header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-11-28 PROC 81

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1145)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome, everyone, to the 81st meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Today we are continuing our study of the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates.

We are pleased to be joined by Paul Wells, senior writer at Maclean's and, by video conference from Boston, Vincent Raynauld, assistant professor in the department of communication studies at Emerson College and[Translation]

affiliate professor, literature and social communications department, Université du Québec à Trois Rivières.[English]

Thank you for being here.

Mr. Reid, is it just about the process here?

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

There were partial consultations, because people were drifting in. It was suggested to me by staff, and we had a chance to chat with a few but not all of the members about the idea of sitting a little bit later. If we go until about a quarter past one, we could have 45 minutes per panel. It means the second panel would start later than anticipated, but we would actually get at some kind of interaction.

Would that be reasonable? We'd just rely on the clerk to adjust questions from each party according to how much time we have.

The Chair:

Mr. Clerk, do you have any comments?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

That's certainly feasible.

The other possibility could be to have all the witnesses stay until 1:00 or 1:15 and have one large panel with all the witnesses.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sure.

The Clerk:

As it is right now, I have spoken to Mr. Wells and Mr. Raynauld, and they are both available to stay later through the second panel.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That might be even better, frankly.

The Chair:

Are any opposed to that? We would stay until 1:15, and we'd have all the panellists at the beginning.

Okay. Let's do it.

Are the other panellists ready?

The Clerk:

We have two of them down there. Do you want to introduce the others?

The Chair:

I will just introduce the other ones now, then, too.

By video conference we have from Vancouver, Maxwell A. Cameron, professor, department of political science, University of British Columbia.[Translation]

By video conference, from Quebec City, we also welcome Thierry Giasson, full professor, political science department, Université Laval.[English]

By video conference from St. John's, we have Alex Marland, professor, department of political science, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Thank you, all, for being here.

Maybe we'll start with you, Mr. Wells, because we can see you in person. Then we'll go to the video conferences.

Mr. Paul Wells (Senior Writer, Maclean's, As an Individual):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman and honourable members. It is thrilling for me to be speaking to your committee. This is the first time in 23 years on Parliament Hill that I'm sitting in a witness chair instead of at the media table.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Mr. Paul Wells: I'm happy to notice that my colleagues are doing what I normally do, which is skipping a committee meeting. And don't worry, I have no intention of making a habit of this.

I should note that while I am an employee of Maclean's and of Rogers, and I have always been a keen student of what is good for my employers, I am not speaking today as their designated representative but as an individual.

I am here at the committee's invitation. I can only guess, because it wasn't explained, but my hunch is that it's because I moderated the Maclean's national leaders' debate in 2015. It was the first debate in the history of Canadian elections that wasn't organized by a consortium of broadcast networks. As such, it upset some people. I believe we did good journalism.[Translation]

I might make myself more useful today by explaining how the 2015 campaign differed from the 11 previous campaigns, during which the only debates were those organized by broadcasters' consortia. I will explain why I believe, and hope, that 2015 was not a mere aberration, but rather the dawn of a new and promising era in Canadian democracy.

I will explain first why the consortium model was necessary in the past, why it is less necessary or not necessary at all today, and why any attempt to impose a new version of the old, monolithic model could prove very counterproductive.[English]

How did the consortium debates come to be? At first it was a combination of true civic-mindedness and necessity. There was real generosity in the broadcast networks' decision to organize the 1968 leaders' debate. There was also the fact that nearly 50 years ago, only the combined expertise of several networks and their combined news budgets could get cameras into the Centre Block and a live television feed out of it.

For most of my life there was no realistic alternative to a debate organized by a broadcast consortium. Over the last couple of decades, that changed. First, CPAC and a constellation of small, new networks, and then the Internet and social media became viable conduits for the information a debate provides. By 2015, it was feasible for others to organize debates without relying on the big networks. At least two party leaders, the Conservative Party's Stephen Harper and the NDP's Tom Mulcair, saw a tactical interest in encouraging such efforts. So, Maclean's organized a debate, as did The Globe and Mail, sort of, the Munk debates, and two competing French-language broadcast partnerships in Quebec. The old networks declined to carry the signal the English debate organizers offered. As a result, fewer people saw the 2015 debates as they happened than in previous election campaigns. That was a serious flaw.

However, our debate was viewed, as Minister Gould said here the other day, by 1.6 million people on television, and as she didn't say, by large numbers of people on a wide assortment of Internet outlets, including several news websites, YouTube, Facebook, and more. All the debates received saturation news coverage and polling suggests they influenced public opinion.

My main point to you today is that the technological revolution that made 2015 possible is continuing and accelerating. Costs of mounting a live broadcast have collapsed to near zero. By 2019 and 2023, the number of organizations with the wherewithal to organize debates and to get them in front of audiences will be much bigger still than in 2015.

It would therefore be odd to recreate, by public policy, a simulacrum of the broadcast consortium's old, natural monopoly long after the conditions that created that monopoly have ended. As Paul Adams from Carleton University told this committee last week, the consortium partners kept very pragmatic considerations, like audience size and scheduling conflicts, in mind when organizing their earlier debates. Good for them. They should. Anyone else would keep similar considerations in mind. We sure did. But precisely so: the debate model you grew up with was not handed down on stone tablets from a perfect deity. It was a product of its times, both flawed and wonderful. And the times have changed.

(1150)

[Translation]

In the past few years, I have told my friends that the model for leaders' debates in the near future might take the form of an average citizen from Regina or Moncton inviting the party leaders to their home to sit around the kitchen table, with the conversation being broadcast from coast to coast via Periscope or Facebook Live. In my opinion, the future looks a lot more like that than the old, monolithic model we are used to.[English]

At least that's one possible future if this committee and the government don't try to capture the past in a bottle by mandating a single, monolithic, “one size fits every campaign” model of debates.

I was struck by how every witness you heard last week called for a light, adaptable debate commission that would vet, and in some cases endorse, debate proposals, sometimes surprising and unexpected proposals, from a wide variety of outside proponents, every witness, that is, except the minister. Minister Karina Gould said she wants to institutionalize debates and ensure “broad representation of membership and advisory bodies to be reflective of Canadian society and ensure the inclusion of women, youth, indigenous peoples, and people with disabilities”.

I can only laud the instinct behind that sort of statement, but that language mirrors her predecessor's language during this government's early, brief attempt at reforming the electoral system last year. It sounds to me like it could be a formula for endless internal process arguments leading to debates that would last about six hours and have the leaders of seven or nine parties interrogated by a panel of 40 jurors chosen through what we would no doubt be assured was an open, transparent, and merit-based selection process, and no less open to criticism for all that.

Would representatives of small business, the Canadian Medical Association, the skilled trades, or advocates of proportional representation be included? Why or why not? Would a single moderator ever again have the latitude to press leaders who attempted to provide partial or evasive answers, as Stéphan Bureau and Steve Paikin did in some of the best debates of the past, or would the whole process become so earnest and cumbersome that any political leader worth her salt could effortlessly run rings around it?

The variety of the 2015 debates was a feature, not a bug. Interesting questions were asked. Should Elizabeth May or Gilles Duceppe participate? Should there be an audience in the room? Should there be one subject area or a broad selection of topics? Those questions received different answers from different organizers. Crucially, leaders were robbed of a chance to spend months learning how to beat the format, because they could not know which format to expect.

Variety and surprise are valuable in debates, too, because, Lord knows, life always delivers plenty of both to our elected leaders. I would argue strongly against any future in which the only debates that get broadcast are those designed by a debate commission or by its designated host network. There must be some provision for novel and unorthodox proposals to become reality. A commission could help some of those proposals along by declaring some debates, designed by outside proponents, a “must carry” on traditional broadcast networks, and by declaring them a “must attend” by political leaders. Good luck enforcing the latter provision, though. The stakes in a campaign are so high that, frankly, leaders will do what they believe is in their interests, as all of them always have.

Whatever you recommend, please favour lighter structures over heavier, more flexibility over less. Campaign techniques and the media environment are changing rapidly. If campaign debates become the only element of the modern campaign that doesn't change, then party strategists will quickly learn how to short-circuit them or hot-wire them to their own partisan advantage.

I look forward to hearing from the other panellists and your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Wells. We appreciate your experience.

Just for some of the panellists who have joined, there was a vote in the House that truncated this session, so we've put all the panellists together on one panel, and that's why you're here now. We'll be coming to your statements shortly.

We will now go to Professor Raynauld, who joins us from Boston.

(1155)

Mr. Vincent Raynauld (Assistant Professor, Emerson College; Affiliate Professor, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and honourable members of the committee, for inviting me to appear today.[Translation]

I would like to thank the chair, as well as the distinguished members of the committee for inviting me to take part in their work today.

Despite being based at Emerson College in Boston since August 2014, I am a Canadian citizen who completed my master's studies at the information and communication department, Université Laval, and his Ph.D. studies at Carleton University's School of Journalism and Communication, not too far from where you are today.

My research interests lie at the intersection of political communication, journalism, social media, and electoral campaigning. In recent years, my research activities have led me to take a closer look at the format of election debates during elections.[English]

Since the first televised leaders' debate during the 1968 Canadian federal elections, televised debates have become a pivotal moment for campaigns in Canada. On the one hand, debates provide political party leaders with a unique opportunity to reach out to and connect with a large portion of the electorate in both official languages. They enable them to make their positions on various political issues heard. On the other hand, they represent an important source of information for members of the public. They allow them to get more details about the electoral issues and to compare and contrast the positions of party leaders. Some leaders' debates are a one-stop shop for voters to get information and make up their minds for election day.

Several academic studies, some older and some more recent, have confirmed the impact of leaders' debates on the public's attitudes, levels of mobilization, and voting intentions. Despite in-depth changes in the expansion and diversification of the media environment, as well as the rise of new generations of citizens with different preferences during the last 50 years, the format and mechanics of leaders' debates have remained largely unchanged. Also, the viewership of leaders' debates has progressively declined during this time. In fact, the leaders' debates during the 2015 Canadian federal elections had a very low viewership compared with leaders' debates during past elections.

It should be noted that during this time period, the campaigning tactics deployed by political parties and candidates have also evolved significantly. This has obviously impacted how voters have access to information that can in some cases prove pivotal in their ability to choose a candidate to support on election day.

It is therefore possible to ask the following questions. Is the format of leaders' debates and the way they are organized still adapted to the current social, political, and media environment in Canada? Should it be reviewed in order to better serve Canadians?

While I don't have a silver bullet to answer these questions, I hope my remarks and my answers to your questions today can offer some food for thought, especially as you're considering the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates.

I can tell you that, first, younger adults are flocking to social media to acquire and share information about politics as well as to engage in political discussions with their peers. This dynamic is particularly prevalent on the night of leaders' debates, a phenomenon known as dual screening. A growing number of viewers are following the live broadcast of the debate on the TV screen while sharing insights as well as interacting with their peers on social media through their computer or mobile device such as a tablet or a smart phone. Leaders have also embraced this dynamic. For example, the leader of the Green Party of Canada, Elizabeth May, who was not included in the leaders' debate during the 2015 federal election, turned to Twitter to broadcast her views as well as share her thoughts on the position of other party leaders during the debate. In sum, it can be argued that the dual-screening dynamic is leading to a situation where there is a debate between political candidates on the TV screen and a larger, more decentralized public debate online.

Second, recent decades have been marked by the rise of a generation of citizens with a new set of preferences, interests, and objectives. It is possible to question whether these citizens are adequately served by the more traditional patterns of political communication, including leaders' debates during campaigns, as well as the structure of what we consider to be mainstream political discourse. In other words, are leaders' debates serving their needs and wants adequately? Are they contributing to making citizens less interested and engaged in the formal political process?

(1200)



I believe that while leaders' debates still represent a vital aspect of election campaigns, and to some degree democratic life in Canada, their format and the way in which they are organized is no longer adapted to the current social, political, and media environment in Canada. More importantly, the situation described earlier in my opening remarks represents, in my opinion, one dimension of a broader debate about the growing disconnect between political elites and members of civil society in Canada. It should be noted that some politicians have deployed efforts in order to address this situation and reshape the way in which they reach out to, and engage with, members of the public.

I suspect that the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates, or institutionalizing the organization of leaders' debates, would be beneficial in addressing some of these concerns and those raised by others who will be appearing in front of the committee. I am unsure that media organizations are in the best position to effect change that would be beneficial to the public and democratic life in Canada. The independent commissioner could act as a neutral arbitrator who could take into account the wants and needs of all players in the context of leaders' debates in Canada: political parties and candidates, media organizations that broadcast the debates, and members of the public. In other words, an independent commissioner could provide a vision that would ensure that leaders' debates are adapted to the current and future social, political, and media environment in Canada.

Mr. Chair, and honourable members of the committee, I hope my appearance will be beneficial to your work. I want to thank you again for inviting me today. Please note that I stand ready to answer any questions you may have, in both official languages.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, distinguished members of the committee, I hope my participation will be helpful to you in your work.

Thank you for the invitation to join you today and I am available to answer your questions in both official languages.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Raynauld.[English]

Before we go to Professor Giasson, I want to remind members that at four o'clock tomorrow, in room 112-N, we have the Ghana meeting. There's a document coming to you on that.[Translation]

We will now hear from Mr. Giasson, from Université Laval.

Mr. Thierry Giasson (Full Professor, Département de science politique, Université Laval, As an Individual):

Hello, Mr. Chair.

I would like to thank the members of the committee for inviting me.

I would also like to say hello to my colleagues, Mr. Raynauld, Mr. Cameron and Mr. Marland. I am pleased to share this time with them.

My name is Thierry Giasson. I am a full professor in the political science department at Université Laval. I am also the director of the political communication research group and a member of the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship.

I would like first to thank you for this invitation to share some of my thoughts on the organization of leaders' debates, as part of your consideration of the Prime Minister Trudeau's proposal to create an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates.

I have also reviewed the testimony of the witnesses who have appeared before you since November 21 and certain documents to which you have access, such as the summary report of the colloquium on the future of televised debates, which was organized in 2015 by the Institute for Research on Public Policy, or IRPP, and Carleton University, as well as the study by the Library of Parliament's parliamentary information and research service on the organization of leaders' debates in other democracies.

So as not to repeat information you have already heard, I will focus on the objective which, in my opinion, should guide the organization of leaders' debates during elections in Canada. My presentation will be in three parts.

First, I will explain the role of a leaders' debate during an election. I will present the objective, in keeping with this role, that should guide the organization and the broadcast of a debate. Third, I will outline the competing interests that make it more difficult to achieve this objective given the way debates are currently organized, which is through negotiation behind closed doors between the media and the political parties.

Finally, I will mention the aspects of the context which, in my opinion, should guide the committee's reflections on creating the position of independent commissioner responsible for organizing leaders' debates.

What purpose does a leaders' debate serve in an election? Research on these broadcasts show that the role of televised debates in a democracy is to give undecided voters an opportunity to compare the positions of the main political parties vying for office on the key issues for society at the time of the election.

The broadcast gives citizens simultaneous access to the parties' platforms on the issues and, importantly, to the type of leadership offered by each party leader taking part in the broadcast.

This gives citizens access to two kinds of electoral information, presented to them in summary and comparatively. The role of a leaders' debate is therefore above all to provide information. The purpose of the broadcast is to offer, to the citizens who need it, information that is easy to access, diverse, and transparent, and is therefore of great added value and will be useful in making a decision in the election.

The debate therefore plays a key role in democratic life since it is the only communication format that offers citizens this unique context of election information. In watching leaders' debates, citizens expend a modest if not minimum effort in return for information that can be very important to them.

This naturally leads to the second part of my presentation, which is to identify the objective that should guide the organization of leaders' debates in Canada. The mission that, in my opinion, should guide the organization of a leaders' debate is providing information, which is a crucial role in democratic elections.

As I said earlier, the leaders' debate program offers added value, as compared to other communication and information formats, that citizens cannot find anywhere else. The objective should therefore be to develop a program that serves this essential purpose of providing information, that serves citizens, and that facilitates their election decisions.

I will say this later on, but, in my opinion, the leaders' debate is first and foremost for citizens and democracy. In my opinion, this principle calls for the establishment of a more transparent and independent process that is free of special interests, and that upholds this basic principle. I would also note that the way leaders' debates are organized currently, with the content and format of the broadcast being negotiated behind closed doors by the media and the political parties, could compromise this objective since the required partners at the bargaining table come with their own strategic priorities.

In what way could these objectives differ? On the one hand, the media seem to regard the debate as an exercise in journalism that promotes their role as gatekeepers of public information and holding political actors to account. Moreover, the IRPP summary report shows that this perception was very prevalent in discussions among the media representatives who took part in the colloquium.

The media are also businesses that are subject to economic imperatives, which means that their production has to draw big audiences in order to be profitable.

(1205)



This pressure leads organizations to give preference to broadcast formats featuring confrontation, spectacle, and drama. This is in fact what the TVA network said when it left the broadcasters' consortium in order to produce leaders' debates that would be like a duel, offering viewers exchanges deemed to be more intense and entertaining.

While entertaining, such theatrics dominated by confrontation might not meet the objective of offering citizens election information that has added value. Moreover, they limit citizens' access to a range of political views, since there are just two opposing viewpoints in a duel.

The media interest in producing a good television show—or simply a good show, since the debate can be seen on various platforms—might not serve citizens' need to obtain diverse, concise and useful information.

Moreover, as we saw in 2015, among other things, holding multiple debates reduces their significance among the electorate. Citizens' interest is diluted when too many debates are held, since their need for information decreases as the campaign progresses.

Holding multiple debates therefore serves no purpose since the potential viewership declines as the campaign progresses. It is nonetheless honourable for party leaders to agree, as they did in 2015, to take part in a number of thematic debates, but I think at least one debate should be held in each official language that includes all the leaders of the main political parties in a campaign.

The political parties are the other group of actors in the negotiations. They have their own strategic interests. Their main objective is to present their platforms to specific electors, while limiting the risk of missteps.

The obsession with strategy will lead politicians to give a very calculated, careful, and repetitive performance, that will sometimes lack authenticity or depth, and that citizens might not view favourably. These strategic interests also lead certain parties to refuse to take part in the debates, as the Conservative Party of Canada refused to take part in the English debate organized by the media consortium in 2015.

It is perfectly normal for political parties to have strategic objectives for their participation in the leaders' debate. It is more difficult to accept that these parties and their leaders should refuse to stand before Canadians to present their platform, defend their record, and answer questions on the issues of public concern when the election is called.

Finally, I will conclude by highlighting certain aspects that I believe should guide your reflections on creating the position of independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates.

First, I think any attempt to reform the organization of leaders' debates should above all be guided by the interest of citizens, since they are the key players in Canada's democratic process.

Any type of reform should focus on recognizing this principle and the need of citizens during an election period for diverse, transparent, and useful information for their decision. The leaders' debate does not belong to the media or to the political parties. It belongs instead to citizens and to Canadian democracy. This reality should guide any reforms, in my opinion.

I think reforming the organization of debates is important in order to reestablish the importance of these election communication activities during elections in Canada. Many voters still need them to make an informed decision, as seen by the audience size, which was still quite large for the debates in 2015, in spite of everything.

Canada's hybrid media landscape does mean, however, that these debates will have to be broadcast on multiple media platforms. As Mr. Raynauld said, they will be consumed on multiple media platforms.

They must also be organized in accordance with the objective of giving undecided voters an election program during which the main party leaders speak up for their record and policy positions to the Canadian public.

I also think the debates should be organized by someone who is independent of the media and of the political parties in order to limit the negative impact of strategic and business interests on the democratic role of debates.

I am not sure, however, that creating the new position of independent commissioner for the organization of leaders' debates is the way to go about this reform. Existing organizations already have resources that could do the coordination work of organizing debates. Off the top of my head, there is the broadcasting arbitrator, who is responsible for allocating free broadcasting time among the political parties as elections approach.

Although temporary at this time, this position could be made permanent and include broader responsibilities, including the organization of debates, as well as perhaps monitoring the advertising activities of political parties outside official election periods.

(1210)



If I may, Mr. Chair, I would like to conclude my remarks with a warning.

Your proposals will be evaluated by the Canadian people who, as numerous studies over more than 20 years have confirmed, are sceptical and suspicious of the political class.

There is democratic malaise in Canada and the government's recent failures to make democratic reforms might make some Canadians more sensitive in their perceptions of their political leaders. They have big expectations, but increasingly they are being disappointed. In my opinion, it would be wise not to disappoint them again.

Thank you very much for the time you have allowed me. I will be pleased to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Giasson.[English]

Now we have Professor Marland, from Memorial University in Newfoundland.

Dr. Alex Marland (Professor, Department of Political Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, As an Individual):

I want to thank the committee for inviting me to speak. I have to say I'm envious of what you're doing. Legislative committees are an essential role in our parliamentary system, and I really want to thank everyone for their service.

Just to situate my ability to offer comment, committee members should be aware that my area of research is Canadian political communication and political marketing. I also study how political strategists are engaged in media management and message coordination. Generally speaking, my approach is non-partisan, and I try to balance all available perspectives when arriving at an informed assessment of a situation.

I want to start by affirming that in my opinion, it's reasonable to create an independent commissioner to organize party leaders' debates. I appreciate that the negotiations with the broadcast consortium can be challenging, and as others have pointed out, the ways of communicating with Canadians are evolving. To me, a debate about debates takes away from attention that should be paid to public policy. However, I don't think we should be fooled; strategic games are not going to vanish by the creation of an individual or any particular commissioner—

(1215)

The Clerk:

Professor Marland, it appears we have a fire alarm going off here, as though things couldn't get any worse. We'll have to suspend and we'll come back.

(1215)

(1245)

The Chair:

We're going to continue with Professor Marland.

It will be okay if you talk quickly, because we have such a short time. Do your best.

We're looking forward to hearing from you.

Dr. Alex Marland:

I'll just pick up on what I was saying about how a debate about debates takes away attention that should be paid to public policy.

Really, one of the messages I'd like to convey is that we shouldn't be thinking that strategic games would magically vanish. With any such commissioner, we have to be concerned about how that person is appointed, and we have to be sure the person is truly independent. Finding a way to ensure that all political parties support that person's appointment must be sacrosanct. If we don't do that, what will happen is that in the heat of an election campaign, a political party will be prone to deriding the office of the commissioner and perhaps even the individual appointee. They will use that individual's alleged partisanship as a reason for delegitimizing the entire debate process. The political strategists and leaders who avoid complaining about the broadcast consortium or about the media might be comfortable complaining about someone they perceive to be a political appointee.

This brings me to my main opinion that I wish to relay to the committee: the proposed focus on leaders' debates is too narrow. It's well intentioned, but it is problematic for reasons I'm going to explain.

I believe the scope of the position needs to be broadened. To me, the position should remove the word “leaders”. This would produce some important changes that would have positive reverberations across our political system. A lot of scholars, including me, have raised concern about the excessive focus on party leaders in Canada. Media attention increases the power of the leadership circle and diminishes the influence of those outside the inner circle. The trend in intensifying the concentration of power in the so-called “centre” is often traced back to the 1970s. Since then, leaders' debates have been the focal point of election campaigns. Political strategists refer to the pre-debate period as the “phony war”, because up to that point, many people aren't paying attention.

It isn't as though there is much in the way of policy discussion drawn from the debates. The media looks for a knockout punch, and instantly judges who won and who lost. Then it moves on to following the leaders' tour. As well, research shows that the leaders' debates are mostly a media spectacle, rather than a civic education function. What many people learn is high level. Research shows that opinion formulation can be as limited as forming a judgment on the basis of candidates' mannerisms.

What matters, and what I'm concerned about, is that the leaders' debates place such an intense media glare on the leaders. This has a ripple effect throughout the entire campaign and into governance. In my view, you have an opportunity to do something about it. By referring to an “independent commissioner to organize party leaders' debates”, Parliament would be further formalizing the power and authority of the leaders. It's the kind of thing that goes against the spirit of the Reform Act that was passed by Parliament in 2015. I believe that the word “leaders” should be removed from the proposed position.

Calling the position “the independent commissioner to organize political party debates” would reduce the emphasis on party leaders. It would provide flexibility to broaden the commission or the commissioner's mandate. This could potentially lead to a much-needed and helpful organizational resource for constituency campaigns, where so many debates among candidates are held. The commissioner could and should provide guidelines and best practices for organizing debates in Canada's 338 electoral districts. After all, this is where candidates are running for whom Canadians can actually vote directly. Local media is also in flux.

Moreover, national level debates can and should emphasize the party as a team, rather than the leader as an individual. Removing the word “leader” could create opportunities for national level debates that include candidates that the leader believes are suitable for cabinet. The narrow nature of the word “leader” in the position reasonably precludes such opportunities.

The last point I'll make is that the more the institutional roles and processes emphasize the party leader, the more party election candidates, backbench MPs, and even ministers become political nobodies off of Parliament Hill. We need to find opportunities to level the playing field. An independent commissioner to organize debates for party leaders treats our parliamentary system as a presidential system. We should not entrench that further.

(1250)



This committee and Parliament has an opportunity to do something about the perceived concentration of power in a political party's leadership circle. Please consider removing the word “leader” from the proposed position title.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for that interesting perspective.

Now we'll go to Professor Cameron at UBC.

Professor Maxwell A. Cameron (Professor, Department of Political Science, University of British Columbia, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity to appear before this committee. I'm really delighted and I'd like to express my strong support for the initiative to create a commission or a commissioner responsible for federal party debates.

I think the status quo is problematic in a number of important respects. The main concern that I would like to focus on is the lack of transparency, accountability, and public engagement in the organization of the debates. Although political debates are an important part of our democracy, the way we organize them isn't particularly democratic.

I think that the creation of a commission or a commissioner could provide an opportunity for more meaningful public engagement and deliberation in our election campaigns. Improvements could be made not only in the form and content of debates, but also in the process by which they are organized.

A commission or a commissioner could provide the opportunity to include a broader spectrum of voices from Canadian society, including first nations, youth, women, and minorities.

More importantly, in my view, it would create an opportunity to counteract the fragmentation in our public life, which I believe is beginning to tear at the fabric of our democracy. I think we're only beginning to see this fragmentation that's under way.

More and more, Canadians are getting their news content from social media platforms that divide us into smaller and smaller publics rather than binding us together into one. Political debates are one of the relatively few moments when the whole public can come together and engage in a common activity.

I believe it's important to do everything we can to encourage a flourishing public life, and for that, we need more opportunities to have dialogue, deliberation, and the engagement of the public in our politics.

This is one of the reasons that in recent years at UBC my colleagues and I at the Centre for the Study of Democratic Institutions have created a school for politicians. We organize what's called the Summer Institute for Future Legislators. It's a program that's designed to foster the kinds of skills and knowledge that we need to be good citizens or to be good statespersons.

One of the things that our participants learn to do is how to debate. They engage in question period, but they also participate in caucus meetings. They organize committee meetings and they meet with and hear from witnesses. They craft legislation. They debate it at first and second readings.

One of the things that's really fascinating about watching the participants in this program is how quickly they're gripped by the spirit of teamwork and partisanship. At the same time, when they come into the activity, as I think most people do when they enter public life, it's in a spirit of interest in public service, a desire to find and to serve the public good. We watch them struggle to balance these competing goals. That's what politics is really all about. That's what citizenship is about.

I think that we need opportunities for people to learn and to cultivate these skills. Unfortunately, there are too few opportunities for citizens to acquire these skills, the knowledge that they need to deliberate, to compromise, to balance goods and to make collective decisions. These aren't things that you learn from a textbook. You don't learn them by studying political science. You learn them by doing.

I think debates provide a marvellous opportunity to cultivate citizenship, but to serve that purpose, debates should not be monopolized by the media and political parties. I don't mean to suggest for a minute that political parties and the media are not crucial; what they bring to the table is central to what debates are all about and they have a critical role to play in their organization.

(1255)



I'm suggesting that should be balanced against the involvement of civil society to ensure the debates don't simply create an entertaining spectacle and don't simply serve partisan interests, but that they also promote active, engaged, and informed citizenship. I think we can imagine a number of ways in which debates could be organized so that their form and content better serve the public interest than our current system does.

Very briefly, let me suggest a few of the ideas that I think might serve this purpose. In the first place, I think a commission or commissioner might well have an advisory body that would reflect Canada's diversity. A commission or commissioner could be empowered to place the organization of the debates in the hands of an independent body that would include, in addition to representatives of parties and the media, citizens, civil society groups, and universities. I believe that universities have a potentially important role to play, given that they exist across our country and have deep connections with civil society. I would suggest that the organization of debates should probably not be placed in the hands of Elections Canada, because I think it's important that it stands above the fray.

The organization of debates should involve open and transparent public engagement to ensure that decisions such as who participates, what kinds of questions are asked, the format, and other matters, reflect the broadest public interest. I also agree with some of the things that have been said by previous speakers, that in the spirit of our Westminster system, debates among party leaders should be complemented by debates in ridings across the country, as well as debates on specific topics involving parliamentarians who are not necessarily party leaders. These debates could be easily taped and stored on a publicly available website for all to watch.

Finally, and perhaps most ambitiously, the public should be encouraged to participate in debates, holding their own local face-to-face meetings in smaller groups or medium-sized assemblies. This could be done by introducing what political scientists Bruce Ackerman and James Fishkin have called a deliberation day, a national holiday held a couple of weeks before the election itself, in which all citizens would be encouraged to take time out to meet with their neighbours, organize activities, and debate for themselves the great issues that the country faces during an election.

Many of these ideas have been articulated in other contexts. There has been some very good work done by my colleague Taylor Owen, and Rudyard Griffiths, on this a number of years back, and I think it would be worthwhile to build on that work.

Needless to say, an ambitious agenda to democratize debates would take some time to develop, but I think that creating an independent commission or commissioner would be an excellent first step.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Professor Cameron.

We have 15 minutes left, so we'll have five minutes for each party, one questioner. You could share your time.

We'll start with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I'm going to try to share my time.

I'll make this very quick. I have an overall question for all our guests.

First of all, thank you for your time.

It seems to me that the proliferation of ways of accessing the latest debates in so many platforms now has basically turned a lot of these debates into single-issue debates as such. As Mr. Wells pointed out, the opportunity is there because the expense of putting this together has collapsed, to the point where anybody can do it. You can have a large studio in a major city with all the broadcast cameras, or you can do it through Facebook in some shed in rural Newfoundland, and it would be sort of the same thing—not that I'm opposed to that.

My question boils down to this, though. With regard to the commission or commissioner, I appreciate that the independence of such has to be tantamount. I get that. But in the process of doing their job, would you be more in favour of a commission or commissioner sanctioning one or two debates—both languages—on a larger scale, for all platforms to plug into, or should the commission or commissioner be in charge of allowing a proposal to come in on several types of debates on different platforms, maybe even a single issue one? In other words, it would be their sanction of this that gives it some credence.

Why don't we go in order of appearance. Mr. Wells.

(1300)

Mr. Paul Wells:

My strong preference is for a variety of leaders' debates in each campaign. We have to look at the real world. The more debates that are organized by an independent commissioner, the higher the likelihood that one or more leaders will decide not to show up for some and indeed to flout whatever sanctions might be levied against them. The fewer debates that are organized, the higher the likelihood that some cheeky news outlet like Maclean's is going to reach out to the party leaders anyway and say “Let's have our own debate.”

Unless a debate commissioner is going to forbid participation in non-sanctioned debates, then I say that sort of event, let's just have a debate, let's just talk.... Say, the Liberal leader and the NDP leader have a grudge against each other and The Globe and Mail or La Presse or the University of Toronto says “Let's just have a debate between the two of you.” I think the likelihood of that happening rises to a near certainty.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Raynauld.

Mr. Vincent Raynauld:

I think there are two ways to look at the issue. First of all, it's been proven that people pay less and less attention or the attention span as well is less, and less time is devoted to these types of exercises. On the one hand, obviously organizing a large number of debates would have an impact on the ability of people to see all these debates to be aware of what's happening. On the other hand, and I think that point was raised by some of my colleagues, it's important to flag this sort of fragmentation of the public and have everybody plug into one or two major debates to have people be aware of a broad spectrum of issues.

It's hard to provide you with a yes or no answer to your question, but I think a couple of components need to be kept in mind. I'm sure that my colleagues will be able to provide additional insights.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Professor Marland.

Dr. Alex Marland:

The more debates you have, the less attention will be paid to the debates, because instead of focusing events that everybody is looking at, all of a sudden, another debate is occurring.

How do you reasonably control what's going on? I think what Mr. Wells said is absolutely right. You're just going to constantly have all this bickering occurring about what is and isn't sanctioned. I think the idea of a commissioner providing guidelines and best practices might be useful in many instances.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Giasson. [Translation]

Mr. Thierry Giasson:

I do not think they are mutually exclusive. The commissioner, if that position is ever created, could be responsible for organizing two official debates among the main party leaders at the time of the election. That would not prevent media organizations from organizing other debates, after negotiating with the political parties.

We must ensure that at least two focal points in the campaign are organized in a transparent way in order to allow for a plurality of partisan views to be expressed. Citizens need that.

As I said earlier, thematic debates are fine, but once again I think it is important for citizens to have this opportunity for comparison and evaluation...

(1305)

[English]

The Chair:

Sorry, we're in a rush here.

Mr. Cameron, briefly, and then we'll go on to the next questioner.

Prof. Maxwell A. Cameron:

I believe that it's not an either-or question. I think there should be a hierarchy of debates. When Canadians vote, they vote because they care about issues. They care about their region, their city, their province, and they're interested in the leaders. It seems to me that it's appropriate to have a major debate among the people who want to be the prime minister and to have other debates within ridings or debates on specific issues.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

It's great to be back here with some old friends, and I do appreciate this conversation. It's very near and dear to my heart. I got here and heard the topic. I'm quite surprised at the fact that we were talking possibly about a commissioner, a tentacle of government, to oversee potential debates. I find this quite shocking.

Maybe I can get a quick comment, a yes or no answer from each of the panellists here. It's my understanding, based on testimony that the minister gave at a previous committee, that the minister would not commit to all-party support for this commission or commissioner or however you want to call it.

I'll start with Mr. Wells because I can see him.

Mr. Paul Wells:

The question is, should the commissioner get all-party support?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's correct.

Mr. Paul Wells:

I view the commissioner as a rough equivalent to an officer of Parliament, and I think merely consulting would not be enough. I think there should be some level of consensus reached around.... You're nominating a person who would normally hold that office when the party currently in power is no longer in power. That sometimes happens in this country.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I don't know who's next.

Mr. Raynauld.

Mr. Vincent Raynauld:

It's a tough question to answer, obviously. The key here is that the commission needs to remain independent, and oftentimes it's hard to achieve full support when you're independent.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Mr. Cameron.

Prof. Maxwell A. Cameron:

Well, if the fundamental interest here is democracy and the public good, then no, I don't believe that any one party should have a veto over that. Of course I think it's critical that such a role, which would be, as Mr. Wells just said, like an officer of Parliament, command the broadest possible support, so I think it would be very important to try to find as much agreement across parties as possible.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Monsieur Giasson. [Translation]

Mr. Thierry Giasson:

I agree with Mr. Cameron. [English]

Mr. Scott Reid:

If you have a second, could I ask a question?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, sure.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want to ask this question. I think we're almost out of time. I'll direct it to Mr. Wells.

We try to make officers of Parliament independent of any individual party's interest by saying that they are answering to the House of Commons, which means, in practice, they are answering to the parties that are in the House of Commons. My experience here in the House of Commons, in watching over the past two decades, is that the parties represented in the House can want to freeze out other parties.

We saw an electoral law passed and then struck down by the Supreme Court, which would have limited funding for parties not yet represented in the House. I worry that the same thing could happen with exclusion of new or insurgent parties, as the Reform Party, of which I was once a member, once was. Is that not a danger with the commission model?

Mr. Paul Wells:

It sure is. I'm not going to solve that conundrum for you. I'm glad this committee is taking some time to ponder questions like that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's similar to my concern. Once government gets hold of something, it usually grows. It doesn't shrink.

Maybe, Mr. Wells, I could quickly ask something. I know time is running short. Was the feed that Maclean's had during the last leaders' debate in the 2015 election offered to other broadcast networks?

Mr. Paul Wells:

It was. I made it my business, because I was trying to get ready to moderate a debate, which was essentially a journalistic job. I didn't pay close attention to those discussions. My understanding is that Rogers offered the feed to other broadcasters for the kind of fee that is normally charged for that service. It's a fee at a level that broadcast networks could easily afford. The broadcast networks said, “No, thank you.” Their public explanation for doing that was that they had no control over the content, and they had no guarantee that we were going to deliver a proper debate to them, and they didn't want to broadcast crap to their audiences.

My personal preference would have been that we offer the feed for free. My personal preference would have been that all of these networks on which I have appeared would understand that I would do good work. I'd also see a potential role for the debate commissioner as vetting independent proposals and declaring that this and this and this proposed debate run by outside groups rise to a certain level of quality, and therefore the commissioner declares these debates a “must carry”—but that's one idea among many.

(1310)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

To your understanding, the only condition was a small fee to the other networks, and they said, “No, thanks.” That's to your understanding.

Mr. Paul Wells:

Yes. I stand to be corrected by the broadcast networks, but that is what I learned.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Mr. Wells, do you see possibly, instead of letting the markets and the network decide how best to work, that this is another step in government overreach in terms of a potential commissioner? How do you see this playing out?

Mr. Paul Wells:

I think it's legitimate for the state to have an interest in this element of campaigns, as it has an interest in so many other elements of campaigns. I think it's really hard to do it in such a way that things improve.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That would be hard, yes.

Mr. Paul Wells:

I've heard people refer to the presidential debate commission in the United States as a model. I would urge this committee to actually study how the presidential debate commission works. It's a farce. It's a racket by the old-line parties to ensure their monopoly over the White House, or their duopoly over the White House. There's a reason that no candidate from a third party has come close to getting elected in a century. The presidential debate commission is not foreign to that outcome.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson has agreed to give up his time to discuss his motion.

I'd like to thank all the witnesses for coming today. I'm sorry for the fire alarm and the vote that took up some of the time, but you provided some very sage advice and we got all your presentations in, which is the important thing. People can of course contact you individually if they have further questions. [Translation]

Mr. Thierry Giasson:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, do you want to present your revised motion? We only have about five minutes. We'll see if we can get started, at least.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

When you informed me we weren't going to get to this today, I didn't want to delay, so I've given up my time in the rotation to move this.

I'll read the amended motion. By the way, the formulary part is taken directly from the discussions that PROC had on BOIE. I just transposed the particulars. It reads as follows: That, in relation to its study on the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates, the Committee allow one Member who is not a member of a recognized party to participate in the hearings in a temporary, non-voting capacity when it is conducting the study, and that the Member be allowed 5 minutes during the second round of questions in which to address witnesses.

Again, this is what we did when were studying BOIE and we wanted to make sure that everybody had a say since everyone was impacted and committee, you asked me to go back and bring language, so I've done that, Chair. I put this in front of the committee, and hopefully we can support it.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I support it.

The Chair:

While people are discussing, I'm going to ask you some questions.

How will the independents be organized? Will they be allowed at in camera meetings? Will they be discussing the draft report? Would they be provided all documents from the committee?

Mr. David Christopherson:

My first response would be, if there are answers to how we answered those questions vis-à-vis BOIE, I would say the same.

The Chair:

Scott, do you have any input?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're just trying to figure it out right now. A change was made, and what we're looking at is not what was discussed. What was the change?

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Would this just tack on five minutes to each meeting?

The Chair:

Five minutes in the second round for that person.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In addition to everything that we already have, so no one's losing time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would our meetings last until five minutes later than the current end time? They wouldn't wrap at 1:00 ; they'd wrap up at 1:05. Or are we taking the time out of something else?

(1315)

The Chair:

That's a question for the committee. Will we just reduce the time of the questions and answers or do we go to 1:05, five minutes later?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do we use up all the time when we do rotation? I think we usually have time left over.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We sometimes lose the three-minute rounds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You lose 10, usually.

The Chair:

David, is the five minutes you're proposing at the beginning or at the end of the second round? Where is it in the second round?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Again, I'm not married to this. I just tried to find something that was fair, and the rules that we had under BOIE must have been fair because they were approved by everybody. I don't care.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Could I propose that it be top of the second round?

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I make a suggestion here?

Given the time, would it not seem unreasonable that we discuss this among ourselves? It sounds as if there's a broad willingness to go with something like this, but the details need to be hammered out where we can do it—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I gave up my time for nothing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm just suggesting that. I'm not trying to be...you'll be quiet for a second and we'll see if you get a resolution and then we won't have to do it. We'll come back on Thursday with an agreement.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

We're not analyzing the Magna Carta here. I think it's pretty explicit as to what it wants to do. I think we've already had one discussion about it. We were asked to have a good think for ourselves and come back and talk about it once more. I agree. I like it. I think it should be at the top of the second round. If that requires an amendment or whatever it may be, I'm willing to do that. I don't know what the concern is.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Why don't you make that amendment? Then we'll be discussing it? Does that make sense? Why don't you propose that amendment?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Here's my thing, if I may, Chair.

I don't know if it requires an amendment. Does it? If this carries, then you can slip it in wherever you wish. The instruction is to give that person the five minutes within our time. I'm only suggesting putting it at the top of the second round. If there is to be an amendment, I'll gladly put one forward.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To solve this problem, I suggest we shave one minute off each of the seven-minute rounds in the first round and give those minutes to the independent round. If they're present, we do this. If they're not, we don't. Between the first and second rounds, the problem is solved. It doesn't add any time to the meeting—it adds one minute—and we only give that minute each to them if they come.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Except you're asking me to pay the biggest price.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Liberals lose two minutes—

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, no, but overall I have less time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—you each lose one, and we give five to them. There's one minute at the end.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You said two minutes from the government?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You still get your second round, because we're taking time out of the first set.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I'm just saying that one minute off seven means more to me than you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Can I suggest an alternative here? I'm actually going to propose it as an amendment just so we have a formal way of either agreeing to it or dismissing it and moving back to what's being suggested here. The amendment I propose is that a comma be added to the end of what's written here and these words added: “provided that the meeting be extended by an additional five minutes for each panel of witnesses”.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That would be the easiest. I would prefer that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would that be okay with people?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That way nobody loses anything and colleagues are gaining for the price of five minutes.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Is that per panel?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, it's per panel.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So if there are two panels, it would be extended by 10 minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Should I read it again, Chris?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

No, I heard it. I just wanted to know—

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's per panel, yes. We would be wrapping up five or 10 minutes later.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This all only applies if they actually come. Is that right?

The Chair:

That's true.

With that amendment, is there any further discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Motion as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: The independents will have to sort out amongst themselves who comes or who's allowed to come.

(1320)

The Clerk:

So I'll write to them all?

The Chair:

Okay. Will you explain that to them?

The Clerk: Yes.

The Chair: We'll bring back, where we can, the Board of Internal Economy rules on those other questions. If there are ones, we'll use them.

Is there anything else for the good of the nation?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, thank you, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate how you always look over at me before you hit the gavel.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1145)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je vous souhaite à tous la bienvenue à la 81e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Nous poursuivons aujourd'hui notre étude sur la création d'un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir parmi nous aujourd'hui Paul Wells, rédacteur principal au Maclean's, et par vidéoconférence de Boston, Vincent Raynauld, professeur adjoint au département de communication du Collège Emerson et[Français] professeur associé au Département de lettres et communication sociale de l'Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières.[Traduction]

Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

Monsieur Reid, voulez-vous simplement intervenir sur une question de procédure?

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Nous n'avons eu que des consultations partielles, et les choses ont un peu dérivé. Le personnel m'a proposé quelque chose, et j'ai eu la chance d'en discuter avec quelques membres du Comité, mais pas tous: nous pourrions prolonger un peu la séance. Si nous siégions jusqu'à et quart, nous pourrions accorder 45 minutes à chaque groupe. Cela signifie que le deuxième groupe commencerait un peu plus tard que prévu, mais nous pourrions avoir un peu d'interaction.

Serait-ce raisonnable? Il suffirait de demander au greffier de modifier le temps de parole accordé à chaque parti en fonction du temps à notre disposition.

Le président:

Monsieur le greffier, avez-vous des commentaires à faire?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

C'est tout à fait faisable.

L'autre possibilité serait de demander à tous les témoins de rester jusqu'à 13 heures, 13 h 15, puis de tous les regrouper en un seul groupe.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien sûr.

Le greffier:

Dans l'état actuel des choses, j'ai parlé avec M. Wells et avec M. Raynauld, et ils sont tous deux prêts à rester un peu plus longtemps avec nous pendant la partie réservée au second groupe.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait peut-être encore mieux, bien honnêtement.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un s'y oppose? Nous siégerons donc jusqu'à 13 h 15, puis entendrons tous les témoins au début.

D'accord. Faisons cela.

Est-ce que les autres témoins sont prêts?

Le greffier:

Il y en a deux qui sont déjà là. Voulez-vous présenter les autres témoins?

Le président:

Je vais effectivement vous présenter les autres témoins tout de suite.

Par vidéoconférence, de Vancouver, nous recevons Maxwell A. Cameron, professeur au département de science politique de l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique.[Français]

Par vidéoconférence, de Québec, nous recevons aussi Thierry Giasson, professeur titulaire au Département de science politique de l'Université Laval.[Traduction]

Par vidéoconférence de St-John's, nous accueillons Alex Marland, professeur au département de science politique de l'Université Memorial de Terre-Neuve.

Je vous remercie tous d'être ici.

Nous pouvons peut-être commencer par vous, monsieur Wells, puisque nous pouvons vous voir en personne. Nous entendrons ensuite tous les témoins par vidéoconférence.

M. Paul Wells (rédacteur principal, Maclean's, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je suis ravi de pouvoir m'entretenir avec votre comité. C'est la première fois en 23 ans sur la Colline du Parlement que je me trouve assis dans la chaise du témoin plutôt qu'à la table des médias.

Des députés: Bravo!

M. Paul Wells: Je suis content de remarquer que mes collègues font ce que je fais habituellement, c'est-à-dire l'école buissonnière pendant une séance de comité. Mais ne vous inquiétez pas, je n'ai aucunement l'intention d'en faire une habitude.

Je dois souligner que si je suis un employé de Maclean's et de Rogers et que je fais toujours très attention à ce qui est bon pour mes employeurs, je ne prends pas la parole aujourd'hui en tant que représentant de mes employeurs, mais à titre personnel.

Je comparais ici à l'invitation du Comité. On ne m'a pas expliqué pourquoi, mais je ne peux que supposer que c'est parce que j'ai modéré le débat national des chefs de Maclean's en 2015. C'était la première fois dans l'histoire des élections au Canada qu'un débat n'était pas organisé par un consortium de télédiffuseurs. Ainsi, la chose a dérangé certaines personnes, mais je crois que nous avons fait du bon journalisme. [Français]

Je pourrai peut-être vous être utile aujourd'hui en expliquant pourquoi la campagne de 2015 était différente des 11 campagnes précédentes, au cours desquelles les seuls débats étaient ceux qui étaient organisés par des consortiums de télédiffuseurs. Je vous expliquerai pourquoi je crois, et j'espère, que 2015 n'était pas qu'une aberration, mais plutôt l'aube d'une nouvelle ère, prometteuse pour la démocratie canadienne.

J'expliquerai d'abord pourquoi le modèle de consortium fut nécessaire à l'époque, pourquoi il l'est moins ou plus du tout aujourd'hui, et pourquoi toute tentative d'imposer une nouvelle version du vieux modèle monolithique risque de s'avérer très contre-productive.[Traduction]

Comment les débats du consortium sont-ils nés? Au départ, c'était à la fois une question de véritable sens civique et une nécessité. Il y avait une véritable générosité dans la décision des réseaux de télédiffuseurs d'organiser le débat des chefs en 1968. Il faut dire aussi qu'il y a presque 50 ans, seules l'expertise combinée de plusieurs réseaux et la combinaison de leurs budgets de nouvelles pouvaient permettre de faire entrer des caméras et la télévision en direct dans l'édifice du Centre.

Pendant le plus clair de ma vie, il n'a jamais été réaliste d'envisager autre chose qu'un débat organisé par un consortium de télédiffuseurs. Au cours des 20 dernières années, les choses ont changé. Premièrement, la CPAC et une constellation de nouveaux petits réseaux, puis Internet et les médias sociaux sont devenus des courroies de transmission viables pour l'information qu'un débat permet de communiquer. En 2015, il était rendu possible pour d'autres d'organiser des débats sans la participation des grands réseaux. Au moins deux chefs de partis, soit Stephen Harper du Parti conservateur et Tom Mulcair du NPD, ont vu l'intérêt tactique à encourager ce genre d'effort. Maclean's a donc organisé un débat, tout comme The Globe and Mail a organisé d'une certaine façon les débats Munk. Il y a aussi les partenariats de deux diffuseurs francophones au Québec. Les vieux réseaux ont refusé de diffuser le signal offert par les organisateurs du débat en anglais. Par conséquent, les électeurs ont été moins nombreux à voir les débats de 2015 que lors des précédentes campagnes électorales. C'est une grave lacune.

Cependant, comme la ministre Gould l'a dit l'autre jour, 1,6 million de téléspectateurs ont vu notre débat à la télévision, mais elle n'a pas précisé qu'il avait également été vu par beaucoup de personnes de diverses sources numériques, dont des sites Web de nouvelles, YouTube, Facebook et bien d'autres. Tous les débats ont reçu une couverture médiatique à saturation, et les sondages laissent croire qu'ils ont influencé l'opinion publique.

Ainsi, mon principal argument aujourd'hui, c'est que la révolution technologique qui a rendu les débats de 2015 possibles se continue et s'accélère. L'organisation d'une télédiffusion en direct ne coûte pratiquement plus rien. D'ici 2019 et 2023, le nombre d'organisations qui auront les moyens d'organiser des débats et de les diffuser à grande échelle seront beaucoup plus nombreuses encore qu'en 2015.

Il serait donc curieux de recréer, par la politique publique, un simulacre de l'ancien monopole naturel du consortium des télédiffuseurs si longtemps après que les conditions favorables à la création de ce monopole se soient dissipées. Comme Paul Adams de l'Université Carleton le disait au Comité la semaine dernière, les partenaires du consortium gardaient toujours des considérations très pragmatiques dans l'organisation de leurs premiers débats, comme le nombre de spectateurs et les conflits d'horaire. Tant mieux pour eux. C'était légitime. N'importe qui d'autre garderait ces considérations à l'esprit, et c'est ce que nous avons fait, mais le fait est que le modèle des débats avec lequel vous avez grandi n'a pas été gravé sur des pierres par un Dieu parfait. C'était le produit de son temps, avec ses lacunes et ses forces. Mais les temps ont changé.

(1150)

[Français]

Depuis quelques années, j'aime dire à des amis que le modèle qu'on peut envisager pour les débats des chefs dans un avenir rapproché est celui d'un citoyen ou d'une citoyenne ordinaire de Regina ou de Moncton qui invite les chefs de parti chez elle, autour de sa table de cuisine, et qui diffuse leurs délibérations d'un océan à l'autre sur Periscope ou sur Facebook Live. Pour moi, l'avenir ressemble beaucoup plus à cela qu'au vieux modèle monolithique que l'on connaît.[Traduction]

À tout le moins, c'est un avenir possible si ce comité et le gouvernement n'essaient pas d'emprisonner le passé dans une bouteille en imposant un modèle de débat unique, monolithique pour toutes les campagnes électorales.

J'ai été sidéré de constater que tous les témoins que vous avez entendus la semaine dernière ont réclamé la création d'une commission des débats souple et conviviale qui évaluerait, et dans certains cas endosserait les propositions de débat, des propositions qui pourraient parfois être surprenantes et inattendues et qui viendraient de toutes sortes de parties extérieures, tous sauf la ministre. La ministre Karina Gould a dit qu'elle voulait institutionnaliser les débats et que « l'entité et ses organes consultatifs doivent comprendre un large éventail de représentants pour être représentatifs de la société canadienne, et veiller à ce que l'inclusion de femmes, de jeunes, d'Autochtones et de personnes handicapées sous-tendent ses activités. »

Je ne peux que louanger l'instinct qui se cache derrière cette affirmation, mais les mots choisis me font penser aux mots utilisés par sa prédécesseure pendant la brève tentative du gouvernement, en début de piste, à réformer le régime électoral l'an dernier. Cette formule me semble ouvrir la porte à une argumentation sans fin sur la procédure interne, qui mènerait à des débats d'environ six heures pendant lesquelles les chefs de sept ou neuf partis seraient interrogés par une quarantaine de juristes choisis à l'issue d'un processus de sélection qu'on qualifierait sûrement d'être ouvert, transparent et fondé sur le mérite, mais qui ne prêterait pas moins le flanc à la critique pour autant.

Les représentants des petites entreprises, de l'Association médicale canadienne, des ordres professionnels ou les défenseurs de la représentation proportionnelle seraient-ils inclus? Pourquoi ou pourquoi pas? Un modérateur unique n'aurait-il jamais plus la latitude d'acculer les chefs au pied du mur s'ils essaient de répondre de façon partielle ou évasive, comme Stéphan Bureau et Steve Paikin l'ont fait lors de quelques-uns des meilleurs débats jamais tenus ou le processus deviendrait-il si lourd et sérieux que n'importe quel chef politique digne de ce nom pourrait facilement se défiler?

La diversité des débats de 2015 était rafraîchissante, ce n'était pas une anomalie. Des questions intéressantes ont été posées. Elizabeth May ou Gilles Duceppe devraient-ils être invités à y participer? Devrait-il y avoir un public dans la salle? Devrait-il y avoir un sujet cible ou un vaste éventail de sujets? Les différents organisateurs ont répondu différemment à ces différentes questions. Surtout, les chefs n'ont pas eu la chance de passer des mois à apprendre comment battre la formule, parce qu'ils ne pouvaient pas savoir à l'avance à quelle formule s'attendre.

La variété et la surprise sont des atouts pendant les débats, aussi, parce qu'on sait à quel point la vie sert toujours des deux en abondance à nos élus. Je serais donc fortement en désaccord avec un cadre qui ne permettrait la diffusion que des débats conçus par une commission des débats ou le réseau hôte désigné. Le cadre doit permettre la réalisation de propositions nouvelles et sortant des sentiers battus. La commission pourrait favoriser ce genre de propositions en déclarant que certains débats imaginés par des sources externes doivent absolument être diffusés par les télédiffuseurs traditionnels et que les chefs politiques doivent absolument y participer. Je vous souhaite bonne chance pour faire appliquer cette dernière proposition, toutefois. Les enjeux sont tellement élevés en campagne électorale que bien honnêtement, tous les chefs feront ce qu'ils jugeront dans leur intérêt, comme toujours.

Quoi que vous recommandiez, je vous prie de favoriser des structures souples plutôt que lourdes et le plus de convivialité possible. Les techniques de campagne et le milieu des médias changent rapidement. Si les débats électoraux devenaient le seul élément des campagnes modernes à ne pas changer, les stratèges électoraux apprendraient rapidement à les court-circuiter ou à s'en servir à leurs fins partisanes.

J'ai bien hâte d'entendre ce que les autres témoins ont à dire, ainsi que vos questions.

Le président:

Merci infiniment, monsieur Wells. Votre expérience est appréciée.

À titre d'information pour les témoins qui viennent de se joindre à nous, il y a eu un vote à la Chambre qui a amputé une partie de la séance, si bien que nous avons regroupé tous les témoins en un seul bloc et que c'est la raison pour laquelle vous êtes tous ici maintenant. Nous entendrons vos exposés sous peu.

Je cède maintenant la parole à M. Raynauld, qui se joint à nous depuis Boston.

(1155)

M. Vincent Raynauld (professeur adjoint, Emerson College; professeur associé, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, de m'avoir invité à comparaître aujourd'hui.[Français]

Je tiens à remercier le président, ainsi que les distingués membres du Comité, de leur invitation à participer à leurs travaux aujourd'hui.

Bien que je travaille au Collège Emerson, à Boston, depuis le mois d'août 2014, je suis un citoyen canadien qui a complété ses études de maîtrise au Département d'information et de communication de l'Université Laval et ses études doctorales à l'École de journalisme et de communication de l'Université Carleton, non loin de là où vous vous trouvez aujourd'hui.

Mes intérêts de recherche se situent sur les plans de la communication politique, du journalisme, des médias sociaux et des campagnes électorales. Au cours des dernières années, mes activités de recherche m'ont poussé à m'intéresser de plus en plus au format des débats électoraux durant les élections.[Traduction]

Depuis le premier débat des chefs télévisé lors des élections fédérales canadiennes de 1968, les débats télévisés sont devenus un moment charnière pendant les campagnes électorales au Canada. D'une part, les débats offrent aux chefs des partis politiques l'occasion unique de communiquer avec une vaste partie de l'électorat dans les deux langues officielles. Ils peuvent faire valoir leurs positions sur divers enjeux politiques. D'autre part, ils représentent une source d'information importante pour le public. Ils leur permettent de comprendre plus en détail les enjeux électoraux, puis de comparer les positions des chefs de parti. Certains débats des chefs sont la principale source d'information des électeurs pour se faire une idée en vue du jour des élections.

Plusieurs études universitaires, certaines plus anciennes et d'autres plus récentes, confirment l'incidence des débats des chefs sur l'attitude du public, le niveau de mobilisation et les intentions de vote. Malgré les changements profonds attribuables à l'expansion et à la diversification des médias, de même qu'à la montée des nouvelles générations de citoyens qui affichent des préférences différentes de celles des 50 dernières années, le format et la mécanique des débats des chefs sont essentiellement restés les mêmes. Parallèlement, les audiences des débats des chefs ont diminué progressivement. En fait, les débats des chefs pendant les élections fédérales canadiennes de 2015 ont attiré une très faible audience comparativement aux débats des chefs tenus pendant les élections précédentes.

Il faut souligner que pendant cette période, les tactiques de campagne déployées par les divers partis et candidats politiques ont également beaucoup évolué. Tout cela a évidemment beaucoup changé la façon dont les électeurs accèdent à l'information, ce qui peut parfois jouer un rôle central dans leur aptitude à choisir le candidat à appuyer le jour des élections.

On peut donc se poser les questions suivantes. Le format des débats des chefs et leur organisation sont-ils toujours adaptés à l'environnement social, politique et médiatique du Canada? Conviendrait-il de les revoir pour mieux servir la population canadienne?

Je n'ai pas de boule de cristal pour répondre à ces questions, mais j'espère que mes observations et mes réponses à vos questions d'aujourd'hui pourront vous porter à réfléchir, surtout si vous envisagez la création d'un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

Je peux d'abord vous dire que les jeunes adultes affluent vers les médias sociaux pour obtenir et partager de l'information sur la politique, ainsi que pour engager des discussions politiques avec leurs pairs. Cette dynamique est particulièrement présente le soir des débats des chefs, un phénomène qu'on appelle parfois le « multiécran ». Un nombre croissant de téléspectateurs suivent la diffusion en direct des débats à la télévision, tout en partageant leurs opinions et en interagissant avec leurs pairs sur les médias sociaux à l'aide d'un ordinateur ou d'un appareil portable comme une tablette ou un téléphone intelligent. Des chefs adoptent eux aussi cette pratique. Par exemple, la chef du Parti vert du Canada, Elizabeth May, qui n'était pas incluse dans le débat des chefs pendant l'élection fédérale de 2015, s'est tournée vers Twitter pour diffuser ses opinions et partager ses réflexions sur les positions des autres chefs de partis pendant le débat. En somme, on peut faire valoir que la dynamique du multiécran fait en sorte qu'il y a un débat public décentralisé en ligne pendant les débats entre les candidats politiques sur les écrans de télévision.

Ensuite, on a vu apparaître au cours des dernières décennies des générations de citoyens aux préférences, aux intérêts et aux objectifs différents. On peut se demander si ces citoyens sont bien servis par les modes de communication politique classiques, y compris par les débats des chefs tenus pendant les campagnes et toute la structure de ce qu'on appelle le discours politique général. Autrement dit, les débats des chefs répondent-ils aux besoins et aux désirs adéquatement? Contribuent-ils au désintérêt et au désengagement des citoyens envers la politique et sa forme officielle?

(1200)



Je crois que si les débats des chefs représentent toujours un aspect vital des campagnes électorales et dans une certaine mesure, de la vie démocratique au Canada, leur format et leur organisation ne sont plus adaptés à l'environnement social, politique et médiatique du Canada. Plus encore, la situation décrite un peu plus tôt dans mon exposé ne constitue à mon avis qu'une dimension du plus vaste débat qui a cours sur la déconnexion grandissante entre les élites politiques et les membres de la société civile au Canada. Il faut toutefois souligner les efforts déployés par certains politiciens pour rectifier le tir et réinventer leur mode de communication et de connexion avec le public.

Je crois que la création d'un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs ou l'institutionnalisation de l'organisation des débats des chefs serait bénéfique pour remédier à ces problèmes et répondre aux préoccupations d'autres personnes qui comparaîtront devant le Comité. Je ne suis pas certain que les médias soient les mieux placés pour effectuer un changement bénéfique pour le public et la vie démocratique au Canada. Le commissaire indépendant pourrait servir d'arbitre neutre capable de tenir compte des désirs et des besoins de tous les acteurs dans le contexte des débats des chefs au Canada: des partis et des candidats politiques, des organisations des médias qui diffusent les débats et des membres du public. Autrement dit, un commissaire indépendant pourrait offrir une perspective qui permettrait d'adapter les débats des chefs à l'environnement social, politique et médiatique actuel et futur du Canada.

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, j'espère que mon témoignage vous aidera dans votre travail. Je souhaite vous remercier encore de m'avoir invité aujourd'hui. Veuillez noter que je suis prêt à répondre à toutes vos questions dans les deux langues officielles.[Français]

Monsieur le président, membres distingués du Comité, j'espère que ma participation à vos travaux vous sera bénéfique.

Je tiens à vous remercier de votre invitation à me joindre à vous aujourd'hui, et je demeure disponible pour répondre à vos questions dans les deux langues officielles.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Raynauld.[Traduction]

Avant de donner la parole à M. Giasson, je tiens à rappeler aux membres du Comité qu'à 16 heures demain, dans la pièce 112-N, aura lieu notre séance sur le Ghana. Vous recevrez sous peu un document à ce sujet.[Français]

Nous entendrons maintenant monsieur Giasson, de l'Université Laval.

M. Thierry Giasson (professeur titulaire, Département de science politique, Université Laval, à titre personnel):

Monsieur le président, bonjour.

Je remercie les membres du Comité permanent de me recevoir.

Je veux aussi saluer mes collègues, MM. Raynauld, Cameron et Marland. Je suis heureux de partager ce moment avec eux.

Je m'appelle Thierry Giasson. Je suis professeur titulaire au Département de science politique à l'Université Laval. Je suis également directeur du Groupe de recherche en communication politique et je suis membre du Centre pour l'étude de la citoyenneté démocratique.

Je tiens d'abord à vous remercier de cette invitation à venir partager avec vous certaines de mes réflexions sur l'organisation des débats des chefs, dans le cadre de votre étude de la proposition du premier ministre Trudeau de créer un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

J'ai également pris connaissance des interventions des témoins qui ont comparu devant vous depuis le 21 novembre et de certains documents auxquels vous avez eu accès, comme le rapport synthèse du colloque sur l'avenir des débats télévisés, organisé en 2015 par l'Institut de recherche en politiques publiques, soit l'IRPP, et l'Université Carleton, de même que l'étude des Services d'information et de recherche parlementaire de la Bibliothèque du Parlement sur les modes d'organisations des débats des chefs dans d'autres démocraties.

Afin d'éviter de répéter des informations qui vous ont déjà été présentées, je préfère axer mon intervention sur l'objectif qui, selon moi, devrait guider l'organisation des débats des chefs lors des élections au Canada. Mon intervention va se diviser en trois sections.

Premièrement, je vais exposer la fonction d'un débat des chefs dans le cadre d'une élection. Je vais présenter l'objectif qui, en accord avec cette fonction, devrait guider l'organisation et la diffusion d'un débat. Troisièmement, je vais exposer les intérêts compétitifs qui compliqueraient l'atteinte de cet objectif dans le contexte actuel d'organisation des débats, qui se déroule lors d'une négociation à huis clos entre les médias et les partis politiques.

Enfin, troisièmement, je vais soulever des éléments contextuels qui, selon moi, doivent baliser la réflexion de ce comité sur la création d'un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

Quelle est la fonction d'un débat des chefs dans le cadre d'une élection? Les travaux de recherche sur ces émissions posent que le rôle des débats télévisés en démocratie est de présenter aux électeurs indécis une occasion d'effectuer une évaluation comparative des positions des principaux partis politiques qui s'opposent, dans la campagne, sur les enjeux qui marquent la société au moment où l'élection se déroule.

Cette émission permet aux citoyens d'avoir accès simultanément aux propositions programmatiques des partis sur les enjeux et aussi, ce qui est important, à la proposition de leadership qu'incarne chaque chef des formations partisanes qui prend part à l'émission.

Ainsi, les citoyens ont accès à une information électorale à double volet, qui se présente à eux de manière synthétisée et comparative. La fonction d'un débat des chefs est donc, avant tout, informative. L'émission trouve sa raison d'être dans sa capacité à offrir aux citoyens qui en ont besoin une information facile à consulter, diversifiée et transparente, qui est donc à forte valeur ajoutée et qui va être utile à la réflexion menant à la prise de décision électorale.

Le débat joue donc un rôle de premier plan dans la vie démocratique, puisqu'il est le seul format communicationnel à offrir aux citoyens ce contexte d'information électorale unique. Par l'écoute des débats des chefs, l'effort de collecte d'informations exigé du citoyen est minime, voire minimal, mais le retour informationnel, par contre, peut être, lui, très important.

Cela m'amène naturellement au second point de mon intervention, qui est d'identifier l'objectif qui devrait guider l'organisation des débats des chefs au Canada. La mission qui, selon moi, devrait guider l'organisation d'un débat devrait être d'assurer cette fonction informative de l'émission, fonction centrale dans le cadre d'élections démocratiques.

Comme je le disais tout à l'heure, l'émission de débats des chefs offre une valeur ajoutée par rapport à d'autres formats communicationnels et informationnels que les citoyens ne retrouvent nulle part ailleurs. L'objectif devrait donc être de développer une émission qui réponde à cet impératif informationnel, qui sert la citoyenneté et facilite la prise de décisions électorales.

Je vais le répéter plus tard, mais, selon moi, le débat des chefs appartient d'abord et avant tout aux citoyens et à la démocratie. À mon avis, ce principe milite en faveur de la mise en place d'un processus plus transparent, indépendant et libre d'intérêts particuliers et qui assure le respect de ce principe fondamental. Il me semble important d'ajouter que le contexte actuel d'organisation des débats des chefs, où le contenu et le format de l'émission se négocient à huis clos entre représentants des médias et des partis politiques, pourrait compromettre l'atteinte de cet objectif, puisque les partenaires obligés qui se retrouvent à la table des négociations y arrivent avec leurs priorités stratégiques.

Quels sont donc ces objectifs qui peuvent être divergents? D'une part, il y a les organisations médiatiques, qui semblent envisager le débat comme un exercice journalistique leur permettant de mettre en valeur leur rôle de gardiens d'intérêts publics et de reddition de comptes des acteurs politiques. D'ailleurs, le rapport synthèse de l'IRPP montre que cette perception était très présente dans les échanges qui ont eu lieu au sein des représentants des médias qui y ont pris part au colloque .

Les médias sont également des entreprises qui répondent à des impératifs économiques qui leur imposent de rentabiliser leur production en attirant des auditoires importants.

(1205)



Cette pression conduit les organisations à privilégier des formats d'émission où vont dominer la confrontation, le spectaculaire et la mise en scène. C'est d'ailleurs ce qu'a invoqué le réseau TVA lorsqu'il a quitté le Consortium des radiodiffuseurs afin de produire des débats des chefs en format de duel qui offriraient aux téléspectateurs des échanges soi-disant plus soutenus et plus divertissants.

Bien que divertissantes, ces mises en scène dramatiques où domine la confrontation ne répondent peut-être pas à l'objectif d'offrir aux citoyens une information électorale à valeur ajoutée. De plus, elles limitent l'accès des citoyens à une diversité de points de vue politique, puisqu'il n'y a, dans un duel, que deux points de vue qui s'opposent.

L'intérêt des médias à produire un bon spectacle de télé — je devrais peut-être dire un bon spectacle, tout simplement, parce que le débat peut être visionné sur différentes plateformes — ne correspond peut-être pas aux besoins des citoyens d'obtenir de l'information électorale diversifiée, synthétisée et utile.

De plus, comme nous l'avons vu en 2015, entre autres, la multiplication des débats diminue leur importance dans l'électorat. L'intérêt des citoyens est dilué par la tenue d'un trop grand nombre de débats, puisque le besoin d'information des citoyens décroît avec le temps au cours d'une campagne.

Il devient donc plutôt inutile de démultiplier ces émissions, puisque le public potentiel décroît théoriquement avec la campagne qui avance. Il est néanmoins honorable que des chefs de parti acceptent, comme ce fut le cas en 2015, de participer à plusieurs débats thématiques, mais je pense qu'il est important d'assurer qu'on organise au moins un débat présenté dans chacune des langues officielles en présence de tous les chefs des principaux partis politiques dans le cadre d'une campagne.

D'autre part, il y a l'autre groupe d'acteurs qui arrive à la table des négociations, soit les partis politiques. Ces derniers se présentent avec leurs propres intérêts stratégiques. Leur objectif central est de présenter leurs propositions à des électeurs ciblés, tout en limitant les risques de dérapages.

L'obsession stratégique va amener les politiciens à livrer des performances très calculées, très prudentes et très répétitives, qui vont manquer parfois d'authenticité, parfois de profondeur, et qui peuvent être mal reçues par les citoyens. Ces intérêts stratégiques mènent d'ailleurs certains partis à refuser de participer aux débats, comme ce fut le cas du Parti conservateur du Canada, qui a refusé de participer au débat en anglais organisé par le Consortium des médias, en 2015.

C'est parfaitement normal que les formations politiques aient des objectifs stratégiques liés à leur participation au débat des chefs. Toutefois, il me semble difficilement justifiable que ces formations et leurs chefs refusent de se présenter devant les Canadiens pour expliquer leur programme, défendre leur bilan et répondre à des questions sur les enjeux qui préoccupent la population lorsqu'une élection est déclenchée.

Je voudrais finalement conclure mon intervention en soulignant certains éléments qui, selon moi, doivent guider votre réflexion sur la création d'un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

Tout d'abord, je pense que la démarche de réforme de l'organisation des débats des chefs doit d'abord et avant tout être guidée par l'intérêt du citoyen, puisqu'il est l'acteur central du processus démocratique canadien.

Toute forme de réforme devrait être consacrée à la reconnaissance de ce principe et du besoin des citoyens en période électorale à obtenir une information politique diversifiée, transparente et utile à leur prise de décision. Le débat des chefs n'appartient ni aux médias ni aux partis politiques. En fait, il appartient aux citoyens et à la démocratie canadienne. Cette réalité doit guider tout projet de réforme, selon moi.

Je pense qu'une réforme de l'organisation des débats est désirable afin de redonner plus d'importance à ces activités de communication électorale dans le cadre de nos élections au Canada. Plusieurs électeurs en ont encore besoin pour prendre une décision éclairée, comme en témoignent les mesures d'audience, qui étaient malgré tout importantes lors des débats de 2015.

Le contexte médiatique hybride qui prévaut au Canada pose toutefois que ces débats vont devoir aussi être diffusés sur une multitude de plateformes médiatiques. Ils vont être consommés, comme M. Raynauld l'expliquait, sur une multitude de plateformes médiatiques.

Leur organisation doit également assurer le respect de l'objectif d'offrir aux électeurs indécis une émission électorale où les principaux chefs de parti viennent rendre compte à la population canadienne de leur bilan et de leurs positionnements programmatiques.

Je pense aussi que ce travail d'organisation doit être mené par une instance indépendante des médias et des partis politiques, afin de limiter l'impact négatif des intérêts stratégiques et corporatistes sur le rôle démocratique que jouent les débats.

Toutefois, je ne sais pas si la création d'un nouveau poste de commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs est la voie à privilégier pour concrétiser cette réforme. On trouve, au sein d'organisations déjà existantes, des ressources qui pourraient assumer le travail de coordination de l'organisation des débats. Je pense spontanément à l'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion électorale, dont la mission est de veiller, à l'approche des élections, à la répartition du temps d'antenne gratuit entre les partis politiques.

Ce poste, qui est actuellement temporaire, pourrait être pérennisé et se voir octroyer des responsabilités plus larges, entre autres, l'organisation des débats, mais aussi peut-être la veille aux activités publicitaires des partis politiques à l'extérieur des périodes électorales officielles.

(1210)



Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, je vais conclure mon intervention en évoquant une mise en garde.

Vos propositions seront évaluées par une population canadienne qui, comme le confirment de nombreuses études depuis plus de 20 ans, est sceptique et méfiante envers la classe politique.

Le malaise démocratique est présent au Canada, et les échecs récents du gouvernement en matière de réforme démocratique contribuent peut-être à fragiliser la perception de certains Canadiens envers les dirigeants politiques. Leurs attentes sont importantes, mais les déceptions semblent s'accumuler. Selon moi, il serait judicieux d'éviter de les décevoir à nouveau.

Je vous remercie beaucoup du temps que vous m'avez consacré et je suis disposé à répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Giasson.[Traduction]

Accueillons maintenant M. Marland, professeur à l'Université Memorial de Terre-Neuve.

M. Alex Marland (professeur, Department of Political Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, à titre personnel):

Je tiens à remercier le Comité de m'inviter à prendre la parole devant lui. Je dois dire que je vous envie. Les comités législatifs jouent un rôle essentiel dans notre régime parlementaire, et je vous remercie tous et toutes sincèrement de nous rendre ce service.

Pour situer un peu ce qui me qualifie pour m'exprimer sur la question, les membres du Comité doivent savoir que mon domaine de recherche est la communication politique et le marketing politique au Canada. J'étudie également les modes de gestion des médias et de coordination du message qu'utilisent les stratèges politiques. De manière générale, j'utilise une approche impartiale, et j'essaie de tenir compte de toutes les perspectives possibles pour arriver à une évaluation éclairée de toute situation.

Je commencerai en affirmant qu'à mon avis, il serait raisonnable de créer un commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats des chefs de partis. Je conviens que les négociations avec le consortium des télédiffuseurs puissent être difficiles, comme d'autres l'ont également souligné, et que les modes de communication avec les Canadiens évoluent. Selon moi, ce débat sur les débats détourne notre attention du rôle de la politique publique. Cependant, il ne faut pas nous leurrer: les jeux politiques ne cesseront pas par la simple création d'un poste où la désignation d'un commissaire en particulier...

(1215)

Le greffier:

Monsieur Marland, il semble qu'une alarme de feu retentisse en ce moment, comme si la situation pouvait être pire encore. Nous devrons interrompre nos délibérations et les reprendre plus tard.

(1215)

(1245)

Le président:

Nous allons poursuivre avec M. Marland.

Vous pouvez parler rapidement, car nous avons très peu de temps. Faites de votre mieux.

Nous voulons entendre ce que vous avez à nous dire.

M. Alex Marland:

Je disais donc qu'un débat au sujet des débats peut absorber une partie de l'attention qui devrait être accordée aux questions de politique publique.

Cependant, n'allons surtout pas croire que les tractations stratégiques cesseraient comme par enchantement. Comme pour n'importe quel commissaire, je m'interroge sur le mode de nomination utilisé ainsi que sur les chances que ce commissaire soit vraiment indépendant. Il faut absolument trouver un moyen de faire en sorte que tous les partis politiques appuient la nomination. Autrement, au plus fort d'une campagne électorale, tel ou tel parti sera enclin à tourner la commission ou le commissaire en dérision en invoquant sa prétendue allégeance partisane pour délégitimiser tout le processus des débats. Les stratèges et les chefs politiques qui évitent actuellement de se plaindre du consortium des radiodiffuseurs seraient moins hésitants à le faire au sujet de quelqu'un dont il percevrait la nomination comme étant de nature partisane.

Cela m'amène à vous présenter l'argument principal que je souhaite porter à votre attention. J'estime que l'angle proposé qui met l'accent sur les débats des chefs est trop restreint. L'intention est sans doute bonne. Or, cette approche est problématique pour les raisons que je vous explique à l'instant.

Je crois qu'il faut élargir le champ d'action du futur commissaire. Il faudrait que les mots « des chefs » n'apparaissent plus dans son titre. Il en résulterait des changements importants et des répercussions positives pour tout notre système politique. Je fais partie des nombreux experts qui sont préoccupés par l'accent excessif mis sur les chefs de parti au Canada. L'attention des médias accroît le pouvoir de la garde rapprochée des chefs et diminue celui de ceux et celles qui n'en font pas partie. On entend souvent dire que la tendance à intensifier la concentration du pouvoir dans cette prétendue garde rapprochée remonte aux années 1970. Depuis lors, les débats des chefs sont le point de mire des campagnes électorales. Les stratèges politiques désignent la période préalable aux débats comme étant « la drôle de guerre » parce que, jusqu'à ce stade-là, les gens ne s'intéressent pas à la campagne.

Ce n'est pas comme si les débats suscitaient de grandes discussions stratégiques. Les médias sont à l'affût du coup décisif qui leur permettra de déclarer sur-le-champ qui va remporter les élections. Ils se mettent ensuite à suivre la tournée des chefs. En outre, des recherches ont démontré que les débats des chefs sont principalement un spectacle médiatique, plutôt qu'un mécanisme d'information du public. La plupart des gens n'en tirent que des indications superficielles. Les chercheurs ont même constaté que certains en arrivent à former leur jugement en fonction des comportements gestuels des candidats.

Ce qui compte, et ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que tous les projecteurs sont braqués sur les chefs lors de ces débats. Cela a des répercussions tout au long de la campagne ainsi que sur la gouvernance. Selon moi, vous avez l'occasion de faire quelque chose à ce sujet. En nommant un « commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats » entre les chefs des partis politiques, le Parlement consacrerait encore plus le pouvoir et l'autorité de ces chefs. C'est le genre de mesure qui va à encontre de l'esprit de la Loi instituant des réformes adoptée par le Parlement en 2015. Je crois qu'il faudrait supprimer les mots « des chefs » de la description du poste proposé.

Si l'on parlait plutôt d'un « commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats entre les partis politiques », on réduirait d'autant l'importance accordée aux chefs de parti. Il serait dès lors possible d'élargir le mandat de la commission ou du commissaire. Cela pourrait déboucher sur la création d'une ressource organisationnelle fort nécessaire et utile pour les campagnes menées dans les circonscriptions où les débats entre candidats pullulent. Le commissaire pourrait et devrait fournir des lignes directrices et des exemples de pratiques à suivre aux organisateurs des débats dans les 338 circonscriptions électorales du Canada. Après tout, c'est là que sont mis en vedette les candidats pour lesquels les Canadiens votent directement, et les médias locaux sont eux aussi de la partie.

En outre, les débats nationaux peuvent et doivent mettre l'accent sur le parti en tant qu'équipe, plutôt que sur le chef à titre individuel. La suppression des mots « des chefs » pourrait mener à des débats nationaux auxquels prendraient part des candidats que les chefs croiraient aptes à occuper un poste au sein du Cabinet. On peut raisonnablement penser que la perspective étroite consistant à inclure les mots « des chefs » dans la description du poste exclurait la possibilité de le faire.

Je dirais en guise de conclusion que, plus les règles et les processus institutionnels mettent en exergue le chef de parti, plus les candidats, les députés d'arrière-ban et même les ministres deviennent les illustres inconnus de la scène politique sur la Colline du Parlement. Nous devons trouver des moyens d'uniformiser les règles du jeu. En créant un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats entre les chefs de parti, on assimile notre système parlementaire à un régime politique présidentiel. Nous devrions éviter d'officialiser le tout encore davantage.

(1250)



Le Comité et le Parlement ont l'occasion de remédier à la concentration des pouvoirs au sein de la garde rapprochée des chefs des partis politiques. Je vous invite donc à envisager la possibilité de supprimer les mots « des chefs » du titre du poste proposé de commissaire.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup pour ce point de vue fort intéressant.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Cameron de l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique.

M. Maxwell A. Cameron (professeur, Department of Political Science, University of British Columbia, à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président, de me donner l'occasion de comparaître devant votre comité. J'en suis ravi d'autant plus que j'appuie vivement le projet d'instaurer une commission ou un poste de commissaire qui s'occupera d'organiser les débats entre les partis fédéraux.

Selon moi, le statu quo pose problème à bien des égards importants. Ma principale préoccupation tient au manque de transparence, de reddition de comptes et de participation publique dans l'organisation des débats. Les débats politiques font certes partie intégrante de la démocratie, mais leur organisation n'est pas particulièrement démocratique.

L'instauration d'une commission ou d'un poste de commissaire devrait rendre possibles une participation publique et des délibérations plus significatives lors des campagnes électorales. On pourrait améliorer autant la forme et le fond des débats que leur processus d'organisation.

Une commission ou un poste de commissaire permettrait aussi d'élargir l'éventail de voix qui peuvent se faire entendre au sein de la société canadienne, y compris celles des membres des Premières Nations et des minorités, des jeunes et des femmes.

Plus important encore, à mon avis, il faut aussi contrecarrer la fragmentation de la vie publique qui est en train de détruire la démocratie. Nous n'en voyons que les premiers effets.

De plus en plus de Canadiens accèdent aux nouvelles via les médias sociaux qui nous divisent en segments d'auditoire de plus en plus petits, au lieu de nous unir en un seul. Les débats publics font partie des rares moments où l'ensemble de la population converge pour participer à une activité commune.

À mes yeux, il importe de tout mettre en oeuvre pour assurer l'épanouissement de la participation citoyenne. Il faut créer des avenues propices au dialogue, à la délibération et à l'engagement du public dans la vie politique.

C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles j'ai créé il y a quelques années avec mes collègues de l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique une école pour politiciens. L'Institut d'été pour les futurs législateurs a été mis sur pied en vue de favoriser l'acquisition des compétences et des connaissances nécessaires pour devenir un bon citoyen et un bon politicien.

Les participants à l'Institut apprennent notamment à débattre. Ils participent aussi à des périodes des questions ainsi qu'à des réunions de caucus. Ils organisent des séances de comité et entendent des témoins. Ils rédigent des lois et en débattent en première et en deuxième lectures.

Il est vraiment fascinant d'observer la vitesse à laquelle les participants se laissent prendre par l'esprit d'équipe et la partisanerie. Parallèlement à cela, ils entreprennent l'activité, un peu à l'instar de la plupart de ceux qui entrent sur la scène politique, en étant vivement motivés par l'engagement envers la chose publique et la recherche du bien commun. Nous les voyons donc être tiraillés entre ces deux objectifs contradictoires. Ce tiraillement reflète bien l'essence même de la vie politique et de la participation citoyenne.

Je crois qu'il faut offrir aux gens l'occasion d'acquérir ces compétences et de les développer. Malheureusement, les citoyens ont trop rarement la possibilité d'acquérir les connaissances et les compétences nécessaires pour délibérer, conclure des compromis, trouver l'équilibre entre les intérêts de tous et prendre des décisions collectives. Ce sont autant de compétences que l'on n'apprend pas dans les livres de sciences politiques, mais bien par la pratique.

J'estime que les débats nous offrent une occasion unique de favoriser la participation citoyenne. Pour ce faire, ils ne doivent toutefois pas être monopolisés par les médias et les partis politiques. Je ne suis aucunement en train de laisser entendre que les partis politiques et les médias n'ont pas un rôle essentiel à jouer. Leur contribution est cruciale, autant à l'égard de la teneur même des débats que pour leur organisation.

(1255)



Il y a un équilibre à trouver pour que la société civile puisse elle aussi prendre part aux débats de telle sorte que ceux-ci ne visent pas simplement à divertir en servant des intérêts partisans. Ils doivent contribuer à la promotion d'une participation citoyenne active et éclairée. Je pense que nous pouvons songer à bien des façons d'organiser les débats en leur donnant une forme et un contenu qui serviraient mieux l'intérêt public que le système actuel.

Permettez-moi de vous soumettre très brièvement quelques idées qui iraient dans le sens de cet objectif. Premièrement, la commission ou le commissaire pourrait profiter de l'aide d'un comité consultatif qui refléterait la diversité du Canada. La commission ou le commissaire pourrait aussi être autorisé à confier l'organisation des débats à une entité indépendante qui compterait des représentants des partis, des médias, des groupes de la société civile, des universités et des citoyens. Je crois que les universités pourraient avoir un rôle important à jouer en la matière étant donné qu'elles sont présentes partout au pays et qu'elles ont noué des liens étroits avec la société civile. Je pense qu'il ne serait pas sage de confier cette tâche à Élections Canada, car il faut une organisation qui reste au-dessus de la mêlée.

L'organisation des débats devrait bénéficier d'une participation publique ouverte et transparente afin que les décisions sur le choix des participants, les questions à poser, le format et les autres enjeux soient aussi représentatives que possible de l'intérêt public. Comme l'ont également fait valoir certains témoins qui m'ont précédé, on pourrait, dans l'esprit du régime de Westminster, adjoindre aux débats des chefs d'autres débats qui seraient tenus dans différentes circonscriptions du pays ou porteraient sur des sujets précis avec la participation de parlementaires qui ne seraient pas nécessairement chefs de leur parti. Ces débats pourraient facilement être enregistrés et diffusés sur un site Web accessible à tous.

Enfin, et c'est peut-être ce qui sera le plus difficile, il faut inciter la population à participer aux débats en tenant des réunions locales avec de petits groupes ou des assemblées de taille moyenne. Cela pourrait se faire dans le cadre de ce que les politologues Bruce Ackerman et James Fishkin ont appelé une journée de la délibération, un jour férié national précédant de quelques semaines l'élection à proprement parler. Les citoyens seraient alors encouragés à prendre le temps de rencontrer leurs voisins, d'organiser des activités et de débattre entre eux des grands enjeux électoraux pour notre pays.

Bon nombre de ces idées ont déjà été articulées dans d'autres contextes. Il vaudrait notamment certes la peine de tenir compte de l'excellent travail accompli il y a quelques années à ce sujet par mon collègue Taylor Owen en compagnie de Rudyard Griffiths.

Il va sans dire que la démocratisation des débats est un objectif ambitieux que nous n'atteindrons pas du jour au lendemain. J'estime tout de même que l'instauration d'une commission ou d'un poste de commissaire indépendant serait un excellent premier pas dans cette direction.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Cameron.

Il nous reste 15 minutes, ce qui donne cinq minutes pour un député de chacun des partis. Vous pouvez partager votre temps.

Nous débutons avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Je vais essayer de faire très rapidement, car je voudrais partager mon temps.

J'ai une question que j'adresse à tous nos témoins.

Je veux d'abord vous remercier pour le temps que vous nous consacrez.

J'ai l'impression que la multiplicité des plateformes découlant de la prolifération des moyens technologiques à notre disposition fait en sorte qu'il y a de plus en plus de débats thématiques. Comme M. Wells le soulignait, c'est maintenant devenu chose possible pour à peu près tout le monde du fait que les coûts ont chuté considérablement. Vous pouvez louer un grand studio dans une métropole avec toutes les caméras de télé, ou vous pouvez le faire via Facebook à partir d'un hangar d'une région rurale de Terre-Neuve —  je n'ai rien contre l'idée — et cela donne à peu près le même résultat.

J'en viens donc à ma question. Je comprends très bien à quel point il est primordial d'assurer l'indépendance de la commission ou du commissaire. Selon vous, serait-il préférable que la commission ou le commissaire n'autorise la tenue que d'un ou deux débats — dans les deux langues officielles — qui seraient diffusés à grande échelle avec accessibilité sur toutes les plateformes, ou bien que l'on permette que plusieurs types de débats se déroulent sur différentes plateformes, certains pouvant même porter sur un seul sujet? En fait, c'est l'approbation de la commission ou du commissaire qui donnerait de la crédibilité à ces divers formats.

Nous pouvons poursuivre dans le même ordre en commençant par M. Wells.

(1300)

M. Paul Wells:

Je suis nettement en faveur de la tenue d'une variété de débats des chefs dans chaque campagne électorale. Il faut considérer la façon dont les choses se passent dans la réalité. Plus un commissaire indépendant va permettre un grand nombre de débats, plus on risque de voir des chefs de parti décider de ne pas prendre part à certains d'entre eux en faisant fi des sanctions auxquelles ils s'exposent. En revanche, si l'on organise moins de débats, on risque davantage de voir un média comme Maclean's avoir l'audace de s'adresser directement aux chefs de parti pour leur proposer d'organiser un débat.

À moins qu'un commissaire n'interdise la participation à de tels débats non sanctionnés, je dirais que ce genre d'événements plus ou moins improvisés... Il se pourrait par exemple qu'en cas de différend entre le chef libéral et le chef néo-démocrate, le Globe and Mail, La Presse ou l'Université de Toronto leur propose de tenir un débat où ils se retrouveraient face à face. Je crois qu'il est à peu près certain que de telles choses se produiraient.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Raynauld.

M. Vincent Raynauld:

Je crois qu'il y a deux façons de voir les choses. Premièrement, il a été démontré que les gens s'intéressent de moins en moins aux exercices de la sorte, que leur capacité d'attention diminue et qu'ils y consacrent moins de temps. D'une part, il va de soi que l'organisation d'un grand nombre de débats ferait en sorte qu'il deviendrait difficile pour les gens de tous les voir pour demeurer au fait de l'évolution des choses. D'autre part, et je crois que certains de mes collègues y ont fait allusion, il importe de cibler cette forme de fragmentation du public en veillant à ce que le plus grand nombre possible de gens assistent à un ou deux grands débats de telle sorte que les principaux enjeux soient connus de tous.

Il est difficile de répondre de façon tranchée à votre question, mais j'estime qu'il y a un ou deux éléments qui doivent être gardés à l'esprit. Je suis persuadé que mes collègues pourront vous aider à y voir plus clair.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Marland.

M. Alex Marland:

Plus vous organisez de débats, moins chacun d'eux suscite de l'intérêt. En effet, vous vous retrouvez alors dans une situation où un débat n'attend pas l'autre, plutôt que de concentrer l'attention des gens sur un nombre limité d'événements.

Dans quelle mesure peut-on raisonnablement contrôler le cours des choses? Je crois que M. Wells avait tout à fait raison. Il va falloir composer sans cesse avec toutes ces querelles à savoir quels débats doivent être sanctionnés ou non. Je crois qu'il serait bon dans bien des cas de pouvoir compter sur un commissaire fournissant des lignes directrices et des exemples de pratiques à suivre.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Giasson. [Français]

M. Thierry Giasson:

Je n'ai pas l'impression que l'un empêche l'autre. Le commissaire, si jamais on devait créer ce poste, pourrait être responsable de l'organisation de deux débats officiels qui réuniraient les chefs des principaux partis au moment de l'élection. Cela n'empêcherait pas que d'autres débats soient organisés par des organisations médiatiques ayant négocié avec les partis politiques.

On doit s'assurer qu'au moins deux moments forts dans la campagne sont organisés de façon transparente et permettent à une pluralité de points de vue partisans d'être exprimés. Les citoyens en ont besoin.

Comme je le disais tout à l'heure, c'est bien d'avoir des débats thématiques, mais encore une fois, je pense que c'est important parce qu'il y a cette caractéristique comparative et évaluative que les citoyens peuvent faire...

(1305)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Désolé, mais nous avons très peu de temps.

Une réponse brève, monsieur Cameron, après quoi nous passerons aux questions du député suivant.

M. Maxwell A. Cameron:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait nécessairement un choix à faire entre l'un ou l'autre. Je pense qu'il devrait y avoir une hiérarchie de débats. Les Canadiens vont voter parce qu'il y a des enjeux qui leur tiennent à coeur. Ils se préoccupent du sort de leur région, de leur ville et de leur province, et ils s'intéressent à ce que disent les chefs de parti. Il m'apparaît approprié d'organiser un grand débat entre tous ceux qui aspirent à devenir premier ministre, le tout parallèlement à d'autres débats tenus dans les circonscriptions ou portant sur des thèmes particuliers.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je suis très heureux d'être de retour au milieu de visages connus et de pouvoir participer à ce dialogue. Cela me tient vraiment à coeur. J'ai été très étonné d'apprendre que nous envisagions la possibilité de créer un poste de commissaire, une nouvelle instance du gouvernement, pour la supervision des débats à venir. Je trouve cela tout simplement stupéfiant.

J'aimerais que chacun de nos témoins commente brièvement en répondant par oui ou par non. D'après ce que j'ai pu comprendre du témoignage de la ministre lors d'une séance précédente, il ne semblerait pas qu'elle se soit engagée à exiger l'appui de tous les partis pour la nomination d'un éventuel commissaire.

Je vais commencer avec M. Wells qui est devant moi.

M. Paul Wells:

Vous voulez savoir si le commissaire devrait être nommé avec l'accord de tous les partis?

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est bien cela.

M. Paul Wells:

À mes yeux, le commissaire serait à peu près l'équivalent d'un agent du Parlement, ce qui fait qu'il ne serait pas suffisant de simplement consulter les différents partis. Il faudrait parvenir à dégager une forme de consensus à ce sujet. La personne qui est nommée va normalement demeurer en fonction lorsque le parti actuellement au pouvoir se retrouvera sur les banquettes de l'opposition. Ce sont des choses qui arrivent dans notre pays.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je ne sais pas qui est le suivant.

Monsieur Raynauld.

M. Vincent Raynauld:

Évidemment, il est difficile de répondre à cette question. L'essentiel, c'est que la commission soit indépendante, et souvent, il est difficile d'avoir un appui sans réserve lorsqu'on est indépendant.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Monsieur Cameron.

M. Maxwell A. Cameron:

Eh bien, si l'intérêt fondamental est la démocratie et le bien public, je crois qu'aucun parti ne devrait avoir de droit de veto là-dessus. Bien entendu, il est à mon avis essentiel que la personne qui a un tel rôle, qui serait, comme l'a dit M. Wells, équivalent à celui d'un agent du Parlement, obtienne l'appui le plus large possible, de sorte qu'il serait très important que les partis s'entendent le plus possible.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Monsieur Giasson. [Français]

M. Thierry Giasson:

Je partage l'opinion de M. Cameron. [Traduction]

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous avez un instant, puis-je poser une question?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Bien sûr.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux seulement poser une question. Je pense que le temps est presque écoulé. Ma question s'adresse à M. Wells.

Nous essayons de faire en sorte que les agents du Parlement soient indépendants par rapport à tout parti en disant qu'ils rendent des comptes à la Chambre des communes, ce qui signifie, concrètement, qu'ils rendent des comptes aux partis qui siègent à la Chambre. D'après ce que j'ai observé au cours des deux dernières décennies, les partis représentés peuvent vouloir exclure d'autres partis.

Une loi électorale a été adoptée pour ensuite être invalidée par la Cour suprême. Elle aurait eu pour effet de limiter le financement des partis qui ne sont pas encore représentés à la Chambre. Je crains que la même chose se produise avec l'exclusion de nouveaux partis ou de partis insurgés comme le Parti réformiste, dont j'ai déjà été membre. Le modèle de commission ne présente-t-il pas un risque à cet égard?

M. Paul Wells:

Certes. Je ne vais pas résoudre cette question difficile. Je suis ravi que votre comité prenne le temps de réfléchir à des questions comme celle-là.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'ai une préoccupation similaire. Une fois que le gouvernement obtient quelque chose, habituellement, cela s'accroît et non le contraire.

J'ai peut-être une brève question à poser à M. Wells. Je sais qu'il reste peu de temps. Est-ce que le signal qu'avait Maclean's au cours du dernier débat des chefs, soit celui de l'élection de 2015, avait été offert à d'autres réseaux?

M. Paul Wells:

Oui. Je m'en suis fait un devoir, car j'essayais de me préparer à modérer un débat, qui était essentiellement un travail journalistique. Je n'ai pas porté une attention particulière aux discussions. Je crois comprendre que Rogers a offert le signal à d'autres diffuseurs moyennant le type de montant qui s'applique normalement à ce service. C'est un montant que les réseaux peuvent facilement se permettre de payer. Les réseaux ont refusé. Ils ont dit publiquement que c'était parce qu'ils n'avaient aucun contrôle sur le contenu, qu'ils n'avaient aucune garantie que nous allions leur offrir un bon débat et qu'ils ne voulaient pas diffuser un mauvais débat.

Personnellement, j'aurais préféré que nous l'offrions gratuitement. J'aurais préféré que tous ces réseaux dans lesquels je suis apparu comprennent que j'allais faire du bon travail. Je crois que le commissaire pourrait évaluer les propositions indépendantes et déclarer que tels débats proposés par des groupes externes ont un certain niveau de qualité et, par conséquent, que le commissaire déclare que ces débats doivent absolument être diffusés... mais c'est une idée parmi d'autres.

(1310)

M. Jamie Schmale:

À votre connaissance, la seule condition, c'était qu'un petit montant allait être chargé aux autres réseaux, et ils ont refusé.

M. Paul Wells:

Oui. Que les réseaux me corrigent si je me trompe, mais c'est ce que j'ai appris.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Monsieur Wells, plutôt que de laisser les marchés et le réseau déterminer la meilleure façon de faire, croyez-vous peut-être que ceci est un autre pas vers une situation où le gouvernement est trop ambitieux concernant un commissaire potentiel? Comment les choses se passeront-elles, selon vous?

M. Paul Wells:

Je crois qu'il est légitime que l'État s'intéresse à cet aspect des campagnes, comme à bon nombre d'autres aspects des campagnes. Je crois qu'il est très difficile de le faire de façon à ce que les choses s'améliorent.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Ce serait difficile, en effet.

M. Paul Wells:

J'ai entendu des gens décrire la commission sur les débats présidentiels aux États-Unis comme un modèle. Je recommande vivement au Comité de se pencher sur le fonctionnement de cette commission. C'est une mascarade. C'est une escroquerie au moyen de laquelle les partis traditionnels assurent leur monopole, ou leur duopole, à la Maison-Blanche. Il y a une raison pour laquelle en un siècle, aucun candidat d'un tiers parti n'a failli être élu. La commission sur les débats présidentiels y est pour quelque chose.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Christopherson a accepté d'utiliser son temps d'intervention pour parler de la motion.

J'aimerais remercier tous les témoins d'être venus comparaître aujourd'hui. C'est dommage que l'alarme d'incendie et le vote aient fait en sorte que nous ayons eu moins de temps, mais vous avez fourni de très sages conseils et nous avons reçu vos exposés, ce qui est le plus important. Les gens pourront bien sûr communiquer avec vous individuellement s'ils ont d'autres questions. [Français]

M. Thierry Giasson:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, voulez-vous présenter votre motion révisée? Nous ne disposons que de cinq minutes environ. Nous verrons au moins si nous pouvons commencer.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Lorsque vous m'avez dit que nous allions le faire aujourd'hui, je ne voulais pas perdre de temps, et j'ai donc renoncé à mon temps d'intervention pour présenter la motion.

Je vais lire la motion modifiée. Soit dit en passant, la partie formulée est tirée directement des discussions que notre comité a eues sur le Bureau de régie interne. Je n'ai fait que transposer les éléments. La motion se lit comme suit: Que, relativement à la création d’un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé d’organiser les débats des chefs, le Comité autorise un député qui n’est pas membre d’un parti reconnu à participer aux audiences de façon temporaire et sans droit de vote lorsqu’il mènera cette étude, et que le député se voit allouer cinq minutes lors du second tour de questions pour s’adresser aux témoins.

Encore une fois, c'est ce que nous avons fait lorsque notre comité s'est penché sur le Bureau de régie interne. Nous voulions faire en sorte que tout le monde participe puisque cela touchait tout le monde. Chers collègues, vous m'avez demandé de préparer une motion, ce que j'ai fait, monsieur le président. Je l'ai présentée au Comité, et j'espère que nous l'appuierons.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des observations?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'appuie la motion.

Le président:

Pendant que les gens en discutent, je vais vous poser des questions.

Comment les choses fonctionneront-elles pour les députés indépendants? Leur permettra-t-on de participer aux réunions à huis clos? Discuteront-ils du rapport provisoire? Leur fournira-t-on tous les documents du Comité?

M. David Christopherson:

De prime abord, si nous avons répondu à ces questions par rapport au Bureau de la régie interne, je dirais que c'est la même chose.

Le président:

Scott, avez-vous quelque chose à dire?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous ne faisons qu'essayer de comprendre. Un changement a été apporté, et ce que nous examinons diffère de ce dont il a été discuté. Quel était le changement?

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

S'agit-il simplement d'ajouter cinq minutes à chaque séance?

Le président:

Il s'agit d'allouer à cette personne cinq minutes au second tour.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Elles s'ajoutent à toutes les interventions que nous avons déjà, de sorte que personne ne perd de temps d'intervention.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que nos séances se termineront cinq minutes après l'heure habituelle? Elles se termineraient cinq minutes plus tard. S'agit-il plutôt de réduire le temps réservé à autre chose?

(1315)

Le président:

Voilà une question pour le Comité. Allons-nous simplement réduire le temps réservé aux questions ou terminerons-nous la séance cinq minutes plus tard?

M. David Christopherson:

Utilisons-nous tout le temps réservé aux questions? Je pense qu'habituellement, il en reste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous perdons parfois les interventions de trois minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est 10 habituellement.

Le président:

David, les cinq minutes que vous proposez seraient-elles allouées au début ou à la fin du second tour? À quel moment seraient-elles allouées?

M. David Christopherson:

Encore une fois, j'ai seulement essayé de trouver une solution juste, et les règles que nous avions dans le cas du Bureau de régie interne devaient être justes, car tout le monde les a approuvées. Cela m'est égal.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Pourrais-je proposer que les cinq minutes soient allouées au début du second tour?

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je proposer quelque chose?

Compte tenu du temps que nous avons, est-ce qu'il semblerait déraisonnable que nous en discutions entre nous. J'ai l'impression que nous sommes disposés à faire quelque chose du genre en général, mais nous devons nous entendre sur les détails...

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai renoncé à mon temps d'intervention pour rien.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne fais que le proposer. Je n'essaie pas de... Nous pourrions déterminer si nous parvenons à trouver une solution et nous n'aurons pas à le faire. Nous reviendrons jeudi avec une entente.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Nous ne sommes pas en train d'analyser la Grande Charte. Je crois que l'objectif est assez clair. Nous en avons déjà discuté une fois. On nous avait demandé de bien y réfléchir et de revenir en discuter une fois de plus. J'approuve la motion. J'aime l'idée. Je crois que les cinq minutes devraient être allouées au début du second tour. S'il est nécessaire de proposer un amendement, je suis prêt à le faire. Je ne vois pas ce qui est inquiétant.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourquoi ne proposez-vous pas l'amendement? Nous pourrions en discuter par la suite. Est-ce sensé? Pourquoi ne proposez-vous pas l'amendement?

M. Scott Simms:

Voici ce qu'il en est, si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président.

Je ne sais pas s'il est nécessaire de proposer un amendement. Est-ce le cas? Si la motion est adoptée, alors il sera possible de placer l'intervention au moment où on le veut. Il s'agit d'allouer à cette personne cinq minutes au cours de cette période. Je propose seulement que ce soit au début du second tour. S'il faut présenter un amendement, je serai ravi de le faire.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour que nous réglions le problème, je propose qu'au premier tour, nous réduisions d'une minute chaque intervention de sept minutes et que nous cédions ce temps au député indépendant, s'il est présent. Sinon, nous ne le faisons pas. Entre les premier et second tours, le problème est réglé. La séance n'est pas prolongée — une minute est ajoutée — et nous cédons chacun une minute au député indépendant s'il se présente.

M. David Christopherson:

Sauf que vous me demandez d'en être le plus grand perdant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les libéraux perdent deux minutes...

M. David Christopherson:

Non, mais globalement, j'ai moins de temps.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... vous perdez chacun une minute, et nous allouons cinq minutes au député indépendant. Il y a une minute à la fin.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous dites deux minutes pour le gouvernement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous interviendrez toujours au second tour, car nous retirons du temps au premier tour.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, je dis seulement que réduire d'une minute le temps d'intervention de sept minutes a plus de conséquences pour moi que pour vous.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je proposer une solution de rechange? Je vais en fait proposer un amendement, de sorte que nous puissions officiellement l'adopter ou le rejeter et revenir à ce qui est proposé ici. Je propose qu'une virgule soit ajoutée à la fin du libellé et que soit ajouté ce qui suit: « à condition que la réunion soit prolongée de cinq minutes par groupe de témoins ».

M. David Christopherson:

Ce serait plus facile. Je préfère cette solution.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que l'idée vous plaît?

M. David Christopherson:

De cette façon, personne ne perd quoi que ce soit et nos collègues gagnent cinq minutes.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Est-ce que c'est par groupe?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, s'il y a deux groupes, la séance sera prolongée de 10 minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Devrais-je le lire à nouveau, Chris?

M. Chris Bittle:

Non, j'ai entendu. Je voulais seulement savoir...

M. Scott Reid:

C'est par groupe. Nous terminerions la séance 5 ou 10 minutes plus tard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela ne s'applique que si la personne se présente, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

C'est vrai.

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions au sujet de l'amendement?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(La motion modifiée est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Les députés indépendants devront déterminer qui sera autorisé à participer.

(1320)

Le greffier:

Alors, je vais leur écrire à tous?

Le président:

D'accord. Allez-vous le leur expliquer?

Le greffier: Oui.

Le président: Nous rappellerons les règles du Bureau de régie interne, là où nous le pouvons, sur ces autres questions. S'il y en a, nous les utiliserons.

Y a-t-il autre chose dans l'intérêt du pays?

M. Scott Reid:

Non, merci, monsieur le président.

J'aime que vous regardiez toujours vers moi avant de lever la séance.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 28, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.