header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-06-05 PROC 110

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1000)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone. Welcome to the 110th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Today we continue our study on Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We are pleased to be joined today by Taylor Gunn, president and chief election officer of CIVIX, and Duff Conacher, co-founder of Democracy Watch.

For the committee's information, you have the list from the clerk of the total number of witnesses. The good news is that they've all been invited—all 300—and we've accommodated everyone who's interested. If there are any more who express an interest, we have slots this week and can fill them. We should be finished with witnesses this week.

We can do some opening statements.

Mr. Gunn, maybe you could start, and then we'll hear from Mr. Conacher.

Mr. Taylor Gunn (President and Chief Election Officer, CIVIX):

It's nice to see everybody again. Last time, it was around the electoral reform issue, and I want to put on the record that I sincerely appreciate all the effort and the time you put in even if it didn't really turn into anything. It was a great example of a parliamentary committee at work.

It's a privilege to have been here a few times before. In case you don't recall who we are and what we do, I'll explain that we're a Canadian civic education charity that works to develop the habits and skills of citizenship within students under the voting age.

Our primary piece of work is the student vote program, which is a parallel election for kids under the voting age. You may have been aware of that. We're running one in Ontario right now. We expect probably around 300,000 kids to go through that process by Thursday of this week.

An interesting addition to our work is that we ran our first student vote outside of Canada in Colombia two weeks ago, with 31,000 kids participating. Hopefully, that will open us up to more countries and we can export our Canadian democratic values.

We've also started a new program that's all about news literacy and “mis-, dis-, and mal-information”, which relates a bit to what's in this bill. That's something that I might bring up later.

It's a privilege to be here. I can't say that I object to much—or maybe anything—in the proposed bill. I'm really comfortable giving more time to Duff, who might have some more specific points. There are some things I can comment on around the preregistration, and maybe a little bit around the foreign interference, with what we've learned over the last few months, and then on another couple of small points.

I'm happy to give up my time to Duff or to end short so that you guys can have a break and plan for your next session.

(1005)

The Chair:

Okay, Mr. Conacher, you're on.

Mr. Duff Conacher (Co-Founder, Democracy Watch):

Thank you very much.

Thank you to the committee for the opportunity to testify before you today.

I am testifying here in my role as co-founder of Democracy Watch, which, if you are not aware, is a citizen advocacy group. We've been working since 1993 to make Canada the world's leading democracy, pushing for changes to require everyone in politics to be honest, ethical, open, and representative, and to prevent waste. A total of 190,000 people have signed up to send a letter or petition in one or another of our campaigns from across Canada.

Today, my submission is based largely, as Mr. Gunn mentioned, on earlier submissions made to the Special Committee on Electoral Reform.

Bill C-76 makes many good changes, reversing many of the unfair changes made by the 2014 so-called Fair Elections Act, but the Democracy Watch position is that the negative effects of many of the changes in that act were exaggerated. As a result, the reversal of those changes will likely have little overall effect on what actually happens in elections. Like the 2014 Fair Elections Act, Bill C-76 unfortunately doesn't live up to its name. It's called the elections modernization act, but like the Fair Elections Act, it allows many old-fashioned, unfair, and undemocratic election practices to continue, as follows:

Number one, of course, the vote-counting system doesn't count votes in a fair way, and usually produces false majority governments. It also doesn't allow voters to vote “none of the above”—a key option that voters should have, and already have in four provinces—and it doesn't fully fix election dates, as the U.K. has, to stop unfair snap election calls.

Number two, it continues to allow the baiting of voters with false promises in ads. The Canada Elections Act prohibits inducing voters to vote for anyone by—and this is the actual wording—“any pretence or contrivance”. However, the commissioner of Canada elections refuses to apply that measure to a blatantly false promise or false statement made during an election. A clearly worded “honest promises” requirement, with significant penalties, is clearly needed. It's the number one hot-button issue for voters: even if they vote for the party that wins, they don't get what they voted for because of blatantly false promises.

While clause 61 of the bill adds some specifics to the measures in sections 91 and 92 of the Canadian Elections Act concerning false statements about candidates, the measures actually significantly narrow the range of prohibited false statements. That is a move in the wrong direction. Dishonesty in elections should be broadly defined and discouraged. It's a fundamental voter rights issue. They have the right to an honest campaign so that they know what they're voting for honestly, and misleaders, as opposed to leaders, should be discouraged with significant penalties.

Related to that, the bill does not do nearly enough to stop the new form of false claims, secret false online election ads, including by foreigners. Bill C-76 trusts social media companies to self-regulate, only holding them accountable if they “knowingly” allow a foreign ad, but not saying anything at all in terms of their knowingly or in any other way allowing a false domestic ad. Again, clause 61 narrows the definition of “false statements”, but it still would be illegal to make a false statement about a candidate.

In terms of the “knowingly” standard, the social media companies will easily be able to come up with evidence that they didn't know an ad had been placed. It's not going to be enforceable. They'll get off every time, so that doesn't discourage them from allowing secret, false, online election ads by people in the country or foreigners.

Media and social media companies should be required to report all details about every election-related ad to Elections Canada during the six months leading up to an election, so that Elections Canada can check whether the ad is false, whether it exceeds the third party spending limits, and whether it is paid for by a foreigner. All those three things are illegal, but if Elections Canada can't see those ads, which they can't because they're micro-targeted, how are they going to enforce those laws against false and foreign-sponsored ads, and ads that exceed the third party spending limits?

(1010)



Don't trust the social media companies to self-regulate in this area. Require them to report every ad to Elections Canada. During those six months, empower Elections Canada to order a clearly false or illegal ad because it's foreign or exceeds the spending limits to be deleted from a media and social media site and impose significant fines on the violators.

In terms of what the bill also does not address, annual donations are still too high. Bill C-50 doesn't do anything about this. As a result, the parties all rely on a small pool of large donors who donate thousands of dollars or more. That facilitates funnelling as SNC-Lavalin was caught doing. It also facilitates lobbyists bundling donations to buy influence. That's all undemocratic and unfair.

There are seven practices the bill does not address that should be switched to be overseen by Elections Canada or other watchdogs.

One is unfair nomination races. Elections Canada should be running all of them. The reform act has not changed anything. All the parties have handed back to party leaders the power to approve election candidates, sometimes with someone in their party headquarters' office as a screen.

Another is unfair leadership races. Elections Canada should be overseeing them.

Another is questionable auditing. Elections Canada should be auditing parties, candidates, and third parties.

Another is unfair election debates. Elections Canada or a commission should be running them with their rules. Hopefully a bill making that change will come soon, before the next election.

Another is biased election polling station supervision. The ruling party and second party choose those people and can force the returning officer to appoint whom they want. Elections Canada should be appointing all the polling station returning officers.

There is the questionable use of voter information. The bill does not extend the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, PIPEDA, to the parties. The law should be extended to the parties with the Privacy Commissioner doing enforcement.

Another is unfair government advertising. Hopefully there will be a bill coming on that as well with the Auditor General or Elections Canada empowered to stop any ads that are partisan in the six months leading up to an election, and a full prohibition on government ads during the three months before an election.

There is the third party spending limits area. There's no way to stop Canadian businesses and citizen groups receiving foreign money from entities that frees up other money they have to use for third party election advocacy activities, unless you're going to prohibit foreign-owned businesses in Canada and foreign contributions to citizen groups completely. This bill does go quite far in requiring the separate bank account to be set up. I think the problem with it is it's discrimination against citizen groups that take donations versus unions and corporations that are also third parties. It's very easy for them to shift money into this bank account, but a third party is going to have to do special fundraising to get money into that account if it's a citizen group. It's going to make it much more difficult for citizen groups. They are allowed to donate into the account from their own funds that they may have gathered throughout the year, obviously not foreign funds. I think the overall effect is going to make it much more difficult for citizen groups to gather any funds compared to unions or corporations.

The disclosure of the reports and the limits are all good as well, but you need a limit on government advertising as well to make it fair for everyone leading up to the pre-writ drop period and the election period. Overall, I don't see any reason to increase the third party limit during the election period. That's a bad idea. That's a move in an undemocratic direction because it would allow wealthier interests to spend more. The cost of online ads is much less than traditional advertising was when the limits were first set. Even though the new limit covers more expenses, including surveys and going door to door and things like that kind of outreach, I don't see a reason to increase the limit. I think it's a move in a bad direction. How was the limit chosen? How were all the limits chosen? Are they based on anything? Are they based on looking at what parties spent on ads in the pre-writ period in the 2015 election, before the 2011 election?

(1015)



It's the same with third parties. Is it based on anything that's been reported to Elections Canada? I know that the figures in 2004 limiting third parties were arbitrary, but now we have some track record and I think it should be examined.

I'll just finish with this point. The limits as stated in the government's backgrounder are not the same as what's in the bill. I'm quite confused by huge discrepancies in the amounts. The pre-writ limit for party spending says $1.5 million in the backgrounder, but in the bill, it says $1.1 million. In the backgrounder, it says it's adjusted for 2019 figures based on inflation, which is 30% inflation which we don't have now. All the limits are the same. For third parties, there's a $300,000 gap between what it says in the bill and the backgrounder, and for a riding there's a $3,000 gap.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Duff Conacher: The pre-writ period and the writ period. I'm not sure where those figures came from in the backgrounder.

I would just make the overall point: how are these limits set? Why not look at what parties actually spent in the pre-writ period leading up to the 2011, 2015 elections. It's the same with the third parties and what they spent during the election. Set a limit based on that. I don't think any of the limits are very meaningful—any of them—because very few parties are going to spend that amount in July and August. People don't usually run big ad campaigns in July and August, especially for voters, because they're not paying attention until September after the writ is dropped.

Finally, overall enforcement must be increased. The fines must be increased. The watchdogs must be made much more independent. The length of time for bringing complaints must be extended from 30 days after an election to one year.

I welcome your questions about any of those points. Thank you again for the opportunity.

The Chair:

Which watchdogs were you referring to?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

There's the Chief Electoral Officer. The ruling party can select that person now with just a majority vote in the House. No consultation is even required with opposition parties. As you may know, we have a court case right now challenging the Ethics Commissioner's appointment and the appointment of the Commissioner of Lobbying, based on consultation not being done, even with the opposition parties.

If they're going to enforce a rule that says a false ad can't be run, then everyone has to view them as completely non-partisan. Right now, the ruling party cabinet chooses the Chief Electoral Officer. The director of public prosecutions is chosen by a committee that has a majority of ruling party members on it.

There's a better way. There's an independent commission in Ontario. The way it appoints judges is the world-leading model, and it should be used for every single appointment of every government watchdog at the federal level. You need these people to be viewed as completely non-partisan, not tainted by even the hint of an appearance of bias. If they're going to stop false ads that are online and curtail people's free expression, you don't want anyone thinking they've done that to protect one party, help one party, or hurt another party.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to questioning now.

We'll start with Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Gunn, can you comment on the register of future voters?

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

Sure.

It's a trend with election management bodies. The purpose is to be able to communicate with younger electors once they are 18.

It seems like there's a couple of different methods for this. One, which they have in Ontario, is that the young people are supposed to opt in before they are added. Another version is where information is shared from wherever it can be collected with the election management body, where it's not an opt in.

I wasn't sure with this bill.... It says it may be opt in. I'm not sure whether it's going to be opt in or not. The opt-in provision represents potentially a teachable moment in schools and in other ways, as long as it's properly funded and executed, but it is also challenging. I believe that Elections Ontario found it challenging to obtain the numbers they were looking forward to in building that preregistration list. Of course, the alternative is that the information is shared behind the scenes. Your name appears on a list where you have no education or understanding about the list, what its purpose is, and you lose the potential for that teachable moment.

(1020)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You mentioned—and I agree with you—that it won't entirely fix the problem of youth voter turnout, but where do we go from here? Is it a good step? What are your thoughts?

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

With the preregistration?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

We always thought that if done properly, it could create an opportunity to educate kids about what the voters list is as a small component of a wider civic education effort. I think it's great that it's been put in here.

It's one of those things that beyond the bill, it comes down to the execution and delivery, and again, the challenge of whether or not it's opt in. With all of these things, I always advise that maybe it shouldn't be an election agency that's running these types of educational campaigns but organizations that are already active in schools and have the experience and knowledge on how to make something out of that.

I think it's great that it's in here. I wouldn't rely on it to increase turnout, but it's a trend that's being seen across Canada. I don't think anyone should object to it.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Based on your engagements with youth, what are the best tools to engage with them?

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

They're probably the best tools you'd have for any adult, as well. As far as turnout in elections goes, in my opinion—and Duff, I'm pretty sure, would have a couple of additional points—there are so many different factors in the circle of attracting someone to participate. Obviously, I'd put civic education at the foundation of that.

Then you have things such as whether the election is competitive. Is it a change election? You still have citizens who will feel that their vote doesn't count. That's based on the electoral system, and nothing is happening on that one.

You have things such as how people receive their information in elections. You do have accessibility. This came from the national youth survey that Elections Canada has now done twice. There are motivation factors, accessibility factors. All those things come into play, and all of them have to be done at the same time. You can't rely just on civic education, for example.

I still would suggest and advise to anyone that the most effective dollars spent on potentially grooming a young person into a citizen is civic education. Then, of course, it comes down to education that is not just out of a textbook, making sure it's experiential. I'd point out that especially when you get into things such as cyber-threats or foreign interference in our elections, you can do the top-down...or the advice that you have in the bill of how people detect these ads and this sort of thing, but if you're not doing the bottom-up at the same time, almost like citizen preparedness or resiliency, you won't get the effect you're looking for.

Outside of this bill are things such as empowering organizations to do the things that Elections Canada either doesn't have the ambitions or aspirations to do, and being more aggressive in tackling these types of challenges. I know that's out of your hands, but someone should be concerned with it, because there isn't a mechanism right now for groups like ours, and maybe others, to be creative.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Conacher, you're not the first witness to mention political parties being subject to PIPEDA. It seems to be...and I don't want to say a trendy thing, but political parties are—

(1025)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

A means.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

—a means, thank you. Political parties are different actors from any others, and I'll give you one example. In terms of PIPEDA, if I call up an organization and ask what information they have on me, they are to provide that information. That's a good practice within PIPEDA.

Political parties have supporters, and they don't like other political parties. What's to stop thousands of individuals from bombarding a political party or a political organization as a coordinated campaign to undermine a party?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Undermine it how?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

To shut it down or overwhelm it with requests.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I think we have to start, if this transition is made, with a notice going out to anyone a party has information about, letting them know what they have and then asking for their consent to whatever the use the party wants to make of it, with a simplified form. That's how the transition would be made, and that whole bombardment wouldn't happen because people would receive a notice proactively from the parties about what had been gathered on them already.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Since political parties receive the voter lists, essentially everyone in the country would get mail from each political party—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

You can make an exception for that kind of thing. For example, people can be given notice in tax forms that this information is shared with political parties. There are ways of getting around that. I'm talking about other information that parties might have gathered from people—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

So you don't think political parties should receive the voter lists automatically unless there is consent from the individual.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I don't have a problem with that particular part. You were just saying that the party would have to notify every voter, but there is another way of dealing with that kind of thing, where parties are shared that basic information.

I'm referring to the other information that's gathered and what parties are doing with it, whether parties are renting their lists to raise money and things like that. There is some compromise position here, I think, to bring the parties—I know they're a different kind of entity—under some of those rules and not allow them to be self-enforcing, which essentially is what the bill does.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now, it's Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Mr. Conacher, I'll start with you.

When you were before this committee—I think it was about a year or so ago now—you stated that you'd like to see disclosure for lobby groups or third party groups in their spending between elections. I'm assuming that's still your position. Given that this is not addressed in Bill C-76, do you think that this legislation should be amended to include that kind of disclosure requirement so that it's out of the writ and the pre-writ periods?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It addresses the pre-writ, which is a start, although I don't think July and August are going to be big spending periods for anybody. They'll save their money and spend it.... It depends, of course, exactly when the election is called, but I think you'll see all of that spending happen just after Labour Day or just leading up to it, if anyone is going to spend any of that pre-writ money.

Going beyond the pre-writ period, yes, I think we should still have disclosure under the Lobbying Act of any spending on any campaign. It doesn't have to be right down to the dollar, but a range could be given for round figures, just to get some sense of how skewed things are in terms of the resources of different stakeholders working on any issue.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You had also indicated the last time you were here that you felt all donations should be disclosed before people vote. You were talking about political parties in that case. I guess it would be candidates as well. Do you feel the same way about third party donations? Do you believe they should be disclosed as well before people vote?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes. The interim report that has to be filed will cover the pre-writ period or whatever period of time during the election campaign itself in which a party starts spending and crosses the threshold of $10,000, so there will be a disclosure if anyone participates.

Some people have said—Senator Frum, for example—that there won't be any disclosure until after the election. There will be with this interim report, and it could disclose quite a bit.

This is done by leadership candidates in leadership races, the disclosure monthly and in the last week as well leading up to the leadership vote. I don't see why it cannot be applied to everybody. Voters have a right to know who is bankrolling every interest, candidate, party, and third party trying to affect the election.

(1030)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but this wouldn't require disclosure of the contributions that would have been received, let's say, by a third party prior to that pre-writ period. Especially when everyone knows that June 30 is the start of that period, do you not think that without disclosure before that, people would just drop the money in on June 28 or June 29? What are your thoughts on that?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Do you mean the disclosure of huge donations?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

The thing is, as a citizen group, you have to set up a separate bank account. You can't use foreign money at all. The money would have to go into that separate bank account. Then, if it is used, the contributors have to be disclosed, even if the money came in before June 30. I'm quite sure citizen groups that want to go through this process will be setting up a bank account before June 30. They'll likely be appealing throughout the whole year leading up to an election year.

If a snap election is called, I don't know where they're going to get funding from. They can transfer from their bank account themselves, and I'm sure they'll send out an appeal right away to get some funds in. It all will be limited, however, based on how much money they have in an account that's not foreign money, that is not dedicated to other programs, and that can be shifted into an account specifically for the partisan activities.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The last time you were here you also mentioned B.C. and some of the changes they made in terms of third parties and their reporting and spending. I wonder if you could give us an update on that. Obviously, there has been some time to take a look at the campaign that occurred there. I'm wondering what your thoughts are on how those changes worked in practice and whether you think there's anything we can learn from their experience.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Do you mean the third party in B.C.?

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's correct. You mentioned it the last time you were here.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I think Bill C-76 goes further than B.C. because of this special bank account you have to set up.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure. However, I'm asking you what we learned from the experience of their changes and what we can....

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I haven't examined that in detail. I'm sorry.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You haven't been able to do that. Okay.

A number of people have raised this issue of collusion, or perhaps co-operation if we want to call it that, among a number of third parties. That might be seen as a way for an organization or individual to work with a party, for that matter, to get around spending limits. What are your thoughts on that? Do we need to be doing something more about that? Do you think that's a problem we need to deal with?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I think the interim report that's required will help, because not only will the third party have to register but you'll get some indication of where contributions are coming from. Overall, I think Elections Canada should be empowered to audit and be proactively auditing these things as they go.

I've said this, I believe, before the committee before. This is a very difficult area. Once the election happens, unless there's outright fraud and it has very clearly affected the election, it's almost impossible to get a judge to say, “I'm going to overturn what tens of thousands of people just did.”

Therefore, you need to be doing real-time auditing, checking, verifying, and going in with the power to say, “I want to see all of your emails from the last log”, and things like that, to ensure that those kinds of things aren't happening.

After the fact, you can penalize people to discourage them, but what they win is a lot. They win power. There are lots of people out there, I think, who would be willing to be the sacrificial lamb who goes to jail for a couple of years to have their party win power.

Empower Elections Canada much more, both on the secret, fake, foreign, and false online election ads and on everything else, to be in there having full disclosure so they can stop anything that is unfair and undemocratic.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses.

I'm just reading through some of our background documents on this. Has the CEO not asked for the repealing? I'm talking about false or misleading statements, particularly about the personal character of the candidates. Has the CEO not recommended repealing this section? They thought his feeling at the time was that defamation and libel can be dealt with better at court than it could be by Elections Canada.

(1035)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes. I don't have the definition right in front of me...that you've committed a crime and something about your professional qualifications.... It's been narrowed to make it more enforceable and also to say that you have withdrawn as a candidate, obviously. I don't think it should be more narrow.

Again, libel court doesn't help you very much a year later if it's damaged the election result, so I think the definition should be broad. I think it should include blatantly false promises, which you have to catch after the fact. However, for blatantly false statements, Elections Canada, or a commissioner under it, should be there.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's run that scenario under your ideal, if Bill C-76 dealt with false statements and false promises. Let's just walk through one.

The last time you both appeared we were talking about electoral reform. We were talking about a specific promise that 2015 would be the last election under first past the post.

In your ideal scenario, what would happen next if the law prevented parties from making false statements?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Democracy Watch's proposal for a long time in its honesty in politics campaign has been that, first of all, we thought the provision in there against a pretense or contrivance was enough. We filed the complaint about the electoral promise with the commissioner. The commissioner said that there have been no cases on this, ever, and pointed to something obscure that happened in the British Parliament 140 years ago, saying that pretense and contrivance do not mean a false promise.

Pretense is a false claim, contrivance is a false claim, and a false promise is a false claim, so I don't know why the commissioner's role—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you think the law is there?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It is there. The commissioner is not enforcing it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If the commissioner were to enforce it, what would the commissioner then do?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I mentioned fines increasing. They have to increase—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Break a promise, pay a fine.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, the leader should pay a fine and the party should also pay a fine.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The leader would personally pay a fine.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, and Democracy Watch's recommendation is a minimum of one year's salary, because this is a very serious voter rights issue. It would be a minimal—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So Justin Trudeau would have to pay a year's worth of salary and the party would pay a fine.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

The party would have also paid for having a misleader.

It has to be stopped. Voters right now are playing poker when they go to vote. They don't know who's bluffing. Their money is on the table.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It's a fundamental voter rights issue. It has to be stopped. We've seen the damage in the U.S. and we've seen the damage here.

It has to be stopped, and the only way to stop it is a serious penalty after the fact. You're not going to be able to reverse an election result based on a false promise.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

You just can't prove it. It has been tried in B.C. and in Ontario.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let me play devil's advocate for a moment.

There is this distinction between third parties raising money and advocating for candidates or for issues versus what parties can raise money for to advocate for issues or their candidates. Why should there be any distinction? If Canadians are sitting there and want to donate to one of the political parties to voice their political expression, or want to donate to a business association or a non-profit environmental group, why should the government care how they choose to voice their democratic rights through their donation in this case?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Are you saying the government cares in terms of the limits?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, in terms of various limits and various permissibility. It gives advantage in terms of our tax code. It gives advantage in terms of spending limits to political parties over charities, for example.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Why should that be? If I'm a citizen and I don't like the political parties but there's an issue I care about and I want to donate to this group instead, but you're making it so much more preferable to me to donate to a political party, it's ironic that the political parties write the rules. However, aside from that—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes. That is why the rules are the way they are.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but is it fair?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

No, it's not fair. The tax receipt you get for donating—

(1040)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's deal with limits, because that's what Bill C-76 deals with.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, the limits should all be looked at.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You argued for lowering those limits on third parties.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, and also the limits for parties.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see. I didn't know you wanted lower limits on both.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes. You don't have to limit it if a political finance system is democratic. The donation limit should be $100, or $200 at most. That's the amount that an average voter can afford. As in Quebec, the per-vote funding should be returned, because it was the most democratic part of the political finance system. It was proportional, based on your actual voter support. The current system is based on your support by wealthy interests.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We had a proportional system at one point—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

That was for financing. Do that with a $100 donation limit. You don't have to worry about the parties being able to spend more, because they won't have the money.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's talk about social media for a second. As it is right now, you call it self-regulation. If some foreign entity or someone breaking one of the laws in Bill C-76 buys $500,000 of Facebook ads, which would be a lot, to advocate for a political party or for an issue, unless Facebook reports that, unless the third party, the foreign entity, reports it, how would we know it happened?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

A voter might see it who is not intended to see it in terms of the micro-targeting, not be happy with it, and report it to Elections Canada.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. With getting all these ads for this pipeline, I don't know what's going on, who is paying for these ads. They have to report it to Elections Canada—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

There are lots of things in the election law already. You have to identify yourself on the ad.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What is the role of Facebook in that?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Their role is to say, “Let's not make this money; let's rat out this person.”

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right now, under Bill C-76, what responsibility do they have?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It's only if it's foreign that they can't knowingly take it. If it's domestic, they don't even have to report it. It's trusting them entirely and their incentive is to make the money, not to report the ad that will be stopped so that they don't get the money.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Someone has talked about having a cache of all the political ads, as we do for the print media, so that all political ads are captured by Elections Canada. If there's a political ad, there's something about having the same thing. Any political ad that Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram take, they'd have to put into a cache and report who paid for it and when it went out.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes. Our recommendation is that this would occur during the six months leading up to the election. That's to enforce the laws that are there against false statements, spending above the limit, the foreign spending that's in this bill, and spending as an unregistered party or putting an ad out there that does not have you identified as a third party. In the six months before, Elections Canada should be watching.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I just want to say, Mr. Gunn, you do great work. All you guys do. You should be supported more.

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

All in favour?

The Chair:

Okay, thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Gunn and Mr. Conacher, for being here today. I'll start with Mr. Conacher.

I know that your passion is democracy and ensuring that people have an opportunity to participate in the democratic process. Can you speak about the way you believe Bill C-76 will contribute to voter participation? What are the strengths in Bill C-76 that you see?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Voter participation, you're saying?

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Well, there are some measures for accessibility to the polls. Lowering the voter ID barrier is fine, but I didn't think it was a huge issue.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

You're speaking about the voter information cards?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, given that 29 pieces of ID could be used before, I think anyone who wanted to vote would have been able to satisfy the requirements. But it's fine to lower it, and it's fine to lower it for expats.

I mentioned that these are all good changes. I haven't spoken on any of them because we don't really have any qualms about them. You can debate whether someone who is abroad forever with no intention of returning should have the right to vote, but they don't vote, so it's not a big problem. That's why I say that most of the changes are good, in good directions, but I don't think they're going to change much of what actually happens, because I don't think they....

Even saying that Elections Canada can only inform people about how to vote, when that was done, voter turnout went up by the highest amount in the last election, from election to election, since Confederation.

A lot of the issues about the unfair elections act were unfair because the act didn't address the 10 things I listed, which this act does not address, either. It's not modernizing elections. It's still allowing a lot of old-fashioned, unfair, and undemocratic practices.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Would you agree that Bill C-76 will result in more voter participation, that the provisions are in there to increase voter participation with things like accessibility, voter information cards, and the like? Would you agree with that?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, but I wouldn't say that it will definitely increase participation. I wouldn't even make a prediction about what's going to happen on Thursday in Ontario, let alone what's going to happen a year and a half from now at the federal level, but it lowers barriers, for sure.

(1045)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Mr. Gunn, considering Mr. Conacher's statement about the voter information cards, I know that youth really struggle with identification, particularly youth who are at school and don't have a driver's licence. What do you think of the voter information card? Do you believe that for youth it's an important piece of identification for them to be able to use?

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

Yes. I've never had a problem with the voter information cards being used to vote at the poll. I think it's partly because I don't know if there is strong evidence of its being abused. It was brought up in the Fair Elections Act debate, but I don't know if those were actually credible stories about the cards being misused. The trend among election management bodies is to make it as easy as possible to vote. They don't want to have any accessibility barriers.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

For students in particular, though, I've heard evidence, and I have three post-secondary institutions in my riding, and the voter information card was a huge deal for those post-secondary institutions. I'm wondering if that's your experience and if you see the importance of this as a vehicle in encouraging students to vote.

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

Well, if you're speaking specifically about a kid at a university who maybe hasn't changed his address, he wouldn't get the voter information card anyway. To me, the biggest barrier to someone's turning out is not the accessibility factor, but the motivation. If kids at university want to participate, they'll find a way to participate, especially with some of the recoil from the Fair Elections Act. So I don't think it's the biggest issue in the world.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Would you agree that it is an important issue for students because it allows them greater ability to vote? It's one less barrier that they have to face. When we're doing those other things, like education campaigns and putting polling stations at universities and colleges, this is one more thing that would help to encourage them to vote.

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

It could be, if they have the right addresses.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

The information we are getting from witnesses is that there is recognition, not only among youth and students but particularly among seniors as well as indigenous people, that the voter information card has been very valuable. That's the evidence that we've heard, and that's my experience in serving as an MP.

Going back now, Mr. Conacher, to this notion of money and limits, I want to get back to this premise. I remember that in your previous testimony you spoke about it as well. You suggest a $100 limit for donors, and you suggest that limit because you feel that a limit has to be placed, so you deem $100 as affordable to most people. Is that the idea?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes. It's based on the principle of one person, one vote. Why should anyone be allowed to use money, just because they have it, as a means to have greater influence? If you look at the stats, all the parties rely for a significant percentage of their funding annually and during an election, 40% of it, usually from a small pool of about 5% of donors. That's fundamentally undemocratic. Loans should be limited as well. To be able to go to a financial institution that is federally regulated and get a huge loan to pay for your election, and then win power based on that loan, they've done you a huge favour. That causes a conflict of interest.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What about the person who can't afford $100?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

That's where the per-vote funding should be restored, and it should only be a base. It should not be as high as it was, because some parties were receiving 60%, 70%, 80% of their funds through the per-vote funding. There should still be an incentive for parties to reach out to voters, not just at election time. You can go into an election based on a bunch of false promises, get those votes, and then get their money with per-vote funding right through the next election. It should just provide base funding. It should be no more than a dollar. That's where you would get supplementary money from voters across the country.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I'm just concerned about the person who can't afford the $100.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Sure. You could go lower.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

If you set a limit, someone is always compromised—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, but much less compromised than now. Quebec has done it.

(1050)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It doesn't make it okay.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It's been proven to work, and it makes it much fairer than it is now. All the parties rely on wealthy donors. Those people I'm sure have more influence. The current donation limit facilitates funnelling, which SNC-Lavalin did. It also facilitates bundling, lobbyists holding big fundraisers in their homes off the record, then saying they just delivered 100 people who donated the max each, and those people I'm sure also have enormous influence on all the parties. We just don't know who they are.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

The last thing I'd like to mention, and you don't have time to answer it now because I'm out of time, but I would be interested in any research you've done specifically with members of Parliament with respect to the influence that money has on them. It's an area of interest for me. I studied ethics at the doctoral level.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Thank you. I'll just make one small response to that.

Clinical tests around the world have shown that very small gifts change how people make decisions. For doctors and—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, I understand that, but I'm looking for specifics because I think as members of Parliament, you come in with a knowledge of ensuring that you are not influenced by that, and I don't think it's impossible.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

If you applied the Access to Information Act to your offices, then I could request your communication logs and see whether you were calling back your big donors and fundraisers more often and more quickly than you are the people who didn't donate and didn't vote for you. The Access to Information Act does not apply to your offices, so the study can't be done.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Nater now.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to both our witnesses for joining us today.

Mr. Conacher, I know you were before the committee to talk about Bill C-50, but I don't recall your joining us to talk about the leadership commission debate, the organizing commission, but I know you mentioned it in your opening comments. We did table a report back in March. During our process of deliberating on that matter, we were informed by Andy Fillmore that the government simply wouldn't have time to introduce legislation to create such a commission, so rather they will likely do that through a grants and contributions scheme.

We have yet to see anything come of that, but I would be interested in your thoughts on the matter. Would a grants and contributions model be supported by Democracy Watch, or would you rather see something with actual legislative backbone to create such an institution?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

You're saying the grants and contributions to third party groups?

Mr. John Nater:

To some third party group to organize a commission, yes.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I think it's better to put it under a centralized commission with all sorts of fairness rules on who gets to participate, based on things like percentage of votes received in the last election, whether you have an MP in the House. Take away all that discretion.

Having third party groups run things, some would say would balance it. You'll have different groups running it. Some will have a certain slant and run it that way because they have an interest, and others will balance it by having a different slant. I think it's better to put it into a non-partisan commission.

I know Elections Canada itself doesn't want it, but it can be a commissioner under Elections Canada, just like the enforcement is now, and have all sorts of fairness rules. The broadcasters are using the public's airwaves. Require them to air it on the public's airwaves. They already gouge us enough and use the airwaves as they want. The airwaves are a public resource. They're licensed to do it. An election is important. The debates should be running on all the broadcast outlets whether they want to run them or not. That should be what's on during prime time that evening.

I think that's the better way to go than grants and contributions.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

You mentioned in your opening comments the term “modernization” within the title of the bill. Certainly technology is changing. Technology changes fast. There are both positive and negative consequences of those changes in technology. You certainly hit on one of the points in terms of real-time disclosure. We already have it fairly quickly in terms of leadership races and things like that.

Then you also hit on some of the more...I hate to use the word negative, but it has negative consequences in terms of social media advertising. There are both sides of it—the benefits and the challenges of technology's quick changes. I know you've talked already about the self-policing aspect of Facebook.

I want us to go a step further. I want you to elaborate a little bit more on that foreign influence on Facebook, and I should say on other social media platforms as well—we shouldn't constrain it to just Facebook, but certainly that's the one in the news—and how we might see a legitimate enforcement regime to really crack down on that foreign influence.

I know Mr. Cullen mentioned that about half a million dollars is a significant Facebook ad buy because the ads are so much cheaper.

What would you envision as an enforcement scheme to effectively deal with foreign powers using domestic platforms?

(1055)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I think it should be applied to media and social media. You could run a radio ad in a small market and not identify yourself as a third party or be registered, and Elections Canada might not find out about it. You could do that in a community newspaper possibly and Elections Canada might not see it. They would probably see TV ads.

Just require all media companies and all social media companies to report every election-related ad to Elections Canada for six months leading up to an election. Give them the power to stop false ads, and stop an ad that doesn't identify the third party. They have to know who paid for it. They have to know where it was targeted as well, all the details. Then they'll be able to also enforce the spending limits that would apply in the pre-writ period.

Otherwise they won't know about the ads. The rules will be there. Just don't leave it to the social media companies especially to self-regulate, because their incentive is to make money, not to stop an ad because someone may not like it.

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

One of the things I didn't notice, which I wonder if you're concerned with at all, is that in terms of making the electoral process a more secure aspect of the bill, there was no mention of the tabulators or machines that election agencies are tending to attempt to simplify with regard to what they say is the challenge of getting people to work on polling day. Who builds those machines, where they come from and how they're used are, to me, very important parts of a secure electoral process.

I'm just wondering if any other bill has been looking at that. Are you leaving that within the management of Elections Canada?

Mr. John Nater:

That's a good question. I think my time is probably up.

Personally in the past year and a half, I voted using a variety of methods. Provincially we use those tabulators. Provincially for the leadership race, we voted online. In last year's leadership race, we used a tabulator as well. There are a variety of options right now.

I'd be curious, Mr. Gunn. Do you use any different types of voting methods for student votes or is it an x on a piece of paper right now?

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

No, people wanted us to make the kids vote online because they thought it would make it easier and more interesting. We always argued against it. Now I think that voting online has been proven to be a silly idea in terms of safety. That is a strong personal opinion of mine. I just wonder about these machines, having recently had discussions with different people and new parts of government that we're not used to dealing with. Some people truly believe that everything can be hacked.

I wonder whether the right motivation is solving that problem to make it easier to use machines or we should be investing in finding ways to make sure there are actually more people to work on election day.

I do believe that everything can be hacked. I just wonder if that's a concern of the committee. Although you're saying that maybe you're making the electoral process more secure with the bill, you may be missing a part that you should be looking at.

Mr. John Nater:

I would say that was briefly discussed in the electoral reform committee, but it wasn't directly related to the study.

I appreciate the comments.

Sorry, Mr. Chair. I know I went over.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, you have two minutes. I know you can get seven minutes into two.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

This is for both Mr. Gunn and Mr. Conacher.

Would you consider yourselves a third party in elections?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I'm sorry?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would you guys consider yourselves a third party in elections?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

In the upcoming election?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In any election.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

We're a third party, yes. We don't usually run ads, though. We release a report card on the parties' platforms through various news releases, and just rely on media coverage.

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

We're non-partisan. We're not considered a third party going after a political outcome.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Mr. Taylor Gunn:

We have received funds from foreign accounts, so I worry if we could ever get caught up, but I think our ability to not get caught up in that is that we're non-partisan.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Conacher, on your website you say that 99.9% of your donations are under $150. You said that the limit should be $100 for us and that you're concerned about large donors. It's a fair criticism, but what's the 0.1% and where do your donors come from?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I'm sorry?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What is the 0.1% that's over $150, and where do your donors generally come from?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

A few people donate more than that. One person has made a large donation in the past few years of $25,000. That's it. Most of them are small donors. We wouldn't even have to disclose them under the third party rules. You could go lower than $200 for the reporting. I don't think you have to because those donations are not huge and influential and don't need to be identified.

I also mentioned that Elections Canada should be doing audits of third parties, and should not be allowing people to choose their own auditors. This is also a way of combatting non-disclosure of donations of over $200 that would violate the disclosure rules. Give Elections Canada that audit power, and I think you can keep the donation disclosure limit at $200 and above.

(1100)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final question before I cede my time.

With respect to the $25,000 donation, do you find that this donor has any different an influence on your organization than the other donors?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

They would if they ever contacted me, but they don't.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I'm acknowledging that these gifts.... Yes, sure. I acknowledged this last time when I was here on Bill C-50. That's why they should be restricted. When you talk about restricting third party citizen groups with respect to how high a donation they could have as the Public Policy Forum recommended in its recent report, you then also have to look at foreign-owned corporations and their ability to do an internal transfer of money to support what they do as a third party.

It's an area that should be looked at, but the place to start is with disclosure of how much is being spent by various interest groups in between elections on everything. You're going to have it for elections, although after the fact; it should be before the fact. Then we can start talking about whether we should limit donations to citizen groups for certain purposes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just out of curiosity, have you ever taken donations from outside of Canada?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

No.

The Chair:

I have one question.

You mentioned right at the beginning that four provinces have the option to choose “none of the above”. Roughly how many people choose that? Give me just a ballpark figure.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It was 0.5% in the last election in Ontario. None of the election agencies inform people that they have this right. We're about to take Elections Ontario to court for failing to do so.

The Chair:

It's not on the ballot?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It's not on the ballot. You decline or refuse your ballot. You're handed your ballot, and then you hand it back. More people would likely do it if the election agencies actually advertised that you have the right to do this. Elections Ontario is once again, for the third election in a row, refusing to do this, so that's why we're about to take it to court. It should say “none of the above” on the ballot, and then there should be a space just a couple of lines below where you could write a reason as to why you voted “none of the above”. That would be reported back to the parties in categories: environmental platforms weren't strong enough, someone didn't like the leader, or whatever it is. It would be a great feedback loop that would increase voter turnout and give parties information on why people are not turning out to vote now.

In terms of overall increase in voter turnout, I work with a charity called Democracy Education Network, and we also do voter turnout initiatives. We have two going on in Ontario, and we did them in the last election. One is VoteParty.ca. It's all aimed at voters because the best way to increase voter turnout is to get voters reaching out to non-voters. We have VoteParty.ca so that you can make a vote date with a non-voter and take them to vote with you. We also have VotePromise.ca so that a person can make the vote promise to help a non-voter vote.

I'll just pick up on some earlier questions very briefly. All of the messages should be aimed at telling voters to reach out to non-voters. That's how you'll increase voter turnout. Trying to reach non-voters with all the ads.... They're not paying attention, and they're not engaged. That's why they're non-voters. You don't reach them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If “none of the above” wins, what should happen?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

If we get to that point of getting “none of the above” on the ballot first, then we can deal with that issue. I think—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can't have it on the ballot if you don't know what's going to happen if it wins.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, well, I'm just saying, show me a process that's even moving close to that and we can talk more about what to do, but it's only happened once, and that was in the Nevada election for governor. Their rule is that the election still stands. Obviously it's a hit to the legitimacy of the person who won, and they had to check themselves, because they knew how many voters out there didn't like them.

The Chair:

Thanks to you both for being here. It's been very interesting and helpful. It's good to see you back again.

We'll suspend and bring the next witness.

(1105)

(1115)

The Chair:

Good morning. Welcome back to the 110th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For our second hour today, we are pleased to welcome Henry Milner, associate fellow, department of political science, Université de Montréal.

Professor Milner, thanks for coming. You can go ahead with your opening statement.

Professor Henry Milner (Associate Fellow, Department of Political Science, Université de Montréal, As an Individual):

I was under the misapprehension that I was going to be one of five, but it turned out that the five are the entire morning session, rather than just this hour. That is okay with me, but it means that I haven't prepared an exhaustive critique or analysis of Bill C-76. I'm just going to talk about the things that are of particular interest to me and where I think I can make a contribution.

The first thing is you will see in my presentation that I've done this before. It's nice to come to such a situation and be basically positive, rather than be here to criticize and be negative, which is the more normal situation for people like me. Much of my efforts have been around electoral reform. That experience was slightly less positive, if I may say, than this one will turn out to be, I think.

I think that I was in front of the same committee—although I think it was across the street from Parliament—being critical of the Fair Elections Act for various problems with it that seemed to have been rectified in Bill C-33, which I was happy to see presented way back when. I had assumed that this issue was now going to be resolved, but it turns out it's only now that the process continues. It has been widened, as I don't have to tell you, with a number of other areas.

From my point of view, the crucial aspect is access to make it easier for people to inform themselves. That's my specialization, political knowledge. I've published a great deal about that, including the political knowledge of young people, by comparing different countries, including Canada, and physical access to the voting booth in terms of some of the restrictions that were brought into the Fair Elections Act that have been removed in Bill C-76.

In my own work, my particular concern has been on the political knowledge aspect, so I was very concerned with the Fair Elections Act's efforts to reduce the ability of Elections Canada to provide information, especially to young people, but not only to young people, so they would be more able to participate in an election at the right time. I think that those aspects of Bill C-33 have found their way into Bill C-76, in terms of the role of Elections Canada, in terms of allowing registration before the age, in fact, encouraging young people to register before the age of 18, as well as other aspects, which are not just for young people, but for people with handicaps and so on. I'm very happy to see that.

In terms of what I would like to see added, there's only one aspect that seems to me to be missing. Once one is really looking at the entire electoral process—and I know there was some discussion of it in the consultation process that took place—perhaps regulate the question of leaders debates during the election period. Set up a process that would be standardized, so that people could expect it. I know that's a complicated issue and I certainly don't want to delay the implementation process, but I do think it's missing from a law that tries to be quite comprehensive about the way we run election campaigns.

My other problem wasn't part of the Fair Elections Act, but with the way the last election was run. It was that it was so long. I don't have to remind you that it lasted more than 11 weeks, I think. That was tied to a change—a change which I had something to do with—namely, fixed election dates. I testified before that, especially in the Senate committee, that was responsible for that issue. I have talked about that in other places, including the House of Lords in London.

(1120)



When fixed election dates were adopted—and the 2015 election took place under fixed election dates—this silly idea of now doubling the time for the campaign was combined with it, which of course made us look bad, those of us who favoured fixed election dates. People were saying now it's a free-for-all, that it lasts forever, and all kinds of money is being spent. I'm glad to see that we're going back to a seven-week campaign like in the Fair Elections Act. That's the one additional factor that I think is very important, and there are some other specific procedures around this that I'm in favour of. I don't have anything particular to say about them.

My real concern is that this happen. We have an election coming up in a year and a half and I'm concerned that the necessary aspects of this law won't be implemented early enough so that they can actually work appropriately. I'm torn between wanting to improve Bill C-76 in any possible way and wanting it to move quickly. Having it move quickly is, I think, in many ways more important, especially the information aspect and so on. We would like to see Elections Canada again able to implement its various information programs.

I have to tell you—and I don't know how many of you are aware of this—that there's a very absurd thing taking place next week in Toronto. I'm not sure how many of you are aware. Probably none of you are aware, but a citizens' group tied to the Canadian Federation of Students.... I think I have it here if you'll just give me a minute. The Council of Canadians, the Canadian Federation of Students, and some individuals hired a law firm to contest the Fair Elections Act. I was one of those who wrote affidavits for this contestation, which is only now coming before the Ontario Supreme Court. All of us—there are several of us, though not as many as you'll be hearing from—those of us who opposed the Fair Elections Act, are required now to be cross-examined by government lawyers to defend our criticism of the Fair Elections Act, which, of course, will no longer exist, hopefully, very soon.

I guess the business of Parliament moves slowly. I found it quite strange, but when I was speaking to the law firm that's running all of this, I asked them why they wouldn't just drop it. They said they weren't sure that the new legislation replacing the Fair Elections Act would be implemented in time, so they had to go ahead. This will all be taking place in Toronto next week.

Finally, I want to stress that I am anxious to see this move ahead, so that it will all be in place in time for the next election.

I have to say that one of the reasons I'm a little bit cynical about how this body moves on it with what seems to be happening or should be happening is my experience with the electoral reform. I was one of a great many political science and other experts in this area who came before this body. We were a very large majority of experts who testified in favour of electoral reform, and it seemed that our voices were going to be heard as part of the process, and then, as I don't need to tell you, we know how that came out.

I don't want to be too cynical but I do want to stress the importance of moving forward with this so that this bill will be in place in time to be implemented correctly for the next election.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for being here, and for those comments. Now we'll go to some questions.

We'll start with Mr. Simms.

(1125)

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Milner, it's nice to see you. I'm sorry. It should be Dr. Milner. Is that correct?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's Dr. Milner to you, sir.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's right. Yes, it is. It is now Dr. Milner to me.

I want to thank you for being here today. Thank you for bringing us your insight and experience.

That's what I want to ask about first: your experience. I see here in your bio reference to universities in Finland, France, Australia, and New Zealand. I'm familiar with Australia and New Zealand only because they have the Westminster system like ours. For the other two examples, I've visited those countries, but I can't say that I'm an expert on either of the two.

What are the practices in these countries that interest you and that you think Canada should adopt or has adopted, or that in your international travels you see as a good practice that you can present to us here?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Let me say to the specific aspects of Bill C-76 that I think we're doing what we can. We're not going to change our entire institutional system to be like theirs, but within our institution, I think we are applying it appropriately. They have other institutions. I can't speak for every country, but essentially they would certainly not be inhibited in terms of informing people and making various kinds of institutional access available, especially to young people.

I could talk about my last book, The Internet Generation, and some very interesting examples from other countries I've been to, including Norway, Sweden, Finland, and so on, in terms of how to inform young people about politics. In fact, if we do have a bit of extra time, I'd love to tell you about it because it's really quite interesting. It's not directly relevant to this but it's very interesting, and it's something that a version of which we could actually do at both the provincial and federal levels.

Specifically, of course—this brings me back to my last point—one of the things we could learn is to change our electoral system. I've argued and written about how I think a proportional system does in fact result over time in a more informed citizenry. It's a long academic argument based on evidence and so on, but I have made it in the past, and I think it can be made.

If one is interested in a citizenry that—again, none of these things are absolute and black and white—is more likely to inform themselves about relevant issues before an election, I would argue that we can learn from these countries. Most European countries, as you know, have proportional representation, as does New Zealand now, and Australia has it for the upper chamber. There is a relationship, but again, that's not the issue of importance at this committee.

Mr. Scott Simms:

No, and that's fine. I appreciate that. You and I may have a few differences on that when it comes to the representation part.

Nevertheless, on a broader scale, I remember that when I was here and we were debating the Fair Elections Act, what came up quite a bit was the fact that it is a constitutional right to vote, which I'm sure it is in many other countries. As such, it seemed to me that other countries take it far more seriously than we did at that time, France being one of those countries. Do you think now that we are a step closer with this? What would you recommend in terms of how we go further?

Prof. Henry Milner:

At this point, I think, in adopting Bill C-76, adding things like political debates and so on is what I would recommend. I would think, though, that we shouldn't say the issue is closed especially on the political knowledge side. I think there are things we could do.

One of the problems.... I shouldn't call it a problem. The situation in Canada, which is not the case in the other countries we've mentioned, is that we have two different levels of government, and education is at the provincial level. In those other countries, linking political knowledge to the educational system through civic education is done through the same people who are concerned about national elections and so on.

Here, of course, education is provincial. Although Elections Canada does have some relationship to the schools, and I don't think provincial governments have a problem with that, nevertheless in the countries that I know there's a very close relationship between—

(1130)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes. I can't see the CIVIX organization complaining about inhibitions—

Prof. Henry Milner:

Taylor Gunn, who was here an hour ago would certainly have talked about all of this.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes. I don't think they face any inhibiting factors when they go into the provincial systems, per se, and do elections.

Prof. Henry Milner:

But there is more done in the way of civic education in other countries than in most Canadian—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Well, that was my question, sir. My goodness, you're smarter than I ever realized.

I don't have much time left, but perhaps you want to comment on that part. One of the things, in addition to that, is to allow Elections Canada to have more freedom to go beyond just telling people where and when to vote, which was the contentious issue. We also have the fact that we're allowing people between the ages of 16 and 18 to register to vote—or is it 14 now? Nevertheless, they can register to vote.

Do you see how Elections Canada can do more on the education aspect now that in Bill C-76 they have the freedom we just talked about?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Well, if they go back to doing what they were doing when I was sort of a consultant, and so on, that's already a major step. Because of the federal system, you can't have Elections Canada doing what the department of education in the province does in terms of the curriculum for high school students. Yes, they can provide information that the students would have access to, but I'm talking about the curriculum at a certain age, of 16-year-olds, in a public school system. The kind of information they'll be getting is really up to the provinces. Some do a better job than others, but that's the nature of Canada.

I'd be happy to tell you what other countries do, but at this point I won't go there.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Dr. Milner.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

I'm starting my little timer here. Is the first round seven minutes? Okay.

You're aware, of course, that the political debates commission, which it sounds like you favour, is not actually part of this piece of legislation. This bill does not contain anything about a political leaders debates commission.

Prof. Henry Milner:

You're quite correct. I was suggesting that this was the one thing that was missing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. I personally think that a debates commission is a bad idea, but I do think that leaving it out of the legislation has at least this merit: if you put it in, you now have a statute that ultimately decides what the cut-off point is for parties. Unless you're inviting all of them—the three flavours of Marxist-Leninists who are there, the Libertarians, the None of the Above Party, and everybody else—

Mr. Nathan Cullen: And the CCF.

Mr. Scott Reid: —that's right—then the one at the cut-off line, in this case likely Ms. May, goes off to court and says that it's an unconstitutional violation.

I still think there's a risk of that occurring. If it's government-sponsored, with government funds, the rule generally is that the charter applies when the government was involved in setting something up, even if those who executed it are not the direct agents of the government. I think this is the advantage of having these things done informally; i.e., the Charter of Rights does not apply to Maclean's magazine or CTV or whoever.

Anyway, seeing as I've gone down that road, why don't you provide your thoughts on a debates commission, and in particular that problem of someone who effectively is an agent of government deciding who gets in and who doesn't get in?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Who gets into the debate?

Mr. Scott Reid: Yes.

Prof. Henry Milner: I haven't really thought about it very much, but my general principle is that it's not a good idea to have it debated in the last minute before an election campaign, because then the rules will be based on the particular situation at that time. It would be better to debate it when there's no election campaign. Then you try to set up general rules that apply beyond the particular situation and create some kind of commission, a neutral commission or commissioner, with the role of implementing those rules.

Just as a general principle, I think that's a better idea. I don't think we do a terrible job in Canada, but we're always left uncertain until the last moment in terms of how many debates, what the rules are, and who will be in the debate. I don't think that's a good way to do it. I think we can do better.

(1135)

Mr. Scott Reid:

That is messy, I grant you. Let me give you another example of a mess.

Ontario is about to have an election. We don't know who will wind up being the new government. We could imagine a very tidy election scenario, like, say the People's Republic of China or the people's democratic republic of North Korea, where we'll know exactly who is going to win beforehand. I'm just saying that untidiness is sort of inherent in democracy.

I want to submit to you, as a counter-proposition, the idea that norms grow culturally in a messy way, but they do emerge. As to what is a reasonable set of debates, what kinds of topics they ought be on, whether there should be specialized topic debates, what the ratio of English and French languages ought to be, length of interventions and so on.... I would submit it's better to have them emerge organically and be generally accepted in society. If it's felt that it's too restrictive, there will be pressure on someone to create a new debate beyond the ones that already exist. It actually did happen in the last election.

Does that not seem like a robust solution that we really haven't given a great chance to develop, given the fact that last time around we could see some new formatting springing up that had never previously happened?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Again, I don't want to talk about the specifics. My general position in these areas, and it comes from knowing a lot of what goes on in other countries, is that the clearer the rules in advance, the better the situation overall. That's why I favour fixed election dates. Everybody—the potential candidates, the media, the people who are going to knock on doors, voters—knows when the next election is going to be and they have to prepare themselves accordingly.

It's not just the strategy of political parties and so on. It's the wider political culture. I would apply that the same way, in terms of debates. There are certain things that are understood to be taken for granted. That's my general principle. We can talk about the particular cases and so on.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You brought up the issue of electoral reform. You appeared before the Special Committee on Electoral Reform on which I sat. I very much enjoyed your testimony there.

Since that time, there's been some water under the bridge, both at the federal level and in the two provinces that are perennial experimenters in this matter, those being British Columbia and Prince Edward Island. They have taken somewhat different approaches to how to deal with it in the upcoming period of time. I would be interested in your comments on the two paths that the two provinces are taking.

I ask this particularly, because this issue could conceivably recur following the next election at the federal level. It's good to get some input in advance.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Let me add that you should include Quebec. All the parties, except for the Liberals, in Quebec are now in favour of electoral reform. It's part of their platform going into the October 1 election. Although it's not like B.C. where there will be a referendum already, and that referendum—if the “yes” side wins—will start the process. These other parties in Quebec are all committed to come forth with a proportional representation proposal within a year, if they are the government . They're pretty much agreed on the components of this proposal, which is one of the three proposals that will be posed in British Columbia.

You may know that it hasn't yet been accepted by the British Columbia legislature, but it's been proposed by the attorney general. I think it's a good proposal, namely, that the first vote will be on principle and if there's a majority for the first vote...in other words, proportional representation versus first past the post. If proportional representation wins more than half, then there are three versions of it, and the voters will choose between the three.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's the model New Zealand used 25 years ago.

Prof. Henry Milner:

The model New Zealand or Scotland used.... I prefer the Scottish variant, but they're very similar. That's the one that has been agreed upon in Quebec by the other parties, with the exception of the ruling Liberals.

I know less about what's happening in Prince Edward Island. I guess they're still waiting for the premier to set up the mechanism by which there will be a referendum, but I think something will happen there as well.

(1140)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

I appreciate your being back, Professor Milner, and your continued optimism sprinkled with a dose of skepticism.

Prof. Henry Milner:

I've been at this for a long time.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Some of us have too, but not maybe quite as long.

I want to talk a bit about process because I think it's as important as the substance of the bill. Just on principle we had a tradition in Canada of one party not changing the rules of the game, if you will, unilaterally, or invoking closure until the unfair elections act came. Is my history correct?

Prof. Henry Milner:

It depends on which laws you consider procedural laws and so on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Voting laws.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Voting-related.... I think generally that's true. I'm not a political historian so I could be wrong. In general that was accepted.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We couldn't find an instance.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Maybe you could, but I don't know of any.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's similar to what Mr. Conacher was testifying earlier that the unilateral appointment of any watchdog makes the job of the watchdog more difficult.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Yes, I think that's a good point.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Because they have to play the referee, and you never want them to have even the taint or anything that it was only one sided.

Prof. Henry Milner:

I think that's the problem with American institutions.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's right. We look to the south and we see that all the time: the judges under suspicion, the rules, the gerrymandering that goes on. We've avoided some of that in Canada until recently. A concern you said at the beginning of your testimony is the strange instance in which government lawyers will be arguing in favour of the unfair elections act next week in Toronto.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They're only obligated to do that because the government didn't move Bill C-33, which they introduced a year and a half ago. If that bill had been moved a year and a half ago would you still be in court and would we be spending taxpayer money arguing against what the government has said?

Prof. Henry Milner:

No. I assumed that was happening; I shouldn't have maybe. That's why I was rather surprised when the law firm in Toronto contacted me a few months ago saying they were going to have this case. I asked what case. They said the fair elections—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You asked hadn't that been taken care of already. Your response was that was already fixed.

Prof. Henry Milner:

I thought it was on its way to being fixed. I do other things in my research so I wasn't paying that much attention.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As you're a political scientist, when changing the rules that affect all the parties and Canadian democracy, is it a good principle to have multi or at least bipartisan support for legislation? Let me establish that first principle.

Prof. Henry Milner:

It's a very good principle. Sometimes you may have a profound issue; that's what referendums are for, when you can't find consensus. For example, those of us in favour of electoral reform are divided over the question of whether it requires a referendum or not because that's more fundamental. On these basically improving—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

On vouching on third party rules on those types of things.

Prof. Henry Milner:

That should be consensual.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We're under the gun, as you know. Elections Canada has told us already that they can't implement all of C-76 if we were to pass it tomorrow. Does that cause you any concern?

Prof. Henry Milner:

I would hope...I don't know how parliamentary procedure operates, but it should be possible. Probably not. As I said here I am in a court case defending a position I've taken against the government that's changed its position toward mine. There should be some way of speeding up those things that Elections Canada says it needs a lot of time to implement, unless somebody is opposed to them.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There's another principle in this though, which is Elections Canada can only do what the law says—

Prof. Henry Milner:

That's what I'm saying, but if you can divide the law in some way, or divide the passage.... I don't know. I'm not a parliamentary procedure person.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So take aspects of the bill.

Prof. Henry Milner:

If that's possible. This is your area, not mine. Ideally there should be a way of moving quickly on those parts that Elections Canada needs more time to pass, where there is no principled opposition, which I'm not hearing yet. I cannot tell you how to do that.

(1145)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is a more empirical question. How do young Canadians rank? Do you do research and rank them globally in terms of their political knowledge?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How do folks in this country stack up?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Not very well.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Not very well. What does “not very well” mean?

Prof. Henry Milner:

If you take all democracies.... I haven't received very recent numbers, and perhaps they're better, but when I was researching this, we were down at the bottom, not quite as bad as the Americans, but certainly not nearly as good as the Europeans, the British, and the Australians.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Not quite as bad as the folks who elected Trump, but not nearly at the range of more functioning democracies.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Right. It's not that easy to do testing where, since institutions are different, you have to give a certain amount of leeway. Overall, among countries—as I said, all democracies—it's clear that Americans are lower in terms of basic political knowledge. What percentage of the people eligible to vote have the minimal knowledge to vote? That's the sort of question we ask in our comparative research. We ask it for the overall, and then we ask it for young people.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To circle back, if knowledge, education, and engagement were a high priority for the government, one of the most effective tools of doing that was total reform.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Yes, but not immediately.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, it doesn't happen in one election, but over the course of time, you want a more engaged and more educated voter, particularly young voters.

Prof. Henry Milner:

It's not the only factor, but it could have a positive effect. I have made that argument, and I still make that argument. It's one of the arguments I've made in Quebec.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You'll make it in court next week, maybe.

Prof. Henry Milner:

We'll see.

If I could just add, I think you're going to find the result in Ontario will, in fact, be an impetus for electoral reform. I think very strongly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I agree with you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you, Professor Milner. It's nice to see you again.

I was on the Special Committee on Electoral Reform, and we got to meet there.

Prof. Henry Milner:

I remember you, yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We had you in a few times. You had great testimony then, and of course your work is very valuable to this committee.

It may be hard to believe from a reasonable man like yourself, but there are parties that are interested in not having this legislation move forward as quicky as possible; hence, the worry that we won't be able to get it done for your court procedure, but I really hope that we do.

Prof. Henry Milner:

It won't be in time for next week, no, that's for sure.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I hope there are ways you don't have to.... It's not the final...?

Prof. Henry Milner:

I don't know the legal process. As far as I know, it would make no sense. If the court, in fact, throws out the Fair Elections Act, which personally I don't think that the constitutional argument is that strong.... I think it was a bad law, but the argument that it's unconstitutional—and I'm not a lawyer—I think is hard to make, so I don't think that would happen. Even if it did happen, it wouldn't change anything, really, because this process would continue.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

From time to time, I know you would understand there are parties that are interested in voter suppression and not necessarily bringing out everyone who's eligible to vote.

Prof. Henry Milner:

In the United States, I would make that as a clear statement. There have been real efforts to do just that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We did have a case in Guelph where there were robocalls giving people the wrong information, leading them to not vote when they were eligible.

Prof. Henry Milner:

At least at the local level we've seen that. I don't want to make an accusation at the national level.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You have made some statements in the past about increasing voter turnout. A lot of your studies have been done about increasing voter turnout when it comes to youth. Also, you've made statements that the ability of Canadians to vote was restricted in this last Fair Elections Act to five years if they were abroad.

Can I get more of your thoughts on that and why removing that restriction is a good thing?

(1150)

Prof. Henry Milner:

I wasn't very strong on that particular aspect before, and I looked around to see what other countries were doing. On balance, I would like it to be a bit longer, but the numbers, I don't think, would be significantly affected, so I wouldn't slow down the bill to try to amend that, for example.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We've removed the restriction, so now when you're abroad.... This bill removes it.

Prof. Henry Milner:

What does it replace it with?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There are no limits.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Is that right? Then I misread the bill.

At this point, a Canadian can...and not return at any point in the interval? Is that really the case?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's correct.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Wow.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can I get your views on that? That is more like the American way, right?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Yes, but remember, the Americans have to pay taxes. They can never have lived in the United States—and I can give you examples of that—and still pay taxes.

Maybe that's going too far. Again, it's not something you'd worry about right away, but I think it's worth thinking about. I don't know of other countries, apart from the United States.... There probably are some. I think the French are like that. The basic idea is that you live your whole life out of the country, but this is still your identity. Do we think that? That's a cultural issue, right? Or wouldn't we say, no, your new identity is the country you live in, even though technically you still have Canadian citizenship? I would say there should be a point where you have to decide.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you think we should be concerned about flocks of people who are living abroad wanting to vote in order to influence an election?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Again, that's the nice thing about being Canadian. We don't take the division over politics so seriously, as certain neighbours tend to do. Politics become such a powerful, emotional division that you can imagine a manipulation of external.... In fact, some effort is made to get democrats abroad or republicans abroad. That's fairly healthy as long as it's fair.

I don't worry about that, especially for Canadians.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What do you think is the main cause of our lower voter turnout? I know you've done some work in terms of younger people not voting now, and how even in their older age, they're not more likely to start voting. What can we do to promote that within—

Prof. Henry Milner:

Within the Canadian federal system?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, within the current system.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Again, I think more effort should be made on civic education. For those of us who are active provincially, that's really the primary focus. That's where I would put the main focus. It's not here. Here the work of Elections Canada is very important. We're too many people to think we can bring.... In Norway, for example, something like one-third of high school students are brought to Parliament during ages 14 to 16 to participate in a kind of simulation. It's an interesting exercise, but numerically, we're better off doing that at the provincial level, where the numbers are.... There are examples of this in other countries. I think the work of Taylor Gunn, which again, is around elections, makes a difference, and I think the Canadian government is still supporting this.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This bill has increased the ability of Elections Canada to do outreach.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Exactly.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are you supportive of that?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Yes, absolutely.

It was very hard for me to understand why one would be opposed to that. It's like being opposed to motherhood, at some level.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Motherhood and apple pie.

Prof. Henry Milner:

Which these days might be politically incorrect to say.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you, doctor.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'll move to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Again, thank you, Dr. Milner, for joining us. I really appreciate your commentary.

I want to go back to your opening comments. You mentioned a book you wrote entitled The Internet Generation, referring to young people.

As you know, Mr. Gunn was here prior. One of the last questions he commented on—I don't think you were in the room for it—was about the use of tabulators or online voting. CIVIX has resisted the urge to move to online voting. They use the traditional paper ballot with an x. From your research, do you have a similar view on the traditional paper ballot? Do you have some thoughts on using tabulators or online voting, as we've seen in the past in a variety of voting instances, whether at the municipal level or at party leadership races?

(1155)

Prof. Henry Milner:

Yes, and by the way, this relates to that. The question was why are young people voting less. Part of it—that's why I called it The Internet Generation—has to do with sources of information. Civic education becomes more important for the Internet generation because the standard sources of political information that we could count on for previous generations just aren't there. For some people, the Internet is a fantastic source of political information, but for most young people, it's a wonderful way of avoiding political information—not consciously—but that's in fact what happens.

I have written about voting at 16. I have written about compulsory voting. I haven't really done very much on electronic voting. I'm still a bit skeptical as we don't have any real data to show that it improves the turnout. I'm not saying it might not be there, but we don't have enough, and I think the act of physically voting itself has a positive effect. You're voting with your neighbours. I know we have a lot of other ways of avoiding that, in terms of early voting and so on, and we should do that; we should have other ways to vote for people who cannot for one reason or another go out and vote on voting day.

At least at the level of national elections—perhaps I would consider that for municipal elections where turnout is very low and so on—but for national elections, even provincial elections, I think the actual act of voting with your neighbours physically has a value. Maybe it's because I'm an old fogey and new generations would look at me and say, “What do you mean? I live on my screen. Those are my neighbours, the people I see on my screen every day. The people who live around me just happen to....”

I don't know, I'd hope that's not the case, but I can't say. For me, though, I think there's a positive element to that and I would be reluctant to eliminate it until I had a lot better evidence to justify it.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm 34, but I guess I'm an old fogey at heart. Even though I have multiple cellphones, iPads, and laptops, I still personally appreciate the excitement of going to the polling station. I voted last weekend at the advance polls provincially. I brought my wife—she voted as well—and our three kids. We had a lot of fun. We were the only ones in the voting station, so my two older kids were running around having fun and giving some entertainment to the poll clerks and—

Prof. Henry Milner:

I've been present at elections in other countries and I've seen the same thing. There is something about that, but I don't know how representative a member of Parliament is of the other people of your age group.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, I would agree with that. I know from campaigning and going door to door in 2015, there was often that question, especially in my rural communities. They typically vote by mail or online as a lot of the municipalities do, so the question came up, “Well, can I vote online and not by mail?” There is that perception, and not just among younger people either. That's a question from the older people.

Can I have another quick question?

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. John Nater: You had talked about the limits on voting abroad, that this bill takes away that—

Prof. Henry Milner:

—that voting restriction.

(1200)

Mr. John Nater:

You had mentioned some concern about that.

The other thing was the intention to return to Canada. Currently, there's that intention to want.... Is that something you would have a concern with as well?

Prof. Henry Milner:

Yes, I don't like that sort of.... Why ask people something where you're giving them an incentive not to tell the truth? I don't see any particular value in that. I think that should be related to coming back. I do think if somebody doesn't come back for x number of years, whatever intention they expressed probably doesn't make all that much difference.

Again, this is not an area I have done research on or am particularly knowledgeable about. I'm giving you a personal opinion, which is no better than anybody else's.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you so much. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

We have time for one question.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you, Professor Milner, for your presence today, and for your passion and all the work you've put into this area, and for sharing your expertise with us.

One of my concerns, and something that I'd really like to see improve, is young people voting and engaging in the democratic process. I'd like to ask you about the research you've done with respect to the finding that if students do not vote as soon as they reach voting age that this will impact their voting pattern as they get older. I think you've indicated that if they don't vote when they reach voting age, they won't vote when they get older, and they're more likely to follow that pattern.

Prof. Henry Milner:

It's not my research, but there are researchers. The best known is a man named Mark Franklin, an American but a comparative expert. He's made that argument, and I think convincingly, that not voting in the first election or the first couple of elections—not everybody, clearly a minority—but it has an effect on reducing voting later on.

There's a habit aspect to voting, just as there is to many things. Yes, you vote sometimes because of what's happening then. Suddenly there's an issue that really matters to you and so on, or a particular political leader you like or dislike, but there's also the habit aspect. You know an election is coming up, and you vote.

To develop a habit makes a difference. Mark's argument, which I share to some extent, is that the way to do that better is to start voting at 16 because young people are more likely to be around other people who are voting, namely their family, because they're still living at home. I'm not persuaded completely of that. That's why I put a lot of emphasis on civic education at the age of 14, 15, 16, which I would connect with voting at 16.

If you have a good system of civic education—because I think you should vote knowledgeably, not just because your mother is going to the polls, and you're joining her even though you don't know who the parties are.... It's the combination of the two. In Norway, for example, they've done some tests, and they found that it really doesn't seem to make very much difference whether you vote at 16 or whether your first vote is at 18, but that's because they have a very strong civic education program already. That's why I'm a bit more reluctant to say that voting at 16 will get a higher turnout. I'd say voting at 16 and civic education, a good civic education program like in Norway or in other countries will get long-term improvement. That would be my argument.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's great. Thank you very much.

My time is up, is it not?

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Because I could go on if you want me to. I do have more questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. You were very helpful.

We'll suspend while we change witnesses.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 110th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

I have some business to attend to and then we will have the final panel.

We will be joined by Lori Turnbull, associate professor, Dalhousie University, and Randall Emery, executive director of Canadian Citizens Rights Council.

As you know all PMB votes are on Wednesdays and tomorrow, there will be a bunch of votes right after QP, so I would ask the committee if it's okay—I can't imagine why it wouldn't be—if we move the witnesses from the first hour after question period to later in the evening, because there are enough blanks to fit them in later in the day.

Is that okay with everyone?

Mr. Blake Richards:

What you're asking is that rather than have six hours, we have five hours.

The Chair:

Yes. There is enough room.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You just fit all the witnesses into five hours rather than six. That's what you're saying.

The Chair:

There are enough blank spots to do that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What would Wednesday afternoon look like?

The Chair:

We can start at, let's say, 4:30.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Start at 4:30 through until what time are you suggesting?

The Chair:

It would be until 9:30 as we'd originally planned.

Mr. Blake Richards:

When will we have an idea of who our witnesses will be?

The Chair:

For tomorrow?

Did you put out the notice yet?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

No, but after this meeting I can go back to the office, and we could publish the notice for tomorrow's meeting with the information that we have now, and as we get more information, we'll update it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, did you have a quick point?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. Just in talking, as we look forward, it's tricky as we're trying to build this witness list as we go, but my understanding is both Facebook and Twitter have declined to appear.

We've been talking a lot about social media and this information and the use of it during campaigns. I'd like the committee to compel.... They have government relations people who work here in Ottawa. It's not as if we're asking them to travel. They've been showing up to a lot of committees, because—ethics and information and others. I think it's inexcusable. We're dealing with this conversation, and the two social media giants are refusing to come.

The Chair:

Is it okay with the committee members that we compel those...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

This ought to be in the form of a motion.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. In terms of the structure of the motion, I defer to the clerk as to what it would look like. I think it's through the chair.

The Clerk:

If I understand correctly, the committee's wish is to summon representatives of both Facebook and Twitter to appear. Normally when we summon there would be a specific date and time that's tied to the summons because we will hire a bailiff to contact them.

(1210)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Understood. It won't come to that, I'm sure.

The last committee hearing we have as of right now for witnesses is when? What's our last available date? Is it Monday? Is it Tuesday?

The Chair:

Our last program for witnesses right now is Thursday afternoon, but it doesn't mean we can't do something after that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. This is a second conversation I was just talking with Andy about . We had a notion of a plan, but this committee is not operating under any deadline right now officially, so at some point we're going to have to have that conversation because, for example, we have a witness we'd like to come. When is the actual deadline for them to appear? I don't know.

I think the compelling would be good. I don't know what date to put on it because I don't know what date this committee is done with witnesses because we haven't had that conversation.

I apologize to our witnesses, by the way.

The Chair:

I'll just see if we have unanimous consent to do whatever procedure we need to make those people come.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In the next hour I can prepare the text with the clerk if we want something formal. I was looking first at the expression of the will of the committee that we want to hear from these two witnesses. I get that sense in terms of the details of how we summon. I'll work on a deadline date.

The Chair:

We'll work out the details.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It might be advisable to fill the blanks in after with regard to the date but to leave the clerk the job of doing that.

We'd want to look at some past form and make sure we've followed that form.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, we've done this before.

The Chair:

As long as everyone is in favour of that....

Okay, thank you very much. We'll go to the witnesses.

Professor Turnbull, you could start, and then we'll go to Mr. Emery

Dr. Lori Turnbull (Associate Professor, Dalhousie University, As an Individual):

Thank you very much for the invitation to appear before the procedure and House affairs committee on Bill C-76.

Before I get into the bill, I'll make some general comments about political finance regulation in Canada. We've been regulating spending and contributions for candidates, parties, and third parties in some form or another since 1974. Every once in a while, the rules get reviewed or reconsidered in light of new realities with respect to democracy, elections, political culture, and things like that. At the heart of all these debates about political finance are some fundamental questions about democracy and political expression. It's always a balancing act between freedom of expression and the public interest, and maintaining a level playing field for political competitors. Neither of these is pursued by regulation to the complete detriment of the other: we need the balance, and that's where the charter comes in. The charter protects that.

It's been the norm historically, in connection with the charter, for political finance laws to end up in court, and there's been some very thoughtful jurisprudence on the role of the state in regulating money in politics. The terrain is shifting now, however, and I would say that money is no longer a reliable proxy for political expression. It used to be that debates and paid prime-time ads were the way to reach people, but now—and in connection with Mr. Cullen's comments—it's Twitter, Facebook, clickbait, Instagram, and micro-targeted email messages. This type of political expression poses a completely new regulatory challenge because, for the most part, it is low cost or free. Talking about spending limits and contribution limits is a little bit offside. Spending limits only get to part of the issue, and, I would suggest, an increasingly smaller part as we go on.

Nevertheless, here we are on Bill C-76. The theme is modernization. Democracy is changing for many reasons, and the law needs to catch up. The bill, as members are aware, covers a lot of ground. Some major areas of concentration, like establishing pre-writ spending limits for parties and third parties, aren't a huge surprise. We've seen this in Ontario. Given the constant campaign, campaigning all the time, imposing limits only once the writ is dropped is seen as arbitrary. The bill limits the writ period to 50 days. It increases transparency around the activities of third parties in a few ways: by requiring third parties to identify themselves in political advertising; by requiring them to keep separate bank accounts to allow their political activity to be seen a bit more clearly when you open up the books; and including things like polling in the expenditures that are limited, which is not the case now. It's an area where third parties are now able to spend in a way that's unlimited, but political parties are not. Also, there are measures to make voting more accessible, including the creation of a register of future electors.

I have a couple of comments on what the bill doesn't do. Third parties can still take unlimited donations from organizations, while political parties and candidates cannot. For over a decade now, contributions coming to candidates and parties from organizations, as opposed to individuals, have not been allowed. This creates an unbalanced playing field and perhaps creates an incentive for wealthier people or organizations to make unlimited donations to third parties.

The issue of foreign money is very tough to regulate, and largely because third parties are often doing many things. They're not just political actors, and they're not just contesting elections. They're also doing charitable work, advocacy work, educational work, and working with partners in other countries. So it's very difficult to impose particular rules during the campaign period or for election spending by third parties. You used to be able to take foreign money for some things, but now for this purpose, during this time, you can't. It's very difficult to police. On some level you don't want to go too far with it because then you're choking off funds used for other purposes, and we want organizations to be able to do those things, presumably. It comes down to how to regulate third party spending and activity that relates to elections.

Many observers have expressed concern over the possibility of foreign involvement in Canadian elections. We have to work on that. We have to be able to make Canadians feel that it's not going to be a problem, and that we are aware of what foreign influence could look like. Again, I think this relates significantly to issues of digital democracy, cybersecurity. Regulating money is not really going far enough and it's not really getting at what people's major concerns are.

I'll leave it there and allow my colleague to speak.

(1215)

The Chair:

Okay, great.

Mr. Emery.

Mr. J. Randall Emery (Executive Director, Canadian Citizens Rights Council):

Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee.

I'm the executive director of the Canadian Citizens Rights Council, which brings together organizational and individual members to invest in a vision of a renewed Canada leading the world in citizens' rights and freedoms.

Our comments today centre on universal voting rights. Bill C-76 does the right thing by restoring full federal voting rights to Canadian citizens abroad. Canadians support this universal right. We urge you to preserve these provisions in the bill and support a timely and fair implementation.

First of all, supporting the right to vote from abroad is the right thing to do. It's the right thing to do because doing nothing harms Canadians. Canadian history has been marked by a steady progression towards universal voting rights, beginning with the enfranchisement of women, then racialized minorities and people who don't own property, Inuit, first nations peoples, federal judges, people with mental disabilities, people with no fixed address, and lastly, prisoners, yet the current five-year rule at issue before the Supreme Court of Canada denies at least one million citizens the right to vote and sends a clear message of exclusion.

These are not hobby voters. Canadians abroad are subject to tax laws, criminal laws, foreign anti-corruption laws, and special economic measures, and they benefit from the right of entry to Canada from foreign soil, Canada pension benefits, citizenship laws, and immigration laws.

Moreover, it's the right thing to do because Canadians abroad benefit Canada. Canadians living and working abroad are directly and indirectly responsible for billions of dollars in bilateral trade. They are exceptionally well educated, linguistically adept, and culturally bilingual. They are our cultural and economic ambassadors. The more we as a country engage them, the more Canada will prosper.

Second, Canadians get this. Over time, Canadians maintain an overwhelming connectedness to Canada, but less so to their home province or municipality. Correspondingly, in 2011, the Environics Institute found that 69% of Canadians thought Canadians abroad should vote in federal elections. This bill strongly aligns with public opinion.

Finally, we ask you to support enfranchising provisions in this bill and to support a timely and fair implementation. When amendments are offered at clause-by-clause consideration, we ask members of this committee to preserve enfranchising language as is, without amendments that would limit the population of eligible voters. We also ask you to support a timely and fair implementation.

Recognizing Elections Canada's time constraints, we urge swift passage of this bill. We also urge members to avoid new identification or other requirements that have been demonstrated to reduce turnout elsewhere.

This is a historic opportunity to let all Canadians vote. It's the right thing to do, and Canadians support it. We applaud the enfranchising provisions of this bill and urge their preservation and timely implementation.

Thank you. I welcome any questions you might have.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you both very much for appearing here today.

We will go on to some questions, starting with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, sir.

Dr. Turnbull, thank you for coming here today. I have just one broad, general question to begin with.

I notice your book that you co-authored with Mr. Aucoin and Mr. Jarvis, Democratizing the Constitution. Are we a step towards democratizing the Constitution in Bill C-76?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Oh, that's a great question. Thank you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sorry. You could probably do a dissertation on it, I understand, but we have only seven minutes, please.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

In some ways, the answer is yes, because the bill gets to some things that we have to get to. In some ways, too, you're always fighting the last battle a bit, so the bill is looking at some realities that have taken place and we have to catch up to it.

People worry about things such as too long an election campaign. You see the 50-day limit because we've gone through something such as 78 days and nobody liked that. That created a bunch of problems. We could talk forever about that. It wasn't all bad, but there were some unforeseen consequences there. People look at that and say, “Okay, we want to regulate that.”

There are things in the bill that are quite necessary and probably not too hard to achieve some consensus on. Personally, I wish it went farther in a few areas, but I try not to be too negative about that stuff. Take progress where it is. You don't want to be too rainy day about it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

No, God forbid I'd be all Pollyannaish about it, sitting here on this side of the House.

Let me just drift away from that for a moment. We are now in the process of possibly making some amendments, despite the fact that we have accepted the principle and scope of the bill, but fine-tuning is always a wonderful thing. You raised concern about how we make Canadians feel secure, when perhaps just regulating the money is not enough. Am I getting that correct?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Where in that lies the opportunity for us to make improvements?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

I think many Canadians are not relying on traditional forms, or what we might consider traditional forms, of political communication to receive their messages. Even the conversation about how we do the leaders debate is fine, but that's not where a lot of people are getting their messages. Some people are watching the debates, but you're talking about how to get younger voters engaged, and they're not watching the debates. They're on Twitter. They're looking at social media, and they're getting a whole lot of information.

Also, I think there's an increasing fear of fake news—the fear that you're getting a whole lot of stuff coming at you and you're not sure if it's true, and there being so much information coming at you at one time. We're losing something on the verification side.

It's just tons of messages, and a lot of it is very micro-targeted. This has to do with the communications technology as well, because now we're able to be so sophisticated about knowing voters, knowing their profiles, and being able to deliver to them the kinds of messages they really want. On several levels that's good, responsive, and positive, but it's almost as if a bunch of people are getting different messages and there's not the same centralization of messaging that I think we could say we used to see in a campaign.

Mr. Scott Simms:

If I could just interrupt you for a second—and I apologize—several years ago the CRTC had a policy where they would lay out regulating of the Internet in the way they would regulate the broadcasting spectrum, especially content. How do we do that? As you say, they're micro-aiming at a particular person who would be susceptible to their view and wouldn't bother to seek out the contrary view. Where does one start?

(1225)

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

I know.

It's a difficult role for the government—and I mean the government in a big sense there, because you don't want state regulation of communication. You don't want the government to come in and say, “That's fake; you're not allowed to say that.” However, on some level we need something.

I don't know a ton about what people are doing in other countries, but in the U.K., the information commissioner has taken a bit of a role there.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's interesting. Can you give me an example of that?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

That was my big example—the information commissioner in the U.K.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Dr. Lori Turnbull: Again, this is sort of in its infancy. We're watching to see how other countries are responding to the same challenges we're having, which is when messaging is so quick, how do you verify and how do we know that what people are getting is true and accurate? How do we force people to have balanced messages? I have no idea. On some level, we can't. We can encourage it, and I think that links to the bill's purpose in increasing the Chief Electoral Officer's education function. I think we can't downplay that. It's significantly important, as messaging becomes more complex, for non-partisan agencies like Elections Canada to be very present in conversation—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, as difficult as that may be....

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

—obviously not in a partisan way but in a controlled, objective way.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

Mr. Emery, my colleague here to my right made a comment earlier about what was being said about those living abroad, that a citizen is a citizen.

Did I get that right, David?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it was something like that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The Constitution states that a citizen has a right to vote. Therefore, in your particular situation—and I'm sure that's kind of music to your ears—are there certain limitations based on who is living abroad that should be there?

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

I think this should really be an unlimited right. Currently, Canadians abroad are the only subset of the Canadian population who are unable to vote. We have to remember that the majority of these Canadians can't vote where they are.

There are also the practical implications. I know of people who have sought out their MPs in the ridings they used to live in to talk about this issue and who got the message back, saying, “I don't know if I'm your MP, because you can't vote here.” They didn't have anyone to talk to. They don't have anyone to go to for help if there's some issue with the program.

I think it is very important and very fundamental that everyone should have the right to vote.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much, both of you. It was very nice.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you. I appreciate your both being here.

Professor Turnbull, I'll start with you.

In the article you wrote for The Globe and Mail back in March, there were some interesting comments about third parties. You talked about, and you mentioned a little bit today as well, what you call “preferential treatment” under the Elections Act. They're able to access types of donations that the other participants in the elections, the political parties themselves, aren't able to access, for example, union and corporate donations. You mentioned about the lack of donation limits.

I wonder if you could give us a bit more detail on that. What I specifically want to know is whether you're suggesting the same donation limits for third parties as you are for political parties. Would you suggest that would only occur during the writ and pre-writ periods, or would you suggest that's something that should occur outside of those periods as well? Would you then be arguing that those third parties should only be receiving contributions from individuals?

That's a lot all at once, but—

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Thank you very much for the question.

Actually, that's really fantastic. You've just said everything, so I can just say “yes”.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Well, that was easy.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

But I'll say a couple more things.

For the purposes of elections and election spending, I would argue that if we want to make things level and we want to level out the playing field, we would look at the same process for third parties as political actors, as we do for everybody else. Therefore, individuals are able to make election contributions to all political actors at the same limit.

I had realized that the regulatory problem is how you compartmentalize the election activity of a third party and separate it out from the rest of their activity. For some organizations, it might be more clear-cut than others.

There are some where they maintain an educational and advocacy function on an ongoing basis. Does that automatically mean that once the pre-writ period kicks in, everything they do is election advertising? I think there would then be an imperative to try to protect what the organization does as part of its ordinary functions, but then try to pull it into a more regulated sphere once the writ is dropped.

(1230)

Mr. Blake Richards:

To clarify regarding the idea of the contribution limits, are you suggesting that we would look at and treat various types of third parties differently, or are you suggesting we would have contribution limits on any third party that would participate in elections?

Ms. Lori Turnbull: Yes, any that are registered.

Mr. Blake Richards: That would not just be throughout the writ period, or this newly created pre-writ period, but I'm talking about the other three years and eight months, or whatever it is.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

If it were during the writ and pre-writ, I'd be happy. I think that would be enough of a way to make a substantive difference to levelling that playing field, which is what I want to achieve.

Parties and other entities have to accept those limits annually, even in non-election years. It would be difficult to enforce that, and I wouldn't need to die on that mountain if we did it in the six months around an election. I think that would be a substantive—

Mr. Blake Richards:

You would argue for expanding a little beyond what it is then.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Exactly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

With fixed election dates, what about that scenario? If everyone knows the deadline and I want to drop in $1 million, and this $1,500 limit is going to exist tomorrow, I'll drop the $1 million in today. How do we fix the problem in that scenario?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

In that case, I agree with your logic entirely. To me, any time you say, “Here's the drop” or “Here's the start time for the limits,” on some level it's arbitrary, because we're campaigning all the time.

I can see there being a different formula applied to third parties, because their behaviour is not necessarily campaigning all the time in the same way that a political entity does. However, I take your point: what stops the millionaire from dropping the money in the day before, especially when we have the fixed election dates, when you know it's coming and you can plan it?

That's also the issue with foreign donations. There's nothing wrong with a third party accepting foreign donations, as long as they're not used for election purposes. It's the same thing. If you have that drop and it's prior to the regulated period, that's just part of the funds that are in the organization's bank account. Those are your own funds, and you can use them.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess what you're saying is you're not really sure you've got a suggestion on how we would regulate that, but if there was a way to do it you would be in favour of it. Is that fair?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

I'd be happy if for political contributions that are kept in a separate bank account, like the bill is advocating, those limits applied all the time. I fear that's not going to survive a court challenge. I'm willing to accept a kind of lesser scenario.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Understood. What you're saying is it's accepting what you think is possible maybe rather than what you think is desirable.

To clarify then, those caps you're suggesting during the writ and pre-writ periods, because you're not sure how we would find a way to regulate outside of that, would they apply only to individuals or would you allow the $1,575 it is currently to come to a third party from other entities other than individuals?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

The way to level the playing field is to have only individuals be able to donate for election purposes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you very much.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I was looking at this quote because I never actually knew where it came from, but apparently in 1929 Lieutenant Colonel Schley of the Corps of Engineers wrote, “It has been said critically that there is a tendency in many armies to spend the peace time studying how to fight the last war.”

There's an interest in my party, and I personally support the interest, in undoing some of the aspects of the Fair Elections Act, the vouching, some of the prescriptions on expat voting, and some of the other things by which, whether they were by intention or not, I think the effect was voter suppression for some Canadians who maybe weren't as supportive of the government in theory or in practice. Yet I think, Ms. Turnbull, Professor Turnbull, Dr. Turnbull, which do you prefer? Do you care?

(1235)

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Not at all.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

There's the fixation on money, and it's not bad to have a fixation on money because they say money in politics is like water on the sidewalk, it finds its way in through all the cracks, and it's one aspect, but to not have the other aspect of political influence gained without a lot of money, would you say that's doing half the job, 90% of the job, 10% of the job, in terms of trying to have a clear connection between those seeking to affect elections and the voters understanding and having free and fair elections in who they choose or propose?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

So the question is—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If the goal is that a voter goes in with the best information, and not the—what was it?—mis-, dis-, and mal-information, as one of our witnesses said.... I thought that was a good summation. If the goal is to make sure that between the voter and those running for office there's a clear line of information and anyone providing information in that conversation is identified and is not of foreign influence or a malevolent nature, money is one aspect of it.

These are people funding certain sides of a debate, funding certain candidates illegally or through surreptitious means. Another side of the debate is the tools now, which were unimagined 20 years ago, the influence of social media. If we just take care of the money side of things and try to limit foreign influence, foreign money coming in, as much as we can, without doing the other side, which is how easy it is to spread mis-, dis-, and mal-information through social media, how much of the task of that goal are we actually accomplishing?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

I would say half, maybe less.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If we're trying to fight the next war, rather than the last one, if this is the trend, I would imagine the power of social media to connect to voters, to inform or misinform voters, is likely only to go up. Is that fair?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

I think that's right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

One of the questions—and forgive me if I've missed this—is the cross-mixing of money, that you can have a Canadian entity set up a Canadian bank account, which this bill requires, yet you can commingle the financing. They can have foreign money in their core financing. When we asked the minister and Elections Canada how you pursue it to the end of the conversation to find out how much is commingled, is any money displacing....

I'm having a hard time articulating questions today. I'll give you a scenario. If an organization has a $2-million budget, normally, an operational budget, and they get an extra $1-million donation from the United States, Russia, it doesn't matter, and they displace their core budget and spend all of their $2 million now on elections or to the prescribed limit, $1.5 million, it's essentially using through a loophole foreign money to advocate a position. I don't see under Bill C-76 how we'd catch that scenario. Do you follow?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Should we be trying to?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How would we do it?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Okay. In some way I think this connects to having only individuals being able to donate, because an organization is able to donate to itself. An organization is able to get donations from other organizations. Then, yes, once that magic period starts, they're still able to get organization donations but they're not supposed to use foreign money, but if it's already in their account, then—

(1240)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The commingling.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

—yes, you can't start dividing it up. That would be impossible.

Returning to Mr. Richard's question, if we did regulate contributions all the time, and you have your roughly maximum $1,700 a year and that goes into your election advertising account, and you don't have organizations donate, that would be a way of making sure, I think, that you don't have commingling.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, run the scenario for me.

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce, or Leadnow, or any of the participants who may hire door knockers or do political advertising, which are now all included, what would they do exactly? Prior to the next election, what would they do?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

They would only be able to take election contributions from individuals at the same maximum that applies to parties, put them in their election account, and that's what you have.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In order to be a participant in the election, if you're going to choose to register yourself, you would essentially not make yourself a political party, but you would assume the same restriction that a political party has.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

That's exactly right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I wondered about this. If you want to play in this game, if you want to be in this conversation, should you have the same limits and restrictions and accountability that all of us as political parties have who are participating in the conversation?

The Liberal Party, the NDP, the Conservatives couldn't simply commingle money and say none of that's foreign, that it's just for rent and hydro at party offices.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is Canadian money that we're spending on it. We couldn't do that. Elections Canada would hammer us.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

No, you can't—exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But third party groups can. Is that our understanding?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

We're not going to be able to make that change prior to 2019. Even if this committee agreed and Parliament agreed to that, this bill has been introduced so late.

I'm very interested in what you just said just in terms of levelling the playing field and having transparency for Canadians. The advertisements they're seeing, the door knocker who they're hearing on the doorstep, have only been solicited by Canadian interests.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Emery, I heard your sense of urgency: get this done.

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think you said “swift passage”.

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Wouldn't that have been great 18 months ago, in Bill C-33?

If you were a government and you said a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian, for example, and that they should be allowed to vote, and this was important to you, and you introduced the bill 18 months ago and then did nothing, what are you telling the expat community?

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

Well, certainly the expat community would have welcomed that to move forward.

We are where we are. We hope that Bill C-76 moves.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We are where we are.

Sorry, Chair. I was talking too long.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

To follow up on Mr. Cullen's theme, I'm interested as well. Perhaps, Professor Turnbull, you may or may not be the right witness to ask in terms of the charter issues with respect to the proposal.

Has there been an issue on the speech side of things or would you perceive there to be a reasonable limit on freedom of speech because political parties are under those same requirements as well?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Third parties have always had a slightly different.... Within that balancing act between freedom of expression on one side and the public interest and a level playing field on the other, that's a balancing act that Parliament and the court, I would say, have had a kind of dialogue about to try to preserve. Within that, there is a microcosm where there's a separate, related balancing act for third parties because they're trying to do different things.

I don't know whether a court would look at an organization that plays an advocacy and educational role all the time, something like Leadnow, and say, “What would come to Leadnow that wouldn't be considered an election contribution?” I'm just picking that off the top of my head. You could make an argument that there is an educational advocacy function that has many benefits and they're not just trying to affect the outcome of an election. I could see third parties saying, hold on, we don't want to have that blanket contribution limit applied to us all the time because that's going to cut into the activities that we do that seem to be a little like election activities but aren't really.

I can see a few more trips to court to try to really narrow down that difference and figure out where that line is.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I can understand the application to an organization like Leadnow, but what about an environmental organization? They say they're saving wetlands, but then they also have an advocacy function. Can they accept the $100,000 donation to save the wetland, but it's...?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

If your goal is to influence government, you have to parse the definition of election and political advertising in such a way that there's still a possibility for third party organizations to receive contributions and do the work they do to lobby government on particular bills, but then carve out a special area that is particularly for election advertising.

(1245)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

Mr. Emery, I noticed something regarding one of the founding members of your council—and I'm going to butcher his name—Nicolas Duchastel de Montrouge.

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

Nicolas Duchastel de Montrouge, yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

He was denied his right to vote while living in the United States, but he could present himself as a candidate in the federal election. How does that work?

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

Yes, that's right. It just shows a bias in the system, which is geared more towards people running for office than for people actually voting. That was his intention in running; he wanted to bring attention to that.

Yes, he ran for office, but he couldn't vote for himself.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I understand he ran as an independent in Calgary in the last election. That's an interesting story. In terms of those two charter rights—the ability to vote and the ability to run for office—there really shouldn't be a hierarchy.

I'll ask both of you that question:. Should there be a hierarchy between those two rights? Shouldn't they be similar in terms of one's access to that?

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

The ability to run in different ridings goes back in Canadian history, right to the beginning. I forget which prime minister it was who ran in the east and lost, and then ran in Quebec, and finally was elected somewhere to the west.

These are two basic fundamental rights of expression and of accountability, and they should be open to every citizen.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Professor Turnbull, would you like to add anything?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

I would concur. It seems illogical for there to be that difference.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Professor Turnbull, back in 2014, you were one of 450 professors who signed an open letter to describe the Fair Elections Act as an irremediably flawed bill that should be completely rewritten. Do you believe that Bill C-76, if passed, will undo what was done in the Fair Elections Act?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You pointed out in that letter that the right to vote is enshrined in the charter as a fundamental part of society. I know you've suggested it hasn't gone far enough, and we've gone into some of the things, but can you comment on the changes in Bill C-76 and how it is protecting or preserving that charter right to vote?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

Yes. There are two major answers that I'd give for that.

One is that to be able to make contributions is a fundamental part of political expression. This is why I'm particularly in favour of making sure that only individuals can make contributions. I think it's an extension of our activity as individuals and as people who participate in a democratic society. Sometimes political finance kind of gets a bad name, and we try to limit it as much as possible to the point sometimes where we're going against what we're trying to do to begin with. In that way, preserving a right to make contributions is incredibly important with regard to political expression.

The other is that I think the bill makes important advances towards accessibility, and that's fundamentally important. With respect to the issue of cybersecurity, many Canadians are still concerned about moving to electronic voting and online voting because of the possible breaches that could occur and result in election results that don't have integrity. I completely understand, and we have to make sure that things are secure. I would also echo Professor Milner's comments about voting being a community exercise and about voting with your neighbours. I understand, and I feel the same way. However, there are many Canadians for whom elections are not accessible in the way that we do them now. It is really no longer possible for us to ignore that, not that we ever really could, but we really have to fix this. We have to get much closer to a full meaning of accessibility, and I think the bill moves us in the right direction on that. That's not my area of expertise, so I'm not going to say it's perfect, but I think we're going in the right direction, yes.

(1250)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In answer to the question about which prime minister lost in the east and then ran for a seat in the west, Sir John A. Macdonald lost in Kingston, which even in those days was not a reliable Conservative seat. He ran on Vancouver Island, which he never actually visited, but he won.

An hon. member: Is that right?

Mr. Scott Reid: Yes, that's true.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier lost in Quebec and ran in Saskatchewan. Again, I don't think he actually visited his riding. Mackenzie King also wound up being a Saskatchewan MP at one point.

Those are the ones I know of. There may have been others. Anyway, it has happened.

I want to ask Mr. Emery a question with regard to the issue of Canadians being abroad, out of the country, for more than five years and their voting rights. It is a charter right, under section 3 of the charter, to vote.

Do you regard that as an absolute right, as opposed to a right on which reasonable restrictions that are “justified in a free and democratic society” can be imposed? Of course, I'm using the language of section 1 of the charter, which is the section that allows for some limitations to be placed on other parts of the charter.

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

That's the question before the Supreme Court at this moment.

My own opinion is that it's an absolute right, and that's shared within the organization that I'm here representing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's one of the those questions that has to have a yes or no answer. There can be a justification for the yes or the no.

If you say that, yes, it's an absolute right, then let me ask you this question about the supposedly highly principled position being taken by the government in this bill. They say that if you're a Canadian citizen, the right pertains to you as a Canadian citizen, not as a Canadian citizen who is a former resident of Canada. If you've been out of Canada for more than five years.... I have some friends who live in Australia, in Adelaide, who've been out of Canada since the late 1990s. This would apply to them. Their children are also citizens of Canada, although they haven't lived here. Their absolute right to vote in elections is being denied by this law. Does that not mean, therefore, that this is also, to the extent that it neglects the rights of these Canadian citizens, an unconstitutional failure on the part of the government?

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

I'm not sure—

Mr. Scott Reid:

They're citizens of Canada who have never lived in Canada, because their parents are Canadian, and this bill does not address their right to vote.

Does that not mean we're still in a situation where—

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

Yes, because you have to come back and live in Canada.

We would like it to go further, I think, but given the system we have now, given the looming timeline for Elections Canada, this is a very positive step forward. I think that is a practical application, because we don't have MPs for citizens abroad right now. Maybe that will develop at some point in the future, I don't know, but—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Maybe we would have to have the system that they use in France and Italy of having constituencies that represent overseas people. I would contend that it's probably unconstitutional in Canada to have a seat that is not considered part of a province or territory, but you could, one assumes, come up with some kind of system whereby you say that their parents' last place of declared residence is regarded as their place of residence or something like that. I think a workaround that is constitutional could, in principle, be found.

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

Perhaps. We support this bill because it takes care of the vast majority of Canadians abroad.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you sure it's the vast majority of Canadians abroad? For people who have left Canada and are living outside of Canada, who have been there for more than five years, as opposed to those who are children of people in that situation, are you sure it's the majority? I'm not sure. I'm genuinely not sure. I have no idea.

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

We have to remember that there have been, since back in 2009, limits on citizenship by descent.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I concur, but that's a separate thing. If you are a citizen, you have a right, full stop.

Thank you. I was putting you in an unfair spot. It wasn't to poke holes in you; it was to poke holes in the argument that this is a highly principled as opposed to pragmatic measure, which has been the way the government has been marketing this side of things. I think it's a pragmatic move, a perfectly defensible pragmatic move, but it is not the point of high principle that it is being marketed as being. That was the point of questioning that way.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Professor Turnbull, my first question will be for you. It's clarification on something you stated earlier in your testimony today.

Clearly with social media, we're in a whole new world with how people communicate and the ability to communicate. You mentioned different people receiving different messages. I want to be clear. Do you have a problem with different people receiving messages that are pertinent to them or is it just the accuracy of those messages that you're commenting on? For example, if we had someone who was a youth, so a party wanted to give parts of their platform that were related to youth, do you have any problem with that targeting or is it just with inaccuracies in what's being communicated?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

I'm more concerned with potential inaccuracies, but I think there's also a concern overall with micro-targeted messaging.

I think historically in Canada, political parties, particularly successful ones, have played a nation-building role and have provided messages and ideologies, perspectives that you sort of put it out there and people unite around it and seek commonality. It's no surprise that political parties would, especially now that we have the technology, become more responsive to individual voters or prospective voters or prospective supporters. I think it could potentially come at a cost if political parties—and not just to put it all on political parties but third parties, too—are using that sophisticated messaging to tailor. It's a responsiveness that can be seen as positive, but we're not necessarily spending enough time building those big messages and big ideas that everybody can come to.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to this bill and the voter information card and the vouching, as well as the commissioner's enhanced ability to enforce the Canada Elections Act, can you talk about those three points and how you feel about them in Bill C-76?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

It was the vouching and—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It was the vouching, the voter information card, and the commissioner's ability to enforce.

Previously you've gone on record as having concerns with respect to the Fair Elections Act. Some of those things you've talked about. You had concerns with respect to the lack of vouching and the taking away of the VIC. How important is this to you in this legislation?

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

It's important to the extent that it increases accessibility and ensures that voters are able to participate. It provides an opportunity for people who want to vote and who are legitimate voters to vote. In that way, I think it serves an important purpose.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Mr. Emery, with respect to the third party spending limitations, would you consider your organization a third party? Would it fall under that? If so, how would you be impacted by this legislation?

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

I'm not certain that we would be, because we're not engaged in anything related to political campaigns.

I would be concerned on the foreign influence piece that Canadian citizens are always free to be part of the process. That's what we would like to see in any legislation pertaining to foreign money. There are certainly legitimate concerns to be accounted for, but we would want to make sure that there would be something to say that a Canadian citizen is always free to be part of the process. I'm not aware of anything contrary to that, but that's what we would hope to see protected.

(1300)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Professor Turnbull, we just spoke about accessibility.

My focus now is on a question for Mr. Emery.

There are provisions in here that I am proud of with respect to enhancing access for people with disabilities. Included in that is the expansion of the definition of what disability means beyond physical disability. Can you speak to the importance of the provisions that you see in the bill and how you feel about their inclusion in Bill C-76?

Mr. J. Randall Emery:

The biggest benefit that we see out of this bill is that it would eliminate one remaining instance in law where different citizens have different rights. That's very important to us, not just as individuals, to strengthen the Canadian community as a whole. Second, it would clearly establish an MP who is accountable for every citizen. As I mentioned before, there are instances now where citizens look for help, and they don't know where to go. I would say those are the two key benefits of this bill.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for coming. We certainly appreciate your being here and your wise counsel. It's been very helpful.

Mr. Cullen, I understand you have wording now.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have it under good advice from the clerk and others. The issue of the summons is pretty dramatic, and I want to be careful with it. We've had these groups testify before, and we've heard from just about every witness we've had so far that social media has an important role, so it is not casual that we're doing this on two important witnesses.

Some language that was offered I think is helpful to sort of do it in two stages. One is to invite again, essentially. We're sitting tonight, and if we don't hear a response, then we'll be more forceful tonight.

The motion would read, “That the clerk invite representatives from Facebook to appear before the committee on either June 6 or June 7, and if they fail to respond by 6:30 p.m. today, Kevin Chan from Facebook and Michelle Austin from Twitter be summoned to appear on” and then we can specify date and time tonight.

The Chair:

And Twitter?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Did I not say that? “Facebook and Twitter to appear before the committee on either June 6 or June 7”.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I find that timeline a bit tight. I would say it's reasonable to give them 24 hours. I'm aware of the problem that we have, that it's June 5, but the choice of June 6 and June 7 is a deadline that was imposed on a basis for which Twitter or Facebook or anybody else can scarcely be blamed. It's the government's haste to get things through. If I saw this at the receiving end, I would genuinely think that's unreasonable. In all fairness, we have to contact them. It is now a little past 1:00 p.m., and 6:30 is after business hours. I have no idea what people in this industry work, probably crazy hours. You know what I'm getting at. I'd say to give them 24 hours. That's a reasonable thing. If I may suggest, it's reasonable to ask them to appear June 6, June 7, or sometime next week.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Could I respond quickly to that, Chair? I know that Ruby will want to get in on it too.

The challenge is.... I didn't want to open up this conversation as we're now into the meeting, and again, apologies to the witnesses, but the challenge is that if we had a subscribed calendar in front of us and we knew that there was this date, this date, and this date on which we were having witnesses, then the motion....

I take Mr. Reid's point, though. I don't want to be unreasonable or aggressive about it. I want to be assertive about it.

Mr. Scott Reid: That's fine.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Just so committee members are aware as well, we have been in contact with both of the groups already, so they know we—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just as a quick point of order, while we're having this discussion, can we release the witnesses?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Of course.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Dr. Lori Turnbull:

This witness is really enjoying it.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You must leave. I have another motion here that says you must leave.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Thanks, David.

That was my only point on Scott's point. The challenge is that if we say 24 hours, then I don't know how long this committee is sitting and hearing witnesses. I honestly don't. We're trying to talk about it, but we had a motion the government prepared.... Everyone is kind of operating under the assumption that's what's going to happen at this committee, but technically and reasonably, this committee doesn't have that timeline at hand.

If we wait 24 hours, we invite, and they say that they'd be happy to come next week but we don't have hearings next week, then I'm in a bind as a committee member in wanting to hear from these witnesses. There are other committee members who want to hear from them too. That's why there is a certain urgency to it, but again, I don't know what our timeline is here, because none of us do.

(1305)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think my point is on the record.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

According to what Nathan has just proposed, I think I'd like to propose an amendment or an addition to your motion, so that we could have that guidance as to where we're ending and when we're starting our amendments and the clause-by-clause study.

I think what Mr. Reid has said is reasonable. We could have Facebook and Twitter in by Monday, have amendments in for Tuesday, and then start our clause-by-clause study by Wednesday.

The Chair: Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Also, if I can add to that, I think we agreed at the start—I don't know if there was a motion, but we did put it on the table, and I think it was fair—that the minister also come on—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's before our clause-by-clause study, right?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes, that's before our clause-by-clause consideration. If the amendments are due on Tuesday and we're starting clause-by-clause next week, we would have, since we're running out of witnesses in any event—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Chris Bittle: —Twitter and Facebook.

They've all been invited. We have empty slots. We could do social media and the minister on Monday, and then proceed as Ruby suggested.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just to clarify what the amendment is, y our suggestion is that Facebook and Twitter—plus the minister, according to Chris—would appear with other witnesses at Monday's meetings, which we haven't set yet, but could—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—and go with clause-by-clause by Tuesday.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: No—

Mr. Nathan Cullen: No. I'm sorry. Amendments by Tuesday—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Amendments would be submitted Tuesday and clause-by-clause started on Wednesday.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the proposal. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, was the amendment to change the time from 24 hours? I'm sorry. I just—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, it's—

The Chair:

[Inaudible—Editor] should then come up until Monday?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, and of course I worried about this, because the proposal now gets into the proposal that I suspect—but I don't know—committee members might want to talk about, which is actually now a proposal to finish the study of the bill.

Now what you're proposing is not just the Twitter, Facebook, and minister thing. It's the whole kit and caboodle.

Mr. Blake Richards: Point of order.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The 24-hour thing would be voluntary and not subpoenaed, right?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Point of order.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: By Monday.

Mr. Blake Richards: Point of order.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Is it in order for....? I don't know the answer to this question. That's why I'm asking.

We're talking about something and Mr. Cullen is talking about inviting and/or potentially compelling some witnesses. The amendment is to talk about the length of the study, to talk about when amendments would be.... To me, it doesn't seem like it's in the context of.... It doesn't seem like an amendment to that. It's a totally different subject matter.

Mr. Scott Reid: It's outside the scope.

Mr. Blake Richards: I wouldn't see that as an acceptable amendment to that motion. Therefore, we should probably just look at Mr. Cullen's situation and then the other thing. If the government chooses to make a motion of some other nature, then that's their right, I suppose.

However, I will also point out at this point in time—while I'm on a point of order, I'll make a second point of order—that we are past the time of the meeting. If we were dealing with something where we could deal with it quickly...but we're starting to talk now about when amendments would be due, witnesses, and all these other things. That's probably a lot longer conversation. Would that be something we'd be better off to schedule to have...I don't know when. However, the point is first of all, that I don't think the amendments are actually in order, and second, what are the thoughts on timing here?

The Chair:

Would the committee be okay if we just dealt with this particular motion on these two witnesses separately?

(1310)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No. I believe the issue was brought up of timing and how we can organize. It's difficult to figure that out if we don't have some kind of timing in mind, so I think that—

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's a point of order and I'm asking the chair to make a ruling.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's an amendment I want to bring, so I don't want to take it off the table.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I'm pointing out that I believe the amendment is out of order and I'm asking the chair to make a ruling.

Mr. Scott Reid:

[Inaudible—Editor] communicate with each other, because everything we say is not going to affect it.

The Chair:

I feel the amendments—if you add all the schedule and everything—are outside the scope of the original motion. You can alter the time, but the others should be dealt with separately.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay, so I could bring a separate motion. Can I ask you this? Within this motion, can there be a final date as to when witnesses are called, which should be Monday because we're bringing this witness in on the end of the witness list?

The Chair:

It's still beyond the scope of this motion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. Shucks.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What I'd say is again, the intention is what the intention is. I want social media to appear before us because I think it's critical in informing amendments that we might make to this bill.

We have to get to the conversation that Ruby also started, which is with respect to how we're handling the rest of this time. I'd suggest we have, as soon as possible—I don't know if there's time this afternoon to carve that out.... If there's some way that we could at least issue a notice to Facebook and Twitter saying we're headed down a path where we request again that you attend and there's that subpoena coming. I don't want to totally have the two enmeshed, as much as that may end up being what's happening here. We have to have those conversations.

It doesn't matter whether I agree with the chair, but yes, we started to expand the scope too much.

(1315)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What's the timing that you're thinking for the witnesses coming? Twenty-four hours—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I hear Scott's point very much. We don't want to make it, like, tomorrow, and if they don't show then they're terrible. The worry about the 24-hour piece is that if we issue it tonight.... Oh yes, if we issue it tonight, then they can appear by Thursday. If that's what we're asking for, then that's reasonable. Right? Here's the warning right now, that if they don't respond to that warning of please appear by Thursday, then we have something more serious—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Then it's Monday.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That could be either the Thursday or Monday next week, depending on what the committee decides on the calendar. I know that's not a very clear motion, but I'm trying to keep the intentions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Nathan, it sounds clear to me. If we were to word it as a motion, it sounds like what you said was that representatives of the relevant organizations be invited forthwith, and that if—let's say—by noon tomorrow, they have not responded affirmatively, then a summons be issued for the named individuals—you have the names there—and that the date on the request for them to appear would be Thursday, I assume, at the time of their choosing.

You'll give that scope within those hours or a time that is worked out with the clerk.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I think we'd just say we have our committee set for Thursday morning.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Something like that, full stop. That's what I would suggest.

To be clear, Nathan, my objection was not with—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I understand.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It would be hard to get them here for tomorrow, but the key thing is that they have no means of responding because it's after our working hours, and we're issuing a summons, which has to be issued during working hours. There would be a lot of—

What's that?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We'll tweet them our subpoena.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You have a point there.

Anyway, that's what I would suggest. Does that give you wording that's satisfactory?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's my intent.

The Chair:

The committee has agreed to that.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings]

The Chair: Yes, Mr. Fillmore.

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Chair, we're going to support what Mr. Cullen has said, but I was just going to remind the committee that we had agreement that we'd cease hearing witnesses on Thursday. That was from the 10th report of the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure, which was concurred in. We said we would finish hearing from witnesses on Thursday.

Just as a reminder, I think we've already taken care of the witnesses. We're going to make an exception to that now. I would like to ask that when we reconvene this evening, we forthwith address Ruby's remaining elements.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is that for committee business?

An hon. member: Yes.

The Chair:

Okay. How do you want to fit that committee business in this afternoon or this evening?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Hold on a minute, Mr. Chair. Are we not dealing with Mr. Cullen's motion right now?

The Chair:

We've already agreed to it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's adopted? Okay, I misunderstood.

The Chair:

Yes, we agreed to that. The parliamentary secretary is just saying that this afternoon, when we reconvene—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can we see the witnesses first, up front, and then do committee business? That way, just in case we go a little over, we don't have witnesses waiting. I hate when that happens.

The Chair:

Is that okay?

The Clerk:

Do you want me to read out the list of witnesses?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sure.

The Clerk:

From 3:30 to 4:30 this afternoon we have the Canadian Federation of Students and the Communications Security Establishment. From 4:30 to 5:30 we have the Privacy Commissioner and the Canadian Forces. From 5:30 to 6:30 we have Ian Lee from Carleton University, and Arthur Hamilton from the Conservative Party of Canada.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the one you want to cut out.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: No, no. That's not what I meant. The Privacy Commissioner is clearly important. The Canadian Forces are important. The very last panel is important as well, but if we have to borrow 15 minutes of time, I don't want to take that from the Privacy Commissioner.

The Chair:

We could go after 8:30 for a bit.

A voice: You mean 6:30.

The Chair: Oh yes, 6:30.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Notice how the staff reacted faster than any of the MPs—“What?”

The Chair:

That's fine. One way or another we'll deal with that after the witnesses.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1000)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Bienvenue à la 110e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons l'étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d’autres lois et apportant certaines modifications corrélatives.

Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir aujourd’hui Taylor Gunn, président et directeur général des élections de CIVIX, et Duff Conacher, cofondateur de Démocratie en surveillance.

J'informe les membres du Comité qu'ils ont la liste de tous les témoins, qui a été dressée par le greffier. La bonne nouvelle, c’est qu’ils ont tous été invités — il y en a 300 — et que nous avons pu réserver une place à tous les intéressés. S’il y en a d’autres qui manifestent de l’intérêt, nous avons des créneaux libres cette semaine et nous pouvons les accueillir. Nous devrions terminer l'audition des témoins cette semaine.

Passons aux déclarations liminaires.

Monsieur Gunn, vous pourriez peut-être commencer, puis nous entendrons M. Conacher.

M. Taylor Gunn (Président et directeur général des élections, CIVIX):

Je suis heureux de revoir tout le monde. La dernière fois, la séance portait sur la réforme électorale. Je tiens à dire que je vous sais gré, sincèrement, de tous les efforts et tout le temps que vous avez consacrés à cette étude, même si elle n’a pas vraiment abouti. C’était un excellent exemple de comité parlementaire à l'oeuvre.

C’est un honneur d’avoir comparu ici à quelques reprises. Au cas où vous ne vous rappelleriez pas qui nous sommes et ce que nous faisons, je vais expliquer que nous sommes un organisme de bienfaisance canadien qui s'occupe d’éducation civique et qui s’efforce de développer les habitudes et les compétences citoyennes des étudiants en âge de voter.

Notre principal travail est le programme Vote étudiant, qui est une élection parallèle pour les jeunes qui n’ont pas l’âge de voter. Vous êtes peut-être déjà au courant. Nous organisons un de ces votes en Ontario en ce moment. Nous prévoyons qu’environ 300 000 jeunes y participeront d’ici jeudi prochain.

Un ajout intéressant à notre travail, c’est que nous avons tenu notre premier vote étudiant à l’extérieur du Canada, en Colombie, il y a deux semaines, et 31 000 jeunes y ont participé. Espérons que cela nous ouvrira la porte d’autres pays et que nous pourrons exporter les valeurs démocratiques canadiennes.

Nous avons également lancé un nouveau programme qui porte sur la littératie en matière d’information et de désinformation, ce qui se rapporte un peu à ce qui se trouve dans le projet de loi. J'aborderai peut-être la question plus tard.

C’est un honneur de comparaître. Je ne peux pas dire que je m’oppose à grand-chose dans le projet de loi. Peut-être même à rien du tout. Je suis tout à fait à l’aise de donner plus de temps à Duff, qui a peut-être des points plus précis à soulever. Il y a des choses que je peux dire au sujet de l’inscription préalable, et peut-être un peu au sujet de l’ingérence étrangère, vu ce que nous avons appris ces derniers mois, puis sur quelques autres points mineurs.

C'est avec plaisir que je cède mon temps de parole à Duff ou que je vous laisserai la possibilité de conclure rapidement pour que vous puissiez prendre une pause et préparer votre prochaine séance.

(1005)

Le président:

D’accord, monsieur Conacher, vous avez la parole.

M. Duff Conacher (co-fondateur, Démocratie en surveillance):

Merci beaucoup.

Je remercie le Comité de me donner l’occasion de témoigner.

Je témoigne ici à titre de cofondateur de Démocratie en surveillance, qui, si vous ne le savez pas, est un groupe de défense des droits des citoyens. Depuis 1993, nous travaillons à faire du Canada la première démocratie au monde, en réclamant des changements qui obligent tous les hommes et femmes politiques à être honnêtes, éthiques, ouverts et représentatifs et à prévenir le gaspillage. Au total, 190 000 personnes des quatre coins du Canada se sont inscrites pour envoyer une lettre ou une pétition dans le cadre de l’une ou l’autre de nos campagnes.

Aujourd’hui, mon exposé repose en grande partie, comme M. Gunn l’a dit, sur des mémoires présentés au Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale.

Le projet de loi C-76 propose de nombreuses modifications constructives, annulant bon nombre des changements injustes apportés par la prétendue Loi sur l’intégrité des élections de 2014, mais la position de Démocratie en surveillance est que les effets négatifs de bon nombre des changements apportés à cette loi ont été exagérés. Par conséquent, l'annulation de ces mesures aura probablement peu d’effet, globalement, sur ce qui se passe réellement au moment des élections. Comme la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections de 2014, le projet de loi C-76 n’est malheureusement pas à la hauteur. C’est ce qu’on appelle la Loi sur la modernisation des élections, mais comme la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, elle permet le maintien de nombreuses pratiques électorales désuètes, injustes et antidémocratiques, comme celles qui suivent.

Premièrement, bien sûr, le système de dépouillement du scrutin ne compte pas les votes de façon équitable et produit habituellement des gouvernements faussement majoritaires. Il ne permet pas non plus aux électeurs de signifier leur abstention — une option clé que les électeurs devraient avoir, et qui existe déjà dans quatre provinces —, et il ne règle pas entièrement la question des élections à date fixe, comme le Royaume-Uni l’a fait, pour mettre un terme aux déclenchements d’élections soudains et injustes.

Deuxièmement, il continue de permettre de leurrer les électeurs en leur faisant de fausses promesses dans des publicités. La Loi électorale du Canada interdit d’inciter les électeurs à voter pour qui que ce soit — et c’est le libellé exact — « par quelque prétexte ou ruse ». Cependant, le commissaire aux élections fédérales refuse d’appliquer cette mesure à une fausse promesse ou à une fausse déclaration faite pendant une campagne électorale. Il est clair qu’une exigence de « promesses honnêtes » clairement formulée et assortie de sanctions importantes, est une nécessité. Même s’ils votent pour le parti qui gagne, les électeurs n’obtiennent pas ce pour quoi ils ont voté parce que les promesses étaient manifestement fausses.

Bien que l’article 61 du projet de loi ajoute des précisions aux dispositions des articles 91 et 92 de la Loi électorale du Canada concernant les fausses déclarations au sujet des candidats, ces mesures réduisent considérablement la gamme des fausses déclarations interdites. Ce n’est pas un progrès. La malhonnêteté électorale devrait être définie de façon large et être découragée. C’est un enjeu fondamental qui concerne les droits des électeurs. Ils ont droit à une campagne honnête, de façon qu'ils puissent savoir ce pour quoi ils votent honnêtement, et ceux qui induisent les électeurs en erreur, par opposition à ceux qui veulent les diriger, devraient être découragés par l'imposition de sanctions sévères.

Dans le même ordre d’idées, le projet de loi n’en fait pas assez pour mettre fin à la nouvelle forme de fausses déclarations, de fausses publicités électorales secrètes en ligne, y compris des publicités de l'étranger. Le projet de loi C-76 compte que les entreprises de médias sociaux vont s’autoréglementer, ne les obligeant à rendre des comptes que si elles autorisent « sciemment » une publicité étrangère, mais sans rien dire des fausses publicités au niveau national qui seraient autorisées sciemment ou autrement. Encore une fois, l’article 61 restreint la définition de « fausses déclarations », mais il serait tout de même illégal de faire une fausse déclaration au sujet d’un candidat.

Pour ce qui est de la norme « sciemment », les entreprises de médias sociaux pourront facilement prouver qu’elles ne savaient pas qu'une telle annonce avait été diffusée. La disposition ne sera pas exécutoire. Elles s’en tireront à chaque fois, ce qui ne les dissuadera pas d’accepter des publicités électorales en ligne secrètes et fausses diffusées par des Canadiens ou des étrangers.

Les médias et les entreprises de médias sociaux devraient être tenus de communiquer à Élections Canada tous les détails de toutes les publicités liées aux élections pendant les six mois précédant les élections, afin que l'organisme puisse vérifier si la publicité est fausse, si elle dépasse les limites de dépenses des tiers et si elle est payée par des étrangers. Ces trois choses sont illégales, mais si Élections Canada ne peut pas voir ces publicités — ce qu’il ne peut pas faire parce qu’elles sont microciblées —, comment va-t-il appliquer ces lois contre les publicités fausses et commanditées par des étrangers, et les publicités qui dépassent les limites de dépenses des tiers?

(1010)



Ne faites pas confiance aux entreprises de médias sociaux pour s’autoréglementer dans ce domaine. Exigez qu’elles déclarent toutes les publicités à Élections Canada. Pendant ces six mois, donnez à Élections Canada le pouvoir d'ordonner la suppression d'une publicité clairement fausse ou illégale parce qu’elle vient de l'étranger ou qu’elle dépasse les limites de dépenses, dans un média ou sur un site de médias sociaux et d'imposer des amendes importantes aux contrevenants.

Le projet de loi ne s'attaque pas non plus au problème des dons annuels encore trop élevés. Le projet de loi C-50 ne fait rien à ce sujet. Par conséquent, les partis comptent tous sur un petit groupe de grands donateurs qui versent des milliers de dollars ou plus. Cela facilite la canalisation de fonds vers des partis, ce pourquoi SNC-Lavalin s’est fait épingler. Cela facilite aussi le regroupement de dons pour acheter de l’influence. Tout cela est antidémocratique et injuste.

Le projet de loi ne traite pas de sept pratiques qui devraient être surveillées par Élections Canada ou d’autres organismes de surveillance.

Il y a d’abord les courses à l’investiture injustes. Élections Canada devrait les gérer toutes. La loi instituant des réformes n’a rien changé. Tous les partis ont redonné aux chefs de parti le pouvoir d’approuver les candidats aux élections, parfois par l'entremise de quelqu’un au bureau central de leur parti.

Il y a aussi les courses à la direction injustes. Élections Canada devrait les surveiller.

Il y a aussi les vérifications douteuses. Élections Canada devrait vérifier les partis, les candidats et les tiers.

Notons ensuite les débats électoraux injustes. Élections Canada ou une commission devraient les gérer selon leurs règles. Espérons qu’un projet de loi apportant cette modification sera présenté bientôt, avant les prochaines élections.

Il y a encore la surveillance partiale des bureaux de scrutin. Le parti au pouvoir et le deuxième parti choisissent ces gens et peuvent forcer le directeur du scrutin à nommer qui ils veulent. Élections Canada devrait nommer tous les directeurs de scrutin.

Il y a l’utilisation douteuse des renseignements sur les électeurs. Le projet de loi n’étend pas aux partis l'application de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, la LPRPDE. Les partis devraient lui être assujettis et le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée devrait être chargé de son application.

Il y a aussi la publicité gouvernementale injuste. Il est à espérer qu’un projet de loi sera présenté à ce sujet et que la vérificatrice générale ou Élections Canada auront le pouvoir de mettre fin à toute publicité partisane dans les six mois précédant les élections, et qu’il y aura une interdiction complète des publicités gouvernementales pendant les trois mois précédant les élections.

Il y a la question des limites de dépenses des tiers. Il n’existe aucun moyen d’empêcher les entreprises canadiennes et les groupes de citoyens de recevoir de l’argent d’entités étrangères, ce qui libère d’autres fonds qu’ils doivent utiliser pour des activités de défense des intérêts électoraux, à moins d'interdire complètement aux groupes de citoyens les dons d'entreprises étrangères au Canada et les contributions étrangères. Ce projet de loi va assez loin en exigeant la création d’un compte bancaire distinct. Le problème, c’est qu’il y a discrimination contre les groupes de citoyens qui acceptent des dons par opposition aux syndicats et aux sociétés qui sont aussi des tiers. Il leur est très facile de transférer de l’argent dans ce compte de banque, mais un tiers devra faire une collecte de fonds spéciale pour y verser de l’argent s’il s’agit d’un groupe de citoyens. Les choses seront donc beaucoup plus difficiles pour les groupes de citoyens. Ils sont autorisés à faire des dons dans le compte à partir de leurs propres fonds qu’ils ont peut-être recueillis tout au long de l’année, et non à partir de fonds étrangers. Dans l’ensemble, il sera beaucoup plus difficile pour les groupes de citoyens de recueillir des fonds que pour les syndicats ou les sociétés.

La communication des rapports et les limites sont également une bonne chose, mais il faut aussi limiter la publicité gouvernementale par souci d'équité pour tout le monde, avant les périodes préélectorale et électorale. Dans l’ensemble, je ne vois aucune raison de relever la limite imposée aux tiers pendant la période électorale. C’est une mauvaise idée. C’est une évolution contraire à la démocratie parce que cela permettrait aux plus riches de dépenser davantage. Le coût des publicités en ligne est bien inférieur à ce qu’il était lorsque les limites ont été fixées. Même si la nouvelle limite couvre davantage de dépenses, y compris les sondages, le porte-à-porte et ce genre de communication, je ne vois pas de raison de relever la limite. C’est un pas dans la mauvaise direction. Comment la limite a-t-elle été choisie? Comment ont été choisies toutes les limites fixées? Sont-elles fondées sur quoi que ce soit? Sur le montant que les partis ont dépensé en publicité pendant la période préélectorale de 2015? Avant les élections de 2011?

(1015)



Il en va de même pour les tiers. S'appuie-t-on sur des faits signalés à Élections Canada? Je sais que les limites imposées aux tiers en 2004 étaient arbitraires, mais nous avons maintenant une certaine expérience et il faudrait l’étudier.

Je vais terminer par le point suivant. Les limites énoncées dans le document d’information du gouvernement ne sont pas les mêmes que dans le projet de loi. Je m'y perds dans les énormes écarts entre les montants. Dans le document d’information, on parle de 1,5 million de dollars pour les dépenses des partis avant le déclenchement des élections, mais dans le projet de loi, il s'agit de 1,1 million de dollars. Dans le document d’information, on dit qu’il est ajusté aux chiffres de 2019 en fonction de l’inflation, c’est-à-dire une inflation de 30 %, taux qui ne correspond pas à la réalité actuelle. Toutes les limites sont les mêmes. Pour les tiers, il y a un écart de 300 000 $ entre ce qui est indiqué dans le projet de loi et le document d’information, et pour une circonscription, il y a un écart de 3 000 $.

Une voix: [Inaudible]

M. Duff Conacher: Il y a la période préélectorale et la période électorale. Je ne sais pas d’où viennent les chiffres du document d’information.

Je voudrais simplement faire une observation d'ordre général: comment ces limites sont-elles établies? Pourquoi ne pas examiner les dépenses réelles des partis pendant les périodes préélectorales de 2011 et de 2015? Même chose pour les tiers et ce qu’ils ont dépensé pendant les élections. Établissez une limite en fonction de cela. Les limites ne me semblent pas très importantes, aucune d’entre elles, parce que très peu de partis vont dépenser ce montant en juillet et en août. Habituellement, on ne fait pas de grandes campagnes publicitaires en juillet et en août, surtout pour les électeurs, parce qu’ils ne prêtent attention aux élections qu’en septembre, après le déclenchement.

Enfin, l’application globale de la loi doit être renforcée. Il faut alourdir les amendes. Il faut rendre les organes de surveillance beaucoup plus indépendants. Le délai pour déposer une plainte doit être prolongé et passer de 30 jours après les élections à un an.

Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions sur ces points. Je vous remercie encore une fois de m’avoir invité.

Le président:

À quels organismes de surveillance faisiez-vous allusion?

M. Duff Conacher:

Il y a le directeur général des élections. Le parti au pouvoir peut maintenant choisir cette personne avec un vote majoritaire à la Chambre. Il n’est même pas nécessaire de consulter les partis de l’opposition. Comme vous le savez peut-être, nous avons saisi les tribunaux d'une contestation de la nomination du commissaire à l’éthique et de la commissaire au lobbying, parce qu’il n’y a pas eu de consultation, même avec les partis de l’opposition.

Si on veut appliquer une règle qui interdit la diffusion d’une fausse publicité, alors tout le monde doit considérer les publicités comme complètement impartiales. À l’heure actuelle, le Cabinet du parti au pouvoir choisit le directeur général des élections. Le directeur des poursuites pénales est choisi par un comité qui compte une majorité de membres du parti au pouvoir.

Il y a une meilleure façon de procéder. Il existe une commission indépendante en Ontario. La façon dont elle nomme les juges est un modèle de premier ordre dans le monde, et il devrait être utilisé pour chaque nomination de chaque dirigeant d'organisme de surveillance fédéral. Il faut que ces personnes soient considérées comme complètement impartiales, au-dessus de tout soupçon de partialité. Si on veut mettre un terme aux fausses publicités en ligne et restreindre la liberté d’expression des gens, il ne faut pas que quiconque puisse penser qu'on l'a fait pour protéger un parti, pour aider un parti ou nuire à un autre.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions.

Commençons par M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Gunn, pouvez-vous nous parler du registre des futurs électeurs?

M. Taylor Gunn:

Bien sûr.

C’est une tendance des organismes de gestion électorale. Le but est de pouvoir communiquer avec les jeunes électeurs une fois qu’ils ont 18 ans.

Il semble qu’il y ait deux ou trois méthodes différentes. La première, qui s'applique en Ontario, c’est que les jeunes sont censés signifier leur volonté d'y être inscrits. Une autre version est celle où l’information est communiquée, à partir de l’endroit où elle peut être recueillie, à l’organisme de gestion des élections. L'inscription n'est pas facultative.

Au sujet du projet de loi à l'étude, je ne sais pas trop à quoi m'en tenir... Il dit que l'inscription pourrait être facultative. J'ignore si ce sera le cas ou non. La disposition d’adhésion représente potentiellement un moment propice à l’enseignement dans les écoles et par d’autres moyens, pourvu qu’il soit adéquatement financé et dispensé, mais c’est aussi un défi. Je crois qu’Élections Ontario a eu de la difficulté à obtenir les chiffres espérés pour établir cette liste de préinscription. Bien sûr, l’autre solution, c’est que l’information soit communiquée en coulisse. Le nom du futur électeur apparaît sur une liste dont il ne sait rien et qu'il ne comprend pas, dont il ne connaît pas la raison d'être, et on perd là une occasion de lui enseigner quelque chose.

(1020)

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous avez dit, et je suis d’accord avec vous, que cela ne réglera pas entièrement le problème de la participation des jeunes aux élections, mais qu’allons-nous faire à partir de là? Est-ce une bonne mesure? Qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Taylor Gunn:

De la préinscription?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

M. Taylor Gunn:

Nous avons toujours pensé que, si c’était fait correctement, cela pourrait donner l’occasion de sensibiliser les enfants à la liste électorale. Ce ne serait qu'un modeste élément d’un effort plus vaste d’éducation civique. C’est une bonne chose de proposer ici un registre des futurs électeurs.

Au-delà du projet de loi, c’est une question d’exécution et de mise en oeuvre, et encore une fois, il faut voir si l’adhésion sera facultative ou non. Dans ce genre de chose, je dis toujours que ce ne devrait peut-être pas être un organisme électoral qui mène ce genre de campagne de sensibilisation, mais des organismes qui sont déjà actifs dans les écoles et qui ont l’expérience et les connaissances nécessaires pour faire fructifier ce genre d'initiative.

Cette proposition est une bonne chose, mais je ne compterais pas là-dessus pour augmenter le taux de participation. C'est néanmoins une tendance qui se manifeste partout au Canada. Personne ne devrait s’y opposer.

M. Chris Bittle:

Selon vos contacts avec les jeunes, quels sont les meilleurs outils à utiliser pour les mobiliser?

M. Taylor Gunn:

Ce sont probablement les meilleurs outils à utiliser auprès des adultes également. En ce qui a trait au taux de participation aux élections — et je suis sûr que Duff voudra faire quelques commentaires —, beaucoup de facteurs entrent en jeu pour attirer un électeur vers le bureau de vote. Je dirais que l'éducation civique est le plus important.

Il y a ensuite d'autres facteurs, par exemple si l'élection est concurrentielle ou non. Si c'est une élection de changement ou non. Il y a encore des citoyens qui pensent que leur vote ne compte pas. C'est à cause du système électoral et sur ce front, rien ne bouge.

Un autre facteur est la façon dont les électeurs reçoivent l'information durant une campagne électorale. L'information doit être accessible. C'est ce qui est ressorti des deux enquêtes nationales menées par Élections Canada auprès des jeunes. Il y a des facteurs liés à la motivation et d'autres, à l'accessibilité. Tous ces facteurs doivent tous être pris en compte en même temps. Vous ne pouvez pas uniquement miser sur l'éducation civique, par exemple.

Je persiste à dire que l'éducation civique est l'investissement le plus efficace pour arriver à transformer un jeune en citoyen. Par la suite, évidemment, cette formation ne doit pas rester théorique, mais doit être mise en pratique. En ce qui concerne les cybermenaces ou l'ingérence étrangère dans nos élections, en particulier, vous pouvez commencer par ce qui est le plus préoccupant... ou suivre les conseils du projet de loi concernant la détection de ces publicités et ce genre de choses, mais si vous ne vous occupez pas des choses de base en même temps, comme la préparation des citoyens et le renforcement de la résilience, vous n'obtiendrez pas les résultats que vous souhaitez.

En dehors de ce projet de loi, il faut aussi donner aux organisations les moyens de faire ce qu'Élections Canada n'a ni l'ambition ni l'intention de faire et de s'attaquer à ces défis de manière plus proactive. Je sais que cela ne dépend pas de vous, mais quelqu'un devrait s'en préoccuper, car il n'existe actuellement aucun mécanisme pour encourager des groupes comme le nôtre à faire preuve de créativité.

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur Conacher, vous n'êtes pas le premier témoin à suggérer qu'il faudrait appliquer la LPRPDE aux partis politiques. Il me semble... je ne veux pas dire que c'est une tendance, mais les partis politiques sont...

(1025)

M. Duff Conacher:

Un moyen...

M. Chris Bittle:

... exact, merci. Les partis politiques sont des acteurs distincts les uns des autres et je vais vous donner un exemple. En vertu de la LPRPDE, si je demande à une organisation quels renseignements elle détient à mon sujet, elle est tenue de me donner cette information. C'est une pratique prévue à la LPRPDE.

Les partis politiques ont des partisans et n'ont pas d'affinités avec les autres partis. Qu'est-ce qui empêcherait des milliers de personnes de bombarder de messages un parti ou une organisation politique dans le cadre d'une campagne coordonnée visant à déstabiliser ce parti?

M. Duff Conacher:

Le déstabiliser de quelle façon?

M. Chris Bittle:

En le forçant à cesser ses activités ou en l'inondant de demandes.

M. Duff Conacher:

Si cette transition a lieu, nous devons commencer par envoyer un avis à toutes les personnes sur lesquelles un parti détient des renseignements, les informer de la nature de ces renseignements et leur demander si elles consentent à ce que le parti les utilise à sa discrétion, en remplissant un formulaire simplifié. Voilà comment se ferait la transition et ce bombardement de messages ne pourrait avoir lieu parce que les partis aviseraient proactivement les gens qu'ils détiennent des renseignements à leur sujet.

M. Chris Bittle:

Comme les partis politiques reçoivent les listes d'électeurs, presque tous les électeurs du pays recevraient un avis de chacun des partis politiques...

M. Duff Conacher:

Vous pouvez faire une exception pour ça. Par exemple, les gens pourraient être avisés, sur leur formulaire d'impôt, que les renseignements qu'ils fournissent pourront être communiqués à des partis politiques. Il y a diverses manières de procéder. Je parle ici d'autres renseignements que les partis peuvent avoir recueillis auprès des électeurs...

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous pensez donc que les partis politiques ne devraient pas recevoir automatiquement les listes d'électeurs, sauf avec le consentement de ces derniers.

M. Duff Conacher:

Je n'ai aucun problème avec ça. Vous venez de dire que le parti devrait en informer chaque électeur concerné. Les partis ont toutefois une autre façon de traiter des renseignements de base qui leur sont communiqués.

Je veux parler des autres renseignements qui sont recueillis par les partis et de l'utilisation qu'ils en font, par exemple s'ils échangent leurs listes contre de l'argent et des choses du genre. Il y a un compromis à faire pour assujettir les partis — je sais qu'il s'agit d'une entité distincte — à certaines de ces règles au lieu de les laisser s'autodiscipliner, comme le fait le projet de loi.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

C'est à vous, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Monsieur Conacher, je vais commencer par vous.

Dans votre dernier témoignage devant le Comité, il y a environ un an, vous avez dit que les groupes de pression ou les tiers partis devraient déclarer leurs dépenses entre deux élections. Je suppose que vous êtes toujours de cet avis. Comme le projet de loi C-76 ne contient aucune disposition à cet égard, pensez-vous qu'il y aurait lieu de l'amender pour y inclure l'obligation de déclarer les dépenses engagées en dehors de la période préélectorale et de la période électorale?

M. Duff Conacher:

Cette obligation existe pour la période préélectorale, c'est déjà un début. Je pense toutefois que les partis ne dépenseront pas beaucoup d'argent en juillet et août. Ils garderont leur argent pour le dépenser... Tout dépend évidemment de la date du déclenchement de l'élection, mais je pense que, si jamais un parti dépense de l'argent pendant la période préélectorale, il commencera vraiment à dépenser juste après la fête du Travail, ou juste avant.

En dehors de la période préélectorale, je pense que les partis devraient quand même être tenus de déclarer leurs dépenses de campagne en vertu de la Loi sur le lobbying. Il n'est pas nécessaire de les déclarer au dollar près, mais ils pourraient indiquer un montant approximatif, juste pour que nous sachions s'il existe un déséquilibre entre les ressources des différents partis sur un enjeu donné.

M. Blake Richards:

Dans votre dernier témoignage, vous aviez également dit que tous les dons devraient être déclarés avant que les gens votent. Vous parliez des partis politiques. Je suppose que les candidats devraient aussi le faire. Selon vous, les tiers devraient-ils également être assujettis à cette règle? Pensez-vous qu'ils devraient déclarer les dons avant que les gens aillent voter?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. Les partis doivent déposer un rapport provisoire portant sur la période préélectorale ou n'importe quelle période de campagne au cours de laquelle leurs dépenses ont dépassé la limite de 10 000 $. Tous les participants devraient donc faire une déclaration.

Certains ont dit, notamment le sénateur Frum, que les dépenses seront déclarées qu'après l'élection. Il y aura toutefois ce rapport provisoire qui pourrait faire état d'une grande partie des dépenses.

Les candidats à la direction d'un parti déclarent leurs dépenses tous les mois ainsi que la semaine précédant le vote. Je ne vois pas pourquoi cette règle ne s'appliquerait pas à tout le monde. Les électeurs ont le droit de savoir qui finance les intérêts, les candidats, les partis et les tiers dans le but d'influencer l'issue de l'élection.

(1030)

M. Blake Richards:

Corrigez-moi si je fais erreur, mais cela n'obligerait pas un tiers à déclarer les contributions qu'il a reçues avant la période préélectorale. Si les gens savent que cette période débute le 30 juin, n'auraient-ils pas tendance à faire leur contribution le 28 ou le 29? Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Duff Conacher:

Voulez-vous parler de la déclaration de montants élevés?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

M. Duff Conacher:

Les groupes de citoyens doivent ouvrir un compte bancaire distinct. Il leur est strictement interdit d'utiliser des fonds étrangers. Ils devront verser les montants reçus dans un compte bancaire distinct. S'ils utilisent cet argent, ils doivent déclarer les contributeurs, même si les fonds ont été versés avant le 30 juin. Je suis quasi certain que les groupes citoyens qui souhaitent recourir à ce mécanisme vont ouvrir un compte de banque avant le 30 juin. Ils l'utiliseront probablement tout au long de l'année précédant une élection.

Si une élection surprise est déclenchée, j'ignore où ils se procureront leur financement. Ils peuvent transférer de l'argent de leur propre compte bancaire, et je suis certain qu'ils lanceront un appel pour obtenir des fonds. Ceux-ci seront toutefois limités, cela dépendra des fonds non étrangers qu'ils ont dans un compte de banque, qui ne sont pas destinés à d'autres programmes et qu'ils peuvent transférer à un compte spécial consacré aux activités partisanes.

M. Blake Richards:

Lors de votre dernière comparution, vous avez également parlé des changements apportés en Colombie-Britannique concernant la déclaration des dépenses de tiers partis. Pourriez-vous faire le point à ce sujet? De toute évidence, vous avez eu suffisamment de temps pour analyser la campagne menée dans cette province. Pensez-vous que ces changements ont donné des résultats concrets et si nous pouvons tirer des leçons de cette expérience?

M. Duff Conacher:

Vous voulez parler des tiers partis en Colombie-Britannique?

M. Blake Richards:

Exact. Vous en avez parlé la dernière fois que vous êtes venu ici.

M. Duff Conacher:

Je pense que le projet de loi C-76 va plus loin que la Colombie-Britannique en obligeant les partis à ouvrir un compte bancaire spécial.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr. Je vous demande cependant quelles leçons avons-nous tirées de ces changements et que pouvons-nous...

M. Duff Conacher:

Nous n'avons pas fait une analyse détaillée. Je suis désolé.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous n'avez pas été en mesure de le faire. D'accord.

Certains témoins ont parlé de collusion, ou pourrait-on dire de coopération, entre plusieurs tiers partis. Cela est peut-être une façon, pour une organisation ou un particulier, de collaborer avec un parti enregistré et de contourner la limite des dépenses. Qu'en pensez-vous? Devons-nous prendre des mesures à cet égard? Est-ce un problème sur lequel nous devons nous pencher?

M. Duff Conacher:

Je pense que l'obligation de déposer un rapport provisoire facilitera les choses, parce que non seulement le tiers parti devra s'enregistrer, mais vous aurez une idée de la source des contributions. Dans l'ensemble, je pense qu'Élections Canada devrait avoir le pouvoir de mener des vérifications proactives au fur et à mesure.

C'est ce que je pense avoir dit devant le Comité. C'est une question très délicate. Dès le déclenchement de l'élection, à moins d'un cas flagrant de fraude pouvant avoir une incidence manifeste sur l'élection, il est presque impossible de convaincre un juge d'annuler le vote de dizaines de milliers d'électeurs.

Il est donc nécessaire de mener des vérifications en temps réel et d'avoir le pouvoir de demander à examiner tous les courriels reçus depuis la dernière déclaration pour s'assurer que ce genre de problème ne se produit pas.

Après le fait, vous pouvez pénaliser les gens afin de les décourager, mais leur gain est énorme. Ils gagnent le pouvoir. Je pense que beaucoup de gens sont prêts à se sacrifier et à faire quelques années de prison pour aider leur parti à prendre le pouvoir.

Il faut donner beaucoup plus de pouvoir à Élections Canada, autant en ce qui concerne la publicité secrète, fausse, étrangère et mensongère en ligne que tout le reste, et exiger une divulgation complète pour mettre fin à toute pratique injuste et antidémocratique.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est maintenant à votre tour, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci également à nos témoins.

Je suis en train de lire certains de vos documents d'information à ce sujet. Le DGE n'a-t-il pas demandé l'abrogation? Je parle des déclarations fausses ou trompeuses, surtout au sujet de la personnalité des candidats. Le DGE n'a-t-il pas demandé l'abrogation de ces dispositions? À l'époque, on pensait qu'il trouvait que les tribunaux étaient mieux placés qu'Élections Canada pour traiter les cas de diffamation et de libelle.

(1035)

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. Je n'ai pas la définition sous les yeux... si un candidat a commis un délit ou si ses qualifications professionnelles sont remises en question... La portée des dispositions a été restreinte afin de rendre cette définition plus facile à appliquer et aussi pour permettre à un candidat de se retirer, évidemment. Je ne crois pas qu'il faille donner un sens plus étroit à cette définition.

Là encore, si un tribunal saisi d'un cas de diffamation rend sa décision un an plus tard, cela ne vous sera pas très utile, si l'issue de l'élection en a été perturbée. Je pense donc que la définition doit avoir une portée large. Elle devrait inclure les fausses promesses flagrantes, qu'il faut maintenant dévoiler après coup. Pour ce qui est des fausses déclarations flagrantes, c'est Élections Canada, ou un commissaire, qui devrait intervenir.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Prenons l'exemple de ce scénario idéal en vertu duquel le projet de loi C-76 porterait sur les fausses déclarations et les fausses promesses. Examinons un cas particulier.

La dernière fois que vous êtes tous deux venus témoigner ici, c'était au sujet de la réforme électorale. Nous parlions de la promesse selon laquelle l'élection de 2015 serait la dernière à être tenue selon le système uninominal majoritaire à un tour.

Selon votre scénario idéal, que se passerait-il si la loi interdisait aux partis de faire de fausses déclarations?

M. Duff Conacher:

Pour favoriser l'honnêteté en période de campagne électorale, Démocratie en surveillance n'a cessé d'affirmer que, premièrement, l'actuelle disposition interdisant le recours à tout prétexte ou ruse est suffisante. Nous avons déposé une plainte auprès du commissaire concernant cette promesse électorale. Le commissaire a dit qu'il n'y avait jamais eu de cas semblable, tout en signalant un cas obscur survenu en Colombie-Britannique il y a 140 ans, affirmant que les fausses promesses ne peuvent être assimilées à un prétexte ou une ruse.

Un prétexte est une fausse affirmation, une ruse est une fausse affirmation, et une fausse promesse est une fausse affirmation. Je ne comprends donc pas pourquoi le commissaire...

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'après vous, la loi existe?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, mais le commissaire ne l'applique pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si le commissaire l'appliquait, que ferait-il ensuite?

M. Duff Conacher:

J'ai parlé d'imposer des amendes plus sévères. Il faut augmenter...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si vous manquez à une promesse, vous payez une amende.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, le chef du parti devrait payer une amende et le parti également.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le chef lui-même devrait payer une amende.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, et Démocratie en surveillance recommande l'équivalent d'un an de salaire, parce c'est un problème grave qui touche le droit des électeurs. Ce serait un montant minimal...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Par conséquent, Justin Trudeau devrait payer l'équivalent d'un an de salaire et le parti paierait également une amende.

M. Duff Conacher:

Le parti paierait également pour avoir trompé les électeurs.

Il faut mettre fin à cette pratique. À l'heure actuelle, aller voter, c'est comme jouer au poker. Les électeurs ne savent pas qui fait du bluff. C'est leur argent qui est sur la table.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Très bien.

M. Duff Conacher:

Ce problème brime les droits fondamentaux des électeurs. Il faut y mettre fin. Nous avons vu les dommages que cela a causés aux États-Unis et chez nous également.

Il faut y mettre fin et la seule façon de le faire, c'est d'imposer une lourde amende après le fait. Il est impossible de faire annuler le résultat d'une élection pour le motif qu'il est basé sur une fausse promesse.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exact.

M. Duff Conacher:

C'est impossible à prouver. On a essayé de le faire en Colombie-Britannique et en Ontario.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi de me faire l'avocat du diable un instant.

Il existe une distinction entre les tiers partis qui recueillent de l'argent et font la promotion de candidats ou d'enjeux et les partis enregistrés qui peuvent recueillir de l'argent dans le même but. À quoi rime cette distinction? Lorsque des Canadiens veulent faire un don à l'un des partis politiques pour exprimer leur opinion, ou souhaitent faire un don à une association d'entreprises ou un groupe écologique à but non lucratif, pourquoi le gouvernement veut-il savoir de quelle façon ils exercent leurs droits démocratiques en faisant un don, dans le cas présent?

M. Duff Conacher:

Voulez-vous parler des limites que le gouverement leur impose?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, les diverses limites et ce qui est permis ou non de faire. Ces règles confèrent un avantage dans le cadre de notre régime fiscal. Par exemple, elles confèrent un avantage en ce qui concerne les plafonds de dépenses des partis politiques par rapport à ceux imposés aux organisations de bienfaisance.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourquoi? Il se peut qu'un citoyen n'ait pas d'affinité particulière avec les partis politiques et souhaite plutôt faire un don à un groupe qui défend un enjeu qui lui tient à coeur. Cependant, les règles actuelles font en sorte qu'il est beaucoup plus avantageux de faire un don à un parti politique. N'est-il pas ironique que ce soit les partis politiques qui établissent les règles? Par ailleurs...

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. C'est pourquoi les règles sont ce qu'elles sont.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais est-ce juste?

M. Duff Conacher:

Non, ce n'est pas juste. Le reçu fiscal que vous recevez pour votre don...

(1040)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Parlons du plafond des dépenses, parce que c'est sur quoi porte le projet de loi C-76.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, il faudrait examiner toutes les limites imposées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez dit que ces limites devraient être réduites pour les tiers.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, et aussi pour les partis.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. Je ne savais pas que vous préconisiez une baisse du plafond des dépenses dans les deux cas.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. Il n’est pas nécessaire de fixer de limite si le système de financement politique est démocratique. La limite de don devrait être de 100 $, ou 200 $ tout au plus. C’est le montant que l’électeur moyen peut se permettre. Le financement proportionnel au vote recueilli devrait être rétabli, comme au Québec, parce que c’était l’aspect le plus démocratique du système de financement politique. C’était proportionnel, basé sur l’appui réel accordé par les électeurs. Le système actuel est fondé sur l’appui donné par de riches intérêts.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous avions un système proportionnel à un moment donné...

M. Duff Conacher:

C’était pour le financement. Faites-le pour les dons, en les limitant à 100 $. Vous n’aurez pas à vous inquiéter que les partis dépensent davantage, parce qu’ils n’auront pas l’argent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Parlons un instant des médias sociaux. À l’heure actuelle, vous parlez d’autoréglementation. S’il y a une entité étrangère, ou quelqu’un d’autre, qui enfreint l’une des dispositions prévues dans le projet de loi C-76 en achetant pour 500 000 $ de publicité sur Facebook, ce qui serait beaucoup, dans le but de promouvoir un parti politique ou un enjeu, à moins que Facebook ou le tiers, l’entité étrangère, ne le signale, comment saurons-nous que cela s’est produit?

M. Duff Conacher:

Un électeur à qui cette publicité n’est pas destinée pourrait néanmoins, malgré le microciblage, en prendre connaissance et, mécontent, la signaler à Élections Canada.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact. Avec toutes ces publicités concernant le pipeline, je ne sais pas ce qui se passe, qui paie pour ces publicités. Ils doivent le signaler à Élections Canada...

M. Duff Conacher:

La loi électorale prévoit déjà beaucoup de choses. L’annonceur doit s’identifier dans l’annonce.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quel est le rôle de Facebook à cet égard?

M. Duff Conacher:

Son rôle est de dire: « N’acceptons pas cet argent, dénonçons cette personne. »

M. Nathan Cullen:

À l’heure actuelle, en vertu du projet de loi C-76, quelle est sa responsabilité?

M. Duff Conacher:

C’est seulement si la publicité est d’origine étrangère que les médias sociaux ne peuvent pas l’accepter sciemment. S’il s’agit d’une publicité de source nationale, ils n’ont même pas à la déclarer. On leur fait entièrement confiance et leur raison d’être c’est de gagner de l’argent et non de déclarer une publicité qui sera arrêtée et ainsi se priver d’un revenu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quelqu’un a parlé de créer une cache de toutes les annonces politiques, comme nous le faisons pour la presse écrite, de telle sorte que toutes les annonces politiques soient connues d’Élections Canada. S’agissant de publicité politique, il serait indiqué d’appliquer la même exigence. Toute publicité politique que Twitter, Facebook ou Instagram feraient, ils auraient à la mettre en cache et déclarer qui l’a payée et quand elle a été diffusée.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. Nous recommandons que cela s’applique au cours des six mois précédant l’élection. Il s’agit d’appliquer les mesures légales existantes contre les fausses déclarations, les dépenses au-delà de la limite, les dépenses par des étrangers, qui sont prévues dans ce projet de loi, les dépenses par un parti non enregistré ou la publication d’une annonce par un tiers non identifié. Dans les six mois précédant l’élection, Élections Canada devrait être aux aguets.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je veux simplement dire en terminant, monsieur Gunn, que vous et les autres faites de l’excellent travail. Vous devriez être mieux soutenus.

M. Taylor Gunn:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tous ceux qui sont pour?

Le président:

D’accord, merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Gunn, monsieur Conacher, je vous remercie de vous être déplacés aujourd’hui. Ma première question s’adresse à M. Conacher.

Je sais que votre grand intérêt, c’est de promouvoir la démocratie et les moyens d’amener les gens de participer au processus démocratique. Pouvez-vous nous dire comment, à votre avis, le projet de loi C-76 favorisera la participation des électeurs? Quels points forts voyez-vous au projet de loi C-76?

M. Duff Conacher:

Vous voulez dire au sujet de la participation des électeurs?

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

M. Duff Conacher:

Eh bien, il y a des mesures pour accroître l’accessibilité des bureaux de scrutin. Réduire les obstacles à l’identification des électeurs, c’est une bonne chose, mais je ne pense pas que ce soit un gros problème.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Vous parlez de la carte d’information de l’électeur?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, étant donné que 29 pièces d’identité pouvaient être utilisées auparavant, je pense que quiconque voulait voter aurait pu satisfaire aux exigences. Mais c’est bien de le réduire, notamment pour les expatriés.

J’ai mentionné que ce sont tous des changements souhaitables. Je n’en ai pas parlé parce que nous n’avons pas vraiment de réserves à leur sujet. On peut discuter pour savoir si une personne qui est à l’étranger pour toujours et qui n’a pas l’intention de revenir devrait avoir le droit de vote, mais elle ne vote pas, alors ce n’est pas un gros problème. C’est pourquoi je dis que la plupart des changements sont bons, qu’ils vont dans la bonne direction, mais je ne pense pas qu’ils vont changer grand-chose à ce qui se passe réellement, parce que je ne pense pas qu’ils...

Même si Élections Canada ne peut qu’informer les gens sur la façon d’exercer leur droit de vote, quand cela a été fait au cours de la dernière élection, le taux de participation a augmenté plus qu’à toute autre élection depuis la Confédération.

Bon nombre des problèmes posés par la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections tenaient au fait qu’elle créait des situations injustes parce qu’elle ne traitait pas des 10 points que j’ai énumérés, pas plus d’ailleurs que le projet de loi. Il n’aura pas pour résultat de moderniser les élections. Il permet encore beaucoup de pratiques désuètes, injustes et antidémocratiques.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Seriez-vous d’accord pour dire que le projet de loi C-76 entraînera une plus grande participation des électeurs, que les dispositions sont là pour accroître leur participation par des moyens comme l’accessibilité, les cartes d’information de l’électeur et ainsi de suite? Êtes-vous d’accord avec cela?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, mais je ne dirais pas que cela va certainement augmenter la participation. Je ne ferais même pas de prédiction sur ce qui va se passer jeudi en Ontario, et encore moins sur ce qui va se passer dans un an et demi au niveau fédéral, mais cela réduit les obstacles, c’est certain.

(1045)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Monsieur Gunn, ayant entendu la déclaration de M. Conacher au sujet des cartes d’information de l’électeur, je sais que les jeunes ont beaucoup de difficulté à s’identifier, surtout les jeunes qui sont à l’école et qui n’ont pas de permis de conduire. Que pensez-vous de la carte d’information de l’électeur? Croyez-vous que ce soit une pièce d’identité importante pour les jeunes?

M. Taylor Gunn:

Oui. Je n’ai jamais eu de problème avec l’utilisation des cartes d’information de l’électeur au bureau de scrutin. Je pense que c’est en partie parce que je ne sais pas s’il y a des preuves solides d’abus. La question a été soulevée à l’occasion du débat sur la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, mais je ne sais pas s’il s’agissait de cas crédibles d’utilisation frauduleuse des cartes. Les autorités de gestion des élections ont tendance à faciliter le plus possible le vote. Ils ne veulent pas d’obstacles à l’accessibilité.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Pour les étudiants en particulier, cependant, j’ai entendu des témoignages et j’ai trois établissements d’enseignement postsecondaire dans ma circonscription; j’ai donc pu constater que la carte d’information de l’électeur a été une grosse affaire dans ces établissements. Je me demande si c’est ce que vous avez constaté et si vous voyez l’importance de cette mesure pour encourager le vote des étudiants.

M. Taylor Gunn:

Eh bien, si vous parlez du cas précis d’un jeune à l’université qui ne s’est peut-être pas occupé de changer son adresse, il n’obtiendrait pas la carte d’information de l’électeur de toute façon. À mon avis, ce qui nuit le plus à la participation des électeurs, ce n’est pas le facteur d’accessibilité, mais la motivation. Si les jeunes à l’université veulent voter, ils trouveront une façon de le faire, surtout avec le retrait de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections. Je ne pense donc pas que ce soit le plus gros problème au monde.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Seriez-vous d’accord pour dire que c’est une question importante pour les étudiants parce que cela facilite l’exercice de leur droit de vote? C’est un obstacle de moins à surmonter. Avec les autres mesures que nous prenons, comme les campagnes de sensibilisation et l’installation de bureaux de scrutin dans les universités et les collèges, c’est un facteur supplémentaire qui les encouragerait à voter.

M. Taylor Gunn:

Ce pourrait être, à condition que leur adresse soit correcte.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D’après ce que nous disent les témoins, non seulement les jeunes et les étudiants, mais surtout les aînés et les Autochtones, ils reconnaissent que la carte d’information de l’électeur a été très utile. C’est le témoignage que nous avons entendu, et c’est ce que j’ai constaté en tant que députée.

Monsieur Conacher, pour revenir à la notion d’argent et de limites, j’aimerais discuter de votre prémisse. Je me souviens que vous en avez également parlé dans votre témoignage précédent. Vous proposez une limite de 100 $ pour les donateurs et vous proposez cette limite parce que vous estimez qu’il en faut une et que 100 $ est un montant abordable pour la plupart des gens. Ai-je bien saisi votre pensée?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. Je me fonde sur le principe « une personne, une voix ». Pourquoi devrait-on permettre à quelqu’un qui a de l’argent d’en dépenser pour accroître son influence? Les statistiques montrent que tous les partis comptent habituellement, pour une part importante de leur financement annuel, atteignant 40 % pendant une campagne électorale, sur un petit groupe qui représente environ 5 % de donateurs. C’est fondamentalement antidémocratique. Les prêts devraient également être limités. Qu’un parti puisse s’adresser à une institution financière sous régime fédéral et obtenir un énorme prêt pour financer sa campagne électorale, puis accéder au pouvoir grâce à ce prêt, il devient forcément redevable à son prêteur. Cela crée un conflit d’intérêts.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Qu’en est-il de la personne qui n’a pas les moyens de payer 100 $?

M. Duff Conacher:

C’est là que le financement proportionnel au vote devrait être rétabli, mais comme base seulement. Il ne devrait pas être aussi élevé qu’auparavant parce que ce financement représentait pour certains partis 60, 70 ou 80 % de leurs fonds. Les partis devraient tout de même être incités à tendre la main aux électeurs, pas seulement au moment des élections. Vous pouvez faire campagne en lançant une série de fausses promesses, obtenir beaucoup de suffrages, puis bénéficier d’un financement proportionnel au vote recueilli jusqu’à la prochaine élection. Ce financement devrait simplement fournir des fonds de base. Il ne devrait pas dépasser un dollar par suffrage. C’est là que vous obtiendriez des fonds supplémentaires des électeurs de tout le pays.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je m’inquiète seulement de la personne qui n’a pas les moyens de payer 100 $.

M. Duff Conacher:

Bien sûr. Vous pourriez aller plus bas.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Si vous fixez une limite, c'est toujours un compromis pour quelqu’un...

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, mais beaucoup moins que maintenant. Le Québec l’a fait.

(1050)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Cela ne la rend pas acceptable.

M. Duff Conacher:

Cette formule a fait ses preuves et elle est beaucoup plus équitable que les pratiques de financement actuelles. Tous les partis comptent sur les riches donateurs. Je suis sûr que ces gens ont plus d’influence. La limite actuelle des dons facilite le recours aux prête-noms, comme le cas de SNC-Lavalin l’a démontré. Cela facilite aussi le regroupement, les lobbyistes qui organisent de grandes activités de financement chez eux de façon non officielle, puis disent avoir sollicité 100 personnes qui ont chacune donné le maximum, et je suis sûr que ces personnes ont aussi une influence énorme sur tous les partis. Nous ne savons tout simplement pas qui elles sont.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

La dernière question que j’aimerais poser, mais vous n’aurez pas le temps d’y répondre maintenant parce que mon temps est écoulé, c’est de savoir si vous avez fait des recherches sur l’influence que cet argent a sur les députés. C’est un domaine qui m’intéresse, puisque j’ai étudié l’éthique au niveau doctoral.

M. Duff Conacher:

Merci. Je vais répondre brièvement à cette question.

Des tests cliniques effectués un peu partout dans le monde ont montré que de très petits cadeaux changent la façon dont les gens prennent des décisions. Pour les médecins et...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, je comprends cela, mais je cherche des renseignements précis parce que je pense que, en tant que députés, nous arrivons ici en sachant que nous ne sommes pas influencés par cela, et je ne pense pas que ce soit impossible.

M. Duff Conacher:

Si la Loi sur l’accès à l’information s’appliquait à vos bureaux, je pourrais demander vos registres de communication pour voir si vous rappelez vos grands donateurs et vos collecteurs de fonds plus souvent et plus rapidement que les gens qui ne vous ont pas fait de don et qui n’ont pas voté pour vous. Mais la Loi sur l’accès à l’information ne s’applique pas aux bureaux des députés, alors l’étude ne peut pas être faite.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie nos deux témoins de s’être joints à nous aujourd’hui.

Monsieur Conacher, je sais que vous avez comparu devant le Comité pour parler du projet de loi C-50, mais je ne me souviens pas que vous vous soyez joint à nous pour le débat sur la commission de direction, la commission organisatrice, mais je me rappelle que vous en avez parlé dans votre déclaration préliminaire. Nous avons déposé un rapport en mars. Pendant nos délibérations sur cette question, Andy Fillmore nous a informés que le gouvernement n’aurait tout simplement pas le temps de présenter un projet de loi pour créer une telle commission et qu’il le ferait donc probablement au moyen d’un programme de subventions et de contributions.

Nous n’avons encore rien vu à ce sujet, mais j’aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez. Un modèle de subventions et de contributions aurait-il l’appui de Démocratie en surveillance, ou préféreriez-vous qu’il y ait quelque chose qui ait un fondement législatif réel pour créer une telle institution?

M. Duff Conacher:

Vous parlez de subventions et de contributions à des groupes tiers?

M. John Nater:

À un groupe tiers pour organiser une commission, oui.

M. Duff Conacher:

Je pense qu’il est préférable de confier la question à une commission centralisée qui aurait toutes sortes de règles d’équité quant à la participation, en fonction de critères comme le pourcentage de suffrages obtenus aux dernières élections, la présence d’un député à la Chambre. Supprimez tout ce qui est discrétionnaire.

Certains diront que le fait d’en confier la direction à des groupes tiers apportera un équilibre. Différents groupes s’en chargeront. Certains auront tel point de vue et l’appliqueront de telle façon parce qu’ils y ont un intérêt, et d’autres équilibreront les choses en apportant un point de vue différent. Je pense qu’il vaut mieux que ce soit aux mains d’une commission non partisane.

Je sais qu’Élections Canada n’en veut pas, mais il pourrait s’agir d’un commissaire relevant d’Élections Canada, comme c’est actuellement le cas, et il pourrait y avoir toutes sortes de règles d’équité. Comme les radiodiffuseurs utilisent les ondes, il faudra les obliger à les diffuser sur les ondes publiques. Ils nous exploitent déjà suffisamment et utilisent les ondes comme bon leur semble. Les ondes sont une ressource publique, et ils doivent être autorisés à les utiliser. Une élection est un événement important. Les débats devraient être transmis par tous les médias, que ceux-ci le veuillent ou non, et aux heures de grande écoute, le soir même.

Je pense que c’est une meilleure façon de procéder que la formule de subventions et de contributions.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez parlé de « modernisation » dans le titre du projet de loi. Certes, la technologie évolue, et rapidement. Les changements technologiques ont des conséquences positives et négatives. Vous avez certainement abordé l’une de ces conséquences en parlant de reportages en temps réel. Nous recevons déjà assez rapidement les nouvelles dans le cas des courses à la direction et des choses de ce genre.

Ensuite, vous avez aussi parlé de certains des plus… Je n’aime pas employer le terme « négatif », mais la publicité dans les médias sociaux a néanmoins des conséquences négatives. Il y a deux côtés à la médaille: les avantages et les défis de l’évolution rapide de la technologie. Je sais que vous avez déjà parlé de l’autosurveillance de Facebook.

Je veux qu’on aille un peu plus loin. J’aimerais que vous nous parliez un peu plus de l’influence étrangère sur Facebook, et je devrais dire sur d’autres plateformes de médias sociaux également — nous ne devrions pas nous limiter à Facebook, bien que ce soit certainement Facebook qui défraie la chronique — et de la façon dont nous pourrions envisager un régime d’application légitime pour vraiment combattre cette influence étrangère.

Je sais que M. Cullen a mentionné qu’un achat de publicité d’un demi-million de dollars sur Facebook est considérable parce que les annonces sont beaucoup moins chères.

À votre avis, en quoi consisterait un régime d’application de la loi pour lutter efficacement contre les puissances étrangères qui utilisent des plateformes nationales?

(1055)

M. Duff Conacher:

Je pense qu’il devrait s’appliquer à tous les médias, y compris aux médias sociaux. Vous pourriez diffuser une annonce radiophonique dans un petit marché sans vous identifier comme tiers ou être enregistré, et Élections Canada pourrait n’en rien savoir. Vous pourriez le faire dans un journal communautaire et Élections Canada ne le saurait pas plus. Il est cependant probable que les annonces télévisées ne lui échapperaient pas.

Il suffirait d’exiger que toutes les entreprises de médias, classiques et sociaux, déclarent à Élections Canada toutes les annonces liées aux élections pendant les six mois qui précèdent l’élection. Donnez-lui le pouvoir de mettre un terme aux fausses publicités et à celles dans lesquelles les tiers ne sont pas identifiés. Élections Canada doit savoir qui a payé l’annonce, où le ciblage s’est fait, et tous les autres détails. Il sera alors en mesure de faire respecter les limites de dépenses qui s’appliquent pendant la période préélectorale.

Autrement, Élections Canada ne sera pas au courant des publicités. Les règles seront en place. Ne laissez tout simplement pas les entreprises de médias sociaux s’autoréglementer parce qu’elles sont intéressées à faire de l’argent, pas à cesser une publicité qui déplairait à quelqu’un.

M. Taylor Gunn:

L’une des choses que je n’ai pas remarquées, et je me demande si cela vous préoccupe, c’est que, relativement aux moyens pour rendre le processus électoral plus sûr, le projet de loi ne mentionne pas les tabulateurs ou les machines auxquels les autorités électorales ont tendance à recourir afin de surmonter la difficulté de trouver des gens pour travailler le jour du scrutin. Le fabricant de ces machines, leur provenance et leur utilisation sont, à mes yeux, des éléments très importants de la sûreté du processus électoral.

Je me demande s’il y a un autre projet de loi qui porte sur ce sujet. Est-ce que vous laissez cela à la direction d’Élections Canada?

M. John Nater:

C’est une bonne question. J'ai bien l'impression que mon temps est écoulé.

Personnellement, au cours de ces 18 derniers mois, j’ai voté de différentes manières. Pour les élections provinciales, nous utilisons ces tabulatrices. Dans notre province, nous avons voté en ligne pour les candidats à la chefferie. Lors de la course à la direction de l’an dernier, nous avons aussi utilisé une tabulatrice. Il existe maintenant toutes sortes de choix.

Je me demande, monsieur Gunn, si vous offrez différentes méthodes de vote aux étudiants, ou si vous leur demandez simplement de tracer un x sur un morceau de papier?

M. Taylor Gunn:

Non, les gens nous ont demandé de faire voter les étudiants en ligne, pensant qu'ils trouveraient cela plus facile et plus intéressant. Nous en avons beaucoup débattu. Maintenant, je trouve le vote en ligne un peu ridicule du point de vue de la sécurité, mais c'est une opinion bien personnelle. Je commence à avoir des doutes au sujet de ces machines après en avoir discuté avec différentes personnes et avec des entités gouvernementales avec lesquelles nous n'avions pas l'habitude de traiter. Certaines personnes sont profondément convaincues que rien n'échappe au piratage.

Je me demande s'il serait plus sage de résoudre ce problème en facilitant l'utilisation des machines ou en investissant pour embaucher un plus grand nombre de personnes pendant les journées électorales.

Je crois aussi que tout peut se faire pirater. Je me demande si ce fait préoccupe le Comité. Vous cherchez à sécuriser le processus électoral en améliorant ce projet de loi, mais vous ignorez peut-être un aspect qu'il serait sage d'examiner aussi.

M. John Nater:

Je vous dirai que le Comité sur la réforme électorale en a brièvement débattu, mais pas directement dans le cadre de cette étude.

Je vous remercie pour vos observations.

Désolé, monsieur le président, j'ai vraiment dépassé mon temps de parole.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez deux minutes. Je suis sûr que vous êtes capable de réduire une intervention de sept minutes à deux minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Cette question s'adresse à M. Gunn et à M. Conacher.

Considérez-vous votre organisme comme un tiers dans le cadre des élections?

M. Duff Conacher:

Pardon?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Messieurs, considérez-vous vos organismes comme étant de tierces parties dans le cadre des élections?

M. Duff Conacher:

Dans le cadre de la prochaine élection?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De n'importe quelle élection.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, nous sommes une tierce partie. Toutefois, nous ne faisons pas habituellement de publicité. Nous divulguons nos bulletins de rendement sur les plateformes des partis dans des communiqués de presse, puis nous nous fions simplement à la couverture médiatique.

M. Taylor Gunn:

Notre organisme est non partisan. Il n'est pas considéré comme un tiers qui vise un résultat politique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

M. Taylor Gunn:

Nous avons reçu des fonds de l'étranger, alors je crains que nous tombions dans cette catégorie, mais comme nous sommes non partisans, je pense que nous y échapperons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Conacher, j'ai lu dans votre site Web que 99,9 % des dons que vous recevez sont inférieurs à 150 $. Vous nous avez dit que nous devrions limiter les dons à 100 $ et que les grands donateurs vous inquiètent. Cette observation est très juste, mais quels donateurs se trouvent dans votre 0,1 % restant et d'où viennent-ils?

M. Duff Conacher:

Pardon?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À quoi correspondent les dons du 0,1 % qui dépassent 150 $, et d'où viennent généralement vos donateurs?

M. Duff Conacher:

Quelques personnes donnent plus. L'une d'elles nous a donné la grosse somme de 25 000 $ au cours de ces dernières années. C'est tout. La plupart de nos donateurs ne nous apportent que de petites contributions. Vous pourriez limiter les sommes enregistrées à 200 $. Je ne pense pas que ce soit nécessaire, parce que ces dons ne sont pas très élevés et ne confèrent pas beaucoup d'influence. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'identifier leurs donateurs.

J'ai aussi suggéré qu'Élections Canada mène des audits chez les tierces parties et ne permette pas aux gens de choisir leur vérificateur. Cette règle préviendrait aussi la non-divulgation des dons de plus de 200 $ effectués à l'encontre de la règle sur la divulgation. Si vous accordez à Élections Canada le pouvoir de mener les audits, je pense que vous pourrez maintenir la limite permise des dons à 200 $.

(1100)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste une question à poser avant de passer la parole au député suivant.

Trouvez-vous que la personne qui a fait le don de 25 000 $ a plus d'influence sur votre organisme que vos autres donateurs?

M. Duff Conacher:

Cette personne en aurait si elle communiquait avec moi, ce qu'elle n'a jamais fait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Duff Conacher:

Je reconnais que ces dons... Oui, bien sûr. Je l'ai reconnu quand j'ai comparu devant vous au sujet du projet de loi C-50. Voilà pourquoi il faut les limiter. Si nous parlons de la limite à imposer aux dons que les groupes de citoyens tiers reçoivent, comme le recommande le Forum des politiques publiques dans son dernier rapport, il faudrait aussi surveiller les sociétés de propriété étrangère, qui peuvent transférer l'argent à l'interne pour fournir un soutien de tierce partie.

Il faudrait vraiment examiner cela, en commençant par déterminer combien les divers groupes d'intérêts dépensent sur différentes choses entre les élections. On fait cela après les élections, mais il faudrait le faire avant les élections. Ensuite, nous pourrons déterminer la nécessité de limiter les dons que reçoivent les groupes de citoyens à des fins précises.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je serais curieux de savoir si vous avez déjà accepté des dons venant de l'étranger?

M. Duff Conacher:

Non.

Le président:

J'ai une question à vous poser.

Vous avez indiqué tout au début que quatre provinces offrent à leurs électeurs le choix de cocher « aucun des candidats ci-dessus ». Combien d'électeurs cochent cette case, à peu près?

M. Duff Conacher:

Nous avons calculé un taux de 0,5 % en Ontario à la dernière élection. Aucun des organismes électoraux n’informe les électeurs de ce droit. Nous nous préparons à poursuivre Élections Ontario pour ne pas l’avoir fait.

Le président:

Ce n'est pas inscrit sur le bulletin de vote?

M. Duff Conacher:

Non. Il faut refuser de voter ou refuser son bulletin de vote. L'électeur doit le redonner aussitôt qu'il le reçoit. La plupart des gens feraient cela si les organismes électoraux les informaient de ce droit. Pour la troisième élection de suite, Élections Ontario a refusé de le faire; voilà pourquoi nous intentons un recours au tribunal. Il faudra inscrire « aucun des candidats ci-dessus », puis laisser un espace quelques lignes en dessous pour que les gens puissent inscrire pour quelles raisons ils ont coché cette case. On pourrait alors en faire rapport aux partis par catégorie: les plateformes environnementales ne poussaient pas assez loin, plusieurs personnes n'aimaient pas le chef, ou d'autres raisons. Ces commentaires seraient extrêmement précieux. Cette méthode augmenterait le taux de participation et indiquerait aux partis les raisons pour lesquelles les gens ne veulent pas aller voter.

En ce qui concerne l'augmentation du taux de participation électorale, je travaille pour un organisme caritatif, Democracy Education Network, où nous menons des initiatives sur la participation électorale. Nous en avons deux en cours en Ontario, et nous les avons menées lors de la dernière élection. L'une d'elles s'intitule VoteParty.ca. Ces initiatives visent les électeurs, parce que la meilleure façon d'accroître la participation électorale est d'inciter les électeurs à motiver les personnes qui ne votent pas. Cette adresse VoteParty.ca permet aux électeurs de fixer un rendez-vous pour aller voter avec quelqu'un qui ne veut pas le faire. Nous avons aussi VotePromise.ca, où les électeurs peuvent promettre de motiver une personne peu intéressée à voter.

Je vais répondre très rapidement à quelques questions posées tout à l'heure. Tous les messages devraient inciter des électeurs à motiver des personnes peu intéressées à voter. C'est ainsi que l'on augmentera les taux de participation. Les annonces publicitaires n'y parviennent pas, parce que les gens qui ne votent pas ne les regardent pas. Voilà pourquoi ils ne votent pas: ils n'écoutent pas vos messages.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si la case « aucun des candidats ci-dessus » gagne les élections, qu'arrivera-t-il?

M. Duff Conacher:

Si la case « aucun des candidats ci-dessus » gagne, alors il faudra s'attaquer à ce problème. Je crois...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On ne peut pas imprimer cette case sur le bulletin de vote si l'on n'a pas prévu la possibilité qu'elle gagne les élections.

M. Duff Conacher:

Évidemment, mais montrez-moi un processus qui s'y rapproche, et nous discuterons de ce qu'il faudra faire. Cela ne s'est produit qu'une fois, à l'élection d'un gouverneur du Nevada. Selon les règles du Nevada, l'élection demeure valide. De toute évidence, ce résultat porte atteinte à la légitimité du candidat qui gagne. Sachant qu'un grand nombre d'électeurs ne l'aiment pas, le gagnant doit surveiller son comportement de très près.

Le président:

Je vous remercie tous deux d'être venus. Votre témoignage est intéressant et nous aide beaucoup. Il faisait bon vous revoir ici.

Nous allons suspendre pendant que les prochains témoins s'installent.

(1105)

(1115)

Le président:

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 110e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Au cours de cette deuxième heure, nous entendrons Henry Milner, chercheur associé, Département de science politique, Université de Montréal.

Monsieur Milner, merci d'être venu. Vous pouvez nous présenter votre allocution.

M. Henry Milner (chercheur associé, Département de science politique, Université de Montréal, à titre personnel):

J’avais l’impression erronée que j’allais faire partie d'un groupe de cinq témoins, mais il s'avère que les cinq noms que j'ai lus sont ceux de toutes les personnes qui témoigneront ce matin et non pendant cette heure. Je n'ai malheureusement pas préparé une longue analyse du projet de loi C-76. Je vais seulement vous parler des enjeux qui m'intéressent particulièrement et qui pourront enrichir votre étude.

Tout d'abord, vous constaterez que j'ai déjà participé à une étude de ce genre. Je suis heureux de me présenter cette fois-ci avec une attitude principalement positive au lieu de venir exprimer des critiques négatives, ce que les gens de ma profession ont tendance à faire. Je me suis surtout penché sur la réforme électorale, ce qui était un peu moins positif que la présentation que je vais faire, je crois.

Il me semble que j'ai comparu devant ce même comité, mais de l'autre côté de la rue, en face du Parlement, pour critiquer la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections et pour aborder certains problèmes que j'y voyais. Si je ne m'abuse, le projet de loi C-33 les a corrigés heureusement à l'époque. Je pensais que ce problème était désormais résolu, mais il semblerait que le processus se poursuive aujourd'hui. On l'a élargi, comme vous le savez bien sûr, en y ajoutant plusieurs domaines.

À mon avis, l'aspect crucial est l'accès aux renseignements qui éclaireraient le vote des électeurs. Je me spécialise en connaissances politiques. J'ai publié de nombreux ouvrages à ce sujet, particulièrement aussi sur les connaissances qu'ont les jeunes. J'ai comparé cela dans différents pays, dont le Canada. J'ai aussi comparé l'accès physique à l'isoloir dans le cadre des restrictions que prévoyait la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections et que le projet de loi C-76 élimine maintenant.

Comme mon travail portait essentiellement sur le savoir politique, je me suis penché sur les dispositions de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections qui limitaient la capacité d'Élections Canada diffuser de l'information surtout aux jeunes, mais pas seulement aux jeunes, afin de mieux préparer ces électeurs à voter le moment venu. Il me semble que ces dispositions du projet de loi C-33 se retrouvent dans le projet de loi C-76. En effet, Élections Canada peut maintenant encourager les jeunes à s'inscrire à la liste électorale avant l'âge de 18 ans. On y retrouve d'autres aspects qui ne visent pas uniquement les jeunes, mais les électeurs handicapés et autres. Je suis très heureux de constater cela.

Je ne vois dans ce projet de loi qu'un aspect manquant. En examinant tout le processus électoral, et je sais que l'on en a discuté un peu pendant les consultations, on devrait peut-être réglementer aussi les débats des chefs pendant les campagnes électorales. On pourrait normaliser le processus pour que les spectateurs sachent à quoi s'attendre. Je reconnais que cette question est très complexe, et je ne voudrais surtout pas retarder l'entrée en vigueur de cette loi, mais je trouve que cet aspect manque à une loi qui vise à prévoir tous les aspects de la gestion des campagnes électorales.

Mon autre objection a trait non pas au contenu de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, mais à l'administration de la dernière campagne. Cette campagne a duré trop longtemps. Vous vous souviendrez qu'elle a duré 11 semaines, si je ne m'abuse. Ce problème découlait d'un changement, auquel j'avais moi-même participé, visant à établir une date fixe pour les élections. J'ai témoigné à ce sujet principalement devant le comité sénatorial chargé de cette question. J'en ai discuté à d'autres endroits, dont à la chambre des communes de Londres.

(1120)



En adoptant une date fixe pour les élections, et l'élection de 2015 a eu lieu à une date fixe, on a eu l'idée bête de doubler la durée de la campagne électorale. Cela a bien sûr éclaboussé négativement les gens qui, comme moi, favorisent la date fixe. Les gens disaient qu'il n'y avait plus de structure, que la campagne n'en finissait plus et que l'on dépensait beaucoup trop d'argent. Je suis heureux de constater que nous avons rétabli la campagne de sept semaines que prévoit la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. À mon avis, ce facteur est extrêmement important, et j'appuie plusieurs procédures qui s'y rattachent. Je n'ai rien de particulier à observer à leur propos.

Je m'inquiète cependant beaucoup de ce qui risque d'arriver. La prochaine élection devrait avoir lieu dans un an et demi, et je crains que nous n'ayons pas le temps de faire entrer cette loi en vigueur à temps pour qu'elle fonctionne bien. Je suis déchiré entre le besoin d'améliorer le projet de loi C-76 et le désir de le mettre en vigueur aussitôt que possible. Je crois qu'il est cependant plus important de l'adopter rapidement, particulièrement à cause de ses dispositions sur la diffusion de l'information. Nous tenons à ce qu'Élections Canada puisse à nouveau lancer ses différents programmes d'information.

Je ne sais pas combien d'entre vous le savent, mais il se passera quelque chose d'assez absurde la semaine prochaine à Toronto. Peut-être qu'aucun de vous ne sait qu'un groupe de citoyens liés à la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants... une seconde, je crois que j'ai l'information ici. Le Conseil des Canadiens, la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants et quelques autres personnes ont engagé un cabinet d'avocats pour contester la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. J'ai rédigé quelques-uns des affidavits pour cette contestation, qui arrive seulement maintenant devant la Cour suprême de l'Ontario. Les procureurs du gouvernement se préparent à nous contre-interroger sur notre contestation de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Nous sommes assez nombreux, mais vous n'entendrez que quelques-uns d'entre nous exprimer notre opinion. Ces avocats vont nous contre-interroger sur une loi qui très bientôt, nous l'espérons, n'existera plus.

Je suppose que les rouages gouvernementaux tournent au ralenti. J'ai trouvé cela étrange, mais en discutant avec les avocats du cabinet qui gère ce recours, je leur ai demandé pour quelle raison ils ne laissent pas simplement tout tomber. Ils m'ont répondu qu'ils n'étaient pas sûrs que la loi qui remplacera la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections entre en vigueur à temps, alors ils sont tenus de poursuivre le recours. Tout cela aura lieu à Toronto la semaine prochaine.

Enfin, je tiens à souligner que j'espère de tout coeur que ce processus progressera rapidement pour que tout fonctionne bien pendant la prochaine élection.

Je me dois d'expliquer que mon expérience de la réforme électorale m'a rendu un peu cynique quant au fonctionnement de ce comité et à ce qui se passe comparé à ce qui devrait se passer. J'ai comparu devant ce comité avec les nombreux autres experts en science politique et en autres disciplines. La grande majorité des experts qui ont témoigné devant vous favorisaient la réforme électorale. Il semblait que l'on allait écouter nos voix dans le cadre de ce processus, puis je n'ai pas besoin de vous le rappeler, vous savez ce qu'il en est ressorti.

Je ne veux pas paraître cynique, mais je tiens à souligner l'importance de faire avancer ce projet de loi pour qu'il entre en vigueur assez tôt afin de bien fonctionner à la prochaine élection.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d'être venu et merci pour ces observations. Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions.

Nous commencerons par M. Simms.

(1125)

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Milner, c'est un plaisir de vous revoir. Pardon. J'aurais dû vous appeler Dr Milner, n'est-ce pas?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour vous, c'est Dr Milner, oui monsieur.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Scott Simms:

C'est vrai. Désormais, je vous appellerai Dr Milner.

Je tiens à vous remercier d'être venu et de nous faire part de vos opinions et de votre expérience.

Je voulais justement commencer par vous poser des questions sur votre expérience. Je vois ici dans votre biographie que vous mentionnez des universités en Finlande, en France, en Australie et en Nouvelle-Zélande. Je ne connais l'Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande que par le fait qu'ils suivent eux aussi le système de Westminster. J'ai visité les autres pays mentionnés, mais je ne possède aucune expertise sur ces pays.

Quelles pratiques y avez-vous observées, qui vous intéressent et que vous recommandez que le Canada adopte, ou qu'il a adoptées? Autrement dit, au cours de vos voyages à l'étranger, avez-vous observé une pratique exemplaire que vous pourriez nous présenter ici?

M. Henry Milner:

Permettez-moi de dire, au sujet des aspects précis du projet de loi C-76, que je pense que nous faisons ce que nous pouvons. Nous n’allons pas changer tout notre système institutionnel pour qu’il soit comme le leur, mais au sein de notre institution, je pense que nous l’appliquons de façon appropriée. Ils ont d’autres institutions. Je ne peux pas parler au nom de tous les pays, mais essentiellement, ils ne seraient certainement pas empêchés d’informer les gens et d’offrir divers types d’accès institutionnel, surtout aux jeunes.

Je pourrais vous parler de mon dernier livre, The Internet Generation et de quelques exemples très intéressants d’autres pays que j’ai visités, notamment la Norvège, la Suède, la Finlande, etc., pour ce qui est d’informer les jeunes sur la politique. En fait, si nous avons un peu plus de temps, j’aimerais vous en parler parce que c’est très intéressant. Ce n’est pas directement pertinent, mais c’est très intéressant et c’est quelque chose que nous pourrions faire à la fois au provincial ainsi qu'au fédéral.

Plus précisément — et cela me ramène à mon dernier point —, l’un des éléments que nous pourrions apprendre, c’est de changer notre système électoral. J’ai discuté et écrit sur la façon dont je pense qu’un système proportionnel contribue en fait, au fil du temps, à mieux informer les citoyens. C’est un long argument théorique fondé sur des données probantes, entre autres, mais je l’ai déjà fait dans le passé et je pense qu’on peut le faire.

Si nous nous intéressons à des citoyens qui — encore une fois, rien de tout cela n’est absolu et noir ou blanc — sont plus susceptibles de s’informer sur des questions pertinentes avant une élection, je dirais que nous pouvons apprendre de ces pays. Comme vous le savez, la plupart des pays européens ont un système de représentation proportionnelle, tout comme la Nouvelle-Zélande et l’Australie. Il y a une relation, mais encore une fois, ce n’est pas un enjeu d'importance à ce comité.

M. Scott Simms:

Non, et c’est très bien. Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Nous avons peut-être quelques différences à ce sujet en ce qui concerne la représentation.

Néanmoins, à plus grande échelle, je me souviens que lorsque j’étais ici et que nous discutions de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, nous avons beaucoup parlé du fait qu’il s’agit d’un droit constitutionnel de vote, ce qui est certainement le cas dans de nombreux autres pays. Par conséquent, il me semble que d’autres pays prennent la question beaucoup plus au sérieux que nous, dont la France. Pensez-vous que nous avons fait un pas de plus? Que recommanderiez-vous pour aller plus loin?

M. Henry Milner:

À ce stade-ci, je crois qu'en adoptant le projet de loi C-76, je recommanderais d’ajouter des éléments comme les débats politiques. Je pense toutefois que nous ne devrions pas dire que la question est close, surtout du côté des connaissances politiques. Je pense qu’il y a des mesures que nous pourrions prendre.

Un des problèmes... Je ne devrais pas dire que c’est un problème. Au Canada, ce qui n’est pas le cas dans les autres pays que nous avons mentionnés, nous avons deux paliers de gouvernement différents et l’éducation relève du provincial. Dans ces autres pays, le lien entre le savoir politique et le système d’éducation par l’éducation civique passe par les mêmes intervenants qui s’intéressent aux élections nationales et ainsi de suite.

Ici, bien sûr, l’éducation relève du gouvernement provincial. Bien qu’Élections Canada ait certaines relations avec les institutions scolaires et je ne pense pas que les gouvernements provinciaux y voient un problème, il n’en demeure pas moins que dans les pays où je sais qu’il y a une relation très étroite entre...

(1130)

M. Scott Simms:

Oui. Je ne vois pas l'organisme CIVIX se plaindre des inhibitions...

M. Henry Milner:

Taylor Gunn, qui était ici il y a une heure, aurait certainement parlé de tout cela.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui. Je ne pense pas qu’ils soient confrontés à des facteurs inhibiteurs lorsqu’ils entrent dans les systèmes provinciaux en tant que tels et tiennent des élections.

M. Henry Milner:

Mais il se fait plus d’éducation civique dans d’autres pays que dans la plupart des...

M. Scott Simms:

Eh bien, c’était ma question, monsieur. Mon Dieu, vous êtes plus intelligent que je ne le pensais.

Il me reste peu de temps, mais vous avez peut-être quelque chose à dire à ce sujet. En outre, il faut permettre à Élections Canada d’avoir plus de liberté pour aller au-delà du simple fait de dire aux gens où et quand aller voter, ce qui était la question litigieuse. Il y a aussi le fait que nous permettons aux personnes âgées de 16 à 18 ans de s’inscrire pour voter — ou est-ce à 14 ans maintenant? Néanmoins, ils peuvent s’inscrire pour voter.

Comment Élections Canada peut-il en faire plus sur le plan de l’éducation, maintenant que le projet de loi C-76 leur accorde la liberté dont nous venons de parler?

M. Henry Milner:

Eh bien, s’ils recommencent à faire ce qu’ils faisaient quand j’étais en quelque sorte consultant, c’est déjà un grand pas. À cause du système fédéral, vous ne pouvez pas demander à Élections Canada de faire ce que fait le ministère de l’Éducation de la province en ce qui concerne le programme d’études pour les élèves du secondaire. Oui, ils peuvent fournir de l’information à laquelle les étudiants auraient accès, mais je parle du programme d’études à un certain âge, des jeunes de 16 ans, dans un système scolaire public. Le genre d’information qu’ils obtiendront dépend vraiment des provinces. Certains font un meilleur travail que d’autres, mais c’est la nature du Canada.

Je serais heureux de vous dire ce que font les autres pays, mais pour l’instant, je n’irai pas jusque-là.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur Milner.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

Je commence mon petit chronomètre. Le premier tour est-il de sept minutes? D’accord.

Vous savez, bien sûr, que la Commission des débats politiques, que vous semblez appuyer, ne fait pas partie de ce projet de loi. Ce projet de loi ne contient rien au sujet d’une commission chargée des débats des chefs politiques.

M. Henry Milner:

Vous avez tout à fait raison. Je disais que c’était la seule chose qui manquait.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est exact. Personnellement, je pense qu’une commission chargée des débats est une mauvaise idée, mais le fait de l'exclure de la législation a au moins ce mérite, c’est-à-dire que vous avez maintenant une loi qui, au bout du compte, détermine le seuil pour les partis. À moins que vous ne les invitiez tous— les trois saveurs des marxistes-léninistes qui sont là, les libertariens, le parti None of the Above et tous les autres...

M. Nathan Cullen: Et le CCF.

M. Scott Reid: ... c’est exact. Dans ce cas-ci, c’est probablement Mme May qui va devant les tribunaux et dit que c’est une violation de la Constitution.

Je continue de croire qu’il y a un risque que cela se produise. S’il s’agit d’un programme parrainé par le gouvernement, avec des fonds publics, la règle générale veut que la Charte s’applique lorsque le gouvernement a participé à la mise sur pied de quelque chose, même si ceux qui l’ont exécuté ne sont pas les agents directs du gouvernement. Je pense que c’est l’avantage de prendre ces mesures de façon informelle; c’est-à-dire que la Charte des droits ne s’applique pas au magazine Maclean’s, à CTV ou à qui que ce soit d’autre.

Quoi qu’il en soit, étant donné que je me suis engagé dans cette voie, pourquoi ne pas nous faire part de vos réflexions sur une commission chargée des débats et en particulier sur le problème relatif au fait qu'un agent du gouvernement décide qui peut entrer et qui ne peut pas entrer?

M. Henry Milner:

Qui participe au débat?

M. Scott Reid: Oui.

M. Henry Milner: Je n’y ai pas beaucoup réfléchi, mais de façon générale, je trouve que n’est pas une bonne idée d’en débattre à la dernière minute avant une campagne électorale, parce que les règles seront alors fondées selon la situation particulière à ce moment-là. Il serait préférable d’en débattre lorsqu’il n’y a pas de campagne électorale. Ensuite, vous essayez d’établir des règles générales qui s’appliquent au-delà de la situation particulière et de créer une sorte de commission ou commissaire neutre, dont le rôle sera de mettre en oeuvre ces règles.

De façon générale, je pense que c’est une meilleure idée. Je ne pense pas que nous fassions un mauvais travail au Canada, mais nous sommes toujours dans l’incertitude jusqu’à la dernière minute pour ce qui est du nombre de débats, des règles et des personnes qui participeront au débat. Je ne pense pas que ce soit une bonne façon de procéder. Je crois que nous pouvons faire mieux.

(1135)

M. Scott Reid:

C’est le désordre, je vous l’accorde. Je vais vous donner un autre exemple de désordre.

L’Ontario est sur le point de tenir des élections. Nous ne savons pas qui sera le nouveau gouvernement. Nous pourrions imaginer un scénario électoral très bien organisé, comme celui de la République populaire de Chine ou de la République démocratique populaire de Corée du Nord, où nous saurons exactement qui gagnera au préalable. Je dis simplement que le désordre est en quelque sorte inhérent à la démocratie.

Je me permets de vous soumettre, comme contre-proposition, l’idée que les normes croissent culturellement de façon désordonnée, mais qu'elles émergent. Quant à savoir ce qui constitue un ensemble raisonnable de débats, les sujets à aborder, s’il devrait y avoir des débats spécialisés, quel devrait être le rapport entre les langues française et anglaise, la durée des interventions et ainsi de suite... À mon avis, il vaut mieux qu’ils émergent de façon organique et qu'ils soient généralement acceptés dans la société. Si l’on estime que c’est trop restrictif, il y aura des pressions pour créer un nouveau débat au-delà de ceux qui existent déjà. Cela s’est effectivement produit lors des dernières élections.

Cela ne semble-t-il pas être une solution solide que nous n’avons pas vraiment eu la chance d’élaborer, compte tenu du fait que la dernière fois, nous avons pu voir émerger un nouveau formatage qui ne s’était jamais produit auparavant?

M. Henry Milner:

Encore une fois, je ne veux pas entrer dans les détails. Ma position générale dans ces domaines, et c’est parce que je sais ce qui se passe dans d’autres pays, est que plus les règles sont claires au préalable, meilleure est la situation dans son ensemble. C’est pourquoi je suis en faveur d’élections à date fixe. Tout le monde — les candidats potentiels, les médias, les gens qui vont frapper aux portes, les électeurs — sait quand auront lieu les prochaines élections et ils doivent se préparer en conséquence.

Il ne s’agit pas seulement de la stratégie des partis politiques. C’est la culture politique générale. C’est la même chose pour les débats. Il y a certaines choses qui sont considérées comme allant de soi. C’est mon principe général. Nous pouvons également parler de cas particuliers.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous avez soulevé la question de la réforme électorale. Vous avez comparu devant le Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale dont je faisais partie. J’ai beaucoup aimé votre témoignage.

Depuis ce temps, de l'eau a coulé sous les ponts, tant au niveau fédéral que dans les deux provinces qui sont des expérimentatrices permanentes dans ce domaine, c’est-à-dire la Colombie-Britannique et l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Elles ont adopté des approches quelque peu différentes quant à la façon de s’y prendre dans les années à venir. J’aimerais avoir vos commentaires sur les deux voies empruntées par les deux provinces.

Je pose cette question en particulier, parce qu'elle sera possiblement d'actualité après les prochaines élections fédérales. Il est bon d’obtenir des commentaires à l’avance.

M. Henry Milner:

J’ajoute que vous devriez inclure le Québec. Tous les partis, sauf les libéraux, au Québec sont maintenant en faveur de la réforme électorale. Cela fait partie de leur programme électoral à l’approche des élections du 1er octobre. Bien que ce ne soit pas comme en Colombie-Britannique, où il y aura un référendum et — si le camp du oui l’emporte —qu'il amorcera le processus. Les autres partis au Québec se sont tous engagés à présenter une proposition de représentation proportionnelle d’ici un an, s’ils forment le gouvernement. Ils sont plutôt d’accord sur les éléments de cette proposition, qui est l’une des trois propositions qui seront présentées en Colombie-Britannique.

Vous savez peut-être qu’elle n’a pas encore été acceptée par l’Assemblée législative de la Colombie-Britannique, mais elle a été proposée par le procureur général. Je pense que c’est une bonne proposition, à savoir que le premier vote soit fondé sur le principe et que s’il y a une majorité pour le premier vote... en d’autres termes, la représentation proportionnelle par opposition au système uninominal majoritaire à un tour. Si la représentation proportionnelle gagne plus de la moitié, il y a trois versions et les électeurs choisiront parmi les trois.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est le modèle que la Nouvelle-Zélande a utilisé il y a 25 ans.

M. Henry Milner:

Le modèle utilisé par la Nouvelle-Zélande ou l’Écosse... Je préfère la version écossaise, mais elle est très semblable. C’est celui qui a été adopté au Québec par les autres partis, à l’exception des libéraux au pouvoir.

J’en sais moins sur ce qui se passe à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Je suppose qu’ils attendent toujours que le premier ministre établisse le mécanisme qui permettra la tenue d’un référendum, mais je pense qu’il se passera quelque chose là aussi.

(1140)

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d’être de retour, monsieur Milner, accompagné de votre optimisme continu saupoudré d'une dose de scepticisme.

M. Henry Milner:

J’y travaille depuis longtemps.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Certains d’entre nous l’ont fait aussi, mais peut-être pas aussi longtemps.

J'aimerais parler un peu du processus parce que je pense que c’est aussi important que le fond du projet de loi. En principe, nous avions au Canada une tradition selon laquelle un parti ne changeait pas les règles du jeu, si vous voulez, unilatéralement, ou invoquait la clôture jusqu’à l’adoption de la loi sur le manque d’intégrité des élections. Est-ce exact?

M. Henry Milner:

Cela dépend des lois que vous considérez comme des lois procédurales et ainsi de suite.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Lois sur le vote.

M. Henry Milner:

En ce qui concerne le vote... Je pense que c’est généralement vrai. Je ne suis pas un historien politique et je peux donc me tromper. En général, cela a été accepté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous n’avons pas pu trouver d'exemples.

M. Henry Milner:

Vous pourriez peut-être, mais je n’en connais aucun.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est semblable à ce que M. Conacher a dit plus tôt dans son témoignage, à savoir que la nomination unilatérale d’un organisme de surveillance rend le travail de l'organisme en question plus difficile.

M. Henry Milner:

Oui, je pense que c’est un bon point.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Parce qu’ils doivent jouer le rôle de l’arbitre et vous ne voulez jamais qu’ils aient la moindre tache ou quoi que ce soit d’autre.

M. Henry Milner:

Je pense que c’est le problème des institutions américaines.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact. Nous regardons vers le sud et observons de façon récurrente des cas de juges soupçonnés, de règles, de découpage arbitraire des circonscriptions électorales. Nous avons pu éviter cela au Canada jusqu’à récemment. Vous avez fait mention au début de votre témoignage que les avocats du gouvernement plaideront en faveur de la loi sur le manque d’intégrité des élections la semaine prochaine à Toronto.

M. Henry Milner:

Exactement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils sont tenus de le faire parce que le gouvernement n’a pas proposé le projet de loi C-33, qu’il a présenté il y a un an et demi. Si ce projet de loi avait été déposé il y a un an et demi, seriez-vous toujours devant les tribunaux et dépenserions-nous l’argent des contribuables pour contester ce dont le gouvernement a fait mention?

M. Henry Milner:

Non. J’ai supposé que c’était le cas; je n’aurais peut-être pas dû. C’est pourquoi j’ai été plutôt surpris lorsque le cabinet d’avocats de Toronto a communiqué avec moi il y a quelques mois pour me dire qu’il allait être saisi de cette affaire. J’ai demandé quel était le cas. Ils ont parlé de l'intégrité des élections...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez demandé si cela avait déjà été fait. Vous avez répondu que c’était déjà réglé.

M. Henry Milner:

Je croyais que le problème était sur le point d’être réglé. Je m'occupe d’autres éléments dans le cadre de mes recherches, alors je n’y prêtais pas tellement attention.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comme vous êtes politicologue, lorsque vous changez les règles qui touchent tous les partis et la démocratie canadienne, est-ce un bon principe que d’avoir un appui multipartite ou du moins bipartite pour une loi? Permettez-moi d’établir ce premier principe.

M. Henry Milner:

C’est un très bon principe. Parfois, il peut y avoir un grave problème; c’est à cela que servent les référendums, lorsqu’il est impossible de trouver un consensus. Par exemple, ceux d’entre nous qui sont en faveur de la réforme électorale sont divisés sur la question à savoir s’il faut tenir un référendum ou non parce que c’est plus fondamental. Sur ces points, essentiellement, l’amélioration...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour ce qui est du recours à un répondant par un tiers, c’est ce genre de choses.

M. Henry Milner:

Cela devrait être consensuel.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comme vous le savez, nous sommes sous la menace. Élections Canada nous a déjà dit qu’il ne serait pas possible de mettre en oeuvre la totalité du projet de loi C-76 si nous l’adoptions demain. Cela vous inquiète-t-il?

M. Henry Milner:

J’espère que...Je ne sais pas comment fonctionne la procédure parlementaire, mais cela devrait être possible. Probablement pas. Comme je l’ai dit ici, je défends devant les tribunaux une position que j’ai prise contre le gouvernement qui a changé de position par rapport à la mienne. Il devrait y avoir un moyen d’accélérer la mise en oeuvre des mesures même si Élections Canada dit avoir besoin davantage de temps, à moins que quelqu’un ne s’y oppose.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a toutefois un autre principe à cet égard, c’est-à-dire qu’Élections Canada ne peut faire que ce qui est prévu dans la loi...

M. Henry Milner:

C’est ce que je dis, mais si vous pouvez diviser la loi d’une façon ou d’une autre, ou diviser l’adoption? Je ne sais pas. Je ne suis pas un spécialiste de la procédure parlementaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Prenons donc certains aspects du projet de loi.

M. Henry Milner:

Si c’est possible. C’est votre secteur, pas le mien. Idéalement, il devrait y avoir un moyen de passer plus rapidement sur les parties dont l'adoption nécessite plus de temps par Élections Canada, lorsqu’il n’y a pas d’opposition fondée sur des principes, ce que je n’entends pas encore. Je ne peux pas vous dire comment faire.

(1145)

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est une question plus empirique. Comment les jeunes Canadiens se classent-ils? Dans le cadre de vos recherches, classez-vous les jeunes en fonction de leurs connaissances politiques?

M. Henry Milner:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comment les Canadiens se comparent-ils?

M. Henry Milner:

Pas très bien.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pas très bien. Que signifie « pas très bien »?

M. Henry Milner:

Si vous prenez toutes les démocraties... Je n’ai pas de chiffres très récents, et ils sont peut-être meilleurs, mais lorsque j’ai fait des recherches à ce sujet, nous étions au bas de l’échelle, pas aussi mauvais que les Américains, mais certainement pas aussi bons que les Européens, les Britanniques et les Australiens.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pas aussi mal que les gens qui ont élu Trump, mais pas au niveau des démocraties plus fonctionnelles.

M. Henry Milner:

C’est exact. Il n’est pas si facile de faire des tests, étant donné que les institutions sont différentes et qu'il faut alors se donner une certaine marge de manoeuvre. Dans l’ensemble, parmi les pays — comme je l’ai dit, parmi toutes les démocraties —, il est clair que les Américains ont moins de connaissances politiques de base. Parmi les personnes ayant le droit de vote, quel est le pourcentage de celles ayant des connaissances minimales pour voter? C’est le genre de question que nous posons dans nos recherches comparatives. Nous posons la question pour l’ensemble de la population, puis nous la posons pour les jeunes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour revenir à notre point, si les connaissances, l’éducation et la mobilisation étaient une grande priorité pour le gouvernement, l’un des outils les plus efficaces aurait été une réforme complète.

M. Henry Milner:

Oui, mais pas immédiatement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, cela ne se produit pas au cours d’une élection, mais au fil du temps, si vous voulez un électeur plus engagé et plus instruit, surtout un jeune électeur.

M. Henry Milner:

Ce n’est pas le seul facteur, mais cela pourrait avoir un effet positif. J’ai fait valoir cet argument et je continue de le faire. C’est un des points de vue que j'ai exposés au Québec.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous allez peut-être vous présenter devant le tribunal la semaine prochaine.

M. Henry Milner:

Nous verrons.

Si vous me permettez d’ajouter quelque chose, je dirais que vous allez constater que le résultat en Ontario sera, en fait, un stimulant pour la réforme électorale. J’y crois très fermement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je suis d’accord avec vous.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous donnons maintenant la parole à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci, monsieur Milner. Je suis heureuse de vous revoir.

J’étais membre du Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale et nous nous sommes rencontrés à cette occasion.

M. Henry Milner:

Je me souviens de vous, oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous vous avons reçu à quelques reprises. Votre témoignage a suscité chaque fois un grand intérêt, et bien sûr, votre travail est très précieux pour le Comité.

C’est peut-être difficile à croire de la part d’un homme raisonnable comme vous, mais il y a des partis qui souhaitent que ce projet de loi ne soit pas adopté aussi rapidement que possible; c’est pourquoi il y a lieu de craindre que la question ne soit pas réglée à temps pour votre procédure judiciaire, mais j’espère vraiment que nous réussirons.

M. Henry Milner:

Ce ne sera pas prêt pour la semaine prochaine, c’est certain.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J’espère qu’il y a des façons de ne pas... Ce n’est pas le dernier...?

M. Henry Milner:

Je ne connais pas le processus juridique. À ma connaissance, cela n’aurait aucun sens. En fait, si le tribunal rejette la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections en se fondant sur l'argument constitutionnel, je crois personnellement que cet argument n'est pas si solide... Je pense que c’était une mauvaise loi, mais l’argument selon lequel la loi est inconstitutionnelle — et je ne suis pas avocat — est difficile à faire valoir, alors je ne pense pas que cela se produirait. Même si cela se produisait, cela ne changerait rien, vraiment, parce que le processus se poursuivrait.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je sais que vous comprendrez qu’il y a, de temps à autre, des partis qui veulent empêcher les électeurs de voter et qui ne veulent pas nécessairement que tous ceux qui ont le droit de voter exercent leur droit.

M. Henry Milner:

Aux États-Unis, je dirais que c'est sans ambiguïté. De réels efforts ont été déployés dans ce but.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y a eu un cas à Guelph où des renseignements erronés ont été communiqués aux gens par des appels automatisés, les empêchant de voter alors qu'ils avaient le droit de vote.

M. Henry Milner:

C’est du moins ce que nous avons constaté à l'échelle locale. Je ne veux pas porter d’accusation au niveau national.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez fait des déclarations dans le passé au sujet de l’augmentation de la participation électorale. Beaucoup de vos études ont porté sur la hausse de la participation chez les jeunes. De plus, vous avez dit que la dernière Loi sur l’intégrité des élections limitait à cinq ans la capacité des Canadiens de voter s’ils sont à l’étranger.

Pouvez-vous me dire ce que vous en pensez et pourquoi l’élimination de cette restriction est-elle une bonne chose?

(1150)

M. Henry Milner:

Mon appui n'était pas très marqué sur cet aspect auparavant, et j’ai effectué une recherche pour voir ce que faisaient les autres pays. Dans l’ensemble, j’aimerais que la période soit un peu plus longue, mais je ne pense pas que les résultats seraient très différents. Je ne ralentirais donc pas le projet de loi pour essayer de modifier ce point, par exemple.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous avons supprimé la restriction, alors maintenant, quand vous êtes à l’étranger... Ce projet de loi élimine la période de cinq ans.

M. Henry Milner:

Par quoi la remplace-t-il?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il n’y a pas de limites.

M. Henry Milner:

Est-ce exact? J’ai alors mal lu le projet de loi.

À ce stade-ci, un Canadien peut... et ne revient à aucun moment dans l’intervalle? Est-ce vraiment le cas?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C’est exact.

M. Henry Milner:

Wow!

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvez-vous me dire ce que vous en pensez? Cela ressemble davantage à la façon américaine, n’est-ce pas?

M. Henry Milner:

Oui, mais n’oubliez pas que les Américains doivent payer des impôts. Ils peuvent ne jamais avoir vécu aux États-Unis — et je peux vous en donner des exemples — tout en payant des impôts.

C’est peut-être aller trop loin. Encore une fois, cela ne devrait pas être un sujet d'inquiétude pour l'instant, mais je pense qu’il vaut la peine d’y réfléchir. Je ne connais pas d’autres pays, à part les États-Unis... Il y en a probablement. Je pense que c'est le cas en France. L’idée fondamentale, c’est que vous vivez toute votre vie à l’extérieur du pays, mais votre identité demeure la même. Sommes-nous de cet avis? C’est une question culturelle, n’est-ce pas? Ou ne dirions-nous pas au contraire que notre nouvelle identité est liée au pays dans lequel nous vivons, même si techniquement nous avons toujours la citoyenneté canadienne? Je dirais qu’il devrait y avoir un moment où il faut prendre une décision.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pensez-vous que nous devrions nous préoccuper des nombreuses personnes qui vivent à l’étranger et qui veulent voter pour influencer une élection?

M. Henry Milner:

Encore une fois, c’est un des atouts d'être canadien. Nous ne prenons pas nos divergences politiques au sérieux autant que certains voisins. Quand la politique devient une source de division tellement puissante et émotive, il est possible d'imaginer une manipulation de l’extérieur... En fait, des efforts sont faits pour aller chercher des démocrates ou des républicains à l’étranger. C’est assez sain tant que c’est équitable.

Ce phénomène ne m’inquiète pas, surtout en ce qui concerne les Canadiens.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Selon vous, quelle est la principale cause de notre faible taux de participation? Je sais que vous avez fait des recherches sur le fait que les jeunes ne votent pas maintenant et que, même lorsqu’ils sont plus âgés, ils ne sont pas plus susceptibles de commencer à voter. Que pouvons-nous faire pour encourager la participation au sein de...

M. Henry Milner:

Au sein du système fédéral canadien?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, dans le système actuel.

M. Henry Milner:

Encore une fois, je pense qu’il faudrait faire plus d’efforts en matière d’éducation civique. Ceux d’entre nous qui sont actifs à l’échelle provinciale constatent que c’est vraiment la priorité. C’est là-dessus que je mettrais l’accent. Ce n’est pas ici. Le travail d’Élections Canada est très important. Nous sommes trop nombreux à penser que nous pouvons amener... En Norvège, par exemple, environ un tiers des élèves du secondaire se rendent au Parlement entre 14 et 16 ans pour participer à une sorte de simulation. C’est un exercice intéressant, mais il vaut mieux le faire à l'échelle provinciale, où les chiffres sont... Il y a des exemples de cela dans d’autres pays. Je pense que le travail de Taylor Gunn, qui, encore une fois, concerne les élections, fait une différence, et je pense que le gouvernement canadien appuie toujours cette initiative.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ce projet de loi a accru la capacité d’Élections Canada de faire de la sensibilisation.

M. Henry Milner:

Exactement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Êtes-vous d’accord?

M. Henry Milner:

Oui, absolument.

J’ai eu beaucoup de difficulté à comprendre pourquoi on s’y opposerait. C’est comme être contre la vertu, dans une certaine mesure.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Contre la vertu et la tarte aux pommes.

M. Henry Milner:

Ce qui est politiquement incorrect de nos jours.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais passer à M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, merci, monsieur Milner, de vous être joint à nous. Vos observations sont vraiment pertinentes.

J’aimerais revenir à votre déclaration préliminaire. Vous avez parlé d’un livre que vous avez écrit intitulé The Internet Generation et qui traite des jeunes.

Comme vous le savez, M. Gunn a déjà comparu. L’une des dernières questions à propos desquelles il a fait des observations — je ne crois pas que vous étiez dans la salle à ce moment — concernait l’utilisation de machines à dépouillement ou le vote en ligne. CIVIX a résisté à la tentation de passer au vote en ligne. Le bulletin de vote traditionnel imprimé avec un x est encore utilisé. À partir de vos recherches, avez-vous un point de vue semblable sur le bulletin de vote traditionnel imprimé? Avez-vous des idées sur l’utilisation des machines à dépouillement ou sur le vote en ligne, comme nous l’avons vu par le passé dans divers contextes électoraux, que ce soit à l'échelle municipale ou lors des courses à la direction d’un parti?

(1155)

M. Henry Milner:

Oui, et en passant, tout est lié. La question était de savoir pourquoi les jeunes votent moins. Une partie du problème — c’est pourquoi j’ai appelé cela La génération Internet — concerne les sources d’information. L’éducation civique devient plus importante pour la génération Internet parce que les sources normales d’information politique sur lesquelles les générations précédentes pouvaient compter ne sont tout simplement pas présentes. Pour certaines personnes, Internet est une source fantastique d’information politique, mais pour la plupart des jeunes, c’est une façon merveilleuse d’éviter l’information politique — inconsciemment —, mais c’est en fait ce qui se passe.

J’ai écrit au sujet du vote à 16 ans. J’ai écrit sur le vote obligatoire. Je ne me suis pas attardé beaucoup au vote électronique. Je suis encore un peu sceptique, car nous n’avons pas de données réelles montrant qu'il améliore le taux de participation. Je ne dis pas qu’il n’a pas d'influence, mais nous n’avons pas assez de données et je pense que l’acte de voter physiquement a un effet positif. Vous votez avec vos voisins. Je sais qu'il y a beaucoup d’autres façons de faire, notamment le vote anticipé, et c’est ce que nous devons encourager; il devrait y avoir d’autres façons de voter pour les gens qui, pour une raison ou une autre, ne peuvent pas aller voter le jour du scrutin.

Au moins dans le cas des élections nationales — j'y penserais peut-être pour les élections municipales ou d'autres où le taux de participation est très faible —, mais pour les élections nationales, même les élections provinciales, je pense que l’acte de voter physiquement avec nos voisins a une valeur. C’est peut-être, parce que je suis vieux et dépassé. Les nouvelles générations me regarderaient probablement en disant : « Que voulez-vous dire? Ma vie se passe sur mon écran. Les gens que je vois sur mon écran tous les jours sont mes voisins. Les gens qui vivent autour de moi se trouvent... »

Je ne sais pas, j’espère que ce n’est pas le cas, mais je ne peux pas le dire. Pour moi, cependant, je pense qu’il y a un élément positif à cela et j’hésiterais à l’éliminer jusqu’à ce que j’aie beaucoup plus de preuves pour le justifier.

M. John Nater:

J’ai 34 ans, mais je suppose que je suis vieux dans l'âme. Même si j’ai plusieurs téléphones cellulaires, iPad et ordinateurs portatifs, je suis toujours très enthousiaste à l'idée de me rendre au bureau de vote. J’ai voté par anticipation la fin de semaine dernière aux élections provinciales. J’ai amené ma femme — elle a, aussi, voté — et nos trois enfants. Nous avons eu beaucoup de plaisir. Comme nous étions les seuls au bureau de scrutin, mes deux enfants plus âgés couraient pour s’amuser et divertir les greffiers du scrutin et...

M. Henry Milner:

J’ai assisté à des élections dans d’autres pays et j’ai vu la même chose. C'est intéressant, mais je ne sais pas dans quelle mesure un député est représentatif des autres personnes de votre groupe d’âge.

M. John Nater:

Oui, je suis d’accord. Je sais, pour avoir fait campagne et fait du porte-à-porte en 2015, que cette question se posait souvent, surtout dans mes collectivités rurales. Les gens votent en général par la poste ou en ligne, comme c’est le cas dans beaucoup de municipalités. La question s'est donc posée: « Puis-je voter en ligne et non par la poste? » Il y a cette perception, non seulement chez les jeunes, également chez les personnes plus âgées.

Puis-je poser une autre question brève?

Le président: Oui.

M. John Nater: Vous avez parlé des limites imposées sur le vote à l’étranger, que ce projet de loi supprime...

M. Henry Milner:

... cette restriction au droit de vote.

(1200)

M. John Nater:

Vous avez exprimé certaines préoccupations à ce sujet.

L’autre point, c’est l’intention de revenir au Canada. À l’heure actuelle, cette intention... Est-ce quelque chose qui vous préoccupe également?

M. Henry Milner:

Oui, je n’aime pas ce genre de... pourquoi poser aux gens une question qui les incite à ne pas dire la vérité? Je n'y vois pas de valeur particulière. Je pense que cela devrait être lié au retour. Je pense que si quelqu’un ne revient pas pendant x nombre d’années, l’intention qu’il a exprimée ne fera probablement pas une grande différence.

Encore une fois, ce n’est pas un domaine sur lequel j’ai effectué des recherches ou que je connais particulièrement bien. Je vous donne une opinion personnelle, qui n’est pas meilleure que celle des autres.

M. John Nater:

Merci beaucoup. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

Nous avons le temps pour une question.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci, monsieur Milner, de votre présence aujourd’hui, de votre passion, de tout le travail que vous avez fait dans ce domaine, et de nous faire profiter de votre expertise.

Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est le vote des jeunes et leur participation au processus démocratique. J'aimerais vraiment voir des améliorations dans ce domaine. J’aimerais vous poser une question au sujet des conclusions de vos recherches selon lesquelles le fait pour les étudiants de ne pas voter dès qu’ils atteignent l’âge de voter aura une incidence sur leurs habitudes de vote tout au long de leur vie. Je crois que vous avez dit que s’ils ne votent pas lorsqu’ils atteignent l’âge de voter, ils ne voteront pas lorsqu’ils prendront de l'âge, et ils sont plus susceptibles de suivre cette tendance par la suite.

M. Henry Milner:

Ce n’est pas ma recherche, mais celle de chercheurs dont le plus connu est un dénommé Mark Franklin, un Américain, expert en politique comparée. Il a fait valoir cet argument, et je pense que c’est convaincant. Le fait de ne pas voter à la première élection ou aux deux ou trois premières élections — nous parlons ici d'une minorité et pas de tous les jeunes — a pour effet de réduire le nombre de votes plus tard.

Il est possible de développer l'habitude de voter, comme bien d'autres choses. Oui, on vote parfois à cause de l'actualité. Tout à coup surgit une question, qui vous tient vraiment à coeur, ou un dirigeant politique que vous aimez ou que vous n’aimez pas, mais il y a aussi l’aspect de l’habitude. Vous savez qu’une élection s’en vient et vous votez.

Développer cette habitude fait une différence. L’argument de Mark, que je partage dans une certaine mesure, est que la meilleure façon de faire est de commencer à voter à 16 ans parce que les jeunes sont plus susceptibles de côtoyer d’autres personnes qui votent, notamment leur famille, parce qu’ils vivent encore à la maison. Mais, je ne suis pas complètement convaincu de cela. C’est la raison pour laquelle j’insiste beaucoup sur l’éducation civique à l’âge de 14, 15 ou 16 ans, que j’associerais au vote à 16 ans.

Si vous avez un bon système d’éducation civique — parce que je pense que vous devriez voter en toute connaissance de cause, pas seulement parce que votre mère va voter, et que vous vous joignez à elle même si vous ne savez pas qui sont les partis... La combinaison des deux mesures fait la différence. En Norvège, par exemple, on a fait des tests et on a constaté que le fait de voter à 16 ans ou à 18 ans ne fait pas vraiment de différence, parce que le programme d’éducation civique est déjà très solide. C’est pourquoi j’hésite un peu plus à dire que le taux de participation sera plus élevé avec le vote à 16 ans. Je dirais que le vote à 16 ans jumelé à un programme d'éducation civique et un bon programme comme celui offert en Norvège ou dans d’autres pays, sont les mesures qui produiront une amélioration à long terme. C’est l'argument que je fais valoir.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C’est très bien. Merci beaucoup.

Mon temps est écoulé, n’est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je pourrais continuer si vous voulez. J’ai d’autres questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Vous avez été très utile.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour accueillir de nouveaux témoins.

(1200)

(1205)

Le président:

Bienvenue à la 110e  séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

J’ai quelques questions à régler, puis nous entendrons le dernier groupe de témoins.

Nous accueillons Lori Turnbull, professeure agrégée à l’Université Dalhousie, et Randall Emery, directeur général du Conseil canadien des droits des citoyens.

Comme vous le savez, tous les votes sur les projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire auront lieu le mercredi et, demain, il y aura beaucoup de votes tout de suite après la période des questions, alors je demanderais au Comité s’il est d’accord — je ne vois pas pourquoi ce ne serait pas le cas — pour que nous déplacions les témoins de la première heure qui suivra la période des questions pour les entendre à la fin de la soirée, parce qu’il y a suffisamment de créneaux disponibles pour qu’ils puissent venir plus tard dans la journée.

Est-ce que tout le monde est d’accord?

M. Blake Richards:

Ce que vous demandez, c’est qu’au lieu d’avoir six heures, nous ayons cinq heures.

Le président:

Oui. Il y a assez de place.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous entendrons tous les témoins en cinq heures, au lieu des six initialement prévues. C’est ce que vous dites.

Le président:

Il y a suffisamment de créneaux disponibles pour le faire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

À quoi ressemblerait le mercredi après-midi?

Le président:

Nous pouvons commencer à 16 h 30, par exemple.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous commencerions à 16 h 30 et jusqu’à quelle heure suggérez-vous que nous poursuivions?

Le président:

Ce serait jusqu’à 21 h 30 comme nous l’avions prévu au départ.

M. Blake Richards:

Quand aurons-nous une idée de qui seront nos témoins?

Le président:

Pour demain?

Avez-vous déjà envoyé l’avis?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Non, mais après cette réunion, je peux retourner au bureau et nous pourrions publier l’avis de convocation pour la réunion de demain avec les informations dont nous disposons maintenant et nous le mettrons à jour au fur et à mesure.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, vouliez-vous intervenir rapidement?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Pour parler de l'avenir, c’est difficile, car nous essayons de dresser cette liste de témoins au fur et à mesure, mais je crois comprendre que les représentants de Facebook et de Twitter ont décliné l’invitation.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé des médias sociaux, de ces informations et de leur utilisation pendant les campagnes. J’aimerais que le Comité contraigne... Ces firmes ont des chargés de relations gouvernementales qui travaillent ici, à Ottawa. Ce n’est pas comme si nous leur demandions de voyager. Ils ont témoigné devant de nombreux comités, parce que... l’éthique et l’information, entre autres. Je pense que c’est inexcusable. Nous discutons de cette question et les deux géants des médias sociaux refusent de venir.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité sont-ils d’accord pour obliger ces...?

M. Scott Reid:

Cela devrait prendre la forme d’une motion.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Pour ce qui est de la structure de la motion, je m’en remets au greffier. Je pense que cela se fait par l’entremise du président.

Le greffier:

Si je comprends bien, le Comité souhaite convoquer des représentants de Facebook et de Twitter. Normalement, lorsque nous convoquons, il y a une date et une heure précises qui sont liées à la convocation parce que nous engageons un huissier pour contacter les témoins.

(1210)

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’ai compris. Je suis sûr que nous n'en arriverons pas à cette extrémité.

Quand sera la dernière séance de Comité dont nous disposons actuellement pour entendre des témoins? Quelle est notre dernière date disponible? Est-ce lundi? Est-ce mardi?

Le président:

Notre dernier créneau programmé pour les témoignages est le jeudi après-midi, mais cela ne veut pas dire que nous ne pouvons rien faire par la suite.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. C’est une deuxième conversation dont je parlais avec Andy. Nous avions l’idée d’un plan, mais le Comité n’a pas de date limite officielle pour le moment, et il nous faudra tôt ou tard avoir cette conversation parce que, par exemple, nous aimerions entendre tel ou tel témoin. Quelle est la date limite réelle pour leur comparution? Je ne sais pas.

Je pense que la convocation serait une bonne chose. Je ne sais pas quelle date fixer, car j'ignore quand le Comité aura terminé les audiences des témoins vu que nous n’avons pas eu cette conversation.

Je m’excuse auprès de nos témoins, en passant.

Le président:

Je vais simplement voir si nous avons le consentement unanime pour prendre les mesures qui s'imposent pour faire venir ces gens.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Au cours de la prochaine heure, je pourrai préparer le texte avec le greffier si nous voulons quelque chose de formel. Je sondais d’abord la volonté du Comité d’entendre ces deux témoins. J’ai compris ce qui concerne les détails de la convocation. Je vais fixer une date limite.

Le président:

Nous allons régler les détails.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Il serait peut-être bon de remplir les créneaux disponibles qui se présentent en fixant la date, mais de laisser au greffier le soin de le faire.

Nous voulons examiner un formulaire antérieur et nous assurer de l’avoir respecté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, nous l’avons déjà fait.

Le président:

Tant que tout le monde y est favorable...

D’accord, merci beaucoup. Nous allons passer aux témoins.

Madame Turnbull, vous pouvez commencer, puis nous passerons à M. Emery.

Mme Lori Turnbull (professeure agrégée, Dalhousie University, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup de m’avoir invitée à comparaître devant le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre au sujet du projet de loi C-76.

Avant d’aborder le projet de loi, je ferai quelques commentaires généraux sur la réglementation du financement politique au Canada. Nous réglementons les dépenses et les contributions des candidats, des partis et des tiers sous une forme ou une autre depuis 1974. De temps en temps, les règles sont examinées ou repensées à la lumière des nouvelles réalités en matière de démocratie, d’élections, de culture politique et de choses de ce genre. Au coeur de tous ces débats sur le financement politique se trouvent des questions fondamentales sur la démocratie et l’expression politique. C’est toujours une question d’équilibre entre la liberté d’expression, l’intérêt public et le maintien de règles du jeu équitables pour les concurrents politiques. Ni l’un ni l’autre de ces objectifs n’est poursuivi par la réglementation au détriment de l’autre; nous avons besoin d’un équilibre et c’est là que la Charte entre en jeu. La Charte protège cet équilibre.

Historiquement, en vertu de la Charte, les lois sur le financement politique se retrouvent devant les tribunaux et il y a eu une jurisprudence très réfléchie sur le rôle de l’État dans la réglementation de l’argent en politique. Cependant, les choses sont en train de changer et je dirais que l’argent n’est plus un indicateur fiable de l’expression politique. Autrefois, les débats et les publicités payantes aux heures de grande écoute étaient la façon de toucher les gens, mais maintenant — je rejoins les commentaires de M. Cullen —, ce sont Twitter, Facebook, les pièges à clics, Instagram et les courriels microciblés. Ce genre d’expression politique pose un tout nouveau défi réglementaire parce que, pour l'essentiel, c’est peu coûteux ou gratuit. Le fait de parler de limites de dépenses et de limites de contributions est un peu hors sujet. Les limites de dépenses ne touchent qu’une partie du problème et, à mon avis, une partie qui va en s'amenuisant.

Quoi qu’il en soit, nous en sommes au projet de loi C-76. Le thème est la modernisation. La démocratie change pour de nombreuses raisons et la loi doit suivre le rythme. Comme les députés le savent, le projet de loi couvre beaucoup de sujets. Certains sujets centraux, comme l’établissement de limites de dépenses préélectorales pour les partis et les tiers, ne sont pas une grande surprise. Nous l’avons vu en Ontario. Compte tenu de la campagne constante, qui se déroule tout le temps, imposer des limites seulement une fois que le bref est émis est considéré comme arbitraire. Le projet de loi limite la durée de la période électorale à 50 jours. Il accroît la transparence des activités des tiers de plusieurs façons, en exigeant que les tiers s’identifient dans la publicité politique; en exigeant qu’ils conservent des comptes bancaires distincts pour que leurs activités politiques soient un peu plus visibles lorsque vous examinez les comptes; et en incluant des choses comme les sondages dans les dépenses limitées, ce qui n’est pas le cas actuellement. C’est un domaine où les tiers peuvent aujourd'hui dépenser de façon illimitée, mais pas les partis politiques. Il y a aussi des mesures pour rendre le vote plus accessible, notamment la création d’un registre des futurs électeurs.

J’ai quelques commentaires à faire sur ce qui n'est pas dans le projet de loi. Les tiers peuvent toujours accepter des dons illimités d’organismes, alors que les partis politiques et les candidats ne le peuvent pas. Depuis plus d’une décennie, les contributions versées aux candidats et aux partis par des organisations ne sont pas autorisées contrairement à celles venant de particuliers. Cela déséquilibre les règles du jeu et incite peut-être les personnes ou les organisations les plus riches à faire des dons illimités à des tiers.

La question de l’argent étranger est très difficile à réglementer, en grande partie parce que les tierces parties font souvent beaucoup de choses. Ce ne sont pas seulement des acteurs politiques et elles ne se contentent pas de contester les élections. Elles font également du travail de bienfaisance, de promotion, d’éducation et de collaboration avec des partenaires d’autres pays. Il est donc très difficile d’imposer des règles particulières pendant la période électorale ou pour les dépenses électorales des tiers. Auparavant, on pouvait prendre de l’argent étranger pour certaines choses, mais maintenant on ne peut pas le faire à cette fin, pendant cette période. C’est très difficile à contrôler. Dans un sens, il ne faudrait pas aller trop loin parce que vous tarirez les sources de fonds utilisés à d’autres fins et nous voulons que les organisations puissent faire ces choses, je suppose. Il s’agit de savoir comment réglementer les dépenses des tiers et les activités liées aux élections.

De nombreux observateurs se sont dits préoccupés par la possibilité d’une participation étrangère aux élections canadiennes. Nous devons travailler là-dessus. Nous devons être en mesure de faire comprendre aux Canadiens que ce ne sera pas un problème et que nous sommes conscients de ce à quoi pourrait ressembler l’influence étrangère. Encore une fois, je pense que cela a un lien important avec les questions de démocratie numérique et de cybersécurité. La réglementation du financement n'est pas suffisante et ne répond pas vraiment aux principales préoccupations des gens.

Je vais m’arrêter ici et laisser parler mon collègue.

(1215)

Le président:

D’accord, très bien.

Monsieur Emery.

M. J. Randall Emery (directeur général, Conseil canadien pour les droits citoyens):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux membres du Comité.

Je suis le directeur général du Conseil canadien pour les droits citoyens, qui réunit des organisations et des membres individuels pour s'engager dans une vision d’un Canada renouvelé, un chef de file mondial en matière de droits et libertés des citoyens.

Nos commentaires d’aujourd’hui portent sur le droit de vote universel. Le projet de loi C-76 fait ce qui s’impose en redonnant aux citoyens canadiens à l’étranger le plein droit de vote fédéral. Les Canadiens appuient ce droit universel. Nous vous exhortons à maintenir ces dispositions dans le projet de loi et à appuyer une mise en oeuvre juste et opportune.

Tout d’abord, appuyer le droit de vote à l’étranger est la bonne chose à faire. C’est la bonne chose à faire, car en cette matière l'inaction nuirait aux Canadiens. L’histoire du Canada a été marquée par une progression constante vers le droit de vote universel, en commençant par l’émancipation des femmes, puis des minorités raciales et des personnes qui ne possèdent pas de biens, les Inuits, les membres des Premières Nations, les juges fédéraux, les personnes ayant des déficiences mentales, les personnes sans adresse fixe et, enfin, les prisonniers. Pourtant, la règle actuelle de cinq ans dont est saisie la Cour suprême du Canada prive au moins un million de citoyens du droit de vote et envoie un message clair d’exclusion.

Ce ne sont pas des électeurs qui votent pour s'amuser. Les Canadiens à l’étranger sont assujettis aux lois fiscales, aux lois pénales, aux lois anticorruption étrangères et aux mesures économiques spéciales et ils bénéficient du droit d’entrée au Canada, des prestations de pension du Canada, des lois sur la citoyenneté et des lois sur l’immigration.

De plus, c’est la bonne chose à faire parce que les Canadiens à l’étranger sont un avantage pour le Canada. Les Canadiens qui vivent et travaillent à l’étranger sont directement et indirectement responsables de milliards de dollars en échanges bilatéraux. Ils sont exceptionnellement instruits, linguistiquement compétents et culturellement bilingues. Ils sont nos ambassadeurs culturels et économiques. Plus notre pays les mobilisera, plus le Canada prospérera.

Deuxièmement, les Canadiens le comprennent bien. Au fil du temps, les Canadiens conservent une connexion très forte avec le Canada, mais moins avec leur province ou leur municipalité d’origine. Par conséquent, en 2011, l’Environics Institute a constaté que 69 % des Canadiens estimaient que les Canadiens à l’étranger devraient voter aux élections fédérales. Ce projet de loi est tout à fait conforme à l’opinion publique.

Enfin, nous vous demandons de soutenir les dispositions de ce projet de loi relatives au droit de vote et d’appuyer une mise en oeuvre juste et opportune. Lorsque des amendements seront proposés à l’étape de l’étude article par article, nous demandons aux membres du Comité de préserver le libellé actuel, sans amendement qui limiterait la population des électeurs admissibles. Nous vous demandons également d’appuyer une mise en œuvre juste et en temps opportun.

Compte tenu des contraintes de temps d’Élections Canada, nous vous exhortons à adopter rapidement ce projet de loi. Nous exhortons également les membres du Comité à éviter les nouvelles exigences en matière d’identification ou d’autres exigences qui ont prouvé par ailleurs qu'elles réduisaient le taux de participation.

C’est une occasion historique de permettre à tous les Canadiens de voter. C’est la bonne chose à faire et les Canadiens y sont favorables. Nous applaudissons les dispositions du projet de loi sur l’émancipation et nous vous exhortons à les préserver et à les mettre en oeuvre rapidement.

Merci. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1220)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à vous deux d’être venus aujourd’hui.

Nous allons passer aux questions, en commençant par M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur.

Madame Turnbull, merci d’être venue aujourd’hui. Je n’ai qu’une question générale pour commencer.

Je remarque que vous avez écrit avec M. Aucoin et M. Jarvis un livre intitulé Democratizing the Constitution. Le projet de loi C-76 constitue-t-il un pas vers la démocratisation de la Constitution?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oh, c’est une excellente question. Merci.

M. Scott Simms:

Désolé. Vous pourriez probablement faire une dissertation à ce sujet, me semble-t-il, mais nous n’avons que sept minutes, s’il vous plaît.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

D’une certaine façon, la réponse est oui, parce que le projet de loi aborde certaines questions auxquelles nous devons nous attaquer. D’une certaine façon, vous êtes toujours un peu en train de livrer la dernière bataille, alors le projet de loi tient compte de certaines réalités existantes et nous devons nous y adapter.

Les gens s’inquiètent de choses comme une campagne électorale trop longue. Vous considérez une limite de 50 jours parce que nous avons vécu quelque chose comme 78 jours de campagne et personne n’a aimé cela. Cela a créé toute une série de problèmes. Nous pourrions en parler indéfiniment. Tout n’était pas mauvais, mais il y a eu des conséquences imprévues. Les gens regardent cela et disent: « D’accord, nous voulons réglementer cela. »

Il y a des choses dans le projet de loi qui sont tout à fait nécessaires et sur lesquelles le consensus ne devrait pas être trop difficile à atteindre. Personnellement, j’aimerais qu’il aille plus loin dans quelques domaines, mais j’essaie de ne pas être trop négative à ce sujet. Il faut voir les progrès accomplis et ne pas faire de mauvais esprit.

M. Scott Simms:

Non, Dieu m’en préserve, je suis tout à fait optimiste, de ce côté-ci de la Chambre.

Permettez-moi de m’éloigner un instant de cette question. Nous sommes en train de proposer des amendements, même si nous avons accepté le principe et la portée du projet de loi, mais il est toujours merveilleux de peaufiner le projet de loi. Vous avez soulevé des préoccupations quant à ce que nous faisons pour que les Canadiens se sentent en sécurité, disant qu’il ne suffit peut-être pas de réglementer le financement. Ai-je bien compris?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

Quelles améliorations pouvons-nous apporter à ce sujet?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Je pense que beaucoup de Canadiens ne se fient pas aux formes traditionnelles — ou que nous pourrions considérer comme étant des formes traditionnelles — de communication politique pour recevoir les messages. Même si le débat sur la façon dont nous organisons le débat des chefs est très intéressant, beaucoup de gens ne s'informent pas de cette façon. Certaines personnes regardent les débats, mais vous parlez de la façon de mobiliser les jeunes électeurs, or ils ne regardent pas les débats. Ils sont sur Twitter. Ils regardent les médias sociaux et ils reçoivent beaucoup d’information.

De plus, je pense qu’on craint de plus en plus les fausses nouvelles — une crainte liée au fait que beaucoup d'informations nous arrivent et que nous ne sommes pas sûrs qu'elles soient vraies et qu’il y ait une telle masse d'informations simultanées. Nous perdons quelque chose du côté de la vérification.

Ce sont des tonnes de messages, dont beaucoup sont très ciblés. Cela a également à voir avec la technologie des communications, parce que nous sommes maintenant en mesure de connaître les électeurs de façon très précise, de connaître leur profil et de leur livrer le genre de messages qu’ils veulent vraiment. D'un côté, c’est une bonne chose, c'est réactif et positif, mais c’est presque comme si un tas de gens recevaient des messages différents et qu’il n’y avait pas la même centralisation des messages que nous avions auparavant dans une campagne.

M. Scott Simms:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompre un instant. Je m’excuse, mais il y a plusieurs années, le CRTC avait pour politique de réglementer Internet de la même façon que le réseau de radiodiffusion, surtout le contenu. Comment pouvons-nous y arriver? Comme vous le dites, ils ciblent une personne en particulier qui serait susceptible d’avoir une opinion et qui ne se donnerait pas la peine de chercher à obtenir une opinion contraire. Par où commencer?

(1225)

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Je sais.

C’est un rôle difficile pour le gouvernement — et je parle du gouvernement dans un sens large, parce que vous ne voulez pas que l’État réglemente les communications. Vous ne voulez pas que le gouvernement intervienne et dise: « C’est faux; vous n’avez pas le droit de dire cela. » Cependant, à un certain niveau, nous avons besoin de quelque chose.

Je ne sais pas grand-chose de ce qui se fait dans d’autres pays, mais au Royaume-Uni, le commissaire à l’information a joué un rôle à cet égard.

M. Scott Simms:

C’est intéressant. Pouvez-vous me donner un exemple?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Mon exemple parfait — la commissaire à l'information du Royaume-Uni.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Lori Turnbull: Je le répète, ce n'est que le début. Nous regardons comment d’autres pays réagissent aux mêmes défis qui nous sont posés, c’est-à-dire lorsque les messages sont si rapides, comment vérifier et comment savoir que l'information que les gens reçoivent est vraie et exacte? Comment obliger les gens à avoir des messages équilibrés? Je n’en ai aucune idée. À un certain niveau, nous ne le pouvons pas. Nous pouvons l’encourager, et je pense que cela est lié à l’objet du projet de loi, qui est de renforcer la fonction d’éducation du directeur général des élections. Je pense que nous ne pouvons pas minimiser cela. À mesure que les messages deviennent plus complexes, il est considérablement important que les organismes non partisans comme Élections Canada soient très présents dans les conversations...

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, aussi difficile que cela puisse être...

Mme Lori Turnbull:

... de toute évidence, pas de façon partisane, mais de façon contrôlée et objective.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Monsieur Emery, mon collègue ici à ma droite a fait un commentaire tout à l’heure à propos de ce qui se disait au sujet des personnes vivant à l’étranger, à savoir qu’un citoyen est un citoyen.

Ai-je bien compris, David?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, c'était quelque chose du genre.

M. Scott Simms:

La Constitution dit qu’un citoyen a le droit de voter. Par conséquent, dans votre situation particulière — et je suis sûr que c’est un peu de la musique à vos oreilles —, y a-t-il certaines limites fondées sur la personne qui vit à l'étranger qui devraient exister?

M. J. Randall Emery:

Je pense que ce devrait être un droit sans limite. À l’heure actuelle, les Canadiens à l’étranger sont le seul sous-ensemble de la population canadienne qui ne peut pas voter. Il ne faut pas oublier que la plupart de ces Canadiens ne peuvent pas voter là où ils sont.

Il y a aussi les conséquences pratiques. Je connais des gens qui ont approché le député de la circonscription où ils habitaient pour parler de cette question et qui se sont fait dire par ce même député qu'il ne savait pas s'il était vraiment leur député, car ils ne pouvaient pas voter à cet endroit. Ces gens n'ont personne vers qui se tourner pour obtenir de l'aide en cas de problème avec le programme.

J'estime qu'il est très important et très fondamental que tout le monde ait le droit de voter.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup à vous deux, c'était très bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci. Je vous suis reconnaissant d'être tous les deux ici.

Madame Turnbull, je vais commencer par vous.

Dans l’article que vous avez écrit pour The Gobe and Mail en mars dernier, vous avez fait des commentaires intéressants à propos des tierces parties. Vous avez parlé de ce que vous appelez le « traitement préférentiel » en vertu de la Loi électorale et vous l'avez aussi mentionné aujourd'hui. Les tiers ont accès à des types de dons auxquels les autres participants aux élections, les partis politiques eux-mêmes, ne peuvent avoir accès, par exemple, les dons des syndicats et des sociétés. Vous avez parlé de l’absence de limite des dons.

Je me demande si vous pourriez nous donner un peu plus de détails à ce sujet. Ce que je veux savoir précisément, c’est si vous proposez les mêmes limites de dons pour les tiers que pour les partis politiques. Diriez-vous que ces limites ne seraient imposées que pendant la période électorale et la période préélectorale ou pensez-vous qu'elles devraient l'être aussi en dehors de ces périodes? Diriez-vous alors que ces tiers ne devraient recevoir que des contributions de la part de particuliers?

C'est beaucoup en même temps, mais...

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Merci beaucoup d'avoir posé cette question.

En fait, c'est vraiment fantastique. Vous avez tout dit, je n'ai donc qu'à acquiescer.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Eh bien, c'était facile.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Or, je vais ajouter deux ou trois choses.

Aux fins des élections et des dépenses électorales, je dirais que si nous voulons niveler les choses et uniformiser les règles du jeu, nous devrions envisager le même processus pour les tiers comme acteurs politiques que celui que nous appliquons à tout le monde. Par conséquent, les particuliers peuvent verser des contributions électorales à tous les acteurs politiques selon la même limite.

Je me suis rendu compte que le problème de la réglementation est de savoir comment compartimenter l’activité électorale d’un tiers et la séparer du reste de ses activités. Pour certains organismes, c’est peut-être plus clair que pour d’autres.

Dans certains cas, ils assurent en permanence une fonction d’éducation et de défense des droits. Cela signifie-t-il automatiquement qu’une fois la période préélectorale déclenchée, tout ce qu’ils font, c’est de la publicité électorale? Je pense qu’il serait alors impératif d’essayer de protéger ce que fait l’organisation dans le cadre de ses fonctions ordinaires, puis d’essayer de l’intégrer à une sphère plus réglementée une fois le bref déposé.

(1230)

M. Blake Richards:

Pour clarifier l’idée des limites de contribution, laissez-vous entendre que nous devrions examiner et traiter différemment les divers types de tiers ou que nous devrions imposer des limites de contribution à tout tiers qui participerait aux élections?

Mme Lori Turnbull: Oui, ceux qui sont enregistrés.

M. Blake Richards: Je ne parle pas seulement de la période électorale ou aussi des trois autres années et des huit autres mois ou peu importe.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Si c’était pendant la période électorale et la période préélectorale, j’en serais heureuse. Je pense que ce serait une façon de faire une différence importante pour uniformiser les règles du jeu et c’est ce que je veux faire.

Les partis et les autres entités doivent accepter ces limites chaque année, même pendant les années non électorales. Il serait difficile de faire respecter cela et je n’aurais pas besoin de mourir pour la cause si nous le faisions au cours des six mois précédant les élections. Je pense que ce serait un grand...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous préconisez d'aller un peu plus loin.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

Avec des élections à date fixe, qu’en est-il de ce scénario? Si tout le monde connaît la date limite et que je veux déposer 1 million de dollars et que cette limite de 1 500 $ sera imposée demain, je vais me hâter de déposer le million de dollars aujourd’hui. Comment régler le problème dans ce scénario?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Dans ce cas, je suis tout à fait d’accord avec votre logique. À mon avis, chaque fois qu'on annonce une baisse ou que c'est l'heure de tombée pour les limites, à un certain niveau, c’est arbitraire, parce que nous faisons constamment campagne.

Je peux concevoir qu’il y ait une formule différente pour les tiers, parce que leur comportement n’est pas nécessairement toujours le même que celui d’une entité politique en campagne. Cependant, je comprends ce que vous dites, à savoir qu’est-ce qui empêche le millionnaire de déposer l’argent la veille, surtout quand il y a des élections à date fixe, quand il sait que cela s’en vient et qu’il peut planifier?

C’est aussi le problème des dons à l’étranger. Il n’y a rien de mal à ce qu’un tiers accepte des dons de l’étranger, pourvu qu’ils ne soient pas utilisés à des fins électorales. C’est la même chose. Si cette baisse survient avant la période réglementée, ces fonds se trouvent simplement dans le compte bancaire de l’organisme. Ce sont vos propres fonds et vous pouvez les utiliser comme bon vous semble.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suppose que ce que vous dites, c’est que vous n’êtes pas vraiment sûre de pouvoir suggérer une façon de réglementer cet aspect, mais que s’il y avait une façon de le faire, vous seriez en faveur. Est-ce juste?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Je serais heureuse si, pour les contributions politiques qui sont conservées dans un compte bancaire distinct, comme le propose le projet de loi, ces limites s’appliquaient tout le temps. Je crains que cela ne résistera pas à une contestation judiciaire. Je suis prête à accepter un scénario moins grave.

M. Blake Richards:

J’ai compris. Ce que vous dites, c’est qu’il s’agit d’accepter ce qui vous semble possible plutôt que ce que vous jugez souhaitable.

Pour que les choses soient bien claires, les plafonds que vous proposez pour les périodes électorales et préélectorales, parce que vous n’êtes pas certaine de la façon dont nous pourrions trouver un moyen de réglementer cet aspect en dehors de ces périodes, s’appliqueraient-ils seulement aux particuliers ou autoriseriez-vous les 1 575 $ qui sont actuellement versés à un tiers par d’autres entités que des particuliers?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Pour uniformiser les règles du jeu, il faut que seuls les particuliers puissent faire des dons à des fins électorales.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci beaucoup.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous cédons maintenant la parole à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je regardais cette citation parce que je n'en connaissais pas vraiment l'origine, mais il semble qu'en 1929, le lieutenant-colonel Schley du Corps of Engineers a écrit qu'il a été dit de façon critique que bien des armées ont tendance à consacrer le temps de paix à étudier comment faire la dernière guerre.

L'idée de défaire certains aspects de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, notamment le recours à un répondant et certaines des prescriptions au sujet du vote des expatriés qui, je pense, que ce soit intentionnel ou non, ont pour effet d'empêcher certains Canadiens qui n’appuyaient peut-être pas le gouvernement en théorie ou en pratique de voter suscite de l'intérêt dans mon parti et j'appuie personnellement cet intérêt. Pourtant, madame Turnbull, où va votre préférence? Vous en souciez-vous?

(1235)

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Pas du tout.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Il y a la fixation sur l'argent et ce n'est pas mal d'avoir une fixation sur l'argent, car il semble que l'argent en politique, c'est comme de l'eau sur le trottoir, il peut s'infiltrer dans chaque fissure; c'est l'un des volets, mais ne pas avoir l'autre volet de l'influence politique sans beaucoup d'argent, diriez-vous que c’est faire la moitié du travail, 90 % du travail, 10 % du travail que d'essayer d’établir un lien clair entre ceux qui cherchent à influencer les élections et la compréhension des électeurs et la tenue d’élections libres et équitables pour ceux qu’ils choisissent ou proposent.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

La question est donc...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si le but, c'est que l'électeur se présente avec la meilleure information possible et non — de quoi s'agissait-il déjà, de la désinformation, de renseignements erronés comme l'a dit l'un de nos témoins — j'estime que c'était bien résumé. Si le but, c'est de veiller à ce qu'il y ait une ligne de communication claire entre les personnes qui votent et les candidats et à ce que quiconque intervient dans cette conversation soit identifié et ne soit pas influencé par une source étrangère ou de nature malveillante, l'argent est un aspect de l'équation.

Ce sont des gens qui financent certains aspects d’un débat, certains candidats de façon illégale ou subreptice. Un autre volet du débat, ce sont les outils inimaginables il y a 20 ans, l'influence des médias sociaux. Si nous ne nous occupons que du volet financier et que nous nous efforçons de limiter l'influence étrangère, les fonds étrangers qui entrent, du mieux que nous le pouvons, aux dépens de l'autre volet, soit à quel point il est facile de désinformer, de propager des renseignements erronés par l'entremise des médias sociaux, dans quelle mesure atteignons-nous cet objectif?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Je dirais la moitié, peut-être moins.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si nous essayons de mener la prochaine guerre, plutôt que la dernière, si c'est la tendance, j'imagine que le pouvoir des médias sociaux pour communiquer avec les électeurs, les informer ou les désinformer, ne fera probablement qu'augmenter. Est-ce exact?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Je pense que oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

L'une des questions — pardonnez-moi si je n'ai pas bien compris — concerne la combinaison de financements, à savoir qu'une entité canadienne peut établir un compte bancaire canadien, une exigence du projet de loi à l'étude, pourtant il peut y avoir combinaison de financements. Le financement de base peut comporter des fonds étrangers. Nous avons interrogé le ministre et Élections Canada sur la façon de se rendre au fond de la question pour trouver ce que représente ce mélange, si des fonds sont déplacés...

J'ai de la difficulté à formuler des questions aujourd'hui. Je vais avoir recours à un scénario. Si un organisme a un budget de 2 millions de dollars, normalement un budget de fonctionnement et qu’il reçoit un don supplémentaire de 1 million de dollars des États-Unis, de la Russie, peu importe et qu’il déplace son budget de base et consacre maintenant la totalité des 2 millions de dollars à des élections ou jusqu’à concurrence de la limite prescrite, soit 1,5 million de dollars, il s’agit essentiellement d’utiliser de l’argent étranger pour défendre une position. Je ne vois pas comment le projet de loi C-76 nous permettrait de faire face à ce scénario. Est-ce que vous suivez?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Devrions-nous essayer de le faire?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comment pourrions-nous y parvenir?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

D'accord. D'une certaine façon, je pense que c'est lié au fait que seules les personnes peuvent faire un don, car un organisme peut se faire un don. Un organisme peut recevoir des dons d'autres organismes. Ensuite, oui, une fois que la période magique commence, ils peuvent toujours obtenir des dons d’organismes, mais ils ne sont pas supposés utiliser des fonds étrangers, même si ces fonds sont déjà déposés dans leur compte...

(1240)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le mélange de financements.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

... oui, on ne peut pas commencer à le diviser. Ce serait impossible.

Pour en revenir à la question de M. Richards, si nous réglementons les contributions tout le temps et que le financement maximal de 1 700 $ est versé dans votre compte de publicité électorale et que vous ne recevez pas de dons d'organismes, je pense que ce serait une façon de s'assurer qu’il n’y ait pas de mélange de financements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Désolé, expliquez-moi le scénario.

Que feraient exactement la Chambre de commerce du Canada, Leadnow et tout autre participant qui embauche des porte-à-porte ou qui fait de la publicité politique, qui sont maintenant tous inclus? Avant les prochaines élections, que feraient-ils?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Ils seraient autorisés à accepter seulement les contributions électorales des particuliers dont le montant maximal serait le même que celui s'appliquant aux partis, à les verser dans leur compte électoral et voilà.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour participer à un scrutin, si vous décidez de vous inscrire, vous ne seriez pas considéré comme un parti politique, mais vous seriez assujetti à la même restriction qu’un parti politique.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

C'est tout à fait exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me suis posé la question. Si vous voulez intervenir et participer à cette conversation, devriez-vous être assujetti aux mêmes limites, restrictions et responsabilités que nous tous, les partis politiques, qui participons à la conversation?

Le Parti libéral, le NPD et les conservateurs ne pourraient tout simplement pas mélanger les financements et affirmer qu'il n'y a pas de fonds étrangers et que cet argent ne sert qu'à payer le loyer et les factures d'électricité des bureaux du parti.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est de l’argent canadien que nous dépensons. Nous ne pourrions pas faire cela. Élections Canada nous martèlerait.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Non, c'est impossible — exactement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Or, les tierces parties le peuvent. C'est bien cela qu'il faut comprendre?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Nous ne pourrons pas apporter ce changement avant 2019. Même si le Comité et le Parlement étaient d'accord, le projet de loi a été présenté si tard.

Vos propos au sujet de l'uniformisation des règles du jeu et de la transparence pour les Canadiens m'intéressent au plus haut point. Les publicités qu'on leur sert et les démarqueurs à la porte n'ont été sollicités que par des intérêts canadiens.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vous en remercie.

Monsieur Emery, j'ai entendu votre message d'urgence: faisons-le.

M. J. Randall Emery:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je pense que vous avez parlé d'adoption rapide.

M. J. Randall Emery:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela n’aurait-il pas été formidable il y a 18 mois, avec le projet de loi C-33?

Si vous êtes un gouvernement et que vous dites, par exemple, qu'un Canadien est Canadien et qu'il devrait pouvoir voter et que c'est important pour vous, mais que vous avez présenté le projet de loi il y a 18 mois puis, plus rien, quel est votre message pour la collectivité des expatriés?

M. J. Randall Emery:

Eh bien, il est certain que les expatriés auraient été heureux d’aller de l’avant.

Nous en sommes là. Nous espérons que le projet de loi C-76 sera adopté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous en sommes là.

Désolé, monsieur le président. J'ai parlé trop longtemps.

Merci.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

J’aimerais revenir sur le thème abordé par M. Cullen. Madame Turnbull, vous êtes peut-être le témoin auquel il faut poser les questions relatives à la Charte concernant la proposition.

Y a-t-il eu un problème en ce qui concerne la liberté de parole ou pensez-vous qu’il y aurait une limite raisonnable à la liberté d’expression parce que les partis politiques sont assujettis aux mêmes exigences?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

La situation des tiers a toujours été un peu différente... Avec ce projet de loi qui équilibre la liberté d’expression d’un côté et l’intérêt public et des règles du jeu équitables de l’autre, c’est un exercice d’équilibre que le Parlement et le tribunal, je dirais, ont tenté de préserver en en discutant. À l’intérieur de cela, il y a un microcosme où il y a un équilibre distinct et connexe pour les tierces parties parce qu’elles essaient de faire des choses différentes.

Je ne sais pas si un tribunal pourrait demander à un organisme qui assume une fonction de défense et d'éducation en tout temps, Leadnow par exemple, ce qui pourrait ne pas être assimilé à une contribution électorale. Voilà ce que j’ai en tête. On pourrait faire valoir que sa fonction d’éducation et de défense des intérêts a bien des retombées et ne vise pas seulement à influer sur le résultat d’une élection. J'imagine très bien que des tiers pourraient dire ne pas vouloir que cette limite générale de contribution s’applique tout le temps parce que cela réduirait leurs activités qui semblent ressembler un peu à des activités électorales, mais qui ne le sont pas vraiment.

Je peux facilement imaginer d'autres interventions au tribunal pour vraiment rétrécir la portée de cette différence et déterminer où tracer la ligne.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je peux comprendre son application à une organisation telle que Leadnow, mais qu’en est-il d’une organisation environnementale qui affirme chercher à protéger les zones humides tout en défendant d’autres causes? Peut-elle accepter le don de 100 000 $ pour sauver les zones humides, tout en...?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Si l’objectif est d’influencer le gouvernement, vous devez reprendre la définition de publicité électorale ou partisane de manière à permettre aux organisations de tiers de recevoir des contributions et de mener leurs activités habituelles pour faire du lobbying auprès du gouvernement sur des projets de loi en particulier, mais en excluant un champ particulier du domaine de la publicité électorale.

(1245)

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Monsieur Emery, j’ai remarqué une chose au sujet d’un des membres fondateurs de votre conseil; je parle ici de — vous pardonnerez ma prononciation — Nicolas Duchastel de Montrouge.

M. J. Randall Emery:

Nicolas Duchastel de Montrouge, oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

On lui a retiré le droit de voter pendant qu’il vivait aux États-Unis, mais il pouvait présenter sa candidature aux élections fédérales. Comment ça se fait?

M. J. Randall Emery:

Oui, c’est exact. Cela montre simplement que le système est biaisé, qu’il a tendance à favoriser les personnes qui se présentent aux élections plutôt que les personnes qui vont aux urnes. C’était le but poursuivi; il voulait attirer l’attention sur ce fait.

Oui, il s’est présenté aux élections, mais non, il ne pouvait voter pour lui-même.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je crois comprendre qu’il s’est présenté comme candidat indépendant à Calgary aux dernières élections. C’est une histoire intéressante. Face à ces deux droits garantis par la Charte, soit le droit de voter aux élections et le droit de poser sa candidature à ces élections, il ne devrait pas y avoir une hiérarchie.

Je pose la question suivante à tous les deux: devrait-il y avoir une hiérarchie entre ces deux droits? Ne devraient-ils pas être aussi accessibles l’un que l’autre?

M. J. Randall Emery:

L’habilité à poser sa candidature dans des circonscriptions différentes remonte loin dans l’histoire du Canada, jusqu’au tout début. J’oublie quel premier ministre s’était présenté dans l’Est et avait perdu, puis s’était présenté au Québec et avait finalement été élu dans l’Ouest.

Ce sont deux aspects fondamentaux de l’exercice de la liberté d’expression et de la reddition de comptes, et tout citoyen devrait y avoir droit.

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur Turnbull, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Je suis d’accord. Cette contradiction n’est pas logique.

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur Turnbull, en 2014, vous avez été l’un des 450 professeurs signataires d’une lettre ouverte dénonçant le caractère foncièrement erroné du projet de loi sur l’intégrité des élections et demandant qu’il soit entièrement réécrit. Croyez-vous que le projet de loi C-76, s’il est adopté, réparera les erreurs qui entachent la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

Dans cette lettre ouverte, on signale que le droit de vote est garanti par la Charte en tant que partie essentielle de la vie en société. Je sais que vous avez laissé entendre que le projet de loi ne va pas assez loin, et nous avons abordé certaines de ces questions, mais pouvez-vous faire des commentaires sur les changements apportés par le projet de loi C-76 et sur la façon dont il protège ou garantit le droit de vote reconnu par la Charte?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Il y a deux changements majeurs dont je voudrais parler.

Le premier, c’est que les contributions sont considérées comme un mode essentiel de participation au processus politique. C’est pourquoi je suis particulièrement favorable à ce que seuls les particuliers puissent verser des contributions. Je pense que c’est un prolongement de notre activité en tant qu’individu et en tant que peuple qui participent à une société démocratique. Il arrive que le financement politique gagne une mauvaise réputation et nous tentons alors de le limiter le plus possible, au point où nous allons parfois à l’encontre de ce que nous essayons de faire au départ. Comme ça, la protection du droit de verser des contributions est extrêmement importante concernant le processus politique.

Le second, c’est que le projet de loi, à mon avis, fait grandement progresser l’accessibilité, et c’est d’une importance capitale. Par rapport à l’enjeu de la cybersécurité, de nombreux Canadiens hésitent encore à passer au vote électronique et au vote en ligne par crainte des infractions possibles qui pourraient entacher les résultats d’une élection. Je les comprends très bien; il faut absolument tout mettre à l’abri des effractions. De plus, j’abonde dans le sens de M. Milner lorsqu’il dit que le vote est un exercice communautaire et qu’il faut voter avec ses voisins. Je le comprends, et je suis du même avis. Cependant, il y a de nombreux Canadiens pour qui le processus électoral actuel n’est pas accessible. Il n’est vraiment plus possible d’ignorer ce fait, pas que nous n’ayons pu le faire, mais nous devons vraiment régler le problème. Nous devons nous rapprocher beaucoup plus de toute l’acception du terme accessibilité, et c’est ce que fait le projet de loi, à mon avis. Ce n’est pas mon domaine de compétence, alors je ne dirai pas que c’est parfait, mais je pense que nous allons dans la bonne direction, en effet.

(1250)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid, c'est à vous.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La réponse à la question du nom du premier ministre qui a perdu dans l’Est et qui s’est ensuite porté candidat dans l’Ouest, c’est sir John A. Macdonald, qui a perdu à Kingston, circonscription qui, même à l’époque, n’était pas sûre pour les conservateurs. Il s’est ensuite présenté sur l’île de Vancouver, endroit qu’il n’avait jamais visité, mais il a gagné.

Un député: Est-ce exact?

M. Scott Reid: Oui, c'est vrai.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier a perdu au Québec et s’est présenté en Saskatchewan. Encore une fois, je ne crois pas qu’il se soit rendu dans cette circonscription. Mackenzie King s’est lui aussi retrouvé député de la Saskatchewan à un moment donné.

Ce sont les noms que je connais. Il y en a peut-être eu d’autres. Quoi qu’il en soit, c’est arrivé.

J’aimerais poser une question à M. Emery au sujet des Canadiens qui sont à l’étranger, en dehors du pays, pendant plus de cinq ans, concernant leur droit de vote. L’article 3 de la Charte reconnaît le droit de vote.

Considérez-vous qu’il s’agit d’un droit absolu, par opposition à un droit qui peut être restreint « dans des limites qui soient raisonnables et dont la justification puisse se démontrer dans le cadre d’une société libre et démocratique. » Bien sûr, j’utilise le libellé de l’article premier de la Charte, qui permet d’imposer des restrictions dans d’autres parties de la Charte.

M. J. Randall Emery:

C’est la question dont la Cour suprême est saisie en ce moment.

À mon avis, c’est un droit absolu, et cette opinion est partagée par des membres de l’organisation que je représente.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est l’une de ces questions où il faut répondre par oui ou par non. Les deux options sont justifiables.

Si vous répondez par l’affirmative, que c’est en effet un droit absolu, alors permettez-moi de vous poser cette question au sujet de la position prétendument fondée sur de grands principes que le gouvernement adopte dans ce projet de loi. Il affirme que ce droit est consenti à un citoyen canadien, et non à un ancien résident du Canada qui jouit de la citoyenneté canadienne. Si vous êtes à l’extérieur du Canada depuis plus de cinq ans, tant pis pour vous. J’ai des amis qui vivent en Australie, à Adélaïde, et qui sont à l’extérieur du Canada depuis la fin des années 1990. Cette disposition s’appliquerait à eux. Leurs enfants ont eux aussi la citoyenneté canadienne, bien qu’ils n’aient pas vécu ici. Cette mesure législative leur refuse le droit absolu d’aller aux urnes. Est-ce qu’il ne faut pas également comprendre par cela que, dans la mesure où la loi ne fait aucun cas des droits de ces citoyens canadiens, le gouvernement fait échec à la Constitution?

M. J. Randall Emery:

Je ne suis pas sûr…

M. Scott Reid:

Ils ont la citoyenneté canadienne, même s’ils n’ont jamais vécu au Canada, parce que leurs parents sont Canadiens, mais le projet de loi ne s’occupe pas de leur droit de vote.

Cela ne veut-il pas dire que nous sommes toujours dans une situation où…

M. J. Randall Emery:

Oui, parce qu’il faut rentrer au Canada et y vivre.

Nous aimerions qu’il aille plus loin, je crois, mais étant donné le système en place et l’échéance imminente d’Élections Canada, c’est un pas en avant très positif. Je pense que c’est une solution pratique, parce que nous n’avons pas de députés pour les citoyens à l’étranger en ce moment. Peut-être que cela prendra forme dans l’avenir, je ne sais pas, mais…

M. Scott Reid:

Il faudrait peut-être avoir le système qu’ils ont en France et en Italie, c’est-à-dire des circonscriptions qui représentent les citoyens qui vivent à l’étranger. Je prétends qu’il est probablement inconstitutionnel, au Canada, d’avoir un siège qui n’est pas rattaché à une province ou à un territoire, mais on pourrait, je suppose, suggérer un système quelconque en vertu duquel on pourrait déclarer que le dernier lieu de résidence déclaré de leurs parents est considéré comme leur lieu de résidence ou quelque chose du genre. Je pense qu’on pourrait trouver une solution de rechange qui soit constitutionnelle, en principe.

M. J. Randall Emery:

Peut-être. Nous appuyons ce projet de loi, parce qu’il s’occupe de la grande majorité des Canadiens à l’étranger.

(1255)

M. Scott Reid:

Êtes-vous sûr que c’est la grande majorité des Canadiens à l’étranger? Les gens qui ont quitté le Canada et qui vivent à l’étranger depuis plus de cinq ans, par opposition aux enfants de ces gens-là, êtes-vous sûr qu’ils forment la majorité? Je n’en suis pas certain. Je n’en suis vraiment pas certain. Je n’en ai aucune idée.

M. J. Randall Emery:

Il ne faut pas oublier que, depuis 2009, la citoyenneté par filiation fait l’objet de restrictions.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d’accord, mais c’est une chose distincte. Si vous êtes un citoyen, vous avez un droit, un point, c’est tout.

Je vous remercie. J’ai été injuste à votre endroit. Je ne voulais pas vous mettre dans l’embarras; je voulais trouver des failles dans l’argument selon lequel cette mesure s’appuie sur de grands principes plutôt que d’être pragmatique, ce qui a été la façon dont le gouvernement a fait la promotion de ce côté de la médaille. Je pense que c’est un geste pragmatique, un geste tout à fait défendable, mais que ce n’est pas la question de principe que l’on prétend adopter. C’était le but de mes questions.

J'ai terminé, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Turnbull, ma première question s’adresse à vous. C’est une précision sur quelque chose que vous avez dit plus tôt aujourd’hui.

De toute évidence, avec les médias sociaux, nous vivons dans un monde, tout à fait, nouveau quant aux modes de communication et à la capacité de communiquer. Vous avez dit que différentes personnes recevaient des messages différents. Je veux comprendre. Est-ce que c’est un problème pour vous que différentes personnes reçoivent des messages, qui s’appliquent à elles en particulier ou est-ce simplement l’exactitude de ces messages qui vous préoccupe? Prenons l’exemple d’un jeune à qui un parti veut faire part des éléments de son programme en lien avec les jeunes; est-ce que ce ciblage vous pose un problème ou est-ce simplement qu’il y a des inexactitudes dans ce qui est communiqué?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Je suis davantage préoccupée par les inexactitudes possibles, mais je m’interroge aussi sur les messages micro-ciblés.

Traditionnellement, au Canada, les partis politiques, en particulier ceux qui sont victorieux, jouent un rôle dans la construction du pays et offrent des messages et des idéologies, des points de vue que vous mettez de l’avant et qui rassemblent les gens autour d’un point commun. Il n’est pas surprenant que les partis politiques, surtout maintenant que nous avons la technologie, deviennent plus attentifs aux besoins des électeurs actuels et futurs ou des partisans éventuels. Si les partis politiques, et, pour qu’ils ne soient pas en reste, les tiers également, se servent de ces moyens sophistiqués de communication pour adapter leurs messages, je pense qu’il se pourrait que nous en fassions les frais. Cette réceptivité peut être perçue comme positive, mais nous ne consacrons pas forcément assez de temps à élaborer ces beaux messages et ces grandes idées auxquels tout le monde peut s’identifier.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Dans ce projet de loi, il est question de la carte d’information de l’électeur, du recours à un répondant et du pouvoir accru du commissaire en matière de contrôle d’application de la Loi électorale du Canada. Pouvez-vous nous parler de ces trois points et de ce que vous pensez de leur présence dans le projet de loi C-76?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Il est question du recours à un répondant et…

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il est question du recours à un répondant, de la carte d’information de l’électeur et du pouvoir d’exécution du commissaire.

Vous avez déjà fait part de vos préoccupations concernant la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections. Vous avez parlé de certaines de ces choses. Vous vous inquiétiez de l’impossibilité d’avoir recours à un répondant et de la suppression de la carte d’information de l’électeur. À quel point est-ce important à vos yeux que ces éléments se retrouvent dans ce projet de loi?

Mme Lori Turnbull:

C’est important dans la mesure où cela augmente l’accessibilité et fait en sorte que les électeurs sont en mesure de participer. Ainsi les gens qui veulent voter et qui sont admissibles peuvent le faire. À ce titre, je pense que c’est important.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Monsieur Emery, par rapport aux restrictions relatives aux dépenses de tiers, considérez-vous votre organisation comme une tierce partie? Est-ce qu’elle y serait assujettie? Dans l’affirmative, quelles seraient les répercussions de ce projet de loi sur votre organisation?

M. J. Randall Emery:

Je ne suis pas certain qu’on serait touché, parce que nous n’intervenons pas dans les campagnes partisanes.

Ce qui m’importe, relativement à la question de l’influence étrangère, c’est que les citoyens canadiens soient toujours libres de participer au processus. C’est ce que nous aimerions voir dans toute loi se rapportant à l’argent provenant de l’étranger. Il y a certes des préoccupations légitimes dont il faut tenir compte, mais nous aimerions que la loi dise quelque part qu’un citoyen canadien est toujours libre de participer au processus. Je ne vois rien qui s’y oppose, mais c’est ce que nous espérons voir protégé.

(1300)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Monsieur Turnbull, nous venons de parler d’accessibilité.

Je m’adresse maintenant à M. Emery.

Le projet de loi contient des dispositions dont je suis fière, car elles améliorent l’accès des personnes handicapées. Notamment, on étend la définition de ce qui constitue une déficience, au-delà de la limitation fonctionnelle. Pouvez-vous nous montrer l’importance des dispositions du projet de loi à cet égard et le sentiment que vous inspire leur inclusion dans le projet de loi C-76?

M. J. Randall Emery:

Le plus grand avantage de ce projet de loi, c’est qu’il élimine une dernière circonstance en droit où tous n’ont pas les mêmes droits. Il est très important pour nous, et pas seulement à titre personnel, de renforcer la communauté canadienne dans son ensemble. L’autre avantage, c’est qu’il établit clairement un député, qui rend des comptes devant tous les citoyens. Comme je l’ai déjà dit, de nos jours, il arrive que des citoyens cherchent de l’aide, mais ils ne savent pas à qui s’adresser. Je dirais que ce sont là les deux principaux avantages de ce projet de loi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous vous remercions beaucoup d’être venu. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de votre présence et de vos sages conseils. Nous avons beaucoup appris.

Monsieur Cullen, je crois comprendre que vous avez maintenant le libellé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’ai reçu de bons conseils du greffier et d’autres personnes. Convoquer un témoin, c’est plutôt radical, et je veux faire attention. Ces groupes ont déjà témoigné, et presque tous les témoins que nous avons entendus jusqu’à maintenant nous ont dit que les médias sociaux ont un rôle important à jouer, donc il n’est pas anodin d’agir ainsi avec deux témoins importants.

Une formule qui nous a été proposée permet, je crois, de procéder en deux étapes. La première consiste à les convoquer de nouveau, essentiellement. Nous siégeons ce soir; s’ils ne répondent pas à notre convocation, nous agirons plus énergiquement ce soir.

La motion se lit comme suit : « Que le greffier invite les représentants de Facebook à comparaître devant le Comité le 6 ou le 7 juin et si aucune réponse ne lui parvient avant 18 h 30 aujourd’hui, qu’il assigne Kevin Chan de Facebook et Michelle Austin de Twitter à comparaître… » Nous ajoutons le jour et l’heure ce soir.

Le président:

Et Twitter?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne l’ai pas mentionné? « Facebook et Twitter à comparaître devant le Comité le 6 ou le 7 juin... »

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je trouve ce délai un peu court. Nous pourrions leur accorder 24 heures. Je suis conscient du problème que nous avons, que nous sommes le 5 juin, mais le choix des 6 ou 7 juin est une date limite qui a été fixée pour une raison qu’on ne peut imputer ni à Twitter, ni à Facebook, ni à personne d’autre. C’est le gouvernement qui est pressé. Si j’étais le destinataire d’un tel envoi, je jugerais le délai déraisonnable. En toute justice, nous devons communiquer avec eux. Il est 13 heures passées et les bureaux ferment à 18 h 30. Je n’ai aucune idée de l’horaire de travail dans cette industrie; ils ont probablement une journée de travail très longue. Vous savez où je veux en venir. Je dirais qu’il faut leur laisser 24 heures. C’est la bonne chose à faire. Si je peux me permettre, leur comparution le 6 juin, le 7 juin ou la semaine prochaine serait raisonnable.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Puis-je formuler une courte réponse, monsieur le président? Je sais que Ruby voudra aussi intervenir.

Le problème, c’est... Je ne voulais pas lancer la discussion sur cette question, parce que nous sommes en pleine réunion, et, encore une fois, je présente mes excuses aux témoins, mais le problème, c’est que si nous avions un calendrier des travaux devant les yeux et que nous savions qu’à telle ou telle date nous entendrions des témoins, alors la motion...

Je comprends toutefois l’argument de M. Reid. Je ne veux pas être déraisonnable ni offenser personne. Je veux faire valoir ma position.

M. Scott Reid: Très bien.

M. Nathan Cullen: Pour la gouverne des membres du Comité, nous avons déjà communiqué avec ces deux groupes, alors ils savent que nous…

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’invoque rapidement le Règlement. Pendant que nous discutons, pouvons-nous libérer les témoins?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bien sûr.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Mme Lori Turnbull:

Ce témoin est très heureux.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous devez partir. J’ai une autre motion qui dit que vous devez partir.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: Merci, David.

C’est tout ce que j’avais à dire sur le point soulevé par Scott. Le problème, c’est que si nous disons 24 heures, je ne sais pas pendant combien de temps le Comité siège et entend des témoins. Franchement, je ne sais pas. Nous essayons d’en parler, mais le gouvernement a préparé une motion... Tout le monde part du principe que c’est ce qui va se passer au Comité, mais techniquement et raisonnablement, le Comité ne dispose pas de cet échéancier.

Si nous attendons 24 heures, nous les invitons, et ils disent qu’ils seraient heureux de venir la semaine prochaine, mais que nous n’avons pas d’audiences la semaine prochaine, alors je suis dans l’obligation, en tant que membre du Comité, de vouloir entendre ces témoins. Il y a d’autres membres du Comité qui veulent aussi les entendre. C’est pourquoi il y a une certaine urgence, mais encore une fois, je ne sais pas quel est notre échéancier parce qu’aucun d’entre nous ne le sait.

(1305)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que ce que je dis est consigné au compte rendu.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D’après ce que Nathan vient de présenter, j’aimerais proposer un amendement ou un ajout à votre motion, afin que nous puissions savoir où nous en sommes et quand nous commençons et finissons les amendements et l’étude article par article.

Je pense que ce que M. Reid a dit est raisonnable. Nous pourrions recevoir les représentants de Facebook et de Twitter d’ici lundi, présenter des amendements d'ici mardi, puis commencer notre étude article par article mercredi.

Le président: Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

De plus, si vous me permettez d’ajouter quelque chose, je pense que nous avons convenu au début — je ne sais pas s’il y avait une motion, mais nous l’avons présentée, et je pense que c’était juste — que le ministre intervienne également...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C’est avant l’étude article par article, n’est-ce pas?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui, c’est avant l’étude article par article. Si les amendements doivent être présentés mardi et que nous commençons l’étude article par article la semaine prochaine, nous l’aurons, puisque nous manquons de témoins de toute façon...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Chris Bittle: ... Twitter et Facebook.

Ils ont tous été invités. Nous avons des créneaux vides. Nous pourrions parler des médias sociaux et du ministre lundi, puis poursuivre comme Ruby l’a suggéré.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour clarifier l’amendement, nous proposons que les représentants de Facebook et Twitter — et le ministre, selon Chris — comparaissent avec d’autres témoins aux réunions de lundi, ce que nous n’avons pas encore établi, mais qui pourrait...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... et passer à l’étude article par article d’ici mardi.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Non...

M. Nathan Cullen: Non. Je suis désolé. Les amendements d’ici mardi...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les amendements seraient présentés mardi et l’étude article par article commencerait mercredi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est la proposition. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, l’amendement visait-il à modifier le délai de 24 heures? Je suis désolé. Je viens de...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, c’est...

Le président:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] devrait-on alors les faire comparaître jusqu’à lundi?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, et bien sûr cela m’inquiète parce que la proposition porte maintenant sur celle dont je soupçonne — mais je ne sais pas — que les membres du Comité voudront peut-être parler, c’est-à-dire une proposition visant à terminer l’étude du projet de loi.

Maintenant, ce que vous proposez ne concerne pas seulement Twitter, Facebook et le ministre. C’est tout le bataclan.

M. Blake Richards: J’invoque le Règlement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La période de 24 heures serait volontaire et les témoins ne seraient pas assignés à comparaître, n’est-ce pas?

M. Blake Richards:

J’invoque le Règlement.

Mme Ruby Sahota: D’ici lundi.

M. Blake Richards: J’invoque le Règlement.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce recevable pour...? Je ne connais pas la réponse à cette question. C’est pourquoi je pose la question.

Nous discutons de quelque chose et M. Cullen parle d’inviter ou d'obliger certains témoins à comparaître. L’amendement porte sur la durée de l’étude, sur le moment où les amendements seraient... À mon avis, ce n’est pas dans le contexte de... Cela ne semble pas être un amendement à cette motion. C’est un sujet totalement différent.

M. Scott Reid: Cela dépasse la portée de la motion.

M. Blake Richards: Je ne pense pas que ce soit un amendement acceptable à cette motion. Par conséquent, nous devrions probablement examiner simplement la situation de M. Cullen et ensuite l’autre question. Si le gouvernement choisit de présenter une motion d’une autre nature, je suppose que c’est son droit.

Cependant, je ferai également remarquer à ce moment-ci — pendant que j’invoque le Règlement, je vais faire un deuxième rappel au Règlement — que nous avons dépassé l’heure de la réunion. Si nous nous occupions de quelque chose dont nous pourrions traiter rapidement... mais nous commençons maintenant à parler de la date à laquelle les amendements seront présentés, des témoins et de toutes ces autres choses. C’est probablement une conversation beaucoup plus longue. Serait-il préférable de prévoir... Je ne sais pas quand. Toutefois, le fait est que d'abord je ne pense pas que les amendements soient recevables et, deuxièmement, qu’en est-il du moment choisi?

Le président:

Les membres du Comité consentiraient-ils à ce que nous nous limitions à traiter cette motion sur ces deux témoins séparément?

(1310)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non. Je crois que la question du calendrier et de la façon dont nous pouvons nous organiser a été soulevée. C’est difficile à comprendre si nous n’avons pas une idée du moment, alors je pense que...

M. Blake Richards:

C’est un rappel au Règlement et je demande au président de rendre une décision.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C’est un amendement que je veux proposer, je ne veux donc pas le retirer.

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, je signale que je crois que l’amendement est irrecevable et je demande au président de rendre une décision.

M. Scott Reid:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] communiquer les uns avec les autres, parce que tout ce qu’on dit n'aura pas une incidence sur les amendements.

Le président:

J’estime que les amendements — si vous ajoutez toute l’annexe et tout le reste — dépassent la portée de la motion initiale. Vous pouvez modifier l’heure, mais les autres devraient être traités séparément.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D’accord, alors je pourrais présenter une motion distincte. Puis-je vous poser la question suivante? Dans cette motion, peut-il y avoir une date finale pour la convocation des témoins, qui devrait être lundi parce que nous convoquons ce témoin à la fin de la liste des témoins?

Le président:

Cela dépasse toujours la portée de cette motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D’accord. Tant pis.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Encore une fois, l’intention est là. Je veux que les médias sociaux comparaissent devant nous parce que je pense que c’est essentiel pour éclairer les amendements que nous pourrions apporter à ce projet de loi.

Nous devons passer à la conversation que Ruby a également amorcée à propos de la façon dont nous gérons le reste du temps. Je propose que nous le fassions le plus tôt possible; je ne sais pas si nous en avons le temps cet après-midi... S’il y a un moyen d’envoyer au moins un avis à des représentants de Facebook et de Twitter pour les informer que nous nous engageons dans une voie où nous leur demandons encore une fois d'être présents et où il y a une assignation à comparaître. Je ne veux pas que les deux soient complètement imbriqués, même si cela pourrait finir par être ce qui se passe ici. Nous devons avoir ces conversations.

Peu importe que je sois d’accord ou pas avec le président, mais oui nous avons commencé à trop en élargir la portée.

(1315)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quel est le délai que vous envisagez pour la comparution des témoins? Vingt-quatre heures...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends très bien l’argument de Scott. Nous ne voulons pas que ce soit demain, par exemple, et s’ils ne se présentent pas, ils sont alors considérés comme terribles. Ce qui nous inquiète au sujet de la période de 24 heures, c’est que si nous l’accordons ce soir... Oh oui, si nous la rendons publique ce soir, ils pourront comparaître d’ici jeudi. Si c’est ce que nous demandons, c’est raisonnable. D’accord? Voici la mise en garde actuelle, à savoir que s’ils ne répondent pas à l’avertissement de comparaître d’ici jeudi, nous aurons alors quelque chose de plus grave...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ensuite, c’est lundi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce pourrait être jeudi ou lundi de la semaine prochaine, selon ce que le Comité décidera à propos du calendrier. Je sais que ce n’est pas une motion très claire, mais j’essaie de conserver les intentions.

M. Scott Reid:

Nathan, cela me semble clair. Si nous devions formuler cela comme une motion, il semble que ce que vous avez dit, c’est que les représentants des organismes pertinents seraient invités sur-le-champ, et que — disons — s'ils n’ont pas répondu par l’affirmative d’ici midi demain, alors une assignation serait émise pour les personnes nommées — vous avez les noms ici — et la date de leur comparution serait fixée à jeudi, je suppose, à l'heure de leur choix.

Vous nous donnerez une idée de la portée de cette motion au cours de ces heures ou du temps qui sera déterminé avec le greffier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je pense que nous dirons simplement que notre comité doit se réunir jeudi matin.

M. Scott Reid:

Quelque chose du genre, point final. C’est ce que je suggérerais.

Pour que ce soit bien clair, Nathan, mon objection n’était pas...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je comprends.

M. Scott Reid:

Il serait difficile de les faire venir ici demain, mais l’essentiel, c’est qu’ils n’ont aucun moyen de répondre parce que c’est après nos heures de travail, et nous signifierons une assignation, qui doit être lancée pendant les heures de travail. Il y aurait beaucoup de...

Qu’est-ce que c’est?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous allons l'envoyer sur Twitter.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous avez raison.

Quoi qu’il en soit, c’est ce que je suggère. Est-ce que cela vous donne une formulation satisfaisante?

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est mon intention.

Le président:

Le comité est d’accord.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Oui, monsieur Fillmore.

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, nous allons appuyer les propos de M. Cullen, mais j’allais simplement rappeler au Comité que nous avions convenu de cesser d’entendre des témoins jeudi. Cela figurait dans le 10e rapport du Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure, qui a été adopté. Nous avons dit que nous finirions d’entendre les témoins jeudi.

Je vous rappelle que nous nous sommes déjà occupés des témoins. Nous allons faire une exception à cette règle maintenant. J’aimerais demander que, lorsque nous reprendrons nos travaux ce soir, nous abordions immédiatement les autres éléments de Ruby.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que cela concerne les travaux du Comité?

Un député: Oui.

Le président:

D’accord. Comment voulez-vous insérer les travaux du Comité cet après-midi ou ce soir?

M. Blake Richards:

Un instant, monsieur le président. Ne sommes-nous pas en train d’examiner la motion de M. Cullen?

Le président:

Nous en avons déjà convenu.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est adopté? D’accord, j’avais mal compris.

Le président:

Oui, nous nous sommes mis d’accord. Le secrétaire parlementaire dit simplement que cet après-midi lorsque nous reprendrons nos travaux...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvons-nous entendre les témoins d’abord puis passer aux travaux du Comité? De cette façon, au cas où nous dépasserions un peu le temps imparti, les témoins n'auraient pas à attendre. Je déteste quand cela se produit.

Le président:

Cela vous convient-il?

Le greffier:

Voulez-vous que je lise la liste des témoins?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Bien sûr.

Le greffier:

De 15 h 30 à 16 h 30 cet après-midi, nous accueillons la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. De 16 h 30 à 17 h 30, nous recevons le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et les Forces canadiennes. De 17 h 30 à 18 h 30, nous entendrons Ian Lee, de l’Université Carleton, et Arthur Hamilton du Parti conservateur du Canada.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est celui que vous voulez supprimer.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: Non, non. Ce n’est pas ce que je voulais dire. Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée est évidemment important. Les Forces canadiennes le sont aussi. Le tout dernier groupe de témoins est également important, mais si nous devons emprunter 15 minutes, je ne veux pas les déduire du temps accordé au commissaire à la protection de la vie privée.

Le président:

Nous pourrions poursuivre un peu après 20 h 30.

Une voix: Vous voulez dire 18 h 30.

Le président: Oh oui, 18 h 30.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Remarquez à quel point le personnel a réagi plus rapidement que n’importe quel député... « Quoi? »

Le président:

C’est bien. D’une façon ou d’une autre, nous réglerons cette question après avoir entendu les témoins.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 05, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.