header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-24 INDU 117

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. What a gorgeous day it is.

Do I hear a cellphone? Are all cellphones off? Thank you.

Welcome to meeting 117 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, as we continue our legislative five-year review of copyright.

Today we have with us, from the Canadian Teachers' Federation, Mr. Mark Ramsankar, President; from the Canadian School Boards Association, Cynthia Andrew, Policy Analyst; and from the University of Calgary, Dru Marshall, Provost and Vice-President, who we'll save for last.

We're going to start with you, Mr. Ramsankar. You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar (President, Canadian Teachers' Federation):

Thank you, Chair.

My name is Mark Ramsankar. I'm the President of the Canadian Teachers' Federation, but first and foremost, I'd like to suggest that I'm a schoolteacher. I've had the opportunity throughout my career to teach all grades and to also work as a consultant with the school board in Edmonton. I've been a special ed teacher as well as an administrator, so I'm speaking from the perspective of the entire K-to-12 education system over my 25 years in the classroom.

As the national voice for Canadian teachers, I represent here today a quarter of a million teachers in the K-to-12 system in every province and territory in the country. We have a part in and strong connection to Education International, which represents over 30 million teachers across the world. We are a long-standing member of the education coalition of national education organizations. We advocate for the rights of teachers and students in the federal government's copyright reform process. We work very closely with the education coalition partners to develop education materials for teachers on matters relating directly to copyright.

We believe very firmly in protecting the legitimate interests of creators and publishers by ensuring there is no copyright infringement when teachers are copying materials for use in their classrooms and for students. We also believe that the current fair dealing provisions maintain a very strong balance between user rights and creator rights. We view this as very strong public policy. Even our global organization, through Education International, holds that the Canadian Copyright Act as it stands is held in very high regard.

Teachers are professionals who respect copyright, and we also teach our students to respect copyright when they do research. Teachers will not copy materials if there is any doubt. They do not copy whole textbooks. It infuriates us throughout the profession when somebody says something such as this, that there is a teacher who is blatantly stepping on copyright rules.

Over the last decade there's been a dramatic shift from print-based materials and resources such as textbooks to digital resources. In our classrooms today, as challenging as they are, teachers find effective ways to teach through these evolving technologies. They are creating their own resources and materials. They're using collaborative approaches to content in creation and are engaging students so that they can learn through online resources as well as more traditional print material. As professionals in the K-to-12 system, teachers want their students to have access to the very best educational content available.

Speaking directly to copyright, it is an important issue, and it's a subject that has been raised with teachers by the Canadian Teachers' Federation. We speak about compliance, and we take part in the awareness of consequences to infringing on copyright. We also engage in a comprehensive awareness program in our efforts to ensure teachers are aware of copyright and the limits of the law when they are preparing for their classes.

Teachers are professionals. Anecdotal stories of whole textbooks being copied are isolated incidents. I speak directly for the K-to-12 system in education, and that is public education. I don't stand here to represent extended or private education. For the CTF, it's not about the money. From our view, it's about students. It's about providing the best for their learning experience in our system and for their futures.

I came today to witness for and represent Canadian teachers, and I'm urging the standing committee to maintain the current fair dealing provisions, which balance the protection of both creators and users.

I also ask you to consider your decisions. Consider the fact that a quarter of a million teachers work with children every day in this country. The decisions made as we go forward in regard to copyright will have very damning effects on classrooms across the country, and every student in the K-to-12 system will be affected by the decisions that are made in the outcome of these hearings.

Thank you very much, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move right to Cynthia Andrew from the Canadian School Boards Association.

You have up to seven minutes.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew (Policy Analyst, Canadian School Boards Association):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and good afternoon, everyone.

My name is Cynthia Andrew. I appear before you this afternoon representing the Canadian School Boards Association, whose members are the provincial school board associations, which represent just over 250 school boards across Canada and serve slightly less than four million elementary and secondary school students across Canada.

I am an employee of one of those provincial associations, the Ontario Public School Boards' Association. I am the key staff person for school boards both in Ontario and within CSBA on all matters relating to copyright. I am pleased to appear before you this afternoon to speak about copyright and school boards.

Copyright law affects all of Canada's school boards and is reflected in policies and practices in school board administration and in classrooms across the country. As a result, CSBA has been attentive to and active in issues related to copyright reform since the 1990s.

CSBA works closely with other national educational organizations on copyright-related policy development. That is why you will notice that many of our supporting materials are the same as those materials you have already seen from other witnesses who have come before you on this issue, for example, the fair dealing guidelines and the “Copyright Matters!” booklet.

CSBA recognizes the importance of copyright awareness in the K-to-12 education community, and we do our part, along with our provincial affiliates and our education partners, to impart the need to foster greater understanding and compliance within our schools and our classrooms. CSBA provides advice to local school boards through its provincial association members.

The provincial ministries and departments of education can exercise greater authority, making certain policy requirements of school boards. You heard from them earlier this week, I know, through the CMEC Copyright Consortium. CSBA works co-operatively with the CMAC Copyright Consortium and other national educational partners to ensure that consistent information about copyright compliance and copyright rights and responsibilities is consistently shared through our provincial school board associations with all of the school boards and their employees.

This decision to educate school board employees consistently across Canada was made late in 2012 and was only partially a result of the amendments to the Copyright Act that passed earlier that year. Significantly, the decision was also a result of the 2012 Supreme Court decision that found it was fair for teachers to copy short excerpts of copyright-protected works for their students. It is that Supreme Court decision that prompted national education associations to establish the fair dealing guidelines.

CSBA supports the fair dealing guidelines. It supported the establishment of them and worked with its provincial affiliates to ensure that directives from their respective provincial ministries were implemented effectively. CSBA believes that the fair dealing guidelines provide school boards and their employees with clear copyright policy guidance, ensuring that educators are aware of their rights and their responsibilities under the Canadian copyright law. The fair dealing guidelines ensure consistent application of the Supreme Court's decision across the country. The guidelines are aligned with copyright law around the world so that our teachers and our students are on a level playing field with those from other countries.

CSBA further believes that fair dealing for education purposes is good public policy that supports student learning and ensures effective use of taxpayer dollars. The Copyright Act balances rights between copyright owners and copyright users, and the fair dealing provision in the act is an important right for Canadian educators. Fair dealing for the purpose of education allows teachers to access a wide range of diverse learning materials and thereby enriches students' learning experiences.

(1540)



The Supreme Court decision and the fair dealing guidelines have established a stability that CSBA supports and wishes to see maintained. Teachers are now certain when they're selecting materials for their lesson planning and when seeking those supplemental materials necessary for teaching individuals who may be more challenged with the lessons.

CSBA is aware that publishers and Access Copyright have been vocal in their claims that fair dealing has caused them economic hardship. To date, they have not been able to present sufficient evidence to support this claim beyond anecdotal examples. The other gap that is evident from the testimony to date is the degree to which the success or decline of publishers and Access Copyright reflects what is fair remuneration to creators. Will restoring tariffs and increasing tariff payments help those writers and those creators?

CSBA does empathize with the challenges currently facing the educational publishing industry. The industry is struggling to stay current with advancing technology and new perspectives about teaching and learning. Textbooks, once the primary learning resource available to educators, are now just one in a series of choices that school boards and teachers have available when preparing classes for their students. School boards spend their learning-resource dollars on digital-content repositories, subscription-based databases, online libraries, provincially developed or locally developed electronic resources, apps, and, of course, the Internet. Again, the true value of the educational use of fair dealing is that educators now have the flexibility to adapt their materials to the specific needs of each class, or even each individual student, in ways that were unimaginable just a few years ago.

While CSBA as an organization is not directly involved in any of the legal or quasi-legal actions that have occurred around copying in schools, some of our member school boards, those in Ontario, are directly involved. Other provinces' school boards are indirectly involved as their ministry is involved. While CSBA itself might not be directly involved in these matters, we certainly have an ongoing interest in ensuring that the Copyright Act continues to balance the rights of both creators and the educational users.

The fair dealing provisions in the act provide balance in both rights and responsibilities. Proceedings of the Supreme Court and other courts, which are playing themselves out today, are providing the definitions and the clarity around fair dealing. There is a new normal in K-12 school communities, which educators are adapting to, which publishers are adapting to, and which teachers and students are benefiting from, that is about access to enriched learning material. CSBA asks MPs to not be tempted to apply legislative amendments to what is already a fair and balanced approach to copyright in our schools.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, Ms. Marshall, you have up to seven minutes.

Ms. Dru Marshall (Provost and Vice-President, University of Calgary):

Good afternoon. I'm Dru Marshall, provost and vice-president, academic, at the University of Calgary, and chair of the copyright committee there. I want to begin by thanking members of the committee for their support for the post-secondary sector. Investments in our campus through the post-secondary strategic investment fund and through the previous knowledge infrastructure program have had a transformative effect on research and learning spaces on our campus. We also really appreciate the significant federal investments made in support of Canada's research ecosystem.

I'm pleased to be here today to make recommendations to the committee and to speak about the University of Calgary's approach to copyright. First, I want to emphasize that the University of Calgary supports the retention of the fair dealing exception for education in Canada's copyright regime. As both creators and users of copyright material, universities must have a balanced approach to copyright and to the issue of fair dealing.

Fair dealing helps ensure a high-quality educational environment for students, and contributes to innovation in teaching by enabling an instructor to use a variety of examples in their lectures, exposing students to the most recent cutting-edge research. The speed at which textbooks and traditional print books are produced and distributed often does not allow for inclusion of these types of examples.

At the University of Calgary, we take a measured approach to fair dealing, ensuring it is used to supplement or complement purchased material, not to replace it. We do not apply fair dealing to print course packs, because while the university produces course packs on a cost-recovery basis, the institutional printing contract with a third party printer includes a commercial element. We also do not apply fair dealing to compilations of works such as literary anthologies. Instead we look for original sources of these works, and in most cases purchase transactional licences for them. Indeed, the university applies fair dealing to a very small proportion of course materials used in classrooms today. In a sample of 3,200 learning items, such as book chapters, articles, and Internet resources used by instructors in our winter 2017 semester, fair dealing was applied to only 250 items, or less than 8%. We most commonly applied fair dealing in instances where a chart, a graphic, or tables from a book or academic journal articles were included in the materials for a lecture.

I'd be happy to walk the committee through a detailed example of how fair dealing is applied to a specific course during the question period of today's meeting.

At the University of Calgary we also strongly discourage introducing any measures to harmonize tariff regimes, imposing statutory damages, or introducing mandatory licensing into Canada's copyright regime. Doing so would remove or threaten a university's ability to choose how to manage copyright, compel them to purchase blanket licences, and result in a university paying twice for the ability to reproduce most of its copyrighted content. This move would be a fundamental change to copyright law and should be studied very closely for all the unintended consequences that would flow from it, especially the cost implications for public institutions.

We understand that in recent government consultations on reforming the Copyright Board of Canada, Access Copyright proposed statutory damages in the range of three to 10 times the royalty for even the smallest case of infringement, with no discretion for the courts to vary from this. We also understand that Access Copyright is currently pursuing royalties, at a rate of $26 per FTE student for the university sector, through rate-setting proceedings at the Copyright Board of Canada. This rate has not yet been confirmed by the board, but if it were, this would mean statutory damages for a university, hypothetically, in the range of $78 to $260 per FTE student at the institution. That scenario would be difficult for any publicly funded institution.

Our opposition to this measure is in line with the University of Calgary's decision to opt out of the Access Copyright interim tariff in September 2012. This decision to opt out came after considerable consultation with our university community, and was driven by significant cost implications stemming from both the increase in the tariff and the limits in the repertoire offered by Access Copyright. The Access Copyright tariff applies only to the copying of print materials within the repertoire, and the details of the specific materials included were not sufficiently transparent.

(1545)



As a growing proportion of library materials is digital, the university increasingly found itself paying twice for the same resource, paying the Access Copyright fee for print copies and also paying for the licence for digital copies preferred by the university community.

This preference and the greater cost-effectiveness of digital resources drive a growing proportion of library acquisitions. We have a digital first policy, and approximately 90% of acquisitions by our library in 2017-18 were digital, just over 10 million dollars' worth, making print-based collective licences less useful.

When we opted out of the Access Copyright tariff in 2012, it was because we recognized that we could implement institutional copyright policies that would be both more cost-effective and, importantly, responsive to the needs of the University of Calgary community.

At the U of C we take copyright compliance extremely seriously. We educate our faculty, staff, and students about copyright. For example, we recommend all course reading lists be submitted to the copyright office to ensure compliance. We have a copyright officer who attends and presents at new faculty orientation sessions and who holds regular information sessions for instructors, staff, and students on copyright. In 2017, that copyright officer gave over 22 presentations and workshops to our community.

Our learning management system includes reminders about where to seek advice about copyright issues and about the appropriate use of materials.

We provide copyright compliance assistance services. We have a copyright office that employs four full-time employees, and they processed over 7,800 requests in the winter term of 2017. The same office negotiates transactional licences and clearances on behalf of our instructors and professors.

In 2012, we became one of the first post-secondary institutions in Canada to adopt a policy on acceptable use of materials protected by copyright, which applies to the campus community. This policy includes sanctions for non-compliance.

We have a copyright committee that meets quarterly and that includes students, administration, and staff, and we have developed a rigorous, we think, and comprehensive approach to managing copyright.

In conclusion, we urge the committee to take a balanced, measured, and fair approach to copyright, one that respects the rights of both creators and users.

Again, we appreciate the opportunity to appear before you and look forward to questions.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you very much for all of your presentations today.

We're going to move right into questions starting with Mr. Sheehan.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, presenters, for the very informative information you have provided.

I was a school board trustee many years ago, and I come from a family of teachers. In fact, my father used to be president of OSSTF. I'm mentioning that because he's in Ottawa today too.

I'm going to start out asking you a question I've been asking various people across the country and here. It's about copyright as it relates to Canada's indigenous people. Canada's indigenous people feel the copyright laws as they exist do not serve their traditional culture and their methods of communicating that.

We've heard from various people, whether on the oral tradition or otherwise, about how we engage. Obviously, in your schools you have indigenous children, indigenous teachers, indigenous trustees, indigenous professors, and whatnot.

Could you provide to this committee your thoughts on how we could improve copyright as it relates to Canada's indigenous population?

Anyone can start. It's for all three of you.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

I will give it a start. Knowing that the indigenous population traditionally passes on knowledge through oral communication makes it difficult to put any kind of copyright on these types of learning environments.

When we're looking at a school per se that is addressing the needs of indigenous children through printed stories and materials, those are made available in classrooms, and students would traditionally be able to borrow such items through libraries or from teacher resources.

When we're talking about building the culture, it goes far beyond just whether or not it's a piece of printed material, because the experience I've had is that in schools right now it goes far beyond taking a piece of paper and putting it in the hands of the students. It's more of a lived cultural experience that has a lot more to it.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

My experience in this matter is limited, but with respect to the purchasing of materials, there are some issues we're thinking about. If we're talking about printed materials, I think we could look at some arrangements where materials are printed or published with different parameters around them, such as between the publisher and the creator. That's something about which the publishing industry would be better informed than I, but I do know that when a creator gets their works published, their compensation depends greatly on what their contract is with their publisher. That is one thought I have.

With respect to materials that are not printed published but are oral or other things, I know that a number of school boards across Canada participate in a program that brings indigenous creators into their school to talk to all students about indigenous art. They participate in art-creating days and indigenous storytelling. By doing that, and by promoting artists in the school who come from indigenous backgrounds, we're making our students more aware of the stories and the art and the culture than they currently would be. There are often benefits to that for the community.

(1555)

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I would say that the current Copyright Act does not afford indigenous people protection for their copyright material. Part of it is the way in which those materials are produced.

We have just spent a significant amount of time putting together an indigenous strategy. I'll give one example. During that strategy, it was apparent that a written document would not tell the story we were trying to create. We wanted to use indigenous symbols to tell the story. Of course, one of the issues is whether or not you are absconding with cultural property if you use those symbols. We spent considerable time with the community. One of our Kainai elders gifted us a series of symbols that we could use, and helped put those symbols together so that an indigenous community could pick up our document and essentially read it in their language without having to read the written word.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

You asked permission.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

We did ask permission. I think any Copyright Act moving forward should include this type of piece within it.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair: A minute and a half.

Mr. Terry Sheehan: Okay.

When it comes to mandatory tariffs, you're going to have to expand on this one, although I don't think with a minute and a half we'll be able to get there. This is with regard to the decision in Access Copyright v. York University and the undoubted appeal that's coming. Do you feel that the dispute between departments of education across Canada and the school boards in Ontario is in particular on whether the tariffs put in place by the Copyright Board are mandatory? Do you believe that tariffs should be mandatory, yes or no, and why?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I'd be happy to start on that, if you'd like.

I don't think tariffs should be mandatory. To speak from a university perspective, I think there are options for tariffs and for ways to clear copyright. Right now Access Copyright is but one collective. There are a variety of different ways that you can gain licences.

We had some issues with Access Copyright in terms of transactional licences, for example. We're not able to obtain them. It was an all-or-none approach to licensing, so we found that we were paying for licences twice. Furthermore, we also found that their repertoire was not transparent. It was difficult to know exactly what we had paid for.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'm sure we can get back to that one.[Translation]

Mr. Bernier, you have seven minutes.

Hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Hello and thank you for being with us today.

My question is for several of you.

Representatives of various organizations have told us about the fees charged for the right to use authors' copies and about the fair dealing exception. I have some questions for you in this regard.

Access Copyright and Copibec asked our committee not to give too much weight to the data showing that spending on acquisitions and licences and on reproduction rights can be excessive. According to Access Copyright and Copibec, in our digital era, we have to make a distinction between acquiring an educational work and reproducing it.

Do you make the same distinction between acquiring a work and reproducing a work? The costs that people incur are primarily for the right to acquire licences and not to reproduce excerpts of works. What is your position on the distinction between acquiring licences and reproducing works?

(1600)

[English]

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

I will open by suggesting that Access Copyright isn't in today's classrooms. Today's classrooms are complex. To simply say that a blanket licence for acquiring material is one way to build a resource to work with the complex needs of students in a classroom is unfounded.

In terms of the separation between acquiring information and then being able to disseminate it, there is a very clear distinction on it. I do know that blanket licensing, when you look at the public system across the country, K to 12, is in various forms. To have a single way that this is how we should be accessing information, and we either have a licence or we don't would be doing a disservice to areas that don't necessarily have the same type of access.

We have all sorts of remote areas in the country. Getting access to material is part of it, but then building and using that material to meet the complex needs of a variety of children in a classroom becomes of greater significance to the teachers who are working with children.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

With regard to your position on fair dealing, you said in your testimony that you don't think we need to change that. The interpretation from the court is okay in terms of the criteria to use the material, and it's a fair deal for the authors of these productions.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Well, in the interpretation as it stands, that's been working. CTF has gone to great lengths to educate teachers across the country. We use our material—such as this—for our members; in fact, in my own school this is hanging right above the copy machine.

We have materials going out in publications. I brought two of them today from across the country. Articles appear on the use of materials and the gathering of materials and on how to deconstruct a purchased piece of material for use within a classroom that does not go outside the copyright laws. The interpretation as it stands right now is something that we're in favour of.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

You don't think there's a need for us, as legislators, to change the definition of the use of fair dealing.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

At this point, no.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Okay.

Cynthia.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I would agree. We don't believe there is a need to change the application of fair dealing as it currently exists in the Copyright Act or the interpretation that was put forward by the Supreme Court of Canada in its ruling.

With respect to the issue of acquiring materials, I think it's important to note that school boards are very much aware when they acquire materials, particularly digital materials, as to whether or not those materials include rights to reproduce. One thing that has been debated at meetings quite extensively is that when you're looking at costs of materials, if you think those costs are high, then look at whether or not they include reproduction rights. If they do, there is a very good reason why that cost might be higher than another resource that does not include reproduction rights, even though the content of the two resources may be similar.

Boards are very much aware of those two issues and the distinction between them, and they make choices about what materials they'll be choosing accordingly.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Ms. Marshall, can you tell us what the University of Calgary is paying in copyright costs?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

The copyright costs for the university have varied. When we started in 2011, before the proposed tariff, we were paying $2.38 a student with 10¢ a copy. It varied between $10 and $15, I think, when all was said and done at the end of a year, per FTE student. We have about 30,000 FTE students on our campus, so that gives you an idea.

We opted out in part because to go from $10 to $15 to $26 or $45 per FTE seemed like a very large jump. We have to manage a number of competing stories all the time at institutions. We are publicly funded. We look very carefully at the use of taxpayer dollars. Our institution has not passed on the costs of copyright to students, believing that this is part of what we do as an institution.

For us, in terms of the issues in copyright and fair dealing, we did not opt out until the Supreme Court of Canada's decision on fair dealing. We thought this was an absolutely critical part for Canadian society. It's very important for universities to be able to share information and to build on information. The idea that you can use part of the information available to take and build on it, to create different research, is a very important part of what we do at the university in both research and teaching.

I would strongly support the fair dealing concepts as they currently exist.

(1605)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Cannings.

Welcome to our committee. You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As you can gather, I'm not usually on this committee, so I haven't heard the testimony leading up to this. I do have a bit of a background from both sides. I worked at UBC for many years, and I have written a dozen or so books. I get my Access Copyright cheque every year. It's not a lot, but it's a nice surprise. It has been getting a lot smaller lately. I see that. I also have quite a number of authors living in my riding who have talked to me about this issue. A lot of them write fairly regional books on history and natural history that are used in schools. These people don't make a lot of money from their writing, so that Access Copyright cheque was actually a good chunk of their annual income. For me, it didn't really matter that much. I see the fairness issues on both sides.

Ms. Andrew, you mentioned that Access Copyright hadn't been able to show undue economic hardship on authors. I think that's what you were trying to say. I'm wondering what the economic hardship is on schools, colleges, and universities. We have statements here in the notes. For instance, Winnipeg School Division spends $34,000 a year on copyright materials, $1 per student. Ms. Marshall was talking about something a little bit higher.

I'm just wondering what you think would be fair and not causing hardship to school boards.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I'm going to backtrack just a bit and clarify my comments about Access Copyright. What I was saying is that they haven't been able to convince with evidence in courts that it is the case. There's a lot of anecdotal evidence that they've come forward with, and stories that they've told, and I know from my own experience that what you said about Access Copyright cheques going down is happening. What I'm trying to say is that they haven't been able to demonstrate in a court of law that the evidence exists—to date.

What I would also like to say is that with respect to how school boards quantify what they spend on—quote, unquote—copyright, those costs go beyond what they would spend on a tariff, because reproduction rights are built into many of the resources they are currently purchasing, which is similar to what you were saying about paying for something twice. With respect to what a school board views as fair, we view the fair dealing guidelines as the most fair way to apply copyright to educational use of works.

With respect to authors who have regional interests in their works, I know that in Manitoba and the Atlantic provinces there are arrangements that the provincial departments of education—I'm sure this may happen in other provinces, but these are two that I'm aware of—have made with local authors to license their material separately and to provide some sort of subsidy or grant so that those materials can be used in the schools outside of their relationship with Access Copyright. This is something that a lot of provincial governments are looking at, particularly where resources have a specific interest for a local region.

(1610)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'll move to you, Mr. Ramsankar, and ask about the movement from print to digital and online resources that you were talking about. Perhaps all of you mentioned that.

Could you expand on that? What's the proportion of online versus print material used in classrooms, if you know, and how might this affect authors or producers of that material? How is that factored into your purchases? Are teachers going online and looking for free material specifically because it's free?

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

I don't have at my fingertips the exact figure for the percentage of online versus print material in terms of the uses in classrooms, but I would suggest that teachers are subject to their own personal purchasing power—that of the school. For example, teachers don't purchase textbooks on an individual basis. They would be purchasing individual materials to use for either developing a curriculum or building a unit for their students. Depending on the complexity of the classroom, they may require different types of access to material. The concern that teachers are looking at right now is what they are subject to in terms of the use of material that is purchased and that they've already brought into their classroom to augment the curriculum development.

What we're talking about right now through fair dealing is that it allows excerpts to be used by teachers. On the notion, for example, that whole textbooks are being printed, I can say for a fact that in terms of the budgets in a school or a teacher's individual purchasing power to be able to photocopy, that's unheard of. In fact, many teachers across the country are subject to specific accounts that limit the amount of photocopying they're allowed to do. Necessarily, when you're talking about your own developed material and the materials you would be using in your classroom, going out and printing something that has copyright applied to it is wasteful, and it's not used in that sense.

As digital material is brought into the classroom, it's cited so that students are aware of it when they are using it in their own research. Teachers do talk to students about the development of copyright citing and about giving credit for material and thoughts that are not their own. That's generally the use in K-to-12 classrooms.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Ms. Ng.

You have seven minutes.

Ms. Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

Thank you so much.

Thank you, everyone, for coming in to speak to us on this important study.

I'm going to start with the Teachers' Federation and pick up on what Mr. Cannings was talking about.

I think you already touched on this, but I'd like you to talk to us about a set of policies that exists for teachers regarding compliance with fair dealing. We certainly have heard from publishers and authors about an excess use by teachers. I know you have a booklet, and I think the booklet is out there for all of your teachers. Just expand on that a little bit, and maybe the School Boards Association could talk to us about that, as well, to help clarify our understanding of the policy and the rules that teachers actually work within to comply with fair dealing.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

We went to work right after the Supreme Court ruling, and that was the production here, with our education partners. There were, during that time, professional development opportunities in the different provinces, put on by our member organizations, to speak directly to copyright. The article that I cited just recently is from March-April, 2018. There's still an article talking about fair dealing and copyright. It's alive and well with our professionals as they're coming in and. As our population or the demographics in teaching turn over, we are continually vigilant to make sure that teachers understand that what they're doing in using copyrighted material falls within the latest definition of compliance.

In answer to the question of how we continue to do it, the rules are laid out. Most of the evidence I've heard about teachers going outside of compliance rules is anecdotal, and I would consider those cases very much one-offs. I don't say that tongue in cheek. Individuals who take opportunities to go outside of use are usually cited. Either the principal or the board itself will make note of that. The teachers are made aware of it, and material is either withdrawn or taken back. But these are very much one-offs, and I can't emphasize that enough. This is not a mass happening across the country.

(1615)

Ms. Mary Ng:

To the School Boards Association, what kinds of policies or rules are in place to help guide compliance in the schools?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I'm going to split your question in two.

There's the education aspect, what we do to educate our staff, and Mark has spoken very eloquently about it. It happens at multiple levels. We all use consistent materials. You'll see that we have the same book. We use the same fair dealing guidelines. There are posters produced by provincial governments through their involvement in the CMEC Copyright Consortium, which go out to every school. Every year in September, this material is redistributed through the provincial associations or provincial departments down to the boards and through the boards to the schools. This happens on an annual basis. All the materials are shared on a regular basis, and then they're also shared through other means, such as their unions or education articles and things like that. There are lots of opportunities for this information to get shared with school board staff, not just teaching staff but all staff.

On the side of compliance, it is a school board's responsibility to ensure that its staff are following all of their policies. School boards have a number of policies. Any non-compliance with copyright that is identified would be dealt with through the process a school board follows depending on which province it's in. It's going to vary from province to province, and may even vary board to board, in terms of which process it follows to communicate with the teacher about what they've done wrong. Frequently, when things are brought to a board's attention about non-compliance, it's more a matter of, “I just didn't know that” than it is a matter of, “I didn't care.” It's a matter of ensuring that the person is educated about what they're supposed to do, and then, very rarely...in fact, I've yet to be made aware of a situation in which there has been a recurrence of non-compliance. From that perspective, I think that school boards are doing their due diligence as employers to ensure that their employees are following all of their policies and that laws are outlined in that.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Thank you both. We certainly heard from everyone, I think, that they want to ensure that the works of creators are respected and that compensation for them is fair and so forth, while at the same time, as I said earlier, we heard from publishers and authors who clearly indicated an impact.

Just for our understanding, can you talk to us, from a school board perspective, about spending? Did you at one time, like the universities and other post-secondary institutions, pay the tariff and now, just because teaching methods have changed and materials are available in many different formats, rather than going through the tariff method of paying for the material, have you gone through the transition to paying for transactional licences?

Has your spending changed? What was it before and what is it now?

(1620)

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I would suggest that our spending hasn't changed. The tariff amount that we pay—

Ms. Mary Ng:

Do you have data on that at all? Do the school boards—

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

We don't nationally. Education is a provincial jurisdiction, so it's very difficult to get national information on how spending occurs. It's actually difficult to get it even at a provincial level because not all provinces have the same budgeting structure. What might count as learning resources in one province doesn't count as learning resources in another, and that sort of thing.

Ms. Mary Ng:

I think I'm almost out of time. Could you try to get at that?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

All right.

Now I've completely lost track of my mind.

With respect to spending, I would suggest it hasn't changed, but what's changed is what we're buying. We're buying more of the digital-based resources and a greater variety of materials.

What was the other half of the question?

Ms. Mary Ng:

That's it. I think I'm out of time.

The Chair:

That's good. That's all you have time for.

Mr. Lloyd, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate everyone coming and the testimony today.

Ms. Andrew, kind of related to the previous question, what are the current costs overall for copyright for your stakeholders, and can you break that down on a per student cost on average across Canada?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I can't and I wish I could, because I would love to be able to answer that question. I think that it would serve me well to be able to answer that question.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

In the evidence we have been provided, the Winnipeg School Division told us they pay about $1 per student. So for 34,000 students, they said the cost is about $34,000. The information that was provided to us by Access Copyright says that the tariff has been set at $2.41 per student per K-12 student. However, the majority of schools outside of Quebec are no longer paying any tariffs, and so the cost would be zero dollars for collective licences.

Would you say that's correct?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

For collective licences it is. For licensing, I would suggest it is not. I think we do pay for licensing, and I do think we pay for reproduction rights.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Who is being paid for that?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

In some cases, it's a distributor of an online database. It is the creator of a repository. Provincial governments, when they do material portals, will often pre-clear all of the materials that go on those portals and, where payment is required, will make that payment. This happens at board levels, at provincial levels.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Prior to 2012 you were paying a collective licence, and after 2012 you're no longer paying a collective licence, so would you say there's any correlation with the loss of revenue for Access Copyright?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I think the loss of revenue for Access Copyright can be attributed to many different types of changes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

If you're not paying them, that's lost revenue for them. Is that correct? It seems kind of obvious.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I think if we were paying them, they would have that revenue, yes. Who wouldn't have it would be the same creators only in a different area. They wouldn't be getting it through these other areas.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

It seems there's a direct correlation between the K-12s not paying the collective licensing and then the authors not receiving the royalties for their costs. Authors are hurting because K-12s aren't paying for the copyright. Is that correct?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I would suggest that most of the purchasing that happened in K-12 sections was through educational publishers, and very little of it went to individual authors, but, yes, there would be some impact.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

My next line of questioning is for Mr. Ramsankar.

Thank you for your testimony. Would you say that previous to 2012, teachers had a hard time accessing copyrighted works to give to their students? Has there been a significant change since 2012 for the on-the-ground teacher?

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

For the on-the-ground teacher, when you're speaking about access to copyrighted material, it has to be defined. If you're talking about textbooks and textbook material, that's provided by the employer. The individual teacher who is using resources in the classroom would be using material that would be in the form of articles, individual novels, and that sort of thing, which a school may produce.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Were they having trouble before 2012 accessing those resources you just mentioned?

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

I want to be careful in how I say this, because for the bulk of my career, I've been focusing on resourcing schools and classrooms. That takes many different forms. It takes the form of time and material as well as the ability to produce materials on their own for classrooms.

(1625)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Was there a big difficulty in accessing files before 2012?

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Teachers did not have issues accessing materials that were provided by the employer.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

My final 45 seconds is for Ms. Marshall.

I really appreciate your testimony. I'm going to rant a little bit here, because a lot of universities have not been able to provide us with the data. You said you used 3,200 works, with 250 that have been used through fair dealing. I really appreciate receiving that breakdown, because that's the kind of accountability that I think a lot of the stakeholders want to see from the universities so that we can dispel the confusion around this issue.

Your fear of having to pay $26 going years back is such a huge fear. Would you say it would be better for the Copyright Board to be more forward-looking and to set rates over the next five years so that you can have predictability and stability in your funding and in what you need to pay?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Yes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

You would say yes, that's something you'd like to do.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Yes. I think there's a fear across the country in post-secondary institutions about any retroactivity, particularly when we think we've been managing copyright in an appropriate fashion.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Jowhari.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all the witnesses.

Mr. Ramsankar, I'm going to start with you. In your opening remarks, you made a comment, and I'm not going to quote you, but my understanding of it is that the need in the classroom has changed and Access Copyright is not in the classroom and they don't understand the change in that need and the complexity of today's need to be able to help the children in the class from K to 12. Can you expand on that and explain to me why Access Copyright doesn't understand that? What has changed? Until last year, I had a K-to-12 student, and he was still using textbooks.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

The variety of material that is used, in a teacher's view, needs to be accessible. However, the use and dissemination of that will change depending on the nature of the students in the classroom.

When I talk about the change in the classroom, I'm talking about the demographics within the classroom and children who have needs that go beyond the norm. Teachers need to have the flexibility to be able to alter and work with the material to meet the individual needs of a child.

For example, if you have a student in grade 3 who is reading at a grade 3 level, there are certain approaches and strategies teachers will be able to use. If the same classroom has students who are reading at a grade 1 level, then the same material, because it's part of the curriculum, has to be disseminated differently. It has to be broken down. It has to be created in such a way that the child at that level will be able to understand the concepts being taught.

When I talk about understanding what it's like to be in the classroom, I am suggesting that the idea of just doing blanket material and having blanket licences that are the same for all, because you're purchasing the material, doesn't necessarily work in all scenarios, because you're not able to take one type of material and then just apply it to today's classroom.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you.

Ms. Andrew, you said that Access Copyright is using anecdotal numbers, and they really haven't been able to clearly demonstrate in a court of law that there is actually infringement in reproduction. They were here on Tuesday and shared some numbers with us. The claim they made is that 600 million pages are copied for free. They said they've had an 89% reduction in their royalties. Can you expand on where you think those numbers might be coming from?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I think I would like to know as much as you would where that figure of 600 million copies comes from, quite frankly. I'm not sure where it came from. I'm not sure if it's K to 12 only or if it includes post-secondary copies as well. If there are 600 million copies per year, and if there are five million students, that's 120 copies per student per year.

That makes how much per month? In 10 months, that makes six copies per student per month. I'm getting that wrong. My math is not my strong suit. Anyway, it makes for a low enough number that to me this does not demonstrate industrial copying, if you will, or widespread copying. It means that teachers are copying short excerpts, like the Supreme Court said they were.

(1630)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Before that they were not...? Access Copyright said its aggregate revenue went down after 2013, from $40 million to somewhat below $10 million in 2017. Is that attributed to the complexity? Might one thing be the complexity in the way we are providing material?

Ms. Marshall, you're trying to jump in. Any of you can answer that question.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I'd love to answer that question. There is no question that Access Copyright revenue would have gone down, because a number of groups opted out of the collective. They were no longer paying their fees, so of course their revenue was going to go down.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Is that fair?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Well, here's the choice you have as an administrator of a university: you can choose to belong to that collective and recognize that on multiple occasions you pay twice, or you can choose to manage it your own way and clear copyright in a different way. It's not that we are not clearing copyright. We're just deciding to do it in a different way. We're deciding to purchase licences in a different way.

There's no question there's a tie to a decision where people decided to opt out of a collective. With the number of universities that opted out of its licences, I'm surprised, to be honest, that Access Copyright has been able to survive as long as they have.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

I'm over my time by 45 seconds. I thank the chair for his indulgence.

The Chair:

That's okay. We enjoyed the answer.

We're going to move to you, Mr. Jeneroux. You have five minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

That's perfect. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to all of you for being here. Ms. Marshall and Mr. Ramsankar, you are both from Alberta. I appreciate seeing you both again.

Not to leave you out, Ms. Andrew, coming as you do from the big city of Toronto—

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I actually live in Brantford.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you? You've cleared the record.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

I'm living in Ottawa.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You're living in Ottawa? My goodness.

I want to quickly ask you this, Ms. Marshall. Do you have any relationship at all with Access Copyright now?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

No.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Not even through a distributor of any sort?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

We opted out of their licences. We have gone back on occasion to ask for a transactional licence for something that is in their repertoire. They have used an all-or-none approach: if you're not in the licence, in the collective, you're not allowed to do a transactional licence.

Interestingly, that has resulted in our going to different copyright collectives, such as the American Creative Commons, to purchase transactional licences.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

When was the last time you contacted Access Copyright?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

It would have been probably in 2013-14. Once we opted out in December 2012, we went back on occasion. As we opted out, we were surprised by what we found out, which was how many licences we had paid for twice because we weren't sure that the licence was included in the repertoire we had purchased.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

That's interesting.

Mr. Ramsankar, I want to question you a bit. We heard from Ms. Marshall about the potential for retroactive payments that could happen if the York decision maintains this where it is right now. It was against the fair-dealing guidelines and is now under appeal, as we know, but there is the potential that it will stay the same.

Your website directs visitors who have questions about copyright to the fair-dealing guidelines that were produced by one of our previous witnesses, the Council of Ministers of Education for Canada. I think you brought the booklet with you. I take from this that your CTF is obviously endorsing the guidelines, even though they were essentially thrown out in the York decision. Again, that's under appeal. If that decision remains the same, does the CTF have any plans or considerations in place to continue to pay for that copyrighted material?

(1635)

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

At this point the York decision is in the courts and it's viewed as an outlier, so to make speculation or to try to suggest decisions that we would be going with at this point, I think, would be premature. On that basis, it is too soon to be able to say that we would go in one direction or the other.

York was an outlier and right now the courts are dealing with it.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay.

We've had it addressed by Ms. Marshall and Mr. Ramsankar.

I'll give you the opportunity, if you wish, Ms. Andrew, to comment on any plans if the York decision is maintained. Are there any plans in place for your organization to make retroactive payments?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I'm going to repeat the sentiment that Mark has put forward. At this point we do not have any plan in place. All of those decisions will be made once a final decision on the court case has been determined. Again, we do believe it's an outlier, and that previous court cases found in favour of users, so we're hopeful.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay.

The Chair:

You're very effective with your time. Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'll start with Ms. Marshall.

You mentioned today that 90% of your spending in 2017-18 was on digital material. Can you compare that to five years ago or 10 years ago? Obviously 20 years ago there wasn't very much. Can you give us a sense of that timeline?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

This is a really important question, because there have been many stories that tie the loss of revenue to authors to fair dealing. In fact, I would tie that loss of revenue to the digital revolution.

We actually have a digital library. We do not have books in our library or very many books in our library.

Our digital library opened in 2011, and I think at that time we were probably close to 30% digital and we're now up to 90% in terms of costs in a year.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The change has been very rapid.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do all of you see a significant difference in behaviour between educators of different generations—I'll put it that way—with regard to who uses digital and who uses traditional paper materials? As a new generation of educators is coming up, are they not looking at paper?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I'll give a quick answer.

At the universities right now, we are dealing with students who are digital natives, so you ignore digital content at your own risk when you're a professor.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

You mentioned earlier that there are sanctions for non-compliance in your processes.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How do those work? What are the sanctions?

I'll give you the opportunity to look in detail at the example you mentioned in your opening. It's a good chance to do that.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I have our policy here. I'll read the sanctions for people who are out of step with our policy: Employees and post-doctoral fellows who use material protected by copyright in violation of this policy may be subject to formal disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Has that happened?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

It's very, very serious. It has not happened, but we certainly have had sanctions before.

For the students: Students who use material protected by copyright in violation of this policy may be disciplined under the Non-Academic Misconduct Policy—

—which allows for expulsion from the university.

As I said at the beginning, we take this very seriously. We take an educative approach in the first instance. For the first offence we say, “Here are the things you must be aware of.” When we find something that has happened, we go back to ensure that authors are appropriately provided with the dollars that they should have been in the first place.

I am happy to give you an example of fair dealing, or of e-books versus the print copy costs, if you'd like.

Which one would you like?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Why stop at one?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Okay.

Let's go e-book versus print costs. Because we're a digital library, e-books are purchased whenever possible and when available. We look at the cost of a multi-user e-book. It's often less than a transactional licensing fee and it doesn't limit access to students enrolled in only one course.

For example, licensing of two chapters of the book, Oil: A Beginner's Guide, 2008—this is an important book in Alberta right now—by Vaclav Smil, for a class of 410 students would cost the library $2,463 in U.S. currency. In contrast, the cost of an unlimited licence for three e-book versions would be $29.90 through Ebook Central, and the book would be available to all library users.

That's, in many cases, why we've gone digital.

I would say, similarly, the cost of licensing two chapters from the book, Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada, by Lynda Jessup, et al, for a class of 60 students would be $414 Canadian, while the cost of an unlimited licence on Ebook Central would be $150 U.S.

There is a tremendous difference in these costs. We use those, and we also are dealing with the needs of our students, who want the material digitally. They prefer to do that. Our professors are very conscious of ensuring that students are getting materials in such a way that they're going to use them.

(1640)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

To all of you, the Copyright Modernization Act five years ago was famous for bringing in TPM exemptions to copyright. I'm wondering how that affects you, if at all. Those are the technological protection measures. If you have a digital lock, fair dealing no longer applies.

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

In terms of the teachers we're looking at, we don't have the ability to unlock. You're using one piece of material at one time. It's not like you can unlock it and then go through it. That's the experience I've had with the teachers in our systems.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there a lot of material they're just not accessing as a result of that?

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

That is the result. Teachers don't have the time, by and large, to start trying to unlock things and figure out how to use one specific material. If it's not accessible, they're moving on.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I think this is a really important area for this committee to pay attention to.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's why I brought it up.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Let me give you an example. We purchased not long ago a variety of CDs. This is how rapidly the technology changes. Now, of course, people want to stream the material live in their classrooms. If we want to do that, we have to pay for a new licence for exactly the same material. It's interesting; while the digital revolution has been absolutely spectacular in terms of teaching and research, this is a new age, and I think the copyright laws have to be updated to help us manage.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm out of time, but if I have a chance later, I'd like to come back to that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Cannings, you have two minutes.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Ms. Marshall, you mentioned other collectives that you're part of. Is there a place for a national collective like Access Copyright? If there is, how should it be designed?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

That's a fantastic question. One of the values I think we hold near and dear as a country is choice. It seems odd to me that we would force institutions like ours to make one choice around something that is really important from an educational perspective. We have to balance the rights of creators and users.

I'll leave it at that. I would hate to be forced into something when you know there are alternatives that might be better for particular institutions. I don't think it's fair to say one size fits all.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Is there no way that a new Access Copyright could be designed so that there was that flexibility?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

It's possible, but I think you'd have to look at that very carefully. There would probably be sliding scales of cost, depending on what people would want to do. I think Access Copyright took some very draconian steps to try to protect users, and the associated decreased author fees, with a number of things that actually were fallacious. I would say that decreased author fees are more associated with the digital revolution than with fair dealing, for example.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Do either of you want to comment quickly on that?

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

I'll just echo Ms. Marshall's comments. The onset of the use of digital material has had a dramatic effect on the use of print material, in that sense. To try to draw a direct correlation between print material and the non-use of Access Copyright as opposed to the impact that the digital age has had isn't doing a service to the people who are using the materials, at this point.

(1645)

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I would like to add to that the fact that we cannot purchase transactional licensing from Access Copyright. I get numerous requests from school boards who want to copy more than what the fair dealing guidelines allow and want to know how to do it. My answer has to be that you approach the author, publisher, or copyright owner directly. If they say no, then you do not copy. Your choice is to get permission, and payment where it's required, and if you cannot get permission and payment where it's required, you do not use that material. You find other material.

Nine times out of 10, people have to find other material because they cannot acquire a transactional licence.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Bratina, you have five minutes.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thanks.

I'm going to try this out like Mr. Sheehan did. I married a teacher. Her brother was a teacher, and he married a teacher. Their two kids are teachers, and one married a teacher and one married an EA. I ran for federal politics so that for six months of the year I don't have to listen to teachers' conversations.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Bob Bratina: Also, my son has his M.A. in library science and he's now a Mountie in northern B.C., so I think we're....

The reason I mention this is that at all of those dinner-table conversations, I never heard this come up. The only thing I ever heard, really, was whether on a snow day you could play the movie Oliver! for the kids who showed up.

How pervasive.... Mr. Ramsankar, you held up the material that you have hanging.... You both have it. Is that how it's circulated among the teachers?

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

We work with our member organizations to see that the material is available. It is in schools. As I say, this material is hanging in the photocopy room, but we go beyond just the material that's contained here with the rules.

I cited an example. As I said, this is from March-April 2018, out of Newfoundland. The articles in here talk about the copyright issue, the use, and whether or not teachers are complying. To be honest with you, you're talking about your dinner conversations around the table that are about education, but teachers that I sit with don't sit around the dinner-table talking about copyright. What they talk about is how they are strategizing to work with student X or what happened in the classroom. Copyright comes up when you have parameters set around you to access material or to help children access material; that's when copyright comes up. The title of our booklet is right there, Copyright Matters! There is respect when you're talking about developing materials to use in your classrooms.

In fact, I will take it a step further. As I've said, I speak for K to 12. When we're teaching about ethical research and writing papers, it goes right back to simple things like plagiarism: giving people credit for what they have written and what they do and making sure they are cited correctly. As teachers, we need to model that.

Simply making the statement that a teacher would blanket-copy a hardcover or a piece of paper, disseminate that out on the one hand and then say, “oh, by the way, you have an ethical responsibility”, doesn't fit. That's why I say that most of the anecdotal examples of evidence are one-offs or are about people who have gone outside.

When cited about it, it's not automatic that an employer or a principal will take a punitive measure on an individual. It's a teachable moment. You talk about copyright and how it goes. You make the corrective measure and you move on. That is what we're talking about in terms of the use of materials in classrooms.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

The digital topic is common at almost every conversation now, by the way.

Who monitors compliance, or how is it monitored?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

First, the person who would monitor it would be the principal, because that is the person who is responsible for distributing. Once they get it from the board, it's their responsibility to distribute the material to their staff and to talk about it in a staff meeting. Every principal across Canada is asked to speak at a staff meeting about copyright at the beginning of every school year. That is the first step.

Every board is asked to have a staff member in their administrative office who is familiar with copyright, so that when principals have questions that go outside their original knowledge base, they have someone to turn to. There is someone at the board level.

If the question goes beyond the person at the board level, there's a list that's available.... I don't think it's actually in this book. No, it isn't. There's a website that was created by the people who worked to create these materials. There's a copyright decision tool on the website fairdealingdecisiontool.ca. I encourage all of you to take a look it. That particular website has on it all of these materials for instant download. It also contains a list of provincial contacts. If your question goes outside what you can copy under the guidelines and is more complicated than that, in there is a list of contacts at the provincial level for you to reach out to in order to get the answer to your question.

(1650)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

That's very helpful. Thanks very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to go to Mr. Lloyd.

You have three minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you, Chair.

The next line of questioning is for you again, Ms. Andrew.

My colleague Mr. Jowhari had some incorrect information. It wasn't 600 million pages for the K-12 sector. We actually have evidence from the Copyright Board's decision on February 19, 2016, that there were 380 million pages of published works from Access Copyright's repertoire copied each year, and that this was done by the K-12s from 2010 to 2015. The Copyright Board ruled in 2016 that out of those 380 million pages, 150 million pages were illegally copied by the K-12s.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

The point is that those copies were compensable.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes, they needed to be compensated for them. Have the school boards paid compensation for those in the wake of the decision by the Copyright Board?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

We have not, because Access Copyright does not offer us transactional licensing.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

The Copyright Board has made the decision that you copied 150 million pages without compensating, but you haven't compensated the board, so are you...?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

If you look at the breakdown of what those pages are, those pages come largely from materials that are considered to be consumable documents, documents that were sold for one-time purposes.

What we did in response to that was to send out a prohibition to all of our school boards across Canada, through the ministries of education, through CSBA, and through the unions, that consumables are no longer allowed to be copied. They are illegal and therefore shall not be copied. There is a poster—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

That's very important, and I think they would appreciate that and the authors would appreciate that, but what about the pages that were printed before that time? I know it's going forward, but has it been compensated for going back? Have you complied with the Copyright Board?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

We paid a tariff going back.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

You paid the tariff going back previous to the 2016 decision?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

We paid the tariff for 2010, 2011, and 2012.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

These numbers go from 2012 to 2015 as well, so you're not paying the tariffs for that period?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

That is correct. We are not.

That data, by the way, was found in a survey that was conducted in our schools in 2006, so it's more than 10 years old. I would suggest to you that copying habits from that time to now are substantively different. The Copyright Board itself did say in that very same ruling that the data was outdated and beyond its useful purpose. I would suggest that copying from consumables would look very different if we conducted a survey today.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'm not familiar with consumables. Can you describe them briefly?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

When you go to Costco, there can be something called “Math for Grade 2”. It's colourful and has pictures and you fill in the little blanks. It's intended for you to take home to your child to have them fill it in. Similar kinds of materials are created by publishers for educators. They're intended for one-time use. Those kinds of copies are not—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

They're distinct from a book, for example.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

They're distinct from a book. They're also distinct from a resource that's intended to be copied, which we call a reproducible, in which case a creator will give a teacher's guide that has blank pages in it. It's intended to be copied.

(1655)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I appreciate that explanation. Thank you.

My final question is for Ms. Marshall. We've heard from many different universities and although many of them had joined York in this case, there seems to be a difference in policies at these universities. For example, I believe the University of Guelph continues to pay for a certain level of collective licensing.

Is there a disagreement amongst the universities or is there a monolithic agreement over fair dealing, copyright, and licensing?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I think there's general agreement on fair dealing. I think there are various points of concerns, partly related to the size of the university, with regard to how you manage copyright and whether you can be effective. For example, some universities opted out in 2012 and, when there was a model licence developed, opted back in because they thought there was better protection in doing that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Are there some universities that have chosen to opt back in to the process?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Something I thought was interesting was that it seemed as though Access Copyright was asking for an exorbitant amount, $45 initially, but that was negotiated down to the $26 amount.

Ms. Dru Marshall:

Right.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

That's almost half the amount. That might very well be the best number, but isn't there an opportunity for more back and forth for universities, to get a better number for the universities?

Ms. Dru Marshall:

I would hope there would be, but if, for example, we were paying in the $10 to $15 range, with the $2.38 plus the 10¢-per-page fee, then going up to $26 and then $45 would seem ridiculous to me. When we're doing our costs, if our students are $10 to $15 a student, why would I pay $26? That's the concern for me. Do we have the numbers the right way, and why did we jump to $26?

Part of that, I think, is that Access Copyright, and rightly so, wants to protect creators. But part of the issue that we have not discussed at all here is the publishing industry. When one of our professors, for example, writes a textbook, we don't control the contract with the publishers. The publishers are having record profits while the authors are getting less money. There is something wrong.

In response to an earlier question, we balance being part of a collective, not only for copyright.... I mean, all those opt-out institutions got together and shared information. We talked about how we would clear copyright. We shared best practices on how we did that. That, I would argue, is a collective in and of itself. We also joined together in many ways to purchase product from publishers, to see whether, if we were part of a collective, we could get a better deal. We've had to come out of those as well, because we're finding that the publishers are just ratcheting up. There's a monopoly with five or six companies, and intellectually, when we talk about academic material, that makes it very difficult. This is why you see the rise of open educational resources and open access materials, which also have had an impact in this area.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I appreciate that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

The publishers are actually coming in next week.

For the final three minutes, Mr. Graham, you have the final take of the day.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I hope my three minutes will be about the same as Dane's three minutes.

The Chair:

No, no. They'll be a tight three minutes.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right.

On a couple of occasions, Mr. Ramsankar and Ms. Andrew, you've held up a book. I want to make sure we have it on record. I believe it's called “Copyright Matters!”

Mr. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Yes, it is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that in itself in the Access Copyright repertoire?

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that something we could get a copy of? I think what it says could be quite informative for our study.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

I can leave you my copy. I believe it was distributed by CMEC last week, when they were here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wasn't here last week.

Ms. Cynthia Andrew:

It's also available through a free download from the copyright decision tool.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Excellent. I'll take a look at that. Thank you.

Ms. Marshall, in your earlier comments, you discussed at length the lack of transparency from Access Copyright. Could you go into more detail? You mentioned that you were double paying for the same material. Can you expand on that? How do you even know?

(1700)

Ms. Dru Marshall:

There are two ways in which universities double pay. The first one is that if we purchase a licence in print material and then we want it in digital, we have to pay for it again. Access Copyright doesn't deal very much in digital material, so that creates an issue.

The second way is related to research that universities produce. Research on campuses is typically federally or provincially funded through the public purse, or the vast majority of it is. Universities take that money and researchers do research. Then they are required by tri-councils—we really agree with this policy—to publish their material. We're trying to go more open access. In order for researchers to get promoted or merit on an annual basis, they want to publish in the best journals. They pay to publish. They provide a publishing fee to the publishers, and then the universities in turn pay a licence to read that same material. It's a good racket.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

Thank you very much for coming.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

I thought you said you wanted three minutes—or three and a half. That was two minutes.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I can keep going, if you'd like.

The Chair:

No, we're good.

Mr. Jowhari, do you have something to say?

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Yes. I have just one comment that I want to make.

In response to my colleague Mr. Lloyd, I want to make sure that the record is clear. The number of 600 million pages that I referred to was from a response by Ms. Levy to a question raised by Mr. Masse. Ms. Levy's comment—I took this from the blues—was that when you use all the data, on a conservative end, you will end up with 600 million pages that are copied or not paid for.

The 600 million that I made the comment on was the aggregate. You referred to the 385 million as related to K to 12. My 600 million basically—

Mr. Dane Lloyd: Is about everything.

Mr. Majid Jowhari: —is about everything.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes. I'm not defining that—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

No, that's fine. I just wanted to make that clarification.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'm not saying you're wrong. There are different groups.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're still one big happy family.

On that note, I would like to thank our three panellists for coming today. Every time we think we have it all, you give us more. We look forward to continuing this process.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Quelle journée magnifique.

Est-ce que j'ai entendu un téléphone cellulaire? Est-ce que tous les téléphones cellulaires sont éteints? Merci.

Bienvenue à la 117e réunion du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui M. Mark Ramsankar, président de la Fédération canadienne des enseignantes et des enseignants, Cynthia Andrew, analyste des politiques de l'Association canadienne des commissions/conseils scolaires, et Dru Marshall, doyenne et vice-présidente de l'Université de Calgary, que nous garderons pour la fin.

Nous allons commencer par vous, monsieur Ramsankar. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. H. Mark Ramsankar (président, Fédération canadienne des enseignantes et des enseignants):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je m'appelle Mark Ramsankar. Je suis le président de la Fédération canadienne des enseignantes et des enseignants, mais j'aimerais vous souligner que je suis avant tout un enseignant. Durant ma carrière, j'ai eu l'occasion d'enseigner à des élèves de tous les niveaux et j'ai aussi travaillé comme consultant pour la commission scolaire d'Edmonton. J'ai été professeur d'éducation spécialisée et administrateur, alors mon point de vue englobe l'ensemble du système d'éducation de la maternelle à la 12e année et s'appuie sur mes plus de 25 ans passés en salle de cours.

En tant que représentant national des enseignantes et enseignants canadiens, je représente ici aujourd'hui un quart de million d'enseignantes et d'enseignants de la maternelle à la 12e année dans chaque province et chaque territoire du pays. Nous faisons partie de l'Internationale de l'éducation et avons des liens solides avec cette organisation, qui représente plus de 30 millions d'enseignantes et d'enseignants à l'échelle internationale. Nous sommes membres de longue date d'une coalition d'organisations nationales du secteur de l'éducation et nous défendons les droits du personnel enseignant et des élèves dans le cadre du projet fédéral de réforme du droit d'auteur. Nous travaillons en très étroite collaboration avec nos partenaires de cette coalition pour élaborer du matériel pédagogique sur le droit d'auteur et des sujets connexes à l'intention du personnel enseignant.

Nous croyons très fermement à la protection des intérêts légitimes des créateurs et des éditeurs en nous assurant qu'il n'y a pas de violation du droit d'auteur lorsque les enseignants copient du matériel qu'ils utilisent dans leur salle de cours et qu'ils fournissent à leurs étudiants. Nous croyons aussi que les dispositions actuelles sur l'utilisation équitable permettent de maintenir un très bon équilibre entre les droits des utilisateurs et ceux des créateurs. Selon nous, il s'agit d'une politique publique très solide. Même notre organisation internationale, par l'intermédiaire de l'Internationale de l'éducation, a en très haute estime la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada.

Les enseignants sont des professionnels qui respectent le droit d'auteur, et nous enseignons aussi à nos étudiants à respecter le droit d'auteur lorsqu'ils effectuent des recherches. Les enseignants ne copient pas de documents en cas de doute. Ils ne copient pas des cahiers d'exercices entiers. Tous les membres de notre profession sont indignés lorsque quelqu'un ose affirmer une telle chose, qu'il y a un enseignant qui enfreint carrément les règles sur le droit d'auteur.

Au cours de la dernière décennie, on a remarqué un changement important, et on est passé de matériel et de ressources imprimées, comme des cahiers d'exercices, à, de plus en plus, des ressources numériques. Dans nos salles de cours actuelles, aussi difficiles soient-elles, les enseignants trouvent des façons efficaces d'enseigner la matière grâce à ces technologies en constante évolution. Ils créent leurs propres ressources et leur propre matériel. Ils misent sur des approches collaboratives en matière de création de contenu et mobilisent les étudiants afin que ceux-ci puissent apprendre grâce à des ressources en ligne en plus du matériel imprimé plus traditionnel. En tant que professionnels du système de la maternelle à la 12e année, les enseignants veulent que leurs étudiants aient accès au meilleur contenu pédagogique possible.

Pour parler directement du droit d'auteur, c'est un enjeu important, et c'est un sujet qui a été soulevé auprès des enseignants par la Fédération canadienne des enseignantes et des enseignants. Nous parlons de conformité, et nous participons aux efforts de sensibilisation aux conséquences des violations du droit d'auteur. Nous réalisons aussi un programme de sensibilisation complet dans le cadre de nos efforts pour nous assurer que les enseignants connaissent les dispositions liées au droit d'auteur et les limites de la loi lorsqu'ils préparent leurs cours.

Les enseignants sont des professionnels. Les récits anecdotiques de cahiers d'exercices copiés en entier sont des incidents isolés. Je parle directement pour le système d'éducation de la maternelle à la 12e année, et je parle donc ici de systèmes d'éducation publics. Je ne suis pas ici pour représenter l'éducation étendue ou le système d'éducation privé. Pour la FCE, ce n'est pas une question d'argent. De notre point de vue, l'important, ce sont les étudiants. Il faut leur offrir la meilleure expérience d'apprentissage possible au sein de notre système et les préparer le mieux possible pour ce qui les attend à l'avenir.

Je suis ici aujourd'hui en tant que témoin pour représenter les enseignantes et enseignants canadiens et je prie le Comité permanent de maintenir les dispositions actuelles sur l'utilisation équitable, un juste équilibre entre la protection des créateurs et la protection des utilisateurs.

Je vous demande aussi de bien réfléchir lorsque vous prenez des décisions. Tenez compte du fait qu'un quart de million d'enseignantes et d'enseignants travaillent avec des enfants chaque jour au pays. Les décisions qui seront prises à l'avenir relativement au droit d'auteur auront des répercussions accablantes dans les salles de cours du pays, et chaque étudiant de la maternelle à la 12e année sera touché par les décisions qui sont prises au terme de vos audiences.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Cynthia Andrew, de l'Association canadienne des commissions et conseils scolaires.

Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

Mme Cynthia Andrew (analyste des politiques, Association canadienne des commissions/conseils scolaires):

Merci, monsieur le président, et bonjour à tous.

Je m'appelle Cynthia Andrew. Je comparais cet après-midi au nom de l'Association canadienne des commissions/conseils scolaires, dont les membres sont les associations provinciales des commissions et conseils scolaires, qui représentent tout juste un peu plus de 250 commissions et conseils scolaires à l'échelle du pays desservant un peu moins de quatre millions d'élèves du niveau primaire et du niveau secondaire à l'échelle nationale.

Je suis une employée d'une de ces associations provinciales, l'Ontario Public School Boards' Association. Je suis la principale responsable, pour les conseils scolaires de l'Ontario et l'ACCCS, de tous les enjeux liés au droit d'auteur. Je suis heureuse de comparaître devant vous cet après-midi pour vous parler du droit d'auteur et des conseils scolaires.

La législation sur le droit d'auteur a une incidence sur tous les conseils scolaires canadiens, comme le reflètent les politiques et les pratiques de l'administration des conseils scolaires et dans toutes les salles de cours du pays. Par conséquent, l'ACCCS s'intéresse aux enjeux liés à la réforme du droit d'auteur et y joue un rôle actif depuis les années 1990.

L'ACCCS travaille en étroite collaboration avec les autres organisations nationales dans le domaine de l'éducation sur l'élaboration d'une politique liée au droit d'auteur. C'est pourquoi vous remarquerez que bon nombre de nos documents d'appui sont les mêmes que ceux que d'autres témoins qui ont comparu devant vous sur cette question vous ont déjà présentés comme, par exemple, les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable et le dépliant « Le droit d'auteur ça compte! ».

L'ACCCS reconnaît l'importance de la sensibilisation au droit d'auteur dans le milieu de l'éducation de la maternelle à la 12e année, et nous faisons notre part, de concert avec nos associations affiliées provinciales et nos partenaires du domaine de l'éducation, pour faire comprendre l'importance d'accroître la compréhension et le respect à cet égard dans nos écoles et nos salles de cours. L'ACCCS prodigue des conseils aux commissions scolaires par l'intermédiaire de ses associations provinciales membres.

Les ministères provinciaux de l'Éducation peuvent exercer un pouvoir accru en imposant certaines exigences stratégiques aux conseils scolaires. Vous les avez rencontrés plus tôt, cette semaine, je le sais, par l'intermédiaire du Consortium du droit d'auteur du CMEC. L'ACCCS travaille de façon coopérative avec le Consortium du droit d'auteur du CMEC et d'autres partenaires nationaux du domaine de l'éducation pour s'assurer que des renseignements uniformes au sujet de la conformité avec le droit d'auteur et des droits et des responsabilités connexes sont communiqués de façon uniforme par l'intermédiaire de nos associations de conseils scolaires provinciales avec l'ensemble des conseils scolaires et de leurs employés.

Cette décision de sensibiliser les employés des commissions scolaires de façon uniforme à l'échelle du Canada a été prise vers la fin de 2012 et n'était que partiellement le résultat des modifications apportées à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur adoptées plus tôt, cette année. Fait important, la décision découlait aussi d'un arrêt de 2012 de la Cour suprême dans lequel la Cour avait déterminé qu'il était juste pour les enseignants de copier de courts extraits d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur pour leurs élèves. C'est cette décision de la Cour suprême qui a amené les associations nationales d'éducation à établir les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable.

L'ACCCS soutient les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable. Elle a soutenu leur création et a travaillé en collaboration avec ses associations affiliées provinciales pour s'assurer que les directives des ministères provinciaux respectifs étaient appliquées efficacement. L'Association croit que les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable fournissent aux commissions scolaires et à leurs employés des directives claires en matière de politique sur le droit d'auteur, veillant à ce que les éducateurs connaissent leurs droits et leurs responsabilités en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada. Les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable assurent l'application uniforme de la décision de la Cour suprême à l'échelle du pays. Elles sont en outre harmonisées avec les lois sur le droit d'auteur du monde entier afin que les enseignants et les étudiants soient sur un pied d'égalité avec leurs homologues d'autres pays.

L'ACCCS croit en outre que l'utilisation équitable à des fins d'éducation est une bonne politique publique qui appuie l'apprentissage des étudiants et assure l'utilisation efficace de l'argent des contribuables. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur établit un juste équilibre entre les droits des titulaires de droits d'auteur et ceux des utilisateurs, et la disposition sur l'utilisation équitable de la Loi soutient un droit important pour les éducateurs canadiens. L'utilisation équitable à des fins éducatives permet aux enseignants d'avoir accès à un large éventail de matériel pédagogique diversifié et d'enrichir par le fait même les expériences d'apprentissage des élèves.

(1540)



L'arrêt de la Cour suprême et les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable ont créé une stabilité que l'ACCCS soutient et espère voir se poursuivre. Les enseignants savent maintenant exactement ce qu'ils font lorsqu'ils choisissent le matériel pour planifier leurs leçons et lorsqu'ils tentent d'obtenir du matériel supplémentaire nécessaire pour enseigner à certaines personnes pouvant avoir plus de difficulté à suivre les cours.

L'ACCCS sait que les éditeurs et Access Copyright ont clamé haut et fort que l'utilisation équitable leur a causé des difficultés économiques. Jusqu'à présent, ils n'ont pas été en mesure de présenter suffisamment de preuves pour étayer cette affirmation à part fournir des exemples anecdotiques. L'autre lacune qui ressort des témoignages entendus jusqu'à présent est la mesure dans laquelle le succès ou le déclin des éditeurs et d'Access Copyright reflète ce en quoi consiste une rémunération équitable pour les créateurs. Le rétablissement des tarifs et leur augmentation aideront-ils ces écrivains et ces créateurs?

L'ACCCS est sensible aux défis auxquels est actuellement confrontée l'industrie de l'édition scolaire. L'industrie a du mal à suivre le rythme des avancées technologiques et des nouveaux points de vue sur l'enseignement et l'apprentissage. Les cahiers d'exercices, qui, à une certaine époque, étaient la principale ressource pédagogique à laquelle les éducateurs avaient accès, ne sont maintenant qu'une option parmi toute une série d'options qui s'offrent aux commissions scolaires et aux enseignants lorsqu'ils préparent les cours pour leurs élèves. Les commissions scolaires dépensent les fonds consacrés aux ressources pédagogiques pour acquérir des référentiels de contenu numérique, des bases de données auxquelles il faut s'abonner, des bibliothèques en ligne, des ressources électroniques élaborées à l'échelon provincial ou local, des applications et, bien sûr, Internet. Encore une fois, la réelle valeur de l'utilisation à des fins éducatives des dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable, c'est que les éducateurs ont maintenant une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour adapter leur matériel aux besoins précis de chaque groupe, et même de chaque étudiant précis, de façons qui étaient tout à fait inimaginables il n'y a de cela que quelques années.

Même si l'ACCCS est une organisation qui ne participe pas directement aux poursuites judiciaires ou quasi judiciaires qui ont été intentées relativement à la copie de contenu dans les écoles, certains de nos conseils scolaires membres, ceux de l'Ontario, y participent directement. D'autres commissions scolaires provinciales participent indirectement puisque leur ministère est en cause. Même si l'ACCCS elle-même ne peut pas être directement impliquée dans ces affaires, nous avons certainement intérêt à veiller à ce que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur continue de prévoir un juste équilibre entre les droits des créateurs et ceux des utilisateurs du domaine de l'éducation.

Les dispositions de la Loi sur l'utilisation équitable assurent un équilibre entre les droits et les responsabilités. Les procédures de la Cour suprême et d'autres tribunaux, qui sont en cours en ce moment même, fournissent des définitions et offrent des précisions au sujet de l'utilisation équitable. Il y a une nouvelle norme dans les milieux scolaires de la maternelle à la 12e année, qui concerne l'accès à du matériel didactique enrichi: les éducateurs s'y adaptent — tout comme les éditeurs — et elle est bénéfique pour les enseignants et les élèves. L'ACCCS demande aux députés de ne pas être tentés d'apporter des modifications législatives à ce qui constitue une approche déjà juste et équilibrée en matière de droit d'auteur dans nos écoles.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Et enfin, nous passons à Mme Marshall. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

Mme Dru Marshall (doyenne et vice-présidente, University of Calgary):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Dru Marshall et je suis doyenne et vice-présidente du volet enseignement à l'Université de Calgary. Je suis aussi présidente du comité sur le droit d'auteur de l'université. Je tiens à commencer par remercier les membres du Comité de leur soutien du secteur de l'enseignement postsecondaire. Les investissements faits dans notre campus grâce au Fonds d'investissement stratégique pour les établissements postsecondaires et le précédent Programme d'infrastructure du savoir ont eu une incidence transformationnelle sur les lieux de recherche et d'apprentissage dans notre campus. Nous sommes aussi très reconnaissants des importants investissements fédéraux pour soutenir l'écosystème de recherche canadien.

Je suis heureuse d'être ici aujourd'hui pour formuler des recommandations au Comité et pour parler de l'approche de l'Université de Calgary en matière de droit d'auteur. Premièrement, je tiens à souligner que l'Université de Calgary soutient le maintien de l'exception pour le domaine de l'éducation relative à l'utilisation équitable dans le cadre du régime canadien du droit d'auteur. En tant que créateurs et utilisateurs de documents protégés par le droit d'auteur, les universités ont besoin d'une approche équilibrée en matière de droit d'auteur et en ce qui concerne l'utilisation équitable.

L'utilisation équitable contribue à offrir aux étudiants un environnement éducatif de grande qualité. Une telle mesure contribue aussi à l'innovation en matière d'enseignement en permettant aux formateurs d'utiliser une diversité d'exemples dans le cadre de leur exposé, présentant ainsi aux étudiants les recherches de pointe les plus récentes. La rapidité avec laquelle les manuels scolaires et les livres imprimés traditionnels sont produits et distribués ne permet souvent pas l'inclusion de ces types d'exemples.

À l'Université de Calgary, nous adoptons une approche mesurée en matière d'utilisation équitable en veillant à ce que cette approche serve à compléter l'achat de matériel, pas à le remplacer. Nous n'utilisons pas les dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable lorsqu'il est question des trousses de cours imprimées, parce que, même si l'Université produit des trousses de cours selon le principe du recouvrement des coûts, le contrat d'impression institutionnelle conclu avec un imprimeur tiers comprend un élément commercial. De plus, nous n'appliquons pas les dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable aux compilations d'oeuvres, comme les anthologies littéraires. Nous tentons plutôt de trouver les sources originales de ces travaux et, dans la plupart des cas, nous achetons des permis transactionnels connexes. En fait, l'Université applique les dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable à une très petite proportion du matériel de cours utilisé actuellement en classe. Dans un échantillon de 3 200 articles pédagogiques, comme des chapitres de livres, des articles ou des ressources sur Internet utilisées par les formateurs durant notre semestre d'hiver 2017, l'utilisation équitable n'était appliquée qu'à seulement 250 articles, soit moins de 8 %. Nous avons le plus souvent appliqué l'utilisation équitable au moment d'inclure un tableau, un graphique ou des tables d'un livre ou d'articles de revue scientifiques dans les documents associés à un cours magistral.

Je serais heureuse de décrire au Comité, grâce à un exemple détaillé, de quelle façon l'utilisation équitable est appliquée dans un cours précis durant la période de questions de la réunion d'aujourd'hui.

À l'Université de Calgary, nous nous opposons aussi fortement à l'introduction de toute mesure visant à harmoniser les régimes tarifaires, à imposer des dommages-intérêts d'origine législative ou à introduire des licences obligatoires dans le régime canadien du droit d'auteur. Procéder ainsi éliminerait ou menacerait la capacité d'une université de choisir de quelle façon elle gère les droits d'auteur, l'obligeant à acheter des licences générales, ce qui fera en sorte qu'une université payerait deux fois pour avoir la capacité de reproduire la majeure partie du contenu protégé par le droit d'auteur qu'elle utilise. Une telle mesure serait un changement fondamental en ce qui a trait à la législation sur le droit d'auteur, et il convient de vraiment regarder ce dossier de près pour cerner toutes les conséquences inattendues qui découleraient d'une telle décision, surtout des répercussions financières pour les institutions publiques.

Nous croyons savoir que, durant les récentes consultations gouvernementales sur la réforme de la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada, Access Copyright a proposé des dommages-intérêts d'origine législative s'élevant à de trois à dix fois les redevances, même dans les cas les moins graves de violation, sans que les tribunaux aient un pouvoir discrétionnaire de les modifier. Nous croyons aussi savoir qu'Access Copyright cherche actuellement à obtenir des redevances à raison de 26 $ par ETP étudiant du secteur universitaire dans le cadre d'une procédure d'établissement des taux qui relèverait de la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada. Ce taux n'a pas encore été confirmé par la Commission, mais s'il devait l'être, cela signifierait, hypothétiquement, que les dommages-intérêts d'origine législative pour universités pourraient s'élever à de 78 $ à 260 $ par ETP étudiant. Il s'agirait d'une situation difficile pour toute institution financée par l'État.

Notre opposition à cette mesure est conforme à la décision de l'Université de Calgary de se retirer du tarif provisoire d'Access Copyright en septembre 2012. Cette décision de retrait a été prise après d'importantes consultations de notre milieu universitaire, et elle était fondée sur les importantes répercussions en matière de coûts découlant de l'augmentation du tarif et des limites du répertoire offert par Access Copyright. Le tarif d'Access Copyright ne s'applique qu'à la reproduction de documents imprimés figurant au répertoire, et les renseignements détaillés sur les documents précis inclus n'étaient pas suffisamment transparents.

(1545)



Comme une proportion croissante de documents de bibliothèque sont numériques, l'université se retrouvait de plus en plus à payer deux fois pour la même ressource. Elle devait payer le droit d'Access Copyright pour les copies imprimées et aussi la licence pour les copies numériques que préféraient les membres de la communauté universitaire.

Cette préférence et la rentabilité accrue des ressources numériques font en sorte que les ressources numériques constituent une proportion de plus en plus importante des acquisitions des bibliothèques. Nous misons sur une politique qui donne la préséance au numérique, et environ 90 % des acquisitions de notre bibliothèque en 2017-2018 étaient numériques. Il y en avait pour tout juste un peu plus de 10 millions de dollars, ce qui rend les licences collectives pour documents imprimés moins utiles.

Lorsque nous nous sommes retirés du tarif d'Access Copyright, en 2012, c'est parce que nous reconnaissions pouvoir mettre en oeuvre des politiques institutionnelles sur le droit d'auteur qui seraient à la fois plus rentables et, ce qui est encore plus important, plus adaptées aux besoins de la communauté de l'Université de Calgary.

À l'Université de Calgary, nous prenons la conformité avec la législation sur le droit d'auteur extrêmement au sérieux. Nous sensibilisons notre corps enseignant, nos employés et les étudiants au sujet du droit d'auteur. Par exemple, nous recommandons que toutes les listes de lecture de cours soient présentées au bureau du droit d'auteur pour en garantir la conformité. Nous misons sur un agent responsable du droit d'auteur qui assiste aux séances d'orientation des nouveaux enseignants et y prend la parole et qui organise aussi régulièrement des séances d'information sur le droit d'auteur à l'intention des enseignants, du personnel et des étudiants. En 2017, cet agent a présenté plus de 22 exposés et ateliers à nos membres.

Notre système de gestion de l'apprentissage inclut des rappels sur les cas où il faut obtenir des conseils au sujet des enjeux liés au droit d'auteur et sur l'utilisation appropriée du matériel.

Nous offrons des services d'aide en matière de conformité avec les droits d'auteur. Nous comptons sur un bureau du droit d'auteur qui emploie quatre employés à temps plein et qui a traité plus de 7 800 demandes durant le semestre de l'hiver 2017. Le même bureau négocie les licences ponctuelles et les autorisations au nom de nos instructeurs et professeurs.

En 2012, nous sommes devenus l'un des premiers établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire au Canada à adopter une politique sur l'utilisation acceptable du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur et qui vise l'ensemble de la communauté universitaire. Cette politique prévoit des sanctions en cas de non-conformité.

Nous avons un comité sur le droit d'auteur qui se réunit tous les trimestres et dont les membres incluent des étudiants, des membres de l'administration et des employés. En outre, nous avons mis en place une approche rigoureuse et, selon nous, exhaustive en matière de gestion du droit d'auteur.

En conclusion, nous exhortons le Comité à adopter une approche équilibrée, mesurée et équitable en matière de droit d'auteur, une approche qui respecte les droits des créateurs et des utilisateurs.

Encore une fois, nous vous remercions de nous avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître aujourd'hui et nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci à vous tous d'avoir présenté vos exposés aujourd'hui.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions en commençant par M. Sheehan.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins de nous avoir fourni des renseignements très instructifs.

J'ai été conseiller scolaire il y a de nombreuses années, et je viens d'une famille d'enseignants. En fait, mon père est un ancien président de la FEESO. Je le mentionne, parce qu'il est ici, à Ottawa, aujourd'hui.

Je vais commencer par vous poser une question que j'ai posée à diverses personnes un peu partout au pays et ici, aussi. C'est au sujet du droit d'auteur et des Autochtones du Canada. Les peuples autochtones du Canada estiment que les lois sur le droit d'auteur actuelles ne servent pas leur culture traditionnelle et leurs méthodes de communication.

Nous avons entendu diverses personnes, qu'il soit question de tradition orale ou autre, parler de la façon dont nous interagissons. Évidemment, dans nos écoles, il y a des enfants autochtones, des enseignants autochtones, des commissaires autochtones, des professeurs aussi et ainsi de suite.

Pouvez-vous dire au Comité de quelle façon, selon vous, nous pourrions améliorer le droit d'auteur en ce qui concerne la population autochtone canadienne?

N'importe qui peut commencer. C'est une question qui s'adresse à vous trois.

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Je vais commencer. Sachant que la population autochtone transmet traditionnellement le savoir par la communication orale, il est difficile d'imposer quelque droit d'auteur que ce soit sur ces types d'environnements d'apprentissage.

Lorsque nous parlons des écoles en tant que telles qui répondent aux besoins des enfants autochtones grâce à des récits et du matériel imprimé, de telles choses sont rendues accessibles en salle de cours, et les étudiants pouvaient traditionnellement emprunter de tels articles à la bibliothèque et auprès des enseignants.

Lorsque nous parlons de bâtir la culture, cela va bien au-delà de la simple question de savoir s'il s'agit d'un document imprimé, car, d'après mon expérience, dans les écoles, actuellement, cela va bien au-delà du simple fait de prendre un bout de papier et de le remettre aux élèves. C'est plutôt une expérience culturelle vécue qui est beaucoup plus complète.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

J'ai une expérience personnelle limitée dans ce domaine, mais pour ce qui est de l'achat de matériel, il y a certains enjeux auxquels nous réfléchissons. Si nous parlons de matériel imprimé, je crois que nous pourrions envisager des arrangements selon lesquels les documents seraient imprimés ou publiés conformément à des paramètres différents, par exemple entre l'éditeur et le créateur. C'est un dossier à propos duquel l'industrie de l'édition en saurait plus que moi, mais je sais que, lorsqu'un créateur fait publier ses oeuvres, sa rémunération dépend en grande partie du contrat qu'il a conclu avec son éditeur. C'est la chose qui me vient à l'esprit à ce sujet.

Pour ce qui est du matériel qui n'est pas imprimé ni publié, lorsqu'il s'agit de choses orales ou autres, je sais qu'un certain nombre de commissions scolaires à l'échelle du Canada participent à un programme qui permet d'inviter des créateurs autochtones dans les écoles pour parler à tous les étudiants des arts autochtones. Ces personnes participent à des journées de création artistique et racontent des récits autochtones. De cette façon, et en faisant la promotion d'artistes autochtones dans les écoles, nous sensibilisons davantage nos étudiants à ces histoires et à la culture qu'ils ne le sont actuellement. Il y a souvent des avantages pour la collectivité liés à de telles initiatives.

(1555)

Mme Dru Marshall:

Je dirais que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur actuelle ne couvre pas le matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur des Autochtones. C'est en partie en raison de la façon dont ces choses sont produites.

Nous venons de consacrer beaucoup de temps à l'élaboration d'une stratégie autochtone. Je vais vous donner un exemple. Dans le cadre de l'élaboration de cette stratégie, il est devenu apparent qu'un document écrit ne pouvait pas raconter l'histoire que nous tentons de produire. Nous voulions utiliser des symboles autochtones pour raconter l'histoire. Bien sûr, l'un des problèmes, c'est celui de savoir si on accapare des éléments de propriété culturelle lorsqu'on utilise ces symboles. Nous avons passé beaucoup de temps avec la communauté. L'un de nos aînés Kainai nous a donné en cadeau une série de symboles que nous pouvons utiliser, et nous les avons réunis afin que la communauté autochtone puisse prendre notre document et, essentiellement, le lire dans sa langue sans avoir à lire le texte.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Vous avez demandé la permission?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Nous avons demandé la permission. Je crois que, à l'avenir, toute loi sur le droit d'auteur devrait inclure ce type de disposition.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président: Une minute et demie.

M. Terry Sheehan: D'accord.

Lorsqu'il est question des tarifs obligatoires, vous allez devoir m'en dire plus à ce sujet, même si je ne crois pas qu'une minute et demie sera suffisante pour y arriver. Cela concerne la décision Access Copyright c. Université York et l'appel qui s'en vient sans doute. Croyez-vous que le différend entre les ministères de l'Éducation à l'échelle du Canada et les commissions scolaires en Ontario porte précisément sur la question de savoir si les tarifs imposés par la Commission du droit d'auteur sont obligatoires? Croyez-vous que les tarifs devraient être obligatoires, oui ou non et pourquoi?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Je serai heureuse de commencer par ce sujet, si vous le voulez.

Je ne crois pas que les tarifs devraient être obligatoires. Si je m'exprime du point de vue des universités, je pense qu'il y a des options pour les tarifs et des façons de s'acquitter des droits d'auteur. En ce moment, Access Copyright ne représente qu'un seul collectif. Il y a une gamme de façons différentes qui vous permettent d'obtenir des licences.

Nous avions certains problèmes avec Access Copyright en ce qui concerne les licences transactionnelles, par exemple. Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de les obtenir. C'était une approche du type tout ou rien à l'égard de l'attribution de licences, et nous avons donc découvert que nous payions deux fois pour les licences. De plus, nous avons aussi remarqué que son répertoire n'était pas transparent. C'était difficile de savoir exactement ce pour quoi nous payions.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Le président:

Je suis sûr que nous pouvons revenir à ce sujet.[Français]

Monsieur Bernier, vous disposez de sept minutes.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Bonjour. Je vous remercie d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Ma question peut s'adresser à plusieurs d'entre vous.

Des gens représentant diverses organisations nous ont parlé des frais à verser pour avoir le droit d'utiliser les copies des auteurs et de l'exception d'utilisation équitable. J'aimerais vous poser des questions à ce sujet.

Access Copyright et Copibec ont invité notre comité à ne pas accorder trop de poids à des données indiquant que les dépenses d'acquisition et de licence ainsi que celles liées aux droits de reproduction peuvent être excessives. Selon Access Copyright et Copibec, dans le contexte numérique actuel, on doit faire une distinction entre acquérir une oeuvre pédagogique et la reproduire.

Faites-vous la même distinction entre acquérir une oeuvre et reproduire une oeuvre? Les frais engagés par les gens servent surtout à obtenir le droit d'acquérir des licences et non pas à reproduire des extraits d'oeuvres. Quelle est votre position sur la distinction à faire entre acquérir des licences et reproduire des oeuvres?

(1600)

[Traduction]

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Je vais commencer en disant qu'Access Copyright ne se trouve pas dans les salles de classe d'aujourd'hui. Les salles de classe d'aujourd'hui sont complexes. Il est injustifié de dire simplement qu'une licence générale pour l'acquisition de matériel est une façon de constituer une ressource pour répondre aux besoins complexes d'étudiants dans une classe.

En ce qui a trait à la séparation entre l'acquisition d'information et la capacité de la diffuser, il y a une distinction très claire à faire. Je sais que les licences générales, lorsque vous regardez le système public partout au pays, de la maternelle à la 12e année, se présentent sous diverses formes. L'adoption d'une approche unique quant à la façon d'accéder à l'information et d'avoir ou non une licence serait mal servir des régions qui n'ont pas nécessairement le même type d'accès.

Notre pays compte toutes sortes de régions éloignées. Obtenir l'accès à du matériel fait partie du problème, mais créer et utiliser ce matériel pour répondre aux besoins complexes d'une diversité d'enfants dans une salle de classe revêt une plus grande importance pour les enseignants qui travaillent auprès des enfants.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Par rapport à votre position sur l'utilisation équitable, vous avez dit dans votre témoignage que vous ne croyez pas que nous devons changer cela. L'interprétation de la cour est convenable en ce qui concerne les critères régissant l'utilisation du matériel, et il s'agit d'une utilisation équitable pour les auteurs de ces productions.

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Eh bien, vu l'interprétation à l'heure actuelle, cela fonctionne. La FCE a déployé beaucoup d'efforts pour éduquer les enseignants partout au pays. Nous utilisons notre matériel — comme ceci — pour nos membres; en fait, dans ma propre école, c'est accroché juste au-dessus de la photocopieuse.

Nous avons du matériel qui se retrouve dans des publications. J'ai apporté deux exemples aujourd'hui qui proviennent de partout au pays. Des articles sur l'utilisation et la collecte de matériel ainsi que sur la façon de déconstruire un document acheté afin de l'utiliser dans une salle de classe qui ne s'écarte pas des lois sur le droit d'auteur sont publiés. L'interprétation sous sa forme actuelle est une chose à laquelle nous sommes favorables.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Vous ne croyez pas qu'il est nécessaire pour nous, en tant que législateurs, de changer la définition de l'emploi de l'utilisation équitable?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

En ce moment, non.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

D'accord.

Cynthia.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je suis d'accord. Je ne crois pas qu'il soit nécessaire de changer l'application de l'utilisation équitable telle qu'elle existe actuellement dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ou l'interprétation qui a été mise de l'avant par la Cour suprême du Canada dans sa décision.

En ce qui concerne la question de l'acquisition de matériel, je pense qu'il est important de souligner que les conseils scolaires sont très bien informés lorsqu'ils font l'acquisition de matériel, particulièrement du matériel numérique, quant à savoir si oui ou non ce matériel comprend des droits de reproduction. Une chose dont on a débattu assez longuement dans le cadre de réunions, c'est que lorsque vous examinez les coûts du matériel, si vous croyez que ces coûts sont élevés, vous devez examiner s'ils comprennent ou non les droits de reproduction. Si c'est le cas, il y a une très bonne raison qui explique pourquoi ce coût pourrait être plus élevé que celui d'une autre ressource qui ne comprend pas de droits de reproduction, même si le contenu des deux ressources peut être semblable.

Les conseils sont très au courant de ces deux questions et de la distinction qui existe entre les deux, et ils choisissent le matériel en conséquence.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Madame Marshall, pouvez-vous nous dire ce que l'Université de Calgary paye en frais de droit d'auteur?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Les frais de droit d'auteur pour l'université ont varié. Lorsque nous avons commencé en 2011, avant le tarif proposé, nous payions 2,38 $ par étudiant et 10 ¢ la copie. Tout compte fait, à la fin d'une année, cela variait entre 10 et 15 $, je pense, par ETP étudiant. Notre campus compte environ 30 000 ETP étudiants, donc cela vous donne une idée.

Nous nous sommes retirés en partie parce que le bond pour passer de 10 à 15 $, à 26 ou à 45 $ par ETP semblait très grand. Nous devons tout le temps gérer un certain nombre d'histoires concurrentes dans les établissements. Nous sommes financés par le public. Nous examinons très attentivement l'utilisation des deniers des contribuables. Notre institution n'a pas refilé les frais de droit d'auteur aux étudiants, estimant que cela fait partie de ce que nous faisons en tant qu'institution.

Pour nous, en ce qui concerne les questions du droit d'auteur et de l'utilisation équitable, nous ne nous sommes pas retirés avant la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada sur l'utilisation équitable. Nous étions d'avis qu'il s'agissait d'un élément absolument essentiel pour la société canadienne. C'est très important pour les universités de pouvoir communiquer de l'information et de miser sur l'information accumulée. L'idée que vous pouvez utiliser une partie de l'information accessible et vous appuyer sur elle, créer des recherches différentes, est un élément très important de ce que nous faisons à l'université dans le domaine tant de la recherche que de l'enseignement.

J'appuie fermement les concepts d'utilisation équitable tels qu'ils existent actuellement.

(1605)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Cannings.

Bienvenue au Comité. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme vous pouvez vous en douter, je ne siège habituellement pas au Comité, et je n'ai donc pas entendu les témoignages présentés jusqu'ici. J'ai acquis une certaine expérience de part et d'autre de la table. J'ai travaillé à l'UBC pendant de nombreuses années, et j'ai écrit une douzaine de livres. Je reçois mon chèque d'Access Copyright chaque année. Ce n'est pas beaucoup, mais c'est une belle surprise. Récemment, il est devenu beaucoup plus petit. Je le constate. Aussi, un bon nombre d'auteurs qui vivent dans ma circonscription m'ont parlé de cet enjeu. Beaucoup d'entre eux écrivent des livres assez régionaux sur l'histoire et l'histoire naturelle qui sont utilisés dans des écoles. Ces personnes ne gagnent pas beaucoup d'argent avec leur plume, donc ce chèque d'Access Copyright comptait pour une bonne partie de leur revenu annuel. Pour moi, cela ne faisait pas vraiment de différence. Je vois les questions relatives à l'équité qui touchent les deux côtés de la table.

Madame Andrew, vous avez dit qu'Access Copyright n'avait pas été en mesure de démontrer des difficultés économiques indues pour les auteurs. Je crois que c'est ce que vous tentiez de dire. Je me demande quelles sont les difficultés économiques pour les écoles, les collèges et les universités. Nous avons ici des relevés dans les notes. Par exemple, la Division scolaire de Winnipeg consacre 34 000 $ annuellement à l'acquisition de matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur, soit 1 $ par étudiant. Mme Marshall parlait de quelque chose d'un peu plus élevé.

Je me demande seulement ce qui, à votre avis, serait juste et ne causerait pas de difficultés pour les conseils scolaires.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je vais juste faire un peu marche arrière et clarifier mes commentaires au sujet d'Access Copyright. Ce que je disais, c'est qu'il n'a pas été en mesure de convaincre les tribunaux, au moyen de preuves, que c'est le cas. Il a présenté beaucoup de preuves anecdotiques et raconté beaucoup d'histoires, et je sais, d'après ma propre expérience, que ce que vous avez dit au sujet des chèques d'Access Copyright qui diminuent se produit bel et bien. Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est qu'il n'a pas été en mesure de démontrer dans un tribunal que les preuves existent — jusqu'à aujourd'hui.

Ce que j'aimerais aussi dire, c'est que, en ce qui concerne la façon dont les conseils scolaires quantifient leurs dépenses liées au — guillemets — droit d'auteur, ces coûts dépassent ce qu'ils dépenseraient pour un tarif, parce que les droits de reproduction sont intégrés à bon nombre des ressources qu'ils achètent actuellement, ce qui revient, comme vous le disiez à payer deux fois pour quelque chose. Par rapport à ce qu'un conseil scolaire considère comme équitable, nous considérons les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable comme le moyen le plus équitable d'appliquer le droit d'auteur à l'utilisation éducative des oeuvres.

Pour ce qui est des auteurs qui ont des intérêts régionaux dans leurs oeuvres, je sais que, au Manitoba et dans les provinces de l'Atlantique, les ministères provinciaux de l'Éducation — je suis sûre que cela pourrait se produire dans d'autres provinces, mais ce sont les deux régions dont je suis au courant — ont conclu des ententes avec des auteurs locaux pour accorder séparément des licences à leur matériel et fournir un certain type de subvention, de sorte que ce matériel puisse être utilisé dans les écoles à l'extérieur de leur relation avec Access Copyright. C'est quelque chose que beaucoup de gouvernements provinciaux envisagent, particulièrement lorsque les ressources ont un intérêt particulier pour une région locale.

(1610)

M. Richard Cannings:

Je vais me tourner vers vous, monsieur Ramsankar, et vous poser une question au sujet du passage du matériel imprimé vers le matériel numérique et les ressources en ligne dont vous parliez. Vous en avez peut-être tous parlé.

Pourriez-vous élaborer à ce sujet? Quelle est la proportion de matériel en ligne par rapport au matériel imprimé qui est utilisé dans les salles de classe, si vous la connaissez, et comment cela pourrait-il avoir une incidence sur les auteurs ou les producteurs de ce matériel? Comment cela est-il pris en compte dans vos achats? Les enseignants vont-ils en ligne et cherchent-ils du matériel gratuit précisément parce que c'est gratuit?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Je n'ai pas sous la main le chiffre exact concernant le pourcentage de matériel en ligne par rapport au matériel imprimé utilisé dans les salles de classe, mais je dirais que les enseignants sont assujettis à leur propre pouvoir d'achat personnel — celui de l'école. Par exemple, les enseignants n'achètent pas des manuels de façon individuelle. Ils achètent du matériel individuel pour élaborer un programme d'études ou créer une unité pour leurs étudiants. Selon la complexité de la classe, ils pourraient avoir besoin de différents types d'accès au matériel. La préoccupation des enseignants en ce moment, c'est ce à quoi ils sont assujettis en ce qui concerne l'utilisation du matériel qui est acheté et qu'ils ont déjà apporté dans leur classe pour compléter l'élaboration de programmes d'études.

En ce moment, l'utilisation équitable permet l'utilisation d'extraits par les enseignants. Par exemple, par rapport à la notion selon laquelle des manuels complets sont imprimés, je peux affirmer péremptoirement qu'en ce qui concerne les budgets d'une école ou le pouvoir d'achat individuel d'un enseignant pour pouvoir faire des photocopies, c'est du jamais vu. En fait, de nombreux enseignants de partout au pays sont assujettis à des comptes particuliers qui limitent la quantité de photocopies qu'ils sont autorisés à faire. Nécessairement, lorsque vous parlez de votre propre matériel élaboré et du matériel que vous utiliseriez dans votre salle de classe, le fait d'aller imprimer quelque chose à quoi s'applique un droit d'auteur est du gaspillage, et ce n'est pas utilisé de cette façon.

Lorsque du matériel numérique est apporté dans la salle de classe, on en cite la source, de sorte que les étudiants en sont conscients lorsqu'ils l'utilisent dans leur propre recherche. Les enseignants parlent aux étudiants de l'apparition des sources du droit d'auteur et de la reconnaissance du matériel et des idées qui ne sont pas les leurs. C'est généralement l'usage dans les salles de classe de la maternelle à la 12e année.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Mme Ng.

Vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous d'être venus nous parler de cette étude très importante.

Je vais commencer par la Fédération des enseignantes et enseignants et enchaîner sur ce dont M. Cannings parlait.

Je pense que vous avez déjà abordé cette question, mais j'aimerais que vous nous parliez d'un ensemble de politiques qui existe pour les enseignants concernant la conformité avec l'utilisation équitable. Nous avons certainement entendu parler, de la part des enseignants, de l'utilisation excessive que font les éditeurs et les auteurs. Je sais que vous avez un livret, et je pense qu'il est accessible à tous vos enseignants. Pourriez-vous juste approfondir un peu cette question, et peut-être que l'Association canadienne des commissions et conseils scolaires pourrait nous en parler aussi, pour nous aider à clarifier notre compréhension de la politique et des règles que les enseignants doivent respecter pour se conformer à l'utilisation équitable?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Nous nous sommes mis au travail tout de suite après la décision de la Cour suprême, et cela a donné lieu à la production ici, avec nos partenaires de l'éducation... Durant cette période, nos organisations membres ont mis sur pied des possibilités de perfectionnement professionnel dans les différentes provinces, afin de traiter directement du droit d'auteur. L'article date de mars ou avril 2018. Il y a toujours un article qui parle de l'utilisation équitable et du droit d'auteur. Il est vivant et convient parfaitement à nos professionnels, à mesure qu'ils arrivent. Au gré du roulement de notre population ou du profil démographique des enseignants, nous faisons continuellement preuve de vigilance pour nous assurer que les enseignants comprennent que ce qu'ils font lorsqu'ils utilisent du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur respecte la plus récente définition de la conformité.

Pour répondre à la question sur la façon dont nous continuons de le faire, les règles sont définies. La plupart des témoignages que j'ai entendus au sujet d'enseignants qui transgressent les règles de la conformité sont anecdotiques, et j'estime qu'il s'agirait vraiment de cas isolés. Je ne le dis pas pour plaisanter. Les personnes qui saisissent les occasions de transgresser les règles d'utilisation sont habituellement citées. Le directeur ou le conseil lui-même en prendra bonne note. Les enseignants sont mis au courant, et le matériel est retiré ou repris. Mais ce sont vraiment des cas ponctuels, et je ne peux insister assez là-dessus. Ce n'est pas quelque chose qui se passe massivement dans l'ensemble du pays.

(1615)

Mme Mary Ng:

Je m'adresse à l'Association canadienne des commissions et conseils scolaires; quel type de politiques ou de règles sont en place pour aider à guider les mesures de conformité dans les écoles?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je vais diviser votre question en deux parties.

Il y a l'aspect de l'éducation, ce que nous faisons pour éduquer notre personnel, et Mark en a parlé de façon très éloquente. Cela se fait à des niveaux multiples. Nous utilisons tous du matériel uniforme. Vous verrez que nous avons le même livre. Nous utilisons les mêmes lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable. Des affiches sont produites par les gouvernements provinciaux dans le cadre de leur participation au Consortium du droit d'auteur du CMEC, et elles sont envoyées dans chaque école. Chaque année, en septembre, ce matériel est redistribué par l'entremise des associations provinciales et des ministères provinciaux jusqu'aux conseils et par l'entremise des conseils scolaires. Cela se fait de façon annuelle. Tout le matériel est communiqué régulièrement, et il est aussi communiqué par d'autres moyens, comme par l'intermédiaire de leurs syndicats ou de leurs articles sur l'éducation, et d'autres choses du genre. Les occasions de communication de cette information auprès des employés du conseil scolaire, pas seulement du corps enseignant mais de tous les employés, ne manquent pas.

Pour ce qui est de la conformité, c'est la responsabilité d'un conseil scolaire de s'assurer que son personnel respecte l'ensemble de ses politiques. Les conseils scolaires ont un certain nombre de politiques. Toute non-conformité avec le droit d'auteur qui est relevée serait traitée au moyen du processus suivi par un conseil scolaire, selon la province où il se trouve. Cela va varier d'une province à l'autre, et peut-être même d'un conseil à l'autre, pour ce qui est de savoir quel processus il suit pour communiquer avec l'enseignant par rapport à ce qu'il a fait de mal. Souvent, lorsque des choses sont portées à l'attention d'un conseil au sujet de la non-conformité, on entend plus souvent « Je ne le savais pas » que « Je m'en fichais ». Il s'agit de s'assurer que la personne est renseignée au sujet de ce qu'elle est censée faire, puis, très rarement... en fait, je n'ai pas encore été mise au courant d'une situation où il y a une récurrence de non-conformité. De ce point de vue, je pense que les conseils scolaires font preuve de diligence raisonnable en tant qu'employeurs pour s'assurer que leurs employés respectent l'ensemble de leurs politiques et que les lois sont décrites dans celles-ci.

Mme Mary Ng:

Merci à vous deux. Nous avons assurément entendu tout le monde dire, je pense, qu'on veut s'assurer que les oeuvres de créateurs sont respectées et que la rémunération qu'ils en tirent est juste et ainsi de suite, même si, en même temps, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous avons entendu des éditeurs et des auteurs qui ont clairement démontré qu'il y avait une incidence.

Juste pour nous permettre de bien comprendre, pourriez-vous nous parler, du point de vue d'un conseil scolaire, des dépenses? Avez-vous déjà payé, comme les universités et les autres établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire, le tarif, et maintenant, juste parce que les méthodes d'enseignement ont changé et que le matériel est accessible sous de nombreux formats différents, plutôt que de passer par la méthode tarifaire qui consiste à payer pour le matériel, avez-vous effectué la transition qui consiste à payer les licences transactionnelles?

Vos dépenses ont-elles changé? Quelles étaient-elles auparavant et quelles sont-elles maintenant?

(1620)

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je dirais que nos dépenses n'ont pas changé. Le tarif que nous acquittons...

Mme Mary Ng:

Avez-vous des données là-dessus? Les conseils scolaires...

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Nous n'en avons pas à l'échelle nationale. L'éducation est de compétence provinciale, donc c'est très difficile d'obtenir de l'information nationale sur la façon dont les dépenses se font. En réalité, c'est même difficile de l'obtenir à l'échelle provinciale, parce que les provinces n'ont pas toutes la même structure budgétaire. Ce qui pourrait compter comme des ressources d'apprentissage dans une province ne compte pas nécessairement comme des ressources d'apprentissage dans une autre, et ce genre de choses.

Mme Mary Ng:

Je pense que mon temps est presque écoulé. Pourriez-vous essayer de répondre à ma question?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Très bien.

J'ai complètement perdu le fil.

En ce qui concerne les dépenses, je dirais qu'elles n'ont pas changé, mais ce qui a changé, c'est l'endroit où nous achetons. Nous achetons plus de ressources numériques et une plus grande diversité de matériel.

Quelle était l'autre partie de votre question?

Mme Mary Ng:

C'est cela. Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

C'est bien. Il ne vous reste plus de temps.

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous d'être venus et de témoigner aujourd'hui.

Madame Andrew, c'est en quelque sorte lié à la question précédente; quels sont les coûts actuels globaux de droit d'auteur pour vos intervenants, et pouvez-vous ventiler cela en fonction d'un coût moyen par étudiant dans l'ensemble du Canada?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je ne peux pas le faire et j'aimerais bien le faire, parce que j'aimerais être en mesure de répondre à cette question. Je pense que cela me servirait bien de pouvoir répondre à cette question.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Dans les témoignages que nous avons reçus, la Division scolaire de Winnipeg nous a dit qu'elle paie environ 1 $ par étudiant. Donc, pour 34 000 étudiants, elle a dit que le coût était d'environ 34 000 $. Selon l'information qui nous a été fournie par Access Copyright, le tarif a été fixé à 2,41 $ par étudiant, pour les étudiants de la maternelle à la 12e année. Toutefois, la majorité des écoles situées à l'extérieur du Québec ne paient plus de tarif, et donc le coût serait de 0 $ pour les licences collectives.

Diriez-vous que c'est exact?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Ça l'est, pour les licences collectives. Pour l'attribution de licences, je dirais que ce ne l'est pas. Je crois que nous payons pour l'attribution d'une licence, et je crois que nous payons pour les droits de reproduction.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Qui est payé pour cela?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Dans certains cas, c'est le distributeur d'une base de données en ligne. C'est le créateur d'un dépôt. Lorsqu'ils créent des portails pour le matériel, les gouvernements provinciaux vont souvent préacquitter tout le matériel qui se retrouve sur ces portails et, lorsque le paiement est requis, ils vont faire ce paiement. Cela se produit à l'échelon des conseils, à l'échelon provincial.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Avant 2012, vous payiez une licence collective, et après 2012, ce n'est plus le cas, donc diriez-vous qu'il y a une corrélation avec la perte de revenus pour Access Copyright?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je pense que la perte de revenus pour Access Copyright peut être attribuée à de nombreux types de changements différents.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Si vous ne le payez pas, c'est une perte de revenus pour lui. Est-ce exact? Cela semble assez évident.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je pense que si nous le payions, il aurait ce revenu, oui. Ceux qui ne l'auraient pas, ce seraient les mêmes créateurs, seulement dans un domaine différent; ils ne l'obtiendraient pas dans ces autres domaines.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Il semble y avoir une corrélation directe entre les étudiants de la maternelle à la 12e année qui ne paient pas les licences collectives, puis les auteurs qui ne reçoivent pas les redevances associées au droit d'auteur. Les auteurs souffrent parce que les étudiants de la maternelle à la 12e année ne paient pas pour le droit d'auteur. Est-ce exact?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je dirais que la plupart des achats qui sont faits dans les tranches de la maternelle à la 12e année sont effectués par l'entremise des éditeurs scolaires, et une très petite partie de ceux-ci sont allés aux auteurs individuels, mais oui, il pourrait y avoir certaines répercussions.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Je vous en remercie.

Ma prochaine série de questions s'adresse à M. Ramsankar.

Merci de votre témoignage. Diriez-vous qu'avant 2012, les enseignants avaient du mal à accéder à des oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur qu'ils pouvaient donner à leurs étudiants? Y a-t-il eu un changement important depuis 2012 pour l'enseignant sur le terrain?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Pour l'enseignant sur le terrain, lorsque vous parlez d'accès à du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur, cela doit être défini. Si vous parlez de manuels et de documents de cours, c'est fourni par l'employeur. L'enseignant individuel qui utilise des ressources dans la salle de classe utilisera du matériel qui se trouverait sous forme d'articles, de romans individuels et ce genre de choses, qu'une école peut produire.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Avant 2012, avaient-ils du mal à accéder à ces ressources que vous venez de mentionner?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Je veux tenir des propos prudents, parce que pour la plus grande partie de ma carrière, je me suis surtout intéressé à doter les écoles et les salles de classe de ressources. Cela revêt de nombreuses formes différentes. Cela revêt la forme de temps et de matériel, ainsi que la capacité de produire du matériel par eux-mêmes pour les salles de classe.

(1625)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Y avait-il une grande difficulté pour ce qui est d'accéder à des dossiers avant 2012?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Les enseignants n'avaient pas de mal à accéder à du matériel qui était fourni par l'employeur.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Mes 45 dernières secondes sont pour Mme Marshall.

J'ai vraiment aimé votre témoignage. Permettez-moi de pester un peu ici, parce que beaucoup d'universités n'ont pas été en mesure de nous fournir les données. Vous avez dit que vous avez utilisé 3 200 oeuvres, dont 250 en vertu de l'utilisation équitable. Je suis très reconnaissant de recevoir cette ventilation, parce que c'est le genre de reddition de comptes que beaucoup des intervenants veulent voir de la part des universités, à mon avis, de sorte que nous puissions dissiper la confusion au sujet de cet enjeu.

Votre crainte de devoir payer 26 $ en remontant à plusieurs années en arrière est très grande. Diriez-vous qu'il serait mieux pour la Commission du droit d'auteur de regarder davantage vers l'avant et de fixer des tarifs au cours des cinq prochaines années pour que vous puissiez avoir la prévisibilité et la stabilité voulues dans votre financement et dans ce que vous devez payer?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Oui.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Vous diriez oui; c'est quelque chose que vous aimeriez faire.

Mme Dru Marshall:

Oui. Je pense que partout au pays, dans les établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire, on a une crainte au sujet de toute rétroactivité, particulièrement lorsque nous pensons que nous avons géré le droit d'auteur d'une façon appropriée.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Je comprends.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer la parole à M. Jowhari.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier tous les témoins.

Monsieur Ramsankar, je vais commencer par vous. Dans votre déclaration liminaire, vous avez formulé un commentaire, et je ne vais pas vous citer, mais, d'après ce que j'ai compris, les besoins dans le contexte des salles de classe a changé, et les responsables d'Access Copyright ne sont pas au fait de cette réalité et ne comprennent pas les changements survenus quant aux besoins d'aujourd'hui et les aspects complexes connexes pour être en mesure d'accompagner les enfants de la maternelle à la fin du secondaire. Pouvez-vous fournir plus de renseignements à ce sujet et expliquer pourquoi les responsables d'Access Copyright ne comprennent pas la situation? Qu'est-ce qui a changé? Jusqu'à l'année passée, j'avais un enfant dans cette tranche d'âge, et il utilisait encore des manuels.

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Du point de vue d'un enseignant, l'ensemble du matériel utilisé doit être accessible. Toutefois, l'utilisation et la diffusion seront différentes d'un document à un autre en fonction des élèves dans la classe.

Quand je parle des changements survenus dans les classes, je fais référence aux caractéristiques démographiques des élèves et aux enfants qui ont des besoins qui diffèrent de la norme. Les enseignants ont besoin d'avoir la flexibilité nécessaire pour modifier le matériel et s'en servir pour satisfaire les besoins particuliers d'un enfant.

Par exemple, si un élève de 3e année possède des compétences en lecture de son niveau scolaire, il y a certaines approches et stratégies que les enseignants peuvent appliquer. Si dans la même classe, il y a des élèves dont les compétences en lecture correspondent à celles d'un élève de 1re année, alors, la même matière, parce qu'elle s'inscrit dans le programme, doit être enseignée de façon différente. On doit la fractionner. On doit créer du matériel qui permet à l'enfant dont les compétences se situent à ce niveau de comprendre les concepts qui lui sont enseignés.

Quand je mentionne la compréhension de la réalité vécue dans les salles de classe, je veux dire que l'idée de n'offrir que du matériel général et des licences générales, qui sont les mêmes pour tous, parce qu'il s'agit d'acheter des ouvrages, ne fonctionne pas nécessairement dans tous les cas, parce qu'il n'est pas possible de prendre, par exemple, un seul type de document et de simplement s'en servir dans les salles de classe de nos jours.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci.

Madame Andrew, vous avez affirmé que les responsables d'Access Copyright utilisent des données anecdotiques, et qu'ils n'ont vraiment pas réussi à montrer de façon claire à un tribunal que, de fait, il y a violation du droit d'auteur lorsqu'il y a reproduction. Ces responsables sont venus témoigner ici, mardi, et nous ont fait part de certains chiffres. Ils allèguent que 600 millions de pages sont copiées sans qu'on verse de redevances. Ils ont affirmé qu'ils ont subi une diminution de leurs redevances de l'ordre de 89 %. Pouvez-vous expliquer d'où proviennent ces chiffres, selon vous?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

En toute honnêteté, je crois que j'aimerais savoir autant que vous d'où vient ce chiffre de 600 millions de copies. Je ne suis pas certaine d'où il vient et je ne sais pas s'il concerne seulement les copies des établissements d'enseignement de la maternelle à la fin du secondaire, ou s'il inclut les copies des établissements postsecondaires. Si on prend ce chiffre de 600 millions de copies par année, et qu'on compte qu'il y a cinq millions d'élèves, cela donne 120 copies par élève par année.

Combien cela fait-il par mois? Sur une période de dix mois, cela fait six copies par élève par mois. Non, je me trompe. Les mathématiques ne sont pas ma matière forte. De toute façon, le nombre est si petit que, à mon sens, cela ne prouve pas qu'il s'agit de reproduction à l'échelle industrielle, si vous voulez, ou d'une pratique de reproduction fort répandue. Cela signifie que les enseignants copient de courts extraits, comme l'a mentionné la Cour suprême.

(1630)

M. Majid Jowhari:

Les enseignants ne le faisaient pas auparavant? Les responsables d'Access Copyright ont affirmé que l'ensemble des revenus de l'entreprise a chuté après 2013, passant de 40 millions de dollars à un peu moins de 10 millions de dollars en 2017. Cela est-il attribuable à la complexité de la situation? Ce pourrait-il qu'un des facteurs soit la façon complexe de fournir les documents?

Madame Marshall, vous voulez dire quelque chose. N'importe qui d'entre vous peut répondre à cette question.

Mme Dru Marshall:

J'aimerais répondre à la question. Il ne fait pas de doute que les revenus d'Access Copyright aient accusé une baisse, parce qu'un certain nombre de groupes ont choisi de se retirer de la licence collective. Ils ont cessé de payer des redevances, donc, bien entendu, il était à prévoir que les revenus de l'entreprise diminueraient.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Est-ce juste?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Eh bien, voici les choix qui s'offrent à vous à titre de gestionnaire d'une université: vous pouvez souscrire à la licence collective et accepter de payer souvent en double, ou vous pouvez choisir de gérer le droit d'auteur à votre façon et de vous acquitter des redevances autrement. Ce n'est pas que nous ne payons pas de redevances sur les droits d'auteur. Nous décidons simplement de le faire d'une autre façon. Nous décidons d'acheter des licences autrement.

Il ne fait pas de doute qu'il existe un lien avec la décision de gestionnaires de se retirer d'une licence collective. Vu le nombre d'universités où on a choisi de ne pas renouveler la licence, je suis étonnée, pour être franche, qu'Access Copyright existe encore.

M. Majid Jowhari:

J'ai dépassé de 45 secondes le temps qui m'était alloué. Je remercie le président de son indulgence.

Le président:

Ce n'est pas grave. Nous étions heureux d'entendre la réponse.

Nous allons maintenant passer à vous, monsieur Jeneroux. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

C'est parfait. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence. Madame Marshall et monsieur Ramsankar, vous venez tous les deux de l'Alberta. Je suis heureux de vous voir de nouveau.

Je ne voudrais pas vous exclure, madame Andrew, vu que vous venez de la grande ville de Toronto...

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

En fait, j'habite à Brantford.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vraiment? Vous avez mis les choses au point.

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

J'habite à Ottawa.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous habitez à Ottawa? Bon sang.

Madame Marshall, je veux vous demander brièvement si vous avez un lien quelconque avec Access Copyright en ce moment?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Non.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Même pas par l'entremise d'un distributeur quelconque?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Nous nous sommes retirés de ses licences. À l'occasion, nous lui avons demandé une licence transactionnelle pour quelque chose qui figurait dans son répertoire. L'entreprise a adopté une approche de tout ou rien: si vous n'avez pas la licence, l'entente collective, on ne nous accorde pas de licence transactionnelle.

Ce qui est intéressant, c'est que, au bout du compte, nous nous sommes tournés vers différentes sociétés de gestion des droits d'auteur, comme l'organisme Creative Commons aux États-Unis, pour acheter des licences transactionnelles.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Quand avez-vous communiqué avec Access Copyright pour la dernière fois?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Probablement en 2013 ou 2014. Nous nous sommes retirés en décembre 2012, et nous avons sollicité les services de l'entreprise à quelques occasions. Après avoir décidé de ne pas renouveler, nous avons fait des constatations qui nous ont étonnés, c'est-à-dire le grand nombre de licences que nous avons payées en double parce que nous n'étions pas certains qu'elles étaient incluses dans le répertoire que nous avions acheté.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'est intéressant.

Monsieur Ramsankar, je souhaite vous poser quelques questions. Mme Marshall nous a parlé de la possibilité que des paiements rétroactifs soient exigés si la décision dans l'affaire Access Copyright contre l'Université York est soutenue à cet égard. Le tribunal n'appuyait pas les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable, et la décision a maintenant été portée en appel, comme nous le savons, mais il est possible qu'elle ne soit pas renversée.

Sur votre site Web, vous dirigez les visiteurs qui ont des questions concernant le droit d'auteur vers les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable établies par le Conseil des ministres de l'Éducation au Canada, dont des responsables sont venus témoigner précédemment devant ce comité. Je crois que vous avez apporté le livret. Je présume ainsi que la Fédération canadienne des enseignantes et des enseignants appuie, de toute évidence, les lignes directrices, même si elles ont été rejetées, pour l'essentiel, par le tribunal dans l'affaire Access Copyright contre l'Université York. Encore une fois, cette décision a été portée en appel. Si elle est soutenue, les responsables de votre organisme ont-ils mis en place un plan afin de continuer à payer pour les documents faisant l'objet de droit d'auteur?

(1635)

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

En ce moment, la décision est devant les tribunaux, et cela est perçu comme un cas isolé. Donc je crois qu'il serait prématuré d'émettre des hypothèses ou d'essayer de faire des propositions quant aux mesures que nous devrions prendre en ce moment. Cela dit, il est trop tôt pour affirmer que nous allons suivre une voie plutôt qu'une autre.

L'affaire York est un cas isolé, et les tribunaux traitent ce dossier actuellement.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Très bien.

Mme Marshall et M. Ramsankar ont abordé ce sujet.

Je vais vous donner l'occasion, si vous le souhaitez, madame Andrew, de donner des commentaires quant aux plans pouvant être adoptés si la décision rendue dans l'affaire York est maintenue. Y a-t-il des plans en place dans votre organisme relativement à des paiements rétroactifs?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je vais reprendre ce qu'a exprimé Mark. En ce moment, nous n'avons pas de plan en place. Toutes ces décisions seront prises quand les tribunaux auront rendu une décision irrévocable dans cette affaire. Encore une fois, nous sommes d'avis qu'il s'agit d'une situation marginale et tenons compte du fait que des tribunaux ont tranché en faveur des utilisateurs précédemment; donc nous avons de l'espoir.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous utilisez votre temps de façon très efficace. Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Graham.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vais commencer par Mme Marshall.

Vous avez mentionné aujourd'hui que 90 % de vos dépenses effectuées en 2017-2018 étaient liées à des documents numériques. Pouvez-vous comparer ce taux avec celui d'il y a cinq ou dix ans? De toute évidence, il y a 20 ans, ce pourcentage devait être très faible. Pouvez-vous nous faire part de l'évolution de ces dépenses au fil du temps?

Mme Dru Marshall:

C'est une question très importante, parce que beaucoup d'affirmations ont circulé selon lesquelles la perte de revenu des auteurs est liée à l'utilisation équitable. Dans les faits, je dirais plutôt que cette perte de revenu est liée à la révolution numérique.

Nous avons une bibliothèque numérique. Nous avons peu ou pas de livres dans notre bibliothèque.

Nous avons ouvert notre bibliothèque numérique en 2011, et je crois qu'à cette époque les documents numériques constituaient environ 30 % des dépenses annuelles, alors que maintenant ils représentent environ 90 %.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce changement est survenu très rapidement.

Mme Dru Marshall:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Constatez-vous, et je m'adresse à tous les témoins, une différence marquée entre les comportements des différentes générations d'enseignants — disons-le ainsi — quant à l'utilisation de documents numériques et d'ouvrages traditionnels en format papier? Une nouvelle génération d'enseignants prend graduellement la relève; n'utilisent-ils pas de documents papier?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Je vais répondre brièvement.

En ce moment, dans les universités, nous avons des étudiants qui sont natifs de l'ère numérique. Ainsi, si vous êtes un professeur, il est risqué de ne pas tenir compte du contenu numérique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En effet, je vous l'accorde.

Vous avez mentionné plus tôt que vos processus prévoient des sanctions en cas de non-respect.

Mme Dru Marshall:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment cela fonctionne-t-il? Quelles sont les sanctions?

Je vais vous donner la possibilité de donner des détails sur l'exemple que vous avez mentionné dans votre exposé. C'est une bonne occasion de le faire.

Mme Dru Marshall:

J'ai notre politique sous la main. Je vais lire les sanctions qui s'appliquent aux personnes qui ne la respectent pas: Tout employé ou boursier postdoctoral qui utilise de façon contraire à la présente politique du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur peut faire l'objet de mesures disciplinaires formelles, pouvant aller jusqu'au renvoi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela s'est-il produit?

Mme Dru Marshall:

C'est très, très sérieux. Nous ne l'avons pas fait, mais, assurément, nous avons déjà appliqué des sanctions.

Pour ce qui est des étudiants: Tout étudiant qui utilise de façon contraire à la présente politique du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur peut faire l'objet de mesures disciplinaires au titre de la politique relative aux inconduites non liées aux études...

... qui permet de renvoyer un étudiant de l'université.

Comme je l'ai mentionné au début, nous prenons cela très au sérieux. Nous adoptons une approche éducative dans un premier temps. Dans le cas d'une première infraction, nous disons: « Voici les choses auxquelles vous devez porter attention. » Quand nous constatons une irrégularité, nous nous assurons que les auteurs reçoivent les redevances qui auraient dû leur être versées.

Je serais heureuse de vous donner un exemple qui porte sur l'utilisation équitable ou sur les coûts des livres électroniques par rapport à ceux du matériel imprimé, si vous voulez.

Lequel préférez-vous?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourquoi s'arrêter à un seul exemple?

Mme Dru Marshall:

D'accord.

Prenons le livre électronique par rapport aux coûts d'impression. Comme nous sommes une bibliothèque numérique, les gens achètent les livres électroniques lorsque c'est possible et dès qu'ils sont offerts. Nous regardons le coût d'un livre électronique multi-utilisateur. C'est souvent moins que le coût d'une licence transactionnelle, et l'accès n'est pas limité aux étudiants inscrits à seulement un cours.

Par exemple, la licence de deux chapitres du livre Oil: A Beginner's Guide, 2008 — il s'agit d'un livre important en Alberta à l'heure actuelle — par Vaclav Smil, pour une classe de 410 élèves, il en coûterait à la bibliothèque 2 463 $ américains. En revanche, le coût d'une licence illimitée pour trois versions de livre électronique serait de 29,90 $ par l'intermédiaire d'Ebook Central, et le livre serait accessible à tous les utilisateurs de la bibliothèque.

C'est pourquoi, dans nombre de cas, nous sommes passés au numérique.

De même, je dirais que le coût de la licence de deux chapitres du livre Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada, par Lynda Jessup et coll., pour une classe de 60 élèves serait de 414 $ canadiens, alors que le coût d'une licence illimitée sur Ebook Central serait de 150 $ américains.

Il y a une énorme différence entre ces coûts. Nous utilisons ces livres électroniques et nous répondons également aux besoins de nos élèves, qui désirent avoir les documents sous format numérique. Ils préfèrent cela. Nos enseignants sont très soucieux de s'assurer que les étudiants obtiennent les documents d'une manière qui leur permettra de les utiliser.

(1640)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends cela.

Je m'adresse à vous tous. Il y a cinq ans, la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur a été reconnue pour avoir permis le recours aux exemptions relatives à la mesure technique de protection pour ce qui est du droit d'auteur. Je me demande comment cela vous touche, le cas échéant. Il s'agit de mesures de protection techniques. Si vous avez un verrou numérique, l'utilisation équitable ne s'applique plus.

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

En ce qui concerne les enseignants que nous examinons, nous n'avons pas la capacité de déverrouiller les documents. Vous utilisez un document à la fois. Ce n'est pas comme si vous pouviez le déverrouiller et ensuite le consulter. C'est l'expérience que j'ai vécue avec les enseignants de nos systèmes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il beaucoup de documents auxquels les enseignants n'ont pas accès en raison de cette façon de faire?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

C'est le résultat. Les enseignants n'ont pas le temps, en général, de commencer à essayer de déverrouiller des documents et de comprendre comment utiliser un document en particulier. S'il n'est pas accessible, ils passent à autre chose.

Mme Dru Marshall:

Je crois qu'il s'agit d'un aspect très important auquel le Comité devrait s'intéresser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est pourquoi j'en ai parlé.

Mme Dru Marshall:

Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple. Il n'y a pas si longtemps, nous avons acheté un éventail de CD. La technologie évolue rapidement. Maintenant, bien sûr, des gens veulent consulter les documents en temps réel dans les salles de classe. Si nous voulons que cela soit possible, nous devons acheter une nouvelle licence pour exactement le même document. C'est intéressant; même si la révolution numérique a été absolument spectaculaire en ce qui concerne l'enseignement et la recherche, il s'agit d'une nouvelle ère, et je crois que les lois sur le droit d'auteur doivent être mises à jour afin de nous aider à nous adapter à cette nouvelle réalité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé, mais si j'en ai l'occasion un peu plus tard, j'aimerais revenir sur ce sujet.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Cannings, vous avez deux minutes.

M. Richard Cannings:

Madame Marshall, vous avez mentionné d'autres regroupements dont vous faites partie. Y a-t-il une place pour un regroupement national comme Access Copyright? Si oui, comment cela devrait-il fonctionner?

Mme Dru Marshall:

C'est une excellente question. À mon avis, une des valeurs qui sont chères aux Canadiens, c'est le choix. Il me semble bizarre qu'on force des institutions comme la nôtre à faire un choix concernant un aspect qui est très important du point de vue de l'enseignement. Nous devons trouver un équilibre entre les droits des créateurs et ceux des utilisateurs.

Je vais en rester là. Je déteste qu'on me force à faire quelque chose lorsque je sais qu'il y a des solutions de rechange qui peuvent être meilleures pour des institutions en particulier. Je crois qu'il est injuste d'adopter une approche universelle.

M. Richard Cannings:

N'y a-t-il pas moyen de concevoir un nouvel Access Copyright afin d'avoir cette souplesse?

Mme Dru Marshall:

C'est possible, mais je crois qu'il faudrait examiner cela très attentivement. Il y aurait probablement des échelles variables de coûts, selon ce que les gens voudraient faire. Je crois qu'Access Copyright a pris des mesures très draconiennes afin d'essayer de protéger les utilisateurs, et la diminution des droits d'auteur associée, avec un certain nombre de choses qui étaient en réalité erronées. Je dirais que la diminution des droits d'auteur découle davantage de la révolution numérique que de l'utilisation équitable, par exemple.

M. Richard Cannings:

L'un de vous veut-il ajouter quelque chose rapidement à ce sujet?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Je vais juste répéter les commentaires de Mme Marshall. Le début de l'utilisation des documents numériques a eu un effet considérable sur l'utilisation des documents imprimés, en ce sens. Si l'on essaie d'établir une corrélation directe entre les documents imprimés et la non-utilisation d'Access Copyright et l'effet que l'ère numérique a eu, cela ne rend pas service aux gens qui utilisent les documents, pour l'instant.

(1645)

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

J'aimerais ajouter que nous ne pouvons pas acheter des licences transactionnelles d'Access Copyright. Je reçois nombre de demandes de commissions scolaires qui désirent faire plus de copies que ce que leur permettent les Lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable, et elles désirent savoir comment y arriver. Je dois répondre qu'il faut communiquer directement avec l'auteur, l'éditeur ou le titulaire du droit d'auteur. S'il dit non, alors vous n'avez pas le droit de faire des copies. Votre choix est d'obtenir une permission et d'effectuer le paiement lorsque c'est nécessaire, et si vous ne pouvez pas obtenir la permission ni faire le paiement au besoin, vous n'utilisez pas le document. Vous en trouvez un autre.

Neuf fois sur dix, les gens doivent trouver un autre document parce qu'ils ne peuvent pas acheter une licence transactionnelle.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Bratina, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vais essayer de répondre de la même manière que M. Sheehan. J'ai épousé une enseignante. Son frère était aussi enseignant et il a également épousé une enseignante. Leurs deux enfants sont enseignants, et l'un d'entre aux a épousé un membre de la profession et l'autre, un assistant en éducation. Je me suis présenté en politique fédérale pour que, pendant six mois, je n'aie pas à écouter des conversations entre enseignants.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Bob Bratina: Également, mon fils a obtenu sa maîtrise en bibliothéconomie et il travaille maintenant pour la Gendarmerie royale du Canada dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique, alors je crois que nous sommes...

La raison pour laquelle je mentionne cela, c'est que, au cours de toutes ces conversations tenues autour de la table, le sujet n'a jamais été abordé. La seule chose que j'ai entendue, c'était si nous pouvions présenter le film Oliver! aux élèves qui se présentaient à l'école lorsqu'il y avait une tempête de neige.

Quelle est l'ampleur... Monsieur Ramsankar, vous avez montré le document qui se trouve au-dessus... Vous l'avez tous les deux. Est-ce la façon dont les documents sont distribués aux enseignants?

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Nous travaillons avec nos organisations membres pour voir si le document est accessible. Il est dans les écoles. Comme je l'ai dit, le document se trouve dans la salle de photocopie, mais nous ne faisons pas que distribuer un document qui contient les règles.

J'ai donné un exemple. Comme je le disais, le document a été publié en mars ou en avril 2018 à Terre-Neuve. Les articles portent sur la question du droit d'auteur, l'utilisation et si les enseignants respectent les règles. Pour être honnête avec vous, vous parlez des conversations sur l'éducation tenues autour de la table, mais les enseignants avec qui je m'assois pour le souper ne parlent pas de droit d'auteur. Ce dont ils parlent, c'est de trouver une stratégie pour travailler avec un étudiant donné ou de ce qui s'est passé dans la salle de classe. Le droit d'auteur entre en jeu lorsqu'il faut respecter des paramètres pour accéder à un document ou aider les enfants à y accéder; c'est à ce moment-là qu'on parle du droit d'auteur. Le titre de notre brochure ici est Le droit d'auteur... ça compte!. On fait preuve de respect lorsqu'on parle d'élaborer des documents qui seront utilisés dans les salles de classe.

En fait, je vais aller un peu plus loin. Comme je l'ai dit, je parle pour les classes de maternelle jusqu'à la 12e année. Lorsque nous enseignons la recherche éthique et la rédaction d'articles, nous revenons immédiatement aux choses simples comme le plagiat: il faut reconnaître le mérite des gens pour ce qu'ils ont écrit et ce qu'ils font et s'assurer qu'on les cite correctement. En tant qu'enseignants, nous devons être des modèles à cet égard.

Dire simplement, d'une part, qu'un enseignant copierait entièrement un livre ou seulement une feuille et diffuserait le tout, puis dire: « Oh, en passant, vous avez une responsabilité éthique » ne cadre pas. C'est la raison pour laquelle je dis que la plupart des exemples anecdotiques de témoignages sont uniques ou concernent des gens qui n'ont pas respecté les limites.

Lorsqu'une telle situation se présente, l'employeur ou le directeur ne prendra pas automatiquement une mesure punitive contre la personne. C'est un moment propice à l'apprentissage. Vous parlez du droit d'auteur et de son fonctionnement. Vous apportez la mesure corrective et vous passez à autre chose. C'est ce dont il s'agit en ce qui concerne l'utilisation de documents dans les salles de classe.

M. Bob Bratina:

Le sujet du numérique fait partie de presque toutes les conversations maintenant, en passant.

Qui surveille la conformité, ou comment est-elle surveillée?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

D'abord, la personne qui la surveillerait serait le directeur parce qu'il est la personne responsable de la distribution. Une fois qu'il reçoit le document de la commission scolaire, il est responsable de le distribuer à son personnel et d'en parler au cours d'une réunion du personnel. Tous les directeurs de partout au Canada doivent parler du droit d'auteur au cours d'une réunion du personnel au début de chaque année scolaire. C'est la première étape.

Chaque commission scolaire doit avoir un membre du personnel dans son bureau administratif qui connaît bien le droit d'auteur pour que, lorsque les directeurs ont des questions qui dépassent leurs connaissances initiales, ils puissent se tourner vers une personne qui peut leur répondre. Il y a une personne à l'échelon de la commission scolaire.

Si la question va au-delà des connaissances de cette personne, une liste est accessible... je ne crois pas qu'elle figure dans ce livre. Non, elle n'y figure pas. Les créateurs de ces documents ont mis en ligne un site Web. Le site Web fairdealingdecisiontool.ca offre un arbre décisionnel de l'utilisation équitable. Je vous encourage tous à l'examiner. Sur ce site Web en particulier, tous les documents peuvent être téléchargés instantanément. Il contient également une liste de personnes-ressources provinciales. Si votre question ne concerne pas ce que vous pouvez copier selon les lignes directrices et est très compliquée, vous trouverez sur ce site une liste de personnes-ressources à l'échelon provincial avec lesquelles vous pouvez communiquer afin d'obtenir la réponse à votre question.

(1650)

M. Bob Bratina:

C'est très utile. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Lloyd.

Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Les prochaines questions s'adressent à vous encore une fois, madame Andrew.

Mon collègue, M. Jowhari, possédait des informations inexactes. Il ne s'agissait pas de 600 millions de pages pour le secteur de la maternelle jusqu'à la 12e année. Selon la décision du 19 février 2016 de la Commission du droit d'auteur, 380 millions de pages de travaux publiés du répertoire d'Access Copyright sont copiées chaque année, et cela concerne le secteur de la maternelle à la 12e année de 2010 à 2015. En 2016, la Commission du droit d'auteur a conclu que, de ces 380 millions de pages, 150 millions avaient été copiées illégalement dans le secteur de la maternelle jusqu'à la 12e année.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Le fait est que les auteurs auraient pu être dédommagés.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui, ils auraient dû être dédommagés. Les commissions scolaires ont-elles payé pour ces copies à la suite de la décision de la Commission du droit d'auteur?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Nous ne l'avons pas fait parce qu'Access Copyright ne nous offre pas la possibilité d'acheter une licence transactionnelle.

M. Dane Lloyd:

La Commission du droit d'auteur a rendu une décision selon laquelle vous avez copié 150 millions de pages sans offrir de dédommagement, mais vous n'avez pas payé un montant d'argent à la Commission, alors êtes-vous...?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Si vous regardez la ventilation de ces pages, elles proviennent largement de documents qui sont considérés comme des documents à utilisation unique, des documents qui ont été vendus pour n'être utilisés qu'une seule fois.

Ce que nous avons fait à la suite de cette décision, c'est d'interdire à toutes nos commissions scolaires partout au Canada, par l'intermédiaire des ministères de l'Éducation, de l'ACCCS et des syndicats, de faire des copies de documents à utilisation unique. Ils sont illégaux et, par conséquent, on ne doit pas en faire des copies. Il y a une affiche...

M. Dane Lloyd:

C'est très important, et je crois que les auteurs apprécieraient cela, mais qu'en est-il des pages qui ont été imprimées avant cela? Je sais que des mesures ont été prises pour l'avenir, mais les auteurs ont-ils été dédommagés pour ce qui a été fait dans le passé? Avez-vous respecté la décision de la Commission du droit d'auteur?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Nous avons payé un tarif rétroactif.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Vous avez payé le tarif pour ce qui est antérieur à la décision de 2016?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Nous avons payé le tarif pour 2010, 2011 et 2012.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ces chiffres couvrent également de 2012 à 2015, alors vous ne payez pas les tarifs pour cette période?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Non, c'est exact.

Ces données, en passant, figuraient dans un sondage réalisé auprès de nos écoles en 2006, alors elles ont plus de 10 ans. Je vous dirais que les habitudes de photocopie d'aujourd'hui sont considérablement différentes de celles de cette époque. La Commission du droit d'auteur elle-même a dit dans cette même décision que les données étaient obsolètes et n'étaient plus utiles. À mon avis, les habitudes de photocopie de documents à utilisation unique seraient très différentes aujourd'hui si nous réalisions un sondage.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je ne connais pas très bien les documents à utilisation unique. Pouvez-vous me les décrire brièvement?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Lorsque vous allez chez Costco, vous pouvez trouver un livre de mathématique pour la 2e année. Il contient des images et est très coloré, et vous remplissez les petits espaces blancs. Il est conçu pour que vous l'utilisiez avec votre enfant à la maison. Les éditeurs créent des documents similaires destinés aux éducateurs. Ils sont destinés à un usage unique. Ces types de copies ne sont pas...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ils sont différents d'un livre, par exemple.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Ils sont différents d'un livre. Ils sont également différents d'une ressource qui est conçue pour être copiée, ce que nous appelons un document qui peut être reproduit, auquel cas un créateur fournira un guide de l'enseignant qui compte des pages blanches. Il est destiné à être copié.

(1655)

M. Dane Lloyd:

J'apprécie cette explication. Merci.

Ma dernière question s'adresse à Mme Marshall. Nous avons entendu le témoignage de représentants de différentes universités et, bien que nombre d'entre elles se sont jointes à l'Université York dans le cas présent, il semble que ces universités ont des politiques différentes. Par exemple, je crois que l'Université de Guelph continue de payer pour un certain niveau de licences collectives.

Y a-t-il un désaccord parmi les universités ou y a-t-il un consensus général sur l'utilisation équitable, le droit d'auteur et les licences?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Je crois qu'il y a un consensus général sur l'utilisation équitable. À mon avis, il existe différentes préoccupations, liées en partie à la taille de l'université, concernant la façon dont on gère le droit d'auteur et la capacité à être efficace. Par exemple, certaines universités ont choisi de se retirer en 2012 et, lorsqu'on a élaboré une licence modèle, elles ont choisi de revenir parce qu'elles croyaient qu'il s'agissait d'une meilleure protection.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Y a-t-il des universités qui ont choisi de participer de nouveau au processus?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Oui, absolument.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Fait intéressant à mon avis, il semblait cependant qu'Access Copyright semblait exiger un prix exorbitant, 45 $ à l'origine, mais il a été négocié à la baisse à 26 $.

Mme Dru Marshall:

Exactement.

M. Dane Lloyd:

C'est presque la moitié du prix. C'est peut-être le meilleur prix, mais n'y a-t-il pas là une occasion de négocier pour les universités afin d'en obtenir un meilleur?

Mme Dru Marshall:

Je l'espère, mais si, par exemple, nous payons de 10 à 15 $, avec les 2,38 $ en plus des frais de 10 ¢ par page, alors passer à 26 $ puis à 45 $ me semble ridicule. Lorsque nous établissons nos coûts, si c'est de 10 à 15 $ par élève, pourquoi paierais-je 26 $? C'est ce qui m'inquiète. Établissons-nous les prix de la bonne façon, et pourquoi sommes-nous passés à 26 $?

Une partie de la réponse, à mon sens, c'est qu'Access Copyright, à juste titre, désire protéger les créateurs. Mais une partie de la question dont nous n'avons pas du tout discuté ici, c'est l'industrie de l'édition. Lorsqu'un de nos professeurs, par exemple, rédige un manuel, nous n'avons pas d'emprise sur le contrat avec les éditeurs. Ces derniers font des profits records alors que les auteurs reçoivent moins d'argent. Il y a quelque chose qui cloche.

En réponse à une question qui a été posée plus tôt, nous maintenons un équilibre au sein d'un regroupement, non seulement pour le droit d'auteur... Je veux dire, toutes les institutions qui ont choisi de se retirer se sont regroupées et ont échangé de l'information. Nous avons parlé de la façon de respecter le droit d'auteur. Nous avons mis en commun des pratiques exemplaires à cet égard. Je dirais qu'il s'agit d'un effort collectif en soi. Nous nous sommes également regroupés de nombreuses façons afin d'acheter des produits provenant d'éditeurs pour voir si nous pouvions obtenir un meilleur prix si nous faisions partie d'un regroupement. Nous avons dû également cesser de nous regrouper parce que nous constatons que les éditeurs augmentent les prix. Cinq ou six entreprises se partagent un monopole et, sur le plan intellectuel, lorsque nous parlons de documents pédagogiques, cela complique les choses. C'est la raison pour laquelle on constate une augmentation des ressources pédagogiques libres et des ressources en accès libre, ce qui a également une incidence dans ce secteur.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je comprends cela.

Merci.

Le président:

Les éditeurs viennent témoigner la semaine prochaine.

Pour les trois dernières minutes, monsieur Graham, vous allez clore la séance d'aujourd'hui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'espère que mes trois minutes seront aussi longues que les trois minutes de Dane.

Le président:

Non, non. Ce sera trois courtes minutes.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

À deux ou trois occasions, monsieur Ramsankar et madame Andrew, vous nous avez montré un livre. Je veux m'assurer qu'il soit consigné au compte rendu. Je crois qu'il est intitulé Le droit d'auteur... ça compte!

M. H. Mark Ramsankar:

Oui, c'est cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fait-il partie du répertoire d'Access Copyright?

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourrions-nous en obtenir un exemplaire? Je crois qu'il pourrait être très utile à notre étude.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Je peux vous laisser mon exemplaire. Je crois que les représentants du CMEC l'ont distribué lorsqu'ils étaient ici la semaine passée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'étais pas ici la semaine passée.

Mme Cynthia Andrew:

Vous pouvez également le télécharger gratuitement par le truchement de l'arbre décisionnel de l'utilisation équitable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Excellent. Je vais y jeter un coup d'oeil. Merci.

Madame Marshall, dans vos observations antérieures, vous avez longuement discuté du manque de transparence d'Access Copyright. Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de détails? Vous avez mentionné que vous payiez en double pour le même document. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur ce sujet? Comment le savez-vous?

(1700)

Mme Dru Marshall:

Il y a deux cas où les universités paient en double. Premièrement, c'est que si nous achetons une licence d'un document imprimé et que nous voulons la version numérique, nous devons payer de nouveau. Access Copyright ne s'occupe pas vraiment des documents numériques, alors cela pose problème.

Deuxièmement, il s'agit des recherches que publient les universités. Les recherches sur les campus sont habituellement financées par les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux grâce à des fonds publics ou, du moins, ils le sont en grande partie. Les universités reçoivent l'argent, et les chercheurs effectuent leurs recherches. Ensuite, selon les directives des trois conseils, ils doivent publier leurs recherches — nous appuyons vraiment cette politique. Nous essayons d'utiliser davantage des ressources en accès libre. Pour pouvoir bénéficier de la promotion de leurs travaux ou recevoir le mérite qui y est associé chaque année, les chercheurs veulent les publier dans les meilleures revues. Ils paient pour publier leurs travaux. Ils paient des frais d'édition aux éditeurs, et ensuite les universités achètent à leur tour une licence pour lire le même document. C'est une bonne arnaque.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends cela.

Merci beaucoup de votre présence.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Je croyais que vous aviez dit que vous vouliez trois minutes ou trois minutes et demie. C'était deux minutes.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je peux poursuivre, si vous voulez.

Le président:

Non, ça va.

Monsieur Jowhari, avez-vous quelque chose à dire?

M. Majid Jowhari:

Oui. Je veux seulement faire un commentaire.

En réponse à la question de mon collègue, M. Lloyd, je veux être certain que le compte rendu est clair. Le nombre de 600 millions de pages auxquelles j'ai fait référence provenait d'une réponse donnée par Mme Levy à une question posée par M. Masse. Le commentaire de Mme Levy — cela provient des bleus — était que, lorsque vous tenez compte de toutes les données, de manière conservatrice, vous obtenez 600 millions de pages qui sont copiées et qui ne sont pas payées.

Les 600 millions auxquels j'ai fait référence étaient le montant total. Vous avez parlé de 385 millions de pages qui concernaient le secteur de la maternelle jusqu'à la 12e année. Mes 600 millions, essentiellement...

M. Dane Lloyd: Sont le total.

M. Majid Jowhari: ... sont le total.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui. Je ne définis pas cela...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Non, ça va. Je voulais seulement apporter cette précision.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je ne dis pas que vous avez tort. Il y a différents groupes.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous sommes encore une grande famille heureuse.

Sur ce, j'aimerais remercier nos trois témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui. Chaque fois que nous croyons avoir obtenu toute l'information, vous nous en donnez davantage. Nous avons hâte de poursuivre ce processus.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 24, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.