header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-11-30 INDU 87

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order. Welcome, everybody.

I'm informed that we might still get called out on votes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

We might not.

The Chair:

We might and we might not.

I want to make sure that we maximize our time here, so we're going to get right into things.

Welcome to meeting 87 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we will continue our study of broadband connectivity in rural Canada.

Today we have with us, from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, Sara Brown, member, and Ray Orb, chair of the rural forum.

You are the only ones today. We were anticipating only having half an hour because of votes, but now we have more time to grill you.

Will you be sharing your time? I will leave it up to you.

Mr. Orb, you have 10 minutes. Go ahead.

Mr. Ray Orb (Chair, Rural Forum, Federation of Canadian Municipalities):

Thank you.

Good morning.

I'd like to begin by thanking the standing committee for the invitation to participate in your study on broadband connectivity.

My name is Ray Orb, and I am the chair of the rural forum at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and also president of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities.

I will be joined today by Sara Brown, chief executive officer of the Northwest Territories Association of Communities.

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities is the national voice of municipal government in Canada. Our member municipalities, nearly 2,000 of them, come from every corner of Canada and represent 91% of Canadians. Our members include Canada's largest cities, as well as small, urban, and rural communities, and 20 provincial and territorial municipal associations.

FCM works on behalf of municipal governments to bring local solutions to national challenges and to empower communities of all sizes to build a more prosperous, livable, and sustainable Canada.

FCM has long advocated for increased federal involvement in developing the telecommunications infrastructure that is critical to the social, cultural, and economic vibrancy of Canada's rural, northern, and remote communities. We brought the municipal perspective to a number of federal consultations on telecommunications services, including spectrum allocation and the development of federal broadband funding programs such as Connecting Canadians and Connect to Innovate.

On behalf of our members, FCM worked closely with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to shape their definition of basic telecommunications services, so we were pleased with the CRTC's announcement last year of a universal service objective which determined that all Canadians should have access to broadband Internet on fixed and mobile networks.

FCM also welcomed the federal government's announcement in 2016 that their new broadband program, Connect to Innovate, would invest up to $500 million to bring high-speed Internet service to rural and remote communities. Too many of our rural and remote communities lack basic access to the broadband services that so many Canadians take for granted, access that is vital for modern commerce and education. Mandating universal access as well as programs like Connect to Innovate will help change that.

However, in order to ensure the universal service objective of the CRTC is a success, funding programs from the federal government must be long term and predictable. Only through this sort of funding will project proponents be able to make long-term decisions about technology as well as the rollout of services and service packages.

The fact is that no two communities are the same, so different technologies will be required for accessing affordable and reliable broadband services. That's why FCM supports flexibility in defining eligible broadband infrastructure in federal funding programs. Both backbone and last-mile components of broadband infrastructure are necessary elements if we hope to reach the goal of universal access. If funding programs only allow last-mile projects, many rural communities without modern backbone infrastructure will simply be left behind.

FCM believes that each of these pieces is important to the development of successful broadband services. It's so important that any federal funding program for broadband infrastructure prioritizes the hardest-to-serve underserved areas. Simply put, broadband Internet access has become fundamental to modern life and has the power to transform rural and northern Canada.

Modern networks contribute to economic growth by improving productivity, providing new services, supporting innovation, and improving market access. They give Canadians the capacity to collaborate, work, share, and learn. Unfortunately, the broadband gap is a reality in underserved communities. Too many Canadians are without broadband coverage, while others remain underserved by insufficient bandwidth and insufficient network capacity to meet user demand.

(1105)



Under Canada's current approach to broadband policy, there is a significant lag in bringing the broadband speeds and technologies that are widely available in urban areas to Canadians in rural and remote regions. Any federal plan to improve rural connectivity must take this into account.

FCM also believes that a lack of broadband adoption on the part of Canadians is due, to some degree, to the issue of cost. That is why any federal plan must make affordability a priority.

Now I'd like to turn it over to my colleague Sara Brown to tell you about the challenges that Canada's northern and remote communities face in accessing broadband services.

Ms. Sara Brown (Member, Federation of Canadian Municipalities):

Thank you very much, Ray.

In Canada's north, many communities simply cannot participate in Canada's digital economy because they are unable to connect to reliable high-speed Internet. Northern and remote communities face frequent outages and technical problems without a backup connection to ensure continued service. The impact of inconsistent service is clear. When northern and remote communities can't take part in today's digital economy, out-migration becomes a serious challenge.

Securing northern and remote access to broadband will provide the same competitive advantage found in other parts of the country, contributing significantly to economic development, health, education, and safety.

As outlined in FCM's submission to the standing committee, we believe the federal government should develop investment strategies for northern and remote communities to bring their Internet services up to the standards of urban centres, including when it comes to speed and redundancy. In order to address the unique challenges remote communities face in connecting to Internet services, there is a strong need for a specific strategy for satellite-dependent communities.

FCM also believes that the federal government needs to utilize local knowledge in data collection to ensure that accurate and up-to-date information is used when funding decisions are made. Municipalities have front-line expertise about the challenges our communities face in accessing broadband. That makes us key partners in developing future federal funding programs.

The federal government plays a critical role in ensuring broadband Internet services are available to all Canadians, regardless of where in the country they reside. To realize this vision, we believe that all orders of government must work together and in full partnership.

On behalf of Canada's cities and communities, we thank the standing committee for the opportunity to take part in this proceeding, along with other parties' contributions and recommendations.

Thank you.

Merci. Mahsi cho.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your presentations.

We're going to go to Mr. Bossio. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Mike Bossio (Hastings—Lennox and Addington, Lib.):

Thank you both for being here this morning. We appreciate your testimony.

I think it's fair to say that no one size fits all when it comes to delivering rural broadband. There are unique challenges that exist there, and really it's the municipal levels of government that are the feet on the ground and that understand the unique challenges that exist within their own communities.

Looking through that lens, what do municipalities think is the best way to deliver rural broadband to their particular communities?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I can take the first crack at that, and if Sara has a comment, she can answer as well.

I think there needs to be some flexibility in how that's delivered. I know that in some provinces it may be delivered in other ways. Alberta has some unique ways. They're working in partnerships with some companies. In Saskatchewan, our approach has been a bit different, because we have a monopoly. We have SaskTel delivering most of the broadband services. There is some satellite delivered in the northern part, but we're really relying on our provincial organizations to work with our provinces and the industry in those provinces.

I would say flexibility, depending on the size of the communities, is a factor as well. We have a lot of diverse communities. Rural communities in Saskatchewan, as you know, Mr. Bossio, are somewhat different from those in Ontario, but we have the same challenges because we just don't have good coverage out in the rural areas.

As one further comment, in our province we're doing a really good survey of the shortfalls where there isn't good Internet coverage. Each municipality is being marked to determine where the lack is.

(1110)

Mr. Mike Bossio:

With the municipalities, to try to get more specific, there are a lot of utilities that are owned both municipally and provincially. Municipalities are of course responsible for the roads. Do you not feel that it would be a good idea to try, through those partnerships between private entities, utilities, and municipalities, to run conduit wherever it's possible when rebuilding a road? It's the cheapest time to lay conduit down. As far as working with utilities goes, you have the existing hydro lines that go past every single home. Right now the utilities companies are charging a fortune for companies to run fibre across their poles to deliver that type of service.

Is FCM putting pressure on its own municipalities, and provincially with its utilities, to try to bring about those circumstances in which we can work in that partnership?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Our approach to FCM is that it's important to have a three-way partnership of the federal government, the provincial government, and the municipalities. Taking advice from members like you is where we want to be on this issue.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Are you seeing any examples of municipalities taking this approach? The federal government has partners, and you and I have had a lot of conversations about this, and we work exceptionally well together in trying to find solutions. However, part of that solution is to get the municipalities more involved. They shouldn't just be waiting for the solution to come to them; they should be helping to drive the solution forward. They should be doing this through laying conduit and by putting lobbying and political pressure on the provinces and utilities to be part of that partnership. Are you seeing any examples of this starting to occur?

Mr. Ray Orb:

We're seeing this, and we know that in Alberta in some cases the municipalities are working on that. There are as many as 80 municipalities, I believe, in one area that have grouped together. We could get that information to you, Mr. Bossio. I think they're doing some partnering.

When I was in Edmonton, Alberta, last fall, we sat in on a workshop where the companies came and talked to the municipalities. They've established a basis for what we want delivered out in the rural areas, and I think it's working quite well.

I'd like to give Sara a chance to comment as well.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Our challenges are a little distinct in that we have a significant backbone connectivity issue and it's not a matter of the last mile. As well, there are many fewer opportunities for municipal governments to participate. Our communities are so tiny that their capacity is very much a challenge. It's not a matter of the service being delivered in the community; it's getting the service to the community.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

We know there are a lot of underserved areas in northern and remote areas. Even in the northern part of my riding in southern Ontario, I couldn't get any companies to bid on a CTI project. They said there just wasn't enough density. Even with 75% of the capital costs paid, the cost to license a spectrum takes away from their efforts to create enough revenue to put forward a project.

Do you see satellite becoming the default for those communities? How can we improve on the satellite coverage? You're always going to have the latency issue, but are there any other avenues you're exploring that could help to solve part of that problem?

(1115)

Ms. Sara Brown:

Some solutions have been discussed, and I know that with adequate funding they would be feasible. As it stands right now, though, there will probably never be a business case for affordable Internet-type services in our communities. That's part of the challenge.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

I know there was a funding announcement to run a backbone up into the northern part of the country. I know that's going to provide some of the backbone coverage. If there's enough of a backbone up there, is it still too remote to do a microwave POP, linking the microwave towers together in order to bring that to the backbone? If the distance is still far too great, are you going to have to rely on satellite coverage?

The Chair:

Could you reply very briefly, please?

Ms. Sara Brown:

The distances are great, and microwave wouldn't be feasible for most locations in the territories.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Bernier.[Translation]

Mr. Bernier, you have seven minutes.

Hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, CPC):

Thank you very much.[English]

I have one question for you concerning your members. Do they have a preference with the services that they want to be delivered to their community?

I will be a little bit more precise. When we have towers, sometimes there's a big discussion in a community that they don't want telecommunication towers in their municipalities. I know that the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development has the power under the Telecommunications Act to be sure that we can have towers that will deliver to the community.

What is the thinking of your members? Do you think they're open for more towers in cities, or are they a little bit against them?

Mr. Ray Orb:

If I can answer that, Mr. Bernier, I think that our members in the rural area would be open to towers. We're in areas where the population is quite sparse and we don't have too much infrastructure, so a tower is actually welcome. We have towers now, but they're really few and far between, and that's why there is a lack of coverage.

When companies put in new infrastructure, they put the hard wiring in with the services that go into the homes, so they need to be hooked up to the tower at some point. The idea of a tower being unsightly is not an issue for our rural members.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

That's good news, because in some municipalities in my own province, it can be an issue. That's a challenge for the minister, because everybody wants to have good services. Thank you very much.

I just want to say to my colleagues that I tabled a motion last Thursday, November 23, for a study on the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act. I don't know if you're ready to vote on that.

The Chair:

Did you want to...?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Could we just ask if they agree with the motion?

The Chair:

Okay.

We'll start with Lloyd and then Terry.

Do we want to just read the motion? You have to tell us what motion you're reading. [Translation]

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

The motion reads as follows: That the Committee review the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA), the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act and the Investment Canada Act (ICA); and that the Committee invite relevant stakeholders to appear before the end of 2017 in order to provide the members with information about the impact on pensioners of companies involved in bankruptcy proceedings such as Sears Canada and U.S. Steel. [English]

The Chair:

I just want to be clear on which motion you're moving forward.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

I think we should have a discussion on the motion. I'd like to continue with the discussion we have going on today with the witnesses we have. We have ministers coming in.

I think it's a motion worth discussing as opposed to voting on. I think we need more time to discuss it.

The Chair:

Okay.

Go ahead, Terry.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

I move to adjourn debate right now.

The Chair:

We have a motion to adjourn debate. That is non-debatable.

(1120)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Can we have that as a recorded vote?

The Chair:

Absolutely.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 3)

The Chair: We're going to go back to our questions.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Do I still have time?

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

All right.

My question is in line with what I said before. When we're talking about Internet access, wireless, and all that, the CRTC has a new proposal for being sure that everybody will have a lot of data, more than they have, and the minimum Internet access. What do you think about their new proposal on that?

Mr. Ray Orb:

You're referring to the download speed, the megabits per second?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

It's the download speed. Yes, you're right.

Mr. Ray Orb:

We're in favour of that. We believe that all Canadians should have a minimum amount of download capacity as well as a minimum of upload capacity. We believe it's a step in the right direction. We believe they need to spread out that coverage throughout the rural and remote areas of the country first before it's enhanced any further. We need to have that basic coverage. The reason is that many people need this to operate their businesses. Whether they are farmers or other kinds of business people in the rural area, they need to have the basic capacity, so we're in favour of it.

We're pleased with the funding. Funding is never enough, obviously, but as time goes on, there's more funding being made available. We're happy with that direction. [Translation]

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Mr. Stewart, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby South, NDP):

Great.

Thank you very much for your presentations today. This issue is important to me because I grew up in a remote area of Nova Scotia that still has very little access to broadband. It's often intermittent, so I understand the challenges faced by folks in rural and remote communities when it comes to Internet access.

To both of you, in terms of coverage, can you give us some examples of the extent of the problem we're facing here? Perhaps you can give us some examples of communities and the levels of access, which range probably from 0% coverage to 50%. Can you give us some sense of the range of the problem we're facing?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, we can. I would say that the problems with coverage are even more exaggerated in northern Canada, so I'll let Sara answer first, if you don't mind, and then I'll answer as well.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Thanks very much.

It's not so much a percentage as it is.... We do have coverage in most communities. We don't have the same rural base in most communities, but the speeds are so slow that it makes it almost impossible to participate using Internet for health, education, and those sorts of things, but our remoteness makes it even more important to have it. You can't drive up the road to access the service that you don't have in your own community. It's absolutely critical to participating in and enjoying a lifestyle that most Canadians have.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Do you have any specific numbers you could give us on how slow things are, such as the worst and mid-range scenarios?

Ms. Sara Brown:

Do you remember dial-up?

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Yes.

Ms. Sara Brown:

That's what we're looking at.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

People are still using dial-up?

(1125)

Ms. Sara Brown:

No. There are some on dial-up, but even when you're not on dial-up, you're still looking at significantly slow speeds. You can't stream. Often video conferencing is a real challenge. The delays with the satellite links just complicate that.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

In terms of people who are still operating on dial-up speeds, do you have any idea of how widespread that is, or what percentage of the population? I know it's a tough question.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Ten of our 33 communities are still on satellite service. They would be the slowest. From a percentage perspective, it's not as high. Yellowknife, for example, is over half of the population of the NWT. Percentage-wise it doesn't speak to it as well.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

But if it's a low percentage, it might be something we could fix quite easily if we invested in it.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Absolutely. We'd like to think so.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay. Thank you.

Did you also have comments, sir?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think the CRTC has done a fairly good job of creating maps. If you go to their website, you can see the areas in every province where there's a lack of high-speed coverage. Those maps are, I would say, at a higher level than maybe what we'd like, because we know that in our own provinces there are places within those areas that are worse. They don't have any coverage at all, and that also applies to cellphone coverage. We have places in rural Canada where we don't have cellphone coverage. We actually have dead spots.

This is an issue, and I'll give you an example. You're familiar with agriculture, with farming. For modern machinery, you now need to have high-speed Internet. You need to have the app either on your cellphone or on a laptop to operate those machines to be able to calibrate them and operate them effectively. That capability isn't there.

More important, I think, is redundancy. You need to have some kind of a backup in case that system goes down, because those machines will not operate without good reliable connectivity.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

I imagine this really affects your economy as well. I have somebody who does web work for me, web pages and things, who used to be located locally, but has since moved to Puerto Vallarta, and that's where he does his work from. I was thinking that if Puerto Vallarta has enough Internet speed for him to do e-commerce from there, wouldn't it be great if we had it in remote and rural communities? It would be a significant boost in employment if your location all of a sudden didn't matter.

Could you comment on how this is negatively impacting our rural and remote economies?

Mr. Ray Orb:

It has a very negative affect on economic development. We know that there are a lot of businesses that would like to move out of some of the larger urban centres and get out to rural areas. It probably makes sense for some of them, because that's where their roots are and that's where their customers are. Because they don't have good connectivity, they're not able to do that. Some of them rely on satellite, but that is not a dependable mode of telecommunication. It has a real effect.

We probably could provide more information on that through FCM, but the impediment is there. We know there is an impediment.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Now, this is the million-dollar question, or perhaps billion-dollar question. How much do you think it would cost to get you where you need to get? Do you have any idea?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I know that in Saskatchewan, SaskTel would like to take all the money from Connecting Canadians. They said they could use it all in rural Saskatchewan. That gives you an idea of the complexity of this issue.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Would that fix the problem there?

Mr. Ray Orb:

They think it will. They're doing a better job now, but there's a big part of this country that needs the same kind of coverage.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

That's right.

Mr. Ray Orb:

As I stated, these programs are really helping rural Canadians, but it's a work in progress because we have to partner with our provinces, our municipal organizations, and the industry as well. The industry, I think, is starting to pay attention. They see that this is heading in the right direction.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Great. Thank you very much for your time. I think my time is up, so I hope we deliver for you. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham. You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Mr. Orb and Ms. Brown, for being here virtually. That's an ironic technical note for this file that I think should be on the record.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: In the poorest county or MRC in Quebec province in my riding, fewer than one in three households has access to broadband Internet. By broadband, we have a fairly loose definition of that even to get there.

We call our access “innovating to connect”. Dial-up and satellite are still common and obviously hopelessly ineffective. Cellphone service is also rare in large areas of my region. It applies to large chunks of that 200 kilometres on the Trans-Canada that we have, but this will change over the next four years because of the large community-led co-operative that is supported by Connect to Innovate, but we're, of course, the exception.

I want to get to the guts of this.

In the opinion of FCM, is Internet access a right?

(1130)

Mr. Ray Orb:

Sorry. I missed the last part.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is Internet access, in your opinion, a right?

Mr. Ray Orb:

A right? I think FCM believes it's probably a privilege for all Canadians to be able to be able to be connected. We're asking for basic high-speed Internet coverage, so if it's a right, that would mean that we would have to be able to have access to it.

In a sense, I think people in rural and northern communities think it is a right because people in the cities, the urban centres, already have it. We know there is a cost associated with it, but at the same time, we need it. We require this for our businesses in our rural communities to be able to survive.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Sara, do you have any comments to add?

Ms. Sara Brown:

Certainly with northern and remote communities being so isolated, you would be relying on it so much more and would be able to participate so much more if you had it. It is bordering on a right, for sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would you consider it an infrastructure or a service?

Ms. Sara Brown:

I'm not sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll leave that question hanging.

You talked a little earlier in your opening remarks and in replying to the questions from Mike about the role of telecom companies in getting them in place. How receptive are you finding companies when you ask if they can come up to these communities and build infrastructure so that you have Internet access? Where's the threshold? Where do they say it is or is not worth it for them? What are you hearing?

Ms. Sara Brown:

We have one service provider for most of the territories, with another smaller group as well in Nunavut and part of the N.W.T. I'm not sure exactly where the threshold is, but it does require significant subsidies to even deliver a land line type of phone service. This is not a place where the business case will ever work without a subsidy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Out of curiosity—I don't know the answer to this—in the far north in the territories, how do the electricity grids work up there? Is it through generators in each town? I assume that's how it works.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Yes, that's correct. We are almost exclusively diesel, and there is some hydro in the southern part of the territories.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right.

I consider Internet access to be extraordinarily urgent, the biggest priority for rural Canada. Would you agree with that?

Mr. Ray Orb:

We think it's part of infrastructure. Some of the programs the federal government is offering will provide some of the municipalities with some funding for the expansion of broadband services.

It's very urgent. The point has to be made that for the money being spent, I think it's really effective. Every dollar that's spent on infrastructure will bring rural business. It will add to the economy of the country, because it will not only attract new businesses to rural Canada but will also enhance the ones there and make them more effective. I think it's money well spent, and it's very wise for the federal government to take on this issue.

It's not as if they haven't heard from FCM on this issue. We've been pushing for some time, through some of the members like you. You realize this is very important, and we're glad the committee is talking to us today about this issue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One thing I find in rural Quebec, where I am, is that a lot of communities have a backbone into their communities, and I get constant calls to my office from people seeing a fibre optic line going by their house but not being able to connect to it. Do you run into that a lot, the perception that we have the backbone in a huge amount of the country but the last mile is seriously missing?

(1135)

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think Sara would agree—she probably wants to comment on that too—that the last mile is really important. You have to have both, as you realize. You can't have one without the other. It is very frustrating.

I know we have that in our communities too. The companies are putting in new fibre optic lines, but they're connecting to the towns and the cities, and the rural areas are not able to use it. We think that's why we need to have more towers put up in our areas. They can use those towers for other things besides just broadband; they can use them for cellphone coverage as well, and that will help our rural areas.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Internet in my area is principally on relay tower signals, but we're in a very mountainous area, so that's also not very effective. A good tower will connect to eight clients, so the economics tends to not be there for that as well.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, that's an issue as well.

Maybe Sara wants to comment.

The Chair:

You have one minute left.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Our emphasis is definitely on backbone. We don't even have the speeds coming into the community, let alone being able to participate. Until that backbone is addressed, the last mile is irrelevant.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair enough.

I have 30 seconds left. I'll hand them over to Mr. Longfield, who has a quick question for you as well.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you. I have a quick follow-up for Mr. Orb around the smaller service providers.

You mentioned SaskTel. I'm wondering about the opportunities for FCM to partner with some of the smaller providers to also create jobs within your communities.

Mr. Ray Orb:

The position of FCM is a good question. I think FCM itself is not willing to partner. Of course, the municipalities will partner. As for the provincial organizations, I can just give you an example from Saskatchewan. SaskTel, our provider, has offered to do some pilot projects in communities where they don't have any cell coverage at all or have very limited Internet. We're looking at doing some pilot projects to see how that can affect us a year along.

It varies so much across the country. I think every province has a different idea. Basically, we all want the same thing: we want basic.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thanks, Mr. Orb.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Jeneroux. You have five minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both for attending today's meeting.

Would you mind quickly commenting on the standards put in place for the minimum speeds that were recently announced? We hear some providers say that it's very low. Some are saying that it's quite high. I'm curious as to your opinion.

Mr. Ray Orb:

You'll have to remind me. Are you referring to the five megabits per second?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Yes.

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think we can say that we believe that's a good place to start. It's a minimum. I think the issue is that as time goes on, if they're delivering by towers, those towers do get overloaded. However, I think it basically provides some high-speed Internet, and we need that basic service. We'll be able to build on that in the future. We think it's a step in the right direction.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Is it too high, too low? Would you rather see it higher, or are you happy with where it is? Do you have any comments on that?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I probably would like 50 megabits per second. We know what the issue is. As technology changes, the apps that we use on our computers and phones increase, so we need more data. We're constantly relying on data to operate our businesses and to communicate, and more and more is used.

Basically, we have to have a threshold where we can start. The idea is to deliver this minimum across the country to all the rural communities and northern communities as well. It's a good starting point.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Recently I saw some announcements out in the eastern Canada with regard to some of the connectivity. We have yet to see any in western Canada. We were told by the minister to expect something when he was here before us.

Is this a concern of your members? Are they eagerly anticipating these announcements? Have they been in communication with the minister recently?

Mr. Ray Orb:

In all honesty, I can't answer that. I guess we could look into it. I don't know if Sara can allude to that any more than I can, but I'm really not able to comment on it right now.

(1140)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

My colleague asked some good questions with regard to the placement of towers. In my community—I represent Edmonton—we recently had some towers go up, and they have been concerns to the local community.

Are you finding in rural municipalities that we're seeing a lot more acceptance of these towers or a lot more encouragement of them by both the municipality and community groups as they relate to the final mile?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Sara, would you like to answer that?

Ms. Sara Brown:

It's really not an issue for our communities, so I'll leave that to you.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Sorry, Sara.

As I stated earlier, it's not an issue for the rural communities. That, I believe, is more of an issue that affects the urban centres. They of course don't like them because they're unsightly. Basically, we have them, especially on the prairies, and I don't think that in rural Ontario it is very different either. In the Maritimes, it would be the same. We have lots of areas. We have farmland. For us, if that tower would basically cover a good part of our municipality, we'd be happy. We'd be able to put another cellphone tower up in conjunction. We could use the same tower. We would be very happy about that. Our members, our farmers, would be really happy about it.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Great. I'm finished.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I just want to throw something in here.

Mr. Orb, you mentioned you are currently working on a pilot project. If you have anything that you would like to submit to the committee on any of those pilot projects, that might be helpful to us.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much for the presentation.

As a former city councillor and a school board trustee, I know the great work that FCM does in thinking about that. We're talking with municipalities now, but in the past and recent history there have been some combined efforts in the MUSH sector—municipalities, universities, schools, hospitals. On the Huron-Superior board that I was on, we created a bit of a network and there was a bit of partnering. Is that still going on, and could you give us examples of where that is happening in Canada?

Mr. Ray Orb:

We could give you specific examples, but I can't give them today. I know there are places where that is happening. That is used, I think, in Saskatchewan. Some of the school boards are doing that for distance education. They're partnering with SaskTel to be able to do that. I know that in northern Saskatchewan they're delivering some health care services that way too.

If you need specific examples, we could get them. Our FCM staff will have to look into it and provide them to you.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That would be very helpful. I know that in my riding of Sault Ste Marie the school board has put an application in to Connect to Innovate. They are working with the Innovation Centre not-for-profit and the city, because up in Goulais River there's a school that has one-fifth the speed of all the other schools in the system. It becomes an issue of fairness and equity when some kids are at a one-fifth disadvantage and there are certain things they can't do. I'm wondering if there are other examples of that out there right now. That would help us in our study.

It leads to my next question. I'm thinking about the private sector now, because we've covered off the non-private. There are so many different poles out there that are held privately by hydro companies and others that are already established in rural and remote Canada. How can we get those private companies to work with municipalities through FCM and through the federal government? Do you have any comments on that?

Mr. Ray Orb:

It's not only the role of the provinces. It's also the role of municipal organizations like ours and like Sara's. I think we need to be in contact.

As I mentioned, in our province we have been. I know that in Alberta they have some different models of communities that are working with service providers. Their organization, the AAMDC, has been very vocal about getting those people together. It is something that all of our provincial organizations understand. I think we have to do more work on that and we have to get a little better at it.

(1145)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

It's perplexing. It raises the question of why that private corporation would be hesitant to partner. Can you shed any light on that?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think in the past they would be hesitant because there wouldn't be much money in it for them. Obviously the money is in the larger urban centres and that's where the low-hanging fruit is, but with these federal programs that we mentioned earlier on, there's some incentive now to do that. I think we're going to see some better Internet service provided into the rural and remote areas.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

We were in Washington a few months ago. We were there to talk about a number of things, including rural broadband. The United States is grappling with the same issue. It's just not Alaska; it's in the Midwest of the United States and all over the place. We sat in on some congressional hearings, and one question that was posed is something that we're grappling with, I think, in our ridings and across this country: should we increase the speeds for people who already have broadband, or should access to broadband for all Canadians be a priority?

What would your preference be?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Obviously ours is access for all Canadians, absolutely.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I agree. That kind of gets into the question of speed, because as we get into it, people are saying they want to get higher and higher. However, access for all, I think, is very important.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Eglinski. You have five minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I apologize for being a little late, but I got involved in something.

Thank you for being here, sir. I don't know your name, but I'll ask you a few questions.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Mike Bossio:

It's Ray, in Saskatchewan.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Welcome, Ray.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Thank you.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You're a neighbour of mine.

Ray, my area is a pretty well rural area with a number of communities in the 5,000 to 7,000 range, and then a whole bunch of small ones, with lots of farm air.

We're seeing a number of small companies start up and bring in the Internet system, usually through a tower, and then make promises to the clients that they're going to get so many megabytes of service. They keep selling subscriptions to their system to the point where people cannot use their computers, especially in the evening, because the system is so loaded down. Do you find that quite common across Canada where there are these small Internet providers?

(1150)

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, it does happen. We have some clients who don't have access to hardwire to be able to get onto high-speed Internet. They have problems with the satellite delivery because satellites can't provide enough capacity to provide good download speeds. At peak times of the day, which probably would be the early morning or evening when most people are either going to work or coming home from work, the system is not able to keep up. That is a big problem for a business that relies on consistent communication. We know that's an issue all across Canada.

We believe there has to be some kind of regulation on that through the CRTC. They need to be able to regulate some of that. If people are selling subscriptions, they need to be able to deliver what they're selling.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

One of our local counties, Clearwater County, has formed what they call the Clearwater Broadband Foundation. They have a pretty unique idea. They want to run cable through old pipelines that are crisscrossing the whole region. In your opinion, is this feasible?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Is Clearwater close to Fort McMurray?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

No, Clearwater is between Edmonton and Calgary, just up against the slopes of the Rockies. It's by Rocky Mountain House, west of Red Deer by 60 miles or so.

Mr. Ray Orb:

It's an interesting concept for sure. I'm not able to answer that, because it's a pretty technical question, but the idea is kind of appealing. I think any way service could be delivered has to be looked at. Obviously there are pipelines. I know there are pipelines across the country that are not being used. Some of them have been set aside. If the companies think that using them could be feasible, I don't see why not.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I have a lot of counties asking about broadband. In your travels and movements around the country and with your knowledge of these systems, do you have any innovative solutions that you've seen other organizations use?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Whenever I go to Ottawa, I meet with some of the Ontario municipalities. I think AMO has really been active on this file. They have some really good examples of companies that have come together with the municipalities. We can provide you some of that information. I know that in Alberta they're really active as well. When I was at the AAMDC conference last fall, there was quite a discussion about the different ways of delivering services there. Alberta has some unique ways of doing that. You may know some of them, but I think they do vary across the country.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Are we realistic in saying that we could provide broadband to everyone in Canada?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I can answer it, and I'll let Sara answer as well.

I think we can do it, but it will take more money and some more time.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That's the question, isn't it?

Now we're going to move to Mr. Longfield. You have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you for this discussion this morning.

Mr. Orb, you mentioned the role of co-ops. This morning, I met with Co-operatives and Mutuals Canada and we talked about the CCIF fund. Looking at partnering with the federal government, working with FCM, could you expand on the role that co-ops have played in your area or through FCM? As we put our report together, we're going to be looking at the possible partnerships that the federal government might consider.

Mr. Ray Orb:

FCM could provide some stats on that. I'm not able to tell you specifically the ones that have been involved, but I know they have been. I know some of that's being taken up in Alberta. That's what I made reference to. There are some counties that have done that. We could provide some of that information. It might take us a bit of time to get the information from the Alberta association, but we certainly could provide that to you.

That is a really good way to effectively spend some of the money that's available through the federal programs.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

We're always looking for matching partners. There may be a similar question around Community Futures. I'm not sure. I know they've been across Canada and they work in small communities. They deliver a lot of different types of programs. Is Community Futures another possible avenue that we could be exploring?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, I don't see why not. We should work with anybody who's available to enhance economic development. That's definitely the direction we want to go in.

Sara, if you want to comment, go ahead.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Certainly Community Futures has been very active in the north and is very well received. It has the opportunity to bring a lot of different types of partners together.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

The thing about co-ops and Community Futures is that they bring people from the community who have experience in the community. They know the community at the grassroots level in a way that would be very beneficial, I think, if we're trying to get to the last mile.

Mr. Ray Orb:

That's a very good statement.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great. Thank you.

I'm going to share my remaining time with Mr. Bossio. He has lots of questions.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

We have all seen the graphs and maps that show that we have 99% coverage of one to five megabits across the country. Would you say that's realistic?

Mr. Ray Orb:

That is a loaded question, Mr. Bossio—not that I'm surprised, because I know you know the detail a lot more than we do.

I'm not saying we disagree with that statistic, but we're looking at doing some more research on it. Just in Saskatchewan, we're looking, as I mentioned, at doing each municipality. We're looking at each rural municipality to see if that's correct.

That number might not be quite correct because of the fact that there are dead spots that CRTC may not exactly know about. They got some of that information from SaskTel, but when we provide the information to SaskTel now, they're saying, “We didn't know that was a dead spot.” We need to do some more research on that. Sara may be able to answer the question—

(1155)

Mr. Mike Bossio:

If I could take it in a different direction.... I apologize, but I don't have a lot of time.

Have you heard of CIRA, the Canadian Internet Registration Authority?

Mr. Ray Orb:

No, I'm sorry.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

They're an organization that has been measuring.... They register a lot of the Internet addresses and they also take a look at devising detailed data on Internet speeds and capacity. One of the major complaints that CIRA has had is with regard to a lot of these studies that are done on congestion. Even when you go to www.speedtest.net, they don't look at congestion, complex traffic routes, other network dynamics, latency, or any of these things when they're looking to deliver one to five megabits of speed. Any of us who have broadband Internet recognize that, for one, broadband isn't defined by five megabits, and two, most of the time, they don't deliver on what they're saying.

CIRA has been going to a number of municipalities to help them fund these tests so that each municipality can determine within their own community exactly where they have and don't have Internet, and the exact speeds that people are experiencing, because they test it on an ongoing basis. It's not just one click, it does the test, and then it's done.

Would you agree that this would be a great avenue for all municipalities to take? They would be able to provide the data themselves and say they've done this and understand totally what the coverage is within their communities.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, absolutely. I'll let Sara answer this one as well.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Yes, absolutely. You have that understanding, but certainly one of our great challenges here is not just speed but actual bandwidth, so even if you're in a community that has better speed that's served by fibre, it's the bandwidth that ends up bringing you to a grinding halt.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Am I done?

The Chair:

You're done.

I'm going to jump in again.

That's a common theme we keep hearing, si if you have any maps that represent speed, bandwidth, or connectivity in your communities, could you please forward them to the clerk? That would be helpful. Thank you.

Mr. Stewart, you have the final two minutes.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you very much.

It's been an interesting conversation. Thanks for your advocacy. That's really important.

Since we are getting near the end now, and I just have two minutes, I am wondering if there is anything you would like to add that perhaps you haven't been able to say over this course of interviews.

Mr. Ray Orb:

I'll make a quick comment and I'll ask Sara to make a comment as well.

I think we need to do a lot more work. I know Mr. Bossio has been very active on this file. We have been working through Rural Forum with the Liberal rural caucus on this issue, and we need to talk not only to the Liberal government but to the Conservative and NDP members of Parliament to get better feedback on what's happening in their ridings across Canada.

We need to work through FCM to do a lot more on this file. We see these Canadian programs, such as Connect to Innovate. The programs have been very effective, but we need to do more work. It's a step in the right direction, as I think we stated before, so we're pleased with it.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Perhaps Sara could comment.

Ms. Sara Brown:

Thank you very much for the opportunity to speak.

I really can't stress enough that the gaps we see in the north are limiting our ability to grow and participate in the global economy and to move our challenges ahead with respect to education, health, and all those sorts of things. It's critically important to moving forward as territories.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

That will wrap it up for today.

Thank you very much to our witnesses for appearing today. There's been lots of good information.

Again, I'm going to reiterate that whatever you can submit to us, be it the maps or any pilot projects, the sooner the better would be extremely helpful.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Thank you.

(1200)

The Chair:

We're going to break for a very quick minute while we get the minister in. We're running on a short clock, so we're going to suspend.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

It was great to see you, Ray and Sara. Take care.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Thank you.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

I want to inform the committee that we are short on time and we need to leave a bit of time towards the end to adopt our motion, or, rather, the supplementary—

Mr. Maxime Bernier: My motion?

The Chair: No, not yours. Yours has already passed—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: I will be cutting down some of the time as we go through, just so everybody has an opportunity to speak.

Having said that, we welcome today the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, with her officials David McGovern and Nipun Vats.

We are glad to have you here today and we look forward to your presentation. You have up to 10 minutes.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan (Minister of Science):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Good morning, everyone.[Translation]

I am happy to be here with you today.[English]

Mr. Chair, thank you for the opportunity to be here on the occasion of the tabling of the supplementary estimates (B) for 2017-18.

As you will remember, I last appeared before this committee in May. I am honoured today to provide you with an update on what I have been doing since then to champion science in this country. I will preface my remarks by emphasizing that all the actions I have taken have been in pursuit of our government's long-term vision for the future of science in Canada.

I recently shared that vision at the Canadian Science Policy Conference. It can be summed up in three points: we want to strengthen research, strengthen evidence-based decision-making, and strengthen our culture of curiosity.

At the heart of our vision are the people who power science, the researchers, lab technicians, academic staff, and students, whose collective contributions improve Canada's science community every day. Ours is a vision that sees Canadian science and our many outstanding scientists re-energized in a forward-looking and bold global pursuit of new knowledge.

Right now, Canada is seen around the world as a progressive country empowering its scientists to make breakthroughs that could change the way we understand ourselves and the world around us. When I was at the G7 in Italy last month, I was proud to hear that Canada is viewed as a beacon for science around the world.[Translation]

This is the right time to follow through on this momentum, and I am happy to tell you that the government is working hard on this.[English]

For example, I recently fulfilled my top mandate commitment by joining the Prime Minister in naming Dr. Mona Nemer as Canada's new chief science advisor. Dr. Nemer is a highly accomplished medical researcher, a former university executive, and an award-winning scholar who is recognized internationally for her contributions to academia. Her job is to provide our government with independent, non-partisan scientific advice. Dr. Nemer will gather the most cutting-edge science and present her advice to me, the Prime Minister, and cabinet.

It is then my job as Minister of Science to incorporate her findings at the cabinet table so that we can make decisions about the things Canadians care about most: their health and safety, the security of their families and communities, their jobs and prosperity, the environment, climate, and the economy.

Prime Minister Trudeau announced Dr. Nemer's appointment the same day that the first-ever Prime Minister's science fair was held here in Ottawa. Why? Our government wanted to connect the big news of the day with the big things that young Canadians are doing to advance science. We want young people to know that their scientific achievements are recognized and have a home on Parliament Hill. This is one of many steps we have taken to encourage young people to be curious and to pursue their ambitions.

We also launched the second phase of our highly successful #ChooseScience campaign this fall. So far, the ads have aired over 2.2 million times and have reached over 520,000 Canadians, with 108,000 Canadians reacting to, commenting on, and sharing the social media ads. It also attracted more than 25,000 visits to our #ChooseScience web page, and more than 55,000 schools now have our campaign posters in their halls.

I'm a strong supporter of programs like these that embolden young people to choose science.

(1210)

[Translation]

That is the culture of curiosity I was telling you about.[English]

Our challenge today continues to be shaping that culture so it welcomes all people. That's why I've made it my personal mission to right the gender equity and diversity scales in academia. I believe we must improve access to opportunities so that everyone has a shot at contributing to the future of our country. That's why I instituted new equity requirements in the Canada excellence research chairs competition, one of the most prestigious research programs in Canada. We also strengthened our efforts to address the under-representation of four designated groups in the Canada research chairs program: women, indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, and visible minorities.

I am so proud to be able to say to you today that my message seems to be getting through. We have a record-setting number of women nominated for both the Canada research chairs and the Canada 150 research chairs competition. Specifically, in this latest round of Canada research chairs nominations, 42% are women, the highest it has ever been. Budget 2017 put forward $117 million for the Canada 150 research chairs, a one-time fund that allows universities to recruit internationally based scholars, including Canadian expat researchers who wish to return home.

The preliminary numbers are in, and they show that the applicants are 62% women and 39% expat Canadians who see the future of their research careers here in Canada. I believe these results wouldn't have come about if it were not for the bold action I have taken to right the gender equity and diversity scales in academia.

Perhaps as further evidence of our international reputation for modern, liberalized science policy, Montreal was chosen this year as the first-ever Canadian host of the international Gender Summit. Earlier this month, Montreal welcomed more than 600 advocates of gender equality from science, innovation, and development around the world. It was a great honour to participate in such a historic event, and I'm awed, humbled, and inspired by the many stories that were shared about women who are making a difference in the sciences around the world.

As you know, as part of my mandate to champion science in this country, I also commissioned a review of federal funding for science, the first of its kind in more than 40 years.

(1215)

[Translation]

I thank the distinguished members of the committee for their work.[English]

The panel gave me more than 200 pages and 35 recommendations to consider. I agree with the majority of the recommendations and have already taken action to implement many of them. These include capping the renewals of Tier 1 Canada research chairs and announcing the creation of the Canada research coordinating committee.

I also launched a network of centres of excellence competition this summer that puts a premium on multidisciplinary, multinational, and bold research initiatives.

I expressed my support for replacing the Science, Technology and Innovation Council with a more nimble, public-facing advisory body. In the coming months I will move forward with a new, more open and transparent science and innovation council so that government can benefit from independent experts working in these fields.

There will be more action to come on the implementation of the panel's recommendations, and I look forward to your support of my efforts.

As well as my work in Ottawa, I have the privilege of visiting Canadian campuses and communities from coast to coast to coast. Meeting with researchers on the ground is such an important way for me to get a sense of the state of play in science at the moment.[Translation]

Quite recently, I had the opportunity of visiting the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms.[English]

MILA, as it is called, is world renowned for breakthroughs in machine learning. It has more than 150 researchers in deep learning, the largest academic concentration in this field in the world.

To support Canada's world-class work in artificial intelligence, this year's budget invests $125 million to create a pan-Canadian artificial intelligence strategy.

I want to underscore the important lesson this investment offers. Canada's current strength in artificial intelligence is a direct result of investments and investigator-led fundamental research made some 30 years ago.

At the time, many thought machine learning was the stuff of science fiction. That skepticism did not deter scientists like Geoffrey Hinton from applying for funding to pursue their interests in artificial intelligence. That we are now realizing the returns of those early investments shows the wisdom of investing in discovery research across the board.

We know that when it comes to science in this country, a culture change will not happen overnight. Still, look how far we've come in the last six months and in the last two years.

With that, I look forward to answering the committee's questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump right into questions.

Go ahead, Mr. Sheehan.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much, and Minister, thank you for the presentation.

You're talking about some of the changes that are happening. In my own home, my daughter, who is 16, has just switched from humanities to science and math. My daughter is also a Métis. My question is going to be specific because I'm also chair of the northern Ontario caucus, and I have a number of first nations in my riding and across the north.

What can we do to work with Canada's indigenous people to elevate science in this great country? In my riding, in Garden River, areas that are now campgrounds were once places where native peoples went and got traditional medicines and recognized a whole bunch of things, all before the western world arrived. What can we do to elevate that?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'll tell you what we've been doing and what more we can be doing. We have this #ChooseScience campaign. The reason we have it is that we have to build the pipeline.

All children are born curious. They want to discover. They want to explore. They pull apart the nearest pen and they'll dismantle the microphone or whatever's nearby. It is our job to foster that natural curiosity through elementary school, high school, and beyond.

We want to attract our young people to the STEM careers—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and I'll add art and design, but it's not enough to attract them; we want to retain them. I'm very much focused on building that pipeline. I make it part of my mandate, when I travel to meet with young people, to hear their experiences and to hopefully encourage them to think about the STEM disciplines.

This past weekend, I was at the University of Toronto Scarborough, back where I used to teach, and I met with 100 girls in grade 9. They are interested in STEM. Every one of those students, when they asked questions, asked about the challenges of being a woman in science. These are kids who want to go into STEM fields.

This summer I had the privilege of being in the Arctic, where I had done research. I was able to meet with indigenous students, and I think there's a lot of work we can be doing there. I also think Canada needs to listen to indigenous peoples—first nations, Métis, Inuit. You can't live on the land for thousands of years if you cannot read the sky, the land, and the water. We have much to learn from indigenous peoples when it comes to the environment, when it comes to thinking about our relationship with the world. We have to recognize who owns that knowledge, and I think there's a lot of work to be done in bringing traditional knowledge and western science together and sharing information both ways.

(1220)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

We recently did an IP study. We heard of a lot of the research that's going on in universities, which is great.

In the Sault, we have a university. We have Sault College and the Heritage Discovery Centre. What can the ministry do to promote more research, more science, more of that kind of work at our colleges and our polytechnical institutes?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm very clear. All our post-secondary institutions have a role within the post-secondary ecosystem. That means our universities, our colleges, and our polytechnics. We have to fund all of them.

The colleges do tremendous work. The applied research that's done.... I have Humber College in my community. I'm so proud to be able to serve that college. I'm told from the college sector that I have visited the most technology access centres, the TAC programs, of any science minister ever.

This summer we were at Niagara College. At lunch we sat down with members of the community. They explained how the college helps them with producing their food and wine products, overcoming challenges they have, and how the college is a source of regional economic development.

Lunch was with the food and wine industry. Later in the day we met with advanced manufacturing, and they gave us the same message. They come to the college with a challenge; the college can turn it around in three or four months and really help their business.

We have the college and community innovation program and our technology access centres, and I hope you all take the time to visit them.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

I'm going to remind everybody that we're very tight on time, so I'm going to stick to the five minutes.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have five minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you.

Thank you, Minister, for being here today, and thank you for bringing your plethora of staff with you in tow. You have always been very generous to me, and I certainly appreciate that.

I have some questions for you. Particularly, let's start with the Naylor report. It has been 234 days now. We're still waiting on the 35 recommendations and your position on a number of them. You have highlighted some, but there are still some outstanding.

When can we expect those ones to be delivered?

(1225)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I will begin by saying that many people joining us today are interns who are here with ISED, and I know this committee would be really pleased to welcome them. I know our focus is a big part on young people.

Thank you for asking about the fundamental science review. I commissioned it. It's the first time this has been done in 40 years. I can't imagine any other system that has gone without a comprehensive review in 40 years. I undertook this review to get the evidence to be able to act.

There was concern out in the community that this report would be buried. I insisted that it be released at the public policy forum so we could begin something that has never happened in this country, which is a discussion on research and research funding. That discussion is happening.

I was very clear in the spring that I agree with the majority of the recommendations, and I plan to act on them in the short, medium, and long term.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you mind if I ask then, Minister, what the holdup is? What can we help you with in terms of helping to speed this along a little bit?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I really appreciate your offer. It takes time. There are 35 recommendations. You can't change a complex ecosystem quickly overnight.

Let me tell you, on the networks of centres of excellence program, that we changed the rules for it, the term limits, so that former networks of centres of excellence could apply for funding.

On the Canada research coordinating committee, this is really important. As I go across the country, what I hear from the researchers is, “I might be able to fund my lab or my tool, but I can't get the money to operate it, so it's of no use.” By creating that coordinating committee—it's going to have the deputy minister of ISED, the deputy minister of health, the heads of our three granting agencies, and CFI—we're going to be able to better coordinate and harmonize these research programs.

I'll talk also about the Tier 1s—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You've been on record as saying that part of the problem with the report is you don't think that putting an unelected body over the funding model as being a hurdle for the report. If that's the hurdle, I would hope you'd just say that and let us know so that we can continue to advocate for and work with the science community on that.

Do you want to shift gears quickly to PEARL funding?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan: Can I—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux: Let me go there first.

On the PEARL funding, the CCAR initiative that our government put in place reached its end of cycle. There was a lot of concern within the science community regarding the funding for PEARL. You swooped in at the 11th hour with the Minister of the Environment to find $1.6 million of transition funding, but it doesn't seem as if there's a transition to anything. There is no commitment past those 18 months.

Can you provide your solution to that?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Our government understands that Arctic research matters more than ever because of climate change. That's why we signed the Paris Agreement. That's why we've put a price on carbon, and that's why we've invested billions of dollars in climate change research and adaptation and mitigation and in clean technology—and I mean billions of dollars.

I sat on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. I was asked by my government to serve on it. In 1995 the IPCC said that humans are having a discernible impact on climate. The former environment minister under the previous government recognized that climate change was real in 2012, so while we've invested—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm sorry, Minister, I have about five seconds. Do you have a plan for after the 18 months?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—billions, the previous government used PEARL as a one-off solution to solve a political problem.

We understand that the Arctic is far too important and we will be coming forward with a comprehensive, thoughtful program, but since you've asked about PEARL, it is unique in Canada. It is our most northern facility. It looks at the atmosphere, climate change, ozone, and the interaction among the atmosphere, ice, and ocean, so we are maintaining the operations and research of PEARL.

(1230)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'll take that as a hard no.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move on to Mr. Stewart. You have five minutes.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Welcome, Minister.

I have hardly any time, so I'll whip through.

In a letter I sent you dated September 29, I asked, among other things, about the extent to which you are prepared to implement Naylor report recommendations. Your office has promised a response, but I haven't yet received one. I'm still hoping I might get a letter, but also, would you answer the three questions I have here?

The first two concern the Naylor report, so I'm going to group two questions here. There are 35 recommendations. I recognize that you have gone some way to implement some of them, but I would suggest those are the more minor recommendations. Two doozies in the report have not yet been addressed. The first recommendation in the Naylor report is to have a new act of Parliament to create a national advisory council on research and innovation. I am wondering whether you will draft and table such legislation.

The second question about the Naylor report concerns the really big one, which is the request to increase annual funding from $3.5 billion to $4.8 billion over a four-year phase-in period. Will you assure the scientific community that this increase will occur?

Thank you.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'll begin with the letter. Thank you for your letter. The reason it has been delayed is that a big change came in, which was that we appointed Canada's first chief science advisor, and we wanted the letter to reflect that. I'd be happy to talk with you about the chief science advisor.

Just so you are aware, my office offered to have a meeting with your office twice, and you know I have come over and personally offered the same—

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Yes, but everything in writing is more important in this case.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

We did offer while that's being drafted, and it is on my desk today, but two offers were made by my office as well as my personal offer on two occasions.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you very much.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

When it comes to the fundamental science review, I think it's important to remember that I commissioned this report because I wanted the evidence, and it gives us a good path forward. I've talked about the action taken, the networks of centres of excellence, the Canada research coordinating committee. I haven't talked about the Tier 1s, and I'd like to—

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

I have my specific question, so—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—but I'm going to talk about the money, if you'll allow me to finish.

Understand that in the previous government, in 10 years we fell from third to eighth position and from 18th to 26th for higher education R and D and business R and D respectively, and now Canada is out of the top 30 in business R and D for the first time. A big hole has been dug and there is no quick fix, but we are in a budget process and we are working hard. We are building the awareness and education of how important discovery research is, and science has no greater champion than myself.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay. Thank you.

How about NACRI, then?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you.

On the question about NACRI, what the committee suggested is that we should have an advisory committee on science and innovation. We absolutely agree.

With our new appointments process—which, as you know, is open, transparent, and merit-based—it takes time, but you will see coming forward in the next few months our launch of that new process. It's really important that this be outward-facing and open and transparent and that the committee knows what's being discussed.

I will also build on the Canada research coordinating committee. You're a former researcher and you understand some of the challenges that our researchers face—

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

I understand the challenges in talking to ministers, too, so my question is—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Well, I'll just finish by saying—

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

—will there be an new act of Parliament? That's the question.

(1235)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

For...?

Mr. Kennedy Stewart: For NACRI.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan: What we are hoping—

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

As requested by the Naylor report.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—on the chief science advisor....

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

That is not a new Parliament act either. That's my point.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Well, we need to build permanence into that. We want permanence within this, and I think it's really important that we build an advisory system within Parliament.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay. I realize my time's short, but that's a “no” on the act. Thank you—

The Chair:

Your time's up. Sorry.

Mr. Longfield, you have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here, and for bringing all the interns.

My question reflects some of that, the difference between science and innovation, and maybe builds on Mr. Stewart's comments. Also, Mr. Jeneroux's comments around PEARL were, I think, very to the point as well.

We need to look at continuing to fund research. The innovation funding that we've put in place is one thing, but innovation doesn't start on its own. Before we have innovation, it needs science. I met with D-Wave yesterday. They're looking at quantum machine learning, machine learning like we've never seen, and they frankly don't know what it is and need to have some scientists play with quantum computers to figure out what the applications could be for quantum machine learning.

Last week we announced $1 million of innovation funding to Mirexus Biotechnologies in Guelph. They're looking for new uses of corn nanoparticles, which are new in themselves. I asked how many staff he has, and he said they have 30 staff there, but they have 15 researchers in various universities across North America who have been funded by our government. When we look at developing solutions that we don't even know where we're going with, we need scientists working and being curious in the background.

On the importance of science funding, as in the Naylor report, and the importance of long-term funding, as in the PEARL funding that we've been talking about, could you speak to the advocacy that you're doing with our government to maintain the focus on science funding separately from innovation funding?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you for the question.

In the very first budget we made a $2-billion investment in research and innovation infrastructure. That's an important investment, because much of the infrastructure was 25 years and older, but I've always been clear that buildings don't do research; people do. We have to invest in our researchers.

I've talked about the cuts that happened under the previous government—third to eighth, 18th to 26th—so we made the largest investment in our three federal granting councils in a decade in that first budget. Unlike the previous government, that was unfettered money, meaning it was not tied money.

I can talk about other large investments: the $950 million for the superclusters, the $900 million for the Canada first research excellence fund, $221 million.... You seem to have a question. I'll let you ask your question.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you. I nod faster as I get closer to my questions.

The role of the chief science advisor is something new to Canada. She's going to be playing a role in tying innovation and the interns you've brought with you who are working in innovation to the scientists who are in the labs right now. How is that role governed? What's the governance structure under the chief science advisor for us to make those very important ties between science and innovation?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you for the question.

I'm really delighted. We have a new chief science advisor. I'll let you know a bit of the process we took to get here.

It was the first major science consultation in 10 years. We wrote to the research community, we wrote to stakeholders, and we wrote to all parliamentarians so that people could feed in on what this position should look like. It came back very clearly that this should be a chief science adviser. Then we contacted the chief science advisers in Australia, Israel, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and we built a made-in-Canada position. Remember, this was a position that was cut by the previous government. We launched the search for the chief science advisor in December 2016.

Through our new, open, merit-based, transparent process, we have a new chief science advisor, and she's terrific. She is a prominent heart researcher. She's a former vice-president of research at the University of Ottawa. She has provided advice nationally and internationally. She's a member of the Order of Canada.

Her job is to provide the Prime Minister, me, and cabinet with scientific advice—to collate the best known information of the time, to bring it together, and provide that advice. It's our job to consider the science, evidence, and facts along with the other evidence we need to make decisions—regional development, economy, diversity, equity, and so on. It's an advisory role.

(1240)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to hit our lightning round.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have three minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I have a generous three minutes, I assume, Mr. Chair.

Quickly, Minister, you talk about the funding for the granting councils; however, there was no new funding in the 2017 budget. The Naylor report calls for increased funding for those. You've criticized our past government for boutique funding; however, you've invested in stem cells, space exploration, and quantum computing. I'm hoping that we'll see some more funding for these granting councils when it comes to the next budget.

I want to continue my question on PEARL and CHARS. In an interview with CBC you referred to the CCAR, the climate change and atmospheric research initiative, as a one-off to climate research. Can you elaborate on what was meant when you say “one-off”, as you also said it again here today?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you for the question.

Before you launched into that, you talked about space, stem cells, and quantum research. In space, yes, we invested $379 million because it's for the future. It's science, technology—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, I have the numbers. I only have three minutes, if you don't mind—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

For genomics it's $237 million, and this is because these are things that we're going to lead on in the future. If we want to transform medicine, it's regenerative medicine, precision medicine, quantum materials, quantum computing, and artificial intelligence. Those really matter.

You asked about CCAR. Programs have a start date and programs sunset, so CCAR is coming to an end. I've asked my officials to work—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You've said it's coming to an end—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

It's because it sunsets. There was an end date that was provided by your government.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Back up a minute. CFCAS was something that we replaced with CCAR. That's where PEARL funding comes from. You've now said that CCAR is no longer going to be funded. You have provided no alternative to that. PEARL was about to sunset because of that, and again, until the eleventh hour you came in and left a bunch of these scientists curious as to what the alternative to this is. I've given you two opportunities now, Minister, to answer this question and you have yet to answer it.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If I could jump in and answer instead of listening to a lot of banter—

The Chair:

You have about 30 seconds.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

CCAR is sunsetting. That was done under the previous government. We did save PEARL, because it's a unique facility in this country.

The previous government did not believe in climate change—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You just said we did, Minister. You just said we did—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

It did not invest in climate change—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You said earlier that we did believe in climate change.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

The intergovernmental panel was set up in 1995. It finally came to climate change being real in 2012.

We have invested billions. There are numerous opportunities for funding, and our officials are working with the researchers to see if there are other opportunities.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are going to move to Mr. Jowhari. You have three minutes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you.

Welcome, Minister.

In your opening remarks, you specifically talked about the Canada 150 research chairs. You also touched on the under-representation of four designated groups.

Within the three minutes I have, can you expand on what you are hoping to accomplish with the Canada research chairs program and how you would see that bringing equity and diversity into those four designated groups that are under-represented?

Thank you.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Research excellence and diversity go hand in hand. In a competitive global economy, we cannot afford to leave any of our talent on the sidelines.

We know when people come from different backgrounds that they bring different experiences, ideas, and perspectives. This may allow them to ask different research questions and use different methodologies that are going to get results that benefit everyone.

I'll give you an example. I think of the first voice recognition software, which was calibrated to only male voices, or the first artificial heart valves, which were created by researchers who happened to be largely men. They created artificial heart valves that fitted only the male-sized heart.

We have excellent researchers in this country. I want them to have a shot. I have spent 25 years fighting for more diversity in research and I'm going to continue to do so.

(1245)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

I have access to a large base of international scholars, researchers both within Canada and outside of Canada. How can the Canada 150 research chairs program facilitate getting them to either stay in Canada or come to Canada?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Canada 150 research chairs were announced in budget 2017. The idea was to attract international top talent from around the world, as well as expat Canadians.

When people come here, they will build research teams. The average size of these teams is about 34 or 35 people. They will train the next generation of researchers. They will make new discoveries that could lead to innovations, products, and services.

There was an overwhelming response from around the world. Researchers applied directly to the universities, and one university told us they had 500 applications. We've had the intake. There have now been those nominations for review. The results are tremendous, with 62% being women. That's a real change. Also, 42% are expat Canadians who want to come home. They see their future in research here in Canada.

That's what we heard at the G7. I was at the G7 12 hours after we had launched our new chief science advisor, Dr. Nemer. That was the news of the summit. They wanted to know. They were excited about our commitment to science and to evidence-based decision-making.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

I'm done, but I'm going to lobby for a repeat of that next year.

The Chair:

You're done. Thank you very much.

Thank you for playing. We're now moving to our super-duper lightning-speed round.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have two minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

There are six other programs that are supported under CCAR. What is your plan for those programs?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

As I've explained, CCAR is sunsetting. Our officials are looking at ways to work with the researchers.

We are taking a thoughtful, comprehensive approach to the Arctic. Our Prime Minister has announced a new Arctic policy framework, which means working with the territories, working with northern communities, and working with indigenous peoples. It will be a framework for the north by the north.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, do you think groups like the network on climate and aerosols, the Canadian Arctic GEOTRACES program, VITALS—Ventilation, Interactions and Transports Across the Labrador Sea—the Canadian network for regional climate and weather processes, and the changing cold regions network will take comfort in the fact that you're answering questions like this today, as opposed to answering what your plan is or what the future is?

Saying that you continue to have these discussions is doing nothing for these programs that are at risk in the same way the PEARL program was.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

As I said, it was your government that gave the sunset date for this program. We are working with the researchers to see if there are other areas that they can apply to. We have invested on the order of two and a half billion dollars in climate change, and that's in straight research, adaptation, and mitigation. It was your government that cut the adaptation impacts research group at Environment Canada.

(1250)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

For those listening at home, Minister, you're usually not this partisan. It's a bit of a surprise, to be honest with you.

However, universities are looking for funding for the next.... They want a plan. They want consistent funding. Can you give comfort right now that what we saw in the last budget was an anomaly and that we'll continue to see funding for universities?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Let me be very clear. Science has no greater champion than myself.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Bossio. You have two minutes.

Wait, it's Mr. Baylis. You just showed up there. [Translation]

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Madam Minister, thank you for having come to meet with us today.

It is very important to invest in pure science. As we know, it is the basis of a scientific society. Currently, Canada—and particularly Quebec—has a significant head start in the area of artificial intelligence. I would not like to see us lose this advantage.

Can you tell us what the government is doing to maintain our lead in this area? [English]

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you for the question.

We were in Montreal two weeks ago to look at the work around artificial intelligence. In budget 2017, our government invested $125 million in artificial intelligence. Why? It seems to be at this tipping point. We have been funding discovery research linked to AI since 1982. Even by the late 1990s, people really weren't sure what it was. There were those continued investments in fundamental research.

It is now at the tipping point, and Canada really has an advantage because we had the leaders in this field. We built the talent base here. When this investment was made...we're attracting companies and we're attracting talent to our companies and institutions. It was amazing. One place told us that they are attracting 10 to 12 people internationally every two weeks.

I hope you all take a look at an article in The Economist from about a month ago. That article talks about “Maple Valley”. People want to know how Canada has been so successful in artificial intelligence. As a government, we've invested $125 million in the pan-Canadian artificial intelligence strategy. It's focused in Toronto, Montreal—

The Chair:

I'm going to have to—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—and Edmonton and it's also going to look at the legal—

The Chair:

I'm going to have to cut you off.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—and ethical and societal issues.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, for the last two minutes, we have Mr. Stewart.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you very much.

According to CANSIM table 358-0146, in the darkest days of the Harper administration—that was in 2012, and you remember the marches on Parliament Hill—36,822 federal personnel were engaged in science and tech activities for the government. There were 35,496 researchers on the federal payroll when you formed government. Now there are 34,594 researchers that are employed by the federal government. That's 2,000 fewer than Harper employed in 2012 and 1,000 fewer than when you formed government in 2015.

How do you account for this decline?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you for the question. I will speak specifically and then go out from there.

I was a part of hiring. I worked with my colleague, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans, and the Canadian Coast Guard, and hired 135 scientists, the largest number of scientists ever hired at one time. I have brought together the deputy ministers of science-based departments, but for the first time we're meeting for eight-hour meetings. We did that for the first time in June 2016 and we did it this year in June. It focuses on HR and how to build the talent pipeline. The average age of a civil servant is 37, and it's higher for scientists, so how do we build that pipeline?

Another area—

(1255)

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Why are we still losing scientists? We've lost 1,000 researchers since you came to office. We've had all the platitudes about science and I really like your work and I respect you as a person, but these are the hard numbers provided by StatsCan. I say that it's tied to funding. If you're not funding your research institutes, you're not going to be able to hire people.

The Chair:

Answer very briefly, please.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Part of it is retirements, but I just want to finish what I was saying.

We are doing this differently, bringing together the deputy ministers of the science-based departments to look at HR, the talent pipeline, science infrastructure, and IT management systems. That is some of the work we're doing. That's why in budget 2017 you saw that I'm to come forward with a science infrastructure strategy. It takes time, but we are working very hard to dig out of this hole.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Unfortunately, we are out of time.

Thank you very much, Minister.

Nobody leave yet—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Chair, may I thank the committee, if you don't mind?

The Chair:

Yes, you may.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the committee for allowing me to come this morning. Thank you for your questions, and most importantly, thank you for the work you've been doing on that intellectual property study. Thank you, everyone, for your tremendous work.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(5), the committee will now dispose of the supplementary estimates (B) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018.

Do I have unanimous consent to deal with all votes in one motion?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay. ATLANTIC CANADA OPPORTUNITIES AGENCY Vote 5b—Grants and contributions..........$40,584,308

(Vote 5b agreed to on division) CANADIAN NORTHERN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY Vote 1b—Operating expenditures..........$313,028 Vote 5b—Contributions..........$4,537,297

(Votes 1b and 5b agreed to on division) CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY Vote 1b—Operating expenditures..........$8,612,533 Vote 5b—Capital expenditures..........$4,200,532

(Votes 1b and 5b agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY Vote 1b—Operating expenditures..........$23,903,710 Vote 10b—Grants and contributions..........$163,305,969

(Votes 1b and 10b agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION Vote 5b—Grants and contributions..........$11,531,673

(Vote 5b agreed to on division) ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY OF CANADA FOR THE REGIONS OF QUEBEC Vote 5b—Grants and contributions..........$5,000,000

(Vote 5b agreed to on division) NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA Vote 10b—Grants and contributions..........$1

(Vote 10b agreed to on division) NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH COUNCIL Vote 1b—Operating expenditures..........$141,000 Vote 5b—Grants..........$3,332,270

(Votes 1b and 5b agreed to on division) SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL Vote 1b—Operating expenditures..........$1,099,655

(Vote 1b agreed to on division) STANDARDS COUNCIL OF CANADA Vote 1b—Payments to the Council..........$1

(Vote 1b agreed to on division) STATISTICS CANADA Vote 1b—Program expenditures..........$14,348,243

(Vote 1b agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report the votes to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Excellent. Thank you all very much for collaborating and co-operating to make sure that we got out of here on time.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Nous allons ouvrir la séance. Bienvenue à tous.

On m'a dit que nous serons peut-être appelés à voter.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Peut-être pas.

Le président:

C'est une possibilité

Nous allons commencer sans plus tarder, car je tiens à utiliser au maximum tout le temps dont nous disposons.

Bienvenue à la réunion 87 du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, nous allons poursuivre l'étude de la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales du Canada.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui Sara Brown, membre de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités et Ray Orb, président du Forum rural de la FCM.

Vous êtes les seuls témoins aujourd'hui. Nous pensions n'avoir qu'une demi-heure à notre disposition, à cause du vote, mais nous avons maintenant plus de temps pour vous interroger.

Je vais vous laisser le soin de décider comment partager votre temps.

Monsieur Orb, vous disposez de 10 minutes. Allez-y.

M. Ray Orb (président, Forum rural, Fédération canadienne des municipalités):

Merci.

Bonjour.

J'aimerais commencer par remercier le Comité permanent de nous avoir invités à participer à son étude sur la connectivité à large bande.

Je m'appelle Ray Orb et je suis président du Forum rural de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, ainsi que président de la Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities.

Sara Brown, chef de la direction de la Northwest Territories Association of Communities, s'associe à moi aujourd'hui.

La Fédération canadienne des municipalités ou la FCM est la voix nationale des administrations municipales du Canada. Elle compte près de 2 000 municipalités membres dans toutes les régions du Canada et représente 91 % de l'ensemble de la population canadienne. Nous comptons parmi nos membres les plus grandes villes du Canada, ainsi que de petites collectivités urbaines et rurales et 20 associations municipales des divers territoires et provinces.

Au nom des administrations municipales, la FCM s'efforce d'apporter des solutions locales aux défis nationaux et de donner aux collectivités de tailles diverses les moyens de bâtir un pays plus prospère, plus agréable et plus durable.

Depuis longtemps, la FCM demande une participation accrue du gouvernement fédéral au développement des infrastructures de télécommunication qui sont d'une importance cruciale pour la vie sociale, culturelle et économique des collectivités rurales, nordiques et éloignées du Canada. Nous avons présenté la perspective des municipalités au cours de diverses consultations fédérales sur les services de télécommunication, notamment à propos de l'attribution des bandes de fréquence et de l'élaboration des programmes de financement fédéraux de connectivité à large bande tels que Un Canada branché et Brancher pour innover.

Au nom de ses membres, la Fédération canadienne des municipalités a collaboré étroitement avec le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes afin d'établir sa définition des services de télécommunication de base. C'est pourquoi nous avons accueilli avec joie l'annonce faite par le CRTC l'an dernier relativement à l'adoption d'un objectif de service universel selon lequel tous les Canadiens devraient avoir accès à des services Internet à large bande sur des réseaux fixes et sans fil mobiles.

La FCM a également applaudi le gouvernement fédéral lorsqu'il a annoncé, en 2016, que son nouveau programme Brancher pour innover investirait jusqu'à 500 millions de dollars pour que les collectivités rurales et éloignées puissent bénéficier d'un service Internet à haute vitesse. Nos communautés rurales et éloignées sont trop nombreuses à être dépourvues d'un accès de base à des services à large bande que beaucoup de Canadiens tiennent pour acquis, un accès crucial pour les initiatives modernes en matière de commerce et d'éducation. Des programmes comme Brancher pour innover couplés à la volonté de rendre l'accès universel obligatoire contribueront à faire évoluer la situation.

Cependant, le gouvernement fédéral doit proposer des programmes de financement à long terme et prévisibles pour que l'objectif du service universel proposé par le CRTC devienne réalité. Seul ce type de financement permettra aux promoteurs de projets de prendre des décisions à long terme en matière de technologie, ainsi que pour la mise en oeuvre des services et des forfaits de service.

Il faut savoir que toutes les collectivités sont différentes et qu'il faudra nécessairement faire appel à des technologies différentes pour accéder à des services à large bande abordables et fiables. C'est pourquoi la FCM préconise une certaine souplesse dans les programmes de financement fédéraux au moment de définir l'admissibilité des infrastructures à large bande. Tant l'infrastructure de base que la connexion du dernier kilomètre sont des éléments à prendre en compte obligatoirement si nous espérons atteindre l'objectif de l'accès universel. Si les programmes de financement ne portent que sur les projets de connexion du dernier kilomètre, de nombreuses collectivités rurales ne disposant pas d'une infrastructure de base moderne, seront tout simplement laissées pour compte.

La FCM estime que chacun de ces éléments est important pour le développement réussi de services à large bande. Il est extrêmement important que tous les programmes fédéraux de financement concernant l'infrastructure d'Internet à large bande accordent la priorité aux secteurs mal desservis qui sont les plus difficiles à équiper. L'accès Internet à large bande est tout simplement indispensable à la vie moderne et ce service a la capacité de transformer les régions rurales et nordiques du Canada.

Les réseaux modernes contribuent à la croissance économique en améliorant la productivité, en donnant accès à de nouveaux services, en soutenant l'innovation et en améliorant l'accès au marché. Ils donnent aux Canadiens la possibilité de collaborer, de travailler, de partager et d'apprendre. Malheureusement, l'écart en matière de disponibilité de la large bande est une réalité dans les collectivités mal desservies. Les Canadiens qui n'ont pas accès à la large bande sont trop nombreux et d'autres sont mal desservis, ne disposant que d'une bande insuffisante et d'une capacité de réseau inadéquate pour répondre à la demande des utilisateurs.

(1105)



L'approche actuelle du Canada vis-à-vis de la politique concernant le service à large bande accuse un retard important faisant en sorte que les populations des régions rurales et éloignées du Canada ne peuvent bénéficier de vitesses et de technologies équivalentes à celles qui sont largement disponibles dans les secteurs urbains. Un plan fédéral visant à améliorer la connectivité dans les régions rurales doit en tenir compte.

La FCM croit par ailleurs que la question du coût explique dans une certaine mesure le retard qu'accusent les Canadiens dans l'adoption de la large bande. C'est pourquoi un plan fédéral doit donner la priorité à un service abordable.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à ma collègue Sara Brown qui va évoquer les défis auxquels font face les collectivités nordiques et éloignées du Canada dans l'accès aux services à large bande.

Mme Sara Brown (membre, Fédération canadienne des municipalités):

Merci beaucoup, Ray.

Dans le Nord canadien, de nombreuses collectivités ne peuvent tout simplement pas prendre part à l'économie numérique du Canada, faute de pouvoir se connecter à un réseau Internet fiable à haute vitesse. Les pannes et les problèmes techniques sont fréquents dans les collectivités nordiques et éloignées qui ne disposent pas d'une connexion de secours pour assurer un service continu. L'irrégularité du service a des conséquences évidentes. L'exode devient un défi de taille dans les collectivités nordiques et éloignées qui ne peuvent prendre part à l'économie numérique actuelle.

Dès que les régions éloignées du Nord auront accès à un service Internet à large bande, elles disposeront des mêmes avantages concurrentiels que les autres régions du pays et pourront réaliser des progrès notables dans les domaines du développement économique, de la santé, de l'éducation et de la sécurité.

Comme nous l'avons indiqué dans le mémoire présenté par la FCM au Comité permanent, nous estimons que le gouvernement fédéral devrait élaborer des stratégies d'investissement pour les collectivités nordiques et éloignées afin de leur offrir un service Internet équivalent à celui dont bénéficient les centres urbains, y compris en matière de vitesse et de redondance. Afin de répondre aux défis particuliers auxquels font face les collectivités éloignées en matière de connexion à Internet, il est indispensable de déployer une stratégie spéciale pour les collectivités tributaires d'une connexion par satellite.

La FCM estime par ailleurs que le gouvernement fédéral doit faire appel aux connaissances locales en matière de collecte de données pour s'assurer que des informations exactes et à jour sont utilisées au moment des prises de décisions. Les municipalités connaissent parfaitement les défis auxquels nos collectivités font face en matière d'accès aux services à large bande. Cela fait de nous des partenaires clés dans l'élaboration des programmes de financement futurs du gouvernement fédéral.

La responsabilité du gouvernement fédéral d'offrir des services Internet à large bande à tous les Canadiens, quelle que soit la région où ils habitent, revêt vraiment une importance capitale. Pour réaliser cette vision, nous estimons que tous les ordres de gouvernement sont de véritables partenaires et doivent collaborer.

Au nom des villes et des collectivités du Canada, nous remercions le Comité permanent de nous donner la possibilité de prendre part à ce débat et d'ajouter nos observations aux contributions et recommandations des autres intervenants.

Merci.

Thank you. Mahsi cho.

Le président:

Merci pour vos exposés.

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Bossio. Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Mike Bossio (Hastings—Lennox and Addington, Lib.):

Je vous remercie tous les deux d'avoir accepté de comparaître ce matin. Merci pour vos témoignages.

Je pense qu'il est juste de dire qu'il n'existe pas de modèle standard quand il s'agit d'offrir un service à large bande en région rurale. Chaque région a ses propres défis et ce sont vraiment les administrations municipales qui sont les mieux placées pour comprendre les besoins particuliers de leurs collectivités.

Cela étant dit, quel est, selon les municipalités, le meilleur moyen de mettre en place un réseau rural à large bande dans leurs collectivités?

M. Ray Orb:

Je vais tenter de répondre le premier et Sara pourra, si elle veut, ajouter ses propres commentaires.

Je pense qu'il faut garder une certaine souplesse dans la fourniture du service. Je sais que certaines provinces peuvent adopter des approches différentes. C'est le cas par exemple de l'Alberta. La province travaille en collaboration avec certaines sociétés. En Saskatchewan, notre approche est légèrement différente, puisque nous avons affaire à un monopole, SaskTel, qui fournit la plupart des services à large bande. Dans le Nord, le service est offert par satellite, mais nous nous appuyons vraiment sur nos organisations provinciales qui collaborent avec les provinces et avec l'industrie dans ces provinces.

Selon la taille des collectivités, il me semble que la flexibilité est également un facteur. Nous avons beaucoup de collectivités diverses. Comme vous le savez, monsieur Bossio, les collectivités rurales de Saskatchewan sont assez différentes de celles de l'Ontario, mais nous faisons face aux mêmes défis, parce que la couverture Internet n'est tout simplement pas adéquate.

J'ajouterais que, dans notre province, nous faisons un excellent inventaire des lacunes dans la couverture Internet. Chaque municipalité est chargée de pointer ses lacunes.

(1110)

M. Mike Bossio:

Si l'on entre un peu plus dans les détails, on se rend compte que les municipalités et les provinces sont propriétaires d'un grand nombre de services publics. Les municipalités, bien entendu, sont responsables des routes. Ne pensez-vous pas que ce serait une bonne idée de travailler en partenariat avec le secteur privé, les services publics et les municipalités, afin de poser des conduits chaque fois que possible, lorsqu'on refait une route? C'est à ce moment-là que la pose des conduits est la moins coûteuse. En parlant des services publics, tous les foyers sont branchés au réseau électrique existant. Actuellement, les sociétés de services publics font payer une fortune aux entreprises qui installent la fibre sur leurs poteaux dans le but d'offrir ce type de service aux consommateurs.

La FCM fait-elle pression sur les municipalités ainsi que sur les services publics provinciaux afin de mettre en place les conditions qui nous permettront de travailler en partenariat?

M. Ray Orb:

Pour la FCM, il est important d'établir un partenariat à trois réunissant le gouvernement fédéral, le gouvernement provincial et les municipalités. Sur cette question, nous tenons à demander conseil à des personnes comme vous.

M. Mike Bossio:

Connaissez-vous des municipalités qui adoptent cette approche? Le gouvernement fédéral a des partenaires et nous travaillons extrêmement bien ensemble pour trouver des solutions. Nous avons eu, vous et moi, de nombreuses conversations à ce sujet. Cependant, une partie de la solution consiste à accroître la participation des municipalités. Elles ne devraient pas attendre que la solution leur parvienne toute prête; elles devraient participer à la création de la solution. Elles devraient y contribuer en faisant poser des conduits et en exerçant des pressions politiques sur les provinces et les sociétés de services publics pour les inciter à s'associer au partenariat. Est-ce que ce type de partenariat commence à se manifester?

M. Ray Orb:

Nous en avons quelques exemples et nous savons que certaines municipalités vont dans ce sens en Alberta. Je crois que 80 municipalités d'une certaine région se sont regroupées. Nous pouvons vous fournir cette information, monsieur Bossio. Je crois qu'elles ont conclu une sorte de partenariat.

L'automne dernier, alors que j'assistais à un atelier à Edmonton, en Alberta, des sociétés se sont présentées pour communiquer avec les municipalités. Elles ont défini les grandes lignes du service que nous voulons offrir dans les régions rurales et je pense que cela fonctionne assez bien.

Je vais laisser à Sara l'occasion de présenter ses propres commentaires.

Mme Sara Brown:

Nos défis sont légèrement différents, puisque nous avons un grave problème d'infrastructure de connectivité, un problème qui ne concerne pas seulement le dernier kilomètre. Par ailleurs, les administrations municipales ont moins l'occasion de participer. Nos collectivités sont si petites que leur capacité présente un grand défi. Il ne s'agit pas d'un problème de diffusion du service dans la collectivité, mais plutôt d'un problème d'acheminement du service à la collectivité.

M. Mike Bossio:

Je sais qu'il y a beaucoup de secteurs mal desservis dans les régions nordiques et éloignées. J'ai même été incapable de trouver des sociétés qui acceptaient de présenter des soumissions dans le cadre d'une initiative en intégration de l'informatique et de la téléphonie au nord de ma circonscription, dans le Sud de l'Ontario. Elles prétendaient que la densité n'était pas assez grande. Même avec 75 % des coûts d'immobilisations payés, le coût d'obtention d'une licence de bande de fréquence les empêche de tirer suffisamment de revenus pour mettre en oeuvre un tel projet.

Est-ce que vous pensez que la connexion par satellite sera la solution par défaut pour ces collectivités? Comment pouvons-nous améliorer la couverture par satellite? Il y aura toujours un problème de latence, mais est-ce que vous examinez d'autres possibilités afin de résoudre partiellement ce problème?

(1115)

Mme Sara Brown:

Certaines solutions ont été envisagées et je sais qu'elles sont réalisables si on leur consacre le financement adéquat. Cependant, dans l'état actuel des choses, il ne sera probablement jamais possible de justifier commercialement des services Internet abordables dans nos collectivités. Cela fait partie du défi.

M. Mike Bossio:

Je sais que l'on a annoncé le financement d'une infrastructure de base pour les régions nordiques du pays et qu'une telle infrastructure rendra possible une partie de la couverture de base. Même si la dorsale était suffisante, la région est-elle trop éloignée pour permettre des transmissions par micro-ondes et créer un réseau de tours hertziennes afin de connecter l'infrastructure de base? Si la distance est encore trop grande, allez-vous rester tributaires de la couverture par satellite?

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très brièvement s'il vous plaît.

Mme Sara Brown:

Les distances sont grandes et le recours aux micro-ondes ne serait pas possible dans la plupart des secteurs des territoires.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant donner la parole à M. Bernier.[Français]

Monsieur Bernier, vous disposez de sept minutes.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, PCC):

Je vous remercie beaucoup.[Traduction]

J'ai une question pour vous à propos de vos membres. Ont-ils une préférence quant aux services qu'ils souhaitent obtenir pour leurs collectivités?

Je vais préciser ma question. Parfois, les tours de télécommunication sont des sources de grandes discussions dans les collectivités et certaines municipalités n'en veulent pas. Je sais que la Loi sur les télécommunications donne au ministre d'Innovation, sciences et développement économique Canada le pouvoir de faire construire des tours pour offrir le service aux collectivités.

Qu'en pensent vos membres? Sont-ils favorables ou plutôt opposés à l'installation de tours plus nombreuses dans les villes?

M. Ray Orb:

Je peux vous répondre, monsieur Bernier. Je pense que nos membres des régions rurales seraient favorables aux tours. Nous sommes dans des régions où la population est assez clairsemée et qui ne disposent pas d'une bonne infrastructure. Par conséquent, une tour de transmission serait la bienvenue. Il en existe actuellement, mais elles sont trop espacées et pas assez nombreuses, ce qui explique l'absence de couverture.

Lorsque les entreprises de télécommunications mettent en place une nouvelle infrastructure, elles créent une installation filaire pour offrir le service aux particuliers. Par conséquent, elles doivent être connectées à la tour de transmission. Le manque d'esthétique d'une tour ne préoccupe pas nos membres des régions rurales.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

C'est une bonne nouvelle, car dans certaines municipalités de ma propre province, cela peut être le cas. C'est un défi pour le ministre, car tout le monde veut avoir de bons services. Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais rappeler à mes collègues que j'ai déposé une motion jeudi dernier, le 23 novembre, pour l'examen de la Loi sur la faillite et l'insolvabilité et la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes prêts à voter sur cette motion.

Le président:

Est-ce que vous voulez...?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Pouvons-nous tout simplement demander aux membres du Comité s'ils appuient la motion?

Le président:

Très bien.

Nous allons commencer par Lloyd et ensuite Terry.

Voulons-nous tout simplement lire la motion? Il faut nous dire quelle est la motion que vous allez lire. [Français]

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

La motion se lit comme suit: Que le Comité examine la Loi sur la faillite et l'insolvabilité, la Loi sur les arrangements avec les créanciers des compagnies et la Loi sur Investissement Canada; et que le Comité invite les intervenants compétents à témoigner d'ici la fin de 2017 afin d'informer les membres du Comité des conséquences, pour les pensionnés, des procédures de faillite entreprises par des compagnies comme Sears Canada et U.S. Steel. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je tiens à ce que l'on sache clairement quelle est la motion que vous présentez.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Je crois que nous devrions débattre de cette motion. J'aimerais poursuivre la discussion avec les témoins que nous accueillons aujourd'hui. Nous attendons des ministres.

Je pense que c'est une motion qui mérite un débat plutôt qu'un simple vote. Je pense que l'on doit prendre le temps d'en discuter.

Le président:

Très bien.

Allez-y, Terry.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Je propose de mettre fin immédiatement au débat.

Le président:

Nous avons une motion visant à mettre fin au débat. Cela ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat.

(1120)

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Pouvons-nous tenir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

Absolument.

(La motion est adoptée à 5 voix contre 3.)

Le président: Nous allons revenir à la période de questions.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Est-ce qu'il me reste encore du temps?

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Très bien.

Ma question se rapporte à ce que j'ai dit précédemment. Selon une nouvelle proposition du CRTC dans le domaine de l'accès à Internet, des communications sans fil et autres, tous les consommateurs devraient avoir un accès minimal à Internet et être en mesure d'obtenir beaucoup plus de données qu'actuellement. Que pensez-vous de cette nouvelle proposition?

M. Ray Orb:

Vous voulez parler de la vitesse de téléchargement, des mégabits par seconde?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Exactement.

M. Ray Orb:

Nous sommes en faveur de cette proposition. Nous estimons que tous les Canadiens devraient disposer d'une capacité minimale de téléchargement et de téléversement. Nous pensons que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction. Nous pensons qu'il faut d'abord étendre la couverture dans les régions rurales et éloignées du pays avant de penser à l'améliorer. Nous devons pouvoir disposer de cette couverture de base. En effet, nombreux sont les utilisateurs qui ont besoin d'une telle couverture pour exercer leurs activités commerciales. Que ce soit des agriculteurs ou d'autres gens d'affaires des régions rurales, ces utilisateurs ont besoin de disposer d'une capacité de base. Par conséquent, nous accueillons favorablement cette proposition.

Nous sommes satisfaits du financement. Bien entendu, le financement n'est jamais suffisant, mais d'autres fonds seront disponibles à l'avenir. Nous sommes heureux de cet engagement. [Français]

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Monsieur Stewart, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby-Sud, NPD):

Bien.

Merci d'être venus présenter vos témoignages aujourd'hui. Je suis particulièrement sensible à cette question, étant donné que j'ai grandi dans une région éloignée de la Nouvelle-Écosse qui a toujours très peu d'accès à la large bande. Le service est souvent intermittent. Par conséquent, je comprends les défis auxquels font face les habitants des collectivités rurales et éloignées en matière d'accès à Internet.

Pouvez-vous tous les deux nous donner quelques exemples afin de nous permettre de mieux comprendre l'ampleur du problème auquel nous faisons face en matière de couverture? Vous pouvez peut-être nous donner des exemples de collectivités et de niveaux d'accès. La couverture varie probablement de 0 à 50 %. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de l'ampleur du problème auquel nous faisons face?

M. Ray Orb:

Certainement. Je crois que les problèmes de couverture sont encore plus graves dans le Nord canadien. C'est pourquoi je vais laisser Sara répondre d'abord, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient et je prendrai la parole ensuite.

Mme Sara Brown:

Merci beaucoup.

Ce n'est pas tant un problème de pourcentage... La plupart des collectivités bénéficient d'une certaine couverture. Nous n'avons pas la même base rurale dans la plupart des collectivités, mais le débit est si lent qu'il est presque impossible de se servir d'Internet dans le domaine de la santé, de l'éducation et autres domaines, alors même qu'une telle utilisation est extrêmement importante pour nous, en raison de notre éloignement. Il est impossible pour les utilisateurs de se déplacer pour obtenir le service qui n'existe pas dans leur propre localité. Il est absolument indispensable que nous puissions nous aussi participer au mode de vie dont bénéficient la plupart des Canadiens.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Pouvez-vous nous donner des chiffres précis qui pourraient nous permettre d'avoir une idée de la lenteur du débit en mentionnant par exemple des cas extrêmes et moyens?

Mme Sara Brown:

Vous vous souvenez de l'accès commuté?

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Oui.

Mme Sara Brown:

C'est un peu la même chose.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Les gens utilisent encore l'accès commuté?

(1125)

Mme Sara Brown:

Non. La connexion commutée existe encore, mais même si ce n'est pas le cas, le débit est toujours extrêmement lent. La diffusion en continu est impossible. Souvent, les vidéoconférences posent un réel défi. Les délais que posent les liens satellitaires ne font que compliquer l'affaire.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Avez-vous une idée du nombre de personnes, ou du pourcentage de la population qui doit encore se contenter de débits extrêmement lents, comparables à ceux de l'accès commuté? Je sais que c'est une question difficile.

Mme Sara Brown:

Dix de nos 33 collectivités utilisent toujours un service par satellite. C'est dans ces localités que le débit est le plus lent. En pourcentage, le chiffre n'est pas si élevé. Par exemple, Yellowknife regroupe plus de la moitié de la population des Territoires du Nord-Ouest. En pourcentage, cela n'est pas très élevé.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Mais si le pourcentage est faible, cela veut dire que l'on pourrait facilement régler le problème en investissant dans ce domaine.

Mme Sara Brown:

Tout à fait. C'est ce que nous souhaiterions.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Très bien. Merci.

Avez-vous aussi des commentaires à formuler, monsieur?

M. Ray Orb:

Je pense que le CRTC a fait un assez bon travail de localisation des besoins. Si vous allez sur le site Web du Conseil, vous pourrez découvrir quelles sont les régions de chaque province où l'accès à haute vitesse fait défaut. Je dirais que ces cartes établies par le CRTC brossent un portrait un peu trop positif de la réalité, car nous savons qu'il existe dans notre propre province des endroits où la situation est pire. Ils n'ont absolument aucune couverture et c'est vrai également pour les téléphones cellulaires. Il y a des régions rurales du Canada qui ne peuvent recevoir aucune communication par téléphone cellulaire. Il existe des zones non couvertes.

Cela pose problème et je vais vous donner un exemple. Vous connaissez l'agriculture. Désormais, les machines modernes doivent être connectées à l'Internet à haute vitesse. Pour faire fonctionner ces machines, vous devez télécharger une application sur votre téléphone cellulaire ou sur votre ordinateur portable afin de pouvoir les calibrer et les faire fonctionner de manière efficace. Cela est impossible dans certaines régions.

Mais je crois que la redondance est encore plus importante. Il faut disposer d'une capacité de sauvegarde au cas où le système tomberait en panne, car ces machines ne peuvent fonctionner sans une connectivité fiable.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

J'imagine que cela a des conséquences pour votre économie également. Je connais un technicien qui m'aide à créer des pages Web et ce genre de choses. Autrefois, il était installé dans la région, mais il a déménagé depuis à Puerto Vallarta où il continue à exercer ses activités. Je me disais que si Puerto Vallarta dispose de services Internet suffisamment rapides pour lui permettre de poursuivre ses activités de commerce électronique, ne pourrait-on pas envisager la même chose pour nos collectivités rurales et éloignées? Ce serait un véritable coup de pouce pour l'emploi, si tout à coup la localisation n'avait plus d'importance.

Pouvez-vous nous dire quels sont les impacts négatifs pour les économies de nos régions rurales et éloignées?

M. Ray Orb:

Le développement économique en souffre beaucoup. Nous savons que beaucoup d'entreprises aimeraient quitter les grands centres urbains et se relocaliser dans des régions rurales. Ce serait sans doute logique pour certaines de ces entreprises, car c'est là que se trouvent leurs racines et leurs clients. Or, elles ne peuvent pas le faire, parce que la connectivité n'est pas suffisante. Certaines d'entre elles ont recours aux communications par satellite, mais ce n'est pas un mode de télécommunication fiable. L'impact est très réel.

Nous pourrions sans doute vous fournir plus d'information à ce sujet par l'intermédiaire de la FCM, mais l'obstacle existe bel et bien. Nous savons qu'il existe.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Voici maintenant la question à 1 million de dollars ou plutôt la question à 1 milliard de dollars. Combien d'après vous cela coûterait-il pour mettre en place le service dont vous avez besoin? Avez-vous une idée?

M. Ray Orb:

Je sais qu'en Saskatchewan, SaskTel souhaiterait obtenir tous les fonds dont dispose le programme Un Canada branché, car cette société affirme qu'elle pourrait utiliser ces fonds pour équiper toutes les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan. Cela vous donne une idée de la complexité du problème.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Est-ce que cela résoudrait le problème?

M. Ray Orb:

La compagnie pense que oui. Elle a amélioré les choses, mais dans ce pays, il y a encore de vastes régions qui ont besoin du même genre de couverture.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Tout à fait.

M. Ray Orb:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, ces programmes aident vraiment les Canadiens en milieu rural, mais c'est un travail de longue haleine parce que nous devons collaborer avec le gouvernement provincial, les organismes municipaux et l'industrie. Et à cet égard, je pense que l'industrie commence à nous entendre. Elle voit que la situation évolue dans la bonne direction.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Tant mieux. Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre temps. Ma période de temps est écoulée, j'espère que nous allons répondre à vos attentes. Merci encore.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons céder la parole à M. Graham. Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Orb et madame Brown, d'être présents avec nous ici, de façon virtuelle. Je formule cette remarque ironique pour le dossier, parce qu'à mon avis ce devrait être dans le compte rendu.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Dans le comté ou la MRC la plus pauvre de ma circonscription, au Québec, moins de un ménage sur trois a accès à Internet large bande. En ce qui a trait à la large bande, nous en avons une définition assez floue, pour commencer.

Nous appelons notre service d'accès « Brancher pour innover ». L'accès par ligne commuté et par satellite est encore très répandu, et de toute évidence, désespérément inefficace. Le service de téléphonie cellulaire est aussi rare dans de grandes zones de ma région. Cela s'applique à de longs tronçons sur les 200 kilomètres de la transcanadienne qui longe la région. Mais la situation va changer au cours des quatre prochaines années grâce à la coopérative d'initiative communautaire de grande envergure qui bénéficie de l'aide du programme Brancher pour innover. Mais, bien entendu, nous sommes une exception.

J'aimerais en venir à l'essentiel.

D'après la FCM, est-ce que l'accès Internet est un droit?

(1130)

M. Ray Orb:

Désolé. Je n'ai pas entendu la dernière partie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que l'accès Internet est, selon vous, un droit?

M. Ray Orb:

Un droit? Je pense que selon la FCM, il s'agit probablement d'un privilège pour tous les Canadiens de pouvoir accéder à Internet. Nous demandons une couverture de base Internet à haute vitesse, donc si c'est un droit, cela voudrait dire que nous devrions pouvoir y avoir accès.

Dans un certain sens, je crois que les gens qui vivent en milieu rural et dans les collectivités nordiques pensent que c'est un droit parce que la population des villes, les centres urbains, l'ont déjà. Nous savons que cela entraîne des coûts, mais en même temps, nous en avons besoin. Nous en avons besoin pour permettre à nos entreprises dans les collectivités rurales de survivre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Sara, aimeriez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Mme Sara Brown:

Il est certain que, compte tenu de leur grand isolement, les collectivités nordiques et éloignées en ont encore plus besoin, et seraient en mesure de participer davantage si elles y avaient accès. C'est à la limite d'être un droit, à mon avis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que vous considérez qu'il s'agirait d'un droit lié à l'infrastructure ou d'un service?

Mme Sara Brown:

Je ne saurais dire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais laisser la question en suspens.

Vous avez parlé tout à l'heure, dans votre déclaration liminaire, et dans vos réponses aux questions de Mike, du rôle que les entreprises de télécommunications sont appelées à jouer pour mettre en place ce service. Trouvez-vous que les entreprises se montrent réceptives lorsque vous leur demandez si elles pourraient venir dans ces collectivités et y installer l'infrastructure requise pour que vous puissiez avoir un accès Internet? Où se situe le seuil? Dans quelles circonstances disent-elles que le jeu n'en vaut pas la chandelle? Que vous disent-elles?

Mme Sara Brown:

Il n'existe qu'un seul fournisseur de service pour la plus grande partie des territoires, et un autre plus petit groupe au Nunavut et dans une partie des Territoires du Nord-Ouest. J'ignore quel est le seuil exact, mais il est clair qu'il faut obtenir d'importantes subventions ne serait-ce que pour installer le téléphone filaire. Ce n'est pas un endroit où une analyse de rentabilisation débouchera sur quoi que ce soit sans subvention.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Par curiosité — j'ignore quelle est la réponse à cette question — dans les territoires situés dans le Grand Nord, comment le réseau électrique est-il implanté? Utilisez-vous des groupes électrogènes dans toutes les villes? Je suppose que c'est comme cela que vous produisez l'électricité.

Mme Sara Brown:

Oui, c'est exact. Nous reposons presque exclusivement sur les groupes électrogènes diesel, et il y a un peu d'hydroélectricité dans le sud des territoires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Je considère le service d'accès Internet comme étant extraordinairement urgent; à mon avis, c'est la première priorité pour les collectivités rurales au Canada. Êtes-vous de cet avis?

M. Ray Orb:

Nous croyons que cela fait partie des infrastructures. Certains programmes offerts par le gouvernement fédéral fourniront à quelques municipalités une partie du financement requis pour l'expansion des services à large bande.

C'est très urgent. Il faut faire valoir qu'en retour des sommes dépensées, le rendement sera très efficace. Chaque dollar dépensé pour l'infrastructure viendra en aide aux entreprises rurales. Et les résultats s'ajouteront à l'économie du pays, parce que cela contribuera non seulement à attirer de nouvelles entreprises en région rurale, mais aussi à améliorer celles qui s'y trouvent déjà et à accroître leur rentabilité. À mon avis, c'est de l'argent bien dépensé, et le gouvernement fédéral agit de façon très avisée en s'occupant de cette question.

Ce n'est pas comme si la FCM ne s'était jamais fait entendre sur la question. Cela fait déjà un certain temps que nous exerçons des pressions, par l'entremise de députés comme vous. Vous réalisez que c'est très important, et nous sommes ravis que le Comité nous parle aujourd'hui de cet enjeu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'une des choses que je constate, dans le milieu rural où je me trouve, au Québec, c'est que beaucoup de collectivités ont un réseau de base dans leur communauté. Des gens appellent constamment mon bureau pour me dire qu'ils voient une ligne de fibres optiques passer à proximité de leur maison, mais qu'il leur est impossible de s'y brancher. Est-ce que cela vous arrive aussi, c'est-à-dire, d'avoir la perception que nous disposons du réseau de base dans une très grande partie du pays, mais que l'accès du dernier kilomètre fait sérieusement défaut?

(1135)

M. Ray Orb:

Je pense que Sara serait d'accord avec vous — elle voudra sans doute formuler quelques observations à ce sujet, elle aussi — c'est-à-dire que l'accès du dernier kilomètre est vraiment important. Bien sûr, il faut pouvoir compter sur les deux. L'un ne va pas sans l'autre. C'est très frustrant.

Je sais que nos collectivités vivent cette situation elles aussi. Les entreprises installent de nouvelles lignes de fibres optiques, mais elles branchent les villes, et les régions rurales n'y ont pas accès. Nous pensons que c'est la raison pour laquelle nous devons installer davantage de tours de télécommunications dans nos régions. Ces tours peuvent servir à autre chose que seulement la large bande; elles pourraient aussi être utilisées pour offrir la couverture en téléphonie cellulaire, et ce serait bénéfique pour nos régions rurales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ma région, on a accès à Internet principalement par le truchement de signaux transmis par des tours de télécommunications, mais comme nous nous trouvons en zone très montagneuse, ce n'est pas très efficace. Une bonne tour permettra de brancher huit clients, donc, les facteurs économiques ne sont pas au rendez-vous dans ce cas non plus.

M. Ray Orb:

Oui, ça aussi, c'est un problème.

Peut-être que Sara aimerait faire des commentaires à ce sujet.

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute.

Mme Sara Brown:

Nous mettons définitivement l'accent sur le réseau de base. Nous ne pouvons même pas parler de la vitesse, et encore moins de participer. Tant que nous n'aurons pas réglé la question du réseau de base, le dernier kilomètre n'a pas vraiment de sens pour nous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Il me reste 30 secondes. Je vais les partager avec M. Longfield, qui aimerait bien lui aussi vous poser une question rapidement.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci. J'aimerais revenir à M. Orb au sujet des petits fournisseurs de services.

Vous avez mentionné SaskTel. Je me demande quelles seraient les possibilités de conclure un partenariat entre la FCM et certains petits fournisseurs, ce qui pourrait aussi contribuer à créer de l'emploi dans vos collectivités.

M. Ray Orb:

Parler de la position de la FCM est une bonne question. Je pense que la FCM elle-même ne souhaite pas conclure de partenariat. Bien entendu, les municipalités vont le faire. Quant aux organismes provinciaux, je peux vous citer l'exemple de la Saskatchewan. SaskTel, notre fournisseur, a offert de mener quelques projets pilotes dans les collectivités qui n'ont aucune couverture de téléphonie cellulaire ou qui ne disposent que d'une couverture Internet très limitée. Nous envisageons la possibilité de mener des projets pilotes afin de voir quelles pourraient être les retombées d'ici un an.

La situation varie tellement d'une région du pays à l'autre. On dirait que chaque province a une vision différente. Mais essentiellement, nous voulons tous la même chose: un réseau de base.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci, monsieur Orb.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Jeneroux. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous les deux de participer à notre réunion d'aujourd'hui.

Est-ce que vous pourriez rapidement formuler quelques commentaires au sujet des normes ayant été mises en place eu égard aux vitesses minimales et qui viennent d'être annoncées? On entend de la part de quelques fournisseurs que ces vitesses sont très basses. D'autres affirment qu'elles sont assez élevées. Je suis curieux de connaître votre opinion à ce sujet.

M. Ray Orb:

Vous allez devoir me rafraîchir la mémoire. S'agit-il de la norme des cinq mégabits par seconde?

M. Matt Jeneroux:

En effet.

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois que l'on peut dire que c'est un bon point de départ. Mais c'est un minimum. Le problème vient du fait que, si l'on opte pour les tours de télécommunications, c'est qu'au fil du temps, ces tours deviennent surchargées. Toutefois, il semble que l'on puisse obtenir de cette manière un accès Internet haute vitesse, et nous avons besoin de ce service de base. Nous pourrons ultérieurement tabler sur les installations existantes. Mais à notre avis, c'est déjà un pas dans la bonne direction.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mais est-ce trop rapide, ou trop lent? Souhaiteriez-vous une vitesse plus élevée, ou êtes-vous satisfait de ce qui est offert actuellement? Aimeriez-vous faire des commentaires à ce sujet?

M. Ray Orb:

Je préférerais sans doute une vitesse de 50 mégabits par seconde. Mais nous connaissons le problème. À mesure que la technologie évolue, les applications que nous utilisons avec nos ordinateurs et nos téléphones deviennent plus gourmandes, et il nous faut plus de données. Nous avons constamment besoin de données pour exploiter nos entreprises et pour communiquer, et il nous en faut toujours plus.

Mais essentiellement, il faut se fixer un seuil de départ. Le but est d'assurer ce minimum d'un bout à l'autre du pays, dans les collectivités rurales et les collectivités nordiques aussi. Donc, c'est un bon point de départ.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

J'ai récemment pris connaissance de certaines annonces dans l'Est du Canada eu égard à la connectivité. De tels développements restent encore à venir dans l'Ouest du pays. Le ministre nous a déclaré que nous pouvions nous attendre à du nouveau lorsqu'il a comparu devant nous.

Est-ce que cela est un sujet d'inquiétude pour vos membres? Est-ce qu'ils attendent impatiemment ces annonces? Ont-ils été en communication avec le ministre récemment?

M. Ray Orb:

En toute honnêteté, je ne peux pas répondre à votre question. Je suppose que nous pourrions nous pencher sur la question. J'ignore si Sara peut vous en dire plus que moi, mais pour le moment, je ne peux rien vous dire à ce sujet.

(1140)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mon collègue a posé quelques bonnes questions au sujet de l'emplacement des tours. Dans ma collectivité — je représente Edmonton — nous avons récemment érigé quelques tours de télécommunications, et la communauté locale a exprimé des réserves à leur sujet.

Est-ce que vous avez constaté, dans les municipalités rurales, que l'on accepte mieux ces tours ou que l'on encourage plus fortement leur installation, tant de la part des municipalités que des groupes communautaires, étant donné qu'elles ont un lien avec l'accès du dernier kilomètre?

M. Ray Orb:

Sara, aimeriez-vous répondre à cette question?

Mme Sara Brown:

Ce n'est vraiment pas un problème dans nos collectivités, aussi je vais vous laisser répondre.

M. Ray Orb:

Désolé, Sara.

Comme je viens de le dire, ce n'est pas un problème dans les collectivités rurales. Ce l'est sans doute davantage dans les centres urbains. Les gens ne les aiment pas parce qu'elles sont disgracieuses. Mais, au fond, nous en avons, principalement dans les prairies, et je ne pense pas que ce soit très différent dans les régions rurales de l'Ontario. Dans les Maritimes, je dirais que ce doit être la même chose. Nous représentons un vaste éventail de régions. Il y a entre autres des terres agricoles. Mais en ce qui nous concerne, si cette tour de télécommunications pouvait offrir une couverture à une bonne partie de la municipalité, nous en serions heureux. Nous pourrions en outre installer une autre tour de téléphonie cellulaire. Nous pourrions utiliser la même tour. Nous en serions très heureux. Nos membres, les agriculteurs entre autres, seraient ravis d'avoir une de ces tours.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Super! J'ai terminé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais seulement signaler quelque chose.

Monsieur Orb, vous avez dit que vous travaillez à un projet pilote. S'il y a quoi que ce soit que vous aimeriez partager avec le Comité au sujet de ces projets pilotes, cela pourrait nous être utile.

Je cède la parole à M. Sheehan.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de vos exposés.

En tant qu'ancien conseiller municipal et commissaire d'école, je peux mesurer l'excellent travail réalisé par la FCM sur la question qui nous occupe. De nos jours, nous nous entretenons avec les municipalités, mais dans le passé et encore récemment, il y a eu des efforts conjoints dans le secteur des municipalités, des universités, des écoles et des hôpitaux. Au sein du conseil scolaire du district Huron-Supérieur auquel je siégeais, nous avions créé une sorte de réseau et une certaine forme de partenariat. Est-ce que ça existe toujours, et pouvez-vous nous fournir des exemples de ce qui se passe au Canada dans ce domaine?

M. Ray Orb:

Nous pourrions vous fournir des exemples précis, mais pas aujourd'hui. Je sais qu'il y a des endroits où ça existe. Je pense que de tels réseaux existent en Saskatchewan. Des conseils scolaires les ont mis sur pied pour l'éducation à distance. Ils collaborent avec SaskTel pour pouvoir offrir leurs programmes. Je sais aussi que dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan on a recours à de tels partenariats pour offrir certains services de soins de santé.

Si vous souhaitez obtenir des exemples précis, nous pouvons vous les fournir. Nous allons demander au personnel de la FCM de faire des recherches et de vous transmettre les résultats.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Ces renseignements nous seraient très utiles. Je sais que dans ma circonscription de Sault Ste. Marie, le conseil scolaire a présenté une demande au programme Brancher pour innover. On collabore avec le Centre d'innovation sans but lucratif et la ville, parce qu'à Goulais River, il y a une école où la vitesse de la connexion n'est que du cinquième de celle de toutes les autres écoles du réseau. Cela devient une question de justice et d'équité, parce que des enfants sont désavantagés, et que cela les prive de faire certaines choses. Je me demande s'il y a d'autres exemples de ce genre ailleurs actuellement. Cela nous aiderait dans notre étude.

Ce qui m'amène à ma prochaine question. Je pense maintenant au secteur privé, parce que nous avons déjà parlé du non privé. Il y a tellement de pylônes différents qui sont la propriété privée de sociétés hydroélectriques et d'autres qui sont déjà installés dans les zones rurales et éloignées du Canada. Y aurait-il moyen de demander à ces sociétés privées de travailler avec les municipalités, par l'entremise de la FCM et du gouvernement fédéral? Qu'est-ce que vous en pensez?

M. Ray Orb:

Ce n'est pas seulement le rôle des provinces. C'est aussi le rôle des organismes municipaux, comme le nôtre et celui de Sara. Je pense que nous devons entretenir des liens.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, dans notre province, nous l'avons fait. Je sais qu'il existe en Alberta divers modèles de collectivités qui travaillent avec des fournisseurs de services. Leur organisme, l'AAMDC, s'est exprimé avec beaucoup de force en vue d'inciter ces gens à s'unir. C'est une chose que tous nos organismes provinciaux comprennent. À mon sens, il faut poursuivre les efforts à ce niveau, et améliorer notre façon de faire.

(1145)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Cette situation me laisse perplexe. Elle soulève la question de savoir pour quelle raison une société privée hésiterait à collaborer. Pouvez-vous nous éclairer à ce sujet?

M. Ray Orb:

Dans le passé, je pense qu'elles hésitaient parce qu'elles n'avaient pas grand-chose à retirer de la collaboration sur le plan financier. Naturellement, l'argent se trouve dans les grands centres urbains et c'est aussi là que se trouvent les occasions les plus faciles à saisir, mais avec les programmes du gouvernement fédéral que nous avons mentionnés tout à l'heure, elles sont aujourd'hui plus enclines à collaborer. Je pense que nous verrons une amélioration des services Internet fournis dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Nous étions à Washington il y a quelques mois. Nous y sommes allés pour discuter d'un certain nombre de choses, et notamment de la large bande en milieu rural. Les États-Unis sont aux prises avec le même problème. Et ce n'est pas seulement l'Alaska qui est visé; il touche aussi le Midwest et des tas d'autres régions. Nous avons assisté à des audiences du Congrès, et l'une des questions qui a été posée concerne une chose qui nous interpelle aussi, je crois, dans nos circonscriptions et un peu partout au pays: devrions-nous accroître la vitesse de transmission pour les gens qui possèdent déjà des services de large bande, ou devrions-nous faire de l'accès aux services de large bande pour tous les Canadiens notre priorité?

Où iraient vos préférences?

M. Ray Orb:

De toute évidence, l'accès aux services pour tous les Canadiens, sans l'ombre d'un doute.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je suis d'accord. Cela nous amène à la question de la vitesse, parce que, à partir du moment où les gens y ont accès, ils veulent une vitesse de plus en plus grande. Cependant, l'accès pour tous est, à mon avis, très important.

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Eglinski. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

Je vous fais toutes mes excuses pour mon retard, j'étais absorbé dans quelque chose.

Je vous remercie de votre présence, monsieur. Je ne connais pas votre nom, mais je vais néanmoins vous poser quelques questions.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Mike Bossio:

Il s'appelle Ray, de la Saskatchewan.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous êtes le bienvenu, Ray.

M. Ray Orb:

Merci.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous êtes mon voisin.

Ray, ma région est principalement une zone rurale où l'on retrouve un certain nombre de collectivités de 5 000 à 7 000 habitants et aussi toute une série de collectivités plus petites encore, avec beaucoup de grand air.

Nous assistons à la création de petites entreprises et à l'arrivée du réseau Internet, habituellement par l'entremise d'une tour de télécommunications. Ensuite, on nous promet que les clients vont pouvoir bénéficier d'un service d'un certain nombre de mégabits. Ces entreprises continuent de vendre des abonnements à leur réseau au point où les abonnés ne peuvent plus se servir de leurs ordinateurs, surtout en soirée, parce que le système est surchargé. Est-ce une situation assez répandue au Canada où l'on retrouve ces petits fournisseurs de services Internet?

(1150)

M. Ray Orb:

Oui, en effet. Nous savons que des clients n'ont pas accès au câble et ne peuvent pas utiliser le service Internet haute vitesse. Ces gens ont des problèmes avec l'offre par satellite parce que les satellites ne suffisent pas du point de vue de la capacité à offrir de bonnes vitesses de téléchargement. Aux heures de pointe, soit tôt le matin ou en soirée, au moment où la plupart des gens partent au travail ou rentrent à la maison, le système ne fournit pas à la demande. C'est un sérieux problème pour une entreprise qui doit pouvoir compter sur une communication constante. Nous savons que c'est un problème très répandu partout au Canada.

Nous croyons que le CRTC devrait adopter une réglementation à cet égard. En effet, il devrait réglementer ce service de quelque manière. Si des gens vendent des abonnements, ils devraient être en mesure de livrer la marchandise promise.

M. Jim Eglinski:

L'un de nos comtés, le comté de Clearwater, a créé ce qu'il appelle la fondation de Clearwater pour la large bande. C'est une idée assez originale. Ils souhaitent passer un câble à travers d'anciens pipelines qui quadrillent toute la région. À votre avis, est-ce réalisable?

M. Ray Orb:

Est-ce que Clearwater se trouve à proximité de Fort McMurray?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Non, Clearwater est situé entre Edmonton et Calgary, sur les versants des Rocheuses. C'est tout près de Rocky Mountain House, à l'ouest de Red Deer, et à une distance d'environ 60 milles.

M. Ray Orb:

C'est un concept intéressant. Je ne suis pas en mesure de vous répondre, parce que c'est assez technique, mais j'avoue que l'idée est assez séduisante. Il me semble que tous les moyens d'assurer les services doivent être examinés. Bien entendu, il y a des pipelines. Je sais qu'il y en a aux quatre coins du pays qui ne sont pas en utilisation. Certains ont été mis de côté. Si les entreprises pensent que l'on pourrait s'en servir, alors pourquoi pas?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je reçois beaucoup de questions de la part des comtés au sujet de la large bande. Au cours de vos déplacements un peu partout au pays, et compte tenu de votre connaissance de ces systèmes, avez-vous pris connaissance de solutions innovatrices utilisées par d'autres organisations?

M. Ray Orb:

Chaque fois que je vais à Ottawa, je rencontre quelques municipalités de l'Ontario. Je pense que l'Association des municipalités de l'Ontario s'est montrée très active sur ce dossier. Elle a de très bons exemples d'entreprises qui se sont associées à des municipalités. Nous pouvons vous fournir des renseignements à ce sujet. Et à ma connaissance, en Alberta, on est très actif aussi. Lorsque j'ai assisté à la conférence de l'AAMDC l'automne dernier, il s'est tenu beaucoup de discussions au sujet des divers moyens d'assurer la prestation des services dans la province. L'Alberta a opté pour certains moyens assez uniques pour y arriver. Vous en connaissez peut-être quelques-uns, mais je pense que l'éventail est assez diversifié d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Est-ce réaliste d'affirmer que nous pourrions fournir l'accès à la large bande à tout le monde au Canada?

M. Ray Orb:

Je peux répondre, et je vais donner l'occasion à Sara de le faire aussi.

Je pense que c'est possible, mais qu'il faudra y consacrer encore plus d'argent et de temps.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. Là est toute la question, n'est-ce pas?

Nous allons céder la parole à M. Longfield. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie pour la discussion de ce matin.

Monsieur Orb, vous avez mentionné le rôle des coopératives. Ce matin, j'ai rencontré des représentants de Coopératives et mutuelles Canada, et nous avons parlé du Fonds canadien d'investissement coopératif. Dans le contexte de l'établissement de partenariats avec le gouvernement fédéral et d'une collaboration avec la FCM, pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur le rôle que les coopératives ont joué dans votre domaine ou par l'entremise de la FCM? Lorsque nous rédigerons notre rapport, nous examinerons les partenariats que le gouvernement fédéral pourrait envisager.

M. Ray Orb:

La FCM pourrait vous fournir des statistiques à ce sujet. Je ne peux pas vous dire avec exactitude quelles coopératives ont été actives à cet égard, mais je sais qu'il y en a. Je sais qu'il se passe des choses de ce genre en Alberta. C'est ce à quoi je voulais faire référence. Certains comtés ont voulu procéder de cette manière. Nous pourrions vous fournir ces renseignements. Cela pourrait prendre un certain temps avant que l'on obtienne les renseignements de l'association albertaine, mais il est certain que nous pouvons vous les transmettre.

C'est un excellent moyen de dépenser intelligemment une partie de l'argent qui est mis à notre disposition dans le cadre des programmes du gouvernement fédéral.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Nous sommes toujours à la recherche de partenaires ou d'associés. Il se peut que nous ayons une question semblable au sujet des Sociétés d'aide au développement des collectivités. Mais je n'en suis pas certain. Je sais qu'elles sont actives d'un bout à l'autre du Canada et plus particulièrement dans les petites collectivités. Elles offrent un éventail de programmes. Est-ce que les Sociétés d'aide au développement des collectivités pourraient être une autre avenue à explorer?

M. Ray Orb:

Oui, pourquoi pas. Nous devrions pouvoir travailler avec quiconque est prêt à nous aider à favoriser le développement économique. C'est assurément la direction que nous souhaitons prendre.

Sara, si vous voulez faire des commentaires, je vous en prie.

Mme Sara Brown:

Il est clair que les Sociétés d'aide au développement des collectivités ont été très actives dans le Nord où elles reçoivent un accueil très favorable. Elles ont la possibilité de réunir un éventail de partenaires de types différents.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Ce qu'il y a d'intéressant avec les coopératives et avec les Sociétés d'aide au développement des collectivités, c'est qu'elles réunissent des gens qui ont acquis une certaine expérience au sein de la collectivité. Ces gens connaissent la collectivité à partir de la base, et à un point qui serait très avantageux, à mon avis, pour l'accès du dernier kilomètre.

M. Ray Orb:

C'est une excellente déclaration.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Très bien. Merci.

Je vais partager le temps qui me reste avec M. Bossio. Il a beaucoup de questions.

M. Mike Bossio:

Nous avons tous vu les graphiques et les cartes qui montrent que dans notre pays, la disponibilité des services de large bande, pouvant atteindre une vitesse de un à cinq mégabits est de 99 %. Diriez-vous que c'est réaliste?

M. Ray Orb:

C'est une question piège, monsieur Bossio — ce qui ne me surprend pas vraiment parce que je sais que vous connaissez la question beaucoup mieux que nous.

Je ne dirai pas que nous contestons les statistiques, mais nous envisageons de les étudier davantage. Pour la Saskatchewan, nous allons, comme je l'ai mentionné, vérifier la situation de chacune des municipalités. Nous allons étudier toutes les municipalités rurales pour voir si ces chiffres sont exacts.

Il se pourrait que ce chiffre ne soit pas tout à fait exact, parce qu'il peut exister des zones mortes dont le CRTC n'a pas vraiment connaissance. Cet organisme a obtenu une partie de ces données auprès de SaskTel, mais lorsque nous fournissons des données à SaskTel, ils nous disent: « Nous ne savions qu'il y avait là une zone morte. » Il faut que nous fassions davantage de recherche sur cette question. Sara sera peut-être en mesure de répondre à la question...

(1155)

M. Mike Bossio:

J'aimerais passer à un autre sujet... Je vous prie de m'excuser, mais je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps.

Avez-vous entendu parler de l'ACEI, l'Autorité canadienne pour les enregistrements Internet?

M. Ray Orb:

Non, désolé.

M. Mike Bossio:

C'est une organisation qui mesure... Elle enregistre un grand nombre d'adresses Internet, et elle essaie également d'obtenir des données détaillées sur la capacité et les vitesses d'Internet. Une des principales critiques qu'a faites l'ACEI concerne les nombreuses études qui ont été effectuées sur la congestion. Le site www.speedtest.net ne prend pas en compte la congestion, les trajets complexes, les autres dynamiques du réseau, la latence, ou les choses de ce genre, lorsqu'un fournisseur essaie d'offrir un service ayant une vitesse de un à cinq mégabits. Tous ceux d'entre nous qui utilisent l'Internet à large bande, savent que, premièrement, la large bande ne se définit pas en termes de cinq mégabits et que, deuxièmement, la plupart du temps, les fournisseurs n'offrent pas les services promis.

L'ACEI s'est adressée à un certain nombre de municipalités pour les aider à financer ces tests pour que chaque municipalité puisse déterminer, sur son propre territoire, ce à quoi elle a vraiment accès ou n'a pas accès pour ce qui est d'Internet, et quelles sont les vitesses exactes dont bénéficient les utilisateurs, parce que ces tests s'effectuent de façon permanente. Il ne s'agit pas dans ce cas de cliquer, d'effectuer le test et d'obtenir les résultats.

Pensez-vous que ce serait une bonne chose que toutes les municipalités se joignent à ce projet? Elles pourraient fournir elles-mêmes les données, dire ce qu'elles ont fait et comprendre exactement quelle est la couverture dont bénéficient leurs collectivités.

M. Ray Orb:

Oui, absolument. Je vais également demander à Sara de répondre à cette question.

Mme Sara Brown:

Oui, absolument. Cela permet de connaître ces choses, mais un de nos grands défis n'est pas simplement la vitesse, mais la largeur de la bande, de sorte que, même si vous vous trouvez dans une collectivité où la vitesse est rapide parce qu'on utilise la fibre optique, c'est l'insuffisance de la bande qui, finalement, bloque tout.

M. Mike Bossio:

Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Non.

Je vais intervenir encore une fois.

C'est un thème que nous entendons constamment, et si vous disposez de cartes qui représentent la vitesse, la large bande ou la connectivité dans vos collectivités, je vous invite à les transmettre à la greffière? Cela nous serait utile. Merci.

Monsieur Stewart, vous allez utiliser les deux dernières minutes.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je vous remercie.

Cette conversation est intéressante. Merci pour vos arguments. Ils sont vraiment très importants.

La séance va bientôt se terminer et je ne dispose que de deux minutes. Je me demande si vous aimeriez ajouter quelque chose que vous n'avez pas encore pu dire au cours de cette discussion.

M. Ray Orb:

J'aimerais faire un bref commentaire et j'inviterais également Sara à en présenter un.

Je crois qu'il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire. Je sais que M. Bossio a travaillé très activement sur ce dossier. Nous avons travaillé par le truchement du Forum rural avec le caucus rural libéral sur cette question; il nous faut parler non seulement avec le gouvernement libéral, mais également avec les députés conservateurs et ceux du NPD pour mieux savoir ce qui se passe vraiment dans leurs diverses circonscriptions.

Nous devons travailler avec la FCM pour faire davantage sur ce dossier. Il y a ces programmes canadiens, comme Brancher pour innover. Ces programmes ont été très efficaces, mais nous devons faire davantage. C'est un pas dans la bonne direction, comme je crois que nous l'avons déjà dit, de sorte que nous en sommes satisfaits.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Merci.

M. Ray Orb:

Sara souhaite peut-être intervenir.

Mme Sara Brown:

Je vous remercie de me donner la possibilité de prendre la parole.

Je ne saurais insister trop sur le fait qu'il existe dans le Nord des écarts de disponibilité qui limitent notre capacité de nous développer, de participer à l'économie mondiale et de répondre aux défis auxquels nous faisons face dans le domaine de l'éducation, de la santé et ce genre de choses. Il est essentiel d'améliorer la situation dans les territoires.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Voilà qui termine cette partie de la séance d'aujourd'hui.

Je remercie les témoins d'avoir comparu. Vous nous avez fourni des renseignements utiles.

Encore une fois, je vais répéter qu'il serait extrêmement utile que vous nous transmettiez rapidement, ce que vous pouvez, qu'il s'agisse de cartes ou de projets pilotes.

M. Ray Orb:

Merci.

(1200)

Le président:

Nous allons faire une pause pendant une brève minute pour l'arrivée de la ministre. Notre horaire est chargé et nous allons donc suspendre immédiatement la séance.

M. Mike Bossio:

J'ai été heureux de vous voir, Ray et Sara. Bonne chance.

M. Ray Orb:

Merci.

(1200)

(1205)

Le président:

J'informe le Comité que nous n'avons pas beaucoup de temps et qu'il faudrait en conserver un peu vers la fin pour adopter notre motion ou plutôt le...

M. Maxime Bernier: Ma motion?

Le président: Non, pas la vôtre. La vôtre est déjà adoptée...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Je vais réduire un peu le temps de parole pour que tout le monde puisse intervenir.

Cela dit, nous accueillons aujourd'hui l'honorable Kirsty Duncan, ministre des Sciences, avec ses collaborateurs, David McGovern et Nipun Vats.

Nous sommes heureux de vous accueillir aujourd'hui et nous avons hâte d'entendre votre exposé. Vous disposez de 10 minutes.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan (ministre des Sciences):

Merci, monsieur le président. Bonjour à tous. [Français]

Je suis heureuse d'être parmi vous aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, merci de m'accueillir ici à l'occasion du dépôt du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de 2017-2018.

Vous vous souviendrez que ma dernière comparution devant ce comité a eu lieu en mai. Je présente aujourd'hui une mise à jour sur les activités que j'ai menées depuis pour faire valoir les sciences au pays. Avant d'aller plus loin, je tiens à souligner que toutes les mesures que j'ai prises avaient un but commun, soit de concrétiser la vision à long terme du gouvernement pour les sciences au Canada.

J'ai présenté récemment cette vision lors de la Conférence sur les politiques scientifiques canadiennes. Cette vision se résume en trois éléments. Nous voulons renforcer la recherche, renforcer la prise de décisions fondées sur des données probantes et renforcer la culture de curiosité au pays.

Les gens sont au coeur de cette vision. Ils donnent vie aux activités scientifiques. lls sont chercheurs, techniciens de laboratoire, professeurs ou étudiants, et leur contribution collective de tous les jours renforce la communauté scientifique canadienne. Nous voulons donner un élan nouveau aux sciences et aux nombreux scientifiques exceptionnels qui travaillent dans ce domaine pour qu'ils pensent à demain et fassent preuve d'audace dans leur vaste quête en vue d'acquérir de nouvelles connaissances.

Le Canada est perçu aujourd'hui dans le monde comme un pays progressiste, qui donne à ses scientifiques les moyens de faire des percées transformatrices, qui peuvent nous aider à changer nos perspectives sur notre propre société et sur le monde qui nous entoure. Lorsque j'ai assisté à la réunion du G7 en Italie le mois dernier, j'étais fière d'entendre dire que le Canada était un pays phare pour la science aux quatre coins du monde.[Français]

C'est le moment de poursuivre sur cette lancée, et je suis heureuse de vous dire que le gouvernement travaille fort en ce sens.[Traduction]

Par exemple, j'ai récemment réalisé I'engagement clé de mon mandat en annonçant, en compagnie du premier ministre, la nomination de Mona Nemer comme conseillère scientifique en chef du Canada. Mme Nemer est une chercheuse de renom dans le domaine de la santé, une ancienne dirigeante universitaire et une chercheuse primée reconnue à l'échelle internationale pour ses contributions au milieu universitaire. Son rôle est de donner des conseils scientifiques indépendants et non partisans au gouvernement. Mme Nemer recueillera les données scientifiques les plus avancées et me présentera ses recommandations, ainsi qu'au premier ministre et au Cabinet.

La tâche me reviendra ensuite, à titre de ministre des Sciences, de présenter ces recommandations au Cabinet pour que nous puissions prendre des décisions sur les enjeux qui importent le plus pour les Canadiens: leur santé et leur sécurité, ainsi que celle de leur famille et de leur collectivité, leur emploi et leur prospérité, l'environnement et le climat et l'économie.

Le premier ministre Trudeau a annoncé la nomination de Mme Nemer le jour même où avait lieu la toute première foire scientifique du premier ministre, ici à Ottawa. Pourquoi? Notre gouvernement voulait faire un lien entre la grande nouvelle du jour et les grands projets que les jeunes Canadiens réalisent pour faire avancer la science. Nous voulons que les jeunes sachent que leurs réalisations scientifiques ne passent pas inaperçues et ont leur place sur la Colline du Parlement. C'est l'une des nombreuses mesures que nous avons prises pour inciter les jeunes à être curieux et à réaliser leurs ambitions.

Par ailleurs, nous avons lancé la deuxième phase de notre très fructueuse campagne #OptezSciences cet automne. Jusqu'à présent, les publicités ont été diffusées plus de 2,2 millions de fois et ont joint plus de 520 000 Canadiens; 108 000 Canadiens ont réagi aux publicités sur les médias sociaux, ont fait des commentaires à leur sujet ou les ont partagées. La campagne a aussi donné lieu à plus de 25 000 visites sur la page Web #OptezSciences. Et plus de 55 000 écoles ont placé les affiches de la campagne dans leurs corridors.

J'appuie fermement les programmes comme celui-là qui donnent aux jeunes l'audace de choisir les sciences.

(1210)

[Français]

C'est la culture de la curiosité dont je vous parlais.[Traduction]

Notre défi aujourd'hui consiste à rendre cette culture accueillante pour tous. C'est pourquoi je me suis donné comme mission personnelle de remettre les pendules à l'heure en ce qui a trait à l'égalité des sexes, à l'équité et à la diversité dans le milieu de l'enseignement supérieur. Je crois que nous devons ouvrir les possibilités plus largement pour que tous aient l'occasion de bâtir l'avenir de notre pays. C'est pourquoi j'ai établi de nouvelles exigences en matière d'équité dans le cadre du Programme des chaires d'excellence en recherche du Canada, qui est l'un des programmes de recherche les plus prestigieux au pays. Nous avons également accru nos efforts pour corriger la sous-représentation de quatre groupes désignés au sein du Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada: les femmes, les Autochtones, les personnes handicapées et les minorités visibles.

Je suis très fière de vous dire aujourd'hui que mon message semble trouver écho. Un nombre record de femmes sont titulaires de chaires de recherche du Canada et de chaires de recherche Canada 150. Plus précisément, à l'issue du plus récent concours des chaires de recherche du Canada, 42 % des personnes retenues étaient des femmes, soit la proportion la plus élevée jamais enregistrée. Le budget de 2017 a prévu l'octroi de 117 millions de dollars pour les chaires de recherche Canada 150, un fonds ponctuel qui donne aux universités les moyens de recruter des universitaires qui travaillent présentement a l'étranger, dont des chercheurs canadiens expatriés qui souhaitent rentrer au pays.

Nous avons obtenu les résultats préliminaires. On constate que les demandeurs sont des femmes dans une proportion de 62 % et des Canadiens expatriés dans une proportion de 39 %. Ces gens voient un avenir pour leurs travaux de recherche ici au Canada. Je crois que ces résultats n'auraient pas été possibles si je n'avais pas agi fermement pour remettre les pendules à l'heure en ce qui a trait à l'égalité des sexes, à l'équité et à la diversité dans le milieu de l'enseignement supérieur.

Autre preuve de la réputation internationale du Canada comme pays ayant des politiques scientifiques modernes et libéralisées, la ville de Montréal a été choisie cette année comme première ville hôtesse canadienne du Gender Summit, une rencontre de calibre international. Au début du mois, Montréal a accueilli plus de 600 défenseurs de l'égalité des sexes dans les domaines des sciences, de l'innovation et du développement provenant d'un peu partout au monde. C'était un grand honneur de participer à cet événement historique. Je demeure émue, touchée et inspirée par les nombreuses histoires qui y ont été présentées au sujet de femmes qui jouent un rôle transformateur dans le milieu scientifique mondial.

Comme vous le savez, dans le cadre de mon mandat de championne des sciences au pays, j'ai également commandé un examen du financement fédéral des activités scientifiques. II s'agissait du premier examen de ce genre en plus de 40 ans.

(1215)

[Français]

Je remercie les distingués membres du Comité de leur travail.[Traduction]

Le comité m'a soumis un rapport comptant plus de 200 pages et présentant 35 recommandations. Je suis d'accord avec la majorité de ces recommandations et j'ai déjà pris des mesures pour mettre en oeuvre plusieurs d'entre elles. Ces mesures comprennent l'imposition de limites au renouvellement des chaires de recherche du Canada de niveau 1 et l'annonce de la création du Comité de coordination de la recherche au Canada.

J'ai aussi lancé cet été un concours visant les réseaux de centres d'excellence dans lequel la priorité est accordée aux initiatives de recherche pluridisciplinaires, multinationales et audacieuses.

J'ai donné mon appui au remplacement du Conseil des sciences, de la technologie et de l'innovation par un conseil consultatif plus souple dont les activités seraient accessibles au public. Au cours des prochains mois, je procéderai à la mise en place d'un nouveau Conseil des sciences et de l'innovation, qui sera plus ouvert et transparent et qui permettra au gouvernement de tirer profit des conseils d'experts indépendants qui travaillent dans ces domaines.

Nous prendrons d'autres mesures pour concrétiser les recommandations du comité. Je vous invite à m'appuyer dans ces efforts.

En plus de mes fonctions à Ottawa, j'ai le privilège de visiter des campus et des communautés dans toutes les régions du pays. Ces rencontres sur place avec des chercheurs sont d'une importance clé parce qu'elles m'éclairent sur l'état de la situation en sciences.[Français]

Tout dernièrement, j'ai eu le privilège de visiter l'Institut des algorithmes d'apprentissage de Montréal.[Traduction]

Connu sous l'acronyme MILA, il jouit d'une renommée mondiale pour ses percées en apprentissage automatique. Cet institut compte plus de 150 chercheurs qui se penchent sur l'apprentissage profond. II s'agit du plus important noyau d'universitaires dans ce domaine au monde.

Dans le but d'appuyer les travaux de calibre mondial menés au Canada dans le domaine de l'intelligence artificielle, le dernier budget a prévu 125 millions de dollars pour l'élaboration d'une stratégie pancanadienne en matière d'intelligence artificielle.

Je tiens à souligner qu'il y a une leçon importante à tirer de cet investissement. Les forces actuelles du Canada en matière d'intelligence artificielle sont le résultat direct d'investissements effectués il y a une trentaine d'années dans des travaux de recherche fondamentale dirigés par des chercheurs.

À l'époque, nombreux étaient ceux qui croyaient que l'apprentissage automatique demeurerait confiné à la science-fiction. Des scientifiques comme Geoffrey Hinton ont fait fi des sceptiques et ont demandé des fonds pour approfondir leurs recherches dans la sphère de l'intelligence artificielle. On constate aujourd'hui que ces investissements précoces ont donné des résultats. Cela confirme la pertinence d'investir dans tous les horizons de la recherche axée sur la découverte.

Nous savons que le changement de culture scientifique au pays ne se fera pas du jour au lendemain. Mais nous avons déjà fait de grands pas en avant au cours des six derniers mois et des deux dernières années.

Cela dit, je serai heureuse de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons passer immédiatement aux questions.

Allez-y, monsieur Sheehan.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie aussi madame la ministre pour son exposé.

Vous avez parlé des changements qui se produisent. Chez moi, ma fille, qui a 16 ans, vient tout juste d'abandonner les arts pour choisir les sciences et les mathématiques. Ma fille est également une Métisse. Ma question va être précise parce que je suis également le président du caucus des députés du nord de l'Ontario et qu'il y a un certain nombre de Premières Nations dans ma circonscription et dans la région du Nord.

Que pouvons-nous faire avec les peuples autochtones du Canada pour augmenter le niveau scientifique dans notre beau pays? Dans ma circonscription, dans Garden River, il y a des secteurs qui sont devenus des campings et qui étaient auparavant des lieux où se rendaient les Autochtones pour obtenir des médicaments traditionnels et étudier toutes sortes de choses, tout ça avant l'arrivée des occidentaux. Que pouvons-nous faire pour améliorer tout cela?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je peux vous dire ce que nous avons fait et ce que nous pouvons faire. Nous avons cette campagne Optez Sciences. Nous l'avons lancée parce qu'il faut construire un pipeline.

Au départ, tous les enfants sont curieux. Ils veulent découvrir des choses. Ils veulent explorer le monde. Ils démontent les stylos à leur portée et les microphones ou tout ce qu'ils peuvent attraper. C'est à nous de renforcer cette curiosité naturelle pendant leurs études primaires et secondaires et au-delà.

Nous voulons attirer les jeunes dans les carrières STEM — science, technologie, ingénierie et mathématiques, et j'ajouterai les arts et le dessin, mais il ne me suffit pas de les attirer, nous voulons qu'ils demeurent dans ce domaine. Je concentre mes efforts sur la construction d'un tel pipeline. Je l'ai intégré à mon mandat; lorsque je me déplace pour rencontrer ces jeunes, je veux qu'ils me parlent de leurs expériences et j'espère les encourager à penser aux matières scientifiques, techniques, mathématiques et à l'ingénierie.

La fin de semaine dernière, je me trouvais à l'Université de Toronto à Scarborough, c'est là que j'ai enseigné, et j'ai rencontré 100 filles de 9e année. Elles s'intéressaient à la science, à la technologie, à l'ingénierie et aux mathématiques. Ces étudiantes ont posé des questions et elles voulaient toutes savoir quels étaient les défis auxquels faisaient face les femmes dans la recherche scientifique. Ce sont des jeunes qui veulent travailler dans les domaines de la science, de la technologie, de l'ingénierie et des mathématiques.

Cet été, j'ai eu le privilège de me rendre dans l'Arctique, où j'avais fait de la recherche. J'ai pu rencontrer des étudiants autochtones et je crois que nous pouvons faire beaucoup de choses dans cette région. Je pense également que le Canada doit mieux écouter les peuples autochtones — les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits. On ne peut vivre sur un territoire pendant des milliers d'années sans connaître le ciel, la terre et l'eau. Nous avons beaucoup à apprendre des peuples autochtones en matière d'environnement, pour ce qui est de notre relation avec le monde. Nous devons savoir qui sont les détenteurs de ces connaissances et je pense qu'il y a beaucoup de travail à faire pour rapprocher les connaissances traditionnelles et la science occidentale et pour intégrer toute cette information.

(1220)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Nous avons récemment effectué une étude IP. On nous a parlé des nombreuses recherches qui s'effectuaient dans les universités, ce qui est une excellente chose.

Nous avons une université à Sault. Nous avons le Sault College et le Heritage Discovery Centre. Que peut faire le ministère pour favoriser davantage la recherche, la science, ce genre de travail dans nos collèges et dans nos instituts polytechniques?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Cela est très clair pour moi. Toutes nos institutions postsecondaires ont un rôle à jouer au sein de l'écosystème postsecondaire. Cela comprend nos universités, nos collèges et nos écoles polytechniques. Nous devons toutes les financer.

Les collèges font un travail considérable. La recherche appliquée qui s'effectue... Humber College se trouve dans ma collectivité. Je suis très fière de pouvoir m'occuper de ce collège. Les gens du milieu des collèges me disent que c'est moi qui ai visité le plus grand nombre de centres d'accès à la technologie, les programmes CAT.

Nous étions cet été au Niagara College. Le midi, nous avons rencontré des membres de la collectivité. Ils nous ont expliqué que le collège les aidait à produire des aliments et du vin, à résoudre les difficultés qu'ils rencontraient et que le collège était un facteur de développement économique régional.

Nous avons déjeuné avec des représentants de l'industrie alimentaire et vinicole. Plus tard dans la journée, nous avons rencontré les représentants des sociétés de fabrication de pointe qui nous ont livré le même message. Ils soumettent au collège un problème; le collège leur apporte une réponse en trois ou quatre mois, ce qui aide leur entreprise.

Nous avons nos programmes d'innovation communautaire et collégiale et nos centres d'accès à la technologie et j'espère que vous prendrez tous le temps de les visiter.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Le président:

Je rappelle à tout le monde que nous avons un horaire très serré et que je vais nous limiter à cinq minutes.

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci.

Madame la ministre, merci d'être venue aujourd'hui et d'être accompagnée par vos nombreux collaborateurs. Vous avez été très généreuse envers moi et je l'apprécie beaucoup.

J'ai quelques questions à vous poser. En particulier, commençons par le rapport Naylor. Cela fait 234 jours maintenant. Nous attendons toujours de savoir ce qui va se passer avec les 35 recommandations et quelle sera votre position sur un certain nombre d'entre elles. Vous en avez mentionné un certain nombre, mais il y en a d'autres qui n'ont pas encore été mises en oeuvre.

Quand pouvons-nous espérer qu'il sera donné suite à ces recommandations?

(1225)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais commencer par dire qu'une bonne partie des personnes qui m'accompagnent aujourd'hui sont des stagiaires qui travaillent au sein d'ISDE et je sais que le Comité se fera un plaisir de les accueillir. Notre mandat est fortement axé sur les jeunes.

Merci d'avoir posé une question au sujet de l'examen de la science fondamentale. C'est moi qui l'ai lancé. C'est la première fois que cela se faisait depuis 40 ans. Je ne pense pas qu'il existe un autre système qui n'ait jamais fait l'objet d'un examen complet en 40 ans. J'ai effectué cet examen pour obtenir les données qui nous permettront d'agir.

Certains membres de la collectivité craignent que ce rapport ne débouche sur rien. J'ai insisté pour qu'il soit publié au forum d'orientation pour être en mesure de démarrer quelque chose qui ne s'est jamais fait dans ce pays, à savoir tenir un débat sur la recherche et sur son financement. Ce débat est lancé.

J'ai dit très clairement au printemps que j'acceptais la plupart des recommandations et que j'avais l'intention de les mettre en oeuvre à court, moyen et long terme.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Puis-je vous demander, madame la ministre, qu'est-ce qui bloque? Que pouvons-nous faire pour vous aider à accélérer un peu les choses?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J'apprécie beaucoup votre offre. Cela prend du temps. Il y a 35 recommandations. Il n'est pas possible de changer du jour au lendemain un écosystème aussi complexe.

Je peux vous dire que, pour ce qui est des réseaux de centres d'excellence, que nous avons changé les règles, les délais, pour que les anciens réseaux de centres d'excellence puissent demander du financement.

Le Comité de coordination de la recherche au Canada est un organisme très important. Quand je voyage, j'entends souvent des chercheurs me dire: « Je pourrais peut-être obtenir des fonds pour mon laboratoire ou mon équipement, mais je ne peux pas en avoir pour le faire fonctionner, de sorte que cela ne sert à rien. » En créant ce comité de coordination — le sous-ministre de ISDE en sera membre, avec le sous-ministre de la Santé, les présidents de nos trois agences de subvention et la FCI — nous allons pouvoir mieux coordonner et harmoniser ces programmes de recherche.

Je vais vous parler également des chaires de recherche de niveau 1...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous avez déclaré publiquement qu'une partie du problème que pose le rapport est que vous ne pensez pas que le fait de confier le modèle de financement à un organisme non élu constitue un obstacle pour la mise en oeuvre du rapport. Si c'est bien là l'obstacle, j'espère que vous allez simplement le reconnaître et nous le dire pour que nous puissions appuyer la communauté scientifique et travailler avec elle sur ce point.

Voulez-vous changer rapidement de sujet et parler du financement du PEARL?

L'hon. Kirsty Duncan: Puis-je...

M. Matt Jeneroux: Permettez-moi de poursuivre.

Pour ce qui est du financement du PEARL, l'IRCCA qu'a lancée notre gouvernement est arrivée à la fin de son cycle. De nombreux membres de la communauté scientifique s'inquiètent du financement du PEARL. Vous êtes arrivé au dernier moment avec le ministre de l'Environnement et vous avez trouvé un financement de transition de 1,6 million de dollars, mais il ne semble pas que cette transition débouche sur quoi que ce soit. Il n'y a aucun engagement de pris au sujet de ce qui va arriver à la fin de ces 18 mois.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce que vous proposez à ce sujet?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Notre gouvernement sait que la recherche arctique est plus importante que jamais en raison du changement climatique. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons signé l'Accord de Paris. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons mis un prix sur le carbone et nous avons investi des milliards de dollars dans la recherche sur le changement climatique, sur l'adaptation et l'atténuation des dommages et sur la technologie propre — et je parle vraiment de milliards de dollars.

J'ai fait partie de la Commission intergouvernementale sur le changement climatique. Le gouvernement m'a invitée à en être membre. En 1995, le GIEC a affirmé que les humains avaient un effet réel sur le climat. Le ministre de l'Environnement précédent, dans le gouvernement antérieur, a reconnu que le changement climatique était une réalité en 2012, de sorte que, si nous avons investi...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je suis désolé, madame la ministre, il me reste environ cinq secondes. Avez-vous un plan pour ce qui se passera à l'expiration des 18 mois?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

... des milliards, le gouvernement précédent a utilisé PEARL comme solution ponctuelle permettant de résoudre un problème politique.

Nous savons que l'Arctique est une région très importante et nous allons présenter un programme global et harmonieux, mais étant donné que vous avez posé une question au sujet de PEARL, je vous dirais que c'est un programme unique au Canada. C'est notre établissement le plus nordique. Il étudie l'atmosphère, le changement climatique, l'ozone et l'interaction entre l'atmosphère, la glace et l'océan, de sorte que nous allons poursuivre les activités de PEARL et la recherche qui s'y fait.

(1230)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Concrètement, votre réponse est « Non ».

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Stewart, qui dispose de cinq minutes.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue, madame la ministre.

Comme je ne dispose que de peu de temps, je vais tenter de faire vite.

Je vous ai écrit en date du 29 septembre pour vous demander, entre autres, dans quelle mesure vous seriez prête à mettre en oeuvre les recommandations du rapport Naylor. Votre cabinet m’a promis une réponse, mais je ne l’ai pas encore reçue. J’espère toujours une réponse écrite, mais cela ne m’empêche pas de vous demander de répondre aux trois questions que je vous ai posées dans cette lettre.

Les deux premières concernent le rapport Naylor, et je les combine ici en une seule. Ce rapport comporte 35 recommandations et je conviens bien volontiers que vous avez déjà mis en oeuvre certaines d’entre elles, mais il me semble que ce sont les moins importantes. Vous n’avez pas encore réagi à deux douzaines d’entre elles. La première qui figure dans ce rapport est de déposer au Parlement un projet de loi pour instituer un conseil consultatif national sur la recherche et l'innovation. Avez-vous l’intention de déposer un tel projet de loi?

Ma seconde question concernant le rapport Naylor est de loin la plus importante. Elle concerne la recommandation proposant de porter, sur une période de quatre ans, le financement annuel de 3,5 à 4,8 milliards de dollars. Êtes-vous en mesure de promettre à nos scientifiques cette hausse de leur financement?

Je vous remercie d’avance de vos réponses.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Permettez-moi, d’abord, de vous remercier de m’avoir adressé cette lettre. Si nous avons tardé à vous répondre, c’est qu’un événement important est survenu entretemps, soit la nomination de la conseillère scientifique en chef du Canada. Nous voulions que notre réponse écrite tienne compte de cette nomination. Je me ferais d’ailleurs un plaisir de parler avec vous de cette nomination.

Sachez que mon cabinet a proposé à deux occasions d’organiser une réunion avec vous et votre personnel, et que je me suis moi-même arrêtée à votre bureau pour vous proposer la même chose…

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Oui, mais, dans ce type de cas, rien ne vaut une réponse écrite.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Le personnel de mon cabinet vous a offert deux fois d’organiser une réunion pendant que nous rédigions notre réponse, qui se trouve d’ailleurs aujourd’hui sur mon bureau, et je vous ai proposé en personne deux fois de tenir une telle réunion.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je vous en remercie.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Dans le cas de l’évaluation fondamentale des projets scientifiques, il importe de vous souvenir que j’ai commandé moi-même ce rapport parce que je voulais disposer de preuves. Ce document nous montre la voie à suivre. Je vous ai déjà parlé des mesures que nous avons prises, de la mise en place des réseaux de centres d’excellence et de la création du Comité de coordination de la recherche au Canada. Je ne vous ai pas encore entretenu des chaires de recherche de niveau 1, et j’aimerais…

M. Kennedy Stewart:

J’ai une question précise, et donc…

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

… vous parler de financement, si vous me permettez de terminer.

Je tiens à vous rappeler que les mesures prises par le gouvernement précédent nous ont fait passer, sur une période de 10 ans, de la troisième à la huitième place et de la 18e à la 26e place dans les domaines respectifs de la R et D dans l’enseignement supérieur et de la R et D au sein des entreprises. Pour la première fois de notre histoire, le Canada ne fait plus partie des trente premiers au titre de la R et D au sein des entreprises. Nous avons pris beaucoup de retard et il n’y a pas de solution miracle. Nous travaillons avec acharnement à un processus budgétaire pour commencer à corriger la situation. Nous mettons en place des mesures pour sensibiliser à l’importance de la recherche axée sur la découverte et sur l’éducation en la matière, et il n’y a pas de défenseur plus ardent de la science que moi-même.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Très bien. Je vous remercie.

Qu’advient-il alors du Conseil consultatif national sur la recherche et l’innovation, le CCNRI?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie.

En ce qui concerne le CCNRI, le comité propose que nous mettions en place un comité consultatif sur la science et l’innovation et nous sommes tout à fait d’accord avec cette recommandation.

La mise en oeuvre des nouvelles modalités de nomination qui, comme vous le savez, sont ouvertes, transparentes et reposent sur le mérite, prend du temps, mais vous en verrez les effets au cours des mois à venir. Il importe que ces modalités tiennent compte des interventions externes, soient ouvertes et transparentes et que le comité soit informé des discussions en cours.

J’entends également m’appuyer sur le Comité de coordination de la recherche au Canada. Vous avez été chercheur et vous comprenez fort bien certains des défis auxquels nos chercheurs sont confrontés…

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je réalise également fort bien la difficulté de s’entretenir avec les ministres et je me permets de vous rappeler ma question.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Eh bien, pour terminer je dirais que…

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Cette question est: « Entendez-vous déposer un nouveau projet de loi au Parlement? »

(1235)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Dans quel but?

M. Kennedy Stewart: Concernant le CCNRI...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan: Nous espérons que ce sera…

M. Kennedy Stewart:

… conformément à la recommandation du rapport Naylor.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

… sur la conseillère scientifique en chef.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Ce n’est pas là non plus un nouveau projet de loi. C’est le point sur lequel j’insiste.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Eh bien, il faut donner une certaine permanence à tout ceci. Il importe à mes yeux de mettre en place un système consultatif au sein du Parlement.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Très bien. Mon temps de parole est quasiment épuisé, mais je note que vous répondez par la négative en ce qui concerne le projet de loi. Je vous remercie…

Le président:

Je suis navré, mais vous avez effectivement épuisé votre temps de parole.

Monsieur Longfield, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous, madame la ministre, d’être venue nous rencontrer, accompagnée des spécialistes de votre ministère.

Ma question tient compte d’un certain nombre de ces éléments, de la différence entre science et innovation, et s’inspire également dans une certaine mesure des commentaires de M. Stewart. Ce que nous a dit M. Jeneroux au sujet du Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory, le PEARL, me semble aussi tout à fait pertinent.

Nous devons chercher des façons de poursuivre le financement de la recherche. Le financement de l’innovation que nous avons mis en place est une bonne chose en soi, mais l’innovation ne part pas de rien. Elle a besoin de s’appuyer sur des recherches scientifiques. J’ai rencontré hier des représentants de D-Wave. Ils s’intéressent à l’apprentissage automatique sur des ordinateurs quantiques, une forme d’apprentissage qui atteint des niveaux inconnus jusqu’à maintenant. Ces gens sont loin de maîtriser cette technologie et ils doivent s’en remettre à des scientifiques utilisant ces ordinateurs quantiques pour déterminer à quoi ils pourraient s’attendre de l’utilisation de telles machines pour l’apprentissage automatique.

La semaine dernière, nous avons annoncé l’attribution d’un financement d'un million de dollars au titre de l’innovation à Mirexus Biotechnologies de Guelph. Ils travaillent sur les nouvelles utilisations de nanoparticules de maïs, qui sont en elles-mêmes une nouveauté. J’ai demandé au représentant de cette société le nombre d’employés qu’elle compte, et il m’a répondu qu’il y en a 30, mais elle fait aussi appel à 15 chercheurs oeuvrant dans diverses universités en Amérique du Nord qui ont été financés par notre gouvernement. Lorsque nous étudions des solutions en cours d’élaboration alors que nous ignorons dans quelle direction elles peuvent nous conduire, nous avons besoin de scientifiques curieux qui oeuvrent en arrière-plan.

Au sujet de l’importance du financement de la science, tel que prôné dans le rapport Naylor, et de la nécessité d’assurer ce financement à long terme, comme dans le cas du Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory que nous avons évoqué, pourriez-vous nous parler de vos activités visant à garantir que le financement des activités scientifiques reste prioritaire, indépendamment de celui consacré à l’innovation?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Dans notre tout premier budget, nous avons consacré 2 milliards de dollars aux infrastructures nécessaires à la recherche et à l’innovation. C’était là un investissement important, qui était justifié par le fait que la plupart des infrastructures avaient alors 25 ans ou plus. J’ai par compte toujours pris soin de préciser que ce ne sont pas les bâtiments qui font de la recherche; ce sont les gens. C’est pourquoi nous devons investir dans nos chercheurs.

Je vous ai déjà parlé des coupures imposées par le gouvernement précédent, qui nous ont fait reculer de la troisième à la huitième place et de la 18e à la 26e, qui expliquent que nous ayons procédé avec notre premier budget au plus important investissement réalisé en une décennie dans nos trois conseils subventionnaires relevant du gouvernement fédéral. À la différence des pratiques du gouvernement précédent, il a s’agit là d’un investissement sans condition, ce qui veut dire que ces fonds étaient vraiment disponibles.

Je peux vous parler d’autres investissements importants: les 950 millions de dollars consacrés aux supergrappes, les 900 millions affectés au Fonds d’excellence en recherche Apogée Canada, les 221 millions… comme vous semblez avoir une question à me poser, je vous écoute.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie. Plus vous approchez de la réponse à ma question et plus je hoche la tête.

Le rôle confié à la conseillère scientifique en chef du Canada constitue une nouveauté dans notre pays. Elle va devoir faire le lien entre les fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent et qui se consacrent aux questions touchant à l’innovation et les scientifiques qui oeuvrent actuellement dans les laboratoires. Quelles sont les règles qui encadrent ce rôle? Quelle est la structure de gouvernance mise en place, sous sa direction, pour nous permettre d’établir ces liens très importants entre la science et l’innovation?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Je suis très heureuse que nous ayons une nouvelle conseillère scientifique en chef. Permettez-moi de vous décrire brièvement le processus que nous avons suivi pour arriver à ce résultat.

Nous avons tenu les premières consultations importantes dans le domaine scientifique en 10 ans. Nous avons écrit aux membres du milieu de la recherche, aux autres intervenants et à tous les parlementaires afin que tous puissent contribuer à la définition de ce poste. Il est alors apparu très clairement qu’il nous fallait un conseiller scientifique en chef, ou une conseillère scientifique en chef. Nous avons ensuite consulté les personnes occupant ce type de poste en Australie, en Israël, en Nouvelle-Zélande, au Royaume-Uni et aux États-Unis et nous nous sommes inspirés de leurs réponses pour définir nous-mêmes la nature de ce poste au Canada. Il faut vous souvenir que c’est un poste qui avait été supprimé par le gouvernement précédent. Nous avons lancé la recherche d’une conseillère scientifique en chef en décembre 2016.

Grâce au nouveau processus ouvert, transparent et reposant sur le mérite que nous avons mis en place, nous avons maintenant une nouvelle conseillère scientifique en chef et elle est extraordinaire. C’est une chercheuse en cardiologie réputée. Elle a été vice-présidente de la recherche à l’Université d’Ottawa et a dispensé ses conseils au pays comme à l’étranger. Elle est membre de l’Ordre du Canada.

La tâche qui lui incombe est de conseiller le premier ministre, la ministre que je suis et l’ensemble du Cabinet dans le domaine scientifique, de collationner l’information la plus fiable au moment, d’en préparer un compendium et de communiquer son opinion. Notre rôle à nous est de tenir compte des résultats des recherches scientifiques, des divers éléments de preuves et des faits dont nous avons besoin pour prendre des décisions en matière de développement régional, d’économie, de diversité, d’équité, etc. C’est un rôle consultatif.

(1240)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à des temps de parole plus courts.

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous disposez de trois minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je vais donc devoir me contenter de trois minutes, monsieur le président.

Très rapidement, madame la ministre, vous avez parlé du financement accordé aux conseils subventionnaires, mais le budget de 2017 ne prévoyait pas l’injection de nouveaux fonds. Le rapport Naylor demande que les budgets attribués à ces conseils soient augmentés. Vous avez critiqué le gouvernement précédent pour avoir pratiqué un financement à la pièce. Vous, vous avez investi dans les cellules souches, dans l’exploration spatiale et dans l’informatique quantique. J’espère que vous allez accroître le financement de ces conseils subventionnaires dans le prochain budget.

J’ai encore des questions à vous poser sur PEARL et sur la Station canadienne de recherche dans l’Extrême-Arctique, la SCREA. Dans une entrevue que vous avez donnée à la CBC, vous avez parlé de l’Initiative de recherche sur les changements climatiques et l’atmosphère, l'IRCCA, comme d’une initiative unique en matière de recherche sur les changements climatiques. Pouvez-vous nous dire de façon un peu plus explicite ce que vous entendez par là, puisque vous avez utilisé à nouveau cette expression ici aujourd’hui?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Avant que vous abordiez cette question, vous avez parlé de la recherche sur l’espace, sur les cellules souches et sur l’informatique quantique. Dans le domaine de l’espace, nous avons effectivement investi 379 millions de dollars parce que l’espace, c’est l’avenir. C’est la science, la technologie…

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la ministre, je connais ces chiffres. Je ne dispose que de trois minutes et si vous n’y voyez pas d’inconvénient…

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Dans le domaine de la génomique, le montant est de 237 millions de dollars parce que c’est un domaine dans lequel nous voulons être un leader à l’avenir. Si nous voulons transformer la médecine que nous connaissons, il faut s’intéresser à la médecine régénérative, à la médecine de précision, aux équipements quantiques, à l’informatique quantique et à l’intelligence artificielle. Ce sont des domaines qui comptent vraiment pour l’avenir.

Vous avez posé des questions sur l'IRCCA. Comme vous le savez, les programmes fédéraux ont une durée de vie limitée avec une date de démarrage et une date d’expiration. L’IRCCA arrive à son terme. J’ai demandé à mes fonctionnaires de…

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous nous dites que ce programme arrive à son terme…

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Oui, parce qu’il atteint la date de fin qui avait été fixée par votre gouvernement.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Arrêtons-nous un instant. Nous avons remplacé la Fondation canadienne pour les sciences du climat et de l’atmosphère, la FCSCA, par l'IRCCA. C’est celle-ci qui a assuré le financement de PEARL. Vous nous dîtes maintenant que le financement de l'IRCCA va prendre fin. Il faut trouver une solution de remplacement. PEARL allait arriver à expiration à cause de cela et, une fois encore, vous avez attendu la onzième heure pour intervenir après avoir laissé ces scientifiques dans l’expectative. Je vous ai donné, madame la ministre, deux occasions de répondre à cette question et vous ne l’avez pas encore fait.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Si j’avais la possibilité de poursuivre et de vous répondre au lieu d’écouter votre badinage…

Le président:

Vous disposez d’environ 30 secondes.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

L’IRCCA a atteint sa fin de vie. C’est une décision qui a été prise sous le gouvernement précédent. Nous sommes parvenus à sauver le PEARL, parce qu’il s’agit d’une installation unique dans ce pays.

Le gouvernement précédent ne croyait pas aux changements climatiques...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous venez tout juste de dire, madame la ministre, que nous y croyions.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

En tout cas, il n’a pas investi dans les changements climatiques...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous avez dit plus tôt que nous croyions aux changements climatiques.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Le Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat a été mis sur pied en 1995. Ce n’est qu’en 2012 qu’il a fini par convenir que les changements climatiques étaient bien réels.

Nous avons investi des milliards de dollars dans ce domaine. Les cas dans lesquels le financement serait le bienvenu sont nombreux et nos fonctionnaires collaborent avec les chercheurs pour déterminer s’il existe d’autres possibilités.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Jowhari, qui dispose de trois minutes.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Bienvenue à vous, madame la ministre.

Dans vos commentaires préliminaires, vous nous avez parlé du Programme de chaires de recherche Canada 150. Vous avez également abordé la question de la sous-représentation des quatre groupes désignés.

Dans les trois minutes dont je dispose, pouvez-vous nous dire plus précisément ce que vous espérez réaliser avec ce programme de chaires de recherche et comment, à votre avis, celles-ci devraient contribuer à l’équité et à la diversité au sein de ces quatre groupes désignés qui sont sous-représentés?

Je vous remercie d’avance de votre réponse.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

L’excellence et la diversité de la recherche sont deux choses qui vont de pair. Dans une économie mondiale concurrentielle, nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de laisser des talents sur le bas-côté.

Nous savons que des gens venant d’horizons variés ont des expériences, des idées et des points de vue qui diffèrent. Cela peut les amener à aborder la recherche sous des angles différents et à faire appel à d’autres méthodes de recherche qui permettront, pour le bien de tous, d’obtenir des résultats inenvisageables autrement.

Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple. Je crois que le premier logiciel de reconnaissance vocale, qui était conçu pour reconnaître uniquement les voix masculines, ou prenons plutôt la première valve cardiaque artificielle, créée par une équipe de chercheurs composés essentiellement d’hommes, qui ne s’adaptait qu’à un coeur masculin.

Nous avons d’excellents chercheurs dans notre pays. Je veux qu’ils aient la possibilité de participer à des travaux de ce type. Je me suis battue pendant 25 ans pour avoir une plus grande diversité dans ce milieu et je ne vais pas m’arrêter là.

(1245)

M. Majid Jowhari:

J’ai accès à une importante base de données d’universitaires et de chercheurs, qui se trouvent aussi bien au Canada qu’à l’étranger. Comment le Programme de chaires de recherche Canada 150 peut-il les amener à rester dans notre pays ou à venir s’y installer?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Le Programme de chaires de recherche Canada 150 a été annoncé dans le budget de 2017. Son objectif est d’attirer de toutes les régions du monde les meilleurs talents ainsi que les Canadiens expatriés.

Si nous y parvenons, ils vont mettre sur pied des équipes de recherches. La taille moyenne de ces équipes est d’environ 34 ou 35 personnes. Elles vont former la prochaine génération de chercheurs. Elles vont faire des découvertes qui pourraient déboucher sur des innovations, des nouveaux produits et des nouveaux services.

Nous avons obtenu une réaction extraordinaire venant de toutes les régions du monde. Des chercheurs ont présenté directement leurs candidatures aux universités et l’une de celles-ci nous a dit avoir reçu 500 demandes. Nous avons effectivement attiré des chercheurs. Il nous reste maintenant à passer en revue ces nominations. Les résultats sont extraordinaires avec 62 % de candidatures féminines. C’est un vrai changement. Il faut aussi savoir que 42 % des candidats sont des expatriés canadiens qui veulent revenir au pays. À leurs yeux, leur avenir dans le domaine de la recherche est au Canada.

C’est ce que nous avons entendu dire au G7. J’ai assisté à cette réunion 12 heures après avoir annoncé la nomination de notre nouvelle conseillère scientifique en chef, Mme Nemer. C’est la nouvelle qui a retenu l’attention lors de ce sommet. Les gens voulaient en savoir davantage. Ils étaient vivement intéressés par notre engagement envers les sciences et notre volonté de prendre des décisions reposant sur des preuves.

M. Majid Jowhari:

J’en ai terminé, mais je vais faire des pressions pour répéter cette opération l’année prochaine.

Le président:

Puisque vous en avez terminé, je vous remercie d’avoir respecté la règle du jeu.

Nous allons maintenant passer à la période de questions ultra-courtes.

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous disposez de deux minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je vous en remercie, monsieur le président.

Six autres programmes ont bénéficié de l’appui de l’IRCCA. Que va-t-il advenir de ces programmes?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Comme je vous l’ai déjà expliqué, l’IRCCA arrive à son terme. Nos fonctionnaires étudient les modalités de collaboration avec les chercheurs.

Dans le cas de l’Arctique, nous avons adopté une approche réfléchie et complète. Le premier ministre a annoncé la publication prochaine d’un nouveau cadre de politique pour l’Arctique, qui implique pour nous de collaborer avec les territoires, avec les communautés nordiques et avec les peuples autochtones. Nous obtiendrons un cadre de travail « pour le Nord conçu par le Nord » ou si vous préférez un cadre pour les régions nordiques conçu par les habitants de celles-ci.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la ministre, pensez-vous que les membres de groupes comme le Network on Climate and Aerosols (NETCARE), le Canadian Arctic GEOTRACES program, le Ventilation, Interactions and Transports Across the Labrador Sea (VITALS), le Canadian Network for Regional Climate and Weather Processes et le Changing Cold Regions Network vont être rassurés par votre façon de répondre aujourd’hui à ces questions au lieu de nous indiquer comment vous entendez dessiner leur avenir?

Cela dit, la poursuite de ces discussions n’apporte aucune solution pour ces programmes dont l’avenir est aussi risqué que l’était celui du programme PEARL.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Comme je vous l’ai déjà rappelé, c’est votre gouvernement qui a fixé la date de fin de ce programme. Nous collaborons avec les chercheurs pour voir s’ils peuvent poser leur candidature auprès d’autres organismes. Nous avons investi environ deux milliards et demi de dollars dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques destinés directement à la recherche, à l’adaptation et à l’atténuation des phénomènes climatiques. C’est votre gouvernement qui a supprimé le Groupe de recherche sur l'adaptation et les répercussions (des changements climatiques) d’Environnement Canada.

(1250)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Permettez-moi, madame la ministre, de vous faire remarquer, à l’intention des gens qui nous suivent chez eux, que, d’habitude, vous n’êtes pas aussi partisane. Pour être honnête avec vous, vous me surprenez aujourd’hui.

Cela n’empêche que les universités se demandent de quel financement elles vont bénéficier à l’avenir. Elles veulent voir un plan. Elles veulent un financement cohérent. Pouvez-vous les rassurer immédiatement en déclarant que ce que nous avons vu dans le dernier budget était une anomalie et que nous allons continuer à financer les universités?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais être très claire. Le monde de la science n’a pas de plus grand défenseur que moi.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Bossio qui dispose de deux minutes.

Je vous demande pardon, c’est à M. Baylis que je la donne. Vous venez d’arriver. [Français]

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie d'être venue nous rencontrer aujourd'hui.

Il est très important d'investir dans la science pure. Elle forme en effet, comme nous le savons, la base d'une société scientifique. À l'heure actuelle, le Canada — et particulièrement le Québec — a une importante longueur d'avance dans le domaine de l'intelligence artificielle. Pour ma part, je ne voudrais pas que nous perdions cet avantage.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce que fait le gouvernement pour maintenir spécifiquement cette longueur d'avance? [Traduction]

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Il y a deux semaines, nous avons assisté à Montréal à l’atelier sur l’intelligence artificielle. Dans le budget de 2017, notre gouvernement y a consacré 125 millions de dollars. Pourquoi? Parce qu’il semble que ce domaine soit à un moment charnière. Nous avons financé des recherches de découverte sur l’intelligence artificielle depuis 1982. Même à la fin des années 1990, les gens ne savaient pas encore très précisément de quoi il s’agissait. Pourtant, les investissements se sont poursuivis en recherche fondamentale.

Nous nous trouvons maintenant à un moment charnière et le Canada bénéficie réellement d’un avantage dans ce domaine parce que nous y avons des leaders. Nous nous sommes dotés au pays de la base de talents nécessaires. En procédant à ces investissements, nous avons attiré des entreprises et nous avons attiré des talents dans nos entreprises et dans nos institutions. C’était époustouflant. Un organisme nous a dit attirer 10 à 12 personnes de l’étranger toutes les deux semaines.

Je vous invite tous à lire l’article paru dans The Economist , il y a un mois. On y parlait de la « Vallée de l’érable » (Maple Valley). Les gens veulent savoir comment le Canada s’y est pris pour réussir aussi brillamment dans le domaine de l’intelligence artificielle. Notre gouvernement a injecté 125 millions de dollars dans la Stratégie pancanadienne en matière d'intelligence artificielle. Les activités en la matière se déroulent essentiellement à Toronto, à Montréal…

Le président:

Je vais devoir…

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

… et à Edmonton et vont aussi se pencher sur les dimensions juridiques, …

Le président:

Je me dois, madame, de vous couper la parole.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

… éthiques et sociétales.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous voici à la dernière question de deux minutes, qui revient à M. Stewart.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

En nous fiant au tableau no 358-0146 de CANSIM, on constate qu'à l’ère la plus sombre de l’administration Harper, en 2012 — vous vous souviendrez des manifestations sur la Colline du Parlement à cette époque —, 36 822 employés du gouvernement fédéral oeuvraient au sein de celui-ci dans le domaine des sciences et de la technologie. Lorsque vous avez formé le nouveau gouvernement, il y avait alors 35 496 chercheurs sur la liste de paye du gouvernement fédéral. Ils sont maintenant 34 594. C’est donc 2 000 de moins qu’en 2012, sous le gouvernement Harper, et 1 000 de moins que lorsque vous avez formé le nouveau gouvernement en 2015.

Comment expliquez-vous cette diminution?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie de cette question. Je vais vous répondre avec précision avant de poursuivre.

J’ai participé, avec mon collègue le ministre des Pêches, des Océans et de la Garde côtière canadienne, à une campagne d’embauche qui nous a permis de recruter 135 scientifiques, le nombre le plus élevé jamais atteint en une seule fois. J’ai convoqué pour la première fois, en juin 2016, les sous-ministres des ministères à vocation scientifique à une réunion qui a duré huit heures. Nous avons recommencé en juin de cette année. Ces réunions étaient consacrées aux ressources humaines et à la façon de nous doter d’un vivier de talents. L’âge moyen d’un fonctionnaire est de 37 ans, et il est plus élevé chez les scientifiques. Il faut donc déterminer comment s’y prendre pour constituer un tel vivier.

Dans un autre domaine…

(1255)

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Pourquoi voyons-nous encore des scientifiques partir? Un millier d’entre eux ont quitté l’appareil fédéral depuis votre arrivée au pouvoir. Nous avons entendu toutes les platitudes habituelles sur la science avec des affirmations du genre « Je suis impressionnée par le travail que vous faites et j’apprécie la personne que vous êtes », mais il est difficile de contester les chiffres de Statistique Canada. J’estime que ce phénomène tient à un financement insuffisant. Si vous ne financez pas vos instituts de recherche, vous n’allez pas parvenir à embaucher des chercheurs.

Le président:

Je vous saurai gré, madame, de répondre très brièvement.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Cela s’explique en partie par les départs à la retraite, mais je tiens à finir ce que j’avais commencé à vous dire.

Nous procédons différemment. Nous regroupons les sous-ministres des ministères à vocation scientifique pour nous pencher sur les questions de ressources humaines, sur le vivier de talents, sur les infrastructures scientifiques et sur les systèmes de gestion des TI. C’est là une partie du travail que nous avons fait. C’est pourquoi, dans le budget de 2017, vous avez appris que je vais devoir présenter une stratégie sur les infrastructures scientifiques. Celle-ci prend du temps à élaborer, mais nous y travaillons avec acharnement pour combler ce manque.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Le temps dont nous disposions est malheureusement épuisé.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Personne ne se lève tout de suite…

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Monsieur le président, avec votre permission, j’aimerais remercier les membres du Comité.

Le président:

Vous pouvez, madame.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier les membres du Comité de m’avoir invitée à me joindre à eux ce matin. Je les remercie également des questions qu’ils m’ont posées et, plus important encore, du travail qu’ils ont fait dans le cadre de cette étude sur la propriété intellectuelle. Merci à tous pour cet excellent travail.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Conformément à l’article 81(5) du Règlement, nous passons maintenant à l'étude du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) pour l'exercice financier prenant fin le 31 mars 2018.

Ai-je le consentement unanime pour rassembler tous les crédits en une motion unique?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Très bien. AGENCE DE PROMOTION ÉCONOMIQUE DU CANADA ATLANTIQUE Crédit 5b — Subventions et contributions..........40 584 308 $

(Crédit 5b adopté avec dissidence.) AGENCE CANADIENNE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE DU NORD Crédit 1b — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........313 028 $ Crédit 5b — Contributions.........4 537 297 $

(Crédits 1b et 5b adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE SPATIALE CANADIENNE Crédit 1b — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........8 612 533 $ Crédit 5b — Dépenses en capital..........4 200 532 $

(Crédits 1b et 5b adoptés avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE L'INDUSTRIE Crédit 1b — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........23 903 710 $ Crédit 10b — Subventions et contributions..........163 305 969 $

(Crédits 1b et 10b adoptés avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE LA DIVERSIFICATION DE L'ÉCONOMIE DE L'OUEST CANADIEN Crédit 5b — Subventions et contributions..........11 531 673 $

(Crédit 5b adopté avec dissidence.) AGENCE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE DU CANADA POUR LES RÉGIONS DU QUÉBEC Crédit 5b — Subventions et contributions..........5 000 000 $

(Crédit 5b adopté avec dissidence.) CONSEIL NATIONAL DE RECHERCHES DU CANADA Crédit 10b — Subventions et contributions..........1 $

(Crédit 10b adopté avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES NATURELLES ET EN GÉNIE Crédit 1b — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........141 000 $ Crédit 5b — Subventions..........3 332 270 $

(Crédits 1b et 5b adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES HUMAINES Crédit 1b — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........1 099 655 $

(Crédit 1b adopté avec dissidence.) CONSEIL CANADIEN DES NORMES Crédit 1b — Paiements au Conseil..........1 $

(Crédit 1b adopté avec dissidence.) STATISTIQUE CANADA Crédit 1b Dépenses de programme..........14 348 243 $

(Crédit 1b adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Dois-je faire rapport des crédits à la Chambre?

Des voix: D’accord.

Le président: Très bien. Je vous remercie tous d’avoir collaboré et coopéré pour nous permettre de terminer à l’heure.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 30, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.