header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-28 PROC 106

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, and welcome to the 106th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. For members' information, this meeting is being televised.

Today, as we begin our study of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments, we are pleased to be joined by the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions. She is accompanied by Allen Sutherland, Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, and Manon Paquet, Senior Policy Adviser.

Thank you for being here.

Thanks for coming, Minister. I'll turn it over to you for your opening statement.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to apologize to the committee for my tardiness. As the member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley noted, I am going to blame my three-month-old son for that, who decided he was hungry just as I was leaving. Anyway, I want to thank the committee for inviting me here and for your commitment to study Bill C-76. [Translation]

I would also like to thank Minister Brison, who acted as Minister of Democratic Institutions during my parental leave.[English]

I am accompanied today by two officials, as you mentioned, Mr. Chair, from the Privy Council Office: Allen Sutherland, the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet for Machinery of Government; and Manon Paquet, Senior Policy Adviser, Democratic Institutions Secretariat. The DI team at PCO is small but mighty. I cannot say enough about the work they have done to prepare Bill C-76. I really want to thank them for their hard work and dedication on this issue, but also on all things in our file.[Translation]

Our government is committed to strengthening Canada's democratic institutions and restoring Canadians' trust and participation in our democratic processes.[English]

We believe the strength of our democracy depends on the participation of as many Canadians as possible. By undoing the unfair aspects of the Conservatives' so-called Fair Elections Act, we are making it easier and more convenient for all Canadians to vote. [Translation]

We are making the electoral process more accessible to Canadians with disabilities, as well as members of the Canadian Armed Forces, and we are restoring voting rights to more than one million Canadians living abroad.[English]

We are strengthening our laws, closing loopholes, and bringing in robust enforcement regimes to make it more difficult for bad actors to influence our elections. We are requiring greater transparency from third parties and political parties so Canadians can better understand who seeks to influence their vote. This legislation will result in a modern, robust, and enforceable election law that addresses the realities of a modern election campaign.[Translation]

Of course, none of this would have been possible without the hard work of this committee last year while it studied the recommendations of the Chief Electoral Officer, or CEO, after the 2015 election.

I believe you will find your work reflected in the legislation. Approximately 85% of the CEO's recommendations are contained in Bill C-76. This committee has already agreed in principle with over 50% of this bill.[English]

There are also components of Bill C-76 that this committee has not studied. I appreciate that the committee may want to focus on these elements of the bill. Please be assured that my officials and I are prepared to provide whatever assistance you need.

Bill C-76 makes our electoral system more accessible for all Canadians. It increases the opening hours of advance polls, strengthens obligations towards Canadians with disabilities, expands voting rights to about a million Canadians living abroad, and makes it easier for Canadian Forces members to vote. The elections modernization act also encourages candidates and registered parties to campaign in a manner that will be more inclusive of persons with disabilities. [Translation]

This bill also modernizes the administration of elections to make it easier for Canadians to vote, while maintaining strong and proven integrity measures.

As Minister of Democratic Institutions, one of my top priorities is to lead the Government of Canada's efforts to defend the Canadian electoral process from cyberthreats. Recent events on the international stage are a reminder that Canada is not immune from such threats. Bill C-76 proposes changes relating to foreign influence and online disruption that can be addressed within the Canada Elections Act.[English]

While foreign entities were already banned from making contributions to political parties and candidates, our government is closing a loophole that allowed foreign entities to spend up to $500 on election advertising during the election period. In addition, all third parties will be required to maintain a Canadian bank account for all of their election-related revenues and expenses.

I also want to address the concern that foreign funds can be donated to third parties before June 30, then used during the writ or pre-writ period. Under Bill C-76, third parties are required to disclose the source of all funds they used during the writ or pre-writ period, regardless of when they received the funds. Further, any attempt to conceal the use of foreign funds for regulated activities in the pre-writ or writ period will be illegal under Bill C-76.[Translation]

New provisions of the Canada Elections Act will clearly prohibit publications and advertisements—online and off-line—aimed at misleading the public as to their source. Similarly, fraudulent uses of computers aimed at affecting the results of an election will be strictly prohibited.

We all have a responsibility to combat foreign influence in our elections. Therefore, organizations selling advertising space will be banned from knowingly accepting foreign-funded election advertising.[English]

In order to ensure compliance and enforcement, the elections modernization act includes several measures designed to make the commissioner of Canada elections more efficient and independent. The commissioner will now have the power to compel testimony and we will restore his power to lay charges. A new enforcement tool and administrative monetary penalties regime will also be at the commissioner's disposal.

Canadians expect electoral processes will be fair and transparent. They want to hear from all sides, not only from voices with the deepest pockets. These values have shaped Canadian electoral and political financing regimes for over 40 years.[Translation]

However, the advent of fixed-date elections has been a game changer. Political actors and third parties are now able to plan partisan advertising campaigns ahead of the election period and, by doing so, circumvent the spirit of our laws.

(1540)

[English]

Bill C-76 will define a pre-election period during which reporting requirements and spending limits will apply to registered parties and third parties.

The pre-election period will begin on June 30 of a fixed-date election year. It will provide more transparency by requiring third parties who spend more than $500 on partisan advertising, partisan activities, and election surveys to register with Elections Canada. Third parties will also have a legal obligation to identify themselves in advertising messages.[Translation]

New spending limits will also apply to both third parties and political entities during that pre-writ period.[English]

Mr. Chair, we cannot take for granted Canadians' trust in their democratic institutions. The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring that our electoral process is transparent, accessible, reflective of modern best practices, and secure and sheltered from undue influence.[Translation]

I look forward to your questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

For the first round we'll go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister, it's good to see you again. Welcome back after your break. I've never had to be in that situation, but I can tell you it must have been absolutely wonderful at the same time. It is good to see you back again.

When we embarked upon this several years ago under what was then called the Fair Elections Act, there were some glaring omissions and glaring examples of what I thought was something that went against the idea that every Canadian citizen has a right to vote. It is our charter right to do so. There are things that bothered me.

The most egregious example to me was the voter information card, which we commonly call in rural Canada and the rest of Canada the voter identification card. Even though it doesn't carry that title, that is what it really is to these people. I used to see so many people, especially seniors, who would put a magnet on this card, and put it on their refrigerator to make sure that they went to vote. Not only was it a reminder, but it said who they were. I thought it was a great tool because it's one of the only national databases of identification. I'm glad to see that this legislation brings it back. I would love for you to comment on that.

The second part I would like for you to comment on is something which I thought was puzzling at the time. I'd like to hear your thoughts on the commissioner having the monetary penalties put now in front of them under this legislation, which I think is long overdue. They were removed from Elections Canada and put into public prosecutions where I thought the commissioner's role was still independent within Elections Canada, but they needed to be within that organization in order to get a better feel for their position.

There are two parts to the question. Could you talk about the VIC as we call it and also the commissioner being placed back to where they belong?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you very much, Scott, for your question and for your request on these two issues.

With regard to the VIC, the voter information card, this is really important for Canadians. In terms of establishing their residency, it's important to note that the VIC can't be used on its own, but can be used with other forms of identification to establish residency. When you think about it, there are not very many forms of identification that actually have your photo, your name, and your address on them. There are numbers of Canadians who don't have driver's licences, for example. For those Canadians, this is really important.

I thought that the acting CEO, Mr. Perrault, had a great point when he talked about the fact that this is actually about dignity for a lot of people. When you think about it, for a lot of married couples, particularly older couples, there might not be mail that comes in the name of both individuals, or there might not be bills or utility bills that could be used to establish residency. When I think about people in my community who really relied on the VIC, I think of elderly women in particular who needed that piece of identification, women who perhaps don't drive or have stopped driving and who don't have mail coming to them in their name that establishes residency with regard to Elections Canada.

In terms of re-enfranchising individuals and ensuring that we're providing dignity to voters and electors, I think it's absolutely critical that we re-establish the voter information card as a piece of identification that can establish residency when we're at a poll.

With regard to the second part of your question and putting the commissioner of Canada elections back within the house of Elections Canada, it's exactly what you're talking about with regard to being within that infrastructure as opposed to at the department of public prosecutions.

Furthermore, with regard to the commissioner, we've re-empowered the commissioner to lay charges and have also added a new tool, which is the ability to compel testimony in order to be able to enforce elections legislation. This was a case that was made very strongly by the commissioner. It's all well and good if we have in place a set of laws that are strict, that limit undue influence, and that really ensure people are abiding by the books, but if we don't have the tools and the ability to actually prosecute and ensure that those rules are being followed, then it's not strong enough. Personally, and on behalf of the government, I think this is very important to ensure that those laws are being upheld.

(1545)

Mr. Scott Simms:

I know you had discussions with former commissioners and the current commissioner. Did you ever get the feeling from talking to them that they had lost independence in any way, shape, or form by being within Elections Canada and working so closely with the CEO?

Hon. Karina Gould:

No.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Very good. That was what we heard the last time around.

There is another thing I'd like to talk about. I know this is pretty comprehensive, and I think the opposition accuses us of having an omnibus bill. If I may make their argument for them and dispel it at the same time, this is all about the Elections Act. As a former opposition critic of the—quote, unquote—Fair Elections Act, I can honestly say that it takes a lot to fix something that went so wrong at that time.

The other issue I want to talk about, which I think is a good initiative, is that of allowing younger voters to get involved before they reach the age of 18. There are two facets to this in this legislation. On the one hand, they can register to be future electors, and on the other hand, they can also be involved in working for Elections Canada. Could you talk about both of those, please?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, of course.

I'll start with the latter, which is that currently under elections legislation you have to be 18 to work in a polling booth. There was a very successful initiative out in British Columbia called “Youth at the Booth” during the last provincial campaign, which had high school students working on polling day. Elections BC talked about how great they were as poll workers, but also, it was a way to get them involved in elections and excited about the prospect of voting.

That's something the former CEO recommended in his recommendations following 2015. It's something that we think is an absolutely excellent initiative, particularly because we know that Elections Canada does struggle to fill the polls with poll workers during general elections.

By extending that pool, you're getting bright-eyed, eager students who are excited about this, and who then are also thinking about participating in the vote when they do turn 18, which leads to the idea of having a national youth voter registry. This basically would enable 14- to 17-year-olds to choose to register, so that when they turn 18, they get onto the electors list. Of course, that's kept in waiting until they turn 18. None of that information would be shared until they're 18, when the electors list is shared.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Minister, it's great to have you here. Welcome back to the committee. I think this is your first time here since you've been back from your brief leave. I wouldn't classify that as a break, myself, and I don't think you would consider it that way either, but we're glad to have you back.

I'll start with this, Minister. Do you believe it's important to make decisions based on evidence?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I do believe it's important to make decisions based on evidence.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I thought you might think so. As well, is there value in learning from the experiences of others and is that important?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Always.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Excellent. I thought we would agree on that too.

In doing this study, do you think it's advisable for this committee to study this legislation thoroughly and with those concepts in mind? Also, would it be prudent to hear from the relevant experiences of others to ensure we're getting the legislation right?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, which is why you're undertaking this study right now, and why PROC has already done 30 hours of study on almost half of this bill.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Given that we agree on those things, and given that Ontario is in the middle of an election where they're for the first time dealing with some changes they have made, some that are similar in nature or cover the same subject matter as some of the changes being proposed in this federal legislation, for example, the future voters registry, privacy policies for political parties, some limits and restrictions on spending by third parties, and government advertising restrictions, which is something the opposition has been suggesting as a potential amendment to this bill, would you say that it would be valuable for us to be able to hear from those involved in the Ontario elections, whether that be election officials, which we certainly should, or others who are involved in it, and hear about any of the difficulties they might have encountered in their experiences?

I think the last thing we would want to do would be to repeat any mistakes that might have been made there, or to not learn from those experiences when they're so readily available to us. What are your thoughts? Would it be advisable for us to hear from those involved in the Ontario election? Would you agree with me on that as well?

(1550)

Hon. Karina Gould:

The committee is independent and decides who to invite to listen to as witnesses, and I would not want to add to or detract from that. You will make your own decisions on that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You don't have an opinion on it? What are your thoughts?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As we say, it's important for the committee to make those decisions.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You don't have a personal opinion on whether that would be a valuable thing for us to learn from?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I said, I think the committee makes those decisions itself.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Fair enough.

When this legislation was introduced, your government introduced a notice of time allocation after only one hour of debate. I would say that's certainly not the signal of a government that really legitimately intends to work with the other parties to try to bring forward something that will be in the best interests of everyone.

However, during the half-hour debate that occurred after time allocation was moved by the government, you stated a number of times that you felt it was really important that this move to committee because you felt this was the place where it could get the best discussion and where it could receive the full amount of the substantive debate that's required. I would like to get your opinion on how much time you would suggest would be required to ensure substantive debate.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, as the committee is independent, I think it would be inappropriate for me to comment on that. That is really up to committee members to decide.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Minister, I appreciate that. I agree with you that it certainly is up to us to decide, but our goal in having witnesses here is obviously to hear their expertise. Being the minister responsible, I would expect that you would obviously have some expertise, and it would be helpful for us to get your opinion and your thoughts on the matter. Would you have any sense as to what you think would be an appropriate amount of debate?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would be happy to answer questions on the substance of the bill, because I don't want to interfere with the committee's work and the independence of the committee on this, so if you have questions on the substance, I'd be happy to answer them.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let me just as an example, then, say this. When the Harper government pushed through the Fair Elections Act, would you say that there was an appropriate amount of time for debate in committee?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I said, I'm happy to answer questions on the substance of the bill here, Mr. Richards.

Actually, when we talk about working with others and ensuring that there is a substantial amount of input from other parties, 50% of this bill has been agreed to in principle by PROC and was worked on over the course of 2016 and 2017. I hope you see some of your work reflected in here. A big part of putting this bill together was definitely ensuring that the voices of different parties were reflected in this.

Furthermore, 85% of this bill is based on the recommendations of the CEO of Elections Canada, following 2015, to improve elections and to ensure we're upholding the highest level of democracy and integrity. I look forward to discussing the contents of the bill itself.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate what you're saying about 50% having been studied before, but I'll point out that there was a significant amount of study done when the Fair Elections Act was passed, and I would hope that we would do the same here.

Since you're not willing to answer any questions about your thoughts in that regard, I guess, what about in regard to the House of Commons itself? Would your government commit to having at least as much debate in the House of Commons as there was under the Harper Fair Elections Act?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, Mr. Richards, I'm happy to discuss the contents of the bill. Since you have me here, this is probably a good time to ask about that before I have to turn it over to officials.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's wonderful. I appreciate that. I would love to do that, and I would love to get some answers to some of the questions I'm asking as well.

Both you and the acting minister while you were away have said numerous times that you were open to amendments by the opposition. What would your thoughts be in terms of amendments? Let's say, for example, that there's an amendment that would have a donation limit for third parties being the same as it is for political parties. Would you be supportive of an amendment such as that?

(1555)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I wouldn't want to comment on that right now. I'd want to see the substance of the amendment and how it's worded before that, but we are open to amendments, so if you do have some, I would entertain them.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I guess it's great to say that you're open to amendments, but you've just indicated to me that you wanted to talk about the substance of the bill. I'm now trying to do that and I'm asking you questions about amendments, and now you're telling me, well, you don't really want to comment on the substance of the bill, so I'm not quite sure what's left on that.

The Chair: Mr. Richards—

Mr. Blake Richards: Okay. I guess we'll have to try it again in the next round and see if we can get some answers then.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Minister Gould, welcome back.

From the reports from Elections Canada, how would you describe the incidence of voter fraud or attempted voter fraud within Canadian elections? Would you characterize it as a high incidence level in terms of democratic countries or relatively low?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Relatively low.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It was one of the arguments used by the previous government when they pushed through their voting changes unilaterally. They had the support of no other party.

You reflected particularly on women. I'll reflect on first nations in my constituency who have gone through this process, some of whom only have gained enfranchisement, or the right to vote, within their lifetimes. They've shown up at a polling booth where the polling clerk was a relative who was unable to vouch for them, nor was anybody else in the polling station, who may also have been related and, in some of the smaller communities, was certainly known to them. No one was able to vouch for them. They're often low income and don't have the proper ID. They're sent away from the polling station.

From the perspective of somebody who just in their own lifetime has gained access to our political conversation to then go through an experience, which is actually quite public, of being turned away and disenfranchised, with, as Mr. Richards talked about, all the evidence pointing in the direction that there is no sweeping voter fraud, using either the voter ID cards or vouching, can that experience not inform the way we consider the use of either of those tools to allow people to vote in our general elections?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think so. I think the reason I and the government feel so strongly about the voter information card and vouching is precisely to enable Canadians to have access to the right to vote. The right to vote is in section 3 of the charter, ensuring that people who have that right are able to cast a ballot.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That section of the charter doesn't say a lot. It says Canadians shall vote.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It doesn't say that they shall vote with a driver's licence or shall vote if they meet these various requirements.

I want to talk about other voter rights. Do you believe in a voter's right to privacy pre-writ and throughout the course of an election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Canadians are protected under PIPEDA and under the Privacy Act.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We don't apply that Privacy Act to political parties.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I appreciate the question. When putting this legislation together, I did draw heavily on PROC's recommendations. I know you weren't on the committee at that time when this came to the fore, but PROC had actually said not to do anything with regard to privacy at the time. Putting this forward I think is a good first step in terms of ensuring that there are privacy standards—

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Yes, but—

Hon. Karina Gould: —and policies put forward.

Go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let me challenge two things.

One is on that first relating of how PROC said nothing about bringing the parties under political privacy. There was conversation. It was Mr. Christopherson who was sitting in this chair, not me.

Second, things have happened since then. We've seen Cambridge Analytica, which your government gave a contract to. We've seen the effects of data mining through social media, and the ability to manipulate elections—I won't even say attempt to manipulate; I will say manipulate—through that ability to gather unbelievable amounts of information not just about voting groups, but about individual voters, to try to send them only certain information, some of it true, much of it not, as seen in both the Brexit experience and the recent U.S. presidential election. Many privacy experts and the interim and potentially permanent CEO of Elections Canada say that we need to do a lot more than Bill C-76 does when it comes to protecting voters' privacy.

Is your government open to doing more in considering bringing political parties under the privacy laws of Canada?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would say that with regard to the private companies that were mentioned—Facebook, Cambridge Analytica—they are covered under the privacy laws of Canada.

(1600)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But not a political party that mines information from those outlets.

Hon. Karina Gould:

What I would say is that we are open to amendments. I would also say that I think it does merit further study as well, because I think it is quite a complex relationship. I also think there is an important relationship between political parties and citizens to engage and have that conversation, which is slightly different from a private company, because they're actually in Ottawa representing their political rights.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Maybe.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would argue that there is a difference. That being said, I'm open to creative ideas.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you believe a voter should have the ability to phone a political party or email them and say, “Tell me what you know about me”?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, I think that's something that merits discussion amongst the members of PROC.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But I'm asking you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think it's a conversation we should be having with regard to privacy. Bill C-76 puts that conversation on the table.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I know, but we have to vote on this legislation.

Hon. Karina Gould:

This legislation outlines what the privacy policy is of parties. It also provides a contact person the individual voters can contact to ask information about—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, according to privacy experts, it goes little beyond the law that we have right now.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, this is something that is important, because if a political party does not provide their policy at the time of registration and does not update it when they need to, then they become deregistered as a party. That's actually a pretty big deal.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Your bill allows parties to still sell data. It would make it still allowable. That seems crazy to a lot of voters.

Hon. Karina Gould:

They're not allowed to collude in any way, under this bill, so that would be part of it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They can collect data, which they get from Elections Canada and they get from multiple sources. We don't know what data political parties get. I just don't know what the resistance is. You say there's some sort of special relationship.

Hon. Karina Gould:

The data that political parties get from Elections Canada is the voters list.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, and that's not it, though.

You say this is part of the conversation. We're in the conversation now. You've given us a 350-page omnibus bill and a very, very short amount of time, as you will admit, to look into it. We're trying to work with what you've given us in terms of time and a very large, 350-page bill. We want to consider modernizing this. You said it's a generational change. That means it doesn't happen very often. This should be something we ought to consider.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I will be very interested to hear what your amendments are.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As my very last comment, I'm going to look at a loophole in terms of foreign influence. Let's say the right wing—or the left wing, it doesn't matter to me—receives an amount of money offshore, displaces their current operating funds, and uses their current operating funds in their Canadian bank account to then run political ads, sponsor door-knocking, or whatever. Put simply, it's a displacement measure.

We've asked your officials if that could be done. Is that a loophole that exists within this bill? We've asked financial experts if it is a loophole that exists within this bill. We've been told yes. Does this present a concern to us in terms of trying to, as you said earlier, limit or eliminate entirely foreign influence on our elections?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think we've done what we can within the Canada Elections Act to limit foreign influence. With regard to the issue you raise, I think it is a legitimate one. The challenge, though, is that we would be asking all third parties to at all times report what they are receiving, whether or not they intend to participate in an election, and I think that poses a serious challenge to the charter.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Don't you have to register to participate, though, in your bill?

Hon. Karina Gould:

You do have to register to participate, so—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They would be the only ones we'd be concerned about.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, but they also have to report. Once you registered to participate and decided to participate, then you would have to report all contributions you received since the previous election, regardless of where they came from. You have to state, when you open your Canadian bank account, that you're only using Canadian funds.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, if you have a creative amendment that ensures charter rights, I would be interested in hearing it. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much.

Minister, welcome back. It's great to see you before the committee.

The Harper government's so-called Fair Elections Act made it harder for Canadians to vote and easier for people to evade our election laws. The Globe and Mail said, “This bill deserves to die.” The Chief Electoral Officer at the time said, “I certainly can't endorse a bill that disenfranchises electors.”

Why is it so important for the government that these provisions be repealed?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's for all of the reasons you just mentioned. It's also because, as we have discussed, it is a fundamental right of Canadians to be able to vote. Any measures that would limit their ability to vote, I think, should definitely, as I believe the government believes as well, be repealed and overturned.

(1605)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Richards in his questioning alluded to the fact that you like evidence-based decision-making. He seemed to suggest that he enjoyed that as well, but it seems the previous government did not enjoy.... Especially having heard what the former chief electoral officer said about that bill, I can't imagine that if I went through Hansard, I would see Mr. Richards' objections to the Fair Elections Act, but I will leave that to some research later on.

Could you advise the committee as to what your department did regarding working with Elections Canada on this bill and recommendations?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Certainly. As has long been the practice in Canadian elections legislation drafting, we worked with Elections Canada in the drafting of this legislation to ensure that it reflected the principles and that it was an effective bill in terms of having Elections Canada participate in that.

From 2006 until 2015, the previous government had eschewed any working relationship with Elections Canada. We do not feel that was necessary or right, and we therefore made a point of consulting Elections Canada. Furthermore, this bill is based on 85% of the CEO's recommendations from the previous election. I would note that many of the recommendations made between 2006 and 2011 were not included previously. There were a considerable number of recommendations we felt it would be important to move forward with to ensure we had a modern 21st century elections act.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

What does Bill C-76 do to help under-represented groups participate in our democracy?

Hon. Karina Gould:

First of all, the return of the use of the voter information card is very important in being able to establish residency for people who don't have the necessary identification. The second thing is with regard to vouching. As Mr. Cullen mentioned with regard to first nations individuals, vouching can be a very important practice to ensure that people who don't have ID can vote. Also with regard to people who live in shelters, for example, and who don't have an ordinary place of residence, this can really assist in ensuring they can cast that ballot. I think it's incredibly important for us as elected representatives and also in a democracy to hear from the most marginalized Canadians.

Additionally, with regard to Canadian Armed Forces members, you may not think of our military women and men as under-represented groups in elections, but actually only about 40-odd per cent of them voted in 2015. We worked with the Canadian Armed Forces in drafting this section of the legislation, part 11, that would make it easier for them to cast their ballot.

Finally, I would look to the youth voter registry in the sense of encouraging more young people to vote. We know that one of the biggest barriers to young people voting is the fact that they are not automatically registered when they turn 18. For them, having the opportunity to register and to, in fact, receive a voter information card lets them know they are part of the process as well and that they can participate.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

What are the obstacles that exist for members of the Canadian Armed Forces, if they are voting at rates substantially lower than those for the rest of Canada?

Hon. Karina Gould:

For one, if you are a Canadian Armed Forces member who is deployed abroad, you don't actually carry identification that would identify your address. Ensuring that we are still working with integrity measures, this would enable Canadian Armed Forces members to vote and protect their security as well.

Additionally, Canadian Armed Forces members can now choose where they cast their ballot, whereas previously they weren't able to do that. This is important so they can cast their ballot in their place of ordinary residence.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Spouses as well?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Many people want to run for office but can't because they have obligations at home, whether child care or care for a parent or spouse. What does this legislation do to make it easier for Canadians to run for elected office?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Whereas previously individuals who had child care or other care needs for individuals in their family could claim up to 60% of their care within their spending limit, we have removed that from the spending limit so that it can be an additional expense. Also individuals can use their personal funds, and they can be reimbursed up to 90%, because we want to make sure that having children or a family member who needs additional care is not a barrier to running for office.

It's not the be-all and end-all, but it is something that I think is important and that will be of assistance.

(1610)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The previous government introduced fixed election dates but didn't seem to abide by that. What changes are in Bill C-76 to help respond to how fixed election dates have changed campaigns?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Fixed election dates have by nature fundamentally changed how we run elections in Canada. Previously, you didn't know when an election was going to happen, so you therefore needed to be nimble and agile and able to spend, if that was your choosing. With a fixed election date, we saw in 2015 that really campaigning started about six months ahead of time. That's completely different from the tradition and culture of elections that we've had in Canada.

This legislation in particular establishes the pre-writ or the pre-election period beginning on June 30, after our Parliament rises, to constrain both political parties and third parties ahead of the general election, still maintaining the focus on the general election while also trying to maintain a fair and level playing field.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'll pick up where we left off.

I think it boils down to this. I'm here today to try to determine whether there is some way we can work together. There are obviously elements of this legislation that we just disagree on. That's fine. But there are probably some other areas where we can work together to try to see if we can strengthen the bill and come up with something where everybody can feel comfortable that there are some improvements to the elections law and that you've really tried to work with all other parties. What that requires, though, is some give-and-take and back and forth.

I'd like to try again. You wanted to speak about the substance of the bill. I'd like to ask you about some amendments, or areas that could be looked at in terms of amendments, and get your opinion and thought on those items. For example, I asked earlier about the donation limit for third parties and the idea of potentially making that the same as it is for political parties. What would be your thoughts on something like that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We have to think about third parties more broadly than political parties, because third parties are not just established for the purposes of an election. Third parties include unions. Third parties include other organizations that don't necessarily have donations and who use their funds in different ways.

Whereas I appreciate the direction you're going in, I'm not sure it applies entirely to third parties.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so it sounds like there's maybe not entirely an openness to that one.

Let's try another one in terms of third parties and foreign funding. For example, let's look at foreign funding in terms of prohibiting organizations registered as third parties from being able to participate if they have received foreign funding, or if they have received funding from a Canadian organization that received foreign funding. What are your thoughts on something like that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think it would face serious charter challenges limiting them because they at one point received foreign funding for something that could be unrelated to an election.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure, but I guess the issue there is whether that is indirect foreign funding, where collusion happens and things like that. At any rate, we'll move on and try another one.

What about ministerial travel and government advertising? I've asked you about this before. It doesn't seem like you are open to the idea of harmonizing those restrictions with the same ones that are put on political parties in the pre-writ. What about requiring ministerial travel and government advertising to be included during the pre-writ as part of a party's spending limit?

Hon. Karina Gould:

You will note that there are no restrictions on a party's spending on travel. The only thing would be on advertising. It's strictly on advertising but not on activity during the pre-writ period. I think that's an important distinction to make.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure, but you wouldn't be open to trying to harmonize that with the requirement on government, or...?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, the government still has business to conduct, as do members of Parliament, so I don't think that would be—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so again, it doesn't sound like there is an openness on that one.

What about the idea of requiring overseas voters to show some kind of intention to return to Canada to be eligible to vote? This law changes it so there is no reason for them to show any kind of intention to return to Canada. What about an amendment that would show some kind of intention to return to Canada, at some point?

(1615)

Hon. Karina Gould:

What this legislation does include is that in order for Canadians who live abroad to vote, they have to demonstrate a previous residence in Canada. They would cast their ballot in that place—

Mr. Blake Richards:

They don't have to show an intention to ever want to return. That's a change that's being made as well. What about an amendment to—

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think that would be very difficult to enforce, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Again, it doesn't sound like there's any openness there.

What about by-elections? There's a change here that increases the amount of time when a by-election can't be called. What that then does is to leave this weird situation where there can be a vacancy for over a year before an election. What about an amendment that might reduce the amount of time where there's a restriction on a by-election being called? Would you be open to something like that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's a direct inclusion from the recommendations from this committee in the bill—

Mr. Blake Richards:

You're not open to an amendment on that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

—but what I would also say is that one of the reasons this committee recommended it is that I believe part of that recommendation was—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry Minister, but I only have 15 seconds—

Hon. Karina Gould:

—specifically because there were by-elections—

Mr. Blake Richards:

—so I'm going to have to cut you off because I have one more question I want to ask.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—that were used to elongate the writ period and to take advantage of the pro rata—

Mr. Blake Richards:

It doesn't—

Hon. Karina Gould:

—that the previous government had put in place.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It doesn't sound like you're open to an amendment there. I've tried about five different things. None of them seem acceptable. It—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, “open” and “accepting” are two different things.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It doesn't sound like a real commitment there when everything is shot down.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, there are for sure an openness and a commitment—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Minister, could you at least commit, then, that you would call off this extremely undemocratic practice of Elections Canada implementing this legislation prior to it being passed by Parliament? I think that's obviously unprecedented. Would you at least commit to that? Would you at least commit to no more use of time allocation or closure?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Mr. Richards, you are grossly misrepresenting the relationship between Elections Canada and the Government of Canada. The Government of Canada—

Mr. Blake Richards:

You can certainly indicate that it shouldn't be implemented.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—has at no point instructed Elections Canada to implement this legislation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You have the ability, Minister, to instruct them not to.

Hon. Karina Gould:

We actually do not. Elections Canada is independent from the Government of Canada. The acting CEO—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would you commit to not using time allocation and closure at least?

Hon. Karina Gould:

—of Elections Canada will be happy, I'm sure, to answer on his own behalf, but as is—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Let me ask about what you do have the ability to commit to.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—the case right now, with the by-election currently ongoing, Elections Canada recently put out a press release to state that the VIC is not acceptable right now because the elections legislation has not yet been changed.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would you at least commit to not using time allocation and closure? That is within your jurisdiction to be able to say. Would you at least commit to no more time allocation or closure on this?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I hope that we can all work together on this committee to get this done in time for 2019.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think I can understand what the code word is there as well.

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Let's go to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Minister, first all, congratulations. I think we're all very excited for you on the birth of your child.

In 2008 I was a young volunteer on a by-election in Guelph. One morning while I was working in the office we started getting a whole bunch of phone calls that Liberal supporters all over the riding were having their brake lines cut. We started getting reports over the course of the next couple of days that across six or seven ridings in southwestern Ontario people had cut the brake lines of Liberal supporters and painted “Liberal” on their houses.

Then, in 2011, voters in Guelph and a handful of other ridings were phoned with a bilingual message claiming to be from Elections Canada directing them to vote in a different polling location than their voting cards stated. In many cases, these were very far away from their voting locations. A judge ruled that these people were called from the database belonging to the Conservative Party. Only one person was charged and convicted in this case, and there's nobody who believes that this person, if they acted at all, did so on their own.

The investigator, under the auspices of the commissioner, had a very limited ability to conduct that investigation, had to tolerate the Conservative Party's lawyer's presence at every single witness interview, and had no power to compel any testimony or to subpoena any actual materials.

Were the robocalls scandal to happen again in 2019, would the elections commissioner, under this act, have an improved ability to investigate? Do you believe this act will help dissuade the obvious election fraud conducted in 2011? What further powers does the elections commissioner have and why?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I can't comment specifically on what happened in previous elections, although I can say that I think these powers would definitely enable the commissioner of Canada elections to investigate more thoroughly any allegations or instances of attempting to misdirect individuals to vote at a different polling location.

I've heard compelling recommendations from the commissioner himself with regard to why it would be important, specifically because, as you know, with regard to the ability to lay charges, it's something that's under the office of public prosecutions. He has to get into a lineup, in terms of when that's able.... That can take a long time. Particularly when it comes to elections legislation, the timeliness of being able to lay charges is really important. It's important to demonstrate that the elections law is upheld. It's important to demonstrate that we as a country do not tolerate transgressions of elections legislation, and it's important to be able to actually pursue the case itself.

Number one, the ability to lay charges is very important. Number two, the ability to compel testimony is also very important, because when you have strong party systems and strong party loyalty, which, as you know, all of us who come from different political parties can understand, it can be difficult for individuals, who perhaps know something, to feel that they can say something or would say something. The ability to compel would give the commissioner the ability to further question.

What's important as well within this is that while he would have the ability to compel testimony, you cannot self-incriminate when you're being compelled to testify. When we're dealing with big scandals that have a big impact on the outcome of an election, it is important that there are the teeth to be able to uphold what really is excellent electoral legislation worldwide.

(1620)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have any idea of what would have been gained or what was the purpose of moving the elections commissioner out of Elections Canada? What purpose was served?

Hon. Karina Gould:

You would have to ask the previous government. I don't know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you explain the inverse for us?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Explain the reverse...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, how it helps us to bring it back under Elections Canada's auspices.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, it's good for them to be in same area in working on elections issues. They still maintain that independence, but they are also able to pursue elections-related charges in a timely manner.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have 40 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will let it go.

Thank you, Minister. I appreciate this.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you very much.

I'm glad to see you here, Minister. Just as I said before in the House, I'm very glad that you're back in the Commons, not just because I like you personally, but also because I think it's helpful with a bill like this—and with any bill, but especially one of this size—to have the minister here, as opposed to a temporary minister. I'm making the assumption that you were involved in the drafting of the bill and that Minister Brison was not. It's just harder, I would think, to defend and to shepherd through a bill that you didn't have a hand in designing compared to one that you did. Having said that, I'm very pleased indeed to see you here.

You've indicated an openness to amendments, and I wanted to ask about one very specifically because, as you know, it is very near and dear to my heart. We discussed it, you and I, before the bill came to the House, when it was in the very early drafting stages and you were asking about suggestions we might have. This is the idea of the provisional ballot.

For the benefit of those who may not be familiar with the term, the idea is that when a person comes in to vote and lacks any ID, they can still vote, but the ballot gets placed into an anonymizing envelope, just as if they had submitted it. On the outside of the anonymizing envelope, they put down their information. In the event that the number of provisional ballots in that kind of anonymizing envelope is large enough to be greater than the margin of difference between the two leading candidates, at that point they're authenticated. Those that are for real are then used to decide the election. This ensures both that nobody who has the right to vote is turned away and that nobody votes fraudulently who does not have the right to vote—or even to vote in error, if they're not citizens and that kind of thing.

This wasn't in the bill. Would you be willing to consider putting it into the final version of the bill? If we introduced amendments to that effect, would you be willing to accept them?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you. I do remember that conversation we had, and I'm glad to be back and glad to be working with you once again.

One of the concerns with that, although I would be open to looking at it a bit more in depth, is ensuring that when individuals come to the polling station, they're not sidelined off somewhere else. I think there is still a question of dignity with regard to casting a ballot, but I would be open to looking into that a bit more. However, I think the reason it was not included was that we wanted to provide as much dignity for an individual as possible when they go to the polling station.

(1625)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. I don't think you'd find there's anything undignified about the process, which is used in a number of other jurisdictions. As things stand, someone who comes in and has to go through a process of either getting a written attestation or vouching does have to step physically to one side, depending on the layout of the station. They vary significantly depending on where they are. As you know, they can be put into church basements, community halls, fire halls, you name it. I must say I literally can't think of anything about this that could be categorized as undignified, but I will ask the Chief Electoral Officer as to his views on the subject when he's here later today. Obviously dignity is of concern to him.

Leaving that aside, I'll just point out that, in the absence of doing something like this, even with the vouching provisions that have been returned to this draft bill and the provisions for voter information cards being used as proof of residence, there's still a hole that's being left here. It's one that was in play during the Wrzesnewskyj and Opitz ruling, in which an attempt was being made at the Supreme Court to decide which of those two had been elected. This is the issue of people who are at mobile polls. Frequently, senior citizens, in many cases who are in residences, don't have identification. There's no one at their poll who can vouch for them because only other seniors in a similar situation—that doesn't include the staff—can vouch for them, and they're unlikely to either have the ID or to, in many cases although this isn't universally true, have a voter information card that would establish residence. They could be in a situation where either they can't vote or they have to vote in a way that is not permitted under this legislation.

What I'm suggesting would cure that problem. Nothing in the legislation as it stands now would cure that problem.

Keeping that in mind, Minister, I wonder if you'd be that much more open to the idea of adopting the provisional balloting suggestion.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I'm not sure why they wouldn't be able to vote, because for individuals who live in shelters, long-term care facilities, on reserve, and one or two other provisions, the staff can actually write an attestation for everyone who lives there to ensure they have the right to vote.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sure. In the case of the polls that were in question before the Supreme Court—certain polls were looked at in that ruling—I think you'll find that actually hadn't happened, and there was a technical reason why it hadn't happened. I have to admit I can't recall the details right now, but I do think this would resolve a problem that has not been dealt with through other means.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would be happy to look into that further then.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Simms, you don't have the full time. There's only four minutes left, but you can have four minutes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh. That's very generous of you, sir.

The Chair:

You're using it now.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This is a question about candidates. I've been through five elections. I've met so many candidates, successful and unsuccessful, and there are a couple of provisions within this that would help a lot of people out. One that's very appropriate not just for you but for other people I've met is with regard to child care expenses as well as disability expenses and how it is going to be easier now for candidates, when it comes to claiming up to 90% of these expenses. I think it is long overdue, because I've seen first-hand just how difficult it is for people in this situation.

You touched on the other aspect, too, which is getting people who have disabilities to vote. That's wonderful, and I think that, too, is long overdue. Could you comment on allowing candidates...in those two areas, disabilities and child care expenses?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Certainly. I think this is a fairly important provision, because previously, while you could claim 60% of your expenses for child care or for caring for an individual who requires it in your family, that had to fall within the spending limits of your riding that you had as a candidate, and now that can fall outside. You can use personal funds for this, so it doesn't put you, as a candidate, at a disadvantage compared to another candidate who may not have those expenses. Additionally, you can be reimbursed for up to 90% of those. I think that is quite important for ensuring the diversity of candidates, which we so hope to have in this country.

The other part you mentioned, which I'm very excited about and which I think is actually really wonderful, is an incentive for political parties and candidates to provide material in an accessible format, up to $5,000 per candidate per riding and $250,000 for political parties. This is something we heard about from the accessibility group at Elections Canada. It was very important for them, because they feel in many ways that they are not included when it comes to material, when it comes to advertising, etc., in an election, and they really want to be part of it. I think that is really very exciting.

(1630)

Mr. Scott Simms:

The other part that I particularly like is the one that allowed people to vote from home. Just to get further comment from you or the officials, there are further allowances here to allow people to vote at home if need be.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, in recognition of PROC's recommendation but also the recommendation from the CEO of Elections Canada, this would allow the CEO of Elections Canada to have more flexibility and more discretion with mobile polls and at-home voting, particularly for individuals who have a disability but also with regard to transfer certificates.

For example, if you have a disability and your polling station is not accessible to you, you have greater flexibility in where you cast your ballot within your own poll. That's something that I think is also very important.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, good.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, do you want 45 seconds?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I do.

We've talked about better gender representation in the House. It's a woeful 25% or 26%. We had a bill that was proposed by Mr. Kennedy Stewart, whom you well know. Would you be open to including some measures to encourage parties to run closer to gender parity slates? Your leader, in fact, has chosen to protect incumbents. The assumption would then be that if your party is successful in the next election, we're not going to move much from 25% in the House of Commons.

You didn't move for proportional representation, which we know increases gender representation, so we're looking for some way to see the House of Commons actually look like Canada.

What openness do you have to including elements of Bill C-237 in this elections act?

Hon. Karina Gould:

With regard to Mr. Stewart's bill, I'm not sure that penalizing parties for not running at gender parity or close to gender parity—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It just doesn't return as much taxpayer money to parties that don't.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Sure, I just think that a penalty system is not the right way to go with this.

However, what I do think is that if there are creative mechanisms or ideas with regard to increasing more women's participation as candidates, I would be open to those.

I also think that it's about more than elections legislation when we talk about encouraging more women to run for office. I think that the demeanor in the House is certainly one thing that we could be working on more, when we think about women in politics. I think that for all of us as members of Parliament, as leaders in our communities, reaching out to women to encourage them to run is also important. Furthermore, other things we're doing as a government, such as having a gender parity cabinet, reaching out to having more women on boards, encouraging women in STEM, and encouraging women in politics are all good things that we should keep doing.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's disappointing. I think this is a creative way. You asked for a creative way. This is taxpayer money that we return to parties. They're not entitled to any of it. Our policies could prescribe a way to encourage women to run. Decorum might be one thing, but if you don't have women candidates, it's very hard to have women MPs.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, everyone.

Thank you for coming, Minister.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for having me.

The Chair:

We look forward to ongoing dialogue.

We're going to suspend for a moment to change the witnesses here.



(1635)

The Chair:

Good afternoon. Welcome to the 106th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Mr. Sutherland and Ms. Paquet will be joined by Jean-François Morin, Senior Policy Adviser, for the next portion of today's meeting.

Thank you all for being here.

Just so the committee knows, we have recently received two documents from the department, the elections modernization act, and this little one here is the clause-by-clause.

Blake, have you read this yet? It came this morning.

(1640)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, four times already.

The Chair:

Okay, good.

We just got something on the bill by email from the Library of Parliament.

Do you want to explain what you just sent us?

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

I believe that will only be half of the briefing note that we prepared for the committee. Due to its length, translation is sending it to us in chunks, so you can expect more.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Our apologies. We were expecting to meet on Tuesday, not Monday, so we were gearing up to have it for tomorrow.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Did you send it to P9 or our general accounts?

The Chair:

It wouldn't have gone to you because you weren't sworn in.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, it went to Mr. Christopherson.

The Chair:

It went to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is there a way to forward me a copy? Thank you.

The Chair:

Our witnesses don't have any opening statements, so we're ready for questions.

Who wants to go first?

Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for your presence here today.

I want to start by speaking about student engagement. I worked in a high school for 20 years, and I currently represent a riding that has three post-secondary institutions, so student engagement and student participation are very important to me.

This issue of the voter information card has come up. We often connect it with seniors, but I think it's also important for students, because not all students have driver's licences. My daughter is a perfect example. Bills come to me, not to her, at my house, and she still lives with us, so I think that the use of the voter information card as a piece for vouching is important, and you're using that in conjunction with other identification so it doesn't stand alone.

I'm looking at other things this bill does that encourage student participation and engagement. I would like first for you to comment on the youth registry. Can you explain how that works, how the information is kept, and how the information is gained in the first instance?

Mr. Allen Sutherland (Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government, Privy Council Office):

I'll just take a moment on the voter information card to say you're right that both students and seniors are least likely to have indications of residence, so the voter information card might be particularly important to those two groups.

On the issue of further improving engagement among students, it has been a long-standing problem that our next generation do not vote as often as older generations. We saw a bit of a change in the last election. It's something I know Elections Canada, indeed, all people interested in democracy, want to continue.

There are a couple of proposals in the proposed legislation that I think deal with it. One is the registry of future electors. The idea here is to develop a registry of young people who would, upon their 18th birthday, be registered for elections. The idea is that they would help develop that first appetite. The mystery of voting would drop when it's included, in fact, with civics classes, which some high schools have. I know Ontario has it, and other provinces do too. The idea of the registry of future electors plus civics classes would help demystify voting and get young people that first taste of voting, and once they have acquired that taste, it would ensure we have electors for life.

The other element that I think is important is participation in Elections Canada. There's a real issue the year of an election getting a sufficient number of people to work the polls, do all the interesting, supportive things we expect as Canadians to ensure the polls work well, and get the experience of Elections Canada. In her remarks, the minister mentioned the B.C. experience about the Youth at the Booth program, all of which suggests that, in fact, it's a great idea to get youth involved, let them see behind the scenes how elections really work, help create that taste for voting, and create that solid democratic foundation that we want to continue as part of our culture and heritage.

(1645)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I think that's great. I think the polling stations are probably more advanced in technology than any of us. I know they're going to speed things up.

With respect to the safety of the information, the names and addresses of the students, can you give assurance that this information is safeguarded and protected? Who has access to that information?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

First, you're absolutely right about the technology part of it, and I think Elections Canada has thought of that.

The information in the registry would be held by Elections Canada. Just to assure everyone, Elections Canada is behind the Government of Canada firewall and so has the protections that entails.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

You made a comment in your answer to the previous question that there was a bit of an increase in youth participation in the last election. Do you have the research that indicates what that can be credited to?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It was an increase of about 10%, if I recall. I think it was just the level of—

Do you know the number?

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

No, I don't.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Okay. I thought you did.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I was just raving about the Prime Minister. He may have been the one who drew them to the....

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It was interest in the campaign, we believe.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

The one thing I witnessed in my own riding that I thought was spectacular was that the advanced polling....

There was an opportunity for students to vote at the university campus, which is where my son and I went to cast our votes.

Having it on campus did a number of things. It created awareness. Different groups and clubs within the university, non-partisan included, would encourage people to vote. It was easy. The students could go there and vote in advance.

Do you think that might have been part of the increase?

What's the plan in looking at the numbers of polling stations, for example, that were included in the last election and those moving forward? Are we going to increase them? What sort of increase are we looking at?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

The proposal in the legislation is to extend the hours of advance polling from nine to nine. It has more in mind, I think, to provide a little more flexibility to the adults who have day jobs.

You're quite right. Advance polling has been a big success story in recent years in getting the vote out. About 25% of Canadians voted in advance polls last election.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I want to address the wait times. I think we all face this.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Quickly then, what are we doing to reduce wait times? We know there are surges in polling stations. People get off work, and then you have the surge. What is being done in this legislation to help reduce wait times when people are going to the polling station to vote?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

A couple of things in the proposed legislation address that issue.

One of them is more flexibility on the part of Elections Canada to deploy their staff more effectively. There are a lot of hidebound rules in the current legislation; people can do some things but not others. The CEO needs more flexibility in how he deploys his staff.

The other thing is just smart use of technology. The modernization part of this proposed legislation would allow improved use of technology to get people through the system more quickly. Some rules around signatures will be dropped in the case of advance polls. While maintaining integrity, that's seen as a way of moving people through the system so they have a better experience when they're voting.

I think the other thing is—and we've all experienced this—you're in the queue at the grocery store. If your lineup is really long and there's a short lineup, previously in Elections Canada you couldn't move to the short lineup. What's being proposed in the legislation is the ability to move people to where the lineup is shortest so they can move through the system more efficiently.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It's not an alphabetical or a geographical queue.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Exactly.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, very good.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I'll get my timer up so I use my time efficiently.

Is it a seven-minute round right now?

(1650)

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I want to talk to you a little about the bill's provisions regarding spending limits for registered third parties during the writ period and the new pre-writ period that starts.... I've forgotten. Is it June 1 or June 30?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It's June 30.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, let me start with that one.

It kicks in on June 30. Let's say there's a minority government in the next Parliament, the 43rd Parliament. If I'm not mistaken, it just says June 30. It doesn't say x number of—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Next election year.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. What happens in a Parliament where there's a minority government and therefore there's the potential for an unscheduled or early election? Is this simply not in existence in those situations?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

History would tell you that you wouldn't get to the fixed election date.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It would tell you that. No, I appreciate that. I'm not trying to challenge the logic; I'm trying to figure out what happens.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I'm just trying to help. If the government were to fall prior to the fixed election date, you would run under the regular rules, so there would be no pre-election period. It would not be possible to set up because you wouldn't know in advance when the government was going to fall.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The writ period remains the same in that eventuality.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You don't have the writ pushed back further in order to obtain some of the benefits. There's no shift in the length of the writ period in the event of an election occurring on an unfixed date.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

You're correct, Mr. Reid. The provision around the 50-day maximum would not apply, either.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Was there an adjustment made to the minimum period for writs in the bill? I can't remember.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

No, it's simply a 50-day maximum.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Were there changes made to the length of by-elections, maximums or minimums?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

No, just what Mr. Richards said, that in the nine months proceeding the fixed-date election you could not call a by-election.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Other than that, there are no changes made?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I'm just checking.

Manon simply adds that the 50-day maximum also applies to the by-election.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's not hard to imagine a situation arising in which a seat becomes vacant before the bill gets royal assent, but the actual by-election is held after the date on which royal assent occurs. This is all within the 42nd Parliament, obviously.

In such a situation, does the new rule apply?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

As you know, the Prime Minister has 180 days to call a by-election. If he were to call the by-election before royal assent, then the new legislation would not apply. If he were to call it after, then it would apply.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The date on which the seat became vacant would not be the determinative thing. Rather, the date on which the Governor General issues a writ for the by-election would be the determinant factor in whether the old or the new legislation applies.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I want to make sure, and I'll look to Manon on this.

In your scenario, the Prime Minister has not initiated the action to call the by-election. Am I understanding that correctly?

Mr. Scott Reid:

He might or might not want to. It's not hard to imagine a situation in which a seat becomes vacant a fairly short time before royal assent is anticipated on the bill. It might or might not be reasonable. I'm not actually trying to figure if it would be reasonable—that's a political consideration. I'm wondering about....

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Just what would apply.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, what would apply.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes, and that's all I'm trying to answer for you.

We can get back to you on this if you like, but my impression of it is that if the seat becomes vacant but the Prime Minister has not yet called the by-election, then once the legislation is in force, it's in force, and then it would be subject to the rules.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. I think I've got that. If you could get back with a confirmation, I'd appreciate it.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We started this discussion on registered third parties and their spending during the election period. I think I'm right that the spending is a flat rate and it's not pro-rated to the length of the writ period.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Correct.

(1655)

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I inquire as to the logic of that? There is still some variation in the logic of writ periods.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Are you referring to the third party spending?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It's not calibrated to the length of the campaign. Are you saying between the 37 and the 50 days?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's actually a relatively large variation if you stop and think about it.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I think the argument would be simplicity.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm sorry?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It would be simplicity.

It's a clear number, so you have the $500,000—

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's just easier to keep track of.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me, but how much time do I have left? One minute?

I think I'm in a situation where the question and the answer could not be done properly in a minute, so why don't we wait and proceed with this in a future round.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to our guests.

Third parties are defined as a person or a group who engage in advertising, other than a candidate, political party, or an EDA.

Is that right?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That sounds right. I think it's the law.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does it apply to other types of spending that third parties might be interested in doing in the course of a pre-writ period or writ period?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It varies. I think it's important to differentiate between the pre-writ and the writ periods.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, let's take them in their parts.

I guess what I'm specifically asking about is that the limits that are being placed at any point—the amounts—are limits on exclusively advertising, or is it anything we would deem to be a political action?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

No, it's other activities too. It includes things like surveys.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Polling.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Door-to-door canvassing, rallies.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I guess in the writing of the bill—it's big and I haven't been through all of it in detail—we define third parties as a person or a group who conduct election advertising, other than a candidate, registered party, or electoral district association.

Which part of the bill broadens the definition of third party in terms of political activity?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

There is some broadening of the scope. I don't know the exact numbers.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The challenge we have is that we're going to have to, under the government's direction, move quickly through this bill, being able to cite and locate the legal remedies that you've outlined. The only definition I read of a third party is that definition.

All the limits we're talking about in terms of spending and declaration, as far as I can read, are about advertising. Of course, as you've said, there are a whole bunch of activities.

It would be very helpful—your office having constructed this bill—to be able to point and say “advertising, and this, and this” all fall under the restrictions that we've placed under Bill C-76.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

We'll get it to you by the end of the meeting.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That would be very helpful.

You feel that these limits are being placed because the minister referenced this...and it's something we've looked through—some of the B.C. cases—about charter rights.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Of course, you feel that you've hit the exact right spot.

Mr. Allen Sutherland: That's right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: It is still a provision with the federal government, when introducing legislation, to put it to charter lawyers to find out how charter-proof the bill is.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There used to be a verification test; it had a such and such probability of surviving a charter challenge.

Has this bill been subjected to such a test?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

We have been working with Justice and with lawyers to try to find that balance.

It's a very difficult balance between freedom of expression and what's fair and just in a democratic society. We've been working to do that, and that informs the pre-writ period and also the writ period, as well the constraints guiding third parties.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Sutherland, I'm going to be very specific with you in terms of that.

There used to be an 85% probability test applied to all federal legislation before it hit the House of Commons. Of course, it's a somewhat subjective test. You ask a bunch of lawyers whether this will survive a charter challenge, and you get a bunch of answers. There has to be a high probability of survival.

My only question is, did this bill go through that test?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

We have worked with Justice lawyers to get that answer.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I smile, but this is actually quite serious, in the sense of—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

There was a tabling of the charter impact statement.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There was a tabling in the House?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

(1700)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Good. I'll look at that more closely.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Okay.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let me ask about the philosophical roots of this. Let's argue from the third party's side of things for a moment.

If I'm a third party advocate—I'm working for a think tank, an NGO, or a union—why should I be more limited than a political party in my ability to spend money legally, to receive money, either from my organization or through donations, to raise the issues that I think are important?

Why are political parties so special?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

First off, I don't think I could convince you—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You think you what? Sorry?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I said, I don't think I could convince you, if you were from that—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, you don't. You're just going to remain upset about this. Uh-oh.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Let me just play it through for you, because it's a serious question.

What is being attempted here, and what makes us.... I would compare the Canadian political system with what we see south of the border and say that we have a superior system in Canada, in part because we have a more restrained system that allows political parties to perform an incredibly useful democratic duty for Canadian society. It is required that their voices not be drowned out. The risk of unfettered involvement by third parties during the election time period would, in effect, drown out the voices of the political parties, making them unable—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Some people would like those political parties to have their voices drowned out.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

They would be wrong to do that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let me challenge it back. I'm not talking about unfettered. We have placed limits on what political parties can raise and spend. We have limits now on what third parties can spend. Why is it so much less? There are some libertarians—and others, not even libertarians—who will argue and say if a Canadian wants to donate to a political party of any stripe to have their issues and their voices back their candidate, that's fine. But many Canadians don't engage in political parties. Less than 1% have a membership in any of the parties represented in the House of Commons. Canadians voice their views in other ways, much more than they did a hundred years ago. Why are we setting a lower limit for that voice than we are for the people who choose to donate through a political party?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

You've come to the crux of the issue. In that moment of an election period, which is not a long period in the length of our democratic society, we're trying to preserve a little extra space for the political parties by providing some restrictions to the amount of partisan advertising. It's partisan advertising in the pre-writ period—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor] candidate. It's issue advertising as well.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

During the writ period it is, but during the pre-writ period it's just partisan advertising. We're doing it for a limited amount of time in order to have the democratic debate that we need to elect a view.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's limited at the most crucial time.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes, indeed.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the time when more voters are paying the most attention. If you or I were sitting in an NGO saying that we have $100,000 to spend on advertising, and what's the best bang for our buck, of course it's when voters are paying the most attention. However, we are now limited by this bill in terms of our ability to get at our issue, which we believe in and which people gave us money for.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

If you had $100,000, that's fine. You could spend $100,000.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Say we had $1.5 million.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It's an important point that most third parties are actually quite small in Canada—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, they are.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

—and that's a good thing.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

We'll go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Chair.

Ladies and gentlemen, thanks for being here with us.

I have a couple of technical questions regarding the legislation. Then I want to get into something that interested me several years ago and I'm glad to see that we're going through it.

The first one is on nomination contestants.

Proposed section 476.67 talks about limits on nomination contest expenses. A lot of people out there are trying to figure out what period it applies to. When the date of the nomination contest becomes public—from there up until that date—is that for every nomination contestant? If that is the case, has anything changed in this particular legislation?

Ms. Manon Paquet (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

It hasn't changed. The same rule applies in terms of the timelines. The definitions were adjusted to align with the new categories that were being established for candidates. That explains part of it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's why it's addressed here, under proposed section 476.67, correct?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, thank you for that.

There is another small technical question I have, under “Election expenses incurred by candidate”. This comes under clause 290. It's proposed subsection 477.47(5.1). Despite subsection (5), a candidate shall, before incurring election expenses, obtain the written authorization of their official agent to incur those expenses, and shall incur them only in accordance with that authorization.

I know we've expanded the idea of personal expenses through several ways. I can pay for it with my Visa card or what have you, and then be reimbursed for it. What does this mean about “the written authorization of their official agent”? I'm not sure how that applies. Why is it here?

(1705)

Ms. Manon Paquet:

This was a recommendation of the Chief Electoral Officer that was implemented to give more accountability if a candidate were to go over the limit in who approved those expenses. There are provisions to account for the fact that some of the expenses can now be paid from personal funds, like child care and disability. Those would not require authorization in the same way.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This is an accountability measure going back to the official agent. Correct?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

Exactly.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That was my confusion there. I apologize.

The Chair:

From my understanding of that section too, it doesn't apply to the personal expenses, it's only the election expenses part of the expenses.

Ms. Manon Paquet:

That's right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I want to talk about the laws when it comes to privacy and the data that's being collected by the parties.

It is my understanding that the party has to be more transparent. It has to transmit its policy through its own Internet site. What does that look like under this legislation? What are they compelled to do?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It has to be made available on the Internet site. It also has to be submitted to Elections Canada. In what needs to be there, there are some requirements of how and what information they collect, how the party is endeavouring to protect personal information. A statement is also required around training measures that will take place as well as approaches to things including cookies. In addition, there is a requirement to have a name and contact information of a person to whom you can address privacy concerns. If I'm a Canadian, I can find out who I can talk to.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I know I'm jumping around all over the place, but I don't have a lot of time.

On compliance agreements with the commissioner, it talks a lot in here about encouraging people who run afoul of the law to comply, and one of the ways of doing this would be the administrative penalties. In your opinion, what is going to be the biggest difference going into this election if someone runs afoul of this law, and how will the administrative penalties be helpful?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Assuming the legislation passes, what would change is in the past the commissioner of Canada elections had a pretty stark choice. For instance, if you didn't close the bank account on time, they had the choice of taking you to court or encouraging you, but had no proportionate instrument that they could use to get you to comply. Now with administrative monetary penalties, the commissioner has a broader range of tools available to get better compliance from third parties and political parties.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Would these penalties make that relationship between public prosecutions and the commissioner easier? I'm assuming it would. How does it affect the relationship? I know right now they're being moved over to Elections Canada, but that aside, when it comes to the compliance agreements themselves, how would the public prosecutor be involved in that situation?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I think the use of AMPs would ease the relationship—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Acronyms drive me crazy.

(1710)

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

The smart use of administrative monetary penalties as a tool to enforce compliance would help ease the relationship with public prosecutions because it means there would be fewer dumb prosecutions where what's at stake is so trivial.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I totally agree. In several departments, whether it's Heritage and CRTC and stuff like that, I notice it's fairly complex. I'm just trying to make my way through the ease between the two to get down to the most egregious people who run afoul of this particular law and how these administrative penalties will be enforced. I thank you for that.

The Chair:

And I want to thank you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Why would that be, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

It's time for Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I have some questions in a few different areas. We'll have a conversation, I guess.

This is in relation to third parties and the changes in this legislation as I understand them. Obviously they can't receive contributions from foreign entities during the election period or the newly created pre-election period, but they can receive them in the time prior to that, but they can't be for political purposes. What ways do we have, based on this legislation, of determining that? What's to stop someone from giving, say, $1 million for some other purpose? Of course what that does is it frees up maybe the $1 million they already had in their bank account to be spent on the election. In a way, it almost is still a way to influence—wink, wink, “I gave it to you for something else; spend your other million in an election.” How do we enforce and prevent that from occurring?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

You're speaking to the commingling issue, that the foreign money could be used for administrative purposes or other non-political purposes, and that frees up money elsewhere. What we have in the legislation creates a limit on it. I say that because it would be possible for the commissioner of Canada elections to demand receipts and to see the flow of the receipts into the third party. In a wild scenario where all the money going into the third party was foreign, it would be pretty easy to determine.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure. That would be true in that scenario. I agree. Between the pre-election and election period they can spend $1.5 million. Is that correct?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Do you mean the combination of the two?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes. Just for precision, in the pre-writ period, it's issue and partisan advertising, and in the writ period it's only partisan advertising.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Having said that, and let's use that $1.5 million figure just to make it easy, let's say the third party was to have $3 million in funding, and then $1.5 million came from foreign sources and $1.5 million came from Canadian sources. Is it possible for that organization to claim that the entire $1.5 million spent during the election was all Canadian, or if they have 50% of their funding from a foreign fund, would they have to...? Do you get what I'm getting at there?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I understand the commingling issue. Ultimately, it would be up to the commissioner of Canada elections to determine whether or not he or she felt that what was being proposed—in your case that the money was just dislocating—was in fact occurring or was foreign money flowing into the partisan campaigns.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What could we do? It certainly is a concern to me. If it were a concern to the majority of the committee, what could we do in terms of amendments to strengthen this, so there would be a better ability to enforce that and make sure that isn't occurring and there isn't this, wink, wink, “Well, we'll give you money for something else and you can spend the rest of it on the election”?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

My role is to talk about the bill as it is. I would tell you that it does make some important steps forward by creating the pre-writ period, by establishing the limits, and by expanding the scope of the activities that are covered by third parties, and also requiring the bank account—

(1715)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm sorry to interrupt. You can't make any suggestions to us in terms of how we might amend, can you?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

No, sorry.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Have you any suggestion on who might be a good person to ask that question?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Your colleagues.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Now I'll move to the privacy of the future registry of electors. When I asked this question of the acting minister at the time in the House, he indicated it would not allow this information to be given to political parties. Can I just confirm with you—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That's correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—that the legislation absolutely forbids that from being shared?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That's correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I just wanted to confirm that.

In terms of the expat voters, they have to prove their last place of residence. How is that done?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I'll turn to you. Go ahead.

Lieutenant-Commander Jean-François Morin (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

Currently, the voters who vote under division 3 of part 11 of the Canada Elections Act have to fill out an application for registration and special ballot. They have to provide sufficient proof of identity, but not sufficient proof of residence. That is the current state of things in the Canada Elections Act.

Bill C-76 doesn't change that. However, Bill C-76 eliminates some options that were available to expats. Currently, they have the choice to determine as their place of ordinary residence the place of ordinary residence of a person whom they would be living with if they were in Canada. Bill C-76 is changing that. Expats will only be able to choose their last place of ordinary residence in Canada and once they are registered on the register of international electors, they cannot change their place of ordinary residence anymore.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

They'd have to move back in order to change it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

This is just a follow-up to make sure that I'm clear on what you're saying.

They simply declare it. I get that you're saying that once they declare it, the declaration is once and for all time, unless they move back to Canada and then have a different residence. How is it demonstrated? Is it simply that they declare it and there's no verification done of that?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Yes, it's only a declaration. That being said, of course, the bill opens up the right to vote to about a million Canadians who have lived abroad for more than five years and who did or did not have an intent to return. It could be very difficult for some of these Canadians who have been away for a long time to prove their last place of ordinary residence in Canada, so yes, they have to declare it, and they don't have to show a paper evidence of it.

Of course, there are offences related to voting—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Of course. Although if there's no way to really verify it, then how do you enforce it?

Is it correct that they don't actually have to declare any intention to ever return to Canada with this legislation either?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

That's correct. That's why we are in this situation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

Now, we'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

In terms of Mr. Richards' line of questioning, is there any reasonable way—I see where he's coming from—to ensure that these million individuals living abroad provide some type of identification or previous form of residency? If you're living abroad for five years, ID expires, is lost, and you don't keep mail, such as a phone bill, from five years ago.

Was there any discussion of that possibility?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Again, as I answered to Mr. Richards, currently there is no obligation to prove residence for people who are registered on the register of international electors. They only have to provide satisfactory proof of identity. Therefore, it would be very difficult for people who have been away from Canada for many years to show documentary evidence of their last place of ordinary residence in Canada.

(1720)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Can you explain how the bill would make it easier for members of the Canadian Armed Forces to vote?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Absolutely. Currently, Canadian Forces members must vote in their military unit between the 14th and the ninth day prior to polling day. Only a small proportion of Canadian Forces electors are able to vote at civilian polls on polling day. These rules were designed at the end of the 1950s. They haven't changed much ever since.

Bill C-76 opens the voting opportunities for Canadian Forces members, and therefore, all Canadian Forces members will be able to choose whether they want to vote at ordinary polls, advance polls, at the office of the returning officer, or by mail from Canada or abroad. When they do vote using one of these opportunities, they will have to comply with identification requirements, including proof of address. Bill C-76 in maintaining the military polls in military units. This is the flexibility that the Canadian Forces needs given the wide variety of contexts in which they operate in Canada and around the world.

In those military polls, Canadian Forces electors will now be required to prove their identify and their service number. As the minister said in her presentation, Canadian Forces members who are on exercises or operations in Canada or abroad often cannot wear a document that would prove their address. That's for maintaining their personal safety and the safety of their family. We're also making it easier for Canadian Forces members to register on the national register of electors. Currently, they have to fill out a paper form that is called the statement of ordinary residence. Now the statement of ordinary residence is being repealed, and they will be able to register on Elections Canada's website on the national register of electors and change their address in order to vote with their families in the communities they serve and where they reside.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Perhaps this is an unfair question, because the number will go up and down, but do we know how many members of the Canadian Armed Forces are typically abroad who are dealing with this situation, or perhaps how many there were in 2015?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

I don't have that information in front of me, but the Canadian Armed Forces currently has about 13 ongoing operations around the world. As I said, the context in which Canadian Forces members serve varies a lot. They can be serving in a multinational operation where there will be hundreds of them together and they could be serving by themselves as an agent in an embassy, for example.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

What consultations, if any, were undertaken with the Canadian Armed Forces?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

There were several consultations held. In his report following the 2015 general election, the Chief Electoral Officer recommended that the special voting rules applicable to Canadian Forces members be reviewed given their age. This committee accepted this recommendation in principle, so there were consultations between Elections Canada and the Canadian Forces for about six months, which led the Chief Electoral Officer to table supplementary recommendations before this committee in June 2017. Following June 2017, the Canadian Forces have been collaborating with the Government of Canada to make sure the amendments included in Bill C-76 would be reflecting concerns of flexibility, but also operational security, for example.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Ms. Vecchio.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London, CPC):

Thanks for having me today.

I was going through some of the information regarding the AMP. Looking at that information with this new system, it has to do with the financial administration.

Can you broaden that a little bit? I'm looking at some of the things and it's basically taking it from being what you would see as a crime, where someone could be convicted, to imposing fines, and the fines are quite small, I find, as well. Can you give me a threshold on what you would expect? Let's say somebody over-contributed or an MP or a candidate put in $50,000 into their campaign, yet their limit is only $5,000, can you tell me exactly what would happen in a situation like that?

(1725)

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

The short answer is no, I can't, because the commissioner of Canada elections would be the one who would determine it.

On the over-contributions, that's an exception to the AMPs rule. That's a different scenario. For the others, you're quite right that administrative monetary penalties are intended to be small. They're intended to deal with small things that aren't worth going through the formal court system, with a lot of waste of both time and resources. I think the maximum is $1,500 for an individual and $5,000 for a group.

It's important to note that there is an ability to contest the AMP if required, but it's a proportionate response and the intention is to try to make it so you end the bad behaviour.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Can you give me the definition of a group, then? Since many of the contributions are coming from individuals, what would be identified as a group if you're talking about a $5,000 limit? What would a group be and why?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

A political party, for example, would be an entity.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Riding associations.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Okay, so, transferring from one EDA to another EDA, that kind of stuff would be at max.

Ms. Manon Paquet:

Maybe to add to the over-contribution issue.... It could fall under administrative monetary penalty, but the limit of the penalty is higher. It could be double the amount of the over-contribution or the contribution that was not allowed.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

It's not just for over-contributions. It's also for overspending, correct? It also takes that in. Let's say somebody has $80,000 during the writ and spends $90,000. You're looking at there not being criminal charges any longer. You're looking at putting this down to a monetary value.

Ms. Manon Paquet:

It would be one or the other. The commissioner would still have the option to prosecute.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Changing the whole line here, I want to go back to the third party spending. In 2015, how many third party organizations were registered with Elections Canada?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Oh, I knew that....

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

You knew that was coming.

I think Wikipedia says 55, but I could be crazy.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes, there are a lot.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

There are a lot. Yes.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

There are a lot, and there are a lot of small ones. The average third party spends about eight and a half thousand dollars.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

What would the number be if we're looking at a large scale? In 2015, I know that there were some very large—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That number I do remember. There were 19 that spent over $100,000.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Did any of them hit the...? I think a political party at a national level can give.... Is it $21 million approximately? How much are they able to give?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It depends year to year. Did any of the third parties hit that? They most certainly did not.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

They didn't hit that.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Not at all.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Do we see a growing trend, though, if we are comparing the 2006, 2008, 2011, and 2015 elections? Do we see an increase in third party spending?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I think there probably is an increase, but it's not.... It's more if you look south of the border.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

I'll go back to the scrutiny. This goes more to where Blake was leading. When we're looking at scrutiny, what is going to be the regulation?

Let's say, for instance, that an American organization provides money to a third party organization here in Canada. It's spent pre-writ and all of those things. When it comes to privacy of their own information, although they're registered, at what point can Elections Canada say that it needs to see everything?

Is it going to be limited to what it can see when it comes to transactions, or would it be able to see everything from the time period in question? It may say, “Hey, listen, this may have come from 2014, and we recognize it's the 2016 election”, or something. How far can it go back, or will there be limitations on when it's able to scrutinize this information?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Currently, third parties have to report on the contributions they have received six months prior to the beginning of the election period. Now they will have to report on contributions that they have received basically since the day after the previous general election. For example, when the pre-writ period starts, if they intend to spend more than $10,000 in the pre-writ period, they will be required to make a report prior to the beginning of the formal election period on all of the contributions that they have received since the day after the previous election.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

So, Elections Canada will have the authority to look at everything from October 20, 2015, forward on anything to do with third party contributions at this moment.

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

The third parties have to make reports to Elections Canada, and Elections Canada has the power to audit these reports. When it has doubts, it can, of course, ask for more information. If it has further doubts, it can refer the matter to the commissioner of Canada elections, who can investigate.

(1730)

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If people turn 18 during the writ period or even on election day itself, at what point will they show up on the voter list for parties?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Under the proposed legislation, they would be registered as of the day of their birthday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right. So, they wouldn't show up on the day 19 list. You know their birthday is coming before the election or on election day, so they're eligible for that election, but they're not yet 18. How is that treated?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

They're not on the list until they've turned 18. Am I correct in that?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

They could likely register at the polls and make a solemn declaration that they will be 18 on polling day. The definition of an elector is to be 18 on polling day, so they would be allowed to vote.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

But the parties wouldn't get the information in that case.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At all?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Not until they turn 18....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On election day, by which point you've received the last list from Elections Canada and—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That's the way it is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Are there any statutory limitations on elections fraud investigations and charges? Is there a statute of limitations? Is it five years, two years, 100 years?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

There are some in the act, but we'd need to dig it up. We can get it to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the interim, what constitutes election advertising for a third party? If a third party wants to talk about the minimum wage, as an example, can they cite a particular party? Is just talking about the issue enough to constitute third party advertising, or do they have to take a position on a party? What are the limits, or how fuzzy is it?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I think what you're getting at is what constitutes partisan advertising on the part of third parties. It's really a statement of either supporting or being against a particular party. Otherwise, it's issue advertising.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They can beat around the bush on an issue without actually naming a party and it won't count.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's good to know.

A fun question—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It's important to note that during the writ period both issue and partisan advertising are counted, so they can't do that during the writ period. All count toward the total.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you are vague about the issue, can you get around that as well, then?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

No. I think if it's issue advertising during the writ period, it gets counted.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's good to know.

The foreign electors, the expat voters, would—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Those aren't foreign electors; those are Canadians living abroad.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The foreign-residing Canadian electors, how's that?

Mr. Allan Sutherland: Sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Would they receive anything resembling a VIC, or is it entirely on their own proactive initiative?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

They have to apply to register and to get a special ballot.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

They have to initiate it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any reaching out to those people before the voting time?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

The mandate of the CEO for public information includes a specific provision allowing Elections Canada to promote to Canadians living abroad.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It's not personalized. They don't go out to each one. It would be an impossible task.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are embassies empowered to help in the elections in any way?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

They can accept the ballots and the mailers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They can accept the ballots. That's interesting.

You explained earlier how you choose the ridings. How is the declaration made of what riding? Do they just send a letter saying, “I will vote in Nathan's riding”, and that's the end of it?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Sorry, could you repeat the question?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When a Canadian living overseas, especially when they've been gone for a long time, wants to register in Canada to vote, mechanically how would that work? Do they just send a short note to Elections Canada saying, “I intend to register in this riding for the rest of the time”?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

No, they have to fill out an application for registration and a special ballot. The act is very prescriptive on the information that needs to be included in the application. They have to provide sufficient proof of identity as well and they have to declare where their last place of ordinary residence was before leaving Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So, it's attached to that residence, not the riding. If there's redistribution, it follows the address.

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Exactly. They have to declare the address, and the address is then linked with the electoral district.

If I may answer one of your previous questions with regard to the limitation period for notice of violations that may be issued in the context of the administrative monetary penalty system, the period of prescription will be five years, which is provided in proposed subsection 521.12(1). I believe there was a limitation period for all other Canada Elections Act offences in the past, but my understanding is that this limitation period was repealed in a previous iteration of the Canada Elections Act.

(1735)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So, you could theoretically investigate election fraud from 40 years ago.

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

For criminal charges?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Right.

LCdr Jean-François Morin: The criminal law needs to be settled in Canada, so likely that limitation period that was applying in the past would have applied to those offences 40 years ago. But since the amendment to the Canada Elections Act, yes, it could be investigated and prosecuted.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

None.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That answers that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

You're welcome.

Once those foreigners register, do they have to register every election, or are they now on the list?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

They are actually on a special register, the register of international electors. They are on that register until they either ask to be deregistered or they come back to Canada.

The Chair:

How do you find out if they die—like, to get off the list?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

That's a very good question, Mr. Chair. I don't have the answer off the top of my head.

That said, there are provisions in I think part 4 of the Canada Elections Act that deal with the national register of electors. There are information exchanges with, for example, Citizenship and Immigration and the CRA that allow the Chief Electoral Officer to be notified of a deceased person.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Cullen. If it's okay with the committee, after that we'll just do open format for anyone who has questions still.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I guess if they stop sending Christmas cards, it's one way to know if they're no longer with us.

With regard to privacy, when I asked the interim CEO of Elections Canada what the current limits are on how parties handle the information they gather on Canadians, he said there are very few to no limits. With regard to what the parties do with that private information and their legal ability to sell it, if they so choose, is it being made illegal for parties to collect data on Canadians and then sell it to some third party, if they choose?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

The approach in the proposed legislation isn't focused on illegality other than the.... If you don't do it, you get deregistered.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If you don't do what?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

If you don't provide a policy.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right now, Bill C-76 says tell us what your policy is, and if you don't tell us what your policy is, then we may deregister you.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

You will be deregistered.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but the policy can simply say very little to nothing.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That's—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The bill doesn't require any enhancement of Canadians' privacy.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

You are correct. What it does do is create transparency. Presumably, if you do have a policy that you put on your website that says your policy is to share the privacy indiscriminately, Canadians will judge it accordingly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So the bill doesn't prevent parties from doing bad things, it just forces parties to tell voters when they're doing bad things.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes, including the selling.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Why not ban the selling? I don't understand. I mean, you hope political parties don't do it, yet....

When I talked to the CEO of Elections Canada, it was about something that we had just watched. We had just witnessed how powerful data can be, not just in the hands of political parties who are vying for power themselves but in the ability to manipulate data and to expose voters to misinformation through that manipulation. This is a core threat, I would argue, to our democratic institutions. Would we agree with that, that the new technologies and the new tools that are now available to those looking to sway public opinion are what we used to do but on steroids? I don't understand why we don't have more—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I don't think it's the case that you can sell the voter rolls, so I think that is—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, not the voter rolls, but—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

But that's the information that Elections Canada comprises.

(1740)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand, but in some European countries, a voter can phone up a party and say, “Tell me what you know about me.” The party has to say, “Well, we know your address and information. We also acquired information that you signed a petition in 1990. We know that you registered this.” Parties collect a data-rich source. They're trying to. The Liberals used to brag about it. They bragged until recently, until Cambridge Analytica, about just how they won the 2015 election: great data management, great data harvesting.

I'm wondering if there's any provision under Bill C-76 that allows a Canadian to petition a party to give them even the source points of data, i.e., “What points of data have you collected about me?”

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

They could certainly ask the contact, but—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It doesn't obligate the party to give over the information.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Why not empower the voter to be able to know what information the...?

Let me ask you this. We have a firewall within my office. Somebody comes into my office and talks about an immigration case with my staff. Every party has a database to manage that file. We're working on it. I just did one with a minister an hour ago. None of that information can transfer over to the dataset saying that this person is interested in immigration issues.

Are we required by law to have that firewall right now? Do you know?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I don't know. You might be better placed to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, this is an interesting thing when we're dealing with Bill C-76 and we're talking about data.

Mr. Allen Sutherland: Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Did the government of the day, in doing a generational change to our voting laws, say that thou shalt never transfer, for incumbents, for those working in political office, information gathered through your work as a member of Parliament over to the party database side? We all hope that we all have good ethics and that every office prevents that transfer, but does Bill C-76 have anything to say about that?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Not to my knowledge.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Now, for a Canadian, you can understand their perspective. They come into one of our offices with a file, a case, that they're working on and that we're working on in a non-partisan fashion as an MP. In terms of an amendment to say that information cannot ever be transferred under penalty of expulsion, Canadians would want to know that, wouldn't they? We can attest to it and tell a citizen coming into our office that we'll never do it if you walk into Larry's office in Whitehorse, but why not enshrine it in law?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

This would be an example of where parties could set examples for other parties by making sure their policy is clear and obvious on that point, and then people could compare it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Setting an example is great—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

But it's transparency—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—but the average voter is not going to look through the policy section of each party's website and say, “Let me get into the legalese about your specific guidance rules—not mandatory rules—about how you're handling my data,” and then be able to say that the Liberals' rules look like this, the Conservatives' rules look like that, and the NDP's look like this, so they're going to vote this way. I just don't think it's a reasonable expectation.

It's like those disclaimers on websites that say “to be able to use this app, click if you agree”, and then there are 47 pages of legalese. We've proven in court that's not a verifiable test that lets companies off the hook. I don't think this is a verifiable test that lets parties off the hook for the misappropriation of Canadians' data when executing an election.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I understand. I have just two quick points.

The minister, in her remarks, said she was open both to amendments in that and to continued work by the committee in this area. The second thing is that it may not be important that Canadians do that cross-comparison—because I agree with you that not every Canadian will do it or is capable—but opinion leaders might, right? Opinion leaders—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but again, if we're doing something.... This is to say that in 2018 and 2019 the reality of conducting an election has fundamentally changed—

Mr. Allen Sutherland: Right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: —from what it was a generation ago in terms of the ability.... People used to look for Sears catalogues and library cards. The data sources were limited. We had door-knocking and phone banks. Now, any time someone clicks a survey on Facebook, we've learned that they might be trolled or exposed, and their data might be sold to political actors, to third parties or registered parties—it doesn't matter to me—and suddenly they're getting only this kind of information.... I think it's only going to get worse, so I wonder why, in a generational change, we're not doing more about it, Mr. Chair.

We're of course going to come to it with amendments. We just went through Bill C-69. We put 300 amendments on the table, and one was accepted, so you'll forgive me if I'm a bit skeptical about how open the government is. We'll see if it's any different on this omnibus bill. It's open, but not accepting.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll open it up, particularly for someone who hasn't asked anything yet.

Mr. Bittle, Mr. Cullen, and then Mr. Richards.

(1745)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'd like to ask a question that goes back to the armed forces and spouses of members of the armed forces. Under the current regime, if a spouse of a member of the armed forces is away for a period of more than five years, do they fall into the same category as other expats?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Currently there is an exception for the five-year limit for dependants of Canadian Forces members residing abroad with those members, so no, they currently don't fall within the five-year rule.

If I may add to that, however, Bill C-76 will bring an improvement for the dependants of Canadian Forces members residing with them abroad and also to other civilians who accompany the Canadian Forces members abroad. For example, RCMP officers could be participating in a mission with the Canadian Forces, or Global Affairs Canada, GAC, officials could be participating in a mission as well. They would still vote under division 3 of part 11 of the act. Currently, they are experiencing some difficulties voting under that division, due to the fact that Canadian Forces members serve in remote areas. With the postal services in those areas, it might not always be easy to get their special ballot kit and send it back to Elections Canada so that it would be received before 6 p.m. on election day.

Bill C-76 brings with it a legal obligation for Elections Canada and the Canadian Armed Forces to collaborate in order to make sure these civilians who accompany the forces abroad, including dependants, have an easier way to vote.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I asked the interim CEO this question. On the west coast, sometimes we get quite frustrated because so much of the vote has taken place and it is then released. There have been challenges all the way up to the Supreme Court about the release of information as to whether it is a citizen's right.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Do you mean the election results?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, the election results. We're talking about election night.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We're out canvassing. All the parties are out canvassing on the west coast. It's 4:30 or five o'clock and we're knocking on doors. We get to doors of whatever type of voter and they say, “I just heard on the news what's going to happen or what's likely to happen.”

As you say, we always want to encourage people to vote. This is a discouragement, and it has actually been said that a voter on the west coast has been given privileged information that a voter on the east coast did not have, which is how seats are starting to be determined. One of the foundations in our voting laws is that no voter should have more information than another, just inherently.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Okay.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is there nothing we can do about this?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

There's nothing in the bill that addresses that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's too bad, because there are a lot of voters who would like to do something about it. Is there any section of the bill that deals with things such as voter information that we could then apply through amendment? In terms of scope and whatnot, we have limitations on how we amend a bill.

I grew up in Toronto, so I did not see this reality until I moved to the west coast. I thought, what are they all complaining about? Then you go through a couple of elections and it's more than annoying. It actually makes you feel a little less of a participant in the action, simply because my good friend Andy and his family have already gone out and voted; the results have already been released, and good or bad for whoever's party, they start to affect the voter decisions down the line, whereas in Mr. Fillmore's case or in others, they're not affected by some type of pre-outcome, other than polls, which are as good as a poll is.

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

This issue is a long-standing one, and it relates to the fact that Canada spans, what, six time zones?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Five and a half time zones

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Voting times used to be the same all across Canada. A few years ago, staggered voting hours were implemented. Yes, there used to be provisions in the Canada Elections Act that restricted publication.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That was challenged in court.

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

That was challenged in court and the government of the day asked Parliament to repeal those provisions, and they were repealed.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. There were provisions in law that prevented the expression of voting results through the public airways, and the Supreme Court said, “CTV and CBC, you can't publish this.” Parliament then brought in a new law to say it's okay to go ahead and do it.

I guess we're just spitballing here. Why can we not simply start releasing the results in a staggered fashion? Don't even count the boxes for an hour or an hour and a half.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

They have tried a few things in terms of staggering voter hours. It's interesting that with all the advance polling and the increasing use of advance polls, that actually reduces the problem that you identify, right?

(1750)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How so?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Voters who vote in an advance poll in British Columbia or in Newfoundland have registered their vote at the same time with the same information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, but the advance poll, which I think is great and we're doing more of it because it's more convenient for Canadians, would say that staggering the voting release would actually be easier because you're counting so many fewer votes on election night. That's what we were told. The volunteers and the workers for Elections Canada are old and they don't want to stay up late.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes.

I'm not agreeing that they're old.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You did say yes. It's on the record.

The Chair:

We have to move on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Chair, I have one last question.

If 30% or 40% of the votes have already been registered and counted, in terms of just not releasing the results, could we not make an amendment within this bill? Do you believe we could make an amendment in the bill to effect the thing that I'm addressing?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Go ahead.

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

We will leave to this committee the decision as to whether such an amendment would be receivable and would be passed. That said, one of the concerns that has been expressed by the acting chief electoral officer and that would be expressed by those persons who have done some electoral observation around the world is one of integrity. There is often suspicion when election administrations hold up the release of election results. That is the reason that election results are usually not held up once they're available.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's not Estonia.

The Chair:

We have a few people here, so let's not take too long for each person.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards, Ms. Tassi, and then Ms. Vecchio.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I can't remember who asked the question, but earlier you were talking about the third party regime and that Elections Canada has the power to audit the contributions that were received pre-writ. That's my terminology, of course. What would trigger an audit of those contributions? I guess you audit spending in the pre-writ period as well. How would that be triggered? What would be the barrier such that Elections Canada would say, “Gee, we'd better look into this”?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It's difficult to be in Elections Canada's shoes. I know you're going to speak with the acting CEO soon, but one might be a suspicion regarding the problem that you outlined, foreign money finding its way into partisan purposes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What I'm wondering is what would arouse that suspicion? What would be a trigger? When legislation talks about there being an ability to audit but there's not really anything that triggers an audit, one wonders whether it would ever happen and, therefore, whether this would be an easy loophole to jump through. Can you imagine for me what might arouse suspicion sufficiently that there would be a need to do an audit? The other question is whether a large part of that could be that a public complaint could be brought that would arrive at one.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

A dramatic change in behaviour of a third party might be reason to arouse the suspicions of someone and make it reasonable to demand the audit trail or the receipts.

Ms. Manon Paquet:

I would add that the reports of the third parties will also be posted on Elections Canada's website at some point. There is a possibility that if someone sees something that they consider suspicious, they could bring forward a complaint through the commissioner.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So it is possible for a member of the public to say, “Gee, something seems funny here. I'd like to see Elections Canada look into this,” and they can make a complaint, and Elections Canada would be able to determine whether it was worth it to investigate. Does the legislation allow that?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

The complaint would go to the commissioner.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, but does the legislation allow that?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

The commissioner would decide whether or not to investigate.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Yes, and one of the provisions in Bill C-76 is the commissioner's ability to initiate an investigation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You mentioned the public, so if a member of the public says, “Gee, something seems funny. This third party all of a sudden sure seems to have a lot more influence than it did before, and I wonder where all the money is coming from” and they make a complaint to the commissioner, does the legislation as it's written now authorize an investigation and an audit to take place as a result of that?

(1755)

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

It's not automatic. I don't want to leave you with the impression that someone would make a complaint and then the commissioner would have to launch to investigation. It's not—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I get that there's a difference between a complaint being received and there being a requirement that there be an audit. I would almost argue that maybe that should be something. However, that being said, based on that complaint, they would be authorized to determine whether—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

If they have reason to believe that there's an issue, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, but it doesn't require; it only authorizes?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

I have two quick clarification questions and then a different question. With respect to the expat declaration, that declaration, I take it, is sworn in front of a commissioner, or what does that declaration look like? Does it have to be sworn?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

It is signed by the elector. I would have to verify in the legislation. I can get back to you right after.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

The question came up with respect to what counts as advertising with a third party. Let's say, for example, you have an organization that endorses the platform of a party specifically and references the platform but isn't necessarily endorsing the party. Is that included as advertising?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Can we accept that “platform” might be an important policy, so “x” is really important?

In that case, they've declared that a certain policy is important.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That is not partisan advertising. That's merely a declaration that this issue is important. It's issue advertising. It's covered in the writ period. It's not covered in the pre-writ period.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right. But in the writ period, if you mention the policy and you mention the party that has that policy—

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

That's partisan. To be crystal clear, even if in the writ period you mention that this policy is really important, that counts towards the spending limit of the third party.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

Above and beyond those two clarifications, can you comment on the changes in Bill C-76 that make voting more accessible for those with disabilities and for those in remote areas?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

In remote areas, there is increased use of mobile polls, and that helps both with advance polling and on the actual day of. In the case of persons with disabilities, there's greater scope for support from Elections Canada, regardless of the type of disability. Currently it's limited, but now it will be more open. There's just more support provided.

Another element has to do with candidates who are required to care for people with disabilities. Ninety per cent of those costs are reimbursed.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

Of course, candidates and parties would have a financial benefit for developing communication materials that are accessible for persons with disabilities.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Vecchio.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Thanks very much.

I'm going through some of this information. I saw that last year.... By no means am I trying to pick on one organization or another, but when I look at political financing of third parties, I see that two trade unions gave $45,000.

Why is there inconsistency between what somebody can give a political party and what somebody can give a special interest group or a third party? Why are the rules different?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

This is speculation on my part, but I would just observe that political parties are dedicated to winning office and winning power; third parties have other and different interests.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

I'm just looking at a return right now. It shows two contributions of $45,000. We know that individuals can give only $1,500 and that corporations and any other groups, even unions, cannot give to political parties like that.

Why do we have two separate sets of rules?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

I can speak to political parties. There's a desire to provide limits on the amount that people and corporations and unions can pay to political parties in the interest of a fair and balanced system. Third parties perform a different function in society, and to date it hasn't been thought that you need to restrict their funding sources in the way you describe.

(1800)

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Okay, but if the entire idea of these organizations is to be politically involved, what is the difference between them and a party? They're just not running any candidates.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Well, they're not trying to win power directly. In Bill C-76 you do have restrictions, both during the writ and in the pre-writ period.

Mrs. Karen Vecchio:

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

For one last question, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's actually two, but it's the same topic.

You mentioned earlier Elections Canada's having the ability to promote to—I don't know how to put it—people who are living abroad, the expat voters. How would that be done? What are some examples of how they might promote the vote to those voters? How would we even know who or where they are unless they've been on the voters list before?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

We'd have to see how they exercise this responsibility. You could imagine they would provide some promotional material at high commissions and embassies and missions abroad. That would be one way. They might do something on their website to promote voting to Canadians overseas and in other countries.

Mr. Blake Richards:

My other question relates to the same thing. In terms of declaring the last place of residence in Canada, how does that work for someone who's never lived in Canada? It is possible for someone who has never lived in Canada to be a citizen and be eligible to vote, is it not?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

No. Under the proposed legislation, they would have to have lived in Canada.

Mr. Blake Richards:

They can't be a citizen who's never lived in Canada. They would have to have lived here at some point and have a residence.

Would they have to have been of voting age when they lived in Canada?

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

They could have lived in Canada as an infant, and as long as they know where that residence was that they lived in as an infant, they could choose to still vote, and that would be how they would declare.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

Correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, thanks.

The Chair:

Yes, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On this same thing, doesn't that obviate the highfalutin rhetoric of the government about how Canadians were being deprived of their right to vote by the previous government when it turns out that Canadian citizens, under this legislation, are also deprived of their right to vote because of the mere fact that they never resided in Canada? I know several people who are in this ostensibly horrendous situation, who were apparently neglected by a government that expressed its moral horror at the fact that folks who had been away for more than five years had been left out.

Could you tell me what the moral distinction is between these two classes of Canadian citizens and how it's backed up by the Charter of Rights? Was it a request in the charter review of the legislation that was done by the Department of Justice?

LCdr Jean-François Morin:

In the Canada Elections Act, every elector needs to have an ordinary residence, and under the rules of ordinary residence, you cannot lose your ordinary residence until you get a new one. For example, when someone moves, their ordinary residence moves with them, but they need to have had an ordinary residence in Canada at least once.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, but that's a Canadian who has lived in a foreign country. When I was living in Australia, I was legally a resident of Australia. The Australians thought so; the Canadians thought so. The tax department for the two countries sure thought so. Oh yes, Nathan, check it out some time. I don't see how you can be a resident in Canada for one purpose, if you were born in Canada and spent some time here, versus someone else otherwise identical who was born in Australia to Canadian parents.

It doesn't make any sense at all, and I can't figure out why it's not in your Department of Justice review of the legislation, and why it was absent from the Liberal Party's rhetoric. They went on and on about these poor Canadians who had been away from Canada for more than five years who are no more Canadian under our Charter of Rights than the ones who are born to Canadian parents overseas.

The Chair:

I guess that's a good item for debate to continue on.

Thank you very much.

We'll suspend for a minute and people can get what they need and then we'll go into committee business.



(1815)

The Chair:

We're in committee business. We had some productive discussions. We're joined by the legislative clerk, Philippe Méla, who will be doing this bill. Andrew guarantees us he's the best legislative clerk in Parliament. That's great. We expect excellent work.

Just to remind members, the preliminary lists of witnesses are due by end of day tomorrow and the final lists by noon on Friday. If we get into travel, the clerk will talk about the related logistics. I think we'll open the discussion on how we deal with the rest of this bill.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We've had some discussion. I won't get into it. I think the most important thing to hammer out today is the travel. We need to get to the bottom of that in terms of the other items on our proposed list. It's something that we have some leverage to discuss tomorrow. At the end of the day, we would like to see clause-by-clause on the 12th to get this bill back to the House of Commons. The committee is ultimately going to have make up its mind about how the witness schedule looks. I know the opposition expressed some desire to bring forward a witness list and they have tomorrow to do that.

As to what that witness list looks like, depending on the track the committee decides, it may be two separate lists. Are we going on the road? That's one set of witnesses. Are we staying here in Ottawa? That's a completely separate list of witnesses.

We've made a proposal on the committee travelling across Canada from June 4, 2018, until June 8, 2018, authorizing the clerk to organize travel with meetings in the communities in the following regions: Atlantic Canada, Quebec, Ontario, the Prairies, and British Columbia, but we all have to narrow that down. I'm sure the clerks would agree with that as it would be of much greater assistance. My understanding is that the Liaison Committee will meet tomorrow and that we can get a budget, finalize it, and move on, with advanced thanks to the clerks for assisting us, given the timetable.

We are proposing that the clerk organize at least one meeting between the indigenous communities, and that the meetings be balanced between urban and rural communities. This is what we heard especially from Mr. Cullen around the desire to travel. I guess I'll turn it over to the opposition to flesh that out with some specifics on that particular point.

(1820)

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If I'm hearing what I think I'm hearing, it's based on the discussions we had before the gavelling of the meeting here. Looking at the travel proposal, I agree that it's advisable that travel is something we settle on if we're going to be doing it, because we have to give the clerk a bit of time to arrange it, especially given how quickly it has to happen. I think it would be good to hear the thoughts of Mr. Cullen on this, because I know he was the one who first raised the importance of travel. I certainly agree with him; I think it is a good thing for us to be doing on this piece of legislation.

This seems to look similar, as far as I can tell, to what Mr. Cullen brought to the meeting last time, although it is different from what I think he had originally hoped to see, in that it is significantly less. I would love to hear his thoughts on the travel part of it. I'm not sure if I'm hearing that we would talk this evening about what the travel portion might look like. I agree, however, with the idea raised by Mr. Bittle of maybe leaving the discussion on the other elements for tomorrow when we see what the witness lists of all three parties look like and we can have some sense of what this would look like in practice.

I can certainly commit, if it would be helpful, to bringing a list to the meeting tomorrow of our proposed witnesses, at least the initial witnesses. I believe I've seen the government's proposed list already. Unless they're planning to add to that, I'm sure they can bring their list tomorrow, no problem. I don't know where Mr. Cullen is on that, but if he can commit to this, then we could have a discussion during the hour we have for business tomorrow and we could arrive at the rest of the elements. I would agree, given the amount of time we have now, that we should try to sort the travel out in this period. This would allow our clerk to get started on that as soon as possible, because it will be a very difficult undertaking in the short time frame that we have.

Those are my thoughts.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, do you have some thoughts?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. Thanks, Chair.

Thanks, Chris, for the comments.

Let me preface this very briefly by saying I don't blame anyone around this table for the circumstance we're in. Clearly, on the government's side, I don't think the timing of the bill and the study was of the choosing of any of the committee members—certainly not you, Chair, and certainly not the opposition—yet the bind that I feel myself in is that I have a similar objection because I don't like some of the rules that exist right now on voting reform. Bill C-76 addresses some of those things that we've talked about openly, vouching and whatnot.

As a parliamentarian, I also see and feel the responsibility of getting whatever we do to Bill C-76 right—amend, reject, whatever those options are—simply because in my experience if you rush legislation, particularly omnibus, it's inevitable you'll make some mistakes. The question is how grievous those mistakes are, and you realize them too late. Elections Canada tries to handle something voters experience at the election and it doesn't work the way that we were told and the way we hoped. I feel myself in a bit of a bind.

I'll start with the witness list and work backwards to the travel proposal. Mr. Christopherson is back and re-engaged, and I just got a witness list from him and, yeah, it's exhaustive and exhausting to look at. We're going to spend tonight whittling some of that down because I have a few thoughts. I was borrowing a little bit from the electoral reform experience, because I think through those many long months of study we found some witnesses who don't immediately pop to mind who I think would be very helpful on this.

I appreciate the efforts in terms of the travel component and the way the motion is worded. As we know, in urban and rural experiences voting is different, and particularly first nations people have a different experience as well.

The initial proposal for travel makes sense. I would hope we would talk today about what a day would look like, because sometimes committees travel and it looks a certain way and other times it looks another way. We had raised the issue of talking to young Canadians when we're out on the road. We had raised the issue of potentially having.... When we go to towns sometimes we go to Halifax or Toronto and we see only experts, so-called experts, people implicated by it, but we have no access to average Canadians who don't have a Ph.D. behind their name. I think we're made more poor for it if we do that. I would advocate some small version of an open house, if we go places in the evening, and then in the daytime we give over to the experts who have lots of opinions about this.

In terms of the rest of the meetings, I remain very open to what we're doing right now. I know it's not always comfortable and it's hard to schedule with extended hours and sitting, simply because we've been given a Sisyphean task here and we ought to try to do as much as we can to get it right.

Other than that, my only other reservation, which I expressed to Andy before, was the proposal of doing clause-by-clause all in one day. We have a philosophical objection to the custom that, if there are more than 80 amendments, suddenly we go on the clock, and that reduces us to five minutes per party per clause, I believe. I've seen from both sides, government and opposition, bills just brutalized because you're hammering through clauses by the end, by the evening sittings. Committee members don't really.... I think we stop doing our jobs at some point. It gives me angst to see a day of clause-by-clause on a bill that's 250 substantive pages. That's a lot.

The last I'll say is that the government talks about different numbers, but 85% of the bill was prestudied or 85% comes from Elections Canada. That's fine. The percentages are fine in terms of public relations or media, but I don't want to suggest that simply because 85% of the bill has been looked at, the 15% is going to be fast. It may not be 15% of the effort because of the stuff the government has added into this bill on top of the previous legislation. It's not simple or obvious things. We're talking about freedom of speech and some things that are potentially complicated. I don't have a pre-opinion as to what that will look like.

All that said, I think the travel is short, but it will work. If we can reconsider the clause-by-clause, that would be good, and we should talk about what a travel day looks like. If we go to Halifax, what does it look like? If we're in Toronto, what does the day look like? That will inform my feelings toward getting out on the road.

(1825)

The Chair:

Does the government have any comments?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I don't know if we can ask the clerk the terms of the travel days. My only concern with what Mr. Cullen has suggested is just the logistics of it. If we're doing public hearings from 10:00 until whenever and then an open microphone at night and then the committee has to travel the next day, logistically speaking, that might be difficult.

The Chair:

I'll go to Mr. Reid, and then I'll go to the clerk to talk about logistics.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All I wanted to add is, if we're looking at travel that lasts essentially five days, as Mr. Cullen suggested, you would leave on Sunday from wherever you are and get to the first city. On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, you're in different cities. Then on Saturday, it's your job to make it either back home or to Ottawa.

If we got that, I think we should agree that we're departing from the usual practice of going to the provincial capitals. I mean, in some cases that's great. Toronto is fine, I guess. Victoria is less fine than Vancouver, given the way the routes work.

In terms of meeting with young people, one obvious way of doing that is to have one or more of the meetings on a university campus. I recognize the school year is not on right now, but I took numerous summer courses in May and June. You're right in the middle of those summer courses, so you will have some folks there. It's not perfect, but nothing, given our schedule, is going to be perfect, and this at least allows for a bit of that.

(1830)

The Chair:

I'll go to the clerk to talk about the logistics of organizing travel.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Members have rightfully noted that there's very little time left between now and the beginning of this proposed travel. I would just like to add that, should the committee agree this evening that they would like to travel and they would like to see a budget, we could put one together in time for tomorrow's meeting, but we would need more specific details about the cities the committee would like to visit. When I read this on the indigenous communities, perhaps the committee could specify an indigenous community and maybe some ideas about how we balance rural and urban, given what cities the committee wants to go to.

If this budget gets adopted by the committee tomorrow and is then approved by the SBLI, say tomorrow afternoon, we won't get House authorization probably until Wednesday, which only leaves us two to three business days to set up these meetings, which is going to be a challenge. We have a formidable team who's ready to put this together; however, there are some things that are going to be out of our control such as flights, hotel availability, and meeting room availability in some of the cities. There's going to be very little flexibility and very little time to adjust if we run into issues with the logistics.

A second concern that I have is that we don't yet have a witness list for any of these cities, or any of the cities that will be proposed, so it may be a challenge to find witnesses who are available and who will be adequately prepared to appear before the committee in those various cities. If the committee's desire is to travel, I would hope that we could get those names as quickly as possible so that we could communicate with those individuals and try to make sure that they're available for the committee. My fear is that we'll go to all the trouble, we'll set up the meetings, we'll travel, and then we won't have all the witnesses that the committee wants to see in those locations.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair. That was very helpful. I imagine, if people wanted to think about logistics, the typical travel day.... My reference point is the electoral reform committee, and we tended to travel in the morning, except for the first day, when we would be in place. We had experts typically from one o'clock or noon on, because we'd arrive in the city, we'd get to wherever we were at the hotel by 10 o'clock or 11 o'clock, the forums would start with the experts for a couple or four hours, depending on the town we were in, and then we'd do a more open type of thing, which goes back to your point of not needing to fill an entire day, because you just make a notification and social media seems to work pretty good in terms of letting people know that a new election bill is on the docket, and we're in town. That's your evening, and then the next morning you wake up and repeat. You travel in the morning, you get to the next place, and you do the same thing.

I'll just throw out some places, because that's what you asked for. Part of this is just the logistics of travelling around this country. It may be more fun to go to Charlottetown, but getting in and out is way more difficult than Halifax. Halifax is the regional hub. That's where flights come and go, and it has connecting flights right to Montreal. That would be my second suggestion, Montreal or Quebec City, probably Montreal. I think Scott makes a fine point about Toronto being the capital. There's a number of witnesses that we have, and I think the Liberals as well, who are based in Toronto, so that would help your second question.

Mr. Mark Gerretsen (Kingston and the Islands, Lib.):

I would recommend Kingston.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This time of year, it's beautiful.

Mr. Scott Reid:

[Inaudible—Editor] substantial airport in there that had direct connections to Halifax and Montreal, that would be awesome. Maybe it's a project we could work on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We'll have to work on that between now and next week.

I think when you get into the Prairies, it could answer the question about rural. If you land in Winnipeg or land in Regina or Saskatoon, you can get to a pretty rural setting pretty quickly. My experience was that folks were very appreciative of us stepping out of the city and going to see them. We did Leduc last time out of Edmonton. It's kind of fake rural. Leduc is where the airport was. We cheated. Then in British Columbia, Vancouver was suggested, and I agree with that. There are a number of very active and vibrant first nation communities either within the city limits or right near the city limits, but they're their own communities. They just happen to be in Vancouver, so that could be a way to...and I agree, Victoria adds a logistical leap that would make it difficult especially if you're coming out of the Prairies to get there.

That's all I wanted to say.

(1835)

The Chair:

We'll have Mr. Reid, and then Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll let you go to Mr. Bittle first because I forgot what my point is. Maybe my mind will be jogged by what will no doubt be very insightful remarks.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You were so inspired by the thought of going to eastern Ontario that we are—

Mr. Scott Reid:

We are actually in eastern Ontario even as we speak.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Well, closer to home.

Anyway, just to perhaps assist with the logistical difficulties if we're running into issues where we're going to, let's say, Montreal or Quebec City, and we're having a difficult time finding those witnesses, it could just be converted into a town hall and we can accept the evidence. It doesn't necessarily have to be as formal as a public hearing like we have right now, and perhaps to assist with the travel across the country and to make this an easier plan it should be an option that would be out there.

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Could I comment on that?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Thank you, Chair. I normally try not to speak, but it's just to add a little more clarity there.

Social media would work in that case. It's much simpler to get a roomful of people through social media than a small room of 10 people through methodical appointments working with and comparing calendars and finding the slots that are available and so forth. I'm wondering if the clerk would have an opinion on whether it is easier just to plan around town halls versus planning a trip around public hearings. Then I suppose if there was a fervent desire to have witness testimony on the record, maybe we take one of the days and have witnesses dial in via teleconference to the committee room here in Ottawa to nail some testimony on the record.

There are some other thoughts.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We did some combo days. We had days in the ERRE process where we had places that were a little less on the expert side of things because we only had an hour, and then people showed up to watch it. Then we just left the mike on and people came to the mike for two minutes each, and that was part of the witness testimony for electoral reform.

I don't think you'd get four or six hours of expert testimony if you're in Saskatoon...maybe, but you'd be digging deep.

The Chair:

For some of the rural people, let's say you're in Saskatoon or Calgary, can you invite some particular rural people to come to that meeting as opposed to...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think we should be creative in this and even talk to people who have worked elections, people who have run the local rural election posts for the last 30 years. You can ask them, these are the proposed changes the government wants or that the government is proposing, how is it going to work in the real world? You can talk to a lot of professors, and they're all great and wonderful people, but....

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, I would have some concerns about getting a rural aspect over if we're just going to land in somewhere like Regina and drive just outside. Maybe it's similar to the Leduc situation, but a suburb is different in many senses. If we're going to start talking about the rural impact of voter information cards, in my riding there are 130 or something towns, and the largest town is only 1,300 people. I'm not saying all my riding, don't get me wrong. I'm sure the Knights of Columbus is free, but nevertheless, I think maybe we should, if we're going somewhere like Regina or just outside of Regina, look to bring someone in from further away to get that rural part of it. I don't think we can actually go to a truly rural area given the time frame, but you can certainly call in people from outside. If it's Toronto, even somewhere around Mr. Shipley's area would be good too. If you call them into a central spot, that would be great.

The Chair:

It's certainly cheaper to bring four people from some rural community into a big city than to take our whole committee and all the equipment that goes with it out there.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If you land in Winnipeg and you go to Portage.... I'm just telling you what we did in the past. I sympathize with what Scott is saying, but really, we just jumped on a bus and we were there in an hour. Sometimes if you fly to into Toronto and you bus from the airport to wherever your meeting is, it will be an hour and a half. Now you're in Portage, which would probably call itself relatively rural....

(1840)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know what Scott is getting at. There really is a distinction. I'm using my riding as an example because I know it better. People living just outside of Carleton Place in the east end of my riding commute into Kanata to go to work during the day and are back in less than an hour's commute. When you go half an hour west of there, to the town of Perth, where I live, it's not so easy. I have to stay in Ottawa at times. To get to an event in the west end of my riding last weekend, it was another hour's drive.

Also, there are no local services there, and finding a public building in which to have a polling station is a significant issue. If there is an issue where Elections Canada can't use a building because it doesn't conform with rules about access for disabled people, they wind up not having an advance poll. It's the kind of problem you would only meet there, but as well, how would we have a meeting there and get enough people out so we could hear what they have to say? I don't know how to square that circle. I just know that Scott is raising a point that so far we don't have a solution to.

The Chair:

Except for bringing the people in....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, or maybe identifying people who have raised issues like this who could be contacted and asked to telephone in or something. Yes, maybe that would be the answer.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Perhaps this is a good time to ask the clerk about this. In terms of what we've outlined in regard to Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg or thereabouts, and Vancouver, is that something that can be put together in the timeline that's being proposed?

The Clerk:

I think that if that's the desire of the committee we will make sure it works. We will put it together—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the spirit.

The Clerk:

—but I can't guarantee that we won't run into any problems along the way.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If I can, perhaps, since this is something that needs to get done and we have to get moving forward, are there any...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Perhaps as committee members start to look through their witness lists and realize that we're shy on Vancouver witnesses, that's also a way to slot your witnesses together. If you say that we're going to have a meeting in Halifax and it changes, and we're hoping to have at least a couple of witnesses from each party's suggestion list, that's something we can do. We just simply contact people in Halifax and ask who is great at this stuff.

The Chair:

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I have a couple of things.

The first one goes back to this discussion about rural communities. I really think that what Nathan first suggested, wherever it might end up being—and I'll get to that in a second—whether it be in Regina, Winnipeg, or Calgary, wherever it is, you can land there and you can be somewhere pretty rural in an hour's drive.

I really do think that we should try to make sure to include a rural perspective in this somehow. I really think that bringing a few people into the city from some rural area is not necessarily going to accomplish that as well as going to the community itself. That's partly because if we start to talk about this idea of maybe going to more of a town hall situation and you bring in a few people, their voices just get swamped by the other things that are being brought up. I think we really should look at one of these stops, at least, being one where we visit a rural community.

The other thing I would say is that—I think this would make the clerk's job somewhat easier—other than our prescribing that it's going to be somewhere near Winnipeg or somewhere near Regina.... We have three provinces there—Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta—and we're going to skip over two of the three, which is unfortunate to say the least, but that's the decision that's being made here, apparently. In order to do this in the easiest way logistically for the clerk, why don't we say that we'd be comfortable with flying into any of the major cities in those three provinces? Based on a flight schedule—getting from Toronto, which is where we would be coming from, and then to Vancouver, where we would be leaving next—logistically that just gives him more possibilities that he can deal with in terms of the flight scheduling and all the rest, so that he has some flexibility. That makes it a little easier.

This is going to be a very difficult job for him as it is. I'd like to try to make it as easy for him as possible.

Frankly, we can get that perspective in any one of those three, four, or five places, however many there are that we can fly into directly. I would think that certainly Regina, Winnipeg, and Calgary would qualify, and probably Edmonton too, and maybe Saskatoon, but I don't know. Whatever they might be, though, I just think we should be giving him the flexibility to logistically deal with it that way. Then we could look at a community that would have a hall that would be sufficient for interpretive booths and all that, a community that is an hour outside one of those places. Some of us who are from those areas.... I know Alberta pretty well, and I know Saskatchewan to some degree too. I'm sure others know of some of these other places. You could draw on that as well for suggestions on communities that we could look at.

(1845)

The Chair:

Do we have agreement for Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, and one of—it's up to the clerk for travel, with flights and everything—Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Saskatoon, or Winnipeg, based on what's available?

Are you saying for every single province, have a rural...or is it just one?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

My assumption was just one.

The Chair:

That will be easy enough.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is all so clipped.

You have to say let's identify a typical rural scenario that's convenient to the airport, and something we can make happen.

The Chair:

One rural one I think is easily doable.

An hon. member: Portage isn't that rural.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Come on, it's 10,000 people.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Rather than starting to get into saying it has to be Portage...because now we're getting back into where we're making it logistically more difficult.

We authorize the clerk to say he's going to find what flight schedules work the best. Once you've picked which one of the cities you're going to fly into, I'm sure people can help, if need be. As I mentioned, I can certainly help with Alberta, and to some degree with Saskatchewan. I have someone on staff who is originally from Manitoba, and they can help pick a community there. I'm sure others can do the same. Let them choose a city to fly into first, and then we can figure that out.

The Chair:

Okay, so we have five cities, and one rural community. We'll start first thing Monday morning. We'll get—

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

We have five days to work with, so it has to be four and one, I believe, four cities and one rural.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Halifax, Montreal, Toronto....

The Chair:

The clerk thinks that of those five prairie cities that would be the rural one, and we wouldn't be meeting in the city.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the suggestion right now.

The Chair:

Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, Vancouver, plus a rural community in the Prairies that the chair can find that would work logistically.

Is that good for what you need for your budget?

The Clerk:

One more thing, it might be helpful if the chair had some discretion, if between now and tomorrow we see that Halifax has an issue getting in, or getting hotel rooms, the chair could deviate from this plan and perhaps go to Moncton or Saint John.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The other option you have, just because of flight logistics, is that you could additionally do a rural community in Nova Scotia. You would end up getting two rural communities, if that becomes a problem.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Another possibility that might make more sense is to go to a rural community near Ottawa. It doesn't have to be tied into our flights, and there are a number of really lovely rural communities nearby, one of which I live in.

I say that not just to promote my riding but to make the point that it might resolve the logistical issue.

The Chair:

Or David Graham's riding....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, it's not that close, but you're right. It's definitely rural.

The Chair:

Nathan, what's that first nation that's just down the bay, on the way to Whistler from Vancouver?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's Squamish.

The Chair:

Would that be a good one to invite to come to the Vancouver meeting?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, the Squamish come down all the time. You have some very strong first nations, Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh, on the north shore within a cab ride of Vancouver.

The Chair:

Do you want to give a list to the clerk?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I'll relay it to the clerk; whatever you like.

The Chair:

We'll include the first nation in the Vancouver meeting.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Distance-wise, it would probably be one of the closest. In terms of political coherence, these are some of the stronger nations on the west coast, for sure.

(1850)

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

We need to be able to show a budget to the subcommittee on committee budgets of the Liaison Committee tomorrow.

The Clerk:

My plan is to prepare a budget in time for tomorrow's PROC meeting, based on our discussion this evening.

My question goes back to what Mr. Cullen asked at the beginning: what does a day look like for the committee? Is it a public meeting, this style, with witnesses? Is it open mike, or is it some of both?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It should be some combination.

If you go to a place like Toronto, you're going to have lots of expertise that you can draw on; maybe in other places, it would be less so. I think it's having some flexibility to do both, and I think the committee would benefit from both.

If we do five days and all we hear from are people who work in a university, that's fine but not exactly comprehensive in terms of our election laws.

The Chair:

What did we do about the youth in this plan?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It doesn't sound like we touched on it, but holding it on a campus is interesting.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Queen's University would be great.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's too expensive.

The Chair:

Andy.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Thank you.

The benefit of the town halls is that social media invitations work. We're getting into an area of my expertise in my previous life, public engagement planning. The nice thing about it also is that witnesses essentially get morphed into becoming invitees. If we want to hear specifically from invitees in that way, perhaps, if they're willing, we could put them on a panel at the front of the room.

These are always expedited planning events. The more flexibility obviously, the more quickly it can be done. We could also involve youth in that way as well, through town halls.

I think we're on the right track with providing the clerk with enough flexibility to come up with something that could work.

The Chair:

I suppose if we fly in the morning, we could have a meeting in the afternoon at a university, and a open public meeting in the evening.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You break for an hour for dinner, move around, and then.... Usually if you're doing anything public, turnout is much better after six or seven o'clock than it is at five o'clock or in the day.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Perhaps on the idea of flexibility, we should try to build in as much flexibility as possible on that rather than prescribing it, because it may not work doing it cookie cutter for each one.

Ideally perhaps this is what we want to see, but it may be, for the purpose of travel—to get from point A to point B—that there could only be a scheduled public meeting or a town hall, however it works.

I'd recommend building in as much flexibility as possible.

The Chair:

Do you have enough there to build a budget?

The Clerk:

Yes, I think so.

The Chair:

We have Elections Canada waiting here. We should go on to that.

We'll suspend for a minute while they get organized.



(1855)

The Chair:

Good evening and welcome back to the 106th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments. We are pleased to be joined by officials from Elections Canada. Here with us again today are Stéphane Perrault, Acting Chief Electoral Officer; Michel Roussel, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Electoral Events and Innovation; and Anne Lawson, General Counsel and Senior Director, Legal Services.

Thank you all for being here.

I forgot to ask, but the clerk will have to know who is going to travel with the committee. The Liaison Committee has a limit of seven people. As soon as parties find out, can you let the clerk know?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Fill me in here. What does it then become? I'm only worried about the Conservative side here.

The Chair:

Right.

The Clerk:

It would normally be four Liberals, two Conservatives, and one NDP.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, it's two Conservatives. That's what we needed to know. That's all we have to manage.

Thank you.

The Chair:

I would just remind you that tomorrow morning we have our briefing with the independent members, with the subcommittee, and the second hour is business and discussing Mr. Richards' motion.

With regard to the Chief Electoral Officer, he was just before us recently, and a number of the things were relevant to this bill. He's not going to repeat those. He's handed them out. He's going to talk about the recommendations they have related to this bill and concentrate on those. What he's talking about is different from what he's handed out. What he's handed out, those who were here at the previous meeting have heard about already.

Monsieur Perrault, it's great to have you back again.

Ms. Lawson, it seems you're almost like part of the committee this year.

(1900)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Acting Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you.

The Chair:

The clerk wants to know if it's okay if we append his remarks to the evidence so they will go into the evidence. I'm sure that's fine.

Some hon members: Agreed.

[See appendix—Remarks by Stéphane Perrault]

The Chair: Monsieur Perrault. [Translation]

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's a pleasure to be back before the committee. This is a bit unusual, but I didn't want to repeat what I said on Tuesday. My remarks are now on the record, with my statement appended to the evidence. As for what I didn't talk about on Tuesday, I focus on that in the table of proposed amendments to improve the bill. That way, you will have more time to ask your questions.

I would like to start by expressing my support for this bill. I think it is an important piece of legislation that will go a long way towards modernizing the Canada Elections Act and improving the integrity of the electoral process. The bill contains some 100 of the 132 recommendations made by Elections Canada, so it's no shock, then, that we generally support the bill.

As I indicated, I'd like to speak to a few specific issues, and they appear in the table, which I will get to shortly.

Generally speaking, the two issues I feel require further examination by the committee are privacy, which we discussed last week, and the rules governing third parties. [English]

The Chair:

Everyone at this table should have what was just handed out. This is what he's talking about: suggested amendments to the act by Elections Canada.

Sorry, go ahead.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's okay.

Again, on privacy and on third parties, these are two areas that may warrant, in my view, some further discussion and examination by the committee.

Before I get into the table, I just want to say a few words about the third party rules.

Overall, the proposals in Bill C-76 are a major improvement on the rules governing third parties. They expand the scope of the rules to include not just advertising activities but also all kinds of partisan activities. The scope is expanded. They also provide for rules that not only apply during the writ period but also the pre-writ period. They contain a number of measures to deal with foreign funding.

I want to note that there is some imbalance between the rules as they apply to third parties and parties in the pre-writ period. Parties would be limited only in their advertising expenses. Third parties would be limited in all of their partisan activities. They would have to file up to two pre-writ reports, and parties don't have to do that. I just note that. I don't have recommendations to that effect, but I did want to bring that to the attention of the committee, when you consider the overall regulatory burden on third parties.

While there are some important rules to deal with foreign funding, there is in my view a residual opening for foreign funding through third parties. There are some ways that this can be addressed. I will be making one particular recommendation in that regard.

I've not made a recommendation on the table in terms of the contribution rules to third parties. I think this is an area where there are a range of options. You need to balance Charter of Rights considerations. You need to look at the overall regulatory burden. I'm quite prepared to have a discussion on those topics with the committee, but I have not made a specific recommendation.

If you turn to the table, I'll take them in the order they appear on the table.

The first issue is a narrow but important issue. There is now in this bill a solemn declaration for voters. Voters would be required in some circumstances to say that either they are 18 or will be 18 on voting day. That's quite correct. However, they also are required to say that they are citizens or that they will be a citizen on polling day. That's something that they cannot make a declaration for. They do not know whether in fact they will become citizens on polling day. They don't control that. The ceremony has not taken place. It may not take place. My view is that certainly only citizens should be able to vote, even in the advance vote or special ballot. The oath should be amended to reflect that. Someone should not be called upon to say that they will be a citizen on polling day.

The second point is one of the issues related to foreign funding of third parties. One of the ways in which the bill improves the regime is that not only does it ban contributions made by foreign sources for the purpose of regulated activities, but it in fact bans the use of foreign funds. In some cases a third party may receive foreign funds and not be able to use them. They could have turned around and passed it on to another third party. That third party could then spend it. I would recommend that there be an anti-avoidance clause in the bill. There are other examples of such clauses in this bill, and the Canada Elections Act. That would deal with those kinds of situations where a third party is turning around and passing on foreign funds to avoid the restrictions in the act. That's an improvement that I'm recommending on the bill.

The third point relates to convention fees. The rule right now is that when a person buys a ticket to participate in a convention, the contribution that this person makes is then determined by looking at the price of the ticket minus the tangible benefits that he or she receives at the convention, such as the meals, beverages, and so forth. The bill recommends to also deduct from the ticket price a reasonable allocation of the overhead costs of doing the convention. It also allows for another individual to not only pay for that ticket but also deduct from the amount the overhead costs. The effect of that is that a wealthy person could, by buying all or most of the tickets, essentially pay for all of the party's convention costs.

(1905)



There are number of ways to deal with that. The first way would be to simply not accept that there be a deduction of the overhead costs from the amount that constitutes a contribution. That is my preferred approach. In the alternative, one could say that this deduction only is allowable for a single ticket, not multiple tickets. It's a bit more complicated to administer. If that is not acceptable to this committee, then perhaps the law should be amended so that the party's annual return reflects the fact that a person has paid for tickets for more than one person to attend a convention, so that if a person buys a slate of tickets for a convention, that is simply reported in the annual report. At least there is some transparency in this regard.

The fourth point I want to raise is in regard to the issue of privacy that we have discussed. As I indicated last week, I am concerned by the fact that there are no minimal standards. Each party would decide which standard is appropriate for them. Perhaps more importantly, I'm concerned about the absence of oversight. On the first issue, the standards adopted by the parties in their policies should be consistent with those set out in the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, which is usually referred to as PIPEDA, and I do believe that the Privacy Commissioner is the appropriate person to provide oversight. I have discussed this with the Privacy Commissioner and he is in agreement with that.

The fifth point that I want to raise is.... This is actually a recommendation that came from Elections Canada. It's reflected properly in the bill. It's a recommendation to deal with the possibility of disinformation in cases where there's a publication that claims to be made by a party or a candidate, but it is not. In our recommendation, we should have made an additional element to that, which is that publications, whether electronically or traditionally made, that are claimed to be by Elections Canada, but are not, should be covered by the same prohibition. That's just an expansion of that same rule to cover false Elections Canada material.

The sixth one relates to an important clause in the bill dealing with cyber-attacks. I believe that is an important issue. There is a proposal in the bill relating to the misuse of or interference with a computer. However, in order for an offence to be committed, there is a requirement to show that there was an intention to affect the result of the election. In some cases, a foreign state or a third party may wish to interfere simply to disrupt the election or simply to undermine trust in the election, so the requirement to prove an intent to change the result goes too far. I think it needs to be expanded to cover other intents, which I've just mentioned.

Finally, the last one is a really technical one. It's a transitional provision regarding the reporting obligations for candidates. There should be a clause in the bill that says that if the rules come into force midway into the campaign or after the campaign, the reporting obligation at the end of the campaign should match the substantive obligations during the campaign. That's sensible. The drafting of this clause can be improved and should be improved. There are similar clauses in the bill that we feel are better drafted in that regard and we refer to those in the table. That is strictly a technical amendment.

Thank you.

(1910)

The Chair:

We'll do at least one round and then we may go into more informal questioning of people. We'll see how we do, after the first round.

We'll start with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

First of all, it's good to see you again. I have a couple of questions on what you provided.

First, let's go back to the convention fees part of it again, just so I get it straight. What you're recommending is that it goes a little too far, in that it prescribes the overhead of a particular convention to be taken away from the contribution part of it. Is that correct? You're okay with the tangible benefits of this thing, like a meal served at such and such. That's included in there. I suppose the intangible stuff is the overhead.

Do you care to comment on that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's perfectly correct. It's the overhead.

A party convention is part of a party's natural activities and defraying for a party's activities normally is a contribution. That's how I see it.

I'm particularly concerned that, if a person is allowed to pay for the entire convention by buying all of the tickets. You have a single, wealthy individual, who would then be buying the party's convention, yet that would not even be reported as such.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It would not be part of the campaign or election expenses; I get that.

The other one is about the unauthorized use of a computer. You're saying that it's—I'm paraphrasing here—a little too focused in its implications. Is that correct?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct. I think that the act should contemplate situations where a person tries to interfere with the conduct of an election, a leadership contest, or a nomination contest, by interfering with a computer system.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Just for the sake of generating chaos, in other words—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Exactly.

Mr. Scott Simms:

—as opposed to it being for a specific end. Okay, I see what you're saying. Right now, in its wording, it's with regard to a certain outcome of an election.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It goes to changing the results. What I'm saying is that it may not be the purpose, but it may be just as nefarious to actually disrupt the election and undermine trust in the election.

I'll give you an example. If someone tries to penetrate the national register of electors and shows that they've been able to do that.... Let's say a foreign state wants to do that. That's what happened in the United States from my understanding. They penetrate, they leave a mark, and then they don't do anything. However, they've undermined trust in the integrity of the election, and that is not covered.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Very quickly for my own purpose.... I have wanted to ask this for some time, and now I'm getting around to doing it. Clause 70 of the bill changes how the official list of electors is prepared. It talks about having it prepared by polling station, instead of by polling division.

For people who are watching this right now and aren't familiar with elections, we all call these lists the “bingo cards”, as it were. I call them “bingo cards”, “bingo sheets”, whatever you want to call them.

Is that going to change here under clause 70? In other words, is it going to be a long compilation of the names for scrutineers who are in the polling stations on that day?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

As part of the modernization effort, the act will now refer to polling stations as what was traditionally a number, in some cases, of polling divisions. That reflects that change.

(1915)

Mr. Scott Simms:

If I'm there as a scrutineer, no matter what station I'm at, I just get a full list—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

You do get the full list.

Mr. Scott Simms:

—of the polling division, instead of what was formerly the polling station.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct, except administratively, this election will continue to operate—for the regular polls—in the same old way, by polling division, because we're not going to be able to go to the new voting model at the next general election for the regular polls.

Mr. Scott Simms:

So for this coming election, it will be as it was before.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The authorization of signatures, electronic signatures, in particular, is fairly new. I understand that it wasn't ready for the last election. Can you assure the committee that a system will be in place to receive electronic signatures for campaign documents and so on?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. That is something that was done in 2014 in the legislation. We did not have time to implement the systems to facilitate electronic submission of candidate returns. That is being done as we speak, and the work is progressing well. I fully expect to have full online submission of returns at the next election.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, so all electronic signatures for the campaign returns will be accepted by Elections Canada this coming election.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Interesting.

One of the things I touched on earlier when I had the minister in was the commissioner. I want you to provide comment on the fact that now the commissioner is returning to....

I'll put my bias on the table. I think it's a good move. I thought it was a bad move to begin with. The commissioner being back in the Office of the CEO.... Obviously, the commissioner can still work closely with the Public Prosecution Service—that's available—but being back inside, housed within Elections Canada, I think, comes as a better....

Would you say that it improves the ability of the commissioner now? With this new legislation, now that administrative penalties are involved, would it also be a good thing that the commissioner is now back inside the house of Elections Canada?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly, in terms of the legal unification of Elections Canada—it is not necessarily a physical co-location but a legal reunification—what it will facilitate is the transfer of information from Elections Canada to the commissioner in a smoother way, and that assists the commissioner.

To be quite frank, I believe there are a number of improvements in this bill that go much further in terms of assisting the commissioner. I think the administrative monetary penalties, which you mentioned—

Mr. Scott Simms:

That was my next question.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

—go a long way to provide a much more calibrated set of tools for the commissioner to intervene and the power to compel testimony as well. From an enforcement point of view, I think this is a good piece of legislation. The reunification is certainly a good thing, but it's not as significant, I would say, as these other changes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The power to compel is one. Personally, I was reading through the administrative penalties section of it and the whole reason it's compliance in this particular case is obviously that you don't have the full threat of a hammer when it's not needed. Your shop obviously feels that this is going to go a long way towards compliance, and for those who want to run afoul, it makes it a lot easier for the commissioner to get compliance.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's our view, yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do I have more time?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The trick is, Scotty, you just don't ask.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Mark Gerretsen:

That's right. Don't make eye contact.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Anyway, thanks for being back with us again. It seems like it's been so long since you've been here.

Let me start with this, and we'll go to a few places. Hopefully there'll be time.

When were you first shown this legislation?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

My officials have been working with PCO officials since last fall. I can't remember the exact date, but they have been providing technical advice, not policy advice but technical advice on the drafting. They haven't been in the drafting room as such, but they have seen various variations of the provisions and their role was to make sure there were as few errors or glitches as possible in the bill, and in fact, there are very few. I have raised a few today, but most of the things that I've raised are policy issues, really, not technical issues.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Obviously, then, you were consulted, but who were you consulted by? Was it PCO? Was it the minister's office? The Prime Minister's Office? Who consulted you?

(1920)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It was strictly a consultation between PCO officials and my officials, and specifically, Madam Lawson here.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You mentioned that it began last fall, at least your involvement as Elections Canada began last fall. I'm wondering if you might be able to give us some insight as to why you think.... Here we are, right? We're being presented with this proposal to, in less than I think 10 days, have a full study of a 350-page bill in committee, including any amendments, clause-by-clause, and all that, but if this process began last fall, that's quite some time.

Do you have any sense that you would be able to share with us as to why this has taken so long to come before the House of Commons and why we're now rushed? Was that length of time needed?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It would be pure speculation on my part to go there. All I know is—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate that, but it would be good to get your insight if you are willing.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I don't know how to respond to that. It's not for me to answer that question.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, fair enough. You can't blame me for trying, right?

In terms of the implementation, you mentioned last time you were here that you were already looking at a plan for implementing this. When did that planning begin in terms of the implementation planning for this legislation?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Thank you for the question, because I think there has been some misunderstanding with respect to my remarks in that area.

When the bill was introduced, we began planning for implementation work, so that was very recent. We expect that we will do some preparation over the course of the summer and the fall. Assuming it has not passed by then, we will need to do some preparation but that is very different from implementing the legislation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Understood.

Would you consider that an unusual step, though, before something is passed? Is there precedent for that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's the word that I used the last time I was here. There sometimes is work that is done in terms of our resources with our own team, that kind of preparatory work. That's not unusual. If we need to contract, for example, to work on IT systems, that is more unusual.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess the reason we're in that unusual circumstance...and it's hard to blame you for being in that circumstance, because you are in that circumstance and you've been put there because this took so long—and I know you don't want to speculate on why that might be. The fact is that it's beyond your control and it's beyond the control of many of us on this committee, and here we all are trying to deal with something that makes for very unusual, and frankly, very difficult circumstances. It makes it difficult for us, as legislators, to do our job properly. I think the proposal we're seeing makes it almost impossible, and I think it makes it very difficult, and maybe even darned near impossible, for you to do your job properly.

You already indicated there would be a need for some compromises, a need for some things that couldn't be properly implemented, and we had a chance to talk about that briefly when you were here before. I'll come to that in a minute to see if we can get a bit more detail on that.

When we had the officials here before you came in, we were talking about the third party regime and the foreign money. I was raising the question of the commingling with the contributions that are still possible from foreign entities prior to the pre-writ period. It was raised that it would leave Elections Canada with the ability to conduct an audit of that. I was asking at that time—and you might be able to give me a bit more clarity on this—what you think would be a reasonable barrier to trigger an audit in those scenarios. What would Elections Canada determine to be an appropriate barrier that would give you concern about that commingling occurring so that you would, therefore, conduct an audit?

Second to that, is there some way we could amend the legislation to be more helpful in this regard?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'll start with the second point and come back to the first one.

I have made a recommendation. I do believe it would be preferable to have a clear anti-avoidance clause to deal with situations where an entity deliberately reaches out...or is offered money from a foreign source so that they can cover their regular expenses and then liberate some funds for the third party regulated activities. If that's the intent, if that's getting around the rules, then there should be a clear clause to that effect.

That would be an improvement.

(1925)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let me just ask you, any time there is foreign funding that comes through one of these organizations, could there not be at least a suspicion of that occurring? In fact, if they're receiving money to use for something else, whether it's one of those wink-wink situations—hey, use this for something else so you can use that for the election—or whether it isn't, it still enables that to happen. Have you thought about whether it would be advisable to suggest just not allowing foreign funding, period? That would avoid having to try to determine if it was someone's intent to do that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I just want to clarify one point before I answer that question.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Certainly.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

You talked about an audit. An audit is based on the information that we receive, and unless on the face of it something is screaming “foreign money”, it will not be seen by an auditor. What we're really talking about is an investigation by the commissioner in those cases. It's not something that would come out in an audit.

I have not made any suggestions in terms of altering the bill to deal with contributions. This is something you may want to consider, being sensitive that there are charter issues. If the concern is foreign money, it perhaps may not be necessary to have a full contribution regime. You may consider, for example, saying that if an entity receives a certain amount of foreign contributions within a certain period of time—and it would be for Parliament to decide what the amount of time would be—that entity should not use its general revenue. It could still form a third party. It would have to fundraise and pour that money into its bank account.

There is a range of options there, and that is an area the committee may want to consider without necessarily going to a full set of contribution limits.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Bottom line, what you're saying is that there are probably some options we could look at that would make this a little bit easier. I think it would even ease the burden on Elections Canada in terms of trying to sort these kinds of situations out, because this creates a situation where it does become quite difficult.

Would you agree with that characterization?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

As I said, on an audit, unless there is a foreign address on the contribution, it's difficult to say on the face of it that it comes from a foreign source.

Mr. Blake Richards:

At the end of the day what happens is that this kind of activity might occur, and maybe after the fact, we might be able to do an investigation and maybe figure out that it happened—or maybe not. Even if we were able to figure out that it happened, it would be too late because it would already have happened and would have affected the election. Is that accurate?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes. It's true of many issues around the Canada Elections Act, but I don't disagree with you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

Now we'll move on to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I like hypotheticals in order to understand what the impact would be. Say we're in 2014 and there's a right-wing think tank that's trying to affect Canadian environmental policy. Say they receive $500,000 from the Koch brothers in the States with a clear agenda and they then spend that money in the 2015 election in Canada trying to influence voters' thinking about environmental policies or the need to have fewer of them.

Would that be something that would fall under the purview of this act or would it not be caught by that? That's direct foreign influence, obviously, by the two richest men in the world.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are a number of elements. If you go back in time, you're under the current rules, not the bill.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I know, but if we applied the rules that are being proposed here, would that be caught?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'll show you how the rules improve the catching of that type of transaction.

Currently, a third party cannot seek funding from a foreign source for the purpose of third party regulated activities. Under the bill, they cannot use foreign funds for the purpose of their activities. If that entity is largely funded by a foreign source, as in your example, it would be very difficult for that third party to justify it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know what the Fraser Institute's annual budget is, but it's not $500,000. It's more than that. Then suddenly we're seeing these things: let's deregulate the environmental conditions on pipelines, an ad campaign directing people to vote a certain way. You at Elections Canada ask, “Hmm, how is the Fraser Institute operating right now?” They say, “We have a $2.5 million or $3 million budget; we're just using funds raised in Canada.” Would you not require the CRA or someone to help you understand actually how the organization works?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No. That would be doing an investigation. We would do an audit. We'd look at their contributions and they would say this is general revenue.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's right.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If there was suspicion that this is really money directed by a foreign entity, the commissioner could investigate that.

(1930)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but to prove what?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If we at least have an anti-avoidance rule to show that in fact there was some form of collusion—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As the bill is right now, we don't have an anti-avoidance rule.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No, we don't. I think it should be added to the bill.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That feels like a loophole. In 2019, or 2018 leading into 2019, the Fraser Institute could also take $500,000 from the Koch brothers on a very specific set of policies they're looking to push into the election, into the minds of voters. You launch your investigation, but they say, “This less than one fifth of our funding; we didn't use any of that $500,000 on any of the brochures or the ads that we ran.”

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are they guilty of anything? Can they do that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Every fact situation is unique, but it would be preferable to have a clear anti-avoidance rule. There is one in the bill for spending, but there isn't one on the contribution side and on the funding side.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We should get all foreign influence out of Canadian elections. I join my Conservative colleagues and friends in looking to making the playing field actually level. By the way, CAPP is going to run into all sorts of issues if we actually do this.

Let's look at the convention loophole. I don't understand it. Under this bill, a very wealthy person could come in and pay for a leadership convention outright.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If the price of the ticket is such as to cover basically just the cost of running the convention, and my understanding is that this is often the case, that there's not much money made out of party conventions—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Conventions are usually money losers for parties, at least for us.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

—in that case, as long as the overhead exceeds or is not greater than the cost of the tickets, an individual, a wealthy person, could buy all the tickets.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That person could buy every ticket to a convention and pay for it outright.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct. That's my concern, that a party convention is a party activity, and funding for party activities—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's not the case right now, though. That would be new.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That would be new.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. I'm trying to understand where this came from. Does that not seem like a massive loop around the restrictions on what an individual can donate to parties?

We all face limits. Rich people can't come in and just drop $1 million on a party. We have laws against that. However, if the convention costs $1 million and they pay for it by buying 3,000 tickets at whatever price....

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think where it comes from is if you compare that with the ticketed fundraisers.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In our interpretation of the act over the years, we've accepted that part of the tangible benefits that people receive is the venue. When you go to a restaurant, it's not just the plate; it's also the venue.

We have not accepted that for conventions because a convention is a party activity. It's doing the party's policy. That is our interpretation.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, because there's no benefit in just hanging out at the Halifax Convention Centre for a weekend.

It's not something people seek to do for part of their vacation, to hang around a convention centre.

Mr. Mark Gerretsen:

To each his own.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You guys have a strange way to party.

I just don't understand why that would be contemplated. I've never—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

To be quite frank, I'm not saying that what was contemplated is the loophole that I've identified.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But this is what the effect is.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In the worst-case scenario, it's what the effect could be.

I'm saying that there has to be a way to at least preserve against the worst-case scenario. I'm offering a number of ways of doing that, some of which I think achieve what was intended by the bill. At least by providing a limit to it, we're providing some transparency.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

On privacy, there is no minimum standard for the parties to achieve.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

On the privacy side.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I asked the minister about the collection of data and whether there is a minimum standard. They said they're going to make the parties put their policy up on their websites, where you have to click seven times to find it, and that's good enough.

There's no enforcement, so if the parties breach some of our privacy laws.... We're not subject to any privacy laws, are we?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

None...?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

None whatever, no.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the wild west.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are some limitations in the act on the use of the information provided by Elections Canada, but as we've discussed it's very limited.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Beyond that, with regard to parties harvesting individuals' data off of social media websites, buying catalogue subscriptions, all of that, there are no limits on what a party does with all of that data on Canadians.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Not on the party side. There may be on the other entities' transaction side, but not on the party's side.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but apparently some of the social media giants don't necessarily always follow that.

There's an arm's race when it comes to data. People couldn't have even imagined Cambridge Analytica seven years ago, and they may have helped sway an election or two.

Does this bill properly face the threats that data mining and data manipulation have on our elections?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In my view—and I've made this recommendation—the bill should go further in establishing minimum standards and providing oversight.

(1935)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

And PIPEDA...?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, I think those standards at least reflect broadly those—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

And enforcement through the Privacy Commissioner.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

With fines.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

With the set of tools that he has already. I don't believe he has fines.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'll work on that too.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

Thanks you again for coming back.

I know there's been some discussion in question period around it, but can you briefly discuss the independence of Elections Canada and make clear its independence vis-à-vis the Government of Canada?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

I think there are two aspects of this independence that are at issue in a way in this context. One is on the policy side. Our policy advice is provided through this committee, and the work we do with the government in terms of the bill is on the technical side. It's very valuable, but it's technical work.

In terms of the implementation, we are masters of what we decide. Nobody can order us to do implementation work, and nobody has even suggested that. That's part of the risk management that I'm responsible for, to make sure we are ready to conduct the election, either on the current set of rules or on a set of rules as they may evolve as we get closer to the election.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You talked about entities engaging in other election systems in terms of undermining the integrity. Perhaps there isn't any change to the data, but it undermines the integrity. That's a problem across the board, and we're seeing that in western democracies.

Similarly, is it dangerous to have elected members of Parliament questioning the independence of Elections Canada and its role in providing for our elections?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If elected members have a concern about the independence, they should feel free to clarify that point. I'm happy to clarify that there is no issue of independence here.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If I can go back to your recommendations in terms of privacy principles, we talked about PIPEDA and your requirements. What would this look like?

It's one good thing to say that privacy should be protected, and that's something everyone agrees on, but, nuts and bolts, what does that look like for a party official or party volunteer?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think the bill could provide that the policy of the party must abide by certain standards, such as those found in PIPEDA. We can examine those and provide guidance to the parties ahead of time as to what these standards are.

I'm not sure I'm answering the question. Is that what you're getting at in terms of the specific amendments I'm proposing to this bill?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In terms of the policy, we can come back with some more details. My notes here are fairly general, and I would be happy, if the committee wants to have some more detailed recommendations, to do that, but essentially I would be working with the Privacy Commissioner in that regard. We could provide some language to ensure the policies are reflective of the basic standards that you normally find in privacy legislation. We could also provide some language with regard to the oversight role of the Privacy Commissioner.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I would appreciate more detail on that point, because sometimes we get into—and it's a good intention and it's coming up with policies—that it's one thing to apply it to a party official who's working at the party headquarters but it's another thing for a party volunteer who's working on a local campaign. Have you taken that into account? Even the difference between a Liberal in St. Catharines who is working on a campaign that's well funded and for which there are lots of volunteers versus a Liberal in rural Alberta where there may be just a couple of people—or one; I was being generous with two—trying to put together.... There are differences between volunteers in terms of their quality and quantity.

Are those being taken into account when we're talking about requirements to abide by federal privacy legislation?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's a very important point. I think we have to be careful not to put everybody in the same situation. I don't think local campaigns are in the same category as parties. They don't amass large amounts of information. Over time, they don't accumulate that information. They don't do the same kind of work in terms of fundraising the same way that parties do. We have to recognize that local campaigns are run largely by volunteers, so I am not proposing that this bill be amended in a way to deal with candidates' campaigns. I think the important point and I think what Canadians expect is that the party databases, which are quite significant, should be subject to some standards and they should be accountable to those standards.

(1940)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In addition to Bill C-76 provisions aiming to prevent misinformation in advertising, is Elections Canada taking any proactive measures to prevent bots and other malicious media manipulators that could impact elections?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly in our case our number one priority is to make sure there is neither misinformation nor disinformation with respect to where, how, and when to register and to vote. One of the measures we are taking is that we will have a repertoire of all of our public communications on that subject, so if somebody is concerned that they are receiving information that they are not sure is from Elections Canada, they can verify against the repertoire to make sure it is, in fact, a communications from Elections Canada. Parties certainly can do the same thing. They can ensure that their communications, if they wish, are listed in a way that people can check.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I have a very quick question. I know I'm running out of time.

Is there a tool within Elections Canada's tool box—so if you can't beat 'em, join 'em—a positive bot that Elections Canada could employ to go out and fight the negativity and potential foreign interference? If it can be used against us, can it be used to assist Elections Canada in ensuring fairness?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's certainly the case that not all bots are dangerous. There are some positive uses for bots. I have not explored the possibilities of those positive bots in terms of fighting misinformation, but perhaps that is something we can explore.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we will go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Perrault, did you get a chance to watch or listen to the minister's testimony from earlier today?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I heard most of it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Did you have a chance to hear the part where she and I had a discussion about provisional balloting?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I did.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. In there she expressed concern that the concept of provisional balloting—which I don't have to describe to you, because you're familiar with how it works—had been left out of the legislation because of a concern for dignity. I expressed complete puzzlement. If I turn up at a poll and I've forgotten my wallet at home and have to put my ballot into an envelope so they can confirm that I actually am who I claim to be, I can't figure out how that affronts my dignity.

I promised I would bring it up with you. I want to ask you what your view is on the subject.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think in terms of provisional ballots, the issue we have to keep in mind is...and I know it's something that exists in various jurisdictions and it's used for different purposes. In some jurisdictions it's used, for example, if there's no polling day registration. If you vote on polling day without being registered, then your ballot is treated as a provisional ballot. That makes sense for those jurisdictions that do not have polling day registration.

In our case, the issue seems to be more around voter identification, if I understand your question. I'm not quite sure how the provisional ballot would assist us in that context. A provisional ballot is a complex procedure. Voters who have a problem proving their address would have to come back at some point to the returning office. In rural areas, this may be some distance.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry, Mr. Perrault, if you don't mind my saying so, with regard to that, you can structure it so that they don't have to do that. It could very well be that it's up to the local returning officer to do the work of following up and making sure people live where they say they do and so on.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That raises the question of, if documentary proof of address is not available, how it would be available later on and whether the work on the returning officer would delay the count of the vote and the result.

I must say, I do have some reservation. Until I see clearly how this would assist in resolving the issues that we find in terms of more identification, I'm not eager to go down that road. I must confess, it may be that I'm missing something about how these procedures could be of assistance.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You indicated to us earlier that you were consulted as far back as last autumn on the bill. I wanted to ask, with relation to—I think you said last autumn—the foreign funding for third parties. How long ago were you consulted about that?

(1945)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That, I believe, was just very recently. I don't have a date on that, but that was.... My counsel advises that it must have been around Christmas.

Ms. Anne Lawson (General Counsel and Senior Director, Legal Services, Elections Canada):

I honestly can't remember. That did come in later, but it was possibly before Christmas, but I honestly can't remember.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Can you get back to us on that?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

You've made a number of suggestions regarding proposed amendments to various sections of the bill including the foreign funding for third parties. I'll just make the assumption that you were consulted, but you did not actually get to see anything that is really close to the final draft until either some time shortly before it came out or perhaps at the time that it was made public to Parliament. Does that seem correct?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I've seen various iterations of that bill, so again, the time is a bit fuzzy. I must say that in terms of my suggestions today, some of them are more on the policy side, and I think it's more appropriate for me to make those recommendations to this committee than to the government. On the government side, it's more of a technical.... Some are technical, and in some cases, we may have raised them. We did raise many and they had addressed many. I think those consultations were very useful. In some cases, we failed to raise them. In other cases, we raised them, and for some reason, they were not retained. I don't know why.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I assume at this point you are looking for the committee or perhaps the government via the parliamentary secretary and representation that it has on this committee to make amendments to address essentially the advice you give us here vis-à-vis proposed amendments.

I assume that's all you're planning on giving us, or were you planning on giving us actual draft, new sections, to put in place and correct things?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

This is what I'm offering. I've been requested to provide more specific language on the privacy side because that language was more generic in style. The others are fairly specific, I think, in terms of what can be done. It refers to specific provisions and changes to be there, but they're not drafting language, I agree.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With regard to the discussion you had on foreign funding for third parties, would the provision being added, or that you suggest to be added, to proposed sections 349.95 and 358, which are the ones mirroring the anti-circumvention provisions elsewhere in the Elections Act, I can certainly see how they would take care of some of the concerns you raised regarding foreign funding, but I'm not sure I see how they would deal with the problem that you characterize in the following words in your table: “Also, if foreign funds are specifically given to free up domestic resources of a third party so that it could conduct regulated activities, it is not clear that this would be prohibited.”

I don't see how that does that, given that money is fungible. Is there a way of overcoming this problem that you can direct us towards?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If you're asking for an airtight regime, this is not it, I agree. This would deal with egregious attempts to deliberately circumvent the rules on foreign funding. If we're talking about just the mere fact that at some point in time some organization received foreign funding, and it still exists in some form on its balance sheet, and then they entertain to participate in the campaign, that does not deal with that. In order to deal with that, you need to go much further than what I have proposed and what the bill currently proposes, and that's where you get into difficult considerations of balancing freedom of expression and freedom of association.

My suggestion is that you may not need to go all the way to a full regime of contribution limits, but you could consider that an entity that has received a certain amount of foreign contributions—which is different from commercial revenue, for example, investment revenue—at a certain level within a certain time period, then perhaps may not be able to use general revenue.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Scott.

Now we'll go to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Just so I understand clearly, with respect to the first amendment that you're proposing that deals with citizenship declaration, I understand the point, because passage of time is clear. We know that's going to happen, but we don't know that a ceremony is necessarily going to happen, so someone can't swear that in the event that something happens, that they don't attend the ceremony or whatever. Just so that I'm clear on the understanding of the amendment, if the amendment goes through, if you have someone who will become a Canadian citizen before election day, but is not able to vote on election day, is there any way that person would have the right to vote if this amendment were to go through?

(1950)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No, if this amendment were to go through, the person would have to have become a citizen on polling day in order to vote.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The risk, if you don't go that way, is that somebody would cast a ballot, for example through a special ballot, and that person is not a citizen because the ceremony was cancelled or the person was denied citizenship on security grounds, for example, and the ballot is cast.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, I understand that. There's no other away around that. There's no other way of ensuring that person.... Can you think of another way of ensuring that person would be able to vote?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We've never allowed that. This is not a new policy direction for the legislation. It's simply what I feel is incorrect content in a formal declaration.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

In a declaration, that makes sense.

We've talked quite a bit about the voter information card. I'm a big supporter of that, and I realize that the voter information card is not only beneficial to seniors, who often get the attention on this, but also with respect to students. Because there's been some question about this voter information card, I'd like your comments on how you feel about this serving as a piece of identification, and also your comments on whether you've ever seen or have data that demonstrates that the voter information card is used in a fraudulent way. Third, how many people were denied the ability to vote because they didn't have the proper identification in the last election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'll start with the last one. What we do know is that, from the labour force survey done by StatsCan at the last general election or after the last general election, 172,000 Canadians could not vote because of the voter identification requirements, including 50,000 who were turned away at the polls. That's the only hard data that we have on this matter that we can affirm.

Let's be clear. The use of the voter information card at the federal level has occurred in the by-election part of 2011, and in 2011 in specific circumstances. In those circumstances, I'm not aware of any complaints or incidents of alleged fraud using the voter information card.

It's also important to note that, of all the provinces in Canada, only seven require proof of address. It is still significant, seven jurisdictions: six provinces and one territory. All of the provinces allow the voter information card as proof of address along with another piece of ID. I'm not aware of any concerns at the provincial level in that regard.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

At a previous appearance, you made comments about ensuring the fundamental dignity of the person who is exercising their right to vote. Can you speak a bit about why you feel it's important that Canadians are empowered to exercise their right to vote on their own?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The right to vote is the most fundamental expression of autonomy that we have in our political system. We hear that a lot from voters with disabilities. They want to not only vote but to vote independently. For them, it's a very important issue of dignity. That's part of their autonomy as Canadians, to be equal with others. That's not just true for people with disabilities. I think the same is true for any voter who would be required to ask somebody else's permission, or to ask somebody else to attest or vouch—it doesn't matter which procedure—to allow them to vote. If we can find ways to minimize that, we maximize the circumstances in which a person can vote independently. I think that's an important issue.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What does C-76 do in that regard?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Allowing a voting information card along with another piece of ID will allow many voters, who would otherwise require vouching or attestation under the current rules, to be able to go and vote and prove their residence without the need for assistance by somebody else.

(1955)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to the attempt of C-76 to make it easier for people to vote, particularly those with disabilities, how does the technology work if someone is voting at home? How does that happen, if they opt to vote at home because they're going to have a problem getting to the polling station?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Right now, the only way people can vote at home is through a special ballot. These are people who cannot vote at their polling location and they're not able to vote at home independently. Through the special ballot rules, a poll worker comes with the returning officer and administers the vote at their home, with assistance.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Is the requirement for that a physical disability, or does it also go beyond physical disability, in Bill C-76?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Bill C-76 expands it beyond physical disability.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Would it include, for example, mental health?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It would.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Very good.

The Chair:

You have time for one more question.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Youth are a passion for me. I think it's critical that we get them involved in the democratic process, because we're all going to benefit from their contributions. How do you see Elections Canada using the restored education mandate if C-76 passes?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

To be clear, the current law allows us to reach out to underage Canadians. The bill would allow us to ignore the age distinction. We would be able to reach out in high schools, or in CEGEP in Quebec, where you may find some 18-year-olds, without any worry about that. That's an improvement. It would allow us to hire youth to work at the polls. The two go hand in hand. I think the minister spoke about youth at the booth. That program was used not only in British Columbia but in other provincial jurisdictions like Nova Scotia and other jurisdictions. Every time it's been used, it's been a success. It shows young Canadians the way the system works. It makes them familiar with the system. If we can combine the recruitment of youth with civic education and preregistration, we'll now have several levers at our disposal to improve youth understanding of the importance of voting, the mechanics of voting, and getting them engaged in the process.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Shipley.

Mr. Bev Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair.

I'm pleased to be here. I'm not normally on the committee, so unlike all those who have said that “It's great to see you” or “I haven't seen you” or “I just saw you lately”, I've never seen you before.

Thank you for being here.

I'm trying to clarify a couple of things. We talk about transparency and creating a level playing field when it comes to political financing. I want to touch on the transparency part first.

On page four of your presentation, you talked about about how “vouching does not remove the obligation to prove identity and address, it simply provides an alternative mechanism”, in which the voucher and the voter take a declaration. That is required. Then you said that they still require a piece of ID.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No. If that's what I said, then it's mistaken. Under the use of the voter information card as proof of address, the elector needs to have another piece of ID and needs to make sure that the voter information card has the same name on it as the other piece of ID. That is what I certainly intended to refer to.

Mr. Bev Shipley:

Not a correct address, then...?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

You have to have the address and the name on the VIC and another piece of ID with the elector's name, as well.

Mr. Bev Shipley:

You gave me a stat just a minute ago. You said that 172,000 people couldn't vote because they didn't have identification for whatever reason. Can you tell me how many addresses change on that voter information card from the time it goes out until the day advance polls and voting days start?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If I remember correctly—and my colleague will correct me if I'm misleading the committee—there were roughly just under a million revised VICs that were issued at the last general election. These are VICs that are reissued to the elector because they've made a correction to their information during the election process.

(2000)

Mr. Bev Shipley:

When you go to the polling station, how do you correct that? First of all, you may have your hydro bill or your lease or your cheque from someplace that says this address, but your information card is different. How do you square that? Now you have two documents that don't match.

For example, when I just voted in the Ontario election I had to show proof of who I was two times. It seems to me that what we're certain about—or I am, anyway, maybe nobody else is—is, how do we know? Now we have a million people who have changed their addresses, and we're talking about 170,000 people who maybe didn't have the right to vote last time because they couldn't get the right information. Yet we know all that information is actually available if you should desire to go get it so you can have the privilege to vote in this country. I'm just trying to square the hole here.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I will perhaps make a few clarifications.

In Ontario, as in Quebec, there is no requirement to prove your address when you vote. There is only a requirement to prove your identity. It's the address portion that is challenging to most Canadians, not the identity portion. In Ontario and Quebec, that's not a requirement.

In the case of an elector who's changed address, and who informs Elections Canada during the revision period, they receive a revised VIC at their new address. The original VIC would have been sent to a former address. They will not have that VIC with them, so they will be using their current address VIC that they will have received at home. The fact that they have, in hand, that VIC means that they have received it and that the name on that VIC is not somebody else's name, it's their name, and it's the same name that appears on another piece of ID. At some point, I think we have to decide when enough is enough. That, to me, is sufficient proof to vote in a Canadian election.

Mr. Bev Shipley:

It proves that they are Canadian to do that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Pardon me?

Mr. Bev Shipley:

It will prove that they are Canadian.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It will not prove that they are Canadian. That proof is done when they register through a declaration. That's been the system in Canada, as we don't have a documentary proof of citizenship in Canada.

Mr. Bev Shipley:

Okay.

I want to move on to the next question.

As acting Chief Electoral Officer, maybe you can explain this. I'm trying to figure out the benefit to the voter and to Canadians. On third party money, foreign money coming in through a third party, can you give me the value or the advantage or the benefit that the Canadian voter gets from that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think I'll take it from another angle. There's a group that wants to participate in a Canadian election. That group has revenues from many sources over many years, so the difficulty is untangling.... In some cases, there may be, in that revenue stream, some foreign sources.

The value of the participation, of course, is the value of participation in a democratic society. What we certainly want to avoid is the case of a foreign entity funding a third party to influence the voting process. There are several measures in this bill to do that. But when you're getting into the more grey zones of the commingling of money, it's a trickier nut to crack.

Mr. Bev Shipley:

I'm trying to understand that part where you say it's a benefit to society for someone who wants to invest in Canada. If Canadians are seeing the benefits of having a democratically elected government in Canada, why do we need third party and foreign money coming in? Why not just use the Canadian money that comes through our donations to parties, and we use the caps that are given, both as a party and as individuals, to each of the parties? That cuts it pretty clear, and that way we know that it's actually Canadians who are supporting the Canadian election and not foreign and third party enterprises.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'm responding to your question. If I'm not, please tell me.

My point is that, as recognized in the Supreme Court of Canada, there's a value to people participating in the electoral debate, not only by voting or directly supporting political parties, but also by engaging in the political debate, which could include doing some advertising or other campaign activities in favour of one idea or another. That's been recognized in our law and our Constitution. The questions are this: how do you distinguish that from illegitimate foreign funding, what is the right balance, and when do the filters against foreign funding become so tight that you're preventing legitimate activity?

There are no easy answers. It's a matter of vetting it and funding a calibrated regime to deal with that issue.

(2005)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you, Mr. Shipley.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thanks again, Chair.

I'm just looking under division 3 in the legislation. It talks about third parties' bank accounts, registry of third parties, and third-party expenses returns. I see that under proposed subsection 358.1(2), the account shall be in a Canadian financial institution as defined by section 2 of the Bank Act. It talks about payments and receipts, closure of the bank account. The reporting mechanism is there. To me, this seems quite thorough and something that you would have trust in when it comes to the third parties. This to me is an essential part of this in order to track third party spending. Would I be safe in saying that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It is, absolutely.

The fact, however, of having a Canadian bank account does not mean that it only includes money of Canadian origin, right?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right, so this is my question. If it's not fail-safe, it's pretty close to it. You may have touched upon this in your recommendations, but is there any way of closing any other possible loopholes there?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No system is fail-safe.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sure.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No system is watertight. We have a contribution regime, for example, for parties and candidates. It says that you can only use your own money to make a contribution. We know from incidents in the past that this is sometimes circumvented. At some point, we have to accept that the regime will not be absolutely airtight. The question is, where is the right balance? I'm saying there's no clear answer, which is why I didn't make a specific recommendation. I'm offering avenues for the committee to reflect upon this issue.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right, that's in order to close it there. I see what you're saying. Certainly, it goes a long way, especially the idea of a Canadian bank account and the registration of that.

Let's go to the return. The third party expenses return, that's proposed subsection 359(2). It says, it shall contain, “in the case of a general elections held on a day set in accordance with” a certain subsection, “a list of partisan activity”. In respect of the return here, are you satisfied with the fact it's going to be partisan activity expenses, election advertising, and surveys?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

I think that's something I tried to point out at the outset, but I'm happy to emphasize it here. The proposed bill includes very significant improvements on the third party regime. In particular, it expands very significantly the scope of regulated activities well beyond the sole issue of advertising. So this is what you're referring to. It also has the effect of regulating foreign funding with respect to those activities.

Currently, for example, a third party can do canvassing—it's not regulated—and can solicit funds from a foreign source for canvassing activities, which is permissible under current law. That would certainly not be possible under C-76.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Because of the survey clause.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Because of the survey and because of the partisan activities.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I do not want to let my suggestions regarding areas of improvements undermine the fact that there are some very significant improvements provided for in the bill in this area.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is there a part of this bill where it's only advertising that's covered, or are you satisfied with the fact that the three elements are covered here?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The three elements are covered, and in the context of the pre-writ period, there's a bit of a difference, and for good reason. In the pre-writ context, the advertising is only direct advertising. It's partisan advertising that says to vote for this or not to support this party. That's because third parties do all kinds of activities, and you have to be careful. It becomes very difficult to draw lines, and I think this is an example of a right balance.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Does that have to do with its being issue-related?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

Groups that are out there that don't necessarily want to take part in the campaign but that advocate issues on a ongoing basis shouldn't have to stop just because an election is coming.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. I appreciate that.

Mark, do you have questions?

Mr. Mark Gerretsen:

Is there still time?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Mark Gerretsen:

You mentioned 50,000 people were turned away at the polls at the last election. Are those 50,000 people who just showed up without the proper ID, or are those 50,000 people that you have been able to identify as not having the proper ID?

(2010)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

This is a labour force survey by StatsCan. I don't believe that it allows that distinction. These are people who said they were turned away because they did not have the proper ID.

Mr. Mark Gerretsen:

It just means they didn't have the ID on them.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think it's possible that includes those numbers. Yes.

Mr. Mark Gerretsen:

I'm sure this question has come up in this committee before, but are you aware of any widespread fraud that's existed from taking the voter cards and using them, other than one-off things that you may have heard of. Are you aware of any widespread activities to that effect?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I have two points on that. First of all, I've heard many allegations over the years. Every time Elections Canada or the commissioner has asked to see any kind of precision or any evidence to substantiate those allegations, people have never been able to provide it. None of these cases were about identification, because the voter information card was not used for identification purposes, except in 2011 for the general election, and we had no issues there with regard to the voter information card being used as a piece of ID.

Mr. Mark Gerretsen:

Okay.

That's all I have, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I want to understand how you audit both of those questions. Do you gather any data on people coming into the polling station and then being refused the ability to vote and sent back out? Does Elections Canada gather that information?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

So far, we have not done that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Have you thought about gathering that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We have thought about it. The logistics of running an election are quite complex.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's what I imagine. If somebody walks into the polling station, they go up to the table to see their name, they're on the registry, and for whatever reason beyond that they are then unable to vote, would it be that difficult if there were a form or sheet beside the people at the front table verifying, to say they turned someone away on ID, or they turned someone away on inconvenience of the line? I think in terms of the performance of our elections, at some of our polling stations waiting is not a problem and at others we've seen people get upset and walk away. Just for the performance of the organization, I think this would be healthy.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I have mixed feelings about this. If you look at the last general election, at advance polls, you will remember there were significant lineups and frustrations. The poll workers work long hours with no health breaks at all, in some cases. We received complaints from electors who didn't understand why the poll worker was eating in front of them.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, because of what?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

They were eating in front of voters. That voter did not understand, of course, that this poll worker cannot stop in a 16-hour day, so we are very careful not to add to the burden of poll workers.

As we move forward, we have improved processes. We have longer hours for advance polls and we have support from technology. It may be more feasible to look at that. We may look at exit polls at the next election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Has Elections Canada ever studied what the impact would be of lowering the voting age in Canada?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Not that I know of. There is debate around this and arguments pro and con. That's really an issue for Parliament to decide.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've seen a number of provinces consider that in referenda that are held. We saw that in the U.K. recently, where under different circumstances the voting age was variable. There are assumptions made about what changing the voting age would do. I assume, when we went from 21 to 18, Elections Canada probably thought about it, or maybe not. Maybe it was just done, but I suspect not.

We often talk about youth and youth participation. It seems part of your effort is to understand voter motivation, voter behaviour. Most of the research I've seen is that, when young people vote at the first opportunity, the chance of their being lifelong voters goes up dramatically.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is this evidence you've seen as well, that if you miss that first opportunity—you're away or choose not to vote—the odds of your ever voting go down dramatically also?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct. The evidence shows that people between 18 and 24 who do not vote in their first or second election have a marked difference in their voting habits later on in life. Those who do vote early tend to vote throughout their lifetimes.

(2015)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You talk about burdens. One of the things I've heard of, talking to financial agents who volunteer during elections and fill out sometimes onerous paperwork all for a good cause, which is making sure that money is handled properly, is that the burden of work for all our volunteers who take on that unfortunate role has gone up dramatically in the last three or four elections. Has Elections Canada looked at any ways to streamline that activity so we keep the verification there, yet don't burn out the thousands of volunteers who just try to be the financial agents for us as political actors?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We certainly have looked into this. There is no silver bullet there. We have made some recommendations, not necessarily endorsed either by this committee or followed through in this legislation. For example, we recommended for years not to have a requirement to have a bank account if you have a nil campaign. For some reason, there is still a requirement in the act to have a bank account, even though you're not running a financial campaign.

We have recommended a subsidy for the official agent. We believe the official agent is the one who bears the heaviest burden. For some reason, that is not in the bill. We will continue our efforts to support official agents.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If you've made public those amendments or those suggestions you've made in the past for this committee, it would be good to have a collated version of them.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Sure.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know how it is for other members on the committee but when we go to seek our official financial agent, we try not to tell them what the job entails because very few people would put up their hand if they knew how many hours were about to go into the work.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly we can compile them from the last two reports we made. This committee did endorse the subsidy for official agents. I certainly remember that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You made comments about disinformation—I'm not sure if it was in the act or you recommended that it be in the act—about Elections Canada's activities, if somebody is out there pretending to be Elections Canada either online or through robocalls?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

A provision in the current legislation deals with impersonation.

The commissioner felt that the wording of that provision could be reinforced to deal with fake communication material, but this was not as clear. We supported that and made that recommendation.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it in Bill C-76?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It is in Bill C-76.

However, what we did not recommend and should have and what we're recommending today is that it be tweaked to include documents that are presented to be from Elections Canada, not just fake partisan material but also fake—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are the current prohibitions on someone pretending to be the Liberal Party or the Green Party?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'll try to be clearer.

The current provisions in the Canada Elections Act, not this bill, covers impersonation in general. They include impersonation of an Elections Canada official as well as a partisan impersonation. Bill C-76, pursuant to recommendations made by us, would clarify this to also cover fake communication material. Just to be clear, on fake websites, fake....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As opposed to someone standing there saying they're from Elections Canada.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Exactly. That came from the commissioner.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Did it go far enough?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

According to the commissioner, it wasn't clear enough, and we're quite happy to support reinforcing those provisions but we should include Elections Canada in the mix.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll open it up a little for interventions that are not too long. We'll go to Mr. Reid and then Mr. Richards.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll make my intervention really short.

I assume amendments will be suggested dealing with at least some of the seven areas you've highlighted, and we'll all get to see them when they come out. After those amendments have been put out would you be willing to come back to this committee to give us your views on whether they accomplished the goals you were seeking? Would that be acceptable to you?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly my officials or I could come and testify if necessary, if the committee wants us to. Of course, we'll testify whenever.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We'll certainly move the motion to enable that on this side.

I haven't checked with anybody, but I suspect the government side would be agreeable to that as well.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I will not be quite as brief as Mr. Reid. That's probably not said very often either, I don't imagine. If you feel you need to cut me off and put me back on the list again, do so.

The voter information card has come up a couple of times. There are obviously some differences of opinion among the members of this committee as to whether it's being used as a form of identification. Is it a wise move or not? Of course, you have your own viewpoint on that.

This bill authorizes you to have it used as a form of ID. If this legislation passes, would your intention be to do so?

(2020)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If the legislation passes, my intention would be to authorize it after I've consulted the political parties, through the advisory committee of the political parties, to see whether there are ways we can alleviate, perhaps, some concerns that parties may have. I do want to engage the parties on how we do it. As to authorizing it, it is my intention to do that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You've certainly met a better barrier than the government has in terms of trying to work with the parties, so that's good. I'm not expecting you to comment on that, obviously.

In terms of the stuff around the expat voters, I had some conversation on this earlier with the officials. I don't know if you saw the conversations we were having there or not. I was asking a little bit about the removal of any kind of intention to return to Canada someday.

If we as a committee wanted to make an amendment around that, would you see that as something that we could easily amend? If so, how?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly, the amendment is not difficult. I think the point was made, and I agree, that there's a limit to the enforceability of that. It's an expression of intention. The fact that someone does intend is hard to verify. Whether they do or don't return is a fact that is irrelevant, at that point. It's only relevant later on.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

The other one you've probably heard, as we've raised it a number of times in question period and elsewhere. It's about ministerial travel and government announcements. Our concern is that we think that gives the governing party a bit of an advantage, because there's a new restriction in the pre-writ period on what political parties can do, but when ministerial travel and government advertising are able to be done, of course the governing party could benefit from that. We feel there's a concern that this pre-writ period is longer than the period when the government is saying they would restrict advertising. Of course, on ministerial travel there's no restriction.

If we wanted to try to look at an amendment on that, would you see...? I think there are a couple of ways it could be done. Obviously, you could try to harmonize that. It wouldn't be the elections law, I know, but it could be done within the context of this legislation, I would think, or it could be done in such a way that those could become election expenses.

I'm wondering what your thoughts are on that. Is that something that's feasible and possible? If so, would you have any advice on how we might do that, if we were seeking to do it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I have a few comments. First, I think the point made earlier today was that to the extent there's an imbalance, it's on the advertising side, because there is no limit pre-writ on the parties' or MPs' travel.

On the advertising side, this is something that is captured, as you know, by a government policy. Certainly, I would welcome some harmonizing of the timelines. That's not something that perhaps should be done under the Canada Elections Act.

I do note that, if I'm not mistaken, the policy also currently requires all advertising not to be partisan. If it is not partisan, then it wouldn't be a contribution, so I'm not sure that contribution is the best angle. I think the better angle would be to harmonize the timeline, but that's something to be done within the policy.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess what you're saying, though, is that you would like that idea of the harmonizing. You think that might be a beneficial approach.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly, to me it would be sensible. I think it's one of the benefits of having a relatively short pre-writ limit. It allows that form of harmonization. If you were to have a much longer pre-writ spending limit, apart from the charter issues it would raise, it would also make it impossible to even contemplate no government advertising for a prolonged period.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

You had talked the last time you were here about some of the compromises or the things that wouldn't be able to be implemented. I want to dig into a couple of areas specifically and ask you what changes you could undertake to actually implement prior to the next election and which ones you couldn't.

This is specifically with regard to third party spending. That's one of the areas that I have the greatest interest and concern about. Could you give us a sense as to what you think can and can't be implemented in time, based on where we're at right now? I don't know when we can reasonably expect this legislation to pass, whether it would be this spring or this fall.

Can you give us some sense of what that looks like?

(2025)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In terms of the mandatory elements of the bill, not those elements that provide the CEO some discretion—the third party regime is a mandatory element—I'm quite confident that the bill will be implemented. What I said the other day and what I can repeat today is that the manner in which it's implemented may not be the long-term optimal manner.

Specifically, for example, in the case of third parties, we would like to move to a form of online transparency that goes beyond simply PDFs. You can search within a report, but you can't look at contributions, not easily, across third party reports using PDFs posted online. It's very labour-intensive.

Certainly, that's the kind of work that will not be done for this election. That does not mean that the rules will not be implemented, but certainly that after the election there will be room for improvements in the manner of their implementation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Were there any areas that you feel will go beyond even this third party regime, or any of the rest, just generally? Are there any areas that you feel you wouldn't be able to implement in the legislation? Would the compromises—I don't know how else to put it—you would have to make in the implementation create a concern? In other words, we wouldn't be meeting the expectations of the legislation as a result.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No, I think we will be meeting the expectations of the legislation. As I said, for the transparency side, it can be improved, but otherwise, we will be meeting the expectations.

There may be some discretionary capabilities that I would have liked to leverage, and I don't know at this point that I will. For example, in terms of advance votes, to have mobile advance polls requires relatively minor IT system changes, but because we're going to prioritize those that are mandatory, I don't know whether we'll get to it in time and whether we'll do that. We haven't had it in the past and we'd love to have it in the future, but perhaps not for this next general election.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I think that gives me what I was looking for. Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Is there anyone else?

Okay. Thank you very much for being here. Do you have any closing comments?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

On the issue, perhaps Madam Lawson can respond.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

Sorry, Mr. Chair, I just want to answer because it was raised earlier. When we were involved in reviewing drafts of the legislation—and I did confirm with some colleagues—we signed confidentiality agreements. I don't want to get into what we saw when, but basically the bulk of what we saw was before Christmas, to answer the earlier question.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for being here again at this late hour. I thank all the people who supported the committee today. It was a long day. Thanks to all the staff for everything.

Is there anything else for the good of the nation?

We'll see you tomorrow at 11 o'clock.

The meeting is adjourned. Remarks by Stéphane Perrault

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 106e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. J'informe les membres du Comité que cette séance est télévisée.

Nous entreprenons aujourd'hui notre étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs. Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir l’honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques, qui est accompagnée d’Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, et de Manon Paquet, conseillère principale en politiques.

Je vous remercie de vous être déplacés aujourd'hui.

Merci d’être venue, madame la ministre. Je vous cède la parole pour votre déclaration liminaire.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à m’excuser auprès du Comité pour mon retard. Comme le député de Skeena—Bulkley Valley l’a fait remarquer, j'en ferai porter le blâme à mon fils de trois mois pour cela, qui a décidé qu’il avait faim au moment où je partais. Quoi qu’il en soit, je tiens à remercier le Comité de m’avoir invitée et d'avoir entrepris l'étude du projet de loi C-76.[Français]

Je tiens également à remercier le ministre Brison, qui a assumé le rôle de ministre des Institutions démocratiques pendant mon congé parental.[Traduction]

Je suis accompagnée aujourd’hui de deux fonctionnaires, comme vous l’avez mentionné, monsieur le président, du Bureau du Conseil privé, soit Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet pour l’appareil gouvernemental, et Manon Paquet, conseillère principale en politiques, Secrétariat des institutions démocratiques. L'équipe des institutions démocratiques au BCP est petite, mais solide. Je ne saurais trop insister sur l'ampleur du travail qu’elle a accompli pour préparer le projet de loi C-76. Je tiens à remercier les membres de l'équipe de leur travail acharné et de leur dévouement dans ce dossier, mais aussi dans tous les dossiers qui nous concernent.[Français]

Notre gouvernement s'est engagé à renforcer les institutions démocratiques du Canada, à rétablir la confiance des Canadiens et des Canadiennes à l'égard de nos processus démocratiques ainsi qu'à encourager leur participation à ceux-ci.[Traduction]

Nous croyons que la force de notre démocratie repose sur la participation du plus grand nombre de nos concitoyens. En mettant de côté les aspects injustes de la soi-disant Loi sur l'intégrité des élections des conservateurs, nous permettons aux Canadiennes et Canadiens d'exercer leur droit de vote plus facilement et d'une manière plus adaptée à leurs besoins.[Français]

Nous rendons notre système électoral plus accessible aux personnes vivant avec un handicap ainsi qu'aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Nous rendons également leur droit de vote à plus d'un million de citoyens vivant à l'étranger.[Traduction]

Nous renforçons nos lois, mettons fin à des échappatoires et mettons en place un régime de contrôle d'application plus robuste afin de rendre la tâche plus difficile aux perturbateurs qui tentent d'influencer nos élections. Nous requérons plus de transparence de la part des tiers et des partis politiques afin que les Canadiennes et les Canadiens comprennent mieux qui tente d'influencer leur vote. Ce projet de loi rendra notre loi électorale plus moderne, plus robuste et plus efficace dans son contrôle d'application, de manière à mieux refléter la réalité des campagnes électorales d'aujourd'hui.[Français]

Évidemment, rien de tout cela n'aurait été possible sans le travail acharné de ce comité, qui a étudié au cours de la dernière année les recommandations formulées par le directeur général des élections, le DGE, à la suite de l'élection de 2015.

Je crois que vous reconnaîtrez votre travail dans ce projet de loi. En fait, environ 85 % des recommandations du DGE ont été incluses dans le projet de loi C-76. Le Comité a déjà exprimé son accord de principe pour plus de 50 % du contenu du projet de loi.[Traduction]

Le projet de loi C-76 comporte aussi des éléments au sujet desquels le Comité ne s'est pas encore prononcé, et je comprends que le Comité pourra vouloir se concentrer sur ceux-ci. Soyez assurés que mes fonctionnaires et moi sommes disposés à vous fournir toute l'aide dont vous pourriez avoir besoin.

Le projet de loi C-76 rend notre système électoral plus accessible pour tous les Canadiens et Canadiennes. Les heures d'ouverture des bureaux de vote par anticipation seront élargies, les obligations envers les électeurs ayant un handicap seront renforcées, le droit de vote sera élargi à environ un million de citoyens et citoyennes vivant à l'étranger, sans compter que les procédures applicables au vote des membres des Forces canadiennes seront modernisées. La Loi sur la modernisation des élections encourage également les candidats et les partis enregistrés à mener leurs campagnes de manière plus inclusive à l'égard des personnes handicapées.[Français]

Ce projet de loi modernise aussi l'administration des élections. En effet, il sera plus facile pour les Canadiennes et les Canadiens d'aller voter dans un contexte où les mesures d'intégrité solides et éprouvées seront maintenues.

L'une de mes principales priorités, à titre de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, consiste à diriger les efforts déployés par le gouvernement du Canada pour défendre le processus électoral canadien contre les cybermenaces. Les événements survenus récemment sur la scène internationale nous rappellent que le Canada n'est pas à l'abri de telles menaces. Le projet de loi C-76 propose des changements liés à l'influence étrangère et aux perturbations en ligne. Ces changement peuvent être mis en oeuvre dans le cadre de la Loi électorale du Canada.[Traduction]

Même s'il était déjà interdit à des entités étrangères de verser des contributions à des partis politiques et des candidats, notre gouvernement vient refermer une brèche qui permettait à des entités étrangères de dépenser jusqu'à 500 $ dans la publicité électorale pendant la période électorale. De plus, tous les tiers devront posséder un compte bancaire au Canada pour toutes les transactions financières liées aux élections.

Je veux également dire un mot sur les fonds étrangers versés à des tiers avant le 30 juin, puis utilisés pendant la période électorale ou préélectorale. Le projet de loi C-76 imposerait aux tiers de divulguer la source de tous les fonds qu’ils ont utilisés pendant la période électorale ou préélectorale, sans égard au moment où ils ont reçu les fonds. De plus, toute tentative de dissimuler l’utilisation de fonds étrangers pour des activités réglementées pendant la période électorale ou préélectorale serait illégale.[Français]

Les nouvelles dispositions de la Loi électorale du Canada interdiront clairement la publication d'annonces, sur support papier ou électronique, visant à induire le public en erreur quant à leur source. De façon similaire, l'utilisation frauduleuse d'ordinateurs dans le but de modifier les résultats d'une élection sera strictement interdite.

Nous avons toutes et tous la responsabilité de combattre l'influence étrangère dans nos élections. Conséquemment, les organisations qui vendent de l'espace publicitaire ne pourront plus sciemment accepter les publicités électorales financées de l'étranger.[Traduction]

Afin d'assurer le respect et l'application de ces nouvelles dispositions, la Loi sur la modernisation des élections contient plusieurs mesures conçues pour accroître l'efficience et l'indépendance du commissaire aux élections fédérales. Le commissaire aura désormais le pouvoir de contraindre à témoigner et retrouvera son pouvoir de porter des accusations. Il disposera également d'un nouvel outil d'exécution, un régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires.

Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes s'attendent à ce que leur système électoral soit juste et transparent. Ils veulent que tous puissent faire entendre leur voix, et non seulement ceux qui ont le plus de moyens. Ces valeurs ont façonné les systèmes de financement électoral et politique canadiens depuis plus de 40 ans.[Français]

Cependant, l'arrivée des élections à date fixe a changé les règles du jeu. Les partis politiques et les tiers peuvent maintenant planifier leurs campagnes publicitaires partisanes bien avant une période électorale et, de ce fait, contourner l'esprit de nos lois.

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le projet de loi C-76 définit une période préélectorale pendant laquelle des exigences en matière de rapports et des limites de financement s'appliqueront aux partis enregistrés et aux tiers.

La période préélectorale, qui débutera le 30 juin des années d'élection à date fixe, favorisera la transparence puisque les tiers qui dépensent plus de 500 $ pour des publicités partisanes, des activités partisanes et des sondages électoraux seront tenus de s'inscrire auprès d'Élections Canada. Les tiers seront aussi légalement tenus de s'identifier dans les messages publicitaires.[Français]

De nouvelles limites de dépenses s'appliqueront aussi aux tiers et aux entités politiques pendant la période préélectorale.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, on ne peut tenir comme acquise la confiance des Canadiennes et des Canadiens dans leurs institutions démocratiques. Le gouvernement du Canada est déterminé à faire en sorte que notre processus électoral soit sûr, transparent, accessible, moderne dans ses pratiques et à l'abri de toute influence indue.[Français]

Je me ferai maintenant un plaisir de répondre à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Pour la première ronde de questions, nous débuterons avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous souhaite la bienvenue au retour de votre pause. Je n’ai jamais été dans cette situation, mais je ne doute pas que cela a dû être, tout à fait, merveilleux pour vous. Je suis heureux de vous revoir.

Lorsque nous nous sommes lancés dans cette voie, il y a plusieurs années, dans le cadre de ce qu’on appelait à l’époque la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, il y avait des omissions flagrantes et des exemples patents de mesures qui me paraissaient aller à l’encontre de l’idée que chaque citoyen canadien a le droit de vote. C'est un droit garanti par la Charte. Il y avait des choses qui me dérangeaient.

L’exemple le plus flagrant à mes yeux est la carte d’information de l’électeur, que nous appelons couramment au Canada rural et ailleurs au Canada la carte d’identité de l’électeur. Même si elle ne porte pas ce titre, c’est vraiment ce dont il s'agit pour les gens. Je voyais beaucoup de gens, surtout des personnes âgées, qui mettaient un aimant sur cette carte et la fixaient à leur réfrigérateur pour s’assurer de ne pas oublier d'aller voter. C’était non seulement un rappel, mais aussi une forme d’identification. J’ai trouvé que c’était un excellent outil parce qu'il s'agissait de l’une des seules bases de données nationales d’identification. Je suis heureux de voir que ce projet de loi la ramène. J’aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

Le deuxième point sur lequel j'aimerais vous entendre est une situation qui m’a paru déroutante à l’époque. J’aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez du fait que le commissaire pourra désormais exercer les sanctions pécuniaires prévues dans le projet de loi, mesure qui, à mon avis, aurait dû être prise depuis longtemps. L'application de ces sanctions avait été retirée d’Élections Canada et confiée aux procureurs de la Couronne, auprès de qui le rôle du commissaire, à mon sens, demeurait indépendant d’Élections Canada, mais il fallait que ceux-ci fassent partie de cet organisme pour se faire une meilleure idée de leur fonction.

La question comporte deux volets. Pourriez-vous nous parler de la carte d’information de l’électeur et aussi du fait que le commissaire soit réintégré à l'organisme auquel il se rattache?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci beaucoup, Scott, de votre question et de votre demande d'information sur ces deux points.

En ce qui concerne la carte d’information de l’électeur, elle est vraiment importante pour les Canadiens. Pour ce qui est d’établir leur lieu de résidence, il importe de signaler que cette carte ne peut pas servir à elle seule à établir le lieu de résidence, mais doit être utilisée avec d’autres formes d’identification. Quand on y pense, il n’y a pas beaucoup de pièces d’identité qui portent la photo, le nom et l'adresse du titulaire. Il y a beaucoup de Canadiens qui n’ont pas de permis de conduire, par exemple. Pour eux, c’est vraiment important.

J’ai trouvé que le DGE par intérim, M. Perrault, avait tout à fait raison de dire qu'il s’agit en fait d'une question de dignité pour beaucoup de gens. Quand on y pense, pour beaucoup de couples mariés, surtout les couples plus âgés, il n’y a peut-être pas de courrier qui est adressé au nom des deux personnes, ou il n’y a peut-être pas de factures ou de comptes de services publics qui pourraient servir à établir le lieu de résidence. Lorsque je pense aux gens de ma collectivité qui comptaient vraiment sur la carte d’information de l’électeur, en particulier aux femmes âgées qui avaient besoin de cette pièce d’identité, aux femmes, qui peut-être ne conduisent pas ou ne conduisent plus, et qui n’ont pas reçu de courrier à leur nom qui indique leur lieu de résidence aux yeux d'Élections Canada.

Pour revaloriser l'exercice du droit de vote et de redonner un sentiment de dignité aux électeurs, je pense qu’il est absolument essentiel de rétablir la carte d’information de l’électeur comme pièce d’identité servant, au moment du scrutin, à établir le lieu de résidence.

Pour ce qui est de la deuxième partie de votre question et de la réintégration du commissaire aux élections fédérales au sein d'Élections Canada, c’est exactement ce dont vous parlez, de le rattacher à cet organisme plutôt que du service des poursuites pénales.

De plus, en ce qui concerne le commissaire, nous l'avons habilité à nouveau à porter des accusations et nous lui avons également donné un nouvel outil, soit la capacité de contraindre les gens à témoigner aux fins d'application de la loi électorale. C’est une cause que le commissaire a défendue très vigoureusement. C’est bien beau d’avoir un ensemble de lois sévères qui limitent l’influence indue et qui garantissent vraiment que les gens s'y conforment, mais si nous n’avons pas les outils et la capacité d’intenter des poursuites et de veiller à ce que les règles soient respectées, alors ce n’est pas suffisant. Je pense personnellement, et je crois parler aussi, au nom du gouvernement, que c’est très important pour assurer le respect de ces lois.

(1545)

M. Scott Simms:

Je sais que vous avez eu des discussions avec d’anciens commissaires et le commissaire actuel. N'avez-vous jamais eu l’impression, en discutant avec eux, qu’ils avaient, de quelque façon, perdu leur indépendance en faisant partie d’Élections Canada et en travaillant si étroitement avec le DGE?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non.

M. Scott Simms:

Très bien. C’est ce que nous avons entendu la dernière fois.

Il y a une autre chose dont j’aimerais parler. Je sais que c’est assez exhaustif, et je pense que l’opposition nous accuse d’avoir un projet de loi omnibus. Si je peux faire valoir leur point de vue et le réfuter en même temps, il s’agit de la Loi électorale. En tant qu’ancien porte-parole de l’opposition sur ladite Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, je peux honnêtement dire qu’il faut beaucoup de travail pour corriger ce qui a été si mal fait à ce moment-là.

L’autre question que je veux aborder, et je pense qu'il s'agit d'une bonne initiative, est celle de permettre aux jeunes de s’engager avant l’âge de 18 ans. Ce projet de loi comporte deux facettes. D’une part, ils peuvent s’inscrire pour devenir de futurs électeurs et, d’autre part, ils peuvent aussi travailler pour Élections Canada. Pourriez-vous nous parler des deux, s’il vous plaît?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, bien sûr.

Je vais commencer par le dernier point, à savoir que, d'après la Loi électorale actuelle, il faut avoir 18 ans pour travailler dans un bureau de scrutin. Il y a eu une initiative très réussie en Colombie-Britannique intitulée « Youth at the Booth » lors de la dernière campagne provinciale, dans le cadre de laquelle des élèves du secondaire ont travaillé le jour du scrutin. Elections BC a dit à quel point ils étaient formidables en tant que travailleurs électoraux, mais qu'il s'agissait aussi d'un moyen de les faire participer aux élections et de susciter chez eux le désir de voter à l'avenir.

C’est ce que l’ancien DGE a recommandé après 2015. Nous pensons que c’est une excellente initiative, surtout parce que nous savons qu’Élections Canada a de la difficulté à recruter des préposés au scrutin pendant les élections générales.

En élargissant le bassin, on attire des étudiants enthousiastes, excités à l’idée de participer au vote lorsqu’ils auront 18 ans. Cela mène à l’idée d’un registre national des jeunes électeurs. Pour l'essentiel, un tel registre permettrait aux jeunes de 14 à 17 ans de s’inscrire, de sorte qu'à leurs 18 ans, ils seraient inscrits sur la liste électorale. Bien sûr, il faut attendre qu’ils aient 18 ans. Aucun de leurs renseignements ne serait communiqué avant qu'ils atteignent l’âge de 18 ans et qu'ils soient inscrits sur la liste électorale, qui est publique.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, c’est un plaisir de vous accueillir. Bienvenue au Comité. Je pense que c’est la première fois que vous y venez depuis votre bref congé. Personnellement, je ne dirais pas que c’est une pause, et je ne pense pas que vous, non plus, le considérerez ainsi. Nous sommes heureux de vous revoir.

Je vais commencer par ceci, madame la ministre. Croyez-vous qu’il soit important de prendre des décisions fondées sur des données probantes?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je le crois effectivement.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pensais bien que vous étiez de cet avis. Dans la même veine, est-il utile d’apprendre des expériences d'autrui? Est-ce important?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Toujours.

M. Blake Richards:

Excellent. Je pensais que nous serions d’accord là-dessus aussi.

Dans le cadre de notre étude, pensez-vous qu’il serait souhaitable que le Comité examine le projet de loi en profondeur, en tenant compte des concepts que nous venons d'affirmer? De plus, serait-il prudent de prendre connaissance des expériences pertinentes des autres, afin de s’assurer que la loi que nous adopterons sera bonne?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, et c’est pourquoi vous entreprenez cette étude en ce moment et c’est pourquoi le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre a déjà consacré 30 heures à étude la moitié ou presque du projet de loi.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord.

Étant donné que nous sommes d’accord sur ces points et que l’Ontario est en plein milieu d’une élection dans laquelle s'appliquent, pour la première fois, des changements apportés par cette province, dont certains sont de nature semblable ou portent sur le même sujet que des changements proposés dans cette Loi fédérale, par exemple, le registre des futurs électeurs, les politiques de protection des renseignements personnels par les partis politiques, certaines limites et restrictions s'appliquant aux dépenses des tiers et les restrictions de la publicité gouvernementale, mesure que l’opposition a d'ailleurs proposée comme modification possible du projet de loi, diriez-vous qu’il serait utile pour nous d’entendre les personnes qui participent aux élections en Ontario, qu’il s’agisse des fonctionnaires électoraux, que nous devrions certainement entendre, ou d’autres personnes qui y sont mêlées, et de prendre connaissance des difficultés qui auraient pu survenir à cette occasion?

Je pense que la dernière chose que nous voudrions faire serait de répéter les erreurs qui auraient pu être commises là-bas, ou de ne pas tirer de leçons de ces expériences alors qu’elles nous sont si facilement accessibles. Qu’en pensez-vous? Serait-il souhaitable que nous entendions ceux qui ont participé aux élections en Ontario? Êtes-vous d’accord avec moi là-dessus également?

(1550)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le Comité est indépendant et décide qui inviter à témoigner, et je ne voudrais pas ajouter quoi que ce soit à cela ou y déroger de quelque façon. Vous prendrez vos propres décisions à ce sujet.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous n’avez pas d’opinion à ce sujet? Qu’en pensez-vous?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous l'avons dit: il importe que ce soit le Comité qui prend ces décisions.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous n’avez pas d’opinion personnelle quant à savoir si ce serait utile pour nous de chercher à en tirer des leçons?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je l’ai dit, je pense que ces décisions reviennent au Comité lui-même.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Je n'insiste pas.

Lorsque ce projet de loi a été déposé, votre gouvernement a présenté un avis d’attribution de temps après seulement une heure de débat. Je dirais que ce n’est certainement pas le signal d’un gouvernement qui a vraiment l’intention légitime de travailler avec les autres partis pour essayer de proposer quelque chose qui sera dans l’intérêt de tous.

Cependant, au cours du débat d’une demi-heure tenu à la suite de la proposition d’attribution de temps présentée par le gouvernement, vous avez dit à plusieurs reprises que vous jugiez qu’il était vraiment important que le Comité soit saisi de cette question, parce que vous estimiez que c’était le lieu où la discussion serait la plus utile et où le débat de fond pouvait durer tout le temps qu'il faudrait. J’aimerais savoir combien de temps, à votre avis, serait nécessaire pour un débat de fond.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, comme le Comité est indépendant, je pense qu’il serait inapproprié que je fasse des commentaires à ce sujet. C’est vraiment aux membres du Comité de décider.

M. Blake Richards:

Madame la ministre, je comprends votre position. Je suis d’accord avec vous pour dire que c’est certainement à nous de décider, mais notre objectif, quand nous accueillons des témoins, c’est évidemment d’entendre des avis compétents. En tant que ministre responsable, je m’attends à ce que vous ayez des avis compétents, et il nous serait utile d’avoir votre opinion et vos réflexions à ce sujet. Avez-vous une idée de ce qui constituerait, selon vous, un débat approprié?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions sur le fond du projet de loi, car je ne veux pas nuire aux travaux du Comité et à son indépendance à cet égard. Si vous avez des questions sur le fond, je serai heureuse d’y répondre.

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple. Lorsque le gouvernement Harper a fait adopter à toute vapeur la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, diriez-vous que le Comité a eu suffisamment de temps pour en débattre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je l’ai dit, je suis heureux de répondre à vos questions sur le fond du projet de loi, monsieur Richards.

En fait, lorsque nous parlons de travailler avec les autres et de veiller à ce que les autres partis puissent apporter une contribution réelle, 50 % de ce projet de loi a été accepté en principe par le Comité et a fait l’objet de travaux en 2016 et 2017. J’espère que vous y retrouverez une partie de votre travail. L’élaboration de ce projet de loi a consisté, en grande partie, à veiller à ce que les voix des différents partis soient prises en compte.

De plus, 85 % de ce projet de loi est fondé sur les recommandations formulées par le directeur général des élections après 2015 dans le but d’améliorer le processus électoral et de maintenir le plus haut niveau de démocratie et d’intégrité. J’ai hâte de discuter du contenu du projet de loi.

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends ce que vous dites à propos des 50 % du texte du projet de loi déjà été étudié, mais je tiens à souligner qu’une étude approfondie a été faite de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections avant son adoption et j’espère que nous ferons de même ici.

Puisque vous n’êtes pas disposée à répondre à des questions sur ce que vous pensez à ce sujet, qu’en est-il de la Chambre des communes elle-même? Le gouvernement s’engagerait-il à tenir un débat à la Chambre des communes d'une durée au moins égale à celui qui a eu lieu pour la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections de Harper?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, monsieur Richards, je serai heureuse de discuter du contenu du projet de loi. Comme je suis ici, le moment est probablement bien choisi pour poser des questions à ce sujet avant que je ne cède la parole aux fonctionnaires.

M. Blake Richards:

C’est merveilleux. Je comprends cela. J’aimerais pouvoir en faire autant, mais j’aimerais également obtenir des réponses à certaines des questions que j'ai posées.

Le ministre suppléant et vous-même avez dit à maintes reprises que vous étiez ouverts aux amendements de l’opposition. À quels genres d'amendements pensez-vous? Supposons, par exemple, qu’il y ait un amendement prévoyant que la limite pour les dons des tiers soit la même que pour les partis politiques. Seriez-vous favorable à un tel amendement?

(1555)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne voudrais pas me prononcer là-dessus maintenant. Je voudrais connaître auparavant le fond de l’amendement et sa formulation. Mais nous sommes ouverts aux amendements, alors si vous en avez, j'accepterais de les prendre en considération.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vois. C’est bien beau de dire que vous êtes ouverte aux amendements, mais vous venez de me dire que vous vouliez parler du fond du projet de loi. J’essaie maintenant de le faire et je vous pose des questions au sujet des amendements, et vous me dites maintenant que vous ne voulez pas vraiment commenter le fond du projet de loi. Je ne suis donc pas tout à fait sûr de ce qu’il reste à dire.

Le président: Monsieur Richards...

M. Blake Richards: D'accord. Je suppose que nous devrons essayer de nouveau au prochain tour et voir si nous pouvons obtenir des réponses à ce moment-là.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous souhaite un bon retour aux affaires, madame la ministre.

Vous fondant sur les rapports d’Élections Canada, comment décririez-vous l’incidence de la fraude électorale ou des tentatives de fraude électorale dans les élections canadiennes? Diriez-vous que cette incidence est élevée par rapport aux autres pays démocratiques ou relativement faible?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Relativement faible.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’était l’un des arguments invoqués par le gouvernement précédent lorsqu’il a imposé unilatéralement des changements au mode de scrutin. Il n’avait l’appui d’aucun autre parti.

Vous avez surtout parlé des femmes. Je vais parler des membres des Premières Nations de ma circonscription qui ont subi le processus, dont certains ont obtenu l’admission au suffrage ou au droit de vote seulement de leur vivant. Ils se présentaient dans un bureau de scrutin où le greffier était un membre de la famille et donc inhabile à répondre de leur identité et où il n'y avait personne d'autre, parent ou connaissance, qui aurait pu répondre d'eux, même si, dans les petites collectivités, ils étaient certainement connus. Aucune personne présente ne pouvait répondre de leur identité. Ce sont souvent des gens à faible revenu et ils n’ont pas les pièces d’identité voulues. Ils sont renvoyés du bureau de scrutin.

Dans l'optique d’une personne qui, de son vivant, s'est vue accorder la possibilité de participer à nos discussions politiques pour ensuite vivre l'expérience, qui est en fait très publique, d’être renvoyée du bureau de scrutin et privée de son droit de vote bien que, comme l’a dit M. Richards, rien ne laisse supposer une fraude électorale organisée, que ce soit au moyen de cartes d’identité d’électeur ou du recours à des répondants, cette expérience ne peut-elle pas nous instruire sur la façon dont nous envisageons l’utilisation de l’un ou l’autre de ces outils pour permettre aux gens de voter dans les élections générales?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que oui. Je pense que la raison pour laquelle le gouvernement et moi-même tenons tant à la carte d’information de l’électeur et au recours à un répondant, c’est précisément pour permettre aux Canadiens d’exercer leur droit de vote. Le droit de vote est énoncé à l’article 3 de la Charte, qui garantit que les gens qui ont ce droit peuvent voter.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cet article de la Charte ne dit pas grand-chose. Il dit que tout citoyen canadien a le droit de vote.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En effet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il ne dit pas qu’ils peuvent voter s'ils montrent un permis de conduire ou s’ils répondent à ces diverses exigences.

Je veux parler des autres droits des électeurs. Croyez-vous au droit à la vie privée des électeurs pendant la période préélectorale et électorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les Canadiens sont protégés aux termes de la LPRPDE et de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels ne s'applique pas aux partis politiques.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J’apprécie la question. En rédigeant le projet de loi, je me suis fortement inspirée des recommandations du Comité. Je sais que vous n’en étiez pas alors membre, mais le Comité avait en fait dit, à ce moment-là, de ne rien faire en matière de protection de la vie privée. Je pense que ce que nous proposons est un premier pas utile pour faire en sorte que, en matière de protection des renseignements personnels, il y a des normes...

M. Nathan Cullen: Oui, mais...

L'hon. Karina Gould: ... et des politiques proposées.

Allez-y.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi de contester deux choses.

La première porte sur le fait que le Comité n’a rien dit au sujet d'assujettir les partis aux politiques de protection de la vie privée. Il y a eu une discussion. C’est M. Christopherson qui occupait ce fauteuil, pas moi.

Deuxièmement, bien des choses se sont produites depuis. Il y a eu le scandale de Cambridge Analytica, à laquelle votre gouvernement a accordé un contrat. Nous avons pu constater les effets de l’exploration de données par les médias sociaux et la faculté de manipuler — pas tenter de manipuler, mais bien manipuler — les élections grâce à la capacité de recueillir des quantités incroyables d’information non seulement sur les groupes d'électeurs, mais aussi sur les électeurs individuels pour essayer de leur communiquer seulement certains renseignements, certains véridiques, mais la plupart non, comme on l’a vu dans la campagne du Brexit et les dernières élections présidentielles aux États-Unis. De nombreux spécialistes de la protection de la vie privée, de même que le DGE par intérim, et éventuellement titularisé, disent que nous devons aller beaucoup plus loin que le prévoit le projet de loi C-76 pour protéger la vie privée des électeurs.

Le gouvernement est-il disposé à en faire davantage en envisageant d’assujettir les partis politiques aux lois canadiennes sur la protection des renseignements personnels?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je dirais qu’en ce qui concerne les entreprises privées qui ont été mentionnées — Facebook, Cambridge Analytica —, elles sont assujetties aux lois canadiennes sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

(1600)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais pas un parti politique qui utiliserait l’information fournie par de telles sources.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je dirais que nous sommes ouverts aux amendements. J'ajouterais que je pense que cela mérite également une étude plus approfondie parce qu'il s'agit, à mon avis, d'une relation assez complexe. Je pense aussi qu’il existe une relation importante entre les partis politiques et les citoyens qui permettrait d’engager et de tenir cette discussion, ce qui est quelque peu différent du cas d’une entreprise privée, parce qu’ils sont en fait à Ottawa pour défendre leurs droits politiques.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Peut-être.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je maintiendrais qu’il y a une différence. Cela dit, je suis ouverte aux idées créatives.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Croyez-vous qu’un électeur devrait pouvoir téléphoner à un parti politique ou lui envoyer un courriel pour lui dire: « Dites-moi ce que vous savez à mon sujet »?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, je pense que c’est une question qui mérite d’être discutée entre les membres du Comité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais c'est à vous que je pose la question.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que c’est une discussion que nous devrions avoir au sujet de la protection de la vie privée. Le projet de loi C-76 amène cette discussion sur la table.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je sais, mais nous devons voter sur ce projet de loi.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce projet de loi prescrit ce que doit être la politique des partis en matière de protection des renseignements personnels. Il prévoit également que ceux-ci doivent désigner une personne-ressource avec qui les électeurs peuvent communiquer pour obtenir des renseignements sur...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, selon les experts en protection de la vie privée, cela va un peu plus loin que la loi actuelle.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, c’est quelque chose d’important parce que, si un parti politique ne présente pas sa politique au moment de son inscription et ne la met pas à jour au moment prescrit, il est radié en tant que parti. En fait, c’est assez important.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Votre projet de loi permet aux partis de vendre des données. Ce serait toujours permis. Pour beaucoup d’électeurs, cela semble être de la folie.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Selon le projet de loi, il leur est interdit de se livrer à toute forme de collusion; alors cela en ferait partie.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils peuvent recueillir des données, qu’ils obtiennent d’Élections Canada et de plusieurs sources. Nous ne savons pas quelles données les partis politiques obtiennent. Je ne sais tout simplement pas pourquoi il y a de la résistance. Vous dites qu’il existe une sorte de relation spéciale.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les données que les partis politiques obtiennent d’Élections Canada sont les listes électorales.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais ce n’est pas tout cependant.

Vous dites que cela fait partie de la discussion. Nous sommes actuellement en pleine discussion. Vous nous avez présenté un projet de loi omnibus de 350 pages et donné très, très peu de temps, vous devez l'admettre, pour l’examiner. Nous essayons de composer avec les contraintes de temps que vous nous avez imposées pour venir à bout d’un très volumineux projet de loi. Nous sommes disposés à moderniser la loi. Vous avez dit qu’il s’agissait d’un changement générationnel. Cela signifie que cela ne se produit pas très souvent. C’est un facteur que nous devrions considérer.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J’aimerais beaucoup savoir quels sont vos amendements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En terminant, je veux parler d’une échappatoire concernant l’influence étrangère. Disons que la droite — ou la gauche, peu m’importe — reçoit un montant d’argent à l’étranger, déplace ses fonds d’exploitation courante dans son compte bancaire canadien et les utilise pour faire de la publicité politique, du porte-à-porte ou se livrer à quelque autre activité. En termes simples, c’est une mesure de déplacement.

Nous avons demandé à vos fonctionnaires si c’était possible. Est-ce une échappatoire qui existe dans ce projet de loi? Nous avons posé la même question à des experts financiers. On nous a dit que oui. Est-ce que cela risque de nous causer des difficultés dans nos efforts, comme vous l’avez dit plus tôt, pour limiter ou éliminer complètement l’influence étrangère dans nos élections?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que nous avons fait ce que nous pouvions dans le cadre de la Loi électorale du Canada pour limiter l’influence étrangère. En ce qui concerne la question que vous soulevez, je pense qu’elle est légitime. Le problème, cependant, c’est qu'il faudrait demander à tous les tiers de faire rapport à tout moment sur ce qu’ils reçoivent, qu’ils aient ou non l’intention de participer à une élection, et je pense que cela constituerait une mesure très contestable en regard de la Charte.

M. Nathan Cullen:

N’est-il pas nécessaire de s'inscrire pour participer, selon votre projet de loi?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il faut être inscrit pour participer, alors...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce sont donc seulement ces tiers-là qui seraient concernés.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, mais ils doivent aussi faire rapport. Une fois qu'un tiers est inscrit et qu'il a décidé de participer, il doit déclarer toutes les contributions reçues depuis l’élection précédente, peu importe leur provenance. Il doit déclarer, à l'ouverture de son compte bancaire canadien, qu'il n'utilise que des fonds de source canadienne.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, si vous avez un amendement créatif pour protéger les droits garantis par la Charte, j’aimerais l’entendre. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Madame la ministre, bon retour. C’est un plaisir de vous revoir ici.

La soi-disant Loi sur l’intégrité des élections du gouvernement Harper a fait en sorte qu’il est plus difficile pour les Canadiens de voter et plus facile pour les gens de se soustraire à nos lois électorales. Le Globe and Mail exprimait l'avis que le projet de loi méritait d'avorter. Le directeur général des élections de l’époque déclarait qu'il lui était impossible d'appuyer un projet de loi qui priverait les électeurs de leur droit de vote.

Pourquoi est-il si important pour le gouvernement de faire abroger ces dispositions?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C’est pour toutes les raisons que vous venez de mentionner. C’est aussi parce que, comme nous l’avons dit, les Canadiens ont le droit fondamental de voter. À mon avis, toute mesure restreignant l'exercice de leur droit de vote devrait nécessairement, comme le gouvernement le croit aussi, être abrogée et annulée.

(1605)

M. Chris Bittle:

Dans ses questions, M. Richards a fait allusion au fait que vous aimez que les décisions soient fondées sur des données probantes. Il laissait entendre qu'il pensait de même, mais il semble que le gouvernement précédent n’a pas apprécié... Surtout après avoir entendu ce que l’ancien directeur général des élections a dit au sujet de ce projet de loi, je ne peux pas imaginer qu'en parcourant le hansard, je trouverais les objections de M. Richards à la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, mais je laisserai cela à quelque recherche future.

Pourriez-vous dire au Comité ce que votre ministère a fait en collaboration avec Élections Canada au sujet de ce projet de loi et des recommandations?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Certainement. Comme c'est le cas depuis longtemps dans nos travaux de rédaction des lois électorales canadiennes, nous avons collaboré avec Élections Canada afin de nous assurer que le ce projet de loi reflétait les principes et qu’il était utile pour ce qui est de la participation d’Élections Canada.

De 2006 à 2015, le gouvernement précédent s'était dérobé à toute relation de travail avec Élections Canada. Nous ne pensons pas que ce soit nécessaire ou juste et nous nous sommes donc fait un devoir de consulter Élections Canada. De plus, ce projet de loi est fondé à 85 % sur les recommandations formulées par le DGE à la suite des élections précédentes. Je signale que bon nombre des recommandations faites entre 2006 et 2011 n’étaient pas incluses auparavant. Nous avons formulé un nombre considérable de recommandations qu’il serait important d’adopter pour moderniser notre loi électorale et l'adapter aux réalités du XXIe siècle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Que prévoit le projet de loi C-76 pour aider les groupes sous-représentés à participer à notre vie démocratique?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Tout d’abord, l’utilisation renouée de la carte d’information de l’électeur est très importante pour établir le lieu de résidence des personnes qui n’ont pas les pièces d’identité voulues. La deuxième mesure concerne le recours à un répondant. Comme M. Cullen l’a mentionné au sujet des membres des Premières Nations, le recours à un répondant peut être une pratique très utile pour permettre aux gens qui n’ont pas de pièce d’identité de voter. Dans le cas des personnes qui vivent dans des refuges, par exemple, et qui n’ont pas de lieu de résidence ordinaire, cela peut vraiment les aider à voter. Je pense qu’il est extrêmement important pour nous, en tant que représentants élus et aussi du fait que nous vivons en démocratie, d’entendre la voix des Canadiens les plus marginalisés.

De plus, en ce qui concerne les membres des Forces armées canadiennes, vous ne considérez peut-être pas nos militaires comme appartenant aux groupes sous-représentés aux élections, mais sachez que seulement 40 % environ d’entre eux ont voté en 2015. Nous avons travaillé avec les Forces armées canadiennes pour rédiger la partie du projet de loi, soit la partie 11, qui leur faciliterait l'exercice du droit de vote.

Enfin, je considérerais le registre des futurs électeurs comme un moyen d’encourager les jeunes à voter en plus grand nombre. Nous savons que l’un des plus grands obstacles au vote des jeunes tient au fait qu’ils ne sont pas automatiquement inscrits dans la liste des électeurs à l’âge de 18 ans. Pour eux, la possibilité de s’inscrire et, en fait, de recevoir une carte d’information de l’électeur leur permet de savoir qu’ils font aussi partie du processus démocratique et qu’ils peuvent y participer.

M. Chris Bittle:

Quels sont les obstacles qui existent pour les membres des Forces armées canadiennes, puisqu’ils votent à un taux beaucoup plus bas que le reste de la population?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Premièrement, si vous êtes un membre des Forces armées canadiennes déployé à l’étranger, vous n’avez pas de pièce d’identité qui indiquerait votre adresse. En continuant de travailler avec des mesures d’intégrité, nous leur permettrons d'exercer leur droit de vote tout en préservant leur sécurité.

De plus, les membres des Forces armées canadiennes pourront désormais choisir l’endroit où ils vont voter, alors qu’auparavant, ils n’étaient pas en mesure de le faire. Ce changement est important pour leur permettre de voter selon leur lieu de résidence ordinaire.

M. Chris Bittle:

Les conjoints aussi?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

Beaucoup de gens veulent poser leur candidature aux élections, mais s'en abstiennent pour cause d'obligations familiales, qu’il s’agisse de la garde d’enfants ou de la garde d’un parent ou d’un conjoint. Que prévoit le projet de loi pour faciliter la candidature des Canadiens aux élections?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Auparavant, les personnes qui avaient besoin de services de garde d’enfants ou d’autres services de garde pour les membres de leur famille pouvaient réclamer jusqu’à 60 % de leurs frais de garde, dans les limites de leur plafond de dépenses, mais nous avons retiré ces frais du plafond de dépenses afin qu’il puisse s’agir d’une dépense supplémentaire. De plus, les particuliers peuvent utiliser leurs fonds personnels, et ils peuvent se faire rembourser jusqu’à 90 %, parce que nous voulons nous assurer que le fait d’avoir des enfants ou un membre de la famille qui a besoin de soins supplémentaires ne constitue pas un obstacle pour présenter sa candidature à des élections.

Nous savons que ce n'est pas une solution parfaite, mais elle sera importante et utile.

(1610)

M. Chris Bittle:

Le gouvernement précédent avait instauré des élections à date fixe, mais il ne semblait pas s’y conformer. Quels changements le projet de loi C-76 apporte-t-il en réaction à la façon dont les élections à date fixe ont modifié le déroulement des campagnes?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les élections à date fixe ont fondamentalement changé la façon dont se déroulent les élections au Canada. Auparavant, l'on ne savait pas quand les élections allaient avoir lieu, alors il fallait être agile et capable de dépenser, si c’était votre choix. Avec des élections à date fixe, nous avons vu en 2015 que les campagnes électorales ont vraiment commencé environ six mois à l’avance. C’est complètement différent des traditions et de la culture électorales canadiennes.

Ce projet de loi établit la période préélectorale, qui commence le 30 juin, après l’ajournement de notre Parlement, afin de limiter les partis politiques et les tiers avant les élections générales, tout en continuant de mettre l’accent sur les élections générales et en essayant de maintenir des règles du jeu équitables.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vais reprendre là où nous nous étions arrêtés.

Pour résumer, je suis ici aujourd’hui pour essayer de déterminer s’il y a moyen de travailler ensemble. Il y a évidemment des éléments du projet de loi sur lesquels nous ne sommes pas d’accord. C’est normal. Mais il y a probablement d’autres domaines où nous pouvons travailler ensemble pour voir si nous pouvons renforcer le projet de loi et en arriver à un texte relativement auquel tout le monde a l’assurance qu’il améliore la loi électorale et a vraiment déployé tous les efforts possibles pour travailler avec tous les autres partis. Il faut toutefois pour cela faire des compromis et des échanges.

J’aimerais essayer de nouveau. Vous vouliez parler du fond du projet de loi. Je voudrais vous poser des questions au sujet de certains amendements, ou de certains aspects qui pourraient être examinés en ce qui concerne les amendements, et j’aimerais avoir votre opinion et votre avis sur ces points. Par exemple, j’ai posé une question plus tôt au sujet du plafond des dons pour les tiers et de l’idée de faire en sorte que ce plafond soit le même que pour les partis politiques. Qu’en pensez-vous?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il faut concevoir les tiers d'une façon plus large que les partis politiques, parce que les tiers ne sont pas simplement établis aux fins d’une élection. Les tiers comprennent les syndicats, d’autres organisations qui ne reçoivent pas nécessairement de dons et qui utilisent leurs fonds de différentes façons.

Je comprends l’orientation que vous prenez, mais je ne suis pas certaine qu’elle s’applique entièrement aux tierces parties.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Il semble donc qu’il n’y ait peut-être pas une ouverture complète à cet égard.

Essayons un autre exemple de tiers et de financement étranger. Par exemple, examinons le financement étranger pour ce qui est d’interdire aux organismes enregistrés comme tiers de participer au processus électoral s’ils ont reçu du financement étranger ou s’ils ont reçu du financement d’une organisation canadienne qui a reçu du financement étranger. Qu’en pensez-vous?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je crois que cette tierce partie ferait face à de graves contestations fondées sur la Charte, puisqu'elle a reçu à un moment donné des fonds de l’étranger à des fins qui n’ont rien à voir avec une élection.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr, mais je suppose que la question est de savoir s’il s’agit de financement étranger indirect, où il y a collusion et ce genre de choses. Quoi qu’il en soit, nous allons passer à autre chose.

Qu’en est-il des voyages ministériels et de la publicité gouvernementale? Je vous ai déjà posé des questions à ce sujet. Il ne semble pas que vous soyez ouverte à l’idée d’harmoniser ces restrictions avec celles qui sont imposées aux partis politiques avant les élections. Qu’en est-il de l’obligation d’inclure les voyages ministériels et la publicité gouvernementale pendant la période préélectorale dans le plafond des dépenses d’un parti?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous remarquerez qu’il n’y a aucune restriction quant aux dépenses d’un parti en matière de déplacements. Les seules restrictions concernent la publicité, et uniquement la publicité, mais pas les activités qui ont eu lieu avant la période électorale. Il importe de bien faire la distinction.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr, mais vous ne seriez pas prête à essayer d’harmoniser ces restrictions avec l’exigence imposée au gouvernement, ou...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, le gouvernement a encore du travail à faire, tout comme les députés, alors je ne pense pas que ce serait...

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Encore une fois, il ne semble pas y avoir d’ouverture à cet égard.

Qu’en est-il de l’idée d’exiger des électeurs de l’étranger qu’ils démontrent une certaine intention de revenir au Canada pour pouvoir voter? Cette loi change cette exigence de sorte qu’il n’y a aucune obligation de démontrer qu’ils ont l’intention de revenir au Canada. Qu’en est-il d’un amendement qui exigerait que la personne montre une certaine intention de revenir au Canada, à un moment donné?

(1615)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le projet de loi prévoit que les Canadiens qui vivent à l’étranger doivent prouver qu’ils ont déjà résidé au Canada. Ils voteraient à cet endroit...

M. Blake Richards:

Ils n’ont pas à montrer leur intention de revenir. C’est un changement qui est également apporté. Qu’en est-il d’une modification à...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que ce serait très difficile à faire observer, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Encore une fois, il ne semble pas y avoir d’ouverture.

Qu’en est-il des élections partielles? Il y a un changement ici qui allonge la période pendant laquelle une élection partielle ne peut être déclenchée. Il en résulte une prolongation de la situation bizarre dans laquelle il peut y avoir un poste vacant pendant plus d’un an avant une élection. Que pensez-vous d’un amendement qui pourrait réduire le délai de déclenchement d’une élection partielle? Seriez-vous ouverte à ce genre d'amendement?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C’est l'une des recommandations du Comité incluses directement dans le projet de loi...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous n’êtes pas ouverte à un amendement à cet égard?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... mais je dirais aussi que l’une des raisons pour lesquelles le Comité a présenté cette recommandation, c’est en partie...

M. Blake Richards:

Désolé, madame la ministre, mais il ne me reste que 15 secondes...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... précisément parce qu’il y avait des élections partielles...

M. Blake Richards:

... je vais donc devoir vous interrompre parce que j’ai une autre question à poser.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... et qu'elle visait à allonger la période du décret d'élection pour tirer parti du pro rata...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous ne semblez pas...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... que le gouvernement précédent avait mis en place.

M. Blake Richards:

Il ne semble pas que vous soyez ouverte à un amendement. J’ai essayé environ cinq propositions différentes, mais aucune d’entre elles ne vous semble acceptable. C’est...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, l'ouverture et l'acceptation sont deux choses différentes.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous semblons loin d'un engagement réel lorsque toutes les propositions sont rejetées en bloc.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, il y a assurément une ouverture et un engagement...

M. Blake Richards:

Madame la ministre, pourriez-vous au moins vous engager à mettre fin à cette pratique extrêmement antidémocratique d'Élections Canada qui consiste à mettre en oeuvre cette loi avant qu’elle ne soit adoptée par le Parlement? Je pense que c’est sans précédent. Pourriez-vous au moins vous engager à le faire? Vous engagez-vous au moins à ne plus recourir à l’attribution de temps ou à la clôture?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Monsieur Richards, vous déformez grossièrement la relation entre Élections Canada et le gouvernement du Canada. Le gouvernement du Canada...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous pouvez assurément indiquer qu’elle ne devrait pas être mise en oeuvre.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... n’a jamais demandé à Élections Canada de mettre en oeuvre cette loi.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez le pouvoir, madame la ministre, de leur dire de ne pas le faire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En fait, nous ne le faisons pas. Élections Canada est indépendant du gouvernement du Canada. Le directeur général des élections par intérim...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous engagez-vous à ne pas recourir à l’attribution de temps et à la clôture?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... d’Élections Canada sera heureux, j’en suis sûre, de répondre en son propre nom, mais...

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Permettez-moi de vous demander quels engagements vous pouvez prendre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... en ce moment, compte tenu de l’élection partielle en cours, Élections Canada a récemment publié un communiqué pour déclarer que la carte d'information de l'électeur n’est pas acceptable à l’heure actuelle parce que la loi électorale n’a pas encore été modifiée.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous engagez-vous au moins à ne pas recourir à l’attribution de temps et à la clôture? Cela relève de votre compétence. Vous engagez-vous au moins à ne plus imposer d’attribution de temps ou de clôture?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J’espère que nous pourrons tous travailler ensemble à ce comité pour que cela se fasse à temps pour 2019.

Le président:

D’accord, merci.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois aussi pouvoir décoder cette déclaration.

Merci, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Passons à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je tiens tout d’abord à vous féliciter. Nous nous réjouissons tous de la naissance de votre enfant.

En 2008, j’ai fait du bénévolat dans le cadre d’une élection partielle à Guelph. Un matin, pendant que je travaillais au bureau, nous avons commencé à recevoir plein d’appels téléphoniques selon lesquels les conduites de freins de partisans libéraux, partout dans la circonscription, avaient été coupées. Dans les jours qui ont suivi, nous avons commencé à recevoir des rapports selon lesquels, dans six ou sept circonscriptions du Sud-Ouest de l’Ontario, des gens avaient coupé les conduites de freins de partisans libéraux et peint le mot « libéral » sur leur maison.

Puis, en 2011, les électeurs de Guelph et d’une poignée d’autres circonscriptions ont reçu un message bilingue d’Élections Canada leur demandant de voter dans un lieu de scrutin différent de celui qui était indiqué sur leur carte de vote. Dans bien des cas, ils se sont retrouvés très loin de leur bureau de vote. Un juge a statué que ces gens avaient été appelés à partir de la base de données du Parti conservateur. Une seule personne a été accusée et reconnue coupable dans cette affaire, mais l'on se doute bien que cette personne n'a pas agi seule.

L’enquêteur, sous les auspices du commissaire, n'a pas profité d'une très grande marge de manoeuvre dans cette enquête, puisqu'il devait tolérer la présence de l’avocat du Parti conservateur à chaque entrevue auprès des témoins et qu'il n’avait pas le pouvoir de contraindre quelqu’un à témoigner ni d’exiger la production de documents.

Si le scandale des appels automatisés devait se reproduire en 2019, le commissaire aux élections aurait-il, en vertu de cette loi, une meilleure capacité d’enquête? Croyez-vous que cette loi contribuera à exercer un effet dissuasif contre les fraudes électorales évidentes commises en 2011? Quels autres pouvoirs le commissaire aux élections a-t-il, et pourquoi?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne peux pas faire de commentaires précis sur ce qui s’est passé lors des élections précédentes, bien que je puisse dire que je pense que ces pouvoirs permettraient certainement au commissaire aux élections fédérales de faire enquête plus en profondeur sur toute allégation ou tentative de détourner des personnes de leur bureau de scrutin habituel.

J’ai entendu le commissaire lui-même formuler des recommandations convaincantes quant aux raisons pour lesquelles ce serait important, précisément parce que, comme vous le savez, en ce qui concerne la capacité de porter des accusations, c’est un aspect qui relève de la Direction des poursuites pénales. Il doit attendre son tour, quand c’est possible... Cela peut prendre beaucoup de temps. En ce qui concerne la loi électorale, il est très important de pouvoir porter des accusations rapidement. Il est important de démontrer que la loi électorale est respectée. Il est important de démontrer que comme pays, nous ne tolérons pas les transgressions de la loi électorale, et c'est important afin de pouvoir poursuivre l'affaire en soi.

Premièrement, la capacité de porter des accusations est très importante. Deuxièmement, la capacité de contraindre les gens à témoigner est également très importante, parce qu'en présence de systèmes de partis solides et d'une forte loyauté envers le parti, ce que peuvent comprendre tous ceux d’entre nous qui viennent de partis politiques différents, il peut être difficile pour des gens qui savent peut-être quelque chose de sentir qu’ils peuvent dire quelque chose ou qu’ils le feraient. La capacité de contraindre les gens à témoigner permettrait au commissaire de poser d’autres questions.

Ce qui est important aussi dans tout cela, c’est que même s’il a le pouvoir de contraindre quelqu’un à témoigner, une personne ne peut pas s’incriminer elle-même lorsqu’elle est contrainte de témoigner. En face de gros scandales qui ont une grande incidence sur le résultat d’une élection, il est important de se donner les moyens de faire respecter ce qui constitue vraiment une excellente loi électorale à l’échelle mondiale.

(1620)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous une idée de ce qu'il y avait à gagner ou de la raison pour laquelle le commissaire aux élections ne faisait plus partie d’Élections Canada? Quel but était visé?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il faudrait poser la question au gouvernement précédent. Je ne sais pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer l’inverse?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Expliquer l’inverse...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, en quoi cela nous aide-t-il de le ramener sous les auspices d’Élections Canada?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, il est bon qu’ils travaillent dans le même secteur pour ce qui est des questions électorales. Ils conservent toujours cette indépendance, mais ils sont également en mesure de porter rapidement des accusations liées aux élections.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste 40 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais laisser tomber.

Merci madame la ministre. Je vous suis reconnaissant de votre collaboration.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis heureux de vous voir ici, madame la ministre. Comme je l’ai déjà dit à la Chambre, je me réjouis beaucoup de vous voir de retour à la Chambre des communes, non seulement parce que je vous apprécie personnellement, mais aussi parce que je pense que c’est utile dans le cas d’un projet de loi comme celui-ci — et dans le cas de n’importe quel projet de loi, mais surtout d’un projet de cette taille — d’avoir la ministre avec nous, plutôt qu’un ministre temporaire. Je suppose que vous avez participé à la rédaction du projet de loi, contrairement au ministre Brison. Il est tout simplement plus difficile, à mon avis, de défendre et de piloter un projet de loi auquel vous n’avez pas contribué. Cela dit, je suis très heureux de vous voir ici.

Vous avez indiqué que vous étiez ouverte aux amendements, et je voulais vous poser une question très précise parce que, comme vous le savez, c’est un sujet qui me tient beaucoup à coeur. Nous en avons discuté, vous et moi, avant que le projet de loi ne soit présenté à la Chambre, alors qu’il en était aux toutes premières étapes de la rédaction et que vous nous demandiez des suggestions. Je veux parler ici de l’idée du bulletin de vote provisoire.

Pour ceux qui n'en ont peut-être pas entendu parler, lorsqu’une personne se présente pour voter et qu’elle n’a pas de pièce d’identité, elle peut quand même voter, mais son bulletin de vote est placé dans une enveloppe anonyme, comme si la personne avait voté. À l’extérieur de l’enveloppe anonyme, elle inscrit ses coordonnées. Si le nombre de bulletins de vote provisoires dans ce genre d’enveloppe anonyme est suffisamment grand pour être supérieur à la marge de différence entre les deux candidats principaux, à ce moment-là, ils sont authentifiés. Ceux qui répondent aux critères servent ensuite à décider du résultat des élections. Ce processus garantit à la fois que tous ceux qui ont le droit de voter puissent le faire, et que personne n'ayant pas le droit de voter ne puisse le faire frauduleusement — ou même voter par erreur, si la personne n'a pas la citoyenneté ou ne répond pas autrement à une condition requise pour voter.

Ces précisions n’étaient pas dans le projet de loi. Seriez-vous prête à envisager de les inclure dans la version définitive du projet de loi? Si nous présentions des amendements en ce sens, seriez-vous prête à les accepter?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci. Je me souviens de notre conversation, et je suis heureuse d’être de retour et de travailler à nouveau avec vous.

L’une de mes préoccupations au sujet de cette idée, bien que je sois disposée à l’examiner un peu plus en profondeur, consiste à veiller à ce que les personnes qui se présentent au bureau de scrutin ne soient pas mises de côté par ailleurs. Je pense qu’il y a encore une question de dignité rattachée au fait de voter, mais je serais prête à approfondir cette idée. Je pense toutefois que cela n’a pas été inclus dans le projet de loi parce que nous voulions rattacher la plus grande dignité possible à la personne qui se rend au bureau de scrutin pour voter.

(1625)

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. Il n'y a rien qui fasse obstacle à la dignité dans le processus, qui est utilisé dans un certain nombre d’autres pays. Dans l’état actuel des choses, une personne qui doit obtenir une attestation écrite de résidence ou recourir à un répondant doit attendre sur les côtés, selon l’aménagement du bureau de scrutin. Ces bureaux varient sensiblement selon l’endroit où ils se trouvent. Comme vous le savez, il peut s'agir de sous-sols d’église, de salles communautaires, de casernes de pompiers, et ainsi de suite. Je dois dire que je ne peux absolument pas penser à quoi que ce soit qui pourrait faire obstacle à la dignité, mais je vais demander au directeur général des élections ce qu’il en pense lorsqu’il sera ici plus tard aujourd’hui. De toute évidence, la dignité lui tient à coeur.

Cela dit, j’aimerais simplement souligner qu’en l’absence d’une mesure comme celle-ci, même avec les dispositions sur le recours à un répondant qui ont été rétablies dans l’avant-projet de loi et les dispositions sur l’utilisation de la carte d’information de l’électeur comme preuve de résidence, il y a encore une lacune. Elle était au coeur de l’arrêt Wrzesnewskyj et Opitz, dans le cadre duquel la Cour suprême a tenté de déterminer lequel des deux avait été élu. Elle concerne ceux qui votent dans les bureaux de scrutin itinérants. Souvent, les aînés, qui vivent dans bien des cas dans des résidences, n’ont pas de pièces d’identité. Il n’y a personne au bureau de scrutin qui peut se porter garant pour eux parce que seuls d'autres aînés dans une situation semblable — cela n’inclut pas le personnel — peuvent se porter garants pour eux, et il est peu probable qu’ils aient une pièce d’identité ou, dans bien des cas, même si ce n’est pas toujours le cas, qu’ils aient une carte d’information de l’électeur qui leur permettrait d’établir leur preuve de résidence. Ils pourraient se retrouver dans une situation où ils ne pourraient pas voter ou devraient voter d’une façon qui n’est pas autorisée en vertu de ce projet de loi.

Ce que je propose réglerait ce problème. Rien dans le projet de loi actuel ne réglerait ce problème.

Compte tenu de tout cela, madame la ministre, seriez-vous plus ouverte à l’idée d’adopter la proposition des bulletins de vote provisoires?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne vois pas pourquoi ils ne pourraient pas voter, parce que pour les personnes qui vivent dans des refuges, des établissements de soins de longue durée, des réserves et une ou deux autres dispositions, le personnel peut en fait leur rédiger une attestation de résidence afin de s’assurer qu’elles ont le droit de vote.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien sûr. Dans le cas des bureaux de scrutin dont la Cour suprême a été saisie — certains bureaux ont été examinés dans le cadre de cette décision — vous constaterez que cela ne s’était pas produit, et qu’il y avait une raison technique pour laquelle cela ne s’était pas produit. Je dois avouer que je ne me souviens pas des détails pour l’instant, mais je pense que cela réglerait un problème qui n’a pu être réglé par d’autres moyens.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je serai heureuse d'examiner cela.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Simms, vous n’avez pas un temps de parole complet. Il ne reste que quatre minutes, mais elles sont à vous.

M. Scott Simms:

Ah bon? C’est très généreux de votre part, monsieur.

Le président:

Le chronomètre est déjà parti.

M. Scott Simms:

Ma question concerne les candidats. J’ai vécu cinq élections. J’ai rencontré un grand nombre de candidats, qu’ils aient été élus ou non, et il y a quelques dispositions dans ce projet de loi qui aideraient beaucoup de gens. L’une des dispositions qui est tout à fait appropriée, non seulement pour vous, mais pour d’autres personnes que j’ai rencontrées, concerne les frais de garde d’enfants ainsi que les dépenses liées à une déficience et comment il sera désormais plus facile pour les candidats, de réclamer jusqu’à 90 % de ces dépenses. Je pense que cela aurait dû être fait il y a longtemps, parce que j’ai vu de mes propres yeux à quel point c’est difficile pour les gens dans cette situation.

Vous avez aussi abordé l’autre aspect, qui est d’aider les personnes handicapées à voter. C’est merveilleux, et je pense que cela aussi aurait dû être fait depuis longtemps. Pourriez-vous nous parler de la possibilité de permettre aux candidats... relativement à ces deux aspects, les dépenses liées à une déficience et les frais de garde d’enfants?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Bien sûr. C’est une disposition assez importante, parce qu’auparavant, même si l'on pouvait déduire 60 % de ses dépenses pour la garde d’enfants ou pour prendre soin d’une personne de sa famille, il fallait respecter le plafond de dépenses de sa circonscription à titre de candidat, mais il est maintenant possible de dépasser ce plafond. Il est permis d'utiliser des fonds personnels à cette fin, ce qui ne vous désavantage pas, comme candidat, par rapport à un autre candidat qui n’a peut-être pas ces dépenses. De plus, l'on peut vous rembourser jusqu’à hauteur de 90 % de ces frais. C’est très important pour assurer la diversité des candidats que nous espérons avoir dans ce pays.

L’autre aspect dont vous avez parlé, qui m’enthousiasme beaucoup et qui me paraît vraiment merveilleux, concerne un incitatif pour les partis politiques et les candidats à fournir des documents dans un format accessible, jusqu’à concurrence de 5 000 $ par candidat par circonscription et de 250 000 $ par parti politique. C’est une suggestion des membres du groupe pour l’accessibilité d’Élections Canada. C’était très important pour eux, parce qu’ils ont l’impression à bien des égards qu’ils ne sont pas inclus lorsqu’il s’agit des documents, de la publicité, et ainsi de suite, dans une élection, et ils veulent vraiment y participer. C’est vraiment très intéressant.

(1630)

M. Scott Simms:

L’autre aspect qui me plaît particulièrement est celui qui permet aux gens de voter de chez eux. J’aimerais avoir votre avis ou celui des fonctionnaires. Il y a d’autres dispositions pour permettre aux gens de voter de chez eux, au besoin.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, pour donner suite à la recommandation du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, mais aussi à celle du directeur général des élections d’Élections Canada, qui accorderait au directeur général des élections d’Élections Canada une plus grande latitude et un plus grand pouvoir discrétionnaire en ce qui concerne les bureaux de scrutin itinérants et le vote à domicile, particulièrement pour les personnes ayant une déficience, mais aussi en ce qui concerne les certificats de transfert.

Par exemple, si vous avez une déficience et n’avez pas accès à votre bureau de scrutin, vous avez une plus grande latitude quant à l’endroit où vous votez dans votre propre bureau de scrutin. C’est un aspect qui est également très important selon moi.

M. Scott Simms:

D’accord, c’est bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, voulez-vous 45 secondes?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je veux bien, oui.

Nous avons parlé d’un meilleur équilibre entre les sexes à la Chambre. Nous en sommes au piètre résultat de 25 % ou 26 % à l'heure actuelle. Un projet de loi avait été proposé par M. Kennedy Stewart, que vous connaissez bien. Seriez-vous ouverte à l’inclusion de certaines mesures pour encourager les partis à se rapprocher de la parité hommes-femmes? En fait, votre chef a choisi de protéger les titulaires. L'on peut donc présumer que si votre parti remporte les prochaines élections, nous resterons à peu près à 25 % à la Chambre des communes.

Vous n’avez pas proposé la représentation proportionnelle, qui permet d'améliorer l'équilibre entre les sexes, comme on le sait. Nous cherchons donc un moyen de faire en sorte que la Chambre des communes ressemble plus fidèlement au Canada.

Quelle ouverture avez-vous en faveur de l’inclusion d’éléments du projet de loi C-237 dans cette loi électorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi de M. Stewart, je ne suis pas sûre que le fait de pénaliser les partis qui n'atteignent pas la parité hommes-femmes ou qui ne s'en approchent pas...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela ne rapporte pas autant d’argent des contribuables aux partis qui ne l'atteignent pas.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Bien sûr, mais je pense simplement qu’un système axé sur des pénalités ne constitue pas la bonne façon de procéder.

Si des idées ou des mécanismes créatifs sont proposés pour accroître la participation des femmes comme candidates, je suis prête à les examiner.

Je pense aussi que cela va plus loin qu’une simple loi électorale s'il est question d’encourager plus de femmes à se porter candidates. Les comportements adoptés à la Chambre devraient assurément être améliorés en ce qui concerne les femmes en politique. Pour nous tous députés, à titre de leaders de nos collectivités, il est également important de tendre la main aux femmes pour les encourager à se présenter. En outre, il y a d’autres choses que nous faisons à titre de gouvernement, comme le fait d'établir un Cabinet paritaire, tendre la main à un plus grand nombre de femmes dans les conseils d’administration, encourager les femmes à faire carrière dans les STIM et en politique, et que nous devons continuer de faire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est décevant. Je pense que c’est une solution créative. Vous avez demandé des solutions créatives. C’est l’argent des contribuables que nous remettons aux partis. Ils n’y ont aucunement droit. Nos politiques pourraient prescrire une façon d’encourager les femmes à se présenter. Le décorum est peut-être un aspect à considérer, mais s'il n'y a pas de candidates, il est très difficile d’avoir des députées.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à tous.

Merci d’être venue, madame la ministre.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci de m’avoir invitée.

Le président:

Nous sommes impatients de poursuivre le dialogue.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant pour accueillir de nouveaux témoins.



(1635)

Le président:

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 106e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

M. Sutherland et Mme Paquet seront accompagnés de Jean-François Morin, conseiller principal en politiques, pour la prochaine partie de la réunion d’aujourd’hui.

Merci à tous d’être ici.

À titre d’information pour le Comité, nous avons récemment reçu deux documents du ministère, soit la Loi sur la modernisation des élections, et ce petit document est l’étude article par article.

Blake, l’avez-vous lu? Il est arrivé ce matin.

(1640)

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, quatre fois déjà.

Le président:

D’accord, c’est bien.

Nous venons tout juste de recevoir un courriel de la Bibliothèque du Parlement au sujet du projet de loi.

Voulez-vous nous expliquer ce que vous venez de nous envoyer?

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Je crois qu'il ne s'agit que de la moitié de la note d’information que nous avons préparée pour le Comité. En raison de sa longueur, la traduction nous la fait parvenir par tranches, alors vous pouvez vous attendre à en recevoir davantage.

Le président:

D’accord.

M. Andre Barnes:

Toutes nos excuses. Comme nous devions nous réunir mardi, et non lundi, nous nous préparions pour demain.

M. Nathan Cullen:

L’avez-vous envoyée à P9 ou à nos comptes généraux?

Le président:

Elle ne vous aurait pas été remise parce que vous n’étiez pas assermenté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, elle est allée à M. Christopherson.

Le président:

Elle a été envoyée à M. Christopherson.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-il possible de m’en faire parvenir une copie? Merci.

Le président:

Puisque nos témoins n’ont pas de déclaration liminaire, nous pouvons donc passer immédiatement à vos questions.

Qui veut commencer?

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence aujourd’hui.

J’aimerais commencer par parler de mobilisation des étudiants. J’ai travaillé dans une école secondaire pendant 20 ans, et je représente actuellement une circonscription qui compte trois établissements d'enseignement postsecondaire, alors la mobilisation et la participation des étudiants sont très importantes pour moi.

La question de la carte d’information de l’électeur a été soulevée. Nous en parlons souvent en rapport avec les personnes âgées, mais je pense que c’est aussi important pour les étudiants, parce que ce ne sont pas tous les étudiants qui ont un permis de conduire. Ma fille en est un parfait exemple. Les factures me sont adressées à moi, et non à elle, à la maison, et elle vit encore avec nous, alors je pense que l’utilisation de la carte d’information de l’électeur comme pièce d’identité est importante, et vous l’utilisez en même temps que d’autres pièces d’identité pour qu’elle ne soit pas la seule.

J’examine d’autres mesures prévues dans le projet de loi qui favorisent la participation et la mobilisation des étudiants. J’aimerais d’abord que vous nous parliez du registre des jeunes électeurs. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment cela fonctionne, comment l’information est conservée et comment l’elle est recueillie en premier lieu?

M. Allen Sutherland (secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental, Bureau du Conseil privé):

J'aimerais prendre un instant pour parler de la carte d’information de l’électeur et préciser que vous avez raison de dire que les étudiants et les personnes âgées sont les moins susceptibles d’avoir des indications de résidence, si bien que la carte d’information de l’électeur pourrait être particulièrement importante pour ces deux groupes.

En ce qui concerne l’accroissement de la participation des étudiants, le fait que la prochaine génération ne vote pas aussi souvent que les générations plus âgées constitue un problème de longue date. Nous avons constaté un certain changement lors des dernières élections. Je sais qu’Élections Canada, et en fait, tous ceux qui s’intéressent à la démocratie, veulent poursuivre dans cette voie.

Il y a quelques propositions dans le projet de loi qui, à mon avis, portent là-dessus. La première est celle du registre des futurs électeurs. Il s’agit de créer un registre des jeunes qui, à leur dix-huitième anniversaire de naissance, seraient inscrits sur la liste des électeurs. Il s'agirait ici d'aider à aiguiser ce premier réflexe. Le mystère du vote s’estomperait si on l’incluait, en fait, dans les cours d’éducation civique, comme c’est le cas dans certaines écoles secondaires. Je sais que l’on fait déjà cela en Ontario, et aussi dans d’autres provinces. L’idée du registre des futurs électeurs et des cours d’éducation civique aiderait à démystifier le vote et à initier les jeunes au vote, et une fois qu’ils auront été initiés, ils deviendront des électeurs à vie.

L’autre élément qui me semble important, c’est la participation à Élections Canada. Il est vraiment difficile, les années d'élections, de trouver un nombre suffisant de personnes prêtes à travailler dans les bureaux de scrutin, à faire toutes les choses intéressantes et positives auxquelles nous nous attendons comme Canadiens, afin de veiller au bon fonctionnement des bureaux de scrutin et d’acquérir l’expérience d’Élections Canada. Dans son allocution, la ministre a parlé de l’expérience en Colombie-Britannique du programme Youth at the Booth, ce qui laisse entendre que c’est une excellente idée de faire participer les jeunes, de leur permettre de voir en coulisse comment les élections fonctionnent vraiment, de les aider à acquérir le goût de voter et de créer une base démocratique solide que nous voulons maintenir dans le cadre de notre culture et de notre patrimoine.

(1645)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C’est excellent. Les bureaux de scrutin sont probablement plus avancés en technologie que n’importe lequel d’entre nous. Je sais qu’ils vont accélérer les choses.

En ce qui concerne la sécurité de l’information, des noms et adresses des étudiants, pouvez-vous donner l’assurance que cette information est sauvegardée et protégée? Qui a accès à cette information?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Tout d’abord, vous avez tout à fait raison au sujet de la technologie, et je pense qu’Élections Canada y a pensé.

Les renseignements contenus dans le registre seraient détenus par Élections Canada. Pour rassurer tout le monde, comme Élections Canada est protégé par le mur coupe-feu du gouvernement du Canada, il offre la même protection que celui-ci.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Dans votre réponse à la question précédente, vous avez dit qu’il y avait eu une légère augmentation de la participation des jeunes aux plus récentes élections. Des recherches vous indiquent-elles à quoi cela peut être attribuable?

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’était une augmentation d’environ 10 %, si je me souviens bien. Je pense que c’était simplement le niveau de...

Connaissez-vous le pourcentage exact?

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Non.

M. Allen Sutherland:

D’accord. Je pensais que vous l’aviez.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je pensais au premier ministre. C’est peut-être lui qui les a attirés...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Nous croyons qu’il s’agissait simplement d'un intérêt pour la campagne.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

L'aspect spectaculaire que j’ai observé dans ma circonscription, c’est que le vote par anticipation...

Les étudiants ont eu l’occasion de voter sur les campus universitaires, et c'est là où mon fils et moi sommes allés voter.

Le fait de pouvoir voter sur le campus a permis de réaliser certaines choses, notamment au chapitre de la sensibilisation. Différents groupes et clubs au sein de l’université, y compris des groupes non partisans, ont encouragé les gens à voter. C’était facile. Les étudiants pouvaient se rendre là et voter à l’avance.

Pensez-vous que cela a pu contribuer à l’augmentation?

Qu’est-ce qui est prévu en ce qui concerne le nombre de bureaux de scrutin, par exemple, qui ont été offerts à la dernière élection et qui vont l’être aux prochaines? Allons-nous augmenter le nombre de bureaux? Dans quelle mesure?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Le projet de loi propose de faire passer les heures d'ouverture des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation de 9 heures à 21 heures. Je crois que cela vise davantage à offrir un peu plus de latitude aux adultes qui occupent des emplois de jour.

Vous avez entièrement raison. Le vote par anticipation a été une grande réussite au cours des dernières années. Environ 25 % des Canadiens ont voté par anticipation aux dernières élections.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

J'aimerais maintenant parler des temps d’attente. Je pense que nous sommes tous confrontés à ce problème.

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Alors, rapidement, que faisons-nous pour réduire les temps d’attente? Nous savons qu’il y a des augmentations de cette attente dans les bureaux de scrutin. Les gens s’absentent du travail, puis ils doivent attendre dans les bureaux. Que fait-on dans ce projet de loi pour réduire les temps d’attente lorsque les gens se rendent au bureau de scrutin pour voter?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Quelques éléments du projet de loi visent à s'attaquer à ce problème.

L’un d’eux consiste pour Élections Canada à faire preuve d'une plus grande souplesse pour déployer son personnel plus efficacement. Il y a beaucoup de règles rigides dans la loi actuelle; les gens peuvent faire certaines choses, mais pas d’autres. Le directeur général des élections a besoin de profiter d'une plus grande souplesse dans la façon dont il déploie son personnel.

L’autre aspect concerne l’utilisation intelligente de la technologie. Le volet modernisation de ce projet de loi permettrait une meilleure utilisation de la technologie pour accélérer la circulation des gens dans le processus. Certaines règles concernant les signatures seront abandonnées dans le cas du vote par anticipation. Tout en maintenant l’intégrité, cette solution est perçue comme une façon de faire circuler les gens dans le processus pour qu’ils aient une meilleure expérience de vote.

L’autre chose — et nous en avons tous fait l’expérience — c’est comme quand vous faites la file à l’épicerie. Si la file d’attente est vraiment longue et qu’il y a une file d’attente plus courte, il était impossible auparavant, en raison des règles d'Élections Canada, de passer dans la file d’attente courte. Ce qui est proposé dans le projet de loi, c’est la capacité de déplacer les gens là où la file d’attente est la plus courte afin qu’ils puissent compléter le processus plus efficacement.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Ce n’est pas une file d’attente alphabétique ou géographique.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Exactement.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D’accord, très bien.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vais utiliser mon chronomètre de façon efficace.

Est-ce un tour de sept minutes en ce moment?

(1650)

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

J’aimerais vous parler un peu des dispositions du projet de loi concernant les limites de dépenses des tiers enregistrés pendant la période électorale et la nouvelle période préélectorale qui commence... J’ai oublié. Est-ce le 1er juin ou le 30 juin?

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est le 30 juin.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord, permettez-moi de commencer par celle-là.

Elle commencera le 30 juin. Supposons qu’il y ait un gouvernement minoritaire au cours de la prochaine législature, la 43e. Si je ne me trompe pas, on mentionne seulement le 30 juin. On ne dit pas x nombre de...

M. Allen Sutherland:

La prochaine année électorale.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. Que se passe-t-il dans un Parlement où il y a un gouvernement minoritaire et où il est possible d'avoir des élections imprévues ou anticipées? Il n'y a tout simplement rien de prévu dans cette situation?

M. Allen Sutherland:

L’histoire vous montrerait que vous n’atteindriez pas la date fixée pour les élections.

M. Scott Reid:

Elle vous le montrerait. Non, je comprends cela. Je n’essaie pas de contester la logique; j’essaie de comprendre ce qui se passe.

M. Allen Sutherland:

J’essaie simplement d’aider. Si le gouvernement devait tomber avant les élections à date fixe, vous seriez soumis aux règles habituelles, donc il n’y aurait pas de période préélectorale. Il ne serait pas possible de s’organiser parce qu’on ne saurait pas à l’avance quand le gouvernement tombera.

M. Scott Reid:

La période électorale demeure la même dans cette éventualité.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Il n’y a pas de délai supplémentaire pour en obtenir certains des avantages. Il n’y a pas de changement dans la durée de la période électorale en cas d’élection à une date non fixée.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Vous avez raison, monsieur Reid. La disposition concernant la durée maximale de 50 jours ne s’appliquerait pas non plus.

M. Scott Reid:

A-t-on modifié la période minimale prévue dans le projet de loi? Je ne m’en souviens pas.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Non, c’est simplement un maximum de 50 jours.

M. Scott Reid:

A-t-on modifié la durée des élections partielles, en indiquant une période maximale ou minimale?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Non, ce que M. Richards a dit, c’est que dans les neuf mois précédant le jour fixé pour la tenue d'une élection générale, il est impossible de déclencher une élection partielle.

M. Scott Reid:

À part cela, il n’y a pas de changements?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je suis en train de vérifier.

Manon ajoute simplement que la période maximale de 50 jours s’applique également à l’élection partielle.

M. Scott Reid:

Il n’est pas difficile d’imaginer une situation où un siège devient vacant avant que le projet de loi ne reçoive la sanction royale, mais où l’élection partielle elle-même a lieu après la date de la sanction royale. Tout cela se passe au cours de la 42e législature, évidemment.

Dans une telle situation, la nouvelle règle s’applique-t-elle?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Comme vous le savez, le premier ministre a 180 jours pour déclencher une élection partielle. S’il devait déclencher la prochaine avant la sanction royale, la nouvelle loi ne s’appliquerait pas. S’il la déclenchait après, la nouvelle loi s’appliquerait.

M. Scott Reid:

La date à laquelle le siège est devenu vacant ne serait pas déterminante. La date à laquelle le gouverneur général émet un décret pour l’élection partielle serait plutôt le facteur prédominant pour déterminer laquelle de l’ancienne loi ou de la nouvelle s’applique.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je veux m’en assurer, et je vais demander à Manon de vous répondre.

Dans votre scénario, le premier ministre n’a pas pris l’initiative de déclencher l’élection partielle. Ai-je bien compris?

M. Scott Reid:

Il pourrait ou non vouloir le faire. Il n’est pas difficile d’imaginer une situation où un siège devient vacant tout juste avant que la sanction royale ne soit prévue dans le projet de loi. C’est peut-être raisonnable ou non. Je n’essaie pas de déterminer si c'est raisonnable — c’est une considération politique. Je me demande...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Qu’est-ce qui s’appliquerait exactement?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, ce qui s’appliquerait.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui, et c’est tout ce que j’essaie de vous dire.

Nous pouvons vous donner une réponse à ce sujet, si vous le voulez, mais j’ai l’impression que si le siège devient vacant, et que le premier ministre n’a pas encore déclenché l’élection partielle, et que la loi est en vigueur, alors elle est en vigueur, et l'élection partielle serait alors assujettie aux règles.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Je crois avoir compris. Si vous pouviez nous donner une confirmation, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

M. Allen Sutherland:

D’accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous avons entamé cette discussion sur les tiers enregistrés et leurs dépenses pendant la période électorale. Je crois avoir raison de dire que les dépenses sont à taux fixe et qu’elles ne sont pas calculées au prorata de la durée de la période électorale.

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est exact.

(1655)

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je me renseigner sur la logique de tout cela? La logique liée aux périodes électorales est encore quelque peu différente.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Parlez-vous des dépenses des tiers?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Elles ne sont pas déterminées en fonction de la durée de la campagne. Voulez-vous dire entre 37 et 50 jours?

M. Scott Reid:

Il s’agit en fait d’une différence relativement importante si vous y réfléchissez.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je pense que nous pourrions faire valoir la simplicité.

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ce serait simple.

C’est un chiffre précis, donc vous avez 500 000 $...

M. Scott Reid:

C’est tout simplement plus facile à suivre.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi, mais combien de temps me reste-t-il? Une minute?

Je pense que je me trouve dans une situation où il est impossible de poser la question et d'y répondre correctement en une minute, alors pourquoi ne pas attendre et en discuter lors d’un prochain tour.

Le président:

D’accord.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos invités.

Les tiers sont définis comme une personne ou un groupe qui font de la publicité, à l’exception d’un candidat, d’un parti politique ou d’une association de circonscription.

Est-ce exact?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Cela semble juste. Je pense que c’est la loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que la loi s’applique à d’autres types de dépenses que des tiers pourraient souhaiter faire au cours d’une période préélectorale ou d’une période électorale?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Cela varie. Je pense qu’il est important de faire la distinction entre les périodes préélectorales et les périodes électorales.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord, examinons-en chacune des composantes.

Je suppose que ma question porte précisément sur le fait que les limites qui sont imposées à n’importe quel moment — les montants — s'appliquent exclusivement à la publicité, ou s’agit-il de tout ce que nous pourrions considérer comme une action politique?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Non, il s’agit aussi d’autres activités. Cela comprend notamment les sondages.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Les sondages.

M. Allen Sutherland:

La sollicitation porte-à-porte, les ralliements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suppose que dans le libellé du projet de loi — il est volumineux et je ne l’ai pas lu en détail — nous définissons les tiers comme une personne ou un groupe qui font de la publicité électorale, à l’exception d’un candidat, d’un parti enregistré ou d’une association de circonscription.

Dans quelle partie du projet de loi élargit-on la définition de tiers en ce qui concerne l'activité politique?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il y a un certain élargissement de la portée. Je ne connais pas les chiffres exacts.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le problème, c’est que, sous la direction du gouvernement, nous allons devoir adopter rapidement ce projet de loi, être en mesure de citer et de trouver les recours juridiques que vous avez décrits. La seule définition d’un tiers que je trouve est celle-là.

Toutes les limites dont nous parlons en ce qui concerne les dépenses et la production de rapports, d’après ce que je peux lire, concernent la publicité. Bien sûr, comme vous l’avez dit, il y a toute une série d’activités.

Il serait très utile — votre bureau ayant élaboré ce projet de loi — de pouvoir pointer du doigt les éléments comme « la publicité, et tel et tel autre élément » qui sont soumis aux restrictions que nous imposons en vertu du projet de loi C-76.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Nous vous ferons parvenir ces informations d’ici la fin de la réunion.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce serait très utile.

Vous estimez que ces limites sont imposées parce que le ministre a fait allusion à... et c’est quelque chose que nous avons examiné — dans certaines affaires en Colombie-Britannique — au sujet des droits garantis par la Charte.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bien sûr, vous avez l’impression d’avoir vu juste.

M. Allen Sutherland: C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen: Lorsque le gouvernement fédéral présente un projet de loi, il y a toujours une disposition l'obligeant à soumettre le projet de loi à des avocats qui évalueront s'il respecte la Charte.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Auparavant, il y avait un test de vérification; il y avait telle ou telle probabilité de survivre à une contestation en vertu de la Charte.

Ce projet de loi a-t-il été soumis à un tel test?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Nous avons travaillé avec le ministère de la Justice et avec des avocats pour essayer de trouver un juste équilibre.

Il est très difficile de trouver un juste milieu entre la liberté d’expression et ce qui est juste et équitable dans une société démocratique. Nous avons travaillé fort pour y arriver et c'est ce qui règle la période préélectorale et aussi la période électorale, ainsi que les contraintes qui guident les tiers.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur Sutherland, je vais être très précis.

Avant, un critère de probabilité de 85 % était appliqué à toutes les lois fédérales avant qu’elles ne soient présentées à la Chambre des communes. Bien sûr, c’est un critère un peu subjectif. Vous demandez à un groupe d’avocats si une loi résistera à une contestation fondée sur la Charte, et vous obtenez une foule de réponses. Il doit y avoir une forte probabilité de survie.

Ma seule question est la suivante: ce projet de loi est-il passé par ce test?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Nous avons travaillé avec des avocats du ministère de la Justice pour obtenir cette réponse.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je souris, mais c’est quand même assez sérieux, en ce sens que...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Un énoncé des répercussions de la Charte a été déposé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Y a-t-il eu un dépôt à la Chambre?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

(1700)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Très bien. Je vais examiner cela de plus près.

M. Allen Sutherland:

D’accord.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi de vous interroger sur les racines philosophiques de cette question. Parlons un instant du point de vue du tiers.

Si je suis un tiers — je travaille pour un groupe de réflexion, une ONG ou un syndicat — pourquoi devrais-je être plus limité qu’un parti politique dans ma capacité de dépenser de l’argent légalement, d'en recevoir, soit de mon organisation, soit par des dons, pour soulever les questions qui me semblent importantes?

Pourquoi les partis politiques sont-ils si privilégiés?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Tout d’abord, je ne pense pas pouvoir vous convaincre...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Que pensez-vous? Pardon?

M. Allen Sutherland:

J’ai dit, je ne pense pas pouvoir vous convaincre, si vous en étiez membre...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ah, non. Vous allez tout simplement demeurer mécontent à ce sujet. Oh, oh!

M. Allen Sutherland:

Permettez-moi de vous expliquer la situation, car c’est une question sérieuse.

Ce qu’on essaie de faire ici, et ce qui nous rend... Je comparerais le système politique canadien à ce que nous voyons au sud de la frontière et je dirais que nous avons un système supérieur au Canada, en partie parce que notre système plus restreint permet aux partis politiques d’exercer des fonctions démocratiques incroyablement utiles pour la société canadienne. Il faut que leurs voix ne soient pas noyées. La participation sans entrave de tiers pendant la période électorale risquerait d'étouffer les voix des partis politiques, les rendant incapables...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Certains voudraient que les voix de ces partis politiques soient noyées.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ils auraient tort de le faire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi de remettre les pendules à l’heure. Je ne parle pas d’un régime sans restriction. Nous avons imposé des limites aux fonds que peuvent recueillir et dépenser les partis politiques. Il y a actuellement des limites à ce que les tiers peuvent dépenser. Pourquoi est-ce tellement moins? Des libertaires — et d’autres qui ne sont pas des défenseurs des libertés — diront que si un Canadien veut faire un don à un parti politique de quelque allégeance que ce soit pour défendre ses intérêts et sa voix, c’est très bien. Mais beaucoup de Canadiens ne sont pas membres d'un parti politique. Moins de 1 % d’entre eux sont membres d’un des partis représentés à la Chambre des communes. Les Canadiens expriment leur point de vue autrement, beaucoup plus qu’il y a 100 ans. Pourquoi fixe-t-on une limite plus basse pour les gens qui choisissent cette façon de s'exprimer que pour ceux qui choisissent de donner par l’entremise d’un parti politique?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Vous êtes arrivé au coeur du problème. Au moment d'une période électorale, qui n’est pas très longue dans notre société démocratique, nous essayons de conserver un peu plus d’espace pour les partis politiques en imposant des restrictions sur le nombre de publicités partisanes. C’est la publicité partisane avant les élections...

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible] candidat. C’est aussi de la publicité sur les enjeux.

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est le cas pendant la période électorale, mais pendant la période préélectorale, il s’agit simplement de publicité partisane. Nous le faisons durant une période limitée afin d’avoir le débat démocratique dont nous avons besoin pour nous forger une opinion.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est limité au moment le plus crucial.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui, en effet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est le moment où un plus grand nombre d’électeurs portent le plus d’attention. Si vous ou moi étions membre d'une ONG et que nous avions, disons, 100 000 $ à dépenser en publicité, et que nous voulions en avoir pour notre argent, bien entendu, nous choisirions le moment où les électeurs prêtent le plus d’attention. Nous sommes toutefois limités maintenant par ce projet de loi dans notre capacité de nous attaquer au problème auquel nous croyons et pour lequel les gens nous ont donné de l’argent.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Si vous aviez 100 000 $, c’est très bien. Vous pourriez dépenser 100 000 $.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Disons que nous avons 1,5 million de dollars.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il est important de noter que la plupart des tiers sont en fait très petits au Canada...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, ils le sont.

M. Allen Sutherland:

... et c’est une bonne chose.

Le président:

D’accord, merci.

Nous allons passer à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Mesdames et messieurs, merci d’être parmi nous.

J’ai quelques questions d’ordre technique concernant le projet de loi. Ensuite, je veux aborder un sujet qui m’a intéressé il y a plusieurs années et je suis heureux de voir que nous l’étudions.

La première question porte sur les candidats à l’investiture.

L’article 476.67 proposé porte sur les limites des dépenses liées aux courses à l’investiture. Beaucoup de gens essaient de déterminer la période à laquelle cela s'applique. Lorsque la date de la course à l’investiture devient publique — de là jusqu’à cette date — est-ce que cela s'applique pour chaque candidat à l’investiture? Si c'est le cas, y a-t-il eu des changements dans ce projet de loi?

Mme Manon Paquet (conseillère principale en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Il n'y a pas eu de changements. La même règle s’applique aux délais. Les définitions ont été ajustées pour s’harmoniser aux nouvelles catégories établies pour les candidats. C'est une partie de l'explication.

M. Scott Simms:

C’est pourquoi on en parle ici, à l’article 476.67 proposé, n’est-ce pas?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

D’accord, merci.

J’ai une autre petite question technique, sous la rubrique « Dépenses électorales engagées par le candidat ». C’est à l’article 290. Il s’agit du paragraphe 477.47(5.1). Malgré le paragraphe (5), le candidat doit, avant d’engager des dépenses électorales, obtenir l’autorisation écrite de son agent officiel d’engager ces dépenses, et il ne doit les engager que conformément à cette autorisation.

Je sais que nous avons élargi le concept des dépenses personnelles de plusieurs façons. Je peux payer des dépenses avec ma carte Visa ou une autre carte, puis me faire rembourser. Qu’entend-on par « l’autorisation écrite de leur agent officiel »? Je ne suis pas certain de la façon dont cette obligation s’applique. Pourquoi en fait-on mention?

(1705)

Mme Manon Paquet:

C’est une recommandation du directeur général des élections mise en oeuvre pour accroître la reddition de comptes si un candidat dépassait la limite quant à l’approbation de ces dépenses. Il y a des dispositions qui tiennent compte du fait que certaines dépenses peuvent maintenant être payées à même les fonds personnels, comme les frais de garde d’enfants et les prestations d’invalidité. Il ne serait pas nécessaire alors d’obtenir le même type d'autorisation.

M. Scott Simms:

Il s’agit d’une mesure de reddition de comptes qui remonte à l’agent officiel. C’est exact?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Exactement.

M. Scott Simms:

J'étais embrouillé à ce sujet. Excusez-moi.

Le président:

Si j’ai bien compris, cet article ne s’applique pas aux dépenses personnelles, mais seulement aux dépenses électorales.

Mme Manon Paquet:

C’est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Je veux parler des lois en matière de protection des renseignements personnels et des données recueillies par les partis.

Je crois comprendre que le parti doit être plus transparent. Il doit publier sa politique sur son propre site Internet. Que propose le projet de loi en cette matière? Que doit-on faire?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il faut que la politique soit publiée sur le site Internet. Elle doit aussi être soumise à Élections Canada. Quels sont les éléments à fournir? Il y a certaines exigences au sujet des modalités de collecte et de la nature des renseignements recueillis et au sujet des mesures que le parti prend pour protéger les renseignements personnels. Il faut également décrire les mesures de formation qui seront prises et les approches à l'égard de diverses choses, dont les témoins des sites. De plus, il faut avoir le nom et les coordonnées d’une personne à qui on peut signaler ses préoccupations en matière de protection de la vie privée. Si je suis Canadien, je dois pouvoir trouver à qui je peux m'adresser.

M. Scott Simms:

Je saute d'un sujet à l'autre, mais je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps.

À propos des transactions avec le commissaire, il est beaucoup question ici d’encourager les gens qui enfreignent la loi à s’y conformer, et l’une des façons de le faire serait d’imposer des sanctions administratives. À votre avis, quelle sera la plus grande différence à l’approche des élections si quelqu’un contrevient à la loi, et en quoi les sanctions administratives seront-elles utiles?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Présumons que le projet de loi soit adopté. Voici un changement. Par le passé, le commissaire aux élections fédérales avait un choix plutôt difficile à faire. Par exemple, si un compte bancaire n'était pas fermé à temps, il avait le choix d'intenter des poursuites ou d'encourager le contrevenant à se conformer, mais il n’avait pas de moyen proportionnel à la gravité du manquement pour l'amener à se conformer. Désormais, grâce aux sanctions administratives pécuniaires, il aura un meilleur arsenal pour contraindre les tiers et les partis politiques à se conformer.

M. Scott Simms:

Ces sanctions faciliteraient-elles la relation entre les poursuites pénales et le commissaire? Je suppose que oui. Comment influeraient-elles sur la relation? Je sais qu’actuellement, les dossiers sont transférés à Élections Canada, mais cela mis à part, lorsqu'il s'agit des transactions, quel serait le rôle du procureur?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Le recours à ces sanctions, aux SAP, faciliterait la relation...

M. Scott Simms:

Les acronymes me rendent fou.

(1710)

M. Allen Sutherland:

L’utilisation judicieuse des sanctions administratives pécuniaires comme moyen de faire respecter la loi contribuerait à faciliter la relation avec les poursuites publiques, car cela signifierait qu’il y aurait moins de poursuites stupides lorsque ce qui est en jeu est si insignifiant.

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis tout à fait d’accord. Dans plusieurs ministères, qu’il s’agisse de Patrimoine canadien ou du CRTC, je constate que c’est assez complexe. J’essaie simplement de voir comment les deux éléments peuvent se conjuguer de sorte qu'on s'en prenne à ceux qui contreviennent le plus gravement à la loi et comment ces sanctions administratives seront appliquées. Je vous remercie de vos lumières.

Le président:

Et je tiens à vous remercier moi aussi.

M. Scott Simms:

Que voulez-vous dire, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Que c’est le temps de passer à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’ai quelques questions sur différents sujets. Nous aurons une conversation, je suppose.

Il s'agit des tiers et des modifications apportées à la loi telle que je les comprends. Évidemment, les tiers ne peuvent pas recevoir de contributions d’entités étrangères pendant la période électorale ou la nouvelle période préélectorale. Ils peuvent certes en recevoir avant cela, mais ce ne peut pas être à des fins politiques. Quels moyens le projet de loi nous donne-t-il de le vérifier? Qu’est-ce qui empêche quelqu’un de donner, disons, 1 million de dollars à d’autres fins? Bien sûr, cela libère peut-être le million de dollars que le tiers avait déjà dans son compte en banque pour le consacrer aux élections. En un sens, c’est presque toujours une façon d’exercer une influence. On dit, avec un clin d’oeil: « Je vous ai donné cet argent pour autre chose; utilisez votre autre million de dollars pour les élections. » Comment pouvons-nous faire respecter la loi et empêcher que cela ne se produise?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Vous parlez du problème du mélange de fonds d'origines diverses. L'argent venu de l'étranger pourrait être utilisé à des fins administratives ou à d’autres fins non politiques, ce qui libérerait d'autres fonds. Le projet de loi impose une limite à cet égard. En effet, le commissaire aux élections fédérales pourrait exiger des reçus et voir d'où proviennent les fonds du tiers. Dans un scénario délirant où tout l’argent versé au tiers proviendrait de l'étranger, les constatations seraient assez faciles à faire.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr. Ce serait vrai dans ce scénario. Je suis d’accord. Pendant les deux périodes, préélectorale et électorale, les tiers peuvent dépenser 1,5 million de dollars. Est-ce exact?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Voulez-vous dire pendant les deux périodes à la fois?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui. À titre de précision, pendant la période préélectorale, il s’agit de publicité électorale et thématique, et pendant la période électorale, il ne s’agit que de publicité électorale.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela dit, utilisons ce chiffre commode de 1,5 million de dollars et disons que le tiers devait avoir des fonds de 3 millions de dollars, dont la moitié viendrait de l'étranger et le reste du Canada. Est-il possible que cette organisation prétende que la totalité des 1,5 million de dollars dépensés pendant la campagne électorale était entièrement canadienne? Si elle reçoit 50 % de ses fonds de l'étranger, est-ce qu’elle devrait...? Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je comprends le problème. En fin de compte, il appartiendrait au commissaire aux élections fédérales de voir si ce qui est proposé — dans le cas dont vous parlez, des fonds se substituent à d'autres — se produit effectivement en train de se produire ou si de l’argent étranger est injecté dans les campagnes partisanes.

M. Blake Richards:

Que pourrions-nous faire? Cela me préoccupe certainement. Si le problème inquiète la majorité des membres du Comité, quels amendements pourrions-nous apporter pour renforcer les dispositions et prévoir de meilleurs moyens de les faire respecter et d'éviter la substitution de fonds: « Eh bien, nous allons vous donner de l’argent pour autre chose et vous pouvez consacrer le reste aux élections »?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Mon rôle est de parler du projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle. Je vous dirais qu’il permet d'accomplir des progrès importants en créant la période préélectorale, en établissant les limites et en élargissant la portée des activités qui sont couvertes par des tiers, et en exigeant également que le compte bancaire...

(1715)

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre. Vous ne pouvez pas nous proposer des amendements, n’est-ce pas?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Non, désolé.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. À qui pourrions-nous adresser cette question? Avez-vous une idée?

M. Allen Sutherland:

À vos collègues.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord.

Passons maintenant à la protection des renseignements personnels sur le Registre des futurs électeurs. Lorsque j’ai posé la question au ministre suppléant à la Chambre, il a dit que ces renseignements ne pourraient pas être communiqués aux partis politiques. Puis-je simplement confirmer avec vous...

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

... que le projet de loi interdit absolument la communication de ces renseignements?

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Je voulais simplement le confirmer.

Pour ce qui est des électeurs qui se trouvent à l'étranger, ils doivent prouver leur dernier lieu de résidence. Comment cela se fait-il?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je vous laisse le soin de répondre. À vous.

Capitaine de corvette Jean-François Morin (conseiller principal en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

À l’heure actuelle, les électeurs qui votent en vertu de la section 3 de la partie 11 de la Loi électorale du Canada doivent remplir une demande d’inscription et un bulletin de vote spécial. Ils doivent fournir une preuve d’identité suffisante, mais pas une preuve suffisante de résidence. C’est l’état actuel de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Le projet de loi  C-76 ne change rien à cet égard, mais il élimine certaines options qui s’offraient aux expatriés. À l’heure actuelle, ils peuvent choisir comme lieu de résidence habituelle l'endroit où ils résideraient avec une autre personne s’ils étaient au Canada. Le projet de loi modifie ces dispositions. Les expatriés pourront seulement choisir leur dernier lieu de résidence habituelle au Canada et, une fois inscrits au Registre international des électeurs, ils ne pourront plus changer leur lieu de résidence habituelle.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il faudrait qu’ils rentrent pour modifier leur lieu de résidence.

M. Blake Richards:

C’est simplement une question complémentaire. Je veux être sûr de bien comprendre ce que vous dites.

Ces électeurs font une simple déclaration. Sauf erreur, vous dites que, une fois leur déclaration faite, elle vaut indéfiniment, à moins qu’ils ne rentrent au Canada et n'adoptent une résidence différente. Comment les faits sont-ils établis? On se contente d'une simple déclaration, sans aucune vérification?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Oui, il n'y a qu'une simple déclaration. Cela dit, bien sûr, le projet de loi offre le droit de vote à environ un million de Canadiens qui ont vécu à l’étranger pendant plus de cinq ans et qui avaient ou n’avaient pas l’intention de rentrer. Il pourrait être très difficile pour certains de ces Canadiens qui sont absents depuis longtemps de prouver leur dernier lieu de résidence habituelle au Canada. Alors oui, c'est une simple déclaration sans preuve documentaire.

Bien sûr, il y a des infractions liées au vote...

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr. Mais s’il n’y a pas moyen de vraiment le vérifier, comment faire respecter les dispositions de la loi?

Est-il exact que, aux termes du projet de loi, ils n’ont pas non plus à déclarer leur intention de rentrer au Canada?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

C’est exact. C’est pourquoi nous sommes dans cette situation.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

Je reviens sur les questions de M. Richards, car je comprends où il veut en venir. Y a-t-il un moyen raisonnable de s’assurer que ces millions de personnes vivant à l’étranger produisent une pièce d’identité ou une attestation de leur lieu de résidence antérieur? Si on habite à l'étranger pendant cinq ans, les pièces d’identité expirent, on peut les perdre, on ne garde pas d'adresse postale, on ne conserve pas des documents comme une facture de téléphone d’il y a cinq ans.

Avez-vous discuté de cette possibilité?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Comme je l’ai dit à M. Richards, à l’heure actuelle, il n’y a aucune obligation de prouver la résidence des personnes inscrites au Registre international des électeurs. Elles n’ont qu’à fournir une preuve d’identité satisfaisante. Il serait très difficile pour les personnes qui sont absentes du Canada depuis de nombreuses années de produire une preuve documentaire de leur dernier lieu de résidence habituelle au Canada.

(1720)

M. Chris Bittle:

Pouvez-vous expliquer comment le projet de loi faciliterait le vote des membres des Forces armées canadiennes?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Absolument. À l’heure actuelle, les membres des Forces canadiennes doivent voter dans leur unité militaire entre le 14e et le neuvième jour précédant le jour du scrutin. Seule une petite proportion des électeurs des Forces canadiennes peuvent voter aux bureaux de scrutin civils le jour du scrutin. Ces règles ont été conçues à la fin des années 1950. Elles n’ont pas beaucoup changé depuis.

Le projet de loi C-76 offre aux membres des Forces canadiennes des possibilités plus nombreuses d'exercer leur droit. Tous, ils pourront choisir s’ils veulent voter au bureau de scrutin normal, au bureau du directeur du scrutin, ou par courrier du Canada ou de l’étranger. Lorsqu’ils votent selon l’une de ces modalités, ils devront se conformer aux exigences en matière de vérification de l'identité, y compris la preuve d’adresse. Le projet de loi C-76 maintient les bureaux de scrutin dans les unités militaires. C’est la souplesse dont les Forces canadiennes ont besoin, compte tenu de la grande variété de contextes dans lesquels elles mènent leurs activités au Canada et partout dans le monde.

Dans ces bureaux de scrutin militaires, les électeurs des Forces canadiennes devront désormais prouver leur identité et produire leur numéro matricule. Comme la ministre l’a dit dans son exposé, ceux qui participent à des exercices ou à des opérations au Canada ou à l’étranger ne peuvent souvent pas porter un document qui prouverait leur adresse. C’est pour assurer leur sécurité personnelle et celle de leur famille. Nous facilitons également l’inscription des membres des Forces canadiennes au Registre national des électeurs. À l’heure actuelle, ils doivent remplir un formulaire papier qu’on appelle la Déclaration de résidence habituelle. Maintenant, cette déclaration est abrogée, et ils pourront s’inscrire, grâce au site Web d’Élections Canada, au Registre national des électeurs et changer d’adresse afin de voter avec leur famille dans les collectivités qu’ils desservent et où ils résident.

M. Chris Bittle:

C’est peut-être une question injuste, parce que le nombre fluctue, mais savons-nous combien de membres des Forces armées canadiennes sont à l’étranger, normalement, dans ce genre de situation? Combien y en avait-il en 2015?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Je n’ai pas cette information sous les yeux, mais les Forces armées canadiennes mènent actuellement 13 opérations dans le monde. Comme je l’ai dit, le contexte dans lequel les membres des Forces canadiennes servent varie beaucoup. Ils peuvent servir dans le cadre d’une opération multinationale où il y en aura des centaines ensemble et ils pourraient servir seuls comme agent dans une ambassade, par exemple.

M. Chris Bittle:

Y a-t-il eu des consultations auprès des Forces armées canadiennes? De quelle nature?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Il y a eu plusieurs consultations. Dans son rapport qui a suivi les élections de 2015, le directeur général des élections a recommandé que les règles électorales spéciales applicables aux membres des Forces canadiennes soient révisées, car elles datent. Le Comité a accepté cette recommandation en principe. Il y a donc eu des consultations entre Élections Canada et les Forces canadiennes pendant environ six mois, ce qui a amené le directeur général des élections à remettre des recommandations supplémentaires au Comité en juin 2017. Après juin 2017, les Forces canadiennes ont collaboré avec le gouvernement du Canada pour s’assurer que les modifications proposées dans le projet de loi C-76 refléteraient les préoccupations relatives à la souplesse, mais aussi à la sécurité opérationnelle, par exemple.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Vecchio.

Mme Karen Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London, PCC):

Merci de m’avoir invitée aujourd’hui.

J’étais en train de passer en revue certains des renseignements sur les sanctions administratives pécuniaires. À considérer les renseignements sur le nouveau régime, on se dit que c'est une question d’administration financière.

Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet? D'après certains éléments, il s’agit essentiellement de remplacer ce qui est considéré comme un crime dont on peut être reconnu coupable par des amendes qui, du reste, me semblent fort modestes. Pouvez-vous me donner une idée de ce à quoi vous vous attendez? Supposons qu’une personne qui a trop contribué ou qu’un député ou un candidat verse 50 000 $ à sa campagne, alors que sa limite n’est que de 5 000 $, pouvez-vous me dire exactement ce qui se passerait dans une telle situation?

(1725)

M. Allen Sutherland:

En un mot, non, je ne peux pas, parce que c’est le commissaire aux élections fédérales qui déciderait.

Pour ce qui est des cotisations excédentaires, il s'agit d'une exception à la règle des sanctions administratives pécuniaires. Pour le reste, vous avez tout à fait raison de dire que les sanctions administratives pécuniaires sont censées être minimes. Il s'agit de sanctionner des irrégularités mineures qui ne valent pas la peine de s'adresser aux tribunaux, ce qui constituerait un grand gaspillage de temps et de ressources. Je crois que le maximum est de 1 500 $ pour un particulier et de 5 000 $ pour un groupe.

Il importe de signaler qu’il est possible de contester les sanctions au besoin, mais il s’agit d’une réponse proportionnelle et le but visé est d’essayer de mettre fin aux comportements répréhensibles.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Pouvez-vous me donner la définition de groupe? Étant donné que bon nombre des contributions proviennent de particuliers, qu’est-ce qui constituerait un groupe, puisque vous parlez d’une limite de 5 000 $? Qu’est-ce qu’un groupe et pourquoi?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Un parti politique, par exemple, serait une entité.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Les associations de circonscription.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

D’accord, donc, un transfert d’une association de circonscription à une autre, par exemple, donnerait ce maximum.

Mme Manon Paquet:

Toujours à propos des contributions excédentaires... Des sanctions administratives pécuniaires pourraient s'appliquer, mais la limite du montant est plus élevée. Il pourrait s’agir du double du montant de la contribution excédentaire ou de la contribution non autorisée.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Il n'y a pas que les cotisations excédentaires, mais aussi les dépenses trop élevées, n’est-ce pas? Il en est également tenu compte. Disons que quelqu’un a 80 000 $ pendant la période électorale et dépense 90 000 $. Il n’y aura plus d’accusations au pénal. Vous envisagez d'appliquer plutôt une sanction pécuniaire.

Mme Manon Paquet:

Ce serait l’un ou l’autre. Le commissaire aurait toujours la possibilité d’intenter des poursuites.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Pour changer de sujet, j’aimerais revenir aux dépenses des tiers. En 2015, combien d’organismes tiers étaient enregistrés auprès d’Élections Canada?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oh, je savais que...

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Vous saviez que ce genre de question allait venir.

Wikipédia dit 55, mais il se peut que je m'égare.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui, il y en a beaucoup.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Il y en a beaucoup, effectivement.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il y en a beaucoup, et il y a beaucoup de petites entités. Le tiers moyen dépense environ 8 500 $.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Quel serait le chiffre si nous nous en tenions aux entités importantes? En 2015, il y en a eu de très importantes.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je me souviens de ce chiffre. Il y en a eu 19 qui ont dépensé plus de 100 000 $.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Y en a-t-il qui ont atteint...? Sauf erreur, un parti politique au niveau national peut donner... Est-ce environ 21 millions de dollars? Combien sont-ils en mesure de donner?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Cela varie d'une année à l’autre. Y a-t-il des tiers qui ont atteint ce montant? Ils ne l’ont certainement pas fait.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Non, ils n’ont pas atteint ce niveau.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Pas du tout.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Observons-nous une tendance à la hausse, cependant, si nous comparons les élections de 2006, 2008, 2011 et 2015? Voyons-nous une augmentation des dépenses des tiers?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il y a probablement une augmentation, mais ce n’est pas... C’est plutôt au sud de la frontière.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Je reviens à l’examen des entités, ce qui se rapproche des questions de Blake. À ce propos, quelle sera la réglementation?

Supposons, par exemple, qu’une organisation américaine verse de l’argent à une organisation tierce au Canada. L'argent est dépensé pendant la période préélectorale et toutes les précautions sont prises. En ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements personnels, même si l'organisation est enregistrée, à quel moment serait-il possible pour Élections Canada d'exiger de tout voir?

L'organisme sera-t-il limité à ce qu'il peut voir dans les transactions? Sera-t-il possible de voir tout ce qui se rapporte à la période en question? Élections Canada pourrait dire: « Tels renseignements remontent peut-être à 2014, et nous admettons qu'il s'agit des élections de 2016 » ou d'une autre année. Dans quelle mesure sera-t-il possible de remonter dans le temps? Y aura-t-il des limites à la période où on pourra examiner les renseignements?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

À l’heure actuelle, les tiers doivent rendre compte des contributions reçues six mois avant le début de la période électorale. Ils devront désormais rendre compte des contributions reçues essentiellement depuis le lendemain des élections précédentes. Par exemple, au début de la période préélectorale, s’ils ont l’intention de dépenser plus de 10 000 $ avant cette période, ils devront produire un rapport avant le début de la période électorale officielle sur toutes les contributions reçues depuis le lendemain des élections précédentes.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Élections Canada aura donc le pouvoir d’examiner tout ce qui concerne les contributions des tiers à partir du 20 octobre 2015.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Les tiers doivent remettre des rapports à Élections Canada, qui a le pouvoir de les vérifier. S’il a des doutes, il est possible, bien sûr, de demander un complément d’information. Et s'il subsiste des doutes, il est possible de renvoyer l’affaire au commissaire aux élections fédérales, qui pourra faire enquête.

(1730)

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si des gens atteignent l’âge de 18 ans pendant la période électorale ou le jour même des élections, à quel moment se retrouveront-ils sur la liste électorale des partis?

M. Allen Sutherland:

En vertu du projet de loi, ils seraient inscrits le jour de leur anniversaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord. Ils ne figureraient donc pas sur la liste du jour 19. On sait que leur anniversaire arrive avant les élections ou le jour des élections et qu'ils auront donc le droit de voter, mais ils n’ont pas encore 18 ans. Comment traite-t-on cette situation?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ils ne sont pas sur la liste avant d’avoir atteint l’âge de 18 ans. Est-ce exact?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Ils pourraient probablement s’inscrire au bureau de scrutin et déclarer solennellement qu’ils auront 18 ans le jour du scrutin. Par définition, l'électeur a au moins 18 ans le jour du scrutin, de sorte qu’il serait autorisé à voter.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Mais les parties n’ont pas obtenu l’information, dans ce cas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Du tout?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ce n’est qu’à l’âge de 18 ans...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le jour des élections, moment où on reçoit la dernière liste d’Élections Canada et...

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est ainsi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord. Y a-t-il des limites légales aux enquêtes et aux accusations relatives à la fraude électorale? Y a-t-il une loi de prescription? Est-ce 5 ans, 2 ans, 100 ans?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il y a des dispositions à cet égard dans la loi, mais il faudrait les chercher. Nous pouvons vous trouver cette information.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Entretemps, qu’est-ce qui constitue de la publicité électorale pour un tiers? Si un tiers veut parler du salaire minimum, par exemple, peut-il citer un parti en particulier? Suffit-il de parler de la question pour que ce soit de la publicité par des tiers ou doit-on prendre position à l'égard d'un parti? Quelles sont les limites? Y a-t-il beaucoup de flou?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Vous voulez savoir ce qui constitue de la publicité électorale de la part de tiers. Il s’agit en fait d’une déclaration d’appui ou d’opposition à un parti donné. Autrement, c’est de la publicité thématique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Un tiers peut donc parler à loisir d'un enjeu sans nommer un parti, et cela ne compte pas.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est bon à savoir.

Une question amusante...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il importe de noter que, pendant la période électorale, la publicité électorale et la publicité thématique sont comptées, de sorte que les tiers ne peuvent pas faire ce genre de publicité pendant la période électorale. Tout est pris en compte dans le total.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si on reste vague, peut-on contourner la règle?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Non. Si c’est de la publicité thématique pendant la période électorale, elle est comptée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est bon à savoir.

Les électeurs étrangers, les expatriés, auraient...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ce ne sont pas des électeurs étrangers; ce sont des Canadiens qui vivent à l’étranger.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qu’en est-il des électeurs canadiens résidant à l’étranger?

M. Allan Sutherland: Bien sûr.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Reçoivent-ils quelque chose qui ressemble à une carte d'information de l'électeur, ou sont-ils livrés à eux-mêmes?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Ils doivent présenter une demande pour s’inscrire et obtenir un bulletin de vote spécial.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ils doivent prendre l'initiative.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu’on communique avec ces gens avant le vote?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Le mandat du directeur général des élections en matière d’information publique comprend une disposition permettant à Élections Canada d'informer les Canadiens vivant à l’étranger.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Les communications ne sont pas personnalisées. Ce serait une tâche impossible que de s'adresser à chacun.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les ambassades ont-elles le droit d'apporter une aide quelconque pendant les élections?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Elles peuvent accepter les bulletins de vote et les envois postaux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Elles peuvent accepter les bulletins de vote. Intéressant.

Vous avez expliqué plus tôt comment on choisit les circonscriptions. Comment fait-on la déclaration? On se contente d’envoyer une lettre disant: « Je vais voter dans la circonscription de Nathan », et c’est tout?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Excusez-moi, pourriez-vous répéter la question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsqu’un Canadien vivant à l’étranger, surtout lorsqu’il est parti depuis longtemps, veut s’inscrire au Canada pour voter, quelle est la marche à suivre? On envoie simplement une petite note à Élections Canada, disant: « J’ai l’intention de m’inscrire dans telle circonscription pour toute la période où je serai à l'étranger »?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Non, il faut remplir une demande d’inscription et il faut obtenir un bulletin de vote spécial. La loi est très prescriptive quant aux renseignements à fournir dans la demande. Il faut également fournir une preuve d’identité suffisante et déclarer où se trouvait son dernier lieu de résidence ordinaire avant de quitter le Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a donc un lien avec le lieu de résidence, et non avec la circonscription. S’il y a redécoupage, on se fie à l’adresse.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Exactement. Il faut déclarer l’adresse, et on voit ensuite dans quelle circonscription électorale elle se trouve.

Permettez-moi de répondre à l’une de vos questions précédentes sur le délai de prescription pour les avis de violation dans le cadre du régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires. Le délai sera de cinq ans, comme le prévoit le paragraphe 521.12(1). Par le passé, il y avait un délai de prescription pour toutes les autres infractions à la Loi électorale du Canada, mais je crois comprendre que ce délai a été abrogé dans une version antérieure de la Loi électorale du Canada.

(1735)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, théoriquement, on pourrait enquêter sur des fraudes électorales d’il y a 40 ans.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Pour les accusations au pénal?

M. David de Burgh Graham: Oui.

Captc Jean-François Morin: Il faut régler la question du droit pénal au Canada. Le délai de prescription qui s’appliquait par le passé aurait probablement été appliqué à ces infractions d'il y a 40 ans. Mais depuis la modification de la Loi électorale du Canada, oui, il pourrait y avoir une enquête et des poursuites.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Rien du tout.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voilà qui répond à ma question.

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous en prie.

Une fois que ces étrangers s’inscrivent, doivent-ils s’inscrire à toutes les élections, ou sont-ils sur la liste pour de bon?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

En fait, ils figurent dans un registre spécial, le registre international. Ils sont inscrits au registre jusqu’à ce qu’ils demandent à être radiés ou jusqu’à ce qu’ils rentrent au Canada.

Le président:

Comment savoir s’ils décèdent, par exemple, pour qu'on puisse les rayer de la liste?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Excellente question, monsieur le président. Je n’ai pas la réponse sur le bout des doigts.

Cela dit, je crois que la partie 4 de la Loi électorale du Canada contient des dispositions sur le Registre national des électeurs. Il y a des échanges d’information avec, par exemple, Citoyenneté et Immigration et l’ARC qui permettent au directeur général des élections d’être avisé des décès.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Cullen. Si les membres du Comité sont d’accord, après l'intervention de M. Cullen, tous ceux qui auront encore des questions à poser pourront intervenir librement.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suppose que, s’ils cessent d’envoyer des cartes de Noël, on peut déduire qu'ils ont disparu.

Au sujet de la protection des renseignements personnels, j’ai demandé au directeur général intérimaire d’Élections Canada quelles étaient les limites imposées aux partis quant au traitement des renseignements recueillis sur les Canadiens. Il a répondu qu’il y en avait très peu, voire aucune. À propos de ce que les partis font de ces renseignements personnels et de leur capacité juridique de les vendre, s'ils le souhaitent, est-il illégal pour les partis de recueillir des données sur des Canadiens et de les vendre à un tiers, s'ils le veulent?

M. Allen Sutherland:

L’approche proposée dans le projet de loi n’est pas axée sur l’illégalité, sauf... Si vous ne le faites pas, votre enregistrement est annulé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si vous ne faites pas quoi?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Si vous ne fournissez pas de politique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

À l’heure actuelle, le projet de loi C-76 dispose que les partis doivent nous communiquer leur politique. S'ils ne le font pas, nous pourrions leur retirer leur enregistrement.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ils perdent leur enregistrement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais la politique peut simplement dire très peu, voire rien du tout.

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est cela...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le projet de loi n’exige aucune amélioration de la protection de la vie privée des Canadiens.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Vous avez raison. Mais le projet de loi apporte une nouvelle transparence. Je présume que, si le parti publie sur son site Web une politique dans laquelle il avoue qu'il communique librement les renseignements personnels, les Canadiens se formeront un jugement en conséquence.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, le projet de loi n’empêche pas les partis de faire de choses répréhensibles. Il les force simplement à dire aux électeurs qu'ils les font.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui, y compris la vente de renseignements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourquoi ne pas interdire la vente? Je ne comprends pas. Vous espérez que les partis politiques ne le feront pas, mais...

Lorsque j’ai parlé au directeur général d’Élections Canada, c’était au sujet d’une chose que nous venions de voir. Nous venions de voir à quel point les données peuvent être puissantes, non seulement dans les mains des partis politiques qui se disputent le pouvoir, mais aussi par la capacité de manipuler les données et d’exposer les électeurs à de la désinformation à cause de cette manipulation. Je dirais que c’est une menace fondamentale pour nos institutions démocratiques. Serions-nous d’accord pour dire que les nouvelles technologies et les nouveaux outils qui sont maintenant à la disposition de ceux qui cherchent à influencer l’opinion publique sont l'équivalent de ce que nous faisions auparavant, mais à la puissance 10? Je ne comprends pas pourquoi nous n’avons pas plus...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je ne crois pas qu’il soit possible de vendre les listes électorales, alors je pense que c’est...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, pas les listes électorales, mais...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Mais ce sont là les renseignements d'Élections Canada.

(1740)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends, mais dans certains pays européens, un électeur peut téléphoner à un parti et demander: « Dites-moi ce que vous savez à mon sujet. » Le parti doit dire: « Eh bien, nous connaissons votre adresse et vos coordonnées. Nous avons aussi appris que vous avez signé une pétition en 1990. Nous savons que vous avez enregistré telle ou telle chose. » Les partis se créent une riche source de données. Ils essaient de le faire. Les libéraux avaient l’habitude de s’en vanter. Ils se sont vantés jusqu’à tout récemment, jusqu’à l'affaire Cambridge Analytica, de la façon dont ils ont remporté les élections de 2015, de leur excellente gestion des données, de leur excellente collecte de données.

Je me demande s’il y a une disposition dans le projet de loi C-76 qui permet à un Canadien de demander à un parti de lui fournir même les sources de données, c’est-à-dire: « Quels éléments de données avez-vous recueillis à mon sujet? »

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ils pourraient certainement demander qui a été contacté, mais...

M. Nathan Cullen:

La loi n’oblige pas le parti à fournir l’information.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourquoi ne pas donner à l’électeur le moyen de savoir quelle information...?

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question suivante. Il y a un pare-feu dans mon bureau. Quelqu’un s'y présente et parle d’un cas d’immigration avec mes collaborateurs. Chaque parti a une base de données pour gérer ce genre de dossier. Nous y travaillons. J’ai discuté d'un dossier avec un ministre il y a une heure. Aucun de ces renseignements ne peut être transféré dans l’ensemble de données pour indiquer que cette personne s’intéresse aux questions d’immigration.

Sommes-nous tenus par la loi d’avoir ce pare-feu en ce moment? Le savez-vous?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je ne sais pas. Vous pourriez être mieux placé pour...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, voilà qui est intéressant. Nous discutons du projet de loi C-76 et voici que nous parlons de données.

M. Allen Sutherland: Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen: Le gouvernement de l’époque, en apportant un changement générationnel à nos lois électorales, a-t-il dit que les titulaires de charge publique, ceux qui ont des fonctions politiques, ne doivent jamais communiquer l’information recueillie dans le cadre de leur travail de député à la base de données du parti? Tous, nous espérons que nous avons tous une bonne éthique et que chaque bureau bloque ce transfert, mais le projet de loi C-76 dit-il quoi que ce soit à ce sujet?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Pas à ma connaissance.

M. Nathan Cullen:

On peut comprendre le point de vue du Canadien qui se présente dans un de nos bureaux avec un dossier auquel il travaille et auquel nous travaillons de façon non partisane en tant que députés. Pourrait-on avoir un amendement qui dit que l’information ne peut jamais être communiquée sous peine d’expulsion? Les Canadiens aimeraient le savoir, n’est-ce pas? Nous pouvons affirmer que les renseignements ne seront pas communiqués et le confirmer au citoyen qui se présente au bureau, comme celui de Larry à Whitehorse. Mais pourquoi ne pas inscrire cela dans la loi?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Les partis pourraient donner l’exemple aux autres partis en s’assurant que leur politique est claire et évidente sur ce point, quitte à ce que les gens comparent ensuite les politiques de chacun.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donner l’exemple est une bonne chose...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il y a de la transparence...

M. Nathan Cullen:

... mais l’électeur moyen ne va pas consulter la section des politiques du site Web de chaque parti et se dire: « Laissez-moi voir clair dans le jargon juridique pour connaître vos orientations, qui ne sont pas des règles obligatoires, sur la façon dont vous traitez mes données », pour se dire ensuite que les règles des libéraux ressemblent à ceci, que les règles des conservateurs sont telles, et que les néo-démocrates ont telles dispositions, et que, en conséquence, il va voter de telle façon. Je ne pense pas qu'il soit raisonnable de s'attendre à une réaction comme celle-là.

C’est comme ces avertissements sur les sites Web qui disent « pour pouvoir utiliser cette application, cliquez si vous êtes d’accord », puis il y a 47 pages de jargon juridique. Nous avons prouvé devant les tribunaux que ce n’est pas un critère vérifiable qui permet aux entreprises de s’en tirer à bon compte. Je ne crois pas qu’il s’agisse d’un critère vérifiable qui permet aux partis de s’en tirer à bon compte en cas de détournement des données des Canadiens dans le cadre d'élections.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je comprends. J’ai seulement deux petites choses à dire.

Dans son allocution, la ministre a dit qu’elle était ouverte aux amendements et à la poursuite des travaux du Comité à cet égard. La deuxième chose, c’est qu’il n’est peut-être pas important que les Canadiens fassent cette comparaison entre les partis. Car je suis d’accord avec vous pour dire que ce ne sont pas tous les Canadiens qui feront cette démarche ou qui en sont capables. Mais les leaders d’opinion pourraient le faire, n’est-ce pas? Les leaders d’opinion...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais encore là, si nous faisons quelque chose... Ce que je veux dire, c'est qu'en 2018 et 2019, la manière de tenir une élection est tout à fait différente...

M. Allen Sutherland: C'est vrai.

M. Nathan Cullen: ... de ce qu'elle était il y a une génération pour ce qui est des moyens... Auparavant, les gens se servaient des catalogues Sears et des cartes de bibliothèque. Les sources de données étaient limitées. Nous faisions du porte-à-porte et de la sollicitation par téléphone. Aujourd'hui, comme nous l'avons appris, dès qu'un internaute participe à un sondage sur Facebook, il peut être harcelé ou exposé à la sollicitation, et ses données peuvent être vendues à des acteurs politiques, des tiers partis ou des partis enregistrés, peu importe, et il se met à recevoir ce genre d'information... Je pense que cette pratique ne fera qu'empirer. Je me demande donc pourquoi nous ne profitons pas du changement de génération pour mieux gérer la situation, monsieur le président.

Bien entendu, nous y arriverons par voie d'amendements. Nous venons de terminer l'examen du projet de loi C-69. Nous avons déposé 300 amendements et un seul a été accepté. Vous me pardonnerez donc d'être sceptique quant au degré d'ouverture du gouvernement. Nous verrons si ce sera différent pour ce projet de loi omnibus. Il se dit ouvert, mais il n'accepte rien.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant élargir la discussion, en entendant ceux qui n'ont pas encore eu la chance d'intervenir.

Messieurs Bittle, Cullen et Richards.

(1745)

M. Chris Bittle:

J'aimerais revenir aux forces armées et aux conjoints et conjointes de militaires. Sous le régime actuel, si la conjointe ou le conjoint d'un membre des forces armées s'absente du pays pour une période de plus de cinq ans, est-ce qu'elle ou il fera partie de la catégorie des autres personnes expatriées?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

La loi actuelle prévoit une exception à cette limite de cinq ans pour les personnes à charge des membres des Forces canadiennes qui accompagnent ces derniers à l'étranger. Alors non, les conjointes ou conjoints ne sont pas visés par cette règle des cinq ans.

Si vous me le permettez, j'ajouterais que le projet de loi C-76 améliorera la situation des personnes à charge de membres des Forces canadiennes qui résident avec eux à l'étranger ainsi que celle d'autres civils qui accompagnent les membres des Forces canadiennes à l'étranger. Par exemple, des agents de la GRC pourraient participer à une mission avec les Forces canadiennes, de même que des fonctionnaires d'Affaires mondiales Canada. Ils pourraient eux aussi voter conformément à la section 3 de la partie 11 de la loi. Il est actuellement difficile pour ces personnes de voter en vertu de cette section, parce que certains membres des Forces canadiennes sont affectés dans des régions éloignées. Les services postaux étant plus lents dans ces régions, il leur est parfois difficile d'obtenir leur trousse de vote et de retourner leur bulletin de vote à Élections Canada avant 18 heures le jour du scrutin.

En vertu du projet de loi C-76, Élections Canada et les Forces armées canadiennes ont l'obligation de faire leur part pour que les civils accompagnant des militaires à l'étranger, y compris les personnes à charge, puissent voter plus facilement.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'ai posé cette question au directeur général des élections par intérim. Les électeurs de la côte Ouest sont parfois contrariés de voir que les résultats commencent à être annoncés dès que le vote est terminé ailleurs au pays. Il y a eu des contestations devant la Cour suprême au sujet de la diffusion des résultats pour savoir s'il s'agit là d'un droit des citoyens.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Vous parlez des résultats électoraux?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, des résultats électoraux. Nous parlons du soir de l'élection.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Sur la côte Ouest, nous sommes encore en train de faire de la sollicitation auprès des électeurs. Tous les partis sont dehors en train de faire de la sollicitation. Chez nous, il n'est pas encore 17 heures et nous faisons du porte-à-porte. Les électeurs chez qui nous nous présentons nous disent qu'ils viennent d'entendre aux nouvelles quelle sera l'issue du vote si la tendance se maintient.

Comme vous le dites, nous voulons toujours encourager les gens à aller voter et cette pratique les décourage. Quelqu'un a d'ailleurs dit qu'un électeur de la côte Ouest reçoit de l'information privilégiée par rapport à un électeur de la côte Est. Voilà comment les sièges commencent à être attribués. L'un des piliers de nos lois électorales, c'est qu'aucun électeur ne devrait jamais recevoir plus d'information qu'un autre de manière inhérente.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Très bien.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvons-nous faire quelque chose à cet égard?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il n'y a rien dans ce projet de loi à ce sujet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est vraiment dommage, parce que beaucoup d'électeurs souhaiteraient faire quelque chose pour régler ce problème. N'y a-t-il pas un article dans ce projet de loi portant sur des sujets comme l'information des électeurs que nous pourrions modifier par voie d'amendement? En ce qui concerne la portée et tout le reste, notre capacité d'amender un projet de loi est limitée.

Ayant grandi à Toronto, je n'avais jamais constaté ce problème avant mon déménagement sur la côte Ouest. Je demandais bien de quoi les gens se plaignaient. Après deux ou trois élections, je peux vous dire que c'est très dérangeant. En fait, j'ai l'impression de ne pas participer autant à l'action, simplement parce que mon bon ami Andy et sa famille sont déjà allés voter; les résultats sont déjà communiqués et, qu'ils soient bons ou mauvais pour un parti ou l'autre, ils commencent à influencer les décisions des électeurs de l'autre bout du pays. En revanche, M. Fillmore ou d'autres électeurs, eux, ne sont pas influencés par les résultats partiels, autres que ceux des sondages, qui ne sont pas plus fiables que le sondage.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Ce problème n'a rien de nouveau et il est dû au fait que le Canada s'étend sur six fuseaux horaires, si je ne me trompe.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cinq fuseaux horaires et demi.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Autrefois, les heures de vote étaient les mêmes d'un bout à l'autre du Canada. Il y a quelques années, on les a décalées. C'est vrai, la Loi électorale du Canada comportait auparavant des dispositions qui restreignaient la publication des résultats.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela a été contesté devant les tribunaux.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Ces dispositions ont été contestées devant les tribunaux et le gouvernement de l'époque a demandé au Parlement de les abroger, ce qu'il a fait.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Exact. Certaines dispositions de la loi interdisaient la communication des résultats électoraux sur les ondes publiques, et la Cour suprême a ordonné à CTV et à CBC/Radio-Canada de ne plus les publier. Le Parlement a ensuite adopté une nouvelle loi qui les autorise à le faire.

J'imagine que nous ne faisons que lancer des idées ici. Pourquoi ne pas simplement commencer à communiquer les résultats avec un décalage? Pourquoi ne pas commencer le dépouillement des urnes une heure ou une heure et demie après la fermeture des bureaux?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Élections Canada a tenté par divers moyens de décaler les heures de vote. Il est intéressant de voir que l'utilisation croissante des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation et le nombre d'électeurs qui s'en prévalent permettent de réduire le problème que vous évoquez, n'est-ce pas?

(1750)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans quelle mesure?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Les électeurs qui votent par anticipation en Colombie-Britannique ou à Terre-Neuve déposent leur bulletin en même temps et ont accès à la même information.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exact. Le vote par anticipation est, à mon avis, une excellente solution et nous l'utilisons de plus en plus parce que c'est plus commode pour les électeurs canadiens; il serait ainsi plus facile de retarder la diffusion des résultats parce qu'il y a moins de bulletins à dépouiller le soir de l'élection. C'est ce qu'on nous a dit. Les bénévoles et les travailleurs d'Élections Canada sont âgés et ils ne veulent pas se coucher trop tard.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui.

Je n'ai pas dit qu'ils étaient âgés.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez dit oui. C'est enregistré.

Le président:

Poursuivons.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur le président, j'ai une dernière question à poser.

Ne pourrions-nous pas proposer un amendement à ce projet de loi pour préciser que les résultats ne peuvent être diffusés avant que 30 ou 40 % des bulletins soient déposés et dépouillés? Pensez-vous que nous pourrions amender le projet de pour mettre en oeuvre la solution que je propose?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Allez-y.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Laissons le Comité décider si cet amendement serait recevable et adopté. Cela étant dit, l'un des points soulevés par le directeur général des élections par intérim, et avec lequel toute personne ayant travaillé comme observateur électoral dans le monde serait d'accord, c'est le souci d'intégrité. Quand des autorités électorales retardent la communication des résultats électoraux, cela paraît souvent suspect. C'est pour cette raison que les résultats sont généralement communiqués dès qu'ils sont disponibles.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce n'est pas l'Estonie ici.

Le président:

D'autres députés souhaitent intervenir ici, je vous demanderais donc d'être brefs.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Désolé, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards, puis Mmes Tassi et Vecchio.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je ne me souviens pas qui a posé la question, mais vous avez évoqué tout à l'heure le régime de financement des tiers partis et le fait qu'Élections Canada a le pouvoir de vérifier les contributions reçues durant la période préélectorale. Je le dis dans mes propres mots, naturellement. Qu'est-ce qui pourrait donner lieu à une vérification de ces contributions? Je suppose que vous vérifiez également les dépenses engagées en période préélectorale. Qu'est-ce qui donnerait lieu à une vérification? Quel obstacle pourrait inciter Élections Canada à déclencher une vérification?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il est difficile de se mettre à la place d'Élections Canada. Je sais que vous allez bientôt rencontrer le directeur général des élections par intérim, mais l'un des facteurs, ce pourrait être un soupçon concernant le problème que vous avez décrit, de l'argent provenant de l'étranger utilisé à des fins partisanes.

M. Blake Richards:

Je me demande ce qui pourrait éveiller ce soupçon? Quel pourrait être l'élément déclencheur? La loi ouvre la porte à une vérification, mais si rien ne déclenche cette vérification, on se demande si elle aura lieu un jour et, par conséquent, si cela n'offre pas une échappatoire facile à utiliser. Pouvez-vous me donner des motifs susceptibles d'éveiller suffisamment de soupçons pour justifier une vérification? Est-ce qu'une plainte déposée par un membre du public permettrait de déclencher une enquête?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Un changement drastique de comportement de la part d'un tiers parti pourrait éveiller des soupçons et justifier une demande de vérification ou de reçus.

Mme Manon Paquet:

J'ajoute que les rapports présentés par les tiers partis seront également affichés sur le site Web d'Élections Canada. Si un électeur remarque quelque chose qui lui paraît louche, il lui serait possible de déposer une plainte auprès du commissaire.

M. Blake Richards:

Il est donc possible qu'un citoyen qui constate quelque chose de bizarre puisse attirer l'attention d'Élections Canada sur ce problème et déposer une plainte. Élections Canada serait alors en mesure de déterminer si cela justifie la tenue d'une enquête. Est-ce que la loi le permet?

Mme Manon Paquet:

La plainte serait adressée au commissaire.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, mais la loi le permet-elle?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Il incomberait au commissaire de déterminer si oui ou non il y aura enquête.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Oui, et l'une des dispositions du projet de loi C-76 confère au commissaire le pouvoir de déclencher une enquête.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez parlé du public. Si un membre du public trouve bizarre qu'un tiers parti semble exercer soudainement beaucoup plus d'influence qu'avant, et s'il se demande d'où provient tout cet argent, il peut déposer une plainte auprès du commissaire. Dans sa forme actuelle, la loi autorise-t-elle la tenue d'une enquête et d'une vérification à la suite d'une plainte?

(1755)

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ce n'est pas automatique. Je ne veux pas vous donner l'impression que si quelqu'un dépose une plainte, le commissaire sera tenu d'ouvrir une enquête. Ce n'est pas...

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends qu'il existe une différence entre le dépôt d'une plainte et l'obligation d'ouvrir une enquête. J'irais presque jusqu'à dire qu'il devrait y avoir quelque chose. Néanmoins, à la suite de cette plainte, Élections Canada serait autorisé à déterminer si...

M. Allen Sutherland:

Si les fonctionnaires ont des raisons de croire qu'il y a un problème, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, mais ils ne sont pas obligés par la loi, seulement autorisés à le faire, c'est bien ça?

M. Allen Sutherland:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Tassi, c'est à vous.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vous remercie.

J'ai deux brèves précisions à demander, puis une question distincte. Si j'ai bien compris, la déclaration des expatriés est faite sous serment devant un commissaire. De quel genre de déclaration s'agit-il exactement? Doit-elle être faite sous serment?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Elle est signée par l'électeur. Je vais devoir vérifier la loi. Je vous reviendrai à ce sujet tout de suite après.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il a déjà été question de ce qui est considéré comme de la publicité par un tiers parti. Supposons, par exemple, qu'une organisation appuie la plateforme d'un parti donné et y fait référence, mais sans nécessairement soutenir ce parti. Cette pratique est-elle considérée comme de la publicité?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Sommes-nous d'accord pour dire que « plateforme » peut signifier une politique importante, ce qui fait en sorte que l'enjeu « x » est vraiment important?

Le cas échéant, le tiers parti a affirmé l'importance d'un certain enjeu.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ce n'est pas de la publicité partisane. C'est simplement une affirmation que cet enjeu est important. C'est de la publicité portant sur un enjeu particulier. Les dépenses sont donc couvertes durant la période électorale, mais pas durant la période préélectorale.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Exact. Mais si vous mentionnez cet enjeu politique durant la période électorale et précisez quel parti le défend...

M. Allen Sutherland:

C'est de la publicité partisane. Pour être tout à fait clair, même si, durant la période électorale, vous affirmez que cet enjeu est vraiment important, cette publicité est comprise dans le budget des dépenses du tiers parti.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

En plus de ces deux clarifications, pouvez-vous dire un mot sur les changements apportés dans le projet de loi C-76 pour rendre le vote plus accessible aux électeurs handicapés et à ceux qui vivent dans des régions éloignées?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Dans les régions éloignées, les bureaux de scrutin mobiles sont de plus en plus utilisés, autant le jour du scrutin par anticipation que le jour de l'élection. Pour ce qui est des personnes handicapées, Élections Canada proposera un éventail plus large de mesures de soutien, quel que soit le handicap. Actuellement, le soutien est limité, mais il sera élargi. Le projet de loi prévoit simplement plus de mesures de soutien.

Un autre élément est l'obligation faite aux candidats de tenir compte des besoins des personnes handicapées. Leurs dépenses à cet égard sont remboursées à 99 %.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Captc Jean-François Morin:

Bien entendu, les candidats et les partis bénéficieraient d'une aide financière s'ils produisaient des documents de communication destinés aux personnes ayant un handicap.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Vecchio.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Je vous remercie.

Je suis en train de passer en revue certains de ces documents d'information. L'an dernier, j'ai remarqué... Je ne veux surtout pas pointer du doigt une organisation en particulier, mais quand je regarde le financement des tiers partis, je constate que deux syndicats ont versé 45 000 $.

Pourquoi y a-t-il une incohérence entre ce qu'une entité peut donner à un parti politique et ce qu'elle peut donner à un groupe d'intérêt spécial ou à un tiers parti? Pourquoi les règles sont-elles différentes?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Ce n'est que pure spéculation de ma part, mais je vous fais observer que les partis politiques consacrent toute leur énergie à gagner l'élection et à prendre le pouvoir; les tiers partis ont des intérêts différents.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Je suis justement en train d'examiner un compte de dépenses. Il fait état de deux contributions de 45 000 $. Nous savons que les particuliers ne peuvent donner que 1 500 $ et que les entreprises et tout autre groupe, même les syndicats, ne peuvent faire des dons de cette ampleur aux partis politiques.

Pourquoi y a-t-il deux séries de règles distinctes?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Je peux uniquement parler des partis politiques. L'intention est de plafonner les montants que les particuliers, les entreprises et les syndicats peuvent donner aux partis politiques pour faire en sorte que le système soit équitable et équilibré. Les tiers partis remplissent un rôle différent au sein de la société et, à ce jour, il n'a jamais été question de restreindre leurs sources de financement de la façon que vous décrivez.

(1800)

Mme Karen Vecchio:

D'accord, mais si le but de ces organisations est de jouer un rôle dans l'échiquier politique, quelle est la différence entre elles et un parti? Elles ne présentent pas de candidats, c'est tout.

M. Allen Sutherland:

C'est-à-dire qu'elles n'essaient pas de prendre le pouvoir directement. Le projet de loi C-76 prévoit des restrictions, tant durant la campagne électorale que durant la période préélectorale.

Mme Karen Vecchio:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Une dernière question, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

En fait, j'en ai deux, mais elles portent sur le même sujet.

Vous avez dit tout à l'heure qu'Élections Canada peut promouvoir le vote auprès des — je ne sais pas quel terme employer — des personnes vivant à l'étranger, des électeurs expatriés. De quelle manière exactement? Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples de mesures qui pourraient être prises pour promouvoir le vote auprès de ces électeurs? Comment peut-on savoir qui ils sont et où ils vivent, à moins qu'ils n'aient déjà été inscrits à la liste électorale?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Il faudrait voir comment ils s'acquittent de cette responsabilité. Par exemple, les fonctionnaires d'Élections Canada pourraient envoyer des documents promotionnels aux hauts commissariats, aux ambassades et aux missions à l'étranger. Ce serait une façon de faire. Ils pourraient aussi afficher de l'information sur leur site Web dans le but d'inciter les Canadiens vivant à l'étranger à voter.

M. Blake Richards:

Ma deuxième question porte sur le même sujet. Comment une personne qui n'a jamais vécu au Canada peut-elle déclarer son dernier lieu de résidence au Canada? Il est tout à fait plausible, n'est-ce pas, qu'une personne n'ayant jamais vécu au Canada ait la citoyenneté canadienne et le droit de vote?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Non. En vertu du projet de loi, ils devraient avoir vécu au Canada.

M. Blake Richards:

Ils ne peuvent pas être des citoyens qui n’ont jamais vécu au Canada. Il faudrait qu’ils aient vécu ici à un moment donné et qu’ils aient eu une résidence.

Auraient-ils dû être en âge de voter lorsqu’ils vivaient au Canada?

M. Allen Sutherland:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

Ils auraient pu vivre au Canada en bas âge et, tant qu’ils savaient où se trouvait la résidence où ils vivaient en bas âge, ils auraient pu choisir de continuer à voter, et ce serait ainsi qu’ils se déclareraient.

M. Allen Sutherland:

C’est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord, merci.

Le président:

Oui, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans le même ordre d’idées, cela n’invalide-t-il pas les beaux discours du gouvernement à savoir que son prédécesseur a privé les Canadiens de leur droit de vote alors que les citoyens canadiens seront aussi privés de leur droit de vote, en vertu de cette loi, simplement parce qu’ils n’ont jamais résidé au Canada? Je connais plusieurs personnes qui se trouvent dans cette horrible situation. Des personnes apparemment négligées par un gouvernement qui a exprimé son horreur morale devant le fait qu’on avait laissé pour compte les gens qui ont été absents depuis plus de cinq ans.

Pourriez-vous me dire quelle est la distinction morale entre ces deux catégories de citoyens canadiens et comment elle est appuyée par la Charte des droits? A-t-on soulevé cette question quand le ministère de la Justice a fait l’examen de cette mesure fondé sur la Charte?

Captc Jean-François Morin:

La Loi électorale du Canada prévoit que chaque électeur doit avoir une résidence habituelle, et selon les règles de la résidence habituelle, une personne ne peut pas perdre sa résidence habituelle avant d’en avoir une nouvelle. Par exemple, lorsqu’une personne déménage, sa résidence habituelle déménage avec elle, mais elle doit avoir eu une résidence habituelle au Canada au moins une fois.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord, mais il s’agit d’un Canadien qui a vécu à l’étranger. Lorsque je vivais en Australie, j’étais légalement résident de l’Australie. Les Australiens le pensaient, les Canadiens le pensaient. Les ministères de la fiscalité des deux pays le pensaient certainement. Je vous le dis, Nathan, prenez le temps de le vérifier. Je ne vois pas comment on peut être résident du Canada pour une raison donnée, si on est né au Canada et qu’on y a passé un certain temps, par opposition à quelqu’un d’autre ayant un profil par ailleurs identique qui est né en Australie de parents canadiens.

Cela n’a aucun sens, et je n’arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi cela ne figure pas dans l’examen de la loi du ministère de la Justice et pourquoi les membres du Parti libéral n’en parlaient pas dans leurs discours. Ils n’en finissaient plus de nous parler de ces pauvres Canadiens qui avaient quitté le Canada pendant plus de cinq ans et qui ne sont pas plus citoyens canadiens en vertu de notre Charte des droits que ceux qui sont nés de parents canadiens à l’étranger.

Le président:

Je crois qu’il s’agit d’un bon sujet qu’il faudra débattre davantage.

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant une minute pour permettre aux gens d’obtenir ce dont ils ont besoin, puis nous passerons aux travaux du Comité.



(1815)

Le président:

Nous en sommes aux travaux du Comité. Nous avons eu des discussions productives. Nous accueillons le greffier législatif, Philippe Méla, qui va s’occuper de ce projet de loi. Andrew nous assure qu’il est le meilleur greffier législatif du Parlement. C’est excellent. Nous anticipons d’excellents résultats.

Je rappelle aux membres que les listes préliminaires de témoins doivent être remises avant la fin de la journée demain et les listes définitives avant midi vendredi. Si nous nous déplaçons, le greffier vous parlera de la logistique. Je pense que nous allons ouvrir la discussion sur la façon dont nous allons traiter le reste du projet de loi.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous avons eu des discussions. Je n’entrerai pas dans les détails. Je pense que la chose la plus importante à souligner aujourd’hui est le voyage. Nous devons aller au fond des choses en ce qui concerne les autres éléments sur la liste que nous proposons. Nous pourrons discuter de cette question demain. Au bout du compte, nous aimerions que l’étude article par article ait lieu le 12 pour que ce projet de loi soit renvoyé à la Chambre des communes. En fin de compte, le Comité décidera de l’horaire des témoins. Je sais que l’opposition a exprimé le désir de présenter une liste de témoins et qu’elle pourra le faire demain.

Pour ce qui est des témoins, selon la voie que le Comité choisit, il peut s’agir de deux listes distinctes. Il y aura un groupe de témoins si nous nous déplaçons et un autre groupe tout à fait distinct si nous restons ici à Ottawa.

Nous avons proposé que le Comité parcoure le Canada du 4 au 8 juin 2018 pour autoriser le greffier à organiser des déplacements avec des réunions dans les collectivités des régions suivantes, soit le Canada atlantique, le Québec, l’Ontario, les Prairies et la Colombie-Britannique, mais nous devons circonscrire tout cela. Je suis sûr que les greffiers seraient d’accord, car cela serait beaucoup plus utile. Je crois comprendre que le Comité de liaison se réunira demain et que nous pourrons obtenir un budget, le finaliser et passer à autre chose, en remerciant d’avance les greffiers de nous avoir aidés, compte tenu de l’échéancier.

Nous proposons que le greffier organise au moins une réunion avec les communautés autochtones et que les réunions soient bien réparties entre les collectivités urbaines et rurales. C’est ce que les députés, notamment M. Cullen, nous ont dit quant au voyage. Je vais laisser l’opposition vous donner plus de détails à ce sujet.

(1820)

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Si j’ai bien compris, c’est en fonction des discussions que nous avons eues avant le début de cette réunion. Quant à la proposition de voyage, je conviens qu’il est souhaitable que nous nous entendions sur les déplacements si nous voulons les faire, parce que nous devons donner un peu de temps au greffier pour les organiser, surtout compte tenu des échéanciers serrés. Je crois qu’il serait bon d’entendre M. Cullen à ce sujet, car je sais qu’il est le premier à avoir soulevé l’importance des déplacements. Je suis tout à fait d’accord avec lui; je crois qu’il serait bien pour nous de nous déplacer dans le cadre de notre étude de ce projet de loi.

Cela ressemble, autant que je sache, à ce que M. Cullen a proposé lors de la dernière réunion, bien que ce soit différent de ce qu’il espérait voir au départ, en ce sens qu’il y aura beaucoup moins de déplacements. J’aimerais savoir ce qu’il en pense. Je ne suis pas certain d’avoir compris que nous discuterons des détails du voyage ce soir. Je suis cependant d’accord avec M. Bittle, qui a proposé qu’on reporte la discussion des autres éléments à demain, lorsque nous aurons les listes de témoins des trois partis et que nous aurons une idée de ce à quoi cela ressemblera en pratique.

Si cela peut être utile, je pourrais certainement apporter notre liste de témoins proposés, du moins une liste préliminaire, à la réunion de demain. Je crois avoir vu la liste que propose le gouvernement. À moins qu’il ait l’intention d’ajouter quelque chose, je suis sûr qu’il pourra apporter sa liste demain, sans problème. Je ne sais pas où en est M. Cullen à ce sujet, mais s’il peut s’engager à cet égard, nous pourrions avoir une discussion pendant l’heure que nous avons pour les travaux du Comité demain, après quoi nous pourrions nous pencher sur les autres éléments. Étant donné le temps dont nous disposons maintenant, je dirais que nous devrions essayer de régler la question des déplacements. Cela permettrait à notre greffier d’amorcer le processus dès que possible, parce que ce sera une entreprise très difficile dans le court laps de temps que nous avons.

Voilà ce que je pense.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, avez-vous des idées?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, Chris, pour vos commentaires.

Permettez-moi de dire très brièvement que je ne blâme personne autour de cette table pour la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons. De toute évidence, du côté du gouvernement, je ne pense pas que l’un ou l’autre des membres du Comité ait choisi le moment pour étudier ce projet de loi — certainement pas vous, monsieur le président et certainement pas l’opposition. Pourtant, je me sens obligé de soulever une objection semblable parce que je n’aime pas certaines des règles qui existent quant à la réforme électorale. Le projet de loi C-76 répond à certaines des questions dont nous avons parlé ouvertement, comme le recours à un répondant et ainsi de suite.

À titre de parlementaire, je me sens aussi responsable de faire en sorte que le projet de loi C-76 soit amendé, rejeté, quelles que soient ces options, tout simplement parce que, d’après mon expérience, précipiter l’adoption d’un projet de loi, en particulier d’un projet de loi omnibus, entraînera inévitablement des erreurs. La question est de savoir à quel point ces erreurs sont graves, et on s’en rend compte trop tard. Élections Canada tente de gérer l’expérience des électeurs lors des élections et cela ne fonctionne pas comme on nous l’a dit et comme nous l’espérions. Je me sens un peu coincé.

Je vais commencer par la liste des témoins et revenir à la proposition de voyage. M. Christopherson est de retour et il s’implique de nouveau. Il vient de me remettre une liste de témoins et elle est, en effet, exhaustive et épuisante à examiner. Nous allons passer la soirée à en réduire le nombre, car j’ai quelques idées. Je m’inspirais un peu de mon expérience avec le comité sur la réforme électorale. Au cours de ces longs mois d’étude, nous avons trouvé des témoins qui ne viennent pas immédiatement à l’esprit et qui, à mon avis, seraient très utiles à notre examen.

J’apprécie les efforts déployés quant aux déplacements et au libellé de la motion. Comme nous le savons, l’expérience du vote en milieux urbain et rural est différente, et les peuples des Premières Nations en particulier vivent une expérience différente.

La proposition initiale de voyage est logique. J’espère que nous parlerons aujourd’hui de l’horaire des journées, parce que les choses se passent différemment d’un comité à l’autre lorsqu’ils se déplacent. Nous avions soulevé la possibilité de parler aux jeunes Canadiens lors de notre voyage. Nous avions soulevé la possibilité d’avoir... Lorsque nous allons dans les villes comme Halifax ou Toronto, nous entendons uniquement des experts, des soi-disant experts, des gens qui sont touchés par les questions que nous examinons. Toutefois, nous n’avons pas accès aux Canadiens moyens qui n’ont pas de doctorat. Je crois que cela nous appauvrit. Je préconiserais une version réduite d’une journée portes ouvertes, si nous nous rendons à certains endroits en soirée. Par la suite, dans la journée, nous céderions la place aux experts qui ont beaucoup d’opinions à ce sujet.

Quant aux autres réunions, je reste très ouvert à ce que nous faisons en ce moment. Je sais qu’il est parfois désagréable et difficile de fixer un itinéraire en raison des séances prolongées, simplement parce qu’on nous a confié une mission sisyphéene et que nous devons tout faire pour assurer son succès.

À part cela, ma seule autre réserve, que j’ai exprimée à Andy tout à l’heure, est la proposition de faire l’étude article par article en une seule journée. Nous avons une objection philosophique à la coutume voulant que, s’il y a plus de 80 amendements, tout d’un coup, nous devions suivre un horaire serré, ce qui nous ramène à cinq minutes par parti par article, je crois. J’ai vu des députés des deux côtés, du gouvernement et de l’opposition, brutaliser des projets de loi parce qu’il fallait les faire adopter avant la fin des travaux et durant les séances du soir. Les membres du Comité ne sont pas vraiment... Je pense qu’on cesse de faire notre travail à un moment donné. Cela m’inquiète de voir une journée consacrée à l’étude article par article d’un projet de loi qui compte 250 pages bien étoffées. C’est beaucoup.

Enfin, le gouvernement nous donne des chiffres différents, mais 85 % du projet de loi a fait l’objet d’une étude préalable ou provient d’Élections Canada. C’est très bien. Les pourcentages sont acceptables sur le plan des relations publiques ou des médias, mais je ne veux pas laisser entendre que, simplement parce que 85 % du projet de loi a été examiné, l’autre 15 % se fera rapidement. Il se pourrait que cela ne représente pas 15 % de l’effort en raison des choses que le gouvernement a ajoutées à ce projet de loi en plus de ce qui était dans la mesure précédente. Il ne s’agit pas de choses simples ou évidentes. Il est question de la liberté d’expression et de certaines choses qui peuvent être compliquées. Je n’ai pas d’opinion préalable sur le déroulement de ce processus.

Cela dit, je pense que le voyage fonctionnera, même s’il sera court. Il serait bien de réexaminer l’étude article par article, et nous devrions parler des horaires et des détails du voyage. À quoi ressemblera une journée à Halifax ou à Toronto? Cela m’aidera à me faire une idée quant à ce voyage.

(1825)

Le président:

Le gouvernement a-t-il des commentaires?

M. Chris Bittle:

Je ne sais pas si nous pouvons demander au greffier quelles sont les conditions des jours de voyage. La logistique est la seule chose qui me préoccupe dans la proposition de M. Cullen. Si nous tenons des audiences publiques de 10 heures à n’importe quelle heure, avec des séances à micro ouvert le soir et que le Comité doit se déplacer le lendemain, cela pourrait être difficile sur le plan logistique.

Le président:

Je vais donner la parole à M. Reid, puis je céderai la parole au greffier pour parler de logistique.

M. Scott Reid:

Je voulais simplement ajouter que, si nous envisageons un voyage qui dure essentiellement cinq jours, comme l’a suggéré M. Cullen, les départs se feront le dimanche en destination de la première ville. Par ailleurs, nous serons dans différentes villes les lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi et vendredi. Le samedi, il nous incombera de nous rendre chez nous ou à Ottawa.

Si c’est le cas, je crois que nous devrions convenir que nous nous écartons de la pratique habituelle qui consiste à nous rendre dans les capitales provinciales. Dans certains cas, c’est excellent. Toronto est bien, je crois. Victoria est moins bien que Vancouver, compte tenu des vols.

Pour ce qui est de rencontrer les jeunes, une façon évidente de le faire est de tenir une ou plusieurs réunions sur un campus universitaire. Je sais que l’année scolaire est terminée, mais j’ai suivi de nombreux cours d’été en mai et en juin. Nous sommes en plein milieu de ces cours d’été, alors il y aura des gens là-bas. Ce n’est pas parfait, mais rien, compte tenu de notre horaire, ne sera parfait, et ce scénario permet au moins de faire un peu cela.

(1830)

Le président:

Je vais demander au greffier de vous parler de la logistique de l’organisation des déplacements.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Les membres du Comité ont souligné, à juste titre, qu’il reste très peu de temps d’ici le début du voyage proposé. J’aimerais simplement ajouter que si le Comité décide ce soir de voyager et qu’il souhaite voir un budget, nous pourrions en préparer un à temps pour la réunion de demain, mais nous aurions besoin de plus de détails sur les villes que le Comité entend visiter. Pour ce qui est des communautés autochtones, le Comité pourrait peut-être en préciser une et peut-être offrir quelques idées sur la façon d’équilibrer les régions rurales et urbaines, compte tenu des villes que le Comité désire visiter.

Si le Comité adopte ce budget demain et que le SBLI l’approuve ensuite, disons demain après-midi, nous n’aurons probablement pas l’autorisation de la Chambre avant mercredi. Cela ne nous laisse que deux ou trois jours ouvrables pour organiser ces réunions, ce qui sera un défi. Nous avons une équipe formidable qui est prête à mettre tout cela en place; cependant, il y a des choses qui échapperont à notre contrôle, comme les vols, la disponibilité des hôtels et la disponibilité des salles de réunion dans certaines villes. Il y aura très peu de souplesse et très peu de temps pour réagir si nous avons des problèmes de logistique.

J’ai une deuxième préoccupation: nous n’avons pas encore de liste de témoins pour ces villes, ni pour les villes qui seront proposées. Il pourrait donc être difficile de trouver des témoins qui sont disponibles et qui seront adéquatement préparés pour comparaître devant le Comité dans ces diverses villes. Si le Comité souhaite voyager, j’espère que nous pourrons obtenir ces noms le plus rapidement possible afin que nous puissions communiquer avec ces personnes et nous assurer qu’elles seront disponibles. Ma crainte, c’est que nous nous mettions à la tâche, que nous organisions les réunions, que nous nous déplacions et que nous n’entendions pas tous les témoins que le Comité souhaite entendre à ces endroits.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président. C’était très utile. J’imagine que si les gens voulaient penser à la logistique, à la journée de voyage normale... Mon point de référence est le Comité sur la réforme électorale; nous avions tendance à voyager le matin, sauf le premier jour, où nous étions sur les lieux. En règle générale, les témoins experts comparaissaient à partir de 13 heures ou à midi, parce que nous arrivions en ville, nous arrivions à l’hôtel vers 10 ou 11 heures. Les experts témoignaient pendant deux ou quatre heures, selon la ville où nous étions. Par la suite, nos travaux étaient plus ouverts, ce qui nous ramène à votre argument selon lequel il n’est pas nécessaire de remplir une journée entière, parce que nous diffusons un communiqué et les médias sociaux semblent fonctionner assez bien pour informer les gens qu’un nouveau projet de loi électorale est à l’ordre du jour et que nous sommes en ville. La soirée était libre, et le lendemain matin, on se réveillait et on recommençait. Le comité voyageait le matin, il arrivait au prochain endroit et le même processus recommençait.

Je vais vous donner quelques exemples, car c’est ce que vous avez demandé. Il s’agit en partie de la logistique des voyages à travers le pays. C’est peut-être plus amusant d’aller à Charlottetown, mais il est beaucoup plus difficile d’y entrer et d’y sortir qu’à Halifax. Halifax est la plaque tournante régionale. C’est là que les vols vont et viennent et il y a des vols de correspondance jusqu’à Montréal. C’est ma deuxième suggestion, Montréal ou Québec, probablement Montréal. Je pense que Scott a raison de dire que Toronto est la capitale. Nous avons un certain nombre de témoins et je pense que les libéraux, qui sont basés à Toronto, en ont aussi, alors cela aide à répondre à votre deuxième question.

M. Mark Gerretsen (Kingston et les Îles, Lib.):

Je proposerais Kingston.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cette période de l’année est magnifique.

M. Scott Reid:

[Inaudible] un aéroport important qui avait des liaisons directes avec Halifax et Montréal, ce serait formidable. C’est peut-être un projet sur lequel nous pourrions travailler.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous devrons y travailler d’ici la semaine prochaine.

Quant aux Prairies, cela pourrait répondre à la question des régions rurales. Si vous atterrissez à Winnipeg ou à Regina ou à Saskatoon, vous pouvez vous rendre assez rapidement dans une région rurale. D’après mon expérience, les gens étaient très heureux que nous sortions de la ville pour aller les rencontrer. Nous nous sommes rendus à Leduc lors de notre dernier voyage à Edmonton. Ce n’est pas vraiment rural. C’est à Leduc que se trouvait l’aéroport. Nous avons triché. Pour ce qui est de la Colombie-Britannique, on a proposé Vancouver, et je suis d’accord. Il y a un certain nombre de communautés des Premières Nations très actives et dynamiques, que ce soit à l’intérieur des limites de la ville ou tout près des limites, mais ce sont leurs propres communautés. Comme par hasard, ils sont à Vancouver, alors ce pourrait être une façon de... et je suis d’accord, Victoria ajoute un saut logistique qui rendrait les choses difficiles, surtout si on sort des Prairies pour s’y rendre.

C’est tout ce que je voulais dire.

(1835)

Le président:

Nous allons entendre M. Reid, puis M. Bittle.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais d’abord vous laisser la parole à M. Bittle, parce que j’ai oublié ce que je voulais dire. Ma mémoire sera peut-être rafraîchie par une intervention qui sera sans doute très perspicace.

M. Chris Bittle:

L’idée d’aller dans l’Est de l’Ontario vous a tellement inspiré...

M. Scott Reid:

Nous sommes en fait dans l’Est de l’Ontario en ce moment même.

M. Chris Bittle:

Eh bien, plus près de chez vous.

Quoi qu’il en soit, pour vous aider à surmonter les difficultés logistiques, si nous avons des problèmes à trouver des témoins à Montréal ou à Québec, par exemple, nous pourrions simplement transformer la réunion en assemblée publique et entendre des témoignages. Il n’est pas nécessaire que ce soit aussi officiel qu’une audience publique comme celle-ci. Cette option pourrait être utile quant aux voyages à travers le pays; elle faciliterait notre planification et nous devrions en tenir compte.

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Puis-je faire un commentaire à ce sujet?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Merci, monsieur le président. Normalement, j’essaie de ne pas parler, mais je veux simplement apporter un peu plus de précisions.

Les médias sociaux fonctionneraient dans ce cas. Il est beaucoup plus simple de remplir une salle au moyen des médias sociaux que de recevoir 10 personnes dans une petite salle par le biais d’invitations officielles pour ensuite travailler et comparer les calendriers et trouver les créneaux disponibles et ainsi de suite. Je me demande si le greffier peut nous dire s’il est plus facile de planifier des séances de discussion que des audiences publiques. Ensuite, je suppose que s’il y avait un fervent désir d’entendre des témoignages aux fins du compte rendu, nous pourrions peut-être prendre une de ces journées et demander aux témoins de communiquer par téléconférence avec les membres du Comité, ici à Ottawa, afin de consigner certains témoignages au compte rendu.

Voilà d’autres idées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous avons eu des journées combinées. Lors des travaux du Comité sur la réforme électorale, nous nous rendions à des endroits où il se trouvait peu d’experts, parce que nous n’avions qu’une heure et les gens se présentaient. Ensuite, nous laissions le micro ouvert et les gens venaient parler pour deux minutes chacun; cela faisait partie des témoignages sur la réforme électorale.

Je ne crois pas qu’on pourrait entendre des témoignages d’experts pendant quatre ou six heures à Saskatoon... Ce serait possible, mais il faudrait vraiment faire des pieds et des mains.

Le président:

Pour certains des habitants des régions rurales, disons que vous êtes à Saskatoon ou à Calgary, pouvez-vous inviter des gens des régions rurales en particulier à cette réunion plutôt que...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je pense que nous devrions faire preuve de créativité à cet égard. Nous devrions même parler à des gens qui ont été des travailleurs électoraux, qui ont dirigé des bureaux de scrutin en milieu rural au cours des 30 dernières années. On pourra leur demander comment les changements que propose le gouvernement fonctionneront dans le monde réel? On peut parler à beaucoup de professeurs et ce sont tous des gens merveilleux, mais...

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, j’aurais des inquiétudes quant à la question rurale si nous atterrissions simplement dans un endroit comme Regina pour ensuite nous rendre à l’extérieur en voiture. Cela ressemble peut-être à la situation de Leduc, mais les banlieues sont différentes à bien des égards. Si nous commençons à parler de l’impact des cartes d’information de l’électeur en milieu rural... Dans ma circonscription, il y a environ 130 villages et le plus grand compte seulement 1 300 habitants. Je ne dis pas qu’il s’agit de toute ma circonscription, ne vous méprenez pas. Je suis sûr que les Chevaliers de Colomb seront disponibles, mais quoi qu’il en soit, je pense que nous devrions peut-être, si nous allons à Regina ou juste à l’extérieur de Regina, chercher à faire venir quelqu’un d’un endroit plus éloigné pour avoir cette représentation rurale. Je ne crois pas que nous puissions nous rendre dans une région vraiment rurale compte tenu du délai, mais on pourrait certainement faire venir des gens de l’extérieur. Ce serait une bonne chose pour notre comité de se rendre à Toronto, ou même quelque part dans la région que M. Shipley représente. Il serait formidable de convoquer ces gens à un endroit central.

Le président:

Il est certainement moins coûteux de faire venir quatre personnes d’une collectivité rurale dans une grande ville que de faire voyager tout notre comité et tout l’équipement qui l’accompagne.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si vous atterrissez à Winnipeg et que vous allez à Portage... Je vous dis simplement ce que nous avons fait dans le passé. Je comprends ce que dit Scott, mais en réalité, nous avons simplement sauté dans un autobus et nous sommes arrivés en une heure. Parfois, si on prend l’avion pour aller à Toronto et qu’on prend l’autobus de l’aéroport jusqu’à l’endroit où se tient la réunion, cela prendra une heure et demie. On est maintenant à Portage, que les gens perçoivent comme étant relativement rurale...

(1840)

M. Scott Reid:

Je sais où Scott veut en venir. Il y a vraiment une distinction. Je prends l’exemple de ma circonscription parce que je la connais mieux. Les gens qui vivent juste à l’extérieur de Carleton Place, dans l’est de ma circonscription, se rendent au travail à Kanata le jour pour revenir à la maison en moins d’une heure. Mais les choses sont plus compliquées à une demi-heure à l’ouest de cet endroit, à Perth, où j’habite. Je dois parfois rester à Ottawa. La fin de semaine dernière, il m’a fallu faire une heure de route de plus pour me rendre à un événement dans l’ouest de ma circonscription.

De plus, il n’y a pas de services locaux là-bas et il est très difficile de trouver un édifice public où on peut installer un bureau de scrutin. Il n’y aura pas de vote par anticipation, si Élections Canada ne peut pas utiliser un édifice, parce qu’il n’est pas accessible aux personnes handicapées. C’est le genre de problème qu’on rencontrera seulement à ces endroits. Par ailleurs, comment pourrons-nous tenir une réunion là-bas et réunir suffisamment de gens pour entendre ce qu’ils ont à dire? J’ignore comment faire la quadrature de ce cercle. Je sais seulement que Scott soulève un problème auquel nous n’avons pas encore de solution.

Le président:

Sauf pour faire venir les gens...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, ou peut-être identifier les personnes qui ont soulevé des questions comme celle-ci et à qui on pourrait demander de nous téléphoner ou quelque chose du genre. Oui, c’est peut-être la réponse.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le moment est peut-être bien choisi pour poser la question au greffier. Pour ce qui est de Halifax, Montréal, Toronto, Winnipeg ou les environs, et Vancouver, est-ce quelque chose qui peut être intégré à l’échéancier proposé?

Le greffier:

Si c’est ce que souhaite le Comité, nous veillerons à ce que cela fonctionne. Nous allons organiser le tout...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voilà comment il faut réagir.

Le greffier:

... mais je ne peux pas garantir que nous n’aurons pas de problèmes en cours de route.

M. Chris Bittle:

Si vous me le permettez, puisque c’est quelque chose qui doit être fait et que nous devons aller de l’avant, y a-t-il...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Lorsque les membres du Comité commenceront à examiner leurs listes de témoins, ils verront que nous en avons peu en provenance de Vancouver — cela pourrait être une autre façon de prévoir les créneaux horaires pour nos témoins. Si nous planifions une réunion à Halifax et que les choses changent et que nous espérons entendre au moins quelques-uns des témoins que chaque parti propose, nous pourrons procéder ainsi. Nous n’avons qu’à demander aux gens d’Halifax le nom des meilleurs candidats pour discuter de ces choses.

Le président:

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

J’ai deux ou trois choses à dire.

La première concerne les collectivités rurales. Je crois vraiment que la première proposition de Nathan, peu importe où nous irons — et j’y reviendrai dans un instant — que ce soit à Regina, à Winnipeg, à Calgary ou ailleurs, on peut y atterrir et se rendre à un endroit relativement rural à une heure de route.

Je crois vraiment que nos travaux devraient tenir compte de la dimension rurale. À mon avis, il sera plus facile d’atteindre cet objectif en visitant les collectivités rurales qu’en invitant quelques personnes d’une région rurale à venir en ville. Cela s’explique en partie par le fait que, si nous organisons un plus grand nombre de séances de discussion, en invitant un certain nombre de témoins, l’intervention des gens sera noyée par les autres sujets qui seront soulevés. À tout le moins, je crois que nous devrions réellement envisager de faire escale dans l’une de ces collectivités rurales.

L’autre chose que je dirais — je pense que cela faciliterait un peu le travail du greffier — à part le fait que nous allons décider que ce sera un endroit près de Winnipeg ou de Regina... Nous parlons de trois provinces — le Manitoba, la Saskatchewan et l’Alberta — et nous allons sauter deux d’entre elles, ce qui est malheureux, mais il s’agit apparemment de la décision que nous allons prendre. Pour faciliter la tâche du greffier sur le plan logistique, pourquoi ne pas dire que nous serions à l’aise de prendre l’avion pour les grandes villes de ces trois provinces? Selon l’horaire des vols — pour nous rendre de Toronto à Vancouver, où nous prendrons l’avion par la suite — sur le plan logistique, cela lui donne plus de possibilités quant à l’horaire des vols et tout le reste. Cela lui donne une certaine marge de manoeuvre et facilite un peu les choses.

La tâche lui sera déjà très difficile. J’aimerais lui faciliter les choses le plus possible.

Franchement, nous pouvons recueillir ce point de vue dans n’importe lequel de ces trois, quatre ou cinq endroits, peu importe le nombre de villes où nous atterrirons. Je crois que Regina, Winnipeg et Calgary seraient certainement de bons endroits et probablement Edmonton aussi et peut-être Saskatoon, je l’ignore. Quoi qu’il en soit, je crois que nous devrions lui donner la souplesse nécessaire pour régler la question sur le plan logistique. Nous pourrions alors envisager une collectivité qui aurait une salle pouvant accueillir les kiosques d’interprétation et tout le reste. Une collectivité qui se trouve à une heure de l’un de ces endroits. Certains d’entre nous qui venons de ces régions... Je connais assez bien l’Alberta et, dans une certaine mesure, la Saskatchewan. Je suis sûr que les autres membres connaissent certains de ces endroits. Vous pourriez vous inspirer de cela pour trouver des suggestions quant aux collectivités que nous pourrions visiter.

(1845)

Le président:

Sommes-nous d’accord pour visiter Halifax, Montréal, Toronto, Vancouver et l’une des villes de — c’est au greffier de décider des voyages, des vols et tout le reste — Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Saskatoon ou Winnipeg, en fonction de ce qui est disponible?

Avez-vous dit que nous devons visiter une collectivité rurale dans chaque province... ou dans seulement une province?

M. Nathan Cullen:

À mon avis, il n’y en aurait qu’une.

Le président:

Ce sera assez facile.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tout cela est tellement serré.

Il faut trouver un endroit rural typique qui soit près de l’aéroport, où nous pourrons en fait nous rendre.

Le président:

Je crois que nous pourrons facilement nous rendre dans une collectivité rurale.

Un député: Portage n’est pas si rural.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voyons donc, elle a une population de 10 000.

M. Blake Richards:

Au lieu de dire que nous devons nous rendre à Portage... parce que maintenant nous revenons à la situation où nous rendons les choses plus difficiles sur le plan logistique.

Nous autorisons le greffier à trouver les horaires de vol qui fonctionnent le mieux. Lorsque nous aurons choisi les villes où nous nous rendrons, je suis certain que les gens pourront nous aider, au besoin. Comme je l’ai mentionné, je peux certainement vous aider pour ce qui est de l’Alberta et, dans une certaine mesure, de la Saskatchewan. J’ai un employé originaire du Manitoba qui peut m’aider à choisir une collectivité. Je suis sûr que d’autres peuvent faire de même. Laissons-les d’abord choisir une ville où l’avion pourra atterrir, et nous pourrons trouver une solution par la suite.

Le président:

D’accord. Nous avons donc cinq villes et une collectivité rurale. Nous allons commencer dès lundi matin. Nous allons obtenir...

M. Andy Fillmore:

Nous disposons de cinq jours pour nos travaux, alors je crois qu’il nous faut quatre villes et une collectivité rurale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Halifax, Montréal, Toronto...

Le président:

Le greffier est d’avis que, parmi ces cinq villes des Prairies, une serait la collectivité rurale et nous ne nous réunirions pas en ville.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est ce qui est proposé.

Le président:

Toronto, Montréal, Halifax, Vancouver et une collectivité rurale des Prairies que le président trouvera et qui pourront fonctionner sur le plan logistique.

Cela vous donne-t-il suffisamment de renseignements pour dresser un budget?

Le greffier:

Une dernière chose, il serait peut-être utile de donner une certaine marge de manoeuvre au président. Si nous constatons, d’ici à demain, que Halifax pose un problème, ou si nous avons de la difficulté à trouver des chambres d’hôtel, le président pourrait s’écarter de ce plan et rediriger le Comité vers Moncton ou Saint John.

M. Blake Richards:

L’autre option, ne serait-ce qu’en raison de la logistique des vols, serait de visiter une collectivité rurale en Nouvelle-Écosse aussi. Nous pourrions ainsi visiter deux collectivités rurales, si cela devient un problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Une autre possibilité qui pourrait être plus sensée serait de visiter une collectivité rurale près d’Ottawa. Nous n’aurions pas besoin de prendre l’avion et il y a un certain nombre de très belles collectivités rurales à proximité, dont celle où j’habite.

Je dis cela non seulement pour faire la promotion de ma circonscription, mais aussi pour faire valoir que cela pourrait régler le problème logistique.

Le président:

Ou la circonscription de David Graham...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, elle n’est pas si proche, mais vous avez raison. C’est certainement une région rurale.

Le président:

Nathan, quelle est la Première Nation qui se trouve juste au bout de la baie, en route vers Whistler à partir de Vancouver?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il s’agit de la Première Nation Squamish.

Le président:

Serait-ce une bonne idée de les inviter à la réunion de Vancouver?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, les Squamish y voyagent tout le temps. Vous avez des Premières Nations très fortes, les Musqueam et les Tsleil-Waututh, sur la rive nord, à une distance d’un voyage en taxi de Vancouver.

Le président:

Voulez-vous remettre une liste au greffier?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je vais la transmettre au greffier, ou comme vous voudrez.

Le président:

Nous inviterons des représentants de la Première Nation à la séance de Vancouver.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Sur le plan de la distance, ce serait probablement l’une des plus proches. Quant à la cohérence politique, nul doute que ces nations comptent parmi les plus fortes de la côte Ouest.

(1850)

M. Andy Fillmore:

Nous devons être en mesure de présenter un budget au Sous-comité des budgets de comités du Comité de liaison demain.

Le greffier:

J’ai l’intention de préparer un budget à temps pour la réunion du comité de la procédure de demain, en tenant compte de ce qui se dit ce soir.

Ma question se rapporte à ce que M. Cullen a demandé au début: à quoi ressemble une journée pour le Comité? S’agit-il d’une séance publique, de ce style, avec des témoins? Est-ce une séance à micros ouverts ou les deux?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il faudrait que ce soit un certain agencement, en fait.

Si vous êtes dans un endroit comme Toronto, vous aurez beaucoup d'expertise sur laquelle vous pourrez vous appuyer; peut-être qu'ailleurs, ce serait moins le cas. Je pense qu'il faudrait une certaine souplesse pour offrir les deux formules et que le Comité en tirerait profit.

Si nous tenons une séance de cinq jours et que nous n'entendons que des intervenants travaillant dans une université, c'est bien, mais le tableau n'est pas tout à fait complet en ce qui concerne nos lois électorales.

Le président:

Qu'avons-nous fait pour les jeunes dans ce plan?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il semble que nous n'ayons pas abordé la question, mais l'idée de tenir une séance sur un campus est intéressante.

M. Scott Simms:

À l'Université Queen's, ce serait bien.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est trop dispendieux.

Le président:

Andy.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Merci.

L'avantage avec les assemblées publiques, c'est que les invitations sur les médias sociaux portent des fruits. Nous entrons dans un de mes domaines d'expertise dans une vie antérieure, celui de la planification de la participation du public. Ce qui est bien également, c'est que les témoins se transforment en invités. Si nous voulons entendre précisément les invités de cette façon, nous pourrions peut-être, s’ils sont d’accord, leur demander de faire partie d’un groupe de témoins à l’avant de la salle.

Ce sont toujours des activités de planification accélérées. Manifestement, plus la marge de manoeuvre est grande, plus cela peut se faire rapidement. Nous pourrions aussi amener les jeunes à participer de cette façon, par les assemblées publiques.

Je pense que nous sommes sur la bonne voie en donnant au greffier suffisamment de souplesse pour trouver une formule qui pourrait fonctionner.

Le président:

Je suppose que si nous prenons l’avion le matin, nous pourrions avoir une réunion en après-midi dans une université et une assemblée publique en soirée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous prenez une pause d’une heure pour dîner, vous vous déplacez et ensuite... Habituellement, si vous faites une activité publique, la participation est bien plus forte après 18 ou 19 heures qu’à 17 heures ou dans la journée.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

En ce qui concerne la souplesse, nous devrions tout mettre en oeuvre pour en intégrer le plus possible plutôt que de la prescrire, car cela ne fonctionnera peut-être pas de la même façon pour chacun.

Idéalement, c’est peut-être ce que nous voulons, mais il se peut que, pour les déplacements — pour aller du point A au point B —, il ne puisse y avoir qu’une réunion publique prévue ou une assemblée publique, peu importe.

Je recommanderais de prévoir le plus de souplesse possible.

Le président:

Avez-vous suffisamment de matière pour établir un budget?

Le greffier:

Oui, je le pense.

Le président:

Les représentants d'Élections Canada attendent. Nous devrions passer à ce point.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant une minute, le temps qu'ils s'installent.



(1855)

Le président:

Bonsoir et bienvenue à la 106e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs. Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir des représentants d’Élections Canada. Voici donc de nouveau aujourd'hui M. Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections par intérim, M. Michel Roussel, sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovation et Mme Anne Lawson, avocate générale et directrice principale, Services juridiques.

Merci à tous d'être ici.

J’ai oublié de le demander, mais le greffier devra savoir qui va voyager avec le Comité. Le Comité de liaison a une limite de sept personnes. Dès que les partis le sauront, pouvez-vous en informer le greffier?

M. Scott Reid:

On pourrait m'expliquer? De quoi parle-t-on alors? Je m’inquiète seulement pour les conservateurs.

Le président:

D'accord.

Le greffier:

Ce serait normalement quatre libéraux, deux conservateurs et un néo-démocrate.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord, il s'agit de deux conservateurs. C’est ce que nous devions savoir. C’est tout ce que nous avons à gérer.

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous rappelle que demain matin, nous aurons notre séance d’information avec les députés indépendants, avec le sous-comité et que la deuxième heure sera consacrée aux travaux du Comité et à la discussion de la motion de M. Richards.

Le directeur général des élections a comparu devant nous dernièrement et certains des points abordés portaient sur ce projet de loi. Il ne va pas les répéter. Il en a distribué des copies. Il va parler de leurs recommandations à l'égard de ce projet de loi et se concentrer sur celles-ci. Ce dont il parle est différent de ce qui figure dans les documents distribués et dont ceux qui étaient ici à la réunion précédente ont entendu parler.

Monsieur Perrault, c'est un plaisir de vous revoir.

Madame Lawson, il semble que vous siégez au Comité cette année.

(1900)

M. Stéphane Perrault (directeur général des élections par intérim, Élections Canada):

Merci.

Le président:

Le greffier veut savoir si nous sommes d’accord pour annexer ses observations aux témoignages afin de les y intégrer. Je suis sûr que ça va.

Des députés: D'accord.

[Voir l’annexe Allocution de Stéphane Perrault]

Le président: Monsieur Perrault. [Français]

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux d'être de retour devant le Comité. C'est là une approche un peu inhabituelle, mais je ne voulais pas répéter les choses que j'ai dites mardi. Elles sont maintenant notées au dossier par l'entremise de mes remarques. Quant aux choses que je n'ai pas dites mardi, j'en traite plus directement dans le tableau des modifications que je propose pour améliorer le projet de loi. Cela permettra de vous laisser plus temps pour poser des questions.

Je voudrais commencer par souligner mon appui au projet de loi. À mes yeux, il s'agit d'un important projet de loi qui permet de moderniser de façon considérable la Loi électorale du Canada, en plus d'en améliorer l'intégrité. Ce projet de loi qui comprend aussi quelque 100 recommandations des 132 qui avaient été faites par Élections Canada. Ce n'est donc pas une surprise que, de façon générale, nous soyons d'accord sur le projet de loi.

Comme je l'ai indiqué, j'aimerais soulever quelques enjeux précis. Ils font partie du tableau dont je vais parler dans quelques instants.

De façon générale, à mon avis, les deux enjeux qui méritent un examen un peu plus approfondi par le Comité sont ceux qui sont relatifs à la vie privée, dont nous avons déjà parlé la semaine dernière, et ceux qui sont relatifs aux règles qui gouvernent les tiers. [Traduction]

Le président:

Tout le monde autour de cette table devrait avoir ce qui vient d’être distribué. C’est ce dont il parle: des modifications proposées à la loi par Élections Canada.

Désolé, allez-y.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ça va.

Je le répète, les questions de la protection des renseignements personnels et des tierces parties méritent, à mon avis, d’être examinées plus à fond par le Comité.

Avant d'entrer dans le vif du sujet, j'aimerais dire quelques mots sur les règles régissant les tierces parties.

Dans l’ensemble, les propositions contenues dans le projet de loi C-76 améliorent sensiblement les règles régissant les tierces parties. Elles en élargissent la portée pour englober non seulement les activités de publicité, mais aussi diverses activités partisanes. La portée est élargie. Elles prévoient également des règles qui s'appliquent non seulement pendant la période électorale, mais aussi pendant la période préélectorale. Il y a certaines mesures concernant le financement étranger.

Je tiens à souligner qu’il y a un certain déséquilibre entre les règles qui s’appliquent aux tiers et celles qui s'appliquent aux partis avant le déclenchement des élections. Les partis ne seraient limités que dans leurs dépenses de publicité. Les tierces parties seraient limitées dans toutes leurs activités partisanes. Elles devraient déposer jusqu’à deux rapports préélectoraux, et les partis n’ont pas à le faire. Je ne fais que le souligner. Je n’ai pas de recommandations à ce sujet, mais je voulais attirer l’attention du Comité sur ce point pour que vous en teniez compte lorsque vous examinerez le fardeau réglementaire global imposé aux tierces parties.

Il y a certes des règles importantes concernant le financement étranger, mais j'estime qu'il y a une ouverture résiduelle à l'égard du financement étranger par l'entremise des tierces parties. Il y a des façons de régler ce problème. Je vais faire une recommandation particulière à ce sujet.

Je n’ai pas fait de recommandation sur les règles de contribution aux tiers. Je pense que c’est un domaine où il y a toute une gamme d’options. Il faut équilibrer les considérations liées à la Charte des droits. Il faut examiner l’ensemble du fardeau réglementaire. Je suis tout à fait disposé à discuter de ces sujets avec le Comité, mais je n’ai pas fait de recommandation précise.

Si vous regardez les questions sur la table, je vais les aborder dans l'ordre dans lequel elles apparaissent.

La première est une question précise, mais importante. Il y a maintenant dans ce projet de loi une déclaration solennelle pour les électeurs. Dans certaines circonstances, les électeurs seraient tenus de dire qu’ils ont 18 ans ou qu’ils en auront 18 le jour du scrutin. C’est tout à fait normal. Cependant, ils sont aussi tenus de dire qu’ils sont citoyens ou qu’ils seront citoyens le jour du scrutin. C’est une chose sur laquelle ils ne peuvent pas faire de déclaration. Ils ne savent pas s’ils deviendront citoyens le jour du scrutin. Ils n’ont aucun contrôle là-dessus. La cérémonie n’a pas eu lieu. Elle n'aura peut-être pas lieu. À mon avis, seuls les citoyens devraient pouvoir voter, même par anticipation ou par bulletin de vote spécial. Le serment devrait être modifié en conséquence. Une personne ne devrait pas être appelée à dire qu’elle sera citoyenne canadienne le jour du scrutin.

Le deuxième point porte sur les problèmes liés au financement étranger de tiers. Le projet de loi améliore le régime notamment en interdisant non seulement les contributions de sources étrangères à des fins d'activités réglementées, mais aussi l’utilisation de fonds étrangers. Dans certains cas, un tiers peut recevoir des fonds étrangers et ne pas pouvoir les utiliser. Ils auraient pu faire volte-face et les transmettre à une tierce partie. Ce tiers pourrait alors dépenser cet argent. Je recommande d'ajouter une clause anti-évitement dans le projet de loi. Il y a d’autres exemples de dispositions de ce genre dans ce projet de loi et dans la Loi électorale du Canada. Cela réglerait les situations où un tiers se retourne et transfère des fonds étrangers pour éviter les restrictions prévues dans la loi. C’est une amélioration que je recommande au projet de loi.

Le troisième point concerne les frais de participation à des congrès. À l’heure actuelle, la règle veut que lorsqu’une personne achète un billet pour participer à un congrès, la contribution qu'elle fait est déterminée en fonction du prix du billet moins les avantages concrets qu’elle reçoit au congrès, notamment les repas et les boissons. Le projet de loi recommande de déduire également du prix du billet une part raisonnable des frais généraux de l'organisation du congrès. Il permet aussi à une personne de payer les frais de participation à un congrès d'une autre personne et de déduire du montant les frais généraux. Cette disposition fait en sorte qu'une personne bien nantie pourrait, en achetant la totalité ou la majeure partie des billets, assumer tous les coûts de participation du parti à des congrès.

(1905)



Il y a plusieurs façons de régler ce problème. La première serait simplement de ne pas accepter qu’il y ait une déduction des frais généraux sur le montant qui constitue une contribution. C’est l’approche que je privilégie. Par ailleurs, on pourrait dire que cette déduction n’est permise que pour un seul billet, pas pour plusieurs. C’est un peu plus compliqué à administrer. Si cela n’est pas acceptable pour le Comité, il faudrait peut-être modifier la loi pour que le rapport annuel du parti reflète le fait qu’une personne a payé des billets pour que plus d’une personne assiste à un congrès, de sorte que si une personne achète une série de billets pour un congrès, il suffit simplement de le déclarer dans le rapport annuel. Cette approche a au moins le mérite d'être transparente dans une certaine mesure.

Le quatrième point que je veux soulever concerne la question de la protection de la vie privée dont nous avons discuté. Comme je l’ai dit la semaine dernière, je suis préoccupé par le fait qu’il n’y ait pas de normes minimales. Chaque partie déciderait la norme qui lui convient. Qui plus est, je m’inquiète de l’absence de surveillance. En ce qui concerne la première question, les normes adoptées par les parties dans leurs politiques devraient être conformes à celles énoncées dans la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, qu’on appelle habituellement la LPRPDE et je crois que le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée est la personne appropriée pour assurer une surveillance du genre. J’en ai discuté avec lui et il est d’accord.

Le cinquième point que je veux soulever est... Il s’agit en fait d’une recommandation d’Élections Canada. Le projet de loi en tient compte. C'est une recommandation visant à contrer la possibilité de désinformation dans les cas d'une publication paraissant, mais n'étant pas, produite par un parti ou un candidat. Nous aurions dû préciser, dans notre recommandation, que les publications électroniques ou traditionnelles paraissant, mais n'étant pas, produites par Élections Canada devraient être frappées de la même interdiction. Ce n'est qu'un prolongement de la même règle pour couvrir les faux documents d'Élection Canada.

Le sixième point concerne un article important du projet de loi qui porte sur les cyberattaques. Je crois que c’est une question importante. Il y a une proposition dans le projet de loi concernant la mauvaise utilisation ou l’interférence avec un ordinateur. Cependant, pour qu’une infraction soit commise, il faut démontrer qu’il y avait une intention d’influencer le résultat de l’élection. Dans certains cas, un État étranger ou un tiers peut souhaiter intervenir simplement pour perturber l’élection ou simplement pour miner la confiance dans l’élection, de sorte que l’obligation de prouver une intention de changer le résultat va trop loin. Je pense qu’il faut l’étendre à d’autres fins, que je viens de mentionner.

Enfin, le dernier point est très technique. Il s'agit d’une disposition transitoire concernant les obligations de déclaration des candidats. Il devrait y avoir un article dans le projet de loi stipulant que si les règles entrent en vigueur au milieu de la campagne ou après celle-ci, l’obligation de faire rapport à la fin de la campagne devrait correspondre aux obligations importantes pendant la campagne. C’est raisonnable. Le libellé de cet article peut être amélioré et devrait l’être. Il y a des articles semblables dans le projet de loi qui, à notre avis, sont mieux rédigés à cet égard et nous y faisons référence dans le tableau. Il s'agit strictement d’un amendement de forme.

Merci.

(1910)

Le président:

Nous allons faire au moins un tour puis nous pourrions poser des questions plus informelles aux témoins. Nous verrons après le premier tour.

Nous allons commencer avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Tout d'abord, je suis heureux de vous revoir. J'ai quelques questions sur ce que vous avez fourni.

Revenons d'abord à la question des frais de congrès pour que je comprenne bien. Vous dites que cette disposition va un peu trop loin, car elle prescrit la déduction des frais généraux d'un congrès en particulier de la contribution qui en fait partie. Est-ce exact? Vous êtes d'accord avec les avantages concrets comme un repas servi à tel ou tel endroit. C'est inclus. Je suppose que ce qui est incorporel, ce sont les frais généraux.

Avez-vous un commentaire à faire à ce sujet?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est tout à fait exact. Ce sont les frais généraux.

Le congrès d’un parti s'inscrit dans les activités naturelles d’un parti et le fait de défrayer les activités d’un parti constitue normalement une contribution. C’est ainsi que je vois les choses.

Ce qui m'inquiète en particulier, c'est le fait qu'une personne soit autorisée à payer tous les frais du congrès en achetant la totalité des billets. Il y aurait donc une seule personne bien nantie qui achèterait le congrès du parti et pourtant, ce fait ne serait même pas déclaré comme tel.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela ne ferait pas partie des dépenses de la campagne ou de l'élection; j'ai compris.

L'autre question porte sur l'utilisation non autorisée d'un ordinateur. Vous dites que — je paraphrase — les répercussions sont un peu trop ciblées. Est-ce exact?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact. Je pense que la loi devrait envisager des situations où une personne tente d'intervenir dans le déroulement d’une élection, d’une course à la direction ou d’une course à l’investiture en s’ingérant dans un système informatique.

M. Scott Simms:

Simplement pour créer le chaos, autrement dit...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

M. Scott Simms:

... plutôt que de viser une fin précise. D'accord, je comprends ce que vous dites. À l'heure actuelle, il est question dans le libellé d'un certain résultat d'une élection.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il s’agit de changer les résultats. Ce que je dis, c’est que ce n’est peut-être pas l’objectif visé, mais qu’il est peut-être tout aussi odieux de perturber les élections et de miner la confiance dans les élections.

Je vais vous donner un exemple. Si quelqu’un essaie de pénétrer dans le registre national des électeurs et montre qu’il y est parvenu... Supposons qu’un État étranger veuille le faire. C’est ce qui s’est passé aux États-Unis, d’après ce que j’ai compris. Ils pénètrent, laissent une marque puis ne font rien. Cependant, ils ont miné la confiance dans l’intégrité des élections et cette question n'est pas abordée.

M. Scott Simms:

Très rapidement, pour ma propre gouverne... Je voulais poser cette question depuis un certain temps et je le fais maintenant. L’article 70 du projet de loi modifie la façon dont la liste électorale officielle est préparée. Il est question de la faire préparer par bureau de scrutin plutôt que par section de vote.

Pour les gens qui nous regardent en ce moment et qui ne connaissent pas bien les élections, nous appelons toutes ces listes les « cartes de bingo », pour ainsi dire. Je les appelle « cartes de bingo », « feuilles de bingo », peu importe le nom que vous voulez leur donner.

Est-ce que cela va changer à l’article 70? Autrement dit, s’agira-t-il d’une longue compilation des noms des scrutateurs qui se trouvent dans les bureaux de scrutin ce jour-là?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Dans le cadre de l’effort de modernisation, la loi désignera désormais les bureaux de scrutin par ce qui était traditionnellement un nombre, dans certains cas, de sections de vote. Cela témoigne de ce changement.

(1915)

M. Scott Simms:

Si je suis là comme scrutateur, peu importe dans quel bureau de scrutin je me trouve, je n’ai qu’une liste complète...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Vous avez la liste complète.

M. Scott Simms:

... de la section de vote, au lieu de ce qui était auparavant le bureau de scrutin.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact, sauf sur le plan administratif, les prochaines élections se dérouleront encore — pour les bureaux de scrutin ordinaire — de la même façon qu'avant, par section de vote, parce que nous ne pourrons pas adopter le nouveau modèle de vote aux prochaines élections générales pour les bureaux de scrutin ordinaire.

M. Scott Simms:

Donc, pour les prochaines élections, ce sera comme avant.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

L’autorisation des signatures, des signatures électroniques en particulier, est assez récente. Je comprends que le système n’était pas prêt pour les dernières élections. Pouvez-vous assurer au Comité qu’un système sera en place pour recevoir les signatures électroniques pour les documents de campagne et ainsi de suite?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument. C’est ce qui a été prévu dans la loi, en 2014. Nous n’avons pas eu le temps de mettre en oeuvre les systèmes pour faciliter la transmission électronique des déclarations des candidats. Ce travail est en cours et il avance bien. Je m’attends à recevoir tous les rapports en ligne aux prochaines élections.

M. Scott Simms:

Très bien. Aux prochaines élections, Élections Canada acceptera donc toutes les signatures électroniques pour les rapports de campagne.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Intéressant.

Une des questions que j'ai abordées avec la ministre, tout à l’heure, concernait le commissaire. J’aimerais que vous commentiez le fait que le commissaire revient maintenant à...

Je vais mettre mon parti pris sur la table. Je pense que c’est une bonne initiative. Pour commencer, j’ai trouvé que c’était une mauvaise décision. Le retour du commissaire au Bureau du directeur général des élections... De toute évidence, le commissaire peut toujours travailler en étroite collaboration avec le Service des poursuites pénales — c’est possible —, mais le fait d’être de retour à l’intérieur, au sein d’Élections Canada, me semble être un meilleur...

Diriez-vous que cela renforce les pouvoirs du commissaire? Avec cette nouvelle loi, maintenant qu’il y a des pénalités administratives, est-ce une bonne chose que le commissaire soit de retour au sein d’Élections Canada?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour ce qui est de l’unification juridique d’Élections Canada — il ne s’agit pas nécessairement d’une cohabitation physique, mais d’une réunification juridique —, cela facilitera le transfert de renseignements d’Élections Canada au commissaire de façon plus harmonieuse, ce qui aidera le commissaire.

En toute franchise, je crois que le projet de loi contient un certain nombre d’améliorations qui vont beaucoup plus loin pour aider le commissaire. Les sanctions administratives pécuniaires, que vous avez mentionnées...

M. Scott Simms:

C’était ma prochaine question.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

... contribuent largement à lui fournir un ensemble beaucoup plus calibré d’outils pour intervenir, de même que le pouvoir de contraindre à témoigner. Du point de vue de l’application de la loi, je pense que c’est une bonne mesure législative. La réunification est certainement une bonne chose, mais elle n’est pas aussi importante, je dirais, que ces autres changements.

M. Scott Simms:

Le pouvoir de contraindre est l'un des pouvoirs du commissaire. Personnellement, j'ai lu la partie sur les sanctions administratives et la raison pour laquelle c'est utile dans ce cas particulier est, évidemment, que vous n'avez pas besoin de frapper avec le maximum de force quand ce n’est pas nécessaire. De toute évidence, votre bureau est d’avis que cela va beaucoup inciter à respecter la loi, et si certains veulent l'enfreindre, il sera beaucoup plus facile au commissaire de les amener à s'y conformer.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est ce que nous pensons, en effet.

M. Scott Simms:

Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Non.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

L’astuce, Scotty, c'est qu'il ne faut pas demander.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Mark Gerretsen:

C’est exact. Ne pas établir un contact visuel.

M. Blake Richards:

Quoi qu’il en soit, merci d’être de retour. J'ai l'impression que vous n'étiez pas venu depuis très longtemps.

Permettez-moi de commencer par cette question et j'en aborderai d'autres. J’espère que nous en aurons le temps.

Quand vous a-t-on présenté ce projet de loi pour la première fois?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Mes employés travaillent avec les fonctionnaires du BCP depuis l’automne dernier. Je ne me souviens pas de la date exacte, mais ils ont fourni des conseils techniques, non pas des conseils stratégiques, mais des conseils techniques sur la rédaction. Ils n’ont pas participé à la rédaction comme telle, mais ils ont vu diverses variantes des dispositions et leur rôle était de veiller à ce qu’il y ait le moins d’erreurs ou de pépins possible dans le projet de loi, et en fait, il y en a très peu. J’en ai soulevé un certain nombre aujourd’hui, mais il s'agit surtout de questions de politique et non pas de questions techniques.

M. Blake Richards:

Évidemment, vous avez été consultés, mais par qui? Était-ce le BCP? Était-ce le cabinet de la ministre? Le Cabinet du premier ministre? Qui vous a consultés?

(1920)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il s’agissait strictement d’une consultation entre les fonctionnaires du BCP et ceux de mon bureau, et plus précisément, madame Lawson, ici présente.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez mentionné que cela a commencé l’automne dernier, ou du moins que la participation d'Élections Canada a commencé l’automne dernier. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous expliquer pourquoi vous pensez... Voilà où nous en sommes, n’est-ce pas? On nous demande qu'en moins de 10 jours, je crois, nous fassions une étude complète d’un projet de loi de 350 pages en comité, y compris tous les amendements, l’étude article par article et tout le reste, mais si ce processus a commencé l’automne dernier, cela fait longtemps.

Pensez-vous pouvoir nous expliquer pourquoi il a fallu tant de temps pour que la Chambre des communes soit saisie de cette question et pourquoi nous sommes maintenant si pressés? Tout ce temps était-il nécessaire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce serait de la pure spéculation de ma part. Je sais seulement que...

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends, mais il serait bon d’avoir votre avis, si vous le voulez bien.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne sais pas comment répondre à cela. Ce n’est pas à moi de répondre à cette question.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord, d’accord. Vous ne pouvez pas me blâmer d’avoir essayé, n’est-ce pas?

Pour ce qui est de la mise en oeuvre, vous avez mentionné, lors de votre dernière comparution, que vous envisagiez déjà un plan de mise en oeuvre. Quand a-t-on commencé à planifier la mise en oeuvre de cette loi?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vous remercie de la question, car je crois qu’il y a eu un malentendu à l'égard de mes remarques à ce sujet.

Lorsque le projet de loi a été déposé, nous avons commencé à planifier les travaux de mise en oeuvre, ce qui est très récent. Nous prévoyons faire des préparatifs au cours de l’été et de l’automne. En supposant que le projet de loi ne soit pas adopté d'ici là, nous aurons du travail à faire, mais ce n'est pas du tout la même chose que la mise en oeuvre de la loi.

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends.

Considérez-vous qu’il s’agit de quelque chose d'inhabituel avant qu’un projet de loi ne soit adopté? Y a-t-il un précédent?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est, je pense, le mot que j’ai utilisé la dernière fois que j’étais ici. Il y a parfois du travail qui se fait au moyen des ressources de notre propre équipe, ce genre de travail préparatoire. Ce n’est pas inhabituel. Si nous devons passer des contrats, par exemple, pour utiliser des systèmes de TI, c’est plus inhabituel.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suppose que la raison pour laquelle nous sommes dans cette situation inhabituelle... et il est difficile de vous le reprocher, car vous vous retrouvez vous-même dans cette situation parce que cela a pris tellement de temps — et je sais que vous ne voulez pas spéculer quant à la raison pour laquelle cela s'est produit. Le fait est que cela échappe à votre contrôle et à celui d’un grand nombre d’entre nous au sein du Comité, et nous essayons tous ici de faire face à quelque chose qui rend les circonstances très inhabituelles et, franchement, très difficiles. Il nous est difficile, en tant que législateurs, de bien faire notre travail. Je pense que la proposition que nous voyons rend presque impossible, très difficile, et peut-être même quasiment impossible, pour vous de faire votre travail correctement.

Vous avez déjà dit qu’il faudrait faire des compromis, que certaines choses ne pourraient pas être mises en oeuvre correctement, et nous avons eu l’occasion d’en parler brièvement lors de votre dernière comparution. J’y reviendrai dans un instant pour voir si nous pouvons obtenir un peu plus de précisions à ce sujet.

Lorsque nous avons reçu les fonctionnaires avant votre arrivée, nous avons parlé du régime des tiers et de l’argent étranger. J'ai soulevé la question des contributions que des entités étrangères pourraient encore faire avant la période préélectorale. On m'a répondu qu'Élections Canada aurait la capacité de mener une vérification à ce sujet. J'ai demandé à ce moment-là — et vous pourriez peut-être me donner un peu plus de précisions à ce sujet — ce que vous considérez comme un élément déclencheur raisonnable d’une vérification dans ce genre de scénario. Qu’est-ce qu’Élections Canada considérerait comme un élément signalant la possibilité d'une contribution étrangère et qui vous amènerait à effectuer une vérification?

Deuxièmement, y aurait-il moyen de modifier la loi pour qu’elle soit plus utile à cet égard?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais commencer par le deuxième point et je reviendrai au premier.

J’ai fait une recommandation. Je crois qu’il serait préférable d’avoir une clause anti-évitement claire pour traiter des situations où une entité tend délibérément la main... ou se fait offrir de l’argent d’une source étrangère pour pouvoir couvrir ses dépenses ordinaires et libère ensuite des fonds pour les activités réglementées de tiers. Si c’est son intention, si c’est pour contourner les règles, alors il devrait y avoir une clause claire à cet effet.

Ce serait une amélioration.

(1925)

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question suivante: chaque fois qu’une de ces organisations reçoit du financement étranger, ne pourrait-on pas au moins soupçonner que cela ait eu lieu? En fait, si elle reçoit de l’argent à d’autres fins, que ce soit ou non pour faire un tour de passe-passe — utilisez ces fonds pour autre chose afin de pouvoir utiliser votre argent pour les élections —, cela reste possible. Avez-vous réfléchi à la question de savoir s’il serait souhaitable de ne pas autoriser le financement étranger, un point c’est tout? Cela éviterait d’avoir à essayer de déterminer si quelqu’un a eu cette intention.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Avant de répondre à cette question, j’aimerais apporter une précision.

M. Blake Richards:

Certainement.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Vous avez parlé d’une vérification. Une vérification se base sur l’information que nous recevons, et à moins qu’à première vue, un indice ne signale « argent étranger », un vérificateur ne le verra pas. En pareil cas, il faut, en fait, une enquête du commissaire. Ce n’est pas quelque chose qui ressortirait d’une vérification.

Je n’ai pas proposé de modifier le projet de loi au sujet des contributions. C’est une chose que vous voudrez peut-être envisager, étant donné qu’il y a des questions liées à la Charte. Si vous vous souciez des contributions étrangères, il n’est peut-être pas nécessaire de viser la totalité des contributions. Vous pourriez envisager, par exemple, de dire que si une entité reçoit un certain montant de contributions étrangères au cours d'une période donnée — et ce serait au Parlement de décider de cette période — l'entité en question ne devrait pas utiliser ses recettes générales. Elle pourrait tout de même former une tierce partie qui aurait à recueillir des fonds et les verser dans son compte bancaire.

Il y a toute une gamme d’options, et c’est un domaine que le Comité voudra peut-être examiner sans nécessairement passer à un ensemble complet de limites de contribution.

M. Blake Richards:

En fin de compte, ce que vous dites, c’est qu’il y a probablement des options que nous pourrions envisager pour faciliter un peu les choses. Je pense que cela allégerait même le fardeau d’Élections Canada pour ce qui est de démêler ce genre de situations, parce que cela devient assez compliqué.

Êtes-vous d’accord avec cette description?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Comme je l’ai dit, dans le cadre d’une vérification, à moins qu’il y ait une adresse étrangère sur la contribution, il est difficile de dire, à première vue, qu’elle provient d’une source étrangère.

M. Blake Richards:

Au bout du compte, ce genre d'activité pourrait avoir lieu, et peut-être qu'après coup, nous pourrions faire une enquête et peut-être déterminer si cela s'est produit ou non. Même si on était en mesure de s’en rendre compte, il serait trop tard parce que cela se serait déjà produit et aurait affecté les élections. Est-ce exact?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui. C’est vrai pour bien des questions entourant la Loi électorale du Canada, mais je ne suis pas en désaccord avec vous.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’aime faire des hypothèses pour comprendre quelles seraient les répercussions. Disons que nous sommes en 2014 et qu’il y a un groupe de réflexion de droite qui essaie d’influer sur la politique environnementale canadienne. Supposons qu’il reçoive 500 000 $ des frères Koch, aux États-Unis, dans un but bien précis et qu’il dépense cet argent lors des élections de 2015 au Canada pour essayer d’influencer l'opinion des électeurs sur les politiques environnementales ou la nécessité d’en avoir moins.

Est-ce que cela relèverait de la loi ou non? C’est évidemment de l’influence étrangère directe de la part des deux hommes les plus riches du monde.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a plusieurs éléments. Si vous remontez dans le temps, vous êtes assujetti aux règles actuelles, et non au projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je sais, mais si nous appliquions les règles proposées ici, cela serait-il visé?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais vous montrer comment les règles améliorent la capture de ce type de transaction.

À l’heure actuelle, une tierce partie ne peut pas demander de financement à une source étrangère pour les activités réglementées de tiers. En vertu du projet de loi, elle ne peut pas utiliser des fonds étrangers aux fins de ses activités. Si cette entité est largement financée par une source étrangère, comme dans votre exemple, il lui serait très difficile de le justifier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas quel est le budget annuel de l’Institut Fraser, mais ce n’est pas 500 000 $. C’est plus que cela. Puis, tout à coup, nous voyons apparaître: déréglementons les conditions environnementales des pipelines, une campagne publicitaire qui demande aux gens de voter d’une certaine façon. Élections Canada demande: « Comment fonctionne actuellement l’Institut Fraser? » On vous répond: « Nous avons un budget de 2,5 ou 3 millions de dollars; nous utilisons simplement les fonds recueillis au Canada. » N’auriez-vous pas besoin de l’ARC ou de quelqu’un pour vous aider à comprendre comment fonctionne l’organisation en question?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non. Ce serait faire une enquête. Nous ferions une vérification. Nous examinerions les contributions de l'Institut et il nous dirait qu’elles proviennent de ses recettes générales.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si on soupçonne qu’il s’agit vraiment d’argent envoyé par une entité étrangère, le commissaire pourrait faire enquête.

(1930)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais pour prouver quoi?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si on a au moins une règle anti-évitement pour démontrer qu’il y a effectivement eu une forme de collusion...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans le projet de loi actuel, nous n’avons pas de règle anti-évitement.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, il n'y en a pas. Je pense qu’il faudrait l’ajouter au projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela semble être une échappatoire. En 2019, ou en 2018 en prévision de 2019, l’Institut Fraser pourrait aussi prendre 500 000 $ des frères Koch pour faire entrer un ensemble de politiques très précises dans l’esprit des électeurs en vue des élections. Vous lancez votre enquête, mais on vous répond: « Cela représente moins d’un cinquième de notre financement; nous n’avons pas utilisé un seul sou de ces 500 000 $ pour nos brochures ou nos annonces. »

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Sont-ils coupables de quoi que ce soit? Est-ce possible?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Chaque situation est unique, mais il serait préférable d’avoir une règle anti-évitement claire. Il y en a une dans le projet de loi pour les dépenses, mais il n’y en a pas pour les contributions et le financement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous devrions retirer toute influence étrangère des élections canadiennes. Je me joins à mes collègues et amis conservateurs pour chercher à uniformiser les règles du jeu. Soit dit en passant, l’ACPP aura toutes sortes de problèmes si nous faisons cela.

Examinons l’échappatoire des conventions. Je ne comprends pas. En vertu de ce projet de loi, une personne très riche pourrait payer entièrement pour un congrès d'investiture.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si le prix du billet est tel qu’il ne couvre essentiellement que le coût de la tenue du congrès, et je crois comprendre que c’est souvent le cas, qu’il n’y a pas beaucoup d’argent tiré des congrès des partis...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Les congrès font généralement perdre de l'argent aux partis, du moins pour nous.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

... dans ce cas, tant que les frais généraux dépassent ou ne dépassent pas le coût des billets, une personne, une personne riche, pourrait acheter tous les billets.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cette personne pourrait acheter tous les billets pour un congrès et les payer entièrement.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact. C’est ce qui me préoccupe, le fait qu’un congrès de parti est une activité du parti et le financement des activités du parti...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais ce n’est pas le cas actuellement. Ce serait nouveau.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce serait nouveau.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord. J’essaie de comprendre d’où cela vient. Ne semble-t-il pas extrêmement facile de contourner les restrictions sur les dons des particuliers aux partis politiques?

Nous sommes tous tenus à des limites. Une personne riche ne peut pas tout bonnement donner un million de dollars à un parti. Nous avons des lois contre cela. Cependant, si le congrès coûte un million de dollars et qu’une personne paie la note en achetant 3 000 billets à tel ou tel prix...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense qu’il faut comparer cela aux activités de financement par vente de billets.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Dans notre interprétation de la loi au fil des ans, nous avons accepté que le lieu d'accueil faisait partie des avantages tangibles que les gens reçoivent. Quand on va au restaurant, ce n’est pas seulement l’assiette qui compte; il y a aussi le lieu.

Nous n’avons pas accepté cela pour les congrès parce qu’un congrès est une activité de parti. Un congrès s'inscrit dans la politique du parti. C’est notre interprétation.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, parce qu’il n’y a aucun avantage à rester au Centre des congrès d'Halifax toute une fin de semaine.

Ce n’est pas quelque chose qu'on tient tellement à faire durant ses vacances, fréquenter un centre de congrès.

M. Mark Gerretsen:

À chacun son choix.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez une drôle de façon de faire la fête.

Je ne comprends tout simplement pas pourquoi on envisagerait de faire cela. Je n’ai jamais...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour être franc, je ne dis pas que ce qui a été envisagé correspond à l’échappatoire que j’ai relevée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais c'est l’effet que cela donne.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Dans le pire des cas, c’est l’effet que cela pourrait avoir.

Ce que je dis, c’est qu’il doit y avoir une façon de se prémunir contre le pire des scénarios. Je propose des façons de le faire, dont quelques-unes, à mon avis, atteignent l’objectif visé par le projet de loi. Au moins, en imposant une limite, on assure une certaine transparence.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements personnels, il n’y a pas de norme minimale que les partis doivent respecter.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

En ce qui concerne les renseignements personnels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’ai demandé à la ministre s'il y avait une norme minimale à respecter à propos de la collecte de données. On m'a dit que les partis seraient tenus d'afficher leur politique sur leur site Web, où il faut cliquer sept fois pour la trouver, et que cela suffisait.

Il n’y a rien pour forcer l'application, alors si les partis enfreignent nos lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels... Nous ne sommes assujettis à aucune, n’est-ce pas?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Aucune...?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument aucune.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est le Far West.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a des exceptions dans la loi quant à l’utilisation des renseignements fournis par Élections Canada, mais comme nous l'avons vu, elles sont très limitées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Au-delà de cela, en ce qui concerne les partis qui recueillent des données personnelles à même les sites Web des médias sociaux, qui achètent des abonnements à des catalogues etc., il n’y a aucune limite à ce qu’un parti peut faire de toutes ces données sur les Canadiens.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pas pour le parti. Il peut y en avoir pour l'autre côté de la transaction, mais pas pour le parti politique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais il semble que les géants des médias sociaux ne les respectent pas toujours.

On assiste à une course aux armements sur le front des données. On n'aurait même pas pu imaginer Cambridge Analytica il y a sept ans et, pourtant, elle a peut-être fait basculer une élection ou deux.

Ce projet de loi nous protège-t-il contre les menaces que l'extraction et la manipulation des données font peser sur nos élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À mon avis — et c'est une recommandation que j’ai faite —, le projet de loi devrait aller plus loin en établissant des normes minimales et en prévoyant une surveillance.

(1935)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Et la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, la LPRPDE...?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, je pense que ces normes correspondent grosso modo à celles...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Et l’application de la loi par l’entremise du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avec des amendes.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Avec l'ensemble des moyens qu’il a déjà. Je ne crois pas qu’il ait des amendes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais y travailler également.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci encore d’être revenu.

Je sais qu’on en a parlé durant la période des questions, mais pourriez-vous nous entretenir brièvement de l’indépendance d’Élections Canada et surtout de son indépendance vis-à-vis du gouvernement du Canada?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

Je pense qu'il y a deux aspects de cette indépendance à considérer ici. Il y a d'une part l'aspect des politiques. Nos conseils à ce sujet passent par votre comité, tandis que le travail que nous faisons avec le gouvernement à propos du projet de loi porte sur l'aspect technique. C’est très utile, mais c’est du travail technique.

Pour ce qui est de la mise en oeuvre, nous sommes maîtres de nos décisions. Personne ne peut nous donner d'ordres dans ce domaine, personne n’y a même fait allusion. Cela fait partie de la gestion du risque dont je suis responsable, veiller à ce que nous soyons prêts à tenir les élections, que ce soit suivant les règles en vigueur ou celles qui pourraient voir le jour à l’approche des élections.

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous avez parlé d’entités qui recourent à d’autres stratagèmes pour miner la confiance dans l'intégrité du processus électoral. Cela n'influence peut-être pas les résultats, mais cela mine la confiance. C’est un problème généralisé que nous constatons dans les démocraties occidentales.

De même, est-il dangereux d’avoir des députés élus qui remettent en question l’indépendance d’Élections Canada et son rôle dans l’organisation de nos élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si des députés ont des préoccupations au sujet de l’indépendance, il ne tient qu'à eux de tirer cela au clair. Il me fait plaisir de préciser qu’il n’y a pas de problème d’indépendance ici.

M. Chris Bittle:

Si vous me permettez de revenir à vos recommandations concernant la protection des renseignements personnels, nous avons parlé de la LPRPDE et de vos demandes. À quoi cela ressemblerait-il?

C’est une bonne chose de dire qu’il faut protéger la vie privée, tout le monde est d’accord là-dessus, mais qu’est-ce que cela signifie pour un représentant ou un bénévole de parti?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le projet de loi pourrait stipuler que la politique du parti doit respecter certaines normes, comme celles qu'on trouve dans la LPRPDE. Nous pouvons examiner ces normes et fournir des directives aux partis à l’avance quant à leur nature.

Je ne suis pas sûr de répondre à la question. Est-ce à cela que vous voulez en venir au sujet des amendements particuliers que je propose au projet de loi?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour ce qui est de la politique, nous pouvons vous revenir avec plus de détails. Mes notes sont assez générales et il me fera plaisir de fournir au Comité des recommandations plus détaillées s'il le désire, mais essentiellement, je travaillerais avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée sur cette question. Nous pourrions formuler un libellé pour que les politiques des partis s'inspirent des normes élémentaires qu'on retrouve normalement dans nos lois en la matière. Nous pourrions aussi préciser le rôle de surveillance du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée.

M. Chris Bittle:

J’aimerais plus de détails à ce sujet, parce que parfois — l'intention est bonne et cela s'en vient avec les politiques — c’est une chose de l’appliquer à un agent du parti qui travaille au siège du parti, mais c’en est une autre de l'appliquer à un bénévole qui travaille à une campagne locale. En avez-vous tenu compte? Même la différence entre un libéral de St. Catharines qui travaille à une campagne bien financée et bien dotée en bénévoles et un autre dans une région rurale de l’Alberta qui ne peut compter que sur deux personnes — ou même une seule; je suis généreux en disant deux — pour tout faire... Il y a des différences entre les bénévoles, tant pour la qualité que la quantité.

Est-ce qu’on en tient compte lorsqu’on parle de l’obligation de respecter les lois fédérales sur la protection des renseignements personnels?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Vous soulevez un point très important. Il faut faire attention de ne pas mettre tout le monde dans la même situation. Je ne pense pas que les équipes de campagne locale soient dans la même catégorie que les partis. Elles ne recueillent pas de grandes quantités de renseignements. Elles n’accumulent pas de renseignements au fil du temps. Elles ne font pas le même travail de collecte de fonds que les partis. Nous devons reconnaître que les campagnes locales sont menées en grande partie par des bénévoles. Je ne propose donc pas que le projet de loi soit modifié en fonction des campagnes des candidats. L’important, je pense, ce à quoi les Canadiens s’attendent, c'est que les bases de données des partis, qui sont plutôt imposantes, obéissent à certaines normes et qu’on doive en rendre compte.

(1940)

M. Chris Bittle:

Outre les dispositions du projet de loi C-76 visant à prévenir la publicité trompeuse, Élections Canada prend-il des mesures proactives pour empêcher des robots et des manipulateurs malveillants de nuire aux élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Notre priorité absolue, en tout cas, est de veiller à ce qu’il n’y ait ni fausse information ni désinformation quant à l’endroit, à la façon et au moment où il faut s'inscrire et aller voter. Par exemple, nous aurons un répertoire de toutes nos communications publiques à ce sujet, de sorte que si quelqu’un doute de la provenance de l'information qu'il reçoit, il pourra vérifier dans le répertoire s'il s'agit bien d’une communication d’Élections Canada. Les partis peuvent certainement faire la même chose. Ils peuvent s’assurer que leurs communications, s’ils le souhaitent, soient répertoriées de telle sorte qu'on puisse les vérifier.

M. Chris Bittle:

J’ai une très brève question. Je sais que je vais manquer de temps.

Y a-t-il un outil dans le coffre d’Élections Canada — si vous ne pouvez pas les battre, joignez-vous à eux, comme on dit —, y a-t-il un robot bienveillant qu’Élections Canada pourrait utiliser pour combattre le négativisme et l’ingérence étrangère? Si on peut se servir de robots pour nous nuire, ne pourrait-on pas s'en servir aussi pour aider Élections Canada à assurer l’équité du scrutin?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il est certain que les robots ne sont pas tous malveillants. On peut les utiliser pour faire du bien. Je ne sais pas de quoi les robots sont capables dans la lutte contre la fausse information, mais il y a peut-être lieu de s'y intéresser.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Perrault, avez-vous eu l’occasion de regarder ou d’écouter le témoignage de la ministre plus tôt aujourd’hui?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J’en ai entendu la majeure partie.

M. Scott Reid:

Avez-vous entendu la partie où elle et moi discutions du bulletin de vote provisoire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. La ministre s'est dite préoccupée par le fait que la notion de bulletin provisoire — que je n’ai pas à vous décrire, parce que vous savez comment cela fonctionne — avait été écartée du projet de loi pour des raisons de dignité. Je ne lui ai pas caché mon étonnement. Si je me présente à un bureau de scrutin, que j’ai oublié mon portefeuille à la maison et que je dois mettre mon bulletin de vote dans une enveloppe pour qu’on puisse confirmer mon identité, je ne vois pas en quoi cela porte atteinte à ma dignité.

J’ai promis de vous en parler. J’aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce qu'il faut garder à l'esprit quand on parle des bulletins de vote provisoires... je sais que c’est quelque chose qui existe dans diverses administrations et qu'on s'en sert à des fins différentes. On s'en sert, par exemple, s’il n’y a pas d’inscription le jour du scrutin. Si vous votez le jour du scrutin sans être inscrit, votre bulletin de vote est considéré provisoire. C’est logique pour les endroits où il n'y a pas d’inscription le jour du scrutin.

Dans notre cas, le problème semble concerner davantage l’identification de l'électeur, si je comprends bien votre question. Je ne vois pas très bien comment le bulletin provisoire pourrait nous aider dans ce contexte. Le vote provisoire entraîne une démarche complexe. L'électeur qui a du mal à prouver son adresse devra revenir au bureau du directeur de scrutin à un moment donné. Dans les régions rurales, c’est peut-être un peu loin.

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Perrault, si vous permettez, mais dans ce cas-là, vous pourriez vous arranger pour qu'il n'ait pas à le faire. Ce pourrait très bien être au directeur de scrutin de l'endroit de faire le suivi et de s'assurer que la personne habite bien là où elle l'affirme.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il faudrait savoir alors, si on ne trouve pas de preuve documentaire de l’adresse, si on en trouvera une plus tard et si le travail imposé au directeur de scrutin retarderait le décompte des voix et l'annonce du résultat.

J'avoue que j'ai des réserves. Tant que je ne verrai pas clairement comment cela pourrait aider à résoudre les problèmes que nous avons pour mieux identifier les électeurs, je ne suis pas prêt à m’engager dans cette voie. Il se peut que quelque chose m'échappe, mais je ne vois pas comment cela pourrait nous être utile.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous nous avez dit tout à l’heure que vous aviez été consultés dès l’automne dernier au sujet du projet de loi. Je voulais poser une question au sujet — j'ai cru entendre l’automne dernier — du financement étranger pour les tiers. Cela fait combien de temps qu'on vous a consultés à ce sujet?

(1945)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je crois que c’était tout récemment. Je n’ai pas de date précise, mais c’était... Ma conseillère juridique me dit que c’était probablement autour de Noël.

Mme Anne Lawson (avocate générale et directrice principale, Services juridiques, Élections Canada):

Honnêtement, je ne m’en souviens pas. C'est arrivé plus tard, possiblement avant Noël, mais je ne m’en souviens pas.

M. Scott Reid:

Pouvez-vous nous revenir là-dessus?

Mme Anne Lawson:

D’accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Vous avez fait un certain nombre de recommandations concernant des amendements proposés à divers articles du projet de loi, à propos notamment des fonds provenant de l'étranger pour les tiers. Je vais présumer que vous avez été consultés, mais que vous n’avez pas eu l’occasion de voir quelque chose de proche de la version définitive avant qu’elle ne soit publiée ou peut-être avant qu’elle ne soit rendue publique au Parlement. Cela vous convient-il?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J’ai vu plusieurs versions du projet de loi, alors la chronologie est un peu floue dans ma mémoire. Pour ce qui est de mes recommandations d’aujourd’hui, certaines portent davantage sur les politiques et je trouve plus approprié de les faire au Comité plutôt qu’au gouvernement. Du côté du gouvernement, c’est plus technique... Certains points sont techniques et il se peut que nous les ayons soulevés. Nous en avons soulevé beaucoup et le gouvernement en a abordé aussi beaucoup. Je pense que ces consultations ont été très utiles. Il y a des points que nous n'avons pas pu soulever et d'autres que nous avons pu, mais pour une raison quelconque, ils n’ont pas été retenus. Je ne saurais dire pourquoi.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord.

Je suppose qu’à ce stade-ci, vous demandez au Comité ou peut-être au gouvernement, par l’entremise du secrétaire parlementaire et de ses représentants au Comité, d’apporter des amendements en fonction des conseils que vous nous donnez aujourd'hui.

Je suppose que c’est tout ce que vous prévoyiez de nous donner, ou aviez-vous l’intention de nous donner une ébauche, de nouveaux articles, pour apporter des correctifs?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Voici ce que j’offre. On m’a demandé de fournir un libellé plus précis au sujet de la protection des renseignements personnels parce que celui-ci était plutôt générique. Les autres points sont assez précis, je crois, quant à ce qu'on peut faire. On vise des dispositions précises et on indique les changements souhaités, mais il n’y a pas de libellé comme tel, j’en conviens.

M. Scott Reid:

En ce qui concerne le financement étranger des tiers, les ajouts qui seraient faits, ou que vous suggérez de faire, aux articles 349.95 et 358 proposés, soit ceux qui reprennent les dispositions anti-contournement qu'on trouve ailleurs dans la Loi électorale, je peux certainement voir comment ils régleraient certaines de vos préoccupations, mais je ne suis pas certain qu’ils régleraient le problème que vous décrivez dans votre tableau, où on peut lire: « De même, le projet de loi n'interdit pas explicitement à un tiers d'utiliser des fonds de l'étranger qui lui ont été versés précisément pour qu'il puisse consacrer ses ressources d'origine canadienne à des activités réglementées. »

Je ne vois pas comment cela règle le problème, étant donné que cet argent est fongible. Y a-t-il un moyen de surmonter ce problème, que vous pourriez nous indiquer?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si vous demandez un régime étanche, je suis d’accord. Cela réglerait le problème des tentatives flagrantes de contourner délibérément les règles du financement étranger. Si nous parlons du simple fait qu’à un moment donné, une organisation a reçu des fonds de l’étranger, que cet argent existe toujours sous une forme ou une autre dans son bilan et qu’elle envisage de participer à la campagne, cela ne règle pas le problème. Pour le régler, il faut aller beaucoup plus loin que ce que j’ai proposé et ce que le projet de loi propose actuellement, et c’est là qu’on entre dans l'épineuse question de l’équilibre entre la liberté d’expression et la liberté d’association.

À mon avis, il n’est peut-être pas nécessaire d’aller jusqu’à un régime complet de limites de contribution, mais on pourrait considérer qu’une entité qui a reçu un certain montant de contributions étrangères — ce qui est différent des recettes commerciales, par exemple, ou des revenus de placements — dans une période donnée ne pourrait plus alors puiser dans ses recettes générales.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, Scott.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour que je comprenne bien, en ce qui concerne le premier amendement que vous proposez au sujet de la déclaration de citoyenneté, vous dites, et je suis d'accord, qu'il faut tenir compte du temps qui passe. Nous savons que cela va se produire, mais nous ne savons pas s'il y aura bel et bien une cérémonie, donc personne ne peut jurer que face à un contretemps, elle ne participera pas à la cérémonie ou peu importe. Pour m'assurer que je comprends bien l'amendement, si ce dernier est adopté, la personne qui deviendra citoyen canadien avant le jour du scrutin, mais qui est dans l'impossibilité de voter le jour du scrutin, pourra d'une certaine manière avoir le droit de voter?

(1950)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, si cet amendement était adopté, il faudrait que la personne ait obtenu la citoyenneté canadienne le jour du scrutin pour pouvoir voter.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D’accord.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le risque, si vous n’allez pas dans ce sens, c’est qu'une personne voterait, par exemple par bulletin spécial, alors qu'elle n’est pas un citoyen parce qu'on a annulé la cérémonie ou qu’on lui a refusé la citoyenneté pour des raisons de sécurité, par exemple, et que le suffrage est exprimé.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, je comprends cela. Il n’y a pas d’autres solutions. Il n’y a pas d’autres moyens de s’assurer que cette personne... Y a-t-il une autre façon de s’assurer que cette personne pourra voter?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous n’avons jamais permis cela. Il ne s’agit pas d’une nouvelle orientation générale de la législation. C’est simplement ce que je considère comme un contenu inexact dans une déclaration officielle.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Dans une déclaration, c’est logique.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé de la carte d’information de l’électeur. Je suis une grande partisane de cet outil, et je me rends compte que c'est bon non seulement pour les personnes âgées, qui sont souvent mentionnées comme destinataires de l'envoi, mais aussi pour les étudiants. Étant donné que cette carte d’information de l’électeur a été remise en question, j’aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez du fait qu'elle serve de pièce d’identité et si vous avez déjà lu ou réuni des données qui montrent qu'elle est utilisée frauduleusement. Troisièmement, combien de personnes se sont vu refuser la possibilité de voter parce qu’elles n’avaient pas les pièces d’identité nécessaires aux dernières élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais commencer par la dernière question. Ce que nous savons, c’est que, d’après l’enquête sur la population active menée par Statistique Canada à la dernière élection générale ou après celle-ci, 172 000 Canadiens n’ont pas pu voter en raison des exigences en matière d’identification des électeurs, et 50 000 d'entre eux ont été refusés au bureau de scrutin. C’est la seule donnée concrète que nous ayons à ce sujet.

Soyons clairs. L’utilisation de la carte d’information de l’électeur aux élections fédérales remonte aux élections partielles de 2011 et à 2011 dans des circonstances particulières. Dans ces circonstances, je ne suis pas au courant de plaintes ou d’accusations d'utilisation frauduleuse de la carte d’information de l’électeur.

Il faut aussi noter que seulement sept provinces ou territoires du Canada exigent une preuve d’adresse. C’est tout de même un nombre significatif: six provinces et un territoire. Toutes les provinces autorisent la carte d’information de l’électeur comme preuve d’adresse, accompagnée d'une autre pièce d’identité. Je ne suis pas au courant de préoccupations des provinces à cet égard.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Lors d’une comparution antérieure, vous avez parlé de la nécessité d’assurer l'éminente dignité de la personne qui exerce son droit de vote. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi vous estimez qu’il est important que les Canadiens puissent exercer leur droit de vote par eux-mêmes?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le droit de vote est l’expression la plus fondamentale de l'autonomie dans notre régime politique. C’est ce que nous disent souvent les électeurs handicapés. Ils veulent non seulement voter, mais aussi voter de façon indépendante. Pour eux, c’est une question de dignité très importante. Cela fait partie de leur autonomie en tant que Canadiens, d’être égaux avec les autres. Ce n’est pas seulement vrai pour les personnes handicapées. Je pense qu'il en va de même pour tout électeur qui serait obligé de demander la permission à quelqu’un d’autre ou de demander à quelqu’un d'autre d’attester de son lieu de résidence ou d'agir comme répondant, peu importe, afin qu'il puisse voter. Si nous trouvons des moyens de réduire au minimum ces contraintes, nous réussirons à maximiser les circonstances dans lesquelles une personne peut voter de façon indépendante. Je pense que c’est une question importante.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Que fait le projet de loi C-76 à cet égard?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le fait de permettre l’utilisation de la carte d’information de l'électeur, accompagnée d’une autre pièce d’identité, permettra à de nombreux électeurs qui, autrement, auraient besoin d’un répondant ou d’une attestation en vertu des règles actuelles, d’aller voter et de prouver leur lieu de résidence sans avoir besoin de l’aide d’une autre personne.

(1955)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

En ce qui concerne la tentative du projet de loi C-76 de faciliter le suffrage des électeurs, en particulier des personnes handicapées, en quoi la technologie facilite-t-elle le vote à domicile? Comment cela se passe-t-il, si on choisit de voter à domicile parce qu’il sera difficile de se rendre au bureau de scrutin?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À l’heure actuelle, la seule façon dont les gens peuvent voter à domicile, c’est au moyen d'un bulletin de vote spécial. Ces personnes ne sont pas en mesure de se présenter à leur bureau de scrutin ou d'exprimer leur suffrage à domicile de façon indépendante. En vertu des règles s'appliquant au bulletin de vote spécial, un employé accompagne le directeur du scrutin au domicile de l'électeur et procède au vote avec de l’aide.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Le projet de loi  C-76 exige-t-il un handicap physique ou va-t-il au-delà?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le projet de loi C-76 va au-delà.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Est-ce qu'on inclut la santé mentale, par exemple?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien.

Le président:

Vous avez le temps de poser une autre question.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

J'adore les jeunes. Je pense qu’il est essentiel de les faire participer au processus démocratique, parce que nous allons tous bénéficier de leurs contributions. À votre avis, comment Élections Canada pourrait-il utiliser le mandat d’éducation populaire que rétablit le projet de loi C-76?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il est clair que la loi actuelle nous permet d'aller à la rencontre des Canadiens mineurs. Le projet de loi nous permettrait de ne pas tenir compte de la distinction d’âge. On pourrait approcher les écoles secondaires, ou les cégeps au Québec, où il y a des jeunes de 18 ans, sans que cela pose de problèmes. C’est une amélioration. Nous pourrions embaucher des jeunes pour les bureaux de scrutin. Les deux vont de pair. Je crois que la ministre a parlé du programme britanno-colombien Youth at the Booth, qui a été aussi appliqué dans d'autres provinces, dont la Nouvelle-Écosse. Chaque fois qu’on s’en sert, c’est un succès. Il enseigne le mode de scrutin aux jeunes Canadiens. Il les familiarise avec le système. Si nous réussissons à combiner le recrutement des jeunes avec l’éducation civique et la préinscription, nous aurons dorénavant plusieurs leviers à notre disposition pour mieux faire comprendre aux jeunes l’importance de voter et le processus électoral et pour les faire participer.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Shipley.

M. Bev Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux d’être ici. Normalement, je ne siège pas à ce comité, alors, contrairement à tous ceux qui se sont dits heureux de vous voir ou de vous revoir, je ne peux que vous dire que c'est la première fois que je vous vois.

Merci d’être ici.

J’essaie de clarifier deux ou trois choses. Nous parlons de transparence et d'uniformisation des règles du jeu en matière de financement politique. J’aimerais d’abord parler de la transparence.

À la page 4 de votre exposé, vous déclarez, et je vous cite: « La possibilité de recourir à un répondant n'élimine pas l’obligation de prouver son identité et son adresse. Elle offre tout simplement un autre moyen de le faire... » Cet autre moyen, c'est la déclaration signée par le répondant et l'électeur. C’est obligatoire. Plus loin, vous dites qu'il faudra tout de même produire une pièce d’identité.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, si j’ai dit cela, c’est une erreur. Si l'électeur présente sa carte d’information de l’électeur pour indiquer quelle est son adresse, il doit présenter une autre pièce d’identité et s’assurer que les deux documents indiquent le même nom. C’est bien à cela que je faisais allusion.

M. Bev Shipley:

Pas une adresse exacte, alors...?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il faut que l’adresse et le nom figurent sur la carte et que le même nom figure sur une autre pièce d’identité.

M. Bev Shipley:

Vous avez fait part d'une donnée statistique il y a un instant. Vous avez dit que 172 000 personnes n'avaient pas pu voter parce qu’elles n’avaient pas de pièce d’identité pour une raison quelconque. Pouvez-vous me dire combien d’adresses changent entre la date d'envoi des cartes d’information de l’électeur et les jours de vote par anticipation ou du scrutin?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si je me souviens bien — et mon collègue me corrigera si j’induis le Comité en erreur —, un peu moins d’un million de cartes révisées ont été produites lors de la dernière élection générale. Ces cartes révisées sont acheminées aux électeurs qui ont fait corriger l'information les concernant pendant la période électorale.

(2000)

M. Bev Shipley:

Au bureau de scrutin, comment procède-t-on pour faire corriger cela? Tout d’abord, vous avez peut-être votre facture d’électricité, votre bail ou un chèque qui porte votre adresse, mais votre carte d’information n'indique pas la même chose. Comment conciliez-vous cela? Vous avez deux documents dont les données ne correspondent pas.

Par exemple, lorsque je suis allé voter en Ontario, j’ai dû montrer patte blanche deux fois. Il me semble que ce dont nous sommes certains — ou du moins je le suis, peut-être que personne d’autre ne l’est — c’est comment on le sait. Un million de personnes ont changé d’adresse et environ 170 000 n'ont pas pu voter parce qu’elles ne pouvaient pas fournir la bonne information. Pourtant, nous savons que toute cette information est disponible si vous la voulez pour avoir le privilège de voter dans ce pays. J’essaie simplement de trouver une solution à un problème insoluble.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais apporter quelques précisions.

En Ontario, comme au Québec, on n’est pas obligé d'attester de la véracité de son adresse quand on vote. Il suffit de prouver son identité. C’est l’adresse qui pose problème à la plupart des Canadiens, et non la preuve d’identité. En Ontario et au Québec, ce n’est pas obligatoire.

Dans le cas d’un électeur qui a changé d’adresse et qui en informe Élections Canada pendant la période de révision, une CIE révisée lui est envoyée à sa nouvelle adresse. La CIE initiale aura été envoyée à son ancienne adresse. Comme il n’aura pas cette dernière CIE en main, il va utiliser la CIE portant son adresse actuelle, qu’il aura reçue à la maison. Le fait qu’il ait en main la CIE révisée signifie qu’il l’a reçue et que le nom figurant sur cette CIE n’est pas celui de quelqu’un d’autre, mais bien le sien, et que c’est le même nom qui figure sur une autre pièce d’identité. À un moment donné, assez, c'est assez. À mon avis, ces documents constituent une preuve suffisante qui autorise à prendre part au scrutin au Canada.

M. Bev Shipley:

Cela prouve qu’ils sont Canadiens.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Excusez-moi?

M. Bev Shipley:

Ce sera la preuve qu’ils sont Canadiens.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce n'est pas une preuve qu’ils sont Canadiens. Cette preuve est faite lorsqu’ils s’inscrivent au moyen d’une déclaration. C’est le système en place au Canada, car il n'y a pas de preuve documentaire de citoyenneté au Canada.

M. Bev Shipley:

D’accord.

Je veux passer à la question suivante.

En qualité de directeur général des élections par intérim, vous pourrez peut-être m'expliquer ceci. J’essaie de voir en quoi c'est dans l'intérêt de l’électeur et de la population canadienne. En ce qui concerne l’argent de tiers, l’argent d'entités étrangères passant par une tierce partie, pouvez-vous me dire quelle en est l'importance, l’avantage ou l’utilité pour l’électeur canadien?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais aborder la question sous un autre angle. Disons qu'il y a un groupe qui veut participer à une élection canadienne. Ce groupe tire des revenus de nombreuses sources depuis de nombreuses années, donc la difficulté est de démêler... Dans certains cas, dans ce flux d'argent, la source est étrangère.

La participation à une élection, bien sûr, n'a de valeur que dans une société démocratique. Ce qu’on veut certainement éviter, c’est qu’une entité étrangère finance un tiers afin que ce dernier influence le vote. Le projet de loi contient plusieurs mesures à cette fin. Cependant, quand on entre dans les zones grises de l'amalgame d’argent, c’est un problème plus difficile à résoudre.

M. Bev Shipley:

J’essaie de comprendre ce que vous voulez dire quand vous parlez d'un avantage pour la société que quelqu’un veuille investir au Canada. Si les Canadiens voient les avantages d’avoir un gouvernement démocratiquement élu au Canada, pourquoi avons-nous besoin de l’apport de tiers et d’étrangers? Pourquoi ne pas simplement utiliser l’argent canadien qui provient de nos dons aux partis, et utiliser l'argent versé à chacun des partis à titre partisan et individuel? C’est assez facile à comprendre et, de cette façon, nous savons que ce sont bel et bien des Canadiens qui financent les élections canadiennes, et non des entités étrangères ou des tiers qui sont des personnes morales.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais tenter de répondre à votre question. Si je ne réussis pas, il faut me le dire.

Ce que je veux dire, c’est que, tel qu'énoncé dans l'arrêt de la Cour suprême du Canada, on accorde de la valeur à la participation populaire au débat électoral, qu'elle prenne la forme du vote ou du soutien direct des partis politiques ou encore d'une intervention dans le débat politique, ce qui peut comprendre de la publicité ou d’autres activités de campagne en faveur d’une idée ou d’une autre. Nos lois et notre Constitution l'autorisent. Voici les questions qui se posent: Comment faire la distinction entre cela et le financement étranger illégitime? Quel est le juste équilibre? À quel moment les mailles du filet de sécurité deviennent-elles tellement fines que vous empêchez les activités légitimes?

Il n’y a pas de réponse toute faite. Il faut examiner la question avec soin et financer un régime étalonné pour faire face à ce problème.

(2005)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci, monsieur Shipley.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci encore, monsieur le président.

La section 3 du projet de loi traite des comptes bancaires des tiers, du registre des tiers et des comptes des dépenses des tiers. Le paragraphe 358.1(2) proposé dit que « [l]e compte est ouvert auprès d'une institution financière canadienne, au sens de l’article 2 de la Loi sur les banques... » La section parle aussi des opérations financières et de la fermeture du compte. Le mode de production de rapports est précisé. À mon avis, tout cela semble complet et forme un tout auquel on peut faire confiance face aux tierces parties. C'est une partie essentielle pour suivre les dépenses des tiers. Ai-je raison de dire cela?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, absolument.

Toutefois, le fait d’avoir un compte bancaire canadien ne signifie pas que l'argent qui y est porté provient du Canada, n’est-ce pas?

M. Scott Simms:

En effet, donc voici ma question: le système n'est peut-être pas à toute épreuve, mais ce n'est pas loin. Vous avez peut-être abordé la question suivante dans vos recommandations: y a-t-il moyen d’éliminer toute autre échappatoire possible?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Aucun système n’est à toute épreuve.

M. Scott Simms:

Bien sûr.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Aucun système n’est inattaquable. Nous avons un régime de contributions destinées aux partis et aux candidats, par exemple. La règle dit que vous ne pouvez utiliser que votre propre argent pour verser une contribution. Nous savons par expérience qu'il arrive que cette règle soit contournée. À un moment donné, il faut accepter que le régime ne soit pas absolument hermétique. La question est de savoir où placer la barre. À mon avis, rien n'est certain, et c’est pourquoi je n’ai pas fait de recommandation précise. Je propose au Comité des pistes de réflexion sur cette question.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, c’est pour y mettre un terme. Je comprends. Assurément, cela va loin, en particulier l’idée d’un compte bancaire unique au Canada et de la déclaration de ce fait.

Passons au compte de dépenses. Le compte des dépenses du tiers, tel que proposé au paragraphe 359(2), doit comporter, je cite: « dans le cas d’une élection générale tenue le jour fixé conformément [au paragraphe ou à l'article untel], la liste des dépenses d'activité partisane ». À l'égard de ce compte de dépenses, êtes-vous satisfait du fait qu’il comportera les dépenses d’activité partisane, de publicité partisane et de sondage électoral?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui.

C’est une chose que j’ai essayé de faire remarquer dès le départ, mais je suis heureux de le souligner maintenant. Le projet de loi apporte des améliorations très significatives au régime de financement politique des tiers. En particulier, il ne limite plus à la seule publicité les activités réglementées. C’est de cela que vous parlez. Il a aussi pour effet de réglementer le financement étranger de ces activités.

À l’heure actuelle, par exemple, un tiers peut faire du démarchage électoral, car ce n'est pas réglementé, et il peut solliciter des fonds d’une source étrangère pour des activités de démarchage, ce qui est permis par la loi. Ce ne sera certainement pas possible en vertu du projet de loi C-76.

M. Scott Simms:

En raison de la clause visant le sondage électoral.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À cause de cela et de celle visant les activités partisanes.

M. Scott Simms:

Bien.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne veux pas que les améliorations que je suggère d'apporter amoindrissent le fait que le projet de loi prévoit des améliorations très importantes à cet égard.

M. Scott Simms:

Y a-t-il une partie du projet de loi qui ne traite que des dépenses de publicité ou êtes-vous convaincu que les trois postes de dépenses sont couverts?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Les trois types de dépenses sont couverts, et en période préélectorale, il y a une petite différence, et ce, pour une bonne raison. En période préélectorale, c'est de la publicité directe uniquement. La publicité est partisane si elle dit en faveur de quoi il faut voter ou quel parti il ne faut pas soutenir. En effet, les tierces parties mènent toutes sortes d’activités, et il faut faire attention. Il devient très difficile de fixer une limite, et je pense que c’est là un exemple de juste équilibre.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela a-t-il à voir avec le fait qu’on parle d'une question en particulier?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

En effet.

Les groupes qui ne veulent pas nécessairement participer à la campagne, mais qui défendent sans cesse une cause ne devraient pas être obligés d'arrêter leur action pour la simple raison qu’une élection est en vue.

M. Scott Simms:

D’accord. Je comprends cela.

Mark, avez-vous des questions?

M. Mark Gerretsen:

Est-ce qu’il me reste du temps?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Mark Gerretsen:

Vous avez dit que 50 000 personnes se sont vu refuser l'accès aux urnes lors des dernières élections. Est-ce à dire que ces 50 000 personnes se sont présentées sans pièce d’identité ou que vous n'avez pu établir leur identité de manière satisfaisante?

(2010)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Cela vient d’une enquête sur la population active de Statistique Canada. Je ne crois pas qu'elle permette cette distinction. Ce sont des gens qui ont dit n'avoir pu voter parce qu’ils n’avaient pas les pièces d’identité appropriées.

M. Mark Gerretsen:

Cela signifie simplement qu’ils n’avaient pas de pièce d’identité.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il est possible qu'ils soient inclus dans ce chiffre. Oui.

M. Mark Gerretsen:

Je suis sûr que cette question a déjà été soulevée devant le Comité, mais savez-vous s’il y a eu une fraude généralisée liée à l’utilisation de cartes d’électeur dérobées, à part des incidents ponctuels dont vous auriez entendu parler? Ce genre de fraude a pris de l'ampleur, que vous sachiez?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J’ai deux choses à dire à ce sujet. Tout d’abord, j’ai entendu bien des allégations au fil des ans. Chaque fois qu’Élections Canada ou le commissaire a demandé qu'on lui montre des détails, des indices tendant à étayer ces allégations, personne n’a jamais été en mesure de le faire. Aucun de ces cas ne portait sur l’identification, parce qu'on n'utilisait pas la carte d’information de l’électeur à des fins d’identification, sauf en 2011 pour les élections générales, où l’utilisation de la carte d’information de l’électeur comme pièce d’identité n'a posé aucun problème.

M. Mark Gerretsen:

D’accord.

C’est tout, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’aimerais comprendre comment vous vérifiez ces deux questions. Vous recueillez des données sur les gens qui se présentent au bureau de scrutin et se voient refuser la possibilité de voter? Élections Canada recueille cette information?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Jusqu’à maintenant, on ne l’a pas fait.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avez-vous pensé à le faire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous y avons réfléchi. La logistique d’une élection est assez complexe.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est ce que j’imagine. Supposons que quelqu’un se présente à la table du bureau de scrutin, voit que son nom est inscrit au registre et qu'après, pour une raison ou une autre, il ne peut pas voter, serait-il si difficile pour les vérificateurs autour de la table de noter sur un formulaire ou un feuillet qu’ils ont refusé à quelqu’un de voter faute d'avoir pu établir son identité ou pour éviter que ne se forme une file d'attente? Pour ce qui est du déroulement du scrutin, dans certains bureaux ce problème n'existe pas alors que dans d’autres, il est arrivé que des gens se fâchent et s’en aillent. Cela contribuerait au bon fonctionnement du système, je pense.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J’ai des sentiments partagés à ce sujet. Prenez la dernière élection générale, le vote par anticipation, vous vous souviendrez des files d’attente et du mécontentement. Les préposés au scrutin travaillent de longues heures sans prendre de pause santé, dans certains cas. Nous avons reçu des plaintes d’électeurs qui ne comprenaient pas pourquoi le préposé au scrutin mangeait devant eux.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Excusez-moi, à cause de quoi?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ils mangeaient devant les électeurs. Ces électeurs ne comprenaient pas, bien sûr, que les préposés au scrutin ont une journée de 16 heures sans aucune pause, alors nous prenons bien soin de ne pas alourdir leur fardeau.

On améliore les processus au fil du temps. On recourt aux horaires prolongés pour le vote par anticipation et on s’appuie sur la technologie. Il serait peut-être plus facile de se pencher là-dessus. On pourra peut-être se pencher sur les sondages sortis des urnes aux prochaines élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

A-t-on déjà étudié les répercussions de l'abaissement de l’âge du vote au Canada à Élections Canada?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pas à ma connaissance. Il y a un débat à ce sujet et des arguments pour et contre. C’est vraiment au Parlement de décider.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Un certain nombre de provinces ont envisagé cette possibilité dans le cadre de référendums. On l’a vu récemment au Royaume-Uni, où l’âge de la majorité électorale changeait selon les circonstances. On a examiné différents scénarios. Je suppose que lorsqu'il est passé de 21 à 18 ans chez nous, Élections Canada y aura réfléchi ou peut-être pas. Peut-être qu'on l'a changé comme ça, mais je soupçonne que non.

On parle souvent des jeunes et de la participation des jeunes. La motivation des électeurs, leur comportement est l'un des objets de vos recherches. D’après la plupart des recherches que j’ai vues, lorsque les jeunes votent à la première occasion, leur chance d’être des électeurs pour la vie augmente considérablement.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avez-vous également constaté que si on rate cette première occasion — si on est absent ou on décide de ne pas voter —, on a beaucoup moins de chances de voter un jour?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est exact. Les données montrent que les jeunes de 18 à 24 ans qui ne votent pas à la première ou à la deuxième élection ont plus tard dans la vie des habitudes de vote profondément différentes. Ceux qui votent tôt ont tendance à le faire tout au long de leur vie.

(2015)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous parlez de fardeaux. En parlant à des agents financiers qui font du bénévolat pendant les élections et s'acquittent parfois d'une lourde tâche administrative, tout pour une bonne cause, consistant à s'assurer que les fonds sont dépensés comme il se doit, j'ai appris que la charge de travail de tous ces malheureux bénévoles a augmenté considérablement au cours des trois ou quatre dernières élections. A-t-on réfléchi à Élections Canada aux moyens de rationaliser cette activité pour que la vérification puisse se poursuivre, sans pour autant épuiser les milliers de bénévoles qui tentent simplement d’être les agents financiers pour nous, les acteurs politiques?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

On y a réfléchi, bien sûr. Il n’y a pas de solution miracle. On a fait certaines recommandations, qui n’ont pas nécessairement été appuyées par le Comité ni mises en oeuvre dans le projet de loi. Par exemple, cela fait des années qu'on recommande de supprimer l'obligation d'avoir un compte bancaire pour qui n'organise pas de campagne financière. Pour une raison ou une autre, la loi continue de l'exiger.

On a recommandé qu'une subvention soit versée à l’agent officiel. C’est lui, à notre avis, qui porte le fardeau le plus lourd. Pour une raison quelconque, ce n’est pas dans le projet de loi. On poursuivra nos efforts à l'appui des agents officiels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si vous avez rendu publics les amendements ou les suggestions que vous avez faits au Comité dans le passé, il serait bon d’en avoir une version regroupée.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Bien sûr.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas ce qu’il en est pour les autres membres du Comité, mais lorsqu'on cherche un agent financier officiel, on évite de parler de ce qu’implique le travail, parce que rares sont ceux qui lèveraient la main s’ils savaient combien d’heures ils allaient travailler.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

On peut certainement les compiler à partir de nos deux derniers rapports. Le Comité a approuvé la subvention pour les agents officiels. Je m’en souviens parfaitement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez parlé de désinformation — je ne sais pas si c’était dans la loi ou si vous avez recommandé que cela y soit — au sujet des activités d’Élections Canada si quelqu’un se fait passer pour Élections Canada en ligne ou au moyen d’appels automatisés?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Une disposition de la loi actuelle porte sur l’usurpation d’identité.

Le commissaire était d’avis que le libellé de cette disposition pourrait être étendu au faux matériel de communication, mais ce n’était pas aussi clair. Nous avons appuyé cette recommandation.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce dans le projet de loi C-76?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C’est dans le projet de loi C-76.

Cependant, ce que l'on n’a pas recommandé et qu'on aurait dû recommander, et ce qu'on recommande aujourd’hui, c’est qu’il soit modifié pour inclure les documents qui sont présentés comme étant d'Élections Canada, pas seulement le matériel partisan faux, mais aussi de faux...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Les interdictions actuelles visent-elles quelqu’un qui prétend être le Parti libéral ou le Parti vert?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais essayer d’être plus clair.

Les dispositions actuelles de la Loi électorale du Canada, et non de ce projet de loi, couvrent l’usurpation d’identité en général. Ils comprennent l’usurpation d’identité d’un fonctionnaire d’Élections Canada et l’usurpation d’identité partisane. Le projet de loi C-76, conformément aux recommandations que nous avons faites, clarifierait cette question afin de couvrir également les faux matériels de communication. Pour que ce soit bien clair, sur les faux sites Web, les faux...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Par opposition à quelqu’un qui dit être d’Élections Canada.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Exactement. Cela vient du commissaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que cela va assez loin?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Selon le commissaire, ce n’était pas assez clair, et on est très heureux d’appuyer le renforcement de ces dispositions, mais il nous faudrait inclure Élections Canada.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons ouvrir un peu la porte aux interventions qui ne sont pas trop longues. Nous allons passer à M. Reid, puis à M. Richards.

M. Scott Reid:

Je serai très bref.

Je suppose qu’on proposera des amendements portant sur au moins quelques-uns des sept domaines que vous avez soulignés, et nous pourrons tous en prendre connaissance lorsqu’ils seront présentés. Une fois ces amendements présentés, seriez-vous disposé à revenir devant le Comité pour nous dire si, à votre avis, ils ont atteint les objectifs que vous visiez? Cela vous conviendrait-il?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Mes fonctionnaires ou moi-même pourrions certainement venir témoigner au besoin, si le Comité le souhaite. Bien sûr, nous témoignerons chaque fois.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous allons certainement proposer la motion pour permettre cela de ce côté-ci.

Je n’ai pas vérifié auprès de qui que ce soit, mais je soupçonne que les députés du parti ministériel seraient aussi d’accord.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne serai pas aussi bref que M. Reid. Ce n’est probablement pas très souvent non plus, j’imagine. Si vous pensez que vous devez me couper la parole et me remettre sur la liste, faites-le.

On a mentionné la carte d’information de l’électeur à quelques reprises. De toute évidence, les membres du Comité divergent sur la question de savoir s’il s’agit d’une forme d’identification. Est-ce une sage décision ou non? Bien sûr, chacun a son propre point de vue là-dessus.

Le projet de loi autorise son utilisation comme pièce d’identité. Si ce projet de loi est adopté, avez-vous l’intention de le faire?

(2020)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si le projet de loi est adopté, j’ai l’intention de l’autoriser après avoir consulté les partis politiques, par l’entremise du comité consultatif des partis politiques, pour voir s’il y a des façons d’apaiser, peut-être, certaines des préoccupations des partis. Je veux consulter les parties sur la façon de procéder. Pour ce qui est de l’autorisation, j’ai l’intention de le faire.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez certainement rencontré un meilleur obstacle que le gouvernement pour ce qui est d’essayer de travailler avec les parties, alors c’est bien. Je ne m’attends évidemment pas à ce que vous fassiez des commentaires à ce sujet.

En ce qui concerne les électeurs expatriés, j’en ai parlé tout à l’heure avec les fonctionnaires. Je ne sais pas si vous savez ce qui s'est dit. J’ai abordé la question du retrait de la disposition concernant l'intention de revenir un jour au Canada.

Si le Comité voulait apporter un amendement à ce sujet, lui serait-il facile de le faire selon vous? Si oui, comment?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

L’amendement ne pose aucune difficulté. On a déjà fait valoir, et je suis d’accord, que l’applicabition de cette disposition a ses limites. Elle exprime une intention. L’intention est difficile à vérifier. Que le retour ait lieu ou non n’est pas pertinent, à ce stade-là. Cela n’est pertinent que plus tard.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord.

Vous avez probablement entendu parler de l’autre question, on l’a soulevée en effet à plusieurs reprises pendant la période des questions et ailleurs. Elle porte sur les voyages des ministres et les annonces du gouvernement. Ce qui nous préoccupe, c’est qu'elle tend, selon nous, à avantager le parti au pouvoir, parce qu’il y a une nouvelle restriction dans la période préélectorale quant à ce que les partis politiques peuvent faire, mais lorsque les voyages ministériels et la publicité gouvernementale peuvent se faire, bien sûr, le parti au pouvoir pourrait en bénéficier. Nous craignons que cette période préélectorale soit plus longue que la période pendant laquelle le gouvernement dit qu’il limiterait la publicité. Bien entendu, il n’y a aucune restriction concernant les voyages ministériels.

Si nous voulions examiner un amendement à ce sujet, verriez-vous...? Je pense qu’il y a plusieurs façons de le faire. Évidemment, vous pourriez essayer d’harmoniser cela. Ce ne serait pas la loi électorale, je le sais, mais cela pourrait se faire dans le contexte de cette loi, je pense, ou cela pourrait se faire de façon à ce que cela devienne des dépenses électorales.

Je me demande ce que vous en pensez. Est-ce faisable et possible? Si oui, vous nous conseilleriez de nous y prendre comment, si c’est ce que l'on cherchait à faire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Quelques commentaires. Tout d’abord, l'argument avancé plus tôt aujourd’hui, c’est que dans la mesure où déséquilibre il y a, c’est du côté de la publicité, parce qu’il n’y a pas de limite avant les élections pour les déplacements des partis ou des députés.

Pour ce qui est de la publicité, comme vous le savez, cela relève d'une politique gouvernementale. Je serais bien sûr favorable à une certaine harmonisation des échéanciers. Cela ne devrait sans doute pas relever de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Sauf erreur, je constate que la politique actuelle exige également que toute la publicité soit non partisane. Si elle est non partisane, ce n'est pas une contribution, alors je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit la meilleure façon de procéder. Il serait préférable, je pense, d’harmoniser les échéanciers, mais cela doit se faire dans le cadre de la politique.

M. Blake Richards:

Dans le fond, cette idée d’harmonisation ne vous déplaît pas. Ce pourrait être une approche bénéfique, selon vous.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À mon avis, ce serait logique. C’est l’un des avantages d’avoir un plafond des dépenses préélectorales relativement peu élevé. Cela permet cette forme d’harmonisation. Si le plafond des dépenses préélectorales était beaucoup plus élevé, mis à part les questions liées à la Charte que cela soulèverait, il serait également impossible d’envisager de ne faire aucune publicité gouvernementale pendant une période prolongée.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord.

La dernière fois que vous avez comparu devant nous, vous avez parlé de certaines choses qu'il serait impossible de mettre en oeuvre. J’aimerais aborder deux ou trois sujets précis et vous demander quels changements vous pourriez apporter avant les prochaines élections et lesquels non.

Cela concerne précisément les dépenses des tiers. C’est l’un des domaines qui m’intéressent le plus. Pourriez-vous nous donner une idée de ce qui, selon vous, peut et ne peut pas être mis en oeuvre à temps, compte tenu de la situation actuelle? Je ne sais pas quand nous pouvons raisonnablement nous attendre à ce que ce projet de loi soit adopté, que ce soit au printemps ou à l’automne.

Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de la situation?

(2025)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

En ce qui concerne les éléments obligatoires du projet de loi, et non ceux qui donnent un certain pouvoir discrétionnaire au DGE — le régime de tiers est un élément obligatoire —, je suis convaincu que le projet de loi sera mis en oeuvre. Ce que j’ai dit l’autre jour et ce que je peux répéter aujourd’hui, c’est que la façon dont il est mis en oeuvre n’est peut-être pas la meilleure façon de faire à long terme.

Plus précisément, par exemple, dans le cas des tiers, nous aimerions passer à une forme de transparence en ligne qui va au-delà des simples PDF. On peut faire une recherche dans un rapport, mais on ne peut pas examiner les contributions, pas facilement, entre les rapports de tiers en gardant les fichiers PDF affichés en ligne. Ça exige énormément de travail.

C’est certainement le genre de travail qui ne sera pas fait pour cette élection. Cela ne veut pas dire que les règles ne seront pas mises en oeuvre, mais plutôt qu’après les élections, on pourra améliorer les modalités de mise en oeuvre.

M. Blake Richards:

Y a-t-il des aspects qui, selon vous, vont au-delà de ce régime de tiers ou de tout autre régime, de façon générale? Y a-t-il des aspects que vous ne pensez pas pouvoir mettre en oeuvre dans la loi? Est-ce que les compromis — je ne sais pas comment le dire autrement — que vous auriez à faire dans le cadre de la mise en oeuvre pourraient devenir problématiques? Autrement dit, qui nous empêcherait de répondre aux exigences de la loi.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, je pense que nous y répondrons. Comme je l’ai dit, du point de vue de la transparence, il est possible de faire mieux, mais autrement, on répondra aux exigences.

J’aurais aimé avancer sur certains aspects facultatifs, mais je ne sais toujours pas si je pourrai le faire. Concernant le vote par anticipation, par exemple, la mise en place de bureaux de vote mobiles n'exige qu'une légère modification de l'infrastructure informatique, mais comme la priorité va à tout ce qui est obligatoire, je ne sais pas si on aura le temps. On ne l’a pas eu jusqu'ici et on aimerait bien l’avoir à l’avenir, mais peut-être pas pour les prochaines élections générales.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Je pense que cela me donne ce que je cherchais. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Y a-t-il quelqu’un d’autre?

D’accord. Merci beaucoup d’être ici. Avez-vous un dernier commentaire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Mme Lawson pourrait peut-être répondre à cette question.

Mme Anne Lawson:

Pardon, monsieur le président, je veux simplement répondre parce que la question a été soulevée plus tôt. Lors de l'examen des ébauches de la loi — et je l’ai confirmé avec certains de mes collègues —, nous avons signé des ententes de confidentialité. Sans entrer dans le détail de ce que nous avons vu et quand, le gros de ce que nous avons vu était avant Noël, pour répondre à la question précédente.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d’être de nouveau parmi nous à cette heure tardive. Je remercie tous ceux qui ont appuyé le Comité aujourd’hui. La journée a été longue. Merci à tout le personnel pour tout.

Y a-t-il autre chose pour le bien de la nation?

Nous nous reverrons demain à 11 heures.

La séance est levée. Allocution de Stéphane Perrault

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 28, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.