn't know at the time and maybe there's been some research done. Do you know of any other police force across this country that has separate bargaining units, for example, between their front-line officers and special constables, as the case may be?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I do not. I did some research on that, and I was not able to identify any, although I do know some police forces that have separate bargaining units for the senior management ranks versus the front line.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll now go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Just for confirmation, is it five minutes at this point?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Mr. Simms asked a question that I was going to ask. In the event that the decision is not made in June to move so that we are in the West Block for September, is it then a delay of a full year? I think the answer we got back was that it could be a full year or it could be six months. Is that correct?

(1150)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I am going to speculate that the fact that we're talking at the end of April about a decision being made in June without any other comforting language that one normally gets—such as, “Formally we're making the decision in June, but we're pretty darn sure it's going to happen”—suggests to me that there is a high probability that we're not going forward this September. To the extent you're able to speculate, does that seem like a reasonable assumption for me to be making?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The House administration is working very closely with Public Services and Procurement Canada, as I said in my opening comments. You've perhaps been through the West Block. You know there's been a great deal of work done. It's coming along extremely well. Naturally, the board wants to be absolutely confident that the details are dealt with and that the myriad things we need in place are functioning properly. I think we're very close, but we'll have that assessment in June, and we'll have to make that decision then. No, I'm not going to speculate.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's fair enough.

We've been discussing this as a Board of Internal Economy decision. The Board of Internal Economy is a House of Commons body. Two legislative bodies occupy this building, the other being the Senate. I assume that there would not be a situation—although I can be corrected if I'm wrong—in which we would move to the West Block and the Senate would remain in Centre Block. I think that's correct.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That's a very good question. In fact, we're very clear that, if one is not ready, the other will not be moving. That's what I understand from the Senate side.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That raises the obvious question. We have the West Block. Renovations have to be finished there and brought up to a standard. You were giving me a pitch as to why that's important, but I think we can all see the common sense that everything must be in place. There's the issue of the visitors centre being ready. I understand. It may not be obvious to an outsider, but the importance of ensuring that Parliament is a publicly accessible facility cannot be overstated. There is no point in our history when it has not been.

The other question is about the former train station, to which the Senate is moving. I realize you're not directly involved in that, but can you report back on whether that is going to be ready, for sure, in time for a summer move?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The first thing I want to do is to indicate my agreement with your statement about the importance of the public being able to have access to the House of Commons. That is an important part of our history and of the operations of Parliament in a democracy.

I wonder if one of the representatives here with me can answer the question. We don't work on the Senate side, but perhaps the clerk, who has some experience with the Senate, might be able to address that.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

The work is progressing very nicely in the Government Conference Centre, but I think the same challenge that we have here in the House remains also with the Senate. It's not simply completing the renovation and restoration work; it has to do with its operability. Just as it is with the House of Commons, that has to be something that is resolved before a final decision can be made.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The next question relates to the part of the presentation where you indicate that, by 2019, the House will have taken ownership of $200 million in new assets. You didn't specify what those assets were. Could you elaborate a little bit?

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

It's basically all of the furniture, the technology, that we have to maintain and go forward. So when we look at the LTVP, it's been going on since about 2001, so it includes the assets for the Valour building, the committee rooms that were in there, it includes 131 and 181 Queen, and more recently the SJAM and 180 Wellington, and what will—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry, these haven't been transferred yet? Have these not already been transferred? We're using some of those buildings.

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

Yes, they have been transferred and we have control over them, but now part of the funding we're asking for is that, because it's been over 10 to 15 years for some of these assets, we have to start life cycling them. The technology in the committee rooms in the Valour needs to be updated.

It's just to give an order of magnitude of what all of this LTVP project is having on the House administration to be able to maintain and support that technology and keep it current and working for us.

(1155)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it primarily AV technology, or is there more to it than just that in the committee rooms?

Actually, I'm out of time so I'll just ask this question. Can you just submit some additional information on this? It's a large amount of money and it would be helpful if we had more information as to the amortization or depreciation that goes on with this equipment.

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

Yes, we can.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Going back to Mr. Cullen's and Mr. Simms' points earlier, if the integration of the bargaining units is integral to the team-building needed for a functional integrated protective service, what is needed to ensure the integration of PPS with the RCMP on the HIll?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

The RCMP are not employees of PPS, as you know, Mr. Graham, and they are, for lack of a better term, a service provider to PPS. They are—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But they do have to operate as an integrated unit in order to provide security here.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Absolutely, and we do have interoperability now on our radios, which was one of our goals from the beginning. We do joint training. Our mobile response team is an integrated unit. It includes RCMP and PPS members.

One of the other pieces that we're looking at right now is that integrated training piece. How can we make that even more robust than it is right now in terms of the MRT, so an exercise planner, integrated exercises, all of that type of thing.

Our standard operating procedures include both the PPS and RCMP sides of the operation, and it's a work-in-progress there is no doubt. We are striving to improve the relationship and that ability for folks to work together, to share information, to work side by side, inside and outside. Particularly during major events and those sorts of things you're going to see far more integration between the RCMP and PPS.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think that's my point.

If the RCMP and PPS are able to integrate without merging unions, because I don't believe the RCMP is even unionized—

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Not yet.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—why is it necessary for the PPS unions to all be one? I'm hearing both things here, and that's why I'm asking.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

There are different points of view, absolutely, in terms of this particular situation.

In the current situation within PPS I see a separation, not between the RCMP and PPS necessarily, but between PPS—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—and PPS.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

—and PPS, and that disturbs me.

I think to have one unified service, one integrated service, it means we all need to feel like we are equally important. We have three pillars in terms of our security in this place. They're detection, protection, response, and all three pillars are crucial. If one piece of that structure feels like they are less than, or not being treated equally, I think that's a problem.

Personally I believe that going forward with one bargaining unit for all uniforms in PPS would enhance that level of integration to avoid that separation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a quick question for you. You probably don't know what this means, but CYR537 is the designation for the airspace above Parliament Hill. That's managed by RCMP, and not by PPS.

Is that always going to be the case?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

It's something that's worth discussing. At this point that's the way it has been for a number of years, as the RCMP were responsible originally for the exterior. They do the air security management piece from a national perspective.

That's not something that's been on my radar recently, and no pun intended, sorry, but it's something that definitely, as we look at the RCMP footprint—and I have spoken with this committee before about a potential reduction in that footprint and an increase in PPS—we will be looking at that piece as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final, very quick question, which I think is an important one that we're all very curious about. How will the parades work between the old train station Senate chamber and the new chamber in West Block? I'm imagining this flurry of taxis and things when the Usher of the Black Rod is going to knock on the door.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

He might get cold.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It could be quite interesting.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'll ask the Clerk to tell us about what the plans are at present.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Actually, it's a very good question, and it's something we're still considering. The challenge really is to some extent that this delves into a realm that is the prerogative of the government. The government controls when Parliament will meet. It controls when the sessions will last.

In terms of trying to come up with an answer, we have to work with the government. To borrow a phrase, it's a work-in-progress.

(1200)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I believe it's two stops on the Confederation Line, so they could use the LRT.

Voices: Oh! Oh!

Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

We're out of time.

Mr. Cullen, if you can ask a question in one minute I'll give you one minute.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Ms. MacLatchy, are there any security concerns with the status quo in terms of the different security services operating under three different unions?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

No. I can tell you right now that from my point of view, our security on the Hill is intact. It's secure. I am not concerned with the safety and security of this place.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I want to be clear with our chair that the interest of PPS in amalgamating these three, even if the various security forces don't want to be amalgamated, is not out of a security desire. I don't want to say it's bureaucratic in a negative sense. You used the term esprit de corps earlier. The point is, it's not a security issue. The current system we have in place is not posing any type of security risk to the House of Commons and the people who visit here.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I want to be clear on how I answer this. Right now we work very hard to ensure the security and safety of this place, and that includes juggling multiple schedules and different collective agreements to make sure we have the appropriate posture at all times. That's my number one. Posture is my number one priority.

That being said, if we were to go to one union, a lot of the aspects that we mitigate on a day-to-day basis would be alleviated.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Mr. Chairman, on that I'll make it very clear that like all members I have the greatest respect and appreciation for the work of the members of the Parliamentary Protective Service. We are all grateful for the work they do and appreciate them very much.

I also want to express again, as I have previously to this committee, my full confidence in Chief Superintendent MacLatchy.

The Chair:

Thank you to the witnesses for coming.

I'd like to remind the committee—because we talked about the two buildings—that the Clerk has agreed we will have a discussion on the plans for the Centre Block at some time with this committee.

I'll do the routine motions. HOUSE OF COMMONS ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$347,004,325

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$76,663,760

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Thank you very much.

We'll suspend for a minute to change witnesses.



(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 98th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Joining us today from Elections Canada, we have Stéphane Perrault, Acting Chief Electoral Officer; Michel Roussel, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Electoral Events and Innovation; and Hughes St-Pierre, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Internal Services.

Mr. Perrault, you may proceed with your opening statement. And thank you for all the time you've spent with our committee. [Translation]

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Acting Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It is a pleasure to be back before the committee today to present Elections Canada's Main Estimates for 2018-19. This appearance also provides the opportunity to highlight the calendar of key activities that remain to prepare for the next general election, particularly in light of potential important legislative changes.

Today, the committee is voting on Election Canada's annual appropriation, which is $30.8 million and represents the salaries of some 360 indeterminate positions. Combined with our statutory authority, which funds all other expenditures under the Canada Elections Act, our Main Estimates total $135.2 million.

There are now at most 16 months left before the start of the next general election. Of course, we do not know exactly when it will begin, but there are at most 16 months before the start of the next election, and less time than that for Elections Canada to achieve a full state of readiness, for which our target date is April 2019. We are giving ourselves some flexibility between April and the start of the election in case any last-minute adjustments are needed.

A strict calendar of activities serves to ensure that changes to the electoral process and its administration are well tested before they are deployed and used by some 300,000 elections workers during the election.

I would therefore like to take this opportunity to explain key aspects of our readiness calendar. This is particularly important should legislative changes be introduced late in the electoral cycle.

(1210)

[English]

There are some 40 IT systems that are critical to the services we provide to electors, candidates, and political parties in the context of the delivery of an election. A majority of these systems will be new or will have gone through significant changes for the next general election. The importance of these changes is a reflection of the need to improve services for Canadians as well as renew aging technology and enhance cybersecurity.

I'm glad to say that work on these systems is progressing well. Over this summer, we will be migrating 27 of these systems and associated databases to our new data centre, which is currently being built. The new data centre is essential to provide the flexibility and the security required to deliver the election in the current environment.

Starting September 1, we will subject all systems to a full round of integrated testing that replicates the activities and transactions of a general election.

Through the fall and winter, we will perform necessary adjustments to our systems and rerun testing cycles until we are satisfied that they are capable of sustaining the requirements, volumes, and pressures of an actual general election.

In March 2019 we plan to hold a simulation of the election process in several electoral districts. This is an exercise we did prior to the last general election as well. The purpose of this exercise is to see how the new business processes and technology that will be used at the next general election perform in a simulated setting, including interactions between local offices and headquarters.

By April 2019 we will also have designed, produced, and largely assembled electoral supplies and materials so that they can be progressively deployed to the 338 electoral districts.

Finally, in the spring of 2019 we will then have also trained all returning officers and have completed and tested the training modules for the poll workers who will be hired for the general election. The training program for returning officers is largely delivered online, and must undergo stringent quality assurance and testing processes before it is rolled out to field administrators, more than a third of whom will be new at the next election.

This is our readiness plan under the current legal framework.

Now, as you know, following the last general election, we made some 130 recommendations for legislative improvements. Many have been endorsed—endorsed unanimously, I should say—by this committee. In its response, the government has indicated that it broadly supports the recommendations for change, and has put forward additional proposals for improvements. These are over and above the proposals already contained in Bill C-33 and Bill C-50, which are currently before Parliament, not to mention private members' bills.

Considering the above, it is pressing for legislative changes to be made without delay if they are to be implemented for the next general election.

When I appeared last February, I indicated that the window of opportunity to implement major changes in time for the next election was rapidly closing. That was not a new message. Both Monsieur Mayrand and I had previously indicated that legislative changes should be enacted by April 2018. This means that we are now at a point where the implementation of new legislation will likely involve some compromises. Let me explain.

Should legislative changes be enacted over the coming year, the agency will need to minimize, as much as possible, changes to existing systems and applications. There are considerable risks in introducing last-minute changes to complex IT systems if there is not enough time to test them thoroughly. As indicated earlier, our window for integrated testing is September 2018, therefore there may not be sufficient time to automate new processes. Less optimal paper or manual solutions may have to be used instead.

Moreover, to the extent that legislative changes impact rules for political entities—and I'm referring here in particular to political financing rules—there will be only a short window of time to complete the necessary steps for renewing all of the manuals and consulting with all the parties, as well as the Commissioner of Canada Elections, on the changes being made, as required by law now. The same is also true for instructions required of field personnel. Last-minute updates to poll worker training and manuals reduce the time for quality control and testing in advance of the election.

Of course, Mr. Chair, our mandate is to implement the changes that Parliament decides to enact, and we will find ways to do that if and when legislation is introduced and passed. However, it is also my responsibility to inform you that time is quickly running out. Canadians trust Elections Canada to deliver robust and reliable elections, and we do not want to find ourselves in a situation where the quality of the electoral process is impacted. Should legislation be introduced, we will, of course, support the work of this committee, including informing members of operational impacts and implementation strategies.

Mr. Chair, this concludes my opening remarks. As usual, my colleagues and I will be happy to answer questions that members may have.

(1215)

[Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Thank you for all the great service Elections Canada has provided us over the last year. We've done some great work together.

Now we'll go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Mr. Perrault.

Thank you very much to all the members here.

Very quickly, obviously deadlines are approaching, but I want to bear down on some of the things you talked about here that you're currently going through. You'll be migrating 27 of the systems and associated databases to the new data centre. The data centre has not been built yet. Is that correct? Is that what you said?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The data centre is in the process of being built. The timeline for that is June 12, to be precise. Following the completion of the data centre, it will be tested. Then we will migrate the systems, which are currently being worked on. The work is being finalized. We will migrate that for integrated testing in September. On September 1, we will start the full round of integrated testing.

Mr. Scott Simms:

How long will the testing take at that point?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It depends on how well it goes. That's why you need to give yourselves a bit of runway.

We will do the testing. To the extent that we need to make adjustments, we are giving ourselves until March. So far things are going very well, but we are giving ourselves enough time to do the adjustments so that in March when we do the simulation, everything will be ready to be deployed and used.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Technically there seems to be a lot that will be happening within the next year or so, obviously. I want to touch on one of the issues.

I was here at the last Parliament. I was a critic for the party. I remember the big issue at the time was about the proactive stance of Elections Canada, which I'm fully in favour of doing. In the last Parliament, the past government believed in just the facts that were out there, which was about where and when you should vote. This government, obviously, had different views on that.

I always felt that Elections Canada, being a separate body, and internationally renowned, by the way.... I've been in other countries in my capacity, and they compliment the nature of Elections Canada, and its separation, being arm's length from the government, but also for being very proactive in what you do.

What have you done to promote yourselves to Canada, to promote the idea of voting, exercising your democratic rights? How does all this activity regarding the migration of data, and so on and so forth...? It seems to me that with all this happening, and pending legislation, you might be a bit too busy to get to the other stuff. I'm sorry if that's a leading question.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It is fair to say that we have been and continue to be quite busy. We have a very tight but clear schedule of the work that needs to be done for the next election. We are working on schedule.

Of course, if changes are coming up, as you've indicated there may be, then we'll have to introduce them into our schedule, so after September, once we've done our testing, we may have to introduce other changes to the system, which is why I'm here today saying time is of the essence. We need to bring forward any legislation if we are going to implement them.

You talked about promoting democracy. As you know, our mandate is limited in that regard. We certainly have been working with youth. We have an inspire democracy program that has been focusing on youth, and we are working toward renewing our civic education program in the lead-up to the election. We will see whether Bill C-33, if I'm not mistaken, has a provision in it to restore the fuller civic education mandate, the public education mandate, to Elections Canada, and we'll see where that goes.

(1220)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Where are you with the civic education part and the youth? Can you give us an update on where it stands right now, and what you plan to do in the lead-up to the next federal election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Some of it will depend on the legislative changes. As always, we like to do simulated elections with youth, and that's still very much in the cards, so we're working on that.

We've been engaging teachers across the country to develop new civic education materials and programs to support teachers in the classrooms. That has been a focus, and we're going to be piloting some works at the next election. Returning officers have started reaching out locally this month to find polling locations, and in some areas in that context, we're going to be having some hired staff reach out to schools and start speaking with the schools about civic education ahead of the election.

A bit of work is going on right now.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's a valid point because the teachers I speak to talk about the fact that they lack the material to help outline democratic rights to their students and how to vote and so on. The support material is very good.

Does that support material go to the returning officer, or do teachers have to go directly to Elections Canada to find material?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We provide it directly to the teachers. We are also working with provinces. This is an area of collaboration moving forward. Provinces also have direct contacts with the schools, and the materials should be coordinated. To a certain degree we can leverage each other's resources to improve the overall quality of the materials we have.

We've had some tools for many years. We're currently refreshing those tools, and we're doing that in consultation not only with the schools, but with the provinces.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Would they primarily be online materials?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's a mix of online and simple artifacts that support teachers.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I think that's a fascinating exercise for several reasons. I worry. Obviously you're here to talk about the impending legislation, and where you need to be, and certainly between now and the fall of this year, technically you're going to be in a place that's either going really well, or not going well at all, meaning migration of data.

I'm no expert, but when it comes to migration of data, so many things could go wrong in a very short period of time. Obviously, I see the message you bring here today is certainly one that is salient to all of us because it is very close. I'll get back to that in just a moment.

I just noticed the by-election stuff and some of the complaints that came in. I don't know if this is a great number of complaints, dealing with polling place accessibility, services at the polls, these sorts of things. The highest one seems to be the services at the polls and the accessibility issue.

Can you update us on where you are? Is it a big number, given all the by-elections from 2017?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I don't think there are any unusual numbers of complaints in those reports. Accessibility is a fairly broad topic; it includes accessibility for people with disabilities, as well as accessibility for ordinary Canadians who find the distance may be too long to get to the polls. That's one key area of work for the next election: to reduce the travel distance for Canadians going to the polls, in particular in rural areas.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, thank you. Yes, reduce travel in rural areas. That's—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We've been making efforts to improve the voting process at the polls through the introduction of some technology at advance polls to speed up and reduce wait times in urban and semi-urban areas. But in rural areas we see long distances to the polls, and we're working to address that at the next election.

(1225)

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm glad you're addressing that.

I'll just leave it at that, Mr. Chair, because you're telling me I should.

The Chair:

That's right.

We'll go now to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I see your opening remarks had indicated, in terms of changes to elections law, that the window of time was rapidly closing in which to implement anything prior to the next election and even mentioned that your predecessor, Mr. Mayrand, had said they should be enacted prior to April of 2018. I note that it is now April 24 of 2018.

However, in a news article—I think it was on March 8—the Office of the Minister of Democratic Institutions had indicated that there were some new rules coming to strengthen and clarify rules governing third party spending by foreign actors financing Canadian political advocacy: We are concerned about the lack of transparency seen around many third parties on all sides of the political spectrum. Canada has robust finance rules governing political fundraising from foreign actors, but we will further strengthen and clarify these rules to ensure greater transparency in our political fundraising system and a stronger defence against foreign interference in our democratic process.

I'll beg to differ somewhat with the assertion there that there are robust rules currently that ensure that, but I certainly do agree there is a need to strengthen those, and there is a need to ensure that foreign influence is not influencing our elections as I think it currently can under the rules that exist now.

Because of the fact that it has been indicated that there is something coming to deal with this, can you give us any indication whether the minister or her office has been in contact with Elections Canada, with yourselves, to consult you on any proposed legislation that they're thinking about bringing forward?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly, I can say that officials at the Privy Council Office and officials at Elections Canada have been engaging over the last several months, and we've been providing some technical advice on the legislation, not policy advice, which we provide to this committee, but technical advice on the options for legislation that they're looking into.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so have you been able to give them some suggestions on what should be included or more on how it should be administered or set up?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We've made recommendations through this committee on their roles and two aspects that we'd like to see improved on the third party regime. One is the scope of activities that are being regulated. Currently, it's only election advertising activities. There's a broader range of campaigning activities that should be captured.

The second issue is the funding issue, which you alluded to, and in particular the fact that, third parties being able to use their general revenue, there's a fair amount of foreign funding that can come through that.

These are two core areas that we've been looking into and making suggestions through this committee, but in terms of working with the Privy Council Office, as I said, the advice is more of a technical matter in terms of how you draft legislation to meet the governance policy objectives.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Obviously, given that there's been some discussion and given the news article I quoted from, there is some indication that something might still be coming prior to the next election.

Is it your position that you would feel comfortable that there is still time to be able to put those things in place and have them be effective? I know you've indicated in this that we were talking about major changes specifically. Do you think the window of time is less to implement some of these things that you're talking about here? You mentioned the two different aspects. What would that window of time look like? When would it close?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I can't say when it closes until we see the full package of legislation, and when we do, as I said, we'll work with this committee and look at the implementation options. Obviously, our preference would have been for the legislation to have been introduced much earlier and passed at this point, so that we could make implementations in a manner that is optimal. That is no longer the case, which doesn't mean there is no more time left, but we'll have to see how we implement this in certain cases.

It may mean that some reporting, for example, of political financing is through a simple PDF online as opposed to a complex system. That allows for some transparency, but not the same ease of auditing, for example, that our systems allow. That's just an example. There is still time, but time is ticking and we're at a point where I'm urging for legislation to be introduced, if it's going to be significant, so we can deliver the election in an orderly fashion.

(1230)

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's much appreciated.

I also noticed that Treasury Board vote 40 set aside $990,000 as new funding for the Public Prosecution Service related to election integrity. Was that part of a recommendation from your office? Is that something you were a part of recommending?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No. Anything that has to do with the investigation of election offences is the role of the Commissioner of Canada Elections. He is now part of the public prosecution branch. That's money that they've been asking for.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess you wouldn't be able to answer how they came up with that number of $990,000.

Given that, I'm going to give notice of motion, Mr. Chair. It reads: That the Committee undertake a study of the subject-matter of Treasury Board Vote 40 in the Main Estimates, 2018-19, in respect of the funding proposed for leaders’ debates and election integrity, and invite witnesses from the Privy Council Office and the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions to appear, respectively, on those initiatives.

Do I have some time?

The Chair:

You have thirty seconds.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Maybe what I'll do then is wait for a further round because I don't think I'll have much opportunity to....

The Chair:

We'll go on to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, gentlemen, for appearing today.

You said you were in conversation with the Privy Council Office. Are you also in conversation with the Minister of Democratic Institutions?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The discussion is of a technical nature, taking place between my officials and those in the Privy Council who support Minister Gould.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They're in Privy Council, but they're not in the Minister of Democratic Institutions' office.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct. They're public servants who work in the Privy Council Office.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's curious.

You talked about the deadline, which you've let us know about. You've let the government know of this deadline. The homework was due in order to have the changes in place. Some of these are very substantive changes. The ones that are contemplated in Bill C-33 include expat voting, Canadians living abroad; your ability, or who does the investigations of potential election fraud; your mandate for public education, which is important; and vouching and ID requirements. Those are all contained in a bill that you said you needed passed by now. Is that right?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We said it was all major changes to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Those sound like major changes.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That also includes the recommendations this committee has been supporting that are not part of Bill C-33.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So it was both the changes that were promised in Bill C-33, which was meant to undo some of the changes made in Bill C-23, the so-called Fair Elections Act—some said “unfair elections act”—plus any changes that this committee proposed after having studied the last election with Elections Canada about how to make the next election secure. Your recommendation to the Government of Canada, to Parliament, was to pass all of those changes through Parliament and the Senate by the end of this month.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Seven days from now. That's not going to happen.

My concern is that you also talk about compromises. Essentially, are you saying that some of the changes that the government promised in the last election and some of the changes that this committee has recommended either have to not be done or to be watered down in order for you to enact them properly and keep our elections whole?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I would distinguish between changes to the law that provide discretion to the Chief Electoral Officer, which we may leverage at any point down the road to improve services to Canadians, to voters, to parties, and to candidates. That discretion may or may not be leveraged for the next election, depending on where we are are in timing. That's one category.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's take one of those; expat voting. Changing the rules around expat voting, changing the rules around vouching and identification, and changing the rules around how investigations are handled are not inconsequential changes. Those are significant changes. If you're going left or right into the next election, you said you needed to know that, in law, by the end of this month.

(1235)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's particularly true of changes that have an impact on IT systems.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

On what system?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Complex IT systems. When you want to make changes to that, you need to test them thoroughly before the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can you give me an example of one of the proposed changes that would affect the IT system? As Mr. Simms pointed out, any mess-up on an IT system can....

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are a number of them, including some in Bill C-33, but in our recommendations to Parliament, for example, we've recommended different categories of expenses to be a bit more fair. When you start playing with categories of expenses, then you need to design the systems to analyze the returns accordingly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, so that's even for things about people spending inappropriately or appropriately, any changes with the way you're meant to govern that, changes the way your computers work, the way that reporting is done.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are different ways of implementing that. In an ideal world, we would leverage the opportunity of IT systems, and we would have them tested thoroughly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Here's what confuses me. The bill to make some of these changes, to fix the problems that the government and that we and many Canadians agreed with, to fix the problems in Harper's elections act, Bill C-23, was introduced November 24, 2016, in Bill C-33, and hasn't been seen since. We don't have it at committee. It hasn't passed through the House for debate, yet the government was in court three weeks ago, fighting against a charter challenge of the unfair elections act.

Are you aware of this case?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I am aware.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is Elections Canada participating in any way?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No, we're not.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So the government is participating, and just dropped 2,000 pages on the claimants, arguing for Bill C-23, Harper's bill. It's more than confusing to Canadians, who said they want truly fair elections. A government that promised to do that is fighting in court to maintain the status quo that was brought in by the former prime minister.

I have a question about Russian diplomats. The Foreign Affairs minister, also a couple of weeks ago, said they have expelled six Russian diplomats who are: intelligence officers or individuals who have used their diplomatic status to undermine Canada's security or interfere in our democracy.

Are you aware of any Russian interference in the 2015 election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No, I am not.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're not?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I am not.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does a citation like that, from our Foreign Affairs Minister concern Elections Canada at all?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's certainly a matter of interest to us. We are working with our security partners. I met recently with the head of CSIS, as well as the Communications Security Establishment, and security people in PCO, so we are working with security partners. This is not something that belongs uniquely to Elections Canada—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, it's not.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

—and we rely on their support as we approach the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're working with our spy agency, and you're working with other intelligence agencies to determine if there was any interference in the 2015 election. Is that right?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No, we are working with them to prepare for the next election.

We've been getting a lot of support from the Communications Security Establishment to make sure that our new systems are secure.

A lot of the investments I'm talking about are based on the need to improve our cybersecurity in this new context.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's about hacking into your system. There's also the threat of the fake news cycle, what we saw in the recent U.S. presidential election.

Is it of concern to Elections Canada that repetition and amplification of outright mistruths, particularly by foreign aggressors, as our Foreign Affairs Minister seems to have implied, is the reason that Canada expelled Russian diplomats?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The issue of fake news is a very broad topic, well beyond the help of the electoral process. Certainly it's of great concern to us to make sure that Canadians have the right information about the voting process, about where, when, and how to register and to vote. That's our core area. We will be focusing on that at the next election.

We are, for example, going to have a repository of all our public communications, so if somebody receives a communication that they're not sure comes from Elections Canada, they can check against our source.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This has happened in the past, hasn't it? There have been false robocalls sending people to the wrong polling stations.

(1240)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It has, but sometimes it's been by mistake and sometimes not by mistake.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I had some similar questions top of mind as well.

Maybe you can elaborate a little bit. You specified on page 6 of the Elections Canada departmental plan, where it states that you are: remaining well positioned to anticipate, detect and respond to emerging security concerns related to the administration of elections by strengthening the agency's cybersecurity posture and maintaining collaboration with Canada's lead security agencies, including the Communications Security Establishment.

Minister Gould is also very concerned about this subject matter, and therefore she released a report on cybersecurity last year.

Can you elaborate on what you meant when it comes to detecting and responding to these security concerns, and on how you're working with these agencies in order to make sure that our coming election is not in any way compromised?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

There are many aspects to this, of course. One aspect is having a good understanding of the threat environment. We are working with security partners so that we stay abreast of the threat environment. Another important aspect, of course, as I mentioned, is our cybersecurity. We've made a lot of investments to restructure our systems. I spoke about the new data centre. We are migrating our systems to a new data centre, which is much more protected than the current one, in the lead-up to the next election, in part in order to enhance our security.

All of our IT improvements have been made in collaboration and with the support of the Communications Security Establishment. They will test for us, for example, the supply chain integrity of the products that we purchase, or they will look at our systems or provide advice on how we should protect.

As I believe I mentioned when I appeared last February, I'm in the process of commissioning a third party audit. We've made some improvements. We just want a third party to look at the improvements we've made and see whether anything is missing. That will be happening this spring so that we have some time to make adjustments as we go forward.

That's the main area. As I mentioned, we are also planning a campaign to make sure that Canadians have the right information about the electoral process and to react quickly if there is misinformation. We will be monitoring, for example, social media, making sure that the information that circulates is correct, and if it's not, we'll be ready to react quickly.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you monitor media in other languages as well?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'd have to get back to you on the number of languages. We do some monitoring, but I'd have to get back to you on it.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think that might be a good idea as well, because we may be missing certain threats, or certain communities may be spreading misinformation that's not hitting our radar.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. It's certainly my understanding that security partners are doing that. Beyond that, in terms of information on the voting process going beyond French and English, it's something I'll be looking into.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You mentioned that you're doing an audit with a third party. What about reaching out to partners similar to Elections Canada in other countries to share best practices, meeting maybe once a year or connecting somehow to determine whether there have been these types of threats or different concerns in other countries, and determine how you can learn from best practices?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, some international engagements do take place. Meetings have happened in Europe. Every jurisdiction is dealing with that issue. We have contacts, and we do some exchanges. I've met personally with colleagues and counterparts in the U.K., Australia, and New Zealand. That is always one of the topics we talk about.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you stick within just the parliamentary system, or do you discuss with the U.S. and others as well?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We have some contact with the U.S., but our environment is quite different from theirs. They have a very unique decentralized structure, whereby, if I'm not mistaken, 60% of the districts or jurisdictions that serve electors in the U.S. are less than 5,000. It's a constellation of micro-jurisdictions with, in some cases, very varying means to deal with threats. They also need to rely on technology a lot more than we do in terms of voting because of the nature of their system. They often have referendums and so forth. They typically don't vote on paper the way we do. Their challenges are quite unique in that regard.

(1245)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In terms of your preparation for the 2015 election and the preparation now for the 2019 election, what differences are there, if any? How have the priorities changed from that election to this election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's a good question. There are a number of changes. One that we've spoken about quite a bit is the cyber-threat. Before the last election, our concern on security included cyber but was nowhere near the level that we have right now. On that front there's been a lot of work done to improve our cybersecurity. We have made great improvements. That's an important change.

We've also made a number of efforts to modernize the voting services. We saw in the last election a dramatic increase of 70% of the vote at advance polls. There was a migration of the voters from polling day to advance polls. That had, as you will remember, an impact on the lineups and the services. We've been working hard to improve that. We're doing different things. Some of them do not require legislative changes. We talked about the electronic poll books to accelerate and streamline the process at the polls. We also streamlined the procedures, even the paper procedures. In polls where there will be no technology, the paper processes will be streamlined. We've also made some recommendations, which we hope we'll see at some point—for example, to increase the number of hours at advance polls.

You always have to adjust your electoral services to the changing reality of Canadians. If you only plan for the last election, then you will run into some difficulties. We're looking at making a number of improvements this time around.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go back to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess I'll start with this: in Treasury Board Vote 40, there was a $570,000 reduction for Elections Canada, which was entitled “Rebalancing Elections Canada's Expenditures”. I'm wondering if you were consulted on that rebalancing or cut in funding and what impact it is going to have on your abilities in the next election. Obviously, there will have to be some changes to deal with that cut in funding.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That is a good question. The numbers can be misleading. It's a change that was made at my request. What we are doing is trying to transfer some of the spending we do right now on the statutory draw, by which we buy services from contractors, for example, IT, terms and casuals, and reduce that amount while increasing the amount on our voted appropriation, the annual appropriation, for which we have the vote today. This is money that is exclusively for indeterminate positions. When we do that, we do two things. We stabilize our workforce. That's particularly important in IT where we do want to have the flexibility of some consultants, but you need a core capacity. Similarly, in other areas as well, you want to reduce the number of terms up to a certain degree and make those positions permanent.

When we do that, we see that full-time public servants are cheaper to hire than consultants, much cheaper. Over five years, you'll see an increase of some $51 million in our annual appropriations and a reduction of $61 million in our statutory spending. This gives us a $10-million saving while at the same time stabilizing our workforce. That's a request that I made, and I was very happy to see it in the budget.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Great, thank you for that clarification.

You mentioned in your opening remarks the migration of a number of your systems and databases—that's maybe tied together, even—over to the new data centre you are currently building.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You said this was necessary in order to have the flexibility and security to deliver the election, and you specifically said “in the current environment”. I wonder if you can give us some clarification or specificity as to what that means. What's the current environment? What's the difference? What's changed that you see as a difference with the current environment?

(1250)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are two things, but mostly one. First of all, we currently have a data centre. The contract for that data centre has expired, so it had to be renewed to begin with. As we move forward to a new data centre, we wanted the greater flexibility of expanding the service, so that especially on voting day when there's a peak demand, we'll have much greater flexibility to deal with that and not risk having the system freeze during the key period of the election. That is one thing.

The most important point about the changing environment is the cybersecure environment. This new data centre is much more secure than the one we currently have, and the security components will take into account the information received from the Communications Security Establishment. That's why it is critical—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry to interrupt, but when you talk about security, are you talking about concerns with the kinds of reports we've heard or the threats we think might be out there in terms of foreign—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

—in terms of penetration of our systems, exactly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You mentioned that starting in September you're going to be conducting integrated testing, the full testing, in a way that replicates the activities and transactions of a general election.

Can you give me some sense as to what we're talking about there? What are those activities? What are those transactions that you're going to be testing starting on September 1?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

For example, during the course of the election we're using a system called REVISE to record the new additions of voters to the list of electors who registered on advance polls. That's one. That information is loaded locally at the returning office and has to work with the central database. It's the same for the election night results.

Mr. Blake Richards:

When you talk about that simulation where you're including a process with several electoral districts, and including the interaction between the local offices and the headquarters, which is what you were just referencing there, how is that done? To do that testing, do you have to physically rent space that would look like a returning office in several electoral districts for a different period of time than what's required for the election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. We do rent space, as we would do during an election, for a limited number of offices, of course. We bring in staff and we go through all the standard procedures that they would go through during an election, and test those systems to make sure they perform properly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, great. Thank you. I appreciate the information.

The Chair:

We'll go on to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you for being here today and for the testimony that you're providing.

Continuing with Mr. Richards' last question, how do you choose the places where you're going to set up that testing?

Mr. Michel Roussel (Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Electoral Events and Innovation, Elections Canada):

It would depend on various factors, but we try to find places, electoral districts, that are representative of the country, so the west, the east, urban, and rural. That's how we select those places.

Usually we take about four or five electoral districts that are selected, so representativity is important.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I see. Okay.

I am interested in the tools that you're preparing for teachers. Part of my background is 20 years in a high school, and I found the biggest stumbling block is that there are so many resources out there, but we're often not aware of the resources available.

What action are you taking to let teachers know that these resources are available—the awareness piece?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We've put together an advisory group of teachers from across Canada. They are actually working with us in the design of the new tools. We want to make sure that the tools reflect their needs. We're currently working to refresh them. Some of the tools we've had were good tools, but they're now outdated. We need to get them up to date and to use more online materials and so forth. Across the country, we're working with the teachers themselves to get some advice on that.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I think that's fantastic. I think that's the best. You're going to develop the best tool by working with the teachers who are in the classrooms. It's brilliant that you're doing that.

The next step is the awareness piece. Is that same group going to advise as to how to get the information to the schools that these tools are available? Or is that independent of that advisory group?

(1255)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No. It's fully integrated. It's about the tools and how we roll them out and make them available.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's perfect.

I believe I asked this question the last time you were here. In terms of having students engaged, one of the most effective things in the democratic process and one of the most effective things that I saw happening was having the advance polls at the university located in my riding. Has there been a determination yet with respect to advance polling and having those polls at universities and colleges across the country?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. The last election was the first time for that. We had some 38 campuses where we had a polling station using special ballots to serve students. Wherever they resided, they could vote at the campus. As well, people who work on campus could too. It was a significant success. We've decided to expand that. We've done a number of things to improve that. One is that we're going from 38 to 110 campuses.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's fantastic.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The criteria include the size of the campus, but also the regional diversity. We want to make sure that we cut across different areas of the country and also go to campuses where there is a concentration of indigenous voters, for example. We have a range of criteria. That's one thing.

We've also expanded the number of days. We went from four to five days. What we saw at the last election was that the number of students who voted kept on growing and had not peaked, so there's an untapped potential there. We're hoping that by expanding it we can better service young voters.

Finally, we've made some improvements to the process. It should be considerably faster. It was not a very quick process, and they were very patient. I was impressed by their patience, I must say, but the process is a complex one because it involves a special ballot. It's a more complex procedure. We're streamlining that procedure so as to make sure it does not unduly delay the vote.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I really commend you on that. I think that initiative is critical and important. I voted with my son on campus, and I did not have a timing problem. It was run very well.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault: It's great to hear that.

Ms. Filomena Tassi: I think the awareness of your presence there makes great strides in terms of getting young people to vote.

You touched on this in terms of indigenous electors in your last answer, so that was good to hear as well. Page 5 of Elections Canada's departmental plan talks about making “voting more accessible to Indigenous electors” by working with local organizations. I wonder if you can give me an update as to what you've done there.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are two aspects to this. One is general across the country. Right now what we're doing, well ahead of the election, is that we've begun as of this month to work locally with returning officers to ask them to identify potential polling locations. That's something that we used to do right at the beginning of the election. We're now doing that 18 months in advance. As they do that, they get to engage with the local community. Where there are indigenous communities, that's an opportunity to engage there.

Over and above that, we've identified 92 communities and 28 electoral districts, I believe, which were remote indigenous communities that were less properly serviced in the last election. There, we're going to ask returning officers to engage them not only this April but on a more sustained basis as we move towards the election, to try to make sure that we design the election in a way that meets the needs of their community and that we can hire more community members to work at the polls. There's going to be a more sustained effort in those areas.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, and thank you for being here again. We really appreciate it. It's always very wise counsel.

I'll ask for the votes. OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ELECTORAL OFFICER ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........30,768,921

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report the votes on the main estimates of the House of Commons, Parliamentary Protective Service, and Chief Electoral Officer to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

Just for committee members, on Thursday it's indigenous languages. As we agreed upon, in the next few meetings if there was a time slot where witnesses couldn't appear, we would do the petitions. Indeed, we have that slot now and it's on May 8, so if the parties could be ready on May 8 to discuss the recommendations that you receive from the clerk on the electronic petitions, it would be great.

Is there anything else, anyone?

We're adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Bienvenue à cette 98e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous nous penchons aujourd'hui sur le Budget principal des dépenses pour 2018-2019.

Au cours de la première heure, nous allons étudier le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Chambre des communes et le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire. Pendant la deuxième heure, nous allons nous intéresser au crédit 1 sous la rubrique Bureau du directeur général des élections.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir aujourd'hui l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre des communes. Il est accompagné de Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre des communes; Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, administration; et Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances.

Du Service de protection parlementaire, nous recevons la surintendante principale Jane MacLatchy, directrice, et Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence ce matin. Comme par le passé, s'il y a des éléments concernant le Service de protection parlementaire dont vous souhaitez discuter à huis clos, veuillez nous le faire savoir.

Je vais maintenant vous céder la parole, monsieur le Président. Je sais que vous êtes un homme très occupé, et je vous suis d'autant plus reconnaissant d'être des nôtres.

L'hon. Geoff Regan (président de la Chambre des communes):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je me réjouis de voir tous mes collègues ici réunis ce matin. Monsieur le président, membres du Comité et distingués invités, je vous remercie de m'accueillir de nouveau. [Français]

À titre de Président de la Chambre des communes, je suis heureux de présenter le Budget principal des dépenses de l'exercice 2018-2019 pour la Chambre des communes et le Service de protection parlementaire.

Vous avez déjà présenté les gens qui sont avec moi aujourd'hui, monsieur le président. Je vais donc entamer tout de suite ma présentation.[Traduction]

Je vais commencer par présenter les principaux éléments du Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019 de la Chambre des communes.

C'est un budget total de 507 millions de dollars. Cela représente une diminution nette de 4 millions de dollars par rapport au Budget des dépenses de 2017-2018, en incluant à la fois le Budget principal et le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Ce budget a été examiné et approuvé par le Bureau de régie interne lors d'une réunion publique.[Français]

Le Budget principal des dépenses sera présenté selon six grands thèmes, ce qui correspond au document que vous avez reçu. L'impact financier lié aux six thèmes représente les variations annuelles par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses de 2017-2018.[Traduction]

Les six thèmes sont: investissements et soutien continus à l'égard de la Vision et du plan d'action à long terme; investissements majeurs; conférences, associations et assemblées; activités des comités; augmentation du coût de la vie; et régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés.

Je vais commencer avec la somme de 10,6 millions de dollars qui est nécessaire pour poursuivre les investissements à l'appui de la Vision et du plan d'action à long terme (VPLT). Bientôt, nous franchirons des étapes importantes, à savoir le déménagement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest rénové et le début des travaux de réfection de l'édifice du Centre. La réfection de l'édifice de l'Ouest est le tout premier projet de construction de cette envergure réalisé sur la Colline du Parlement dans le cadre de la VPLT.

Je tiens à souligner que la Chambre travaille en étroite collaboration avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada en vue du déménagement dans le nouvel édifice de l'Ouest. En juin, avant que la Chambre ajourne ses travaux pour l'été, le Bureau sera informé des progrès réalisés dans le cadre de ce projet. C'est à ce moment qu'il sera décidé si le transfert aura lieu cet été ou non.

L'objectif commun est de veiller à ce que tout sur place fonctionne comme prévu afin d'éviter toute perturbation des délibérations de la Chambre. C'est absolument primordial.

Le financement prévu au Budget principal des dépenses aux fins des investissements et du soutien continus à l'égard de la VPLT, qui a été examiné et approuvé par le Bureau, est nécessaire pour appuyer les activités en cours dans l'ensemble de la Cité parlementaire, et entretenir les systèmes de technologie de l'information et les actifs immobiliers.

(1105)

[Français]

Les travaux de réhabilitation en cours dans la Cité parlementaire auront d'importantes répercussions sur les ressources humaines et financières de la Chambre. Les députés doivent pouvoir continuer à recevoir les services dont ils ont besoin pendant cette période de croissance et de changements remarquables. Même si les ressources actuelles seront affectées là où les besoins sont les plus grands, des ressources supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour appuyer les activités essentielles pour les députés, leur personnel et l'Administration qui leur offre un soutien.

Par ailleurs, la réinstallation dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et l'ouverture du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs donneront lieu à une augmentation directe des dépenses de fonctionnement de la Chambre des communes. Ces dépenses visent à consigner, à protéger et à entretenir les actifs connexes qui seront cédés à la Chambre des communes par Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, ainsi qu'à gérer leur cycle de vie. D'ici 2019, la Chambre aura pris possession de nouveaux éléments d'actif d'une valeur de plus de 200 millions de dollars.[Traduction]

Il est essentiel que tous les édifices de la Cité parlementaire soient munis de l'infrastructure et des équipements technologiques nécessaires pour nous assurer l'accès aux services d'information, aussi bien pour poursuivre la modernisation que pour assurer le bon fonctionnement du Parlement.

Je vais maintenant passer à la somme de 11,7 millions de dollars approuvée par le Bureau à l'appui des investissements majeurs de la Chambre des communes.[Français]

Nous en sommes à une étape cruciale où la Chambre des communes doit investir dans des solutions et des systèmes de technologie de l'information qui lui permettront de répondre aux besoins des députés, de leurs employés et de l'Administration de la Chambre, qui ne cessent d'évoluer. Il faut également accroître l'accès aux renseignements parlementaires par l'entremise des médias sociaux et en modernisant notre présence en ligne.

Compte tenu du renouvellement de nombreux espaces voués aux fonctions parlementaires, des investissements sont également requis afin d'offrir des services de soutien aux députés.

À cette fin, la modernisation et l'optimisation des Services de restauration sont axées sur l'expérience vécue par les clients, tout en appuyant la transition de la production vers le Centre de production alimentaire à l'extérieur de la Cité parlementaire, en vue de la réinstallation dans l'édifice de l'Ouest.[Traduction]

Le groupe Paie et avantages sociaux offre également un service essentiel aux députés et à l'Administration de la Chambre. Des fonds sont requis afin d'assurer que ce groupe est doté des effectifs nécessaires pour répondre aux besoins actuels et atténuer les problèmes liés aux systèmes.

Des fonds sont également requis pour apporter les améliorations nécessaires à la sécurité de l'édifice de l'Ouest. Pour des raisons de sécurité, il ne m'est pas possible d'entrer dans les détails, mais je peux vous assurer que la Chambre des communes et ses partenaires en matière de sécurité continuent de collaborer pour améliorer la gestion des urgences et l'approche adoptée afin de garantir la sécurité au Parlement.

Un autre investissement dont il est question dans le Budget principal des dépenses permettra de rendre publiques les dépenses des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et des bureaux de recherche des caucus nationaux. Le Bureau s'étant engagé à faire preuve de transparence et à rendre des comptes, le premier rapport annuel sur la question, intitulé Rapport de dépenses des agents supérieurs, sera publié sur le site noscommunes.ca en juin. Conformément au calendrier établi pour le Rapport de dépenses des députés, des rapports trimestriels suivront. [Français]

Passons maintenant à la diplomatie parlementaire.

Une somme de 1,1 million de dollars est nécessaire pour ce travail important qui vise à favoriser la compréhension mutuelle, à accroître la confiance, à améliorer la coopération et à contribuer à la bonne entente entre les législateurs.

Conformément à ces engagements, le Canada accueillera trois grands événements en 2018-2019.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Comme vous êtes sans doute nombreux à le savoir, la 56e Conférence régionale de l'Association parlementaire du Commonwealth aura lieu à Ottawa en juillet. Cette conférence permet aux parlementaires et à leur personnel de définir des modèles de bonne gouvernance et de mettre en application les valeurs durables du Commonwealth.

Ensuite, la 15e Assemblée plénière annuelle de ParlAmericas se tiendra à Vancouver, en Colombie-Britannique, en septembre 2018.

Enfin, la 64e Session annuelle de l'Assemblée parlementaire de l'OTAN, qui offre aux députés de l'Alliance atlantique une tribune spécialisée leur fournissant une occasion unique d'échanger entre eux et d'exercer une influence sur les décisions relatives à la sécurité de l'Alliance, aura lieu à Halifax, en Nouvelle-Écosse. Ils sont bien chanceux, n'est-ce pas? Le député de Halifax est d'accord. Celui de St. Catharines a l'air moins certain.

Je vais maintenant vous parler de la somme de 1,7 million de dollars qui est requise à l'appui des activités des comités. Chaque année, les comités parlementaires étudient de nombreuses questions importantes pour les Canadiens. Ils examinent et modifient des lois, passent en revue les dépenses du gouvernement, mènent des enquêtes et entendent les témoignages de spécialistes et de citoyens.

Les comités utilisent principalement les fonds qui leur sont accordés pour payer les dépenses liées aux témoins, aux vidéoconférences, aux déplacements, aux repas pendant les heures de travail et à la rédaction de rapports destinés à la Chambre des communes qui portent sur les questions qu'ils étudient. Le Comité de liaison gère avec rigueur l'enveloppe budgétaire globale allouée aux activités des comités par le Bureau de régie interne.

Je vais maintenant vous parler de la somme de 4,6 millions de dollars qui est requise pour compenser l'augmentation du coût de la vie. Cette somme répondra aux besoins de l'Administration de la Chambre et sera aussi utilisée pour les budgets des députés et des agents supérieurs de la Chambre. En ce qui concerne l'Administration de la Chambre, ces fonds permettront de payer les augmentations économiques d'environ 1 600 employés. Ces augmentations de la rémunération permettent d'assurer le maintien en poste du personnel et d'offrir des salaires compétitifs pour attirer de nouveaux employés.[Français]

Je passe maintenant au financement nécessaire pour les budgets, les suppléments et les salaires des députés et des agents supérieurs de la Chambre.

Le Bureau a déterminé que les budgets de bureau des députés, des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et des bureaux de recherche seront ajustés chaque année en fonction de l'indice des prix à la consommation.[Traduction]

Des fonds sont également accordés à l'appui de l'augmentation des suppléments aux budgets de bureau des députés afin de tenir compte des difficultés liées au fait de devoir servir la population dans des circonscriptions vastes, plus peuplées ou éloignées. Le Bureau a également approuvé une augmentation au compte officiel que les députés peuvent utiliser pour payer leurs frais d'hébergement et de repas lorsqu'ils se déplacent.

En outre, conformément à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, l'indemnité de session et les salaires supplémentaires des députés sont ajustés chaque année, le 1er avril, en fonction de l'indice de la moyenne, en pourcentage, des rajustements des taux des salaires de base, pour une année civile, issus des principales ententes conclues dans le secteur privé au Canada.[Français]

Le dernier élément figurant dans le Budget principal des dépenses de la Chambre des communes est la somme de 1,2 million de dollars demandée pour les régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés.

Conformément aux directives du Conseil du Trésor, il s'agit d'une dépense législative non discrétionnaire qui comprend les coûts payés par l'employeur pour le Régime de retraite de la fonction publique, le Régime de pensions du Canada, le Régime de rentes du Québec, les prestations de décès et le Compte d'assurance-emploi.[Traduction]

J'aimerais maintenant présenter le Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019 du Service de protection parlementaire (SPP).

Le mois de juin prochain marquera la troisième année d'activités du SPP depuis l'unification des anciens services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat sous le commandement opérationnel de la surintendante principale Jane MacLatchy. Cette entité a été créée en vertu d'une loi du Parlement afin d'unifier et de mieux coordonner la sécurité physique du Parlement en application d'un mandat unique.

À titre de Président de la Chambre des communes, je suis responsable du Service de protection parlementaire, conjointement avec le Président du Sénat. On nous présente d'ailleurs régulièrement des rapports au sujet de différents enjeux. Permettez-moi tout d'abord de résumer l'évolution de l'organisation au cours des trois dernières années, et notamment l'incidence de cette évolution sur son Budget principal des dépenses.

Au cours de ses neuf premiers mois, le SPP a fonctionné avec un budget de 40 millions de dollars calculé au prorata. Pendant cette période de transition, la Chambre des communes a fourni à la nouvelle organisation un soutien organisationnel selon un modèle de rétrofacturation. Cette mesure provisoire a permis au SPP de se préoccuper principalement de l'unification des services de sécurité et de la mise au point de l'interopérabilité. Cela lui a également permis d'évaluer ses besoins sur deux ans afin que ses services internes puissent s'autosuffire.

(1115)

[Français]

En 2016-2017, après la présentation de son tout premier Budget principal des dépenses, le SPP a fonctionné avec un financement de 62,1 millions de dollars, ce qui a considérablement amélioré les efforts d'unification grâce à la normalisation des uniformes et de l'équipement et à la modernisation des infrastructures.

Cette année, le Service a reçu 68,3 millions de dollars, qui ont aidé à la mise en oeuvre de nombreuses mesures de sécurité sur la Colline du Parlement, notamment l'embauche de personnel de sécurité supplémentaire pour l'édifice Wellington et la mise sur pied d'une équipe intégrée d'intervention mobile.[Traduction]

Aujourd'hui, l'organisation commence à se stabiliser et réalise d'importants progrès dans la mise en place d'une structure administrative efficace à l'appui de ses opérations de protection. Au cours de l'exercice, le SPP entend s'acquitter de son mandat avec un budget de 83,5 millions de dollars. La majoration du financement comprend 7 millions de dollars à l'égard de besoins permanents, 7,6 millions de dollars pour des initiatives de sécurité temporaires, et 600 000 $ de fonds législatifs.

Le Service de protection parlementaire est un organisme autonome et un employeur parlementaire distinct, mais il a conclu plusieurs ententes sur les niveaux de service avec la Chambre des communes pour obtenir de l'aide à l'égard des finances, de la paie et des technologies de l'information. Ces ententes seront maintenues à court terme pendant que l'organisation renforcera progressivement sa capacité afin de réduire sa dépendance à l'égard de la Chambre en matière de soutien administratif.[Français]

C'est pourquoi la demande de financement permanent comprend les montants suivants: 4,5 millions de dollars affectés à des postes au sein des services des finances, des ressources humaines et des installations; 1,9 million de dollars pour la stabilisation des fonctions principales dans les services de l'information, des actifs et des principaux événements, ainsi que de l'infrastructure physique et de la planification des mesures d'urgence; et 600 000 $ pour la formation du personnel affecté à la protection.[Traduction]

Dans le cadre du financement accordé pour des initiatives temporaires en matière de sécurité, soulignons un montant de 5,7 millions de dollars pour l'entretien et la mise à niveau nécessaires de l'infrastructure de sécurité, comme le remplacement et la modernisation des caméras extérieures et des barrières au poste de contrôle des véhicules. Comme certaines de ces mises à niveau sont assorties de préoccupations confidentielles aux fins de la sécurité, mes représentants et moi-même nous ferons un plaisir de répondre à huis clos à toute question à ce sujet, si les membres du Comité le souhaitent. Il y a également une somme de 1,1 million de dollars sur trois ans pour fournir à nos agents chargés des services de protection la même attestation de sécurité minimale que celle requise dans tous les organismes de sécurité fédéraux, une autre mesure clé visant à améliorer les communications et à simplifier l'échange d'information avec les partenaires externes. Notons enfin un montant de 775 000 $ pour des initiatives et un soutien organisationnel temporaires, comme l'embauche de consultants, l'élaboration d'un site Web interne et l'acquisition d'un système de gestion de documents.

Le financement demandé dans le cadre du Budget des dépenses assure la croissance constante de l'organisation et garantit le soutien de sa main-d'oeuvre et sa dotation en ressources suffisantes pour lui permettre de s'acquitter de son mandat en matière de sécurité.[Français]

Monsieur le président, c'est ainsi que se termine mon aperçu du Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019 de la Chambre des communes et du Service de protection parlementaire. Mes représentants et moi serons ravis de répondre aux questions.

(1120)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le Président.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Graham. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le Président.

J'ai quelques commentaires à formuler brièvement avant de passer à mes questions. Tout d'abord, monsieur le président, je veux remercier l'Administration de la Chambre d'avoir répondu aussi rapidement à mes demandes concernant noscommunes.ca. J'avais entre autres demandé des modifications au format XML, et on a exaucé mes désirs en un rien de temps. Je vous en remercie. Vous avez une excellente équipe.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'aimerais dire que c'est grâce à moi, mais ce n'est pas le cas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous ne faisiez même pas partie de la liste de distribution.

À la fin de la période de questions à la Chambre, la tribune du public, celle juste au-dessus de vous, monsieur le président, est libérée juste avant 15 heures, peu importe ce qui se passe ou si les gens veulent partir ou non. Même si en théorie les gens quittent la tribune de façon volontaire, il n'y a rien de très volontaire là-dedans. Pouvez-vous m'expliquer pourquoi on procède ainsi?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je suis content que vous posiez la question, car quelques membres m'en ont parlé. Je crois que cela a rapport au budget ou aux coûts liés à la sécurité dans le corridor nord.

C'est peut-être une question à poser à M. Graham. Qui pourrait répondre à la question? Savez-vous ce qui se passe? Pourquoi ferme-t-on la tribune et demande-t-on aux gens de partir avant la fin de la période de questions?

Nous n'en avons peut-être jamais parlé, alors c'est le moment de le faire.

L'agent de la sécurité institutionnelle est mieux placé pour le savoir. Le sergent d'armes va prendre tout le blâme, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je croyais que c'était une question facile.

M. Patrick McDonell (sergent d’armes adjoint et dirigeant de la sécurité institutionnelle, Chambre des communes):

La décision de fermer la tribune remonte à plusieurs années avant mon arrivée à la Chambre. Le sergent d'armes de l'époque a mis en place cette mesure afin de réduire les coûts. En fermant la tribune à 15 heures, on réduit le nombre d'heures de garde dans le corridor nord, et on a ainsi moins besoin d'opérateurs de scanographe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que ces visiteurs sont invités à passer à la tribune qu'on appelait la « tribune des dames », de l'autre côté? Est-ce que le nom a changé?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Oui, c'est maintenant la tribune sud, la tribune publique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les gens assis dans la tribune nord sont conduits à la tribune sud ou ils doivent s'en aller?

M. Patrick McDonell:

Habituellement, les gens qui se trouvent dans la tribune nord font partie d'un plus grand groupe, comme on en voit tous les jours. Ils partent tous ensemble lorsqu'il est temps de libérer la tribune nord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, merci monsieur McDonell. C'est apprécié.

Je passe à ma prochaine question. J'ai entendu dire récemment qu'on avait lancé un nouveau programme, qui consiste à faire escorter les entrepreneurs dans les immeubles par des agents de sécurité externes. J'aimerais avoir plus de détails à ce sujet. Ces agents de sécurité seront-ils formés par la Chambre des communes pour qu'ils sachent ce que signifie la notion de privilège et pour qu'ils sachent à quoi ils auront accès ou non?

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration, Chambre des communes):

Ce programme a été mis en place en partenariat avec le Service de protection parlementaire, ainsi que Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada. C'est en prévision de la rénovation des immeubles et des réparations à effectuer à l'intérieur des locaux. Le programme est sous la responsabilité de SPAC.

Un sous-traitant a été engagé essentiellement pour escorter les entrepreneurs. Le sous-traitant est accrédité par le Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle — le processus d'accréditation régulier — et est à la disposition des entrepreneurs effectuant les travaux sur les immeubles et dans les locaux. Le but est d'alléger le fardeau de la sécurité et d'accélérer les travaux.

Je note cependant que s'il y a des travaux, des réparations ou des rénovations à faire dans les bureaux des députés, les entrepreneurs seront escortés par le personnel du Service de protection parlementaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les agents de sécurité externes n'auront pas accès aux bureaux des députés. C'est bien cela?

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est exact.

On conserve le même programme pour les bureaux des députés, c'est-à-dire que le personnel du Service de protection parlementaire va escorter les entrepreneurs et rester sur place pendant la tenue des travaux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Madame MacLatchy, j'ai une question pour vous.

Quand nous vous avons vue en février, vous nous aviez dit qu'il y avait 46 postes vacants du côté opérationnel. Où en sommes-nous maintenant?

(1125)

Surintendant principal Jane MacLatchy (directrice, Service de protection parlementaire):

Nous venons tout juste d'embaucher de nouveaux employés. Je vais toutefois demander à M. Graham, l'officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel, de vous donner plus de détails.

M. Robert Graham (officier responsable de l’administration et du personnel, Service de protection parlementaire):

Oui. Tous les postes ont maintenant été dotés. Il n'y a plus de poste vacant du côté opérationnel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée des économies réalisées depuis l'intégration du SPP par rapport au système précédent? Avons-nous des données à cet égard?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Je n'ai pas de statistiques à ce sujet.

M. Robert Graham:

Voulez-vous que je le vérifie? Je peux vous revenir là-dessus.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Absolument.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr.

Monsieur le Président, vous avez parlé des caméras. J'avais une question à ce sujet, mais nous pourrons y revenir pendant la portion à huis clos tout à l'heure, si le temps nous le permet.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le Président, et merci aux témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

J'ai en premier lieu une question d'ordre général à propos de certains postes vacants à la Chambre des communes. Comme vous le savez, le sergent d'armes est en poste à titre intérimaire depuis janvier 2015.

En votre qualité de Président, avez-vous été consulté au sujet du processus de nomination ou au sujet des candidats potentiels pour certains postes, dont celui de sergent d'armes?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Généralement, on me consulte. De mémoire, je ne suis pas certain que ce soit le cas pour ce poste. Pas que je me souvienne. Mais dans le passé, il est arrivé qu'on me consulte pour des postes semblables.

M. John Nater:

Trouvez-vous normal qu'après plus de trois ans, ces postes n'aient pas encore trouvé de titulaire permanent?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous me demandez de m'aventurer sur un terrain que le Président devrait tâcher d'éviter.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Allez-y.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci, monsieur Cullen, de m'inviter sur ce terrain glissant. C'est gentil.

Je crois que les parlementaires préfèrent que ces postes soient dotés dans un délai raisonnable.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

À l'heure actuelle, prévoyez-vous le dépôt d'un Budget supplémentaire des dépenses devant le Parlement, soit pour la Chambre soit pour le SPP?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais renvoyer la question à Michel.

M. Michel Patrice:

Pour ce qui est de la Chambre des communes, outre le report de fonds, qui fait partie du cours normal des choses, nous ne prévoyons pas déposer de Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Nous sommes d'avis que le budget approuvé par le Conseil du Trésor sera suffisant pour reporter des fonds au mois suivant.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous m'avez vu toucher du bois...

M. John Nater:

Oui, j'ai vu. Je vais vous en tenir rigueur.

Et pour le SPP?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Nous étudions actuellement les exigences de la VPLT. Nous venons tout juste de terminer un examen de la situation à l'aide d'un expert externe. Nous voulions avoir une analyse complète des ressources dont nous aurons besoin, particulièrement lors de la transition de l'édifice du Centre vers l'édifice de l'Ouest et le Centre des conférences du gouvernement. Nous n'avons pas terminé cette analyse. Il est possible que nous déposions un Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, mais je ne peux pas vous le confirmer pour le moment.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Monsieur le Président, dans votre allocution, il a été question de la nouvelle formule pour la divulgation des dépenses des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et des bureaux de recherche des caucus.

Savez-vous à quoi nous devons nous attendre? La divulgation des dépenses va-t-elle ressembler à ce que nous avons actuellement dans les bureaux des députés? Sinon, en quoi ce sera différent?

M. Daniel G. Paquette (dirigeant principal des finances, Chambre des communes):

Ce sera semblable... du type résumé. La présentation pourrait être différente, car nous mettons à niveau la technologie utilisée. Je crois que cela facilitera légèrement l'accès à noscommunes.ca quand il sera question d'éplucher les dépenses d'accueil et de déplacement.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le Président, vous avez récemment statué sur un point de privilège soulevé par mon collègue Luc Berthold, concernant l'accès à la tribune durant le processus budgétaire. Vous avez dit dans votre décision que des mesures allaient être prises afin d'améliorer les communications et les pratiques entourant les activités de cette envergure.

Pouvez-vous nous dire si ces nouvelles mesures ont été mises en place? Sinon, quels sont les plans à cet égard?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'ai donné des directives à ce sujet, mais je vais demander au sergent d'armes s'il a des développements pour nous.

Nous voulons que ce soit en place pour le budget de l'an prochain, et c'est ce dont il est question d'ailleurs, mais c'est encore loin.

Monsieur McDonell.

M. Patrick McDonell:

Un invité de M. Berthold a été mal informé ce jour-là.

Nous avons examiné la situation et nous en avons discuté avec la surintendante principale MacLatchy. Je crois qu'il est possible d'améliorer les communications entre le bureau du sergent d'armes et le personnel sur le terrain, le personnel opérationnel, lorsqu'il y a des activités d'envergure, comme c'est le cas le jour du budget.

(1130)

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Avec un peu de chance, nous allons nous installer dans l'édifice de l'Ouest à l'automne. C'est du moins ce qui est prévu, je crois. Et cela signifie également l'inauguration du nouveau centre d'accueil des visiteurs.

J'aurais quelques questions à cet égard, mais je vais peut-être manquer de temps. Je vais m'en remettre à mes collègues des tours suivants si c'est le cas. Puisque le nouveau centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera situé dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, est-ce que la procédure de vérification du personnel et des invités des députés va changer, ou est-ce qu'on va procéder comme on le fait actuellement à l'édifice du Centre?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Nous élaborons toujours des procédures de fonctionnement normalisées en fonction des nouvelles installations. Je peux cependant vous dire que le niveau de vérification demeurera le même. Nous travaillons encore au processus étape par étape en tant que tel, mais je vous assure que nous allons informer le Comité et tous les parlementaires lorsque nous aurons terminé.

M. John Nater:

Si jamais le déménagement à l'édifice de l'Ouest devait être retardé, ai-je raison de présumer qu'on reportera également l'utilisation du nouveau centre d'accueil des visiteurs? J'imagine que le nouveau centre ne sera utilisé que lorsque nous occuperons physiquement les locaux.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est ce qu'on me dit.

M. John Nater:

J'ai une question plus générale sur l'édifice de l'Ouest. Pendant notre visite l'an dernier, nous avons appris que la tribune de la presse parlementaire allait être déplacée. Plutôt que d'être au-dessus du Président, elle sera installée en face de lui.

Est-ce exact?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

M. Cullen a dit « FaceTime ». Pauvres eux.

Elle sera au même endroit. Cela n'a pas changé. La bonne nouvelle, c'est qu'ils n'auront pas à voir mon visage.

M. John Nater:

La mauvaise nouvelle, c'est qu'ils verront les nôtres plus clairement.

Excellent.

Si jamais on décide de reporter le déménagement après septembre 2018, y aura-t-il des coûts supplémentaires à assumer, que ce soit pour le SPP ou l'Administration de la Chambre?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je pense que le coût serait plus associé à l'édifice du Centre. Bien entendu, lorsque vous planifiez commencer des rénovations à une date donnée et que la date change, il peut y avoir une incidence.

Ce qui me préoccupe, et je tiens à le préciser — car je pense que c'est la préoccupation des membres du Bureau de régie interne —, c'est que nous voulons être certains que la Chambre peut exercer ses activités pleinement et normalement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, et il y a une foule de détails qui doivent être tout à fait prêts pour ce faire. Nous sommes optimistes. Nous avons hâte de recevoir le rapport de juin, puis le Bureau devra alors décider s'il est convaincu que c'est le cas. S'il reste encore d'autres éléments à régler, nous devrons examiner quelles sont les options.

Désolé, le reste de votre question portait sur...?

M. John Nater:

Les coûts.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Les coûts, à savoir s'il y a des coûts associés au SPP ou d'autres coûts administratifs pour un retard dans le déménagement.

M. Michel Patrice:

Pas d'un point de vue de la Chambre des communes, comme le Président l'a mentionné. Ce serait davantage des coûts reportés plutôt que des dépenses. Les coûts ne seraient pas engagés au moment du déménagement, mais un peu plus tard.

Le président:

Merci.

J'aimerais maintenant souhaiter la bienvenue au Comité au député de la circonscription qui se classe deuxième parmi les plus belles au pays, Nathan Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

C'est reparti, une autre question de privilège, monsieur le président. Ne vous inquiétez pas, je vais me prononcer là-dessus cet après-midi.

Merci d'être venu, et merci à tous vos fonctionnaires de leur présence.

Monsieur le Président, je vais me concentrer sur le SPP et la situation actuelle. Il n'arrive pas souvent que nous soyons tous d'accord en tant que parlementaires, à quelques exceptions près, mais nous nous entendons notamment sur la qualité et le professionnalisme du service de sécurité qui assure notre protection et celle des membres du public qui visitent la Chambre des communes chaque jour.

J'examine la question de façon sérieuse. Les événements incroyablement tragiques survenus hier à Toronto nous rappellent tous l'importance de la sécurité. Le premier ministre vient de parler de la nécessité d'avoir un bon système de sécurité, le meilleur possible, dans une ville compliquée. Nous avons ici une enceinte compliquée où des membres des médias et du public sont présents.

Vous et moi étions tous les deux ici en octobre 2014. J'étais dans cette salle. Il y a un trou de balle sur cette porte. J'allais quitter la pièce ce matin-là pour faire un appel durant un caucus. L'un de nos spécialistes de la sécurité est entré par l'autre porte et a fermé la porte pour m'empêcher de sortir. C'est là où la balle a atteint la porte — l'une de nos balles. Elle a traversé une porte et s'est logée dans la deuxième, juste à côté de sa tête.

J'ai vu M. Son ce matin. Il travaille à régler des détails à l'avant de la Chambre des communes. Il a reçu une balle dans la jambe cette journée-là.

Nous avons accueilli la même force de sécurité à la Chambre des communes. Je ne sais pas si vous étiez le Président cette journée-là. Je ne pense pas que vous l'étiez; je pense que c'était M. Scheer. Nous avons rendu hommage aux forces de sécurité pour les remercier. J'ai vu un grand nombre de personnes, de personnes formidables, qui ont été applaudies à la Chambre des communes. Je ne crois pas avoir jamais vu des applaudissements aussi longs et chaleureux que lorsque nos agents de sécurité se trouvaient devant nous pour les remercier de leurs services, des risques qu'ils prennent pour le public et nous. J'ai du mal à comprendre comment nous n'en tenons pas compte dans le cadre de nos négociations avec ces professionnels pour négocier un contrat équitable.

Comme députés, nous passons tous chaque jour devant nos agents de sécurité. Ils portent leur casquette, demandant à être respectés. Ce n'est pas trop demander. Or, les agents de sécurité de la Chambre des communes n'ont pas de contrat depuis plus d'un an, au Sénat aussi, et ceux qui travaillent à la détection n'en ont pas depuis plus de trois ans, presque quatre ans.

Le Président du Sénat et vous, comme vous l'avez dit, êtes responsables du SPP. Sauf votre respect, pourquoi sommes-nous dans cette situation? Pourquoi n'avons-nous pas été en mesure de dénouer l'impasse et de négocier de bonne foi avec les gens qui assurent notre sécurité chaque jour?

(1135)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous vous rappellerez sans doute que le SPP, en vertu de la loi, est un organisme autonome. En vertu de la loi, la directrice du SPP est un membre de la GRC. Elle fait rapport sur des aspects de son travail au Président. Elle relève de nous. Elle ne prend pas nos... Nous ne lui donnons pas des directives. C'est une distinction très importante qu'il faut établir. Elle travaille aussi, de toute évidence, avec la GRC pour régler des questions d'ordre opérationnel.

Je vais la laisser répondre aux autres questions.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Absolument. Merci de la question, monsieur Cullen.

Premièrement, j'aimerais dire que je souscris entièrement à votre description, à votre représentation, de la force de sécurité qu'est le Service de protection parlementaire. Je suis impressionnée chaque jour par le professionnalisme et la compétence des gens qui travaillent au sein de ce service, et je pense ici à toutes les catégories d'employés qui font partie de cette organisation.

Cela dit, lorsque le Service de protection parlementaire, le SPP, a été créé en vertu de la loi qui l'a établi, il était prévu que toutes les parties pouvaient présenter une demande à la CRTEFP, la Commission des relations de travail et d'emploi dans la fonction publique, qui est maintenant la CRTESPF, pour qu'elle se prononce sur le nombre d'unités de négociation qui feraient partie du SPP.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le SPP a-t-il l'intention de n'avoir qu'une seule unité de négociation entre la Chambre des communes, le Sénat et les gens qui travaillent à la détection?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est exact. Nous pensons qu'une unité de négociation cadrerait complètement avec l'unification, l'intéropérabilité du SPP. De mon point de vue, lorsque je pense à quoi ressemblera cette organisation dans 10 à 20 ans, je pense qu'il serait très utile d'avoir une unité de négociation solide qui couvre tous les aspects du SPP.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour revenir à l'admiration que nous portons tous à cette force de sécurité qui assure notre protection, elle a déposé une plainte de négociation de mauvaise foi. S'il ne s'agit pas du Président et du Bureau de régie interne, alors il s'agit de vous, pas personnellement, mais des négociations qui viennent de la GRC.

Je comprends que vous voulez unifier le service, mais cette unification suscite de la résistance, et en l'absence d'unification, nous n'avons pas eu une seule heure de négociation de bonne foi avec les gens qui assurent notre sécurité. Je ne comprends pas pourquoi.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Pour commencer, sauf votre respect, je ne souscris pas aux allégations de négociations de mauvaise foi. Nous travaillons extrêmement fort pour essayer de trouver une solution afin d'aller de l'avant avec nos unités de négociation dans leur forme actuelle. Nous respectons les conventions collectives précédentes. Dans tous mes avis juridiques, je dis que jusqu'à ce que la Commission du travail rende sa décision sur le nombre d'unités de négociation que nous aurons, je ne suis pas en mesure d'entamer des négociations collectives avec l'une ou l'autre de ces unités.

(1140)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Examinons le statu quo alors. Nous avons des agents qui travaillent ici 60, 70 et parfois 80 heures par semaine. Les heures supplémentaires sont facultatives jusqu'à ce qu'il manque de personnel pour faire les quarts; lorsqu'il manque de personnel, les heures supplémentaires deviennent alors obligatoires.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est possible.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est ce qui se passe, et c'est l'une des plaintes. Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que selon le statu quo, jusqu'à ce que ces questions soient résolues, nous aurons des gens qui travailleront debout pendant 80 heures pour assurer notre sécurité. Cela ne semble pas être un lieu de travail sain pour ces gens dont le travail nous est nécessaire et que nous respectons grandement.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Vous avez raison. Nous travaillons très fort à essayer de trouver un moyen de régler la question des heures supplémentaires. Nous voyons des gens qui font beaucoup trop d'heures supplémentaires, à mon goût. Je tiens beaucoup à veiller à ce que tous nos employés aient accès à des congés, à des vacances et à un équilibre travail-famille adéquats. Nous avons procédé à un processus d'embauche. Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons embauché 114 nouveaux agents de protection et, si je ne m'abuse, 57 spécialistes de la détection pour essayer d'alléger une partie de ces...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne veux pas vous prêter des propos, mais diriez-vous que les heures supplémentaires et les pressions additionnelles sur les familles demeurent une source de préoccupation?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Absolument. L'une des initiatives que nous mettrons en oeuvre est un programme de mieux-être pour les employés au sein du SPP. Nous embauchons un coordonnateur du mieux-être qui s'emploiera à trouver des solutions pour assurer le bien-être des employés au sein du SPP.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter, monsieur Graham?

M. Robert Graham:

L'autre aspect est que, comme la superintendante en chef MacLatchy l'a mentionné, nous avons comblé tous les postes opérationnels vacants. L'autre partie de l'équation est un examen de tous les postes occupés sur la cité parlementaire pour vérifier s'ils sont nécessaires. Il peut y avoir des secteurs où nous pouvons réduire la nécessité des quarts et des postes, mais la sécurité doit demeurer la priorité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Madame MacLatchy, continuons sur le sujet un instant. Avec les gens que vous venez d'embaucher, vous avez maintenant un effectif complet de personnel à temps plein. Est-ce exact?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Tous nos postes opérationnels sont comblés. Cependant, nous avons un certain taux de postes vacants en raison de maladies de longue durée et divers... Je pense que ce taux est d'environ 8 % à l'heure actuelle, en raison des départs pour congé de maternité et de paternité, notamment.

M. Robert Graham:

Oui, c'est lié aux gens qui font l'objet de mesures d'adaptation. Nous adoptons ces mesures d'adaptation pour des raisons de santé, pour les gens qui sont en congé pour une période prolongée. C'est environ 8 % de l'effectif opérationnel.

M. Scott Simms:

Ces congés sont notamment en lien à des taux de stress élevés, n'est-ce pas? Le stress est l'un des principaux facteurs?

M. Robert Graham:

Oui, il faut une note du médecin. Je n'ai pas les détails de la ventilation, mais c'est sans doute l'un des facteurs.

M. Scott Simms:

Dans ce contexte, avec l'effectif complet que vous avez évoqué plus tôt — à l'exception des 8 % que vous venez de mentionner —, le lieu de travail sera moins stressant. Mais y a-t-il d'autres facteurs? Vous avez mentionné le programme pour le mieux-être des employés.

Le fait que vous reconnaissez que le niveau de stress est élevé parmi les employés du SPP fait-il partie de l'équation?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Je pense que le stress fait partie intégrante de toutes les fonctions de protection où le niveau de stress peut être amplifié, selon la menace à laquelle les employés sont confrontés au quotidien. C'est un emploi qui est très routinier la majorité du temps, mais il faut faire preuve de vigilance en tout temps, et la nature du travail fait augmenter les niveaux de stress. Cela dit, je pense que nous avons fini par reconnaître que dans les fonctions liées à la protection et au renseignement, le stress représente un réel problème, et l'organisation doit se pencher là-dessus et trouver des façons d'aider ses employés.

Nous avons des ressources en place à l'heure actuelle auxquelles nos employés peuvent avoir accès pour contribuer à leur bien-être. Nous avons un service d'aide accessible 24 heures par jour, 7 jours par semaine. Toutes ces ressources font partie du programme pour le mieux-être des employés dont je vous parle, mais nous encourageons les employés à temps plein à prendre des mesures pour leur santé et leur bien-être.

(1145)

M. Scott Simms:

Le besoin s'est certainement fait sentir au cours des trois ou quatre dernières années.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Nous voyons dans de multiples organismes que c'est vraiment une nécessité. La situation n'est aucunement différente ici. Le Service de protection parlementaire se compose de gens très dévoués et professionnels qui se présentent au travail peu importe les conditions, si bien que nous devons nous assurer de prendre soin d'eux.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci de cette observation.

Très rapidement, je ne veux pas m'étendre sur le sujet, mais pourquoi est-il préférable d'avoir une unité de négociation plutôt que deux?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Il y a un certain nombre de raisons qui expliquent cette situation. De mon point de vue, le plus important, et c'est l'un des éléments que nous essayons d'incorporer dans le SPP à l'heure actuelle — et je vous le concède, c'est un défi —, c'est un esprit d'équipe parmi les membres du personnel de l'organisme, que ce soit les agents de protection, les spécialistes de la protection et les membres de la GRC qui nous aident dans les postes à l'extérieur.

La GRC serait...

M. Scott Simms:

Mais n'a-t-elle pas des fonctions différentes?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Oui, absolument, et la GRC est un fournisseur de services distinct. C'est une entité distincte, de toute évidence. Mais en ce qui concerne le SPP, il est extrêmement important d'avoir ce service solide unifié, tant pour l'esprit de corps que pour l'interopérabilité dans l'ensemble du service. Il touche à une foule d'aspects différents en ce qui a trait à la formation, à l'établissement des horaires et aux avantages sociaux. Si nous pouvons regrouper tous les employés dans le même groupe, je pense que nous renforcerions l'organisme pour qu'il soit un service unique, et il ne fait aucun doute que la logistique, pour établir les horaires notamment, serait plus facile à coordonner.

M. Scott Simms:

Ce serait plus facile pour vous.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Eh bien, pour l'organisme, absolument; la logistique en serait simplifiée. Mais l'idée d'avoir une unité de négociation à l'avenir pour assurer un SPP unifié va bien au-delà des avantages pratiques connexes.

C'est cet esprit de corps qui fait défaut, à mon avis. Nous avons besoin d'une force unifiée, solide et fière; tous pour un. Je ne veux pas citer des adages, mais j'estime qu'il serait préférable d'avoir une unité de négociation à l'avenir pour cet organisme.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est donc un exercice de renforcement de l'esprit d'équipe. Je suis désolé. Je ne veux pas parler à votre place.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Oui, c'est pour mettre sur pied une équipe, tout à fait.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est ce que l'esprit de corps signifie pour moi.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est pour pouvoir être fier en tant qu'organisme. Peu importe la catégorie d'employés dont vous faites partie au sein du service, vous faites tous partie de la même équipe — pour utiliser votre expression. Je pense que c'est l'aspect le plus important qui nous permettra d'avoir un service plus professionnel et plus compétent.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

J'ai une brève question à poser pour terminer. Nous allons bientôt déménager dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, d'ici quelques mois. Prions le ciel qu'il n'y aura pas de retards, mais n'aurions-nous pas dû attendre après les prochaines élections?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est une question pour la forme, n'est-ce pas?

M. Scott Simms:

Vous voyez? Geoff... oh, désolé, monsieur le président, vous vous y attendiez.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

En bien, le Bureau de régie interne, comme je l'ai dit, recevra un rapport en juin sur l'état de la situation et prendra une décision à ce moment-là. Il y aura un certain nombre d'options, de toute évidence. L'une d'elles sera d'aller de l'avant avec le projet cet été. La relâche parlementaire en décembre et janvier serait une autre possibilité. Bien entendu, ce sera une décision que le bureau devra prendre.

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] Vous ne le saviez pas à l'époque, et des recherches ont peut-être été menées. Savez-vous s'il existe d'autres corps de police au pays qui ont des unités de négociation distinctes, par exemple, entre leurs agents de première ligne et leurs gendarmes spéciaux?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Je l'ignore. J'ai fait quelques recherches sur le sujet, mais je n'en ai trouvé aucun. Je sais, par contre, que certaines forces policières ont des unités de négociation distinctes pour les membres de la haute direction comparativement aux agents de première ligne.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

À titre de précision, est-ce que je dispose de cinq minutes?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

M. Simms vous a posé la question que j'allais vous poser. Si une décision n'est pas prise en juin et que nous ne sommes pas dans l'édifice de l'Ouest en septembre, est-ce que cela signifie que le déménagement serait repoussé d'une année complète? Selon ce que nous avons appris, le déménagement pourrait être repoussé d'une année complète ou de six mois. Est-ce exact?

(1150)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Le fait de dire, à la fin avril sans utiliser les propos réconfortants habituels, comme: « Officiellement, une décision sera prise en juin, mais nous sommes presque certains que le déménagement aura lieu », qu'une décision serait rendue en juin me laisse croire qu'il y a de fortes chances que le déménagement n'ait pas lieu en septembre. Dans la mesure où vous pouvez émettre des hypothèses, est-ce une supposition raisonnable de ma part?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Comme je l'ai dit dans mon exposé, l'Administration de la Chambre travaille en étroite collaboration avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada. Si vous avez visité l'édifice de l'Ouest, vous savez que des travaux importants ont été réalisés. Les travaux avancent très bien. Bien entendu, le Bureau tient à s'assurer que tous les détails ont été peaufinés et que tout fonctionne correctement. Nous y sommes presque, mais nous aurons les résultats de l'évaluation en juin. Nous pourrons alors prendre notre décision. Non, je ne formulerai pas d'hypothèse.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends.

Nous parlons de cette décision comme si elle revenait au Bureau de régie interne. Le Bureau est un organisme de la Chambre des communes. Il y a deux instances législatives dans cet édifice, l'autre étant le Sénat. Je présume qu'il n'y a aucune chance — et vous me corrigerez si j'ai tort — que la Chambre déménage dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et que le Sénat reste dans l'édifice du Centre. Je crois que j'ai raison de dire cela.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est une très bonne question. En fait, nous avons été très clairs à ce sujet. Si l'une des chambres n'est pas prête à déménager, l'autre ne déménagera pas. C'est ce que j'ai pu comprendre en ce qui concerne le Sénat.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela soulève une question évidente. Nous avons l'édifice de l'Ouest où des travaux de rénovation et de mise aux normes doivent être terminés. Vous m'avez expliqué pourquoi c'est important, mais je crois que nous pouvons tous comprendre que tout doit être en place. C'est logique. Le centre des visiteurs doit être prêt, et je le comprends. Ce n'est peut-être pas évident pour quelqu'un de l'extérieur, mais on ne saurait trop insister sur l'importance que le Parlement soit accessible au public. Il l'a toujours été.

L'autre question concerne la gare ferroviaire où s'installera le Sénat. Je sais que vous ne participez pas directement à ce projet, mais pouvez-vous nous assurer que les travaux seront terminés à temps pour le déménagement de cet été?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'aimerais d'abord dire que je suis d'accord avec vous lorsque vous dites qu'il est important que la Chambre des communes soit accessible au public. Il s'agit d'un élément important de notre histoire et des activités du Parlement dans le cadre d'une démocratie.

J'ignore si l'un des autres témoins peut vous répondre. Nous ne travaillons pas avec le Sénat à ce projet, mais peut-être que le greffier, qui a travaillé avec le Sénat, pourrait vous répondre.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Les travaux vont bon train au Centre de conférences du gouvernement, mais je crois que le Sénat est confronté aux mêmes défis que nous à la Chambre. Ce n'est pas simplement une question de terminer les travaux de rénovation et de remise en état; il faut que le tout soit fonctionnel. Comme c'est le cas pour la Chambre des communes, tous les détails doivent être peaufinés avant qu'une décision définitive soit prise.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question concerne la partie de votre exposé où vous avez dit que d'ici 2019, la Chambre aura pris possession de nouveaux éléments d'actifs d'une valeur de plus 200 millions de dollars. Vous n'avez pas précisé quels sont ces actifs. Pourriez-vous nous fournir plus de détails à ce sujet?

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

Il s'agit essentiellement de tous les meubles et appareils technologiques que nous devons entretenir. Cet exercice est en cours depuis environ 2001 dans le cadre de la VPLT. Cela inclut les actifs de l'édifice de la Bravoure, comme les salles de comités, les édifices du 131 et du 181, rue Queen, et, plus récemment, l'édifice SJAM et le 180, rue Wellington, et ce qui...

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais ces édifices n'ont toujours pas été transférés? N'ont-ils pas été transférés? Nous utilisons certains de ces édifices.

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

Oui, ils ont été transférés et nous en sommes responsables, mais une partie des fonds que nous demandons servira à leur entretien, car, pour certains, cela fait plus de 10 à 15 ans et nous devons planifier leur cycle de vie. Les appareils technologiques des salles de comité de l'édifice de la Bravoure doivent être modernisés.

C'est simplement pour vous donner une idée de l'impact de ce projet de la VPLT sur l'Administration de la Chambre pour l'entretien et le soutien de cette technologie et pour s'assurer qu'elle demeure actuelle et qu'elle fonctionne pour nous.

(1155)

M. Scott Reid:

Est-il principalement question de technologies audiovisuelles dans les salles de comité ou est-ce plus large?

En fait, mon temps d'intervention est presque écoulé, alors je vais vous poser la question suivante. Pourriez-vous simplement nous fournir des informations supplémentaires à ce sujet? C'est beaucoup d'argent et il nous serait utile d'avoir plus d'information sur l'amortissement ou la dépréciation de cet équipement.

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

Certainement.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'aimerais revenir aux points qu'ont soulignés plus tôt MM. Cullen et Simms. Si l'intégration d'unités de négociations est intégrale au renforcement de l'esprit d'équipe afin de disposer d'un service de protection intégré fonctionnel, que doit-on faire pour assurer l'intégration du SPP à la GRC sur la Colline?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Comme vous le savez, monsieur Graham, les membres de la GRC ne sont pas des employés du SPP. La GRC est, à défaut d'un meilleur terme, un fournisseur de services pour le SPP. Elle est...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais elle doit fonctionner comme une unité intégrée afin de pouvoir assurer la sécurité sur la Colline.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Absolument. L'un de nos objectifs dès le début était d'assurer l'interopérabilité de nos radios, ce que nous avons fait. Nous offrons une formation conjointe. Notre équipe d'intervention mobile est intégrée. Elle comprend des membres de la GRC et du SPP.

L'un des autres éléments auquel nous travaillons est la formation intégrée. La question est de savoir comment renforcer notre EIM, comme l'ajout d'un planificateur des exercices et des exercices intégrés.

Nos procédures opérationnelles normalisées incluent le SPP et la GRC et il ne fait aucun doute qu'il y a encore du travail à faire. Nous nous efforçons d'améliorer la relation et la collaboration entre les intervenants, la mise en commun des informations et le travail d'équipe à l'interne comme à l'externe. Vous remarquerez une plus grande intégration entre la GRC et le SPP, surtout lors d'événements majeurs, par exemple.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je voulais dire.

Si la GRC et le SPP peuvent être intégrés sans fusionner les syndicats, car, à ma connaissance, les membres de la GRC ne sont pas syndiqués...

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Pas encore.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... pourquoi est-il nécessaire que les syndicats représentant le SPP soient réunis? J'entends des arguments des deux côtés et c'est la raison pour laquelle je pose la question.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Cette situation soulève certainement différents points de vue.

À mon avis, dans la situation actuelle, il y a une séparation au sein du SPP, pas nécessairement entre la GRC et le SPP, mais entre le SPP...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... et le SPP.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

... et le SPP, et c'est ce qui me perturbe.

Je crois que pour disposer d'un service unifié et intégré, tous les intervenants doivent se sentir tout aussi importants les uns que les autres. La sécurité sur la Colline repose sur trois piliers: la détection, la protection et l'intervention. Tous les trois sont essentiels. Si l'un des intervenants de cette structure se sent moins important que les autres ou se croit traité différemment, c'est un problème.

Je crois que le fait d'avoir une seule unité de négociation pour tous les membres du SPP qui portent l'uniforme permettrait d'accroître ce sentiment d'intégration et d'éviter cette séparation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais une brève question à vous poser. Vous l'ignorez probablement, mais le code CYR537 représente l'espace aérien au-dessus de la Colline du Parlement. Cette zone est sous la responsabilité de la GRC, et non du SPP.

Est-ce que cela va changer?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est une question qui mérite d'être abordée. Depuis plusieurs années, cette responsabilité revient à la GRC, car, à l'origine, c'est elle qui était responsable de l'extérieur des édifices de la Colline. C'est elle qui assure la gestion de la sécurité aérienne du point de vue national.

Sans faire de jeux de mots, ce n'est pas un sujet qui figure sur mon écran radar. Mais, alors que nous examinons les responsabilités de la GRC... et j'ai déjà abordé, au Comité, la possibilité de réduire ces responsabilités et d'accroître celles du SPP. C'est certainement un sujet que nous allons aborder.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais une dernière question très brève à vous poser sur un sujet important sur lequel nous sommes tous très curieux de vous entendre. De quoi auront l'air les déplacements entre l'ancienne station ferroviaire où sera installé le Sénat et la nouvelle Chambre dans l'édifice de l'Ouest? Je m'imagine une vague de taxis lorsque le huissier du bâton noir viendra frapper à la porte.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il pourrait avoir froid.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La situation pourrait être intéressante.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais demander au greffier de nous faire part de ses plans.

M. Charles Robert:

En fait, c'est une très bonne question, une question que nous étudions. La vraie question est de savoir dans quelle mesure il s'agit d'une prérogative du gouvernement. C'est le gouvernement qui décide quand le Parlement se réunit. C'est lui qui contrôle la durée des sessions.

Nous devons donc travailler avec le gouvernement à cet égard. Pour reprendre une expression utilisée plus tôt, il y a encore du travail à faire.

(1200)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si je ne m'abuse, on parle de deux arrêts sur la Ligne de la Confédération. Ils pourront donc emprunter le SLR.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Notre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Cullen, si vous pouvez poser une question en une minute, je vais vous laisser la parole.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Madame MacLatchy, le statu quo, c'est-à-dire les différents services de sécurité représentés par trois syndicats différents, soulève-t-il des préoccupations en matière de sécurité?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Non. À mon avis, actuellement, la sécurité sur la Colline est intacte. La zone est sûre. Je n'ai aucune inquiétude quant à la sûreté et à la sécurité de l'endroit.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je tiens à ce que ce soit très clair pour notre président que ce n'est pas pour des raisons de sécurité que le SPP souhaite fusionner ces trois services, même si les divers services de sécurité ne souhaitent pas fusionner. Je ne veux pas dire qu'il s'agit d'une décision bureaucratique au sens négatif de l'expression. Vous avez parlé plutôt d'esprit de corps. En réalité, il ne s'agit pas d'une question de sécurité. Le système actuel ne pose aucun risque à la sécurité de la Chambre des communes et des gens qui la visitent.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Je tiens à être claire dans ma réponse. Nous travaillons très fort pour assurer la sécurité et la sûreté de cet endroit, y compris jongler plusieurs calendriers et travailler avec diverses conventions collectives, pour nous assurer d'adopter en tout temps la meilleure position possible. Il s'agit de ma principale priorité.

Ceci dit, le fait de n'avoir à composer qu'avec un seul syndicat permettrait d'éliminer plusieurs des difficultés avec lesquelles nous devons composer.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Monsieur le président, je tiens à préciser que, comme tous les autres députés, j'ai beaucoup de respect pour les membres du Service de protection parlementaire et le travail qu'ils font. Nous leur en sommes tous reconnaissants.

Je tiens à réitérer, comme je l'ai fait lors de séances précédentes du Comité, mon entière confiance envers la surintendante principale MacLatchy.

Le président:

Merci à tous les témoins d'avoir accepté notre invitation.

Je tiens à rappeler aux membres du Comité — car nous avons parlé des deux édifices — que le greffier a accepté de discuter des plans pour l'édifice du Centre avec le Comité.

Je vais maintenant aborder les motions de routine. CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de programme.......347 004 325 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de programme.......76 663 760 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour quelques instants afin d'accueillir le prochain groupe de témoins.



(1205)

Le président:

Reprenons. Bienvenue à cette 98e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Nous accueillons Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections par intérim, Michel Roussel, sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovations, et Hughes St-Pierre, sous-directeur général des élections, Services internes, Élections Canada.

Monsieur Perrault, vous pouvez nous présenter votre exposé. Je tiens également à vous remercier pour tout le temps que vous avez passé au Comité. [Français]

M. Stéphane Perrault (directeur général des élections par intérim, Élections Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux de comparaître de nouveau devant le Comité aujourd'hui pour présenter le Budget principal des dépenses d'Élections Canada pour l'année 2018-2019. Cela me donne également l'occasion de parler du calendrier des activités essentielles qui doivent être menées pour préparer la prochaine élection générale, surtout dans un contexte où il pourrait y avoir d'importants changements législatifs.

Aujourd'hui, le Comité se prononce sur le crédit annuel d'Élections Canada, qui totalise 30,8 millions de dollars, soit l'équivalent de 360 postes permanents. Si l'on additionne l'autorisation législative, qui finance l'ensemble des autres dépenses encourues en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada, notre Budget principal des dépenses s'élève à 135,2 millions de dollars.

Il reste tout au plus 16 mois avant le début de la prochaine élection générale. Évidemment, nous ne savons pas exactement quand elle commencera, mais il reste tout au plus 16 mois avant le début de l'élection, et il reste encore moins de temps à Élections Canada pour atteindre ce que l'on appelle un état de préparation pour conduire l'élection, pour lequel notre cible est avril 2019. Nous nous donnons donc une période de jeu entre avril et le début de l'élection, au cas où il y aurait des ajustements de dernière minute à faire.

Un échéancier strict des activités de préparation vise à nous assurer que les changements au processus électoral ont fait l'objet de tests approfondis avant d'être déployés et de servir aux quelque 300 000 travailleurs électoraux pendant l'élection.

J'aimerais donc profiter de l'occasion qui m'est offerte aujourd'hui pour expliquer les principaux aspects de notre calendrier de préparation électorale. Cela est particulièrement important si des changements législatifs doivent être mis en oeuvre tard dans le cycle électoral.

(1210)

[Traduction]

Quelque 40 systèmes de TI sont essentiels aux services que nous offrons aux électeurs, candidats et partis politiques dans le contexte d'une élection. Pour la prochaine élection générale, la majorité de ces systèmes seront nouveaux ou auront fait l'objet de modifications importantes. Ces changements témoignent de l'importance d'améliorer les services aux Canadiens ainsi que du renouvellement de la technologie vieillissante et de l'amélioration de la cybersécurité.

Je suis heureux de dire que ces travaux avancent bien. Cet été, nous procéderons à la migration de 27 de ces systèmes et bases de données connexes vers notre nouveau centre de données actuellement en construction. Ce nouveau centre de données est essentiel pour offrir la souplesse et la sécurité nécessaires à la prestation d'une élection dans l'environnement actuel.

Dès le 1er septembre, tous les systèmes feront l'objet d'une mise à l'essai intégrée qui simulera les activités et transactions qui se produisent dans le cadre d'une élection générale.

Au cours de l'automne et de l'hiver, nous apporterons les ajustements nécessaires à nos systèmes et reprendrons les essais jusqu'à ce que nous soyons convaincus que les systèmes peuvent satisfaire les exigences et soutenir les volumes et pressions d'une élection générale.

Nous prévoyons d'organiser, en mars 2019, une simulation du processus électoral dans plusieurs circonscriptions. Il s'agit du même exercice que nous avons mené avant la dernière élection générale. Le but de cet exercice est d'évaluer le rendement des nouveaux processus d'affaires et nouvelles technologies qui seront utilisés lors de la prochaine élection générale, y compris les interactions entre les bureaux locaux et quartiers généraux.

D'ici avril 2019, nous aurons conçu et produit du matériel électoral en grande partie assemblé que nous pourrons acheminer progressivement aux 338 circonscriptions électorales.

Finalement, au printemps 2019, tous les directeurs de scrutin auront été formés et nous aurons terminé et mis à l'essai des modules de formation à l'intention des préposés au scrutin qui seront embauchés pour la prochaine élection générale. Le programme de formation à l'intention des directeurs de scrutin est offert principalement en ligne et doit faire l'objet de processus d'évaluation et d'assurance de la qualité rigoureux avant d'être acheminé aux administrateurs de bureaux locaux dont le tiers seront nouveaux lors de la prochaine élection.

Voilà notre plan de préparation sous le cadre juridique actuel.

Maintenant, comme vous le savez, à la suite de la dernière élection générale, environ 130 recommandations d'améliorations législatives ont été formulées. Bon nombre ont été soutenues — à l'unanimité, je tiens à le préciser — par le Comité. Dans sa réponse, le gouvernement a souligné qu'il soutenait de façon générale les recommandations de changement et a formulé de nouvelles propositions d'amélioration. Celles-ci s'ajoutent aux propositions que l'on retrouve déjà dans les projets de loi C-33 et C-50 actuellement à l'étude au Parlement, sans parler des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire.

Compte tenu de ce qui précède, il est urgent que les changements législatifs soient apportés sans tarder s'ils doivent être mis en oeuvre pour les prochaines élections générales.

Lors de ma dernière comparution en février, j'ai indiqué que la fenêtre d'opportunité pour mettre en oeuvre des changements majeurs à temps pour les prochaines élections générales rétrécissait rapidement. Ce message n'avait rien de nouveau: M. Mayrand et moi-même avions déjà indiqué que les changements législatifs devaient être adoptés avant avril 2018. Cela signifie que nous sommes maintenant au point où la mise en oeuvre de nouvelles dispositions législatives comportera vraisemblablement certains compromis. Je m'explique.

Si les changements législatifs sont adoptés dans la prochaine année, l'organisme devra réduire au minimum les changements aux applications et aux systèmes existants. L'introduction de changements de dernière minute à des systèmes de TI complexes sans faire de tests approfondis comporte des risques considérables. Comme je l'ai indiqué précédemment, la période de tests intégrés est prévue pour septembre 2018. Par conséquent, il se pourrait que le temps manque pour automatiser les nouveaux processus et qu'il faille avoir recours à des solutions papier ou manuelles moins optimales.

De plus, dans la mesure où les changements législatifs ont une incidence sur les règles visant les entités politiques — et je fais allusion ici en particulier aux règles concernant le financement politique —, nous disposerons de très peu de temps pour franchir les étapes nécessaires afin de modifier tous les manuels et consulter tous les partis et le commissaire aux élections fédérales sur les changements effectués, comme l'exige maintenant la loi. C'est aussi vrai pour les instructions données au personnel en région. Les mises à jour de dernière minute à la formation et aux manuels des travailleurs électoraux réduisent le temps accordé au contrôle de qualité et aux tests effectués avant l'élection.

Évidemment, monsieur le président, nous avons le mandat de mettre en oeuvre les changements que le Parlement décidera d'adopter, et nous trouverons des moyens d'y parvenir lorsqu'un projet de loi sera proposé et adopté. Toutefois, j'ai aussi la responsabilité de vous informer qu'il ne reste vraiment plus beaucoup de temps. Les Canadiens font confiance à Élections Canada pour assurer l'intégrité et la fiabilité des élections, et nous ne voulons pas nous retrouver dans une situation où la qualité du processus électoral serait compromise. Dans l'éventualité où un projet de loi est proposé, nous appuierons le travail du Comité, notamment en l'informant des répercussions opérationnelles et des stratégies de mise en oeuvre.

Monsieur le président, voilà qui termine mon exposé. Comme à l'habitude, mes collègues et moi-même serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1215)

[Français]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Je vous remercie des excellents services qu'a fournis Élections Canada au cours de la dernière année. Nous avons très bien travaillé ensemble.

Passons maintenant à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur Perrault.

Merci beaucoup à toutes les personnes présentes.

La date butoir approche évidemment à grands pas, mais j'aimerais discuter de certains travaux en cours dont vous avez parlé ici. Vous procéderez à la migration de 27 systèmes et banques de données connexes vers un nouveau centre de données. Je crois comprendre que ce centre de données n'a pas encore été construit. Est-ce exact? Est-ce bien ce que vous avez dit?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le centre de données est en construction. Les travaux devraient être terminés le 12 juin pour être précis. Lorsque la construction du centre de données sera terminée, nous testerons les installations. Ensuite, nous procéderons à la migration des systèmes, et nous effectuons actuellement des travaux en ce sens. Le travail est pratiquement terminé. Nous procéderons à la migration en vue de réaliser des tests intégrés en septembre. À compter du 1er septembre, nous soumettrons nos systèmes à une série complète de tests intégrés.

M. Scott Simms:

À partir de ce moment, combien de temps les tests prendront-ils?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tout dépend si le processus se déroule bien. Voilà pourquoi vous devez vous donner une certaine marge de manoeuvre.

Nous ferons les tests. Dans le cas où nous ayons besoin d'apporter des changements, nous nous donnons jusqu'en mars. Jusqu'à présent, le tout se déroule très bien, mais nous nous donnons suffisamment de temps pour apporter les changements nécessaires pour qu'en mars, lorsque nous procéderons à la simulation, tout soit prêt à être déployé et utilisé.

M. Scott Simms:

Sur le plan technique, il semble évident qu'il se passera beaucoup de choses au cours de la prochaine année. Je souhaite discuter de l'un des enjeux.

J'étais député lors de la précédente législature. J'étais porte-parole du parti. Je me rappelle que la grande question à l'époque était l'attitude proactive d'Élections Canada, ce que j'appuie pleinement. Dans la précédente législature, l'ancien gouvernement se bornait à se limiter seulement aux faits: où et quand il faut voter. Le gouvernement actuel a évidemment un point de vue différent sur la question.

J'ai toujours pensé qu'Élections Canada, qui est un organisme indépendant et qui jouit d'une renommée internationale, soit dit en passant... J'ai visité d'autres pays dans le cadre de mes fonctions, et les autres pays nous félicitent de la nature d'Élections Canada et de son indépendance du gouvernement et ils nous disent aussi que votre organisme est très proactif.

Qu'avez-vous fait pour promouvoir votre organisme au Canada, l'idée de voter et l'exercice de nos droits démocratiques? Comment toutes ces mesures relatives à la migration des données et à tout le reste...? J'ai l'impression qu'avec tout ce qui se passe et un projet de loi imminent, votre organisme risque peut-être d'être un peu trop occupé pour s'occuper du reste. Je m'excuse si c'est une question tendancieuse.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il est juste de dire que nous avons été très occupés et que nous continuons de l'être. Nous avons un calendrier très chargé, mais clair quant au travail à réaliser d'ici les prochaines élections. Nous sommes dans les temps.

Évidemment, si des changements devaient survenir, comme vous en avez souligné la possibilité, il faudrait en tenir compte dans notre calendrier. Bref, après septembre, lorsque nous aurons terminé nos tests, nous devrons peut-être apporter d'autres changements au système. C'est la raison pour laquelle je suis ici aujourd'hui et que je vous dis que le temps presse. Nous devrons proposer un projet de loi si nous voulons le mettre en oeuvre.

Vous avez parlé de la promotion de la démocratie. Comme vous le savez, notre mandat est limité à cet égard. Nous avons certainement des programmes pour les jeunes. Nous avons le programme Inspirer la démocratie qui met l'accent sur les jeunes, et nous nous employons à renouveler notre programme d'éducation civique à l'approche des élections. Nous verrons si le projet de loi C-33, si ma mémoire est bonne, prévoit une disposition en vue de redonner à Élections Canada un mandat plus vaste en matière d'éducation civique et d'éducation du public, et nous verrons où cela nous mènera.

(1220)

M. Scott Simms:

Quelle est la situation en ce qui concerne l'éducation civique et les jeunes? Pouvez-vous faire le point sur l'état actuel des choses et ce que vous prévoyez faire durant la période qui précède les prochaines élections fédérales?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Cela dépendra en partie des modifications législatives. Comme toujours, nous aimons bien faire des simulations d'élections avec les jeunes, et c'est encore ce qui est prévu. Nous prenons donc des mesures en ce sens.

Nous collaborons avec des enseignants partout au pays pour élaborer de nouvelles ressources et de nouveaux programmes en matière d'éducation civique pour soutenir les enseignements dans les salles de classe. C'est une priorité, et nous lancerons des projets pilotes dans le cadre des prochaines élections. Les directeurs du scrutin ont commencé à faire des démarches dans les régions ce mois-ci pour trouver des bureaux de scrutin. À ce sujet, dans certaines régions, notre personnel communiquera avec des écoles pour entamer les discussions au sujet de l'éducation civique avant la tenue des élections.

Certains travaux sont en cours.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous soulevez un bon point, parce que les enseignants avec lesquels je discute me disent qu'ils n'ont pas le matériel didactique pour aider à expliquer les droits démocratiques à leurs élèves, le processus de vote, etc. C'est une très bonne idée de produire des ressources.

Le matériel didactique est-il envoyé au directeur du scrutin ou les enseignants doivent-ils communiquer directement avec Élections Canada pour trouver des ressources?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous les fournissons directement aux enseignants. Nous collaborons également avec les provinces. Il y aura de la collaboration dans ce domaine. Les provinces sont aussi en contact direct avec les écoles, et il devrait y avoir une certaine coordination au sujet du matériel didactique. À un certain égard, nous pouvons aussi mettre en commun nos ressources pour améliorer la qualité de notre matériel didactique.

Nous avons eu certains outils au fil des ans. Nous sommes en train de les actualiser, et nous consultons pour ce faire non seulement les écoles, mais aussi les provinces.

M. Scott Simms:

S'agit-il principalement de ressources en ligne?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce sont des ressources en ligne et du matériel didactique pour soutenir les enseignants.

M. Scott Simms:

Je crois que c'est un exercice fascinant pour plusieurs raisons. Je suis inquiet. Vous êtes évidemment ici pour parler du projet de loi imminent et de la situation dans laquelle vous devez vous trouver. Chose certaine, d'ici l'automne, sur le plan technique, la migration des données ira soit vraiment bien ou soit pas bien du tout.

Je ne suis pas expert en la matière, mais les choses peuvent tourner au vinaigre pour de multiples raisons en très peu de temps avec la migration des données. Je comprends évidemment le message que vous nous livrez ici aujourd'hui; c'est certainement crucial pour nous, parce que c'est très près. Je vais y revenir dans un instant.

Je viens de prendre connaissance des renseignements sur les élections partielles et certaines plaintes qui ont été formulées. Je ne sais pas si cela représente un nombre élevé de plaintes ayant trait à l'accessibilité des lieux de vote, aux services offerts aux bureaux de vote, etc. Il semble que les aspects qui ont fait l'objet du plus grand nombre de plaintes sont les services aux bureaux de vote et l'accessibilité.

Pouvez-vous faire le point sur la situation? Cela représente-t-il un nombre élevé de plaintes, compte tenu de toutes les élections partielles en 2017?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne crois pas que nous pouvons dire qu'un nombre de plaintes est inhabituel dans ces rapports. L'accessibilité est un thème assez vaste; cela inclut l'accessibilité pour les personnes handicapées ainsi que les Canadiens ordinaires qui trouvent que les bureaux de scrutin sont peut-être trop loin. C'est l'un des principaux domaines de travail en prévision des prochaines élections: réduire la distance que les Canadiens doivent parcourir pour aller voter, surtout dans les régions rurales.

M. Scott Simms:

Oh, merci. Oui. Réduisez la distance à parcourir dans les régions rurales. C'est...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous prenons des mesures pour améliorer le processus aux bureaux de scrutin grâce à l'adoption de certaines technologies lors du vote par anticipation pour accélérer le tout et réduire les temps d'attente dans les régions urbaines et semi-urbaines. Toutefois, dans les régions urbaines, nous constatons que les électeurs doivent parcourir d'énormes distances pour aller voter, et nous nous appliquons à corriger la situation pour les prochaines élections.

(1225)

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis content de l'entendre.

Je vais m'arrêter là, monsieur le président, parce que c'est ce que vous me dites de faire.

Le président:

C'est exact.

Passons maintenant à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je constate que dans votre exposé vous indiquez qu'en ce qui concerne l'adoption de changements à la Loi électorale du Canada le temps pour mettre en oeuvre tout changement d'ici les prochaines élections file rapidement. Vous avez aussi dit que votre prédécesseur, M. Mayrand, a affirmé qu'il faudrait que le tout soit adopté au plus tard en avril 2018. Je souligne que nous sommes le 24 avril 2018.

Cependant, dans un article de journal — je crois que c'était le 8 mars —, le cabinet de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques a indiqué que de nouvelles règles seront proposées pour renforcer et préciser les règles encadrant les dépenses par des tiers étrangers concernant le financement d'activités politiques au Canada: Nous sommes préoccupés par le manque de transparence concernant bon nombre de tiers de tous les côtés du spectre politique. Le Canada a de solides règles sur le financement en ce qui a trait au financement politique par des entités étrangères, mais nous les renforcerons et les préciserons pour veiller à une transparence accrue dans notre système de financement politique et à une meilleure protection contre l'ingérence étrangère dans notre processus démocratique.

Je ne suis pas tout à fait d'accord avec cette affirmation selon laquelle nous avons actuellement de solides règles en la matière, mais je suis tout à fait d'accord pour dire qu'il faut les renforcer et que nous devons nous assurer que des entités étrangères n'influent pas sur nos élections, comme je crois qu'elles le peuvent en vertu des règles actuelles.

Comme il a été annoncé que le gouvernement proposera quelque chose à ce sujet, pouvez-vous nous dire si la ministre ou son cabinet a communiqué avec Élections Canada ou vous-même pour vous consulter au sujet d'un projet de loi que le gouvernement songe à proposer?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je peux certainement dire que des fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé et des fonctionnaires d'Élections Canada ont eu des échanges au cours des derniers mois et que nous avons fourni certains conseils techniques au sujet de la loi, non pas des conseils stratégiques comme ceux que nous avons communiqués à ce comité, mais des conseils techniques concernant les options qu'ils sont en train d'examiner concernant ces mesures législatives.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Alors, vous avez eu l'occasion de leur faire des suggestions au sujet de ce qui devrait être inclus dans cela ou sur la façon d'administrer ou de mettre en oeuvre ces modifications. Est-ce exact?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous avons fait des recommandations par l'intermédiaire de ce comité sur les rôles et les deux aspects que nous aimerions voir améliorer en ce qui a trait au régime des tiers. L'un de ces aspects est l'étendue des activités réglementées. Présentement, la réglementation se limite aux activités de publicité électorale, mais nous sommes d'avis qu'elle devrait porter sur une gamme plus vaste d'activités de campagne.

L'autre aspect est la question du financement — à laquelle vous avez fait allusion — et, notamment, le fait que les tiers puissent utiliser leurs revenus globaux, un vecteur par lequel il est possible de laisser entrer beaucoup de financement étranger.

Ces deux questions fondamentales ont retenu notre attention et nos suggestions au Comité portent là-dessus, mais en ce qui concerne le travail que nous avons fait avec le Bureau du Conseil privé, comme je l'ai dit, nos conseils portent davantage sur des aspects techniques, sur la façon de rédiger les modifications législatives de manière à atteindre les objectifs stratégiques en matière de gouvernance.

M. Blake Richards:

De toute évidence, compte tenu des discussions qui ont eu lieu et de l'article que je viens de citer, il y a lieu de croire que des modifications pourraient être apportées avant la prochaine élection.

Pouvez-vous affirmer avec une certaine assurance qu'il reste suffisamment de temps pour que ces dispositions puissent être mises en place et appliquées à temps? Je sais que vous avez souligné le fait qu'il s'agissait de modifications majeures. Croyez-vous que le temps dont nous disposons pour mettre en oeuvre certaines de ces dispositions est suffisant? Vous avez parlé de ces deux aspects. De combien de temps parle-t-on? Quelle serait la date limite?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne peux pas dire jusqu'à quand nous avons sans avoir vu l'ensemble des modifications qui devront être apportées, et lorsque je les verrai, comme je l'ai dit, nous allons travailler avec ce comité afin de cerner les options qui s'offrent à nous quant à la mise en oeuvre. Bien entendu, nous aurions préféré que ces dispositions législatives soient proposées et adoptées beaucoup plus tôt, ce qui nous aurait permis de les mettre en oeuvre de la meilleure façon qui soit, mais il est maintenant trop tard pour cela. Je ne dis pas qu'il ne nous reste plus de temps, mais nous allons devoir déterminer comment, selon les cas, nous allons procéder à la mise en oeuvre de ces différentes dispositions.

Cela pourrait vouloir dire que certains rapports — sur le financement politique, par exemple — prendront la forme de simples PDF en ligne plutôt que de passer par un système complexe. Cela assurera une certaine transparence, mais sans toutefois fournir l'aisance de nos systèmes en ce qui a trait à la conduite des audits. Ce n'est qu'un exemple. Il reste encore du temps, mais il se fait court, et nous sommes rendus à un point où nous commençons à mettre de la pression pour que les modifications envisagées soient présentées sous peu afin que nous puissions tenir l'élection de manière ordonnée.

(1230)

M. Blake Richards:

Votre attitude est très appréciée.

J'ai aussi remarqué que le Conseil du Trésor a réservé une somme de 990 000 $ aux termes du crédit 40 pour le nouveau financement du Service des poursuites pénales du Canada en ce qui a trait à l'intégrité électorale. Cela faisait-il partie de l'une des recommandations de votre bureau? Avez-vous eu quelque chose à voir avec cette recommandation?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non. Tout ce qui concerne les enquêtes au sujet des infractions électorales relève du commissaire aux élections fédérales. Il fait maintenant partie de la direction des poursuites pénales. C'est de l'argent qu'ils ont demandé.

M. Blake Richards:

Je présume que vous n'êtes pas en mesure de nous dire comment ils sont arrivés à ce chiffre de 990 000 $.

Dans ce cas, monsieur le président, je vais donner un avis de motion. Voici: Que le Comité entreprenne une étude de la teneur du crédit 40 du Conseil du Trésor dans le Budget principal des dépenses, 2018-2019, en ce qui concerne le financement proposé pour les débats des chefs et l’intégrité électorale, et qu’il invite des représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé et du Bureau de la directrice des poursuites pénales à témoigner sur ces questions, respectivement.

Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. Blake Richards:

Dans ce cas, je pense que je vais attendre à une série de questions ultérieure, car je ne crois pas être en mesure d'aller bien loin...

Le président:

Alors, nous allons passer à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, messieurs, d'être là aujourd'hui.

Vous avez dit être en liaison avec le Bureau du Conseil privé. Communiquez-vous aussi avec la ministre des Institutions démocratiques?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est une discussion de nature technique entre mes collaborateurs et les fonctionnaires du Conseil privé qui soutiennent la ministre Gould.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils sont au Conseil privé; ils ne font pas partie du bureau de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact. Ce sont des fonctionnaires qui travaillent au Bureau du Conseil privé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voilà qui est curieux.

Vous avez parlé de la date limite, et vous nous avez informés de cette date. Vous l'avez signalée au gouvernement. Le travail nécessaire devait être fait pour veiller à ce que ces modifications soient mises en place. Certaines de ces modifications sont très substantielles. Parmi les modifications consignées dans le projet de loi C-33, il y a celle sur le vote des expatriés, le vote des Canadiens vivant à l'étranger. Il y a celle sur votre capacité, ou qui établit qui doit enquêter sur les possibilités de fraude électorale. Il est aussi question de votre mandat en ce qui concerne la sensibilisation du public — ce qui est important — et des exigences relatives aux répondants et à leur identification. Tous ces aspects se retrouvent dans un projet de loi qui, selon vous, devrait déjà être adopté. Est-ce exact?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous avons dit que toutes ces modifications étaient des modifications majeures pour...

M. Nathan Cullen:

On dirait qu'il s'agit de modifications majeures.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Cela comprend les recommandations qu'appuie ce comité et qui ne font pas partie du projet de loi C-33.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il s'agit donc à la fois des modifications promises aux termes du projet de loi C-33, lesquelles veillaient à défaire certaines des modifications mises de l'avant dans le projet de loi C-23, la soi-disant Loi sur l'intégrité des élections — certains ont préféré parler « d'anti-intégrité » — et de toutes les modifications que ce comité a proposées après avoir examiné la dernière élection avec Élections Canada dans le but de trouver une façon de garantir le caractère sécuritaire de la prochaine élection. La recommandation que vous avez faite au gouvernement du Canada, au Parlement, était de faire adopter ces modifications par le Parlement et le Sénat avant la fin du présent mois.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous sommes à sept jours de cette échéance, et nous savons que cela ne se produira pas.

Je suis préoccupé par le fait de vous entendre parler de compromis. Essentiellement, êtes-vous en train de dire que certaines des modifications promises par le gouvernement lors de la dernière campagne et certaines des recommandations mises de l'avant par ce comité devront être laissées de côté ou diluées pour que vous soyez en mesure de les mettre en oeuvre de façon appropriée et de préserver l'intégrité de l'élection?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ferais une distinction entre les modifications qui doivent être apportées à la loi qui donne son pouvoir discrétionnaire au directeur général des élections, pouvoir dont nous pourrons nous servir en tout temps pour améliorer les services aux Canadiens, aux électeurs, aux partis et aux candidats. Ce pouvoir discrétionnaire pourrait être utilisé — mais pas nécessairement — dans le cadre des prochaines élections, selon où nous en serons par rapport aux échéances. C'est une première catégorie.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Prenons les modifications sur le vote des expatriés. Les modifications qui seront apportées aux règles relatives au vote des expatriés, aux règles concernant les exigences relatives aux répondants et à l'obligation de s'identifier ainsi qu'aux règles sur la façon d'enquêter ne sont pas des modifications sans conséquence. Ce sont des modifications considérables. Vous avez dit que pour savoir quelle orientation vous alliez prendre en ce qui concerne les prochaines élections, il fallait que ces modifications aient été faites aux termes de la loi d'ici la fin de présent mois.

(1235)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Cela est particulièrement pertinent en ce qui concerne les choses qui auront une incidence sur les systèmes de TI.

M. Nathan Cullen:

De quel système parlez-vous?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Des systèmes de TI complexes. Lorsque vous apportez des modifications à ces systèmes, vous devez être en mesure de les tester de manière exhaustive avant les élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Parmi les modifications proposées, pouvez-vous m'en citer une qui risque d'avoir une incidence sur le système de TI? Comme l'a souligné M. Simms, tout cafouillage avec un système de TI peut...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y en a un certain nombre, dont certaines qui sont dans le projet de loi C-33. En ce qui concerne nos recommandations au Parlement, par exemple, nous avons proposé qu'il y ait différentes catégories de dépenses pour rendre les choses un peu plus équitables. Or, lorsque vous commencez à jouer avec des catégories de dépenses, il faut configurer les systèmes pour analyser les déclarations subséquentes en conséquence.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. Alors, cela s'applique même aux modifications concernant les dépenses inappropriées ou appropriées des gens, la façon de gérer cela, la façon dont vos ordinateurs fonctionnent, la façon dont les rapports connexes sont produits.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a différentes façons d'assurer la mise en oeuvre de ces modifications. Dans un monde idéal, nous mettrions à profit les fonctionnalités des systèmes de TI et nous testerions les modifications de manière exhaustive.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a quelque chose qui m'échappe. Les modifications nécessaires pour régler les problèmes créés par la loi électorale du gouvernement Harper ont été mises de l'avant dans le projet de loi C-33, projet de loi qui avait reçu l'assentiment du gouvernement, de nous et de nombreux Canadiens, mais dont on n'a pas vraiment réentendu parler depuis sa présentation, le 24 novembre 2016. Nous ne l'avons pas examiné en comité et il n'a pas été débattu à la Chambre. Et pourtant, le gouvernement était devant les tribunaux il y a trois semaines pour se défendre d'une contestation fondée sur la Charte au sujet de la loi électorale inique laissée par le gouvernement précédent.

Êtes-vous au courant de cette affaire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, je suis au courant.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Élections Canada participe-t-il à cela de quelque façon que ce soit?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, nous n'y participons pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quoi qu'il en soit, le gouvernement y participe, et il vient de laisser tomber 2 000 pages de documents devant les demandeurs dans le but de défendre la loi introduite par Harper avec le projet de loi C-23. Pour les Canadiens, qui ont demandé des élections vraiment intègres, c'est on ne peut plus déroutant. Le gouvernement qui avait promis de rectifier la situation est devant les tribunaux pour défendre le maintien de ce qui a été mis de l'avant par l'ancien premier ministre.

J'ai une question concernant les diplomates russes. Il y a deux semaines, la ministre des Affaires étrangères a affirmé que les autorités avaient expulsé six diplomates russes qui: [...] sont des agents du renseignement ou des personnes qui ont utilisé leur statut diplomatique pour compromettre la sécurité du Canada ou s’immiscer dans sa démocratie.

Êtes-vous au courant de quelque interférence de la part des Russes lors de l'élection de 2015?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, je ne le suis pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous n'êtes pas au courant?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne le suis pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce qu'une citation comme celle de notre ministre des Affaires étrangères inquiète Élections Canada de quelque façon?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est assurément un sujet qui nous interpelle. Nous travaillons avec nos partenaires de la sécurité. Il n'y a pas longtemps, j'ai pu rencontrer le directeur du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, ainsi que des représentants du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications et certains responsables de la sécurité du Bureau du Conseil privé, alors oui, nous travaillons avec nos partenaires de la sécurité. Ces questions ne relèvent pas seulement d'Élections Canada...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, vous avez raison de le dire.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

... et nous avons besoin de leur aide en préparation des prochaines élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous travaillez avec notre agence d'espionnage et avec nos autres organismes du renseignement afin de déterminer s'il y a eu des interférences lors des élections de 2015. Est-ce bien cela?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, nous travaillons avec eux afin de nous préparer pour les prochaines élections.

Nous avons reçu un bon coup de main du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications pour nous aider à nous assurer que nos nouveaux systèmes sont sécuritaires.

Les investissements dont j'ai parlé sont en bonne partie associés au besoin d'améliorer la cybersécurité dans ce nouveau contexte.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela a trait au piratage de votre système. Il y a aussi la menace des fausses nouvelles, comme on l'a vu lors de la dernière élection présidentielle aux États-Unis.

Cela inquiète-t-il Élections Canada que la répétition et l'amplification de faussetés éhontées — surtout de la part d'agresseurs étrangers, comme notre ministre des Affaires étrangères a semblé vouloir insinuer — soit la raison pour laquelle le Canada a procédé à l'expulsion des diplomates russes?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

La question des fausses nouvelles est un sujet très vaste qui va bien au-delà du processus électoral. Il est certainement très important pour nous de veiller à ce que les Canadiens aient les bonnes informations sur le processus de vote, sur le lieu, le moment et la façon de s'inscrire et de voter. C'est notre fonction fondamentale. Nous allons nous focaliser là-dessus lors des prochaines élections.

Par exemple, nous allons avoir un répertoire de toutes nos communications publiques, ce qui permettra aux personnes de vérifier l'authenticité des messages qu'ils recevront prétendument au nom d'Élections Canada, mais dont ils auront des doutes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela s'est déjà produit, n'est-ce pas? Il y a eu de faux appels automatisés qui cherchaient à envoyer les gens voter au mauvais bureau de vote.

(1240)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, c'est arrivé. Parfois, c'était une erreur, mais pas toujours.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'avais des questions qui allaient dans le même sens.

Vous pourriez peut-être préciser votre pensée. En page 6 du Plan ministériel d'Élections Canada, on apprend que vous vous efforcez de: [...] demeurer en bonne position pour anticiper et détecter les problèmes de sécurité pouvant surgir concernant l'administration des élections et y réagir en renforçant la posture de l'organisme en matière de cybersécurité et en maintenant la collaboration avec les organismes responsables de la sécurité au Canada, comme le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications.

La ministre Gould se préoccupe elle aussi beaucoup de cette question, et c'est pourquoi elle a fait paraître l'an dernier un rapport sur la cybersécurité.

Pouvez-vous nous donner des précisions sur ce que vous avez voulu dire lorsque vous avez parlé de détecter les problèmes de sécurité et d'y réagir? Aussi, pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment vous collaborez avec ces organismes pour assurer que la prochaine élection ne sera altérée d'aucune façon?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

Il y a de nombreux aspects à cela. L'un d'eux est d'avoir une bonne compréhension des menaces qui ont cours. Nous travaillons avec nos partenaires de la sécurité afin de rester au fait de ces menaces. Bien sûr, comme je l'ai mentionné, un autre aspect important est la cybersécurité. Nous avons fait beaucoup d'investissements pour restructurer nos systèmes. J'ai parlé du nouveau centre de données. En prévision des prochaines élections et, en partie, pour améliorer notre sécurité, nous sommes en train de transférer nos systèmes à un nouveau centre de données beaucoup mieux protégé que le centre actuel.

Toutes nos améliorations en matière de TI ont été réalisées en collaboration avec le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications et avec son aide. Par exemple, c'est lui qui testera l'intégrité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement des produits que nous achetons, qui examinera nos systèmes ou qui nous donnera des conseils sur la façon de nous protéger.

Comme je crois l'avoir mentionné lors de ma comparution en février dernier, je suis en train de commander un audit par un tiers. Nous voulons simplement qu'un tiers examine les améliorations que nous avons apportées et s'assure qu'il ne nous manque rien. Cela aura lieu au printemps afin que nous ayons le temps pour faire des ajustements en préparation de la suite des choses.

C'est le principal aspect. Comme je l'ai dit, nous sommes également en train de planifier une campagne pour veiller à ce que les Canadiens aient la bonne information au sujet du processus électoral et pour repérer rapidement les tentatives de désinformation. Par exemple, nous allons faire une veille médiatique afin de nous assurer que l'information qui circule est correcte, à défaut de quoi, nous serons prêts à réagir promptement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Surveillerez-vous aussi les médias dans d'autres langues?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais devoir vous revenir sur le nombre de langues. Nous faisons de la surveillance, mais je vais devoir vous revenir à ce sujet.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ce serait sans doute une bonne idée également, car des menaces pourraient nous échapper ou des communautés pourraient véhiculer de fausses informations qui ne sont pas sur notre radar.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tout à fait. Je crois savoir que nos partenaires à la sécurité s'en occupent, mais pour ce qui est de l'information sur le processus électoral dans les autres langues que l'anglais et le français, je vais devoir m'informer.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez parlé d'une vérification par une tierce partie. Avez-vous pensé à consulter vos homologues dans d'autres pays pour échanger sur vos pratiques exemplaires respectives, à vous rencontrer une fois par année, par exemple, ou à communiquer autrement pour savoir s'ils ont eu ce genre de menaces ou ont d'autres préoccupations, et déterminer comment vous pourriez tirer parti des pratiques exemplaires?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, nous avons des rencontres internationales. Nous avons eu des réunions en Europe. Tous les pays sont aux prises avec ce problème. Nous avons des contacts et procédons à des échanges. J'ai déjà rencontré des collègues et homologues au Royaume-Uni, en Australie et en Nouvelle-Zélande. C'est un sujet qui est toujours à l'ordre du jour.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous en tenez-vous au système parlementaire uniquement, ou discutez-vous avec les États-Unis et d'autres pays également?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous sommes en contact avec les États-Unis, mais notre environnement est très différent du leur. Ils ont une structure unique très décentralisée, et si je ne me trompe pas, 60 % des districts ou administrations qui servent les électeurs en comptent moins de 5 000. C'est donc une constellation de micro-administrations qui ont des moyens parfois très différents pour lutter contre les menaces. De plus, ils doivent s'en remettre beaucoup plus à la technologie que nous pour les scrutins en raison de la nature de leur système. Ils tiennent notamment beaucoup de référendums. Les électeurs ne votent pas normalement sur papier comme nous le faisons. Ils ont des défis uniques de ce point de vue.

(1245)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quelles différences y a-t-il, si c'est le cas, dans votre façon de vous préparer pour l'élection de 2019 par rapport à celle de 2015? Les priorités ont-elles changé depuis la dernière élection?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est une bonne question. Il y a divers changements. L'un d'eux dont nous avons beaucoup parlé est la cybermenace. Avant la dernière élection, c'était une préoccupation, mais qui était loin d'être ce qu'elle est aujourd'hui. Nous avons travaillé très fort pour améliorer la cybersécurité. Nous avons fait de grands progrès. C'est un changement important.

Nous nous sommes employés également à moderniser les services de vote. Lors de la dernière élection, le vote par anticipation a connu une augmentation fulgurante de 70 %. Les électeurs ont voté par anticipation plutôt que le jour même du scrutin. Vous vous souviendrez sans doute que cela a eu des répercussions sur les services et les files d'attente. Nous travaillons fort pour améliorer la situation. Nous modifions nos façons de faire, certaines modifications ne nécessitant pas de changements législatifs. Nous avons parlé des registres de scrutin électronique qui permettent d'accélérer et de simplifier les procédures au bureau de scrutin. Nous avons aussi simplifié les procédures, même celles sur papier. Dans les bureaux de scrutin où il n'y a pas de technologie, les procédures sur papier seront simplifiées. Nous avons aussi fait diverses recommandations, qui se concrétiseront, nous l'espérons, notamment celle d'accroître la durée du vote par anticipation.

Il faut toujours adapter les services électoraux à la réalité changeante des Canadiens. Si on planifie uniquement en fonction de la dernière élection, on aura des problèmes. Nous voulons apporter diverses améliorations cette fois-ci.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vais commencer par ceci: au crédit 40 du Conseil du Trésor, on indique une diminution de 570 000 $ pour Élections Canada, intitulée « Rééquilibrer les dépenses d'Élections Canada ». Je me demande si vous avez été consulté au sujet de ce rééquilibrage ou cette réduction de votre financement et quelles en seront les répercussions sur les moyens à votre disposition aux prochaines élections. De toute évidence, vous devrez vous adapter à cette réduction dans votre financement.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est une bonne question. Les chiffres peuvent être trompeurs. C'est une modification qui a été faite à ma demande. Nous voulons transférer certaines dépenses financées actuellement par l'autorisation législative — qui nous servent à acheter des services auprès des contractants, par exemple, pour les TI, les employés occasionnels ou les employés pour une durée déterminée — et réduire ce montant pour augmenter notre budget de crédits votés, les crédits annuels, sur lequel porte le vote d'aujourd'hui. Cet argent est réservé exclusivement aux postes à durée indéterminée. Ce faisant, nous accomplissons deux choses. Nous stabilisons notre effectif. C'est important dans le secteur des TI en particulier où nous voulons avoir la souplesse nécessaire pour embaucher des consultants, mais où il nous faut aussi un noyau de base. De même, dans d'autres domaines, nous voulons réduire, dans une certaine mesure, le nombre d'employés à durée déterminée pour rendre ces postes permanents.

Nous constatons, par ailleurs, qu'il coûte moins cher, beaucoup moins cher, d'embaucher des fonctionnaires à temps plein que des consultants. Sur une période de cinq ans, vous constaterez une augmentation de quelque 51 millions de dollars de nos crédits annuels, et une diminution de 61 millions de dollars de nos dépenses législatives. Nous économisons donc 10 millions de dollars tout en stabilisant notre effectif. J'en ai fait la demande et j'étais très heureux de voir que cela faisait partie du budget.

M. Blake Richards:

Excellent. Merci de la clarification

Vous avez parlé dans votre déclaration liminaire de la migration de certains de vos systèmes et bases de données — qui sont sans doute rattachés ensemble — vers le nouveau centre de données que vous êtes en train de construire.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez dit que c'était nécessaire pour offrir la flexibilité et la sécurité requises pour conduire l'élection et vous avez ajouté « dans l'environnement actuel ». J'aimerais que vous nous précisiez ce que cela veut dire. Quel est l'environnement actuel? Quelle est la différence? Qu'est-ce qui a changé dans l'environnement actuel?

(1250)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a deux éléments, mais un en particulier. Premièrement, nous avons actuellement un centre de données. Le contrat pour ce centre de données est arrivé à expiration, alors il fallait le renouveler. Comme nous allions avoir un nouveau centre de données, nous voulions avoir plus de flexibilité pour accroître le service, afin que, lorsque la demande atteint un sommet le jour du scrutin, nous soyons en mesure d'y répondre et d'éviter que le système gèle à un moment clé de l'élection. C'est un élément.

L'aspect le plus important des changements dans l'environnement concerne la cybersécurité. Notre nouveau centre de données est beaucoup plus sécuritaire que celui que nous avons à l'heure actuelle, et les composantes liées à la sécurité tiendront compte de l'information reçue du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. C'est pourquoi il est crucial...

M. Blake Richards:

Désolé de vous interrompre, mais lorsque vous parlez de sécurité, parlez-vous des préoccupations au sujet des rapports dont nous avons entendu parler ou des menaces qui pourraient venir de l'étranger...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

... l'accès à nos systèmes, exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez mentionné qu'à partir de septembre, vous allez procéder à des tests intégrés de vos systèmes, une série complète de tests, qui reproduisent les activités et les opérations effectuées pendant une élection générale.

Pouvez-vous me donner une idée de ce dont il est question ici? De quelles activités parle-t-on? Quelles sont les opérations que vous allez tester à partir du 1er  septembre?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pendant une élection, nous utilisons un système qui s'appelle RÉVISE pour inscrire les ajouts à la liste électorale des électeurs qui s'inscrivent dans les bureaux de vote par anticipation. C'est un exemple. L'information est chargée localement au bureau du directeur du scrutin et doit fonctionner avec la base de données centrale. C'est la même chose pour les résultats le soir de l'élection.

M. Blake Richards:

Lorsque vous parlez de faire une simulation du processus dans plusieurs circonscriptions, en incluant les interactions entre les bureaux locaux et l'administration centrale, ce à quoi vous venez tout juste de faire référence, comment procédez-vous? Pour effectuer ces tests, devez-vous louer des espaces qui ressemblent à un bureau du directeur du scrutin dans plusieurs circonscriptions électorales pour une période de temps différente de ce qui est requis pour une élection?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Exactement. Nous louons des espaces, comme nous le ferions pendant une élection, en nombre limité, bien sûr. Nous y installons du personnel et nous passons en revue toutes les procédures standards d'une élection, et nous testons les systèmes pour nous assurer qu'ils fonctionnent adéquatement.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. Merci. Je suis ravi des renseignements.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci d'être avec nous aujourd'hui et de votre témoignage.

Pour reprendre le fil de la dernière question de M. Richards, comment choisissez-vous les endroits où vous allez procéder aux tests?

M. Michel Roussel (sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovation, Élections Canada):

Cela dépend de divers facteurs, mais nous essayons de trouver des endroits, des circonscriptions électorales, qui sont représentatifs du pays, donc de l'ouest, de l'est et des régions urbaines et rurales. C'est ainsi que nous procédons pour les sélectionner.

Nous choisissons habituellement quatre ou cinq circonscriptions. La représentativité est donc importante.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vois. Très bien.

Je m'intéresse aux outils que vous préparez pour les enseignants. J'ai notamment travaillé pendant 20 ans dans une école secondaire, et je me suis rendu compte que le plus gros écueil est que nous ne sommes pas au courant des nombreuses ressources qui sont à notre disposition.

Que faites-vous pour informer les enseignants des ressources qui sont à leur disposition, le volet sensibilisation?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous avons mis sur pied un groupe consultatif d'enseignants en provenance de partout au Canada. Ils travaillent en fait avec nous à la conception des nouveaux outils. Nous voulons nous assurer que les outils répondent à leurs besoins. Nous voulons les rafraîchir. Certains sont de bons outils, mais ils sont dépassés. Nous devons les mettre à jour et utiliser plus de matériel en ligne, etc. Nous collaborons donc avec des enseignants partout au pays pour obtenir des conseils à cet égard.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est vraiment fantastique. C'est la meilleure façon de procéder, à mon avis. Vous allez concevoir les meilleurs outils qui soient en collaborant avec les enseignants qui sont dans les salles de classe. C'est une brillante initiative.

L'étape suivante est la sensibilisation. Est-ce que ce même groupe va vous conseiller sur la façon d'informer les écoles que ces outils sont à leur disposition, ou est-ce que ce sera fait séparément?

(1255)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, tout est intégré. Le groupe consultatif se penche sur les outils et la façon de les diffuser.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est parfait.

Je pense vous avoir posé la question à votre dernière comparution. Une des mesures les plus efficaces dans le processus démocratique et une des mesures les plus efficaces que j'aie vues pour mobiliser les étudiants a été d'avoir des bureaux de vote par anticipation à l'université qui se trouve dans ma circonscription. Avez-vous pris une décision au sujet du fait d'installer des bureaux de vote par anticipation dans les universités et les collèges partout au pays?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tout à fait. C'était une première lors de la dernière élection. Il y avait des bureaux de vote et des bulletins spéciaux pour répondre aux besoins des étudiants dans quelque 38 campus au pays. Ils pouvaient voter sur le campus, peu importe leur lieu de résidence. Les gens qui travaillaient sur le campus pouvaient aussi voter sur place. Cela a eu beaucoup de succès. Nous avons décidé d'élargir la formule. Nous avons apporté quelques améliorations, notamment en faisant passer le nombre de campus de 38 à 110.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est fantastique.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Parmi les critères, il y a la taille du campus, mais aussi la diversité régionale. Nous voulons nous assurer qu'il y en a dans différentes régions du pays et d'en avoir dans les campus où se trouve une concentration d'électeurs autochtones, par exemple. Nous avons divers critères. C'est un élément.

Nous avons aussi prolongé la période. Nous sommes passés de quatre à cinq jours. Nous avons pu constater lors de la dernière élection que le nombre d'étudiants qui allaient voter continuait d'augmenter et n'avait pas plafonné; il y a donc encore du potentiel de ce côté. Nous espérons qu'en élargissant la formule, nous serons à même de mieux servir les jeunes électeurs.

Enfin, nous avons amélioré aussi la procédure. Elle devrait être beaucoup plus rapide. La procédure prenait un certain temps et les gens ont été très patients. J'ai été impressionné par leur patience, je dois dire, mais la procédure est compliquée parce qu'il s'agit d'un bulletin spécial. C'est plus complexe. Nous allons la simplifier pour que cela ne retarde pas indûment le vote.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vous félicite sincèrement de cette initiative qui est, à mon avis, importante et cruciale. J'ai voté avec mon fils sur le campus, et cela n'a pas pris de temps. Cela s'est très bien déroulé.

M. Stéphane Perrault: C'est une bonne nouvelle.

Mme Filomena Tassi: Je pense que votre présence sur les campus fait beaucoup pour inciter les jeunes à voter.

Vous avez abordé la question des électeurs autochtones dans votre dernière réponse, et c'est aussi une bonne nouvelle. À la page 5 du plan ministériel d'Élections Canada, on parle d'accroître l'accessibilité de l'inscription et du vote pour les électeurs autochtones en collaboration avec les organismes communautaires. J'aimerais savoir si vous pouvez nous dire où vous en êtes dans ce dossier.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a deux volets. Un s'applique de façon générale à l'ensemble du pays. Nous avons commencé ce mois-ci, soit bien avant l'élection, à travailler avec les directeurs du scrutin pour leur demander de recenser les bureaux de vote potentiels. Nous le faisions habituellement au tout début de l'élection. Nous nous y prenons maintenant 18 mois à l'avance. Ce faisant, les directeurs du scrutin s'impliquent auprès des communautés. S'il y a des communautés autochtones, ils ont ainsi l'occasion de s'impliquer auprès d'elles.

De plus, nous avons recensé 92 communautés et 28 circonscriptions électorales, si je me souviens bien, des communautés autochtones éloignées qui n'avaient pas été aussi bien servies qu'ailleurs lors de la dernière élection. Nous allons donc demander aux directeurs du scrutin de les mobiliser, pas uniquement en avril, mais sur une base régulière jusqu'aux élections, pour nous assurer que nous procédons d'une façon qui respecte les besoins de la communauté et nous allons embaucher plus de membres de la communauté pour travailler dans les bureaux de scrutin. Nous allons faire des efforts plus soutenus dans ces endroits.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup et merci encore une fois de votre présence. Nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants. Vous avez toujours des conseils judicieux.

Nous allons passer au vote. BUREAU DU DIRECTEUR GÉNÉRAL DES ÉLECTIONS ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........30 768 921 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Puis-je faire rapport du vote sur le Budget principal des dépenses de la Chambre des communes, du Service de protection parlementaire et du Bureau du directeur général des élections à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci.

J'aimerais mentionner aux membres du Comité que la réunion de jeudi portera sur les langues autochtones. Comme nous en avons convenu, si des témoins ne peuvent se présenter aux prochaines réunions, nous prendrons ce temps pour discuter des pétitions. En fait, nous pourrons le faire le 8 mai, alors si les partis peuvent être prêts à cette date pour discuter des recommandations que le greffier vous a fait parvenir concernant les pétitions électroniques, ce serait excellent.

Quelqu'un a-t-il autre chose à ajouter?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 24, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.