header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-01 PROC 100

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome to meeting number 100 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study on the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

We are pleased to be joined this morning by officials from the Translation Bureau at Public Services and Procurement Canada: Stéphan Déry, Chief Executive Officer; and Matthew Ball, Acting Vice-President.

Just before we do that, I have a couple of questions for the committee. First, we received two long articles from the AFN. They are not directly or totally related to the study, but they are on aboriginal languages. We can't distribute them because they are only in English, and they are very thick, so they're not normally translated.

There are two choices. One is that we can put you in touch with the person at AFN if you want the articles, and they can give them to you. The other is that the committee could unanimously agree that we can distribute them in English.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

How big are they? Can they not just be translated? Is that not—

The Chair:

They are fairly—

Mr. Scott Reid:

There must be a practical limit, Mr. Chair, on what we normally translate and what we don't.

The Chair:

I will ask the clerk.

Mr. Scott Reid:

These are obviously above the normal limit. What is the normal limit on things that we translate?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

It depends on what is being submitted to the committee. Normally, for briefs, we will translate up to 10 pages. For anything longer than 10 pages, we will ask for an executive summary, which we will translate.

I think one of these is about 20 pages, and the other one is similar in length.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Personally, I would be okay with translating them. I realize that there is a certain expense involved, but this is probably likely to be germane.

Mr. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NDP):

I think that, as a matter of principle, we should get a translation of the documents. I'm here on a matter of principle trying to get indigenous languages in this House. I'm not going to let that go by. I think the documents should be translated.

The Chair:

Okay. Is that what the consensus of the committee is, to get them translated?

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

You were saying that they're not even that related, so what's the cost going to be? Is there a purpose in our spending that money, or should we just leave it?

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

We have the experts here.

The Chair:

There is one article, “An Aboriginal Languages Act:”—that's the act that's going to come to Parliament—“Reconsidering Equality on the 40th Anniversary of Canada's Official Languages Act.” The other one is an article by someone of Ojibwa and Canadian ancestry who is a member of Nipissing First Nation. It is called “Reconciliation and the Revitalization of Indigenous Languages”.

(1105)

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's hard to tell from the titles whether they are relevant or not. The second one certainly sounds relevant enough to put the effort in.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Whatever the committee wants, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Is there consensus to translate?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay. Thank you.

We're winding down. Thursday is our last meeting with witnesses on this, which we can discuss a bit later. Then, hopefully, right away we can give instructions to the analysts.

I would tell committee, although I'm sure they all understand, that these are functionally our most key witnesses because they are the ones who have to put the idea into practice, into something that can actually technically be done. Hopefully, you will ask a lot of questions of this group because they are the ones who do translation, the ones who have to provide the facilities, the translators, and everything possible.

We will turn it over to Mr. Déry for his opening statement. Then we will have some questions.

Mr. Stéphan Déry (Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Thank you.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, committee members, good morning.

I'd like to begin by acknowledging that we are meeting on the traditional territories of the Algonquin nation.

Thank you for inviting me to appear before this committee to talk about the use of indigenous languages in House of Commons proceedings.

My name is Stéphan Déry and I am the Chief Executive Officer of the Translation Bureau. Here with me is my colleague, Matthew Ball, Vice-President of Service to Parliament and interpretation.

The translation bureau provides translation and interpretation services in indigenous languages to the House of Commons and the Senate on an as-needed basis, when requested by Parliament. For example, during the meetings of this committee of the last few weeks, it is the bureau that ensured interpretation services in indigenous languages. For these reasons, we maintain an up-to-date list of approximately 100 interpreters who work in 20 different indigenous languages.

Before going into greater detail about our services in indigenous languages, allow me to speak briefly about the bureau.[English]

Established in 1934, the Translation Bureau has its foundation in the Translation Bureau Act, which mandates it to serve departments and agencies as well as the two Houses of Parliament on all matters related to the translation and revision of documents, as well as interpretation, sign language, and terminology.

We are the sole in-house service provider to one of the world's largest consumers of translation services, the Government of Canada and Parliament, which makes us a major player in what is, in every sense, a global industry. Our translation services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, via secure infrastructure, and in over 100 languages and dialects.

In concrete terms, the bureau fulfilled approximately 170,000 requests in 2017-18, mostly for translation, or nearly 305 million words for departments and agencies and over 49 million words for Parliament.

In official languages, we provide over 5,000 days of interpretation for Parliament, nearly 7,000 days of conference interpretation, and over 4,500 hours of closed captioning for sessions in the House of Commons, the Senate, and your committees. Lastly, we supply over 9,700 hours of visual interpretation.[Translation]

I now would like to talk to you about what we do for indigenous languages. The data that I just mentioned contextualizes the translation bureau's current capacity in providing services in indigenous languages.

The bureau is well equipped to meet the current demand, in particular through partnerships it has established over time with a number of indigenous organizations. Our mandate is clear: we are here to serve Parliament.

If Parliament chooses to increase the demand for services in indigenous languages, as the exclusive provider of language services, the translation bureau will regard it as its duty to meet that demand.[English]

Requests for services in indigenous languages are few and far between compared with the overall volume of translation and interpretation requests for all languages combined. Thus, of the 170,000 translation and interpretation requests we handled in 2017-18, approximately 760, or 0.5% of the total volume, involved indigenous languages. Of those 760 requests, nearly 85% were for Inuit languages. The other requests were spread among 28 language combinations.

As for interpretation, requests from the House of Commons and Senate committees have totalled 33 days of interpretation in indigenous languages since 2016, primarily in Cree—East and Plains—Inuktitut, and Dene.

(1110)

[Translation]

In 2009, the bureau worked with the Senate on a pilot project aimed at providing interpretation services in lnuktitut to senators Charlie Watt and Willie Adams, stemming from one of the recommendations in the fifth report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament. Pursuant to the affirmation of aboriginal rights of the first nations, the report recommended that the use of lnuktitut be allowed in Senate deliberations, in addition to English and French.

The interpretation services were provided on several occasions, and the senators seemed pleased with the service provided. However, although greater capacity has been established in lnuktitut than other indigenous languages, identifying interpreters with parliamentary experience proved to be a challenge.[English]

I would like now to touch on two operational challenges for the bureau.

First, your committee has discussed the possibility of using remote interpretation services.

The Translation Bureau conducted a pilot project in 2014 to test the viability of such a service. While the results were encouraging, there are still issues that need to be addressed before we can offer this service on a regular basis. The two key issues are audio quality and bandwidths, which can be erratic, resulting in variable audio quality for interpreters and clients alike. We are committed, though, to continuing to explore this possibility further as technology improves.

Second, as other witnesses before this committee have explained, since there are approximately 90 indigenous languages and dialects in Canada, the capacity of skilled interpreters is limited. The translation bureau's ability to assess their language skills is equally restricted.

This capacity is based in part on the limited demand for this service. Should Parliament create a more sustained demand, the bureau would be prepared to play an active role in increasing capacity, in partnership with indigenous communities and organizations. Over time, this service could be offered to Parliament on a regular basis, thus contributing to the preservation of indigenous languages in Canada.[Translation]

I would now like to describe the work the bureau has undertaken to foster new relationships and build new partnerships, in anticipation of an increased demand, which would support the government's objective to renew the relationship between Canada and indigenous peoples.

We have assigned a senior interpreter to assess the bureau's capacity, and then leverage our expertise in linguistic services. We want to develop strategic partnerships to enhance capacity development. To do so, we are in contact with the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Inuit language authority, and the Grand Council of the Crees, as well as with training institutions such as the Arctic College of Canada and the First Nations University of Canada.

We are also working in partnership with the University of Alberta's Canadian Indigenous Languages and Literacy Development Institute, to promote the interpretation field amongst students, over the coming summer.

Since 2003, we have also been working regularly with the Government of Nunavut, among other things to provide terminology training to Inuit translators. The focus of our most recent project, in 2017, was our terminology tool, Termium, for which we created a terminology directory that now contains some 2,300 records in lnuktitut.

In other words, Mr. Chair, we are always looking for new avenues that will allow us to broaden our partnerships and increase our pool of indigenous language translators and interpreters. As indicated earlier, we are meeting the current demand and are taking the necessary steps to build a pool of additional resources.[English]

In conclusion, I'd like to draw your attention to the new vision for the translation bureau, which is to make it a world-class centre of excellence in language services. This vision is notably based on the need to strengthen the bureau's ties with its employees and clients, but also with its partners. It also relies on training and the next generation of language professionals. These are the foundations on which we intend to build, if you, the Parliament, request services from the bureau in indigenous languages on a more consistent basis. Our mandate is clear: we are here to serve Parliament.

In closing, I would like to underscore the work of our interpreter in the interpretation booth near us, thanks to whom today's meeting has taken place in both official languages.

Thank you for your time and attention. I would be pleased to answer any of your questions.

(1115)

The Chair:

Thank you. Meegwetch.

We'll start out with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you for being here.

I'll go right into it.

You said in your opening remarks that translation is provided on request. When Robert-Falcon Ouellette requested translation for his statement in the House, which started this whole process, I'm wondering what happened. Why was he refused and what could have been done differently?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Thank you for the question. I'm pleased to respond.

For us, the more lead time.... As we're not providing these services on a consistent basis, we have to call on external resources to be able to provide the service. When we had the pilot with the Senate in 2009—and this was more constant—we were asking for 48 hours turnaround. There was an intention that this would happen and sometimes, when we couldn't find an interpreter, they would move the committee or they would change the date of the committee, or something like that. The more lead time we have and the more structured the requests are, the better it is since then we have time to find an interpreter. Since there's no continuous demand from Parliament, the interpreters are taking other placements and doing work for other clients.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. However, in this specific case that generated the question of privilege that got us to this debate, he had requested translation services. He offered to provide text to the translation booths, but that was declined. I'm wondering what the rules are and how that can be fixed.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

It could be fixed if we had reasonable notice, so that we can have an interpreter for Cree or Inuktitut, so that they can be interpreted by a real interpreter who understands their language. If you're okay, I'll respond a little bit in French for those— [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Go ahead.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

The interpreters' code of ethics requires them to interpret languages they know, not to mention all the respect we have for Parliament. The text is provided. Today, I gave you a text, but I may have said something else. So there is a correlation. Interpreters need to understand the spoken language, not just read documents that are provided to them.[English]

I know Matthew had a real example where he had to use text.

I'll ask him to explain his example.

Mr. Matthew Ball (Acting Vice-President, Translation Bureau, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Sure.

An interpreter is ethically bound to understand the text that he or she is interpreting, so it would be difficult to ask an interpreter.... They could read the text, but they wouldn't understand it.

I have a good example, personally. I was an interpreter for most of my career. I was working at the Canada Day celebrations and it was broadcast live across the country. In the moments right before a speech was to be read by an elder in an indigenous language, I was given the text and was asked to read this into English. I did that. It was given at the last minute. There was no time for ethical considerations or for me to make a stand and say, no, it's not professional of me to read something I don't understand. I did it.

The elder finished the prayer, and I still had four lines to read. It's a good example of how it's putting both the client and the interpreter, and the original speaker, in a bit of a difficult situation when you're asking them to read something they don't understand.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When you translate as opposed to interpret, you know that in French it's about 13% longer than English. It shouldn't be a surprise that it would finish at a different time.

The question that I asked earlier was based on notice period. For example, if Mr. Saganash gave you notice that he was going to speak Cree in the House next week, would you then have translation, or do the rules not permit it?

(1120)

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

We would have translators to interpret, as we did at this committee in the last few weeks.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're telling me under the current regime we can have translation now in the House.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

You can have interpretation if it's requested from the bureau. We organize for interpretation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

How would a member go about that request? This is a bit new to a lot of us.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

The request, I believe, was made to the....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the chamber, I'm talking about.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

In the chamber, the request would be made to the clerk.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

By whom? Any member?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

It would be by the member. Then it's the process of the chamber that would dictate whether we're providing interpretation or not.

As I've said, we are here to serve. If we're requested by the chamber to provide interpretation services in Inuktitut, or any other language, we'll do our best to ensure that we provide you with the service.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I'll return to Mr. Ball's example of the prayer that was given to him for interpretation. Members are considered honourable by tradition in this place, so if a member provides you with an interpretation, regardless of outside considerations, it would be the member's privilege to be taken at their word.

Would there be any reason you couldn't accept that from a member of Parliament in the chamber, a written translation?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

It speaks more to ethical considerations for the client, the speakers, and the interpreter. You know, in interpreting we sort of have three categories of language. An interpreter has an A language, a B language, and a C language. In the C language, which is the least mastered by the interpreter, they would only interpret passably from C into their A. In A and B the interpreters would work both ways.

If you were to ask me as an interpreter to interpret a language I don't know, it would put me in an ethically difficult situation because I don't understand what I'm saying. The speaker doesn't necessarily have faith in me to render it. In the equation there's not enough certainty to understand the language properly.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, I might come back to you later on.

You also mentioned that you do a tremendous number of languages. Do you do any languages whatsoever that are not either English, French, or indigenous?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

We do multiple languages. In the G7 meeting that will happen soon, we will organize all the languages. We will organize the interpretation for all foreign languages.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you. I'll come back to you in the next round.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses as well.

Previous to serving on this committee, I served on the official languages committee. We had the honour of having your predecessor to that committee a number of times. It's good to have you at this committee today.

Back in December, the CBC reported on information it received through an access to information request. It was a memo about translation services and the potential use of indigenous languages in the new West Block. To date, we haven't seen a copy of that memo.

Is that something you would be able, or willing, to provide the committee, a copy of that memo?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I will have to verify with procedure, but if the procedure permits, then I would be more than happy to provide this memo.

Mr. John Nater:

That's great. Perhaps you could follow up with the clerk.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

If that could be made available to the committee, that would be great.

Mr. Ball, you mentioned some of the ethical considerations and standards an interpreter would have in terms of delivering the interpretation services. I'm assuming there's a written code that is available. I don't know if it is in the collective bargaining agreement or where that would be. Is that something the committee could be provided with?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Do you mean an interpreter's code of ethics?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

The international professional association that governs interpreters is know as AIIC. We can provide that for you. It's public and it's on their website.

Mr. John Nater:

Is there anything in your collective bargaining agreement that would touch on these types of standards, that you would have the right or the privilege to abide by those codes of conduct?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

It wouldn't be in the collective agreement. It would be more the interpreters. All of the interpreters for the bureau have master's degrees and, therefore, are professionals and would abide by the code of ethics in their standard of practice.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Okay.

You mentioned in your opening comments that you helped to secure the interpreters for our committee meetings thus far. Have you had a chance to review those committee meetings? Do you have any thoughts or analysis of how those interpretation services worked thus far from the translation bureau's perspective?

(1125)

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

That's an interesting and important question. The bureau presently has an accreditation process for official languages. All the interpreters who work for the translation bureau have been accredited by the translation bureau to standards that are renowned around the world. We're part of a world organization of conference interpreters, so we have to keep a high standard for official languages.

When we get indigenous languages, it's not the exact same standard, because we don't have—as I was mentioning—the internal capacity to assess in the 90 languages and dialects present in Canada. I'll ask Mr. Ball to explain how we work when we have a request for interpretation in indigenous languages.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Thank you, Mr. Déry.

I'm not sure if I understood your question. Did you ask how it goes from the bureau's perspective?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Did you mean from the perspective of organizing and administering the contracts?

Mr. John Nater:

I meant organizing and quality of the interpretation, as well.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

From the perspective of organizing and administering, I'll be frank. Organizing and administering interpretation contracts can be challenging, depending on the rarity of the language request, but it's something the bureau has been doing—as Mr. Déry said—since 1934, and we're good at it. From an organizational perspective, we felt it was fine.

From a quality perspective—and Mr. Déry was alluding to this—the bureau doesn't have internal capacity. We don't have staff interpreters in most languages of the world. We have staff interpreters and senior interpreters in the official languages, and we cover the most commonly used foreign languages that Canada and the bureau are called upon to serve.

In other languages, when we accredit interpreters, they're what's called “accredited on file”. If my team is asked to provide interpretation for a major diplomatic event.... I don't have a Polish staff interpreter anymore, so I would probably contact chief interpreters from around the world and ask them to recommend Polish interpreters from the worldwide community of interpreters. That's what we call “accrediting on file”.

That's what we do currently with the indigenous languages. When we have a request, we have—as Mr. Déry mentioned—a pool of people who have pre-qualified in indigenous languages that we use frequently in Canada. Right now that number stands at 20 languages and some 100 or so freelancers in our pool. We would typically do that. We would ask for references from knowledgeable members of the community, and that could vary depending on the language.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you so much.

I want to follow up a little bit on the capacity side of things. We understand, from what we have heard so far, that typically most of the indigenous language translation is to English, rather than indigenous languages to French. Is that correct, from your understanding, that it tends to be more indigenous to English, rather than indigenous to French?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I would say we could find interpretation on both sides, given the notice. As Mr. Ball mentioned, it could be more complicated for rare languages and languages that are not spoken.... We know that some indigenous languages are spoken in Canada by from 10 to 100 people, so it's more difficult than for Inuktitut to find interpreters who can interpret from the indigenous language to French or the indigenous language to English. However, with the necessary lead time.... So far we've been able—I would say—to respond to all the requests we have received.

Mr. John Nater:

That leads to the next question regarding relay interpretation, which we've heard a bit about. We've heard that often when it's relayed, there's a loss in translation, for lack of a better phrase. Does the translation bureau have standards or concerns about that relay interpretation? Is it something the bureau tries to avoid at all costs? If not, how do you help to alleviate some of the concerns?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I will ask Mr. Ball to respond. He's the career interpreter.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

You're right, relay interpreting is something we try to avoid when possible, but there are circumstances where it's required. If we had an indigenous language, typically, most of the interpreting of an indigenous language would be done to and from English, because the majority of Canadians are English speakers. It also depends on the contact between the languages. In Quebec, there would be more indigenous languages interpreted to and from French. We try to avoid it when possible.

A good example of this is the G8, which we're currently servicing right now. Where possible, we try to have interpreters who can do French to Japanese and German to Italian, but we can't cover all language combinations, so we do our best.

(1130)

The Chair:

Mr. Saganash.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

My thanks to the witnesses for their very interesting presentations.[English]

Mr. Ball, I can totally relate to the example you gave from a code of ethics perspective. That was an important point to mention.[Translation]

Mr. Déry, I will start with you.

Let's assume that the outcome of the study we are doing is positive and that the committee and Parliament accept the interpretation of indigenous languages in Parliament—which I have been hoping for since my election in 2011, as demonstrated by my discussions with the clerk at the time and with the clerks of the House. When would that happen in Parliament?

Will I be able, within a year and a half—because I will be leaving in a year and a half—to speak Cree and make my speech in Cree in the House during this Parliament?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Thank you for your question. I would be happy to answer it. This is a very important question.

I will assume that the committee agrees with the recommendations made by Mr. Wolvengrey, a witness who appeared before the committee. He recommended that you focus on the interpretation of the four or five best known indigenous languages or of languages spoken by parliamentarians.

The following is just speculation. Parliament could decide to provide interpretation services in an indigenous language once a week, on Fridays, for example. The department I work for will therefore ask for proposals to ensure that we have contract interpreters. They will not be able to say that they are not available to work in Parliament on Friday because they have another contract. Every Friday, or every two weeks, they will serve Parliament by interpreting in the chosen languages.

Thanks to Parliament’s new facilities in the West Block, barriers are coming down. Right now, there are two interpretation booths, as you know. It is therefore difficult to interpret in a third language. Temporary booths should be installed, which would require more equipment. In the new West Block facilities, three booths have been installed. This allows for more interpretation in a third language, whether indigenous or other languages, when there are guests.

Since those barriers are coming down, it should be easier to provide this service if Parliament so requests. It is difficult for me to answer that question, because it is speculation and it will depend on the number of languages that we will be asked to interpret. However, I think it could be put in place quite quickly, unless we are asked to interpret the 90 indigenous languages and dialects, which might be very challenging. If we choose languages for which there are local interpreters, it will be much easier. In addition, if the demand is steady, we can make arrangements more easily to meet requests. Interpreters must also have parliamentary experience, which is very important in Parliament.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you. I see that time is running out.

You mentioned that there are 100 interpreters on your list, and that they can cover 20 indigenous languages.

Are you currently making efforts to add other languages to that list of 20 indigenous languages?

(1135)

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Yes and no. As I said, we started discussions with a number of organizations to see how to promote the interpretation of indigenous languages. We are making these efforts to ensure, as in the case of any other language, that the bureau is ready to meet the demand, if there is a request from Parliament. Our goal is to make sure we have the largest network possible to recruit as many interpreters as possible. From those interpreters, we choose the best ones, with the best parliamentary experience.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Do you provide training and development courses to those 100 interpreters who appear on your list?

We were talking about accreditation earlier. I think Mr. Ball mentioned accreditation. In your opinion, who should evaluate the interpreters' skill level? The officials from Nunavut mentioned to us, including the clerk, that in Nunavut there are four or five levels. I asked who evaluated those interpreters and at what level they were.

Would there be a similar mechanism in Parliament?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I would say that, depending on the scale of Parliament's request, we would put the necessary mechanisms in place to ensure that we meet the demand. The greater the demand, the more mechanisms the bureau will put in place. Right now, we are working with all the indigenous organizations, as Mr. Ball said, to make sure we have references on paper. If the demand is truly great, as I said in my opening remarks, we are ready to commit and work with indigenous communities to ensure that we develop interpretation of this kind as a profession. We are already working on it with the Government of Nunavut. [English]

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Am I done?

The Chair:

Do you have one really short question?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Okay.

Beyond the conclusions of this study, if there were an indigenous person elected who only spoke their indigenous language, and you are here to serve Parliament, would you be obliged to provide interpretation for that person?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

If we have a request by the chamber to provide interpretation, we would provide interpretation.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I'll go to Ms. Tassi now.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Okay.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you both for your presence today and your testimony.

I'd like to follow up on Mr. Saganash's last question along the same line of questioning as Mr. Graham's.

This is new to me. Am I understanding this correctly? If a member is going to speak in the House and asks for interpretation in a certain language, and they provide the text ahead of time, do you provide that interpretation on the member of Parliament's request?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

As I mentioned, if we're asked to provide interpretation in an indigenous or any foreign language and we don't have the internal capacity, as Mr. Ball explained, the member would request it through the chamber. Then the chamber, if they agreed—and that's a process of Parliament—would turn to the translation bureau and tell us that we need interpretation from, say, Inuktitut to English.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

When you say “the chamber”, what do you mean?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

It's Parliament, the clerk and the process internal to Parliament. It's the same as what they did in the Senate for the pilot project. They requested that we provide indigenous language interpretation.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right now you have not ever been asked for that. Even if a member asked for interpretation, you would have needed the clerk to make that request to you before you could provide interpretation.

(1140)

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

We need the administration of Parliament to make a request to us as a service provider because we're here to provide services. We have provided indigenous languages interpretation 33 times in the last two years to Parliament, so it did happen that we were asked to do that.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

With respect to the question of capacity now, I can understand the importance of the code, Mr. Ball, that you mentioned. Just so that I'm clear, is there something in the code that would allow an interpreter to interpret based on a text if the permission was given ahead of time from the organization, the House of Commons? We understand that your code exists, but we are asking that you provide the interpretation based on the text. This goes to capacity. Say, for example, it was too difficult to get with all the dialects of an indigenous language that's spoken and the text is provided to someone to interpret. If the House of Commons said, we would like you to do this and your understanding was that you're just going to interpret based on the text, would your code allow you to do that?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Not to give you a grey answer, but typically a translation is a translation of a text. We would ask the person who's provided the translation to read it. Therefore, the translation bureau could provide the translation of the text and we could read it, yes. But when we're given a text that we haven't translated, for the interpreter, it puts them in an awkward situation ethically because they're reading something they don't necessarily understand.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

With respect to the code, for you to fulfill your obligations under the code, you wouldn't be able to do that. You wouldn't be able to take a text that someone's given to an interpreter and have that interpreter interpret based on that text, not understanding the first language that's being used.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Correct. It would be awkward for someone to read a text they didn't understand.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right, okay.

Do you have any issues with respect to capacity, because this committee has heard testimony with respect to how there are various dialects. I understand and appreciate starting...and maybe the start is on a smaller scale. Could I maybe have your comments on that with respect to what's a reasonable start-up? With respect to dialects, if you had that issue, is there the potential that someone could bring in an interpreter who would be acceptable to you? Is there some sort of process whereby that can happen?

How many languages and what sort of an approach would you suggest to this committee as a start?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Personally, I would suggest we—as in the rest of our lives and in business—start small and build on successes.

Mr. Wolvengrey, a professor of Algonquian languages and linguistics from Regina, who testified here earlier on video conference, mentioned that it would be almost impossible if you were to ask us for 90 languages. But if you start with the languages that are spoken by members of Parliament already, then if you have a guest, we can work on maybe finding an interpreter for that guest.

The first step is the languages that are spoken already by members of Parliament, and then we can start building from there. Then if you have guests who speak a dialect that we don't have, I would say we need advance notice. We haven't refused anybody so far, so with all our connections and partnerships with communities, we have been able to fulfill all the requests.

Now it's been 33 since 2016. It's not 300. But the more structured the approach will be, the more chances we have to fulfill all the requests.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right, okay.

What's your suggestion of a reasonable time? You're saying a reasonable turnaround time. What would that be? It's been suggested 48 hours. Is that a reasonable time for a request?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Yes. Forty-eight hours for requests that are common indigenous languages, and where we have local interpreters, is a lot easier.

Again, if we don't have a constant demand from Parliament, these interpreters are not waiting and sitting at home. In the case of this committee, there was Kevin Lewis who did interpret, and he's not an interpreter we usually call upon.

(1145)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

The interpreter we called upon had another engagement. He couldn't make it. We asked him if he could suggest someone. That referral is how we got Mr. Lewis, who I believe, from what I read in the notes, did a good interpretation. We work with the community to try to find the right interpreter, but if we had a structured demand, that would be a lot easier.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. That's very good.

How long would it take you to get to capacity? Say, for example, that we suggested this to every member in the House who speaks an indigenous language and we offered that member the right to speak in their language. How long would it take you to get up to capacity for us to implement that?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

From my knowledge right now, there are three members of Parliament who speak indigenous languages.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

It wouldn't be too hard for us.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Are you saying that you could do it in a week?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I would propose that we would do that in the new House, as the infrastructure would be there. I don't know when the move is scheduled, but as soon as you would, it would be—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I mean that it would be a lot easier to implement when we have the third booth and the infrastructure to do it, but it could be done in this House.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, and fulfill Mr. Saganash's dream.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go on to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and again, thank you to our witnesses.

We were talking a bit about the hundred or so interpreters you have on file, for lack of a better word. I'm curious about this. Perhaps there would be some way we can do this without releasing personal information, but would we be able to get a profile of those hundred interpreters, without names or whatever, but what languages they speak, their profiles, and perhaps as well where they're located geographically? It would help us in our deliberations.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Absolutely. We would be happy to provide that without names, but with the location, the capacity of the interpreters, and the languages. There are about 20 languages. We will provide that from the information we have. We don't have a major database for that, but we can provide the information.

Mr. John Nater:

That would be greatly appreciated.

Stemming from that as well, you mentioned that many of these interpreters have other jobs. Would you be able to tell the committee what some of those other positions are? Are they in health care? Are they in the justice system? Where would they normally be if they're not interpreting for us?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

That's a question that I don't think we would be able to answer, to be honest. Also, a lot of these interpreters are not necessarily full-time interpreters. There is no profession of interpreter in indigenous languages like there is in official languages, but they also could be community interpreters, or they could do other work that is not related to interpreting.

Mr. John Nater:

I'll follow up a bit on what we talked about in that first round in terms of relay in translation and how there is often that loss in translation. I'm curious to hear if you have any comments on whether it would present a challenge for the Official Languages Act if something is being interpreted from an indigenous language into English and then relayed into French. Would that loss, which we have been told is 20%, give or take, offend the Official Languages Act in terms of having to use a relay translation in those situations?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Thank you for the question. I will try to answer. I may ask my colleague Mr. Ball to continue the answer.

Interpretation is different from translation. It's not word for word. We're not speaking word for word what has been said by the person. Let's say the person says, “one point eight billion, two hundred and sixty-two million, and five hundred and sixty-two”. A good interpreter will probably say “around two billion dollars”.

If they start repeating every single number, they'll lose the context and they'll lose the speaker. That's a big difference. This would be a bad translation: “approximately two billion dollars”. You would have to write down the entire number. But in the interpretation, to give the sense of the message, you would say “two billion dollars”. It's not exactly the same in terms of the Official Languages Act.

The person who is receiving the message would get a sense of the message, of what has been said. I would say that they won't get all the flowers around the message, and maybe they'll lose a few of the colourful statements, but they'll have the intent of the message.

(1150)

Mr. John Nater:

That follows when it's recorded in Hansard. Does the translation bureau do the translation for that as well, in which it would be the exact—

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

That would be the exact number, yes.

Mr. John Nater:

The translation bureau does that entirely for the production of Hansard.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

I want to go back and talk a little about the code of conduct and things like that. I was curious about some of the rules the translation bureau has in terms of working conditions. I know we often see the rotation of interpreters within the House. Are there set rules for how long an interpreter works consecutively before a break, or the length of a workday?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I will ask Mr. Ball to answer the question.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Yes, there are. There are internationally accepted standards, and the bureau abides by them. What you see here in Parliament is typical. The team strength is based on the length of the event, so typically for your meetings, if they're two hours, we may send two interpreters. You're right, the interpreters will spell off in rotation. Interpreting is a cognitively demanding task. We would not expect an interpreter to do her or his best work non-stop for hours on end.

The interpreters also are there to work for their clients, so there are times when we.... These are principles and standards that we respect in theory. If a meeting goes over by 20 minutes we don't usually send in another team. That's a little context for you.

Mr. John Nater:

Are those documents publicly available?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

That's great.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

We're here for process. I want to know if you think what I'm saying here is reasonable. Every member has their spoken indigenous languages documented on arrival in this place. Everyone is given a reasonable notice period for speaking so that someone like MP Saganash can have that right. If we recommend that honourably submitted text be read, how would you handle that, given the conflict between our rules and your ethical rules?

If we make that a rule, how will you take that? If we put it in our Standing Orders that if a member provides the text to the interpretation booth, that it will be read, and that puts you in an ethical conflict, how will you take it?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

I believe the rules state now that the members are to read their statements themselves. If the bureau were to be asked to read statements, it would be made clear that this was a statement provided to be read into the record. I don't think we would make an interpreter speak through the voice of the interpreter. We would make the distinction clear. I don't see an issue with that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's a good point. If a member speaks a language other than English or French and gives the English or French text to the interpreter, and our rules state that you will be obligated to read it, can you do that or is the ethical conflict such that you couldn't do it?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

It could be read, but the interpreter wouldn't characterize it as his or her work. Do you understand the distinction? When the interpreter—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How would they say that? Would they say into the mike, “This is not my work”, and that's it?

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Yes, we'd make an announcement. That's done sometimes in certain specific contexts. Typically, in many of our assignments if a video is going to be played, we normally would make a note saying that the interpretation would resume after the video is finished.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

I think that Mr. Saganash has some more questions for you. I'd like to give him my time, if I could.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

I'm unaware of the relations that you have with the 100 or so interpreters you have on your list. Over time, have you had any conversations relating to the fact that this is a very particular setting, that this is Parliament? Have you had any discussions with them about the difficulty of translating certain concepts?

I speak my language fluently, but there are some words that we use in a parliamentary setting, like filibustering, for example.... I know a lot of chiefs who filibuster all the time, but that's another setting. Certain concepts exist in our setting, the parliamentary setting, that don't exist in indigenous languages. Have you had any discussions to that effect with the interpreters you have right now?[Translation]

You can answer in French, if you wish.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Generally, some of the interpreters we hire and who work on parliamentary committees have little or no parliamentary experience. This is often the case with indigenous languages. In these cases, we send a senior interpreter who supports them during the process. We provide them with background documentation to explain what parliamentary committees are, how meetings are run, the roles of members of Parliament, the chair, the opposition and the interpreter, and the fact that the interpreter speaks in the first person, as the witness who is speaking.

So that's what we are doing right now. As for the unique features of a language and notions of that kind, it is up to the interpreters to be familiar with them and to master them, and to make the transfer between languages and cultures.

(1155)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I imagine that's part of your code of ethics.

Mr. Matthew Ball:

Yes.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We will go on to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think it's actually Mr. Nater.

The Chair:

You're next on the list. Mr. Nater just went.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's fine, but Mr. Nater has some questions to ask.

The Chair:

Okay. That's fine.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

I want to talk a little about technology. I know that the translation bureau has been involved in projects in the past—for example, the Portage tool. What efforts are being made from the technology side of things in terms of developing a capacity on the technological side of things for indigenous languages?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I could come back with additional details, but currently we're working with the National Research Council looking at incorporating English, French, and Inuktitut into machine translation. That's not machine interpretation. It's different.

We're looking at this. As you know, though, Portage is a tool to understand, not necessarily to translate. It's the same thing with any tools we will be looking at, especially for dialect, Inuktitut and others, and indigenous languages. As you heard from many of the witnesses, there's not even consensus on how it should be written, so it's difficult.

As I said, we're working with the National Research Council. We're trying to make progress on that, but I would say that the progress is slow coming.

Mr. John Nater:

The Star Trek universal translator machine isn't in the near future, then.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

In interpretation, definitely not.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay. That's great.

I want to touch a little bit more on the remote translation idea. You had some concerns about that in your opening comments. I've not been in the new chamber since last spring when it was an empty cement block, but I understand that the third translation booth isn't in the chamber itself. Is that your understanding?

One of the concerns we heard is that when someone is interpreting, it's better to see the person who's speaking. If the third translation booth is not physically in the chamber, does that present challenges for interpreters?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

I will have to verify that, because to my understanding, it is there, or it was when I visited the chamber.

As an interpreter, if you don't see the speaker, you can't really use the body language for your verbal intonation. Visual expression is, we say, worth a thousand words. It's important for them to see. It's harder when they are working remotely. It's feasible, but it's harder, especially when they don't see the interlocutor.

Mr. John Nater:

The technology is there, potentially, but the usefulness or ability or capacity to do that would be the challenge. It wouldn't necessarily be the technology.

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

What we have seen with remote interpretation is that when we have somebody from Nunavut, let's say, trying to interpret something in Parliament here, the bandwidth is the biggest issue we have. There's a disconnect. Sometimes the lack of audio quality of the interpretation is extremely difficult for the participant.

Mr. John Nater:

Absolutely. Having briefly been in Iqaluit for a committee meeting and calling back here to talk with a school group, there was about a two-second delay over the line, so I certainly appreciate the challenges there.

That's good, Chair. Thank you.

The Chair:

Does anyone else have any questions? We have one minute left.

Ms. Tassi.

(1200)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The only follow-up question I have is with respect to the suggestion you made about choosing a day—the Friday, for example. Is there an advantage to choosing a day, or is it okay to have it any day as long as you have the 48 hours? Is there some advantage to that?

Mr. Stéphan Déry:

For us in the industry, we have 100 freelancers who work with us right now. If there's a demand that is constant and it requires the translation bureau to hire an indigenous interpreter, then we will have them on staff, just as we do for a lot of our official languages interpreters. We have about 70 of them on staff. We also deal with freelancers. If they're all freelancers, though, and we don't tell them when they're going to be asked to come to Parliament, then they may take other contracts.

So as I was saying, a day or so makes it easier for them to schedule and to arrange their professional life around working in Parliament. You have a lot more consistency and probably a better interpreter and a higher quality interpretation. They will over time develop this parliamentary experience in the language that MP Saganash was talking about.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. It's been very helpful for us that you're making all the arrangements possible for this to occur on a reasonable basis. I think it's very exciting for Parliament and for all of us on the committee.

While we're shifting witnesses, I want to ask the committee something.

We could get our last two witnesses into the first hour of the next meeting, if that's okay. There's one we could do later, which would not interrupt our flow or anything, and that's the Northern Territory of Australia. They're not available the week of May 22, which would be an evening thing, so I'll leave that out for now. On Thursday, if we did our last witnesses in the first hour, would it be okay on Tuesday, then, to give instructions to the analyst for the report?

Some hon. members: Yes.

The Chair: They could basically start now because we don't have a lot left to do. Then we could still go ahead with the Northern Territory if we want. As we did with Costa Rica, if there's any little thing that needs to be added, we could do that.

We'll suspend while we change witnesses.



(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 100th meeting of the committee.

For our second panel, we're pleased to be joined by Jérémie Séror, Director and Associate Dean, Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute, the University of Ottawa. We have Johanne Lacasse, Director General, from the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government; and Melissa Saganash, Director of Cree-Quebec relations, Grand Council of the Crees and Cree Nation Government.

Thank you, all, for being here. It's great that you can make it.

Now we'll have opening statements from each of you, and we'll start with Mr. Séror. [Translation]

Mr. Jérémie Séror (Director and Associate Dean, University of Ottawa, Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute):

Mr. Chair, members of the committee, thank you for inviting me to appear before you today on the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

By way of background, I am the Director of the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute and the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Ottawa. I'm also an Associate Professor.

My main field of research focuses on the educational, social and political dimensions of developing advanced literacies. I am particularly interested in educational approaches that promote the academic and social success of language learners.

My research highlights the importance of languages as a means of socialization and integration. They carry values and cultures. They are often the tool for identity building and social construction par excellence. Learning to use a new language is developing skills that facilitate communication with another person. It is also a way of opening oneself up to new ways of understanding and expressing the world.

Languages are therefore powerful political tools and language policies, which seek to preserve, encourage and develop the multilingual identity of individuals in society; they are seen all over the world as important tools to ensure a better mutual understanding and greater openness to others in this world that is increasingly marked by diversity and the need for “intracultural” and “intralinguistic” exchanges.

This vision of language learning and the benefits of multilingualism is, of course, at the heart of Canada's major policies. Canada has long been a leader in the field of language teaching and language policies that seek to promote French and English bilingualism in our particular context.

In terms of the topic being studied by this committee, although the discussions in Canada have often revolved around the issue of learning French and English, I confirm that universities are now expressing a growing interest in programs and initiatives that also focus on the development of indigenous languages and literacies.

This interest reflects the recommendations of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples in 1996 and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission almost 20 years later. Both of those documents have dealt with the issue of indigenous languages and call for initiatives to stop their decline or, consequently, to encourage their development.

I think there is no doubt that allowing the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons would serve to advance those recommendations.

Allowing the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons would enhance the symbolic status and function of indigenous languages at the federal level. This simple act of making indigenous languages visible and heard as part of the activities of the House of Commons, the elected legislative branch of Parliament, would result in enhancing these languages, the communities attached to them, and the contributions of indigenous peoples to Canadian heritage.

To achieve this goal, it is important to remain flexible and to keep in mind a number of factors, including the great diversity of Canada's first peoples—Inuit, Métis and first nations—their needs and the unique setting of the House of Commons. Nevertheless, the task is not impossible, in my opinion. I think we could, in fact, be inspired by similar initiatives that have been previously taken in Canada.

For example—I'm sure this has already been discussed—the 1988 Northwest Territories Official Languages Act, which is now almost 20 years old, already recognizes in section 6 that: “Everyone has the right to use any Official Language in the debates and other proceedings of the Legislative Assembly.” Subsection 7(3) states that: "Copies of the sound recordings of the public debates of the Legislative Assembly, in their original and interpreted versions, shall be provided to any person on reasonable request.”

Similarly, the 2008 Nunavut Official Languages Act recognizes the same rights. Subsection 4(1) of the act recognizes that: “Everyone has the right to use any Official Language in the debates and other proceedings of the Legislative Assembly.” Subsection 4(3) states: “Copies of the sound recordings of the public debates of the Legislative Assembly, in their original and interpreted versions, shall be provided to any person on reasonable request.”

(1210)



In my opinion, the House of Commons could adopt provisions similar to those of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. We could also envision procedures similar to those proposed by the Senate that allows the use of an indigenous language, and offers simultaneous interpretation and translation services, provided reasonable notice is given.

From the perspective of applied linguistics, allowing members of the House of Commons to speak in an indigenous language would not only recognize their right to express their culture and language during debates, but would also allow all members of the House of Commons and Canadians nationwide who listen to these debates to gain from the values and beliefs encoded within indigenous languages. All languages have their own distinct ideals and ways of thinking, and that is often something that draws people towards languages different from their own. It is what the Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, entitled “Looking Forward, Looking Back”, called “a fundamentally different world view [that] continues to exist and struggles for expression whenever Aboriginal people come together”.

Such provisions, as well as the potential sharing and enhancing of existing Senate resources would allow the House of Commons to send a strong signal of support for preserving, promoting and revitalizing indigenous languages, as well as acknowledging the special place indigenous peoples have in Canadian society.

However, to successfully implement this type of legislative measure—I am sure that you have also talked about this a lot—the Government of Canada and the House of Commons will have to implement strategies and invest resources.

I will now focus on one of these measures. Just as the Government of Canada did the day after passing the Official Languages Act in 1969, this type of initiative would probably require an investment to make sure that universities include the indigenous languages of Canada and indigenous language teaching in the curriculum, as well as train teachers. They will also need to train translators and interpreters to provide a pool of translators and interpreters, as well as a new wave of professional interpreters who will be necessary for the success of this new legislative measure.

In my opinion, this investment and interest expressed by the Government of Canada would have a significant multiplier effect. An investment would help put indigenous languages on par with other modern languages, and would show young students everywhere who are interested in indigenous languages studies that they could actually have careers as teachers, translators and interpreters. In my opinion, this would be an attractive virtuous circle.

This investment would also meet one of the recommendations of the “Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action” document: We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages.

An initiative such as the one we've discussed today would invigorate this type of recommendation.

When the Official Languages Act was originally implemented, the translation bureau had to face the same challenges, that is, finding a pool of interpreters. Translation students were recruited directly on campus. Some students were even offered an incentive that would allow their university years to count in their pension plans if they worked at the translation bureau. Those positive measures allowed universities to develop those programs, and allowed the government to have a pool of highly qualified translators and interpreters, who are now internationally respected due to the quality of their work.

Clearly, the demand for translation and interpretation will not be as large. On the one hand, the demand will be far more arbitrary and ad hoc if the legislative measures resembled those adopted by the territories. On the other hand, the source of the demand would be very diversified, because of the dozens of indigenous languages commonly spoken today, which isn't something to consider when systematically translating between French and English, our two official languages.

Notwithstanding these differences, it is essential for Parliament to be able to depend on well trained and qualified human resources. That is why I emphasize that the House of Commons and the Government of Canada could not only count on universities, but also on the expertise and collaboration of indigenous communities and their elders to supply and train interpreters. I am convinced that they would be greatly interested in any initiative that would allow their languages to be brought to life and heard in the public sphere. Allowing children, young people and seniors the opportunity to hear their language being spoken at the heart of Parliament would be a very powerful gesture.

(1215)



This is where I will end my presentation. Thank you for listening to me. It would be my pleasure to answer questions from the members of the committee. [English]

The Chair:

Meegwetch.

Now we'll have Ms. Lacasse. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Lacasse (Director General, Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair. Wachiya. Kwe.[English]

We wish to thank the members of the committee for inviting the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government to appear before the committee, and we hope that our presentation will contribute to your study on the use of indigenous languages in the proceedings of the House of Commons.

We also wish to acknowledge the efforts of our member of Parliament for the riding of Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, Mr. Romeo Saganash, in recognizing the importance of using indigenous languages in House of Commons proceedings.

Meegwetch, Mr. Saganash.

My name is Johanne Lacasse. I am the Director General of the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government and a member of the Anishinabe nation.

Ms. Melissa Saganash (Director of Cree-Québec Relations, Grand Council of the Crees/Cree Nation Government, Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair, members.

[Witness speaks in Cree]

To my family, hello.

My name is Melissa Saganash. I'm the Director of Cree-Québec Relations for the Grand Council of the Crees. I also serve as a member of the James Bay Regional Government technical committee, so I have the honour of working with Johanne Lacasse every so often. I'm also a member of the the Waswanipi Cree first nation of James Bay.

Today our presentation will essentially cover topics pertaining to general provisions of the governance model of the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government and primarily on key factors of our practical experience in the implementation of the multi-language simultaneous translation that is used by our citizens, in French, English, and Cree.

To set you in context of how and why we are in the position to deliver such a service, it's important to understand the essence of a particular agreement that was signed with the province and the Cree nation.

On July 24, 2012, the Government of Quebec signed an agreement with the Cree nation government, known as the Agreement on Governance in the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Territory between the Crees of Eeyou Istchee and the Gouvernement du Québec. This historic agreement resulted in the abolishment of the former Municipalité de Baie-James, where only mayors of the municipalities and localities of James Bay would govern, and led to the creation of the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government. This new structure now includes a seat at the table for each elected chief in addition to the mayors of the territory—a first of its kind in the country. This agreement provides for the modernization of the governance regime that once prevailed in the territory, and promotes the inclusion of the Eeyou in decision-making powers.

Essentially, the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government now provides significant Cree participation in decision-making over shared lands and resources. The new regional government reflects a vision of a path for our territory based on the noble principles of inclusiveness, democracy, and social harmony.

(1220)

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

I would like to share a brief description of our designated territory, the territory of Eeyou Istchee James Bay. As you probably know, it's within the federal ridings of Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou and Abitibi—Témiscamingue.

The territory covers a large portion of northern Quebec, which is between the 49th and 55th parallel in Quebec. It's approximately 277,000 square kilometres if you include all the category III lands of our territory. Of course, that excludes category I and II lands, as well as the municipal territories. We have four municipalities and nine Cree communities.

Overall, we're looking at a territory that represents approximately 17% of the territory of Quebec. We are considered the largest municipality in the world. If we look at the population density, that represents approximately 0.05 inhabitants per square kilometre. The estimated population is approximately 20,000 Cree and 17,000 Jamesians.

If we look at the composition of our local governance, Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government local governance is carried out by way of the council of the regional government, which for its first 10 years is to be composed of 11 Cree representatives, 11 Jamesian representatives and one non-voting representative that is appointed by the Gouvernement du Québec.

The Cree representatives consist of the grand chief and the deputy grand chief of the Grand Council of the Crees and the Cree Nation Government, and nine members that are chiefs of the Cree communities elected by the board council of the Grand Council and the Cree Nation Government.

As for the Jamesian representatives, they consist of elected members of the local municipal councils, the majority of which are mayors, and of course, some of the councillors of Chapais, Chibougamau, Lebel-sur-Quévillon, and Matagami, as well as the non-Crees in the Eeyou Istchee James Bay territory.

If you look at the governance model and the concept of the regional government, our regional government is subject to Quebec's Cities and Towns Act, which in this case is pertinent today as it requires a public call-for-tenders process for all our professional services.

The chairman of the council is designated in alternation by representatives of the Cree and the representatives of the Jamesians for a two-year mandate, so they alternate every two years.

A minimum of six regular council meetings are held per year. Our council meetings are held at various locations throughout our territory, including the Jamesian municipalities, as well as our nine Cree communities. The locations of our council meetings are held in an alternate manner, which means a Jamesian municipality followed by a Cree community, and so on, which represents three regular council meetings in Cree communities and three regular council meetings held in one of our four municipalities.

Also, what's interesting here is that our council members may participate by telephone conference call for a maximum of once per year should they be unable to attend in person.

(1225)



The documents tabled at council meetings and presentations are made available in French and English, and provided two weeks in advance whenever possible. We have an in-house translator who translates from English and French and vice versa.

Our simultaneous translation services are provided in English, French, and Cree during council meetings. Our council meetings are also broadcast live through live streaming, and broadcast live through Cree radio broadcasting in the Cree communities whenever possible.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

Here are some of the guiding principles in the implementation of the multi-language simultaneous translation services that we provide.

On the basis that Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government was created to ensure the inclusion and participation of the Cree or Eeyou people in decision-making over shared lands and resources, our guiding principles are based on legislative frameworks. These are just extracts that we'll share with you about what we've included in these agreements. In the act establishing the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Regional Government in section 36 of chapter VII: The Regional Government must, where applicable, take the necessary measures to have any text intended to be understood by a Cree translated into either Cree or English. Nothing in the first paragraph must be interpreted as authorizing an infringement of the right to work in French in the Regional Government....

Furthermore, we have chapter V of the Agreement on Governance in the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Territory between the Crees of Eeyou Istchee and the Gouvernement du Québec. In section 108 of chapter V in the rules of operation, it says: 108. Cree and French shall be the principal languages of the Regional Government. 109. The Regional Government may use either French or English in its internal communications and language of work. 110. A citizen may communicate verbally or in writing with the Regional Government, including at meetings of the council, in Cree, English or French. 111. Texts and documents intended for Cree individuals or for the Cree population in general shall be translated into Cree and English, including any document enabling the users to exercise a right or to meet an obligation.

We've been proactive as well with article 13.2 of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to ensure effective measures “to ensure that indigenous peoples [in our territory] can understand and be understood in political...and administrative proceedings, where necessary through the provision of interpretation or by other appropriate means.”

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

We would like to share some of the considerations in the implementation of our simultaneous translation services. These are the more practical considerations that we were faced with when implementing our translation services.

As I mentioned earlier, the fact that we are subject to the Cities and Towns Act means that we are subject also to a call for a public tender process for our simultaneous translation services.

There is also the additional cost of providing simultaneous translation services. This is a major factor. The revenues of the regional government are basically—and I would say practically solely—based on the taxation revenues of the citizens of the category III lands of our territory. The costs are covered through the taxation revenues that are generated.

We've also considered the need to create a bank of qualified and available Cree interpreters who are hired on a contractual basis.

We've also taken into consideration the fact that we needed to compose with various Cree dialects in the territory, which means that there are the northern and southern Cree dialects and also the coastal and inland Cree dialects that were taken into consideration.

The technical aspects of the contents pertaining to municipal matters and our contents are of a very technical nature. They're dealing with municipal and land use planning matters, so we've taken into consideration those aspects. We've also foreseen the space that is required to accommodate translation booths and the work areas that are required for the technicians who accompany our interpreters. This means that we have one booth for the French and English interpreters. We have a second booth for the Cree interpreters. We also have a work area for the two technicians who accompany the four interpreters.

The cost, as I mentioned earlier, includes the translation fees and the lodging and travel costs. I would say that the overall translation cost represents anywhere from $100,000 to $150,000 per year for the regional government.

The fact is that we do hold our meetings in remote areas, and that includes as far north as Whapmagoostui, which does not have any access road. We do have a challenge with accessing reliable high-speed Internet in certain remote areas.

For access to reliable telephone communication lines, because of the fact that members do call in or join by conference call, it means that we need two separate telephone lines, one line to accommodate the English and French, and a second phone line to accommodate the members requiring Cree translation.

We have been experimenting with new technologies such as remote or distant translation, but we're not there yet, for the sole reason that we have to compose with different considerations—that is, we have the live streaming, we require the simultaneous translation, and there are the members who are joining in by phone—so we haven't yet arrived at identifying the possibility of introducing new technologies for remote translation. I was listening to the presentation earlier. It's very difficult. Our interpreters have mentioned to us that they prefer to be on location for the translation.

(1230)



There's also radio broadcasting, so that's another consideration.

I would have to say that the added value to the quality of the implementation of our simultaneous translation services depends on the devotion and dedication of the regional government public services that are operating under time constraints and under a lot of pressure at certain times. In particular, our public servants have managed their way through an extensive administrative transformation to ensure that services are based on an inclusive approach for all citizens of our territory.

(1235)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Meegwetch. Mahsi cho.

Now we'll go to some questions. We'll start with Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

I'm going to be sharing my time with Mr. Simms.

My first question is for Mr. Séror. You said that the use of indigenous languages here in Parliament would definitely have an effect on the desire to speak those languages or would reawaken people to wanting to use those languages again. I heard from a witness before this committee, also, an aspirational goal of our translation bureau helping academia to standardize some of the languages, to help finalize, maybe, where there's controversy over what word to use at what particular moment.

What are your thoughts on that? How much do you think that the work that's done here through our translation bureau could help serve the work that you do in your department?

Mr. Jérémie Séror:

I think it would, indeed, be one of those gestures that sort of sparks a bunch of interesting consequences. It would actually spark a number of problems to be solved, including, for example, how to write a particular word or what's the perfect word for filibustering. These are the kinds of problems where, because there's a need, all of a sudden there's a need to actually talk about these things and look for a solution, in collaboration with all the parties involved, of course.

As soon as you start to apply those solutions, then you see if it's a good solution, and then it sort of gets this virtuous circle going. With time, what you would hope would happen is that some of these problems would no longer be problems. They would become things that have stabilized a little bit.

Having a real need to think about how we can do interpretation or how we might translate certain terms or concepts creates a need for the discussion to happen with academics, but also with the students who are working with the academics, with the future translators. This then launches the.... It's not that these conversations are not happening right now, but when you have a real objective tied to some of these conversations, to these functions, it certainly creates a motivation to look at these things and invest the time and energy that is often required to get at solutions.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Would you see there being a role for universities to play in helping the translation bureau achieve its goals and do it accurately?

Mr. Jérémie Séror:

Yes, I think so. Certainly, I'm not representing the school of translation, although we're in the same building and we talk, but certainly the field of translation has expertise and has, over time, looked at issues such as the challenge of translating something that's not translatable. It's never a “one word for one word” equivalent. There are different theories, and there are different best practices. There's the development of resources that can be used and certain kinds of training that can be developed. I think that theoretical...or the knowledge of what the best practices are in relationship with the people on the ground who are actually putting these things into implementation is always going to be a very fruitful interaction.

If the challenges are related to a certain language, then that's where people tend to orient their conversations. However, as soon as you create a new need or a new type of interaction, then you're going to see, I think, that some of the universities will be happy to think about these questions, or to apply what they know and guide what's going to be happening in the future with regard to providing quality interpretation and translation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In your opinion, what indigenous languages have been most developed or most taught in universities up to this point?

(1240)

Mr. Jérémie Séror:

That's a good question. Although I'm not familiar with the whole list, the big ones being taught at the University of Ottawa are Cree, Ojibwa, and Inuktitut. Year by year, it depends on which individuals are available to teach those languages and also where the various groups are interested in having the languages taught. Sometimes they will bring people to the community, or sometimes they will come to the campus.

It depends on the year. I don't think it's clearly established yet, but at the moment, it tends to be the languages that have the most speakers.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'll pass the rest of my time to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you, Ruby.

I come from a world where, every time you have a problem, you seek out a person who had the problem before and look for best practices. Ms. Lacasse and Ms. Saganash, when it comes to regional governance, I think there's a lot for us to learn when you're dealing with a larger assortment of dialects and languages than we are, with just the two languages.

You mentioned a couple of issues. You have six meetings per year. What do these meetings look like in the form of translation with different dialects? What is the main one, and what are the different dialects that you have to deal with?

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

I was just reading an article, actually, before we came in. When we began our sessions of the regional government in the north, a local reporter came to watch a session. [Translation]

In his opinion, Chibougamau felt like the United Nations.[English]

That's exactly what it looks like. It's 22 people sitting around a table. There's Cree, French, and English. The chair might be speaking English, French, or Cree, depending on the subject or who is being addressed. Next to the large table is a translation booth, set up so that we can watch everybody who is in the room. We have technicians who've figured out some sort of magic with the lines. There are three lines. I know that once you go beyond two lines, a bit of technicality gets involved, but they've sorted it out.

We are now transportable. We can pick up the regional government, and if you tell us where to go, we'll land there and provide the services in three languages.

Mr. Scott Simms:

When you say that the services you provide are transportable, do you mean the whole technical outlay of how you do translation?

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

It's everything. It's a road show. We have roadies.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Really?

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's very interesting. I'm glad I asked the question. That's really something, because my next question deals with—

The Chair:

You don't have a next question.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm going to follow up a little on Mr. Simms' comments, so maybe I'll ask his question. Who knows?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you so much.

Mr. John Nater:

From the aspect of the cost of moving the government interpretation or translation, if it's fully portable now, there are very minimal additional costs beyond what you've already invested, because you've done it that way.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

The agreement that provides for the three languages was signed in 2012. To be honest, it was a bit of trial and error in the beginning. At first, we were renting everything, so we had providers bringing in the equipment. It didn't take very long for us to realize that it would be a lot more efficient and cost-saving if we actually bought the equipment. Then it would become ours. The services would become the regional government's, and we would be providing that.

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

In terms of cost-effectiveness, as I mentioned, we are subject to the call for tenders process. We've also learned from that call for tenders experience. We've recently hired a new simultaneous translation service provider. This is done every two years. When we change our service provider, we need to take the time to explain certain situations in terms of travel in very remote areas, and the service provider needs to integrate and work with the radio broadcast technicians. They need to learn to work hand in hand with our live streaming technicians.

Yes, there is the cost factor involved, and of course, we work with the service providers that submit the lowest bids. The budgets are forecast in accordance with the bids submitted by the service providers.

(1245)

Mr. John Nater:

Basically, you send out a tender, or a request for proposals, saying you need interpretation or translation services for six meetings that have to.... Then different companies that have interpreters on staff would then provide you with that—

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

That's correct for the English-French translation. Of course, we have a bank of Cree interpreters available who are integrated within the services provided by the simultaneous translation service provider.

Mr. John Nater:

Now in terms of the Cree interpreters, you mentioned in the opening comments four different dialects that were common. Do you have four separate Cree interpreters, or is it kind of hit and miss, in terms of how that operates?

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

These are local. I mentioned that the locations of the meetings alternate.

We don't have interpreters with different dialects. It's on the basis that the Crees have been holding public meetings since the signing of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, the JBNQA. They've always found a way to communicate. I don't think it's necessary, at this point in time, to find people with the various dialects. They have a common understanding. They've been working together since the signing of the agreement.

In terms of the process, we do have a concern about providing opportunities to the local people while we're visiting their community, while holding our council meetings. These people normally have a minimum quality of translation skills. They've been doing it for court proceedings, medical services, and their own public meetings.

I have to say that we don't necessarily have a problem with attracting Cree interpreters, because our Cree citizens feel very strongly about self-governance initiatives. From that perspective, they're proud to serve, and proud to serve their institutions—the regional government, the Cree Nation Government, or any other Cree entity that holds public meetings within their institutions. I think they feel compelled to serve in the capacity of providing the interpretation services, to serve the public and our citizens.

Mr. John Nater:

That's really great to hear.

In terms of the age of those who provide services, are there many who are younger who are providing the services? What's the age category?

I know Mr. Saganash has spoken of his mother, who is an exceptional Cree speaker. Are there younger generations who know the language and are also providing the interpretation services?

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

I think we need to promote and encourage the younger generation to provide this quality interpretation service.

I was discussing it earlier this morning with Melissa, and I was saying that we have an older generation of elected officials who have now retired, and we call upon their services. They have the practical experience in the political and administrative field. They're often available, because they're retired. They also have a general knowledge of our council proceedings.

Mr. John Nater:

The challenge about the two separate phone lines.... If I'm calling into a meeting as an elected representative, and I speak at the meeting, am I able to both be translated out and then translated back in at the same time?

(1250)

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

Yes, that's the magic that Melissa was referring to, absolutely.

I don't have the technical knowledge—

Mr. John Nater:

But it happens.

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

Yes, we make it happen. Our technicians make it happen.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

The technicians arrive the evening before the proceedings begin. This way they're able to set up and iron out any kinks, if there are any.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. [Translation]

The Chair:

We will now go to Mr. Saganash. [English]

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our presenters.

I'm quite amazed that this regional government has managed to turn around so fast after the signing of that agreement with Quebec and was able to work together so fast with the non-indigenous population through this institution. After 50 years of both peoples ignoring each other, I think what you guys have gone through, over the last couple of years only, is quite fascinating.

It's always a pleasure to have a family member at the committee. I had my nephew, a fire chief, here not too long ago in another committee. I'm really honoured to have my niece here.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

It's an honour to be here. [Translation]

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I will begin with you, Mr. Séror.

I listened closely to your presentation. You talked about how important languages are for humanity, and also about intercomprehension, a term I had never heard before, I believe. You mentioned provisions in a variety of agreements that were signed in the north, in the territories, including Nunavut. Melissa referred to article 13 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, in which United Nations member states are called upon to take all possible measures to ensure that indigenous peoples can be understood in various institutions, including political ones. Coincidentally, Call to Action number 13 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada speaks of indigenous languages as being ancestral rights under the Constitution.

What I'm interested in—and you touched on this—are the effects the recognition of an indigenous language has on the communities that speak this language. Clearly, they will be positive if the use of the language is recognized in an institution such as the Parliament of Canada.

I would like this process to be more than symbolic. That is important to me. Can you tell us more about the positive effects it would have?

I believe you said that indigenous languages should perhaps have the same status as English and French, the country's two official languages. I often raise this issue, and I would like you to expand on it. The effects—I'm referring to the positive effects on indigenous languages—would be more than just symbolic.

Mr. Jérémie Séror:

I will give you a very personal example.

I always keep young people in mind. Adults and seniors are important as well, but we often look to younger generations when we talk about the vitality of languages in communities. For minority language speakers, whether they speak an indigenous language or an official one, it is dangerous to believe at a young age that this language is a game. Even if our parents and grandparents speak to us in the language, we can sometimes believe that this language is a game, or that it is only used in a family environment. That has an impact.

What is interesting is that we often focus on the use of a language to communicate a message, but language is not only used for communication. At all times, it allows us to establish relationships and convey information on the social status of communities. As soon as children see that the language is used outside of their homes and immediate environments, that it is used in public, this tells them that it isn't a game: It is a real language that is recognized and used. Children then realize that they have every right to use it outside of their immediate environments. Also, it sends a message about the value given to the language by everyone in the public space.

This kind of effect is sometimes felt subconsciously. Young people, and even adults, are not aware of the influence it has on the way they see themselves and on the way they themselves use the language. But we know that this effect exists. For example, I grew up in a very English-speaking region of Prince Edward Island, but the fact that I knew that French was spoken in Parliament and in Quebec encouraged me to continue speaking the language. I saw it as a real language with value and a role to play.

In applied linguistics, we sometimes refer to collective imagination. In order to commit to a language, we need to be able to imagine what can be done with it, and envision a world in which this language has a meaning. Each time we lend languages validity and we see them used in all kinds of contexts, we enrich this collective imagination, which has a motivating effect.

(1255)

[English]

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I have about a minute left.

Johanne or Melissa, I'll rapidly give you my three or four questions, which will perhaps take the remaining time.

Are there unilingual members on your council who speak only English, French, or Cree?

What has the positive effect been on Cree youth with the use of language in your institution?

What is the per cent of the budget used for interpretation and translation services? How many people do you have in the bank of interpreters? [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Lacasse:

Let me answer your first question.

It's true that the majority of the James Bay representatives are unilingual French speakers. As for the Cree representatives, they use Cree as a first language and English as a second one.

We are seeing more and more young, trilingual Cree representatives, but the majority of the people from James Bay are unilingual French speakers. Crees, on the other hand, speak Cree and sometimes English as a language of work.

In terms of the influence these initiatives have on young people, we have seen an increase in the number of young people interested in following this closely, whether by listening to live streams or to community radio. More and more people are contacting us for information on the vocation, mission and directions of the regional government. Young people feel very engaged with all the issues surrounding governance, especially when it concerns the territory where they live, such as the Eeyou Istchee James Bay territory.

Now, on the topic of budget expenditures, the regional government has an annual expenditure budget, excluding the three localities, of approximately $9 million. If we quickly do the math and we include all the costs, that's between $120,000 and $150,000. That is still considerable for a territory with so few taxpayers, so it's important that the council's elected officials and representatives champion interpretation services. Furthermore, the requirement to provide simultaneous interpretation services rests on the necessity of ensuring transparency and accountability, but it is especially a matter of inclusion.

(1300)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you. Meegwetch.

I think we have time for one short question from Scott Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Because we always have time for short questions.

Where were we? One of the things I wanted to talk about is the Cree radio broadcasting that you have. How are they set up to handle this? On a couple of occasions when I've gone abroad about issues, and the issue of first nations comes up and APTN comes up. It seems to be quite famous around the world for what it provides for first nations coverage, but also because they provide it with some of the language services. In Cree radio broadcasting, how does that accommodate the languages?

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

For the territory, actually, there's the JBCCS, the James Bay Cree Communications Society. It's a regional radio broadcasting outfit that's based out of Mistassini but has an antenna that reaches all communities.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Are they online?

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

They're online as well.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

For the purpose of the regional government, when we have sessions, they send over a tech, and the tech comes in and plugs into the board.

I'm using words that I'm not sure what they mean.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's okay, we're following you.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

They plug into the board, and it broadcasts to the JBCCS airwaves in Cree because JBCCS, James Bay Cree Communication Society, is exclusively Cree radio.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

When they come into either the Cree Nation Government council meetings or the regional government council meetings, they plug in. They plug into the interpreter's booth, actually, the interpreter's line. That's what they're broadcasting out to the communities, because radio is the way of communication, still, for many of our communities.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It seems to me, then, that what you described in my first round of questioning is the key to disseminating the information you want to disseminate in all the languages and dialects that you have.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The genesis, the origin of this thing that you had, did you develop that yourself?

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

I wish I could take the credit for JBCCS, but I can't.

The regional government's guidelines and its framework and its agreement are built so that we have to serve in Cree. We have the technology. We're up in James Bay. Sometimes there's no road. Sometimes there's no Wi-Fi—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

—but we bring it up there. We have it. ECN is the Eeyou Communications Network. It's a fibre-optic company. It's a Cree company, Cree-owned. We call ECN before heading to a community where we don't have Wi-Fi. We say, “Hi, ECN. Can you give us a line, please? We're going to be there for three days.” They plug a line into, literally, the phone pole outside. They drop a line down, we run it into the building, and this is what we use to feed our live stream, our radio, the phone lines, everything.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can I comment?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Saying “please” won't help?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. All right.

Thank you very much. It was fascinating.

Ms. Melissa Saganash:

It's a pleasure. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. It's great you could come here, and it was very helpful.

Committee members, don't leave yet for a minute. After I hit the gavel I want you to stay for another minute.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let the record show that we met, but we didn't meet.

The Chair:

Right.

As we agreed earlier, during the first hour on Thursday we'll do the last couple of witnesses, and next Tuesday we'll do the electronic petitions in the first hour and drafting instructions for this report in the second hour.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à la 100e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons notre étude de l’utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Nous sommes très heureux d’accueillir MM. Stéphan Déry et Matthew Ball, respectivement président-directeur général et vice-président par intérim au Bureau de la traduction, qui relève de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada.

Toutefois, avant d'inviter ces messieurs à prendre la parole, j’aurais quelques questions à poser au Comité. La première concerne deux articles assez longs qui nous ont été transmis par l’Assemblée des Premières Nations, l'APN. Bien qu'ils ne soient pas directement ou entièrement liés à notre étude, ils traitent tous les deux des langues autochtones. Nous ne pouvons pas les distribuer parce qu'ils sont en anglais uniquement et les documents aussi longs ne sont pas traduits normalement.

De deux choses l'une: soit vous communiquez directement avec la personne responsable à l'APN pour qu'elle vous transmette les articles, soit le Comité accepte à l'unanimité qu'ils soient distribués dans leur version anglaise seulement.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Quelle est la longueur de ces articles? Ne peuvent-ils vraiment pas être traduits? N'est-ce pas...

Le président:

Ils sont assez...

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, il doit bien y avoir une limite concrète qui détermine ce qui est traduit et ce qui ne l'est pas?

Le président:

Je vais en référer au greffier.

M. Scott Reid:

Ces deux articles dépassent manifestement la limite habituelle. Comment établit-on si un texte sera traduit ou non?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Tout dépend de ce que le Comité reçoit. En règle générale, nous faisons traduire les mémoires de moins de 10 pages. Dans le cas des mémoires plus longs, nous demandons un résumé, que nous faisons traduire.

Si je me souviens bien, l'un des textes en question compte une vingtaine de pages, et l'autre est à peu près de la même longueur.

M. Scott Reid:

En ce qui me concerne, je serais d’accord pour qu'ils soient traduits. Je sais que la traduction a un coût, mais je pense que ces textes seront pertinents.

M. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NPD):

Par principe, je pense que les documents devraient être traduits. Je milite pour le principe de l'emploi des langues autochtones à la Chambre. De toute évidence, je plaide pour la traduction de ces documents.

Le président:

Très bien. Est-ce l'avis unanime du Comité? Êtes-vous tous d'accord pour que les documents soient traduits?

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Selon ce que vous avez dit, ils ne sont pas vraiment liés à notre étude. La question est de savoir s'il est justifié d'engager cette dépense ou s'il vaut mieux renoncer à l'idée, tout simplement.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Les spécialistes de la question sont justement parmi nous.

Le président:

L’un des articles est intitulé « An Aboriginal Languages Act: Reconsidering Equality on the 40th Anniversary of Canada's Official Languages Act ». Il s'agit du projet de loi qui sera présenté sous peu au Parlement. L'autre a été écrit par un membre de la Première Nation de Nipissing, d'ascendance ojibway et canadienne, et s'intitule « Reconciliation and the Revitalization of Indigenous Languages ».

(1105)

M. Scott Reid:

Les titres ne nous disent pas vraiment si ces textes sont pertinents. À première vue, le second semble l'être assez pour qu'on le fasse traduire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est le Comité qui décide, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Êtes-vous tous d'accord pour qu'on le fasse traduire?

Des députés: Oui, d'accord.

Le président: Excellent. Je vous remercie.

Nous achevons. Jeudi, nous accueillerons un dernier groupe de témoins sur ce sujet. Nous y reviendrons un peu plus loin. J’espère que nous serons en mesure de donner des indications aux analystes immédiatement après.

Je précise aux membres du Comité, même si je suis convaincu qu’ils le savent déjà, que ce sont nos plus importants témoins sur le plan fonctionnel, car ce sont eux qui mettent l’idée en pratique, dans un cadre qui en permet la réalisation technique. Je vous inviterais donc à préparer beaucoup de questions pour ce groupe, car ce sont eux qui font la traduction, qui fournissent les installations, les traducteurs, et tout ce qui est nécessaire.

J’invite maintenant M. Déry à nous présenter sa déclaration préliminaire, qui sera suivie d’une période de questions.

M. Stéphan Déry (président-directeur général, Bureau de la traduction, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Merci.[Français]

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, bonjour.

Avant toute chose, je précise que nous nous réunissons actuellement sur le territoire de la nation algonquine.

Je tiens à vous remercier de votre invitation à comparaître au sujet de l'utilisation des langues autochtones durant les délibérations.

Je m'appelle Stéphan Déry, et je suis le président-directeur général du Bureau de la traduction. Je suis accompagné de mon collègue Matthew Ball, vice-président des services au Parlement et de l'interprétation.

Le Bureau de la traduction offre des services de traduction et d'interprétation en langues autochtones à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat sur une base ponctuelle, quand le Parlement en fait la demande. À titre d'exemple, lors des comparutions de plusieurs témoins à ce comité au cours des dernières semaines, c'est le Bureau qui a organisé le service d'interprétation en langues autochtones. C'est pour ces raisons que nous tenons à jour une liste d'environ 100 interprètes couvrant 20 langues autochtones différentes.

Avant de vous parler plus en détail des services en langues autochtones, permettez-moi de vous parler brièvement du Bureau.[Traduction]

Fondé en 1934, le Bureau de la traduction prend ses assises dans la Loi sur le Bureau de la traduction, qui lui confère la responsabilité de servir les ministères et organismes, ainsi que les deux Chambres du Parlement, pour tout ce qui concerne la traduction et la révision de documents, ainsi que l'interprétation, l'interprétation gestuelle et la terminologie.

Nous sommes l'unique fournisseur interne de services de traduction du gouvernement fédéral et du Parlement, parmi les plus importants consommateurs au monde, ce qui fait du Bureau de la traduction un acteur de premier plan dans une industrie mondiale. Nos services de traduction sont offerts 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, au moyen d'une infrastructure sécurisée, dans plus de 100 langues et dialectes.

Concrètement, le Bureau a traité environ 170 000 demandes en 2017-2018, surtout en traduction, ce qui signifie près de 305 millions de mots pour les ministères et organismes, et plus de 49 millions de mots pour le Parlement.

En langues officielles, nous effectuons plus de 5 000 jours d'interprétation pour le Parlement, près de 7 000 jours d'interprétation de conférence, ainsi que plus de 4 500 heures de sous-titrage pour la Chambre des communes, le Sénat et vos comités. Enfin, nous fournissons plus de 9 700 heures d'interprétation visuelle.[Français]

Maintenant, j'aimerais vous parler un peu plus de ce que nous faisons pour les langues autochtones. Les données que je viens de mentionner me permettent de mettre en contexte la capacité actuelle du Bureau de la traduction à offrir des services en langues autochtones.

Le Bureau est bien équipé pour répondre à la demande actuelle, notamment grâce aux partenariats qu'il a formés au fil du temps avec plusieurs organisations autochtones. Notre mandat est clair: nous sommes ici pour servir le Parlement.

Si le Parlement décide d'augmenter la demande de services en langues autochtones, en tant qu'unique fournisseur de services linguistiques, le Bureau de la traduction se fera un devoir d'y répondre.[Traduction]

Les demandes de services en langues autochtones sont sporadiques et peu nombreuses, relativement au volume total de demandes de traduction et d'interprétation, toutes langues confondues. Ainsi, des 170 000 demandes de traduction et d'interprétation que nous avons traitées en 2017-2018, environ 760, ou 0,5 % du volume total, concernaient des langues autochtones. De ces 760 demandes, près de 85 % étaient en langues inuites. Les autres demandes étaient réparties entre 28 combinaisons linguistiques.

Concernant l'interprétation au Parlement, les demandes pour les comités de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat ont représenté 33 jours d'interprétation en langues autochtones depuis 2016, principalement en cri — de l'Est et des plaines —, en inuktitut et en déné.

(1110)

[Français]

En 2009, le Bureau a collaboré avec le Sénat pour un projet pilote visant à fournir des services d'interprétation en inuktitut aux sénateurs Charlie Watt et Willie Adams, à la suite de l'une des recommandations du cinquième rapport du Comité permanent du Règlement, de la procédure et des droits du Parlement. Dans le cadre de la confirmation des droits ancestraux des Premières Nations, le rapport recommandait que l'utilisation de l'inuktitut soit permise dans les délibérations du Sénat, en plus du français et de l'anglais.

Nous avons fourni ces services d'interprétation à plusieurs occasions, et les sénateurs ont semblé satisfaits des services reçus. Cependant, bien qu'il y ait eu une plus grande capacité établie en inuktitut que dans d'autres langues autochtones, trouver des interprètes ayant une expérience parlementaire avait constitué un défi.[Traduction]

Je voudrais maintenant aborder deux enjeux opérationnels du Bureau.

D'abord, votre comité a discuté de la possibilité d'utiliser des services d'interprétation à distance.

Le Bureau de la traduction a mené un projet pilote en 2014 pour tester la viabilité de ce service. Bien que les résultats soient encourageants, il y a encore des problèmes qui doivent être réglés avant de pouvoir offrir ce service sur une base régulière. Les deux principaux problèmes sont la qualité audio et les bandes passantes, qui peuvent être erratiques, ce qui entraîne une qualité audio variable pour les interprètes comme pour les clients. Nous sommes déterminés à continuer d'explorer cette solution, alors que la technologie évolue.

Ensuite, comme d'autres témoins l'ont dit à ce comité, parce qu'il existe environ 90 langues et dialectes autochtones différents au Canada, la capacité en matière d'interprètes qualifiés est limitée. La capacité du Bureau de la traduction d'évaluer leurs compétences linguistiques est également restreinte.

Cet enjeu de capacité est fondé, en partie, sur la demande limitée pour ce service. Si le Parlement décidait de créer une demande plus soutenue, le Bureau serait prêt à jouer un rôle actif pour augmenter la capacité, en partenariat avec les communautés et organisations autochtones. Au fil du temps, ce service pourrait être offert au Parlement sur une base régulière, contribuant ainsi à la préservation des langues autochtones au Canada.[Français]

J'aimerais maintenant décrire le travail que le Bureau a entrepris pour favoriser l'établissement de nouvelles relations et de nouveaux partenariats, en prévision d'une augmentation de la demande qui appuierait l'objectif du gouvernement de renouveler les relations entre le Canada et les peuples autochtones.

Nous avons affecté un interprète principal pour évaluer la capacité du Bureau et mettre à profit notre expertise en matière de services linguistiques. Nous voulons établir des partenariats stratégiques afin d'améliorer le développement des capacités. Pour ce faire, nous sommes en contact avec l'Assemblée des Premières Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, l'autorité des langues inuites, et le Grand Conseil des Cris, ainsi qu'avec des établissements de formation, comme le Collège de l'Arctique du Canada et l'Université des Premières Nations du Canada.

Nous travaillons également en partenariat avec le Canadian Indigenous Languages and Literacy Development Institute de l'Université de l'Alberta pour promouvoir le domaine de l'interprétation auprès de ses étudiants au cours de l'été prochain.

Depuis 2003, nous collaborons aussi régulièrement avec le gouvernement du Nunavut, notamment pour former des traducteurs inuits en terminologie. Notre projet le plus récent, en 2017, concernait notre outil Termium, pour lequel nous avons créé un tiroir terminologique qui contient maintenant quelque 2 300 fiches en inuktitut.

En d'autres mots, monsieur le président, nous sommes toujours à l'affût de nouvelles avenues qui nous permettraient d'élargir nos partenariats et d'augmenter notre bassin de traducteurs et d'interprètes en langues autochtones. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, nous répondons à la demande actuelle et prenons les mesures nécessaires pour bâtir un bassin de ressources additionnelles.[Traduction]

En guise de conclusion, je voudrais porter à votre attention la nouvelle vision pour le Bureau de la traduction d'en faire un centre d'excellence en services linguistiques de renommée mondiale. Cette vision se fonde notamment sur le besoin de renforcer les liens du Bureau avec ses employés et ses clients, mais également avec ses partenaires. Elle mise également sur la relève et la formation dans le domaine linguistique. Ce sont les assises sur lesquelles nous comptons miser si vous, le Parlement, demandez au Bureau des services en langues autochtones de façon plus constante. Notre mandat est clair, nous sommes ici pour servir le Parlement.

En terminant, j'aimerais souligner le travail de nos interprètes, qui occupent les cabines d'interprétation à côté, grâce à qui la rencontre d'aujourd'hui se déroule dans les deux langues officielles.

Merci de votre temps et de votre attention. C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions.

(1115)

Le président:

Merci. Meegwetch.

Nous entamerons la période des questions avec M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci de participer à nos travaux.

Je vais entrer dans le vif du sujet.

Vous venez de dire que les services de traduction sont fournis sur demande. Lorsque M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette a demandé que sa déclaration à la Chambre soit traduite, déclenchant ainsi le présent processus, que s'est-il passé au juste? Pourquoi sa demande a-t-elle été refusée et qu'aurait-on pu faire différemment?

M. Stéphan Déry:

C'est une excellente question et j'y répondrai avec plaisir.

Au Bureau, plus nous avons de temps... Étant donné que nous ne fournissons pas ces services sur une base régulière, nous devons faire appel à des ressources externes. Quand nous avons mené notre projet pilote avec le Sénat en 2009 et que la demande pour ces services était plus constante, nous demandions un préavis de 48 heures. L'intention de fournir le service était claire et, si nous n'arrivions pas à trouver d'interprète, le comité se déplaçait ou une autre date de réunion était choisie, ou quelque chose du genre. L'idéal pour nous est que les demandes nous soient transmises suffisamment à l'avance et qu'elles soient bien structurées, parce que nous avons alors le temps de trouver un interprète. Comme ils ne peuvent pas compter sur des demandes régulières du Parlement, les interprètes occupent des postes ailleurs ou ils acceptent des offres d'autres clients.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je comprends. Toutefois, dans le cas qui nous occupe, qui a soulevé la question du privilège et entraîné ce débat, des services de traduction ont été sollicités. M. Ouellette a proposé de fournir un texte aux traducteurs, mais il a essuyé un refus. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer les règles et nous suggérer des solutions?

M. Stéphan Déry:

La solution est de nous donner un préavis raisonnable pour que nous ayons le temps de trouver un interprète compétent vers le cri ou l'inuktitut, qui a une véritable compréhension de la langue. Si vous me le permettez, je vais poursuivre en français pour... [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Allez-y.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Le code déontologique des interprètes leur demande d'interpréter des langues qu'ils connaissent, sans compter tout le respect qu'on a pour le Parlement. Le texte est donné. Aujourd'hui, je vous ai donné un texte, mais j'ai peut-être dit autre chose. Il y a donc une corrélation. L'interprète a besoin de comprendre le langage parlé et pas seulement de lire des documents qui lui sont fournis.[Traduction]

Matthew a un exemple concret où il a dû s'en remettre au texte.

Il peut vous le relater lui-même. Matthew?

M. Matthew Ball (vice-président par intérim, Bureau de la traduction, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Avec plaisir.

Les interprètes ont l'obligation déontologique de comprendre le texte interprété. Il serait donc difficile de leur demander... Un interprète aurait pu lire le texte, mais cela ne signifie pas qu'il en aurait compris le sens.

J'ai un bon exemple d'une telle situation. J'ai été interprète pendant une bonne partie de ma carrière. Un jour, à l'occasion de célébrations de la fête du Canada diffusées en direct à l'échelle du pays, tout juste avant l'allocution que s'apprêtait à prononcer un aîné en langue autochtone, on m'en a remis la version anglaise et demandé de la lire. Je l'ai fait. J'avais vraiment reçu le texte à la dernière minute. Je n'avais pas le luxe de réfléchir aux considérations déontologiques ou de refuser sous prétexte qu'il ne serait pas professionnel de ma part de lire quelque chose que je ne comprenais pas. J'ai lu le texte.

Quand l'aîné a terminé sa prière, il me restait quatre lignes de texte à lire. Cet exemple illustre très bien la situation délicate dans laquelle se retrouvent le client et l'interprète quand on demande à celui-ci de lire un texte qu'il ne comprend pas, mais également l'orateur lui-même.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En traduction, contrairement à l'interprétation, il est connu que la version française est environ 13 % plus longue que la version anglaise. Il n'est donc pas surprenant que l'orateur et l'interprète ne finissent pas en même temps.

Ma question précédente avait trait à la période de préavis. Par exemple, si M. Saganash vous informe qu'il a l'intention de s'exprimer en cri à la Chambre la semaine prochaine, pourriez-vous assurer la traduction ou serait-ce contraire aux règles?

(1120)

M. Stéphan Déry:

Nous aurions affecté des interprètes, comme nous l'avons fait ces dernières semaines pour le Comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si je comprends bien, le régime actuel permettrait d'obtenir des services de traduction dès maintenant à la Chambre.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Vous pouvez obtenir des services d'interprétation en en faisant la demande au Bureau. Nous organisons la prestation de ces services.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Comment un député peut-il soumettre une telle demande? C'est relativement nouveau pour la plupart d'entre nous.

M. Stéphan Déry:

La demande, je crois, a été soumise au...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À la Chambre. Je parle de la Chambre.

M. Stéphan Déry:

À la Chambre, la demande doit être soumise au greffier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Par qui? Par un député?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Oui, un député doit soumettre une demande. Ensuite, c'est le processus en vigueur à la Chambre qui dictera si des services d'interprétation seront fournis ou non.

Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, nous sommes à votre service. Si la Chambre nous demande des services d'interprétation vers l'inuktitut ou une autre langue, nous ferons de notre mieux pour répondre à la demande.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'aimerais revenir à l'exemple de M. Ball concernant la prière qu'on lui a demandé d'interpréter. Traditionnellement, les députés sont considérés comme honorables dans cette enceinte. Par conséquent, si un député vous fournit une interprétation, et indépendamment de toute autre considération extérieure, il jouit du privilège d'être cru sur parole.

Existe-t-il des raisons qui vous amèneraient à refuser une traduction écrite proposée par un député à la Chambre?

M. Matthew Ball:

Dans un tel cas, ce sont plutôt les considérations déontologiques du client, des intervenants et de l'interprète qui seraient en jeu. En quelque sorte, chaque interprète peut travailler dans trois catégories de langues, que l'on appelle la langue A, la langue B et la langue C. Dans la langue C, qui est celle que l'interprète maîtrise le moins, on lui demandera seulement une interprétation passable vers sa langue A. En revanche, il traduira dans les deux sens dans ses langues A et B.

Si vous me demandez, en tant qu'interprète, de livrer une interprétation à partir d'une langue que je ne connais pas, vous me placeriez dans une situation délicate sur le plan déontologique puisque je ne comprendrais pas ce que je dirais. L'orateur ne pourrait pas se fier à moi pour transmettre le sens de ses paroles. Dans une telle combinaison, rien ne certifie que le message sera bien compris.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien. Il est possible que je revienne sur cette question plus tard.

Vous avez parlé du nombre impressionnant de langues dans lesquelles vous offrez des services. Traduisez-vous dans des langues autres que l'anglais, le français ou une langue autochtone quelconque?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Nous traduisons dans beaucoup de langues. Pendant le sommet du G7 qui aura lieu bientôt, nous fournirons des services dans toutes les langues. Nous organiserons les services d'interprétation pour toutes les langues étrangères.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je vous reviendrai dans la prochaine série de questions.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie également nos témoins.

Avant de siéger à ce comité, j'étais membre du comité des langues officielles. Mes collègues et moi avons eu l'honneur de nous entretenir avec votre prédécesseure à maintes reprises. Je suis ravi que le Comité vous accueille aujourd'hui.

En décembre dernier, la CBC a présenté une nouvelle qui faisait suite à une demande d'accès à l'information. Il y était question d'une note de service sur la traduction et l'emploi projeté de langues autochtones dans le nouvel édifice de l'Ouest. Cette note de service ne s'est pas rendue jusqu'à nous.

Seriez-vous en mesure de nous fournir cette note ou une copie de celle-ci, ou seriez-vous d'accord pour qu'on nous la transmette?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je devrai vérifier, mais, si la procédure ne l'interdit pas, je vous transmettrai cette note de service avec grand plaisir.

M. John Nater:

Excellent! Vous pourrez peut-être faire un suivi avec le greffier.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Oui, bien sûr.

M. John Nater:

Si le Comité pouvait en obtenir une copie, ce serait merveilleux.

Monsieur Ball, vous avez évoqué quelques-unes des normes et des considérations déontologiques auxquelles un interprète est tenu dans le cadre de son travail. J'imagine qu'il existe un code écrit? Ce genre de code peut être incorporé à la convention collective ou à un autre document. S'il existe, pourriez-vous vous serait-il possible de nous le transmettre?

M. Matthew Ball:

Voulez-vous parler d'un code déontologique des interprètes?

M. John Nater:

Exactement.

M. Matthew Ball:

La profession d'interprète est régie par l'Association internationale des interprètes de conférence. Nous pouvons vous communiquer le code en question. C'est un document public. En fait, vous le trouverez au site Web de l'Association.

M. John Nater:

Votre convention collective établit-elle des normes qui vous accordent le privilège ou vous imposent de vous conformer à ce code de conduite?

M. Matthew Ball:

Non, ce n'est pas dans la convention collective. Je dirais plutôt que c'est intrinsèque aux interprètes. Tous les interprètes qui travaillent pour le Bureau ont une maîtrise. Ce sont des professionnels qui respectent d'office le code de déontologie dans leur pratique courante.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Très bien.

Vous avez dit dans vos observations préliminaires que vous avez contribué à l'affectation d'interprètes pour les délibérations du Comité jusqu'à maintenant. Avez-vous eu la chance de passer en revue les comptes rendus des réunions? Avez-vous des réflexions ou une analyse à nous proposer concernant le fonctionnement de ces services d'interprétation jusqu'ici, du point de vue du Bureau de la traduction?

(1125)

M. Stéphan Déry:

C'est une question intéressante et primordiale. Le Bureau a un processus d'accréditation pour les langues officielles. Tous les interprètes qui travaillent pour le Bureau de la traduction ont été accrédités en fonction des normes internationales. Nous faisons partie d'une organisation mondiale des interprètes de conférence qui nous impose des normes strictes en matière de langues officielles.

Dans le cas des langues autochtones, les normes diffèrent un peu. Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, nous avons une capacité interne limitée pour ce qui concerne l'évaluation dans les 90 langues et dialectes en usage au Canada. M. Ball sera mieux placé pour vous expliquer comment nous traitons les demandes d'interprétation dans une langue autochtone.

M. Matthew Ball:

Merci, monsieur Déry.

Je ne suis pas certain d'avoir bien compris la question. Vous voulez savoir comment vont les choses du point de vue du Bureau?

M. John Nater:

Exactement.

M. Matthew Ball:

Voulez-vous connaître le point de vue du Bureau relativement à l'organisation et à l'administration des contrats?

M. John Nater:

Oui, je parlais de l'organisation, mais également de la qualité de l'interprétation.

M. Matthew Ball:

Pour ce qui est de l'organisation et de l'administration, je vous avouerai que l'exercice peut être assez complexe pour ce qui est des contrats d'interprétation, en fonction de la rareté des langues visées par les demandes. Toutefois, comme l'a dit M. Déry, le Bureau fait ce travail depuis 1934, et nous le faisons bien. Sur le plan de l'organisation, nous considérons que tout se passe bien.

Pour ce qui concerne la qualité, ce à quoi M. Déry a aussi fait allusion, la capacité interne du Bureau est insuffisante. Nous n'avons pas d'interprètes permanents pour la plupart des langues utilisées dans le monde. Nos interprètes permanents et principaux travaillent dans les langues officielles, et nous fournissons des services dans la plupart des langues qui font le plus couramment l'objet de demandes au Canada et au Bureau.

Pour les autres langues, nous accréditons des interprètes « sur dossier ». Si mon équipe reçoit une demande de services d'interprétation pour un événement diplomatique d'envergure... Comme nous n'avons plus d'interprète permanent pour le polonais, je communiquerais probablement avec des chefs interprètes ailleurs dans le monde pour qu'ils me recommandent des interprètes de la communauté mondiale qui travaillent en polonais. C'est ce que nous appelons l'« accréditation sur dossier ».

Pour l'instant, nous fonctionnons de la même façon pour les langues autochtones. Quand nous recevons une demande, comme M. Déry l'a déjà expliqué, nous faisons appel à une banque d'interprètes préqualifiés pour les langues autochtones les plus courantes au Canada. Actuellement, nous parlons de 20 langues et d'une banque de 100 pigistes environ. C'est la procédure la plus fréquente. Nous demandons des références à des interprètes compétents de la communauté, tout dépendant de la langue.

M. John Nater:

Merci infiniment.

Je voudrais revenir un peu sur le sujet de la capacité. Nous comprenons, d'après ce que nous avons entendu jusqu'ici, que la traduction de la plupart des langues autochtones se fait vers l'anglais, rarement vers le français. Est-ce exact, selon ce que vous avez constaté, que la traduction des langues autochtones se fait plutôt vers l'anglais que vers le français?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je dirais que nous faisons de l'interprétation vers les deux langues, suivant la demande. Comme l'a dit M. Ball, c'est plus compliqué pour les langues rares et celles qui ne sont pas... Nous savons que le nombre de locuteurs se situe entre 10 et 100 pour certaines langues autochtones au Canada. Dans ces cas, au contraire de l'inuktitut, il est difficile de trouver des interprètes qui peuvent traduire de la langue autochtone vers le français ou l'anglais. Toutefois, si on nous donne un délai suffisant... Jusqu'à maintenant, je dirais que nous avons répondu à toutes les demandes reçues.

M. John Nater:

Cela m'amène à ma prochaine question, qui a trait à l'interprétation dans une langue-relais, un sujet dont nous avons un peu entendu parler. Est-il vrai que l'emploi d'une langue-relais entraîne une perte d'information, si je puis m'exprimer ainsi? Le Bureau de la traduction a-t-il établi des normes ou a-t-il des préoccupations au sujet de l'interprétation-relais? Est-ce une approche qu'il préfère proscrire? Si ce n'est pas le cas, quels moyens prenez-vous pour combler les lacunes?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je vais demander à M. Ball de répondre. Il est interprète de carrière.

M. Matthew Ball:

Vous avez raison, dans la mesure du possible, nous évitons le recours à une langue-relais en interprétation, mais nous n'avons pas toujours le choix. Dans le cas des langues autochtones, l'interprétation se fait la plupart du temps vers l'anglais et de l'anglais puisque la majorité des Canadiens sont anglophones. Tout dépend aussi du contact entre les langues. Au Québec, l'interprétation se fait plutôt en français. Nous évitons l'interprétation-relais dans la mesure du possible.

Un bon exemple de cela est le sommet du G8, pour lequel nous sommes à organiser la prestation de services. Si possible, nous essayons de trouver des interprètes qui peuvent traduire du français au japonais ou de l'allemand à l'italien. Cependant, il serait utopique de penser que nous pourrons couvrir toutes les combinaisons linguistiques, alors nous faisons de notre mieux.

(1130)

Le président:

Monsieur Saganash.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Je remercie les témoins de leurs présentations très intéressantes.[Traduction]

Monsieur Ball, votre exemple lié à votre code de déontologie a fait vibrer une corde sensible chez moi. C'est un aspect très important dont il faut parler.[Français]

Monsieur Déry, je vais commencer par vous.

Admettons que la conclusion de l'étude que nous sommes en train de faire soit positive et que le Comité et le Parlement acceptent l'interprétation des langues autochtones au Parlement — ce que je souhaite depuis mon élection en 2011, comme le démontrent mes discussions avec la greffière à l'époque et avec les greffiers de la Chambre —, à quel moment cela pourrait-il avoir lieu au Parlement?

Est-ce que je pourrai, d'ici un an et demi — car je partirai d'ici un an et demi —, parler cri et faire mon discours en cri à la Chambre dans la présente législature?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Je me ferai un plaisir d'y répondre. Il s'agit d'une question très importante.

Je vais avancer l'hypothèse que le Comité accepte les recommandations de M. Wolvengrey, un témoin qui a comparu devant le Comité. Il vous a recommandé de vous concentrer sur l'interprétation des quatre ou cinq langues autochtones les plus connues ou des langues parlées par les parlementaires.

Ce qui suit n'est qu'une supposition. Le Parlement pourrait décider d'offrir des services d'interprétation en langue autochtone une journée par semaine, par exemple le vendredi. Le ministère pour lequel je travaille demandera donc des propositions pour s'assurer d'avoir des interprètes sous contrat. Ces derniers ne pourront donc pas dire qu'ils ne sont pas disponibles le vendredi pour travailler au Parlement parce qu'ils ont un autre contrat. Tous les vendredis, ou toutes les deux semaines, ils vont servir le Parlement en faisant l'interprétation dans les langues qui seront choisies.

Grâce aux nouvelles installations du Parlement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, des barrières tombent. Présentement, il y a deux cabines d'interprétation, comme vous le savez. C'est donc difficile de faire l'interprétation dans une troisième langue. Il faudrait installer des cabines temporaires, ce qui nécessiterait plus d'équipements. Dans les nouvelles installations de l'édifice de l'Ouest, trois cabines ont été installées. Cela permet donc plus d'interprétation dans une troisième langue, que ce soit les langues autochtones ou d'autres langues, quand il y a des invités.

Puisque ces barrières tombent, il devrait être plus facile de rendre ce service si le Parlement le demande. C'est difficile pour moi de répondre à cette question, parce que c'est une hypothèse et que cela dépendra du nombre de langues qu'on nous demandera d'interpréter. Toutefois, je crois que cela pourrait être mis en place quand même assez rapidement, à moins qu'on nous demande d'interpréter les 90 langues et dialectes autochtones, ce qui pourrait être très difficile. Si on choisit des langues pour lesquelles il y a des interprètes locaux, ce sera beaucoup plus facile. De plus, si la demande est constante, nous pourrons avoir des arrangements plus facilement pour répondre aux demandes. Les interprètes doivent aussi avoir une expérience parlementaire, ce qui est très important au Parlement.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je vous remercie. Je vois que le temps file.

Vous avez mentionné qu'il y a 100 interprètes sur votre liste, et qu'ils peuvent couvrir 20 langues autochtones.

Mettez-vous des efforts actuellement pour ajouter d'autres langues à cette liste de 20 langues autochtones?

(1135)

M. Stéphan Déry:

Oui et non. Comme je le disais, nous avons entamé des discussions avec plusieurs organisations pour voir comment faire la promotion de l'interprétation des langues autochtones. Nous faisons ces efforts dans le but de s'assurer, comme dans le cas de toute autre langue, que le Bureau est prêt à répondre à la demande, s'il y a une demande de la part du Parlement. Notre objectif est donc de nous assurer du plus grand réseau possible pour recruter le plus grand nombre d'interprètes possible. De ces interprètes, nous choisissons les meilleurs, avec la meilleure expérience parlementaire.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Donnez-vous des cours de formation et de perfectionnement à ces 100 interprètes qui apparaissent sur votre liste?

On parlait tout à l'heure de l'accréditation. Je pense que M. Ball a mentionné l'accréditation. À votre avis, qui devrait évaluer le niveau de capacité de ces interprètes? Les représentants du Nunavut nous ont mentionné, le greffier entre autres, qu'au Nunavut, il y a quatre ou cinq niveaux. J'ai demandé qui évaluait ces interprètes et à quel niveau ces derniers se situaient.

Y aurait-il un mécanisme similaire au Parlement?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je dirais que, selon l'ampleur de la demande du Parlement, nous mettrions les mécanismes requis en place pour nous assurer de remplir cette demande. Plus la demande sera importante, plus le Bureau mettra en place des mécanismes. Dans le moment, nous travaillons avec tous les organismes autochtones, comme le disait M. Ball, pour nous assurer d'avoir des références sur papier. S'il y a vraiment une grande demande, comme je le disais dans mon discours d'ouverture, nous sommes prêts à nous engager et à travailler avec les communautés autochtones pour nous assurer de développer cette profession d'interprète. Nous y travaillons déjà avec le gouvernement du Nunavut. [Traduction]

M. Romeo Saganash:

Ai-je écoulé mon temps de parole?

Le président:

Vous avez du temps pour une très brève question.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je vais faire de mon mieux.

Au-delà des conclusions de l'étude, si un élu d'origine autochtone s'exprime seulement dans sa langue maternelle, étant donné que vous avez le mandat de servir le Parlement, auriez-vous l'obligation d'affecter un interprète pour cette personne?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Si nous recevons une demande de services d'interprétation de la Chambre, nous y répondrons.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Je donne maintenant la parole à Mme Tassi.

M. Stéphan Déry:

D'accord.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Je vous remercie tous les deux de votre présence et de vos témoignages.

Permettez-moi de poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Saganash et son prédécesseur, M. Graham.

C'est nouveau pour moi. En fait, je ne suis pas certaine d'avoir bien compris. Si un député qui souhaite prendre la parole à la Chambre soumet une demande de services d'interprétation dans une langue X et fournit à l'avance le texte écrit de son intervention, allez-vous donner suite à sa demande?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Comme je l'ai dit, s'il souhaite obtenir des services d'interprétation dans une langue autochtone ou une langue étrangère quelconque pour laquelle nous n'avons pas de ressources internes, le député en question doit soumettre sa demande par l'entremise de la Chambre, tel que M. Ball l'a expliqué. Si, au titre du processus parlementaire, la Chambre accepte, elle demandera au Bureau de lui fournir des services d'interprétation de l'inuktitut à l'anglais, par exemple.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Qu'entendez-vous au juste par « la Chambre »?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je parle du Parlement, du greffier et du processus parlementaire interne. C'est une situation analogue à celle du projet pilote du Sénat. On nous a demandé de fournir des services d'interprétation en langue autochtone.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Jusqu'à maintenant, vous n'avez jamais reçu pareille demande. Actuellement, si un député souhaite obtenir des services d'interprétation, il faudrait que le greffier vous soumette une demande pour que vous fournissiez ces services.

(1140)

M. Stéphan Déry:

L'administration du Parlement doit présenter une demande au fournisseur de services que nous sommes. C'est notre mandat. Nous avons fourni des services d'interprétation en langues autochtones au Parlement à 33 occasions au cours des 2 dernières années. C'est donc dire que nous avons reçu ce genre de demandes.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Sur la question de la capacité courante, je comprends l'importance du code dont vous avez parlé, monsieur Ball. Pour que ce soit bien clair, pouvez-vous me dire s'il est prévu dans le code que l'interprétation peut se faire à partir d'un texte si l'organisme, c'est-à-dire la Chambre des communes, en a donné l'autorisation à l'avance? Nous comprenons que vous êtes tenus à un code, mais nous vous demandons de livrer votre interprétation à partir d'un texte. C'est une question de capacité. Je pense notamment à une situation où, parce qu'il est difficile de trouver quelqu'un qui peut faire l'interprétation dans un dialecte parlé d'une langue autochtone qui en compte plusieurs, on fournit un texte à l'interprète. Si la Chambre des communes vous soumet une demande d'interprétation à partir d'un texte, votre code vous permettrait-il de le faire?

M. Matthew Ball:

Sans vouloir dévier de la question, je précise qu'une traduction se fait normalement à partir d'un texte. Nous demanderions à la personne qui a fourni la traduction de lire le texte. Ainsi, le Bureau de la traduction pourrait affecter quelqu'un à la traduction et à la lecture du texte, certainement. En revanche, si un texte n'a pas été traduit par nous et qu'on le remet à un interprète, celui-ci se trouve dans une position délicate sur le plan déontologique s'il ne comprend pas ce qu'on lui demande de lire.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je comprends.

Donc, pour ce qui est du code et des obligations qu'il vous impose, ce n'est pas quelque chose que l'on peut vous demander de faire. Vous ne pouvez pas demander à un interprète de lire un texte traduit par un tiers s'il n'en comprend pas la langue de départ.

M. Matthew Ball:

C'est exact. Il serait incongru pour un interprète de lire un texte qu'il ne comprend pas.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est juste.

Avez-vous des difficultés pour ce qui concerne la capacité? Des témoins nous ont parlé de la diversité des dialectes. Je peux concevoir qu'au début... Il faudra probablement commencer sur une plus petite échelle. Selon vous, qu'est-ce qui serait raisonnable au début? Quand il s'agit des dialectes, si jamais la question se pose, pourriez-vous collaborer avec des interprètes qui vous seront recommandés? Est-ce une façon de faire envisageable?

Combien de langues et quelle approche recommanderiez-vous au Comité pour commencer?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Pour ma part, et je dirais que le même principe s'applique dans nos vies et nos activités, je vous recommanderais de commencer modestement et d'élargir les services à partir de ce qui fonctionne.

Selon M. Wolvengrey, un professeur de langues algonquiennes et de linguistique à Regina qui a témoigné devant vous par vidéoconférence, vous nous mettriez dans une situation extrêmement difficile si vous nous demandiez de fournir des services dans 90 langues. Vous pourriez commencer avec les langues parlées par les députés et, si vous avez des invités, nous ferions le nécessaire pour trouver un interprète dans sa langue.

Dans un premier temps, nous pourrions offrir des services dans les langues parlées par les députés, et bâtir à partir de là. Quand vous recevrez des invités qui parlent un dialecte pour lequel nous n'avons pas d'interprète, il faudra probablement que vous nous donniez un préavis. C'est ce qui se fait actuellement, et nous n'avons jamais refusé de demande. Nos nombreux contacts et partenariats avec les communautés nous ont permis de répondre à toutes les demandes que nous avons reçues.

Bien sûr, nous en avons reçu 33 depuis 2016, pas 300. Cela dit, un processus bien structuré augmentera nos possibilités de répondre à toutes les demandes.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien.

Et quelle devrait être selon vous la période de préavis? Vous avez parlé de délai raisonnable. De combien de temps parle-t-on? Il a été question de 48 heures. Est-ce un délai raisonnable pour vous permettre de répondre à une demande?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Tout à fait. Dans le cas des langues autochtones usuelles, 48 heures suffisent. C'est encore plus facile si nous connaissons déjà des interprètes locaux.

Je me répète, si nous ne recevons pas des demandes régulières du Parlement, les interprètes ne restent pas à rien faire en attendant nos appels. Par exemple, pour les travaux de ce comité, nous avons fait appel à Kevin Lewis pour l'interprétation, mais il n'est pas l'un de nos interprètes habituels.

(1145)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est juste.

M. Stéphan Déry:

L'interprète que nous avons appelé avait un autre engagement. Il n'était pas disponible. Nous lui avons demandé s'il pouvait recommander quelqu'un d'autre. C'est par son intermédiaire que nous avons recruté M. Lewis. Si je me fie à ce que j'ai lu dans les notes, il a fait du bon travail. Nous collaborons avec les communautés pour trouver des interprètes compétents, mais il est clair qu'une meilleure structuration des demandes faciliterait grandement notre travail.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vois. Très bien.

De combien de temps auriez-vous besoin pour mobiliser toutes les ressources nécessaires? Par exemple, si nous offrons à tous les députés de la Chambre qui parlent une langue autochtone la possibilité de s'exprimer dans cette langue, combien de temps vous faudrait-il pour mobiliser les ressources qui nous permettraient d'instaurer ces services?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Si je ne me trompe pas, la Chambre compte actuellement trois députés qui parlent une langue autochtone.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Effectivement.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Alors ce serait relativement facile pour nous.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Êtes-vous en train de dire que l'instauration des services pourrait se faire en une semaine?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je pense qu'il serait mieux d'attendre d'être installés dans la nouvelle Chambre des communes, où l'infrastructure sera déjà en place. Je ne connais pas la date du déménagement, mais dès que vous la connaîtrez, il sera...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je pense que l'instauration de tels services sera beaucoup plus facile quand nous aurons une troisième cabine et l'infrastructure requise, mais rien n'empêche de le faire dès maintenant, dans la Chambre actuelle.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je suis certaine que c'est de la musique aux oreilles de M. Saganash.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Nous allons continuer avec M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je réitère mes remerciements à nos témoins.

Nous avons parlé brièvement de la centaine d'interprètes inscrits dans votre banque, comme vous dites. J'aimerais savoir s'il existe un moyen d'obtenir non pas les renseignements personnels, mais du moins le profil de ces 100 interprètes? Il n'est pas nécessaire pour nous de connaître leurs noms, mais simplement les langues dans lesquelles ils travaillent, leur profil, et peut-être leur localisation géographique. Ces renseignements nous seraient très utiles pour nos travaux.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Sans aucun doute. Nous serions très heureux de vous fournir une liste qui ne donnerait pas les noms, mais seulement les lieux où se trouvent les interprètes et les langues dans lesquelles ils travaillent, qui sont au nombre de 20 environ. Nous pourrions établir des listes à partir des renseignements que nous avons en main. Nous n'avons pas de grande base de données, mais nous pouvons vous fournir ces renseignements.

M. John Nater:

Ce serait grandement apprécié.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, vous avez mentionné que beaucoup de ces interprètes travaillent ailleurs. Seriez-vous en mesure de nous donner des renseignements sur les emplois occupés par certains d'entre eux, et s'ils sont liés au domaine de la santé, de la justice ou que sais-je? Où les trouve-t-on quand ils ne font pas de l'interprétation pour nous?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Pour dire la vérité, je ne crois pas que nous serions en mesure de vous donner ces renseignements. Beaucoup de ces interprètes ne font pas ce travail à temps plein. La profession d'interprète n'existe pas pour les langues autochtones, contrairement aux langues officielles. Ils peuvent être des interprètes communautaires ou avoir un autre travail qui n'a rien à voir avec l'interprétation.

M. John Nater:

Je vais revenir à un thème qui a été abordé durant la première série de questions, soit la traduction-relais et la perte d'information qui peut découler du processus de traduction. À votre avis, y a-t-il atteinte à la Loi sur les langues officielles lorsque l'interprétation se fait d'une langue autochtone vers l'anglais, qui devient la langue-relais vers le français? Est-ce que la perte d'information attribuable à l'utilisation d'une langue-relais, qui peut être de l'ordre de 20 % selon ce qui nous a été dit, constitue une atteinte à la Loi sur les langues officielles?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Merci de poser la question, à laquelle je vais tenter de répondre. Je demanderai peut-être à mon collègue, M. Ball, de compléter ma réponse.

Il ne faut pas confondre l'interprétation et la traduction. L'interprète n'est pas tenu de livrer le message textuellement. Nous ne reproduisons pas mot à mot les paroles prononcées. Par exemple, si l'orateur dit « un virgule huit milliard deux cent soixante-deux millions cinq cent soixante-deux », un bon interprète dirait probablement « environ 2 milliards de dollars ».

Si l'interprète répète scrupuleusement chaque nombre, il risque de perdre le contexte et le fil du discours. Cette différence est très importante. Si un traducteur écrivait « environ 2 milliards de dollars », ce serait une mauvaise traduction. Il n'a pas le choix de donner le nombre exact, tel qu'il figure dans le texte d'origine. En revanche, puisque l'interprète doit rendre le sens du message, il peut dire « 2 milliards ». Ce n'est pas tout à fait l'objet de la Langue sur les langues officielles.

Il faut que le destinataire du message puisse en saisir le sens, comprendre ce qui a été dit. Si je puis dire, le but n'est pas de lui transmettre toutes les fioritures d'un message. Il se peut qu'il rate quelques belles envolées, mais il aura l'intention du message, et c'est ce qui compte.

(1150)

M. John Nater:

Le reste se retrouve dans le hansard. Le Bureau de la traduction traduit-il également ces textes, en s'assurant de l'exactitude...

M. Stéphan Déry:

Oui, le nombre exact figurerait dans le hansard.

M. John Nater:

Le Bureau de la traduction fait une traduction intégrale en vue de la production du hansard.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. John Nater:

Je voudrais revenir brièvement sur le code de conduite et ce qui en découle. J'aurais des questions au sujet des règles du Bureau de la traduction relativement aux conditions de travail. Je sais que les interprètes travaillent en alternance à la Chambre. Existe-t-il des règles strictes concernant la longueur des périodes d'activité continue entre les pauses ou d'une journée de travail pour les interprètes?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je vais demander à M. Ball de répondre à cette question.

M. Matthew Ball:

Oui, ces règles existent. Elles sont dictées par les normes internationales auxquelles le Bureau adhère. Les pratiques courantes au Parlement sont tout à fait conformes aux normes. La composition d'une équipe est fonction de la longueur d'un événement. Par exemple, si la durée prévue d'une réunion de comité est de deux heures, nous affecterons deux interprètes. Vous avez raison, les interprètes travaillent en alternance. L'interprétation est un travail exigeant sur le plan cognitif. Il serait impensable de demander à un interprète de donner son plein rendement pendant des heures sans pause.

Les interprètes travaillent également pour leurs clients, et il n'est pas rare que nous... Bien entendu, il s'agit de principes et de normes théoriques. Si une réunion dure 20 minutes de plus que prévu, nous n'affecterons pas une autre équipe. Cet exemple illustre un peu notre contexte professionnel.

M. John Nater:

Ces documents sont-ils accessibles au public?

M. Matthew Ball:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

C'est très bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Nous sommes réunis aujourd'hui pour trouver un processus. J'aimerais savoir si vous trouvez que ce que j'avance est raisonnable. À l'arrivée de chaque député à la Chambre, les langues autochtones dans lesquelles il s'exprime sont prises en note. Chacun se voit accorder un certain temps de parole, et on lui transmet un préavis à cet effet, afin que des députés, comme M. Saganash, puissent se prévaloir de ce droit. Si nous recommandions que le texte soumis de façon honorable soit lu, comment vous y prendriez-vous pour rendre cela possible, compte tenu du conflit possible entre notre règlement et votre code d'éthique?

Si nous décidions d'en faire un règlement, quelle serait votre réaction? Si nous décidions d'inclure dans notre Règlement qu'un député peut fournir le texte d'une intervention à la cabine d'interprétation, en vue d'en faire la lecture, et si cette façon de faire vous mettait en conflit avec votre code de déontologie, comment réagiriez-vous?

M. Matthew Ball:

Je pense que selon le règlement actuel, les députés doivent lire eux-mêmes leurs déclarations. Si on demandait au Bureau de lire les déclarations, il faudrait indiquer clairement qu'elles lui ont été fournies en vue d'être lues, pour le compte rendu. Je ne pense pas que nous accepterions que l'interprète s'exprime en son nom personnel. Nous ferions en sorte que la distinction soit claire. Je ne vois pas où est le problème.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est un bon point. Si un député s'exprime dans une autre langue que l'anglais ou le français, s'il remet le texte soit en anglais ou en français à l'interprète, et si d'après nos règles vous êtes tenu de le lire, pourriez-vous obtempérer ou alors, si c'est contraire à votre code de déontologie, est-ce que cela vous empêcherait de le faire?

M. Matthew Ball:

Le texte pourrait être lu, mais l'interprète ferait en sorte que l'on sache qu'il ne s'agit pas de son interprétation personnelle. Comprenez-vous la distinction? Si l'interprète...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment s'y prendrait-il pour faire cela? Est-ce qu'il dirait dans le micro, « Il ne s'agit pas de mon interprétation, et c'est tout?

M. Matthew Ball:

Oui, nous ferions une annonce. Nous le faisons parfois dans certains contextes précis. Généralement, dans bon nombre de nos affectations, si une vidéo doit être présentée, nous faisons une remarque pour dire que l'interprétation reprendra après la diffusion de la vidéo.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie de votre exemple. Merci encore.

Je pense que M. Saganash a d'autres questions à vous poser. J'aimerais qu'il profite du temps qu'il me reste, si c'est possible.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

J'ignore quelle est la nature de vos relations avec la centaine d'interprètes qui figurent sur votre liste. Au fil du temps, avez-vous eu des conversations avec eux au sujet du cadre très particulier dans lequel nous évoluons, c'est-à-dire le Parlement? Avez-vous parlé avec eux de la difficulté de traduire certains concepts?

Je m'exprime couramment dans ma langue, mais il y a certains mots que nous utilisons dans le contexte parlementaire, comme « filibustering » en anglais, par exemple. Je sais que beaucoup de chefs font systématiquement de l'obstruction, mais ça c'est une autre histoire. Donc, certains concepts existent dans notre contexte, c'est-à-dire le contexte parlementaire, mais ils n'ont pas d'équivalent dans les langues autochtones. Avez-vous déjà discuté de cette question avec les interprètes que vous utilisez actuellement?[Français]

Vous pouvez répondre en français, si vous le souhaitez.

M. Matthew Ball:

Généralement, il arrive que certains des interprètes que nous embauchons et qui oeuvrent aux comités parlementaires aient moins d'expérience parlementaire, voire aucune. Cela arrive souvent dans le cas des langues autochtones. Dans ces cas, nous envoyons un interprète principal qui les accompagne au cours du processus. Nous leur offrons de la documentation contextuelle pour expliquer ce que sont les comités parlementaires, le déroulement des réunions, les rôles des députés, du président, de l'opposition et de l'interprète, et le fait que l'interprète s'exprime à la première personne, au nom du témoin qui parle.

C'est donc ce que nous faisons à l'heure actuelle. Quant aux particularités d'une langue et des notions de ce genre, c'est effectivement à l'interprète de les connaître et de les maîtriser, et de faire le transfert entre les langues et les cultures.

(1155)

M. Romeo Saganash:

J'imagine que cela fait partie de votre code de déontologie.

M. Matthew Ball:

Oui.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que c'est le tour de M. Nater.

Le président:

Vous êtes le suivant sur la liste. M. Nater vient juste de parler.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est très bien, mais M. Nater aimerait poser quelques questions.

Le président:

D'accord. Pas de souci.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais parler un peu de technologie. Je sais que le Bureau de la traduction a mené divers projets dans le passé — par exemple, l'outil Portage. Quelles initiatives menez-vous du point de vue de la technologie en vue de mettre au point une capacité technique pour les langues autochtones?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je pourrais vous revenir avec plus de précisions, mais actuellement nous travaillons avec le Conseil national de recherches du Canada en vue d'incorporer l'anglais, le français et l'inuktitut dans un programme de traduction machine. Il ne s'agit pas d'interprétation. C'est différent.

Nous sommes en train d'étudier cela. Comme vous le savez, toutefois, Portage est un outil pour comprendre, mais pas nécessairement pour traduire. Il en va de même pour tous les autres outils que nous allons examiner, et plus particulièrement pour les dialectes, l'inuktitut, et d'autres langues autochtones. Comme vous l'avez entendu de la part de nombreux autres témoins, on ne s'entend même pas sur la graphie des mots, alors c'est un travail difficile.

Comme je viens de le dire, nous travaillons avec le Conseil national de recherches. Nous essayons de faire des progrès à ce niveau, mais j'avoue que les résultats se font attendre.

M. John Nater:

Le traducteur universel de Star Trek n'est pas à l'horizon, on dirait.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Dans le domaine de l'interprétation, absolument pas.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. C'est très bien.

J'aimerais revenir un peu sur l'idée de la traduction à distance. Vous avez exprimé certaines réserves à cet égard dans votre déclaration liminaire. Je ne suis pas retourné dans la nouvelle chambre depuis le printemps dernier, et à l'époque il ne s'agissait finalement que d'une pièce vide en béton. Mais j'ai cru comprendre que la troisième cabine d'interprétation ne se trouvera pas dans la chambre proprement dite. Est-ce exact?

L'une des préoccupations dont on nous a fait part, eu égard à l'interprétation, tient au fait qu'il est préférable de voir la personne qui parle. Si la troisième cabine d'interprétation ne se trouve pas dans la chambre, est-ce que cela présente des difficultés pour les interprètes?

M. Stéphan Déry:

Je vais devoir vérifier, parce que j'avais compris que la cabine se trouvait bien dans la chambre, lorsque je suis allé visiter.

À titre d'interprète, si vous ne voyez pas la personne qui parle, vous ne pouvez pas vous servir de son langage corporel pour trouver la bonne intonation. L'expression visuelle, comme on dit, vaut mille mots. Il est important pour l'interprète de voir la gestuelle. Aussi, c'est plus difficile de travailler à distance. C'est faisable, mais plus difficile, surtout si on ne peut pas voir l'interlocuteur.

M. John Nater:

La technologie existe, potentiellement, mais c'est la façon de l'utiliser ou la capacité de l'utiliser qui peut présenter des difficultés. Le problème ne vient donc pas nécessairement de la technologie.

M. Stéphan Déry:

Avec l'interprétation à distance, nous avons pu constater que lorsqu'une personne qui se trouve au Nunavut, par exemple, essaie d'interpréter ce qui se dit au Parlement, ici, c'est la largeur de bande qui présente la plus grande difficulté. Il y a une déconnexion. Parfois, la mauvaise qualité de l'interprétation sur le plan audio rend les choses extrêmement difficiles pour le participant.

M. John Nater:

Tout à fait. Je suis allé brièvement à Iqaluit pour une réunion du Comité, et nous avons appelé ici pour nous entretenir avec un groupe scolaire; il y avait un retard d'environ deux secondes sur la ligne, alors je comprends très bien les difficultés dont vous parlez.

J'ai terminé, monsieur le président. Merci.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre souhaite poser des questions? Il nous reste une minute.

Madame Tassi.

(1200)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

La seule question de suivi qui me vient à l'esprit concerne votre suggestion de choisir une journée en particulier — le vendredi, par exemple. Quel avantage y a-t-il à choisir une journée en particulier, pourrions-nous choisir n'importe quelle journée, du moment qu'il y aurait ce préavis de 48 heures? Pourquoi choisir un jour en particulier?

M. Stéphan Déry:

En ce qui nous concerne, dans l'industrie, nous avons réuni un groupe de 100 pigistes qui travaillent avec nous actuellement. Mais si la demande est constante, et si le Bureau de la traduction doit retenir les services d'un interprète en langues autochtones, alors nous l'embaucherons, comme nous l'avons fait pour bon nombre de nos interprètes dans les langues officielles. Nous comptons un effectif de quelque 70 interprètes. Nous faisons aussi affaire avec des pigistes. Mais si ce sont tous des pigistes, cependant, et que nous ne leur disons pas à quel moment ils seront appelés à se rendre au Parlement, alors ils pourraient accepter d'autres contrats.

C'est pourquoi, comme je le disais, un préavis d'une journée ou deux leur permet d'établir plus facilement leur emploi du temps et d'organiser leur vie professionnelle autour du travail au Parlement. De cette manière, on tend à obtenir une plus grande uniformité et, probablement, un meilleur interprète et une interprétation de meilleure qualité. Au fil du temps, ils vont acquérir de l'expérience avec les termes utilisés au Parlement, comme le mentionnait le député Saganash.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C'est très utile pour nous que vous preniez toutes les mesures nécessaires pour que cela devienne possible dans un délai raisonnable. Je pense que c'est très stimulant pour le Parlement et pour chacun d'entre nous, au Comité.

Pendant que les témoins sortent, et en attendant les nouveaux, j'aimerais demander quelque chose au Comité.

Nous pourrions entendre nos deux derniers témoins pendant la première heure de la prochaine réunion, si vous êtes d'accord. Il y en a un autre que nous pourrions faire plus tard, ce qui n'interromprait pas le flux des discussions, ou quoi que ce soit, et c'est celui du Northern Territory of Australia. Ce groupe n'est pas disponible avant la semaine du 22 mai, et ce serait en soirée, donc je vais le laisser de côté pour le moment. Jeudi, si nous recevions nos derniers témoins pendant la première heure, est-ce que vous seriez d'accord dans ce cas pour que nous transmettions nos instructions à l'analyste mardi, pour le rapport?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: La rédaction pourrait essentiellement commencer dès maintenant, parce qu'il ne nous reste plus beaucoup de travail à faire. Ensuite, nous pourrions quand même aller de l'avant avec le groupe du Northern Territory, si nous le souhaitons. Comme nous avons fait avec le Costa Rica, s'il y a de petits détails à rajouter, nous pourrions procéder ainsi.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant le changement de témoins.



(1205)

Le président:

Je vous souhaite de nouveau la bienvenue à la centième réunion du Comité.

Dans notre deuxième groupe de témoins, nous accueillons Jérémie Séror, directeur et doyen associé, Institut des langues officielles et du bilinguisme, de l'Université d'Ottawa. Ainsi que Johanne Lacasse, directrice générale, gouvernement régional d'Eeyou lstchee Baie-James et Melissa Saganash, directrice des relations Cri-Québec, Grand Conseil des Cris/gouvernement de la Nation.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence aujourd'hui. C'est formidable que vous ayez pu vous libérer.

Nous entendrons maintenant les déclarations liminaires de chacun d'entre vous, et nous commencerons avec M. Séror. [Français]

M. Jérémie Séror (directeur et doyen associé, Université d'Ottawa, Institut des langues officielles et du bilinguisme):

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, je vous remercie de votre invitation à témoigner aujourd'hui sur la question de l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Pour vous situer un peu, je suis le directeur de l'Institut des langues officielles et du bilinguisme et le doyen associé à la Faculté des arts de l'Université d'Ottawa. J'y suis également professeur agrégé.

Mon principal champ de recherche se concentre sur les dimensions éducatives, sociales et politiques du développement des littératies avancées. Je m'intéresse particulièrement aux démarches et approches pédagogiques qui favorisent le succès scolaire, mais aussi social, d'apprenants langagiers.

Mes travaux de recherche soulignent l'importance des langues comme moyen de socialisation et d'intégration. Elles sont porteuses de valeurs et de cultures. Elles sont souvent l'outil de construction identitaire et social par excellence. Apprendre à se servir d'une nouvelle langue, c'est développer des compétences qui facilitent la communication avec l'autre. C'est aussi une manière de s'exposer à de nouvelles façons de comprendre et de dire le monde.

Les langues sont ainsi de puissants outils politiques et de politiques linguistiques, qui visent à préserver, à encourager et à développer le plurilinguisme d'individus en société; elles sont perçues un peu partout dans le monde comme des moyens importants pour assurer une meilleure intercompréhension et une plus grande ouverture à l'autre dans ce monde de plus en plus marqué par la diversité et la nécessité d'échanges « intraculturels » et « intralinguistiques ».

Cette vision de l'apprentissage langagier et des bénéfices du multilinguisme est, bien sûr, au coeur des grandes politiques du Canada qui, depuis longtemps, est un chef de file dans le domaine de la didactique des langues et des politiques linguistiques visant à promouvoir le bilinguisme, français-anglais, dans notre contexte particulier.

En ce qui a trait au sujet abordé par ce comité, quoique les discussions au Canada aient souvent effectivement tourné autour de la question de l'apprentissage du français et de l'anglais, je confirme qu'il existe présentement un intérêt grandissant dans les universités pour des programmes et des initiatives qui mettent aussi l'accent sur le développement des langues et des littératies autochtones.

Cet intérêt reflète les recommandations de la Commission royale sur les peuples autochtones, en 1996, et de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, presque 20 ans plus tard. Ces deux documents ont tous les deux traité de la question des langues autochtones et fait appel à des initiatives visant à freiner leur déclin ou, conséquemment, à favoriser leur épanouissement.

Selon moi, il ne fait aucun doute que l'idée de permettre l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes servirait à faire avancer ces recommandations.

Permettre l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes rehausserait au palier fédéral le statut et la fonction symboliques des langues autochtones. Ce geste simple, qui permettrait de voir et d'entendre des langues autochtones dans le cadre des activités de la Chambre des communes, l'organe législatif élu du Parlement, entraînerait une valorisation de ces langues, des communautés qui s'y rattachent et des contributions des peuples autochtones au patrimoine canadien.

Pour atteindre ce but, il faudra rester flexible et prendre en compte plusieurs facteurs, y compris la grande diversité des premiers peuples du Canada — les Inuit, les Métis et les Premières Nations —, leurs besoins ainsi que le contexte unique de la Chambre des communes elle-même. Néanmoins, la tâche n'est pas impossible, à mon avis. Je crois que nous pourrions, en effet, nous inspirer d'initiatives similaires qui ont déjà été prises au Canada.

Par exemple — je suis sûr que cela a déjà été discuté —, la Loi sur les langues officielles des Territoires du Nord-Ouest de 1988, qui a donc presque maintenant 20 ans d'application, reconnaît déjà à l'article 6 que: « Chacun a le droit d'employer l'une quelconque des langues officielles dans les débats et travaux de l'Assemblée législative. » Au paragraphe 7(3) on dit que: « Une copie de l'enregistrement sonore des débats publics de l'Assemblée législative, dans sa version originale et traduite, est fournie à toute personne qui présente une demande raisonnable en ce sens. »

De même, la Loi sur les langues officielles de 2008 du Nunavut reconnaît les mêmes droits. Le paragraphe 4 1) de la Loi reconnaît que: « Chacun a le droit d'utiliser l'une quelconque des langues officielles dans les débats et autres travaux de l'Assemblée législative. » En vertu du paragraphe 4 3), « Des copies des enregistrements sonores des débats publics de l'Assemblée législative, dans leurs versions originale et interprétée, sont fournies à toute personne sur demande raisonnable en ce sens. »

(1210)



À mon avis, la Chambre des communes pourrait adopter des dispositions similaires à celles des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et du Nunavut. Nous pourrions aussi imaginer des procédures semblables à celle proposées par le Sénat qui prévoit de parler dans une langue autochtone, avec l'interprétation simultanée et avec des services de traduction, sous réserve d'un préavis raisonnable.

Du point de vue de la linguistique appliquée, permettre à des députés de la Chambre des communes de s'exprimer en langue autochtone reconnaîtrait non seulement leur droit d'exprimer leur culture et leur langue dans les débats, mais aussi de permettre à tous les députés de la Chambre des communes et au grand public canadien qui écoute ces débats de profiter des valeurs et des croyances encodées dans les langues autochtones. Le fait que l'on retrouve, dans chaque langue, des idéaux et des façons de penser différentes est souvent l'un des attraits relatif à l'exposition à d'autres langues. C'est ce que le Rapport de la Commission royale sur les peuples autochtones, intitulé « Un passé, un avenir » appelait: « une vision du monde fondamentalement originale, qui cherche à se manifester chaque fois que des autochtones se retrouvent ensemble ».

De telles dispositions et un partage ou un enrichissement possible des ressources qui existeraient au Sénat permettraient à la Chambre des communes de signaler de manière puissante son soutien à la préservation, à la promotion et à la revitalisation des langues autochtones et la reconnaissance de la place particulière qu'occupent les peuples autochtones dans la société canadienne.

Toutefois, pour qu'une telle mesure législative puisse être mise en oeuvre avec succès — je suis sûr que vous en avez aussi beaucoup discuté —, le gouvernement du Canada et la Chambre des communes devront mettre en place des stratégies et investir des ressources.

Je m'attarderai ici à l'une de ces mesures. Tout comme le gouvernement du Canada l'a fait au lendemain de l'adoption de la Loi sur les langues officielles, en 1969, une telle initiative nécessiterait probablement un investissement pour s'assurer que, dans les universités, les langues autochtones du Canada, la didactique des langues, la formation d'enseignants et finalement la formation de traducteurs et d'interprètes seront là pour assurer un bassin de traducteurs et d'interprètes et une relève d'interprètes professionnels qui seront nécessaires au succès de cette nouvelle mesure législative.

Selon moi, cet investissement et l'intérêt communiqué par le gouvernement du Canada auraient un effet multiplicateur important. Un investissement aiderait à placer sur un pied d'égalité les langues autochtones et les autres langues modernes et indiquerait à tous les jeunes étudiants intéressés à faire des études liées aux langues autochtones qu'il y a en effet des perspectives de carrière comme enseignants, traducteurs ou interprètes. À mon avis, il s'agirait d'un cercle vertueux intéressant.

Cet investissement permettrait aussi de répondre à l'une des recommandations du document « Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada: Appels à l'action »: Nous demandons aux établissements d’enseignement postsecondaire de créer des programmes et des diplômes collégiaux et universitaires en langues autochtones.

Une initiative telle que celle qui est discutée aujourd'hui permettrait de dynamiser ce genre de recommandation.

Au début de la mise en oeuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles, le Bureau de la traduction avait eu à faire face aux mêmes défis, c'est-à-dire qu'il devait trouver un bassin d'interprètes. Les étudiants en traduction ont été recrutés directement sur les campus. Certains étudiants se voyaient même offrir un incitatif voulant que leurs années d'études pouvaient compter comme années pour leur régime de pension s'ils travaillaient au Bureau de la traduction. Ces mesures positives ont eu pour effet de permettre aux universités de développer ces programmes, et au gouvernement, de disposer d'un bassin de traducteurs et d'interprètes hautement qualifiés. Ces derniers sont maintenant respectés de par le monde, vu la qualité de leur travail.

Bien évidemment, on ne parle pas ici du même ordre de grandeur en matière de demande de traduction et d'interprétation. D'une part, la demande serait plus aléatoire et ponctuelle si les mesures législatives s'apparentaient à celles des territoires. D'autre part, la source de la demande, avec quelques dizaines de langues autochtones toujours bien vivantes, serait très diversifiée, ce qui n'est pas le cas quand on traduit systématiquement le français et l'anglais comme langues officielles.

Nonobstant ces différences, il serait essentiel que le Parlement puisse compter sur des ressources humaines bien formées et compétentes. À cet égard, je souligne que la Chambre des communes et le gouvernement du Canada pourraient non seulement compter sur les universités, mais ils pourraient aussi, pour aider à fournir et à former des interprètes, compter sur l'expertise et la collaboration des communautés autochtones et de leurs aînés qui porteraient, j'en suis certain, un grand intérêt à toute initiative qui permettrait de faire vivre et entendre leurs langues sur la place publique. Permettre à des enfants, à des jeunes et à des aînés d'entendre la langue utilisée au coeur du Parlement serait un geste très puissant.

(1215)



C'est ici que je mettrai fin à mon intervention. Je vous remercie de m'avoir écouté. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité. [Traduction]

Le président:

Meegwetch.

Maintenant, je cède la parole à Mme Lacasse. [Français]

Mme Johanne Lacasse (directrice générale, Gouvernement régional d’Eeyou Istchee Baie-James):

Bonjour, monsieur le président. Wachiya. Kwe.[Traduction]

Nous tenons à remercier les membres du Comité d'avoir invité le gouvernement régional d'Eeyou lstchee Baie-James à comparaître, et nous espérons que notre exposé vous sera utile dans votre étude de l'utilisation des langues autochtones pendant les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Nous souhaitons aussi souligner les efforts de notre député de la circonscription d'Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, M. Roméo Saganash, en ce qui concerne la reconnaissance de l'importance d'utiliser les langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Meegwetch, monsieur Saganash.

Je m'appelle Johanne Lacasse. Je suis directrice générale du gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James, et membre de la nation Anishinabe.

Mme Melissa Saganash (directrice des relations Cri-Québec, Grand Conseil des Cris/Gouvernement de la Nation Crie, Gouvernement régional d’Eeyou Istchee Baie-James):

Bonjour monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs.

[La témoin s'exprime en langue crie.]

Bonjour à la famille!

Je m'appelle Melissa Saganash. Je suis directrice des relations Cri-Québec, Grand Conseil des Cris. Je suis également membre du Comité technique du gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James. J'ai donc l'honneur de travailler assez souvent avec Johanne Lacasse. Je suis aussi membre de la Première Nation des Cris de Waswanipi, à la baie James.

Aujourd'hui, notre exposé portera essentiellement sur des sujets ayant trait au modèle de gouvernance du gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James et aux principaux éléments de notre expérience pratique dans la mise en place de la traduction simultanée multilingue qui est utilisée par nos citoyens en français, en anglais et en cri.

Pour vous situer en contexte, et vous expliquer comment nous nous sommes retrouvés dans la situation d'offrir un tel service, il est important de comprendre l'essence d'un accord particulier qui a été signé entre la province et la nation crie.

Le 24 juillet 2012, le gouvernement du Québec a signé un accord avec le gouvernement de la nation crie, intitulé l'Entente sur la gouvernance dans le territoire d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James entre les Cris d'Eeyou Istchee et le gouvernement du Québec. Cet accord historique a entraîné l'abolition de l'ancienne Municipalité de Baie-James, où seuls les maires des municipalités et des localités de la baie James pouvaient gouverner, ce qui a entraîné la création du gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James. Cette nouvelle structure comprend aujourd'hui un siège à la table pour chacun des chefs élus, en plus des maires du territoire — une première du genre au pays. Cette entente a permis la modernisation du régime de gouvernance qui prévalait jadis dans le territoire, et promeut l'inclusion du territoire d'Eeyou dans le processus décisionnel.

Essentiellement, le gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James favorise désormais une participation importante des Cris dans le processus de décision entourant les terres et les ressources partagées. Le nouveau gouvernement régional reflète une vision d'un territoire fondé sur les principes nobles de l'inclusion, de la démocratie et de l'harmonie sociale.

(1220)

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

J'aimerais vous décrire brièvement notre territoire désigné, le territoire d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James. Comme vous le savez probablement, il chevauche les circonscriptions électorales fédérales d'Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou et Abitibi—Témiscamingue.

Le territoire couvre une grande partie du nord du Québec, et se situe entre le 49e et le 55e parallèle au Québec. Il représente une superficie d'environ 277 000 kilomètres carrés, si on inclut toutes les terres de catégorie III de notre territoire. Bien entendu, cela exclut les terres de catégorie I et II, ainsi que les territoires municipaux. Nous comptons quatre municipalités et neuf collectivités cries.

Dans l'ensemble, il est question d'un territoire qui représente environ 17 % de la superficie du Québec. Il s'agit donc de la municipalité la plus étendue au monde. Si on regarde la densité de la population, elle représente environ 0,05 habitant par kilomètre carré. La population est estimée à près de 20 000 Cris et 17 000 Jamésiens.

Pour ce qui est de la composition de notre gouvernance locale, le gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James repose sur un conseil qui, pour la dixième année, est formé de 11 représentants cris et 11 représentants jamésiens ainsi que d'un représentant sans droit de vote qui est nommé par le gouvernement du Québec.

Les représentants cris sont formés du Grand Chef et du vice Grand chef du Grand Conseil des Cris et du gouvernement de la nation crie, ainsi que de neuf membres qui sont des chefs de communautés cries élus par le conseil du Grand Conseil et le gouvernement de la nation crie.

Quant aux représentants jamésiens, ils sont formés de membres élus de conseils municipaux locaux, dont la majorité sont des maires et, bien entendu, des conseillers de Chapais, Chibougamau, Lebel-sur-Quévillon et Matagami, ainsi que des non-Cris dans le territoire d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James.

Si on regarde le modèle de gouvernance et le concept de gouvernement régional, il se trouve que notre gouvernement régional est régi par la Loi sur les cités et villes du Québec, laquelle est pertinente aujourd'hui parce que nous sommes tenus de recourir à un processus d'appel d'offres public pour tous nos services professionnels.

Le président du conseil est désigné en alternance par les représentants cris et les représentants jamésiens pour un mandat de deux ans, il alterne donc tous les deux ans.

Il se tient au moins six réunions régulières du conseil chaque année. Les réunions du conseil se déroulent en divers endroits dans tout le territoire, soit dans les municipalités jamésiennes, et dans les neuf collectivités cries. L'endroit où se tient la réunion du conseil est choisi à tour de rôle, ce qui signifie qu'une municipalité jamésienne sera suivie d'une collectivité crie, et ainsi de suite. Au total, il se tient donc trois réunions régulières du conseil dans les collectivités cries, et trois autres réunions régulières du conseil dans l'une ou l'autre de nos quatre municipalités.

Fait intéressant, les membres du conseil peuvent participer à une conférence téléphonique, au plus une fois par année, dans l'éventualité où ils auraient un empêchement de se présenter en personne.

(1225)



Les documents déposés lors des réunions du conseil et les présentations sont mis à la disposition des membres en anglais et en français, et fournis deux semaines à l'avance, dans la mesure du possible. Nous bénéficions des services d'un traducteur à l'interne qui traduit de l'anglais vers le français, et inversement.

Les services de traduction simultanée sont offerts en anglais, en français et en cri pendant les réunions du conseil. Les réunions sont aussi diffusées en continu en direct par l'entremise d'un radiodiffuseur cri dans les collectivités de langue crie, dans la mesure du possible.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Voici quelques-uns des principes directeurs qui régissent la mise en place des services de traduction simultanée que nous fournissons.

Étant donné que le Gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James a été créé en vue d'assurer l'inclusion et la participation du peuple cri ou Eeyou au processus décisionnel concernant les terres et les ressources partagées, les principes qui nous guident sont fondés sur les cadres législatifs. Voici quelques extraits que nous vous communiquons sur le contenu de l'entente. Dans la Loi instituant le Gouvernement régional d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James, à l'article 36 du chapitre VII: Le Gouvernement régional doit, au besoin, prendre les mesures nécessaires afin que tout texte destiné à être compris par un Cri soit traduit en cri ou en anglais. Rien dans le premier alinéa ne doit être interprété comme autorisant une atteinte au droit de travailler en français au sein du Gouvernement régional...

De plus, j'aimerais citer le chapitre V de l'Entente sur la gouvernance dans le territoire d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James entre les Cris d'Eeyou Istchee et le gouvernement du Québec. À l'article 108 du chapitre V des Règles d'opération, on peut lire: 108. Le cri et le français sont les langues principales du Gouvernement régional. 109. Le Gouvernement régional peut utiliser soit le français soit l'anglais dans ses communications internes et comme langue de travail. 110. Un citoyen peut communiquer verbalement ou par écrit avec le Gouvernement régional, y compris lors des séances du conseil, en cri, en anglais ou en français. 111. Les textes et les documents préparés pour les individus cris ou pour la population crie en général sont traduits en cri ou en anglais, incluant tout document permettant à l'usager d'exercer un droit ou de remplir une obligation.

Nous nous sommes montrés proactifs également eu égard à l'article 13.2 de la Déclaration sur les droits des peuples autochtones afin d'assurer que des mesures efficaces soient prises pour protéger ce droit et « faire en sorte que les peuples autochtones [sur notre territoire] puissent comprendre et être compris dans les procédures politiques...et administratives, en fournissant, si nécessaire, des services d'interprétation ou d'autres moyens appropriés ».

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

Nous aimerions partager certaines considérations liées à la mise en place de nos services de traduction simultanée. Il s'agit des considérations les plus pratiques que nous avons dû affronter au moment de la mise en oeuvre de nos services de traduction.

Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, le fait que nous soyons régis par la Loi sur les cités et villes signifie que nous sommes également tenus de recourir à un processus d'appel d'offres public pour assurer la prestation des services de traduction simultanée.

Il faut aussi tenir compte des frais additionnels que représentent les services de traduction simultanée. C'est un facteur important. Les revenus du Gouvernement régional sont essentiellement — et je dirais, pratiquement exclusivement — fondés sur les recettes tirées des taxes foncières payées par les citoyens possédant des terres de catégorie III sur notre territoire. Les frais sont donc couverts par les recettes fiscales qui sont produites.

Nous avons aussi envisagé la possibilité de créer une banque d'interprètes qualifiés et disponibles en langue crie qui sont engagés sur une base contractuelle.

Nous avons également pris en considération le fait de devoir composer avec les divers dialectes cris parlés dans le territoire. Il existe donc un dialecte des Cris du Nord, un dialecte des Cris du Sud, et également un dialecte des Cris de l'Intérieur, et un dialecte des Cris de la Côte et nous avons dû en tenir compte.

Les aspects techniques du contenu en ce qui a trait aux affaires municipales et aux autres sujets sont de nature très technique. Il est donc question d'affaires municipales et d'aménagement du territoire, et ce sont d'autres aspects dont il a fallu tenir compte. Nous avons aussi étudié l'espace requis pour accueillir des cabines d'interprétation et des lieux de travail pour les techniciens qui accompagnent nos interprètes. Nous avons donc prévu une cabine pour les interprètes en français et en anglais, et une autre pour les interprètes en cri. Nous disposons aussi d'un espace de travail pour les deux techniciens qui accompagnent les quatre interprètes.

Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, les frais comprennent les honoraires des interprètes plus les frais d'hébergement et de voyage. Je dirais que, globalement, les coûts de traduction se situent entre 100 000 $ et 150 000 $ par année pour le Gouvernement régional.

Le fait est que nous tenons nos réunions dans des régions éloignées, et cela comprend des localités aussi reculées dans le Nord que Whapmagoostui, qui n'a aucune route d'accès terrestre. Et il est vrai que c'est difficile d'avoir accès à une connexion Internet haute vitesse fiable dans certaines régions éloignées.

En ce qui a trait à l'accès à des lignes téléphoniques fiables, parce que les membres peuvent en effet appeler ou se réunir par vidéoconférence, il nous faut deux lignes téléphoniques séparées. Une ligne pour l'anglais et le français, et une deuxième ligne pour les membres qui ont besoin d'une traduction en cri.

Nous avons fait l'essai de nouvelles technologies, comme la traduction à distance, mais ce n'est pas encore au point, et ce, pour la simple raison que nous devons composer avec différentes considérations — c'est-à-dire, la diffusion en direct en continu, la traduction simultanée, et les membres qui souhaitent nous joindre au téléphone — ce qui explique que nous n'avons pas encore trouvé comment introduire de nouvelles technologies pour la traduction à distance. J'écoutais la présentation tout à l'heure. C'est très difficile. Nos interprètes nous ont confié qu'ils préféraient se trouver sur place pour faire la traduction.

(1230)



Il faut aussi tenir compte de la radiodiffusion, c'est un autre facteur qui entre en considération.

Je dois dire que la valeur ajoutée liée à la qualité de la mise en oeuvre de nos services de traduction simultanée repose sur le dévouement et l'engagement des services publics du Gouvernement régional qui exercent leurs activités malgré des contraintes de temps et même parfois, beaucoup de pression. Plus précisément, nos fonctionnaires ont réussi, grâce à une transformation en profondeur sur le plan administratif, à faire en sorte que les services soient fondés sur une approche inclusive de tous les citoyens se trouvant sur notre territoire.

(1235)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Meegwetch. Mahsi cho.

Maintenant, nous avons quelques questions à vous poser. Nous allons commencer avec Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Simms.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Séror. Vous avez dit que l'utilisation des langues autochtones, ici au Parlement, aurait définitivement une incidence sur le désir de parler ces langues ou que cela inciterait des gens à vouloir les parler encore. J'ai entendu aussi, de la part d'un témoin de ce comité, l'expression d'un objectif audacieux de notre Bureau de la traduction qui consisterait à aider les universitaires à normaliser certaines de ces langues afin d'en établir une forme définitive dans les cas où une certaine controverse entoure l'utilisation d'un mot précis dans un contexte donné.

Qu'en pensez-vous? Dans quelle mesure croyez-vous que le travail qui est accompli ici par l'entremise de notre Bureau de la traduction pourrait faciliter les travaux que vous réalisez dans votre département?

M. Jérémie Séror:

Je pense en effet que ce serait l'un de ces gestes qui déclenchent toute une série de conséquences intéressantes. Cela inciterait vraiment à régler une série de problèmes, y compris par exemple, comment écrire un mot en particulier ou comment rendre le mieux possible l'expression anglaise filibustering. Il s'agit du genre de problèmes pour lesquels, compte tenu de l'existence d'un besoin, on ressent soudainement qu'il serait important de discuter de ces choses et de chercher une solution, en collaboration avec toutes les parties intéressées, bien entendu.

Dès que l'on commence à appliquer ces solutions, on est à même de voir si elles sont efficaces, et par la suite, le cercle vertueux se met en place. Au fil du temps, ce que l'on souhaiterait voir arriver, c'est que certains de ces problèmes cessent d'en être. Autrement dit, ils deviendraient des éléments qui se sont stabilisés jusqu'à un certain point.

Le fait d'éprouver un besoin réel de réfléchir à la manière d'interpréter ou de traduire certains termes ou concepts crée le besoin d'une discussion entre universitaires, mais aussi avec les étudiants qui travaillent avec les universitaires, autrement dit, les traducteurs de demain. C'est ce qui déclenche le... Je ne veux pas dire que ces conversations n'ont pas lieu actuellement, mais plutôt que le fait qu'un objectif réel soit lié à certaines de ces conversations, de ces fonctions, contribue certainement à créer une motivation à se pencher sur ces éléments et à investir le temps et l'énergie souvent nécessaires pour trouver une solution.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pensez-vous que les universités ont un rôle à jouer pour aider le Bureau de la traduction à atteindre ses objectifs et à le faire adéquatement?

M. Jérémie Séror:

Oui, je pense que oui. Bien entendu, je ne représente pas l'école de traduction, même si nous travaillons dans le même édifice et que nous échangeons, mais il est clair que le domaine de la traduction possède une expertise et, qu'au fil du temps, il s'est penché sur des enjeux tels que le défi d'avoir à traduire quelque chose d'intraduisible. Il ne s'agit jamais de produire une traduction littérale. Il existe différentes théories, et aussi des pratiques exemplaires qui peuvent différer. On peut penser à l'élaboration de ressources qui peuvent être utilisées, et à certains types de formation qui peuvent être mis au point. Je pense que la théorie... ou la connaissance des pratiques exemplaires ont un lien avec les personnes qui travaillent sur le terrain et qui mettent concrètement ces choses en application, et que l'interaction entre les deux ne peut être que fructueuse.

Si les difficultés sont en lien avec une langue en particulier, alors c'est dans cette direction que l'on sera tenté d'orienter les conversations. Toutefois, dès que l'on crée un nouveau besoin ou un nouveau type d'interaction, je pense que l'on peut voir que certaines universités sont disposées à réfléchir à ces questions, ou à appliquer leur savoir et à orienter la direction que pourrait prendre dans le futur la prestation de services d'interprétation et de traduction de qualité.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

À votre avis, quelles sont les langues autochtones les plus développées ou les plus enseignées dans les universités à ce jour?

(1240)

M. Jérémie Séror:

C'est une bonne question. Même si je ne connais pas toute la liste, les plus importantes qui sont enseignées à l'Université d'Ottawa sont le cri, l'ojibwa et l'inuktitut. D'année en année, leur enseignement dépend de la possibilité de trouver des personnes disponibles pour enseigner ces langues, et aussi de l'endroit où les divers groupes souhaitent que ces langues soient enseignées. Il arrive parfois que les étudiants soient invités à se rendre dans la communauté, et à d'autres moments, ce sont les enseignants qui viennent sur le campus.

Cela varie chaque année. Je ne pense pas qu'il y ait quoi que ce soit de réellement établi encore, mais pour le moment, ce sont habituellement les langues qui comptent le plus grand nombre de locuteurs.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vais céder le temps qui me reste à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci monsieur le président, et merci Ruby.

Là d'où je viens, chaque fois que l'on éprouve un problème, on cherche quelqu'un qui s'est buté au même problème dans le passé pour lui demander comment il s'en est sorti. Madame Lacasse et madame Saganash, en ce qui concerne la gouvernance régionale, je pense que vous avez beaucoup à nous apprendre, puisque vous devez composer avec un éventail plus large de langues et de dialectes que nous, avec seulement deux langues.

Vous avez mentionné deux ou trois enjeux. Vous tenez six réunions par année. À quoi ressemblent ces réunions, du point de vue de la traduction avec différents dialectes? Quel est le dialecte principal, et quels sont les différents dialectes avec lesquels vous devez composer?

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Juste avant d'entrer, je lisais un article. Lorsque nous avons commencé à tenir nos séances du Gouvernement régional dans le Nord, un journaliste local est venu observer le déroulement de la réunion.[Français]

Selon lui, Chibougamau avait des airs de Nations unies.[Traduction]

C'est exactement à cela que ça ressemble. Vous voyez 22 personnes assises autour d'une table. On entend parler le cri, le français et l'anglais. Le président peut s'exprimer en anglais, en français ou en cri, selon le sujet abordé ou la personne à laquelle il s'adresse. À côté de la grande table se trouve la cabine d'interprétation aménagée de manière à ce que l'interprète puisse voir tout le monde dans la pièce. Il y a aussi des techniciens qui ont réussi à faire des merveilles avec les lignes téléphoniques. Il y a trois lignes. Je sais qu'à partir du moment où on veut plus que deux lignes les choses commencent à se compliquer un peu sur le plan technique, mais ils ont réussi à s'en sortir.

Et aujourd'hui, nous sommes transportables. Nous pouvons passer prendre les membres du Gouvernement régional, et si vous nous dites où aller, nous allons nous y rendre et offrir les services dans les trois langues.

M. Scott Simms:

Lorsque vous dites que les services sont transportables, voulez-vous parler de tout l'appareillage technique nécessaire pour l'interprétation?

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Oui, nous transportons tout le matériel. Comme pour une tournée. Nous avons des machinistes itinérants.

M. Scott Simms:

Vraiment?

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est très intéressant. Je suis content d'avoir posé la question. C'est vraiment quelque chose de spécial, parce que ma prochaine question porte sur...

Le président:

Vous n'avez pas de prochaine question.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Simms, et peut-être que je vais poser sa question. Qui sait?

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup.

M. John Nater:

Pour ce qui est du coût inhérent au transport des services d'interprétation ou de traduction du gouvernement, s'ils sont entièrement transportables aujourd'hui, cela entraîne donc très peu de frais additionnels par rapport aux investissements de départ, parce que vous avez conçu le système de cette manière.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

L'entente qui prévoit la traduction dans les trois langues a été signée en 2012. Honnêtement, il y a eu un peu de tâtonnements dans les débuts. En effet, au début, nous louions tout le matériel, et nous devions demander à des fournisseurs de transporter l'équipement. Nous avons vite réalisé qu'il serait beaucoup plus efficace et économique d'acheter le matériel. Il nous appartiendrait alors. Les services deviendraient ceux du gouvernement régional, et nous nous occuperions de la prestation.

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

Pour ce qui est de la rentabilité, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, nous sommes assujettis au processus d'appel d'offres. Nous avons aussi tiré des leçons de l'expérience des appels d'offres. Nous avons récemment retenu les services d'un nouveau fournisseur de services de traduction simultanée. Nous répétons ce processus tous les deux ans. Lorsque nous changeons de fournisseur, nous devons prendre le temps d'expliquer certaines situations en regard des déplacements dans les régions très éloignées. Le fournisseur de services doit s'intégrer et travailler avec les techniciens de la radiodiffusion. Ils doivent tous apprendre à travailler en étroite collaboration avec nos techniciens de la diffusion continue en direct.

Et bien entendu, le coût est un facteur important, aussi nous travaillons avec les fournisseurs de services qui présentent la soumission la plus basse. Les budgets sont établis en fonction des soumissions présentées par les fournisseurs de services.

(1245)

M. John Nater:

Essentiellement, vous publiez un appel d'offres ou une demande de propositions stipulant que vous avez besoin de services d'interprétation ou de traduction pour six réunions qui doivent... Puis diverses entreprises qui travaillent avec des interprètes vous envoient...

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

C'est exact pour la traduction de l'anglais vers le français. Bien entendu, nous avons une banque d'interprètes cris qui sont intégrés aux services fournis par l'entrepreneur en traduction simultanée.

M. John Nater:

Maintenant, en ce qui concerne les interprètes cris, vous avez mentionné dans vos observations liminaires que quatre dialectes étaient répandus. Est-ce que vous disposez de quatre interprètes cris distincts, ou est-ce que vous fonctionnez un peu au hasard pour ce qui est de la façon de fonctionner à cet égard?

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

Ces interprètes sont issus de la localité. J'ai mentionné que les réunions se tiennent en divers endroits, en alternance.

Nous n'avons pas d'interprètes dans les différents dialectes. Tout repose sur le principe que les Cris tiennent des assemblées publiques depuis la signature de la Convention de la Baie James et du Nord québécois, la CBJNQ. Ils ont toujours trouvé le moyen de communiquer entre eux. Je ne pense pas qu'il soit nécessaire, à ce moment-ci, de trouver des personnes qui parlent les divers dialectes. Ils se comprennent entre eux. Ils travaillent ensemble depuis la signature de la Convention.

Du point de vue du processus, nous tenons aussi à offrir aux gens sur place la possibilité de faire la traduction lorsque nous nous rendons dans les collectivités pour y tenir nos assemblées. Ces gens possèdent habituellement des aptitudes minimales à produire une traduction de qualité. Ils l'ont déjà fait lors de procédures judiciaires, pendant la prestation de soins médicaux et lors de leurs propres assemblées publiques.

Je dois dire qu'il n'est pas très difficile de recruter des interprètes cris parce que nos citoyens accordent beaucoup d'importance aux initiatives d'autonomie gouvernementale. De ce point de vue, ils sont fiers de servir, et de servir leurs institutions — le gouvernement régional, le gouvernement de la nation crie ou toute autre entité crie qui tient des assemblées publiques au sein de leurs institutions. Je pense qu'ils ressentent le besoin d'agir à titre d'interprète pour servir le grand public et nos citoyens.

M. John Nater:

Cela fait vraiment plaisir à entendre.

Pour ce qui est de l'âge des personnes qui fournissent ces services, est-ce qu'il y beaucoup de jeunes parmi elles? Quelle est la tranche d'âge des interprètes?

Je sais que M. Saganash a parlé de sa mère qui est une locutrice exceptionnelle en langue crie. Est-ce que des membres de la jeune génération qui connaissent la langue fournissent aussi des services d'interprétation?

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

Je pense qu'il faut promouvoir ces services d'interprétation et encourager la jeune génération à fournir des services d'interprétation de qualité.

Ce matin, je discutais avec Melissa, et je lui disais justement qu'une génération plus âgée de représentants élus ont pris leur retraite maintenant, et que nous faisons appel à leurs services. Ils possèdent une expérience pratique du domaine politique et administratif. Ils sont souvent disponibles, puisqu'ils sont retraités. Ils possèdent également une connaissance générale des procédures de notre conseil.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais revenir sur le problème avec les deux lignes téléphoniques séparées... Si j'appelle pendant une réunion à titre de représentant élu, et si je parle pendant la réunion, est-ce que vous êtes en mesure de traduire à la fois ce que je dis pour les autres interlocuteurs, et de traduire pour moi ce qu'ils disent en même temps?

(1250)

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

Oui, tout à fait, et c'est la merveille dont Melissa voulait parler tout à l'heure.

Je ne possède pas les connaissances techniques...

M. John Nater:

Mais, ça marche.

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

Oui, nous faisons en sorte que cela fonctionne. Nos techniciens y parviennent.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Les techniciens arrivent sur place la veille de l'assemblée. Ce qui leur donne le temps de s'installer et de corriger les problèmes éventuels.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. J'ai vraiment apprécié votre témoignage. [Français]

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Saganash. [Traduction]

M. Romeo Saganash:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Et merci à nos présentateurs.

Je suis très impressionné de la rapidité avec laquelle ce Gouvernement régional s'est débrouillé après la signature de la convention avec le Québec pour travailler avec la population non autochtone dans le cadre de cette institution. Ces deux peuples ont vécu pendant 50 ans en s'ignorant, mais je trouve que ce que vous avez réussi à accomplir, en l'espace de quelques années seulement, est proprement fascinant.

C'est toujours un plaisir d'accueillir un membre de la famille au Comité. Il n'y a pas très longtemps, mon neveu, un chef de pompiers, a comparu devant un autre comité. Je suis vraiment honoré de voir ma nièce ici.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

C'est un honneur pour moi d'être ici. [Français]

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je vais d'abord m'adresser à vous, monsieur Séror.

J'ai écouté attentivement votre présentation. Vous avez parlé de l'importance des langues pour l'humanité ainsi que de l'intercompréhension, un terme que j'entendais pour la première fois, je crois. Vous avez fait allusion à des dispositions de diverses ententes qui ont été signées dans le Nord, dans les territoires, dont le Nunavut. Melissa a fait référence à l'article 13 de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, dans lequel on demande aux États membres des Nations unies de prendre toutes les mesures possibles pour que les peuples autochtones soient compris dans différentes institutions, incluant les institutions politiques. Le hasard a fait que l'appel à l'action numéro 13 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada parle des langues autochtones comme d'un droit ancestral en vertu de la Constitution.

Ce qui m'intéresse — et vous en avez parlé un peu —, ce sont les effets de la reconnaissance d'une langue autochtone sur les peuples qui parlent cette langue. Il est certain que l'effet sera positif si l'emploi de cette langue est reconnu dans une institution comme le Parlement du Canada.

Je voudrais que, dans cette démarche, on aille au-delà du symbolisme. Je pense que c'est important. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage sur les effets bénéfiques que cela aurait?

Vous avez dit, je crois, que les langues autochtones devraient peut-être avoir le même statut que les deux langues officielles du pays, soit l'anglais et le français. J'aimerais que vous nous entreteniez de cette question, que je soulève souvent. Les effets — et je parle ici d'effets bénéfiques pour les langues autochtones — dépasseraient le simple symbolisme.

M. Jérémie Séror:

Je vais donner un exemple très personnel.

Je pense toujours aux jeunes. Il y a les adultes et les aînés aussi, mais c'est souvent vers les jeunes générations qu'on se tourne, quand on parle de la vitalité d'une langue dans une communauté. Quand on est locuteur d'une langue minoritaire, que ce soit une langue autochtone ou une langue du patrimoine, il y a un danger, quand on est enfant, de croire que cette langue est un jeu. Même si nos parents ou notre grand-mère nous parlent la langue, on peut parfois croire que c'est un jeu ou qu'on n'utilise cette langue que dans le contexte familial. Cela a une incidence.

Ce qui est intéressant, c'est qu'on se concentre souvent sur l'utilisation de la langue pour communiquer un message, mais la langue ne fait pas que nous permettre de communiquer. Elle permet tout le temps d'établir des relations et d'envoyer des informations sur le statut social des communautés. Dès qu'un enfant voit que la langue dépasse le cadre de sa famille ou de son contexte proche et qu'il la voit utilisée dans le grand public, cela lui indique que ce n'est pas un jeu, que c'est une véritable langue reconnue et utilisée. L'enfant réalise alors qu'il a le droit de s'en servir à l'extérieur de son cadre immédiat. De plus, cela envoie un message quant à la valeur donnée à cette langue par tout le monde dans l'espace public.

Ce genre d'effet est parfois inconscient. Les jeunes, et même les adultes, ne sont pas conscients de l'incidence de cela sur la façon dont ils se voient et sur leur propre utilisation de la langue, mais on sait que cet effet existe. Par exemple, j'ai grandi dans une région très anglophone de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, mais le fait de savoir qu'on parlait le français au Parlement et au Québec m'a encouragé à continuer à parler cette langue. Je voyais que c'était une langue réelle qui avait de la valeur et qui avait un rôle à jouer.

En linguistique appliquée, il est parfois question de l'imaginaire communautaire. Pour s'investir dans une langue, il faut pouvoir s'imaginer ce qu'on peut en faire et imaginer un monde dans lequel cette langue a un sens. Chaque fois qu'on donne une validité à des langues et que celles-ci sont utilisées dans toutes sortes de contextes, on enrichit cet imaginaire communautaire, ce qui a un effet de motivation.

(1255)

[Traduction]

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il me reste environ une minute.

Johanne ou Melissa, je vais vous poser rapidement mes trois ou quatre questions, qui prendront probablement le reste du temps.

Est-ce qu'il y a des membres de votre conseil qui sont unilingues, c'est-à-dire qui s'expriment uniquement en anglais, en français ou en cri?

Quel a été l'effet positif sur les jeunes Cris de constater que l'on utilisait leur langue dans votre institution?

Quel est le pourcentage de votre budget utilisé pour les services d'interprétation et de traduction? Combien de personnes avez-vous dans votre banque d'interprètes? [Français]

Mme Johanne Lacasse:

Je vais répondre à votre première question.

Effectivement, la majorité des représentants Jamésiens sont unilingues francophones. Quant aux représentants cris, ils utilisent la langue crie comme première langue et l'anglais comme deuxième langue.

On voit de plus en plus de jeunes représentants cris trilingues, mais la majorité des Jamésiens sont unilingues francophones. Les Cris, de leur côté, utilisent le cri et parfois l'anglais comme langue de travail.

En ce qui a trait à l'incidence de ces initiatives sur les jeunes, on a quand même remarqué une augmentation du nombre de jeunes intéressés à suivre cela de près, que ce soit par la diffusion en direct ou par les radios communautaires. Nous recevons de plus en plus de demandes de renseignements sur la vocation, la mission et les orientations du gouvernement régional. Les jeunes se sentent très interpellés par toutes les questions entourant la gouvernance, surtout sur le territoire où ils habitent, comme le territoire d'Eeyou Istchee Baie-James.

Maintenant, en ce qui concerne le pourcentage du budget, le gouvernement régional a un budget annuel de dépenses, en excluant les trois localités, d'environ 9 millions de dollars. Si on fait le calcul rapidement et si on englobe l'ensemble des coûts, c'est entre 120 000 $ et 150 000 $. C'est quand même considérable pour un territoire qui compte très peu de contribuables, d'où l'importance que les élus et les représentants du conseil misent sur les services d'interprétation. De plus, l'obligation d'offrir des services d'interprétation simultanée repose sur la nécessité d'assurer une transparence et une reddition de comptes, mais c'est surtout une question d'inclusion.

(1300)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci. Meegwetch.

Je pense qu'il nous reste assez de temps pour que Scott Simms pose une brève question.

M. Scott Simms:

Parce que nous avons toujours du temps pour les brèves questions.

Où en étions-nous? L'une des choses dont je voulais parler est la radiodiffusion en langue crie. Comment cette entreprise est-elle organisée pour travailler? En quelques occasions, lors de séjours à l'étranger pour discuter de certains enjeux, il est arrivé que les Premières Nations viennent sur le tapis, et aussi l'APTN. Ce réseau de télévision semble assez réputé dans le monde parce qu'il présente des émissions sur les Premières Nations, mais aussi parce qu'il les offre dans des langues autochtones. En ce qui a trait à la radiodiffusion en cri, comment s'y prend-on pour tenir compte des diverses langues?

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Dans le territoire, en réalité, il y a la Société des communications cries de la Baie-James, la SCCBJ. Il s'agit d'une entreprise de radiodiffusion régionale qui est établie à Mistassini, mais qui est dotée d'une antenne qui rejoint toutes les collectivités.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce qu'elle exerce ses activités en ligne?

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Oui, elle diffuse aussi en ligne.

M. Scott Simms:

Très bien.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Pour les besoins du gouvernement régional, lorsque nous tenons des assemblées, la Société envoie un technicien qui se charge de faire les connexions nécessaires.

Je me sers de termes dont j'ignore la signification exacte.

M. Scott Simms:

Ça va, nous vous suivons.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Donc, ils branchent les câbles quelque part, et l'émission est mise en ondes par la SCCBJ, la Société des communications cries de la Baie James, qui diffuse exclusivement en langue crie.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Lorsqu'ils viennent soit aux réunions du conseil du gouvernement de la nation crie ou aux réunions du Gouvernement régional, ils se connectent. Ils se connectent dans la cabine d'interprétation, en fait, dans la ligne de l'interprète. C'est ce qu'ils diffusent dans les collectivités, parce que la radio est encore le moyen de communication utilisé pour bon nombre d'entre elles.

M. Scott Simms:

Il me semble, dans ce cas, que ce que vous avez décrit lors de ma première série de questions, est la clé de la diffusion de l'information que vous souhaitez livrer dans toutes les langues et les dialectes que vous parlez.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

La genèse, l'origine de ces services que vous offrez, est-ce que vous l'avez élaborée vous-même?

Mme Melissa Saganash:

J'aimerais bien pouvoir m'attribuer le mérite de la SCCBJ, mais je ne le peux pas.

Les lignes directrices et le cadre de travail du Gouvernement régional, et l'entente correspondante sont conçus de manière à ce que nous devions servir les Cris. Nous disposons de la technologie. Nous sommes là-haut, à la baie James. Parfois, il n'y a pas de routes. Et parfois, il n'y a pas de WiFi...

M. Scott Simms:

Oui.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

... mais nous faisons en sorte de l'avoir là-bas. Et nous l'avons. ECN, c'est-à-dire le réseau de télécommunications d'Eeyou, est une entreprise de fibre optique. C'est une entreprise crie, qui appartient à des intérêts cris. Donc, nous appelons ECN avant de nous rendre dans une communauté où il n'y a pas de WiFi. Nous disons, « Bonjour, pourriez-vous nous donner une ligne, s'il vous plaît? Nous allons être là-bas pendant trois jours. » Et ils installent une ligne, ils la branchent littéralement dans le poteau de téléphone dehors. Ils font descendre une ligne, ils la passent à l'intérieur du bâtiment, et nous nous en servons pour alimenter la diffusion continue en direct, la radiodiffusion, les lignes téléphoniques, tout ça.

M. Scott Simms:

Puis-je faire un commentaire?

Le président:

Non.

M. Scott Simms:

Si je dis, « s'il vous plaît », est-ce que ça change quelque chose?

Le président:

Non.

M. Scott Simms:

Bon, très bien.

Merci beaucoup. C'était fascinant.

Mme Melissa Saganash:

Ce fut un plaisir. Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. C'est formidable que vous ayez pu vous présenter aujourd'hui, et votre exposé nous a été très utile.

Chers collègues, ne partez pas tout de suite. Après que j'aurai levé la séance, j'aimerais que vous restiez pour une minute de plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour que ce soit noté au compte rendu que nous nous sommes réunis, mais sans nous réunir.

Le président:

Tout à fait.

Comme nous en avons convenu plus tôt, pendant la première heure mardi, nous entendrons le dernier groupe de témoins, et le mardi suivant, nous nous occuperons des pétitions électroniques pendant la première heure, et des instructions relatives à la rédaction du présent rapport pendant la deuxième heure.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 01, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.