header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-20 PROC 132

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1130)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome to the 132nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Our first order of business today is the supplementary estimates (A), for 2018-2019: vote 1a under House of Commons and vote 1a under Parliamentary Protective Service.

We are pleased to have with us the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House of Commons. Joining him are Charles Robert, Clerk of the House; Michel Patrice, Deputy Clerk, Administration; and Daniel Paquette, Chief Financial Officer. From the Parliamentary Protective Service, we are joined by Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy, Director; and Robert Graham, Administration and Personnel Officer.

In the second hour, we will have witnesses on a question of privilege, which Mr. Robert will stay for, along with the Treasury Board.

This afternoon, for those who want to, we have the informal meeting with the Mongolian delegation. There are no parliamentarians, as I said earlier, but you're still welcome to attend.

I'll open the floor for opening remarks.

Mr. Speaker.

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, members of the committee.

It's a pleasure to be back before your committee in my role as Speaker of the House of Commons to present our supplementary estimates (A) for the 2018-19 fiscal year.[Translation]

This appearance is an opportunity for the House of Commons to present the approved additional funding for previous planned initiatives, which are designed to maintain and enhance the administration's support to members of Parliament and to the institution itself.[English]

I will also present the supplementary estimates (A) for the Parliamentary Protective Service, or PPS.

You've introduced the people with me this morning, so I won't go through those. I'm happy to have these folks with me this morning.

I'll begin my presentation by highlighting key elements of the 2018 supplementary estimates (A) for the House of Commons. These total $15.9 million in additional funding. The amount allocated for members and House officers is $6.9 million. The remaining $9 million was distributed to House administration service areas to fund in-year strategic priorities, bringing the House of Commons' estimates to $522.9 million for the fiscal year.

As you'll note, the line item falls under the broad category of voted appropriations.[Translation]

To begin, our line item confirms that temporary funding in the amount of $15.9 million has been sought for what is technically known as the operation budget carry forward.

I would like to highlight that no additional funding is sought as part of the supplementary estimates other than the carry forward, contrary to what has been done in previous years.[English]

The Board of Internal Economy's carry-forward policy allows members, House officers and House administration to carry forward unspent funds from one fiscal year to the next, up to a maximum of 5% of their operating budgets in the main estimates. Members will know that this is to avoid what's known as “March madness”. This practice follows that of the Government of Canada and gives members, House officers and House administration more flexibility in planning and carrying out their work.

The House of Commons' carry-forward has been approved by the Board of Internal Economy and, further to a Treasury Board directive, is reflected in our supplementary estimates.

I would now like to turn to the Parliamentary Protective Service.

Since the beginning of the 2018-19 fiscal year, the Parliamentary Protective Service, or PPS, has continued to deliver its mandate to ensure the physical security within the parliamentary precinct and on Parliament Hill.

In support of the PPS' progress to date, and to ensure its continued ability to deliver its protection mandate, I'm here to present to you PPS's supplementary estimates (A) requests.

I'll begin with an overview of PPS's supplementary estimates (A) request for 2018-19, which totals $7.6 million. This includes a voted budget component of $7.1 million and a $502,000 statutory budget requirement for the employee benefits program.

The voted authorities to date for the PPS total $76.7 million from the 2018-19 main estimates. Adding the 2018-19 supplementary estimates (A) voted amount of $7.1 million will bring the PPS voted appropriations to a total of $83.8 million for the 2018-19 fiscal year. Including statutory requirements, the total estimates to date for the PPS are $91.1 million.

It's important to note that the total estimates to date of $91.1 million for 2018-19 include $6.75 million for initiatives that will be completed by the end of the current fiscal year. These include the camera project for the West Block, a crash barrier replacement at the vehicle screening facility or VSF, the acquisition of vehicles and several IT projects. These are one-time things. Obviously, in due course, we will eventually have to replace some of these again, but for a while, they are one time.

(1135)

[Translation]

The vehicle screening facility (VSF) is the primary access control point for the vehicular traffic on Parliament Hill. Following an internal review, PPS is requesting two additional supervisory positions at the VSF to oversee the personnel for this twenty-four-hour, seven-day-a-week operation.[English]

PPS is requesting funding to acquire seven law-enforcement-rated vehicles to be used within the parliamentary precinct. These vehicles will be PPS assets and will blend in with the parliamentary precinct's vehicular fleet in support of PPS operations. Currently, PPS personnel use RCMP minivans that are nearing the end of their life cycle and do not meet PPS's operational requirements.

Protection agencies around the world are amending their training policies to ensure that the closest first responders are able to engage a threat as quickly as possible. Currently not all of PPS's protection personnel have such training. The PPS intends to apply proven tactics and training methods to empower all its protection personnel to neutralize threats. PPS would also like to build on the success of the lockdown drills with multidisciplinary, collaborative emergency management exercises. To that end, it is requesting six additional training personnel: four to certify protection officers and ensure these skills are maintained, and two to design and carry out ongoing emergency management exercises.[Translation]

Ensuring that our operational employees are properly equipped is a priority for PPS. PPS is now requesting $144,000 in funding to equip all recruits for the next constable training program.

Funding has also being requested to ensure all PPS employees have licenced copies of the emergency notification system which sends alerts to all parliamentarians and parliamentary employees when specific incidents take place that may affect their security.[English]

Over the last few years, the role of protection officers has evolved. As a result, a new role profile was revised and updated by management, operational employees and human resources professionals. After consultation with the associations, these profiles were evaluated by a third-party job evaluation consulting firm, which recommended that these positions be reclassified one level higher, leading to a salary increase. This reclassification represents an approximate 6.5% salary increase for all PPS protection officers, supervisors and managers, and requires a $2.8-million increase to the PPS's annual salary budget.

When the PPS was first created, it worked closely with the Senate and House administrations to leverage existing corporate systems and administrative tools. While these administrations continue to work closely with PPS, some areas, such as finance and procurement, require additional resources to meet the specific requirements of the PPS. As such, the PPS is requesting an additional two full-time equivalents, FTEs, for the procurement team to manage competitive processes and complex negotiations with suppliers.

PPS is also requesting an additional resource to develop and manage its financial policies in consultation with its parliamentary partners. These initiatives support the sound financial stewardship of funds and resources.

You'll be glad to hear that this concludes my presentation. Thank you for your attention. My team and I are happy to answer questions you may have, or to try to at least.

(1140)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

Before we start, I'd like to congratulate Michaela, our Library of Parliament researcher, for the format of your report, having last year's report beside this year's report. That is very helpful.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Speaker, it won't surprise you that I want to focus on PPS, as I have the last several times that you've been here.

I and many of my colleagues are frustrated that the labour dispute on the Hill continues. I have a number of questions related to that. They do tie back into the estimates, and I'll get to that.

In October, the PPS released a new organizational chart, and for the first time the commissioner appeared on the organizational chart. Can you enlighten us as to what he's doing there?

Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy (Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

It's “she”.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, she.

What is that position doing there?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

It's in line with the legislation that created the organization and the MOU that was subsequently signed in terms of the governance of the PPS and how we moved forward at the time in 2015 when it was created. There's actually a trilateral reporting system.

The Speaker of the House of Commons and the Speaker of the Senate are solely responsible for the service in terms of ensuring that it goes forward from an administrative and policy point of view. However, operationally, the RCMP has the lead on operations on the Hill.

If you notice on the organizational chart that we created, it just indicates that I still have some interaction with the RCMP in terms of overseeing operations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just give us a sense of what kind of interaction. Your office, I assume, is on the Hill, or is it at national division, or is it at both?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

In terms of my office...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In terms of where you are and your interaction with the RCMP operationally.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

My office is downtown on Sparks Street. It's within the PPS headquarters, for lack of a better term, where our main corporate executive team is.

I do have interaction with the commanding officer of national division on a regular basis, but entirely on any operational aspects of the management of PPS. As far as things like labour or anything administrative or corporate are concerned, I don't deal with the commanding officer of national division on any of those things.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all you directly.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. That's great because the next question I have is about the labour board, which brought down a ruling on October 10 requiring you to negotiate with the unions by October 30.

Did that happen?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

What happened after the labour board ruling was rendered on October 10 was that we reached out to all three bargaining units with messaging and began to set up dates to do exactly that, to meet our requirement to start bargaining.

We are in the process right now. We have already met with one, and we have dates with the other two. We're in the process of moving forward with our collective bargaining now, based on that decision from the labour board.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the estimates, is there anything set aside for the bargaining process?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Not at this time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that anticipated in the future?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Excuse me, but to be clear, are you asking if we are putting some money aside for potential increases in—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For both the bargaining itself, which doesn't come for free, and for the potential results of that.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

As far as the bargaining itself is concerned, no, I am not expecting that we are going to come to this table for extra funds.

In terms of what the results of the bargaining are, that's a potential. When we go forward in terms of.... I don't want to speak to what the results of that bargaining process will be, but if there is an increased demand for funding, then we would certainly seek it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, so you're reaching out to the unions now. We talked in the past about the fact that there is an application at the labour board to merge the unions.

I know you can't talk until that happens. What is the status of that application?

(1145)

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

That application is ongoing, and we are still in the midst of hearings with the labour board. We had several of them over the course of the last couple of months, and right now we have dates right up until May 2019, prior to a decision being rendered.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we expect that it has to be rendered shortly thereafter, or are we talking about a few more years until this gets decided?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I wish I could answer that, sir. I don't know how long it's going to take the arbitrator to make that decision once the hearings are complete.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, because if you have the decision requiring you to negotiate now, is it still necessary to pursue that labour board ruling?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I believe that, moving forward, one union is the ideal structure for us as an organization, so yes, I would suggest that we still want to move forward on that application.

We were advised previously that based on the legislation that created PPS, we would not be in a tenable position going forward if we did our collective bargaining while we are awaiting that decision. The arbitrator ruled against that and has directed us to begin collective bargaining, which takes that jeopardy off us. We are perfectly happy to go forward with collective bargaining with all three units at this time, but that application is still pending.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You already have negotiators ready to go.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

We have named a lead negotiator, and we have a team behind them at this point, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's good to hear.

I met a large group of new PPS recruits on the Hill a couple of weeks ago. It was pretty nice to meet 20-or-so new members.

How are they trained on privilege? I'm just curious about the process because, as you know, our concern on this committee has been ensuring that privilege is protected at all times. The RCMP is a police force rather than a protective force. I want to make sure that the training is properly separated in that regard.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Absolutely, sir, I can assure you that they are trained in the recruit program. In the basic training of our new protection officers, privilege is definitely highlighted in the midst of the training by our PPS trainers. We also bring in representatives from both administrations to speak to them on privilege. It's certainly not something that's thrown in on the side of somebody's desk. It's a definite piece within that training program, and it's something that they work very hard on.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

If I may, I would note that some of the funds requested were in relation to the vehicle screening facility. In relation to that, the priority there from the PPS is privilege, so that members aren't held up there unduly.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have experienced interesting interactions at the VSF. You show your ID and they are looking for something, but if they don't see it right away, they'll open your car and start searching. Once you say, “I'm a member”, then they say, “Sorry sir, you can carry on”. I get the point.

You said that you're acquiring seven new vehicles to replace the vans that are on the Hill. Are they going to be marked vehicles?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

No. This time we've decided that they will not be marked vehicles.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I think my time is up now.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now, we'll go to Ms. Kusie. [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank our esteemed witnesses for being here today.[English]

Mr. Robert, who has control or management of the parliamentary staff assigned to support interparliamentary associations, please?

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

Who has control?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Correct. Who has management of the parliamentary staff assigned to support interparliamentary associations, please?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The parliamentary association is part of the IIA. Therefore, it would be under the clerk assistant and then the clerk assistant answers to me.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Is that staff support funded from the budget assigned to interparliamentary associations?

Is it part of the general House administration budget, which is administered by or on behalf of the Clerk of the House?

Mr. Charles Robert:

If it were dealing with salaries of staff, I would assume that it's not part of the association, but it would be part of the administration.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Are the clerks and staff authorized to participate in unofficial activities of the interparliamentary associations?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Unofficial activities...? I'm not sure to what you're referring.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

If there were activities that were not deemed to be official, but unofficial, would the clerks and staff be authorized to participate in something like that?

If there was, in fact, an unofficial meeting, would they be authorized to participate in these meetings?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I suspect you might be referring to what occurred several weeks ago. The question then would be whether or not a determination was made as to whether or not it was official or unofficial.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

If a meeting is held outside of an association's constitution, bylaws or rules, would you consider that meeting illegitimate?

(1150)

Mr. Charles Robert:

If it could be determined that it was, in fact, outside of the constitutional boundaries of the association, I think it would raise serious questions.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

At such a meeting, if it was illegitimate, would the clerks and staff provide support and assistance?

Mr. Charles Robert:

If it was legitimate, I would suspect—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

If it was illegitimate....

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I think the determination would have to be made. That is not necessarily something that can be determined immediately. Out of an abundance of caution, I think that there would be some idea of actually co-operating with the leadership of the association.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Would the parliamentary resources used at such illegitimate meetings constitute inappropriately spent funds, in your opinion?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I think the issue really has to revolve around the idea of whether it was legitimate or illegitimate. Then, when a question like that does come up, I think the circumstances would assist the personnel in how they would conduct the proceeding or the event.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In regard to the October 30 business of the Canadian NATO Parliamentary Association, I wanted to turn to some specific questions in regard to that.

How many clerks from the House administration were present at that meeting?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I was not informed, so I'm afraid I can't tell you.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Are you aware how long the clerks remained present, after the lawful chair of the association, Ms. Alleslev, adjourned the meeting?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I suspect most of them who were present probably would have stayed. I would want to have confirmation of that, but that would be my initial response.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

For what purpose did the clerks remain, in your opinion, after the meeting had been adjourned?

Why didn't they just leave after Ms. Alleslev adjourned the meeting?

Mr. Charles Robert:

As part of our practices, there is an understanding that when a meeting is called a decision to adjourn in a meeting assumes consensus. If it is done at the initiative of the chair present and if the consensus is not clear, then the staff may decide to stay, as an appropriate response.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

But by what authority did the clerks remain and so act?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think the answer I'm giving you suggests that there was, in fact, a belief that the meeting had not been properly adjourned.

The Chair:

Sorry, we have a point of order.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

This is well outside the relevance of what this committee is looking at. A few of these questions have come forward, but where are we really going on this? This is not relevant to the estimates.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think it's very relevant, given that the funds here support parliamentary associations. I think it's very relevant, Mr. Bittle.

The Chair:

Okay. Carry on.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Mr. Bagnell.

Monsieur Robert, would you commit to get us that information, once it is determined in terms of the basis of the meeting having been deemed constitutional or not, and therefore, the decisions that you have indicated flow from that decision? Would you be able to report back to us with those determinations, please?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Certainly.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's very much appreciated.

As well, in February, our former committee colleague Mr. Richards asked some questions about the clerk's initiative to rewrite our Standing Orders. Monsieur Robert, at that meeting you gave Mr. Christopherson assurances that this committee—the House procedures committee—would be involved in this project concerning the Standing Orders. Unfortunately, we have yet to hear anything.

What would be your plan for engaging this committee or members of the House of Commons regarding the rewrite of the rules we follow in the House, and can you update us on this project, please?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes, certainly.

The purpose of the revision of the rules is basically to make them more accessible to the members. The way they are written now does not actually facilitate that. If, for example, you were to look at the table of contents of the current Standing Orders, it just gives you under each chapter heading the number of the standing order relevant that falls under that chapter. It gives language that obliges the member to search out certain other standing orders where it says “pursuant to” or “pursuant to this”. The idea, again, is that, since our mandate really as an administration is to provide the best support we possibly can to the members, it seemed to me at the time that this would include making the Standing Orders more user-friendly and accessible, similar to a project that has occurred elsewhere.

The initiative was basically mine, but any decision to accept the revisions rests with this committee and rests certainly with the House itself. I'm here as an agent to assist the operations of the House of Commons in the best way I can. Initial contacts were made with the leadership offices of all the major parties to let them know that this undertaking was in process and to assure them that, in undertaking this project, no substantive changes to the rules or Standing Orders are in fact being made. The language is only being simplified and tools are being added to the table of contents, as I've just suggested—subheaders, marginal notes and chapter revisions or groupings—in a way that would facilitate the understanding of the Standing Orders by the members and certainly their staff.

(1155)

[Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you for your answers. I also thank you for being here today.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Cullen now has the floor. [English]

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Speaker and all of your guests.

Just to follow up very quickly on Ms. Kusie's questions to Mr. Robert, I think her specific question was this. Is there an attempt or will there be an attempt to engage PROC in the process that you just described to us?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Absolutely. Again, I undertook this initiative for the benefit of the House, but I have no authority to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, I understand.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Once there is something ready to show you...and certainly, you would be involved, if there is an agreement that this should go forward.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see. I think for committee members' benefit, it's that point of engagement we're interested in. No one's questioning the validity of what you're suggesting.

To you, Speaker, since 2016, the PPS budget has grown from approximately $62 million to this year, when the request is $91 million. Is that correct?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's approximately a 50% increase from when we first unified the protective services on the Hill. Is that correct?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's gone up, certainly, and as the PPS has developed as a new organization, it's become clear that it needs foundational supports that weren't there at the beginning. I'm sure Chief Superintendent MacLatchy would be happy to explain that further.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Chief Superintendent MacLatchy, last time we spoke was at this place. It's only by coincidence that I'm here again, I assure you.

Mr. Christopherson is in lock-up, but he has done nothing illegal. It's just with the Auditor General's report. At least I think he's done nothing illegal. I can't confirm or deny.

The last time you testified here, I asked you about the quality and the professionalism of the people who protect us, the women and men, every day. You said that you're “impressed every day with the professionalism and the competence of the folks who work within this service, and that goes across all categories of employees who are part of this organization.”

We talked a lot about esprit de corps and the mood, but in the conversations I had with people in PPS, in a casual way.... Some were reluctant to talk at all, but when they did chat, the esprit de corps was not great. Your version of how the group was doing is not shared.

I have a couple of specific questions. How long have those under the PSAC union been without a contract?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I believe it expired in 2014.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The two other groups that are represented by unions have been without a contract since when?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I believe, though I would have to refer to my administration and personnel officer—

Mr. Robert Graham (Administration and Personnel Officer, Parliamentary Protective Service):

It's since 2017.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

It was 2017, early.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They recently—well not recently—received a labour board ruling to implore the management, in this case, you, to negotiate a contract. Why did they even have to go through that process?

This is the concern I had a year ago, and the concern I bring to you now. With the words we use, the Speaker, the MPs, the political leaders and the leaders of your department all praise the women and men for their professionalism, yet they have to go to the labour board just to get you to the table to negotiate a contract that's free and fair.

Do you understand why that doesn't seem to square? In as much esteem as we hold them, the members are forced to stand and wear caps to ask for the basic level of respect. I agree with them that it doesn't seem respectful that we have people serving us, protecting us, without a contract for five years, and others without a contract for more than a year who have had to go to the labour board just to get you to negotiate with them.

I say, “you”, but I mean the collective “you”, us, their management.

Do you understand why that doesn't seem to square?

(1200)

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I understand the question, Mr. Cullen, and thank you for that.

The one thing I mentioned, I believe, previously in this committee—and I will try to explain—is that within the legislation that created PPS, under the Parliament of Canada Act, there were aspects on which we sought legal opinion. We—and I'm talking about my predecessor, before I actually assumed this position—sought legal opinion on whether we could go forward with collective bargaining as we saw the agreements expiring. We had multiple legal opinions, both prior to my arrival and since my arrival, that said that, no, as per that legislation, we were not in a position to collectively bargain until the labour board had made its ruling in terms of how many bargaining units would be present.

I was looking at that from an organizational perspective. I was being advised that there was a certain level of jeopardy, for lack of a better term, to go forward with any kind of collective bargaining until that labour board had made its decision.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It is not unusual for an employer, even an employer of protective services, to deal with more than one union in a negotiation. I don't know why the House has been dragging its feet because of this question. I know, someone—the Speaker, maybe, or maybe it was you—said that you'd prefer to have one union, but you don't. You have three. That's a historical thing that has been adopted, which has proven to be legal and sound within the laws of Canada. We all wish for different things that we don't have. This is the reality.

Further to this, my question is one of urgency. Are we going to be back here again with another report from the Speaker saying we still have not reached a settlement? Because it's not for lack of money. We've increased services. Is that the barrier? We don't want to pay folks more, or pay them an equivalency that they deem to be fair?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think you heard what I said about the 6.75% increase that was paid earlier this year after reclassification, in accordance with the advice that the PPS received.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's a good thing. You've triggered me, Mr. Speaker. There were mandatory overtimes last time we spoke. Have those been eliminated? Are there still mandatory overtime shifts that PPS are covering?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

They have been considerably reduced.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What are we at now? We had some very bad scenarios in which people were working 70- or 80-hour weeks, which is not good for anybody, and certainly not for them. “Considerably reduced”—what does that mean?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

It's a rare occurrence now that we have to force somebody to take overtime, whereas at one time when I first arrived it was a fairly common thing.

You have the numbers, Mr. Graham, in terms of how much we're spending on overtime versus what we did before.

Mr. Robert Graham:

Yes. There are some events, major events like Canada Day, which is sort of “all hands on deck” for both operational and non-operational employees as well, but we're forecasting a reduction for overtime expenses in the range of 10% to 15% this fiscal year.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can I just clarify that, Chair? Is it a reduction in overtime expenses by 10% to 15%?

Mr. Robert Graham:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. I'm not sure if I had that question answered. When you say “rare”.... Those are interpretative terms. I don't know how to quantify it.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

I'm sorry. I don't have actual numbers for you, but what I can tell you is that when I first arrived in this chair it was a daily occurrence that we needed to...well, not daily. It was virtually a daily occurrence that we needed to bring somebody in on overtime and often had to order them in because they didn't want the excess overtime.

Now, as I said, I had the conversation with my operation commanders just this morning. They confirmed for me that it's a very rare thing now, but I don't have numbers for you.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is that a fair request, for those numbers to be provided to us?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Certainly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The previous number and the current...?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy: Certainly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: That would be helpful. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I have a question about the move that's happening. I'm not sure how you can answer it. It's somewhere between you guys and Public Works, obviously, but I'll save that.

I have a quick question, though, for you, Ms. MacLatchy. You mentioned earlier the two bargaining units, that you're not in favour of that and PPS says they want to have the two units. I understand that there's no jurisdiction in this country, but have we looked into what other jurisdictions around the world do? What happens in the parliamentary system in Westminster, Australia or New Zealand? They're similar types of systems. Do they have internal bargaining units?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

In terms of the labour structure...?

I'm afraid I don't know the answer to that, sir. I would have to seek it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. I'm interested in that because maybe we should compare to what they do, as an example, and how they handle Parliament.

Yes, there are parliaments across the country but they're not bicameral. They're not as big as this one. Perhaps that's something that we want to consider in all of this when it comes to the bargaining units.

(1205)

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

We have actually gotten a lot of interaction with our partners—federal parliaments, for a lack of a better term—in Australia, the U.K. and those sorts of places in terms of operational information, but no, I have no information in terms of their labour structure. I can certainly seek that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. Thank you.

Can I go back to the move situation? We've been delayed now. I know that in the fall we were hoping to go in. Now we're going in, I'm assuming, in January or February. Where are we on that? Is that reflected in this or is it more for Public Works?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Originally, the plan was to go in during the summer, to start moving after the House rose at the end of June. In fact, that partly happened, in the sense that members who had offices in Centre Block and were not going to have offices in West Block were moved this summer. The House officers and so forth, the whips and House leaders, etc., and my office have not yet moved and will be during the December-January break. On January 28, the House will sit in West Block, in the interim chamber.

By the way, I should tell you that if members are interested in touring it, there will be opportunities weekly to do that. We're going to have a weekly time slot. I know that a lot of members haven't seen it yet and would like to do so.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I have a quick question. As far as budgetary concerns go, for this delay what are we looking at? What's the impact to the overall budget for this project?

Feel free to comment on the Senate as well, if you wish.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms: Since we're at it....

Hon. Geoff Regan:

My understanding is that because in fact some work has already been able to begin here there's not an impact, but I'll go over to Dan Paquette or Michel.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration, House of Commons):

I could say that there's no negative impact in terms of the so-called delay and the fact that we're moving and transitioning to the interim chamber in January. Everything has been accounted for and budgeted in the main estimates that you have for this fiscal year.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The upper chamber...?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I would be reluctant to comment on what's going on in the other place.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

Did you notice how I tried to do that?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You must have friends in the Senate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sorry. It's just a matter of interest.

I'm very interested in that because I'm also interested in the technology. I don't know how much time I have here, but one of the things that I wanted to see is in terms of the fact that when people stand up in the House and do a speech, there's a clock. It's quite visible, rather than.... No offence, you're very good at it. You hold up your hand for one or two minutes or whatever it may be. I appreciate that.

In most jurisdictions around the world, or any parliamentary assemblies, they have a visible clock. It may not mean a lot to other people, but are we considering that and other types of technologies for the interim chamber?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I've seen that, for instance, in France, and I think it may exist in Washington, but not in Westminster, of course. At any rate, that's the sort of thing where the House would have to decide that it wants this different process whereby you have a clock that starts at 10 minutes and then goes down to zero, or 35 seconds down to zero, but that hasn't been the House's decision up until now.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Does it require a change in the Standing Orders to include that technology?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That's a good question.

Mr. Charles Robert:

You're probably safer going with a Standing Orders change.

Mr. Scott Simms:

With the technology nowadays, it just seemed obvious. I know we stand up and sit down to vote. We don't have an electronic voting mechanism.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think your question is whether there is the capacity to put up a monitor or monitors that would play the role of a clock and show how much time members have left. I think we could probably answer that.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The answer is that the technology would be there, should the House decide to use it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'll pursue that further as we move in.

Thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have an important question related to that.

Have we solved the parade between the Commons and the Senate? Are we taking the Confederation Line? Are we going to go down Wellington Street in the Popemobile?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The preference is to maintain the traditions and the ceremonies that have been part of our practice for 150 years. Adjustments will be made for the fact that we will exist in two buildings for a period of time, once the move takes place.

Proposals are being put forward to determine how this will be carried out. One would suspect, for example, that for the very first Speech from the Throne in the new location, House members might want to participate in the event. For future events, we will probably have to get into a process whereby we would actually solicit interest to determine the number of vehicles required to bring the members to the Senate.

(1210)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can the mace fit on the bus?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Sadly, the transporter beam research hasn't been going that well.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Charles Robert:

The Queen's crown is carried by a separate carriage for State Opening, so I suppose we could do the same thing for the mace.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I have a very quick question, which Mr. Reid brought to my attention. We talked about the new vans being purchased by PPS. Will those be equipped with defibrillators, and would there be an effort to equip all vehicles with defibrillators going forward?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

That's an interesting question. In the police vehicles you see on the Hill, there are a couple of defibrillators within those, but as we said, we're moving away from the RCMP vehicles into PPS vehicles. I will talk to our operations folks. Right now, I don't believe there are defibrillators in all of our vehicles, but I will get you that information. It's an interesting idea to put a defibrillator in each one.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can I have a follow up question?

The Chair:

Make it quick.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Will the vehicles be fully equipped police vehicles, or will they be civilian vehicles?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

They will be PPS vehicles. It's a vehicle rated for law enforcement.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it a law-enforcement-equipped vehicle, or just a rated vehicle?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

It will be equipped for the specific operational unit that's using it. In this case, it will have firearms capacity.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Are we getting into an area that might be better covered in camera?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

The Chair:

I'll use the chair's prerogative to ask one last question. Regarding the renovations of this building, this committee talked about a courtyard inside or outside, something for a playground for children, which leads to a larger question. There was an article in Policy Options about our input into the 13-year renovation of this building. I wonder if the clerk would be willing to have a session with this committee on that at some time in the future.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think that would be a worthwhile exercise. We would be willing to bring the architects and the other designers, as well as the heritage specialists, who would be willing to answer questions and deal with suggestions you might have about how you would like to see the building renovated.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Along with the architects working for the House of Commons, I think you would want to have architects from Public Services and Procurement Canada. That would be valuable.

Frankly, I think it's essential for the House, during the time of the renovations, to continue to emphasize the importance of public access to Centre Block to parliamentarians and to media. The idea of having the “hot room” where it is now is very important because they're more able to get down to question period quickly, to be present here in Centre Block and to question members about what's going on. To me, this is essential to our democracy, and I would hope that whatever members are here over the next 10 years will continue to emphasize it.

The Chair:

It's 13 years.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Whatever number it is....

The Chair:

Committee members, we will move to some votes on supplementary estimates (A). HOUSE OF COMMONS ç Vote 1a—Program expenditures..........$15,906,585

(Vote 1a agreed to on division) PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE ç Vote 1a—Program expenditures..........$7,127,658

(Vote 1a agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report the votes of the supplementary estimates (A) to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you to our witnesses. We'll do a really quick turnover so that we can get into the next session for the next witnesses. We'll suspend for 30 seconds or so.

(1210)

(1215)

The Chair:

Good afternoon, and welcome back to the 132nd meeting of the Standing Committee of Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study on the question of privilege related to the matter of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police publications respecting Bill C-71, an act to amend certain acts and regulations in relation to firearms.

We are pleased to be joined by Charles Robert, the Clerk of the House of Commons, as well as by the following officials from Treasury Board Secretariat. We have Louise Baird, Assistant Secretary, Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs; and Tracey Headley, Director, Communications and Federal Identity Policy. Thank you for making yourselves available today.

We'll begin with Monsieur Robert's opening statement and then Ms. Baird. Please go ahead, Mr. Robert.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Members of the committee, I am pleased to be here with you to help the committee with its review of the question of privilege raised by Mr. Motz, the member from Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, concerning the documents published by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police website on the subject of Bill C-71.

(1220)

[Translation]

When questions of privilege are referred to the committee, they are an opportunity to study in detail an issue put forward by the members themselves and to issue recommendations that will benefit everyone. It is through your committee that witnesses can be heard, documents obtained and concrete action taken, if that is the will of the committee, of course.

Respecting the dignity and authority of Parliament is a fundamental right which the House takes very seriously. The mission of the Speaker as a servant of the House is to ensure the protection of the rights and privileges, not only of every member, but also those of the House as a whole. In that sense, any affront to the authority of the House may constitute contempt of Parliament.

As its states on page 87 of the House of Commons Procedure and Practice, third edition: There is [...]no doubt that the House of Commons remains capable of protecting itself from abuse should the occasion ever arise. [English]

In his ruling on June 19, 2018, the Speaker of the House of Commons summarized the facts surrounding the publication of information about Bill C-71 on the RCMP website. While the bill in question was following the normal legislative process, the information published on the RCMP website suggested its provisions would necessarily be enacted or had been already.

The Speaker reminded the members that Parliament's authority in scrutinizing and adopting bills remains unquestionable and must never be taken for granted. He then added, “Parliamentarians and citizens should be able to trust that officials responsible for disseminating information related to legislation are paying attention to what is happening in Parliament and are providing a clear and accurate history of the bills in question.”

When questions similar to the one before your committee were raised by members in the House, previous Speakers have repeated that situations such as this should never occur and have urged the government in various departments for which they are responsible to find solutions. Indeed, the Speakers of the House have always taken great care to act as defenders of Parliament's authority. An affront to that authority constitutes a transgression or a lack of respect for the House and its members. As Speaker Sauvé said on October 17, 1980, the publication of information harmful to the House may, for example, turn into a contempt of Parliament.

In the current case, the Speaker noted the careless attitude the RCMP displayed to the fundamental role of members as legislators. For him, parliamentary authority with respect to legislation cannot and should not be usurped. The Speaker explained the matter well when he said, “As Speaker, I cannot turn a blind eye to an approach by a government agency that overlooks the role of Parliament. To do otherwise would make us compliant in denigrating the authority and dignity of Parliament.”[Translation]

I thank you once again for this invitation to testify.

I would now be pleased to answer your questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Baird.

Ms. Louise Baird (Assistant Secretary, Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs, Treasury Board Secretariat):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the invitation to appear before your committee.

I have Tracey Headley with me today. She's the Director of the Communications and Federal Identity Policy Centre with me at Treasury Board Secretariat.

I am the assistant secretary of strategic communications and ministerial affairs, where I have responsibility for the Government of Canada's policy on communications and federal identity. I am also the functional head of communications at the secretariat, so I'm responsible for the communications work within the department.[Translation]

In my opening remarks, I would like to give you an overview of the communications policy and highlight some of the changes that were made in 2016.

As you can imagine, a lot has changed in recent years in the communications environment. The amendments to the policy reflect those changes. Communications are central to the Government of Canada's work and contribute directly to the Canadian public's trust in their government.[English]

One of the key requirements of the policy is that communications to the public must be “timely, clear, objective, factual and non-partisan”. That applies to all communications activities, including those in relation to legislation before Parliament, which need to be clear and factual to ensure there is no confusion and no presumption of the decision of either chamber. Public servants, by virtue of our Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector, respect the fundamental role Parliament has in reviewing, amending and approving legislation.

The communications policy sets out deputy heads' accountabilities in ensuring the communications function is carried out appropriately in their organizations. As part of that, they must designate a senior official as head of communications. The policy does not prescribe departmental approval processes. Instead, it allows the departments to determine the best way to manage their communications given their specific operational requirements. This makes sense given the wide array of diverse organizations covered by the policy.

The government communicates with the public in both official languages to inform Canadians of policies, programs, services and initiatives and of Canadians' rights and responsibilities under the law. The administration of communications is a shared responsibility that requires the collaboration of various personnel within individual departments as well as among departments on horizontal initiatives.

The new policy is supported by the new directive on the management of communications. Together they modernize the practice of Government of Canada communications to keep pace with how citizens communicate in what is largely now a digital environment.

One of the changes in the new policy is to make accountabilities more clear. The previous policy was targeted at the institution as a whole. The new policy clarifies accountabilities for deputy heads and designates a senior official as head of communications to manage the department's corporate identity and all its communications.

The directive lays out the specific accountabilities for heads of communications. For example, they are responsible for approving communications products and overseeing the department's web presence, collaborating with the Privy Council Office and other departments on priority initiatives that require input from multiple departments, and monitoring and analyzing the public environment.

(1225)

[Translation]

Both deputy heads and heads of communications are responsible for ensuring information is timely, clear, objective, accurate, factual and non-partisan.[English]

Another new feature is the significant strengthening of the policy and directive on non-partisan communications. While the previous policy required the public service to carry out communications activities in a non-partisan way, it did not include a definition of non-partisan. For the first time, the new policy explicitly defines the term non-partisan communications in the following manner.

Communications must be objective, factual and explanatory, and free from political party slogans, images, identifiers, bias, designation or affiliation. The primary colour associated with the governing party cannot be used in a dominant way unless an item is commonly depicted in that colour, and advertising specifically must not include the name, voice or image of a minister, member of Parliament or senator.

Turning to digital communications, another new feature of the policy puts greater emphasis on the use of digital as the primary way to connect and interact with the public. What this means is that departments and agencies are using the web and social media as the principal communications channels.

It's important that the government make information available and engage citizens on the platforms of their choice. At the same time, we recognize there are Canadians who will continue to require traditional methods of communications, so multiple channels are still being used to meet all the diverse needs of the public.

As I mentioned, I am the functional head of communications at the Treasury Board Secretariat. This means that my sector is responsible for developing communications products and providing advice and services in consultation with subject matter experts in the department. This includes internal communications as well as external communications, and to that end, my team organizes things like ministerial events and press conferences. We also prepare communications strategies, speeches, news releases and a variety of other communications products.[Translation]

We also provide a Web presence for the secretariat, manage the corporate social media accounts, and manage the media relations function.

These core communications functions are relatively standard across government departments and agencies. As I mentioned at the beginning, however, there are some differences, based on the nature of the work and the specific operational requirements of the organization.

(1230)

[English]

This concludes my remarks. I would be happy to take questions if it would please the committee.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to both of you.

Ms. Baird, in your speech, the key words you have are “timely, clear, objective, factual and non-partisan”. Can we just focus on the word “timely” for a moment? I understand the mistake of this, implying that a legislation has passed when it has not, but I do believe that all government departments must exercise due diligence to anticipate this type of thing.

I compared this situation of Bill C-71 with Bill C-76, which is about the election. Of course, Elections Canada has to get its act together, as it were, before legislation is even passed. Otherwise, it would not work. The coming into force is taken seriously, and so on and so forth.

I understand how some departments can rush ahead with something that was not given sober second thought, if I could steal that term from the other chamber, but in this particular case, you talk about your communications both outward and inward. Although the mistake was the result of something that happened in Public Safety that was an outward mistake, it's the inward mechanisms by which it could have been solved.

This doesn't pertain to your department, but how do you take responsibility for this, and how do you fix it as an inward communication exercise among the other departments?

Ms. Louise Baird:

How do I, or how should individuals who are responsible for that within their department?

Mr. Scott Simms:

How would you communicate to them that what they did was not right, and here's how we can fix it? You say, for example, here are particular wordings we can use, such that we avoid giving this royal assent before it has been royally assented.

Ms. Louise Baird:

We do provide advice and outreach to departments quite regularly through Tracey's team. They are the ones who develop the policy, ensure compliance with it and create awareness of the rules and the requirements within the policy. Reminders do go out regularly.

To your earlier point, communications divisions along with other parts of a department do have to be ready for something. There should be appropriate communications around the tabling of a bill. It needs to be worded appropriately to acknowledge its status, but that is part of regular communications work.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Have we engaged in this type of exercise? Do you know of any examples where maybe certain departments—not your own—have said, “Okay, here's the wording that we can use”? Have you seen internal communications that point this out?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I don't think I have seen anything specific to this very specific circumstance. I can say that our regular monitoring shows that communicators around town are quite aware that they have to use the conditional. They have to use words like “if passed”.

If you look at news releases and things that maybe get a bit more scrutiny than the example that we're talking about today, I would say those have a very high level of compliance in using the appropriate language.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I understand. The department seemed to be quite apologetic about the situation that happened. They admitted to the mistake, but what they said through the minister—you probably read his testimony—was that this should be looked at in the future, to be fixed. It sounds to me like you are on your way, or have fixed it really already. This seems to be a one-off. Is that a fair statement?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I think this specific type of situation is fairly unusual. I don't hear about it frequently.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The situation that they found themselves in, where they were in the wrong.

Ms. Louise Baird:

Yes, but I think there's room to remind people of the rules around that and that there are channels, existing channels, through our communications network.

Mr. Scott Simms:

And that's your responsibility.

Ms. Louise Baird:

That would probably be my responsibility. It can be my responsibility. As a head of comms for a central agency and responsible for the communications policy, it would probably be something I would look at doing jointly with PCO because they're the functional head for communications.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see. Perhaps that's a recommendation we could make in our report, to basically put out a template of language by which we don't.... [Translation]

Mr. Robert, I am happy to see you again.[English]

I just want to ask you about the question of privilege. I've been reading up on privilege over the past little while and trying to find out through the history books about privilege and how it has evolved in many different ways. I give credit to Mr. Robert Maingot, who wrote a book on this and he did a great job.

Does this really impede upon our responsibilities as parliamentarians? When this happens outside, does it really affect us inside? How is this a breach?

(1235)

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's a determination that's really made by you as parliamentarians.

Looking at it historically, in the United Kingdom, in the four studies that have been made since the Second World War—in 1967, 1977, 1999, and I think 2013 was the last—you can see that there is a greater sensitivity to public participation and a retrenchment of the notion of privilege to those aspects that parliamentarians believe are still fundamental and crucial to how they conduct their business, and also, from the public perspective, how Parliament retains its authority and dignity.

For contempt, previously, newspapers were hauled before Parliament regularly for any sort of untoward criticism of parliamentarians or Parliament itself. Here we're talking about something that's quite different. We're talking about a partner in the system of government. We're talking about the executive, and historically, in Canada, there has been some sensitivity to how governments might make statements that make assumptions about the work that Parliament is undertaking, and that is where this issue has come up and it's not the first time.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Hopefully we'll get another round. Will we?

The Chair:

We'll try.

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My questions are for Madame Baird and Madame Headley.

Is the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, notwithstanding its independence in respect of specific law enforcement operations, governed by the policy on communications and federal identity, and the directive on the management of communications?

Ms. Louise Baird:

Yes, it is.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What consequences follow an episode of non-compliance with those documents?

Ms. Louise Baird:

Generally...?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, generally, please.

Ms. Louise Baird:

There is a range of things that can be done in cases of non-compliance. Typically, our starting point, depending on the seriousness of the nature of the infraction, would be to work with the department to correct it, to fix it. We would then make sure that the department was aware, maybe give a bit of a training session with their staff so that they were clearly aware of the rules under the communications policy and the directive.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Would the two RCMP online publications that led to this study have been subject to those two policy instruments?

Ms. Louise Baird:

Yes, the RCMP does fall under that.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Do you believe that the RCMP publications complied with the policy and the directive?

Ms. Louise Baird:

The issue was never brought to us at the Treasury Board Secretariat as a compliance issue. We obviously have learned about it since then. The accountabilities—what I spoke about a bit at the beginning—are clear for the deputy and the head of communications.

In this case, the head of communications has responsibility for the content on their websites. It sounds like there were process problems in terms of who was approving that web content. I understand the RCMP is now looking at or has modified their processes to ensure they have the appropriate level of approvals in place.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Of course, policies are usually meant to cover general matters, but I believe there are times when specific issues get addressed. One example is that the directive on the management of communications has specific rules on pre-election communications. In fact, Treasury Board ministers amended that specific element just last month after Conservatives insisted that the government had made the playing field far too uneven with its Bill C-76 proposals.

Back to the specific study, is there any guidance in any of the federal government's communication policies concerning communications about parliamentary business?

Ms. Louise Baird:

There's nothing in the policy that talks about communications generally around parliamentary business. There is one very specific requirement to do with advertising, which says that you can't advertise anything if it requires parliamentary approval, before that approval is secured.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Do you have any insight as to why there might be nothing?

Ms. Louise Baird:

Do I know why there might be nothing in the policy? I think it's that the policy, as you mentioned, is not at that level of granularity.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Do you believe that we need to make a recommendation in our report that says that you should amend these policy instruments to add a reminder to respect Parliament?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I think that's up to the committee and what they would like to recommend. I do think that there are some tools at our disposal that guide communications officials in the government that may be better placed to provide this type of guidance. We have a well-used document called the “Canada.ca Content Style Guide”, which prescribes how text should be written specifically for the web. We can share the link with the committee if you're interested. It does have that level of granularity and detail on the written word. It might be an appropriate place to include some of that guidance.

(1240)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's unfortunate that PCO officials couldn't be here with us today. With regard to that, I'll ask you these questions about coordination and approvals, given your role with regard to the ministerial aspect of your position.

What types of communications products need to be sent to the Privy Council Office for review and/or approvals by the centre?

Ms. Louise Baird:

There's not a black and white rule around that. There's daily discussion with PCO between communications groups. It's usually the higher profile announcement, or something maybe with a very high dollar value, or if there are some sensitivities, then there's more of a coordination role for the PCO in that.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

Given that PCO has more officials who are immediately aware of Parliament's rights and privileges, should draft communications about parliamentary business be referred to them, either as a requirement of policy or simply a suggestion to avoid problems, so that problems like these RCMP documents can be caught and prevented?

Ms. Louise Baird:

The PCO certainly has the expertise within their area. Maybe not in the communications group, but in the legislative and House planning area, they have the expertise on parliamentary procedure.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm going back to the document. Section 6.3.1 of the policy says that deputy heads are responsible for ensuring that their department provides “objective, factual and non-partisan information”.

In your opinion, was that requirement satisfied by the RCMP documents?

Ms. Louise Baird:

Again, I wasn't involved at the time when the issue first came about. In hindsight, I'd say if you look at that description, because of the confusion and the misinformation, it probably was not factual—to use one of the words from that requirement.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Turning to the directive on the management of communications, section 6.10 provides that heads of communications are responsible for ensuring that communications products and activities are “clear, timely, accurate” as indicated.

In your opinion, was this complied with?

Ms. Louise Baird:

From the discussions at this committee and what the RCMP talked about, I think there was some confusion—a lack of clarity.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Finally, section 8.1.2 of the directive states that the Privy Council Office is responsible for providing “leadership, challenge, strategic direction, and coordination” of departmental communications.

In your opinion, was there a failure here in respect of the RCMP documents?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I think what should have been a fairly routine web posting would probably not have been shared with PCO.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In your opinion, do you think it's necessary that something as simple as “respect Parliament” shouldn't need to be written down in a policy manual for public servants, or something similar to that nature?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I alluded to the values and ethics in my opening remarks. I think public servants are guided by that, and that includes something like respect for Parliament and democracy.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Finally, what do you think needs to occur so that a contempt such as this never occurs again?

Ms. Louise Baird:

There is definitely room for reminders. Through our well-established channels, we are certainly happy to go out and remind people about their responsibilities in this area.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you very much, Madam Baird.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Kusie.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

I come at this conversation, not unlike other conversations, with a healthy dose of ignorance of the topic.

This question of privilege is where we're at. I assume that's not part of the training across departments.

We were just talking about it with the security services. When we hire new security members to the Hill, that is part of the training. The interaction between security outside of a parliamentary precinct would be very different here because of this notion of privilege, which has been long guarded by this Parliament and others.

Regarding this question of privilege that was breached—and I suspect breached here—is that in the training for communications staff across the federal government? I assume they wouldn't understand—unless they had a real nerd effect for parliamentary privilege—what it is and why it would affect their day-to-day work.

Ms. Louise Baird:

I'm not aware of any training as part of communications training. PCO, among their responsibilities, may or may not have something like that. I don't know.

In my area, for example, I have responsibility for both parliamentary affairs and communications, and the groups work very closely together. We have the experts there to get advice from, and we do training sessions within our department and appearances at committee, understanding the parliamentary procedures.

System-wide, though, that wouldn't be under the communications policy.

(1245)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The communications people working for some federal department or agency, including the RCMP, wouldn't understand why this might be important and why this is seen as a problem by Parliament.

If I understand this correctly, what was released was as if the legislation had been passed and was now law. That's a problem for Parliament. It gives the public—correct me if I'm wrong—an impression that is not factually correct and can lead to other unintended consequences. For instance, with MPs voting on legislation that our constituents think is already law, we might get “Why did you vote against this when it's already...?”

You can understand where that misunderstanding gives us grief as parliamentarians. Is that fair?

Ms. Louise Baird:

From what I understand of this specific situation, there was a process mistake. A head of communications is responsible for the web content. Heads of communications around town would definitely understand the appropriate language to use in terms of parliamentary privilege.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is “proposed”. This is...

Ms. Louise Baird:

Yes, absolutely. “If passed”, “proposed changes”, and all those sorts of things.

My understanding of this specific RCMP situation is that it didn't go through the appropriate level of approval.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As my friend Mr. Simms pointed out, this sticks on both the timeliness and non-partisan nature of the communications.

I would also raise a similar bill where we have departments, in that case, Elections Canada, already acting as if legislation had passed in order to prepare. You seem to concur that this is a good practice.

The problem comes when that legislation is still being debated, especially over contentious things: gun control, gun classification, the election rules. These are not casual things for Canadians. It can create an environment in which the federal agency starts to be perceived as biased and in favour of these changes rather than the one that enacts the changes.

Do you follow my logic?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I do. I think it's important to be open and transparent.

There should be communications about bills, but they need to be very clearly positioned as “bills with proposed changes”, “if passed”, with all of that very clear language within them.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We guard this jealously. This idea that Parliament is just an afterthought.... Sometimes in majority governments it can be perceived as, “Oh, that legislation is proposed by government. They have a majority. It's going to be law.” That eliminates all of the due process we are supposed to be engaged in here on behalf of Canadians.

I have a last question. Have there been any consequences for this mistake?

Ms. Louise Baird:

Not from us. No.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

From within the RCMP that you're aware of...?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I don't know the details.

I know they have changed their processes. They have ratcheted up what the approval levels have to be. I assume there have been—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm sorry, by “ratcheted up”, do you mean it's going to a higher level before it's signed off?

Ms. Louise Baird:

A higher level of approvals, yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cullen.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Mr. Robert, where were we? I want to go back to this issue again because, first of all, I said his name wrong. It was actually Joseph Maingot, not Robert. I want to thank him for his work.

I will read from his book: But any attempt by improper means to influence or obstruct a Member in his parliamentary work may constitute contempt. What constitutes an improper means of interfering with Members' parliamentary work is always a question depending on the facts of each case. Finally, there must be some connection between the material alleged to contain the interference and the parliamentary proceeding.

Therein lies, encapsulates, why it's a breach of my privileges as a member if it impedes my performance. I guess what you're saying is that it's more or less an insult, which leads to contempt.

Mr. Charles Robert:

There are two aspects to it. There is the issue of interference with a member. That's certainly true. If there were interference, if somebody actually tried to prevent you from doing your work in a way that was clearly improper and clearly had intentions, then you could make the claim that you were being impeded in your ability to function as a parliamentarian and raise that as a contempt.

That's you as an individual MP. There's also the institutional privilege that might be involved, which assumes that Parliament is going to act as a collective body to do this or that.

The question was raised by a member who perceived that this in fact was a contempt. He raised it as a question of privilege. The Speaker said, based on the precedents that he had seen before, he agreed that this appeared on its face to be a question of privilege that somehow or other raises questions about the authority and dignity of Parliament and its capacity to work and the assumptions about how it will work.

(1250)

Mr. Scott Simms:

That certainly appears why—

Go ahead, sorry.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Just to finish, the House agreed, and that's why the question is now before this committee, because the reference was given to it by a vote of the House to pass it on to this committee for review.

Mr. Scott Simms:

But that could be construed as a wide scope of things, couldn't it?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is that just by a mere vote in the House to judge whether it has been in contempt of Parliament, that some outside body, in this case the executive, has been contemptuous of Parliament's function?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The decision really is for this committee to make an assessment of the case, to determine whether it was severe. I guess it's the Goldilocks approach: Was it severe, was it too little or was it just right? You have to make a determination about that and then, to actually close the circle, the House would have to adopt the report. Then you have actually made a full case of the issue of privilege, and the House has said, yes, it doesn't want to see this happen again.

I think the members of the government departments will be sensitive to the very idea that this was even exposed and raised to this level. So one would agree with the Treasury Board Secretariat that, as cases arise, members of the various departments who deal with communications respecting legislation before Parliament will become more sensitive and will avoid these kinds of careless errors, because one assumes that none of this is intentional.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I feel that there is probably more emphasis to be put on this toward the citizens of this country who rely on that information and who feel that it's coming. I think it's more an egregious insult to them than it is to us. I know that's a whole other issue right there. That's why I'm trying to figure out whether this is more of an administrative penalty to be laid upon the department, as opposed to a breach of my particular privilege. I carried on as usual. I voted on the bill, debated on the bill—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I think the perspective with respect to it is more about the institution as opposed to individual members and their rights and their ability to function.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much for that.

I want to return also to the department. I promise this won't be a similar academic exercise, for that matter, or it might. I don't know.

I want to go back to the communications aspect of it and I want to pick up on the comments about the department. In your case do you provide information to newer people coming into public service about the process of legislation, how it works? I know that seems kind of.... I didn't really get that training, and I'm an MP. Do public servants get that type of training when they join the service?

Ms. Louise Baird:

I certainly don't do that on behalf of government. Within my own department, with my own communications staff, as I said—

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's in your department.

Ms. Louise Baird:

Yes...in my department.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What do the other departments do? Do you have that authority to say, maybe....

Ms. Louise Baird:

I don't have that authority. I'm responsible for the communications policy. I think some of the legislative stuff would be handled elsewhere.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I just bring that up because maybe—to my committee members—we should think about discussing the legislative process as well. It would be ironic, though, that we teach people in the public service about legislative process and we tell nothing to brand-new members of Parliament who are elected. Nevertheless, that's a whole other issue.

Thank you for your time, everyone, and thanks for your patience.

The Chair:

Thank you.

For our last round, we'll go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Just to follow up on Mr. Simms's comments, I know when I joined the Treasury Board Secretariat back in 2008 as a public servant, we did have a one-day session at the old city hall here in Ottawa on a general, “how government works” type of thing.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Simms:

There you go. That's more than we got.

Mr. John Nater:

I don't disagree. I don't know if that program still exists. It's been 10 years since I was there. Coming from a political science background it was a bit of a refresher, but it was nonetheless enjoyable.

Thank you to our friends and witnesses today.

Mr. Robert, when Minister Goodale appeared before the committee he suggested that the committee might want to consider some wording, some phraseology, some types of suggestions and tips and helpful hints for the department as to what language they ought to use when communicating information that is still before Parliament, that Parliament hasn't yet dealt with.

I'm not a fan of reinventing the wheel. I don't like doing extra work when a lot of this documentation would already exist, and I think, 30-plus years of Speakers' rulings on matters similar to this. Would it be within your purview and your thoughts on whether or not there could be a document—maybe from table research branch—consolidating that information from the past 30 years as to what the Speakers of the past and today have said on this matter?

Mr. Charles Robert:

We could probably compile that. I don't think that would be too difficult.

A kind of solution that might be helpful is if the communications presented a chronology of the legislation—if they said, as of whatever date their communication has been released, that “Bill C-76 is at second reading in the House of Commons”, or “is before a committee”. If you are required to put in some kind of chronological context then you would be absolutely sure that the bill hasn't yet passed. That might be a helpful way to anchor the communiqué that the departments or agencies may wish to convey with a clear understanding that, yes, it's still before Parliament, nothing has happened, nothing is finalized, and the members have full scope to review the bill, change it, reject it, whatever they might decide to do.

Mr. John Nater:

Would you be willing to jot down in recommendation form that idea you just suggested and provide it to our committee?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Sure, I'd be happy to.

Mr. John Nater:

Would you also be able to provide us with maybe a Coles Notes version of the Speakers' rulings of the past? I suspect table research branch may be close to having already done that, but—

Mr. Charles Robert:

We would certainly be able to assist the committee with that, and I'll communicate with Andrew on that.

Mr. John Nater:

That would be worthwhile.

I always want to thank our researchers who've done exceptional work, and they've provided us with the useful information of past precedents and different cases where similar types of things have occurred.

I wonder, from your perspective and your knowledge, have specific precedents occurred in the past that we should be particularly mindful of when we're drafting our report.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I'm not sure. I think they had a similar look and feel. It depends on whether you felt—or at the time it was felt, given the particular case—that the communication went too far in the assumptions. Let's say that the communication had been issued the day the bill was introduced at first reading. Parliament is looking at this bill and it's going to be passed and everything is just taken for granted.

That perhaps is an example that would go too far, but if it's now in the second chamber and it's already at third reading and we anticipate that royal assent will be some time in the next week or so, that's a different situation. That's why I think the chronological element becomes a nice bit of a safety catch. You don't go too far in assuming what the final version of the bill will be. You certainly know what the first version of the bill will be, but not necessarily the final version. That's what's going to be critical to the public interest.

Mr. John Nater:

Certainly, we have a lot of international comparators that we often turn to as well as domestic with the provinces and territories. Certainly, different jurisdictions deal with this type of issue differently. The U.K. has its own way of dealing with it.

Do you have any thoughts on how we might go about this when we're comparing it to international comparators? I'm thinking about the U.K. in particular, and how they deal with an issue such as this. Do you have some thoughts on that?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think the one you should be asking this question to is Andre Barnes, who did the research paper on this with respect to comparative analysis. With respect to the United Kingdom, he points out that there are no cases or matters similar to the very one that is engaging this committee, based on the 24th edition of Erskine May. That could be for all sorts of reasons. That doesn't necessarily mean the point of view that's taken here is either less credible or more credible. That's really a decision that belongs to you.

Mr. John Nater:

Perhaps we should all travel to the U.K. and talk to them about it.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Nater.

As an academic, I'm sure you read Mr. Barnes' report of all the precedents, but he has a couple of words to add to that report.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

I'll just update the committee, because the document said that we hadn't heard back from the U.K., Australia or New Zealand. They were in touch, and they did say that they don't have a similar precedent. They wouldn't consider it to be in contempt there for whatever reason. They were surprised that it was here.

(1300)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Of the two facets that we talked about then, are you saying that the Westminster system relies on the individual member as a breach of Parliament as opposed to contempt of the whole joint?

The Chair:

Do you know what he's saying? If this isn't an issue in New Zealand, Australia or Great Britain, this isn't an issue.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I get that.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Our precedents have evolved.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, but why?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

This is a very good question.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Another study, I feel.... No, I'm just kidding.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

That's not a bad thought. We're getting to the end of this Parliament. It means that it's an opportunity that rarely exists for us to be able, potentially, to have some space to deal with some of the more abstract questions that may face us. Mr. Simms may have pointed to something we should consider doing.

The Chair:

We'll bring that to the subcommittee on agenda sometime, Mr. Simms.

Thank you, all.

Thank you, Mr. Robert, for being here for both sessions.

This meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1130)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Bienvenue à la 132e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Aujourd'hui, le premier point à l'ordre du jour est le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) 2018-2019: crédit 1a sous la rubrique Chambre des communes et crédit 1a sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre des communes. Il est accompagné de M. Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre; M. Michel Patrice, sous-greffier à l'administration; M. Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances. Représentant le Service de protection parlementaire, nous avons la surintendante principale Jane MacLatchy, directrice, et M. Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel.

Pendant la deuxième heure, nous accueillerons des témoins concernant une question de privilège. M. Robert restera pour cette partie, avec des représentants du Conseil du Trésor.

Cet après-midi, pour ceux que cela intéresse, il y a une rencontre informelle avec la délégation de Mongolie. Aucun parlementaire n'en fait partie, comme je l'ai déjà dit, mais vous êtes tous les bienvenus.

Nous passons maintenant à la déclaration préliminaire.

Monsieur le Président.

L'hon. Geoff Regan (Président de la Chambre des communes):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, ainsi que les membres du Comité.

Je suis heureux de comparaître à nouveau devant votre comité en tant que Président de la Chambre des communes pour vous présenter notre Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) pour l'exercice 2018-2019.[Français]

Cette comparution est l'occasion pour la Chambre des communes de présenter le financement supplémentaire approuvé pour des initiatives déjà prévues, qui visent à maintenir et à améliorer le soutien offert par l'Administration aux députés et à l'institution.[Traduction]

Je présenterai aussi le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) du Service de protection parlementaire, ou SPP.

Je ne présenterai pas les personnes qui m'accompagnent, puisque vous l'avez fait. Je suis ravi de les avoir à mes côtés ce matin.

Je commencerai ma présentation en soulignant les principaux éléments du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) pour la Chambre des communes. En tout, il représente 15,9 millions de dollars en financement supplémentaire. Le montant affecté aux députés et aux agents supérieurs de la Chambre est de 6,9 millions de dollars. Les 9 millions de dollars restants sont répartis dans les divers secteurs administratifs de l'Administration de la Chambre pour financer les priorités stratégiques de l'exercice courant. Le budget des dépenses de la Chambre des communes s'élève donc à 522,9 millions de dollars pour l'exercice en cours.

Comme vous pouvez le constater, ce poste budgétaire est classé dans la catégorie générale des crédits votés.[Français]

Tout d'abord, notre poste budgétaire confirme qu'un financement temporaire de 15,9 millions de dollars a été demandé pour ce qu'on appelle le report du budget de fonctionnement.

Je tiens à souligner que, contrairement aux années précédentes, aucun financement supplémentaire n'est demandé dans le cadre de ce budget supplémentaire des dépenses, mis à part le report de fonds.[Traduction]

La politique sur le report de fonds du Bureau de régie interne autorise les députés, les agents supérieurs de la Chambre et l'Administration de la Chambre à reporter des fonds non utilisés d'un exercice à l'autre, jusqu'à concurrence de 5 % de leurs budgets de fonctionnement prévus dans le Budget principal des dépenses. Comme vous le savez, cela vise à éviter ce qu'on appelle la « folie du mois de mars ». Cette pratique est conforme à celle du gouvernement du Canada et donne une plus grande latitude aux députés, aux agents supérieurs de la Chambre et à l'Administration de la Chambre pour planifier et effectuer leurs activités.

Le report de fonds de la Chambre des communes a été approuvé par le Bureau de régie interne et, conformément à la directive du Conseil du Trésor, est inclus dans notre Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

Je passe maintenant au Service de protection parlementaire.

Depuis le début de l'exercice 2018-2019, le Service de protection parlementaire, ou SPP, continue de remplir son mandat d'assurer la sécurité physique dans la Cité parlementaire et sur la colline du Parlement.

Je suis ici pour vous présenter les demandes du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) du SPP afin d'appuyer les progrès réalisés à ce jour par le SPP et d'assurer sa capacité continue à remplir son mandat de protection.

Pour commencer, je vous donnerai un aperçu du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) du SPP pour 2018-2019, qui s'élève à 7,6 millions de dollars. Cela comprend 7,1 millions de dollars en crédits votés et 502 000 $ au titre des dépenses prévues par la loi pour les régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés.

Les autorisations votées à ce jour pour la SPP totalisent 76,7 millions de dollars dans le Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019. L'ajout du montant de 7,1 millions de dollars du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) portera le total des crédits votés du SPP à 83,8 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2018-2019. En incluant les dépenses prévues par la loi, le budget des dépenses à ce jour pour le SPP sera de 91,1 millions de dollars.

Il est important de noter que le budget des dépenses à ce jour de 91,1 millions de dollars pour 2018-2019 comprend 6,75 millions de dollars pour des initiatives qui seront achevées d'ici la fin du présent exercice. Ces initiatives comprennent le projet de caméra pour l'édifice de l'Ouest, le remplacement des barrières de sécurité au poste de contrôle des véhicules, ou PCV, l'acquisition de véhicules et plusieurs projets de TI. Ce sont des projets ponctuels. Certaines de ces choses devront évidemment être remplacées un moment donné, mais pour l'instant, ce sont des projets ponctuels.

(1135)

[Français]

Le PCV est le principal poste de contrôle d'accès pour la circulation des véhicules sur la Colline du Parlement. À la suite d'un examen interne, le SPP demande l'ajout de deux postes de superviseur au PCV pour encadrer le personnel nécessaire au fonctionnement de 24 heures sur 24, sept jours sur sept de ce service.[Traduction]

Le Service de protection parlementaire, le SPP, demande des fonds pour l'acquisition de sept véhicules homologués pour les services de maintien de l'ordre public, qui seront utilisés dans la Cité parlementaire. Ces véhicules appartiendront au SPP et s'intégreront au parc de véhicules de la Cité parlementaire à l'appui des opérations du SPP. À l'heure actuelle, le personnel du SPP utilise des fourgonnettes empruntées à la GRC, qui arrivent à la fin de leur cycle de vie et qui ne répondent pas aux besoins opérationnels du SPP.

Les organismes de protection du monde entier modifient leurs politiques de formation afin de s'assurer que les premiers intervenants les plus proches sont en mesure d'intervenir le plus rapidement possible en cas de menace. À l'heure actuelle, certains membres de notre personnel de protection n'ont pas reçu cette formation. Le SPP a l'intention d'appliquer des tactiques et des méthodes de formation éprouvées pour donner à tout son personnel de protection les moyens pour neutraliser les menaces. Le SPP aimerait également miser sur le succès des exercices de confinement grâce à des exercices de gestion multidisciplinaires et concertés des situations d'urgence. Pour ce faire, nous demandons six formateurs supplémentaires: quatre pour certifier nos agents de protection et assurer le maintien de ces compétences, et deux pour concevoir et effectuer des exercices continus de gestion des urgences.[Français]

Pour le SPP, s'assurer que ces employés opérationnels sont bien équipés est une priorité. La SPP demande maintenant 144 000 $ pour équiper toutes les recrues en vue du prochain programme de formation des agents.

Des fonds sont également demandés pour assurer que tous les employés du SPP ont des copies autorisées du Système de notification en cas d'urgence qui envoie des alertes à tous les parlementaires et employés du Parlement lorsque des événements particuliers susceptibles d'avoir une incidence sur leur sécurité se produisent.[Traduction]

Le rôle des agents de protection a évolué au cours des quelques dernières années. Par conséquent, le nouveau profil de rôle a été révisé et mis à jour par la direction, les employés opérationnels et les professionnels des ressources humaines. Après consultation avec les associations, ces profils ont été évalués par une tierce firme d'experts-conseils en évaluation des emplois, qui a recommandé que la classification de ces postes soit augmentée d'un niveau, ce qui a entraîné une augmentation salariale. Cette reclassification représente une augmentation salariale d'environ 6,5 % pour tous nos agents de protection, superviseurs et gestionnaires, et nécessite une augmentation du budget annuel des salaires du SPP de 2,8 millions de dollars.

Lorsque le SPP a été créé, il a travaillé en étroite collaboration avec les administrations du Sénat et la Chambre pour tirer parti des systèmes et des outils administratifs institutionnels existants. Bien que ces administrations continuent de travailler en étroite collaboration avec le SPP, certains domaines, tels que les finances et l'approvisionnement, nécessitent des ressources supplémentaires pour répondre aux besoins particuliers du SPP. Ainsi, nous demandons deux équivalents temps plein supplémentaires pour l'équipe d'approvisionnement afin de gérer les processus concurrentiels et les négociations complexes avec les fournisseurs.

Le SPP demande également une ressource supplémentaire pour l'élaboration et la gestion de ses politiques financières en consultation avec ses partenaires parlementaires. Ces initiatives appuient la saine gestion financière des fonds et des ressources.

Vous serez heureux d'apprendre que c'est ainsi que se termine ma présentation. Je vous remercie de votre attention. Mon équipe et moi ferons un plaisir de répondre à vos questions, ou du moins pour essayer d'y répondre.

(1140)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le Président.

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais féliciter Michaela, notre attachée de recherche de la Bibliothèque du Parlement, pour le format choisi pour votre rapport. Les rapports de l'an dernier et de cette année sont présentés côte à côte, ce qui est très utile.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur le Président, vous ne serez pas surpris que je me concentre sur le SPP, comme je l'ai fait plusieurs fois lorsque vous êtes venu au Comité.

Comme beaucoup de mes collègues, je suis frustré que le conflit de travail sur la Colline se poursuive. J'ai plusieurs questions à ce sujet. Elles sont liées au budget; j'y reviendrai.

En octobre, le SPP a présenté un nouvel organigramme et le commissaire y figure pour la première fois. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il fait là?

Surintendant principal Jane MacLatchy (directrice, Service de protection parlementaire):

C'est « la commissaire ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En effet.

Quelle est la raison d'être de ce poste?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est conforme à la loi qui a créé le SPP et au protocole d'entente en matière de gouvernance subséquemment signé, et aux mesures qui ont été prises en 2015 lors de sa création. Il s'agit d'un système de rapport trilatéral.

Les responsabilités du Président de la Chambre des communes et du Président du Sénat à l'égard du Service se limitent à l'administration et aux politiques. Sur le plan opérationnel, la GRC dirige les activités sur la Colline.

Vous remarquerez sur notre organigramme qu'on indique simplement que j'interagis toujours avec la GRC pour la surveillance des opérations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donnez-nous une idée du type d'interaction. Je suppose que votre bureau est situé sur la Colline. Est-il plutôt à la division nationale, ou avez-vous un bureau aux deux endroits?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Vous parlez de mon bureau?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle de l'endroit où vous êtes et de votre interaction avec la GRC sur le plan opérationnel.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Mon bureau est au centre-ville, sur la rue Sparks, au quartier général du SPP, à défaut d'un meilleur terme. C'est là que sont les bureaux de l'équipe de direction du Service.

Je communique régulièrement avec le commandant de la division nationale, mais seulement sur les aspects opérationnels de la gestion du SPP. Je ne communique pas avec lui pour des choses comme les relations de travail ou des questions d'ordre administratif ou organisationnel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela relève entièrement de vous directement.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. C'est excellent, parce que ma prochaine question porte sur la Commission des relations de travail qui, le 10 octobre, a rendu une décision vous ordonnant de négocier avec les syndicats avant le 30 octobre.

L'avez-vous fait?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Après la décision du 10 octobre de la Commission des relations de travail, nous avons envoyé un message aux trois unités de négociation afin d'établir un calendrier pour respecter l'obligation d'entreprendre des négociations.

Nous avons commencé; nous avons déjà rencontré une unité, et des dates sont fixées pour les deux autres. Donc, nous avons entrepris les négociations collectives, conformément à la décision de la Commission des relations de travail.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le budget comprend-il un montant pour les négociations?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Pas pour le moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce prévu pour l'avenir?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Excusez-moi; je veux être certaine de la question. Cherchez-vous à savoir si nous mettons de l'argent de côté pour des augmentations potentielles...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tant pour les négociations elles-mêmes, qui ne sont pas gratuites, que pour ce qui en découlera.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

En ce qui concerne les négociations elles-mêmes, je ne m'attends pas à ce que nous revenions ici pour demander des fonds supplémentaires.

Quant au résultat des négociations, c'est une possibilité. Lorsque nous irons de l'avant par rapport à... Je ne veux pas m'avancer sur le résultat des négociations, mais si cela nécessite un financement accru, nous le demanderons certainement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Donc, vous êtes actuellement en communication avec les syndicats. Nous avons déjà discuté de la demande de fusion des syndicats qui a été soumise à la Commission des relations de travail.

Je sais que vous ne pouvez en discuter jusqu'à ce qu'une décision ait été rendue. Où en est cette demande?

(1145)

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Cela suit son cours. Nous sommes toujours à l'étape des audiences de la Commission des relations de travail. Il y a eu plusieurs audiences ces deux ou trois derniers mois. Des dates sont fixées jusqu'en mai 2019, puis une décision sera rendue.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous nous attendre à ce que la décision soit rendue peu après, ou faudra-t-il attendre quelques années avant que ce soit fait?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

J'aimerais avoir la réponse à cela, monsieur, mais je ne sais pas combien de temps l'arbitre prendra pour rendre une décision après la fin des audiences.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Puisqu'une décision vous ordonne de négocier maintenant, est-il toujours nécessaire que la Commission des relations de travail rende une décision?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Pour nous, à mon avis, l'idéal serait qu'il n'y ait qu'un syndicat. Je dirais donc que nous voulons toujours une décision dans ce dossier.

Nous avions reçu un avis selon lequel, aux termes de la loi créant le SPP, la tenue de négociations collectives pendant que nous attendions une décision nous placerait dans une situation intenable. L'arbitre a rejeté cet avis et nous a ordonné d'entreprendre des négociations collectives. Ce n'est donc plus un risque pour nous. Nous sommes ravis de poursuivre les négociations avec les trois unités à ce moment-ci, mais la requête est toujours en cours d'examen.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez déjà des négociateurs prêts à aller de l'avant.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

En effet. Nous avons nommé un négociateur en chef et une équipe pour l'appuyer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une excellente nouvelle.

Il y a deux ou trois semaines, j'ai rencontré sur la Colline un important groupe de recrues du SPP — ils étaient une vingtaine. C'était un plaisir de rencontrer ces nouveaux membres.

Quel genre de formation reçoivent-ils sur le privilège? J'aimerais simplement savoir comment cela fonctionne, car comme vous le savez, le Comité veille toujours à ce que le privilège soit protégé en tout temps. La GRC est une force policière et non une force de protection. Je veux m'assurer que cette distinction est prise en compte dans la formation.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Vous pouvez en être certain, monsieur. Je vous assure que le personnel reçoit cette formation dans le cadre du programme des recrues. La formation de base des nouveaux agents de protection, donnée par les formateurs du SPP, comprend évidemment une formation sur le privilège. Nous faisons aussi appel à des représentants des deux administrations pour traiter de ces questions. Ce n'est pas un aspect qu'on aborde de façon succincte au passage. C'est un élément important du programme de formation et ils y consacrent tous les efforts nécessaires.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Si vous me le permettez, je soulignerais qu'une partie des fonds demandés visait le poste de contrôle des véhicules. À ce titre, la priorité du SPP est le privilège, de sorte que les députés ne soient pas retenus indûment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai eu quelques interactions intéressantes au poste de contrôle des véhicules, le PCV. Vous montrez votre pièce d'identité et ils cherchent quelque chose, mais s'ils ne le trouvent pas tout de suite, ils entrent dans votre voiture et la fouillent. Lorsque vous leur dites que vous êtes député, ils s'excusent et vous laissent passer. Je comprends.

Vous dites que vous allez acquérir sept nouveaux véhicules pour remplacer les camions qui se trouvent sur la Colline. Est-ce que ce seront des véhicules marqués?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Non. Cette fois-ci, nous avons décidé qu'ils ne seraient pas marqués.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Kusie. [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, chers invités, d'être ici aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Monsieur Robert, qui est responsable du contrôle ou de la gestion du personnel parlementaire affecté au soutien des associations interparlementaires?

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Qui a le contrôle?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Qui gère le personnel parlementaire affecté au soutien des associations interparlementaires?

M. Charles Robert:

L'association parlementaire fait partie des AII. Le personnel relève donc du greffier adjoint, qui relève de moi.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Est-ce que l'aide offerte par ce personnel est financée à même le budget consacré aux associations interparlementaires?

Est-ce que cela fait partie du budget d'administration de la Chambre, qui est géré par le greffier ou en son nom?

M. Charles Robert:

S'il est question des salaires du personnel, je dirais que cela ne fait pas partie de l'association, mais bien de l'administration.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Est-ce que les greffiers et le personnel sont autorisés à participer aux activités non officielles des associations interparlementaires?

M. Charles Robert:

Les activités non officielles...? Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre à quoi vous faites référence.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

S'il y a certaines activités jugées non officielles, est-ce que les greffiers et le personnel sont autorisés à y participer?

S'il y avait une réunion non officielle, est-ce qu'ils pourraient y participer?

M. Charles Robert:

Je suppose que vous faites référence à ce qui s'est passé il y a quelques semaines. La question viserait à savoir si l'on a déterminé qu'il s'agissait d'une réunion officielle ou non.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Si la réunion dépassait la constitution, les règles ou règlements d'une association, est-ce que vous la considéreriez comme illégitime?

(1150)

M. Charles Robert:

Si l'on déterminait que la réunion dépassait les limites constitutionnelles de l'association, je crois que cela soulèverait d'importantes questions.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce que les greffiers et le personnel offriraient leur soutien dans le cadre d'une telle réunion illégitime?

M. Charles Robert:

Si elle était légitime, je suppose...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Si elle était illégitime...

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, je crois qu'il faudrait déterminer de quel type de réunion il s'agit. On ne peut pas nécessairement le faire de façon immédiate. Dans un souci de prudence, je crois qu'il faudrait coopérer avec les leaders de l'association.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce que l'utilisation des ressources parlementaires aux fins de ces réunions illégitimes constituerait une dépense inappropriée, selon vous?

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, je crois qu'il faudrait d'abord savoir si la réunion était légitime ou non. Ensuite, je crois que le personnel tiendrait compte des circonstances pour décider de la manière de procéder.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'aurais quelques questions précises au sujet de la réunion de l'Association parlementaire canadienne de l'OTAN.

Combien de greffiers de l'administration de la Chambre y étaient présents?

M. Charles Robert:

Je n'ai pas été mis au courant, alors je ne peux pas vous répondre, malheureusement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Savez-vous pendant combien de temps sont restés les greffiers, après que la présidente, Mme Alleslev, a mis fin à la séance?

M. Charles Robert:

Je suppose que la plupart des greffiers présents sont restés. Il faudrait que je le confirme, mais ce serait ma première réponse.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pourquoi les greffiers sont-ils restés après la réunion, à votre avis?

Pourquoi ne sont-ils pas tout simplement partis après que Mme Alleslev a levé la séance?

M. Charles Robert:

Selon nos pratiques, la décision de lever la séance présume un consensus. Si le président met fin à la séance et que le consensus n'est pas clair, alors le personnel peut décider de rester.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mais en vertu de quelle autorité les greffiers restent-ils dans la salle?

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois que les greffiers pensaient qu'on n'avait pas mis fin à la séance de façon appropriée.

Le président:

Excusez-moi; on invoque le Règlement.

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Cela dépasse la portée de notre étude. On a posé quelques questions à ce sujet, mais où est-ce qu'on s'en va vraiment? Ce n'est pas pertinent aux fins du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois que c'est tout à fait pertinent, puisque les fonds visent à appuyer les associations parlementaires. Je crois que c'est très pertinent, monsieur Bittle.

Le président:

D'accord. Vous pouvez continuer.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur Bagnell.

Monsieur Robert, pourriez-vous nous transmettre cette information lorsque vous aurez déterminé si la réunion a été jugée constitutionnelle ou non et quelles décisions ont été prises par la suite? Pourriez-vous nous revenir avec ces réponses, s'il vous plaît?

M. Charles Robert:

Bien sûr.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup.

De plus, en février, notre ancien collègue M. Richards a posé quelques questions au sujet de l'initiative du greffier de reformuler notre Règlement. Monsieur Robert, lors de cette réunion, vous avez dit à M. Christopherson que le Comité de la procédure de la Chambre participerait à ce projet.

Comment comptez-vous faire participer le Comité ou les députés de la Chambre à la révision des règles de la Chambre et pouvez-vous nous faire une mise à jour à ce sujet, s'il vous plaît?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, bien sûr.

En gros, la révision vise à rendre les règles plus accessibles aux députés, ce qui n'est pas facile selon la formulation actuelle. Par exemple, sous le titre de chaque chapitre de la table des matières, on ne présente que le numéro du Règlement visé par ce chapitre. Aussi, le député est forcé de faire une recherche lorsqu'il est écrit « en vertu de », par exemple. Comme nous avons pour mandat d'offrir le meilleur soutien possible aux députés, je crois qu'il faut rendre le Règlement plus convivial et plus accessible, de façon similaire à ce qui s'est fait ailleurs.

L'initiative était la mienne, en fait, mais toute décision d'accepter ces révisions revient au Comité et à la Chambre. Je suis ici pour faciliter les opérations de la Chambre des communes de la meilleure façon possible. Nous avons communiqué avec les bureaux des leaders de tous les principaux partis, afin de les informer du processus et de leur faire comprendre qu'aucune modification importante n'allait être apportée aux règles ou au Règlement. Nous allons seulement simplifier le langage et ajouter des outils à la table des matières, comme je l'ai fait valoir — des sous-titres, des notes marginales et une révision ou un regroupement des chapitres — afin de faciliter la compréhension des députés et de leur personnel.

(1155)

[Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je vous remercie de vos réponses. Je vous remercie également d'être ici aujourd'hui.

M. Charles Robert:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est maintenant le tour de M. Cullen. [Traduction]

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous, monsieur le Président, et à tous vos invités.

J'aimerais faire suite rapidement aux questions de Mme Kusie à l'intention de M. Robert. Je crois que sa question était la suivante: y a-t-il eu ou y aura-t-il une tentative de faire participer le Comité de la procédure au processus que vous venez de nous décrire?

M. Charles Robert:

Tout à fait. Encore une fois, j'ai pris cette initiative pour le bien de la Chambre, mais je n'ai pas le pouvoir de...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, je comprends.

M. Charles Robert:

Lorsque nous aurons quelque chose à vous montrer... Bien sûr, vous allez participer s'il est convenu d'aller de l'avant.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. Je crois que ce qui nous intéresse, c'est l'élément de l'engagement. Personne ne remet en question la validité de ce que vous proposez.

Monsieur le Président, depuis 2016, le budget du SPP est passé d'environ 62 millions à 91 millions pour cette année. Est-ce exact?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela représente une augmentation d'environ 50 % par rapport au moment où nous avons fusionné les services de protection de la Colline. Est-ce exact?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Le budget a augmenté, oui, et alors que le SPP s'est transformé en une nouvelle organisation, il est devenu évident qu'il aurait besoin d'un plus grand soutien de base. Je suis certain que la surintendante principale MacLatchy serait heureuse de vous expliquer cela plus en détail.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Madame MacLatchy, c'est ici que nous nous sommes parlé la dernière fois. Je suis ici par coïncidence aujourd'hui, je vous l'assure.

M. Christopherson est en huis clos, mais il n'a rien fait d'illégal. Il étudie le rapport du vérificateur général. En fait, je ne crois pas qu'il fasse quoi que ce soit d'illégal; je ne pourrais le confirmer ou l'infirmer.

La dernière fois que vous avez témoigné devant le Comité, vous avez parlé de la qualité et du professionnalisme des hommes et des femmes qui nous protègent tous les jours. Vous avez dit ceci: « Je suis impressionnée chaque jour par le professionnalisme et la compétence des gens qui travaillent au sein de ce service, et je pense ici à toutes les catégories d'employés qui font partie de cette organisation. »

Nous avons beaucoup parlé de l'esprit de corps et de l'ambiance qui régnait au SPP, mais lorsque j'ai parlé de manière informelle aux membres du Service... Certains hésitaient à me parler, mais ceux qui l'ont fait m'ont dit que l'esprit de corps ne se portait pas très bien. Votre vision du groupe ne semblait pas partagée.

J'aimerais vous poser quelques questions précises à ce sujet. Depuis combien de temps les membres de l'AFPC sont-ils sans contrat?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Je crois que le contrat est expiré depuis 2014.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Les deux autres groupes représentés par des syndicats sont sans contrat depuis quand?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Il faudrait que je demande à l'officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel, mais je crois...

M. Robert Graham (officier responsable de l’administration et du personnel, Service de protection parlementaire):

C'est depuis 2017.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Depuis le début de 2017.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Récemment — en fait, pas si récemment que cela —, une décision de la Commission du travail implorait la direction — dans le cas présent, vous — de négocier un contrat. Pourquoi a-t-on dû passer par ce processus?

C'est ce qui me préoccupait il y a un an, et cela me préoccupe encore aujourd'hui. De par leurs mots, le Président, les députés, les leaders politiques et les chefs de votre ministère félicitent tous ces femmes et ces hommes pour leur professionnalisme, mais ils doivent se présenter devant la Commission du travail pour que vous acceptiez de vous asseoir à la table pour négocier un contrat libre et équitable.

Comprenez-vous pourquoi cela nous semble illogique? Bien que nous les tenions en grande estime, les membres de ce groupe sont obligés de porter des casquettes pour obtenir un minimum de respect. Je suis d'accord avec eux: ce n'est pas respectueux de laisser les gens qui nous servent et qui nous protègent sans contrat pendant plus d'un an et de les obliger à se présenter devant la Commission du travail pour qu'ils puissent négocier avec vous.

Je dis « vous », mais je parle de la direction dans son ensemble.

Comprenez-vous pourquoi cela ne semble pas logique?

(1200)

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Je comprends votre question, monsieur Cullen, et je vous en remercie.

La seule chose que j'ai dite devant le Comité, je crois — et je vais tenter de l'expliquer —, c'est que nous avons demandé une opinion juridique au sujet de certains éléments de la loi qui a créé le SPP: la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Nous — et je parle ici de mon prédécesseur, qui occupait le poste avant moi — avons demandé si nous pouvions aller de l'avant avec les négociations collectives, puisque les conventions arrivaient à échéance. Selon nombre des opinions juridiques obtenues avant et après mon entrée en fonction, nous n'étions pas en mesure de procéder aux négociations collectives avant que la Commission du travail ne prenne une décision sur le nombre d'unités de négociation présentes.

J'ai examiné la question d'un point de vue organisationnel. On m'a dit qu'il était dangereux — faute d'un meilleur terme — d'aller de l'avant avec une quelconque négociation collective avant que la Commission du travail ne rende sa décision.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il n'est pas inhabituel pour un employeur, même un employeur des services de protection, de négocier avec plus d'un syndicat. Je ne sais pas pourquoi la Chambre se traîne les pieds de cette façon. Je sais que quelqu'un — le Président, peut-être, ou c'était peut-être vous — a dit qu'il préférait avoir un seul syndicat, mais que ce n'était pas le cas. Vous en avez trois. C'est une réalité qui a été adoptée, qui est légale et qui respecte les lois du Canada. Nous voulons tous avoir certaines choses que nous n'avons pas. C'est la vie.

De plus, ma question est urgente. Est-ce que nous allons recevoir un autre rapport du Président disant que nous n'en sommes pas encore arrivés à une entente? Parce que ce n'est pas par manque de fonds. Nous avons accru les services. Est-ce que c'est cela l'obstacle? Nous ne voulons pas payer plus les gens, ou leur verser un salaire qu'ils considèrent comme juste?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je pense que vous avez entendu ce que j'ai dit à propos de l'augmentation de 6,75 % qui a été payée plus tôt cette année après la reclassification, conformément au conseil que le SPP a reçu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est une bonne chose. Vous avez piqué ma curiosité, monsieur le Président. Il y avait des heures supplémentaires obligatoires la dernière fois que nous nous sommes parlé. Ont-elles été éliminées? Le SPP couvre-t-il encore des quarts d'heures supplémentaires?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Ils ont été considérablement réduits.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Où en sommes-nous maintenant? Il y a eu des mauvaises situations où des gens travaillaient des semaines de 70 ou 80 heures, ce qui n'est pas bon pour personne, et certainement pas pour eux. Qu'entendez-vous par « considérablement réduits »?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Il est rare maintenant que nous devons obliger une personne de faire des heures supplémentaires, tandis que c'était monnaie courante lorsque je suis arrivée ici.

Vous avez les chiffres, monsieur Graham, sur ce que nous dépensons en heures supplémentaires par rapport à ce que nous dépensions dans le passé.

M. Robert Graham:

Oui. Il y a des événements, des événements d'envergure comme la Fête du Canada, où tout le monde doit mettre l'épaule à la roue, tant les employés opérationnels que non opérationnels, mais nous prévoyons une réduction des dépenses en heures supplémentaires de l'ordre de 10 à 15 % pour l'exercice en cours.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Puis-je demander une clarification, monsieur le président? Est-ce une réduction des dépenses en heures supplémentaires de 10 à 15 %?

M. Robert Graham:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Je ne suis pas certain si on a répondu à cette question. Lorsque vous dites « rare ». Ce sont des termes d'interprétation. Je ne sais pas comment ce peut être quantifié.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Je suis désolée. Je n'ai pas les chiffres pour vous, mais ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que lorsque je suis arrivée ici, nous devions tous les jours... eh bien, pas tous les jours. Nous devions presque quotidiennement demander à des gens de faire des heures supplémentaires et, souvent, nous devions les obliger de rentrer travailler, car ils ne voulaient pas faire ces heures supplémentaires.

Maintenant, comme je l'ai dit, j'ai eu une conversation avec mes commandants des opérations ce matin. Ils m'ont confirmé que c'est très rare maintenant, mais je n'ai pas de chiffres à vous donner.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce une demande raisonnable de nous fournir ces chiffres?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Certainement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Les chiffres dans le passé et les chiffres actuels...?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy: Certainement.

M. Nathan Cullen: Ce serait utile. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai une question à propos de ce qui se passe. Je ne sais pas si vous pourrez y répondre. Elle s'adresse à vous et à Travaux publics, mais je vais la poser plus tard.

J'ai une question brève pour vous, madame MacLatchy. Vous avez mentionné plus tôt les deux unités de négociation, et vous avez dit que vous n'y êtes pas favorable, et le SPP dit qu'il veut les deux unités. Je sais qu'il n'y a pas de compétence au pays, mais avons-nous examiné ce que d'autres pays dans le monde font? Que se passe-t-il dans le système parlementaire à Westminster, en Australie ou en Nouvelle-Zélande? Ils ont des systèmes semblables. Ont-ils des unités de négociation internes?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

En ce qui concerne la structure opérationnelle...?

Je ne connais pas la réponse, monsieur. Il faudrait que je me renseigne.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Je serais curieux de le savoir, car nous pourrions peut-être faire des comparaisons avec ce qu'ils font, par exemple, et comment ils administrent le Parlement.

Oui, il y a des parlements dans le monde, mais ils ne sont pas bicaméraux. Ils ne sont pas aussi grands que celui-ci. C'est peut-être un point que nous voudrons prendre en considération en ce qui concerne les unités de négociation.

(1205)

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Nous avons beaucoup discuté avec nos partenaires — les parlements fédéraux, à défaut d'une meilleure expression — en Australie, au Royaume-Uni et dans ces pays pour obtenir des renseignements sur les opérations, mais je n'ai pas de données sur leur structure opérationnelle. Je peux certainement obtenir ces renseignements.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Merci.

Puis-je revenir au déménagement? Nous accusons du retard. Je sais que nous espérions déménager à l'automne. Je présume que ce sera en janvier ou en février. Qu'en est-il? Est-ce prévu dans cela ou est-ce davantage une question qui relève de Travaux publics?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Initialement, le plan était de déménager durant l'été, de commencer à déménager après l'ajournement de la Chambre à la fin de juin. En fait, c'est arrivé en partie, car les membres qui avaient des bureaux dans l'édifice du Centre et qui n'allaient pas avoir de bureaux dans l'édifice de l'Ouest ont été déménagés cet été. Les bureaux des agents supérieurs de la Chambre, des whips et des dirigeants de la Chambre, ainsi que mon bureau, n'ont pas encore été déménagés mais ils le seront durant la pause de décembre et de janvier. Le 28 janvier, la Chambre siégera dans l'édifice de l'Est, dans la chambre provisoire.

Soit dit en passant, je devrais vous dire que si les membres sont intéressés à faire une visite, il y aura des occasions de le faire chaque semaine. Nous prévoirons un créneau chaque semaine. Je sais que de nombreux députés n'ont pas encore vu l'enceinte et aimeraient la voir.

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai une question rapide. En ce qui concerne les préoccupations budgétaires, à quoi devons-nous nous attendre pour le retard? Quelle est l'incidence sur le budget global pour ce projet?

Sentez-vous libre de parler du Sénat également, si vous le voulez.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms: Puisque nous sommes sur le sujet....

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je crois savoir qu'étant donné que des travaux ont déjà été entrepris, il n'y a pas d'incidence, mais je vais laisser le soin à Dan Paquette ou à Michel de répondre.

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration, Chambre des communes):

Je dirais qu'il n'y a aucune incidence négative concernant le soi-disant retard et le fait que nous déménagerons dans la chambre provisoire en janvier. Toutes les dépenses ont été comptabilisées dans le Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice en cours.

M. Scott Simms:

La Chambre haute...?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je serais réticent à commenter ce qui se passe à l'autre endroit.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

Avez-vous remarqué ce que j'ai essayé de faire?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous devez être amis au Sénat.

M. Scott Simms:

Désolé. C'est juste une question d'intérêt.

Je m'intéresse beaucoup à ce sujet et aux technologies. Je ne sais pas combien de temps il me reste, mais l'une des choses que je voulais voir, c'est que lorsque les gens se lèvent à la Chambre pour faire un discours, il y a une horloge. Elle est très visible, plutôt que... Je ne veux pas vous offenser, car vous faites très bien votre travail. Vous levez la main après une minute ou deux ou peu importe. Je vous en remercie.

Dans la majorité des pays dans le monde, ou dans les assemblées parlementaires, il y a une horloge qui est visible. Ce n'est peut-être pas important pour d'autres, mais tenons-nous compte de cela et des autres types de technologies pour la chambre provisoire?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'ai vu cela, par exemple, en France, et je pense que c'est le cas aussi à Washington, mais pas à Westminster, bien entendu. Quoi qu'il en soit, c'est le type de décisions que la Chambre devra prendre pour déterminer si elle veut un processus différent où l'on utilise un chronomètre qui commence à 10 minutes jusqu'à zéro, ou à 35 secondes jusqu'à zéro, mais ce n'était pas la décision de la Chambre jusqu'à maintenant.

M. Scott Simms:

Faut-il apporter une modification au Règlement pour inclure cette technologie?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est une bonne question.

M. Charles Robert:

Il est probablement plus sûr d'apporter un changement au Règlement.

M. Scott Simms:

Avec la technologie de nos jours, cela semblait tout simplement évident. Je sais que nous nous levons et nous nous assoyons pour voter. Nous n'avons pas de mécanisme de vote électronique.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je pense que votre question consiste à savoir s'il est possible d'installer un écran ou des écrans qui pourraient servir d'horloge et indiquer aux députés combien de temps il leur reste. Je pense que nous pourrions probablement répondre à cela.

M. Michel Patrice:

La réponse est que la technologie serait là, si la Chambre décide de l'utiliser.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vais vous donner plus de détails lorsque nous aurons déménagé.

Merci beaucoup, mesdames et messieurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une importante question liée à cela.

Avons-nous réglé la question du défilé entre la Chambre des communes et le Sénat? Allons-nous prendre la Ligne de la Confédération? Allons-nous emprunter la rue Wellington dans la papamobile?

M. Charles Robert:

La préférence est de maintenir les traditions et les cérémonies qui font partie de nos pratiques depuis 150 ans. Des ajustements seront apportés, car nous serons dans deux édifices pendant un certain temps, lorsque le déménagement aura lieu.

Des propositions sont mises de l'avant pour déterminer comment procéder. On peut penser, par exemple, que pour chaque discours du Trône au nouvel emplacement, les députés voudront y participer. Pour les événements futurs, nous devrons probablement passer par un processus dans le cadre duquel nous solliciterions l'intérêt des gens pour déterminer le nombre de véhicules nécessaires pour emmener les membres au Sénat.

(1210)

M. Scott Simms:

Y a-t-il de l'espace pour la masse à bord de l'autobus?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Malheureusement, les recherches sur le transporteur à faisceau ne sont pas fructueuses.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Charles Robert:

La couronne de la Reine est transportée dans une voiture distincte pour la rentrée parlementaire, alors je suppose que nous pourrions faire la même chose pour la masse.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

J'ai une question à poser très rapidement, que M. Reid a porté à mon attention. Nous avons parlé des nouveaux fourgons dont le SPP fait l'acquisition. Seront-ils équipés de défibrillateurs et des efforts seront-ils déployés pour équiper tous les véhicules de défibrillateurs à l'avenir?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est une question intéressante. Dans les véhicules de police que vous voyez sur la Colline, il y a quelques défibrillateurs, mais comme nous l'avons dit, nous délaissons les véhicules de la GRC et optons pour les véhicules du SPP. Je vais discuter avec notre personnel des opérations. À l'heure actuelle, je ne crois pas qu'il y a des défibrillateurs dans tous nos véhicules, mais je vous ferai parvenir cette information. L'idée d'équiper tous les véhicules d'un défibrillateur est intéressante.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Puis-je poser une question complémentaire?

Le président:

Soyez rapide.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les véhicules seront-ils des véhicules de police complètement équipés, ou s'agira-t-il de véhicules civils?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Ce seront des véhicules du SPP. C'est un véhicule certifié pour l'application de la loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce un véhicule équipé pour l'application de la loi, ou est-ce seulement un véhicule certifié?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Il sera équipé pour l'unité opérationnelle qui l'utilisera. Dans ce cas-ci, les agents pourront avoir des armes à feu.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Ce secteur ne serait-il pas mieux couvert par des caméras?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Le président:

Je vais utiliser ma prérogative en tant que président pour poser une dernière question. En ce qui concerne les rénovations de cet édifice, le Comité a parlé d'une cour à l'intérieur ou à l'extérieur, pour un terrain de jeux pour les enfants, ce qui m'amène à une question plus importante. Un article est paru dans Options politique sur nos opinions au sujet des travaux de rénovation de 13 ans de cet édifice. Je me demande si le greffier serait disposé à tenir une séance avec le Comité à ce sujet dans le futur.

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que ce serait un exercice utile. Nous serions disposés à faire appel à des architectes et à d'autres concepteurs, de même qu'à des spécialistes du patrimoine, qui pourraient répondre à des questions et examiner des suggestions que vous pourriez avoir sur la façon dont vous voulez que l'édifice soit rénové.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Outre les architectes qui travaillent pour la Chambre des communes, je pense que vous voudrez faire appel aux architectes de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada. Ce serait utile.

Bien franchement, je pense qu'il est essentiel pour la Chambre, durant la période des rénovations, de continuer de mettre l'accent sur l'importance de l'accès public à l'édifice du Centre aux parlementaires et aux médias. L'idée d'avoir une « salle des dépêches » là où elle se trouve en ce moment est très importante, car les parlementaires peuvent se rendre à la période des questions rapidement, pour être présents ici à l'édifice du Centre et pour questionner les députés sur ce qui se passe. Pour moi, c'est essentiel à notre démocratie, et j'espère que les membres qui seront ici au cours des 10 prochaines années continueront d'insister là-dessus.

Le président:

C'est 13 ans.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Peu importe le nombre...

Le président:

Chers collègues, nous allons passer à des votes sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A). CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES ç Crédit 1a—Dépenses des programmes..........15 906 585 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.) SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE ç Crédit 1a—Dépenses des programmes..........7 127 658 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Puis-je faire rapport des crédits du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci à nos témoins. Nous allons faire une courte pause pour passer à la prochaine séance avec les prochains témoins. Nous allons suspendre nos travaux une trentaine de secondes.

(1210)

(1215)

Le président:

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 132e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre dans le cadre de laquelle nous allons poursuivre notre étude de la question de privilège concernant la question des publications de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada au sujet du projet de loi C-71, Loi modifiant certaines lois et un règlement relatifs aux armes à feu.

Nous sommes ravis d'accueillir Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre des communes, de même que des fonctionnaires du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor. Nous recevons Louise Baird, secrétaire adjointe, Communications stratégiques et affaires ministérielles, et Tracey Headley, directrice, Centre de politique des communications et de l'image de marque. Merci de vous être libérés aujourd'hui.

Nous allons commencer avec la déclaration liminaire de M. Robert, qui sera suivie de celle de Mme Baird. On vous écoute, monsieur Robert.

M. Charles Robert:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je suis ravi d'être ici avec vous pour aider le Comité dans le cadre de son étude de la question de privilège soulevée par M. Motz, le député de Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, concernant les documents publiés sur le site Web de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada au sujet du projet de loi C-71.

(1220)

[Français]

Les questions de privilège, lorsqu'elles sont renvoyées en comité, sont l'occasion d'étudier en détail une problématique mise en avant par les députés eux-mêmes et d'émettre des recommandations qui profiteront à tous. C'est par l'entremise de votre comité que des témoins pourront être entendus, que des documents pourront être obtenus et que des actions concrètes pourront être accomplies, si tel est le désir du Comité, bien sûr.

Le respect de la dignité et de l'autorité du Parlement est un droit fondamental que la Chambre prend très au sérieux. La mission de la présidence, comme serviteur de la Chambre, est d'assurer la protection des droits et des privilèges non seulement de chaque député, mais aussi ceux de la Chambre dans son ensemble. En ce sens, tout affront à l'autorité de la Chambre peut constituer un outrage au Parlement.

Comme il est écrit à la page 87 de la troisième édition de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes: Il ne fait [...] aucun doute que la Chambre des communes a toujours les moyens de se protéger contre la pure malveillance si l’occasion se présente. [Traduction]

Dans sa décision du 19 juin 2018, le Président de la Chambre a résumé les faits entourant la publication d’information concernant le projet de loi C-71 sur le site Web de la GRC. Alors que le projet de loi en question suivait le cours normal du processus législatif, l’information publiée sur le site Web de la GRC laissait croire que ses dispositions allaient nécessairement entrer en vigueur, ou l’étaient déjà.

Le Président a rappelé aux députés que l’autorité du Parlement concernant l’examen et l’adoption des projets de loi est incontestable et ne doit jamais être tenue pour acquise. Il a aussi ajouté, et je cite: « Les parlementaires et les citoyens doivent avoir l’assurance que les fonctionnaires responsables de diffuser de l’information concernant la législation prêtent attention à ce qui se passe au Parlement et fournissent des renseignements clairs et précis sur les projets de loi en question. »

Lorsque des questions similaires à celle devant votre comité ont été soulevées à la Chambre par les députés, d’anciens Présidents ont répété que ce type de situation ne devrait jamais se produire et ont invité le gouvernement et les divers ministères dont ils ont la responsabilité à trouver des solutions. En effet, les Présidents de la Chambre ont toujours pris grand soin de se faire les défenseurs de l’autorité du Parlement. Une atteinte à cette autorité se définit comme une transgression ou un manque de respect envers la Chambre et ses députés. Comme l’avait dit le Président Sauvé le 17 octobre 1980, la publication d’information préjudiciable aux délibérations de la Chambre peut, par exemple, se transformer en outrage au Parlement.

Dans le cas présent, le Président a déploré le manque d’attention dont la GRC a fait preuve à l’égard du rôle fondamental des députés à titre de législateurs. Pour lui, l’autorité parlementaire en ce qui concerne la législation ne peut pas être contournée ou usurpée. Le Président l’a bien expliqué quand il dit: « […] je ne peux fermer les yeux sur une façon de faire […] qui fait fi du rôle du Parlement. Autrement, nous nous ferions les complices du dénigrement de l’autorité et de la dignité du Parlement. »[Français]

Je vous remercie à nouveau de cette invitation à témoigner.

Je me ferai maintenant le plaisir de répondre à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Baird.

Mme Louise Baird (secrétaire adjointe, Communications stratégiques et affaires ministérielles, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Merci, monsieur le président, de nous avoir invitées à comparaître devant le Comité.

Je suis accompagnée de Tracey Headley. Elle est la directrice du Centre de politique des communications et de l'image de marque, au Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor.

Je suis la secrétaire adjointe, Communications stratégiques et affaires ministérielles, et j'assume, à ce titre, la responsabilité de la politique du gouvernement du Canada visant les communications et l'image de marque. Je suis également chef fonctionnel des communications au Secrétariat, ce qui veut dire que je suis responsable du travail de communication au sein du ministère.[Français]

Dans ma présentation, j'aimerais vous donner un aperçu de la politique sur les communications et souligner certains des changements qui ont été apportés en 2016.

Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, l'environnement des communications a beaucoup changé au cours des dernières années. Les modifications à la politique reflètent ces changements. Les communications sont au coeur du travail du gouvernement du Canada et contribuent directement à la confiance du public canadien envers son gouvernement.[Traduction]

Une des principales exigences de la politique veut que les communications avec le public soient claires, objectives, factuelles, non partisanes et présentées en temps opportun. Cette exigence s’applique à toutes les activités de communication, y compris celles qui portent sur les projets de loi présentés au Parlement: elles doivent être claires et factuelles afin d’éviter toute confusion et toute présomption quant à la décision de l’une ou l’autre des chambres. En vertu du Code de valeurs et d’éthique du secteur public, les fonctionnaires reconnaissent et respectent le rôle fondamental que joue le Parlement dans l’examen, la révision, la modification et l’approbation des lois.

La politique sur les communications établit les responsabilités des administrateurs généraux pour ce qui est de veiller à ce que la fonction des communications soit exercée de façon appropriée dans leur organisation. Dans le cadre de ces responsabilités, ils doivent désigner un haut fonctionnaire en tant que chef des communications. La politique ne prescrit pas les processus d’approbation des ministères, mais permet plutôt aux ministères de déterminer la meilleure façon de gérer leurs communications compte tenu de leurs besoins opérationnels particuliers. C'est logique étant donné la vaste gamme d’organisations visées par la politique.

Le gouvernement communique avec le public dans les deux langues officielles pour informer les Canadiens des politiques, des programmes, des services et des initiatives, ainsi que des droits et des responsabilités des Canadiens en vertu des lois. L’administration des communications est une responsabilité commune qui exige la collaboration de divers membres du personnel au sein des ministères et entre les ministères sur des initiatives horizontales.

La nouvelle politique est appuyée par la nouvelle Directive sur la gestion des communications. Ensemble, elles modernisent la pratique des communications du gouvernement du Canada afin de suivre le rythme de la façon dont les citoyens communiquent dans un environnement largement numérique.

Un des changements apportés par la nouvelle politique vise à mieux définir les responsabilités. La politique précédente ciblait l'institution dans son ensemble. La nouvelle politique clarifie les responsabilités des administrateurs généraux et désigne un haut fonctionnaire comme chef des communications pour gérer l’image de marque et toutes les communications du ministère.

La directive connexe énonce les responsabilités propres aux chefs des communications. Par exemple, ils doivent, entre autres, approuver les produits de communication et superviser la présence du ministère sur le Web, collaborer avec le Bureau du Conseil privé et d’autres ministères à des initiatives prioritaires qui nécessitent la participation de plusieurs ministères, et surveiller et analyser l’environnement public.

(1225)

[Français]

Les administrateurs généraux et les chefs des communications doivent veiller à ce que les renseignements soient opportuns, clairs, objectifs, exacts, factuels et non partisans.[Traduction]

Une autre nouveauté est le renforcement important de la politique et de la directive en ce qui concerne les communications non partisanes. La politique précédente exigeait que la fonction publique mène des activités de communication de façon non partisane, sans toutefois définir ce qu’on entendait par là. Pour la première fois, la nouvelle politique définit explicitement le terme « communications non partisanes » de la façon suivante.

Les communications doivent être objectives, factuelles et explicatives, et ne doivent pas contenir de slogans, d’images, d’identificateurs, de biais, de désignation ou d’affiliation à un parti politique. La couleur principale associée au parti au pouvoir ne peut être utilisée de façon dominante, à moins qu’un élément soit couramment représenté dans cette couleur, et la publicité ne doit pas comprendre le nom, la voix ou l’image d’un ministre, d’un député ou d’un sénateur.

En ce qui concerne les communications numériques, une autre caractéristique de la nouvelle politique met davantage l’accent sur l’utilisation du numérique comme moyen principal de communication et d’interaction avec le public. Cela signifie que les ministères et organismes utilisent le Web et les médias sociaux comme principaux canaux pour communiquer avec les Canadiens.

Il est important que le gouvernement diffuse les renseignements et mobilise les citoyens sur les plateformes de leur choix. En même temps, nous reconnaissons qu’il y a des Canadiens qui continueront d’avoir besoin des méthodes traditionnelles de communication, de sorte qu’un éventail de produits sont encore utilisés pour répondre aux divers besoins du public.

Comme je l’ai mentionné, j’ai le rôle de chef fonctionnel des communications au Secrétariat. Cela signifie que mon secteur est responsable d’élaborer des produits de communication, d’offrir des conseils en communication et de fournir des services en consultation avec des experts du ministère. Cela comprend les communications internes et externes. À cette fin, mon équipe organise des événements ministériels, y compris des conférences de presse, et prépare des stratégies de communication, des discours et des communiqués, entre autres produits de communication.[Français]

Nous assurons aussi une présence sur le Web pour le Secrétariat et nous gérons les comptes de médias sociaux ministériels et la fonction des relations avec les médias.

Ces principales fonctions de communication sont relativement normalisées dans tous les ministères. Comme je l'ai mentionné au début, cependant, il y a certaines différences selon la nature du travail et les exigences des opérations.

(1230)

[Traduction]

Voilà qui conclut mon allocution. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions, si c'est ce que le Comité souhaite.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous deux.

Madame Baird, dans votre allocution, vous avez utilisé les mots clés « claires, objectives, factuelles, non partisanes et présentées en temps opportun ». Est-ce que nous pouvons nous concentrer sur l'aspect de la présentation « en temps opportun »? Je comprends l'erreur commise, d'avoir donné à croire qu'un projet de loi avait été adopté alors que ce n'était pas le cas, mais je crois que tous les ministères du gouvernement doivent faire preuve de diligence raisonnable et prévoir ce genre de situation.

J'ai comparé la situation relative au projet de loi C-71 à celle du projet de loi C-76, au sujet de l'élection. Bien sûr, Élections Canada doit s'organiser avant que le projet de loi soit adopté. Sinon, cela ne fonctionnerait pas. L'entrée en vigueur est prise au sérieux, et ainsi de suite.

Je comprends que certains ministères puissent se lancer tête première dans quelque chose, même si la décision n'a pas fait l'objet d'un second examen objectif, si je peux me permettre d'utiliser cette expression qui nous vient de l'autre chambre. Cependant, dans ce cas particulier, vous parlez de vos communications internes et externes. L'erreur a été causée par quelque chose qui s'est produit à la Sécurité publique, dans les communications externes, mais ce sont les mécanismes internes qui auraient pu servir à résoudre cela.

Ce n'est pas l'affaire de votre ministère, mais comment pouvez-vous assumer la responsabilité de cela, et corriger cela comme étant un exercice de communication interne au sein des autres ministères?

Mme Louise Baird:

Comment dois-je le faire? Ou comment les personnes qui sont responsables de cela dans leurs ministères doivent-elles le faire?

M. Scott Simms:

Comment leur feriez-vous savoir que ce qu'ils ont fait n'est pas correct et qu'ils doivent faire ceci ou cela pour corriger la situation? Vous dites, par exemple, qu'il y a des formulations particulières à utiliser pour éviter de donner à croire que le projet de loi a reçu la sanction royale avant que cela ait été fait.

Mme Louise Baird:

L'équipe de Tracey va très régulièrement donner des conseils aux ministères et faire de la sensibilisation auprès d'eux. Ce sont les ministères qui élaborent la politique, en assurent la conformité et veillent à faire connaître les règles et les exigences de la politique. Des rappels sont très régulièrement transmis.

Pour revenir sur ce que vous avez dit en premier, il faut en effet que les services de communication et d'autres parties d'un ministère donné soient prêts. Il faut des communications appropriées autour du dépôt d'un projet de loi. Il faut que le tout soit bien formulé en fonction du statut réel, mais cela fait partie du travail normal de communication.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce que nous nous sommes adonnés à ce genre d'exercice? Avons-nous des cas de ministères — pas le vôtre — qui ont précisé la formulation à employer? Avez-vous vu des communications internes qui soulignent cela?

Mme Louise Baird:

Je ne crois pas avoir vu quoi que ce soit pour ces circonstances très précises. Je peux dire que, selon le suivi que nous faisons régulièrement, les agents de communication en ville savent très bien qu'ils doivent utiliser le « si ». Ils doivent préciser que c'est « si le projet de loi est adopté ».

Si vous regardez les communiqués de presse et ce qui est soumis à un examen un peu plus étroit que le cas dont nous discutons aujourd'hui, je dirais que le degré de conformité est très élevé, quant à la pertinence du langage employé.

M. Scott Simms:

Je comprends. Le ministère s'est montré très désolé de la situation. Ils ont admis l'erreur, mais ce qu'ils ont indiqué par l'intermédiaire du ministre — vous avez probablement lu son témoignage —, c'est qu'on va s'employer à examiner et à corriger cela. J'ai l'impression que vous êtes en bonne voie d'obtenir que ce soit corrigé, ou même que c'est déjà corrigé. Il semble que ce soit un cas isolé. Est-ce juste?

Mme Louise Baird:

Je crois que ce type particulier de situation est assez inhabituel. Je n'entends pas souvent cela.

M. Scott Simms:

La situation dans laquelle ils se sont retrouvés, du fait de leur propre erreur.

Mme Louise Baird:

Oui. Je crois cependant qu'il y a lieu de rappeler les règles aux gens, et de leur rappeler aussi qu'il y a des canaux de communication dans notre réseau.

M. Scott Simms:

Et cela relève de vous.

Mme Louise Baird:

Cela m'incomberait probablement. Cela peut relever de ma responsabilité. En tant que chef des communications d'un organisme central, et responsable de la politique de communication, c'est probablement une chose que j'envisagerais de faire de concert avec le BCP, car c'est le BCP qui est à la tête de la fonction de communication.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois. C'est peut-être une recommandation que nous pourrions faire dans notre rapport, soit, essentiellement, de présenter un modèle pour le libellé de sorte que nous ne...[Français]

Monsieur Robert, je suis heureux de vous revoir.[Traduction]

J'aimerais simplement vous interroger sur la question du privilège. Je fais des lectures sur le privilège, depuis quelque temps, et j'essaie de me renseigner sur le privilège dans les livres d'histoire, et sur la façon dont il a évolué de diverses façons. Je tiens à reconnaître la contribution de M. Robert Maingot, qui a écrit un excellent livre à ce sujet.

Est-ce que cela l'emporte vraiment sur nos responsabilités à titre de parlementaires? Quand cela se produit à l'extérieur, est-ce que cela nous touche vraiment à l'intérieur? En quoi est-ce un manquement?

(1235)

M. Charles Robert:

C'est en fait une décision que vous prenez, en tant que parlementaires.

Historiquement, au Royaume-Uni, dans les quatre études qui ont été réalisées depuis la Deuxième Guerre mondiale — en 1967, en 1977, en 1999 et la dernière, je crois, en 2013 —, vous pouvez voir une plus grande réceptivité concernant la participation publique, et la réduction de la portée du privilège à des aspects que les parlementaires estiment toujours fondamentaux et cruciaux pour leurs activités. On constate aussi, du point de vue du public, que le Parlement conserve son pouvoir et sa dignité.

En cas d'outrage, auparavant, les journaux devaient régulièrement aller répondre de leurs actes devant le Parlement pour des critiques indésirables exprimées au sujet des parlementaires ou du Parlement lui-même. Nous parlons ici de quelque chose de très différent. Nous parlons d'un partenaire dans le régime politique. Nous parlons de l'exécutif, et historiquement, au Canada, il y a une certaine sensibilité concernant la façon dont les gouvernements font des déclarations qui comportent des suppositions sur le travail que le Parlement entreprend. C'est dans un tel cas que le problème a surgi, et ce n'est pas la première fois.

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Scott Simms:

Il est à espérer que nous aurons un autre tour. Nous en aurons un?

Le président:

Nous allons essayer.

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Mes questions s'adressent à Mme Baird et à Mme Headley.

Est-ce que la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, peu importe son indépendance concernant des opérations particulières d'application de la loi, est soumise à la politique sur les communications et l'image de marque, ainsi qu'à la Directive sur la gestion des communications?

Mme Louise Baird:

Oui, elle l'est.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Quelles sont les conséquences d'un épisode de non-respect de ces documents?

Mme Louise Baird:

En général?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, en général.

Mme Louise Baird:

Il est possible de faire diverses choses, en cas de non-respect. En général, pour commencer, selon la gravité de la nature de l'infraction, nous travaillerions avec le ministère à apporter des correctifs. Nous veillerions ensuite à ce que le ministère... nous donnerions peut-être une session de formation au personnel pour qu'il connaisse bien les règles de la Politique de communication et de la Directive sur la gestion des communications.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce que les deux publications en ligne de la GRC ayant mené à cette étude sont soumises à ces deux instruments de politique?

Mme Louise Baird:

Oui, la GRC est soumise à cela.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Croyez-vous que les publications de la GRC étaient conformes à la politique et à la directive?

Mme Louise Baird:

La question ne nous a jamais été signalée, au Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, comme étant une question de conformité. De toute évidence, nous en avons entendu parler depuis. Les responsabilités — j'en ai parlé un peu au début — sont claires, pour l'administrateur général et le chef des communications.

Dans le cas qui nous intéresse, le chef des communications est responsable du contenu de leurs sites Web. Il semble qu'il y a eu des problèmes de processus, concernant la personne qui devait approuver le contenu Web. D'après ce que je comprends, la GRC examine maintenant ou a modifié ses processus afin de veiller à avoir le niveau d'approbation approprié.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien entendu, les politiques visent habituellement les questions d'ordre général, mais je crois qu'il y a des moments où des questions particulières sont traitées. Par exemple, la Directive sur la gestion des communications comporte des règles précises sur les communications précédant une élection. En fait, les ministres du Conseil du Trésor ont modifié cet élément particulier le mois dernier, après que les conservateurs aient soutenu que le gouvernement rendait les règles du jeu nettement inéquitables avec ce qu'il proposait dans son projet de loi C-76.

Pour revenir à l'étude dont il est question, est-ce qu'il y a, dans les politiques gouvernementales en matière de communication, des directives sur les communications relatives aux travaux parlementaires?

Mme Louise Baird:

La politique ne contient rien au sujet des communications en général visant les travaux parlementaires. Il n'y a qu'une exigence particulière, liée à la publicité, qui dit que vous ne pouvez rien annoncer qui requiert l'approbation du Parlement, tant que cette approbation n'a pas été donnée.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Avez-vous une idée des raisons pour lesquelles il n'y a rien?

Mme Louise Baird:

Est-ce que je sais pourquoi il n'y a rien dans la politique? Je crois que la politique, comme vous l'avez mentionné, n'a pas ce degré de détail.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Croyez-vous que nous devrions inclure, dans notre rapport, une recommandation vous demandant d'ajouter à ces instruments de politique un rappel de la nécessité de respecter le Parlement?

Mme Louise Baird:

Je crois que c'est au Comité de décider de ce qu'il veut recommander. Je crois que nous pouvons compter sur des outils qui guident les agents de communication du gouvernement, ces gens étant peut-être mieux placés pour fournir ce type d'orientation. Nous avons un document qui est très utilisé et qui s'intitule « Guide de rédaction du contenu Web pour Canada.ca ». Il prescrit la façon de rédiger les textes destinés au Web. Nous pouvons donner le lien au Comité si cela vous intéresse. On y trouve un certain niveau de détail pour les écrits. Ce serait peut-être l'endroit qui conviendrait pour ce type d'orientation.

(1240)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il est dommage que les fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé ne puissent être ici. À ce sujet, je vous pose ces questions sur la coordination et les autorisations, vu votre rôle dans votre ministère.

Quels types de produits de communication faut-il envoyer au Bureau du Conseil privé pour les soumettre à l'examen et à l'approbation du Centre?

Mme Louise Baird:

Il n'y a pas de règle explicite. Quotidiennement, le Bureau du Conseil privé discute avec les groupes chargés des communications. On privilégie habituellement l'annonce susceptible d'une plus grande médiatisation ou qui, peut-être, met en jeu des sommes très élevées ou risque de froisser des susceptibilités, auquel cas, le Bureau du Conseil privé hérite davantage d'un rôle de coordination.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Comme le Bureau du Conseil privé compte plus de fonctionnaires plus immédiatement sensibles aux droits et aux privilèges du Parlement, devraient-ils être saisis des projets de communication sur les travaux parlementaires, conformément à une règle de conduite ou, simplement, parce que c'est conseillé pour voir venir et prévenir les problèmes comme ceux qu'ont causés les documents de la GRC?

Mme Louise Baird:

Il est sûr que le Bureau du Conseil privé possède des compétences dans son domaine. Peut-être pas dans le groupe chargé des communications, mais dans le domaine législatif et celui de la planification parlementaire où il s'y connaît en procédure parlementaire.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je reviens au document. Au paragraphe 6.3.1 de la politique, on lit que les administrateurs généraux ont l'obligation de fournir des renseignements objectifs, factuels et non partisans.

D'après vous, les documents de la GRC ont-ils satisfait à cette exigence?

Mme Louise Baird:

Encore une fois, quand la question a été soulevée, je n'étais pas impliquée. Après coup, je dirais, d'après ces critères, qu'ils n'étaient peut-être pas factuels, à cause de la confusion et de renseignements inexacts.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'après le paragraphe 6.10 de la Directive sur la gestion des communications, les chefs des communications sont chargés de veiller à ce que les activités et les produits de communication soient clairs, actuels, exacts.

D'après vous, ces conditions ont-elles été respectées?

Mme Louise Baird:

D'après les discussions de votre comité et ce dont la GRC a parlé, je pense qu'il y a eu confusion — manque de clarté.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Enfin, d'après le paragraphe 8.1.2 de la Directive, le Bureau du Conseil privé a la responsabilité d'exercer un rôle de leadership, de remise en question, d'orientation stratégique et de coordination des activités ministérielles de communication.

D'après vous, la GRC a-t-elle failli à cette tâche pour ses documents?

Mme Louise Baird:

Je pense que ce qui aurait été une publication sans histoire sur le Web n'aurait peut-être pas été communiqué au Bureau du Conseil privé.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Croyez-vous que quelque chose d'aussi simple que le respect du Parlement n'a pas besoin de figurer explicitement dans un guide de la politique à l'usage des fonctionnaires ou dans un document de cette nature?

Mme Louise Baird:

Dans ma déclaration préliminaire, j'ai fait allusion aux valeurs et à l'éthique. Je pense que les fonctionnaires s'en inspirent et qu'elles englobent quelque chose comme le respect pour le Parlement et la démocratie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Enfin, d'après vous, que faut-il qu'il arrive pour éviter la répétition d'un tel outrage?

Mme Louise Baird:

Indéniablement, il est possible d'annoncer des rappels. Grâce à nos canaux bien établis, nous sommes certainement heureux de rappeler aux intéressés leurs responsabilités dans ce domaine.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup, madame Baird.

Le président:

Merci, madame Kusie.

La parole est maintenant à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'interviens, comme d'habitude, avec une saine dose d'ignorance.

Il s'agit d'une question de privilège. Je suppose que ça ne fait pas partie de la formation dans les ministères.

Nous venons d'en parler avec les services de sécurité de la Colline. Ça fait partie de la formation de leurs nouveaux agents. La perception de la sécurité à l'extérieur de la Cité parlementaire serait très différente de celle d'ici, à cause de cette notion de privilège que notre Parlement et d'autres ont longtemps gardée avec soin.

Concernant le privilège auquel on a porté atteinte — et ici, comme je le soupçonne — est-ce que c'est abordé dans la formation de tous les agents fédéraux des communications? Je suppose que sa notion et son importance sur leur travail quotidien ne seraient pas innées chez eux — à moins qu'ils ne soient particulièrement doués en matière de privilège parlementaire.

Mme Louise Baird:

À ma connaissance, ça ne fait pas partie de la formation aux communications. Ça fait peut-être partie des responsabilités du Bureau du Conseil Privé, mais je l'ignore.

Dans mon secteur, par exemple, je suis chargée des affaires parlementaires et des communications, et des groupes collaborent étroitement entre eux. Là se trouvent les experts que nous pouvons consulter et nous avons des séances de formation interne, des comparutions devant des comités, pour comprendre les procédures parlementaires.

Mais, à la grandeur du système, la politique des communications n'en dirait rien.

(1245)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le personnel des communications de certains ministères ou organismes fédéraux, y compris celui de la GRC, ne saisiraient pas l'importance de cette question ni la raison pour laquelle elle serait perçue comme un problème par le Parlement.

Si je comprends bien, la publication donnait à entendre que le projet de loi avait été adopté et avait force de loi. C'est un problème pour le Parlement. Ça donne au public — corrigez-moi si je me trompe — l'impression que ça ne correspond pas aux faits et ça peut conduire à d'autres conséquences imprévues. Par exemple, des députés qui voteraient sur un projet de loi que les électeurs croient déjà adopté pourraient se faire demander des explications.

Vous pouvez comprendre en quoi ce malentendu ennuie les parlementaires. Est-ce justifié?

Mme Louise Baird:

D'après ce que je comprends de cette situation particulière, il y a eu erreur dans le processus. Un chef des communications est chargé du contenu Web. Les chefs des communications de toute la ville sauraient indéniablement quel langage employer pour respecter le privilège parlementaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Par exemple, « il est proposé ». C'est...

Mme Louise Baird:

Oui, absolument. Toutes ces expressions comme « si c'est adopté », « modifications proposées ».

Il me semble que, à la GRC, ça n'est pas passé par le niveau convenable d'approbation.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comme mon ami Simms l'a fait remarquer, ça accroche sur le caractère opportun et non partisan des communications.

Je soulèverais aussi le cas d'un projet de loi semblable pour lequel des ministères, dans ce cas, Élections Canada, agissent déjà comme si la loi avait été adoptée, pour se préparer. Vous semblez d'accord pour dire que c'est une bonne façon d'agir.

Le problème survient quand le projet de loi est encore l'objet de débats, particulièrement sur des points controversés: contrôle et classement des armes à feu, règles électorales, qui ne sont pas sans importance pour les Canadiens. Il peut s'instaurer un climat qui fait percevoir l'organisme fédéral comme ayant un parti pris et favorable à ces changements plutôt que d'être celui qui les applique.

Comprenez-vous ma logique?

Mme Louise Baird:

Oui. Je pense qu'il importe d'être transparent.

Ces projets de loi devraient faire l'objet de communications, mais il faut y expliquer qu'ils proposent des changements, qui surviendront s'ils sont adoptés, avec tous les éclaircissements nécessaires.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous en sommes les gardiens jaloux. Cette idée selon laquelle le Parlement n'est qu'un acteur après coup... Parfois, un gouvernement majoritaire peut donner l'impression que tel projet de loi qu'il propose sera adopté parce qu'il est majoritaire, en passant sous silence tout le processus d'application régulière de la loi dans laquelle nous sommes censés nous engager pour le compte des Canadiens.

Dernière question: cette erreur a-t-elle eu des conséquences?

Mme Louise Baird:

Pas de notre fait. Non.

M. Nathan Cullen:

De la part de la GRC, à ce que vous sachiez...?

Mme Louise Baird:

Je ne connais pas les détails.

Je sais que l'organisation a changé ses processus. Elle a rehaussé les niveaux d'approbation à ce qu'ils étaient censés être. Je suppose qu'il y a eu...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suis désolé, mais voulez-vous dire que l'autorisation est confiée à un niveau supérieur?

Mme Louise Baird:

À un niveau plus élevé d'approbation, oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Pareillement.

Entendons maintenant M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Robert, où en étions-nous? Revenons-y, parce que, pour commencer, j'ai fait erreur sur la personne. En fait, c'était Joseph Maingot et non Robert. Je tiens à le remercier de son travail.

Voici le passage de son livre: Cependant, toute manoeuvre visant à entraver ou à influencer l'action parlementaire d'un député par des moyens abusifs peut constituer une atteinte aux privilèges. C'est en fonction des faits de l'espèce qu'on détermine ce qui constitue un moyen de pression inadmissible. Finalement, il doit exister un lien entre les éléments qui sont censés établir l'ingérence et les délibérations du Parlement.

Voilà l'explication de l'atteinte à mes privilèges de député, si elle entrave mon travail. Je suppose que vous dites que c'est plus ou moins une insulte, qui conduit à l'atteinte aux privilèges.

M. Charles Robert:

Deux aspects sont à prendre en considération. Il y a certainement entrave au travail d'un député. Dans ce cas, si quelqu'un a effectivement essayé, de façon visiblement abusive et délibérée, de vous empêcher de faire votre travail, vous pourriez dire qu'il a entravé votre travail de parlementaire et dénoncer cette atteinte à vos privilèges.

C'est vos privilèges à vous, de député. Ceux de l'institution pourraient aussi être en cause, ce qui suppose que le Parlement réagira collectivement.

Un député, qui s'est senti atteint dans ses privilèges, a soulevé la question de privilège. Le Président a répondu que, d'après les précédents dont il avait eu connaissance, ça lui en semblait une, à première vue, qui mettait en cause l'autorité et la dignité du Parlement, sa capacité de jouer son rôle et soulevait des hypothèses sur sa façon de le remplir.

(1250)

M. Scott Simms:

Ça semble certainement la raison pour laquelle...

Désolé, poursuivez.

M. Charles Robert:

Pour terminer, la Chambre était d'accord, et c'est la raison pour laquelle votre comité est saisi de la question par suite d'un vote de la Chambre.

M. Scott Simms:

Mais ça pourrait englober une foule de choses, n'est-ce pas?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce qu'il suffit d'un seul vote de la Chambre pour juger s'il y a eu outrage au Parlement, qu'un organisme de l'extérieur, en l'occurrence l'exécutif, a fait preuve de mépris pour les fonctions du Parlement?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est vraiment à votre comité d'en décider après examen et de juger de la gravité de l'outrage, petite, moyenne, ou grande. Ensuite, pour boucler la boucle, la Chambre devrait adopter le rapport. Vous aurez alors examiné toute la question du privilège sous toutes ses coutures, et la Chambre aura conclu qu'elle ne veut pas que ça se reproduise.

Je pense que les fonctionnaires des ministères seront sensibles à l'idée même que ç'a été exposé et soulevé à ce niveau. On pourrait donc s'accorder à dire, avec le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor que, quand la situation se représentera, les agents des divers ministères qui produiront des communications sur les projets de loi déposés au Parlement seront plus sensibles à ces questions et éviteront ce genre de négligences, parce qu'on suppose que rien de cela n'était délibéré.

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai l'impression qu'on pourrait insister davantage sur cet aspect, pour les Canadiens qui comptent sur ces renseignements et en ressentent l'imminence. Je pense que l'affaire a été une insulte plus monumentale pour eux que pour nous. Ça change la nature du problème. Voilà pourquoi j'essaie de déterminer s'il faut plutôt imposer au ministère une peine administrative plutôt que de l'accuser d'avoir porté atteinte à mes privilèges particuliers. J'ai fait comme je fais d'habitude. J'ai débattu du projet de loi, je me suis prononcé...

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, je pense que la première intéressée est l'institution plutôt que les députés, individuellement, et leurs droits et leur capacité de travailler.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous en remercie.

Revenons aussi au ministère. J'espère que ce ne sera pas un exercice semblablement dépourvu de portée pratique. J'ignore si c'est le cas.

Revenons à l'aspect des communications et aux commentaires sur le ministère. Informez-vous les nouveaux fonctionnaires fédéraux sur le processus législatif, ses modalités? Je sais que ça semble un peu... Moi qui suis député, je n'ai pas vraiment reçu cette formation. Les fonctionnaires reçoivent-ils ce genre de formation à leur arrivée dans la fonction publique?

Mme Louise Baird:

Je ne le fais certainement pas au nom du gouvernement. Dans mon propre ministère, avec mon propre personnel des communications, comme je l'ai dit...

M. Scott Simms:

C'est dans votre ministère.

Mme Louise Baird:

Oui... dans mon ministère.

M. Scott Simms:

Que font les autres ministères? Avez-vous le pouvoir de dire, peut-être...

Mme Louise Baird:

Je ne l'ai pas. Je suis chargée de la politique des communications. Je pense qu'une partie des renseignements sur le processus législatif relèverait d'un autre service.

M. Scott Simms:

Je pose seulement la question parce que, peut-être, et je m'adresse ici à mes collègues, nous devrions songer à discuter aussi du processus législatif. Ne serait-il pas ironique que nous enseignions aux nouveaux fonctionnaires le processus législatif sans rien en dire aux nouveaux élus. Néanmoins, c'est une tout autre histoire.

Je vous remercie tous de votre temps et de votre patience.

Le président:

Merci.

Notre dernier intervenant est M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour enchaîner sur les observations de M. Simms, je me souviens que, à mon arrivée au Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, en 2008, nous avons eu droit à une journée de formation à l'ancien hôtel de ville d'Ottawa, sur le mode général de fonctionnement du gouvernement.

(1255)

M. Scott Simms:

Vous voyez bien! C'est plus que ce que nous avons eu.

M. John Nater:

J'en conviens. J'ignore si le programme existe toujours. Ça fait 10 ans. Comme j'avais des antécédents en sciences politique, c'était comme une remise à niveau des connaissances, mais néanmoins agréable.

Je remercie nos amis et nos témoins.

Monsieur Robert, quand le ministre Goodale a comparu, il a proposé à notre comité d'envisager l'étude d'un libellé, de propositions et de conseils utiles à l'intention du ministère sur la terminologie à utiliser quand il communique des renseignements sur un projet de loi encore à l'étude, que le Parlement n'a pas encore adopté.

Je n'aime pas particulièrement devoir réinventer la roue, faire du travail de plus quand la documentation, notamment plus de 30 années de décisions des Présidents de la Chambre sur des questions semblables, abonde déjà. Serait-il de votre ressort ou dans vos projets de produire un document — peut-être par l'entremise de la Direction des recherches pour le Bureau — qui réunirait ces renseignements sur ces décisions des 30 dernières années sur cette question?

M. Charles Robert:

Nous pourrions probablement colliger l'information, en effet. Je doute que ce soit très difficile.

Le genre de solution qui pourrait aider, ce serait que les communications nous présentent une chronologie du projet de loi. Par exemple, le personnel pourrait indiquer qu'à la date où la communication est diffusée, le projet de loi C-76 en était à la deuxième lecture à la Chambre des communes ou qu'un comité en était saisi. S'il fallait préciser le contexte chronologique, alors on serait absolument certain que le projet de loi n'a pas encore été adopté. Ce pourrait être une bonne façon de situer un communiqué pour que les ministères ou organismes concernés comprennent bien que le projet de loi est toujours à l'étude au Parlement, que rien n'est joué, qu'il n'a pas encore été finalisé et que les parlementaires ont encore toute la latitude possible pour l'étudier, le modifier, le rejeter à leur guise.

M. John Nater:

Seriez-vous prêt à noter cette idée sous forme de recommandation et à la transmettre au Comité?

M. Charles Robert:

Certainement. Avec plaisir.

M. John Nater:

Pourriez-vous aussi nous remettre un genre de version simplifiée des décisions des Présidents à ce jour? Je présume que le service de recherche a probablement déjà préparé quelque chose du genre, mais...

M. Charles Robert:

Nous pourrions sûrement aider le Comité en ce sens. Je communiquerai avec Andrew à ce sujet.

M. John Nater:

Cela vaudrait la peine.

Je tiens toujours à remercier nos attachés de recherche, qui font un travail exceptionnel. Ils nous ont déjà fourni de l'information utile sur les précédents, les différents contextes où des événements similaires se sont produits.

Je me demande si, de votre point de vue et selon vos connaissances, il y a des précédents en particulier que nous devrions garder à l'esprit pendant la préparation de notre rapport.

M. Charles Robert:

Je n'en suis pas trop certain. Je pense qu'il y en a qui étaient assez semblables. Tout dépend de l'impression que vous ont laissée les communications ou qu'elles vous laissent en rétrospective, si vous avez trouvé que trop de choses étaient tenues pour acquises. Supposons qu'une communication soit diffusée le jour où un projet de loi est présenté à la première lecture. Le Parlement l'étudie, il sera adopté et tout est tenu pour acquis.

Ce serait peut-être un exemple où une communication irait trop loin, mais si le projet de loi est déjà rendu à la deuxième chambre, à la troisième lecture, et qu'on s'attend à ce que la sanction royale ait lieu d'ici une ou deux semaines, c'est totalement différent. C'est la raison pour laquelle je crois que l'indication chronologique serait un bon mécanisme de sécurité. Il ne faut pas aller trop loin dans les suppositions sur ce que contiendra la version finale d'un projet de loi. On peut être certain de ce qui se trouvera dans sa première mouture, mais pas nécessairement dans la dernière. C'est ce qui sera fondamental pour l'intérêt public.

M. John Nater:

Nous avons assurément beaucoup de points de comparaison à l'échelle internationale, comme nous en avons à l'échelle nationale, avec les provinces et les territoires. Ce genre de chose peut être traité différemment d'un endroit à l'autre. Le Royaume-Uni a ses propres façons de faire.

Avez-vous une idée de ce que nous pourrions faire à la lumière de l'expérience d'autres pays? Je pense au Royaume-Uni, en particulier, à la façon dont il gère ce genre de choses. Avez-vous des réflexions à ce sujet?

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois que vous devriez poser cette question à Andre Barnes. C'est lui qui a produit cette analyse comparative. Il souligne qu'il n'y a pas d'exemple, à tout le moins au Royaume-Uni, similaire à celui sur lequel se penche ce comité, selon la 24e édition du Erskine May. Il peut y avoir toutes sortes de raisons à cela. Cela ne signifie pas nécessairement que le point de vue adopté ici est plus ou moins crédible. C'est vraiment une décision qui vous appartient.

M. John Nater:

Peut-être que nous devrions tous nous rendre au Royaume-Uni pour aller en discuter avec eux.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Nater.

En tant que chercheur, vous avez sûrement lu le rapport de M. Barnes sur tous les précédents, mais il aurait quelques mots à ajouter sur ce rapport.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Je veux seulement informer le Comité d'une chose, parce que selon ce document, nous n'avons pas eu de nouvelles du Royaume-Uni, de l'Australie ni de la Nouvelle-Zélande. En fait, des représentants de ces trois pays ont communiqué avec nous et nous ont dit qu'ils n'avaient pas de précédent similaire. Ils ne considéreraient pas cela comme un outrage, pour une raison ou une autre. Ils étaient surpris que ce soit le cas ici.

(1300)

M. Scott Simms:

Concernant les deux éléments dont nous avons parlé alors, nous dites-vous que le système de Westminster se fonde sur le concept de l'infraction par un député à la Loi sur le Parlement, plutôt que sur le concept d'outrage au Parlement?

Le président:

Comprenez-vous ce qu'il veut dire? Si cela ne constitue pas un problème en Nouvelle-Zélande, en Australie ou en Grande-Bretagne, ce n'est pas un problème.

M. Scott Simms:

Je comprends.

M. Andre Barnes:

Nos précédents ont évolué.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, mais pourquoi?

M. Andre Barnes:

C'est une très bonne question.

M. Scott Simms:

Je pense qu'une autre étude... Non, je blague.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Ce n'est pas une mauvaise idée. Nous approchons de la fin de la législature. Ce serait donc une rare occasion de peut-être nous prévoir du temps pour nous pencher sur des questions plus abstraites auxquelles nous pouvons être confrontés. M. Simms soulève peut-être une question que nous devrions étudier.

Le président:

Nous en parlerons un moment donné au Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure, monsieur Simms.

Merci à tous.

Monsieur Robert, je vous remercie d'avoir participé à ces deux séances.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 20, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.