header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-29 PROC 107

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1230)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon. This is the 107th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. We are in public now.

After we deal with Blake's motion, the clerk definitely needs some serious feedback if we're going to travel. We have to finalize a lot of arrangements and get some feedback to the clerk on the rest of the process on this bill.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I want to wait until Blake's motion. But are you talking about the Scott Brison motion?

The Chair:

Whatever he's going to raise now. It's up to Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Mr. Chair, I'll ask for a bit of advice from our clerk, because the problem that now arises in my understanding is that the deadline for us to confirm the appointment of a new CEO or not is June 7. Is that correct?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Pursuant to the Standing Orders, it's up to the House to ratify.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We can make a recommendation as to our thoughts can we not, if we choose?

The Clerk:

The House can ratify the appointment without any input from the committee, independently of the appointment.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

The Clerk:

The Standing Order reads the committee may study the nomination for up to 30 calendar days, which takes us to June 7.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. So if we wanted to have the House consider anything that we had to say it would have to be done prior to that date.

The Clerk:

Yes, that's right.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That does present a bit of a problem, obviously, given the suggestions and discussions that took place last night about travelling next week. That would put us into a position where....

I guess the government in trying to rush through this elections bill, which they waited forever on, puts us in a position where we're not giving that bill anywhere near the due justice it deserves. I would argue, frankly, based on what's before us there, that we're not going to do our jobs properly as legislators on that piece of legislation. It simply is not going to happen. The fact of the matter is that we will not be meeting what I would say is our proper duty as legislators on that bill. At the same time, we are also going to say that we're not going to meet our proper duty as members of this committee in dealing with an appointment for a new Elections Canada CEO. If we put ourselves in a position to travel next week, we will be left with a situation where we actually cannot perform our duties by having the Minister of Democratic Institutions come and speak to the process.

This really, really is troublesome to me. Actually, I'll be frank that I'm at a little bit of a loss as to what to even suggest. That said, I suppose I'll still bring forward the motion and move it here. As a committee, I guess we can try to decide how best to deal with that. I think it's a travesty, frankly, that we're not going to give either one of these things due justice, but that's the reality. If the government chooses to force through this motion that they handed around to us last night, then that's the reality we're faced with. I guess we'll see how that goes.

Having said that, we can move this, and I will have some amendments to make to it. The reality of the situation is that some things have changed since the notice of motion was given. I'll get to those in a second. At the end of the day, I think we should still be trying to do our proper duty here. If the efforts that are being made by the government to ram through their Bill C-76 prevent us from doing our jobs properly not only on that legislation but also on this motion, and therefore the appointment of the CEO, I think at the very least we still should undertake to do our duty properly even if it is after the fact, which would be significantly unfortunate.

Having said that, I'll read the motion that I gave notice of, and then I will suggest what I think are the appropriate amendments. The notice of motion was the following: That the Committee invite the Acting Minister of Democratic Institutions, Scott Brison, to appear within two weeks of the adoption of this motion, to answer questions regarding the appointment of a new Chief Electoral Officer, for no less than two hours, and that this meeting be televised.

There's an obvious amendment required here. I was unaware that the minister would be returning so shortly after this notice of motion was given. It was my mistake. I probably should have just used the title of the minister, and of course the acting minister would have come in place of the minister. I did not do that, and therefore I'll make that amendment now.

The amendment would change “Acting Minister of Democratic Institutions, Scott Brison” to “Minister of Democratic Institutions”. It would be replacing that wording for obvious reasons.

I'll make that motion for the amendment first, I guess.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

(1235)

Mr. Scott Reid:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, I just want to find out if someone can amend their own motion in this manner. Do you have to get unanimous consent of the committee? How does it work?

The Clerk:

Normally, the person moving the motion would not be able to amend their own motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

In that scenario, then, I'll move the motion as it stands and hope that one of my colleagues will take up the challenge to make the amendment for me.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm assuming that the motion is now moved and you've finished your remarks.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I would ask to be put back on the list, because I'd like to speak to it again, after the amendment is moved.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I move the amendment that the words “Scott Brison” be struck out and that “Karina Gould” be—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Actually, it would be all of that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh, right. Sorry.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Replace “Acting Minister of Democratic Institutions, Scott Brison”.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll just read it. It will now read like this: That the committee invite the Minister of Democratic Institutions, Karina Gould, to appear within two weeks of the adoption of this motion, to answer questions regarding the appointment of a new Chief Electoral Officer, for no less than two hours, and that this meeting be televised.

As the proposer of the amendment, if I may speak to it briefly, I would say that obviously this was done with good intentions, not realizing that Ms. Gould would be back as minister. I didn't know she was coming back as minister until I actually saw her in the House. I was very glad to see her back for a whole pile of reasons. First, I like her. Second, I think she understands this legislation better than Scott Brison does, and I mean no disrespect to Scott. He's a very smart guy and he at least pretends to like me, which warms the cockles of my heart, obviously.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Is this part of the motion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, but this is a public meeting and I want to make sure that people know how much Scott Brison likes me.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That should get you re-elected, I think.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It should put me over the top in my riding.

Obviously, he didn't design the legislation. We know from the Chief Electoral Officer's comments yesterday that he was in consultation with the department back when Karina Gould was the minister in charge, so Scott wouldn't have known all of that stuff. He does have other duties as well. It's a lot to ask of anybody, especially with a voluminous piece of legislation like this. Obviously, with regard to all of those things, it's helpful to have Karina back. I wanted to make that clear.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What I meant was that I wanted to be on the speaking list for the main motion if the amendment was to pass.

The Chair:

Okay.

On the amendment, Mr. Bittle is next on the list.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

I'll wait for the main motion.

The Chair:

There appear to be no more comments on this difficult amendment, so we'll vote on the amendment.

(Amendment agreed to)

The Chair: On the motion as amended, go ahead, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

I do want to speak to the motion itself. I appreciate the indulgence of everyone on that. It was obviously a mistake on my part to have done it that way to begin with, and now we've resolved that.

We had the task of taking a look at whether we would agree or confirm or give our recommendation to the House that the appointment be made. That duty is something we as a committee should take quite seriously. We have that duty.

In that spirit, we had the chosen appointee—sorry, it was the second appointee chosen. The first one, for some mysterious reason, was withdrawn. It seems that no one is yet aware of why that is, including, to my understanding, the person who was actually the original appointee. It's a very odd circumstance, to say the least, and is certainly suspicious. I would think that the minister would want the opportunity to clarify what occurred, what happened and why. I would think that would help us in determining whether the right decision was, in fact, made.

When the person who has been chosen, the acting CEO, has been before our committee, I've always been satisfied with his level of knowledge and so on, so that's not of concern to me. Certainly we want to make sure the right decision was made with regard to this appointment. Part of the right decision being made is ensuring that the process was proper and fair. When there is something as odd as what occurred in this situation in a process, that is in doubt.

It may well be that there is nothing all that odd or suspicious to the situation at all, but there's only one way to find that out and that's to ask. Obviously, the best person to do that with is the minister. That is the reason I am making this suggestion.

I'm obviously aware of the logistical challenges that are now created by the government trying to ram through this piece of legislation, Bill C-76, but I'm hopeful we can find some way to undertake this and do it properly. It would only make sense. I would certainly hope that all members of this committee would support it.

(1240)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll speak very briefly to the motion.

I appreciate where Blake is coming from, but with respect to privacy and privacy legislation, the minister can only comment on the individual who has been appointed in seeking the House to vote on that. It would be two hours of “I can't comment on that because of privacy legislation,” and that's of no value to this committee. That's why I can't support the motion.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I had actually not meant to get back on the speakers list, but do I need to comment on that.

We have no way of knowing and I don't think we will wind up knowing, but perhaps there are privacy considerations relating to private information appertaining to either the initial appointee to this position, Mr. Boda from Saskatchewan, or some other individual being referenced here. However, given the giant gas cloud of it all being a big secret, the fog bank of “Gosh, we can't tell you anything”, to say it's unhelpful is putting it mildly.

I think it's designed to prevent us from doing our jobs. It may be designed in a way that is actually not permissible, but how do we know, since it's all a big fog bank of secrecy? The bigger the fog bank of secrecy, the bigger the curtain behind which the guy with the levers is doing his job—that's a reference to The Wizard of Oz, by the way—and the more the munchkins will be fooled and impressed by his or her ostensible grandeur.

Just to be clear, that was actually in reference to me, not to anybody else.

I do think that's an issue. There are many things the minister could share with us that, in my experience, much as I like her, she has not been sharing with us. As we saw just yesterday, by way of example, she didn't say “no comment”, but she found other words with which to say “no comment” or that she wasn't going to answer a question. Her words were, “I'm here and prepared to answer questions about the substance of the bill”, not about the timing of the bill, not about the rush to get the bill through.

The fact is, the decision to rush the bill through is one made at the cabinet level, and there was only one person in the room who was a member of cabinet and had any say in it, who had an awareness of what was being done or would have a chance to take the views of the committee back to the cabinet, who was involved in the drafting and scheduling of the legislation, the timing that caused it to come out so late. Having to rush this bill through the House by June 12 would have been an easy matter had the bill been developed, say, a year earlier, or six months earlier, and had it been divided into several slices so that the package we'd get at this late date would be much smaller. Several other pieces of the legislation, containing other elements of the bill, had been dealt with at some earlier time, and lest anyone make the claim that this could not have been done, I note that Bill C-33 was introduced some months ago.

(1245)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I believe it was almost a year ago.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It might even be more than a year ago.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It was 18 months ago.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It was introduced 18 months ago.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Who's counting, though?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think Maryam Monsef was the minister at the time, and the idea that the government might be introducing electoral reform was still a live issue at the time. Indeed, at that time, we were being told repeatedly by the Prime Minister and the then minister, Maryam Monsef, that they were firm, that 2015 would be the last election conducted under first past the post. It almost seems like talking about an ancient species that existed at the same time as the dinosaurs and remains unchanged to this very day when we talk about Bill C-33. Yet it sat there, unchanged, unmoved. Some of its provisions are contained in this law and would not be part of this ginormous bill if they'd been passed then.

The creation of an artificial crisis is something that is very relevant. Now coming back to the other artificial crisis created by the weird way in which one candidate was put forward and another was not does not convince me very much.

I note that in Mr. Bittle's comments—and I suspect this is precisely the sort of thing that makes Scott Brison not like him very much—he didn't say, “So the minister can't make it for two hours. I therefore am going to amend it to one hour, because instead of having all this empty space, we think there's enough to fill one hour instead of two.”

With that in mind, Mr. Chair, I'm going to see if that would make the whole thing more palatable to the Liberals, and I therefore move to amend this motion by removing the words “no less than two hours”, and change them to “no less than one hour” and see what happens in terms of Liberal acceptance of the motion when it's worded that way.

The Chair:

Okay, on the amendment.

Mr. Cullen on the main motion.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is kind of a mess of the government's own making, and I'm not referring to members here who are not in cabinet; it wasn't your decision. This is an officer of Parliament, and the rules require that, when an officer of Parliament is appointed or suggested, there are consultations with the other parties. That never happened. It didn't happen on the languages commissioner, which ended up blowing up in the government's face. It didn't happen in any of the other officers of Parliament, nor did it happen with Mr. Boda's nomination, nor did it happen with this recent nomination. All we're left with is confusion.

The interest I have more so is in the government explaining publicly what the consultation process actually was. I know what it was from our point of view. It was a letter, “Here's our nominee, you've been consulted.” Two weeks later, “Here's our other nominee. Congratulations, you've been consulted again.” It's laughable in its incomprehension and lack of respect. You talk about respect for these nominees, who are high-profile people with long, distinguished careers. It's not laughable in the sense of what these people are supposed to do, which is to govern our elections for 10 years in this case, audit the government for many years, and be the environmental assessment people for our country.

I take it quite seriously, and David Christopherson, who normally occupies this chair, takes it even more seriously than I do. We've made recommendations to the government of a better process that would consult with the opposition. By the way, that would innoculate the government, if we're interested in that, from the accusations that come by simply not consulting and being arrogant about it. Pardon my accusation, but it's true.

My interest is not saying what was wrong with Mr. Boda. I don't know what's happened to his reputation, but he was the nominee and then suddenly he wasn't.

I had a government member accuse me of leaking his name, by the way, which was ironic, since the leak came out of the office of the Minister of Democratic Institutions, but never mind that.

The ability of these people to do their jobs requires support from all sides of the House, and I know the chair would agree with that, that they don't work for the cabinet. They're officers of Parliament. We hire them. Only we can fire them, but this process has not been well done under this government, I think, by anybody's assessment, and I would hope by their own self-reflection.

Support for this motion comes from me directly, not with our interim CEO, the nominee per se, but to talk to the minister about what the consultation process was like. Maybe it was different for the Conservatives. I don't know, but I suspect it was not. Certainly anybody who believes in the idea of consultation, which this government talks about all the time, means that it should mean something. In this case, it meant nothing. It was not consultation at all.

(1250)

The Chair:

Okay. We'll vote on Mr. Reid's amendment to change from two hours to one hour.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let's record the vote.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 8; nays 1)

The Chair:

The motion stays the same, except it's for one hour instead of two.

Mr. Cullen, do you have anything more on the main motion, the amendment?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, my comments reflect on the amendment, which is a reasonable one—to reduce to an hour—and reflect further to the main motion.

The Chair:

Do you want to speak to the main motion now?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, I'm good.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Richards and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

The first thing I'll do is point out the very brief, dismissive comments made by those on the other side, that this motion simply consisted of, well, there's no point in having the minister come in here and say she won't comment for an hour—or for two hours, I guess, at that time. We saw that happen yesterday.

Whether it's privacy issues or otherwise, that may well be the case, and that may be what she chooses to do. However, that doesn't mean there shouldn't be the opportunity to ask questions of her. It doesn't mean we shouldn't do our jobs as committee members. If the minister refuses to do her job and answer the questions, then Canadians will judge that. That doesn't mean we as a committee would say, “Oh, well, there's no point in doing it because she won't answer anyway.” If that were the case, we probably wouldn't have question period every day, because there would be no point then either. I don't think that's true. I think there is a point to it, and if people choose not to answer, that is something people should be judged for. If she chooses not to answer questions, that's her right.

Of course, if we're talking about legitimate privacy issues, fine; that may be the case. However, there are a lot of things in this process that certainly would not qualify for the excuse that we can't give you an answer to that because of privacy. For example, I'll start with....

To be frank, Mr. Chair, I intended this to happen quickly, but I'm a little angry now by the dismissiveness on this motion, on something so important, so it may not be so quick now. It's unfortunate, because it should have been quick.

To follow up on the consultation process that Mr. Cullen mentioned, the type of so-called consultation that happened with his party, the letter that said “Here's our appointment”, it didn't ask what we thought about it. It's the same letter we got, I'm sure. I didn't see their letter, but I'm sure it's the same. It was simply, “Here's our appointment.” It wasn't, “What did you think? You have until x date to let us know your thoughts.” It was that this is the appointment they made.

Essentially, that's what the letter consisted of. It was the one name, which has been linked to the media, obviously. I think it was two or three weeks later that another name came. It was very much like the kind of comments we had from the other side today. It was very dismissive. It was sort of, “Well, other candidates have been withdrawn and here's the new candidate.” It wasn't, “What do you think about that?” It was, “We're just letting you know.”

I don't think that is in the spirit of what this government promised it would do. It was always going to work with other parties. I don't see that happening, so let's answer to that. That doesn't cause any privacy issues; that's something the minister should answer for. It's a decision that her government has made or she has made, so let her answer to it.

In terms of the memorandum that was drafted for the Prime Minister on this issue, which was obtained through access to information, it says right in that memo that one of the things that should occur in this process, and I quote from the memo to the Prime Minister: “Consultation would occur with the Procedure and House Affairs Committee to ensure transparency and to capture its views.”

According to the very memo that was given to the Prime Minister of this country, this committee is supposed to be consulted with. How is it supposed to be consulted with to ensure transparency and to capture its views? If we're going to ensure transparency, doesn't that mean the minister should probably answer some questions about the process? That would seem like transparency. Maybe this government views transparency in the same way they view openness to amendments, when we heard from the minister yesterday, “Oh, we're open to amendments, but we won't accept them.”

Okay, great. They'll give us the chance to put forward our amendments, but they won't accept them. That's quite open, much like the type of transparency we're seeing here. Capturing the views of the committee, I would assume means the committee would be asked for its opinion. It wouldn't just be, “Oh, here's the second appointment after we withdrew the other one for who knows what reason. We'll bring him in and the committee can ask him some questions for an hour.”

(1255)



How does that capture the views of the committee? It doesn't, does it? Maybe the government should follow its own words and capture the views of the committee. In order to do that, they have to let us do our job properly, which means the minister needs to come here and answer.

Beyond all that, this process has taken about two years. Why, I don't know. Who might be able to answer that question? The minister, perhaps? One would sure hope, but if we don't have the minister come to answer the questions, how will we know, and how can we properly make a decision, and how can we share our views? Does the government want to capture our views, as it claimed it did in this memo to the Prime Minister?

The idea of why bother having the minister and it's a waste of time because she won't answer the questions anyway, as the government member said, is not right. She should come here, and if she chooses not to answer the questions, she should be held accountable for that.

Now, if there are legitimate privacy issues, fine, but there are plenty of things, and I've just outlined a few of them, that can be commented on here. Frankly, this is an officer of Parliament, someone who is supposed to serve this Parliament, as was mentioned already, for 10 years. It's the person who runs our elections in this country. It's a very significant and important role. If the government messes up the process and refuses to answer questions about that process, then how can this committee do its job? Remember, it said we're supposed to capture this committee's views.

Well, we don't have the answers. We don't have the information required to make an assessment and properly give our views. It seems to me as though what we're hearing from the government side is that they don't really care about trying to do that job and that they don't really care what the views are of this committee.

Well, I want to do my job properly. I want to ensure we're doing what we're supposed to do as parliamentarians. If you don't question the decisions, and I don't care what side of the House of Commons you sit on, you should care about doing your job properly and questioning the decisions of the executive. That's our job as members of Parliament. We should all want to do that.

I'm really quite offended by the comments that were made that there's no point having the minister come here because she won't answer the questions anyway; she can't answer questions. Well, she darn well should. I will be appalled if this motion doesn't pass. I thought it was an easy no-brainer. I really did. Why would we not want to do our jobs properly? Why would we not want to ensure that the Prime Minister lives up to his own words? I would sure think, even if I were sitting on the other side, elected under the banner of the Prime Minister, that I would want to make sure he keeps his word. I would think that would be helpful in getting re-elected, if I were on that side. If the Prime Minister chooses not keep his word, I would take that fairly seriously. I certainly do over here, and I know my colleagues do as well.

I sure hope that we will be given the opportunity to do our jobs, that the minister will be expected to do hers, and that the government will be expected to live up to its word. The only way that any of that will happen is for us to pass this motion, and I will point out we very generously made the offer to amend it, to cut the time in half, to help facilitate this. I get the jam that the government has put itself in here. Let's hope that members on the other side choose to take a second thought to this and not be so dismissive of it.

(1300)

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Mr. Chair, on a point of order. I would point out that we are at 1:01 p.m., which would be the normal hour of adjournment for this committee. I look to you, Mr. Chair, as to whether we will be adjourning at 1:01 p.m.

The Chair:

The committee chair cannot adjourn the meeting without the consent of the majority of the members, unless the chair decides that a case of disorder or misconduct is so serious as to prevent the committee from continuing its work.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I would like to follow up on that point of order.

Would it not be incumbent upon you, as chair, to then canvass the committee because we are past the time we would ordinarily adjourn. Would it not be incumbent upon you to canvass the committee for its thoughts on that, and perhaps put it to a vote?

The Chair:

You can move to adjourn the meeting, if you want.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You as chair would not do that? Someone would make a motion to adjourn?

The Chair:

They could.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Is that how it would work? I'm trying to understand the procedures.

The Chair:

Is there general...?

There doesn't seem to be general consent to adjourn.

As I said earlier, if we're going to travel, we'll have to have a lengthy discussion on that, because we need a budget.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If I understand correctly, you're saying that the meeting would continue. You wouldn't canvass the members. It's only if someone made the motion to adjourn. Correct?

(1305)

The Chair:

I just did canvass, and I didn't see a majority in favour, so, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, on a point of order, am I on the speaking list after Mr. Richards?

The Chair:

Yes, you're after Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think I have concluded my remarks.

I hope we can go to a vote on this. I sure hope that the other side will choose to be far less dismissive of trying to do our jobs properly.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Were you going to move adjournment?

Mr. Blake Richards:

No, I want to see a vote on the motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right.

I come back to the issue of consultation and secrecy, but actually, before I do that, Mr. Chair, with your permission, I actually meant to raise this as a separate point of order. I hope you'll indulge me.

The issue of adjournment in these kinds of proceedings is, of course, a bit touchy in this committee. There's an interesting history, and as we are engaging in essentially the same process once again, I'll just suggest that what we do with respect to determining how to adjourn and the search for implied consent will have more weight with those who are trying to figure out how to revise House of Commons Procedure and Practice—What is it right now? It's Bosc and Gagnon—than will what has happened elsewhere.

So I would like to make the suggestion that the practice of looking around the room and seeing if there is consent, and taking one's time in doing this, as you just did, ought to govern us just as much when the—I don't know how to put this any different way—party of which the chair is a member would like proceedings to wrap up as it does when the party of which the chair is not a member would like things to wrap up. There was an inconsistency last time. I think the process of looking around the room, seeking consent, and taking at least several seconds to do that is appropriate.

I can't remember how much time you took. Maybe it was 10 seconds. That, I think, is a reasonable thing to do, to see about consent. Consent implies “I'm looking to see if there's a consensus”, and not “I'm looking to see if there's a majority.” That could be dealt with by means of someone moving adjournment. That's where you establish majority and so that's why I asked Mr. Richards if he was going to move adjournment. We then would have found out where the majority sits. There would have been a vote.

In the absence of a vote, presumably the assumption is that any one member can deny a consensus, and everything we do is structured around that basic assumption that you have to move to an actual vote in one form or another in order to establish that the majority is in charge. I'm just saying that so that we can make sure we're consistent, should we be here for some length of time, in the way in which we wrap up these proceedings, when the government decides that they would like the proceedings to be wrapped up.

Let me now turn to the issues of this very expansive definition of secrecy and of privacy in particular. I find that there are certain buzzwords that point to salutary and widely accepted concepts but in a fuzzy way that permits the same word to have different meanings at different times, based on the convenience of the speaker—I don't mean the Speaker of the House; I mean the person then holding the floor—around terms like privacy and dignity. These are terms that, when narrowly constructed, have unanimous support of everybody, the vast majority of Canadians. When very, very broadly constructed, they are used as a way of withholding information, disclosure, access, democracy, and so on. We saw the term “privacy” being used today for that purpose. The implication of Mr. Bittle's words was that—

(1310)

The Chair:

Do you have a point of order?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

No, I just want to go on the list.

The Chair:

You want to go on the list. Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The implication of Mr. Bittle's words was that there's some piece of information that would be embarrassing to somebody—I got the feeling that there was a little subtle implication that it was embarrassing to the initial appointee to the position—that has to be withheld from us.

So out of that, we are deprived of a series of pieces of information that, I think, are legitimately our right. We took an extraordinary length of time to arrive at an appointee, regardless of which of the two appointees we're talking about.

What is the name of the fellow from Saskatchewan again?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Michael Boda.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, Mr. Boda, and then Mr. Perrault.

It does not speak badly of the merits of either of these two excellent individuals to say that the process itself left Canada's electoral system in limbo for a long time. Now, because everything's been left to a very late hour, we have, once again, the same kind of last-second chaos that has prevailed in the electoral reform issue where the government spun its wheels for 18 months while I got up repeatedly to point out that time was running out, and certain models are going to become inaccessible to us, let alone consulting the people via a referendum.

For 18 months they spun their wheels and then said there was a mad panic until committee produced a result the government didn't like, and then suddenly, it wasn't a priority at all, and the Prime Minister announced that he'd been opposed to proportional representation from the very start, even though he'd had his minister steering the course of the proceedings: “The Prime Minister and I have no favourite model, and we're open to all possibilities.” At one point, following a meeting in Victoria, I think, she said she was starting to drift towards one model. That was all contradicted when the Prime Minister came out and said that, since before the election, he'd only ever believed that preferential balloting was an option.

Given the fact that preferential balloting is, compared to proportional representation, a very straightforward system, it doesn't require vast changes. It's not as if he was saying there were multiple versions of preferential to look at. There's really one and one only. There are actually two: optional preferential and mandatory preferential.

The Chair:

Could you kind of stay closer to this motion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh yes. That which is implicit in my words will become fully evident to all in a very short period of time. My words are, I would say, pregnant with meaning and lots of meaning.

As you know, sometimes I have these thoughts that, like the fetus developing inside a pregnant whale, take months and months, even years, to develop.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Blake Richards:

Just when you thought it couldn't get any better.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're saying we could be here a while.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We saw something being slowed down unnecessarily. I don't know whether it's mismanagement that led to that in that particular case or in the case of the current legislation, or in the case of.... Professionally I'm not talking about the decision, I'm talking about the appointment process for the Chief Electoral Officer or for any other appointment processes, which are also held up for an inordinate amount of time. I don't know whether it's a process issue or whether it's an execution issue.

I would like to know because this is a pattern. We have a right to know. Saying it's all private information is just a way of saying, “We're not going to show you what goes on, and you just have to trust us that there's a secret that we are obliged to keep as a government as opposed to a secret that we in practice are obliged to share but we choose not to share for reasons that have to do with the fact that we're a little embarrassed by the fact that we're kind of incompetent at this sort of thing.”

I don't ascribe nefarious motives to the government for doing what it did in this matter. I don't know who said this, but I've always thought it was profound, that one ought never to ascribe to machiavellianism that which can be explained by ineptitude. I'm fully prepared to believe that the government was just inept in this matter. I can only speculate as to what the reasons for that ineptitude might be: too many chefs? Alternatively, in the case of this government, the problem is one chef who has to decide on everything, no sous-chefs, and it is difficult to play to the entire dinner for many people. I used to work in a kitchen, by the way.

Without the assistance of people other than the head chef, I think that's the problem here. Everything's got to wait until Justin Trudeau says yes or no personally, and that does not speed up processes very much, not in my experience.

I think that explains what happened during last year's filibusters. It took a month to finally get the issue all the way to the top echelon. In the interim, we'd all come away more enlightened than we currently are. We developed an entirely new set of procedures, allowing us to have a back-and-forth conversation in the middle of the filibuster, the key principle of which was named after my esteemed colleague Mr. Simms. While that speaks well to the people on this committee and their ability to work together, it doesn't speak well to the nature of highly centralized decision-making, which I think may be the problem here. If so, we could learn that without revealing any secrets about Ms. Sahota, Mr. Parent, or any other person other than the secret of what's going on behind that curtain in the middle of the emerald city, where I think one wizard has too many levers to twiddle with and just can't keep up with all the decisions that these highly centralized decision-making structures have caused. That's my theory.

I don't know that is the problem, but it's a problem which occurs to me, and if I'm wrong, I could be disabused of my mistaken notion by having the minister come here for an hour and explain what was going on. We might very well leave impressed.

I do think I'm right in saying that the minister, on the whole, is a very intelligent person who is able to express herself eloquently, when she is given liberty to do so, to defend her government's practices and to show there is genuine goodwill to improve the practices in the future. I think that on the whole, she has been able to juggle a very difficult portfolio and certain personal challenges, of which we're all aware, with a capacity that I think very few other people could manage, so I think she could handle an hour-long meeting. I really do. I think she could do it with ease. We'd all come away more enlightened than we currently are.

(1315)



That is why I say this whole secrecy argument doesn't really hold up very well. It's too broad. It's too inclusive. It is too much the use of a term that has a fungible meaning—an expandable, contractible meaning. It's the use of what is known as a motte and bailey argument. Secrecy can mean something very specific, like in the Official Secrets Act, or it can mean something very broad, some information that would make somebody feel uncomfortable, and good taste forbids us from going in that direction.

I will mention, now that I've raised the Official Secrets Act, a very strong counter-argument to what Mr. Bittle is putting forward. Let's say, for the sake of argument, it is the case there is something that actually would qualify as an official secret, a cabinet confidence that really cannot be shared with the members of this committee and the public. There is a way around this. We know this because the government has actually actively offered exactly this way of handling things.

Do you remember when our Conservative leader, Honourable Andrew Scheer, was raising the issue of Daniel Jean, the national security adviser, and his commentary relating to the actions of the Indian government and the conspiracy theory that Mr. Jean put forward? The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness stood up in the House of Commons and said, well, they were happy.

(1320)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Chair, I rise on a point of order. I apologize to my friend Mr. Reid. I always enjoy his chatter.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know you meant that in the very best way.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I meant it totally, exactly, in the nicest way possible

By sequence of timing—and I never want to impinge on a member's right to speak to an issue—liaison meets this afternoon, I believe, and if things proceed as they are right now, at least, we will be making a decision as a committee not to be able to petition for travel next week.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know what the government's feeling is on this, and I'm not going to speak to anyone's intention as to why they're speaking to what or for how long, but my suggestion would be that the committee—and I don't know how this would work procedurally—suspend the conversation on this motion, which is what we're dealing with right now, Mr. Richards' motion, to be able to have the conversation as to whether the committee is still interested in proposing the travel, as we discussed last night, and at least confirming that piece of it. Otherwise, we will have made the decision not to do it. I don't know anyone's intentions around the table, but the intention of the committee, as of last night, was that we were, in fact, travelling. We were going to petition the liaison committee this afternoon, through you, Chair, on our behalf. I don't know what the Liberals' feelings on the committee are to at least deal with the travel component. If we don't make that decision within the next 40 minutes or so, the ship will have sailed.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

On the point of order, I agree with Mr. Cullen that decisions have to be made. In attempting to provide the clerk with flexibility, I think we made his job more difficult, and some decisions have to be made essentially to set out our calendar for the next few weeks. Understanding and appreciating the rights of Mr. Reid and Mr. Richards, if these decisions aren't made, then travel won't happen, just because of the logistics of it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

On that, it's my motion, obviously, but I will say this. I'm comfortable with interrupting that, if it's procedurally possible, in order to deal with the travel portion. If we deal with that and then come back to the motion, I would be happy to entertain that as well.

The Chair:

Is there unanimous consent to suspend debate on Mr. Richards' motion while we talk about travel?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Before I would consent to that, what that would then mean, though, is that as soon as that decision is made about travel, we would be returning to this motion. Is that correct?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Is it about travel or is it about the rest of this study?

Mr. Blake Richards:

My understanding is it's just travel.

(1325)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We can't deal with one issue in absence of the other, so let's be realistic about this.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm comfortable with discussing the travel portion. Otherwise I would say we must continue with the motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's really up to Mr. Cullen to say, isn't it, what his motion consists of?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

My intention was the timing piece of it. If we lose two o'clock, then we potentially lose the travel component. On the larger motion, we've had some conversations about it, but more informally. Have we had a full committee conversation about it? I don't think so. It's just been informal. The government presented a motion and we've had chats about it, but the committee itself....

My original intent was exclusively to talk about travel, but it sounds like that might be a line in the sand for both Liberals and Conservatives. Liberals want to be able to talk about the whole motion, is my guess, and Conservatives only want to talk about the travel motion. That's where we might be.

The Chair:

I think that was a good description.

The Chair:

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would just add to that. I'm completely comfortable with the idea of our discussing the travel. The way Mr. Cullen's explained it, we've already had discussions about that. It's an easy thing for us to resolve and finalize, whereas the other portions of what the government presented are maybe not so easy to finalize. To me it would seem unfortunate. It sounds to me that if they're not willing to carve out the travel, maybe they just don't want to travel. I can understand why they wouldn't want to do that. That's unfortunate, because it would be easy for us to all come to a....

It seems to be a kind of pattern that's developing here. It's the same thing as with this motion. It seemed like it would have been an easy situation to deal with something that's doing our jobs and making sure we're doing them properly. It would seem like it would be easy for us at this point to just deal with the travel quickly, answer any questions the clerk has, and allow that to move forward. If the government doesn't want to travel and hear from Canadians, I guess we're stuck with the motion.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Well, it's unfortunate. I was watching Facebook Live last night. Mr. Richards was talking about private conversations that we had. During those private conversations we agreed last night to discuss the travel portion so we could discuss the remainder today. Is he a person of his word? I'm finding more and more of these instances, as we're going forward in this committee, and it's truly unfortunate. We pushed forward on that presumption last night. I hope he follows through on that.

We legitimately debated and focused on the travel issue last night in order to debate the remainder of it the next day. He told me it probably wasn't going to.... I suggested it might be a fight, and he said, “Well, it may not be a fight”, which were his words. Unfortunately, I was right.

This is something that has to be discussed. We're up against the tail end. We want to get this through. I know we want to bring this forward to Canadians. The Conservatives suggest they want to bring this forward to Canadians. I know Mr. Cullen has been straight from the start saying that he wants to bring this across the country. Let's get this done, but let's talk about this in the context of an entire study. It doesn't make sense to talk about a week's worth of study in the context of two to three weeks of study. Let's be realistic about this and let's follow through on the promises that we make to each other.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If I can respond to that, I think what we heard just now was quite disingenuous. What we're talking about in the motion the government put forward, after looking at it and considering what is in there, essentially it simply allows the week of travel, and there would be no other study based on the motion the government's put forward. If they're going to try to claim that somehow it needs to be considered in the context of everything else, what that's saying is they just don't want to travel. All they're talking about in terms of a study would be the week of travel.

I came here today with the intention that my motion would be dealt with quickly. The government doesn't want to allow that to happen because they want to deny it, and that's unfortunate. Now we're stuck in a position where we have to fight for that. I will not give up that fight because it's an important one. I understand the position the government's in. They want to get their bill rammed through. I want to make sure we have proper and full debate. If this government is going to come forward to say, “Look, we're going to try to do our job, allow this motion to pass”, we can move to that stuff, but that doesn't appear to be the case. We'll be debating that motion until that does appear to be the case.

In the meantime, I thought it was very reasonable of Mr. Cullen to suggest to deal with this easy situation, which we'd already agreed to, the travel. If the government doesn't want to travel, then they should just say so instead of trying to blame others. If they want to go forward with the rest of the stuff, that means putting aside my motion, and I'm sorry, but I can't agree to that. I'm insulted and offended by what they've done today.

(1330)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Richards still hasn't addressed the questions I brought forward based on our discussion last night. He can pretend to feign all the outrage that exists in this room, and I appreciate his attempting to do so.

We're happy to travel. We've been asking members of the opposition for a plan over the—

Mr. Blake Richards: Get on with it.

Mr. Chris Bittle: Mr. Richards, I have the floor. I didn't interrupt you, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Get on with it.

Mr. Chris Bittle: Get on with it. We've been listening to you speak for an hour and a half, and that was your right, and I have the floor—

Mr. Blake Richards: We're all willing to work on it, and you're not.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle has the floor.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We're happy to travel. We've been asking members of the opposition for a detailed plan for the last two weeks. The Conservatives have provided nothing. The NDP are the only ones that have come forward with any helpful suggestions. I appreciate the attempt—this is politics—to blame the government. However, in between a filibuster, this continued debate, saying something last night, doing something completely different, and then saying something even different from that on Facebook Live last night—which was bizarre in and of itself, but it's your right as a member of Parliament to do so—we're here.

We want to get this bill through. I know that the Conservatives do not want to see this bill passed. We want to see this bill passed. There's where it sits at the end of the day. We'd like to have a schedule that includes travel that takes us from coast to coast. We put forward a plan for that last night. I think the committee was in agreement that we do that. The discussion last night when you and I spoke, Mr. Richards, was that we would discuss the remainder of the motion today. It doesn't seem that you want to do that today. I don't know which Mr. Richards to trust: the one when the cameras are on or the one when the cameras are off.

We'd like to discuss this based on our conversations yesterday.

I saw that Mr. Cullen had his hand up, so I'd like to hear what he has to say on this.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, did you want to add something?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think what I described before still sounds accurate, maybe with more ad hominem attacks there, but the basic principles are the same. My ultimate goal is to allow us to be able to petition.... It's the liaison, right? No?

The Clerk:

It's the subcommittee on budgets, the liaison subcommittee.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. My ultimate goal is to allow us to petition them with what we seemed to have agreed to last night. It sounds like, from the Liberal side, agreeing to that being put forward is conditional on having the conversation of the rest of the committee's study. It sounds like, from the Conservative side of things, that's not acceptable. My original motion was just to talk about the travel component. That is what I said.

I'm open to either, but if it's intractable, we need unanimous consent—which is what I suspect, Mr. Chair—to be able to accomplish that. I suggest that we maybe go back to the conversation around Mr. Richards' motion, and see if we can't figure out something prior to two o'clock with some off-line conversations.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm not returning to Mr. Richards' motion just at the moment. I want to deal with the point of order because there's some information that I don't have. Perhaps I should just know these things. The deadline is 2 p.m. The committee meets—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor] for question period, and I think the subcommittee meets at 3:30 this afternoon typically—

The Clerk:

It's 5:30.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know what your deadline is. I'd have to refer to our clerk or our chair as to when we need this committee to pass the motion on travel. I assume it's well before five o'clock.

The Clerk:

The earlier the better, but up until 5:30.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There is a potential even post-QP if this is the conversation that we're still having to resolve something. In terms of the travel component, which you have to bring to the subcommittee, you have the basic tenets of it. You just have to have the committee members nod around the table to say yes, but it's now become hooked to this other thing, Mr. Chair. It seems like we have to risk sacrificing something that we've all agreed to.

The Chair:

Yes.

I think that on the point of order there is, as Mr. Cullen has described, no consensus, so we'll go back to the—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want to clarify that the deadline we actually have is not 2 p.m. It's a little later than that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's a little later than that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, all right. I'm not the person who would negotiate for my side. I just wanted to make sure of that.

Could I ask just one more thing? It relates to the same point. The subcommittee meets once per week. Is that right? I'm not actually advocating this. Please don't misunderstand. I'm merely throwing it out as a possibility. We have a very tight deadline that involves travel next week and the week after that, on the Tuesday, I believe.

I have item 6 of the Liberals' scheduling motion, which came out last night. I think this is the one that Mr. Bittle was referring to. Item 6 refers to Tuesday of the week following.

In principle, anyway, if that were to slide back a further week, we could still have the travel. It would just be the week of June 10 to 13. I'm not advocating anything. I'm just pointing out that you want to have as many doors as possible, and then others have to decide on this.

I hope I won't be misunderstood as suggesting anything that I'm not. Now I know that it's once a week, and that basically Tuesdays are the days that you have to get it done.

The Chair: Okay, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid: Okay, I'll go back to the motion.

(1335)

The Chair:

Go back to Mr. Richards' motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, but we now know we have a couple of different things we didn't know before.

Who is on the speaking list besides me?

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle and Mr. Nater.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think Mr. Richards is also on there.

The Chair:

Then, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right.

I think I've dealt with most of what I had to say on the subject of privacy. I had just one further comment on the subject of the issue of privacy, a summation, as it were, of what I was saying earlier. I would summarize it this way. I don't want to be unfair to Mr. Bittle, but I do feel that what he was doing was a bit of a version of what's known as a motte and bailey argument, in which you use a term where you can retract it to its narrow meaning and say, don't you agree with the right to privacy? Don't people have a right to their privacy? For goodness sake, you can't have everybody spying into everybody else's life. Aren't you outraged by Cambridge Analytica, and aren't you appalled by Mr. Zuckerberg's willingness to sell your information to people who then make assumptions about your activities and desires and try to manipulate them through their ads?

I assume that is why I used to get ads on Facebook—or maybe it was Google—where they thought I wanted orthopaedic aids. I think the reason was that they identified I was getting a lot of correspondence dealing with pensions. It was from people who were worried about their Canada pension plan cheque not having come through. Anyway, they said, “Ha, there's this key word. He must need orthopaedic aids.” I would have been happier if that hadn't happened. I could say that's an invasion of my privacy. We all agree with that kind of privacy.

When you spread it so broadly that everything that might make, say, the government uncomfortable is counted as privacy, you've entered the bailey region. The motte is the little part in the middle of the castle. The bailey is the larger part. You then expand out to something else that's broader, and you take in claims as part of that word that are not something the average person thinks is reasonable. So yes, it could be embarrassing to the government. It could be that people would say that this is not a reasonable way of doing things, and the government would be a little embarrassed by the fact that people now know this, but that doesn't change the fact that the people have the right to know it.

Preserving the government from embarrassment is not something that is regarded as a legitimate thing in this country. We have very careful rules about this. This is a motte and bailey argument. You can actually look up motte and bailey arguments on the Internet and learn more about them in greater detail. I invite you to do that.

I want to now turn to the issue of consultation with the other parties. The term “consultation” seems to be interpreted more and more narrowly by the current government. Every opposition complains about every government's lack of consultation and the pro forma nature of its consultation. I've been in opposition twice now, once back from 2000 through 2005 and then since the 2015 election, with a 10-year period where my party was in government. I've had a chance to see this from both sides, and from the opposition side twice.

Under the Chrétien government we complained, because Mr. Chrétien would—as it was described to me—call up Stockwell Day and then John Reynolds, who was the leader of the opposition. After that, it was Stephen Harper. He did this pro forma thing where he'd call up and say, “We've chosen so-and-so for this job. We're just letting you know.” That was consultation. At least we got a phone call.

Now, if what Nathan Cullen described is correct, we get the equivalent of an automated voice that says, “Your call is important to us.” That's not consultation. That's giving prior cognizance, but that's all it is. Consultation actually involves people having the ability to say something back, like, “We don't think that's the best candidate. Have you considered so-and-so?” or something of that nature.

(1340)



The standards of Mr. Chrétien's government were not high. I actually can't remember what the standards of the government I was a part of were—I'm going to guess the Liberals say they were not high—and the standards of the current Trudeau government, by that low measure, are too low: they are lower yet.

This is not an acceptable way of carrying on a consultation. We should have the right to ask the minister what the process was, what the protocol is.

Here's what we're really getting at: is there an internal protocol in the Liberal government on what constitutes a consultation? This is not something dictated by law. It's dictated by convention, which is to say it's dictated by that which is generally found to be acceptable by the public at large and particularly by the politically knowledgeable public. By that standard I believe this government is failing, but as long as the failure is kept in obscurity, as long as we don't know what the rule is, if they have a rule—maybe it's a moving target, or they use a different standard at different times, depending on which minister is making.... Who knows?

Knowing whether there is an internal protocol as to what constitutes consultation, when it was adopted, how it varies from that which existed under the previous government would be helpful. That should be public information.

There is in the Library of Parliament a book that lists political conventions and attempts to systematize them. It was developed under the Pearson government in 1967. It has not, shamefully, been updated since that time, but it contains protocols for any number of different things.

Here, for example, is the way, if you are resigning from cabinet, that you ought to address the issue on which you are resigning without revealing a cabinet confidence. There is a draft letter laid out. There is a draft response from the Prime Minister laid out so this can be followed, allowing for a person who is resigning on principle to indicate what the principle was without violating cabinet confidences, to prevent their resigning under a cloud or breaking an official secret.

Similarly, there is some kind of protocol at work here, and we ought to know what it is. It ought to be public. The minister could provide us information on it that would not involve saying it's all a secret—would not legitimately involve saying that. The minister could try to say it did, but were she to say that, she would not be telling the truth.

We all avoid in this place. We may not always say the whole truth, but that which we say is the truth, and that, of course, includes the minister, who has as far as I can tell always been truthful with me, and indeed as far as I can see with everybody else—as is her duty, but I think it comes naturally to her.

If you don't mind, Mr. Chair, I want in connection with this to deal with Mr. Bittle's comments earlier regarding my colleague, Mr. Richards. I must say, having known Blake a long time—Blake worked under me when I was the critic or shadow minister, as we now say, and I have subsequently worked under his leadership—that I have never once seen him deviate from the absolute truth on anything or suggest that it's acceptable ever. He is a man of the highest honour, as is appropriate.

Some people will say you should devalue remarks made by a colleague in defence of a colleague of the same partisan stripe. You can do that if you wish, but I have the highest regard for Blake Richards, and I think that Mr. Bittle's comments were not ideal. Upon consideration he may come to that conclusion himself—although I hold Mr. Bittle in high regard.

I made some jokes earlier about Scott Brison not really liking him. That, of course, was not.... I was dissembling a bit when I said I suspect that Scott Brison likes him just as much as he likes the rest of his own caucus. I can go and ask Scott at some point and confirm this. He may wonder why I'm asking such a strange question, but—

(1345)

Mr. John Nater:

On a point of order, just to confirm, has Mr. Brison ever been a member of your caucus?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well, that's actually—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not sure he liked you when he was.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Actually, that's a complicated question, because Mr. Brison left the PC caucus when the merger was anticipated. It hadn't yet happened.

Mr. Simms knows that story. That's right.

We have thus never actually served in the same caucus.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Almost.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We came close. He has let me know that the fact I was a member of the caucus he'd be joining had nothing to do with his decision, so this is the basis on which I say that he likes me so much.

Mr. Chair, I know that you are worried that I might, in the future, stray a tiny bit from the strict and punctilious observance I've had of absolute relevancy in every detail of what I've said so far. Keeping that thought in mind, I have decided that it might now be a good opportunity to bring my conclusions on this matter to a close, although I do have some further thoughts, which I can express after I get put back on the speaker's list further down on this particular motion.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I move that the debate be now adjourned.

Some hon members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Blake Richards:

Point of order.

The Chair:

Sorry, there's no debate on this. We have to go to the vote on this.

Mr. Blake Richards:

On a point of order, I just wanted to point out that this is open and accountable government right here, Mr. Chair. This is open and accountable government.

An hon. member: I would like a recorded vote.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 3)

The Chair:

With the discussion on the travel, the clerk thinks it is better to do this in camera. Is it okay if we go in camera to discuss—

Mr. Blake Richards:

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry, to discuss—

The Chair:

The travel—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that Mr. Cullen's travel bit?

The Chair:

Yes. It's the travel for next week.

Okay. We have to continue in public, unless someone moves a motion that we go in camera.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Shall we suspend until Mr. Cullen returns?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

We'll have to suspend for question period anyway.

Mr. Scott Reid:

He's going to be at QP.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If we want to suspend until after question period—

The Chair:

Okay.

(1350)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We should suspend and reconvene after QP.

The Chair:

Suspend and reconvene after QP? That's it for that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What does after QP mean? At 3:30? Give me a time.

The Chair:

Yes, we will reconvene at 3:30.



(1535)

The Chair:

Welcome back to meeting 107 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Before we get into the business at hand, I just want to mention that the researcher thinks he can have the report that we did this morning, which was in confidence, so I won't say anything about it, back by tomorrow afternoon. If that's the case, I'll set aside 10 minutes. There wasn't any discussion on it, and if there are no changes, I'll set aside 10 minutes on Thursday just to approve that.

We're doing committee business, and we're talking about the potential of travel.

The floor is open.

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I was hoping that we would get started with the travel so that we can assist the clerk in the plans that need to be made. Mr. Cullen is very interested in travelling, and obviously, we see the benefit in the testimony that we would receive there. I wasn't here yesterday, but I believe that something was negotiated to go from the east coast to the west coast, hitting the cities of Halifax, Montreal....

Help me out, people.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Toronto, Vancouver....

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Maybe Winnipeg, and then Vancouver, and something else.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Winnipeg and Vancouver.

We've had some discussions in which we were thinking we could hit some rural areas or city areas, but I was wondering if there were specific questions that maybe the clerk could address to the chair, and then we could give our feedback on how we would like to see it happening.

I think, from what Mr. Cullen said before, he wants to hear from the public and also have some expert witness testimony, so we're hoping that we would have expert witnesses up front, and if there was an opportunity to provide it in a given city, we would hear from the public immediately following the expert witnesses. If anyone wanted to come forward, we'd hear from them in a way that would be similar somehow to the structure that we had for the electoral reform committee.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I just want to clarify that the government now is interested in discussing the travel separately, because that was something they didn't want to do before, and I think it was a good idea, and I hope that they've changed their minds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's contingent upon a lot of other factors, but I thought we would just get the ball rolling with discussing it.

Of course, I'll bring forward everything else that we want to see. If we are going to go on the road, we have to have some reassurance that we're going to get through this bill clause by clause, so I'd like to move with that proposal for that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So the government doesn't intend to move the motion that was handed out last night?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We do intend to move it. I do intend to move it—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Your intention is to split the travel out first and then move the motion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

The Chair:

We have with us, fortunately, the logistics person, Jill McKenny.

Thank you for joining us.

She's done a little research into the different routes and that kind of stuff. She could update us on some of the options. Some of the rooms that we thought of aren't available at certain times of the week, etc. If you could outline what you've found out, that would probably be helpful for the committee.

The Clerk:

Maybe just before we do that, I'll address the committee quickly about some of the information. We'd be looking for some more specific information from the committee about destinations that the committee wishes to go to. I know we have some idea, and Jill and her team have done a fair amount of work already putting together a couple draft budgets based on last evening's discussion, and I think those budgets include Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, somewhere in the Prairies, and Vancouver. It would be helpful to us if the place across the Prairies—those are three provinces—could be narrowed down a little.

The discussion yesterday was about visiting a rural area on that stop as well, and maybe holding meetings in a rural area. We've done a little bit of research, but we haven't had a chance to do any sort of exhaustive research about which rural communities would be able to accommodate the type of hearing that we're anticipating. If members have some guidance for us, that would be helpful.

(1540)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

If it facilitates the planning a lot quicker to have it in an urban centre because of the facilities that would be available to you, we can have witnesses who are from nearby rural areas come to that meeting and testify. If we are doing an open mike there, we can have it open to people from the rural area, or at the very least....

The Chair:

Let's wait until we've heard the options.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

The Chair:

Then you can put in all of this feedback.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If I could, because it's on the very point that was just raised, we did discuss that yesterday, if you recall, and the point that was made at that time—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I wasn't here, so let me know.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so maybe that's why.

The issue with that would be that if you invite people from the rural areas, especially in a town hall type of setting, those voices would be swamped by the urban voices. The whole idea of having a rural location was to give that opportunity—at least in one location, if not more, but I think it was only going to be one—for those voices to be the primary voices. That was the idea.

I know the clerk is looking for some way to narrow down that centre. I understand that you had looked into this a bit and had looked at the idea of Olds, Alberta. I would understand why you would choose Olds, Alberta, because Olds College is located there. It has a very central location. It has the college, and the good facilities for it. It's less than an hour from Calgary airport. It makes sense.

I'm going to throw this in here. It's a selfish matter for me. It's my hometown, where I was born and raised. It's not my constituency. I would not be able to be on the last portion of the week, because I have a private member's motion that's being debated, and I would have to be here for that, obviously.

If we were going there, I would ask for the indulgence of the clerks, my colleagues. It would sure be nice to be there for that, in my hometown where I was born and raised.

If that's the decision you would make to go, I think it is a good choice, not just because it's my hometown but because it does makes sense for all of the reasons of what we're trying to find in this hearing. I would ask that maybe we can facilitate it. Maybe we can flip it and have the travel go west to east, rather than east to west, which would allow....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What day would you have to be back?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think as long as I'm here on Thursday, it would be okay.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As long as it's done by Wednesday, you're good.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

The Chair:

Let's hear the logistics. They've already looked into some of this.

The Clerk:

Jill has put together a few different scenarios. Maybe at this point I'll let her explain what the options are.

Ms. Jill McKenny (Coordinator, Logistics Services, House of Commons):

In terms of the availability of the meeting space at Olds College, they would be available uniquely at the beginning of the week, so Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That would be all right. I should have just kept my mouth shut.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

There also seemed to be an interest in possibly the Vancouver area, holding the public hearings in Tsawwassen. That is also only available at the beginning of the week.

The west to east flow works well for those two cities.

In terms of the logistics of getting you there, it's a bit more difficult, because you do lose time, particularly if you're going from Olds to Toronto, meaning that you'll either have to cut your time short in Olds, or start later in Toronto, if you're doing commercial flights. There is a workaround. If you do a chartered flight, that solves those logistical issues. It does come with a price tag.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't mean to question your work. I know you do excellent work; I have worked with you as chair of this committee before. But I know there are a lot of direct flights from Calgary to Toronto.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Thank you.

There are indeed. It's the timing.

My understanding is that the committee would like to hold public hearings in the afternoon and evening, and because of that, then the Olds portion in the evening would be cut short to accommodate leaving for the 7:19 p.m. flight.

(1545)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, unless we do a red-eye flight.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

The red-eye would be the only other option, leaving just shortly after midnight, 12:20 a.m., arriving at 6 a.m.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I could point out, if it's helpful, that in a more rural community sometimes it is a little easier for people to do it during the day than in the evening. In rural communities sometimes the schedules are a little different, if it's farmers or someone like that. Not that their evenings are necessarily any better than their—

Ms. Jill McKenny:

If we approach that in one city, then consistency is key, in order for the logistics to make sense.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

One thing I had suggested up front, though, was for the meetings to be together. If we had the expert panel, the open session would be immediately after, without a break, so we have it compact. If it's afternoon or evening, we can travel during the day, and then head into the session and have it all together within the three-hour period, with maybe two hours of expert testimony and one hour of open mike, depending how many witnesses we have in any given city.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The challenge being outlined here, though, is that because of the flight, the time changes, and things such as that, if we were to do it, we'd have to fly either in the evening or in the morning.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In the morning.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If we use the red-eye flight, we can leave at midnight and get in at 6 a.m. If we don't do that—and it isn't the best thing to do, although I've done it a number of times because it had to be done—then we leave on the earliest flight, at 6 a.m. or 7:00 a.m., or whatever it is, and we lose half a day because of the time change and everything. That's what you're getting at, isn't it?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

If your idea is to have your public hearings in the afternoon and evening, you're travelling in the morning and doing your public hearings in the afternoon and evening. However, in order to get from Olds to Toronto, there's that gap and the time change. You'll need to leave a little earlier and you'll eat into some of that time at Olds College. That is, unless you're doing a charter, in which case you have a lot more flexibility.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As well, you'll have a lot more free time at the spot.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Indeed.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If we could leave early in the morning, and if we're saying we're going to do just afternoons and evenings in Toronto, would there be a flight to facilitate that? There has to be a 6 a.m. or 7 a.m. flight, or something such as that.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Right. Your idea would be to start a little earlier in Olds, finish earlier, and then head to Toronto on an afternoon flight.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's possible too, but based on what I thought I heard Ruby say, we'd have afternoon and evening sessions in Toronto. That would allow us the time in Olds. We could stay overnight near the Calgary airport and then fly out on the first, or one of the first, available flights the next morning, which would put us in Toronto by—

Ms. Jill McKenny:

It would be 1:15 p.m. You'll get out of the airport at around two o'clock and you'll be downtown around three o'clock. It becomes a little later start in Toronto.

Mr. Blake Richards:

[Inaudible—Editor] closer to the airport.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

There's that, absolutely.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Then we can have an extra hour and make it two o'clock.

The Chair:

Before we go any further, Mr. Garrison has just joined us and he has no idea what we're talking about.

I'll just explain that we're looking at potential travel for the committee next week to the five regions of Canada: to four major cities in four of those regions, and to a rural community in the fifth region. We're just discussing the logistics.

Mr. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NDP):

Thank you, sir.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

Yes, but we are going to finish hearing from the logistics coordinator.

Carry on.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

You do have other options. You can travel from east to west with the travel in the morning and public hearings in the afternoon. That allows a little more flexibility for the travel and for the public hearings to occur in the afternoon. However, it would then not be possible to go to Olds College and to the indigenous community as well.

The Chair:

It's Tsawwassen.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Tsawwassen.

The Clerk:

If the committee has other suggestions—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Are you done?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We are just talking about one hearing in each location. Whichever location we choose, there's a divide of rural and urban that we're probably going to do throughout the week, but in each location, we're just having the one hearing and it's going to be together. We'll have the two hours of witnesses and then open mike right away so that it's efficient on time. That's how I envision it.

(1550)

Mr. Blake Richards:

It was very much like what we did with the electoral reform committee, where in each province we had the one stop or whatever. Yes, exactly, that was my understanding.

I'd go back to the original idea of going west to east.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I've been on the list for 10 minutes now. No offence, guys, but—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Scott, the floor is yours.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I don't even know what I wanted to ask you about.

For the Olds situation and the community out west, absolutely it seems to me that Olds is the place to go for our rural setting. I wholeheartedly agree with you. We should go to a setting and not ask people to come in from the outside. Even I suggested that yesterday and realized the folly of my ways by the end of the conversation.

When it comes to the charter flight, just so that I have this straight, would the charter be only for the west? You would do it the whole way through.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Indeed.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is the price tag considerably higher then?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Yes, $100,000 higher.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh my, that's considerable.

Mr. Scott Simms:

If you look at the western area, we go around the western area and then fly commercial to the east. Even that would not reduce it either. I'm thinking you'd get a smaller charter, if that were the case, or am I making it more complicated?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

The distance is the issue, and that's why we need a jet to travel that long distance in that amount of time.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see.

Then we go toward the east. It would make things more efficient if we'd go to Toronto, Montreal, then Halifax, assuming that commercial activity will be there, such that we can easily get around.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Essentially, with a charter flight you have so much flexibility that the committee can do whatever it pleases.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can we do a different charter in the east as opposed to the west? Would that make things cheaper? You would be getting a prop plane now, I would assume.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Your suggestion would be to travel between the east and the west commercially.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

There would still be the issue for the time. If I'm hearing correctly and the intention is to have shorter public hearings, just a few hours, it may be something we can work around. For example—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would like to inject one little thing into this because it fits with what you're saying. What I was hearing before was literally that Alberta to Toronto was the issue. Are there any other issues you wouldn't have without the charter?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

I believe that's the only one. However, if the public hearings are only going to be a few hours, that may still work. We may be able to get to Olds on time, able to leave. The afternoon portion would be doable. The evening portion would be difficult in Olds.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We could either adjust that, or the other option would be to adjust in Toronto and have the meetings, rather than closer to downtown, closer to the airport, so we would save an hour of driving, which would give us some time in the afternoon for a meeting and still an evening in Toronto as well. We could adjust either one of those, whatever is easiest for you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

In addition to that, just a final note on the eastern side of things, Toronto-Montreal, I'd leave it to my colleagues to come up with suggestions there. Halifax, I'm probably speaking for my colleague.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What about St. John's?

Mr. Scott Simms:

She wants to go to St. John's, Newfoundland. I would too, but I think that yesterday the consensus was Halifax. If it is, maybe you want to consider a university campus there. We did talk about going to a campus for youth. I know that both St. Mary's and Dalhousie would probably be good places for that.

Are you about to correct me on something?

The Clerk:

No, not correct you. It's just to state that the Olds College stop would be on a college campus, so that would check one of the boxes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see.

Yes, because I was just thinking that the problem in going to a campus in Halifax is that, for some reason—I know we're public but I always poke fun at them—the fact is that Halifax has a wonderful airport, but why they put it in Cape Breton, I don't know. Anyway, no offence there, but we could probably stay closer. That would be a bit of—

Mr. Blake Richards:

An interesting thing in Olds, with the college—you mentioned the campus there—is that probably more so than most colleges it draws from pretty much all over western Canada. These kids would be further from home maybe than they would be in a lot of cases. That probably is a good thing. If there are challenges, they would be more likely to have them there.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Boy, this Olds community is covering off everything, isn't it? I'm going to move there by the time this is done.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's a pretty great place.

(1555)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How far is Olds from the airport?

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's about 45 minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's an airport in Olds, but it's only for props.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, you don't want to fly into there—for the size of what we would have to fly in, no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could fly in a smaller prop plane. I wonder if that would be a lot cheaper, because if you want to go in a jet, which seems—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not sure anything besides...it would be a very small aircraft.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's 3,600 feet. We can land there.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Honestly, it would be quicker to drive than fly, anyway.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay, so what cities, what areas, locations have we confirmed, Alberta?

The Chair:

One point, Scott, I think that the choice of Halifax was because of commercial flights. If we were to do the charter, I don't think it really matters where we'd go in the east.

Go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I was just going to ask whether we could lock down the locations. We have Olds school. We have Tsawwassen, which is where we'd start. Then we'd go to Olds school and Toronto.

Is it Olds school?

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's the college in Olds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh, sorry about my ignorance. I think it will be lovely to go, and I'll never forget it after that.

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC):

I did go to the old school, but it wasn't that one.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You are old school.

It's Toronto after that and then Montreal. It's too bad Nathan Cullen isn't here because this really was his baby, and this is what he wanted to do. He wants to go on the road. We're making these decisions on his behalf, I guess.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

They found a member with a similar haircut.

The Chair:

We kind of agreed with all of these cities last night, Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No. I think we've changed it a little bit.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We've put more detail to it. I know for a fact that Nathan.... I don't want to speak for him, but I did talk to him about whether he would be okay with flipping the west to the east, and he said that was fine by him. He wasn't concerned. That's really the only change over what was discussed, and he did indicate to me that he was fine with that, if that helps.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. We have Montreal. Then we're headed into Atlantic Canada, and we'll land in Halifax. Is that what was discussed yesterday?

Mr. Scott Simms:

That was what we came to yesterday, Halifax.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Halifax. Is that it?

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Our plan would be to do commercial flights for Halifax.

We should probably have a deadline for witnesses on the road whom we'd like to invite. I'm sure there's some guidance that could be provided by the clerk, but we should all be responsible for figuring out who we'd like to hear from on the road.

Thank you, Mr. Cullen, for joining us. We were just sorting out the travel plans that you so anxiously wanted to be in on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Randall wants to travel. I don't know why he's leaving the table.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

I do 18 hours per week.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, my apologies.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No problem. We believe you and Blake had a conversation about the possibility of flipping the travel. That's what we're talking about right now.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I know all about Blake. We'll reverse course. I'm open to whatever works for committee members.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We're going back to his hometown, Olds. We'll start in B.C., then go to Alberta, Ontario, Montreal, and Halifax. We'll end there. Commercial flights are what our clerks have looked into as being the more economical choice.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Did you mention Olds?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Olds, yes, in Alberta. That will be the rural community, and in B.C. we're doing an indigenous community.

The Chair:

Tsawwassen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is the idea for Vancouver just Tsawwassen or the whole—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We're doing one location per stop and then trying to have—and you can weigh in on this now—something similar to what we did on electoral reform. We'll have expert witnesses come before us and have a panel of whoever is going to present in the more formal presentation. Then, immediately following that, without much gap or interruption, for whoever is there and would like to—

(1600)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Get a couple of minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—get a couple of minutes in, we'd have them weigh in. That would concentrate the meeting to three or four hours, and then we can move on to our next location.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Ruby and I are experts on how to set these things up.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We saw 18 of them.

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

What were you studying?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Something.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Something that I'm sure won't come up on this tour at all.

The Chair:

We have a list. Mr. Nater, you were next on the list.

Mr. John Nater:

No.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have anything.

The Chair:

Mr. Garrison is gone.

Ms. Tassi, you are on the list.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I have a couple of things to clarify.

First of all, I heard $100,000 more, but can we get some information on cost?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Absolutely.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

The cost of commercial versus charter.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

The cost of the commercial flights would be $146,593.20.

The cost with a charter would be $249,668.60.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Are you satisfied that with this order, with these places, and with the timing that we can do commercial, and it would be satisfactory?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

It seems feasible knowing that you're only wanting to meet for three hours. We would likely be able to be there by 1 p.m. and leave by 4 p.m., so that gives the three-hour chunk.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I appreciate the challenge that you have, and I'm thankful for the work that you're doing.

I'm wondering if we could get clarification, because the timing is so tight, in terms of what other information you need logistically to make this happen, and whether we should consider giving the chair some discretion. You're saying you think you can make it happen, but if something comes up and there's a problem with one of the legs of the journey, I'm going to propose that we give the chair the authority to make a decision. Timing is tight. I don't know that we're going to have an opportunity to get back together because next week is when we're beginning to travel.

It's those two things, the logistics you need and, of course, at the committee level, about the authority for the chair.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Right, so what we require from you are the names of the travellers, of course, and where they'll be flying from to join the committee at the first stop and where they'll be flying to at the end.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I'm thinking as well of the logistics of arranging the actual places where we're going to go...spaces and those sorts of things. The details...for example, witness lists. Do we need to have the witness list today in order to arrange for the witnesses to be available at the time that we're travelling?

If you can, that will help us, because we want to make this happen, and we just need the information that you need.

The Clerk:

The witness names or witness list would be helpful as early as possible. Obviously, we won't be able to communicate with them until we know whom the committee wants to meet with.

Once I get them from you, I have to have some sense, too, of how the lists are going to be balanced for each meeting space. Are we going to try to have a dozen witnesses at each location? Are we talking about a two-hour formal meeting? Are you thinking two panels of four or five?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

More than that gets a bit crowded. The witnesses don't get to talk much and we don't get to ask them much.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

The Clerk:

Is there a proportion that you'd like to have for each party?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How do we do it when we're having a witness set of hearings in Ottawa? There's a proportionality to the witnesses when they come.

An hon. member: Uh, oh.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Yes, we have 30 minutes until the votes.

The Chair:

We have 30 minutes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

There's another point. Do you need to know from us the actual location of the places we're going to?

The Chair:

It sounds to me as though we've worked that out.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We'll have the conversation after that, right?

The Chair:

I think we have 30 minutes. Can we stay for a few minutes?

Mr. Blake Richards:

You need the committee's permission.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think we'd better come back after the votes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

The Chair:

You don't want to stay for 10 minutes?

Mr. Blake Richards:

No.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll come back after the vote.



(1650)

The Chair:

Welcome back to meeting 107. I forget who had the floor when we left.

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

I honestly don't remember. I would like the floor once we move on from the travel, but I think we were in the middle of—

The Chair:

Okay, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The last thing Filomena asked was whether there is anything we can do to facilitate the planning of the travel. Are there any other questions you have? I don't think facility location was one of them, but having witness lists would probably be a big one.

By when would you need those from us?

The Clerk:

I agree that with the work Jill's team has done and the discussion we had here, we have a pretty good sense and are confident that we'll be able to move west to east and hit all the major centres.

The witness lists are very important to me. I think that's the big piece right now, if our meetings are going to be successful. We need to get people before the committee in those locations, so it's as soon as possible, please.

The Chair:

The deadline was today. We need lists for those communities. The clerk doesn't want the House of Commons to be embarrassed, to have a meeting at which there are no witnesses. I looked at the Liberals' list, and almost all their witnesses were from the Ottawa area. That is not that helpful.

(1655)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm wondering, through you to the clerk, about organizing our witness lists, if we can, by region, just to focus the mind. We have a few folks in Halifax, Toronto, etc. Now that we've chosen the cities....

The Chair:

Yes, it would make sense.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's one thing to put a witness list together overall for a study and another thing to put one together for specific locations. We may have a list now that you can look at to see whether there are a couple we could pull from here or there that would fit a particular location, but we may all now need to go back to see who we know in a particular area and really didn't think of before who would still be a good witness. That probably means the lists we now have need to be augmented for that purpose.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think that's also why Filomena raised the issue of giving the chair some discretion and authority, especially if things happen as they popped up on electoral reform, whereby somebody can't make it and then we can substitute somebody in without having to reconvene the committee in order to figure out how to do it, as long as there weren't some big veto.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's a different issue from what I'm talking about, though. I think we're talking about giving the initial lists of witnesses. I don't disagree that, if one person drops out, the chair and the clerk should have the ability to slot X into that spot in the schedule. That's different from their coming up with an entire list themselves.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, all the parties should help in doing that.

The Clerk:

I would say from my point of view that, tomorrow being Wednesday, if we're having meetings on Monday, it's probably important that I start calling people tomorrow for Monday.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

So should it be tomorrow at 9:00 a.m.?

The Chair:

It could be today.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We could give you our initial lists. We can do it in tranches. We have some that we're winnowing down.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, and we could just keep updating them as we have them.

The Clerk:

Yes, and prioritize them, if you could. Monday's meetings will be in Vancouver. If you could, as early as possible, get me your witnesses for Vancouver, the rest of them, hopefully, will come shortly thereafter.

The Chair:

If there's any community for which we don't have any witnesses, it's problematic to leave it on the list. It would be a bit of an embarrassment to spend tens of thousands of dollars to go for no witnesses.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's a very rushed way to do it, for sure, but we'll do our best.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

May I throw something out there, if I have a second? An idea to put out there for witnesses while we travel would be to invite returning officers in the riding we're going to and nearby ridings, who have the most on-the-ground experience with the administration of elections.

The Chair:

Can you get those names from Elections Canada?

The Clerk:

Are you talking about one location specifically or all locations?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think it would be helpful to have a couple across the country, if we're short on witnesses in an area, to invite the returning officers in that area. It's an idea I am putting out there.

Especially in Halifax, to get the ones from rural Nova Scotia and the area would be very helpful, because we'd want someone with lots of experience in administering elections in the areas we're affecting.

The Clerk:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I know that's rather broad.

The Clerk:

There was some discussion during the suspension as well about whether Tsawwassen was the ideal location for Vancouver or whether it would be better to be in Vancouver proper.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want us to err on the side of leaving the city.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you have a comment about the location in B.C.?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I was saying earlier that, especially for the witness side of things, if we're looking to have a panel or two, for people who don't know Vancouver, going out to Tsawwassen means going out past the airport away from the two major universities. Tsawwassen wouldn't have been my first pick necessarily, because it's near the airport on the opposite side from the town. It would be not quite like going from Toronto to Barrie, but mentally it would be. In other words, we're going to lose witnesses, if we go that way.

There are reserves, as the chair would know, in Vancouver. There is the Musqueam and the Tsleil-Waututh, which is on the north shore. The Musqueam reserve land is UBC. It's not going on what most people.... It's just that logistically, if you ask a UBC professor to come out to Tsawwassen, it's an hour each way for them, minimum.

I think we're going to just not get people, as compared with their getting on the SkyTrain and going to this other place.

(1700)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

The Chair:

Is it possible to have another location in Vancouver?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Remember that in Vancouver we have the whole day. It's the only place we have the whole day, because we arrive the night before. If you really were hooked on Tsawwassen, you could do it for an hour or two in the morning to meet with community leaders, then do the Vancouver part.

The Clerk:

One of the advantages for us in planning is that we knew the that facility in Tsawwassen was available on the Friday. We had done some preliminary research into that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, I see.

The Clerk:

There is flexibility here, so we can look at other venues in Vancouver, and if for some reason we can't find a suitable spot—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If you have trouble, just let us know.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Who wouldn't want to come out to speak to a prestigious committee like PROC?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but you want to reduce the barriers, if you can.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Especially academics, no?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Most of them like it, as you know.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll try to find another location and another first nation in Vancouver, one that's closer—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There are three or four that are much more accessible.

Were you on the one when we went to...? No, the committee wasn't with me that time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I went everywhere.

The Clerk:

Maybe, Mr. Cullen, you could include the first nations that are in Vancouver on your witness list. That would be helpful.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, that's no problem. I'll do it right now.

The Clerk:

Jill had one other comment that she wanted to make generally about logistics.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

It's about the commercial flights. Keep in mind that the longer we wait to book those commercial flights, the fewer possibilities there are. There may be a possibility that we'd have to split the group from one city to another, but we'll do our best to keep everyone together.

If we can please receive the travelling members' names and their city of departure and return city as quickly as possible, it would help us with our planning.

The Chair:

I think we have their names.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You want witness lists and names today, at least by the end of the day. We'll try to do that for you.

The Clerk:

There's another aspect. Given that we are going to be holding open-mike sessions, I was wondering whether the committee would be open to giving the chair the discretion to approve tweets that could go out to advertise or announce that the committee is going to be visiting specific cities across Canada.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Does that sound okay with the committee to advertise on Twitter that we're coming?

The Chair:

Is there any objection to it?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We did it last time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, we went beyond that for that one.

Now that we have a lot of the travel component out of the way and the logistics, as I said earlier, all of this is contingent upon our getting through this piece of legislation. That's really important to me and the Liberals on this committee, so I'd like to move the motion that was put before the committee yesterday regarding the timing of getting through the legislation.

Would you like me to read the motion into the record?

Mr. Blake Richards:

On a point of order, this is my own fault, but I missed a little chunk of what was happening here, and we seem to have leaped somewhere else. I want to catch up, to be frank.

On the travel stuff, where did we end up, just so that I'm clear on it? Then I can hear what has been said here.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The liaison committee is going to be in here at 5:30. They're scheduled to meet. That's why we're trying to get this all done, so that we can move on all the plans for tomorrow.

We ended up with—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I can probably help there. With the motion you have, you're probably not going to be done at 5:30 anyway, so you might as well let me find out what's going on with travel.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The end of the travel debate was that we are going to go the route you said. You have already heard what towns we're going to. Witness lists are to be submitted as soon as possible, preferably by the end of today, if not, by 9:00 a.m. tomorrow.

As well, we need the names by the end of the day of everyone in your party who is going to be on the trip. To the best of their ability, they're going to make sure we travel all together, but some of our flights may be split.

I think that's where we ended up.

(1705)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not trying to stall here at all, because that's not an issue, if I wanted to do so.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Blake Richards: As you already know, I would not be able to do the whole trip, for example. I believe one of my colleagues is in that same boat as well. I don't know whether there are others.

What are the plans? If someone has to be there for part of the week and we substitute somebody else in, there is no issue with that, is there? With the travel, there are no issues in accommodating that?

Ms. Jill McKenny:

It complicates things when we have substitution of members. It adds a layer to our logistical planning.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We need to let you know that as soon as we can, then.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

—along with which city you are leaving from and returning to.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Do you have a draft? I know it might not be finalized and that you wouldn't want us to live by it as gospel at this point, but do you have some kind of rough draft that you could forward? As soon as you can give us that.... I, for example, would have to make a decision on Wednesday, my last day, or part of Thursday.

If I could get that as soon as possible—

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Do you mean a draft itinerary?

Mr. Blake Richards:

—it would allow me to tell you sooner when I would have to have the substitutes come in, for example.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Right.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Even if it's not finalized, if you have something in draft, it would be helpful.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

We haven't started to build an itinerary. We're just finalizing our understanding of your requirements. Certainly, though, the idea is to be in the cities that were mentioned and in that order, if that helps at all, or—

Mr. Blake Richards:

The rough times when we'll be travelling is what I'm getting at, so that we can have some sense as to what makes sense for what a substitute would want to know.

Ms. Jill McKenny:

Right.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Could we get that whenever you can send it?

The other thing, Mr. Chair, is that you and I had a conversation about your availability and my availability, as the only chair and vice-chair. We don't have a second vice-chair at the present time. Given that we've arrived at this, which might create a bit of an odd situation.... I think there is a standard practice anyway, but I don't know that it happens automatically. It may be something we have to pass a motion to do, or something to that effect, which is that when the committee is travelling, there wouldn't be any motions undertaken or heard.

Is it not correct that we would have to pass a motion for that rule to be in effect?

What is the appropriate thing for us to do, and is it something the committee is interested in doing? I think it makes sense.

The Chair:

Yes, what he is talking about is that I too probably can't make Friday, so the committee would have to propose an interim chair for that day, because there is no chair, vice-chair, or other vice-chair.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Related to that is the idea that typically, when committees travel, we don't entertain motions and things like that—

The Chair:

Does that require a motion?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think we have to prove that this is the case. Maybe we would want to pass some kind of motion to that effect. I don't know what's required to do it.

Maybe the clerk could give us some advice on this.

The Clerk:

If the committee agrees to the idea that motions not be entertained while the committee is travelling, that would certainly suffice.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I can add that to my motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You may want to deal with that part now, because I think we're going to have a bit longer issue with your motion, to be honest.

If you want to deal with travel, then at least you know you can start to work on those arrangements. You're going to have a bit more problem with your motion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I don't see the point. I can just add it to that motion altogether anyway, because it's all part of one piece, isn't it? Do we move forward—?

Mr. Blake Richards:

That tells us where the government stands, then, so that's fine.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

Basically, where we stand is.... I can—

Mr. Blake Richards:

You want to get by your end date on your.... You get to ram it through, basically.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, not ram it through, but we want some reassurances from your side that we're not going to come back and then be at a standstill, but that we're going to be making progress and moving forward. I would hate to spend all this money getting input from people across the country and then not be moving forward with this legislation.

That's where I am on it. The Liberal members on this committee just want some reassurance. We can talk about maybe shifting dates here and there, but right now, this is how I see it fitting best.

We want to move on this. We want to make sure that in the next election Canadians are able to vote, that Canadians have access to our elections. We want to make sure about all of those things. To do so, we have heard from the CEO that we need to move on this.

You'll probably respond by saying we should have done it even quicker, and of course we should have, perhaps, but this is where we are right now. In order to move it forward, we need to do something.

I'm not really comfortable going on the road without knowing that the money spent and all the input we get from witnesses on the road is going to be useful to us when we get back to Ottawa to do the clause-by-clause, to present amendments, and also to use that feedback to bounce ideas around regarding all the submissions we may get from our colleagues.

This is where my mindset is, and that's why I'm doing this. It's not out of any kind of unwillingness on my part; it's just so that we know this is going to go somewhere and that we can get this legislation moving.

Is now a good time to read it?

(1710)

The Chair:

Yes, why don't you read the motion that you are proposing.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There are several separate paragraphs to the motion.

Number one is that notwithstanding any motion adopted by the committee in relation to the submission of proposed amendments to bills, the members of the committee, as well as members who are not part of a caucus represented on the committee, submit to the clerk of the committee all their proposed amendments to the bill no later than the end of day on June 8, 2018, in both official languages, and that these be distributed to members.

I'll summarize. This is basically allowing all the parties and all of those who are not represented here to make submissions.

Number two is that the clerk of the committee write immediately to each member of Parliament who is not a member of a caucus represented on the committee to inform them of the beginning of the consideration of the bill by the committee and to invite them to prepare and submit any proposed amendments to the bill for the committee's consideration prior to the deadline, which is June 8, 2018.

Number three is that the committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Tuesday, June 12, 2018, at 11:00 a.m.

Number four is that 80 or more suggested amendments are received, the chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party per clause.

Number five is that should the committee not complete its clause-by-clause consideration of the bill by 9:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 12, 2018, all remaining amendments submitted to the committee shall be deemed moved, the chair shall put the question forthwith and successively, without further debate, on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the bill, as well as all questions necessary to report the bill to the House, order that it be reprinted, and order the chair to report the bill to the House as soon as possible.

We can say as number six that no substantive motions should be passed while the committee is on travel.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Or “entertained”.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—or “entertained”, sure, or—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The member proposing it—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, “proposed”; I think I said “passed”.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can entertain it, but you can't move it.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

“Moved”.

The Chair:

Is there discussion on that motion?

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

It's changed slightly from what we had last night, in terms of the travel portion. That's not actually mentioned in the motion. Should travel be separately dealt with?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, it can be. That was just a portion. I mean, the travel itself is all together. The travel is contingent on our having reassurance that we're moving forward.

But you're talking about—

Mr. John Nater:

But this is the motion—

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, I will do a motion on the travel.

Mr. John Nater:

No, it's just that the original motion that we circulated had that first clause, so that's been—

An hon. member: It ought to be in one motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's not, though.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Will this be number seven of what she just said?

Mr. Blake Richards:

There already was a paragraph seven that was added.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, it was paragraph six.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let's give them some time to figure out what their motion is.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Here we go. I'll rearrange paragraphs six and seven. Number six would be travel. Travel arrangements and logistics discussed in committee are contingent upon the acceptance of the prior clauses.

Paragraph seven would be that no substantive motions be moved while on travel.

(1715)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, this is a point of clarification again.

It isn't that the government wants to deal with these things together. It wants to deal with them separately, but it wants to deal with everything else first and then the travel second.

Is that what I'm hearing? You're not including it in the motion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just did. I added it as paragraphs six and seven.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You said it was “contingent upon”, but you haven't indicated in the motion what the travel would be. That would mean we would be dealing with it separately following the motion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I mean the travel plans as discussed and agreed upon by the committee today. We were, so far, moving through consensus on the cities we wanted to hit, the locations, and how the logistics would work.

Mr. Blake Richards:

My understanding was that we hadn't agreed upon them, because you were indicating that you felt we had to agree to everything else at the same time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, that's why I'm saying.... This is all laid out. Now we have discussed in committee, with what I believe was consensus about the locations and the logistics of the travel. I'm saying in paragraph six that we accept—I accept—those travel plans—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, they have to be agreed to in order to be accepted, though, and they're not, either before the motion or in it, are they?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Paragraph six of the motion would be that the travel plans we have discussed today would be contingent upon the reassurance of all these prior five paragraphs.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Can I ask the advice of our clerk on this one? Is this an acceptable form for a motion or is it better for the plans to be reiterated...?

My understanding was that we were asking to agree to the travel, and government members were saying that they wouldn't do that at this time, which therefore means that we haven't agreed to the travel. Now we're saying some vague thing about something we discussed or whatever—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We haven't agreed on whether we'll go on the road—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Is that an acceptable form of a motion, or is it better for the motion to actually outline what the travel would in fact look like?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We haven't agreed whether we're going to go on the road, but if we go on the road, what we have just discussed would be the travel plans.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Somehow or other, there has to be agreement of the committee to do that, and it's not happening in the motion right now.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay, if you could, please clarify.

The Chair:

You've asked the clerk. He can go ahead and answer.

The Clerk:

I think I understand the question, and what I am understanding from Ms. Sahota's presentation is that the travel component—

I don't know whether you have a copy of the motion in front of you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, I have.

The Clerk:

What is in number one would be slightly different, based on our conversation, and would now find itself in number six, if I'm understanding correctly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's not my understanding. Maybe we need to clarify that, because my understanding is that.... It seems to me that they're pulling this from the motion. They're not amending it or anything.

The Chair:

Andy.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Mr. Chair, last night we reached agreement on the travel, and then today we are looking, as Ms. Sahota has very clearly laid out, to make sure that the travel is not in vain, which it would be if we didn't have the remainder of the elements of the motion in place.

It's a single motion consisting of multiple interdependent parts, and the travel cannot be separated from the remainder of the motion. The travel was agreed to last night, so we've already given the—

Mr. Blake Richards:

No, it wasn't, so—

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Well, we haven't agreed to the budget.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—we have to agree to it.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

We haven't agreed to the budget; that's true.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You have to agree one way or the other to the travel, and it's not in your motion and it hasn't been agreed otherwise.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

It is in the motion. It's very clearly in the motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

No, it's not. That's the point. It's not in there, so you put the travel in or do it now. You can't have it both ways.

The Chair:

Do you want them to put in the five cities and that kind of stuff?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Put it in, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Whatever you're doing, put the travel in the motion, if you're going to do it, because everybody else wanted to agree with the travel separately, and the government said no, we can't do that. Now they won't put it in their motion, either. It's as though they don't have a clue what they're doing over there.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I did put it in. I put it in at the end portion, rather than having it up front like you guys had it yesterday. Forgive me a little bit. I wasn't here yesterday, but I still think it's incorporated within the same ideas—

Mr. Blake Richards:

[Inaudible—Editor] clear what you're doing.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—and the ideas are within those separate clauses. The travel is a portion of it. We can lay out the cities that we just decided on, and the indigenous community, and we can put that into the motion in number six.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not comfortable discussing motions unless there's an agreement and we know what the actual text of the motion—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Well, we know where we're headed anyway.

You're not comfortable with giving any reassurance. Would you provide some reassurance that we're going to come back and that we're going to go through the legislation?

(1720)

The Chair:

He just wants to have in the motion the names of the cities that we're going to.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We're the ones asking to actually go through the legislation. You're the ones wanting to ram it through. There's no problem with getting us to go through the legislation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's why I put under number six that the proposed travel—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I don't believe it's appropriate to discuss a motion that is undefined. Tell us what your motion is in relation to travel.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Blake Richards: We have not agreed to that, so put it in the motion.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

[Inaudible—Editor] chance to approve it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

No, it's not, because you guys refused to agree to it, so you have to put it in your motion. You can't have it both ways.

The Chair:

Read it in.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. Still going in the same order that I had laid out earlier.... I think you can go back to the record, but anyway, number one was—

Would you like me to reread it all so that it's clarified?

The Chair:

Just read the travel clause.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

The travel clause, I guess, would go from being number one to number six from what you guys got yesterday, right? It would be that the committee travel across Canada from June 4, 2018, until June 8, 2018, and the clerk be authorized to organize travel with meetings in communities in the following regions: Atlantic Canada...and I think we should specify all the communities that we've just named today in numbered order...and that the travel budget be approved.

A voice: As described....

Ms. Ruby Sahota: Yes.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Ms. Ruby Sahota: I don't know [Inaudible—Editor]. You can say “as described”. No, it's not.... It's Vancouver rather than.... This is an estimate, right? We can be clearer in number six about the cities that we've mentioned, the locations we've mentioned, and then add “and that the travel budget be approved.”

Mr. Blake Richards:

We're being asked to debate a motion that no one can even tell us the wording of.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'll just read it out to you again, Blake. I mean—

Mr. Blake Richards:

What I would require is to actually hear the wording of the motion not these vague concepts that are being thrown around here.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's not a vague concept. We've sat here for two hours and discussed—

Mr. Blake Richards:

It is.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No. The cities, the—

Mr. Blake Richards:

If you want to pass a motion—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—journey, which way—

Mr. Blake Richards:

This is the way you guys want to do things. This is the way you guys want to do it.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This is how I want to do it, so I'll read it out to you once more.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If you want to do it that way, give us a motion that is properly worded so we know what we're dealing with and what we're debating.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Hopefully you'll be able to understand this. I'll read it.

Number one is that notwithstanding any motion adopted by committee in relation to the submission of proposed amendments to bills, the members of the committee, as well as members who are not part of a caucus represented on the committee, shall submit to the clerk of the committee all of the proposed amendments to the bill no later than end of day on June 8, 2018, in both official languages, and that these be distributed to members.

Number two is that the clerk of the committee write immediately to each member of Parliament who is not a member of the caucus represented on the committee to inform them of the beginning of consideration of the bill by the committee, and to invite them to prepare and submit any proposed amendments to the bill for the committee's consideration prior to the deadline.

Number three is that the committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Tuesday, June 12, 2018, at 11 a.m.

Number four is that if 80 or more suggested amendments are received, the chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party, per clause.

Number five is should the committee not complete its clause-by-clause consideration of the bill by 9 p.m. on Tuesday, June 12, 2018, all remaining amendments submitted to the committee shall be deemed moved, the chair shall put the question forthwith and successively without further debate on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the bill, as well as all questions necessary to report the bill to the House, order that it be reprinted, and order the chair to report the bill to the House as soon as possible.

Number six is that the committee travel across Canada from June 4, 2018 until June 8, 2018, and the clerk be authorized to organize travel with meetings in communities in the following regions, as discussed in committee: 1. Atlantic Canada; 2. Québec; 3. Ontario; 4. Prairies—or I guess Alberta——and, 5. British Columbia.

Then, in brackets, we can put the specific locations that we're going to. I would do that, and then end with that the travel budget for the required travel be approved.

Then we have number seven which is that no substantive motions be passed in committee while the committee is on travel.

(1725)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Your number six is as worded in the original proposal—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Number one.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Just let me finish. It's number one in the original proposal with the following changes: in number four, you're changing “Prairies” to “Alberta” and—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—you're striking everything after British Columbia?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, but then we're adding that the corresponding travel budget be approved.

The Chair:

Is there any debate on the motion?

Mr. Blake Richards:

That would put the committee in a place where it would be deciding to approve a travel budget without knowing the amount of it.

The Chair:

I can tell you the amount.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes. Present it to us.

The Chair:

It's $150,993.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would that change depending on the final...? I don't know how that works.

The Chair: The clerk will tell you the amount.

The Clerk:

The draft budget that was distributed had a total of $146,593.20. After some consultation with Jill, we decided that starting in Vancouver would add a night in Vancouver that wouldn't have been there had we gone from Ottawa to Halifax in the morning. The new total has an additional $4,400 added to it, so $150,993.20 is the draft budget.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I just thought in looking at it that some of the cities were listed differently from what we ended up deciding on, so I wasn't sure if that changed it considerably or not. Okay.

The Chair:

Is there debate on the motion?

Mr. Blake Richards:

There was a new number seven as well, something about the....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Number seven is what you pointed out earlier, which I think is a very valid point, that no substantive motions be moved while the committee is on travel.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thank you for clarifying that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there debate on the motion?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I believe Mr. Genuis wanted to be on the list next as well. He mentioned that to me.

In relation to the motion—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Sorry, Chair, but on a point of order, I had my hand up to speak next and it was interjected with someone else wanting to speak.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I simply asked that he be put on the list. That's all. I was not indicating that nobody else could speak.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll go with Mr. Richards, Mr. Bittle, Mr. Genuis, and Mr. Nater.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

First of all, despite any characterizations that they've tried to make otherwise, we're in this situation because this government is trying to change the election laws of this country, and they're trying to do it in such a way that certainly there is much question as to whether this benefits themselves. Also, in doing that, they're trying to ram it through Parliament.

If you recall, when we were in the very short period of time that was given for debate in the House of Commons at second reading, after one hour of debate this government decided to move a notice of time allocation. That means shutting down debate: there was one hour for debate on the legislation that governs our elections in this country, that decides the rules by which the people of Canada choose their representatives in Parliament.

This government somehow believes that one hour of debate is enough time on something of that significance. Of course, that was not something that was acceptable to those of us in the opposition; however, they moved time allocation, and in the debate that occurred for 30 minutes thereafter, the Minister of Democratic Institutions was questioned numerous times—

(1730)

The Chair:

I have a point of order, Blake. We have to tell the subcommittee of the liaison committee.... They're ready to either meet or go home. We have to give them some direction. There are four speakers on the list.

They could meet first thing in the morning, but we have to give them some direction. They're all sitting here. We can't keep them for.... We don't know how long people are going to talk, but there are three people on the list.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I have a lot to say, I can tell you that, and I think that until this government starts listening they might not want to make too many plans.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

On that point, it seems that the Conservatives are in the mood to discuss the issue, and perhaps it's wise to just let the—

The Chair:

To let the subcommittee go...?

Is anyone opposed? Okay, the subcommittee can—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I'm not sure. What are you asking when you're asking if anyone is opposed?

The Chair:

To letting the subcommittee go....

Mr. Blake Richards:

I believe that the committee should meet and approve travel for this committee so that we can hear from Canadians, but this government is saying “unless we're allowed the ability to also ram the bill through, we won't allow that”. I certainly don't think that the committee should not meet. I think they should, but the government is refusing to allow that to happen.

I don't know what you do, Mr. Chair [Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

There's one person who thinks the subcommittee should stay.

Is there anyone else?

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's probably [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

I agree with Blake.

The Chair:

Members on this side...?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

May I speak? It's on this issue.

The Chair: Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: I don't think it's very kind to them to have to sit through....

I see that they have a lot to say and, as they have a right to say it, this could go on for I don't know how long.

You say you have “a lot to say”. Does that mean an hour? Two hours? Would you keep a subcommittee waiting for that long, just sitting here with no resolution in sight?

I've proposed my motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Nobody wants to keep them sitting—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Unless we're ready to vote on it, have a conclusion, and tell the subcommittee whether we're going or not going, then....

Mr. Blake Richards:

The only people who want to keep them sitting here is the government, because the government wants to—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No. My vote would be to let them go if this is not going to resolve any time soon.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The government does not want to approve travel. If the government approved travel, they could deal with that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As the chair has pointed out, they could meet in the morning, so we definitely are interested in moving forward with the study on this legislation, and with travel, hopefully, but if we don't have some resolution for them any time soon to decide on, I just do not feel right about having members of the subcommittee sit here and listen to all of this discussion that we're about to have.

The Chair:

The clerk is reminding me that we can't actually control the subcommittee. The subcommittee can decide on their own. They can get together and decide what they want to do.

It looks like we're going to be here for a while. We'll let Blake carry on with his speech.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Again, here we are. It's because this government, after a one-hour debate, moved notice of time allocation on this very important piece of legislation that determines how people choose who will represent them in Parliament. Then, when they did their time allocation and they moved it....

For anyone who isn't familiar with parliamentary language, it basically means they shut down the debate in the House of Commons on a piece of legislation that determines how we choose our representatives in Parliament, trying to rig the system in their own favour. They didn't want to allow the opposition to have a chance to make points about that, to show how foolish some of the things they were attempting to do were, or to point out that they are serving own interests, as they have done so many times in the past. Rather than allow that, they said, well, let's just shut down debate.

When that happened, and members of the opposition questioned the Minister of Democratic Institutions about this heavy-handed, undemocratic approach her government was taking, the minister gave the same response over and over again; she didn't say it just once. She said that she felt the best place to have a full debate, to really hear out the issues and get the different perspectives, was at this committee.

That was the excuse that was given at that time. That was the rationale that was given. We all knew that this was utter and complete nonsense. It was not true.

I could use other words, Mr. Chair, but we're in a parliamentary setting here, so I won't do that. I know that there are words you would probably hear on occasion in the streets of your hometown, as I would in mine, but I won't use them here. All Canadians know what I would like to say, or what I would like to call this.

It was nonsense—we'll call it that—and we knew it was, which this government is just in the middle of proving. They're demonstrating it. They're showing us that what she said was untrue, that it was not, in fact, the truth. They can characterize it however they'd like, but if Canadians were to take a look at this motion that's been presented, they would see a government trying to ram through this piece of legislation, and ram it through this committee as well.

What typically happens, just for the benefit of those who might be following this committee from outside this parliamentary precinct—I'm sure there are some—is that when a bill comes before a committee, the committee will make some determination as to how best to study it. They will ensure, however, that there are opportunities for Canadians who wish to be heard at the committee to come forward and bring their perspectives. That gives members the opportunity to question those individuals and try to gather more from those perspectives, or to challenge those perspectives, if they wish. The goal of all of this is to give us, as parliamentarians, the ability to properly weigh out the pros and cons of the various parts of the legislation.

This legislation is 350 pages. That's a pretty big piece of legislation. I think it would only make sense that there would be a number of different expert perspectives that we could draw from. There would need to be some full examination and discussion about what those things mean or what changes they will in fact enact in our elections legislation and in other consequential acts that might be amended. In doing that, there may be unintended consequences. There may be things that the government hadn't really considered, when it was making those changes, would have an impact.

(1735)



I'll go down a bit of a rabbit trail just for a second here, to give a good example. There are a number of changes in this legislation—and if my memory serves me correctly, I'll give you a few examples, but I don't have the paper right in front of me, although I'm sure I could find it if you wanted me to be more precise.

The Ontario government not too long ago approved some changes to their election law, and some of those changes are similar in nature or affect the same parts of election law, I guess, for lack of a better way of putting it, that the legislation the federal government has brought forward contemplates doing. A future registry of electors is one of those things. There are some changes to the third party regime and how that is treated in Ontario. Those are a couple of examples and there are others.

In this legislation, there are similar changes or changes to the same parts of electoral law, and so, as I've argued before, I think it would be wise for this committee to hear those perspectives. I raised this with the minister when she appeared before the committee this week. I asked her if she felt it was important to learn from the experiences of others, if she felt that it was important to make decisions based on evidence, and not surprisingly, I would imagine for anyone, she agreed with me that that was a wise thing to do, until I asked her whether we should actually apply those things to this study and hear about the experiences of others and gather evidence. Then, of course, her tune changed a little, much as it changed after she was able to pass and ram through the time allocation motion about how important it was for this committee to have a chance to have a full debate. Her tune changed then too.

Suddenly now, she has the government's representatives here on this committee saying, “Oh, no, we can't possibly do that. Why would we want to have a full debate? We want to ram this thing through.” There, again, her tune changed, and we went from her thinking it was important to hear evidence and important to learn from the experiences of others to suddenly those things not being so important to her when it meant that we would hear about the experiences of those who are in the middle of an election right now. That will end on June 7, voting day for the election here in Ontario. We're just days away from that, so why not wait a few more days and have the opportunity to hear from those experts, whether they be Elections Ontario or others who have been involved in the Ontario election and who these changes affected, to ask them what they learned from their experiences having run through an election with some of these changes? Maybe we don't want to repeat some of those mistakes if mistakes were made. I don't know—maybe there haven't been any, but if there were, why would we want to repeat those when we can gain that experience and that wisdom from those who have already done that?

It kind of reminds me a bit of when I was a kid. I think we can all relate to this experience. How many times did our parents give us a piece of advice that we just chose to ignore? Of course they always ended up saying, “Well, you know, you should have listened.” When you're a kid, you just think you have it all figured out and your parents can't be all that smart. But you realize as you get a little older that your parents actually had the experience and they learned from their own mistakes and they just wanted to see their children not make the same mistakes.

I've been through it now as a parent as well. I have a 22-year-old son at home and I have watched him make some mistakes too. One thing I've learned with him is that the more I try to provide advice, the less he's going to listen, so I have to watch him make those mistakes, and it's frustrating. It's difficult.

(1740)



What I would say is that it's one thing when you're talking about a parent watching a child make a mistake, maybe negotiating a bad price on a used car he's trying to buy, for example. Sure, it has a little bit of a consequence for him. Maybe it means he can't afford to take his girlfriend out on a date or something. Maybe that's not an insignificant consequence to him, but it's a consequence that's a lot different from what we're talking about here.

What we're talking about here are consequences that will affect our elections and will affect the very way we choose who our representatives are. There's a pretty significant consequence when you get something wrong, so when you have the opportunity to learn from the experience of others, I can't imagine why you wouldn't take that opportunity.

That's one example. I mentioned that it was a rabbit trail I was going down, because where I'm going with all of that is to say that the minister made these excuses back then, and they clearly were just that. They were excuses. Within hours of those excuses being made, we were already getting indications from the government that they were going to just ram it through the committee as well. Their excuse was that this committee was the place for the full debate, all the discussion, and the openness to amendments, which I'll get to in a second in terms of how much of a true statement that really was and how insincere that actually was, because we talked about that with the minister when she was here as well.

Here we are with the government. Let's be absolutely clear about what this motion does. What this motion does is ram it through. The typical process, as I was stating earlier, is that we go through it and we debate these things. We hear from the experts. We hear from people who may be affected and ask, “How would this affect you?” We ask what they think of these changes. Or people who have dealt with these kinds of things....

I guess I'll just point this out here. I notice that on the government side there have been a lot of conversations going on. They're probably just asking what they can do now, because the opposition is not just going to roll over and die here. They're asking, “What do we do now?” I'll point out to them, if they care to listen, that if at any point in time they want to take a walk back from the attempt to ram this through and they're willing to allow proper debate in this committee, they can come over and give me a tap on the shoulder, and I'll be happy to facilitate that. Otherwise, you can plan to get used to my voice for a while.

Some of my colleagues will probably have some things to say too. I'm sure you've noticed that my friend to my right here brought in a whole lot of.... He's probably to my right in a whole lot of ways, really.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Blake Richards: My friend brought in a whole lot of material, and I don't think it was just to read it to himself. Keep that in mind. If at any point in time you want to tap me on the shoulder and say, “Hey, you know what, we realized that it was a mistake to try and ram this through and maybe we will rethink that”, I'd be happy to entertain that discussion.

Until then, we'll go back to where I was, which is this motion. As for what actually happens, of course, once you hear these different perspectives and you have a chance to challenge those perspectives, you yourself hopefully will be challenged in your thinking. It's something that we all should do as members of Parliament: hear these different perspectives.

I know that for me, I'm proud to say as a member of Parliament that I certainly feel I've broadened my horizons in terms of the different perspectives I've picked up from all across this country through the various things I've been involved in as a member of Parliament. Whether it be committee proceedings like this one or other parts of your job as a member of Parliament, you're exposed to a lot of different perspectives, and it challenges your way of thinking. I will readily admit that there are things that I thought—I knew—were absolute truths when I first came to this Parliament, and that I realize now weren't completely.... I didn't have it all figured out, as I said earlier, right? I didn't have it all figured out. We learn from these things.

That's why all of these opportunities are a good thing for us as members of Parliament, because at the end of the day our job is to take on legislation that is proposed by the government. It doesn't matter whether you sit on the opposition benches or on the government's side; your job as a member of Parliament is to scrutinize the legislation, scrutinize the actions of the executive branch of the government, ensure that the proper questioning is done on those things, and ensure that those decisions are in the best interests of your constituents and all Canadians.

(1745)



In order for us to do that job properly, we have to take sometimes the time necessary.... When you talk about a bill of the magnitude of this one, at 350 pages, how many clauses are there in the bill? There are over 400 clauses. When you talk about a bill of that magnitude—350 pages, over 400 clauses—it will take a little bit of time.

That's not me speaking as an opposition member or wanting to delay a piece of legislation. That's me speaking as a member of Parliament, no matter what side of the House I sit on, wanting to ensure that it receives proper scrutiny. I'm not sure how many members of this committee will have a different story than mine on this, but I will readily admit I have not read the entire bill, all 350 pages. I'm working towards that. You'll note that my copy has a lot of—

(1750)

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

Well, read it during the committee.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—tabs here that have been added to it and dog ears and things like that. I actually have a second copy that I've used as well, so there are some on that as well.

That means there are areas in which I have questions or concerns. Maybe some of them are things I actually really like, because there are some things in there I do like. But, I would think that if we all want to do our jobs properly, we would want to scrutinize that properly. This is a great place to do that, because it's easy for me to read a piece of legislation and say what I like or don't like.

I'll readily confess, again.... Some of the members of this committee are lawyers and are more familiar with the legalese in a bill. I have been a member of Parliament for a little while now, and I've become more familiar with that but I don't pretend that I am an expert in legalese. Being able to get a perspective from officials, as we've been able to do, helps. Being able to get a perspective from those who will come in and who are experts in certain subject matters will help. Getting a perspective from people who are actually going to be directly affected by the legislation will help.

An example is Canadian Forces electors. There are some big changes in terms of that. Maybe we should hear from people in the Canadian Forces or from members of the Canadian Forces who are serving and ask them how they think this will affect them.

For those with disabilities, with regard to where there are some changes, maybe we want to hear from people with different disabilities. Maybe there are unintended consequences. If I recall correctly, in our review of the CEO's report of the last election, which the government likes to claim should form part of the debate on this bill—a suggestion I find baffling, by the way—I can recall us thinking we had some good ideas on certain areas. I won't get into those, because they were from in camera discussions. But then we heard from people who had perspectives on how they were affected by things we were talking about, and we realized that there were unintended consequences to some of those things. Therefore they maybe didn't make the most sense.

That's where we have the opportunity to walk back on those things and say that it might have been a mistake to put them in this piece of legislation, in this example. So, whether we be opposition or government members, our goal should be to try to find what those things are. Maybe there are none—I doubt that, because I have some concerns about this legislation—but if we don't do the proper examination, we'll never know that.

Maybe I can be convinced on some of the things I have concerns about now. Maybe government members on this committee will be convinced that there are certain things in the legislation that they should be taking a closer look at, and maybe even amending or removing from the piece of legislation. It could be the case, but we won't know, and we'll never know, if this motion is to pass, because it just rams it through and doesn't allow that opportunity.

Now, I guess I should probably explain how it doesn't allow that, because people who might be listening are probably wondering that. They're saying, “Is this just an opposition politician talking because he wants to delay things?” I'll prove to you that's not the case.

Here's how I will demonstrate that. What this motion does—and I'll just explain it in brief detail—is to first of all—I guess now it's sixth or seventh of all, because the government wanted to change the order of it for some reason—have us travel across the country next week, which, I'll add, creates a very difficult logistical challenge for those who are trying to arrange this, our clerk and our travel logistics experts.

It doesn't give a lot of time for the witnesses who would probably like to come forward to rearrange schedules, to give real consideration to their thoughts and perspectives on these various things. That being said, that's what it does. It has us travel across Canada next week, which certainly is a good thing. I know it's far less than it should be. I actually thought that the NDP was exceedingly generous, frankly, because this was initially their suggestion—that we travel.

Mr. Cullen had put forward a proposal that was far more extensive than this in terms of travel. I think it would have gone a lot closer toward giving this its proper examination from that perspective; I think there still needs to be meetings here as well.

I say that—I'll briefly go down this rabbit trail, Mr. Chair—as someone who was part of the previous examination of the Elections Act. That was the last time there were changes. At that time, the government asked the opposition how long they wanted to discuss the changes, and that was the timetable the government followed. It meant a lot of hearings.

(1755)

Mr. John Nater:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, just as a general question of clarification about the motion, we've had it read into the record, but I don't think any of us have a hard copy of the motion, let alone one that's been translated into both official languages. For the benefit of all of us on this committee and those who might be joining our committee throughout the evening, I think it would be helpful if we had that motion in writing in both official languages for committee members.

I'm looking to you for direction, Mr. Chair, on whether that's something that can be done.

The Chair:

There is a copy of most of it already. We've made a few minor changes.

To the clerk, is there someone who could get that typed and brought to the committee?

The Clerk:

I don't have a translated version of the motion, and I wouldn't be able to distribute it until I had a translated version. If someone could provide me with an electronic version, which I could then send to translation, I could get it to you as soon as possible.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sure.

The Clerk:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Nater. That was a good point.

We'll go back to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I kind of forget where I was, Mr. Chair, but I'll pick it up somewhere along my trail.

The Chair:

It was about the fact that we were going to travel next week.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Right.

As I said, I was part of the committee that studied the last election law changes. The government asked the opposition how long they needed to debate this and to have a hearing on this. That's the way that government proceeded. I mean, we spent just about every evening, for weeks, discussing that legislation in committee. That's the way these things should be discussed. Everyone should be given an opportunity to have a full discussion.

That's not what's happening in this motion. Instead, there would be one week of travel next week—a very quick timeline—and then the government would propose that we come back to Ottawa, not hear from any further witnesses, and not have a chance to have the minister, as was promised to us, come back for another hour. That was promised to us, and it won't happen under this scenario. It won't give us an opportunity to hear from any of the experts here in Ottawa who might have something to say, or give us any further chance to debate or discuss this. Then it would go immediately to clause-by-clause consideration.

For people who aren't familiar with parliamentary procedure, we would take a look at the bill clause by clause. Each clause of the bill would be looked at. There would be an opportunity to have discussion about it and make any amendments that the committee felt were necessary.

This government has said, “Great. We'll let that happen.” They have no choice, of course; they have to let that happen, but they're going to put in place a very draconian measure that would put a very strict timeline to that. For every amendment that's being proposed, it would allow five minutes of debate per party. Obviously, the government's intention is to ram this through, so that means probably five minutes total. That's not a lot of debate about something that could have a very significant impact on our elections, as some of these things certainly do.

It means they're breaking their promise, as it seems they're very inclined to do on just about everything. The minister promised full debate and discussion in committee, which is where it should happen. Instead, they're saying, nope, we're just going to ram that sucker right through.

Guess what will probably happen when it goes back to the House of Commons? They'll probably close down debate there too and ram it through. There will be changes made to our elections law, and nobody will really know for sure whether they were sensible or smart or should have been done, because no member of Parliament had the opportunity to give this its proper due and do our job, which is to scrutinize properly and question. It shouldn't matter whether we sit on the government side or the opposition side. We should all have an interest in doing that and in doing what's in the best interest of Canadians. This motion simply does not allow that.

I wanted to say all that, Mr. Chair, just to give people a sense of what we're talking about here and what we're debating. I do have more to say on this. I'll ask that you put my name on the list, and then I will yield the floor.

(1800)

The Chair:

Okay, you're back on the list.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Richards. That clearly wasn't filibustering as was promised.

I'll be very brief. It's been disappointing throughout this process, because we've been going back and forth for quite some time and we haven't seen any counter-proposals from the Conservatives, nor any offers or witness list or statement as to how long we need to discuss this, how long the Conservative Party requires, or how many witnesses. There's, “Well, show me the offer.” I hear Mr. Richards saying, “Well, that's not true. Show me the offer.”

We still haven't seen the witness list that was promised for today, but that being said—

Mr. Blake Richards:

You're right, I guess. Sorry.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Well left or right, whatever the case, that being said, it's disappointing all around. This is a debate that has to happen. This was an election promise that was made by us and something that we would like to see go through. That being said, it's clear that travel is not going to happen. Again there were no proposals or counter-proposals, and perhaps this is best handled through our steering committee.

At the end of the day, though, I move that the committee do now adjourn.

The Chair:

There is a non-debatable, non-amendable motion that the committee do adjourn.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1230)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Il s'agit de la 107e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous sommes maintenant en séance publique.

Après que nous aurons réglé la question de la motion de Blake, le greffier aura assurément besoin d'une rétroaction sérieuse, si nous devons voyager. Nous devons parachever beaucoup de dispositions et faire parvenir au greffier des commentaires sur le reste du processus relatif au projet de loi.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je veux attendre la motion de Blake. Toutefois, parlez-vous de la motion de Scott Brison?

Le président:

Quelle que soit la question qu'il va maintenant soulever. C'est à Blake de décider.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je vais demander quelques conseils à notre greffier, car, à ce que je crois savoir, le problème qui se pose maintenant tient au fait que la date limite pour que nous confirmions ou non la nomination d'un nouveau DGE est le 7 juin. Est-ce exact?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Conformément au Règlement, il incombe à la Chambre de la ratifier.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous pouvons formuler une recommandation concernant nos réflexions, n'est-ce pas, si nous choisissons de le faire?

Le greffier:

La Chambre peut ratifier la nomination sans aucun commentaire du Comité, indépendamment de la nomination.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

Le greffier:

Le Règlement prévoit que le Comité peut étudier la nomination pour une période allant jusqu'à 30 jours civils, ce qui nous amène au 7 juin.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Alors, si nous voulions que la Chambre tienne compte de ce que nous avons à dire, il faudrait que ce soit fait avant cette date.

Le greffier:

Oui, c'est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela pose un petit problème, manifestement, étant donné les suggestions qui ont été faites et les discussions qui ont lieu hier soir au sujet d'un déplacement la semaine prochaine. Nous nous retrouverions ainsi dans une position où...

Je suppose qu'en tentant de faire adopter à la hâte ce projet de loi électorale, qu'il attend depuis toujours, le gouvernement nous met dans une position où nous ne rendons vraiment pas justice à ce projet de loi. Honnêtement, je ferais valoir qu'à la lumière de ce qui nous a été présenté, nous ne ferons pas adéquatement notre travail de législateurs relativement à ce texte de loi. Cela n'arrivera tout simplement pas. Le fait est que nous ne nous acquitterons pas des obligations que nous avons, selon moi, en tant que législateurs, relativement à ce projet de loi. En même temps, nous allons également affirmer que nous ne respecterons pas la responsabilité que nous devons assumer en tant que membres du Comité quant à la nomination d'un nouveau DGE d'Élections Canada. Si nous nous organisons pour pouvoir voyager la semaine prochaine, nous serons pris avec une situation où nous ne pourrons pas accomplir nos tâches en invitant la ministre des Institutions démocratiques à prendre la parole au sujet du processus.

À mes yeux, c'est vraiment, vraiment problématique. En réalité, je dirais même que je ne sais pas trop quoi proposer. Cela dit, je suppose que je présenterai, tout de même, la motion et la proposerai ici même. En tant que Comité, nous pouvons tenter de décider de la meilleure façon de composer avec cette situation. Je pense honnêtement que le fait que nous n'allons rendre justice à aucun de ces deux éléments est scandaleux, mais c'est la réalité. Si le gouvernement choisit de forcer l'adoption de la motion qu'il nous a distribuée hier soir, il s'agit de la réalité à laquelle nous faisons face. Je suppose que nous verrons comment ça se passera.

Cela dit, nous pouvons présenter la motion, et j'aurai certaines modifications à y apporter. Dans les faits, certains éléments ont changé depuis que l'avis de motion a été présenté. J'y arriverai dans une seconde. Au bout du compte, je pense que nous devrions tout de même tenter de nous acquitter adéquatement de nos obligations. Si les efforts, qui sont déployés par le gouvernement dans le but de faire adopter à toute vitesse son projet de loi C-76, nous empêchent de bien faire notre travail, en ce qui concerne non seulement le projet de loi, mais aussi cette motion, et, par conséquent, la nomination du DGE, je pense que nous devrions au moins tout de même nous acquitter adéquatement de notre obligation, même si c'est après coup, ce qui serait considérablement malheureux.

Cela dit, je vais lire la motion dont j'ai présenté l'avis, puis je proposerai celles qui, selon moi, sont des modifications appropriées. L'avis de motion était ainsi libellé: Que le Comité invite le ministre des Institutions démocratiques par intérim, Scott Brison, à comparaître dans les deux semaines suivant l’adoption de cette motion pour répondre aux questions sur la nomination d’un nouveau directeur général des élections, pendant pas moins de deux heures, et que cette rencontre soit télévisée.

Une modification évidente est requise. Je ne savais pas que la ministre allait revenir aussi rapidement après le dépôt de cet avis de motion. C'était mon erreur. J'aurais probablement dû simplement utiliser le titre de la ministre et, bien entendu, le ministre par intérim aurait pu comparaître à sa place. Je ne l'ai pas fait; par conséquent, je vais apporter cette modification maintenant.

Ainsi, « le ministre des Institutions démocratiques par intérim, Scott Brison » devient « la ministre des Institutions démocratiques ». On remplacerait ce libellé pour des raisons évidentes.

Je suppose que je vais commencer par présenter la motion concernant cette modification.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

(1235)

M. Scott Reid:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président; je veux seulement savoir si une personne peut modifier sa propre motion de cette manière. Faut-il obtenir le consentement unanime du Comité? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il?

Le greffier:

Normalement, la personne qui propose la motion ne peut pas modifier sa propre motion.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Dans cette situation, alors, je vais proposer la motion telle qu'elle est, et espérer que l'un de mes collègues relèvera le défi afin d'apporter la modification pour moi.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suppose que la motion est maintenant présentée et que vous avez terminé votre déclaration.

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, je demanderais à ce qu'on remette mon nom sur la liste, car je voudrais en parler de nouveau, après que l'amendement aura été proposé.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je propose la modification consistant à ce que le nom de « Scott Brison » soit retiré et que celui de « Karina Gould » soit...

M. Blake Richards:

En fait, ce serait tout le passage.

M. Scott Reid:

Oh, exact. Désolé.

M. Blake Richards:

Remplacer « le ministre des Institutions démocratiques par intérim, Scott Brison ».

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais simplement la lire. Elle sera maintenant ainsi libellée: Que le Comité invite la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, Karina Gould, à comparaître dans les deux semaines suivant l’adoption de cette motion pour répondre aux questions sur la nomination d’un nouveau directeur général des élections, pendant pas moins de deux heures, et que cette rencontre soit télévisée.

En tant que personne qui propose la modification, si je puis en parler brièvement, j'affirmerais qu'il est évident que cette motion avait été rédigée avec de bonnes intentions et que l'auteur ne s'était pas rendu compte que Mme Gould serait de retour à titre de ministre. Je ne savais pas qu'elle serait de retour à son poste de ministre avant de l'avoir vue en personne dans la Chambre. J'ai été très heureux de son retour pour tout un tas de raisons. Premièrement, je l'aime bien. Deuxièmement, je pense qu'elle comprend le projet de loi mieux que Scott Brison, et ce n'est pas pour manquer de respect envers lui. C'est un homme très intelligent, et il fait au moins semblant de m'aimer, ce qui me fait chaud au cœur, bien entendu.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Cela fait-il partie de la motion?

M. Scott Reid:

Non, il s'agit d'une séance publique, et je veux m'assurer que les gens savent à quel point Scott Brison m'aime bien.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela devrait assurer votre réélection, selon moi.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela devrait me mettre grand gagnant dans ma circonscription.

Évidemment, il n'a pas conçu le projet de loi. D'après les commentaires formulés hier par le directeur général des élections, nous savons qu'il tenait des consultations auprès du ministère à l'époque où Karina Gould était la ministre responsable, alors Scott ne savait pas toutes ces choses. Il exerce également d'autres fonctions. C'est beaucoup demander à n'importe qui, surtout dans le cas d'un texte de loi volumineux comme celui-là. Évidemment, en ce qui concerne tous ces éléments, il est utile que Karina soit de retour. Je voulais l'affirmer clairement.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce que je voulais dire, c'est que je voulais figurer sur la liste des intervenants pour la motion principale, si la modification était adoptée.

Le président:

D'accord.

Concernant la modification, M. Bittle est le prochain intervenant sur la liste.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je vais attendre la motion principale.

Le président:

Il ne semble plus y avoir de commentaires portant sur cette modification difficile, alors nous allons la mettre aux voix.

(La modification est adoptée.)

Le président: Concernant la motion modifiée, allez-y, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je veux discuter de la motion en soi. J'apprécie l'indulgence dont tout le monde a fait preuve à cet égard. Il s'agissait évidemment d'une erreur de ma part que de l'avoir ainsi libellée, et, maintenant, nous avons réglé ce problème.

Nous avions pour tâche de vérifier si nous allions nous entendre pour que la nomination soit faite, confirmée ou recommandée à la Chambre. Cette tâche est une chose que nous, en tant que Comité, devrions prendre très au sérieux. Nous en avons l'obligation.

Dans cette optique, nous avions choisi la personne à nommer... Désolé, c'était la deuxième personne à nommer que nous avons choisie. La première avait été retirée pour une raison mystérieuse. Il semble que personne ne sache encore pourquoi cela a été fait, y compris, à ce que je crois savoir, la personne qui devait être nommée au départ. C'est une situation très bizarre, pour le moins qu'on puisse dire, et c'est certainement suspect. J'aurais tendance à penser que la ministre voudrait avoir la possibilité de clarifier ce qui s'est produit et pourquoi. Selon moi, cette précision nous aiderait à déterminer si, en fait, la bonne décision a été prise.

Quand la personne qui a été choisie — le DGE par intérim — a comparu devant le Comité, j'ai toujours été satisfait de son degré de connaissance, et ainsi de suite, alors il ne s'agit pas d'une source de préoccupation, à mes yeux. Certes, nous voulons nous assurer que la bonne décision a été prise en ce qui concerne cette nomination. La prise de la bonne décision vise en partie à garantir que le processus est approprié et équitable. Lorsque quelque chose d'aussi bizarre que ce qui s'est produit dans cette situation a lieu dans le cadre d'un processus, on peut en douter.

Il se pourrait très bien que la situation n'ait absolument rien de bizarre ou de suspect, mais il n'y a qu'une manière de le découvrir, et c'est en posant la question. Évidemment, la meilleure personne qui puisse répondre, c'est la ministre. Voilà pourquoi je fais cette suggestion.

Évidemment, je suis conscient des problèmes logistiques qui sont maintenant causés par le fait que le gouvernement tente de faire adopter à toute vitesse ce texte de loi — le projet de loi C-76, mais j'ai bon espoir que nous pourrons trouver un moyen d'accomplir cette tâche et de le faire adéquatement. Ce ne serait que logique. J'espère certainement que tous les membres du Comité y seraient favorables.

(1240)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'aborderai très brièvement la motion.

Je comprends où Blake veut en venir, mais, en ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements personnels et les lois qui la régissent, la ministre ne peut formuler de commentaires que sur la personne qui a été nommée au moment de demander à la Chambre de voter à ce sujet. Pendant deux heures, la ministre ne ferait que répéter qu'elle ne peut pas formuler de commentaires à ce sujet en raison des lois régissant la protection des renseignements personnels, et cela n'a aucune valeur pour le Comité. Voilà pourquoi je ne peux pas appuyer la motion.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, je ne voulais pas retourner sur la liste des intervenants, mais je dois vraiment formuler un commentaire à ce sujet.

Nous n'avons aucun moyen de savoir, et je ne pense pas que nous finirons par le savoir, mais il y a peut-être des considérations de confidentialité liées aux renseignements personnels de la personne nommée au départ à ce poste — M. Boda, de la Saskatchewan — ou d'une autre personne mentionnée. Toutefois, compte tenu du mystère qui plane et du grand secret qui entoure toute la situation, ainsi que du fait qu'on ne peut jamais rien nous dire, affirmer que c'est inutile est un euphémisme.

Je pense que le but est de nous empêcher de faire notre travail. Peut-être que les règles sont bafouées, mais comment pouvons-nous le savoir, puisque tout est entouré d'un si grand secret? Plus le mystère plane, plus le rideau derrière lequel l'homme manipule les leviers est opaque — c'est une allusion au Magicien d'Oz, en passant —, et plus les Munchkins seront dupés et impressionnés par sa grandeur ostentatoire.

Simplement pour que ce soit clair: il était question de moi-même, pas de quelqu'un d'autre.

Je pense que cela pose problème. La ministre pourrait nous faire part de nombreuses choses dont, d'après mon expérience — même si je l'aime bien —, elle ne nous parle pas. Comme nous l'avons constaté pas plus tard qu'hier, par exemple, elle n'a pas dit « sans commentaires », mais elle a trouvé d'autres termes équivalents pour indiquer qu'elle n'allait pas répondre à une question. Les termes qu'elle a employés étaient les suivants: « Je suis là et prête à répondre aux questions sur le fond du projet de loi »; elle n'était pas là pour parler du moment de sa présentation ni de la hâte avec laquelle on veut le faire adopter.

Le fait est que la décision de faire adopter le projet de loi à la hâte est prise à l'échelon du Cabinet et qu'une seule personne dans la salle était membre du Cabinet et avait son mot à dire relativement à cette décision. Une seule personne savait ce qui était fait, avait la possibilité de faire part du point de vue du Comité au Cabinet et avait participé à la rédaction du projet de loi, à l'établissement du calendrier connexe et à la décision qui avait fait en sorte qu'il soit présenté aussi tard. Il aurait été facile de faire adopter le projet de loi à la hâte par la Chambre avant le 12 juin s'il avait été élaboré, disons, un an ou six mois plus tôt et s'il avait été réparti en plusieurs segments afin que le dossier à étudier à cette date tardive soit bien plus petit. Plusieurs autres textes de loi, contenant d'autres éléments du projet de loi, avaient été étudiés à une date antérieure et, au cas où quiconque prétendrait que ce n'aurait pas pu être fait, je souligne que le projet de loi C-33 a été présenté il y a quelques mois.

(1245)

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que c'était il y a presque un an.

M. Scott Reid:

C'était peut-être même il y a plus qu'un an.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'était il y a 18 mois

M. Scott Reid:

Il a été présenté il y a 18 mois.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais qu'est-ce que ça change?

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que Maryam Monsef était la ministre à ce moment-là et que l'idée que le gouvernement puisse instaurer une réforme électorale était encore un enjeu d'actualité à l'époque. En effet, à ce moment-là, le premier ministre, puis, la ministre — Maryam Monsef — nous répétaient sans cesse qu'ils étaient fermes, que 2015 allait être la dernière année où les élections seraient tenues sous un système uninominal majoritaire à un tour. On a presque l'impression de parler d'une ancienne espèce qui existait en même temps que les dinosaures et qui demeure inchangée à ce jour, au moment où nous parlons du projet de loi C-33. Pourtant, il est resté là, inchangé, et rien n'a bougé. Certaines de ses dispositions figurent dans l'énorme projet de loi à l'étude, mais n'en feraient pas partie si elles avaient été adoptées à l'époque.

La création d'une crise artificielle est quelque chose de très pertinent. Pour revenir à l'autre crise artificielle créée par la manière bizarre dont un candidat a été présenté et un autre ne l'a pas été... Cela ne me convainc pas beaucoup.

Je souligne que, dans les commentaires formulés par M. Bittle — et je soupçonne qu'il s'agit précisément du genre de choses qui font que Scott Brison ne l'aime pas beaucoup —, il n'a pas dit: « Alors, la ministre ne pourra pas comparaître pendant deux heures; par conséquent, je vais modifier la motion pour faire passer la durée à une heure, car, au lieu d'avoir tout cet espace vide, nous pensons qu'il y a assez de matière pour remplir une heure plutôt que deux. »

Dans cette optique, monsieur le président, je vais vérifier si cette modification rendrait le tout plus intéressant pour les libéraux; par conséquent, je propose que l'on modifie la motion en retirant les termes « pas moins de deux heures » et qu'on les change pour « pas moins d'une heure ». Voyons si les libéraux accepteront mieux la motion une fois qu'elle sera ainsi libellée.

Le président:

D'accord, concernant la modification.

Monsieur Cullen, concernant la motion principale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est un fouillis que le gouvernement a lui-même créé, et je ne parle pas des députés ici présents qui ne sont pas membres du Cabinet; ce n'était pas votre décision. Il s'agit d'un agent du Parlement, et les règles exigent que, lorsqu'un agent du Parlement est nommé ou que sa nomination est proposée, des consultations soient tenues avec les autres partis. Ces consultations n'ont jamais eu lieu. Elles n'ont jamais eu lieu concernant le commissaire aux langues officielles, dont la nomination a fini par sauter au visage du gouvernement. Elles n'ont pas eu lieu dans le cas des autres agents du Parlement, ni dans celui de la nomination de M. Boda, ni dans le cas de cette nomination récente. Tout ce qu'il nous reste, c'est de la confusion.

Ce qui m'intéresse davantage, c'est que le gouvernement explique publiquement le processus de consultation. Je sais de quoi il a eu l'air de notre point de vue. Il s'agissait d'une lettre: « Voici la personne que nous nommons; vous avez été consultés. » Deux semaines plus tard: « Voici l'autre personne que nous nommons. Félicitations, vous avez de nouveau été consultés. » Ce processus est incompréhensible et irrespectueux, au point d'être risible. Vous parlez de respect à l'égard des personnes nommées, qui sont très en vue et ont une longue carrière distinguée. Les tâches qui incombent à ces personnes — c'est-à-dire gouverner nos élections pendant 10 ans, dans ce cas-ci, soumettre le gouvernement à des audits pendant de nombreuses années et mener des évaluations environnementales pour le pays — ne sont pas risibles, elles.

Je prends cela très au sérieux, et David Christopherson, qui occupe habituellement ce fauteuil, prend cela encore plus au sérieux que moi. Nous avons adressé au gouvernement des recommandations concernant l'établissement d'un meilleur processus dans le cadre duquel l'opposition serait consultée. En passant, ce processus protégerait le gouvernement — si nous le souhaitons — contre les accusations qui lui sont lancées simplement parce qu'il ne tient pas de consultation et qu'il fait preuve d'arrogance à cet égard. Pardonnez mon accusation, mais c'est vrai.

Le problème avec la candidature de M. Boda ne m'intéresse pas. Je ne sais pas ce qui est arrivé à sa réputation, mais il était le candidat choisi, puis, soudainement, il ne l'était plus.

Un membre du gouvernement m'a accusé d'avoir révélé son nom, en passant, ce qui était ironique, puisque la fuite provenait du cabinet de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, mais c'est sans importance.

La capacité de ces gens de faire leur travail requiert du soutien de tous les côtés de la Chambre, et je sais que le président souscrirait à cette opinion, c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne travaillent pas pour le Cabinet. Ce sont des agents du Parlement. Nous les embauchons. Nous sommes les seuls à pouvoir les congédier, mais ce processus n'a pas été bien mené sous le gouvernement actuel, selon moi, d'après quiconque, et, j'ose espérer, selon l'évaluation du gouvernement lui-même.

Le soutien à l'égard de cette motion vient directement de moi, pas de notre DGE par intérim, le candidat lui-même, mais le but est de parler à la ministre de l'aspect qu'a pris le processus de consultation. Il était peut-être différent pour les conservateurs. Je ne le sais pas, mais je soupçonne que ce n'était pas le cas. Certes, quiconque croit en l'importance des consultations — ce dont le gouvernement parle tout le temps — est d'avis qu'elles doivent être significatives. Dans ce cas-ci, elles ne l'étaient pas. On n'a pas du tout tenu de consultation.

(1250)

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons mettre aux voix l'amendement proposé par M. Reid afin que l'on passe de deux heures à une heure.

M. Blake Richards:

Votons par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est adopté par 8 voix contre 1.)

Le président:

La motion reste telle quelle, sauf que c'est pour une heure au lieu de deux.

Monsieur Cullen, avez-vous quoi que ce soit à ajouter au sujet de la motion principale ou de l'amendement?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, mes commentaires ont trait à l'amendement, qui est raisonnable — réduire la durée à une heure —, de même qu'à la motion principale.

Le président:

Voulez-vous aborder la motion principale maintenant?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, ça va.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Richards, puis M. Reid.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La première chose que je veux faire, c'est souligner les commentaires très brefs et méprisants formulés par les personnes qui siègent de l'autre côté, selon lesquelles cette motion consistait simplement en... eh bien, il est inutile d'inviter la ministre à comparaître et d'affirmer qu'elle ne formulera aucun commentaire pendant une heure, ou pendant deux heures, je suppose, à ce moment-là. Nous avons vu cela se produire hier.

Qu'il s'agisse de questions touchant la protection des renseignements personnels ou d'autres problèmes, ce pourrait très bien être le cas, et ce sera peut-être ce qu'elle choisira de faire. Toutefois, cela ne veut pas dire que nous ne devrions pas avoir la possibilité de lui poser des questions ni faire notre travail en tant que membres du Comité. Si la ministre refuse de faire son travail et de répondre aux questions, les Canadiens en jugeront par eux-mêmes. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous, en tant que Comité, devrions dire: « Oh, eh bien, il est inutile de le faire, puisqu'elle ne répondra pas de toute manière. » Si c'était le cas, nous ne tiendrions probablement pas la période de questions tous les jours, car ce ne serait pas plus utile. Je ne pense pas que ce soit le cas. Je pense que les questions ont une utilité et, si les gens choisissent de ne pas répondre, ils devraient être jugés en conséquence. Si la ministre choisit de ne pas répondre aux questions, c'est son droit.

Bien entendu, s'il y a des questions légitimes touchant la protection des renseignements personnels, cela ne pose pas problème; ce pourrait être le cas. Toutefois, beaucoup d'éléments dans ce processus ne pourraient certainement pas être excusés au moyen d'une déclaration selon laquelle on ne peut pas donner de réponse à une question pour des raisons de confidentialité. Par exemple, je commencerai par...

Pour être honnête, monsieur le président, j'avais l'intention que cela se fasse rapidement, mais, maintenant, je suis un peu fâché par le mépris dont a fait l'objet cette motion, dont l'objet est si important, alors ce sera peut-être plus long. C'est malheureux, car cela aurait dû être rapide.

Pour donner suite à la question soulevée par M. Cullen concernant les soi-disant consultations qui ont lieu auprès de son parti, j'ajouterai que la lettre où on disait « Voici la personne que nous avons nommée »... ne sollicitait pas notre avis. Je suis certain que nous avons reçu la même lettre. Je n'ai pas vu celle de son parti, mais je suis certain que c'est la même. C'était simplement: « Voici la personne que nous avons nommée. » Ce n'était pas: « Qu'en pensez-vous? Vous avez jusqu'à telle date pour nous faire connaître vos réflexions. » On nous annonçait simplement la nomination.

Essentiellement, voilà en quoi consistait la lettre. Elle contenait un nom, lequel a été communiqué aux médias, évidemment. Je pense que c'était deux ou trois semaines plus tard qu'un autre nom est arrivé. Cela ressemblait beaucoup au genre de commentaires que nous avons reçus de l'autre côté aujourd'hui. C'était très méprisant. On nous disait en quelque sorte: « Eh bien, les autres candidats ont été retirés, et voici le nouveau. » On ne demandait pas notre opinion; on nous informait tout simplement de la situation.

Je ne pense pas que ce soit dans l'esprit de ce que le gouvernement avait promis de faire. Il devait toujours travailler avec les autres partis. Je constate que ce n'est pas ce qui se passe, alors tenons-nous en là. Cela ne pose aucun problème du point de vue de la protection des renseignements personnels; la ministre devrait répondre de la situation. Il s'agit d'une décision que son gouvernement a prise ou qu'elle a elle-même prise, alors laissez-la rendre des comptes.

Dans le mémoire rédigé à l'intention du premier ministre sur cette question, qui avait été obtenu grâce à une demande d'accès à l'information, il est dit directement — et je cite le document — que « Des consultations seront tenues auprès du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre afin qu'on puisse assurer la transparence et obtenir son point de vue. »

Selon le même mémoire, qui a été remis au premier ministre du pays, le Comité est censé être consulté. Comment est-il censé être consulté afin qu'on puisse assurer la transparence et obtenir son point de vue? Si nous voulons assurer la transparence, cela ne veut-il pas dire que la ministre devrait probablement répondre à certaines questions au sujet du processus? Cela ressemblerait à de la transparence. Peut-être que le gouvernement est aussi ouvert à la transparence qu'aux amendements, car nous avons entendu la ministre faire la déclaration suivante, hier: « Oh, nous sommes ouverts aux amendements, mais nous ne les accepterons pas. »

D'accord, excellent. On va nous donner la possibilité de présenter nos amendements, mais on ne les acceptera pas. Il y a une grande ouverture, un peu comme dans le cas du degré de transparence que nous observons en ce moment. Obtenir le point de vue du Comité... j'aurais cru que cela voulait dire qu'on allait lui demander son opinion, qu'on ne dirait pas simplement: « Oh, voici le deuxième candidat, après que nous avons retiré l'autre pour je ne sais quelle raison. Nous allons l'inviter à comparaître, et le Comité pourra lui poser des questions pendant une heure. »

(1255)



En quoi ce processus permet-il d'obtenir le point de vue du Comité? Il ne le permet pas, n'est-ce pas? Le gouvernement devrait peut-être tenir sa parole et tenir compte du point de vue du Comité. Pour ce faire, il devra nous laisser faire notre travail adéquatement, ce qui signifie que la ministre doit venir comparaître et répondre aux questions.

Au-delà de tout cela, ce processus dure depuis environ deux ans. Pourquoi? Je ne le sais pas. Qui pourrait être en mesure de répondre à cette question? La ministre, peut-être? On peut certainement l'espérer, mais, si nous ne l'invitons pas à comparaître pour répondre aux questions, comment le saurons-nous, et comment pourrons-nous prendre une décision appropriée et communiquer notre point de vue? Le gouvernement veut-il obtenir notre point de vue, comme il le prétendait dans son mémoire adressé au premier ministre?

L'idée selon laquelle il est inutile de s'embêter à inviter la ministre et que c'est une perte de temps parce qu'elle ne répondra pas aux questions de toute manière — comme l'a affirmé le député du gouvernement — n'est pas valable. La ministre devrait venir comparaître et, si elle choisit de ne pas répondre aux questions, elle devrait en être tenue responsable.

Si des problèmes légitimes concernant la protection des renseignements personnels se posent, d'accord, mais il y a plein de choses, et je viens tout juste d'en souligner quelques-unes, sur lesquelles il est possible de formuler des commentaires. Honnêtement, il s'agit d'un agent du Parlement, d'une personne qui est censée servir le Parlement, comme on l'a déjà mentionné, pour une période de 10 ans. C'est la personne qui dirige nos élections au pays. Il s'agit d'un rôle très considérable et important. Si le gouvernement bousille le processus et refuse de répondre aux questions à son sujet, comment le Comité peut-il faire son travail? N'oubliez pas que le gouvernement a affirmé qu'il devait obtenir le point de vue du Comité.

Eh bien, nous n'avons pas les réponses. Nous ne disposons pas de l'information requise pour effectuer une évaluation et donner adéquatement notre point de vue. J'ai l'impression que le gouvernement nous dit qu'il ne se soucie pas vraiment de tenter de faire ce travail ni de connaître le point de vue du Comité.

Eh bien, je veux faire mon travail adéquatement. Je veux m'assurer que nous faisons ce que nous sommes censés faire en tant que parlementaires. Si vous ne remettez pas en question les décisions... Peu importe de quel côté de la Chambre vous siégez, vous devriez avoir à coeur de bien faire votre travail et remettre en question les décisions de l'organe exécutif. C'est notre travail en tant que députés. Nous devrions tous vouloir faire cela.

Je suis vraiment très offensé par les commentaires qui ont été formulés, selon lesquels il est inutile d'accueillir la ministre parce qu'elle ne répondra pas aux questions, de toute manière; elle ne peut pas répondre aux questions. Eh bien, elle le devrait vraiment. Je serai consterné si cette motion n'est pas adoptée. Je pensais qu'il s'agissait d'une évidence flagrante. Je le pensais vraiment. Pourquoi ne voudrions-nous pas bien faire notre travail? Pourquoi ne voudrions-nous pas nous assurer que le premier ministre tient sa parole? Même si je siégeais de l'autre côté, élu sous la bannière du premier ministre, je voudrais certainement m'assurer qu'il respecte sa parole. Je me dirais que ce serait utile au moment de me faire réélire, si j'étais de ce côté-là. Si le premier ministre choisissait de manquer à sa parole, je prendrais cela très au sérieux. Je prends certainement cela au sérieux de ce côté-ci, et je sais que c'est aussi le cas de mes collègues.

J'espère certainement qu'on nous donnera la possibilité de faire notre travail, que l'on s'attendra à ce que la ministre fasse le sien et à ce que le gouvernement tienne sa parole. Cette motion est le seul moyen que nous avons de nous en assurer, et je soulignerai que nous avons très généreusement offert de la modifier, de réduire la période de moitié, afin de contribuer à faciliter ce processus. Je comprends le bourbier dans lequel le gouvernement s'est mis les pieds. Espérons que les députés de l'autre côté choisiront d'y penser à deux fois et de ne pas faire preuve d'autant de mépris à cet égard.

(1300)

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Je soulignerais qu'il est 13 h 1, heure à laquelle on ajourne normalement la séance du Comité. Je vous demande, monsieur le président, si nous allons ajourner la séance à 13 h 1.

Le président:

Le président du Comité ne peut pas ajourner la séance sans le consentement de la majorité des membres, sauf s'il décide qu'une situation de désordre ou d'inconduite est grave au point d'empêcher le Comité de poursuivre ses travaux.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je voudrais donner suite à ce rappel au Règlement.

Dans ce cas, ne vous incombe-t-il pas, en tant que président, de sonder le Comité parce que nous avons dépassé l'heure à laquelle nous ajournons habituellement la séance? Ne vous incombe-t-il pas de sonder les membres afin de connaître leurs réflexions à ce sujet, et peut-être de mettre la question aux voix?

Le président:

Vous pouvez proposer l'ajournement de la séance, si vous voulez.

M. Blake Richards:

En tant que président, ne devez-vous pas le faire? Quelqu'un doit présenter une motion d'ajournement?

Le président:

C'est une possibilité.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce ainsi que cela fonctionnerait? Je tente de comprendre les procédures.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un consensus général...?

Il ne semble pas y avoir de consentement général à l'égard d'un ajournement.

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, si nous devons nous déplacer, nous devrons tenir une longue discussion à ce sujet, car nous avons besoin d'établir un budget.

M. Blake Richards:

Si je comprends bien, vous affirmez que la séance se poursuivra. Vous n'allez pas sonder les membres. C'est seulement si une personne présentait la motion d'ajournement. Exact?

(1305)

Le président:

Je viens juste de les sonder, et je n'ai pas vu qu'une majorité était favorable à l'ajournement, alors, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement; mon nom figure-t-il sur la liste des intervenants après celui de M. Richards?

Le président:

Oui, vous êtes après M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pense avoir conclu mes commentaires.

J'espère que nous pourrons mettre cette question aux voix. J'espère certainement que l'autre côté choisira d'être bien moins méprisant à l'égard de nos efforts pour bien faire notre travail.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Allez-vous proposer l'ajournement?

M. Blake Richards:

Non, je veux que la motion soit mise aux voix.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

J'en reviens à la question des consultations et du secret, mais, en fait, avant cela, monsieur le président, avec votre permission, je voulais soulever cette question en tant que rappel au Règlement distinct. J'espère que vous me le permettrez.

Bien entendu, la question de l'ajournement dans ces genres de procédures est un peu délicate au sein du Comité. Il y a une histoire intéressante, et, comme nous nous engageons essentiellement dans le même processus encore une fois, je ferai simplement valoir que notre façon de procéder pour décider de la façon d'ajourner la séance et pour obtenir un consentement implicite aura davantage de poids auprès des personnes qui tentent de déterminer comment réviser La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes — comment l'appelle-t-on maintenant? C'est Bosc et Gagnon — que n'en aura ce qui se passe ailleurs.

Alors, je voudrais proposer que la pratique consistant à regarder dans la salle pour voir s'il y a un consentement et à prendre son temps pour le faire, comme vous venez tout juste de le faire, devrait être tout aussi valable lorsque le — je ne sais pas comment l'expliquer d'une autre manière — parti dont le président est membre voudrait que la séance soit ajournée que lorsque c'est le parti dont le président n'est pas membre qui le voudrait. Il y a eu une incohérence, la dernière fois. Je pense que le processus consistant à regarder dans la salle, à obtenir le consentement, et à prendre au moins quelques secondes pour le faire est approprié.

Je n'arrive pas à me rappeler combien de temps vous avez pris. C'était peut-être 10 secondes. Il s'agissait selon moi d'une chose raisonnable à faire, de vérifier le consentement. Pour savoir s'il y a consentement, on doit regarder pour voir s'il y a un consensus, et non pas pour voir s'il y a une majorité. Cette question pourrait être réglée au moyen d'une personne qui proposerait l'ajournement. C'est là qu'on établit la majorité, alors, c'est pourquoi j'ai demandé à M. Richards s'il allait proposer l'ajournement. Nous aurions ensuite découvert où se trouve la majorité. On aurait tenu un vote.

Comme cela n'a pas été le cas, on suppose qu'un seul membre, quel qu'il soit, peut priver le Comité d'un consensus et que tout ce que nous faisons est structuré en fonction de cette supposition de base, selon laquelle il faut proposer une motion qui sera mise aux voix sous une forme ou une autre dans le but d'établir que c'est la majorité qui décide. Je ne fais que le mentionner afin que nous puissions nous assurer d'être uniformes — si nous devons rester là pour un certain temps — dans la manière dont nous levons la séance, lorsque le gouvernement décide que c'est ce qu'il souhaite.

Laissez-moi maintenant passer aux questions liées à cette définition très vaste du secret et de la confidentialité en particulier. J'estime qu'il existe certains mots à la mode qui désignent des notions bénéfiques et largement acceptées, mais d'une manière floue qui permet au même terme d'avoir des significations différentes à divers moments, selon ce qui convient à l'intervenant. C'est notamment le cas des termes « confidentialité » et « dignité ». Ce sont des termes qui, lorsqu'ils sont très circonscrits, font l'objet d'un soutien unanime, de la grande majorité des Canadiens. Lorsqu'ils sont interprétés de façon très, très vaste, ils sont utilisés comme moyen de retenir de l'information, de refuser de communiquer des renseignements, de refuser l'accès à l'information, de brimer la démocratie, et ainsi de suite. Nous avons vu le terme « confidentialité » être utilisé aujourd'hui à cette fin. Ce que sous-entendaient les paroles de M. Bittle, c'était que...

(1310)

Le président:

Voulez-vous invoquer le Règlement?

M. Chris Bittle:

Non, je veux seulement que mon nom soit inscrit sur la liste.

Le président:

Vous voulez figurer sur la liste. D'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce que sous-entendaient les paroles de M. Bittle, c'était qu'il existe certains éléments d'information qui seraient embarrassants pour quelqu'un — j'ai eu l'impression qu'il y avait un petit sous-entendu subtil quant au fait qu'il s'agissait de la personne initialement nommée au poste — qui ne devaient pas nous être révélés.

Alors, il en ressort que nous sommes privés d'une série d'éléments d'information que, selon moi, nous avons légitimement le droit d'obtenir. Nous avons pris un temps extraordinaire pour arriver à la nomination d'une personne, quel que soit celui des deux candidats dont il est question.

Quel est le nom de l'homme de la Saskatchewan, encore?

M. Blake Richards:

Michael Boda.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, M. Boda, puis M. Perrault.

Je ne parle pas en mal de l'une ou l'autre de ces deux excellentes personnes si j'affirme que le processus en soi a laissé le système électoral du Canada dans les limbes pendant longtemps. Maintenant, comme tout doit être fait à la toute dernière minute, encore une fois, nous nous retrouvons avec le même genre de chaos que dans le cas de la question de la réforme électorale, où le gouvernement a fait du sur place pendant 18 mois, pendant que je me levais à répétition pour souligner qu'il ne restait plus beaucoup de temps et que certains modèles allaient devenir inaccessibles, sans compter la consultation des gens au moyen d'un référendum.

Le gouvernement a fait du sur place pendant 18 mois, puis a affirmé que c'était la panique générale jusqu'à ce que le Comité produise un résultat qu'il n'a pas aimé, puis, soudainement, il ne s'agissait plus du tout d'une priorité, et le premier ministre a annoncé qu'il s'opposait à la représentation proportionnelle depuis le départ, même s'il avait chargé sa ministre d'orienter la procédure: « Le premier ministre et moi-même n'avons aucun modèle privilégié, et nous sommes ouverts à toutes les possibilités. » À un certain moment, à la suite d'une séance tenue à Victoria, je pense, elle a affirmé qu'elle commençait à pencher vers un modèle. Cette affirmation a été complètement contredite lorsque le premier ministre a déclaré que, depuis avant les élections, le scrutin préférentiel était pour lui la seule option possible.

Comme le scrutin préférentiel est un système beaucoup plus direct que la représentation proportionnelle, il ne requiert pas de vastes changements. Ce n'est pas comme s'il affirmait qu'il existait plusieurs versions du scrutin préférentiel à étudier. Il n'y en a vraiment qu'une seule. En fait, il y en a deux: le scrutin préférentiel facultatif et le scrutin préférentiel obligatoire.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous vous en tenir plutôt à l'objet de la motion?

M. Scott Reid:

Certainement. Ce qui est sous-entendu deviendra très clair pour tous très bientôt. Je dirais que mes propos sont très lourds de sens. Ne craignez rien, je vais bientôt accoucher.

Comme vous le savez, j'ai parfois des réflexions qui, comme le petit qui grandit dans le ventre de la baleine, prennent des mois et des mois, même des années à se former. Ensuite, j'accouche de grandes idées.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Blake Richards:

Et nous qui pensions que ça ne pouvait être meilleur.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'après ce que vous dites, nous pourrions être ici encore un bon moment.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous avons été témoins d'un processus qui a été inutilement ralenti. Je ne sais pas si c'est une mauvaise gestion qui en est la cause dans ce cas en particulier, ou dans le cas du projet de loi, ou dans le cas de... Sur le plan professionnel, je ne parle pas de la décision; je parle du processus de nomination du directeur général des élections et de tous les autres processus de nomination, qui sont aussi bloqués pendant une période extrêmement longue. Je ne sais pas s'il s'agit d'un problème lié au processus ou s'il s'agit d'un problème d'exécution.

J'aimerais le savoir parce qu'on remarque une tendance. Nous avons le droit de savoir. Le fait de déclarer qu'il s'agit de renseignements privés n'est qu'une façon de dire: « Nous ne vous expliquerons pas ce qui se passe, et vous n'avez qu'à nous croire lorsqu'on déclare qu'il existe un secret que nous devons garder comme gouvernement, contrairement à un secret que nous sommes obligés de dévoiler, dans les faits, et que nous choisissons de garder parce que nous sommes un peu embarrassés de notre incompétence dans ce genre de processus. »

Je ne veux pas attribuer de mauvais desseins au gouvernement pour avoir décidé de faire ce qu'il a fait à ce sujet. Je ne sais pas qui a dit qu'on ne devrait jamais qualifier de machiavélique une situation qui peut être expliquée par l'incompétence, mais j'ai toujours trouvé que c'était rempli de sens. Je suis prêt à croire que le gouvernement a simplement fait preuve d'incompétence dans cette situation. Je ne peux que présumer des raisons qui pourraient expliquer cette incompétence: il y a peut-être trop de chefs? Autrement, dans le cas de ce gouvernement, le problème, c'est qu'il y a un chef qui doit décider de tout, qu'il n'y a pas de sous-chefs, et qu'il est difficile d'être responsable de tous les plats qui seront servis à de multiples convives. En passant, j'ai déjà travaillé dans une cuisine.

Il n'y a personne d'autre que le grand chef pour aider, et je crois que c'est le problème. Tout doit attendre jusqu'à ce que Justin Trudeau dise oui ou non personnellement, et cela n'accélère pas beaucoup les processus, pas selon mon expérience, du moins.

Je crois que ça explique ce qui est arrivé l'an passé pendant l'obstruction systématique. Il a fallu un mois pour que, enfin, le problème arrive à l'échelon du haut. Toutefois, nous en sommes tous ressortis plus éclairés que nous le sommes en ce moment. Nous avons élaboré un tout nouvel ensemble de procédures, ce qui nous a permis d'avoir un échange en plein milieu de l'obstruction systématique, dont le principe clé porte le nom de mon collègue tant apprécié, M. Simms. Même si cela en dit long sur les membres de ce comité et leur capacité de collaborer, ce n'est pas reluisant quant au processus décisionnel très centralisé, qui, à mon sens, constitue peut-être le problème. Si c'est le cas, nous pourrions apprendre, sans révéler de secrets à propos de Mme Sahota, de M. Parent ou de toute autre personne, ce qui se passe derrière le rideau, dans la cité d'Émeraude, où je crois qu'un magicien a trop de leviers à manipuler et qu'il n'arrive pas à suivre le rythme de toutes les décisions à prendre découlant de ces structures décisionnelles très centralisées. C'est ma théorie.

Je ne sais pas si c'est le problème, mais c'est un problème possible à mon sens, et, si je suis dans l'erreur, je pourrais être détrompé en faisant comparaître la ministre pendant une heure et en lui permettant d'expliquer ce qui s'est passé. Nous pourrions très bien être surpris.

Je ne crois pas me tromper en affirmant que la ministre est, somme toute, une personne très intelligente et capable de s'exprimer de façon éloquente, quand on lui en donne l'occasion, pour défendre les pratiques de son gouvernement et pour faire la preuve qu'il a véritablement la volonté d'améliorer les pratiques à l'avenir. Je crois que, dans l'ensemble, elle a réussi à gérer un portefeuille très difficile de même qu'à relever certains défis sur le plan personnel, que nous connaissons tous, et qu'elle a fait preuve de capacités en gestion dont, selon moi, très peu d'autres personnes auraient fait preuve. Donc, je suis d'avis qu'elle serait en mesure de témoigner pendant une heure. Je le crois vraiment. Je suis d'avis qu'elle le ferait avec aisance. Nous serions tous plus éclairés que nous le sommes en ce moment.

(1315)



C'est pourquoi j'affirme que l'argument du secret ne tient pas vraiment la route. Il est trop vague. Sa portée est trop grande. C'est abuser d'un terme dont le sens est en quelque sorte élastique — c'est-à-dire que sa signification peut être plus ou moins englobante. Nous sommes devant l'utilisation d'un argument fallacieux qui consiste à passer d’une affirmation établie à une affirmation controversée. Un secret peut désigner quelque chose de très précis, qui se rapporte à la Loi sur les secrets officiels, ou quelque chose de très large, comme des renseignements qui seraient gênants pour une personne, et le bon goût nous interdit de suivre cette dernière voie.

Je vais apporter, maintenant que j'ai soulevé la Loi sur les secrets officiels, un contre-argument très solide à ce qu'a avancé M. Bittle. Disons que, aux fins de la discussion, c'est le cas et qu'il existe quelque chose qu'on pourrait qualifier de secret officiel, soit un secret du Cabinet qui ne peut vraiment pas être communiqué aux membres de ce comité et au public. Il y a une façon de contourner cette situation. Nous le savons parce que le gouvernement a activement proposé cette façon de procéder.

Vous souvenez-vous du moment où le chef du Parti conservateur, l'honorable Andrew Scheer, a soulevé des questions concernant Daniel Jean, le conseiller national pour la sécurité, et commenté les gestes posés par le gouvernement de l'Inde et la théorie du complot soutenue par M. Jean? Le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile s'est levé en Chambre et a déclaré: « Eh bien, tout le monde était heureux. »

(1320)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur le président, puis-je invoquer le Règlement? Je tiens à m'excuser auprès de mon ami, M. Reid. J'apprécie toujours son bavardage.

M. Scott Reid:

Je sais que vous avez dit ça dans le bon sens du terme.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je l'ai dit en toute gentillesse.

Selon le calendrier normal — et je ne veux surtout pas porter atteinte au droit d'un membre d'aborder un sujet —, le comité de liaison tient une réunion cet après-midi, si je ne m'abuse, et si nous poursuivons comme nous le faisons en ce moment, du moins, nous devrons nous rendre à l'évidence que, comme comité, nous ne pourrons pas demander l'autorisation de nous déplacer la semaine prochaine.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne connais pas l'opinion du gouvernement à ce sujet, et je ne vais pas présumer des intentions d'autres députés quant à la raison pour laquelle ils abordent un sujet en particulier ou à la période qu'ils comptent occuper, mais je propose que le Comité, et je ne sais pas comment cela peut fonctionner sur le plan procédural, suspende la discussion portant sur cette motion, c'est-à-dire celle dont nous discutons en ce moment, la motion de M. Richards, afin de pouvoir discuter et savoir si les membres du Comité veulent toujours proposer le déplacement dont nous avons discuté hier soir, et au moins confirmer cette volonté. Sinon, cela revient à décider de ne pas se déplacer. Je ne sais pas ce qu'en pensent les personnes autour de la table, mais l'intention du Comité, hier soir, était que nous nous déplacions. Il était prévu que nous soumettions une demande au comité de liaison cet après-midi, par votre entremise, monsieur le président, en notre nom. Je ne sais pas ce qu'en pensent les libéraux qui sont membres du Comité quant au fait de régler au moins la question du déplacement. Si nous ne prenons pas de décision à cet égard d'ici 40 minutes environ, il sera trop tard.

M. Chris Bittle:

Pour ce qui est du rappel au Règlement, je suis d'accord avec M. Cullen sur le fait qu'on doit prendre des décisions. Nous devons essayer de donner de la flexibilité au greffier — je crois que nous avons rendu son travail plus difficile —, et que nous devons prendre des décisions pour établir à tout le moins notre calendrier pour les quelques prochaines semaines. Je comprends et respecte les droits de M. Reid et de M. Richards, mais si nous ne prenons pas de décision à ce sujet, alors il n'y aura pas de déplacement, en raison du temps qui doit être consacré aux arrangements.

M. Blake Richards:

Sur ce, c'est ma motion, de toute évidence, mais je suis d'accord pour interrompre la discussion à ce sujet, si la procédure le permet, afin de traiter la question du déplacement. Si nous réglons cette question et que, ensuite, nous revenons à la motion, je serais heureux de procéder de cette façon.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un consentement unanime pour suspendre le débat concernant la motion de M. Richards pendant que nous discutons du déplacement?

M. Blake Richards:

Avant de donner mon consentement, je veux m'assurer que cela signifie que, dès que nous aurons pris une décision concernant le déplacement, nous poursuivrons le débat portant sur cette motion. Est-ce bien le cas?

Le président:

Oui.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Est-ce que la discussion portera sur le déplacement ou sur le reste de cette étude?

M. Blake Richards:

D'après ce que je comprends, il ne s'agit que du déplacement.

(1325)

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous ne pouvons pas traiter une question sans traiter l'autre, donc soyons réaliste.

M. Blake Richards:

Je conviens de discuter du déplacement. Sinon, je dirais que nous devons poursuivre le débat concernant la motion.

M. Scott Reid:

De fait, il appartient à M. Cullen de présenter sa motion, n'est-ce pas?

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'étais préoccupé par l'opportunité. Si nous dépassons 14 heures, alors nous perdrons peut-être la possibilité de faire approuver la partie qui porte sur le déplacement. En ce qui concerne la motion dans son ensemble, nous en avons discuté à ce propos, mais de façon plutôt informelle. En avons-nous discuté à proprement parler en comité? Je ne crois pas. Nous n'avons tenu que des discussions informelles. Le gouvernement a présenté une motion, et nous avons échangé à ce sujet, mais dans le cadre des activités du Comité...

Mon intention première était de discuter seulement du déplacement, mais il semble que cela soit un frein pour les libéraux et les conservateurs. Je crois que les libéraux veulent discuter de l'ensemble de la motion, et que les conservateurs ne veulent débattre que de la partie portant sur le déplacement. C'est probablement là où nous en sommes.

Le président:

Je crois que c'est une bonne description de la situation.

Le président:

Allez-y, Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Je souhaite ajouter quelque chose. Je suis très à l'aise avec l'idée que nous discutions du déplacement. Selon les explications de M. Cullen, nous avons déjà eu des échanges à ce sujet. C'est une question facile à trancher et à régler, alors que les autres points de la motion présentée par le gouvernement pourraient ne pas être aussi faciles à régler. Cela me semble malheureux. À mon sens, si les libéraux ne sont pas prêts à traiter la question du déplacement de façon distincte, peut-être ne souhaitent-ils tout simplement pas se déplacer. Je comprendrais pourquoi. C'est dommage, parce qu'il nous serait facile d'arriver à...

Il semble y avoir une tendance qui s'installe. Il se passe la même chose dans le cas de cette motion. Il semblait de prime abord qu'il aurait été facile de traiter une situation liée à l'exécution de nos tâches et au fait de nous assurer que nous les effectuons de façon adéquate. Il pourrait sembler facile pour nous, au point où nous en sommes, de simplement régler la question du déplacement rapidement, de répondre aux questions du greffier et de faire en sorte que les choses suivent leur cours à ce sujet. Si les membres du gouvernement ne souhaitent pas se déplacer et entendre ce que les Canadiens ont à dire, alors j'imagine que nous sommes dans une impasse quant à la motion.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Eh bien, c'est dommage. J'ai regardé la transmission au moyen de Facebook Live hier soir. M. Richards a mentionné des échanges que nous avons eus en privé. Au cours de ces échanges tenus hier soir, nous nous sommes entendus pour discuter de la partie portant sur le déplacement afin de pouvoir traiter le reste de la motion aujourd'hui. Est-il une personne qui tient parole? Je constate de plus en plus ces situations, au fil des réunions de ce comité, et c'est vraiment malheureux. Nous avons avancé les travaux en nous fondant sur cette présomption hier soir. J'espère qu'il tiendra parole.

Nous avons débattu de façon légitime de la question du déplacement hier soir, et nous nous sommes penchés sur ce sujet afin de débattre du reste le lendemain. Il m'a dit que ce ne serait probablement pas... J'ai laissé entendre qu'il y aurait probablement de l'opposition, et il a dit: « Eh bien, ce ne sera peut-être pas le cas. » Malheureusement, j'avais raison.

Il s'agit de quelque chose qui doit être discuté. Il ne reste plus beaucoup de temps. Nous souhaitons faire adopter cette motion. Je sais que nous souhaitons consulter les Canadiens. Les conservateurs ont laissé entendre qu'ils souhaitent aussi le faire. M. Cullen l'a dit ouvertement dès le début, en affirmant qu'il souhaite mener cette consultation à l'échelle du pays. Réglons la question, mais tenons nos discussions dans le contexte de l'ensemble d'une étude. Ce n'est pas sensé de discuter des activités d'une semaine menées dans le cadre d'une étude qui en dure deux ou trois. Soyons réalistes et soyons fidèles aux promesses que nous nous faisons les uns aux autres.

M. Blake Richards:

Si je peux me permettre, je crois que les propos que nous venons d'entendre étaient plutôt fourbes. Ce dont il est question dans la motion présentée par le gouvernement — et je l'ai lue et analysée — , c'est simplement de permettre une semaine de déplacement, et le contenu de la motion présentée par le gouvernement n'ouvre pas la voie à une autre étude. Si les députés du gouvernement affirment qu'il faut examiner la motion en tenant compte du contexte dans son ensemble, cela revient à dire qu'ils ne veulent tout simplement pas se déplacer. En ce qui les concerne, l'étude se résumerait à la semaine de déplacement.

Je suis venu ici aujourd'hui en pensant qu'on traiterait rapidement ma motion. Les membres du gouvernement ne veulent pas que cela se passe ainsi, parce qu'ils veulent la refuser, et c'est malheureux. Nous sommes maintenant coincés dans une situation où nous devons nous battre pour faire adopter la motion. Je n'abandonnerai pas, parce que c'est une bataille importante. Je comprends la situation dans laquelle le gouvernement se trouve. Il veut faire adopter son projet de loi en vitesse. Je souhaite m'assurer que nous tenions un débat en bonne et due forme. Si les membres de ce gouvernement sont prêts à dire: « Voici, nous allons essayer de faire notre travail, adoptez cette motion s'il vous plaît », nous pouvons commencer à travailler, mais cela ne semble pas être le cas. Nous tiendrons des débats concernant cette motion jusqu'à ce que ce soit le cas.

En attendant, je suis d'avis qu'il est très raisonnable de la part de M. Cullen de proposer de régler cette question facile, sur laquelle nous nous sommes déjà entendus, soit le déplacement. Si les membres du gouvernement ne veulent pas se déplacer, ils devraient tout simplement le dire, au lieu de blâmer d'autres personnes. S'ils souhaitent poursuivre le reste des travaux, ce qui signifie mettre ma motion de côté, alors je suis désolé, mais je ne peux accepter cela. Leurs agissements aujourd'hui m'ont insulté et offensé.

(1330)

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

M. Richards n'a toujours pas traité des questions que j'ai soulevées au cours de notre discussion d'hier soir. Il peut feindre d'être offensé tant qu'il veut, et je comprends cette tentative de sa part.

Nous sommes heureux de nous déplacer. Nous avons demandé aux membres de l'opposition de présenter un plan au cours de...

M. Blake Richards: Venez-en aux faits.

M. Chris Bittle: Monsieur Richards, j'ai la parole. Je ne vous ai pas interrompu.

M. Blake Richards:

Venez-en aux faits.

M. Chris Bittle: En venir aux faits. Nous vous avons écouté pendant une heure et demie, et vous avez exercé votre droit, maintenant j'ai la parole...

M. Blake Richards: Nous sommes tous prêts à travailler sur cette question, et vous ne l'êtes pas.

Le président:

M. Bittle a la parole.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous sommes heureux de nous déplacer. Nous demandons aux membres de l'opposition de fournir un plan détaillé depuis les deux dernières semaines. Les conservateurs n'ont rien fourni. Les membres du NPD sont les seuls à avoir fait des propositions utiles. Je comprends la tentative — nous sommes en politique — de blâmer le gouvernement. Toutefois, entre les moments d'obstruction parlementaire, le débat qui se poursuit, le fait de dire une chose hier soir, de faire ensuite quelque chose de complètement différent et même de tenir des propos encore différents de ceux diffusés au moyen de Facebook Live hier soir — ce qui est bizarre en soi, mais c'est votre droit comme député —, voici où nous en sommes rendus.

Nous souhaitons faire adopter ce projet de loi. Je sais que les conservateurs souhaitent le contraire. Au bout du compte, voilà la situation. Nous aimerions établir un horaire qui comprend nos déplacements d'est en ouest. Nous avons proposé un plan à cet égard hier soir. Je crois que les membres du Comité y ont souscrit. Ce qui est ressorti de notre discussion d'hier soir, entre vous et moi, monsieur Richards, c'est que nous allions discuter le reste du contenu de la motion aujourd'hui. Vous ne semblez pas vouloir le faire maintenant. Je ne sais pas à quel M. Richards accorder ma confiance: à celui qui s'exprime pendant une séance publique ou à celui qui s'exprime à huis clos.

Nous souhaitons discuter de cela en nous fondant sur nos échanges d'hier.

J'ai vu que M. Cullen a levé la main. J'aimerais entendre ce qu'il a à dire à ce sujet.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je crois que la description que j'ai faite de la situation tantôt semble encore juste, à l'exception peut-être du fait qu'il y a plus d'attaques personnelles, mais les principes fondamentaux demeurent les mêmes. Mon but, c'est de nous permettre de présenter une demande... C'est bien le Comité de liaison, n'est-ce pas? Non?

Le greffier:

Il s'agit du Sous-comité des budgets de comité, le sous-comité du Comité de liaison.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Très bien. Mon but est de nous permettre de soumettre une demande concernant ce sur quoi nous semblions nous être entendus hier soir. Selon ce que j'entends des libéraux, le fait d'accepter de présenter cette demande est subordonné à la tenue de discussions sur le reste de l'étude menée par le Comité. D'après ce que je comprends du point de vue des conservateurs, cela n'est pas acceptable. Ma motion initiale visait simplement à discuter de l'élément qui porte sur le déplacement. C'est ce que j'ai dit.

Je suis ouvert aux deux points de vue, mais si les deux côtés sont intraitables... il nous faut obtenir le consentement unanime — c'est ce que je présume, monsieur le président — pour y arriver. Je propose que nous poursuivions le débat concernant la motion présentée par M. Richards, et que nous essayions de voir si nous pouvons arriver à nous entendre sur quelque chose avant 14 heures en tenant des discussions en aparté.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne reviens pas tout de suite à la motion de M. Richards. Je souhaite traiter du rappel au Règlement, parce qu'il me manque certains renseignements. Il me faut peut-être savoir seulement deux choses: la limite est bien à 14 heures; le Comité tient une réunion...

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible] pour la période de questions, et je crois que les membres du Sous-comité se réunissent à 15 h 30 cet après-midi, habituellement...

Le greffier:

C'est à 17 h 30.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas quelle est l'heure limite. Je dois demander à notre greffier ou à notre président à quel moment ce comité doit adopter la motion concernant le déplacement. J'imagine qu'il faudra que ce soit bien avant 17 h.

Le greffier:

Le plus tôt sera le mieux, mais vous avez jusqu'à 17 h 30.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il est possible que nous dépassions la période de questions, si nous poursuivons cette discussion pour résoudre l'impasse. En ce qui concerne l'élément qui porte sur le déplacement, que vous devez présenter au Sous-comité, vous en avez l'essentiel. Vous devez seulement obtenir l'approbation par un hochement de tête des membres du Comité réunis autour de la table, mais cet élément est maintenant lié à autre chose, monsieur le président. Il semble que nous devons risquer de sacrifier une chose sur laquelle nous nous étions tous entendus.

Le président:

Oui.

Je suis d'avis que, en ce qui concerne le rappel au Règlement, comme M. Cullen l'a dit, il n'y a pas de consensus. Donc nous allons revenir à la...

M. Scott Reid:

Je souhaite seulement préciser que l'heure limite n'est pas 14 heures. C'est un peu plus tard.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est un peu plus tard, en effet.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Je ne suis pas celui qui négocierait de mon côté. Je voulais simplement préciser ce renseignement.

Puis-je poser une autre question? C'est lié au même point. Le Sous-comité tient une réunion une fois par semaine, est-ce exact? Je ne propose pas ce qui suit. Comprenez-moi bien. Je souligne simplement une possibilité. Nous avons un délai très serré en ce qui concerne les déplacements prévus la semaine prochaine et la semaine suivante, le mardi, si je ne m'abuse.

J'ai le texte du point 6 de la motion présentée par les libéraux, qui a été diffusée hier soir. Je crois qu'il s'agit du point auquel M. Bittle faisait référence. Il est mentionné au point 6 le mardi de la semaine suivante.

En principe, si cette date était repoussée d'une semaine, nous pourrions quand même nous déplacer. Ce serait seulement du 10 au 13 juin. Je ne propose rien. Je souligne simplement que l'on souhaite examiner le plus de possibilités, et que d'autres personnes doivent rendre une décision à ce sujet.

J'espère qu'on ne m'attribuera pas des propositions que je n'ai pas faites. Je sais maintenant que la réunion a lieu une fois par semaine, et que c'est le mardi qu'il faut présenter une demande.

Le président: Très bien, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid: D'accord, je vais revenir à la motion.

(1335)

Le président:

Revenez à la motion présentée par M. Richards.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, mais maintenant nous savons des choses que nous ne connaissions pas auparavant.

Qui d'autre figure sur la liste d'intervenants?

Le président:

M. Bittle et M. Nater.

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois que M. Richards figure aussi sur la liste.

Le président:

Ensuite, il y a M. Richards.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je crois avoir dit pratiquement tout ce que j'avais à dire au sujet du respect de la vie privée. Il ne me reste qu'une observation à faire à ce sujet. En fait, c'est plutôt un résumé de ce que j'ai dit plus tôt. Voici comment je résume les choses: je ne veux pas paraître injuste envers M. Bittle, mais j'ai trouvé que son argument s'apparentait quelque peu à un sophisme: il a résumé sa position à son sens le plus essentiel, c'est-à-dire le respect de la vie privée. Qui oserait dire que les gens n'ont pas le droit au respect de leur vie privée? Bon sang, on ne peut pas tolérer une société où tout le monde espionne tout le monde. Qui ne serait pas indigné face aux actions de Cambridge Analytica? Qui ne serait pas consterné par le fait que M. Zuckerberg n'a pas hésité à vendre les renseignements personnels de ses utilisateurs à des gens qui s'en sont servis pour deviner leurs activités et leurs désirs et ainsi les manipuler grâce à leurs publicités?

J'imagine que c'est pour cette raison que je recevais des publicités pour des appareils orthopédiques sur Facebook, ou peut-être était-ce sur Google. On croyait probablement que j'en avais besoin vu le grand nombre de communications que je recevais à propos des régimes de retraite, de gens qui n'avaient pas reçu leur chèque de pensions du Canada et qui étaient préoccupés. Peu importe, parce que le résultat a été: « Ah, voilà un mot clé. Il doit avoir besoin d'appareils orthopédiques. » J'aurais préféré que cela n'arrive pas. J'irais jusqu'à dire que c'est une atteinte à ma vie privée. Nous sommes tous d'accord pour dire que le respect de la vie privée est important.

Lorsque vous étirez ce principe jusqu'à prétendre, disons, que tout ce qui rend le gouvernement mal à l'aise relève de la vie privée, vous généralisez. Vous partez d’un cas précis et vous le montez en épingle pour en faire un principe englobant. Vous donnez à un mot une signification qu’une personne ordinaire ne trouverait pas raisonnable. Donc, oui, c'est peut-être embarrassant pour le gouvernement. Peut-être que les gens diraient qu’il n'est pas raisonnable de faire les choses de cette façon, et peut-être que le gouvernement serait un peu mal à l’aise de savoir que les gens sont désormais au courant, mais cela ne change rien au fait que les Canadiens ont le droit de savoir ce genre de choses.

Au Canada, préserver le gouvernement de l'embarras n'est pas un objectif légitime. Nous avons des règles très précises qui régissent cela. Votre argument est fallacieux. Vous ne cherchez qu’à noyer le poisson à force d’arguments rhétologiques fallacieux. Je vous invite à faire une recherche sur Internet pour en apprendre davantage là-dessus.

J'aimerais à présent parler de la consultation des autres partis. Le gouvernement actuel semble avoir une interprétation de plus en plus étroite de ce que la « consultation » est censée être. C'est le propre des partis de l'opposition de se plaindre du gouvernement au pouvoir, de dire qu'il y a un manque de consultations ou que les consultations sont tenues simplement pour la forme. J'ai fait partie de l'opposition deux fois maintenant, une fois entre 2000 et 2005 et à nouveau depuis les élections de 2015, avec un intervalle de 10 ans où mon parti était au pouvoir. J'ai pu voir comment les choses se passaient des deux côtés, et deux fois dans l'opposition.

À l'époque du gouvernement Chrétien, nous nous sommes plaints de l'habitude de M. Chrétien — je vous dis ce qu'on m'a dit — d'appeler Stockwell Day et puis John Reynolds, le chef de l'opposition. Après, c'était Stephen Harper. M. Chrétien les appelait pour la forme, pour leur dire: « Je veux simplement vous laisser savoir que nous avons choisi M. Untel pour ce travail. » C'était ce qu'il appelait une consultation. Au moins, il nous téléphonait.

Aujourd'hui, si ce que dit Nathan Cullen est exact, le téléphone qu'on reçoit est l'équivalent d'un appel enregistré: « Votre appel est important pour nous. » Il n'y a pas de consultation. On nous avertit à l'avance, mais c'est tout. Dans une véritable consultation, les gens ont le droit de répliquer, de dire quelque chose comme: « Cette personne n'est pas le meilleur candidat. Avez-vous songé à M. Untel? » ou quelque chose du genre.

(1340)



Les normes du gouvernement Chrétien n'étaient pas très élevées, et je ne me rappelle pas, à dire vrai, quelles étaient les normes à l'époque où mon gouvernement était au pouvoir, mais j'imagine que les libéraux diraient qu'elles n'étaient pas très élevées non plus. En ce qui concerne les normes du gouvernement Trudeau, elles sont encore plus basses que les autres.

C'est inacceptable de tenir une consultation de cette façon. Nous devrions pouvoir demander à la ministre quel était le processus, quel est le protocole.

Voici où je veux vraiment en venir: existe-t-il un protocole interne au gouvernement libéral qui détermine ce qu'une consultation devrait être? Ce genre de choses n'est pas régi par la loi, mais par les conventions, ce qui veut dire que cela respecte généralement ce qui est accepté par le grand public et en particulier par les gens informés sur le plan politique. Dans ce contexte, je crois que le gouvernement actuel faillit à sa tâche, mais, tant que ce manquement reste dans l'obscurité, tant que nous ne savons pas quelles sont les règles, si règles il y a... Peut-être que leurs objectifs ou leurs normes changent selon les circonstances, dépendamment de ce que fait tel ou tel ministre. Qui sait?

Ce serait utile de savoir s'il existe vraiment un protocole interne en matière de consultation, de savoir quand il a été adopté et de savoir en quoi il diverge de celui du gouvernement précédent. Le public devrait avoir accès à ce genre d'information.

À la Bibliothèque du Parlement, il y a un livre qui énumère les conventions politiques et qui tente de les systématiser. C'est une création du gouvernement Pearson de 1967, mais, et c'est une honte, il n'a pas été mis à jour depuis. Malgré tout, on y recense les protocoles applicables dans divers domaines.

Par exemple, si vous démissionnez du Conseil des ministres, le livre explique comment vous devriez procéder pour démissionner sans dévoiler de renseignements confidentiels du Cabinet. Il y a une ébauche de lettre déjà préparée, ainsi qu'une ébauche de réponse du premier ministre. De cette façon, la personne qui démissionne pour une question de principe peut préciser le principe en question sans dévoiler de renseignements confidentiels. Ainsi, la personne peut démissionner honorablement sans divulguer de secrets officiels.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, un protocole est appliqué ici, et nous avons le droit de savoir de quoi il en retourne. Cette information devrait être publique. La ministre devait nous donner de l'information au lieu de nous dire qu'elle est tenue au secret, ou du moins, elle ne pourrait pas le faire en toute légitimité. La ministre pourrait bien essayer, mais dans ce cas, elle ne dirait pas la vérité.

Nous ne révélons pas toujours tout ici. Nous ne disons peut-être pas toujours l'entière vérité, mais ce que nous disons doit être vrai, et cela s'applique aussi à la ministre. À ce que je sache, elle a toujours été honnête avec moi et, d'après ce que j'en sais, avec tout le monde également. C'est son devoir, et je crois que c'est naturel chez elle.

Si vous le permettez, monsieur le président, j'aimerais à ce propos revenir sur les commentaires qu'a faits M. Bittle plus tôt à propos de mon collègue, M. Richards. Je dois dire que je connais Blake depuis longtemps. Il travaillait pour moi à l'époque où j'étais porte-parole de l'opposition ou ministre de cabinet fantôme, comme on dit aujourd'hui, et j'ai ensuite travaillé sous sa direction. Je ne l'ai jamais vu dévier un tant soit peu de l'entière vérité à n'importe quel sujet, ni même laisser entendre que ce serait acceptable de le faire. C'est l'un des hommes les plus honorables qui soit, comme il se doit de l'être.

Certaines personnes croient que les commentaires formulés pour défendre un collègue du même parti n'ont pas beaucoup de valeur. Vous êtes libre de me croire, mais il demeure que j'ai le plus grand des respects pour Blake Richards, et je crois que les commentaires de M. Bittle n'étaient pas entièrement appropriés. Avec le recul, peut-être que M. Bittle en arrivera-t-il lui aussi à cette conclusion, et je dois dire que j'ai aussi beaucoup de respect pour lui.

Plus tôt, j'ai blagué à propos du fait que Scott Brison ne l'aime pas particulièrement. Bien sûr, ce n'était pas... J'ai déformé un peu les faits lorsque j'ai dit soupçonner que Scott Brison l'aimait autant qu'il aime le reste de son propre caucus. Je vais peut-être aller poser la question à Scott à un moment donné. Il se demandera probablement pourquoi je lui pose une question si étrange, mais...

(1345)

M. John Nater:

J'invoque le Règlement. J'aimerais savoir si M. Brison a déjà fait partie de votre caucus.

M. Scott Reid:

Eh bien, en vérité...

M. Blake Richards:

Je doute qu'il vous aimait bien lorsqu'il en faisait partie.

M. Scott Reid:

En vérité, c'est une question assez complexe, puisque M. Brison a quitté le caucus du Parti conservateur lorsqu'on a envisagé une fusion. Elle ne s'était pas encore concrétisée.

M. Simms connaît l'histoire, oui.

Donc, nous n'avons jamais vraiment siégé au même caucus.

M. Blake Richards:

Mais presque.

M. Scott Reid:

Il s'en est fallu de peu. Par la suite, il m'a dit que le fait que je faisais partie du caucus qu'il s'apprêtait à rejoindre n'avait rien à voir avec sa décision, ce qui me porte à croire qu'il m'aimait bien après tout.

Monsieur le président, je sais que vous vous préoccupez de la possibilité que je pourrais, à l'avenir, déroger un tant soit peu au principe absolu de la pertinence que j'ai respecté rigoureusement et pointilleusement jusqu'ici dans tout ce que j'ai dit. Sur ce, je crois que maintenant serait le bon moment de conclure mes observations sur le sujet, même si j'ai encore d'autres commentaires à formuler. Vous pouvez me réinscrire sur la liste des intervenants à propos de cette motion afin que je puisse continuer plus tard.

Merci.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je propose que le débat soit ajourné.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement.

Le président:

Vous m'en voyez navré, mais il n'y a pas de débat possible sur cette question. Je dois la mettre aux voix.

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement. Je veux souligner que le gouvernement est censé être transparent et ouvert, monsieur le président. Le gouvernement doit être transparent et ouvert.

Un député: Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 3.)

Le président:

Le greffier est d'avis qu'il serait mieux de discuter à huis clos du déplacement du Comité. Êtes-vous d'accord pour que nous passions à huis clos...

M. Blake Richards:

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

Pardon, pour discuter...

Le président:

du déplacement...

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce le déplacement dont a parlé M. Cullen?

Le président:

Oui, le déplacement qui devrait avoir lieu la semaine prochaine.

D'accord. La séance publique se poursuit jusqu'à ce que quelqu'un propose que nous passions à huis clos.

M. Chris Bittle:

Peut-être pourrions-nous suspendre la séance jusqu'au retour de M. Cullen?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Nous allons devoir suspendre la séance pour la période de questions de toute façon.

M. Scott Reid:

Il va assister à la période de questions.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous pouvons suspendre la séance et reprendre après la période de questions...

Le président:

D'accord.

(1350)

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous devrions suspendre la séance et reprendre après la période de questions.

Le président:

Donc, nous allons suspendre la séance et reprendre après la période de questions? Je crois que c'est entendu.

M. Scott Reid:

Que voulez-vous dire exactement par « après la période de questions »? Voulez-vous dire à 15 h 30? Donnez-moi une heure précise.

Le président:

Oui, nous allons reprendre les travaux à 15 h 30.



(1535)

Le président:

Bienvenue encore une fois à la 107e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Avant de reprendre nos travaux, je veux mentionner que l'analyste croit qu'il pourra produire le rapport sur lequel nous avons travaillé ce matin — à huis clos, alors je vais taire son contenu — d'ici demain après-midi. Je vais donc prévoir 10 minutes pour cela. Il n'y a pas eu de discussions à ce sujet et, s'il n'y a pas de modifications à apporter, alors je réserverai 10 minutes jeudi pour l'approuver.

Reprenons les travaux du Comité. Nous discutions de la possibilité d'un déplacement.

Je vous cède la parole.

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J'espérais commencer à discuter du déplacement afin d'aider le greffier à prendre les dispositions nécessaires. M. Cullen semble très enthousiaste à l'idée que le Comité se déplace, et évidemment, nous pourrons tirer parti des témoignages que nous entendrons ailleurs. J'étais absente hier, mais je crois que nous en sommes venus à une entente et que nous allons nous déplacer de la côte Est à la côte Ouest en nous arrêtant à Halifax, à Montréal et...

Pourrais-je avoir un peu d'aide?

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Toronto, Vancouver...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Peut-être Winnipeg, puis Vancouver et une autre ville.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Winnipeg et Vancouver.

Nous avons aussi discuté de la possibilité de nous rendre dans des régions rurales ou métropolitaines, et je me demandais si le greffier allait poser des questions précises au président afin que nous puissions fournir une rétroaction sur la façon dont les choses devraient se dérouler, selon nous.

D'après ce que M. Cullen a dit plus tôt, je crois qu'il veut prendre le pouls de la population et entendre des témoignages d'experts. Donc, nous voulons que des témoins experts soient invités, et si cela est possible dans la ville où nous serons, nous inviterions le public à s'exprimer tout de suite après les experts. Si un membre du public veut s'exprimer, nous pourrions prendre des dispositions comme nous l'avons fait pour le Comité sur la réforme électorale.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je tiens seulement à souligner que, maintenant, le gouvernement souhaite discuter du déplacement séparément, alors que ce n'est pas quelque chose qu'il voulait précédemment. Je crois que c'est une bonne idée, et j'espère que les députés ont changé d'avis.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De nombreux autres facteurs entrent en ligne de compte, mais je me disais qu'il fallait amorcer la discussion.

Bien sûr, nous pourrons discuter de tout ce que vous voulez, mais si le Comité va effectivement se déplacer, nous devons être certains de pouvoir procéder à l'étude article par article du projet de loi. C'est quelque chose que je compte proposer.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous voulez dire que le gouvernement n'a pas l'intention de présenter la motion qui a été distribuée hier soir?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous comptons le faire. Je compte la présenter...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous voulez donc régler la question du déplacement, et ensuite vous allez présenter la motion, c'est ça?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

Le président:

Par chance, nous avons avec nous notre experte en logistique, Jill McKenny.

Merci d'être ici.

Elle a étudié un peu les différents itinéraires que nous pourrions prendre et d'autres choses du genre. Elle pourra nous tenir au courant des autres options. Certaines salles que nous voulions ne sont pas disponibles à certains moments de la semaine, etc. Il serait probablement utile que vous donniez au Comité les grandes lignes de ce que vous avez appris.

Le greffier:

Avant, il y peut-être quelques renseignements que je devrais donner rapidement au Comité. Nous avons besoin de détails précis quant aux destinations où le Comité aimerait se rendre. Je sais que vous avez déjà des idées, Jill et son équipe ont déjà fait beaucoup de travail pour préparer deux ou trois ébauches de budget à partir de la discussion d'hier soir. Je crois que les destinations prévues dans ces budgets sont Halifax, Montréal, Toronto, quelque part dans les Prairies et Vancouver. Il nous serait utile d'avoir une courte liste des villes intéressantes dans les trois provinces des Prairies.

La discussion d'hier a aussi porté sur la possibilité que le Comité se rende dans une région rurale, dans les Prairies également, et peut-être, qu'il y tienne une séance. Nous avons fait quelques recherches, mais nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'examiner en détail dans quelles collectivités rurales il serait possible de tenir ce genre de séances. Toutes les indications des députés seraient les bienvenues.

(1540)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Si cela aide à accélérer la planification, nous pourrions tenir les séances dans une ville et utiliser ses installations, et les témoins venant des régions rurales à proximité pourront toujours se déplacer pour venir témoigner. Si nous tenons une tribune ouverte, les gens des régions rurales pourront y venir, ou du moins...

Le président:

Attendons d'avoir entendu nos options.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous pouvez ensuite commenter l'ensemble des options.

M. Blake Richards:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais faire un commentaire sur ce qui vient d'être dit. Nous avons effectivement discuté de cela hier, si vous vous rappelez, et il avait été dit...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'étais absente hier, alors pouvez-vous m'éclairer?

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, ceci explique cela.

Le problème, c'est que si on invite les gens des régions rurales à participer à une séance de discussion ouverte en région urbaine, leur voix sera étouffée par celle des gens des régions urbaines. Le but de tenir une séance en région rurale — au moins à un endroit sinon plus, mais je crois que nous nous sommes entendus sur un seul endroit —, c'est justement de donner l'occasion à ces voix de se faire entendre. Voilà l'objectif.

Je sais que le greffier souhaite savoir dans quelle ville nous pourrons tenir une séance. Je sais que vous vous êtes un peu penché sur la question et que vous avez envisagé la ville de Olds, en Alberta. Je comprends pourquoi vous voudriez la ville de Olds en Alberta: c'est là où se trouve le Olds College. C'est un endroit très centralisé. Il y a le collège ainsi que des installations utilisables qui y sont rattachées. C'est aussi à moins d'une heure de l'aéroport de Calgary. Ce serait un choix logique.

Je voulais mettre cette option en relief, un peu par égoïsme. C'est ma ville natale, c'est là où je suis né et où j'ai grandi, même si ce n'est pas ma circonscription. Je ne pourrais pas être là pendant la dernière partie de la semaine, parce que je dois assister au débat sur une motion d'initiative parlementaire, et ma présence est obligatoire, évidemment.

Si nous prenons la décision de nous rendre là-bas, je demanderais l'indulgence des greffiers et de mes collègues. J'aimerais vraiment que nous nous y rendions. C'est ma ville natale où j'ai grandi.

Je crois que ce serait une bonne chose d'y aller, et pas seulement parce que c'est ma ville natale. Ce serait aussi logique, vu tout ce dont nous avons discuté jusqu'ici. Peut-être pourrions-nous prendre des mesures pour faciliter les choses. Peut-être pourrions-nous voyager dans le sens inverse, d'ouest en est plutôt que d'est en ouest, ainsi...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quand devez-vous être de retour?

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois qu'il n'y aura pas de problème si je suis de retour jeudi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Donc, il n'y a aucun problème si ça se fait mercredi.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

Le président:

Passons aux détails techniques. On s'est déjà penché un peu là-dessus.

Le greffier:

Jill a quelques scénarios à proposer. Je crois que je vais lui laisser vous expliquer les options.

Mme Jill McKenny (coordonnatrice, Services logistiques, Chambre des communes):

En ce qui concerne les salles que nous pourrions utiliser au Olds College, elles sont disponibles seulement au début de la semaine, lundi, mardi ou mercredi.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela ne présente pas d'inconvénient. J'aurais mieux fait de me taire.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Je crois que vous vouliez aussi tenir des séances publiques dans la région de Vancouver, à Tsawwassen. Là aussi, les salles utilisables sont seulement disponibles au début de la semaine.

Si vous voulez vous rendre dans ces deux villes, ce serait mieux que le Comité se déplace d'ouest en est.

Les choses sont un peu plus compliquées pour ce qui est de la planification des déplacements, étant donné que vous perdrez beaucoup de temps en vous rendant de Olds à Toronto, ce qui veut dire que vous allez, soit devoir écourter votre séjour à Olds, soit commencer plus tard à Toronto, du moins si vous prenez un vol commercial. La solution, pour remédier à ce genre d'inconvénient, serait de prendre un vol nolisé, mais cela coûterait évidemment plus cher.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne veux pas critiquer votre travail. Je sais que vous faites de l'excellent travail, et j'ai même travaillé avec vous lorsque j'étais président du Comité. Mais je sais qu'il existe beaucoup de vols directs de Calgary à Toronto.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Merci.

C'est exact, mais c'est une question de synchronisation.

Il me semble que le Comité veut tenir des séances publiques l'après-midi et le soir. En conséquence, vous devrez écourter la séance du soir à Olds pour prendre le vol de 19 h 19.

(1545)

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, à moins de prendre un vol de nuit.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Le vol de nuit serait la seule autre option. Il décolle 20 minutes après minuit et atterrit à 6 heures.

M. Blake Richards:

J'aimerais souligner à titre indicatif que, dans les collectivités rurales, il est parfois plus facile pour les gens de se déplacer le jour que le soir. Les horaires des gens des collectivités rurales, par exemple les agriculteurs, sont parfois un peu différents. Ce qui ne veut pas dire que leurs soirées sont nécessairement plus...

Mme Jill McKenny:

Si nous adoptons cette approche dans une des villes, il sera important d'être uniforme afin que la logistique soit compréhensible.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'avais suggéré d'emblée que les séances soient communes. J'ai proposé de tenir les tribunes ouvertes immédiatement après nos discussions avec les experts, et sans prendre de pause afin de ne pas perdre de temps. Si nous tenons les séances l'après-midi ou le soir, nous pouvons nous déplacer le jour et tenir toute la séance en trois heures, soit peut-être deux heures avec les experts et une heure de tribune ouverte, dépendamment du nombre de témoins qui se présentent dans chaque ville.

M. Blake Richards:

Le problème, manifestement, c'est qu'il faut tenir compte de l'horaire des vols, du décalage horaire et de ce genre de choses. Si c'est ce que nous choisissons de faire, nous allons devoir prendre un vol le soir ou le matin.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le matin.

M. Blake Richards:

Si nous prenons un vol de nuit, nous pouvons partir à minuit et arriver à 6 heures. Autrement — et ce n'est pas la meilleure chose à faire, même si je l'ai fait plus d'une fois parce que je n'avais pas le choix —, nous devrons prendre le premier vol, celui de 6 heures ou de 7 heures, peu importe, ce qui nous fera perdre une demi-journée à cause du décalage horaire et tout le reste. C'est ce que vous voulez dire, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Si vous voulez tenir les séances publiques l'après-midi et le soir, vous allez devoir voyager le matin et tenir les séances publiques l'après-midi ou le soir. Cependant, Olds et Toronto ne sont pas dans le même fuseau horaire, alors vous allez perdre du temps. Vous allez devoir partir un peu plus tôt et gruger le temps que vous aurez à Olds College. Si vous prenez un vol nolisé, toutefois, vous aurez une plus grande marge de manoeuvre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et cela nous laisserait un peu plus de temps libre sur place.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

Y aurait-il un vol disponible tôt le matin, si nous voulons passer l'après-midi et le soir à Toronto? Je tiens pour acquis qu'il y a un vol à 6 heures ou à 7 heures ou à une heure semblable.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Oui. Donc, vous voulez commencer un peu plus tôt à Olds, finir plus tôt, et puis vous rendre à Toronto en prenant un vol l'après-midi.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est une autre possibilité, mais d'après ce que Ruby a dit, je crois, nous tiendrions des séances l'après-midi et le soir, à Toronto. Cela nous laisserait aussi du temps à Olds. Nous pourrions passer la nuit près de l'aéroport de Calgary et prendre le premier vol, ou l'un des premiers vols, le matin suivant. Nous arriverions à Toronto vers...

Mme Jill McKenny:

Vous arriveriez vers 13 h 15, quitteriez l'aéroport à 14 heures et seriez au centre-ville vers 15 heures. La séance à Toronto devrait commencer un peu plus tard.

M. Blake Richards:

[Inaudible] plus près de l'aéroport.

Mme Jill McKenny:

C'est possible, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela nous laisse une heure de plus, et nous arriverions à 14 heures.

Le président:

Avant de poursuivre, sachez que M. Garrison vient de se joindre à nous et il n'a aucune idée de ce dont nous parlons.

Je vais lui expliquer sommairement. Nous étudions les déplacements potentiels du Comité, la semaine prochaine, dans les cinq régions du Canada, à savoir quatre grandes villes dans quatre régions, et une collectivité rurale dans la cinquième région. Nous discutons des détails de la planification.

M. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NPD):

Merci, monsieur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible]

Le président:

Oui, mais nous allons finir d'écouter ce que la responsable de la logistique a à dire.

Poursuivez.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Vous avez d'autres options. Si vous vous déplacez d'est en ouest, vous pouvez vous déplacer le matin et tenir vos séances publiques l'après-midi. Ainsi, vous aurez un peu plus de latitude pour les déplacements et pour la tenue de séances publiques l'après-midi. Cependant, vous n'aurez pas le temps de vous rendre au Olds College et dans la collectivité autochtone.

Le président:

Tsawwassen.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Tsawwassen.

Le greffier:

Si le Comité a d'autres suggestions...

M. Scott Simms:

Avez-vous terminé?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous parlons d'une seule séance par endroit. Peu importe où nous choisissons de nous rendre, il y aura un écart entre les régions rurales et les régions urbaines, nous le constaterons probablement toute la semaine, mais nous allons seulement tenir une séance commune à chaque endroit. Nous allons discuter deux heures avec les témoins, puis tenir une tribune ouverte immédiatement après, afin de maximiser notre temps. Voilà comment je vois les choses.

(1550)

M. Blake Richards:

Cela ressemble beaucoup à ce que nous avons fait au Comité de la réforme électorale. Nous nous sommes rendus dans chaque province et avons tenu une seule séance, ou quelque chose du genre. C'est aussi exactement comme ça que je voyais les choses.

Je préférerais revenir à notre première idée de nous déplacer d'ouest en est.

M. Scott Simms:

Excusez-moi, mais je suis sur la liste depuis 10 minutes maintenant, et...

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous cède la parole, Scott.

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Scott Simms:

Je ne me souviens même plus de ce que je voulais vous demander.

En ce qui concerne Olds et les collectivités de l'Ouest, je suis tout à fait d'accord: c'est à Olds que nous devons aller pour la séance en région rurale. Je suis entièrement d'accord avec vous. Nous devrions nous rendre là-bas au lieu de demander aux gens de se déplacer. C'est ce que j'avais proposé hier, et j'ai réalisé ma déplorable erreur avant la fin de la discussion.

À propos des vols nolisés, je veux m'assurer de comprendre. Allons-nous seulement prendre des vols nolisés pour nous déplacer vers l'ouest? Est-ce que ce serait pour tous les déplacements?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Et cela coûterait beaucoup plus cher, oui?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Oui, on parle de 100 000 $ de plus.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Bon sang, c'est beaucoup d'argent.

M. Scott Simms:

J'imagine que nous pourrions nous déplacer ainsi dans l'ouest, puis prendre un vol commercial vers l'est. Mais ça ne serait pas plus économique. J'imagine que vous pourriez noliser un avion plus petit, dans ce cas, ou est-ce que cela compliquerait les choses?

Mme Jill McKenny:

C'est une question de distance. Nous avons besoin d'un avion à réaction qui peut parcourir cette grande distance dans ce laps de temps.

M. Scott Simms:

Je comprends.

Lorsque nous allons nous déplacer vers l'est, ce serait plus efficient de nous rendre à Toronto, à Montréal, puis à Halifax. Je tiens pour acquis qu'il y aura des vols commerciaux et que nous pourrons nous y rendre facilement.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Essentiellement, avec un vol nolisé, le Comité dispose de toute la flexibilité nécessaire pour faire ce qu'il veut.

M. Scott Simms:

Pourrions-nous prendre des vols nolisés différents en allant vers l'est et vers l'ouest? Est-ce que ce serait moins cher de cette façon? J'imagine qu'on utiliserait un avion à turbopropulseurs dans ce cas.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Vous proposez de prendre des vols commerciaux pour les déplacements d'est en ouest, oui?

M. Scott Simms:

Oui.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Le problème demeure le temps. Si je comprends bien et que vous comptez tenir des séances publiques plus courtes — de quelques heures seulement —, ce serait peut-être possible de s'arranger. Par exemple...

M. Blake Richards:

J'aimerais ajouter un tout petit commentaire en lien avec ce que vous dites. D'après ce que vous disiez plus tôt, le problème tenait au déplacement de l'Alberta à Toronto. Y a-t-il d'autres problèmes qu'on pourrait régler sans prendre un vol nolisé?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Je crois que c'est le seul. Cependant, les choses peuvent toujours s'arranger si les séances publiques ne durent que quelques heures. Vous serez peut-être en mesure d'arriver à Olds et d'en repartir à temps. Ce serait possible de tenir une séance en après-midi. C'est la séance du soir à Olds qui pose problème.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous pourrions, soit arranger cela, soit prendre des dispositions pour tenir les séances de Toronto plus près de l'aéroport que du centre-ville. On sauverait ainsi une heure de route. Nous aurions un peu de temps l'après-midi pour une séance, et nous pourrions aussi passer la soirée à Toronto également. Les deux options sont valides, choisissez la plus simple.

M. Scott Simms:

Une dernière chose, à propos des déplacements dans l'est, entre Toronto et Montréal... Je vais laisser à mes collègues le soin de proposer quelque chose. Pour Halifax... je suis probablement en train de parler au nom d'un de mes collègues.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Que diriez-vous de St. John's?

M. Scott Simms:

Ruby voudrait aller à St. John's, à Terre-Neuve. Moi aussi, mais je crois que nous nous sommes entendus hier sur Halifax. Peut-être, pourrions-nous envisager de nous rendre à un campus universitaire là-bas. Nous avions discuté de cette possibilité, pour les jeunes. Je crois que l'Université St. Mary's et l'Université Dalhousie seraient des endroits appropriés.

J'ai l'impression que vous allez me corriger.

Le greffier:

Non, je ne vais pas vous corriger. Je veux seulement dire que, si nous tenons une séance au Olds College, nous serions sur un campus collégial, ce qui est un de nos objectifs.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Je me disais seulement que le problème, si nous voulons aller sur un campus à Halifax, c'est que, même s'il y a un merveilleux aéroport à Halifax — je sais que nous sommes en public, mais je blague toujours à ce sujet — pour une raison ou une autre, on a choisi de le construire à Cap-Breton. Je ne veux insulter personne, mais je crois que nous devrions probablement éviter de trop nous éloigner. Ce serait un peu...

M. Blake Richards:

Une chose intéressante à propos du Olds College — et vous avez aussi mentionné son campus —, c'est qu'il attire des étudiants de tout l'Ouest canadien, beaucoup plus que les autres universités. Par rapport à d'autres lieux d'enseignement, les jeunes y viennent de très loin. C'est probablement une bonne chose. S'ils ont des difficultés, c'est sans doute là que nous en entendrons parler.

M. Scott Simms:

Eh bien, on dirait que la ville de Olds a vraiment tout ce dont nous avons besoin, n'est-ce pas? Quand nous aurons terminé, je vais y déménager.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est vraiment un endroit fantastique.

(1555)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À quelle distance de l'aéroport se trouve la ville?

M. Blake Richards:

À environ 45 minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a un aéroport à Olds, mais on peut seulement l'utiliser pour les avions à turbopropulseurs.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, vous ne voudriez pas atterrir là-bas, certainement pas, vu la taille des appareils que nous devrions prendre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions toujours prendre un petit avion à turbopropulseurs. Je me demande si ça ne serait pas beaucoup moins cher, parce qu'en avion à réaction...

M. Blake Richards:

Je doute que... il faudrait que ce soit un aéronef très petit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La piste mesure 3 600 pieds. Nous pouvons y atterrir.

M. Blake Richards:

À dire vrai, ce serait plus rapide de prendre la route que de voler.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Dans quelles villes, régions ou installations sommes-nous sûrs de nous rendre? Où allons-nous en Alberta, par exemple?

Le président:

Un détail, Scott. Je crois que nous avons choisi Halifax à cause des vols commerciaux. Si nous prenons un vol nolisé, je crois que nous pouvons aller où nous voulons dans l'est.

Allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je me demandais simplement s'il serait possible de confirmer les endroits où nous allons nous rendre. Il y a la Olds school. Il y a Tsawwassen, par où nous commencerions. Ensuite, nous allons à la Olds school et à Toronto.

Est-ce bien Olds school?

M. Blake Richards:

C'est le collège de la ville de Olds.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh, je ne savais pas, désolée. Ce sera sans doute un endroit merveilleux, et je ne ferai jamais la même erreur ensuite.

M. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, PCC):

Olds College, ça n'a rien à voir avec une « vieille école ».

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous, vous êtes de la vieille école.

Ensuite, nous nous rendons à Toronto, puis à Montréal. C'est dommage que Nathan Cullen ne soit pas ici, puisque c'est son bébé. C'est ce qu'il voulait faire. Il voulait que le Comité se déplace, et nous sommes en train de prendre des décisions en son nom, j'imagine.

M. Randall Garrison:

On a trouvé un député avec la même coupe de cheveux.

Le président:

Nous nous sommes mis d'accord sur toutes ces villes hier soir, Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, je crois que ce n'était pas tout à fait ça.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous avons précisé des détails. Je sais pertinemment que Nathan... Je ne veux pas parler en son nom, mais je lui ai demandé s'il serait d'accord d'inverser l'est et l'ouest, et il a dit qu'il n'y voyait pas d'inconvénient. Cela ne lui pose aucun problème. Concrètement, c'est tout ce qui a changé depuis hier, et il m'a dit qu'il était d'accord, si cela peut nous aider.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Ensuite, c'est Montréal. Après, nous nous rendons dans le Canada atlantique et atterrissons à Halifax. Est-ce bien ce qui a été dit, hier?

M. Scott Simms:

C'est ce que nous avons décidé, hier, d'atterrir à Halifax.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Halifax. C'est ça?

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Et nous irions à Halifax en prenant un vol commercial.

Nous devrions probablement fixer une date limite pour les témoins que nous aimerions inviter pendant nos déplacements. Je suis certaine que le greffier pourrait nous donner des directives à suivre, mais c'est à nous de décider des témoins que nous aimerions inviter pendant que nous sommes ailleurs.

Merci de vous joindre à nous, monsieur Cullen. Nous discutons actuellement des déplacements du Comité. Je crois que cela vous tient à coeur.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Randall aussi veut se déplacer. Je ne sais pas pourquoi il quitte la table.

M. Randall Garrison:

Je travaille 18 heures par semaine.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, excusez-moi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il n'y a pas de problème. Je crois que Blake et vous avez discuté de la possibilité de voyager en sens inverse. Nous en parlions justement lorsque vous êtes arrivé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suis au courant de ce que Blake veut. Nous pouvons voyager en sens inverse. Je suis prêt à accepter tout ce que les membres du Comité jugeront adéquat.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous nous rendons dans sa ville natale, Olds. Nous allons commencer par la Colombie-Britannique, puis nous nous rendrons en Alberta, en Ontario, à Montréal et à Halifax, notre dernier arrêt. Nos greffiers croient qu'il serait plus économique de prendre des vols commerciaux.

M. Scott Simms:

Avez-vous parlé de Olds?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, Olds, en Alberta. Ce sera notre collectivité rurale, et en Colombie-Britannique, nous nous rendons dans une collectivité autochtone.

Le président:

Tsawwassen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

À propos de Vancouver, est-ce qu'il s'agit seulement de Tsawwassen ou de toute...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous allons nous rendre dans une ville par région — et vous pourrez aussi exprimer votre opinion là-dessus — comme nous l'avons fait pour la réforme électorale. Nous allons inviter des experts à témoigner dans le volet, disons, plus officiel, et tout de suite après, sans prendre une pause ni interrompre la séance, nous allons demander au public de...

(1600)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Prendre la parole pendant deux ou trois minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... prendre la parole pendant deux ou trois minutes et exprimer son opinion. La séance ne devrait pas durer plus de trois ou quatre heures, et ensuite, nous pourrons partir pour notre prochaine destination.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ruby et moi sommes devenus des experts dans la préparation de ce genre de choses.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous en avons vu 18.

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Quel était le sujet de votre étude?

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quelque chose.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quelque chose qui, j'en suis sûre, ne sera pas abordé pendant ces séances.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous étiez le prochain sur ma liste.

M. John Nater:

Non.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai rien à dire.

Le président:

M. Garrison est parti.

Madame Tassi, vous êtes la prochaine sur la liste.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il y a deux ou trois questions que j'aimerais éclaircir.

Avant tout, on a dit que cela coûterait 100 000 $ de plus, mais pourrions-nous avoir plus de détails sur le coût?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Bien sûr.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je parle de la différence de coût entre un vol commercial et un vol nolisé.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Le coût pour des vols commerciaux serait de 146 593,20 $.

Pour des vols nolisés, on parle de 249 668,60 $.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Êtes-vous d'accord pour dire qu'avec cet ordre, ces endroits et cet horaire, nous serons en mesure de prendre des vols commerciaux?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Je crois que c'est faisable, puisque vous comptez vous réunir seulement pour trois heures. Nous serons probablement en mesure d'arriver avant 13 heures et de repartir avant 16 heures. Cela vous laisse trois heures de séance.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je sais que ce n'est pas facile de démêler tout cela, et je vous remercie du travail que vous faites.

Pourriez-vous nous dire précisément de quelle information vous aurez besoin pour régler tous les détails techniques, étant donné que l'horaire semble très serré? Peut-être devrions-nous laisser quelques choix à la discrétion du président. Vous dites que vous croyez pouvoir vous arranger, mais qu'arriverait-il si un problème survenait pendant l'un des déplacements du Comité? Je propose de donner au président le pouvoir de prendre certaines décisions. Nous devons composer avec un horaire très serré. Je ne sais pas si nous aurons l'occasion de nous réunir à nouveau avant de partir la semaine prochaine.

Voilà les deux choses dont je voulais parler: d'un côté, l'information dont vous avez besoin, et de l'autre — cela concerne les membres du Comité —, le pouvoir décisionnel du président.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Oui, nous aurions besoin du nom des voyageurs, bien sûr, de l'endroit où ils vont prendre un vol pour rejoindre le Comité à sa première destination et de leur destination finale.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je pensais aussi aux dispositions à prendre pour les endroits où nous allons nous rendre... les espaces à réserver et tout ce genre de choses. Les détails... par exemple, la liste des témoins. Devons-nous préparer une liste de témoins aujourd'hui afin que les témoins soient disponibles lorsque nous serons sur place?

Si vous pouviez nous éclairer, cela nous aiderait, parce que nous voulons que ces séances soient un succès. Vous n'avez qu'à nous dire de quels renseignements vous avez besoin.

Le greffier:

Ce serait bien si nous pouvions avoir le nom des témoins ou une liste de témoins le plus tôt possible. Évidemment, nous ne pourrons pas communiquer avec eux tant que nous ne savons pas qui le Comité souhaite inviter.

En plus des noms, j'aurais aussi besoin de savoir comment vous voulez organiser chaque séance. Voulez-vous une douzaine de témoins à chaque endroit? Voulez-vous une séance de deux heures dans un contexte formel? Voulez-vous deux groupes de quatre ou cinq témoins?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il risque d'y avoir un peu trop de monde si on dépasse ce nombre. Les témoins n'ont pas le temps de vraiment s'exprimer, et nous ne pouvons pas leur poser beaucoup de questions.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

Le greffier:

Y a-t-il une certaine proportion que vous préféreriez pour chaque parti?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comment procédons-nous lorsque nous invitons des témoins à une séance à Ottawa? On essaie de conserver un certain équilibre en ce qui concerne les témoins.

Un député: Oh, oh.

M. Nathan Cullen: Oui, il nous reste 30 minutes avant le vote.

Le président:

Il nous reste 30 minutes

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il y a autre chose. Voulez-vous que nous vous informions des endroits exacts où nous voulons aller?

Le président:

Je crois que nous en avons déjà décidé.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous allons poursuivre la discussion après, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Je crois que nous avons encore 30 minutes. Pouvons-nous poursuivre pendant quelques minutes?

M. Blake Richards:

Vous devez demander la permission du Comité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je crois que ce serait préférable de revenir après le vote.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous ne voulez pas rester 10 minutes de plus?

M. Blake Richards:

Non.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous reprendrons après le vote.



(1650)

Le président:

Nous sommes de retour à la 107e séance du Comité. J'ai oublié qui avait la parole lorsque nous sommes partis.

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Pour être honnête, je ne me rappelle plus. J'aimerais prendre la parole une fois que nous aurons terminé de discuter des déplacements du Comité, mais je crois que nous étions en train de...

Le président:

D'accord, allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La dernière question que Filomena a posée visait à savoir s'il y avait quelque chose que nous pouvions faire pour aider à la planification des déplacements. Avez-vous d'autres questions? Je ne crois pas que vous vouliez parler des installations, mais j'ai cru comprendre que les listes des témoins étaient une priorité.

Quand en auriez-vous besoin?

Le greffier:

Grâce au travail de l'équipe de Jill et de ce dont nous avons discuté ici, nous avons une assez bonne idée de la façon dont les choses vont se dérouler, et il ne devrait y avoir aucun problème pour nous rendre dans toutes les grandes villes prévues d'ouest en est.

J'aurais vraiment besoin des listes des témoins. Je crois que c'est le plus important présentement, si nous voulons des séances fructueuses. Nous devons inviter les gens avant que le Comité arrive aux endroits désignés, alors ce serait bien que j'obtienne les listes le plus tôt possible, je vous prie.

Le président:

La date limite était aujourd'hui. Nous avons besoin des listes pour chaque collectivité. Le greffier veut éviter que le Comité tienne une séance sans aucun témoin, ce qui serait embarrassant pour la Chambre des communes. J'ai jeté un oeil sur la liste des libéraux, et pratiquement tous leurs témoins viennent de la région d'Ottawa. On pourrait faire mieux.

(1655)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me demandais — je pose la question au greffier par personne interposée — s'il était possible de dresser les listes de témoins par région, afin que ce soit plus clair. Nous avons quelques personnes à Halifax, à Toronto, etc. Maintenant que nous nous sommes entendus sur les villes...

Le président:

Oui, ce serait logique.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est une chose de préparer une liste de témoins pour l'ensemble d'une étude, et c'en est une autre de préparer une liste pour des endroits précis. Peut-être pourrions-nous examiner notre liste pour voir s'il n'y aurait pas deux ou trois témoins qu'il vaudrait mieux inviter à un endroit plutôt qu'à un autre. Peut-être devrions-nous tous revoir nos listes en nous demandant qui nous connaissons que nous n'avons pas pensé à inviter et qui feraient un bon témoin dans un endroit ou un autre. Il y a sans doute des témoins que nous pourrions ajouter à nos listes à cette fin.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que c'est aussi pour cette raison que Filomena a proposé de donner un certain pouvoir décisionnel au président, afin d'éviter le genre de situations qu'a connues le Comité de la réforme électorale, par exemple lorsqu'un témoin a un empêchement et qu'il faut trouver un remplaçant sans pour autant que le Comité se réunisse pour examiner la question. Il n'y a pas de problème si personne ne s'oppose obstinément.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce n'est pas exactement ce dont je parlais. Nous devons communiquer nos premières listes de témoins. Je suis d'accord avec vous, si un témoin ne peut pas venir témoigner, le président et le greffier devraient pouvoir le remplacer. Ils ne devraient toutefois pas pouvoir dresser toute la liste eux-mêmes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, tous les partis devraient contribuer.

Le greffier:

J'aimerais dire, de mon point de vue, que demain est mercredi et que les séances commencent lundi, alors il faudrait vraisemblablement que je commence à faire les téléphones demain pour la séance de lundi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Donc, vous voulez la liste d'ici demain 9 heures?

Le président:

Ou dès aujourd'hui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous pouvons vous donner nos listes provisoires. Nous pouvons procéder par tranches. Nous sommes en train de faire le tri.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, et nous pourrions mettre les listes à jour à mesure que nous ajoutons des témoins.

Le greffier:

Oui, et établissez un ordre de priorité, s'il vous plaît. La séance de lundi se tiendra à Vancouver. Je vous demanderais donc de me faire parvenir la liste de témoins pour Vancouver le plus tôt possible, et le reste peu de temps après.

Le président:

Il ne faudrait pas laisser sur la liste des collectivités où nous n'avons aucun témoin à inviter. Ce serait très embarrassant de dépenser des dizaines de milliers de dollars pour tenir une séance sans témoins.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous allons devoir nous dépêcher, mais nous ferons de notre mieux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose, en une seconde? Je me dis que nous devrions inviter comme témoins pendant nos déplacements les directeurs de scrutin des circonscriptions où nous nous rendons ainsi que des circonscriptions voisines. Ils ont beaucoup d'expérience sur le terrain en ce qui concerne l'administration des élections.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous obtenir les noms d'Élections Canada?

Le greffier:

Voulez-vous dire pour un endroit en particulier ou pour tous les endroits où nous nous rendons?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que nous devrions en inviter deux ou trois pour l'ensemble du pays. Si nous avons peu de témoins à un endroit donné, nous pouvons inviter les directeurs de scrutin qui s'y trouvent. Je voulais seulement proposer l'idée.

À Halifax en particulier, je crois que ça nous serait utile d'inviter ceux des régions rurales de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Nous voulons entendre les commentaires des gens qui ont beaucoup d'expérience relativement à l'administration des élections dans les régions touchées.

Le greffier:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je sais que c'est plutôt vaste.

Le greffier:

Pendant la pause, quelqu'un a demandé si Tsawwassen était le meilleur endroit où tenir une séance dans la région de Vancouver ou s'il serait préférable que cela se fasse dans la ville de Vancouver.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je préférerais qu'on évite la ville.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous un commentaire à formuler au sujet de l'emplacement en Colombie-Britannique?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je disais plus tôt que, particulièrement du côté des témoins, si nous envisageons d'avoir un groupe de témoins ou deux, pour les gens qui ne connaissent pas Vancouver, le fait de se rendre à Tsawwassen signifie s'éloigner de l'aéroport dans le sens inverse des deux principales universités. Tsawwassen n'aurait pas nécessairement été mon premier choix, car c'est près de l'aéroport du côté opposé de la ville. Ce ne serait pas la même chose que d'aller à Barrie à partir de Toronto, mais mentalement, ce le serait. En d'autres mots, nous allons perdre des témoins, si nous allons à cet endroit.

Comme le président le sait, il y a des réserves à Vancouver. Il y a les Musqueam et les Tsleil-Waututh, qui se trouvent sur la rive nord. Les terres de la réserve Musqueam sont dans le secteur de l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique. Cela ne va pas dans le sens de ce que la majorité des gens... Seulement, du point de vue logistique, si vous demandez à un professeur de l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique de se rendre à Tsawwassen, il lui faudra au moins une heure de route dans les deux sens.

Je crois que certaines personnes ne viendront pas, mais elles viendraient si elles pouvaient avoir recours au réseau SkyTrain et se rendre à l'autre endroit.

(1700)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Le président:

Est-il possible de choisir un autre endroit à Vancouver?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il ne faut pas oublier que, à Vancouver, nous avons toute la journée. C'est le seul endroit où nous disposons de toute la journée, car nous arrivons la veille. Si vous tenez vraiment à ce que ce soit à Tsawwassen, vous pourriez vous y rendre pour rencontrer les dirigeants de la communauté durant une heure ou deux le matin, puis aller à Vancouver pour la suite des choses.

Le greffier:

L'un des avantages pour nous, du point de vue de la planification, c'est que nous savions que cette installation à Tsawwassen était disponible le vendredi. Nous avions fait certaines recherches préliminaires à cet égard.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, je vois.

Le greffier:

Nous avons une certaine souplesse, donc nous pouvons examiner d'autres endroits à Vancouver, et si, pour une raison ou une autre, nous n'arrivons pas à trouver un endroit convenable...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si vous avez de la difficulté, vous n'avez qu'à nous le faire savoir.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Qui ne voudrait pas s'adresser à un prestigieux comité comme le PROC?

M. Nathan Cullen:

En effet, mais vous voulez éliminer les obstacles, si vous le pouvez.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Particulièrement pour les universitaires, n'est-ce pas?

M. Nathan Cullen:

La majorité d'entre eux apprécient cela, comme vous le savez.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons essayer de trouver un autre endroit et une autre Première Nation à Vancouver, qui est plus près...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y en a trois ou quatre qui sont beaucoup plus accessibles.

Étiez-vous là lorsque nous sommes allés à...? Non, le Comité n'était pas avec moi à ce moment-là.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis allée partout.

Le greffier:

Monsieur Cullen, vous pourriez peut-être inclure les Premières Nations qui sont à Vancouver sur votre liste de témoins. Cela serait utile.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, cela n'est pas un problème. Je vais le faire immédiatement.

Le greffier:

Jill avait un autre commentaire général à formuler au sujet de la logistique.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Cela concerne les vols commerciaux. Il ne faut pas oublier que, plus nous attendons avant de réserver ces vols commerciaux, moins il y a de possibilités. Il se peut que nous soyons obligés de diviser le groupe d'une ville à l'autre, mais nous ferons notre possible pour que tout le monde reste ensemble.

Je vous saurais gré de bien vouloir nous envoyer le nom des membres qui voyagent ainsi que leur ville de départ et leur ville d'arrivée le plus rapidement possible, cela nous aiderait à planifier les choses.

Le président:

Je crois que nous avons leurs noms.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous voulez les listes de témoins et les noms aujourd'hui, avant la fin de la journée. Nous allons essayer de faire cela pour vous.

Le greffier:

Il y a autre chose. Puisque nous allons tenir des séances ouvertes, je me demandais si le Comité serait prêt à accorder au président la discrétion d'approuver les gazouillis qui pourraient être publiés pour annoncer que le Comité va visiter certaines villes au Canada.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que le Comité est d'accord pour que l'on publie nos visites sur Twitter?

Le président:

Y voyez-vous un inconvénient?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous l'avons fait la dernière fois.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, nous étions allés plus loin cette fois-là.

Maintenant que nous avons réglé beaucoup d'aspects liés aux déplacements et à la logistique, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, tout cela dépend de l'adoption du projet de loi. C'est très important pour moi et pour les libéraux qui siègent au Comité, donc j'aimerais proposer la motion qui a été présentée au Comité hier en ce qui concerne le temps attribué pour l'adoption du projet de loi.

Aimeriez-vous que je lise la motion pour le compte rendu?

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement, c'est ma faute, mais j'ai manqué un petit bout de la discussion, et il semble que nous soyons passés à autre chose. Honnêtement, j'aimerais m'y retrouver.

En ce qui concerne les déplacements, pour être sûr de bien comprendre, quel est le résultat? Ensuite, je pourrai écouter ce qui a été dit.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le comité de liaison sera ici à 17 h 30. Il a prévu une rencontre. C'est pourquoi nous essayons de régler tout cela, afin que nous puissions passer aux plans pour demain.

Nous avons finalement...

M. Blake Richards:

Je peux probablement vous aider. Avec la motion que vous proposez, vous n'aurez certainement pas terminé à 17 h 30 de toute manière, donc autant me dire ce qui se passe à propos des déplacements.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le débat sur les déplacements s'est terminé avec l'itinéraire que vous avez proposé. Vous savez déjà dans quelles villes nous allons. Les listes de témoins doivent être soumises le plus rapidement possible, préférablement avant la fin de la journée, ou au plus tard demain à 9 heures.

De plus, avant la fin de la journée, nous avons besoin des noms de toutes les personnes de votre parti qui prendront part au voyage. Dans la mesure du possible, ils s'assureront que nous voyageons tous ensemble, mais certains de nos vols pourraient être divisés.

Je crois que c'est là que nous nous sommes arrêtés.

(1705)

M. Blake Richards:

Je n'essaie pas de gagner du temps ici, car je n'aurais pas de problème à le faire si c'était ce que je voulais.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Blake Richards: Comme vous le savez déjà, je ne serai pas en mesure de faire tout le voyage par exemple. Je crois que l'un de mes collègues est dans le même bateau que moi. Je ne sais pas s'il y en a d'autres.

Quels sont les plans? Si une personne doit être présente pour une partie de la semaine et que nous la remplaçons par quelqu'un d'autre, ce n'est pas un problème, n'est-ce pas? En ce qui a trait aux déplacements, il n'y a pas de problèmes à cet égard?

Mme Jill McKenny:

Cela complique les choses lorsque nous remplaçons des membres. Cela ajoute un aspect de plus à notre planification logistique.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous devons donc vous le faire savoir le plus rapidement possible.

Mme Jill McKenny:

... et aussi me dire de quelle ville vous partez et dans quelle ville vous retournez.

M. Blake Richards:

Avez-vous une version préliminaire? Je sais qu'elle ne doit pas être terminée et que vous ne voulez probablement pas qu'on la respecte religieusement pour l'instant, mais avez-vous une sorte de brouillon que vous pourriez nous faire parvenir? Aussitôt que vous pouvez nous la remettre... Pour ma part, par exemple, je devrais prendre une décision mercredi, ma dernière journée, ou jeudi, pendant la journée.

Si je pouvais l'obtenir le plus rapidement possible...

Mme Jill McKenny:

Voulez-vous dire un projet d'itinéraire?

M. Blake Richards:

... cela me permettrait de vous dire plus tôt à quel moment on me remplacerait, par exemple.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Bien.

M. Blake Richards:

Même si ce n'est pas la version finale, si vous aviez une ébauche, ce serait utile.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Nous n'avons pas commencé à tracer l'itinéraire. Nous en sommes encore à comprendre vos exigences. Chose certaine, ce que nous voulons, c'est être présents dans les villes dont nous avons parlé et dans cet ordre, si cela peut aider, ou...

M. Blake Richards:

J'essaie de savoir à quel moment environ nous serons en déplacement, de sorte que nous puissions avoir une bonne idée des renseignements à fournir au remplaçant.

Mme Jill McKenny:

Bien.

M. Blake Richards:

Pourrions-nous l'avoir dès que vous serez en mesure de l'envoyer?

L'autre chose, monsieur le président, c'est que vous et moi avons eu une conversation à propos de votre disponibilité et de la mienne, à titre de président et de vice-président uniques. À l'heure actuelle, nous n'avons pas de deuxième vice-président. Comme nous sommes rendus à ce stade, ce qui peut être quelque peu étrange... Quoi qu'il en soit, je crois qu'il existe une pratique courante, mais je ne sais pas si cela se fait automatiquement. Il s'agit peut-être de quelque chose pour lequel nous devons adopter une motion ou faire quelque chose afin que, lorsque le comité se déplace, aucune motion ne puisse être adoptée ou entendue.

N'est-il pas vrai qu'il faudrait adopter une motion pour que cette règle entre en vigueur?

Quelle est la bonne chose à faire et est-ce quelque chose que le Comité souhaite faire? Je pense que c'est logique.

Le président:

Oui, ce qu'il dit, c'est que je ne serai probablement pas en mesure d'être là le vendredi, donc le Comité devra proposer un président par intérim pour cette journée, car il n'y a pas de président, de vice-président ni d'autre vice-président.

M. Blake Richards:

Aussi, habituellement, lorsque des comités se déplacent, on ne propose pas de motions et des choses comme cela...

Le président:

Cela nécessite-t-il une motion?

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que nous devons prouver que c'est bien le cas. Peut-être que nous pourrions adopter une quelconque motion à cet effet. Je ne sais pas ce qu'il faut faire.

Peut-être que le greffier pourrait nous donner des conseils à cet égard.

Le greffier:

Si les membres du Comité sont d'accord avec l'idée qu'on ne propose pas de motion lorsque le Comité se déplace, cela devrait certainement suffire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je peux ajouter cela à ma motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous voudrez peut-être régler cet aspect maintenant, car je crois que nous en aurons pour longtemps avec votre motion, pour être honnête.

Si vous voulez aborder la question des déplacements, vous savez que vous pouvez à tout le moins commencer à travailler sur ces dispositions. Vous aurez plus de mal avec votre motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je ne vois pas l'intérêt. Je peux seulement ajouter cela à la motion, car tout cela fait partie d'un projet de loi, n'est-ce pas? Pouvons-nous poursuivre...?

M. Blake Richards:

Alors cela nous donne la position du gouvernement, donc c'est bien.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

Essentiellement, notre position... Je peux...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous voulez vous en sortir avant la date d'échéance de votre... Essentiellement, vous essayez de l'adopter à toute vitesse.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, pas l'adopter à toute vitesse, mais nous voulons avoir une assurance de votre part que nous n'allons pas revenir et nous trouver dans une impasse, mais bien que nous allons réaliser des progrès et aller de l'avant. Je ne voudrais pas dépenser tout cet argent pour recueillir l'opinion des gens à l'échelle du pays, puis ne pas aller de l'avant avec ce projet de loi.

Voilà où j'en suis. Les membres libéraux du Comité veulent seulement une certaine assurance. Nous pouvons envisager de changer de dates ici et là, mais à l'heure actuelle, je crois que c'est ce qui convient le mieux.

Nous voulons faire bouger les choses. Nous voulons nous assurer que, lors de la prochaine élection, les Canadiens soient en mesure de voter, que les Canadiens puissent bénéficier de notre processus électoral. Nous voulons être certains de tous ces éléments. Le directeur général des élections a dit que, pour ce faire, nous devons aller de l'avant.

Vous répondrez probablement en disant que nous aurions dû faire cela encore plus rapidement, et bien sûr, nous aurions peut-être dû, mais c'est là où nous en sommes à l'heure actuelle. Pour faire avancer le dossier, nous devons faire quelque chose.

Je ne suis pas très à l'aise de prendre la route, sans savoir si l'argent dépensé et toute la rétroaction que nous obtenons des témoins sur la route nous seront utiles à notre retour à Ottawa pour examiner le projet de loi article par article, présenter des amendements et aussi utiliser cette rétroaction pour lancer des idées à propos de tous les mémoires que pourraient nous présenter nos collègues.

C'est ce que je pense, et c'est pourquoi je fais cela. Ce n'est pas par manque de volonté de ma part; c'est seulement pour que nous sachions que cela s'en va quelque part et que nous pouvons faire adopter ce projet de loi.

Est-ce le bon moment d'en faire la lecture?

(1710)

Le président:

Oui, pourquoi ne faites-vous pas la lecture de la motion que vous proposez.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La motion comporte plusieurs paragraphes distincts.

Premièrement, nonobstant toute motion adoptée par le Comité relativement à la présentation d’amendements proposés au projet de loi, que les membres du Comité et les députés qui ne sont pas membres d’un caucus représenté au sein du Comité présentent au greffier tous leurs amendements proposés au projet de loi, et ce, au plus tard en fin de journée le 8 juin 2018, dans les deux langues officielles, et que ces amendements soient transmis aux membres.

Je vais résumer. Essentiellement, cela permet à tous les partis, ainsi qu’à tous les députés qui ne sont pas représentés ici de présenter des mémoires.

Deuxièmement, que le greffier du Comité écrive immédiatement à chacun des députés qui n’est pas membre d’un caucus représenté au sein du Comité pour l’inviter à rédiger et à présenter tout amendement proposé au projet de loi pour l’examen du Comité, et ce, avant le délai susmentionné, soit le 8 juin 2018.

Troisièmement, que le Comité procède à l’étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le mardi 12 juin 2018 à 11 heures.

Quatrièmement, que si 80 amendements proposés ou plus sont présentés, le président peut limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article.

Cinquièmement, advenant que le Comité ne termine pas son étude article par article du projet de loi d’ici 21 heures le mardi 12 juin 2018, que tous les autres amendements qui lui ont été présentés soient réputés proposés, que le président mette aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat ni amendement, le reste des articles et des amendements proposés, ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour disposer de l’étude article par article du projet de loi, et toute question nécessaire pour faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre, ordonne de le réimprimer et de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible.

Et sixièmement, nous pourrions ajouter qu’aucune motion de fond ne soit adoptée pendant que le Comité est en déplacement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ou « prise en considération ».

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... ou « prise en considération », certainement, ou...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le membre qui la propose...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, « proposée ». Je pense que j'ai dit « adoptée ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pouvez la prendre en considération, mais vous ne pouvez pas la proposer.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

« Proposée ».

Le président:

Voulez-vous débattre de la motion?

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Elle est légèrement différente de ce que nous avons entendu hier soir, en ce qui a trait au volet sur les déplacements. Il n'en est pas question dans la motion. Est-ce que les déplacements devraient être abordés de manière distincte?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, c'est possible. Ce n'était qu'une partie. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que les déplacements en soi font partie d'un tout. Ils dépendent de l'assurance que nous irons de l'avant.

Mais vous parlez de...

M. John Nater:

Mais il s'agit de la motion...

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, je présenterai une motion sur les déplacements.

M. John Nater:

Non, c'est seulement que, la motion initiale que nous avons fait circuler comportait cette première clause, donc cela a été...

Un député: Cela devrait figurer dans une motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Pourtant, ce n'est pas le cas.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Est-ce que ce sera la septième clause de ce qu'elle vient tout juste de dire?

M. Blake Richards:

Un septième paragraphe a déjà été ajouté.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, c'était le sixième paragraphe.

M. Blake Richards:

Laissons-leur du temps pour déterminer quelle est leur motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Voilà. Je vais réorganiser les sixième et septième paragraphes. Le sixième paragraphe portera sur les déplacements. Les dispositions et la logistique en matière de déplacement dont nous avons parlé au Comité dépendent de l'acceptation des clauses précédentes.

Le septième paragraphe se lirait comme suit: qu'aucune motion de fond ne soit adoptée pendant que le Comité est en déplacement.

(1715)

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, il s'agit d'une précision encore une fois.

Ce n'est pas que le gouvernement souhaite aborder ces aspects ensemble. Il veut qu'on les aborde de manière distincte, mais il veut qu'on règle tous les autres points d'abord, puis les déplacements ensuite.

Ai-je bien compris? Vous ne l'incluez pas dans la motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je viens tout juste de le faire. J'en ai fait l'ajout aux paragraphes 6 et 7.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez dit que cela « dépendait », mais vous n'avez pas indiqué dans la motion quel serait le déplacement. Cela voudrait dire que nous aborderions la question de manière distincte après la motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je veux dire les itinéraires abordés et convenus par le Comité aujourd'hui. Nous en étions rendus à dégager un consensus quant aux villes où nous voulions aller, les endroits et la logistique.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois comprendre que nous ne nous étions pas entendus sur ces aspects, car, selon vous, nous devions nous mettre d'accord sur tout le reste en même temps.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, c'est pourquoi je dis... Tout cela a été établi. Maintenant, nous avons discuté au sein du Comité de ce que je croyais être un consensus au sujet des endroits et de la logistique relativement aux déplacements. J'ai dit au paragraphe 6 que nous acceptons — j'accepte — ces itinéraires...

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, ils doivent faire l'objet d'un consensus afin d'être acceptés, et ce n'est pas le cas, ni avant la motion ni dans la motion, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Selon le paragraphe 6 de la motion, les itinéraires dont nous avons discuté aujourd'hui dépendraient de l'assurance à l'égard des cinq paragraphes précédents.

M. Blake Richards:

Puis-je demander l'avis de notre greffier à cet égard? S'agit-il d'une forme acceptable de motion ou devrions-nous réitérer les itinéraires...?

D'après ce que je comprends, nous demandons d'accepter les déplacements, et les députés ministériels disaient qu'ils ne le feraient pas à ce moment-ci, ce qui veut donc dire que nous n'avons pas accepté les déplacements. Maintenant, nous parlons de choses floues à propos d'un élément dont nous avons discuté ou peu importe...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous n'avons pas décidé si nous allions prendre la route...

M. Blake Richards:

S'agit-il d'une forme acceptable de motion, ou est-ce que la motion devrait en fait présenter quels seraient, en fait, les déplacements?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous n'avons pas décidé si nous allions prendre la route, mais si nous le faisons, ce dont nous venons tout juste de parler constituerait l'itinéraire.

M. Blake Richards:

D'une façon ou d'une autre, les membres du Comité doivent arriver à une entente et ce n'est pas le cas avec la motion présentement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord, pourriez-vous être plus précis?

Le président:

Vous avez demandé au greffier. Il peut maintenant poursuivre et répondre à la question.

Le greffier:

Je crois comprendre la question, et en mon sens, selon la présentation de Mme Sahota, le volet concernant les déplacements...

Je ne sais pas si vous avez une copie de la motion devant vous.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, j'en ai une.

Le greffier:

D'après nos discussions, le numéro 1 serait légèrement différent, et il se retrouverait au numéro 6, si je comprends bien.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce n'est pas ce que je comprends. Nous devrions peut-être éclaircir cela, car je crois comprendre que... Je crois qu'ils retirent cela de la motion, ils ne la modifient pas ou quoi que ce soit.

Le président:

Andy.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Monsieur le président, hier soir, nous nous sommes entendus au sujet des déplacements, puis aujourd'hui, comme Mme Sahota l'a très clairement énoncé, nous voulons nous assurer que les déplacements ne sont pas inutiles, ce qui serait le cas si les autres éléments de la motion n'étaient pas en place.

Il s'agit d'une motion unique qui comporte de multiples parties interdépendantes, et les déplacements ne peuvent être isolés du reste de la motion. Nous avons convenu des déplacements hier soir, donc nous avons déjà donné...

M. Blake Richards:

Non, ce n'était pas le cas, donc...

M. Andy Fillmore:

Eh bien, nous n'avons pas convenu du budget.

M. Blake Richards:

... nous devons y consentir.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Nous n'avons pas accepté le budget, c'est vrai.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous devez accepter les déplacements d'une manière ou d'une autre, et ce n'est pas dans votre motion, et cela n'a pas été convenu autrement.

M. Andy Fillmore:

C'est dans la motion. C'est très clairement énoncé dans la motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Non, ce n'est pas le cas. C'est justement le point. Cela ne figure pas dans la motion, donc vous y ajoutez la question des déplacements ou vous le faites maintenant. Vous ne pouvez pas le faire des deux manières.

Le président:

Voulez-vous qu'ils ajoutent le nom des cinq villes et ce genre d'information?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ajoutez-les, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Peu importe ce que vous faites, ajoutez la question des déplacements dans la motion, si vous avez l'intention de le faire, car tous les autres voulaient approuver les déplacements de manière distincte, mais le gouvernement a dit: « non, nous ne pouvons pas faire cela. » Maintenant, ils ne veulent pas non plus l'inclure à leur motion. C'est comme s'ils ne savent pas ce qu'ils font.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je l'ai ajouté dans la motion. Je l'ai mis à la fin, au lieu de le mettre au début comme c'était le cas hier. Il faut me pardonner. Je n'étais pas ici hier, mais je crois tout de même que cela s'inscrit dans le même ordre d'idées...

M. Blake Richards:

[Inaudible] clair ce que vous faites.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... et les idées se trouvent dans des clauses distinctes. Les déplacements en font partie. Nous pouvons énoncer les villes sur lesquelles nous venons tout juste de nous entendre, la communauté autochtone, et nous pouvons ajouter cela à la sixième clause de la motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne suis pas à l'aise de discuter des motions sans qu'il y ait une entente et que nous connaissions le libellé réel de la motion...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Eh bien, nous savons où nous allons de toute façon.

Vous n'êtes pas à l'aise de donner des assurances. Pourriez-vous nous assurer que nous reviendrons et que nous passerons en revue le projet de loi?

(1720)

Le président:

Il veut seulement que les noms des villes où nous irons figurent dans la motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous sommes ceux qui demandent en réalité d'examiner le projet de loi. Vous êtes ceux qui désirent l'adopter à toute vitesse. L'examen du projet de loi ne nous pose aucun problème.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est pourquoi je propose, sous le numéro 6, que les déplacements suggérés...

M. Blake Richards:

En fait, je ne crois pas qu'il soit approprié de discuter d'une motion qui n'est pas définie. Faites-nous part de votre motion concernant les déplacements.

Un député: [Inaudible]

M. Blake Richards: Nous n'avons pas convenu de cela, alors mettez-le dans la motion.

M. Andy Fillmore:

[Inaudible] occasion de l'approuver.

M. Blake Richards:

Non, parce que vous avez refusé de l'approuver, alors vous devez mettre les déplacements dans votre motion. Vous ne pouvez pas gagner sur tous les tableaux.

Le président:

Lisez la motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Encore dans le même ordre que j'ai indiqué plus tôt... Je crois que vous pouvez consulter le compte rendu, mais, de toute façon, le numéro 1 était...

Voudriez-vous que je relise la motion au complet pour que ce soit clair?

Le président:

Lisez seulement l'article sur les déplacements.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

L'article sur les déplacements, j'imagine, passerait du numéro 1 au numéro 6 selon ce que vous avez reçu hier, n'est-ce pas? L'article prévoirait que le Comité parcourt le Canada du 4 juin au 8 juin 2018 et que le greffier soit autorisé à organiser les déplacements de sorte que des réunions soient tenues dans les collectivités dans les régions suivantes: Canada atlantique... et je crois que nous devrions préciser toutes les collectivités que nous venons de nommer aujourd'hui au moyen d'une liste numérotée... et que le budget des déplacements soit approuvé.

Une voix: Comme il est décrit...

Mme Ruby Sahota: Oui.

Un député: [Inaudible]

Mme Ruby Sahota: Je ne sais pas [Inaudible]. Vous pouvez dire « comme il est décrit ». Non, ce n'est pas... C'est Vancouver plutôt que... Il s'agit d'une estimation, n'est-ce pas? Nous pouvons être plus précis au numéro 6 à propos des villes et des endroits que nous avons mentionnés et ensuite ajouter « et que le budget des déplacements soit approuvé ».

M. Blake Richards:

On nous demande de débattre d'une motion dont personne ne peut nous dire le libellé.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vais vous la relire, Blake. Je veux dire...

M. Blake Richards:

Ce que je voudrais, c'est entendre en réalité le libellé de la motion, non pas ces concepts vagues qu'on lance ici.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il ne s'agit pas d'un concept vague. Nous en avons discuté ici pendant deux heures...

M. Blake Richards:

Ce l'est.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non. Les villes...

M. Blake Richards:

Si vous voulez adopter une motion...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... l'itinéraire, quelle direction...

M. Blake Richards:

C'est la façon dont vous voulez faire les choses. C'est ainsi que vous voulez faire adopter la motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est la façon dont je veux la faire adopter, alors je vais vous la relire encore une fois.

M. Blake Richards:

Si vous voulez procéder de cette façon, donnez-nous une motion qui est libellée correctement afin que nous puissions comprendre ce dont il est question et ce dont nous débattons.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'espère que vous serez en mesure de comprendre cela. Je vais la lire.

Numéro 1: Que, nonobstant toute motion adoptée par le Comité relativement à la présentation d'amendements proposés aux projets de loi, que les membres du Comité et les députés qui ne sont pas membres d'un caucus représenté au sein du Comité présentent au greffier tous leurs amendements proposés au projet de loi, et ce, au plus tard en fin de journée le 8 juin 2018, dans les deux langues officielles, et que ces amendements soient transmis aux membres.

Numéro 2: Que le greffier du Comité écrive immédiatement à chacun des députés qui n’est pas membre d’un caucus représenté au sein du Comité pour l’inviter à rédiger et à présenter tout amendement proposé au projet de loi pour l’examen du Comité, et ce, avant le délai susmentionné.

Numéro 3: Que le comité procède à l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le mardi 12 juin 2018 à 11 h.

Numéro 4: Que si 80 amendements proposés ou plus sont présentés, le président peut limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article.

Numéro 5: Advenant que le Comité ne termine pas son étude article par article du projet de loi d’ici 21 heures le mardi 12 juin 2018, que tous les autres amendements qui lui ont été présentés soient réputés proposés, que le président mette aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat ni amendement, le reste des articles et des amendements proposés, ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour disposer de l’étude article par article du projet de loi, et toute question nécessaire pour faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre, ordonne de le réimprimer et de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible.

Numéro 6: Que le Comité se déplace à travers le Canada du 4 juin au 8 juin 2018 et que le greffier soit autorisé à organiser les déplacements et des réunions dans les collectivités des régions suivantes, comme il a été discuté au Comité: 1. Canada atlantique; 2. Québec; 3. Ontario; 4. Prairies — ou, j'imagine, l'Alberta — et 5. Colombie-Britannique.

Ensuite, nous pouvons indiquer entre parenthèses les endroits précis où nous irons. Je ferais cela et je terminerais ensuite par ce qui suit: Que le budget des déplacements pour les déplacements requis soit approuvé.

Nous avons ensuite le numéro 7: Qu'aucune motion de fonds ne soit adoptée pendant que le Comité est en déplacement.

(1725)

M. Blake Richards:

Votre numéro 6 est libellé comme dans la proposition initiale...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Numéro 1.

M. Blake Richards:

Laissez-moi terminer. C'est le numéro 1 de la proposition initiale comportant les changements suivants: dans le numéro quatre, vous changez « Prairies » pour « Alberta » et...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

... vous enlevez tout après Colombie-Britannique?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, mais nous ajoutons ensuite que le budget des déplacements correspondant soit approuvé.

Le président:

Voulez-vous débattre de la motion?

M. Blake Richards:

Cela placerait le Comité dans une position où il déciderait d'approuver un budget des déplacements sans en connaître le montant.

Le président:

Je peux vous dire le montant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui. Dites-le-nous.

Le président:

C'est 150 993 $.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela pourrait-il changer selon le dernier...? Je ne sais pas comment cela fonctionne.

Le président: Le greffier vous dira le montant.

Le greffier:

Le projet de budget qui a été distribué comptait un total de 146 593,20 $. Après consultation avec Jill, nous avons décidé que si on commençait à Vancouver, cela ajouterait une nuit à Vancouver, ce qui n'aurait pas fait partie du budget si nous avions quitté Ottawa pour aller à Halifax le matin. Le nouveau total compte 4 400 $ supplémentaires, alors il est de 150 993,20 $ dans le projet de budget.

M. Blake Richards:

En regardant le projet de budget, j'ai constaté que certaines des villes étaient énumérées différemment de ce que nous avions décidé; je ne savais pas que cela faisait une grande différence. D'accord.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un débat sur la motion?

M. Blake Richards:

Il y avait également un nouveau numéro 7, quelque chose concernant...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le numéro 7 est ce que vous avez souligné plus tôt, qui est, à mon avis, un point très valable, soit qu'aucune motion de fond ne soit adoptée pendant les déplacements du Comité.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Merci d'avoir précisé ce point.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un débat sur la motion?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que M. Genuis voulait également être le prochain sur la liste. Il me l'a dit.

Concernant la motion...

M. Chris Bittle:

Je suis désolé, monsieur le président, mais j'invoque le Règlement; j'avais la main levée pour être le prochain à prendre la parole, et quelqu'un d'autre qui voulait parler est intervenu.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai simplement demandé qu'il soit ajouté à la liste. C'est tout. Je n'ai pas dit que personne d'autre ne pouvait parler.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons passer à M. Richards, à M. Bittle, à M. Genuis et à M. Nater.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, malgré l'image qu'on tente de projeter, nous sommes dans cette situation, parce que le gouvernement tente de modifier les lois électorales de notre pays, et il essaie de le faire d'une manière qui soulève certainement des questions à savoir si cela l'avantage. Également, ce faisant, il essaie d'adopter le projet de loi à toute vitesse.

Si vous vous souvenez bien, pendant la très courte période qu'on nous avait accordée pour le débat à la Chambre des communes lors de la deuxième lecture, après une heure de débat, le gouvernement a déposé un avis de motion d'attribution de temps. Cela signifie la fin du débat: une heure a été accordée pour le débat sur le projet de loi qui régit les élections dans notre pays et qui dicte les règles selon lesquelles les Canadiens choisissent leurs représentants au Parlement.

Ce gouvernement semble penser qu'un débat d'une heure suffit pour une question aussi importante. Bien sûr, c'était inacceptable pour nous, l'opposition; cependant, il a présenté l'avis de motion d'attribution de temps, et, au cours du débat qui s'est tenu dans les 30 minutes qui ont suivi, la ministre des Institutions démocratiques a été questionnée à de nombreuses reprises...

(1730)

Le président:

J'invoque le Règlement, Blake. Nous devons dire au sous-comité du Comité de liaison... Le Comité est prêt à se réunir ou à retourner à la maison. Nous devons lui donner des directives. Il y a quatre intervenants sur la liste.

Ils pourraient se réunir au début de la matinée, mais nous devons leur donner des directives. Ils sont tous ici. Nous ne pouvons pas les garder ici pour... Nous ignorons pendant combien de temps les gens prendront la parole, mais trois personnes figurent sur la liste.

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, j'ai beaucoup de choses à dire, croyez-moi, et je pense que, tant que le gouvernement ne nous écoute pas, il ne devrait pas faire trop de plans.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons...

M. Chris Bittle:

Sur ce point, il semble que les conservateurs sont d'humeur à discuter de la question, et il est peut-être sage de seulement laisser...

Le président:

De laisser partir le sous-comité?

Est-ce que quelqu'un s'y oppose? D'accord, le sous-comité peut...

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, je ne suis pas certain. Que demandez-vous lorsque vous demandez si quelqu'un s'y oppose?

Le président:

À laisser partir le sous-comité...

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que le Comité devrait se réunir et approuver les déplacements de ce comité afin que nous puissions entendre les Canadiens, mais le gouvernement dit: « À moins de pouvoir adopter le projet de loi à toute vitesse, nous ne le permettrons pas. » Je ne crois certainement pas que le Comité ne devrait pas se réunir. Je crois qu'il devrait le faire, mais le gouvernement refuse de le permettre.

Je ne sais pas ce que vous faites, monsieur le président [Inaudible]

Le président:

Il y a une personne qui croit que le sous-comité devrait rester ici.

Y a-t-il quelqu'un d'autre?

M. Blake Richards:

C'est probablement [Inaudible]

M. Garnett Genuis:

Je suis d'accord avec Blake.

Le président:

Les membres de ce côté...?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Puis-je intervenir? Cela concerne cette question.

Le président: Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Je ne crois pas que c'est très aimable envers les membres du sous-comité de les obliger à patienter ici...

Je vois qu'ils ont beaucoup de choses à dire, et, bien qu'ils aient le droit de le dire, on ne sait pas combien de temps cela pourrait durer.

Vous dites que vous avez « beaucoup de choses à dire ». Est-ce que cela signifie une heure? Deux heures? Feriez-vous patienter un sous-comité aussi longtemps sans aucune résolution en vue?

J'ai proposé ma motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Personne ne veut les faire attendre...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

À moins que nous soyons prêts à voter sur la motion, à tirer une conclusion et à dire au sous-comité si nous allons procéder ou non, alors...

M. Blake Richards:

Les seules personnes qui désirent que les membres du sous-comité demeurent ici, c'est le gouvernement parce qu'il veut...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non. J'opterais pour les laisser partir si nous n'arrivons pas à régler cette question bientôt.

M. Blake Richards:

Le gouvernement ne veut pas approuver les déplacements. Si le gouvernement les approuvait, le sous-comité pourrait s'occuper de la question.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comme le président l'a souligné, le sous-comité pourrait se réunir en matinée, alors nous souhaitons certainement aller de l'avant avec l'étude du projet de loi, ainsi que les déplacements, espérons-le, mais si nous n'avons pas bientôt une résolution à lui présenter pour qu'il prenne une décision, je trouve qu'il est injuste que les membres du sous-comité restent ici à écouter toutes les discussions que nous allons tenir.

Le président:

Le greffier me rappelle que nous n'avons pas en réalité d'emprise sur le sous-comité. Il est maître de lui-même. Il peut se réunir et décider ce qu'il désire faire.

Il semble que nous allons être ici pendant un bon moment. Nous allons laisser Blake poursuivre son intervention.

M. Blake Richards:

Encore une fois, voilà où nous en sommes. C'est parce que ce gouvernement, après un débat d'une heure, a déposé un avis de motion d'attribution de temps pour cet important projet de loi qui détermine la façon dont les gens choisissent leurs représentants au Parlement. Ensuite, lorsqu'il a effectivement présenté sa motion d'attribution de temps...

Pour quiconque ne connaît pas le langage parlementaire, cela signifie essentiellement qu'il a mis fin au débat à la Chambre des communes sur un projet de loi qui détermine la façon dont nous choisissons nos représentants au Parlement en essayant de truquer le système en sa faveur. Il n'a pas voulu permettre à l'opposition d'avoir l'occasion de faire valoir ses arguments sur le sujet, de lui montrer à quel point certaines des choses qu'il tentait de faire étaient ridicules ou de souligner qu'il sert ses propres intérêts, comme il l'a fait si souvent par le passé. Plutôt que de permettre cela, il a plutôt décidé de simplement mettre fin au débat.

Lorsque cela s'est produit et que les députés de l'opposition ont questionné la ministre des Institutions démocratiques à propos de l'approche autoritaire et antidémocratique adoptée par son gouvernement, la ministre a répété la même réponse à maintes reprises; elle ne l'a pas dit qu'une seule fois. Elle a affirmé qu'elle croyait que le Comité était le meilleur endroit pour tenir un débat complet, vraiment entendre les questions et obtenir les différents points de vue.

C'est l'excuse qu'elle a donnée à ce moment-là. C'est la justification qu'elle a offerte. Nous savions tous que c'était absolument insensé. C'était faux.

Je pourrais utiliser d'autres mots, monsieur le président, mais nous sommes dans une enceinte parlementaire, alors je ne ferai pas cela. Je sais qu'il y a des mots que vous entendriez probablement à l'occasion dans les rues de votre ville, comme c'est le cas dans la mienne, mais je ne les utiliserai pas ici. Tous les Canadiens savent ce que j'aimerais dire ou comment je qualifierais cela.

C'était insensé — disons cela comme ça —, et nous savions que ce l'était, et c'est ce que le gouvernement est en train de prouver. Il nous en donne la preuve. Il nous montre que ce qu'elle a dit était faux, que ce n'était pas, en réalité, la vérité. Il peut appeler cela comme il le veut, mais si les Canadiens examinaient la motion qui a été présentée, ils verraient que le gouvernement essaie d'adopter un projet de loi à toute vitesse et de faire en sorte que ce Comité l'examine à toute allure.

Ce qui se produit habituellement, au bénéfice des personnes qui peuvent suivre le Comité de l'extérieur de la Cité parlementaire — je suis certain qu'il y en a —, c'est que, lorsqu'un comité est saisi d'un projet de loi, il détermine quelle est la meilleure façon de l'étudier. Il s'assure, toutefois, que les Canadiens qui souhaitent être entendus par le Comité aient l'occasion de se présenter et de donner leur point de vue. Cela donne l'occasion aux membres de questionner ces personnes et d'essayer de recueillir plus d'information à partir de ces points de vue, ou de les remettre en cause, s'ils le désirent. L'objectif de cet exercice consiste à nous donner, en tant que parlementaires, la capacité de peser adéquatement le pour et le contre des diverses dispositions du projet de loi.

Le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis compte 350 pages. Il est assez volumineux. Je crois qu'il serait tout à fait logique d'obtenir l'avis d'un certain nombre d'experts dont nous pourrions nous inspirer. Il faudrait effectuer un examen exhaustif et tenir des discussions approfondies à propos de la signification des choses ou des modifications qui seront en fait apportées à notre loi électorale et à d'autres lois corrélatives qui peuvent être modifiées. Ce faisant, il pourrait y avoir des conséquences imprévues. Des aspects, dont le gouvernement n'a pas vraiment tenu compte au moment d'apporter ces modifications, pourraient avoir un effet.

(1735)



Je vais brièvement m'éloigner un peu pour donner un bon exemple. Il y a un certain nombre d'amendements dans ce projet de loi, et, si ma mémoire est bonne, je vais vous donner quelques exemples; cependant, je n'ai pas la feuille devant moi, mais je suis certain que je pourrais la trouver si vous vouliez que je sois plus précis.

Il n'y a pas si longtemps, le gouvernement de l'Ontario a approuvé certaines modifications de sa Loi électorale, et certaines de ces modifications sont similaires ou touchent les mêmes parties de la Loi électorale, j'imagine, faute d'une meilleure formulation, que ce que prévoit le projet de loi qu'a présenté le gouvernement fédéral. Un éventuel registre des électeurs est une de ces initiatives. Certaines modifications sont apportées au régime des tiers et à la façon dont il est traité en Ontario. Voilà deux exemples, et il y en a d'autres.

Dans ce projet de loi, il y a des modifications similaires ou des modifications aux mêmes parties de la Loi électorale; par conséquent, comme je l'ai déjà soutenu, je crois qu'il serait sage pour le Comité d'entendre ces points de vue. J'en ai parlé à la ministre lorsqu'elle a témoigné devant le Comité cette semaine. Je lui ai demandé si elle croyait que c'était important d'apprendre de l'expérience des autres, si elle pensait que c'était important de prendre des décisions fondées sur des données probantes, et, sans surprise pour personne, elle a convenu avec moi que c'était la sage chose à faire, jusqu'à ce que je lui demande si nous devrions en réalité appliquer ces aspects à la présente étude afin d'entendre l'expérience des autres et de recueillir des données probantes. Alors, bien sûr, elle a changé un peu de refrain, comme elle l'a fait après avoir été en mesure d'adopter la motion d'attribution de temps à toute vitesse, en ce qui concerne l'importance pour le Comité d'avoir l'occasion de tenir un débat complet. Elle a également changé de refrain à ce moment-là.

Soudainement, les représentants du gouvernement témoignent devant le Comité et disent: « Oh, non, nous ne pouvons pas faire cela. Pourquoi voudrions-nous tenir un débat complet? Nous voulons adopter ce projet de loi à toute vitesse. » Là, encore une fois, elle a changé de refrain; alors qu'elle disait qu'il était important d'entendre des témoignages et d'apprendre de l'expérience des autres, ces aspects sont, tout d'un coup, devenus secondaires pour elle alors que nous étions sur le point d'entendre l'expérience de personnes qui sont en plein milieu d'une élection à l'heure actuelle. Cela prendra fin le 7 juin, jour du scrutin de l'élection en Ontario. C'est dans quelques jours, alors pourquoi ne pas attendre encore un peu afin d'avoir l'occasion d'entendre ces experts, qu'il s'agisse de représentants d'Élections Ontario ou d'autres personnes qui ont participé à l'élection en Ontario et qui ont été touchées par ces changements, pour leur demander ce qu'ils ont appris de leur expérience après avoir participé à une élection à laquelle ces changements s'appliquaient? Nous ne voudrions pas répéter certaines des erreurs, s'il y en a eu. Je ne sais pas... peut-être qu'il n'y en a pas eu, mais si des erreurs ont été commises, pourquoi voudrions-nous les répéter alors que nous pouvons profiter de l'expérience et de la sagesse de personnes qui sont passées par là?

Cela me rappelle un peu lorsque j'étais enfant. Je crois que nous avons tous vécu cette expérience. Combien de fois nos parents nous ont-ils donné un conseil que nous avons choisi de ne pas suivre? Bien sûr, ils finissaient toujours par dire: « Eh bien, tu vois, tu aurais dû écouter. » Lorsque vous êtes enfant, vous pensez que vous savez tout et que vos parents ne sont pas très intelligents. Mais vous comprenez, en vieillissant, que vos parents possédaient en réalité de l'expérience, qu'ils avaient appris de leurs propres erreurs et qu'ils ne voulaient pas voir leurs enfants commettre les mêmes.

Je suis également passé par là, maintenant, comme parent. J'ai un fils de 22 ans à la maison et je l'ai vu commettre des erreurs lui aussi. Une chose que j'ai apprise avec lui, c'est que plus j'essaie de lui donner des conseils, moins il m'écoute, alors je dois le regarder faire ses erreurs, et c'est frustrant. C'est difficile.

(1740)



Je dirais que c'est une chose de parler d'un parent qui regarde un enfant commettre une erreur, par exemple négocier un mauvais prix pour une automobile usagée qu'il essaie d'acheter. Certainement, cela entraîne de légères conséquences pour lui. Il ne pourra peut-être pas faire une sortie avec sa copine ou quelque chose du genre. Ce n'est peut-être pas une conséquence importante pour lui, mais c'est bien différent de ce dont il est question ici.

Nous parlons ici de conséquences qui toucheront nos élections et la manière même dont nous choisissons nos représentants. Si vous commettez une erreur, il y aura une conséquence très importante, alors si vous avez l'occasion d'apprendre de l'expérience des autres, je ne vois pas pourquoi vous n'en profiteriez pas.

C'est un exemple. J'ai mentionné que j'allais m'éloigner un peu parce que là où je veux en venir, c'est que la ministre a présenté ces excuses à ce moment-là, et voilà tout ce qu'elles étaient: des excuses. Dans les heures suivant ces excuses, le gouvernement nous indiquait déjà qu'il allait simplement faire en sorte que le Comité examine également le projet de loi à toute vitesse. Son excuse était que le Comité était l'endroit où on pouvait tenir un débat complet et toutes les discussions à cet égard, et où il y avait une ouverture aux amendements. Je vais parler dans un moment de la mesure dans laquelle il s'agissait d'une déclaration véridique et à quel point elle manquait vraiment de sincérité parce que nous en avons parlé avec la ministre lorsqu'elle était ici.

Voici maintenant où nous en sommes avec ce gouvernement. Soyons absolument clairs à propos de ce que fait cette motion: elle fait en sorte qu'il faut examiner le projet de loi à toute vitesse. Le processus normal, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, consiste à examiner le projet de loi et à en débattre. Nous entendons des experts et des gens qui peuvent être touchés par le projet de loi et nous leur posons la question suivante: « Dans quelle mesure cela vous touche-t-il? » Nous leur demandons ce qu'ils pensent des modifications. Ou les gens qui ont dû composer avec ces types de choses...

Je vais souligner un point ici. J'ai remarqué que les députés du gouvernement tiennent beaucoup de discussions. Ils se demandent probablement ce qu'ils peuvent faire maintenant parce que l'opposition ne s'écrasera pas et ne se laissera pas faire. Ils se demandent quoi faire maintenant. Je leur signale, s'ils daignent m'écouter, que si, à tout moment, ils désirent revenir en arrière après leur tentative d'accélérer l'étude du projet de loi et qu'ils sont disposés à tenir un débat approprié au Comité, ils peuvent venir m'en parler, et je serai heureux de faciliter le processus. Autrement, vous pouvez vous préparer à entendre ma voix pendant un bon moment.

Certains de mes collègues auront aussi probablement des choses à dire. Je suis certain que vous avez remarqué que mon ami à ma droite a apporté beaucoup de... Il est probablement à droite à bien des égards, d'ailleurs.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Blake Richards: Mon ami a apporté beaucoup de documents, et je ne crois pas que c'est seulement de la lecture personnelle. Ne l'oubliez pas. Si à un moment donné vous voulez venir me voir et me dire « Vous savez quoi, nous avons compris que tenter d'examiner le projet de loi à toute vitesse était une erreur et nous reviendrons peut-être là-dessus », je serais heureux de tenir cette discussion.

D'ici là, nous allons revenir là où j'étais rendu: la motion. Pour ce qui est du processus, bien sûr, une fois que vous entendez ces différents points de vue et que vous avez l'occasion de les remettre en cause, vous remettrez sans doute en question votre propre façon de penser. C'est quelque chose que nous devrions tous faire comme députés: entendre ces différents points de vue.

Pour ma part, je suis fier de dire que, en tant que député, je crois que j'ai certainement élargi mes horizons en entendant différents points de vue partout au pays dans le cadre de différentes initiatives auxquelles j'ai participé. Qu'il s'agisse de délibérations du Comité, comme dans le cas présent, ou d'autres volets de notre travail en tant que député, nous sommes exposés à beaucoup de points de vue différents, et cela remet en question notre façon de penser. J'admets volontiers que je croyais que certaines choses étaient des vérités absolues lorsque je suis arrivé au Parlement, mais je comprends maintenant qu'elles n'étaient pas complètement... Je n'avais pas tout compris, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, n'est-ce pas? Je n'avais pas tout compris. Nous apprenons de ces choses.

C'est pourquoi toutes ces occasions sont bonnes pour nous en tant que députés parce que, au bout du compte, notre travail est d'examiner le projet de loi proposé par le gouvernement. Peu importe si vous êtes dans l'opposition ou au gouvernement, votre travail en tant que député, c'est d'examiner à fond le projet de loi et les mesures prises par l'organe exécutif du gouvernement, de vous assurer de poser les bonnes questions sur ces aspects et de veiller à ce que les décisions servent les intérêts supérieurs de vos électeurs et de tous les Canadiens.

(1745)



Pour que nous puissions faire notre travail adéquatement, nous devons parfois prendre le temps nécessaire... Lorsque vous parlez d'un projet de loi de la portée de celui-ci, qui comprend 350 pages, cela suppose combien d'articles? Il y a plus de 400 articles. Lorsque vous parlez d'un projet de loi d'une telle ampleur — 350 pages, plus de 400 articles —, l'examen prendra un peu de temps.

Je ne parle pas en tant que député de l'opposition ou quelqu'un qui désire retarder un projet de loi. Je parle en tant que député, peu importe le côté de la Chambre où je siège, qui désire s'assurer que le projet de loi fasse l'objet d'un examen approfondi. Je ne sais pas combien de membres du Comité auront une histoire différente de la mienne à cet égard, mais je reconnais volontiers que je n'ai pas lu le projet de loi en entier, toutes les 350 pages. J'y travaille. Vous remarquerez que mon exemplaire comporte beaucoup...

(1750)

M. Garnett Genuis:

Eh bien, lisez-le pendant les séances du Comité.

M. Blake Richards:

... d'onglets ici qui ont été ajoutés et que certaines pages sont abîmées et des choses du genre. En fait, j'ai également utilisé un autre exemplaire, alors il y en a aussi dans celui-là.

Cela signifie qu'il y a des aspects à propos desquels j'ai des questions ou des préoccupations. Peut-être que certains d'entre eux sont des choses que j'aime vraiment, parce qu'il y en a. Mais, à mon avis, si nous voulons tous faire notre travail correctement, nous devrions examiner adéquatement le projet de loi. C'est un excellent endroit pour faire ce travail, parce que c'est facile de lire le projet de loi et de dire ce que j'aime et ce que je n'aime pas.

Encore une fois, je reconnais volontiers... Certains des membres du Comité sont avocats et connaissent davantage le jargon juridique d'un projet de loi. Je suis maintenant député depuis un bon moment, alors je le connais mieux maintenant, mais je ne prétends pas être un expert du jargon juridique. Il est utile pour nous d'être en mesure d'obtenir le point de vue d'intervenants, comme nous avons pu le faire. Le fait d'être capable de recueillir le point de vue d'experts qui viennent témoigner à propos de certains enjeux nous aidera, tout comme recueillir l'avis de personnes qui seront en réalité directement touchées par le projet de loi.

Prenons par exemple les électeurs des Forces canadiennes. Il y a des modifications importantes à cet égard. Nous devrions peut-être entendre des représentants des Forces canadiennes ou des membres en service des Forces canadiennes et leur demander dans quelle mesure ils seront touchés par le projet de loi.

Pour les personnes handicapées, selon ce sur quoi les modifications portent, nous devrions peut-être entendre des personnes ayant différentes invalidités. Il y a peut-être des conséquences imprévues. Si je me souviens bien, dans le cadre de notre examen du rapport du D.G.E. de la dernière élection, rapport qui, selon le gouvernement, devrait faire partie du débat sur ce projet de loi — une proposition que je trouve déconcertante, en passant —, nous pensions que nous avions de bonnes idées sur certains aspects. Je ne les aborderai pas parce qu'elles proviennent de discussions tenues à huis clos. Mais nous avons ensuite entendu des gens qui ont parlé de la façon dont ils étaient touchés par des choses sur lesquelles nous nous penchions et nous avons compris que certains aspects pouvaient entraîner des conséquences imprévues. Par conséquent, ils n'étaient peut-être pas les plus logiques.

Nous avons maintenant l'occasion de revenir en arrière à propos de ces idées et de dire que les avoir incluses dans le projet de loi était peut-être une erreur, dans cet exemple. Donc, que nous soyons des députés de l'opposition ou du gouvernement, notre objectif devrait être d'essayer de trouver ces aspects. Peut-être qu'il n'y en a pas — j'en doute parce que j'ai des préoccupations à l'égard du projet de loi —, mais si nous n'effectuons pas un examen adéquat, nous ne le saurons jamais.

On peut peut-être me convaincre à propos de certains des aspects qui m'inquiètent à l'heure actuelle. On convaincra peut-être les députés du gouvernement siégeant au Comité qu'ils devraient examiner de plus près certaines dispositions du projet de loi et peut-être même les amender ou les retirer du projet de loi. Ce peut être le cas, mais nous ne le savons pas et nous ne le saurons jamais si la motion est adoptée parce que nous examinerons le projet de loi à toute vitesse et nous n'aurons pas cette occasion.

Maintenant, j'imagine que je devrais probablement expliquer en quoi la motion ne permet pas de faire cela parce que les gens qui nous écoutent peut-être se posent probablement la question suivante: « Est-ce seulement un député de l'opposition qui parle parce qu'il veut retarder les choses? » Je vais vous prouver que ce n'est pas le cas.

Voici comment je vais le démontrer. Je vais expliquer brièvement ce que fait cette motion. Tout d'abord — j'imagine maintenant que c'est la sixième ou la septième en tout parce que le gouvernement voulait en changer l'ordre pour une raison quelconque —, elle nous fait voyager partout au pays au cours de la prochaine semaine, ce qui, j'ajouterai, pose un défi logistique très difficile pour les personnes qui tentent d'organiser ce voyage: notre greffier et nos experts en logistique du voyage.

Cela ne donne pas beaucoup de temps aux témoins qui aimeraient probablement se manifester quant à la réorganisation des horaires et se pencher sérieusement sur leurs pensées et leur point de vue sur ces différents aspects. Cela dit, c'est ce que vise la motion. Elle nous fait voyager partout au pays la semaine prochaine, ce qui est certainement une bonne chose. Je sais que c'est beaucoup moins que ce devrait l'être. Je croyais vraiment que le NPD était extrêmement généreux, bien honnêtement, parce que ce voyage était initialement sa proposition.

M. Cullen avait présenté une proposition qui était beaucoup plus approfondie que celle-ci en ce qui concerne le voyage. À mon avis, elle aurait prévu un examen plus adéquat de ce point de vue; je crois qu'on devrait encore tenir des séances ici également.

Je dis cela — je vais brièvement poursuivre sur cette piste, monsieur le président — en tant que personne qui a participé à l'examen précédent de la Loi électorale du Canada. C'est la dernière fois où il y a eu des modifications. À ce moment-là, le gouvernement a demandé à l'opposition combien de temps elle désirait discuter des modifications et il a suivi ce calendrier. Cela supposait beaucoup d'audiences.

(1755)

M. John Nater:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Seulement à titre de précision générale concernant la motion; elle a été consignée au compte rendu, mais je crois que personne d'entre nous n'en a une copie papier, encore moins une version traduite dans les deux langues officielles. Pour la gouverne de tous les membres du Comité et de ceux qui s'y joindront peut-être au cours de la soirée, je crois qu'il serait utile que les membres du Comité aient cette motion par écrit dans les deux langues officielles.

J'attends vos directives, monsieur le président, quant à savoir si c'est quelque chose qui peut être fait.

Le président:

Il y a déjà un exemplaire d'une grande partie de la motion. Nous y avons apporté quelques modifications mineures.

Monsieur le greffier, y a-t-il quelqu'un qui pourrait taper la motion et la remettre au Comité?

Le greffier:

Je n'ai pas de version traduite de la motion et je ne serais pas en mesure de la distribuer avant d'en avoir une version traduite. Si quelqu'un pouvait me fournir une version électronique, que je pourrais faire traduire, je pourrais vous la remettre dès que possible.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Certainement.

Le greffier:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Nater. C'était un bon point.

Nous revenons à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai en quelque sorte oublié où j'étais rendu, monsieur le président, mais je vais continuer sur ma lancée.

Le président:

Vous parliez du fait que nous allions entreprendre un voyage la semaine prochaine.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est ça.

Comme je l'ai dit, je faisais partie du comité qui a étudié les dernières modifications de la loi électorale. Le gouvernement a demandé à l'opposition combien de temps elle avait besoin pour débattre de la question et tenir une audience à cet égard. C'est la façon dont le gouvernement a procédé. Nous avons passé presque chaque soir, pendant des semaines, à discuter du projet de loi au sein du comité. Voilà comment nous devrions discuter de ces choses. Tout le monde devrait avoir l'occasion de tenir une discussion complète.

Ce n'est pas ce qui se produit avec cette motion. Il y aurait plutôt une semaine de voyage la semaine prochaine — un échéancier très serré —, et le gouvernement proposerait ensuite que nous revenions à Ottawa, qu'aucun autre témoin ne soit entendu et que nous n'ayons pas l'occasion de recevoir à nouveau la ministre, comme on nous l'avait promis, pour une autre heure. Cela nous avait été promis, mais cela ne se produira pas selon ce scénario. Il ne sera pas possible d'entendre des experts ici à Ottawa qui pourraient avoir quelque chose à dire ou d'avoir une autre occasion de débattre ou de discuter de la question. Ensuite, on passerait immédiatement à l'examen article par article.

Pour les gens qui ne connaissent pas la procédure parlementaire, nous examinerions le projet de loi article par article. Chaque article du projet de loi serait examiné et pourrait faire l'objet d'une discussion, et des amendements pourraient être apportés, si le Comité le jugeait nécessaire.

Ce gouvernement a dit: « Excellent. Nous allons laisser cela se produire. » Il n'a pas le choix, bien sûr; il doit laisser cela se produire, mais il mettra en place une mesure très draconienne qui fixerait un échéancier très strict. Pour chaque amendement proposé, il permettrait cinq minutes de débat par parti. Évidemment, l'intention du gouvernement est de précipiter l'adoption, alors cela signifie probablement cinq minutes en tout. Ce n'est pas un long débat pour quelque chose qui pourrait avoir une incidence très importante sur nos élections.

Cela signifie que le gouvernement ne respecte pas sa promesse, comme il semble très disposé à le faire à propos de presque tout. La ministre a promis de tenir un débat complet et des discussions approfondies au Comité, qui est l'endroit où cela devrait se produire. Au lieu de cela, le gouvernement dit non, nous allons juste examiner le projet de loi à toute vitesse.

Devinez ce qui va probablement se produire lorsque le projet de loi retournera à la Chambre des communes? Le gouvernement mettra probablement fin au débat là aussi et précipitera l'adoption du projet de loi. Des modifications seront apportées à notre loi électorale, et personne ne saura vraiment si les modifications étaient raisonnables ou judicieuses ou si elles avaient lieu d'être parce qu'aucun député n'aura eu l'occasion de les examiner adéquatement et de faire son travail, lequel consiste à examiner adéquatement le projet de loi et à poser des questions. Que nous siégions du côté du gouvernement ou de l'opposition n'a aucune importance, nous devrions tous chercher à faire cela et à agir dans l'intérêt supérieur des Canadiens. Cette motion ne nous permet simplement pas de faire notre travail.

Je voulais dire tout cela, monsieur le président, simplement pour donner aux gens une idée de la question et du débat. J'en ai effectivement encore à dire sur ce sujet. Je vais vous demander d'ajouter mon nom à la liste et je vais céder la parole à mes collègues.

(1800)

Le président:

D'accord, vous êtes de nouveau sur la liste.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Richards. Ce n'était clairement pas de l'obstruction systématique comme promis.

Je serai très bref. L'ensemble du processus a été décevant parce que nous débattons de cette question depuis un bon moment et que nous n'avons pas reçu de contre-proposition de la part des conservateurs, ni d'offre, de liste de témoins ou de déclaration quant au temps dont nous avons besoin pour discuter de la question ou dont les conservateurs ont besoin, et quant au nombre de témoins nécessaires. J'entends M. Richards dire: « Eh bien, ce n'est pas vrai. Montrez-moi l'offre. »

Nous n'avons toujours pas vu la liste de témoins qui avait été promise pour aujourd'hui, mais cela dit...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez raison, j'imagine. Désolé.

M. Chris Bittle:

Eh bien, qu'on soit de la gauche ou de la droite, peu importe, cela dit, l'ensemble du processus est décevant. C'est un débat qui doit être tenu. Il s'agissait d'une de nos promesses électorales et quelque chose que nous aimerions mener à bien. Cela dit, il est clair que le voyage n'aura pas lieu. Encore une fois, il n'y a eu aucune proposition, ni contre-proposition, et il est peut-être préférable que notre comité de direction s'en occupe.

Au bout du compte, cependant, je propose que le Comité lève la séance.

Le président:

Nous sommes saisis d'une motion proposant que le Comité lève la séance, qui ne saurait être modifiée ni débattue.

Des députés: D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 29, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.