header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-30 INDU 165

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good morning, everybody. Welcome to meeting 165 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology.

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(4), we're resuming our study of the main estimates 2019-20.

With us today we have the honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Sport.

Welcome, Minister. Thank you for coming today.

From the Department of Industry we have David McGovern, Associate Deputy Minister, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

You have up to 10 minutes to tell us your story.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan (Minister of Science and Sport):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Esteemed committee members, thank you for the opportunity to be here on the occasion of the tabling of the main estimates for the 2019-20 fiscal year.

Science research and evidence-based decision-making matter. They matter more than ever as the voices that seek to undermine science, evidence and fact continue to grow.

Canadians understand that science and research lead to a better environment—cleaner air, cleaner water—new medical treatments or cures, stronger communities, and new and effective technologies.

Our talented researchers and students are developing robotic devices to help people recover from strokes and injuries, making it easier for seniors and persons with disabilities to lead fully independent lives.[Translation]

Researchers are also developing vaccines and technologies to combat infectious diseases.[English]

Canadians understand that science and research are essential to innovation and to the foundations of a 21st century economy. At the same time, the world's top economies systematically invest in research for its own sake.[Translation]

The growth of modern economies has been driven largely by science, technology and engineering.[English]

Investments in fundamental research come back to Canadians in the form of new jobs and higher wages. It's for these many reasons that our government has prioritized science and research since day one. We reinstated the long-form census, encouraged our scientists to speak freely and reinstated the position of the chief science adviser.

I requested that Canada's chief science adviser work with science-based departments to create departmental chief scientist positions in order to strengthen science advice to government and to develop a scientific integrity policy.

We have taken a very different approach in working with the science and research community. We have listened carefully to the community and have undertaken six major consultations.[Translation]

One of those consultations was the first review of federal funding for basic science in 40 years.[English]

We are committed to returning science and research to their rightful place. Four successive federal budgets have invested a total of more than $10 billion in science and research and in our researchers and students. We are putting them at the centre of everything we do. That means ensuring they have the necessary funding, state-of-the-art labs and tools, and digital tools to make discoveries and innovations.

(0850)

[Translation]

We invested $4 billion in science and research in 2018.[English]

This included the largest investment in fundamental research in Canadian history. In fact, we increased funding to the granting councils by 25% after 10 years of stagnant funding. The impact of this decision was profound and positive. We are hearing directly from researchers who say that because of increases to NSERC and SSHRC, they are able to hire students who gain the skills they need for the jobs of the future.

We provided $2 billion for 300 research and innovation infrastructure projects at post-secondary institutions from coast to coast to coast. We also invested $763 million over five years in the Canada Foundation for Innovation and have committed predictable, sustainable, long-term funding for the organization.

We also devoted $2.8 billion to renewing our federal science laboratories because we understand the critical role that government researchers play in Canada's science and research community.

In parallel to these historic investments, our government is making important changes to the research system itself. We will shortly announce the establishment of the council on science and innovation to help strengthen Canada's efforts to stimulate innovation across our country's economy. Minister Petitpas Taylor and I have already announced the establishment of the Canada research coordinating committee to better coordinate and harmonize programs of the three federal granting councils—CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC—as well as the CFI.

The Canada research coordinating committee's action over the last year has led to the creation of the new frontiers in research fund, which supports international, interdisciplinary, fast-breaking and high-reward research.

The committee also launched the first-ever dialogue with first nations, Métis and Inuit regarding research. We provided 116 research connection grants to support community workshops and the development of position papers to inform this effort. More than half of these grants were awarded to indigenous researchers and indigenous not-for-profit organizations to help chart a shared path to reconciliation.

As we put into place the foundations for this significant culture change, we vowed that each and every Canadian would benefit.[Translation]

To achieve our vision, the scientific and research communities must reflect Canada's diversity.[English]

We want as many people as possible experiencing our world-class institutions, but it is not enough to attract people. We also have to retain them. That's why I put in place new equity and diversity requirements for our internationally recognized Canada excellence research chairs and Canada research chairs.

Because of our changes, more than half of the Canada excellence research chairs resulting from the last competition are women. I'm thrilled to say that in the most recent competition, for the first time in Canadian history, we had 50% women nominated for the Canada research chairs, and we had the highest percentage of indigenous and racialized researchers and scholars, as well as researchers with a disability.

Earlier this month, we took the historic step of launching a program that we are calling “Dimensions: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Canada”.[Translation]

This is a pilot program inspired by the internationally recognized Athena SWAN program.[English]

We are encouraging universities, colleges, polytechnics and CEGEPs to endorse the dimensions charter to signal their commitment to ensuring that everyone has access to equal opportunities, treatment and recognition in our post-secondary institutions. I am pleased to share that 32 institutions have already signed the charter.

We have repeatedly heard that inadequate parental leave creates many challenges, especially for early-career researchers who are women.

(0855)

[Translation]

No one should ever have to choose between having a research career and raising a family.[English]

We know that a delay in career progress early on can often mean that women achieve lower levels of academic seniority and earn a lower salary and pension. That's why, in budget 2019, we are doubling parental leave from six to 12 months for students and post-doctoral fellows who are funded by the granting councils.

Budget 2019 also plans to provide for 500 more master's level scholarships annually and 500 doctoral scholarships, so that more Canadian students can pursue research.

Remaking Canada's science and research culture is a huge and complex undertaking, but we are hearing from G7 countries that Canada is now viewed as a beacon for research because of the investments we are making. We saw it first-hand with the international interest in the Canada 150 research chairs.[Translation]

Obviously, there's still much more to do and it will take time.[English]

Canadians can be proud, however, that in a short period, the landscape of science and research has forever been altered. We want Canada to be an international research leader, continuing to make discoveries that positively impact the lives of Canadians, the environment, our communities and our economy.[Translation]

I'm sure that all committee members share this goal.[English]

Mr. Chair, I'd like to finish by saying thank you to all the members of this committee for the work they have done over these last three and a half years.

I'd be pleased to answer any questions you may have.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister, for your opening remarks.

We'll go right into questions. We're going to start off with Mr. Longfield.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thanks, Minister Duncan, for being here.

Thanks also for visiting the University of Guelph as many times as you have over the last four years.

I was meeting with one of our younger scientists, in fact, one who is being repatriated to Canada thanks to what we're doing by investing in science. In fact, five people on this team have come back to Canada as part of the brain gain. Jibran Khokhar is a neuropsychopharmacologist. He's working on addictions and mental health, studying the effects in mice.

His concern has to do with early stage investment and what we're doing for young scientists doing higher risk science versus the traditional larger investments in science.

Could you comment on the work of the Canada research coordinating committee or any other way that we're doing investment in younger stage scientists?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Lloyd, for being such a strong champion of research.

When I came into this role, I pulled the data. What I found is that, in one of our granting councils, our researchers weren't getting their first grant until age 43. You simply cannot build a research career when you're getting that first grant at 43. I've made a real focus on early-career researchers because if we don't, where will our country be in 10 to 15 years?

You talked about the Canada research coordinating committee. We've developed a new research fund. It's called the new frontiers in research fund. It is focused on international, interdisciplinary, fast-paced, high-risk, high-reward research. It's $275 million and will double over the next five years, and then we'll be adding $65 million a year to it. It will be the largest pod of funds available to researchers. The first stream, the exploration stream, we made available only to early-career researchers. We've announced the award winners; $38 million went to 157 researchers.

As I went across the country 25 years ago when I was teaching, people asked if I had a research career or a child. I didn't expect to hear that as I went across the country. That's why, as another action for early-career researchers, we are investing in extending parental leave from six months to 12 months. You shouldn't have to choose between having a research career and a baby. You should be able to have both, and we need to make it easier to do that.

(0900)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'll pass that on to Jibran. All the young researchers are connected—it's not a surprise—and they're all looking for these new avenues.

I also met with Dr. Beth Parker, who is the Canada research chair for groundwater. She's doing some work on groundwater, on geothermal, and what that could do in terms of climate change mitigation; working on urban buildings that could get heating and cooling from geothermal. She's a water research scientist.

You mentioned in your presentation the connections with Environment and Climate Change Canada. Could you expand a little bit on how Dr. Parker could connect with the programs around environment and climate change for retrofitting buildings, as an example?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Lloyd, please pass along, first of all, my best wishes to Jibran. I know his work.

If you have specific questions, they should absolutely go to Environment Canada.

One of the things I've brought in, though, is that we want.... Traditionally, academic science as the outside research community and government science have not worked together. There is some crossover and there are some research institutes on academic campuses, but we need to do a better job of doing this.

I've been very focused on government science. On day two of our government, we unmuzzled our scientists. It's one thing to say and it's another thing to create a communications policy to remind colleagues and other ministers that we want our scientists speaking freely and we want them out collaborating. We're also investing $2.8 billion in government science infrastructure to cut new labs. Many of our labs are 25 years of age. With these new labs we're not going to build them the same old way where you have one discipline, a weather lab, for example. We're going to bring environment and fisheries labs together. We're also going to have increased collaboration with researchers, universities, colleges and industry.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Along that line, I was in the Arctic last summer at the PEARL research station. Environment Canada has a weather station there, and there are about seven universities doing atmospheric research looking at climate change. In our budget we had $21.8 million for PEARL. I believe most of that came through Environment and Climate Change Canada, but we still have to do the science there.

Can you comment on the connection between our investments? I know Environment and Climate Change Canada isn't your file, but how do we keep that research centre going, doing important work that it's doing?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Lloyd.

I know you did visit PEARL, the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory. It's our most northerly lab in Canada. It studies atmosphere and the links between atmosphere and ocean biosphere. We believe it's an important lab. It was going to be shuttered under the previous government. That is why our government has committed to keeping PEARL open. Environment Canada will be keeping PEARL open.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

But they'll have to keep reapplying to NSERC in order to do the science. Is that what I'm understanding?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

It's important that the researchers apply for research funding just as any of our researchers across the country do. They can apply to NSERC. They can look at other funds. We're of course always happy to put our officials in touch to see what funding might be available.

(0905)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'll pass that on to Pierre Fogal, who comes from Guelph and runs that research lab.

Thank you very much, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to Mr. Chong.

You have seven minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for appearing and providing us testimony on the estimates.

I first want to correct the record that there's been some huge sea change in levels of higher education funding in Canada. While I acknowledge that the current government has somewhat increased funding for the four granting councils, if you look at the OECD's measures on higher education expenditures on research and development, they actually haven't changed much in the last 20 years. In 2005 it was 0.67% of GDP. In 2012 it was 0.7%. In 2013 it was 0.67%. In 2014, it was 0.65%. In 2015, it was 0.67%. In 2016, it was 0.68%. In 2017, the most recent year for which OECD has figures available, it was 0.65%. It's not as if there's been a massive sea change in levels of funding for higher education expenditures in this country. I think that's important to note on the record.

As far as being a world leader on higher education expenditures on research and development goes, while we place in the top 10, we're certainly not a world leader. We are behind countries like Austria, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, which spend considerably more than we do on higher education research and development. In fact, in the United States, the National Institutes of Health alone spend the equivalent of $49 billion Canadian a year on research, each and every year. Even on a pro rata basis, that dwarfs the budgets of the four granting councils in this country.

My question for you is quite simple. The Naylor report recommended increases to funding. The current government has spent considerably more than it had projected when it took office some four years ago. Why hasn't the government increased funding levels for the four granting councils to the levels recommended in the Naylor report?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'd like to thank my honourable colleague. He and I have worked together a very long time.

I, too, would like to correct the record. The data that you presented, the latest data, as you pointed out, was 2017, but 2018 was the historic investment in research, $6.8 billion in research, the largest investment in Canadian history, a 25% increase to our granting councils.

My goal was to put our researchers at the centre of everything we do to make sure they had the funding to do their research, that they have the labs and tools necessary to do their research and that they have the digital tools. That meant a 25% increase to our granting councils. It meant a $762-million investment in CFI and then the promise of predictable, sustainable, long-term funding of $462 million annually. Finally, after 20 years, there would be stable funding for CFI and, because so much of research today is big data, the digital research tools, there's an investment of $573 million.

When I go to a G7 meeting, what I hear from my G7 colleagues is that Canada is, and I quote, “a beacon for science and research”, and they are looking forward to collaborating, and because of that new frontiers in research funds, that $275-million fund that will double over the next few years, our researchers are going to have access to international money to be able to collaborate with Europe and the United States, and that really has not existed.

Hon. Michael Chong:

To be fair, the funding levels have increased, but the 2018 figures will not be much off from the 2017 figures.

What I hear from researchers is that they feel that they are at a competitive disadvantage when competing against the funds available to American researchers through the National Institutes of Health, for example.

I think that, while funding levels have increased, they still have not increased to the levels that the Naylor report recommended, and that's clear.

The other question I had—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I will respond to that. I was very pleased to commission the fundamental science review of which Dr. David Naylor was the chair. It was a blue ribbon panel. We had former UBC president Dr. Martha Piper. We had Nobel Prize winner Dr. Art McDonald. We had the chief scientist of Quebec, Dr. Rémi Quirion. It was the second consultation we had done. They listened to 1,500 researchers. It is a really important report. The first—

(0910)

Hon. Michael Chong:

I agree, but the funding levels—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I do want to respond.

Hon. Michael Chong:

I don't have a lot of time. I'd like to move on to my next question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I do want to respond to you.

It was the first review of federal funding in 40 years. We took that report very seriously, and it led to the $6.8-billion budget, the largest in Canadian history. My last sentence—

Hon. Michael Chong:

On a nominal basis.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Under the previous government, your government also asked Dr. David Naylor to do a report. There was to be a press conference on a Friday and that report was buried.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Moving on to my next question, I have a question about the chief science adviser, Minister. The position of chief science adviser was created with a lot of fanfare but, frankly, a lot of people have been wondering why she wasn't given a sufficient mandate to do her job. A lot of people have been watching her try to fulfill her role to the best of her abilities but without any support from the government.

One of the questions that has been asked is: Why hasn't she been appointed to head up the coordinating council rather than the presidency, the chairing of that council, to rotate the presidents of the various granting councils?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

First of all, let me say that we decided to bring back the position of the chief science adviser, a position that was abolished by your government. We appointed Dr. Mona Nemer, an internationally renowned cardiologist with many awards. Your party's former INDU critic said it was an excellent choice, and we agree.

Hon. Michael Chong:

The problem is that she hasn't been given a sufficient mandate—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

She has been given—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—to do her job. She has been struggling to find that role in the government, so it's much like—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If I could finish—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—a lot of the rhetoric coming out of the government—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If I could finish—

Hon. Michael Chong:

There has been a big disconnect between the rhetoric and what has actually been delivered, whether it's the Naylor report, which recommended certain funding levels that have not been fulfilled; whether it's appointing a new chief science adviser who wasn't given a sufficient mandate to carry out her role—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If I could actually respond—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—or whether it's the creation of a coordinating council—

The Chair:

Mr. Chong, sorry, but you are over time.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Fair enough, but just let me finish my sentence.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Well, I wasn't given that opportunity.

The Chair:

I would like to make sure the minister has a chance to respond to your question.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Fair enough.

The Chair:

You are over time. We're at eight minutes. I've allowed—

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Chair, I agree. I just want to finish my sentence, please, if I might.

The Chair:

I would like the minister to be able to have a moment to respond to you, please.

Hon. Michael Chong:

May I finish my sentence?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Hon. Michael Chong:

There has been a huge disconnect between the rhetoric and the reality of what the government has delivered, and I believe that also includes the science portfolio.

The Chair:

I will allow the minister time to respond.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

With a $10-billion investment, we've changed the trajectory for science and research in this country.

Dr. Nemer is doing important work.

I will remind the honourable member, I'm glad to hear his respect for Dr. Naylor today, but I wish it was shown when his government was in power.

You buried the report. You ignored his report, and what he asked for was $1 billion for health innovation.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we move on to Mr. Masse, I want to remind everybody to try to not talk over each other. We want to have respectful dialogue and questions and answers here. It will make it easier for everybody to be able to get the questions and answers that they'd like.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

To start, I'm going to move to something a little easier to deal with. It's actually related to your position as Minister of Sport.

Given the fact that the Toronto Raptors are in a historic position today....

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Mr. Brian Masse: Exactly. Actually, my Chris Bosh jersey from the old times is out, as well.

I do have a serious question, though, with regard to the National Basketball League of Canada. I'm not sure if you're familiar with the league, but it has been important in terms of bringing sport and science to inner cities such as mine, in Windsor, where we have the Windsor Express.

The connection today, ironically, is the Oshawa franchise moved to Mississauga, which later folded for the Raptors 905 NBA D-League, affiliated with the current Raptors.

There are franchises in Cape Breton, Halifax, Charlottetown, Moncton, Saint John, Kitchener, London, Sudbury and Windsor.

What is your government doing to partner with leagues such as the NBL? I haven't seen anything yet to deal with concussion in sport and other supports. They have grassroots teams that are professional but also have a tremendous amount of community outreach.

For example, I know our Windsor Express were out for the Mayor's Walk recently, and also running a clinic on the street.

Before, when I had a different job, I ran an inner city youth basketball and sand volleyball program where we got kids off the street and did a lot of stuff for nutrition and so forth.

Specifically, has the government done anything with the National Basketball League of Canada? What opportunities are there for organizations such as that to deal with education on everything from nutrition to sport and culture, and most importantly, concussions?

(0915)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Brian, thank you for all the coaching you've done. I know you've been a long-time hockey coach. I didn't know about the basketball, so thank you.

Far too many children and athletes suffer from concussion. That's why we've worked with the health minister to develop new concussion guidelines that are being adopted by our national sport organizations. That's being done with the help of Parachute.

In this budget, we have invested $30 million for safe sport. I'm happy to talk about that if you would like. Part of that funding will be for protecting our children.

I'd also add that the House of Commons has undertaken a study on sport-related concussions. It's an all-party committee. I thank them for their work. The report will be tabled, and I'm really looking forward to their recommendations.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm going to move to another one, but I want to thank you. I'll leave it at that. It will be for another Parliament.

There have been some improvements with regard to science, and getting a profile here on the Hill. I have seen that evolve. I've been involved in this committee for a long time. I still think as a country we're underutilizing science and sport.

I'm not saying that nothing is being done, but it's one of the things that isn't often raised here. That's my personal criticism. Science and sport don't seem to get the attention they probably deserve for a country like Canada.

With some of my time, I want to move to what wouldn't be an unexpected topic for this table. My Bill C-440 on Crown copyright in Canada is very important for the science community. It's not only with regard to the universities, but is also related to a number of different academic associations, research think tanks and so forth.

Our law on Crown copyright is based on a 1911 U.K. law, which was put in place here in Canada in 1929. This is the restriction of government publications, scientific research and other materials that the public has paid for. Over 200 research academics testified here at our committee calling for the elimination of Crown copyright. It doesn't exist in the United States or in most Commonwealth nations. It's very rare to find it in Canada.

What is your position on Crown copyright as it currently is in Canada?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Brian.

You've touched on a number of areas. I'm going to touch on a number of them, and then I'll hand it over to my deputy minister.

You mentioned science and sport. The two absolutely go together. It's really important. If we want to improve performance and the health and safety of our athletes, it's through science. We do have the sport research institutes. I'd be happy to talk about that further.

You also talked about making research available. We absolutely agree. We want our scientists and researchers in government speaking freely. I take every opportunity to say that. We have to change that culture. We believe in open data and open—

(0920)

Mr. Brian Masse:

As the government, do you believe in Crown copyright? That's my specific question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

We believe in open data and open science.

To pick up on Michael's question, he asked what the chief science adviser has been doing. I hope he has taken a look at her first annual report and the areas that she thinks we should be looking at.

I will turn it over to my deputy minister.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Madam Minister, I'm asking about a specific Crown copyright, the protection and prohibited use of government documents and research materials. I'm asking for your position on that. I don't need the deputy minister's position on that. We've studied it extensively in this House. It's a well-known fact that Canada has a unique system of protection, and I want to know whether you support the status quo of Crown copyright.

I think it's a fair question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Brian.

This issue is raised with us all the time. We're aware of the issue and we're reviewing it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

None.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Oh, there we go.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes, sir.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I sure hope that industry presents a report on copyright soon. I think it would be quite helpful.

Minister, could you explain to us what the Canada research chairs do and what they've accomplished so far?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

David, thank you for the question.

The Canada research chairs are some of our prestigious chairs. They were brought in in the year 2000. We have two kinds of chairs. Tier one Canada research chairs receive $200,000 over seven years, and tier two chairs receive $100,000 over five years.

We have made changes to the program. The tier one chairs used to be able to have seven years, then seven years and then seven years and that could go on forever. We have capped that at one renewal. Why? It gives more researchers access to these prestigious chairs.

We have actually made the first increase to the tier two funding in 19 years. That's because it is for early-career researchers.

We have made changes in terms of equity and diversity. Of course, I pulled the data; that's what I do as I want to see how we're doing. If we look at the history of the Canada research chairs program, we weren't close to our chairs reflecting the Canada we see today when you look at percentages of the population. I told our institutions that they had two years to make the voluntary targets that they had agreed to in 2006. I really want to thank our institutions. They really changed the way they do nominations and, for the first time, 50% women were nominated for these chairs. The highest percentage of indigenous, racialized and persons with disabilities were being nominated to these chairs.

I want to stress that, for the first time, we have five persons with disabilities holding a research chair. That's not 5%. It's five. That shows the work that needs to be done and that's why we're bringing in the dimensions charter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many research chairs are there?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

It's close to 2,000. Through budget 2018, the historic budget I talked about with the $6.8 billion, we're investing $210 million for another 285 Canada research chairs.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's more than I realized. I sense great pride in the program.

I do have another question related to the research. How does one motivate particular research to happen? One of the big issues in my rural riding, which has no research institutions, is that there are over 10,000 lakes in my riding. It's a big riding. We have Eurasian milfoil and other invasive species that are causing great problems. There seems to be no research being done on how to address them, mitigate them and prevent them from spreading further.

If somebody who isn't a scientist wants to take a particular topic up for research, how does that happen?

(0925)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm going to start right at the beginning.

I want to strengthen our culture of curiosity in Canada. All children are born curious. All children want to discover and explore. They'll pull apart this pen. They'll pull apart the microphone. They want to understand how things work. They're interested in nature. They want to go out and explore the lake and what's found at the bottom of the lake and what insects are there.

It's up to us to foster that natural-born curiosity through elementary school, high school and hopefully beyond. It's not enough to attract them in their institutions. We have to be able to retain them. I think it's about science literacy. It's about strengthening a culture of curiosity.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Massé wanted to ask a quick question as well, if I could pass some time to him.

The Chair:

You have two and a half minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Thank you. It's greatly appreciated.

Minister Duncan, first, I want to thank you for your commitment, passion and determination when it comes to science. It's extraordinary.

I've had the opportunity to meet with you several times with representatives of our research centres, both at the college and university levels. On a number of occasions, you and I have been told that regional research centres have difficulty accessing grants to continue their research. We've been told that these grants are mainly allocated to major research centres. However, some extraordinary research is also being conducted in the regions.

I'd like you to discuss potential measures to help our smaller regional college or university research centres access these funds.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I want to thank my colleague for his question.[English]

Rémi, thank you. Yes, we met with a number of your researchers, and it was just fascinating to know the research they were doing.

As you know, all the research that's done is peer reviewed. There are panels created, but we want to make sure those panels reflect Canada, and that has been changed.

We haven't talked about colleges yet. Colleges, polytechnics and CEGEPs play an incredible role in the research ecosystem. Just as we've made the largest investment in universities, we've also made the largest investment in our colleges, in applied research, of $140 million. That's the largest investment ever.

When I go across Canada, whether it's at Red River College—that's where Lloyd went—Humber College, Centennial or Seneca, the research that's being done is absolutely extraordinary, and they are able to make a difference in the community.

A company comes in. They need an answer, a quick turnaround, whether it's in robotics, artificial intelligence or virtual reality, and in three or four months the college is able to provide a solution.

At Niagara College, it was a certain type of nut they were able to do. At Niagara College, it's the help they're able to provide to the wine industry.

Thank you for raising this important question.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Minister and officials for attending today.

It has been reported as recently as May 2 in the Globe and Mail by Stephen Chase and Colin Freeze that in a National Research Council application process for advisory members of a committee related to a Huawei research grant, those with political opinions about Huawei need not apply for this process.

I think it's disturbing to Canadians when they're seeing that our federal agencies are screening people out for their political viewpoints in terms of their membership on committees. We have seen this trend in other departments, with the government putting political and personal values tests on whether or not you get government funding.

I'm just wondering, Minister, if we can trust the government in the future to protect Canadians and protect our processes from people being screened out for their political and personal viewpoints, and excluded from sharing in government programs and processes.

(0930)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Dane, thank you for your question.

I believe it is incredibly important that our researchers, whether in government or academia, are able to explore, to cross disciplines and to cross boundaries. That's how research works.

When it comes to academia, NSERC has very specific rules in terms of peer review. It needs to be hands-off. It is the specialists who review applications.

You mentioned foreign investment. As you know, there is a review being undertaken by security officials, and we will respect the results of that review.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you, Minister.

That is a separate matter. It is related. However, this is about an NSERC process for deciding who gets to sit on a site advisory committee related to Huawei's co-investment with the University of Laval. In the application process, people were asked if they had political views about Huawei. If they had political views, they would be excluded from this process.

When asked about this, Huawei stated that they did not request this screening process and do not expect a screening process for this application, so why is NSERC, a federal agency under your control, proactively going in and screening people out for their political views?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm going to turn this over to my deputy minister.

Mr. David McGovern (Associate Deputy Minister, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Department of Industry):

Thanks very much.

Let me preface my comments by telling you that, before I started with ISED, I was the deputy national security adviser to former prime minister Harper and then to Prime Minister Trudeau.

When these issues first emerged on our radar screen, Minister Duncan, as she's told you throughout, asked us to put together the data, to put together the fact base. We reached out to our granting councils, to the U15, which are the 15 most research intensive universities, to Universities Canada. We covered the whole spectrum. We just wanted to get a sense of what the issue of foreign investment in research in our academic institutions looked like. In the specific case that you're talking about, our granting councils want to ensure there's no bias in any of the people who do peer review. The way this story was portrayed in the newspaper suggests that it was focused on a single entity, single company, single country. But the notion of having no bias by the people who do the peer review, it applies to every grant application.

What we've been doing recently for Minister Duncan is trying to look at the broader issue of foreign investment in research at our universities. We're working with the universities. We brought in the national security community. We've reached out to foreign countries. We're putting together sort of the fact base, but we're also raising awareness on the part of all of the participants.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I have only 30 seconds left, and I do thank you for that thorough technical response.

I understand that we need to have strong protections from conflict of interest in these cases, and I do support that matter. However, when Canadians see that government granting agencies are asking people for their personal political viewpoints before they can apply for a process, I think that is crossing a line, and I think Canadians have a lot of concerns when that is a factor.

I only have four seconds left, so I just want to thank both of you again for appearing today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to Mr. Oliver.

You have five minutes.

Mr. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Jowhari.

We're spending a lot of time talking about science. I did want to thank you for your leadership on the sports file as well, the great work you've been doing across Canada to promote sports, inclusive sports, in particular.

I want to harken back to the conversation you had with Mr. Chong. I think it was Samuel Clemens who said there are lies, damned lies and statistics, which is basically the use of statistics to bolster weak arguments. I just wanted to reflect on that, because in this case, there were statistics being used that weren't relevant to the time period that was reflective of the work you've done as minister.

Here's the quick reality story. In my previous life, I chaired a peer review committee for CIHR, and over the previous government span we watched our allocation actually just dry up. We had people with Ph.D.s leaving Canada. Worst of all, we couldn't bring new students in to bring them up to Ph.D. level. There was a paucity of funds.

I've stayed in touch with the science officers and the others who are involved in it. They are all reporting incredible interest back into.... This is health research, which I know isn't NSERC or SSHRC, but it's been a phenomenal change and we're seeing now robust academic programs. We're seeing good Ph.D.-calibre people back in our universities, and we're seeing training happening across Canada. I just wanted to reflect that. As he said, there's reality and there's rhetoric. This is the reality. The rest is rhetoric.

(0935)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

John, thank you for highlighting it. Yes, it was disappointing to provide stats only to 2017, knowing the historic budget was in 2018.

Mr. John Oliver:

It's very obfuscating on his part, I think.

I did want to ask you a question, though. Part of what you've been working on is the Canada research chairs program, which I think has been a phenomenal statement about our commitment as a government to research and bringing long-lasting leadership—not just funding, but leadership positions—to make sure we keep research strong across Canada.

I was wondering if you could give us an update on how that's working, the early-career researchers and the work they're doing to retain very accomplished Ph.D.s and promote new researchers coming in.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'll give you a very specific example. Last week we announced the discovery grants, which are a large NSERC program. We made the largest investment in discovery grants in Canadian history. Some $588 million went to 5,000 researchers across Canada. What is particularly exciting is that 500 of those grants went to early-career researchers. There was an increase. They got an increase in the funding. They got a stipend as well as 1,700 scholarships for postgrads.

What we hear from the researchers is that they are feeling the difference. They understand that under the previous government, funds stagnated. No one was talking to the research community. It really was a broken relationship that needed repairing. When you stagnate funds it means there are small pools. The previous government added to the challenge by concentrating funds in a few hands.

The last thing they did was to tie research funding. For example, if you wanted a SSHRC grant, it had to have a business outcome. That's not how research works. We are saying the lifeblood of the research ecosystem is our researchers.

My goal is to put our researchers and our students at the centre of everything we do and to ensure that they have their funding, their labs and tools and digital tools.

Mr. John Oliver:

Sorry, Majid.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

No worries. With 45 seconds, I will say welcome.

Minister, there has been much talk about institutions, our educational institutions and our private sector when it comes to supporting research. However, I understand that the Government of Canada is also supporting a lot of researchers within the government.

With 30 seconds left, can you shed some light on the research that we are doing? What kind of researchers are we hiring?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Majid, thank you for highlighting our government scientists.

The Chair:

You have about 20 seconds for that one.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Okay.

We've given $2.8 billion for these new labs. I want to highlight the increase in our scientists and our technical experts since we have come into government. In 2015-16 to this time period there's been an increase of 2,000. That comes on top of the 2,500 that the previous—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

That's 2,000 that we have hired within the government?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

That's 2,000 scientists and technical experts. That's April StatsCan data.

The Chair:

Thanks very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Chong for five minutes.

We are going to go over by a couple of minutes. I just want to make sure that everybody keeps their time on track. The minister does have to go. We're going to try to finish off everything.

You have five minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I just want to respond to what Mr. Oliver said.

I use accurate statistics. We pulled out the latest OECD statistics. The reason I used 2017 is that's the latest year for which data was available from the OECD on the higher education research and development measures. That's why I used the 2017 figures and not those for 2018. I will put to the committee that I expect the 2018 figures will not be that far off from those for 2017 and previous years.

All of that is to say while I acknowledge that the current government has increased funding levels for the four granting councils, there has not been a sea change in funding levels relative to history and relative to the rest of the world. That's borne out by the facts. The facts are this: The four granting councils together in the estimates this year will receive approximately just under $4 billion. The National Institutes of Health in the United States will receive $49 billion Canadian alone for research. On a pro rata basis, that dwarfs what we're doing. So to suggest, as the minister has, that Canada is a world leader in funding levels simply is not true. While we are in the top 10 for HERD measures, we are not number one. That's clear on a variety of different measures.

I want to go to a specific question from the Naylor report. The Naylor report recommended that the government form a national advisory council on research and innovation. One of the concerns I've heard from the research community is that they fear that the board, which the report recommended be made up of 12 to 15 members, will be highly politicized. What they are looking for is to have framework legislation adopted by Parliament that would depoliticize the appointment process to ensure that this board and this advisory council are at arm's length from politics and serve their function.

Does the government have any plans to do that?

(0940)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I, too, am going to respond to you regarding funding.

We have absolutely changed—

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Chair, with respect, I asked a question about—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—the trajectory of funding.

Hon. Michael Chong:

—the advisory council.

The Chair:

You prefaced with a comment. It's only fair that the minister respond to that comment in the process of answering your question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We've absolutely changed the trajectory of funding in this country from stagnation to investment. First year, $2 billion.... I'll just give the example. In the first year, $95 million—

Hon. Michael Chong:

With respect, Minister, it's not to the levels recommended in the Naylor report.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm trying, if you'll allow me—

Hon. Michael Chong:

You keep citing the Naylor report, and you have not—

The Chair:

Mr. Chong, please let the minister answer.

Hon. Michael Chong:

It's also my time, Mr. Chair, and the Naylor report was clear about its recommendations for increased funding levels. The fact of the matter is the government has not increased funding for the four granting councils to that level. That's a fact.

The Chair:

You don't need to make that point with me. Again, you are asking the minister—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—about the national advisory council and not about funding levels.

The Chair:

You are commenting and now you're.... Please let the minister answer. It's only fair. You prefaced all of that information—

Hon. Michael Chong:

I asked about the—

The Chair:

You're running out of time, Mr. Chong. We're running out of time, so if you'd like the minister to answer—

Hon. Michael Chong:

I'd like her to answer about the national advisory council.

The Chair:

She can answer to whatever she feels is appropriate.

Hon. Michael Chong:

And I can respond in any way I'd like to respond.

The Chair:

Well, your time is running out.

Minister.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In year one, we made a $95-million investment in the granting councils. It was heralded across the country because that $95 million was the largest investment in the granting councils in a decade. In budget 2018, we increased our funding to the granting councils by 25% to $1.7 billion.

Now I'm happy to answer. There will shortly be an announcement about the council on science and innovation. I'd like to thank the Science, Technology and Innovation Council, or STIC, for its work. This will be our council and we will take a different approach. It will be open and transparent. Agendas will be provided so Canadians know what will be discussed, and there will be reporting to Canadians. We are taking a very different approach and there will be the 12 members that you mentioned.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan for five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister, for bringing science back. In fact, you've brought it back to schools, back to government, back to industry and back to Canada.

Sault Ste. Marie is known as a steel town but we also have one of the highest rates of Ph.D.s per capita. There's a lot of scientific research happening on flora and fauna, forestry, the Great Lakes and the rivers. We also have Algoma University and Sault College. I noted that you had mentioned the dimension charter. Algoma University has signed that. It's a semi-rural university and they're leading the way. They have, since 2015, two research chairs. They're basically our front-line warriors in the battle against climate change. They're doing significant scientific research. They're working with both the private and public sectors there.

As you know, my daughter Kate was just accepted to the University of Ottawa for science. I really appreciate your leadership over the last few years in making things more diverse and giving a leg up.

I have a couple of questions. Can you explain some of the changes you have made to help women enter the scientific field and do their research? Can you explain in particular some of the changes that have been made to maternity leave?

As well, I noted with great significance that one of Doug Ford's first actions was to get rid of the chief science officer for Ontario. However, you were tasked with creating a chief science officer for Canada. Can you explain the importance of a chief science officer as well?

Last, Dr. Bondar says hi.

(0945)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Terry. Congratulations to your daughter. Please give Dr. Bondar my very best. She's a Canadian hero.

Equity, diversity, inclusion: We have world-class institutions in this country, and they rank in the top 100. I think we should all be celebrating our researchers and our institutions.

I want as many people going through these institutions as possible. We have to attract them there, and we have to retain them. That's why we've put in place these equity, diversity, inclusion requirements for our prestigious research chairs. That's why we're increasing parental leave. When I came in, the parental leave for the three granting councils was three months, six months and six months. We got it to six months, and in this budget it's going to 12 months.

That's why we're bringing in the dimensions charter. This is based on the Athena SWAN program in the U.K., which has been replicated in Ireland, the United States and Australia. The Canadian program will be the most ambitious, and it's really exciting. In a matter of a few weeks, we will have 32 institutions signing on.

We want our institutions to be welcoming. I was at Dalhousie University on Friday, and there's really great excitement that people can be part of transformative change. In 1970, there was 0% full women professors in engineering. Roughly 50 years later, it's 11%. We've made progress, but it's incremental. There's excitement that together we can make transformative change. It's very exciting.

You asked about the chief science adviser. We believe in science advice to government so that our scientists can speak freely, so that they are not muzzled. They can be collaborating and going to international conferences. The chief science adviser has done really important work this year. She has worked on having departmental chief scientists to increase science advice to science-based departments.

I asked her to develop a scientific integrity policy—this is a first in Canada—to protect our scientists and researchers so we can never go back to as it was under the previous government. Nature, one of our most prestigious research journals, talked about Canada muzzling its scientists. We can never go back to that.

She has done an important aquaculture report that our government is now acting upon. She has done her first annual report. She is rebuilding the relationships with the research community outside and inside of government, as well as international relationships. Science and diplomacy matter.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

The final two minutes are yours, Mr. Masse.

(0950)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Again, thank you, Minister, for being here.

To continue along that line, there has been a lot of talk here about the silencing and muzzling of scientists in the previous government but your government right now does not allow scientists to release papers. Your scientists' papers are often redacted when they finally do get them released.

Your government right now has partial use and restrictions on papers in scientific research that is commissioned. It is not allowed, when you finally get them, to use them and share them.

Often requests from scientists and researchers are delayed or even ignored amongst departments. The situation has become so critical right now that your government also has lost information. As we go to the digital area, some departments treat it with respect, some do not, and information and research are also lost with regard to not moving into digital formats.

All of that has been expressed as part of the concerns on Crown copyright. Right now, you muzzle and restrict scientists, not by necessarily restricting what they say in public, but by denying the free access of their works for other Canadian researchers.

Aren't you then part of the problem?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Brian, thank you for your question.

I will tell you what I am absolutely committed to. On day two, we unmuzzled our scientists.

Let me explain this. It is one thing to say it and it's another thing to act.

We developed a new communications policy from the previous government, because Nature magazine was reporting about Canada muzzling its scientists. I then wrote, along with the former president of the Treasury Board, to all ministers of the science-based departments to make sure they knew there was a new policy. We stressed that we want our scientists to speak. We want them communicating with Canadians. We want them speaking to the public.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Then why won't you let them share their papers? Why do you have restrictions?

The Chair:

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That is the problem that we face here.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, the minister has actually stayed over her time. I wanted to make sure you got your time. Please do a quick wrap-up.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Fair enough.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you.

We want them out speaking. Culture change takes time. I take every opportunity when I speak with government scientists. I'm the first science minister to ever meet with the deputy ministers of science-based departments throughout the year, and annually for eight hours, to discuss the challenges of government scientists. I am also committed to open science and open data—and I've asked our chief science adviser to work on this, because we want Canadians to have access.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

On that note, we've come to the end of our first hour.

Minister, thank you very much for being here today. Thank you for staying the extra minutes so that everybody could get in their time.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Chair, thank you to you.

Once again, I'd really like to thank this committee for the opportunity to appear before you to answer your questions. Mostly, I'd like to thank you for the important work you've done over the last three and a half years.

Merci.

The Chair:

Thank you. We will suspend for a few minutes.

(0950)

(0955)

The Chair:

We're back.

Before we go into committee business, we need to vote on the main estimates. ATLANTIC CANADA OPPORTUNITIES AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$65,905,491 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$241,163,563 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$2,091,224 ç Vote 15—Increased Funding for the Regional Development Agencies..........$24,900,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 agreed to on division) CANADIAN NORTHERN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$14,527,629 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$34,270,717 ç Vote 10—A Food Policy for Canada..........$3,000,000 ç Vote 15—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$1,709,192 ç Vote 20—Strong Arctic and Northern Communities..........$9,999,990

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 agreed to on division) CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$181,393,741 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$78,547,200 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$58,696,000

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) CANADIAN TOURISM COMMISSION ç Vote 1—Payments to the Commission..........$95,665,913 ç Vote 5—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$5,000,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division) COPYRIGHT BOARD ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$3,781,533

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures ..........$442,060,174 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$6,683,000 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$2,160,756,935 ç Vote L15—Payments pursuant to subsection 14(2) of the Department of Industry Act..........$300,000 ç Vote L20—Loans pursuant to paragraph 14(1)(a) of the Department of Industry Act..........$500,000 ç Vote 25—Access to High-Speed Internet for all Canadians..........$26,905,000 ç Vote 30—Giving Young Canadians Digital Skills..........$30,000,000 ç Vote 35—Preparing for a New Generation of Wireless Technology..........$7,357,000 ç Vote 40—Protecting Canada's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats..........$964,000 ç Vote 45—Protecting Canada's National Security..........$1,043,354 ç Vote 50—Supporting Innovation in the Oil and Gas Sector Through Collaboration..........$10,000,000 ç Vote 55—Supporting Renewed Legal Relationships With Indigenous Peoples..........$3,048,333 ç Vote 60—Supporting the Next Generation of Entrepreneurs..........$7,300,000 ç Vote 65—Supporting the work of the Business/Higher Education Roundtable..........$5,666,667 ç Vote 70—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism (FedNor)..........$1,836,536

(Votes 1, 5, 10, L15, L20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 and 70 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$37,981,906 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$209,531,630 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$3,607,224 ç Vote 15—Protecting Water and Soil in the Prairies..........$1,000,000 ç Vote 20—Increased Funding for the Regional Development Agencies..........$15,800,000 ç Vote 25—Investing in a Diverse and Growing Western Economy..........$33,300,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 agreed to on division) ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY OF CANADA FOR THE REGIONS OF QUEBEC ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$39,352,146 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$277,942,967 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$3,097,848

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) FEDERAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY FOR SOUTHERN ONTARIO ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$29,201,373 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$224,900,252 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$3,867,976

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$436,503,800 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$58,320,000 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$448,814,193

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH COUNCIL ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$53,905,016 ç Vote 5—Grants..........$1,296,774,972 ç Vote 10—Paid Parental Leave for Student Researchers..........$1,805,000 ç Vote 15—Supporting Graduate Students Through Research Scholarships..........$4,350,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 agreed to on division) SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$35,100,061 ç Vote 5—Grants..........$884,037,003 ç Vote 10—Paid Parental Leave for Student Researchers..........$1,447,000 ç Vote 15—Supporting Graduate Students Through Research Scholarships..........$6,090,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 agreed to on division) STANDARDS COUNCIL OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Payments to the Council..........$17,910,000

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) STATISTICS CANADA ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$423,989,188 ç Vote 5—Monitoring Purchases of Canadian Real Estate..........$500,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall the chair report the main estimates for 2019-20, less the amounts voted in the interim estimates, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you very much.

We will now go in camera to discuss M-208.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0845)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Soyez les bienvenus à cette 165e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie.

Conformément à l’article 81(4) du Règlement, le Comité reprend son examen du Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons la ministre des Sciences et des Sports, l'honorable Kirsty Duncan.

Madame la ministre, soyez la bienvenue. Merci de nous honorer de votre présence.

Du ministère de l'Industrie, nous recevons David McGovern, sous-ministre délégué, Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada.

Vous avez un maximum de 10 minutes pour nous livrer vos observations liminaires.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan (ministre des Sciences et des Sports):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Distingués membres du Comité, merci de m’avoir invitée à l’occasion du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses pour l’exercice 2019-2020.

Les sciences, la recherche et les prises de décisions fondées sur des données probantes comptent plus que jamais, car de plus en plus de voix s’élèvent pour discréditer les sciences et les faits.

Les Canadiens sont conscients que les sciences et la recherche sont garantes d'un meilleur environnement, donc d'une eau et d'un air plus purs. Elles sont aussi source de nouveaux traitements médicaux et de technologies efficaces, et elles permettent de dynamiser les communautés.

Nos étudiants et chercheurs de talent conçoivent des appareils robotisés qui facilitent le rétablissement des patients à la suite d’un accident vasculaire cérébral ou d’une blessure et qui aident les aînés et les personnes handicapées à vivre en toute indépendance. [Français]

Les chercheurs mettent aussi au point des vaccins et des technologies pour combattre les maladies contagieuses.[Traduction]

Les Canadiens sont conscients du rôle important que jouent les sciences et la recherche en ce qui a trait à l’innovation. Ils savent qu’elles sont des assises essentielles de l’économie du XXIe siècle. À preuve, les grandes économies du monde investissent systématiquement dans la recherche pour soutenir leur propre avancement. [Français]

Les sciences, les technologies et le génie ont stimulé grandement la croissance des économies modernes.[Traduction]

Les investissements dans la recherche fondamentale se traduisent pour les Canadiens par la création d’emplois bien rémunérés. Voilà pourquoi nous avons mis les sciences et la recherche au cœur de nos préoccupations depuis notre arrivée au pouvoir. C’est d’ailleurs dans cette optique que nous avons rétabli le questionnaire détaillé du recensement, que nous avons invité nos scientifiques à s’exprimer publiquement et que nous avons rétabli la fonction de conseiller scientifique en chef.

J’ai d’ailleurs demandé à la conseillère scientifique en chef de travailler avec les ministères à vocation scientifique afin qu’ils se dotent eux-mêmes d’un poste de scientifique en chef. L’objectif est de rendre plus efficace la prestation de conseils scientifiques au gouvernement et d’appuyer l’élaboration d’une politique en matière d’intégrité scientifique.

L’approche que nous avons adoptée pour travailler avec la communauté scientifique et de la recherche est tout à fait originale. Nous sommes à l’écoute de ses préoccupations et nous avons entrepris six importantes consultations. [Français]

Parmi ces consultations, il y a eu le premier examen en 40 ans du soutien fédéral à la science fondamentale.[Traduction]

Nous nous sommes engagés à redonner aux sciences et à la recherche la place qui leur revient. Dans le cadre de quatre budgets successifs, le gouvernement fédéral a consacré un total de plus de 10 milliards de dollars aux sciences, à la recherche, aux chercheurs et aux étudiants. Les chercheurs et les étudiants sont au centre de notre action. Cela signifie que nous nous assurons qu’ils obtiennent le financement nécessaire, qu’ils disposent de laboratoires et d’instruments de recherche de pointe et qu’ils ont accès aux technologies numériques leur permettant d’innover et de faire des découvertes.

(0850)

[Français]

Nous avons donc investi 4 milliards de dollars dans les sciences et la recherche en 2018.[Traduction]

Ce montant comprend le plus important investissement ponctuel en recherche fondamentale jamais effectué au Canada. En fait, nous avons augmenté le financement consacré aux conseils subventionnaires de 25 %. Ce financement n’avait pas bougé depuis une décennie. Cette décision a eu d'importantes répercussions positives. Les chercheurs nous ont indiqué que l’augmentation du financement du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie, le CRSNG, et du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines, le CRSH, leur a permis d’engager plus d’étudiants des cycles supérieurs, lesquels ont ainsi pu acquérir des compétences qui leur seront utiles pour les emplois de demain.

Nous avons investi 2 milliards de dollars dans 300 projets d’infrastructure de recherche et d’innovation dans des établissements d’enseignement postsecondaire d’un peu partout au pays. Nous avons aussi investi 763 millions de dollars supplémentaires sur cinq ans dans la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. Nous nous sommes engagés à offrir à cet organisme un financement prévisible et stable à long terme.

Comme nous sommes bien conscients du rôle essentiel que jouent les chercheurs fédéraux au sein de la communauté scientifique et de la recherche du Canada, nous avons aussi consacré 2,8 milliards de dollars pour moderniser les laboratoires fédéraux.

Le gouvernement ne se contente pas de ces investissements sans précédent, puisqu'il apporte aussi des modifications importantes au système de recherche proprement dit. Nous allons annoncer sous peu la création du Conseil des sciences et de l’innovation, qui aura entre autres fonctions d'intensifier les efforts déployés pour stimuler l’innovation au pays. La ministre Petitpas Taylor et moi avons déjà annoncé la création du Comité de la coordination de la recherche au Canada, qui vise à améliorer la collaboration et l’harmonisation entre les trois conseils subventionnaires du gouvernement fédéral — les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada (les IRSC), le CRSNG et le CRSH — et la Fédération canadienne des inventeurs, la FCI.

Les travaux de la dernière année du Comité de coordination de la recherche au Canada ont mené à la création du Fonds Nouvelles frontières en recherche, lequel soutient certaines recherches internationales et interdisciplinaires qui progressent rapidement et qui sont susceptibles de mener à des découvertes avantageuses pour tous.

Le Comité a aussi entamé le tout premier dialogue en matière de recherche avec les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits. Nous avons accordé 116 subventions Connexion afin de soutenir la tenue d’ateliers au sein des collectivités et l’élaboration d’exposés de position connexes. Plus de la moitié de ces subventions ont été accordées à des chercheurs autochtones et à des organismes autochtones sans but lucratif. Il s’agit là d’une façon de favoriser la délimitation d’une voie commune vers la réconciliation.

Monsieur le président, nous avons jeté les bases de cet important changement de culture et nous souhaitons que tous les Canadiens puissent en profiter.[Français]

Pour réaliser notre vision, il faut que le milieu scientifique et le milieu de la recherche reflètent la diversité canadienne.[Traduction]

Nous voulons que le plus de gens possible tirent profit de nos institutions de calibre mondial. Toutefois, il ne suffit pas d’attirer les gens; encore faut-il les garder. C’est pourquoi j’ai instauré de nouvelles exigences en matière d’équité et de diversité pour les chaires d’excellence en recherche du Canada et les chaires de recherche du Canada, qui sont reconnues dans le monde entier.

Grâce à ces changements, plus de la moitié des titulaires de chaire d’excellence en recherche du Canada nommés lors du dernier concours étaient des femmes. Je suis fière de mentionner que lors du dernier concours, pour la première fois dans l’histoire, 50 % de femmes ont été mises en candidature pour une chaire de recherche du Canada. Nous avons aussi vu le plus fort pourcentage de nominations de tous les temps provenant de chercheurs autochtones, handicapés ou membres de minorités visibles.

Plus tôt ce mois-ci, nous avons innové en lançant un programme que nous avons appelé Dimensions : équité, diversité et inclusion au Canada. [Français]

Il s'agit d'un programme pilote inspiré de l'initiative Athena SWAN, qui est reconnue à l'échelle internationale.[Traduction]

Nous incitons les universités, les collèges, les écoles polytechniques et les cégeps à adopter la charte Dimensions et à s’engager ainsi à veiller à ce que tous aient accès aux mêmes possibilités, au même traitement et à la même reconnaissance. Je suis heureuse de vous dire que 32 établissements ont déjà signé cette charte.

Monsieur le Président, on nous a souvent répété que le régime inadéquat des congés parentaux créait toutes sortes de problèmes pour les chercheuses en début de carrière.

(0855)

[Français]

Personne ne devrait avoir à choisir entre poursuivre une carrière en recherche et avoir des enfants.[Traduction]

Nous sommes conscients que, pour une femme, il peut être préjudiciable de mettre sa carrière en veilleuse alors qu’elle ne fait que commencer. Cela se traduit souvent par l’occupation de postes moins prestigieux, offrant un salaire moindre et par une pension de retraite moins élevée en fin de parcours. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous avons annoncé dans le budget de 2019 que le congé parental va passer de 6 à 12 mois pour les étudiants et les stagiaires postdoctoraux recevant des fonds des conseils subventionnaires.

Le budget de 2019 a aussi annoncé la création de 500 nouvelles bourses pour les étudiants à la maîtrise et de 500 bourses pour les doctorants, ce qui permettra à un nombre accru d’étudiants canadiens de poursuivre leurs activités de recherche.

Le fait de repenser du tout au tout la culture scientifique au Canada n’est pas une mince tâche. Nous sommes bien conscients de la complexité du travail qu'il y a à faire. Or, étant donné les investissements que nous consacrons à cela, les pays du G7 considèrent désormais le Canada comme étant un exemple à suivre en matière de recherche. Cet engouement a des effets bien concrets: des chercheurs du monde entier se sont intéressés au Programme des chaires de recherche Canada 150. [Français]

Évidemment, il y a encore beaucoup à faire et il faut du temps pour y arriver.[Traduction]

Les Canadiens peuvent toutefois être fiers. En peu de temps, le visage des sciences et de la recherche au Canada a changé pour de bon. Nous désirons faire du Canada un chef de file mondial dans le domaine de la recherche. Nous voulons continuer à faire des découvertes qui ont des incidences positives sur la vie des Canadiens, sur l’environnement, sur nos collectivités et sur notre économie. [Français]

Je suis convaincue que c'est aussi l'objectif de tous les membres de ce comité.

[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais terminer en remerciant chacun des membres de ce comité du travail qu'il a fait au cours des trois dernières années et demie.

Je serai heureuse de répondre à toutes vos questions.[Français]

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie de votre exposé.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par M. Longfield.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci de votre présence.

Merci également d'avoir visité l'Université de Guelph autant de fois que vous l'avez fait au cours des quatre dernières années.

J'ai rencontré l'un de nos jeunes scientifiques. En fait, c'en est un qui a été rapatrié au Canada en raison des investissements que nous faisons en sciences. À vrai dire, ce sont cinq membres de cette équipe qui sont revenus au Canada dans le cadre de ce recrutement de cerveaux. Jibran Khokhar est neuropsychopharmacologue. Il travaille sur les dépendances et la santé mentale, dont il étudie les effets chez la souris.

Ce qui le préoccupe, ce sont les ressources que nous consacrons aux premières démarches de jeunes scientifiques qui travaillent sur des sujets de recherche à haut risque par rapport à nos investissements traditionnels plus importants dans le domaine de la science en général.

Pourriez-vous nous parler du travail du Comité de la coordination de la recherche au Canada ou des autres façons que nous avons d'investir dans les jeunes scientifiques?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Longfield, d'être un si ardent défenseur de la recherche.

Quand j'ai assumé ce rôle, je suis allée chercher les données qu'il me fallait. Ce que j'ai constaté, c'est qu'avec l'un de nos conseils subventionnaires, nos chercheurs n'obtenaient pas leur première subvention avant l'âge de 43 ans. On ne peut tout simplement pas se bâtir une carrière de chercheur lorsqu'on reçoit sa première subvention à 43 ans. J'ai vraiment mis l'accent sur les chercheurs en début de carrière, car si personne ne le fait, où en sera notre pays dans 10 ou 15 ans?

Vous avez parlé du Comité de la coordination de la recherche au Canada. Nous avons créé un nouveau fonds de recherche, le Fonds Nouvelles frontières en recherche. Il est axé sur la recherche internationale, interdisciplinaire, à évolution rapide, à haut risque et à haut rendement. Il s'agit d'une enveloppe de 275 millions de dollars, montant qui sera doublé au cours des cinq prochaines années et bonifié subséquemment de 65 millions de dollars par année. Ce sera la plus importante réserve de fonds mise à la disposition des chercheurs. Or, nous avons fait en sorte que le premier volet, celui de l'exploration, ne soit accessible qu'aux chercheurs en début de carrière. Nous avons annoncé les récipiendaires; 157 chercheurs se sont partagé 38 millions de dollars.

Lorsque j'ai parcouru le pays il y a 25 ans, alors que j'enseignais, on m'a demandé si j'avais une carrière en recherche ou un enfant. Je ne m'attendais pas à cela. C'est pourquoi, dans le cadre d'une autre mesure pour les chercheurs en début de carrière, nous investissons dans le prolongement du congé parental, le faisant passer de 6 à 12 mois. Vous ne devriez pas avoir à choisir entre une carrière de chercheur et un bébé. Vous devriez pouvoir avoir les deux, et nous devons faciliter les choses à cet égard.

(0900)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vais dire cela à Jibran. Tous les jeunes chercheurs sont connectés — ce n'est pas une surprise — et ils sont tous à la recherche de ces nouvelles avenues.

J'ai également rencontré Mme Beth Parker, qui est titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les eaux souterraines. Dans le cadre de son travail sur les eaux souterraines, elle s'intéresse à la géothermie et sur ce que cela pourrait faire pour atténuer les changements climatiques. Ses recherches portent sur les bâtiments urbains qui pourraient être chauffés et refroidis par la géothermie. C'est une chercheuse scientifique dans le domaine de l'eau.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé des liens avec Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur la façon dont Mme Parker pourrait établir des liens avec les programmes sur l'environnement et les changements climatiques pour faire avancer, par exemple, l'adaptation des bâtiments à cette forme d'énergie?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Monsieur Longfield, tout d'abord, je vous prie de transmettre à Jibran mes meilleurs vœux de réussite. Je connais son travail.

Si vous avez des questions précises, vous devriez assurément les adresser à Environnement Canada.

Toutefois, l'une des choses que j'ai retenues, c'est que nous voulons... Jusqu'ici, la science universitaire en tant que communauté de recherche externe et la science gouvernementale n'ont pas travaillé ensemble. Il y a un certain chevauchement et il y a des instituts de recherche sur les campus universitaires, mais nous devons définitivement faire un meilleur travail à cet égard.

Je me suis beaucoup focalisée sur la science gouvernementale. Le deuxième jour de notre gouvernement, nous avons démuselé nos scientifiques. C'est une chose de le dire, mais c'en est une autre d'instaurer une politique de communication pour rappeler à nos collègues et aux autres ministres que nous voulons que nos scientifiques parlent librement et collaborent. Nous avons également investi 2,8 milliards de dollars dans l'infrastructure scientifique du gouvernement pour mettre en place de nouveaux laboratoires. Plusieurs de nos laboratoires ont 25 ans. Contrairement aux anciens, les nouveaux laboratoires ne seront pas des établissements à fonction unique — un laboratoire météorologique, par exemple. Nous allons réunir les laboratoires pour l'environnement et ceux des pêcheries. Nous allons également collaborer davantage avec les chercheurs, les universités, les collèges et l'industrie.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

L'été dernier, j'étais dans l'Arctique à la station de recherche PEARL. Environnement Canada y a une station météorologique et environ sept universités y font de la recherche atmosphérique sur les changements climatiques. Dans notre budget, nous avions 21,8 millions de dollars pour le programme PEARL. Je crois que la plus grande partie de cette somme est venue d'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, mais il y a encore des travaux scientifiques qui se font là-bas.

Pouvez-vous nous parler des liens qui existent entre nos investissements? Je sais qu'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada n'est pas votre ministère, mais comment pouvons-nous faire en sorte que ce centre de recherche poursuive son important travail?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de cette question.

Je sais que vous avez visité le PEARL, le laboratoire de recherche atmosphérique en environnement polaire. C'est notre laboratoire le plus septentrional. Il étudie l'atmosphère et les liens entre l'atmosphère et la biosphère océanique. Nous pensons que c'est un laboratoire important. Le gouvernement précédent avait l'intention de le fermer. C'est pourquoi notre gouvernement s'est engagé à le garder en fonction. Environnement Canada verra à garder le PEARL ouvert.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Sauf que, d'après ce que je comprends, ils devront continuer de présenter des demandes au CRSNG pour être en mesure de poursuivre leurs recherches. Est-ce exact?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Il est important que les chercheurs fassent des demandes de financement pour leurs recherches, comme c'est le cas pour n'importe quel chercheur au pays. Ils peuvent présenter une demande au CRSNG. Ils peuvent envisager d'autres fonds. Bien entendu, nous sommes toujours heureux de mettre nos fonctionnaires en contact pour voir quels fonds sont accessibles.

(0905)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je cède la parole à Pierre Fogal, qui vient de Guelph et qui dirige ce laboratoire de recherche.

Merci beaucoup, madame Duncan.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Chong.

Vous avez sept minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, d'être venue témoigner au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses.

J'aimerais d'abord rectifier les faits en ce qui concerne l'affirmation selon laquelle les niveaux de financement de l'enseignement supérieur au Canada ont subi un changement radical. Je reconnais que le gouvernement actuel a quelque peu augmenté le financement accordé aux quatre conseils subventionnaires, mais si vous examinez les données de l'OCDE sur les dépenses au titre de la recherche et du développement dans le secteur de l'enseignement supérieur, elles n'ont pas beaucoup changé au cours des 20 dernières années. En 2005, elles représentaient 0,67 % du PIB; en 2012, 0,7 %; en 2013, 0,67 %; en 2014, 0,65 %; en 2015, 0,67 %; en 2016, 0,68 %. Enfin, en 2017, dernière année pour laquelle l'OCDE dispose des chiffres, c'était de 0,65 %. Ce n'est donc pas comme s'il y avait un changement radical des niveaux de financement pour les dépenses dans le secteur de l'enseignement supérieur au Canada. Je crois qu'il est important de le souligner aux fins du compte rendu.

Pour ce qui est de notre position mondiale au chapitre des dépenses en recherche et développement dans le secteur de l'enseignement supérieur, même si nous nous classons parmi les 10 premiers pays, nous ne sommes certainement pas un chef de file mondial. Nous nous plaçons derrière des pays comme l'Australie, le Danemark, la Finlande, la Norvège et la Suède, qui dépensent considérablement plus d'argent que nous dans la recherche et le développement en milieu universitaire. En fait, aux États-Unis, les National Institutes of Health dépensent, à eux seuls, l'équivalent de 49 milliards de dollars canadiens par année dans la recherche. Toutes proportions gardées, les budgets des quatre conseils subventionnaires canadiens sont loin d'être de la même ampleur.

Ma question pour vous est assez simple. Le rapport Naylor avait recommandé d'augmenter le financement. Le gouvernement actuel a dépensé nettement plus que ce qu'il avait prévu à son arrivée au pouvoir il y a environ quatre ans. Pourquoi le gouvernement n'a-t-il pas augmenté le financement des quatre conseils subventionnaires aux niveaux recommandés dans le rapport Naylor?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je tiens à remercier mon collègue. Lui et moi travaillons ensemble depuis très longtemps.

J'aimerais, moi aussi, rectifier les faits. Les données que vous avez présentées — les plus récentes, comme vous l'avez souligné — étaient celles de 2017, mais en 2018, nous avons effectué un investissement historique de 6,8 milliards de dollars dans la recherche. C'est le plus important investissement jamais effectué au Canada. Il s'agit d'une hausse de 25 % pour nos conseils subventionnaires.

Mon objectif était de placer nos chercheurs au centre de tout ce que nous faisons afin de veiller à ce qu'ils aient les fonds, les laboratoires et les outils nécessaires, y compris les outils numériques, pour mener leurs recherches. À cette fin, nous avons augmenté de 25 % le financement consacré à nos conseils subventionnaires. Nous avons également investi 762 millions de dollars dans la Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation, en plus de lui promettre un financement prévisible, durable et à long terme de 462 millions de dollars par année. Ainsi, après 20 ans d'existence, la Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation aurait enfin droit à un financement stable. Par ailleurs, comme une grande partie des recherches menées aujourd'hui reposent sur les mégadonnées et les outils de recherche numériques, nous avons prévu un investissement de 573 millions de dollars à cet égard.

Lorsque je vais à une réunion du G7, mes collègues là-bas me disent que le Canada représente, et je cite, « le point de référence en matière de sciences et de recherche », et ils ont hâte de collaborer avec nous, car grâce au Fonds Nouvelles frontières en recherche, dont le montant de 275 millions de dollars sera doublé au cours des prochaines années, nos chercheurs auront accès à des fonds internationaux pour pouvoir collaborer avec leurs homologues en Europe et aux États-Unis. C'est vraiment du jamais vu.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Pour être juste, je reconnais que les niveaux de financement ont augmenté, mais les données de 2018 ne devraient pas être bien différentes de celles de 2017.

Ce que j'entends de la part des chercheurs, c'est qu'ils se sentent désavantagés par rapport aux chercheurs américains, compte tenu des fonds qui sont mis à la disposition de ces derniers par l'entremise des National Institutes of Health, par exemple.

À mon avis, même si les niveaux de financement ont augmenté, ils ne correspondent toujours pas aux niveaux recommandés dans le rapport Naylor, et cela saute aux yeux.

L'autre question que je...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais répondre à cette observation. J'ai été très heureuse de commander l'examen du soutien fédéral à la science fondamentale, sous la présidence du Dr David Naylor. Ce groupe d'experts était composé de membres triés sur le volet. Mentionnons, entre autres, l'ancienne rectrice de la UBC, Mme Martha Piper; le lauréat du prix Nobel, M. Art McDonald; le scientifique en chef du Québec, M. Rémi Quirion. C'était la deuxième consultation que nous organisions. Le groupe d'experts a entendu 1 500 chercheurs. Il s'agit d'un rapport très important. Le premier...

(0910)

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je suis d'accord, mais les niveaux de financement...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J'aimerais bien répondre.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. Je voudrais passer à ma prochaine question.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je tiens à vous répondre.

C'était le premier examen du soutien fédéral en 40 ans. Nous avons pris ce rapport très au sérieux, comme en témoigne le budget de 6,8 milliards de dollars, le plus important de l'histoire du Canada. Ma dernière phrase...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Il s'agit d'une valeur nominale.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Sous le gouvernement précédent, votre parti avait également demandé au Dr David Naylor de produire un rapport. Une conférence de presse devait avoir lieu un vendredi, mais ce rapport a été enterré.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Passons à ma prochaine question, madame la ministre, et cela concerne le mandat de la conseillère scientifique en chef. Ce poste a été créé en grande pompe, mais, bien franchement, de nombreuses personnes se demandent pourquoi la conseillère scientifique en chef n'a pas reçu un mandat suffisant pour faire son travail. Beaucoup de gens voient comment elle se démène pour exercer ses fonctions du mieux qu'elle peut, sans aucun soutien de la part du gouvernement.

Une des questions qui se posent est la suivante : pourquoi n'a-t-elle pas été nommée pour diriger le comité de la coordination, plutôt que d'en confier la présidence à tour de rôle aux présidents des divers conseils subventionnaires?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Tout d'abord, permettez-moi de dire que nous avons décidé de rétablir le poste de conseiller scientifique en chef, lequel avait été aboli par votre gouvernement. Nous avons nommé la Dre Mona Nemer, une cardiologue de renommée internationale qui a reçu de nombreux prix. D'ailleurs, l'ancien porte-parole de votre parti en matière d'industrie a dit que c'était un excellent choix, et nous sommes d'accord.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Le problème, c'est que le mandat qui lui a été attribué n'est pas suffisamment large...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Elle s'est vu attribuer...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... pour lui permettre d'accomplir son travail. Elle fait des pieds et des mains pour remplir ce rôle au sein du gouvernement. Il semble donc y avoir beaucoup...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Si vous pouviez me laisser terminer...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... de discours creux de la part du gouvernement...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J'aimerais bien pouvoir terminer...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Il y a un énorme décalage entre les discours creux et les résultats concrets. Songeons au rapport Naylor, dans lequel certains niveaux de financement étaient recommandés, mais c'est resté lettre morte. Songeons à la nomination de la nouvelle conseillère scientifique en chef, qui n'a pas un mandat assez large pour exercer ses fonctions...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Si je pouvais bien répondre...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... ou encore, songeons à la création d'un comité de la coordination...

Le président:

Monsieur Chong, je suis désolé, mais votre temps est écoulé.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je comprends, mais permettez-moi de terminer ma phrase.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Eh bien, moi, je n'ai pas eu cette possibilité.

Le président:

J'aimerais m'assurer que la ministre a l'occasion de répondre à votre question.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Fort bien.

Le président:

Vous avez dépassé votre temps de parole. Nous en sommes à huit minutes. J'ai permis...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Monsieur le président, je suis d'accord. Je veux seulement terminer ma phrase, si vous me le permettez.

Le président:

J'aimerais que la ministre puisse vous répondre brièvement.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Puis-je terminer ma phrase?

Le président:

Allez-y.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Il y a un énorme décalage entre les discours creux et les résultats réels que le gouvernement a obtenus, et je crois que cela s'applique aussi au portefeuille des sciences.

Le président:

Je vais donner à la ministre le temps de répondre.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Grâce à notre investissement de 10 milliards de dollars, nous avons changé la donne pour les sciences et la technologie au Canada.

La Dre Nemer fait un travail important.

Je rappelle au député que je suis contente de l'entendre aujourd'hui parler avec respect du Dr Naylor, mais il aurait dû en faire autant lorsque son gouvernement était au pouvoir.

Vous avez enterré le rapport. Vous avez fait fi de ce que le Dr Naylor demandait dans son rapport, à savoir un financement de 1 milliard de dollars pour l'innovation en santé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de céder la parole à M. Masse, je tiens à rappeler à tout le monde qu'il faut éviter de parler en même temps. Nous voulons tenir un dialogue respectueux pendant la période des questions et réponses. Cela facilitera la tâche à tout le monde, car vous pourrez ainsi obtenir des réponses à vos questions.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais commencer par un sujet qui est un peu plus léger. En fait, c'est lié à votre poste de ministre des Sports.

Étant donné que les Raptors de Toronto se trouvent aujourd'hui dans une position historique...

Des députés: Bravo!

M. Brian Masse: Exactement. À vrai dire, j'ai également sorti mon vieux chandail de Chris Bosh.

Cela dit, j'ai une question sérieuse à vous poser sur la Ligue nationale de basketball du Canada. Je ne sais pas si vous connaissez la ligue, mais elle a joué un rôle important pour ce qui est de mettre à profit les sports et les sciences dans les quartiers défavorisés, comme le mien, à Windsor, où nous avons l'Express de Windsor.

Le lien avec la situation d'aujourd'hui, assez ironiquement, c'est qu'après le déménagement de la franchise d'Oshawa à Mississauga, elle a été intégrée aux Raptors 905 de la ligue D de la NBA, lesquels sont affiliés à l'équipe actuelle des Raptors.

Il y a des franchises au Cap-Breton, à Halifax, Charlottetown, Moncton, Saint John, Kitchener, London, Sudbury et Windsor.

Que fait le gouvernement pour collaborer avec des ligues comme la Ligue nationale de basketball? Je n'ai encore rien vu au sujet des commotions cérébrales dans le sport, entre autres. Ces ligues comptent des équipes professionnelles à l'échelle locale, mais elles offrent aussi beaucoup de services d'intervention communautaire.

Par exemple, je sais que l'Express de Windsor a récemment pris part à la marche organisée par le maire, en plus de diriger une clinique dans la rue.

Dans ma vie professionnelle antérieure, j'ai déjà dirigé un programme de basketball et de volleyball de plage pour les jeunes des quartiers défavorisés afin de les retirer de la rue. Nous faisions également beaucoup de choses sur le plan de la nutrition, et tout le reste.

À cet égard, le gouvernement a-t-il travaillé d'une manière quelconque avec la Ligue nationale de basketball du Canada? Quelles sont les possibilités qui s'offrent à de telles organisations pour contribuer aux efforts de sensibilisation dans une foule de domaines, dont la nutrition, le sport, la culture et, surtout, les commotions cérébrales?

(0915)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Monsieur Masse, je vous remercie de tout votre travail d'encadrement. Je sais que vous avez été entraîneur de hockey pendant longtemps, mais je n'étais pas au courant pour le basketball, alors merci.

Il y a beaucoup trop d'enfants et d'athlètes qui subissent des commotions cérébrales. C'est pourquoi nous avons collaboré avec la ministre de la Santé pour élaborer de nouvelles lignes directrices sur les commotions cérébrales, lesquelles sont adoptées par nos organismes nationaux de sport. Ce travail se fait avec l'aide de Parachute.

Dans le budget actuel, nous avons investi 30 millions de dollars pour la pratique sécuritaire des sports. Je serai ravie d'en parler, si vous voulez. Une partie de ce financement servira à protéger nos enfants.

J'ajouterai que la Chambre des communes a entrepris une étude sur les commotions cérébrales liées à la pratique d'activités sportives. Il s'agit d'un comité composé de représentants de tous les partis. Le rapport sera déposé, et j'ai vraiment hâte de savoir quelles seront les recommandations.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vais passer à un autre sujet, mais je tiens d'abord à vous remercier. Je n'en dirai pas plus. Ce sera pour une autre législature.

Il y a eu quelques améliorations en ce qui concerne les sciences et l'importance accordée à ce domaine sur la Colline. J'ai vu la situation évoluer, car je siège au Comité depuis longtemps. Je persiste à croire que notre pays ne mise pas assez sur les sciences et les sports.

Je ne dis pas que rien n'est fait à cet égard, mais nous n'en parlons pas souvent ici. Voilà ce que je déplore personnellement. Les sciences et les sports ne semblent pas recevoir l'attention qu'ils méritent peut-être dans un pays comme le Canada.

Dans le temps qu'il me reste, j'aimerais aborder un sujet qui ne devrait surprendre personne ici. Mon projet de loi C-440 sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne au Canada est très important pour la communauté scientifique. Cela ne concerne pas seulement les universités, mais aussi un certain nombre d'associations universitaires, de groupes de réflexion en matière de recherche, et tout le reste.

Notre loi sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne repose sur une loi britannique de 1911, qui a été adoptée au Canada en 1929. Cette mesure législative impose des restrictions aux publications gouvernementales, aux recherches scientifiques et à d'autres documents financés par la population. Plus de 200 chercheurs universitaires ont témoigné devant notre comité pour réclamer l'élimination du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Cela n'existe pas aux États-Unis ni dans la plupart des pays du Commonwealth. C'est très rare de trouver une telle loi au Canada.

Quelle est votre position sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, dans sa forme actuelle, au Canada?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Masse.

Vous avez soulevé un certain nombre de questions. Je vais en aborder quelques-unes, puis je céderai la parole à mon sous-ministre.

Vous avez mentionné les sciences et les sports. Les deux vont tout à fait de pair. C'est vraiment important. Si nous voulons améliorer la performance, la santé et la sécurité de nos athlètes, il faut miser sur les sciences. Nous avons des instituts de recherche sur le sport. Je serai heureuse d'en parler plus en détail.

Vous avez également évoqué l'importance de rendre les travaux de recherche accessibles. Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord. Nous voulons que les scientifiques et les chercheurs du gouvernement parlent librement. Je profite de chaque occasion pour le répéter. Nous devons changer cette culture. Nous croyons à l'accès aux données et aux...

(0920)

M. Brian Masse:

Le gouvernement libéral croit-il au droit d'auteur de la Couronne? Voilà précisément ma question.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Nous croyons à l'accès aux données et aux sciences.

Pour revenir à la question de M. Chong, il a demandé ce que la conseillère scientifique en chef a accompli. J'espère que le député a examiné le premier rapport annuel de la Dre Nemer et les domaines qu'elle nous propose d'étudier.

Sur ce, je cède la parole au sous-ministre.

M. Brian Masse:

Madame la ministre, ma question porte précisément sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, soit la protection des documents de recherche et des documents gouvernementaux et l'interdiction de les utiliser. Je vous demande votre opinion sur le sujet. Je n'ai pas besoin d'entendre celle du sous-ministre. Nous avons étudié en détail cette question à la Chambre des communes. C'est bien connu que le Canada a un système unique de protection, et j'aimerais savoir si vous êtes en faveur du statu quo par rapport au droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

J'estime que c'est une question légitime.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Masse.

Les gens nous parlent constamment de cet enjeu. Nous en sommes conscients et nous l'étudions.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

C'est fini.

M. Brian Masse:

Oh, je vois.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'espère vraiment que l'industrie présentera dans un proche avenir un rapport sur le droit d'auteur. Je crois que ce serait très utile.

Madame la ministre, pouvez-vous nous expliquer ce que font les chaires de recherche du Canada et ce qu'elles ont permis d'accomplir jusqu'à présent?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Monsieur Graham, je vous remercie de votre question.

Les chaires de recherche du Canada sont parmi les plus prestigieuses. Elles ont été créées en 2000. Nous avons deux types de chaires. Les titulaires des chaires de recherche du Canada de niveau 1 reçoivent 200 000 $ sur 7 ans, et les titulaires des chaires de niveau 2 reçoivent 100 000 $ sur 5 ans.

Nous avons modifié ce programme. Les titulaires des chaires de niveau 1 pouvaient recevoir du financement pendant sept ans, puis encore sept ans et encore sept ans, et cela pouvait se répéter à l'infini. Nous avons limité cela à un renouvellement. Pourquoi? Cela permet à plus de chercheurs d'avoir accès à ces prestigieuses chaires.

Nous avons en fait augmenté pour la première en 19 ans le financement des chaires de niveau 2. Nous l'avons fait parce que cela vise les chercheurs en début de carrière.

Nous avons aussi apporté des changements en ce qui concerne l'équité et la diversité. J'ai bien entendu extrait les données. C'est ce que je fais, parce que je tiens à vérifier nos résultats. Si nous regardons l'histoire du Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada, les titulaires de nos chaires étaient très loin de refléter la composition actuelle du Canada sur le plan des pourcentages. J'ai expliqué à nos institutions qu'elles avaient deux ans pour atteindre les cibles volontaires dont elles avaient convenu en 2006. Je tiens à vraiment remercier nos institutions. Elles ont vraiment changé la manière dont elles procèdent aux nominations, et c'était la première fois que les femmes représentaient 50 % des personnes nommées à ces chaires de recherche. Un pourcentage record d'Autochtones, de personnes racialisées et de personnes handicapées a été nommé à ces chaires de recherche.

Je tiens à souligner que pour la première fois nous avons cinq personnes handicapées qui sont titulaires d'une chaire de recherche. Ce n'est pas 5 %. Ce sont cinq personnes. Cela montre bien tout le travail qu'il reste à faire, et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons adopté la charte Dimensions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien y a-t-il de chaires de recherche?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Il y en a près de 2 000. Grâce au budget de 2018, soit le budget historique dont j'ai parlé avec des investissements de 6,8 milliards de dollars, nous investissons 210 millions de dollars pour créer 285 nouvelles chaires de recherche du Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le nombre est plus élevé que je le pensais. Je note un grand sentiment de fierté à l'égard du programme.

J'ai une autre question concernant la recherche. Comment pouvons-nous inciter des gens à mener certaines recherches? L'un des gros enjeux dans ma circonscription rurale, où il n'y a aucune institution de recherche, c'est qu'il y a plus de 10 000 lacs. C'est une immense circonscription. Nous avons le myriophylle en épi et d'autres espèces envahissantes qui causent de graves problèmes. Il ne semble y avoir aucune recherche réalisée sur la manière de lutter contre ce problème, de l'atténuer et d'empêcher ces espèces de se propager ailleurs.

Si une personne qui n'est pas scientifique souhaite que des travaux soient réalisés sur un sujet précis, comment faut-il procéder?

(0925)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais commencer par le début.

Je souhaite renforcer notre culture de curiosité au Canada. Tous les enfants sont curieux de naissance. Tous les enfants souhaitent découvrir le monde et explorer. Ils démonteront ce stylo ou ce microphone. Ils veulent comprendre la façon dont les choses fonctionnent. La nature pique leur curiosité. Ils veulent explorer le lac et examiner ce qui se trouve au fond et les insectes présents.

Il nous incombe de stimuler cette curiosité naturelle et innée à l'école primaire, à l'école secondaire et, je l'espère, au-delà. Ce n'est pas suffisant de les attirer dans nos institutions. Nous devons être en mesure de les garder dans nos institutions. Je crois qu'il faut mettre l'accent sur la culture scientifique. Il faut renforcer une culture de curiosité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Massé voulait aussi poser une petite question, si vous me permettez de lui céder mon temps de parole.

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes et demie. [Français]

M. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Je vous remercie. C'est fort apprécié.

Madame la ministre, j'aimerais d'abord vous remercier de votre engagement, de votre passion et de votre détermination à l'égard des sciences. C'est extraordinaire.

J'ai eu l'occasion de vous rencontrer à plusieurs reprises avec des représentants de nos centres de recherche, aussi bien collégiaux qu'universitaires. À plusieurs reprises, on vous a dit, ainsi qu' à moi, que les centres de recherche régionaux avaient de la difficulté à accéder à des subventions leur permettant de poursuivre leurs recherches. On nous a dit que celles-ci étaient accordées en grande partie à de grands centres de recherche. Or, il y a aussi de la recherche extraordinaire qui se fait en région.

J'aimerais que vous nous parliez des mesures qui pourraient être prises pour aider nos plus petits centres de recherche collégiaux ou universitaires en région à accéder à ces fonds.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je remercie mon cher collègue de sa question.[Traduction]

Merci, monsieur Massé. Oui. Nous avons rencontré un certain nombre de vos chercheurs, et c'était fascinant de voir leurs travaux.

Comme vous le savez, toutes les recherches réalisées font l'objet d'un examen par les pairs. Des comités sont en place, mais nous voulons nous assurer que ces comités sont le reflet du Canada, et des changements ont été apportés.

Nous n'avons pas encore parlé des collèges. Les collèges, les écoles polytechniques et les cégeps jouent un rôle incroyable dans l'écosystème de la recherche. Tout comme nous avons procédé au plus important investissement dans les universités, nous avons aussi procédé au plus important investissement dans les collèges dans le domaine de la recherche appliquée, soit un investissement de 140 millions de dollars; c'est l'investissement le plus important de tous les temps.

Lorsque je visite le Canada, que je sois au Red River College, là où M. Longfield est allé, au Humber College, au Centennial ou au Seneca, les recherches qui y sont menées sont tout à fait extraordinaires, et cela permet d'améliorer les choses dans la collectivité.

Une entreprise communique avec l'établissement. Elle a besoin rapidement d'une réponse dans le domaine de la robotique, de l'intelligence artificielle ou de la réalité virtuelle, et le collège est en mesure de lui offrir une solution trois ou quatre mois plus tard.

Au Niagara College, la recherche a porté sur un certain type de noix. Au Niagara College, c'est l'aide que l'établissement est en mesure d'offrir à l'industrie vinicole.

Je vous remercie d'avoir soulevé cette importante question.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Lloyd.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie également la ministre et son personnel de leur présence aujourd'hui.

Pas plus tard que le 2 mai, Stephen Chase et Colin Freeze rapportaient dans le Globe and Mail que les personnes ayant des opinions politiques concernant Huawei devaient s'abstenir de présenter leur candidature dans le cadre d'un processus du Conseil national de recherches pour la nomination de membres à un comité consultatif lié à une subvention de recherche de Huawei.

Je crois que c'est troublant pour les Canadiens de voir nos organismes fédéraux écarter des gens en raison de leurs opinions politiques pour les nominations à des comités. Nous avons vu cette tendance dans d'autres ministères, où le gouvernement imposait des critères liés aux valeurs personnelles et politiques en vue de déterminer si des fonds publics étaient accordés ou non.

Madame la ministre, pouvons-nous avoir l'assurance que le gouvernement protégera à l'avenir les Canadiens et nos processus pour éviter que des gens soient écartés en raison de leurs opinions politiques et personnelles et aussi éviter qu'ils se voient refuser le droit de participer à des programmes et à des processus gouvernementaux?

(0930)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de votre question, monsieur Lloyd.

J'estime que c'est incroyablement important que nos chercheurs au gouvernement ou dans les universités soient en mesure d'explorer diverses disciplines et d'aller au-delà de leur secteur. C'est ainsi que fonctionne la recherche.

Pour ce qui est du milieu universitaire, le Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada a des règles très précises par rapport à l'examen par les pairs. Il faut que ce soit indépendant. Ce sont les experts qui examinent les demandes.

Vous avez parlé des investissements étrangers. Comme vous le savez, un examen est en cours par des responsables de la sécurité, et nous respecterons les résultats de cet examen.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci, madame la ministre.

C'est un enjeu distinct. C'est connexe. Toutefois, cela concerne le processus du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada en vue de déterminer les membres d'un comité de consultation concernant le co-investissement de Huawei avec l'Université Laval. Dans le processus de demande, les candidats se sont fait demander s'ils avaient des opinions politiques à l'égard de Huawei. S'ils en avaient, ils étaient exclus du processus.

Lorsque la question a été posée à l'entreprise, Huawei a affirmé qu'elle n'a pas demandé une telle vérification et qu'elle ne s'attend pas à un tel processus dans le cas en question. Bref, pourquoi le CRSNG, un organisme fédéral qui relève de votre ministère, cherche-t-il proactivement à écarter des gens en raison de leurs opinions politiques?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais laisser mon sous-ministre vous répondre.

M. David McGovern (sous-ministre délégué, Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada, ministère de l'Industrie):

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais tout d'abord vous dire qu'avant de me joindre à ISED j'étais conseiller adjoint en sécurité nationale auprès de l'ancien premier ministre Harper et ensuite du premier ministre Trudeau.

Lorsque nous avons été informés pour la première fois de ces enjeux, la ministre Duncan, comme elle vous l'a expliqué, nous a demandé de recueillir des données et d'établir les faits. Nous avons communiqué avec nos conseils subventionnaires, le groupe U15, soit le regroupement des 15 universités canadiennes à forte intensité de recherche, et Universités Canada. Nous avons couvert l'ensemble du milieu. Nous voulions seulement avoir une idée de ce qu'était le problème avec les investissements étrangers dans la recherche dans nos institutions universitaires. En ce qui concerne le cas précis dont vous parlez, nos conseils subventionnaires veulent s'assurer de l'impartialité des membres des comités d'examen par les pairs. La manière dont cette histoire a été dépeinte dans le journal laisse entendre que cela visait une seule entité, une seule entreprise et un seul pays. Cependant, le critère d'impartialité pour les membres des comités d'examen par les pairs s'impose pour toutes les demandes de subvention.

Ce que nous faisons dernièrement pour la ministre Duncan, c'est d'essayer d'examiner l'enjeu plus vaste des investissements étrangers dans la recherche dans nos universités. Nous collaborons avec les universités. Nous avons demandé l'aide du milieu canadien de la sécurité nationale. Nous avons communiqué avec d'autres pays. Nous établissons une base factuelle, mais nous sensibilisons aussi tous les participants à la question.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Il ne me reste que 30 secondes, mais je vous remercie pour cette réponse technique détaillée.

Je comprends que nous ayons besoin de solides protections pour éviter les conflits d'intérêts dans de tels cas, et j'y suis favorable. Cependant, lorsque des Canadiens voient que des organismes subventionnaires publics demandent aux gens leurs opinions politiques personnelles avant de poser leur candidature à un processus, je crois que c'est inacceptable et que cela inquiète beaucoup les Canadiens lorsque c'est un facteur qui entre en ligne de compte.

Il ne me reste que quatre secondes. Je souhaite seulement vous remercier encore une fois de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Oliver.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Merci. Je partagerai mon temps avec M. Jowhari.

Nous consacrons beaucoup de temps à parler des sciences. Je souhaitais aussi vous féliciter de votre leadership dans le dossier des sports et de l'excellent travail que vous avez fait partout au Canada pour faire la promotion du sport et en particulier du sport inclusif.

Je souhaite revenir aux échanges que vous avez eus avec M. Chong. Je crois que c'est Samuel Clemens qui disait qu'il y a des mensonges, de vils mensonges et des statistiques, ce qui revient en gros à utiliser des statistiques pour renforcer des arguments boiteux. Je voulais seulement m'attarder sur cet aspect, parce que mon collègue a mentionné des statistiques qui ne portaient pas sur la période où vous avez été ministre.

Voici un résumé de la réalité. Dans une autre vie, j'ai présidé un comité d'examen par les pairs des IRSC, et nous avons vu nos fonds fondre comme neige au soleil sous le précédent gouvernement. Des gens avec des doctorats quittaient le Canada. Pire encore, nous n'arrivions pas à attirer de nouveaux étudiants pour les aider à obtenir leur doctorat. Il y avait un manque de fonds.

Je suis resté en contact avec les scientifiques et les autres dans le milieu. Ils me disent tous qu'il y a un incroyable regain d'intérêt dans... Cela concerne la recherche en santé, et je sais que cela ne touche pas le CRSNG ou le CRSH, mais c'est tout un changement, et nous voyons maintenant des programmes universitaires plus solides. Nous assistons à un retour de bons étudiants au doctorat dans nos universités, et nous constatons que de la formation est offerte partout au Canada. Je voulais seulement le souligner. Comme il l'a mentionné, il y a la réalité et il y a les beaux discours. C'est la réalité. Le reste, ce sont de beaux discours.

(0935)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Oliver, d'avoir souligné ces éléments. C'était décevant de seulement fournir des statistiques jusqu'en 2017, compte tenu du budget historique de 2018.

M. John Oliver:

Je crois que c'était vraiment trompeur de sa part.

J'aimerais aussi vous poser une question. Une partie de votre travail vise le Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada, et j'estime que cela traduit très bien l'engagement du gouvernement à l'égard de la recherche et de l'arrivée d'un leadership à long terme — non seulement du financement, mais aussi des postes de leadership — pour nous assurer de continuer d'avoir un solide milieu de la recherche partout au Canada.

Pouvez-vous faire le point sur la façon dont cela fonctionne, les chercheurs en début de carrière et le travail qui est fait pour garder ici des titulaires de doctorat très accomplis et attirer de nouveaux chercheurs au pays?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais vous donner un exemple bien précis. La semaine dernière, nous avons annoncé les subventions à la découverte, soit un important programme du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada ou CRSNG. C'est le plus imposant investissement dans les subventions à la découverte dans l'histoire du pays. Quelque 588 millions de dollars ont été versés à 5 000 chercheurs partout au Canada. Ce qui est particulièrement emballant, c'est que 500 de ces subventions ont été versées à des chercheurs en début de carrière. Il y a eu une augmentation. Ils ont obtenu davantage de fonds. Ils ont reçu une allocation, sans compter les 1 700 bourses pour les étudiants des cycles supérieurs.

Et les chercheurs nous confirment qu'ils sentent les effets de ce changement. Ils comprennent que le financement était stagnant sous le gouvernement précédent. Personne ne consultait la communauté scientifique. La relation devait vraiment être rétablie. Quand les fonds demeurent toujours au même niveau, cela réduit le bassin de possibilités. Le gouvernement précédent a amplifié ce problème en allouant les fonds à seulement quelques bénéficiaires.

La dernière chose qu'il a faite a été de lier le financement de la recherche à ses résultats. Par exemple, si vous vouliez une subvention du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines, elle devait avoir des retombées commerciales. Ce n'est pas de cette façon que la recherche fonctionne. Ce que nous affirmons, c'est que l'écosystème scientifique n'est rien sans ses chercheurs.

Mon objectif est de placer nos chercheurs et nos étudiants au cœur de tout ce que nous faisons et de veiller à ce qu'ils reçoivent du financement et qu'ils aient accès à des laboratoires, de même qu'à des outils, numériques et autres.

M. John Oliver:

Désolé, monsieur Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Pas de souci. Comme il me reste 45 secondes, permettez-moi de vous souhaiter la bienvenue.

Madame la ministre, on a beaucoup parlé des établissements, de nos établissements d'enseignement et du secteur privé, en ce qui a trait au soutien de la recherche. Cela dit, je crois comprendre que le gouvernement du Canada soutient également beaucoup de chercheurs au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental.

Dans les 30 secondes qu'il me reste, pourriez-vous nous fournir des détails sur la recherche que nous effectuons? Quel type de chercheurs embauchons-nous?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Jowhari, d'attirer notre attention sur les scientifiques fédéraux.

Le président:

Vous avez environ 20 secondes pour répondre.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

D'accord.

Nous avons consacré 2,8 milliards de dollars à la rénovation de ces laboratoires. J'insiste sur l'augmentation du nombre de scientifiques et d'experts techniques au sein du gouvernement depuis notre arrivée. De 2015-2016 à aujourd'hui, il y en a 2 000 de plus, qui viennent s'ajouter aux 2 500 que le gouvernement précédent...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Donc, 2 000 embauches au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Oui, 2 000 scientifiques et experts techniques. Ce chiffre est tiré des données d'avril de Statistique Canada.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Chong, qui aura cinq minutes.

Nous allons dépasser l'heure prévue de quelques minutes. Je souhaite seulement m'assurer que tout le monde tient compte du temps qui lui est alloué. La ministre doit retourner à son travail. Nous allons essayer de conclure.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je souhaite d'abord répondre à M. Oliver.

J'ai utilisé les bonnes statistiques. Nous avons consulté les dernières statistiques de l'Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques ou OCDE. J'ai utilisé celles de 2017 parce que ce sont les dernières en date fournies par l'OCDE sur les résultats en matière de recherche et d'innovation dans l'enseignement supérieur. C'est pour cette raison que j'ai utilisé les données de 2017 et non celles de 2018. Je crois toutefois pouvoir affirmer au Comité que les données de 2018 ne devraient pas être bien différentes de celles de 2017 et des années antérieures.

Tout cela pour dire que, même si je reconnais que le gouvernement actuel a augmenté les fonds alloués aux quatre conseils subventionnaires, il n'y a pas eu de changement radical dans le financement quand on regarde les antécédents nationaux et ce qui se fait ailleurs dans le monde. C'est ce que confirment les faits, soit que les 4 conseils subventionnaires doivent globalement recevoir cette année presque 4 milliards de dollars. Aux États-Unis, les National Institutes of Health ont reçu à eux seuls 49 milliards de dollars canadiens pour la recherche. Toutes proportions gardées, ce que nous faisons est loin d'être de la même ampleur. Ainsi, faire valoir, comme la ministre l'a fait, que le Canada est un leader mondial dans le financement est tout simplement faux. Bien que nous soyons parmi les 10 premiers selon les résultats de l'OCDE, nous n'arrivons pas au premier rang. Et cela est évident pour bien des éléments évalués.

Cela dit, je souhaite aborder une question précise dans le rapport Naylor. Ce rapport recommande que le gouvernement crée un conseil consultatif national sur la recherche et l'innovation. Une des préoccupations soulevées par la communauté scientifique est la crainte que ce conseil, qui devrait être composé de 12 à 15 membres selon le rapport, soit très politisé. On m'a dit souhaiter l'adoption d'une législation-cadre par le Parlement qui rendrait le processus de nomination apolitique afin de veiller à ce que ce conseil consultatif et son conseil d'administration soient indépendants de toute entité politique et puissent assumer leurs fonctions.

Est-ce que le gouvernement a l'intention de procéder de cette façon?

(0940)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais moi aussi vous répondre pour ce qui est du financement.

Nous avons indéniablement changé...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Monsieur le président, avec tout le respect que je dois à la ministre, j'ai posé une question sur...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

... le niveau de financement.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... le conseil consultatif.

Le président:

Vous avez d'abord formulé un commentaire. Il est tout à fait normal que la ministre y revienne dans sa réponse à votre question.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous avons indéniablement changé le niveau de financement stagnant dans ce pays par l'apport d'argent frais. La première année, 2 milliards de dollars... Je vais juste donner un exemple. La première année, 95 millions de dollars...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, madame la ministre, ce n'est pas le niveau recommandé dans le rapport Naylor.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J'essaie, si vous me le permettez...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Vous parlez constamment du rapport Naylor, et vous n'avez pas...

Le président:

Monsieur Chong, je vous prie de laisser la ministre répondre.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Ce temps est aussi le mien, monsieur le président, et les recommandations du rapport Naylor sur l'augmentation du financement sont claires. En réalité, le gouvernement n'a pas augmenté le financement des quatre conseils subventionnaires au niveau cité. C'est un fait.

Le président:

Vous n'avez pas à me convaincre. Comme je vous l'ai dit, vous avez posé une question à la ministre...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... sur le conseil consultatif national et non sur le niveau de financement.

Le président:

Vous faites un commentaire, et maintenant vous... Je vous prie de laisser la ministre répondre. Ce n'est qu'un juste retour des choses. Vous avez commencé par fournir tous ces renseignements...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

J'ai posé une question sur...

Le président:

Vous n'avez presque plus de temps, monsieur Chong. Nous n'avons presque plus de temps, donc si vous voulez que la ministre réponde...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je voudrais qu'elle réponde à ma question sur le conseil consultatif national.

Le président:

Elle peut répondre à tout ce qu'elle juge pertinent.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Et je peux répondre de la façon dont je le souhaite.

Le président:

Eh bien, votre temps est presque écoulé.

Madame la ministre, poursuivez.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La première année, nous avons investi 95 millions de dollars dans les conseils subventionnaires. Cela a été salué à l'échelle du pays parce que ces 95 millions de dollars représentaient le plus grand investissement accordé aux conseils subventionnaires en une décennie. Dans le budget de 2018, nous avons augmenté de 25 % notre financement à ces mêmes conseils pour un total de 1,7 milliard de dollars.

Maintenant, je serai heureuse de répondre à votre question. Nous allons bientôt faire une annonce sur le conseil des sciences et de l'innovation. Je souhaite remercier le Conseil des sciences, de la technologie et de l'innovation pour son travail. Ce sera notre conseil et nous adopterons une approche différente, qui sera ouverte et transparente. L'ordre du jour sera diffusé afin que les Canadiens connaissent les sujets abordés. Ils seront aussi tenus au courant des activités du conseil. Nous adoptons une approche bien différente. Comme vous l'avez dit, ce conseil comptera 12 membres.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Sheehan pour cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, de ramener les sciences à l'avant-plan. En fait, vous les avez ramenées dans les écoles, au sein du gouvernement, dans l'industrie et au Canada.

Sault Ste. Marie est connue pour son acier, mais c'est aussi là qu'on trouve le taux le plus élevé de titulaires de doctorat par habitant. On y mène beaucoup de travaux sur la flore et la faune, la foresterie, les Grands Lacs et les cours d'eau. C'est aussi là qu'on trouve l'Université Algoma et le Collège Sault. J'ai noté que vous aviez mentionné la charte Dimensions. L'Université Algoma est l'une des institutions signataires. Cette université semi-rurale est un chef de file. Depuis 2015, elle a créé deux chaires de recherche. Elle fait essentiellement figure de combattante de première ligne contre le changement climatique. Elle mène des recherches scientifiques importantes et collabore tant avec le secteur privé que public.

Comme vous le savez, ma fille, Kate, vient d'être acceptée en sciences à l'Université d'Ottawa. Je suis très heureux du leadership dont vous faites preuve depuis quelques années pour diversifier les choses et propulser la recherche.

J'aimerais enchaîner avec quelques questions. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer certains des changements que vous avez apportés pour aider les femmes à accéder au milieu scientifique et à y mener des recherches? Pouvez-vous expliquer, notamment, certains des changements qui ont été apportés au congé de maternité?

J'ai aussi relevé avec beaucoup d'intérêt que l'une des premières mesures prises par Doug Ford a été de renvoyer le scientifique en chef de l'Ontario. Toutefois, on vous a chargée de créer un bureau du scientifique en chef du Canada. Pouvez-vous aussi nous expliquer l'importance de ce poste?

Enfin, sachez que Mme Bondar vous salue.

(0945)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Sheehan. Et toutes mes félicitations à votre fille. Veuillez transmettre mes meilleures salutations à Mme Bondar. C'est une véritable héroïne nationale.

Équité, diversité et inclusion: Le Canada a des institutions de renommée internationale qui se classent parmi les 100 premières dans le monde. Je crois que nous devons tous être fiers des accomplissements de nos chercheurs et de nos institutions.

Je veux qu'un maximum de personnes fréquentent ces institutions. Nous devons les amener à y accéder, mais aussi à y rester. C'est pour cette raison que nous avons établi ces exigences en matière d'équité, de diversité et d'inclusion pour nos prestigieuses chaires de recherche. Et c'est aussi pour cette raison que nous prolongeons le congé parental. Quand je suis arrivée en poste, le congé parental des trois conseils subventionnaires était respectivement de trois mois, de six mois et de six mois. Nous avons normalisé la durée à 6 mois, puis, dans ce budget, l'établissons à 12 mois.

Et c'est pour cette raison que nous appliquons la charte Dimensions. Il s'agit d'un programme pilote inspiré du programme Athena SWAN du Royaume-Uni, qui a été repris en Irlande, aux États-Unis et en Australie. Sa version canadienne est toutefois la plus ambitieuse de toutes, et c'est vraiment exaltant. En quelques semaines, 32 institutions auront adhéré à cette charte.

Nous voulons que nos institutions soient accueillantes. Vendredi dernier, j'étais à l'Université Dalhousie, où on sentait un réel enthousiasme pour la mise en œuvre d'un changement transformateur auquel les gens peuvent participer. En 1970, il n'y avait aucune professeure titulaire en génie. Environ 50 ans plus tard, elles forment 11 % du corps professoral dans le domaine. Nous avons fait des progrès, mais ils sont graduels. Il y a un véritable désir d'œuvrer ensemble à un changement transformateur. C'est très excitant.

Vous avez posé une question sur la conseillère scientifique en chef. Le gouvernement reconnaît la valeur des conseils scientifiques pour que nos scientifiques puissent s'exprimer librement et ne pas être muselés. Ils peuvent collaborer avec des collègues et participer à des colloques internationaux. La conseillère scientifique en chef a fait un travail très important cette année pour amener les scientifiques en chef des différents ministères de nature scientifique à fournir davantage de conseils aux personnes concernées.

Je lui ai également demandé d'établir une politique sur l'intégrité scientifique — la première du genre au pays — pour protéger les scientifiques et les chercheurs afin de ne jamais revenir au climat qui régnait sous le gouvernement précédent. La revue scientifique Nature, l'une de nos plus prestigieuses, a traité du muselage des scientifiques par le gouvernement canadien. Nous ne devons jamais revenir à une telle situation.

La conseillère scientifique en chef a déposé un important rapport sur l'aquaculture dont notre gouvernement suit actuellement les recommandations. Elle a également déposé son premier rapport annuel, en plus de rétablir nos liens avec la communauté scientifique à l'extérieur du gouvernement ainsi qu'au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental, sans oublier nos liens à l'échelle internationale. Les sciences et la diplomatie sont importantes.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Il nous reste deux minutes et elles sont à vous, monsieur Masse.

(0950)

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Et, merci une fois de plus d'être ici, madame la ministre.

J'aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine; on a beaucoup parlé du muselage des scientifiques sous le gouvernement précédent, mais votre gouvernement ne leur permet pas de publier des articles à l'heure actuelle. Les articles de vos scientifiques sont souvent caviardés quand ils sont finalement rendus publics.

Actuellement, votre gouvernement permet seulement l'utilisation partielle des articles sur les recherches scientifiques commandées, en plus d'y imposer diverses restrictions. Il n'est donc pas permis, une fois les recherches terminées, de se servir des résultats ni de les diffuser.

Les demandes des scientifiques et des chercheurs sont souvent retardées, voire mises de côté, dans les ministères. La situation a atteint un tel point que votre gouvernement a aussi perdu des renseignements. Tandis que nous passons à l'ère numérique, certains ministères traitent ces renseignements avec respect, d'autres non, et des renseignements et des travaux de recherche sont aussi perdus puisqu'ils ne sont pas transférés en format numérique.

Tout cela a été soulevé dans le cadre des préoccupations associées aux droits d'auteur de la Couronne. En ce moment même, vous muselez et limitez les scientifiques, pas nécessairement en intervenant dans leurs déclarations publiques, mais en empêchant les autres chercheurs canadiens d'accéder librement à leurs travaux.

Ne pourrions-nous pas dire, alors, que vous faites partie du problème?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci pour votre question, monsieur Masse.

Je vais vous dire envers quoi je suis totalement engagée. À mon deuxième jour en poste, j'ai permis à nos scientifiques de rompre le silence.

Cela dit, déclarer la fin du muselage est une chose, mais agir en ce sens en est une autre.

Nous avons élaboré une nouvelle politique en matière de communications, parce que la revue scientifique Nature affirmait que le Canada muselait ses scientifiques sous le gouvernement précédent. Ensuite, de concert avec l'ancien président du Conseil du Trésor, j'ai écrit à tous les ministres responsables de portefeuilles de nature scientifique pour m'assurer qu'ils étaient au fait de la nouvelle politique. Nous avons insisté sur notre volonté de laisser les scientifiques s'exprimer librement. Nous voulons qu'ils s'adressent aux Canadiens. Nous voulons qu'ils communiquent avec le public.

M. Brian Masse:

Alors pourquoi ne les laissez-vous pas partager leurs articles? Pourquoi imposez-vous des restrictions?

Le président:

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse:

Il est là, le problème.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, en fait, la ministre est restée plus longtemps que prévu. Je voulais m'assurer que vous ayez l'occasion de prendre la parole. Merci de conclure rapidement.

M. Brian Masse:

Très bien.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci.

Nous voulons qu'ils parlent. Les changements de culture prennent du temps. Je profite de chaque occasion où je m'adresse aux scientifiques du gouvernement fédéral. Je suis la première ministre responsable des sciences qui rencontre les sous-ministres des ministères de nature scientifique au cours de l'année, et chaque année pendant huit heures, pour discuter des défis auxquels les scientifiques fédéraux sont confrontés. Je suis aussi engagée à promouvoir l'accès aux sciences et aux données scientifiques — et j'ai demandé à notre conseillère scientifique en chef d'y travailler, car nous voulons que les Canadiens aient cet accès.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Sur ce, nous avons terminé la première heure de notre réunion.

Madame la ministre, merci beaucoup d'être venue ici aujourd'hui. Merci d'être restée quelques minutes de plus pour que tout le monde ait le temps de vous poser des questions.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci à vous, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, je tiens vraiment à remercier les membres du Comité de m'avoir donné l'occasion de me présenter devant vous pour répondre à vos questions. J'aimerais surtout vous remercier pour l'important travail que vous avez accompli au cours des trois dernières années et demie.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci. Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes.

(0950)

(0955)

Le président:

Reprenons nos travaux.

Avant de passer aux affaires du Comité, nous devons voter sur le Budget principal des dépenses. AGENCE DE PROMOTION ÉCONOMIQUE DU CANADA ATLANTIQUE

Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........65 905 491 $ Crédit 5 — Subventions et contributions..........241 163 563 $ Crédit 10 — Lancement d'une stratégie fédérale pour l'emploi et le tourisme..........2 091 224 $ Crédit 15 — Financement accru pour les agences de développement national..........24 900 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE CANADIENNE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE DU NORD Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........14 527 629 $ Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........34 270 717 $ Crédit 10— Une politique alimentaire pour le Canada..........3 000 000 $ Crédit 15— Lancement d'une stratégie fédérale pour l'emploi et le tourisme..........1 709 192 $ Crédit 20— Des collectivités arctiques et nordiques dynamiques..........9 999 990 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15 et 20 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE SPATIALE CANADIENNE Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........181 393 741 $ Crédit 5— Dépenses en immobilisations..........78 547 200 $ Crédit 10— Subventions et contributions..........58 696 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) COMMISSION CANADIENNE DU TOURISME Crédit 1— Paiements à la Commission..........95 665 913 $ Crédit 5— Lancement d'une stratégie fédérale pour l'emploi et le tourisme..........5 000 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) COMMISSION DU DROIT D’AUTEUR Crédit 1— Dépenses du programme..........3 781 533 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE L’INDUSTRIE Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........442 060 174 $ Crédit 5— Dépenses en capital..........6 683 000 $ Crédit 10— Subvention et contributions..........2 160 756 935 $ Crédit L15— Paiements effectués en vertu du paragraphe 14(2) de la Loi sur le ministère de l’Industrie..........300 000 $ Crédit L20— Prêts effectués en vertu de l’alinéa 14(1)a) de la Loi sur le ministère de l’Industrie..........500 000 $ Crédit 25— Accès au service Internet à haute vitesse pour tous les Canadiens..........26 905 000 $ Crédit 30— Donner des compétences numériques aux jeunes Canadiens..........30 000 000 $ Crédit 35— Préparatifs pour une nouvelle génération de technologie sans fil..........7 357 000 $ Crédit 40— Protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces..........964 000 $ Crédit 45— Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada..........1 043 354 $ Crédit 50— Soutenir l’innovation dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier par la collaboration.........10 000 000 $ Crédit 55— Appuyer la relation juridique renouvelée avec les peuples autochtones..........3 048 333 $ Crédit 60— Appuyer la nouvelle génération d’entrepreneurs..........7 300 000 $ Crédit 65— Soutenir les travaux de la Table ronde sur le milieu des affaires et l’enseignement supérieur..........5 666 667 $ Crédit 70— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme (FedNor)..........1 836 536 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, L15, L20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 et 70 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE LA DIVERSIFICATION DE L’ÉCONOMIE DE L’OUEST CANADIEN Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........37 981 906 $ Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........209 531 630 $ Crédit 10— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme..........3 607 224 $ Crédit 15— Protéger l’eau et les terres dans les Prairies..........1 000 000 $ Crédit 20— Financement accru pour les agences de développement régional..........15 800 000 $ Crédit 25— Investir dans une économie de l’Ouest diversifiée et croissante..........33 300 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 et 25 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE DU CANADA POUR LES RÉGIONS DU QUÉBEC ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........39 352 146 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........277 942 967 $ ç Crédit 10— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme..........3 097 848 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE FÉDÉRALE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE POUR LE SUD DE L’ONTARIO ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........29 201 373 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........224 900 252 $ ç Crédit 10— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme..........3 867 976 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL NATIONAL DE RECHERCHES DU CANADA ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........436 503 800 $ ç Crédit 5— Dépenses en capital..........58 320 000 $ ç Crédit 10— Subventions et contributions..........448 814 193 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES NATURELLES ET EN GÉNIE ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........53 905 016 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions..........1 296 774 972 $ ç Crédit 10— Congé parental payé pour les chercheurs étudiants..........1 805 000 $ ç Crédit 15— Des bourses de recherche pour soutenir les étudiants de deuxième et de troisième cycles..........4 350 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES HUMAINES ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........35 100 061 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions.....884 037 003 $ ç Crédit 10— Congé parental payé pour les chercheurs étudiants..........1 447 000 $ ç Crédit 15— Des bourses de recherche pour soutenir les étudiants de deuxième et de troisième cycles..........6 090 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL CANADIEN DES NORMES ç Crédit 1— Paiements au Conseil..........17 910 000 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) STATISTIQUE CANADA ç Crédit 1— Dépenses du programme..........423 989 188 $ ç Crédit 5— Surveiller les achats de biens immobiliers canadiens..........500 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

Le président: Le président peut-il faire rapport à la Chambre du Budget principal des dépenses pour 2019-2020, moins les montants votés dans le Budget provisoire des dépenses?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant poursuivre à huis clos pour discuter de M-208.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 30, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.