header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-19 INDU 138

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Welcome to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Today, pursuant to Standing Order 81(5), we will be reviewing the supplementary estimates.

With us today for the first hour we have, from the Department of Industry, John Knubley, deputy minister; Philippe Thompson, assistant deputy minister, corporate management sector; Lisa Setlakwe, senior assistant deputy minister, strategy and innovation policy sector; Paul Halucha, senior assistant deputy minister, industry sector; Mitch Davies, senior assistant deputy minister, Innovation Canada; and Éric Dagenais, assistant deputy minister, industry sector.

I believe you have seven minutes, Mr. Knubley.

Mr. John Knubley (Deputy Minister, Department of Industry):

Very quickly, I have four or five points. [Translation]

I would first like to present supplementary estimates (A) for 2018-2019.[English]

There's an additional $286 million in total for the budget overall, and $160 million of that is for the department. The main component is related to steel and aluminum. There is $126 million for the portfolio overall. The largest component is $45 million for Churchill.

I have a few more points.

Who are we? We are the executives of the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. ISED, as it's known, has a budget of over $3.4 billion and has almost 5,000 FTEs. In terms of the portfolio, which includes organizations like the National Research Council, the granting councils, Statistics Canada, Business Development Bank of Canada, the Canadian Space Agency, all the regional development agencies, Destination Canada and the Standards Council of Canada, this is an organization that spends close to $10 billion a year and employs almost 19,000 FTE employees.

As Minister Bains would say of me when I sit beside him next, my colleagues will take all the difficult questions and I will do the easy ones. Again, this is just to say we are the representatives of ISED. What we've done as a team working in support of Minister Bains is really focus squarely on implementing Canada's innovation and skills plan.[Translation]

We have made significant progress to date in implementing a range of targeted, aligned and collaborative programs.[English]

These include the innovation superclusters initiative, the strategic innovation fund, or SIF for short, and innovative solutions Canada. We'll have an opportunity to talk about those programs, I assume, in the questions.

The third point I wanted to make is that, as we've focused on implementation of these programs, which were largely introduced in budget 2017, there have been two new initiatives under way under the innovation and skills plan.

First, we conducted national digital and data consultations from June to October, and we pursued consultations with respect to three areas: innovation, workforce or workplace as related to digital, as well as trust in terms of how we create a trusted framework for working on digital and data strategies.

The other initiative—and this is my last point—is really a result of budget 2018. We had launched six economic strategy tables. They included agri-food, advanced manufacturing, digital industries, clean technologies, health and biosciences, and resources of the future. These tables reported a month ago in one report. Each got an individual chapter, and there was an overall chapter identifying six signature items that were crosscutting in terms of the activities. Much of their focus, of course, was on competitiveness issues and regulatory issues, among others.

Mr. Chair, I'll stop there as a way of introduction, but again, we're the department of ISED, and my colleagues will take all the tough questions.

(1535)

The Chair:

Excellent. We'll try to hold everybody to that.

Mr. John Knubley:

Okay, that would be great.

The Chair:

As I said, the first hour is for those here, and in the second hour we'll have Minister Bains with us. Please mind your times, because I will be holding tight and I want to make sure everybody gets in all the questions they can.

We're going to start right away with Mr. Longfield.

You have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thanks, Mr. Knubley and staff, for being here.

As you know, we're in the midst of the copyright review, the statutory act review.

In the estimates, the Copyright Board has been asking for $3 million over the last couple of years. This year, again, it's $3 million for program expenditures, more specifically to ensure balanced decision-making to provide proper incentive for the creation and use of copyrighted works. We've been hearing testimony that it's taking two to three years for some of the decisions to come through that board.

The question is around the supplementary estimates; there's no funding being requested there. Could you comment on how these decisions get made, whether it's the Copyright Board or whether it's the department that is reviewing the resources that are needed to do the job at the Copyright Board?

Mr. John Knubley:

Well, I think it's both the department as well as working with the minister in terms of how we move forward. As you know, in the budget implementation act there were two fundamental focuses: notice and notice, as well as changes to the Copyright Board.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Mr. John Knubley:

Lisa, can you speak to the specific issues around funding?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe (Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategy and Innovation Policy Sector, Department of Industry):

The funding was in fact acknowledging that there were delays in getting to decisions. Part of the legislative changes also allow, beyond the actual financial resources needed, the acceleration to make those decisions, but also how those decisions are made so there's flexibility for decisions and settlements to be made before you go through a long, arduous process.

It was in consultation. The decision ultimately is the government's to provide the additional funding, but it was certainly made in discussing with the Copyright Board the realities of today and their ability to turn around these decisions in a timely manner.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right. We are midstream in our study, but maybe that's a future opportunity, so I can just flag it. Maybe this isn't the right venue to do that in.

On innovation, thank you for the additional funding for Bioenterprise in Guelph. We announced about $2 million last week to work with Innovation Guelph, an organization I was working on before politics.

I found out at the meeting with them, though, that IRAP is no longer supporting not-for-profits as part of its mandate. This is moving over to FedDev. I'm wondering whether you're aware of whether there's a transfer there, or whether FedDev is getting the resources that used to go to IRAP to support projects like the ones at Innovation Guelph.

Mr. John Knubley:

I think what has happened is that the National Research Council has received $540 million in budget 2018, and in budget 2017 there was $700 million specifically for IRAP.

I think people are looking at the delivery of IRAP broadly, partly in the context of a review that was conducted with Treasury Board around innovation programming. I'm not fully aware of what the situation is with not-for-profits, however.

Mitch, do you happen to know?

(1540)

Mr. Mitch Davies (Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Innovation Canada, Department of Industry):

Specifically on the question of supporting regional innovation ecosystems, non-profits, or intermediaries that are helping organize in the local economy, that job essentially is assigned to the regional development agencies. You're accurate. There was funding brought forward in the last budget for all of the RDAs, and essentially this is to deal with a program count of some 92 programs touching business innovation. That's been reduced by two-thirds to streamline how many folks you have to deal with to secure support for what you're doing. That count has been brought down now to 35-plus, as a consequence of some of these realignments, but there are active relationships that are going on and picking up these things and smoothing the transition for stakeholders.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great. I remembered seeing that streamlining in the budget and wondered whether this was an example.

In the work that Innovation Guelph and Bioenterprise are doing around creating new businesses, there were about 135 businesses created in the last funding they received. They're hoping to help entrepreneurs to start up 56 more businesses in Guelph.

The innovation agenda seems to be paying back in dividends in what we're investing and what we're getting back. Do we track that in any way, in terms of the economic returns on investments going into supporting innovation start-up?

Mr. John Knubley:

Yes, we do. We track it and we use evaluation methods as well as audit procedures to do that.

Backing way up and avoiding your question somewhat, just to clarify, what we did in this innovation review was to really identify four platform delivery agents. One is the regional development agencies, and in the context of the review, the focus on their new programming is around cluster development as well as technology adoption. On average, they are supporting SMEs in the $150,000 to $500,000 range.

IRAP, of course, is lower than that, so the National Research Council is at the beginning of the innovation pipeline. It's focused, again, on helping SMEs at that lower end, although it has been given authority now to give IRAP contributions up to $10 million, so it can actually do large ones.

Then there's the strategic innovation fund, which of course tends to be for larger projects and often consortia, so it isn't just for multinationals. There's the trade service that is also at play.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

It was great to see the $10 million bridging the valley of death, so congratulations on that funding.

Mr. John Knubley:

BDC of course is part of this mix.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Deputy Minister and ISED officials, thank you for the work you do for Canadians and for being here today.

I'd like to start with a follow-up to Mr. Longfield in regard to the Copyright Board. The BIA, the budget implementation act, has a series of reforms that many people said are necessary. Many also have said that the board was not sufficiently funded.

It sounds to me as if you're giving it the same allocation it previously received. Is it going to be able to enact some of the reforms that are in the budget implementation act, on the same budget?

Mr. Paul Halucha (Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Industry Sector, Department of Industry):

I'll just make a couple of comments on that.

I think the allocation has.... We have done a lot of benchmarking on the Copyright Board in comparison to similar organizations in other jurisdictions, and they compare quite well.

Second, the intention of the policy initiatives that were brought forward by the minister is largely to increase efficiencies and improve...not only for the board but also for the stakeholders who make submissions, and that was something that had been requested for a number of years. Our view—and I think the analysis supports it—is that those efficiencies should pass on and hopefully improve the flow-through of decisions in cases, in adjudication from the organization itself.

Third, one of the stakeholder comments that we've heard for a number of years is that often the amount of work that gets undertaken by the board can be disproportionate with the decision and the outcome from the board itself. For example, we've seen instances where it studies international experiences and then much of it doesn't ever get factored into and impact the result and the analysis that it undertakes in Canada.

The totality of the direction that the government has given is to hopefully enable it to both use its resources more effectively, to streamline, and then perhaps to have a process that's more in line with both what international jurisdictions do and what stakeholders' expectations are.

(1545)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Sure.

I'm a little skeptical when.... I appreciate benchmarking. Benchmarking needs to be done because then you know you're dealing with apples and apples, but to be asking for structural reforms to happen in an organization while it's delivering the same level of service means it's not always going to happen seamlessly. To me, it seems rather strange that your department would not be contemplating ensuring that those reforms can be done with the proper funding.

I'm going to move on.

Mr. John Knubley:

The one thing I would further say is just that the two changes—notice and notice, and the changes with respect to the board itself—were really seen as actions that needed to be taken now. This is not to preclude the work that you would be doing as a committee. Again, there's a lot of opportunity for you as you move forward to look at that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. I appreciate that.

The CRTC chair has recently stated that he desires flexibility on the topic of net neutrality. Many have argued that these statements refer to a desire by the CRTC to reduce or remove net neutrality entirely. I know that the minister has received many emails from concerned Canadians. I know because I'm being carbon copied on them, as well.

Are the CRTC chair's comments that net neutrality may be ignored telegraphing a change in government policy?

Mr. John Knubley:

This is a question you should ask Minister Bains. I believe the answer is no.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Going back to the CRTC, in 2016 the CRTC claimed that broadband was a basic service and set speed levels at 50 megabits per second. Now the CRTC says that the actual speed target is half of that, 25 megabits per second.

Seeing as rural residents will now receive only half the speed, will the fund be cut in half so that taxpayers spend only half the cost?

Mr. John Knubley:

On this issue, we just met with the provinces to talk about developing a broadband strategy.

In terms of the desired outcome, the 50/10 goal certainly remains in place. I think that for certain jurisdictions, in the north for example, reaching the 50/10 is a challenge. This was part of the discussion. You need to take into account the specific challenges and the starting point for the particular area of jurisdiction.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Sure.

Again, though, this committee, this minister—your minister—and the CRTC made that the goal. Now the goal posts have moved, and they haven't moved further ahead. They have actually moved down lower.

How do you explain that to residents?

Mr. John Knubley:

I am not aware of the target actually changing. On what basis are you saying that?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Well, the CRTC says that the standard on these contracts is going to be half of what it's supposed to be, so how do you—

Mr. John Knubley:

As I understand it, in the discussions that I've had with the CRTC chair, he continues to want to pursue that long-term goal.

Mr. Dan Albas:

The CRTC's universal service objective states, “subscribers should be able to access speeds of at least 50 megabits per second (Mbps) download and 10 Mbps upload”.

How can you explain that the CRTC is able to so completely ignore its own objectives?

Mr. John Knubley:

You are referring to their $750-million program and how they're proceeding. Is that what you're referring to?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes, sir.

Mr. John Knubley:

Well—

Sorry, do you want to comment?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

I would say that it's probably a question for them specifically because they are in the process right now of consulting on the program parameters. They announced that they were launching the program, and now they are initiating a discussion on what the parameters will be and how the program will be delivered.

As the deputy has just referenced, I think there are unique circumstances in different parts of the country.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Longfield made the point earlier that this may not be the forum for doing that.

This is a parliamentary committee that is overlooking the spending in your area and whatnot. I would also say that it is taxpayer money that the CRTC ultimately will be spending.

I'd like to have a better answer than “You should go to talk to the CRTC.” Both of you are experts in your field. You should be able to deliver an answer in this particular area.

Mr. John Knubley:

Well, I did give an answer, which was that as far as I know, in my discussions with the chair—

Mr. Dan Albas:

You said, “Go talk to the provinces.”

Mr. John Knubley:

No, I said that we have just been discussing with the provinces, in the context of the commitment to basic service, how we need to work together more effectively to develop a long-term strategy that will meet the 50/10 goal.

In our discussions with the CRTC chair, he is implementing a new program, which is $750 million. The revenues for that come from the industry. You may be aware that they have actually set up a process by which the industry pays for the $750 million.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here.

I want to drill down on the funding for steel and aluminum producers through the strategic innovation fund. How much has the government collected in revenue from steel tariffs through the policy you have right now?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

I believe the number that's been reported was about $350 million.

Mr. Brian Masse:

So the $125 million is additional to the $350 million you've collected, then. Where is that money going to go, specifically?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

Sorry, the $125 million...?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, I'm asking about the $125 million.

Mr. Paul Halucha:

Where is the $125 million from?

Mr. Brian Masse:

You're requesting $125 million here under your estimates.

Mr. Paul Halucha:

Oh, so this is the—

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is your own—

Mr. Paul Halucha:

It's half of the $250 million that was allocated to the strategic innovation fund.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay, so where is that money going to go?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

What was announced on July 1 was an additional allocation, as I noted, of $250 million for the strategic innovation fund, to support primary steel and aluminum producers.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You've collected $350 million. Are you returning this $125 million directly to those you've collected the money from?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

I don't know that dollars that come in through duties are tagged somehow and returned through another funding program. I think the Department of Finance could better answer that question. Effectively, the dollars coming in are a source of funding, but they're not the source of funding that we—

Mr. Brian Masse:

If they've had $350 million taken from them from duties imposed on doing business in Canada, I don't think they really care whether it comes from your department or the finance department, especially since it's their money. Of the $125 million, how much is going directly back to steel companies that have been tariffed, and are there other monies going to administration and other policies?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

We did not increase our administration of the money for the strategic innovation fund at all. We have Innovation Canada, and Mitch Davies is the head of that organization. We are effectively managing it through existing administrative resources.

Mr. Brian Masse:

How much of those resources has been given back to the companies to date?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

The minister announced an agreement with ArcelorMittal for $50 million about three or four weeks ago. That was the first announcement that was undertaken. We have about six or seven other proposals in advanced stages right now, and we're working very quickly with the companies.

The feedback we got is that we were ready with the program extremely quickly after the announcement on July 1. As you can imagine, these are complex investments—

Mr. Brian Masse:

I would argue that you're not ready.

On August 15, we made a proposal to the department and also to the minister to reimburse those funds.

Let me be clear: $350 million has been taken from companies. You're asking for $125 million more, but you've only reimbursed $50 million of it, and you've provided no funding at all to increase supports and services to get that money out the door. You're sitting on a $300-million cash cow from the backs of steel and aluminum workers across this country.

Mr. John Knubley:

I'll just simplify the answer by saying that although we're only asking for $125 million this year, it is over two years, so it's $250 million in total. We are looking at support for some smaller and medium-sized businesses. We're still working on that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You're still going to keep $100 million out of that and that's going to take two years, when companies get this loss on their steel products in a matter of days.

How long does it take to take the money from the steel and aluminum companies?

Mr. John Knubley:

We remain fully committed to supporting the steel and aluminum sector in the context of the Trump administration, and we're doing our best to do that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You're fully committed to do that. That's fine. I appreciate that. But you're not allocating any resources whatsoever to increase the bureaucratic process and the distribution process for that. You're doing it with the existing staffing and components.

Mr. Paul Halucha:

The objective was not to take a top-up of the money and move it to pay for public service management. We had sufficient resources—

Mr. Brian Masse:

No. Your government could take that outside of that. They don't have to take it from the funds you've taken from companies to begin with, but you could figure out how to bankroll to get that out the door because you have hundreds of millions of dollars lying on the table from steel and aluminum workers.

(1555)

Mr. Paul Halucha:

Sir, with all due respect, we have not been the holdup on any of those projects moving forward. We have met with the companies on a regular basis from the moment we announced it, and as the projects have been developed.

You have to remember that these are capital expenditures by the firms. They need to undertake engineering studies before they can make commitments because we can only pay for projects. There has been a lot of work on the side of the companies, but we have been working with them extremely diligently and on a real-time basis throughout the summer. I've heard a couple of the companies saying that this is one of the first times the government has been moving faster than the companies are ready to move.

Mr. Brian Masse:

But you're sitting on some money here and you're still not even getting the full amount back to the actual companies. Is that the plan?

Right now, I think you have about $250 million planned over two years, but you've already collected $350 million, plus more tariffs to come. Is that how it's going to evolve?

Mr. John Knubley:

That's not the plan.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Are the companies the problem, then? All kinds of companies and others are claiming that their process is still taking far too long. You can collect in a matter of days from them, but their disbursement isn't there.

Isn't there any backup plan to do this, other than what you have? I appreciate what you're saying, but it's not what I'm hearing, especially from the smaller and medium-sized companies.

Mr. Paul Halucha:

I think you're thinking of.... Over there, it's the duty drawback and relief programs, and there's also the remissions process. Both of those are run through the Department of Finance. It did take some time for decisions to be made there, but now there has been funding through both of those envelopes as well.

The difference with those funds is that you're effectively requesting to simply have the money returned to you if you were not required to pay. For example, if you imported aluminum or steel solely for the purpose of exporting, then there is an ability to get a duty drawback repayment. Effectively, there is no process around that, other than putting in your claims and getting your money back.

The strategic innovation fund is a classic innovation capital investment program where we had to receive project proposals and we had to do the full due diligence because we're deploying taxpayers' dollars there. That required significant work on the part of the companies to identify their capital expenditure plans and to make sure they aligned with the program priorities of the fund. They have been working extremely closely with us, so I think—

Mr. Brian Masse:

I have shops that are closing up—

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

—and I just hope you can streamline the process. Thank you for your work.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Graham. You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have a few different subjects to dive into, but we will start with this one.

Vote 1a has a $1.2-million reinvestment of royalties from intellectual property. As you know, we're talking about copyright a lot here and Crown corporation issues come up a little bit, but not a lot. Is there any connection between this and Crown copyright? What is the source of this revenue and what is it about?

Mr. Philippe Thompson (Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Management Sector, Department of Industry):

The $1.2 million is for intellectual property from the CRC, the Communications Research Centre. They have $200,000 that they get from royalties from projects they have run. The other one is the new program at Corporations Canada, and it's the remainder of the funds. I think it's a little more than $1 million.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it's $1,004,358.

Mr. Philippe Thompson:

It's for the program used when you are interrogating the database on the names of corporations in Canada. They get royalties from that program.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. On the $200,000, what kinds of programs are they recovering that money from?

Mr. Philippe Thompson:

These are royalties they are getting from charges from the system, so it's the intellectual property for having developed the system in-house.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned also a reference to CanCode. From what I understand, Kids Code Jeunesse has met or completed all of its targets so far. Can anybody give me an update on how CanCode is going, and whether all of you can now code?

Mr. John Knubley:

We're still working on the coding part, but Éric Dagenais is the leader on CanCode.

Mr. Éric Dagenais (Assistant Deputy Minister, Industry Sector, Department of Industry):

Sure. The initial target was to teach 500,000 kids how to code, and we're on track to actually double that target and hit one million by March 31, 2019.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Wow.

Mr. Éric Dagenais:

The 22 organizations through which we are delivering CanCode are meeting with great success.

I still can't code, though.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So it hasn't reached complete success yet.

Mr. Éric Dagenais:

I'm not a kid.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. John Knubley:

More broadly, though, I think the department is putting a great deal of emphasis on STEM initiatives, including for women, and of course, coding. I know the minister would want to emphasize this if he were here. It's not just about, strictly speaking, doing coding. It's actually achieving objectives in terms of the STEM education. That really is our intent, with respect to CanCode as well.

(1600)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm not sure you can answer this, but do you have a sense of how many coders are missing now in society? I've said this before. Twenty years ago, when I was learning to code—and I can code.... In my generation, we were in our basements with our trench coats on, with our long hair, coding and taking our computers apart and putting them back together. Now we have these iPads—I still have a BlackBerry; everyone else has iPhones—that you can't take apart and see inside how they work.

Mr. John Knubley:

Again, I'm not an expert coder, by any means, but I think that at this current point in time, there is a great deal of demand for coders, exactly as you described. I think the question is whether, in the long run, there will still be, strictly speaking, coding that's required. For example, in the context of artificial intelligence and the applications that are possible, what coders will do in the future could change significantly, and the emphasis may be that you actually need capabilities and skills or competencies that are broader than just coding related to STEM.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As any programmer will tell you, no program is better than the person who wrote it, either.

Mr. John Knubley:

Yes, there you go.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There needs to be quite a bit of education on that.

Thank you for that.

We've talked a lot about the Internet, as you know. I'm wondering if you can talk a bit about the importance of our Internet infrastructure in the country. In my own riding, we know that more than half of the riding doesn't have high-speed Internet, by any measure. It's a philosophical question, but I'll throw it out to you, anyway.

Mr. John Knubley:

The Internet is very important, and of course, we're moving to new generations of telecommunications like 5G, generally. How does Canada take full advantage of moving towards those new directions? First of all, in terms of digital infrastructure, we want to put a greater emphasis on broadband. As we mentioned earlier in response to a question from another member, we just met with the provinces to talk about how to develop this long-term strategy to put in place a robust digital infrastructure that meets the targets that have been described by the CRTC chair. They announced the basic service commitment as part of the CRTC.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair enough.

Thank you, Mr. Knubley.

I'm going to pass it back to Mr. Longfield, who had a couple of questions.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

I see that the strategic innovation fund under the innovation and skills plan has $15,042,000 attached to it.

We've been working with Lutherwood in Guelph, and with Conestoga College, with people who are trying to upgrade skills. How does this flow through the province, or is this something that directly gets into programming?

The Province of Ontario's new Conservative government is cutting back a lot of programs. Could they influence these types of investments, or is this something we need to look at going forward? How does that money get to the people who need to do the training?

Mr. John Knubley:

I'll let Mitch reply to you in more detail, but SIF is a federal program, so these are federal projects.

The issue of addressing some of the shortcomings or changes in Ontario programming is something that we could look at as we move forward; however, to date our focus has been on identifying, particularly, R and D types of projects that are fed with the strategic innovation fund terms and conditions.

The $15 million that's referenced here is really just a reprofiling of projects. Two or three of the projects are going more slowly than we might have anticipated.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Terrific.

Mitch, innovation.canada.ca is a great initiative, pulling everything together into one website. We need that for SMEs.

In 10 seconds, is there further work that's going to be done for supporting innovation with SMEs?

Mr. Mitch Davies:

I would profile, in the last budget, the $700 million in new funding for IRAP. It is a singular investment in start-ups. Businesses that at some point we'll know the name of start somewhere and have that initial help.

We're happy that we have this website platform to get people access to the programs that are there and get it to them in two minutes or less, because they don't have time. They need government to be coherent and to be able to give them the answers they need.

I appreciate the time to comment.

(1605)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to go to Mr. Albas. You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

Deputy Minister, earlier in response to my NDP colleague here, you mentioned that you are currently working on a small and medium-sized response, specifically on steel and aluminum tariffs.

Could you just explain what you meant by that?

Mr. John Knubley:

I meant what I said. The details of that have not yet been made public, but we are looking at exactly what needs to be done there.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Is there a reason why? Can you maybe elucidate some of the details as to why you're looking into that?

Mr. John Knubley:

The simple answer is that the SIF program itself tends to look at larger firms.

Mr. Dan Albas:

It's over 200 employees usually. Is that what the limit is?

Mr. John Knubley:

Yes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Many small and medium-sized entrepreneurs I've spoken with are either eating the tariffs—and thus the price goes up and their customers are just not making as many orders because the price is higher—or.... Pardon me, it's the reverse there. They're either passing it along or they're eating the tariffs and thus their profitability and their ability to capitalize is an issue.

Is that similar to what you're hearing from small and medium-sized businesses?

Mr. John Knubley:

Totally.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Can you provide us with an update on the consultations on revisions to the 3,500 megahertz band?

Mr. John Knubley:

Well, the consultations took place, and now we are reviewing exactly what the next steps will be on the 3,500 megahertz band.

The decisions have not yet been made, but we hope to come forward with that in due course.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I've heard from many who are concerned that their Internet service in rural areas may be lost in order for cities to have more 5G.

Will the ministry ensure that no rural customers will lose service due to any changes?

Mr. John Knubley:

We will do our darndest to take into account the challenges that the rural citizens have in this area, in the context of the 3,500 megahertz band.

Mr. Dan Albas:

That leaves me with cold comfort there.

In regard to the Canadian Space Agency, I see there is just over $27 million for funding for RADARSAT Constellation Mission. Is that with the current delays, or is that in anticipation of that? What I mean to say is, will there be further need for funding of that mission due to its current delays?

Mr. John Knubley:

No.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Since the Ottawa tornado, we've been discussing wind issues at this committee, or at least some of us have been talking about that. We've been asking about industry's preparedness when it comes to these kinds of cases, because Canadians are concerned that in an emergency they may not be able to use their cellphones.

Obviously, being so close to home, I would hope that your ministry has been looking into this. Does any of the funding in this current allocation in the supplementary estimates (A) have anything to do with studying that issue?

Mr. John Knubley:

I believe that the answer would be no. To reassure you, though, clearly critical infrastructure issues, like the tornado, involve an important telecom component, as you identify.

We look at that on an ongoing basis, working with other agencies, such as the public security agencies, for example.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Beyond just assuring us that it is a concern, are there any documents or reports that your department has made public in order that the public can be reassured that this is being looked at?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

I'm not aware of any reports. We've been in the business of these kinds of emergencies, whether it's forest fires or others, so we are equipped and resourced to deal with that.

However, I'm not aware of any reports per se on this particular—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. When you say you're equipped and resourced for that, did your department take any swift action during the recent Ottawa incident?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

We were at the ready. There's—

Mr. Dan Albas:

What does that mean?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

Well, there are staff dedicated to making sure that infrastructure is either in the state it needs to be in to support emergency responders—

Mr. Dan Albas:

How do we know that? I'd like to know if there are protocols.

Is there anything you could table with the committee to indicate that this is a priority for you?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

There are protocols. I cannot tell you what they are. I don't know them myself personally.

(1610)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Would you be able to supply that to this committee so that we know? Are there any plans in future supplementary estimates (B) or (C) to fund any of these initiatives to make sure Canadians can be assured that your department is looking after this?

Mr. John Knubley:

Public security would be in the lead in terms of the critical infrastructure activity.

We participate in interdepartmental meetings on a regular basis in terms of emergency preparedness. It would be in that context that there would be a request—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Who does the review? Does Public Safety review, or does your department monitor—

The Chair: Sorry, the time is up.

Mr. John Knubley:

We look at the telecom elements and participate in emergency preparedness.

The Chair:

Okay, we're going to move on. We have to monitor our time and make sure everybody gets their time in.

Mr. Sheehan, you have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our presenters for this important update. I was there when the announcement was made by Minister Bains in Hamilton on support for steel and aluminum. Many of the officials from here were there.

I was glad to see the response, as the co-chair of the all-party steel caucus, and it was a multi-ministerial response. There was $2 billion in aid that was put forward, and ISED with the $250 million, and the $1.7 million from EDC and BDC. Minister Hajdu has extended the EI benefits and made them more generous. The $1.6 billion in retaliatory tariffs was also announced.

This is one of the questions I have. I also sit on the trade committee, and the Algoma steel company has testified in the open that they have applied for SIF funding. They put their application in not too long ago.

I know you can't share company-specific applications, but have there been announcements on SIF funding for the steel and aluminum industries, and who would that be? That would be public.

Mr. Paul Halucha:

The only announcement so far has been about ArcelorMittal.

However, as I noted, we have a number of proposals that we've been working on with companies. We have probably about seven or eight that are close, by which I mean they could be ready in the next six weeks or so.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

On the $125 million, how is that different?

The SIF funding was there in budget 2018. How is the $250 million different from the regular SIF funding? Is it a specific carve-out?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

Exactly. It was a specific carve-out.

Obviously, with the duties being put in place against Canada, we knew the immediate impacts were going to be on the large steel producers in particular and aluminum companies as well. The price of aluminum has gone up considerably, but it's a continental price so the effect has not been as significant on the large primary producers, but on steel companies the effect has been in the millions of dollars per day.

The first issue we were aware of that was going to happen was that many of them would be put in a situation where they would be either cancelling or pushing forward their investment plans, and that's a recipe to have firms become less competitive over time. The SIF program, the new allocation of $250 million, was put in place to support investment plans and investments in capital infrastructure by those large producers, recognizing they were going to be the most impacted.

We set a couple of parameters: that the companies had to have at least 200 employees and that they had to have capital investment plans of at least $10 million. That was done—to the point that was raised earlier—to enable us to act more quickly with the largest companies that were going to be the most affected.

We know from past practice that, in the absence of some parameters for programs, what happens is that you can get inundated by requests from everybody. We looked very carefully at who was going to be in the field of the most impacted and made sure we were scoping them in, in an effort to ensure we were not effectively paralyzed by an endless number of requests. I think our own analysis, as the deputy alluded to earlier, is that there are about 7,000 or 8,000 other companies that are downstream users of steel and aluminum that have been impacted in one way or another.

The $2 billion that you identified.... That was why there were allocations within BDC and EDC to ensure they were in a position to respond. Some of the data I have is that BDC so far has more than 267 clients that have been impacted for over $100 million, and EDC has done roughly $60 million for 25 clients. Those numbers are up to the end of October.

That was the intention, to have the smaller and medium-sized companies go there, in addition to being able to do things like use the duty drawback initiative, and then also apply for remissions where either they were contractually obligated to continue to purchase, so they had no ability to change suppliers, or there was no steel supply that was Canadian in source. So in instances where you couldn't move within the Canadian marketplace, we have identified a remissions process through the Department of Finance, and they have already begun to provide relief to companies through that.

They deal with all of the elements working together. It would provide a comprehensive response, in addition to, obviously, the retaliation package, where the government responded dollar for dollar to what had been done out of the United States.

The point, too, is that one of those programs is retroactive.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you again.

Keeping on the topic of steel and aluminum tariffs and whatnot, one comment I have is that some firms have been very upfront, wanting to be very productive. They have invested into their mills and into their operations, so they have already put in the hard work, and they are seeing the strain under the tariffs. Now you will have other ones that may not have done the same. For them there's an unlevel playing field for looking for project-based funding.

Is this a concern? Have you come across this in your work on the SIF?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

To understand better, are you asking about a situation where a company has already made an investment, and therefore has paid for it?

In our experience, there are tips that innovation and keeping an enterprise competitive are not a one-off step, so we have expectations that companies are going to continue to invest. I think that's normal. They have maintenance capital, and they have other forms of capital that they regularly need to do.

We have been pretty flexible within our program parameters, and under the strategic innovation fund, we have an ability to.... We don't have a one-size-fits-all where only one type of project can come forward. As the projects are announced, you will start to see that they have in common objectives of increasing the competitiveness of the company, upskilling the workers, increasing the use of technology, accessing new markets. Those are the kinds of parameters we look at as policy objectives. Then behind that, we're able to fund quite a broad set of activities in order to reach those.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Recently it was declared that the B.C. LNG project is going to be moving forward, but only with severe reductions in terms of future carbon tax increases, waiving of the PST, and also waiving of steel tariffs—and I believe some aluminum tariffs, but mainly steel tariffs—that will allow foreign steel to come in.

Many British Columbians have asked, why are we continuing to rely on steel from outside of Canada? Are any of the funds that you're talking about through SIF used to see if we can improve things, improve the supply chains or market operations on the west coast, so we're not being forced to build these large projects utilizing out-of-country steel?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

I'll just make two comments. I won't comment on the LNG decision, because I think you would need to be within all of the aspects that are required in order to successfully attract what is one of the largest investments—if not the largest—in Canadian history to British Columbia.

On your second point, could you be a bit more precise about exactly what you're asking?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Sure. The point is that, rather than just working on existing mills and their productivity—although I'd still contend that many will not proceed because they've already put money into their operations to be productive—I'm talking about a structural change in how that market operates by encouraging development of that market on the western side of Canada.

Mr. Paul Halucha:

I'll make two comments on that.

If you look at trade flows between Canada and the United States—and as in so many areas, we are each other's largest importers and exporters of steel and products—it's very much a north-south flow on each of the coasts, because of the costs of transporting steel from one coast to the other. By the time our product gets from Ontario or Quebec out to British Columbia, there's a significant cost. That becomes a prohibitive issue.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I recognize that, but the question was this. Are you making sure there are SIF funds available to actually change the structure of that market, if a market participant says that they want to do it out in B.C.? I will tell you that it's Turkish, Korean, Chinese rebar and all that. We've had issues with this before, and the costs just keep going up.

(1620)

Mr. Paul Halucha:

The answer is yes. That would be an eligible expense, and we would be excited to see such a project. The challenge would be that, commercially, it would need to not only be viable during the period of tariffs but be able to survive the removal of those tariffs in the future. That is a key condition. There are a lot of things.... If the tariffs are still in place in two or three years, commercially you could imagine this kind of a venture.

But the trade flows exist because there is a strong logic to them. In normal circumstances, we want to see that free flow of goods across those borders. It would be challenging to imagine rebuilding all of that capacity in eastern Canada to service western Canada, not knowing when the tariffs are going to be removed. We continue to have that as a major policy focus of our government.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Jowhari.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the department officials for coming today.

I want to probe further into the $15-million funding for the strategic innovation fund under the innovation and skills plan. Back in May 2017, our committee put out a report with the name, “The Canadian Manufacturing Sector: Urgent Need to Adapt”. One of the recommendations we made was to suggest that “the federal government improve the labour market information it produces, notably connecting jobs in occupations in demand...with skills available with job seekers”.

We've been very successful. The economy has created more than 500,000 jobs, yet we still have labour shortages. We still have skills shortages. We need to enable job seekers with the opportunities. Is any of this $15 million going into helping to bring that match of supply and demand? If not, what have we done on it, if anything?

I recall you mentioned that they are reprofiling certain programs. That's what the $15 million was. Can you explain where the $15 million is going, and are we addressing the concern that I raised?

Mr. John Knubley:

The $15 million is strictly related to projects that have been approved, and they are changing the rate at which they are spending their money. We have had to reprofile, to a later year, the dollars for those projects.

In terms of skills, a big component of the innovation and skills plan is the skills side of things. In comparison to previous competitive programming, what is very interesting is that, when you sit down with firms, they talk about two issues on the skills side, and they do it almost immediately. The first is where there are challenges in terms of skills shortages currently, as well as the question of what the workplace of the future will be as many of these technologies are introduced, such as the Internet of things, artificial intelligence and quantum. What kind of workforce will they need for the future?

The government has put a great deal of emphasis on the skills side of things, including changing course requirements in terms of bringing in....

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

If my constituents are asking me where the government is going, where the focus is, how they can get retrained, and where they would be able to find that information, what should I answer?

Mr. Éric Dagenais:

ESDC has put forward the future skills centre. An RFP went out in May 2018, and that call for proposals and applications is now closed. The selected organization will be announced shortly. That's my understanding. The centre is dedicated to understanding the skills of the future and how best to take workers—ideally before they have to be laid off—and reskill them so they can keep their jobs in the economy of tomorrow. That's at ESDC.

At ISED we have a number of programs. We mentioned CanCode earlier. We also fund Mitacs, which is really about work-integrated learning and dovetails with what some of the private sector firms have told us. BHER, the Business/Higher Education Roundtable, has called on the government and large firms to ensure that 100% of college and university students have access to work-integrated learning opportunities before they graduate.

Mitacs feeds into that objective. There is CanCode, as I mentioned, and we worked very closely with ESDC and IRCC on the global skills strategy. That's something Minister Bains heard very clearly from firms during the consultations on the innovation agenda. They were having a hard time bringing in global talent, so as a result of work in our department and others, there is now a two-week turnaround time that's being met over 90% of the time for global skills people coming in. The preliminary stats are that for every person who comes in with top global talent, 11 jobs are created for Canadians, so bringing in global talent creates jobs here.

Skills are a really important focus in the department, and there are a number of initiatives under way.

(1625)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you.

Mr. John Knubley:

I would add that the six sector tables actually spent a good deal of time talking about the issues you've raised, and there are a number of recommendations in there. In terms of upscaling, it really needs to be done on a sectoral basis.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For the final two minutes, we have Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Can you tell us a bit about the $2.5 million in government-related advertising?

Mr. Philippe Thompson:

This is money that is being transferred from a central fund in PCO to cover three advertising programs related to Innovation Canada, women entrepreneurs and women in STEM. The money is coming from a central allocation, and we are adding some additional funding within the organization to top up the $2.4 million.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay, so it's for women entrepreneurs, women in STEM and Innovation Canada. How much advertising revenue in total will be spent on those programs?

Mr. Philippe Thompson:

I'm afraid I don't have that information with me. We could get it.

Mr. John Knubley:

We'll have to come back to you with some more information.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay, that's fine.

Are they initiatives to support existing programs?

Mr. Philippe Thompson:

Yes, it's to promote existing programs in the organization.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I assume that's going to be social media purchases, videos and so on. I'm just looking at how you're going to reach people with the money.

Mr. John Knubley:

We're still in discussion as to exactly how we would do it, but we'll come back to you with whatever information we have.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I would just like to follow up on the process to reach some of the small aluminum and steel producers who are affected by the tariffs. When can we actually see a specific action or plan for them to be able to get their money back?

Mr. John Knubley:

First of all, we're continuing to monitor the situation, for the reasons several members are raising here. They have immediate access to BDC, so there are opportunities there. Second, as I mentioned earlier, we are looking at other options.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Is BDC providing loans, then? That's not a way to get their money back. You're saying they should just borrow from BDC. Is that correct?

Mr. Paul Halucha:

BDC is providing loans. The number I gave was $100 million. It's actually $204 million to 200 to 300 clients.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's not their money. Borrowing more money from the government isn't their money.

Mr. Paul Halucha:

On the program idea that the deputy talked about, effectively what we're looking at are those companies that were not eligible under the strategic innovation fund to determine whether there is both sufficient demand and a policy rationale to look at providing support. At this point, there's no determination of its going forward; it's simply an analysis that's under way in the department.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are going to suspend for a very quick two minutes, or one minute, actually. We have our next guest here.

We are short on time, so I need everybody to make sure they do their thing.

(1625)

(1630)

The Chair:

Can we get everybody back in their seats? We do have a tight timetable, bearing in mind that we do need to vote on the supplementary estimates later on.

We are joined by the Honourable Navdeep Bains.

Mr. Bains, you have seven minutes.

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development):

Thank you very much, Chair.

It really is great to be here.

Thank you very much for the opportunity and the invitation today. I really do appreciate the opportunity to meet with you on the occasion of tabling supplementary estimates (A) for 2018-19. In doing so, I am seeking approval for spending that is aligned with our government's priorities, in particular promoting economic growth, which is our number one priority.

Mr. Chair, despite a challenging global climate, Canada's economy remains rock-solid. In fact, our jobless rate, as mentioned by the Minister of Finance in the House of Commons today, is at a 40-year low, with over half a million full-time jobs having been created since 2015. Of course, there's no coincidence to this, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

We have been making strategic and targeted investments. And our middle class has benefited from the creation of new jobs and now has a better and sustained quality of life.

Many of these investments are reflected in the supplementary estimates that we are discussing today. The primary mechanism under which we are doing this work is called the Innovation and Skills Plan.[English]

Through our plan, Mr. Chair, we're taking a partnership-based approach to innovation-driven competitiveness in Canada, one that includes strategic investments and first-of-their-kind programs to develop innovation ecosystems and foster growth.

This new approach to innovation funding is accelerating and building on Canada's economic strengths. For example, it's really supporting the scale-up of Canadian firms and helping expand their roles in regional and global supply chains. It's about how we can compete not only within Canada, but internationally as well. It's attracting the kind of investment that creates good-quality well-paying jobs for the middle class.

It is my pleasure, Mr. Chair, to share with you some of the accomplishments under the innovation and skills plan, which is really our new smart industrial policy, as well as a view to where we're headed.

One of our most successful programs has been the strategic innovation fund, and I want to highlight this because it was a key initiative that was introduced in our plan.

(1635)

[Translation]

It encourages research and development to speed up technology transfer and the commercialization of Canadian innovations. It facilitates the growth and expansion of Canadian firms and helps attract and retain large-scale investments. And, because industry boundaries are blurred in today's economy, it is open to all industries.[English]

As of November 1 of this year, the fund has announced over 30 projects totalling $775 million in contributions that we've made, investments that we've made. What's more impressive is that these investments have leveraged a total investment of $7.3 billion, and we can all be very proud of this.

In a similar vein, another initiative that many of you are familiar with was highlighted last week. We've been making great progress on the $950-million innovation superclusters initiative. It's a collaborative effort between industry, academia and government through which we are building up existing areas of industrial strength to grow globally competitive companies.[Translation]

Just last week I was pleased to announce contribution agreements with the Ocean, Advanced Manufacturing, and Protein Industries Supercluster.

The government really couldn't have asked for better partners.[English]

I've also been very impressed with the ability to mobilize the innovation ecosystem, from small and large companies to universities and research partners, and from entrepreneurs and investors to other government agencies as well. The end result of this initiative—and I think this is really important to highlight, Mr. Chair—is that more than 50,000 new jobs will be created over the next 10 years, and these superclusters will add over $50 billion to our economy in the coming years as well. These are huge numbers, so we're super excited about these two programs: the superclusters initiative and the strategic innovation fund initiative. Again, this speaks to our government's overall new smart industrial policy, which is really focused around growth and jobs.

The innovation and skills plan is not simply about dollars and cents. It's about making it easier for businesses to grow. That's what we're truly here to talk about: growth. We made it easier for companies to access government programs through Innovation Canada. This is a one-stop shop. If entrepreneurs want to deal with the Government of Canada, rather than dealing with different levels and trying to figure out different programming, they answer a few short questions and in minutes they will get tailored, clear information about the programs that best meet their needs. I'm talking about federal, provincial and territorial information. It is a way to streamline the process for businesses to be business-focused and business-centric.

Complementing this, we've launched Canada's intellectual property strategy, the first such strategy. Imagine, in a knowledge economy, this is the first time the federal government has put forward such an ambitious strategy. As the members of this committee know, IP is integral to growing firms and fuelling innovation in today's technology-driven economy. Looking at other successful innovation nations, we always knew that our innovation and skills plan needed to include a proper IP plan. Members of the committee, as you heard from stakeholders when you undertook your study on IP, businesses armed with a strong, modern IP strategy make more money and pay their employees higher wages than those without. Those that have an IP strategy pay on average 16% more. This is good for companies, but more importantly this is really good for workers.

Furthermore, small and medium-sized businesses that use IP are two and a half times more likely to be involved in innovation activities. Again, it's about creating a culture of innovation and building that ecosystem. Our strategy, therefore, contains several measures to increase IP awareness and to make the system more transparent and predictable so businesses can focus on what matters, which is innovating and coming up with new ideas for new solutions.

Let me also take this opportunity to thank this committee once again for its thoughtful report and recommendations on this issue, because again it was a collective effort. You stepped up in a big way. We heard you loud and clear, and we implemented your recommendations.[Translation]

These are just a handful of the government's accomplishments under the Innovation and Skills Plan, but rest assured, we are not done.

(1640)

[English]

Mr. Chair, I want to quickly highlight that we're moving in a direction that also addresses issues around data and privacy, particularly the consultations we've done under the national digital and data consultations. Of course, our country's competitive advantages are increasingly defined by the ability to create, commercialize and implement digital technologies to harness the power of data. That's why we held the national digital and data consultations from June to October, engaging more than 550 thought leaders right across the country. We wanted to genuinely understand how Canada can drive digital innovation, prepare Canadians for the future of work, and ensure they can trust how their data is used. These consultations were a first step and will help guide us as we continue to make sure that Canada is in a leadership role.

I would also be remiss if I did not mention the continued renaissance of our regional development agencies. This truly is a point of pride because we brought the agencies together, provided additional money for them, and allowed them to focus on innovation-related projects as well. Again, they've done a tremendous job of focusing on helping companies scale up. They helped with diversification. This speaks to the concerns—and more importantly, the opportunities—that innovation occurs everywhere and not just in the big cities. It's important that all Canadians benefit from innovation.

Colleagues, as you can see, this is a very comprehensive innovation and skills plan.[Translation]

The global economy is more competitive than ever. Canada must move quickly or risk being left behind. That is why these measures are so important. For Canada to succeed, innovation is imperative.[English]

All the middle-class families from coast to coast to coast are counting on us to set this country on the right path, and that is exactly what we're doing.

I want to thank you, Chair, for this opportunity, and the committee members for their time. I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have.[Translation]

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you much.

I am mindful of the time. The first round will be five minutes instead of seven minutes, and again, I will be holding people to their times because we are going to be short of time.

Mr. Graham, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

I have a few different questions, so I'll be as brief as I can.

First of all, can you give us a sense of why you think it's important for us to restore rail service to Churchill through Western Economic Diversification?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Thank you for that question. That really is a point of pride for us—the announcement that we made. I had the opportunity to visit Churchill a few years ago and saw first-hand the devastation that occurred because the rail line services were no longer taking place. The cost of food had gone up pretty substantially, and it was having an impact not only on morale but really on families. We worked very closely with indigenous leadership. We recognize that safety is important. We recognize that economic development is important, and we want to give people hope and an opportunity to succeed.

We worked very closely with the indigenous leadership and with the private sector, and we came forward with the solution that the Prime Minister just announced with my colleague Jim Carr. It was a $117-million investment up front with the Arctic Gateway Group LP, to really demonstrate our commitment to that community, to bring rail service back to that community, to really have that as a port, and to allow more opportunities going forward. The response has been overwhelmingly positive, not only for Churchill or Manitoba but for all of Canada as well.

I also want to take this opportunity to thank the members and the team involved from Western Economic Diversification who helped work on that investment, which was so critical to our country.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

On a totally different topic, last Thursday, Japanese minister of cybersecurity Yoshitaka Sakurada was testifying at a committee in Japan and admitted that he has never used a computer. I just want to clarify for the record that you have.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That I have used a computer...?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Thank you for asking that question. I'm not sure where you're going with that line of questioning, but yes, I have used a computer. Thank you for posing that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just want to make sure. Thank you. It's a segue into digital economy stuff.

You've mentioned the importance of economy and infrastructure. We talked a bit about this with your officials a few minutes ago. Can you elaborate on what you've done to make sure Canadians have the opportunity to succeed in the digital economy, and also a bit on how your perspective on rural has changed in this job over the last few years?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Well, we are dealing with the digital divide. It's the new reality. It's so important to make sure that we have comprehensive opportunities for Canadians regardless of where they live. Therefore we've been very mindful of making sure that high-speed Internet connectivity is provided to rural and remote communities.

We have put forward initiatives like the connect to innovate program, which we're very proud of. It speaks to the strategic investments we've made in many communities across the country: 900 communities have benefited under that program, and we were able to leverage dollar for dollar, if not more, from the private sector and other communities as well. In terms of significant investments, 19,500 kilometres' worth of fibre has been put in place, which is absolutely essential to providing that backbone infrastructure.

With respect to the coding question, I would say that it's essential that kids learn how to code, not simply to code but to really have digital literacy and skills in this new digital economy. It is absolutely critical, no matter where you live or which segment of the economy you're interacting with.

We put forward a $50-million investment that will help teach one million kids from kindergarten to grade 12 to code. We're well on our way. Over 245,000 kids have learned how to code under this program so far. We're confident that by the end of 2019, we will reach our target of one million kids. It's empowering teachers as well, so that they have the tools to teach kids in the classroom about coding.

For me, as the father of two young girls—I have an 11-year-old and an eight-year-old—it's very important that they have these opportunities. From a personal perspective, this program has been a success, but more broadly speaking, I've heard positive stories from Canadians. It's really about promoting lifelong learning in a digital economy, to really make sure kids have the digital skills to succeed.

(1645)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have only about 45 seconds or so left, and I still have three more questions.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I'll do rapid response.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Last month you met with your provincial and territorial counterparts on rural Internet. Can you tell us what you agreed to, why it's important and what the next steps are? I know you can't do that in 10 seconds, but—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

A few weeks ago, I met with my provincial and territorial counterparts, and we agreed to a national broadband strategy. The idea is to align policies and programs to make sure that we provide not only Internet connectivity but high-speed Internet connectivity right across Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is my final question, I guess, for the time I have. The pagers are ending at the end of December, leaving a lot of rural areas with difficulty with wireless service for firefighters and so forth. Where are we on thinking about planning for a cellular future for rural areas? That's another line on the Internet.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

When we talked about the national broadband strategy, it was not simply about high-speed Internet connectivity. We also talked about the importance of cellular service and cell towers, and making sure that we played a role with the private sector, and the provinces as well, to move forward on this and deal with it from a public safety perspective.

It's working with Minister Goodale and his team from that perspective, and also making sure that we deal with communities to understand what the local needs are, so that any future programming we have, when we talk about high-speed Internet connectivity, also deals with cellular service.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

Minister, you've sat on this side before as an opposition MP, so you know how important these committees are. I appreciate your saying that the committee is doing good work on copyright.

However, your government has made some changes, through the USMCA as well as in the budget implementation act, which would change our study on copyright.

Minister, are you willing to come forward to this committee to talk about those subjects? If so, will you please ask your Liberal members to allow that if we make that motion?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Thank you very much for your question on copyright.

As you know, under the current BIA that we presented in the House of Commons, we brought forward measures around the Copyright Board to streamline the process, to add resources to the board members, and to provide additional funding for case management so we can have quicker decisions. This is really important for artists and creators as well, and it provides an important step in that direction. It's a commitment that I was very clear about when I came to committee before.

With respect to the committee and who says what, you know that ultimately you decide that. I am not in a position to direct anyone, but I do thank you for thinking of me.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes, said with a bit of a smile.... I just hope that Liberal members will allow us to do our work in that area.

Subsection 8(3) of the Statistics Act says: The Chief Statistician shall notify the Minister of any new mandatory request for information at least 30 days before the day on which it is published.

Minister, on what date did you learn that Statistics Canada would be seeking to download the personal financial information of over 500,000 Canadian households?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

On this issue, we were not notified until much, much later in the process.

As you mentioned, the chief statistician ultimately is responsible for the methodology of how the data is collected and what the data will be used for. The chief statistician has that level of discretion and independence. However, we were not notified 30 days before.

(1650)

Mr. Dan Albas:

What date were you notified?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Very close to—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Was it before October 26?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I don't have the specific date, but I can get back to you on that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

If you could have it back in writing, that would be helpful.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Yes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

So you were not briefed before media reports started coming out on this, Mr. Minister.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Briefed in terms of what?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Of the scope of the program....

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We are very familiar with Statistics Canada looking at administrative data and other data sets to make sure it can compile good-quality, reliable data. But the specifics of where those requests were being made and for whom, I did not know until it was made available in the media.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, so Statistics Canada did not alert your office prior to that.

At the time, when you first found out about this, did you think about advising the Privacy Commissioner about this program?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

As you know, this is a pilot project and no data has actually been collected or obtained. The way this all unfolded was that Statistics Canada engaged the Privacy Commissioner, so the appropriate steps were being taken to deal with issues around privacy and data protection.

I think you heard from the chief statistician, who came before the committee as well, that he would only move forward if issues around data privacy and data protection were dealt with in a meaningful way.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Do you think, Minister, that something has gone wrong here, when the Privacy Commissioner of Canada goes to a Senate committee and says that he wasn't aware of 500,000 Canadian households being asked to participate without their knowledge or their consent?

You didn't know about it either. You learned about it through the media. Do you think that's a problem there?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I think Statistics Canada is a world-class statistical agency. It has a lot of respect within Canada, and internationally as well.

For me, it was a point of pride when we reintroduced the mandatory long-form census to get good-quality, reliable data. I have a lot of confidence in the chief statistician and the work they do. Clearly—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, Minister, just on consent—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Yes, but clearly on—

Mr. Dan Albas:

—do you believe that StatsCan needs to ask for consent for this level of data?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

My understanding is that, first of all, no data has been transferred. Let's state the facts.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Well, you're the minister, and you're going to be able at some point to rein in on this. Do you believe that Canadians should be able to give their consent?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We need to be mindful of the fact that we saw political interference by the previous government, which led to the resignation of Munir Sheikh, the former chief statistician. We have to be very mindful of the fact that the chief statistician understands the methodology, as well as how to collect the data appropriately and in a manner that respects data privacy.

We establish what we need the data for. For example, we need good-quality, reliable data for Canadians to get benefits from the Canada child benefit—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Minister, the question was whether you believe that for this level of collection there should be people's consent. Is that yes or no?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

My understanding was that customers would have been informed.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse. You have five minutes, please.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister.

Bill C-36 actually moved the statistical analysis and collection from Statistics Canada to Shared Services.

Do you still support that decision? It is what led to the problem we have now. It's a new data collection, and you're describing it in House of Commons testimony as a “pilot project”. Are you going to confirm right now that this is absolutely a one-time thing that's happening, or now that it's moved to Shared Services this is actually the practice that was in the legislation?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

With respect to this particular initiative, it's a pilot project. It was the first time this project was moved forward, so it's still in its early stages. As the chief statistician has indicated, this is really about making sure data privacy is protected. It's still early stages, and it simply is a pilot project.

Mr. Brian Masse:

What is not a pilot is that Shared Services now does the data collection instead of Statistics Canada. Is that not correct?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

You're correct. The actual data is protected and managed between Statistics Canada and Shared Services.

Mr. Brian Masse:

The chief statistician, in whom you've expressed confidence, referred to the uproar that's been created as “fake news” and “Trumpism”. Do you support that statement?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We have to be very respectful and mindful of the legitimate concerns Canadians have around data protection and privacy. What is problematic—and it's nothing really new; it's the opposition doing its job—is that in the House of Commons there's a lot of over-the-top rhetoric, with comments about surveillance and suggestions that people's personal information will be disclosed.

We have to be very thoughtful about saying there are issues around data protection and around privacy, but no personal information has ever leaked from the servers. Personal information is removed, and this is still early stages. No data had been collected. The banks would have needed to inform the customers as well.

We cannot underestimate the importance of data protection and privacy. That's why we launched a data consultation process, to build that trust with Canadians.

(1655)

Mr. Brian Masse:

I saw that in your letter to the chair you indicated a willingness to come back to our committee, and I've tabled a motion to invite you back with regard to the budget bill and our copyright study.

Can I confirm that you would be willing to come back to the committee? That was your original offer to the chair. The budget bill changes things, and we'd like to have that analysis to hopefully address our concerns and have a study that's actually worthwhile.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, I appreciate that you think I have some say on committee matters. I don't. The committee controls its own destiny. Whatever you guys determine, I'm willing to accommodate. Thank you for the offer.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Fair enough.

Really quickly, moving to steel tariffs, we just had testimony that $350 million has been collected by the government. We have about a million dollars a day coming in with regard to the tariffs. About $50 million has gone back out. The request from your estimates here is for $125 million—part of a total $250 million out there—and there's a process now to try to reimburse smaller companies that have been shut out of reimbursement.

Was there any economic impact analysis done, and was it done for small and medium-sized businesses with regard to the government plan and its consequences? Has that been done, and if it hasn't been done, what can you do to ensure that we're actually going to see those smaller companies accessing the money that was basically tariffed from them?

Right now, they're being told to go to BDC, which is borrowing money, not getting their money back. The promise of your government was that it would be revenue-neutral.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We are definitely providing duty relief, as you highlighted, as part of our support to the steel and aluminum workers in that industry.

You're right that we put forward a $2-billion support package, with financing options through BDC, EDC and the strategic innovation fund. Most recently, out of the strategic innovation fund, we announced $50 million for ArcelorMittal to expand its operations. Over $200 million has been disbursed through BDC, to provide financing for cash flow issues. I believe over $100 million has been disbursed through EDC as well.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Will you reimburse the borrowing costs for companies? That is their money that you've tariffed by an action of your government. Will you reimburse the borrowing costs to those companies?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

It's important to add context. We responded dollar for dollar to the unjust and unfair tariffs imposed by the Americans. That was the appropriate response to demonstrate that we completely disagreed and found it baffling—actually mind-boggling—that they would think we're a security concern under section 232. That's why we responded.

At the same time, we recognize that certain companies, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises as you rightly mentioned, should get duty relief. We have targeted relief for them, and we are working to get the money out sooner rather than later.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Will you commit to, or at least consider, actually reimbursing all the borrowing costs?

Some of these smaller companies cannot afford this because of their profit margin, so they have two problems. One is the borrowing cost, and the other is getting it to them in the first place.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Look, we've made it very clear we want to support the workers in both the steel and the aluminum sectors. We put forward a very strong, $2-billion support package. We'll continue to work with them and deal with issues around cash flow to make sure they continue to be viable and have long-term success.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Sheehan, you have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much.

I was there when the $2 billion was announced by you and a number of other ministers. It was a multi-ministerial response. We'll drill down a bit more on the SIF, the strategic innovation fund that you talked about in your speech, and its being very critical to Canada's economy. I totally agree with that. We heard earlier that there was a specific carve-out of $250 million for the steel and aluminum industry.

What is the objective of that money? What is your hope for the steel and aluminum industries that access that particular fund?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

First of all, thank you for your leadership. I know steel is very important in your constituency and you've been a great advocate for this. I remember you pushing for this initiative when we were coming up with the support package, and you made it very clear we needed to support our steelworkers. Thank you for your personal leadership on this, Terry.

The first signal we wanted to send is that this is an important sector. There's a lot of innovation occurring in this sector. There are a lot of transformations occurring, and we want to make sure we accelerate that. We want to see more money in research and development. We want to see more money in capital and equipment to make sure our producers have the latest technologies so they can compete in the long run. This was a great opportunity for us to really invest and coinvest with them in some of the major capital projects that would allow the sector to continue to grow and be competitive going forward.

That's really the objective of the strategic innovation fund. It's saying, look, we have your back. We're here to support you. We want to see more jobs. We want to see more R and D. We want to see more capital invested. That's exactly what we had from the ArcelorMittal announcement. Right after that they did a job fair, because they were looking to hire more people. That's a great sign.

We recognize that we have legitimate challenges under section 232 with the tariffs that are still in place by the Americans—the 25% on steel and 10% on aluminum. We don't underestimate the impact that's having on producers. At the same time, these investments send a very powerful and positive signal to our producers that we are supporting them, particularly our workers. These investments will create more jobs and more opportunities, and that bodes well for the long-term success of our steel and aluminum workers.

(1700)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

As you're already aware—and this is public knowledge because they mentioned it at the trade committee that I'm also on—Algoma has an application in SIF programming, and their hope is to continue to diversify as well. They agree with all your comments, so I appreciate your support for our ask and that program.

You were also in Sault Ste. Marie. It is true that we make steel. We're a great community and a city of steel excellence, but we also have a lot of innovation and creation happening. You've been in Sault Ste. Marie and had some round tables and discussions with various companies. I'm really interested in the dialogues you had recently with some different players related to the innovation and the strategies around those particular round tables that happened.

What did you learn? What did you hear?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

As you know, one of the areas we talked extensively about was clean tech—the investments that are being made in clean technology and the green jobs that are being created. Some of that diversification in job creation opportunities is really a reflection of the additional monies you advocated for, along with your colleagues from northern Ontario, for FedNor.

Actually, since we formed government, we've seen an increase of $58.2 million for FedNor. We've seen that in three successive budgets. There was $5.2 million in the 2016 budget, $25 million in the 2017 budget, and $28 million in the last budget. That speaks to the overall funding increase that we've seen in the last budget for all the regional development agencies, $511 million. Specifically, FedNor has received funding in all three budgets.

There are enormous opportunities in innovation. As I said, we talked about high-speed Internet connectivity. It's essential to make sure people have access to the Internet so they can really succeed in the e-commerce platform.

Also, as we discussed when I was there, the opportunities with clean tech in the Soo are enormous. It's great that we have municipal leadership on board. Christian Provenzano, the local mayor, is on board as well. Many companies are receiving support through Sustainable Development Technology Canada, which is a commercialization support mechanism start-up for clean tech. There have been some good announcements there.

They're further supported by FedNor, and that's an example of the kind of diversification that's taking place and the jobs that are being created. It allows young people to stay there and raise their families there. It enables that community to grow. There's no doubt steel is important, and we're very supportive of working with Algoma, but there's so much happening there in the Soo, and I want to thank you for your leadership in that.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Chong. You have five minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for appearing in front of our committee.

I have a question about vote 1a under Statistics Canada, about the pilot project. Have you or your cabinet colleagues issued a directive or ministerial order to the chief statistician with respect to the pilot project?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

No.

Hon. Michael Chong:

You say the pilot project is on hold.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I just want to give clarification on that. The chief statistician said that he would not proceed until issues of privacy and data—

Hon. Michael Chong:

Yes, but in the House of Commons you said the pilot project is on hold.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Based on that commentary, yes. I just wanted to identify what—

Hon. Michael Chong:

Okay. Was there any communication between you and the chief statistician about putting this project on hold, or was this a decision he came to completely independently of any conversation between your office and his office?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I've not spoken to him about—

Hon. Michael Chong:

I'm asking if he came to the decision independently of your office or yourself?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Of course. He has to make independent decisions.

Hon. Michael Chong:

That's interesting, because when appearing before our committee, he made it quite clear that he supports this pilot project and thinks it's a good idea. It's passing strange that he would support the project and indicate that he wants it to go ahead, and then at the same time indicate to the House of Commons, through you, that it's on hold. There seems to be a bit of a contradiction there. How long will this project be on hold?

(1705)

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, I can only refer to the comments made by the chief statistician, who's ultimately responsible for the implementation of this program. He indicated that he's only going to proceed when he's confident that issues around privacy and data protection are dealt with in a meaningful way. That speaks to the broader concern that we want good-quality, reliable data, but at the same time we want the other issues to be dealt with in an appropriate way.

Hon. Michael Chong:

I understand that.

Look, it's important to acknowledge that the previous government made a mistake when it cancelled the mandatory long-form census. It was clear that Munir Sheikh resigned as chief statistician as a result of that, but your government has not done a very good job of managing Statistics Canada either.

You had Wayne Smith, the subsequent chief statistician to Munir Sheikh, resign in protest to your government's management of Statistics Canada. You promised to make Statistics Canada fully independent from the department in the last election campaign. On page 37 of your platform, you said you'd make it fully independent, but Bill C-36 doesn't in fact do that.

In fact, before the election you argued that the chief statistician should be nominated by an outside committee, but when Wayne Smith resigned, you unilaterally appointed his successor. Now we have the fiasco of this pilot project, where the proposal is to obtain the personal financial data of millions of Canadians at a granular level that's never been seen before.

You know, when people fill out the mandatory long-form census, they imply their consent or face consequences for not filling it out, and they know exactly what information they're providing to the Government of Canada. With this pilot project, you're basically getting the data through the back door, through the banks, and it's very personal information. It's about whether somebody purchased personal hygiene products at Shoppers Drug Mart, or whether they paid for psychological services at a therapist, or whether they purchased a beer at a bar, and when they did it. This is data that is far more intrusive than anything we've seen before at a level that would make Alphabet and Amazon blush. We're talking about very personal information from millions of Canadians—hundreds of thousands, if not millions of households.

This is why this has raised the ire of so many people. What's particularly egregious about this pilot project is that it's going to be used by some of the largest corporations in the world. Yes, we know that the data will be scrubbed and cleaned up and aggregated on a postal code basis, but nevertheless the reality is that this data is going to be used by some of the largest companies in the world in order to market their services to Canadians. Your government proposed to use the coercive power of the state under the Statistics Act to get this data. It's a big-time overreach on the part of your government, and I think it reflects poor management of Statistics Canada.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

You have about 10 seconds if you wish to answer.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

You're a very thoughtful individual with very thoughtful commentary. Unfortunately, I don't have much time to get into the details.

I may very quickly highlight a couple of key points. One is that this and any information Statistics Canada wants to obtain is designed to help develop good public policy. For instance, why do we need good-quality, reliable data? We want to make sure citizens get the appropriate support: the Canada pension plan or old age security or the Canada child benefit. I think we need to be mindful that a lot of the transactions are going online. Again, privacy and data protection are essential.

One thing is very important to note: Under section 17 of the Statistics Act, no government, no private entity, no large corporation can compel data from Statistics Canada, particularly personal data, which they have a track record of protecting. I think it's important to note that as well. This data is designed for public use, public policy for public good—good-quality, reliable data—but we have to underscore the importance of privacy and data protection. That's why the Privacy Commissioner is engaged, and that's why the chief statistician has made it very clear that he will only proceed if he's able to deal with those issues about privacy and data protection in a meaningful way.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Jowhari, you have five minutes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Minister, welcome to our committee once again.

I'd like to take our conversation in a different direction and get your feedback on USMCA and the impact it has had specifically on industry. One industry is the automotive industry. Can you give us an update on what's happening in that industry, as well as in aerospace? I understand that you're asking for about $30 million in the estimates to invest in aerospace. If you can give us some update on those two, I would appreciate it.

(1710)

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

In the USMCA, there was a lot of debate about dairy and supply management, and a lot of thoughts and feedback about the automotive sector. The current President said he would invoke section 232 on the automotive sector and impose a 25% tariff. We were very fortunate, because of the leadership of Minister Freeland, to shield the automotive sector. It's such a critical part of our economy: 500,000 direct and indirect jobs are connected to the automotive sector.

It's not only about the OEMs or the major automakers; it's about the supply chain and the number of people they employ throughout the country, not only in Ontario. We took very clear steps to protect that by making sure that production levels for the number of vehicles that are built, and also the parts that are sold, have significant growth potential. Part of the USMCA also changed the rules of origin for vehicle content, making sure there was a higher threshold for regional value content.

Currently, we're at 62.5% for regional value content for vehicles made in North America to local content requirements. That will go up to 75%. That creates more opportunities in the automotive sector. That complements our support. Since we've been in government, we've seen $5.6 billion invested in the automotive sector. Those are significant investments. People talk about how people view Canada. When it comes to the automotive sector, a lot of innovation and a lot of investments are occurring. That's translating into a lot of jobs, both being maintained and created on a going-forward basis as well.

That was a key aspect of the USMCA, to make sure that we not only protect the automotive sector, but set it up for success going forward. A high regional value content helps, and also the labour standards with Mexico, because now their labour standard employee costs have gone up to $16. A competitive advantage potentially existed with Mexico in labour costs, which now no longer is the case. The difference is much smaller. That makes Canada even more attractive as an investment opportunity. We're very pleased with the progress we've made, and now we look forward to working with the automotive sector to build a car of the future as well.

This supports what we've also done in the aerospace sector. Recently the Prime Minister announced significant investments in CAE from the strategic innovation fund to make sure it continues to be a global leader in flight simulation. They have also pivoted toward health and health simulation. There are great opportunities in Canada for investments, for growth and jobs, particularly in the automotive and aerospace sectors, two sectors that were part of industrial policy for decades and that have a bright future as well in some of the policies and programs we've put in place for innovation and trade.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you.

I have about a minute left. I want to go back to the funding request of about $7.5 million made under Statistics Canada. It's funding for the statistical survey operations settlement. Can either the minister or Mr. Knubley comment on that one?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Yes, the deputy can speak to the specifics of what that's for. As I mentioned before, though, we do have a proud record when it comes to Statistics Canada. On day one, we reintroduced the mandatory long-form census. As we committed in the platform, through legislation, Bill C-36, we dealt with its independence, reinforcing and strengthening the independence of Statistics Canada.

Right now, we're going through a modernization process to make sure that it is able to succeed going forward in the new knowledge economy, to make sure that we use other datasets and administrative datasets to provide good-quality, reliable data for policy-makers.

With respect to the $7.5 million, Deputy, do you want to speak to that?

Mr. John Knubley:

This is related to an HR issue. Some time ago, in 1985, the Public Service Staff Relations Board ruled that the long-standing interviewers who are used in the census process, for example, were actually employees of the Treasury Board. There continue to be payments as a result of this settlement.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

(1715)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you again, Mr. Chair.

Minister, you said earlier that the information that would be used from this pilot project would be used for analysis for policy-makers. StatsCan repackages its data for private businesses to purchase. It's an endeavour that brought in about $113 million last year. Currently, 400 people are employed to help supply businesses with government data.

My question is, do you think the demand for this repackaged data from private companies will increase once your government starts collecting this information?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

First of all, it's not our government—it's Statistics Canada that will make that decision. They've indicated that they will only proceed if they have dealt with issues around privacy and data protection. No personal information is ever sold by StatsCan, so I think you might be misinformed there.

Second, the $113 million you're referring to is for requests made by the private sector where they've engaged StatsCan to collect data. It's not data that StatsCan has and that they're selling to the private sector. I think you need to make sure that—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Well, Minister, we had the chief statistician come in here and explain that sometimes companies will ask to have datasets—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Correct.

Mr. Dan Albas:

—and put them into certain ways so that they can better use them to sell their products.

Minister, you have to appreciate the point that this information would be highly valuable. As my colleague Mr. Chong has said, groups like Amazon already have large transactional databases of their own. To be able to break down, postal code by postal code, the granularity of what we're talking about would be highly lucrative for businesses.

If this program were to go forward, do you see an increased demand for those services?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's a hypothetical. I don't know. Again, as you said, it's a pilot project that has not moved forward. Data has not been collected, and we don't know what data would or would not turn out at this stage.

What I can say is that having good-quality, reliable data is important. For example, with respect to the long-form census, when we made it voluntary, 1,128 communities did not have good-quality, reliable data. That also impacted small businesses. Businesses use that data—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Minister—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

—to make sure that they plan—

Mr. Dan Albas:

—we're not talking about the past. We're talking about the future, and I'd like you to stay focused on something that's in your bailiwick right now. Specifically, I think that Canadians are not happy with that idea, and your government seems convinced that this is the only way that StatsCan can do this.

The chief statistician gave us this “Well, people don't want to take their cloggy logbooks around and write down every transaction.” Now, what was proposed, Minister, is light years ahead, and in fact it does seem to be more intrusive than anything. If this program were to move forward, would you require there to be consent?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, this is a hypothetical. What I am getting at is that they will only move forward when issues around privacy and data protection are dealt with, and I think that's very important to note.

Our government has been very clear about protecting privacy. We brought forward regulations to PIPEDA to strengthen privacy legislation. We're actually undergoing consultations to further strengthen privacy laws. We recognize the importance of privacy and data protection, but we also acknowledge that Statistics Canada needs good-quality, reliable data, so this is why they need to engage Canadians to build that trust.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Minister, again, you have to say that when both the minister and the Privacy Commissioner have to read in the paper what Statistics Canada is up to, there is a problem here. Parliamentarians—both Conservative and NDP—have raised those concerns, and I hope you would be looking at this and putting your foot down on this.

Again, when we talk about people who are receiving CPP, EI and other forms of government support, Minister, what about the dignity of those persons to have the privacy of their own transactions? Again, this is over a million people who would be affected just on the first round.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

When it comes to privacy, I do want to highlight the fact that StatsCan has a tremendous track record of removing personal data. I cannot think of any data breach with the servers where personal information was compromised—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Well, in the last census there was, and again, there are multiple cases where these things have been circumvented—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I'm talking about—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Minister, I would simply suggest that you look at the chief statistician's testimony before this committee. I asked him if there is a “master key” that allows for those files to become un-anonymized, where you can actually say whose information it is and link that directly to transactions. He said that there was a capacity at any time, subject to policy.

Minister, to say that the data is going to be anonymized and thus that you can't link it to the original person is false.

(1720)

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

No.

May I make one point very clear?

The Chair: Very quickly, please.

Hon. Navdeep Bains: When it comes to Statistics Canada, they want to generate good-quality, reliable data. They're not here trying to pry into people's personal lives. They're not trying—as the rhetoric you mentioned—to do surveillance. They're genuinely trying to collect good-quality, reliable data.

You have raised legitimate points—and so have other Canadians—around data, privacy and protection. Those issues need to be addressed, but by no means has anyone's personal information in the past been compromised with information on servers. Going forward, obviously we have confidence in the system, but before we get there, it's a hypothetical. They need to build that trust with Canadians.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Well, the previous chief statistician—

The Chair:

Thank you. We're going to move on to Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Dan Albas:

—resigned over this. I think it's important to note that—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield: Thank you, Mr. Chair—

Mr. Dan Albas: —this is a country where we believe in democratic values.

The Chair:

Mr. Albas—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Again, it shouldn't just be up to some bureaucrat to decide how that—

The Chair:

Mr. Albas, your time is up.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I wanted to talk about the IP strategy fit, but I also want to bridge on some of Mr. Albas's comments. As a previous consumer of the CANSIM tables, I mentioned to the chief statistician when he was here how valuable those CANSIM tables are for businesses in order to understand the markets in Canada. I also worked on the poverty elimination task force in Guelph, and I mentioned how important the CANSIM tables are to understand unemployment, homelessness and food insecurity and to have the right data.

As this is an innovation and skills plan that we've developed using IP, my first question to our businesses is about who owns the IP and how they are going to go to the market with that IP, maybe using CANSIM information. I'm just trying to bridge two topics here, the IP strategy fit with our innovation agenda. It was great to see it showing up in budget 2017.

I know that our committee did a lot of work around the IP strategy. Could you comment, Minister, on the importance of the IP strategy fitting in with our innovation and skills plan?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Thank you for that question. Intellectual property is a foundational piece and an essential piece for the knowledge economy going forward.

If you look at the U.S. and their S&P 500, you see that 84% of the assets attributed to the companies are intangible assets. It's connected to IP. If you look at the TSX top 30, you see that 40% of the asset base is attributed to IP. We're behind the U.S., and compared to other jurisdictions as well, and we really have to step up.

We want to be in the business of generating more IP and making sure that we see the benefits here in Canada. That's why we put forward the first national IP strategy, based on the work you did. It was really well received.

Jim Balsillie, for example, someone who is really knowledgeable about this, said that ISED—not me, but more specifically the department I work with—“has been a tireless champion of innovative Canadian companies". He said, “I'm delighted that [under the leadership of ISED we've] put in place this most significant pillar for an innovation strategy.... Raising sophisticated domestic capacity in IP ensures Canada will improve the commercialization of our ideas globally.” This is pretty high praise from someone who understands the importance of IP.

We received similar support from many different professors, the IP Institute of Canada and the different organizations and companies that use IP. Particularly in our smaller and medium-sized businesses, only 10% actually have an IP strategy, and only 10% actually use that IP strategy as part of their business plan. What we're trying to do, fundamentally, is to say, how do we increase that number?

I think the larger companies, generally speaking, are better when it comes to IP generation and IP development and the benefits of it, but it's really about the small and medium-sized companies. We've put forward measures in the IP strategy to also protect Canadian companies, particularly around trolls, to deal with issues around the demand letters that are issued in order to make sure that those demand letters protect them and protect their IP. We've looked at patent collectives, another area that's really important: to combine different patents to provide more opportunities for businesses and to deal with trolls as well.

These are some of the strategies we're deploying. It's $85.3 million that we're investing for significant investments in IP, so it's not simply legislative changes that you're seeing in the legislature, in the House of Commons, but financial resources as well, to move forward on the strategy.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Last week, I was announcing on your behalf $2.28 million for Bioenterprise. They're working in bioplastics and a lot of bioproducts. The next day, I was visiting a company that was taking all the coffee-grounds from McDonald's Canada and making bioplastic headlamp covers for the Ford Motor Company for their Lincoln line. I was thinking that the farm equipment manufacturers in western Canada could benefit from this technology.

To go back to this, you have this idea from IP, the IP is owned in Canada, and we have market information through Statistics Canada CANSIM tables to see who else has headlights and who else is making equipment that could use that technology. Do you see a continuum between our IP strategy and providing the right market data for companies to expand their businesses?

(1725)

The Chair:

Answer very quickly, please.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Yes, absolutely. That's a great illustration of how we connect data to IP and make sure we get the commercial benefit of it. That is definitely part of the vision going forward. Thank you for that insight.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For the final two minutes, Mr. Masse, we're back to you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Dr. Wayne Smith, the former chief statistician, said that Bill C-36—this is your bill that you had in the House of Commons—does nothing to prevent a repeat of the uproar after the 2011 switch from mandatory to voluntary long-form census.

We're back here now, and I can understand the reservations of people, because the reality is that data will be mined down to your postal code in terms of influencing consumer behaviour. Bill C-36 is different on a couple of things from the bill I had, and I would like your opinion on these things to end this meeting.

One of the biggest things was that the chief statistician would be responsible to Parliament, similar to the Auditor General, and wouldn't be the creature of the office of the Minister of Industry, as it is right now. Would you agree to that change?

Another thing would be, would you actually fulfill the promise that you had in your election platform with regard to making a new appointment process that's different from what we have right now?

Last, will the Statistics Canada department continue to be the one that actually gets the data from Canadians, and not Shared Services Canada?

Those were the divergent points. I agree that data is a very important point, but what is just as important is the quality of the data and also the empowerment and the personal confidence people have in giving it. In this situation, the chief statistician has undermined his own process, because people will change their banking ways with what's taken place.

On those three things, can you give at least some guidance in terms of whether you would change Parliament and the Statistics Act to create a culture of inclusion and accountability for the position of the office?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Under the legislation we presented, accountability is a key feature. The reason why we would not be able to repeat what happened in the past, which was political interference when it came to the long-form census, is that with the new legislation, for any of those policy changes you need to inform Parliament, so there's that transparency. What this says is that ultimately, as government officials, as elected officials, we drive policy. We say—

Mr. Brian Masse:

He reports to you, though, not Parliament.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

—that we need information on clean technology and we need information on the new digital economy—

Mr. Brian Masse:

I don't disagree with all of that. I'm talking about the position.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We set the policy directive. Then, in terms of how that data is collected, if we're bringing about changes to that—as the previous government did in terms of the methodology, from mandatory making it voluntary—that's where that aspect of it becomes very open and transparent. That information needs to be shared. If we're trying to change methodology or trying to change a process, we need to explain why. That's why—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Will you send it back to Stats Canada from Shared Services?

The Chair:

We're pretty much out of time. Do you have a quick answer?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Yes. Again, the questions around data protection—where the data is stored and how it's stored—are very important questions. Our government endeavours to make sure that data is properly protected. We recognize that we now live in an era where cybersecurity in general.... It doesn't matter if you're a private entity or a government; all institutions face this threat, and we need to be mindful of it to make sure we continue to earn the trust of Canadians.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister, for coming and sharing some time with us today.

We are very tight on time, and we have some votes for the supplementaries. May I get unanimous consent to lump them all together?

Some hon. members: Agreed. ATLANTIC CANADA OPPORTUNITIES AGENCY ç Vote 5a—Grants and contributions..........$25,537,539

(Vote 5a agreed to on division) CANADIAN NORTHERN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY ç Vote 1a—Operating expenditures..........$99,196

(Vote 1a agreed to on division) CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY ç Vote 1a—Operating expenditures..........$1,800,000 ç Vote 5a—Capital expenditures..........$29,654,327

(Votes 1a and 5a agreed to on division) COPYRIGHT BOARD ç Vote 1a—Program expenditures..........$99,196

(Vote 1a agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY ç Vote 1a—Operating expenditures..........$4,149,095 ç Vote 10a—Grants and contributions..........$154,667,316

(Votes 1a and 10a agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION ç Vote 5a—Grants and contributions..........$53,521,644

(Vote 5a agreed to on division) FEDERAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY FOR SOUTHERN ONTARIO ç Vote 1a—Operating expenditures..........$99,196

(Vote 1a agreed to on division) NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA ç Vote 10a—Grants and contributions..........$4,927,922

(Vote 10a agreed to on division) NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH COUNCIL ç Vote 5a—Grants..........$1

(Vote 5a agreed to on division) SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL ç Vote 5a—Grants..........$1

(Vote 5a agreed to on division) STATISTICS CANADA ç Vote 1a—Program expenditures..........$7,542,506

(Vote 1a agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall the chair report the votes on the supplementary estimates to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

I remind you that we are not here on Wednesday.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous et bienvenue au Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Aujourd'hui, conformément au paragraphe 81(5) du Règlement, nous examinerons le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

Pour la première heure, nous recevons aujourd'hui John Knubley, sous-ministre; Philippe Thompson, sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de la gestion intégrée; Lisa Setlakwe, sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation; Paul Halucha, sous-ministre adjoint principal, Secteur de l'industrie; Mitch Davies, sous-ministre adjoint principal, Innovation Canada; et Éric Dagenais, sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'industrie, du ministère de l'Industrie.

Je crois que vous avez sept minutes, monsieur Knubley.

M. John Knubley (sous-ministre, ministère de l'Industrie):

Très rapidement, j'aimerais aborder quatre ou cinq points. [Français]

Je voudrais d'abord présenter le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) 2018-2019.[Traduction]

Au total, 286 millions de dollars supplémentaires sont prévus pour le budget dans son ensemble, et, de cette somme, 160 millions de dollars sont consacrés au ministère. La principale composante est liée à l'acier et à l'aluminium. On a réservé 126 millions de dollars pour le portefeuille dans son ensemble. Les 45 millions de dollars pour Churchill sont la composante la plus importante.

J'ai quelques autres points à souligner.

Qui sommes-nous? Nous sommes les cadres supérieurs du ministère de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, ISDE. ISDE, comme nous le savons, a un budget de plus de 3,4 milliards de dollars et près de 5 000 ETP, équivalents temps plein. Pour ce qui est du portefeuille, qui comprend des organisations comme le Conseil national de recherches, les conseils subventionnaires, Statistique Canada, la Banque de développement du Canada, l'Agence spatiale canadienne, tous les organismes de développement régional, Destination Canada et le Conseil canadien des normes, il s'agit d'une organisation qui dépense près de 10 milliards de dollars par année et emploie près de 19 000 ETP.

Comme le ministre Bains dirait à mon sujet quand je m'assoirai plus tard à côté de lui, mes collègues répondront à toutes les questions difficiles, et je m'occuperai des questions faciles. Encore une fois, je veux simplement dire que nous sommes les représentants d'ISDE. En tant qu'équipe travaillant au soutien du ministre Bains, nous nous sommes vraiment concentrés directement sur la mise en oeuvre du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences du Canada. [Français]

Nous avons fait d'importants progrès jusqu'à maintenant. Nous avons mis en place divers programmes conjoints, ciblés et harmonisés.[Traduction]

Cela suppose l'Initiative des supergrappes d'innovation, le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, ou FSI pour faire court, et Solutions innovatrices Canada. Nous aurons l'occasion de parler de ces programmes, je présume, durant la période de questions.

Le troisième point que j'aimerais aborder, c'est que, comme nous nous sommes concentrés sur la mise en oeuvre de ces programmes, qui ont surtout été introduits dans le budget de 2017, deux nouvelles initiatives ont cours dans le cadre du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences.

D'abord, nous avons tenu des consultations nationales sur le numérique et les données de juin à octobre, puis nous avons poursuivi les consultations relativement à trois domaines: l'innovation, la main-d'oeuvre et le milieu de travail touchant le numérique, ainsi que la confiance à l'égard de la création d'un cadre de confiance pour travailler sur des stratégies numériques et des stratégies de données.

L'autre initiative — et c'est mon dernier point — est vraiment le résultat du budget de 2018. Nous avions lancé six tables sectorielles de stratégies économiques, dont le secteur agroalimentaire, la fabrication de pointe, les industries numériques, les technologies propres, la santé et les sciences biologiques ainsi que les ressources de l'avenir. Ces tables ont déposé il y a un mois un rapport commun. Chaque table a présenté un chapitre individuel, et un chapitre global désignait six principaux éléments qui se recoupaient sur le plan des activités. Pour la plupart, les tables misaient, bien sûr, sur des questions de compétitivité et de réglementation, entre autres choses.

Monsieur le président, je vais terminer ici mon préambule, mais encore une fois, nous sommes le ministère de l'ISDE, et mes collègues répondront à toutes les questions difficiles.

(1535)

Le président:

Excellent. Je voudrais que tout le monde s'en tienne à ce rôle.

M. John Knubley:

D'accord, ce serait très bien.

Le président:

Comme je l'ai dit, la première heure est réservée à ceux qui sont ici, et nous recevrons le ministre Bains au cours de la deuxième heure. Je vous prie de bien vouloir vous en tenir à votre temps, parce que je le surveillerai de près et que je veux m'assurer que tout le monde a l'occasion de poser toutes les questions possibles.

Commençons tout de suite par M. Longfield.

Vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercier M. Knubley et les employés d'être ici.

Comme vous le savez, nous sommes au beau milieu de la révision du droit d'auteur, de la Loi sur les textes réglementaires.

Dans le budget des dépenses, la Commission du droit d'auteur a demandé 3 millions de dollars au cours des dernières années. Cette année, encore une fois, ce sont 3 millions de dollars pour les dépenses de programme, plus précisément pour assurer une prise de décisions équilibrée afin d'offrir de bonnes mesures incitatives concernant la création et l'utilisation des oeuvres visées par le droit d'auteur. Nous avons entendu des témoignages selon lesquels il faut de deux à trois ans pour que cette commission présente certaines des décisions.

La question concerne le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses; aucun financement n'y est demandé. Pourriez-vous nous dire comment ces décisions sont prises et si c'est la Commission du droit d'auteur ou le ministère qui examine les ressources nécessaires pour faire le travail à la Commission du droit d'auteur?

M. John Knubley:

Eh bien, je pense que ce sont les deux: le ministère et le travail avec le ministre pour ce qui est de la façon d'aller de l'avant. Comme vous le savez, Loi d'exécution du budget ciblait deux priorités fondamentales: le régime d'avis et avis, ainsi que les changements apportés à la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Exact.

M. John Knubley:

Lisa, pourriez-vous parler des enjeux précis concernant le financement?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe (sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation, ministère de l'Industrie):

Le financement concernait en fait la reconnaissance des retards pour ce qui est de parvenir à des décisions. Une partie des changements législatifs prévoit également, au-delà des ressources financières réelles nécessaires, l'accélération de la prise de ces décisions, mais aussi le changement de la façon dont ces décisions sont prises, afin d'assurer une flexibilité relativement aux décisions à prendre et aux règlements à négocier avant de subir un long processus compliqué.

Ces éléments sont ressortis des consultations. Au final, la décision de fournir du financement additionnel appartient au gouvernement, mais elle a certainement été prise lorsqu'on a discuté avec la Commission du droit d'auteur des réalités d'aujourd'hui et de sa capacité d'infirmer ces décisions de façon opportune.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Exact. Nous sommes en plein milieu de notre étude, mais c'est peut-être une occasion future, donc je peux juste le signaler. Peut-être que ce n'est pas le bon endroit où le faire.

Par rapport à l'innovation, je vous remercie du financement supplémentaire accordé à Bioenterprise, à Guelph. Nous avons annoncé la semaine dernière environ 2 millions de dollars pour travailler avec Innovation Guelph, une organisation dans laquelle j'ai travaillé avant d'entrer en politique.

Toutefois, lors d'une réunion avec ses membres, j'ai découvert que le Programme d'aide à la recherche industrielle, le PARI, ne soutient plus, dans le cadre de son mandat, les organismes à but non lucratif. Ce soutien passe maintenant à FedDev. Je me demande s'il s'agit d'un transfert ou si FedDev obtient les ressources qui étaient auparavant envoyées au PARI pour soutenir des projets comme ceux réalisés à Innovation Guelph.

M. John Knubley:

Je crois que ce qui s'est produit, c'est que le Conseil national de recherches a reçu 540 millions de dollars dans le budget de 2018, et, dans le budget de 2017, 700 millions de dollars étaient précisément réservés au PARI.

Je crois que les gens examinent de façon générale la prestation du PARI, notamment dans le contexte d'un examen effectué auprès du Conseil du Trésor au sujet des programmes d'innovation. Je ne suis toutefois pas tout à fait au courant de la situation concernant les organismes à but non lucratif.

Mitch, êtes-vous au courant?

(1540)

M. Mitch Davies (sous-ministre adjoint principal, Innovation Canada, ministère de l'Industrie):

En ce qui concerne précisément la question de soutenir les écosystèmes régionaux de l'innovation, les organismes à but non lucratif ou les intermédiaires qui contribuent à l'organisation dans l'économie locale, ce travail est essentiellement attribué aux organismes de développement régional. Vous avez raison. Dans le dernier budget, on a proposé du financement pour tous les ODR, et celui-ci vise essentiellement à s'occuper de quelque 92 programmes touchant l'innovation des entreprises. On a réduit ce nombre de deux tiers afin de rationaliser le nombre de personnes avec qui on doit traiter pour obtenir le soutien nécessaire à ce qu'on fait. Ce nombre a maintenant été réduit à plus de 35, comme conséquence de certains de ces réalignements, mais des relations actives mises en place permettent de reprendre ces programmes et de favoriser la transition pour les intervenants.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Très bien. Je me souviens avoir vu cette rationalisation dans le budget et m'être demandé si c'était un exemple.

Dans le cadre du travail que font Innovation Guelph et Bioenterprise par rapport à la création de nouvelles entreprises, environ 135 entreprises ont été créées durant le dernier financement qu'elles ont reçu. Elles espèrent aider des entrepreneurs à lancer 56 entreprises de plus à Guelph.

Le programme d'innovation semble rapporter des dividendes pour ce que nous investissons et ce que nous recevons. Faisons-nous une certaine forme de suivi sur le plan des rendements économiques des investissements qui servent à soutenir les nouvelles entreprises d'innovation?

M. John Knubley:

Oui, nous en faisons. Nous faisons un suivi et utilisons des méthodes d'évaluation ainsi que des procédures d'audit pour le faire.

Pour revenir tout en arrière et éluder en quelque sorte votre question, juste à des fins de précision, ce que nous avons fait dans le cadre de cet examen de l'innovation, c'est vraiment cerner quatre types d'agents de prestation. L'un d'eux, ce sont les organismes de développement régional, et, dans le contexte de l'examen, leurs nouveaux programmes s'intéressent particulièrement à la création de grappes et à l'adoption de technologies. En moyenne, ils soutiennent les PME à hauteur de 150 000 à 500 000 $.

Bien sûr, le soutien accordé au PARI est inférieur à cela, donc le Conseil national de recherches se situe au début de la filière de l'innovation. Encore une fois, son intérêt particulier est d'aider les PME de cette fourchette inférieure, même s'il s'est maintenant vu conférer le pouvoir d'accorder au PARI des contributions pouvant aller jusqu'à 10 millions de dollars, et il peut donc, en fait, faire de grandes contributions.

Mentionnons aussi le Fonds pour l'innovation stratégique, qui concerne surtout, bien sûr, de grands projets, et souvent des consortiums, donc ce n'est pas juste pour les multinationales. Le service commercial est aussi en jeu.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

J'ai été heureux de voir que les 10 millions de dollars ont permis de traverser la vallée de la mort, donc félicitations pour ce financement.

M. John Knubley:

Bien sûr, la BDC a joué un rôle.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Albas.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le sous-ministre et les représentants de l'ISDE, merci de faire ce travail pour les Canadiens et d'être ici aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais d'abord poursuivre le sujet abordé par M. Longfield en ce qui a trait à la Commission du droit d'auteur. La LEB, la Loi d'exécution du budget, renferme une série de réformes que de nombreuses personnes ont jugées nécessaires. De plus, de nombreuses personnes ont dit que la Commission n'était pas suffisamment financée.

J'ai l'impression que vous lui affectez les mêmes fonds que ceux qu'elle a déjà reçus. Cela va-t-il permettre de mettre en vigueur certaines des réformes qui figurent dans la Loi d'exécution du budget, dans le cadre du même budget?

M. Paul Halucha (sous-ministre adjoint principal, Secteur de l'industrie, ministère de l'Industrie):

J'aimerais juste émettre quelques commentaires à ce sujet.

Premièrement, je pense que les fonds affectés ont... Nous avons fait beaucoup d'analyses comparatives concernant la Commission du droit d'auteur et des organisations semblables d'autres administrations, et elles se comparent très bien.

Deuxièmement, l'intention des initiatives stratégiques qui ont été proposées par le ministre consiste en grande partie à accroître l'efficacité et à améliorer... pas seulement pour la Commission, mais aussi pour les intervenants qui présentent des observations, et c'est quelque chose qui est demandé depuis un certain nombre d'années. Nous sommes d'avis — et je crois que les analyses le soutiennent — que cette efficacité devrait se transmettre et, espérons-le, améliorer le transfert des décisions dans des affaires, dans l'arbitrage de l'organisation elle-même.

Troisièmement, un des commentaires que nous entendons depuis un certain nombre d'années de la part des intervenants, c'est que, souvent, la quantité de travail réalisé par la Commission peut être disproportionné par rapport à la décision et au résultat de la Commission elle-même. Par exemple, nous avons vu des cas où elle étudie des expériences internationales, puis une bonne partie de ces expériences ne sont jamais prises en considération dans le résultat et l'analyse qu'elle entreprend au Canada ni ne se répercutent sur ceux-ci.

La totalité de la directive que le gouvernement a fournie vise à permettre d'utiliser ses ressources de façon plus efficace, afin de les rationaliser, puis peut-être d'avoir un processus plus conforme à celui utilisé par les organisations internationales et aux attentes des intervenants.

(1545)

M. Dan Albas:

Bien sûr.

Je suis un peu sceptique quand... J'apprécie l'analyse comparative. Une analyse comparative doit être effectuée, car vous savez alors que vous comparez des pommes à des pommes, mais demander des réformes structurelles dans une organisation tout en offrant le même niveau de service signifie que cela ne se fera pas toujours de manière transparente. Il me semble bizarre que votre ministère n'envisage pas de veiller à ce que ces réformes puissent être réalisées avec le financement approprié.

Je vais passer à autre chose.

M. John Knubley:

J'aimerais simplement ajouter que les deux changements — le régime d'avis et avis ainsi que les changements touchant la Commission elle-même — étaient en réalité considérés comme des mesures à prendre maintenant. Cela n'exclut pas les travaux que le Comité effectuerait. Encore une fois, vous avez beaucoup d'occasions d'examiner cette question à mesure que vous avancez.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord, je comprends.

Le président du CRTC a récemment déclaré qu'il souhaitait une certaine souplesse en matière de neutralité du Net. Nombre de personnes ont fait valoir que ces déclarations faisaient référence au souhait du CRTC de réduire ou de supprimer totalement la neutralité du Net. Je sais que le ministre a reçu de nombreux courriels de Canadiens préoccupés. Je le sais, car mon nom est également inscrit en copie conforme.

Les commentaires du président du CRTC selon lesquels on peut faire fi de la neutralité du Net communiquent-ils un changement de politique gouvernementale?

M. John Knubley:

C'est une question que vous devriez poser au ministre Bains. Je crois que la réponse est non.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Pour en revenir au CRTC, celui-ci a affirmé en 2016 que le haut débit était un service de base et il a fixé des niveaux de vitesse de 50 mégabits par seconde. Maintenant, le CRTC dit que la vitesse cible réelle est la moitié, soit 25 mégabits par seconde.

Étant donné que les résidents ruraux ne recevront que la moitié de la vitesse, le fonds sera-t-il divisé par deux afin que les contribuables ne dépensent que la moitié du coût?

M. John Knubley:

À ce sujet, nous venons de rencontrer les provinces pour discuter de l'élaboration d'une stratégie de large bande.

En ce qui concerne le résultat souhaité, l'objectif de 50 mégabits pour le téléchargement et de 10 mégabits pour le téléversement reste certainement en place. Je pense que pour certaines administrations, dans le Nord par exemple, atteindre l'objectif 50-10 constitue un défi. Cela faisait partie de la discussion. Vous devez tenir compte des défis particuliers et du point de départ pour la région particulière qui relève de l'administration.

M. Dan Albas:

Bien sûr.

Encore une fois, cependant, le Comité, le ministre — votre ministre — et le CRTC en ont fait l'objectif. Maintenant, les objectifs ont changé, et ils n'ont pas progressé; ils ont plutôt régressé.

Comment expliquez-vous cela aux résidents?

M. John Knubley:

À ma connaissance, la cible n'a pas été modifiée. Sur quoi vous fondez-vous pour dire cela?

M. Dan Albas:

Eh bien, le CRTC dit que la norme s'appliquant à ces contrats sera la moitié de ce qu'elle est censée être, alors comment pouvez-vous...

M. John Knubley:

D'après ce que j'ai compris, dans les discussions que j'ai eues avec le président du CRTC, celui-ci continue de vouloir poursuivre cet objectif à long terme.

M. Dan Albas:

L'objectif du service universel du CRTC est le suivant: « Les abonnés doivent être en mesure d'avoir accès à des vitesses d'au moins 50 mégabits par seconde ou Mbps pour le téléchargement et de 10 Mbps pour le téléversement. »

Comment pouvez-vous expliquer que le CRTC soit capable de faire fi complètement de ses propres objectifs?

M. John Knubley:

Vous faites référence à son programme de 750 millions de dollars et de la façon dont les responsables procèdent, n'est-ce pas?

M. Dan Albas:

Oui, monsieur.

M. John Knubley:

Eh bien...

Désolé, vous voulez commenter?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Je dirais que c'est probablement une question qui les concerne particulièrement, car ils mènent actuellement des consultations sur les paramètres du programme. Ils ont annoncé le lancement du programme et entament maintenant une discussion sur les paramètres et la manière dont le programme sera mis en oeuvre.

Comme le sous-ministre vient de le mentionner, je pense qu'il existe des circonstances uniques dans différentes régions du pays.

M. Dan Albas:

M. Longfield a souligné plus tôt que ce n'était peut-être pas le lieu pour le faire.

Il s'agit d'un comité parlementaire qui surveille les dépenses dans votre région, entre autres. Je dirais également que ce sera l'argent des contribuables que le CRTC dépensera au bout du compte.

J'aimerais avoir une meilleure réponse que: « Vous devriez aller parler au CRTC. » Vous êtes tous deux des experts dans votre domaine. Vous devriez être en mesure de fournir une réponse dans ce domaine particulier.

M. John Knubley:

Eh bien, j'ai donné une réponse, à ma connaissance, dans mes discussions avec le président...

M. Dan Albas:

Vous avez dit: « Allez parler aux provinces. »

M. John Knubley:

Non, j'ai dit que nous venions de discuter avec les provinces, dans le contexte de l'engagement envers le service de base, de la nécessité de collaborer plus efficacement en vue d'élaborer une stratégie à long terme qui répondra à l'objectif 50-10.

Lors de nos discussions avec le président du CRTC, celui-ci a dit qu'il met en oeuvre un nouveau programme, doté d'un budget de 750 millions de dollars. Les revenus à cette fin proviennent de l'industrie. Vous savez peut-être que le CRTC a établi un processus permettant à l'industrie de payer pour les 750 millions de dollars.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Masse.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être ici.

Je souhaite parler en détail du Fonds pour les producteurs d'acier et d'aluminium lié au Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation. À combien s'élèvent les recettes perçues par le gouvernement qui découlent des tarifs sur l'acier grâce à la politique que vous avez actuellement?

M. Paul Halucha:

Je pense que le chiffre déclaré était d'environ 350 millions de dollars.

M. Brian Masse:

Les 125 millions de dollars s'ajoutent donc aux 350 millions de dollars que vous avez perçus. Où va cet argent, en particulier?

M. Paul Halucha:

Désolé, les 125 millions de dollars...?

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, je parle des 125 millions de dollars.

M. Paul Halucha:

D'où proviennent les 125 millions de dollars?

M. Brian Masse:

Vous demandez 125 millions de dollars dans votre budget.

M. Paul Halucha:

Oh, alors voici le...

M. Brian Masse:

C'est votre propre...

M. Paul Halucha:

C'est la moitié des 250 millions de dollars alloués au Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord, alors où va cet argent?

M. Paul Halucha:

Ce qui a été annoncé le 1er juillet est une allocation supplémentaire, comme je l'ai indiqué, de 250 millions de dollars pour le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation destiné à soutenir les producteurs d'acier primaire et d'aluminium.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous avez perçu 350 millions de dollars. Redonnez-vous ces 125 millions de dollars directement à ceux auprès de qui vous avez perçu l'argent?

M. Paul Halucha:

Je ne sais pas si l'argent provenant des droits de douane sont marqués d'une quelconque façon puis redistribués dans le cadre d'un autre programme de financement. Je pense que le ministère des Finances serait mieux à même de répondre à cette question. Effectivement, les rentrées de fonds constituent une source de financement, mais ce n'est pas la source de financement que nous...

M. Brian Masse:

Si on a prélevé 350 millions de dollars en droits de douane imposés aux entreprises au Canada, je ne pense pas qu'elles se soucient vraiment de savoir si cela provient de votre ministère ou du ministère des Finances, surtout qu'il s'agit de leur argent. Sur les 125 millions de dollars, combien sont remis directement aux sociétés sidérurgiques qui se sont vu imposer des tarifs douaniers? De plus, d'autres sommes vont-elles à l'administration et à d'autres politiques?

M. Paul Halucha:

Nous n'avons pas du tout augmenté notre administration de l'argent destiné au Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation. Nous avons Innovation Canada, et Mitch Davies dirige cette organisation. Nous gérons efficacement les choses grâce aux ressources administratives existantes.

M. Brian Masse:

À combien s'élèvent ces ressources qui ont été remises aux entreprises jusqu'à présent?

M. Paul Halucha:

Le ministre a annoncé une entente conclue avec ArcelorMittal pour un montant de 50 millions de dollars il y a trois ou quatre semaines. Il s'agissait de la première annonce. Nous avons environ six ou sept autres propositions à un stade avancé, et nous travaillons très rapidement avec les entreprises.

D'après les commentaires que nous avons reçus, le programme était prêt très rapidement après l'annonce du 1er juillet. Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, il s'agit d'investissements complexes...

M. Brian Masse:

Je dirais que vous n'êtes pas prêts.

Le 15 août, nous avons proposé au ministère et au ministre de rembourser ces fonds.

Soyons clairs: 350 millions de dollars ont été prélevés auprès d'entreprises. Vous demandez 125 millions de dollars de plus, mais vous n'en avez remboursé que 50 millions et vous n'avez fourni aucun financement destiné à augmenter les soutiens et les services permettant de faire sortir cet argent. Vous êtes assis sur une vache à lait de 350 millions de dollars provenant des travailleurs de l'acier et de l'aluminium partout au pays.

M. John Knubley:

Je vais juste simplifier la réponse en disant que, bien que nous ne demandions que 125 millions de dollars cette année, c'est sur une période de deux ans, donc un total de 250 millions de dollars. Nous envisageons de soutenir certaines petites et moyennes entreprises. Nous travaillons toujours là-dessus.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous allez quand même garder 100 millions de dollars sur cette somme, et cela prendra deux ans, tandis que des entreprises subiront cette perte sur leurs produits en acier en quelques jours.

Combien de temps faut-il pour prendre l'argent des sociétés d'acier et d'aluminium?

M. John Knubley:

Nous restons pleinement déterminés à soutenir le secteur de l'acier et de l'aluminium dans le contexte de l'administration Trump, et nous faisons de notre mieux en ce sens.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous vous y engagez pleinement. C'est très bien. Je l'apprécie. Toutefois, vous n'affectez aucune ressource visant à accélérer le processus bureaucratique et le processus de distribution. Vous le faites avec la dotation en personnel et les composantes existantes.

M. Paul Halucha:

L'objectif n'était pas de récupérer l'argent supplémentaire et de le transférer pour payer la gestion de la fonction publique. Nous avions suffisamment de ressources...

M. Brian Masse:

Non. Votre gouvernement pourrait prendre l'argent ailleurs. Il n'a pas à le prendre à même les fonds que vous avez prélevés auprès des entreprises au départ, mais vous pourriez trouver un moyen de financer le processus afin de faire sortir l'argent, car vous disposez de centaines de millions de dollars provenant des travailleurs de l'acier et de l'aluminium.

(1555)

M. Paul Halucha:

Monsieur, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, nous n'avons freiné aucun de ces projets. Nous avons rencontré les entreprises régulièrement à partir du moment où nous avons fait l'annonce et au fur et à mesure que les projets étaient élaborés.

N'oubliez pas qu'il s'agit de dépenses en immobilisations des entreprises. Elles doivent entreprendre des études d'ingénierie avant de pouvoir prendre des engagements, car nous ne pouvons payer que pour des projets. Les entreprises ont beaucoup travaillé, mais nous avons travaillé avec elles de manière extrêmement diligente et en temps réel tout au long de l'été. J'ai entendu quelques entreprises dire que c'était l'une des premières fois où le gouvernement agissait plus vite que les entreprises n'étaient prêtes à passer à l'action.

M. Brian Masse:

Mais vous avez de l'argent dans vos coffres et vous ne remettez toujours pas le montant intégral aux entreprises. Est-ce le plan?

À l'heure actuelle, je pense que vous avez prévu environ 250 millions de dollars sur deux ans, mais vous avez déjà perçu 350 millions de dollars, plus d'autres tarifs douaniers à venir. Est-ce la façon dont les choses vont évoluer?

M. John Knubley:

Ce n'est pas le plan.

M. Brian Masse:

Les entreprises constituent-elles le problème, alors? Toutes sortes d'entreprises et d'autres parties affirment que leur processus prend encore beaucoup trop de temps. Vous pouvez percevoir de l'argent auprès d'elles en quelques jours à peine, mais leur versement n'est pas là.

N'y a-t-il pas de plan de rechange pour le faire, outre ce que vous avez? Je comprends ce que vous dites, mais ce n'est pas ce que j'entends, en particulier de la part des petites et moyennes entreprises.

M. Paul Halucha:

Je crois que vous pensez à... De ce côté-là, il y a le remboursement des droits de douane et les programmes d'exonération, et il y a aussi le processus de remises. Les deux sont gérés par le ministère des Finances. Il a fallu un certain temps pour que les décisions soient prises, mais maintenant, il y a également un financement à partir de ces deux enveloppes.

La différence, avec ces fonds, c'est que vous faites effectivement une demande pour être simplement remboursé si vous n'êtes pas tenu de payer. Par exemple, si vous importez de l'aluminium ou de l'acier seulement à des fins d'exportation, les droits de douane peuvent vous être remboursés. Effectivement, il n'y a pas de processus précis; il vous suffit de présenter une réclamation et recevoir votre argent.

Le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation est un programme classique d'investissement de capital axé sur l'innovation; nous devrions recevoir des propositions de projet et faire preuve de toute la diligence nécessaire, car c'est l'argent des contribuables que nous utilisons. Cela a exigé beaucoup de travail des entreprises, qui ont dû élaborer leurs plans de dépenses en capital et s'assurer qu'ils concordent avec les priorités du programme de financement. Elles ont travaillé très étroitement avec nous, et je pense donc...

M. Brian Masse:

J'ai des usines qui ferment...

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

... et j'espère simplement que vous pourrez simplifier le processus. Merci pour le travail que vous faites.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Graham. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Il y a différents sujets que j'aimerais approfondir, mais nous allons commencer par celui-ci.

Le crédit 1a comprend un réinvestissement des redevances de la propriété intellectuelle de l'ordre de 1,2 million de dollars. Vous le savez, nous parlons beaucoup des droits d'auteur dans notre comité, et les questions relatives à la société d'État sont parfois abordées, mais pas souvent. Y a-t-il un quelconque lien entre cela et le droit d'auteur de la Couronne? Quelle est la source de ces revenus et que concernent-ils?

M. Philippe Thompson (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de la gestion intégrée, ministère de l'Industrie):

Le 1,2 million de dollars concerne les droits de propriété intellectuelle du Centre de recherches sur les communications, qui a touché 200 000 $ en redevances sur les projets qu'il a menés. L'autre partie du financement concerne le nouveau programme de Corporations Canada. Je crois que c'est un peu plus de 1 million de dollars.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, c'est 1 004 358 $.

M. Philippe Thompson:

C'est pour le programme utilisé pour trouver les noms des entreprises canadiennes dans la base de données. Elles reçoivent des redevances de ce programme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Pour ce qui est des 200 000 $, de quel type de programmes l'argent est-il récupéré?

M. Philippe Thompson:

Ce sont des redevances liées aux droits d'utilisation du système; il s'agit donc de la propriété intellectuelle relative à l'élaboration du système à l'interne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez également mentionné CodeCan. D'après ce que j'ai compris, Kids Code Jeunesse a atteint tous ses objectifs jusqu'ici. Pourrait-on me faire une mise à jour sur la situation de CodeCan? J'aimerais aussi savoir si vous savez tous programmer, maintenant ?

M. John Knubley:

Nous travaillons toujours sur la question de la programmation, mais c'est Éric Dagenais qui mène, en ce qui concerne CodeCan.

M. Éric Dagenais (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'industrie, ministère de l'Industrie):

Bien sûr. L'objectif initial était d'enseigner la programmation à 500 000 enfants, et nous sommes sur la bonne voie pour en fait doubler cet objectif et atteindre un million d'ici le 31 mars 2019.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Formidable!

M. Éric Dagenais:

Les 22 organismes avec lesquels nous offrons le programme CodeCan ont remporté un très grand succès.

Mais j'avoue que je ne sais toujours pas faire de la programmation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils n'ont donc pas encore complètement réussi.

M. Éric Dagenais:

Je ne suis pas un enfant.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. John Knubley:

De façon plus générale, je pense quand même que le ministère met beaucoup l'accent sur les initiatives relatives à la science, la technologie, l'ingénierie et les mathématiques, y compris sur les femmes et, bien sûr, sur la programmation. Je sais que si le ministre était ici, il aurait voulu mettre l'accent là-dessus. Il n'est pas simplement question, à proprement parler, de programmation, il s'agit en fait d'atteindre des objectifs en matière d'enseignement des STIM. C'est réellement ce que nous avons l'intention de faire, en ce qui concerne CodeCan également.

(1600)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne suis pas sûr que vous puissiez répondre à cette question, mais avez-vous une idée du nombre de programmeurs qui manquent aujourd'hui dans la société? Je l'ai déjà dit. Il y a 20 ans, quand j'apprenais la programmation, et je sais programmer... À mon époque, nous étions au sous-sol, en imperméable, les cheveux longs, à faire de la programmation, à démonter nos ordinateurs et à les remonter. Aujourd'hui, nous avons des iPads — j'ai encore un BlackBerry, mais tout le monde a un iPhone —, mais vous ne pouvez pas les démonter pour voir leur fonctionnement de l'intérieur.

M. John Knubley:

Encore une fois, je ne suis pas un spécialiste de la programmation, loin de là, mais je crois qu'à l'heure actuelle, il y a une grande demande de programmeurs, comme vous l'avez parfaitement décrit. Je crois que la question est de savoir si, au long terme, il y aura encore, à proprement parler, un besoin en matière de programmation. Par exemple, dans le cadre de l'intelligence artificielle et des applications possibles, les tâches des programmeurs pourraient considérablement changer à l'avenir, et l'accent pourrait être mis plutôt sur des capacités et des compétences ou des qualifications qui vont au-delà de la simple programmation liée aux STIM.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme vous le dirait n'importe quel programmeur, d'ailleurs aucun programme n'est meilleur que la personne qui l'a écrit.

M. John Knubley:

Et voilà!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faut faire de la sensibilisation à ce sujet.

Merci pour vos commentaires.

Comme vous le savez, nous avons beaucoup parlé d'Internet. Pourriez-vous nous parler davantage de l'importance des infrastructures Internet dans notre pays? Dans ma circonscription, nous savons que plus de la moitié des circonscriptions n'ont pas de service Internet haute vitesse, loin de là. C'est une question philosophique, mais je vais quand même vous la poser.

M. John Knubley:

Internet est très important et, bien sûr, nous sommes de façon générale en train de passer aux nouvelles générations de télécommunications, comme la 5G. Comment le Canada tire-t-il pleinement avantage du passage à ces nouvelles voies? Tout d'abord, en ce qui concerne les infrastructures numériques, nous voulons faire plus de place aux services à large bande. Comme nous l'avons mentionné tout à l'heure en réponse à une question d'un autre membre, nous venons de rencontrer les représentants des provinces pour parler de l'élaboration d'une stratégie à long terme visant la mise sur pied d'une infrastructure numérique solide, qui nous permettra d'atteindre les objectifs décrits par le président du CRTC. Ils ont annoncé l'engagement en matière de services de base, dans le cadre du CRTC.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est très bien.

Merci, monsieur Knubley.

Je vais redonner la parole à M. Longfield, qui avait deux ou trois questions.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Je constate que le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation dans le cadre du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences est rattaché à un montant de15 042 000 $ .

Nous avons travaillé avec Lutherwood, à Guelph, avec le Conestoga College, avec des personnes qui essayent d'améliorer les compétences. Comment cet argent est-il distribué aux provinces? Est-il versé directement aux programmes?

Le nouveau gouvernement conservateur de l'Ontario élimine un grand nombre de programmes. Peut-il avoir une influence sur ce type d'investissement, ou s'agit-il de quelque chose que nous devrons examiner à l'avenir? Comment cet argent parviendra-t-il aux personnes qui ont besoin de suivre des formations?

M. John Knubley:

Je vais laisser Mitch répondre à cette question plus en détail, mais le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation est un programme fédéral; ce sont donc des projets fédéraux.

Nous pourrions à l'avenir corriger certaines lacunes ou réagir à certains changements relatifs aux programmes de l'Ontario; cependant, jusqu'ici, nous nous sommes efforcés de cerner, en particulier, les types de projets de recherche et développement qui reflètent les modalités du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation.

Les 15 millions de dollars mentionnés ici correspondent simplement à une réaffectation des fonds de projet. Deux ou trois projets avancent plus lentement que prévu.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Formidable.

Mitch, innovation.canada.ca est une excellente initiative, qui réunit le tout dans un seul site Web. Nous avons besoin de cela pour les PME.

En 10 secondes, se fera-t-il autre chose pour soutenir l'innovation dans les PME?

M. Mitch Davies:

Dans le précédent budget, il y avait un nouveau financement de 700 millions de dollars pour le PARI. C'est un investissement ponctuel pour les entreprises en démarrage. Les entreprises dont on finira par connaître le nom commencent quelque part et bénéficient de cette aide initiale.

Nous sommes contents d'avoir cette plateforme Web qui donne aux gens accès aux programmes offerts en deux minutes ou moins, car les gens n'ont pas de temps. Ils veulent que le gouvernement soit cohérent, qu'il soit capable de leur donner les réponses dont ils ont besoin.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné le temps de formuler mon commentaire.

(1605)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer à M. Albas. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Monsieur le sous-ministre, tout à l'heure, en répondant à mon collègue du NPD, vous avez mentionné que vous travaillez actuellement sur une réponse pour les petites et moyennes entreprises, concernant en particulier sur les tarifs sur l'acier et l'aluminium.

Pourriez-vous simplement nous expliquer ce que vous entendiez par là?

M. John Knubley:

Je maintiens ce que j'ai dit. Les détails à ce sujet n'ont pas encore été rendus publics, mais nous examinons ce qui doit être fait exactement.

M. Dan Albas:

Y a-t-il une raison? Pourriez-vous nous donner quelques détails concernant la raison pour laquelle vous examinez cela?

M. John Knubley:

La réponse est simple; le programme du FSI a lui-même tendance à s'intéresser aux grandes entreprises.

M. Dan Albas:

D'habitude, c'est plus de 200 employés. Est-ce qu'il s'agit de la limite?

M. John Knubley:

Oui.

M. Dan Albas:

Je me suis entretenu avec de nombreux petits et moyens entrepreneurs, et soit ils absorbent les tarifs — et par conséquent, les prix augmentent et leurs clients ne passent simplement plus autant de commandes — soit... Excusez-moi, c'est le contraire. Soit ils refilent la hausse des coûts à leurs clients, soit ils absorbent les tarifs, et par conséquent leur rentabilité et leur capacité à capitaliser deviennent problématiques.

Cela ressemble-t-il à ce que vous entendez du côté des petites et moyennes entreprises?

M. John Knubley:

Absolument.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Pourriez-vous nous faire une mise à jour au sujet des consultations sur les changements envisagés pour la bande de 3 500 mégahertz?

M. John Knubley:

Eh bien, les consultations ont eu lieu, et actuellement nous examinons point par point les prochaines étapes touchant la bande de 3 500 mégahertz.

Les décisions n'ont pas encore été prises, mais nous espérons le faire en temps voulu.

M. Dan Albas:

Un grand nombre de personnes concernées m'ont dit que leur service Internet, dans les régions rurales, pourrait être diminué afin que les villes aient plus de service 5G.

Le ministère s'assurera-t-il qu'aucun client des régions rurales ne perdra de service en raison d'un quelconque changement?

M. John Knubley:

Nous ferons de notre mieux pour tenir compte des défis auxquels font face les citoyens des régions rurales, dans le cadre du projet de la bande de 3 500 mégahertz.

M. Dan Albas:

C'est une mince consolation pour moi.

En ce qui concerne l'Agence spatiale canadienne, je constate un financement d'un peu plus de 27 millions de dollars pour la mission de la Constellation RADARSAT. Est-ce que cela tient compte des délais actuels, des délais prévus? Je voulais dire... Faudra-t-il un financement supplémentaire pour cette mission en raison des délais actuels?

M. John Knubley:

Non.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Depuis qu'une tornade a frappé Ottawa, le Comité s'est intéressé — ou du moins, certains d'entre nous l'ont fait — aux problèmes liés au vent. Nous avons posé des questions sur le niveau de préparation de l'industrie à ce genre de situation. Voyez-vous, les Canadiens craignent de ne pas pouvoir utiliser leur téléphone cellulaire dans une situation d'urgence.

Évidemment, c'est quelque chose qui nous touche personnellement, alors j'ose espérer que votre ministère s'est penché là-dessus. Y a-t-il au moins une partie du financement dans cette affectation du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) qui sera utilisée pour étudier la question?

M. John Knubley:

Je crois que je vais devoir répondre par la négative. Si cela peut vous rassurer, toutefois, comme vous l'avez mentionné, l'industrie des télécommunications joue un rôle important lorsqu'il y a des problèmes, comme une tornade, qui touchent des infrastructures clairement essentielles.

Nous examinons ce genre de choses de façon continue et travaillons à cette fin avec d'autres organisations, par exemple avec les organismes de sécurité publique.

M. Dan Albas:

Sans se contenter de dire qu'il s'agit d'un sujet de préoccupation, votre ministère a-t-il publié des documents ou des rapports pour rassurer le public sur le fait qu'il s'en occupe?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Je ne suis pas au courant de rapports de ce genre. C'est notre travail de nous occuper de ce type d'urgences, par exemple, les feux de forêt, et nous avons le matériel et les ressources en conséquence.

Cependant, je ne sais pas s'il existe des rapports sur cela en particulier...

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord. Vous avez dit que vous aviez le matériel et les ressources en conséquence, alors votre ministère a-t-il pris des mesures pour réagir rapidement après ce qui s'est passé à Ottawa?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Nous étions prêts. Il...

M. Dan Albas:

Que voulez-vous dire?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Eh bien, nous avons du personnel chargé de veiller à ce que les infrastructures soient en état de soutenir les intervenants en cas d'urgence ou...

M. Dan Albas:

Et comment peut-on savoir cela? J'aimerais savoir s'il y a des protocoles.

Y a-t-il quelque chose que vous pourriez faire parvenir au Comité pour montrer que c'est une priorité pour vous?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Il y a des protocoles, mais je ne peux pas vous en parler. Je ne les connais pas personnellement.

(1610)

M. Dan Albas:

Pourriez-vous les transmettre au Comité afin que nous puissions en prendre connaissance? Prévoyez-vous, dans les prochains budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (B) ou (C), financer au moins une initiative qui fera en sorte que les Canadiens sachent hors de tout doute que votre ministère s'en occupe?

M. John Knubley:

C'est Sécurité publique qui serait l'organisme responsable des activités touchant les infrastructures essentielles.

Nous participons régulièrement à des réunions interministérielles sur la préparation aux situations d'urgence. Dans ce contexte, on demanderait...

M. Dan Albas:

Qui se charge de l'examen? Est-ce Sécurité publique, ou est-ce que votre ministère surveille...

Le président: Je suis désolé, mais votre temps est écoulé.

M. John Knubley:

Nous examinons les éléments liés aux télécommunications et participons aux activités de préparation aux situations d'urgence.

Le président:

D'accord, nous devons poursuivre. Nous devons faire attention à l'heure pour que tout le monde puisse prendre la parole.

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos témoins d'avoir fait le point avec nous. C'était important. J'étais présent quand le ministre Bains a fait son annonce à Hamilton, en exprimant son soutien à l'industrie de l'acier et de l'aluminium. Un grand nombre de fonctionnaires y étaient.

J'ai aimé la réaction, puisque je suis le vice-président du caucus multipartite de l'acier. La réaction émanait de plus d'un ministère. Une aide de 2 milliards de dollars a été fournie; Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada a fourni 250 millions de dollars et Exportation et développement Canada et la Banque de développement ont fourni 1,7 million de dollars. La ministre Hajdu a prolongé la durée des prestations d'assurance-emploi et les a augmentées. Des contre-mesures tarifaires de 1,6 milliard de dollars ont également été annoncées.

Voici une de mes questions: je siège aussi au comité du commerce, et les représentants de la société sidérurgique Algoma, dans leur témoignage public, ont dit qu'ils avaient présenté une demande de financement dans le cadre du Fonds d'investissement stratégique il n'y a pas si longtemps.

Je sais que vous ne pouvez pas divulguer de détails sur les entreprises précises qui présentent des demandes, mais y a-t-il eu des annonces relativement au financement offert dans le cadre du FSI pour les industries de l'acier et de l'aluminium? De qui parlerait-on, dans ce cas? Cette information serait publique.

M. Paul Halucha:

Jusqu'ici, la seule annonce concernait ArcelorMittal.

Cependant, comme je l'ai mentionné, nous travaillons avec un certain nombre d'entreprises sur diverses propositions. Il y en a probablement environ sept ou huit qui pourraient être mises en oeuvre dans plus ou moins six semaines.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Les 125 millions de dollars seront-ils utilisés différemment?

Le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation était prévu dans le budget 2018. En quoi les 250 millions de dollars se distinguent-ils du reste du FSI? Est-ce que c'est un montant réservé à un usage exclusif?

M. Paul Halucha:

Exactement. C'est un montant à usage exclusif.

Vu les droits supplémentaires imposés au Canada, il était clair que les grands producteurs d'acier en particulier ainsi que les alumineries allaient être immédiatement affectés. Le prix de l'aluminium a augmenté considérablement, mais, puisque c'est un prix à l'échelle du continent, les grands producteurs primaires n'en ont pas autant ressenti les effets, à l'inverse des aciéries, à qui cela coûte des millions de dollars par jour.

Le premier problème que nous avons cerné était qu'un grand nombre d'entreprises allaient devoir, dans ce contexte, soit annuler leurs projets d'investissement, soit les remettre à plus tard. Ce genre de décision nuit à la compétitivité au fil du temps. Nous avons donc mis en place une nouvelle affectation de 250 millions de dollars, au titre du FSI, afin de soutenir les projets d'investissement et les investissements dans les immobilisations par des grands producteurs, puisque ce sont eux qui allaient être plus touchés.

Nous avons établi deux critères: il faut que l'entreprise compte au moins 200 employés et que ses plans d'investissements en capitaux représentent au moins 10 millions de dollars. Nous avons fait cela — pour revenir à ce qui a été dit plus tôt — afin de pouvoir réagir plus rapidement afin d'aider les grandes entreprises qui allaient être les plus touchées.

D'expérience, nous savons que, sans ce genre de critères pour les programmes, nous serions inondés de demandes venant de toutes parts. Nous avons examiné très attentivement le milieu pour savoir qui serait le plus touché, et nous nous sommes assurés que ces entreprises seraient admissibles, pour éviter d'être effectivement paralysés par un nombre incalculable de demandes. Je crois que, selon notre analyse — comme le sous-ministre l'a dit plus tôt —, il y a aussi environ 7 000 ou 8 000 entreprises en aval qui utilisent de l'acier et de l'aluminium et qui ont aussi été touchées d'une façon ou d'une autre.

Les 2 milliards de dollars que vous avez mentionnés... Les affectations à la Banque de développement du Canada et à Exportation et développement Canada ont pour but d'assurer notre capacité de réaction. Selon les données à ma disposition, la BDC compte jusqu'ici plus de 267 clients qui ont été touchés, et elle leur a versé plus de 100 millions de dollars. EDC, pour sa part, a versé environ 60 millions de dollars à 25 clients. Les chiffres avaient augmenté vers la fin du mois d'octobre.

Le but était donc de faire en sorte que les petites et moyennes entreprises puissent s'en servir, en plus d'autres choses comme l'initiative de remboursement des droits, et aussi présenter une demande de remise dans les cas où elles étaient obligées par contrat de maintenir leurs achats, sans possibilité de changer de fournisseur, ou lorsqu'il n'y avait pas de fournisseur canadien d'acier. Donc, pour les entreprises qui n'avaient pas d'options dans un marché canadien, nous avons mis en place un processus de remboursement au ministère des Finances, et celui-ci a déjà commencé à accorder des exonérations à ces entreprises.

Tous les éléments sont pris en considération. Ainsi, nous pourrons prendre des mesures exhaustives en plus des contre-mesures que le gouvernement a mises en place, dollar pour dollar, en réaction au geste posé par les États-Unis.

Je veux aussi souligner que l'un des programmes est rétroactif.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci.

La parole va à M. Albas.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci encore.

Pour rester sur le sujet des tarifs sur l'acier et l'aluminium et tout le reste, j'aimerais dire que certaines entreprises avaient pris des mesures proactives pour être vraiment productives. Elles ont investi pour exploiter des aciéries, elles ont travaillé avec acharnement, et maintenant, elles éprouvent des difficultés à cause des tarifs. Mais les entreprises n'ont peut-être pas toutes fait cela. Elles ne seront donc pas sur un même pied d'égalité pour ce qui est du financement par projet.

Est-ce que c'est une préoccupation? Avez-vous vu ce genre de choses dans votre travail sur le FSI?

M. Paul Halucha:

Pour être sûr que je comprenne, parlez-vous d'une situation où une entreprise aurait déjà dépensé de l'argent, déjà investi?

D'après ce que nous avons vu, il semble que l'innovation et la compétitivité d'une entreprise ne sont pas des choses que l'on règle une fois pour toutes, et nous nous attendons à ce que les entreprises continuent d'investir. Cela me semble logique. Elles ont des capitaux pour l'entretien ainsi que d'autres capitaux pour des activités qui doivent être faites régulièrement.

Les paramètres de notre programme sont plutôt flexibles et, dans le cadre du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, nous pouvons... Nous n'avons pas une approche universelle ni un seul type de projet admissible. Au fur et à mesure que les projets sont annoncés, vous verrez qu'ils ont en commun des objectifs comme l'augmentation de la compétitivité, le perfectionnement des employés, le recours accru aux technologies et l'accès à de nouveaux marchés. C'est ce genre de paramètres que nous voulons voir aux côtés des objectifs stratégiques. Ensuite, nous finançons un ensemble général d'activités afin d'atteindre ces objectifs.

M. Dan Albas:

Récemment, on a annoncé que le projet de gaz naturel liquéfié en Colombie-Britannique allait être réalisé, mais seulement si on réduisait considérablement les augmentations à venir de la taxe sur le carbone et que l'on renonçait à la TVP ainsi qu'aux tarifs sur l'acier — y compris, je crois, à une partie des tarifs sur l'aluminium, mais principalement aux tarifs sur l'acier — afin de permettre l'importation de produits d'acier.

Bien des gens en Colombie-Britannique ont demandé pourquoi nous continuons de dépendre de l'acier étranger. Existe-t-il des fonds dans le FSI, des sommes qui pourraient servir à améliorer les choses, à améliorer les chaînes d'approvisionnement ou le fonctionnement du marché sur la côte Ouest, de façon à ce que nous ne soyons plus obligés d'utiliser l'acier étranger pour les projets de grande envergure?

M. Paul Halucha:

J'ai deux commentaires à faire. Je ne vais pas parler de la décision sur le projet de gaz naturel liquéfié, parce qu'il faudrait que je connaisse parfaitement tout ce qui a été nécessaire pour attirer l'un des plus grands investissements — sinon le plus grand — de l'histoire canadienne en Colombie-Britannique.

Pour ce qui est de la deuxième partie de votre question, pourriez-vous être un peu plus précis? Que me demandez-vous exactement?

M. Dan Albas:

Oui. Ce que je veux dire, c'est qu'au lieu d'investir simplement dans les aciéries existantes et leur exploitation — même si je continue de dire que de nombreuses entreprises ne présenteront pas de demande parce qu'elles ont déjà mis de l'argent dans leur exploitation pour rester productives —, il faudrait modifier la structure du marché en encourageant le développement du marché dans l'Ouest du Canada.

M. Paul Halucha:

J'ai deux commentaires à faire pour répondre.

Prenez le flux commercial entre le Canada et les États-Unis. Comme dans bon nombre de domaines, nous sommes l'un pour l'autre l'importateur et l'exportateur le plus important en ce qui concerne l'acier et les produits de l'acier. Sur les deux côtes, le flux commercial se fait surtout verticalement, à cause du coût du transport de l'acier d'une côte à l'autre. Il faut dépenser énormément d'argent pour expédier quelque chose de l'Ontario ou du Québec vers la Colombie-Britannique. C'est quelque chose de prohibitif.

M. Dan Albas:

Je suis conscient de cela, mais voici ce que je voulais savoir: veillez-vous à ce qu'il y ait de l'argent dans le FSI pour modifier effectivement la structure d'un marché, par exemple si un joueur du marché dit qu'il veut faire quelque chose à l'extérieur de la Colombie-Britannique? Disons qu'il veut des barres d'armatures de la Turquie, de la Corée ou de la Chine... Nous avons déjà vu cela auparavant, et les coûts continuent d'augmenter.

(1620)

M. Paul Halucha:

La réponse est oui. Ce serait une dépense admissible, et nous serions ravis de voir un tel projet. Le défi serait que, sur le plan commercial, cela devrait non seulement être viable pendant la période d'application des tarifs, mais également pouvoir survivre à la suppression de ces tarifs dans l'avenir. C'est une condition essentielle. Il y a beaucoup de choses... Si les tarifs sont toujours en vigueur dans deux ou trois ans, sur le plan commercial, vous pourriez imaginer ce genre d'entreprise.

Toutefois, les échanges commerciaux existent parce qu'ils ont une forte logique. Dans des circonstances normales, nous souhaitons voir la libre circulation des marchandises au-delà des frontières. Il serait difficile d'imaginer de renforcer toute cette capacité dans l'Est du Canada pour desservir l'Ouest canadien, sans savoir à quel moment les tarifs seront supprimés. Nous continuons d'en faire l'un des principaux objectifs stratégiques de notre gouvernement.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons passer à M. Jowhari.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci aux représentants du ministère d'être venus aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais approfondir la question du financement de 15 millions de dollars du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation dans le cadre du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences. En mai 2017, notre comité a publié un rapport intitulé « Le secteur manufacturier canadien: urgent besoin de s'adapter ». Il a entre autres recommandé que « le gouvernement du Canada améliore l'information produite sur le marché du travail, notamment afin d'identifier les professions en demande et les compétences détenues par les travailleurs en relation à ces professions. »

Nous avons eu beaucoup de succès. L'économie a créé plus de 500 000 emplois, mais il y a encore des pénuries de main-d'oeuvre. Nous avons encore des pénuries de main-d'oeuvre qualifiée. Nous devons permettre aux chercheurs d'emploi d'avoir accès à ces possibilités. Est-ce qu'une partie des 15 millions de dollars servira à faire correspondre l'offre à la demande? Sinon, qu'avons-nous fait à ce sujet, le cas échéant?

Je me souviens que vous avez mentionné qu'on reporte les fonds de certains programmes. C'est de là que venaient les 15 millions de dollars. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer où vont les 15 millions de dollars, et répondons-nous à la préoccupation que j'ai soulevée?

M. John Knubley:

Les 15 millions de dollars sont strictement liés à des projets qui ont été approuvés, et le rythme auquel l'argent est dépensé change. Nous avons dû reporter à une année ultérieure les fonds consacrés à ces projets.

En ce qui concerne les compétences, un élément important du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences est justement cet aspect. Comparativement aux programmes concurrentiels précédents, ce qui est très intéressant, c'est que, lorsque vous discutez avec des entreprises, elles parlent de deux problèmes concernant les compétences, et elles le font presque immédiatement. Il y a d'abord les secteurs touchés par les difficultés liées aux pénuries actuelles de main-d'oeuvre qualifiée, ainsi que la question de savoir ce que sera le lieu de travail de l'avenir à mesure que ces technologies seront introduites, comme l'Internet des objets, l'intelligence artificielle et la quantique. Quel genre de main-d'oeuvre aura-t-on besoin dans l'avenir?

Le gouvernement a grandement mis l'accent sur l'aspect des compétences, notamment en modifiant les exigences en matière de cours pour ce qui est d'amener...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Si mes électeurs me demandent où va le gouvernement et sur quoi il se concentre, comment ils peuvent se recycler et où ils pourraient trouver cette information, que devrais-je répondre?

M. Éric Dagenais:

EDSC a mis en place le Centre des Compétences futures. Une demande de propositions a été publiée en mai 2018, et cet appel de propositions et de demandes est maintenant terminé. L'organisation choisie sera annoncée sous peu. C'est ce que je crois comprendre. Le Centre se consacre à comprendre les compétences de l'avenir et la meilleure façon d'aller chercher des travailleurs — idéalement avant qu'ils ne soient mis à pied — et de les recycler pour qu'ils puissent conserver leur emploi dans l'économie de demain. C'est ce qui se fait à EDSC.

À ISDE, nous avons un certain nombre de programmes. Nous avons mentionné plus tôt le programme CodeCan. Nous finançons également Mitacs, qui se consacre vraiment à l'apprentissage intégré au travail et s'harmonise avec ce que certaines entreprises du secteur privé nous ont dit. La Table ronde du milieu des affaires et de l'enseignement supérieur a demandé au gouvernement et aux grandes entreprises de veiller à ce que 100 % des étudiants des collèges et des universités aient accès à des possibilités d'apprentissage intégré au travail avant d'obtenir leur diplôme.

Mitacs contribue à cet objectif. Il y a le programme CodeCan, comme je l'ai mentionné, et nous avons collaboré étroitement avec EDSC et IRCC sur la Stratégie en matière de compétences mondiales. C'est quelque chose que les entreprises ont dit très clairement au ministre Bains au cours des consultations sur le programme d'innovation. Elles avaient de la difficulté à recruter des gens qualifiés d'autres pays, de sorte que, à la suite du travail réalisé dans notre ministère et dans d'autres ministères, il y a maintenant un temps de traitement de deux semaines, qui est respecté plus de 90 % du temps pour les personnes qualifiées arrivant d'autres pays. D'après les statistiques préliminaires, pour chaque personne parmi les mieux qualifiées au monde qui arrive au pays, 11 emplois sont créés pour les Canadiens; l'arrivée de gens qualifiés de partout dans le monde crée donc des emplois au Canada.

Les compétences sont une priorité vraiment importante au sein du ministère, et un certain nombre d'initiatives sont en cours.

(1625)

M. Majid Jowhari:

Je vous remercie.

M. John Knubley:

J'ajouterais que les six tables sectorielles ont en fait passé beaucoup de temps à parler des questions que vous avez soulevées, et un certain nombre de recommandations ont été formulées à ce chapitre. Pour ce qui est du perfectionnement, il faut vraiment qu'il se fasse de manière sectorielle.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Masse pour les deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu des 2,5 millions de dollars pour la publicité afférente au gouvernement?

M. Philippe Thompson:

Il s'agit d'argent transféré d'un fonds central du BCP pour financer trois programmes de publicité liés à Innovation Canada, aux femmes entrepreneures et aux femmes dans les STIM. L'argent provient d'une allocation centrale, et nous ajoutons des fonds supplémentaires au sein de l'organisation pour compléter les 2,4 millions de dollars.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord. C'est donc pour les femmes entrepreneures, les femmes dans les STIM et Innovation Canada. Combien de recettes publicitaires au total seront consacrées à ces programmes?

M. Philippe Thompson:

J'ai bien peur de ne pas avoir cette information avec moi. Il serait possible de l'obtenir.

M. John Knubley:

Nous allons devoir vous fournir d'autres renseignements.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord. C'est très bien.

S'agit-il d'initiatives visant à appuyer des programmes existants?

M. Philippe Thompson:

Oui, c'est pour promouvoir les programmes existants au sein de l'organisation.

M. Brian Masse:

Je suppose qu'il s'agira d'achats relatifs aux médias sociaux, de vidéos et ainsi de suite. Je regarde juste comment vous allez atteindre les gens avec cet argent.

M. John Knubley:

Nous discutons toujours de la façon exacte de procéder, mais nous vous reviendrons avec toute l'information dont nous disposerons.

M. Brian Masse:

J'aimerais simplement revenir au processus visant à atteindre certains des petits producteurs d'aluminium et d'acier qui sont touchés par les tarifs. Quand pourrons-nous réellement voir une mesure ou un plan précis pour qu'ils puissent récupérer leur argent?

M. John Knubley:

Tout d'abord, nous continuons de surveiller la situation, pour les raisons invoquées par plusieurs députés. Ils ont un accès immédiat à la BDC, de sorte qu'il y a des possibilités à cet égard. Ensuite, comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, nous examinons d'autres options.

M. Brian Masse:

La BDC accorde-t-elle donc des prêts? Ce n'est pas une façon de récupérer leur argent. Vous dites qu'ils devraient simplement emprunter à la BDC. Est-ce exact?

M. Paul Halucha:

La BDC accorde des prêts. J'ai parlé de 100 millions de dollars. Il s'agit en fait de 204 millions de dollars dont profitent de 200 à 300 clients.

M. Brian Masse:

Ce n'est pas leur argent. Emprunter plus d'argent au gouvernement ne fait pas de cet argent le leur.

M. Paul Halucha:

En ce qui concerne l'idée de programme dont a parlé le sous-ministre, nous examinons en fait les entreprises qui n'étaient pas admissibles au Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation afin de déterminer s'il y a une demande suffisante et une justification stratégique pour envisager de fournir un soutien. À l'heure actuelle, rien n'est déterminé quant à son avenir; il s'agit simplement d'une analyse qui est en cours au ministère.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour une très courte période de deux minutes, ou plutôt d'une minute. Notre prochain invité est ici.

Nous manquons de temps, alors j'ai besoin que tout le monde s'assure de faire son travail.

(1625)

(1630)

Le président:

Veuillez reprendre vos places. Nous avons un horaire serré, compte tenu du fait que nous devrons voter plus tard sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

L'honorable Navdeep Bains se joint à nous.

Monsieur Bains, vous avez sept minutes.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains (ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je suis vraiment heureux d'être ici.

Merci beaucoup de cette occasion et de l'invitation d'aujourd'hui. Je suis très heureux de pouvoir vous rencontrer à l'occasion du dépôt du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) pour 2018-2019. Ce faisant, je viens solliciter votre approbation pour les dépenses qui nous permettent de voir aux priorités de notre gouvernement, et plus particulièrement de promouvoir la croissance économique, qui est notre priorité absolue.

Monsieur le président, malgré la conjoncture mondiale difficile, l'économie du Canada demeure très forte. En fait, notre taux de chômage, comme l'a mentionné le ministre des Finances à la Chambre des communes aujourd'hui, est à son plus bas depuis 40 ans, et plus d'un demi-million d'emplois à temps plein ont été créés depuis 2015. Bien entendu, monsieur le président, cela n'est pas fortuit.[Français]

Nous avons fait des investissements stratégiques et ciblés. Notre classe moyenne a tiré profit de la création de nouveaux emplois, et elle jouit maintenant d'une qualité de vie meilleure et durable.

Plusieurs de ces investissements sont reflétés dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses qui fait l'objet de nos discussions aujourd'hui. Le Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences est notre plan qui nous soutient dans ces efforts.[Traduction]

Avec ce plan, monsieur le président, nous adoptons une approche axée sur le partenariat pour stimuler la concurrence du Canada dans le domaine de l'innovation; cette approche comprend des investissements stratégiques et des programmes inédits en vue de créer des écosystèmes d'innovation et de stimuler la croissance.

Cette nouvelle approche à l'égard du financement de l'innovation vise à maximiser et à renforcer les forces économiques du Canada. Par exemple, elle appuie vraiment l'expansion des entreprises canadiennes et les aide à étendre leurs rôles au sein des chaînes d'approvisionnement régionales et mondiales. Elle est axée sur la façon dont nous pouvons être concurrentiels non seulement au Canada, mais aussi à l'échelle internationale. Elle vise à attirer le genre d'investissements qui créent de bons emplois bien rémunérés pour la classe moyenne.

J'ai le plaisir, monsieur le président, de vous faire part de certaines des réalisations au titre du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences, qui est en fait notre nouvelle politique industrielle intelligente, et de vous donner un aperçu de ce que l'avenir nous réserve.

L'un de nos programmes les plus fructueux est le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, et je tiens à le souligner, car il s'agit d'une initiative clé qui a été intégrée dans notre plan.

(1635)

[Français]

Ce fonds encourage la recherche et le développement, et il vise à accélérer le transfert et la commercialisation des innovations canadiennes. Il rend plus facile la croissance et l'expansion des entreprises canadiennes, et il aide à attirer et à retenir au pays les investissements. Comme les frontières entre les industries ne sont plus aussi bien définies, toutes les industries y ont accès.[Traduction]

Au 1er novembre de cette année, le Fonds avait annoncé plus de 30 projets totalisant 775 millions de dollars en contributions et en investissements que nous avons faits. Ce qui est encore plus impressionnant, c'est que ces investissements ont généré un investissement total de 7,3 milliards de dollars, et nous pouvons tous en être très fiers.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, une autre initiative que beaucoup d'entre vous connaissent bien a été soulignée la semaine dernière. Nous avons fait d'importants progrès dans le cadre de l'initiative des supergrappes d'innovation, une initiative de 950 millions de dollars. Cette initiative est le fruit d'une collaboration entre l'industrie, le milieu universitaire et le gouvernement. Elle nous permettra de miser sur les secteurs les plus robustes de l'industrie pour favoriser la croissance d'entreprises concurrentielles à l'échelle mondiale.[Français]

La semaine dernière, j'ai eu le plaisir d'annoncer la conclusion d'accords de contribution avec la Supergrappe de l'économie océanique, la Supergrappe de la fabrication de pointe et la Supergrappe des industries des protéines.

Vraiment, le gouvernement n'aurait pu trouver de meilleurs partenaires.[Traduction]

J'ai été frappé par la capacité de mobiliser l'écosystème d'innovation, des entreprises plus petites et plus grandes aux universités et aux partenaires de recherche, et des entrepreneurs et des investisseurs aux autres organismes gouvernementaux également. Les résultats de cette initiative — et je crois que c'est vraiment important de le souligner, monsieur le président —, c'est que plus de 50 000 nouveaux emplois seront créés au cours des 10 prochaines années, et ces supergrappes ajouteront plus de 50 milliards de dollars à notre économie dans les prochaines années. Ces chiffres sont significatifs. Nous sommes donc très fiers de ces deux programmes: l'initiative des supergrappes et le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation. Encore une fois, cela témoigne de la nouvelle politique industrielle intelligente globale de notre gouvernement, qui se concentre vraiment sur la croissance et les emplois.

Le Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences n'est pas seulement une affaire d'argent. Il a aussi comme objectif de faciliter les démarches des entreprises pour prendre de l'expansion. C'est ce que nous recherchons réellement après tout: la croissance. Nous avons agi pour faciliter l'accès des entreprises aux programmes gouvernementaux par le truchement d'Innovation Canada. Il s'agit d'un guichet unique. Si les entrepreneurs veulent traiter avec le gouvernement du Canada, au lieu d'avoir affaire à différents ordres de gouvernement et d'essayer de trouver divers programmes, ils répondent à quelques courtes questions et peuvent obtenir en quelques minutes des renseignements clairs et personnalisés sur les programmes qui correspondent le mieux à leurs besoins. Je ne parle pas seulement des programmes fédéraux, mais aussi des programmes provinciaux et territoriaux. C'est une façon de rationaliser le processus afin qu'il soit axé et centré sur les entreprises.

Par ailleurs, nous avons lancé la Stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle du Canada, la première en son genre. Imaginez, dans une économie du savoir, c'est la première fois que le gouvernement fédéral met de l'avant une stratégie aussi ambitieuse. Comme les membres du comité le savent, la PI est essentielle à la croissance des entreprises et au progrès de l'économie moderne axée sur les technologies. En regardant ce que font les autres nations innovatrices prospères, nous avons toujours su que notre Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences devait inclure un volet adéquat en matière de PI. Membres du Comité, comme vous l'ont dit les intervenants que vous avez consultés dans le cadre de votre étude sur la PI, les entreprises dotées d'une stratégie robuste et moderne en matière de PI font plus d'argent et paient des salaires plus élevés à leurs employés que celles qui ne sont pas dotées d'une telle stratégie. Les entreprises qui possèdent une stratégie en matière de PI offrent en général des salaires 16 % plus élevés que les autres. C'est une bonne chose pour les entreprises, mais, plus important encore, c'est excellent pour les travailleurs.

En outre, les petites et moyennes entreprises qui utilisent la PI sont deux fois et demie plus susceptibles de mener des activités d'innovation. Encore une fois, il s'agit de créer une culture de l'innovation et d'édifier cet écosystème. C'est pourquoi notre stratégie prévoit plusieurs mesures destinées à accroître la sensibilisation à l'égard de la PI, et à rendre le système plus transparent et prévisible, afin que les entreprises puissent concentrer leurs efforts sur ce qui compte vraiment: l'innovation et la recherche de nouvelles idées pour des solutions novatrices.

J'aimerais profiter de l'occasion pour remercier ce comité une fois de plus pour son rapport et ses précieuses recommandations sur cette question parce que, encore une fois, il s'agissait d'un effort collectif. Vous avez joué un rôle très important. Nous vous avons bien entendu et nous avons mis en oeuvre vos recommandations.[Français]

Ce ne sont là que quelques-unes des réalisations du gouvernement dans le cadre du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences, mais nous sommes loin d'avoir terminé.

(1640)

[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, je veux souligner rapidement que nous sommes en voie de nous occuper aussi des questions entourant les données et la vie privée, particulièrement au chapitre des consultations nationales que nous avons tenues sur le numérique et les données. Comme vous le savez, notre pays se démarque de plus en plus par sa capacité à créer, à commercialiser et à adopter des technologies numériques pour exploiter la puissance des données. C'est pour cette raison que nous avons mené, de juin à octobre, des consultations nationales sur le numérique et les données. Plus de 550 leaders d'opinion nous ont transmis leurs commentaires d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Nous voulions vraiment comprendre comment le Canada peut stimuler l'innovation dans le domaine du numérique, préparer les Canadiens aux emplois de l'avenir et faire en sorte que les Canadiens puissent avoir confiance en l'utilisation qui sera faite de leurs données. Ces consultations ne sont qu'une première étape et orienteront nos efforts pour continuer à veiller à ce que le Canada joue un rôle de chef de file.

Je m'en voudrais de ne pas mentionner également la renaissance soutenue de nos organismes de développement régional. Nous en sommes vraiment fiers parce que nous les avons regroupés, leur avons fourni du financement supplémentaire et leur avons permis également de se concentrer sur des projets liés à l'innovation. Encore une fois, ils ont fait de l'excellent travail pour aider les entreprises à prendre de l'expansion. Ils ont favorisé la diversification. Cela répond aux préoccupations — et plus important encore, aux possibilités — selon lesquelles l'innovation se produit partout, non pas seulement dans les grandes villes. Il est important que tous les Canadiens profitent de l'innovation.

Chers collègues, comme vous pouvez le voir, il s'agit d'un plan très complet pour l'innovation et les compétences.[Français]

L'économie mondiale est de plus en plus axée sur la concurrence. Le Canada doit agir rapidement, sinon il risque de manquer le bateau. Voilà pourquoi ces mesures sont si importantes. L'innovation est essentielle à la réussite du Canada.[Traduction]

Toutes les familles de la classe moyenne d'un océan à l'autre comptent sur nous pour que nous mettions notre pays sur la bonne voie, et c'est exactement ce que nous faisons.

Je veux vous remercier, monsieur le président, de m'avoir donné l'occasion de discuter de ce sujet avec vous, de même que les membres du Comité de m'avoir écouté. Je serai heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions.[Français]

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Compte tenu du temps, nous allons procéder à une première série de questions de cinq minutes au lieu de sept minutes, et, encore une fois, je vais être très strict parce que nous allons manquer de temps.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez cinq minutes, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être ici.

J'ai quelques questions, alors je vais être aussi bref que possible.

Tout d'abord, pourriez-vous nous dire pourquoi vous croyez qu'il est important que nous rétablissions le service ferroviaire à Churchill par l'entremise du ministère de la Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Merci de la question. C'est vraiment une fierté pour nous — l'annonce que nous avons faite. J'ai eu l'occasion de visiter Churchill il y a quelques années et j'ai vu de mes propres yeux la dévastation causée par l'arrêt des services ferroviaires. Le coût des denrées alimentaires a augmenté de manière substantielle, et cela a eu des incidences non seulement sur le moral, mais également sur les familles. Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec les dirigeants autochtones. Nous reconnaissons que la sécurité et le développement économique sont importants et nous voulons donner aux gens de l'espoir et la possibilité de réussir.

Nous avons collaboré de très près avec les dirigeants autochtones et le secteur privé et nous avons trouvé la solution que le premier ministre vient d'annoncer avec mon collègue Jim Carr . Il s'agissait d'un investissement immédiat de 117 millions de dollars avec l'Arctic Gateway Group LP pour vraiment montrer notre engagement envers cette collectivité, rétablir le service ferroviaire dans cette collectivité pour qu'il tienne lieu de port et offrir plus de possibilités dans l'avenir. La réponse a été extrêmement positive, non seulement pour Churchill ou le Manitoba, mais également pour l'ensemble du Canada.

J'aimerais également profiter de l'occasion pour remercier les membres et l'équipe de Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest qui ont travaillé sur cet investissement, lequel était vraiment essentiel pour notre pays.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Sur un tout autre sujet, jeudi dernier, le ministre japonais de la cybersécurité, Yoshitaka Sakurada, a témoigné devant un comité au Japon et a admis qu'il n'avait jamais utilisé d'ordinateur. Je veux seulement préciser pour le compte rendu que ce n'est pas votre cas.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Que j'ai déjà utilisé un ordinateur...?

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Merci de la question. Je ne suis pas certain où vous voulez en venir, mais, oui, j'ai déjà utilisé un ordinateur. Merci de l'avoir demandé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je voulais seulement être certain. Merci. Cela m'amène à la question de l'économie numérique.

Vous avez mentionné l'importance de l'économie et des infrastructures. Nous en avons un peu parlé avec vos collaborateurs il y a quelques minutes. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur ce que vous avez fait afin de vous assurer que les Canadiens ont la possibilité de réussir dans l'économie numérique, de même que sur la façon dont votre point de vue a changé sur le milieu rural depuis que vous occupez ce poste ces dernières années?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Eh bien, nous nous occupons du fossé numérique. C'est la nouvelle réalité. Il est très important que nous nous assurions d'offrir d'immenses possibilités aux Canadiens, peu importe où ils vivent. Par conséquent, nous avons été très soucieux de veiller à fournir la connexion Internet haute vitesse aux collectivités rurales et éloignées.

Nous avons mis de l'avant des initiatives comme le programme Brancher pour innover, dont nous sommes très fiers. Il témoigne des investissements stratégiques que nous avons réalisés dans nombre de collectivités partout au pays: 900 collectivités ont profité de ce programme, et nous avons été en mesure de tirer parti de chaque dollar, sinon plus, provenant du secteur privé et également d'autres collectivités. Pour ce qui est des investissements importants, 19 500 kilomètres de fibre ont été mis en place, ce qui est absolument essentiel pour que l'on puisse fournir cette infrastructure de base.

Quant à la question se rapportant au codage, je dirais qu'il est essentiel non seulement que les enfants apprennent à coder, mais qu'ils acquièrent de réelles connaissances et compétences numériques dans cette nouvelle économie numérique. C'est absolument essentiel, peu importe où l'on vit ou dans quel secteur de l'économie on travaille.

Nous avons réalisé un investissement de 50 millions de dollars qui permettra d'enseigner le codage à un million d'enfants, de la maternelle à la douzième année. Nous sommes sur la bonne voie. Plus de 245 000 enfants ont appris le codage grâce à ce programme jusqu'à maintenant. Nous sommes convaincus que, d'ici la fin de 2019, nous allons atteindre notre cible de un million d'enfants. Ce programme fournit aux enseignants les outils qui leur permettent d'enseigner le codage aux enfants dans la salle de classe.

Je trouve, en tant que père de deux jeunes filles — j'ai une fille de 11 ans et une autre de 8 ans —, qu'il est très important qu'elles aient accès à ces possibilités. Personnellement, je crois que ce programme est une réussite, mais, de manière plus générale, j'ai entendu des histoires positives de la part de Canadiens. Il s'agit vraiment de faire la promotion de l'éducation permanente dans une économie numérique afin de vraiment s'assurer que les enfants possèdent les compétences numériques pour réussir.

(1645)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Il ne me reste qu'environ 45 secondes et j'ai encore trois autres questions.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je vais répondre brièvement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le mois dernier, vous avez rencontré vos homologues provinciaux et territoriaux concernant Internet en milieu rural. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce dont vous avez convenu, pourquoi c'est important et quelles sont les prochaines étapes? Je sais que vous ne pouvez pas répondre à ces questions en 10 secondes, mais...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Il y a quelques semaines, j'ai rencontré mes homologues provinciaux et territoriaux, et nous avons convenu d'une stratégie nationale en matière de services à large bande. L'idée est d'harmoniser les politiques et les programmes pour veiller à offrir non seulement une connexion Internet, mais une connexion Internet haute vitesse partout au Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ma dernière question, j'imagine, vu le temps dont je dispose. Les services de téléavertisseurs se termineront à la fin de décembre, ce qui entraînera des difficultés pour nombre de régions rurales concernant le service sans fil des pompiers et ainsi de suite. Où en sommes-nous relativement à la planification de l'avenir du service cellulaire des régions rurales? C'est un autre aspect lié à Internet.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Lorsque nous avons parlé de la stratégie nationale en matière de services à large bande, il ne s'agissait pas simplement de connexion Internet haute vitesse. Nous avons également discuté de l'importance du service et des stations cellulaires, et nous nous sommes assurés de jouer un rôle aux côtés du secteur privé, de même que des provinces, pour aller de l'avant et aborder la question du point de vue de la sécurité publique.

Il faut travailler avec le ministre Goodale et son équipe dans cette optique et aussi se pencher sur les collectivités pour comprendre quels sont les besoins locaux pour que tout programme futur, lorsqu'il s'agit de connexion Internet haute vitesse, tienne compte également du service cellulaire.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être ici.

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez auparavant siégé comme député du côté de l'opposition, alors vous connaissez l'importance de ces comités. Je vous remercie de dire que le Comité fait du bon travail sur le droit d'auteur.

Toutefois, votre gouvernement a apporté des changements au moyen de l'AEUMC ainsi que dans la Loi d'exécution du budget, laquelle modifierait notre étude sur le droit d'auteur.

Monsieur le ministre, êtes-vous disposé à venir devant le Comité pour parler de ces sujets? Si oui, pourriez-vous demander à vos députés libéraux d'y consentir si nous présentons une motion à cet égard?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Merci beaucoup de votre question sur le droit d'auteur.

Comme vous le savez, dans le cadre de l'actuel projet de loi d'exécution du budget que nous avons présenté à la Chambre des communes, nous avons mis de l'avant des mesures concernant la Commission du droit d'auteur pour simplifier le processus, mettre plus de ressources à la disposition des membres de la Commission et ajouter un financement supplémentaire pour la gestion de cas afin que nous puissions prendre des décisions plus rapidement. C'est vraiment important pour les artistes et les créateurs également, et il s'agit d'un pas important dans cette direction. C'est un engagement dont j'ai parlé très clairement lorsque j'ai comparu devant le Comité auparavant.

En ce qui concerne le Comité et qui dit quoi, en définitive, c'est vous qui décidez. Je ne suis pas en mesure de donner des ordres à qui que ce soit, mais je vous remercie d'avoir pensé à moi.

M. Dan Albas:

Oui, dit-il avec un sourire... J'espère simplement que les libéraux nous laisseront faire notre travail à ce chapitre.

Le paragraphe 8(3) de la Loi sur la statistique est ainsi libellé: Il avise le ministre de toute nouvelle demande de renseignements à caractère obligatoire au moins trente jours avant sa publication.

Monsieur le ministre, quand avez-vous appris que Statistique Canada voudrait télécharger les renseignements financiers personnels de plus de 500 000 foyers canadiens?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

À ce sujet, nous ne l'avons appris que beaucoup plus tard dans le processus.

Comme vous l'avez mentionné, c'est le statisticien en chef qui est en fin de compte responsable des méthodes employées pour la collecte et l'utilisation des données. Le statisticien en chef a ce type de pouvoir discrétionnaire et ce degré d'indépendance. Toutefois, nous n'avions pas été informés 30 jours avant la publication.

(1650)

M. Dan Albas:

Quand en avez-vous été informé?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Autour du...

M. Dan Albas:

Était-ce avant le 26 octobre?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je n'ai pas la date précise, mais je peux vous revenir à ce sujet.

M. Dan Albas:

Ce serait utile si vous pouviez nous fournir la réponse par écrit.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui.

M. Dan Albas:

Donc, vous n'en avez pas été informé avant que les médias commencent à en parler, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Informé à propos de quoi?

M. Dan Albas:

De la portée du programme...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous savons très bien que Statistique Canada étudie des ensembles de données administratives et autres pour s'assurer de compiler des données de bonne qualité et fiables. Mais je ne savais pas précisément où étaient représentées ces demandes ni qui elles visaient avant que l'information ne soit rendue publique par les médias.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord. Donc, Statistique Canada n'a pas avisé votre bureau avant cela.

À ce moment-là, lorsque vous en avez pris connaissance, avez-vous pensé à informer le commissaire à la vie privée du programme?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Comme vous le savez, il s'agit d'un projet pilote, et aucune donnée n'a en fait été recueillie ou obtenue. Les choses se sont déroulées de la manière suivante: Statistique Canada a communiqué avec le commissaire à la vie privée, et les mesures appropriées ont été prises pour aborder les questions touchant la protection des renseignements personnels et des données.

Je pense que vous avez entendu le statisticien en chef dire, lorsqu'il a lui aussi comparu devant le Comité, qu'il n'ira pas de l'avant tant que les questions touchant la protection des renseignements personnels et des données n'auront pas été réglées de manière significative.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le ministre, croyez-vous que quelque chose cloche quand le commissaire à la vie privée du Canada se présente devant un comité sénatorial et affirme ne pas être au courant qu'on cherche à obtenir les renseignements de 500 000 foyers canadiens qui n'en savent rien ou qui n'ont pas donné leur consentement?

Vous ne le saviez pas non plus. Vous l'avez appris par les médias. Estimez-vous qu'il y a un problème?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je pense que Statistique Canada est un organisme de statistiques de renommée mondiale. On le respecte beaucoup au Canada et sur la scène internationale également.

Pour moi, c'était une fierté que l'on réintroduise le questionnaire détaillé obligatoire du recensement dans le but de recueillir des données de bonne qualité et fiables. J'accorde une grande confiance au statisticien en chef et à son travail. Manifestement...

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord. Monsieur le ministre, en ce qui concerne le consentement...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui, mais clairement, à propos...

M. Dan Albas:

... croyez-vous que Statistique Canada doit demander le consentement des gens pour ce genre de données?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Tout d'abord, je crois comprendre qu'aucune donnée n'a été transférée. Tenons-nous-en aux faits.

M. Dan Albas:

Eh bien, vous êtes le ministre, et à un moment donné, vous serez en mesure de maîtriser cela. Pensez-vous que les Canadiens devraient pouvoir donner leur consentement?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous devons garder à l'esprit que nous avons constaté une certaine ingérence politique de la part de l'ancien gouvernement, ce qui a mené à la démission de Munir Sheikh, l'ancien statisticien en chef. Il ne faut pas oublier que le statisticien en chef comprend la méthode et sait comment recueillir adéquatement les données de manière à respecter la confidentialité des données.

Nous déterminons la raison pour laquelle nous avons besoin de données. Par exemple, il nous faut des données de bonne qualité et fiables pour que les Canadiens profitent de l'allocation canadienne pour enfants...

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le ministre, ce que je vous ai demandé, c'est si ce type de collecte de renseignements devrait, selon vous, se faire avec le consentement des gens. Est-ce oui ou non?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je crois savoir que les clients en ont été informés.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Masse. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Le projet de loi C-36 a en fait transféré les activités d'analyse et de collecte de statistiques de Statistique Canada à Services partagés.

Appuyez-vous toujours cette décision? C'est ce qui a mené au problème que nous avons actuellement. Il s'agit d'une nouvelle collecte de données, et vous la décrivez dans votre témoignage devant la Chambre des communes comme un « projet pilote ». Allez-vous nous confirmer dès maintenant qu'il s'agit d'une mesure tout à fait ponctuelle, ou qu'il s'agit en fait de la pratique qui figurait dans le projet de loi, maintenant que les activités ont été transférées à Services partagés?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

En ce qui a trait à cette initiative, il s'agit d'un projet pilote. C'était la première fois que le projet allait de l'avant, il n'en est donc qu'à ses premières étapes. Comme l'a mentionné le statisticien en chef, cette mesure vise réellement à assurer la protection des données personnelles. Il s'agit simplement d'un projet pilote qui en est à ses balbutiements.

M. Brian Masse:

Ce qui n'est pas un projet pilote, c'est le fait que Services partagés s'occupe maintenant de la collecte de données à la place de Statistique Canada, n'est-ce pas?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Vous avez raison. La protection et la gestion des données réelles se font par Statistique Canada et Services partagés.

M. Brian Masse:

Le statisticien en chef, en qui vous dites avoir confiance, a fait référence au tollé créé par les « fausses nouvelles » et le « trumpisme ». Appuyez-vous cette affirmation?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous devons être très conscients et respectueux des préoccupations légitimes que nourrissent les Canadiens au sujet de la protection des données et des renseignements personnels. Ce qui pose un problème — et ce n'est rien de vraiment nouveau, c'est l'opposition qui fait son travail —, c'est que, à la Chambre des communes, on tient beaucoup de propos excessifs et de commentaires au sujet de la surveillance et on laisse entendre que les renseignements personnels des gens seront divulgués.

Il faut réfléchir sérieusement: on dit qu'il y a des problèmes au sujet de la protection des données et des renseignements personnels, mais il n'y a jamais eu de fuite de renseignements personnels des serveurs. Les renseignements personnels sont éliminés, et le processus en est à ses débuts. Aucune donnée n'a été recueillie. Il aurait fallu que les banques en informent les clients également.

Nous ne pouvons pas sous-estimer l'importance de la protection des données et des renseignements personnels. Si nous avons lancé un processus de consultation des données, c'est pour instaurer cette confiance chez les Canadiens.

(1655)

M. Brian Masse:

J'ai vu que, dans la lettre que vous avez adressée au président, vous faites part de votre volonté de revenir devant notre comité, et j'ai déposé une motion pour vous inviter de nouveau pour discuter du projet de loi d'exécution du budget et de notre étude sur le droit d'auteur.

Puis-je confirmer que vous êtes prêt à revenir devant le Comité? C'était l'offre que vous avez présentée initialement au président. Le projet de loi d'exécution du budget change des choses, et nous aimerions procéder à une analyse pour, espérons-le, tenter de dissiper nos préoccupations et mener une étude qui en vaut réellement la peine.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Encore une fois, je vous suis reconnaissant de penser que j'ai un mot à dire sur les travaux du Comité. Ce n'est pas le cas: le Comité est maître de son destin. Peu importe ce que vous décidez, je suis prêt à m'adapter. Je vous remercie de l'offre.

M. Brian Masse:

Très bien.

Très rapidement, nous allons passer aux tarifs sur l'acier. Nous venons tout juste d'entendre que 350 millions de dollars ont été perçus par le gouvernement. Les tarifs génèrent environ 1 million de dollars par jour. Près de 50 millions de dollars ont été remboursés. Dans votre budget des dépenses, vous réclamez 125 millions de dollars —  sur un total de 250 millions de dollars —, et il y a maintenant un processus en place pour tenter de rembourser les petites entreprises qui ont été exclues du remboursement.

Une analyse des répercussions économiques a-t-elle été réalisée, et visait-elle les petites et moyennes entreprises en ce qui a trait au plan du gouvernement et à ses conséquences? Cela a-t-il été fait, et si ce n'est pas le cas, que pouvez-vous faire pour nous assurer que ces petites entreprises vont réellement avoir accès à l'argent qu'elles ont en fait payé sous forme de tarif?

À l'heure actuelle, on leur dit de s'adresser à la BDC, qui emprunte de l'argent, mais l'argent n'est pas remboursé. Votre gouvernement a promis que ce serait sans incidence sur les recettes.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous offrons assurément une exonération des droits de douane, comme vous l'avez souligné, pour soutenir les travailleurs de l'industrie de l'acier et de l'aluminium.

Il est vrai que nous avons mis de l'avant un programme de soutien de 2 milliards de dollars, lequel est assorti d'options de financement par l'entremise de la BDC, d'EDC et du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation. Plus récemment, à même le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, nous avons annoncé que 50 millions de dollars seraient versés à ArcelorMittal pour permettre au groupe d'accroître ses activités. La BDC a redistribué plus de 200 millions de dollars pour résoudre les problèmes de trésorerie. Je pense qu'EDC a redistribué plus de 100 millions de dollars également.

M. Brian Masse:

Allez-vous rembourser les coûts d'emprunt aux entreprises? C'est leur argent qui a fait l'objet des tarifs imposés suivant une initiative de votre gouvernement. Allez-vous rembourser les coûts d'emprunt à ces entreprises?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Il est important de mettre les choses en contexte. Nous avons réagi proportionnellement aux tarifs injustes et inéquitables imposés par les États-Unis. C'était la réponse appropriée pour montrer que nous étions totalement en désaccord et que nous trouvions déconcertant — en fait, je dirais ahurissant — qu'ils puissent penser que nous posions un problème de sécurité en vertu de l'article 232. C'est pourquoi nous avons riposté.

Par ailleurs, nous reconnaissons que certaines entreprises, particulièrement les petites et les moyennes entreprises, comme vous l'avez mentionné à juste titre, devraient obtenir une exonération des droits de douane. Nous avons prévu des mesures d'allégement pour elles, et nous nous efforçons de débloquer les fonds le plus rapidement possible.

M. Brian Masse:

Allez-vous vous engager à rembourser tous les coûts d'emprunt, ou, à tout le moins, envisager la possibilité de le faire?

Certaines de ces petites entreprises ne peuvent se permettre de payer ces tarifs en raison de leur marge bénéficiaire; elles sont donc aux prises avec deux problèmes. Non seulement elles doivent assumer les coûts d'emprunt, mais elles doivent aussi trouver un prêteur.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous avons dit très clairement que nous voulions soutenir les travailleurs des secteurs de l'acier et de l'aluminium. Nous avons mis en place un excellent programme de soutien de 2 milliards de dollars. Nous allons continuer de travailler avec eux et de régler les problèmes concernant le flux de trésorerie pour faire en sorte qu'ils puissent continuer d'assurer leur viabilité et leur réussite à long terme.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup.

J'étais là quand vous et un certain nombre de ministres avez fait l'annonce du programme de 2 milliards de dollars. C'était une initiative de plusieurs ministères. Nous allons approfondir la question du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation dont vous avez parlé dans votre exposé; il s'agit d'un aspect très crucial pour l'économie canadienne. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec cela. Nous avons entendu plus tôt qu'il y avait un montant à usage exclusif de 250 millions de dollars pour les industries de l'acier et de l'aluminium.

À quoi sert cet argent? Quelles sont vos attentes pour les industries de l'acier et de l'aluminium qui auront accès à ce financement particulier?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Tout d'abord, je vous remercie de votre leadership. Je sais que la question de l'acier est très importante pour votre circonscription et que vous défendez cette cause avec brio. Je me souviens de vos efforts pour encourager cette initiative lors des discussions sur le programme de soutien, et vous avez indiqué très clairement la nécessité de soutenir nos métallurgistes. Je vous remercie de votre leadership dans cette affaire, Terry.

Le premier message que nous souhaitions envoyer porte sur l'importance de ce domaine. Bon nombre d'innovations et de transformations ont lieu, et nous voulons garantir l'accélération de ce processus. Nous souhaitons voir plus d'argent investi dans la recherche et le développement, ainsi que davantage de dépenses d'investissement et d'équipement afin de garantir à nos fabricants une technologie de pointe qui leur permette de faire face à la concurrence à long terme. Il s'agissait d'une bonne occasion pour nous d'investir et de coinvestir avec nos fabricants dans de grands projets de capital qui permettraient au domaine de continuer à croître et à être concurrentiel pour l'avenir.

Voilà le véritable but de ce fonds stratégique pour l'innovation. Il s'agit de dire: « Nous vous appuyons. Nous sommes ici pour vous soutenir. Nous souhaitons créer plus d'emplois, voir plus de recherche et développement et un accroissement du capital investi. » C'est exactement ce qu'a annoncé ArcelorMittal. Juste après cette annonce, l'entreprise a organisé un salon de recrutement, car elle cherchait à embaucher un plus grand nombre de personnes. C'est très bon signe.

Nous reconnaissons qu'il y a certains défis légitimes en ce qui a trait à l'article 232 pour ce qui est des tarifs que les Américains appliquent toujours; soit 25 % sur l'acier et 10 % sur l'aluminium. Nous ne sous-estimons pas l'effet que ces tarifs ont sur nos fabricants. En même temps, ces investissements envoient un message puissant et positif à nos fabricants: nous les appuyons, particulièrement nos travailleurs. Ces investissements permettront de créer un plus grand nombre d'emplois et de possibilités, ce qui est de bon augure pour le succès à long terme de nos travailleurs de l'acier et de l'aluminium.

(1700)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Comme vous le savez déjà — et c'est de notoriété publique puisque cela a été mentionné par le comité du commerce dont je fais également partie —, Algoma a présenté une demande à l'égard du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation et l'entreprise souhaite continuer à se diversifier également. Elle souscrit à tous vos commentaires; j'apprécie donc votre soutien pour notre demande et pour ce programme.

Vous étiez également à Sault Ste. Marie. C'est vrai que nous produisons de l'acier. Nous sommes une collectivité formidable qui excelle dans le secteur de l'acier, mais nous nous démarquons également sur le plan de l'innovation et de la création. Vous étiez à Sault Ste. Marie et avez participé à quelques tables rondes et discussions avec diverses entreprises. Je m'intéresse aux discussions que vous avez eues récemment avec différents acteurs relativement à l'innovation, ainsi qu'aux stratégies discutées lors de ces tables rondes.

Qu'avez-vous appris? Qu'avez-vous entendu?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Comme vous le savez, l'un des domaines dont nous avons abondamment discuté est la technologie propre — les investissements faits dans la technologie propre et les emplois verts créés. Une partie de la diversification à l'égard des possibilités de création d'emplois découle en fait des fonds supplémentaires que vous avez demandés, vous et vos collègues du Nord de l'Ontario, pour FedNor.

En fait, depuis l'arrivée au pouvoir de notre gouvernement, nous avons vu une augmentation de 58,2 millions de dollars du financement pour FedNor, le tout dans les trois budgets consécutifs. Il s'agissait de 5,2 millions de dollars pour le budget de 2016, de 25 millions de dollars pour le budget de 2017 et de 28 millions de dollars pour le dernier budget. Cela reflète l'augmentation à hauteur de 511 millions de dollars du financement en général que nous avons pu constater dans le dernier budget pour les organismes de développement régional. Plus précisément, FedNor a reçu du financement dans les trois derniers budgets.

Il y a d'énormes possibilités d'innovation. Comme je l'ai mentionné, nous avons parlé de la connectivité Internet à haute vitesse. Il est essentiel de garantir un accès à Internet à la population afin que les entreprises puissent vraiment réussir sur le plan du commerce électronique.

Également, comme nous en avons discuté lorsque j'y étais, les possibilités à l'égard des technologies propres à Sault Ste. Marie sont énormes. C'est formidable que nous ayons l'appui des dirigeants municipaux. Christian Provenzano, le maire, appuie également le projet. Bon nombre d'entreprises reçoivent du soutien par l'entremise de Technologies du développement durable Canada, qui sert de mécanisme de soutien à la commercialisation et de catalyseur dans le domaine des technologies propres. Certaines annonces intéressantes ont été faites lors de cette discussion.

FedNor offre aussi un appui, et il s'agit là d'un exemple de diversification et de création d'emplois. Cela permet aux jeunes de rester dans la région et d'y élever leur famille. Cela permet à la collectivité de s'agrandir. Il n'y a aucun doute sur le fait que l'acier soit important, et nous soutenons la collaboration avec Algoma. Tant de choses se passent à Sault Ste. Marie, et je vous remercie de votre leadership à cet égard.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Chong. Vous avez cinq minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, de comparaître devant le Comité.

J'ai une question par rapport au crédit 1a sous la rubrique Statistique Canada, concernant le projet pilote. Est-ce que vous ou l'un de vos collègues du Cabinet avez délivré un arrêté ministériel ou une directive au statisticien en chef en ce qui concerne le projet pilote?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Non.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Vous dites que le projet pilote est en suspens.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je souhaite juste clarifier ce point. Le statisticien en chef a mentionné qu'il ne poursuivrait pas le projet tant que la question de la confidentialité et des données...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Oui, mais, à la Chambre des communes, vous avez dit que le projet pilote était en suspens.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Selon ce commentaire, oui. Je souhaitais juste cerner ce qui...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

D'accord. Y a-t-il eu quelconque communication entre vous et le statisticien en chef concernant la mise en suspens du projet, ou s'agissait-il d'une décision qu'il a prise de façon complètement indépendante en ne se fondant aucunement sur une conversation entre vos deux bureaux?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous n'avons pas discuté de...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je vous demande s'il a pris cette décision de façon indépendante, sans vous consulter vous ou votre bureau.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Bien sûr. Il doit prendre des décisions de façon indépendante.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Voilà qui est intéressant, puisque lorsqu'il a comparu devant ce comité, il a très clairement indiqué qu'il soutenait ce projet pilote et pensait qu'il s'agissait d'une bonne idée. Il me semble étrange qu'il soutienne le projet et indique qu'il souhaite aller de l'avant, tout en indiquant en même temps à la Chambre des communes, par votre entremise, que le projet est en suspens. Il semble y avoir une contradiction. Pour combien de temps ce projet sera-t-il en suspens?

(1705)

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Encore une fois, je ne peux faire référence qu'aux commentaires émis par le statisticien en chef, qui est le responsable, au bout du compte, de la mise en oeuvre de ce programme. Il a indiqué qu'il n'irait de l'avant que lorsqu'il serait persuadé que les problèmes entourant la confidentialité et la protection des données ont été réglés de façon significative. Cela témoigne de la préoccupation générale quant à des données fiables et de bonne qualité, mais nous souhaitons aussi nous assurer que les autres problèmes seront réglés de façon appropriée.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je comprends.

Il est important d'admettre que le gouvernement précédent a commis une erreur en éliminant le questionnaire détaillé du recensement. Il était clair que Munir Sheikh a démissionné de son poste de statisticien en chef pour cette raison, mais votre gouvernement n'a pas fait un très bon travail dans la gestion de Statistique Canada non plus.

Wayne Smith, le statisticien en chef qui a suivi Munir Sheikh, a démissionné pour protester contre la gestion de Statistique Canada par votre gouvernement. Vous avez fait la promesse de rendre Statistique Canada complètement indépendant du ministère lors de la dernière campagne électorale. À la page 37 de votre programme, vous avez mentionné que vous le rendriez complètement indépendant, mais ce n'est pas ce que fait le projet de loi C-36.

En fait, avant les élections, vous avez soutenu que le statisticien en chef devrait être nommé par un comité extérieur, mais lorsque Wayne Smith a donné sa démission, vous avez unilatéralement nommé son successeur. Maintenant, nous avons le fiasco de ce projet pilote, où l'on propose d'obtenir les données de finances personnelles de millions de Canadiens avec une précision qui n'a jamais été égalée.

Vous savez, lorsque les gens remplissent le questionnaire détaillé obligatoire du recensement, leur consentement est implicite puisque sinon, ils feront face à des conséquences. Ils savent exactement quels renseignements ils fournissent au gouvernement du Canada. Avec ce projet pilote, vous obtenez essentiellement les données par la porte d'en arrière, par l'entremise des banques. Ce sont des renseignements très personnels. Il s'agit de savoir si quelqu'un a acheté des produits d'hygiène personnelle chez Pharmaprix ou si cette personne a payé pour des services de psychologie auprès d'un thérapeute, ou si elle a acheté une bière dans un bar, et le moment où ces achats ont été effectués. Ces données sont bien plus intrusives que tout ce que nous avons vu auparavant, à un degré qui ferait rougir Alphabet et Amazon. Nous parlons ici de renseignements très personnels de millions de Canadiens — des centaines de milliers, sinon des millions de ménages.

C'est pour cela que ce projet a soulevé la colère de tant de personnes. Ce qui est particulièrement inacceptable à propos de ce projet pilote, c'est que ces données seront utilisées par quelques-unes des plus grosses sociétés dans le monde. Oui, nous savons que les données seront nettoyées et agrégées selon le code postal, mais tout de même, la réalité est que ces données seront utilisées par quelques-unes des plus grosses entreprises dans le monde afin qu'elles puissent faire la promotion de leurs services au Canada. Votre gouvernement a proposé d'utiliser le pouvoir coercitif de l'État en vertu de la Loi sur la statistique afin d'obtenir ces données. Il s'agit d'une réaction excessive de la part de votre gouvernement, et j'estime que cela reflète la piètre gestion de Statistique Canada.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Vous avez environ 10 secondes si vous voulez répondre.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Vous êtes une personne réfléchie qui émet des commentaires judicieux. Malheureusement, je ne dispose pas d'assez de temps pour entrer dans les détails.

Je vais simplement souligner quelques points clés. D'abord, tout renseignement que Statistique Canada tente d'obtenir sert à aider la mise en place d'une bonne politique gouvernementale. Par exemple, pourquoi avons-nous besoin de données fiables et de bonne qualité? Nous voulons nous assurer que les citoyens obtiennent le soutien approprié, que ce soit au moyen du Régime de pensions du Canada, de la Sécurité de la vieillesse ou de l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants. Je crois que nous devons être conscients que bon nombre des transactions se font en ligne. Encore une fois, la confidentialité et la protection des données sont essentielles.

Voici un autre point important à mentionner: en vertu de l'article 17 de la Loi sur la statistique, aucun gouvernement, aucune personne ni aucune grande société ne peut obtenir de données de Statistique Canada, en particulier des données personnelles, lesquelles ont toujours été protégées. J'estime qu'il est important de souligner ce point également. Les données sont destinées à une utilisation publique, aux fins de la mise au point d'une politique gouvernementale pour le bien du public — des données fiables et de bonne qualité —, mais il faut souligner l'importance de la confidentialité et de la protection de ces données. C'est pourquoi le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a été mobilisé, et que le statisticien en chef a exprimé clairement qu'il n'ira de l'avant que s'il est en mesure de régler de façon significative les problèmes concernant la confidentialité et la protection des données.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Jowhari, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous souhaite à nouveau la bienvenue devant ce comité.

J'aimerais aborder un autre sujet et recueillir vos commentaires sur l'AEUMC et l'effet que cet accord a eu sur l'industrie. L'une des industries touchées est celle de l'industrie automobile. Êtes-vous en mesure de faire le point sur ce qui se passe dans cette industrie, et également dans l'industrie de l'aérospatiale? Je crois comprendre que vous avez demandé environ 30 millions de dollars dans les budgets des dépenses afin d'investir dans l'aérospatiale. Si vous étiez en mesure de nous informer quant à ces deux domaines, je l'apprécierais.

(1710)

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Dans le cadre de l'AEUMC, on a tenu un important débat au sujet des produits laitiers et de la gestion de l'offre, et on a formulé beaucoup de réflexions et de commentaires au sujet du secteur de l'automobile. L'actuel président a affirmé qu'il invoquerait l'article 232 à l'égard du secteur de l'automobile et qu'il imposerait un tarif de 25 %. Nous avons eu beaucoup de chance, grâce au leadership de la ministre Freeland, d'avoir pu protéger ce secteur. Il s'agit d'un volet tout à fait crucial de notre économie: 500 000 emplois directs et indirects sont liés au secteur de l'automobile.

Il ne s'agit pas que des équipementiers ou des grands fabricants d'automobiles; il s'agit de la chaîne d'approvisionnement et du nombre de personnes qu'on emploie partout au pays, pas seulement en Ontario. Nous avons pris des mesures très claires dans le but de protéger ce secteur en nous assurant que les taux de production pour les véhicules construits — ainsi que les pièces vendues — présentent un potentiel de croissance important. Une partie de l'AEUMC a également changé les règles d'origine concernant le contenu des véhicules et assuré l'établissement d'un seuil plus élevé en ce qui concerne la teneur en valeur régionale.

Actuellement, l'exigence liée à la teneur en valeur locale est de 62,5 % pour les véhicules construits en Amérique du Nord. Ce seuil passera à 75 %, ce qui entraînera la création de plus nombreuses possibilités dans le secteur de l'automobile. Cette mesure complète le soutien que nous offrons. Depuis que nous sommes au gouvernement, nous avons investi 5,6 milliards de dollars dans le secteur de l'automobile. Il s'agit là d'investissements importants. Les gens parlent de la façon dont le Canada est perçu. En ce qui concerne le secteur de l'automobile, il se produit d'importantes innovations, et beaucoup d'investissements sont faits. Cette situation se traduit par un grand nombre d'emplois maintenus et créés de façon continuelle.

Il s'agissait d'un aspect clé de l'AEUMC: nous assurer non seulement que nous protégeons le secteur de l'automobile, mais aussi que nous favorisons sa prospérité dans l'avenir. Une forte teneur en valeur régionale est utile, et les normes du travail au Mexique nous sont aussi favorables, parce que les coûts liés aux normes du travail de ce pays relativement aux employés sont passés à 16 $. Le Mexique possédait peut-être un avantage concurrentiel sur le plan des coûts liés à la main-d'oeuvre, mais ce n'est plus le cas. La différence est beaucoup moins grande. Cette situation rend le Canada encore plus attrayant pour les investisseurs. Nous sommes très satisfaits des progrès que nous avons réalisés, et nous avons maintenant hâte de travailler avec le secteur de l'automobile sur la construction d'une voiture de l'avenir.

Cette mesure appuie ce que nous avons également fait dans le secteur de l'aérospatiale. Récemment, le premier ministre a annoncé des investissements importants dans CAE, provenant du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, afin de garantir que la société continue d'être un chef de file mondial en simulation de vol. Elle s'est également tournée vers la santé et la simulation des soins de santé. Au Canada, il existe d'excellentes occasions d'investissement, de croissance et d'emploi, plus particulièrement dans les secteurs de l'automobile et de l'aérospatiale, qui font tous deux partie de la politique industrielle depuis des décennies et qui ont un avenir radieux, notamment grâce à certaines des politiques et à certains des programmes que nous avons mis en place aux fins de l'innovation et du commerce.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci.

Il me reste environ une minute. Je veux revenir sur la demande de financement d'environ 7,5 millions de dollars pour Statistique Canada. Il s'agit d'un financement destiné au règlement avec les Opérations des enquêtes statistiques. Le ministre ou M. Knubley pourraient-ils formuler un commentaire sur ce sujet?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui, le sous-ministre pourra aborder les particularités de ce à quoi ce financement est destiné. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, toutefois, nous sommes fiers de notre bilan en ce qui concerne Statistique Canada. Dès le premier jour, nous avons rétabli le questionnaire détaillé obligatoire du recensement. À mesure que nous nous sommes engagés à cet égard, par voie législative — le projet de loi C-36 —, nous avons réglé la question de l'indépendance de Statistique Canada, que nous avons renforcée.

Actuellement, nous suivons un processus de modernisation visant à garantir que l'organisme pourra connaître du succès à l'avenir, dans la nouvelle économie du savoir, afin de nous assurer que nous utilisons des ensembles de données, administratives et autres, afin de pouvoir fournir aux décideurs des données fiables de bonne qualité.

En ce qui concerne les 7,5 millions de dollars, monsieur le sous-ministre, voulez-vous aborder cette question?

M. John Knubley:

Cette somme est liée à un problème de RH. Il y a un certain temps — en 1985 —, la Commission des relations de travail dans la fonction publique a rendu une décision selon laquelle les intervieweurs de longue date à qui on a recours dans le cadre du processus de recensement, par exemple, étaient en fait des employés du Conseil du Trésor. Des paiements continuent d'être versés en conséquence de ce règlement.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

(1715)

M. Dan Albas:

Merci encore, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez affirmé plus tôt que les renseignements tirés de ce projet pilote seraient utilisés à des fins d'analyse pour les décideurs. Statistique Canada regroupe ses données afin que des entreprises privées les achètent. Cette activité a entraîné un apport d'environ 113 millions de dollars l'an dernier. Actuellement, 400 personnes sont employées afin de mieux approvisionner les entreprises en données gouvernementales.

Ma question est la suivante: pensez-vous que la demande des entreprises privées à l'égard de ces données regroupées augmentera une fois que votre gouvernement aura commencé à recueillir ces renseignements?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Premièrement, c'est non pas notre gouvernement, mais Statistique Canada qui prendra cette décision. Ses responsables ont indiqué qu'ils n'iront de l'avant que s'ils ont réglé les problèmes touchant la protection des renseignements personnels et des données. Statistique Canada ne vend jamais de renseignements personnels, alors je pense qu'on vous a peut-être mal informé à ce sujet.

Deuxièmement, la somme de 113 millions de dollars à laquelle vous faites allusion provient des demandes faites par le secteur privé, dans les situations où on a engagé Statistique Canada pour qu'il recueille des données. Il ne s'agit pas de données que l'organisme a en sa possession et qu'il vend au secteur privé. Je pense que vous devez vous assurer que...

M. Dan Albas:

Eh bien, monsieur le ministre, nous avons invité le statisticien en chef à comparaître, et il nous a expliqué que, parfois, des entreprises demandent à ce que des ensembles de données leur soient fournis...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Exact.

M. Dan Albas:

... et à ce qu'ils soient agencés de certaines manières afin qu'elles puissent mieux les utiliser pour vendre leurs produits.

Monsieur le ministre, vous devez reconnaître que ces renseignements seraient d'une très grande valeur. Comme l'a affirmé mon collègue, M. Chong, des groupes comme Amazon possèdent déjà leurs propres bases de données transactionnelles d'importance. La capacité de répartir, par code postal... un tel degré de granularité serait extrêmement lucratif pour les entreprises.

Si ce programme allait de l'avant, estimez-vous que la demande à l'égard de ces services augmenterait?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C'est une situation hypothétique. Je ne sais pas. Encore une fois, comme vous l'avez mentionné, il s'agit d'un projet pilote qui n'a pas encore été mis en oeuvre. Les données n'ont pas été recueillies, et, pour l'instant, nous ne savons pas quels renseignements nous obtiendrons.

Ce que je peux affirmer, c'est que le fait de disposer de données fiables de bonne qualité est important. Par exemple, en ce qui concerne le questionnaire détaillé du recensement, une fois que nous l'avons rendu facultatif, 1 128 collectivités ne disposaient pas de données fiables de bonne qualité. Cette situation a également eu une incidence sur les petites entreprises. Les entreprises utilisent ces données...

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le ministre...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

... pour s'assurer qu'elles planifient...

M. Dan Albas:

... il n'est pas question du passé. Nous parlons de l'avenir, et je voudrais que vous restiez concentré sur quelque chose qui relève de votre compétence actuellement. Plus précisément, je pense que les Canadiens ne sont pas heureux de cette idée, mais votre gouvernement semble convaincu qu'il s'agit de la seule manière dont Statistique Canada peut procéder.

Le statisticien en chef nous a servi son: « Eh bien, les gens ne veulent pas trimbaler leurs registres encombrants et inscrire toutes les transactions. » Or, ce qui a été proposé, monsieur le ministre, est à des années-lumière et, en fait, cette mesure semble plus intrusive qu'autre chose. Si ce programme devait aller de l'avant, exigeriez-vous qu'un consentement soit obtenu?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Encore une fois, il s'agit d'une situation hypothétique. Et là où je veux en venir, c'est que les responsables n'iront de l'avant qu'une fois que les problèmes touchant la protection des renseignements personnels et des données auront été réglés, et je pense qu'il est très important de le souligner.

Notre gouvernement a été très clair au sujet de la protection des renseignements personnels. Nous avons adopté des dispositions réglementaires pour l'application de la LIPRP dans le but de renforcer les lois régissant la protection des renseignements personnels. Nous menons des consultations afin de renforcer davantage ces lois. Nous reconnaissons l'importance de la protection des renseignements personnels et des données, mais nous reconnaissons également que Statistique Canada a besoin de données fiables de bonne qualité, alors c'est pourquoi ses responsables ont besoin de mobiliser les Canadiens afin d'établir cette confiance.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le ministre, encore une fois, il faut dire que, quand le ministre et le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée doivent tous deux consulter les journaux pour savoir ce que fait Statistique Canada, un problème se pose. Les parlementaires — les conservateurs et les néo-démocrates — ont soulevé ces préoccupations, et j'espère que vous vous pencherez sur ce problème et que vous ferez acte d'autorité à cet égard.

Encore là, lorsqu'il est question des gens qui touchent des prestations du RPC, de l'assurance-emploi et d'autres formes de soutien gouvernemental, monsieur le ministre, qu'en est-il de la dignité de ces personnes qui souhaitent que leurs propres transactions demeurent confidentielles? Encore une fois, ce sera plus d'un million de personnes qui seraient touchées seulement au premier tour.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

En ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements personnels, je veux souligner le fait que Statistique Canada affiche un bilan exceptionnel relativement au retrait des données personnelles. Je n'arrive à me souvenir d'aucune atteinte à la protection des données sur les serveurs, où des renseignements personnels ont été compromis...

M. Dan Albas:

Eh bien, lors du dernier recensement, de telles situations sont survenues, et, encore une fois, il y a de nombreux cas où ces éléments ont été contournés...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je parle de...

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le ministre, je vous proposerais simplement d'examiner le témoignage présenté par le statisticien en chef devant le Comité. Je lui ai demandé s'il existe une « clé maîtresse » qui permet de désanonymiser ces fichiers, de savoir à qui appartiennent les renseignements et de les lier directement à des transactions. Il a répondu qu'on en avait la capacité en tout temps, sous réserve des politiques.

Monsieur le ministre, il est faux de dire que les données seront anonymisées et qu'ainsi, on ne pourra pas les lier à la personne initiale.

(1720)

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Non.

Puis-je formuler un argument très clairement?

Le président: Très rapidement, s'il vous plaît.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains: En ce qui concerne Statistique Canada, l'organisme veut générer des données fiables de bonne qualité. Il n'est pas là pour tenter de s'immiscer dans la vie personnelle des gens. Il n'essaie pas — contrairement à ce que vous avez dit — d'effectuer de la surveillance. Il tente véritablement de recueillir des données fiables de bonne qualité.

Vous avez soulevé des questions légitimes — tout comme l'ont fait d'autres Canadiens — relativement aux données, à la vie privée et à la protection. Ces enjeux doivent être abordés, mais absolument aucun renseignement personnel se trouvant sur les serveurs n'a été compromis dans le passé. Pour l'avenir, évidemment, nous faisons confiance au système, mais avant d'en arriver là, c'est une situation hypothétique. Il faut établir cette confiance auprès des Canadiens.

M. Dan Albas:

Eh bien, le statisticien en chef précédent...

Le président:

Merci. Nous allons passer à M. Longfield.

M. Dan Albas:

... a démissionné à cause de cela. Je pense qu'il importe de souligner que...

M. Lloyd Longfield: Merci, monsieur le président...

M. Dan Albas: ... nous sommes dans un pays où nous croyons aux valeurs démocratiques.

Le président:

Monsieur Albas...

M. Dan Albas:

Encore une fois, il ne devrait pas simplement incomber à je ne sais quel bureaucrate de décider comment ce...

Le président:

Monsieur Albas, votre temps de parole est écoulé.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je voulais aborder l'adaptation de la stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle, mais je veux également faire des liens avec certains des commentaires formulés par M. Albas. En tant que personne qui a déjà consulté les tableaux CANSIM, j'ai mentionné au statisticien en chef, quand il a comparu, toute la valeur que présentaient ces tableaux pour les entreprises qui souhaitent comprendre les marchés au Canada. J'ai également travaillé au sein du groupe de travail sur l'élimination de la pauvreté, à Guelph, et j'ai mentionné toute l'importance des tableaux CANSIM pour ce qui est de comprendre le chômage, l'itinérance et l'insécurité alimentaire et de disposer des bonnes données.

Comme le plan que nous avons élaboré à l'aide de la propriété intellectuelle est axé sur l'innovation et sur les compétences, la première question que j'adresse à nos entreprises vise à savoir qui possède la PI et comment ces entités vont aller sur le marché munies de cette PI, peut-être à l'aide des renseignements CANSIM. J'essaie simplement d'établir des liens entre deux sujets, soit l'adaptation de la stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle et notre programme d'innovation. C'était formidable de voir cela figurer dans le budget de 2017.

Je sais que le Comité a effectué beaucoup de travaux relativement à cette stratégie. Monsieur le ministre, pourriez-vous formuler un commentaire sur l'importance de l'adaptation de la stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle en fonction de notre Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Merci d'avoir posé cette question. La propriété intellectuelle est un élément fondamental et essentiel au progrès de l'économie du savoir.

Dans le cas des États-Unis et de leur indice S&P 500, nous constatons que 84 % des actifs des entreprises sont des actifs incorporels. Ils sont liés à la PI. Pour ce qui est des 30 entreprises les plus importantes inscrites à la Bourse de Toronto, 40 % de leurs actifs tiennent à leur PI. Nous tirons de l'arrière comparativement aux États-Unis ainsi qu'à d'autres pays, et nous devons vraiment redoubler d'efforts.

Nous souhaitons mener des activités pouvant générer plus de PI et voulons nous assurer que le Canada en tire les avantages. C'est pour cette raison que nous avons lancé la première stratégie nationale en matière de PI, fondée sur le travail que vous avez réalisé. Cela a été très bien accueilli.

Par exemple, Jim Balsillie, qui connaît vraiment bien ce sujet, a dit que ISDE — il n'est pas question de moi, mais plus particulièrement du ministère dans lequel je travaille — « s'est fait le champion infatigable des entreprises innovatrices canadiennes ». Il a ajouté: « Je suis ravi de constater que, [sous la direction de ISDE, nous avons] mis en place ce pilier très important d'une stratégie en matière d'innovation [...] Le fait d'acquérir une capacité intérieure sophistiquée dans le domaine de la PI aidera le Canada à améliorer la commercialisation de ses idées à l'échelle mondiale. » C'est un très bel éloge exprimé par une personne qui saisit l'importance de la PI.

Nous avons reçu un soutien semblable de la part de bon nombre de professeurs, de l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada et de différentes organisations et entreprises qui se servent de la PI. Plus particulièrement, parmi nos petites et moyennes entreprises, seulement 10 % d'entre elles ont une stratégie en matière de PI, et seulement 10 % se servent vraiment de cette stratégie dans le cadre de leur plan d'affaires. Essentiellement, ce que nous essayons de faire c'est d'augmenter ce chiffre. Comment pouvons-nous y parvenir?

De façon générale, je crois que les grandes entreprises excellent en matière de création et d'élaboration de PI et qu'elles en tirent d'autant plus les avantages, mais il est question ici des petites et moyennes entreprises. Dans le cadre de la stratégie en matière de PI, nous avons mis en oeuvre des mesures visant également à protéger les entreprises canadiennes, particulièrement par rapport aux trolls, pour les aider à régler des problèmes concernant les lettres de demande envoyées, de façon à garantir que ces lettres protègent les entreprises ainsi que leur PI. Nous avons examiné les collectifs de brevets. Il s'agit d'un autre domaine important, car il permet de combiner différents brevets, pour offrir davantage de possibilités aux entreprises et gérer les trolls.

Il s'agit de certaines stratégies que nous mettons en oeuvre. Nous accordons 85,3 millions de dollars pour que des investissements importants soient faits dans le domaine de la PI; les changements apportés pour faire progresser la stratégie sont effectués non seulement sur le plan législatif, à la Chambre des communes, mais aussi sur le plan des ressources financières.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

La semaine dernière, j'ai fait l'annonce, en votre nom, de l'octroi de 2,28 millions de dollars à Bioenterprise. L'entreprise travaille dans le domaine des bioplastiques et d'un bon nombre de bioproduits. La journée suivante, je visitais une entreprise qui récupère les marcs de café de McDonald's Canada pour fabriquer des couvre-phares destinés à la ligne de production de Lincoln de la Ford Motor Company. Je me disais que les fabricants d'équipement agricole de l'Ouest canadien pourraient profiter de cette technologie.

J'aimerais revenir sur votre opinion concernant la PI. La PI appartient à des intérêts canadiens, et nous avons accès aux informations relatives au marché, par l'intermédiaire des tableaux CANSIM de Statistique Canada, qui nous permettent de connaître les autres entreprises qui vendent des phares et celles qui pourraient fabriquer leur équipement à l'aide de cette technologie. Envisagez-vous un processus continu entre notre stratégie en matière de PI et la communication, aux entreprises, de données concernant le marché visé afin qu'elles puissent accroître leurs activités?

(1725)

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très rapidement à la question.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui, absolument. C'est un excellent exemple de la manière dont nous faisons un lien entre les données et la PI et dont nous nous assurons d'en tirer les avantages commerciaux. Cela fait assurément partie de la vision d'avenir. Merci d'avoir fait mention de ce renseignement.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez la parole durant les deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Wayne Smith, l'ancien statisticien en chef, a dit que le projet de loi C-36 — c'est le projet de loi que vous avez étudié à la Chambre des communes — n'empêche en rien que le tollé soulevé en 2011, lorsque le questionnaire détaillé à participation obligatoire est devenu facultatif, se reproduise.

Nous sommes de retour ici aujourd'hui, et je peux comprendre la réserve éprouvée par certaines personnes, étant donné que les données seront regroupées de façon aussi précise que par code postal pour ce qui est d'influencer le comportement du consommateur. Le projet de loi C-36 est différent à certains égards du projet de loi sur lequel je m'étais penché, et, pour terminer la séance, j'aimerais connaître votre opinion sur ces différences.

L'une des choses importantes à mentionner était que le statisticien en chef relèverait du Parlement, comme le vérificateur général, et non du cabinet du ministre de l'Industrie, comme c'est le cas à l'heure actuelle. Seriez-vous d'accord pour qu'on procède à ce changement?

Par ailleurs, pourriez-vous vraiment tenir la promesse que vous avez faite dans le cadre de votre programme électoral qui concerne la création d'un nouveau processus de nomination différent de celui actuellement en place?

Pour conclure, Statistique Canada sera-t-il l'organisme qui continuera de recenser les données auprès des Canadiens, plutôt que Services partagés Canada?

Il s'agissait des différents points de vue. Je suis d'avis que les données sont très importantes, mais leur qualité l'est tout autant, ainsi que le sentiment d'autonomie et de confiance suscité chez les personnes qui fournissent des données. Dans cette situation, le statisticien en chef a miné son propre processus, car les gens vont modifier leur manière de faire des transactions bancaires à cause de ce qui se passe.

Pour ce qui est des trois points soulevés, pourriez-vous au moins m'indiquer si vous changeriez des rouages parlementaires et la Loi sur la statistique de façon à créer une culture d'inclusion et de responsabilisation à l'égard du poste associé à la fonction?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

La responsabilisation est un élément important de la loi que nous avons présentée. Grâce à la nouvelle loi, ce qui s'est déjà passé, c'est-à-dire une ingérence politique à l'égard du questionnaire détaillé de recensement, ne pourrait pas se reproduire, puisqu'il serait obligatoire d'informer le Parlement de tout changement apporté aux politiques; il y a donc une transparence à cet égard. Cela veut dire, qu'en définitive, en tant que représentants du gouvernement, en tant que représentants élus, nous orientons les politiques. Nous disons...

M. Brian Masse:

Il relève de vous, toutefois, et non pas du Parlement.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

... que nous avons besoin de l'information portant sur la technologie propre et la nouvelle économie numérique...

M. Brian Masse:

Je ne désapprouve pas tout cela. Je parle du poste.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous avons mis en place la directive en matière de politique. Ensuite, si nous apportons des changements à la manière de recueillir des données — comme l'a fait le dernier gouvernement en ce qui concerne la méthodologie, en rendant la version longue facultative —, cet aspect du processus devient très ouvert et transparent. Cette information doit être communiquée. Si nous essayons de changer une méthodologie ou un processus, nous devons expliquer pourquoi. C'est la raison pour laquelle...

M. Brian Masse:

Allez-vous transférer la responsabilité de Services partagés Canada à Statistique Canada?

Le président:

Nous ne disposons pratiquement plus de temps. Pouvez-vous répondre rapidement?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui. Une fois de plus, les questions qui concernent la protection des données — l'emplacement et le stockage des données — sont très importantes. Notre gouvernement s'efforce de protéger adéquatement les données. Nous reconnaissons que nous vivons à une époque où la cybersécurité en général... Cela importe peu si les données sont détenues par une entité privée ou par un gouvernement; toutes les organisations font face à cette menace, et nous devons en tenir compte pour continuer à mériter la confiance des Canadiens.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre, d'être venu et de nous avoir accordé du temps aujourd'hui.

Il nous reste très peu de temps, et nous devons voter au sujet du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Puis-je obtenir le consentement unanime pour regrouper les éléments?

Des députés: D'accord. AGENCE DE PROMOTION ÉCONOMIQUE DU CANADA ATLANTIQUE ç Crédit 5a — Subventions et contributions........25 537 539 $

(Le crédit 5a est adopté avec dissidence.) AGENCE CANADIENNE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE DU NORD ç Crédit 1a — Dépenses d'exploitation........99 196 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.) AGENCE SPATIALE CANADIENNE ç Crédit 1a — Dépenses d'exploitation........1 800 000 $ ç Crédit 5a — Dépenses en capital........29 654 327 $

(Les crédits 1a et 5a sont adoptés avec dissidence.) COMMISSION DU DROIT D'AUTEUR ç Crédit 1a — Dépenses de programme........99 196 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE L'INDUSTRIE ç Crédit 1a — Dépenses d'exploitation........4 149 095 $ ç Crédit 10a — Subventions et contributions........154 667 316 $

(Les crédits 1a et 10a sont adoptés avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE LA DIVERSIFICATION DE L'ÉCONOMIE DE L'OUEST ç Crédit 5a — Subventions et contributions.........53 521 644 $

(Le crédit 5a est adopté avec dissidence.) AGENCE FÉDÉRALE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE POUR LE SUD DE L'ONTARIO ç Crédit 1a — Dépenses d'exploitation........99 196 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.) CONSEIL NATIONAL DE RECHERCHES DU CANADA ç Crédit 10a — Subventions et contributions........4 927 922 $

(Le crédit 10a est adopté avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES NATURELLES ET EN GÉNIE ç Crédit 5a — Subventions.........1 $

(Le crédit 5a est adopté avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES HUMAINES ç Crédit 5a — Subventions........1 $

(Le crédit 5a est adopté avec dissidence.) STATISTIQUE CANADA ç Crédit 1a — Dépenses de programme........7 542 506 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Le président peut-il faire rapport des votes sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à tous.

Je voudrais vous rappeler que nous ne tenons pas de séance mercredi.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 19, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.