header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-06-05 PROC 111

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon. Welcome to meeting 111 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We are pleased to be joined by officials from the Communications Security Establishment, Scott Jones, Deputy Chief, Information Technology Security; and Jason Besner, Director, Cyber Threat Evaluation Centre, Information Technology Security. As well, from the Canadian Federation of Students, we have Coty Zachariah, National Chairperson, and Justine De Jaegher, Executive Director.

I have some good news for the committee. Twitter has agreed—

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

I sent the email to Mr. Chan from Facebook and to Twitter as well, and I've been in contact with both of them by phone or by email. Mr. Chan said that he would be able to be here on Thursday afternoon, and I'm still waiting to hear back from Twitter with an official response.

The Chair:

Mr. Jones, you can make your opening statement. Thank you for coming.

Mr. Scott Jones (Deputy Chief, Information Technology Security, Communications Security Establishment):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. My name is Scott Jones and I'm the head of cybersecurity at the Communications Security Establishment. As mentioned, I'm accompanied by Jason Besner, the Director of the Cyber Threat Evaluation Centre, or CTEC, at CSE. Thank you for inviting us here today.[Translation]

As I believe it has been sometime since a CSE official appeared before this committee, please allow me to provide you with a brief overview of CSE's cybersecurity mandate.

For over 70 years, CSE has helped provide and protect Canada's most sensitive information.

In addition to our foreign signals intelligence and lawful assistance mandates, CSE, as Canada's centre of excellence for cyber operations, is mandated to help ensure the protection of information and information infrastructures of importance to the Government of Canada.

In this effort, CSE provides advice, guidance, and services to Government of Canada departments and agencies and to owners of other systems of importance to the Government of Canada. CSE works closely with partners from across government as part of this important effort, some of whom you have already heard from as part of your study.

(1540)

[English]

As you know, the Minister of Democratic Institutions asked CSE to analyze risks to Canada's political and electoral activities from hackers. In response, CSE released an assessment of cyber-threats to Canada's democratic process. This assessment, released in June 2017, was developed by looking at the experiences of elections around the world over the last 10 years. The report found that Canada is not immune from cyber-threat activity against its elections.

While the threat in Canada was assessed as generally low sophistication, political parties, politicians, and the media are vulnerable to cyber-threats and influence operations. Indeed, the report assessed that in 2015 Canada's democratic process was targeted by low-sophistication cyber-threat activity.

There are many types of threat actors who could target our democratic process, and CSE plays a vital role in preventing them from achieving their goals. By providing advice to government departments, political parties, and the public on how they can better protect themselves against cyber-threats, we help prevent harmful compromises.

Since publishing the report on cyber-threats to Canada's democratic process in June, CSE has held productive meetings with political parties, parliamentarians, and electoral officials to discuss the report and its findings and to offer cybersecurity advice and guidance. For example, at the federal level, CSE officials have met with parliamentarians, representatives from all political parties with standing in the House of Commons, and in partnership with Elections Canada, we met with a majority of federally registered political parties in Canada.

We have been asked by the Minister of Democratic Institutions to continue our analysis of cyber-threats to Canada's democratic process. Our 2017 report was produced with the intent of it being updated as required. Our analysis will continue to look at the rapidly changing technological and threat environment, and will help characterize and understand the evolving threats to our democratic processes.

These efforts are part of CSE's goal of supporting an enhanced understanding of cybersecurity issues and will help increase resilience against threats to Canada's democratic process. In addition, this ongoing analysis will help inform briefings to Government of Canada officials, political parties, and parliamentarians.

Our ongoing efforts are set within the context of broader initiatives taken by the Government of Canada to bolster cybersecurity. Through budget 2018, the government has announced its intention to create a Canadian centre for cybersecurity within CSE as part of a new “to be announced” Canadian cybersecurity strategy. This initiative is complemented by the enhanced statutory framework proposed under Bill C-59, which would help strengthen CSE's capacity to thwart cyber-threats. This important legislation includes key provisions to advance the tools available to government in this domain, set within an enhanced accountability regime.

Thank you, and we look forward to answering your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Coty Zachariah, from the Canadian Federation of Students.

Mr. Coty Zachariah (National Chairperson, Canadian Federation of Students):

[Witness speaks in Mohawk]

I was just speaking Mohawk and said, “Hello, everyone.” My name is Coty Zachariah, or “He Speaks in the Wind”. I come from the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte First Nation, located near Kingston. I'm also the national chairperson of the Canadian Federation of Students and represent around 650,000 students across the country at the post-secondary level.

In October 2014, we joined the Council of Canadians in a charter challenge to the voter suppression elements of the so-called Fair Elections Act. Our primary concerns about the act were with regard to prohibiting the authority of the Chief Electoral Officer, or CEO, to authorize the use of the voter information cards as valid ID for voting, and limiting the CEO's authority to carry out voter education and outreach.

Students face additional barriers to voting, notably that students move frequently, often up to twice a year. As a result, common identification cards do not indicate the address that students live at on election day, or their names are not on the voters list in the poll or riding that they live in while they attend school. Moreover, by limiting the CEO's authority to carry out voter education and outreach, students, who are often new voters, are likely to be more confused about the process.

Despite these barriers in the last election, the CFS undertook a massive, non-partisan elections campaign that worked to mobilize students to come out in record numbers to vote. In 2015, 70,000 student voters took part in the democratic process at on-campus polling stations. It led to an expansion of that initial pilot project within Elections Canada. For 18- to 24-year-olds, turnout was 57.1%, compared to 38.8% in 2011. This increase of 18.3 percentage points is the largest increase of voting engagement in any demographic in the country. However, this increase was in spite of the Fair Elections Act and students still faced issues.

To quote the Chief Electoral Officer's post-2015 election retrospective report: As in the previous two elections, problems with voter identification at the polls were more often related to proof of address. The labour force survey after the 42nd general election asked non-voters why they did not vote. In terms of reasons related to the electoral process, the inability to prove identity or address was the main reason cited ... and was more often cited among those aged 18 to 24.... Based on estimations from the survey, that amounts to approximately 172,700 electors. Among them, some 49,600 (28.7%) said they went to the polling station, but did not vote because they were not able to prove their identity and address. Approximately 39% of that group were aged 18 to 34.

We at CSF find that unacceptable. Students, however, are encouraged to see that Bill C-76 would make substantial reform to the Canada Elections Act, including the amendments formerly set in Bill C-33, and we look forward to seeing it passed.

We are discouraged, however, that these reforms are coming so late. It seems likely that even if Bill C-76 proceeds expeditiously, it would not make it through the Senate and be proclaimed into force until 2019, making it unlikely that Elections Canada could fully implement the bill's reforms before the next general election in October of next year. It seems likely that it is our court case with the Council of Canadians that might result in the necessary reforms around voter suppression being implemented prior to this election, a regretful outcome of a delayed process around Bill C-33 that we would like noted.

We believe student and youth participation in the democratic process is something to be celebrated and not discouraged. We hope that Bill C-76 will promote this principle.

Thank you.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll begin our round of questions, starting with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

My question is to our friends Mr. Jones and Mr. Besner.

What services does CSE provide to Elections Canada and political parties?

Mr. Scott Jones:

There are a few areas. We've been working with Elections Canada on general architecture, advice, and guidance, things such as supply-chain integrity, contractual clauses, and so on, as they start to establish the infrastructure for the election. In addition, though, we've also worked with them in the development of the threat assessment itself, just to ensure that we were maintaining neutrality and not stepping into what is the domain of Elections Canada as a non-government entity, an entity of Parliament.

Further to that, though, we are also looking at how to actively participate and work with Elections Canada in terms of defending the infrastructure that is being deployed in support of election 2019 to ensure that it is properly protected and is able to proceed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

From your point of view, what's the greatest threat to cybersecurity in parties and in elections in general? Is it technical issues or is it social engineering?

Mr. Scott Jones:

I think it's a mix. If you look at political parties and politicians as candidates, the lack of advice that can be practically implemented and easy to use...technology itself is a barrier to that. It is hard to implement proper security right now. It's not simply something that you can just buy. Frankly, the technology we use needs to be improved drastically itself.

We do provide advice and guidance in terms of things people can do themselves. Everything takes time. We all know there's probably not a large IT organization behind every candidate or behind every party; it's what's necessary to run the election. The biggest challenge is that right now cybersecurity takes a tremendous amount of effort and it takes expertise. It should become secure by default and design rather than you having to secure yourself.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any such thing as a completely secure system?

Mr. Scott Jones:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we were to go down the road of electronic voting, which isn't talked about a lot, how secure would that be? Or how easy would that be to compromise, in your view?

Mr. Scott Jones:

It all depends on how early you get in and start working on security. If you look at security from the very beginning, you can design a system that is able to protect itself, that's able to detect when there is malicious activity happening, and that is able to assure that the data itself has integrity. That starts from the beginning, so that security is designed as an integral part. When we look at security at the end, it interferes with our ability to use the system; it interferes with our ability as users to interact.

The key aspect of going with online voting—and there are a number of benefits that I know have been discussed—is really to get in early and design it from the start for the security environment we face, which is one of a number of threats. It doesn't necessarily need to be a state threat, but sometimes the threat of mayhem and the ability to just do something.... Enthusiasts are actually a significant risk at this point as well.

(1550)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

What can we as politicians do to protect ourselves from cyber-threats, both during elections and between them?

Mr. Scott Jones:

We have a number of things. One is simply configuring when you're using mobile devices. Obviously as members of Parliament you have to travel quite extensively, but in your ridings, etc., we have a number of pieces of advice and guidance on our website. I know that we've actually made them available as well through the House of Commons IT staff. As well, we work really closely with that IT staff in terms of increasing the security you have as parliamentarians using your infrastructure.

There are some simple things that can be done in terms of how you use your IT, how you configure it, and the passwords you set. How do you manage your environment? Who do you give access to for your account? Who do you give access to for your equipment?

Some of that mobile security guidance is one of the pieces of advice that I would encourage everybody to use. It's freely available on the Internet site of CSE. Those are some concrete steps that should be done by everybody.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is your assessment generally that Elections Canada and we as political parties and as politicians are properly understanding the threat you're presenting to them and are reacting appropriately?

Mr. Scott Jones:

Elections Canada has reacted very quickly. We started working with them before the 2015 election. That has continued unbroken since. They're very aware of the rapidly evolving environment.

I think one of the issues we have in terms of dealing with individual politicians and political parties is that it's just one of the issues that everybody has to tackle along with everything else they're facing. There's the ongoing, day-to-day business that you all have to face, and cybersecurity is yet another thing on top of that.

How can we work together to make it easy? I think that's one of the key things. That's where we need to really work in society to raise the bar on cybersecurity so that you don't have to do something special. We should all have at least a basic level of cybersecurity by default.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is hacking—or what some people call cracking—of a political party or political system illegal, and is it pursuable in any meaningful way?

Mr. Scott Jones:

It's probably best left to the RCMP. Anything that is illegal interference with a computer system or any type of activity would probably qualify, but it's probably best left for my colleagues in the RCMP to address.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Earlier, I mentioned social engineering as a big risk. What can you recommend to people to protect against social engineering? All the volunteers in the offices have access to databases and it's pretty easy to convince them, I suspect. Do you have thoughts on that?

Mr. Scott Jones:

Yes. With social engineering, I think the thing they're usually taking advantage of is time. How quickly...? You're busy, so they want to catch you off guard and get you to click on something. In social engineering, I'm really talking about them trying to convince you they're somebody they're not, so that you reveal a password, a critical piece of information, or something they need to be able to get into your systems.

One of the key things we always say is that just because somebody has called you and seems to know something, don't trust it. Ask a question or, for example, say what we always say in the banking context, which is that you'll call them back. You say, “Give me a file number and I will look on the back of my credit card and I will call you with the file number.” Then I know that at least I've called the right place. That's a simple step, but it's things like that.... Unfortunately, approaching everything with a little bit of suspicion is one of those things that's necessary in the cybersecurity context now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If as a campaign volunteer or candidate I were to suspect that there is something amiss informatically, would I go to you at CSE to find out what is amiss, or if I'm just crazy or it really is a threat that's taking place?

Mr. Scott Jones:

I think the thing right now is that it wouldn't be CSE's lead. That would really be the lead of Public Safety Canada and the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre, at least in the broader context of a larger piece of infrastructure, but as the Canadian centre for cybersecurity stands up, it would definitely be the cyber centre that would be a place to come to.

In general, though, we'd be looking to leverage some of the other activities going on, such as the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre and some of the awareness campaigns—for example, “Get Cyber Safe”—to just bolster the level of defence and the general knowledge that's out there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I told you—and it's slightly off topic, but it's on topic—that the House of Commons once told me that I could only use Internet Explorer on our computers because it's the only browser considered secure, how would you react?

Mr. Scott Jones:

I would say that we have to evaluate software constantly in terms of which is the most up to date. The key thing, no matter what you're using, is to ensure that it's up to date and patched. Those are the critical factors.

(1555)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. My connection has been reset, so thank you for that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Now we'll go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you. We appreciate all of you being here today.

I'll start with the Canadian Federation of Students. I'm not sure who wants to answer. Mr. Zachariah could, I guess, but it's up to you. There are a few things I want to touch on.

First of all, I note that you were registered as a third party advocacy group in the last election. I want to first of all get a bit of context on that and then ask you for your thoughts on the changes in this legislation around third parties in terms of how those changes will impact you and whether there's anything more you'd like to see.

I see that you've spent about $15,000 on social media advertising, so I guess I'll back up here. Are you funded through student dues or do you receive donations and contributions? Could you tell me how you're funded for those purposes?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher (Executive Director, Canadian Federation of Students):

We're funded 100% by membership dues.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. There would be no contributions that would be received from anyone outside those dues?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

That's right, with I think the exception of when we run our days of action. Sometimes there will be coalition partners who donate in-kind materials, resources, etc.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would you have had any contributions coming from foreign sources?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Are you talking about small contributions or would there be any major contributions from different sources?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

For our election campaign or for a day of action or something like that?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, I guess for any purpose.

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

For anything.... I guess it depends on what you consider small or large, but—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let's say over the contribution limit of political parties. That's roughly $1,500.

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

For an election campaign, no. Perhaps for a day of action we would see a bigger donation from a solidarity partner.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

That $15,000 in the last election on social media advertising, what would that consist of? What type of advertising? What would you have done? What would it have been promoting?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

In the last federal election, we ran a get-out-the-vote campaign, primarily telling students how to vote, what kinds of ID they would need, and where polling stations were located. Oftentimes, there's confusion about which riding they should be voting in. Is it their parents' riding? Is it where they're going to school? A lot of it was informational and just promoting the idea of participating in the system.

Some of it would have been links to our page around issues that our students democratically identified as being important in the election. It was a non-partisan campaign. We don't support any particular party or candidate; however, we did identify through our membership some key issues that students wanted to see talked about in the election.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let me ask about both those things.

First of all, I think this is probably a brief question on the issues part of it. Would that be one of these types of campaigns that you often see from different organizations or groups in terms of “here are the issues that we've identified as important, and here are the different parties' or candidates' stances on those issues”? Would it have gone any further than that to say “we think these parties are recommendable and these parties aren't”? What would that look like?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

That's right. For both of us, the election was actually before our terms, but I believe a survey was sent out to all political parties on the issues that had been identified, and we published those responses verbatim.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I appreciate that.

On the other part, actually, that drew up something interesting, because it's something that I've argued for in the past and that I think Elections Canada doesn't do a good enough job on, which is to let people know exactly what their options are for voting and how they can vote.

I've even brought up the idea that it's never really promoted that you can vote at almost any point during the election. There are a lot of ways to vote. On the forms of ID that are acceptable, that's another thing that I don't think is promoted well enough. I agree with you on the idea about students and where they vote: is it in the at-home riding or in the school-home riding?

These are all things that I think Elections Canada needs to do a better job of, and obviously you must agree, because you felt there was a need to advertise those things yourselves, which would tell me that you think Elections Canada wasn't doing a sufficient job of that. Would that be accurate?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

I think Elections Canada worked very well within the parameters it was allowed to operate under in the last election. We would, however, like to see a greater opportunity for us to work with Elections Canada to better promote these kinds of things.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Could you clarify what exactly it was that would have prevented them from being able to promote those types of things? I know that in the last changes to the elections law it was clarified that it was supposed to be their role. What prevented them from doing that?

(1600)

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

Right. I guess that's more in terms of our relationship with them and if we had worked more closely together to promote specific demographics.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I appreciate that you picked up some of the slack there. I certainly hope that they'll do a little better job on this.

To go back to where I was going with that, it was the third party rules. There are obviously some changes in this legislation. I'm sure you're familiar with them. I won't reiterate what they are. What are your thoughts on those changes? Do you think there's something in there that will be of concern to you or will affect you negatively? Are there any other changes that you might suggest?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

We're generally supportive of the legislation, including those changes. The one area in which we really can't proclaim to be any kind of expert is more on the cybersecurity pieces. Obviously we're glad that you're speaking to experts in that area.

However, other than that, we're quite happy with this legislation. Again, our concern is primarily with the timing. We feel it's a bit late, unfortunately. We were hoping to see Bill C-33 passed much earlier to make sure that it came into effect before the next election.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I have one minute left. I guess that will leave just enough time for the last question, or for this question anyway.

On the legislation itself, obviously it's a large piece of legislation, with I think 401 different clauses, so it touches on a lot of different areas. You've mentioned a couple of things that you're supportive of, and I wish there were time to get into some of those things, but could you give me any sense of any concerns you have? I assume that there must be one or two things that you might have some concerns about or that you think are missing. Outside of the timing, what would you want to share with us in that regard?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

Again, we really wanted to emphasize that the elements featured in Bill C-33 are again featured in this bill. We're leaving some of the other areas up to other experts that you'll be speaking to.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Fair enough. I appreciate your time.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to our witnesses for being here today.

The student vote went up by how much?

Mr. Coty Zachariah:

It was 18.3%.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

By 18.3%: do you think it was because of the unfair election act, in part? Was it an unintentional motivator, an unintentional gift, to young people to get out and vote when someone said that maybe they shouldn't have the right to vote?

Mr. Coty Zachariah:

I think there's long been this kind of theory that young people are apathetic or don't really care to take part in the democratic process, but what we found is that sometimes people are just really confused about the process. That's why we emphasized more information and more access, and we had a lot of success with our on-campus polling stations.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just as a parenthetical thing, what kinds of issues do you think drove people? Eighteen per cent is a huge jump under any demographic.

Mr. Coty Zachariah:

It's the biggest jump.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What kinds of issues were students and young people coming back to you folks with and saying “this is why I'm voting this time”? Were there certain issues that presented themselves? One or two or three...?

Mr. Coty Zachariah:

Yes. I believe tuition was a huge one. It seems to be going up every year. Young people needed to have their voices heard. We heard that from almost every province.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Anything else?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

Youth unemployment was a major issue that was also identified. Among our student parent demographic, child care was identified as a major concern. Then there was our advocacy around the post-secondary student support program. The funding for indigenous learners was also major, I would say.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thanks. That's helpful.

To our security friends—I don't get to say that very often—what did you say about the 2015 election? Was it that there was a low-skill threat...?

Mr. Scott Jones:

Low-sophistication activity.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

A low-sophistication threat: what does that mean?

Mr. Scott Jones:

That would mean the normal use of things, such as low-level denial of service attacks and things like that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

On party websites, or...?

Mr. Scott Jones:

On things like that; they're attempts to deface, usually hacktivist-type activity.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Were any countries or national governments identified?

Mr. Scott Jones:

No, not that we had seen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The Government of Canada kicked out four Russian diplomats earlier this year for using their diplomatic status to undermine Canada's security or interfere in our democracy in the 2015 election.

Mr. Scott Jones:

There were some pieces outside of the cyber realm. In terms of any further details on that, I'm probably not the right person to talk about it from the cyber perspective.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Not the right person because...?

Mr. Scott Jones:

It's outside my area of expertise and also not an area that we would cover.

(1605)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So there were no Russian cyber-attacks that CSEC is aware of.

Mr. Scott Jones:

The report said that we didn't see any nation-state cyber type of activity.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I guess Russia being a nation-state, it would include them.

It's just confusing, because that's a pretty big deal. I saw the news, and I thought, “Holy mackerel, Russia attacked our democracy. We should find out how and not let it happen again.” We asked Elections Canada, and they said the same thing you just said. I'd like to find someone—maybe the government can provide a witness—who can tell us exactly what happened so that Canadians are aware.

Now, there are different types of hacks. There are people just looking to cause disorder, but you also mentioned “enthusiasts”? What's an enthusiast?

Mr. Scott Jones:

Sometimes an enthusiast is somebody who does it just because they can. They want to show that they can actually achieve something. They can achieve their goal.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They're not politically motivated, you mean? They're just showing off?

Mr. Scott Jones:

It's just that they can do it, yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right: denial of service stuff, crashing a website—and stealing data?

Mr. Scott Jones:

In some cases, absolutely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If they hack into Elections Canada, they can get the voter registry. They can get some information, but it's not exactly a gold mine.

Mr. Scott Jones:

That's also why we work with Elections Canada to bolster their cyber-defences, so that they are able to deal with those types of activities.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you give political parties advice?

Mr. Scott Jones:

We've made the offer to meet with any political party to give advice.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you provide a service to political parties to make their systems protected?

Mr. Scott Jones:

Right now it would be limited to kind of architectural advice in terms of how to set up systems and how to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You can point at things, but you don't do the thing itself.

Mr. Scott Jones:

No. We are limited in terms of providing services.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Everything can be hacked.

Mr. Scott Jones:

Everything can be. Now you can make it hard and very expensive.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sure. Do political parties make it hard and very expensive to hack into their systems?

Mr. Scott Jones:

I actually don't have the detailed information on how individual political parties—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you ever test our systems?

Mr. Scott Jones:

No. That's something that would have to be a direct request. We would probably refer to a commercial service to do that rather than us doing that sort of test.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To the best of your knowledge, do political parties hire that commercial service or go through you? That's something a private corporation that has sensitive information will do. They will hire someone to hack them and test them.

Mr. Scott Jones:

To my knowledge, no, we have never had a request to refer a political party to any service like that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The reason that's interesting to me is that in this bill, there's no.... Political parties remain outside of Canadian privacy laws. We're in this unique space, yet the type of information....

Just from a security expert point of view, if you were able to gather information on individuals—voting preference, where they live, petitions they've signed, all sorts of consumer behaviour—that would be an information-rich data source, would it not?

Mr. Scott Jones:

I think, as you look at some of the recent activities in terms of some of the things that have come out about social media and trend analysis, etc., that certainly would be the type of data you could use to profile.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes: clicks, behaviour, all sorts of things. That would be a high prize, wouldn't it, for some of these hackers? That would be commercially quite valuable?

Mr. Scott Jones:

From the—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I will tell you an individual's shopping habits. I will tell you their voting habits, individual by individual.

Mr. Scott Jones:

All of those types of things have been shown to have a very high commercial value, especially in terms of direct targeting, whether it's for commercial marketing or targeting in terms of social media engagement.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I assume you've paid some attention to what's happened south of the border.

Mr. Scott Jones:

Of course.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Would Canada be exposed to similar threats? We're not talking about hacking into Elections Canada. We could also talk about misinformation and disinformation and trying to sway an election.

Mr. Scott Jones:

Yes. In the report, we actually point out that this is probably where we're more vulnerable. The election itself is quite secure in terms of paper ballots and hand—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, we're not doing voting machines and we don't vote online, so we don't have any of those threats. We do have significant threats when somebody is able to influence voters by hacking into Mr. Zachariah's and Ms. De Jaegher's system or by influencing young people through misinformation about candidates.

Mr. Scott Jones:

Certainly there's misinformation, but there's also the fact that social media is set up such that you don't always know why you're getting information pushed to you, because it's profiled based on other things.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. Under this bill, those social media agents, like Facebook and Twitter, don't have any obligation with regard to ads or misinformation posted on their sites. I would point to our two friends from CFS and say that many young people, like many Canadians, get the large majority of their news and information from social media. Is that fair to say? I don't want to generalize.

(1610)

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

Yes.

Mr. Coty Zachariah:

That's fair.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We have all sorts of rules about the print media with respect to ads, influence, and donations, and we have almost none in this bill pertaining to social media. I said this earlier today, but are we fighting the last war as opposed to the next one?

Mr. Scott Jones:

I think in general, social media is one of those things that are very hard to figure out how to deal with.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are we doing enough?

Mr. Scott Jones:

One of the things we're trying to do is to increase awareness so that people at least question why they're seeing something and to make people aware that they're not necessarily seeing what they expect; they're seeing what's being pushed to them for other reasons. It's not a neutral feed of data.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, it's not.

That's great. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on now to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

My initial questions are for the Canadian Federation of Students, whoever would like to answer.

I know that your executive director, Bilan Arte, has gone on record before to call the Fair Elections Act, Bill C-23, an insult to Canadian youth and a form of voter suppression. Why did you feel that way about Bill C-23, referred to by your organization as the “unfair elections act”?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

That was our previous executive director, Toby Whitfield, but we still maintain that position, of course.

Primarily, we felt that the changes made through the act would influence already marginalized populations, and there was research to bear this out in terms of, for example, homeless populations and populations that move frequently, students being one of them.

We found that for students in particular, who oftentimes live in homes, for example, with five, six, or seven roommates in some cases, it's tricky. The line we were often given was that we just had to bring a utility bill with our name on it. When you're living in that kind of situation—and many students are—whose name is on the utility bill or on any form of identification? It becomes extremely complicated, and at times it becomes so complicated that students will just give up. That's why the voter identification card was a useful means for students to access their vote, essentially.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How many students do you think may have been impacted by the taking away of voter information cards?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

We don't have hard data on that on our end, obviously, although I do think the statistics Coty cited from the Chief Electoral Officer's report after the election are useful. We could extrapolate from those youth voter figures the degree to which post-secondary students of that group factored in.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The legislation we're studying right now, Bill C-76, reverses that and brings back the voter information card. Do you think more students would be likely to go out to polls if they were able to use that as one of their pieces of identification?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

We do. We think the fewer the burdens placed on students in terms of accessing that vote, the more likely they are to do it.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Another concern your executive director had at that time was with respect to the removal of the commissioner from Elections Canada. Why was that a concern? That's something that has been reversed now, too.

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

That was just essentially, I believe, more oversight, and allowing for more of that. Also, I know there were concerns raised about our work with Elections Canada, trying to facilitate rather than hinder that. To my understanding, that's where this was coming from.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Engagement is also a big piece of this legislation, and that, I think, is mainly what your organization does as well. The role of Elections Canada will now be re-expanded, I guess, back to being able to educate, as one piece, and being able to inform people on more than just where they can vote but also on the importance of voting, with more information around voting.

Why do you see that as being important, if you do, and how do you think your organization can work with Elections Canada to engage more voters in the future?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

We're strong advocates of encouraging greater democracy for everyone. We think that should be the goal, so we think the reforms proposed are positive. We already do work with Elections Canada, in what capacity we can, in terms of testing new voting systems. We have participated in tests around an expanded on-campus polling station program with Elections Canada. That was very successful, so I imagine that relationship would continue to be positive.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I know that you're registered as a third party with Elections Canada. You spent almost $29,000, or a little short of that, in the last election. What type of activities did you engage in to spend that money?

(1615)

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

I believe that was primarily spent on social media advertising—YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, etc.—around information on how to vote and the issues that students felt it was important to consider in this election. It was primarily that, but it was also materials, such as printing. We did a lot of on-the-ground outreach with our members on campus. It was probably those two areas.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kind of information do you disseminate in those print materials? Do you support a certain political party, or do you consider it to be more information as to where the parties stand on issues?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

It's the latter. Again, I believe we sent out a survey to all parties to provide their responses to questions on the student issues we had identified as being important to our members. Then we did publish those responses, I believe verbatim, on our website, with a link to them on the print materials and the social media materials. The materials were a mix of information on how to vote, what you need in terms of ID, the importance of voting, and the issues that students had identified as being important. They were not identifying a particular party to support.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Earlier you said that your financing comes mainly from dues. How much are your dues, and who are the students who have become members? Are they university, college, high school...?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

They are part-time and full-time college and university students from across the country. There are about 650,000 of them in member locals. Student unions are certified as members with the CFS through a referendum process. Student dues vary slightly from province to province, based on CPI increases and things like that, but it's approximately $16 per year per student.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do I have any more time, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Thank you so much for being here and for engaging students. You guys do a lot of great work. I'm glad to hear that the count for student voters, young voters, went up last election. Hopefully, we can keep that up.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Sahota.

Now we will go on to Mr. Falk.

Welcome to the most exciting committee on the Hill.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Good. Well, thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.

Thank you to our witnesses for attending committee today. Your interventions have been interesting and informative, so thank you.

Mr. Jones and Mr. Besner, I would like to start with you. In the work you do, when it comes to cybersecurity and investigating threats or breaches of security, do you do that proactively or do you respond to reports?

Mr. Scott Jones:

It's a mix of both. We strive to always be proactive, really look at what a malicious cyber-actor would be doing, and try to get ahead of the threat. Especially in our defence of the Government of Canada, we've invested really heavily in proactive defence, taking action to thwart the activity before it is a costly breach, that type of thing. Unfortunately, though, with the dynamics of cybersecurity and the cyber-threats that are out there, threats sometimes evolve very quickly and do get through, so we have to respond to events as well. We work to minimize that. Every time there's an event, we also try to learn and apply defences so that it can't happen again that same way.

So it's a mix of the two.

Mr. Ted Falk:

You identified different groups. You called them enthusiasts, and there were others. What are the primary sources of your threats?

Mr. Scott Jones:

It's a broad mix of everything from very sophisticated nation-state activity typically targeting the government for espionage types of things, all the way down to hacktivists or enthusiasts, but in between you have cybercriminals.

Cybercrime is growing on the Internet and is increasingly sophisticated and very hard to detect, and there's a lot of money to be made. Because of its pan-global approach, it's also hard to track it all down. Cybercrime is growing.

You do see some terrorist use of the Internet, mostly for propaganda and recruiting types of things, and for fundraising, not necessarily in the cyber-attack sphere. Then you have hacktivists and enthusiasts.

Jason, did that cover it?

Mr. Jason Besner (Director, Cyber Threat Evaluation Centre, Information Technology Security, Communications Security Establishment):

Yes, you covered it.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Are there algorithms you use or programs you've developed that assist you in the work you do?

Mr. Scott Jones:

We use a wide variety of things. Last year, we actually open-sourced some of our cyber-defence tools to share with the cybercommunity in Canada as part of our approach to try to grow the Canadian ecosystem. That was our program called “Assemblyline”.

In addition, certainly we use a lot of algorithmic work in terms of machine learning and some artificial intelligence: anything that can automate the repetitive work of my analysts so that they can concentrate on the new threats, the emerging threats. Our goal is to understand it, automate it, automate defences, and then move forward so that our analysts can be freed up.

(1620)

Mr. Ted Falk:

When you've identified a threat, what would be your course of action?

Mr. Scott Jones:

It depends on the nature of the system. If it's the Government of Canada, we take immediate action to block, to defend, and to stop that threat from having any impact. At the same time, we would also be releasing that information publicly, right now through the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre at Public Safety Canada. Indicators of compromise are something that we would provide to the general security community.

Also, depending on the nature of the threat, it might be more effective for us to engage with some of our industry partners. That could be anti-virus vendors. The real goal is to get whatever we're seeing hit us into a sphere where it can defend all of us. It's about sharing that information widely, sharing the approach, and sharing what we've learned. It would be along those lines.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Were you going to add something, Mr. Besner?

Mr. Jason Besner:

No. I think Mr. Jones has covered it.

The idea is to deal with the volume that is coming at us and to make sure that our defences are working 24 hours a day. The primary purpose is to deal with the threat, then automate and have those defences running 24 hours a day, and then share with others to use as force multipliers to defend all Canadians.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Recently we were advised to reboot our routers. Is that something you were involved in at all?

Mr. Scott Jones:

That would be an example of something that we would have contributed to. The public advice would have come through Public Safety Canada at this time, as they're the lead, but certainly we would work with our international partners as we see malicious activity—something that looks like it's systemic. We try to give simple approaches for people to actually make themselves more cyber-secure. That's an example of something that would be important.

Mr. Ted Falk:

In your presentation, you identified that sophistication levels were fairly low in the last election. How about in terms of intensity levels?

Mr. Scott Jones:

From our observation point, we could see that it was also fairly low, but it continued. We would expect to see that ramping up as we approach the next election. The fact is that these tools are in the reach of pretty much anybody. The issue with cybersecurity and cyber-tools is that they are quite cheap and easy to access, so for us it's really about having to raise that resilience bar faster than the adversaries are able to engage new tools and new techniques against us.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you for your presence here today.

My question is directed to the Canadian Federation of Students and whoever feels more comfortable with it.

First, I want to thank you for your advocacy and great work. I am very committed to engaging youth not only in the electoral process but in everything in life, because I think they are one of the greatest untapped resources.

Let me begin by asking whether in your advocacy you see anything that's unique to students, that's different for youth generally. Are there concerns you have with respect to students that you would raise as obstacles or other things, and that don't relate to other youth, or do you think the group is combined?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

Do you mean pertaining to elections specifically?

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

Yes, there are a few different things. One major thing is the proportion of students who live in on-campus residences. Proving one's address can be a bit trickier for students living on campus, we've found when we've spoken to those students, given the frequency with which they will move on and off campus. Oftentimes, they have to seek out a formal letter of residence confirmation in order to take that to the polls. A lot of students aren't aware that's available, and some residence offices aren't aware that they should issue them. There's kind of an extra layer of bureaucracy created there, so I think on-campus students would definitely be one example.

I also think we have a growing population of international students in Canada, which is great, but having people trying to determine at what point they're eligible to vote in a Canadian election, what residence status they require, and things like that pertaining to their student visa sometimes adds layers of confusion as well.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. That's excellent.

I have three post-secondary institutions in my riding as well, and so this issue comes up over and over again.

The response we have heard, potentially—it's out there—is that there are over 80 pieces of identification that can be accepted. You don't really need the VIC card, because there are 80 plus pieces of other identification.

So, other than a driver's licence, which has an address on it, or the confirmation from—what department gives it in universities?—the registrar's office or whatever—

(1625)

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

It's from housing or residence—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It's housing. Okay.

Other than those two pieces of identification that specifically have addresses, is there anything else that a student in residence is going to have that could suffice for ID?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

There could be some examples, but not generally speaking.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

They're few and far between.

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

That's right.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

So, that's the problem.

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

That's the issue, yes.

If students have those pieces of ID at all, they would be very inconsistent. They're not going to have utility bills in the same way. They might have a phone bill but it's quite unlikely that that's going to be addressed to their temporary residence in housing.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Exactly. Okay.

Mr. Cullen asked the question, but I wasn't clear on the answer. With regard to the increase in the last election—there was an amazing increase, and we're very happy about that—other than crediting yourselves, perhaps, with the work, what would you say were the contributing factors to that increase?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

I do think that students felt particularly mobilized in the last election. I do think that our advocacy work had a big part in that, but also students just identified a number of issues on which they wanted to see political action, and made that known.

We definitely did redouble our efforts to ensure that students were heading to the polls, and we'll be doing that again in 2019.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's excellent. That's awesome.

A previous witness here today talked about the importance of student engagement at a very young age,. The idea was that the research showed that if you engage students at a younger age, it's habit-forming and they will be more likely to vote in the future, and if you don't engage them in the process, then they will perhaps be less likely.

Does your experience, with the advocacy you've carried out, support that finding?

Mr. Coty Zachariah:

Yes. I would say so.

We believe that people who are informed at a younger age are more likely to get involved at a younger age. People who have voted in their first year tend to vote throughout their provincial and federal elections as well. We just really believe that informed voters tend to take part in the process.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

There are a number of initiatives included in Bill C-76, including the CEO's mandate to educate, the national voter's registration, and the dropping of the age to hire students. I take it that you are very supportive of all of those initiatives.

With respect to the court case, if in fact Bill C-76 were to become law tomorrow, would you be dropping that court case? Is everything that you are fighting for in your court case contained in Bill C-76?

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

To my understanding, it is. I would confer with our lawyers in that event. However, our concern with the court case, unfortunately again, is more one of timing. We're fairly concerned that by the time this legislation would be implemented, it might not be fully implemented by Elections Canada for the next election, whereas a court ruling—unfortunately, because it's not the route we'd want to go down—might push that deadline up, and at this point, we just want more students and more people, generally, to have access to the vote.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I appreciate the timing piece—I get that—but your remedy is contained in Bill C-76. That's the answer.

Ms. Justine De Jaegher:

That is our understanding, yes.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for appearing. We really appreciate it. This is very interesting and helpful information.

I would ask that we change witnesses quickly because I think there are a lot of questions for the next witness, so we'll get started as quickly as we can.

We'll suspend for a minute.



(1630)

The Chair:

I think we'll get started.

Good afternoon, and welcome back to meeting number 111 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For our second hour this afternoon, we are pleased to have with us Daniel Therrien, Privacy Commissioner of Canada. He is accompanied by Barbara Bucknell, Director of Policy, Parliamentary Affairs and Research; and Regan Morris, Legal Counsel.

Also appearing on this panel is Colonel Vihar Joshi, Deputy Judge Advocate General, Administrative Law, from the Canadian Forces.

Thank you all for coming today. I know there is great interest in your appearance, so I'm sure it will be a very interesting session.

Maybe we will start with Mr. Therrien.

Mr. Daniel Therrien (Privacy Commissioner of Canada, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Good afternoon. I would like to thank the committee for the invitation today to discuss the privacy implications of Bill C-76.

As you are well aware, citizens' concerns have been voiced globally around how their personal information is being gathered from online platforms and used in the political process. Allegations about the misuse of the personal information of 87 million Facebook users are a serious wake-up call that highlights a growing crisis for privacy rights. Not only is consumer trust at risk, so too is trust in our democratic processes.

As you know, no federal privacy law applies to political parties; British Columbia is the only province to cover them. This is not the case in many other jurisdictions. In most regions of the world, laws provide that political parties are governed by privacy laws. This includes jurisdictions such as the E.U., the U.K., New Zealand, Argentina, and Hong Kong. Canada is becoming the exception.

(1635)

[English]

We recently reviewed the privacy policies of political parties. While these policies have some positive features—for instance, all make provisions for people to update personal information or correct details that are out of date—they all fall way short of globally accepted fair information principles.

Similarly, the standards alluded to in clause 254 of Bill C-76 also fall short. In fact, Bill C-76 does not prescribe any standards. It simply says that parties must have policies that touch on a number of issues, leaving it to parties to define the standards that they want to apply. In terms of privacy protection, Bill C-76 adds nothing of substance.

For instance, the bill does not require parties to seek consent from individuals, limit collection of personal information to what is required, limit disclosure of information to others, provide individuals with access to their personal information, or be subject to independent privacy oversight.

By contrast, in British Columbia, parties must apply all generally applicable privacy principles, and B.C. otherwise has very similar legislation to the federal legislation. In B.C., consent applies, but it is subject to other laws, such that consent is not required for the transmission of lists of electors under electoral laws.

I've heard much support, including from federal politicians, for the idea that political parties should be subject to privacy laws. The government, meanwhile, appears to think that political parties are not similarly situated to private companies as they relate to privacy.

For instance, ministers seem concerned that applying privacy laws would impede communications between parties and electors. This is an interesting proposition, but I have not yet seen any evidence to that effect. That evidence may exist, but it has not been presented for public discussion.

I would note that in Europe, however, political parties have been subject to privacy laws for over 20 years. I understand that such protections have now become part of the culture of how elections are run.

What we know at the end of the day is that democracy appears to still thrive in those jurisdictions where parties must comply with privacy laws.[Translation]

The precise law where privacy rules should be found does not much matter. It could be the Elections Act, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, PIPEDA—in other words, an act governing privacy protection in the private sector—or another act.

What matters are that internationally recognized privacy principles, not policies defined by parties, be included in domestic law and that an independent third party, potentially my office as we have expertise, have the authority to verify compliance.

Independent oversight is necessary to ensure that privacy policies or principles are not just empty promises but actual safeguards applied in practice.

Together with Elections Canada, we have developed amendments that would achieve these goals. We provided these suggestions to the committee today. If you wish, I can explain them during the question period.

In conclusion, the integrity of our democratic processes is clearly facing significant risks. If there ever was a time for action, this is it.

I welcome your questions.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That's very helpful.

Now, we'll have Colonel Joshi.

Colonel Vihar Joshi (Deputy Judge Advocate General, Administrative Law, Canadian Forces):

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, I'd just like to thank the committee for the opportunity I've been given to speak to you about Bill C-76 and its positive impact on members of the Canadian Armed Forces.

I am Colonel Vihar Joshi. I'm the Deputy Judge Advocate General, who is responsible for the Administrative Law Division of the office of the JAG and I'm the coordinating officer designated by the Minister of National Defence for the purposes of section 199 of the Canada Elections Act.

I'll first make a few opening remarks and then I will gladly answer any questions the committee may have.

The special voting rules, presently set out in division 2 of part 11 of the Canada Elections Act, were developed at the end of the 1950s and have undergone very few significant changes since then.

Currently, Canadian Forces electors must complete the statement of ordinary residence upon enrolment and maintain it for election purposes. Exceptionally, the statement of ordinary residence allows these voters to choose the electoral district in which they will vote during federal elections. For example, they may choose to vote in the riding in which they were living when they enrolled, the riding in which they currently reside because of their military service, or a riding in which a loved one lives and with whom they would be living, if not for their military service.

However, once an election is called, members can no longer modify this address during the election period.

Canadian Forces electors who wish to exercise their right to vote must do so within their unit during the military voting period, which is between 14 and nine days prior to the civilian election day. When they vote in a unit, Canadian Forces electors are not subject to any identification requirements. Only the few members who qualify may exceptionally vote at a civilian polling station and may only do so on polling day.

In the most recent federal general election, the participation rate of Canadian Forces electors was significantly lower than that of the general population. There are certain factors that may explain this.

(1640)

[Translation]

In his report entitled “An Electoral Framework for the 21st Century: Recommendations from the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada Following the 42nd General Election”, the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada recommended a complete review of the special voting rules that apply to Canadian Forces electors. Mr. Chair, I understand that the members of the committee unanimously supported such a review.

Over the past two years, we have been working hard to review the provisions of the Canada Elections Act that affect Canadian Forces electors.

The aim of the amendments to Bill C-76 that are of interest to us is to make the federal electoral system more accessible to members of the Canadian Armed Forces. These amendments also help to ensure the integrity of the vote and maintain the flexibility the Canadian Armed Forces require as they operate around the globe in a broad range of security and operational contexts.

Mr. Chair, before taking questions from committee members, I would like to draw your attention to certain key amendments Bill C-76 makes to the special voting rules that apply to Canadian Forces electors.

First, the bill eliminates the statement of ordinary residence, or SOR, procedure. This measure will allow our members to register on the National Register of Electors, as all other Canadians do, and to update their registration during the election period. In so doing, Canadian Forces electors will be required to register in the riding of their ordinary place of residence or, if they reside outside Canada, their last ordinary place of residence before leaving the country. This change will allow our members to vote in the same riding as their loved ones, in addition to preventing certain Canadian Forces electors from having to vote in a riding to which they no longer have a connection.

The bill also eliminates the obligation for Canadian Forces electors to vote within their unit. Our members may now choose to exercise their right to vote by using the voting method that best meets their needs.

As all other voters, they will be able to vote at advanced polling stations, at polling stations on polling day, at the offices of returning officers across Canada, or by mail from Canada or abroad. When they choose to vote elsewhere than at their unit, members of the Canadian Armed Forces will be subject to the same identification rules as other voters, including proof of residence.

The bill does, however, maintain the possibility for full-time members of the Canadian Armed Forces to vote within their unit, whether in Canada or abroad. Bill C-76 will also allow our part-time members to benefit from this opportunity, which is currently not an option for them.

(1645)

[English]

At the military polling stations, Canadian Forces electors will now be subject to new, clear, and consistent identification rules. Using identification documents issued by the Canadian Armed Forces, they will be required to prove their name and service number in order to receive their voting ballot. Our members who are participating in operations or exercises in Canada or abroad, on land or at sea, generally cannot bring documents that show their residential address with them. This security measure aims to ensure the protection of our members and their families. As a result, Canadian Forces electors voting within their unit will not be required to provide proof of address. They will, however, be required to declare that they are voting in the riding where their ordinary place of residence is located. Any misrepresentation may be subject to an investigation and could lead to charges before civil or military tribunals.

The bill also allows for a more fluid exchange of information between Elections Canada and the Canadian Armed Forces. These exchanges will lead to increased integrity of the vote, in particular by ensuring that the names of Canadian Forces electors voting at military polling stations are removed from the list of electors used at civilian polling stations.

Lastly, I would like to draw the committee's attention to one more significant legislative modification. Many civilians accompany the Canadian Armed Forces abroad: for example, foreign service officers, members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, civil support staff for the Canadian Armed Forces, and dependants of these individuals and our members. Currently, these civilians could have difficulty exercising their right to vote by mail from abroad, in particular because of restrictions related to postal service in certain areas of the world. Bill C-76 would correct this imbalance by giving a clear mandate to the Canadian Armed Forces and Elections Canada, which must work together to help these electors exercise their right to vote.

To conclude, members of the Canadian Armed Forces demonstrate courage, determination, and resilience in their service to Canada. They do this in Canada and abroad. The Canadian Armed Forces is therefore enthusiastic about this Parliament's modernizing the provisions in the Canada Elections Act that affect the Canadian Forces electors.

I would be glad to answer any questions you might have.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you very much to the witnesses for the very helpful things we are listening to.

Nathan, because you have to slip out, through the generosity of the other parties you may go first.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair. I had only asked my Conservative colleagues, but I appreciate it from the Liberals as well.

First, Colonel Joshi, thank you very much for your testimony. There's nothing in what you've said, nor in Bill C-76 as it pertains to our women and men serving overseas, that we object to. I'm glad these reforms have come about. I'm going to devote much of my questioning to Mr. Therrien. Don't take any offence. It's hard to ask questions of someone when you're agreeing with them a lot.

It's not that I disagree with what you said, Mr. Therrien, but there are some things in this bill that cause concern, and that's what I would hope to get at.

To clarify, in Europe, for 20 years, political parties have been subjected to some privacy provisions and some limitations.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes. Essentially under the 1995 directive adopted by the European Union, political parties are subject to that directive in the same way as private corporations are.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They are in the same way that crown corporations are?

(1650)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It's corporate organizations, companies.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, it's not crown corporations but companies. Okay. That's interesting.

Would you or your office now or later—and later couldn't be too much later, because this bill is under some urgency, obviously—provide us with any information as to what the impact has been on those political parties? Has there been an inability to perform their function and their aspirations as political entities?

That's been one of the worries, that there could be some sort of politically motivated bad behaviour by people trying to slow political parties down if we were subjected to similar rules.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

We can do that more fully, but I will say that our colleagues in the U.K., as well as in the province of British Columbia, who have similar legislation and have had it for some time and who have been in discussion obviously with political parties on the application of privacy laws, are not hearing many, if any concerns, from political parties that their work—the work of parties—is impeded by being subjected to privacy laws.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I assume that the last election in B.C., then, was run under these provisions?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's interesting. I engage with all three political parties in the legislature and I've never heard anyone raise with me anything about just running the election and trying to contact voters.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

That's what we are told by our colleagues, that the situation is that parties are not raising concerns.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So when we're asking the security experts how secure our data systems are within the parties, would it be fair to say that political parties—certainly ambitious ones, certainly ones that use a lot of social media and mine data from social media—gain access to a fair amount of specific information about individual Canadians. Is that a fair...?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If that information were ever acquired illegally, not only in terms of misinforming voters, disinforming voters about elections, or trying to sway voters but also the actual gaining of that type of detailed information about individual Canadians, we heard from our security experts that it would have significant commercial value.

Let's take it outside politics and look at the commercial aspect. Being able to hack into a political party's database and achieve the information they have acquired over time about individuals would be of high commercial value, our security experts told us today.

Is that a concern to you, as Privacy Commissioner?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes, this information is of high commercial value, but beyond being of commercial value, it is sensitive information. Political opinions of individuals are sensitive personal information, deserving of even higher privacy protection than other types of personal information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That personal political information....

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So if someone goes on my Facebook account or the Prime Minister's Facebook account and clicks “like”, engages through social media, or retweets, we've learned over time that that information can be harvested, mined.

If Canadians knew that the information—their opinions about sensitive issues, environmental issues, abortion issues, or any of those types of opinions—could be gathered and collected by political parties—and is collected by political parties—and that the information was then vulnerable to exposure, what do you think the effect would be on Canadians? You're a privacy expert. What effect does that have?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think trust in the electoral system and in the work of political parties would be affected if electors knew that this information was vulnerable to further disclosure.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What do you mean by “affected”? That's a very neutral term. It could be affected positively.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I mean negatively affected.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

So the conditions you talked about—the rights that we talk about that individuals should have—are around issues like consent, disclosure, access to the information that's been gathered about them, independent oversight, and a limit on the types of information that parties would be able to gather on Canadians.

Have I summarized your list?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It's a good summary.

There are 10 generally recognized privacy principles internationally, and you have mentioned about half of them.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

I'm quoting you. You said there is “nothing of substance” in Bill C-76 to raise the bar in terms of privacy for Canadians.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

The reason I am saying that is that parties have privacy policies currently. All the bill does is to give some publicity to existing privacy policies, and there is nothing in the bill to require any particular content in these privacy policies. So for these reasons, I don't see any enhancements.

(1655)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. The minister came to committee and said that if parties don't disclose what their policy is....

The policy can say nothing, really. The bill doesn't tell parties what to do about privacy. It just says to tell Canadians somewhere on your website; then the penalty is that we could bar you from elections.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes, but policies are public already, without this bill.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So it's status quo.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It is the status quo.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the status quo.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

With all the threats we've talked about at this committee, with the new powers that big data and social media now have over our elections and influencing our voters, from a privacy perspective why do we need to do this bill?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Well, we worked with our colleagues at Elections Canada to suggest certain amendments that I believe are before you.

To summarize, the amendments we recommend are that policies not just be policies defined by political parties. Policies have to be consistent with internationally recognized principles. That's the first point.

The second point is whether or not there should be an obligation for parties to actually comply with the policies—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Who's going to have oversight over that?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

—and then there needs to be independent oversight. This means that individuals should, in our view, be able to file a complaint with our office, where we would investigate.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To not do this—just to circle back to something you said—would erode the trust in our electoral process.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think so, for the reason that there are no substantive rules currently that prevent parties from using information for any and all purposes. I do not think that is aligned with the wishes and desires of the population.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, committee members, for switching the order.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

Are there significant differences between PIPEDA and the B.C. privacy legislation?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Other than what we are talking about in terms of the principles applying to the institutions subject to these laws, no, there are no meaningful differences.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In PIPEDA, currently non-profit organizations are exempt. Is that correct?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

That's correct.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Why is that?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

They do not engage in commercial activities.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Do political parties engage in commercial activities?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

In the main, political parties are not engaged in commercial activities, so in that regard they are similarly situated to non-profit organizations. The point is that by and large, companies and commercial organizations in terms of the private sector and government departments in the public sector are subject to privacy laws. There are very few exceptions. Political parties currently are among the very few exceptions.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

For the sake of clarity, though, you can confirm that commercial organizations like Facebook and Twitter would be required to comply.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

With PIPEDA, yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes. Thank you so much.

Colonel, I think we heard in your testimony—if not, I apologize—that the voter turnout for armed forces members is much lower. To my understanding, it's 45%. Do you think the changes in Bill C-76 will have an impact on voter turnout?

Col Vihar Joshi:

That is the intent. By giving more voter opportunities, if you will, people will be able to avail themselves of their right to vote, and we will see higher levels of participation.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Were the armed forces consulted by the department in terms of this bill?

Col Vihar Joshi:

We were. As I spoke about earlier, in the report that was tabled, this committee agreed to a revision of the special voting rules portion. In that context, we were consulted by Elections Canada in looking at the amendments.

(1700)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Are there any numbers with respect to civilians and members of the RCMP who were with Canadian Forces abroad? Were there any numbers to go along with that or is that outside your...?

Col Vihar Joshi:

I can get those numbers if you wish. For some of them we would not necessarily have all the numbers, but for teachers and assistants outside Canada we can certainly get those numbers. It's not that high. It's a very small group of individuals at this time.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

They do face significant obstacles in voting?

Col Vihar Joshi:

They could, yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll go back to you, Monsieur Therrien.

One of the issues I talked about—and you've suggested that there's no evidence to suggest that—is that in privacy principles there is a requirement that if you, the individual, ask “what information do you have about me?”, the organization is to then provide that information. What's to stop a coordinated campaign by supporters of one political party to overwhelm another political party?

Political parties don't necessarily have enormous staffs like a corporation may, and it's a type of organization that is completely different from a commercial activity. What would stop that type of behaviour?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I suppose nothing would stop that behaviour, but I would say that this question of the right of access by individuals to what institutions have on them is near the top of the privacy safeguards under privacy principles.

It all starts with individuals knowing what companies and, as we are suggesting with our Elections Canada colleagues, parties have on them. How can individuals protect their sensitive personal information held by parties if they do not know what parties have about them? This is a pretty fundamental part of privacy protection.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I appreciate that it's a fundamental part of that, but when you're dealing with a different type of organization, where there can be individuals significantly motivated to engage in this type of behaviour that other corporate entities don't face, that's something that has to be taken into consideration, doesn't it?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It has not been the experience in jurisdictions where parties are subject to privacy laws, but I—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I can appreciate that, but if we're talking about.... We've talked about Facebook, Twitter, social media and the ability to organize this type of activity, with bots and whatnot. Perhaps the fact that it hasn't happened in the past doesn't mean that it won't happen going forward, because the technology is ever advancing. In terms of an individual being able to set up a site to send out the requests, it's just a matter of typing it in. Again, the possibility does exist that this could be used as a type of political weapon against another political party.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Let's assume that is a possibility. You as a committee can adopt amendments to protect parties from that possibility, which is a finite situation. In terms of principles, I would say on what principle basis would parties say “no” to an individual who wants to know what the party has about them?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It seems I'm out of time. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Tom now.

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I was going to ask you questions about the British Columbia experience, Mr. Therrien, you and those with you here today, but I want to continue on with something that Mr. Bittle said about commercial activity.

La Presse, with one of the biggest Quebec newspaper storied histories, has announced that it's converting into a charitable, not-for-profit organization. I want to hear from you if that will then make them exempt. Are they still undertaking commercial activity despite the status that they might take on in the structure of their organization? How would you view that?

I sit on the finance committee. There's talk in the federal budget about allowing all newspapers to convert themselves into not-for-profits. It's a difficult industry to be in right now. There have been a lot of layoffs. They're pressured by it. The activity they undertake is still considered commercial activity: it's the collection and distribution of information. Is this something that you feel would continue to be covered by PIPEDA in how they behave? Or would they then not be obliged to...?

(1705)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I'll turn the question over to my colleagues in a second, but the first thing to mention is that La Pressewould be governed by Quebec provincial legislation rather than by PIPEDA federally, but, of course, the situation could be the same in a province without provincial privacy legislation. It's an interesting question.

Regan, do you have an answer for that?

Mr. Regan Morris (Legal Counsel, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada):

Well, keep in mind that PIPEDA and substantially similar legislation in the provinces exempts journalistic activities from the application of PIPEDA, so that would apply to La Presse with respect to their collection, use, and disclosure of information for journalistic purposes. With regard to the extent to which a news structure would continue to engage in commercial activity, I think we would need to know more about the details of how that structure would operate.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Just as a side question on something that piqued my interest, can you explain a little about how the law works in British Columbia? You referred to that in your speaking notes, so I'd like to understand. Are there audits done at some point on how the privacy rules are working in the political parties? Do they have to disclose? Have there been complaints? Anything would be useful.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

You need to start with the fact that under B.C. legislation, the term “organization” is defined more broadly than it is federally, so the distinction we've been discussing between commercial organizations and other types of organizations is irrelevant in British Columbia. The provincial privacy legislation applies to all organizations, and that's why in British Columbia political parties, being organizations, are covered by provincial privacy legislation.

Then the usual procedural mechanisms apply. It is possible for individuals to make complaints. We saw earlier this year that the then acting commissioner in British Columbia decided to initiate an investigation against all parties. Individuals can complain, which leads to investigations by the commissioner. The commissioner can himself initiate complaints where he thinks there is reason to investigate. Those then lead to findings as to whether or not there have been violations of the provincial legislation.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Okay.

One of the things I have a problem with when people declare to me that there has been a breach of their privacy is the following. When my father moved from Quebec to Alberta, he had to reapply for his driver's licence and insurance and the conversion of all the things you have to do. His insurance company in Quebec told him that they could not disclose to him his driving history, so that he could then give it to another insurance company, because of privacy laws. He explained to them that it was his driving history that they were holding and that he should be able to tell them to transfer it to someone else.

But, no, for privacy reasons, they said, they couldn't do that. He said that seemed kind of ridiculous to him, and they said, yes, it was, but that's what the law said.

Mr. Daniel Therrien: They were wrong.

Mr. Tom Kmiec: I'm always worried that we're going to create these structures, these laws and regulations, and then people applying them in their offices will misapply them—that's something I've seen—and they will err on the side of caution. They'll do it justifiably. They're trying to protect their organizations. They have privacy officers in corporations and in organizations. I used to be a privacy officer at the HR Institute. They're cautious. Everything is about caution. They don't want to make a mistake. They want to err on the side of caution.

How much of that would impact political parties in the day-to-day activities they have in trying to both identify issues that are important to their supporter base and identify those people whom they don't agree with? I have supporters who don't agree with the New Democrats and the New Democrats have supporters who don't agree with me. I obviously don't want to be communicating with them on an issue on which they don't want to be communicated with, and I'll try to avoid doing that, because I have a finite amount of time.

What do you say to those who make the case that political parties are incentivized already to avoid communicating with those who obviously don't want to speak to them, don't care about the same issues, and are not compelled by the same things? It's a public debate. Whether I'm door-knocking or I'm at a town hall and I'm trying to figure out if Chris and Ruby agree with me or not and whether they are supporters or not supporters, or if I do it on social media or through some other means such as a letter-writing campaign, where do we draw the distinction between what should be private and what is part of the public square or public debate about what is arguably the right of politicians—or not the right of politicians, because we don't have a right to anything—or the ability to understand how our citizens think about a particular issue, and where they are leaning in terms of support or voting? Where's the line?

(1710)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I'll answer by again referring to the experience of other jurisdictions. I do not think the application of privacy legislation impedes the normal work of political parties in reaching and communicating with their electors. This is the experience in the jurisdictions where privacy laws apply. We should assume that in Europe and in British Columbia, technology is used to identify people who may sympathize with a party so that the party's work is efficient. All of this is going on currently in other jurisdictions while parties are subject to privacy legislation.

In terms of the difficulty of the application of laws, and the possibility that because this is complex people will err on the side of caution, I would say that PIPEDA is probably a good tool, to that extent. It's 10 principles. It's scalable to the size of an organization. Small businesses are subject to PIPEDA and do not apply the legislation with the same sophistication as Facebook and Google and Microsoft.

So it's a flexible tool, and I think parties would be able to train their staff in a way to respect the law.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I have a quick question for you, Mr. Therrien. It may be a longer question than I anticipate, and if so, I apologize.

In going through the legislation, something came to my attention that I thought was somewhat positive. Under Bill C-76, if a party intentionally misled someone in their policy, which is now to be required under this legislation, there would be serious ramifications. I mean, the leader could face serious punishment. There would be a deregistering of the party, as it's laid out here.

Is that a positive step, to you?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It's a theoretically—

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor] good to know.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Perhaps someone else would like to weigh in; I don't know.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It's a theoretically positive step. I say “theoretically”, because the law does not dictate any content for the policies in question.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sorry, I didn't quite hear you. Could you just repeat that?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

The amendment or the section that you're referring to is theoretically progress. It would be progress if the offence were linked to a privacy policy with substance, but because the bill does not dictate substance, then parties are able to describe their use of information in fairly vague ways.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, but certainly if the party went against the particular policy that was put up and advertised on their website as such—

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

What I'm saying is that the party can make public a privacy policy that is so vague it will not actually contravene it, and we're no further ahead in terms of privacy protection. So if it was a privacy policy with substance that was contravened, I would agree with you. If it was a privacy policy—

Mr. Scott Simms:

If you have a penalty, it's obviously worthwhile to.... It may sound harsh to some to have the deregistration of a party or the sanctioning of a leader, but certainly that's apt, in your opinion.

(1715)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes, but always subject—it's a big caveat—to “does the policy have substance?”

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Monsieur Therrien.

Colonel Joshi, I was here—I was actually sitting over where Mr. Blaikie is—during the Fair Elections Act as we were going through it. I remember at the time there was a lot of talk about how this was going to diminish the right of democracy, which is in our constitution, for members of the military, and particularly their spouses as well.

You brought forward one of those issues, which is, of course, the SOR. You said in your brief, “In the most recent federal general election, the participation rate of Canadian Forces electors was significantly lower than that of the general population.” Would I be right in saying that the SOR is the main reason why?

Col Vihar Joshi:

That could be one of the reasons why, absolutely. Some folks may not have changed their SOR at the time the writ was dropped, so they're no longer able to vote in the riding in which they feel the most connection. As an example, let's say you joined in Pembroke and you never changed your SOR. Two or three postings later, when you find yourself in Ottawa, but your riding, your SOR, is still in Pembroke—

Mr. Scott Simms:

A lot of the critics back then said a statement of ordinary residence was supported by those in the party machinery who want to support riding choosing. I forget the name of the actual term they they used. Basically they won't allow anyone just to choose a riding as they see fit. I get from your speech that this is not the case here. They feel this is their ordinary residence, that they have family reasons for wanting to vote there, and this should make a difference. Is that correct?

Col Vihar Joshi:

That is correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

In the next election, you're confident, obviously, that this will encourage a lot more people to vote. I remember in 2004 when I first ran, a lot of people in the military voted, according to the polls, but they kept diminishing over the years. I'm assuming there are other factors there too. Was there a lack of promotion from Elections Canada?

Col Vihar Joshi:

I really can't speak to that. There are a number of reasons that people may not have voted. There could have been operational reasons for an inability to vote in some cases. Not feeling connected with the riding is certainly a reason.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sorry, I don't mean to cut you off. We don't have a lot of time. The reason that I ask is that now we're looking at more involvement by Elections Canada, not only just where and when to vote, which is obviously applicable to here, but to encourage them to be more proactive as to the voting in the next election and that it's easier, and it's a constitutional right.

Do you think this will help Elections Canada? Do you think they have a ways to go when it comes to promoting voting for members of the military?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Certainly informing members about how to vote and their right to vote will help. Through the education program, that certainly will help get the message out to Canadian Forces' electors on how they can vote and where they can vote. I think it will go a long way to encouraging people to exercise their right to vote.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's good to hear. It may not be particularly pertinent on Bill C-76, but certainly your message that maybe Elections Canada step up a bit to inform people about the statement of ordinary residence, and so on.... It's not to say that you're not. I'm just thinking you could always use some help.

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll go back to Tom.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

I will go back to the commissioner for one last question, and then I will hand it over to my colleague.

Organizations and political parties usually have a privacy officer. It just came to me at the end of our exchange that there are certified professionals in human resources who work in a lot of these places.

Doesn't this partly also make the case for ensuring our people are certified, and that they have professional standards to meet in order to ensure that privacy rules are in place? I know you said that in this particular piece of legislation it doesn't outline exactly the contents of the privacy rule for the workplace or for the organization. If you have certified people there managing it, their professional college will ensure that it meets certain requirements set out. I was a registrar before. Privacy is part of human resources' standards of practice, the kind of professional code they have. In Quebec there's a registered association that oversees this, just like for accountants who oversee audited financial statements.

Doesn't this make the case for ensuring there are certified people in those organizations, including political parties?

(1720)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

PIPEDA has accountability as one of its 10 principles. The accountability principle requires organizations subject to PIPEDA to appoint a point of contact for consumers or individuals, and that person has certain responsibilities for privacy protection within the organization.

There is no certification per se in privacy. There are some associations and courses given so there is a semi-certification process. Certainly, it is desirable that the point of contact be quite knowledgeable in privacy legislation, but at this point it is not a strict requirement.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Colonel Joshi, thanks for your service to our country.

I would say there are a lot of things in this legislation that I have concerns with, but—surprise—there are some things in a bill this size that I do agree with. This is one of those areas that is going to make it easier for the men and women who serve our country in uniform to have voting options. I think that's a great thing.

At the end of the day, those of you who serve our country in uniform are the ones who protect our right to vote, and the least we can do is to make it a little easier for you to exercise that right. It's something I do appreciate in this legislation.

I want to touch on it a bit and get a bit more from you. You mentioned the current provisions, where there is the SOR and where the only option for Canadian Forces electors is that period called the military voting period that's between 14 days and nine days before the election. That's the only option currently, correct?

Col Vihar Joshi:

There is a very slight window. For people who happen to live in the district that pertains to their SOR, they can vote but only on polling day.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So it's only if that exists. We're not just talking about those who were deployed overseas; we're talking about anybody, even on a base here in Canada unless it happens to be the riding that's in their SOR.

Col Vihar Joshi:

That is correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

One can understand why that might have been the case for someone deployed overseas, but certainly on a base here in Canada you would think that other options should be available. So it's good to see.

Do you want to give us some hints as to what the challenges would be for someone to vote who would be deployed overseas? This business of 14 to nine days I can see being a problem, but what other methods are available for someone who is deployed overseas, and how would they utilize them?

Col Vihar Joshi:

We will be maintaining the military vote for overseas members. They will still be able to avail themselves of that mechanism.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It would still be only in that small five-day period.

Col Vihar Joshi:

That is correct. It would be if they were to avail themselves of that—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would that be a challenge, that five-day period? Obviously on certain missions, maybe during that period of time you would not be where voting would be possible.

Col Vihar Joshi:

It could be a challenge, but every effort is made to ensure that the ability to vote is there. There are systems in place to—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Why not just expand that window?

Col Vihar Joshi:

The big issue is to get the ballots back to Ottawa to be counted. It's a logistical issue.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I get that at a certain point they have to get back. You could probably allow it a little sooner, I don't know. Can you explain to us what other options might be available for personnel deployed overseas?

Col Vihar Joshi:

The other options would be the same that are available to Canadian citizens who are abroad.

(1725)

Mr. Blake Richards:

You mean a mail ballot?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Yes, if that's a possibility, depending on where they're serving at the time.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Are there any other options? Would that be the extent of it at that point, the special ballot process where you mail it to the military base or wherever? Or would they still use the process that exists now, the only difference being that they wouldn't have declared a place of ordinary residence? What would that look like?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Their place of ordinary residence would be the ordinary residence before they went overseas.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It would be on the register of electors rather than in some separate—

Col Vihar Joshi:

Correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess that's all the time I have.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

Mr. Therrien, previously you mentioned that this piece of legislation doesn't go further in the privacy policy issue and just maintains the status quo.

My understanding is that it was never mandatory for any party to submit their privacy policy, and that is what this bill requires. I know that doesn't seem to go as far as you would like, but that certainly isn't the status quo, correct?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It is factually the status quo; it is not legally the status quo.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

However, this bill does make it mandatory, so they are required now.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

They are required to publish a privacy policy, without any indication of the content of the privacy policy, compared to the factual status quo where these privacy policies are already public.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

But the policy for the protection of personal information, including information regarding its practices for the collection, protection, and use of personal information.... They must submit all of that to the Chief Electoral Officer before registering.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

What the bill provides is that there's an obligation for parties to publish privacy policies that touch on a certain number of issues, but the bill does not require these subject matters to be consistent with generally accepted, internationally accepted, legal privacy principles.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You were saying that some provinces have taken this step.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

One: British Columbia.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What year was that?

Ms. Barbara Bucknell (Director, Policy, Parliamentary Affairs and Research, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada):

That would have been in 2004.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's been some time then.

Have you seen any requests for information come forward? How is that policy working out there? Do you have any tips as to what they have done, things to steer clear of if we do do this in the future, or things to implement?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

What we're told by my colleague in British Columbia is that provincial parties in B.C. are able to function in that environment.

Whether any lessons were learned there to train or inform employees of parties as to how to apply this legislation, we can certainly inquire of that from our colleague in British Columbia and provide that to you.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you know if any complaints have been filed?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

There have been complaints, yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Have there been a lot of complaints?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Not many.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

The Minister of Democratic Institutions has suggested to this committee that we should revisit the issue of parties and privacy rules to recommend a more robust framework.

I understand that you're disappointed it's not within Bill C-76. However, that does not preclude us from being able to revisit the topic in the future and putting together our best framework.

What would you suggest that framework contain, if this committee does do a study on that? You had mentioned following international principles. Is that going far enough, or do you have other suggestions?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

My suggestion would be that the party privacy policies align with international privacy principles, which are reflected in Canada's federal privacy law, which is PIPEDA. I think the policies of parties should be consistent with PIPEDA principles, which are the same as international principles.

Point two, parties should be legally required to comply with these undertakings, which is not the case under Bill C-76.

Point three, whether or not parties are in compliance should be subject to oversight through a complaint mechanism to an independent third party, likely our office.

(1730)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Colonel Joshi, I learned quite a few things from your introduction. We had the opportunity to meet when you presented to the electoral reform committee, so it's nice to have you back.

You mentioned that officers serving overseas cannot bring any identification that has their residence listed, for security reasons. That makes complete sense to me, but I was not aware of that point.

Had the previous legislation, the Fair Elections Act, made it difficult, and was it requiring even people serving in the military overseas to provide that identification?

Col Vihar Joshi:

We've not had to provide the identification.

Now we will have to provide photo ID, which has a service number and your name on it. There was no prescribed information before. We would not bring, for example, bills or anything with our identification on it. We have our own driver's licences overseas, so we wouldn't have that information with us for security reasons.

You're not precluded from bringing your driver's licence in all situations, but there are certainly situations where you wouldn't want any personal information with you.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Under the current law, you'd have to provide that.

Col Vihar Joshi:

Not if you were voting in the military vote; you would just have to have the identification card we have, which only has our specific service number identification, name, and photo. Everybody has that issued to them in the Canadian Forces.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Thank you to our witnesses. We appreciate it. This was very helpful. We were very interested in hearing from you, and we'll switch our panels relatively quickly and get on with our final list of witnesses for today.



(1735)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 111th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. For our final panel we are pleased to be joined by Ian Lee, Associate Professor at Carleton University; and Arthur Hamilton from the Conservative Party of Canada, partner at Cassels, Brock & Blackwell LLP.

Just while we're waiting for Blake to come back, Mr. Lee, I looked at your list of ID. A lot of those don't identify a current address, which seems to be one of the big problems people had in the last election.

We'll go to opening statements. Who would like to go first?

Mr. Lee.

Dr. Ian Lee (Associate Professor, Carleton University, As an Individual):

Thank you very much.

I just want to disclose at the beginning that my presentation is exactly six minutes and 30 seconds, so I hope you'll give me indulgence for an extra 90 seconds.

The Chair:

That's fine.

Dr. Ian Lee:

Thanks for inviting me to appear on this important subject.

First, I want to run through my disclosures very quickly. I do not consult to anyone, anything, or anybody anywhere in the world: not corporations, not governments, not lobbyists, not unions, not NGOs, and not people. Secondly, I don't belong to any political party, nor do I donate funds to any political party or candidate. Thirdly, in 2014, I researched and authored an op-ed on identification systems that was published in The Globe and Mail. I believe everyone has a copy.

After spending quite a bit of time—that was in the spring of 2014—researching identification systems in Canada only, public and private, and the rules legislated concerning identification systems federally and provincially, it became clear to me that it is legally and factually impossible to be invisible in terms of identity in Canada in the 21st century, so I'm putting caveats around that.

In a post-modern sophisticated society, multiple large public and private organizations— from governments to military, to banks, universities, tax authorities, and health care authorities—have been forced to develop systems of identification over the years to authenticate identity before ID is issued or access is allowed to the system, such as seeing a doctor. Thus, it is more useful to think of our systems—plural—of identification in Canada as a gigantic Venn diagram of interlocking circles, for those who can remember Venn diagrams from their university days, wherein each circle of the 40 or 50 systems of identification represents merely one identification system in Canada: OHIP health card, or driver's licence, or passport, or credit card.

But each identification system overlaps many but not all of the other identification systems in Canada. In plain English, millions of Canadians simultaneously, as does everyone in this room, carry an employee identification card, often a driver's licence, a social insurance card, a health care card, an automobile ownership certificate, an auto insurance certificate on the automobile or truck, a passport or a permanent resident card, a credit card, and a debit card, not to mention other forms of identification.

This leads to two critical points. Number one, the mistake of critics in claiming that there is inadequate identification in Canada amongst some Canadians is to focus on only one of the multiple systems of identification and, upon finding some voters who may lack that particular ID—e.g., a passport—then conclude that some Canadians lack any ID to vote, and that's not true. I may not have a passport, but I may have a driver's licence. I may not have a driver's licence, but I may have a passport, and so on and so on. Restated, it is necessary to examine the totality of our national, provincial, and municipal banking, education, and health care et al. identification systems—not any one system in isolation.

Secondly, some critics claim that many identification systems do not disclose much information and thus are inadequate. This fails to recognize the elaborate and very sophisticated systems and rules of primary identification, driven, I would point out, by many of you parliamentarians and past parliamentarians in legislating the systems of identification in a myriad of statutes on the books passed by Parliament over the years, including the tax act, the pensions act, and so forth, which make the secondary identification more valuable.

This may sound very abstract. Let me very concrete. It can be argued that a bank debit card, an ATM card—I have one in my pocket, and I'm sure everyone here does—is pretty useless. All it has on it is my name and long line of multiple digits. What use is that? Except that Canada's Bank Act, passed by you, the parliamentarians, mandates that any person who opens a bank account must—not could, ought to, or should, but must—produce two pieces of primary identification issued by government, and defined as a driver's licence, a passport, or a birth certificate, in order to open a bank account.

(1740)



Now the FCAC reports—of course, this is established by Parliament—that 96% of Canadians possess a bank account, those little debit cards, which means that 96% of Canadians have a minimum of two forms of government-issued primary ID.

Now I'll quickly review some of the important identification systems that are allowing me to say it's impossible to be digitally or identifiably invisible.

One, per the Vital Statistics Act, passed by every province and territory—I did check that—this is just from Ontario, “The Registrar General shall, upon receipt, cause the registrations of births, marriages, deaths, still-births, adoptions and changes of name occurring in Ontario....” That becomes the database that issues birth and death certificates.

Two, by law, Canadian citizens, newcomers to Canada or temporary residents must have a social insurance number—as you know, because it's been passed by Parliament—to work in Canada or to receive benefits and services from government programs. What a lot of people don't realize is even student loans must be recorded. A social insurance number must be disclosed by the student to get a student loan. That also applies to the myriad of benefits, not just federally but provincially and municipally.

Three, schools record and report to education ministries when a student starts elementary and then secondary school, including immunization.

Four, provincial health ministries issue health care photo ID cards. If you go to the website of any province, it states you must provide two forms of government-issued primary ID. In Ontario, a person has to first show proof of citizenship, then provide separate primary ID establishing residency address before getting a health card to access health care, including doctors or even doing blood tests at the hospital here.

Five, provincial DOT ministries' licensed drivers: per Transport Canada's latest report, 25 million Canadians have driver's licences. They issue ownership certificates mandating the owner name and address for the 33 million cars, trucks, and SUVs registered in Canada. That's 33 million pieces of identification. Of course, there is the insurance, the corresponding mandatory insurance that is necessary.

Six, the bureaucracy that collects and records more data on individuals than anything else is the CRA. In 2015, per the CRA, 29.2 million people filed tax returns. This is more than the 25 million people who were eligible to vote, according to Elections Canada, in 2015. On every tax return, we are required to provide our social insurance number and our address.

Seven, and this is the last on my itemized list, by law, all land titles must be in writing—in English common law systems—and record the name and address of the owner, while under provincial landlord and tenancy laws, rental tenancies must be in writing and record the name and address of the tenant.

At the airport, as we all know, every one of the 133 million passengers in Canada in 2015 had to provide photo ID not once but three times: once to get the boarding pass, once to go through security, and once at the gate, just to get on the plane.

Over two million students in post-secondary education, according to Statistics Canada, are provided photo ID by every college and every university in Canada, because it is mandatory. I've supervised every exam in every course I have taught for one-third of a century. They must bring their photo ID or I will send them home and they cannot write the exam. That is standard practice across universities and colleges because we can't possibly memorize and know all of the people sitting in that class.

It's been argued that the requirement for voter ID negatively affects low-income people much more, yet when you examine Ontario Works—that's the bureaucracy that administers social welfare—you will quickly realize it is vastly more onerous to obtain social welfare because of the identification. They want bank accounts. They want tax returns. They want driver's licences. They want tenancy agreements. It is vastly more onerous to obtain social assistance or welfare than it is to vote because of the identification requirements.

It is likewise for those who have looked at the OAS requirements, GIS requirements, and the Canada Pension Plan requirements to identify yourself in order to be paid a pension under those systems.

In conclusion, in a large, sophisticated society, it is widely recognized that we need rigorous systems of identification to ensure confidence in the integrity of our tax system, our health care system, our election voting system, our student records system, our banking system, and all our other identification systems.

Thank you.

(1745)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Hamilton.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton (Lawyer, Conservative Party of Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I am the legal counsel for the Conservative Party of Canada, and I thank the committee for the opportunity to appear here this afternoon.

There is one particular feature of Bill C-76 that I propose to address, and in fact, it's an omission in the legislation that has now been proposed. Specifically, while the bill seeks to further restrict the spending of registered parties by a newly defined official pre-writ period, it ignores the larger issue of third party financing and the types of third party activities that are not even regulated.

The integrity of federal elections is an issue on which we all agree. Our federal election should be determined by Canadians. If that is agreed, we can also agree that this bill does not go far enough in plugging several holes that permit foreign influence in Canadian federal elections via third party activity. To illustrate my point, I refer to correspondence from Elections Canada prepared in the year 2015. During the 2015 general election, it became clear that several groups, including one referred to as Leadnow, were engaged in several aspects of the election and that they used foreign contributions.

By a letter dated October 1, in response to the concerns the Conservative Party of Canada had raised, the Office of the Commissioner of Elections Canada responded in part: As provided for in the Act, Leadnow Society cannot use, for election advertising purposes, any foreign contribution that was received by the third party. It can use foreign contributions, however, to finance any of its activities that are not related to elections advertising. For instance, they may use foreign contributions to call electors, hold events, survey the opinions of electors, send e-mails or give media briefings. Such activities, if carried out by a third party independently from any candidate or registered party, are not regulated under the act.

Elections Canada's interpretation of the Canada Elections Act on this point is open to serious challenge, but rather than endless debate on this point, this Parliament can and should act decisively to ensure that foreign contributions cannot influence Canadian federal elections.

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled on the importance of the strict regulation of third parties in its decision in Harper v. Attorney General of Canada, where it cautioned: For voters to be able to hear all points of view, the information disseminated by third parties, candidates and political parties cannot be unlimited. In the absence of spending limits, it is possible for the affluent or a number of persons or groups pooling their resources and acting in concert to dominate the political discourse....If a few groups are able to flood the electoral discourse with their message, it is possible, indeed likely, that the voices of some will be drowned out...Where those having access to the most resources monopolize the election discourse, their opponents will be deprived of a reasonable opportunity to speak and be heard. This unequal dissemination of points of view undermines the voter’s ability to be adequately informed of all views.

That's from paragraph 72 of the Supreme Court's reported decision.

Later in that same decision, the Supreme Court of Canada recognizes that: If individuals or groups were permitted to run parallel campaigns augmenting the spending of certain candidates or parties, those candidates or parties would have an unfair advantage over others not similarly supported.

That appears at paragraph 108 of the reported decision.

The interpretation by Elections Canada quoted earlier must be corrected by clear legislative language. Our Supreme Court has been decisive on this point. This Parliament should regulate all third party activities and ban all foreign contributions. When it does so, and only when it does so, we will have secured electoral fairness in this country.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

(1750)

The Chair:

Thank you very much to both our witnesses.

Now we'll go to some rounds of questioning, and we'll start with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Chair.

Dr. Lee, it's good to see you again. I was around in the last Parliament, and you were a witness then. I really appreciate your fervour, your excitement, your passion about this. I won't interrupt you too much because I enjoy how you phrase things, especially your vector diagrams.

A term comes to my mind. I will read it from the dictionary. It's called “universal suffrage”.

Dr. Ian Lee:

Universal?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Universal suffrage “including or covering all or a whole collectively or distributively without limit or exception”. The very basis for why we put the right to vote within our Constitution, our Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

I get what you're saying about the vector diagram, about all these methods of identification: the bank cards, to get on a plane, social assistance, students, CRA forms, and all that stuff. For me in a way what you're saying is right on target, but it's just wide of the mark because you talk about 4% of the people not getting involved in bank ID. To me, that's a substantial number of people who don't get to exercise their right to vote. That's what worries me.

As I say, I worry about fraud, and I worry about other things. I'm going to quote you for a second. Back when you were doing Bill C-23, you said—this was your argument in favour of the new rules—“It is prudent and responsible risk management to adopt anticipatory precautionary measures before bad things happen, not after bad things happen”.

I don't disagree with you, but where did that fraud go that was so prevalent before? Tell me how all you have talked about here covers all.

(1755)

Dr. Ian Lee:

You have asked two questions.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I did ask two questions. I apologize.

Dr. Ian Lee:

I will answer them quickly.

In terms of the first one, with the greatest respect, Mr. Simms, I think you're making that mistake. You're finding one system where 4% don't have coverage, therefore you're saying they have no ID whatsoever. That's simply not true because every citizen, every person in this country, is covered under the Statistics Act. It is illegal not to record the birth or the death of any person in this country. You can't suppress someone's birth or death. That's just that.

Under the pension systems—and I'm saying this, having just applied and obtained CPP—I can tell you the hoops I had to go through. It's vastly more complex than voting in an election, I assure you.

Those are just two examples so I don't accept the argument that there's any Canadian in this country who doesn't have some form of identification. Twenty-nine million people file tax returns because the CRA requires you to file a tax return even if you don't owe money, for example, if you want an HST rebate, or you're receiving some kind of benefit from the government such as student loans.

To your second one, because I think it's more important, I think my views are even stronger now, not because I'm suggesting there's massive fraud or even minor fraud. I don't believe there is. I also don't believe most planes are blown up in Canada, or in the U.S., or across the OECD because we have very rigorous systems of protection.

Where I'm going with this is we have seen the assaults on our institutions, not so much in Canada but in the States in the last 24 to 30 months. It is absolutely crucial that we maintain the integrity of our voting systems and the belief in the integrity of our voting systems and our banking systems and our political systems. It's the famous Caesar's remark, not only must you be honest, you must appear to be.

I'm suggesting, given that we all have ID, everyone has ID because there are so many overlapping identification systems in this country, we should want to have a system where we are validating identity to vote so it will not give someone the opportunity in a close election to say that somebody was cheating, somebody was cooking, and that's what I'm worried about: undermining the authenticity of our excellent election system. I'm not suggesting people are cheating en masse or even in small numbers.

Mr. Scott Simms:

But what I mean by the 4% on the banking issue is you would expect anyone who does not have banking identification.... There are so many other types of identification that they don't have. I've seen it with my own eyes. I've seen seniors or the disenfranchised come in who've never had this type of ID. Maybe they're in a rural area; maybe they travel a great distance. One of the issues we talk about is vouching. I'm not sure how you feel about vouching. I suspect you don't feel that great about it. That system exists so that a person can be franchised. They can be vouched for by someone else. You talked about passports. Passports don't have the address; you write that in.

This is all part of the issue. I'm saying that this vector diagram does leave people out. It does, and we have seen it first-hand. I'm saying can we not just have something, a fail-safe, by which these people will be captured to enfranchise them to exercise their right—I have a right to vote; I don't have a right to get my ass on a plane to get to Florida in January, that sort of thing?

Let me ask this pointed question. You said there is a piece of ID, for example a driver's licence, but they still have to make the second piece concrete. Do you think the voter information card is a second concrete piece of identification that is vital to our system?

Dr. Ian Lee:

No, I think it's a piece of cardboard that somebody's printed a name on. I can produce a voter ID card too.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I can say that about any ID, really.

Dr. Ian Lee:

No you can't, because of the authentication systems that lie behind them, legislated by parliamentarians. Take for example, the bank accounts, to go back for a moment. It isn't private sector ID, but—

Mr. Scott Simms:

A voter information card is not a greeting card I buy at a store, for goodness' sake. It does have a system behind it by which that authentication....probably even more than many of the pieces of ID that you mentioned.

Dr. Ian Lee:

I'm answering your question. The ID that is accepted to apply for old-age pension, to apply for Canada pension or a passport or a driver's licence is government-issued ID only. That's the fascinating thing. When you start drilling down in a deep dive into all these different identification systems, you'll see they all come back to government-issued, government-controlled, government-regulated identification, and I have a lot more confidence in those systems in Canada for that reason.

(1800)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Some of the things don't really add up here. You don't like vouching, but you have to vouch for someone to get a passport.

Dr. Ian Lee:

To answer your question, I don't like vouching. I use the health care system because I'm older, and older people use it. I use it a lot, because I have arthritis. I can assure you, I've been to my doctor and forgotten my OHIP card, and they refused me service. Surely the health of Canadians is critically important. I would argue, no disrespect, that it's more important than voting—if I'm sick. Yet I've been sent home to go get my health care card because we think identity is that important for access to the health care system.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Dr. Lee. I appreciate the conversation.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Personally, I'd like to give Scott about three times as much time, because these exchanges with Ian Lee are.... Give me time to get some popcorn and one of those great big family-sized drinks, and I'd just watch you two go at it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This is great.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to raise the issue of the voter information card. I had this discussion many years ago with Jean-Pierre Kingsley, and I pointed out this out to him. The voter information card does provide information on a person. I guess you could falsify one if you wanted to; I don't think that's happening. But it suffers from a certain degree of database error, and these kinds of mistakes indicate it's not necessarily all that helpful.

One example that I pointed out to him at the time was that I received, when I was living alone, three voter information cards—one to Scott Reid, one to Jeffrey Reid, and one to Scott Jeffrey Reid. Of course, all three of these are me. I was on the voters list three times as a result of that. In theory, I could have voted as three people—once at the advance poll, once at the returning office, and once at my local polling station. Of course, as an incumbent MP, somebody might have noticed, so that restrained my conduct.

I just throw this out as a way of illustrating that it is not a foolproof system. I'm going to guess you probably agree with that.

Dr. Ian Lee:

Yes, if you're referring to the physical voter registration cards.

My bias, and I will fully acknowledge it, is that I am purely in the digital world. In that respect I'm a young person—even though I'm not young. I'm purely digital, and I trust digital electronic data. I'm talking about data with the massive protections—the CRA income tax database is a very secure system, as is the RCMP intelligence database.

We still have a voting system from the 19th century. We do not have a voting system that's for the 21st century. We're going to have to start, especially with millennials, to move towards electronic voting. You can't do electronic voting with these very archaic, 19th-century technologies of identification, because electronic systems require much more secure and sophisticated methods of identification.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I can only say, duly noted. That's obviously not going to be contemplated in the current legislation; hence, it's merely of academic interest.

I'll turn to Mr. Hamilton and to the issue of third parties and their spending. This is being presented as part of a package that includes a reduction in the length of the writ period. The maximum writ period has now shrunk. This prevents the pro-rating of party expenditures that occurred in the longer writ period that took place in 2015. The government has touted this as being an important step forward, but I notice they had to create a new pre-writ period. It's sort of two writ periods that have lumped on to each other, one of which is actually longer than the last election was. They then place limits on what parties can do in that period, without placing commensurate limits on what third parties can do.

If you said to me, Scott, your challenge today is to design a law that will have the effect of privileging third parties over registered parties, I think I would have designed this system. Am I being fair in my assessment?

(1805)

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

That's a very fair assessment of the current state of play, given this bill. It is not going to achieve the stated purposes of the legislation, if you accept that those stated purposes are really what's going on with this piece of legislation.

Third parties are a clear and present danger to our electoral system. When you allow third parties to be the conduit to foreign influence and foreign money, that danger is extreme. This bill has done nothing to correct or arrest any of the mischiefs that can be done by third parties.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

In your view, does it actually expand those mischiefs, or does it merely keep them kind of in the position they were already in, without a significant change?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Theoretically, you've increased spend limits in this pre-writ period, so presumably the mischief is more problematic coming into the next general election now—if that's conceivable, because it was already terrible in the last election.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Do you have any idea how readily it became evident that there was an issue with Leadnow in the last election? The reason I ask this is we're in the midst of a provincial election in Ontario, which will be taking place on Thursday. It would be helpful to have some analysis of how their rules have worked in order to examine whether the rules here are appropriate. I'm just wondering how long it would take to have an idea as to these things, based on what happened federally?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

To answer your direct question, it was very evident, very early, that Leadnow was engaged. I believe it was an outside media source. It wasn't one of the political parties that identified this cheque coming up from a San Francisco organization, which Leadnow readily admitted it had taken into its coffers.

In terms of going forward, it's this simple: If you are serious about arresting the undue influence of third parties, you need a complete code of conduct that deals with both sides of the question. Yes, you want to stop the mischief-makers in the third party from foreign sources, but you also want to make sure that our regulators have the ability to challenge those who are receiving the money as the third party.

You need to put a sanction on the people who figure they can just ask for forgiveness later. That may be one way that some people think effective regulation occurs. In the electoral setting, the horse is very much out of the barn by the time any regulator can, if they choose, try to get to the bottom of something months or even years later.

Just so you know, our request for an investigation of Leadnow by the Conservative Party, as I understand it, remains an open investigation in the year 2018. The election was three years ago and that remains open. If you want to tell me that's an effective piece of regulation that keeps the third parties in exactly the position our Supreme Court has directed they should be kept, without pointing fingers at anybody, it's been an abject failure.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'll start with you, Mr. Hamilton. What investigation was this? You said, investigation by the Conservative Party?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

No. The Conservative Party lodged a complaint with the commissioner of Elections Canada.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see.

So, that would be a little like the Fraser Institute accepting $750,000 from the Koch brothers. Would that be a clear and present danger to our democracy?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Do you mean in an election setting? I don't know that the Fraser Institute is participating in an election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, don't they participate in elections?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I'm not aware.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They don't provide, say, research to the Conservative Party that then gets advocated for in elections, and then distributed to voters?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I'm aware of no such thing.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you want to double-check that before you answer that?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I'll take your source, if you have one.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So, the Koch brothers are okay to donate to people who participate in our elections. It's okay for the largest foreign investors in the oil sands to advocate for certain policies, which were then enacted by, say, the Conservative Party of Canada, but if somebody does it from another political point of view, that's when you have a problem with it?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

No. Read my statement; review it again. I say eliminate all of it, every last inch of it—eliminate it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Would it be wrong for anybody to, say, divert voters to the wrong polling station, using databases that political parties have obtained over time?

(1810)

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

One hundred percent, that would be wrong. That's already a violation of the current legislation. People should be prosecuted if they do that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So, if 40,000 people were contacted from the CIMS Conservative Party database and then misdirected to voting stations, that would be a terrible thing to do.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Do you have a source for that? I'm not aware of that instance.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know, the filing's in court. It's interesting that...

I appreciate vigour and determination on an issue, if it's applied equally. What causes me concern is to suggest that there are clear and present dangers to our democracy, but then not equally apply it across the political spectrum.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I'm calling for equal application.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are you calling historically, as well?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Lee, the security of our voting system is very important to you. Voter ID cards are a problem, because you see them as not secure. Yet, at the very end, it's not contemplated in this bill, but you talked about electronic voting or online voting. Are an advocate for it?

I'm confused, because not just in this committee, but in a previous committee on electoral reform, we actually looked into that as a possibility, and were told that it's one of the most unsecure things we could do to our democracy, because a) there's no system we'd create that would be secure and b) when it became unsecured, when it became hacked, it would be very difficult to even be aware of that hack.

How do you—

Dr. Ian Lee:

My response?

You may or may not know that I'm a former banker from many, many years ago. I don't have any relationship with any banks, but I was 10 years in banking in my 20s and early 30s, and I worked in the building that you people expropriated, which is now the Sir John A. MacDonald Building. I was there for many years, lending a lot of money to people in the Trudeau cabinet, as well as senior members of Parliament.

Where I'm going with this is that the banking system.... I don't agree with you that you cannot make a voting system secure. You know, it's that old joke about a boat is a hole in the water into which you pour money; you can make any system secure if you want to spend enough money.

I'm talking about the Canadian banking system. It has, I believe, one of the most secure and robust IT security systems anywhere. If you look, and there's the evidence, for people who are going to challenge that.... We're getting off-topic, but I'll just give you the....

They have very tiny losses as a percentage of the total dollars flowing through. So, when you look at the empirical data, you see they have very small losses, which tells me it's very secure.

So, going to voting, electronic voting, I do believe we can develop—and I'm not saying it's going to be cheap; I'm not saying we can do it on the cheap, but we can.

Just very quickly, Mr. Cullen, because I think your party is very concerned about access to people—I made this very argument at the university. We're unionized at Carleton, and we still do archaic voting for everything in the union. I said, well, guess what: we have very tiny turnouts for the election. Literally 5% of the faculty are voting for the slate, because you have to physically show up on campus, the votes are held in summer, the professors aren't there, etc., etc.

Electronic voting will encourage and increase participation in the democratic process.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Surprisingly, and we'll step off this topic. The evidence isn't that strong in supporting that, which surprises me, especially amongst youth voters.

However, I want to get over to the statement you made about the integrity and the belief in the integrity. You said not just the integrity but “the belief in the integrity of the voting systems”.

I want to talk about privacy for a moment. Under Bill C-76 the status quo is maintained: political parties are not exposed to any significant duties under the privacy laws of Canada, very few.

The data we all collect as political parties is shielded from the privacy commissioner or any independent observer of what we do with the data. There is no obligation to seek consent of voters or to inform them about what kind of data, personal information, we collect on them. Banks are obliged to do that, and private corporations. Do you think political parties should be as well?

Dr. Ian Lee:

I have come to that conclusion. Two years ago I didn't agree with that, but I've come to that conclusion because of what we've seen with the Russian hacking of electoral systems, and it's not just the Russians. It is undermining confidence in the integrity of the electoral system, so I think we're probably going to have to extend it to political parties.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Hamilton, what's your opinion on that question?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Due fairness is my opinion. Simply put, due fairness.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What does that mean?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

It means you will have a populace that accepts the integrity of the voting system when the populace buys that what you're doing is correct. When you talk about securing data and things like that, I am concerned that sometimes governments, and therefore legislation, do move at the speed—

(1815)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So should we be subjected to the privacy laws of Canada? Right now, we are not.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I think parts of that sound attractive but would be problematic. On balance, I'm not in favour today of those privacy laws being applied to political parties.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you think voters should have the right to know what information political parties have about them on an individual basis?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Well, they already know.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do they?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Sure. If they read the Canada Elections Act, they would know that the Chief Electoral Officer produces the list of electors.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's not all that parties have on people's personal information.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

It gives the personal information that political parties want, doesn't it?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, come on. Let's not be naive here. We know that political parties collect massive amounts of data.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Do they?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Come on now.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Compared to other corporations in the private sector, I'm not sure I agree with you on that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They're not subjected to privacy laws like other actors in the private sector.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I'm not sure their information is the same either.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It may be more.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

What I'm telling you is that I can't accept your premise.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, my goodness.

Okay, thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now, we'll go on to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have just a quick question for Dr. Lee.

You were talking about elections at Carleton and how little participation you had because people have to actually come and vote. Are you suggesting that requiring proof of ID reduces participation?

Dr. Ian Lee:

No, and I'll tell you why I'm very much of that view. We—not the royal we but all of us Canadians—have become inured to the idea of identification. Look at the boarding of a plane. Everyone of us has to flash the ID three times—not once but three times.

Every student knows that if you come to Carleton, or any university or college, you have to produce your photo ID to sit and write the exam. If you want to enter the parliamentary precinct, as I did about an hour ago, you have to produce photo ID called a passport or a driver's licence.

In a modern, complex, post-industrial society, we've accepted.... It's not like living in the village, where everybody knew everybody. You didn't need identification in the good old days of 150 years ago because the village only had a hundred people and everybody knew everybody. Those days are gone, and so we need identification in every aspect, for every system; banking, going into a sports stadium, whatever.

I went to the Eiffel Tower last August. I had to produce ID I don't know how many times in the line, just to get in at the front. What I'm saying is we've become accepting of the idea that we have to produce identification.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Those small communities where everybody knows each other still exist. I have a lot of them in my riding. Under the Fair Elections Act, we lost the right to vouch, but you are vouching in the banking system. I just want make that point as well.

I do have other topics, so I have to cut it there. We could always come back later.

Mr. Hamilton, I want to come back to a point made by Mr. Cullen earlier. In 2011, you were more than aware of the robocalls investigation and subsequent activity. Were you involved in that investigation in any way?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

It's a matter of public record that I assisted to bring witnesses to Elections Canada, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In what way did you bring witnesses to Elections Canada?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I attended at Election Canada's offices.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Were you the lawyer for those witnesses?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

No. I was there for the Conservative Party.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Was the Conservative Party involved in robocalls?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

Sorry, involved?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Was the Conservative Party involved in robocalls?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

What do you mean by “involved”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm asking you, if you are the Conservative Party lawyer and you were present at these interviews, why were you there if the Conservative Party wasn't involved?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I'm not sure I understand, but let me try to answer this way.

When the revelations about that wrongdoing came to light—and nobody doubted that there was wrongdoing—the clear directive from former prime minister Harper was that we were to co-operate and give any information to the investigators that we could. I followed that directive. I still believe that was the proper directive, and there was a conviction that certainly was aided by the information that we pointed up to the Elections Canada investigators.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Had the elections commissioner had the power to compel testimony and evidence, would the outcome have been different in your view?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I don't know, because the way that trial was conducted, Elections Canada clearly had a strategy with their prosecution team. I don't know if they would have had a different result by being able to compel evidence and at what stage.

(1820)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the Sona decision, the judge was fairly clear that other people had been involved and there's no method to investigate who that would have been and why or how, or how to get to them. Is that true?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I understand that, but surely we understand, especially on your side of the table where charter values are something that we're spoken to about every day, the right to remain silent still exists. The idea that a commissioner could compel testimony, does that include in the face of self-incrimination? I don't know that the Liberal Party is advocating that. So I'm not quite sure if there would have been a different outcome.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Were you present for the deposition of any of the witnesses in the robocall investigation?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

It's a matter of public record. I believe investigator Matthews testified to that during the trial.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What was your objective in being there?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

To assist the investigation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To assist the investigation or the Conservative Party?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

The Conservative Party wasn't under suspicion, so I was not there—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then why were you there?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

We had witnesses and, as I told you, the Prime Minister's directive was clear and I supported that directive.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you were there and you were acting as a lawyer for the Conservative Party with witnesses who...anyway, is there no conflict of interest there?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

None.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Did any of the witnesses you assisted in finding provide very similar testimony that was later discredited?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

That was later discredited?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, in the trial.

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

No, not that I'm aware of at all.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the trial, it came out that Michael Sona was overseas at the time that all the witnesses stated that he had come around to talk to them. Is that true?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I don't remember that piece of transcript, no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Prescott was given an immunity deal for his testimony. Do you have any idea why that might have been necessary?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I can't speak to that. I would not have been involved in that strategy by the crown.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could the use of compelled testimony have perhaps not required as many deals and perhaps got more truth out of this investigation?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I don't think so, because you're into the same problem where you're going to butt up against the right of a party to remain silent as guaranteed by the charter. I don't see how a piece of legislation without notwithstanding clause-type language in it would overcome that charter value.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you believe it's in the interest of democracy to allow the commissioner to have any power to compel or is it against [Inaudible—Editor] mostly for that?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I think the power to compel probably is back to the “horse is already out of the barn” problem. I would suggest that this Parliament spend more time preventing the harm in the first place. You've heard my statement on third parties and the harm that that represents. That's where our efforts should be focused, because then you're not butting up against charter rights. We're all talking about the integrity of the vote, as opposed to effectively coming in to clean up the mess after it has already been made.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you oppose these powers being given to the elections commissioner?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I just think they're going to have their limits. If someone's holding this out as the panacea that's going to fix everything, it's not, and that's one more of the holes that I've made reference to.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. My time is up.

The Chair:

Now we go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

Dr. Lee, you mentioned something, and I can't remember if it was in your opening statement or maybe it might have been in response to Mr. Simms' question, but it doesn't matter. The point is you made the comment that you require your students to show ID when they write exams. I tend to agree with the comment that you made, that it would be hard to imagine someone not having one of the 39 different forms of ID that are available to use in an election. I find it hard to imagine that scenario, that someone would have that and have a valid voter information card. I think that scenario is pretty hard to imagine, but I think a good illustration of that would be what you've mentioned about the students. Have you ever had a student who couldn't provide that identification? Maybe they didn't have it with them and they were able to bring it back later, which would be the same scenario that would happen in a voting situation, right? Someone might show up and say, I forgot to bring my ID, go home and get it and come back kind of thing. Have you ever had a student who just simply did not have ID, and could not produce any and couldn't find any way to produce any so they could not write an exam?

Dr. Ian Lee:

I've proctored every exam for 30 years—I don't outsource my exams—and I've had exactly two students who did not have ID, and in both instances they had forgotten their ID. I don't know how they did it. They said they were driving home, which meant that they left their driver's licence at home too, so they were driving illegally, I presume. But they went home and got their ID. We're very liberal. We're not saying that it must be a university photo ID; we said anything with a photo. We would take a mass transit pass, OHIP, card a driver's licence, a passport, or a university card.

(1825)

Mr. Blake Richards:

It sounds as if your requirement for ID was probably, in some ways, a higher barrier than what is required in order to vote in an election, possibly. And you're telling me that you never once, other than these two who went back to get it—which is not saying they didn't have it—had a situation where there wasn't a student....

This is actually one of the arguments or examples that's often used of someone who would be disenfranchised by not requiring.... How many students do you think would, roughly, in an estimate—

Dr. Ian Lee:

My flow-through is 250 a year. I've been teaching for 30 years, so you can do the math.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's a pretty significant number of students.

Dr. Ian Lee:

Can I, very quickly, respond to that?

The key point, the answer to your question.... You're quite right. It's education and disclosure.

It's on the syllabus. It's in the calendar. It's drilled into every student's head. I send an email around the week before the exam, and in fact, the night before the exam saying, “Remember, bring photo ID.” It's educating the person. They have the ID, but some forget it.

Elections Canada could do a better job, saying, “Remember, everybody, please bring ID to the voting booth on voting day.” They could run ads across the country advising people to do so. It's not difficult. Every other institution of government demands ID.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would agree. This is something that I've said many times. I think Elections Canada needs to do a better job of it. We had representatives from the Canadian Federation of Students here today, and I was asking them about that very thing. They were indicating that they had to advertise that in the last election because they didn't feel it had happened, I guess. So I certainly agree with you.

I thank you for that.

With the time I have left, I'll turn to you, Mr. Hamilton.

You identified where you see the shortcomings in the bill. What is your advice on what this should look like in terms of third parties and their limits in spending and that kind of thing? What do you suggest the rules around that should look like, if it were up to you?

Mr. Arthur Hamilton:

I would strongly argue for a complete code of conduct, as I said before, that deals with both sides of the equation—the people trying to fund from foreign sources and those here in Canada receiving it. We do this in other things that Parliament has legislated on—our anti-corruption legislation now that puts the onus on a CFO sitting in the C-suite in Calgary, Toronto, or Montreal for things that are going on overseas in that company's operations. We make it the business of that CFO to know exactly where every dollar is going. This seems like a very high standard, but it's something we've chosen to do, to say that, “We, as Canadians, following the OECD, are not going to allow corrupt activities from our Canadian-domiciled companies.”

That same structure can be adopted to put the onus at the front end of registration for third parties to demonstrate that they are not acting...or facilitating in any way foreign dollars. That should be the bare minimum in any legislation that is serious about dealing with the third party crisis, which existed in the last election.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Finally, Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Mr. Lee, I'd like to begin with you.

The example we talked about with the students, where, as Mr. Richards pointed out.... There were two students who were refused in your time working as a professor. May I ask you, did you know the identity of those students?

Dr. Ian Lee:

No.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

In other words, were you sending them home to get their ID because you didn't actually know who they were—

Dr. Ian Lee:

Precisely.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

—or because a rule was in place? Okay.

Dr. Ian Lee:

No, really. I'm getting older. I can't remember 50 students and all their names.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I've worked with students for the past 20 years too, so I understand what—

Dr. Ian Lee:

It's a sea of faces.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Let me ask you this. If you were to know their ID. Let's say you were to know who they were but they had forgotten their identification, would you have allowed them into the exam to write that exam?

(1830)

Dr. Ian Lee:

If you'd asked me that 10 or 15 years ago, I probably would have said yes. Today, I've become much more of a stickler on the idea of due process. I really believe in one rule for everybody, not one rule for the students who I've developed a friendship with because they've sought me out, as opposed to another rule. I've said this to students. This rule applies to everybody, regardless of your gender, your ethnicity, or your religion. I can't start playing favourites, because that's not right.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

So, your focus there is really on the process, and ensuring it's applied equally.

Dr. Ian Lee:

Equally, fairly, and objectively.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

If you knew the integrity was going to be preserved, you knew that person who was writing, and if they had to go home, they could lose the course, because it could be a 100% final, for example.... It's more important to you that the due process is followed.

Dr. Ian Lee:

Yes, because of students saying you're starting to create favourites and playing games—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, I can understand.

Dr. Ian Lee:

—and that's what I meant by the integrity of the system. It's very easy today to be challenged. Authority can be challenged by someone saying that you're playing games, you're making special rules, because—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Except you wouldn't be doing be that if you knew the person, if you knew the nature of the person. What you're saying is the process is more important for you.

The evidence that we've heard, from not only the Canadian Federation of Students, but others, indicates that students face a particular challenge, and the challenge is that, although there might be many different pieces of ID they could have, it's the address that presents the problem. Some people have 80 plus different potential identification pieces, but they don't have identification pieces with their address on it. This is why the testimony of the students' federation was so strong saying this is making it difficult.

I have two questions. One, do you appreciate that students are in a different position in this, because they don't have the plethora of ID that other people have? Two, that the evidence that we've heard is that with the voter identification cards, there is no fraud. So, if you were given that assurance, that fraud was not an issue with the voter identification cards, would you support it? Do you recognize that students are in a different position because they don't have ID with their address on it?

Dr. Ian Lee:

I was hoping someone was going to ask this question of me, thank you.

I'm very familiar with the registrar's office, which, as you may or may not know, are present in every university and college.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, and they all operate differently, and some are aware—

Dr. Ian Lee:

Let me finish.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

—that the addresses can be provided, and some are not, and that's a problem for students. We heard that—

Dr. Ian Lee:

In the registrar's offices that I'm familiar with, and I'm pretty sure they're pretty standard, we must have an address. We will not register a student who will not provide an address, and they provide the address where they're living, on-campus or off-campus. Our students are also ubiquitous in terms of cell phones, and the bill is coming in to them wherever they're living. I simply don't accept the argument.

I talk to students all the time—by the way, I teach full-time, I'm not a part-timer—and they're very open and transparent, and they are very sophisticated. As I said, I do not know a student who doesn't have a cell phone, which means they have a cell phone bill with an address.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Some of the bills are going to the parents. If you have students, and you're not aware bills are going to parents.... There are many bills that are going to the parents, and I may be one of those parents. The issue is that the testimony we heard today—and I've experienced this first-hand—is that number one, students aren't aware that they can go to the registrar's office to get that letter, and number two, registrar's offices aren't pumping those letters out, because they don't realize they have the obligation to present the letter.

Dr. Ian Lee:

I think that's a much more fair point. I don't agree with the first point. The second point is, there is an education process needed by Elections Canada to educate people, and not just about voting. There are people who don't know what they have to do to go apply for Canada pension cheques, but we don't say that they don't have to produce any ID, they can just walk in and ask for the cheque, and we'll give them the cheque, and they walk out. We don't do that. Likewise, at the border, if you say your forgot your passport, they just say that's just too bad.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It's a bit of a difference, though, comparing those things, because here we are in a situation where we are trying to encourage young people to go out and vote. We're not saying to them, “Okay, you're going to go to Florida for a week's vacation, so you better have your proper ID”. This is something where we are trying to encourage them and to whet their appetite to get them voting. We have to do what we can to make it easier, not make it harder and put standards on them, given they may not want to take extra steps.

If you were assured that the voter identification cards were not fraudulent, that they could be relied on, would you then say that you would accept those as a piece of identification for students?

(1835)

Dr. Ian Lee:

I'm answering; I'm not ducking your question at all. I do not believe that the voter registration card—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Do you have evidence to the contrary?

Dr. Ian Lee:

I don't believe they can be made secure. I have had voter registration cards. I've been voting for a long time. I just turned 65 this year and I've never missed a single provincial or federal election. Every time I've had one of the cards, I've thought, my God, this is a really crappy, insecure system. It's just a piece of paper. I could make one of those. I could concoct one and make a pretty good facsimile.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

The letter from the registrar's office, you think it's more thorough than that?

Dr. Ian Lee:

I'm saying it isn't very thorough. It is not up to the standards of Service Canada. It's not up to the standards of the other databases of the Government of Canada. It certainly doesn't meet the standards of our passport security system, which is very strong. All I'm saying is that we should have the same standard we have in all of our other government services and identification, a standard that has been mandated by you, the parliamentarians, a standard that I applaud.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Thank you, everyone. My thanks to the witnesses, a very active panel compared to some of the previous ones.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Don't diss the previous ones.

The Chair:

I'm not saying they were bad; I'm just saying this one was very animated; maybe animated is the word I meant.

We're going to suspend while we go into committee business.



The Chair:

Welcome back to the 111th meeting. We are discussing the second part. We separated two issues this morning and agreed to come back to deal with the second issue.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can I just get a quick update? Have we heard back from Twitter? They're sending us panicky notes from Washington. I just want to see if they've connected with the clerk yet.

The Clerk:

I have yet to hear back from Twitter, but I've had a couple of exchanges with Facebook.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are they available Thursday?

The Clerk:

Thursday afternoon.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can we circle back to it when we're done? We need to know how many days of witnesses we have so that we can be sure of what we want to do about inviting them. They're at a training course, which is awesome. But we can Skype them in or Twitter them in, whatever technology they want to use.

Mr. Scott Reid:

More prosaically, couldn't we just do a video conference?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We were talking to them about that.

Can we circle back to it once we get done with the calendar?

The Chair:

Okay.

Ruby, do you want to go back to what you were proposing?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Part of what we just discussed is important. I'm not sure I understood. So Facebook has replied and they're available for Thursday afternoon, but through video conference? Is that what's been said?

(1840)

The Chair:

That was Twitter.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh, it was Twitter. Twitter is available Thursday.

The Clerk:

Facebook was supposed to come Thursday afternoon.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In person on Thursday.

The Clerk:

Twitter gets to respond officially. The email we sent them said the deadline to respond was noon tomorrow.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

So we'll know tomorrow. Where do we stand on scheduling all the witnesses, the 300 or so witnesses who were called? In regard to those who have made themselves available or want to be available, where are we at?

The Clerk:

We're still taking emails and processing responses, but I can say that on Thursday we have a full slate of witnesses. The notice of meeting went out for tomorrow's meeting as well and it's also relatively full.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay, do we have anything for Monday?

The Chair:

We didn't schedule Monday.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Right, it wasn't part of the original motion.

I was just wondering whether the committee would feel okay in case there is some interest shown in the next couple of days. There have been quite a lot of witnesses submitted by the other parties, and I was wondering whether we could extend hearing witnesses into Monday, just as a slot, just in case, and then have the minister come in as well in one of the time slots.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is chicken-and-egg. With the committee not confirming, it's difficult for the clerk to be open to things we haven't decided yet. We should decide if there's a slot or two slots on Monday or whatever we're doing on Tuesday so we won't have people writing back to the committee saying they're interested but then it's full on Thursday and so on. We have to make the call and say what we want to do. Do you know what I mean?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, I'd like to see what both of your parties think about allowing that time. Or do you think we should move past the witnesses after Thursday?

The Chair:

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

My comment would simply be that we should hear from the people who wish to be heard. That is the barrier that was used the last time we looked at elections law, and it's the barrier that should be used in this case.

I think these arguments that are being made to just leave a little time on Monday in case a few more people want to come, I don't know.... Maybe the clerk can help us. Obviously, people were being offered spots for this week. In some cases, in the best-case scenario, they were being offered a spot in the next four business days and, in the worst case, maybe even for the next day or two days from the day they were contacted. Clearly, that would have disqualified a lot of people who would have wanted to come from coming this week.

I think we can all understand that people have busy schedules. In some cases, they have to travel across the country, and it wouldn't even have been possible. To be thinking that, just because they weren't necessarily able to come this week they weren't interested is to make a huge leap. I would assume that there are a lot of people on those lists who still have an interest and would like to come. They should be heard.

We are talking about making changes to the elections law of this country. It is a very significant piece of legislation. From the very few witnesses we've heard—and it is very few—we have already heard a number of things that I know I hadn't thought of. I notice that other members were picking up on things that they hadn't thought of or heard about in terms of concerns or potential amendments. This is why we do this.

I get that the government has for whatever reason suggested that they really feel they have to ram this through and do it quickly. I disagree with that, but that seems to be the case. I don't think that serves the best interests of the country or of any of us as parliamentarians in trying to do our jobs properly. We need to hear from the people who want to be heard, and we're nowhere near that at this point. To say that we should be done after Thursday is utterly ridiculous, frankly. To suggest that Monday would then be enough is no less ridiculous, really.

My suggestion would be that we actually determine how many witnesses want to be heard and schedule the number of meetings necessary to do that.

(1845)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

May I ask what your proposal is, Blake? How much longer should we...?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We haven't had one day yet, Blake, in three weeks, so I don't know if we....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you have any kind of proposal about what you see as a time schedule, so that we can have that discussion and try to figure out how to plot it?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think that much like most studies we do, we probably would determine it based on the witnesses. I don't know if they've been canvassed, even, as to whether they're interested in appearing or not. They were asked if they would appear this week. Those are two different things.

Maybe the clerk could help us as to whether they've been canvassed on their interest, and then we can get some sense as to how many meetings are required based on that.

The Clerk:

I can say that people in my office have been assisting me, and we've reached out to almost everyone on the witness lists that were submitted. They were all offered an opportunity to appear on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday of this week. There was never any mention of additional meetings, so on the responses that we got back, we did not ask people to specify whether they would be interested in appearing at a later date. It's not information that we have on hand at this point in time.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would suggest, then, because I'm being asked for a proposal, that we do that work: that we canvass the individuals and determine how many are interested in appearing, and then schedule the appropriate number of meetings.

The Chair:

Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Could we just recap?

Although the suggestion is that we haven't studied this, I feel like it's all that I've studied for months and months. Can the clerk confirm that we've had about 30 hours of witnesses? Do you have the number? That doesn't include the next few days of witnesses. It's in addition to that. For Bill C-33, we studied for....

I'm just concerned about it being suggested that we haven't studied this sufficiently. I am happy if there are witnesses who want to come forward soon, but I don't appreciate the comment that we haven't studied this. I feel that we have studied it. We have 30 plus hours already and we have another—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't mean to interrupt, but where do you get this 30-hour figure from? We met for three hours yesterday, and six hours today, that's nine. Then if you include the minister and the officials that's 11, maybe. We've heard from Canadians for nine hours.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

As of Thursday, it will be 30 hours. I don't know what it was with Bill C-33, which is included in this. I would like the clerk to tell us.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't really—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Blake, I know you really like interrupting everyone, but you don't have the floor.

Chair—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm just asking where the 30 hours is coming from. We had three hours yesterday, and six hours today.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I thought the 30 hours was to the end of today. It's actually to the end of Thursday; by the end of Thursday we will have had 30 hours. I'm not making the point to end discussion. I'm making the point to say that a suggestion that we haven't had witnesses or listened to witnesses in a robust way I think is misrepresentative, particularly in light of the fact that Bill C-33 is also in this bill, which we also spent numerous hours on.

I'd like to get a response from the clerk, not right now, but maybe the next time we meet, as to how many hours of witnesses we heard there. I want to make that point. I don't want to drag this out. I don't want it to be misrepresented that we haven't heard from witnesses.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

She means the CEO's report, not Bill C-33.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's what I meant.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Clearly, there's no path forward.

Mr. Richards, we've been asking for plans from you from weeks.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I gave you one.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

A plan to come up with a plan to come up with a plan is not a plan, Blake. I appreciate that.

We're in camera, so taking swipes at each other is not worthwhile.

Voices: We're not.

Mr. Chris Bittle: We're not in camera? Fabulous.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Chris Bittle: Fabulous. But still, that explains Blake's....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Tell us what you were going to say.

(1850)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Don't stop now.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Do it in camera, swear, swear, swear.

Clearly, there's still just a plan to come up with a plan. If the Conservatives want to offer something concrete, I think we could go forward.

There's an offer on the table to extend the amount of time. That's been pushed back. I don't know if we're going to get anywhere tonight.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What's the offer on the table exactly?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's to extend witnesses to Monday if there are any of those who we can re-ask, I guess. If we so choose, we can instruct the clerk to canvass those same witnesses again and let them know that there's another slot available. That gives them four more days and a weekend to prepare and come before committee.

Most of the witnesses, with the exception of maybe the chicken farmers...I'm not sure if they have a good grasp on this type of material about elections.

What my colleague, Filomena, has said it that we've been through a lot of this material with the Chief Electoral Officer's report because 80% of what the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations were are in Bill C-76. We have thoroughly gone through it. We had the Chief Electoral Officer sit here meeting after meeting with us and also explain to us every time we had any question on any issues.

So we had the foremost expert on elections law here throughout that whole time. I can't even recall how many meetings that was at this point. I would have to go back to take a look. There were 25 meetings. That's over 50 hours there of meetings at that point. There's 50 hours plus the 30 hours of witnesses, now.

I'm just saying that it's not on this legislation but a huge chunk of it really was discussing whether these recommendations were good or not and what they entailed. We have a good understanding, I believe.

Let's put it out there to see if any of those witnesses want to come forward with another time slot. There's at least another six hours of options for them. Then we would have to naturally progress after that. That's the only way I see it. That's what we do as a committee, right?

Once we've had the witnesses, we have to go on to the next stage of the study.

The Chair:

Mr. Kmiec.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

I'm just going to make a point. In the name of brevity, I'll keep it short.

I sit on the Standing Committee on Finance, and we're going through a statutory review of the anti-money laundering act. We've been at it for eight months—maybe even nine months—at this point. I think we have easily reached almost 100 hours. The committee is travelling this week to study the issue.

I think Bill C-76 is a much bigger deal than the statutory review of the anti-money laundering act. The provisions contained within it have a direct impact on our democracy. The anti-money laundering act provisions are important in and of themselves, but they're not fundamental to what happens in 2019, which is a general election. I understand there is a certain amount of urgency to deal with it.

That being said, you want to get it right in the first place. You want to have all the right witnesses, and the right amount of feedback. You want to keep your list open, as has been the practice on two committees that I have been on, the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, as well as the finance committee. Keep the list open, because as you're questioning witnesses they might say that they know this professor who could provide you with this type of information.

This is a big bill. It's 354 pages. I have gone through it myself. It's a lot to read and compare to what the act says right now. These documents aren't easy to read. Bills aren't made in a format that are simple for anyone to pick up.

I think it's more than reasonable to keep it open, so that witnesses can come in when they can. As you're questioning individuals who come before the committee, they provide new names and you have the opportunity to go and find additional information to test what's in the bill, and its validity. Either it is, and you find evidence out there that confirms the direction that the Government of Canada has taken is the correct one, or they say it's faulty, because of an experience in their jurisdiction.

Commissioner Therrien, who was here today, provided a lot of information about the European context, and how political parties comply with privacy rules. He didn't name specifically that in Italy, they do x, y, and z, or in Greece, they do the following.... He could have said that in Greece, I have the contact for so and so, a commissioner who could provide you with that information. You never know what you're going to get until you start to process off.

Again, I'm just dropping in on this meeting to make a contribution. Other committees have dealt with this in other ways. By keeping it open and not restricting themselves to a strict timetable, they've had a better outcome.

It's an observation.

(1855)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Not to knock any committee, but maybe we're just more efficient.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

I'm going to tell Wayne you said that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In eight months, you have gone through 100 hours. We've gone through about almost 80. By Monday we'll have 80 hours completed, when it comes to looking at the subject matter.

I think it's also very important that we have an independent person, the Chief Electoral Officer. He has guided us through a lot of these different issues in his recommendations, all along the way. He really knows how these rules impact people, day in and day out, from experiences they've had in the past, through previous elections.

I think being able to hear from him previously, when we studied his recommendations, and then now, before committee, has been a really effective use of our time. We've learned a lot.

I just put it out there that we leave spots open. We've asked hundreds of people to come forward. I think a lot of those who had valuable information have come forward. There might be a few others. That's why I'm saying let's leave that spot open, to see what they have to say.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

As much as I'm enjoying seeing these numbers inflate by the minute...the number of hours that are claimed we have heard from witnesses. I think it started at 30 a few minutes ago, and now we're up to 80.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I mean the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's really accelerated. That's even faster than Mr. Graham's pace of speaking.

Having said all that, I certainly would disagree with the numbers. I'm just boggled at where they might possibly come from. I've done the math, and we've heard this week from witnesses for nine hours. I think we've made some progress thus far in hearing from witnesses. We're getting more for the next couple of days. That's a positive thing. Following this week there are two more weeks before Parliament rises for the summer. Why don't we take those two weeks, let the clerk utilize those two weeks, and we can decide on what the schedule will look like for those two weeks. I'm open to whatever works for everybody. In those two weeks, we could offer whatever spots we determine to those witnesses. That would give them a choice, so that it wouldn't be just a few days from now; there's a second week there as well. I would suggest that, beyond inviting them for those two weeks, for those who aren't able to come in that two-week period, we ask a follow-up question—maybe they could be asked at the same time—that, if they're not able to appear in the next two weeks, if there were more time available, whether they would be interested. At that point we could get through scheduling for those two weeks. We would determine what we will be able to hear during that two-week period and then make a decision at some point during that time as to whether there are more witnesses we need to hear from, and we could schedule those meetings for the future. If not, then we could have a discussion about what comes next instead. That gives us a couple of weeks to hear from a very large list of witnesses who remain unheard. It might get us somewhere near the numbers we're hearing on the other side now.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, Mr. Bittle, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We're studying this bill. Of course committee members know that I was quite keen on something that would have taken us around the country. For various reasons, that didn't happen. We're now at the point where we've had a number of meetings. I don't know what we're currently at in terms of hours of studying this particular legislation, but I'd say it's 10 or 15, or maybe it will be 20 by the end of the week, give or take, which would not be great for me. The government is under pressure to get the bill back into the House at some certain point. They're probably not happy. Until everybody is equally unhappy, we probably haven't arrived at the right calendar. I'd rather cut to the chase than circle around this thing. The Conservatives have proposed something that would not have the bill returned to the House prior to the end of the spring sitting. The Liberals are obviously—I don't want to speak for them—not going to be willing to agree to that. Some point in the middle of those two proposals is where we're.... I guess we just need a motion eventually from you guys as to what you want and when you want the bill back. I would really avoid saying we've exhausted the witness list, because we've exhausted it with the very tight constraint that we had, which was, whether witnesses could come in within two days or three days. A bunch of people said no. For a normal committee, we would have submitted witness lists and we would normally have had two or three weeks of witness hearings and people slotted in. We've taken a very aggressive approach in terms of the number of hours, but they were all very immediate.

All I'm saying is in order to not have this go on forever, find out what the government wants. When do they want the bill out? How many more witness days do they want to have? We can agree, disagree, have votes, and then move on. I just don't know if we're going to get super productive arguments back and forth philosophically. I think this is going to come down to brass tacks at some point.

(1900)

The Chair:

So you want a proposal.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, essentially. We had one, and it was withdrawn. There was one that was floated around for a while, and it wasn't submitted for a vote. I don't know if there is another version of that ready or if tomorrow there could be one ready. I just don't know if we're getting anywhere.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I think I'm going to propose to adjourn. Maybe we should all take Nathan's suggestions under advisement. I'm going to use the time to go through Hansard and check out the Bill C-23 debate and check all of Blake's references for there not being enough time in committee to study the bill. I'm sure there will be lots of those. I do propose a motion that we adjourn right now.

The Chair:

The motion is not debatable.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 111e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Scott Jones, chef adjoint de la Sécurité des technologies de l'information, et Jason Besner, directeur du Centre de l'évaluation des cybermenaces, Sécurité des technologies de l'information, du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Nous accueillons aussi Coty Zachariah, président national, et Justine De Jaegher, directrice exécutive, de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants.

J'ai de bonnes nouvelles pour le Comité. Twitter a accepté...

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

J'ai envoyé un courriel à M. Chan de Facebook, et à Twitter aussi, et j'ai communiqué avec ces deux organisations par téléphone ou par courriel. M. Chan a dit pouvoir être ici mardi après-midi. J'attends toujours une réponse officielle de Twitter.

Le président:

Monsieur Jones, vous pouvez présenter votre déclaration préliminaire. Merci d'être là.

M. Scott Jones (chef adjoint, Sécurité des technologies de l'information, Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications):

Bonjour, monsieur le président et bonjour aussi aux membres du Comité. Je m'appelle Scott Jones. Je suis le chef de la cybersécurité du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Comme on l'a déjà mentionné, je suis accompagné de Jason Besner, le directeur du Centre de l'évaluation des cybermenaces, le CEC du CST. Nous vous remercions de nous avoir invités aujourd'hui.[Français]

Comme il y a déjà un moment qu'un représentant officiel du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications s'est adressé à ce comité, permettez-moi d'abord de vous donner un aperçu du mandat de cybersécurité du CST.

Depuis plus de 70 ans, le CST aide à fournir et à protéger l'information la plus sensible du Canada.

En plus de son mandat touchant le renseignement électromagnétique étranger et de son mandat d'assistance, le CST, en tant que centre d'excellence du gouvernement en matière de cyberopérations, a pour mandat d'aider à assurer la protection de l'information et des infrastructures d'information importantes du gouvernement du Canada.

Pour ce faire, il fournit des avis, des conseils et des services aux ministères et aux organismes du gouvernement du Canada, ainsi qu'aux propriétaires d'autres systèmes importants pour le gouvernement canadien. Le CST collabore étroitement avec des partenaires de l'ensemble du gouvernement dans le cadre de cet important effort. Vous avez d'ailleurs entendu parler de certains d'entre eux dans le cadre de la présente étude.

(1540)

[Traduction]

Comme vous le savez, la ministre des Institutions démocratiques a demandé au CST d'analyser les risques que représentent les pirates informatiques relativement aux activités politiques et électorales canadiennes. En réponse, le CST a publié une évaluation des cybermenaces qui pèsent sur le processus démocratique canadien. Cette évaluation, publiée en 2017, repose sur les leçons qui ont été tirées des élections tenues à travers le monde au cours des 10 dernières années. Le rapport a révélé que le Canada n'est pas à l'abri des cybermenaces contre ses élections.

Même si la menace qui pèse contre le Canada a été évaluée comme étant généralement peu perfectionnée, les partis politiques, les politiciens et les médias restent vulnérables aux cybermenaces et aux opérations d'influence. En fait, le rapport a démontré que, en 2015, le processus démocratique du Canada a été la cible d'activités de cybermenaces peu perfectionnées.

Il existe plusieurs types d'auteurs de cybermenaces capables de cibler notre processus démocratique, et le CST joue un rôle essentiel pour les empêcher d'atteindre leurs objectifs. Nous apprenons aux ministères, aux partis politiques et au public de quelle façon mieux se protéger contre les cybermenaces, afin de prévenir toute compromission néfaste.

Depuis la publication du rapport sur les cybermenaces contre le processus démocratique du Canada en juin, le CST a organisé des rencontres productives avec les partis politiques, les parlementaires et les responsables des élections pour discuter des conclusions du rapport et leur prodiguer des conseils en matière de cybersécurité. Par exemple à l'échelon fédéral, les représentants du CST ont rencontré les parlementaires et les représentants de tous les partis politiques siégeant à la Chambre des communes et, en partenariat avec Élections Canada, nous avons aussi rencontré la majeure partie des représentants des partis politiques fédéraux inscrits au Canada.

La ministre des Institutions démocratiques a demandé au CST de poursuivre ses analyses du risque que représentent les cybermenaces ciblant le processus démocratique canadien. Notre rapport de 2017 a été produit de façon à pouvoir être mis à jour, au besoin. Notre analyse portera encore sur les technologies et l'environnement de menaces qui changent rapidement et aidera à caractériser et comprendre les menaces en constante évolution contre nos processus démocratiques.

Ces efforts appuient l'objectif du CST qui consiste à mieux comprendre les enjeux liés à la cybersécurité et aideront à augmenter la résilience à l'égard des menaces contre le processus démocratique canadien. De plus, cette analyse continue nous aidera à fournir de l'information détaillée aux représentants du gouvernement du Canada, aux partis politiques et aux parlementaires.

Ces efforts déployés par le CST font partie des initiatives générales du gouvernement du Canada pour renforcer la cybersécurité. Dans le budget de 2018, le gouvernement a en outre annoncé son intention de créer un centre canadien pour la cybersécurité au sein du CST dans le cadre de la nouvelle Stratégie de cybersécurité du Canada « qui sera annoncée ». Cette initiative est complétée par le cadre législatif amélioré proposé au titre du projet de loi C-59, qui aiderait à renforcer la capacité du CST à contrer les cybermenaces. Cet important projet de loi comprend des dispositions essentielles pour améliorer les outils dont dispose le gouvernement dans ce domaine ainsi qu'un régime de reddition de comptes plus strict.

Nous vous remercions et nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Coty Zachariah, de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants.

M. Coty Zachariah (président national, Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants):

[Le témoin s'exprime en mohawk.]

Je viens de parler mohawk et j'ai dit: « bonjour à tous ». Je m'appelle Coty Zachariah, ou « celui qui parle dans le vent ». Je viens de la nation mohawk de la baie de Quinte, près de Kingston. Je suis aussi le président national de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants, qui représente environ 650 000 étudiantes et étudiants de niveau postsecondaire à l'échelle du pays.

En octobre 2014, nous nous sommes joints au Conseil des Canadiens pour contester les dispositions de la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Nos principales préoccupations au sujet de la loi étaient qu'on éliminait le pouvoir du directeur général des élections, le DGE, d'autoriser l'utilisation de la carte d'information de l'électeur comme pièce d'identité valide pour voter et qu'on limitait son pouvoir de mener des activités d'éducation et de sensibilisation auprès des électeurs.

Les étudiants font face à des obstacles supplémentaires au moment de voter, notamment parce qu'ils déménagent fréquemment, souvent jusqu'à deux fois par année. Par conséquent, leurs cartes d'identité habituelles n'indiquent pas leur adresse le jour des élections, et leur nom ne figure pas sur les listes électorales du bureau de scrutin ou de la circonscription où ils vivent pendant leurs études. De plus, si on limite le pouvoir du DGE de mener des activités d'éducation et de sensibilisation auprès des électeurs, les étudiants, qui sont souvent de nouveaux électeurs, risquent de moins bien comprendre le processus.

Malgré ces obstacles, durant les dernières élections, la FCE a entrepris une vaste campagne électorale non partisane visant à mobiliser les étudiants pour qu'ils votent en nombre record. En 2015, 70 000 électeurs étudiants ont participé au processus démocratique dans les bureaux de vote sur les campus. Cela a mené à l'expansion du projet de loi initial réalisé par Élections Canada. Chez les 18 à 24 ans, le taux de participation s'élevait à 57,1 %, comparativement à 38,8 % en 2011. Cette augmentation de 18,3 points de pourcentage est la plus importante augmentation de la participation électorale dans tous les groupes démographiques au pays. Cependant, cette augmentation s'est produite en dépit de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, et les étudiants restent confrontés à des problèmes.

Je vais citer ici le rapport rétrospectif sur les élections de 2015 du directeur général des élections: Comme aux deux élections précédentes, les problèmes d'identification aux bureaux de vote concernaient plus souvent la preuve d'adresse. Dans le cadre de l'Enquête sur la population active menée après la 42e élection générale, on a demandé aux électeurs concernés pourquoi ils n'avaient pas voté. Pour ce qui est des raisons liées au processus électoral, l'incapacité de prouver son identité ou son adresse arrivait en tête […], plus particulièrement parmi les 18 à 24 ans […]. Selon les estimations, ce pourcentage représente environ 172 700 électeurs. Environ 49 600 d'entre eux (28,7 %) ont dit qu'ils s'étaient présentés à un bureau de vote, mais qu'ils n'avaient pas pu voter en raison de leur incapacité à prouver leur identité et leur adresse. Environ 39 % de ces électeurs étaient âgés de 18 à 34 ans.

La FCE trouve cette situation inacceptable. Cependant, les étudiants sont encouragés de voir que le projet de loi C-76 apporterait une réforme en profondeur à la Loi électorale du Canada, y compris les modifications qui figuraient auparavant dans le projet de loi C-33, et nous avons hâte qu'il soit adopté.

Nous sommes toutefois découragés par le fait que ces réformes arrivent si tard. Il semble probable que, même si le projet de loi C-76 est adopté rapidement, il ne pourra pas passer par le Sénat et ne pourra pas entrer en vigueur avant 2019, de sorte qu'il est peu probable qu'Élections Canada puisse mettre pleinement en oeuvre les réformes prévues dans le projet de loi avant les prochaines élections générales d'octobre prochain. Il semble probable que ce sera notre affaire devant les tribunaux aux côtés du Conseil des Canadiens qui pourrait entraîner la mise en oeuvre — avant les élections — des réformes nécessaires liées à la suppression des électeurs. Nous tenons à souligner qu'il s'agit là d'une conséquence regrettable du processus retardé lié au projet de loi C-33.

Selon nous, la participation des étudiants et des jeunes au processus démocratique mérite d'être célébrée, pas découragée. Nous espérons que le projet de loi C-76 favorisera ce principe.

Merci.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions en commençant par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Ma question est destinée à nos amis M. Jones et M. Besner.

Quels services le CST fournit-il à Élections Canada et aux partis politiques?

M. Scott Jones:

Il y a quelques domaines. Nous avons travaillé en collaboration avec Élections Canada sur l'architecture générale, des conseils et des directives, des choses comme l'intégrité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement, les clauses contractuelles et ainsi de suite au moment où ses représentants commencent à établir l'infrastructure pour les élections. De plus, malgré tout, nous avons aussi travaillé en collaboration avec les responsables pour les aider à mettre au point l'évaluation des menaces proprement dite, tout simplement pour nous assurer de maintenir notre neutralité et de ne pas empiéter sur le domaine d'Élections Canada en tant qu'entité non gouvernementale, une entité du Parlement.

Par ailleurs, nous examinons également la façon de participer activement aux côtés d'Élections Canada pour défendre l'infrastructure déployée à l'appui des élections de 2019, de façon à veiller à bien la protéger et à garantir qu'on pourra aller de l'avant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À votre avis, quelle est la plus grande menace à la cybersécurité des partis et les élections en général? Est-ce des problèmes techniques ou l'ingénierie sociale?

M. Scott Jones:

Je crois que c'est un mélange des deux. Si on regarde les partis politiques et les politiciens candidats, l'absence de conseils pouvant être aisément mis en oeuvre et pouvant être faciles à utiliser... La technologie en elle-même est un obstacle dans ce cas-là. Il est difficile de mettre en place cette mesure de sécurité appropriée actuellement. Ce n'est tout simplement pas quelque chose qu'on peut acheter. Franchement, la technologie que nous utilisons doit être considérablement améliorée.

Nous prodiguons des conseils et fournissons des directives sur ce que les gens peuvent faire eux-mêmes. Tout prend du temps. Nous savons tous qu'il n'y a probablement pas une grande organisation de TI derrière chaque candidat ou derrière chaque parti, et c'est ce qu'il faut pour mener des élections. Le principal défi, actuellement, c'est que la lutte contre la cybersécurité exige d'énormes efforts et de l'expertise. Le système devrait être sécuritaire par défaut et à dessein, plutôt que de laisser les gens se protéger eux-mêmes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Existe-t-il un système qui serait entièrement sûr?

M. Scott Jones:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous décidons d'adopter le vote électronique, ce dont on ne parle pas beaucoup, dans quelle mesure serait-il sécuritaire? À votre avis, dans quelle mesure serait-il facile de compromettre un tel système?

M. Scott Jones:

Tout dépend du moment où on commence à travailler sur la sécurité. Si on pense à la question de la sécurité d'entrée de jeu, on peut concevoir un système capable de se protéger, capable de détecter si des activités malveillantes se produisent et capable de s'assurer de l'intégrité des données en tant que telle. Il faut commencer d'entrée de jeu, afin que la sécurité fasse partie intégrante de la conception. Lorsqu'on réfléchit à la sécurité en fin de processus, on mine notre capacité d'utiliser le système et d'interagir en tant qu'utilisateurs.

L'aspect clé du vote en ligne — et je sais qu'un certain nombre d'avantages ont fait l'objet de discussions — c'est de vraiment commencer tôt et de concevoir d'entrée de jeu le système en tenant compte de notre situation au chapitre de la sécurité, soit l'une des nombreuses menaces auxquelles nous sommes confrontés. Ce n'est pas nécessairement une menace venant d'un État; il s'agit parfois de la menace de chaos et tout simplement de la capacité de faire quelque chose... Les passionnés représentent en fait un risque important à ce point-ci aussi.

(1550)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Que pouvons-nous faire en tant que politiciens pour nous protéger contre les cybermenaces, aussi bien pendant qu'entre les élections?

M. Scott Jones:

Il y a un certain nombre de choses. La première consiste simplement à configurer les appareils mobiles qu'on utilise. Évidemment, en tant que députés, vous devez beaucoup voyager, que ce soit dans vos circonscriptions ou ailleurs, et nous avons à ce sujet un certain nombre de conseils et de lignes directrices sur notre site Web. Je sais que nous les avons aussi communiqués par l'intermédiaire du personnel des TI de la Chambre des communes. En outre, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les membres du personnel des TI afin d'accroître la sécurité de l'infrastructure que vous utilisez en tant que parlementaires.

Il y a des choses simples qui peuvent être faites en ce qui concerne la façon dont vous utilisez vos TI, la façon dont vous pouvez les configurer et les mots de passe que vous établissez. De quelle façon gérez-vous votre environnement? À qui donnez-vous accès à votre compte? À qui donnez-vous accès à votre équipement?

Certaines de ces lignes directrices liées à la sécurité mobile sont parmi les conseils que j'encouragerais tout le monde à suivre. On peut y avoir accès gratuitement sur le site Internet du CST. Ce sont là certaines des mesures concrètes que tout le monde devrait prendre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Diriez-vous que, de façon générale, Élections Canada et nous tous, au sein des partis politiques et en tant que politiciens connaissons bien la menace dont vous nous faites part et est-ce que nous réagissons de façon appropriée?

M. Scott Jones:

Élections Canada a réagi très rapidement. Nous avons commencé à travailler avec ses représentants avant les élections de 2015. Ce travail n'a pas cessé depuis. Les représentants de l'organisme sont très conscients du fait que l'environnement évolue très rapidement.

Selon moi, l'un des problèmes que nous rencontrons lorsqu'il est question d'interagir avec différents politiciens et les divers partis politiques, c'est que ce n'est qu'un des problèmes auxquels ils doivent tous s'attaquer en même temps que tout le reste. Vous devez tous continuellement mener vos activités courantes, et la cybersécurité est une autre chose qui s'ajoute au reste.

De quelle façon pouvons-nous travailler en collaboration pour faciliter les choses? Je crois que c'est l'un des éléments clés. C'est là où nous devons vraiment travailler au sein de la société pour relever la barre en matière de cybersécurité, afin que nous n'ayez rien de spécial à faire. Nous aurions ainsi tous, au moins, un niveau de compréhension de base par défaut de la cybersécurité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le piratage — ce que certains appellent le déplombage — d'un parti politique ou d'un système politique est-il illégal? De telles activités peuvent-elles faire l'objet de poursuites dignes de ce nom?

M. Scott Jones:

Il serait probablement mieux pour moi de laisser la GRC répondre. Tout ce qui touche l'interférence illégale avec un système informatique ou tout autre type d'activité serait probablement reconnu comme tel, mais c'est une question qu'il serait probablement plus approprié de poser à mes collègues de la GRC.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

J'ai mentionné tantôt l'ingénierie sociale comme étant un grand risque. Que pouvez-vous recommander aux gens afin qu'ils se protègent contre l'ingénierie sociale? Tous les bénévoles dans les bureaux ont accès aux bases de données, et je suppose qu'il est assez facile de les convaincre. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Scott Jones:

Oui. Dans le cas de l'ingénierie sociale, je crois que, souvent, les malfaiteurs tirent parti du temps. À quelle rapidité...? Les gens sont occupés, alors les délinquants veulent les prendre par surprise et les pousser à cliquer ici ou là. Lorsque je parle d'ingénierie sociale, je parle vraiment du fait que certaines personnes tentent de vous convaincre qu'ils sont quelqu'un qu'ils ne sont pas vraiment, afin que vous leur révéliez un mot de passe, un renseignement crucial ou quelque chose dont ils ont besoin pour avoir accès à vos systèmes.

L'une des choses importantes que nous disons toujours, c'est que même si quelqu'un vous appelle et semble posséder une information, il ne faut pas lui faire confiance. Posez une question. Par exemple, dites ce que nous disons toujours dans le contexte bancaire, soit que vous allez les rappeler. Dites à la personne: « Donnez-moi un numéro de dossier, je vais regarder au verso de ma carte de crédit et je vous rappellerai en fournissant ce numéro de dossier ». Puis, vous saurez alors que vous avez appelé au bon endroit. C'est une mesure toute simple, mais ce sont de telles choses... Malheureusement, dans le contexte actuel de la cybersécurité, il est nécessaire de toujours faire preuve d'un peu de suspicion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si, en tant que bénévole de campagne ou candidat, je soupçonne qu'il y a quelque chose qui cloche sur le plan informatique, dois-je me tourner vers vous, au CST, pour savoir ce qui ne va pas, savoir si je suis tout simplement fou ou s'il y a vraiment quelque chose de menaçant?

M. Scott Jones:

Je pense que, à l'heure actuelle, le CST ne serait pas responsable. C'est un dossier qui relèverait vraiment de Sécurité publique Canada et du Centre canadien de réponse aux incidents cybernétiques, du moins dans le contexte plus général d'une infrastructure majeure, mais, lorsque le centre canadien pour la cybersécurité sera mis en oeuvre, c'est définitivement vers lui qu'il faudrait se tourner.

En général, cependant, nous cherchons à tirer parti de certaines autres activités en cours, comme les activités du Centre antifraude du Canada et certaines des campagnes de sensibilisation, comme, par exemple, « pensez cybersécurité », pour tout simplement renforcer le niveau de défense et accroître le niveau de connaissances générales des gens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si je vous disais — et c'est un peu hors sujet, mais c'est tout de même à propos — que la Chambre des communes m'a déjà dit que je pouvais seulement utiliser Internet Explorer sur nos ordinateurs parce que c'est le seul navigateur qui est considéré comme étant sécuritaire, quelle serait votre réaction?

M. Scott Jones:

Je dirais que nous devons constamment évaluer les logiciels qui sont les plus à jour. L'important, peu importe le logiciel utilisé, c'est de s'assurer qu'il est à jour et que les correctifs sont installés. Ce sont les facteurs critiques.

(1555)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Ma connexion a été rétablie, alors je vous en remercie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci. Nous vous remercions tous d'être là aujourd'hui.

Je vais commencer par la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants. Je ne sais pas qui veut répondre. M. Zachariah pourrait, j'imagine, mais c'est à vous de voir. J'aimerais aborder quelques points.

Dans un premier temps, je remarque que vous étiez enregistré comme un groupe de défense tiers durant les dernières élections. J'aimerais d'abord obtenir un peu de renseignements à ce sujet en guise de contexte, puis je vous demanderai ce que vous pensez des modifications prévues dans le projet de loi concernant les tiers quant à l'incidence que ces changements auront sur vous et s'il y a quoi que ce soit d'autre que vous aimeriez voir.

Je constate que vous avez dépensé environ 15 000 $ en publicité sur les médias sociaux, alors j'imagine que je vais revenir un peu en arrière. Êtes-vous financés par les cotisations des étudiants ou receviez-vous des dons et des contributions? Pouvez-vous me dire de quelle façon vous avez obtenu du financement à ces fins?

Mme Justine De Jaegher (directrice exécutive, Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants):

Nous sommes financés à 100 % par les cotisations des membres.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Vous ne recevez pas de contribution de quiconque outre ces cotisations?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

C'est exact, sauf, si je ne m'abuse, lorsque nous organisons nos journées d'action. Parfois, les partenaires de la coalition font des dons de matériel en nature, de ressources et ainsi de suite.

M. Blake Richards:

Auriez-vous reçu des contributions de sources étrangères?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Parlez-vous de petites contributions ou y aurait-il des contributions plus importantes de différentes sources?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Pour notre campagne sur les élections, une journée d'action ou quelque chose du genre?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, à n'importe quelle fin, j'imagine.

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

N'importe quelle fin... j'imagine que tout dépend de ce que vous considérez comme petit ou grand, mais...

M. Blake Richards:

Disons au-delà de la limite de contribution des partis politiques, qui est d'environ 1 500 $.

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Pour une campagne liée aux élections, non. Nous pourrions peut-être obtenir un don plus élevé que cela d'un partenaire solidaire pour une journée d'action.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

En quoi consistaient ces 15 000 $ utilisés pour faire de la publicité sur les médias sociaux durant les dernières élections? De quel type de publicité s'agissait-il? Qu'avez-vous fait? De quoi avez-vous fait la promotion?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Durant les dernières élections fédérales, nous avons mené une campagne pour faire sortir le vote; nous disions principalement aux étudiants de quelle façon voter, les genres de documents d'identité dont ils avaient besoin et l'emplacement des bureaux de vote. Souvent, il y a de la confusion au sujet de la circonscription où les étudiants doivent voter. Est-ce la circonscription de leurs parents? Là où ils vont à l'école? Il s'agissait en grande partie de communiquer de l'information et simplement de promouvoir l'idée de participer au sein du système.

Dans un certain nombre de cas, il s'agissait de liens vers notre page portant sur les questions que nos étudiants ont cernées démocratiquement comme étant importantes dans le cadre des élections. Il s'agissait d'une campagne non partisane. Nous ne soutenons pas un parti ou des candidats précis. Cependant, nous avons cerné par l'intermédiaire de nos membres certains enjeux clés dont les étudiants voulaient qu'on parle durant les élections.

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de vous poser des questions sur ces deux choses.

La première question sera, probablement, une brève question sur les enjeux en cause. S'agissait-il d'un de ces types de campagne qu'on voit souvent, qui émanent de différentes organisations et différents groupes, du genre: « Voici les enjeux que nous avons cernés comme étant importants, et voici les points de vue des différents partis ou des différents candidats sur ces enjeux? » Seriez-vous allés plus loin au point de dire: « Nous croyons que ces partis sont recommandables, mais pas ceux-là? » À quoi tout cela ressemblait-il?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

C'est exact. Pour ce qui est de nous deux, les élections ont eu lieu avant le début de notre mandat, mais je crois qu'un sondage avait été envoyé à tous les partis politiques sur les enjeux qui avaient été cernés, et nous avons publié les réponses textuellement.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Je comprends.

Pour ce qui est de l'autre aspect, en fait, vous avez soulevé un enjeu intéressant, parce que c'est quelque chose que j'ai défendu dans le passé, et je crois qu'Élections Canada ne fait pas un assez bon travail à ce sujet, au moment de dire aux gens exactement quelles sont leurs options pour voter et de quelle façon ils peuvent le faire.

Je rappelle le fait qu'on peut voter à n'importe quel moment pendant les élections. Il y a beaucoup de façons différentes de voter. Pour ce qui est des formes de pièces d'identité acceptables, c'est une autre question dont nous ne faisons pas suffisamment la promotion. Je suis d'accord avec vous au sujet des étudiants et des endroits où ils votent: est-ce dans la circonscription de leur résidence ou celle de leur école?

Selon moi, ce sont tous des dossiers où Élections Canada doit faire du meilleur travail et, évidemment, vous serez d'accord, parce que vous avez ressenti le besoin de communiquer ces choses vous-mêmes, ce qui m'indique, selon vous, Élections Canada ne faisait pas de l'assez bon travail à cet égard. Je me trompe?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Je pense qu'Élections Canada a très bien respecté les paramètres qui lui avaient été imposés dans le cadre des dernières élections. Cependant, nous aimerions avoir une meilleure occasion de travailler en collaboration avec Élections Canada afin de mieux communiquer ce genre de choses.

M. Blake Richards:

Pouvez-vous préciser ce qui aurait empêché Élections Canada de promouvoir ce genre de choses? Je sais que, dans le cadre du dernier processus de modification de la loi électorale, on a précisé que c'était là son rôle. Qu'est-ce qui a empêché l'organisation de le faire?

(1600)

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Exact. Je suppose que tout cela concerne davantage notre relation avec elle et si nous avions travaillé en plus étroite collaboration avec elle pour cibler des groupes démographiques précis.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Je vous remercie d'avoir pris le relais là où il y avait des lacunes. J'espère bien sûr qu'Élections Canada fera du meilleur travail cette fois-ci.

Revenons à là où je voulais en venir, soit les règles touchant les tiers. Il y a évidemment certains changements apportés dans le projet de loi. Je suis sûr que vous les connaissez bien. Je ne vais pas les répéter. Que pensez-vous de ces changements? Pensez-vous qu'il y a là quelque chose de préoccupant ou qui vous nuira? Y a-t-il d'autres changements que vous pourriez suggérer?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

De façon générale, nous appuyons le projet de loi, y compris ces changements. Le seul domaine où nous ne pouvons pas vraiment prétendre être des experts, c'est lorsqu'il est question de la cybersécurité. Évidemment, nous sommes heureux que vous parliez à des experts du domaine.

Cependant, à part cela, nous sommes assez satisfaits du projet de loi. Encore une fois, notre principale préoccupation est de nature temporelle. Selon nous, il est malheureusement un peu tard. Nous espérions que le projet de loi C-33 soit adopté beaucoup plus rapidement afin qu'il puisse entrer en vigueur avant les prochaines élections.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Il me reste une minute. Je suppose que cela me laisse juste assez de temps pour la dernière question, ou cette question, en tout cas.

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi en tant que tel, il s'agit d'un projet de loi volumineux qui contient, si je ne m'abuse, 401 articles différents, alors il touche à beaucoup de domaines différents. Vous avez mentionné deux ou trois choses que vous appuyez, et j'aimerais avoir le temps d'en parler, mais pouvez-vous me donner une idée de ce qui vous préoccupe? J'imagine qu'il doit y avoir une ou deux choses qui suscitent chez vous des préoccupations ou qui, selon vous, ont été oubliées? En dehors de la question temporelle, que voudriez-vous nous dire à ce sujet?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Encore une fois, nous voulions vraiment souligner que les éléments contenus dans le projet de loi C-33 se retrouvent à nouveau dans le projet de loi actuel. Nous laissons certains autres domaines aux experts à qui vous allez parler.

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends. Merci de votre temps.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à nos témoins d'être là aujourd'hui.

Le vote étudiant a augmenté de combien?

M. Coty Zachariah:

De 18,3 %.

M. Nathan Cullen:

De 18,3 %. Croyez-vous que c'était en raison de la loi sur le manque d'intégrité des élections, du moins en partie? S'agissait-il d'une motivation involontaire, un cadeau non prévu, fait aux jeunes afin qu'ils aillent voter puisque quelqu'un avait dit que, peut-être, on ne devrait pas leur donner le droit de le faire?

M. Coty Zachariah:

Je pense qu'on croit depuis longtemps que les jeunes sont apathiques ou ne veulent pas vraiment participer au processus démocratique, mais nous avons constaté que, parfois, les gens ne comprennent tout simplement pas le processus. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons mis l'accent sur plus d'information et plus d'accès, et nous avons eu beaucoup de réussite avec nos bureaux de vote sur les campus.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Entre parenthèses, quel genre de questions ont motivé les gens? Dix-huit pour-cent, c'est un bond énorme pour n'importe quel groupe démographique.

M. Coty Zachariah:

Le plus grand bond.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quels sont les genres d'enjeux dont vous ont parlé les étudiants et les jeunes qui venaient vous voir en disant: « voilà pourquoi je vais voter cette fois-ci »? Quels sont certains des enjeux soulevés? Qu'il y en ait un, deux ou trois...?

M. Coty Zachariah:

Oui. Je crois que les frais de scolarité étaient un enjeu très important. Les frais semblent augmenter chaque année. Les jeunes avaient besoin de se faire entendre. C'est quelque chose que nous avons entendu dans quasiment toutes les provinces.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quelque chose d'autre?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Le chômage chez les jeunes était également un problème majeur qui a été cerné. Parmi nos parents-étudiants, la garde d'enfants était considérée comme une préoccupation majeure. Puis, il y a eu notre défense du Programme de soutien aux étudiants du niveau postsecondaire. Je dirais aussi que le financement pour les apprenants autochtones était un enjeu majeur.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci. C'est utile.

Pour ce qui est de nos amis de la sécurité — je n'ai pas souvent l'occasion de les appeler ainsi —, qu'avez-vous dit au sujet des élections de 2015? Avez-vous dit qu'il y avait une menace peu compétente...?

M. Scott Jones:

Des activités peu perfectionnées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Une menace peu perfectionnée: qu'est-ce que cela signifie?

M. Scott Jones:

Je parle ici de l'utilisation normale de choses comme des attaques par déni de service de faible niveau et ce genre de choses.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Sur les sites Web des partis ou...?

M. Scott Jones:

Des choses comme ça. Des gens ont tenté d'altérer des choses, c'est habituellement des activités d'hacktivistes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Des pays ou des gouvernements nationaux ont-ils été cernés?

M. Scott Jones:

Non. Pas à notre connaissance.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le gouvernement du Canada a expulsé quatre diplomates russes au début de l'année parce qu'ils avaient utilisé leur statut diplomatique pour miner la sécurité du Canada ou s'ingérer dans notre processus électoral démocratique en 2015.

M. Scott Jones:

Il s'agissait là d'éléments qui ne relèvent pas du domaine cybernétique. Pour ce qui est de fournir des renseignements plus détaillés à ce sujet, je ne suis probablement pas la bonne personne pour en parler du point de vue cybernétique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pas la bonne personne parce que...?

M. Scott Jones:

Tout ça ne relevait pas de mon domaine d'expertise et ce n'est pas non plus un domaine que nous couvrons.

(1605)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le CSTC n'a donc pas été au courant de la moindre attaque cybernétique russe?

M. Scott Jones:

Le rapport précise que nous n'avons constaté aucune activité de type cybernétique réalisée par un État nation.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suppose que la Russie étant un État-Nation, cette déclaration l'inclut.

C'est un peu déroutant, parce que c'est quelque chose d'assez gros. J'ai vu les nouvelles et je me suis dit: « bon sang, la Russie a attaqué notre démocratie. Nous devrions trouver quoi faire pour ne pas que ça se reproduise ». Nous avons posé la question aux représentants d'Élections Canada, et ils nous ont dit la même chose que vous venez de dire. J'aimerais trouver quelqu'un — le gouvernement peut peut-être fournir un témoin — qui puisse nous dire exactement ce qui s'est produit afin que les Canadiens puissent le savoir.

Et là, il y a différents types de pirates. Il y a ceux qui cherchent à causer du désordre, mais vous avez mentionné aussi les « passionnés ». De quoi s'agit-il?

M. Scott Jones:

Parfois, un passionné, c'est tout simplement quelqu'un qui le fait parce qu'il en est capable. Il veut voir s'il est capable d'accomplir quelque chose, s'il peut atteindre son objectif.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous voulez dire qu'ils ne sont pas motivés par des considérations politiques? Ils veulent seulement épater la galerie?

M. Scott Jones:

Oui, c'est tout simplement parce qu'ils peuvent le faire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord: des attaques par déni de service, faire fermer un site Web et voler des données?

M. Scott Jones:

Dans certains cas, absolument.

M. Nathan Cullen:

S'ils piratent les systèmes d'Élections Canada, ils peuvent obtenir le registre des électeurs. Ils peuvent obtenir certains renseignements, mais ce n'est pas exactement une mine d'or.

M. Scott Jones:

C'est aussi pour cette raison que nous travaillons en collaboration avec Élections Canada pour renforcer ses cyberdéfenses, afin que l'organisme puisse faire face à ce genre d'activités.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Prodiguez-vous des conseils aux partis politiques?

M. Scott Jones:

Nous avons offert de rencontrer n'importe quel parti politique pour lui prodiguer des conseils.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Offrez-vous un service aux partis politiques pour protéger leurs systèmes?

M. Scott Jones:

Actuellement, notre soutien se limiterait à des conseils architecturaux sur la façon de mettre en place les systèmes pour...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous pouvez souligner certaines choses, mais vous ne faites pas le travail vous-mêmes.

M. Scott Jones:

Non. Nous nous limitons à la prestation de services.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tout peut être piraté.

M. Scott Jones:

Tout peut l'être. Cependant, on peut faire en sorte que ce sera très difficile et très coûteux.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Des partis politiques font-ils en sorte qu'il est difficile et très coûteux de pirater leurs systèmes?

M. Scott Jones:

En fait, je n'ai pas l'information détaillée sur la façon dont chaque parti...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Testez-vous leurs systèmes parfois?

M. Scott Jones:

Non. Il faudrait à ce sujet recevoir une demande directe. Nous commanderions probablement un service commercial qui pourrait le faire plutôt que de le faire nous-mêmes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

À votre connaissance, les partis politiques ont-ils recours à ce genre de service commercial ou passent-ils par vous? C'est quelque chose que ferait une société privée qui possède des renseignements de nature délicate. Elle embaucherait quelqu'un pour se faire pirater et mettre à l'essai ses systèmes.

M. Scott Jones:

À ma connaissance, non, nous n'avons jamais reçu de demande pour aiguiller un parti politique vers un tel service.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La raison pour laquelle je trouve cette question intéressante, c'est que, dans le projet de loi, il n'y a pas... les partis politiques ne sont pas visés par les lois canadiennes en matière de protection des renseignements personnels. Nous nous trouvons dans cet espace unique, mais le type d'information...

Simplement du point de vue d'un expert en sécurité, si vous pouviez recueillir des renseignements sur des particuliers — leur préférence électorale, où ils vivent, les pétitions qu'ils ont signées et toutes sortes de comportements de consommation — il s'agirait là d'une source de données riche en information, n'est-ce pas?

M. Scott Jones:

Selon moi, si on examine certaines des activités récentes, et je parle ici de certaines des choses qu'on a constatées au sujet des médias sociaux, des analyses des tendances et ainsi de suite, ce serait assurément le type de données qu'une personne pourrait utiliser à des fins de profilage.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Les clics, les comportements, tous ces genres de choses. Ce serait un haut fait d'armes, n'est-ce pas, pour certains de ces pirates informatiques? Ce serait très utile d'un point de vue commercial?

M. Scott Jones:

Par rapport à...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais vous communiquer les habitudes d'achat d'une personne. Je vais vous dire ses habitudes électorales, personne par personne.

M. Scott Jones:

Il a été démontré que toutes ces choses ont une très grande valeur commerciale, surtout en ce qui concerne le ciblage direct, qu'il s'agisse de marketing commercial ou de ciblage dans les médias sociaux.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suppose que vous avez prêté attention à ce qui s'est passé au Sud de la frontière.

M. Scott Jones:

Bien sûr.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le Canada serait-il exposé à des menaces similaires? Nous ne parlons pas ici du piratage d'Élections Canada. Il pourrait s'agir de désinformation, de mauvais renseignements visant à influencer les élections.

M. Scott Jones:

Oui. Dans le rapport, nous avons souligné que c'est probablement à ce niveau là que nous sommes le plus vulnérables. Les élections en tant que telles sont assez sûres, vu les bulletins de vote papier et la manipulation...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, nous n'utilisons pas de machine à voter et nous ne votons pas en ligne, alors nous ne sommes pas exposés à ces genres de menaces. Mais nous sommes exposés à d'importantes menaces lorsqu'une personne peut influer sur des électeurs en piratant les systèmes de M. Zachariah ou de Mme De Jaegher ou en influençant des jeunes en fournissant des renseignements erronés sur les candidats.

M. Scott Jones:

Il y a assurément de la désinformation, mais il ne faut pas oublier le fait que les médias sociaux sont conçus d'une telle façon qu'on ne sait pas toujours pourquoi on reçoit telle ou telle information, parce que tout ça est présenté en fonction d'autres facteurs.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Exactement. En vertu du projet de loi, ces agents des médias sociaux, comme Facebook et Twitter, n'ont aucune obligation à l'égard des publicités ou des renseignements erronés affichés sur leurs sites. J'aimerais attirer l'attention de nos deux amis de la FCE et leur dire que de nombreux jeunes, comme beaucoup de Canadiens, tirent la grande majorité de leurs nouvelles et de leur information des médias sociaux. Est-il juste de dire une telle chose? Je ne veux pas généraliser.

(1610)

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Oui.

M. Coty Zachariah:

C'est juste.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous avons toutes sortes de règles au sujet des médias imprimés en ce qui concerne les publicités, l'influence et les dons, il n'y a presque rien dans le projet de loi concernant les médias sociaux. C'est quelque chose que j'ai dit tantôt, mais est-ce que nous livrons la dernière guerre plutôt que la prochaine?

M. Scott Jones:

Je pense que, en général, les médias sociaux sont l'une des choses qui sont très difficiles à comprendre et à gérer.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En faisons-nous assez?

M. Scott Jones:

L'une des choses que nous essayons de faire, c'est de sensibiliser les gens afin qu'ils se posent au moins des questions sur la raison pour laquelle ils voient telle ou telle chose, afin qu'ils sachent que ce qui leur est présenté n'est pas nécessairement ce qu'ils croient. Ils voient ce qu'on leur impose pour d'autres raisons. Il ne s'agit pas là d'un flux de données neutres.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, ce n'en est pas un.

C'est excellent. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Mes premières questions sont destinées aux représentants de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants. Je les pose à qui voudra bien y répondre.

Je sais que votre directeur exécutif, Bilan Arte, a déjà déclaré publiquement que la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, le projet de loi C-23, était une insulte aux jeunes Canadiens et une forme de suppression des électeurs. Pourquoi étiez-vous de cet avis au sujet du projet de loi C-23, que votre organisation a qualifié de « Loi sur le manque d'intégrité des élections »?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Il s'agissait là de notre ancien directeur exécutif, bien sûr, Toby Whitfield, mais nous sommes toujours de cet avis, bien sûr.

Principalement, nous estimions que les changements apportés dans la loi allaient avoir une influence sur les populations déjà marginalisées et que des recherches montraient que c'était bel et bien le cas pour, par exemple, les populations itinérantes et les populations qui se déplacent fréquemment, dont les étudiants.

Nous avons constaté que, pour les étudiants particuliers, qui vivent souvent dans des logements où ils ont, par exemple, cinq, six ou sept colocataires, dans certains cas, ce peut être difficile. On nous disait souvent qu'il fallait seulement apporter une facture de service public sur laquelle figure notre nom. Lorsqu'on vit dans ce genre de situation — et c'est le cas de beaucoup d'étudiants —, quel nom figure sur la facture de service public ou une autre forme d'identification? Tout ça peut devenir extrêmement compliqué, et, parfois, le processus devient tellement compliqué que les étudiants abandonnent. C'est la raison pour laquelle la carte d'identification des électeurs est un moyen utile pour les étudiants de pouvoir voter, essentiellement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Selon vous, combien d'étudiants ont été touchés par l'élimination des cartes d'information de l'électeur?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Nous n'avons pas de données précises à ce sujet, même si, évidemment, je crois que les statistiques citées par Coty et provenant du rapport du directeur général des élections après les élections sont utiles. Nous pourrions extrapoler à partir de ces chiffres sur les jeunes électeurs pour découvrir la mesure de l'impact des étudiants de niveau postsecondaire au sein du groupe.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le projet de loi que nous étudions actuellement, le projet de loi C-76, renverse la situation et rétablit la carte d'information de l'électeur. Pensez-vous qu'un plus grand nombre d'étudiants irait voter s'ils pouvaient utiliser ce document comme pièce d'identité?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Oui. Nous croyons que moins les étudiants ont de la difficulté à obtenir le droit de vote, plus ils sont susceptibles de l'exercer.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Une autre préoccupation que votre directeur exécutif avait soulevée à ce moment-là concernait la destitution du commissaire d'Élections Canada. Pourquoi s'agissait-il d'une situation préoccupante? C'est quelque chose qui a aussi été renversé.

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Selon moi, il était essentiellement question de surveillance accrue et de permettre d'en faire plus à ce sujet. De plus, je sais que certaines préoccupations avaient été soulevées quant à notre travail auprès d'Élections Canada, alors qu'on tentait de faciliter les choses, plutôt que de les rendre plus difficiles. D'après ce que j'ai compris, c'est de là que ça venait.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

L'engagement était également un élément important du projet de loi, et ça, selon moi, c'est principalement ce que votre organisation fait. Le rôle d'Élections Canada sera à nouveau élargi, j'imagine, afin que l'organisation soit en mesure de sensibiliser les gens, c'est déjà une chose, et de les informer, pas seulement au sujet de l'endroit où ils peuvent voter, mais aussi au sujet de l'importance de voter, en fournissant plus de renseignements à ce sujet.

Pourquoi pensez-vous que c'est important, si c'est le cas, et de quelle façon croyez-vous que votre organisation peut travailler avec Élections Canada pour mobiliser plus d'électeurs à l'avenir?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Nous sommes de fervents partisans d'une plus grande démocratie pour tout le monde. Nous croyons que ce devrait être l'objectif, alors nous estimons que les réformes proposées sont positives. Nous travaillons déjà en collaboration avec Élections Canada, dans la mesure du possible, pour mettre à l'essai de nouveaux systèmes électoraux. Nous avons participé à des essais dans le cadre d'un programme de bureau de scrutin dans les campus en collaboration avec Élections Canada. Ce projet a été fructueux, alors j'imagine que la relation continuera d'être positive.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je sais que vous êtes une organisation inscrite comme tierce partie auprès d'Élections Canada. Vous avez dépensé près de 29 000 $, ou un peu moins, au cours des dernières élections. Quel type d'activités avez-vous réalisées pour dépenser ces fonds?

(1615)

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Je crois que cette somme a été dépensée principalement pour de la publicité dans les médias sociaux — YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, etc. — en vue de fournir des renseignements sur la façon de voter et les enjeux que les étudiants jugeaient importants dans le cadre des élections. C'était principalement ça, mais il y a aussi eu des dépenses matérielles, comme l'impression. Nous avons réalisé beaucoup d'activités d'extension sur le terrain auprès de nos membres dans les campus. Ce sont probablement là les deux principaux domaines.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quel genre de renseignements avez-vous communiqués dans ces documents imprimés? Soutenez-vous un parti politique précis ou considériez-vous qu'il s'agissait plutôt d'information sur la position des partis sur certaines questions?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Le deuxième choix. Encore une fois, je crois que nous avons envoyé un sondage à tous les partis afin qu'ils répondent à des questions sur les enjeux cernés par les étudiants comme étant importants pour nos membres. Puis, nous avons publié ces réponses, si je ne m'abuse, textuellement, sur notre site Web, et il y avait un lien vers ce site sur le matériel imprimé et le contenu affiché dans les médias sociaux. Les documents contenaient une combinaison de renseignements sur la façon de voter, ce qu'il faut à des fins d'identification, l'importance du vote et les enjeux que les étudiants avaient jugés importants. On n'y précisait pas un parti précis qu'il fallait soutenir.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez dit plus tôt que votre financement provient principalement des cotisations. À combien s'élèvent vos cotisations et qui sont les étudiants qui deviennent membres? Sont-ils à l'université, au collège, à l'école secondaire...?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Il s'agit des étudiants de niveau collégial et universitaire à temps partiel et temps plein de partout au pays. Il y en a environ 650 000 dans les différentes sections locales. Les syndicats étudiants sont accrédités comme membre de la FCEE par voie de référendum. Les cotisations des étudiants varient légèrement d'une province à l'autre, en fonction de l'augmentation de l'IPC et de choses du genre, mais elle s'élève à environ 16 $ par année par étudiant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Me reste-t-il du temps, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici et de faire participer les étudiants. Vous faites de l'excellent travail. Je suis heureuse de savoir que le nombre d'étudiants qui votent, de jeunes étudiants, a augmenté au cours des dernières élections. Espérons que nous pourrons poursuivre sur cette lancée.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame Sahota.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Falk.

Bienvenue au comité le plus intéressant sur la Colline.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Parfait. Eh bien, merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos témoins de participer à la réunion d'aujourd'hui. Vos interventions ont été intéressantes et instructives, alors je vous en remercie.

Monsieur Jones et monsieur Besner, j'aimerais commencer par vous. Dans le cadre du travail que vous faites, lorsqu'il est question de cybersécurité et d'enquête sur les menaces ou atteinte à la sécurité, le faites-vous de façon proactive ou réagissez-vous aux rapports?

M. Scott Jones:

C'est un mélange des deux. Nous nous efforçons toujours d'être proactifs, d'examiner vraiment ce que les cyberacteurs malveillants font et de prévenir les menaces. Surtout dans le cadre de nos activités de défense du gouvernement du Canada, nous avons beaucoup investi dans la défense proactive. Nous prenons des mesures pour contrecarrer les activités avant qu'elles ne soient coûteuses, ce genre de choses. Malheureusement, cependant, vu la nature dynamique de la cybersécurité et des cybermenaces qui pèsent sur nous, les menaces évoluent parfois très rapidement et elles touchent leur cible, alors nous devons aussi réagir à certains événements. Nous nous efforçons de réduire ce genre de choses au minimum. Chaque fois qu'il y a un événement, nous tentons aussi d'apprendre et de mettre en place des défenses afin que la même chose ne se reproduise pas.

C'est donc un mélange des deux.

M. Ted Falk:

Vous avez mentionné deux groupes. Vous avez parlé des passionnés, puis il y a les autres. Quelles sont les principales sources des menaces?

M. Scott Jones:

Il y a un large éventail d'activités, des activités très perfectionnées menées par des États-nations qui ciblent habituellement le gouvernement à des fins d'espionnage ou de ce genre de choses, jusqu'aux hacktivistes ou aux passionnés, mais, entre les deux, il y a les cybercriminels.

La cybercriminalité est en hausse sur Internet et est de plus en plus perfectionnée. Elle est très difficile à détecter, et il y a beaucoup d'argent à faire. En raison de son approche internationale, c'est aussi très difficile de trouver les fautifs. La cybercriminalité est en croissance.

On constate aussi une certaine utilisation d'Internet par des terroristes, surtout pour la propagande de recrutement ainsi que la collecte de fonds, mais pas nécessairement dans le domaine des cyberattaques. Puis, il y a les hacktivistes et les passionnés.

Jason, est-ce que cela couvre la question?

M. Jason Besner (directeur, Centre de l'évaluation des cybermenaces, Sécurité des technologies de l'information, Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications):

Oui, tout est dit.

M. Ted Falk:

Utilisez-vous des algorithmes ou des programmes que vous avez mis au point pour vous aider dans le cadre du travail que vous faites?

M. Scott Jones:

Nous utilisons une grande diversité de choses. L'an dernier, nous avons en fait ouvert certains de nos outils de cyberdéfense pour les partager avec la cybercommunauté au Canada dans le cadre de notre approche pour essayer de favoriser la croissance de l'écosystème canadien. C'était notre programme intitulé « Assemblyline ».

En outre, nous utilisons assurément beaucoup d'algorithmes liés à l'apprentissage machine et à certaines formes d'intelligence artificielle: nous automatisons dès que possible le travail répétitif de mes analystes afin que ceux-ci puissent se concentrer sur des nouvelles menaces, celles qui pointent à l'horizon. Notre objectif, c'est de comprendre la situation, d'automatiser notre travail et nos défenses, puis d'aller de l'avant afin de libérer nos analystes.

(1620)

M. Ted Falk:

Lorsque vous cernez une menace, quelle est votre ligne de conduite?

M. Scott Jones:

Tout dépend de la nature du système. Si on parle du gouvernement du Canada, nous prenons une mesure immédiate pour bloquer la menace, défendre le système et empêcher un impact quelconque. En même temps, nous communiquons cette information publiquement, actuellement par l'intermédiaire du Centre canadien de réponse aux incidents cybernétiques de Sécurité publique Canada. Nous fournissons de tels indicateurs de compromission au milieu général de la sécurité.

De plus, tout dépendant de la nature de la menace, il peut être plus efficace pour nous de travailler en collaboration avec certains de nos partenaires de l'industrie. Il pourrait s'agir de fournisseurs de logiciels antivirus. L'objectif concret, c'est de communiquer toutes les attaques afin de créer un écosystème au sein duquel nous pouvons tous nous défendre. Il s'agit de communiquer de tels renseignements à grande échelle, de communiquer l'approche utilisée et de mettre en commun ce que nous avons appris. C'est le genre de choses que nous ferions.

M. Ted Falk:

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Besner?

M. Jason Besner:

Non. Je crois que M. Jones a tout dit.

Il s'agit de composer avec le volume de choses qui nous arrivent et de s'assurer que nos défenses fonctionnent 24 heures sur 24. L'objectif principal, c'est de flairer la menace, puis de procéder à l'automatisation et de s'assurer que nos défenses sont en place 24 heures sur 24. Ensuite, nous pouvons communiquer avec les autres pour qu'ils servent de multiplicateur de force et qu'on puisse défendre tous les Canadiens.

M. Ted Falk:

On nous a récemment demandé de redémarrer nos routeurs. Est-ce une mesure à laquelle vous avez participé?

M. Scott Jones:

C'est un exemple d'une situation à laquelle nous avons participé. Le conseil aurait été donné par Sécurité publique Canada à l'heure actuelle, puisque c'est l'organisme responsable, mais nous aurions certainement travaillé en collaboration avec nos partenaires internationaux lorsque nous constatons une activité malveillante, lorsque ce semble être systémique. Nous essayons d'offrir des approches simples aux gens afin qu'ils puissent eux-mêmes agir de façon plus sécuritaire dans le monde cybernétique. C'est un exemple de quelque chose qui serait important.

M. Ted Falk:

Dans votre déclaration, vous avez parlé du fait que les niveaux de perfectionnement des attaques étaient assez bas durant les dernières élections. Qu'en est-il des niveaux d'intensité?

M. Scott Jones:

De notre point de vue, nous pouvions voir que c'était assez bas, mais ça s'est poursuivi. Nous nous attendons à une augmentation tandis que nous approchons des prochaines élections. Le fait est que ces outils sont à la portée de presque n'importe qui. Le problème de la cybersécurité et des cyberoutils, c'est que tout ça est assez bon marché et facile d'accès, alors, pour nous, il s'agit en fait d'accroître notre résilience plus rapidement que nos adversaires sont capables d'utiliser les nouveaux outils et les nouvelles techniques contre nous.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Ma question s'adresse aux représentants de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants. Je la pose à quiconque se sent le plus à l'aise d'y répondre.

Pour commencer, je tiens à vous féliciter de vos efforts de défense et votre excellent travail. Je suis très déterminée à faire participer les jeunes non seulement au processus électoral, mais à tout ce qui se passe dans la vie, parce que je crois qu'ils constituent l'une de nos plus grandes ressources inexploitées.

Permettez-moi de commencer par vous demander si, dans le cadre de vos activités de défense des droits, vous constatez quoi que ce soit qui est unique aux étudiants, quelque chose qui est différent des jeunes en général. Avez-vous certaines préoccupations relativement aux étudiants, des choses que vous avez notées comme étant des obstacles ou quelque chose d'autre, mais qui ne touche pas les autres jeunes ou croyez-vous que ces mêmes choses s'appliquent aux deux?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Vous voulez dire liées précisément aux élections?

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Oui, il y a quelques différences. Une chose importante, c'est la proportion d'étudiants qui vivent dans des résidences sur les campus. Prouver son adresse peut être un peu plus difficile pour les étudiants qui vivent sur le campus. C'est quelque chose que nous avons constaté en parlant aux étudiants, et c'est en raison de la fréquence à laquelle ils viennent vivre sur le campus puis retournent vivre ailleurs. Souvent, ils doivent obtenir une lettre officielle de confirmation de leur lieu de résidence afin de pouvoir participer aux élections. Beaucoup d'étudiants ne savent pas que c'est possible d'obtenir une telle lettre, et certains bureaux de résidence ne savent même pas qu'ils devraient en délivrer. Il y a comme une couche bureaucratique supplémentaire, ici, alors je crois que les étudiants qui vivent sur les campus sont définitivement un exemple à soulever.

Je crois aussi que nous avons une population grandissante d'étudiants internationaux au Canada, ce qui est parfait, mais le fait que ces personnes doivent déterminer à quel moment ils peuvent voter dans le cadre des élections canadiennes, connaître le statut de résidence requis et connaître des choses du genre qui sont liées à leur visa étudiant ajoute parfois à la confusion.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. C'est excellent.

Il y a trois établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire dans ma circonscription aussi, et c'est un enjeu qui revient sans cesse sur le tapis.

La réponse que nous avons entendue — c'est quelque chose qui a été dit —, c'est qu'il y a possiblement plus de 80 pièces d'identité qui peuvent être acceptées. Il n'est pas vraiment nécessaire d'avoir une carte d'information de l'électeur, parce qu'il y a plus de 80 pièces d'identité possibles.

Par conséquent, à part le permis de conduire, sur lequel figure l'adresse, ou la lettre de confirmation de... Quel service donne la lettre dans les universités? C'est le bureau du registraire ou je ne sais pas...

(1625)

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Le service du logement ou des résidences...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Le logement. D'accord.

À part ces deux pièces d'identité sur lesquelles figurent des adresses, y a-t-il quoi que ce soit d'autre qu'un étudiant en résidence aura et qui peut être accepté comme pièce d'identité?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Il pourrait y avoir des exemples, mais pas de façon générale.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Ils sont rares.

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

C'est exact.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Donc, il est là le problème.

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Il est là le problème, oui.

Si les étudiants ont ces pièces d'identité, ce n'est pas de façon uniforme. Ils ne peuvent pas trouver des factures de services publics pour les mêmes raisons. Ils peuvent avoir une facture de téléphone cellulaire, mais il est très peu probable que l'adresse qui y figurera sera celle de leur résidence temporaire.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Exactement. D'accord.

M. Cullen a posé la question, mais je ne suis pas sûr d'avoir compris la réponse. En ce qui concerne l'augmentation durant les dernières élections — on a constaté une augmentation merveilleuse, et nous en sommes très heureux —, à part le mérite qui vous revient, peut-être, en raison du travail que vous avez fait, quels étaient, selon vous, les facteurs qui ont contribué à cette augmentation?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

Je pense vraiment que les étudiants se sont sentis particulièrement mobilisés durant les dernières élections. Je pense que notre travail de défense des droits a joué un rôle important dans tout ça, mais il y a aussi le fait que les étudiants ont cerné un certain nombre d'enjeux relativement auxquels ils voulaient voir une action politique, et ils l'ont fait savoir.

Il est évident que nous avons redoublé d'efforts pour nous assurer que les étudiants se rendaient aux urnes, et nous le ferons à nouveau en 2019.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est excellent. C'est merveilleux.

Un témoin précédent qui a comparu aujourd'hui a parlé de l'importance de l'engagement des étudiants à un très jeune âge. L'idée, c'était que la recherche montre que, si on mobilise les étudiants à un jeune âge, on crée ainsi une habitude, et ils seront plus susceptibles de voter à l'avenir, tandis que, si on ne les fait pas participer au processus, alors ils seront peut-être moins susceptibles de voter.

Est-ce que votre expérience et vos efforts de défense des droits que vous avez déployés appuient cette conclusion?

M. Coty Zachariah:

Oui, c'est ce que je dirais.

Nous croyons que les gens qui sont informés à un plus jeune âge sont plus susceptibles de participer de façon plus précoce. Les personnes qui ont voté à la première occasion ont tendance à voter aux élections provinciales et fédérales aussi. Nous croyons tout simplement que des électeurs informés ont tendance à participer au processus.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il y a un certain nombre d'initiatives prévues dans le projet de loi C-76, y compris le mandat du DGE en matière d'éducation, l'inscription des électeurs à l'échelle nationale et la diminution de l'âge requis pour embaucher des étudiants. Je suppose que vous appuyez toutes ces initiatives?

En ce qui a trait à l'affaire judiciaire, si le projet de loi C-76 entrait en vigueur demain, abandonneriez-vous votre poursuite? Est-ce que tout ce pour quoi vous vous battez dans le dossier devant les tribunaux est contenu dans le projet de loi C-76?

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

À ma connaissance, oui. Je consulterais nos avocats dans une telle situation. Cependant, notre préoccupation relativement à l'affaire devant les tribunaux, malheureusement, encore une fois, est davantage une question de temps. Nous sommes très préoccupés par le fait que, lorsque le projet de loi sera mis en oeuvre, il ne pourra pas l'être totalement par Élections Canada avant les prochaines élections, tandis qu'une décision judiciaire — et c'est malheureux, parce que ce n'est pas la voie que nous voudrions emprunter —, pourrait rapprocher la date limite et, à ce stade-ci, nous voulons tout simplement qu'un plus grand nombre d'étudiants et qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes de façon générale puissent voter.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je comprends le facteur temps, vraiment, mais votre solution se trouve dans le projet de loi C-76. Elle est là, la réponse.

Mme Justine De Jaegher:

C'est ce que nous comprenons, oui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de votre comparution. Nous vous remercions vraiment. Ce sont des renseignements très intéressants et très utiles.

Je demanderais à ce que nous changions de groupe de témoins rapidement, parce que je crois qu'on a beaucoup de questions à poser au prochain témoin, alors ce serait bien de commencer le plus rapidement possible.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant une minute.



(1630)

Le président:

Je crois que nous allons commencer.

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 111e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Pour notre deuxième heure, cet après-midi, nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Daniel Therrien, commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada. Il est accompagné de Barbara Bucknell, directrice, Politiques, affaires parlementaires et recherche, et de Regan Morris, conseiller juridique.

Nous accueillons aussi dans ce groupe de témoins le colonel Vihar Joshi, juge-avocat général adjoint, Droit administratif des Forces canadiennes.

Merci à vous tous d'être là aujourd'hui. Je sais que votre comparution suscite beaucoup d'intérêt, alors je suis sûr que ce sera une séance très intéressante.

Nous allons peut-être commencer par vous, monsieur Therrien.

M. Daniel Therrien (commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président. [Français]

Bonjour. Je remercie les membres du Comité de m'avoir invité à discuter aujourd'hui de l'incidence du projet de loi C-76 sur la protection de la vie privée.

Vous savez que, à l'échelle internationale, les citoyens ont exprimé leurs préoccupations quant à la façon dont leurs renseignements personnels sont recueillis sur les plateformes en ligne et sont utilisés dans le processus politique. Les allégations au sujet d'une utilisation non autorisée des renseignements personnels de 87 millions d'utilisateurs de Facebook sonnent l'alarme et mettent en lumière une crise dans le droit à la vie privée. Non seulement la confiance des consommateurs a été mise à mal, mais celle des citoyens à l'égard des processus démocratiques l'a été également.

Comme vous le savez aussi, aucune loi fédérale sur la protection de la vie privée ne s'applique aux partis politiques. La Colombie-Britannique est la seule province qui possède une loi en la matière. La situation, par contre, est différente dans de nombreux autres pays. Dans la plupart des régions du monde, les lois prévoient que les partis politiques sont assujettis à la législation sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Cela comprend des pays comme ceux de l'Union européenne, le Royaume-Uni, la Nouvelle-Zélande, l'Argentine et Hong Kong, par exemple. Le Canada devient l'exception.

(1635)

[Traduction]

Nous avons récemment étudié les politiques sur la protection des renseignements personnels des partis politiques. Même si ces politiques ont quelques caractéristiques positives, comme, par exemple, le fait qu'elles prévoient toutes la possibilité pour les personnes de mettre à jour leurs renseignements personnels ou de corriger des renseignements désuets, elles sont toutes loin de satisfaire aux principes relatifs à la protection des renseignements personnels reconnus mondialement.

De même, les normes suggérées à l'article 254 du projet de loi C-76 sont nettement insuffisantes. En fait, le projet de loi C-76 ne prescrit aucune norme. Il ne fait qu'indiquer que les partis doivent mettre en place des politiques sur un certain nombre de questions, laissant le soin aux partis de définir les normes qu'ils souhaitent appliquer. Sur le plan de la protection des renseignements personnels, le projet de loi C-76 n'ajoute rien de majeur.

Par exemple, il n'oblige pas les partis à obtenir le consentement des personnes, à limiter la collecte de renseignements personnels à ceux qui sont requis, à limiter la communication de renseignements à d'autres parties, à fournir aux personnes un accès à leurs renseignements personnels et à faire l'objet d'une surveillance indépendante en matière de protection des renseignements personnels.

Par comparaison, en Colombie-Britannique, les partis doivent appliquer tous les principes généralement applicables, et la Colombie-Britannique a par ailleurs un texte législatif très similaire à celui à l'échelon fédéral. En Colombie-Britannique, le consentement s'applique, mais il est assujetti à d'autres lois, de sorte que ce consentement n'est pas requis pour la transmission des listes d'électeurs en vue des lois électorales.

J'ai constaté que l'idée d'assujettir les partis politiques à des lois relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels est bien accueillie, notamment par les politiciens fédéraux. Toutefois, le gouvernement semble penser que les partis politiques ne sont pas dans la même situation que les entreprises privées en ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements personnels.

Par exemple, les ministres semblent craindre que l'application des lois relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels nuise aux communications entre les partis et les électeurs. C'est une thèse intéressante, mais je n'ai pas encore vu de preuve à cet effet. Il y en a peut-être, mais cette information n'a pas été présentée afin qu'elle soit débattue publiquement.

Il convient de souligner que, en Europe, cependant, les partis politiques sont assujettis à des lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels depuis plus de 20 ans. Je comprends que de telles mesures de protection font maintenant partie de la culture liée à la façon dont les élections sont menées là-bas.

Au bout du compte, ce que nous savons, c'est que la démocratie semble toujours florissante dans les pays où les partis doivent se soumettre aux lois relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels. [Français]

Il importe peu d'identifier la loi précise où trouver les règles en matière de protection de la vie privée. Ce pourrait être dans la Loi électorale du Canada, la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, c'est-à dire une loi sur la protection de la vie privée dans le secteur privé ou une autre loi.

Ce qui importe, c'est que des principes de protection de la vie privée reconnus à l'échelle internationale, et non pas des politiques définies par les partis, soient intégrés dans la législation nationale et qu'un tiers indépendant, possiblement le Commissariat puisqu'il possède l'expertise nécessaire, ait le pouvoir d'en vérifier la conformité.

Une surveillance indépendante est nécessaire pour veiller à ce que les politiques ou les principes relatifs à la vie privée ne soient pas seulement des promesses creuses, mais des mesures de protection bien réelles et concrètement appliquées.

Nous avons élaboré, de concert avec Élections Canada, des amendements qui permettraient d'atteindre ces buts, et nous vous avons fait parvenir ces textes aujourd'hui. Si vous le voulez, je pourrai vous les expliquer lors de la période des questions.

Pour conclure, je dirai que l'intégrité de nos processus démocratiques fait clairement face à des risques importants. À mon avis, il est important d'agir maintenant.

IJe serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C'est très utile.

Nous allons maintenant passer au colonel Joshi.

Colonel Vihar Joshi (juge-avocat général adjoint, Droit administratif, Forces canadiennes):

Merci.

Monsieur le président, je tiens à remercier le Comité de l'opportunité qui m'est offerte de m'adresser à vous au sujet du projet de loi C-76 et de son incidence positive sur les membres des Forces armées canadiennes.

Je suis le colonel Vihar Joshi. Je suis le juge-avocat général adjoint responsable de la Division du droit administratif au sein du bureau du JAG. Je suis aussi l'agent coordonnateur désigné par le ministre de la Défense nationale aux fins de l'article 199 de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Je vais formuler de brefs commentaires, puis je serai heureux de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité.

Les Règles électorales spéciales applicables aux électeurs des Forces canadiennes qui figurent présentement dans la section 2 de la partie 11 de la Loi électorale du Canada ont subi très peu de changements importants depuis la fin des années 1950.

À l'heure actuelle, les électeurs des Forces canadiennes doivent établir à l'enrôlement et maintenir par la suite une déclaration de résidence habituelle à des fins électorales. De manière exceptionnelle, cette déclaration de résidence habituelle permet à ces électeurs de choisir au sein de quelle circonscription électorale ils voteront dans le cadre des élections fédérales. Ils peuvent par exemple choisir de voter dans la circonscription où ils résidaient lors de leur enrôlement, où ils résident présentement en raison de leur service militaire ou dans la circonscription où réside un proche avec lequel ou avec laquelle ils résideraient si ce n'était de leur service militaire.

Cependant, une fois l'élection déclenchée, les militaires ne peuvent plus modifier cette adresse durant la période électorale.

Les électeurs des Forces canadiennes qui souhaitent exercer leur droit de vote doivent le faire au sein de leur unité pendant la période de scrutin militaire, c'est-à-dire entre le 14e et le neuvième jour précédant le jour du scrutin civil. Lorsqu'ils votent au sein d'une unité, les électeurs des Forces canadiennes ne sont assujettis à aucune formalité d'identification. Seuls quelques militaires bénéficiant d'une exception peuvent voter à un bureau de scrutin civil, et ce, seulement le jour du scrutin.

Lors des plus récentes élections générales fédérales, le taux de participation des électeurs des Forces canadiennes était nettement inférieur à celui de la population générale. Certains facteurs permettent d'expliquer cette situation.

(1640)

[Français]

Le directeur général des élections du Canada a recommandé, dans son rapport intitulé « Un régime électoral pour le 21e siècle : Recommandations du directeur général des élections du Canada à la suite de la 42e élection générale », une révision complète des règles électorales spéciales applicables aux électeurs des Forces canadiennes. Je crois comprendre que les membres du Comité ont d'ailleurs unanimement appuyé une telle révision.

Au cours des deux dernières années, nous avons travaillé d'arrache-pied à la révision des dispositions de la Loi électorale du Canada ayant trait aux électeurs des Forces canadiennes.

Les amendements au projet de loi C-76 qui nous intéressent visent à rendre le système électoral fédéral plus accessible aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Ces amendements permettent également d'assurer l'intégrité du vote, ainsi que de maintenir la flexibilité nécessaire aux Forces armées canadiennes qui opèrent un peu partout au monde dans des contextes sécuritaires et opérationnels qui varient grandement.

Avant de répondre aux questions, j'aimerais attirer votre attention sur certaines modifications clés qu'apporte le projet de loi C-76 aux règles électorales spéciales applicables aux électeurs des Forces canadiennes.

D'abord, le projet de loi met fin à la procédure de déclaration de résidence habituelle. Cette mesure permettra à nos membres de s'inscrire au Registre national des électeurs, comme le font tous les autres Canadiens, ainsi que de mettre à jour leur inscription pendant la période électorale. Ce faisant, les électeurs des Forces canadiennes devront s'inscrire dans la circonscription où se situe leur lieu de résidence habituelle ou, s'ils résident à l'extérieur du Canada, dans celle où était située leur dernière résidence habituelle avant de quitter le pays. Ce changement permettra à nos membres de voter dans la même circonscription que leurs proches. Cela permettra également d'éviter que certains électeurs des Forces canadiennes soient forcés de voter dans une circonscription avec laquelle ils n'ont plus de lien.

Le projet de loi met également fin à l'obligation qu'ont les électeurs des Forces canadiennes de voter au sein de leur unité. Nos membres pourront dorénavant choisir d'exercer leur droit de vote en utilisant le mode de votation qui convient le mieux à leurs besoins.

Comme tous les autres électeurs, ils pourront désormais voter aux bureaux de vote par anticipation, aux bureaux de scrutin le jour du scrutin, aux bureaux des directeurs de scrutin partout au Canada, ainsi que par la poste, du Canada ou de l'étranger. Lorsqu'ils choisiront de voter ailleurs que dans leur unité, les membres des Forces armées canadiennes seront soumis aux mêmes règles d'identification et de preuve de résidence que les autres électeurs.

Le projet de loi maintient toutefois la possibilité qu'ont les membres des Forces armées canadiennes qui servent à temps plein de voter au sein de leur unité, et ce, tant au Canada qu'à l'étranger. Le projet de loi loi C-76 permettra aussi à nos membres qui servent à temps partiel de profiter de cette possibilité, ce qu'ils ne peuvent pas faire présentement.

(1645)

[Traduction]

Aux bureaux de scrutin militaire, les électeurs des Forces canadiennes seront dorénavant soumis à de nouvelles règles d'identification claires et uniformes: à l'aide notamment de documents d'identité émis par les Forces armées canadiennes, ils devront prouver leur nom et leur numéro de matricule pour pouvoir recevoir un bulletin de vote. Nos membres qui participent à des opérations et à des exercices, au Canada comme à l'étranger, ne peuvent généralement pas porter sur eux de documents montrant leur adresse résidentielle. Cette mesure de sécurité opérationnelle vise à assurer la protection de nos militaires et de leur famille. Conséquemment, les électeurs des Forces canadiennes votant au sein de leur unité n'auront pas à fournir de preuve d'adresse. Ils devront toutefois déclarer qu'ils votent dans la circonscription où se situe leur lieu de résidence habituel. Toute déclaration mensongère pourra faire l'objet d'une enquête et mener à des accusations devant les tribunaux civils et militaires.

Le projet de loi permet aussi un échange plus fluide de renseignements entre Élections Canada et les Forces armées canadiennes. Ces échanges permettront d'accroître l'intégrité du scrutin, notamment en garantissant que les noms des électeurs des Forces armées qui votent au bureau de scrutin militaire soient rayés des listes électorales utilisées dans les bureaux de scrutin civil.

Enfin, j'attire l'attention du Comité sur une dernière modification législative d'importance. De nombreux civils accompagnent les Forces armées canadiennes à l'étranger. Pensons, par exemple, à des agents du service extérieur, à des membres de la GRC, au personnel de soutien civil des Forces armées canadiennes ainsi qu'aux personnes à charge de ceux-ci et de nos membres. À l'heure actuelle, toutes ces personnes peuvent avoir de la difficulté à exercer leur droit de vote par la poste, de l'étranger, notamment en raison de contraintes liées au service postal dans certaines régions du monde. Le projet de loi C-76 permettrait de corriger cette iniquité en donnant un mandat clair aux Forces armées canadiennes et à Élections Canada, qui devront travailler en collaboration afin de faciliter l'exercice par ces électeurs de leur droit de vote.

En conclusion, les membres des Forces armées canadiennes font preuve de courage, de détermination et de résilience au service du Canada. Ils le font au pays comme à l'étranger. L'état-major des Forces armées canadiennes est donc enthousiaste à l'idée que le Parlement modernise les dispositions de la Loi électorale du Canada ayant trait aux électeurs des Forces canadiennes.

Je serai maintenant heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup aux témoins des choses très utiles qu'ils nous ont dites.

Nathan, parce que vous devez partir, les autres partis se montrent généreux et vous permettent de passer en premier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je n'avais posé la question qu'à mes collègues conservateurs, mais je remercie aussi les libéraux.

Premièrement, colonel Joshi, merci beaucoup de votre témoignage. Il n'y a rien dans ce que vous avez dit et il n'y a rien non plus dans le projet de loi C-76 qui concerne les femmes et les hommes qui servent le Canada à l'étranger à quoi nous nous opposons. Je me réjouis de ces réformes. Je vais poser une bonne partie de mes questions à M. Therrien. Ne vous en offusquez pas. C'est difficile de poser des questions à quelqu'un lorsqu'on est beaucoup d'accord avec lui.

Ce n'est pas que je ne suis pas d'accord avec ce que vous avez dit, monsieur Therrien, mais il y a des choses dans le projet de loi qui suscitent des préoccupations, et c'est ce dont j'espère pouvoir parler.

Je précise que, en Europe, depuis 20 ans, les partis politiques sont assujettis à certaines dispositions en matière de protection des renseignements personnels et à certaines limites.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui. Essentiellement, en vertu de la directive de 1995 adoptée par l'Union européenne, les partis politiques sont assujettis à cette directive de la même façon que le sont les sociétés privées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils le sont de la même façon que les sociétés d'État?

(1650)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je parle des sociétés, des entreprises.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, pas les sociétés d'État, mais les entreprises. D'accord. C'est intéressant.

Est-ce que vous ou votre bureau, maintenant ou plus tard — et, si c'est plus tard, pas trop tard, parce que le projet de loi est évidemment assez urgent —, pourriez nous fournir des renseignements sur l'incidence que tout ça a eu sur ces partis politiques? Ont-ils été incapables de remplir leurs fonctions et de réaliser leur aspiration en tant qu'entités politiques?

C'est là l'une des préoccupations, soit qu'il pourrait y avoir une sorte de mauvaise conduite motivée par des motifs politiques de la part de gens qui essaient de ralentir les partis politiques si ceux-ci étaient assujettis à des règles similaires.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Nous pouvons le faire de façon plus exhaustive, mais je peux vous dire que nos collègues du Royaume-Uni, ainsi que ceux de la province de la Colombie-Britannique, sont assujettis à une loi similaire, et ce, depuis un certain temps et ils ont discuté, évidemment, avec les partis politiques au sujet de l'application des lois liées à la protection des renseignements personnels, et ils n'entendent pas beaucoup de partis politiques affirmer que leur travail — le travail des partis — est miné par le fait qu'ils sont assujettis aux droits sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suppose que les dernières élections en Colombie-Britannique ont été tenues en vertu de ces dispositions?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est intéressant. Je discute avec les trois partis politiques de l'Assemblée législative et je n'ai jamais entendu quiconque me parler de quoi que ce soit qui concerne la participation aux élections et le fait de tenter de communiquer avec les électeurs.

M. Daniel Therrien:

C'est ce que nous disent nos collègues, soit que la situation des partis n'est pas préoccupante.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, lorsque nous demandons aux experts de la sécurité dans quelle mesure les systèmes de données des partis sont sécuritaires, serait-il juste de dire que les partis politiques — certainement ceux qui sont ambitieux, ceux qui misent beaucoup sur les médias sociaux et tirent des données des médias sociaux — ont accès à une grande quantité de renseignements précis sur les Canadiens? Est-il juste de le dire?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si cette information était un jour obtenue illégalement, non seulement pour fournir de mauvais renseignements aux électeurs ou les induire en erreur au sujet des élections ou même pour les convaincre de voter pour un parti, mais aussi pour obtenir ce type de renseignements détaillés au sujet des Canadiens, nos experts de la sécurité nous ont dit que ces données auraient une valeur commerciale importante.

Sortons de la politique et examinons l'aspect commercial. Nos experts en sécurité nous ont dit aujourd'hui que le piratage de la base de données d'un parti politique pour obtenir l'information acquise au fil du temps au sujet des personnes permettrait d'obtenir des renseignements d'une grande valeur commerciale.

Est-ce là quelque chose qui vous préoccupe en tant que commissaire à la protection des renseignements personnels?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui. Ces renseignements ont une grande valeur commerciale, mais au-delà de leur valeur commerciale, il s'agit de renseignements de nature délicate. Les opinions politiques des personnes sont des renseignements personnels sensibles qui méritent une protection encore plus grande que les autres types de renseignements personnels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ces renseignements politiques de nature personnelle...

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, si quelqu'un va sur ma page Facebook ou la page Facebook du premier ministre et clique sur « j'aime », qu'il interagit dans les médias sociaux ou qu'il renvoie un gazouillis, nous avons appris que, au fil du temps, de tels renseignements peuvent être récoltés.

Si les Canadiens savaient que l'information — leurs avis au sujet d'enjeux de nature délicate, les enjeux environnementaux, les questions liées à l'avortement et tous ces différents types d'opinions — pouvait être recueillie et rassemblée par les partis politiques — et elle l'est — et que cette information sera ensuite à risque d'être communiquée, quel serait, selon vous, l'impact sur les Canadiens? C'est vous l'expert en protection des renseignements personnels. Que effet cela aurait-il?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je crois que la confiance dans le système électoral et dans le travail des partis politiques serait touchée si les électeurs savaient que cette information est susceptible d'être divulguée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Que voulez-vous dire par « touchée »? C'est un terme très neutre. Touchée positivement?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je voulais dire touchée négativement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Donc, les conditions dont vous avez parlé — les droits que les personnes devraient avoir et dont nous avons parlé — concernent des questions comme le consentement, la divulgation, l'accès à l'information qui a été recueillie à leur sujet, la surveillance indépendante et une limite en ce qui a trait aux types de renseignements que les partis pourraient recueillir sur les Canadiens.

Ai-je bien résumé votre liste?

M. Daniel Therrien:

C'est un bon résumé.

Il y a 10 principes de protection des renseignements personnels généralement reconnus à l'échelle internationale, et vous en avez mentionné environ la moitié.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Exactement.

Je vous cite. Vous avez dit que le projet de loi C-76 « n'ajoute rien de majeur » en ce qui a trait à l'augmentation de la protection des renseignements personnels des Canadiens.

M. Daniel Therrien:

La raison pour laquelle je dis cela, c'est que les partis ont déjà des politiques de protection des renseignements personnels. Tout ce que fait le projet de loi, c'est de rendre publiques les politiques actuelles en matière de protection des renseignements personnels, et il n'y a rien dans le projet de loi qui exige un consentement précis relativement à ces politiques liées à la protection des renseignements personnels. C'est pour ces raisons que je ne vois aucune amélioration.

(1655)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Exactement. La ministre a comparu devant le Comité et a dit que, si les partis ne communiquent pas leurs politiques...

La politique peut ne rien dire, en fait. Le projet de loi ne dit pas aux partis ce qu'ils doivent faire en matière de protection des renseignements personnels. Le projet de loi dit simplement qu'il faut le dire aux Canadiens, quelque part, sur le site Web, pour ensuite indiquer que la pénalité est que les fautifs pourraient être exclus des élections.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui, mais les politiques sont déjà publiques, sans le projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, c'est le statu quo.

M. Daniel Therrien:

C'est le statu quo.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est le statu quo.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Vu toutes les menaces dont nous avons parlé au Comité, à la lumière des nouveaux pouvoirs que les mégadonnées et les médias sociaux ont maintenant dans le cadre des élections et au moment d'influer sur nos électeurs, du point de vue de la protection des renseignements personnels, pourquoi avons-nous besoin du projet de loi?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Eh bien, nous avons travaillé en collaboration avec nos collègues d'Élections Canada pour proposer certains amendements dont vous êtes saisis, je crois.

En résumé, les amendements que nous recommandons sont que les politiques ne doivent pas seulement être des politiques définies par les partis politiques. Les politiques doivent être conformes aux principes reconnus à l'échelle internationale. C'est le premier point.

Le deuxième point, c'est la question de savoir si les partis devraient en fait être obligés de vraiment respecter les politiques...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Qui va assurer la surveillance?

M. Daniel Therrien:

... puis il doit y avoir une surveillance indépendante. Cela signifie que, selon nous, des particuliers devraient pouvoir déposer une plainte au Commissariat, et nous pourrions mener des enquêtes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ne pas le faire — pour revenir à ce que vous avez dit tantôt — minerait la confiance à l'égard de notre processus électoral.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je crois que oui, parce qu'il n'y a pas de règle de fond qui empêche actuellement les partis d'utiliser les renseignements à quelque fin que ce soit. Je ne pense pas que la situation corresponde aux souhaits et désirs de la population.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux membres du Comité d'avoir modifié l'ordre des intervenants.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Y a-t-il des différences importantes entre la LPRPDE et la loi de la Colombie-Britannique en matière de protection des renseignements personnels?

M. Daniel Therrien:

À part ce dont nous parlons, les principes qui s'appliquent aux institutions assujetties à ces lois, non, il n'y a pas de différence importante.

M. Chris Bittle:

Dans la LPRPDE, les organismes sans but lucratif sont exemptés. C'est exact?

M. Daniel Therrien:

C'est exact?

M. Chris Bittle:

Pourquoi?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Ils ne se livrent pas à des activités commerciales.

M. Chris Bittle:

Les partis politiques se livrent-ils à des activités commerciales?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Dans l'ensemble, les partis politiques ne se livrent pas à des activités commerciales. Ils sont donc dans une situation similaire à celle des organismes sans but lucratif. Le point c'est que, de façon générale, les entreprises et les organisations commerciales du secteur privé et des ministères du gouvernement dans le secteur public sont assujettis aux lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Il y a très peu d'exceptions. Les partis politiques font actuellement partie des rares exceptions.

M. Chris Bittle:

Par soucis de clarté, cependant, pouvez-vous confirmer que les organisations commerciales comme Facebook et Twitter sont tenues de se conformer?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Avec la LPRPDE, oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui. Merci beaucoup.

Colonel, je crois que vous avez dit dans votre déclaration — et si ce n'est pas le cas, je m'en excuse — que le taux de participation des membres des forces armées aux élections est beaucoup plus faible. Si j'ai bien compris, il s'élève à 45 %. Pensez-vous que les changements proposés dans le projet de loi C-76 auront une incidence sur la participation électorale?

Col Vihar Joshi:

C'est le but. Si l'on donne aux gens plus d'occasions de voter, disons, ils pourront exercer leur droit de vote, et le taux de participation augmentera.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le ministère a-t-il consulté les forces armées relativement à ce projet de loi?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Il l'a fait. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, dans le rapport qui a été déposé, le Comité a accepté une modification de la partie touchant les règles électorales spéciales. Élections Canada nous a consultés à ce sujet relativement aux amendements.

(1700)

M. Chris Bittle:

Avez-vous des données sur le nombre de civils et de membres de la GRC qui ont accompagné les Forces armées canadiennes à l'étranger? Y a-t-il des données à ce sujet, ou est-ce que cela dépasse votre...

Col Vihar Joshi:

Je peux trouver ces données, si vous le souhaitez. Je ne pourrais pas avoir des données pour tout le monde, mais pour les formateurs et les adjoints à l'étranger, ce sera certainement possible. Le nombre n'est pas très élevé. C'est un très petit groupe de personnes actuellement.

M. Chris Bittle:

Y a-t-il des obstacles importants qui empêchent ces personnes de voter?

Col Vihar Joshi:

C'est possible, oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vais m'adresser de nouveau à vous, monsieur Therrien.

L'une des questions que j'ai posées — et vous avez dit que rien ne permet de croire que cela serait — concerne les principes relatifs à la protection des renseignements personnels. Si vous, un particulier, demandez à une organisation « quelles données avez-vous sur moi? », celle-ci doit obligatoirement vous fournir l'information. Qu'est-ce qui empêcherait les partisans d'un parti politique de s'organiser afin de submerger un autre parti politique de demandes?

Les partis politiques n'ont pas vraiment un effectif énorme, contrairement aux entreprises. Ce type d'organisation est complètement différente des entreprises commerciales. Qu'est-ce qui pourrait prévenir des comportements de ce genre?

M. Daniel Therrien:

J'imagine que rien n'empêcherait ce genre de choses, mais je dirais que le droit des particuliers d'accéder à l'information que les organisations détiennent sur leur compte est l'un des principaux mécanismes de protection de la vie privée prévus dans les principes de protection des renseignements personnels.

À la base, les particuliers doivent s'informer de ce que les entreprises et les partis — comme nous le proposons de concert avec nos collègues d'Élections Canada — savent sur leur compte. Comment les particuliers peuvent-ils protéger leurs renseignements personnels de nature délicate qui se trouvent entre les mains des partis s'ils ne savent même pas de quels renseignements il s'agit? C'est un aspect fondamental de la protection de la vie privée.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je comprends que ce soit un aspect fondamental, mais il est question ici d'un autre type d'organisation, et certaines personnes peuvent être extrêmement motivées à agir de la sorte. Les entreprises n'ont pas à se soucier de cette possibilité. Cela devrait être pris en considération, non?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Cela ne semble pas s'être produit dans les régions administratives où les partis sont assujettis aux lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels, mais je...

M. Chris Bittle:

Je comprends cela, mais s'il est question... Nous avons parlé de Facebook, de Twitter et des médias sociaux et du fait que les gens peuvent organiser ce genre d'actions, grâce aux bots et à d'autres choses du genre. Ce n'est pas parce que ça n'est jamais arrivé dans le passé que ça ne se produira jamais dans l'avenir; la technologie ne cesse d'évoluer. Une personne qui sait comment créer un site pour présenter ce genre de demande n'a qu'à écrire le code. Encore une fois, il est possible que ce soit utilisé comme arme politique contre un autre parti politique.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Admettons que c'est une possibilité. Le Comité peut adopter des amendements afin de protéger les partis en conséquence. C'est une situation bien définie. En ce qui concerne les principes, je ne sais pas quel principe les partis pourraient invoquer pour refuser la demande d'accès d'une personne à ses renseignements personnels.

M. Chris Bittle:

Il semble que mon temps soit écoulé. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est au tour de Tom.

M. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Therrien, j'allais vous poser des questions à propos de ce qui a été fait en Colombie-Britannique, à vous et aux personnes qui vous accompagnent, mais je vais poursuivre sur la lancée de M. Bittle à propos des activités commerciales.

Le journal La Presse, l'un des plus respectables et des plus anciens journaux du Québec, a annoncé qu'il allait devenir un organisme de bienfaisance sans but lucratif. Selon vous, le quotidien va-t-il être exempté? Les activités de l'organisation vont-elles toujours être considérées comme commerciales malgré son nouveau statut et sa restructuration? J'aimerais connaître votre opinion.

Je siège au comité des finances. Le budget fédéral pourrait permettre à tous les journaux de se convertir en organismes sans but lucratif. L'industrie vit des jours difficiles. Il y a eu beaucoup de mises à pied. Leurs activités sont toujours considérées comme des activités commerciales, puisqu'ils recueillent et diffusent de l'information. Croyez-vous que la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques va continuer de régir ce qu'ils font? Les journaux ne seront-ils donc pas obligés de...

(1705)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je vais laisser mes collègues répondre à la question, mais je vais prendre une seconde pour dire, avant tout, que La Presse est assujettie aux lois provinciales du Québec et non à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques du gouvernement fédéral. Bien entendu, la même question pourrait se poser dans une province où il n'y a pas de loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. C'est une question intéressante.

Regan, pouvez-vous répondre?

M. Regan Morris (conseiller juridique, Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada):

Eh bien, rappelez-vous que les activités journalistiques sont exemptées de l'application de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques et des lois provinciales similaires, ce qui comprend la collecte, l'utilisation et la diffusion par La Presse de renseignements à des fins journalistiques. En ce qui concerne la mesure dans laquelle le journal pourra poursuivre ses activités commerciales, je crois qu'il faudrait d'abord avoir plus de détails sur la façon dont l'organisation va fonctionner.

M. Tom Kmiec:

J'ai une question à poser entre parenthèses relativement à quelque chose qui m'a intrigué: pouvez-vous expliquer un peu comment la loi fonctionne en Colombie-Britannique? Vous en avez parlé dans votre allocution, et j'aimerais comprendre. Mène-t-on, à un moment ou à un autre, des audits sur la façon dont les règles en matière de protection des renseignements personnels s'appliquent aux partis politiques? Doivent-ils divulguer de l'information? Y a-t-il eu des plaintes? Tout ce que vous pouvez dire sera utile.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Pour commencer, le terme « organisation » est défini de façon plus générale dans la loi de la Colombie-Britannique que dans celle du gouvernement fédéral. La nuance que nous faisons entre les organisations commerciales et les autres types d'organisations ne s'applique pas en Colombie-Britannique. La loi provinciale sur la protection des renseignements personnels s'applique à toutes les organisations, et c'est pourquoi les partis politiques — qui sont des organisations en vertu du droit de la Colombie-Britannique — sont assujettis à la loi provinciale sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

Ensuite, les mécanismes procéduraux habituels s'appliquent. Les gens peuvent présenter des plaintes. Plus tôt cette année, le commissaire par intérim à la protection de la vie privée de la Colombie-Britannique a lancé une enquête sur l'ensemble des partis. Les gens peuvent déposer des plaintes, ce qui déclenche des enquêtes du commissaire. Le commissaire lui-même peut déposer une plainte s'il croit qu'une enquête est justifiée. À l'issue de l'enquête, on détermine si la loi provinciale a été violée ou pas.

M. Tom Kmiec:

D'accord.

Je vais vous expliquer le problème que j'ai lorsque des gens me disent qu'il y a eu une atteinte à leur vie privée. Quand mon père a quitté le Québec pour s'installer en Alberta, il a dû présenter une nouvelle demande de permis de conduire, d'assurance et de changement de tout le reste. Son assureur du Québec lui a dit que les lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels lui interdisaient de divulguer son dossier de conduite, même s'il devait le communiquer à sa nouvelle compagnie d'assurance. Mon père lui a répondu qu'il s'agissait de son dossier de conduite et qu'il devrait avoir le droit de lui demander de le communiquer à quelqu'un d'autre.

Mais non. On lui a répondu que c'était impossible pour des raisons de confidentialité. Il trouvait que c'était plutôt ridicule, et l'assureur était d'accord, mais il devait respecter la loi.

M. Daniel Therrien: Il avait tort.

M. Tom Kmiec: Je suis toujours préoccupé à l'idée que les structures, les lois et les règlements que nous créons seront mal appliqués, en contexte professionnel — j'en ai déjà vu des exemples —, et que les gens vont pécher par excès de prudence. Ils seront justifiés de le faire. Ils essaient de protéger leur organisation. Il y a aussi des agents responsables de la protection de la vie privée dans les entreprises et les organisations. J'ai moi-même été agent responsable à l'institut des ressources humaines. Ce sont des gens prudents. La prudence prend toute la place. Ils ne veulent faire aucune erreur. Ils pèchent par excès de prudence.

Dans quelle mesure cela aura-t-il un impact sur les activités quotidiennes des partis politiques qui essaient en même temps de cerner les enjeux importants pour leurs partisans et de repérer les gens avec qui ils ne sont pas d'accord? Certains de mes partisans ne sont pas d'accord avec les néo-démocrates, et il y a des partisans du NPD qui ne sont pas d'accord avec moi. Logiquement, je ne veux pas leur parler d'un sujet qui ne les intéresse pas. C'est quelque chose que je veux éviter, parce que mon temps est limité.

Que répondez-vous à ceux qui disent que les partis politiques sont encouragés à ignorer ceux qui ne veulent pas interagir avec eux, qui ne se soucient pas des mêmes enjeux et qui n'ont pas les mêmes intérêts? C'est un débat public. Lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte ou que je participe à une assemblée générale, j'essaie de déterminer si Chris et Ruby sont d'accord avec moi et s'ils comptent parmi mes partisans. J'essaie aussi de le faire sur les médias sociaux et par d'autres moyens, comme une campagne épistolaire en me demandant où nous fixons la limite entre les renseignements personnels et les renseignements publics. Dans le débat public à propos, disons, du droit des politiciens — ce n'est pas vraiment un droit, parce que nous n'avons aucun droit de la sorte — ou de la capacité des politiciens de prendre le pouls de la population, savoir ce qu'elle pense à propos de questions précises et quelles sont ses intentions de vote, où est la limite?

(1710)

M. Daniel Therrien:

À nouveau, je vais répondre en m'appuyant sur ce qui s'est fait dans d'autres régions administratives. Je ne crois pas que l'application des lois sur les renseignements personnels nuise aux activités habituelles des partis politiques qui cherchent à approcher leurs électeurs et à communiquer avec eux. C'est ce qu'on a vu dans les provinces et les pays où les lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels s'appliquent. En Europe et en Colombie-Britannique, on devrait tenir pour acquis que la technologie est employée pour déterminer qui appuie un parti, et ainsi, le parti peut déployer des efforts de façon efficiente. Tout cela se fait dans d'autres régions administratives, même si les partis sont assujettis à des lois relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels.

En ce qui concerne les difficultés liées à l'application des lois et la possibilité que les gens pèchent par excès de prudence à cause de la complexité des lois, je dirais que la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques est un bon outil, dans ce contexte. Elle repose sur 10 principes qui s'adaptent à la taille de l'organisation. Les petites entreprises assujetties à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques ne l'appliquent pas d'une façon aussi méticuleuse que Facebook, Google ou Microsoft.

C'est un outil adaptable, et je crois que les partis pourront enseigner leur personnel à agir en conformité avec la loi.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole va maintenant à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Rapidement, j'ai une question pour vous, monsieur Therrien. Je m'excuse à l'avance si je finis par m'étirer.

En consultant le projet de loi, j'ai remarqué quelque chose qui, selon moi, me semblait positif. Le projet de loi C-76 prévoit des sanctions importantes pour les partis qui induisent intentionnellement les gens en erreur quant à leur politique et, comme cela est maintenant exigé dans le projet de loi, les conséquences pourraient être graves. Plus précisément, le chef du parti s'expose à des sanctions sévères. Cela peut aller jusqu'à la radiation du parti. C'est écrit noir sur blanc.

Selon vous, est-ce une mesure positive?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Théoriquement...

Un député: [Inaudible] c'est bon à savoir.

M. Scott Simms:

Quelqu'un d'autre souhaite-t-il commenter? Je ne saurais dire.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Théoriquement, c'est un pas positif en avant. Je dis « théoriquement », parce que la loi ne prescrit rien quant au contenu des politiques en question.

M. Scott Simms:

Excusez-moi, je ne vous ai pas bien entendu. Pouvez-vous répéter?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Théoriquement, l'amendement ou l'article que vous avez mentionné est un pas dans la bonne direction. Ce le serait si l'infraction relative à la protection des renseignements personnels reposait sur quelque chose de concret, mais, puisque le projet de loi ne prévoit rien de concret, les partis peuvent définir vaguement la façon dont ils utilisent l'information.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, mais il est certain que, si un parti allait à l'encontre de la politique affichée et promue sur son site Web, par exemple...

M. Daniel Therrien:

Ce que je veux dire, c'est qu'un parti a beau afficher publiquement sa politique de confidentialité, si le libellé est vague, il sera impossible de l'enfreindre, et nous ne serons pas plus avancés en ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements personnels. Je serais d'accord avec vous si c'étaient des politiques de confidentialité définies concrètement qui étaient enfreintes. Si c'était une politique de confidentialité...

M. Scott Simms:

Dans la mesure où il y a des sanctions, il vaudrait évidemment la peine de... Certains diront que c'est une punition très sévère, radier un parti ou sanctionner le chef, mais ce serait approprié, selon vous.

(1715)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui, mais cela revient toujours — c'est une mise en garde importante — à répondre à la question: « Est-ce que la politique est définie concrètement? »

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur Therrien.

Colonel Joshi, j'étais présent — j'étais même assis là où M. Blaikie est présentement — pendant l'étude de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Je me rappelle qu'il y a eu toute une discussion sur le fait qu'elle allait limiter l'exercice de la démocratie prévu par la Constitution pour les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et pour leurs conjoints et conjointes en particulier.

Vous avez soulevé l'une des questions connexes. Je parle bien sûr de la déclaration de résidence ordinaire, la DRO. Dans votre mémoire, vous dites: « Lors des plus récentes élections générales fédérales, le taux de participation des électeurs des Forces canadiennes était nettement inférieur à celui de la population générale. » Aurais-je raison d'affirmer que cela est principalement dû à la DRO?

Col Vihar Joshi:

C'est peut-être l'une des raisons, absolument. Peut-être que les membres n'avaient pas modifié leur DRO lorsque le bref électoral a été émis, et que, en conséquence, ils n'ont pas pu voter dans la circonscription la plus importante pour eux. Par exemple, disons que vous vous êtes enrôlé à Pembroke et que vous n'avez jamais modifié votre DRO. Après deux ou trois affectations, vous vous retrouvez à Ottawa, mais votre circonscription, votre DRO, est toujours Pembroke...

M. Scott Simms:

À l'époque, de nombreux opposants disaient que les membres du parti qui soutenaient le libre choix de la circonscription étaient aussi ceux qui appuyaient la déclaration de résidence ordinaire. Je ne me souviens plus exactement de l'expression qu'ils utilisaient. Essentiellement, ils refusaient de laisser les gens choisir la circonscription qu'ils jugent appropriée. À la lumière de votre témoignage, je crois que ce n'est pas le cas ici. Les gens ont des motifs familiaux de vouloir voter dans la circonscription où se trouve leur résidence ordinaire et qu'ainsi, leur vote devrait compter. Est-ce exact?

Col Vihar Joshi:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Vous êtes convaincu, manifestement, que cela va encourager les gens à voter aux prochaines élections. Je me suis présenté pour la première fois en 2004, et je me rappelle que beaucoup de membres des Forces armées ont voté, selon les sondages; leur nombre a toutefois décliné avec les années. Je tiens pour acquis qu'il y a d'autres facteurs en jeu. Les efforts promotionnels d'Élections Canada étaient-ils défaillants?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Je ne saurais dire. Les gens ne votent pas pour toutes sortes de raisons. Il se peut qu'il y ait eu un contretemps opérationnel qui les a empêchés de voter, mais le fait de n'avoir aucun lien avec la circonscription peut évidemment être une raison.

M. Scott Simms:

Excusez-moi. Je ne veux pas vous interrompre, mais nous n'avons pas beaucoup de temps. Je pose cette question parce que nous envisageons d'élargir les activités d'Élections Canada. Nous voulons, en plus d'expliquer aux gens où voter et à quel moment, même si cela est manifestement pertinent ici, les encourager à être proactifs en ce qui concerne leur vote aux prochaines élections, leur expliquer que c'est plus facile. C'est un droit constitutionnel.

Croyez-vous que cela aidera Élections Canada? Croyez-vous que l'organisation est encore loin de déployer suffisamment d'efforts pour encourager les membres des Forces armées canadiennes à voter?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Bien sûr, il sera utile d'informer les membres sur la façon dont ils peuvent voter et sur leur droit de vote. Le programme de sensibilisation aidera sans doute à transmettre le message aux électeurs des Forces canadiennes. Ils sauront qu'ils peuvent voter et où ils peuvent le faire. Je crois que cela encouragera grandement les gens à se prévaloir de leur droit de vote.

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis content de l'entendre. Cela n'est peut-être pas entièrement pertinent en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-76, mais je comprends bien que vous demandez à Élections Canada de songer à déployer davantage d'efforts pour informer les gens relativement à la déclaration de résidence ordinaire et tout le reste... Je ne veux pas dire que cela n'est pas fait présentement. Mais j'imagine que de l'aide serait toujours la bienvenue.

Merci.

Le président:

C'est à nouveau au tour de Tom.

M. Tom Kmiec:

J'ai une dernière question à poser à M. le commissaire, puis je vais céder la parole à mon collègue.

Généralement, les organisations et les partis politiques ont un agent de la protection de la vie privée. À la fin de notre discussion, j'ai réalisé qu'il y a des professionnels agréés en ressources humaines qui travaillent au sein de bon nombre de ces organisations.

Ne devrait-on pas alors exiger que les gens soient agréés et qu'ils aient des normes professionnelles à respecter? Ne pourrait-on pas ainsi veiller à ce que des règles relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels soient en place? Je sais que vous avez dit que le projet de loi à l'étude ne définit pas clairement ce que les règles de confidentialité des entreprises et des organisations doivent comprendre. Mais si des personnes agréées s'en chargent, leurs collègues professionnels vont s'assurer que les exigences prévues sont respectées. J'ai déjà occupé des fonctions de registraire. La protection des renseignements personnels s'inscrit dans les normes de pratique des gestionnaires en ressources humaines; c'est un peu leur code de déontologie. Au Québec, ce genre de choses est surveillé par une association enregistrée, de la même façon que les comptables ont une organisation qui surveille les états financiers vérifiés.

Compte tenu de tout cela, ne devrait-on pas nommer des personnes agréées au sein des organisations, y compris les partis politiques?

(1720)

M. Daniel Therrien:

La responsabilité est l'un des 10 principes de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques. Conformément à ce principe, les organisations assujetties à la loi doivent nommer une personne-ressource avec qui les consommateurs et les particuliers peuvent communiquer, et cette personne assume certaines responsabilités liées à la protection des renseignements personnels au sein de l'organisation.

Il n'y a aucun agrément proprement dit dans le domaine de la protection des renseignements personnels. Il existe certaines associations ainsi que des formations, alors on peut dire qu'il y a un processus d'agrément partiel. Bien sûr, il est préférable que la personne-ressource connaisse bien les lois relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels, mais ce n'est pas une exigence stricte présentement.

M. Blake Richards:

Colonel Joshi, je vous remercie du service que vous avez rendu à votre pays.

Je dois dire qu'il y a beaucoup de choses dans ce projet de loi qui me préoccupent, mais — surprise —, il y en a aussi certaines dans ce long projet de loi, que j'approuve. Entre autres, je crois que cela va rendre le vote plus facile pour les hommes et les femmes qui défendent notre pays. Je trouve cela formidable.

Au bout du compte, les gens comme vous, ceux qui servent notre pays, sont ceux qui protègent notre droit de vote, alors le moins que nous puissions faire c'est de leur simplifier un peu la tâche lorsqu'ils veulent se prévaloir de leur droit de vote. C'est quelque chose que j'approuve dans ce projet de loi.

Je veux approfondir le sujet un peu, et j'aimerais avoir vos commentaires. Vous avez dit que, selon les dispositions actuelles, lorsqu'il y a une déclaration de résidence ordinaire, la seule option pour les électeurs des Forces canadiennes est de voter pendant ce qu'on appelle la période de scrutin militaire, soit de 14 à 9 jours avant les élections. C'est leur seule option présentement, exact?

Col Vihar Joshi:

C'est une période très courte. Les gens qui vivent dans la circonscription de leur DRO peuvent aussi voter, mais seulement le jour du scrutin.

M. Blake Richards:

Donc, seulement si c'est une possibilité. Cela ne s'applique pas seulement aux membres déployés à l'étranger. On parle de tout le monde, même ceux qui se trouvent sur une base ici au Canada, sauf s'ils se trouvent dans la circonscription de leur DRO.

Col Vihar Joshi:

C'est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Je peux comprendre que les choses se passent ainsi pour les membres déployés à l'étranger, mais pour ceux qui se trouvent sur une base ici au Canada, j'aurais cru qu'il y avait d'autres options. C'est une bonne chose de le savoir.

Pouvez-vous nous parler brièvement des difficultés qu'éprouverait une personne qui veut voter alors qu'elle est déployée à l'étranger? Je peux comprendre qu'une période de 14 à 9 jours est un problème, mais y a-t-il d'autres moyens pour cette personne de voter alors qu'elle est déployée à l'étranger, et si oui, lesquels?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Le scrutin militaire est maintenu pour les membres à l'étranger. Ils pourront toujours voter de cette façon.

M. Blake Richards:

Mais seulement dans cette courte période de cinq jours.

Col Vihar Joshi:

C'est exact. Ils devront se prévaloir de leur droit de vote pendant...

M. Blake Richards:

Une période de cinq jours, cela crée une difficulté, n'est-ce pas? Disons qu'un membre est en mission, il ne lui sera pas possible d'aller voter pendant cette période, manifestement.

Col Vihar Joshi:

Cela peut poser une difficulté, mais nous faisons tout notre possible pour que les membres puissent voter. Il y a des systèmes en place pour...

M. Blake Richards:

Pourquoi ne pas simplement prolonger le délai?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Le gros problème, c'est qu'il faut envoyer les bulletins de vote à Ottawa pour le décompte des voix. C'est un problème de logistique.

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends qu'il faut renvoyer les bulletins de vote à un moment donné. Peut-être pourriez-vous commencer un peu plus tôt, je ne sais pas. Pouvez-vous nous dire quelles sont les autres options pour les membres déployés à l'étranger?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Les autres options sont les mêmes que celles qui sont offertes aux citoyens canadiens qui se trouvent à l'étranger.

(1725)

M. Blake Richards:

Vous voulez dire un bulletin de vote postal?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Oui, lorsque c'est possible à l'endroit où le membre est déployé.

M. Blake Richards:

Y a-t-il d'autres options? Est-ce tout ce qui est offert présentement? Les bulletins de vote spéciaux sont envoyés par courrier à la base militaire ou n'importe où ailleurs? Les membres pourraient-ils utiliser le processus actuel, la seule différence étant qu'ils n'ont pas produit de déclaration de résidence ordinaire? Comment est-ce que tout cela fonctionne?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Leur résidence habituelle serait la même qu'avant le déploiement.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce serait inscrit sur la liste électorale et non dans un autre...

Col Vihar Joshi:

Exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé.

Merci.

Le président:

La parole va à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Monsieur Therrien, vous avez mentionné précédemment que ce projet de loi ne fait pas avancer la question de la protection des renseignements personnels et maintient seulement le statu quo.

D'après ce que je sais, aucun parti n'a jamais été obligé de divulguer sa politique de confidentialité comme le prévoit le projet de loi. Je sais que ça ne va pas aussi loin que vous l'auriez voulu, mais on ne peut certainement pas dire que cela maintient le statu quo, n'est-ce pas?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Dans les faits, il s'agit d'un statu quo, même si ce ne l'est pas sur le plan juridique.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Toutefois, le projet de loi rend cette pratique obligatoire, alors les partis sont maintenant tenus de le faire.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Ils sont tenus de publier une politique sur la protection des renseignements personnels, bien que rien n'indique ce qu'elle doit contenir, alors que, à l'heure actuelle, ces politiques sont déjà publiques.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Mais, la politique relative à la protection des renseignements personnels, y compris l'information concernant les pratiques qu'elle prévoit en matière de collecte, de protection et d'utilisation des renseignements personnels... Les partis doivent présenter tout cela au directeur général des élections avant de s'enregistrer.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Ce que prévoit le projet de loi, c'est une obligation pour les partis de publier les politiques sur la protection des renseignements personnels qui touchent un certain nombre d'enjeux, mais il ne requiert pas que ces sujets soient conformes aux principes juridiques en matière de protection des renseignements personnels généralement acceptés à l'échelle internationale.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous disiez que certaines provinces ont pris cette mesure.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Une: la Colombie-Britannique.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

En quelle année?

Mme Barbara Bucknell (directrice, Politiques, affaires parlementaire et recherche, Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada):

C'était en 2004.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ainsi, c'était il y a un certain temps.

Avez-vous vu des demandes de renseignements être présentées? Comment est-ce que cela se passe en ce qui a trait à cette politique? Avez-vous des conseils à nous donner quant à ce que les Britanno-Colombiens ont fait, ou bien y a-t-il des choses qu'il faut éviter ou mettre en œuvre, si nous faisons cela dans l'avenir?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Ce que nous dit mon collègue de la Colombie-Britannique, c'est que les partis provinciaux là-bas sont capables de fonctionner dans cet environnement.

Pour ce qui est de savoir si des leçons ont été tirées là-bas, en ce qui a trait à la formation des employés des partis ou au fait de les informer de la façon d'appliquer cette loi, nous pourrons certainement nous renseigner auprès de notre collègue de la Colombie-Britannique et vous fournir cette information.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Savez-vous si des plaintes ont été déposées?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Des plaintes ont été formulées, oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Y en a-t-il eu beaucoup?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Pas beaucoup.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

La ministre des Institutions démocratiques a laissé entendre au Comité qu'il devrait revoir la question des partis et des règles relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels afin de recommander un cadre plus solide.

Je crois savoir que vous êtes déçu que cela ne figure pas dans le projet de loi C-76. Toutefois, cela ne nous empêche pas de nous pencher de nouveau sur le sujet dans l'avenir et d'établir le meilleur cadre possible.

Que proposeriez-vous que ce cadre contienne, si le Comité procède à une étude sur ce sujet? Vous avez mentionné le fait de respecter les principes internationaux. Est-ce assez, ou bien avez-vous d'autres suggestions?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je proposerais, premièrement, que les politiques sur la protection des renseignements personnels des partis soient harmonisées avec les principes internationaux en la matière, lesquels se reflètent dans la loi fédérale du Canada sur la protection des renseignements personnels, c'est-à-dire la LPRPDE. Je pense que les politiques des partis devraient être conformes aux principes de cette loi, qui sont les mêmes qui s'appliquent à l'échelle internationale.

Deuxièmement, les partis devraient être tenus par la loi de respecter ces engagements, ce qui n'est pas le cas sous le régime du projet de loi C-76.

Troisièmement, la conformité des partis devrait faire l'objet d'une surveillance au moyen d'un mécanisme de traitement des plaintes dont serait responsable un tiers indépendant, probablement notre bureau.

(1730)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Colonel Joshi, j'ai appris pas mal de choses de votre introduction. Nous avons eu l'occasion de nous rencontrer quand vous avez présenté un exposé devant le comité de la réforme électorale, alors je suis heureuse de vous revoir.

Vous avez mentionné que les agents qui servent à l'étranger ne peuvent pas apporter de pièces d'identité indiquant leur lieu de résidence, pour des raisons de sécurité. C'est tout à fait logique, à mes yeux, mais je n'étais pas au courant de cette exigence.

La loi précédente — la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections — rendait-elle la tâche difficile, et exigeait-elle que même les personnes qui servent dans l'armée à l'étranger présentent ces pièces d'identité?

Col Vihar Joshi:

Nous ne devions pas présenter les pièces d'identité dont vous parlez.

Maintenant, nous devrons présenter une pièce d'identité avec photo, sur laquelle figurent un numéro de service et notre nom. Aucune information n'était obligatoire auparavant. Par exemple, nous n'apportions pas de facture ni aucun document sur lequel figuraient des renseignements permettant de nous identifier. Nous avons notre propre permis de conduire à l'étranger, alors nous n'apportions pas ces renseignements pour des raisons de sécurité.

On ne vous empêche pas d'apporter votre permis de conduire dans toutes les situations, mais il y en a certainement où vous ne voudriez avoir en votre possession aucun renseignement personnel.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Sous le régime de la loi actuelle, vous devez fournir ces renseignements.

Col Vihar Joshi:

Pas si vous votez à un bureau de scrutin militaire; il vous faut simplement la carte d'identité que nous avons, sur laquelle ne figurent que notre numéro d'identification de service particulier, notre nom et notre photographie. Tout le monde s'est vu délivrer cette carte au sein des Forces canadiennes.

Le président:

Merci.

Je remercie nos témoins. Nous apprécions votre contribution. Ces témoignages étaient très utiles. Nous souhaitions beaucoup entendre votre opinion, et nous allons changer de groupe de témoins relativement rapidement et poursuivre avec notre dernière liste de témoins de la journée.



(1735)

Le président:

Bienvenue encore à la 111e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir au sein de notre dernier groupe de témoins Ian Lee, professeur agrégé à l'Université Carleton; et Arthur Hamilton, du Parti conservateur du Canada, associé à Cassels, Brock and Blackwell LLP.

Pendant que nous attendons le retour de Blake, monsieur Lee, j'ai regardé votre liste de pièces d'identité. Beaucoup de ces documents n'indiquent pas d'adresse actuelle, ce qui semble être l'un des plus importants problèmes qu'ont eus les gens lors des dernières élections.

Nous allons passer aux déclarations préliminaires. Qui voudrait commencer?

Monsieur Lee.

M. Ian Lee (professeur agrégé, Carleton University, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup.

Je veux simplement vous faire part d'emblée du fait que mon exposé dure exactement six minutes et 30 secondes, alors j'espère que vous aurez l'indulgence de m'accorder 90 secondes supplémentaires.

Le président:

Ça va.

M. Ian Lee:

Merci de m'avoir invité à comparaître sur ce sujet important.

Premièrement, je veux faire certaines déclarations très rapidement. Je n'agis à titre de consultant auprès d'aucune personne ni d'aucun groupe, où que ce soit dans le monde: pas de sociétés, pas de gouvernements, pas de lobbyistes, pas de syndicats, pas d'ONG et pas d'individus. Deuxièmement, je n'appartiens à aucun parti politique et ne donne des fonds à aucun parti ni candidat politiques. Troisièmement, en 2014, j'ai effectué des recherches et rédigé un article d'opinion sur les systèmes d'identification, qui a été publié dans le Globe and Mail. Je crois que tout le monde en a une copie.

Après avoir consacré pas mal de temps — c'était au printemps 2014 — à des recherches sur les systèmes d'identification au Canada seulement — dans les secteurs public et privé — et sur les règles prévues dans la loi concernant ces systèmes aux échelons fédéral et provincial, il m'est apparu clairement qu'il est impossible, d'un point de vue juridique et factuel, d'être invisible en matière d'identité au Canada, au XXIe siècle, alors je fais des mises en garde à ce sujet.

Dans une société post-moderne complexe, plusieurs grandes organisations publiques et privées — des gouvernements aux autorités de la santé, en passant par l'armée, les banques, les universités et les autorités fiscales —  ont été forcées, au fil des ans, de créer des systèmes servant à authentifier l'identité d'une personne avant qu'une pièce d'identité lui soit délivrée ou qu'on lui donne accès à un système, notamment pour qu'elle puisse consulter un médecin. Ainsi, il est plus utile d'imaginer nos systèmes — au pluriel — d'identification, au Canada, comme un gigantesque diagramme de Venne constitué de cercles entrelacés — pour ceux qui arrivent à se souvenir des diagrammes de Venne de l'époque de leurs études universitaires —, où chaque cercle représente l'un des 40 ou 50 systèmes d'identification du Canada: la carte d'assurance-maladie, le permis de conduire, le passeport ou la carte de crédit.

Toutefois, chaque système d'identification en chevauche de nombreux autres, mais pas tous. En langage clair, des millions de Canadiens — comme c'est le cas de tout le monde ici présent dans la salle — transportent simultanément une carte d'identité d'employé, souvent un permis de conduire, une carte d'assurance sociale, une carte d'assurance-maladie, un certificat d'enregistrement d'automobile, un certificat d'assurance automobile à bord de la voiture ou du camion, un passeport ou une carte de résident permanent, une carte de crédit et une carte de débit, sans compter les autres formes d'identification.

Cela m'amène à deux éléments cruciaux. Premièrement, les personnes qui émettent des critiques en prétendant qu'au Canada, l'identification de certains Canadiens est inadéquate font l'erreur de ne se concentrer que sur l'un des multiples systèmes d'identification et, au moment où elles découvrent que certains électeurs pourraient ne pas posséder une pièce d'identité particulière — p. ex., un passeport —, de conclure que certains Canadiens ne possèdent pas les pièces d'identité nécessaires pour voter, alors que ce n'est pas vrai. Je n'ai peut-être pas de passeport, mais j'ai peut-être un permis de conduire. Je n'ai peut-être pas de permis de conduire, mais j'ai peut-être un passeport, et ainsi de suite. Pour reformuler mon idée, il est nécessaire que l'on examine la totalité de nos systèmes d'identification nationaux, provinciaux et municipaux établis par les banques, les établissements d'enseignement et les établissements de santé et compagnie, pas un seul système de façon isolée.

Deuxièmement, certains prétendent que de nombreux systèmes d'identification ne dévoilent pas beaucoup d'information et qu'ainsi, ils sont inadéquats. C'est méconnaître les règles et les systèmes complexes et très sophistiqués relatifs aux pièces d'identité principales, lesquels — je soulignerais — découlent du travail d'un grand nombre d'entre vous — les parlementaires et anciens parlementaires — qui ont légiféré sur les systèmes d'identification au moyen d'une myriade de lois adoptées officiellement par le législateur au fil des ans, y compris la Loi de l'impôt, la Loi sur les pensions et ainsi de suite, lesquelles ajoutent de la valeur aux pièces d'identité secondaires.

Cela pourrait sembler très abstrait. Laissez-moi être très concret. On peut faire valoir qu'une carte de débit bancaire, une carte de guichet automatique — j'en ai une dans ma poche, et je suis certain que c'est le cas de tout le monde ici présent —, est tout à fait inutile. Tout ce qui figure dessus, c'est mon nom et une longue ligne de plusieurs chiffres. Quelle est son utilité? Sauf que la Loi sur les banques du Canada, adoptée par vous-mêmes, les parlementaires, prévoit que toute personne qui ouvre un compte bancaire doit — pas pourrait ni devrait, mais doit — produire deux pièces d'identité principales délivrées par le gouvernement, c'est-à-dire un permis de conduire, un passeport ou un acte de naissance, afin de pouvoir ouvrir un compte bancaire.

(1740)



Selon l'ACFC — bien entendu, c'est attesté par le Parlement —, 96 % des Canadiens possèdent un compte bancaire, ces petites cartes de débit, ce qui signifie que 96 % d'entre eux possèdent au moins deux formes de pièces d'identité principales délivrées par le gouvernement.

Je vais maintenant passer rapidement en revue certains des systèmes d'identification importants qui me permettent d'affirmer qu'il est impossible d'être invisible, sur le plan numérique ou de l'identité.

Premièrement, la Loi sur les statistiques de l'état civil de l'Ontario — l'ensemble des provinces et des territoires ont adopté une telle loi, j'ai bien vérifié — prévoit ce qui suit: « Dès qu’il les reçoit, le registraire général de l’état civil fait numéroter[…] les enregistrements concernant les naissances, les mariages, les décès, les mortinaissances, les adoptions et les changements de nom survenus en Ontario[…] » Les enregistrements deviennent la base de données qui délivre les certificats de naissance et de décès.

Deuxièmement, la loi exige que les citoyens canadiens, les nouveaux arrivants au pays ou les résidents temporaires possèdent un numéro d'assurance sociale — comme vous le savez, car cette mesure a été promulguée par le législateur — pour travailler au Canada ou pour toucher des prestations et recevoir des services dans le cadre de programmes gouvernementaux. Ce dont bien des gens ne se rendent pas compte, c'est que même les prêts étudiants doivent être enregistrés. Un numéro d'assurance sociale doit être communiqué par l'étudiant s'il veut obtenir un prêt étudiant. Ce principe s'applique également à la multitude de prestations, pas seulement à l'échelon fédéral, mais aussi aux échelons provincial et municipal.

Troisièmement, les écoles consignent, pour en faire rapport aux ministères de l'Éducation, le moment où un élève commence l'école primaire, puis l'école secondaire, et se fait vacciner.

Quatrièmement, les ministères provinciaux de la Santé délivrent des cartes d'assurance-maladie avec photo. Si vous vous rendez sur le site Web de n'importe quelle province, on dit que vous devez présenter deux pièces d'identité principales délivrées par le gouvernement. En Ontario, une personne doit d'abord montrer une preuve de citoyenneté, puis présenter une pièce d'identité principale distincte établissant l'adresse de résidence avant de pouvoir obtenir une carte d'assurance-maladie afin d'accéder aux soins de santé, y compris aux médecins, ou même d'obtenir une analyse sanguine à l'hôpital.

Cinquièmement, les permis de conduire délivrés par les ministères des Transports: selon le dernier rapport de Transports Canada, 25 millions de Canadiens possèdent un permis de conduire. Les ministères délivrent des certificats d'immatriculation sur lesquels figurent le nom et l'adresse des propriétaires des 33 millions de voitures, de camions et de VUS immatriculés au Canada. C'est 33 millions de pièces d'identité. Bien entendu, il y a l'assurance correspondante obligatoire qui est nécessaire.

Sixièmement, l'ARC est l'organisation qui recueille et enregistre le plus de données sur les particuliers. En 2015, selon l'Agence, 29,2 millions de personnes ont présenté une déclaration de revenus. C'est plus que les 25 millions de personnes qui étaient admissibles à voter, selon Élections Canada, en 2015. Sur chaque déclaration de revenus, nous sommes tenus de fournir notre numéro d'assurance sociale et notre adresse.

Septièmement, et c'est le dernier élément de ma liste détaillée, la loi exige que tous les titres fonciers existent en version papier — sous le régime de la common law anglaise — et indiquent le nom et l'adresse du propriétaire, alors que, sous le régime des lois provinciales sur les propriétaires et les locataires, les baux doivent être conclus par écrit, et le nom et l'adresse du locataire doivent y être consignés.

À l'aéroport, comme nous le savons tous, chacun des 133 millions de passagers au Canada en 2015 a dû présenter une pièce d'identité avec photo, pas une, mais trois fois: une fois pour obtenir la carte d'embarquement, une fois pour passer au contrôle de sécurité, et une fois à la porte d'embarquement, simplement pour monter à bord de l'avion.

Selon Statistique Canada, plus de deux millions d'étudiants fréquentent un établissement postsecondaire et reçoivent donc une pièce d'identité avec photo. Tous les collèges et les universités du Canada en délivrent, car c'est obligatoire. J'ai supervisé tous les examens de tous les cours que j'ai donnés pendant un tiers de siècle. Les étudiants doivent apporter leur pièce d'identité avec photo, sans quoi ils seront renvoyés chez eux et ne pourront pas passer l'examen. C'est la pratique courante dans l'ensemble des universités et des collèges, car il est impossible que nous puissions mémoriser le nom et le visage de toutes les personnes assises dans la salle de classe et connaître tous nos étudiants.

Il a été soutenu que l'exigence concernant les pièces d'identité des électeurs a un effet négatif bien plus important sur les personnes à faible revenu; pourtant, si vous examinez le programme Ontario au travail — il s'agit de l'organisme qui administre l'aide sociale —, vous vous rendrez rapidement compte que la vérification de l'identité pose un problème beaucoup plus important à ceux qui veulent obtenir de l'aide sociale. On veut des renseignements de comptes bancaires. On veut des déclarations de revenus. On veut des permis de conduire. On veut des baux. Il est beaucoup plus difficile d'obtenir de l'aide sociale que de voter en raison des exigences relatives à l'identification.

Pour ceux qui ont étudié ces éléments, il en va de même dans le cas des exigences relatives à la SV, au SRG et au Régime de pensions du Canada qui concerne la façon de s'identifier afin de pouvoir toucher une pension sous ces régimes.

En conclusion, il est généralement reconnu que, dans une grande société complexe, nous avons besoin de systèmes d'identification rigoureux pour assurer la confiance en l'intégrité de nos systèmes fiscal, électoral, bancaire, de nos systèmes de santé et d'enregistrements scolaires et de tous nos autres systèmes d'identification.

Merci.

(1745)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Hamilton.

M. Arthur Hamilton (avocat, Parti conservateur du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis l'avocat-conseil du Parti conservateur du Canada, et je remercie le Comité de me donner l'occasion de comparaître devant lui cet après-midi.

Je propose que l'on corrige une caractéristique particulière du projet de loi C-76, et, de fait, il s'agit d'une omission dans la loi qui a maintenant été proposée. Plus précisément, même si le projet de loi cherche à limiter davantage les dépenses des partis enregistrés au moyen d'une période préélectorale officielle nouvellement définie, il fait fi du problème plus important que posent le financement par des tiers et les activités menées par des tiers qui ne sont même pas réglementées.

L'intégrité des élections fédérales est un enjeu au sujet duquel nous sommes tous d'accord. L'issue des élections fédérales devrait être déterminée par les Canadiens. Si nous en convenons, nous pouvons également nous entendre pour dire que le projet de loi ne va pas assez loin pour ce qui est de combler plusieurs lacunes qui permettent une influence étrangère dans les élections fédérales canadiennes par l'intermédiaire de l'activité de tiers. Pour illustrer mon propos, je vous renvoie à une correspondance provenant d'Élections Canada, rédigée en 2015. Durant les élections générales de cette année-là, il est devenu clair que plusieurs groupes, y compris un qu'on appelait Leadnow, participaient à de multiples aspects des élections et avaient recours à des contributions étrangères.

Au moyen d'une lettre datée du 1er octobre rédigée en réponse aux préoccupations qu'avait soulevées le Parti conservateur du Canada, le Bureau du commissaire aux Élections fédérales a répondu en partie: Comme le prévoit la Loi, la Leadnow Society ne peut avoir recours, à des fins de publicité électorale, à aucune contribution étrangère qu'elle a reçue. Elle peut toutefois utiliser ces sommes dans le but de financer n'importe laquelle de ses activités qui ne sont pas liées à la publicité électorale. Par exemple, elle pourrait avoir recours à des contributions étrangères afin de téléphoner aux électeurs, de tenir des événements, de mener des sondages d'opinion, d'envoyer des courriels ou de présenter des séances d'information à l'intention des médias. Si ces activités sont menées par un tiers de façon indépendante de tout candidat ou parti enregistré, elles ne sont pas réglementées au titre de la loi.

L'interprétation de la Loi électorale du Canada par Élections Canada sur ce point pourrait faire l'objet d'une contestation sérieuse, mais, au lieu de tenir un débat sans fin à ce sujet, le législateur peut et devrait agir de façon décisive afin de s'assurer que les contributions étrangères ne peuvent pas influer sur les élections fédérales canadiennes.

La Cour suprême du Canada a tranché quant à l'importance d'une réglementation stricte des tiers dans son arrêt Harper c. Procureur général du Canada, où elle a formulé la mise en garde suivante: Pour que les électeurs puissent entendre tous les points de vue, il ne faut pas que les tiers, les candidats et les partis politiques soient autorisés à diffuser une quantité illimitée d’information. En l’absence de plafonnement des dépenses, il est possible aux mieux nantis ou à un certain nombre de personnes ou de groupes mettant leurs ressources en commun et agissant de concert de dominer le débat politique. Le mémoire de l’intimé illustre à quel point la publicité politique est une entreprise onéreuse. S’il est permis à certains groupes de saturer le discours électoral de leur message, il est possible, d’ailleurs même probable, que certaines voix soient étouffées : Libman, précité; Figueroa, précité, par. 49. Si ceux qui disposent des ressources les plus imposantes monopolisent le débat électoral, leurs adversaires seront privés de la possibilité raisonnable de s’exprimer et d’être entendus. Cette diffusion inégale des points de vues compromet la capacité de l’électeur d’être informé adéquatement de tous les points de vue.

Cet extrait est tiré du paragraphe 72 de la décision en question de la Cour suprême.

Plus tard dans le même arrêt, la Cour suprême du Canada a reconnu ce qui suit: En effet, si l’on permettait à des individus ou à des groupes de livrer des campagnes parallèles favorisant certains candidats ou partis, ces derniers jouiraient d’un avantage injuste sur leurs adversaires.

Ce passage figure au paragraphe 108 de la décision en question.

L'interprétation d'Élections Canada citée plus tôt doit être corrigée par un libellé législatif clair. Notre Cour suprême a été décisive sur ce point. Le législateur devrait réglementer toutes les activités menées par des tiers et interdire toutes les contributions étrangères. Ce n'est qu'une fois qu'il l'aura fait que nous aurons obtenu l'équité électorale au pays.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1750)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à nos deux témoins.

Nous allons maintenant procéder à certaines séries de questions, et nous allons commencer par M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Lee, je suis heureux de vous revoir. J'étais là lors de la dernière législature, et vous aviez été témoin à ce moment-là. J'apprécie vraiment votre ferveur, votre enthousiasme, votre passion à ce sujet. Je ne vous interromprai pas trop parce que j'aime bien la façon dont vous formulez les choses, surtout vos diagrammes vectoriels.

Un terme me vient à l'esprit. Je vais lire sa définition dans le dictionnaire. Il s'agit du « suffrage universel ».

M. Ian Lee:

Universel?

M. Scott Simms:

Suffrage universel: « qui concerne tout ce qui existe, qui s'étend à toutes les personnes et choses qui existent. » C'est le fondement même de la raison pour laquelle nous avons inscrit le droit de vote dans notre Constitution, dans notre Charte des droits et libertés.

Je comprends ce que vous affirmez au sujet du diagramme vectoriel, au sujet de toutes ces méthodes d'identification: les cartes bancaires, l'embarquement à bord d'un avion, l'aide sociale, les étudiants, les formulaires de l'ARC, et toutes ces choses. À mes yeux, d'une certaine manière, les propos que vous tenez sont assez justes, mais ils ratent tout simplement la cible parce que vous affirmez que 4 % des gens n'obtiennent pas de pièce d'identité bancaire. À mon avis, il s'agit d'un nombre important de personnes qui ne peuvent pas exercer leur droit de vote. Voilà ce qui m'inquiète.

Comme je l'ai dit, je me préoccupe des possibilités de fraude et d'autres choses. Je vais vous citer pendant une seconde. À l'époque où vous rédigiez le projet de loi C-23, vous avez dit ce qui suit pour appuyer les nouvelles règles: « […] la gestion prudente et responsable des risques exige que l'on prenne des mesures préventives avant que des incidents déplorables se produisent, et non pas après coup. »

Je ne suis pas en désaccord avec vous, mais où sont passés ces risques de fraude qui étaient si importants auparavant? Dites-moi en quoi tout ce que vous avez abordé aujourd'hui englobe tous les aspects.

(1755)

M. Ian Lee:

Vous avez posé deux questions.

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai posé deux questions. Je m'en excuse.

M. Ian Lee:

J'y répondrai rapidement

En ce qui concerne la première question, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, monsieur Simms, je pense que vous faites erreur. Vous trouvez un système qui n'englobe pas 4 % des gens et, par conséquent, vous affirmez que ces personnes n'ont aucune pièce d'identité. Ce n'est tout simplement pas vrai, puisque tous les citoyens, toutes les personnes au pays, sont visés au titre de la Loi sur les statistiques. Il est illégal de ne pas enregistrer la naissance ou le décès de toute personne au pays. On ne peut pas supprimer la naissance ou le décès d'une personne. C'est tout.

Sous les régimes de pension — et je le mentionne, du fait que je viens tout juste de demander et d'obtenir des prestations du RPC —, je peux vous décrire les obstacles que j'ai dû franchir. C'est extrêmement plus complexe que de voter à des élections, je vous l'assure.

Ce ne sont là que deux exemples, alors je n'accepte pas l'argument selon lequel il existe des Canadiens au pays qui n'ont aucune pièce d'identité. Vingt-neuf millions de personnes présentent des déclarations de revenus parce que l'ARC l'exige, même si on ne doit aucun argent, par exemple, si on veut un remboursement de TVH, ou bien qu'on touche un certain genre de prestations du gouvernement, comme des prêts étudiants.

Pour répondre à votre deuxième question, parce que je pense qu'elle est plus importante, selon moi, mon point de vue est encore plus ferme maintenant, pas parce que je veux laisser entendre que des fraudes massives, voire même des fraudes mineures, sont commises. Je ne crois pas que ce soit le cas. Je ne crois pas non plus que la plupart des avions explosent au Canada, ni aux États-Unis, ni dans l'ensemble des pays de l'OCDE, car nous disposons de systèmes de protection très rigoureux.

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que nous avons vu les attaques contre nos institutions, pas tant au Canada, mais aux États-Unis, au cours des 24 à 30 derniers mois. Il est absolument crucial que nous maintenions l'intégrité de nos systèmes électoraux et la croyance en l'intégrité de ces systèmes et de nos systèmes bancaires et politiques. C'est le célèbre commentaire de César, selon lequel non seulement il faut être honnête, mais il faut aussi sembler l'être.

Comme nous possédons tous une pièce d'identité — tout le monde en possède une parce qu'il existe un très grand nombre de systèmes d'identification qui se chevauchent au pays —, j'affirme que nous devrions vouloir établir un système où nous validons l'identité des électeurs afin qu'ils puissent voter et que personne n'ait la possibilité, dans le cadre d'élections serrées, d'affirmer qu'une personne a triché, qu'une personne était en train de manipuler les résultats, et c'est ce qui me préoccupe: miner l'intégrité de notre excellent système électoral. Je ne veux pas laisser entendre que les gens trichent en masse ni même en petites nombres.

M. Scott Simms:

Mais, ce que j'entends par les 4 % concernant la question bancaire, c'est qu'on s'attendrait à ce que toute personne qui ne possède pas de pièces d'identité bancaires... Il existe un très grand nombre d'autres types de pièces d'identité que ces personnes ne possèdent pas. Je l'ai vu de mes propres yeux. J'ai vu des personnes âgées ou marginalisées se présenter, et elles n'avaient jamais possédé ce type de pièces d'identité. Ces personnes vivent peut-être dans une région rurale; peut-être qu'elles ont parcouru une grande distance. L'un des problèmes dont nous discutons est celui du recours aux répondants. Je ne suis pas certain de savoir ce que vous pensez de cette pratique. Je soupçonne que vous n'en avez pas une très bonne opinion. Ce système existe afin qu'une personne puisse obtenir le droit de vote. Une autre personne peut lui tenir lieu de répondant. Vous avez parlé des passeports. L'adresse ne figure pas dans les passeports; on l'inscrit à l'intérieur.

Tout cela fait partie du problème. J'affirme que ce diagramme vectoriel exclut des gens. C'est vrai, et nous en avons été témoins directement. Ne pouvons-nous pas simplement prévoir quelque chose, une mesure de sécurité, qui nous permettrait de recenser ces personnes afin qu'elles puissent exercer leur droit de vote? Ça me donne le droit de voter, mais pas nécessairement de monter à bord d'un avion pour me rendre en Floride au mois de janvier.

Laissez-moi poser cette question précise. Vous avez affirmé que ces personnes possèdent une pièce d'identité, par exemple un permis de conduire, mais qu'elles doivent encore présenter une deuxième pièce d'identité valable. Pensez-vous que la carte d'information de l'électeur soit une deuxième pièce d'identité qui est essentielle à notre système?

M. Ian Lee:

Non, je pense que c'est un morceau de carton sur lequel une personne a imprimé un nom. Je peux produire une carte d'information de l'électeur, moi aussi.

M. Scott Simms:

Je peux l'affirmer au sujet de toute pièce d'identité, en réalité.

M. Ian Lee:

Non, vous ne le pouvez pas, en raison des systèmes d'authentification qui les sous-tendent, qui sont assujettis à des lois fédérales. Prenez, par exemple, les comptes bancaires, pour revenir en arrière pendant un instant. Il s'agit non pas d'une pièce d'identité du secteur privé, mais...

M. Scott Simms:

Une carte d'information de l'électeur n'est pas une carte de souhaits que j'achète dans un magasin, bonté divine! Un système la sous-tend, au moyen duquel cette authentification... probablement même plus qu'un grand nombre des pièces d'identité que vous avez mentionnées.

M. Ian Lee:

Je réponds à votre question. Seules les pièces d'identité délivrées par le gouvernement sont acceptées au moment de présenter une demande de pensions de vieillesse, de demander une pension du Canada, un passeport ou un permis de conduire. Voilà ce qui est fascinant. Quand on commence à approfondir vraiment la question de tous ces divers systèmes d'identification, on constate qu'ils nous ramènent tous à une pièce d'identité délivrée, contrôlée et réglementée par le gouvernement, et c'est pourquoi j'ai beaucoup plus confiance en ces systèmes au Canada.

(1800)

M. Scott Simms:

Certains des éléments ne collent pas vraiment. Vous n'aimez pas le recours aux répondants, mais vous devez avoir un répondant pour obtenir un passeport.

M. Ian Lee:

Pour répondre à votre question, je n'aime pas le recours aux répondants. J'utilise le système de santé parce que je suis âgé et que les personnes âgées l'utilisent. Je l'utilise beaucoup, parce que je suis atteint d'arthrite. Je peux vous assurer que je me suis présenté à la clinique de mon médecin, que j'avais oublié ma carte d'assurance-maladie et qu'on a refusé de me servir. La santé des Canadiens est certainement d'une importance cruciale. Sans vouloir vous manquer de respect, j'affirmerais qu'il est plus important de me faire soigner que de voter, si je suis malade. Pourtant, on m'a renvoyé chez moi pour que j'aille chercher ma carte d'assurance-maladie, car nous pensons que l'identité est importante à ce point en ce qui concerne l'accès au système de santé.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Lee. J'apprécie la discussion.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Personnellement, je voudrais accorder à Scott environ trois fois plus de temps de parole, parce que ces échanges avec Ian Lee sont... Laissez-moi le temps d'aller me chercher du maïs éclaté et l'une de ces grosses boissons en format familial, et je vais simplement vous regarder aller.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est excellent.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux soulever la question de la carte d'information de l'électeur. J'ai tenu cette discussion il y a bien des années avec Jean-Pierre Kingsley, et je lui avais souligné ceci: la carte d'information de l'électeur présente des renseignements sur une personne. Je suppose qu'on pourrait en falsifier une si on le voulait; je ne pense pas que cela ait lieu. Toutefois, elle contient parfois des erreurs causées par la base de données, et cela indique qu'elle n'est pas nécessairement tout à fait utile.

Un exemple que je lui avais donné à l'époque était le fait que, quand je vivais seul, j'avais reçu trois cartes d'information de l'électeur: une adressée à Scott Reid; une adressée à Jeffrey Reid; et une adressée à Scott Jeffrey Reid. Bien entendu je suis ces trois personnes. Je figurais trois fois sur la liste des électeurs en conséquence de cette erreur. En théorie, j'aurais pu voter en tant que trois personnes: une fois au bureau de vote par anticipation; une fois au bureau du directeur de scrutin; et une fois à mon bureau de vote local. Bien entendu, comme j'étais un député sortant, quelqu'un aurait pu le remarquer, alors cela a limité ma conduite.

Je ne fais que le mentionner pour illustrer le fait qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un système à toute épreuve. Je vais supposer que vous souscrivez probablement à cette opinion.

M. Ian Lee:

Oui, si vous parlez des cartes d'information de l'électeur en carton.

Mon parti pris, et je le reconnais pleinement, tient au fait que j'évolue purement dans le monde numérique. À cet égard, je suis une jeune personne, même si je ne suis plus tout jeune. Je fonctionne exclusivement par voie numérique, et j'ai confiance aux données électroniques et numériques. Je veux parler des données faisant l'objet de mesures de protection massives, comme dans le cas de la base de données de l'impôt sur le revenu de l'ARC et de la base de données sur le renseignement de la GRC.

Notre système électoral date encore du XIXe siècle. Il n'est pas conçu pour le XXIe siècle. Nous allons devoir commencer, surtout avec les enfants du millénaire, à adopter progressivement le vote électronique. On ne peut pas tenir un vote par voie électronique au moyen de ces technologies d'identification très archaïques du XIXe siècle, car les systèmes électroniques requièrent des méthodes d'identification beaucoup plus sécurisées et sophistiquées.

M. Scott Reid:

Je peux seulement dire que c'est bien noté. Ce ne sera évidemment pas envisagé dans le projet de loi actuel; c'est donc simplement une question théorique.

Je vais m'adresser à M. Hamilton et aborder la question des tiers et de leurs dépenses. On présente cette mesure comme faisant partie d'un ensemble de dispositions qui, entre autres, réduit la durée de la période électorale. La période est maintenant plus courte. Cela empêche le calcul proportionnel des dépenses des partis qui ont eu lieu durant la période électorale plus longue de 2015. Le gouvernement vante cette mesure comme un important pas en avant, mais je remarque qu'il a dû créer une nouvelle période préélectorale. Il s'agit en quelque sorte de deux périodes électorales qui viennent se greffer l'une à l'autre, dont l'une est en fait plus longue que la dernière période électorale. On impose ensuite des limites quant à ce que peuvent faire les partis durant cette période, sans placer de limites proportionnelles à ce que peuvent faire les tiers.

Si vous me disiez aujourd'hui: « Scott, tu dois concevoir une loi qui aura pour effet de privilégier les tiers par rapport aux partis enregistrés », je pense que je créerais un système de ce genre. Est-ce que je vise juste dans mon évaluation?

(1805)

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Il s'agit d'une évaluation très juste de la situation actuelle, compte tenu du projet de loi. Ces mesures ne permettront pas d'atteindre les objectifs énoncés du projet de loi, si vous croyez que c'est vraiment ce qu'il vise.

Les tiers présentent un danger clair et réel pour notre système électoral. Si vous permettez à des tiers d'exercer une influence étrangère et d'utiliser des sommes qui proviennent d'ailleurs, ce danger est extrême. Le projet de loi ne fait rien pour corriger ou faire cesser les méfaits qui pourront être commis par des tiers.

M. Scott Reid:

Exact.

À votre avis, étend-il ces méfaits, ou bien fait-il simplement en sorte que la situation reste la même, sans apporter de changement important?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Théoriquement, vous avez augmenté les limites de dépenses dans cette période préélectorale, alors on peut supposer que les méfaits seront maintenant plus problématiques à l'arrivée des prochaines élections générales... si c'est concevable, car c'était déjà terrible lors des dernières élections.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Avez-vous la moindre idée de la facilité avec laquelle on s'est rendu compte qu'un problème se posait relativement à Leadnow lors des dernières élections? La raison pour laquelle je pose cette question, c'est que nous sommes au beau milieu des élections provinciales, en Ontario, et que le vote sera tenu jeudi. Il serait utile d'obtenir une certaine analyse du fonctionnement de ces règles dans le but de vérifier si celles qui sont prévues ici sont appropriées. Je me demande seulement combien de temps il faudrait pour nous faire une idée de ces choses, à la lumière de ce qui est arrivé à l'échelon fédéral.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Pour répondre à votre question directe, il a été très évident, très tôt, que Leadnow participait. Je crois que la source était un média de l'extérieur. Ce n'était pas l'un des partis politiques qui a déclaré que tel chèque provenait d'une organisation de San Francisco, que Leadnow a admis volontiers avoir versé dans ses coffres.

Pour ce qui est de l'avenir, c'est aussi simple que cela: si vous envisagez sérieusement de mettre fin à l'influence indue des tiers, il vous faut un code de conduite complet qui aborde les deux aspects de la question. Oui, vous voulez arrêter les fauteurs de troubles d'origine étrangère, mais vous voulez également vous assurer que nos organismes de réglementation ont la capacité de contrer les personnes qui touchent l'argent à titre de tiers.

Vous devez imposer une sanction aux personnes qui se disent qu'elles pourront simplement demander pardon plus tard. C'est peut-être une façon dont certaines personnes s'imaginent une réglementation efficace. Dans le contexte électoral, il est déjà trop tard au moment où tout organisme de réglementation peut, s'il le choisit, tenter de tirer quelque chose au clair des mois, voire des années plus tard.

Simplement pour que vous le sachiez: l'enquête sur Leadnow demandée par le Parti conservateur — à ce que je crois savoir — est encore ouverte en 2018. Les élections ont eu lieu il y a trois ans, et cette enquête demeure ouverte. Si vous voulez me dire qu'il s'agit d'un texte de loi efficace qui régit les activités des tiers exactement de la façon dont notre Cour suprême l'a prescrit — et je ne pointe personne du doigt —, c'est un échec lamentable.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Hamilton. De quelle enquête s'agissait-il? Vous avez dit une enquête par le Parti conservateur?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Non. Le Parti conservateur a déposé une plainte auprès du commissaire aux élections fédérales.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois.

Alors, ce serait un peu comme si l'Institut Fraser acceptait 750 000 $ des frères Koch. S'agirait-il d'un danger clair et réel pour notre démocratie?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Voulez-vous dire dans un contexte électoral? Je ne suis pas au courant de la participation de cet institut à des élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, ne participent-ils pas aux élections?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Pas que je sache.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il ne fournit pas au Parti conservateur, disons, des recherches dont les résultats sont ensuite utilisés dans le cadre des élections, puis distribués aux électeurs?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je ne suis au courant d'aucune pratique de ce genre.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voulez-vous effectuer une contre-vérification à ce sujet avant de répondre à cette question?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je prendrai votre source, si vous en avez une.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Alors, les frères Koch ne voient pas de mal à verser des dons à des personnes qui participent à nos élections. Il est acceptable que le plus important investisseur étranger dans les sables bitumineux milite en faveur de certaines politiques, lesquelles ont ensuite été promulguées, disons, par le Parti conservateur du Canada, mais, si une personne le fait d'un autre point de vue politique, c'est là que cela vous pose problème?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Non. Lisez ma déclaration; examinez-la encore. Je dis qu'il faut tout éliminer, absolument tout, sans exception.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Serait-ce répréhensible pour quelqu'un de, disons, diriger des électeurs vers un mauvais bureau de scrutin, en utilisant des bases de données constituées par des partis politiques au fil du temps?

(1810)

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Tout à fait, il s'agirait d'un acte répréhensible. C'est déjà contraire aux lois actuellement en vigueur. On devrait poursuivre en justice les auteurs de tels actes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, si on communiquait avec 40 000 personnes dont les renseignements figurent dans la base de données du système de gestion de l'information sur les électeurs tenue par le Parti conservateur et qu'on les dirigeait ensuite vers un mauvais bureau de vote, ce serait vraiment une chose épouvantable.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Avez-vous une source pour cet exemple? Je ne suis pas au courant de cet événement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas, l'affaire a été portée devant les tribunaux. C'est intéressant que...

J'estime la vigueur et la persévérance dont on peut faire preuve à l'égard d'un problème, quand ces qualités sont utilisées équitablement. Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est le fait de laisser entendre que des menaces claires et réelles pèsent sur notre démocratie actuellement, et ensuite de ne pas viser toutes les formations du spectre politique par ces affirmations.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je demande une application équitable.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'un point de vue historique aussi?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur Lee, la sécurité de notre système de scrutin est très importante à vos yeux. Les pièces d'identité présentées par les électeurs constituent un problème, parce que, selon vous, elles ne sont pas sûres. Toutefois, même si, en fin de compte, cela ne figure pas dans ce projet de loi, vous avez mentionné le vote électronique ou le vote en ligne. Soutenez-vous cette façon de voter?

Vous me voyez confus, parce que, dans le cadre non seulement des travaux de ce comité, mais aussi ceux d'un comité antérieur sur la réforme électorale, nous avons examiné cette possibilité, et nous nous sommes fait dire qu'il s'agissait d'une des choses les moins sûres que nous pouvions faire à l'égard de notre démocratie, parce que: premièrement, il ne nous serait pas possible de créer un système sûr; et, deuxièmement, s'il y avait une atteinte à la sécurité du système, s'il était piraté, il serait très difficile de même s'en apercevoir.

De quelle façon?...

M. Ian Lee:

Quelle serait ma réponse?

Vous ne savez peut-être pas que j'ai déjà été un banquier il y a très longtemps. Je n'ai pas de lien avec des banques, mais j'ai travaillé dans le domaine pendant 10 ans, dans ma vingtaine et au début de ma trentaine, justement dans l'édifice que vous avez exproprié, qui s'appelle maintenant l'édifice Sir-John-A.-MacDonald. J'y ai passé de nombreuses années à prêter de l'argent aux membres du Cabinet Trudeau, de même qu'à des parlementaires haut placés.

Ce que je veux dire c'est que le système bancaire... Selon moi, il n'est pas impossible de créer un système de vote électronique sûr. Vous savez, l'expression puits sans fond pourrait s'appliquer; il est possible de faire en sorte que tout système soit sûr, si on est prêt à y mettre assez d'argent.

Je parle du système bancaire canadien. D'après moi, on y trouve l'un des systèmes de sécurité les plus sûrs et les plus robustes au monde. Il existe des preuves de cela, pour les gens qui mettront en doute cette affirmation. Je m'écarte du sujet, mais je vais vous donner brièvement...

Les institutions financières n'accusent que de très petites pertes par rapport au montant total des transactions traitées. Donc, quand nous examinons les données empiriques, nous constatons que les pertes sont très petites, ce qui me dit que le système est très sûr.

Ainsi, pour revenir au vote électronique, nous pouvons, selon moi, mettre au point un système... Je ne dis pas que ce ne sera pas dispendieux; je ne dis pas que nous pouvons le faire au rabais, mais il est possible d'en créer un.

Je vais ajouter quelque chose brièvement, monsieur Cullen, parce que je crois que les membres de votre parti sont très préoccupés par le fait de joindre les gens — j'ai soutenu le même argument à l'université. Nous sommes syndiqués à l'Université Carleton, et nous utilisons encore des méthodes archaïques pour tous les votes tenus par le syndicat. Eh bien, devinez ce que j'ai dit: nous avons un très faible taux de participation aux élections. De fait, 5 % des membres de la faculté votent pour élire les administrateurs, parce que nous devons être présents sur le campus, que les votes sont tenus en été, que les professeurs sont absents, etc.

Le vote électronique incitera les gens à voter et augmentera la participation au processus démocratique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est étonnant, et nous allons laisser ce sujet de côté. Il n'y a pas beaucoup de données qui appuient cela, ce qui me surprend, en particulier en ce qui concerne les jeunes électeurs.

En outre, je souhaite aborder la déclaration que vous avez faite à propos de l'intégrité et de la confiance en l'intégrité. Vous avez dit non seulement l'intégrité, mais « la confiance en l'intégrité des systèmes électoraux ».

Je souhaite aborder le sujet de la confidentialité. Sous le régime du projet de loi C-76, on maintient le statu quo: les partis politiques ne se voient pas imposer de responsabilités importantes liées aux lois sur la confidentialité au Canada, ou très peu.

Les données que tous les partis politiques recueillent sont soustraites à l'autorité du commissaire à la vie privée ou à celle de tout observateur indépendant en ce qui a trait à leur utilisation. Il n'existe aucune obligation d'obtenir le consentement des électeurs ou de les informer à propos du type de données et de renseignements personnels que nous recueillons à leur sujet. Les institutions bancaires et les entreprises privées ont ce genre d'obligations. Croyez-vous que ce devrait être aussi le cas pour les partis politiques?

M. Ian Lee:

C'est la conclusion à laquelle je suis arrivé. Ce n'était pas le cas il y a deux ans, mais j'ai changé d'avis en raison du piratage informatique russe des systèmes électoraux qui a été mis en lumière, et il n'y a pas que les Russes qui posent ce genre de gestes. Cela mine la confiance dans l'intégrité du système électoral, donc je crois que nous allons probablement devoir étendre ces exigences aux partis politiques.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur Hamilton, quel est votre avis à ce sujet?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

À mon avis, il s'agit tout simplement d'équité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Qu'est-ce que cela signifie?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Cela signifie que la population reconnaîtra l'intégrité du système électoral quand elle sera convaincue que ce que vous faites est juste. Quand vous parlez de sécurité des données et de choses du genre, ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que parfois les gouvernements, et en conséquence les mesures législatives, avancent à la vitesse...

(1815)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, les partis devraient-ils être assujettis aux lois sur la confidentialité au Canada? Actuellement, ils ne le sont pas.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je crois que c'est une idée qui est séduisante, en partie, mais qui entraînerait certains problèmes. Tout compte fait, je ne suis pas favorable aujourd'hui à ce que les lois sur la confidentialité s'appliquent aux partis politiques.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Croyez-vous que les électeurs devraient avoir le droit de savoir quels renseignements individuels les partis politiques détiennent à leur sujet?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Eh bien, ils le savent déjà.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vraiment?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Assurément. S'ils lisent la Loi électorale du Canada, les électeurs sauront que le directeur général des élections établit la liste des électeurs.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce ne sont pas les seuls renseignements personnels que les partis détiennent sur les gens.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Cette liste fournit les renseignements personnels que les partis politiques cherchent, n'est-ce pas?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Allons donc. Ne soyons pas naïfs. Nous savons que les partis politiques recueillent des quantités phénoménales de données.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Vraiment?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voyons donc.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

En comparaison d'autres entreprises du secteur privé, je ne suis pas certain que je suis d'accord avec vous à ce sujet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils ne sont pas soumis à la législation relative à la protection de la vie privée comme d'autres acteurs du secteur privé.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je ne suis pas certain que les renseignements qu'ils conservent sont les mêmes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils en conservent peut-être davantage.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Ce que je dis, c'est que je ne peux accepter votre prémisse.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bonté divine.

Très bien, merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous cédons maintenant la parole à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je souhaite poser une brève question à M. Lee.

Vous avez parlé d'élections à l'Université Carleton et du faible taux de participation attribuable au fait que les personnes doivent se déplacer pour voter. Sous-entendez-vous que le fait de demander des pièces d'identité diminue le taux de participation?

M. Ian Lee:

Non, et je vais vous expliquer pourquoi je suis de cet avis. Nous — et je n'emploie pas ici le nous de majesté, mais je veux dire nous tous, les Canadiens — sommes devenus habitués à l'idée de prouver notre identité. Prenons par exemple le processus d'embarquement dans un avion. Nous devons tous montrer notre pièce d'identité non pas une fois, mais bien trois fois.

Chaque étudiant sait que s'il fréquente l'Université Carleton, ou tout autre collège ou université, il devra montrer sa carte étudiante avec photo pour avoir le droit de passer les examens. Si vous voulez entrer dans l'enceinte parlementaire, comme je l'ai fait il y a environ une heure, vous devez montrer une pièce d'identité avec photo, soit votre passeport ou votre permis de conduire.

Dans une société post-industrielle moderne et complexe, nous avons accepté... Ce n'est pas comme dans un village, où tout le monde se connaît. Nous n'avions pas besoin de pièces d'identité à l'époque, il y a 150 ans, parce que le village ne comptait que 100 habitants qui se connaissaient tous. Cette époque est révolue, et nous avons maintenant besoin de prouver notre identité dans tous les aspects de la vie et pour tous les systèmes: le système bancaire, l'accès à un stade, et ainsi de suite.

J'ai visité la tour Eiffel en août dernier. Je ne sais plus combien de fois j'ai dû montrer une pièce d'identité pendant que je faisais la file jusqu'à l'entrée. Ce que je dis, c'est que nous avons accepté l'idée que nous devons fournir des pièces d'identité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il existe encore de petites collectivités où tous les habitants se connaissent. Il y en a beaucoup dans ma circonscription. Sous le régime de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, nous avons perdu le droit d'attester l'identité d'une personne, mais cela existe dans le système bancaire. Je tenais simplement à soulever ce point aussi.

J'ai d'autres sujets à aborder, alors je dois m'arrêter ici à ce propos. Nous pourrons toujours y revenir plus tard.

Monsieur Hamilton, je souhaite revenir sur un point soulevé plus tôt par M. Cullen. En 2011, vous étiez très au courant de l'enquête sur les appels automatisés et des activités connexes qui ont suivi. Avez-vous participé, d'une quelconque façon, à cette enquête?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Oui, c'est connu publiquement que j'ai aidé à amener des témoins aux bureaux d'Élections Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De quelle façon avez-vous apporté votre aide pour amener des témoins à Élections Canada?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

J'étais présent dans les bureaux d'Élections Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Étiez-vous l'avocat de ces témoins?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Non. J'étais présent au nom du Parti conservateur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le Parti conservateur était-il impliqué relativement aux appels automatisés?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je suis désolé, vous avez dit impliqué?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le Parti conservateur était-il impliqué relativement aux appels automatisés?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Qu'entendez-vous par « impliqué »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voici ma question: si, en effet, vous étiez l'avocat du Parti conservateur et que vous étiez présent pendant ces rencontres, pourquoi étiez-vous là, si le Parti conservateur n'était pas impliqué?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre, mais laissez-moi vous offrir cette réponse.

Quand les révélations concernant ces actes répréhensibles ont été faites — et personne n'a mis en doute qu'il s'agissait de méfaits —, l'ancien premier ministre Harper nous a donné l'instruction claire de collaborer avec les enquêteurs et de leur fournir tous les renseignements que nous possédions. J'ai suivi cette directive. Je suis toujours d'avis que c'était la bonne chose à faire, et que les renseignements que nous avons donnés aux enquêteurs d'Élections Canada ont certainement aidé le tribunal à déclarer la culpabilité de la personne en cause.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si le commissaire aux élections avait eu le pouvoir de citer des témoins à comparaître et d'exiger des éléments de preuve, le résultat aurait-il été différent, selon vous?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je ne sais pas, parce que, si l'on se fie à la façon dont le procès a été mené, les responsables d'Élections Canada avaient assurément établi une stratégie avec leur équipe d'avocats. Je ne sais pas s'ils auraient obtenu un résultat différent s'ils avaient été en mesure de citer des gens à comparaître et à quel moment des procédures ils l'auraient fait.

(1820)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans l'affaire Sona, le tribunal a affirmé de façon assez claire que d'autres personnes avaient participé, et qu'il n'y a pas de moyen d'enquêter pour savoir qui sont ces personnes, pourquoi ou comment elles auraient agi ni d'engager des poursuites à leur égard. Est-ce exact?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je crois comprendre que, mais nous le comprenons tous certainement, particulièrement de votre côté de la table, puisqu'on nous parle des valeurs de la Charte presque tous les jours, le droit de garder le silence existe encore. L'idée selon laquelle un commissaire pourrait contraindre un témoin à témoigner, est-ce que cela veut dire au détriment du droit de ne pas s'autoincriminer? Je ne crois pas que c'est ce que préconise le Parti libéral. Alors je ne suis pas certain s'il y aurait eu un résultat différent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Étiez-vous présent lors de la déposition des témoins dans le cadre de l'enquête sur les appels automatisés?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

L'enquête est du domaine public. Je crois que l'enquêteur Matthews a témoigné à ce sujet au cours du procès.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel était l'objectif de votre présence?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Pour aider l'enquête.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour aider l'enquête ou le Parti conservateur?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Le Parti conservateur n'était soupçonné de rien, alors je n'étais pas là...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors pourquoi étiez-vous là?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Nous avions des témoins, et, comme je vous l'ai dit, la directive du premier ministre était claire, et j'appuyais cette directive.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous étiez là et que vous agissiez à titre d'avocat pour le Parti conservateur avec des témoins qui... de toute façon, n'y a-t-il pas ici un conflit d'intérêts?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Aucun.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les témoins que vous avez aidés à trouver ont-ils fourni des témoignages très similaires qui ont été par la suite discrédités?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Qui ont été par la suite discrédités?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, pendant le procès.

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Non, pas à ma connaissance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est ressorti du procès que Michael Sona était à l'étranger au moment où tous les témoins ont indiqué qu'il était allé les voir pour leur parler. Est-ce exact?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je ne me souviens pas de cette partie de la transcription, non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Prescott s'est vu accorder une immunité en échange de son témoignage. Savez-vous pourquoi cela aurait pu être nécessaire?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je ne peux pas vous répondre. Je n'ai pas participé à cette stratégie de la Couronne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pensez-vous que, si on avait eu recours au témoignage forcé, on n'aurait pas eu à conclure autant d'ententes et qu'on aurait pu faire davantage éclater la vérité dans le cadre de l'enquête?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je ne crois pas parce qu'on se heurte au même problème du droit d'une partie à garder le silence, comme le garantit la Charte. Je ne vois pas comment une loi qui n'est pas assortie d'une sorte de disposition de dérogation pourrait l'emporter sur cette valeur de la Charte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Croyez-vous que c'est dans l'intérêt de la démocratie d'accorder au commissaire un pouvoir de contraindre un témoin à témoigner ou cela va-t-il à l'encontre [Inaudible] en grande partie pour cette raison?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

À mon avis, le pouvoir de contraindre un témoin à témoigner revient probablement à dire que le mal est déjà fait. Je dirais que le Parlement devrait d'abord passer plus de temps à prévenir le mal. Vous avez entendu mon exposé sur les tiers et le danger que cela représente. Nous devrions concentrer nos efforts sur cet aspect parce que, ainsi, nous n'avons pas à composer avec les droits conférés par la Charte. Nous parlons tous de l'intégrité du vote au lieu de s'affairer à nettoyer efficacement les dégâts qui ont déjà été causés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que vous vous opposez à ce qu'on octroie ces pouvoirs au commissaire aux élections?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je crois seulement qu'ils comporteront des limites. Si on pense qu'il s'agit d'une panacée qui va tout régler, on se trompe, et c'est d'ailleurs une des lacunes dont j'ai parlé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je n'ai plus de temps.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Monsieur Lee, vous avez mentionné quelque chose et je ne me souviens pas si c'était dans votre déclaration liminaire ou lorsque vous avez répondu à la question de M. Simms, mais cela n'a pas d'importance. Vous avez dit que vous exigez que vos étudiants vous montrent une pièce d'identité avant de faire leur examen. Je suis d'accord avec vous qu'il serait difficile de concevoir qu'une personne ne possède pas une des 39 formes d'identification différentes qui sont acceptées pour une élection. À mon avis, il est difficile d'imaginer ce scénario; une personne aurait une de ces pièces d'identité et une carte d'information de l'électeur valide. Je crois que ce scénario est assez difficile à imaginer, mais, à mon sens, ce que vous avez mentionné à propos de vos étudiants est une bonne façon de l'illustrer. Avez-vous déjà eu des étudiants qui n'ont pas pu présenter une pièce d'identité? Peut-être qu'ils n'en avaient pas sur eux et qu'ils ont été en mesure de vous la présenter plus tard, ce qui serait le même scénario que ce qui se produirait lorsqu'une personne s'apprête à voter, n'est-ce pas? Une personne peut se présenter et dire « j'ai oublié ma pièce d'identité », puis retourner à la maison la chercher et revenir plus tard. Avez-vous déjà eu un étudiant qui n'avait tout simplement pas de pièce d'identité, qui ne pouvait pas vous la présenter ni trouver une façon de le faire et qui n'a donc pas pu faire son examen?

M. Ian Lee:

Je surveille tous mes examens depuis 30 ans — je ne trouve pas quelqu'un d'autre pour surveiller mes examens — et j'ai eu précisément deux cas d'étudiants qui n'avaient pas de pièce d'identité, et, dans les deux cas, ils l'avaient oubliée. Je ne sais pas comment cela a pu leur arriver. Ils m'ont dit qu'ils retournaient à la maison en voiture, ce qui signifiait qu'ils avaient également laissé leur permis de conduire à la maison; ils ont donc conduit illégalement, j'imagine. Mais ils sont retournés à la maison et sont revenus avec leur pièce d'identité. Nous sommes très libéraux. Nous ne disons pas qu'il doit s'agir d'une pièce d'identité avec photographie délivrée par l'université; nous disons toute pièce d'identité avec photographie. Nous accepterions un laissez-passer de transport en commun, une carte de la RAMO, un permis de conduire, un passeport ou une carte d'université.

(1825)

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai l'impression que votre exigence en matière de pièce d'identité est probablement, d'une certaine manière, plus sévère que celle que nous avons pour voter à une élection. Et vous me dites que jamais, à l'exception de ces deux étudiants qui sont retournés chercher leur pièce d'identité — ce qui ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne l'avaient pas — vous n'avez vécu une situation où un étudiant...

C'est en vérité un des arguments ou un des exemples qu'on donne souvent lorsqu'on parle d'une personne qui serait privée du droit de voter parce qu'elle ne peut pas... À votre avis, combien d'étudiants environ, selon vous...

M. Ian Lee:

J'ai 250 étudiants par année. J'enseigne depuis 30 ans, alors faites le calcul.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est un nombre assez important d'étudiants.

M. Ian Lee:

Puis-je faire un commentaire rapide là-dessus?

Ce qui est important, pour répondre à votre question... Vous avez raison. C'est une question d'éducation et de transparence.

C'est dans le plan de cours. C'est dans le calendrier. On le rappelle constamment aux étudiants. Je leur envoie un courriel environ une semaine avant l'examen, et, en fait, la veille de l'examen, je leur dis de ne pas oublier leur pièce d'identité. Il faut éduquer les gens. Ils possèdent une pièce d'identité, mais parfois ils l'oublient.

Élections Canada pourrait faire un meilleur travail en rappelant à tous d'avoir sur eux une pièce d'identité lorsqu'ils vont voter. L'organisme pourrait faire une campagne publicitaire à l'échelle du pays pour rappeler aux gens d'apporter une pièce d'identité. Ce n'est pas difficile. Toutes les autres institutions gouvernementales exigent une pièce d'identité.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis d'accord avec vous. C'est quelque chose que j'ai dit à de nombreuses reprises. Je crois qu'Élections Canada doit faire un meilleur travail à cet égard. Nous avons reçu des représentants de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants plus tôt aujourd'hui, et je leur ai posé exactement la même question. Ils ont répondu qu'ils avaient dû aviser les étudiants lors de la dernière élection parce qu'ils croyaient que cela n'avait pas été fait, j'imagine. Alors je suis certainement d'accord avec vous.

Je vous remercie de votre commentaire.

Vu le temps qu'il me reste, je vais passer à vous, monsieur Hamilton.

Vous avez relevé des aspects qui comportent des lacunes dans le projet de loi. Quelle est votre opinion sur ce que nous devrions faire en ce qui concerne les tiers et leurs limites, en ce qui a trait aux dépenses et à ce genre de choses? À votre avis, à quoi devraient ressembler les règles à cet égard, s'il n'en tenait qu'à vous?

M. Arthur Hamilton:

Je suis convaincu que nous avons besoin d'un code de conduite complet, comme je l'ai dit auparavant, qui tient compte des deux côtés de l'équation —les gens qui tentent de fournir du financement provenant de sources étrangères et ceux ici au Canada qui le reçoivent. Nous faisons cela dans d'autres domaines dans laquelle le Parlement a légiféré — notre loi anticorruption impose maintenant la responsabilité au directeur financier qui fait partie de la direction à Calgary, à Toronto ou à Montréal pour ce qui se passe à l'étranger dans le cadre des activités de cette entreprise. Nous faisons en sorte qu'il revienne à ce directeur financier de savoir exactement où va chaque dollar. Cela semble une norme très élevée, mais nous avons choisi d'agir ainsi et de dire: « Nous, en tant que pays qui suit les règles de l'OCDE, ne permettrons pas que des entreprises domiciliées au Canada mènent des activités de corruption. »

Cette même structure peut être adoptée pour placer cette responsabilité au début du processus d'enregistrement des tiers afin de démontrer qu'ils n'agissent ni ne facilitent de quelque façon l'entrée de dollars étrangers. Cela devrait être le fondement essentiel de tout projet de loi qui vise réellement à résoudre la crise des tiers, qui a secoué la dernière élection.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

Enfin, madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Monsieur Lee, je vais commencer par vous.

L'exemple des étudiants dont nous avons parlé, où, comme M. Richards l'a souligné... Deux étudiants ont été refusés à leur examen pendant que vous étiez professeur. Est-ce que vous connaissiez l'identité de ces étudiants?

M. Ian Lee:

Non.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Autrement dit, leur avez-vous demandé d'aller chercher leur pièce d'identité parce que vous ne les connaissiez pas en réalité...

M. Ian Lee:

Précisément.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

... ou parce que c'était une règle en place?

M. Ian Lee:

Non, vraiment. Je me fais vieux. Je ne peux pas me rappeler du nom de tous mes étudiants.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je travaille aussi avec des étudiants depuis 20 ans, alors je comprends ce que...

M. Ian Lee:

C'est une mer de visages.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question suivante. Supposons que vous les connaissiez, mais qu'ils avaient oublié leur pièce d'identité, les auriez-vous autorisés à faire leur examen dans ce cas-là?

(1830)

M. Ian Lee:

Si vous m'aviez posé la question il y a 10 ou 15 ans, je vous aurais probablement répondu oui. Aujourd'hui, je suis beaucoup plus à cheval sur l'idée de respecter le processus. Je crois vraiment qu'il doit y avoir une règle pour tous, non pas une règle pour les étudiants avec qui j'ai noué une amitié parce qu'ils m'ont demandé de l'aide et une autre pour le reste des étudiants. J'ai dit à mes étudiants que cette règle s'applique à tous, peu importe leur sexe, leur ethnicité ou leur religion. Je ne peux pas avoir de chouchous parce que ce n'est pas juste pour les autres.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Alors, vous vous concentrez vraiment sur le processus et vous vous assurez de l'appliquer de manière équitable.

M. Ian Lee:

De manière équitable, juste et objective.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Si vous saviez que l'intégrité allait être préservée, si vous connaissiez la personne qui fait l'examen et saviez que, si elle devait retourner à la maison, elle pourrait échouer au cours si l'examen représentait 100 % de la note finale, par exemple... Pour vous, il est plus important de respecter le processus.

M. Ian Lee:

Oui, parce que les étudiants vous disent que vous commencez à avoir des chouchous et à vous livrer à un petit jeu...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, je comprends.

M. Ian Lee:

... et c'est ce que je veux dire lorsque je parle de l'intégrité du système. Il est très facile aujourd'hui d'être contesté. L'autorité peut être contestée par une personne qui affirme que vous vous livrez à un petit jeu et que vous imposez des règles spéciales parce que...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Sauf que vous ne feriez pas cela si vous connaissiez la personne, si vous saviez qui elle était. Ce que vous dites, c'est que le processus est plus important pour vous.

Les témoignages que nous avons entendus, de la part non seulement des représentants de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants, mais également d'autres, indiquent que les étudiants font face à un défi particulier: même s'ils peuvent posséder nombre de pièces d'identité différentes, c'est l'adresse qui pose problème. Certaines personnes peuvent détenir plus de 80 pièces d'identité différentes, mais aucune n'indique leur adresse. C'est la raison pour laquelle le témoignage des représentants de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants disait fermement que cela complique les choses.

J'ai deux questions. Premièrement, est-ce que vous comprenez que les étudiants se trouvent dans une position différente à cet égard parce qu'ils ne possèdent pas la multitude de pièces d'identité que d'autres personnes détiennent? Deuxièmement, selon les témoignages que nous avons entendus, il n'y a pas de fraude avec les cartes d'information de l'électeur. Alors, si vous aviez l'assurance que la fraude n'est pas un problème avec les cartes d'information de l'électeur, est-ce que vous appuieriez cette solution? Reconnaissez-vous que les étudiants se trouvent dans une position différente parce qu'ils ne possèdent pas de pièces d'identité avec leur adresse?

M. Ian Lee:

J'espérais que quelqu'un me pose cette question, merci.

Je connais très bien le bureau du registraire, qui, comme vous le savez peut-être déjà, se trouve dans chaque université et chaque collège.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, et ils fonctionnent tous différemment, et certains savent...

M. Ian Lee:

Laissez-moi terminer.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

... que les adresses peuvent être fournies, mais d'autres pas, et il s'agit d'un problème pour les étudiants. Nous avons entendu que...

M. Ian Lee:

Dans les bureaux du registraire que je connais, et je suis presque certain qu'ils sont assez standards, on doit avoir une adresse. Nous n'enregistrerons pas un étudiant qui ne fournit pas d'adresse; il fournit l'adresse où il vit, que ce soit sur le campus ou ailleurs. Nos étudiants sont également omniprésents en raison des téléphones cellulaires et ils reçoivent leur facture à leur domicile. Je n'accepte tout simplement pas cet argument.

Je parle tout le temps à mes étudiants — en passant, j'enseigne à temps plein, non pas à temps partiel —, et ils sont très ouverts, très transparents et très évolués. Comme je l'ai dit, je ne connais pas un seul étudiant qui ne possède pas de téléphone cellulaire, ce qui signifie qu'ils reçoivent une facture de téléphone cellulaire qui comporte une adresse.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Certaines factures sont envoyées aux parents. Si vous avez des étudiants et que vous ne savez pas que les factures sont envoyées aux parents... Un grand nombre de factures sont envoyées aux parents, et je fais peut-être partie de ces parents. La question, selon les témoignages que nous avons entendus aujourd'hui — et j'ai été à même de le constater —, c'est que, premièrement, les étudiants ne savent pas qu'ils peuvent aller au bureau du registraire pour obtenir cette lettre, et, deuxièmement, les bureaux du registraire n'envoient pas toutes ces lettres parce qu'ils ne savent pas que les étudiants doivent la présenter.

M. Ian Lee:

À mon avis, c'est un point très valable. Je ne souscris pas au premier point, mais pour ce qui est du deuxième point, Élections Canada doit entamer un processus d'éducation pour sensibiliser les gens à bien des égards, non pas seulement sur le vote. Il y a des gens qui ne savent pas comment présenter une demande pour recevoir leurs chèques de pension du Canada, mais nous ne leur disons pas qu'ils n'ont pas à présenter de pièce d'identité, qu'ils n'ont qu'à se présenter pour demander leur chèque, que nous le leur remettrons et qu'ils pourront retourner chez eux. Nous ne faisons pas cela. C'est la même chose à la frontière, si vous dites que vous avez oublié votre passeport, on va vous répondre que c'est tant pis pour vous.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Cependant, la comparaison entre ces aspects est quelque peu différente parce que nous essayons d'encourager les jeunes à voter. Nous ne leur disons pas: « D'accord, vous allez passer une semaine de vacances en Floride, alors vous êtes mieux d'avoir les pièces d'identité requises. » Nous essayons de les encourager à voter et à y prendre goût. Nous devons faire ce que nous pouvons pour faciliter cela, non pas compliquer les choses et leur imposer des normes, étant donné que les étudiants ne voudront peut-être pas déployer d'efforts supplémentaires pour aller voter.

Si on vous assurait que les cartes d'information de l'électeur ne sont pas frauduleuses et que vous pouvez vous y fier, alors les accepteriez-vous à titre de pièces d'identité pour les étudiants?

(1835)

M. Ian Lee:

Je réponds à la question, je n'essaie pas du tout de l'éviter. Je ne crois pas que la carte d'information de l'électeur...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Avez-vous une preuve du contraire?

M. Ian Lee:

Je ne crois pas qu'on puisse rendre cette carte sécuritaire. J'ai eu des cartes d'information de l'électeur. Je vote depuis très longtemps. J'ai eu 65 ans cette année et je n'ai jamais manqué une seule élection provinciale ou fédérale. Chaque fois que j'ai reçu une de ces cartes, je me suis dit, mon Dieu, quel mauvais système non sécuritaire. Il s'agit seulement d'un morceau de papier. Je pourrais moi-même fabriquer une de ces cartes. Je pourrais en élaborer une et créer une assez bonne copie.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Croyez-vous que la lettre du bureau du registraire est plus sécuritaire?

M. Ian Lee:

Je dis que cette carte n'est pas très sécuritaire. Elle ne respecte pas les normes de Service Canada ni celles d'autres bases de données du gouvernement du Canada. Elle ne répond certainement pas aux normes de notre système de sécurité des passeports, qui sont très rigoureuses. Tout ce que je dis, c'est que nous devrions avoir la même norme que celle que nous avons dans tous les autres services gouvernementaux et d'identification; une norme que vous, en tant que parlementaires, avez demandée, et que j'approuve.

Le président:

Merci.

Merci à tous. Je remercie les témoins, vous avez été un groupe très actif en comparaison d'autres que nous avons reçus précédemment.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ne critiquez pas les groupes de témoins précédents.

Le président:

Je ne dis pas qu'ils étaient mauvais; je dis seulement que ce groupe était très animé; peut-être que c'est le mot que je voulais utiliser, animé.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un moment pour parler des affaires du Comité.



Le président:

Nous reprenons la réunion no 111. Nous discutons de la deuxième partie. Nous avons séparé les deux questions ce matin et convenu de revenir pour examiner la deuxième question.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que je peux avoir une brève mise à jour? Avons-nous eu des nouvelles du représentant de Twitter? On nous envoie des notes alarmistes de Washington. Je voulais seulement vérifier si on avait communiqué avec le greffier.

Le greffier:

Je n'ai rien reçu de la part du représentant de Twitter, mais j'ai eu quelques échanges avec les représentants de Facebook.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Sont-ils disponibles jeudi?

Le greffier:

Jeudi après-midi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvons-nous y revenir lorsque nous aurons terminé? Nous devons savoir pendant combien de jours nous recevrons des témoins afin d'être certains de savoir ce que nous voulons faire relativement aux invitations. Ils suivent un cours de formation, ce qui est fantastique. Mais nous pouvons communiquer avec eux par Skype ou leur écrire un message sur Twitter, peu importe la technologie qu'ils préfèrent utiliser.

M. Scott Reid:

Ne pourrions-nous pas simplement tenir une vidéoconférence?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous leur en avons parlé.

Pouvons-nous y revenir lorsque nous en aurons terminé avec le calendrier?

Le président:

D'accord.

Ruby, voulez-vous revenir à votre proposition?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Une partie de ce dont nous venons juste de discuter est importante. Je ne suis pas certaine d'avoir bien compris. Alors les représentants de Facebook nous ont répondu et ils sont disponibles jeudi après-midi, mais par vidéoconférence? C'est bien ce qu'ils ont dit?

(1840)

Le président:

C'était le représentant de Twitter.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh, c'était le représentant de Twitter. Il est disponible jeudi.

Le greffier:

Les représentants de Facebook étaient censés témoigner jeudi après-midi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

En personne, jeudi.

Le greffier:

Le représentant de Twitter n'a pas encore répondu officiellement. Le courriel que nous lui avons envoyé indique que la date limite pour répondre est demain midi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Alors nous le saurons demain. Où en sommes-nous avec le calendrier de comparution de tous les témoins, les quelque 300 témoins qui ont été convoqués? Qu'en est-il de ceux qui sont disponibles ou qui désirent être disponibles?

Le greffier:

Nous recevons encore des courriels et traitons les réponses, mais je peux dire que, jeudi, nous accueillons de nombreux témoins. Nous avons également envoyé l'avis de convocation pour la réunion de demain, qui est aussi relativement chargée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord, avons-nous quelque chose pour la réunion de lundi?

Le président:

Nous n'avons pas fait l'horaire de lundi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord, cela ne faisait pas partie de la motion initiale.

Je me demandais seulement si le Comité se sentirait à l'aise d'entendre des témoins s'ils nous disent qu'ils désirent comparaître dans les deux ou trois prochains jours. Il y a beaucoup de témoins qui ont été présentés par d'autres partis, et je me demande si nous pourrions continuer d'entendre des témoins jusqu'à lundi, juste pour une plage horaire, à tout hasard, et la ministre pourrait également témoigner dans une des plages horaires.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est l'histoire de la poule et de l'oeuf. Sans la confirmation du Comité, il est difficile pour le greffier d'être ouvert à des choses à propos desquelles nous n'avons pas encore pris de décision. Nous devrions décider s'il y aura une ou deux plages horaires lundi, ou peu importe ce que nous ferons mardi, afin d'éviter que des gens écrivent au Comité pour l'informer qu'ils souhaitent témoigner pour ensuite se faire dire que l'horaire est complet jeudi et ainsi de suite. Nous devons prendre une décision et dire ce que nous désirons faire. Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, j'aimerais savoir ce que pensent vos deux partis en ce qui concerne l'attribution de ce temps. Ou croyez-vous que nous devrions passer à autre chose à la suite des témoignages de jeudi?

Le président:

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Je dirais simplement que nous devrions entendre les gens qui désirent être entendus. C'est l'approche que nous avons adoptée la dernière fois que nous avons examiné la loi électorale et c'est l'approche que nous devrions privilégier dans le cas présent.

Je crois que les arguments selon lesquels on devrait laisser un peu de temps lundi au cas où plus de personnes désiraient venir témoigner, je ne sais pas... Peut-être que le greffier peut nous aider. Évidemment, des gens se sont vu offrir des plages horaires pour cette semaine. Dans le meilleur des cas, on leur offrait une plage au cours des quatre prochains jours ouvrables, et, dans le pire des cas, peut-être un ou deux jours après qu'on a communiqué avec eux. Clairement, cela a pu exclure beaucoup de gens qui auraient voulu témoigner cette semaine.

Je pense que nous pouvons tous comprendre que les gens ont des horaires chargés. Dans certains cas, ils doivent traverser le pays, et cela n'aurait même pas été possible. Toutefois, il ne faut pas du tout penser que, si les témoins ne peuvent pas venir cette semaine, ils ne souhaitent pas témoigner. Je suppose qu'il y a beaucoup de personnes sur ces listes qui souhaitent encore venir témoigner. Elles devraient être entendues.

Nous parlons de modifier la loi électorale de notre pays. Il s'agit d'un projet de loi très important. Grâce aux quelques témoins que nous avons entendus — et il y en avait très peu —, nous avons déjà appris un certain nombre de choses auxquelles je n'avais pas pensé. J'ai remarqué que d'autres membres ont relevé des éléments nouveaux pour ce qui est de préoccupations ou d'amendements potentiels. C'est la raison d'être de nos travaux.

Je comprends que le gouvernement croit, peu importe la raison invoquée, qu'il doit vraiment adopter le projet de loi à toute vitesse. Je suis en désaccord avec cela, mais ça semble être sa façon de procéder. Je ne crois pas que cela serve l'intérêt supérieur du pays ou de quiconque d'entre nous qui, comme parlementaires, essayons de faire correctement notre travail. Nous devons entendre les personnes qui désirent être entendues et nous en sommes encore bien loin. Dire que nous devrions avoir terminé après jeudi est tout à fait ridicule, bien honnêtement. Affirmer que nous aurons terminé lundi ne l'est pas moins.

Je proposerais que l'on détermine en réalité combien de témoins veulent être entendus et que l'on prévoie le nombre de réunions nécessaires à cette fin.

(1845)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Puis-je vous demander quelle est votre proposition, Blake? Combien de temps encore devrions-nous...?

M. Chris Bittle:

Blake, nous n'avons pas encore eu une journée en trois semaines, donc je ne sais pas si nous...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous une proposition quelconque à faire à propos de ce que vous envisagez comme calendrier, afin que nous puissions en discuter et essayer de déterminer comment l'organiser?

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que, comme la majorité des études que nous effectuons, nous devrions probablement le déterminer en fonction des témoins. Je ne sais même pas si on leur a demandé s'ils étaient intéressés à comparaître ou non. On leur a demandé s'ils voulaient comparaître cette semaine. Ce sont deux choses différentes.

Peut-être que le greffier pourrait nous dire s'ils ont été sollicités quant à leur intérêt, puis nous pourrions avoir une certaine idée du nombre de réunions nécessaires en fonction de cela.

Le greffier:

Je peux dire que les gens à mon bureau m'ont aidé, et nous avons joint la plupart des gens dont le nom figure sur les listes de témoins soumises. On leur a tous donné la possibilité de comparaître lundi, mardi, mercredi ou jeudi de cette semaine. Il n'a jamais été question d'autres réunions, nous n'avons pas demandé à ceux qui nous ont répondu s'ils voulaient comparaître à une date ultérieure. Nous ne disposons pas de cette information pour le moment.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suggère alors, puisqu'on me demande de formuler une proposition, que nous fassions le travail: que nous sollicitions les gens et que nous déterminions combien d'entre eux seraient intéressés à comparaître, puis nous planifierons le nombre approprié de réunions.

Le président:

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Pourrions-nous récapituler?

Même si on laisse entendre que nous n'avons pas étudié la question, j'ai l'impression de n'avoir fait que ça depuis des mois. Le greffier peut-il confirmer que nous avons entendu environ 30 heures de témoignages? Avez-vous le nombre? Cela n'inclut pas les témoins que nous entendrons au cours des prochains jours. Ceux-là s'ajouteront au nombre. En ce qui a trait au projet de loi C-33, nous avons étudié...

Je suis simplement préoccupée par le fait qu'on laisse entendre que nous n'avons pas étudié suffisamment la question. Je serai heureuse si d'autres témoins veulent comparaître bientôt, mais je n'aime pas qu'on dise que nous ne l'avons pas étudiée. Je crois que nous l'avons examinée. Nous avons déjà entendu plus de 30 heures de témoignages et nous avons...

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne veux pas vous interrompre, mais d'où tenez-vous ce nombre de 30 heures? Nous nous sommes réunis trois heures hier et six heures aujourd'hui, cela fait neuf heures. Puis, si vous incluez le ministre et les fonctionnaires, cela fait peut-être 11 heures. Nous avons écouté des témoignages de Canadiens pendant neuf heures.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

En date de jeudi, cela fera 30 heures. Je ne sais pas combien cela faisait avec le projet de loi C-33, qui est inclus dans ce nombre. J'aimerais que le greffier nous le dise.

M. Blake Richards:

En réalité, je...

M. Chris Bittle:

Blake, je sais que vous aimez interrompre tout le monde, mais vous n'avez pas la parole.

Monsieur le président...

M. Blake Richards:

Je veux simplement savoir d'où viennent ces 30 heures. Nous avons eu trois heures hier et six heures aujourd'hui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je croyais que cela ferait 30 heures à la fin de la journée. C'est en fait à la fin de la journée de jeudi; en fin de journée jeudi, nous y aurons entendu 30 heures. Je ne dis pas cela pour mettre fin à la discussion. Je dis cela, car je pense que c'est une erreur de dire que nous n'avons pas reçu ni entendu suffisamment de témoins, particulièrement étant donné que le projet de loi C-33 fait aussi partie du présent projet de loi, auquel nous avons également consacré de nombreuses heures.

J'aimerais que le greffier me réponde, pas maintenant, mais peut-être à l'occasion de notre prochaine rencontre, et qu'il me dise combien d'heures de témoignages nous avons entendues. Je veux faire valoir ce point. Je ne veux pas étirer encore le processus, mais je ne veux pas qu'on prétende que nous n'avons pas entendu de témoins.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Elle veut dire le rapport du DGE, pas le projet de loi C-33.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est ce que je voulais dire.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Visiblement, on ne voit pas la lumière au bout du tunnel.

Monsieur Richards, nous vous demandons des plans depuis des semaines.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous en ai donné un.

M. Chris Bittle:

Présenter un plan pour dire que vous allez présenter un plan n'est pas un plan, Blake. J'en suis conscient.

Nous sommes à huis clos, il n'est pas nécessaire de nous décocher des flèches mutuellement.

Des voix: Nous ne le sommes pas.

M. Chris Bittle: Nous ne sommes pas à huis clos? Fantastique.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Chris Bittle: Fantastique, mais tout de même, cela explique...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dites-nous ce que vous alliez dire.

(1850)

M. Scott Reid:

Ne vous arrêtez pas maintenant.

M. Chris Bittle:

Faites-le à huis clos. Laissez-vous aller. Tous les coups sont permis.

Manifestement, il ne s'agit encore que d'un plan pour proposer un plan. Si les conservateurs veulent présenter quelque chose de concret, je crois que nous pourrions aller de l'avant.

On propose de prolonger la période. Elle a été repoussée. Je ne sais pas si nous allons en arriver à quelque chose aujourd'hui.

M. Blake Richards:

Quelle est l'offre sur la table exactement?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il s'agit d'entendre des témoins jusqu'à lundi, s'il y en a que nous pouvons inviter de nouveau, je présume. Si nous décidons de procéder ainsi, nous pouvons demander au greffier de solliciter de nouveau ces témoins et de leur faire savoir qu'il y a une autre plage disponible. Cela leur donne quatre jours de plus et une fin de semaine pour se préparer et venir comparaître devant le Comité.

La majorité des témoins, sauf peut-être les éleveurs de poulets... Je ne sais pas s'ils comprennent bien ce genre d'aspect à propos des élections.

Ce que ma collègue, Filomena, a dit, c'est que nous avons beaucoup étudié la question avec le rapport du directeur général des élections, car 80 % des recommandations de ce dernier figurent dans le projet de loi C-76. Nous l'avons parcouru très attentivement. Le directeur général des élections était assis à nos côtés à chaque réunion et il répondait à toutes les questions que nous avions sur tous les sujets.

Nous étions donc en compagnie du meilleur expert sur la loi électorale pendant tout ce temps. Je n'arrive même pas à me rappeler du nombre de réunions qu'il y a eues. Il faudrait que je vérifie. Il y en a eu 25. Cela fait plus de 50 heures de réunions à l'heure actuelle. Nous en sommes donc à 50 heures plus 30 heures de témoignages.

Je dis seulement que, ce n'est pas dans le projet de loi, mais une grosse partie du travail consistait à déterminer si ces recommandations étaient bonnes ou non et ce qu'elles supposaient. Je crois que nous comprenons bien l'enjeu.

Procédons ainsi pour voir si certains de ces témoins veulent venir à un autre moment. Nous leur offrons au moins six heures de plus comme possibilité. Puis, nous devrons reprendre le cours normal des choses après cela. À mon avis, c'est la seule façon de procéder. C'est ce que nous faisons en tant que Comité, n'est-ce pas?

Lorsque nous aurons entendu les témoins, nous devrons passer à la prochaine étape de l'étude.

Le président:

Monsieur Kmiec.

M. Tom Kmiec:

J'aimerais seulement faire valoir un point. Par souci de brièveté, je serai concis.

Je siège au Comité permanent des finances, et nous sommes en train de procéder à un examen législatif de la Loi sur le blanchiment d'argent. Cela fait maintenant huit mois, peut-être même neuf mois que nous travaillons là-dessus. Je crois que nous avons facilement accumulé environ 100 heures. Le Comité est en déplacement cette semaine pour étudier la question.

Je crois que le projet de loi C-76 est un enjeu beaucoup plus important que l'examen législatif de la Loi sur le blanchiment d'argent. Les dispositions qu'il contient ont une incidence directe sur notre démocratie. Les dispositions de la Loi sur le blanchiment d'argent sont importantes en soi, mais elles ne sont pas au coeur de ce qui se passera en 2019, soit une élection générale. Je comprends qu'il est passablement urgent de régler la question.

Cela dit, vous devez avant tout bien faire les choses. Vous devez entendre les bons témoins et obtenir suffisamment de rétroaction. Vous devez garder votre liste ouverte, tout comme le font les deux comités auxquels je siège, soit le Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du développement international ainsi que le Comité permanent des finances. Gardez la liste ouverte, car pendant que vous questionnez les témoins, ces derniers pourraient dire qu'ils connaissent un professeur qui pourrait vous fournir des renseignements précis.

C'est un gros projet de loi. Il fait 354 pages. Je l'ai parcouru moi-même. Cela fait beaucoup de choses à lire et de comparaisons à faire par rapport à ce que dit la loi à l'heure actuelle. Ces documents ne sont pas faciles à lire. Les projets de loi ne sont pas rédigés de manière à être facilement compris par quiconque.

Je crois qu'il est plus que raisonnable de garder la liste ouverte, afin que les témoins puissent venir lorsqu'ils le peuvent. Lorsque vous questionnez des gens qui témoignent devant le Comité, ils fournissent de nouveaux noms et vous avez la possibilité d'obtenir plus de renseignements pour mettre à l'épreuve le contenu du projet de loi et sa validité. On peut vous dire que le projet de loi est bon, puis vous trouvez des données probantes qui confirment que le gouvernement du Canada adopte la bonne voie, ou qu'il contient des lacunes, selon l'expérience vécue dans leur administration.

Le commissaire Therrien, qui était ici aujourd'hui, a fourni beaucoup de renseignements à propos du contexte européen et de la manière dont les partis politiques se conforment aux règles sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Il n'a pas dit qu'en Italie précisément, les gens font ceci ou cela, ni qu'en Grèce, ils font... Il aurait pu dire qu'il avait des contacts en Grèce, qu'un commissaire pourrait vous fournir ces renseignements. Vous ne savez jamais ce que vous allez apprendre avant de lancer le processus.

Encore une fois, je viens ici simplement pour apporter une contribution. D'autres comités ont géré cela d'autres façons. En gardant la liste ouverte et en ne se limitant pas à un calendrier rigide, ils ont obtenu de meilleurs résultats.

C'est une observation.

(1855)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je ne veux pas critiquer les autres comités, mais peut-être que nous sommes simplement plus efficaces.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Je vais dire à Wayne que vous avez dit cela.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

En huit mois, vous y avez consacré 100 heures. Nous en sommes à environ 80 heures. D'ici lundi, nous aurons passé 80 heures à examiner la question.

Je crois qu'il est très important pour nous d'avoir une personne indépendante, soit le directeur général des élections. À l'aide de ses recommandations, il nous a guidés relativement à ces différents enjeux, tout au long du processus. Il sait vraiment de quelle manière ces règles touchent les gens au quotidien d'après les expériences qu'il a vécues par le passé, lors des élections précédentes.

Je crois que le fait d'avoir pu l'entendre précédemment, lorsque nous avons étudié ses recommandations, puis maintenant, devant le Comité, nous a permis d'utiliser notre temps de manière plus efficace. Nous avons appris beaucoup.

Je tiens à préciser que nous laissons des plages de temps ouvertes. Nous avons demandé à des centaines de personnes de venir témoigner. Je crois que beaucoup de gens qui détenaient des renseignements précieux sont venus. Il y en a peut-être d'autres. C'est pourquoi je dis qu'il faut laisser ces plages de temps disponibles, pour voir ce qu'ils ont à dire.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien que je me délecte de voir ces nombres augmenter à chaque minute... le nombre d'heures que l'on prétend avoir passées à écouter des témoins. Je crois que nous avons commencé à 30 heures il y a quelques minutes, et nous en sommes maintenant à 80 heures.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je parle ici des recommandations du directeur général des élections.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela a vraiment augmenté très rapidement. C'est encore plus vite que le débit de M. Graham.

Cela dit, je suis tout à fait en désaccord avec les chiffres. Je me demande seulement d'où ils peuvent bien venir. J'ai fait les calculs, et cette semaine, nous avons entendu des témoins pendant neuf heures. Je crois que nous avons réalisé certains progrès jusqu'à maintenant en entendant les témoins. Nous en aurons d'autres au cours des deux ou trois prochains jours. C'est une bonne chose. Après cette semaine, il reste deux semaines avant que le Parlement n'ajourne pour l'été. Pourquoi ne prendrions-nous pas ces deux semaines, laissons le greffier utiliser ces deux semaines et nous pourrons décider quel en sera l'horaire. Je suis ouvert à ce qui convient à tous. Durant ces deux semaines, nous pourrions offrir à ces témoins les plages horaires que nous déterminerons. Cela leur donnerait un choix, afin que ce ne soit pas seulement les quelques prochains jours; il y aurait une deuxième semaine également. En plus de les inviter pendant ces deux semaines, je propose que nous posions à ceux qui ne sont pas en mesure de venir une question complémentaire — que nous pourrions peut-être leur poser en même temps — , à savoir s'ils seraient intéressés à venir si nous pouvions leur proposer plus de temps. À ce moment-là, nous pourrions établir le calendrier pour ces deux semaines. Nous déterminerions combien d'entre eux nous pouvons entendre durant cette période de deux semaines, puis déciderions à un certain moment si nous avons besoin d'entendre plus de témoins; nous pourrions alors planifier ces rencontres pour l'avenir. Dans le cas contraire, nous pourrions discuter plutôt des prochaines étapes. Cela nous donne deux ou trois semaines pour entendre un très grand nombre de témoins qui n'ont pas encore été entendus. Cela devrait nous rapprocher du nombre d'heures dont on nous parle maintenant de l'autre côté.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, monsieur Bittle, monsieur Graham.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous examinons le projet de loi. Bien sûr, les membres du Comité savent que j'étais très enthousiaste à l'idée de parcourir le pays. Pour diverses raisons, cela ne s'est pas produit. Nous en sommes maintenant à un point où nous avons tenu un certain nombre de réunions. Je ne sais pas où nous en sommes pour ce qui est du nombre d'heures d'étude de ce projet de loi en particulier, mais je dirais 10 ou 15, ou peut-être que nous en serons à 20 heures à la fin de la semaine, plus ou moins, ce qui n'est pas convenable à mon sens. Le gouvernement subit des pressions pour que le projet de loi revienne à la Chambre à un moment donné. Cela suscite probablement du mécontentement. Nous ne réussirons probablement pas à établir le bon calendrier avant que tout le monde soit tout aussi mécontent. Je préfère aller droit au but que tourner autour du pot. Les conservateurs ont avancé une proposition qui ne permettrait pas au projet de loi de revenir devant la Chambre avant la fin des travaux du printemps. Manifestement, les libéraux — je ne veux pas parler pour eux — ne vont pas accepter cela. Le juste milieu entre les deux propositions consisterait à... Je pense que nous avons simplement besoin d'une motion de votre part quant à ce que vous voulez et à quel moment vous voulez que le projet de loi ne soit retourné. J'éviterais de dire que nous avons épuisé la liste de témoins, car nous l'avons épuisée selon les limites très restreintes que nous avions, c'est-à-dire que les témoins devaient pouvoir venir dans un délai de deux ou trois jours. Beaucoup de gens nous ont dit non. Normalement, nous aurions soumis des listes de témoins et nous aurions disposé de deux ou trois semaines pour entendre les témoignages et ajouter des gens à l'horaire. Nous avons adopté une approche très ambitieuse en ce qui a trait au nombre d'heures, mais ils étaient tous très pressés.

Tout ce que je dis, c'est que pour éviter que cela dure éternellement, il faut savoir ce que le gouvernement veut. Quand veut-il présenter le projet de loi? Combien de jours de plus veut-il pour entendre les témoins? Nous pouvons être d'accord, en désaccord, tenir des votes, puis passer à autre chose. Je ne sais tout simplement pas si nous allons entendre des arguments très productifs de part et d'autre sur le plan philosophique. Je crois qu'à un certain moment, il faudra en venir aux faits.

(1900)

Le président:

Vous voulez donc une proposition.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, essentiellement. Nous en avions une, puis elle a été retirée. Une proposition a été lancée pendant un certain temps, mais elle n'a pas été soumise aux voix. Je ne sais pas s'il existe une autre version prête ou s'il y en aura une demain. Je ne sais tout simplement pas si cela mène quelque part.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je crois que je vais proposer l'ajournement du débat. Nous pourrions peut-être tous prendre en considération les suggestions de Nathan. Je vais prendre le temps de parcourir le hansard et regarder le débat sur le projet de loi C-23 ainsi que toutes les références de Blake, car nous n'avons pas suffisamment de temps en comité pour examiner le projet de loi. Je suis certain qu'il y en aura beaucoup. Je propose une motion pour lever la séance maintenant.

Le président:

La motion ne peut pas être débattue.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 05, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.