header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-11-30 PROC 82

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 82nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

I'd like to let the committee members know that we had a great meeting yesterday with the delegation from Ghana. As well, just a few minutes ago I presented our report to Parliament that would enhance the participation of MPs with babies and infants in the political system. That was great. Good work, committee.

Today we are continuing our study on the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates. For this morning's panel we're pleased to be joined by a number of witnesses.

From CBC/Radio-Canada we have Jennifer McGuire, general manager and editor-in-chief, CBC News,[Translation]

Also from CBC/Radio-Canada, we have Michel Cormier, General Manager, News and Current Affairs, French Services.[English]From Corus Entertainment we have Troy Reeb, senior vice-president, news, radio and station operations, and from Bell Media we have Wendy Freeman, president, CTV News.

I know that you are all very important and busy people, so we are very honoured to have you here. We look forward to hearing your opening statements in the order I introduced you.

Jennifer McGuire, we will start with you.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire (General Manager and Editor in Chief, CBC News, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation):

Thank you very much.

Thank you for offering us a chance to speak with you today. We are a collection of broadcast networks with a large and pivotal role to play in making Canadian democracy function. In coming here today, we share the same objective as this committee—to find the most effective way of providing voters with the tools they need to make thoughtful, informed choices and to engage Canadians, ultimately, in the democratic process. That's especially true for Canada's public broadcaster, but it applies to each and every one of us. Not only do we bring programs to people in every nook and cranny of this country but we have direct experience with every manner of election coverage, including leaders' debates.

Our experience with federal election debates goes back to the very first one in 1968. At that time, CBC/Radio-Canada and CTV started with a blank slate, negotiating the terms with the parties. The arguments over inclusion were not so different from what you hear now. That first debate was split into two sections. Part one had the Liberals, Conservatives, and New Democrats. Part two added the Créditistes. The Social Credit Party was excluded altogether.

Over the years, more broadcasters signed up while political parties came and went. We added debates in French, and have always experimented with format, from round tables to live audiences to social media. Each campaign, lessons and productions evolved.

Certain themes pop up every time. My colleagues and I will discuss the most important today, and we urge you to give them considered attention.

One, we need debates that have the potential to reach each and every Canadian. Again, the shared objective here is public service. How do we improve Canadians' knowledge of the parties, their leaders, and their policy positions? Debates help achieve that by testing candidates for their knowledge, their values, and the nimbleness of their thinking under pressure. We benefit most when the leaders offer depth beyond their prepared messages. Don't underestimate the importance of reaching a vast audience. In this modern world of fractured discourse, this is a rare chance for Canadians to assess candidates in the same time, in the same place, and in the same context. The impact of a debate increases exponentially when they are part of a shared national experience.

Two, we need debates that people will actually watch. Reaching an audience doesn't do much good if people don't engage. You need to have a format that works, a set that looks good, lighting, and a moderator with skill. You need to push and challenge the candidates to stay on topic and relevant to the issues of the day. That's one reason broadcast journalists bring so much value to these debates. Of course, you need producers who understand what it takes to keep eyeballs on the screen, not just television screens but the digital and social spaces too. In that context, I'm sure you know that CBC News is not only a television and radio broadcaster but also a digital leader in Canada, reaching 18.3 million unique visits. In big moments, though, as I think all of us will echo, nothing matches the power and draw of television when it's done properly.

Three, we need to redefine the parties' role in the process. I recognize that's risky—you're all affiliated with political parties—but bear with me. It's our assessment that the biggest flaw in the current system is that the parties are able to use their leverage to direct the debate process. Although it became fashionable in 2015 to attack the major broadcast networks, the truth is that we have never controlled the terms of the debates. They have been the product of a delicate negotiating dance with the political parties themselves. Each party pushes for every edge it can get, from where and when the debate takes place to who can take part to what format is acceptable. They threaten to withhold their participation as they seek terms to give them advantage.

In 2015 the networks acted in good faith but were strung along for months, until we were pushed right off the stage, at least in the English debates. In this the public was not well served. A fraction of Canadians were reached when you compare the audience numbers with those of 2011. If we accomplish nothing else here, it should be to depoliticize the process, put the public interest out front, and ensure that partisan interests are kept in check.

My colleague Michel Cormier of Radio-Canada will explain how this played out in the 2015 campaign.

(1105)

Mr. Michel Cormier (General Manager, News and Current Affairs, French Services, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation):

I get to do this because I was intimately involved in negotiating the debates, especially the French one.[Translation]

The 2015 election debate context was a strange one indeed. There was no national televised debate in English because one of the parties declined to participate. In French, there was a national debate with all the major party leaders but without the participation of one of the two major television networks. I'll come back to the French debate later.

There is a point of view that the reason the debate negotiations failed is because the consortium model is a failed one. That broadcast executives negotiating behind closed doors with party representatives is undemocratic, that debate rules and parameters set by journalists may serve the interests of television but not political debate.

While we agree that the process has to evolve, let me inject some nuance into this argument by revisiting what happened.

The English debate did not happen because the whole negotiation process was highly politicized. From the early spring of 2015, when we made our first approach to the parties, to the dying days of the campaign, when we still held out hope for a debate, we could not get a commitment from the party in power to participate. The misgivings were not about inclusion or the use of social media or format or content, they were about the consortium itself.

We have always been open to widely distribute the debate and were already in discussions with Google and Facebook to increase its reach on digital platforms. Essentially, as long as the consortium was involved in the exercise— [English]

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I have a point of order, Mr. Chair.

I'm sorry. I'm having some confusion understanding why we don't have copies of this presentation. I understand that there were copies given in both official languages, but for some reason they're not in front of us. Please help me.

Mr. Michel Cormier:

Am I talking too fast for the interpreter?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, it's not that. It's procedural. Normally we have copies of what you're saying in front of us for accuracy, but I don't. I'm trying to find out why because apparently you sent them in, in both languages.

Mr. Michel Cormier:

I have a copy in English here if you want.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fine.

The Chair:

Apparently there weren't enough copies. They're just making copies.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I hadn't raised a point of order, we wouldn't have gotten them because we didn't have enough copies. That can't be correct. Is that what happened?

The Chair:

The clerk says that they had confusion between them; it's their fault.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, I just wanted to make clear what happened.

Did you say we're getting copies done ASAP?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I think I'm right in saying that there may be more than one copy of some of these. If so, why don't we just give one to each party if there are enough to do that. The three Conservatives could share, for example. That way, Mr. Christopherson could have one.

The Chair:

Good idea. We'll do that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

But please, in the future, there's no reason to keep copies of these in an envelope because there aren't enough copies. Do you know how many photocopiers are probably in this building?

Anyway, that's fine. Thank you.

(1110)

The Chair:

The Corus one is not in both languages, so we won't be able to distribute that one.

Monsieur Michel Cormier, please continue. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Cormier:

I was saying that we were even in discussions with Google and Facebook to increase the reach of the debate on digital platforms. Essentially, as long as the consortium was involved in the exercise, the debate was not possible. There was also an opinion that a number of smaller debates was better than one big television debate. This is what eventually happened in English.

Was the voting public better served by this? We think not. The combined audience of these debates was far less than what a national television debate usually gets.

Let me reiterate. We, the major television networks, were open to revisit the format, to make it less staid, to include more partners in making sure that the highest number of voters could access the debate, through Facebook and other platforms. But the discussion never got there. Excluding the consortium from the exercise, in our view, was a disservice to Canadian democracy.

The experience in French was radically different. After much negotiation, all parties eventually agreed to a debate organized by Radio-Canada under the umbrella of the consortium. The parties, at some point, concluded that it was in their interest to participate. We, at Radio-Canada, partnered with other media. TVA held its own leaders' debate on Quebec issues for a Quebec audience. We included the newspaper La Presse, Télé-Québec, Quebec's public broadcaster, as well as Facebook and YouTube, and we made our signal available for a minimum fee to broadcasters like CPAC. We also broadcast the debate on radio and streamed it on all our digital platforms. CBC and CTV, by the way, broadcast the French debate in translation on their all-news networks and Global TV also broadcast the debate on its website.

Radio-Canada produced the debate in our studios and we picked up most of the tab because we believe that it is part of our mandate as a public broadcaster. We also were the only ones with the technical resources and expertise to produce and distribute the debate. The event was a democratic success. We reached more than 1 million viewers on all combined platforms. A national audience that had access to the same information to help them make an informed decision about the leadership of the country.

In a way, the French debate addressed many of the issues that concern the committee. It was inclusive, we reached out to many partners and made the signal available to many others to make sure as many people as possible had access to the debate. We used social platforms to reach other audiences, cord-cutters, who do not subscribe to television service. For the record, our digital reach is as important as our television audience.

So, to conclude, the post-consortium or consortium-plus model we are all looking for may already be out there. What we need, and what we are open to, is a structure that de-politicizes the process, and a commitment from all parties to participate in a wide-ranging, readily available, national debate.

My colleague Troy from Global Television will now explain why it is imperative that major broadcasters be active participants in this process.

Thank you. [English]

Mr. Troy Reeb (Senior Vice-President, News, Radio and Station Operations, Corus Entertainment Inc.):

Thank you. Good morning.

As mentioned, my name is Troy Reeb. I currently serve as the senior vice-president in charge of Global news, radio and station operations for Corus Entertainment. In a previous capacity, I also served six years as chair of the broadcast consortium on debates and elections and oversaw the process that helped to create the highly successful and highly watched 2008 and 2011 televised leaders' debates.

I will recognize right off the bat that the word “consortium” conjures up images of a grandly organized body, though I should point out that we are very much competitors every day of the week, and we do not speak with a single voice despite the fact that we are all here in front of you today. In the case of the consortium, it simply represents an ad hoc agreement of various news organizations to work together in the public interest. Its creation stems from a desire of the parties to not participate in multiple debates, and a desire of the broadcasters to not be pitted against one another for the right to hold a debate and then to reach as large an audience as possible when a debate was held.

The consortium was never designed to limit the number of debates. I say to you firmly today, the more debates, the better. Indeed, during past elections Global News and other members of the consortium have staged their own supplementary debates. We've staged regional debates, specific topic debates, often featuring candidates beyond the party leaders. This diversity of debates should be encouraged, but there should also be at least one well-produced national debate in each official language that meets broadcast and journalistic standards and is distributed as broadly as possible to Canadians.

To be frank, a chamber of commerce debate does not meet that test. A debate live-streamed by an online magazine does not meet that test: proper lighting, camera placement, pacing, topic choices, a skilled moderator, a set not emblazoned with advertising. As we saw in 2015, all of these things matter, and all of these things also cost money.

A witness earlier this week pointed out, quite correctly actually, that one could now stage a debate and distribute it online for almost zero cost. What he failed to point out is that without production values, proper facilities, and I would say very importantly a journalistic frame for that debate, then there would be almost zero viewers as well.

In the past, consortium debates have been paid for by the participating news organizations and distributed to other media either on a cost-share or sometimes free basis. It has, of course, been up to the individual choice of any media organization as to whether they choose to carry it, and often that's based on whether it meets their standards and the standards that their audience would expect of a debate. This needs to continue to be the case, regardless of how future debates are produced. We, as broadcasters, as journalistic organizations, have the responsibility for upholding our conditions of licence and our journalistic standards. The ability of news organizations to make programming decisions independently is as key to the free functioning of democracy as is the ability to engage in vigorous debate.

I look forward to your questions later, and I'll turn it over to my colleague, Wendy Freeman.

(1115)

Ms. Wendy Freeman (President, CTV News, Bell Media Inc.):

Good morning. Thank you for allowing us the opportunity to provide our feedback on this important process. As broadcast networks, Canadians have long counted on our involvement in the debate process. We consider it an obligation to our viewers and the communities we serve. We believe that it is in the best interest of democracy to expose as many Canadians as possible to our potential leaders as they debate the issues affecting our nation.

We are open to working with an independent commission or commissioner. It is imperative that we have a seat at the table to create a process that works for Canadians. As broadcast networks, we play an indispensable role in ensuring a functioning democracy, one that is designed to properly inform our citizens through inclusion and transparency. Together our networks reach the most Canadians of any communications platform. This was the reason we formed the consortium in the first place, to ensure that the largest audience has access to the debates. We can all agree that an informed citizenry ensures that more Canadians make educated decisions at the polls, and we take great pride in this role.

In 2011 the consortium's English-language debate reached over 10 million Canadians, or 46% of the population, and four million Canadians tuned in to watch the consortium's French-language debate, or 50% of the population. In 2015 a different debate structure, without the involvement of Canada's national broadcast networks, was proposed and followed. The debates were smaller and much more scaled down, and unfortunately, viewership, compared with previous years, was alarmingly low.

You may ask yourself if, in today's social media and digital streaming universe, TV networks even matter. The answer is yes, they absolutely matter. We can demonstrate with hard data that Canadians still very much tune into television, especially live-event television. In fact, we only need to look south of the border, where last year's U.S. election debates drew a record 259 million viewers.

There have been calls for the debate process to be treated as a democratic exercise and not to concern itself with the journalistic integrity that established and trusted news organizations deliver to Canadians each and every day. I ask you, should we not strive for both? The consortium was founded on journalistic values and the broad experience of its members. As a consortium, we have the journalistic broadcast and digital production expertise to deliver the best possible debate content, adequately representative of the Canadian political reality, in a format that can generate the broadest possible audience.

Successful debates are a high point of our democratic process. With the onset of the fake news phenomenon, it is even more important that credible journalism play a strong role in our debates. Voters should not be forced to get their information second-hand via highlight reels, clips taken out of context, or through the delivery of coordinated fake news.

Moving forward, as my colleague said earlier, there are many questions that need to be answered. How do we reach the most Canadians possible? How do we provide the best experience, in a journalistic and non-partisan way, to involve Canadians and maximize voter engagement while drawing the biggest audience? How do we depoliticize the process without cutting off more debates from happening?

Once again, the best way to serve democracy is through reach and credibility. In 2015 the debates went unseen by millions of Canadians. We owe it to Canadians to do better. Together we can create a solution that strengthens our democracy, and we are committed to meeting that objective.

Thank you, and we look forward to your questions.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you, everyone.

Now we'll go to questions, from one broadcaster to some others.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I was a weatherman, so it wasn't quite the same. Anyway, I'll leave it at that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fake weather.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, I didn't even have to be right. It's a great business to be in.

Everything was going hunky-dory as far as the paradigm that you've outlined here.

Mr. Reeb, I appreciate what you're saying about the form of this thing. A leaders' debate run through the Fogo Island chamber of commerce does not quite have the same impact as what you're doing. I get that. The journalistic principles, the lights, the sets, the shooting, all of that I get. Things are going fairly well from the 1968 debate all the way through. Now in the last one, things started to go a little awry. We have all these platforms, and now you have major leaders saying they're not doing a debate, or they are, and who's involved, so on and so forth.

I have two questions. The first one is, basically, how do you look at a leader of a national party who doesn't want to participate in what you're offering? Should there be penalties in place by which they should be at that debate?

The second question I have is, what you outlined, that paradigm you outlined, we're here to see if we can hand that paradigm over to an official body that does just that, as deemed by Parliament. How do you see that working?

I apologize for the two questions, because I want to get all of you on this.

Maybe, Mr. Reeb, we'll start with you.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

Thank you. You did that right, even without a green screen behind you.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Troy Reeb: It's an interesting question. The consortium has taken flak in the past for the fact that a lot of its discussions took place behind closed doors, in camera.

I would say to the members of this committee that you know that the kinds of conversations you can have in camera around publicly sensitive topics are different than the kinds of conversations you can have when the cameras are rolling. I think, as journalists and people who head news organizations, we are very much in favour of providing more transparency to the discussions that lead to a debate.

The problem is that the more politicized those discussions become, the more difficult it is to reach a consensus for how a debate can take place. I think if we saw what happened in the 2015 process, the politicization happened very, very early, and for whatever reason, one party in particular decided there was an advantage to be gained by continuing to play media organizations against each other. I think we saw the results of that, and Canadians weren't as well served with a debate.

I don't think it's my place—I wouldn't say it's the place of anybody else on this panel—to suggest whether there should be penalties for someone who doesn't participate in the debate. That would be the work of this committee, I'm sure. The challenge has always been to compel participation, particularly when one party or one leader feels the deck is not stacked in their favour by the format of the debate. That's why there's a lot of back and forth between party officials to try to come up with a format that works for all. Recognizing that's rarely achieved, it then starts to fall to public pressure. The public expects there to be a broadly televised debate.

Therefore, if someone doesn't want to participate, it's the public pressure that would be put on that leader as a result that has been the accountability mechanism in the past. It clearly didn't work the last time.

Mr. Scott Simms:

So an empty podium would be punishment enough.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

I'm sorry, it's not my determination to say whether that's the case.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I understand.

(1125)

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

I think where the public doesn't understand the process of the debate is with regard to how much of it is a negotiated process. There's negotiation among the broadcast consortium, because we're competitors and there are things that have to be sort of compromised on to put the debate forward.

Certainly with the parties, the negotiations go beyond what I think the public perception of it would be. I mean, my—

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm sorry to interrupt. When you say that, though, if there's a commission put in place to do all that, there's not going to be that much negotiation because of the rules put in place.

Would you agree with that?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Listen, CBC/Radio-Canada is the public broadcaster. We would support working with an independent commission if that's what this committee decides to do. The caveat from us would be that it's not only staging a debate that matters; it's engaging Canadians.

Particularly in this climate of information and fractured participation in media, creating a collective experience and broad engagement of the debate is important, recognizing that whatever frame you put on it has to evolve with the political reality that has evolved over time.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Ms. Freeman.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

I would agree with my colleagues.

It's a negotiation, and it changes with how the world is as well. Set rules don't always work, depending on what's going on in the political realm.

Again, I don't think it's our place to decide any penalties. I think that's something you would have to do.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Quickly, then, would I be right in saying that with a commission that is set up—whether it's a commissioner, Elections Canada, all that stuff—would you feel there's a structure in place to propose what it is that you do? Do you see this structure being fairly loose, in other words, a lot of negotiations to be maintained, but handled by this particular commission or commissioner?

Ms. McGuire.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

I'll speak for CBC. I won't speak on behalf of the other networks.

We would absolutely support definition around a debate guarantee. If you look at the consortium—and I was the chair of the 2015 consortium, as much of a ride as that was—most of our conversations were about actually getting the debate to happen. If that were guaranteed, if there were some guarantee of the number of debates and participation, I still think it would be an obligation of the journalists to frame the issues and create that independence around the journalism piece of it, in terms of connecting it to what we understand, through our daily reporting, Canadians want and care about.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can we get comments from the others as well, if that's possible?

The Chair:

Michel Cormier.

Mr. Michel Cormier:

I'll chime in on the last point. I think in terms of credibility for the public, if there is a commission, it can't be seen to set all the rules and the themes and we broadcasters are just here to broadcast a debate. The public has to be convinced that we have an independent role in holding those debates and making them happen, so I think that's a very important issue. You don't want to lose the credibility of the exercise by giving the impression that this is directed by the parties.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses as well. I appreciate your joining us today.

On Tuesday we heard from Paul Wells from Maclean's that the first debate, the Maclean's debate, was off to all the major broadcasters for a manageable and usual fee. Why did your stations decline to air that debate?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We were still involved in active conversations and still held hope that an English-language debate would happen. We saw movement on the French side where no debate was offered at the beginning of the process, and in the end we had a debate. We were convinced with the impact of the first debates in relatively small reach that it would be in everybody's interest to get there. It didn't in the end, but it was our belief that it was still possible, and that's why.

Mr. John Nater:

You didn't carry the other four debates either. Why?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We were still actively in conversations to try to make a debate happen with the broadcast consortium.

Mr. John Nater:

Even up until October 2, when the TVA debate was aired?

(1130)

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

In your opening comments, Ms. McGuire, you said that you “share the same objective as this committee—to find the most effective way of providing voters with the tools they need to make thoughtful, informed choices and to engage Canadians...in the democratic process.”

How is it engaging Canadians in the political process if the CBC is airing Coronation Street or Dragons' Den rather than one of these five debates? How is that in the public interest? I know a lot of Canadians love Coronation Street. I know people love Dragons' Den. One of the dragons even tried to become our leader. But how is it in the democratic interest when you're the national broadcaster and you refuse to air one of those five debates?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We aired the debate. That was done by the consortium.

Mr. John Nater:

No, you aired it on the news network.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

That's right, and our election coverage is not only limited to covering the debates. I think if you did a content analysis of CBC's coverage of the election, you'd find Canadians were very well served with a lot of content about the campaign.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay.

I'll move on to CTV. In your opening comments, Ms. Freeman, you said, “We believe that it is in the best interest of democracy to expose as many Canadians as possible to our potential leaders as they debate the issues affecting our nation”.

Yet CTV saw fit to run a rerun of The Big Bang Theory, The Goldbergs, Saving Hope, and Gotham. I know that perhaps the finance minister took that to heart, and that's his Bruce Wayne complex, but again, how is airing these American television episodes doing anything when we had five debates being offered to Canadians and your network refused to air all of them? How is that serving Canadians' best interests?

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

We were holding out in the hopes that we were going to have an English debate, which we would have aired on the main network. That never happened. We always hoped it would. We did run the French debate on our news channel, and we did stream it live.

Mr. John Nater:

Again, that was on your news channel. Why not the main network?

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

It was because we were not putting on those debates. We were holding out that we were going to do that.

Again, as my colleague said earlier, there were production and journalistic values in putting things on. We wanted to put on our debate and, as I said earlier, we ran the French debate on our news channel. We live-streamed it, and we were hoping that we would have an English debate that would be far-reaching and put on our main networks.

Mr. John Nater:

The consortium is saying it's like the kid in the schoolyard. If you don't get your way, you're not playing.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

I'll jump in on this one.

First, I'm assuming that you're not advocating that another company's product should be pushed onto a private broadcaster's airwaves.

Leaving that aside, the fact of the matter is that, as part of the consortium, there was a negotiation not just with the parties but between the networks as well. We are accountable for what runs on our airwaves, not only for the broadcast standards that are required but for meeting the standards of our journalistic principles and practices. I know that when we are organizing the debate with the other members of the consortium, those journalistic principles and practices are going to be met. We're part of producing that debate. We're not just willy-nilly going to take a product that is offered and comes down a pipe and put it onto airwaves that we're accountable for, and certainly not when it involves splashing a billboard for Maclean's magazine all over the set.

Beyond the other issues, I can speak very specifically on behalf of Corus, and on behalf of the private broadcaster, that the idea of having a product forced upon us simply isn't on.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm hoping that you're not now implying that someone like Paul Wells has journalistic standards that are willy-nilly.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

No, but we....

Mr. Troy Reeb:

I'm not trying to imply that at all, but I have no idea what kind of deal Rogers Communications may have done to create that debate. They were the producers of the debate behind the scenes. We knew for a fact as members of the consortium that one party in particular was seeking very friendly terms to try to participate in debates.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

That was my other point. The negotiations for the debate are not only about when it happens and where it happens, but the terms of how the format happens, the kind of content. These are all part of those conversations. We as journalistic organizations had no visibility into that.

Mr. John Nater:

One of the suggestions that was made was that CPAC be given the authority to produce and broadcast the debates and then a mandatory carry for the major broadcast. Would you support that, if CPAC were to produce and distribute the debates and you simply pick up the feed for a manageable fee?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We're open to looking at any scenarios moving forward. To give you some context on what a robust production of a debate costs, in 2011 it was about $250,000 to put on that debate. That's before you count displaced ad revenue on all of the networks who replaced other programming, that is commercial programming, to air it.

Again, my point is that we're open to considering anything moving forward. We're here to be part of the process, but at the end of the day there are two issues. One, how do you make them happen? Two, how do you get Canadians to engage in them?

Both in our view are important.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Before we go to Mr. Christopherson, just so both panels that are in the room know, we're extending this five minutes so Elizabeth May can participate. Then our second panel will be about 10 minutes later than our normal time frame.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Great. Thank you very much, Chair.

Thank you, all, for being here. My first observation is that it's nice to see gender balance. It's very good.

Having said that, I have to tell you, given that you're all journalists and news agencies, I'm left at the end of your presentations with “what's the news?” You, Ms. Freeman, said you're open to working with an independent commission or commissioners. I've heard the collective message that the idea of a consortium method is good. You thought that's healthy.

We've heard in detail about how it all fell apart last time. I have to say that's what's really motivating me this time. It was, when the idea first came up, from having watched what happened last time and thinking that this is nuts. I don't know how much my party was culpable, too. I'm just saying a pox on all their houses. Canadians were let down. We have to fix this.

Having come all the way around, what would you recommend? I think maybe what you're saying is to keep the consortium idea. That would be part of the main debate. I'm really not clear on what it is you're urging us to do.

What is your perspective? You said you're willing to work if we go with an independent commission. Do you like that idea? Is that what you think we should do? Are you recommending that we stay out and let you continue to do it the way you have done it in the past and you're going to try to do a better job? What exactly are you recommending that we do?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We like the idea of a guaranteed debate and that it not be part of the negotiation process, open to the terms of when and where being defined. We think that having the big broadcasters involved in defining the production of it is advantageous in terms of having it reach a bigger audiences.

With respect to CPAC, I think the impact that you would have by having the production approach that has happened through the consortium would be far beneficial and have greater impact. It's guaranteeing that it happens but letting the production and journalistic frame happen through the journalistic organizations.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

That's not to say other debates couldn't happen either, around this. It would be for there to be one big English-language debate that all Canadians can watch with lots of others happening.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

I'll reiterate what I said in my presentation, the more debates the better. Perhaps the consortium process would not have been necessary in the past had the campaigns been longer and parties been more willing to participate in more high-profile debates. It would be fantastic if each one of the networks up here and lots of other media organizations got to stage their own debates, but there is a limited appetite amongst those in the backrooms of your parties to do multiple debates. Therefore, there was an effort to come together to try to get one to stand out from the rest. That's the resulting consortium process.

We would be thrilled, I will only speak for us, to stage our own debate. But we don't want to start getting into battles with the other networks about who's going to get it this year, who's going to get it next year. That starts the process of going back and forth and trying to curry favour with the parties, which no one wants to get into.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The main question for us is whether or not there should be an independent entity of some sort and if so, what it would look like and things like that. I am still having some problems understanding your recommendations vis-à-vis that. I am not sure you've even spoken to that directly. I am trying to understand your message. The main thing you are trying to say is to preserve the consortium idea that there are the two big debates in both languages.

You don't really have as much comment on whether we would do that within a commission or with the Chief Electoral Officer—and that would be fine, too. I am just trying to understand exactly what your message is. As of yet, you haven't talked to us directly about whether there should be an independent entity. If so, do you have a preference in terms of what that would look like?

(1140)

Mr. Troy Reeb:

Again, I will speak for my organization, because I can't for my colleagues. Our preference is that there be as light a touch as possible. The independence of our news organization is sacrosanct to us, and we don't believe that there should be heavy regulation to try to mandate something when it comes to a debate.

To compel participation would be helpful. That's something that we have—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm the other way around. I have to tell you, my gut reaction is the other way around. If you are stupid enough not to go to a high-profile debate, hopefully you'll pay a price. In terms of regulating—

Mr. Troy Reeb:

Some would say that happens but....

Mr. David Christopherson:

—if we don't step in and do something, there is a good chance we are going to end up in the mess we got into last time. You and I have known each other for a while, Troy. I have to say that, on this one, one of us is right and one of us is wrong. History will tell.

Is there anybody else?

Mr. Michel Cormier:

I think the basic problem we have is that we don't have time to actually negotiate the terms of debate. We are just negotiating to see if there is a debate. If the best way to have a commitment from all parties, before the election is called, to participate in a national debate is through some kind of legal framework—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let me see if I understand what you are saying. You think you could make this work in a positive way for Canadians if there was something that compelled people and you removed “I won't play” as an option. Am I correct?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Yes. If there was a guarantee that it would happen, we are confident that we could extend the reach digitally. In 2015, we had Facebook, Google, YouTube, and Twitter all on board to extend the social and digital reach, but it just didn't get a chance to be implemented.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let me flip it around, then, and put the question to you. If we went down that road, do you have a preference about whether we go with a stand-alone entity or a carve-out within Elections Canada? Does it matter to you whether that entity is stand-alone or Elections Canada? Do you have a preference?

Mr. Michel Cormier:

I don't know. We haven't seen any proposal yet.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Because there isn't one....

Mr. Michel Cormier:

I know. It's kind of hard to—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hear you. We are in the process of doing that. I am trying to elicit as much input as I can from you folks. You are a big part of the play. What you think is going to find its way into our thinking, and I'm just giving you as much opportunity as possible to influence that outcome. Have at it.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

If I may.... Whether it's one or the other, from our perspective—and I think I am speaking for my colleagues now—the news organizations would want to have significant say there. It's important to have.... CPAC was referenced earlier. CPAC runs vigorous debate on television every day. I'll show you what the ratings are. They are not very good. That's because they are sort of taking raw debate the way it is set up in the Commons, or in the committee rooms sometimes. However, if you frame that with a proper moderator and in the proper circumstance, and you have the journalistic pulse that's provided to make sure that it hits all the touch points, then you create great television and you connect with all kinds of Canadians. I think the role of the news organizations is really key in that.

It's also key that we figure out scheduling. For a committee to just say, “We are going to stick this on Wednesday nights at nine”, then you're up against Survivor. Even if you mandate that it go on Global and that we bump Survivor, Survivor is still going to be on CBS and the tribe will have spoken by the end of that debate. There is a lot of stuff that needs to be figured out.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

So I—

The Chair:

Briefly, please, because the time is up.

Also, welcome to the kids at the committee. We love to have kids here.

Wendy, go ahead.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

I was just going to say that we want to be a part of whatever is decided.

Mr. David Christopherson:

At the end of the day, I can't imagine that you wouldn't be, I have to say.

I think my time is done. Thank you, Chair.

Thanks very much for the answers. I appreciate it. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bittle, the floor is yours. [English]

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you so much, everyone, for participating today.

A number of you spoke about journalistic standards. I'm wondering if you could expand on what that means to your organizations. If there are examples from a debate that didn't conform to those standards, if you could perhaps highlight those for us, we could have a better idea of what you're referring to.

(1145)

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Journalistic standards include defining what topics get discussed, defining how the debate will take place in terms of the format, and having a journalist be able to ask follow-up questions in the context of the issues of the day, again, to move past prepared speeches into some of the back and forth around the issues. You want the person who's moderating to cover the issues. You want someone who knows the issues, who can participate and gear and reality-check if necessary.

You want to make sure, in the staging of the debate, that you're touching the issues that you see, in terms of whatever the campaign is, really matter to Canadians.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

The moderator is a good example. It really needs to be someone who is following politics and really understands the issues of the day. Also, even in the production, journalism is involved—the way the shots are, the sets, etc.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

This is a specific question. I know we haven't provided a proposed framework, but hypothetically speaking, if there were a framework and an independent commissioner put forward, with advice and/or input from the broadcasters, would the broadcasters accept a change to the Broadcasting Act requiring them to broadcast the debate if it was approved by an independent commissioner, having been advised by the broadcasters?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Certainly, CBC is going to play in whatever scenario gets put forward. I would say that in terms of public trust, the arm's-length view, having the journalists frame the issues will be important in terms of how it resonates.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

I don't think we should ever be forced into doing anything that we normally would be doing. We've always run debates in the past, and we want to run them again.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

I wouldn't pretend to answer your question with another question, but how broad is that change to the Broadcasting Act? There are 300-plus licensed channels in this country. To be clear, at Global, our local stations are not required to cover national news. We are not mandated to do a national newscast. We're licensed as local stations. We voluntarily create a national news broadcast, and we voluntarily open a bureau here on Parliament Hill to cover the affairs of the nation.

Should Global be penalized in its regulation because of its voluntary acquiescence to doing the right thing in the past? Why not mandate the debate on TSN or on Food Network, or on the myriad other channels that are out there—or on Netflix or YouTube or Facebook? Where does this go? Even in the conventional television space, there are many licensed over-the-air broadcasters that have not taken the debates in the past and choose not to have national news organizations.

I think we would be very resistant to that. Without consulting with my regulatory team, I can't say that we wouldn't accept something, but I would say we would be very resistant to any such change.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In my opinion, zero nationally broadcast debates is clearly not enough for Canadians. I know Mr. Reeb talked about the shortness, typically, of the writ period. On the other side of it, is there a number of debates that is too many? Is there an ideal number—one in English, one in French? Should there be more?

What are your thoughts in terms of viewership by Canadians to get the most reach and have the best interest of the public at heart?

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

We definitely have to have one in English and one in French. I think there was a year in which we did two in French and two in English. I can't remember when that was, but absolutely, we need to have at least one in each language.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

The value of having more is that you can frame them more narrowly, but you're going to lose the impact. In terms of having too many, it is a relatively short period of time.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Is the timing of the debate something that a commissioner should get into? Is that something that should be discussed? Is that something the networks have an opinion on? Is there a better time frame—closer to the election, in the middle of the election—or is it best to have, as some have suggested, a more nimble organization that really doesn't get into it and be too overly prescriptive as parliamentarians on such an independent commissioner?

(1150)

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Certainly we would advocate for it being well into the campaign. Canadians have their interests piqued and there's more engagement, we think, mid-campaign or later. However, I think that should be negotiated with the networks.

As Troy said, even for us there is a negotiation that goes on with our own networks in terms of positioning it to advantage, but there are revenue implications for all of us in terms of displacing existing programming. That is also a negotiation among the networks.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I think I'm out of time. Thank you so much.

The Chair:

We have Ms. May for five minutes.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to colleagues around the table because I'm allowed to sit at the table, just for background, but I'm not necessarily allowed to speak without the consent of my colleagues.

I've been engaging with the consortium. In fact, the first and only face-to-face meeting I had with the consortium was back in 2007, so it's a decade of experience. I have to say that over that time I've had the impression that many individual members of the consortium regarded the task as thankless. I think your appearance before the committee today absolutely underscores how thankless it is, but I do want to thank you, although I've had a rather bad experience.

I want to approach the narrative that's emerging today that somehow the debates were all going really well between the late sixties up until 2015. Just for purposes of historical interest, I think you may recall Tony Burman's op-ed. Tony Burman, who was editor-in-chief of CBC News, chaired the consortium between 2000 and 2007, and this op-ed ran in The Globe and Mail under the heading “The election debate process is a sham”. What he concentrated on was this, which is his first line: Prime Minister Harper's refusal to allow the Green Party leader to participate in the Federal Election Debates is cynical and self-serving, but at least it exposes the sham that Canada's election debate process has become.

This article appeared in March 2009. What he refers to, of course, is that: The CRTC and federal courts have reaffirmed the networks' right to “produce” this broadcast on their own, without any outside interference. And this is certainly the claim of the networks—including by me when I chaired the “consortium” for those seven years. But in reality, the government in power has a veto, and without the Prime Minister's participation, the debate won't happen.

We've skirted around this issue so far today.

In terms of reflecting back, I've been involved in getting in the debates, not getting in the debates, rules changing, debates disappearing, and so on, for a decade. I'm just wondering whether you would agree with Tony Burman that the parties negotiate, but the larger parties have systematically operated to exclude smaller parties from access to the room where the negotiations happen.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

First off, I won't fully disagree with Mr. Burman's comments on that. I've been involved in lots of debate negotiations not only at the federal level but at the provincial level as well. I would say that the front-running party in the election often has the hammer in terms of how they get pulled to the table or not, or they perceive that they have the hammer because their participation is key. They're the ones that are either going to go up or down following the debate, and they have wielded that hammer to the best of their ability.

To the point about the exclusion of smaller parties, it is not simply a function of the parties involved. It's a function of us as well who have worked at times to exclude smaller parties. We want debates that work well on television. We want debates that don't become a cacophony of arguing. We want debates that are simple for the viewer to comprehend. We understand that we have obligations in terms of how we cover news, and we want to ensure that we give proper coverage to smaller parties elsewhere.

However, I wouldn't say it's only a function of the major parties that have worked to exclude the smaller parties. Certainly, it's part of it.

(1155)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I'm sorry for switching gears. I have a minute left.

There is one thing I've observed over the years. It's that being in the debates also dictates how much coverage those parties get. You'll see the bands of the colours of the five parties on the screen at the beginning, and when the Bloc or the Greens are suddenly out, it goes to the three parties' colours.

Could you reflect on the news coverage that is linked to debate participation?

Mr. Troy Reeb:

I won't. I'm not here to justify our news coverage. I'm happy to talk about the debate participation.

Mr. Michel Cormier:

But we do have criteria for allowing the parties, and I think that's why Radio-Canada has to be.... We haven't talked about the French market, which is very different. We have TVA, which is basically a Quebec-based network, and Radio-Canada, which broadcasts more across the country.

In the debate that we had, we included the Green Party. Although a lot of people told us it was suicidal to do that, we thought it would make for a better debate. There was a broader view expressed and the ratings were there.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We monitor our election coverage pretty closely overall, and I don't think those are themes that we have seen play out.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we move back to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you again for the opportunity to ask a couple of questions.

I want to follow up on a question that Mr. Bittle asked. In response, our panellists gave certain general comments about journalistic standards and production values of the debates that were held. I want to get to a greater level of specificity.

I'd like to offer each of you an opportunity to tell me exactly what your concerns were with the journalistic standards of the moderators, such as Paul Wells, David Walmsley, Rudyard Griffiths, and Pierre Bruneau. What was the problem with the journalistic standards of those moderators in the debates?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

I don't think it's fair for us to comment on how David Walmsley performed as a moderator, or the journalistic credibility of Paul Wells—

Mr. John Nater:

But you did—

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

—who clearly is a very capable journalist. I think our position is to move this process forward. We can debate for hours what happened in 2015, but our understanding of the goal is for us to bring insights to this process to move it forward.

What I will say on behalf of CBC/Radio-Canada is that we know the nature of the discussions in the negotiations to make a debate happen. We know it involves who gets to play. We know it involves a format, locations, timing, topics. To not be part of any of those conversations in other sorts of contexts, for us, is an issue in terms of offering our airways and opening them up. It's not a political advertisement or a political announcement. This is a journalistic exercise for us. If that shifts, then the framing of it will shift for us too.

We absolutely want to play, but as it stands now, we treat this very much as a journalistic exercise. Just as we wouldn't rerun content that we haven't verified in terms of a news organization, the same approach applies in terms of understanding the trade-offs that are made to guarantee a debate.

Mr. John Nater:

Ms. Freeman, I see you want to answer.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

I agree with my colleague. We want to move this forward.

I'm not going to talk about what they did and who moderated, and all of that. This is about finding a solution. That's why we're here today, to find a solution, and look forward not backward.

Canadians were not well served, and it's about serving Canada in the future, and looking ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

You're saying Canadians weren't well served, but yet you're not willing to pinpoint exactly where that failure happened in these other four debates. You're not willing to tell me where the journalists who moderated the debate did not perform well. You're not willing to tell me that. You're saying that only you, the consortium, should be hosting the major national broadcast. You're not willing to pinpoint exactly where those so-called journalistic failures happened and where that challenge is, yet you're casting aspersions that they were.

My second point is on production values, and I'll give you the opportunity....

In each of those four debates that the consortium didn't run, tell me specifically what you would have changed in terms of the production of those debates? What were your concerns with the production of those debates? Was it camera angles?

Mr. Troy Reeb:

If you would like me to respond to that—

Mr. John Nater: Please do.

Mr. Troy Reeb: —there was lots to criticize in the production of several of those debates.

However, the bottom line comes down to, I'm not going to flip the switch and put on to our network a product that we're not familiar with. If someone hands you a sandwich on the street, you might be hungry but you're probably not going to take a bite if it's a strange sandwich suddenly coming to you.

That was the choice we were being offered, to basically open the switch and take a product from the Munk centre or from Rogers—“Hey, put this on your airwaves”—for which you have accountability for that broadcast.

We answer to the Canadian Broadcasting Standards Council, to the CRTC. We're not prepared to do that. We weren't prepared to do it then. I wouldn't necessarily be prepared to do it if it was the CBC that was putting on its own product as well.

We want to have a voice and we want to have an understanding of what that product is going to be.

(1200)

Mr. John Nater:

So you want to be in control.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

To be clear, in 2015 the rationale was really that we were still in active conversation, and we were hopeful and confident that we would get a debate.

Mr. John Nater:

Airing more than one debate would have been a problem for you as a national broadcaster committed to—

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

No. In fact, in 2015 we were proposing four.

Mr. John Nater:

But only those that were hosted by you, the consortium.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We had organized a consortium to create the widest reach of the debates to Canadians and to defray our individual costs to produce them.

Mr. John Nater:

Following up on that widest reach, could you tell me what your online viewership was?

The Chair:

In 10 seconds or less....

Mr. John Nater:

It will only take 10 seconds.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Currently, CBC—

Mr. John Nater:

No, no, the viewership of the debate you streamed online.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

I would have to pull that number. I don't have it in front of me.

Mr. John Nater:

Could you please provide it to the clerk?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Nater.

Our last questioner is Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm actually going to split my time with Ms. Sahota. We both have questions that we would like to present to the panel.

I want to thank you for being here today and for the input. It's been very helpful for me. I appreciate your comments with respect to the excellence of the product, and I agree with that. I think that we will engage more Canadians by providing an excellent product. I know that you put a lot of time and effort into doing that.

In terms of what we're here for today—I think, Wendy, you mentioned it in terms of finding a solution—I have a two-part question. First, we are trying to see to it that we present an excellent product that helps inform voters and engages voters. Do you see the establishment of a commission or a commissioner in helping us to get to that end?

Second, what input would you give us with respect to how to move forward in order to establish a framework in which you're still going to provide and have input on the excellence of the product but we get to a point where we are able to present excellent products at the end, with the role of a commissioner if you feel that's the right move?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

I would encourage flexibility.

I will tell you that even from a broadcast perspective, we produce a television product and distribute it digitally, but that is no longer the reality of how people consume content. More and more, we're moving towards interactivity in the digital and social spaces. What the production model is and how you could define that in a fixed way.... I don't know how you do something that will be relevant five or 10 years down the road because how people consume content is changing at such a rapid rate.

That is why we're arguing that people with the production expertise who are active in these spaces should help frame the nature of the product that is created, and then the journalistic independence will impact whether people trust it or not. We know that.

We would absolutely support a guarantee of access. Would we work with an independent commission? Absolutely, we would. Does the CBC feel it has a role to play in this? Yes, as I'm sure the other broadcasters will say as well.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Do you see it as a consortium still, where you gather together, come up with ideas, and then present them to the commissioner? Is that what you think is a positive move forward?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

My view would be that the committee frame the conditions for a debate to happen and then we figure out the best way to connect it and engage with Canadians.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Quickly, with what little time I may have left, there was evidence, through testimony previously presented to this committee, that not only a commission or a commissioner could perform this role, that it could be the broadcast arbitrator. What are your thoughts about that?

Mr. Troy Reeb:

Are you referring to the CRTC or...?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I actually don't know what they were referring to, but they said that there was a broadcast arbitrator that could play this role, to make sure that there weren't the disagreements that happened last time.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

Are you referring to the CRTC, or...?

(1205)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I believe so.

The Chair:

I think it might be Elections Canada that is the broadcast arbitrator.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's correct. Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

Elections Canada has a role as broadcast arbitrator to decide how the airing of advertising happens during the election. They were referring to that arbitrator. Do you see that they could maybe play this role?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

I would have to think about it more, where it best sits. Again, I think that when they happen and how they get scheduled should be an active conversation, to position them to have greater impact.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

You were saying that you would like to compel the leaders, but you won't say what kinds of penalties should be associated with that or how we motivate them. What stops companies like YouTube from having their own debate and perhaps the leaders running to that debate if they see a big public interest in that forum? Even if tomorrow we have a commissioner who says, “We're mandating these four debates. These are the official debates,” what's to stop us from being sidelined by a big YouTube debate? Who's to control that? How do we do anything about it?

Mr. Troy Reeb:

Honestly, I don't know that anybody does, and hopefully YouTube does try to stage a big debate. As I said earlier, the more debates the better. Canadians deserve to hear from their prospective leaders on the platforms that they choose. By and large, the largest platform continues to be television, particularly for live events.

I would like to draw the distinction between being television broadcasters and being news organizations, which I think is paramount here. It's to have a debate that is framed through the window of a news organization, so there is a story that's told that can be engaging to Canadians, and the debate is framed that way.

I don't think there should be anything that should limit who is able to propose debates.

Ms. Wendy Freeman:

I think it's also important to know that these are not journalists at YouTube. YouTube is a distributor. They are not production experts. They are not journalists. I'm not sure who they would get to moderate a debate. They are distributors of video.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm sure many people would be willing to come forward to do that, but I'm just asking how we control that, and whether we control it. I liked the answer I got.

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

The big digital social players were absolutely engaged and on board to participate in the consortium in the last round. I think, if the question whether the consortium can look different from these four people, absolutely it can and should. It should broaden, particularly if you're trying to reach millennial and younger audiences who will only consume their content via a digital channel.

The Chair:

Thank you.

If it's okay with the committee, I would like to have one short question.

Do you feel, if there is an independent commission or commissioner, that the broadcasters—and it seemed so from your presentation—should have some input into the subjects and topics so that perhaps they are more sensational or they create more advertising, as opposed to an independent commissioner who would pick something that's more in the public interest?

Ms. Jennifer McGuire:

We see defining the topics or trying to speak for Canadians or advocate on behalf of Canadians as a journalistic exercise. What has been the preoccupation in any given campaign has shifted, so it is to try to keep that independent, however you frame this exercise.

Mr. Troy Reeb:

To be clear, Mr. Chair, the debates, as long as I've been involved with them, have always been run commercial free, so it's not like there's an advertising win there.

The Chair:

Great.

We really appreciate your being here. I know you're all very busy, and it's very helpful to be able to go right to the core of your interests. It will certainly help our deliberations.

We'll break for a couple of minutes while we change panels.

(1205)

(1210)

The Chair:

Good afternoon, and welcome back to the 82nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study on the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates.

We are happy to have the following witnesses. From Elections Canada, we have Stéphane Perrault, acting chief electoral officer; and Anne Lawson, general counsel and senior director, legal services. They are almost a part of this committee, they are here so often. It's great to have you back.

From the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, we have Michael Craig, manager, English and third-language television; and Peter McCallum, general counsel, communications law.

Perhaps we could have Elections Canada go first. [Translation]

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Acting Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It is my pleasure to assist the committee in its study of the creation of an independent commission responsible for leaders' debates.

I have been following the proceedings of the committee and am pleased to provide input from the perspective of Elections Canada. My remarks will briefly touch on the objectives that, in my view, should inform the creation of an independent commission, or commissioner, for regulating leaders' debates. I will also outline a number of considerations respecting how such an entity could be structured and function, should the committee choose to recommend one.

There are several models internationally for leaders' debates, including regulation through an independent public commission. But, before looking at a particular design, it is important, in my view, to look at the objectives that may lead this committee to recommend the creation of a commission and that, if it does, may determine the mandate and certain features of the commission's structure.

For my part, I would suggest the following three objectives that directly contribute to a fair and open electoral process. Clearly, these concerns are my own.

First, debates should be organized in a manner that is fair, non-partisan and transparent.

Second, debates should be broadly accessible to the public. For example, they should be presented in a format that is available to the largest possible audience, including persons with disabilities.

Third, debates should contribute to informing the electorate of the range of political options they have to choose from.

There are three considerations to be taken into account in establishing an independent commission, or a commissioner. First, there is the matter of the criteria for inclusion in the debates. You know that one of the most important and contentious issues with regard to leaders' debates is who is included. Everyone is aware that this question has given rise to significant controversy over the years. In my view, an independent commission should not be mired in controversies regarding inclusion, especially in the middle of an election campaign. For that reason, the criteria for inclusion in the debates must be clear, and should allow for no or very little residual discretion by the commission. The criteria may allow for a range of factors. I know that, last week, witnesses came before the committee to talk about a range of factors. I am specifically thinking about Mr. Fox, who talked about a basket of criteria. The criteria could allow for a good deal of flexibility, for example, to allow for the participation of emerging parties.

But the criteria should be such that their application by the commission should be straightforward, if not mechanical. It is important to keep in mind that, to date, challenges to leaders' debates under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms have failed on the basis that they were essentially private events not subject to charter scrutiny.

If a commission were created to regulate the debates. and more specifically participation in the debates, the commission would be subject to the Canadian charter without doubt.

I recognize that it is difficult to draw the line regarded regarding inclusion in leaders' debates. For this very reason, I feel that it is important for parliamentarians to establish the appropriate criteria rather than the commission. I feel that the commission must apply criteria that are flexible, but that provide no room for discretion.

(1215)

[English]

The second point regards the format and content of debates. While I believe the criteria for inclusion should leave little to no discretion to a commission, I see no reason that it could not have broad latitude in shaping the format and editorial aspects of the debates, subject only to the overarching objectives that I highlighted at the beginning of my remarks.

In terms of the format, as we know, the media landscape is in constant evolution, in particular with respect to social media. The commission should have the latitude to adjust with the industry and to take advantage of the opportunities.

In deciding the format, however, the equality of French and English must be respected and promoted. The broadcasting of the debates should also ensure access for people with disabilities. This means providing closed-captioning, sign language, accessible web design, or other means of facilitating access for persons with specific disabilities.

In dealing with both the content and format of the debates, an independent commission or commissioner could be required to receive input from participants and other stakeholders. It could also, and I believe this is important, be required to report to Parliament after the election to ensure transparency in its decision-making.

The final consideration is the structure of an independent commission. Obviously, the committee will need to consider the leadership and membership of a commission. Certainly the chair and members of a commission, should there be additional members, need to have the knowledge and expertise to organize debates. They could include representatives of the traditional networks as well as representatives of new media, appointed through a formula that prevents partisanship. They could also include representatives of civil society groups. If the chosen model was that of a single commissioner, he or she could consult with civil society groups and other stakeholders or set up an advisory committee to assist him or her in making decisions.

Some have suggested that Elections Canada should have a role to play in this area. With due respect, I disagree. I strongly believe that Elections Canada must be insulated from any decision-making regarding the leaders' debates so as to remain above the fray.

Debates are an important element of the campaign and often contribute to defining the ballot box issues. This is what makes the debates exciting and important. The Chief Electoral Officer should not be involved in matters that could be perceived as having an influence on the orientation of the campaign or the results of the election.

That being said, you may wish to consider a broadcasting arbitrator in establishing a commissioner or an independent commission. As you know, the arbitrator is an independent office-holder under the Canada Elections Act. He is appointed by unanimous consent of the parties in the House of Commons, or if there is no consent, by the Chief Electoral Officer after consultation with the parties. For example, the broadcasting arbitrator could be appointed as the chair of the commission to play essentially a facilitating role in convening the commission and ensuring that it functions properly, or instead, the model of the arbitrator could be emulated in the establishment of either a new commission or commissioner.

Finally, the nature of the commission's mandate may not necessitate an ongoing entity. Its activities will likely be sporadic and its meetings ad hoc. For example, most of the editorial decisions may be made in the lead-up to or during the campaign.

Elections Canada could certainly provide administrative support for an independent commission, including the payment of the commission's expenses. This is the model that is currently followed for the broadcasting arbitrator. It is also the model followed for the electoral boundaries commissions, which work independently from Elections Canada. It's a flexible and effective model that allows the commission to function with some basic administrative support without implicating Elections Canada in the decisions themselves.

Mr. Chair, I've set out a number of considerations that I hope will be helpful to the committee. I would be happy to answer any questions that committee members may have.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now can we have the CRTC?

Mr. Michael Craig (Manager, English and Third-language Television, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Thank you for inviting us to appear before this committee as part of your study on a proposal to create an independent commission or commissioner to organize political party leaders' debates during future federal election campaigns.

My name is Michael Craig, and I am a manager in the television policy group at the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission or the CRTC. With me today is my colleague Peter McCallum, and he is our general counsel of communications law.

We are pleased to have this opportunity to explain the role played by the CRTC as it pertains to leaders' debates during federal elections. [Translation]

The Broadcasting Act sets out, among other things, that the programming provided by the Canadian broadcasting system offer a balance of information and provide a reasonable opportunity for the public to be exposed to the expression of different views on matters of public concern.

As trustees of the public airwaves, radio and television broadcasters play a significant role in providing news and information to Canadians, particularly during elections. They have a duty to ensure that the public has sufficient knowledge of the issues surrounding an election, and the positions of political parties and candidates to the public at large. Such a role is vital to the functioning of the democracy we enjoy in this country.[English]

Our role at the CRTC is to ensure that broadcasters serve the Canadian public during elections so that citizens may make informed decisions on election day. The CRTC, as a matter of principle, does not dictate the type of content that broadcasters must air, be it political coverage or otherwise. Those are editorial and business decisions best left to the broadcasters themselves.

The Broadcasting Act does give the CRTC the power to make regulations regarding the proportion of time that may be devoted to the broadcasting of programs, advertisements, or announcements of a partisan political character.[Translation]

Accordingly, the commission has made regulations affecting most broadcasters if they choose to air programs of a political nature. Those that do are required to allocate time for the broadcast of programs, advertisements or announcements of a partisan political character on an equitable basis to all accredited political parties and rival candidates.

In addition, the Canada Elections Act requires that the CRTC publish a bulletin within four days of the writ being issued for a general election. The bulletin essentially reminds broadcasters of their obligations during the election period. What follows is set out in these bulletins.

(1225)

[English]

Mr. Peter McCallum (General Counsel, Communications Law, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission):

Let me explain how we fulfill our mandate. Broadcasters must offer equitable on-air time to all candidates, parties, and issues during the election, so if broadcasters offer time on air they must do so for all candidates and parties. This enables them to share their ideas and opinions on issues with the public. The decision to accept or reject that offer of time on air rests solely with the candidate or party.

I'll pause for just a moment to make an important clarification. “Equitable”, which is in our regulations, does not necessarily mean equal. Our role at the CRTC is not to ensure that every candidate or party receives the same time on air as any other. [Translation]

Similarly, the CRTC has also identified four types of election coverage: first. campaign advertising time paid for by a party or candidate; second, free campaign advertising time for a party or candidate; third, campaign news coverage; and fourth, public affairs and prime-time advertising during federal elections.

In most of these types of coverage, offers that are extended to one party or candidate must also be extended to other candidates or parties. So if one party or candidate receives free time, rival parties and candidates must also be offered free time. And if a broadcaster sells paid advertising time to any party or candidate, it must also make advertising time available to rival parties and candidates.[English]

As far as debates among political leaders during election times are concerned, the CRTC's current approach was put in place in 1995 following a decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal that held that debates were not of a partisan political character. As a result, debate programs do not need to feature all the rival parties or candidates in one or more programs. So long as the broadcaster takes steps to ensure that audiences are informed on the main issues, and the positions of the candidates and the parties are presented on their public affairs programming generally, the CRTC considers them to be in compliance with its regulation. [Translation]

Mr. Michael Craig:

Mr. Chair, honourable members, your committee has asked the CRTC to comment on the question of how an independent commission or commissioner might organize political party leaders' debates during future federal election campaigns.

As an independent regulator, the CRTC does not have any views on this proposal. The role of the CRTC is to supervise and regulate the Canadian broadcasting system in a flexible way, and to be responsive to the legislative frameworks that Parliament adopts.[English]

We would be pleased to answer your questions about our experience in administering our current regulations as they concern federal election campaigns. We trust this will assist the committee in its work on these important issues for our democracy.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for being here.

We're all very busy, and we'll start the questions with Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Perrault, Mr. Craig, Mr. McCallum and Ms. Lawson, thank you for being here.[English]

Welcome back. It's nice to see you here.[Translation]

Mr. Perrault, we see you a little less frequently than Ms. Lawson. We are pleased to welcome you.

You expressed some concerns about the Charter. You were saying that, if this became a public issue, rather than a private one, it could contravene the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Given that situation, what should the criteria be? How far can we go with the criteria?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

As soon as participation is regulated, Charter arguments can arise, saying that the rules are inadequate, either in terms of having the right to vote and being eligible to vote, or in terms of freedom of expression, whatever. I believe that those discussions should be held outside the election campaign. In my opinion, priority number one is that the criteria should be written into the law. Any challenge would be about the law itself, not about the application of the law by a commission or a commissioner in the middle of an election campaign. That is the main thing.

As for the criteria that should be chosen, you have heard other witnesses propose various criteria. For me, it's a tricky question. I understand that we cannot have a leaders' debate with 22 leaders at the same time. On the other hand, it is not up to me to come up with rules that would exclude any of them. My role is to look after all political parties, not to propose a framework for which parties should take part in the debates.

You have heard various proposals from the witnesses. What emerges from the proposals is the possibility of creating a flexible system that is open to emerging parties, while recognizing the need for an informative debate to take place between a limited number of participants.

Clearly, there are other possibilities, like alternative debates and so on. Once again, it is not my role to propose a framework for participation.

(1230)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the Chief Electoral Officer were responsible for managing the debate, would he be able to give the parties unequal amounts of time?

By virtue of his role, should the Chief Electoral Officer force the 15 or 22 leaders to show up, so that it is fair for everyone?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Should the Chief Electoral Officer have the power to force the leaders to show up?

That question has been raised several time, unless I have misunderstood you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, my question is the opposite.

If you were responsible for managing the debate, would it be beyond your mandate to say that one party can appear but not another?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think your question shows why that cannot be the role of the Chief Electoral Officer. It is not up to the Chief Electoral Officer to exclude participants from a debate in the middle of the election campaign.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be bad for his overall mandate.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

That is something that my presentation today has to make very clear. It cannot be the responsibility of the Chief Electoral Officer.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I share your opinion; I just wanted it to be included in the transcript.[English]

For the CRTC, you mentioned “equitable” versus “equal”. I wanted to dig a little more deeply into that. I'm not really fully clear, if you have a debate of candidates locally, for example, and you don't include all the candidates, how that is permissible. You explain that it is, but I don't really follow how that is.

Mr. Peter McCallum:

First of all, the CRTC does not mandate debates. The CRTC says that the court decision of 1993 means that the debates themselves are not about partisan political character. The “equitable” and in fact the obligation of balance, which is also in the Broadcasting Act, apply throughout the broadcast period, the election period, which is a defined term and is defined by the issue of the writs.

It's measured by the CRTC in response to, for example, complaints, by looking at the overall conduct of the broadcasters during the entire election period as to what they have shown, what they have not shown, and what parties they have featured in the four types of coverage I mentioned.

“Equity” does not necessarily mean “equal”. It recognizes that broadcasters have the liberty of expression that's guaranteed in the charter and also mentioned in the Broadcasting Act to make that sort of editorial decision. It does not necessarily mean “equal”, but the “equity” of the choices are looked at globally over the period.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

A witness at a previous meeting suggested that the commission shouldn't necessarily be called the “Leaders Debate Commission” but just the “Debates Commission”. Do you think any such structure should have a role in local debates or just in national debates? Do you have any opinion on the matter?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I would be inclined to suggest that the first order of business would be that if you're going to create a commission to start with the leaders' debate, it's quite a task to deal with the full magnitude of an all-candidates' debate in all 338 ridings.

That said, a commission could conceivably set out best practices and guidelines that could serve as a model code for people organizing debates. That's a different matter from having a commission involved in every debate in every riding in an election.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there any comments?

Mr. Michael Craig:

As I explained in my opening remarks, anything to do with the structure of a commission or the mandate and role of a commission or a commissioner is not something we're going to be taking an opinion on.

(1235)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand. Thank you very much.

I'll pass my remaining time over to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm very interested to hear that you're absolutely against the idea of Elections Canada being involved. That has enlightened me, and I completely agree. I think it would be wise to maintain their independence for the election purpose.

At the same time, you said that the broadcast arbitrator could sit as a chair on the commission. Do you think that would still be seen as not having independence from the election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

To me that's a very different matter. The broadcasting arbitrator sits under the umbrella of the Canada Elections Act. It operates completely independently from the Chief Electoral Officer and is appointed, as I've said, by unanimous agreement of the parties in the House. There's an arm's-length relationship; its decisions are not that of the Chief Electoral Officer.

At the same time, what I like about this model is that given the fact that this commission would not likely be operating on a full-time basis—it would need to ramp up and down—having a new bureaucracy created for it seems a bit rich. Having Elections Canada provide administrative support, as we do for electoral boundaries commissions or for the the arbitrator, is appealing.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now go to Mr. Reid, for seven minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I have a series of questions, all of which stem from Mr. Perrault's excellent presentation. I thought it was one of the most thoughtful presentations I've heard on any subject before this committee for some time. But before I do that, I just want to respond editorially to Mr. Graham's inquiry about local debates.

There are no formal standards for local debates, as he knows. If you look around, you'll discover that they take on a very similar character across ridings and within a riding, despite the fact that these groups clearly don't talk to each other. The scheduling of debates in my own very large, rural riding confirms this. We are constantly driving back and forth from the far ends of the riding. That being said, they do have a natural symmetry.

I just wanted to say that once you get into having some kind of central control, you have to start getting into centralized criteria such as accessibility. In a rural riding like mine, or yours—our Chief Electoral Officer can confirm this—trying to find suitable polling locations that are accessible and meet all the relevant criteria is a logistical nightmare. We frequently fudge on that, the chambers of commerce and so on that organize these things. I think allowing that fudge factor to continue to exist is the right way of handling things. A decentralized system is the best way of achieving it. Those are my thoughts.

My questions are for Mr. Perrault.

Let me start with page 3 of your presentation. You suggested there are three important objectives that need to be met. You said that debates should be organized in a manner that is fair, non-partisan, and transparent, and that debates should be as broadly accessible as possible to the public. You then made specific reference to making sure they are available to persons with disabilities. I imagine you're thinking primarily of visual and auditory disabilities, although you may have others in mind as well. The third criterion was that they should inform the electorate of the range of political options they have to choose from. I assume that is a reference to the various political parties.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let me ask this question. Looking at 2015—essentially the most recent status quo—where do you think we failed on those criteria? Where is there room for improvement, based on what you saw happening in 2015?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'm not in a position to comment on what happened in 2015 in terms of the debates, whether they met anybody's standard or expectation. You've heard from a number of witnesses on that point. I'll leave it at that.

These I put forward as objectives, not as criteria that must be met. I think this is the spirit or the objectives that I think could serve to guide the mandate of a commission, should the committee want to establish one. I'm not saying, for example, that all parties would have to be represented in the same format at the same time in a single debate. I'm saying that the spirit of having a commission would be in part to ensure there's the broadest possible way of informing Canadians on the various options.

I'm not sure if that answers your question.

(1240)

Mr. Scott Reid:

It does answer my question. I just wanted to make sure there weren't some further thoughts that you had, but did not have the ability to express. You've been very helpful that way.

The next question I want to ask relates to page 4 of your presentation where you say that “criteria for inclusion in the debates must be clear, and should allow for no or very little residual discretion by the commission.” I just want to editorialize that I think you're right. This does raise the question that a commission would presumably, as our electoral boundaries commissions do, have to formulate its proposals well in advance of an election in order to ensure that we are not in the middle of a writ period or at the dawn of a writ period, surprised to discover that, for example, the Green Party is in or out.

Does it seem reasonable to you that a commission or commissioner ought to have to make recommendations in this regard, assuming that he or she has been left with that discretion well in advance of a writ period, in order to allow the appropriate public feedback that meets whatever standards Canadians have?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Maybe I wasn't clear in my explanation. I don't think that the commission or commissioner should have the role of establishing the criteria. I think it's preferable for Parliament to decide what the criteria are, and that the commission or commissioner simply have a role in a fairly mechanical way of applying those criteria. I think Parliament is better positioned. I think having the commissioner establish the criteria would bring him or her into controversies. I don't know that it's something that would be of use to be done well in advance of the election. Things may evolve closer to the election, so that's my position.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Actually, you did make it clear. As you were speaking, I was looking at the part of your presentation that I hadn't read while I was making notes on it. First time around, you did specifically use the word “mechanical”, so you were quite clear on that.

That raises the point, if I may editorialize again for the benefit of the whole committee, that we'd have to put criteria, whatever the criteria are determined on which parties are in and which ones are out, in the statute itself. I don't think that is a problem that can be avoided if we aren't giving it to the commissioner.

In the remaining moment I have left, I just want to ask, does this require a commission model? Does it require changes to the Canada Elections Act or not?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I guess it would depend on the model that you choose. You could conceivably do it through that mechanism if you are to enrich, for example, the mandate of the broadcasting arbitrator. There may be stand-alone legislation as an alternative option.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. I have 30 seconds left, so I'll ask another question here. You used the electoral boundaries redistribution model and the commissions that are set up as a potential model. The question that occurred to me was, either we have a commissioner who is paid full time to mostly do nothing, or else we have a job that's episodic.

I personally wouldn't want that job. Everybody's going to hate you, you don't get paid very much, and it's only episodic. The Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act had similar problems, and they've been overcome somehow. Do you have any insight as to how one would deal with that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The broadcasting arbitrator is episodic in the same way, so he's not paid full time. He's paid on a per diem basis. A similar model could be used here.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you. That's very helpful.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid.[Translation]

It is now Mr. Christopherson's turn. [English]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

I agree with Mr. Reid. You gave an excellent presentation, Mr. Perrault. At the risk of getting a civics lesson in public, which is probably what's about to happen, I have to say, just for my own benefit—bear with me—you stated in your remarks, “Some have suggested that Elections Canada should have a role to play in this area.... I strongly believe that Elections Canada must be insulated from any decision-making regarding the leaders' debates so as to remain above the fray.”

My difficulty is that I have trouble distinguishing the role that would be played here versus the role that the Chief Electoral Officer is already playing, where we're asking him to be fair-minded. There are an awful lot of decisions that are taken by the CEO where people could get angry and say, “Well, that's not right. You're screwing us. It's clear this is rigged.” Yet you're suggesting that this particular aspect is so refined in its need to be pure that even you dare not go there.

Help me understand why you feel you can't stay above the fray when I'm looking at other areas where you're in the midst of the fray.

(1245)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Essentially, because the debates get into the choice of substantive issues, and who gets to present and in what order, and who sits between who, and who is asking the questions and how they're being asked, all these issues are deeply within the hot issues of the campaign. We all know that leaders’ debates can in some cases be a game-changer in a campaign. I can hardly see the Chief Electoral Officer being part of that game-changing moment in the campaign.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I've heard others give the same opinion. I guess this is one of those times where we find ourselves thinking we're the only ones in the whole army marching wrong. I accept that's probably the prevailing view. I just can't get there. If I have to worry about the decisions that you might impact in this area, it would lead me immediately to think maybe I need to worry about some of the others, but I think you're talking about the scale of the impact and the cut and thrust of the election versus the framework you do. Anyway the civics lesson is concluded; I hear where you're coming from.

I was one of those saying “Elections Canada” or “a stand-alone” just because it made common sense to me. I'm pleased to see that you have suggested at least one role where it would be embedded, but you'd be removed from that decision-making. Again the whole idea of the cost factor, the idea of creating a whole bureaucracy to exist and remain idling for three and a half years doesn't make a lot of sense, and re-creating it from scratch every time, as often as Mr. Reid has noted, is not always the best approach.

I'm warming to one of the options that you presented, the broadcasting arbitrator. Talk to me a little more about how you'd see this working within the confines of your shop but allowing it to remain independent. Help me understand this a bit more.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

To be frank I have not worked out all the details of this. I can certainly say that the way it works right now with the arbitrator, as it is with the boundaries commission, is that he does his own thing. He's the one who convenes the parties for example to allocate the broadcast time for the election. We provide administrative support for his work, and the same is true of the electoral boundaries commission. It is a flexible mechanism because at any point they can decide to convene a meeting, and we would provide the support for that, but we would not be the ones making the decisions.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right, and I'll tell you the ways I'm warming to it. I like the environment. As they're making the decisions, the people around them in their workplace are all geared to free, fair, transparency.... I'm warming to that one and will be looking for those who could argue that it's a bad idea, and that I ought to take that in mind.

Can you tell me a bit more again exactly what the broadcasting arbitrator does?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

His main role is very limited, but it's a role that can be critical during an election. He does two things. First, he applies a formula in the act for the allocation of free and paid time. That formula is in the act. A recommendation was made to this committee to review that and perhaps at some point you'll get to that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's deep in the weeds these days, I have to tell you.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

During an election there may be situations where there may be conflict regarding the purchase of time, whether a broadcaster makes available the right time at the right moment, or there may be issues between the broadcaster and the party, and he would serve as an arbitrator in that context. Those are his two roles.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You said it's very episodic too. That one is episodic as well as the boundary commission, so the nature of this other one would not be a shock to your system.

(1250)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct. It's very similar.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I'm good. I appreciate it. Thank you very much for the answers and thanks for the excellent presentation.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Christopherson.

Now we're moving on to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thanks to each of you for your participation today, your presence here, your testimony. Mr. McCallum, with respect to the Ontario Court of Appeal decision you referenced, was that 1993 or 1995?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

I think it initially was 1993, but the current reference is to 1995.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

Mr. Peter McCallum:

Just for your information, leave to the Supreme Court of Canada was subsequently refused.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. That was part of my question.

Let me ask you this. Do I understand correctly, from what you said, that it was determined by the court of appeal that debates are not political or partisan in nature, and therefore, don't need to ensure that all parties participate? Is that right?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

Effectively, yes.

What happened was that there was a prosecution under the Broadcasting Act, instituted by the exclusion of the Green Party from election coverage. It was an interpretation of section 8, I believe, of the TV regulations, which uses the expression “partisan political character”. The court determined that debates do not fall within partisan political character. Therefore, section 8 is not engaged and the equity requirement in the regulations is not breached.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I see.

Leave was made to the Supreme Court and was not granted.

Mr. Peter McCallum:

Leave was denied. That is correct.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

With respect to the relationship between this commission or commissioner and CRTC, how do you see that working? How do you see a relationship with a potential commissioner established?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

I can't really answer that vis-à-vis a going-forward basis.

I can say something about the broadcasting arbitrator, and that is that it's recognized in the Canada Elections Act. There is a requirement for the CRTC to publish, for example, the results of the allocation of the 390 minutes among the parties. The CRTC duly publishes those results. It's a section of the Canada Elections Act. That is fairly episodic, but it also happens quite frequently during the period between elections, because some parties are registered and others are deregistered, which triggers a change in the allocation among the parties. The requirement to publish is in the act, and the CRTC duly publishes and follows the obligation as a result.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It's just ensuring that those procedures are followed.

With respect to that, is there often a breach of the requirements?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

I haven't been made aware of any breach.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Very good.

Now I'll go over to Mr. Perrault.

You've spoken about the importance of Parliament establishing the criteria, and you've expanded a little on that. When you talk about the importance of Parliament establishing the criteria—taking that away from the commissioner and making sure Parliament establishes it—what criteria are you referring to?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

These are not my criteria, but there have been proposals made regarding the percentage of votes received in the last election or the number of candidates who ran, these kinds of objective criteria. I like the idea that was suggested by Mr. Fox, who came last week, that if you meet a number of the criteria but not all, you may qualify to participate in the debate. This could provide some flexibility, for example, for non-parliamentary parties.

Those are the kinds of criteria that I would see set out in legislation.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That would be conducted by Parliament.

What authority would the commissioner have with respect to establishing any criteria? Would the commissioner or commission have any authority?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

My recommendation would be that he or she not have any authority. He or she would be applying fairly mechanical criteria set out by Parliament. There may be situations where you need to have some form of residual discretion, but I would remove that from the commissioner to all extent possible.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

How valuable do you think the role of the commissioner or commission is?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It depends. Again, that is why, at the outset, I asked what objectives you are trying to pursue. I think you have to work from the objectives up, and see how a commission can assist in pursuing those objectives.

In my view, I do not see the commissioner as having a role in carving out which parties are excluded and which are included.

(1255)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What about other criteria, for example the number of debates, the language of the debates, or the content of the debates?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I see no reason why the commission or commissioner would not have broad latitude. To the extent that the commission is involved in editorial aspects of the debates and so forth, it must be equipped with the proper expertise. We were talking earlier about the broadcasting arbitrator. He has knowledge of the industry, but he is not a journalist and does not have the full range of expertise.

That is why, in my remarks, I said that if that were the model, he would either be supported by other members or have an advisory committee that he would create to reflect the interests of parties and civil society, and to speak to the media. I think the commission would need to have some expertise if it is going to be making content and format decisions.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I'm going to take one more minute, Dave, but then I'll put it over to you. My colleague wants to ask another question.

One of the witnesses previously spoke about the commissioner being engaged in outreach with respect to stakeholders and ensuring research is done in order to get input from stakeholders generally, Canadians across the country, to determine what shape and form these take.

Would you support that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I have no particular view on that.

I think that's one model. Another model is to have an advisory group of people from various walks of life that could assist the commission in making sure that, in their choices, they're reflecting the needs and interests of a range of people.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

I'll pass the last minute to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I had a question earlier that I lost, so I threw it over to Ruby.

Do you think that it is possible, workable, advisable, supportable to have any kind of a commission require mandatory carriage of debates in some way, shape, or form? Presumably, you can have all the debates you want but if the networks aren't carrying them, you're limiting who's actually going to see them.

Would it be workable—and I guess this is more for the CRTC, but you're both free to answer—to say every network must carry at least one debate in the language of their regular broadcasts?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

I think some sort of mechanism would have to be put in place, whether it's an amendment to the Broadcasting Act or a direction or something, in order to make carriage of debates mandatory.

Right now, there's not an obligation in the act for broadcasters to carry debate programs. They have done it. The commission is happy with that, but there's not an obligation that requires them to do it. Some mechanism would have to be put in place in order to accomplish that.

Mr. Michael Craig:

Yes, and just to loop back to my opening remarks, we don't take a stand on the programming that a broadcaster must broadcast. We don't dictate their editorial decisions or their business decisions. We leave it to them. To echo Mr. McCallum's response to you, there would have to be some form of change.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. May, we're delighted to have you speak again.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the witnesses for your excellent testimony.

It seems to me that it's boiling down to two questions and each of these bodies, Elections Canada and CRTC, have a role to play if we're looking at what kinds of rules we might want to put in place to have fair debates that reach the maximum number of Canadians. It looks like one mechanism is to get the debates on air, so that deals with broadcasting. The other is to get the leaders to show up in front of the podium.

Certainly your preference, Mr. Perrault, is that Parliament determine the criteria. I think that also makes a lot of sense. They should be predetermined so that, as Scott Reid was pointing out, we don't find out in the middle of the election campaign who's in and who's out, because it creates a lot of uncertainty.

On the point of how we might get the leaders there, I just wanted to put a question to you, Mr. Perrault.

It seems to me that election campaign financing might give us a bit of an effective inducement to show up. Contrary to the rhetoric when they cancelled the per vote support that we used to have due to the reform put in place by Jean Chrétien.... The rhetoric at the time of getting rid of that $1.75 per vote, or whatever it was, was that the Canadian taxpayer doesn't want to fund political parties. However, we know that the Canadian taxpayer does fund political parties quite a lot, and the part that was cancelled was the smallest part. The biggest part is the rebates at the end of the campaign, and there's also the benefit of very generous tax treatment.

Focusing on the rebate...and I got this idea from a private members' bill that Kennedy Stewart put forward, which didn't succeed. He was trying to put forward the idea that if you had gender parity you'd get all your money back, but to the extent that you didn't have gender parity in your candidate selection a political party would get less money back.

I'm just wondering what your view would be if the Canada Elections Act was amended to say that any party leader of a recognized political party who meets the criteria to participate in the debate and who refuses to participate, faces some form—I'm not going to dictate what it might be—of financial penalty for failing to provide the Canadian public with what we all agree and all witnesses agree is the moment of maximum public engagement to see how policies and proposals are put forward by different leaders.

Would that be something that you'd think the Canada Elections Act...? Obviously, Parliament would determine it, but I think it would be an effective inducement. I'd just love your opinion on that.

(1300)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I may disappoint you. I don't have a strong opinion on that in the sense that I do think that's a fundamental policy decision for Parliament.

I do think I could certainly administer such a regime. You may want to consider whether the mere fact of having created a commission, should you do that, which gives some standing to that debate, may be a sufficient incentive to participate in the debate and whether you actually need that additional financial incentive. It may be something to consider over time, but these are policy issues for Parliament.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

As another policy issue, you mentioned the notion that there might be 22 leaders on the stage. I just want to clarify that in the current situation, I think, we have 15 recognized federal political parties.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We do have 15. We were up to 23 in the last election. It tends to go up as you get closer to the election. I suspect that next year we'll see additional parties registered.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Okay.

Although I may be wrong on this—I couldn't find it quickly in any Wikipedia sources, so I'll put it to you—to my recollection, other than the Liberals, Conservatives, New Democrats, Greens, and Bloc, the total vote count for, at that point, all the other 18 political parties didn't reach 2%. Is that correct?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I do not know the answer to that.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Okay. That's my recollection. You would agree that none of them come close to 1% on their own.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think so. I think that's correct.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

And 2% is the threshold in the elections act for the rebates that flow.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's 2%, or 5% in the ridings in which the party supports candidates. It's dual criteria.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Those give us some guidance in terms of existing policy moving forward. If we're looking at the past record of which parties are able, despite.... We're not going to get into a discussion of electoral reform. A number of us around this table were part of the special parliamentary committee on electoral reform.

Setting that aside, under our current first-past-the-post voting system, it's very difficult to get MPs elected across the country if you're not able to.... Getting 2% is a tough challenge. That's what I'm trying to suggest.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault: Yes.

Ms. Elizabeth May: Okay.

In terms of what the CRTC does—this is again a policy question for Parliament—do you think there would be ways that Parliament could say to networks that provide news coverage, Canadian content across the country, that the participation in broadcasting debates could be made a licensing requirement?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

As I said earlier, I think it would require some sort of amendment to the act or some other measure to accomplish that.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

That was my assumption, that we'd be talking about amending the Broadcasting Act. Just as Elections Canada can't determine what's in the Canada Elections Act but can administer it, the CRTC would administer if it were in the Broadcasting Act as an amendment.

Mr. Peter McCallum:

That's correct. If it were done by Parliament, CRTC would administer it.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I think those are all my questions. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. May.

The Conservatives have a couple of minutes. Do you have any questions?

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I guess to our folks in the CRTC, this follows up on the question Mr. Graham had in regard to the idea or concept of mandating that debates be carried. I was still a little bit unclear after the response. Would it be possible to do that under the current legislative framework, or would new legislation be required?

(1305)

Mr. Peter McCallum:

We believe it's not really possible under the current framework just because of the way in which the act is set out with objectives and balancing requirements and so on. There's also the fact that the courts said that debates were not of a partisan political character, so you'd need some other measure to get there.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Putting aside political debate, is there any type of broadcast that now exists that's mandated? Is there anything through the CRTC or otherwise that you're aware of that's mandated and must be carried by television networks?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

There are a lots of conditions of licence. My colleague Mr. Craig can speak to the conditions of licence that have mandatory requirements in them. There are quotas for Canadian content and so on and so forth.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Canadian content aside, is there a specific event or one specific thing that's required to be broadcast by the networks? I get the Canadian content requirements, but I'm talking about one specific event or such thing.

Mr. Michael Craig:

Our content requirements really are related to much broader things than a specific event. At the risk of sounding a little bit like a broken record—I do apologize—the notion is that the CRTC is not going to dictate editorial decisions or business decisions made by broadcasters. When we're talking about specific events, “You must carry x”, that's what it would be boiling down to.

As Mr. McCallum said and as I think I have repeated a few times, this is not something that we do currently.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

I know you don't have an opinion on this, and you're not wanting to offer one. That's fine. I'm not asking you to, but if it were determined—I'm certainly not necessarily advocating, either, that it be done—by this committee and then by the government that it was something they were going to do, and would require these things, how would you envision that being enforced? Can you see a way that could be enforced?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

I think it depends on the measure that's put in place in the first place, the content of the measure, and the specifics of it. It's a little hard to answer that. As I say, right now the election coverage is determined over the entire election period. Whichever measure it would be would have to be sufficiently specific in order to determine what the remedies might be. The Broadcasting Act does create certain remedies for situations where the broadcasters do not adhere to the regulations or the act, or to their conditions of licence, so it would have to be in some instrument that's possible to be enforced through the other instruments that exist in the Broadcasting Act.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't want to put words in your mouth, but I get the sense that you're suggesting that this might be incredibly difficult to do.

Mr. Peter McCallum:

It's up to Parliament, frankly. We have no opinion as to what the measure might be and how it would be implemented. That's up to Parliament. If Parliament decides that some measure is required, the CRTC will do its best to administer it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Again, if the committee would indulge me for a minute, I'd like to follow up on what Mr. Richards said on making it mandatory.

In 2015, as Mr. Nater said, there was a poor turnout and the broadcasters didn't agree. One of the broadcasters suggested that you have to mandate everyone, such as Netflix, Google, Facebook, and all the dozens of channels in Canada, the Food Networks and so on. I'm not sure if anyone here can answer this. If not, I'm sure PCO will look it up.

Would the broadcasters have a legal case against the government if all these people I mentioned were also forced to carry the debates?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

It's kind of hard to answer that. Right now certain entities are exempt from regulation in the sense that the Broadcasting Act has a provision in which they may be exempted from regulation. Broadcasting over the Internet is generally an exempt activity, so it would have to be thought through very carefully as to how to accomplish something like that. We have no view on how that might be accomplished, but it could be difficult. It could be difficult to enforce, depending on whether the entity is carrying on a broadcasting undertaking in Canada, which is another concept that's in the Broadcasting Act.

(1310)

The Chair:

Finally, who decides the subjects or topics? As regulators of the broadcasters, would you get a sense that the broadcasters may pick topics that would, if they had a say or controlled it, increase the number of viewers, increase their profile, or be in the interest of the broadcasters—as opposed to the independent commissioner who would decide the topics in the best interests of Canadians?

Mr. Peter McCallum:

Again, I find that a little bit difficult to answer. The Broadcasting Act does, independently of the charter, recognize the journalistic freedom of expression of broadcasters, so that's one thing that would have to be taken into account. The only thing I can offer is that when the broadcasting arbitrator makes decisions on the allocation of advertising time, the broadcasting arbitrator convenes the different political parties in front of him and hears representations on those before making a decision. That's the only thing I can offer on that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We really appreciate your coming. Your wise counsel, as a number of people already mentioned, is very helpful. It gives us lots to think about.

Committee members, there's a little bit of homework for the weekend, if that's okay. There's a list here of all our witnesses for the rest of the study. They may not be in this order, but these are the ones who have agreed to come. We've agreed that if we're going to have anyone else before the given time for the report, we will have an extra meeting or an extended meeting. Let me know if there's anyone else you would like. Some of the people who were on the original huge list have declined to come. If there's someone you want who's not on this list, check with the clerk to make sure that they were asked and just declined. Then we'll sort that out on Tuesday.

Is there anything else? No.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 82e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Je tiens à indiquer aux membres du Comité que nous avons eu une excellente rencontre hier avec la délégation du Ghana. De plus, il y a quelques minutes, j'ai présenté notre rapport au Parlement sur les façons d’améliorer la participation au système politique des députées ayant des bébés et des nourrissons. C'était formidable. Félicitations au Comité pour ce bon travail.

Aujourd'hui, nous allons poursuivre notre étude sur la création d'un commissariat indépendant chargé des débats des chefs. Nous allons accueillir pour commencer un certain nombre de témoins.

De CBC/Radio-Canada, nous entendrons Jennifer McGuire, directrice générale et rédactrice en chef de CBC News.[Français]

Également de CBC/Radio-Canada, Michel Cormier est directeur général de l'information, Information et affaires publiques, Services français.[Traduction]De Corus Entertainment, nous accueillons Troy Reeb, vice-président principal, News, Radio and Station Operations, et de Bell Media, nous accueillons Wendy Freeman, présidente de CTV News.

Je sais que vous êtes tous deux des personnalités très importantes, très occupées, et nous sommes très honorés de vous avoir parmi nous. Nous avons hâte de vous entendre, dans l'ordre dans lequel je vous ai présentés.

Jennifer McGuire, nous allons commencer par vous.

Mme Jennifer McGuire (directrice générale et rédactrice en chef, Nouvelles CBC, Société Radio-Canada):

Merci beaucoup.

Merci de nous avoir invités à vous donner notre point de vue aujourd'hui. Nous représentons plusieurs radiodiffuseurs qui jouent un rôle important et essentiel dans la vie démocratique du Canada. Notre présence devant ce comité est motivée par un objectif commun — trouver la façon la plus efficace de fournir aux électeurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour faire des choix réfléchis et éclairés et, à terme, pour faire participer les Canadiens au processus démocratique. C’est particulièrement vrai pour le diffuseur public du Canada, mais aussi pour chacun d'entre nous. Non seulement nos émissions sont-elles diffusées aux quatre coins du pays, mais nous avons en plus une expérience directe de toutes les façons de couvrir une élection, incluant les débats des chefs.

Notre expérience des débats des élections fédérales date du tout premier qui a eu lieu en 1968. À l'époque, CBC/Radio-Canada et CTV partaient de zéro pour négocier avec les partis les conditions de la tenue de ce débat. Les arguments sur l’inclusion d'un parti ou d'un autre n'étaient pas si différents de ceux invoqués aujourd'hui. Ce premier débat s'était déroulé en deux parties. La première incluait les libéraux, les conservateurs et les néo-démocrates. La deuxième accordait une place aux créditistes. Le Parti Crédit social avait été totalement exclu du débat.

Au fil des ans, d'autres radiodiffuseurs se sont joints à nous, alors que les partis politiques allaient et venaient. Nous avons ajouté des débats en français et essayé différentes formules, dont des tables rondes, des échanges devant public et sur les médias sociaux. Chaque campagne a été l’occasion de tirer des leçons et d'évoluer.

Mais certains points sont récurrents. Mes collègues et moi aborderons aujourd'hui les plus importants et nous vous demandons de bien vouloir en tenir compte.

Premièrement, nous devons tenir des débats pouvant atteindre tous les Canadiens. Encore une fois, notre objectif commun est l'intérêt public. La question est de savoir comment faire en sorte que les Canadiens connaissent mieux les partis, leurs chefs et leurs positions politiques. Les débats jouent ce rôle, car ils mettent à l'épreuve les connaissances des candidats, leurs valeurs et leur vivacité d'esprit sous la pression. C'est lorsque les chefs s'éloignent de leurs messages formatés à l'avance que nous pouvons mieux apprécier la profondeur de leurs idées. Ne sous-estimez pas l’importance d’atteindre un vaste auditoire. Dans notre monde moderne où le discours est fractionné, il s'agit d'une rare occasion pour les Canadiens d'évaluer les candidats en même temps, au même endroit et dans le même contexte. L'impact des débats augmente de façon exponentielle lorsqu'ils font partie d'une expérience nationale commune.

Deuxièmement, nous devons présenter des débats que le public regardera, car il importe peu d’avoir un auditoire si celui-ci ne se sent pas mobilisé. Il faut que le format fonctionne, que le décor soit attrayant et que l’animateur ait du talent. II faut amener les candidats à ne pas s'éloigner du sujet et les forcer à coller aux questions de l'heure. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles la contribution des journalistes aux débats est si importante. Bien entendu, il faut aussi avoir des réalisateurs qui savent comment capter l’attention du public, pas seulement à la télévision, mais aussi sur les plateformes numériques et sociales. À cet effet, vous savez sûrement que CBC News est un chef de file du contenu numérique au Canada, avec 18,3 millions de visites uniques. Toutefois, dans les moments importants, rien ne peut égaler la force et la puissance d'attraction de la télévision, surtout quand les choses sont bien faites.

Troisièmement, nous devons exclure les partis politiques du processus. Je suis consciente que chacun de vous est affilié à un parti. Permettez-moi tout de même d'exprimer mon point de vue. Nous constatons que le plus gros défaut du système actuel réside dans le fait que les partis pèsent de tout leur poids pour influencer le déroulement des débats. Si, en 2015, il est devenu de bon ton d'attaquer les grands réseaux de radiodiffusion, en vérité, nous n'avons jamais contrôlé les conditions régissant les débats. Celles-ci découlaient de rondes de négociations délicates menées avec les partis politiques eux-mêmes. Chaque parti cherche à obtenir tous les avantages possibles, que ce soit l'endroit, la date du débat, le choix des participants ou le format acceptable. Les partis vont jusqu'à menacer de ne pas participer au débat en même temps qu'ils cherchent à obtenir des conditions à leur avantage.

En 2015, les réseaux ont agi de bonne foi, mais leur détermination à tenir les débats a été mise à l'épreuve pendant des mois, pour finalement obtenir une fin de non-recevoir, du moins du côté anglais. En fin de compte, c'est le public qui a été perdant. Par rapport aux chiffres de 2011, nous n'avons atteint qu'une fraction de l'auditoire. S'il est une chose qui mérite d'être accomplie dans le cadre de ces travaux, c'est de dépolitiser le processus et de faire en sorte que les intérêts partisans soient tenus à l'écart.

Mon collègue Michel Cormier de Radio-Canada va maintenant vous expliquer comment les choses se sont déroulées pendant la campagne de 2015.

(1105)

M. Michel Cormier (directeur général de l'information, Information et Affaires publiques, Services français, Société Radio-Canada):

Je peux le faire parce que j'ai été mêlé de près à la négociation des débats, surtout du côté français.[Français]

Les débats électoraux de 2015 ont eu lieu dans un contexte très particulier, en effet. Il n'y a pas eu de débat national télévisé en anglais, parce que l'un des partis n'a pas voulu y participer. Du côté francophone, il y a eu un débat national réunissant les chefs de tous les partis. Toutefois, l'un des deux grands réseaux de télévision francophone ne l'a pas présenté. Je reviendrai sur le débat en français un peu plus tard.

Certains sont d'avis que, si les négociations entourant la tenue des débats ont échoué, c'est parce que le modèle du consortium ne fonctionne plus, qu'il est antidémocratique, que des dirigeants de l'industrie de la radiodiffusion négocient derrière des portes clauses avec les représentants des partis et que le fait que les règles et les paramètres des débats soient établis par les journalistes peut servir les intérêts de la télévision, peut-être, mais pas le débat politique.

Nous reconnaissons que le mécanisme des débats doit évoluer, mais permettez-moi de nuancer cet argument en revenant sur la façon dont les choses se sont déroulées en 2015.

Le débat en anglais n'a pas eu lieu en raison du contexte extrêmement politisé des négociations. Dès le début du printemps, lorsque nous avons entrepris nos discussions avec les partis, et jusqu'aux derniers jours de la campagne, nous avons toujours eu espoir d'organiser un débat. Toutefois, à aucun moment le parti au pouvoir ne s'est engagé à y participer. Sa réticence ne découlait pas nécessairement de l'inclusion ou de l'utilisation des médias sociaux ni du format ou du contenu proposé, mais bien du rôle joué par le consortium lui-même.

Nous avons toujours été disposés à distribuer le débat le plus largement possible. Nous avions même entrepris des discussions avec Google et Facebook, afin d'étendre sa portée sur les plateformes numériques. Essentiellement, tant et aussi longtemps que le consortium était impliqué... [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président.

Je suis désolé. Je comprends mal pourquoi nous n'avons pas de copies de cet exposé. Je comprends que des copies ont été remises dans les deux langues officielles, mais pour une raison ou une autre, elles ne sont pas devant nous. S'il vous plaît, aidez-moi.

M. Michel Cormier:

Est-ce que je parle trop vite pour l'interprète?

M. David Christopherson:

Non, ce n'est pas ça. C'est procédural. Normalement, nous avons des copies de ce que vous nous dites pour être précis, mais pas moi. J'essaie de savoir pourquoi, car apparemment vous les avez envoyées dans les deux langues.

M. Michel Cormier:

J'en ai un exemplaire en anglais, si vous voulez.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très bien.

Le président:

Apparemment, il n’y avait pas assez de copies. Ils sont en train d'en faire.

M. David Christopherson:

Si je n'avais pas invoqué le Règlement, nous ne les aurions pas obtenues parce que nous n'avions pas assez d'exemplaires. Ce n'est pas possible. C'est ce qui s'est passé?

Le président:

Le greffier dit qu'il y a eu confusion entre eux; c'est de leur faute.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, je voulais simplement savoir ce qui s'était passé.

Vous avez dit qu'on en faisait des copies rapidement?

Le président:

Oui.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je pense pouvoir dire qu'il y en a peut-être plusieurs exemplaires. Si c'est le cas, pourquoi ne pas en donner un à chaque parti s'il y en a assez pour cela? Les trois conservateurs pourraient s'en partager une copie, par exemple. Comme ça, M. Christopherson pourrait en avoir une aussi.

Le président:

Bonne idée. Faisons cela.

M. David Christopherson:

Mais, s'il vous plaît, à l'avenir, il n'y a aucune raison de garder des copies des documents dans une enveloppe parce qu'il n'y en a pas assez. Savez-vous combien il y a de photocopieurs dans cet immeuble?

Quoi qu'il en soit, c'est très bien. Je vous remercie.

(1110)

Le président:

Celui de Corus n'est pas dans les deux langues, donc nous ne pourrons pas le distribuer.

Monsieur Michel Cormier, veuillez continuer. [Français]

M. Michel Cormier:

Je disais que nous avions même entrepris des négociations avec Google et Facebook afin d'étendre la portée du débat sur les plateformes numériques. Essentiellement, tant et aussi longtemps que le consortium était impliqué dans l'exercice, il était impossible que le débat ait lieu. Il y avait aussi le point de vue selon lequel il était préférable de tenir plusieurs petits débats plutôt qu'un seul grand débat télévisé. C'est ce qui s'est produit dans le marché anglophone.

Est-ce que les électeurs ont été mieux servis ainsi? Nous ne le croyons pas. Les auditoires combinés de ces petits débats ont été largement inférieurs à ceux qu'un débat national télévisé obtient habituellement.

Permettez-moi d'insister sur un point. Les grands réseaux de télévision comme le nôtre sont ouverts à l'idée de revoir les formats des débats, de les rendre moins rigides, de collaborer avec plus de partenaires pour que le plus grand nombre possible d'électeurs puissent y avoir accès par l'intermédiaire des plateformes numériques. Or nous n'avons même pas eu l'occasion d'en discuter. Selon nous, exclure le consortium de l'exercice nuisait à la démocratie canadienne.

Du côté francophone, l'expérience a été tout à fait différente. Après de longues négociations, tous les partis se sont finalement entendus sur un débat organisé par Radio-Canada et chapeauté par le consortium. Radio-Canada, de son côté, s'est associée à d'autres médias, à l'exception de TVA, qui avait décidé de tenir son propre débat sur des enjeux concernant le Québec et s'adressant à un auditoire québécois. Nos partenaires incluaient le journal La Presse, Télé-Québec, le diffuseur public du Québec, ainsi que Facebook et YouTube. Nous avons aussi offert notre signal à d'autres radiodiffuseurs, notamment CPAC, moyennant des frais minimes. Nous avons également diffusé le débat à la radio, de même qu'en continu sur nos plateformes numériques. D'ailleurs, CBC et CTV ont diffusé la traduction du débat en français sur leurs chaînes d'information continue, et Global TV aussi a diffusé le débat sur son site Web.

Radio-Canada a produit le débat dans ses studios et a assumé la majorité des coûts parce que nous croyons que cela fait partie de notre mandat en tant que diffuseur public. En outre, nous étions les seuls à disposer des ressources et de l'expertise techniques nécessaires pour produire et distribuer un tel débat. L'exercice s'est avéré un succès pour la démocratie. Le débat a été suivi par plus d'un million de personnes sur toutes nos plateformes combinées. Partout au Canada, les gens ont pu avoir accès à la même information visant à les aider à prendre une décision éclairée sur le leadership du pays.

D'une certaine façon, le débat en français a abordé de nombreuses questions qui intéressent le Comité. Il a été inclusif. Nous avons en effet collaboré avec de nombreux partenaires et offert notre signal à bon nombre d'acteurs de l'industrie pour assurer au plus grand nombre possible de personnes d'avoir accès au débat. Nous nous sommes servi des médias sociaux pour rejoindre d'autres auditoires, comme les désabonnés, c'est-à-dire ceux qui ne sont pas abonnés à un service de télévision. Pour votre information, notre portée numérique est aussi importante que notre auditoire télévisuel.

En conclusion, le modèle « post-consortium » ou « consortium-plus » que nous recherchons tous existe peut-être déjà. Cependant, nous avons besoin d'une structure qui permettra de dépolitiser le processus et de l'engagement de tous les partis à participer à un vaste débat national facilement accessible.

Mon collègue Troy Reeb va maintenant vous expliquer les raisons pour lesquelles il est impératif que les grands radiodiffuseurs participent activement à ce processus.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

M. Troy Reeb (vice-président directeur, News, Radio and Station Operations, Corus Entertainment inc.):

Merci. Bonjour.

Comme vous l’avez dit, je m'appelle Troy Reeb. J'occupe actuellement le poste de premier vice-président responsable des nouvelles mondiales, de la radio et de l'exploitation des stations pour Corus Entertainment. Avant cela, j'ai également présidé pendant six ans le consortium de radiotélévision sur les débats et les élections et j'ai supervisé le processus qui a contribué à l'organisation des débats télévisés des leaders, très réussis et très regardés, en 2008 et 2011.

Je reconnais d'emblée que le mot « consortium » évoque des images d'un organisme magnifiquement organisé, même si je dois souligner que nous sommes très compétitifs tous les jours de la semaine et que nous ne parlons pas d'une seule voix, bien que nous soyons tous ici aujourd'hui devant vous. Dans le cas du consortium, il s'agit simplement d'un accord ad hoc entre divers médias pour travailler ensemble dans l'intérêt public. Sa création découle d'une volonté des partis de ne pas participer à de multiples débats et d'un désir des radiodiffuseurs de ne pas s'opposer les uns aux autres pour le droit de tenir un débat et d'atteindre ensuite un public aussi large que possible lors d'un débat.

Le consortium n'a jamais été conçu pour limiter le nombre de débats. Je vous le dis avec force conviction aujourd'hui, plus il y a de débats et mieux c'est. En effet, lors des dernières élections, Global News et d'autres membres du consortium ont organisé leurs propres débats supplémentaires. Nous avons organisé des débats régionaux, des débats thématiques spécifiques, souvent avec des candidats autres que les chefs de parti. Cette diversité de débats devrait être encouragée, mais il devrait aussi y avoir au moins un débat national bien produit dans chaque langue officielle qui réponde aux normes de la radiodiffusion et du journalisme et qui soit distribué le plus largement possible aux Canadiens.

Pour être franc, un débat au sein d'une chambre de commerce ne répond pas à ce critère. Un débat retransmis en direct par un magazine en ligne ne répond pas à ce critère qui exige un éclairage adéquat, le bon positionnement des caméras, un rythme dynamique, des choix de sujets, un modérateur compétent et un produit final non émaillé de publicité. Comme nous l'avons vu en 2015, toutes ces choses sont importantes, et toutes ces choses coûtent aussi de l'argent.

Plus tôt cette semaine, un témoin a souligné, à juste titre en fait, qu'on pouvait maintenant organiser un débat et le distribuer en ligne pour un coût presque nul. Ce qu'il n'a pas fait remarquer, c'est que sans valeurs de production, sans installations appropriées, et je dirais que c'est un cadre journalistique pour ce débat, il n'y aurait presque pas de téléspectateurs non plus.

Dans le passé, les débats en consortium étaient payés par les organes de presse participants et distribués à d'autres médias sur une base de partage des coûts ou parfois gratuitement. Bien entendu, c'est à chaque média qu'il appartient de décider s'il veut ou non le diffuser, et cela dépend souvent du respect de ses normes et des normes que son auditoire attend d'un débat. Cela doit continuer d'être le cas, quelle que soit la manière dont les débats futurs seront produits. En tant que radiodiffuseurs et organisations journalistiques, nous avons la responsabilité de respecter nos conditions de licence et nos normes journalistiques. La capacité des médias de prendre des décisions en matière de programmation de façon indépendante est aussi essentielle au libre fonctionnement de la démocratie que la capacité d'engager un débat vigoureux.

J'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions tout à l'heure, et je cède maintenant la parole à ma collègue Wendy Freeman.

(1115)

Mme Wendy Freeman (présidente, CTV News, Bell Média inc.):

Bonjour. Merci de nous offrir cette tribune aujourd'hui pour faire connaître notre point de vue sur ce processus capital. Les Canadiens comptent depuis longtemps sur le rôle des diffuseurs dans la présentation des débats. De notre côté, nous voyons cette participation comme un devoir envers nos téléspectateurs et les communautés que nous servons. Nous croyons servir efficacement la démocratie en exposant le plus grand nombre de Canadiens possible aux débats où les chefs s'affrontent sur des questions fondamentales pour notre pays.

Nous sommes ouverts à l'idée de prendre part aux travaux d'une commission indépendante ou de travailler avec un commissaire indépendant. Il est essentiel que nous ayons voix au chapitre durant les travaux préparatoires pour parvenir à un processus adapté à la réalité canadienne. À titre de télédiffuseurs, nous jouons un rôle indispensable dans le fonctionnement d'une saine démocratie, rôle qui consiste à informer efficacement les citoyens selon des principes de transparence et d'inclusivité. En combinant leurs forces, nos réseaux ont une portée qui dépasse celle de toute autre plateforme média au Canada. C'est d'ailleurs la raison pour laquelle nous avons mis sur pied le consortium au départ, pour assurer l'auditoire le plus grand aux débats. Nous sommes tous convaincus ici que des citoyens informés sauront faire des choix éclairés aux urnes, et nous sommes particulièrement fiers de cette responsabilité.

En 2011, le débat en anglais présenté par le consortium a été suivi par plus de 10 millions de Canadiens, soit 46 % de la population, et le débat en français, par quatre millions de Canadiens, soit 50 % de la population. En 2015, une structure différente, sans l'appui des réseaux de télévision nationaux, avait été proposée et adoptée. L'envergure des débats avait été de beaucoup réduite et malheureusement, les cotes d'écoute comparées aux exercices précédents ont plongé à des niveaux alarmants.

Vous pouvez vous interroger aujourd'hui sur la pertinence des réseaux de télévision à l'ère des médias sociaux et des services de diffusion en continu, mais on sait qu'ils sont d'une importance vitale. Nous pouvons faire la preuve avec des données objectives que les Canadiens regardent encore beaucoup la télévision, surtout les événements diffusés en direct. En fait, il suffit de regarder chez nos voisins du Sud, où les débats durant la campagne présidentielle de l'an dernier ont attiré 259 millions de téléspectateurs, un record d'écoute.

Des voix se sont élevées pour réclamer que les débats soient traités comme un simple exercice démocratique pouvant se passer de l'intégrité journalistique que des médias établis et dont la crédibilité était reconnue offrent aux Canadiens chaque jour. Ne vaudrait-il pas mieux, en fait, viser à combiner démocratie et intégrité? Le consortium des télédiffuseurs repose sur les principes journalistiques défendus par ses membres et met à profit leur vaste expérience. Ensemble, nous possédons le savoir-faire en journalisme, en diffusion et en production numérique nécessaire pour offrir des débats de la meilleure tenue possible, pour refléter les enjeux de la politique canadienne dans une formule capable de maximiser les auditoires.

Les débats des chefs, lorsqu'ils sont bien menés, sont un des points culminants de notre processus démocratique. À l'ère des fausses nouvelles, il est encore plus important qu'ils soient cautionnés par l'intégrité journalistique. Les électeurs ne devraient pas être obligés de compter sur des sources d'information indirectes comme des extraits de faits saillants ou des clips pris hors contexte ou par des campagnes orchestrées de fausses nouvelles.

Comme mes collègues l'ont mentionné avant moi, il faudra répondre à plusieurs questions. Par exemple, comment joindre le plus grand nombre de Canadiens possible? Comment offrir une expérience de la plus grande qualité qui soit, de manière objective et selon des principes journalistiques reconnus, pour mobiliser les électeurs et maximiser les auditoires? Comment dépolitiser le processus des débats sans réduire le nombre de débats?

Comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, c'est en maximisant la portée de notre couverture et en assurant sa crédibilité que nous pourrons le mieux servir la démocratie. En 2015, des millions de Canadiens ont manqué la diffusion des débats. Nous devons aux Canadiens de faire mieux. Ensemble, nous pouvons trouver des solutions pour renforcer le processus démocratique, et nous sommes déterminés à travailler en ce sens.

Merci de votre attention. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

(1120)

Le président:

Merci à tous.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions, en alternant entre les radiodiffuseurs.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

J'étais météorologue, alors ce n'était pas tout à fait pareil. Bref, je m'en tiendrai à cela.

M. David Christopherson:

Faux temps.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, je n'avais même pas à avoir raison. Beau métier.

Tout allait très bien jusqu'au paradigme que vous avez décrit ici.

Monsieur Reeb, je comprends ce que vous dites quant à la forme de ce genre d’événement. Un débat des dirigeants de la Chambre de commerce de l'île Fogo n'a pas le même impact que ce que vous faites. Je comprends cela. Les principes journalistiques, les lumières, les décors, le tournage, tout cela je le comprends. Les choses vont plutôt bien depuis le débat de 1968. Cela étant, les choses ont mal tourné pour le dernier. Nous avons tous des plateformes, et il y a maintenant des têtes d’affiche importantes qui disent ne pas vouloir tenir de débat, ou en vouloir, mais qui veulent décider de qui peut participer, par exemple.

J'ai deux questions. D’abord, que dites-vous du chef d'un parti national qui ne veut pas participer à ce que vous proposez? Devrait-il y avoir des sanctions en cas de non participation à ce débat, laquelle serait obligatoire?

Deuxièmement, je veux revenir sur le paradigme que vous avez décrit. Nous sommes ici pour voir si nous pouvons confier l’articulation de ce paradigme à un organisme officiel qui ferait ce que le Parlement a estimé. Comment voyez-vous la chose?

Excusez-moi pour ces deux questions, mais je veux que vous vous prononciez tous à ce sujet.

Nous allons peut-être commencer par vous, monsieur Reeb.

M. Troy Reeb:

Merci. Vous avez bien fait cela, malgré l’absence d’écran vert derrière vous.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Troy Reeb:La question est intéressante. Le consortium a déjà essuyé son lot de critiques en raison des nombreuses discussions qui se tenaient derrière des portes closes, à huis clos.

Les membres de ce comité savent que les pourparlers qui se déroulent à huis clos sur des sujets délicats sont différents des pourparlers qui se déroulent devant les caméras. En notre qualité de journalistes et de dirigeants d’organes de presse, nous voyons d’un très bon oeil le fait de rendre plus transparentes les discussions qui mènent à un débat.

Malheureusement, plus ces pourparlers deviennent politisés, plus il est difficile d’en arriver à un consensus sur la manière dont un débat peut se dérouler. Si nous remontons à ce qui s'est passé en 2015, la discussion s’est politisée très très tôt et, pour une raison ou pour une autre, un parti en particulier a décidé qu'il avait avantage à continuer de monter les organes de presse les uns contre les autres. Nous avons vu ce que cela a donné, et les Canadiens n'ont pas été aussi bien servis par le débat.

Je ne pense pas que ce soit à moi — ni à personne d’autre dans ce groupe de témoins — de suggérer si des amendes doivent être imposées à ceux qui ne participent pas au débat. Il reviendrait assurément au comité de décider cela. La difficulté a toujours consisté à favoriser la participation, en particulier lorsqu'un parti ou un chef estime que le débat ne tournera pas en sa faveur. C'est pourquoi il y a beaucoup de va-et-vient entre les représentants des partis pour essayer de trouver un format qui plaît à tous. Puisque c'est rarement le cas, le débat devient alors soumis à la pression du public. Le public s'attend à ce qu'il y ait un débat télévisé à grande échelle.

En conséquence, si quelqu'un ne veut pas participer, c'est la pression du public exercée sur ce chef qui a toujours fait office de mécanisme de reddition de comptes, mais ce mécanisme n’a clairement pas fonctionné la dernière fois.

M. Scott Simms:

Un podium vide constituerait donc une punition suffisante.

M. Troy Reeb:

Je suis désolé, mais ce n’est pas à moi de le dire.

M. Scott Simms:

Je comprends.

(1125)

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Le public est loin de se douter à quel point une grande partie du débat constitue un processus négocié. Des négociations ont lieu entre les membres du consortium des radiodiffuseurs, parce que nous sommes en concurrence et qu'il y a des compromis à faire pour que le débat puisse avoir lieu.

Il est certain que pour les partis, les négociations vont bien au-delà de ce que voit le public. Je veux dire, mon…

M. Scott Simms:

Désolé de vous interrompre, mais si une commission est mise en place pour faire tout cela, il n’y aura pas autant de négociation compte tenu des règles mises en place.

Êtes-vous d'accord?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Écoutez, CBC/Radio-Canada est le radiodiffuseur public. Nous sommes disposés à collaborer avec une commission indépendante si c'est ce que le Comité décide de faire. Nous tenons simplement à signaler qu'il ne s'agit pas seulement d'organiser un débat qui compte, mais aussi de faire participer les Canadiens.

En particulier dans ce climat d'information et de participation fragmentée aux médias, il est important de créer une expérience collective et une vaste mobilisation pour le débat, puisque le cadre qui est mis en place doit suivre le même rythme que la réalité politique, qui a elle-même évolué au fil du temps.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Madame Freeman.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Je suis d'accord avec mes collègues.

C'est une négociation, et elle varie aussi en fonction de l’état du monde. Des règles immuables ne fonctionnent pas toujours, compte tenu de ce qui se passe dans le domaine politique.

Encore une fois, je ne pense pas que ce soit à nous de décider des amendes à imposer. C'est le Comité qui a cette responsabilité.

M. Scott Simms:

Rapidement, aurais-je donc raison de dire que, dans le cas d'une commission mise sur pied —  qu'il s'agisse d'un commissaire, d’Élections Canada, etc. — une structure est mise en place pour proposer ce que vous faites? Verriez-vous pour cela une structure assez souple, c'est-à-dire toujours beaucoup de négociations, mais gérée par cette commission ou ce commissaire en particulier?

Madame McGuire.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Je parlerai au nom de la CBC, mais pas au nom des autres réseaux.

Nous appuierions sans réserve l’établissement d’une définition entourant une garantie de débat. Si vous regardez le consortium —  et j'en étais la présidente en 2015, contre vents et marées — la plupart de nos discussions visaient à faire en sorte que le débat ait lieu. Si cela était garanti, s'il y avait une certaine garantie quant au nombre de débats et à la participation, les journalistes auraient l'obligation de définir les enjeux et de créer cette indépendance autour de l'élément journalistique, en établissant un lien avec ce que nous estimons, par l’intermédiaire de nos reportages quotidiens, que les Canadiens veulent et dont ils se soucient.

M. Scott Simms:

Pouvons-nous aussi entendre les autres, si c'est possible?

Le président:

Michel Cormier.

M. Michel Cormier:

Je ferai écho au dernier point. Je pense qu'à des fins de crédibilité aux yeux du public, si une commission est mise sur pied, elle ne peut être perçue comme établissant toutes les règles et tous les thèmes et nous, les radiodiffuseurs, ne pouvons être perçus comme n'ayant d'autre rôle que la diffusion du débat. Le public doit être convaincu que nous avons un rôle indépendant à jouer dans la tenue de ces débats et dans leur concrétisation. Il ne saurait être question de miner la crédibilité de l'exercice en donnant l'impression qu'il est dirigé par les partis.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

La parole est maintenant à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci monsieur le président.

Je remercie également nos témoins. Je vous remercie d’être tous présents ici aujourd'hui.

Mardi, Paul Wells de Maclean's est venu nous dire que le premier débat, celui de Maclean's, a été offert à tous les grands radiodiffuseurs à un prix raisonnable et habituel. Pourquoi vos stations n’ont-elles pas diffusé ce débat?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Nous étions encore activement engagés dans des pourparlers et nous espérions toujours qu'il y aurait un débat en anglais. Nous avons vu des progrès du côté français, où aucun débat n'avait été offert au début du processus et où il y a en fin de compte eu un débat. Nous avons été convaincus, avec l'impact des premiers débats de portée relativement limitée, qu'il serait dans l'intérêt de tout le monde d’y arriver. Cela ne s’est pas concrétisé en bout de ligne, mais nous croyions que c'était encore possible, et c'est pourquoi nous n’avons pas diffusé ce débat.

M. John Nater:

Vous n'avez pas non plus diffusé les quatre autres débats. Pourquoi?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Nous étions encore activement en pourparlers avec le consortium de radiodiffuseurs pour qu'un débat ait lieu.

M. John Nater:

Même jusqu'au 2 octobre, quand le débat de TVA a été diffusé?

(1130)

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

Dans vos observations liminaires, madame McGuire, vous avez dit partager le même objectif que le Comité, à savoir trouver le moyen le plus efficace de fournir aux électeurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour faire des choix réfléchis et éclairés et pour faire participer les Canadiens au processus démocratique.

Comment faire participer les Canadiens au processus politique si la CBC diffuse Coronation Street ou Dragon's Den plutôt que l'un de ces cinq débats? En quoi est-ce dans l'intérêt public? Je sais qu’un grand nombre de Canadiens aiment Coronation Street. Je sais aussi que les gens adorent Dragon's Den. Un des dragons a même essayé de devenir notre chef. Mais en quoi est-il dans l'intérêt de la démocratie qu’en votre qualité de radiodiffuseur national, vous refusiez de diffuser l'un de ces cinq débats?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Nous avons diffusé le débat. Cela a été fait par le consortium.

M. John Nater:

Non, vous l'avez diffusé sur la chaîne d'information.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

C'est exact, et notre couverture électorale ne se limite pas seulement aux débats. Je pense que si vous analysiez le contenu de la couverture des élections par la CBC, vous constateriez que les Canadiens ont été très bien servis avec beaucoup de contenu sur la campagne.

M. John Nater:

D'accord.

Je vais passer à CTV. Dans vos observations liminaires, madame Freeman, vous avez dit: « Nous croyons servir efficacement la démocratie en exposant le plus grand nombre de Canadiens possible aux débats où les chefs s'affrontent sur les questions fondamentales pour notre nation durant les campagnes électorales. »

Pourtant, CTV a jugé bon de diffuser des reprises de The Big Bang Theory, The Goldbergs, Saving Hope et Gotham. Je sais que le ministre des Finances a peut-être pris cela à cœur, et cela part de son complexe Bruce Wayne, mais en quoi est-il utile de diffuser ces émissions américaines au moment où nous offrions cinq débats aux Canadiens et où votre réseau a refusé de les diffuser tous? En quoi cela sert-il les intérêts des Canadiens?

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Nous attendions dans l'espoir qu’il y ait un débat en anglais, que nous aurions diffusé sur le réseau principal. Cela ne s’est toutefois pas produit. Nous l'avions toujours espéré. Nous avons présenté le débat en français sur notre chaîne d'information, et nous l'avons diffusé en direct.

M. John Nater:

Encore une fois, c'était sur votre chaîne d'information. Pourquoi pas sur le réseau principal?

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Nous avions décidé de ne pas diffuser ces débats. Nous attendions dans l’espoir d’un débat en anglais.

Encore une fois, comme ma collègue l’a dit tout à l'heure, il y avait certaines valeurs de production et de journalisme en jeu. Nous voulions présenter notre débat et, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous avons présenté le débat en français sur notre chaîne d'information. Nous l'avons diffusé en direct, et nous espérions qu’il y aurait un débat en anglais qui aurait une grande portée et qui serait diffusé sur nos principaux réseaux.

M. John Nater:

Le consortium agit comme un enfant dans la cour d'école. S’il n’obtient pas ce qu’il veut, il ne joue pas.

M. Troy Reeb:

J’aimerais répondre à cela.

Tout d'abord, je suppose que vous ne préconisez pas que la présentation du produit d'une autre entreprise soit imposée à un radiodiffuseur privé.

Le fait est que, dans le cadre du consortium, il y a eu une négociation non seulement avec les partis, mais aussi entre les réseaux. Nous sommes responsables de ce qui est diffusé sur nos ondes, non seulement sous l’angle des normes de diffusion à observer, mais aussi en ce qui a trait au respect des normes de nos principes et pratiques journalistiques. Lorsque nous organisons le débat avec les autres membres du consortium, ces principes et pratiques journalistiques sont respectés. Nous participons à la production de ce débat. Nous n’allons pas nous contenter de prendre un produit qui nous arrive tout prêt et le mettre en ondes quand nous en sommes responsables, et certainement pas faire de la publicité gratuite au magazine Maclean's partout sur le plateau.

En mettant de côté les autres problèmes, je peux parler très précisément au nom de Corus et au nom du radiodiffuseur privé, qu’il ne saurait être question à l’heure actuelle de nous imposer un produit.

M. John Nater:

J'espère que vous n'insinuez pas par là que les normes journalistiques de Paul Wells ne sont pas à la hauteur.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Non, mais nous...

M. Troy Reeb:

Je n'insinue rien du tout, mais je n'ai aucune idée du genre d'entente que Rogers Communications a pu conclure pour pouvoir présenter ce débat. Ils étaient les producteurs du débat en coulisses. Nous avons su, comme membres du consortium, qu'un parti en particulier exigeait des conditions très favorables pour participer aux débats.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

C'était l’autre point que je voulais soulever. Les négociations entourant le débat ne portent pas seulement sur le moment et l'endroit où il se produit, mais aussi sur le format sous lequel il se présente, sur le type de contenu. Tout cela fait partie des pourparlers. Comme organes de presse, nous n’avons eu aucun mot à dire.

M. John Nater:

Il a notamment été suggéré d’accorder à CPAC l’autorisation de produire et de diffuser les débats, puis de diffuser obligatoirement les débats sur les chaînes principales. Seriez-vous d’accord pour que CPAC produise et diffuse les débats et que vous les retransmettiez moyennant des droits raisonnables?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Nous sommes prêts à examiner tous les scénarios possibles. Pour vous donner une petite idée du coût de la production d'un débat de qualité, ce coût s’est chiffré en 2011 à environ 250 000 $, sans compter les revenus des publicités déplacées sur tous les réseaux ayant remplacé d'autres émissions, c'est-à-dire des émissions commerciales, pour diffuser les débats.

Encore une fois, ce que je veux dire, c'est que nous sommes prêts à tout envisager pour l’avenir. Nous sommes ici pour participer au processus, mais en fin de compte, il y a deux problèmes. Premièrement, comment faire en sorte qu’ils se concrétisent? Deuxièmement, comment faire en sorte que les Canadiens y participent?

À notre avis, ces deux aspects sont importants.

(1135)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Avant de céder la parole à M. Christopherson, pour que les deux groupes de témoins ici présents le sachent, nous prolongeons la séance de cinq minutes pour qu'Elizabeth May puisse participer. Ensuite, notre deuxième groupe aura environ 10 minutes de plus par rapport à la durée prévue.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Parfait. Merci beaucoup monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d'être venus. Je commencerai par dire qu'il est agréable de voir l'équilibre entre les sexes. C'est très bien.

Cela dit, puisque vous êtes tous des journalistes ou des représentants d’organes de presse, je dois vous dire qu'à la fin de vos présentations, la seule phrase qui m’est venue à l’esprit a été: « Quoi de neuf? »... Vous, madame Freeman, avez dit que vous étiez prête à collaborer avec une commission ou avec des commissaires indépendants. J'ai entendu le message collectif selon lequel la méthode du consortium est une bonne idée. Vous estimez que cette méthode est saine.

Nous avons tous entendu en détail comment le processus a lamentablement échoué la dernière fois. Je dois dire que c'est ce qui me motive vraiment cette fois-ci. Quand l'idée a été soumise initialement, après avoir vu ce qui s'était passé la dernière fois et avoir trouvé cela complètement fou. Je ne sais pas non plus dans quelle mesure mon parti en a été responsable. C’est une honte pour tout le monde. Nous avons laissé tomber les Canadiens et nous devons corriger le tir.

Après toute cette réflexion, que recommanderiez-vous? Si je comprends bien, vous garderiez l'idée du consortium? Cela ferait partie du débat principal. Je ne comprends pas très bien ce que vous nous pressez de faire.

Quel est votre point de vue? Vous avez dit être prête à collaborer avec une commission indépendante. Vous aimez cette idée? C'est ce que nous devrions faire selon vous? Recommandez-vous que nous restions à l'écart pour vous laisser continuer de faire comme vous avez fait auparavant, mais d’une meilleure façon? Que recommandez-vous exactement?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Nous aimons l'idée d'un débat garanti qui ne ferait pas partie du processus de négociation, et qui serait ouvert quant au moment et à l'endroit choisis. Nous estimons qu'il serait avantageux de faire participer les grands radiodiffuseurs à la définition de la production pour que le débat rejoigne un public plus large.

En ce qui concerne CPAC, l'impact de l'approche de production qui a été adoptée par l'entremise du consortium serait très avantageuse et aurait un plus grand impact. Cette approche permet de garantir la tenue du débat, mais elle laisse la production et le cadre journalistique aux organes de presse.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Cela ne veut pas dire que d'autres débats ne pourraient pas avoir lieu non plus. Il y aurait un grand débat en anglais que tous les Canadiens pourraient suivre, et beaucoup d'autres.

M. Troy Reeb:

Je vais répéter ce que j'ai dit dans mon témoignage, à savoir que plus il y a de débats, mieux c'est. Le processus de consortium n'aurait peut-être pas été nécessaire auparavant si les campagnes avaient duré plus longtemps et si les partis avaient été davantage disposés à participer à des débats plus médiatisés. Il serait formidable que chacun des réseaux ici présents et beaucoup d'autres organes de presse puissent organiser leurs propres débats, mais les membres des partis qui travaillent en coulisses n’aiment pas beaucoup l’idée de multiples débats. En conséquence, l’on s’est efforcé de se rassembler pour essayer d'en organiser un qui se démarque des autres. C'est ainsi qu’est né le processus de consortium.

Je ne parle qu’en notre nom, mais nous serions ravis d'organiser notre propre débat. Nous ne voulons toutefois pas nous lancer dans des batailles avec les autres réseaux pour savoir qui l'obtiendrait cette année ou l'année prochaine. Cela relancerait le processus du va-et-vient auprès des partis pour essayer d'obtenir leur faveur, et personne ne veut revenir à cela.

M. David Christopherson:

La principale question que nous devons nous poser consiste à déterminer s'il devrait y avoir une entité indépendante et, dans l'affirmative, à quoi elle devrait ressembler. J'ai encore un peu de difficulté à comprendre vos recommandations à cet égard. Je ne suis même pas sûr que vous en ayez parlé directement. J'essaie de comprendre votre message. Votre principal message consiste à préserver l'idée du consortium qu'il y ait deux grands débats dans les deux langues officielles.

Vous n'en avez vraiment pas dit beaucoup à savoir si cela devrait se faire dans le cadre d'une commission ou avec le directeur général des élections — ce qui serait très bien aussi. J'essaie simplement de comprendre votre message. Vous ne nous avez pas encore dit si vous souhaitez ou non l'existence éventuelle d'une entité indépendante. Dans l'affirmative, avez-vous une préférence quant à la forme que prendrait cette entité?

(1140)

M. Troy Reeb:

Encore une fois, je vais parler au nom de mon organisme, car je ne peux pas me faire le porte-parole de mes collègues. Nous préférons qu'on y aille aussi légèrement que possible. L'indépendance de notre organe d'information nous est sacro-sainte, et nous ne croyons pas, lorsqu’il s'agit des débats, qu'il serait utile d’avoir une lourde réglementation en vue d'imposer quelque chose.

Il pourrait être utile d’obliger à la participation. C'est quelque chose que nous…

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis de l’avis opposé. Je dois vous dire que ma réaction instinctive va dans le sens contraire. Si quelqu’un est assez bête pour refuser de participer à un débat hautement médiatisé, j'espère qu’il en paiera le prix. Pour ce qui est de réglementer…

M. Troy Reeb:

Certains diraient que cela arrive, mais…

M. David Christopherson:

… si nous n'intervenons pas, il y a de bonnes chances que nous nous retrouverons dans le même pétrin que la dernière fois. Toi et moi, nous nous connaissons depuis un bon moment, Troy. Je dois dire que, sur ce point, l'un de nous a forcément raison et l'autre tort. La suite le dira.

Est-ce qu’il y a quelqu'un d'autre?

M. Michel Cormier:

Je pense que le problème fondamental, c'est que nous n'avons pas le temps de négocier les modalités du débat. Nous devons négocier la tenue même du débat. Si le meilleur moyen d'obtenir, avant le déclenchement des élections, l'engagement de tous les partis de participer à un débat national passe par une sorte de cadre juridique…

M. David Christopherson:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompre pour m'assurer de vous avoir bien compris. Vous pensez qu’il serait possible que cela fonctionne utilement pour les Canadiens s'il y avait quelque obligation contraignant les gens à participer et leur interdisant l'option « Je ne jouerai pas ». Vous ai-je bien compris?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Oui. Si la tenue du débat était garantie, nous serions confiants de pouvoir en étendre la diffusion aux médias numériques. En 2015, nous avions Facebook, Google, YouTube et Twitter à bord, ce qui aurait permis une extension aux médias sociaux et numériques, mais cela n'a tout simplement pas eu la chance de se produire.

M. David Christopherson:

Permettez-moi de retourner la situation et de vous demander quelle serait votre préférence si nous décidions d’emprunter cette voie: une entité autonome ou une entité au sein d'Élections Canada? Est-il important pour vous que cette entité soit autonome ou qu'elle fasse partie d’Élections Canada? Avez-vous une préférence?

M. Michel Cormier:

Je ne sais pas. On n'a encore vu aucune proposition.

M. David Christopherson:

Parce qu'il n'y en a pas…

M. Michel Cormier:

Je le sais. C'est difficile de…

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous comprends. C’est ce que nous sommes en train de préparer. Je cherche à d'obtenir autant d’idées que possible de votre part. Vous jouez un grand rôle dans la pièce. Ce que vous pensez va enrichir notre réflexion, et c’est pourquoi je tente de vous donner toutes les occasions possibles d'influer sur le résultat. Saisissez-les.

M. Troy Reeb:

Si vous permettez… Que ce soit l'un ou l'autre, dans notre optique — et je crois maintenant parler au nom de mes collègues —, les médias voudraient avoir leur mot à dire. Il est important d'avoir… La CPAC a été mentionnée plus tôt. Elle diffuse tous les jours des débats animés à la télévision. Je vous montrerai les cotes d’écoute. Elles sont vraiment peu reluisantes. Cela s'explique par le fait que la CPAC transmet sur le vif les débats tels qu'ils se déroulent aux Communes ou, parfois, au sein de ses comités. Cependant, si ces débats étaient dirigés par un bon animateur, dans des conditions appropriées, et si l’instinct journalistique pouvait jouer pour faire en sorte que tous les points d’intérêt sont touchés, vous auriez alors de l’excellente télévision et vous établiriez le contact avec toutes sortes de Canadiens. Je pense que le rôle des médias est vraiment essentiel à cet égard.

Il est également essentiel de résoudre les questions d’horaire. Si un comité se contente de dire: « Nous allons tenir le débat mercredi soir à neuf heures », vous serez alors en concurrence avec Survivor. Même si vous ordonnez qu'il passe sur Global et que nous supprimons Survivor, cette émission sera quand même sur CBS et la tribu aura parlé avant la fin du débat. Il y a beaucoup de choses qui doivent être résolues.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Ainsi, je…

Le président:

Rapidement, je vous prie, parce que le temps est écoulé.

Je souhaite la bienvenue aux enfants qui sont présents. On adore voir des enfants ici.

Wendy, allez-y.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

J'allais simplement dire que nous voulons prendre part à toutes les décisions qui seront prises.

M. David Christopherson:

Tout compte fait, je ne peux pas m’imaginer que vous n’y soyez pas, je tiens à le dire.

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé. Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup pour les réponses. J'ai beaucoup apprécié. [Français]

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bittle, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie aussi tous ceux qui ont participé à la discussion aujourd'hui.

Plusieurs d'entre vous ont parlé de normes journalistiques. Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage sur ce que cela signifie pour vos organismes? Si vous aviez des exemples de non-respect de ces normes à l’occasion d'un débat, si vous pouviez peut-être nous les décrire, nous pourrions nous faire une meilleure idée de ce à quoi vous vous référez.

(1145)

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Les normes journalistiques comprennent la définition des sujets qui seront discutés, la définition de la façon dont le débat se déroulera compte tenu du format retenu et la possibilité pour un journaliste de poser des questions de suivi dans le contexte des enjeux d'actualité dans le but, encore une fois, d’aller au-delà des discours préparés et de susciter des échanges autour des enjeux. Vous voulez que l’animateur du débat couvre les enjeux. Il faut que ce soit quelqu'un qui connaît les enjeux, qui peut y participer et qui peut, au besoin, assurer les embrayages et rappeler les gens à la réalité.

Vous voulez vous assurer, dans la préparation du débat, que seront abordées les questions qui vous semblent, dans le contexte de la campagne, importer vraiment aux Canadiens.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Le rôle de l’animateur est un bon exemple. Il faut que ce soit quelqu'un qui suit l’actualité politique et qui comprend vraiment les enjeux de l'heure. De plus, même dans la production, la responsabilité journalistique est engagée, dans les plans de prises de vue, les décors, etc.

M. Chris Bittle:

J’ai une question précise. Je sais que nous n'avons pas encore proposé un cadre, mais, hypothétiquement, si un cadre et un commissaire indépendant étaient proposés, sur l'avis ou avec la participation des radiodiffuseurs, ceux-ci accepteraient-ils une modification de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion les obligeant à diffuser le débat si celui-ci était approuvé par un commissaire indépendant, conseillé par les radiodiffuseurs?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Il ne fait aucun doute que CBC y serait, quel que soit le scénario. Je dirais que, pour ce qui est de la confiance du public, le fait que nous soyons indépendants, le fait que ce soient les journalistes qui définissent les enjeux, influeront sur la résonance qu’aura le débat.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Je pense que nous ne devrions jamais être forcés de faire quelque chose que nous ferions normalement. Nous avons toujours tenu des débats dans le passé et nous comptons en tenir à l’avenir.

M. Troy Reeb:

Je ne veux pas donner l’impression que je réponds à votre question par une autre question, mais quelle serait la portée de la modification à apporter à la Loi sur la radiodiffusion? Il y a plus de 300 stations autorisées dans ce pays. Pour dire les choses clairement, chez Global, nos stations locales ne sont pas tenues de couvrir l’actualité nationale. Nous n'avons pas le mandat de faire un téléjournal national. Nous sommes des stations locales. C’est volontairement que nous diffusons une émission d'information nationale et que nous avons établi un bureau sur la Colline du Parlement pour couvrir les affaires nationales.

Le réseau Global serait-il pénalisé en matière de réglementation du fait d’avoir consenti dans le passé, de son propre mouvement, à faire ce qui lui semblait indiqué? Pourquoi ne pas ordonner que le débat soit diffusé sur TSN, sur Food Network ou sur la myriade d'autres stations en activité, ou encore sur Netflix, YouTube ou Facebook? Où est-ce que cela mène? Même dans l'espace télévisuel classique, il y a de nombreux radiodiffuseurs en direct qui n'ont pas diffusé les débats dans le passé et qui ont choisi de ne pas se doter des moyens de couverture de l’actualité nationale.

Je pense que nous serions très réfractaires à une mesure de ce genre. Sans avoir consulté mon équipe chargée des questions de réglementation, je ne peux pas affirmer catégoriquement que nous ne l'accepterions pas, mais je dirais que nous serions très réfractaires à un tel changement.

M. Chris Bittle:

À mon avis, il est clair que l’absence de débats à l'échelle nationale serait inacceptable pour les Canadiens. Je sais que M. Reeb a parlé de la brièveté habituelle de la période électorale. Par ailleurs, à partir de quel point les débats seraient-ils trop nombreux? Existe-t-il un nombre idéal, un en anglais et un en français? Devrait-il y en avoir plus?

Comment faut-il considérer l'ensemble des téléspectateurs canadiens, pour peu que l’on se propose d’atteindre autant de gens que possible et de tenir compte des intérêts du public?

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Il faut absolument qu’il y ait un débat en anglais et un en français. Je me rappelle qu’une année nous en avons eu deux en français et deux en anglais. Je ne me souviens pas de l'époque, mais il nous faut absolument en avoir au moins un dans chaque langue.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

L'avantage d'en avoir plus, c'est que vous pouvez circonscrire plus étroitement les sujets à débattre, mais leur impact sera amoindri. Quant à en avoir trop, n’oublions pas que la période électorale est relativement courte.

M. Chris Bittle:

Est-ce qu'un commissaire devrait se pencher sur le moment de tenir le débat? Faut-il en discuter? Les réseaux ont-ils une opinion à ce sujet? Y a-t-il un moment plus propice — vers la fin de la campagne électorale ou au milieu —, ou est-il préférable d'avoir, comme certains l'ont suggéré, un organisme plus souple agile qui ne s'en mêle pas vraiment et de se montrer, en tant que parlementaires, trop prescriptifs à l’endroit d’un tel commissaire indépendant?

(1150)

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Il est certain que nous préconiserions que le débat ait lieu une fois que la campagne électorale est bien engagée. À notre avis, l’intérêt des Canadiens est plus vif et ils se sentent davantage engagés à partir du milieu de la campagne. Cependant, je pense que cela devrait être négocié avec les réseaux.

Comme l'a dit Troy, même pour nous, il y a une négociation qui se poursuit avec nos propres réseaux en vue d’obtenir un positionnement avantageux, mais il y a des conséquences financières pour nous tous du fait que notre programmation est perturbée. Il y a aussi une négociation entre les réseaux.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé. Je vous remercie infiniment.

Le président:

Je laisse la parole à Mme May, pour cinq minutes.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie aussi mes collègues autour de la table de m’avoir accordé le droit de m'asseoir ici, bien que je ne sois pas nécessairement autorisée à prendre la parole sans leur consentement.

Je suis depuis longtemps en relation avec le consortium. En fait, la première et unique rencontre en personne que j'ai eue avec le consortium remonte à 2007; mon expérience s’étend donc sur une dizaine d’années. Je dois dire qu'au cours de cette période, j'ai eu l'impression que beaucoup de membres du consortium considéraient cette tâche comme ingrate. Je pense que votre comparution ici aujourd'hui montre à quel point elle est ingrate, mais je tiens à vous remercier, même si mon expérience a été plutôt désagréable.

Je voudrais parler du récit qui semble se dégager aujourd'hui, à savoir que les débats se sont tous très bien déroulés entre la fin des années 1960 et 2015. Ne serait-ce qu’en raison de son intérêt historique, je pense que vous vous rappelez l'éditorial de Tony Burman. Tony Burman, qui était le chef de service de CBC News et qui a présidé le consortium entre 2000 et 2007, a publié son éditorial dans The Globe and Mail sous le titre « The election debate process is a sham ». Dès la première ligne, il a abattu ses cartes: Le refus du premier ministre Harper d'autoriser le chef du Parti vert à participer aux débats électoraux fédéraux est cynique et intéressé, mais il révèle au moins l'imposture qu’est devenu le processus de débat électoral du Canada.

Cet éditorial a paru en mars 2009. Ce dont il est question, c’est, bien entendu, que: Le CRTC et les tribunaux fédéraux ont réaffirmé le droit des réseaux de « produire » cette émission par eux-mêmes, sans ingérence extérieure. Et c'est certainement ce que font valoir les porte-parole des réseaux, moi-même compris pendant les sept années où je présidais le « consortium ». Mais en réalité, le gouvernement peut exercer un veto, puisque sans la participation du premier ministre, le débat n'aura pas lieu.

Jusqu' à présent aujourd'hui, nous avons évité cette question.

Pour faire un retour en arrière, je rappellerai que j'ai pu participer à des débats et que je n’ai pas pu participer à des débats, qu’il y a eu des changements de règles, que des débats ont été annulés, et ainsi de suite, pendant une décennie. Je me demande simplement si vous êtes d'accord avec Tony Burman pour dire que les partis négocient, mais que les grands partis ont systématiquement exclu les petits partis de la salle où se déroulaient les négociations.

M. Troy Reeb:

Je dirai tout d'abord que je ne suis pas entièrement en désaccord avec les observations de M. Burman à ce sujet. J'ai participé à beaucoup de négociations entourant la tenue de débats, non seulement au niveau fédéral, mais aussi au niveau provincial. Je dirais que le parti qui est en tête du peloton pendant la campagne a le gros bout du bâton quand il s’agit d’accepter ou non de se présenter à la table, ou qu’il a l'impression de tenir le gros bout du bâton parce que sa participation est essentielle. C’est lui qui va monter ou baisser dans les sondages à la suite du débat et c’est pourquoi il utilise son bâton du mieux qu’il le peut.

Pour ce qui est de l'exclusion des petits partis, il ne s'agit pas simplement d'une décision des partis concernés. C'est aussi notre décision, nous qui avons parfois cherché à exclure les petits partis. Nous voulons des débats qui passent bien à la télévision. Nous ne voulons pas de débats qui se transforment en cacophonie d'arguments. Nous voulons des débats simples à comprendre pour le spectateur. Nous comprenons que nous avons des obligations quant à la façon dont nous couvrons les nouvelles et nous voulons nous assurer d’accorder une couverture adéquate aux petits partis ailleurs que dans les débats.

Cependant, je ne dirais pas que la décision d’exclure les petits partis est attribuable uniquement aux grands partis. Mais ils y sont certainement pour quelque chose.

(1155)

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je suis désolée de devoir changer de vitesse. Il me reste une minute.

Il y a une chose que j'ai observée au fil des ans. C'est le fait de participer aux débats qui dicte aussi la couverture médiatique de ces partis. Au début, apparaissent à l’écran les bandes en couleur des cinq partis, et quand le Bloc québécois ou le Parti vert sont soudainement exclus, on ne voit que les couleurs des trois grands partis.

Auriez-vous des réflexions à faire au sujet de la couverture médiatique en rapport avec la participation au débat?

M. Troy Reeb:

Je m’en garderai bien. Je ne suis pas ici pour justifier notre couverture médiatique. Je serai heureux de parler de la participation au débat.

M. Michel Cormier:

Mais nous avons des critères pour permettre aux partis, et je pense que c'est pour cela que Radio-Canada doit être… Nous n’avons pas parlé du marché francophone, qui est très différent. Il y a TVA, qui est un réseau essentiellement québécois, et Radio-Canada, qui est plutôt un diffuseur national.

Dans le débat que nous avons tenu, nous avons inclus le Parti vert. Bien que beaucoup de gens nous aient dit qu'il était suicidaire de le faire, nous pensions que cela donnerait lieu à un meilleur débat. L’éventail des vues exprimées était plus large, et les cotes d’écoute étaient au rendez-vous.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Nous surveillons de près l’ensemble de notre couverture des élections, et je ne pense pas que ce soient là des thèmes qui ont suscité l’attention.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous revenons maintenant à M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie encore une fois de me donner l'occasion de poser quelques questions.

J'aimerais revenir à une question que M. Bittle a posée. En réponse, nos témoins ont formulé quelques observations générales sur les normes journalistiques et les valeurs ayant présidé à la production des débats qui ont eu lieu. Je voudrais un plus haut niveau de spécificité.

J'aimerais donner à chacun d'entre vous l'occasion de me dire exactement quelles étaient vos préoccupations quant aux normes journalistiques des animateurs, tels que Paul Wells, David Walmsley, Rudyard Griffiths et Pierre Bruneau. Quel problème les normes journalistiques de ces animateurs ont-elles posé dans les débats?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Je ne pense pas qu'il soit juste de commenter la façon dont David Walmsley a agi dans son rôle d’animateur ou la crédibilité journalistique de Paul Wells…

M. John Nater:

Mais vous l'avez fait…

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

… qui est manifestement un journaliste très compétent. Je pense que notre objectif est de faire avancer le processus. Nous pouvons discuter pendant des heures de ce qui s'est passé en 2015, mais l'objectif visé, il nous semble, est d’apporter des idées pour faire avancer ce processus.

Ce que j’affirmerai au nom de CBC/Radio-Canada, c’est que nous connaissons la nature des discussions qui ont eu lieu dans les négociations en vue de la tenue d'un débat. Nous savons qu’elles impliquent de choisir ceux qui seront admis à participer au débat. Nous savons qu’elles portent aussi sur le format, les lieux, les dates, les thèmes, du débat. Pour nous, le fait de ne pas participer à ces discussions dans d'autres types de contextes constitue un problème pour ce qui est d’offrir la mise en ondes. Pour nous, il ne s’agit pas d’une publicité ou d’une annonce politique, mais d’un exercice de journalisme. S’il change, le cadrage changera également pour nous.

Nous tenons absolument à jouer un rôle, mais, dans l'état actuel des choses, force nous est de considérer cela comme un exercice journalistique. Tout comme, en tant qu’organe d'information, nous ne rediffuserions pas un contenu que nous n'avons pas vérifié, nous appliquons la même approche quand il s’agit de comprendre les compromis qui sont faits pour garantir la tenue d’un débat.

M. John Nater:

Madame Freeman, je vois que vous voulez répondre.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Je suis d'accord avec ma collègue. Nous voulons aller de l'avant.

Je ne vais pas discuter de ce qu'ils ont fait, des animateurs et de tout cela. Il s'agit de trouver une solution. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici aujourd'hui, pour trouver une solution, pour regarder devant nous, non derrière.

Les Canadiens n'ont pas été bien servis, et il s'agit de servir le Canada à l'avenir et de regarder vers l'avenir.

M. John Nater:

Vous dites que les Canadiens n'ont pas été bien servis, mais vous refusez de dire exactement où l'échec s'est produit dans les quatre autres débats. Vous refusez de me dire où les animateurs n'ont pas été à la hauteur. Vous refusez de me dire cela. Vous dites que seul le consortium devrait présenter le grand débat national. Vous refusez de dire exactement où ces soi-disant échecs journalistiques sont survenus et où se situe le problème, mais vous n'hésitez pas à recourir aux calomnies au soutien de vos dires.

Mon deuxième point concerne les valeurs de la production, et je vais vous donner l'occasion...

Dans chacun de ces quatre débats que le consortium n'a pas présentés, dites-moi exactement ce que vous auriez changé au niveau de la production? Quelles étaient vos préoccupations au sujet de la production de ces débats? Était-ce les angles de caméra?

M. Troy Reeb:

Si vous voulez ma réponse...

M. John Nater: Je vous en prie.

M. Troy Reeb: ... il y avait beaucoup à critiquer dans la production de plusieurs de ces débats.

Mais, essentiellement, je ne vais pas appuyer sur le bouton et mettre sur notre réseau un produit que nous connaissons mal. Si un passant dans la rue vous remet un sandwich, vous aurez beau avoir faim, vous n'en prendrez probablement pas une bouchée si c’est un étrange sandwich qui vous tombe tout à coup entre les mains.

C’est le choix qu’on nous offrait: essentiellement appuyer sur le bouton et prendre un produit du centre Munk ou de Rogers — « Allez donc, mettez ceci en ondes » — pour lequel nous avons des comptes à rendre.

Nous rendons compte au Conseil canadien des normes de radiodiffusion, au CRTC. Nous ne sommes pas prêts à le faire. Nous n’étions pas prêts à le faire à ce moment-là. Je ne serais pas nécessairement prêt à le faire si c’était Radio-Canada qui offrait son propre produit également.

Nous voulons avoir notre mot à dire et comprendre ce que sera le produit.

(1200)

M. John Nater:

Donc, vous voulez avoir le contrôle.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Soyons clairs: en 2015, la justification était que nous étions encore en pleine conversation, et nous avions bon espoir d'avoir un débat.

M. John Nater:

En tant que diffuseur national, vous auriez eu du mal à diffuser plus d’un débat...

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Non. De fait, en 2015, nous en proposions quatre.

M. John Nater:

Mais seulement les vôtres, ceux du consortium.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Nous avions organisé un consortium pour rejoindre le plus grand nombre possible de Canadiens et répartir nos coûts de production.

M. John Nater:

Justement, pourriez-vous me dire combien vous avez eu d'auditeurs en ligne?

Le président:

En 10 secondes ou moins...

M. John Nater:

Cela ne prendra que 10 secondes.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

À l'heure actuelle, la SRC...

M. John Nater:

Non, non, les auditeurs du débat que vous avez diffusé en ligne.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Il faudra que je trouve ce chiffre. Je ne l'ai pas sous la main.

M. John Nater:

Pourriez-vous le fournir au greffier?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Oui.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Nater.

Notre dernière intervenante est Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais partager mon temps avec Mme Sahota. Nous avons toutes deux des questions à poser aux témoins.

Je tiens à vous remercier de votre présence et de votre contribution. J'y ai trouvé grand profit. Je vous remercie de vos commentaires sur l’excellence du produit, et je suis d’accord avec vous. Je pense que nous allons mobiliser davantage de Canadiens en leur proposant un excellent produit. Je sais que vous y avez consacré beaucoup de temps et d’efforts.

Quant à la raison pour laquelle nous sommes là aujourd’hui — je crois, Wendy, que vous en avez parlé pour chercher une solution —, j’ai une question à deux volets. Premièrement, nous essayons de présenter un excellent produit pour éclairer et mobiliser les électeurs. Pensez-vous que la création d’une commission ou la nomination d’un commissaire nous aidera à atteindre l'objectif?

Deuxièmement, quels conseils nous donneriez-vous sur la façon d’aller de l’avant pour établir le cadre dans lequel vous continuerez de contribuer à l’excellence du produit que vous proposez, jusqu'au point où nous sommes en mesure de présenter d’excellents produits à la fin, avec le rôle d’un commissaire si vous pensez que c’est la chose à faire?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Je privilégierais la souplesse.

Je vous dirai que, même dans la perspective du radiodiffuseur, nous offrons un produit de télévision et le distribuons numériquement, mais ce n’est plus la réalité de la façon dont le contenu est consommé. De plus en plus, nous nous dirigeons vers l’interactivité dans les espaces numérique et social. Quel est le modèle de production et comment pourrait-on en donner une définition fixe...? Je ne sais pas comment faire quelque chose qui sera pertinent dans 5 ou 10 ans, vu que le mode de consommation du contenu change à une vitesse folle.

C’est pourquoi nous disons que ceux qui ont l’expertise de la production et qui sont actifs dans ces espaces devraient aider à définir la nature du produit qui est créé, et que l’indépendance journalistique déterminera si les gens y font confiance ou pas. Nous le savons.

Nous sommes tout à fait en faveur d’une garantie d’accès. Travaillerions-nous avec une commission indépendante? Absolument, oui. La SRC estime-t-elle avoir un rôle à jouer à cet égard? Oui, comme je suis sûre que les autres radiodiffuseurs le diront également.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Voyez-vous quand même cela comme un consortium, où vous vous réunissez pour brasser des idées, avant de les présenter au commissaire? Pensez-vous que c’est un pas dans la bonne direction?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

À mon avis, c'est le Comité qui devrait établir les conditions de la tenue d’un débat, après quoi nous chercherons le meilleur moyen de rejoindre les Canadiens.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Rapidement, compte tenu du peu de temps qu'il me reste, d’après les témoignages que nous avons déjà entendus, c'est non seulement une commission ou un commissaire qui pourrait jouer ce rôle, mais ce pourrait être l'arbitre. Qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Troy Reeb:

Parlez-vous du CRTC ou...?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je ne sais pas vraiment de quoi ils parlaient, mais ils ont dit qu’il y a un arbitre qui pourrait jouer ce rôle, pour éviter les désaccords qui ont surgi la dernière fois.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Parlez-vous du CRTC, ou...?

(1205)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que oui.

Le président:

Je pense que l'arbitre, c’est Élections Canada.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est juste. Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Élections Canada, dans son rôle d’arbitre, décide de la façon de diffuser la publicité en campagne électorale. C'est de cet arbitre qu'on parlait. Pensez-vous qu’il pourrait jouer ce rôle?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Il faudrait que j’y réfléchisse un peu plus, avant de dire quel est l'endroit idéal. Encore une fois, je pense qu'il faudrait une conversation active sur la façon dont cela se produit et la façon dont c'est diffusé, afin d'arrêter un positionnement ayant plus d'impact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Vous disiez que vous aimeriez obliger les chefs, mais vous refusez de dire quelle serait la nature des sanctions applicables ou comment nous les motiverons. Qu’est-ce qui empêche des entreprises comme YouTube de présenter leur propre débat et peut-être les chefs de prendre part au débat s’ils y voient un grand intérêt public? Même si demain nous avons un commissaire qui dit: « Nous imposons ces quatre débats. Ce sont les débats officiels », qu’est-ce qui empêchera YouTube de nous damer le pion avec un grand débat? Qui va contrôler cela? Que pouvons-nous y faire?

M. Troy Reeb:

Honnêtement, personne que je sache; et j'espère que YouTube essaie d'en présenter un. Je l’ai dit tantôt, plus il y a de débats, mieux c’est. Les Canadiens méritent d’entendre leurs futurs dirigeants sur les plateformes de leur choix. Dans l’ensemble, la plus grande plateforme reste la télévision, surtout pour le direct.

La distinction entre radiodiffuseurs et organismes de presse est primordiale ici. Il s’agit d'organiser un débat encadré par un organisme de presse, de sorte qu'il y ait une histoire à raconter pour intéresser les Canadiens et que le débat soit structuré ainsi.

Je ne pense pas qu'il devrait y avoir quoi que ce soit pour restreindre la possibilité de proposer des débats.

Mme Wendy Freeman:

Il importe aussi de savoir que YouTube n'a pas de journalistes. YouTube est un distributeur. Il n'a pas d'experts en production. Il n'a pas de journalistes. Je ne vois pas trop à qui il confierait l'animation d'un débat. YouTube est un distributeur de vidéos.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis sûre que bien du monde accepterait de se manifester, mais je me demande simplement comment nous pouvons contrôler cela et si nous le faisons. J’ai aimé la réponse.

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Les acteurs des grands réseaux sociaux numériques étaient tout à fait engagés et prêts à participer au consortium lors des dernières négociations. Le consortium peut-il être différent de ces quatre personnes? C’est tout à fait possible et c'est ainsi que cela devrait être. Il faut élargir cela, particulièrement si l'on veut rejoindre les milléniaux et les jeunes qui ne consomment leur contenu que par un canal numérique.

Le président:

Merci.

Si le Comité est d'accord, j'aimerais poser une brève question.

S’il y a une commission ou un commissaire indépendant, pensez-vous que les radiodiffuseurs — comme vous avez semblé le dire dans votre exposé — devraient avoir leur mot à dire sur les sujets et les thèmes à débattre pour qu'ils soient plus sensationnels ou qu’ils créent plus de publicité, plutôt qu’un commissaire indépendant qui préférerait quelque chose qui soit davantage dans l’intérêt public?

Mme Jennifer McGuire:

Pour nous, le choix des sujets ou le désir de parler au nom des Canadiens et de défendre l'intérêt des Canadiens est un exercice journalistique. La préoccupation qui marque chaque campagne n'est plus la même, si bien que c'est pour essayer de protéger cette indépendance, peu importe le cadre de l’exercice.

M. Troy Reeb:

Pour être clair, monsieur le président, depuis que je m'en occupe, les débats se sont toujours déroulés sans messages publicitaires; ce n’est pas comme s’il y avait un avantage publicitaire de ce côté-là.

Le président:

Super.

Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants de votre présence chez nous. Je sais que vous êtes tous très occupés, et il est très utile d'aller directement au coeur de vos intérêts. Cela éclairera certainement nos délibérations.

Nous allons faire une pause de quelques minutes, le temps de laisser le nouveau groupe de témoins s'installer.

(1205)

(1210)

Le président:

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la reprise de la 82e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous reprenons l'étude de la création d’un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir les témoins suivants. Pour Élections Canada, Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections par intérim, et Anne Lawson, avocate générale et directrice principale, Services juridiques. Ils font presque partie du Comité, car nous les voyons toujours ici. Nous sommes heureux de vous revoir.

Pour le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes, nous avons Michael Craig, gestionnaire, Télévision anglaise et de tierce langue, et Peter McCallum, avocat général, Droit et communications.

Nous pourrions peut-être commencer par Élections Canada. [Français]

M. Stéphane Perrault (directeur général des élections par intérim, Élections Canada):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux d'appuyer le Comité dans son étude sur la création d'une commission indépendante chargée des débats des chefs.

J'ai suivi les travaux du Comité et je suis heureux de vous présenter aujourd'hui le point de vue d'Élections Canada. Je vais parler brièvement des objectifs qui, selon moi, devraient ou pourraient guider la création d'une commission indépendante ou d'un poste de commissaire pour régir les débats des chefs. Je vais également aborder quelques points qui touchent à la structure et au fonctionnement d'une telle entité, si le Comité devait choisir d'en recommander une.

Il existe plusieurs modèles dans le monde relativement aux débats des chefs, y compris des modèles de réglementation par une commission publique indépendante. À mon avis, avant de concevoir un modèle particulier, il est important de considérer les objectifs qui pourraient mener le Comité à recommander la création d'une commission et, le cas échéant, qui pourraient déterminer le mandat et certains aspects de la structure de la commission.

Pour ma part, je propose les trois objectifs suivants, qui sont directement liés à l'équité et à l'ouverture du processus électoral. Évidemment, ces préoccupations sont les miennes.

Premièrement, les débats devraient être organisés de manière équitable, non partisane et transparente.

Deuxièmement, les débats devraient être largement accessibles au grand public. Par exemple, ils devraient être présentés dans un format auquel le plus grand nombre de personnes possible a accès, y compris les personnes handicapées.

Troisièmement, les débats devraient contribuer à informer les électeurs des différents choix politiques qui s'offrent à eux.

Cela dit, il y a trois éléments à prendre en considération pour établir une commission indépendante ou un poste de commissaire. D'abord, il y a la question des critères d'inclusion dans les débats. Vous le savez, la sélection des participants est l'une des questions les plus importantes et litigieuses associées aux débats des chefs. Comme chacun le sait, cette question a d'ailleurs suscité de vives controverses au fil des ans. Une commission indépendante ne devrait pas, selon moi, être mêlée à des controverses portant sur l'inclusion ou l'exclusion, surtout en pleine campagne électorale. C'est pourquoi les critères d'inclusion dans les débats devraient être clairs et ne laisser aucune ou alors très peu de discrétion résiduelle à la commission. Les critères peuvent inclure un éventail de facteurs. Je sais que, la semaine dernière, des témoins qui se sont présentés devant le Comité parlaient d'un éventail de facteurs. Je pense notamment à M. Fox, qui parlait d'un panier de facteurs. Une grande flexibilité peut être créée par les critères, notamment pour permettre la participation de partis émergents.

Toutefois, les critères devraient être tels que leur application par la commission serait simple, voire presque mécanique. Il ne faut pas oublier que, par le passé, il y a eu des contestations visant les débats des chefs fondées sur la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Ces contestations ont été rejetées essentiellement au motif les débats étaient des événements privés qui n'étaient pas assujettis à la Charte.

Si l'on devait créer une commission pour réglementer les débats, et plus particulièrement la participation aux débats, la commission serait sans doute assujettie à la Charte canadienne.

Je suis conscient de la difficulté de décider qui pourrait participer aux débats des chefs, mais c'est précisément pour cette raison que, selon moi, il est important que ce soit les parlementaires qui établissent les critères plutôt que la commission. Je pense que la commission doit appliquer des critères flexibles, mais qui ne donnent pas lieu à une discrétion.

(1215)

[Traduction]

Le deuxième point concerne le format et le contenu des débats. Même si j'estime que les critères d'inclusion devraient laisser peu ou pas de latitude à la commission, je ne vois pas pourquoi celle-ci ne pourrait pas en avoir beaucoup plus dans le choix du format et du contenu des débats, sous réserve des grands objectifs dont j'ai parlé au début de mon allocution.

Pour ce qui est du format, nous savons tous que le paysage médiatique est en constante évolution, particulièrement en ce qui a trait aux médias sociaux. La commission devrait avoir la latitude pour s'adapter et tirer avantage des nouvelles possibilités.

Le choix du format des débats devrait néanmoins respecter et promouvoir l'égalité du français et de l'anglais. La diffusion devrait également assurer l'accessibilité des débats aux personnes handicapées, par exemple en offrant le sous-titrage, l'interprétation gestuelle, une conception Web accessible ou d'autres moyens facilitant l'accès des personnes ayant des handicaps particuliers.

Si une commission indépendante s'occupait du contenu et du format des débats, elle pourrait être tenue de recevoir les suggestions des participants et d'autres intervenants. Elle pourrait également avoir l'obligation de rendre des comptes au Parlement après l'élection afin d'assurer la transparence de ses décisions.

La dernière considération est la structure d'une commission indépendante. Bien sûr, le Comité doit se pencher sur la composition et la direction d'une commission. De toute évidence, le président et les possibles membres de cette commission devraient posséder les connaissances et l’expertise suffisantes pour pouvoir organiser les débats. La commission pourrait inclure des représentants de réseaux traditionnels, ainsi que de nouveaux médias, nommés selon un processus qui assurerait son caractère non partisan. Si l'on choisissait de créer uniquement un poste de commissaire, celui-ci pourrait consulter des groupes issus de la société civile et d'autres intervenants, ou encore former un comité consultatif pour l’appuyer dans ses décisions.

Certains ont suggéré qu’Élections Canada joue un rôle dans ce domaine. En toute déférence, je ne suis pas d’accord. Je crois fermement qu’Élections Canada devrait rester en dehors de toute décision concernant les débats des chefs afin de rester au-dessus de la mêlée.

Les débats constituent un volet important de la campagne et influencent souvent les enjeux déterminants pour le vote. C’est ce qui rend les débats passionnants et importants. Le directeur général des élections ne doit pas être mêlé à des questions pouvant être perçues comme ayant une influence sur l’orientation de la campagne ou les résultats de l’élection.

Cela dit, vous voudrez peut-être envisager l'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion pour la création d'un poste de commissaire ou d’une commission indépendante. Comme vous le savez, l’arbitre est une entité indépendante créée en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada. Il est nommé sur décision unanime des partis à la Chambre des communes ou, à défaut d'unanimité, par le directeur général des élections après consultation des partis. Par exemple, l’arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion pourrait être nommé président de la commission, essentiellement afin de faciliter les rencontres de la commission et d’assurer son bon fonctionnement. Ou encore, le modèle de l’arbitre pourrait être reproduit pour créer une commission ou un poste de commissaire.

Enfin, la nature du mandat de la commission ne requerra pas nécessairement la création d'une entité permanente. Ses activités seront probablement sporadiques et ses réunions, ponctuelles. Par exemple, la plupart des décisions liées au contenu seront sans doute prises peu avant ou pendant la campagne.

Élections Canada pourrait certainement offrir un soutien administratif à une commission indépendante, y compris pour le paiement des dépenses de la commission. C’est le modèle qui est actuellement utilisé pour l’arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion. C’est aussi le modèle suivi par les commissions indépendantes de délimitation des circonscriptions électorales. C'est un modèle souple et efficace qui permet à la commission de fonctionner avec un soutien administratif de base sans faire intervenir Élections Canada dans les décisions mêmes.

Monsieur le président, j’ai présenté un certain nombre d'éléments à prendre en considération qui, je l’espère, seront utiles au Comité. Je répondrai maintenant avec plaisir à toutes questions que pourraient avoir les membres du Comité.

(1220)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pouvons-nous maintenant entendre le CRTC?

M. Michael Craig (gestionnaire, Télévision anglaise et de tierce langue, Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes):

Monsieur le président, merci pour l'invitation à venir témoigner devant ce comité à l'occasion de votre étude sur une proposition visant à créer une commission indépendante ou un poste de commissaire indépendant afin d’organiser les débats des chefs des partis politiques lors des prochaines campagnes électorales fédérales.

Je m'appelle Michael Craig et je suis le gestionnaire des Politiques relatives à la télévision au Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes, c'est-à-dire le CRTC. Mon collègue Peter McCallum, qui est avocat général, Droit des communications, m'accompagne aujourd'hui.

Nous sommes heureux d’avoir l’occasion d’expliquer le rôle que joue le CRTC en ce qui a trait aux débats des chefs lors des élections fédérales.[Français]

La Loi sur la radiodiffusion stipule, entre autres, que la programmation offerte par le système canadien de radiodiffusion devrait l'être sur une base équilibrée et, dans la mesure du possible, qu'elle doit offrir au public l'occasion de prendre connaissance d'opinions divergentes sur des sujets qui l'intéressent.

En tant que mandataires des ondes publiques, les radiodiffuseurs et les télédiffuseurs jouent un rôle important pour rapporter les nouvelles et informer les Canadiens, particulièrement lors des élections. Ils ont le devoir de faire en sorte que le public soit convenablement informé des décisions entourant une élection et de la position des partis et des candidats en présence. Ce rôle est essentiel pour le fonctionnement de la démocratie telle que nous la connaissons dans ce pays. [Traduction]

Notre rôle au CRTC est de nous assurer que les radiodiffuseurs servent le public canadien lors des élections de manière à ce que les citoyens puissent faire des choix éclairés le jour de l'élection. Par principe, le CRTC n'impose pas le type de contenu que les radiodiffuseurs doivent présenter, qu'il s'agisse de couverture politique ou autre. Il s'agit de choix éditoriaux et commerciaux qu'il vaut mieux laisser aux radiodiffuseurs eux-mêmes.

La Loi sur la radiodiffusion donne au CRTC le pouvoir de réglementer la proportion de temps qui devrait être consacrée à la diffusion d'émissions, de publicités ou d'avis politiques de la nature partisane.[Français]

Par conséquent, le Conseil a adopté des règlements qui touchent la plupart des radiodiffuseurs s'ils décident de diffuser des émissions à caractère politique. Ceux qui le font doivent allouer du temps, de manière équitable, à la diffusion d'émissions, de publicités ou d'avis politiques de nature partisane à tous les partis politiques accrédités et aux candidats rivaux.

De plus, la Loi électorale du Canada exige que le CRTC publie un bulletin dans les quatre jours suivant la délivrance des brefs pour une élection générale. Essentiellement, le bulletin rappelle aux radiodiffuseurs leurs obligations en période électorale et précise les étapes subséquentes.

(1225)

[Traduction]

M. Peter McCallum (avocat général, Droit des communications, Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes):

Permettez-moi d'expliquer la manière dont nous concrétisons notre mandat. Les radiodiffuseurs doivent offrir du temps d’antenne équitable à tous les candidats, partis et enjeux lors d'une élection. Ainsi, si les radiodiffuseurs offrent du temps d’antenne, ils l'offrent à tous les candidats et à tous les partis. Cela leur permet de partager avec le public leurs idées et leurs opinions au sujet des enjeux. La décision d’accepter ou de rejeter cette offre de temps d'antenne appartient entièrement au candidat ou au parti.

Je m’arrête un instant afin d'apporter une précision importante. Équité ne veut pas nécessairement dire égalité. Notre rôle au CRTC n’est pas de veiller à ce que chaque candidat ou chaque parti reçoive le même temps d'antenne.[Français]

De même, le CRTC a défini quatre types d'émissions politiques en période électorale: premièrement, le temps publicitaire payé d'un parti ou d'un candidat; deuxièmement, le temps publicitaire gratuit d'un parti ou d'un candidat; troisièmement, la couverture des nouvelles de la campagne; quatrièmement, les affaires publiques et la publicité aux heures de grande écoute lors des élections fédérales.

Pour la plupart de ces types de diffusion, les offres faites à un parti ou à un candidat doivent aussi être faites aux autres candidats et aux autres partis. Ainsi, si un parti ou un candidat reçoit du temps d'antenne gratuit, le même type d'offre doit être fait aux candidats et aux partis rivaux. De plus, si un radiodiffuseur vend du temps publicitaire payé à un parti ou à un candidat, il doit faire en sorte que les partis et les candidats rivaux aient aussi accès à du temps publicitaire. [Traduction]

Pour ce qui est des débats entre les chefs de parti en période électorale, l'approche actuelle du CRTC a été mise en place en 1995 à la suite d'une décision de la Cour d'appel de l'Ontario qui a statué que les débats n'avaient pas un caractère politique partisan. Par conséquent, il n'est pas indispensable que tous les partis ou candidats rivaux soient invités dans une ou plusieurs émissions. Tant que le radiodiffuseur prend des mesures pour s'assurer que les auditeurs sont informés des principaux enjeux et que ses émissions d'affaires publiques font état des positions des candidats et des partis, le CRTC les considère conformes à sa réglementation. [Français]

M. Michael Craig:

Monsieur le président, honorables députés, votre comité a demandé au CRTC d'émettre des observations sur le fait qu'une commission ou qu'un commissaire indépendant pourrait organiser les débats des chefs de partis politiques lors des prochaines élections fédérales.

En tant qu'organisme de réglementation indépendant, le CRTC n'a pas d'opinion au sujet de cette proposition. Le rôle du CRTC est de superviser et de réglementer le système canadien de radiodiffusion de manière souple et d'agir en fonction des cadres législatifs qu'adopte le Parlement. [Traduction]

Nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions sur l'expérience que nous avons en matière d'administration des réglementations actuelles des campagnes électorales fédérales. Nous espérons que cela aidera le Comité dans son travail sur ces questions importantes pour notre démocratie.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d'être ici.

Nous sommes tous très occupés et nous allons commencer les questions avec M. Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Messieurs Perrault, Craig et McCallum, ainsi que madame Lawson, de votre présence.[Traduction]

Bon retour parmi nous. Nous sommes contents de vous voir ici.[Français]

Monsieur Perrault, nous vous voyons un peu moins souvent que Mme Lawson. Nous sommes contents de vous recevoir.

Vous avez exprimé des inquiétudes relativement à la Charte. Vous disiez que, si cela devenait un une question publique et non privée, cela pourrait contrevenir à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Compte tenu de cela, quels devraient être les critères? Jusqu'où peut-on aller en ce qui concerne les critères?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À partir du moment où on réglemente la participation, des arguments pourraient être formulés en vertu de la Charte, selon lesquels les règlements sont inadéquats, soit sur le plan du droit de vote et d'éligibilité ou de celui de la liberté d'expression, peu importe. Je crois que ces discussions devraient se tenir à l'extérieur de la campagne électorale. Selon moi, le premier aspect prioritaire, c'est que les critères devraient être inscrits dans la loi. S'il y avait contestation, cela aurait lieu sur le plan légal, et non pas sur celui de l'application de la loi par une commission ou un commissaire en pleine campagne électorale. C'est l'élément principal.

Quant aux critères qui devraient être choisis, vous avez entendu d'autres témoins proposer différents critères. C'est pour moi une question délicate. Je comprends qu'on ne peut pas avoir un débat des chefs qui réunisse 22 chefs en même temps. En revanche, ce n'est pas à moi de présenter des règles d'exclusion. Mon rôle est de défendre l'ensemble des partis politiques et ce n'est pas à moi de proposer un cadre quant aux partis devraient participer aux débats.Vous avez entendu différentes propositions de la part des témoins. Ce qui ressort de ces propositions, c'est la possibilité de créer un régime flexible et qui donne une ouverture à des partis en émergence, tout en reconnaissant la nécessité qu'un débat informatif se tienne entre un nombre limité de participants.

Il y a évidemment d'autres possibilités, par exemple des débats alternatifs, et ainsi de suite. Encore une fois, ce n'est pas à moi de proposer un cadre quant à la participation.

(1230)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si le directeur général des élections avait la responsabilité de gérer le débat, est-ce qu'il pourrait donner un temps de parole inégal aux partis?

En raison de son rôle, est-ce que le directeur général des élections devrait forcer les 15 ou 22 chefs à se présenter pour que ce soit juste pour tous?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Est-ce que le directeur général des élections devrait avoir un pouvoir de contrainte pour forcer les chefs à se présenter?

Cette question a été soulevée à différentes reprises, à moins que je vous aie mal compris.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, ma question est à l'inverse.

Si vous étiez responsable de gérer le débat, est-ce que ce serait hors de votre mandat de dire qu'un parti peut se présenter, mais pas un autre?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je crois que votre question illustre pourquoi ce ne pourrait pas être le rôle du directeur général des élections. Ce n'est pas au directeur général des élections d'exclure des participants à un débat en pleine campagne électorale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela nuirait à son mandat en général.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

C'est un élément qui doit ressortir très clairement de ma présentation d'aujourd'hui. Cela ne peut pas relever de la responsabilité du directeur général des élections.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis du même avis, mais je voulais simplement que ce soit inscrit à la transcription.[Traduction]

En ce qui concerne le CRTC, vous avez parlé d'équité plutôt que d'égalité. Je voulais approfondir ce sujet. Je n'ai pas bien compris, si vous avez un débat entre candidats au niveau local, par exemple, et que vous n'invitez pas tous les candidats, comment cela peut-il être accepté? Vous expliquez que c'est le cas, mais je ne comprends pas vraiment.

M. Peter McCallum:

Tout d'abord, le CRTC n'impose pas de débat. Pour le CRTC, la décision du tribunal de 1993 signifie que les débats eux-mêmes n'ont pas de caractère politique partisan. L'équité et, en fait, l'obligation d'équilibre, qui est également prévue dans la Loi sur la radiodiffusion, s'appliquent tout au long de la période de radiodiffusion, soit durant la période électorale qui a une durée précise et qui est déterminée par la délivrance des brefs électoraux.

Elle est mesurée par le CRTC en réponse, par exemple, à des plaintes, en examinant la conduite générale des radiodiffuseurs pendant toute la période électorale, ce qu'ils ont montré, ce qu'ils n'ont pas montré et les partis représentés dans les quatre types de couvertures que j'ai mentionnés.

« Équité » ne signifie pas nécessairement « égalité ». Cela permet de reconnaître que les radiodiffuseurs jouissent de la liberté d'expression nécessaire, garantie par la Charte et également mentionnée dans la Loi sur la radiodiffusion, pour prendre ce genre de décision éditoriale. Cela ne signifie pas nécessairement « égalité », mais « l'équité » des choix est examinée dans son ensemble sur la période.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Lors d'une précédente réunion, un témoin a laissé entendre que la commission ne devrait pas nécessairement s'appeler la « Commission des débats des chefs », mais simplement la « Commission des débats ». Pensez-vous qu'une telle structure devrait jouer un rôle dans les débats locaux ou seulement dans les débats nationaux? Avez-vous un avis à ce sujet?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J'aurais tendance à dire que, si vous voulez créer une commission qui commence par le débat des chefs, le fait de s'attaquer à un débat de grande ampleur auquel participeraient tous les candidats des 338 circonscriptions serait une tâche considérable.

Cela dit, il est concevable qu'une commission établisse des pratiques exemplaires et des lignes directrices qui pourraient servir de code modèle pour les organisateurs de débats. Ce n'est pas la même chose qu'une commission qui participe à tous les débats dans toutes les circonscriptions électorales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. Michael Craig:

Comme je l'ai expliqué dans mes remarques liminaires, tout ce qui a trait à la structure d'une commission ou au mandat et au rôle d'une commission ou d'un commissaire n'est pas un sujet sur lequel nous allons nous prononcer.

(1235)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends. Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Je vais céder le temps qui me reste à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai retenu que vous êtes absolument contre l'idée d'une participation d'Élections Canada. Cela m'a éclairée et je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous. Je pense qu'il serait sage de maintenir l'indépendance de cet organisme relativement aux élections.

Par ailleurs, vous avez dit que l'arbitre de la radiodiffusion pourrait présider la commission. Pensez-vous que cela serait encore perçu comme un manque d'indépendance par rapport aux élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour moi, c'est une question très différente. L'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion siège sous l'égide de la Loi électorale du Canada. Il fonctionne de façon totalement indépendante du directeur général des élections et est nommé, comme je l'ai dit, par accord unanime des partis à la Chambre. Il y a une relation sans lien de dépendance; ses décisions ne sont pas celles du directeur général des élections.

En même temps, ce que j'aime avec ce modèle, c'est que, compte tenu du fait que cette commission ne fonctionnerait probablement pas à temps plein — il lui faudrait accélérer et réduire la cadence —, la création d'une nouvelle bureaucratie semble un peu luxueuse. Le fait qu'Élections Canada fournisse un soutien administratif, comme nous le faisons pour les commissions de délimitation des circonscriptions électorales ou pour l'arbitre, est séduisant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Reid, pour sept minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'ai une série de questions, qui découlent toutes de l'excellent exposé de M. Perrault. Je pense que c'est l'un des exposés les plus réfléchis que j'ai entendus depuis un certain temps sur n'importe quel sujet dont le Comité a été saisi. Mais j'aimerais d'abord répondre à la question de M. Graham au sujet des débats locaux.

Il n'y a pas de normes formelles pour les débats locaux, comme il le sait. Si vous regardez autour de vous, vous constaterez qu'ils sont très semblables dans toutes les circonscriptions et à l'intérieur d'une circonscription, bien que ces groupes ne se parlent manifestement pas. La programmation des débats dans ma propre circonscription, rurale et très étendue, le confirme. Nous faisons constamment des allers et retours d'un bout à l'autre de la circonscription. Cela dit, il existe une symétrie naturelle.

Je voulais simplement dire qu'une fois que l'on commence à exercer un certain contrôle central, il faut établir des critères centralisés comme l'accessibilité. Dans une circonscription rurale comme la mienne ou la vôtre — notre directeur général des élections peut le confirmer —, essayer de trouver des bureaux de scrutin accessibles et répondant à tous les critères pertinents est un cauchemar logistique. Il y a souvent une interprétation souple de ces critères, pour les chambres de commerce et ainsi de suite qui organisent ces choses-là. Je pense qu'il est bon que cette souplesse perdure. Un système décentralisé est le meilleur moyen d'y parvenir. Voilà ce que j'en pense.

Mes questions s'adressent à M. Perrault.

Permettez-moi de commencer par la page 3 de votre exposé. Vous avez laissé entendre qu'il y avait trois objectifs importants à atteindre. Vous avez dit que les débats devraient être organisés d'une manière équitable, non partisane et transparente et qu'ils devraient être aussi largement accessibles au public que possible. Vous avez ensuite mentionné expressément qu'il fallait veiller à ce qu'ils soient accessibles aux personnes handicapées. J'imagine que vous pensez principalement aux déficiences visuelles et auditives, bien que vous ayez peut-être d'autres personnes en tête. Le troisième critère était d'informer l'électorat de l'éventail des choix politiques qui s'offraient à lui. Je présume que c'est une référence aux différents partis politiques.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Permettez-moi de poser cette question. Si l'on se penche sur l'année 2015 — en particulier le récent statu quo —, en quoi pensez-vous que nous n'avons pas satisfait à ces critères? Où y a-t-il matière à amélioration, compte tenu de ce que vous avez vu en 2015?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne suis pas en mesure de commenter ce qui s'est passé en 2015 en ce qui concerne les débats et leur conformité aux normes ou aux attentes des uns et des autres. Vous avez entendu plusieurs témoins à ce sujet. Je m'en tiendrai là.

Je les présente comme des objectifs et non comme des critères à respecter. Ce sont les objectifs qui, à mon avis, pourraient guider le mandat d'une commission, si le Comité voulait en établir une. Je ne dis pas, par exemple, que tous les partis devraient être représentés dans le même format, en même temps et dans un même débat. Je dis que l'esprit d'une commission serait en partie de veiller à ce que les Canadiens soient informés de la manière la plus large possible sur les différents choix qui s'offrent à eux.

Je ne sais pas si cela répond à votre question.

(1240)

M. Scott Reid:

Cela répond à ma question. Je voulais juste m'assurer que vous aviez eu la possibilité d'exprimer toutes vos idées. Vous m'avez beaucoup aidé.

Ma prochaine question porte sur la page 4 de votre exposé, où vous dites que les « critères d'inclusion dans les débats doivent être clairs et ne pas laisser de marge discrétionnaire résiduelle à la commission ». Je veux juste dire que je partage votre avis. Cela soulève le fait qu'une commission devrait vraisemblablement, comme le font nos commissions de délimitation des circonscriptions électorales, formuler ses propositions bien avant une élection afin de s'assurer que nous ne sommes pas en pleine période de bref électoral ou à l'aube d'une période de bref, étonnés de découvrir que, par exemple, le Parti vert participe ou ne participe pas.

Est-ce qu'il vous semble raisonnable qu'une commission ou un commissaire doive faire des recommandations à cet égard, en supposant qu'on lui laisse ce pouvoir discrétionnaire bien avant le début d'une période visée par le bref électoral, afin qu'il soit possible d'obtenir une rétroaction du public qui soit conforme aux normes des Canadiens?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je n'ai peut-être pas été clair dans mon explication. Je ne pense pas que le rôle de la commission ou du commissaire devrait être d'établir les critères. Je pense qu'il est préférable que le Parlement décide quels sont les critères et que la commission ou le commissaire ait simplement un rôle assez mécanique à jouer dans l'application de ces critères. Je pense que le Parlement est mieux placé. Je pense que le fait de demander au commissaire d'établir les critères le mettrait dans une situation délicate. Je ne sais pas s'il serait utile de le faire bien avant les élections. Les choses peuvent évoluer à mesure que l'on se rapproche de l'élection, voilà mon avis.

M. Scott Reid:

À vrai dire vous avez été clair. Pendant que vous parliez, je regardais la partie de votre exposé que je n'avais pas lue, car je prenais des notes. La première fois, vous aviez déjà utilisé le mot « mécanique », vous avez été très clair à ce sujet.

Si je puis me permettre de le répéter pour l'ensemble du Comité, il nous faudrait établir des critères au sujet de la participation des partis, dans la loi elle-même. Je ne pense pas que ce problème puisse être évité si nous ne le transmettons pas au commissaire.

Dans le temps qui me reste, je veux juste demander si cela nécessite un modèle de commission. Faut-il ou non modifier la Loi électorale du Canada?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je suppose que cela dépend du modèle que vous choisissez. Vous pourriez le faire par l'entremise de ce mécanisme si vous voulez élargir, par exemple, le mandat de l'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion. Une autre solution serait d'avoir une loi autonome.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien. Il me reste 30 secondes, alors je vais poser une autre question. Vous avez utilisé le modèle de redécoupage des circonscriptions électorales et les commissions établies à cet effet comme modèle potentiel. La question est donc de savoir si nous avons un commissaire rémunéré à temps plein pour ne pas faire grand-chose, ou une personne occupant un emploi épisodique.

Personnellement, je ne voudrais pas de ce travail. Tout le monde va vous détester, vous n'êtes pas très bien payé et c'est seulement épisodique. La Loi sur la révision des limites des circonscriptions électorales a connu des problèmes semblables et ils ont été surmontés d'une façon ou d'une autre. Avez-vous une idée de la façon dont on pourrait y faire face?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

La fonction d'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion est, elle aussi, épisodique, donc elle n'est pas rémunérée à temps plein. Elle est payée à la journée. Un modèle similaire pourrait être utilisé ici.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci. C'est très utile.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Reid.[Français]

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Christopherson. [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis d'accord avec M. Reid. Vous avez fait un excellent exposé, monsieur Perrault. Au risque de recevoir une leçon de civisme en public, ce qui est probablement ce qui va arriver, juste pour ma propre gouverne — ne m'en veuillez pas —, vous avez dit dans vos remarques: « Certains ont laissé entendre qu'Élections Canada devrait avoir un rôle à jouer dans ce domaine... Je crois fermement qu'Élections Canada doit être tenu à l'écart de toute prise de décisions concernant les débats des chefs afin de rester au-dessus de la mêlée. »

J'ai du mal à distinguer le rôle qui serait joué ici de celui que joue déjà le directeur général des élections à qui nous demandons d'être juste. Le DGE prend énormément de décisions qui pourraient mettre les gens en colère et leur faire dire: « Eh bien, ce n'est pas juste. Vous nous flouez. Il est clair que c’est truqué. » Pourtant, vous semblez dire que cet aspect particulier est tellement délicat à cause de la nécessité de parvenir à quelque chose de pur, que même vous n'oseriez pas jouer ce rôle

Aidez-moi à comprendre pourquoi vous estimez ne pas pouvoir rester au-dessus de la mêlée alors qu'il y a d'autres secteurs où vous êtes au beau milieu de cette mêlée.

(1245)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense essentiellement au fait que les débats portent sur la détermination des questions de fond, mais aussi sur le choix des intervenants et sur l'ordre dans lequel ils vont parler, sur leur place sur scène, sur la désignation des journalistes et sur la façon dont les questions sont posées. Toutes ces questions font partie des sujets brûlants de la campagne. Nous savons tous que les débats des chefs peuvent, dans certains cas, changer le cours d'une campagne. J'imagine mal le directeur général des élections participer à ce moment décisif de la campagne électorale.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai entendu d'autres personnes exprimer la même opinion. Je suppose que c'est un de ces moments où nous pensons être les seuls à ne pas filer droit. Je reconnais que c'est probablement le point de vue dominant. Mais je ne peux le partager. Si je devais m'inquiéter des décisions que vous pourriez prendre dans ce domaine, cela m'amènerait immédiatement à penser que je devrais peut-être m'inquiéter au sujet de certaines des autres décisions que vous prenez. Mais je pense que vous parlez de l'ampleur des décisions et des joutes électorales et non du cadre que vous établissez. Quoi qu'il en soit, la leçon de civisme est terminée, je comprends votre position.

Je faisais partie de ceux qui disaient soit « Élections Canada » soit « un organisme autonome » simplement parce que cela relevait selon moi du bon sens. Je suis heureux de voir que vous avez proposé au moins un rôle où cela serait intégré, mais vous ne seriez pas tenu de participer à la prise de décision. Encore une fois, l'idée même du facteur coût, celle de créer toute une bureaucratie pour qu'elle existe et qu'elle demeure inactive pendant trois ans et demi, n'a guère de sens et le fait de la recréer à partir de zéro à chaque fois, aussi souvent que M. Reid l'a décrit, n'est pas toujours la meilleure approche.

J'adhère progressivement à l'une des possibilités que vous avez présentées, l'arbitre de la radiodiffusion. Dites-m'en un peu plus sur la façon dont vous verriez cela fonctionner dans les limites de votre compétence tout en permettant à cet arbitre de rester indépendant. Aidez-moi à mieux comprendre.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour être franc, je n'ai pas réglé tous les détails. Je peux certainement dire qu'actuellement l'arbitre, à l'instar de la commission de délimitation des circonscriptions électorales, travaille de son côté. C'est lui qui convoque les partis par exemple pour allouer le temps d'antenne pour les élections. Nous lui apportons un soutien administratif dans son travail, tout comme la commission de délimitation des circonscriptions électorales. C'est un mécanisme souple parce qu'à tout moment, elle peut décider de convoquer une réunion et nous lui apportons notre soutien, mais ce n'est pas nous qui prenons les décisions.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, je vais vous dire ce qui me fait adhérer à cette proposition. J'aime le contexte. Pendant qu'ils prennent les décisions, les gens qui les entourent dans leur milieu professionnel gardent tous à l'esprit les notions de liberté, d'équité, de transparence... J'y adhère et je vais chercher ceux qui pourraient soutenir que c'est une mauvaise idée et que je devrais en tenir compte.

Pouvez-vous m'en dire un peu plus sur ce que fait exactement l'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Son rôle principal est très limité, mais c'est un rôle qui peut être crucial en période électorale. Il fait deux choses. D'abord, il applique une formule présente dans la loi pour l'attribution de temps gratuit et payé. Cette formule est dans la loi. On a recommandé au Comité d'examiner cette question et peut-être que vous le ferez à un moment donné.

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est pas une priorité ces temps-ci, je dois vous le dire.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il peut arriver, en cours d'élection, que des conflits surgissent au sujet de l'achat de temps d'antenne, de la mise à disposition, par un radiodiffuseur, de plages de diffusion appropriées ou des relations entre le radiodiffuseur et un parti. Dans de telles situations, il ferait office d'arbitre. Ce sont ses deux rôles.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous avez dit que c'est aussi très épisodique. C'est également épisodique dans ce cas, tout comme la commission de délimitation des circonscriptions, de sorte que la nature cette autre commission ne serait pas un choc pour votre système.

(1250)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact. C'est très similaire.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, j'ai terminé. Merci beaucoup pour vos réponses et pour votre excellent exposé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Christopherson.

C'est au tour de Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci à chacun de vous de votre participation, de votre présence et de vos témoignages. Maître McCallum, est-ce que la décision de la Cour d'appel de l'Ontario dont vous avez parlé a été rendue en 1993 ou en 1995?

M. Peter McCallum:

Je pense que c'était 1993, mais la référence actuelle donne 1995.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien.

M. Peter McCallum:

À titre de simple information, la demande d'autorisation d'appel auprès de la Cour suprême du Canada a été rejetée par la suite.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Cela faisait partie de ma question.

Je voudrais vous demander ceci. Est-ce que vous avez bien dit que la Cour d'appel avait estimé que les débats ne sont pas d'ordre politique ou partisan par nature et qu'il n'est donc pas nécessaire de s'assurer que tous les partis y participent? C'est bien cela?

M. Peter McCallum:

Oui, en effet.

Il y a eu une poursuite en vertu de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion, déclenchée par l'exclusion du Parti vert de la couverture des élections. Il s'agissait d'une interprétation de l'article 8, je crois, du règlement sur la télévision, où l'on emploie l'expression « de nature partisane ». Le tribunal a estimé que les débats ne sont pas de nature partisane. Par conséquent, l'article 8 n'est pas applicable, et le principe d'équité inscrit dans la réglementation n'est pas enfreint.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vois.

La demande d'autorisation d'appel auprès de la Cour suprême n'a pas été accueillie.

M. Peter McCallum:

La demande a été rejetée, c'est exact.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Comment voyez-vous les relations entre cette commission ou ce commissaire et le CRTC? Comment envisagez-vous les relations avec un commissaire éventuel?

M. Peter McCallum:

Je ne peux pas vraiment répondre à cette question à titre prospectif.

Je peux dire quelque chose au sujet de l'arbitre, et c'est que la Loi électorale du Canada le reconnaît. Le CRTC est tenu de publier, par exemple, les résultats de l'attribution des 390 minutes entre les partis et il le fait. C'est une disposition de la Loi électorale du Canada. C'est relativement épisodique, mais cela arrive aussi assez fréquemment entre les périodes électorales, parce que certains partis sont enregistrés et que d'autres sont désinscrits, ce qui modifie la répartition entre les partis. L'obligation de publier est énoncée dans la loi, et le CRTC remplit son obligation en publiant les résultats.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il s'agit simplement de veiller à ce que ces procédures soient respectées.

À ce sujet, est-ce que ces exigences sont souvent enfreintes?

M. Peter McCallum:

Je n'ai pas eu connaissance de cas de ce genre.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien.

Je vais maintenant m'adresser à M. Perrault.

Vous avez dit qu'il est important que le Parlement fixe les critères, et vous vous en êtes expliqué un peu. Au sujet de ces critères qui ne dépendraient plus du commissaire, mais relèveraient du Parlement, quels seraient-ils?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce ne sont pas mes critères, mais des propositions concernant le pourcentage de votes obtenus à la dernière élection ou le nombre de candidats qui se sont présentés, ce genre de critères objectifs. J'aime bien l'idée avancée par M. Fox, qui est venu la semaine dernière: si on remplit un certain nombre de critères sans les remplir cependant tous, on peut participer au débat. Cela laisse une certaine souplesse, par exemple, pour les partis non parlementaires.

C'est ce genre de critères que je verrais bien dans la réglementation.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Cela relèverait du Parlement.

Quel serait le pouvoir du commissaire à l'égard du choix des critères? Est-ce que le commissaire ou la commission aurait un quelconque pouvoir à cet égard?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À mon avis, le commissaire ne devrait avoir aucun pouvoir à cet égard. Il serait chargé d'appliquer assez mécaniquement les critères fixés par le Parlement. On pourrait, dans certains cas, avoir besoin d'un certain pouvoir discrétionnaire, mais j'éviterais dans toute la mesure du possible d'en accorder au commissaire.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Quelle valeur accordez-vous au rôle du commissaire ou de la commission?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Cela dépend. Encore une fois, c'est la raison pour laquelle, d'emblée, je vous ai demandé quels objectifs vous poursuivez. Je pense qu'il faut partir des objectifs et déterminer comment une commission pourrait contribuer à leur réalisation.

D'après moi, le commissaire ne devrait pas jouer de rôle dans la décision d'exclure ou d'inclure tel ou tel parti.

(1255)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Et les autres critères? Par exemple, le nombre de débats, la langue des débats ou le contenu des débats?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne vois pas pourquoi le commissaire n'aurait pas une grande latitude en la matière. Dans la mesure où la commission participe aux aspects éditoriaux des débats, etc., elle doit être munie de l'expertise dont elle a besoin. Nous parlions tout à l'heure de l'arbitre. Il connaît le milieu, mais il n'est pas un journaliste et n'a pas toute l'expertise.

C'est pour cette raison que j'ai dit, dans mes remarques, que, si c'était le modèle retenu, le commissaire serait appuyé par d'autres membres ou créerait un comité consultatif chargé de le renseigner sur les intérêts des partis et de la société civile et de communiquer avec les médias. Je pense que la commission aurait besoin d'avoir accès à une certaine expertise pour prendre des décisions en matière de contenu et de présentation.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vais prendre encore une minute, Dave, après quoi je vous redonne la parole. Mon collègue souhaite poser une autre question.

L'un des témoins précédents a parlé des relations du commissaire avec les différents protagonistes et de son rôle dans l'assurance que les parties intéressées, les Canadiens de tout le pays, donnent leur avis sur la forme que cela prendra.

Êtes-vous d'accord?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je n'ai pas vraiment d'avis à ce sujet.

Je pense que c'est un modèle parmi d'autres. On pourrait aussi créer un groupe consultatif composé de gens de divers horizons qui seraient chargés d'aider la commission à s'assurer que ses choix traduisent les besoins et les intérêts de toutes sortes de gens.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

La dernière minute appartient à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'ai perdu une question tout à l'heure et je l'ai passée à Ruby.

Pensez-vous qu'il soit possible, réalisable, souhaitable, tenable qu'une quelconque commission puisse imposer que des débats aient lieu de telle ou telle façon? En principe, on peut avoir tous les débats qu'on veut, mais, si les réseaux ne les transmettent pas, on limite l'auditoire.

Est-ce qu'on pourrait dire — et je suppose que la question s'adresse plutôt au CRTC, mais vous pouvez répondre tous les deux — que tous les réseaux devraient organiser au moins un débat dans la langue de leurs émissions habituelles?

M. Peter McCallum:

Je pense qu'il faudrait instaurer un mécanisme quelconque, par le biais d'une modification à la Loi sur la radiodiffusion ou d'une directive, ou quelque chose comme cela, pour rendre l'organisation de débats obligatoire.

Actuellement, rien dans la loi n'oblige les radiodiffuseurs à organiser des débats. Ils le font cependant. Et la commission en est satisfaite, mais ils n'y sont pas obligés. Pour cela, il faudrait mettre en place un mécanisme.

M. Michael Craig:

C'est exact, et, pour en revenir à mes remarques préliminaires, nous ne nous prononçons pas sur le genre d'émission qu'un radiodiffuseur doit diffuser. Nous n'intervenons pas dans leurs décisions éditoriales ou professionnelles. Cela leur appartient. Pour faire écho à ce que M. McCallum vous a répondu, il faudrait apporter un changement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame May, nous sommes ravis de vous entendre de nouveau.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux témoins de leurs excellents exposés.

Il me semble que tout cela revient à deux questions et que chacun de ces organismes, Élections Canada et le CRTC, a un rôle à jouer compte tenu des règles que nous souhaiterions peut-être instaurer pour garantir des débats équitables accessibles à un maximum de Canadiens. Il s'agit, d'une part, de trouver le moyen de diffuser les débats, et c'est la question de la radiodiffusion. Et il faut, d'autre part, faire en sorte que les dirigeants se présentent devant l'estrade.

Vous préféreriez, monsieur Perrault, que le Parlement se charge de déterminer les critères. Je pense aussi que c'est une très bonne idée. Ces critères devraient être fixés d'avance pour éviter, comme l'a fait remarquer Scott Reid, de découvrir au beau milieu de la campagne électorale qui participe et qui est exclu, parce que cela crée beaucoup d'incertitude.

Quant à savoir comment y attirer les dirigeants, j'aurais une question à vous poser, monsieur Perrault.

Il me semble que le financement de la campagne électorale pourrait être l'occasion d'une incitation efficace à se présenter. Contrairement à la rhétorique qui leur a permis d'annuler la subvention en fonction du nombre de votes que nous avions dans le cadre de la réforme mise en place par Jean Chrétien.... À l'époque, on a justifié l'annulation du 1,75 $ par vote, ou peu importe le chiffre, en disant que les contribuables canadiens ne voulaient pas financer de partis politiques. Mais nous savons très bien que les contribuables canadiens financent énormément les partis politiques, et ce qui a été annulé était la partie la moins importante. La plus importante est le remboursement en fin de campagne, et il y a aussi l'avantage d'un traitement fiscal très généreux.

Au sujet du remboursement... et je tiens cette idée d'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire présenté par M. Kennedy Stewart, mais qui n'a pas été adopté. Il essayait de faire valoir l'idée que, en cas de parité entre hommes et femmes parmi les candidats, on récupérerait tout son argent et que, si ce n'était pas le cas, on en récupérerait moins.

Je me demandais ce que vous penseriez de l'idée de modifier la Loi électorale du Canada pour prévoir que les chefs de partis politiques reconnus qui rempliraient les critères de participation au débat, mais qui refuseraient d'y participer, seraient sanctionnés — et je ne veux pas dicter la forme que cela pourrait prendre — par une pénalité financière pour avoir fait faux bond à la population canadienne à un moment que nous savons et que tous les témoins savent être une période de participation maximale au cours de laquelle sont exposées les politiques et les propositions des différents dirigeants.

Est-ce que ce serait, d'après vous, quelque chose que la Loi électorale du Canada...? Bien sûr, le Parlement en déciderait, mais je pense que ce serait un stimulant efficace. J'aimerais avoir votre avis.

(1300)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais peut-être vous décevoir. Je n'ai pas d'opinion ferme à ce sujet, au sens où je ne crois pas qu'il s'agisse d'une décision stratégique importante pour le Parlement.

Je pourrais certainement administrer un système de ce genre. On peut se demander si le simple fait de créer une commission, si tel est le cas, ne serait pas une raison suffisante, compte tenu du statut réservé aux dirigeants dans le débat, de participer et s'il serait effectivement nécessaire d'y ajouter un stimulant financier. Il se peut qu'on ait à l'envisager au fil du temps, mais ce sont des enjeux stratégiques qui appartiennent au Parlement.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Parmi les autres enjeux, vous avez dit qu'il pourrait y avoir 22 dirigeants sur la scène. Je voudrais simplement préciser que, actuellement, il y a 15 partis politiques fédéraux reconnus.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y en a 15, en effet. Il y en a eu jusqu'à 23 à la dernière élection. Le nombre a tendance à augmenter à mesure qu'on approche de l'élection. Je crois bien que nous aurons d'autres partis enregistrés l'année prochaine.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Très bien.

Je me trompe peut-être — et je n'ai rien trouvé après une rapide recherche dans Wikipédia, donc je m'en remets à vous —, mais, si je me souviens bien, en dehors des libéraux, des conservateurs, des néo-démocrates, des verts et du bloc, les 18 autres partis politiques, d'après le compte total des votes, n'ont pas atteint 2 % à eux tous. C'est bien cela?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je l'ignore.

Mme Elizabeth May:

D'accord. En tout cas, c'est ce dont je me souviens. Vous êtes d'accord pour dire qu'aucun d'eux ne s'est approché de 1 % à lui seul.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui. Je pense que c'est exact.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Et 2 % est le seuil à partir duquel le remboursement est prévu dans la loi électorale.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est 2 %, mais aussi 5 % dans les circonscriptions où le parti soutient des candidats. Il y a un double critère.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Cela nous donne une idée de la direction que prend la politique actuelle. Si on se penche sur ce que les partis ont été capables de faire malgré... mais n'entrons pas dans une discussion sur la réforme électorale. Plusieurs d'entre nous ici ont fait partie du comité parlementaire spécial de la réforme électorale.

En dehors de cela, dans le cadre de notre système électoral uninominal à un tour, il est très difficile de faire élire des députés dans tout le pays si on n'est pas capable de... bref, il est très difficile d'atteinte 2 %. C'est ce que j'essaie d'expliquer.

M. Stéphane Perrault: Oui.

Mme Elizabeth May: D'accord.

Au sujet de ce que fait le CRTC — et c'est aussi un enjeu stratégique pour le Parlement —, pensez-vous qu'il y aurait des moyens par lesquels le Parlement pourrait imposer aux réseaux de nouvelles qui offrent un contenu canadien dans le pays de faire de la participation aux débats diffusés une condition d'attribution du permis?

M. Peter McCallum:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, je crois qu'il faudrait alors apporter une modification à la loi ou prendre d'autres mesures.

Mme Elizabeth May:

C'est ce que je présumais: il faudrait modifier la Loi électorale du Canada. Tout comme Élections Canada n'est pas habilité à déterminer ce que contient la Loi électorale du Canada, mais peut l'appliquer, le CRTC appliquerait la loi telle qu'elle serait modifiée.

M. Peter McCallum:

C'est exact. Si c'est le Parlement qui en décide, le CRTC l'appliquera.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je n'ai plus de questions. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame May.

Nos collègues conservateurs ont encore quelques minutes. Avez-vous des questions?

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je pense que la question s'adresse aux représentants du CRTC. Pour faire suite à la question de M. Graham au sujet de l'idée de rendre les débats obligatoires, je reste encore un peu perplexe après la réponse qu'on lui a donnée. Est-ce qu'il serait possible de faire cela dans le cadre de la réglementation actuelle ou est-ce qu'il serait nécessaire d'adopter de nouvelles dispositions législatives?

(1305)

M. Peter McCallum:

Nous pensons que ce n'est pas vraiment possible dans le cadre actuel, tout simplement à cause de la façon dont la loi est conçue, avec des objectifs, des exigences en matière d'équilibrage, etc. Il y a aussi que les tribunaux ont déclaré que les débats ne sont pas de nature partisane. Il faut donc prendre d'autres mesures pour y arriver.

M. Blake Richards:

Laissons de côté le débat politique: est-ce qu'il existe actuellement des émissions obligatoires? À votre connaissance, est-ce que les réseaux de télévision, par le biais du CRTC ou autrement, sont obligés de diffuser certaines émissions?

M. Peter McCallum:

Les permis sont assortis de beaucoup de conditions. Mon collègue M. Craig peut vous parler des conditions de permis qui imposent des obligations. Il y a les quotas de contenu canadien, etc.

M. Blake Richards:

En dehors du contenu canadien, est-ce que les réseaux sont tenus de diffuser certains événements ou certaines choses? Je comprends bien l'exigence relative au contenu canadien, mais je parle d'événements ou de choses de ce genre.

M. Michael Craig:

Les exigences relatives au contenu couvrent bien plus qu'un événement en particulier. Au risque de me répéter — excusez-moi —, l'idée est que le CRTC ne dictera pas leurs décisions éditoriales ou professionnelles aux diffuseurs. Quand on parle d'événements précis, il est question essentiellement de dire « Vous devez organiser ceci ou cela ».

Comme l'a dit M. McCallum, et je crois l'avoir répété quelques fois, ce n'est pas quelque chose qui se fait actuellement.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Je sais que vous n'avez pas d'opinion à ce sujet, et vous ne voulez pas en proposer. C'est correct. Je ne vous demande pas de le faire, mais s'il arrivait — et je ne suis pas non plus en train de défendre nécessairement cette idée — que ce comité ou le gouvernement estime que c'est une mesure à prendre et que ces obligations soient imposées, comment, d'après vous, seraient-elles exécutées? Voyez-vous un moyen de les faire respecter?

M. Peter McCallum:

Je pense que cela dépend tout d'abord de la mesure qui serait prise, de son contenu, de ses détails. C'est un peu difficile de vous répondre. Comme je l'ai dit, à l'heure actuelle, la couverture électorale est déterminée au cours de toute la période électorale. Quelle que soit la mesure adoptée, il faudrait qu'elle soit suffisamment précise pour englober des recours. La Loi sur la radiodiffusion prévoit certains recours pour les cas où des diffuseurs ne respecteraient pas la réglementation, la loi ou les conditions de leur permis. Il faudrait donc que ce soit un instrument qu'il est possible de faire respecter grâce aux autres instruments prévus dans la Loi sur la radiodiffusion.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne veux pas parler à votre place, mais j'ai l'impression que vous laissez entendre que ce serait incroyablement difficile à faire.

M. Peter McCallum:

Franchement, c'est au Parlement d'en décider. Nous n'avons pas d'opinion quant au type de mesure que cela pourrait être et aux moyens de la mettre en oeuvre. Cela revient au Parlement. Si le Parlement décide qu'il faut prendre une mesure quelconque, le CRTC fera de son mieux pour l'appliquer.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Encore une fois, si le Comité le permet, j'aimerais prendre une minute pour faire suite à ce qu'a dit M. Richards au sujet de l'idée de rendre les choses obligatoires.

En 2015, comme l'a dit M. Nater, il y a eu un faible taux de participation, et les diffuseurs n'étaient pas d'accord entre eux. L'un d'eux a proposé de rendre les choses obligatoires pour tout le monde, que ce soit Netflix, Google, Facebook et les dizaines de chaînes en activité au Canada, etc. Je ne suis pas sûr que quelqu'un ici puisse répondre. Sinon, je suis sûr que le BCP vérifiera.

Est-ce que les diffuseurs pourraient porter plainte contre le gouvernement si tous les gens dont je viens de parler étaient obligés d'organiser les débats?

M. Peter McCallum:

C'est un peu difficile de répondre à cette question. À l'heure actuelle, certaines entités sont exemptées de la réglementation dans la mesure où la Loi sur la radiodiffusion comporte une disposition en ce sens. La diffusion sur Internet est généralement une activité exemptée, et il faudrait donc réfléchir soigneusement au moyen d'obtenir quelque chose comme cela. Nous n'avons aucune idée de la façon dont cela pourrait se faire, mais cela pourrait être difficile. Il pourrait être difficile de faire respecter cette obligation et cela dépendrait notamment de la question de savoir si l'entité exploite une entreprise de radiodiffusion au Canada, qui est une autre notion définie dans la Loi sur la radiodiffusion.

(1310)

Le président:

Enfin, qui décide des sujets ou des thèmes abordés? À titre d'organisme de réglementation des radiodiffuseurs, avez-vous une idée des thèmes qu'ils pourraient choisir et qui permettraient, s'ils avaient leur mot à dire ou exerçaient un contrôle, d'accroître le nombre de téléspectateurs, d'améliorer leur profil ou d'intéresser les radiodiffuseurs, par opposition aux décisions d'un commissaire indépendant qui déterminerait les sujets qui seraient dans l'intérêt des Canadiens?

M. Peter McCallum:

Ici aussi, je trouve un peu difficile de vous répondre. La Loi sur la radiodiffusion, indépendamment de la Charte, reconnaît la liberté d'expression journalistique des radiodiffuseurs, et c'est donc quelque chose dont il faudrait aussi tenir compte. La seule chose que je peux dire, c'est que, quand l'arbitre rend des décisions sur la répartition du temps d'antenne, il convoque les différents partis politiques et écoute leurs arguments avant de décider. C'est tout ce que je peux vous dire à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci beaucoup de votre visite. Vos sages conseils, comme l'ont déjà dit plusieurs personnes, ont été très instructifs. Cela nous donne beaucoup de matière à réflexion.

Chers collègues, si vous permettez, il y a un peu de travail à faire pour le week-end. Voici une liste des autres témoins que nous entendrons durant le reste de l'étude. Ils ne sont peut-être pas dans l'ordre, mais ce sont les témoins que nous avons décidé de recevoir. Je rappelle que nous avons aussi décidé que, si nous voulons recevoir quelqu'un d'autre avant l'échéance du rapport, nous aurons une réunion supplémentaire ou une réunion prolongée. Faites-moi savoir si vous désirez recevoir quelqu'un d'autre. Certains témoins de la très longue liste initiale ont décliné l'invitation. Si vous voulez entendre un témoin qui n'est pas dans la liste, vérifiez auprès du greffier pour vous assurer que le témoin n'a pas déjà décliné l'invitation. Nous ferons ensuite le tri jeudi.

Est-ce qu'il y a autre chose? Non.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 30, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.