header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-07 INDU 137

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1620)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody.

Before we get to our guests for the day, I want to do a couple of quick housekeeping matters.

Because of the fall economic update, there will be no meeting on the 21st. We had actually scheduled either the 19th or the 21st for supplementaries, so that gives us no choice but to do the supplementaries on the 19th. We've extended an invitation to the minister.

We have our constituency week next week, so on the 19th we'll have the minister. We're still trying to finalize on whether it will be the first hour or second hour; I'm not sure. There will be no meeting on the 21st, and then the 26th will be fun and exciting; we will have Google, YouTube, Facebook and Spotify.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

That will be fun.

The Chair:

That will be an exciting day.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's the 26th?

The Chair:

Yes, the 26th.

Are there any questions on that? No? Good.

Let's focus here. Today we have a briefing with the chief statistician of Canada, Anil Arora; André Loranger, assistant chief statistician, economic statistics; and Linda Howatson-Leo, director, office of privacy management and information coordination.

Normally, I'm pretty easy with the time, but I just want to make sure that you are paying attention, because I will follow the time sharply. I don't want to have to cut people off, but I want to make sure that everybody gets the chance to ask whatever questions they would like to ask.

Having said that, Mr. Arora, you have seven minutes to enthrall us.

Mr. Anil Arora (Chief Statistician of Canada, Statistics Canada):

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Good morning, Mr. Chair, Mr. Deputy Chair and committee members.

Thank you for this opportunity to share with you information on Statistics Canada's pilot project on using financial transaction records to provide timely and quality data on our economy and society.[English]

Before I begin my remarks, I would like to immediately dispel three major inaccuracies of the pilot project to enhance the statistical system using payments data. First, no data has been collected by Statistics Canada as it pertains to this pilot project. I repeat, nothing has been collected. Second, trust is the foundation of how Statistics Canada operates, and we will continue to earn the trust of Canadians. Third, I can assure you that this project will not proceed until we have addressed the privacy concerns of Canadians and the Privacy Commissioner has done his work.

As you may be aware, Statistics Canada, like many national statistical organizations around the world, is undertaking a comprehensive modernization effort. This modernization effort will redefine how we gather and deliver data by using leading-edge methods, by leveraging existing administrative sources, by excelling at our core competencies of data integration, e-collection and big data processing. Continuous evolution and innovation has made the agency a world leader in the field of statistics.

In all of this, of course, I want to underline that Statistics Canada respects the rightful privacy of Canadians and has always devoted itself to doing so. We understand and respect the concerns being expressed by Canadians about accessing their personal information.

The modernization of Statistics Canada began in earnest in the summer of 2017, when the vision for modernizing the organization was publicly announced. This was followed by a budget 2018 announcement of funding in the amount of $51.3 million to support Statistics Canada's modernization.

I want to stress that the issue in front of us today is not simply an academic one. Statistics have far-reaching implications for all Canadians. Diminished quality will have direct impacts on Canadians.

For example, estimates of household spending are used in part to drive the consumer price index. The CPI is in turn used to index pensions and old age security, directly impacting the income of seniors. It is also used to help establish wage rates and labour contracts, employment insurance and policies designed to address things like poverty. Provinces and territories also depend on quality data to apportion HST revenue that funds necessary public sector services such as health care and infrastructure.

The allocation of these funds is in large part determined by the level of household spending on taxable goods in each province and territory. The Bank of Canada uses our statistics to set interest rates and monitor inflation.

The methods by which Statistics Canada traditionally collects data from Canadians are falling short of what Canadians demand of us today. Home phones have been replaced by smart phones, taxis compete with ride-sharing apps and withdrawal and deposit slips that used to be filled out at banks have been replaced with online financial transactions.

The pace at which Canadians are adopting digital services has accelerated rapidly. Today we email money, and we get our food delivered through the use of an app. Eighty per cent of all financial transactions are done electronically, some 21 billion of them in 2016 alone.

As a matter of fact, following the global financial crisis in 2008-09, there has been an increased demand for more timely and detailed data to better understand how income, wealth and consumption are distributed in Canada, which segments are more vulnerable, and how resilient these groups are to changing economic conditions.

The Governor of the Bank of Canada, Stephen Poloz, said recently: We know that cross-border supply chains have complicated the task of gathering accurate data on trade. Digital technologies are making it even easier to fragment production globally. And digital ordering, payments and service delivery are making it easier for transactions to occur that fall below customs reporting thresholds or are missed altogether.

In today's digital world, Canadians can order goods at any time from anywhere, so a simple question such as, “What did you spend on clothing?” becomes very complex to answer.

As household purchases become increasingly complex and the volume of transactions multiplies, the burden on citizens to explain, track and report these activities and transactions via surveys is becoming unsustainable.

Over the last year, we've been actively engaging Canadians about the type of data they need from Statistics Canada. We've consulted Canadians at 176 different sessions over the past year, and they told us there's an overwhelming need and demand for the work Statistics Canada undertakes. In fact, we recently completed a week-long national consultation in every corner of this country, with a full range of stakeholders.

(1625)



Users of Statistics Canada were very clear. Canadians want more data from us, not less. They're seeking data at the city and neighbourhood levels. They expect Statistics Canada to be able to tell them whether single parents, senior citizens and low-income households in their cities have the necessary resources to meet their basic needs for shelter at a time of increasing interest rates. Businesses need better data on consumer spending patterns to grow and serve their customers.

While our traditional methods are becoming more challenging, fortunately the information we require to develop precise income and spending measures exists in administrative records.

In that context, I'd like to move on to the second part of my remarks, to briefly describe the pilot project and outline our discussions with the Canadian Bankers Association and financial institutions over the course of this last year. Let me be clear. This is a pilot. It was still under discussion. It has not been implemented yet and no data has been received by Statistics Canada.

Early in 2018, Statistics Canada initiated a pilot project to determine if the financial information held by financial institutions could be used to help address data quality concerns and data gaps. An important part of this work was to determine if the digital information captured by the payment system had statistical value, and if it could be used to address these emerging data gaps while protecting privacy and confidentiality. [Translation]

Statistics Canada met and corresponded with the Canadian Bankers Association and financial institutions on multiple occasions—12 times since April 2018—to outline a high-level pilot project and determine the conditions under which the required data could be obtained.[English]

Statistics Canada, the CBA and the financial institutions have been committed to a process that would protect the privacy of Canadians right from the onset.

The project is designed to follow rigorous methodological principles and privacy by design elements. Selected households would be assigned an anonymized statistical number developed by Statistics Canada. The bank would then be asked to go through its payment information and extract records from a statistical sample of selected dwellings or addresses.

The current design proposes that the institution create two files. One file contains the anonymized statistical number and the personal information, and a second file would contain the anonymized statistical number and the financial information without the personal information. The current design proposes that these two separate files would be transferred to Statistics Canada.

Statistics Canada would process the two files separately. Once the demographic information, such as type of household or age of the head of the household, is added, the personal information received from the banks would be deleted. We would take the second file containing the financial transaction data and code them to expenditure categories. We would then join the household demographic information with the coded financial transaction data using the anonymized statistical number I talked about.

Let me be clear. It would be impossible to associate the financial records and transactions with a given individual or household from this joined file. We have been clear on the need to be fully transparent with Canadians that information was to be provided to Statistics Canada, and we've explained the reason for doing so. We asked that the banks inform their customers that Statistics Canada was requesting this information in August of this year.

While the notion of data for 500,000 addresses may seem large, there are over 14 million households in Canada. The chance that a given address is selected as part of our sample is one in 28. The chance that the dwelling is used in the actual sample is one in 40. The long-form census by comparison has a one in four sample. We will rotate this sample from year to year so that a history of information for any one household is not possible.

The sophisticated design has been guided by the very helpful input of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner.

To put this in perspective, in 2016, as I said, the Canadian payment system processed over 21 billion transactions. Our pilot project sample proposes to access less than 2% of these transactions, each of which has been anonymized and stripped of any personal identifiers.

My third and final point is around the current status of the pilot, and next steps.

Mr. Chair, as I said at the outset, Statistics Canada takes the privacy of Canadians very seriously. We have a strong record and reputation on privacy and we understand the concerns of Canadians. Statistics Canada has worked hard to build the trust of Canadians for 100 years, as they provide us with some of their most personal information.

(1630)

[Translation]

We have heard the concerns of the Canadian Bankers Association and the banks and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner as well as parliamentarians, Canadians and Quebeckers.[English]

The result of the investigation of the complaints received by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner will further guide the design of this project. We continue to engage with the CBA and financial institutions, and their advice will further help strengthen the privacy protections of this project.

I can assure you that we will not proceed with this project until we have addressed the privacy concerns expressed by Canadians.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going right into questions with Mrs. Caesar-Chavannes.

You have seven minutes, please.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Canadians, many in my riding of Whitby, are concerned about their personal data and want to ensure that it's secure and protected. Canadians have also trusted Statistics Canada for years to use their data to improve lives. I thank you for your service.

I have many questions. They are not meant to be offensive or to offend. Many come from my constituents. I hope you can keep your answers as brief as possible.

Can you tell me if I got my coffee this morning from Tim Hortons or Starbucks?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No, I can't.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Do you want to monitor Canadians' every move?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Is this data project a surveillance scheme in disguise?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Are you a spy?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Could the government spy on Canadians using Statistics Canada data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Could the Liberal government spy on Canadians using Statistics Canada data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with the government?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with the Liberal government?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with a member of the opposition?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with any politician?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with the courts?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with the RCMP?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with the Canada Revenue Agency?

(1635)

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can Statistics Canada be compelled to share identifiable personal information with CSIS?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

How many data files have been hacked from Statistics Canada databases?

Mr. Anil Arora:

None.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

When has Statistics Canada lost data in transfer?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Never.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Why is Statistics Canada requesting household spending and income data from our financial institutions?

Mr. Anil Arora:

I can identify four reasons.

One is the declining response rates from our major source of survey, the Canadian household spending survey. It's sitting at about 40% today. It just isn't giving us the timely and detailed data that we need. We are seeing gaps because of the consumption of digital services in Canada. That is a real gap for us. Our modernization agenda is all about experimentation and piloting, of which this is one example, where we're looking for new ways to fill those gaps. We've demonstrated that when we do use administrative data, as we've done with our housing gap that we've had, we can actually provide good-quality and timely data to Canadians.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

How long have you been using administrative data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

The use of administrative data in Statistics Canada goes back to 1921, when we first started using vital statistics. Then it was supplemented in 1938 with trade data and so on.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

You've been using surveys for quite some time. Why are you switching over to this type of data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

As I said, with our traditional surveys we're seeing declining response rates. Canadians are busy. Canadians in many cases are not even reachable. They don't have land lines. There are various reasons why we're seeing the kinds of declining response rates. We have to go to administrative sources. Again, using administrative sources is not anything new to Statistics Canada.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

How will Canadians benefit from this initiative?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Canadians will have better quality data. They'll have it for the areas that they're interested in. Canadians don't want to just know what's going on at the national level or the provincial level or even at the municipal level; they want to know what's going on at the neighbourhood level. Obviously, this is all with the protection of privacy and confidentiality that they deserve as well.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Will the data collected be given to the government in any form?

Mr. Anil Arora:

It will only be in aggregate form, where no individual transaction or data can ever be identified.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Will the data collected be given to the opposition in any form?

Mr. Anil Arora:

It will only be in the aggregate form, where no one's information can be identified.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Has Statistics Canada been asked to spy on Canadians?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Who asked Statistics Canada to do this project?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Well, as I said, using innovative ways, new ways, to get at data is nothing new to Statistics Canada. We're a world leader when it comes to this. When we hear from Canadians that our data are falling short of their needs, we look for new ways to get at that information—again, without ever compromising the privacy and confidentiality of Canadians.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Is it correct to say that this was internally driven from Statistics Canada?

Mr. Anil Arora:

That is correct.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Did the Government of Canada ask Statistics Canada to start this project?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No, not any specific project, per se; I think the Government of Canada said that they have a desire to increase the quality and the timeliness of data, and I think there's been support, as I just mentioned, for the modernization of Statistics Canada.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can this data that has been collected be used by the government in any way to spy on Canadians?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can the Liberal government use this data in any way to spy on Canadians?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can the opposition members use this data in any way to spy on Canadians?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can the government use the data collected in any way to see what specifically Canadians are doing with their money?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can the Liberal government use the data collected in any way to see what Canadians are doing with their money?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can the opposition use the data collected in any way to see what Canadians are doing with their money?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can any member of the government access Statistics Canada data that has been collected?

Mr. Anil Arora:

They can't in individual form, only in aggregate form, which has been completely scrubbed.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

What do you mean when you say “aggregate” form?

Mr. Anil Arora:

It's rolled up into statistics, i.e., a trend in a particular neighbourhood or for a particular segment of the population. It's never about an individual, either a firm or an individual Canadian.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can any politician access Statistics Canada data?

(1640)

Mr. Anil Arora:

Only in aggregate form, never as an individual record.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can any member of the opposition access Statistics Canada data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Only in aggregate form, never as an individual record.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Is there any pressure from any politician to access the collected data from Statistics Canada?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Is there—

The Chair:

I will have to cut you off there.

Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Chief Statistician, for coming in today and for the work you and your organization do for Canadians.

I'd like to start with clarifying a few things.

First of all, many people were under the assumption that it was 500,000 individuals. In your remarks today, you said “households”. Are those 500,000 households or individuals?

Mr. Anil Arora:

It's 500,000 dwellings. Our unit of measure there is a particular dwelling. From there we create census families, economic families and other prototypes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

What is the average per household?

Mr. Anil Arora:

The average household size in Canada is just under three, I think.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Are we looking at approximately 1.5 million people who will be picked up by this sample?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Well, it's a little bit more complicated than that. What we're trying to do is to collect information at a neighbourhood level. We know that in some neighbourhoods you'll have smaller household sizes. There could be an apartment building, for example, or a student residence or whatever it is. Others would be more single-family dwellings.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Obviously, Canadians' health records as well as their financial records are quite important to them. Suddenly having a change in scheme has raised, I think, a lot of concern.

When you are collecting this information, will it include children?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Our intent is not to include children.

Mr. Dan Albas:

How do you safeguard that if someone has a bank account and lives in that household—

Mr. Anil Arora:

That's why we do need some level of personal information, so that we can detect what are outliers and what are in scope.

Mr. Dan Albas:

What if someone has a joint bank account for a relative—let's say an elderly mother or father who's on their own—that their name is on also and they live separate in a different household? Will that then be caught up by your survey of that particular household?

Mr. Anil Arora:

If we're talking about a multi-generational occupied dwelling, for example, then that would form—

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'm not speaking about that, sir. I'm speaking about specifically other people. Some people will have joint accounts because they have control over those accounts for an elderly parent or grandparent. Will that elderly parent or grandparent be caught up because their social insurance number is tied to that bank account?

Mr. Anil Arora:

This is still in a design phase. It's a pilot project.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Would you say yes or no?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Once the data comes to us, those are the kinds of things that we will look at.

There are definitions about the conditions under which a census family is formed, an economic family is formed. Those are the kinds of things that we will determine.

We're not interested in an individual's transaction. We're interested in the household consumption pattern.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Let's go back to the pilot project.

Originally, the letter you wrote to the Canadian Bankers Association did not mention anything about a pilot project.

Also, I'd like you to confirm, sir, that TransUnion, a credit bureau, has given Statistics Canada personal information on 27 million or so Canadians, when it comes to their credit file, dating back 15 years. Is that the case? Does the pilot project you're discussing today include that?

You've said that this pilot project has not gone forward. I'd like you to explain the reason.

Mr. Anil Arora:

First, we've been very clear both in writing and verbally with the CBA that this is a pilot project. It remains a pilot project in its design phase.

In terms of your question about our work with TransUnion, we worked with them over the course of a year. We worked in collaboration with them to explain exactly why we needed that data and how we needed that data. Something they have been very clear about with their clients as well—

Mr. Dan Albas:

No, sir, I don't think that's the case.

Mr. Anil Arora:

—is that this is data. You can look at an individual—

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'd like just to move on here.

The problem I have here is that the pilot project you're talking about with the banks is not possible without having the credit bureau information. The two are intrinsically linked.

Let's say you pick a particular neighbourhood randomized in Canada. You pick a household and you then use the credit bureau data to go to all of the banks, and I imagine this would also be for institutions such as credit card companies. Then you could say, “We've identified this person's social insurance number. We know they have an account with you. We would like you to supply us with all of that information.”

We're not talking about just bank accounts, sir. We're talking about credit card-specific information. Is that correct?

(1645)

Mr. Anil Arora:

Let me provide some clarification.

First of all, this pilot project with the financial institutions is about expenditure data, individual financial transactions that we're getting, as I said, from a one in 40 sample.

The transactions we get from TransUnion, for example, are looking at the credit. We're using that data to look at housing statistics and the degree to which people are over-leveraged.

That is a complete—

Mr. Dan Albas:

How are you going to be able to get credit card information then?

For example, some people will have a chequing account at a bank but then they'll use a credit card for much of their activity. You need to have access to both sets of information to do exactly what you're talking about.

How do you do that then, if you're not using the credit bureau information? The bank that you ask that information for will not know about that credit card.

Mr. Anil Arora:

We're not interested in matching those two, first of all.

This is about household expenditure patterns. This project is about looking at what a typical household spends, and what they spend that money on.

The reason that's important, sir, is that we use that expenditure pattern, by a demographic profile, and their pattern then fits as the weight for our CPI project. It tells you that, in this particular situation, a typical household spends so much on these types of services.

Every month we go out and get prices to feed into our consumer price index and then we benchmark and weight up that one commodity against how much a typical household spends on clothing, food, mortgage or digital services. That's what this project is about.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Again, if you were only able to—

The Chair:

Thank you.

The time is up. You'll have time. We'll come back to you.[Translation]

Mr. Boulerice, you have the floor.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank the witnesses for being here today.

To start, I want to tell you that the work you do is extremely important for the development of effective public policies that reflect the Canadian and Quebec reality. We strongly believe that accurate data allows us to make the best possible decisions. Otherwise, we're sort of in the dark, and it's extremely fuzzy. That's why, at the time, we so strongly defended the long-form census, a tool that we feel is absolutely essential.

Having said that, you have sparked a whole shock wave. Many people are concerned that a public institution may have direct access to their personal information through a bank or credit card company. It makes people very nervous.

I first want to talk about citizen consultation and transparency. In your presentation, you said that you held information sessions and spoke to people. I don't know who you spoke to, but I don't think it was with a lot of people, because the media, journalists and people in our ridings are worried. They learned about this pilot project in the newspapers and are a little shocked.

What consultation process did you follow to inform people of the upcoming launch of this pilot project?

Mr. Anil Arora:

First, I understand the concerns of Canadians about this pilot project. As I said earlier, this project hasn't yet begun; it is still at the design stage. We are still working with stakeholders to determine how best to communicate with their clients. Again, the intention is to be transparent. We want to tell Canadians that this is what it takes to have high quality data. We have done this several times before in other cases, and that is exactly what we'll do for this pilot project.

(1650)

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

The Privacy Commissioner has already mentioned that he will launch an investigation into your pilot project.

If the commissioner ever concludes that this doesn't meet the standards for protecting the privacy of citizens, what will you do?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We'll see. Let's let Mr. Therrien do his job first.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Are you willing to commit to following his recommendations?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Of course. We'll take his recommendations into account.

I also asked Mr. Therrien to give us other recommendations, if he has any. We worked with him during the design period of this pilot project and took his recommendations into account. He has received complaints, and he will do his job. If he still has recommendations to make, we will, of course, take them into account in our pilot project.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

You said that, since the communication methods aren't the same anymore, there are no longer many fixed telephones in the home and that people communicate more on social media. So they are more difficult to reach.[English]You used the expression that traditional surveys are unsustainable.[Translation]

You aren't the only organization facing this challenge, but it seems that the solution you've found is quite intrusive as to people's lives and their personal and banking information. No polling firm would dare do anything like that. Personally, I'm not convinced you've found “the” solution.

In recent years, has Statistics Canada been giving mandates to subcontractors or third parties to collect information, on which Statistics Canada relies to feed its database and establish its statistics? Was the pilot project designed in-house or did you outsource some activities?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We designed it ourselves, and the data remains in our buildings and systems. Of course, everyone buys software, and we do too, but we never pass on the data we collect from citizens to anyone.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Do you use the services of a third party to collect data on your behalf?

Mr. Anil Arora:

No.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Do you use Shared Services Canada?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Shared Services Canada provides services to everyone. We have given them the mandate to maintain our systems, but we control our data and how employees access it.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Do you think the level of security and privacy protection at Shared Services Canada equal that of Statistics Canada?

Mr. Anil Arora:

As I said, we control our servers and our data. They don't have access to our data.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Boulerice, you have 40 seconds left.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

I'll give them to you.

The Chair:

Great.[English]

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan.

You have exactly seven minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank the chief statistician and staff for appearing before this committee.

We had unanimous consent to ask you to come here to answer some questions. We appreciate your appearing on short notice.

My question is around your engagement to date with the financial institutions. Could you please delve into that a bit more for us?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We started working with the Canadian Bankers Association early this year, around January or February. As I said in my opening remarks, we've had about a dozen interactions with them, either in person or on the phone. We've shared with them why we need it. We've also shared with them the design of the project as we've had input from the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. They've asked about the authorities. They've asked about the privacy concerns and so on. We've certainly tried to answer all their questions, and we continue, as I said, to work with them on the design of this project.

The design I just laid out, the separating of the files and bringing them in, etc., is something that's very clearly shared with them. As I said, we met with them and their members in person in June and August and laid out where we are. Based on the last meeting we had with them, their advice was that this is now the time to move from understanding the purpose and the design to now going deeper with each of the institutions. It's now time to get at what the unique system needs and what the unique file formats are, and so on. They provided us with the contacts of the relevant people in the individual institutions, and they asked us to spell out very clearly the authorities under which we would operate.

Like any other provider of information, we work with them. We make sure we understand their concerns and their clients' concerns, and we make sure these are addressed so there isn't a negative impact on their clients. That's just the way we operate, and it's no different from how we operate with all our providers.

As those financial institutions work with us to tell us about their specific needs and the concerns of their clients, maybe there will be some design elements that we will have to include that are unique to their systems, but we will never, never, never compromise the privacy or the confidentiality of the individual transactions we'll get access to.

(1655)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

In your engagement with these financial institutions was there any discussion of informing their clients about your pilot project?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Yes, absolutely. In August, we made it very clear to them. We asked them to ensure that as we roll out this project, informing their clients will be an important element. We asked them to let their clients know that Statistics Canada may—because we're talking about a sample of one in 40 clients—look at their data. We let them know that yes, this is a legitimate purpose, and we told them what it will be used for and how it's to be communicated to their clients.

They have their own systems. They have their own consent, etc., that they do. That's the kind of work we still have to do, and we were fully intending on elaborating a public communications and a rollout plan. That's where we are today.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much.

I'm going to share some time with Majid as well.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, sir, for coming here and sharing your insight into the pilot project. Let me ask a couple of questions.

Can you tell me the benefit that you are trying to get from this pilot project? I'd like you to expand on that one and really get into what the scope of the pilot project is. I understand the stakeholders and I understand some of the demographics, but what were you trying to achieve by initiating this pilot project? What is the benefit you are going to give us?

Mr. Anil Arora:

There are numerous benefits.

First of all, as I said, the quality of the data that's coming from our traditional methods is not meeting the needs of—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Can you give us an example?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Let me talk about seniors, for example. Let me, then, talk about a business person who wants to expand their business or even just somebody who's between two jobs—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Seniors' pension would be an excellent example.

Mr. Anil Arora:

The amount that a person receives as part of their old age benefit, their pension, etc., and whether it's enough, in a sense, to keep them sustained is dependent upon the rate of inflation. It's indexed in a sense. It's then benchmarked to how much prices are either going up or not in certain categories.

The amount that individual will receive on an ongoing basis is determined by the work that we do. The better we are at benchmarking the types of services and the consumption Canadians have, the better the data are for that to be benchmarked.

It's similar, as I said, for a business. A business person who wants to expand their business wants to know the ability of that in that particular neighbourhood and what the consumption pattern is. What are they consuming? They can then decide whether it makes sense for them to expand or not or maybe go to another area to expand.

You have people who are holding multiple jobs these days. How are they procuring services? They could be participating in the gig economy. They may be an Uber driver and may be renting out their place under Airbnb, and to be able to understand what a social safety net is and what the vulnerabilities are.... These are the kinds of questions policy-makers ask of us.

(1700)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Talking about vulnerabilities, I'm definitely impacted as a member of Parliament and as an individual by the increase in the interest rate.

How will your analysis be able to help me, as a consumer, be able to deal with a situation that may arise as a result of the interest rate?

The Chair:

You have about 15 seconds to answer that question.

Mr. Anil Arora:

You'll have better data at a local level to understand the implications of, let's say, rising interest rates.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you.

I appreciate the testimony today.

As we in this room all know, this issue's been quite a political firestorm over the past few weeks, and I just wanted to know, did you or your office coordinate in advance of this meeting today with any members of Parliament, ministers or ministerial staffers regarding your appearance at committee today?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We, of course, have kept our minister's office in the loop on the fact that we're coming to this committee, but these remarks are my own.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I appreciate that.

Next, some of my constituents have raised this issue: Does Statistics Canada provide aggregate data to private for-profit companies?

Mr. Anil Arora:

First of all, most of everything that we produce in terms of aggregate statistics is done so that people can use good data rather than the alternative, and we put it on our website.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Are there instances where data has been sold to companies?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We do, from time to time, get a request from a company, for example, that says, “Your standard table puts it this way, by this way, by this way. Really what we want to do is to have a different rendition, or we want it for a different geography, because my geography is different from your geography.”

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

But do these companies pay Statistics Canada for that data and you configure it in the way that they ask you to configure it?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Our starting point is that we recover the cost of being able to customize that request to their needs using the aggregate data that we have. We feel the taxpayers should not be subsidizing the cost of a unique request or an individual's request, so it's a cost recovery.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. I understand.

I am part of the millennial generation, and when I use Facebook or Google or any of these platforms, there are always these long terms of agreement. There are various instances where they ask me for my consent when they want to know where my location is. I have the option to consent to that or not.

Why is Statistics Canada in this pilot project not giving Canadians the same option to consent?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We know that people who consent look different from those who don't consent. When you get local areas for which you need good-quality data, or if you want to now know about a target population—how seniors are impacted or how single parents are impacted by certain things—the cross product, if you like, of that low level of geography and a particular targeted subpopulation requires a higher level of quality of data.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Participation you're saying.

Mr. Anil Arora:

It's no different from the census long-form debate this country had. As I said, we know the profile of those who consent is different from the ones who don't consent. Our ability to essentially account for those who don't consent doesn't allow itself to be substituted or weighted up, if you like, to those who do, because those who consent don't look like the ones who don't.

We know the youth don't participate. We know in many cases single parents are too busy and they can't participate. So we miss data in many cases for the very audiences that policy-makers are trying to get a better handle on.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

With that, though, you believe Canadians should not be allowed to refuse consent for Statistics Canada information.

Mr. Anil Arora:

Look, as I said before, we understand the concerns of Canadians. We get it. We deal with sensitive data all the time.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

But if a Canadian writes to you and says they explicitly do not want Statistics Canada to have this information, would you respect their request?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We have, give or take, 400 programs in Statistics Canada. Many of them are mandatory and many of them are voluntary. The difference simply is, as I explained earlier, what the level of precision is, what the level of accuracy is, what the level of geography is to which this information is needed.

(1705)



In some cases it's good enough to have it at a Canada level or a provincial level. In some cases, for information that really matters, for issues that are important to Canadians, we have to have high-quality data.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Some jurisdictions in the U.K., though, have introduced nudge models where you are automatically considered to have consented unless you explicitly say that you do not consent.

Why has that not been considered as a model for Statistics Canada?

Mr. Anil Arora:

First of all, what Statistics Canada is doing is consistent with what most modern statistical agencies in the world do. They have carve-outs from privacy acts, PIPEDA, etc., for statistical purposes, and it's only for statistical purposes that we can in fact go and get at representative data, even in some cases without consent.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Longfield.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Arora. This is a great conversation.

I used to use the CANSIM reports when I was in business. The Canadian paper industry was going through transition. I reported to a board of directors in Europe that asked where the emerging markets were that would substitute for the business we were doing in the paper industry. We looked at wind turbines and steel mills. We got some of those customized reports, and paid what it cost for those. In terms of our business it was very important to have good data.

Europe seemed to always be one step ahead of us on data, and I had to report to Europe. As a Canadian business director, it made it difficult for me.

Now I look at the labour force surveys. I wait for the Friday that they come out because in my riding we have 3.6% unemployment. There's a lot of stress on business to find workers. We need data for the business community in my riding.

The not-for-profits that are working on poverty elimination are looking for data. They were more concerned than I was when the long-form census was cancelled.

When we went from the long-form census being mandatory to voluntary, what was the impact on data? The people in the not-for-profit sector said, “Now we're drifting. We don't know where we're at.”

Could you let us know what happened there?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Sure. I've done a few censuses in my life.

When we went back and looked at the results in 2006, 2016, and the 2011 national household survey results, we can see as I was saying earlier, the impact of people who respond and who don't. We know for approximately 1,126 communities out of 5,000 communities, the data for that level of detail was just not good enough for the kinds of needs that Canadians have.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right. Communities, because of their size, became invisible, and some of our most vulnerable communities didn't get serviced. Is that what you were saying?

Mr. Anil Arora:

In many cases we had to take it up to the next level of geography because we weren't confident with the level of information at that smaller level. As I said, we do know that the prevailing traits, if you like, of the population start to get amplified when you don't have enough detail.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right. I'm thinking that in terms of expenditures, when you're in northern or remote communities, you're going to have a different mix of expenditures that would cause us to look at different types of social programs in order to support them. Really, that's what we're trying to get to.

Mr. Anil Arora:

Clearly somebody living in Whitehorse or Resolute Bay has a very different cost and profile for their clothing, food and shelter than somebody living in downtown Toronto or Vancouver.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I was working on another project with our downtown. Guelph is on the list of designated places to grow. We're looking at getting 8,000 people into the downtown. We're looking at creating 4,000 jobs in the downtown.

The downtown businesses in Guelph are saying they wish they knew the neighbourhoods around the downtown. Are they professional people? Are they people who could shop in the downtown? What kind of shops would we want to attract into the downtown?

Are those standard reports, or is that where you're trying to head with this pilot project, to be able to give, let's say, business improvement areas information on the neighbourhoods around them so that we can have the right types of retail opportunities?

Mr. Anil Arora:

I think you're pointing out exactly the kinds of questions that are being asked of us by Canadians, associations, businesses, social support groups and so on. They're saying, “Just giving me the data for Vancouver isn't good enough. What do I do with that? I know that Surrey looks very different from Richmond and downtown Vancouver. Those data don't help me expand my markets or even understand whether people will actually be able to consume the product if I do put something in place."

You see the changes in demographics, immigration and so on. Knowing the tastes and habits of people in that area, how they are changing over time, and how different subgroups in that area consume products and services differently than others is what this project is designed to do—

(1710)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Again, there is a wall. We can't know what address has what.... When I was in business, I would have loved to know which paper mill was no longer going to be buying my product.

Mr. Anil Arora:

Not from Statistics Canada you won't.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I couldn't get to the paper mill. I couldn't get to the level of detail. I could only get aggregated detail. In terms of policy, that's what we're looking for.

Mr. Anil Arora:

Yes. Again, when I say we take the privacy of Canadians very seriously, it's not just a “trust me”. There are actually processes and procedures in place.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move back to Mr. Albas, for five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you again, Mr. Chair.

I want to get back to your opening statement. You said the chance a given address is selected as part of our sample is one in 28. The chance that the dwelling is used in the actual sample is 1 in 40.

To me that seems to say that you're actually oversampling. Is that the case? Do you really need 500,000 households?

Mr. Anil Arora:

One, we don't want the banks to even know which dwellings are going to be in the sample.

Mr. Dan Albas:

By what ratio are you going to be oversampling? How many Canadians do you actually need for this project to go forward, and why are you using 500,000?

Mr. Anil Arora:

What we need in order to make sure that we have enough information for our census areas, essentially at the neighbourhood level, is about 350,000 dwellings. However, in the design of the project, even the providers of that data don't know which dwellings are going to be used in the sample.

Mr. Dan Albas:

You're going to be asking for confidential information that people back home are upset about, sir. You only need 350,000 households, and you're going to be sampling 500,000. I appreciate your answering the question, but I'm disappointed to hear that.

When it comes to the actual retention of your data, you talked about having the two different areas, and how they're separate. Will Statistics Canada maintain a master key that can reidentify the information?

Mr. Anil Arora:

We will keep, as I said, the two files, as you explained. The identifiable information with the StatsCan number comes in. The actual financial transactions come in. Once we have associated a transaction, the expenditures that my family and I have—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Will you be able to re-engineer it using a master key to reunite those files if you so choose, yes or no?

Mr. Anil Arora:

If there is a policy need for us to be able to do that, we have a very controlled process in place. It is only—

Mr. Dan Albas:

It sounds like the answer is yes.

Will Statistics Canada maintain a technical capability to access the data with personal identifiers after anonymizing the data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Sorry, could you repeat that?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Will you maintain the technical capability to access data with personal identifiers after anonymizing the data?

If you have a master key, will you have the ability to have those files back together at some point in the future?

Mr. Anil Arora:

One, there are no fishing expeditions here. When we have a specific policy need, a case has to be made to be able to link that to another source. That case has to be looked at and agreed to that whatever other source is with that key is joined together and only the anonymized microdata is given to the area that—

Mr. Dan Albas:

I understand the separation, but why would you not remove the records that have personal identifiers after anonymizing the data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Well—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Why not delete it?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Essentially, there are retention periods for files such as this. This is still a pilot project. We are trying to assess exactly what the short-term and long-term needs are for these data.

Again, to your point earlier about 500,000 dwellings, as I said, that is out of a universe of 14 million households that we have in Canada—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Mr. Anil Arora:

—and a fresh sample is selected every year so that we cannot create a file that keeps that transaction for even the selected households.

Mr. Dan Albas:

To do this game, you're going to have to require the use of the banks. Obviously, the banks don't have the infrastructure to make that information available.

You've also talked about real time and frequency, higher frequency use of the information. Are you going to be seeking to port the information through an API directly to Statistics Canada from the banks themselves? Will this be required of other institutions? Will it also be put upon credit unions, ATB in Alberta, trust companies that do deposit-taking activities?

(1715)

Mr. Anil Arora:

At the moment, the project is restricted to nine institutions. We have secure transfer protocols that meet all the Government of Canada standards for secure transfer, and that is how we're bringing the data into Statistics Canada.

As you can imagine, we have millions of transactions with Canadians where they're providing us with their really confidential and sensitive data. We use the same protocols that we get to bring that data into Statistics Canada, and we have processes within Statistics Canada that we've built over 100 years with input from the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, as well.

Mr. Dan Albas:

You didn't build the infrastructure for this real time. Again, when someone fills out their census, sir, they know exactly what they're doing. In this case, you're not even advising them that this information may be taken. What if someone moves from one area to another—

The Chair:

I hate to—

Mr. Dan Albas:

—and then ends up being sampled a second time?

The Chair:

Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas:

This is an intrusion in someone's—

The Chair:

Mr. Albas, I hate to tell you, but you're out of time.

Mr. Dan Albas:

—personal...and I believe government should not have that power.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. David Graham.

You have five minutes

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

To Mr. Albas' question, would households in any way be informed that their data could be collected?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Yes, that's what we expect the institutions to tell their clients. We made that very clear to them in August. We asked them to say it was part of their process. We want to operate in a transparent way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So it's not done in some magical background way. I appreciate that.

Would it be accurate to say that the 500,000 households collected for 350,000 samples used is to ensure that the data is properly blinded?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Sorry, I didn't hear the first part of your question. Maybe the microphone is just a little farther away.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Or it's just me. That also happens.

Would it be accurate to say that the 500,000 households collected for only 350,000 used is to ensure that the data is properly blinded?

Mr. Anil Arora:

That is simply to make sure that even the institutions that are providing us with that information don't know which records were actually used. It's noise, if you like, to further protect the privacy and confidentiality of—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that a standard methodology?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Many times we use that methodology to mask, if you like, from the person providing that information, not knowing and being able to replicate that kind of analysis.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand.

To Mr. Lloyd's question, what's the legal basis of your ability to compel data without consent?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Section 13 of the Statistics Act is the actual provision. That makes it very clear that, for statistical purposes only, we have the right to go to seek administrative—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How long has that been on the books?

Mr. Anil Arora:

That's been there since the inception of the Statistics Act—at least since 1971, if not even earlier than that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do statistical agencies in European countries have the power to compel data, in spite of the GDPR?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Yes they do. In fact, the GDPR has a carve-out in various sections, for statistical purposes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Lloyd asked this earlier. If someone sent you a letter saying they didn't want their data being used, would you even be able to identify the data as theirs to take it out?

Mr. Anil Arora:

It would take a lot of gymnastics to find out whether their individual record or the household would be.... As I said, once the linkages are made, those linkages are put away in a vault, and we're dealing with the individual record in an anonymized fashion after that point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do the banks already have the information that you're requesting from them?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Yes, they're the source of this information.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can the banks use that information in any way and for any purpose other than to simply process the transactions?

Mr. Anil Arora:

I couldn't speak to what the banks can or can't do. I don't know what their policies, procedures and processes are.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

You know that the businesses need the improved data that come out of this research. Could the banks themselves benefit from this aggregated data?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Sure. The banks use this to expand their client base as well, and they obviously are impacted by inflation, CPI, interest rates and consumption patterns of households.

Even the formula on which a mortgage gets approved or denied is based on household leveraging and income and so on. Yes, the banks very much use this data. I think they will also benefit from the strengthened lower level of geography and more timely data.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are some banks—

Mr. Anil Arora:

Again, at the aggregate level—they would never be able to get at who said what.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In your opinion, are some banks concerned that other banks might be able to benefit from their data being in the pool?

(1720)

Mr. Anil Arora:

I don't see how. I'm sorry. Do you mean—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If a big bank sends in data, a small bank or credit union then might say, “Wow, look at this great data that we got from Statistics Canada from banks.” Is that providing a competitive advantage to smaller banks and is that why the bigger banks are worried?

Mr. Anil Arora:

The data we get from them would never be shared other than at the aggregate level.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, but what about the results of the data^

Mr. Anil Arora:

The results would be available for everybody, all Canadians. That's why we collect it. We don't collect it for us. We collect it to share it with all Canadians.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned—

Mr. Anil Arora:

Again, in aggregate form....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right.

You talked about the declining response rates of the old system. Can you explain how the old system actually worked?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Sure.

This is one example. As I said, there are a number of changes that are happening in today's society that require us to move in this direction. Previously, one of the surveys was the survey of household spending. We used to go out to 20,000 households. We used to actually give them a diary to keep track, and we still have.... We've suspended that project right now. Individuals had to actually take their salary and log every single expenditure, with the receipts, and be able to take their salary and calculate it to about a 2% to 3% variance. In many cases, we found that they didn't know, or they didn't have the receipts, or they weren't completing it.

It's a growing problem that we've had. Now, 60% of those we go to either refuse or don't give us access to them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have five seconds left. Do I have time for a very quick question?

The Chair:

You have no seconds left. Thank you very much.

We're going to move to the final two minutes.[Translation]

Mr. Boulerice, you have the last two minutes.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Thank you.

Mr. Arora, you said earlier that you intend to communicate with Canadians about this pilot project, ask them what they think about it and inform them. This seems to be wishful thinking. I didn't hear much detail on how you were going to proceed. Can you tell us more about that?

Mr. Anil Arora:

As I said earlier, we are still developing the pilot project. We want to work with the institutions and the commissioner to develop the communications plan. Of course, the institutions themselves will communicate with their clients, and we will inform Canadians. We have published several documents on our website. We will also hold several information sessions during which we will answer Canadians' questions, explain why this process is necessary and how we will protect their privacy and confidentiality.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

How many information sessions will there be: three, 30, 50? Can you tell us?

Mr. Anil Arora:

Given the concerns expressed by Canadians, we will, of course, increase the number of information sessions and the amount of information to be provided to them based on their needs.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Okay.

In addition, we live in a digital world that offers many opportunities for malicious people—I'm talking about hackers—to break into systems, appropriate information and use it for various purposes. Just recently, we have seen this with Facebook. This company is still able to hire staff who should normally be able to protect people's pages, their personal or confidential information, and so on.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but your time is up.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Already?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

That's too bad, especially since it was a good question. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I do recognize that we've had a lot of discussion here, and the chief statistician should be commended for coming. That being said, even he in his testimony today has pointed out that there are various aspects of this so-called pilot project.

The Chair:

Is this a point of order that you're making?

Mr. Dan Albas:

No, it's just that since we're on the business of discussing this particular topic, I'd like to move the following motion: That further to the appearance of the Chief Statistician, that the Committee on Industry, Science and Technology invite the Privacy Commissioner, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, TransUnion, the Canadian Banker’s Association, Ann Cavoukian and the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.

This is so we can have further discussions on this important topic, sir.

The Chair:

Actually, that was a motion we dealt with in committee on Monday, so it's not something we can do.

(1725)

Mr. Dan Albas:

No, Mr. Chair, I would simply point out that, first of all, it's a motion relating to this, and it's an invitation, not a study. Also, we have TransUnion included in this, and that was not in the original motion you're referring to.

If you won't find it in order I'd like to know, because then I would like to make it as a formal notice of motion.

The Chair:

Again, the substantive motion was dealt with in committee, so I will rule against that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, I'd like to put a notice of motion, Mr. Chair, “That, further to the appearance of the chief statistician, the committee on industry, science and technology invite the Privacy Commissioner, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, TransUnion, the Canadian Bankers Association, Ann Cavoukian and the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.”

I would hope that would be translated and that we would have an opportunity to discuss the motion.

Again, I'm not asking for a report. I'm asking for an invitation. I would hope that members would say that more discussion is necessary. Mr. Longfield said the other day specifically that we can't discuss this further until we've heard from the chief statistician.

The Chair:

You've submitted your notice of motion. The clerk will have that translated.

Unfortunately, today we really don't have time to do anything because there is a second committee that's taking over here. That's what I needed to confirm. It's HUMA. It's all about accessibility and there's a certain set-up that's required here, and they need half an hour to do that. We actually just verified with the clerk that they need half an hour.

Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Mr. Chair, I just want to support my colleague. Obviously he can't re-present the exact same motion, but if the motion is different, I hope you will rule it in order. I think it's really important that we do hear from additional witnesses on this matter.

When we first established the census in Canada hundreds of years ago, it was entirely for the use of government itself, to raise armies or to collect taxes. With the development of the modern economy the data that StatsCan is collecting, the census data, is used by private sector corporations. Canadians are increasingly concerned about the development of large data being used by companies like Facebook, Google and the banks.

The issue, I think, in front of us as a committee is whether or not it's appropriate for the federal government to use the coercive power of the state to force, compel banks to hand over very personal and granular financial information—

The Chair:

You're actually getting into debate. We're not going to get into a debate right now.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Okay. I hope you rule it in order.

The Chair:

We've accepted the notice of motion that you've put forward to the clerk. It will be translated, and we'll go from there.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Again, Mr. Chair, could I just have clarity on this as to exactly why you ruled the previous one out of order? It was based on the conversation at the business of the committee here today. It was substantially different, in that we were not talking about a study but about invitations, just the same as the Liberal members did last time.

I can't see why you would rule this out of order. I'd like an explanation.

The Chair:

I haven't ruled your notice of motion out of order.

Mr. Dan Albas:

No, but the previous motion.

The Chair:

I ruled the first one out of order because we actually dealt with the substantive motion in committee business. I can't really have that conversation out of committee business because it's in committee business.

You've put forward a new notice of motion. We'll deal with that as it comes.

As it stands right now, I just want to point out that no motions were passed to get the statistician here. It was an ask for unanimous consent to bring the statistician in and have a conversation with him. That was the ask. It wasn't a motion regarding a study, regarding anything. It was very specific: Do we have unanimous consent to have the chief statistician come in? It was unanimous. Everybody agreed with it, and that's why the gentleman is here today. That's the business we are doing today.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes. Again, that's why I suggested we do something similar. We were just doing the business here, Mr. Chair. It is clearly tied to the business of the committee today, so I can't see why it wouldn't be in order.

That being said, we will prepare ourselves for future meetings where we will be taking a much different approach until we have this issue looked at, and I do hope that colleagues consider that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

No problem.

On that note, I'd like to thank our guests for coming in today. It was very enlightening, and we look forward to the next time we meet.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1620)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous.

Avant d'accueillir nos témoins d'aujourd'hui, j'aimerais régler quelques petites questions d'ordre administratif.

En raison de la mise à jour économique de l'automne, il n'y aura pas de réunion le 21. Nous avions prévu examiner le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses le 19 ou le 21, donc nous n'aurons d'autre choix que de l'examiner le 19. Nous vous avons fait parvenir une invitation au ministre.

Nous passerons la semaine dans nos circonscriptions la semaine prochaine, donc nous recevrons le ministre le 19. Nous sommes toujours en train de voir s'il comparaîtra pendant la première ou la seconde heure. Je n'en suis pas encore certain. Il n'y aura pas de réunion le 21, puis la réunion du 26 sera très intéressante, puisque nous recevrons des représentants de Google, de YouTube, de Facebook et de Spotify.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Cela s'annonce intéressant.

Le président:

Ce sera passionnant!

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est le 26?

Le président:

Oui, le 26.

Y a-t-il des questions à ce propos? Non? C'est bon.

Ne nous égarons pas. Nous tenons aujourd'hui une séance d'information avec le statisticien en chef du Canada, Anil Arora, de même qu'avec André Loranger, statisticien en chef adjoint, Statistique économique, et Linda Howatson-Leo, directrice, Bureau de gestion de la protection de la vie privée et de coordination de l'information.

Habituellement, je suis assez laxiste, côté temps, mais je vous demande d'être très disciplinés, parce que je serai strict dans le respect de l'horaire. Je ne voudrais pas devoir interrompre qui que ce soit, mais je veux m'assurer que tout le monde aura la chance de poser les questions qu'il souhaite poser.

Cela dit, monsieur Arora, vous avez sept minutes pour nous captiver.

M. Anil Arora (statisticien en chef du Canada, Statistique Canada):

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Bonjour, monsieur le président, monsieur le vice-président, mesdames et messieurs membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de vous présenter le projet pilote de Statistique Canada, qui vise à utiliser les enregistrements de transactions financières pour fournir des données de qualité en temps utile sur notre économie et notre société.[Traduction]

Avant de commencer, je tiens à corriger immédiatement trois inexactitudes importantes au sujet du projet pilote visant à améliorer le système statistique au moyen des données sur les paiements. Premièrement, aucune donnée relative à ce projet pilote n'a encore été recueillie par Statistique Canada. Je le répète: aucune donnée n'a été recueillie. Deuxièmement, la confiance est le fondement même des activités de Statistique Canada. Nous continuerons à gagner la confiance des Canadiens. Troisièmement, je peux vous assurer que ce projet n'ira pas de l'avant avant que le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée ait terminé son enquête et que nous ayons répondu aux préoccupations relatives au respect de la vie privée des Canadiens.

Comme vous le savez sans doute, Statistique Canada, comme de nombreux organismes nationaux de statistique du monde entier, déploient des efforts exhaustifs de modernisation. Cette modernisation va redéfinir comment nous recueillons et fournissons des données: en ayant recours à des méthodes de pointe, en exploitant les sources administratives existantes et en excellant dans nos compétences essentielles que sont l'intégration des données, la collecte électronique et le traitement des mégadonnées. Notre organisme est un chef de file mondial dans le domaine de la statistique puisqu'il évolue et innove sans cesse.

Pour y arriver, je tiens à souligner que Statistique Canada respecte le droit à la vie privée des Canadiens et s'est toujours appliqué à le protéger. Nous comprenons et respectons les préoccupations exprimées par les Canadiens quant à l'accès à leurs renseignements personnels.

La modernisation de Statistique Canada a été entamée à l'été 2017, lorsque la vision de la modernisation de Statistique Canada a été annoncée au public. Un financement de 51,3 millions de dollars a par la suite été accordé dans le budget de 2018 en vue d'appuyer la modernisation de Statistique Canada.

La question d'aujourd'hui n'est pas un débat purement académique: les statistiques ont une incidence profonde sur tous les Canadiens, et la réduction de leur qualité aura des répercussions directes sur eux.

Par exemple, les estimations des dépenses des ménages servent en partie à calculer l'Indice des prix à la consommation. L'IPC est ensuite utilisé pour indexer les pensions et la Sécurité de la vieillesse, ce qui a une incidence directe sur le revenu des personnes âgées. Il sert aussi à établir les taux salariaux et les contrats de travail, l'assurance-emploi et les politiques conçues pour enrayer la pauvreté. Les provinces et les territoires dépendent aussi de données de qualité pour répartir les revenus de la TVH qui financent les services essentiels du secteur public, comme les soins de santé et l'infrastructure.

L'attribution de ces fonds est, en grande partie, déterminée par le montant dépensé par les ménages pour des produits taxables dans les provinces et les territoires. La Banque du Canada utilise nos statistiques pour établir les taux d'intérêt et surveiller l'inflation.

Les méthodes traditionnelles utilisées par Statistique Canada pour recueillir des données auprès des Canadiens ne suffisent plus pour répondre aux attentes des Canadiens aujourd'hui. Les téléphones dans les foyers ont été remplacés par les téléphones intelligents, les taxis partagent le marché avec les applications de covoiturage, les bordereaux de dépôt ou de retrait qui étaient remplis au guichet ont été remplacés par des opérations financières en ligne.

Le rythme auquel les Canadiens se tournent vers des services numériques a accéléré rapidement. Aujourd'hui, nous envoyons de l'argent par courriel et nous commandons nos repas à l'aide d'une application. Au total, 80 % des opérations financières sont effectuées électroniquement, ce qui a représenté environ 21 milliards d'opérations en 2016 seulement.

D'ailleurs, à la suite de la crise financière mondiale de 2008-2009, il y a eu une augmentation de la demande pour des données plus actuelles et détaillées afin de mieux comprendre la répartition du revenu, de la richesse et de la consommation au Canada, les segments de la société qui sont les plus vulnérables et la résilience de ces groupes devant le changement des conditions économiques.

Le gouverneur de la Banque du Canada, Stephen Poloz, a indiqué récemment: Nous savons que les chaînes d'approvisionnement mondiales ont compliqué la collecte de données fiables sur les échanges. Les technologies numériques favorisent davantage la fragmentation de la production dans le monde. Avec la numérisation des commandes, des paiements et de la prestation de services, il devient plus facile d'effectuer des transactions dont le montant n'exige pas de déclaration aux douanes ou qui échappent aux instituts statistiques.

Dans le monde numérique d'aujourd'hui, les Canadiens peuvent à tout moment commander des biens, et ce, de n'importe où. La réponse à une question simple comme « Combien avez-vous dépensé en vêtements? » devient plus compliquée.

Tandis que les achats des ménages deviennent de plus en plus complexes, le volume des transactions se multiplie, et le fardeau imposé aux citoyens pour expliquer, suivre et déclarer ces opérations dans les enquêtes n'est plus viable.

Au cours de la dernière année, Statistique Canada a communiqué activement avec les Canadiens pour connaître le type de données dont ils ont besoin. Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons tenu 176 séances de consultations différentes auprès des Canadiens et ils nous ont signalé que les travaux entrepris par Statistique Canada étaient absolument nécessaires. Qui plus est, nous avons récemment mené une semaine de consultation nationale partout au pays auprès de tous les types d'intervenants.

(1625)



Les utilisateurs des données de Statistique Canada ont été clairs: les Canadiens veulent plus de données de Statistique Canada, pas moins. Ils cherchent des données par ville et par quartier et s'attendent à ce que Statistique Canada soit en mesure de leur dire si les parents seuls, les personnes âgées et les ménages à faible revenu de leur ville ont les ressources nécessaires pour satisfaire à leurs besoins de base en matière de logement alors que les taux d'intérêt augmentent. Les entreprises ont besoin de meilleures données sur les habitudes de dépenses des consommateurs pour croître et servir leurs clients.

Alors que nos méthodes traditionnelles posent de plus en plus de difficultés, les renseignements dont nous avons besoin pour établir des mesures précises des revenus et des dépenses existent heureusement dans les dossiers administratifs.

Dans ce contexte, j'aimerais passer à la deuxième partie de mes remarques et décrire brièvement le projet pilote et les discussions que nous avons eues avec l'Association des banquiers canadiens et les institutions financières au cours de la dernière année. Permettez-moi d'être clair. Il s'agit d'un projet pilote: les discussions sont en cours, le projet n'a pas encore été lancé et Statistique Canada n'a reçu aucune donnée.

Au début de 2018, Statistique Canada a entrepris un projet pilote pour déterminer si les renseignements financiers détenus par les institutions financières pourraient servir à répondre aux préoccupations relatives à la qualité et à combler les lacunes statistiques. Une partie importante de ce travail a consisté à déterminer si les renseignements numériques saisis dans les systèmes de paiement avaient une valeur statistique et s'ils pouvaient servir à combler les lacunes statistiques émergentes tout en protégeant les renseignements personnels et la confidentialité.[Français]

Statistique Canada a rencontré des représentants de l'Association des banquiers canadiens et des institutions financières à de nombreuses reprises, c'est-à-dire 12 fois depuis avril 2018, et a correspondu avec eux pour définir un projet pilote de haut niveau et déterminer les conditions en vertu desquelles les données requises pourraient être obtenues.[Traduction]

Statistique Canada, l'ABC et les institutions financières se sont engagées à entreprendre un processus qui protégerait les renseignements personnels des Canadiens dès le début.

Le projet est conçu pour s'appuyer sur des principes méthodologiques rigoureux et des éléments de protection des renseignements personnels. Statistique Canada attribuerait un numéro statistique anonymisé aux ménages sélectionnés. La banque devrait ensuite parcourir ses renseignements sur les paiements et extraire les dossiers d'un échantillon statistique d'adresses sélectionnées.

Le concept actuel propose que l'institution financière crée deux fichiers. Le premier fichier renfermerait le numéro statistique anonymisé et les renseignements personnels, et le deuxième fichier comprendrait le numéro statistique anonymisé et les renseignements financiers. Ensuite, ces deux fichiers distincts seraient transférés à Statistique Canada.

Statistique Canada traiterait ces deux fichiers séparément. Une fois que les renseignements démographiques comme le type de ménage ou l'âge du chef de ménage auraient été ajoutés, les renseignements personnels obtenus des banques seraient supprimés. Statistique Canada prendrait ensuite le deuxième fichier comportant les renseignements sur les opérations financières et attribuerait aux données le code correspondant aux catégories de dépenses. Nous relierions ensuite les renseignements démographiques des ménages aux données sur les opérations financières codées au moyen du numéro statistique anonymisé dont j'ai parlé.

Permettez-moi d'être clair: il serait alors impossible d'associer les opérations financières à un particulier ou à un ménage donné à partir de ce fichier relié. Statistique Canada a été clair sur la nécessité d'être entièrement transparent envers les Canadiens quant aux données qu'il allait recueillir et à la raison derrière cette façon de procéder. Nous avons demandé aux banques d'informer leurs clients que Statistique Canada allait demander ces renseignements en août.

Bien qu'un échantillon de 500 000 adresses puisse sembler important, il y a plus de 14 millions de ménages au Canada. La probabilité qu'une adresse donnée soit sélectionnée pour faire partie de l'échantillon est de 1 sur 28. La probabilité qu'un logement soit utilisé dans l'échantillon réel est de 1 sur 40. Le questionnaire détaillé du recensement a un échantillon d'un ménage sur quatre. L'échantillon du projet sera renouvelé d'une année à l'autre afin qu'il soit impossible de retracer l'historique des renseignements pour un ménage donné.

Ce modèle complexe s'inspire des conseils très utiles du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée.

Pour mettre les choses en perspective, en 2016, comme je le disais, le système canadien des paiements a traité plus de 21 milliards d'opérations financières. L'échantillon de notre projet pilote permettrait d'accéder à moins de 2 % de ces opérations, chacune d'entre elles ayant été anonymisée et dépouillée de tout identificateur personnel.

Mon troisième et dernier point concerne l'état actuel du projet pilote et les prochaines étapes.

Monsieur le président, comme je l'ai dit d'entrée de jeu, Statistique Canada prend la vie privée des Canadiens très au sérieux. Nous jouissons d'un excellent bilan et d'une solide réputation pour ce qui est de la protection des renseignements personnels, et nous comprenons les préoccupations des Canadiens. Statistique Canada a travaillé fort pour établir un lien de confiance avec les Canadiens depuis 100 ans, et ceux-ci nous ont fourni certains de leurs renseignements les plus personnels.

(1630)

[Français]

Nous avons écouté les préoccupations des représentants de l'Association des banquiers canadiens, des banques, du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, ainsi que des parlementaires, des Canadiens et des Québécois.[Traduction]

Le résultat de l'enquête menée sur les plaintes reçues par le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée nous aidera à orienter davantage la conception du projet. Nous continuerons de collaborer avec l'ABC et les institutions financières, et leurs conseils nous aideront à renforcer davantage les mesures de protection des renseignements personnels dans ce projet.

Je tiens à vous assurer que nous n'irons pas de l'avant avec ce projet tant que nous n'aurons pas répondu aux préoccupations relatives à la vie privée exprimées par les Canadiens.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons immédiatement aux questions, et c'est Mme Ceasar-Chavannes qui ouvrira le bal.

Vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Les Canadiens, et ils sont nombreux dans ma circonscription de Whitby, se préoccupent de leurs renseignements personnels et veulent être certains qu'ils sont bien protégés. De même, les Canadiens font confiance à Statistique Canada depuis des années pour utiliser leurs données afin d'améliorer leurs vies. Je vous remercie de ce service.

J'ai beaucoup de questions. Elles ne se veulent pas insultantes. Beaucoup me viennent de mes électeurs. J'espère que vous pourrez être le plus bref possible dans vos réponses.

Pouvez-vous me dire si j'ai acheté mon café chez Tim Hortons ou chez Starbucks, ce matin?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Voulez-vous surveiller tous les faits et gestes des Canadiens?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Ce projet de données se veut-il un plan déguisé de surveillance?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Êtes-vous un espion?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Le gouvernement pourrait-il espionner les Canadiens à l'aide des données de Statistique Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Le gouvernement libéral pourrait-il espionner les Canadiens à l'aide des données de Statistique Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne au gouvernement?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne au gouvernement libéral?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne à un député de l'opposition?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne à un politicien?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne aux tribunaux?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne à la GRC?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne à l'Agence du revenu du Canada?

(1635)

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada pourrait-elle être contrainte de communiquer des renseignements personnels pouvant permettre d'identifier une personne au SCRS?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Combien de fichiers de données ont été obtenus par piratage des bases de données de Statistique Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Aucun.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Quand Statistique Canada a-t-elle déjà perdu des données dans des transferts?

M. Anil Arora:

Jamais.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Pourquoi Statistique Canada demande-t-elle des données sur les revenus et les dépenses des ménages de nos institutions financières?

M. Anil Arora:

Je peux vous citer quatre raisons.

La première, c'est la diminution du taux de participation à notre principal sondage source, soit l'Enquête sur les dépenses des ménages. Il se situe actuellement autour de 40 %. Il ne nous permet tout simplement plus d'obtenir les données actuelles et détaillées dont nous avons besoin. Nous constatons des lacunes en raison de la consommation de services numériques au Canada. Nous manquons vraiment de données. Notre programme de modernisation table beaucoup sur l'expérimentation et les projets pilotes, dont c'est un exemple, parce que nous cherchons de nouvelles façons de combler ces lacunes. Nous avons fait la preuve que quand nous utilisons des données administratives, comme nous l'avons fait pour recueillir les données qui nous manquaient sur le logement, nous pouvons fournir des données actuelles et de bonne qualité aux Canadiens.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Depuis combien de temps utilisez-vous des données administratives?

M. Anil Arora:

Statistique Canada utilise des données administratives depuis 1921. C'est la première année où nous avons utilisé les statistiques de l'état civil. En 1938 s'y sont ajoutées des données sur le commerce, puis d'autres ont suivi.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Vous effectuez des enquêtes depuis longtemps. Pourquoi voulez-vous changer vos méthodes pour privilégier ce genre de données aujourd'hui?

M. Anil Arora:

Comme je l'ai dit, le taux de participation à nos enquêtes traditionnelles baisse. Les Canadiens sont débordés. Bien souvent, ils ne sont même joignables. Ils n'ont pas de ligne fixe. Il y a diverses raisons pour lesquelles nous voyons les taux de participation diminuer. Nous devons nous tourner vers les sources administratives. Encore une fois, ce n'est pas nouveau que Statistique Canada utilise des sources administratives.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

En quoi les Canadiens bénéficieront-ils de ce projet?

M. Anil Arora:

Les Canadiens disposeront de données de meilleure qualité. Ils en auront sur les questions qui les intéressent. Les Canadiens ne veulent pas seulement savoir ce qui se passe à l'échelle nationale, provinciale ou même municipale, ils veulent savoir ce qui se passe dans leur quartier. Évidemment, il faut protéger la vie privée et la confidentialité comme il se doit aussi.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Les données recueillies seront-elles remises au gouvernement d'une manière ou d'une autre?

M. Anil Arora:

Seulement sous une forme agrégée, et il sera impossible d'identifier les personnes associées à une transaction ou à des données.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Les données recueillies seront-elles remises à l'opposition d'une manière ou d'une autre?

M. Anil Arora:

Seulement sous une forme agrégée, et l'on ne pourra pas identifier la personne sur qui porte l'information.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Statistique Canada s'est-elle déjà fait demander d'espionner les Canadiens?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Qui a demandé à Statistique Canada de mener ce projet?

M. Anil Arora:

Eh bien, comme je l'ai dit, ces nouvelles méthodes pour recueillir des données ne sont pas vraiment nouvelles pour Statistique Canada. Nous sommes un chef de file mondial en la matière. Quand nous entendons les Canadiens dire que nos données ne répondent pas à leurs besoins, nous cherchons de nouvelles façons de recueillir l'information pertinente, encore une fois, sans jamais compromettre la vie privée, ni la confidentialité des Canadiens.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Serait-il juste de dire que c'est Statistique Canada elle-même qui en a pris l'initiative?

M. Anil Arora:

C'est juste.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Le gouvernement du Canada a-t-il demandé à Statistique Canada de mener ce projet?

M. Anil Arora:

Non, il n'a demandé aucun projet particulier. Je pense que le gouvernement du Canada a manifesté le désir que la qualité et l'actualité des données augmentent, et je pense qu'il s'est positionné en faveur d'une modernisation de Statistique Canada, comme je viens de le dire.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Les données qui sont recueillies pourraient-elles être utilisées par le gouvernement d'une manière ou d'une autre pour espionner les Canadiens?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Le gouvernement libéral pourrait-il utiliser ces données d'une manière ou d'une autre pour espionner les Canadiens?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Les membres de l'opposition pourraient-ils utiliser ces données d'une manière ou d'une autre pour espionner les Canadiens?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Le gouvernement pourrait-il utiliser les données recueillies de manière à savoir ce que les Canadiens font exactement de leur argent?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Le gouvernement libéral pourrait-il utiliser les données recueillies de manière à savoir ce que les Canadiens font de leur argent?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

L'opposition pourrait-elle utiliser les données recueillies de manière à savoir ce que les Canadiens font de leur argent?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Est-ce qu'un membre du gouvernement peut accéder aux données collectées par Statistique Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Pas aux données individualisées, seulement aux données agrégées et complètement épurées.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Que voulez-vous dire par « agrégé »?

M. Anil Arora:

Les données sont transformées en statistiques, c'est-à-dire en une tendance dans un quartier donné pour un segment donné de la population. Elles ne portent jamais sur un individu, que ce soit une entreprise ou un Canadien.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Un politicien peut-il accéder aux données de Statistique Canada?

(1640)

M. Anil Arora:

Seulement aux données agrégées, jamais aux données individualisées.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Et un membre de l'opposition?

M. Anil Arora:

Seulement aux données agrégées, jamais aux données individualisées.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Les politiciens exercent-ils des pressions pour accéder aux données recueillies par Statistique Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Y a-t-il...

Le président:

Je dois vous interrompre.

Monsieur Albas.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le statisticien en chef d'être ici et je le remercie ainsi que son organisation pour leur travail au service des Canadiens.

Commençons par quelques éclaircissements.

D'abord, beaucoup supposaient qu'il s'agissait de 500 000 individus. Aujourd'hui, dans votre exposé, vous parlez de « ménages ». S'agit-il de ménages ou d'individus?

M. Anil Arora:

Il s'agit de 500 000 logements, notre unité de mesure, à partir de laquelle nous créons des familles de recensement, des familles économiques et d'autres prototypes.

M. Dan Albas:

Quelle est la taille moyenne du ménage?

M. Anil Arora:

Un petit peu moins que trois personnes.

M. Dan Albas:

Est-ce que ça fait un échantillon d'un million et demi de personnes?

M. Anil Arora:

Eh bien, c'est un petit peu plus compliqué. Nous essayons de rassembler des renseignements à l'échelle du quartier. Nous savons que, dans certains quartiers, la taille des ménages sera moindre. Par exemple, à cause d'un immeuble d'habitation ou d'une résidence d'étudiants ou de n'importe quoi d'autre, comme de plus de logements unifamiliaux.

M. Dan Albas:

Manifestement, leurs dossiers médicaux et financiers importent beaucoup aux Canadiens. Soudainement, un changement de plan a soulevé, je pense, beaucoup de craintes.

Les renseignements que vous collecterez comprendront-ils les enfants?

M. Anil Arora:

Nous n'avons pas l'intention d'y inclure les enfants.

M. Dan Albas:

Comment protéger les renseignements du titulaire d'un compte bancaire qui fait partie de ce ménage...

M. Anil Arora:

C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons besoin de renseignements personnels, pour déceler les situations aberrantes et celles qui sont normales.

M. Dan Albas:

Qu'arrive-t-il au titulaire d'un compte bancaire conjointement avec un membre de sa parenté — disons une mère ou un père âgés mais autonomes — dont le nom figure dans le compte et qui habitent dans un ménage différent, séparé? Toutes ces personnes seront-elles englobées dans le même ménage par votre recensement?

M. Anil Arora:

Si c'est un logement multigénérationnel, par exemple, il formerait...

M. Dan Albas:

Je ne parle pas de ça, mais d'autres personnes, titulaires, avec l'enquêté, de comptes conjoints, l'enquêté ayant le contrôle de ces comptes pour un parent ou un grand-parent âgés. Ce parent ou ce grand-parent sera-t-il visé par le recensement, parce que son numéro d'assurance sociale est lié à ce compte bancaire?

M. Anil Arora:

Nous sommes encore à la conception de ce projet pilote.

M. Dan Albas:

Oui ou non?

M. Anil Arora:

Quand les données nous parviendrons, c'est le genre de détails que nous examinerons.

Il existe des définitions des conditions dans lesquelles se forment la famille de recensement, la famille économique. Voilà le genre de déterminations que nous ferons.

Nous ne nous intéressons pas aux opérations financières de l'individu, mais aux habitudes de consommation du ménage.

M. Dan Albas:

Revenons au projet pilote.

À l'origine, la lettre que vous avez adressée à l'Association des banquiers canadiens ne disait rien d'un projet pilote.

De plus, je voudrais que vous confirmiez que l'agence d'évaluation du crédit TransUnion a communiqué à Statistique Canada 15 années de renseignements personnels sur les dossiers de crédit de 27 millions à peu près de Canadiens. Est-ce vrai? Est-ce que le projet pilote dont il est question englobe ces données?

Vous avez dit que ce projet pilote n'a pas démarré. Pour quels motifs?

M. Anil Arora:

D'abord, nous avons très clairement exprimé, par écrit et verbalement, à l'Association des banquiers que c'était un projet pilote. Ça le reste, à l'étape de sa conception.

Notre collaboration avec TransUnion a duré un an, pour lui expliquer exactement pourquoi nous avions besoin de ces données et sous quelle forme nous en avions besoin. L'entreprise a aussi très clairement expliqué à ses clients...

M. Dan Albas:

Non, je ne pense pas.

M. Anil Arora:

... que c'était des données. On peut examiner, individuellement...

M. Dan Albas:

Je voudrais poursuivre.

Le problème est que le projet pilote dont vous discutez avec les banques ne peut pas aboutir sans les renseignements de l'agence d'évaluation du crédit. Les deux sont intrinsèquement liés.

Supposons que vous choisissez un quartier au hasard, au Canada, puis, dans ce quartier, un ménage, puis que vous employez les données de l'agence d'évaluation du crédit pour vous adresser à toutes les banques, et, je suppose, aux institutions comme les émetteurs de cartes de crédit. Vous pourriez ensuite leur demander des renseignements sur tel membre du ménage dont vous avez trouvé le numéro d'assurance sociale et qui, vous le savez, possède un compte chez ces institutions.

Nous ne parlons pas seulement de comptes bancaires, mais, aussi, de renseignements précis sur l'usage d'une carte de crédit, n'est-ce pas?

(1645)

M. Anil Arora:

Permettez que j'apporte des éclaircissements.

D'abord, ce projet pilote avec les établissements financiers concerne les données sur les dépenses, les opérations financières d'une personne que nous obtenons, comme je l'ai dit, dans un échantillon d'un individu sur 40.

Les opérations que nous obtenons de TransUnion, par exemple, concernent le crédit. Nous utilisons ces données pour examiner les statistiques de logement et le degré de surendettement des individus.

C'est complètement...

M. Dan Albas:

Comment pourrez-vous alors pouvoir obtenir des renseignements sur les cartes de crédit?

Par exemple, certains possèdent un compte de chèques dans un établissement bancaire, mais ils se servent d'une carte de crédit pour une grande partie de leurs opérations. Vous devez avoir accès aux deux ensembles de renseignements pour faire exactement ce dont vous parlez.

Comment faites-vous alors, si vous n'utilisez pas les renseignements de l'agence d'évaluation du crédit? La banque à qui vous demandez ces renseignements ne saura rien de la carte de crédit.

M. Anil Arora:

Je précise d'abord que nous ne désirons pas apparier les deux ensembles de données.

Il s'agit des habitudes de consommation du ménage. Ce projet vise à examiner les dépenses d'un ménage type et ce à quoi il dépense son argent.

La raison pour laquelle c'est important, c'est que nous employons les habitudes de consommation de tel profil démographique et ses habitudes servent à pondérer notre projet relatif à l'indice des prix à la consommation. Nous apprenons ainsi que, dans telle situation, le ménage type consacre tels montants à l'obtention de tels types de services.

Tous les mois, nous relevons les prix pour déterminer notre indice des prix à la consommation, puis nous comparons et pondérons cet indice par rapport aux dépenses ordinaires du ménage consacrées à l'habillement, à l'alimentation, au paiement de l'hypothèque ou à l'obtention de services numériques. Voilà l'utilité du projet.

M. Dan Albas:

Encore une fois, si vous pouviez seulement...

Le président:

Merci.

Votre temps est écoulé. Vous pourrez vous reprendre.[Français]

Monsieur Boulerice, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Pour commencer, je veux vous dire que le travail que vous faites est extrêmement important pour l'élaboration de politiques publiques efficaces, qui reflètent la réalité canadienne et québécoise. Nous croyons fortement que des données justes permettent de prendre les meilleures décisions possible. Sinon, nous nageons un peu dans le brouillard et c'est extrêmement flou. C'est pour cela qu'à l'époque, nous avions autant défendu le questionnaire long de recensement, un outil qui, à nos yeux, est absolument essentiel.

Cela étant dit, vous avez provoqué toute une onde de choc. Beaucoup de gens sont inquiets à l'idée qu'une institution publique puisse directement accéder à leurs renseignements personnels par l'entremise d'une banque ou d'une compagnie de carte de crédit. Cela rend les gens très nerveux.

Je veux d'abord parler de la consultation des citoyens et citoyennes et de la transparence. Dans votre présentation, vous avez dit avoir tenu des séances d'information et parlé aux gens. Je ne sais pas à qui vous avez parlé, mais cela n'a pas dû être avec énormément de personnes, parce que les médias, les journalistes et les concitoyens de nos circonscriptions sont inquiets. Ils ont appris l'existence de ce projet pilote dans les journaux et sont un peu sous le choc.

Quel processus de consultation avez-vous suivi pour avertir les gens du lancement imminent de ce projet pilote?

M. Anil Arora:

Premièrement, je comprends les inquiétudes des Canadiens concernant ce projet pilote. Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, ce projet n'a pas encore commencé; il en est encore à l'étape de la conception. Nous travaillons encore avec les intervenants pour déterminer quelle serait la meilleure façon de communiquer avec leurs clients. Encore une fois, l'intention est d'être transparent. Nous souhaitons dire aux Canadiens que c'est ce qu'il faut faire pour avoir des données de haute qualité. Nous l'avons fait plusieurs fois auparavant dans d'autres dossiers, et c'est exactement ce que nous allons faire pour ce projet pilote.

(1650)

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a déjà mentionné qu'il allait lancer une enquête sur votre projet pilote.

Si jamais le commissaire arrivait à la conclusion que cela ne correspond pas aux normes relatives à la protection de la vie privée des citoyennes et des citoyens, qu'allez-vous faire?

M. Anil Arora:

Nous allons voir. Laissons d'abord M. Therrien faire son travail.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Êtes-vous prêt à vous engager à suivre ses recommandations?

M. Anil Arora:

Bien sûr. Nous allons tenir compte de ses recommandations.

J'ai aussi demandé à M. Therrien de nous donner d'autres recommandations, s'il en a. Nous avons travaillé avec lui pendant la période de conception de ce projet pilote et nous avons tenu compte de ses recommandations. Il a reçu des plaintes et il va faire son travail, et s'il a encore des recommandations à formuler, nous allons bien sûr en tenir compte dans notre projet pilote.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Vous avez dit que, les moyens de communication n'étant plus les mêmes, il n'y a plus beaucoup de téléphones fixes à domicile et que les gens communiquent davantage sur les médias sociaux. Ils sont alors plus difficiles à joindre.[Traduction]

Vous avez dit que les recensements traditionnels n'étaient plus viables.[Français]

Vous n'êtes pas la seule organisation à devoir faire face à ce défi, mais on a l'impression que la solution que vous avez trouvée est assez intrusive quant à la vie des gens et à leurs renseignements personnels et bancaires. Aucune maison de sondage n'oserait faire quelque chose de cet ordre. Personnellement, je ne suis pas convaincu que vous ayez trouvé « la » solution.

Depuis quelques années, est-ce que Statistique Canada donne des mandats à des sous-traitants ou à des tierces parties pour qu'ils recueillent des informations, sur lesquelles Statistique Canada se base pour alimenter sa base de données et établir ses statistiques? Le projet pilote a-t-il été conçu à l'interne ou avez-vous sous-traité certaines activités?

M. Anil Arora:

Nous avons fait la conception nous-mêmes, et les données restent dans nos édifices et nos systèmes. Bien sûr, tout le monde achète des logiciels, et nous le faisons aussi, mais nous ne transmettons jamais à quiconque les données des citoyens que nous recueillons.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Avez-vous recours aux services d'un tiers pour recueillir des données en votre nom?

M. Anil Arora:

Non.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Avez-vous recours à Services partagés Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Services partagés Canada fournit des services à tout le monde. Nous lui avons confié le mandat de maintenir nos systèmes, mais nous contrôlons nos données et la façon dont les employés y ont accès.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

À votre avis, le niveau de sécurité et de protection des renseignements personnels en vigueur à Services partagés Canada équivaut-il à celui de Statistique Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous contrôlons nos serveurs et nos données. Ils n'ont accès à aucune de nos données.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Boulerice, il vous reste 40 secondes.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Je vous les donne.

Le président:

C'est excellent.[Traduction]

La parole est à M. Sheehan.

Vous disposez d'exactement sept minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier le statisticien en chef et ses adjoints d'être ici.

C'est à l'unanimité que nous vous avons invité à venir répondre à nos questions. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de comparaître, malgré le court préavis.

Ma question porte sur vos rapports, jusqu'ici, avec les institutions financières. Pourriez-vous nous éclairer un peu plus?

M. Anil Arora:

Notre collaboration avec l'Association des banquiers canadiens remonte au début de l'année, vers janvier ou février. Comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, nous avons eu une douzaine de contacts avec elle, en personne ou au téléphone. Nous lui avons expliqué nos besoins en ces données et nous lui avons communiqué le plan du projet, puisque nous avions été en rapport avec le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée. Elle nous a interrogés sur nos pouvoirs, sur les motifs de crainte pour la protection de la vie privée et ainsi de suite. Nous avons certainement essayé de répondre à toutes ces questions et nous continuons, comme je l'ai dit, à collaborer avec elle à la conception de ce projet.

Le plan que je viens tout juste d'exposer, la séparation des dossiers puis leur communication, etc., nous avons très clairement communiqué tout cela à l'Association. Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons rencontré ses représentants, en personne, en juin et août, pour faire le point. Après notre dernière rencontre, elle nous a conseillé de passer désormais de la conception et des orientations du projet à l'approfondissement de l'enquête auprès de chacune des institutions, de répondre aux besoins de ce système unique en son genre et de nous attacher aux formats particuliers de fichiers et ainsi de suite. Elle nous a communiqué les coordonnées des personnes compétentes dans chacune des institutions et elle nous a demandé d'exposer très clairement les pouvoirs en vertu desquels nous travaillerions.

Comme avec tout autre fournisseur de renseignements, nous collaborons avec elle. Nous nous assurons de comprendre ses inquiétudes et celles de sa clientèle et d'y répondre pour qu'il n'y ait pas de conséquences négatives pour la clientèle. C'est simplement notre façon de faire, qui n'est pas différente de celle que nous employons avec tous nos fournisseurs.

À la faveur de la collaboration de ces institutions financières et des besoins particuliers ainsi que des craintes de leur clientèle dont elles nous font part, il se trouvera peut-être certains éléments de conception que nous devrons inclure et qui sont propres à leurs systèmes, mais nous ne compromettrons absolument jamais le caractère privé ou la confidentialité des opérations individuelles auxquelles nous accéderons.

(1655)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Dans votre engagement avec ces institutions financières, avez-vous discuté d'informer la clientèle de l'existence de votre projet pilote?

M. Anil Arora:

Oui, absolument. En août, nous les avons très clairement informées. Nous leur avons signalé l'importance, pendant le lancement du projet, d'informer leur clientèle. Nous leur avons demandé de prévenir leur clientèle que Statistique Canada risquait — parce qu'il s'agit d'un échantillon d'un client sur 40 — d'examiner les données de certains clients. Nous les avons informées que l'opération avait un objectif légitime et nous leur avons dit à quoi le projet servirait et comment il fallait l'annoncer aux clients.

Elles ont leurs propres systèmes. Elles ont leur propre mode d'obtention du consentement, etc. C'est le genre de travail qu'il nous reste à faire, et nous avons absolument l'intention d'élaborer un plan de lancement du projet et de communication avec le public. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici, aujourd'hui.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup.

Je partage mon temps avec Majid.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Arora, d'être ici et de nous éclairer le projet pilote. Permettez que je vous pose quelques questions.

Pouvez-vous me dire ce que vous escomptez du projet pilote? Expliquez-le et décrivez-en vraiment la portée. Je comprends les parties prenantes et certains des facteurs démographiques, mais qu'essayez-vous d'accomplir avec ce projet? Quels avantages nous procurera-t-il?

M. Anil Arora:

Les avantages sont nombreux.

D'abord, comme je l'ai dit, la qualité des données que nous obtenons grâce à nos méthodes traditionnelles ne satisfait pas aux besoins des...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Par exemple?

M. Anil Arora:

Par exemple, si vous permettez, les personnes âgées; par exemple aussi la femme ou l'homme d'affaires qui veut développer son entreprise ou, même seulement un chercheur d'emploi...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Les pensions de personnes âgées seraient un excellent exemple.

M. Anil Arora:

L'allocation, c'est-à-dire son montant, son caractère suffisant pour répondre aux besoins de la personne âgée, dépend du taux d'inflation. Son montant est indexé dans une certaine mesure. On le compare ensuite à l'augmentation des prix ou à leur stagnation dans certaines catégories.

Le montant que chacun recevra périodiquement dépend de notre travail. Mieux nous comparons les types de services et les habitudes de consommation des Canadiens, mieux les données conviennent aux comparaisons.

Pour l'entreprise, comme je l'ai dit, c'est semblable. La femme ou l'homme d'affaires qui veut l'agrandir veut en connaître le potentiel dans le quartier et connaître les habitudes de consommation. Qu'y consomme-t-on? Il peut ensuite décider si c'est une bonne idée de l'agrandir là ou de la relocaliser.

Aujourd'hui, il y en a qui exercent plusieurs métiers. Comment fournissent-ils leurs services? Ils pourraient participer à l'économie des petits boulots: être chauffeurs pour Uber, louer leur appartement pour Airbnb et comprendre en quoi consiste le filet de sécurité sociale et ses vulnérabilités... C'est le genre de questions que les stratèges nous posent.

(1700)

M. Majid Jowhari:

Parlant de vulnérabilité, les augmentations des taux d'intérêt touchent vraiment le particulier et le député que je suis.

Comment votre analyse pourrait-elle aider le consommateur que je suis, à réagir à la situation qui pourrait découler des taux d'intérêt?

Le président:

Vous avez 15 secondes pour répondre.

M. Anil Arora:

Vous disposerez de meilleures données, à l'échelon local, pour comprendre les conséquences de, disons, l'augmentation des taux d'intérêt.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Lloyd.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci.

J'apprécie le témoignage d'aujourd'hui.

Comme nous le savons tous, cette question a alimenté une tempête de feu politique ces dernières semaines, et je voulais simplement savoir si vous ou votre bureau avez coordonné d'avance la rencontre d'aujourd'hui avec un député, des ministres ou le personnel du cabinet d'un ministre?

M. Anil Arora:

Bien sûr, nous avons tenu le cabinet de notre ministre informé de notre convocation, mais les remarques que je formule sont de mon cru.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je l'apprécie.

Ensuite, certains de mes électeurs m'ont demandé si Statistique Canada fournissait des données agrégées à des entreprises privées à but lucratif?

M. Anil Arora:

Pour commencer, la plus grande partie des statistiques agrégées que nous produisons vise à favoriser l'emploi, dans la population, de données de qualité plutôt que le contraire, données que nous publions sur notre site Web.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Est-il arrivé que vous ayez vendu des données à des entreprises?

M. Anil Arora:

De temps en temps, nous avons une demande d'une société, qui dit: « Votre tableau standard présente les choses comme ceci ou comme cela. Ce que nous voulons, c'est une description différente, ou une géographie différente, car ma géographie est différente de la vôtre. »

M. Dane Lloyd:

Mais est-ce que ces sociétés paient Statistique Canada pour avoir ces données et pour obtenir que vous les configuriez de la façon dont elles vous demandent de le faire?

M. Anil Arora:

Au départ, nous cherchons à recouvrer les coûts que représente le travail d'adapter nos données globales en fonction de leurs besoins. Nous estimons que le contribuable ne devrait pas avoir à subventionner le coût d'une demande individuelle. Nous recouvrons donc nos coûts.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Je comprends.

Je suis un enfant du millénaire, et quand j'utilise Facebook ou Google, ou n'importe quelle plateforme, il y a toujours les très longues conditions d'utilisation. On me demande régulièrement de consentir à ce qu'on puisse me localiser. J'ai l'option de consentir à cela ou de refuser.

Pourquoi, dans son projet pilote, est-ce que Statistique Canada ne donne pas aux Canadiens la même possibilité de donner leur consentement ou pas?

M. Anil Arora:

Nous savons que les gens qui donnent leur consentement sont différents de ceux qui ne le donnent pas. Pour des localités où il vous faut des données de bonne qualité, ou si vous voulez vous enquérir maintenant d'une population cible — la façon dont les aînés sont touchés, ou la façon dont les parents seuls sont touchés par certaines choses —, le produit vectoriel, si on veut, de cette géographie restreinte et d'une sous-population particulière qui est ciblée exige des données de qualité supérieure.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Vous parlez de participation.

M. Anil Arora:

C'est comme le débat sur la version longue du recensement que nous avons eu au pays. Comme je l'ai dit, nous savons que le profil de ceux qui donnent leur consentement est différent du profil de ceux qui refusent. Notre capacité de tenir compte de ceux qui ne donnent pas leur consentement ne peut pas faire l'objet d'une substitution ou d'une pondération, par rapport à ceux qui donnent leur consentement, car ceux qui donnent leur consentement ne ressemblent pas à ceux qui refusent de le donner.

Nous savons que les jeunes ne participent pas. Nous savons que dans de nombreux cas les parents seuls sont trop occupés et ne peuvent pas participer. Les données relatives aux segments de la population que les décideurs essaient justement de mieux comprendre nous échappent donc très souvent.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Compte tenu de cela, donc, vous croyez que les Canadiens ne devraient pas avoir la possibilité de refuser à Statistique Canada la permission d'utiliser leur information.

M. Anil Arora:

Comme je l'ai dit précédemment, nous comprenons les préoccupations des Canadiens. Nous avons compris. Nous traitons constamment des données de nature très délicate.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Mais si un Canadien vous écrit et vous dit explicitement ne pas vouloir que Statistique Canada ait cette information, allez-vous respecter sa demande?

M. Anil Arora:

À Statistique Canada, nous avons autour de 400 programmes. Nous en avons de nombreux qui sont obligatoires, et de nombreux autres qui sont facultatifs. La différence réside tout simplement, comme je l'ai déjà dit, dans le degré de précision, ou le degré d'exactitude de l'information requise, et dans la portée géographique de l'information.

(1705)



Dans certains cas, il est suffisant d'avoir de l'information de portée nationale ou provinciale. Dans d'autres cas, pour de l'information vraiment importante, pour des enjeux très importants aux yeux des Canadiens, nous devons obtenir des données de grande qualité.

M. Dane Lloyd:

En certains endroits au Royaume-Uni, on a adopté des modèles incitatifs selon lesquels on estime que vous avez automatiquement consenti si vous n'avez pas explicitement indiqué que vous ne donnez pas votre consentement.

Pourquoi ce modèle n'a-t-il pas été envisagé pour Statistique Canada?

M. Anil Arora:

Premièrement, ce que Statistique Canada fait correspond à ce que la plupart des agences statistiques modernes dans le monde font. Elles bénéficient de dérogations aux lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels, à la LPRPDE, et ainsi de suite, à des fins statistiques, et c'est seulement à des fins statistiques que nous pouvons en fait aller chercher des données représentatives, même sans consentement dans certains cas.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Longfield.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Arora. Tout ceci est très intéressant.

Quand j'étais dans les affaires, j'utilisais les rapports CANSIM. L'industrie canadienne du papier était en transition. Je faisais rapport à un conseil d'administration en Europe qui voulait savoir où se trouvaient les marchés émergents qui viendraient se substituer à nos activités commerciales dans l'industrie du papier. Nous avons regardé du côté des éoliennes et des aciéries. Nous avons obtenu certains de ces rapports adaptés et les avons payés. Pour nos affaires, il était très important que nous ayons de bonnes données.

L'Europe a toujours semblé avoir un peu d'avance sur nous, en matière de données, et je devais présenter des rapports en Europe. En tant que directeur opérationnel canadien, c'était difficile pour moi.

Maintenant, je regarde les enquêtes sur la population active. J'attends que les résultats sortent, le vendredi, car dans ma circonscription, le taux de chômage est de 3,6 %. La recherche de travailleurs cause beaucoup de stress aux entreprises. Il faut des données pour le milieu des affaires de ma circonscription.

Les organismes sans but lucratif qui travaillent à lutter contre la pauvreté cherchent des données. Ils ont trouvé plus inquiétante que moi l'annulation de la version longue du recensement.

Quand la version longue du recensement est devenue facultative, quel a été l'effet sur les données? Les gens du secteur sans but lucratif ont dit qu'ils partaient à la dérive, ne sachant plus où ils en étaient.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qui s'est passé alors?

M. Anil Arora:

Oui. J'ai fait quelques recensements au cours de ma vie.

Quand nous revenons sur les résultats de l'Enquête nationale auprès des ménages de 2006, 2016 et 2011, nous pouvons voir l'effet des personnes qui choisissent de répondre ou de ne pas répondre. Nous savons que pour quelque 1 126 collectivités sur 5 000, le niveau de détail des données ne répond pas aux types de besoins des Canadiens.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui. À cause de leur population, les collectivités sont devenues invisibles, et certaines de nos collectivités les plus vulnérables n'ont pas été servies. Est-ce bien ce que vous voulez dire?

M. Anil Arora:

Dans de nombreux cas, nous avons dû amener nos données au niveau géographique suivant, car le niveau de l'information à cette plus petite échelle ne nous inspirait pas confiance. Comme je l'ai dit, nous savons que les caractéristiques dominantes d'une population se mettent à être amplifiées si vous n'avez pas assez de détails.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui. Je me dis que sur le plan des dépenses, quand vous êtes dans des collectivités nordiques ou éloignées, il y aura une combinaison différente de dépenses qui nous amèneraient à envisager des types différents de programmes sociaux pour les appuyer. C'est en fait ce que nous cherchons à accomplir.

M. Anil Arora:

Il est évident que le profil et les dépenses d'une personne qui vit à Whitehorse ou à Resolute Bay sont très différents pour ses vêtements, ses aliments et son logement, par rapport à quelqu'un qui vit au coeur de Toronto ou de Vancouver.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je travaillais à un autre projet pour notre centre-ville. Guelph est sur la liste des aires de croissance désignées. Nous cherchons à amener 8 000 personnes au centre-ville. Nous voulons créer 4 000 emplois au centre-ville.

Les entreprises du centre-ville de Guelph disent qu'elles aimeraient connaître les quartiers voisins du centre-ville. Est-ce qu'on y trouve des professionnels? Est-ce que ce sont des gens qui pourraient magasiner au centre-ville? Quels seraient les types de magasins qui pourraient les attirer au centre-ville?

Est-ce que ce sont des rapports standard? Est-ce que c'est ce que vous cherchez à accomplir avec ce projet pilote: pouvoir donner aux zones d'amélioration commerciale de l'information sur les quartiers environnants de sorte qu'on puisse y trouver les types de commerces de détail qui conviendraient?

M. Anil Arora:

Je crois que vous posez exactement les types de questions que nous posent les Canadiens, les associations, les entreprises, les groupes d'aide sociale, etc. Ils disent: « Les données pour Vancouver ne suffisent pas. Qu'est-ce que je peux faire avec cela? Je sais que Surrey est très différente de Richmond et du centre-ville de Vancouver. Ces données ne m'aident pas à étendre mes marchés ou même à comprendre si les gens seront réellement en mesure de consommer le produit si je mets quelque chose en place. »

Vous voyez les changements démographiques, l'immigration, et ainsi de suite. Connaître les goûts et les habitudes des gens dans le secteur, la façon dont ils évoluent, et les différences dans la façon dont les divers sous-groupes du secteur consomment des produits et des services par rapport à d'autres — c'est pour cela que ce projet a été conçu...

(1710)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Encore là, il y a un mur. Nous ne pouvons pas savoir ce qu'il y a à telle ou telle adresse... Quand j'étais dans les affaires, j'aurais aimé savoir quelle usine de papier allait cesser d'acheter mon produit.

M. Anil Arora:

Cela ne va pas venir de Statistique Canada, c'est sûr.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je ne pouvais pas me rendre au niveau de la papetière. Je ne pouvais avoir ce niveau de détails. En matière stratégique, c'est ce que nous recherchons.

M. Anil Arora:

Oui. Je le répète: quand nous disons que nous prenons très au sérieux la protection de la vie privée des Canadiens, il ne s'agit pas que de dire: « Faites-moi confiance. » Il y a des processus et des procédures.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous revenons à M. Albas, qui a cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci encore, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir à votre déclaration liminaire. Vous dites qu'il y a une chance sur 28 qu'une adresse donnée soit sélectionnée pour votre échantillon, et qu'il y a une possibilité sur 40 que l'habitation soit effectivement utilisée dans l'échantillon.

Pour moi, cela semble indiquer que vous faites du suréchantillonnage. Est-ce que c'est le cas? Avez-vous vraiment besoin de 500 000 ménages?

M. Anil Arora:

Premièrement, nous ne voulons pas que les banques sachent quelles habitations seront incluses dans l'échantillon.

M. Dan Albas:

Dans quelle mesure allez-vous faire du suréchantillonnage? Combien de Canadiens vous faudra-t-il en réalité pour que ce projet se réalise? Et pourquoi utilisez-vous 500 000 ménages?

M. Anil Arora:

Ce qu'il nous faut pour que nous soyons sûrs d'avoir assez d'information pour nos territoires de recensement, essentiellement à l'échelon des quartiers, c'est environ 350 000 habitations. Cependant, selon la façon dont le projet est conçu, même ceux qui fournissent les données ne savent pas quelles habitations vont entrer dans l'échantillon.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous allez demander de l'information confidentielle alors que cela dérange les gens, monsieur. Vous avez besoin de seulement 350 000 ménages, mais vous allez créer un échantillon de 500 000 ménages. Je vous remercie de votre réponse, mais je suis déçu.

Sur le plan de la conservation de vos données, vous avez parlé de deux différents secteurs et de la façon dont ils sont distincts. Est-ce que Statistique Canada va garder la clé maîtresse qui lui permettra d'identifier de nouveau les gens liés à l'information?

M. Anil Arora:

Comme je l'ai dit et comme vous l'avez expliqué, nous allons conserver les deux fichiers. L'information identifiable portant le numéro de Statistique Canada est saisie. Les transactions financières comme telles sont saisies. Une fois qu'une transaction a été associée, les dépenses de ma famille et moi...

M. Dan Albas:

Allez-vous pouvoir rétablir cela à l'aide d'une clé maîtresse et réunir ces deux fichiers si vous le voulez — oui ou non?

M. Anil Arora:

S'il y a une raison stratégique qui exige que nous soyons en mesure de le faire, nous avons un processus très contrôlé en place. Ce n'est que...

M. Dan Albas:

On dirait que la réponse est « oui ».

Est-ce que Statistique Canada va maintenir la capacité technique d'accéder aux données comportant des éléments d'identification personnelle après avoir anonymisé les données?

M. Anil Arora:

Je suis désolé. Pourriez-vous répéter?

M. Dan Albas:

Allez-vous conserver la capacité technique d'accéder aux données qui comportent des éléments d'identification personnelle après avoir anonymisé les données?

Si vous avez une clé maîtresse, aurez-vous la capacité de réunir ces fichiers à un moment donné?

M. Anil Arora:

Pour commencer, il ne se fait aucune recherche à l'aveuglette. Quand nous avons un besoin stratégique précis, il faut justifier la nécessité de pouvoir lier cela à une autre source. Il faut examiner le besoin et convenir de l'autre source pour laquelle utiliser cette clé pour réunir les fichiers, et seules les microdonnées anonymisées sont données au...

M. Dan Albas:

Je comprends la séparation, mais pourquoi ne pas retirer les dossiers qui comportent des éléments d'identification personnelle, après avoir anonymisé les données?

M. Anil Arora:

Eh bien...

M. Dan Albas:

Pourquoi ne pas les supprimer?

M. Anil Arora:

Essentiellement, il y a des périodes de conservation établies pour des fichiers de ce genre. C'est un projet pilote. Nous essayons d'évaluer exactement les besoins à court terme et à long terme, concernant ces données.

Pour revenir à ce que vous disiez à propos des 500 000 habitations, comme je l'ai dit, ce sont 500 000 habitations dans un univers de 14 millions de ménages au Canada...

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

M. Anil Arora:

... et un nouvel échantillon est choisi chaque année, ce qui fait que nous ne pouvons pas créer un fichier qui conserverait la transaction, même pour les ménages sélectionnés.

M. Dan Albas:

Pour vous adonner à cela, vous allez devoir recourir aux banques. De toute évidence, les banques n'ont pas l'infrastructure nécessaire pour fournir cette information.

Vous avez aussi parlé de données en temps réel et de fréquence, d'une fréquence plus élevée d'utilisation de l'information. Allez-vous demander que l'information soit transmise au moyen d'une API à Statistique Canada par les banques elles-mêmes? Est-ce que cela sera exigé d'autres établissements? Est-ce qu'on demandera cela également aux coopératives de crédit, aux ATB en Alberta, aux sociétés de fiducie qui acceptent des dépôts?

(1715)

M. Anil Arora:

En ce moment, le projet se limite à neuf établissements. Nous avons des protocoles de transfert sécurisé qui répondent à toutes les normes du gouvernement du Canada concernant le transfert sécurisé, et c'est ainsi que nous allons obtenir le transfert des données à Statistique Canada.

Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, nous avons des millions de transactions avec des Canadiens qui nous fournissent leurs données très confidentielles et de nature très délicate. Nous utilisons les mêmes protocoles pour le transfert de ces données à Statistique Canada, et nous avons au sein de Statistique Canada des processus que nous avons établis sur plus de 100 ans, notamment avec la contribution du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous n'avez pas créé cette infrastructure pour le transfert en temps réel. Encore là, quand une personne remplit son formulaire de recensement, monsieur, elle sait exactement ce qu'elle fait. Dans le cas présent, vous ne lui dites même pas que cette information pourrait être utilisée. Et si quelqu'un déménageait d'une région à une autre...

Le président:

Je n'aime pas du tout...

M. Dan Albas:

... et que l'information est incluse une deuxième fois dans l'échantillon?

Le président:

Monsieur Albas.

M. Dan Albas:

C'est une intrusion dans...

Le président:

Monsieur Albas, je n'aime pas du tout cela, mais je suis obligé de vous dire que votre temps est écoulé.

M. Dan Albas:

... la vie d'une personne... et je crois que le gouvernement ne devrait pas avoir ce pouvoir.

Le président:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. David Graham.

Vous avez cinq minutes, monsieur.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Comme le demandait M. Albas, est-ce que les ménages seraient informés de la saisie de leurs données?

M. Anil Arora:

Oui. Nous nous attendons à ce que les établissements le disent à leurs clients. Nous leur avons précisé cela très clairement en août. Nous leur avons demandé de dire que cela faisait partie de leur processus. Nous voulons fonctionner de façon transparente.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, cela ne se fait pas en arrière-plan d'une manière mystérieuse. Je comprends.

Est-il juste de dire qu'inclure 500 000 ménages pour établir un échantillon de 350 000 ménages sert à garantir que les données sont convenablement masquées?

M. Anil Arora:

Je suis désolé. Je n'ai pas entendu la première partie de votre question. Le micro est peut-être un peu trop loin.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est peut-être juste moi, aussi. C'est aussi possible.

Est-il juste de dire qu'inclure 500 000 ménages pour établir un échantillon de 350 000 ménages seulement sert à garantir que les données sont convenablement masquées?

M. Anil Arora:

C'est simplement pour nous assurer que même les institutions qui nous fournissent ces renseignements ne savent pas quels dossiers ont été utilisés. C'est de l'interférence, pour ainsi dire, afin de mieux protéger la vie privée et la confidentialité de...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce une méthodologie standard?

M. Anil Arora:

Bien souvent, nous utilisons cette méthodologie pour masquer, pour ainsi dire, la personne qui fournit les renseignements, de manière à ce qu'il soit impossible de reproduire ce type d'analyse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Pour revenir à la question de M. Lloyd, quel est le fondement juridique de votre capacité de compiler des données sans consentement?

M. Anil Arora:

C'est énoncé à l'article 13 de la Loi sur la statistique. Il précise clairement que, seulement à des fins statistiques, nous avons le droit d'obtenir des données administratives...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Depuis combien de temps cette disposition existe-t-elle?

M. Anil Arora:

Depuis la création de la Loi sur la statistique — au moins depuis 1971, voire plus tôt.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les bureaux de statistiques européens ont-ils le pouvoir de compiler des données, malgré le RGPD?

M. Anil Arora:

Oui. En fait, le RGPD prévoit une exemption dans divers articles pour les fins statistiques.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Lloyd a posé la question suivante plus tôt. Si une personne vous envoie une lettre dans laquelle elle dit qu'elle ne veut pas que ses données soient utilisées, seriez-vous en mesure de retracer les données de la personne et de les retirer?

M. Anil Arora:

Il serait très difficile de déterminer si le dossier de la personne ou du ménage... Comme je l'ai dit, une fois que les liens sont faits, ils seront placés dans un coffre-fort, et les dossiers personnels sont alors anonymes par la suite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les banques ont-elles les renseignements que vous leur demandez?

M. Anil Arora:

Oui, elles sont la source de ces renseignements.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les banques peuvent-elles utiliser ces renseignements d'une façon quelconque et à n'importe quelle fin autre que le traitement des transactions?

M. Anil Arora:

Je ne peux pas parler de ce que les banques peuvent ou ne peuvent pas faire. Je ne sais pas quelles sont leurs politiques, leurs procédures et leurs processus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est de bonne guerre.

Vous savez que les entreprises ont besoin de données améliorées qui découlent de ces recherches. Les banques pourraient-elles tirer parti de ces données regroupées?

M. Anil Arora:

Absolument. Les banques utilisent ces données pour élargir leur clientèle également, et elles sont évidemment touchées par l'inflation, l'IPC, les taux d'intérêt et les tendances de consommation des ménages.

Même la formule en vertu de laquelle un prêt hypothécaire est approuvé ou refusé est fondé sur les actifs et les revenus du ménage. Oui, les banques utilisent beaucoup ces données. Je pense qu'elles bénéficieront également du niveau de géographie plus bas renforcé et de données plus à jour.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que certaines banques...

M. Anil Arora:

Là encore, avec les données compilées, elles seraient en mesure de déterminer qui a dit quoi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À votre avis, certaines banques sont-elles inquiètes que d'autres banques puissent pouvoir bénéficier de leurs données dans le bassin?

(1720)

M. Anil Arora:

Je ne vois pas comment. Je suis désolé. Voulez-vous dire...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si une grande banque envoie des données, une banque ou une coopérative de crédit de petite taille pourraient alors dire, « Wow, regardez ces excellentes données des banques que nous avons obtenues de Statistique Canada ». Cela offre-t-il un avantage concurrentiel aux banques de plus petite taille, et est-ce la raison pour laquelle les banques de plus grande taille sont préoccupées?

M. Anil Arora:

Les données que nous obtenons des banques ne seraient jamais communiquées autrement que de façon globale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, mais qu'en est-il des résultats des données?

M. Anil Arora:

Les résultats seraient disponibles à tout le monde, à tous les Canadiens. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous les colligeons. Nous les recueillons pour les communiquer à tous les Canadiens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné...

M. Anil Arora:

Là encore, de façon globale...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exact.

Vous avez parlé des taux de réponse en baisse de l'ancien système. Pouvez-vous expliquer comment l'ancien système fonctionnait?

M. Anil Arora:

Bien sûr.

Voici un exemple. Comme je l'ai dit, il y a un certain nombre de changements qui surviennent dans la société d'aujourd'hui qui nous obligent à aller dans cette direction. Auparavant, l'une des enquêtes que nous menions était l'enquête sur les dépenses des ménages. Nous interrogions 20 000 ménages. Nous leur donnions un carnet pour consigner leurs dépenses, et nous avons encore... Nous avons suspendu ce projet à l'heure actuelle. Les gens devaient consigner leur salaire et chaque dépense engagée, avec les reçus, et l'écart devait être d'environ 2 ou 3 %. Dans bien des cas, nous avons constaté qu'ils ne savaient pas les dépenses qu'ils effectuaient, n'avaient pas les reçus ou ne consignaient pas les dépenses dans le carnet.

C'est un problème qui s'aggrave. Maintenant, 60 % des personnes à qui nous nous adressons refusent de participer ou ne nous donnent pas accès à ces données.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste cinq secondes. Ai-je le temps de poser une question très rapidement?

Le président:

Il ne vous reste plus de temps. Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer aux deux dernières minutes.[Français]

Monsieur Boulerice, vous disposez de ces deux dernières minutes.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Merci.

Monsieur Arora, vous avez dit plus tôt avoir l'intention de communiquer avec les Canadiens et les Canadiennes au sujet de ce projet pilote, de leur demander ce qu'ils en pensent et de les informer. Cela m'apparaît être un voeu pieux. Je n'ai pas entendu beaucoup de détails sur la façon dont vous alliez procéder. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage?

M. Anil Arora:

Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, nous sommes encore en train d'élaborer le projet pilote. Nous voulons travailler avec les institutions et le commissaire pour élaborer le plan de communications. Bien sûr, les institutions elles-mêmes vont communiquer avec leurs clients et nous allons, quant à nous, informer les Canadiennes et les Canadiens. Nous avons publié plusieurs documents sur notre site Web. De plus, nous allons tenir plusieurs séances d'information au cours desquelles nous allons répondre aux questions des Canadiens, leur expliquer pourquoi ce processus est nécessaire et comment nous allons protéger leur vie privée ainsi que la confidentialité.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Combien y aura-t-il de séances d'information: trois, trente, cinquante? Pouvez-vous le dire?

M. Anil Arora:

Compte tenu des préoccupations exprimées par les Canadiens, nous allons, bien sûr, augmenter le nombre de séances d'information et la quantité de renseignements à leur transmettre en fonction de leurs besoins.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

D'accord.

Par ailleurs, nous vivons dans un monde numérique qui offre beaucoup de possibilités aux personnes malintentionnées — je parle ici des pirates informatiques — pour s'introduire dans des systèmes, s'approprier de l'information et l'utiliser à diverses fins. Encore récemment, nous avons pu constater cela dans le cas de Facebook. Cette entreprise est tout de même en mesure d'embaucher du personnel qui devrait normalement pouvoir protéger les pages des gens, leurs renseignements personnels ou confidentiels, et ainsi de suite.

Le président:

Je m'excuse, mais votre temps de parole est écoulé.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Déjà?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

C'est bien dommage, d'autant plus que c'était une bonne question. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Albas.

M. Dan Albas:

Je reconnais que nous avons tenu de nombreuses discussions ici, et nous devrions féliciter le statisticien en chef d'être venu. Cela dit, il a lui-même souligné dans son témoignage aujourd'hui qu'il y a divers aspects à ce soi-disant projet pilote.

Le président:

Faites-vous un rappel au Règlement?

M. Dan Albas:

Non, puisque nous discutons de ce sujet particulier, j'aimerais proposer la motion suivante: Que, à la suite de la comparution du statisticien en chef, le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie invite à témoigner le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, TransUnion, l'Association des banquiers canadiens, Ann Cavoukian et l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles.

C'est pour que nous puissions poursuivre les discussions sur cet important sujet, monsieur.

Le président:

En fait, c'est une motion que nous avons étudiée au Comité lundi, alors ce n'est pas quelque chose que nous pouvons faire.

(1725)

M. Dan Albas:

Non, monsieur le président, je veux simplement souligner que, dans un premier temps, c'est une motion qui porte sur le sujet; ce n'est pas une invitation ou une étude. De plus, nous avons inclus TransUnion, et ce n'était pas dans la motion initiale à laquelle vous faites allusion.

Si vous la jugez irrecevable, j'aimerais le savoir, car j'aimerais alors en faire un avis de motion officiel.

Le président:

Je répète que la motion de fond a été étudiée au Comité, si bien que je vais me prononcer contre cette motion.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord, j'aimerais présenter un avis de motion, monsieur le président, « Que, à la suite de la comparution du statisticien en chef, le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie invite à témoigner le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, TransUnion, l'Association des banquiers canadiens, Ann Cavoukian et l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles. »

J'espère qu'elle sera traduite et que nous aurons une occasion de discuter de la motion.

Je ne demande pas un rapport. Je demande une invitation. J'espère que les membres conviendront que des discussions additionnelles sont nécessaires. M. Longfield a dit l'autre jour que nous ne pouvons plus discuter de cette question avant d'avoir entendu le témoignage du statisticien en chef.

Le président:

Vous avez présenté votre avis de motion. Le greffier le fera traduire.

Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas vraiment le temps de faire quoi que ce soit aujourd'hui car un deuxième comité occupera la salle. C'est ce que je voulais confirmer. C'est le Comité HUMA. C'est une question d'accessibilité et d'une certaine configuration qui est nécessaire, et le Comité a besoin d'une demi-heure. Nous venons de vérifier auprès du greffier, et le Comité a besoin d'une demi-heure.

Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je veux seulement appuyer mon collègue. De toute évidence, il ne peut pas présenter de nouveau la même motion, mais si la motion est différente, j'espère que vous la déclarerez recevable. Je pense qu'il est très important d'entendre des témoins additionnels sur cette question.

Lorsque nous avons mis en place pour la première fois le recensement au Canada il y a de cela des centaines d'années, son utilisation était uniquement réservée au gouvernement, pour mobiliser une armée ou percevoir des impôts. Avec le développement d'une économie moderne, les données recueillies par Statistique Canada et les données du recensement sont utilisées par les entreprises du secteur privé. Les Canadiens sont de plus en plus inquiets par la création de grandes banques de données utilisées par des entreprises comme Facebook, Google et les banques.

Je pense que le problème dont nous sommes saisis au Comité consiste à déterminer s'il est approprié ou non que le gouvernement fédéral utilise le pouvoir coercitif de l'État d'obliger, de contraindre les banques à remettre les données financières personnelles et détaillées...

Le président:

Vous êtes en train de lancer un débat. Nous n'allons pas entreprendre un débat maintenant.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

D'accord. J'espère que vous la déclarerez recevable.

Le président:

Nous avons accepté l'avis de motion que vous avez présenté au greffier. Il sera traduit, et nous procéderons à partir de là.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci.

M. Dan Albas:

Là encore, monsieur le président, pourriez-vous préciser pourquoi exactement vous avez déclaré la motion précédente irrecevable? Elle était fondée sur la conversation sur les travaux du Comité d'aujourd'hui. Elle était sensiblement différente, car nous ne parlons pas d'une étude mais d'invitations, tout comme les libéraux l'ont fait la dernière fois.

Je ne comprends pas pourquoi vous déclareriez celle-ci irrecevable. J'aimerais avoir une explication.

Le président:

Je n'ai pas déclaré votre avis de motion irrecevable.

M. Dan Albas:

Non, mais la motion précédente.

Le président:

J'ai déclaré la première motion irrecevable, car nous avions étudié la motion de fond dans le cadre des travaux du Comité. Cette conversation ne peut pas être tenue en dehors des travaux du Comité.

Vous avez présenté un nouvel avis de motion. Nous verrons ce qui se passera.

Pour le moment, je veux seulement signaler qu'aucune motion n'a été adoptée pour convoquer le statisticien ici. C'était une demande de consentement unanime pour convoquer le statisticien et avoir une conversation avec lui. C'était la demande. Ce n'était pas une motion concernant une étude ou quoi que ce soit. C'était très précis: avons-nous le consentement unanime pour convoquer le statisticien en chef? C'était unanime. Tout le monde était d'accord, et c'est pourquoi il est ici aujourd'hui. C'est ce que nous faisons aujourd'hui.

M. Dan Albas:

Oui. C'est pourquoi j'ai suggéré de faire quelque chose de semblable. Nous faisons notre travail ici, monsieur le président. L'avis de motion est clairement en lien avec les travaux du Comité d'aujourd'hui, alors je ne vois pas pourquoi il serait irrecevable.

Cela dit, nous nous préparerons pour nos réunions futures où nous adopterons une approche très différente jusqu'à ce que cette question soit étudiée, et j'espère que mes collègues en tiendront compte.

Merci.

Le président:

Aucun problème.

Sur ce, j'aimerais remercier nos invités d'être venus aujourd'hui. C'était très éclairant, et nous avons hâte à notre prochaine rencontre.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 07, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.