header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-23 PROC 104

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1915)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good evening. Welcome to the 104th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study on the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

We are pleased to be joined by Michael Tatham, Clerk of the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory of Australia. He is appearing by video conference from Darwin, Australia, where it is early tomorrow morning.

Let me just remind committee members that tomorrow we have a meeting at the regular time. The first hour is on indigenous languages. The second hour is on committee business. You probably don't have that notice yet.

Thank you for making yourself available and changing the time. We got stuck with a whole bunch of votes. I'm sure you understand that.

If you could make an opening statement, that would be great.

Mr. Michael Tatham (Clerk of the Legislative Assembly, Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I will give you a brief outline of our jurisdiction and the matters around languages and use of language.

The Northern Territory is a large land mass on the Australian continent, with about 18% of the land mass, but only 1% of the Australian population lives in the Northern Territory. However, 30% of those people are aboriginal people, and the aboriginal interpreter service estimates that 60% of aboriginal people in the Northern Territory speak an aboriginal language at home or in their community on a daily basis.

The aboriginal languages in the Northern Territory are very diverse. There are estimated to be well over 100 different languages and dialects spoken every day in the Northern Territory that are aboriginal languages, in communities right across the Northern Territory.

In the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory we have had aboriginal members since the assembly's inception in 1974. We've always had at least one aboriginal member. At the moment, in our 13th assembly, we have six members with aboriginal heritage, and some of those members speak an aboriginal language as their first language.

One of the facts around representation in the Northern Territory in our assembly is the lack of continuity and cohesion with regard to the languages spoken as first languages by members from assembly to assembly. For example, in our 12th assembly, from 2012 to 2016, we had a number of members who spoke as their first language different aboriginal languages from those of members in our 13th assembly, the existing assembly. In the last assembly we had a speaker of Laragiya as her first language. She also spoke another language called Warlpiri. Another member spoke Warlpiri as her first language. That diversity of language led to some interesting conflict, which I will get onto in a little bit, about what happened with regard to our standing orders being changed and the use of aboriginal languages or languages other than English in our assembly.

Our situation here is probably similar in some ways to that in many parts of Canada, in terms of our having large land masses with small populations, particularly when you get to the Northern Territory. As I have said, the diversity of language is a huge challenge for us in our Parliament when it comes to trying to accommodate language or doing outreach work or communicating how Parliament works to people who use only their traditional language or do not speak English as well as we would hope they would if they are to understand what's going on in our Parliament.

In the past, we have made some efforts around communicating in some aboriginal languages what goes on in our Parliament through our committee system, but not for a number of years. The last time the assembly did outreach work through its committee system in aboriginal languages was 2011, when the assembly spent some considerable time and money on prioritizing 17 aboriginal languages and providing interpreters and outreach about how governance and the assembly works to communities in a concerted effort during that year, 2011.

In the existing assembly, the 13th assembly, we have a member who has made it clear in the assembly that English is not his first language. He speaks a language called Yolngu Matha, which is a language from the East Arnhem Land region of the Northern Territory. He communicates in Parliament in English, but he does so in a slow and sometimes stilted fashion, and he admits quite openly that he finds it sometimes quite challenging to communicate in English in the Northern Territory Assembly.

(1920)



As a consequence of that, in 2017, he sought to amend our standing orders to have an interpreter on the floor with him, so that he could communicate in his own language and the interpreter would translate it for him into English.

The assembly didn't agree with the proposal, and his proposed standing order was not even referred to the standing orders committee at the time. It was amended in debate, and the matter didn't go any further. However, the standing orders committee did consider the use of standing order 23A.

Standing order 23A was introduced into our assembly in 2016 as a consequence of a debate that had occurred late in 2015 where a member was interjecting in the Warlpiri language. A debate was happening about an education matter. A member was constantly interjecting. A point of order was raised, and when the point of order was raised, the member switched to the Warlpiri language, and another member who also spoke the Warlpiri language accused that member of speaking in unparliamentary terms and saying offensive words in the Warlpiri language.

This brought the Speaker into a difficult situation because of course she does not speak the Warlpiri language, and a whole question arose about whether the words were offensive or not.

The Speaker then made a ruling and said, “No matter what the words were, in debate you shouldn't be interjecting. Therefore, the interjection itself was out of order, so please don't interject.” This became quite a hot political issue, with the member who had interjected saying that her first language had been suppressed and that she should have the right to speak in her first language.

In the legislative assembly we had always had a procedure where a member could speak in their language at any time with the leave of the assembly, and the leave of the assembly had never been denied.

The problem, of course, with that was that if a member spoke in their language, there was no interpretation, no translation of that, and the member would be relied upon to then either say those same words again in English or to provide a written translation for incorporation into the Hansard. That was the process that had been available for members for 40 years before this controversy occurred in late 2015 and early 2016.

Then the member for Stuart at the time, who was the member who had interjected in the Warlpiri language, moved a motion before the standing orders committee to include a new standing order that would allow a member as a right to speak in any language other than English, provided that after they spoke in that language they would provide an oral and/or a written translation of what they had said.

At the standing orders committee meetings the committee deliberated on that, and the report that was reported back to the assembly in April 2016 stated that a member could speak in any language other than English so long as they spoke in English first, and then spoke in the other language, so that moved around to the idea of when you would provide your translation. That became the standing order.

In 2017, the member for Nhulunbuy, who is the gentleman I was talking about previously and is a speaker of the Yolngu Matha language, moved an amendment for that to be switched back around, so that you could provide the translation after you spoke in your aboriginal language or whatever language you wanted to speak in. That was not agreed to. The assembly has, in its wisdom, decided to maintain a watching brief and has requested any member who wants to make a submission to the standing orders committee to do so at any time up until the end of 2018 on the matter of speaking in a language other than English.

There's quite a bit of politics around what occurred. Here in the Northern Territory, 2016 was an election year, and there was a lot of politics around the use of language and whether people were oppressing other people and suppressing the use of their language.

(1925)



Things have calmed down a bit on that front; however, it's still a matter of some engagement for the member for Nhulunbuy, because he and his staff have said that he is being prevented from communicating fully and participating fully in the proceedings of the legislative assembly for as long as he does not have access to a translation service in the assembly. The assembly hasn't gone any further on that.

All of the Australian parliaments that we surveyed permit speaking in a language other than English by leave only; there's no interpreter or translation service available as a matter of right.

Of course, the situation is very different in New Zealand, and we understand from looking at Nunavut that it's very different there as well, where there are official languages. Australia doesn't actually have an official language in a constitution or a document such as that. The immigration department maintains that English is the language of Australia, but it's not in any official constitutional document or embedded in anything like that.

The difficulty, I think, that the members of the assembly have always said is that there's no homogeneity here, whereas when you go to New Zealand there are different dialects but there is one Maori language. If you're a Maori person, you can speak and understand, mainly, the different dialects of the Maori language, whereas in Australia, with the huge diversity of language groups, there's always a concern about how we would, for example, in the Northern Territory, provide services for the top 17 languages, which was what was being considered when we were doing some committee work.

That gives you a bit of an idea of where we sit here. We have a standing order. The standing order sticks out a bit as the only one we know of in the Australian context that provides rules around the speaking of language other than English. The Prime Minister of Australia a few years ago famously spoke to Canberra in the local aboriginal language, which is the Ngunnawal language. He spoke a few words in a speech there and was of course lauded for doing so because he was trying to be inclusive. Once again, though, perhaps it was more a gesture than anything that flowed on from it

I understand the Australian Parliament has a reference from a committee to look at how to do better with aboriginal languages, but it hasn't gone any further than being referred back for further consideration by a committee.

I think that's probably all I'll say for opening.

(1930)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I know you only have 10 minutes left, so we're going to be very informal. We'd like really quick questions and really quick answers.

Just really quickly, can you tell me how many aboriginal languages you have and how many seats there are in your Parliament?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

We have 25 seats in our Parliament. In our Parliament we have six aboriginal members, in this assembly.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, I meant how many languages in the country, in the area?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

In the country, I'm not sure.

The Chair:

In the territory...?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

In Northern Territory, we have an estimate that it's between 100 and 130 languages or subdialects of aboriginal languages, but when we are talking to people in East Arnhem, they will have subdialects and there will be a community not far from another community that will speak a different language.

The Chair:

Romeo, do you have a question?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

First of all, is there any physical infrastructure to do translation in the Australian Parliament?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

In the Australian Parliament I don't think so. There's certainly not here in the Northern Territory Parliament. We don't have any infrastructure in place that provides a booth or services or earpieces or any of that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the legislature there's no special treatment for an aboriginal language rather than a foreign language, so you could speak Japanese as easily as a local aboriginal language. Is that correct?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

That is correct; there is a standing order that would permit that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're required to provide a translation for what you say. Does that include captured heckles?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

You have to provide what you said, whatever that is, and it's on trust. It's not done by an independent service.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Next is Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

Well, you answered one question that I think we all needed to understand. Australia, perhaps next to Papua New Guinea, has the richest linguistic diversity for its geography and population of any place in the world. That is somewhat different from Canada, where we have a smaller number of indigenous languages that in some cases are spread across 1,000 kilometres or more of territory. That creates its own problems.

Effectively someone can stand up, then, and give a speech in their own indigenous language and submit a written transcript—is that how it's done?—to allow everybody else to know what's going on. Or do they have to then say, now I'm going to stop and repeat it in English? What is the process there?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

They are to speak in English first or table a copy of the English words first. This was the matter of controversy, as to whether it should be first in English or first in your own language. The member from Nhulunbuy has said he speaks in his own language first, and English comes second, but the assembly has said no, the language of the assembly is English first.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. I think I see what he's getting at. He's going to formulate his ideas, and they will be.... It strikes me that if you don't have a set piece whereby you know the structure of the debate a day in advance, it would be hard to prepare your remarks, have them written down for yourself, and translate them. I can see a practical difficulty that might arise, certainly if you want to respond in the moment to whatever is being discussed. It sounds as though this process would be limiting.

Mr. Michael Tatham:

The member has indicated that it does limit his ability to contribute to debate on behalf of his constituents.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What percentage of the population of the Northern Territory would be people who use aboriginal languages—all of them together—as what we would call their mother tongue, as distinct from those for whom English is their mother tongue?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

The population of the Northern Territory is around 230,000 people. Around 70,000 of those are aboriginal people, and around 60% of those 70,000 speak an aboriginal language every day as their first language.

(1935)

Mr. Scott Reid:

We call that the language of home use; it's something that you prefer to speak, given a choice, in a domestic environment. Would that be the way to think of it?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. That's very high by Canadian standards.

Thank you for that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Is there anyone else?

Mr. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NDP):

Maybe I'll ask a quick question.

Thank you for your presentation.

You spoke about the fact that there's no constitutional framework for official languages in Australia. Are there other rules that may govern certain situations? For instance, if an indigenous person is elected who only speaks an indigenous language, what happens in that case?

In our case, government services are here to serve Parliament, and that was confirmed by testimony here in this committee. What are the other rules that will govern that situation?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

There are rules of the court, for example; an aboriginal interpreter service will be used for a person who is appearing before a court and needs to speak in their first language, their aboriginal language.

The aboriginal interpreter service is a well-funded, large service, with a lot of different people working in it to try to cover all of the language groups. That is the service we used seven or eight years ago when we did outreach committee work in communities. We did consultation with that service and we chose the 17 most commonly used languages for doing the outreach work. That still didn't enfranchise everyone.

There is a problem. There's a problem when people need to engage with government and they don't speak the language of government. The language of government is English. The government has put some resources into such things as the aboriginal interpreter service, but of course, in communities there are problems with policing and things like that, when people might interact with law enforcement and the law enforcement officer doesn't speak the local language. What they've done in the police is have liaison officers who engage local community people to work with the police.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If an indigenous language speaker were to speak in an indigenous language in the legislative assembly and refused to speak English, what would be the repercussions?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

That would be highly disorderly. That would be a matter for the assembly itself to determine.

Of course, the Speaker has pulled up the member from Nhulunbuy. The member from Nhulunbuy has done that on one occasion. The Speaker didn't interrupt him; she let him speak and afterwards she said, what you've done is out of order. She was conciliatory, saying, what you've done is out of order, because we don't know what you've said and we don't have any systems in place to find out what you've said. I think, of course, that was the point he was making.

It becomes a matter of disorder under the standing order.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any constitutional protection for either the people or the languages, in either the country or the states?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I realize that none of these languages had a written form prior to the arrival of Europeans, but do they presently? Do any of the languages in the Northern Territory have a written form, or are they all purely oral?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

There is a written form. It's interesting. When we look at all this, the way that the Inuit language is being put into syllabic form is very interesting, but of course here it has just been a transliteration using the European alphabet.

There is, then, a written form, but of course once it is written down there are many more consonants than vowels, and it's very difficult sometimes to get the correct spelling of what the written form is, because it's not standardized.

There have been attempts at written form. I think a Bible was written a few years ago in one of the aboriginal languages, but it would be the linguists who decided that this is the way you write that aboriginal language.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. It would make it genuinely difficult for a member who had done what you described: giving a speech without having an English written form. He would have to, on his own, provide that English after the fact by listening to himself. He couldn't actually consult his notes, because he wouldn't have had written notes in his own language.

(1940)

Mr. Michael Tatham:

He would not necessarily; that's right. It's much more organic when you have a discussion with aboriginal people about what's coming out of their mouths, which is not necessarily something they are reading from.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Is there anything different in any of the state or the national legislatures that you are aware of, related to this topic?

Mr. Michael Tatham:

No, the situation is the same. When we did our survey a little more than a year ago, all the legislatures only allowed the speaking of a language other than English by leave. We're the only one we know of that actually has a standing order now that has a set of rules around it. Whether that's a good idea or not is a matter for the assembly, but there is no constitutional right for anyone to speak in any of the languages.

The constitutions of the states of Victoria and New South Wales and maybe one or two others in the last 10 or 15 years were amended to recognize that aboriginal people were there first, but that's as far as they go.

The Australian constitution does not recognize aboriginal people in any particular way, other than around the fact that the Australian Parliament may make special laws for aboriginal people. That's pretty much as far as it goes.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thanks very much. I really appreciate this. It's been very informative for me.

The Chair:

Thank you for staying late. We know you have to rush off now, so thank you very much. We really appreciate it. It was some very fascinating information.

We can't see having our translation booth with 125 translators. You have a lot of languages.

Thank you.

Mr. Michael Tatham: Okay. Best of luck. Thank you.

The Chair:

Tomorrow in the first hour we're going to do the report on indigenous languages. Look at the draft, which you got in an email this afternoon. Then in the second hour we'll do committee business.

Tuesday, for the first hour the committee and the sub-committee—anyone who wants to come—and one witness from the CHRO are briefing the independents on the confidential sub-committee report.

Thanks for coming. It was bad timing, but I think it was very interesting.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1915)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. Bonsoir. Bienvenue à cette 104e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons notre étude sur l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Michael Tatham, greffier de l'Assemblée législative du Territoire du Nord de l'Australie. Il participe à la séance par vidéoconférence de Darwin, en Australie, où il est très tôt.

Je tiens à rappeler aux membres du Comité que la séance de demain aura lieu à l'heure habituelle. La première partie de cette séance-ci portera sur les langues autochtones, alors que la seconde portera sur les travaux du Comité. Vous n'avez probablement pas encore reçu l'avis à cet effet.

Nous vous remercions de votre disponibilité et d'avoir accepté de changer l'heure de la séance. Nous avons été légèrement coincés par des votes. Je sais que vous comprenez la situation.

Je vous laisse la parole pour que vous nous présentiez votre exposé.

M. Michael Tatham (greffier de l'Assemblée législative, Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais vous donner un aperçu de notre juridiction et des questions entourant les langues et leur utilisation.

Le Territoire du Nord couvre une grande superficie de l'Australie, environ 18 %, mais seulement 1 % de la population australienne vit dans ce territoire. Cependant, 30 % de ceux qui vivent sur ce territoire sont Autochtones et, selon le service d'interprétation autochtone, 60 % des Autochtones qui vivent sur le Territoire du Nord parlent quotidiennement une langue autochtone à la maison ou dans leur communauté.

Les langues autochtones parlées dans le Territoire du Nord sont très diverses. On estime que plus de 100 langues et dialectes différents parlés quotidiennement dans le Territoire du Nord sont des langues autochtones.

Depuis sa création en 1974, l'Assemblée législative du Territoire du Nord compte des députés autochtones. Nous avons toujours compté sur au moins un député autochtone. Actuellement, dans la 13e assemblée, nous comptons six députés ayant un patrimoine autochtone et certains d'entre eux parlent une langue autochtone comme langue maternelle.

Un des faits qui ressort de la représentation au sein de l'Assemblée du Territoire du Nord, c'est le manque de continuité et de cohésion par rapport aux langues maternelles parlées par les députés d'une assemblée à l'autre. Par exemple, dans la 12e assemblée, de 2012 à 2016, plusieurs députés parlaient une langue autochtone comme langue maternelle, comparativement à la 13e assemblée. Au cours de la dernière assemblée, une des députées parlait le laragiya comme langue maternelle. Elle parlait également le warlpiri. Une autre députée parlait le warlpiri comme langue maternelle. Cette diversité linguistique a mené à un conflit intéressant, dont je vous parlerai dans quelques instants, quant à la modification de notre règlement et à l'utilisation de langues autochtones ou de langues autres que l'anglais au sein de notre assemblée.

Dans certaines mesures, notre situation ressemble probablement à ce que vous vivez dans bien des régions du Canada, en ce sens que nous avons de grands territoires peu peuplés, notamment le Territoire du Nord. Comme je l'ai souligné, la diversité linguistique représente un défi important pour notre parlement lorsque vient le temps de prendre des mesures d'accommodement linguistique, de sensibiliser les communautés ou d'expliquer les rouages du parlement aux citoyens qui ne parlent que leur langue traditionnelle ou qui ne parlent pas suffisamment bien l'anglais pour comprendre comment fonctionne le parlement.

Par le passé, des efforts ont été déployés, par l'entremise de notre système de comités, pour expliquer dans certaines langues autochtones les rouages du parlement, mais c'était il y a plusieurs années. La dernière fois, c'était en 2011, alors que l'Assemblée a investi beaucoup de temps et d'argent pour fournir des interprètes et travailler avec les communautés dans 17 langues autochtones dans un effort concerté pour expliquer les rouages de la gouvernance et de l'Assemblée.

Un des députés de l'Assemblée actuelle, la 13e assemblée, a clairement indiqué que l'anglais n'était pas sa langue maternelle. Il parle l'yolngu matha, une langue de la région d'East Arnhem Land, dans le Territoire du Nord. Il communique en anglais au parlement, mais s'exprime lentement et parfois de façon guindée. Il admet ouvertement qu'il est parfois difficile pour lui de communiquer en anglais dans l'Assemblée du Territoire du Nord.

(1920)



Il a donc tenté, en 2017, de faire modifier le Règlement afin qu'il puisse avoir avec lui dans la chambre un interprète qui lui permettrait de communiquer dans sa langue en traduisant ses propos en anglais.

L'assemblée a refusé cette proposition, même que la proposition n'a pas été renvoyée au comité du Règlement. La proposition a été modifiée au cours du débat et la question n'a pas été examinée davantage. Toutefois, le comité du Règlement a étudié le recours à l'article 23A.

L'article 23A a été adopté par l'assemblée en 2016 à la suite d'un débat survenu vers la fin de 2015 où une députée avait interrompu le débat en s'exprimant en warlpiri. Le débat portait sur une question relative à l'éducation. La députée interrompait constamment le débat. Un autre député a invoqué le Règlement et, à ce moment, la députée s'est mise à s'exprimer en warlpiri. C'est alors qu'un autre député qui parle le warlpiri a accusé la députée de tenir des propos non parlementaires et d'utiliser des expressions offensantes en warlpiri.

Cette situation a placé la Présidente dans une position difficile, car, bien entendu, elle ne parle pas warlpiri. Une question a été soulevée à savoir si les propos étaient ou non offensants.

La Présidente a alors tranché disant: « Peu importe les propos utilisés, le débat ne devrait pas être interrompu. Par conséquent, l'interruption elle-même était irrecevable. Je vous demanderais donc de cesser d'interrompre le débat. » Ce dossier est devenu un enjeu politique important, la députée qui interrompait le débat prétendant qu'on l'interdisait de s'exprimer dans sa langue maternelle et qu'elle devrait avoir le droit de s'exprimer dans sa langue maternelle.

L'Assemblée législative a toujours eu une procédure permettant à un député de s'exprimer dans sa langue, avec l'autorisation de l'assemblée. Cette autorisation a toujours été accordée.

Bien entendu, le problème avec cette procédure, c'est si un député s'exprime dans sa langue, il n'y a aucune interprétation ou traduction possible et l'on doit ensuite se fier au député pour qu'il répète ses propos en anglais ou qu'il fournisse une traduction écrite aux fins du Hansard. Ce processus était en place depuis 40 ans avant cette controverse survenue vers la fin de l'année 2015 et le début de 2016.

À l'époque, la députée de Stuart, qui interrompait le débat en warlpiri, a présenté une motion devant le comité du Règlement demandant à ce qu'un nouvel article soit créé autorisant les députés à s'exprimer dans la langue de leur choix, autre que l'anglais, pourvu qu'ils fournissent ensuite une traduction orale ou écrite de leurs propos.

Le comité du Règlement a examiné la question et, dans le rapport qu'il a présenté à l'assemblée en avril 2016, il a jugé qu'un député pouvait s'exprimer dans une autre langue que l'anglais, pourvu qu'il s'exprime d'abord en anglais et ensuite dans l'autre langue. Cette décision a modifié le moment où le député doit fournir sa traduction. Un article correspondant a été ajouté au Règlement.

En 2017, le député de Nhulunbuy, auquel j'ai fait référence plus tôt et qui s'exprimait en yolngu matha, a proposé un amendement visant à inverser cet ordre, soit que les députés qui s'expriment dans une langue autochtone ou une autre langue puissent fournir une traduction après s'être exprimés. L'amendement a été rejeté. Dans sa sagesse, l'assemblée a décidé de continuer à surveiller le dossier et a demandé aux députés qui souhaitent faire une présentation au comité du Règlement sur la question de l'utilisation d'une langue autre que l'anglais de le faire avant la fin de 2018.

Il y a beaucoup de politiques dans ce dossier. Deux mille seize a été une année électorale dans le Territoire du Nord. Il y a beaucoup de politiques qui entourent l'utilisation de la langue et les questions à savoir si les députés sont victimes d'oppression et si on leur interdit de s'exprimer dans leur langue.

(1925)



Les choses se sont calmées un peu à cet égard. Toutefois, cela reste un combat pour le député de Nhulunbuy. Le député et les membres de son personnel ont dit que, tant et aussi longtemps qu'il n'aura pas accès à un service de traduction à l'Assemblée législative, cela voudra dire qu'on l'empêche de communiquer pleinement ses idées et de participer entièrement aux activités de l'Assemblée. L'Assemblée n'est pas allée plus loin dans ce dossier.

Tous les parlements australiens sondés permettent l'utilisation d'une langue autre que l'anglais, mais seulement sur autorisation de l'Assemblée. Cependant, aucun député n'a droit au service d'un interprète ou à un service de traduction.

Bien entendu, la situation est très différente en Nouvelle-Zélande et nous sommes conscients que la situation est également très différente au Nunavut où il existe des langues officielles. Ni la constitution ni aucun document ne confirme une langue officielle pour l'Australie. Le ministère de l'Immigration maintient que l'anglais est la langue de l'Australie, mais rien à cet égard n'a été consigné ou enchâssé dans un document constitutionnel.

Les députés de l'Assemblée ont toujours dit que le problème, c'est le manque d'homogénéité, comparativement à la Nouvelle-Zélande où il existe plusieurs dialectes différents, mais une seule langue maorie. De façon générale, une personne maorie peut parler et comprendre les différents dialectes de la langue, alors qu'en Australie, étant donné l'énorme diversité des groupes linguistiques, on s'inquiète toujours de la capacité de fournir, par exemple, dans le Territoire du Nord, des services pour les 17 principales langues, option qui a été considérée au comité.

Cela vous donne une idée d'où nous en sommes dans ce dossier. Un article a été ajouté dans le Règlement. À notre connaissance, c'est le seul article du genre dans le contexte australien qui fixe des règles quant à l'utilisation d'une langue autre que l'anglais. Il y a quelques années, le premier ministre de l'Australie s'est démarqué, à Canberra, en parlant la langue autochtone locale, le ngunnawal. Il a inclus quelques mots dans son discours et a bien entendu été louangé pour cette initiative, car il tentait d'être inclusif. Toutefois, il s'agit peut-être davantage d'un geste qu'autre chose; rien de plus n'est ressorti de cette initiative.

Je sais que le parlement australien a fait référence au recours à un comité pour se pencher sur la façon d'améliorer la situation en ce qui concerne les langues autochtones, mais outre le renvoi de la question aux fins de considération par un comité, rien de plus n'a été fait.

Je crois que je vais arrêter mon exposé ici.

(1930)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Je sais que vous n'avez plus que 10 minutes à nous accorder, donc nous allons procéder de façon très informelle. J'aimerais que tous les participants se limitent à de brèves questions et de brèves réponses.

Très brièvement, pourriez-vous me dire combien vous comptez de langues autochtones et combien il y a de sièges dans votre parlement?

M. Michael Tatham:

Notre parlement compte 25 sièges. Dans l'Assemblée actuelle, nous avons six députés autochtones.

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi, je me suis peut-être mal exprimé, je voulais savoir combien de langues sont parlées au pays et dans la région.

M. Michael Tatham:

Au pays, je ne sais trop.

Le président:

Dans la région...?

M. Michael Tatham:

Dans le Territoire du Nord, nous estimons qu'il existe entre 100 et 130 langues ou sous-dialectes autochtones, mais en ce qui concerne les habitants d'East Arnhem, ils utilisent des sous-dialectes et il y a une communauté tout près de la nôtre où l'on utilise une langue différente.

Le président:

Romeo, auriez-vous une question à poser?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

D'abord, y a-t-il une infrastructure physique pour offrir un service d'interprétation dans le Parlement australien?

M. Michael Tatham:

Dans le parlement australien, je ne le crois pas. Je peux vous dire qu'il n'y en a pas dans le Parlement du Territoire du Nord. Nous n'avons aucune infrastructure pour offrir un service d'interprétation, aucune cabine, aucun système audio.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La législature ne prévoit aucun traitement particulier pour une langue autochtone comparativement à une langue étrangère. Donc, les députés pourraient tout aussi facilement s'exprimer en japonais que dans une langue autochtone locale. Est-ce exact?

M. Michael Tatham:

C'est exact; il y a un article du Règlement qui le permettrait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les députés doivent fournir une traduction de leurs propos. Est-ce que cela inclut le chahutage?

M. Michael Tatham:

Ils doivent fournir une traduction de tout ce qu'ils disent, peu importe, et on leur fait confiance. La traduction n'est pas offerte par un service indépendant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

Vous avez répondu à une question sur quelque chose que nous avions tous besoin de comprendre. Outre peut-être Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée, l'Australie compte la diversité linguistique la plus riche de sa région et du monde. C'est quelque peu différent du Canada où l'on retrouve un nombre moins élevé de langues autochtones qui, dans certains cas, sont parlées sur un territoire qui s'étend à plus de 1 000 kilomètres. Cela crée d'autres problèmes.

Donc, un député peut prononcer un discours dans sa langue autochtone et fournir ensuite une traduction écrite — est-ce ainsi que fonctionne le processus? — pour que tous puissent savoir ce qu'il a dit. Doivent-ils dire: « Je vais maintenant répéter ce que j'ai dit en anglais? » Quel est le processus?

M. Michael Tatham:

Les députés doivent d'abord s'exprimer en anglais ou présenter d'abord une copie de leur discours en anglais. C'est ce qui sème la controverse, à savoir si les députés devraient d'abord s'exprimer en anglais ou dans leur langue autochtone. Le député de Nhulunbuy a dit qu'il allait d'abord s'exprimer dans sa langue autochtone, puis en anglais, mais l'Assemblée a refusé, précisant que la langue de l'Assemblée était d'abord l'anglais.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Je crois comprendre où il veut en venir. Il souhaite d'abord formuler ses idées, et ensuite... Je me dis que si les députés ignorent à l'avance quelle sera la structure du débat, il serait difficile de préparer une intervention, de l'écrire et de la traduire. Je peux comprendre le problème pratique que cela soulève lorsque les députés veulent intervenir dans la discussion. Ce processus limiterait leur capacité à intervenir.

M. Michael Tatham:

Le député concerné a indiqué que le processus limite sa capacité à participer au débat au nom de ses électeurs.

M. Scott Reid:

Quel pourcentage de la population du Territoire du Nord parle une langue autochtone — toute langue confondue — comme langue maternelle, comparativement à ceux qui parlent l'anglais comme langue maternelle?

M. Michael Tatham:

La population du Territoire du Nord compte environ 230 000 habitants. Environ 70 000 d'entre eux sont des Autochtones et environ 60 % de ces 70 000 parlent quotidiennement une langue autochtone comme langue maternelle.

(1935)

M. Scott Reid:

C'est ce que l'on appelle la langue à domicile, soit la langue que quelqu'un préfère utiliser, lorsqu'il a le choix, dans un environnement familial. Est-ce que ce serait la façon de voir la chose?

M. Michael Tatham:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. C'est quelque chose de très important par rapport à la norme canadienne.

Merci.

Le président:

D'accord.

Quelqu'un d'autre voudrait intervenir?

M. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NPD):

J'aurais une brève question à poser.

Merci pour votre exposé.

Vous dites qu'il n'existe aucun cadre constitutionnel pour les langues officielles en Australie. Existe-t-il d'autres règles pour régir certaines situations? Par exemple, si un Autochtone qui ne parle qu'une langue autochtone est élu, que se passe-t-il?

Ici, les services gouvernementaux servent le Parlement, ce qu'ont confirmé des témoignages au Comité. Quelles sont les autres règles qui permettraient de régir une telle situation?

M. Michael Tatham:

Il existe des règles pour les tribunaux, par exemple. Un service d'interprétation autochtone sera utilisé si un témoin qui se présente devant un tribunal doit s'exprimer dans sa langue maternelle autochtone.

Il s'agit d'un service d'interprétation autochtone d'envergure et bien financé pour lequel beaucoup de gens travaillent afin de pouvoir offrir un service à tous les groupes linguistiques. C'est le service auquel nous avons eu recours il y a sept ou huit ans lorsque nous avons amorcé nos travaux avec les communautés. Grâce à ce service, nous avons mené des consultations et avons retenu les 17 langues les plus utilisées pour effectuer nos travaux avec les communautés. Malgré cela, certains n'ont pas été desservis.

Il y a un problème. C'est un problème lorsque les citoyens doivent communiquer avec le gouvernement et qu'ils ne parlent pas la langue du gouvernement. La langue du gouvernement, c'est l'anglais. Le gouvernement a investi des ressources dans le service d'interprétation autochtone, notamment, mais, bien entendu, dans les communautés, il y a également des problèmes de communication avec les forces de l'ordre, par exemple, lorsque des citoyens doivent interagir avec les policiers, mais que les policiers ne parlent pas la langue locale. Les autorités policières se sont donc dotées d'agents de liaison qui encouragent les gens de la communauté à travailler avec les policiers.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Merci.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si un député décide de s'exprimer à l'Assemblée dans une langue autochtone et qu'il refuse de s'exprimer en anglais, quelles seraient les conséquences?

M. Michael Tatham:

Il s'agirait d'une inconduite sérieuse. Il reviendrait à l'Assemblée de définir les conséquences.

Bien entendu, la Présidente a déjà donné la parole au député de Nhulunbuy. Le député en question a déjà agi de la sorte. La Présidente ne l'a pas interrompu, mais, une fois qu'il a eu terminé son intervention, elle lui a dit que son intervention était irrecevable. Elle a été conciliante en lui disant que son intervention était irrecevable, parce qu'on ne pouvait pas savoir ce qu'il avait dit et que l'Assemblée ne disposait pas des systèmes nécessaires en place pour savoir ce qu'il avait dit. Je crois que c'est le point qu'il voulait souligner.

En vertu du règlement, il s'agirait d'une question d'inconduite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les députés ou les langues, que ce soit au pays ou dans les différents États, jouissent-ils d'une quelconque protection constitutionnelle?

M. Michael Tatham:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis conscient qu'avant l'arrivée des Européens, aucune de ces langues n'avait été écrite. Le sont-elles maintenant? Les langues utilisées dans le Territoire du Nord sont-elles écrites ou sont-elles uniquement utilisées pour parler?

M. Michael Tatham:

Elles sont écrites. Il est très intéressant de voir comment la langue inuite est écrite en caractères syllabiques, mais, bien entendu, ici, il s'agit uniquement d'une translittération en alphabet européen.

Donc, les langues sont écrites, mais elles comptent beaucoup plus de consonnes que de voyelles. Il est parfois très difficile de bien épeler les mots dans la forme écrite, car il n'existe aucune normalisation de ces langues.

On a tenté d'écrire ces langues. Si je ne m'abuse, il y a quelques années, une bible a été écrite dans l'une des langues autochtones, mais ce sont les linguistes concernés qui ont décidé de la façon d'écrire les mots.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Il serait très difficile pour un député de faire ce que vous avez décrit: prononcer un discours sans en avoir fourni une version écrite en anglais. Il devrait, de son propre chef, fournir une version anglaise de ses propos après avoir écouté ce qu'il a dit. Il ne pourrait pas consulter ses notes, car il n'aurait pas de notes écrites dans sa propre langue.

(1940)

M. Michael Tatham:

Pas nécessairement, vous avez raison. Les discussions avec les Autochtones sont beaucoup plus organiques, ce qui n'est pas le cas lorsqu'ils lisent un texte.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Merci.

Le président:

À votre connaissance, y a-t-il quelque chose de différent sur le sujet dans les législatures nationales ou des États?

M. Michael Tatham:

Non, c'est la même chose partout. Au moment de mener notre sondage il y a un peu plus d'un an, toutes les législatures permettaient aux députés d'intervenir dans une langue autre que l'anglais, avec l'autorisation de l'Assemblée. À notre connaissance, nous sommes la seule législature à disposer d'un article dans le règlement qui établit des règles concernant l'utilisation d'une autre langue. Il reviendra à l'Assemblée de décider s'il s'agit ou non d'une bonne idée, mais les députés qui choisissent de s'exprimer dans une autre langue ne jouissent d'aucune protection constitutionnelle.

Au cours des 10 ou 15 dernières années, les constitutions des États de Victoria et de Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, et peut-être une ou deux autres, ont été modifiées pour reconnaître le fait que les peuples autochtones étaient ici avant nous, mais rien de plus.

La constitution de l'Australie ne reconnaît pas les peuples autochtones d'une façon particulière, autre qu'en soulignant que le parlement australien peut adopter des lois spéciales pour les peuples autochtones. Rien de plus.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup. Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Cette discussion a été très instructive pour moi.

Le président:

Merci d'avoir prolongé votre participation. Nous savons que vous devez nous quitter, alors, merci beaucoup. Vous nous avez fourni des renseignements fascinants.

Je ne peux concevoir une cabine d'interprétation avec 125 interprètes. Vous devez composer avec beaucoup de langues.

Merci.

M. Michael Tatham: D'accord. Merci. Je vous souhaite la meilleure des chances.

Le président:

Au cours de la première heure de notre séance de demain, nous discuterons du rapport sur les langues autochtones. Vous avez reçu une copie de l'ébauche du rapport par courriel cet après-midi, alors, prenez le temps de le consulter. Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous aborderons les travaux du Comité.

Pour la première heure de la séance de mardi, le Comité et le sous-comité — l'invitation est ouverte à quiconque voudrait participer — et un représentant de la DPRH informeront les indépendants sur le rapport confidentiel du sous-comité.

Merci d'être venus. Le temps nous a fait défaut, mais je crois que nous avons eu une discussion très intéressante.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 23, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.