header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-01 INDU 104

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 104 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Today, pursuant to Standing Order 81(4), we will be reviewing the main estimates related to the Department of Industry.

Today we have with us the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities; John Knubley, Deputy Minister; and David McGovern, Associate Deputy Minister.

We're going to get right into it so we don't lose time.

Minister, you have up to 10 minutes.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan (Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities):

Mr. Chair and esteemed committee members, thank you for the opportunity to be here on the occasion of the tabling of the main estimates for the 2018-19 fiscal year. [Translation]

Our government believes that the best investments we can make are in our people.[English]

We believe a growing economy means investing in curiosity, creativity, and innovation. That's why, as you are no doubt aware, our government recently made the biggest investment in research in Canadian history. [Translation]

We made this investment because research is the engine that drives an innovative economy.[English]

That's right. Budget 2018 sets aside nearly $4 billion to support current and future scientists and researchers.

In addition to the new funding, $2.8 billion will go toward renewing federal laboratories to ensure federal scientists have the infrastructure they need to inform evidence-based decisions about our environment, our health, our communities, and our economy. [Translation]

Budget 2018 represents the culmination of so much work with so many partners and stakeholders. We believe these investments will encourage current researchers and inspire the next generation.[English]

We want to continue to position Canada at the leading edge of discovery, discovery that improves not only the health and quality of life of Canadians, but also our environment. We want to supercharge the economy with research, enabling the discoveries that create jobs and even entirely new industries.

Take artificial intelligence, for example. Budget 2017 committed $125 million for the pan-Canadian artificial intelligence strategy. This investment is supporting hubs across the country. Industry is taking notice. Alphabet Inc., the parent company of Google, is setting up shop in Toronto, and now The Economist is talking about “Maple Valley”, not just Silicon Valley. People around the globe are asking, “How did Canada do this?”[Translation]

We also want to improve the lives of Canadians with new breakthroughs in areas like health care.[English]

These investments in research will help lead to new treatments, new medicines, and better care every day for Canadians across the country. We want to build a dynamic 21st-century workforce, one that is equipped with the science, technology, engineering, and math—and I would add arts and design skills—needed to respond to future challenges and opportunities with creativity, courage, and confidence.

Let me share some details. Of the $4-billion investment I mentioned, $1.7 billion is going to support research funded through the granting councils. This includes the single largest investment in discovery research in Canada's history. This will mean better opportunities and increased support for about 21,000 researchers, students, and highly qualified personnel across Canada. That includes $210 million in new funding for our Canada research chairs program.

Already, through the Canada 150 research chairs, we have recruited 25 internationally renowned chair-holders who are making their way to Canadian universities in the coming year from Austria, Australia, France, the United States, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. I'm happy to say that 42% of them are Canadians, returning home because they now see a future in research here in Canada. Let me add, 58% of them are women. They are leaders in their fields, attracted to Canada by the supportive funding and the advantages that our research ecosystem offers.

(1540)



Budget 2018 also sets aside over $1.3 billion to provide researchers across the country with access to state-of-the-art tools and facilities. This means that over 44,000 students, post-doctoral fellows, and researchers will have access to the equipment they need to carry out groundbreaking research.

I'd also like to highlight an important investment that budget 2018 makes in our world-class colleges and polytechnics. They are a critical innovation bridge between ideas and the marketplace. Through the college and community innovation program we have set aside $140 million to increase support for collaborative innovation projects involving businesses, colleges, and polytechnics. This is the largest research investment ever.[Translation]

These institutions are critical to innovation. They partner with small businesses in their communities to solve real-world challenges.[English]

Mr. Chair, I'd like to share a local story that illustrates this.

I recently visited the technology access centre at Niagara College. While there, I chatted with a representative of General Electric. He was happy to share that one of the main reasons the company decided to open a manufacturing facility in Welland was the technology access centre in the college. GE saw first-hand how the capabilities of the college could benefit the company. Everything it needed was there, in Welland: access to faculty and research teams; resources and equipment; and highly skilled and knowledgeable graduates in technology, trades, and business. This is huge. Today, the GE brilliant factory employs approximately 200 people.

We are making investments that strike the appropriate balance between discovery research that supports breakthroughs and the commercialization of ideas.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, I'm glad to say that budget 2018 was well received by those on whom it will have the greatest impact.[English]

The Universities Canada president said: “This budget makes important advances on the roadmap developed by the Naylor report.... It's a major investment in research that impacts Canadians' everyday lives, from shortening commute times to lifesaving medical treatments and environmental protection.”

The CICan president and CEO said, “Supporting applied research is one of the most efficient ways to boost Canadian innovation.”

This investment will go a long way toward unleashing the potential of colleges and institutes to drive growth in their communities and to train future innovators.

To that end, I want to emphasize that budget 2018 is about renewing Canada's research ecosystem to train the next generation of researchers. In recognition of this historic opportunity for real change, we want to ensure that Canada's next generation of researchers, including students, trainees, and early-career researchers, is larger, more diverse, and better supported than ever before. We task the granting councils with developing new plans to achieve greater equity and diversity in the sciences, and to support more early-career researchers.

We want to see our support advance the research ambitions of more women, indigenous peoples, minorities, persons with disabilities, and those at early stages in their careers. What's more, over the next year, the government will do further work to determine how to better support our next generation of researchers through scholarships and fellowships.

Mr. Chair, the government is playing the long game here.

(1545)

[Translation]

This is our chance to harness the power of research to change the lives of Canadians for the better.[English] This is our chance to create a research ecosystem capable of sustaining brilliant minds and groundbreaking work.

We do all this because we want to be a global research leader and be at the forefront of discoveries that positively impact the lives of Canadians, the environment, our communities, and our economy. We are doing our part to train and support this generation of Canadian researchers so that they can help make that happen.

Thank you. I'd be pleased to answer any questions the committee members have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

We're going to move right into questioning, with Ms. Ng for seven minutes.

Ms. Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

Minister, thank you so very much for coming here today to talk to us about the great work you are doing in leading the department.

I'm going to ask a question about the government's investment in fundamental research. You talked about our government making the largest investment in Canadian history in discovery research through the granting councils. To me, this is really great news for Canadians, including the people in my riding. In my riding, we have great institutions, such as York University and Seneca College.

I wonder whether you could talk to us about the college sector. You touched on that. Maybe you can talk about the investments you're making that will help in applied research, innovative research, at the colleges, the polytechnics, and the CEGEPs.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Mary, for the question.

I will begin by saying that this is the largest research investment in Canadian history. It is a $4-billion investment, and on top of that, there is $2.8 billion for government science infrastructure so our government scientists have the best labs possible to do their research.

It is a $1.7-billion investment in discovery research, $1.3 billion to the Canada Foundation for Innovation. For the first time, after 20 years, the CFI will have sustainable funding.

We are making the largest investment in college research in Canadian history as well. When you visit the colleges, as I know you have in your riding, you see that the work they're able to do, for example with business, is so important. A small or a medium-sized business comes in. They have a challenge. They're able to work on state-of-the-art infrastructure. They're able to work with students. They're able to work with faculty. They get an answer they need within a matter of months that will help grow their business and create jobs.

I'm really excited about the investments in both fundamental research and discovery research. The colleges play an enormously important role in our research ecosystem.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Can you talk to us about the benefits to the students in the college system? The government is making investments to enable them to do the research, and in many colleges it will be applied research. Can you talk about its relevance to industries because of that very collaboration? What are we doing about supporting those students that would also enable the partnerships and the learning that will take place with industries?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Mary, thanks for the great question.

I, too, have a college in my community. It's Humber College, and I get there as often as I can. We want our students doing that applied research because that makes them very attractive to business, to industry, and to the community when they finish their degree. They're getting real-world experience. They're working on real-world problems. That makes them very attractive to industry. Research funding will give them the opportunity to work with faculty, to work on the best infrastructure, and to do their research.

(1550)

Ms. Mary Ng:

On the other side, for those organizations that collaborate so often and so well, can you talk about how the investments will actually help the industries? I think they have an opportunity here to collaborate more with the community, with the colleges, and with the post-secondary institutions in their respective areas. You used GE as an example, but maybe you could talk about other industries that have benefited from the investments that we're making for students.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Mary, for the question.

Today, we have the NSERC award winners here on Parliament Hill. I think that is a really good example. The Prime Minister met with them this morning to do a round table, and there was a college researcher who has worked with industry for 10 years. His research is around removing chemicals from cleaning products. It's really exciting to celebrate these researchers on Parliament Hill.

I will also highlight the investment we've made in the National Research Council. It is $540 million, the largest investment in the National Research Council in 15 years. This is about allowing the National Research Council to go back to doing some discovery research, but also, in terms of innovation, to help small and medium-sized businesses with the problems and challenges they face.

Ms. Mary Ng:

When I think about these wonderful researchers in the colleges and in the post-secondary institutions, I know that we are making a number of supports for women in the research field. Can you talk a bit about that?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Mary. I am a former researcher myself. I spent 25 years fighting for more diversity in the research system. Our government understands that equity and diversity go hand in hand with excellence. We want more women, indigenous people, people from minority backgrounds, and persons with disabilities in the research system.

That is why I brought back the university and college academic staff survey. It was cancelled by the previous government after being in existence since 1937. That gives us the data. Are women and men progressing through the ranks at the same rate? Are they making equal pay?

We've put in place new equity and diversity requirements for our Canada excellence research chairs and our Canada research chairs. For the excellence research chairs, it is $10 million over seven years. During the first rollout of the program under the previous government, not one woman was nominated. During the second rollout, one woman was nominated. Today, we have 27 Canada excellence research chairs, whom we are enormously proud of—one is winning an award today—but only one of them is a woman.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Jeneroux. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here today.

I have only seven minutes, so if you could keep your answers short, it would be appreciated. If I interrupt you, it's not my intent to cut you off; it's just that we have only seven minutes here.

You mentioned in your comments that your investments would ensure that government scientists have the best labs possible. Minister, where are the scientists?

In your last appearance before this committee, you were asked about CANSIM table 358-0146, which shows a loss of 1,571 federal personnel engaged in science and technology when the government changed over. You told this committee it was part of retirements, with no further elaboration. Do you still stand by that explanation?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Matt, for the question.

One of the challenges we face is that different departments look at the numbers in different ways. It has to do with the way researchers are categorized.

That's why I am having a full-day retreat with the deputy ministers of the science-based departments in June. One of the areas I've put on the table for discussion is human resources. If the average age of a civil servant is 38, what is the average age of a government scientist? How are we attracting new Ph.D.s and post-docs into government science? How are we supporting them through their careers? It's an incredibly important area for me, and I was proud that, with my colleague from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, one of the first things we did was hire 135 scientists.

I can't be clearer. We are committed—

(1555)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, I'm sorry to cut you off. I think you got your point across. The table says otherwise, though.

I have the chart here. I'd be happy to share it with you. I am especially concerned with another row in the same chart, about those engaged in research and development—direct scientists. It reads to me as if these are federal front-line researchers. In that category, there was a drop of another 2,602 personnel in research and development when the government changed over.

The 2018 numbers show that there are currently 3,507 fewer scientists employed by this government than there were in the previous government. It's difficult to believe that this is solely because of retirements. I'm happy you're having a retreat, but this is two and a half years in the making, and you now have 3,500 fewer scientists. Why?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

That is not the case. In fact, we have gone back to the science-based departments. We have been told that it has to do with the classification of researchers.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

After two and a half years, Minister, are the classifications still incorrect?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

It really should be.... I will give you an example. As a result of the previous administration and the restructuring of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, which was completed in September 2015, the scientific and professional personnel at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories at Chalk River are no longer employed by AECL but by the Canadian National Energy Alliance. It's a private sector company. That shift is responsible for 2,873 full-time equivalents. That decision was taken by the previous government.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It was enacted by your government, Minister. When you have 3,507—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

No. I have to take issue with that. That decision—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You have 2,800 out of 3,507. There are still missing scientists.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

That decision was taken by the previous government—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Where are the missing scientists, Minister?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Matt, our government is committed to science, research, and evidence-based decision-making. We are committed to supporting our government scientists. We are committed to unmuzzling them. On day two of our government, we unmuzzled our scientists. We have backed that up with a new communications policy. Minister Brison and I wrote to all the ministers and the department heads to make sure they were aware of that policy change.

We know culture change takes time. We know there has been a new study done showing the improvements. The number of scientists thinking they were muzzled has gone from 90% down to 50%. There is still work to do.

Minister Brison, the president of PIPSC, and I have written a joint letter directly to our researchers to reinforce that we want them out speaking both to the media and to the public. That is a very large change from the previous government.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

The fact is that it's actually 63% who say they are unsatisfied. You're still quoting these numbers two and a half years into your mandate.

Anyway, Minister, we will change the channel a bit here. I want to talk about the chief science adviser position. Part of the chief science adviser's mandate is to “provide and coordinate expert advice to the Minister of Science and members of Cabinet...on key scientific issues”. That's directly from her mandate letter.

Your government has recently pushed through a new environmental assessment process and continues down the path of imposing a carbon tax, insisting that these are evidence-based decisions.

How many times has the chief science adviser been asked to weigh in on these or any other matters since her tenure began seven months ago?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

As you know, Matt, I was delighted to undertake the first consultation with the research community in a decade, as well as with Parliament and with Canadians, to get a chief science adviser. That position was abolished by the previous government.

We asked what this position should look like, and it was an advisory role. We could not have a better chief science adviser than Dr. Mona Nemer—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm talking about the adviser position.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm going to answer you. For example, the member for Beauce said she was an excellent candidate. She reports directly to the Prime Minister and to me. She can also be tasked by the Prime Minister, by me, or by cabinet. It is an advisory role.

We have brought forth a new environmental assessment process after environmental legislation, I'm sorry to say, was gutted by the previous government.

(1600)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, I don't have much time. How many times has she been consulted?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

After the legislation is passed on the new environmental assessment process we've put in place, there will be a review, and of course our chief science adviser will be weighing in on that.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

She will be weighing in after the process.

The Chair:

Sorry, Mr. Jeneroux, we're a little over time, but we will get back to you.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

You mentioned the GE brilliant factory in your presentation. What type of commitment have they made in terms of investment?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I would have to get you the details of that. I can tell you what I know on my side. When I met them, they were really excited because of the opportunities the college offered in terms of faculty, state-of-the-art infrastructure, and the access to students who could work to solve their real-world problems. That is why we have made the investment of $140 million. That is the largest applied research investment in Canadian history.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Are you aware that they're laying off 350 workers in Peterborough?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I cannot comment on that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This leads to my further question. There seems to be frustration for a lot of people with regard to the involvement of the private sector. On the one hand, there is an investment in the public with regard to the facility you referenced, the GE brilliant factory; on the other hand, down the road, in Peterborough, they're actively laying off 360 people and closing a factory. It becomes a little difficult.

My next question relates to what I'm hoping to see over the next year, which is some accountability. You're talking about $2.8 billion in renewing federal laboratories. What specifics can you provide right now in terms of where this is going and how we're going to ensure Canadian content for those investments? What I really want to know is what types of structures are being put in place, so that when we have this type of investment, it's not going to be absent of Canadian jobs and Canadian participation.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

We're really excited, Brian, about this investment in federal labs, and we are just at the initial stages. I talked about this full-day retreat we have. I brought that in. This had never been done before in government, bringing together the science-based departments. Some of the things we've looked at are the age of some of the infrastructure and how research was done in these single-use labs. We want to make sure we bring together environment and health so we have a multidisciplinary perspective.

One thing that has come out of that yearly retreat is a new science infrastructure strategy. It was important to get the money in this budget for the work that's being done.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I appreciate that. I guess my concern is about a lens on procurement, and that's why I'm looking for specifics. If you don't have it now, I wonder whether it's even being done. I'm also wondering about the use of small and medium-sized businesses to participate in that procurement.

I imagine that the nearly $3 billion is going across the country, and I'm looking for measurement processes in terms of that. That's what I really would like to hear.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I appreciate your questions. This line of questioning is really for PSPC. We are at the beginning of the process on the science side, but I do want to stress how important accountability is. In budget 2016, we announced $2 billion for research and innovation infrastructure across the country, and there was a two-year window. I want you to know how carefully we watch, so there is that accountability mechanism.

(1605)

Mr. Brian Masse:

I've had a chance to sit on other committees, and I know that procurement is a mess right now. There's no doubt about it.

I guess I'll move on to another question. The reason I used the General Electric example is that, if we just leave it to another department or another minister, there is no guarantee that there would be an actual business plan for the money to be used in procurement for the advancement of small and medium-sized business and other businesses in Canada.

I'll just leave that out there. I would hope that, as a minister, you have an interest in making sure that the procurement really is reflective of Canadians.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Our departments are working very closely, as are all the science-based departments, and we have the chief science adviser also feeding in to make sure we get the right infrastructure. Understand that this is bringing all these departments together. That's really new.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay, thank you.

I will move on, then, to the pan-Canadian artificial intelligence strategy. I received a briefing with regard to the superclusters. One of the concerns I had about artificial intelligence investment was the lack of detail, at least at this point in time, about whether there would be communication and sharing with manufacturing and the other clusters.

I'm wondering whether there's going to be a connection to these investments in terms of AI across Canada, or whether they're going to be individual one-offs. I'm looking for a little more detail as to how that will work.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

You asked first of all about the pan-Canadian artificial intelligence strategy. That was announced in budget 2017. It was $125 million to invest in artificial intelligence research. I'd like people around the table to know that Canada is really a world leader in this area. Government began funding AI in Canada in the 1980s. No one was really sure what that was, even in the late 1990s, but Canada kept investing in it.

AI is now at the tipping point, when it will affect how we work, live, and play, and Canada is really at the forefront, because of the investments in discovery research and because of the training of our researchers. The $125 million was for a corridor from Montreal through Toronto and Waterloo to Edmonton.

You're also asking about the superclusters.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Is the $125 million for individual, one-off investments, or are they going to be succinctly connected in some capacity for the overall funding?

You're calling it a strategy. I'm just trying to understand that part.

The Chair:

Answer very quickly, please.

Mr. John Knubley (Deputy Minister, Department of Industry):

The short answer is that CIFAR is playing a role in administering the $125 million. As part of that, Alan Bernstein is very much encouraging coordination across the three centres. With respect to the superclusters, each of the three areas has proposed investments related to three of the five superclusters.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Baylis, go ahead, for seven minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister Duncan, for being here.

Since getting to know you over the last two years, I know that you have been a tireless advocate for research. You've been ringing that bell about the investments we need to make. As we're talking about the mains, I would delve a bit into the investments that you see coming.

Specifically, let's talk about infrastructure. You can't have leading research if you're using old stuff. It just can't work. Before we even talk about hiring more scientists doing anything, if they're not working on the latest infrastructure, they can't be advanced.

Can you talk specifically about the $2.8 billion that's in the estimates just for infrastructure? How do you see that impacting Canadian research in general?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

There are two large investments in research infrastructure. One is for the universities and polytechnics, $1.3 billion through the Canada Foundation for Innovation. For the first time, after 20 years, this will now be sustainable funding. Researchers won't be wondering when the next bit of money is coming and asking themselves, “Do I apply for a grant now? Do I wait?” They've never been able to plan. They will now be able to do that. It's really exciting for the research community.

We also track where the infrastructure is across the country. Universities, colleges, and polytechnics can use it. Business can come and use it. On the government science side, we've been working with the science-based departments to develop, for the first time, a government science infrastructure strategy.

That is an investment of $2.8 billion. Many of our labs are 25 years old. It is time that they be updated. It will be exciting. Instead of one lab for one type of research, we want to bring together multiple experts so we can solve big challenges.

(1610)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I like one of the things you mentioned, that infrastructure is not just going to be limited to federal scientists. You also mentioned businesses. Can you elaborate a bit about how that's going to help our businesses?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I've had several long discussions with the Canada Foundation for Innovation on this. You can go on the website and see that it actually tracks where the infrastructure is around the country. CFI is really excited about this new investment, because it will give our researchers a greater opportunity to get state-of-the-art equipment. CFI is excited for businesses, how they might be able to use it and how there might be a sharing of equipment.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

There is great value in that. I've heard the same thing, Minister.

If we build this amazing new infrastructure, and we allow our businesses to co-operate with our scientists, it's not only going to help our businesses, but it's going to help that interlink that we've been studying. I'm very happy to see that our government is doing that.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'll just add, Frank, that the National Research Council also plays a role here. I think I mentioned earlier that it's a $540-million investment.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I want to ask you about that.[Translation]

Madam Minister, this is an important topic, not only for Canada as a whole, but also for Quebec, which uses a lot of resources for research, including the National Research Council. I know several companies that use it. This $540 million investment is extremely important.

Could you provide more details on this?[English]

How is that going to help our businesses again?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm really pleased about this investment, the $540 million. It's the largest investment in the National Research Council in 15 years.

It has been described as the jewel in government research, and it plays such an important role. It does discovery research, but it also does the innovation side. It works with small businesses and medium-sized businesses. It brings together academics, business, and the government to help businesses address challenges, grow their business, and hopefully hire more people.

The way our new president Iain Stewart is looking at this is that he also wants to build stronger collaboration between the NRC, academia, and industry. In many areas, there may be an NRC facility on an academic campus, but there may be a few researchers going back and forth.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That makes that link again, which we want.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

He wants to really strengthen that important link.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I would agree with you. We've heard that often, that the businesses have to be linked more with our researchers. That way, we can transfer the technology. I encourage that, as well.

I have only a minute left, but I'll throw back something that was brought up by my colleague and that you didn't get a chance to answer fully. It's about how sometimes full-time equivalents are reassigned, and how the numbers may look.

We have an old saying that there are lies, darned lies, and statistics. I'll let you address those statistical anomalies, if you will.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

We researchers love statistics.

Under the previous government, AECL was to be shut down. These researchers have gone to another organization. That's one of the main reasons. The other reason is with regard to the classification.

I'm very focused on making sure that our government scientists have the funding they need to succeed, and that they have the labs and tools they need. That's one of the reasons we're bringing together the science-based departments in June, to talk about the needs of our government scientists.

(1615)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are going to move to Mr. Jeneroux.

You have four minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

There's a lot to unpack in that last answer, Minister, but we'll leave that be.

You said something at this committee just a few moments ago that I think most Canadians will find shocking. You said that a chief science adviser who has now been in place for seven months would play no part in looking at the environmental assessment process of the carbon tax. I think that is shocking, but it's also very disappointing. You wouldn't look to the chief science adviser for her advice on a very scientific and evidence-based policy.

Why not, Minister?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm going to go back to the previous question you asked, Matt.

The number of federal personnel engaged in science and technology has actually increased since this government was elected.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, we can argue—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If we look at 2015-16, we see that it went from 33,925 full-time equivalents to 34,484 full-time equivalents, and that's with the changes at AECL.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, right here in your table, we see that the number of people involved in total science and technology, as well as in research and development, has gone increasingly in a downward trend since your government took over. I encourage you, Minister, to look at that CANSIM table, please.

Let's go back to the chief science adviser. I find it shocking that the chief science adviser was not part of the decision-making process. Why not?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I just want to finish this.

The shift of 2,873 full-time equivalents is explained by the restructuring that your previous government did around Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. These scientists are no longer employed by AECL, but by the Canadian National Energy Alliance, which is a private sector company.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, why was the chief science adviser not consulted on the environmental assessment process?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

As you know, we put the chief science adviser in place to make sure that government science is made fully available to Canadians, that government scientists speak freely about their work, and that scientific analyses inform decision-making. She will regularly review the methods and integrity of the science used in impact assessments and decision-making, and there will be an annual report at the end of her year to the Prime Minister and me. That will be made public.

She put out a letter after her first 100 days about the work she's been doing. She hit the ground running. She has criss-crossed the country listening to the research community, because it's about rebuilding trust and—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Minister, it's up to you, though, to ensure that she is consulted on legislation that's imperative to your government's success. The fact is that you haven't consulted her on it, and you said earlier that you would consult her after the fact.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Let me be clear. She did feed into the process for the new environmental assessment, which is—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You said she didn't. You said she will be doing it after the fact.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

There will be a review as well, but she did feed into this new environment assessment process that was brought in.

With respect, Matt—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Did she see the redacted documents?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Under the previous government, environmental legislation was gutted. Fish protection was gutted, and the waterways—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Was the chief science adviser privy to the information, the heavily redacted documents?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

This new environmental assessment process is focused on our environment and waterways. It's about rebuilding trust with Canadians, advancing reconciliation with indigenous peoples, and ensuring that good projects go ahead.

The Chair:

Sorry, we have to move on.

Mr. Jowhari, you have three minutes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Welcome, Minister. Let's change the topic to the digital world and the digital economy. As you know, we are moving fast in an ever-changing landscape within our world. Digital is playing a huge role.

As it relates to the $4 billion and our youth, especially women, what are the government and your department doing about the digital skill set among our youth? Specifically considering that diversity is something you are a great supporter of, how is it translating into making sure we are fully diverse within the digital skill set?

(1620)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Majid.

I know that, as an engineer, you're very interested in this area.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Just to clarify, I'm a former engineer.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

We've made a $50-million investment to teach young people to code. That's a really exciting program. To encourage more young people to consider a career in science, technology, engineering, and math—the STEM fields—we have the #ChooseScience campaign, which has delivered thousands of posters to thousands of schools across the country. It's a digital campaign, and it's receiving wonderful attention.

I'll build on what Mary asked earlier about what we have done to increase equity and diversity in universities. I talked about bringing back UCASS. I talked about our Canada excellence research chairs. I've also put in place new equity and diversity requirements for our Canada research chairs. We've had the universities put in place, by this past December, equity and diversity plans for how they plan to achieve the voluntary targets they agreed to in 2006 for women, indigenous people, people of minority backgrounds, and persons with disabilities. I've been clear that if they don't make their targets, I will consider withholding peer review.

I'd like to tell you that we're having real success with this. With our Canada 150 chairs, we were able to attract 42% expat Canadians, 58% women, back to Canada because they saw the research future here. That is a real difference, a real achievement, and it's measurable.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move back to Mr. Jeneroux. You have three minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister, while in opposition, you were a vocal advocate of a controversial CCSVI treatment. Its founder, Dr. Zamboni, claims that it improves the lives of patients with MS by widening their veins to allow for better blood circulation to the brain. You presented Bill C-280 in support of a national CCSVI strategy and claimed to have attended seven conferences on CCSVI, presented at three, and spent close to 100 hours reviewing MRIs and watching the procedure.

A study was recently done at UBC on this treatment. The lead neurologist, Dr. Traboulsee, concluded that there was absolutely no difference—no smidgen of a difference—between the group treated with the CCSVI treatment and the group treated with placebos. In light of this study, and in light of the fact that you're now science minister, has your opinion on CCSVI changed?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Matt, I thank you for the question.

In the last Parliament, I asked that the previous government do the science. I asked that it collect the evidence. I asked for clinical trials and for a registry for MS. The government reversed its position, agreed to do clinical trials, and agreed to do the registry. As you say, the results have been put forth, but what I asked for was that the government do the science.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Has your opinion on CCSVI changed?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

We are a government that is committed to science and evidence-based decision-making.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I am sure there are many scientists who have been waiting for a long time to hear that answer from you, Minister.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

The scientific community, Matt, is absolutely thrilled with the Canadian historic record investment in research: $4 billion in research, plus $2.8 billion for science infrastructure, which the largest investment; the largest investment in discovery research, $1.7 billion; the largest investment, and now sustainable funding, for science infrastructure, $1.3 billion; the largest investment in the NRC in 15 years, as well as the largest investment—

(1625)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I have 45 seconds left, so could I just get to my last question, Minister? Then I promise you'll be off the hot seat for a minute.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—in application research in Canadian history. I think the research community is very thrilled.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

In your department's response to an order paper question submitted by my colleague, it was revealed that your department had awarded a contract of $51,000 and change to BESC Ottawa for headhunting services related to the chief science adviser position. How many candidates did BESC submit for review, and which departments, offices, and individuals were involved in the selection process?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Matt, I'd have to come back to you with the details. What I can tell you is that it was a rigorous process over about six months. We advertised the position widely. Numerous people were interviewed. We wanted to get the best candidate. As your colleague, the member for Beauce, said, she is an excellent candidate, and her appointment has been lauded across the country.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We going to move right to Mr. Sheehan. You have three minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Minister, thank you for your presentation. You do great work, especially around the research chairs. I know that even little old Sault Ste. Marie has reached out to apply for one, for a plant lipid metabolism research project, and they're very confident in their application. I am really glad to see that the program is reaching out to the smaller areas of Canada where great research is being done.

What I'm really interested in, as well, is that in 2006 it took a legal settlement to change the program to create hiring targets for four groups: women, indigenous people, people with disabilities, and visible minorities. I read an article about that in the fall. It talked about how there hadn't been much movement for a decade, but then you implemented term limits and it was changing. That was last year. I congratulate you on that.

I want to ask about 2018. What's in the budget to increase equity in science and research?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Terry, for the question. I know this matters so much to you because of your daughter.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Yes, it does, very much.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

You've asked a lot about this. I'll answer very briefly. We've brought back the UCASS survey. We've put in place equity and diversity requirements for our Canada excellence research chairs and our Canada research chairs, and we want to do more. We're going to put in place the well-known, well-respected Athena SWAN program. There was $15 million in the budget to put this in place, and we're looking forward to moving forward with it so that we have equity and diversity at our institutions.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That's excellent.

You also had talked about how, in delving into a lot more about truth and reconciliation, science research can be a part of that, and again, I go back to Algoma University. It was a former residential school. I toured it recently. I saw the research. They're applying for research chairs, but they're also trying to involve indigenous components. Can you comment on what you see going forward, and how that might happen?

The Chair:

Sorry, you'll have to keep it tight. You have 30 seconds.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Terry, thank you for asking this.

We're doing it in government science. We've been working on how we bring western science and ways of knowing together, how do we include ways of knowing. Then in this budget, we received $3.8 million for the granting councils to work with indigenous peoples to develop a research strategy that will better support our Inuit, Métis, our first nations researchers.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Masse, take us home for the final two minutes, please.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Thank you, Madam Minister.

Again, one of the things I'd like to talk about is Canada catching up with the world with regard to medical testing using animals. There's a growing body of evidence that 95% of those that have used animal testing for drugs have not led to successful rates. There are questions as to how efficient the drug testing is and whether or not Canada's scientific community should play a role in pushing non-animal testing. How do you feel about having a centre for alternatives to animal testing?

Have you considered, and are there currently any plans to look at how we can be innovators and advance that issue, or is the government not interested in that right now?

(1630)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm well aware of the research you mentioned from the University of Windsor. It's where I used to teach. I think we've talked about this before. I think other members of Parliament have asked about this. As you know the way things work in research is that there's a peer-review process. Canada has a world-renowned peer-review process, and the researchers could apply for different areas.

I'm pleased to tell you we have a 25% increase to the granting councils in this budget. It's going to open up new areas. There's $275 million for a new multidisciplinary, multinational risky research fund. There's $210 million for Canada research chairs, so with this large investment, there are many more opportunities for our researchers. What we saw in the past, and what we were hearing from the granting councils, was that there was good research, but it couldn't get funded. There simply wasn't the money. Now because there is the money, that research will get funded and I can't wait to see what our researchers do next. I think they're going to undertake research we can't even begin to imagine.

The Chair:

On that note, we are done.

Thank you very much, Minister, for being here with us today.

We are going to suspend for a very quick two minutes while we change the players around. Then we'll come back.

Thank you.



(1635)

The Chair:

Welcome back, everybody.

We are going to continue for the second hour. We have the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, as well as John Knubley, Deputy Minister.

We want to make sure that we get all the time we can, so Minister, you have up to 10 minutes.

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development):

Thank you very much, Chair.

It's great to be back. It's great to see a lot of familiar faces, some new faces as well.

Thank you very much for this opportunity.[Translation]

I appreciate the opportunity to meet with you on the occasion of the tabling of the 2018-19 main estimates.[English]

It is my intention to share with this committee the details of the continued implementation of our government's innovation and skills plan, which we've discussed in several of our budgets.

Chair, my comments will be brief to allow maximum time for questions. I know you said up to 10 minutes, but I will do my best to take less than that so we have a fulsome discussion.

However, before I do that, I'd like to thank this committee once again for its report on intellectual property and technology transfer. As you saw last week, when I announced our government's first national IP strategy, which is a huge point of pride, it reflected the recommendations, and you were instrumental in driving those initiatives home. I thank you for your leadership.[Translation]

I would be happy to discuss our strategy in more detail during the Q&A session.[English]

As for our innovation and skills plan, it is already providing a better life for middle-class Canadians from coast to coast to coast. We are well on our way to accomplishing our goals. Our economy has been growing at a rate of more than 3%, so GDP is doing really well relative to previous decades.[Translation]

Our economy is the fastest growing economy in the G7.[English]

But we can't be complacent. We must continue to make investments. We need to be strategic, we need to be smart, and we need to be thoughtful. From day one, jobs have been a priority for me and for our government.[Translation]

Since we formed the government, in 2015, the Canadian economy has seen more than 600,000 jobs created. Our unemployment rate right now is at 5.8%, so clearly we're headed in the right direction.[English]

Naturally, we want to continue to build on that momentum. That's why I'm here today to discuss the proposed budget allocation of $7.8 billion in the 2018-19 time period across the ISED portfolio and to answer any questions you may have. In doing so, I am seeking approval for spending to continue advancing our government's innovation and skills plan—again, it's a multi-year plan—including the priorities announced in budget 2017.

One of the centrepieces of our innovation and skills plan that received funding, or that was allocated in the 2017 budget, was the supercluster initiative. In February we revealed the five successful proposals that link together business, academia, and non-profit society to come together to supercharge our economy. The framework for partnership is there. Now it's up to innovators to bring those partners together and put their plans into action, and I look forward to seeing what each supercluster does in the coming months and years. [Translation]

The strategic innovation fund, which was also announced in budget 2017, is another tool intended to stimulate innovation.[English]

This fund will help Canadian innovators build in areas of economic strength, expand the role of Canadian firms and regional and global supply chains, attract investments, and create new, good-quality middle-class jobs.

Since its launch in 2017, Canada's innovative industries have responded positively to the strategic innovation fund. For example, hundreds of applications have been received through this new single-window program. We will put departmental resources to good use to allow SIF, the strategic innovation fund, to accelerate technology transfer and commercialization in sectors ranging from aerospace, defence, and automotive to agri-food and clean tech. Really, again, it's to diversify our economy and to look at the areas of high growth.[Translation]

I'd like to highlight a couple of other important measures that are ensuring Canada's place in the digital economy.[English]

I'm referring to the CanCode and connect to innovate initiatives. Through CanCode, we're teaching coding and other digital skills, and this is really a point of pride for me as a father of two young girls. One million kids from kindergarten to grade 12 will learn how to code in the next two years, and we will also help train more than 60,000 teachers on how to incorporate new technology in the classroom.

(1640)



Of course, none of this is possible without access to high-speed Internet service. That's why we are funding the connect to innovate program, which helps bridge the digital divide in rural and remote communities across Canada. This is a matter of fairness and a matter of equality. This is a really essential part in the new digital economy.

Canada's success in the digital economy also depends on leveraging our diverse talent and providing opportunities for all to participate in investing in digital skills, and infrastructure, we believe, will help achieve this.

Finally, among the many 2017 measures I'm talking about here today, let me draw your attention to the innovative solutions Canada program. Under this program, 20 federal departments and agencies will challenge small and medium-sized Canadian companies to solve real departmental problems. These are challenges the government is facing. They're going to go out and put them out in a very open and transparent way. This program will support the scale-up and growth of Canada's innovators and entrepreneurs by having the federal government act as a first customer, to be that marquee customer.

In return, the government will have access to the latest and most innovative products and services. This is aimed squarely at innovators, and we are confident it will help smaller companies become successful global players as well.[Translation]

Our government's investments under the innovation and skills plan ensure that Canada will sustain its leadership position as one of the world's best places to live and to do business.[English]

They will help sustain a world-class workforce in cutting-edge infrastructure, and they will attract investment and opportunities from around the world.

Once again, I thank this esteemed committee for this opportunity to speak and share some of my thoughts, and I look forward to any questions you may have.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

We're going to move right to Ms. Ng. You have seven minutes.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Minister, it is so wonderful to have you here to talk to us about the investments being made in innovation, as part of the estimates process.

I want to talk about the innovation superclusters initiative. There's a particular one that's a bit close to me. That's the advanced manufacturing supercluster. That bid was done out of the area I represent, and it included a lot of partners. It included the City of Markham, the Regional Municipality of York, ventureLAB, York University, Seneca College, and many industry partners such as Celestica, Magna, Canvass Analytics, Peytec, SterileCare, and ChipCare. I'm really pleased that their bid was successful and they will receive funding through the advanced manufacturing supercluster.

It really does represent a wonderful economic opportunity because of the concentration of companies that are here, from start-ups to scale-ups to SMEs to multinationals. They work and operate in a place that really is an ecosystem.

With that, could you talk to us about the superclusters? I've just highlighted the one, but can you talk to us about the five superclusters, how they were chosen, and the government investment in the superclusters initiative?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Thank you very much for your question and your leadership in this area. I know Markham is really a hub of innovation. There are a lot of great companies there, and many of them are participating in this particular initiative, as you mentioned, in the supercluster initiative, the advanced manufacturing one, more specifically.

Now, just to take a step back, we decided as a government that we wanted to unlock more money for research and development. We wanted better quality jobs. We wanted to see more economic growth. We decided that, rather than being prescriptive, we would create an open and transparent process led by businesses. The idea was that they would put forward competitive bids and proposals and ideas of how they'd work with smaller companies, large companies, academic institutions, and not-for-profits, to get us those desired outcomes.

Again, if someone asks me what a supercluster is, I'll say it's a job magnet. It's really about good-quality jobs. It's creating an ecosystem. Also as you mentioned, this was a very competitive process, and ultimately, we selected five. We avoided what we call the “peanut butter” approach. We wanted to be very strategic, we wanted to be very deliberate, and we wanted to have impact.

By selecting up to five—we determined five ultimately based on the criteria—we felt this would allow them to really compete, not only within Canada but globally as well. We have the digital supercluster out of British Columbia, one out of the Prairie provinces around protein and adding value to protein products, obviously the advanced manufacturing initiative that you talked about in Ontario, the artificial intelligence supply chain initiative, and then, of course, the oceans supercluster in the Atlantic Canada region.

This represents the fact that innovation takes place across the country, but fundamentally, the key metrics and take-aways are that this, at minimum, would generate billions of dollars of economic activity and tens of thousands of jobs over the coming years. This has been validated by third party experts. We also engaged government experts. We also had an expert panel, so we're very confident that this is an economic policy that will give us those desired outcomes.

Specifically in advanced manufacturing, it's about platforms. How can additive manufacturing—3-D printing, for example—and robotics help so many different aspects of our economy? It's not focused on aero or auto exclusively. These platforms like artificial intelligence or digital platforms, for instance, have a profound impact across the entire economy. I would say we have to be careful that this isn't a regional strategy. This is really about platforms that are going to be deployed and benefit the entire Canadian economy from coast to coast to coast.

(1645)

Ms. Mary Ng:

That's great.

Can you talk to us about the—

The Chair:

Sorry, can I just jump in for one moment, please?

Is there somebody playing music on this side? We're hearing music. It's interfering, and we've had a couple of complaints already, so please stop. Thank you.

You can go ahead.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Can you talk to us about the investment dollars in superclusters?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

It's a significant investment. It's $950 million. We wanted to get, at minimum, dollar-for-dollar leverage out of the private sector. I can tell you that the private sector has stepped up in a big way. They exceeded that expectation with more than a dollar-for-dollar investment. The investment is well over $2 billion, from government but also from, more importantly, the private sector.

As I mentioned earlier, the objective is to unlock cash on balance sheets for more research and development. If we want our companies to succeed and grow, they need to bet on new emerging technology, on new solutions. They need to think five, 10, and 15 years down the road. We feel that we've created not only that incentive but also that ecosystem. It's really about helping the small businesses scale up as well. This isn't a play about big businesses. This is really about the ecosystem that would benefit a lot of start-ups and companies that are scaling up.

For us, if you look at our innovation and skills plan, that's really our focus: How can we help Canadian companies scale and grow? Our ambition is not only Canada. We also have global ambition. We want these companies to succeed internationally as well. That's why we made such a significant investment of $950 million.

Ms. Mary Ng:

Thank you.

I'll switch this up a little bit and talk about the innovative solutions Canada program. Thank you for sharing with us the budget investments in innovative solutions Canada. It's great, because the government being the first customer for a lot of start-ups is something that will give these start-ups the leg they need for greater access into the marketplace, particularly if the government becomes their first customer.

Can you talk to us about how the innovative solutions Canada program might support under-represented groups? We have a lot of start-ups that cover that waterfront. How is the government going to help there?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

This is a program designed to help companies scale up. It's government acting as a marquee customer, making a bet on emerging Canadian technology, and validating that technology, so that when they go abroad, particularly as companies of diverse backgrounds, they can succeed not only in Canada but globally as well.

Hopefully, in the next round we'll get a chance to elaborate on that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Ms. Rempel.

You have seven minutes.

Hon. Michelle Rempel (Calgary Nose Hill, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister, for the period covered by these estimates, what's the total amount of direct grants and contributions made to for-profit enterprises by all of the departments within your signing authority?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Based on the amounts we have here in the 2018-19 estimates, the total portfolio amount is $7.8 billion. Are you specifically looking for grants?

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Grants and contributions made to for-profit enterprises.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Not the companies that are non-profit, but the for-profit.

(1650)

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Right.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Okay. I'll get you that specifically. We have different grants within different portfolios. I'll get you that sum momentarily.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Okay.

Of that number, how much went to female-led businesses?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, I will have to get you that number momentarily.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How much went to non-Canadian-owned businesses?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, we'll have to get you that number. We'll definitely break that information out.

Are you looking for international investments and domestic investments?

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I'm trying to figure out how much money you directly gave to companies.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, we'll get the exact amount.

We have different ways. It's primarily through grants and loans as repayable contributions. Those are the two mechanisms that we have.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Sure. I mean, some of the budgetary figures we've seen are $372 million for Bombardier and $35 billion for the Infrastructure Bank.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Correct.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I just would like to know how much money, since we're at the main estimates, you've given to companies.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

In the main estimates there are two components. There's an operating component to the main estimates, which is the baseline for personnel—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Yes, I know. I realize that.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

There's also the grants and contributions component.

We'll get those for you.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How much in grants and contributions did you give to for-profit enterprises, including all of the sub-departments?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

It's a great question. We'll get that to you momentarily. I'll just ask my officials to get that number for me.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Mr. Knubley, do you know what that amount is?

Mr. John Knubley:

No. We'll get back to you with the exact number.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

We're at the main estimates. I wanted to know how much money you're giving to companies because I was going to ask you how many jobs you've created from that money.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, just to—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I'll give Mr. Knubley a moment.

Hon. Navdeep Bains: Sure.

Mr. John Knubley:

I think of the voted activities, which is $2.3 billion in total, 80% are grants, as I understand it.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

To for-profit enterprises...?

Mr. John Knubley:

They're not all for-profit. We would have to clarify that because it's not broken into that detail.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How much money are you giving to companies?

Mr. John Knubley:

I can't answer that question. As we indicated, we'll have to come back to you with that.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

But why? I mean, these are the main estimates, right?

Mr. John Knubley:

These are the main estimates, and the way it is broken out is as follows in terms of the way it has been done, and it's done by program.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Right. Okay, but the whole argument—

Mr. John Knubley:

If you want the totals, then we will have to come back to you with the totals.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

The whole argument that has been made with the superclusters and this and that is that if we give money to companies, there will be jobs created. What I'm trying to do is figure out, as a parliamentarian at the main estimates, how much money you've given to companies and how many jobs have been created. Can you tell me how much you've given to companies?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

If I may, as I indicated, the total amount for the portfolio is $7.8 billion, of which we will siphon off and determine exactly the amount that you're requesting, and we'll make sure we provide you with the job numbers.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Okay. I'm just wondering why that's not possible today given that you—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

It's not possible today. We're just getting that information.

We'll definitely get back to you.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

By the end of my question round...?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

As soon as possible.

The Chair:

However long it takes them.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Okay. I'm sort of surprised. It's the industry committee, and your department has a lot of grants and contributions that you've talked about, but we don't know how much is going to companies at all or...?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We do know. We're just getting the accurate number for you.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Okay.

Mr. Knubley, do you have that number?

Mr. John Knubley:

No, I do not.

What the main estimates show tends to be the actual changes in the funding related to the program in terms of budget 2017 and budget 2018—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How can you manage—

Mr. John Knubley:

—so in new funding spending from budget 2017 totalling $568.5 million—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I can't—

Mr. John Knubley:

—the innovation superclusters was increased to $149.3 million.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I don't have enough time—

Mr. John Knubley:

The strategic innovation fund was increased $99.3 million—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

The question I wanted to ask was that you're spending a lot of Canadian tax dollars on companies, so how many jobs were created? But I can't get to that, so I'll ask, because I know a lot of this has gone to companies like Bombardier and your government has said that it is going to be entering into some sort of unknown financial agreement with Kinder Morgan for the pipeline.... I'm wondering if you have allocated anything in these mains for whatever sort of corporate subsidy you plan to give to a pipeline that was prepared to be built with no public subsidy.

Or do you not know that either?

Mr. John Knubley:

There are issues in terms of disclosure. What we do provide to all Canadians on a regular basis is that we publish investments made in companies and the total amount of investment. We do this on an aggregate basis—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How about Kinder Morgan? The Kinder Morgan—

Mr. John Knubley:

No, because the issue is that there's confidentiality with respect to individual firms, so all that we actually release—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

With respect to Kinder Morgan, as you know, right now we're looking at our financial and legislative options, so in the estimates you will not find any allocation for that.

(1655)

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

We don't know how much money you've given to companies so far—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

No, we're just going to get you the accurate number.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Okay. Do you have it yet?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We're going to get that to you momentarily.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Well, you're just sitting there.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Yes, our official is making sure that we get you the correct number.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

So we don't know how much money you've spent on companies.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

No, we do have the number. We're getting you that number.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Why can't I just have that right now?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

You asked, and I appreciate your patience. I'd ask you to endeavour to be a bit more patient. We'll definitely get you that information. I just want to clarify the record: we do have that number. We'll get you that number.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

To clarify, you as the minister, in charge of signing off on this, don't know how much money you've spent on companies.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

No, I do know.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Then what is it?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

You asked for a specific number, and we'll get you that number momentarily.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

What about you, Mr. Knubley? You're in charge of this as well.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

It's the same answer. It hasn't changed in the last three seconds.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I guess, you know, trying to figure out how many jobs have been created—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We'll get you that information as well, absolutely. We'll get you the contributions and the jobs associated with that as well.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

So we don't know how much you're going to be spending on...?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We do know. We're just getting that information.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

What about in Kinder Morgan? That's not in the budget at all right now.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

As we mentioned, these are estimates, and they primarily reflect approved Treasury Board submissions since December of 2017. Therefore, there's no provision in this for Kinder Morgan.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I'm at the end of my time, I think. Do we have an answer to that?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We'll get you that momentarily.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

But I'm out of time.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's okay. It's an hour-long committee. We'll definitely get that to you soon.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to you, Mr. Masse. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I think I'll move onto something more exciting.

In terms of gas pricing, is there any money allocated for increases either to the Competition Bureau or for support to actually fund a petroleum monitoring agency or an office of an oil and gas ombudsman? I've asked this question in the House of Commons before. The issue—I don't want to get into debating the pricing of gasoline and a series of things—is that I'm looking for more consumer accountability and transparency. Is there anything for Canadians in these estimates to allow for that?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Unfortunately, there's no new money allocated in these estimates.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm disappointed to hear that because I've been hoping there would be at least be something of the nature of even augmenting the Competition Bureau, but I'll set that aside.

I want to move to what we're hearing are concerns with regard to our hearings on copyright right now. It is a mess with regard to the Copyright Board of Canada in terms of the expression that we're hearing from interested parties on both sides. There have been some hearings and some submissions made.

Are there any allocated funds or improvements for making sure that Copyright Board of Canada decisions move quicker and we have decisions in a more timely manner?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's a great question. Copyright Board reform is important to us. We want to make sure there's an efficient, transparent, and predictable Copyright Board. We are going to be bringing forward changes to reflect the issues that you've raised. We feel this is something that industry wants.

More importantly, for example, if you look at the national IP strategy that we announced last week, there are some legislative changes to the “notice and notice” regime as well to make it easier for consumers. You mentioned, as well, the 85 year-old lady who received a notice to pay an up to $5,000 fine. We think that's unacceptable so we're going to be bringing you some of those changes as well. There will be some changes to the board reform as well to make it more transparent and to deal with the issues in a more timely manner. Some legislative changes will be proposed as well to deal with issues like notice and notice.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I would like to quickly follow up on that.

One of the concerns that I've expressed during our review of copyright—which we're doing right now—is, even if we present whatever report, whether there will be time for a quick turnaround and also changes. There's no doubt that the Copyright Board's time frame of decision-making seems to be perhaps impeded by resources. I just wanted to note that.

Now that we have Mr. Knubley back, you might be part of this answer because it follows up with regard to the new window that you have. I've expressed concerns in the past about the strategic innovation fund, not because of the fund itself but because we had an independent auto fund. It was different for aerospace but now it's the one-shop window.

Can you provide any numbers in terms of percentages of where the funding is going? My concern has always been a siphoning, perhaps, from the auto sector. What can you report at this point?

(1700)

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

The overall fund amount is $1.26 billion. This is really a reflection of the SADI fund that you referred to for the aerospace sector and the automotive innovation fund that existed. They've been consolidated and we added new resources as well.

We just started to announce some programming in projects under the SIF that go beyond aero and auto. I would say that auto is in a strong position. One of the key announcements we made was on Linamar, for example. That was the first announcement we made. There we announced a 1,500 job contribution. It's still too early to say because there's a competitive process and we're looking at a range of different proposals that are coming forward. The automotive sector has done well historically and we're confident it will do well going forward because we're looking for significant capital investments as well. It's still in early stages, as you know. This was just announced and we've just rolled out a few projects and there are many more to come.

Mr. Brian Masse:

We can pick them apart individually but will there be a compartmentalization of the types of industries that will be accessing this fund, or is it just going to be a long list?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We can prepare it in a manner that would be helpful to you and others if you want it broken out by sectors. Ultimately, we're going to list the different projects. For some of those projects, it's interesting, it's not necessarily auto but auto and aero working together. It is sometimes based on R and D to help multiple platforms that deal with multiple sectors. We can do our best to categorize them. If you're thinking of the car of the future, I am too. It's a huge concern of ours and a preoccupation because we want to see the long-term success of the automotive industry. We're looking at the role of AI, clean tech, autonomous vehicles, and making sure that we make those strategic investments. We're very mindful of that in the strategic innovation fund to set ourselves up for success, not only in mandates right now but also in mandates 10 or 15 years from now.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I will move on to another issue.

We've just issued a report as a committee on rural broadband. Is there any comment you wish to provide right now? Obviously, we are receiving a lot of attention about this from not only constituents but also companies in the field. Do you want to use this opportunity of one minute to comment about the fact that we've submitted the report right now?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

First of all, thank you.

As I mentioned, on the intellectual property report, your feedback and guidance were extremely helpful as we articulated the government's first national IP strategy. In the new knowledge economy, it was long overdue.

With respect to investments in high-speed Internet connectivity in rural and remote communities, that's still a priority for our government. That's why we introduced—and it's in the estimates as well—the connect to innovate program. This is a $500-million program to provide that fibre backbone infrastructure.

The neat attribute about this program is that it actually leverages private sector funding. Overall investment will be over a billion dollars. It will help over 700 communities, including really remote and rural communities, but we're looking to build upon that. We announced for example, LEOs, low Earth orbit satellite technologies, that can help, again, those rural and remote communities to deal with the latency issue.

We're looking at technology. We're looking at traditional funding in fibre. We're looking at partnerships with the private sector. We've also been working very closely with the provinces and territories to make sure that we have better program alignment to maximize those opportunities as well. It continues to be an important issue that our caucus raises. We'll continue to make those investments.

Mr. Brian Masse:

When will you respond to the report though?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

It will be in a timely manner. We'll look at it, review it, and get back in a timely manner.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move on to Mr. Jowhari.

You have seven minutes.

I would just remind everybody that we're very tight on time, so let's keep it tight.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Sheehan.

Welcome, Minister.

I want to go back to the discussion that Mr. Masse started around the strategic innovation fund. In your opening remarks you said that since its launch in 2017, Canada's innovation industry has responded positively to the strategic innovation fund. You highlighted one or two of the areas where the funding has been announced. Can you also touch on the benefits this has brought into the government's innovation agenda?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Which particular program are you alluding to?

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

The strategic innovation fund.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

This fund is really designed with multiple objectives. First of all, we really want to bet on early-stage R and D. One of the challenges we see for us in Canada is that our businesses are 22nd out of 34 OECD countries when it comes to investments in R and D. We can and must do better. There's a sense of complacency. There are also just challenges in the environment here where risk aversion exists.

We're trying to unlock the record cash that's on balance sheets right now and see how we can invest in R and D. One of the key objectives of the strategic innovation fund is to develop that partnership not only with the private sector but with academia and small businesses as well to unlock some of that money.

The other aspect of this is to look at some key emerging technologies. For example, we just did an encore announcement. This is really about 5G and creating the 5G bed, this platform on which small businesses can come and test out their ideas, their solutions, their technologies. The larger companies have put money in too. So have the Province of Ontario, the federal government, and Quebec. This is, again, an area where emerging technologies can really flourish.

We're really focusing on unlocking new monies but also on investing in key strategic areas where there's high growth. Especially with 5G, with the Internet of things, there are enormous opportunities there. It plays a big role in autonomous vehicles as well. The connected vehicle is a key component of that. Hence the name—the strategic innovation fund. We're being very strategic, but again, we're not prescribing what these partnerships should look like. The onus is really on businesses. These are initiatives led by businesses working very closely with academia and smaller businesses in particular to come forward with ideas to invest more money in R and D and also in emerging technologies.

(1705)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

I have one last question on that topic. There was a narrowing down of the amount of funds from $15 billion to $10 billion. I'm sure that's focused on benefiting a lot of businesses.

Can you highlight one or two of those benefits as a result of this narrowing down?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's a narrowing down of...?

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

It's the limitation of funds from $15 billion down to $10 billion.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

The benefit is that ultimately we want to see more activity. We want to see more competition. We want to see more businesses participate.

As you know, historically these funds have been allocated for two key sectors. They are important sectors. The aerospace sector is absolutely essential, and so is the auto sector. In my opinion, they'll continue to participate in an active way in this fund, but we've opened it up to different sectors as well.

We believe the criteria that we have in place really allow us to touch on key growth areas. For example, I was in Vancouver just a few weeks ago, on stem cell technologies, at a Canadian company. As you know, in the sixties we discovered stem cells. It's Canadian know-how, Canadian research, but now we're commercializing it. Our investment of $22.5 million will generate 800 new jobs. We're excited about those strategic investments. Again, that's above and beyond the traditional aero and auto, which are important, in an area where there's high growth. These are good-quality jobs, especially because these companies deploy strong IP strategies. On average they pay a 16% wage premium. Those are the kinds of middle-class jobs that we talk about, and those are the kinds of investments that we want to see more of.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Mr. Sheehan.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much, Minister.

In your presentation you talked about the innovation superclusters initiative, and we all know that it was oversubscribed. What tended to happen, at least in places like Sault Ste. Marie—and in other places, according to other MPs—is that you had businesses that were talking again that hadn't talked in a long time, or had never talked before, including with partners in colleges and universities.

My question to you, Minister, is that we're down to five, so what about all the other ideas that are out there? Will regional economic development agencies be able to play a part in partnering with some of those ideas? How is the funding for the regional economic development agencies in the 2018 budget, if you could describe that?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Regional economic development agencies are really critical to our government's overall agenda, especially the economic agenda, because we want the benefits for the many, not just a few. This is not simply about urban Canada. We want to see rural and remote Canada succeed as well.

That's why we've brought the portfolios together. That's why we've elevated their importance. That's why we've had successive budgets of increasing funding for a lot of these regional development agencies.

You'll see that these estimates reflect the budget commitment going forward of previous 2017 increases, but as you saw in the last budget as well, we've increased the funding for regional development agencies by $511 million. The idea is to give them more resources to better coordinate with these initiatives. Whether it's the superclusters initiative, or the strategic innovation fund, or innovative solutions Canada—the programs I just briefly highlighted—the idea is that we want to break down those silos. That's why everything has come together in one department, to have better coordination, better alignment, and better opportunities, and again, to go above and beyond the traditional urban centres to really make sure that Canadians benefit. Twenty per cent of our population is outside urban Canada, and we want to make sure they succeed going forward in this new digital economy.

We're very confident that the additional funding for the regional development agencies will provide them with the resources to better coordinate with some of the initiatives that I highlighted.

(1710)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

That's it.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Ms. Rempel. You have five minutes, please.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Great. Do do we have the numbers?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Were you asking me how much of the total $7.8 billion goes to grants and contributions?

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

No. For the period covered by these estimates, what was the total amount of direct contributions made to for-profit enterprises by all of the departments within your signing authority—not the $7.8 billion but the entire portfolio?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

All those make up the entire portfolio. I just wanted to make clear that we have the same premise.

Of that, $5.5 billion is attributed to direct grants and contributions for all the portfolios combined.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

That $5.5 billion is to for-profit enterprises?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's correct.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How many full-time private sector jobs were created in that time period for that expenditure?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We're getting the specific breakdown, but overall I would say definitely tens of thousands of jobs have been created.

I just highlighted an example—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

In what industries?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

In all industries, because—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Call me skeptical. Do you have an exact number of jobs?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

No, we're working on that to get you the specific number, but I can tell you right now that the $5.5 billion has led to tens of thousands of jobs.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Where?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Across the economy.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Where?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Where do you want me to look?

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

What industries? Where were those—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Name me an industry.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How many jobs were created, let's say, in Alberta, with the $5.5 billion?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's not an industry. That's a region.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Okay, yes, but you asked me where, so—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Since the last election, since 2015, over 600,000 jobs have been created in the Canadian economy, and the vast majority are full-time jobs.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Yes, but I asked—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

In Alberta, if I may please complete my sentence, more than 50,000 jobs have been created.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I don't think you're—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

You asked for Alberta.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

But I asked.... You spent $5.5 billion, and you gave that to companies. I'm asking you, from that money, how many jobs were created for which you can say, “I spent that money. Here is a job.”

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

As I said, if you want to look at the overall record, since we've formed government, over 600,000 jobs have been created—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

No, but—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

The vast majority are full-time.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

So the economy creates jobs, right?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's correct, and that's a great point you raise.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

So I'm asking—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Let me highlight that point to you.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

No, I want an answer to my question.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We make these investments—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

No, no. I want an answer to my question.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

It's not directly related to this. It's also leveraging private sector support as well.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

You said that the growth in the economy is not directly related to the $5.5 billion.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

This is partially. We create the conditions.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How much? Where? You said tens of thousands.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

There were 50,000 jobs in Alberta.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Were they directly related to the $5.5 billion?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

They were partly related to this, yes.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How much was related directly?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

There's not one direct correlation. As you know, when a job is created there are many factors that come into play.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I think for $5.5 billion we should be able to say—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Companies make investment opportunities where they want to invest. Different levels of government, if they are looking at——

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How about this? Let's try this.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Sure.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

For $372 million to Bombardier, how many jobs were created out of that?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

My understanding was 3,000.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Those were full-time.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Correct. Good-paying jobs that on average pay 60% more than the average industry-related—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Were they directly related to the $372 million?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Absolutely. That's exactly right. Yes. That's the aerospace sector.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

For the rest of the $5.5 billion, let's go back again. How many were created in Alberta?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Again, as I mentioned to you it was 50,000.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

This is out of the $5.5 billion.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Yes. We're getting those numbers for you. You know that. You wanted overall job numbers. Over 50,000 jobs have been created in Alberta since we formed the government.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

We're looking at main estimates and the $5.5 billion to private companies. You won't tell me how much—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

No, I'm not saying I won't tell you. You're asking this based on geography and number, and we will get you that number. I'm not saying we don't want to share that number, but you're asking it to be sliced a different way. Based on the investments we make, how does it impact a certain region? We will definitely get you that number just as we got you the grants and contributions number.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Okay. So for the superclusters—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We're very open and very transparent.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How many jobs have been created in Alberta for the supercluster?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We're just finalizing the contribution agreement so it's tough to say today exactly how many jobs have been created. Based on the business plan, I can tell you right now over 50,000 jobs will be created.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Where?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Across the country.... These are platforms. For example, artificial intelligence impacts retail, oil and gas, farming, agriculture. It impacts aerospace, auto—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

But looking at my province, you sign off for a lot of different——

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I'm just saying those jobs are created on the entire economy now.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

But you couldn't tell people in Alberta how many jobs would be created?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Fifty thousand jobs have been created in Alberta since we formed the government.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

For $5.5 billion, is that directly related to that?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's part of our strategy. Grants and contributions aren't the only thing we do as a government to support the economy.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

Let's do substractive—

(1715)

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

For example, BDC, when Alberta went through a difficult time—

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

How many of those 50,000 jobs were created by people who didn't get any money from you?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

What do you mean by “didn't get any money from you”?

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

If a company created a job, I'm assuming it would be included in that figure.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Our job is to create the conditions for success for business. Sometimes there's a direct correlation. Sometimes an indirect correlation. Our policies in general have created an environment where we have record GDP growth and record job creation, and a historic low unemployment rate of 5.8%.

Hon. Michelle Rempel:

I will ask a different way.

The Chair:

I hate to cut you off, but we are out of time.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham. You have five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister.

I think along the same line we've actually seen, in my area, us go from a shortage of jobs to a shortage of workers so something is working. I appreciate that.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Way to go.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want to thank you also for the tremendous work you have been doing in helping us get rural Canada off of our heavy reliance on smoke signals and carrier pigeons for Internet, what you might know as dial-up and satellite.

We spent years on what I call “innovating to connect”. My own home relies on a low-reliability, low-speed relayed wireless system. It goes from one lake to the next lake to a house that connects to a cable system. Eventually sometimes you have Internet. It's pretty awesome.

I want to thank you for the comments you made to Mr. Masse regarding connect to innovate. For me it's a very visionary program. Do you have more comments after what you said to him on connect to innovate before I dive into some of the related topics?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

The vision is very clear. We want to break that digital divide. We think investments in high-speed Internet in rural and remote communities is almost a matter of life and death in some cases. It's absolutely essential for businesses that want to go online and grow. It's essential for those who want to get a world-class education. It's essential for some communities when it comes to health care. There are so many important aspects to bridging that digital divide. That's why we were very proud of introducing this program. This is a meaningful first step. We want to continue to do more. We look forward to your thoughts and ideas on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have tons.

You mentioned the digital divide. I think that's a really important point. One aspect you talk about a whole lot less is the cellphone service. In rural Canada, it's dire, at least in my riding. Rural cellphone service is as dire as Internet service.

Are you looking for creative new solutions to solve this rather less discussed aspect of the digital divide?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I think one of the advantages of the connect to innovate program, for example, is that it provides that fibre backbone infrastructure, which is helpful for cellphone towers. We think the issue you raise right there is connected to that program as well. We believe in many cases that this fibre backbone infrastructure will allow for those cell towers to be established, which will deal with that issue as well.

We recognize there are other mechanisms in place, other solutions that exist as well, and we're very open to that. I know you have played a leadership role in discussing those in caucus and in committee as well. Just like intellectual property, just like the study on broadband, just like the study you did on manufacturing, we really value the work that's done in this committee. It really helps shape a lot of our programs and policies.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

There is a worldwide shortage of programmers. It's as bad as the worldwide shortage of pilots. When we say we're connecting to innovate, for me, solving the coder issue is a big part of the innovation part of that equation. It's inextricably tied to the visionary CanCode program. Can you bring us up to date in more detail on CanCode: where we are, how it improves inclusiveness, how it's going to get a new generation to understand technology, and how the money is being spent? How are your own coding lessons going?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I'm still a bit challenged with my coding. These young kids can outmanoeuvre me all the time.

I was in Mississauga last week announcing a specific program, code:mobile, for this initiative where a fleet is purchased to allow different vehicles to help kids code in places across the country.

Overall, the program objective is very simple: one million kids will learn how to code. This is a $50-million program. Sixty thousand teachers will also get tools to help students better learn coding. This is not simply about coding. It's about digital literacy and digital skills. It's about making sure that young people have the tools they need to succeed in the new digital economy.

This investment is also strengthening our domestic pipeline. Many of the jobs that will be created will be related to coding and STEM—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—but we have specific targets around more girls learning how to code. In the past, for example, 38% of graduates from STEM programs were women, but if you look at STEM-related jobs, it's only 21%. We can and must do a better job of, not only attracting more women into the STEM-related fields but making sure that they stay in those fields, because those are better-paying jobs, and there's high-growth opportunities in those areas as well. That's why coding is designed to also focus on indigenous populations. In the past they might not have necessarily had those opportunities. We're very thoughtful of being more inclusive in some of our programs.

(1720)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for your leadership on this.

I'm out of time.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have three minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister Bains and Mr. Knubley, for coming in. I want to say for the record that we have your agreement that you will be tabling the information on how much of the funding from the $5.5 billion will be going towards Alberta companies and how many direct jobs that would create.

Going into my question, Minister Bains, you're in charge of the proposed takeover of Aecon by Chinese state-owned China Communications and Construction Company, which, in my opinion, represents a threat to the viability of small and medium-sized enterprises. For example, they recently bid on a Sampson Cree water plant and left about a million dollars on the table underbidding Canadian companies. This poses a real threat to the construction centre.

Have you as minister undertaken to assess the impact of Aecon's takeover by a Chinese state-owned enterprise on small and medium-sized enterprises in Canada?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

As you know, I'm the minister responsible for the Investment Canada Act. Under that, I have a responsibility to do a thorough net economic benefit analysis. The issues you raised would be under my purview, and those are the things we would analyze.

There are two dimensions to this. There is the economic benefit and the test and the analysis that needs to be done. As you know, all such transactions are subject to a national security review. This is a multi-step process that exists. I work very closely with Minister Goodale and our security intelligence agencies—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

But on the economic impact aspect, what did you find? What were the results of that impact—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

As of right now, we're still going through the process of doing our due diligence. It is a rigorous and robust process. We haven't made any final determination at this moment.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

We've known for months that this takeover is happening, so do you have any idea what the impact—

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I have lots of ideas and I have lots of information, but at this moment I'm not in a position to share it, not until we complete our due diligence. I don't want to speculate on anything until we make a final determination, but I can assure you that Canada's national economic interest will always guide our decision-making. It always has in the past and will continue to do so going forward.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Former CSIS director, Ward Alcock, has stated recently that the proposed takeover of Aecon is a threat to our national security. Furthermore, this takeover would limit opportunities to co-operate with our largest trading partner, the United States. We've seen that with the Gordie Howe bridge project that's coming up.

Do you believe that this takeover is in Canada's best interest?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

We're going through that analysis right now. I respect experts and their opinions, and I have a great deal of confidence in the current experts we have, the current head of CSIS, the current head of the RCMP and other security agencies. I value their advice and feedback. I've always listened to their advice and feedback, and I follow their advice. As I've stated in the House of Commons, I'll state here unequivocally that we never have and never will compromise on national security. We'll make sure we do our proper due diligence before we render any decision and go public with it.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

It's an interesting statement, because we have the recent case of the Norsat satellite company that was sold without a national security review. How can you say that you take national security seriously when a satellite company wasn't even subject to a national security review?

The Chair:

Answer very quickly, please.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

Every review is subject to a national security multi-step process. That process is always followed. As I said, I've always followed the advice of our national security officials.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Baylis. You have a very quick three minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister Bains, for being here.

The innovation economy that you've been working so heavily on is ultimately based on intellectual property, so I was really very happy to see the announcements that were made last week on our innovation strategy related specifically to intellectual property. I noted that a lot of the points that you brought up stemmed from the reports of this committee, so I want to thank you for that. I think the experts who testified appreciated that.

Can you talk to us about the IP marketplace? This is one of the cornerstones of what you announced. Can you explain that a bit more?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

You're right. This is the first national IP strategy that the federal government has deployed. In a new knowledge economy, it was long overdue, and I want to thank you again for your work.

As you know, there is $85.3 million associated with this strategy as well, so it has substantial resources deployed. There are three components to it. One, of course, is around IP literacy, which is really important, particularly, small businesses and IP. Only 9% actually have an IP strategy, and only 10% actually own IP, so this is a real challenge for us. Even if you look at the context in the U.S. for the S&P 500, 84% of their assets are attributed to IP, while for the TSX top 30, it's only 40%. We're really behind in the IP game relative to our U.S. peers.

We brought different provisions. We looked at trolls and bad behaviour. We brought a patent collective forward as well, to deal with issues and to provide better resources to deal with—again—those bad actors.

The IP marketplace is a great initiative that this committee highlighted. It really is a one-stop shop for businesses, to be able to determine the different patents that exist in a more clear and concise way and to see how they can better leverage it in their own business. Also, those patent holders are in a position to then get better licensing, revenue, and fees out of their patents as well.

(1725)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's facilitate that.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

That's exactly it. The whole idea is to be that one-stop shop, a marketplace for patent holders that really allows businesses, academia, and IP patent holders to work together.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Another point that was brought up through our consultations was the need to help our small and medium-sized businesses become more IP literate, to really bring them up a bit. I saw that there's a great initiative on that front. Can you elaborate on what you're doing specifically to help the small and medium-sized businesses become more literate, with stronger IP?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office, CIPO, is going to provide additional resources for training. We're going to have IP legal clinics. We're very mindful of that. We recognize that small businesses, in particular, need to have a strategy when it comes to IP. They don't fully appreciate it, and what happens is that these trolls or bad actors come and can undermine their business by extorting money for the IP that they didn't patent, for example.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to cut you off—sorry.

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

The bottom line is that there is a comprehensive program to promote literacy and tools for businesses to create a strong business strategy for IP.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We notice the bells are going off. I would like unanimous consent so that Mr. Masse gets his final two minutes.

All right. Thank you.

Mr. Masse, take it home for the final two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you. With that, I of course have to ask about my local community, but it is a national issue, and that's the Gordie Howe bridge. It was raised in regard to Aecon and the Investment Canada Act. We have SNC-Lavalin, which is under criminal investigation, as the second of three bidders, and then there's a third one.

Is there any concern, or is there a backup plan with regard to...? We're going into the June selection of the preferred candidate of those three groups. One's involved in an Investment Canada review. The second one's under criminal investigation. For the third one, we don't know of anything yet, problem-wise, but is there a backup plan with regard to this process?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

My understanding is that the process is well under way. We've been very clear about our support for the bridge. I'm not aware of a plan B, plan C, or plan E right now. I know that they're going through a competitive bidding process.

When it comes to Aecon, for example, we're going to do our proper due diligence in terms of the acquisition that's being discussed under the Investment Canada Act, but we are very supportive, as you know, of the Gordie Howe bridge initiative, and right now they're going through the bidding process.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Last, an order in council was provided for the Ambassador Bridge, owned by Matty Moroun, a private American billionaire.

My question is why. It is destroying my Sandwich Town community, which is adjacent to it, and there were no community benefits that were provided. This is a serious situation. Why were no community benefits provided for in that order in council?

Hon. Navdeep Bains:

I can get back to you on that. I appreciate your raising that issue. That is not the objective. We want to make sure we get the Gordie Howe bridge built. We recognize the challenges right now with the Ambassador Bridge as well. That's why we support the Gordie Howe bridge, but specific to this order in council, we can get back to you on that and determine what next steps we can take.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's fair enough. Thank you.

The Chair:

All right.

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

I will remind everybody that on Thursday we are in camera for the first hour discussing travel, and for the second hour we will have Minister Chagger.

Thank you, everybody.

The meeting is adjourned for the day.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à cette 104e réunion du Comité permanent de l’industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Conformément à l’article 81(4) du Règlement, nous examinons aujourd’hui le Budget principal des dépenses du ministère de l’Industrie.

Nos témoins sont l’honorable Kirsty Duncan, ministre des Sciences et ministre des Sports et des Personnes handicapées, ainsi que John Knubley, sous-ministre, et David McGovern, sous-ministre délégué.

Nous commençons tout de suite pour ne pas perdre de temps.

Madame la ministre, vous avez 10 minutes.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan (ministre des Sciences et ministre des Sports et des Personnes handicapées):

Merci, monsieur le président et membres du Comité, de me donner l’occasion de m’adresser à vous à propos du Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019.[Français]

Notre gouvernement croit que les meilleurs investissements sont ceux qui sont axés sur les gens.[Traduction]

Nous sommes convaincus que, pour assurer la croissance de l’économie, nous devons faire preuve de curiosité et investir dans la créativité et l’innovation. C’est pourquoi, comme vous le savez sans aucun doute, le gouvernement a fait récemment des investissements sans précédent dans le domaine de la recherche au Canada.[Français]

Nous avons fait ces investissements parce que la recherche est le moteur de toute économie axée sur l'innovation.[Traduction]

Le budget de 2018 prévoit donc un soutien de près de 4 milliards de dollars pour les scientifiques et les chercheurs actuels et futurs.

À ce nouveau financement s’ajoutent 2,8 milliards de dollars qui iront à la remise à neuf des laboratoires fédéraux. Ainsi, les scientifiques fédéraux disposeront des infrastructures dont ils ont besoin, et nous pourrons prendre des décisions éclairées et fondées sur des données probantes dans le domaine de l’environnement, de la santé, des collectivités et de l’économie.[Français]

Le budget de 2018 est l'aboutissement du travail intensif mené en collaboration avec de nombreux partenaires et intervenants. Nous croyons que ces investissements motiveront les chercheurs actuels et inspireront ceux de la prochaine génération.[Traduction]

Nous voulons continuer de positionner le Canada à la fine pointe des découvertes. Des découvertes qui améliorent la santé et la qualité de vie non seulement des Canadiens, mais aussi de notre environnement. Nous voulons que la recherche stimule l’économie, en facilitant les découvertes qui créent des emplois et même des industries totalement nouvelles.

Prenez le cas de l’intelligence artificielle. Le budget de 2017 prévoyait 125 millions de dollars pour la Stratégie pancanadienne en matière d’IA. Cet investissement soutient des plaques tournantes au pays. L’industrie prend bonne note de ce qui se passe. Alphabet Inc., notamment, la société mère de Google, est en voie de s’établir à Toronto, et voici que The Economist parle de la « Maple Valley » en plus de la Silicon Valley. Des gens autour du monde se demandent comment le Canada a pu accomplir un tel exploit![Français]

Nous voulons aussi améliorer la qualité de vie des Canadiens, et cela sera possible grâce aux découvertes d'avant-garde qui seront faites, notamment en matière de soins de santé.[Traduction]

Ces investissements dans la recherche contribueront à la découverte de nouveaux traitements et de nouveaux médicaments ainsi qu’à la prestation de meilleurs soins chaque jour pour les Canadiens partout au pays. Nous voulons nous doter d’une main-d’oeuvre dynamique, digne du XXIe siècle, qui possède des compétences en science, technologie, ingénierie et mathématiques, auxquelles j’ajouterai l’art et le design, pour répondre aux défis futurs et saisir les possibilités à venir avec créativité, courage et confiance.

Permettez-moi maintenant de préciser certains points. Des 4 milliards de dollars d’investissement dont j’ai parlé au début, 1,7 milliard servira à soutenir la recherche financée par les conseils subventionnaires dans la recherche de découvertes. Cela se traduira par de meilleures occasions et un soutien accru pour quelque 21 000 chercheurs, étudiants et travailleurs hautement qualifiés partout au pays. Et cela comprend 210 millions de dollars en nouveau financement pour le Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada.

Déjà, par l’entremise du Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada 150, nous avons recruté 25 titulaires de chaires de renom international qui viendront d’Autriche, d’Australie, des États-Unis, de la Nouvelle-Zélande, d’Afrique du Sud et du Royaume-Uni, et je suis heureuse de vous dire que 42 % sont des Canadiens qui souhaitent revenir dans leur pays parce qu’ils constatent que l’avenir de la recherche est ici. J’ajoute que 58 % sont des femmes. Tous sont des leaders dans leur domaine, attirés au Canada par le financement de soutien de la recherche et par les avantages qu’offre notre écosystème de recherche.

(1540)



Le budget de 2018 prévoit aussi 1,3 milliard de dollars pour permettre aux chercheurs du pays d’avoir accès aux outils et aux installations plus modernes dont ils ont besoin pour faire des découvertes. Cela veut dire que plus de 44 000 étudiants, boursiers de recherche postdoctorale et chercheurs auront accès à l’équipement dont ils ont besoin pour mener leurs recherches d’avant-garde.

J’aimerais aussi souligner un investissement clé du budget de 2018 dans nos collèges et écoles polytechniques de calibre mondial. Sur le plan de l’innovation, ces établissements sont essentiels, car ce sont des vecteurs de transition entre les idées et la mise en marché. Par l’entremise du Programme d’innovation dans les collèges de la communauté, nous avons mis de côté 140 millions de dollars pour augmenter le soutien aux projets d’innovation faisant appel à la collaboration des entreprises, des collèges et des écoles polytechniques. Il s’agit du plus important investissement du genre à ce jour. [Français]

Ces établissements sont importants pour l'innovation, car ils s'associent aux petites entreprises dans leur collectivité afin de trouver des solutions à des défis réels.[Traduction]

Permettez-moi, monsieur le président, de raconter une courte anecdote en guise d’illustration.

J’ai récemment visité le Centre d’accès à la technologie du Collège Niagara où j’ai eu l’occasion de discuter avec un représentant de Générale électrique qui était heureux de me dire qu’une des principales raisons pour lesquelles l’entreprise avait ouvert une usine de fabrication à Welland était précisément l’existence du Centre d’accès à la technologie du Collège. GE avait pu évaluer comment les capacités du Collège lui seraient bénéfiques. Tout ce dont elle aurait besoin s’y trouvait: l’accès aux équipes de recherche, aux ressources et à l’équipement ainsi que la présence d’un bassin de diplômés hautement qualifiés et spécialisés en technologie, en métiers et en affaires. Tout cela est énorme. Aujourd’hui, monsieur le président, l’usine « brillante » de GE emploie environ 200 personnes.

Nous faisons des investissements qui visent à établir un juste équilibre entre la recherche de découvertes dans les domaines d’avant-garde et la commercialisation des idées.[Français]

Monsieur le président, je suis heureuse de dire que le budget de 2018 a été bien reçu par ceux et celles pour qui il aura le plus d'effet.[Traduction]

Le président d’Universités Canada a dit que: « Ce budget permettra de faire progresser le plan élaboré dans le rapport Naylor... Ce sont des investissements majeurs dans des travaux de recherche qui ont une incidence sur la vie quotidienne des Canadiens, comme par exemple réduire les temps de déplacement, trouver des traitements médicaux qui sauvent des vies et protéger l’environnement. »

La présidente-directrice générale de CICan a dit ce qui suit: « Appuyer la recherche appliquée est l’un des moyens les plus efficaces de stimuler l’innovation au Canada ».

Ces investissements permettront de libérer le potentiel d’innovation des collèges et instituts canadiens afin qu’ils puissent contribuer encore davantage au développement économique de leurs régions, tout en formant les innovateurs de demain.

Dans cet ordre d’idées, j’aimerais faire remarquer que le budget de 2018 vise à renouveler l’écosystème de recherche du Canada en vue d’appuyer la formation de la prochaine génération de chercheurs. En raison de cette ouverture historique à de réels changements, nous voulons nous assurer que la prochaine génération de chercheurs du Canada, comprenant les étudiants, les stagiaires et les chercheurs en début de carrière, soit plus large, plus diversifiée et encore mieux soutenue que jamais. Nous avons demandé aux conseils subventionnaires d’élaborer de nouvelles mesures pour avoir plus d’équité et de diversité en sciences et d’appuyer davantage de chercheurs en début de carrière.

Nous voulons que notre appui permette de satisfaire aux ambitions en matière de recherche d’un nombre accru de femmes, d’Autochtones, de membres de minorités et de personnes handicapées ainsi que de personnes en début de carrière. De plus, au cours de la prochaine année, le gouvernement poursuivra son travail en vue de déterminer comment mieux appuyer notre prochaine génération de chercheurs au moyen de bourses.

Monsieur le président, le gouvernement entre dans une aventure de longue haleine.

(1545)

[Français]

Nous avons la chance de prendre en main le pouvoir de la recherche pour améliorer la qualité de vie des Canadiens.[Traduction]Nous avons l’occasion de créer un écosystème de recherche capable d’appuyer des esprits brillants et aussi le travail d’avant-garde.

Nous faisons tout cela parce que nous voulons devenir un chef de file mondial dans le domaine de la recherche et des découvertes qui ont des incidences positives sur la vie des Canadiens, l’environnement, nos collectivités et notre économie. Alors, nous faisons notre part pour former et appuyer la présente génération de chercheurs canadiens afin qu’ils puissent nous aider à concrétiser cet objectif.

Je vous remercie de votre attention. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre aux questions que pourraient avoir les membres du Comité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Nous passons tout de suite aux questions avec Mme Ng, pour sept minutes.

Mme Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.):

Merci, madame la ministre, d’être venue nous parler de l’action merveilleuse que vous menez dans votre ministère.

J’ai une question à vous poser sur l’investissement du gouvernement dans la recherche fondamentale. Vous avez dit que notre gouvernement fait un investissement sans précédent dans la recherche, par l’entremise des conseils subventionnaires. C’est à mon avis une excellente nouvelle pour les Canadiens, y compris pour les électeurs de ma circonscription qui abrite d’excellentes institutions, comme l’Université York et le Collège Seneca.

Pourriez-vous nous parler un peu plus du secteur des collèges? Vous en avez dit quelques mots en passant, mais peut-être pourriez-vous nous parler des investissements que vous faites pour appuyer la recherche appliquée, la recherche innovatrice, dans les collèges, les écoles polytechniques et les CEGEP.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de cette excellente question, Mary.

Je commence en vous disant que nous faisons dans ce budget le plus gros investissement dans la recherche jamais réalisé au Canada. C’est un investissement de 4 milliards de dollars, auxquels il faut ajouter 2,8 milliards dans les infrastructures scientifiques du gouvernement, afin que les chercheurs du secteur public puissent travailler dans les meilleurs laboratoires possible.

Nous investissons 1,7 milliard de dollars dans la recherche axée sur la découverte et 1,3 milliard dans la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. Pour la première fois depuis 20 ans, la FCI aura un financement stable de longue durée.

Nous faisons aussi le plus gros investissement de notre histoire dans les collèges. Quand vous allez visiter les collèges de votre circonscription, vous pouvez voir tout le travail qui s’y fait, et qui est tellement important, par exemple avec les entreprises. Si une PME entre en contact avec eux, c’est pour relever un défi. Elle peut travailler avec une infrastructure de premier plan. Elle peut travailler avec les étudiants. Elle peut travailler avec les enseignants. Elle peut obtenir en quelques mois la réponse qu’elle cherche et qui lui permettra de grandir et de créer des emplois.

Je suis très enthousiaste au sujet de nos investissements en recherche fondamentale et en recherche axée sur la découverte. Les collèges jouent un rôle extrêmement important dans notre écosystème de recherche.

Mme Mary Ng:

Pouvez-vous nous parler des bienfaits pour les étudiants du système collégial? Le gouvernement fait des investissements pour leur permettre de faire de la recherche — ce sera de la recherche appliquée dans bien des cas —, mais pouvez-vous nous parler de la pertinence de cette collaboration pour les entreprises? Que faisons-nous pour aider les étudiants à établir des partenariats qui leur permettront d’acquérir de l’expérience dans des industries?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de cette superbe question, Mary.

Moi aussi, j’ai un collège dans ma circonscription. C’est le Collège Humber, et j’y vais aussi souvent que je le peux. Nous voulons que nos étudiants puissent faire de la recherche appliquée parce que cela en fait des candidats très attrayants pour les entreprises et pour la communauté lorsqu’ils obtiennent leur diplôme. Ils acquièrent l’expérience du monde réel. Ils travaillent sur des problèmes du monde réel, ce qui les rend très attrayants pour l’industrie. Le financement de la recherche leur donnera l’occasion de travailler avec les enseignants, de travailler avec les meilleures infrastructures et de faire leur recherche.

(1550)

Mme Mary Ng:

En contrepartie, pour ces organisations qui collaborent si souvent et si bien, pouvez-vous nous dire comment ces investissements pourront les aider? Je pense qu’elles auront la possibilité de collaborer avec la communauté, avec les collèges, avec les établissements d’enseignement postsecondaire dans leurs domaines respectifs. Vous avez donné l’exemple de GE, mais vous pourriez peut-être nous parler d’autres entreprises qui ont bénéficié des investissements que nous faisons pour les étudiants.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de la question, Mary.

Aujourd’hui, le CRSNG va annoncer les noms des lauréats sur la Colline du Parlement, ce qui est à mon avis un très bon exemple. Le premier ministre les a rencontrés ce matin à l’occasion d’une table ronde, et il y avait là un chercheur de collège qui travaille avec l’industrie depuis 10 ans pour éliminer les produits chimiques des détergents. C’est vraiment stimulant de célébrer des chercheurs sur la Colline du Parlement.

Je voudrais aussi souligner l’investissement que nous faisons dans le Conseil national de recherches, à hauteur de 540 millions de dollars. C’est le plus gros investissement en 15 ans dans cet organisme. Cela lui permettra de recommencer à faire de la recherche de découvertes et aussi, en termes d’innovation, d’aider des PME à relever les défis auxquels elles sont confrontées.

Mme Mary Ng:

Quand je pense aux merveilleux chercheurs qu’il y a dans nos collèges et nos établissements postsecondaires, je pense aussi à l’appui que nous accordons aux femmes qui font de la recherche. Pourriez-vous nous dire quelques mots à ce sujet?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, Mary. Je suis moi-même une ancienne chercheuse. J’ai passé 25 ans à me battre pour qu’il y ait plus de diversité dans le système de recherche. Notre gouvernement est convaincu que l’équité et la diversité contribuent à l’excellence. Nous voulons plus de femmes, d’Autochtones, de membres des groupes minoritaires et de personnes handicapées dans le système de recherche.

C’est pourquoi j’ai rétabli le Système d’information sur le personnel d’enseignement dans les universités et les collèges. Il avait été aboli par le gouvernement précédent alors qu’il existait depuis 1937. Il nous donne des informations importantes. Est-ce que les femmes et les hommes progressent au même rythme dans les hiérarchies? Est-ce que leurs salaires sont égaux?

Nous avons ajouté de nouvelles exigences d’équité et de diversité pour les chaires d’excellence en recherche du Canada. Ce programme reçoit 10 millions de dollars sur 7 ans. Dans la première version du programme mise en oeuvre par le gouvernement précédent, aucune femme n’avait été nommée. Dans la deuxième version, il y en avait une. Aujourd’hui, nous avons 27 chaires d’excellence en recherche, ce dont nous sommes extrêmement fiers, et l’une d’entre elles fait partie du groupe qui sera célébré aujourd’hui, mais une seule est occupée par une femme.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Jeneroux, pour sept minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre, de comparaître aujourd’hui devant le Comité.

Comme je n’ai que sept minutes, je vous serais très reconnaissant de me donner de courtes réponses. Si je vous coupe la parole, ce ne sera pas parce que je veux vous interrompre, mais parce que je n’ai que sept minutes.

Vous avez dit que vos investissements garantiront que les chercheurs du gouvernement auront les meilleurs laboratoires possible. Où se trouvent ces chercheurs, madame la ministre?

Lors de votre dernière comparution devant notre comité, on vous avait interrogée sur le tableau CANSIM 358-0146, qui signale une perte de 1 571 employés fédéraux dans le domaine des sciences et de la technologie lorsque le gouvernement a changé. Vous aviez dit au Comité que c’était à cause des départs à la retraite et n’aviez donné aucune autre précision. Maintenez-vous toujours cette explication?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de cette question, Matt.

L’une des difficultés que nous rencontrons est que les ministères n’interprètent pas les chiffres de la même manière. Cela provient de la façon dont les catégories de chercheurs sont établies.

C’est pourquoi j’organise une retraite d’une journée complète avec les sous-ministres des ministères à vocation scientifique. L’une des questions que j’ai inscrites à l’ordre du jour est la question des ressources humaines. Si l’âge moyen des fonctionnaires est de 38 ans, quel est l’âge moyen des chercheurs du gouvernement? Parvenons-nous à attirer des titulaires de doctorats et de postdoctorats et à les accompagner durant toute leur carrière? C’est une question incroyablement importante à mes yeux, et je suis fière qu’avec mon collègue de Pêches et Océans, l’une des premières choses que nous avons faites a été de recruter 135 chercheurs.

Je ne saurais être plus claire. Nous sommes déterminés...

(1555)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Veuillez m’excuser, je dois vous interrompre. Je pense que nous avons compris votre réponse. Par contre, le tableau dit le contraire.

Je l’ai sous les yeux et je peux vous le communiquer. Il y a une ligne du tableau que je trouve particulièrement préoccupante, c’est celle qui concerne ceux qui font de la recherche et développement, donc les chercheurs eux-mêmes. À mon avis, ce sont vraiment les chercheurs fédéraux de première ligne. Dans cette catégorie, il y a eu une diminution de 2 602 personnes lors du changement de gouvernement.

Selon les chiffres de 2018, il y a actuellement 3 507 moins de scientifiques qui travaillent pour le gouvernement actuel que pour le précédent, et il est difficile de croire que c’est simplement à cause des départs à la retraite. Je ne vous reproche pas d’organiser une retraite avec vos sous-ministres, mais en l’espace de deux ans et demi, vous avez perdu 3 500 scientifiques. Pourquoi?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Ce n’est pas exact. En fait, nous avons interrogé les ministères à vocation scientifique et ils nous ont dit que c’est à cause de la reclassification des chercheurs.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Après deux ans et demi, madame la ministre, les classifications sont-elles encore incorrectes?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Ça devrait en réalité… je vais vous donner un exemple. À cause du gouvernement précédent et de la restructuration d’Énergie atomique du Canada Limitée, qui s’est achevée en septembre 2015, le personnel scientifique et professionnel des Laboratoires nucléaires canadiens de Chalk River n’est plus employé par EACL, mais par la Canadian National Energy Alliance, une société du secteur privé. Ce changement a touché 2 873 équivalents temps plein et il avait été décidé par le gouvernement précédent.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mais il a été mis en oeuvre par votre gouvernement, madame la ministre. Quand on constate que 3 507...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Non. Je conteste cette affirmation. Cette décision...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Ça fait 2 800 sur 3 507. Il en manque encore beaucoup.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

C’était une décision du gouvernement précédent...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Où sont les scientifiques qui nous manquent, madame la ministre?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Matt, notre gouvernement appuie vigoureusement la science, la recherche, et la prise de décision fondée sur des données probantes. Nous sommes déterminés à appuyer les scientifiques du gouvernement. Nous sommes déterminés à les débâillonner. Dès le deuxième jour de notre arrivée au pouvoir, nous avons débâillonné nos scientifiques, et nous l’avons confirmé en adoptant une nouvelle politique des communications. Le ministre Brison et moi-même avons écrit à tous les ministres et à tous les chefs des ministères pour leur faire part de ce changement de politique.

Nous savons qu’un changement de culture prend du temps. Nous savons qu’il y a une nouvelle étude qui montre qu’il y a des améliorations. Le nombre de scientifiques qui étaient bâillonnés est passé de 90 à 50 %. Nous avons encore du pain sur la planche.

Le ministre Brison, la présidente de l’IPFPC et moi-même avons envoyé une lettre commune directement aux chercheurs pour leur dire que nous voulons qu’ils puissent s’exprimer librement dans les médias et en public. C’est là un changement considérable par rapport au gouvernement précédent.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Il n’en reste pas moins que 63 % se disent insatisfaits. On a encore ce genre de chiffre deux ans et demi après votre arrivée au pouvoir.

Quoi qu’il en soit, madame la ministre, je vais maintenant changer un peu de sujet. Je voudrais parler du poste de conseiller scientifique en chef dont le rôle est de « fournir et coordonner les avis formulés par les experts à l’intention de la ministre des Sciences et des membres du Cabinet [...] sur d’importantes questions d’ordre scientifique ». C’est extrait de sa lettre de mandat.

Votre gouvernement a récemment mis en place un nouveau processus d’évaluation environnementale et il a toujours l’intention d’imposer une taxe carbone en proclamant que c’est là une décision fondée sur des données probantes.

Combien de fois avez-vous demandé son avis à la conseillère scientifique en chef sur ces questions et d’autres, depuis son entrée en fonction il y a sept mois?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Comme vous le savez, Matt, j’ai eu le plaisir d’entreprendre la première consultation de la communauté de la recherche depuis une décennie, en y faisant participer le Parlement et les Canadiens, ainsi que la conseillère scientifique en chef, dont le poste avait été aboli par le gouvernement précédent.

Nous avons réfléchi à la nature de ce poste et avons conclu que ce devait être une fonction de consultation. Nous ne pourrions pas avoir de meilleure conseillère scientifique en chef que Mme Mona Nemer...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je parle de la conseillère scientifique.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais vous répondre. Par exemple, le député de Beauce a dit que c’était une excellente nomination. Elle relève directement du premier ministre et de moi même. Elle peut recevoir des missions particulières du premier ministre ou du Cabinet et son rôle est de les conseiller.

Nous avons proposé un nouveau processus d’évaluation environnementale parce que, malheureusement, le gouvernement précédent l’avait complètement éviscéré.

(1600)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la ministre, je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps. Combien de fois a-t-elle été consultée?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Une fois que le Parlement aura adopté la loi sur le nouveau processus d’évaluation environnementale que nous avons mis en place, il y aura une révision et, bien sûr, notre conseillère scientifique en chef y participera.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Elle participera donc après-coup.

Le président:

Veuillez m’excuser, monsieur Jeneroux, votre temps de parole est un peu dépassé, mais je vous redonnerai la parole plus tard.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de votre présence, madame la ministre.

Vous avez parlé de l’usine « brillante » de GE. Quel genre d’engagement l’entreprise a-t-elle pris en termes d’investissement?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous ferai parvenir les détails plus tard. Quand j’en ai rencontré les représentants, ils étaient très enthousiastes au sujet des opportunités que leur offrirait le collège en termes d’enseignants, d’infrastructures de pointe et d’accès à des étudiants qui pourraient travailler sur des problèmes concrets. C’est pourquoi ils ont fait cet investissement de 140 millions de dollars. C’est le plus gros investissement en recherche appliquée de l’histoire du Canada.

M. Brian Masse:

Savez-vous qu’ils vont mettre à pied 350 travailleurs à Peterborough?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je ne peux rien dire à ce sujet.

M. Brian Masse:

Cela m’amène à ma question suivante. Il semble y avoir une certaine dichotomie au sujet du rôle du secteur privé. On a d’un côté l’investissement dans l’usine « brillante » de GE dont vous avez parlé et, de l’autre côté, à Peterborough, la mise à pied de 360 personnes et la fermeture d’une usine. Ça devient difficile à concilier.

Ma question suivante porte sur ce que j’espère voir à partir de l’an prochain, c’est-à-dire de la reddition de comptes. Vous parlez de 2,8 milliards de dollars pour la rénovation des laboratoires fédéraux. Quels détails pouvez-vous nous donner sur l’utilisation de cet argent, et pouvez-vous nous dire ce que vous faites pour vous assurer qu’il y aura du contenu canadien dans ces investissements? Ce que je veux vraiment savoir, c’est quel type de structure on met en place quand on fait ce type d’investissement afin d’avoir l’assurance qu’il y aura des emplois canadiens et de la participation canadienne.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je peux vous dire, Brian, que nous sommes très enthousiastes au sujet de cet investissement dans les laboratoires fédéraux et que nous n’en sommes qu’aux premières étapes. Je vous ai parlé de cette retraite d’une journée. J’en suis l’initiatrice et ça n’avait encore jamais été fait au gouvernement; on n’avait encore jamais réuni les représentants de tous les ministères à vocation scientifique. Parmi les choses que nous avons examinées, il y avait l’âge de certaines des infrastructures et comment on fait la recherche dans certains de ces laboratoires à vocation unique. Notre but est d’associer l’environnement et la santé, afin d’avoir une perspective pluridisciplinaire.

De cette retraite annuelle est sortie une nouvelle stratégie des infrastructures scientifiques. Il était important de prévoir de l’argent dans ce budget pour le travail qui se fait.

M. Brian Masse:

J’entends bien. Je crois que ce qui m’intéresse, c’est l’approvisionnement, et c’est pourquoi je vous demande des détails. Si vous ne les avez pas maintenant, j’en arrive à me demander s’il y a quoi que ce soit qui se fait vraiment à ce sujet et aussi si l’on prévoit de faire appel à des petites et moyennes entreprises pour cet approvisionnement.

Je suppose que cette somme de près de 3 milliards de dollars sera répartie dans tout le pays, et j’aimerais donc savoir comment on va mesurer cela. Voilà ce que je veux vraiment savoir.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie de vos questions, mais ce sont des questions qu’il conviendrait plutôt de poser à SPAC. Nous n’en sommes qu’au début du processus du côté de la science, mais je tiens à souligner que la reddition de comptes est très importante à mes yeux. Dans le budget de 2016, nous avions annoncé 2 milliards de dollars pour les infrastructures de recherche et d’innovation à l’échelle du pays, sur une période de 2 ans. Puisque vous voulez le savoir, oui, il y a un mécanisme de reddition de comptes.

(1605)

M. Brian Masse:

J’ai eu l’occasion de participer à d’autres comités et je sais que l’approvisionnement est une vraie pagaille actuellement. Il n’y a aucun doute à ce sujet.

Je vais donc vous poser une autre question. La raison pour laquelle je suis revenu sur l’exemple de Générale électrique est que, si nous nous en remettons à un autre ministère ou à un autre ministre, nous n’aurons aucune garantie qu’il y aura effectivement un plan détaillé pour que l’argent consacré à l’approvisionnement permette vraiment de faire appel à des petites et moyennes entreprises du Canada.

J’en resterai là. J’espère simplement que vous, en tant que ministre, avez à coeur de vous assurer que l’approvisionnement profite vraiment aux Canadiens.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Nos ministères collaborent très étroitement, comme tous les ministères à vocation scientifique, et nous avons aussi la conseillère scientifique en chef qui intervient pour s’assurer que nous aurons les bonnes infrastructures. Il faut bien comprendre que c’est un dossier qui rassemble tous ces ministères, c’est vraiment nouveau.

M. Brian Masse:

Bien, merci.

J’aimerais maintenant passer à la stratégie pancanadienne en matière d’intelligence artificielle. J’ai reçu de l’information au sujet des supergrappes, mais je trouve qu’on ne nous donne pas assez d’informations détaillées sur les investissements dans ce domaine, notamment s’ils seront partagés avec les fabricants et les autres grappes.

J’aimerais savoir si les investissements dans l’intelligence artificielle vont avoir un lien entre eux, ou bien si ce seront des investissements ponctuels, au cas par cas, partout au Canada. J’aimerais avoir plus de détails sur la façon dont cela va se faire.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Votre première question concerne la stratégie pancanadienne en matière d’intelligence artificielle. Cette stratégie a été annoncée dans le budget de 2017 et était accompagnée d’un budget de 125 millions de dollars pour la recherche dans ce domaine. Il faut que vous sachiez que le Canada est vraiment un chef de file mondial en matière d’intelligence artificielle. Le gouvernement a commencé à la financer dans les années 1980. À l’époque, on ne savait pas vraiment ce que ça allait donner, même encore à la fin des années 1990, mais le Canada a continué d’investir là-dedans.

Nous en sommes arrivés aujourd’hui à un tournant crucial, car nous voyons bien que l’intelligence artificielle va avoir un impact sur notre travail, sur notre vie quotidienne, sur nos loisirs. Mais je peux vous dire que le Canada est vraiment à l’avant-garde, grâce à tous les investissements qu’il a consentis dans la recherche de découvertes, et grâce aussi au calibre de nos chercheurs. Les 125 millions de dollars visaient à financer la création d’un couloir entre Montréal, Toronto-Waterloo et Edmonton.

Vous m’avez également posé une question au sujet des supergrappes.

M. Brian Masse:

Ces 125 millions de dollars vont-ils être distribués de façon ponctuelle, au cas par cas, où vont-ils être plus ou moins liés à l’investissement global?

Comme il s’agit d’une stratégie, j’essaie de comprendre comment ça fonctionne.

Le président:

Répondez brièvement, s’il vous plaît.

M. John Knubley (sous-ministre, ministère de l'Industrie):

Je répondrai tout simplement que l’ICRA joue un rôle dans la gestion de ces 125 millions de dollars. Alan Bernstein encourage beaucoup la collaboration entre les trois centres. S’agissant des supergrappes, chacun d’entre eux a proposé des investissements dans trois des cinq supergrappes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Baylis, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre, de comparaître devant notre comité aujourd’hui.

Depuis deux ans que j’apprends à vous connaître, je sais que vous défendez inlassablement le secteur de la recherche. Vous avez su alerter l’opinion quant à la nécessité de faire certains investissements, et puisque nous examinons le Budget principal des dépenses, j’aimerais avoir des précisions sur les investissements que vous envisagez de faire à l’avenir.

Parlons des infrastructures. On ne peut pas faire de la recherche de pointe avec des équipements désuets. C’est impossible. Avant d’envisager de recruter des chercheurs, il faut pouvoir leur offrir des équipements modernes, sinon ils ne peuvent pas progresser.

Pouvez-vous nous donner une ventilation détaillée des 2,8 milliards de dollars qui sont prévus dans le budget pour les infrastructures? Dans quelle mesure cela aura-t-il une incidence sur la recherche en général, ici au Canada?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

L’investissement dans les infrastructures de recherche se divise en deux grandes catégories. La première regroupe les universités et les écoles polytechniques, qui vont recevoir 1,3 milliard de dollars par l’entremise de la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. Pour la première fois depuis 20 ans, il va s’agir de financement durable. Les chercheurs n’auront plus à se demander quand la prochaine subvention va arriver, s’ils doivent en demander une ou attendre. Jusqu’à présent, ils ne pouvaient jamais planifier quoi que ce soit; maintenant, ils seront en mesure de le faire. C’est une très bonne nouvelle pour les chercheurs.

Nous sommes également en train d’identifier toutes les infrastructures du pays. Les universités, les collèges et les écoles polytechniques peuvent les utiliser, aussi bien que les entreprises. Pour ce qui est du gouvernement, nous collaborons avec les ministères à vocation scientifique pour élaborer, pour la première fois dans notre histoire, une stratégie gouvernementale des infrastructures scientifiques.

Cet investissement représente 2,8 milliards de dollars. Bon nombre de nos laboratoires ont 25 ans, et il est temps de les rénover. Tout cela est très excitant. Au lieu d’avoir un laboratoire par type de recherche, nous voulons rassembler des chercheurs de disciplines différentes afin de pouvoir relever de grands défis.

(1610)

M. Frank Baylis:

Il y a quelque chose qui me plaît tout particulièrement dans ce que vous venez de dire, c’est que ces infrastructures ne vont pas être limitées aux chercheurs fédéraux. Vous avez parlé des entreprises. Pouvez-vous nous dire en quoi cela va être bénéfique à nos entreprises?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J’ai eu à ce sujet de longues discussions avec la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. Vous pouvez aller voir sur son site Web, elle recense toutes les infrastructures du pays. La FCI se réjouit grandement de ces nouveaux investissements, car cela va donner à nos chercheurs la possibilité de travailler avec des équipements de pointe. Elle s’en réjouit aussi pour les entreprises, car celles-ci pourront partager les équipements avec les chercheurs.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ça va leur être très bénéfique, d’après ce que j’ai pu entendre, madame la ministre.

Si nous nous dotons de ces superbes infrastructures et que nous permettons à nos entreprises de les partager avec nos chercheurs, je suis convaincu que non seulement cela va aider nos entreprises, mais cela va aussi permettre d’établir cet hyperlien que nous recherchons. Je suis absolument ravi que notre gouvernement s’engage dans cette voie.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Permettez-moi d’ajouter, Frank, que le Conseil national de recherches a également un rôle à jouer. J’ai parlé tout à l’heure d’un investissement de 540 millions de dollars.

M. Frank Baylis:

J’allais justement vous poser une question là-dessus.[Français]

Madame la ministre, c'est un sujet important, non seulement pour l'ensemble du Canada, mais aussi pour le Québec, qui utilise beaucoup les ressources destinées à la recherche, dont le Conseil national de recherches. Pour ma part, je connais plusieurs entreprises qui y font appel. Cet investissement de 540 millions de dollars est extrêmement important.

Pouvez-vous nous donner un peu plus de détails à ce sujet?[Traduction]

En quoi cela va-t-il être bénéfique à nos entreprises?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je suis contente que nous soyons en mesure de faire cet investissement de 540 millions de dollars. C’est le plus important que le Conseil national de recherches ait reçu en 15 ans.

On dit que c’est le fleuron de la recherche gouvernementale, et il joue un rôle vraiment très important. Il fait de la recherche fondamentale, mais il s’intéresse aussi à l’innovation. Il collabore avec les petites et moyennes entreprises. Il réunit des universitaires, des entrepreneurs et des représentants du gouvernement pour aider les entreprises à relever des défis, à développer leurs activités et, il faut l’espérer, à recruter davantage.

Notre nouveau président, Iain Stewart, a annoncé son intention de renforcer la collaboration entre le CNRC, les universités et l’industrie. Il y a des laboratoires du CNRC dans un grand nombre de campus universitaires, et il y a peut-être quelques chercheurs qui ont des contacts avec les deux entités.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cela contribue au lien que nous voulons établir.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Il veut vraiment renforcer ce lien important.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je suis d’accord avec vous. On nous a souvent dit que les entreprises devraient avoir des liens étroits avec nos chercheurs. De cette façon, le transfert technologique se fait plus facilement. Je suis tout à fait pour.

Il ne me reste qu’une minute, alors je vais revenir sur une question qu’a soulevée mon collègue et à laquelle vous n’avez pas eu la possibilité de donner une réponse complète. Cela concerne la façon dont on réaffecte parfois des équivalents temps plein, et les résultats que ça donne dans les chiffres.

On dit souvent qu’il y a trois sortes de mensonges: les mensonges, les sacrés mensonges et les statistiques. Je vais vous laisser nous parler de ces anomalies statistiques, si vous le voulez bien.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Nous autres, chercheurs, nous adorons les statistiques.

Le gouvernement précédent a pris la décision de fermer l’EACL. Les chercheurs sont donc allés travailler dans une autre organisation. C’est l’une des raisons principales. L’autre raison concerne la classification.

Ma priorité, c’est de m’assurer que les chercheurs du gouvernement ont l’argent, les laboratoires et les équipements dont ils ont besoin pour réussir. C’est l’une des raisons pour lesquelles nous réunissons les ministères à vocation scientifique en juin prochain, afin de parler des besoins des chercheurs du gouvernement.

(1615)

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant donner la parole à M. Jeneroux.

Vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Il y aurait beaucoup à dire suite à cette dernière réponse, madame la ministre, mais nous en resterons là.

Il y a quelques instants, vous avez dit quelque chose qui va sans doute choquer beaucoup de Canadiens. Vous avez dit que la conseillère scientifique en chef, qui a été nommée il y a maintenant sept mois, n’allait pas du tout participer au processus d’évaluation environnementale de la taxe carbone. Je trouve cela à la fois choquant et décevant. Cela veut dire que vous n’allez pas demander l’avis de la conseillère scientifique en chef au sujet d’une politique à caractère fortement scientifique et fondée sur des données probantes.

Pourquoi, madame la ministre?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Permettez-moi de revenir sur la question que vous avez posée précédemment, Matt.

Le nombre de fonctionnaires fédéraux qui travaillent dans les domaines de la science et de la technologie a en fait augmenté depuis que notre gouvernement a été élu.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la ministre, nous pouvons argumenter...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

En 2015-2016, ce nombre est passé de 33 925 à 34 484 équivalents temps plein, et cela tient compte des changements survenus à EACL.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la ministre, dans votre propre tableau, ici, nous voyons que le nombre de fonctionnaires fédéraux affectés à des activités scientifiques et technologiques diminue de plus en plus rapidement depuis que votre gouvernement a pris le pouvoir. Je vous invite, madame la ministre, à vous reporter au tableau CANSIM.

Revenons-en à la conseillère scientifique en chef. Je trouve choquant qu’elle n’ait pas été invitée à participer au processus de décision. Pourquoi?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Permettez-moi de terminer ma réponse.

La réaffectation de 2 873 équivalents temps plein est due à la restructuration d’Énergie atomique du Canada Limitée, qui a été décidée par votre gouvernement. Ces chercheurs ne sont plus employés par EACL, mais par la Canadian National Energy Alliance, qui est une entreprise du secteur privé.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la ministre, pourquoi la conseillère scientifique en chef n’a-t-elle pas été consultée au sujet du processus d’évaluation environnementale?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Comme vous le savez, nous avons nommé une conseillère scientifique en chef pour nous assurer que la recherche scientifique gouvernementale soit pleinement accessible aux Canadiens, que les chercheurs du gouvernement puissent parler librement de leur travail, et que les analyses scientifiques enrichissent le processus décisionnel. Elle va revoir régulièrement les méthodes et l’intégrité des analyses scientifiques utilisées dans les évaluations d’impact et dans le processus décisionnel. Et à la fin de l’année, elle va présenter un rapport annuel au premier ministre et à moi-même, rapport qui sera rendu public.

Elle a publié une lettre à la fin de ses 100 premiers jours pour parler de ce qu’elle avait accompli. Elle s’est mise au travail rapidement, parcourant toutes les régions du pays pour rencontrer des chercheurs, car elle doit rétablir la confiance et...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la ministre, c’est pourtant à vous qu’il incombe de vous assurer qu’elle est consultée sur un projet de loi qui est crucial pour l’avenir du gouvernement. Le fait est que vous ne l’avez pas consultée sur ce dossier, et vous avez dit tout à l’heure que vous la consulteriez après coup.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Entendons-nous bien. Elle a participé au processus de la nouvelle évaluation environnementale, qui est...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mais vous avez dit que non. Vous avez dit qu’elle serait consultée après coup.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Il y aura en effet un réexamen, mais elle a participé à ce nouveau processus d’évaluation environnementale.

Matt, en ce qui concerne...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

A-t-elle vu les documents caviardés?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Le gouvernement précédent a vidé de son sens la législation environnementale, il a réduit à néant la protection des poissons; quant aux cours d’eau...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

La conseillère scientifique en chef était-elle au courant de ce que contenaient les documents caviardés?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Le nouveau processus d’évaluation environnementale porte principalement sur notre environnement et sur les cours d’eau. Aujourd’hui, nous devons retrouver la confiance des Canadiens, faire avancer le processus de réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones, et veiller à ce que les bons projets soient menés à bien.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais le temps passe.

Monsieur Jowhari, vous avez trois minutes.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bienvenue parmi nous, madame la ministre. Changeons de sujet et passons au monde numérique et à l’économie numérique. Comme vous le savez, tout évolue très vite de nos jours. Le numérique joue un rôle de plus en plus grand.

S’agissant des crédits de 4 milliards de dollars et de nos jeunes, surtout les femmes, que font le gouvernement et votre ministère pour accroître les compétences numériques de nos jeunes? Je sais que vous êtes une ardente défenseure de la diversité, et je voudrais donc tout particulièrement savoir si nos efforts se traduisent par une plus grande diversité.

(1620)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, Majid.

Je sais que vous êtes vous-même ingénieur et que cette question vous intéresse tout particulièrement.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Pour être plus précis, je suis un ancien ingénieur.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Nous avons consenti un investissement de 50 millions de dollars pour apprendre le code aux jeunes. C’est un programme très intéressant. Pour encourager les jeunes à envisager une carrière dans les sciences, la technologie, l’ingénierie et les mathématiques — les disciplines STIM —, nous avons la campagne #OptezSciences, qui a permis de livrer des milliers d’affiches à des milliers d’écoles de tout le pays. C’est une campagne numérique, qui reçoit énormément d’attention.

Je reviens sur ce que Mary demandait tout à l’heure au sujet des mesures que nous avons prises pour accroître l’équité et la diversité dans les universités. J’ai parlé tout à l’heure du SPEUC que nous avons rétabli, et de nos chaires d’excellence en recherche du Canada. J’ai aussi mis en place de nouvelles exigences en matière d’équité et de diversité pour nos chaires de recherche. Les universités ont été invitées à mettre en place, avant décembre dernier, des plans d’équité et de diversité indiquant comment elles entendent atteindre les cibles volontaires qu’elles ont acceptées en 2006 pour les femmes, les Autochtones, les personnes issues de minorités et les personnes handicapées. Je leur ai indiqué très clairement que si elles n’atteignent pas leurs cibles, j’envisagerai de suspendre l’évaluation par les pairs.

Je dois vous dire que toutes ces mesures donnent d’excellents résultats. Dans nos 150 chaires du Canada, nous avons réussi à attirer 42 % de Canadiens expatriés, dont 58 % de femmes, qui ont compris que l’avenir de la recherche était ici. C’est vraiment un beau résultat, tout à fait mesurable.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant redonner la parole à M. Jeneroux. Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, quand vous étiez dans l’opposition, vous défendiez avec véhémence un traitement controversé de l’IVCC. Son inventeur, le Dr Zamboni, prétend que son médicament améliore la vie des personnes atteintes de SP en élargissant leurs veines et en favorisant ainsi une meilleure circulation du sang jusqu’au cerveau. Vous avez présenté le projet de loi C-280 qui prévoit l’élaboration d’une stratégie nationale pour l’IVCC, et vous prétendez avoir assisté à sept conférences sur l’IVCC, avoir présenté une communication à trois d’entre elles, et avoir examiné des IRM et observé la procédure utilisée pendant près de 100 heures.

L'Université de la Colombie-Britannique a récemment fait une étude sur ce traitement. Le neurologue en chef, le Dr Traboulsee, y conclut qu’il n’y a absolument aucune différence — pas l’ombre d’une différence — entre le groupe soigné avec le médicament du Dr Zamboni et le groupe soigné avec des placebos. Suite à cette étude, étant donné que vous êtes aujourd’hui ministre des Sciences, avez-vous changé d’opinion au sujet de l’IVCC?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Matt, je vous remercie de votre question.

Pendant la législature précédente, j’ai demandé à l’ancien gouvernement de faire des analyses scientifiques, de recueillir des données probantes, de procéder à des essais cliniques et d’établir un registre. Le gouvernement a changé d’avis, et il a accepté de faire des essais cliniques et d’établir un registre. Comme vous le savez, les résultats en ont été publiés, mais ce que j’avais demandé, c’était que le gouvernement fasse des analyses scientifiques.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Avez-vous changé d’avis à propos de l’IVCC?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Notre gouvernement s’est engagé à prendre des décisions fondées sur des analyses scientifiques et des données probantes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Il y a certainement beaucoup de chercheurs qui attendaient depuis longtemps cette réponse de votre part, madame la ministre.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

La communauté scientifique, Matt, est absolument ravie que le gouvernement ait consenti des investissements sans précédent dans la recherche: 4 milliards de dollars dans la recherche, plus 2,8 milliards dans les infrastructures scientifiques, soit un investissement sans précédent; 1,7 milliard dans la recherche de découvertes, soit un investissement sans précédent; 1,3 milliard de dollars pour les infrastructures scientifiques, soit un investissement sans précédent et en même temps un investissement durable; un investissement sans précédent dans le CNRC en 15 ans, et aussi un investissement sans précédent...

(1625)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Il me reste 45 secondes, pourriez-vous s’il vous plaît répondre à ma question, madame la ministre? Je vous promets qu’ensuite vous ne serez plus sur la sellette pendant un petit moment.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

... dans la recherche appliquée, de toute l’histoire du Canada. La communauté scientifique est ravie.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Dans la réponse de votre ministère à une question au Feuilleton posée par mon collègue, on apprend que votre ministère a accordé un contrat de 51 000 $ et quelques à BESC Ottawa, un cabinet de chasseurs de têtes, pour doter le poste de conseiller scientifique en chef. Combien de candidatures BESC a-t-il proposées, et quels ministères, bureaux et individus ont participé au processus de sélection?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Matt, je vous ferai parvenir ces détails plus tard. Ce que je peux vous dire pour le moment, c’est qu’il y a eu un processus très rigoureux pendant environ six mois. Nous avons publié cette offre d’emploi un peu partout, et un grand nombre de personnes ont été interviewées. Nous voulions trouver le meilleur candidat. Comme l’a dit votre collègue, le député de Beauce, la candidate retenue est excellente et sa nomination a été applaudie partout au Canada.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant donner la parole à M. Sheehan. Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie de votre exposé. Vous faites un excellent travail, surtout en ce qui concerne les chaires de recherche. Il se trouve que même la bonne vieille ville de Sault Ste. Marie a décidé de soumettre une demande pour un projet de recherche sur le métabolisme lipidique des végétaux, et qu’elle a bon espoir. Je me réjouis que ce programme s’adresse aussi aux petites villes du Canada, où des recherches extraordinaires se font déjà.

Ce qui m’intéresse aussi, c’est qu’en 2006, il a fallu un règlement juridique pour modifier le programme et créer des cibles d’embauche pour quatre groupes: les femmes, les Autochtones, les personnes handicapées et les minorités visibles. J’ai lu un article là-dessus l’automne dernier. J’ai déjà eu l’occasion de dire que pendant 10 ans, pratiquement rien n’avait changé, mais qu’ensuite, vous aviez fixé des cibles et que la situation commençait à évoluer. C’était l’an dernier. Je vous félicite de tout cela.

Maintenant, pour ce qui est de 2018, que prévoit le budget pour accroître l’équité dans les domaines de la science et de la recherche?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, Terry, de votre question. Je sais que c’est un sujet qui vous intéresse tout particulièrement, à cause de votre fille.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Oui, en effet.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Vous avez posé beaucoup de questions là-dessus. Je vais essayer de vous répondre très brièvement. Nous avons rétabli le SPEUC. Nous avons mis en place des exigences en matière d’équité et de diversité dans les chaires d’excellence en recherche du Canada et dans les chaires de recherche du Canada, mais nous voulons faire plus. Nous allons mettre en oeuvre le célèbre programme Athena SWAN, auquel le budget a alloué un crédit de 15 millions de dollars et qui va nous permettre d’instaurer l’équité et la diversité dans nos institutions.

M. Terry Sheehan:

C'est parfait.

Vous avez aussi dit comment la recherche scientifique peut encourager la vérité et la réconciliation, et j’aimerais revenir sur le cas de l’Université Algoma. C’est un ancien pensionnat, je m’y suis rendu récemment, et j’ai vu le genre de recherche qu’ils font. Ils ont présenté une demande pour une chaire de recherche, à laquelle ils essaient d’intégrer des composantes autochtones. Comment cela va-t-il évoluer?

Le président:

Je suis désolé, il nous reste très peu de temps. Vous avez 30 secondes.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Terry, je vous remercie de votre question.

C’est ce que nous faisons dans les services de recherche du gouvernement. Nous essayons de conjuguer la science occidentale et les formes de savoir autochtone. Dans ce budget, nous allouons 3,8 millions de dollars aux conseils subventionnaires pour qu’ils élaborent, en collaboration avec les peuples autochtones, une stratégie de recherche mieux adaptée aux besoins des chercheurs inuits, métis et des Premières Nations.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez deux minutes pour clôturer cette partie de la réunion.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Merci, madame la ministre.

J’aimerais savoir ce que fait le Canada pour rattraper son retard par rapport aux autres pays, en ce qui concerne les essais médicaux sur des animaux. Selon un nombre croissant d’études scientifiques, 95 % des médicaments testés sur des animaux ne donnent pas des taux de réussite très élevés. D’aucuns se posent des questions sur le degré d’efficacité de ces tests, et se demandent si la communauté scientifique du Canada devrait préconiser de ne pas utiliser d’animaux pour ces tests. Que pensez-vous de la création d’un centre de recherche sur des tests n’utilisant pas d’animaux?

Avez-vous déjà pensé au rôle d’avant-garde que le Canada pourrait jouer dans ce domaine, avez-vous déjà des plans dans ce sens, ou bien cela n’intéresse-t-il pas du tout le gouvernement?

(1630)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je suis tout à fait au courant de cette recherche de l’Université de Windsor. C’est là que j’enseignais. Ce n’est pas la première fois que nous en parlons, et d’ailleurs, d’autres députés ont soulevé la question. Comme vous le savez, dans le secteur de la recherche, il y a ce qu’on appelle le processus d’évaluation par les pairs. Celui du Canada est connu dans le monde entier, et les chercheurs peuvent présenter une demande dans différents domaines.

Je suis heureuse de pouvoir vous dire que le budget prévoit une augmentation de 25 % de la dotation des conseils subventionnaires, ce qui va permettre d’élargir leur champ d’action. Un crédit de 275 millions de dollars permettra de créer un fonds pour soutenir la recherche internationale interdisciplinaire présentant des risques élevés. Un crédit de 210 millions de dollars est alloué aux chaires de recherche du Canada. Cet investissement considérable permettra d’offrir beaucoup plus d’opportunités à nos chercheurs. Ce que nous ont dit les conseils subventionnaires, c’est que, dans le passé, il y avait de bonnes recherches qui ne pouvaient pas être financées, faute de ressources. Maintenant qu’ils vont avoir les ressources, ils vont pouvoir financer ces recherches, et j’ai bien hâte de voir ce que ça va donner. Je pense qu’ils vont faire des travaux de recherche qui défient notre imagination.

Le président:

Nous terminons sur cette note.

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, d’avoir comparu devant notre comité aujourd’hui.

Nous allons faire une courte pause de deux minutes, le temps de changer de joueurs. À tout de suite.

Merci.



(1635)

Le président:

Rebonjour, tout le monde.

Nous allons commencer notre deuxième heure de séance, en présence, cette fois-ci, de L'honorable Navdeep Bains (ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique) et de son sous-ministre, John Knubley.

Pour ne pas perdre de temps, monsieur le ministre, je vous donne immédiatement la parole. Vous avez un maximum de 10 minutes.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains (ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je suis ravi d’être de retour parmi vous et de revoir des visages qui me sont familiers et d’autres, moins.

Merci beaucoup de m’avoir invité.[Français]

Je suis heureux de vous rencontrer à l'occasion du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019.[Traduction]

J’ai l’intention aujourd’hui de présenter au Comité les détails concernant la mise en oeuvre de notre Plan pour l’innovation et les compétences, dont nous avons discuté dans le cadre de plusieurs de nos budgets.

Monsieur le président, je serai bref afin de laisser le maximum de temps aux questions. Vous m’avez dit que j’avais 10 minutes tout au plus, mais je vais faire tout mon possible pour ne pas utiliser tout ce temps, afin que nous puissions avoir ensuite une bonne discussion.

Avant d’aller plus loin, je tiens à remercier une fois de plus votre comité pour son rapport sur la propriété intellectuelle et le transfert de technologies. La semaine dernière, j’ai présenté la Stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle du gouvernement. Comme vous l’avez sûrement remarqué, vos recommandations ont orienté les éléments clés de notre stratégie, et j’en suis particulièrement fier, car vous avez su nous convaincre de la nécessité d’entreprendre ces initiatives. Merci de votre leadership.[Français]

Je serai heureux de discuter plus en détail de notre stratégie lors de la séance de questions et réponses.[Traduction]

Le plan pour l'innovation et les compétences contribue déjà à améliorer la vie des Canadiens de la classe moyenne dans toutes les régions du pays. Nous avons fait de grands pas vers la réalisation de nos buts. La croissance économique est supérieure à 3 % par année, de sorte que notre PIB progresse de façon très satisfaisante par rapport aux décennies passées.[Français]

Notre économie connaît la plus forte croissance parmi celles des pays du G7.[Traduction]

Mais, nous ne pouvons nous asseoir sur nos lauriers. Nous devons continuer à investir. Nous devons être stratégiques et intelligents. Nous devons agir de manière réfléchie. Les emplois ont toujours été une priorité pour moi et pour notre gouvernement.[Français]

Depuis que nous sommes arrivés au pouvoir, en 2015, l'économie canadienne a créé plus de 600 000 emplois. Le taux de chômage est de 5,8 %. Il est clair que nous sommes sur la bonne voie.[Traduction]

Naturellement, nous voulons poursuivre sur cette lancée. C'est pour cela que je veux vous parler de la manière dont le budget prévoit des investissements de 7,8 milliards de dollars dans le portefeuille de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique en 2018-2019. Je répondrai aussi à vos questions. Je demande ainsi l'approbation des dépenses qui serviront à poursuivre la réalisation du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences — encore une fois, c'est un plan pluriannuel — ce qui inclut les priorités énoncées dans le budget de 2017.

L'Initiative des supergrappes d'innovation est l'un des éléments clés du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences. Cette initiative a été financée et prévue par le budget 2017. En février, nous avons annoncé les cinq supergrappes retenues. Ces supergrappes réunissent des entreprises, des établissements du savoir et des entreprises sans but lucratif et elles ont pour objectif d'accélérer notre économie. Le cadre de ses partenariats est établi. Il revient maintenant à ses innovateurs de réunir leurs partenaires et de concrétiser leurs plans. Je suis impatient de constater les réalisations des supergrappes au cours des mois et des années à venir.[Français]

Le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, qui a également été annoncé dans le budget de 2017, est un autre outil destiné à stimuler l'innovation.[Traduction]

Ce fonds aide les innovateurs canadiens à tirer parti des forces économiques du pays. Il aide aussi des entreprises canadiennes à se tailler une plus grande place dans les chaînes d'approvisionnement régionales et mondiales. Enfin, il attire des investissements qui créent de bons emplois pour la classe moyenne.

Depuis son lancement en 2017, les industries innovatrices du Canada ont fait des progrès intéressants. Par exemple, le nouveau guichet unique du programme a reçu des centaines de demandes. Nous allons mettre les ressources ministérielles à bon usage afin que le FSI, le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, accélère le transfert de technologies et la commercialisation dans divers secteurs, dont l'aérospatiale, la défense, l'automobile, l'agroalimentaire et les technologies propres. En fait, le but est, encore une fois, de diversifier notre économie et d'aider les secteurs à forte croissance.[Français]

J'aimerais vous dire un mot sur d'autres mesures importantes qui permettent au Canada d'occuper la place qui lui revient dans l'économie numérique.[Traduction]

Il s'agit de CodeCan et de Brancher pour innover. Grâce à CodeCan, nous enseignons le codage et d'autres compétences numériques et c'est un aspect dont je suis particulièrement fier parce que je suis père de deux petites filles. Un million d'élèves de la maternelle à la fin du secondaire vont ainsi acquérir des compétences en codage au cours des deux prochaines années et nous allons aussi offrir de la formation à 60 000 enseignants pour faciliter l'intégration des nouvelles technologies en salle de classe.

(1640)



Bien entendu, rien de cela ne serait possible sans un accès à Internet haute vitesse. C'est pour cela que nous finançons le programme Brancher pour innover, qui aide à combler le fossé numérique dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées du Canada. C'est une question de justice et d'égalité. C'est en fait un élément essentiel de la nouvelle économie numérique.

Pour assurer le succès du Canada dans l'économie numérique, il faut tirer profit de notre grand éventail de talents et donner à tous les citoyens la possibilité d'y participer et d'investir dans les compétences et l'infrastructure numériques. C'est ainsi que nous y parviendrons.

Enfin, j'aimerais vous parler de Solutions innovatrices Canada, qui est une autre des mesures annoncées dans le budget 2017. Vingt ministères et organismes fédéraux vont lancer aux petites et moyennes entreprises le défi de les aider à régler des problèmes concrets. Il s'agit de problèmes qui se posent au gouvernement. Ils vont les présenter de façon très ouverte et transparente. Ce programme appuiera le développement et la croissance des innovateurs et des entrepreneurs du Canada puisque le gouvernement fédéral deviendra leur premier client de marque.

En échange, le gouvernement accédera aux tout derniers produits et services innovateurs. Ce programme s'adresse directement aux innovateurs. Nous sommes convaincus qu'il aidera de petites entreprises à marquer de grandes réussites.[Français]

Les investissements de notre gouvernement au titre du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences aideront le Canada à maintenir sa position en tant que l'un des meilleurs endroits au monde où vivre et mener des affaires.[Traduction]

Ces investissements appuieront notre main-d'oeuvre de calibre mondial et notre infrastructure de pointe et ils attireront des investissements et des possibilités des quatre coins du monde.

Une fois de plus, merci aux distingués membres de ce comité de m'avoir donné l'occasion de m'adresser à vous. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous allons tout de suite passer à Mme Ng. Vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Mary Ng:

Monsieur le ministre, il est fantastique que vous soyez venu nous parler des investissements que nous effectuons dans l'innovation, dans le cadre du processus budgétaire.

J'aimerais parler de l'initiative concernant les supergrappes d'innovation. Il y en a une qui me touche de près. C'est la supergrappe de fabrication avancée. Cette offre a été lancée dans le secteur que je représente et elle regroupe de nombreux partenaires. Il y a la Ville de Markham, la Municipalité régionale de York, ventureLab, l'Université York, le Collège Seneca et de nombreux partenaires industriels comme Celestica, Magna, Canvass Analytics, Peytec, SterileCare et ChipCare. Je suis très heureuse que leur offre ait été retenue et de savoir qu'ils vont recevoir des fonds dans le cadre de la supergrappe de fabrication avancée.

Cela constitue une excellente opportunité économique en raison de la concentration des entreprises que l'on retrouve ici, qui vont des jeunes pousses à des entreprises en développement jusqu'aux PME et aux multinationales. Elles exercent leurs activités dans un secteur qui est en fait un écosystème.

Cela dit, pourriez-vous nous parler des supergrappes? Je viens de parler d'une d'entre elles, mais pourriez-vous nous parler des cinq supergrappes, de la façon dont elles ont été choisies et de l'investissement que fait le gouvernement dans l'initiative des supergrappes.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je vous remercie d'avoir posé cette question et de vous intéresser autant à ce domaine. Je sais que Markham est vraiment un centre d'innovation. On y trouve beaucoup de grandes entreprises, et elles sont nombreuses à participer à cette initiative, comme vous l'avez mentionné, l'initiative des supergrappes, celle de la fabrication avancée, plus précisément.

Pour revenir un peu en arrière, je préciserais que le gouvernement a décidé qu'il fallait débloquer des fonds pour la recherche et le développement. Nous voulions des emplois de meilleure qualité. Nous voulions accélérer la croissance économique. Nous avons pensé qu'au lieu d'imposer des choses, il serait préférable de créer un processus ouvert et transparent qui serait animé par les entreprises. Nous voulions que ces entreprises nous présentent des idées et des propositions ainsi que des offres compétitives sur la façon dont elles étaient disposées à travailler avec de petites entreprises, de grandes entreprises, des établissements universitaires et des organismes à but non lucratif, pour obtenir les résultats recherchés.

Encore une fois, si quelqu'un me demande ce qu'est une supergrappe, je dirai que c'est un aimant pour les emplois. Il s'agit en fait d'emplois de bonne qualité. Cela crée un écosystème. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, c'est un processus qui était très compétitif et finalement, nous en avons retenu cinq. Nous avons voulu éviter ce que nous appelons le « saupoudrage des fonds ». Nous voulions respecter une stratégie, prendre des décisions réfléchies et nous souhaitions avoir une incidence.

En choisissant cinq supergrappes — nous en sommes arrivés finalement à cinq en fonction de ces critères — nous avons pensé qu'elles pourraient soutenir la concurrence, non seulement au Canada, mais également sur le plan mondial. Nous avons la supergrappe numérique en Colombie-Britannique, il y en a une dans les provinces des Prairies au sujet des protéines et de la valeur ajoutée aux produits protéinés, il y a bien évidemment l'initiative de fabrication avancée dont vous avez parlé pour l'Ontario, l'initiative de chaîne d'approvisionnement et intelligence artificielle et bien entendu, la supergrappe des océans dans la région de l'Atlantique.

Cela reflète le fait qu'il se fait de l'innovation dans toutes les régions du pays, mais essentiellement, les principales retombées et les véritables indicateurs seront que ces initiatives vont produire des milliards de dollars d'activités économiques et des dizaines de milliers d'emplois au cours des prochaines années. Ce plan a été confirmé par des experts indépendants. Des experts du gouvernement y ont également participé. Nous avons formé un comité de spécialistes, de sorte que nous sommes convaincus que, grâce à cette politique économique, nous obtiendrons les résultats souhaités.

Plus précisément, pour ce qui est de la fabrication avancée, il s'agit surtout de plateformes. Comment la production additive — l'impression numérique 3D, par exemple — et la robotique peuvent-elles avoir des effets positifs sur autant d'aspects différents de notre économie? Il ne s'agit pas seulement du secteur automobile ou de l'aérospatiale. Ces plateformes, comme les plateformes numériques ou d'intelligence artificielle, ont des répercussions profondes sur l'ensemble de l'économie. Je crois qu'il faut éviter de parler de stratégie régionale. Il s'agit en fait de plateformes qui vont être déployées et qui vont profiter à l'ensemble de l'économie canadienne, d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

(1645)

Mme Mary Ng:

Voilà qui est excellent.

Pouvez-vous nous parler de...

Le président:

Excusez-moi, puis-je intervenir, si vous le permettez?

Est-ce qu'il y a quelqu'un qui fait jouer de la musique de ce côté? Nous entendons de la musique. Cela est gênant, et nous avons déjà reçu quelques plaintes. Je vous demande donc de cesser. Merci.

Vous pouvez reprendre.

Mme Mary Ng:

Pourriez-vous nous parler des montants investis dans les supergrappes?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C'est un investissement important. Il s'agit de 950 millions de dollars. Nous voulions obtenir au minimum, par effet de levier, une contrepartie égale de la part du secteur privé. Je peux vous dire que l'apport du secteur privé a été très important. Notre attente qui consistait à obtenir un investissement égal de la part de ces secteurs a été dépassée. L'investissement total est largement supérieur à 2 milliards de dollars, dont une partie vient du gouvernement, mais également, et surtout, du secteur privé.

Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, l'objectif est de débloquer des fonds dans les bilans pour faire davantage de recherche et développement. Nous voulons que nos entreprises prospèrent et réussissent, elles doivent parier sur les technologies émergentes, sur les solutions nouvelles. Il faut qu'elles imaginent ce que sera la situation dans 5, 10 ou 15 ans. Nous estimons que nous avons non seulement créé cet incitatif, mais également un écosystème. Il s'agit en fait d'aider les petites entreprises à se développer. Cela ne concerne pas uniquement les grandes entreprises. Il s'agit de créer un écosystème qui profitera à de nombreuses jeunes pousses et aux sociétés qui veulent se développer.

Pour nous, si vous prenez notre Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences, c'est vraiment notre objectif: Comment aider les entreprises canadiennes à se développer et à croître? Nous ne visons pas seulement le Canada. Nous visons également l'international. Nous voulons que ces entreprises connaissent également du succès dans le monde entier. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons fait un investissement aussi important de 950 millions de dollars.

Mme Mary Ng:

Merci.

Je vais changer légèrement de sujet et parler du Programme Solutions innovatrices Canada. Merci de nous avoir parlé des crédits budgétaires qui sont affectés à Solutions innovatrices Canada. C'est une excellente chose, parce que le gouvernement sera le premier client pour de nombreuses jeunes pousses, ce qui leur donnera l'impulsion dont elles ont besoin pour prendre pied sur le marché, surtout si le gouvernement devient leur premier client.

Pouvez-vous nous dire comment le Programme Solutions innovatrices Canada pourrait appuyer les groupes sous-représentés. Il y a beaucoup de jeunes pousses dans ce secteur. Comment le gouvernement va-t-il les aider?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Ce programme a été conçu pour aider les sociétés à se développer. Le gouvernement devient alors leur client de marque; il parie sur les technologies canadiennes émergentes et il valide ces technologies; de sorte que, lorsque ces entreprises travaillent à l'étranger, en particulier les entreprises travaillant dans des secteurs divers, elles pourront réussir non seulement au Canada, mais mondialement.

J'espère que nous pourrons parler plus en détail de ce sujet lors de la prochaine série de questions.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons passer à Mme Rempel.

Vous avez sept minutes.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel (Calgary Nose Hill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, pour ce qui est de la période visée par ce Budget principal des dépenses, quel est le montant total des subventions versées à des entreprises à but lucratif par tous les ministères qui relèvent de vous?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

D'après les chiffres que nous avons dans le Budget principal 2018-2019, le portefeuille s'élève au total à 7,8 milliards de dollars. Voulez-vous parler en particulier des subventions?

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Des subventions et des contributions destinées aux entreprises à but lucratif.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Pas aux entreprises sans but lucratif, mais à but lucratif.

(1650)

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Exact.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Très bien. Je vais vous obtenir ce chiffre. Nous avons différentes subventions qui relèvent de portefeuilles différents. Je vous obtiendrai ce chiffre dans un moment.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien.

Sur ce chiffre, combien y en a-t-il qui ont été attribués à des entreprises dirigées par des femmes?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Encore une fois, je vais devoir vous fournir ce chiffre dans un instant.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien ont été versés à des entreprises qui n'appartenaient pas à des Canadiens?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Encore une fois, nous allons vous fournir ce chiffre. Nous allons certainement vous fournir cette information.

Parlez-vous d'investissements internationaux ou d'investissements nationaux?

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

J'essaie de savoir combien d'argent vous avez donné directement à des entreprises.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Encore une fois, nous vous fournirons le montant exact.

Il y a différentes façons de fournir ces fonds. Il s'agit principalement de subventions et de prêts, sous la forme de contributions remboursables. Ce sont là les deux mécanismes que nous utilisons.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

D'accord. Nous avons vu certains chiffres au budget; il y a 372 millions de dollars pour Bombardier et 35 milliards pour la Banque de l'infrastructure.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Exact.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

J'aimerais simplement savoir quels sont les montants que vous avez accordés à des entreprises, puisque nous examinons le Budget principal des dépenses.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Le Budget principal des dépenses a deux composantes. Il y a le volet fonctionnement du budget principal, qui est la base pour le personnel...

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Oui, je le sais. Je comprends.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Il y a aussi le volet subventions et contributions.

Nous vous les ferons parvenir.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Quel est le montant des subventions et des contributions que vous avez accordées à des entreprises à but lucratif, y compris celles qui l'ont été par les différents services du ministère?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C'est une bonne question. Nous vous ferons parvenir ce renseignement dans un moment. Je vais simplement demander à mes collaborateurs de me trouver ce chiffre.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Monsieur Knubley, connaissez-vous ce montant?

M. John Knubley:

Non. Nous vous ferons parvenir le chiffre exact.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Nous étudions le Budget principal des dépenses. Je voulais savoir combien de fonds vous attribuez aux sociétés parce que j'allais vous demander combien d'emplois vous aviez créés grâce à ces fonds.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Encore une fois, pour...

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je vais donner un peu de temps à M. Knubley.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains: Bien sûr.

M. John Knubley:

Pour ce qui est des crédits votés, qui représentent au total 2,3 milliards de dollars, 80 % de tout cela sont des subventions, d'après ce que je sais.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Destinés à des entreprises à but lucratif...?

M. John Knubley:

Elles ne sont pas toutes à but lucratif. Il faudrait préciser cet aspect parce que ces sommes ne sont pas ventilées en fonction de ce critère.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien d'argent donnez-vous aux entreprises?

M. John Knubley:

Je ne peux pas répondre à cette question. Comme nous l'avons mentionné, nous allons devoir vous faire parvenir plus tard ces données.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Mais pourquoi? Je veux dire qu'il s'agit là du Budget principal des dépenses, n'est-ce pas?

M. John Knubley:

C'est bien le Budget principal des dépenses, mais les données sont réparties de la façon suivante, comme cela a été fait, et cela est fait par programme.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien. D'accord, mais tout le raisonnement...

M. John Knubley:

Si vous voulez les totaux, nous allons devoir vous les faire parvenir plus tard.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Le raisonnement qui a été tenu au sujet des supergrappes et du reste est que, si nous donnons de l'argent aux entreprises, elles vont créer des emplois. J'essaie de savoir, dans mon rôle de parlementaire chargé de l'examen du Budget principal des dépenses, quelles sont les sommes que vous avez accordées à des entreprises et combien d'emplois ont été créés. Pouvez-vous me dire quel est le montant des fonds qui ont été attribués à des entreprises?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Si vous le permettez, comme je l'ai mentionné, le montant total du portefeuille est de 7,8 milliards de dollars; nous allons calculer exactement les sommes que vous demandez et nous allons également veiller à vous fournir les chiffres concernant les emplois.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien. Je me demande tout simplement pourquoi il n'est pas possible d'avoir ces chiffres aujourd'hui, étant donné que vous...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Ce n'est pas possible aujourd'hui. Nous sommes en train d'obtenir cette information.

Vous allez certainement recevoir ces chiffres.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

D'ici la fin du tour de question...?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Le plus rapidement possible.

Le président:

Cela prendra le temps qu'il faudra.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien. Je suis un peu surprise. C'est le Comité de l'industrie, et votre ministère accorde des subventions et des contributions, comme vous l'avez dit, mais nous ne savons pas exactement combien sont attribuées aux entreprises ou...?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous le savons. Nous voulons simplement vous fournir un chiffre exact.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien.

Monsieur Knubley, avez-vous ce chiffre?

M. John Knubley:

Non.

Les données que contient le Budget principal des dépenses reflètent les changements concrets apportés au financement concernant le programme pour ce qui est du budget de 2017 et du budget de 2018...

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Comment pouvez-vous gérer...

M. John Knubley:

... de sorte que les crédits de dépense nouveaux provenant du budget de 2017 s'élèvent à 568,5 millions de dollars au total...

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je ne peux...

M. John Knubley:

... les supergrappes d'innovation ont obtenu 149,3 millions de dollars de plus.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je n'ai pas suffisamment de temps...

M. John Knubley:

Le Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation a été augmenté de 99,3 millions de dollars...

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

La question que je voulais vous poser était la suivante: vous dépensez beaucoup d'argent des contribuables canadiens pour les entreprises, et je veux donc savoir quel est le nombre d'emplois qui ont été créés? Mais je ne peux pas obtenir tout cela, je vais donc vous demander, parce que nous savons qu'une bonne partie de ces fonds ont été attribués à des sociétés comme Bombardier et que votre gouvernement a déclaré qu'il allait conclure des ententes financières non précisées avec Kinder Morgan pour l'oléoduc... Je me demande si vous avez attribué des sommes provenant du Budget principal des dépenses sous la forme de subventions que vous vous apprêtez à verser à un pipeline qui devait au départ être construit sans aucun apport de fonds publics.

Ou est-ce que vous ne savez pas non plus ceci?

M. John Knubley:

Cela pose des problèmes de divulgation. Nous fournissons régulièrement à tous les Canadiens le montant des investissements faits dans les sociétés et le montant total de ces investissements. Nous faisons cela sur une base globale...

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Et Kinder Morgan? Kinder Morgan...

M. John Knubley:

Non, parce que cela pose un problème de confidentialité lorsqu'on parle d'entreprises particulières, de sorte que nous publions réellement...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Pour ce qui est de Kinder Morgan, comme vous le savez, nous sommes en train d'examiner à l'heure actuelle des mesures législatives et financières de sorte que vous ne trouverez aucune attribution de fonds à cette société dans le budget des dépenses.

(1655)

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Nous ne savons pas le montant des sommes qui ont été attribuées aux sociétés jusqu'ici...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Non, mais nous voulons vous fournir un chiffre exact.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien. L'avez-vous finalement?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous allons vous le donner dans un moment.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

D'accord, mais vous ne faites rien.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui, un de mes collaborateurs est en train de veiller à ce que vous receviez un chiffre exact.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

De sorte que nous ne savons pas combien d'argent nous avons donné aux entreprises.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Non, nous avons ce chiffre. Nous allons vous le fournir.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Pourquoi est-ce que je ne peux pas l'avoir maintenant?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Vous avez posé une question et j'apprécie le fait que vous soyez patiente. Je vous invite à faire preuve encore d'un peu plus de patience. Nous allons définitivement vous fournir cette information. J'aimerais préciser quelque chose pour le compte rendu: nous avons ce chiffre. Nous vous le transmettrons.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je précise que, vous, en tant que ministre, vous êtes chargé d'approuver tout ceci et vous ne savez pas combien d'argent vous avez fourni aux sociétés.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Non, je le sais.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Alors quel est ce montant?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Vous souhaitez obtenir un chiffre précis et nous allons vous le fournir dans un moment.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Et vous, monsieur Knubley; vous êtes également responsable de cet aspect.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C'est la même réponse. Elle n'a pas changé depuis une minute.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

J'essaie, vous le savez, de calculer le nombre d'emplois qui ont été créés...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous allons vous fournir également cette information, c'est certain. Nous allons vous transmettre les contributions et aussi les emplois qui en découlent.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

De sorte que nous ne savons pas combien vous avez dépensé pour...

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous le savons. C'est simplement une question d'obtenir l'information.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Qu'en est-il de Kinder Morgan? Cela ne figure pas du tout dans le budget actuellement.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Comme nous l'avons mentionné, il s'agit du budget des dépenses et il reflète principalement les propositions approuvées par le Conseil du Trésor depuis décembre 2017. C'est la raison pour laquelle il n'y a rien de prévu dans ce budget pour Kinder Morgan.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je crois que j'ai épuisé mon temps de parole. Pouvez-vous répondre à ma question?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous allons vous fournir une réponse dans un moment.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Mais mon temps de parole est écoulé.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Ne vous inquiétez pas. Le Comité va siéger pendant une heure. Nous allons absolument vous fournir cela très bientôt.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons maintenant donner la parole à M. Masse. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je pense que nous allons aborder un sujet plus intéressant.

Pour ce qui est du prix de l'essence, des fonds supplémentaires ont-ils été prévus pour le Bureau de la concurrence ou pour soutenir et pour financer une agence de surveillance des hydrocarbures ou un bureau de l'ombudsman du gaz et du pétrole? J'ai déjà posé cette question à la Chambre des communes. Mon but — et je ne veux pas commencer un débat sur le prix de l'essence et du reste — est de renforcer la transparence et la responsabilité envers les consommateurs. Est-ce que ce budget des dépenses contient des éléments qui permettront de faire ce genre de choses pour les Canadiens.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Malheureusement, il n'y a pas eu de fonds nouveaux attribués pour ceci dans le budget des dépenses.

M. Brian Masse:

Je suis déçu d'entendre cela, parce que j'espérais qu'il y aurait eu au moins une augmentation des fonds accordés au Bureau de la concurrence, mais je vais mettre cela de côté.

J'aimerais parler des préoccupations qui nous ont été transmises au sujet des audiences concernant le droit d'auteur. La Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada semble susciter de nombreuses critiques émanant des diverses parties intéressées. Il y a eu des audiences et des propositions.

Avons-nous prévu des fonds ou des améliorations pour que la Commission du droit d'auteur Canada puisse prendre ses décisions plus rapidement et que nous puissions obtenir des décisions dans un délai convenable.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C'est une excellente question. La réforme de la Commission du droit d'auteur Canada est très importante pour nous. Nous voulons que la Commission du droit d'auteur soit un organisme efficace, transparent et prévisible. Nous allons introduire des changements qui vont régler les difficultés que vous avez soulevées. Nous estimons que c'est ce que souhaite l'industrie.

Et surtout, si vous prenez par exemple la Stratégie nationale en matière de propriété intellectuelle que nous avons annoncée la semaine dernière, nous avons introduit des changements législatifs au régime « d'avis et avis » qui vise également à faciliter les choses pour les consommateurs. Vous avez également mentionné la femme de 85 ans qui a reçu un avis lui demandant de payer une amende pouvant aller jusqu'à 5 000 $. Cela nous paraît inacceptable; nous allons donc introduire d'autres changements dans ce domaine. Il y aura des changements qui vont réformer la Commission pour qu'elle soit plus transparente et qu'elle soit en mesure de rendre ses décisions plus rapidement. Nous proposerons également des changements législatifs pour régler les problèmes associés au régime d'avis et avis.

M. Brian Masse:

J'aimerais poser une brève question de suivi à ce sujet.

Une des craintes que j'ai exprimées dans le cadre de notre examen du droit d'auteur — auquel nous procédons actuellement — est que même si nous présentons un rapport, quel qu'il soit, nous nous demandons s'il y aura suffisamment de temps pour rebrousser rapidement notre chemin et introduire des changements. Il est évident que la Commission du droit d'auteur ne peut rendre rapidement à l'heure actuelle ses décisions faute de ressources. Je voulais simplement le mentionner.

Maintenant que M. Knubley est de retour, vous pourrez peut-être répondre en partie à cette question parce qu'elle concerne le nouveau guichet que vous avez créé. J'ai déjà exprimé des craintes au sujet du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, non pas à cause du Fonds lui-même, mais parce qu'il existait un fonds indépendant pour l'automobile. Cela était différent pour l'aérospatiale, mais il y a maintenant un guichet unique.

Pouvez-vous nous fournir des chiffres au sujet de la façon dont ces fonds sont répartis, en pourcentages? J'ai toujours craint que le secteur de l'automobile reçoive la part du lion. Que pouvez-vous nous dire aujourd'hui à ce sujet?

(1700)

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Le montant total de ce fonds est de 1,26 milliard de dollars. Cela correspond au budget de l’Initiative stratégique pour l’aérospatiale et la défense, l’ISAD, auquel vous avez fait allusion au sujet du secteur de l’aérospatiale, et à celui de l’ancien Fonds d’innovation pour le secteur de l’automobile. Nous avons regroupé ces deux fonds, en y ajoutant également de nouvelles ressources.

Nous venons tout juste de commencer à annoncer des éléments de programmation concernant les projets qui relèvent du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation, le FSI, dont la portée dépasse les définitions habituelles des secteurs de l’aérospatiale et de l’automobile. Je dirais que le secteur de l’automobile se trouve dans une bonne posture. La première annonce que nous avons faite, également l’une des plus importantes, concernait Linamar. Dans ce cas-ci, nous nous sommes engagés à contribuer à la création de 1 500 emplois. Il est encore un peu trop tôt pour vous en dire davantage, parce qu’un processus de sélection concurrentiel est en cours et que nous étudions toute une gamme de propositions différentes les unes des autres. Par le passé, le secteur automobile a obtenu de bons résultats et nous sommes confiants qu’il en sera de même à l’avenir, parce que nous étudions également des investissements importants dans celui-ci. Comme vous le savez, nous n’en sommes encore qu’aux premières étapes. Cela vient tout juste d’être annoncé et nous ne faisons que commencer à mettre en oeuvre quelques projets, mais beaucoup plus sont à venir.

M. Brian Masse:

Nous pouvons les sélectionner individuellement, mais allons-nous trier ceux qui auront accès à ces fonds par secteurs d’activité, où allons-nous simplement dresser une longue liste?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous pouvons préparer la liste de ces entreprises pour que vous, et les autres personnes que cela intéresse, puissiez les classer par secteur d’activité. Au bout du compte, nous allons dresser la liste des différents projets. Il est intéressant de noter que certains de ceux-ci ne relèvent pas nécessairement du secteur de l’automobile, mais que ceux de l’automobile et de l’aérospatiale y collaborent. C’est qu’il s’agit parfois de R-D destinée à des plateformes multiples visant à répondre aux besoins de plusieurs secteurs. Nous pouvons faire de notre mieux pour les classer par catégories. Si vous pensez à la voiture de l’avenir, je fais de même. C’est une préoccupation majeure pour nous, parce que nous voulons également assurer le succès à long terme de l’industrie automobile. Nous nous penchons sur le rôle de l’intelligence artificielle, des technologies propres, des véhicules autonomes et nous veillons à faire les investissements stratégiques nécessaires. Ce sont des sujets auxquels nous accordons beaucoup d’attention dans le cadre du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation afin d’assurer la réussite des mandats actuels dans l’industrie, mais aussi de ceux qui seront confiés aux entreprises du secteur d’ici 10 à 15 ans.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vais maintenant passer à un autre sujet.

Notre comité vient tout juste de publier un rapport sur la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales. Avez-vous des commentaires à nous faire maintenant à ce sujet? Sans surprise, ce document reçoit beaucoup d’attention, non seulement de la part de nos électeurs, mais également des entreprises implantées sur le terrain. Aimeriez-vous prendre une minute pour réagir à la publication récente de ce rapport?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je tiens tout d’abord à vous remercier.

Comme j’ai déjà eu l’occasion de vous le dire à la suite de la publication de votre rapport sur la propriété intellectuelle, vos commentaires et vos conseils se sont révélés fort utiles lorsque nous avons structuré la première Stratégie nationale en matière de propriété intellectuelle du gouvernement. À l’ère de cette nouvelle économie du savoir, cette stratégie était attendue depuis longtemps.

Quant aux investissements en connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées du Canada, ils sont toujours prioritaires pour notre gouvernement. C’est pourquoi nous avons présenté le programme Brancher pour innover, qui est également inscrit dans le Budget principal des dépenses. Il s’agit d’un programme de 500 millions de dollars devant permettre la construction d’une infrastructure Internet de base en fibre optique.

Une caractéristique astucieuse de ce programme est qu’il tire tout le parti possible du financement du secteur privé. L’investissement total dépassera le milliard de dollars. Ce programme va aider au-delà de 700 collectivités, y compris celles qui sont réellement éloignées et très rurales, mais nous espérons construire sur cette base. C’est dans cette perspective que nous avons annoncé, par exemple, l’utilisation des technologies en orbite basse terrestre qui, là aussi, peuvent venir en aide à ces communautés rurales éloignées pour combler les retards dans ce domaine.

Nous analysons les possibilités offertes par la technologie. Nous envisageons un financement traditionnel dans le domaine des fibres optiques. Nous cherchons à mettre sur pied des partenariats avec le secteur privé. Nous avons également collaboré très étroitement avec les provinces et les territoires pour nous assurer d’harmoniser au mieux les programmes afin de maximiser aussi leurs possibilités. C’est un problème qui retient toujours l’attention de notre caucus. Nous continuerons à procéder à ces investissements.

M. Brian Masse:

Mais quand allez-vous répondre au rapport?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous allons le faire en temps opportun. Nous allons l’analyser et répondrons en temps opportun.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Jowhari.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

Je me permets de rappeler à tous que le temps nous est compté, alors veillons à bien l’utiliser.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Je vais partager le temps dont je dispose avec M. Sheehan.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous souhaite la bienvenue.

Je veux revenir à la discussion lancée par M. Masse au sujet du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation. Dans vos commentaires préliminaires, vous nous avez dit que, depuis son lancement en 2017, le secteur canadien de l’innovation a réagi favorablement à l’instauration du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation. Vous avez souligné un ou deux domaines dans lesquels des financements ont été annoncés. Pouvez-vous nous parler également des retombées de ces investissements dans le programme d’innovation du gouvernement?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

À quel programme précis faites-vous allusion?

M. Majid Jowhari:

Le Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

En vérité, ce fonds a été conçu en tenant compte d’objectifs multiples. Tout d’abord, nous tenons vraiment à miser sur des activités embryonnaires de recherche et de développement. L’un des défis auxquels nous sommes confrontés au Canada est que les investissements en R-D de nos entreprises ne se classent qu’au 22e rang parmi les 34 pays membres de l’OCDE. Nous pouvons faire mieux que cela, et il le faut. Il y a un sentiment de complaisance. Il y a également des défis dans l’environnement qui est le nôtre du fait de l’aversion au risque.

Nous essayons de remettre en circulation les liquidités record qui figurent actuellement sur les bilans et cherchons des façons d’investir en R-D. L’un des principaux objectifs du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation est de mettre sur pied ce partenariat non seulement avec le secteur privé, mais également avec le milieu universitaire et avec les petites entreprises, afin de débloquer une partie de ces liquidités.

L’autre aspect de notre démarche consiste à examiner certaines technologies émergentes et importantes. À titre d’exemple, nous venons de rappeler une annonce déjà faite. Elle concerne en vérité la 5G et la mise en place de son infrastructure, cette plateforme que les petites entreprises pourront utiliser pour tester leurs idées, leurs solutions ou leurs technologies. Les entreprises plus importantes y ont aussi consacré des fonds. Nous voulons que ce projet implique l’Ontario, le gouvernement fédéral et le Québec. C’est là encore un domaine dans lequel les technologies émergentes peuvent réellement se développer.

Nous concentrons nos efforts sur le déblocage de nouveaux fonds, mais également sur les investissements dans des domaines stratégiques importants dans lesquelles la croissance est élevée. Il y a là d’énormes possibilités, en particulier avec la 5G et avec l’Internet des objets. La 5G va aussi jouer un rôle dans les véhicules autonomes, parmi lesquels les véhicules connectés représentent un élément important. De là vient le nom du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation. Nous sommes très stratégiques, mais une fois encore, nous n’imposons pas la forme que ces partenariats pourraient prendre. C’est un choix qui incombe réellement aux entreprises. Il y a des initiatives dirigées par des entreprises collaborant très étroitement avec le milieu universitaire et avec les petites entreprises pour proposer des idées permettant d’investir davantage en R-D, ainsi que dans les technologies émergentes.

(1705)

M. Majid Jowhari:

J’ai une dernière question pour vous sur ce sujet. Le montant du Fonds qui devait être de 15 milliards de dollars a été ramené à 10 milliards de dollars. Je suis sûr qu’il s’agissait de venir en aide à quantité d’entreprises.

Pouvez-vous nous parler brièvement d’un ou deux des avantages imputables à cette diminution des fonds?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

La diminution de quels fonds?

M. Majid Jowhari:

Je parle de la réduction des fonds de 15 milliards de dollars à 10 milliards de dollars.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Cette mesure a été motivée par la volonté de voir davantage d’activité. Nous voulons voir davantage de concurrence. Nous voulons voir davantage d’entreprises y participer.

Comme vous le savez, par le passé, ces fonds avaient été affectés à deux grands secteurs de notre économie. Ce sont des secteurs importants. Celui de l’aérospatiale est absolument essentiel, et il en est de même du secteur de l’automobile. À mon avis, ils vont continuer à participer de façon active à ce fonds, mais nous avons ouvert l’accès à celui-ci à d’autres secteurs.

Nous sommes d’avis que les critères que nous avons mis en place nous permettent réellement d’avoir des effets sur des domaines à forte croissance. C’est ainsi que, lorsque j’étais à Vancouver, il y a quelques semaines, je me suis intéressé aux technologies des cellules souches dans une société canadienne. Comme vous le savez, nous avons découvert les cellules souches dans les années 1960. Il y avait au début un savoir-faire canadien et des recherches canadiennes, que nous commercialisons maintenant. Notre investissement de 22,5 millions de dollars va permettre de créer 800 nouveaux emplois. Nous sommes vivement intéressés par ces investissements stratégiques. Encore une fois, cela va au-delà des secteurs traditionnels de l’aérospatiale et de l’automobile, qui sont importants, dans un domaine qui offre une forte croissance. Ce sont des emplois de bonne qualité, en particulier parce que ces entreprises mettent en place des stratégies énergiques de propriété intellectuelle. En moyenne, elles offrent des salaires plus élevés de 16 %. Ce sont les types d’emplois pour des citoyens de la classe moyenne dont nous parlons, et ce sont là les types d’investissements que nous voulons voir se multiplier.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

Monsieur Sheehan, nous vous écoutons.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Dans votre exposé, vous nous avez parlé de l’Initiative des supergrappes d’innovation, l’ISI. Nous savons tous que ces supergrappes ont attiré davantage de candidats qu’elles ne pouvaient en accueillir. Dans certains endroits, comme Sault Ste. Marie, et ailleurs d’après d’autres députés, des entreprises qui s’ignoraient depuis longtemps ou qui n’avaient jamais eu de relations auparavant ont commencé à se parler, y compris avec des partenaires des collèges et des universités.

Ce que j’aimerais que vous me disiez, monsieur le ministre, alors que le nombre de ces supergrappes n’est que de cinq, c'est ce qu’il advient des autres idées apparues ici et là qui n’ont pas été retenues? Les organismes régionaux de développement économique seront-ils en mesure de jouer un rôle dans les partenariats pouvant découler de certaines de ces idées? Comment se présente le financement de ces organismes régionaux de développement économique dans le budget de 2018? Pouvez-vous nous le décrire?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Les organismes régionaux de développement économique jouent un rôle essentiel dans l’ensemble de notre programme gouvernemental, en particulier dans notre programme économique, parce que nous voulons que les avantages profitent au plus grand nombre et non pas seulement à quelques-uns. Cela ne doit pas toucher uniquement le Canada urbain. Nous voulons que les régions rurales éloignées du Canada réussissent également.

C’est pourquoi nous avons combiné ces portefeuilles. C’est pourquoi nous leur avons conféré une plus grande importance. C’est pourquoi nous avons accru le financement d’un grand nombre de ces organismes de développement régional sur plusieurs budgets successifs.

Vous verrez que ces budgets principaux des dépenses tiennent compte des engagements ultérieurs de hausse pris avant 2017, mais comme vous l’avez constaté également dans le dernier budget, nous avons accru le financement consacré aux organismes de développement régional de 511 millions de dollars. Il s’agit de mettre à leur disposition davantage de ressources pour mieux coordonner ces initiatives. Qu’il s’agisse de l’Initiative des supergrappes ou du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation, ou encore des Solutions innovatrices Canada, nous voulons nous défaire de ces structures traditionnelles. C’est pourquoi tout a été regroupé dans un seul ministère afin d’assurer une meilleure coordination, une meilleure harmonisation, de meilleures possibilités d’avenir et, une fois encore, pour dépasser les limites des centres urbains traditionnels afin de nous assurer que tout le Canada en profite vraiment. Vingt pour cent de notre population réside en dehors des centres urbains et nous voulons nous assurer que, à l’avenir, ils réussiront dans cette nouvelle économie numérique.

Nous sommes convaincus que le financement additionnel des organismes de développement régional leur permettra de disposer des ressources nécessaires pour mieux coordonner certaines des initiatives que j’ai évoquées.

(1710)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je vous remercie.

C’est tout pour moi.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Rempel, la parole est maintenant à vous. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien. Avons-nous les chiffres?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Me demandez-vous quelle est la part du total de 7,8 milliards de dollars qui est ensuite réaffectée à ces contributions?

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Non. Quel est le montant total des contributions directes aux entreprises à but lucratif de tous les ministères relevant de votre autorité pour la période couverte par ce budget? Je ne parle pas ici du montant de 7,8 milliards de dollars pour l’ensemble du portefeuille.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Tous ceux-ci composent l’intégralité du portefeuille. Je veux simplement que vous sachiez bien que nous travaillons à partir des mêmes prémices.

De ce total, 5,5 milliards de dollars de tous les portefeuilles combinés sont consacrés aux subventions directes et aux contributions.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Ce montant de 5,5 milliards de dollars est bien destiné aux entreprises à but lucratif?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C’est exact.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien d’emplois à temps plein ont été créés dans le secteur privé pendant la période couverte par ces dépenses?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous allons connaître sous peu la répartition précise, mais je vous dirai que, dans l’ensemble, on parle sans aucun doute de création de dizaines de milliers d’emplois.

Je viens tout juste de donner un exemple…

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Dans quels secteurs d’activité?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Dans toutes les industries parce que…

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Vous pouvez me trouver sceptique, mais avez-vous le nombre précis d’emplois créés?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Non. Nous procédons actuellement au décompte pour pouvoir vous donner leur nombre exact, mais je peux vous dire tout de suite que ces 5,5 milliards de dollars ont permis de créer des dizaines de milliers d’emplois.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Où?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Dans toute l’économie.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

À quel endroit?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Dans quelle région voulez-vous que je cherche les chiffres?

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Dans quels secteurs d’activité ? Où sont ces emplois?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Donnez-moi le nom d’un secteur d’activité.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Par exemple, combien d’emplois ont été créés en Alberta avec ces 5,5 milliards de dollars?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Ce n’est pas un secteur d’activité. C’est une région.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

C’est vrai, mais vous m’avez demandé où, alors…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Depuis la dernière élection, soit depuis 2015, plus de 600 000 emplois ont été créés dans l’économie canadienne. Il s’agit, pour la plupart, d’emplois à temps plein.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Oui, mais je vous ai demandé…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

En Alberta, si vous me laissez terminer ma phrase, plus de 50 000 emplois ont été créés.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je ne crois pas que vous…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Vous m’avez demandé les chiffres en Alberta.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Mais ce que je vous ai demandé… Vous avez dépensé 5,5 milliards de dollars qui sont allés dans les poches des entreprises. Ce que je vous demande est, avec cet argent, combien d’emplois ont été créés pour lesquels vous pourriez dire: « J’ai dépensé ce montant et voici un emploi qui a été créé. »

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Comme je l’ai déjà dit, si vous voulez regarder la performance d’ensemble, depuis que nous formons le gouvernement, plus de 600 000 emplois ont été créés…

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Non, mais…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Il s’agit pour la vaste majorité de ceux-ci d’emplois à temps plein.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Donc l’économie crée des emplois. C’est bien ça?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C’est exact, et vous soulevez là un point fort intéressant.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Donc, je vous demande…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Permettez-moi d’insister sur ce point à votre intention.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Non. Je veux une réponse à ma question.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous avons procédé à ces investissements…

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Non et non. Je veux une réponse à ma question.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Ce n’est pas directement relié à ceci. Nous tirons également parti de l’appui du secteur privé.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Vous nous avez dit que la croissance de l’économie n’est pas directement imputable à ces 5,5 milliards de dollars.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C’est en partie cela. Nous créons les conditions.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien et où? Vous avez parlé de dizaines de milliers d’emplois.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Il y en a eu 50 000 de créés en Alberta.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Étaient-ils directement imputables à ces dépenses de 5,5 milliards de dollars?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui, en partie.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien étaient dus directement à ces dépenses?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Il n’y a pas de corrélation directe. Comme vous le savez, la création d’un emploi dépend d’une combinaison de facteurs.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je trouve que pour des dépenses de 5,5 milliards de dollars, nous devrions être en mesure de dire…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Ce sont les entreprises qui décident où elles vont investir. Si divers paliers de gouvernement examinent…

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Que pensez-vous de ceci ? Essayons une autre formulation.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

D’accord.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien d’emplois ont été créés chez Bombardier à la suite de l’investissement de 372 millions?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je crois savoir que c’est 3 000.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Des emplois à temps plein.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C’est exact. Des emplois bien rémunérés puisque, en moyenne, les salaires y dépassent de 60 % la moyenne de ceux des industries connexes…

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Ont-ils été créés directement du fait de cet investissement de 372 millions de dollars?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Tout à fait. C’est exactement cela. C’est le secteur de l’aérospatiale.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je reviens aux effets du reste des 5,5 milliards de dollars. Combien d’emplois ont été créés en Alberta?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Comme je vous l’ai déjà dit, 50 000.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

À même les 5,5 milliards de dollars.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Oui. Nous allons obtenir ces chiffres pour vous. Vous le savez. Vous vouliez le nombre total d’emplois. Plus de 50 000 emplois ont été créés en Alberta depuis que nous formons le gouvernement.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Nous nous penchons sur le Budget principal des dépenses et les 5,5 milliards de dollars destinés aux entreprises privées. Vous ne nous dites pas combien…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Non. Ce n’est pas que je ne vous le dirai pas. Vous me demandez ces chiffres sur une base géographique, et nous allons vous les communiquer. Je ne dis pas ne pas vouloir vous les donner. Vous nous demandez de vous les donner selon d’autres critères. Vous voulez savoir quelles ont été les répercussions des investissements que nous avons faits dans une région donnée? Soyez certaines que nous allons vous donner les chiffres précis, comme nous l’avons fait pour les subventions et les contributions.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Très bien. Venons-en maintenant aux supergrappes…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous sommes tout à fait ouverts et très transparents.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien d’emplois ont été créés en Alberta avec les supergrappes?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous sommes en train de mettre la dernière main à l’entente de contribution et il serait donc difficile de vous dire aujourd’hui avec précision le nombre d’emplois qui ont été créés. En nous fiant au plan opérationnel, je peux vous dire immédiatement que plus de 50 000 emplois ont été créés.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Où?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Dans tout le pays… il y a des plateformes. C’est ainsi que l’intelligence artificielle à des répercussions sur les secteurs du commerce de détail, du pétrole et du gaz, des exploitations agricoles, de l’agriculture. Les secteurs de l’aérospatiale et de l’automobile en profitent aussi.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Mais quand j’examine la situation dans ma province, je vois que vous avez approuvé beaucoup de projets différents…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je ne fais que dire pour l’instant que ces emplois ont été créés dans toute l’économie.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Mais vous n’avez pas été en mesure de nous dire combien d’emplois devraient être créés en Alberta.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Cinquante mille emplois ont été créés en Alberta depuis que nous formons le gouvernement.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Ces emplois sont-ils liés directement à ces 5,5 milliards de dollars?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Cela fait partie de notre stratégie. Les subventions et les contributions ne sont pas les seuls outils dont nous disposons comme gouvernement pour soutenir l’économie.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Faisons une soustraction…

(1715)

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Prenons, par exemple, les chiffres de BDC lorsque l’Alberta a connu une période difficile…

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Combien de ces 50 000 emplois ont été créés indépendamment de votre intervention?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Que voulez-vous dire par « créés indépendamment de votre intervention »?

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Si une entreprise donnée a créé un emploi, je suppose qu’il sera comptabilisé dans votre chiffre.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Notre tâche est d’instaurer des conditions favorisant la réussite des entreprises. Il y a parfois des corrélations directes et parfois des corrélations indirectes. En règle générale, nos politiques ont eu pour effet d’instaurer un milieu propice qui nous a permis d’enregistrer des taux record de croissance du PIB et de création d’emplois, et un taux de chômage qui n’avait pas été aussi bas depuis de longues années, soit 5,8 %.

L’hon. Michelle Rempel:

Je vais poser ma question de façon différente.

Le président:

Je n’aime pas devoir vous couper la parole, mais le temps dont nous disposions est épuisé.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Graham, pour cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Ma vision des choses est conforme à ce que nous avons observé, dans ma région, en passant d’une pénurie d’emplois à une pénurie de travailleurs, ce qui conduit à penser qu’il y a des mesures qui sont efficaces. Cela me plaît.

M. Frank Baylis:

Voilà qui est bien!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je tiens à vous remercier du travail extraordinaire que vous avez fait en nous aidant à éliminer la dépendance du Canada rural envers les signaux de fumée et les pigeons voyageurs pour passer à Internet, ce que vous appelez peut-être accès par ligne commutée et communication satellite.

Nous avons passé des années sous le régime de ce que j’appelle « innover pour se connecter ». Mon domicile ne dispose que d’un système sans fil de transmission à faible vitesse et peu fiable. Il se rend d’un lac au suivant, jusqu’à une maison reliée à un système de câblodistribution. Il arrive même parfois que vous ayez accès à Internet. C’est fantastique.

Je veux aussi vous remercier des commentaires que vous avez faits à M. Masse concernant le programme Brancher pour innover. À mes yeux, c’est un programme visionnaire. Auriez-vous d’autres commentaires à ajouter à ce que vous lui avez dit sur ce programme avant que j’aborde quelques sujets connexes.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Notre vision en la matière est très claire. Nous voulons venir à bout de cette fracture numérique. Nous estimons que les investissements dans Internet à haute vitesse dans les communautés rurales et éloignées constituent la solution à des problèmes qui posent parfois des questions de vie ou de mort. L’accès à Internet à haute vitesse est absolument essentiel pour les entreprises qui veulent être présentes en ligne et croître. Il est essentiel pour les personnes qui veulent profiter d’une éducation de niveau mondial. Il est essentiel pour la prestation de services de santé dans certaines communautés. Il y a quantité de raisons importantes pour vouloir corriger cette fracture numérique. C’est pourquoi nous sommes très fiers d’avoir mis ce programme en oeuvre. C’est une première étape vraiment efficace. Nous voulons continuer à en faire plus. Nous sommes désireux de connaître vos réflexions et vos idées sur ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’en ai des tonnes.

Vous avez parlé de la fracture numérique. Je trouve que c’est là un point réellement important. Un élément dont vous parlez beaucoup moins est le service de téléphonie cellulaire. C’est une catastrophe dans le Canada rural, au moins dans ma circonscription. Ce service est aussi catastrophique que les services Internet.

Cherchez-vous des solutions novatrices pour résoudre ce volet de la fracture digitale dont on parle beaucoup moins?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je crois que l’un des avantages du programme Brancher pour innover est, entre autres, qu’il fournit l’infrastructure de fibre optique dont ont besoin les tours de téléphonie cellulaire. Nous pensons que ce programme devrait contribuer à résoudre le problème que vous venez de soulever. Nous sommes d’avis que, dans de nombreux cas, cette infrastructure de fibre optique permettra de mettre en place ces tours de retransmission pour téléphones cellulaires qui, elles, permettront de s’attaquer à ce problème.

Nous savons qu’il y a d’autres mécanismes en place, que d’autres solutions existent, et nous sommes très ouverts à toutes celles qui peuvent être efficaces. Je sais que vous avez joué un rôle de leader en discutant de ces questions en caucus et en comité. Tout comme dans les cas de la propriété intellectuelle et de la connectivité à large bande, comme dans celui de votre étude sur la fabrication, nous apprécions réellement le travail de votre comité. Il contribue réellement à modeler quantité de nos programmes et de nos politiques.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’en suis bien conscient.

Il y a une pénurie mondiale de programmeurs. Elle est aussi importante que la pénurie mondiale de pilotes. Quand nous disons que nous branchons pour innover, pour moi, résoudre le problème des programmeurs est un élément important du volet innovation de cette équation. C’est un problème qui est lié de façon inextricable au programme visionnaire CodeCan: êtes-vous en mesure de nous faire un point détaillé de la situation de ce programme: où en sommes-nous, comment améliorer son caractère inclusif, comment va-t-il amener une nouvelle génération à comprendre la technologie et comment l’argent est-il dépensé? Comment se passent vos propres leçons de programmation?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

J’ai encore un peu de mal en programmation. Ces jeunes se montrent meilleurs tacticiens que moi à tous les coups.

La semaine dernière, je me trouvais à Mississauga pour annoncer le lancement d’une initiative, la code:mobile, qui nécessite l’achat d’une flotte de véhicules pour permettre d’aider des enfants à apprendre la programmation, où qu’ils habitent.

L’objectif de ce programme est en vérité fort simple: un million d’enfants vont apprendre à programmer. Le budget de ce programme est de 50 millions de dollars. Soixante mille enseignants vont aussi recevoir des outils pour aider leurs étudiants à mieux apprendre la programmation. Il ne s’agit pas ici uniquement de programmation, mais de littéracie et de compétences numériques. Nous voulons nous assurer que les jeunes maîtrisent les outils dont ils auront besoin pour réussir dans la nouvelle économie numérique.

Cet investissement doit également permettre de consolider nos infrastructures nationales. Parmi les emplois qui seront créés, nombreux sont ceux qui toucheront à la programmation ainsi qu’aux sciences, à la technologie, à l’ingénierie et aux mathématiques, les STIM. Nous voulons aussi qu’un plus grand nombre de filles apprenne la programmation. Par le passé, dans les programmes de STIM, nous comptions 38 % de diplômées mais elles n’étaient plus que 21 % dans ces domaines sur le marché du travail. Nous pouvons et devons faire mieux, non seulement pour attirer davantage de femmes dans le domaine des STIM, mais aussi pour nous assurer qu’elles y restent, parce qu’il offre des emplois mieux rémunérés, et parce que ce domaine laisse aussi entrevoir de fortes possibilités de croissance. C’est la raison pour laquelle l’apprentissage de la programmation est également une priorité pour les peuples autochtones. Par le passé, ils n’avaient pas toujours accès à ces possibilités. Nous sommes bien décidés à rendre certains de nos programmes plus inclusifs.

(1720)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie du leadership que vous exercez dans ce domaine.

Mon temps de parole est épuisé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Lloyd.

Vous disposez de trois minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le ministre Bains et M. Knubley d’être venus nous rencontrer. Je tiens à rappeler, pour que cela figure au procès-verbal, que vous vous êtes engagés à nous fournir la part de ces 5,5 milliards de dollars qui iront à des entreprises albertaines, ainsi que le nombre d’emplois directs qu’elle va permettre de créer.

J’en viens maintenant, monsieur le ministre, à ma question. Vous êtes responsables du dossier de la prise de contrôle d’Aecon envisagée par la China Communications and Construction Company, une société d’État chinoise, qui, à mon avis, constitue une menace pour la viabilité des petites et moyennes entreprises. C’est ainsi qu’elle a soumissionné récemment pour faire l’acquisition de l’usine de traitement d’eau de la Nation crie de Samson. Elle a proposé environ un million de dollars, une offre dépassant de beaucoup celle des sociétés canadiennes. Cela pose une menace bien réelle pour le centre de construction.

Avez-vous, monsieur le ministre, entamé l’étude des répercussions de cette prise de contrôle d’Aecon par une société d’État chinoise sur les petites et moyennes entreprises du Canada.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Comme vous le savez, je suis responsable de l’application de la Loi sur Investissement Canada. Il m’incombe donc de réaliser une analyse détaillée des avantages économiques nets d’un projet. Je vais me pencher attentivement sur les questions que vous venez de soulever, et elles font certainement partie de celles que nous allons analyser.

Cette analyse comprend deux volets. Il y a celui des retombées économiques, et celui des critères à respecter et de l’analyse à faire. Comme vous le savez, toutes les transactions de cette nature font l’objet d’un examen de la sécurité nationale. C’est un processus d’analyse en plusieurs étapes qui n’est pas nouveau. Il m’amène à collaborer très étroitement avec le ministre Goodale et avec les dirigeants de nos organismes de renseignements de sécurité…

M. Dane Lloyd:

Que vous a dit votre analyse des répercussions économiques de ce projet? Comment se manifesteront-elles?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

À ce jour, le processus d’analyse se poursuit et nous faisons preuve de toute la vigilance voulue. C’est un processus rigoureux et efficace. Nous n’avons pas encore pris de décision finale.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Cela fait des mois que nous savons que cette prise de contrôle est en cours, alors avez-vous une idée des répercussions…

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

J’ai beaucoup d’idées et je dispose de beaucoup de renseignements, mais je ne suis pas actuellement en mesure de vous les communiquer, pas avant que nous ayons terminé notre analyse. Je n’entends pas spéculer sur les résultats de celle-ci, tant que nous n’aurons pas pris de décision finale, mais je peux vous assurer que cette décision finale obéira toujours aux intérêts économiques de notre pays. Cela a toujours été le cas par le passé et nous continuerons à procéder de la même façon à l’avenir.

M. Dane Lloyd:

L’ancien directeur du SCRS, Ward Alcock, a déclaré récemment que la prise de contrôle d’Aecon menacerait notre sécurité nationale. De plus, celle-ci limiterait les possibilités de coopérer avec notre principal partenaire commercial, les États-Unis. Nous avons déjà connu ce type de problème dans le cadre du projet de pont Gordie-Howe dont la construction devrait bientôt commencer.

Estimez-vous que cette prise de contrôle est dans l’intérêt supérieur du Canada?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Nous procédons en ce moment à cette analyse. Je respecte nos spécialistes et leurs opinions. J’ai une grande confiance en eux, qu’il s’agisse du dirigeant actuel du SCRS, de la dirigeante de la GRC ou de ceux d’autres organismes de sécurité. J’apprécie leurs avis et leurs commentaires que j’ai toujours écoutés et suivis. Comme je l’ai déclaré à la Chambre des communes, je peux vous redire sans équivoque que je n’ai jamais compromis et ne compromettrai jamais notre sécurité nationale. Avant de prendre une décision, quelle qu’elle soit, et de la faire connaître, nous allons mener à terme notre analyse en toute diligence.

M. Dane Lloyd:

C’est une déclaration intéressante parce que nous avons vu récemment le cas de la société de satellites Norsat qui a été vendue sans examen de la sécurité nationale. Comment pouvez-vous dire que vous prenez la sécurité nationale au sérieux quand une société de satellites n’a même pas été soumise à un tel examen?

Le président:

Je vous saurais gré de répondre très brièvement.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Chaque examen implique un processus à plusieurs étapes de détermination de la sécurité nationale. Nous suivons toujours ce processus. Comme je l’ai dit, j’ai toujours suivi les conseils de nos dirigeants des organismes de sécurité nationale.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Baylis. Vous disposez de trois petites minutes.

M. Frank Baylis:

Très bien. Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d’être venu vous entretenir avec nous.

Au bout du compte, l’économie de l’innovation sur laquelle vous avez travaillé si intensément repose sur la propriété intellectuelle. C’est pourquoi j’étais très heureux de prendre connaissance des annonces que vous avez faites la semaine dernière sur notre stratégie d’innovation, touchant précisément à la propriété intellectuelle. J’ai observé que vous avez repris quantité de points des rapports de ce comité, et je tiens à vous en remercier. Je crois que les spécialistes qui ont témoigné devant nous l’apprécieront.

Pouvez-vous nous entretenir un peu du marché de la propriété intellectuelle? C’est l’une des pierres angulaires de vos annonces. Pouvez-vous nous donner un peu plus de détails à ce sujet.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Vous avez tout à fait raison. C’est la première Stratégie nationale en matière de propriété intellectuelle que le gouvernement fédéral a déployée. Dans le contexte d’une nouvelle économie du savoir, elle était attendue depuis longtemps, et je tiens encore une fois à vous remercier de votre travail.

Comme vous le savez, cette stratégie va disposer d’un budget de 85,3 millions de dollars, et elle bénéficiera donc de ressources substantielles. Elle comporte trois éléments. L’un d’eux est, bien sûr, la littéracie de la propriété intellectuelle, qui est d’une importance toute particulière pour les petites entreprises. Il n’y a actuellement que 9 % de ces entreprises à s’être dotées d’une stratégie de la propriété intellectuelle et seulement 10 % à posséder des éléments de propriété intellectuelle. C’est là tout un défi pour nous. Si vous comparez la situation entre les États-Unis et le Canada, pour les 500 entreprises inscrites sur la liste de Standard & Poor’s, 84 % de leurs actifs tiennent à leurs propriétés intellectuelles, alors que ce n’est le cas que de 40 % parmi les 30 plus importantes inscrites à la Bourse de Toronto. Nous sommes vraiment en retard par rapport à nos homologues américains dans le domaine de la propriété intellectuelle.

Nous avons pris diverses mesures. Nous avons examiné les trolls et les mauvais comportements en la matière. Nous avons aussi mis en place un collectif de brevets pour l’avenir, afin de faire face aux problèmes et de fournir des ressources plus efficaces pour faire face à ceux cherchant à nous nuire.

Le marché de la propriété intellectuelle est une initiative fort intéressante que ce comité a soulignée. C’est en vérité un guichet unique pour les entreprises, pour leur permettre de déterminer les divers brevets qui existent d’une façon plus claire et plus concise et de voir comment elles peuvent en tirer le meilleur parti dans leurs propres activités. Les détenteurs de brevets sont également en mesure de concéder de meilleures licences, de retirer des revenus plus intéressants et d’encaisser des droits sur leurs brevets.

(1725)

M. Frank Baylis:

Il faut faciliter tout cela.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

C’est exactement ça. L’idée est de mettre à leur disposition un guichet unique, un marché pour les détenteurs de brevets qui permette réellement aux entreprises, aux universités et aux détenteurs de propriété intellectuelle de collaborer.

M. Frank Baylis:

Un autre point qui s’est dégagé lors de nos consultations a été le besoin d’aider nos petites et moyennes entreprises à avoir une meilleure connaissance des questions de propriété intellectuelle pour relever un peu leur niveau en la matière. J’ai constaté qu’il y a une importante initiative dans ce domaine. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur ce que vous faites précisément pour aider les petites et moyennes entreprises à se familiariser davantage avec les questions de propriété intellectuelle et à relever leur niveau en la matière.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

L’Office de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada, l’OPIC va fournir des ressources additionnelles pour la formation. Nous allons tenir des cliniques juridiques sur la propriété intellectuelle. Nous sommes très soucieux de l’état actuel de ces problèmes. Nous convenons que tout particulièrement les petites entreprises ont besoin d’avoir une stratégie pour affronter les questions à la matière. Elles n’en sont pas pleinement conscientes et cela laisse la place à des trolls et à des personnes malintentionnées qui peuvent nuire à leurs entreprises en leur extorquant des fonds pour des propriétés intellectuelles qui, par exemple, n’ont pas été enregistrées.

Le président:

Je suis navré, mais je vais devoir vous interrompre.

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Ce qu’il importe que vous sachiez est que nous allons mettre en oeuvre un programme complet pour promouvoir la littéracie et les outils dont les entreprises ont besoin pour se doter d’une stratégie opérationnelle efficace en matière de propriété intellectuelle.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous avons entendu la sonnerie d’appel. J’aimerais avoir votre consentement unanime pour donner à M. Masse ses deux dernières minutes.

Très bien, je vous remercie

Monsieur Masse, profitez bien de vos deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vous remercie. Dans ces conditions, je n’ai d’autre choix que de vous poser une question qui intéresse ma propre collectivité, mais c’est une question de portée nationale, puisqu’il s’agit du pont Gordie-Howe. Quelqu’un y a fait allusion dans le cadre de la discussion sur Aecon et la Loi sur Investissement Canada. Le deuxième des trois soumissionnaires, SNC-Lavalin, fait l’objet d’une enquête criminelle, et il y en a un troisième.

Est-ce que cela vous préoccupe ou avez-vous dans ce cas-ci un plan de secours? Le choix du soumissionnaire doit se faire en juin entre ces trois groupes. L’un fait l’objet d’un examen par Investissement Canada, le deuxième fait l’objet d’une enquête criminelle. Dans le cas du troisième, nous ne savons encore rien de cette nature, mais avez-vous un plan de secours pour faire face à d'éventuels problèmes?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Je crois que le processus est bien avancé. Nous avons affirmé très clairement notre appui à la construction de ce pont. Je n’ai pas connaissance pour l’instant d’un plan B ni d’un plan C. Je sais que les propositions de ces trois consortiums sont analysées dans le cadre d’un processus concurrentiel.

Dans le cas d’Aecon, par exemple, nous allons procéder comme il se doit, en examinant l’acquisition dont il est question conformément à la Loi sur Investissement Canada. Par contre, comme vous le savez fort bien, nous sommes tout à fait favorables à la construction du pont Gordie-Howe et nous laissons pour l’instant le processus concurrentiel aller à son terme.

M. Brian Masse:

Enfin, vous avez pris un décret concernant le pont Ambassador, appartenant à Matty Moroun, un milliardaire américain.

Je me demande pourquoi. Il détruit ma communauté de Sandwich, qui se trouve à côté du pont et qui n’a bénéficié d’aucune retombée. C’est un problème sérieux. Pourquoi le décret n’a-t-il prévu aucune retombée dans la communauté?

L'hon. Navdeep Bains:

Vous allez devoir attendre ma réponse à cette question. Vous avez bien fait de la soulever. Ce n’était pas notre objectif. Nous voulons nous assurer que le pont Gordie-Howe sera construit. Nous savons bien que, actuellement, le pont Ambassador pose, lui aussi, des problèmes. C’est pourquoi nous sommes partisans du pont Gordie-Howe, mais en ce qui concerne votre question précise sur le décret, nous vous répondrons plus tard et nous allons voir quelles sont les autres mesures que nous pourrions prendre.

M. Brian Masse:

Cela me convient. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Très bien.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, d’être venu nous rencontrer.

Je rappelle à tous que jeudi, nous allons siéger à huis clos pendant la première heure de notre réunion pour discuter de déplacements, et pendant la seconde, nous accueillerons la ministre Chagger.

Merci à tous.

Nous en avons terminé pour aujourd’hui. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 01, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.