header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-12-03 INDU 141

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody, to meeting number 141 as we continue our legislative review of copyright.

With us today we have, as individuals, Georges Azzaria, director of the art school at Université Laval; Ariel Katz, associate professor and innovation chair in electronic commerce at the University of Toronto; and Barry Sookman, partner with McCarthy Tétrault and adjunct professor in intellectual property law at Osgoode Hall Law School.

From the Canadian Bar Association, we have Steve Seiferling, executive officer, intellectual property law section; and Sarah MacKenzie, lawyer, law reform.

You will each have up to seven minutes. Then we will go into our questions. Hopefully, we will have time to get it all down.

We'll start with Mr. Azzaria. You have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Georges Azzaria (Director, Art School, Université Laval, As an Individual):

Thank you.

Good afternoon, and thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today about copyright. With 186 witnesses having appeared before this committee, I hope everything has not been said.

I am the director of the art school of Laval University in Quebec City, and was previously a professor in the law faculty at Laval University for 15 years.

I will start with some general comments.

Making law is about ideas, priorities and objectives. A neutral standpoint does not exist, and a proper balance does not exist. Dozens of testimonies gave you dozens of points of view that were called balanced; none were neutral. The legislator is always making choices. That's nothing new. You all know that, of course.

Copyright law takes into account authors' rights, art practices, the concept of property, the concept of work, the concept of labour, the concept of public, and technologies. Copyright law is a cultural policy, and there are many ways to build a copyright law with these concepts.

Copyright was, historically, a way of providing revenues for authors through reproduction, retransmission, etc. In Canada, for the last 20 years, copyright has been impacted by three forces: law, jurisprudence and technology.

First, here are a few words about the law. The 2012 modifications enforced many new exceptions, among them fair dealing in education, and none of them included remuneration for authors. It was a major step back for authors.

In jurisprudence, I will remind you that, in the 1990 case Bishop v. Stevens, the Supreme Court of Canada quoted an old English decision, saying, “the Copyright Act...was passed with a single object, namely, the benefit of authors of all kinds”.

But there was a shift in 2002. The Supreme Court in the Théberge case wrote: Excessive controls by holders of copyrights and other forms of intellectual property may unduly limit the ability of the public domain to incorporate and embellish creative innovation in the long-term interests of society as a whole....

In 2004, in the CCH case, the Supreme Court invented a user's right, saying, “The fair dealing exception, like other exceptions in the Copyright Act, is a user's right.”

Théberge and CCH are based on a mythology that the authors may hide their work and not let the public get access to it.

Third is technology. With the Internet, access to art and the democratization of creation are great, of course, but they are pushing aside authors' rights and remuneration. We have witnessed the arrival of a new type of author who is not interested in copyright protection—such as Creative Commons, here before this committee—and doesn't need remuneration. With new technologies, legislators, not only in Canada, have kind of abdicated and let private corporations make the law. This is the case with Google, which redefined fair use and remuneration with Google Books, Google News, Google Images, and YouTube.

There is a shift that benefits everyone—the public, Internet providers and Silicone Valley corporations—except the authors. It's what we call a value gap. The combined result of law, jurisprudence and technology is a decline of copyright protection for authors.

I suggest that making the law means working with studies. What were the economic effects of the 2012 amendments? Did authors get more or less royalties?

Since the arrival of the Internet, authors' incomes have decreased. We did a study a few years ago in Quebec with the INRS and the ministry of cultural affairs, showing that revenues are becoming micro-revenues. I think Access Copyright, Copibec, L'Union des Écrivains and a lot of people came here to tell you that revenues have decreased.

On the other side, what are the revenues of Internet providers and Silicone Valley corporations? Did they decline?

Artists should be better protected as a social and cultural value. This is not a question of balance. The message is quite simple. If art matters, we must care about authors. The general principles of the Canadian act respecting the status of the artist should be followed.

I'll run through a couple of proposals.

First, as a general proposal, you should make the wording of the Copyright Act much simpler. The wording is quite a mess at some points. One example is that no one can really explain the distinction between non-commercial purposes, private purposes, private use and private studies. Confused and complicated rules are usually not followed.

Second, you can fix what was, in my opinion, broken in 2012. Take away all the exceptions of 2012, or keep them but add a remuneration mechanism. Canada has to comply, as you know, with the triple test of the Berne Convention. The idea is to replace authorization with a royalty, a global licence model like the private copying regime of 1997. The private copying regime was a way to answer to a technology that gives the public the possibility of reproducing work themselves and provides remuneration to the rights holders.

Third, add a resale right. I think RAAV and CARFAC testified in that sense. A resale right is a tangible way of expressing support for visual artists.

Fourth, create a fair dealing exception for creative work, which means to clarify the right to quote for visual artists and musicians.

Fifth, give a greater role to copyright collectives. They are the tangible way of making copyright functional by giving access and providing royalties. Perhaps you could think about extended collective licensing, and that could be an answer.

Sixth and finally, think about perhaps including a provision for professional authors, something that would be more coherent with the Status of the Artist Act and the notion of independent contractors.

I will conclude by saying that the question for us is to see from which perspective we are looking at copyright. The challenge is to act, as you know, like a legislator and not like a spectator.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Ariel Katz, from the University of Toronto.

You have up to seven minutes, sir.

Mr. Ariel Katz (Associate Professor and Innovation Chair, Electronic Commerce, University of Toronto, As an Individual):

Good afternoon.

My name is Ariel Katz. I'm a law professor at the University of Toronto, where I hold the innovation chair in electronic commerce. I am very grateful for the opportunity to appear before you this afternoon.

In my comments today, I would like to focus on dispelling some of the misinformation about the application of copyright law and fair dealing in the educational sector.

Since 2012, Access Copyright and some publishers and authors organizations have embarked on an intensive and, unfortunately, somewhat effective campaign, portraying Canada as a disastrous place for writers and publishers. This campaign, which I call the “copyright libel against Canada”, was built on misinformation, invented facts and sometimes outright lies. Regrettably, it has slandered Canada and its educational institutions, not only at home but also abroad.

I debunked many of the claims in a series of blog posts four years ago, when the campaign started. I encourage you to read them. I also invite you to read the submissions and posts by Michael Geist, Meera Nair and others. I'm happy to provide the links to those.

Nevertheless, the copyright libel persists. It persists because it presents three simple, correct facts, wraps them in enticing rhetoric and half-truths, and then tells a powerful yet wholly fictitious story.

Here are the three uncontroversial facts.

Fact number one is that over the last few years, and especially since 2012, most educational institutions stopped obtaining licences from Access Copyright, and Access Copyright's revenue has declined dramatically. This is true.

Fact number two is that, as a result, the amount that Access Copyright has distributed to its members and affiliates has also declined significantly. This is also true.

Fact number three is that most freelance Canadian authors, namely novelists, poets and some non-fiction writers, earn very little from their writing. This is true.

All of that is correct, but what is incorrect is the claim that the changes in Canada's copyright law and the decisions by universities not to obtain licences from Access Copyright are responsible for the decline in Canadian authors' earnings.

First of all, as you've already heard from some witnesses, even though universities stopped paying Access Copyright, they did not stop paying for content. Indeed, they have been paying more for content than they paid before. Most publishers are actually doing quite well, and some are doing extremely well.

Now you may wonder, if educational institutions aren't paying less for content, but more, then why do the earnings of Canadian authors decrease rather than increase? That seems to be the question that puzzles this committee. I'll try to help you with that.

To answer this question, we need to get into the details of Access Copyright's business model and consider things like these: Which works are actually in its repertoire? Which authors are members of Access Copyright, and which aren't? What type of content is generally being used in universities? How does Access Copyright actually distribute the money it collects?

I'll try to answer these questions. The logic behind Access Copyright's business model has been deceptively simple and attractive. Access Copyright would offer educational institutions a licence that allowed them to basically copy every work they needed without worrying about copyright liability. It would charge reasonable fees for the licence, distribute the fees among copyright owners, and everyone would live happily ever after.

This sounds great, except that this model can work only if you believe in two fictions. First, you have to believe that Access Copyright actually has the repertoire it purports to license. Second, you have believe that a cartel of publishers would provide an attractive service and charge reasonable fees. However, good fictions do not make good business models.

Access Copyright has never had the extensive repertoire it purported to license. As a matter of copyright law, Access Copyright can only give a licence to reproduce a work if the owner of the copyright in that work has authorized Access Copyright to license on her behalf. It would have been a copyright miracle if Access Copyright actually managed to get all the copyright owners to appoint it to act on their behalf. They never have been able to do that.

Access Copyright has always known that it didn't really have the legal power to license everything that it did, but that knowledge has not stopped it from pretending to have virtually every published work in its repertoire. Practically, Access Copyright has been selling universities the copyright equivalent of the Brooklyn Bridge. However, as a matter of copyright, not only can Access Copyright not license stuff that doesn't belong to it or to its members, but its attempt to do that constitutes, in itself, an act of copyright infringement.

Yes, you may find it surprising that Access Copyright has, in my opinion, committed one of the most massive acts of copyright infringement that Canada has ever seen, by authorizing works that don't belong to it or to its members.

(1545)



For many years, educational institutions were quite content to play along and overlook the limited scope of Access Copyright's repertoire. They did that because the licence agreement contained an indemnity clause. It basically told universities, “Don't worry about whether we can lawfully give you permission to copy those works, because as long as you continue paying us, we will protect you. We'll indemnify you should the copyright owner come and actually sue you. We'll take on the risk.” As long as universities paid the sufficiently low prices, they were happy with this “don't ask, don't tell” policy. They just continued paying and thought that they were protected.

You would expect that if Access Copyright collected money for the use of works that aren't in its repertoire, it would then refund the money to the institution that paid—that overpaid—but that's not how Access Copyright works. Instead, it keeps the money that it collects for works that aren't its own and distributes this money among its own members. This is principally the money that has now all but disappeared and that you hear a lot of complaints about.

At this point, it is important to consider which authors are actually members of Access Copyright, which aren't, and what type of works are actually being used in universities.

In general, except for a handful of courses in the English departments, Canadian universities don't teach Canadian literature. When they do, students actually buy those books. As U of T historian and English professor Nick Mount recently wrote in his book Arrival: The Story of CanLit, “At eleven of Canada's largest twenty universities, English and French, you can complete a major in literature without any of it being Canadian.”

This may surprise you, but it shouldn't. Most Canadian universities are serious academic institutions. The works they typically use for research and teaching are academic works written by academics, some from Canada, but in many cases from elsewhere. Canadian universities are not parochial schools but serious academic institutions. They are members in good standing in the global enterprise of science. The study of contemporary Canadian literature is only a tiny fraction of that enterprise. Moreover, most academic authors, the ones who actually write most of the works that are being used in universities, aren't even members of Access Copyright.

According to Stats Canada, there are 46,000 full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities. Most of those are active authors who write and publish—otherwise they'll perish. Some faculty members are members of Access Copyright, but most are not—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Katz, but we're going a little bit over and we have a tight schedule. I will ask you to wrap it up quickly, please.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Okay.

There are 46,000 full-time academic authors employed by Canadian universities, and Access Copyright has only 12,000 writer members. U of T alone has more writer members than Access Copyright. In other words, the vast majority of works that you use in universities are not written by members of Access Copyright.

Where is this money that the authors and members of Access Copyright used to get? They don't get it anymore. Where did this money come from? It came from Access Copyright collecting money for everything, even though it did not own everything. Whatever it didn't own, it kept for itself and distributed this money to the authors. That worked as long as the model worked, but eventually it could no longer sustain the flaws that underlay this model, and it collapsed. That's the money that is now gone.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

It has very little to do with copyright and very little to do with fair dealing.

The Chair:

Thank you. I'm sure they'll have lots of questions for you.

We're going to move on to Mr. Barry Sookman. You have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Barry Sookman (Partner with McCarthy Tétrault and Adjunct Professor, Intellectual Property Law, Osgoode Hall Law School, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I wish this were a debate about Access Copyright, so I could spend my seven minutes replying to what you've just heard.

Thank you very much for the opportunity of having me appear today.

I’m a senior partner in the law firm of McCarthy Tétrault. I also teach intellectual property law at Osgoode Hall Law School. I know about copyright in theory and in practice, and I want to share some of my thoughts with you today.

A key reason copyright exists is to create a framework encouraging creators to develop and make works available and to ensure they are paid appropriately for their creative efforts. You have heard many arguments in favour of broad exemptions and free uses of works. In these remarks, I want to provide some guidance to help you analyze many of the conflicting submissions you've heard, especially by those who oppose reasonable framework laws required to support a vibrant creative community and functioning markets for creative products.

I intend to focus on decoding for you certain norm-based appeals and misleading arguments made to oppose reasonable framework laws.

You have heard appeals for exceptions to copyright relying on the norm of fairness; however, a fair dealing is a free dealing, and a free dealing should be understood for what it is. Free is not necessarily fair, nor is it fair market value. Courts in Canada have developed a unique, expansive framework for determining what is a fair dealing. But whether something is fair as a matter of law cannot be dispositive as to whether it is actually fair and in the public interest. This is especially true because the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that a dealing can be fair even if it has an adverse effect on the market.

You should not conclude that the addition of “such as” in the fair dealing exception, as some have advocated for, would be no big deal and would simply add flexibility to the act. The appeal to the flexibility norm reflects a judgment that compulsory free dealings should be expanded to uses not expressly permitted or even imagined by Parliament. This was rejected in 2012, after being opposed by practically the entire creative sector, including in a major submission to the reform process.

You have heard appeals for exceptions in the name of balance, but the concept of balance does not provide any useful guidance for copyright reform any more than it provides a principled framework for reforms to tax, energy or other laws. You should be mindful of norm-based appeals for reforms based on balance where not supported by principled justifications. Supreme Court decisions on copyright often refer to balance, but some mythical balance in itself is not what the court teaches. Rather, the court teaches that the complementary goals of copyright are to encourage the creation and dissemination of works and to provide a just reward for the creators. These are the goals this committee should focus on.

You have heard that exceptions are needed to promote access to works and to foster innovation. Creators fully support a framework that promotes broad access and innovation, but free access as a guiding norm is not consistent with encouraging new investment by creators or paying them properly. Broad exemptions and limitations in rights also result, as Georges just indicated in his remarks, in value gaps, where creators cannot negotiate market prices and are not adequately compensated, or compensated at all.

Opponents of creator rights often justify piracy, arguing that it is fundamentally a business model, and that creators should, in effect, make content available at prices that compete with those who steal and distribute their content. This business model defies basic economics. A similar argument against providing creators the rights and remedies they need is that they are successful even despite piracy or because they’re paid for other uses or have other revenues. The “they are doing just fine” argument is really a normative judgment that creators should not have a copyright framework that will enable them to achieve their full potential—what they could produce and earn but for piracy and uses not paid for.

(1550)



The “they are making money in other ways” argument is another normative judgment that creators should not be paid for valuable uses of their works by others, such as when they innovate to bring new products to market, even though those innovations don't cover the lost revenues on the other uses.

The bottom line is that the smoke-and-mirror arguments are premised on the normative judgment that it is justifiable to acquire and consume a product or service for free, essentially forcing the creator to subsidize uses and even piracy on a compulsory basis. These are assertions most people would never advance outside of the copyright discourse.

You are told that laws that would help tackle online piracy, such as site blocking, should not be enacted. There are over 40 countries that have court or administrative website-blocking regimes. This is not some experiment, as one witness has told you. These remedies support functioning marketplaces that are otherwise undermined by unauthorized pirate services. Numerous studies and courts worldwide have found website blocking effective in countering piracy and promoting the use of legitimate websites, and to be fully consistent with freedom of expression values.

We can learn from international experience. The United Kingdom is currently studying expanding its regime to include administrative blocking. Australia has just enacted a law to expand its site blocking to search engine de-indexing.

When people oppose reasonable remedies against blatant online theft and leave no stone unturned arguing against creators having a framework law that enables them to control the uses of their works and to be paid a fair market value for such uses, you should question why. In particular, you should question what moral compass and values underlie these arguments and whether they comport with norms that this committee is prepared to accept for copyright or in any other situation.

I thank you for the opportunity to appear today, and I look forward to any questions you might have.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, from the Canadian Bar Association, we have Mr. Steven Seiferling. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Steven Seiferling (Executive Officer, Intellectual Property Law Section, Canadian Bar Association):

I'll let Ms. MacKenzie start.

Ms. Sarah MacKenzie (Lawyer, Law Reform, Canadian Bar Association):

Thank you very much.

I'm Sarah MacKenzie. I'm a law reform advocate with the Canadian Bar Association. Thanks for your invitation today to provide the CBA's input on the Copyright Act review.

The CBA is a national association of over 36,000 lawyers, students, notaries and academics with a mandate to seek improvements in the law and the administration of justice.

Our written submission, which you've received, represents the position of the CBA's intellectual property law section, which was developed in consultation with members of other CBA groups. The CBA IP section deals with law and practice relating to all forms of ownership, licensing, transfer and protection of intellectual property.

I am here today with Steve Seiferling, an executive member of the CBA IP law section and chair of the section's copyright committee. Mr. Seiferling will address CBA's comments on the Copyright Act review and take your questions.

Thank you.

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

Thank you, Mr. Chair and honourable members.

Although our submission goes into a number of issues that I'm happy to take questions on, I want to focus on two that actually have something of a common theme: the best use of judicial resources, or judges, with respect to copyright law. In the two areas I want to highlight, we have created an unnecessary and burdensome use of the court system, in which court applications are required. We question whether there is something short of court applications that would apply, or that would work in many cases.

The first area, which you haven't heard a lot about, despite the number of witnesses Mr. Azzaria noted, is anti-counterfeiting and imports. You haven't heard a lot on that area.

Currently, where a brand or copyright owner has registered with the Canada Border Services Agency and an uncontested counterfeit is discovered at the time of import at the border, an importer can simply fail to respond, be hard to reach or be non-responsive in their response for a short 10-day period. That's the limit on how long the Canada Border Services Agency will hold goods without a court application. If a court application is not filed by the end of the 10 days, the goods are released to the importer.

The CBA section is proposing that for uncontested counterfeits—we're not talking about a legitimate claim about whether the goods are proper—when we have an affidavit or statutory declaration from the brand owner or the copyright owner, the goods could be destroyed or seized without the need for imposing an additional burden on the courts, and without the need for a court order.

You have heard a lot about the second area that I want to talk about. This is notice and notice.

The Internet is borderless, and our laws are not. Our current system, even with very recent amendments and proposed amendments, only allows us to deal with copyright infringement online when three things exist. Number one, the alleged infringer is in Canada. Number two, the alleged infringer can be identified, so they're not falsifying, masking or spoofing their ID or their IP address, which is pretty common when we're in this type of area. Number three, the rights holder actually files a claim. That's our system in Canada. Once again, we're taking up court time and resources.

The reality is that most infringers are not located here in Canada and they'll ignore a notice provided by an intermediary. Notice and notice ignores the borderless nature of the Internet. If we're going to absolve intermediaries of liability in Canada for infringement claims, the least we can do is adopt a notice-and-takedown system, which allows rights holders a greater ability to protect their copyrighted works and recognizes the issues posed by a global Internet.

Let me give you an example. Let's say that someone goes online to my law firm website and takes my picture. They set up an account on, say, the Toronto Maple Leafs fan site. I'm an Oilers fan, so if you put me on the Leafs website, that's not necessarily appropriate. Then they talk about how much I appreciate the Leafs, with my picture attached.

My recourse as a rights holder is to file a notice with the intermediary, with that website, which they would pass on. I get a limited amount of information back, which I may be able to use to file a claim, if I have identifiable information. The claim is useful only if the person who set up that false account is in Canada, can be identified and has not masked or concealed their true identity. Meanwhile, everyone thinks I've become a Leafs fan.

I use this example somewhat jokingly, but what if we change the facts to associate me, or anybody whose picture is available online, with organized crime or something a lot more problematic than the Toronto Maple Leafs fan site? We have the same enforcement struggles.

By continuing to use notice and notice, we in Canada fail to recognize the global nature of the Internet and its users.

Those are my introductory remarks, and I look forward to any questions you might have on that or any other issues raised by the CBA.

(1600)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we jump into our round of questions, I need to let everybody know that we need about 10 minutes at the end. We have to discuss our final three meetings and some of the challenges that have come up. We'll save some time at the end for that.

Mr. Longfield, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thanks, everybody, for coming as witnesses to this important and confusing study. We have had a lot of different opinions, and we purposely brought you folks in near the end, to help us sort through what we've been hearing.

I want to start with Mr. Azzaria.

When you're talking about the author royalties and incomes decreasing, and the democratization of technology versus the creators being paid for the works they've been working on, it seems we have a lack of transparency in the system. In trying to get to where the system breaks down, do you have an opinion on where we need to be focusing our efforts in terms of creators being paid?

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

There are a lot of things to say. What I was trying to say is that democratization of creation is a great thing. Your neighbour is making art, and that's fantastic, but the problem is that your neighbour is now in competition with professional artists who want to make a living with their artwork. Because he's giving away his work, he doesn't care about copyright, but the professional artist does.

There are a lot of ways we can try to find a mechanism to separate that. This is just a hypothesis. I'll just speak generally, and maybe afterwards we can make some distinctions. You could have an opt-out system, where everybody is in a collective society but then your neighbour could opt out if he wants, because he doesn't care about copyright or he doesn't need copyright to make a living. The other way would be to have something that would be coherent with the act respecting the status of the artist and the professional relations between artists and producers in Canada, which you may know.

It's actually quite an interesting act. If you read the general principles, they really focus on how artists are important to our society and everything. That's with the professional artists. That would be another way of thinking about things, saying, “Well, we have two types of creators: professionals and non-professionals.” I'm not saying they're “amateurs” and what they're doing is not good; I'm just saying that some want to make a living with copyright and some just don't care. The ones who don't care are slowly starting to argue that copyright is not important for anyone.

I don't know if that was a clear answer for you.

(1605)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes. The barriers to entry are low, so a lot of people can get in, but we should have a way of separating out the ones who need to earn a living.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

It's a hypothesis. If you work with that second hypothesis, it would be a kind of opt-in situation. However, then you'd have to have all the collectives agreeing with that, because it might be something funny in terms of the Bern Convention.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay, thank you.

I'm going to flip over to Mr. Sookman, and possibly the Bar Association.

In looking at the five-year review that we're in the middle of right now, we had testimony last meeting that this is way too frequent, that the Supreme Court is still dealing with the previous review. Some of the cases are just getting through. We don't know whether the law is working yet, and now we're going to start changing the law.

Do you have any comments on how frequently we're doing this review? The testimony also said that we're helping a lot of lobby groups, but we're not really helping society by doing this review so often.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

It's worth bearing in mind that while there's a five-year review, Parliament has quite a bit of scope to determine the extent to which they want to review the entirety of the act. Technology is changing. It's putting enormous pressure on all stakeholders. This is one of these areas. Given that copyright is such an important framework law, having it reviewed and making sure it works is important.

The other thing is that we've actually had quite a bit of Supreme Court jurisprudence on this. We can already see on the ground that there are problems and that there need to be some solutions. I would suggest that in the next five years in the Internet world, where it's seven years for one, we have to have 35 years of experience. I would say that reviewing the act every 35 years is a good idea.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay, we'll get that testimony to review that testimony.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Lloyd Longfield: What does the bar association think? You also mentioned the load on the courts, which is also a very interesting piece for us to be considering.

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

I'll comment on the five-year review, and then I can comment a little on the load on the courts.

As to the five-year review, all you have to do is look at the cycle of technology. We're innovating at a record speed. If we're innovating at a record speed, shouldn't our law move at the same speed, or at least try? We were playing catch-up in 2012. We were playing a huge catch-up trying to fix things that we may have identified 10 or 15 years before that. We were trying to ratify treaties that existed in the late 1990s. That's a problem.

Five years, no, that's not too soon. It's definitely not too soon.

As for the other part of your question, on the burden on the courts, clear legislation also lessens the burden on the courts. If we're able to review and refine the legislation on a more regular basis, I think that would be effective for the lawyers whom the CBA represents and for the judges who used to be lawyers, and their caseloads and the judicial burden.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

What you're saying is that the legislation isn't adequately protecting against foreign actors.

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

Yes, that's right, especially on the notice-and-notice issue.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'm not going to have time for more.

I think I'll turn it back to you, Chair.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses today.

I'm just going to move a motion, so we can have a conversation on a very important subject. The motion reads: That the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), undertake a study of no less than 4 meetings to investigate the impacts of the announced closure of the General Motors plant in Oshawa, and its impacts on the wider economy and province of Ontario.

I believe I can make that motion, Mr. Chair. Hopefully, you'll find it in order.

The Chair:

Your motion is in order, and you are able to move it.

You have finished, so Mr. Carrie will have the floor.

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

First of all, I want to thank my colleague and everyone around the table for the last week since we had this news in Oshawa about the General Motors plant. I sincerely want to thank everyone for their comments and for reaching out to me in order to help.

I want to apologize to the witnesses. I know this is a disruption, but this is a huge issue in my community.

I was pleased to hear the Prime Minister make a commitment that he does want to develop a plan. I know this committee. I've been in this committee in the past. It's one of the least partisan committees. I think that if there's something we could do, it behooves us to do it.

I think we heard about the 2,800 job losses in Oshawa, but when you take into account the spin-offs of these jobs—anywhere from seven to nine other jobs for each—it's somewhere around 20,000 total job losses in our community. To put that in perspective, it was announced that 3,600 jobs will be lost in the U.S., but the American economy is about 10 times bigger than ours, so it would be an equivalent of something along the lines of 200,000 jobs in the U.S. Then we heard that Mexico loses basically zero jobs.

I was very pleased to let the committee know that we were able to get down there with our leader Andrew Scheer within the first 24 hours. We met with the mayors and municipal leaders. We met with the leadership at GM and with business communities, and the most important thing we were able to do was get down to the gates.

The mayor, through me, mentions to my Liberal colleagues that if they could get the message to the Prime Minister, he really would welcome a phone call to determine the effects of this closure on our community, the impacts. That's what this study is all about.

The most important thing, as I said, is that we were actually at the gates. It was one of the hardest things to see workers who found out this news on a Sunday evening when they were eating dinner, that they wouldn't have a job in the future. They were going back into the plant for the first time, and one of the comments really stuck to me. It was from a worker; I'll call her C. She was a very young lady, 30 years old. She mentioned to me that she had been working there for six years and that it was a great job, a job that allowed her to put a roof over her head, feed her kids and have a future. This was something that was going to be taken away from her. When I found out that this was happening, I asked her what message I could bring back. She said, “Please fight for our jobs and do what you can.”

So when I found out about this motion towards committee here, studying the impacts.... I think it's fairly obvious to people around the table here that the impacts are not just workers like C., but the feeder plants. I was at one this weekend in Brockville, where I could just see the United States across the way. They're constantly getting attempts to poach them over there...jobs in the community, the restaurants, the retail outlets. There are also impacts with regard to R and D, the billions of dollars that the auto industry spends at our universities and colleges. It's our educational system, future knowledge. If we lose these industries, that knowledge goes away, as well as the jobs of the future.

I think everybody would agree that the impacts are huge. This plant was an award-winning, number one GM plant. If GM can't build a new vehicle or make the case for that in Canada, we have a problem. Having this study go forward, I think, would be helping the Prime Minister. When these companies make these investments, they are once-in-a-generation investments. This is not something that they do for three or four years, or even 10 years. This is decades of investment. I think that if we can really put a highlight on this now [Technical difficulty—Editor].

I think it was Donald Trump trying to interrupt the committee to get his word in here.

We've been listening to businesses talk about different policies that maybe we could look at, whether it's energy cost, steel and aluminum tariffs, regulatory changes, carbon taxes, things along these lines. However, one of the things we know is that Ray Tanguay was appointed the “auto czar”, and he came up with a plan. I think this is something we could take a look at in this study.

(1615)



All Oshawa workers want is the opportunity to be able to bid on a new investment—a product, a job. In the past, whenever we've had this opportunity, we've been very resilient. We've been very innovative. We've actually won it when we've had the chance to compete. The hope here is that General Motors didn't say they were going to bulldoze the plant; they said there's no product allocation after 2019.

So there is hope, colleagues. Workers and community leaders in my community want to help the Prime Minister with his plan. He was in the House of Commons saying that he's working on it, but we need to start immediately. I don't know if I can tell you how urgent it is. We have to discover the impacts and develop a plan, because the clock is ticking.

With that, Mr. Chair, I want to thank you, and I want to thank our witnesses today for letting me speak up for my community at this very difficult time.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Carrie.

Mr. Masse, you have the floor.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My heart goes out to the families and the workers of Oshawa. General Motors closed in my community after a hundred years of operations, to the exact year. Since 2002, I've been advocating in the House of Commons for a Canadian national auto policy, similar to the calls of the CAW, as well as other economists who have called for this.

Other nation states actually have a specific auto policy. In fact, a number of those states have now usurped Canada's position as the number two auto manufacturer and assembler to move us now to 10th in that model. We've shed tens of thousands of jobs in that tenure. In fact, we have slid so significantly that it has even affected our North American supply chain. That has been unfortunate, because one auto job equates to seven other jobs in the economy. This is the pain and suffering the member for Oshawa sees. My heart goes out to him and his community, because it's not just those who go to the plant every single day.

It's important to note that in a national auto strategy that we laid out with the late Jack Layton back in 2003—even David Suzuki was part of it—in terms of a green auto strategy, specific elements were taken from many other jurisdictions because of the transition. You have workers in Oshawa and other places who have quite literally been the best. They've been the best, as shown through the powertrain awards they've received for their work, and it hasn't been enough. That's one of the problems we're faced with in this industry.

The motion we have in front of us is reasonable in four meetings. In fact, if it could be more comprehensive, that's certainly something I would support. But it's important to note, Mr. Chair, that other countries, again, are still going forward with their policies.

Germany has a policy. South Korea has a policy. The United States has a series of trade barriers, and the most recent USMCA has a series of barriers related to investment. They actually cap our investment and they also create new taxes, which are part of the forthcoming agreement. That would be appropriate, because we are competing. I will note, as the member has noted, that the Ray Tanguay report was tabled in 2017—this is the auto czar. Unfortunately, we haven't seen action on that particular file yet. It's almost a year in the making. It will be a year in the making a month from now.

Time is of the essence. I can remember this debate going back as far as when I found the Liberal auto policy in a washroom here in the House of Commons. It's a true story. This is well articulated in the chamber. We called for one. We almost got one at one point. At that time, Minister Cannon for Paul Martin was ready to table a policy, but when he switched and crossed over to the Conservatives, he never followed through on that.

We still need to have some resolution to having an overall plan. This is the first step to having it. We have heard from the Prime Minister that there would be some interest in doing so. I would encourage us to do the four meetings that are necessary. I would also be prepared to meet additionally to that. I don't think this has to interrupt any of our committee business whatsoever. I would hope that the movers of the motion would accept that.

I'll conclude, so that we can get to our guests, but I think it's important to note that we have an opportunity to do this. We have the time available in our schedule if necessary. I would encourage all members to do so.

Thank you for your time.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mrs. Caesar-Chavannes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I do appreciate the opportunity to speak to this. Our hearts certainly go out to the people of Oshawa. I know that in Whitby there are many organizations that contribute to the ecosystem that is a part of the GM ecosystem much more broadly.

Mr. Chair, as the member for Oshawa has said, the news is hopeful; there has been no allocation of new product, but that can still change. The other alternative is that, if it actually does close down.... The member for Oshawa talked about developing a plan and having these four meetings to investigate the impacts be part of what is necessary to develop a plan.

I really believe that the educational institutions, business leaders, municipal governments, the workers, and people who are involved in the ecosystem should be able to lead the charge in coming up with this plan. They are closest to the source. They are closest to what the impact is going to be, so they really need to be a part of what that plan starts to look like and how it does take shape.

I know there are talks with the Prime Minister, as you noted, to make those phone calls. Again, a made-in-Ottawa solution for what is happening in Oshawa is not reasonable. It will require a long-term strategy to be able to ensure that we have the jobs of today and tomorrow. Those who are closest to the situation can come up with the best plan and the best assessment of what is happening in Oshawa and the surrounding area, the Durham region.

With that, I would move that we call the vote.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate?

Dan, go ahead.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Chair, we've heard quite eloquently from the member for Oshawa about the need for us to be with the community and to show some leadership in recognizing the wider economic benefit of that industry, not just in Oshawa but in this province and this country.

I am disappointed to hear that members opposite don't believe that we can be leaders in helping to foment that reaction so that the community can benefit from ongoing economic development.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Carrie, go ahead.

Mr. Colin Carrie:

I just have a quick note for my colleague from Whitby. Respectfully, we did get a chance to meet with our business leaders and the educational leaders. I just want people around the table, before they vote, to know that they actually are willing to work with us. They are willing to get on a plane. They are willing to come here to make sure that we get something moving as soon as possible, but they are looking for some leadership.

There was some hope when the Prime Minister said he was committed to a plan, and they are right on board because we know that when we work together, we can be very resilient. Oshawa's had these bad announcements before. We've always gotten through it.

What they've asked me to do is see what we can do here in Ottawa. They've actually asked for that. Before the vote, just so you know, they will be there to help us.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Hearing no other debate, we will go to a vote.

Mr. Colin Carrie:

Could we have a recorded vote?

The Chair: We will have a recorded vote.

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

(1625)

The Chair:

Thank you for your intervention.

Mr. Albas, you still have about three minutes left.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to start with Mr. Katz.

Mr. Katz, you've written that South Africa's fair use rights should be a model for the world. Could you explain what their framework is and why you think other countries should copy it?

Mr. Ariel Katz:

South Africa basically has followed something that the United States and Israel have been doing for many years. I argue that it has also been the law in Canada for many years, even though we don't really know that this is the law. We don't have such magic words in the fair dealing provision.

The point is that they would be moving into adopting fair dealing as an open, flexible, and general exception that could apply potentially to any purpose, subject to a criterion of fairness, as opposed to a system where by default, unless Parliament had contemplated a particular use in advance, it is unlawful unless the copyright owner agreed to do that.

The problem with the model that relies on specific exceptions and a closed list of exceptions is that it requires Parliament to have the magic ability to foresee things that happen in the future. When we're talking about innovation, by definition the nature of innovation is that there are things we don't think of as existing today. If innovators, in order to do what they're doing, need to get permission or go to Parliament and get Parliament to enact a specific exception to do that, very few innovators would do so, because if you are a true innovator, the limited amount of time, money, and effort you have, you want to put into your innovation. You don't have the money to hire or entertain lobbyists.

A system that relies on closed exceptions necessarily reflects the interests of the status quo and does not allow breathing room for true innovators. However, an open and flexible system gives true innovators an ability to at least have their day in court. They could come and say that what they're doing is actually fair. They could show the benefits, show why the harms do not exist or are exaggerated and why the benefits outweigh the harm.

They can do that. If they have a good case, they will prevail. If they don't, they won't. However, at least they have the opportunity of doing that. If what they have to do is convince Parliament to allow them to do that, they won't do it.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Mr. Albas, could I spend two minutes just to provide some additional insight on that?

The Chair:

You have one minute.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Okay.

A famous U.S. lawyer who was very familiar with fair use in the United States, Lawrence Lessig, said that fair use in the United States is just the right to hire a lawyer, because there's a tremendous amount of uncertainly. Nobody knows until it's over how it's going to work. It creates a great amount of uncertainty and litigation.

We have experience with fair dealing in Canada, with lots of cases, and it is not working in Canada.

The other thing we need to really understand is that if we open up the purposes, the existing framework we have for assessing what's fair would apply, and our framework is far different from what's in the United States or elsewhere. In fact, it's probably way broader than in the United States. Thus, if we do that, we have to recognize that it will be the courts that will be making policy for Parliament, and lots of individuals will not be able to enforce their rights. There will be fights between large platforms with lots of money perpetuating the current imbalance that exists in Canada today between the small artist-creator and the big platform.

It would be a huge setback for creators in Canada should we adopt that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, thank you for that. I'm sure we'll have many duelling banjo questions for the two of you, so thank you very much.

(1630)

Mr. Barry Sookman:

We agree on almost everything.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

To start, what would be the top two things to create clarity in the structure of a system of rules in place that might be the easiest things to do? We're getting, obviously, two sides, but even more than that in terms of copyright. What would be the prioritization?

We have a number of things that are going on. Could you scope it down to two things to work on right away? I know that's hard.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

The prioritization is to prioritize. The law was meant for authors, and you should still put the authors at the centre of the law, because everybody has invited themselves into the copyright law, all kinds of users, specific users and so on. It's not really a copyright law anymore; it's a party to which everybody is allowed to go. I would go back to a copyright law where the author is at the centre of it.

I'm not saying you don't have to have exceptions, but you have to say that it allows the authors to be at the centre. That would mean either that the author authorizes uses or that he is compensated if he can't authorize.

If you have that, you have a framework that respects the author. He authorizes, so he says yes or no; or, with the private copying regime, he doesn't have the right to authorize and the public can have access, but we put a mechanism where he gets remuneration.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Katz, go ahead.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Are you asking about my recommendations?

Mr. Brian Masse:

You have about a minute. I'm going to insist on this or I'll just move on.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

I would try to scale down the act by getting back to first principles. Focus on defining certain rights that are narrow in scope. Identify, for example, that if you're an author, somebody cannot make an identical or near-identical copy of your book and sell it.

That's easy and makes a lot of sense, but the moment you start expanding the rights over further and further types of uses, you increase uncertainty. Then you need to introduce a lot of exceptions and you create an unmanageable piece of legislation. We're getting there, unfortunately.

Mr. Brian Masse:

So you'd cut it off at....

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Yes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Sookman, go ahead.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Thank you very much, Mr. Masse. It's a great question.

I don't think we can rewrite the act, but there are some things we can do that would have the most potent effect.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Give me two, really quickly.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

The first one is that we improve enforcement through site blocking and search engine de-indexing. There's quite a bit of uncertainty in this area. There are powerful reasons why we should have it by court, and I'm happy to answer that if there's a question about it.

The other one is that we need to create incentives to require payments when tariffs are set. Harmonizing the statutory damage regime would be easy; it wouldn't require a lot of words. It would promote a reorganization of people's priorities, and we would have authors getting paid.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You would like to see some consistency there.

Mr. Seiferling, go ahead.

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

Fortunately for me, I highlighted two areas when I gave my introductory remarks, so I'll just repeat them in a very concise way.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

The first one is anti-counterfeiting, dealing with the brand owners and the copyright owners who've registered with CBSA and need these additional non-judicial mechanisms to protect their brands, to protect their goods.

The second one is recognizing the global nature of the Internet and recognizing that we protect based on Canadian laws. We can't cross those borders, so how do we do that most effectively? With respect to copyright infringement online, that's a notice-and-takedown system rather than notice and notice.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You need international treaties to do that.

Mr. Chair, how much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have about three minutes, or two and a half minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Good.

In terms of the Copyright Board right now, its current status, and the proposals that have been made to the minister, do you have any opinion in terms of where it's going?

If you do, you have about 30 seconds. I know this is quick, but I don't have much time. If you don't have anything, please pass.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

I'll pass.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

The criteria introduced in the bill are, by and large, a good idea. I have a problem with the public interest criterion, because that could mean anything.

The main criterion there, that the tariffs be set to try to imitate as far as possible what would have been charged in a competitive market, is the right thing to do. Introducing public interest, in principle, is a good thing, except that the board could then introduce anything under “public interest” and could actually empty out all the other criteria.

(1635)

Mr. Brian Masse:

You're worried about the mechanics of it.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

I'm concerned about what's going to be put into the public interest.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Sookman, go ahead.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

I'd give the government 95% in terms of what they've done. I take off two and a half marks because of the public interest. Competitive market is the way to go. It creates less uncertainty and the speed would be much better.

My last point is that they should have addressed harmonization of statutory damages across all collectives. That's a loss of two and a half marks there.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay.

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

To be fair, there were a lot of issues with the Copyright Board in the past, and anything would have been a step up. This is generally, from the CBA's perspective, viewed as a positive, with the one condition that we take a wait-and-see approach. When it has taken more than seven years to implement a three-year tariff in the past, we're hoping we'll see some significant improvement on that, and quickly.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Speed is of the essence.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

I didn't want to repeat what the critics said—

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's okay.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

—but you heard here about the Copyright Board, that it's too slow and doesn't pay enough. A lot of people—

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's the speed as well.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

Yes, that's it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Great.

Speaking of speed, I know I'm out of time, but thank you for being so quick. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Masse.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'll try to use it wisely.

Mr. Sookman, my first question is for you. From your comments earlier, do you believe that copyright is an absolute property right?

Mr. Barry Sookman:

The rights that are established under the Copyright Act take into account the public interest. I don't think anybody has an absolute property right. It isn't in real property; it isn't in tangible property; and it isn't in copyright.

I do believe, however, that effective rights and effective remedies are essential, just as they are to any other property owner. We have laws against theft. We have laws against stealing. These are meant to protect property and to ensure that owners of property can exploit it in a marketplace.

I believe those same principles apply to copyright. It's not absolute, but they should be like property rights, to enable rights holders to have a framework they can use to develop new products, market new products, and license products. That does two things: It creates the products and it provides a consumer benefit. The idea that somehow there is this duality of completely divorced goals of copyright, whereby one side wins and one side loses, is really wrong. As with other property rights, copyright provides a mechanism that enables copyright owners to provide consumers with what they want: new products, new services and new innovation models. We're seeing that in the marketplace.

The problem is that there are these exceptions to property rights, which are in fact creating uncertainties, undermining markets. As with other property, we need to have a regime that protects property appropriately in the public interest.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Katz, do you have a response?

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Some of the most innovative countries, such as the United States, have the open and flexible fair use principle that Mr. Sookman is strongly opposed to. Also, they don't have site blocking, which he advocates for. I think you should be aware of that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have three or four segues to where I want to go next. Thank you for that.

Mr. Sookman, you were an intervenor in Google v. Equustek. Can you give us a 10-second background on that and which side you took? You were quite public about it at the time.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

I was.

The Google v. Equustek case was the first case that established the possibility for global de-indexing orders against the search engine. We appeared in the British Columbia Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada, supporting the possibility that intermediaries whose systems were used to facilitate a wrongful act or whose systems were used to help defy a court order could be subject to orders of a court.

(1640)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In that case, the rules we have were able to be used to accomplish that.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

They were.

If your question is why we need a regime for site blocking, which I think is what you're getting at—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

—then let me tell you why.

First of all, the site-blocking regimes around the world have proved to be effective and to work. Some of the detractors of it oppose site blocking before fair play and say, “Let's have courts do it.” Then they show up before this committee and say, “No, let's not have courts do it.” Therefore, what's the effect? They say, “Let's just leave it.”

When we come to site-blocking orders, although I believe the equitable jurisdiction does exist in the courts, there are questions of public policy that are for Parliament to really flesh out. Let me give you some examples.

There are going to be questions about what type of sites should be blocked. Should they be primarily infringing, or should they be something else? What factors should the court take into account when deciding to make an order? Who should bear the cost of site-blocking orders? What method should be ordered to be used for site blocking? Then, how do we deal with the inevitable attempts to circumvent these orders, which, by the way, courts have said don't undermine their effectiveness?

I believe those questions are fundamental ones for Parliament. Courts can make them up, but we might end up with one or two trips to the Supreme Court and with rights holders and users spending a ton of money.

Australia enacted specific legislation. Singapore enacted specific legislation. The EU has it through all member states. Why? That's because they recognize it's the most effective way to deal with foreign sites that disseminate piracy, and because they want to establish criteria as to what the proper framework is.

We need that framework. Courts can make it up, but there are going to be debates and they may not end up where Parliament would end up. That's why Parliament should deal with it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Mr. Katz, you made quite a few expressions.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Yes. When you think of whether site blocking is effective, you have to think, effective in what? One question is whether it's effective in blocking those sites. It might be, even though people can work around that. That's one type of effectiveness. However, if the question is whether it's effective in stopping piracy, or even better, in transforming the pirates into actual paying customers, the studies that Mr. Sookman and his clients have relied on do not show that. They show very little transformation within a period of time after the blocking orders have been done.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

If you want to stop piracy, the question is, what causes piracy? As I wrote in my report with respect to the CRTC, and I blogged about it, we don't have a piracy problem; we have a competition problem. We have a highly concentrated telecom market. We have incumbents that control the market, and they block the content. People want to watch the content, but in order to watch certain content, you have to subscribe to premium packages from the cable companies. For people who cannot afford doing that, if they can't obtain the content legally, they go elsewhere.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

You should read Professor Danaher, who actually does study this issue. He has found several studies saying that in fact it promotes the purchase at legal sites—

Mr. Ariel Katz:

That's exactly the study—

Mr. Barry Sookman:

This committee should understand the facts.

The Chair:

Excuse me—

Mr. Ariel Katz:

That's exactly the study I was referring to.

The Chair:

Excuse me. Thank you very much.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Chair, could we have some popcorn?

The Chair:

No, we're not going to have popcorn.

Mr. Brian Masse:

On a point of order, I would expect that the witnesses wouldn't have a debate amongst themselves.

The Chair:

That is why I stopped them.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Showing a bit of respect back and forth for the testimony would be appreciated. This is going in the wrong direction.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That is why we stopped that.

Mr. Graham, you have 30 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for that. I think it was helpful. We'll figure it out.

Is it reasonable not to ask a court whom they can block? To me, it seems a really strange thing to say we can just arbitrarily block a site. There should be some court oversight. Is that unreasonable, that courts would oversee it?

I'm asking whoever wants to answer it within the 10 seconds I have.

(1645)

Mr. Barry Sookman:

When it comes to blocking, the regimes around the world have done it in two ways. They either have court orders, or they've done it through administrative agencies, which have all the hallmarks of judicial oversight. We have Greece, Spain and others, about seven countries around the world that do it administratively with the process. I don't think it has to be a court, but it has to be a body with the expertise and the lawful authority.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd. You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you.

I love debating. That's why I got into politics. There is no offence taken by me here.

My first question is for Mr. Sookman. Do you think most people are aware they're actually pirating, or is it just something they think it's innocent, where they're on a website and it must be legal because they saw it?

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Mr. Lloyd, that's a great question. I appreciate that you like debates. Thank you.

It depends on whom you're talking about. One of the things about notice and notice, which does have its drawbacks, as Steven mentioned, is that when users who don't know what they're doing get the notice, they often do stop; or when they get the second notice, they often do stop. There are some people who do it as a matter of convenience. They think they can get away with it. They don't think they're going to get caught, and then when they or their parents get the notice, they say “Oops.” There are others who do know and don't care.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

May I interrupt? I appreciate that. Thank you. I have only five minutes.

I would say that, from what you said, most people aren't aware. They stop when they get a couple of things. However, I think Mr. Katz is quite right that if somebody is really determined to get it, it's very difficult to stop them. If we're talking about dealing with the majority of the issues, you would say with your site-blocking proposal, as with the notice on notice, that people will see that the site is blocked and they'll say, “Oh, it must be pirated; I shouldn't be doing that.”

Would you say that's effective?

Mr. Barry Sookman:

You're exactly right. There has been a lot of study of this by courts in the United Kingdom. The argument that has been put to those judges is that these orders are easy to circumvent, and they will be. The judges have actually found and expressed the opinion that in fact most users are going to abide by the order. They're not going to circumvent; they don't have the technical skills. Only a small number would, but that small number doesn't undermine the fact that these orders are effective.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you, Mr. Sookman.

Mr. Azzaria, I see you're itching for a question, and I do have a question for you.

Basically, you said that you think the system needs to be simpler, and I think Mr. Sookman also mentioned avoiding the legal costs. Would you have a recommendation as to how we can make the fair use system simpler, so that authors can be compensated and so we can also avoid all this legal back and forth?

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

As I said, maybe something close to the private copying regime with a type of compensation would be good.

What I was saying is that, generally speaking, I find the copyright law much harder to read. Each time there's a modification, we just add pages and pages.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Where would you recommend a clarification? We have private study; we have education; we have all these different exceptions. Is there a way we can roll it into something that's much more efficient and clear legally?

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

I even said you could add one for creative work by artists. A lot of contemporary art works with appropriation. I find some types of appropriation are on the good side of the fence, maybe not what Jeff Koons would do, but other kinds of appropriation. Actually, each week I have someone writing to me to say, “This is my work. Do you think it's appropriation or not?” There are no decisions in Canada on that question. There aren't big guidelines in Canada in the jurisprudence.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Then this committee would be successful if we were to actually recommend something that's much simpler.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

Yes, and remember that CCH is about lawyers not wanting to pay for photocopies. It's not about creative fair use or fair dealing, so that's one thing.

If you want to rewrite the Copyright Act, the test would be to give it to a second-year student in a law faculty just to see what they understand.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thanks. I appreciate that.

I have to cut you off because I have to get my next question in to Mr. Katz.

You talked in your testimony about cases where Access Copyright was infringing on the copyrights of people. Can you tell me about some of those cases?

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Do you mean decided cases?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

No. They have been doing that. They still do that. They authorize the use of works that aren't theirs.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Do you have any evidence?

Mr. Ariel Katz:

I have evidence that they do that, and in my opinion, this constitutes copyright infringement. The Copyright Board agreed that—

(1650)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Are there any copyright holders who are saying Access Copyright is stealing their information?

Mr. Ariel Katz:

I'm a copyright holder. Some of my works are used by Access Copyright. They are happy to license them, and they don't have the right to do that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Also, they're happy to collect money for that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

That's interesting.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

Can I sue them? I may have other things to do with my life.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I think we all do.

I have only 20 seconds left, and I see Mr. Sookman is asking to comment.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

In that 20 seconds, I'll comment that Access Copyright has had numerous tariffs certified by the board. Their repertoire has been challenged. It is simply nonsense to assert that they don't have rights to license.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you very much.

I'll take my three seconds to say thank you to all the witnesses. It's much appreciated.

The Chair:

Thank you for managing your time.

We're going to move to Mrs. Caesar-Chavannes for five minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to all the witnesses.

To the Canadian Bar Association, if I'm reading this correctly, your recommendation is to consider implementation of the notice-and-takedown system. In the written statement you've provided, you say that neither system, notice and notice or notice and takedown, is perfect. You go on to say that “a notice-and-takedown regime can result in Internet service providers removing content following an allegation, without evidence or warning to the alleged infringer.”

Why are you recommending notice and takedown, and not to improve the effectiveness of notice and notice to redress online infringement?

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

That's an interesting question. I would turn it back to you and say, what do you mean by improving the effectiveness of notice and notice?

Are you proposing something such as I heard in a comment earlier, that the international treaties govern what we can do with people who are posting or infringing copyright from overseas? I don't know of an international treaty that lets me enforce against somebody who is overseas, so I don't know where you're going in terms of improving the notice-and-notice system.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

I'm just asking a question.

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

It's an interesting question, but when it comes to that, yes, we acknowledge that neither system is perfect. You're never going to find a perfect system. You're always striving for perfection.

The more effective system of the two is going to be notice and takedown, because it gives the rights holders the strongest protection they can have against the use of infringing content online, and potentially problematic infringing content online.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

You also talk about the anti-counterfeiting section. You recommend that simplified procedures be adopted to permit the relinquishment of uncontested counterfeits, and that the importer, in a failure to respond to any accusations against them, be required to relinquish the detained counterfeits, or the CBSA has to relinquish the detained counterfeit to the rights holder.

Can you explain a bit further what you would like to see happen with that particular recommendation?

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

It's kind of like what Mr. Sookman was talking about with the site blocking. It's more of an administrative regime. There is an ability for somebody at the Canada Border Services Agency to accept an affidavit or a statutory declaration from a copyright owner or a rights holder or a brand owner saying that these are counterfeit goods.

Then you go back to the importer. If they say nothing or if they admit that these are counterfeit—I'm talking about uncontested goods here—there is an opportunity to seize or destroy the goods right away, without any further action required, without having to go to the courts.

That is an administrative process that prevents an extra burden on our judicial system.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you.

Mr. Katz, I want to go back to a submission that was made on behalf of the Canadian intellectual property law scholars, of which you were a signatory. One of the recommendations was on open access to scientific publications.

Are researchers amenable to that recommendation? Does the research community writ large want that to be part of a copyright regime?

(1655)

Mr. Ariel Katz:

In my experience, it does, yes.

Academic publication suffers from an underlying kind of absurdity. Most of the studies are funded by the the public. They pay our salaries. They pay the grants that we get to do those studies. We do all the work.

Then, because of the way the commercial publication industry is structured, we get commercial publishers, to whom we tend to assign the copyright. They become the copyright owner, and then they sell it back to universities and to the public at steadily increasing prices that are non-sustainable. The authors don't see a penny out of those subscription fees that we continue to pay.

The public is paying twice. First, the public is paying for the research, and then the public is paying for getting access to the research. With the people who write those studies, their goal generally is to get them disseminated as widely as possible, but then you get the paywalls interfering in between.

Generally, this is something that academic authors, in my experience, would support.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Going over to the Bar Association, we've heard testimony that notice and takedown doesn't work. In fact, I've heard from creators who have had the system abused by rights holders and copyright trolls. These systems are often automated and throw out takedown notices without an actual person checking on whether the site includes infringing content.

Why should Canada embrace such a framework?

Mr. Steven Seiferling:

Once again, we admit that neither system is perfect. The notice-and-takedown system is not perfect, and the notice-and-notice system is not perfect.

You're perfectly correct in saying that there are automated systems out there that are sending out notices under the notice and takedown. There are algorithms that are programmed to scour and search YouTube-type sites to automatically send out those notices—the DMCA notices, in the U.S. That happens.

If you craft a notice-and-takedown system, you can put checks and balances in place that prevent that type of abuse. They've talked about the fair use exceptions in the U.S., and a requirement for the intermediary to possibly consider those fair use exceptions in the U.S. before the takedown. That's one of the things they've looked at. That might not be the best solution, but you could put some checks and balances in place.

The end of the line—the overall answer—is that the notice-and-takedown system is more effective than the notice-and-notice system.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Again, we have an example of where a TV network took a clip from YouTube, inserted it into a network TV show, and then sent a takedown notice to the original uploader for violating their own copyright.

Sir, I'd just simply point this out: If it's not necessarily working in the ways that we'd want it to in the United States, why would we be looking at it here?

Anyway, on to Mr. Sookman—

Mr. Steven Seiferling: Can I respond to that?

Mr. Dan Albas: Mr. Sookman, you have written extensively on the negative impacts of piracy and why efforts like site blocking are needed. We've heard testimony that music piracy is falling due to options like Spotify.

Do you believe that the only way to lower the instances of piracy are options like site blocking? It sounded from your testimony that you don't believe it is a competitive market issue but an issue of law.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

When it comes to piracy, there's no silver bullet. Multiple tools are needed to address piracy.

You can look at the statistics. Let's say you look at TV piracy. The Armstrong Consulting report showed that the loss is between $500 million and $650 million per year. These are real numbers in just one segment, TV piracy, because of Kodi boxes and pirate streaming sites that are foreign.

You can have litigation against them and get an injunction against a site that's under a rock somewhere and that no one can find, and it's not going to be effective. When you look at the source of this massive piracy, you see that generally it is foreign. Since there isn't another effective remedy that you can get, I do believe that the most effective remedy, the one that's been recognized around the world as being effective—not the only one—is site and de-indexing orders.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Sookman, I appreciate that you have both the theoretical and the practical experience of working in this space, and I value that, but the CEO of Valve Corporation, Gabe Newell, said that “there is a fundamental misconception about piracy. Piracy is almost always a service problem and not a pricing problem.”

He argues that if products are conveniently available in the form that consumers want, people will pay for it. Here is someone who is out there fighting in that marketplace and looking for that share, who is saying that it's fundamentally a service issue rather than a legal one.

(1700)

Mr. Barry Sookman:

That's a great narrative, and those who oppose effective rights and remedies often use that narrative. I don't accept it. If you look at the Canadian marketplace, you see that it has a plethora of rights as far as TV and streaming go. We have Netflix and a lot of other services, and in the music space we have a lot of different services, yet we have a tremendous amount of piracy.

I'm not saying that having competitive products and services available isn't something we should have and that it isn't a factor in reducing unauthorized services. Of course it is, but should legitimate operators be required to lower their prices to compete with those who are stealing their product at the price of zero? No. We don't say, for example, that manufacturers of spare parts who could be doing stuff at Oshawa should have to compete with chop shop dealers who are stealing cars and then selling those parts at discount rates. I—

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would also argue, though, sir, that there's a difference when you're talking about real property versus something that is digitally created. The transactional costs often work out differently. I would like us not to muddy the waters. As you very rightly point out, there's a difference when someone has a real product that has been stolen and then changed, but we are talking about products and services that are often intangible in nature.

Thank you.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

We have—

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I'm sorry.

Mr. Jowhari, you have five minutes. You'll notice the theme. We have to keep it short.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Oh, I wasn't on the list. Sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I could do it, if you want—

The Chair:

You have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll go back to the very beginning. Mr. Katz made extensive comments about Access Copyright, and Mr. Sookman expressed an intention to respond. While I don't want to get into a debate like we had before, I kind of do.

Mr. Sookman, if you could take a minute to respond to the earlier points and why you disagreed so vociferously, perhaps we can get into the weeds on this a bit. I think it's important for us to do that.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

I'll give you a couple of points, given the time I have.

First of all, he said that there's no repertoire, and I've already dealt with that. Boards have certified tariffs, and they've looked at the repertoire. To say that they have no repertoire is just not right.

Second, the board, Mr. Graham and everyone else, has taken into account in certifying tariffs.... When a board certifies a tariff, they look at the usage across the sector—whatever it is, education or others. They take into account fair dealing, and they take into account other licence uses, and where there are reproductions they exclude those from considering the rates. In one tariff, they concluded that fair dealing was 60%, so they set the rate based on 40%, a much lower rate.

Access Copyright collects—or used to collect, or had a right under the tariffs to collect—against institutions the amount of the tariff, so what we have going here is a mechanism whereby individual authors and individual publishers cannot make a claim for royalties. They need to collectively license. The Access Copyright regime was something that worked well, until 2012. Authors were being paid, and publishers were being paid, Then it dried up, and it dried up as—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Sookman, I don't have much time. I'd love to have another three hours on this, I really would, but we don't have time.

Mr. Katz's point earlier was that he is a copyright holder and Access Copyright collects for him but he has not granted them permission to do that. How do you respond to that?

Mr. Barry Sookman:

He hasn't been paid because the educational institutions are not paying. If they did, he would he get paid.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

I haven't given them permission to collect on my behalf, but they do it nonetheless.

The Chair: Mr. Katz—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Katz is making the point that I wanted to make. We're talking about Access Copyright claiming copyright of all the material that's in the universities and anywhere else prior to 2012. It's the same thing. That fact hasn't changed, but the great majority of the producers of that content aren't members of Access Copyright and have not given that permission to Access Copyright, so on what basis can it collect money that is not distributed to all those copyright holders just because they haven't registered?

(1705)

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Access Copyright doesn't represent every author in the world, but it represents—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's just in Canada.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Just like any other collective, Mr. Graham, it represents a very large percentage of authors and publishers. That system was potentially viable. I'm not saying they represent everybody, but no collective represents everybody.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Katz, go ahead.

Mr. Ariel Katz:

For Access Copyright, if you go to their submissions and to their documents, they say that you can copy every published work, except specific works that appear on an exclusion list. In order for it to appear on an exclusion list, someone has to actively tell them, “Take me out.” That's how they structure their business.

This is not how the law works. The way the law works is that they can only license works when the copyright owners authorize them to act on their behalf. That's how they work.

Now, if you want to read more about what the Copyright Board said about the repertoire most recently—I think it was the 2015 K-to-12 tariff—there is a rather extensive discussion on the repertoire and lack thereof, and why it would be infringement to authorize things they don't have. I think that's the latest thing the Copyright Board said about that.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Mr. Graham, would you mind if I just said for 20 seconds what I—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all I have, so take it.

Mr. Barry Sookman:

Okay.

It's neither here nor there whether any particular author is or is not within a repertoire. What's really important for this committee is why Access Copyright is not being paid after tariffs are certified by the board, and what this committee can recommend to address that problem.

Mr. Steven Seiferling: Can I respond to that?

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Apparently not.

The Chair: Now, for the final two minutes, it's all yours, Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's been exciting.

One of the things I would like to follow up on, Mr. Katz, is with regard to the artists being at the centre, as you mentioned. What's your interpretation right now in terms of the remuneration they're getting? There's a lot of money being made with regard to copyright. Control seems to have been ceded by many artists as it goes to YouTube and other types of sharing platforms. It's a debate in terms of where you have control and where you don't, and whether you get overexposed or underexposed.

I'd like to reinforce what I think is an interesting point you made about the artists and creators being at the centre of the law. Can you complete that, please?

Mr. Ariel Katz:

I think Mr. Azzaria made the point.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Oh, I'm sorry. I'm mistaken.

Mr. Azzaria, go ahead, please.

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

What was your question?

Mr. Brian Masse:

There seems to be an incredible amount of wealth being generated here. You made the comment about artists and creators being at the centre of that. What disconnect do you think is taking place? That's the whole point of copyright. It was to protect some of that to start with. Where do you think some of this wealth is going?

Mr. Georges Azzaria:

I think there are a lot of studies showing that the authors are not being paid. I think it's quite obvious. As for who is getting the money, it's the Internet providers, the big ones like Google, Facebook, etc. The money is going there. That's the problem. They're making a lot of money. The people who produce the content are not making that money. The value gap is all about that. That's a serious problem.

From a policy point of view, I think it's quite cynical to say, well, the creators will create anyway so we don't have to give them too many rights; they love to create, so just let them write books and do art. That's okay. They'll do it anyway because it's their passion.

I think we have to say, from a policy point of view, that we have to protect them and give them some rights, especially in the case where the money is there. A study in Quebec that was issued a few weeks ago said that people pay more for services than they do for content. The money is there, you know.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much to all of our guests for coming today. We had some lively moments. It was exciting.

We're going to suspend for a quick two minutes. You can say your goodbyes, and we'll come back in camera and deal with some housekeeping.

Thank you very much.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous à la 141e séance du Comité. Nous poursuivons notre examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui, à titre personnel, Georges Azzaria, directeur de l'École d'art de l'Université Laval; Ariel Katz, professeur agrégé et titulaire de la chaire d'innovation en commerce électronique à l'Université de Toronto; et Barry Sookman, associé chez McCarthy Tétrault et professeur auxiliaire de droit de la propriété intellectuelle à la Osgoode Hall Law School.

De l'Association du Barreau canadien, nous aurons Steve Seiferling, cadre de direction, Section de la propriété intellectuelle; et Sarah MacKenzie, avocate, Réforme du droit.

Vous aurez chacun un maximum de sept minutes. Nous passerons ensuite aux questions. J'espère que nous aurons le temps de tout faire.

Nous allons commencer par M. Azzaria. Sept minutes, je vous prie.

M. Georges Azzaria (directeur, École d’art, Université Laval, à titre personnel):

Merci.

Bonjour, et merci de me donner l'occasion de vous parler du droit d'auteur. J'espère que tout n'a pas été dit par les 186 témoins qui ont comparu devant votre comité.

Je suis le directeur de l'École d'art de l'Université Laval à Québec, et j'ai été 15 ans professeur à la faculté de droit de l'Université Laval.

Je commencerai par quelques observations générales.

Faire des lois est une question d'idées, de priorités et d'objectifs. Il n'y a pas de point de vue neutre et il n'y a pas de juste équilibre. Des dizaines de témoignages vous ont donné des dizaines de points de vue considérés comme équilibrés; aucun n'était neutre. Le législateur a toujours des choix à faire. Cela n'a rien de nouveau. Vous le savez tous, bien sûr.

La législation sur le droit d'auteur tient compte des droits des auteurs, des pratiques artistiques, du concept de la propriété, du concept du travail, du concept de la main-d'oeuvre, du concept du public et des technologies. Elle est une politique culturelle, et il y a de nombreuses façons d'élaborer une loi avec ces concepts.

Historiquement, le droit d'auteur était un moyen de générer des revenus pour les auteurs par la reproduction, la retransmission, etc. Au Canada, depuis 20 ans, le droit d'auteur est le résultat de l'équilibre de trois forces: le droit, la jurisprudence et la technologie.

Quelques mots d'abord au sujet de la loi. Les modifications de 2012 ont créé de nombreuses nouvelles exceptions, dont l'utilisation équitable en enseignement, mais aucune d'entre elles ne prévoyait la rémunération des auteurs. Elles ont été un important recul pour les auteurs.

Dans la jurisprudence, je vous rappellerai que, dans l'affaire Bishop c. Stevens de 1990, la Cour suprême du Canada a cité en ces termes un vieil arrêt anglais: « la Copyright Act... a un but unique et a été adoptée au seul profit des auteurs de toutes sortes ».

Mais il y a eu un changement en 2002. La Cour suprême a écrit, dans l'affaire Théberge: Un contrôle excessif de la part des titulaires du droit d'auteur et d'autres formes de propriété intellectuelle pourrait restreindre indûment la capacité du domaine public d'intégrer et d'embellir l'innovation créative dans l'intérêt à long terme de l'ensemble de la société...

En 2004, dans l'affaire CCH, la Cour suprême a inventé un droit de l'utilisateur en disant: « À l'instar des autres exceptions que prévoit la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, cette exception correspond à un droit des utilisateurs. »

Théberge et CCH reposent sur un mythe qui veut que les auteurs puissent cacher leur travail et ne pas laisser le public y avoir accès.

En troisième lieu, il y a la technologie. Avec Internet, l'accès à l'art et la démocratisation de la création sont, bien sûr, formidables, mais ils écartent les droits et la rémunération des auteurs. Nous avons été témoins de l'arrivée d'un nouveau type d'auteur qui ne s'intéresse pas à la protection du droit d'auteur — comme Creative Commons, ici, devant votre comité — et qui n'a pas besoin de rémunération. Avec les nouvelles technologies, les législateurs — pas seulement au Canada — ont en quelque sorte abdiqué et laissé les sociétés privées imposer leur loi. C'est le cas de Google, qui a redéfini l'utilisation équitable et la rémunération avec Google Books, Google News, Google Images et YouTube.

Il y a un virage qui profite à tout le monde — le public, les fournisseurs d'Internet et les sociétés de la Silicon Valley —, mais pas les auteurs. C'est ce que nous appelons un transfert de valeur. Le résultat combiné de la loi, de la jurisprudence et de la technologie est un recul de la protection du droit d'auteur pour les auteurs.

À mon avis, pour légiférer, il faut travailler avec des études. Quels ont été les effets économiques des modifications de 2012? Les auteurs ont-ils touché plus de redevances ou moins?

Depuis l'arrivée d'Internet, les revenus des auteurs ont reculé. Selon une étude que nous avons réalisée au Québec avec l'INRS, l'Institut national de la recherche scientifique, et le ministère des Affaires culturelles, les revenus deviennent des micro-revenus. Je pense qu'Access Copyright, Copibec, l'Union des écrivains et beaucoup de personnes sont venus vous dire que les revenus ont baissé.

D'autre part, quels sont les revenus des fournisseurs d'Internet et des sociétés de la Silicon Valley? Ont-ils reculé?

Les artistes devraient être mieux protégés en tant que valeur sociale et culturelle. Ce n'est pas une question d'équilibre. Si l'art est important, nous devons nous soucier des auteurs. Il faut respecter les principes généraux de notre loi concernant le statut de l'artiste.

J'ai quelques propositions à vous présenter.

Premièrement, de façon générale, vous devriez simplifier le libellé de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Ce libellé est du charabia à certains moments. Par exemple, personne ne peut vraiment expliquer la distinction entre fins non commerciales, fins privées, usage privé et études privées. Les règles confuses et compliquées ne sont habituellement pas respectées.

Deuxièmement, vous pouvez réparer ce qui a été, à mon avis, brisé en 2012. Supprimez toutes les exceptions de 2012, ou conservez-les en ajoutant un mécanisme de rémunération. Le Canada doit se conformer, comme vous le savez, au triple critère de la Convention de Berne. Il s'agirait de remplacer l'autorisation par une redevance, un modèle de licence globale comme le régime de la copie pour usage privé de 1997. Le régime de la copie pour usage privé était une réaction à une technologie qui donne au public la possibilité de reproduire lui-même l'oeuvre et rémunère les titulaires des droits.

Troisièmement, ajoutez un droit de suite. Je pense que le RAAV, le Regroupement des artistes en arts visuels, et le CARFAC, le Front des artistes canadiens, ont témoigné en ce sens. Le droit de suite est une façon tangible de marquer un appui aux artistes visuels.

Quatrièmement, créez une exception d'utilisation équitable pour les oeuvres de création, c'est-à-dire clarifiez le droit de citer pour les artistes visuels et les musiciens.

Cinquièmement, donnez un plus grand rôle aux sociétés de gestion du droit d'auteur. Elles sont la façon tangible de rendre le droit d'auteur fonctionnel en donnant accès aux redevances. Vous pourriez peut-être songer à l'octroi de licences collectives étendues, et cela pourrait être une solution.

Sixièmement et enfin, il faudrait peut-être inclure une disposition pour les auteurs professionnels, quelque chose qui serait plus convergent avec la Loi sur le statut de l'artiste et la notion d'entrepreneur indépendant.

Je termine en disant que nous devons décider dans quelle perspective il faut voir le droit d'auteur. Le défi est d'agir, comme vous le savez, comme législateur, et non comme spectateur.

Merci.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Ariel Katz, de l'Université de Toronto.

Vous avez sept minutes, monsieur.

M. Ariel Katz (professeur agrégé et titulaire de la Chaire d’innovation, commerce électronique, University of Toronto, à titre personnel):

Bonjour.

Je m'appelle Ariel Katz. Je suis professeur de droit à l'Université de Toronto, où je suis titulaire de la chaire d'innovation en commerce électronique. Je vous suis très reconnaissant de me donner l'occasion de comparaître devant vous cet après-midi.

Dans mes observations d'aujourd'hui, je m'attacherai à dissiper certains renseignements erronés au sujet de l'application de la législation sur le droit d'auteur et de l'utilisation équitable dans le secteur de l'éducation.

Depuis 2012, Access Copyright et certains organismes d'éditeurs et d'auteurs mènent une campagne intensive et malheureusement plutôt efficace, qui dépeint le Canada comme un endroit désastreux pour les écrivains et les éditeurs. Cette campagne, que j'appelle le « dénigrement du droit d'auteur au Canada », repose sur l'information erronée, les faits inventés et parfois le mensonge pur et simple. Malheureusement, elle a calomnié le Canada et ses établissements d'enseignement, non seulement au pays, mais aussi à l'étranger.

Au début de la campagne, il y a quatre ans, j'ai réfuté bon nombre des accusations contenues dans une série de blogues. Je vous encourage à les lire. Je vous invite également à lire les mémoires et les messages de Michael Geist, de Meera Nair et d'autres. Je pourrai vous communiquer les liens d'accès.

Néanmoins, le dénigrement du droit d'auteur persiste. Il persiste parce qu'il présente trois faits corrects et simples, les enrobe d'une rhétorique séduisante et de demi-vérités, et raconte une histoire convaincante, mais totalement fictive.

Voici les trois faits non controversés.

Le premier fait, c'est que depuis quelques années, et surtout depuis 2012, la plupart des établissements d'enseignement ne se procurent plus des licences d'Access Copyright, qui a vu ses revenus fondre comme neige au soleil. C'est vrai.

Le deuxième fait, c'est que, par conséquent, le montant qu'Access Copyright a distribué à ses membres et à ses sociétés affiliés a également diminué considérablement. C'est aussi vrai.

Le troisième fait, c'est que la plupart des auteurs canadiens indépendants, c'est-à-dire les romanciers, les poètes et certains auteurs d'ouvrages à valeur documentaire, tirent très peu de revenus de leur écriture. C'est vrai.

Tout cela est exact. Ce qui n'est pas vrai, c'est l'affirmation selon laquelle les changements à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur au Canada et les décisions des universités de ne pas se procurer de licences d'Access Copyright sont responsables de la baisse des revenus des auteurs canadiens.

Tout d'abord, comme certains témoins vous l'ont dit, même si elles ont cessé de payer Access Copyright, les universités continuent de payer le contenu. De fait, le contenu leur coûte plus cher qu'auparavant. La plupart des éditeurs se tirent assez bien d'affaire, voire extrêmement bien.

Si le contenu ne coûte pas moins cher, mais plus cher aux établissements d'enseignement, vous vous demandez peut-être alors pourquoi les gains des auteurs canadiens diminuent plutôt que d'augmenter? Cela semble être la question qui vous rend perplexes. Je vais essayer de vous éclairer.

Pour répondre à cette question, nous devons entrer dans les détails du modèle d'affaires d'Access Copyright et examiner des choses comme celles-ci: quelles oeuvres Access Copyright a-t-il réellement dans son répertoire? Quels sont les auteurs qui en sont membres, et lesquels ne le sont-ils pas? Quel type de contenu les universités utilisent-elles généralement? Comment Access Copyright distribue-t-il réellement l'argent perçu?

Je vais tenter de répondre à ces questions. La logique qui sous-tend le modèle d'affaires d'Access Copyright est désarmante par sa simplicité et son attrait. Access Copyright offre aux établissements d'enseignement des licences qui leur permettent essentiellement de copier chaque oeuvre dont ils ont besoin, sans s'inquiéter du droit d'auteur. Il impose des droits de licence raisonnables, qu'il répartit entre les titulaires des droits d'auteur, et tout le monde est heureux pendant très longtemps.

Voilà qui semble formidable, sauf que ce modèle ne peut fonctionner que si vous croyez à deux fictions. D'abord, il faut croire qu'Access Copyright a vraiment le répertoire qu'il offre sous licence. En second lieu, vous devez croire qu'un cartel d'éditeurs offrirait un service intéressant moyennant des droits raisonnables. Mais les bonnes fictions ne font pas de bons modèles d'affaires.

Access Copyright n'a jamais eu le vaste répertoire qu'il offre sous licence. En vertu de la loi, Access Copyright ne peut donner une licence autorisant la reproduction d'une oeuvre que si le titulaire du droit d'auteur l'a autorisé à octroyer une licence pour son compte. C'aurait été un miracle si Access Copyright avait effectivement réussi à convaincre tous les titulaires de droits d'auteur de le laisser agir pour leur compte. C'était du jamais vu.

Access Copyright a toujours su qu'il n'avait pas vraiment le pouvoir légal d'octroyer toutes les licences qu'il donnait, mais cela ne l'a pas empêché de prétendre avoir pour ainsi dire toutes les oeuvres publiées dans son répertoire. Dans la pratique, Access Copyright vend aux universités l'équivalent en droit d'auteur du pont de Brooklyn. Cependant, en ce qui concerne le droit d'auteur, non seulement Access Copyright ne peut pas octroyer de licence pour ce qui ne lui appartient pas ou qui n'appartient pas à ses membres, mais encore toute tentative en ce sens constitue, en soi, un acte de violation du droit d'auteur.

Oui, vous serez peut-être surpris d'apprendre qu'Access Copyright a, à mon avis, commis l'un des pires actes de violation du droit d'auteur que le Canada ait jamais connus, en donnant des licences pour des oeuvres qui n'appartiennent ni à lui, ni à ses membres.

(1545)



Pendant de nombreuses années, les établissements d'enseignement se sont facilement prêtés à son jeu et ont oublié que le répertoire d'Access Copyright est de portée limitée. C'est que le contrat de licence renfermait une clause d'indemnisation. Il disait essentiellement aux universités: « Ne vous inquiétez pas de savoir si nous pouvons légalement vous donner la permission de copier ces oeuvres, parce que, tant que vous nous paierez, nous vous protégerons. Nous vous indemniserons si jamais le titulaire du droit d'auteur se manifeste et intente une poursuite contre vous. Nous assumons ce risque. » Tant qu'elles payaient les prix suffisamment bas, les universités étaient satisfaites de cette politique « ne demandez rien, ne dites rien ». Elles ont simplement continué de payer en se croyant protégées.

On s'attendrait que s'il recevait des fonds pour l'utilisation d'oeuvres ne faisant pas partie de son répertoire, Access Copyright rembourserait l'argent à l'établissement qui aurait payé — qui aurait trop payé —, mais ce n'est pas ainsi que fonctionne Access Copyright. Access Copyright garde plutôt les fonds qu'il perçoit pour des oeuvres qui ne lui appartiennent pas et les distribue parmi ses membres. Il s'agit principalement de l'argent qui est presque disparu et au sujet duquel vous entendez de nombreuses plaintes.

À ce stade-ci, il est important de considérer quels auteurs sont effectivement membres d'Access Copyright, lesquels ne le sont pas, et quel type d'oeuvres sont effectivement utilisées dans les universités.

En général, sauf pour une poignée de cours dans les départements d'anglais, les universités canadiennes n'offrent pas de cours de littérature canadienne. Lorsqu'elles en offrent, les étudiants achètent ces livres. Comme l'a écrit récemment l'historien et professeur d'anglais Nick Mount de l'Université de Toronto dans son ouvrage intitulé Arrival: The Story of CanLit, « Dans onze des vingt plus grandes universités canadiennes, anglophones et francophones confondues, on peut faire une majeure en littérature qui n'a rien de canadien. »

Vous serez peut-être surpris, mais vous ne devriez pas. La plupart des universités canadiennes sont des établissements d'enseignement sérieux. Les oeuvres qu'elles utilisent habituellement pour la recherche et l'enseignement sont des oeuvres universitaires produites par des universitaires, parfois canadiens, mais bien souvent étrangers. Les universités canadiennes ne sont pas des écoles paroissiales, mais des établissements d'enseignement sérieux. Elles sont membres en règle de l'entreprise mondiale de la science. L'étude de la littérature canadienne contemporaine ne représente qu'une infime partie de cette entreprise. En outre, la plupart des auteurs universitaires, ceux qui produisent la plupart des ouvrages utilisés dans les universités, ne sont même pas membres d'Access Copyright.

Selon Statistique Canada, il y a 46 000 enseignants à temps plein dans les universités canadiennes. La plupart sont des auteurs actifs qui écrivent et publient — sous peine de mourir. Certains professeurs sont membres d'Access Copyright, mais la plupart ne le sont pas...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, monsieur Katz, nous dépassons un peu le temps prévu à notre horaire serré. Je vous demanderais de conclure rapidement, je vous prie.

M. Ariel Katz:

D'accord.

Les universités canadiennes emploient 46 000 auteurs universitaires à temps plein, et Access Copyright ne compte que 12 000 membres auteurs. À elle seule, l'Université de Toronto a plus de membres auteurs qu'Access Copyright. Autrement dit, la très grande majorité des oeuvres que vous utilisez dans les universités ne sont même pas les oeuvres de membres d'Access Copyright.

Où est cet argent que les auteurs et les membres d'Access Copyright recevaient jadis? Ils ne le voient plus. D'où venait cet argent? Il venait d'Access Copyright, qui percevait des droits pour tout, même pour ce qu'il ne possédait pas. Ce qu'il ne possédait pas, il le gardait pour lui-même et distribuait l'argent aux auteurs. Cela a duré tant que le modèle a fonctionné, mais le modèle a fini par succomber à ses défaillances et s'est effondré. C'est l'argent qui a disparu.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Ariel Katz:

Cela a très peu à voir avec le droit d'auteur et très peu avec l'utilisation équitable.

Le président:

Merci. Je suis sûr qu'on aura beaucoup de questions à vous poser.

Nous allons passer à M. Barry Sookman. Vous avez sept minutes, je vous prie.

M. Barry Sookman (associé chez McCarthy Tétrault et professeur auxiliaire, Droit de la propriété intellectuelle, Osgoode Hall Law School, à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Il est bien dommage que le débat ne porte pas sur Access Copyright. J'aurais volontiers consacré mes sept minutes à répondre à ce qui vient d'être dit.

Merci beaucoup de me donner l’occasion de comparaître aujourd’hui.

Je suis associé principal au cabinet d’avocats McCarthy Tétrault. J’enseigne également le droit de la propriété intellectuelle à la Osgoode Hall Law School. J'ai une connaissance à la fois pratique et théorique du droit d’auteur. J’aimerais vous faire part de certaines de mes réflexions aujourd’hui.

Le droit d’auteur existe d'abord et avant tout à titre de cadre servant à encourager les créateurs à créer des oeuvres et à les rendre publiques. Il s'agit de veiller à ce que les créateurs soient rémunérés adéquatement pour leurs efforts. Vous avez entendu de nombreux arguments pour les exemptions générales et l’utilisation gratuite des oeuvres. Dans mon exposé, j’aimerais vous fournir quelques balises pour vous aider à analyser bon nombre des propos contradictoires que vous avez entendus, tout particulièrement les propos de ceux qui s’opposent à des lois-cadres sensées, lesquelles sont nécessaires pour soutenir une communauté créative et dynamique ainsi que des marchés de produits créatifs qui fonctionnent bien.

Je me propose de décrypter pour vous certaines demandes fondées sur des normes et certains arguments trompeurs qui vous ont été présentés en opposition à des lois-cadres raisonnables.

Vous l'avez entendu: en se fondant sur la norme d’équité, on en a appelé à des exceptions au droit d’auteur. Toutefois, ici, utilisation équitable veut dire utilisation gratuite. Il faut bien voir ce que signifie « utilisation gratuite ». Gratuit ou libre ne sont pas forcément des synonymes d'équité ou de juste valeur marchande. Les tribunaux canadiens ont élaboré un cadre unique et étendu pour déterminer ce qui constitue une utilisation équitable. Cependant, qu'une chose soit ou non équitable en droit ne permet pas de conclure qu'elle est ou non équitable en fait et qu'elle est ou non dans l’intérêt public. C’est d’autant plus vrai que la Cour suprême du Canada a statué qu’une utilisation peut être équitable même si elle a un effet négatif sur le marché.

Il ne faut pas croire qu'en ajoutant « comme » — suivi d'exemples — dans l’exception relative à l’utilisation équitable, comme certains l’ont préconisé, on ne fait que rendre la loi plus souple, sans plus. L’appel à la norme de flexibilité reflète l'idée selon laquelle les utilisations obligatoirement gratuites devraient être étendues à certaines utilisations que le Parlement n'a pas encore explicitement autorisées ni même imaginées. Cette proposition a été rejetée en 2012 après que l'ensemble du secteur de la création — ou presque — s’y soit opposé, notamment dans un important mémoire contre le processus de réforme.

Comme vous l'avez aussi entendu, on en a appelé aux exceptions au nom de l’équilibre, mais le concept d’équilibre ne fournit pas de balises pour la réforme du droit d’auteur, pas plus qu’il ne fournit un cadre raisonné pour les réformes des lois fiscales, énergétiques ou autres. Vous devriez prendre garde aux appels à des réformes fondés sur des normes comme la norme d'équilibre et non pas sur des justifications fondées sur des principes. Les décisions de la Cour suprême sur le droit d’auteur font souvent référence à l’équilibre, mais il ne s'agit pas de quelque équilibre mythique. Ce que la cour nous enseigne, c'est que les objectifs complémentaires du droit d’auteur sont, d'une part, d’encourager la création et la diffusion d’oeuvres et, d'autre part, d’offrir une juste rétribution aux créateurs. Voilà les objectifs sur lesquels le Comité devrait se concentrer.

On vous a aussi dit que des exceptions sont nécessaires pour promouvoir l’accès aux oeuvres et favoriser l’innovation. Les créateurs appuient sans réserve un cadre favorisant l’innovation et un vaste accès aux oeuvres, mais en faisant de l'accès gratuit une norme directrice, on n’encourage pas les nouveaux investissements des créateurs et on ne paye pas les créateurs comme il se doit. Comme Georges vient de le dire dans son exposé, si on établit des exemptions et des limites étendues des droits, on crée des écarts de valeur, c’est-à-dire que les créateurs ne peuvent plus vendre leurs oeuvres au prix courant et ils ne sont pas suffisamment rémunérés, si du moins ils le sont.

Les opposants aux droits des créateurs justifient souvent le piratage en soutenant qu’il s’agit au fond d’un modèle d’affaires et que les créateurs devraient vendre leurs contenus à des prix concurrentiels par rapport à ceux qui volent et distribuent ces contenus. Ce modèle d’affaires défie les principes économiques fondamentaux. De même, pour s'opposer aux droits et aux recours dont les créateurs ont besoin, on argue que ceux-ci réussissent bien malgré le piratage, parce qu’ils reçoivent des paiements pour d’autres utilisations ou parce qu’ils ont d’autres revenus. L’argument selon lequel « ils se débrouillent bien » constitue un jugement normatif voulant que les créateurs ne doivent pas disposer d'un cadre de droit d’auteur leur permettant de réaliser leur plein potentiel — tout ce qu'ils pourraient produire et gagner s'il n'y avait pas de piratage et d'utilisations non rémunérées.

(1550)



L’argument selon lequel « ils tirent de l’argent d’autres sources » est un autre jugement normatif voulant que les créateurs ne doivent pas être rémunérés pour l’utilisation de leurs oeuvres par d’autres personnes — une utilisation qui n'est pas sans valeur —, par exemple lorsqu’ils font montre d'innovation en mettant de nouveaux produits sur le marché, même si cette innovation ne couvre pas les pertes de revenus liées à d'autres utilisations.

En fin de compte, les arguments fallacieux sont fondés sur le jugement normatif selon lequel l'acquisition et la consommation gratuites d'un produit ou d'un service sont justifiables. Au fond, le créateur se trouve ainsi obligé de subventionner des utilisations de ses oeuvres et même le piratage. Ce sont là des affirmations que la plupart des gens n'oseraient jamais formuler en dehors du contexte du débat sur le droit d’auteur.

On vous dit que les lois qui contribueraient à lutter contre le piratage en ligne, comme le blocage des sites, ne devraient pas être adoptées. Des recours administratifs ou judiciaires de blocage des sites Web existent dans plus de 40 pays. Ce n’est pas une démarche expérimentale, contrairement à ce qu'un témoin vous a dit. Ces recours viennent soutenir le bon fonctionnement des marchés, qui autrement sont minés par le piratage. Selon de nombreuses études et selon des tribunaux du monde entier, le blocage des sites Web est tout à fait conforme à la liberté d’expression et il constitue un moyen efficace pour lutter contre le piratage et promouvoir l’utilisation de sites Web légitimes.

Nous pouvons tirer des leçons de l’expérience internationale. Le Royaume-Uni étudie actuellement la possibilité d'élargir son régime pour inclure le blocage par voie administrative. L’Australie vient d’adopter une loi pour étendre le blocage des sites au délistage des sites dans les moteurs de recherche.

Lorsque des gens s’opposent à des recours raisonnables contre ce qui constitue manifestement un vol en ligne et lorsque ces personnes ne ménagent aucun effort pour empêcher les créateurs de disposer d'une loi-cadre leur permettant de contrôler l’utilisation de leurs oeuvres et d’être rémunérés à une juste valeur marchande pour cette utilisation, il convient de se demander pourquoi. Plus précisément, vous devriez vous demander, d'une part, quel sens moral et quelles valeurs sous-tendent ces arguments et, d'autre part, s’ils sont conformes aux normes que le Comité est prêt à accepter dans le contexte du droit d’auteur ou dans tout autre contexte.

Je vous remercie de m’avoir donné l’occasion de comparaître aujourd’hui. Je répondrai volontiers à vos questions.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Enfin, nous accueillons M. Steven Seiferling, de l’Association du Barreau canadien. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Steven Seiferling (cadre de direction, Section de la propriété intellectuelle, Association du Barreau canadien):

Je laisse Mme MacKenzie commencer.

Mme Sarah MacKenzie (avocate, Réforme du droit, Association du Barreau canadien):

Merci beaucoup.

Je m'appelle Sarah MacKenzie. Je suis avocate à la Réforme du droit de l'Association du Barreau canadien — soit l'ABC. Je vous remercie de m’avoir invitée à présenter le point de vue de l’ABC sur l’examen de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur.

L’ABC est une association nationale comptant plus de 36 000 avocats, étudiants, notaires et universitaires. Elle a pour mandat d’améliorer le droit et l’administration de la justice.

Notre mémoire, que vous avez reçu, représente la position de la Section de la propriété intellectuelle de l’ABC, position qui a été déterminée en consultation avec des membres provenant d’autres sections de l’ABC. La section de la PI de l’ABC s’occupe du droit et de la pratique de la propriété intellectuelle en matière de titularité, de licences, de cession et de protection.

Je suis accompagnée aujourd’hui de Steve Seiferling, cadre de direction à la Section de la PI de l’ABC et président du comité du droit d’auteur de cette section. M. Seiferling formulera les observations de l’ABC sur l’examen de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, puis il répondra à vos questions.

Merci.

M. Steven Seiferling:

Monsieur le président, chers membres du Comité, je vous remercie.

Notre mémoire aborde beaucoup d'enjeux; je serai heureux de les aborder lors des questions. Cela dit, j’aimerais me focaliser sur deux sujets qui ont un thème en commun, soit l’utilisation optimale des ressources judiciaires, ou des juges, en matière de droit d’auteur. Dans les deux domaines sur lesquels je veux mettre l'accent, nous avons créé une situation où, des demandes de nature judiciaire étant requises, il y a trop de recours inutiles et lourds au système de justice. Nous nous demandons si, dans bien des cas, une solution de rechange aux demandes de nature judiciaire ne pourrait pas s'appliquer efficacement.

Le premier sujet n'a pas beaucoup été abordé, malgré le grand nombre de témoins dont M. Azzaria a parlé. Il s'agit des importations et de la lutte contre la contrefaçon. Vous n’en avez pas beaucoup entendu parler.

À l’heure actuelle, si le titulaire d'une marque ou de droits d’auteur s’est inscrit auprès de l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et qu’une contrefaçon est découverte sans l'ombre d'un doute lors de l'importation à la frontière, l'importateur peut tout simplement omettre de répondre ou se rendre difficilement joignable pendant une courte période de 10 jours. C’est la limite de la durée pendant laquelle l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada retient des marchandises en l'absence de demande judiciaire. Si aucune demande judiciaire n'a été présentée à la fin de la période de 10 jours, les marchandises sont remises à l’importateur.

La section de l’ABC propose que, dans le cas des contrefaçons qui ne font aucun doute — il ne s'agit pas des cas où l'on se demande si les produits sont vraiment authentiques —, le titulaire de la marque ou des droits d’auteur puisse faire une déclaration sous serment, après quoi les produits pourraient être détruits ou saisis sans qu’une ordonnance judiciaire soit nécessaire et sans qu’il faille imposer un fardeau supplémentaire aux tribunaux.

Le deuxième sujet que je veux aborder, vous en avez beaucoup entendu parler. Il s’agit de l'avis et avis.

Le réseau Internet n'a pas de frontières, mais nos lois en ont. En dépit des modifications récentes et des propositions d’amendement, notre système actuel ne nous permet de lutter contre la violation du droit d’auteur en ligne que lorsque trois conditions sont réunies. Premièrement, le présumé contrevenant se trouve au Canada. Deuxièmement, l'identité du présumé contrevenant peut être déterminée, ce qui n'est pas le cas s'il falsifie ou masque son identité ou son adresse IP, chose courante dans ce genre de situation. Troisièmement, le titulaire des droits présente une demande. Au Canada, notre système est ainsi fait. Là encore, cela absorbe une partie du temps et des ressources des tribunaux.

En réalité, la plupart des contrevenants ne se trouvent pas au Canada et ne feront qu'ignorer les avis qui leur seront remis par un intermédiaire. Le régime d’avis et avis ne tient pas compte de l'absence de frontières dans le réseau Internet. Si, au Canada, nous décidons de ne pas tenir les intermédiaires responsables pour les allégations de contrefaçon, il faudrait à tout le moins que nous adoptions le système d’« avis et retrait », un système qui prend acte des problèmes posés par Internet à l'échelle mondiale et qui permet aux titulaires de droits de mieux défendre leurs oeuvres protégées par le droit d’auteur.

À titre d'exemple, supposons que quelqu'un se rend sur le site Web de mon cabinet d’avocats et télécharge ma photo. La personne ouvre un compte, disons, sur le site des amateurs des Maple Leafs de Toronto. Je suis un partisan des Oilers, alors si je me retrouve sur le site des Leafs, ce n’est pas très convenable. Ensuite, la personne dit à quel point j’aime les Maple Leafs, tout en affichant ma photo.

À titre de titulaire de droits, je dispose du recours suivant: je peux déposer un avis auprès de l’intermédiaire, c'est-à-dire le site Web, avis qui devrait ensuite être acheminé au contrevenant. J'obtiens quelques renseignements que je peux utiliser pour présenter une demande en justice, si les renseignements contiennent l'identité de la personne. La demande ne sera utile que si les conditions suivantes sont réunies: la personne qui a ouvert ce faux compte se trouve au Canada; son identité peut être déterminée; la personne n'a pas masqué ou dissimulé son identité véritable. Pendant ce temps, tout le monde pense que je suis devenu un partisan des Maple Leafs.

J’utilise cet exemple un peu à la blague. Or, que se passerait-il si, au lieu de m'associer aux Maple Leafs, on m’associait — moi ou n'importe quelle personne dont la photo se trouve sur Internet — au crime organisé ou à d'autres activités beaucoup plus douteuses qu'un site de partisans d'une équipe de hockey? Les difficultés liées à l’application de la loi seraient les mêmes.

En conservant le régime d’avis et avis au Canada, nous ne prenons pas acte du caractère international d’Internet et de ses utilisateurs.

Voilà qui met fin à ma déclaration préliminaire. Je répondrai volontiers à vos questions portant sur ce sujet ou sur d'autres enjeux soulevés par l’ABC.

(1600)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de passer aux questions, je dois informer tout le monde que nous aurons besoin d’environ 10 minutes à la fin. Nous devons discuter de nos trois dernières réunions et des défis qui se sont présentés à nous. Nous réserverons du temps à la fin pour cela.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci à tous d’être venus témoigner à l'occasion de cette étude importante et déroutante. Nous avons entendu beaucoup d’opinions diverses. C'est pourquoi nous vous avons convoqués vers la fin de l'étude, afin que vous nous aidiez à faire le tri dans les propos que nous avons entendus.

J’aimerais commencer par M. Azzaria.

Lorsque vous parlez de la diminution des redevances et des revenus des auteurs et que vous opposez la démocratisation de la technologie à la rémunération des créateurs pour leurs oeuvres, il semble que le système manque de transparence. En tentant de cerner le point de rupture du système, pouvez-vous nous dire dans quels secteurs nous devrions concentrer nos efforts pour que les créateurs soient rémunérés?

M. Georges Azzaria:

Il y a beaucoup de choses à dire. Ce que j’essayais d'exprimer, c’est que la démocratisation de la création est une excellente chose. Votre voisin fait de l’art, c’est fantastique, mais le problème, c’est qu'il entre en concurrence avec des artistes professionnels qui veulent gagner leur vie avec leurs oeuvres. Comme il offre son oeuvre gratuitement, il ne se soucie pas du droit d’auteur, mais l’artiste professionnel, lui, s’en soucie.

Il existe différentes façons d’essayer de trouver un mécanisme pour faire la part des choses. Ce n’est qu’une hypothèse. Je parlerai d'abord en termes généraux, puis nous pourrons établir des distinctions. Il pourrait y avoir un système de participation facultative. Tout le monde ferait partie d’une société de gestion collective, mais votre voisin, par exemple, pourrait s'en retirer volontairement, puisqu’il ne se soucie pas du droit d’auteur ou qu’il n’en a pas besoin pour gagner sa vie. L'autre solution, ce serait d'avoir quelque chose qui soit cohérent avec la Loi concernant le statut de l’artiste et régissant les relations professionnelles entre artistes et producteurs au Canada, une loi que vous connaissez peut-être.

C’est une loi très intéressante. Si vous lisez les principes généraux, vous verrez qu'on y met beaucoup l’accent sur l’importance des artistes dans notre société. C’est pour les artistes professionnels. On pourrait ainsi penser les choses en établissant une distinction entre deux types de créateurs: les professionnels et les non-professionnels. Je ne dis pas que les non-professionnels sont des « amateurs » et que ce qu’ils font n’est pas bon. Je dis simplement que certains veulent gagner leur vie grâce aux droits d’auteur et d’autres ne s’en soucient tout simplement pas. Or, ces derniers commencent à affirmer que le droit d’auteur n’est pas important pour qui que ce soit.

Je ne sais pas si j'ai pu vous donner une réponse claire.

(1605)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui. Il y a beaucoup de gens dans le domaine parce qu'il y a peu d'obstacles à l’entrée, mais nous devrions trouver le moyen de séparer ceux dont c'est le gagne-pain des autres.

M. Georges Azzaria:

C’est une hypothèse. Selon la deuxième hypothèse, il y aurait un système de participation facultative. Cependant, il faudrait que toutes les sociétés de gestion se mettent d'accord, car du point de vue de la Convention de Berne, la proposition pourrait paraître quelque peu farfelue.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D’accord. Merci.

Je me tourne maintenant vers M. Sookman et peut-être aussi vers l’Association du Barreau.

Au sujet de l’examen quinquennal qui nous occupe en ce moment, des témoins nous ont dit lors de la dernière réunion que cette fréquence est beaucoup trop élevée et que la Cour suprême n'en a pas encore fini avec l’examen précédent. On commence à peine à se pencher sur certaines affaires. Nous allons commencer à modifier la loi alors que nous ne savons même pas encore si elle fonctionne.

Que pensez-vous de la fréquence de l'examen? Les témoins nous ont également dit que, en effectuant cet examen si fréquemment, nous faisons le jeu des groupes de pression sans vraiment aider la société.

M. Barry Sookman:

Il ne faut pas oublier que même s’il y a un examen quinquennal, le Parlement a une marge de manoeuvre assez grande pour décider si l'examen portera sur l’ensemble de la loi ou non. La technologie évolue et, de ce fait, les intervenants font l'objet d'une pression énorme. Il en va ainsi dans ce domaine. Étant donné que le droit d’auteur est une loi-cadre très importante, il est important de l'examiner pour s’assurer qu’elle fonctionne bien.

Par ailleurs, il y a une jurisprudence non négligeable de la Cour suprême sur ce sujet. Sur le terrain, on constate déjà qu’il y a des problèmes et qu’il faut trouver des solutions. Étant donné que, dans le monde d’Internet, les choses changent sept fois plus vite qu'ailleurs, les cinq prochaines années devraient nous donner 35 ans d’expérience. Ce n'est pas une mauvaise idée d'examiner la loi tous les 35 ans, à mon avis.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D’accord. Que le prochain témoignage soit un examen du précédent, alors.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Lloyd Longfield: Qu’en pense-t-on à l’ABC? Vous avez parlé du fardeau des tribunaux. Il s'agit d'un autre aspect très intéressant que nous devons prendre en considération.

M. Steven Seiferling:

Je vais parler de l’examen quinquennal, puis je parlerai un peu du fardeau des tribunaux.

Pour ce qui est de l’examen quinquennal, il suffit d’examiner le cycle de la technologie. Nous innovons à la vitesse de l'éclair. Si nous innovons à une telle vitesse, notre loi ne devrait-elle pas évoluer à la même vitesse, dans la mesure du possible? En 2012, nous étions à la traîne. Nous faisions un énorme effort de rattrapage pour tenter de régler des problèmes que nous avions cernés 10 ou 15 ans auparavant, peut-être. Nous tentions de ratifier des traités qui existaient déjà à la fin des années 1990. Voilà qui pose problème.

Cinq ans, ce n'est pas exagéré, non. L'examen ne vient pas trop tôt.

Pour répondre à l’autre partie de votre question, je dirai qu'une loi claire aura pour effet d'alléger le fardeau des tribunaux. Si nous sommes en mesure d’examiner et de peaufiner la loi plus souvent, je pense que ce sera utile pour les avocats que l’ABC représente et pour les juges qui ont déjà été avocats. Le nombre d'affaires et le fardeau judiciaire s'en trouveront réduits.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Ce que vous dites, c’est que la loi n'assure pas une protection suffisante contre les acteurs étrangers.

M. Steven Seiferling:

Oui, c’est exact, surtout en ce qui concerne la question des avis et avis.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je n’aurai pas le temps de poser d’autres questions.

Je vous redonne donc la parole, monsieur le président.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Albas.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins d’aujourd’hui.

Je vais simplement proposer une motion pour que nous puissions débattre un sujet très important. La motion se lit comme suit: Que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, entreprenne une étude sur l'impact de la fermeture annoncée de l'usine de General Motors à Oshawa, et sur ses répercussions à l'échelle de l'économie générale et de la province de l'Ontario, et que cette étude s'échelonne sur au moins quatre réunions.

Je crois pouvoir présenter cette motion, monsieur le président. J’espère que vous la jugerez recevable.

Le président:

Votre motion est recevable et vous pouvez la proposer.

Comme vous avez terminé, la parole est à M. Carrie.

M. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Tout d’abord, je tiens à remercier mon collègue et tous ceux qui sont autour de la table depuis la semaine dernière, depuis que nous avons appris cette nouvelle en provenance d'Oshawa au sujet de l’usine de General Motors. Je vous remercie tous sincèrement de vos commentaires et de m’avoir offert votre aide.

Je tiens à m’excuser auprès des témoins. Je sais que j'interromps les travaux, mais cela concerne un problème énorme dans ma collectivité.

J’ai été heureux d’entendre le premier ministre s’engager à élaborer un plan. Je connais ce comité. J’ai déjà siégé à ce comité. C’est l’un des comités les moins partisans. S’il y a quelque chose que nous pouvons faire, il nous incombe de le faire.

Nous avons entendu parler des 2 800 emplois perdus à Oshawa, mais si l’on tient compte des retombées de ces emplois — de sept à neuf autres emplois indirects pour chacun d'eux —, cela représente environ 20 000 pertes d’emplois au total dans notre collectivité. Pour mettre les choses en perspective, on a annoncé la perte de 3 600 emplois aux États-Unis, mais l’économie américaine est environ 10 fois plus importante que la nôtre. Ce serait donc l’équivalent de quelque 200 000 emplois aux États-Unis. On nous a ensuite dit que le Mexique ne perdrait pratiquement aucun emploi.

J’ai été très heureux d’informer le Comité que nous avons pu nous rendre là-bas avec notre chef Andrew Scheer dans les 24 premières heures. Nous avons rencontré les maires et des dirigeants municipaux. Nous avons rencontré les dirigeants de GM et des gens d’affaires, et nous avons surtout pu nous rendre aux portes de l'usine.

Le maire, par mon entremise, a signalé à mes collègues libéraux qu'il aimerait bien recevoir un appel téléphonique du premier ministre pour déterminer les effets de cette fermeture sur notre collectivité et ses répercussions. C’est l’objet central de notre étude.

Le plus important pour nous, comme je l’ai dit, c’est d'avoir pu nous rendre aux portes de l'usine. C’est l’une des choses les plus difficiles à voir lorsque des travailleurs apprennent cette nouvelle, un dimanche soir à l'heure du souper, qu’ils perdent leur emploi. Ils retournaient à l’usine pour la première fois depuis l'annonce, et l’un des commentaires m’a vraiment frappé. C’était celui d'une travailleuse; appelons-la simplement C. C’était une très jeune femme d'une trentaine d'années. Elle m’a dit qu’elle travaillait à l'usine depuis six ans et que c’était un excellent emploi, qui lui permettait de se loger, de nourrir ses enfants et d’envisager l'avenir avec optimisme. C’était tout cela qu'elle allait perdre. Après avoir entendu cela, je lui ai demandé quel message je pouvais transmettre de sa part. Elle m’a dit: « S’il vous plaît, luttez pour nos emplois et faites tout ce que vous pouvez. »

Donc, lorsque j’ai pris connaissance de cette motion à l’intention du Comité, l’étude des répercussions... Je pense qu’il est assez évident pour les gens autour de cette table que les répercussions ne concernent pas seulement des travailleurs comme C., mais aussi les usines qui approvisionnent celle d'Oshawa. J’étais à l'une d'elles ce week-end à Brockville, d'où je pouvais voir les États-Unis. Ils sont constamment victimes de tentatives de maraudage là-bas... que ce soit pour des emplois dans la collectivité, dans les restaurants, dans les points de vente au détail. Il y a aussi des répercussions sur la R-D, les milliards de dollars que dépense l’industrie automobile dans nos universités et collèges. C’est notre système d’éducation, notre savoir futur. Si nous perdons ces industries, ces connaissances disparaissent, tout comme les emplois de l’avenir.

Tout le monde conviendra que les répercussions sont énormes. Cette usine avait été récompensée, la meilleure usine GM. Si GM ne peut pas construire un véhicule neuf ou justifier sa production au Canada, nous avons un problème. Je pense que cette étude pourrait aider le premier ministre. Les investissements de ces entreprises ne se font qu’une fois par génération. Ce n’est pas quelque chose qu’ils font pour trois ou quatre ans, ou même 10 ans. Il s'agit d’investissements pour des décennies. Si nous pouvons vraiment mettre l’accent là-dessus maintenant... [Difficultés techniques].

Je crois que c’est Donald Trump qui essayait d’interrompre le comité pour ajouter son grain de sel.

Nous avons écouté des représentants d'entreprises parler de différentes politiques que nous pourrions peut-être examiner, qu’il s’agisse du coût de l’énergie, des tarifs sur l’acier et l’aluminium, de changements réglementaires, des taxes sur le carbone, etc. Cependant, une des choses que nous savons, c’est que Ray Tanguay a été nommé « tsar de l’automobile », et qu'il a élaboré un plan. Je pense que nous pourrions l'examiner dans le cadre de cette étude.

(1615)



Tout ce que veulent les travailleurs d’Oshawa, c’est la possibilité de soumissionner pour un nouvel investissement — un produit, un emploi. Par le passé, chaque fois que nous en avons eu l’occasion, nous avons été très résilients. Nous avons été très novateurs. Nous avons gagné lorsque nous avons eu la chance de soutenir la concurrence. L'espoir réside dans le fait que les représentants de General Motors n’ont pas dit qu’ils allaient démolir l’usine; ils ont dit qu’il n’y avait aucune allocation de produits après 2019.

Il y a donc de l’espoir, chers collègues. Les travailleurs et les dirigeants de ma collectivité veulent aider le premier ministre à réaliser son plan. Il était à la Chambre des communes pour dire qu’il y travaillait, mais il faut commencer immédiatement. Je ne saurais vous dire à quel point c’est urgent. Il faut découvrir les répercussions et élaborer un plan, parce que le temps presse.

Sur ce, monsieur le président, je tiens à vous remercier et à remercier nos témoins de me permettre de parler au nom de ma collectivité en cette période très difficile.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Carrie.

Monsieur Masse, la parole est à vous.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis de tout coeur avec les familles et les travailleurs d’Oshawa. General Motors a fermé ses portes dans ma collectivité après exactement 100 ans d’exploitation. Depuis 2002, je milite à la Chambre des communes en faveur d’une politique canadienne de l’automobile, semblable à ce que réclament les TCA et d’autres économistes.

D’autres États ont en fait une politique automobile précise. En fait, un certain nombre de ces États ont maintenant pris la place du Canada comme deuxième fabricant et assembleur d’automobiles, ce qui nous relègue maintenant au 10e rang. Nous avons perdu des dizaines de milliers d’emplois pendant cette période. En fait, nous avons tellement glissé que cela a même affecté notre chaîne d’approvisionnement nord-américaine. C’est malheureux, parce qu’un emploi dans le secteur de l’automobile équivaut à sept autres emplois dans l’économie. Voilà la douleur et la souffrance que ressent le député d’Oshawa. Je suis de tout coeur avec lui et sa collectivité, parce que cela ne concerne pas seulement les gens qui vont à l’usine tous les jours.

Il est important de noter que, dans le cadre d’une stratégie nationale de l’automobile que nous avons élaborée avec le regretté Jack Layton en 2003 — même David Suzuki y a contribué — en ce qui concerne l’automobile verte, des éléments précis ont été empruntés à de nombreux autres pays en raison de la transition. Il y a des travailleurs à Oshawa et ailleurs qui ont littéralement été les meilleurs. Ils ont été les meilleurs, comme en témoignent les prix du meilleur groupe motopropulseur qu’ils ont reçus pour leur travail, mais cela n’a pas été suffisant. C’est l’un des problèmes auxquels nous sommes confrontés dans cette industrie.

La motion dont nous sommes saisis vise un objectif raisonnable en quatre réunions. En fait, si elle pouvait être plus complète, c’est certainement quelque chose que j’appuierais. Mais il est important de noter, monsieur le président, que d’autres pays, encore une fois, continuent d'appliquer leurs politiques.

L’Allemagne a une politique. La Corée du Sud en a une aussi. Les États-Unis appliquent toute une série d’obstacles au commerce, et le tout nouvel AEUMC comporte une série d’obstacles liés à l’investissement. En fait, nos partenaires plafonnent notre investissement et ils créent de nouvelles taxes, qui font partie de l’accord à venir. Cela tombe sous le sens, parce que nous sommes en concurrence. Comme le député l’a fait remarquer, le rapport de Ray Tanguay — c’est le tsar de l’automobile — a été déposé en 2017. Malheureusement, rien n’a encore été fait dans ce dossier, même si cela fait presque un an. Cela fera un an dans un mois.

Le temps presse. Je me souviens que ce débat remonte à l’époque où j’ai découvert la politique libérale sur l’automobile dans l'une des salles de toilette, ici à la Chambre des communes. C’est une histoire vraie. Elle est bien expliquée à la Chambre. Nous en avons demandé une. Nous en avons presque eu une à un moment donné. À l’époque, le ministre Cannon était prêt à déposer une politique pour Paul Martin, mais lorsqu’il est ensuite passé aux conservateurs, il n’y a jamais donné suite.

Nous avons encore besoin d’un plan global. C’est la première étape. Le premier ministre nous a dit qu’il serait intéressé à le mettre en oeuvre. Je nous encourage à tenir les quatre réunions nécessaires. Je serais également prêt à rencontrer d’autres témoins. Je ne pense pas qu’il soit nécessaire d’interrompre les travaux de notre comité. J’espère que les auteurs de la motion accepteront cela.

Je vais conclure, pour que nous puissions entendre nos invités, mais je pense qu’il est important de souligner que nous avons l’occasion de réussir. Nous avons le temps prévu à notre horaire si nécessaire. J’encourage tous les députés à suivre le mouvement.

Merci de m'avoir écouté.

(1620)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Mme Caesar-Chavannes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureuse de pouvoir prendre la parole à ce sujet. Nous sommes de tout coeur avec les gens d’Oshawa. Je sais qu’à Whitby, il y a de nombreuses organisations qui contribuent à l’écosystème qui fait partie de l’environnement GM de façon beaucoup plus générale.

Monsieur le président, comme le député d’Oshawa l’a dit, les nouvelles sont encourageantes. Il n’y a pas eu d’allocation de nouveaux produits, mais cela peut encore changer. L’autre solution, c’est que, si elle ferme effectivement... Le député d’Oshawa a parlé d’élaborer un plan et de tenir ces quatre réunions pour que l'étude des répercussions fasse partie de l'élaboration de ce plan.

Je crois vraiment que les établissements d’enseignement, les chefs d’entreprise, les administrations municipales, les travailleurs et les gens qui participent à l’écosystème devraient être en mesure de mener la charge de l'élaboration de ce plan. Ils sont plus près de la source. Comme ils sont plus près des répercussions, ils doivent vraiment contribuer à ce plan dès le début et tout au long de son élaboration.

Je sais qu’il y a des discussions avec le premier ministre, comme vous l’avez dit, pour qu'il fasse ces appels téléphoniques. Encore une fois, une solution conçue à Ottawa pour ce qui se passe à Oshawa n’est pas raisonnable. Il faudra une stratégie à long terme pour nous assurer d’avoir les emplois d’aujourd’hui et de demain. Ceux qui sont le plus près de la situation peuvent élaborer le meilleur plan et la meilleure évaluation possible de ce qui se passe à Oshawa et dans les environs, dans la région de Durham.

Sur ce, je propose que nous passions au vote.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres interventions?

Dan, la parole est à vous.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le président, le député d’Oshawa a parlé avec beaucoup d’éloquence de la nécessité pour nous d’être aux côtés de la collectivité et de faire preuve de leadership en reconnaissant les avantages économiques globaux de cette industrie, non seulement à Oshawa, mais dans notre province et notre pays.

Je suis déçu d’entendre que les députés d’en face ne croient pas que nous pouvons être des chefs de file de cette réaction afin que la collectivité puisse profiter d'un développement économique continu.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Carrie, c'est à vous.

M. Colin Carrie:

J’ai juste une petite remarque rapide pour ma collègue de Whitby. Avec tout le respect que je lui dois, nous avons eu l’occasion de rencontrer nos chefs d’entreprises et les chefs de file du milieu de l’éducation. Je veux simplement que les gens autour de la table, avant de voter, sachent qu’ils sont prêts à travailler avec nous. Ils sont prêts à prendre l’avion. Ils sont prêts à venir ici pour faire bouger les choses le plus rapidement possible, mais ils veulent un certain leadership.

Il y avait de l’espoir lorsque le premier ministre a dit qu’il était déterminé à mettre en oeuvre un plan, et ils ont raison parce que nous savons que lorsque nous travaillons ensemble, nous pouvons être très résilients. Les gens d'Oshawa ont déjà fait face à d'autres mauvaises nouvelles. Nous avons toujours réussi à nous relever.

Ils m’ont demandé de voir ce que nous pouvons faire ici, à Ottawa. C’est ce qu’ils ont demandé. Avant le vote, je vous signale qu’ils seront là pour nous aider.

Le président:

Merci.

Comme il n’y a pas d’autres interventions, nous allons passer au vote.

M. Colin Carrie:

Pourrions-nous tenir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président: Nous tiendrons un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

(1625)

Le président:

Je vous remercie de votre intervention.

Monsieur Albas, il vous reste environ trois minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais commencer par M. Katz.

Monsieur Katz, vous avez écrit que les droits d’utilisation équitable de l’Afrique du Sud devraient servir de modèle au reste du monde. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer leur cadre et dire pourquoi, selon vous, d’autres pays devraient le copier?

M. Ariel Katz:

Essentiellement, l’Afrique du Sud a suivi un modèle que les États-Unis et Israël ont adopté depuis de nombreuses années. Je soutiens que c’est aussi la loi qui est observée au Canada depuis de nombreuses années, même si nous n'en sommes pas vraiment conscients. L'on ne trouve pas de telles formules magiques dans la disposition sur l’utilisation équitable.

Le fait est que l’utilisation équitable pourrait être adoptée comme une exception ouverte, souple et générale qui pourrait s’appliquer à n’importe quelle fin, sous réserve d’un critère d’équité, par opposition à un système où, de manière implicite, sauf si le Parlement a envisagé une utilisation particulière à l’avance, elle est illégale, à moins que le titulaire du droit d’auteur ne l’accepte.

Le problème avec le modèle qui repose sur des exceptions précises et une liste fermée d’exceptions, c’est qu’il exige que le Parlement ait le pouvoir magique de prévoir ce qui se passera à l’avenir. Lorsque nous parlons d’innovation, par définition, il y a des choses que nous ne considérons pas comme existantes aujourd’hui. Si les innovateurs, pour faire ce qu’ils font, doivent obtenir la permission du Parlement ou demander au Parlement d’adopter une exception précise, très peu d’innovateurs le feront, parce que pour un véritable innovateur, le temps, l’argent et les efforts sont limités, et il veut les investir dans ses innovations. Il n'a pas l’argent nécessaire pour embaucher ou employer des lobbyistes.

Un système qui s’appuie sur des exceptions fermées favorise nécessairement les intérêts du statu quo et ne laisse pas de marge de manoeuvre aux véritables innovateurs. Toutefois, un système ouvert et souple permet aux vrais innovateurs d’avoir au moins la possibilité de faire valoir leurs droits. Ils pourraient venir nous dire que ce qu’ils font est équitable. Ils pourraient montrer les avantages, démontrer pourquoi les préjudices n’existent pas ou sont exagérés et pourquoi les avantages l’emportent sur les préjudices.

Ils peuvent faire cela. S’ils ont de bons arguments, on leur donnera raison. Sinon, on ne leur donnera pas raison. Ils auront toutefois au moins eu l’occasion de défendre leurs intérêts. S’ils doivent d'abord convaincre le Parlement de leur permettre de le faire, ils ne le feront pas.

M. Barry Sookman:

Monsieur Albas, puis-je prendre deux minutes pour donner plus de précisions à ce sujet?

Le président:

Vous avez une minute.

M. Barry Sookman:

D’accord.

Un célèbre avocat américain qui connaissait très bien l’utilisation équitable aux États-Unis, Lawrence Lessig, a dit que l’utilisation équitable aux États-Unis se traduit simplement par le droit d’engager un avocat, parce qu’il y a énormément d’incertitude. Personne ne sait avant que ce soit terminé comment cela va fonctionner. Cela crée beaucoup d’incertitude et de litiges.

Nous avons l’expérience de l’utilisation équitable au Canada, où ces affaires sont nombreuses, et cela ne fonctionne pas ici.

L’autre chose que nous devons vraiment comprendre, c’est que si nous élargissons les objectifs, c'est le cadre d'évaluation actuel du caractère équitable qui s’appliquerait, et notre cadre est très différent de celui des États-Unis ou d’ailleurs. En fait, il est probablement beaucoup plus vaste qu’aux États-Unis. Donc, si nous faisons cela, nous devons reconnaître que ce seront les tribunaux qui décideront des politiques pour le Parlement, et que de nombreuses personnes ne pourront pas faire respecter leurs droits. Il y aura des luttes entre les grandes plateformes qui ont beaucoup d’argent et qui perpétueront le déséquilibre qui existe actuellement au Canada entre le petit artiste-créateur et la grande plateforme.

Ce sera un énorme recul pour les créateurs canadiens si nous adoptons cette mesure.

M. Dan Albas:

D’accord, merci. Je suis sûr que nous aurons beaucoup de questions à vous poser à tous les deux, alors merci beaucoup.

(1630)

M. Barry Sookman:

Nous sommes d’accord sur presque tout.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour commencer, quelles seraient les deux principales choses les plus faciles à faire pour clarifier la structure du système de règles en place? De toute évidence, il y a deux côtés à la médaille, mais plus encore en ce qui concerne le droit d’auteur. Quel serait l’ordre de priorité?

Il y a un certain nombre de choses à faire, mais pouvez-vous en nommer deux à faire tout de suite? Je sais que c’est difficile.

M. Georges Azzaria:

La priorité consiste à établir les priorités. La loi était destinée aux auteurs, et il faut quand même garder les auteurs au centre de la loi, parce que tout le monde s’est invité à participer à la loi sur le droit d’auteur, toutes sortes d’utilisateurs, certains utilisateurs, et ainsi de suite. Ce n’est plus vraiment une loi sur le droit d’auteur; c’est une grande kermesse à laquelle tout le monde a le droit de participer. Je reviendrais à une loi sur le droit d’auteur centrée sur l’auteur.

Je ne dis pas qu’il n’est pas nécessaire d’avoir des exceptions, mais il faut préciser que les auteurs doivent être au centre de la loi. Cela voudrait dire soit que l’auteur autorise l’utilisation, soit qu’il est indemnisé s’il ne peut pas l’autoriser.

Un tel cadre respecte l’auteur. L'auteur doit donner son autorisation; il accepte ou il refuse. Avec le régime de copie privée, il n'a pas le droit de donner son autorisation et le public peut avoir accès aux oeuvres, mais nous nous sommes dotés d'un mécanisme pour rémunérer les auteurs.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Katz, la parole est à vous.

M. Ariel Katz:

Vous voulez connaître mes recommandations?

M. Brian Masse:

Vous avez environ une minute. Je vais insister là-dessus ou je vais simplement passer à autre chose.

M. Ariel Katz:

J’essaierais de réduire la portée de la loi en revenant aux principes de base. Il faut se concentrer sur la définition de certains droits de portée restreinte. Indiquer, par exemple, que si vous êtes un auteur, quelqu’un ne peut pas faire une copie identique ou presque identique de votre livre et le vendre.

C’est facile et tout à fait logique, mais dès que l'on commence à étendre les droits à d’autres types d’utilisations, on augmente l’incertitude. Il faut ensuite introduire beaucoup d’exceptions et l'on crée ainsi une loi ingérable. C'est malheureusement là où nous nous dirigeons.

M. Brian Masse:

Donc, vous vous arrêteriez à...

M. Ariel Katz:

Oui.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Sookman, c'est à vous.

M. Barry Sookman:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Masse. C’est une excellente question.

Je ne pense pas que nous puissions réécrire la loi, mais il y a certaines choses que nous pouvons faire qui seraient très efficaces.

M. Brian Masse:

Pouvez-vous m'en nommer deux, très rapidement?

M. Barry Sookman:

La première consiste à améliorer l’application de la loi grâce au blocage des sites et à la désindexation des moteurs de recherche. Il y a beaucoup d’incertitude dans ce domaine. Il y a de très bonnes raisons pour lesquelles nous devrions avoir recours aux tribunaux, et je serai heureux de donner cette réponse s’il y a une question à ce sujet.

L’autre consiste à créer des incitatifs pour exiger des paiements lorsque des tarifs sont établis. Il serait facile d’harmoniser le régime de dommages-intérêts préétablis dans la loi; cela ne nécessiterait pas beaucoup de mots. Cela favoriserait une réorganisation des priorités, et les auteurs seraient payés.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous aimeriez qu’il y ait une certaine uniformité.

Monsieur Seiferling, c'est à vous.

M. Steven Seiferling:

Heureusement pour moi, comme j’ai souligné deux points dans ma déclaration préliminaire, je vais les répéter très brièvement.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord.

M. Steven Seiferling:

Le premier est la lutte contre la contrefaçon, c’est-à-dire traiter avec les propriétaires de marques et les titulaires de droits d’auteur qui se sont inscrits auprès de l’ASFC et qui ont besoin de ces mécanismes non judiciaires supplémentaires pour protéger leurs marques et leurs biens.

Le deuxième est qu'il faut reconnaître la nature mondiale d’Internet et reconnaître que nous accordons notre protection en fonction des lois canadiennes. Nous ne pouvons pas agir au-delà de nos frontières, alors comment pouvons-nous procéder le plus efficacement possible? En ce qui concerne la violation du droit d’auteur en ligne, il s’agit d’un système d’avis et retrait plutôt que d’un système d’avis et avis.

M. Brian Masse:

Il faut des traités internationaux pour cela.

Monsieur le président, combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste environ trois minutes, ou deux minutes et demie.

M. Brian Masse:

Bien.

En ce qui concerne la Commission du droit d’auteur, sa situation actuelle et les propositions qui ont été faites au ministre, avez-vous une idée de ce qui va se passer?

Si c’est le cas, il vous reste environ 30 secondes. Je sais que c’est rapide, mais je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps. Si vous n’avez rien à ajouter, passez simplement votre tour.

M. Georges Azzaria:

Je passe mon tour.

M. Ariel Katz:

Les critères proposés dans le projet de loi constituent, dans l’ensemble, une bonne idée. Le critère de l’intérêt public me pose toutefois un problème, parce que cela pourrait vouloir dire n’importe quoi.

Le principal critère, à savoir que les tarifs doivent ressembler le plus possible à ceux qui auraient été fixés dans un marché concurrentiel, constitue la bonne chose à faire. L’introduction de l’intérêt public, en principe, est une bonne chose, sauf que la Commission pourrait alors introduire n’importe quoi sous la rubrique « intérêt public » et ainsi rendre inopérants tous les autres critères.

(1635)

M. Brian Masse:

Vous vous inquiétez de la mécanique.

M. Ariel Katz:

Je m’inquiète de ce qui sera considéré dans l’intérêt public.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Sookman, c'est à vous.

M. Barry Sookman:

Je donnerais au gouvernement la note de 95 % pour ce qu’il a fait. J’enlève deux points et demi à cause de l’intérêt public. Le marché concurrentiel est la voie à suivre. Cela crée moins d’incertitude et permet d'accélérer les choses.

Enfin, le gouvernement aurait dû s'occuper de l’harmonisation des dommages-intérêts préétablis dans l'ensemble des sociétés de gestion. Il a perdu deux points et demi de plus pour cela à mon point de vue.

M. Brian Masse:

D’accord.

M. Steven Seiferling:

Honnêtement, puisque beaucoup de problèmes ont déjà été soulevés relativement à la Commission du droit d’auteur, n'importe quelle mesure constitue une amélioration. Du point de vue de l’ABC, tout cela est positif, à la seule condition que nous adoptions une approche attentiste. Puisqu'il a fallu plus de sept ans pour mettre en oeuvre un tarif triennal, nous espérons voir des améliorations importantes à cet égard, et rapidement.

M. Brian Masse:

La rapidité est essentielle.

M. Georges Azzaria:

Je ne voulais pas répéter les critiques...

M. Brian Masse:

Ça va.

M. Georges Azzaria:

... mais vous avez entendu parler ici de la Commission du droit d’auteur, qui est trop lente et qui ne paie pas assez. Beaucoup de gens...

M. Brian Masse:

C’est aussi un problème de rapidité.

M. Georges Azzaria:

Oui, aussi.

M. Brian Masse:

Excellent.

Parlant de rapidité, je sais que mon temps est écoulé, mais je vous remercie d’avoir été si rapide. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Masse.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vais essayer de les utiliser à bon escient.

Monsieur Sookman, ma première question s’adresse à vous. D’après ce que vous avez dit plus tôt, croyez-vous que le droit d’auteur est un droit de propriété absolu?

M. Barry Sookman:

Les droits établis en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur tiennent compte de l’intérêt public. Je ne pense pas que quiconque ait un droit absolu de propriété. Il n'y en n'a pas dans le domaine des biens immobiliers, ni dans celui des biens corporels, ni dans celui du droit d’auteur.

Je crois toutefois que des droits et des recours efficaces sont essentiels, tout comme ils le sont pour tout autre propriétaire. Nous avons des lois contre le vol. Ces mesures visent à protéger les biens et à faire en sorte que les propriétaires puissent les exploiter sur le marché.

Je crois que ces mêmes principes s’appliquent au droit d’auteur. Ce n’est pas absolu, mais ils devraient être comme les droits de propriété, pour permettre aux titulaires de droits de disposer d’un cadre qu’ils peuvent utiliser pour développer et commercialiser de nouveaux produits et obtenir des licences pour ces produits. Deux objectifs sont ainsi réalisés: l'on crée des produits et l'on procure un avantage aux consommateurs. L’idée qu'il existe une dualité d’objectifs complètement différents en matière de droit d’auteur, selon laquelle une partie gagne et l'autre perd, est fondamentalement mauvaise. Comme pour les autres droits de propriété, le droit d’auteur offre un mécanisme qui permet aux titulaires de droits d’auteur d’offrir aux consommateurs ce qu’ils veulent, c’est-à-dire de nouveaux produits, de nouveaux services et de nouveaux modèles d’innovation. C’est ce que nous observons sur le marché.

Le problème, c’est qu’il y a ces exceptions aux droits de propriété qui, en fait, créent des incertitudes et minent les marchés. Comme c’est le cas pour les autres biens, nous avons besoin d’un régime qui protège adéquatement les biens dans l’intérêt public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Katz, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

M. Ariel Katz:

Certains des pays les plus novateurs, comme les États-Unis, appliquent un principe d’utilisation équitable ouvert et souple, auquel M. Sookman s’oppose fermement. De plus, il n’y a pas aux États-Unis de blocage de sites, ce qu’il préconise. Je pense que vous devriez en être conscient.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai trois ou quatre questions à poser pour nous amener vers les prochains sujets. Je vous en remercie.

Monsieur Sookman, vous êtes intervenu dans l’affaire Google c. Equustek. Pouvez-vous nous donner un aperçu de la situation en 10 secondes et nous dire de quel côté vous étiez? Vous en avez parlé publiquement à l’époque.

M. Barry Sookman:

C'est exact.

L’affaire Google c. Equustek a été la première qui a permis d'établir la possibilité d’imposer des ordonnances de délistage global à l’égard du moteur de recherche. Nous avons comparu devant la Cour d’appel de la Colombie-Britannique et la Cour suprême du Canada, pour appuyer la possibilité que des intermédiaires dont les systèmes ont été utilisés pour faciliter un acte répréhensible ou pour aider à défier une ordonnance judiciaire puissent être assujettis à des ordonnances d’un tribunal.

(1640)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce cas, nos règles ont permis de réaliser cet objectif.

M. Barry Sookman:

En effet.

Si vous demandez pourquoi nous avons besoin d’un régime de blocage des sites, et je pense que c’est là où vous voulez en venir...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

M. Barry Sookman:

... permettez-moi de vous expliquer pourquoi.

Tout d’abord, les régimes de blocage des sites autour du monde se sont révélés efficaces. Certains de leurs détracteurs se sont opposés au blocage des sites en jouant franc jeu et en demandant que ce soit aux tribunaux de trancher. Ensuite, ils se sont présentés devant le Comité en disant qu'au contraire, il ne fallait pas laisser les tribunaux trancher. Quel serait le résultat? Ils ont répondu: « Laissons cela de côté. »

En ce qui concerne les ordonnances de blocage des sites, même si je crois que la compétence équitable existe dans les tribunaux, il y a des enjeux de politique publique que le Parlement doit vraiment étoffer. Permettez-moi de vous donner quelques exemples.

Il y aura des questions sur le type de sites qui devraient être bloqués. Devrait-il s’agir principalement d’une infraction ou d’autre chose? Quels facteurs le tribunal devrait-il prendre en considération lorsqu’il rend une ordonnance? Qui devrait assumer le coût des ordonnances de blocage des sites? Quelle méthode devrait être exigée pour le blocage des sites? Ensuite, comment composer avec les inévitables tentatives de contournement de ces ordonnances qui, selon les tribunaux, soit dit en passant, n’ont pas pour effet de miner leur efficacité?

Je crois qu'il revient fondamentalement au Parlement de répondre à toutes ces questions. Les tribunaux peuvent trouver des réponses, mais l'on pourrait devoir recourir à quelques reprises à la Cour suprême, et des ayants droit et des utilisateurs pourraient devoir dépenser des tonnes d’argent.

L’Australie a adopté une loi précise. Singapour a adopté une loi précise. Tous les États membres de l'Union européenne ont une loi semblable. Pourquoi? Parce qu’ils reconnaissent que c’est le moyen le plus efficace de lutter contre les sites étrangers qui propagent le piratage et parce qu’ils veulent établir des critères quant au cadre à adopter.

Nous avons besoin de ce cadre. Les tribunaux peuvent improviser, mais il y aura des débats et il se pourrait que le résultat final ne corresponde pas à celui que souhaiterait le Parlement. C’est pourquoi le Parlement doit s’en occuper.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord.

Monsieur Katz, je vous ai vu grimacer.

M. Ariel Katz:

Oui. Quand on se demande si le blocage des sites est efficace, il faut se demander en quoi il est efficace. Est-il effectivement efficace pour bloquer ces sites? C’est possible, même si les gens peuvent le contourner. C’est un type d’efficacité. Cependant, si la question est de savoir s'il est efficace pour mettre fin au piratage, ou encore mieux, pour transformer les pirates en véritables clients payants, les études sur lesquelles M. Sookman et ses clients se sont fondés ne le démontrent pas. Il y a très peu de transformation, pendant une certaine période, une fois que les ordonnances de blocage ont été émises.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est exact.

M. Ariel Katz:

Si vous voulez mettre fin au piratage, la question est de savoir ce qui cause le piratage. Comme je l’ai écrit dans mon rapport au sujet du CRTC, et j’ai blogué à ce sujet, le problème ne concerne pas tant le piratage que la concurrence. Notre marché des télécommunications est très concentré. Certains titulaires contrôlent le marché et bloquent le contenu. Les gens veulent regarder le contenu, mais pour regarder un certain contenu, il faut s’abonner à des forfaits haut de gamme des câblodistributeurs. Les gens qui n'en ont pas les moyens, s’ils ne peuvent pas obtenir le contenu légalement, cherchent d'autres façons d'y avoir accès.

M. Barry Sookman:

Vous devriez lire les travaux du professeur Danaher, qui s'est penché sur cette question. Il a cité plusieurs études selon lesquelles en fait, cela favorise l’achat sur des sites légaux...

M. Ariel Katz:

C’est exactement l’étude...

M. Barry Sookman:

Le Comité doit comprendre les faits.

Le président:

Je vous en prie...

M. Ariel Katz:

C’est exactement l’étude dont je parlais.

Le président:

Je vous en prie. Merci beaucoup.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur le président, pourrions-nous avoir du maïs soufflé?

Le président:

Non, il n'y aura pas de maïs soufflé.

M. Brian Masse:

J’invoque le Règlement. Je m’attends à ce que les témoins ne débattent pas entre eux.

Le président:

C’est pourquoi je les ai arrêtés.

M. Brian Masse:

Nous vous saurions gré de faire preuve d’un peu de respect à l’égard des témoignages. Nous nous en allons dans la mauvaise direction.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C’est pourquoi nous y avons mis fin.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez 30 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en remercie. Je pense que c’était utile. Nous allons trouver une solution.

Est-il raisonnable de ne pas demander à un tribunal qui il peut bloquer? Il me semble vraiment étrange de dire que nous pouvons bloquer arbitrairement un site. Il doit y avoir une certaine surveillance judiciaire. Est-il déraisonnable que les tribunaux surveillent la situation?

Je demande à quiconque veut répondre dans les 10 secondes qu'il me reste.

(1645)

M. Barry Sookman:

Pour ce qui est du blocage, les régimes, partout dans le monde, procèdent de deux façons. Ils peuvent obtenir des ordonnances du tribunal, ou passer par des organismes administratifs, qui ont toutes les caractéristiques d'organes de surveillance judiciaire. Il y a la Grèce, l’Espagne et d’autres, environ sept pays dans le monde qui passent par un processus administratif. Je ne pense pas qu’il faille obligatoirement passer par un tribunal, mais il faut que ce soit un organisme ayant l’expertise et l’autorité légale.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons céder la parole à M. Lloyd. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci.

J’adore débattre. C’est pourquoi je me suis lancé en politique. Je ne m’en offusque pas.

Ma première question s’adresse à M. Sookman. Pensez-vous que la plupart des gens sont conscients de faire du piratage, ou le font-ils plutôt en toute innocence, c’est-à-dire qu’ils consultent un site Web et qu'ils ont l'impression de le faire en toute légalité puisqu'ils y ont accès?

M. Barry Sookman:

Monsieur Lloyd, c’est une excellente question. Je suis heureux d'apprendre que vous aimez les débats. Merci.

Cela dépend de qui l'on parle. Ce qu'il faut savoir au sujet du régime d’avis et avis, qui a ses inconvénients, comme Steven l’a mentionné, c’est que lorsque des avis sont envoyés à des utilisateurs qui ne savent pas ce qu’ils font, ils arrêtent souvent; ou s'ils n'arrêtent pas après le premier avis, ils le font après le deuxième. Il y a des gens qui piratent par commodité. Ils pensent pouvoir s’en tirer à bon compte. Ils ne pensent pas qu’ils vont se faire prendre, et quand eux ou leurs parents reçoivent l’avis, ils s'en mordent les doigts. Il y en a d’autres qui savent ce qu'ils font et qui s’en fichent.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Puis-je vous interrompre? Je comprends ce que vous dites. Merci, mais je n’ai que cinq minutes.

Je dirais que, d’après ce que vous avez dit, la plupart des gens ne sont pas conscients. Ils s’arrêtent lorsqu’ils sont prévenus deux ou trois fois. M. Katz me semble avoir, tout à fait, raison de soutenir que, si quelqu’un est vraiment déterminé à obtenir quelque chose, il est très difficile de l’arrêter. S'il s'agit de régler la majorité des problèmes, vous diriez, avec votre proposition de blocage de site, comme dans le cas du régime d'avis et avis, que les gens verront que le site est bloqué et se diront: « Ce doit être piraté. Je devrais m'abstenir. »

Diriez-vous que c’est efficace?

M. Barry Sookman:

Vous avez, tout à fait, raison. Les tribunaux du Royaume-Uni ont beaucoup étudié la question. Selon l’argument soumis aux juges, ces ordonnances sont faciles à contourner, et elles le seront. Les juges ont en fait conclu et exprimé l’opinion que la plupart des utilisateurs vont respecter l’ordonnance. Ils ne vont pas la contourner; ils n’ont pas les compétences techniques voulues. Seul un petit nombre le ferait, mais ce petit nombre n'empêche pas que ces ordonnances soient efficaces.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci, monsieur Sookman.

Monsieur Azzaria, je vois que vous êtes impatient de répondre à une question, et j’en ai une à vous poser.

Essentiellement, vous avez fait valoir que le système devrait être plus simple, et je crois que M. Sookman a aussi dit qu'il fallait éviter les frais juridiques. Auriez-vous une recommandation à faire sur la façon de simplifier le régime d'utilisation équitable, de sorte que les auteurs puissent être rémunérés et que nous puissions éviter tout ce va-et-vient juridique?

M. Georges Azzaria:

Je le répète, il serait peut-être bon d’avoir quelque chose qui s’apparente au régime de copie privée, avec une forme de rémunération.

Ce que j'ai dit, c’est que, de façon générale, je trouve la Loi sur le droit d’auteur beaucoup plus difficile à lire. Chaque fois qu’il y a une modification, des pages et des pages s'ajoutent au texte.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Où recommanderiez-vous d'apporter une clarification? Il y a l'étude privée, le système d'éducation et toutes sortes d'exceptions. Y a-t-il une façon de tout intégrer en un régime plus efficace et clair sur le plan juridique?

M. Georges Azzaria:

J’ai même dit qu’on pourrait ajouter une exception pour les créations des artistes. Beaucoup d’oeuvres d’art contemporain se caractérisent par l'appropriation. À mon avis, certains types d'appropriation sont acceptables. Peut-être pas ce que ferait Jeff Koons, mais d'autres types d'appropriation. Pas une semaine ne passe sans que quelqu'un m'écrive pour me demander: « Il s'agit de mon oeuvre. Pensez-vous que c'est de l'appropriation ou non? » Au Canada, aucune décision n'a été rendue sur la question. Il n'existe pas de grandes lignes directrices dans la jurisprudence canadienne.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ce serait donc une réussite pour le Comité s'il parvenait à recommander quelque chose de beaucoup plus simple.

M. Georges Azzaria:

Oui, et n’oubliez pas que l’arrêt CCH concerne les avocats qui ne veulent pas payer lorsqu'ils font des photocopies. L'enjeu n'est pas l'utilisation équitable dans la création. Voilà donc un élément.

Si vous voulez réécrire la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, le test à utiliser serait de la donner à un étudiant de deuxième année dans une faculté de droit pour voir ce qu’il y comprend.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Je comprends.

Je dois vous interrompre parce que je dois poser ma prochaine question à M. Katz.

Dans votre témoignage, vous avez parlé de cas où Access Copyright a violé des droits d’auteur. Pouvez-vous me parler de certains de ces cas?

M. Ariel Katz:

Parlez-vous d'affaires qui ont été tranchées?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui.

M. Ariel Katz:

Non. Access Copyright a violé des droits d'auteur et continue de le faire en autorisant l'utilisation d'oeuvres qui ne lui appartiennent pas.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Avez-vous des preuves?

M. Ariel Katz:

J’ai la preuve qu'il le fait et, à mon avis, cela constitue une violation du droit d’auteur. La Commission du droit d’auteur a convenu que...

(1650)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Y a-t-il des titulaires de droits d’auteur qui disent qu’Access Copyright vole une information qui leur appartient?

M. Ariel Katz:

Je suis titulaire de droits d’auteur. Certaines de mes oeuvres sont utilisées par Access Copyright, qui se fait un plaisir d'octroyer des licences sans avoir le droit de le faire.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D’accord.

M. Ariel Katz:

Et il ne se fait pas prier pour percevoir de l’argent au passage.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Intéressant.

M. Ariel Katz:

Puis-je intenter des poursuites? J’ai peut-être autre chose à faire de ma vie.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Comme nous tous.

Il ne me reste que 20 secondes, et je vois que M. Sookman veut intervenir.

M. Barry Sookman:

Pendant ces 20 secondes, je dirai que la Commission a certifié de nombreux tarifs d’Access Copyright, dont le répertoire a été contesté. Il est tout simplement insensé d’affirmer qu'il n'a pas le droit d'octroyer des licences.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais prendre mes trois secondes pour remercier tous les témoins. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants.

Le président:

Merci de bien gérer votre temps.

Nous allons passer à Mme Caesar-Chavannes, qui aura cinq minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous les témoins.

Je m’adresse maintenant à l’Association du Barreau canadien. Si j’ai bien compris, vous recommandez d’envisager l'application du régime d'avis et de retrait. Dans la déclaration écrite que vous nous avez remise, vous dites que ni l’un ni l’autre des régimes, avis et avis ou avis et retrait, ne sont parfaits. Vous poursuivez en disant qu'« un fournisseur d’accès Internet peut retirer du contenu après une simple allégation, sans qu’il y ait de preuve ou que le contrefacteur présumé reçoive un avertissement. »

Pourquoi recommandez-vous le régime d'avis et de retrait et non l'amélioration du régime d'avis et avis pour lutter contre les violations en ligne?

M. Steven Seiferling:

C’est une question intéressante. Je vous renvoie la balle et vous demande ce que vous voulez dire par amélioration de l’efficacité du régime d'avis et avis.

Proposez-vous quelque chose comme ce que j'ai entendu dans des observations tout à l'heure, soit que des traités internationaux établissent ce que nous pouvons faire au sujet de ceux qui, de l'étranger, affichent des contenus ou enfreignent le droit d'auteur? Je ne connais aucun traité international qui me permette de faire respecter la loi par quelqu'un qui se trouve à l'étranger. J'ignore ce que vous voulez dire en proposant une amélioration du régime d'avis et avis.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Je ne fais que poser une question.

M. Steven Seiferling:

La question est intéressante, mais nous reconnaissons, il est vrai, qu’aucun des deux régimes n’est parfait. On ne trouvera jamais un système parfait. La perfection est une recherche constante.

Le régime d’avis et de retrait sera le plus efficace, parce qu’il offre aux titulaires de droits la protection la plus solide possible contre l’utilisation en ligne de contenu en contravention du droit d’auteur, et peut-être contre une violation de contenu en ligne qui peut faire problème.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Vous parlez aussi des dispositions sur la contrefaçon. Vous recommandez l'adoption d'une procédure simplifiée pour permettre l’abandon des produits contrefaits sans recours au tribunal pour les cas il n'y a pas contestation. Vous recommandez aussi que l'importateur qui ne répond pas aux accusations portées contre lui soit tenu d'abandonner les produits contrefaits détenus ou que l'ASFC soit obligée de remettre ces produits détenus au titulaire des droits.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer un peu plus en détail le résultat que vous souhaitez obtenir en formulant cette recommandation?

M. Steven Seiferling:

Cela se rapproche de ce dont parlait M. Sookman au sujet du blocage des sites. Ce n'est pas qu'un régime administratif. L’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada peut accepter un affidavit ou une déclaration solennelle d’un titulaire de droit d’auteur ou d’une marque indiquant qu’il s’agit de produits contrefaits.

Ensuite, on revient à l’importateur. S’il ne dit rien ou admet qu’il s’agit de produits contrefaits — je parle ici de produits qui ne font l'objet d'aucune contestation —, il est possible de saisir ou de détruire les produits immédiatement sans qu’il soit nécessaire de prendre d’autres mesures, sans s’adresser aux tribunaux.

C’est un processus administratif qui évite un fardeau supplémentaire à notre système judiciaire.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci.

Monsieur Katz, je voudrais revenir à un mémoire qui a été présenté au nom des spécialistes canadiens du droit de la propriété intellectuelle, dont vous êtes signataire. L’une des recommandations portait sur le libre accès aux publications scientifiques.

Les chercheurs sont-ils disposés à accepter cette recommandation? Le milieu de la recherche en général veut-il que ce libre accès soit prévu dans le régime de droit d’auteur?

(1655)

M. Ariel Katz:

D’après mon expérience, oui.

Dans le domaine des publications universitaires, on observe une sorte d’absurdité sous-jacente. La plupart des études sont financées par le public, qui paie nos salaires et les subventions que nous recevons pour réaliser des études. Nous faisons tout le travail.

Ensuite, étant donné la structure du secteur de la publication commerciale, nous faisons appel à des éditeurs, à qui nous avons tendance à attribuer le droit d’auteur. Ils deviennent propriétaires du droit d’auteur, puis ils le revendent aux universités et au public à des prix qui augmentent constamment et qui ne peuvent pas durer. Les auteurs ne touchent pas un sou des frais d’abonnement que nous continuons de payer.

Le public paie deux fois. D’abord, il paie la recherche, puis il paie pour y avoir accès. Quant aux auteurs des études, leur objectif est généralement de les faire diffuser le plus largement possible, mais il y a ensuite les verrous d'accès payant entre les auteurs et les lecteurs.

En général, d’après mon expérience, les auteurs universitaires appuieraient le libre accès aux publications scientifiques.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je m’adresse à l’Association du Barreau canadien. Nous avons entendu des témoignages selon lesquels le régime d'avis et de retrait ne fonctionne pas. En fait, j’ai entendu des créateurs dire que des titulaires et des trolls de droits d’auteur en abusent. Les régimes de cette nature font souvent appel à l'automatisation et lancent des avis de retrait sans que quiconque vérifie si le site offre du contenu qui viole le droit d'auteur.

Pourquoi le Canada devrait-il adopter un tel cadre?

M. Steven Seiferling:

Nous admettons, je le répète, qu’aucun des deux régimes n’est parfait. Le régime d’avis et de retrait n’est pas parfait, et le régime d'avis et avis ne l'est pas non plus.

Vous avez tout à fait raison de dire qu’il y a des systèmes automatisés qui envoient des notifications en vertu du régime d’avis et de retrait. Des algorithmes sont programmés pour scruter et fouiller des sites de type YouTube et envoyer automatiquement ces avis en vertu de la DMCA, aux États-Unis.

Si on élabore un régime d’avis et de retrait, on peut mettre en place des freins et contrepoids qui préviennent ce genre d’abus. Il a été question de prévoir des exceptions pour l'utilisation équitable aux États-Unis et d'imposer à l'intermédiaire l'obligation de tenir compte de ces exceptions avant le retrait. C’est l’une des mesures envisagées. Ce n’est peut-être pas la solution idéale, mais il est possible de mettre en place des freins et contrepoids.

Au bout du compte, la réponse globale est que le régime d'avis et de retrait est plus efficace que le régime d'avis et avis.

M. Dan Albas:

D’accord.

Nous avons vu un cas où un réseau de télévision a pris un clip de YouTube, l’a utilisé dans une émission de télévision réseau, puis a envoyé un avis de retrait à celui qui avait téléchargé le contenu, au départ, pour violation de son propre droit d’auteur.

Monsieur, je voudrais simplement demander pourquoi, si ce régime ne fonctionne pas nécessairement comme nous le souhaiterions aux États-Unis, nous devrions songer à l'adopter chez nous.

Quoi qu’il en soit, je m'adresse à M. Sookman...

M. Steven Seiferling: Puis-je répondre?

M. Dan Albas: Monsieur Sookman, vous avez beaucoup écrit sur les effets négatifs du piratage et sur les raisons pour lesquelles des efforts, comme le blocage des sites, s'imposent. Nous avons entendu des témoignages selon lesquels le piratage de la musique diminue grâce à des services comme Spotify.

Croyez-vous que la seule façon de faire diminuer le nombre de cas de piratage, ce sont des solutions comme le blocage de sites? D’après votre témoignage, vous semblez croire que ce n’est pas une question de concurrence, mais une question de droit.

M. Barry Sookman:

En ce qui concerne le piratage, il n’y a pas de solution miracle. Il faut de multiples outils pour le combattre.

Vous pouvez consulter les statistiques. Prenons l’exemple du piratage télévisuel. Selon le rapport d’Armstrong Consulting, la perte se situe entre 500 et 650 millions de dollars par année. Ce sont des chiffres réels dans un seul segment du marché, le piratage télévisuel. C'est à cause des boîtes Kodi et des sites de diffusion en continu de pirates étrangers.

On peut intenter des poursuites contre eux et obtenir une injonction contre un site qui est caché quelque part et reste introuvable, mais cela ne donnera rien. Si on cherche la source de ce piratage massif, on constate qu'elle se trouve généralement à l'étranger. Comme il n’y a pas d’autre recours efficace, le moyen le plus efficace — ce n'est pas le seul —, celui dont l'efficacité a été reconnue dans le monde entier, c’est le blocage de site ou les ordonnances de délistage.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Sookman, vous avez des connaissances théoriques et de l'expérience pratique dans ce domaine, et j’y attache de l'importance, mais le PDG de Valve Corporation, Gabe Newell, a fait valoir: « On se fait une idée fondamentalement erronée du piratage. C'est presque toujours un problème non pas de service, mais de prix. »

Selon lui, si les produits sont facilement disponibles dans la forme qui est commode pour eux, les consommateurs paieront. Voilà quelqu’un qui se bat sur ce marché et qui veut en obtenir une part, et il soutient que c’est fondamentalement une question de service plutôt que de droit.

(1700)

M. Barry Sookman:

C’est une belle thèse, et ceux qui s’opposent à des droits et à des recours efficaces l'utilisent souvent. Je n'y adhère pas. Si vous regardez le marché canadien, vous constaterez qu’il a une pléthore de droits en ce qui concerne la télévision et la diffusion en continu. Nous avons Netflix et beaucoup d’autres services et, dans le domaine de la musique, nous avons de nombreux services différents, et pourtant, nous avons énormément de piratage.

Je ne dis pas qu’il ne faut pas offrir des produits et des services concurrentiels et que ce n’est pas un facteur qui permet de faire reculer les services non autorisés. Bien sûr que oui, mais les exploitants légitimes devraient-ils être tenus de baisser leurs prix pour concurrencer ceux qui volent leur produit en ne payant pas un sou? Non. Nous ne disons pas, par exemple, que les fabricants de pièces de rechange qui pourraient avoir des activités à Oshawa devraient être obligés de concurrencer les ateliers de cannibalisation qui démontent des voitures volées et vendent les pièces au rabais. Je...

M. Dan Albas:

Je dirais toutefois, monsieur, qu’il y a une différence entre les biens qui ont une existence concrète et les biens créés numériquement. Les coûts de transaction sont souvent différents. J’aimerais qu’on ne brouille pas les cartes. Comme vous le soulignez à juste titre, il y a une différence entre un vrai produit concret qui a été volé puis changé, et les produits et services en cause ici, qui sont souvent incorporels.

Merci.

M. Barry Sookman:

Nous avons...

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Je suis désolé.

Monsieur Jowhari, vous avez cinq minutes. Vous remarquerez le mot d'ordre: nous devons être brefs.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Oh, je n’étais pas sur la liste. Désolé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pourrais vous inscrire, si vous le voulez...

Le président:

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais revenir au tout début. M. Katz a parlé longuement d’Access Copyright, et M. Sookman a exprimé l’intention de répondre. Je ne veux pas amorcer un débat comme celui que nous avons déjà eu, mais c’est un peu ce que je fais.

Monsieur Sookman, pourriez-vous prendre une minute pour répondre aux points qu'on a fait valoir tout à l'heure et expliquer pourquoi votre désaccord a été aussi véhément? Nous pourrions peut-être entrer dans les détails. Il est important pour nous de le faire.

M. Barry Sookman:

Je vais aborder un ou deux points, étant donné le temps dont je dispose.

Tout d’abord, M. Katz a dit qu’il n’y avait pas de répertoire, et j’en ai déjà parlé. Les commissions ont certifié des tarifs et elles ont examiné le répertoire. Il n’est pas exact qu’il n’y en a pas.

Deuxièmement, la Commission, M. Graham et tous les autres ont pris en considération, pour certifier les tarifs... Lorsqu’une commission certifie un tarif, elle examine l’utilisation dans l’ensemble du secteur quel qu’il soit, l’éducation ou un autre. Elle tient compte de l’utilisation équitable et d’autres utilisations de licence, et lorsqu’il y a des reproductions, elle les exclut de l’examen des taux. Dans un tarif, ils ont conclu que l’utilisation équitable représentait 60 %. Le taux a donc été fixé à 40 %, ce qui est beaucoup plus bas.

Access Copyright perçoit — ou avait l’habitude de percevoir, ou avait le droit de le faire en vertu des tarifs — auprès des institutions le montant du tarif. Ce que nous avons ici, c’est un mécanisme par lequel les auteurs et les éditeurs individuels ne peuvent pas réclamer des redevances. Ils doivent collectivement obtenir une licence. Le régime d’Access Copyright a bien fonctionné jusqu’en 2012. Les auteurs étaient payés, les éditeurs étaient payés, puis tout s’est tari, et tout s’est tari comme...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Sookman, je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps. Je voudrais vraiment avoir trois heures de plus, mais nous n’avons pas le temps.

M. Katz a dit tout à l’heure qu’il est titulaire de droits d’auteur et qu’Access Copyright les perçoit pour lui, mais qu’il ne lui a pas donné la permission de le faire. Que répondez-vous à cela?

M. Barry Sookman:

Il n’a pas été payé parce que les établissements d’enseignement ne paient pas. Si c’était le cas, il serait payé.

M. Ariel Katz:

Je ne leur ai pas donné la permission de recueillir de l'argent en mon nom, mais ils le font néanmoins.

Le président: Monsieur Katz...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Katz fait valoir le point que je voulais mettre en lumière. Access Copyright réclame les droits d’auteur sur tous les documents qui se trouvaient dans les universités et ailleurs avant 2012. C’est la même chose. Rien n’a changé, mais la grande majorité des producteurs de ce contenu ne sont pas membres d’Access Copyright et n’ont pas donné cette permission à cette société. Au nom de quoi lui est-il possible de percevoir de l’argent qui n’est pas remis à tous ces détenteurs de droits simplement parce qu’ils ne se sont pas inscrits?

(1705)

M. Barry Sookman:

Access Copyright ne représente pas tous les auteurs dans le monde, mais il représente...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est seulement au Canada.

M. Barry Sookman:

Comme toute autre société de gestion, monsieur Graham, Access Copyright représente un très fort pourcentage des auteurs et des éditeurs. Ce système pouvait être rentable. Je ne dis pas qu'Access Copyright représente tout le monde, mais aucune société de gestion ne représente tout le monde.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Katz, vous avez la parole.

M. Ariel Katz:

En ce qui concerne Access Copyright, si vous consultez ses mémoires et ses documents, ceux-ci disent qu'on peut copier toutes les oeuvres publiées, à l’exception de certaines oeuvres qui figurent sur une liste d’exclusion. Pour qu’une oeuvre y figure, il faut que quelqu’un le demande expressément. C'est ainsi que la société structure son activité.

Ce n’est pas ainsi que la loi est conçue. La loi prévoit que les sociétés de gestion ne peuvent octroyer des licences pour des oeuvres que lorsque les titulaires du droit d’auteur leur accordent l'autorisation d'agir en leur nom. C’est ainsi que cela fonctionne.

Si vous voulez en savoir plus sur ce que la Commission du droit d’auteur a dit au sujet du répertoire tout récemment — c’était le tarif maternelle-12e année de 2015 —, on peut trouver un exposé assez substantiel sur le répertoire et l’absence de répertoire, et sur les raisons pour lesquelles ce serait une violation que d’autoriser des oeuvres dont la société de gestion n'a pas la propriété. C’est la dernière chose que la Commission du droit d’auteur ait dite à ce sujet.

M. Barry Sookman:

Monsieur Graham, me permettez-vous de dire en 20 secondes ce que je...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est tout le temps que j’ai, alors prenez-le.

M. Barry Sookman:

D’accord.

Il ne s’agit pas de savoir si un auteur particulier fait partie ou non d’un répertoire. Ce qui est vraiment important pour le Comité, c’est la raison pour laquelle Access Copyright n’est pas payé une fois que les tarifs sont certifiés par la Commission, et la recommandation que le Comité peut formuler pour régler ce problème.

M. Steven Seiferling: Puis-je répondre?

Le président:

Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham : Apparemment non.

Le président: C'est maintenant à vous, monsieur Masse. Vous avez les deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président. C’était passionnant.

Monsieur Katz, je voudrais revenir sur le fait que les artistes sont au centre de la notion même de droit d'auteur, comme vous l’avez dit. Quelle est votre interprétation actuelle de la rémunération qu’ils reçoivent? On fait beaucoup d’argent avec le droit d’auteur. De nombreux artistes semblent avoir cédé le contrôle à YouTube et à d’autres types de plateformes de partage. Il s’agit de savoir où les auteurs ont le contrôle ou pas, et s'ils sont surexposés ou sous-exposés.

Je reviens à ce que vous avez dit au sujet des artistes et des créateurs qui sont au centre de la loi. Pouvez-vous étoffer votre point de vue, s’il vous plaît?

M. Ariel Katz:

C'est M. Azzaria qui a fait valoir ce point de vue.

M. Brian Masse:

Oh, je suis désolé. Je me suis trompé.

Monsieur Azzaria, je vous en prie.

M. Georges Azzaria:

Quelle était votre question?

M. Brian Masse:

Il semble qu'une incroyable richesse soit créée par les droits d'auteur. Vous avez dit que les artistes et les créateurs sont au centre de tout cela. Selon vous, quelle est la pierre d'achoppement? C’est à cela que rime le droit d’auteur. Il devait au départ protéger une partie de cette richesse. À votre avis, où va une partie de cette richesse?

M. Georges Azzaria:

Beaucoup d’études montrent que les auteurs ne sont pas payés. C'est assez évident. Qui empoche l’argent? Les fournisseurs d’accès Internet, les grandes entreprises comme Google, Facebook, etc. C'est là que va l’argent. Voilà le problème. Ils font beaucoup d’argent. Les producteurs de contenu n'en font pas. C’est là que se situe le transfert de valeur. C’est un grave problème.

Sur le plan de la politique, il est assez cynique de dire que les créateurs vont créer de toute façon et que nous n’avons pas à leur accorder trop de droits; ils adorent créer, alors laissez-les écrire des livres et faire de l’art. C'est acceptable. Ils le feront de toute façon parce que c’est leur passion.

Nous devons dire, sur le plan des principes, qu'il faut les protéger et leur accorder certains droits, surtout lorsqu'il y a de l'argent à faire. Une étude réalisée au Québec et publiée il y a quelques semaines disait que les consommateurs paient plus pour les services que pour le contenu. C'est là que se trouve l’argent.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à tous les témoins d'avoir comparu. Il y a eu des moments très animés. C’était passionnant.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant deux minutes. Vous pouvez dire au revoir et nous reprendrons la séance à huis clos pour discuter de questions d’ordre administratif.

Merci beaucoup.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 03, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.