header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-31 INDU 119

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1545)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Thank you very much. Our apologies. Voting is always fun at this time of year.

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 119 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology as we continue our fascinating, in-depth review of the Copyright Act.

We have with us today from the Professional Writers Association of Canada, Christine Peets, President; and from the Canadian Council of Archives, Nancy Marrelli, Special Adviser, Copyright.

Before we begin, Mr. Jeneroux, you had something you wanted to say.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Yes, thank you, Mr. Chair. I apologize to the witnesses for the few moments that this will take.

I do want to take the opportunity because of the exceptional circumstances that I believe we find ourselves in. I'm sure when the witnesses booked their travel a few weeks ago, they weren't anticipating that there would have been a pipeline purchase by the government at this point in time, so I want to take the opportunity to move the motion that we put on the Order Paper last Tuesday. The motion reads: That the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology undertake a study of four meetings to review, among other things: the overall cost of buying and expanding the Trans Mountain Pipeline project, the costs related to oversight (crown corporation) of the project, and how this decision will impact investor confidence in Canadian resource projects; and that the Committee reports the findings back to the House and make recommendations on how to restore investor confidence.

I believe, again, it's imperative at this point in time, with the uncertainty in the energy sector created by the situation that the Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance have unfortunately put us into, that this be something we undertake urgently so that we have that study before us, and we're able to advise the House of Commons appropriately.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

First we have Mr. Graham and then Mr. Baylis.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'm not really clear that it's relevant to having the witnesses here at this time. It's quite rude to the witnesses to do that right now.

The Chair:

Go ahead Mr. Baylis.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

I move that we adjourn the debate.

The Chair:

Debate will be adjourned, and we will move forward. Okay?

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Given that, Mr. Chair, I'm going to move my motion. If we're simply going to do that kind of a tactic, I will move my motion, which I have tabled in the committee.

The Chair:

May I jump in? As we talked about earlier, after the witnesses, you can move your motion at that time so we're not wasting the witnesses' time. We agreed to allow that out of camera so that you can move it in public, then we can actually debate it, but it's your call.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Do we have to vote on the motion? Procedurally, we can't talk about his motion now.

The Chair:

We have to vote on the motion to adjourn the debate.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's where I was coming from.

The Chair:

My apologies.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

On a point of order, are we voting on my motion to adjourn the debate?

The Chair:

To adjourn the debate, yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Are you all in favour of it?

An hon. member: No, not all.

Mr. Frank Baylis: Well, you just said it, so they're all in favour of my motion.

The Chair:

Stop. It's not debatable. It's a vote on the motion to adjourn the debate.

(Motion agreed to: yeas, 5; nays, 4)

(1550)

The Chair:

On that note, Mr. Masse, can we move forward?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, we can move forward.

The Chair:

Thank you.

To our witnesses, we are going to start off with Christine Peets. You have up to seven minutes. Thank you.

Ms. Christine Peets (President, Professional Writers Association of Canada):

Good afternoon. Thank you for this opportunity to speak to you as you undertake this very important task.

I am here on behalf of the Professional Writers Association of Canada, known as PWAC. Our organization represents more than 300 non-fiction writers from coast to coast to coast. Copyright is an extremely important issue to us, as it affects our members’ income and the respect that should be accorded us. We earn our living through our writing, and can only do so successfully when royalties are paid because we own the copyright. When we lose the right to claim the work as our own, income and respect are eroded.

Each year, PWAC members receive a repertoire payment as creator affiliates of Access Copyright, an organization that PWAC helped found. In the past 15 years, I have seen my payment diminish from several hundred dollars to less than $100 annually. Payments are based on the amount of work I report for the period being reviewed, which has fluctuated in part due to the fact that there are fewer print publications in Canada. Those that remain often have onerous contracts. Many publishers have instituted contracts giving almost all rights to the company and none, or very few, to the writer. This is common with our members.

To give you a concrete personal example, in 2009 I was presented with a contract to continue writing for a publication that had employed me since 2004. I reluctantly signed the contract but not before questioning it. I was being asked to give up all rights to material I had written. My client wanted certainty that I wouldn’t be able to sue them if or when they reused my writing. Is this fair?

The company claimed that it now needed to secure these rights because of what became known as the Heather Robertson case, a class action suit launched in 1996. Ms. Robertson was the plaintiff against several major media outlets that reprinted her work electronically without permission or payment. Other writers were similarly affected. The case was finally settled, after 13 years. There have been similar lawsuits in the United States, and there very well could be another one in Canada. Should freelancers have to engage in lengthy and expensive lawsuits against media outlets in order to protect their copyright and income?

Contract issues may be beyond the scope of this committee, but I hope this helps to illustrate the importance of protecting our copyright. As B.C. PWAC member Connie Proteau wrote to me, “It is important that our creative professionalism continues to be respected and appreciated by...fellow Canadians who read and learn from our works. We need strong copyright laws to protect works that are available in print format.”

To that I would add that we need strong copyright laws to protect all work, whether in print or electronic format. If writers are not fairly compensated and properly respected for their work, they will produce less work. Why would anyone continue to work without income or respect for the work? This could have a significant impact on the Canadian material available to Canadian readers, who may then look increasingly to other countries for their information. Ultimately, it could affect the quality of work being published, and perhaps the viability of our publishing industry. Canada needs a strong writing and publishing sector that contributes to the economy by providing both personal and corporate incomes that increase tax revenues.

Ontario PWAC member Michael Fay reminded me that our association and other writers' organizations played a critical role in the 2012 review of the Copyright Act, when copying restrictions and procedures were set. It is important to remember not only the user but the creator with this current review.

Another PWAC member from Ontario, Lori Straus, put it this way: “People copy creative work because it speaks to them and because it’s easy to do. It’s much harder to copy a KitKat: the effort wouldn’t be worth it.”

Finally, I would like to share with you another perspective. This was brought forward by B.C. PWAC member Ronda Payne. She draws an interesting comparison, as follows: No one debates who built a building or tries to usurp its ownership. What makes it acceptable to do so with the written word? It’s not. We put just as much effort into writing as the architect, the contractor or the building owner [puts into their work]. When the building owner allows others to use his space, he is paid in the form of rent or a lease, or the sale of the building. As writers, we should be afforded the same recognition of our ownership and rights. When someone takes our work, without even considering payment to the creator, it’s the equivalent of squatting in a building. I want people to appreciate my work, but I also want to be compensated for it. I deserve to be paid for the work I do.

Thank you very much for your time.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move now to Nancy Marrelli.

You have up to seven minutes.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli (Special Advisor, Copyright, Canadian Council of Archives):

Thank you.

The Canadian Council of Archives, the Conseil canadien des archives, the CCA, is a national non-profit organization representing more than 800 archives across the country. Membership includes provincial and territorial councils across Canada, the Association des archivistes du Québec, and the Association of Canadian Archivists.

I want to talk first about technological protection measures or TPMs. Provisions introduced in 2012 prohibit the circumvention of TPMs, or digital locks, even for non-infringing purposes, such as preservation activities used by archivists to protect our holdings. This draconian measure is of grave concern in the digital environment, where obsolescence is both rapid and disastrous for long-term access. Of course, long-term access is what archives are all about.

Let me give you a fictional example of this problem. An archives holds a copy of a CD on the history of a small company that built birchbark canoes for over 150 years. It was the main industry in the town that grew around the factory. The CD was created by a group that came together briefly in 1985 as the company closed down. The only existing CD was deposited by the last surviving family member of the owners, and it includes photographs, oral history interviews, catalogues, and film footage, which are the kinds of materials commonly found in archives. The group disbanded after fire destroyed its office and all the original material it had collected. The original material has disappeared, and all that is left is the CD.

As the CD approaches obsolescence, the archives wishes to ensure that the contents are preserved for posterity. However, the CD is protected with a digital lock and the archives cannot locate the creators. It cannot circumvent the digital lock to preserve this unique material. As the CD becomes obsolete and the files become unreadable, we will lose this important part of our documentary history.

We recommend that the Copyright Act be amended so that circumvention of TPMs is permitted for any activity that is otherwise allowable under the act. Archives are allowed to reformat materials and reproduce them if they are in an obsolete or about-to-become obsolete format, but we're not allowed to use that exception if we have to circumvent a digital lock in order to do so.

I want to talk a little about crown copyright. Crown works are works that are prepared or published by or under the direction or control of Her Majesty, or any federal, provincial, or territorial government department. Copyright in crown works never expires unless the work is published, in which case the work is protected for 50 years from the date of the first publication.

Canadian archives hold millions of unpublished crown works of historical interest, including correspondence, reports, studies, photographs, and surveys—all kinds of works. We've been promised changes to crown copyright for decades and decades. Crown copyright provisions, as they stand now, do not serve the public interest in the digital age. They're long overdue for a comprehensive overhaul.

We recommend that the act be amended immediately so that the term of protection for crown works is 50 years from the date of creation, whether or not the works are published. We further recommend that there be a comprehensive study to identify problem issues, to consult with stakeholders, and to recommend solutions that serve the public interest in the digital age. We need to change these rules.

I want to talk a bit about reversion, which is not a very well-known provision in the Copyright Act. When transferring historical materials to archives, many donors assign the copyrights that they hold in those materials to the archives. Subsection 14(1) of the Copyright Act, reversion, is a little-known relic inherited from the 1911 British act. It provides that where an author who is the first owner of copyright in a work has assigned that copyright, other than by will, to another party—and the example I'll give is a contract to an archival repository—the ownership of the copyright will revert to the author's estate 25 years after his or her death. The estate will own the copyright for the remaining 25 years of the copyright term.

(1600)



This provision cannot be overridden by additional contract terms. It's clearly undue interference in the freedom of an author to enter into a contract, and it's an administrative nightmare for archival institutions and for donor estates. It's just one of those things that's there, and people are not even aware of it.

We recommend that subsection 14(1) be repealed, or at the very least that it be amended to permit the author to assign the reversionary interest by contract, which is not currently allowed.

Regarding indigenous knowledge, it's a bit of a landmark day after yesterday's vote on the UNDRIP provisions. Canadian archivists are concerned about copyright protection of indigenous knowledge and cultural expressions: stories, songs, names, dances, and ceremonies in any format. We have all of these kinds of materials in the Canadian archives.

The foundational principles of copyright legislation are that copyright is owned by an author for a term based on the author's life. In the indigenous approach, there is ongoing community ownership of creations. Archivists are committed to working with indigenous communities to provide appropriate protection and access to the indigenous knowledge in our holdings, while at the same time ensuring the traditional protocols, concerns, and wishes of indigenous peoples are addressed.

We urge the federal government to engage in a rigorous, respectful, and transparent collaboration with Canada's indigenous peoples to amend the Copyright Act to recognize a community-based approach. The archives community will very happily participate in this process. We're eager, in fact, to do so. This is an issue that we believe needs to be resolved.

Thank you.

The Chair:

We are going to go right into questioning,

Mr. Baylis, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you, Chair. I won't be moving a motion.

Ms. Peets, you brought up something that we haven't heard before. We have heard a lot about the writers seeing their income going down, but you brought up a point about some challenges between the writers and the publishers.

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You felt that there's an imbalance. Is that part of what is chewing into your income, these contracts that they said they force you to sign?

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes, it does. I can only claim work to which I still own copyright, for my Access Copyright payment, for example. If the publisher has taken all of the copyright and the moral rights, then I no longer have the right to that material. Therefore, I cannot put it into my repertoire for my Access Copyright payment.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

What would you like to see the government do about that?

Ms. Christine Peets:

That's why I said that I think the contracts are beyond the scope of this committee, but the copyright laws could be strengthened so that publishers no longer can ask for those rights, that those rights remain with the author.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That might sound like a good idea today, but would it not add something like Nancy brought up, cause problems for someone who may wish to do it and cannot do it?

Would you have something to add to that, Ms. Marrelli?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I wouldn't dare to comment on the writers. It seems like she's better placed to....

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If you were, as an archivist, or someone who wanted to purchase all the rights.... Say we were to do what you're asking and write a law that you can't sell all your rights. Would that not impact—

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Certainly, in terms of archival matters, knowing the actual status of the copyright is very important when something is deposited into an archive. That's why it becomes an issue. That's where the contractual agreements definitely come in.

The contractual agreements that any creator has have to be part of their archival deposit.

(1605)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I'll go back to you, Ms. Peets. If we were to say that you cannot sell your rights to a publisher and someone wants to.... I don't see how that could work, to be honest.

Ms. Christine Peets:

I'm not saying that the writer can't sell the rights to the publisher should they wish to, or can't enter into any other kind of contract with their right. What I'm asking is to make sure that the right to do as they wish with their work remains with the creator.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If I understand you, your publisher said, “This is a deal that I'm forcing on you.” Maybe you could elucidate that for me. You could have said, “I don't want the deal.”

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If you say you don't want the deal, then you lose your publisher.

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So they strong-armed you.

Ms. Christine Peets:

Basically.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I still am at a loss to see what recommendation you'd like us to do in the Copyright Act to stop them from strong-arming you. There's an imbalance of power, I get that, but....

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes. I wish I could say that this could be legislated, but I don't think it can be. The only thing is to make the copyright laws strong enough that the publisher wouldn't then think that they can ask for that right. I think the way it's written now is perhaps a little weaker, and that's why the publishers have looked at that and said, “Yes, we want all of these rights.” If the copyright laws were strengthened so that the publishers wouldn't look at that and ask for those rights.... I don't know what else you could do.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. Thank you.

I'll move to Ms. Marrelli about the question of crown copyright.

On this topic, if it becomes readily available, it's one thing, and you're saying that if it's not published, it never becomes available after 50 years. How would you know about it, then? You want access to it and it's not published. How do you know it exists?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

That's one of the issues. In archives, we certainly increasingly want to make materials available digitally. We have materials. We have a lot of these materials in the archives. People come to our reading rooms, but where people want to access archival materials now is on the Internet.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You're saying you cannot put the crown copyright on.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

We have to get permissions. In fact, recently, the government has changed the way permissions for crown copyright have come about. It's devolved not to a single, centralized source but to the departmental source where the material was created.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You have this crown copyright in your archive. Someone comes along and says, “I'd like to access it”, and it's a big to-do for you because—

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

You can access it in our reading rooms.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If they physically come....

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Exactly.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If they don't physically show up, you're effectively making a copy. Is that it?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

We want to digitize a lot of these materials—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Oh, you want to digitize them.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

—because they have historical interest.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. If it's not digitized.... I see.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

We can't digitize it and put it on the Internet without permission.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You don't have the right.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

And it has to go document by document.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I see.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

If you want to digitize a folder, which might include 5,000 documents, you have to go document by document to get the permission.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If I understand it, your archives, the people you represent, have crown copyright documents.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Most archives in Canada do have crown copyright.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

They'll have these crown copyright documents. They will be physical documents, a book, say.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Right. It could be a letter from an MP to a—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If someone wants to see that letter from an MP, they have the right to show up and say, “Show it to me”—

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

—but you don't have the right to copy it and put it out there.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

That's right.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Even if you wanted to put it out there, you'd have to physically go through every piece to get it....

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes, and if the researcher wants to use the material, they have to get permission from the department.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Each department, too.... It's not even centralized.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Exactly. It's no longer centralized.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

What do you see as a solution?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

First of all, I think there's no reason to have perpetual copyright anymore for crown materials. Making it 50 years from the date of creation is a reasonable first accommodation.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That's a first step.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes, and I think that we then need to look at some of the more problematic areas, and I think we do need a proper.... There have been many different studies, but I think we need a current look at the issues, and we need to bring the stakeholders together to try to solve this problem, which definitely has solutions. Other jurisdictions have—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

My time is up, but I'm sure my colleague will continue on that front.

The Chair:

You were only over by three seconds.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That's rare for me.

The Chair:

Thank you for being good about it.

(1610)

[Translation]

Mr. Bernier, go ahead for seven minutes.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Thank you very much for being with us.

My first question would be for Ms. Christine Peets.

You said during your presentation that your income changes a lot. Can you explain that a little more? Do you think that you're a specific case or does it also happen with other authors and creators in Canada?

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes, it has happened with a number of our members. I'm specifically referring to their Access Copyright payments.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes.

Ms. Christine Peets:

They have reported that they have gone down significantly, in some cases as much as 50%. This is due to the fact that they are losing the copyright to their works. They are being asked to sign over the copyright to particular works, so they lose that copyright and can no longer claim that work.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Should a Canadian author be able to reclaim his or her copyright before his or her death by terminating its transfer of licensing? Do you agree with that?

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes. Again, the author should be able to determine where and to whom the copyright goes and for what period of time.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Do you think we need to make a change in our legislation to be able to do that in Canada?

Ms. Christine Peets:

Currently, it's 50 years after the death of the author. Most of my colleagues felt that was fair. I understand there is some consideration of going to 70 years, which would be acceptable as well.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Thank you.

We will now hear from the Canadian Council of Archives.

Ms. Marelli, regarding the digital lot, you said it's something that we may improve. What is your...?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

The anti-circumvention rules came in with the 2012 amendments to the act, and at the time there were many requests to make exceptions for the anti-circumvention laws. In fact, there were very few exceptions that are in the law.

For sure, I remember testifying to a committee exactly like this for the 2012 act that there was a problem for archives in not being able to circumvent a digital lock to carry out essential preservation activities For us, that is the issue. It's something we are allowed to do in the act, but because it sometimes involves circumvention of a digital lock, we cannot carry out that essential function. We are losing essential historical materials because we cannot circumvent in order to carry out an otherwise allowed act.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Will you ask for a change in our legislation to give you an exception?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes. If there is an allowable act in the Copyright Act, we would ask that we be allowed to do circumvention in order to perform it. [Translation]

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Masse. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to our witnesses.

I have been asking witnesses about the Copyright Board. What I am concerned about is that we get this review done and then the minister is going to respond to the review. Then, if there were some significant changes, it's most likely to come with a suggestion or legislation, which would require, in my opinion, more consultations. We're just getting a little bit of feedback now on the change process, but nothing specific has been offered up at this time. We could end up running out of time before the next electoral cycle.

Is there anything that could be done in the short term through the regulatory process or through improving the Copyright Board decision-making process and the enforcement process that would be beneficial at this time? I am looking for those things that perhaps would be through the lens of a regulatory approach versus that of a legislative approach, because the regulatory approach is a matter of the minister's decision and discretion.

(1615)

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

The Copyright Board deals with published materials. Since archival materials for the most part are unpublished materials, our materials are not covered by the Copyright Board, so we don't have a lot to say about the Copyright Board.

I know that the process has been criticized for being very long and complicated. Certainly, we have issues around orphan works in archives. There have been some suggestions to include published materials as well as unpublished materials under the Copyright Board. I'm not sure that adding the burden of unpublished materials to the Copyright Board is the way to go for orphan works. I guess my answer, in terms of archives, is that I don't have any concrete suggestions, but I wouldn't recommend adding unpublished materials to the Copyright Board mandate at this point.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay, that's helpful. That's what we're looking for.

Ms. Christine Peets:

I think I would just add that, when it comes to published works, the Copyright Board does oversee those. I think what you're suggesting, a regulatory process as opposed to a legislative process, might be something that PWAC would definitely be interested in working on with you in further consultation.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes. That's what I fear. We're hearing of quite a bit of disruption and disturbance amongst creative society. I also believe that, when you change rules, if there are going to be people who are affected by government policy, amelioration should be part of that change. It seems to me that there's a lot of artists and creators who are still trying to figure things out.

Ms. Christine Peets:

That's very true. I think what we want to stress is that we do want to share our work, we want to have our work read and appreciated, and we want to be fairly compensated for that work. In past reviews, perhaps things were skewed a bit more to the end user, and somewhere the creator got lost in the shuffle. We want to make sure there is a balance, that the rights of the creator and the rights to the user are kept in check.

Mr. Brian Masse:

If nothing changes over the next three years, can you do any crystal ball gazing? What is your greatest fear?

Ms. Christine Peets:

I think the greatest fear is that, as more work does go from the print format to the electronic format and therefore can be shared much more quickly and more widely, the rights to that work will be lost. People find things on the Internet and they share them, and they don't necessarily take the time to figure out who wrote that in the first place and who that belongs to. That kind of goes along and it snowballs. That would be my fear. I think I can speak for the writers and the others in our association. We want to make sure our rights don't get lost in that shuffle.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thanks.

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm just going to indulge the Canadian Council of Archives, just to thank you for your work. I know that sometimes you probably don't get the glory, in archives.

However, a true story is that when I was on city council, it was our municipal archives that led to the repatriation of the Windsor-Detroit tunnel on the Canadian side, its coming back to public ownership. This is significant because there was an archived document of the original agreement that put it in the private sector, through a P3, which they didn't want to relinquish. By the time we received the tunnel back, it was ready to float down the river because of the erosion on the top. We couldn't find people to replicate the actual exhaust and fan system, and it immediately required millions of dollars. To this day, it pays significant revenue for the City of Windsor and is a critical piece of Canada's infrastructure.

I'll just conclude by saying thank you to you and your members, who probably have not envisioned the glory, but you have actually saved one of Canada's significant pieces of infrastructure.

(1620)

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Thank you. That's what we do. That's what we're all about. It's about accountability and keeping the public record.

The Chair:

Thank you.

May I say I've never seen this bridge of yours, but I have a clear vision in my mind because I've heard about it for the last three years. You're going to have to take us on a tour.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I've crossed it many times, but I didn't know that story.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This one's about the tunnel, though.

The Chair:

There you go.

We're going to move to Mr. Lametti. You have seven minutes.

Oh, sorry, I got the wrong David. It's Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

These naming conflicts; it's like in a computer file system.

Are there any circumstances in which you believe the use of a technological protection measure should override other copyright rules or fair dealing exceptions?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Sorry, could you repeat that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any time that you believe it's appropriate for a technological protection measure to override fair dealing? Should that ever happen?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I'm trying to imagine that situation. No, I think that really, fair dealing should stand on its own. I don't think TPMs should stand in the way of fair dealing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

Do you have any comments, Christine?

Ms. Christine Peets:

No, I don't. I don't understand the TPMs well enough to comment on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

You know, if it's something that's allowable in the act, a TPM should not prevent it from happening.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. That's exactly what I'm looking for.

In the digital age, it's so easy to register things now, if we wanted to. Does it still make sense for copyright to apply to everything automatically, or should we be thinking about copyright being on a proactive registration as it used to be?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I think it should be automatic.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It should be automatic?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes. That's pretty well an internationally accepted principle. I don't have a problem with that one at all.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, that's why I asked.

We talked a lot about 50 years after the creation, of life plus 50 years. Is it appropriate for copyright to survive the life of the creator in the first place? On what basis do we have this system, in your view, in which copyright lasts longer than the person who created it?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

The history of copyright, if you look at it, is a long one. It started out as a very short time period, then it has crept up. Archivists certainly believe that the period of protection, as it stands now, should not be extended. People's work needs to be properly recompensed.

Archives are a place where that balance in the act between creator and user is an everyday occurrence. The people who deposit their materials into the archives are creators. The users come to use those materials. We walk that line of balance every day, and I do believe that the term of protection, as it stands now, as an international standard, is a fair one, life plus 50, and that is the international standard.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It is the international standard, but if you were drawing your own rules, would it be 50 years, 25 years, or at death that the copyright ends?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I don't think it's unfair. That's a personal opinion. I can't speak for all archivists about that.

I think that with creative commons and the ability to waive your copyright, it's perfectly legitimate. If you want to make things openly accessible, it's very easy now to do so.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

In speaking of the creative commons and waiving copyright, I think it's a good segue into crown copyright, which is a topic that I find really fascinating, and a lot of people have never heard of it. Section 105 of the U.S. Copyright Act prevents government-created material from being copyrighted.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

It's absolutely open and free.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right. It's public demand.

Is that the correct model for Canada?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

We have crown corporations, and I think there are some issues around crown corporations that need to be addressed. I think it's a little more complicated here.

The British model is a little bit different from completely open. That's why I think we need a proper sit-down and investigation with stakeholders to look at what the issues are and try to come up with reasonable solutions. For heaven's sake, let's do it and stop talking about doing it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let's do something.

What in the British model should we emulate, in your opinion?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

There are different provisions. It's a little more nuanced than absolutely open copyright for everything. I think that nuance is more suitable for our environment.

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you ever had material that you couldn't archive because of copyright rules? Can you give examples to illustrate that?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

The example that I gave is one of those situations where you have the thing physically in your hand. It's going to disappear because the CD is deteriorating, and there's nothing you can do legally to make it available for the long term. It's ridiculous.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. I was a staffer the last time this topic came up, and I was working for the critic at the time during the 2013 reform. I remember learning at the time that the national archives had apparently lost about 80% of the videotape of Parliament prior to 2005.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Audiovisual materials are a big issue. Anything that's not in your hand that you can see is definitely problematic. Definitely the AV materials are an issue, but we have the right to reformat those audiovisual materials, as long as they're not protected by a TPM. If it's under digital lock, we can't reformat. If it's not under digital lock, we already have the right in the act to reformat it. Whether we have the funding to do that is another matter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That makes sense.

Are you familiar with archive.org?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I'm sorry?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Internet archive, archive.org.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes, of course.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is offshoring of material to circumvent copyright happening a lot? Is that a method to protect materials?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I don't think so. Not that I know of. I can't imagine how that would work.

The international framework with the international treaties is such that work is protected no matter where it is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right, well—

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

The rules are slightly different, but if you go to the U.S., the terms of protection are life plus 70 rather than life plus 50. You wouldn't be gaining much by going offshore. I can't imagine....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, but they also have much looser fair use rules than our fair dealing rules, and if you look at—

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

They're different, but the reality is that when you're using copyright, it's the place where you are using the material whose laws apply.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

If you're using the material in Canada, you have to follow the rules in Canada whether you access it from the U.S. or you access it from Canada. I can't see the way that would be an advantage.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Apparently, my copyright's up.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes, please.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for coming today.

My first question is for you, Ms. Marrelli. You brought up a good example, a CD that is deteriorating. You were saying that a change in the law to allow you to circumvent a TPM is the solution.

Is there the technology out there to circumvent that law?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

You've said that you're not able to speak to the owner of the copyright for what reason?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Sometimes you can't. Sometimes you can't reach them. Sometimes you don't know who they are.

In this case, it was a group that came together and then dispersed.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I think that's called an orphaned work, right?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

It's an orphaned work, yes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Would you say that we could make a distinction between orphaned works and non-orphaned works? Should we be able to circumvent a TPM where the copyright holder is explicitly against the circumvention of that?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

It would be one way to go, but the reality is if you have the right to do it in the act, what's the problem with saying you can do it without going through a whole rigmarole? We don't have to do anything for materials that are not under digital locks. Why is suddenly circumventing a digital lock an issue when you already have the right to perform the act?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

My next question is for Ms. Peets. It's more simple. I think it's straightforward.

If copyright were better and more effectively enforced and authors and publishers received the royalties that they believe they're entitled to from educational institutions, would you see the need for a mandatory tariff in that case? If it was being dealt with effectively, enforcement was happening, people who are illegally copying works were being held accountable and paying for that, would you see the need for a mandatory tariff regime?

Ms. Christine Peets:

I think we still do need the tariffs. We do need the universities, the libraries, and the other institutions, to pay their fees to Access Copyright because that really is the only way. I think it would be too difficult to develop some sort of an enforcement procedure. Who then is going to do that enforcement and how is that going to be carried out and that type of thing? I think if you just stick with the fees that are negotiated with each institution, then that is the easiest way to make sure that the publishers and creators do get paid for their work.

(1630)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

There's a significant amount of worry from the universities and the educational institutions that they're not really getting what they're paying for. They're not getting the value for the money that they're paying for, and so it seems to me there should be a more transactional model so that they can actually get what they're paying for.

Don't you think there needs to be a better way for universities?

Ms. Christine Peets:

Perhaps there needs to be a different model, but universities at this point are claiming that they shouldn't have to pay a tariff for this material because it's being used for educational purposes and education should be free.

To that, I would answer that education isn't free. Students pay tuition. University professors are paid. Support staff is paid.

Education isn't free. Why should the material that is created by the writers be free?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I totally sympathize with the point you're making. We had some testimony from the University of Calgary last week that they have attempted to pay for transactional licences with Access Copyright but that they were refused. They weren't allowed to do transactional licences when they wanted to do that.

What would be your comment on that? The universities are trying—not all universities, but in some cases—to get transactional licences, but they're being refused. What's your comment on that?

Ms. Christine Peets:

I can't speak for Access Copyright.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

How much time do I have left, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have about 45 seconds.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Could you give me a quick comment? Are authors being better protected in jurisdictions similar to Canada, for example, the European Union or the United States, and what do they do better for authors and publishers, or what do they worse, in your opinion?

Ms. Christine Peets:

New York has just enacted legislation that is called “Freelance Isn't Free”. I think if Ontario, to start, and Canada perhaps, to follow, could do something like that, it would ensure that more authors are being paid for their work, particularly when it's done on a freelance basis and not by staff writers with newspapers and magazines.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

Ms. Christine Peets:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Ms. Ng.

You have five minutes.

Ms. Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

Thank you so very much, both of you, for coming to speak to us today.

My first question is for Madam Marelli, to help me understand a bit better the users of the archives, the researchers and so forth. When we were talking about crown copyright and that material, who would be the typical users who would want to access those bodies of work?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

It could be a family doing a family history. I'll pull an example totally out of my head. Let's say the family of a chaplain in a prison received a letter from the head of that prison because that chaplain was killed during a prison riot in the 1800s. Well, that letter is still under perpetual protection because it was never published, but the family wants to write a family history and needs to publish it. Why shouldn't that letter be included in the materials that we can digitize anyway, if we are looking at prison riots and want to prepare documentation on our websites about that? There's no reason that material should not be included.

Ms. Mary Ng:

I think about the efforts these days to get greater Canadian content, and the support for Canadian creators, and when I think about creators, I think about young people. I think about those innovators. I think about the kind of research or discovery or finding of works, and ways for them to access material. As we think about the Copyright Act and how we might need to look at it, what do we need to be thinking about in the future?

In other words, you have this great body of work at the archives, and we want to encourage more, not fewer, content creators.

(1635)

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

We want to get it out there.

Ms. Mary Ng:

We want it to get out there, and you know, greater digitization and technology formats allow that, and we can have another generation of great content creators in this country.

On that, I have a slightly different question. Data mining might actually come as part of that type of work. You get content in many ways, but some of it might actually be through data mining. Do you think we should be looking at something like an exception that allows for that kind of content scraping, if you will, or content mining, as a provision in the Copyright Act that allows for a future-looking potential use?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Digitizing the materials in the first place is an issue. We won't digitize material. You can't mine material that hasn't been digitized—

Ms. Mary Ng:

I see.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

—unless you're doing it by hand, with index cards, which is the old way of doing it.

We cannot think about digitizing materials unless we can actually make them accessible on our website. That's the kind of materials we actually digitize.

Before we even get to the point of data mining, you have to be able to go through the digitization process, and we talk about orphan works in the brief that we're going to submit. I didn't talk about it today because we had a limited amount of time, but orphan works are definitely one of those issues. There are barriers, and in the case of archives, most of the material in our institutions is not commercially viable material. It's material from families. It's material from individuals, from companies, material that doesn't have a commercial value in and of itself. The material has a historical value. So the barriers to doing the digitization in the first place are an issue before you even get to the data mining.

Ms. Mary Ng:

How much of the collection is digital?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Do you mean our materials?

Ms. Mary Ng:

Yes.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I would say less than 5%.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Oh, really? Okay.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

It's very little. We have masses of material.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Right, okay.

On that point about whether or not there is commercial value to it, I am hoping that in the future some of those creators may actually look through it. In looking at how they might put that out there, they could very well find a stream for it, but that's another conversation.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

We're working at digitizing materials, but archives don't have a lot of money.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Okay.

Ms. Peets, just to pick up on a point that was raised a little earlier—actually, I think it was when we were in Montreal—we heard from an organization that is essentially a platform. If I understand it, their technology remunerates authors based on usage, down to a chapter level.

We talk about access to copyright through a tariff approach. We've certainly heard from institutions that it is a challenge because, while you're right that education isn't free, we also want educational institutions to get the material they want and not to have to pay for duplication, which is what we've heard in some of the testimony.

In your view, could something like that work? There are emerging platforms, and certainly, we're seeing it in the music industry, where there is an ability to compensate on a more transactional and on a more targeted use basis. Can you comment on that?

Ms. Christine Peets:

I think you're talking about the pay-per-click model. Most of that is offered at such a low rate. It's a penny per click kind of thing, so if you have written a story or you've written a chapter of a book, you'll get a penny for every person who reads it. That could take a long time. That means a hundred people have to read it for you to make a dollar, so to do a transactional payment like that is very problematic.

Ms. Mary Ng:

So transactional payment is problematic as it's remunerated now, but if it were remunerated in a fairer way, could the mode work?

Ms. Christine Peets:

I suppose so, but I think you only have to look at what the models are now, and they certainly are skewed towards the person putting the material on the platform, not the person who wrote the material.

(1640)

Ms. Mary Ng:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to the last questioner, who is Mr. Jowhari.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I yield my time to MP Lametti.

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Thanks to both of you for coming. I'm an old copyright professor, and I am guilty of rarely having mentioned the reversionary right in over 20 years of teaching, so I am as guilty as anyone else.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

I am one of those as well.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

He's an old professor.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Lametti:

That's it. I'm guilty.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

As long as we don't become relics.

Mr. David Lametti:

Ms. Peets, I remember teaching the case of Robertson v. Thomson Corp more than once, and thinking that the good news is that Heather Robertson won, and the bad news is that Heather Robertson won. This is simply because, as you said and as I think we all predicted at the time, publishers would just react by ensuring that every time they signed a contract to a freelancer, they would get all the rights.

Ms. Christine Peets:

Yes.

Mr. David Lametti:

That's even truer now because when Heather Robertson wrote the articles in 1995, we were talking about microfiche and putting articles on databases, before linking on the Internet and that kind of stuff were even in anyone's thoughts. The case was finally decided in 2006.

Help us find a solution. It's not even a copyright problem. It's a contract problem.

Ms. Christine Peets:

It is a contract problem.

Mr. David Lametti:

It's an imbalance of power contract problem because the publishers, newspapers, or whoever is buying he freelancer's work are always going to have a great deal more power. As a freelancer you have to sell your work, and now publishers are going to want to ensure that they don't get sued if something gets linked or if they want to use it in some other format.

Is there some model out there that can help us? I'm trying to get my head around it, and I'm not sure I can. I sympathize with the problem, but I'm not sure where I see the solution.

Ms. Christine Peets:

I can speak only to my personal experience on this. It was always the large publishers that wanted all the rights. I never had that problem with a small publisher, who you would think would want all the rights and who would maybe make that demand even more strongly than the larger publishers would. That, to me, was always an interesting paradox, because the people who, as you say, had all the power wanted even more power, and the struggling publishers, who were maybe putting out one or two magazines, paid me reprint rights. They paid me if they wanted to put something on their website, and that kind of thing.

Where the solution lies is that there is a balance that can be achieved. It's a question of will and whether the publishers really want to have that. If you can look at it as that without strong content they will not be able to sell their advertising, then they need to pay for that content.

Mr. David Lametti:

If your association finds any models or can think through a model, would you please submit it?

Ms. Christine Peets:

We will. We will take that on that task. Thank you.

Mr. David Lametti:

That would be great.

Ms. Marelli, thank you for coming.

There is an argument out there, in academic circles at the very least, that fair dealing provisions already apply to archives and other fair dealing uses with regard to TPMs.

Have you tried any of this in court, that fair dealing applies to the TPM provisions?

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Do you mean that we should just go ahead and circumvent?

Mr. David Lametti:

I'm not saying that, but do you know of any cases that have—

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

How many archivists do you know who are really daring and willing to break the law?

Mr. David Lametti:

I know at least one. I've just met one apparently.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Yes, maybe.

We do risk management, for sure, and there are some instances when an archivist just quite honestly can't let the thing go.

Mr. David Lametti:

Yes. You cross yourself and you do it.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

It's just ridiculous, and the chances of you actually being taken to court over this are very low. But we shouldn't be in that position. We really shouldn't be put in that position. We're allowed to do it under the provisions of the law. Why can't we just have an exception for circumventing TPMs? It's just not that complicated.

I remember the process in 2012 so well. Everyone was absolutely fed up with the discussion. People were ready to kill each other at the end, and finally the government just said, “No exceptions, period. That's it. That's all. We're not excepting anything. ” Everyone in the room knew and understood that it was crazy for archives, but it just went through. It just slipped into the cracks.

Mr. David Lametti:

Okay.

(1645)

The Chair:

You're done. Thank you very much.

On that note, I want to extend our gratitude to our two witnesses today.

Ms. Nancy Marrelli:

Thank you for having us.

The Chair:

It's been very informative, and we're looking forward to continuing our study.

We are going to suspend for a few minutes while we get everything in order and say goodbye to our witnesses, and then we'll come back.

Thank you.



The Chair:

We are back.

Mr. Masse, I'll let you go.

I just want to say that we do have some committee business that we need to get to, not that I want to limit any of this. We were supposed to be in camera. If we can leave about 20 minutes, is that enough?

All right.

(1650)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a motion that I gave notice for at the last meeting. I'd like to read the motion and bring it to a vote for the committee. It's a small motion. I'm just going to read it and then I'll speak briefly to it. I know there are potentially other motions here today. I think it speaks for itself: That the Standing Committee on Industry hold hearings to study the proposed purchase by this government of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project pipeline and infrastructure, including: a) the terms of the purchase including the costs to taxpayers and long-term impacts of purchasing and completing this project, b) the direct and indirect impacts on Canadian businesses directly in competition with pipeline products and the use of those products in respective markets, and, c) the plan for the sale of this project once completed.

Could I speak to the motion?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I won't get into the full (a), (b), and (c) of the motion, but I will get into the general spirit of it. Why I think it belongs here at the industry committee is that the pipeline purchase and the potential expansion of the pipeline will have direct competitive implications not only on the industry itself, that being oil and natural resources, but also on the subsequent markets the products then go to, especially given the fact that we now have public participation in the distribution of the product. That subsidization potentially could affect Canadian businesses.

For example, if in the expansion of the project and the diversion, the products going through the pipeline go to China and are used to produce steel that competes against Canadian industries, or if they're actually fuelling components, it's something that we at least need to have a discussion about and hear some witnesses on.

There are significant consequences with regard to the supply chain, the cost for consumers, and the viability of different products in the market. You have the outright industry itself in terms of how consumable oil and other energy products are used for the production of goods and services, and then, if they are publicly subsidized, you have the actual use and the competition with similar ones that you have to compete against. That's why I believe it would be appropriate to have hearings on this motion.

I will conclude by saying that I will be keeping an open mind in regard to our current studies, but if we can't get this done by the end of this session, I'm hoping that perhaps some meetings in the fall would be appropriate, so that we can provide at least a bit of a lens on the positive, potentially negative, or challenging consequences. Again, it's about amelioration for markets, consumers, and competitors when there is government intervention in this respect.

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Mr. Chair, we on this side fully support the motion put forward by Mr. Masse. I think what you're seeing right now is that there are two parties here that are certainly willing to debate the Trans Mountain pipeline and the impact it will have on the taxpayer, and certainly now that we all own it. I think it's also important to note that there is a $4.5-billion commitment by the government to this pipeline, but that does nothing to actually get the pipeline built.

I think it would be very informative for and also helpful to the government if we undertook a study here at the committee to look at the three things that Mr. Masse put forward in his motion. Certainly we would be supportive of this coming about urgently; I'd even suggest that there would be some appetite on this side of the table to do it over the summer months too. I think that's how important this motion is.

The Chair:

Mr. Baylis.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Well, if I were going to support a motion, I'd have to support Mr. Masse's motion. It's not that Mr. Jeneroux's motion isn't very well written too. They're both excellent motions.

In reality, this pipeline purchase falls under two ministers who are not the ISED minister. They fall under Mr. Carr, at Natural Resources, and Minister Morneau, at Finance. That's not to belittle this or to say that it's not an important issue, but it's not our issue any more than it's our issue to study agricultural issues and matters.

In that sense, I would say that we would be against it. We're coming at it with regard to the fact that we're against it strictly because it's not our minister who is involved. He hasn't been involved in any of the discussions or announcements on it.

It really sits with the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Natural Resources. Their committees are unto themselves in terms of what they choose to do or not, but that's where this should be done. I would encourage you to speak to your colleagues on those two committees to push it forward.

(1655)

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Mr. Baylis, for allowing us to go back and forth a little bit here, at least, I imagine, before debate is adjourned at...or voted against.

I do respectfully disagree with the comments saying that this isn't our issue. I think it's every committee's issue, to be honest with you. I think there is a lot at stake, particularly in the industry committee. We're a very integral and important committee, if not one of the most important, in this Parliament. I think the industries that would be affected by this certainly fall within the purview of both the ISED minister and the tourism and small business minister.

I think all of those are reasons why this is something that we as a committee should come together and look at collectively. The timing is I think urgent right now.

The Chair:

Do we have any other speakers?

Then we shall call the vote.

An hon. member: I'd like a recorded vote.

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

If I may, Mr. Chair, I'd like to put a new motion on notice for consideration. I'd like to read it into the record:

That the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology undertake a study of four meetings to review, among other things: the impacts of US imposed tariffs on Canadian Steel and Aluminum producers and the related supply chains; and that the Committee reports the findings back to the House and make recommendations on measures that could be taken to protect the Canadian industry and its competitiveness.

I'll bring that up at the next meeting.

The Chair:

The notice of motion has been received. Thank you very much.

We will suspend and then go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1545)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Merci beaucoup. Toutes nos excuses. C'est toujours plaisant de voter à cette période-ci de l'année.

Bienvenue à tous à la réunion 119 du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie alors que nous poursuivons notre passionnant examen approfondi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Aujourd'hui, nous sommes en compagnie de Christine Peets, présidente de la Professional Writers Association of Canada; et de Nancy Marrelli, conseillère spéciale en droit d'auteur au Conseil canadien des archives.

Avant que nous commencions, monsieur Jeneroux, vous aviez quelque chose à dire.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Oui, merci, monsieur le président. Je m'excuse auprès des témoins pour le temps que cela prendra.

Je veux profiter de l'occasion, vu les circonstances exceptionnelles dans lesquelles nous nous trouvons. Je suis certain que, quand les témoins ont planifié leurs déplacements il y a quelques semaines, ils ne pensaient pas que le gouvernement achèterait un pipeline, je vais donc saisir l'occasion pour présenter la motion que nous avons fait inscrire au Feuilleton mardi dernier. La motion est ainsi libellée: Que le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie étudie en quatre réunions pour examiner entre autres: le coût global de l'achat et de l’expansion du projet de pipeline Trans Mountain, les coûts liés à la surveillance (société d'État) du projet et avoir une incidence sur la confiance des investisseurs dans les projets de ressources canadiens et que le Comité fasse rapport des résultats à la Chambre des Communes et fasse des recommandations sur la façon de restaurer la confiance des investisseurs.

Encore une fois, je crois qu'il est impératif, à ce moment-ci, en raison de l'incertitude créée dans le secteur de l'énergie par la situation dans laquelle nous ont malheureusement placés le premier ministre et le ministre des Finances d'entreprendre cela, instamment, pour que nous puissions avoir l'étude devant nous et être en mesure d'informer la Chambre des communes de manière appropriée.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Tout d'abord, nous entendrons M. Graham, puis M. Baylis.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je ne sais pas vraiment si c'est pertinent de faire comparaître les témoins à ce moment-ci. C'est plutôt grossier envers les témoins de faire cela maintenant.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Baylis.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Je propose qu'on ajourne le débat.

Le président:

Le débat sera ajourné, puis nous poursuivrons. Êtes-vous d'accord?

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Puisque c'est ainsi, monsieur le président, je vais présenter ma motion. Si nous sommes pour employer ce genre de tactique tout simplement, je vais présenter la motion que j'ai déposée devant le Comité.

Le président:

Puis-je intervenir? Comme nous en avons parlé plus tôt, après avoir entendu les témoins, vous pourrez présenter votre motion et nous éviterons ainsi de faire perdre du temps à nos témoins. Nous avons convenu de procéder ainsi en séance publique afin que vous puissiez présenter la motion publiquement, puis nous pourrons en débattre, mais c'est votre choix.

M. Brian Masse:

Avons-nous à voter sur la motion? Du point de la procédure, nous ne pouvons pas parler de sa motion maintenant.

Le président:

Nous devons voter sur la motion pour ajourner le débat.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est à cela que je faisais allusion.

Le président:

Toutes mes excuses.

M. Frank Baylis:

J'invoque le Règlement. Allons-nous voter sur ma motion pour ajourner le débat?

Le président:

Pour ajourner le débat, oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Êtes-vous tous en faveur de la motion?

Un député: Non, pas tous.

M. Frank Baylis: Bien, vous venez de le dire, donc eux sont tous en faveur de ma motion.

Le président:

Arrêtez. Ce n'est pas sujet à débat. C'est un vote sur la motion pour ajourner le débat.

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 4.)

(1550)

Le président:

Sur ce, monsieur Masse, pouvons-nous poursuivre?

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, nous pouvons poursuivre.

Le président:

Merci.

Je m'adresse à nos témoins. Nous allons commencer par Christine Peets. Vous avez sept minutes. Merci.

Mme Christine Peets (présidente, Professional Writers Association of Canada):

Bonjour. Merci de me donner l'occasion de m'adresser à vous tandis que vous entreprenez cette tâche très importante.

Je suis ici au nom de la Professional Writers Association of Canada, qu'on appelle la PWAC. Notre organisme représente plus de 300 auteurs d'ouvrages non romanesques d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Le droit d'auteur est un enjeu extrêmement important pour nous, puisqu'il a une incidence sur le revenu de nos membres, de même que sur le respect qu'on devrait nous accorder. Nous gagnons notre vie grâce à l'écriture, et nous ne pouvons réussir à le faire que lorsqu'on nous paie des redevances, parce que le droit d'auteur nous appartient. Lorsque nous perdons le droit de revendiquer notre travail, notre revenu et le respect qui nous est accordé en sont amoindris.

Chaque année, les membres de la PWAC reçoivent un paiement en tant que créateurs affiliés à Access Copyright, une organisation que la PWAC a aidé à fonder. Au cours des 15 dernières années, j'ai vu mon paiement passer de plusieurs centaines de dollars à moins de 100 $ par année. Les paiements sont fondés sur la quantité de travail que je déclare pour la période visée par l'examen, ce qui a fluctué surtout en partie, parce qu'il y a moins de publications imprimées au Canada. Celles qui demeurent sont souvent couvertes par des contrats onéreux. De nombreux éditeurs ont établi des contrats en vertu desquels presque tous les droits vont à l'entreprise et aucun, ou très peu, vont à l'auteur. C'est courant chez nos membres.

Pour vous donner un exemple personnel concret, en 2009, on m'a offert un contrat pour continuer d'écrire pour une publication qui m'employait depuis 2004. J'ai signé le contrat à contrecoeur, mais pas sans le remettre en question. On me demandait de renoncer à tous les droits sur tout ce que j'avais écrit. Mon client voulait certainement s'assurer que je ne puisse pas le poursuivre s'il se servait de mes textes. Est-ce juste?

L'entreprise a prétendu qu'elle devait maintenant obtenir ces droits en raison de l'affaire bien connue de Heather Robertson, un recours collectif intenté en 1996. Mme Robertson a intenté des poursuites contre plusieurs grands médias qui ont reproduit son travail électroniquement sans son autorisation et sans lui verser de paiement. D'autres auteurs ont été touchés de la même façon. Cette affaire s'est finalement réglée après 13 ans. Il y a eu des poursuites semblables aux États-Unis, et il pourrait très bien y avoir une autre au Canada. Est-ce que les pigistes doivent se lancer dans des poursuites interminables et coûteuses contre les grands médias pour protéger leur droit d'auteur et leur revenu?

La question des contrats sort peut-être du champ d'études du Comité, mais j'espère que cela aide à illustrer l'importance de protéger notre droit d'auteur. Comme Connie Proteau, membre de la PWAC de la Colombie-Britannique, m'a écrit: « Il est important que notre professionnalisme créatif continue d'être respecté et reconnu par... nos concitoyens canadiens qui lisent nos ouvrages et qui apprennent de ceux-ci. Il nous faut des lois rigoureuses en matière de droit d'auteur pour protéger les textes accessibles en format imprimé. »

À cela j'ajouterais que nous avons besoin de lois strictes sur le droit d'auteur pour protéger tous les ouvrages, qu'ils soient en format imprimé ou électronique. Si les auteurs ne sont pas rémunérés à leur juste valeur et que leurs ouvrages ne sont pas respectés comme il se doit, ils écriront moins. Pourquoi une personne continuerait-elle de travailler si son travail n'est ni rémunéré ni respecté? Cela pourrait avoir une incidence importante sur les documents canadiens mis à la disposition des lecteurs canadiens, qui risquent de se tourner de plus en plus vers d'autres pays pour trouver les renseignements recherchés. Au bout du compte, cela pourrait influer sur la qualité des ouvrages publiés, et peut-être même sur la viabilité de notre industrie de l'édition. Le Canada a besoin d'un solide secteur de l'écriture et de l'édition qui contribue à l'économie en générant des revenus pour les particuliers et pour les entreprises qui augmentent les recettes fiscales.

Michael Fay, membre de la PWAC de l'Ontario, m'a rappelé que notre association et d'autres organisations d'écrivains avaient joué un rôle crucial dans le cadre de l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur mené en 2012, lorsque des restrictions et des procédures en matière de reproduction ont été établies. Dans le cadre du présent examen, il est important de penser non seulement à l'utilisateur, mais aussi au créateur.

Lori Straus, une autre membre de la PWAC de l'Ontario, s'est exprimée ainsi: « Les gens reproduisent des oeuvres créatives parce que ses dernières les inspirent et parce qu'il est facile de le faire. Il est beaucoup plus difficile de reproduire une KitKat: cela n'en vaudrait pas la peine. »

Enfin, j'aimerais vous faire part d'un autre point de vue. Il nous vient de Ronda Payne, une membre de la PWAC de la Colombie-Britannique. Elle a établi une comparaison intéressante, qui se lit comme suit: Personne ne veut contester la personne qui a construit un bâtiment ni n'essaie d'usurper sa propriété. Pourquoi est-ce acceptable de le faire avec des mots écrits? Ce ne l'est pas. Nous déployons tout autant d'efforts en écrivant que le fait un architecte, un entrepreneur ou un propriétaire d'immeuble [à l'égard de son travail]. Lorsque le propriétaire d'un immeuble autorise des gens à utiliser ses locaux, il est rémunéré sous forme de loyer, ou il touche le produit de la vente du bâtiment. En tant qu'auteurs, nous devrions bénéficier de la même reconnaissance pour notre propriété et nos droits. Quand une personne prend un ouvrage, sans même envisager de verser un montant au créateur, c'est l'équivalent de squatter un immeuble. Je veux que les gens reconnaissent mon travail, mais je veux aussi être rémunérée en conséquence. Je mérite d'être payée pour le travail que je fais.

Merci beaucoup du temps que vous m'avez accordé.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre Nancy Marrelli.

Vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Nancy Marrelli (conseillère spéciale, Droit d'auteur, Conseil canadien des archives):

Merci.

Le Conseil canadien des archives, le CCA, est un organisme national sans but lucratif qui représente plus de 800 archives à l'échelle du pays. Il compte parmi ses membres les conseils provinciaux et territoriaux à l'échelle du Canada, l'Association des archivistes du Québec et l'Association canadienne des archivistes.

J'aimerais d'abord parler des mesures de protection technologiques ou MPT. Les dispositions mises en place en 2012 interdisent le contournement des MPT, ou serrures numériques, même à des fins où il n'y a pas de violation, comme les activités de préservation exercées par les archivistes pour protéger nos avoirs. Cette mesure draconienne est très préoccupante dans l'environnement numérique, où l'obsolescence est à la fois rapide et désastreuse pour l'accès à long terme. Et c'est bien sûr ce en quoi consistent les archives.

Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple fictif pour illustrer le problème. Un service d'archives possède un exemplaire d'un CD portant sur l'histoire d'une petite entreprise qui a fabriqué des canots d'écorce de bouleau pendant plus de 150 ans. C'était la principale industrie dans la ville qui s'est constituée autour de l'usine. Le CD a été créé par un groupe qui a existé brièvement en 1985, à l'époque où l'entreprise a fermé ses portes. Le seul CD existant a été confié au service d'archives par le dernier membre de la famille des propriétaires, et il comprend des photos, des entrevues d'histoire orale, des catalogues et des séquences filmées, soit le genre de documents que l'on retrouve habituellement dans les archives. Le groupe s'est dissout après qu'un incendie ait ravagé son bureau et détruit tous les documents originaux qui s'y trouvaient. Les documents originaux ont disparu, et tout ce qui reste, c'est le CD.

Comme les CD seront bientôt obsolètes, le service d'archives désire s'assurer que le contenu est préservé pour la postérité. Toutefois, le CD est protégé par une serrure numérique, et le service d'archives n'arrive pas à retracer les créateurs. Il ne peut donc pas contourner la serrure numérique pour protéger ce document unique. Lorsque le CD deviendra désuet et que les fichiers seront illisibles, nous perdrons cette importante partie de notre histoire documentaire.

Nous recommandons que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur soit modifiée de sorte que le contournement des MPT soit permis pour toute activité qui serait par ailleurs autorisée par la loi. Les services d'archives sont autorisés à reformater des documents et à les reproduire s'ils sont obsolètes ou sur le point de le devenir, mais nous ne sommes pas autorisés à nous prévaloir de cette exception si nous devons contourner une serrure numérique pour le faire.

J'aimerais parler un peu du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Les ouvrages de la Couronne sont des documents préparés ou publiés par Sa Majesté ou sous sa direction ou son contrôle, ou par un ministère fédéral, provincial ou territorial. Le droit d'auteur des ouvrages de la Couronne n'expire jamais, à moins que l'ouvrage ne soit publié, auquel cas il est protégé pendant 50 ans à partir de la date de la première publication.

Les archives canadiennes détiennent des millions d'ouvrages de la Couronne non publiés d'intérêt historique, y compris des correspondances, des rapports, des études, des photographies et des sondages — toutes sortes d'ouvrages. On nous promet de changer le droit d'auteur de la Couronne depuis des dizaines et des dizaines d'années. Les dispositions sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, telles qu'elles sont aujourd'hui, ne servent pas l'intérêt public à l'ère numérique. Il est grand temps d'entreprendre une réforme exhaustive.

Nous recommandons que la loi soit modifiée immédiatement afin que la durée de protection des ouvrages de la Couronne soit de 50 ans à partir de la date de création, que l'ouvrage soit publié ou non. Nous recommandons également que l'on mène une étude approfondie afin de cerner les problèmes, de consulter les intervenants et de recommander des solutions qui servent l'intérêt public à l'ère numérique. Nous devons changer ces règles.

J'aimerais aborder la réversibilité, qui n'est pas une disposition très bien connue de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Au moment de transférer des documents historiques aux archives, de nombreux donateurs cèdent les droits d'auteurs qu'ils détiennent sur ces documents aux archives. Le paragraphe 14(1) de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, qui porte sur la réversibilité, est une relique méconnue qui vient d'une loi britannique de 1911. Il prévoit que, lorsque l'auteur d'une oeuvre est le premier titulaire du droit d'auteur sur une oeuvre et qu'il cède ce droit d'auteur, autrement que par testament, à une autre partie — et l'exemple que je vais donner est un contrat avec un dépôt d'archives — la propriété du droit d'auteur revient à la succession de l'auteur 25 ans après la mort de ce dernier. La succession sera propriétaire du droit d'auteur pour les 25 années restantes de la durée du droit d'auteur.

(1600)



La disposition ne peut pas être annulée par d'autres conditions contractuelles. Il s'agit clairement d'une ingérence indue dans la liberté d'un auteur de conclure un contrat, et c'est un cauchemar administratif pour les institutions d'archives et pour la succession du donateur. C'est une autre disposition de la loi, dont les gens ne connaissent même pas l'existence.

Nous recommandons que l'article 14(1) soit abrogé, ou du moins qu'il soit modifié afin de permettre à l'auteur d'assigner le droit de réversibilité au moyen d'un contrat, ce qui n'est pas permis à l'heure actuelle.

Pour ce qui est du savoir autochtone, nous avons vécu en quelque sorte une journée importante en raison du vote d'hier sur les dispositions relatives à la DNUDPA. Les archivistes canadiens sont préoccupés par la protection du droit d'auteur relativement au savoir autochtone et aux expressions culturelles: les histoires, les chansons, les noms, les danses et les cérémonies sous quelque forme que ce soit. Nous avons tous ces types de documents dans les archives canadiennes.

Les principes fondateurs de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur veulent que le droit d'auteur appartienne à un auteur jusqu'à sa mort. Dans l'approche autochtone, il existe une propriété communautaire continue des créations. Les archivistes sont déterminés à travailler avec les collectivités autochtones afin d'offrir une protection appropriée du savoir autochtone et un accès adéquat à celui-ci dans nos fonds documentaires, tout en s'assurant de tenir compte des protocoles traditionnels, des préoccupations et des désirs des peuples autochtones.

Nous prions le gouvernement fédéral d'entreprendre une collaboration rigoureuse, respectueuse et transparente avec les peuples autochtones du Canada afin de modifier la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour reconnaître une approche fondée sur la collectivité. La communauté archivistique sera ravie de participer à ce processus. En fait, nous sommes impatients de le faire. À notre avis, il s'agit d'une question qui doit être réglée.

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons passer directement aux questions.

Monsieur Baylis, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je ne vais pas présenter de motion.

Madame Peets, vous avez souligné quelque chose de nouveau. Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler des auteurs qui voient leur revenu diminuer, mais vous avez mentionné certains problèmes entre les écrivains et les éditeurs.

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous considérez qu'il y a une iniquité. Est-ce que ces contrats qu'on vous force à signer sont une des causes de votre baisse de revenu?

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui. Je ne peux revendiquer que les travaux pour lesquels je suis titulaire d'un droit d'auteur pour mes paiements d'Access Copyright, par exemple. Si l'éditeur a pris tous les droits d'auteur et tous les droits moraux, alors je n'ai plus aucun droit sur l'ouvrage. Par conséquent, je ne peux pas le mettre dans mon répertoire pour mon paiement d'Access Copyright.

M. Frank Baylis:

Qu'aimeriez-vous que le gouvernement fasse à ce sujet?

Mme Christine Peets:

C'est pourquoi j'ai dit que, à mon avis, les contrats dépassent le mandat du Comité, mais les dispositions législatives sur le droit d'auteur pourraient être renforcées pour faire en sorte que les éditeurs ne puissent plus revendiquer ces droits et que ces droits demeurent la propriété de l'auteur.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cela semble être une bonne idée aujourd'hui, mais cela n'entraînerait-il pas un problème semblable à celui que Nancy a souligné, soit si une personne souhaite vendre son droit d'auteur, mais qu'elle ne le peut pas?

Madame Marrelli, auriez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Je n'oserais pas faire des commentaires sur les auteurs. Il semble que Mme Peets soit mieux placée pour...

M. Frank Baylis:

Si vous étiez, en tant qu'archiviste ou personne qui voudrait acheter tous les droits... Supposons que nous faisions ce que vous nous demandez et que nous rédigions une disposition selon laquelle vous ne pouvez pas vendre tous vos droits. Cela n'aurait-il pas un effet...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Certainement, du point de vue des archives, il est très important de connaître l'état actuel du droit d'auteur lorsqu'on dépose quelque chose dans un service d'archives. C'est pourquoi cela pose problème. C'est là où les ententes contractuelles entrent assurément en jeu.

Les ententes contractuelles qu'a signées n'importe quel créateur doivent faire partie de son dépôt d'archives.

(1605)

M. Frank Baylis:

Je reviens à vous, madame Peets. Supposons que vous ne pouvez pas vendre vos droits à un éditeur et que quelqu'un désire... Je ne sais pas comment cela pourrait fonctionner, pour être honnête.

Mme Christine Peets:

Je ne dis pas que l'écrivain ne peut pas vendre ses droits à un éditeur s'il le désire ou qu'il ne peut pas signer tout autre type de contrat avec ces droits. Ce que je demande, c'est que le créateur conserve le droit de disposer de son oeuvre comme il l'entend.

M. Frank Baylis:

Si je vous comprends bien, votre éditeur vous dit: « Voilà l'entente que vous devez signer. »Vous pouvez peut-être éclairer ma lanterne. Vous auriez pu dire: « Je ne veux pas signer cette entente. »

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Si vous dites que vous ne voulez pas signer l'entente, vous perdez votre éditeur.

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Alors il vous a tordu le bras.

Mme Christine Peets:

Essentiellement.

M. Frank Baylis:

Mais je ne comprends toujours pas quelle modification vous aimeriez que nous apportions à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur afin d'empêcher les éditeurs de vous tordre le bras. Il s'agit d'un déséquilibre de pouvoirs, je comprends cela, mais...

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui. J'aimerais pouvoir dire que cela peut être légiféré, mais je ne pense pas que ça peut l'être. La seule chose est de rendre les dispositions législatives sur le droit d'auteur assez rigoureuses pour que l'éditeur ne croie pas qu'il puisse demander qu'on lui cède ce droit. Je crois que le libellé actuel de la loi est peut-être un peu faible, et c'est la raison pour laquelle les éditeurs se sont dit: « Oui, nous voulons tous ces droits. » Si la Loi sur le droit d'auteur était renforcée afin que les éditeurs ne puissent pas demander qu'on leur cède ces droits... je ne sais pas ce qu'on pourrait faire d'autre.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord. Merci.

Je vais passer à Mme Marrelli à propos de la question du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Sur ce sujet, si l'ouvrage devient facilement accessible, c'est une chose, et vous dites que, s'il n'est pas publié, il ne devient jamais accessible après 50 ans. Comment savoir s'il existe, à ce moment-là? On veut y accéder et il n'est pas publié. Comment savoir s'il existe?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

C'est un des problèmes. Dans les archives, nous désirons certainement de plus en plus rendre les ouvrages accessibles de façon numérique. Nous avons des ouvrages. Nous en avons beaucoup dans les archives. Les gens viennent dans nos salles de lecture, mais les gens veulent maintenant accéder aux ouvrages archivés sur Internet.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous dites que vous ne pouvez pas appliquer le droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Nous devons obtenir la permission. En fait, le gouvernement a récemment changé la façon d'obtenir une permission pour le droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Cela ne relève plus d'un guichet unique et centralisé, mais de la source ministérielle où on a créé le document.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez ce droit de la Couronne dans vos archives. Quelqu'un arrive et dit « j'aimerais consulter cet ouvrage », et c'est une tâche importante pour vous parce que...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Vous pouvez le consulter dans nos salles de lecture.

M. Frank Baylis:

S'il vient en personne...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Exactement.

M. Frank Baylis:

S'il ne se présente pas en personne, vous devez faire une copie, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Nous voulons numériser nombre de ces ouvrages...

M. Frank Baylis:

Oh, vous désirez les numériser.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

... parce qu'ils comportent un intérêt sur le plan historique.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord. S'ils ne sont pas numérisés... je vois.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Nous ne pouvons pas numériser l'ouvrage et le publier sur Internet sans permission.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous n'avez pas le droit.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Et il faut procéder document par document.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je vois.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Si vous voulez numériser un dossier, qui peut compter 5 000 documents, vous devez obtenir la permission pour chacun d'eux.

M. Frank Baylis:

Si je comprends bien, vos archives, les gens que vous représentez, ont des ouvrages visés par le droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

La plupart des archives au Canada sont visées par le droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

M. Frank Baylis:

Elles comptent ces documents visés par le droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Il s'agira d'ouvrages physiques, un livre, par exemple.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Exactement. Il pourrait s'agir d'une lettre d'un député à un...

M. Frank Baylis:

Si quelqu'un désire voir cette lettre d'un député, il a le droit de se présenter en personne et de dire « montrez-la-moi »...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

... mais vous n'avez pas le droit d'en faire une copie et de la publier.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

C'est exact.

M. Frank Baylis:

Même si vous vouliez la publier, vous auriez à aller vous-même fouiller pour la trouver dans les archives...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui, et si la personne désire utiliser le document, elle doit obtenir la permission du ministère.

M. Frank Baylis:

Et il faut le faire pour chaque ministère parce que le système n'est même pas centralisé.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Exactement. Il n'est plus centralisé.

M. Frank Baylis:

Selon vous, comment peut-on résoudre la situation?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Tout d'abord, je crois qu'il n'y a plus aucune raison d'avoir des droits d'auteur perpétuels pour les ouvrages visés par le droit de la Couronne. Une première concession raisonnable serait de fixer la durée du droit d'auteur à 50 ans après la date de création.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est une première étape.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui, et je pense que nous devons examiner certains des aspects les plus problématiques et que nous avons besoin d'un bon... On a réalisé beaucoup d'études, mais je crois que nous devons jeter un regard actuel sur ces problèmes et regrouper les intervenants afin de tenter de régler ce problème, qui a certainement des solutions. D'autres administrations ont...

M. Frank Baylis:

Je n'ai plus de temps, mais je suis certain que mon collègue poursuivra dans la même veine.

Le président:

Vous n'avez dépassé votre temps que de trois secondes.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est rare que ça m'arrive.

Le président:

Merci de respecter les règles.

(1610)

[Français]

Monsieur Bernier, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Merci beaucoup d'être avec nous.

Ma première question s'adresse à Mme Christine Peets.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez dit que votre revenu fluctue beaucoup. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus? Croyez-vous que vous êtes un cas unique ou que cela se produit également avec d'autres auteurs et d'autres créateurs au Canada?

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui, cela se produit avec un certain nombre de nos membres. Je parle précisément des paiements d'Access Copyright.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui.

Mme Christine Peets:

Ils ont dit que leur revenu a considérablement baissé, dans certains cas jusqu'à 50 %. Cela découle du fait qu'ils perdent le droit d'auteur de leurs ouvrages. On leur demande de signer une renonciation au droit d'auteur pour des ouvrages en particulier, alors ils perdent leur droit d'auteur et ne peuvent plus réclamer les fruits de ce travail.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Un auteur canadien devrait-il pouvoir récupérer ses droits d'auteur avant sa mort en mettant fin à leur transfert ou à l'octroi d'une licence? Approuvez-vous cela?

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui. Encore une fois, l'auteur devrait être en mesure de déterminer à qui ira le droit d'auteur et pendant combien de temps.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Croyez-vous que nous devons modifier notre loi afin d'être en mesure de faire cela au Canada?

Mme Christine Peets:

À l'heure actuelle, c'est 50 ans après le décès de l'auteur. La plupart de mes collègues croient que c'est juste. Je crois comprendre qu'on envisage d'aller à 70 ans, ce qui serait également acceptable.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant entendre la représentante du Conseil canadien des archives.

Madame Marelli, pour ce qui est du verrou numérique, vous avez dit que c'est quelque chose que nous devrions améliorer. Quel est votre...?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Les dispositions anticontournement ont été intégrées dans les modifications de 2012 de la loi, et, à ce moment-là, il y avait beaucoup de demandes d'exceptions aux dispositions anticontournement. En fait, la loi prévoyait très peu d'exceptions.

Je me souviens certainement d'avoir affirmé, devant un comité exactement comme le vôtre, à propos de la loi de 2012, qu'il était problématique que les archives ne puissent pas contourner le verrou numérique afin de mener ses activités de préservation essentielles. Pour nous, voilà le problème. C'est quelque chose que nous pouvons faire en vertu de la loi, mais comme cela suppose parfois le contournement d'un verrou numérique, nous ne pouvons pas nous acquitter de cette fonction essentielle. Nous perdons des documents historiques essentiels parce que nous ne pouvons pas contourner le verrou numérique afin de faire ce qui est par ailleurs permis en vertu de la loi.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Allez-vous demander une modification de la loi afin qu'elle prévoie une exception dans votre cas?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui. Nous demanderions que, si quelque chose est permis en vertu de la loi sur le droit d'auteur, nous puissions nous prévaloir du contournement pour pouvoir le faire. [Français]

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

D'accord, merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Masse. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à nos témoins.

J'ai posé des questions à des témoins sur la Commission du droit d'auteur. Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est que nous allons réaliser cet examen et que, par la suite, la ministre va y réagir. S'il y avait des modifications importantes, elles seraient fort probablement apportées à la suite d'une suggestion ou d'un projet de loi, ce qui exigerait, à mon avis, plus de consultations. Nous recevons un peu de rétroaction maintenant à propos du processus de modification, mais rien de précis n'a été proposé jusqu'à maintenant. Nous pourrions manquer de temps avant le prochain cycle électoral.

À court terme, est-ce qu'on ne pourrait pas modifier le processus réglementaire ou améliorer le processus décisionnel de la Commission du droit d'auteur et le processus d'application de la loi, ce qui serait bénéfique à l'heure actuelle? On pourrait peut-être se servir d'une approche réglementaire au lieu d'une approche législative parce qu'une approche réglementaire relève du pouvoir décisionnel et de la discrétion de la ministre.

(1615)

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

La Commission du droit d'auteur s'occupe des documents publiés. Comme la plupart des archives ne sont pas publiées, nos documents ne relèvent pas de la Commission du droit d'auteur, nous n'avons donc pas grand-chose à dire sur la Commission.

Je sais qu'on a critiqué le processus parce qu'il est long et compliqué. Nous éprouvons certainement des problèmes avec les oeuvres orphelines dans les archives. On a proposé que les documents publiés de même que ceux non publiés relèvent de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Je ne suis pas certaine qu'ajouter le fardeau des documents non publiés à la Commission du droit d'auteur serait la façon de régler le problème des oeuvres orphelines. Pour ce qui est des archives, je n'ai pas vraiment de suggestion concrète, mais je ne recommanderais pas d'ajouter les documents non publiés au mandat de la Commission du droit d'auteur à l'heure actuelle.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, c'est une réponse fort utile. C'est ce dont nous avons besoin.

Mme Christine Peets:

J'ajouterais seulement que, lorsqu'il s'agit d'ouvrages publiés, la Commission du droit d'auteur s'en occupe. Je crois que ce que vous proposez, un processus réglementaire au lieu d'un processus législatif, peut être quelque chose sur lequel la PWAC souhaiterait certainement travailler avec vous dans le cadre d'autres consultations.

M. Brian Masse:

Oui. C'est ce que je crains. On nous dit qu'il y a beaucoup de perturbations et de désordre au sein de la société de création. Je crois également que, si on change les règles et que des gens sont touchés par une politique gouvernementale, ce changement devrait être assorti d'une amélioration. Il me semble qu'il y a beaucoup d'artistes et de créateurs qui essaient encore de comprendre tout cela.

Mme Christine Peets:

C'est très vrai. Je crois que ce que nous voulons souligner, c'est que nous désirons vraiment partager nos oeuvres et qu'elles soient lues et appréciées, et nous voulons être rémunérés de manière équitable pour ce travail. Dans le cadre d'examens antérieurs, peut-être que les choses ont été un peu faussées pour l'utilisateur final, et le créateur a été perdu dans la foulée de ces examens. Nous voulons nous assurer de trouver un équilibre entre les droits du créateur et ceux de l'utilisateur.

M. Brian Masse:

Si rien ne change au cours des trois prochaines années, d'après vous, que va-t-il se passer? Quelle est votre plus grande crainte?

Mme Christine Peets:

Ma plus grande crainte, c'est que, à mesure que les oeuvres passent du format imprimé au format électronique et qu'on peut donc les partager beaucoup plus rapidement et entre beaucoup plus de personnes, les droits qui y sont rattachés seront perdus. Les gens trouvent des textes sur Internet, les partagent et ne prennent pas nécessairement le temps de trouver qui les a écrits et à qui ils appartiennent. Cela a en quelque sorte un effet boule de neige. Voilà ma crainte. Je crois que je peux parler au nom des écrivains et des autres membres de notre association. Nous voulons nous assurer que nos droits ne se perdent pas dans la foulée.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Je veux seulement remercier le Conseil canadien des archives de son travail. Je sais que, parfois, vous ne recevez probablement pas la reconnaissance que vous méritez aux archives.

Toutefois, lorsque je siégeais au conseil municipal, c'est grâce à nos archives municipales que nous avons repris le tunnel Windsor-Detroit afin qu'il redevienne une propriété publique canadienne. C'est important parce qu'il y avait dans les archives l'entente initiale qui a fait en sorte que le tunnel est devenu, dans le cadre d'un partenariat public privé, la propriété du secteur privé, lequel ne voulait pas y renoncer. Lorsque nous avons repris possession du tunnel, il était sur le point de s'effondrer en raison de l'érosion du plafond. Nous ne pouvions trouver personne qui pouvait réparer le système initial de ventilateur pour gaz d'échappement, et cela a immédiatement coûté des millions de dollars. À ce jour, le tunnel génère des recettes importantes pour la ville de Windsor et il est un élément essentiel des infrastructures du Canada.

Je vais conclure en vous remerciant, vous et vos membres, qui n'avez probablement pas cherché la gloire, mais vous avez en réalité sauvé un des éléments importants des infrastructures du Canada.

(1620)

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Merci. C'est ce que nous faisons. Voilà notre raison d'être: rendre des comptes et tenir un registre public.

Le président:

Merci.

Je dois vous dire que je n'ai jamais vu ce pont dont vous parlez, mais je l'ai clairement en tête parce que j'en ai entendu parler au cours des trois dernières années. Vous devrez nous le faire visiter.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Je l'ai traversé à de nombreuses reprises, mais je ne connaissais pas cette histoire.

M. Brian Masse:

Non, cette histoire concerne le tunnel.

Le président:

Et voilà.

Nous allons passer à M. Lametti. Vous avez sept minutes.

Oh, désolé, ce n'était pas le bon David. C'est au tour de M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ces erreurs de noms; c'est comme un système de fichiers informatiques.

D'après vous, y a-t-il des situations dans lesquelles vous croyez que l'utilisation d'une mesure de protection technologique devrait avoir préséance sur les autres règles de droit d'auteur ou les exceptions en matière d'utilisation équitable?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Désolée, pourriez-vous répéter la question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'après vous, serait-il parfois approprié qu'une mesure de protection technologique ait préséance sur l'utilisation équitable? Est-ce que cela devrait se produire?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

J'essaie d'imaginer cette situation. Non, à mon sens, l'utilisation équitable devrait être indépendante. Je ne crois pas que les mesures de protection technologique devraient entraver l'utilisation équitable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends cela. Merci.

Avez-vous des commentaires, Christine?

Mme Christine Peets:

Non, je ne comprends pas assez bien les mesures de protection technologique pour les commenter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parfait.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Vous savez, si quelque chose est permis par la loi, une mesure de protection technologique ne devrait pas l'empêcher.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. C'est exactement le type d'observation que je recherchais.

Nous sommes à l'ère numérique, il est donc facile d'enregistrer des choses maintenant, si nous le voulons. Est-il encore logique que le droit d'auteur s'applique automatiquement à tous les ouvrages? Ne devrions-nous pas plutôt envisager le droit d'auteur comme étant un enregistrement proactif comme c'était le cas par le passé?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Je crois que ce devrait être automatique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce devrait être automatique?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui. C'est un principe qui est reconnu à l'échelle internationale. Je n'y vois aucun problème.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, c'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai posé la question.

Nous avons parlé de 50 ans après la création, 550 ans après le décès de l'auteur. Est-il approprié à la base que le droit d'auteur soit maintenu après le décès du créateur? D'après vous, d'où vient cette idée d'avoir ce système dans lequel le droit d'auteur est maintenu après le décès de l'auteur?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

L'histoire du droit d'auteur, si vous l'examinez, remonte à loin. Au début, il était de très courte durée, et on l'a ensuite peu à peu prolongé. Les archivistes croient certainement que la période de protection actuelle ne devrait pas être prolongée. Le travail d'une personne doit être rémunéré de manière adéquate.

Les archives sont un endroit où on trouve cet équilibre entre le créateur et l'utilisateur tous les jours. Les personnes qui déposent leurs ouvrages dans les archives sont les créateurs. Les utilisateurs viennent utiliser ces ouvrages. Nous voyons cet équilibre tous les jours, et je crois que la durée de protection actuelle est juste — 50 ans après le décès du créateur —, et c'est la norme internationale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est la norme internationale, mais si vous fixiez vos propres règles, le droit d'auteur prendrait-il fin après 50 ans, 25 ans, ou au décès du créateur?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Je ne crois pas que c'est injuste. C'est mon opinion personnelle. Je ne peux pas parler au nom de tous les archivistes à ce sujet.

Je crois qu'avec Creative Commons et la capacité de renoncer à votre droit d'auteur, c'est parfaitement légitime. Si vous voulez rendre les ouvrages facilement accessibles, il est maintenant très facile de le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

À mon avis, parler de Creative Commons et de la renonciation au droit d'auteur est une bonne transition vers le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, qui est un sujet que je trouve vraiment fascinant et dont nombre de personnes n'ont jamais entendu parler. L'article 105 de la loi américaine sur le droit d'auteur empêche un ouvrage créé par le gouvernement d'être visé par le droit d'auteur.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Il est complètement accessible au public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exact. À la demande du public.

Est-ce le bon modèle pour le Canada?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Nous avons des sociétés d'État, et je crois qu'il y a certains problèmes à leur égard qui doivent être réglés. D'après moi, c'est un peu plus compliqué ici.

Le modèle britannique est un peu différent parce que ce n'est pas complètement accessible au public. C'est pourquoi je crois que nous devons prendre le temps d'en parler et réaliser une enquête auprès des intervenants afin de cerner les problèmes et d'essayer de trouver des solutions raisonnables. Pour l'amour du ciel, faisons-le et arrêtons d'en parler.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, faisons quelque chose.

Quelles parties du modèle britannique devrions-nous conserver, à votre avis?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Il y a différentes dispositions. Ce n'est pas un modèle où tous les documents sont libres du droit d'auteur, c'est un peu plus nuancé. Je crois que cette nuance convient davantage à notre environnement.

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous déjà eu des ouvrages que vous n'avez pas pu archiver en raison des règles du droit d'auteur? Pouvez-vous nous en donner des exemples?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

L'exemple que j'ai donné est une de ces situations où vous tenez l'objet dans votre main. Le contenu va disparaître parce que le disque compact se détériore et que vous ne pouvez rien faire, d'un point de vue juridique, pour le rendre accessible à long terme. C'est ridicule.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Je faisais partie du personnel la dernière fois que ce sujet a été soulevé, et je travaillais pour le porte-parole, à l'époque, durant la réforme de 2013. Je me souviens d'avoir appris à ce moment-là que les archives nationales avaient apparemment perdu environ 80 % des bandes vidéo du Parlement datant d'avant 2005.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Le matériel audiovisuel présente un problème important. Tout ce qu'on ne peut pas tenir dans sa main et qu'on peut voir est indubitablement problématique. Le matériel audiovisuel pose assurément problème, mais nous avons le droit de reformater ce matériel, pourvu qu'il ne soit pas protégé par une MTP. Si le matériel est sous verrou numérique, nous ne pouvons pas le reformater. S'il ne l'est pas, la loi nous confère déjà le droit de le reformater. Le fait que nous disposions ou non du financement nécessaire pour le faire est une autre question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est logique.

Connaissez-vous archive.org?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Je suis désolée?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les archives Web, archive.org.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui, bien sûr.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La délocalisation d'œuvres dans le but de contourner le droit d'auteur est-elle une chose qui arrive souvent? S'agit-il d'une méthode visant à protéger les documents?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Je ne le pense pas. Pas à ma connaissance. Je ne peux imaginer comment cela fonctionnerait.

Le cadre international, sous le régime des traités internationaux est tel que les oeuvres sont protégées, quel que soit l'endroit où elles se trouvent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Exact, eh bien...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Les règles sont légèrement différentes, mais, si vous allez aux États-Unis, la durée de la protection est à vie plus 70 ans plutôt qu'à vie plus 50 ans. Vous ne gagneriez pas grand-chose en procédant à une délocalisation. Je ne peux pas m'imaginer...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, mais les règles américaines en matière d'utilisation équitable sont beaucoup plus souples que les nôtres, et, si vous regardez...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Elles sont différentes, mais, la réalité, c'est que, quand vous utilisez le droit d'auteur, ce sont les lois de l'endroit où vous utilisez le matériel qui s'appliquent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Exact.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Si vous utilisez le matériel au Canada, vous devez suivre les règles de ce pays, que vous y accédiez depuis les États-Unis ou depuis le Canada. Je ne vois pas en quoi cela constituerait un avantage.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il semble que mon droit d'auteur ne soit plus valide.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Lloyd.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes; allez-y.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui.

Ma première question s'adresse à vous, madame Marrelli. Vous avez soulevé un bon exemple, celui d'un disque compact qui se détériore. Vous affirmiez qu'une modification de la loi visant à permettre de contourner une MTP est la solution.

Existe-t-il une technologie permettant de contourner cette loi?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pour quelle raison avez-vous affirmé ne pas pouvoir parler au détenteur du droit d'auteur?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Parfois, on ne peut pas le faire. Il arrive qu'on ne puisse pas le joindre. Parfois, on ne sait pas de qui il s'agit.

Dans ce cas-là, il s'agissait d'un groupe qui s'était formé, puis qui s'était dispersé.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je pense qu'on appelle cela une œuvre orpheline, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

C'est une œuvre orpheline, oui.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Diriez-vous que nous pourrions faire une distinction entre les œuvres orphelines et celles qui ne le sont pas? Devrions-nous pouvoir contourner une MTP si le détenteur du droit d'auteur s'y oppose explicitement?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Ce serait une possibilité, mais la réalité, c'est que si vous avez le droit de le faire, selon la loi, quel est le problème si vous affirmez pouvoir le faire sans vous plier à toutes sortes d'exigences? Nous n'avons rien à faire dans le cas des documents qui ne sont pas sous verrou numérique. Pourquoi le fait de contourner un verrou numérique pose-t-il soudainement problème si on a déjà le droit d'exécuter la loi?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à Mme Peets. Elle est plus simple. Je pense qu'elle est directe.

Si le droit d'auteur était appliqué et appliqué de façon plus efficace et que les auteurs et les éditeurs recevaient les redevances auxquelles ils croient avoir droit des établissements d'enseignement, verriez-vous le besoin d'un tarif obligatoire dans ce cas-là? Si on s'en occupait efficacement, qu'on faisait appliquer la loi, que les gens qui copient illégalement des œuvres étaient tenus responsables et payaient pour l'avoir fait, verriez-vous le besoin d'un régime de tarification obligatoire?

Mme Christine Peets:

Je pense que nous avons tout de même besoin des tarifs. Il faut que les universités, les bibliothèques et les autres établissements paient leurs droits à Access Copyright, parce que c'est vraiment le seul moyen. Je pense qu'il serait trop difficile d'élaborer un autre genre de procédure d'application de la loi. Dans ce cas, qui va faire appliquer la loi et comment va-t-il le faire et ce genre de choses? Selon moi, si on s'en tient simplement aux droits qui sont négociés avec chaque établissement, c'est la façon la plus facile de s'assurer que les éditeurs et les créateurs sont payés pour leur travail.

(1630)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Les universités et les établissements d'enseignement manifestent une crainte importante à l'égard de la possibilité qu'ils n'obtiennent pas vraiment ce pour quoi ils paient. Ils n'en ont pas pour leur argent, alors, il me semble qu'un modèle transactionnel devrait être établi afin qu'ils puissent obtenir ce pour quoi ils paient.

Ne pensez-vous pas qu'il doit y avoir un meilleur moyen pour les universités?

Mme Christine Peets:

Peut-être qu'un autre modèle doit être établi, mais, en ce moment, les universités prétendent qu'elles ne devraient pas avoir à payer un tarif pour ces documents parce qu'ils sont utilisés à des fins de formation et que l'éducation devrait être gratuite.

À cela, je répondrais que l'éducation n'est pas gratuite. Les étudiants paient des droits de scolarité. Les professeurs universitaires sont rémunérés, de même que le personnel de soutien.

L'éducation n'est pas gratuite. Pourquoi les œuvres qui sont créées par les auteurs devraient-elles l'être?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je suis tout à fait sensible à l'argument que vous formulez. La semaine dernière, nous avons entendu des témoignages de l'Université de Calgary, selon lesquels les responsables de cette université ont tenté de payer des licences transactionnelles à Access Copyright, mais qu'on leur a refusé de le faire. Ils n'avaient pas la permission d'acheter des licences transactionnelles au moment où ils le voulaient.

Quel serait votre commentaire à ce sujet? Les universités tentent — pas toutes, mais certaines — d'obtenir des licences transactionnelles, mais elles leur sont refusées. Quel est votre commentaire à ce sujet?

Mme Christine Peets:

Je ne peux pas parler au nom d'Access Copyright.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous disposez d'environ 45 secondes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pourriez-vous m'adresser un commentaire rapide? D'autres administrations semblables au Canada — par exemple l'Union européenne ou les États-Unis —, protègent-elles mieux les auteurs et que font-elles de mieux — ou de pire — pour les auteurs et les éditeurs, à votre avis?

Mme Christine Peets:

New York vient tout juste de promulguer une loi qui s'appelle Freelance Isn't Free. Je pense que, si l'Ontario — pour commencer — et peut-être le Canada — ensuite — pouvait faire quelque chose de ce genre, cela nous assurerait qu'un plus grand nombre d'auteurs sont payés pour leur travail, en particulier lorsqu'il est fait à la pige plutôt que par des rédacteurs employés de journaux et de magazines.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. J'apprécie ce commentaire.

Mme Christine Peets:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à Mme Ng.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Mme Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

Merci infiniment à vous deux d'être venues nous parler aujourd'hui.

Ma première question s'adresse à Mme Marelli et vise à m'aider à comprendre un peu mieux les utilisateurs des archives, les chercheurs et ainsi de suite. Quand nous discutons du droit d'auteur de la Couronne et de ces documents, qui seraient les utilisateurs typiques qui voudraient accéder à ces séries d'œuvres?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Ce pourrait être une famille faisant des recherches généalogiques. Je vais donner un exemple entièrement inventé. Disons que la famille de l'aumônier d'une prison a reçu une lettre du directeur de cette prison parce que l'aumônier a été tué durant une émeute de prisonniers dans les années 1800. Eh bien, cette lettre fait encore l'objet d'une protection perpétuelle parce qu'elle n'a jamais été publiée, mais la famille veut rédiger son histoire et doit publier la lettre. Pourquoi cette lettre ne devrait-elle pas être incluse dans le matériel que nous pouvons numériser de toute manière, si nous étudions les émeutes de prisonniers et que nous voulons rédiger un document à ce sujet sur notre site Web? Il n'y a aucune raison pour laquelle ces œuvres ne devraient pas être incluses.

Mme Mary Ng:

Je songe aux efforts déployés ces temps-ci dans le but d'obtenir un plus grand contenu canadien et au soutien offert aux créateurs canadiens, et, quand je pense aux créateurs, je vois des jeunes. Je pense à ces innovateurs, au genre de recherches ou de découvertes de travaux et aux moyens dont ces personnes disposent pour accéder au matériel. Au moment où nous réfléchissons au sujet de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur et à la façon dont nous devrions peut-être l'envisager, à quoi devrions-nous penser dans l'avenir?

Autrement dit, ce grand ensemble d'œuvres se trouve dans les archives, et nous voulons encourager davantage, pas moins, de créateurs de contenu.

(1635)

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Nous voulons que les œuvres soient publiées.

Mme Mary Ng:

Nous voulons qu'elles soient publiées, et, vous savez, un plus grand recours à la numérisation et à divers formats technologiques permet de le faire, et nous pourrons avoir une autre génération d'excellents créateurs de contenu au pays.

Sur ce, j'ai une question légèrement différente à poser. L'exploration de données pourrait en fait faire partie de ce type de travail. On obtient du contenu de nombreuses manières, mais une partie de ce contenu pourrait l'être par l'exploration de données. Pensez-vous que nous devrions envisager quelque chose comme une exception qui permettrait ce genre de prélèvement de contenu — si on veut — ou d'exploration de contenu, en tant que disposition de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur qui permettrait une utilisation potentielle future?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Tout d'abord, la numérisation des documents pose problème. Nous refusons d'en numériser. On ne peut pas explorer des documents qui n'ont pas été numérisés...

Mme Mary Ng:

Je vois.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

... sauf si vous le faites manuellement, au moyen de fiches signalétiques, c'est-à-dire l'ancienne façon de procéder.

Nous ne pouvons pas envisager de numériser des documents si nous ne pouvons pas les rendre accessibles sur notre site Web. Voilà le genre de matériel que nous numérisons.

Avant même que nous en arrivions à l'étape de l'exploration de données, il faut être à même de suivre le processus de numérisation, et, dans le mémoire que nous allons soumettre, il est question d'œuvres orphelines. Je n'en ai pas parlé aujourd'hui parce que le temps dont nous disposions était limité, mais les œuvres orphelines constituent assurément l'un de ces problèmes. Il y a des obstacles, et, dans le cas des archives, la majeure partie du matériel qui se trouve dans nos institutions n'est pas viable sur le plan commercial. Ces documents proviennent de familles. Ce sont les œuvres de particuliers et d'entreprises, qui n'ont pas de valeur commerciale en soi. Ce matériel a une valeur historique. Alors, les obstacles qui nous empêchent de les numériser, dès le départ, sont un problème auquel on se bute avant même d'arriver à l'exploration de données.

Mme Mary Ng:

Quelle part de la collection est numérique?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Voulez-vous parler de nos documents?

Mme Mary Ng:

Oui.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Je dirais moins de 5 %.

Mme Mary Ng:

Oh, vraiment? D'accord.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

C'est très peu. Nous avons des tonnes de documents.

Mme Mary Ng:

Très bien, d'accord.

Concernant la question de savoir si les documents ont une valeur commerciale ou non, j'espère que, dans l'avenir, certains de ces créateurs pourront les parcourir. J'essaie de déterminer comment on pourrait les rendre accessibles; on pourrait très bien trouver une filière à cette fin, mais il s'agit d'une autre discussion.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Nous travaillons sur la numérisation des documents, mais les archives n'ont pas beaucoup d'argent.

Mme Mary Ng:

D'accord.

Madame Peets, simplement pour revenir sur une question qui a été soulevée un peu plus tôt — en fait, je pense que c'était quand nous étions à Montréal —, nous avons entendu le témoignage d'une organisation qui est essentiellement une plateforme. Si je comprends bien, sa technologie permet de rémunérer les auteurs en fonction de l'utilisation, même pour un seul chapitre.

Nous discutons de l'accès au droit d'auteur grâce à une approche tarifaire. Nous avons certes entendu des établissements déclarer qu'il s'agit d'un défi parce que, même si vous avez raison d'affirmer que l'éducation n'est pas gratuite, nous voulons également que les établissements d'enseignement obtiennent le matériel dont ils ont besoin et qu'ils n'aient pas à payer pour la reproduction, et c'est ce que nous avons entendu dans certains des témoignages.

À votre avis, un tel régime pourrait-il fonctionner? De nouvelles plateformes voient le jour, et nous observons certainement le phénomène dans l'industrie de la musique, où il est possible de rémunérer les auteurs de façon transactionnelle et en fonction d'une utilisation ciblée. Pouvez-vous formuler un commentaire à ce sujet?

Mme Christine Peets:

Je pense que vous parlez du modèle de paiement au clic. La plupart de ces œuvres sont offertes à un taux très bas. C'est le genre de chose à un cent du clic, alors si vous avez écrit une histoire ou rédigé le chapitre d'un livre, vous allez recevoir un cent pour chaque personne qui le lit. Ce pourrait être très long. Cela signifie qu'une centaine de personnes doivent le lire pour que vous touchiez un dollar, alors, un tel paiement transactionnel est très problématique.

Mme Mary Ng:

Alors, le paiement transactionnel est problématique du point de vue de son mode de rémunération actuel, mais, si cette rémunération était plus équitable, cela pourrait-il fonctionner?

Mme Christine Peets:

Je suppose, mais je pense que vous n'avez qu'à regarder quels sont les modèles, actuellement, et ils favorisent certainement la personne qui met le matériel sur la plateforme, et non pas celle qui a rédigé le document.

(1640)

Mme Mary Ng:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer au dernier intervenant, c'est-à-dire M. Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais céder mon temps de parole à M. Lametti.

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à vous deux de vous être présentées. Je suis un ancien professeur qui donnait des cours sur le droit d'auteur, et dois avouer que je n'ai que rarement mentionné le droit réversif au cours de mes quelque 20 années d'enseignement, alors je suis tout aussi coupable que n'importe qui d'autre.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

J'en fais partie également.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est un ancien professeur.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. David Lametti:

Ça y est. Je suis coupable.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Pourvu que nous ne devenions pas des reliques.

M. David Lametti:

Madame Peets, je me rappelle avoir enseigné l'affaire Robertson c. Thompson Corp plus d'une fois et m'être dit que la bonne nouvelle était que Heather Robertson avait eu gain de cause et que la mauvaise, c'était qu'elle avait gain de cause. C'est simplement parce que, comme vous l'avez dit — et je pense que nous l'avions tous prévu à l'époque —, les éditeurs allaient simplement réagir en veillant à ce que, toutes les fois qu'ils signent un contrat avec un pigiste, ils obtiennent tous les droits.

Mme Christine Peets:

Oui.

M. David Lametti:

C'est encore plus vrai maintenant, parce que, quand Heather Robertson avait rédigé les articles en 1995, nous parlions de microfiches et de stockage d'articles dans des bases de données, avant que les liens sur Internet et ce genre de choses ne soient même dans les pensées de quiconque. L'affaire avait finalement été tranchée en 2006.

Aidez-nous à trouver une solution. Ce n'est même pas un problème de droit d'auteur. C'est un problème de contrat.

Mme Christine Peets:

En effet.

M. David Lametti:

Ce problème est lié au déséquilibre des pouvoirs, parce que les éditeurs, les journaux ou qui que ce soit qui achète le travail du pigiste auront toujours beaucoup plus de pouvoir. En tant que pigiste, vous devez vendre votre travail, et, maintenant, les éditeurs vont vouloir s'assurer de ne pas se faire poursuivre si un lien vers l'oeuvre était créé ou qu'ils voulaient utiliser le document dans un autre format.

Existe-t-il un modèle quelconque qui puisse nous aider? J'essaie de bien comprendre le problème, et je ne suis pas certain d'en être capable. Je suis sensible au problème, mais je ne suis pas certain de voir la solution quelque part.

Mme Christine Peets:

Je ne peux parler que de mon expérience personnelle à ce sujet. Les grands éditeurs ont toujours voulu tous les droits. Je n'ai jamais eu ce problème avec un petit éditeur, dont on aurait tendance à penser qu'il aurait voulu tous les droits et qu'il l'aurait peut-être exigé encore plus fermement que les grands éditeurs. À mes yeux, cela a toujours été un paradoxe intéressant, car les gens qui — comme vous le dites — avaient tout le pouvoir en voulaient encore plus, et les éditeurs qui avaient du mal à s'en sortir, qui publiaient peut-être un ou deux magazines, me versaient des droits de réimpression. Ils me payaient s'ils voulaient afficher quelque chose sur leur site Web, et ce genre de choses.

La solution consiste en l'établissement d'un équilibre. C'est une question de volonté; il s'agit de savoir si les éditeurs veulent vraiment que ce problème soit réglé. Si on peut considérer que, sans contenu solide, ils ne pourront pas vendre leur publicité, alors, ils doivent payer pour ce contenu.

M. David Lametti:

Si votre association trouve un modèle ou peut en inventer un, auriez-vous l'obligeance de nous le soumettre?

Mme Christine Peets:

Nous le ferons. Nous nous attaquerons à cette tâche. Merci.

M. David Lametti:

Ce serait formidable.

Madame Marelli, je vous remercie de votre présence.

On fait valoir, du moins, dans les cercles universitaires, que les dispositions relatives à l'utilisation équitable s'appliquent déjà aux archives et aux autres utilisations équitables en ce qui a trait aux MTP.

Avez-vous déjà abordé cette question devant les tribunaux, c'est-à-dire celle de savoir si l'utilisation équitable s'applique aux dispositions relatives aux MTP?

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Voulez-vous dire que nous devrions simplement les contourner?

M. David Lametti:

Ce n'est pas ce que j'affirme, mais connaissez-vous des cas où on a...

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Combien d'archivistes connaissez-vous qui sont vraiment audacieux et disposés à enfreindre la loi?

M. David Lametti:

J'en connais au moins un. Il semble que je viens tout juste d'en rencontrer un.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Oui, peut-être.

Il est certain que nous effectuons de la gestion des risques et qu'il y a des situations où, bien franchement, un archiviste ne peut tout simplement pas en rester là.

M. David Lametti:

Oui. Vous vous signez, et vous le faites.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

C'est tout simplement ridicule, et les probabilités qu'on soit poursuivi devant les tribunaux à pour cette raison sont très faibles. Toutefois, nous ne devrions pas nous retrouver dans cette position. On ne devrait vraiment pas nous mettre dans cette position. Les dispositions de la loi nous permettent de le faire. Pourquoi ne pouvons-nous pas tout simplement obtenir une exception pour le contournement des MTP? Ce n'est pas si compliqué.

Je me souviens très bien du processus mené en 2012. Tout le monde en avait plus qu'assez de la discussion. Les gens étaient prêts à s'entretuer, à la fin, et, finalement, le gouvernement a simplement dit: « Aucune exception, point final. Un point, c'est tout. Nous ne prévoyons aucune exception pour quoi que ce soit. » Tout le monde dans la salle savait et comprenait que c'était inconcevable pour les archives, mais c'est tout simplement passé. C'est tombé entre les mailles du filet.

M. David Lametti:

D'accord.

(1645)

Le président:

Vous avez terminé. Merci beaucoup.

Sur cette note, je veux également faire part de notre gratitude à nos deux témoins d'aujourd'hui.

Mme Nancy Marrelli:

Merci de nous accueillir.

Le président:

C'était très instructif, et nous avons hâte de poursuivre notre étude.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour quelques minutes pendant que nous mettons de l'ordre dans nos affaires et que nous disons au revoir à nos témoins, puis nous reviendrons.

Merci.



Le président:

Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Monsieur Masse, je vais vous laisser prendre la parole.

Je veux seulement préciser que nous devons nous attaquer à certains travaux du Comité, pas que je veuille limiter le débat. Nous sommes censés être à huis clos. Si nous pouvons nous garder environ 20 minutes, est-ce que ça sera suffisant?

Très bien.

(1650)

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai une motion concernant laquelle j'ai présenté un avis lors de la dernière séance. Je voudrais la lire et la mettre aux voix pour le Comité. C'est une petite motion. Je vais simplement la lire, puis j'en parlerai brièvement. Je sais que d'autres motions seront peut-être présentées aujourd'hui. Je pense que la mienne est éloquente: Que le Comité permanent de l'industrie tienne des audiences afin d'étudier l'achat proposé, par le gouvernement, du pipeline et de l'infrastructure rattachés au projet d'agrandissement Trans Mountain, y compris: a) les modalités de l'achat, dont les coûts pour les contribuables et les impacts à long terme de l'achat et de la réalisation du projet, b) les impacts directs et indirects pour les entreprises canadiennes qui sont en concurrence directe avec les produits pipeliniers et l'utilisation de ces produits dans les marchés respectifs, et c) les plans relatifs à la vente du projet une fois réalisé.

Pourrais-je parler de la motion?

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'aborderai pas en détail l'ensemble des éléments a), b) et c) de la motion, mais j'en décrirai l'esprit général. La raison pour laquelle je pense que la motion a sa place ici, au Comité de l'industrie, c'est que l'achat du pipeline et son expansion potentielle auront des conséquences directes du point de vue de la concurrence non seulement sur l'industrie en soi — c'est-à-dire celle du pétrole et des ressources naturelles —, mais aussi sur les marchés subséquents des produits qui en découleront, surtout compte tenu du fait que le public participe maintenant à la distribution du produit. Ce subventionnement pourrait avoir une incidence sur des entreprises canadiennes.

Par exemple, si, dans le cadre de l'expansion du projet et du détournement du pipeline, les produits qui passent par ce pipeline vont vers la Chine et sont utilisés pour produire de l'acier, qui est en concurrence avec celui produit par les industries canadiennes, ou bien s'il s'agit en fait de composantes de combustible, nous devons au moins tenir une discussion et entendre certains témoins à ce sujet.

Il y aura des conséquences importantes en ce qui a trait à la chaîne d'approvisionnement, au coût pour les consommateurs et à la viabilité de divers produits sur le marché. Il y a carrément l'industrie en tant que telle, du point de vue de la façon dont le pétrole consommable et d'autres produits énergétiques sont utilisés pour la production de biens et de services, puis, si l'État octroie des subventions, il y a l'utilisation elle-même et la concurrence qu'il faudra livrer à l'égard de produits semblables. Voilà pourquoi je crois qu'il conviendrait de tenir des audiences sur cette motion.

Je vais conclure en disant que je garderai l'esprit ouvert à l'égard de nos études en cours, mais, si nous ne pouvons pas effectuer cette étude d'ici la fin de la session en cours, j'espère que la tenue de certaines séances à l'automne serait appropriée, afin que nous puissions offrir au moins un certain point de vue sur les conséquences positives ou peut-être négatives, ainsi que sur celles qui présenteront un défi. Encore une fois, il est question d'une amélioration pour les marchés, les consommateurs et les concurrents, si le gouvernement intervient à cet égard.

Le président:

Monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Monsieur le président, de ce côté-ci, nous appuyons pleinement la motion présentée par M. Masse. Je pense que vous voyez actuellement que deux partis ici présents sont certainement disposés à débattre du pipeline Trans Mountain et de l'incidence qu'il aura sur les contribuables, particulièrement maintenant qu'il nous appartient à tous. Je pense qu'il importe également de souligner qu'un engagement de 4,5 milliards de dollars a été fait par le gouvernement à l'égard de ce pipeline, mais que cette somme ne permettra aucunement la construction du pipeline.

Selon moi, il serait très instructif et utile pour le gouvernement que nous entreprenions une étude, au sein du Comité, afin d'examiner les trois éléments que M. Masse a présentés dans sa motion. Il est certain que nous serions favorables à la tenue de ces séances d'urgence; j'affirmerais même que, de ce côté-ci de la table, nous souhaiterions le faire au cours de l'été également. Voilà à quel point cette motion est importante, selon moi.

Le président:

Monsieur Baylis.

M. Frank Baylis:

Eh bien, si nous devions appuyer une motion, il faudrait que j'appuie celle de M. Masse. Ce n'est pas que la motion de M. Jeneroux ne soit pas bien rédigée, elle aussi. Ce sont deux excellentes motions.

En réalité, l'achat de ce pipeline est régi par deux ministres qui ne sont pas le ministre d'ISDE. Il est du ressort de M. Carr, à Ressources naturelles, et du ministre Morneau, aux Finances. Ce n'est pas pour minimiser ce projet ou pour affirmer qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un enjeu important, mais ce n'est pas plus notre problème que l'étude des enjeux et des affaires agricoles.

En ce sens, je dirais que nous serions contre la motion. Nous nous y opposons strictement parce que ce n'est pas notre ministre qui est concerné. Nous n'avons participé à aucune des discussions ou des annonces à ce sujet.

Cet achat est vraiment la responsabilité du ministre des Finances et du ministre des Ressources naturelles. Leurs comités sont libres de choisir ce qu'ils font ou ne font pas, mais c'est là que cette étude devrait être effectuée. Je vous encouragerais à parler à vos collègues de ces deux comités afin de promouvoir l'idée.

(1655)

Le président:

Monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, monsieur Baylis, de nous permettre de perdre un peu de temps, au moins — j'imagine — avant que le débat soit ajourné à... ou que l'on ait voté contre la motion.

Je suis respectueusement en désaccord avec les commentaires selon lesquels ce n'est pas notre problème. Je pense que c'est le problème de tous les comités, pour être honnête avec vous. Selon moi, il y a beaucoup en jeu, plus particulièrement au sein du Comité de l'industrie. Nous sommes un comité tout à fait essentiel et important, peut-être même parmi les plus fondamentaux du Parlement. Je pense que les industries qui seraient touchées par cet achat sont certainement du ressort du ministre d'ISDE et de la ministre de la Petite entreprise et du Tourisme.

Je pense que ce sont toutes des raisons pour lesquelles il s'agit de quelque chose à l'égard de quoi nous devrions nous réunir en tant que comité et que nous devrions étudier collectivement. Selon moi, cette étude est maintenant urgente.

Le président:

Avons-nous d'autres intervenants?

Dans ce cas, nous allons mettre la motion aux voix.

Un député: Je voudrais un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président: Monsieur Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Si je puis, monsieur le président, je voudrais présenter un nouvel avis de motion à prendre en considération. Je voudrais lire la motion officiellement:

Que le Comité permanent de l’industrie, des sciences et de la technologie entreprenne une étude composée de quatre séances au cours desquelles il examinera, entre autres questions: les impacts des tarifs douaniers imposés par les États Unis pour les producteurs canadiens d’acier et d’aluminium et les chaînes d’approvisionnement de ces secteurs, et que le Comité présente à la Chambre un rapport exposant ses constatations et ses recommandations sur des mesures possibles destinées à protéger l’industrie canadienne et sa compétitivité.

Je soulèverai cette question à l'occasion de la prochaine séance.

Le président:

L'avis de motion a été reçu. Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons suspendre la séance, puis passer à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 31, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.