header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-03 PROC 101

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I'd like to welcome Bob Zimmer, and I want to abuse my authority as chair to ask everyone to join the outdoor caucus, which Bob chairs.

This morning, we pursue our study of use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

We are pleased to be joined by Malcolm Williams, co-chair, board of examiners from the Canadian Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters Council.

By video conference from Edinburgh we are happy to have the following officials from the Scottish Parliament: Ruth Connelly, head of broadcasting; Linda Orton, head of public information and resources; and Bronwyn Brady, sub-editor, Official Report.

We're also receiving a written submission from the U.K. Parliament about the use of Welsh. They didn't want to come on video; they're going to send it in.

Next Tuesday we're studying e-petitions in the first hour; and in the second hour, we are drafting instructions on indigenous languages to the House. We may have the subcommittee's report on sexual conduct between members.

We'll turn it over to our witnesses now.

We'll start with Ms. Brady from the Scottish Parliament. Thank you for taking the time to appear before us today.

Ms. Bronwyn Brady (Sub-Editor, Official Report, Scottish Parliament):

You're very welcome. Thank you for asking us to talk to you.

I thought we would start just by giving you a bit of social and political context for Gaelic in the Scottish Parliament. It all starts with the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005. That's an act that establishes a body that has “functions exercisable with a view to securing the status of the Gaelic language as an official language of Scotland commanding equal respect to the English language”. The functions of that body include preparing a national Gaelic language plan, requiring public authorities to prepare and publish Gaelic language plans in connection with the exercise of their functions and to maintain and implement such plans, and issuing guidance in relation to Gaelic education.

That body is known as Bòrd na Gàidhlig, and it takes the lead in identifying actions that it believes are likely to support the use, the learning, and the promotion of Gaelic.

The Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body, which is our legal identity, is the named public authority in the Gaelic language act, which means that we have a duty to prepare a Gaelic language plan. We've just submitted the latest version of that to Bòrd na Gàidhlig. Its main aims are stated as setting out how we will use Gaelic in community outreach, how we will support MSPs and staff to develop confidence in using Gaelic, and how we will integrate Gaelic into the fabric of the Parliament's thinking.

The main responsibility for facilitating the implementation of that plan sits with the head of our outreach services. In addition, we've got two Gaelic officers who provide support for Gaelic in the Parliament and in parliamentary outreach.

You can see that we're in an environment that is very supportive of the use of Gaelic. However, it's not new. It's not only since the 2005 act. When the Scottish Parliament was established in 1999, the standing orders were written to say that the Parliament shall normally conduct its business in English but members may speak in Scots Gaelic or in any other language with the agreement of the presiding officer.

Those bare bones of the standing orders are filled out by the Parliament's language policy, and that provides the detail for how we will implement our ambitions to support the use of Gaelic in parliamentary business. More recently, the Parliament took a further step and passed the British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015, which places similar obligations on us to support the use of BSL.

Linda Orton, who is the head of public information and resources, can talk about the language policy and the interpretation contract. Ruth Connelly, who's our head of broadcasting, can talk about the services we need to provide, including technical facilities, to support multilingual parliamentary business. If you have any questions about the Official Report, which is what we call our Hansard, and it includes Gaelic, I'd be happy to answer those.

Thank you.

(1105)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Are there any further opening remarks from the other two?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Not at this stage.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

Mr. Williams, go ahead. Maybe in your opening remarks, you can explain your organization and what it does.

Mr. Malcolm Williams (Co-Chair, Board of Examiners, Canadian Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters Council):

That's essentially what I'm going to do.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As was already stated, I am the co-chair of the Board of Examiners of the Canadian Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters Council. That would indicate to you that we have an examination process. Our main job is to certify language professionals.

CTTIC, our organization, is a national umbrella organization, representing professional associations in seven provinces—B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. PEI and Newfoundland and Labrador do not have a professional translators and interpreters association, nor do the territories. There was a professional association in Nunavut up to a few years ago, but to our knowledge that organization is no longer in existence. We have had discussions with representatives of the Nunavut government regarding certification of Inuktitut translators and interpreters, but those discussions are in the very, very early stage.

Regulation of occupations is within provincial jurisdiction, so it is our seven provincial affiliates that are responsible for certifying individuals. We certify individual language professionals, not companies. We certify them as professional translators, for written interlingual communication; interpreters, for spoken interlingual communication; and terminologists, in the interest of protecting the public. Interpreters can be certified as conference, community, medical, or court interpreters. Certification provides a reasonable insurance that the language professional will produce reliable work.

In the case of four provincial associations—those in B.C., Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick—provincial legislation confers upon certified members reserved title, meaning that only members in good standing of those associations can call themselves “certified” professionals. Under a reciprocity agreement, certification is portable from province to province, so I, as a certified member of ATIO, can apply to become a member of the B.C. association without having to re-sit any exams. Note, however, that the provincial associations do not have exclusive jurisdiction. Any individual or group in Canada can set up shop as a translation or interpretation service provider. As a result, many translators and interpreters may not see the benefits of certification. Note also that a number of other agencies across the country claim to accredit or certify language professionals and that many employers administer their own recruitment tests.

Now I'm going to talk about conference interpreting in the broad frame. Conference interpreters typically work in soundproof booths—there they are right there—providing simultaneous interpretation, with very little lag time between the delivery of the speech and the actual interpretation. They work primarily for conferences and legislative assemblies, with the Canadian Parliament, New Brunswick, and Manitoba being current examples of that. The work involves interpreting from language A, that of the speaker, to language B, that of some or all participants in the assembly, meeting, or conference.

The interpreters working for Parliament, our colleagues over here, are highly trained. A master's degree in conference interpreting from the University of Ottawa, York University, or a recognized university program in another country is now required. Most graduates also have first degrees in translation. Conference interpreters working at the Manitoba legislature are all certified by the Manitoba professional association.

I'll talk a little bit about our master's degree in conference interpreting. The University of Ottawa's master's program is an intensive full-time one, lasting 10 months. It is designed to train interpreters working in the two official languages. The program does not provide instruction in foreign language or indigenous language interpreting. The program is a demanding one for good reason. First, the clients—you, Parliament, and other federal institutions—are high-profile, so the consequences of error can be significant. Second, what the interpreter delivers is the finished product. There is no opportunity to revise, edit, or otherwise refine the product before the listener receives the message.

(1110)



Now I'll talk about community and medical interpreting, which is a different type of occupation. Community interpreters ensure communication understanding among the speakers of different languages, often by interpreting from language A to language B, and vice versa, within the same dialogue. The context may be social services, education, health care, or interaction with the legal system. Typical situations include medical appointments for immigrant families, meetings of school staff with immigrant children and their parents, visits by social workers, health professionals speaking to seniors and persons with disabilities, meetings at community centres regarding housing for families and services for immigrant women, and meetings between attorneys and refugee claimants. Listening to the client or service provider and then relaying the information or question to the other party is the community and medical interpreter's role.

Unlike the conference interpreter, the community interpreter is observable and participates in the dialogue. As noted earlier, interpreters can become officially specialized as provincially certified community or medical interpreters. However, as the aforementioned list of typical assignments illustrates, community interpreters in any case require knowledge of concepts and a vocabulary of specialized fields.

In Ontario, many take courses in legal and medical terminology offered by community colleges and by a dozen agencies making up the Ontario network of language interpreter services, and these agencies are authorized by the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship. In B.C., Simon Fraser University offers medical interpreting training in several Asian languages, and some private interpretation companies offer training to help people obtain certification. Regarding academic qualification for community and medical interpreters, a university degree is not a requirement, but most interpreters in the medical field community do have one.

There are other accreditation and certification bodies. The Ontario Council on Community Interpreting accredits community interpreters. Cultural Interpretation Services for Our Communities, an organization based in Ottawa, certifies health interpreters in over 60 languages, but not indigenous languages; and community colleges such as Humber College, in Toronto, offer a language interpreter training certificate.

Finally, on court interpreting, our provincial affiliates provide testing and certification in all these different kinds of interpreting. Court interpreters are typically located beside the judges' bench, interpret questions, answers, testimony, and other statements in court cases at the provincial level. CTTIC and its affiliates offer court interpreter certification. The Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General runs exams to accredit court interpreters for their purposes. In B.C., however, the Ministry of the Attorney General encourages court interpreters to become certified through our provincial affiliate.

Court interpretive training in Ontario is provided by a number of agencies. In B.C, Simon Fraser, again, offers legal interpreting courses, as does our provincial affiliate.

Finally, I have a few words on our actual certification procedures. To be eligible to apply for certification in translation or interpreting from a provincial association—one of our affiliates—candidates must demonstrate an acceptable combination of academic qualifications, in most cases, a degree in translation or modern languages, along with two years of professional experience, or five years of professional experience.

There are two main routes to certification: by examination, and by what we call “on dossier”. In the interest of uniformity and efficiency, the national body, CTTIC, organizes annual certification exams in translation, community interpreting, medical interpreting, and court interpreting. Translation exams are offered in many language combinations, from and to English and French. Community, medical, and court interpreting exams are offered in about 10 language combinations. No exams have been run for a language combination including an indigenous language.

For on dossier certification, you don't have to go through the exams; you can go through this other process. Candidates must provide proof of experience, the number of words translated, or years of interpreting, samples of their work, and references. In the case of conference interpreters in New Brunswick, for example, five years of full-time conference interpreting, or a master's degree in conference interpreting, plus two years of full-time experience are the eligibility requirements. Conference interpreters can obtain certification by another route, by passing the federal government translation bureau's freelance interpreter accreditation exam.

(1115)



Thank you.

The Chair:

Mahsi cho. Gunalcheesh.

Now we'll go to Mr. Simms for questions.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Ms. Brady, for the record—and this is very important to me—last year, I had the honour of being in the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood. I really enjoyed it. It's a beautiful building. It's well adapted. We have many things to learn from that Parliament as far as modern parliaments go, including languages. I even have my Scottish pin, which they were nice enough to give me. I don't know if that curries their favour but I just thought...

The Chair:

Your time is running out.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That would be my life story, Mr. Chair.

I want to get to a couple of things that you mentioned in your presentation.

To support MSPs, members of the Scottish Parliament, and staff to develop confidence in using Gaelic and integrate Gaelic into the fabric of the Parliament's thinking.... You're very interested and eager for them not only to speak it but also to learn it. You've integrated this into the daily proceedings.

How do you do that? If I were to say to you that I'm an MSP and I want to learn Gaelic, do I have to call someone in advance to conduct a speech within the Parliament itself?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Yes, you do.

At the moment, we have a limited number of MSPs who can speak Gaelic, and we ask for notification before they speak simply so we can provide the right infrastructure for them. We can make sure we have interpreters, and that the transcription of the speech can happen.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is it requested that whenever someone speaks in Gaelic, they have to notify or can I just get up and freely speak Gaelic and expect it to be translated into English?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

No, because we don't have interpreters on hand. If you want to make a substantial contribution in Gaelic, then we ask that you notify us so that interpretation provision can be made because if you make a speech in Gaelic, you'll be speaking largely to yourself as things stand at the moment.

(1120)



Members can and do have the odd sentence in Gaelic. That's fine. We can manage that. But to make it so they can participate properly in debate, we ask for notification and it's simply because the call on the resources would be very infrequent, I suppose. To maintain a bank of interpreters to be on hand for every debate just wouldn't be useful.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It's infrequent.

Just to follow up on that—this will be my final question to you—rule 7.1.1 says, “The Parliament shall normally conduct its business in English but members may speak in Scots Gaelic or in any other language with the agreement of the Presiding Officer”.

Are there any limitations on that or is it any language? Can I call someone and say I want to do this in Spanish?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Yes, you can. Not so very long ago, one of our ministers gave a speech in Norwegian, a language that she had just learned and wanted to demonstrate to all of us. It does literally mean any language.

Again notification is required because if we couldn't find an interpreter for that language, we might go back to the person and tell them if they speak it, no one will understand what they're saying because we can't find anyone to interpret it. But fundamentally yes, there is no restriction on language.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It seems to me there's an expansive program to encourage people to speak Gaelic.

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Yes, there is.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Williams, I've been in the Council of Europe for several years, and I've noticed when you sit in the assembly there, seven languages are available to people who want to understand that language.

My understanding is there are two relay languages there. Can you explain this concept? Obviously going from one language to the other is easier to do in the more general languages, but would I be right in saying there are relay languages and then there are major languages?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

For the major languages, yes. It could go from Slovenian to English, and then from English to one of the other—

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm sorry. I don't mean to cut you off, but I don't have a lot of time.

Let's bring this in domestically: if you're in a situation in which there are several languages, including Cree and other dialects, how would that work here?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

You could transpose that model, if that's what you're suggesting.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The relay languages would be French and English?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

That's right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right, and to do that, it would be.... I'm having a hard time understanding how that works, only because I'm not an interpreter.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Nor am I, by the way.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, but you certainly have a better understanding. The other day we heard about a conference that takes place in northern Quebec. If you were to do that, how would that work for us? Let's put it that way, in the sense—

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

You would have interpreters in separate booths, soundproofed, listening to the speaker who is speaking in Cree, for example. The person in the English booth would interpret into English, and then the person in the French booth would go from English to French.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. For those going to English, it would be straight into English, if English were the relay language.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

That's right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I assume that English is a popular relay language around the world. Is that correct?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

It would be number one.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It would be the number one language, primarily. Would French be considered a relay language, or we're just duplicating...?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

French, yes, certainly in Europe, and German as well, in Europe.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The qualifications for interpreters are something very important—

The Chair:

You have five seconds.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I want to say thank you to all the guests who are joining us by video conference. It was nice to speak to you. Thanks for the pen.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I had some similar questions, so maybe Mr. Simms will get his answer. You never know.

Mr. Williams, I might have missed this, but how many interpreters belong to your various constituent associations? I don't know if you mentioned that.

(1125)

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

It varies. I can give you some total numbers. The B.C. association has 400 members, the Ontario association has 700, and New Brunswick has 250. I would say that between a fifth and a quarter of those would be interpreters of various kinds.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. This is where I get to my colleague's potential question in terms of the qualifications.

You did mention some of the qualifications in terms of the certification. You mentioned that it's generally a degree and two years or five years of experience.

Mr. Malcolm Williams: That's right.

Mr. Blake Richards: How is that experience generally gathered and what other qualifications might there be that are generally expected?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Normally, for the on dossier certification process, we would expect candidates to submit a log of their work over the target number of years: where you did do your—

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's about the types of work as well.

Mr. Malcolm Williams: Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards: In order to do some of the work that is expected of your associations, they obviously have to gain experience in other ways. What's typical?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

They'd have to indicate what kinds of assignments they were involved in. For the community interpreter, for example, I gave that long list. There are medical visits and visits by social workers.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. That was actually the type of work that would be required to get the experience, not just what they do—

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

That's right, absolutely.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay—

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

I'm sorry for interrupting you, but as I said, certification is not a requirement in Canada. It's a nice thing to have, but it's not a requirement.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Got it.

How many interpreters within your association work with indigenous languages? What percentage or what number?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

None.

Mr. Blake Richards:

None? Okay.

Can you tell me a bit more about the proportion of the assignments? You mentioned a number of the different assignments that you do, whether it be court work, etc. Can you tell me a bit more about the proportion who would work with health care assignments, say, or government assignments, or justice- and court-related assignments?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

I hesitate to give a percentage, but a significant proportion would involve health care and visits with physicians, and a significant portion would also involve attorneys with immigrant or refugee families.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Those would be the two main ones, then; you're quite certain of that. I know you're hesitant to give a percentage, but would they be in the majority? Would they be more than 50% between the two of them?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

It would be in the 40% range, but that is really a guesstimate, and that's just for community and medical interpreting. I'm not talking about conference interpreting.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It might not be fair to ask you this, given that you have no indigenous interpretation under your association. You might have some familiarity though, so I'll just ask you, and if you don't have the expertise that's fine. Would you know if the same patterns and proportions would exist with indigenous interpretation?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Knowing I was going to be at this meeting, our Manitoba representative did some research. He came back to me two days ago, informing me that community medical interpretation services in indigenous languages in Manitoba are managed by an agency called Indigenous Health. The main languages interpreted there are Cree and Ojibwa, so that would be very much in a community interpreting environment. He also informed me that Nunavut manages a centre for Inuit needing health care services in Winnipeg. That centre provides interpreting services in Inuktitut.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Do you know, in terms of their interpreters, what percentage would be involved with those medical services?

(1130)

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

No, I have no numbers on that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. We've obviously been talking about various types of interpretation methods: relay interpretation, remote interpretation, and a couple of those things. I know they're generally not considered ideal situations by interpreters, obviously. I want to get your opinions on that, and whether that's something we should or should not look at and why.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

They're not ideal, but why not look at it? Remote interpreting is becoming very popular.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What do you see as the challenges in that?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

I still go back to the question beyond the technical aspect, which is of the certification itself. How are you going to guarantee quality interpreting? That is a question that should be asked.

Mr. Blake Richards:

All right. I was going to go to our Scottish officials, but with the 45 seconds I have left, we wouldn't even get started.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Saganash, please.

Mr. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to our guests.

I want to start with the Scottish Parliament. I wanted to ask the question Mr. Simms asked about rule 7.1.1, so I got the answer for that.

The other question I have is about that notification requirement. How much time is that? Is that a 24-hour or 48-hour notification that you require?

Ms. Linda Orton (Head of Public Information and Resources, Scottish Parliament):

Hello. I'm Linda Orton. I'm head of Public Information, and it's part of my remit to find the interpreters.

We use an external contractor who has access to any language we might request. Generally speaking, we like two weeks' notice, I'm afraid. We need that long-term notice, really.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Okay. Thank you.

Mr. Williams, I listened to your enumeration of your provincial affiliates. Was Quebec part of it?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Quebec is not part of our—

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Is there a particular reason for that?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Quebec was a member until 2011, and then decided to go its own way. Only Quebec can tell you why.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

All right.

You also talked about the certification requirements you have for different provinces and interpreters and translators. Public Works and Government Services informed us on Tuesday of this week that they have a list of 100 indigenous interpreters who can interpret some 20 languages. Would you recommend that these people become members of your council?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

It would be great if you could encourage them to do so, yes.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Would they have to go through the same certification requirements as your other members?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

It would be through either examination or on dossier. If they have a number of years' experience and then provide references, we could certify them.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Was that part of your discussions with Nunavut?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

We haven't even gotten to that point yet; it's just very, very initial. I've sent them an outline of our certification procedures, and I'm waiting for them to get back to us on that.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

But that definitely would be desirable.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

I think so.

What I was trying to get across was the fact that you have these myriad agencies all accrediting and certifying language professionals. That should be harmonized in some way.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Okay.

That's it for me, Mr. Chair.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

We will move to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Ms. Orton, you said there's a two-week notice period to use Gaelic in the House. I assume that applies to all languages other than English?

(1135)

Ms. Linda Orton:

Generally, yes. That would be preferable, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What is the issue for that length of delay? Is it the lack of available interpreters who are qualified? What causes such a long delay?

Ms. Linda Orton:

It's mostly that, and certainly for Gaelic. There are only four or five Gaelic interpreters we're able to use, so trying to book them in advance is a good idea.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are other languages and dialects in Scotland ever used in the chamber?

Ms. Linda Orton:

The most important one at the moment is British Sign Language. We are in the process of putting together a British Sign Language plan, which is encouraging more use and more engagement with the BSL community. It's likely that we will be increasing the number of occasions when BSL is interpreted in the chamber. Currently, there are more BSL interpreters than Gaelic in the chamber.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you seeing a positive impact on Gaelic from this program—or, with the long delays, are people reticent about actually using it?

Ms. Linda Orton:

I don't think that's the problem. I think the problem is that possibly there are fewer MSPs who are fluent in Gaelic. There are only two.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Two: that is quite few.

Ms. Linda Orton: Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I understand. We are facing the same situation with the indigenous languages here in terms of the number who speak it. But it's a chicken-and-egg problem: if you provide the languages, perhaps you can get more people who speak it in the chamber.

Anyway, thank you for that. I want to go to Mr. Williams for a few minutes. I may come back to you, if I have the time.

We've talked about relay languages a little bit. If you remember the advent of translation services on the Internet, when you translated from one language to another and then back, the message was often completely changed. What kinds of challenges do you face in relay translation reliability-wise?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

We'd be facing exactly the same challenges.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you translated from English to French, and then had a relay translation back to English, would it be significantly different?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Again, it depends on the quality of the interpreter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

Many interpreters have told me that if they'd had to use me for certification, they wouldn't be certified. I just want to put that on the record.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: One thing that's come up here a bit is the idea of providing written translated text to interpreters to read into the record for the languages that could not otherwise be translated in an efficient manner. We've been told that there is an ethical issue with this. Do you have codes of ethics or things like it that you could share with us?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Each provincial association has its own code of ethics.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would it be possible for you to share those—whatever you can get your hands on—with the committee?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

I can send you the links.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

I'm going to go back to Scotland for a second.

You mentioned that there are only two speakers of Gaelic and that you've had Norwegian spoken. What other languages have been tried, and when did it first happen?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

We've had a lot of languages used in the Chamber. When a language is used that isn't one that we support, as it were, such that we won't put it into the record, what we do is report the English interpretation. We've had witnesses giving evidence in Czech, in German, and in French, and we've had members in the Chamber offering small bits of speeches. We used to fairly regularly have a debate on the European Day of Languages, when everybody would wheel out their own favourite sentences in some other language, and that all went onto the record.

There has been quite a wide variety of languages used right from the very beginning. One of the very earliest experiences of that was in the early 2000s when we studied an education bill that was very pertinent to Gaelic, and we had a lot of witnesses using Gaelic. In fact, it's in committees, really, that most Gaelic is used, when witnesses come along and give evidence. That is interpreted, and then of course, that is all included on the record.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do the Chamber and committees have permanent translation infrastructure, or are there temporary booths on request?

(1140)

Ms. Ruth Connelly (Head of Broadcasting, Scottish Parliament):

We have two permanent double booths that can take two interpreters in each. We have six committee rooms in the Scottish Parliament where we can have six committees meeting simultaneously. The two largest committee rooms—that's rooms 1 and 2—also have two double booths in them, and they are used.

We actually provide an interpretation service quite regularly because the presiding officer regularly has visitors from other countries to the VIP gallery for, say, first minister's question time, so we are regularly working with these interpreters. The visiting delegation brings their own interpreters, and Linda isn't required to book interpreters, so we work with them quite regularly.

I agree with Mr. Williams on one point about interpreters working remotely. They don't like that, but we have had occasion to do that because we've done some events where we have had multiple languages spoken. We set up 12 booths in another room and just fed the video to these interpreters in their individual booths. We gave them each a separate television monitor so that they could see, because interpreters don't like not having clear lines of sight, and they won't work with just audio either. It's such an intensive and highly pressurized job that it's better if they're actually in or adjacent to the room that they're interpreting from.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If someone wants to speak a language that you're not able to provide interpretation for in a timely manner, would you accept for them to provide a written translation into English of what they intend to say, for someone to read from that booth?

Ms. Ruth Connelly:

Bronwyn can maybe answer this, but I think the answer to that would be yes.

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Yes, I think so, certainly if it were a member, for example, who wanted to do that. In fact, that's exactly what happened with the minister who delivered part of his speech in Norwegian. He gave us the Norwegian text and the English text, and that's what we used. Yes, we have done that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Who would be the person reading that into the record? Would it be the minister's staff? Would there be someone provided whose job it would be to read the translated statement, or would it be an official interpreter?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

It was interpreted at the time, but I have to say, from the point of view of Hansard, we used what the minister gave us.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

If somebody were to speak a language that wasn't expected in the Chamber and obviously couldn't provide the interpretation for, would it still be translated for the Hansard?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

If people are going to use a language that we can't find an interpreter for, and if it's not a huge, long, 10-minute speech—if they just want to say a few paragraphs or something—we will encourage them to speak in that language but then to say, “This is what I said,” and repeat it in English. That's how we get around that one.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But if they don't do that, you don't proactively look for someone who speaks the language to transcribe it.

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

No, we don't.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Next up we have Mr. Reid for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

We're in five-minute rounds now?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Yes, we're in five-minute rounds, but if you need a little more time, we had some of the rounds in the beginning that didn't get used fully, so I don't imagine there is an issue there.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I want to turn to our friends from Scotland.

First of all, welcome, and thank you for staying up late.

I don't know if they have our riding names listed here, but I represent a district called Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston. As you can tell from the Lanark part, it's an area of Scottish settlement. I live in the town of Perth, so I have a deep affection for our ancestral language.

I want to ask you a question, as a starting point, to get a sense of how many people have a need and an ability. If we compare Scotland to its nearest counterpart, to Ireland, we see that there are about 57,000 native Gaelic speakers in Scotland and about 75,000 in Ireland. However, in Ireland, because of their education program, there are also—at least in principle, according to census data—about 1.8 million people who can speak it as a second language.

Is there something parallel in Scotland, or is the number of second-language speakers much lower?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Do you have the numbers for it, Linda?

Ms. Linda Orton:

I don't have them with me, but it's around about 80,000 who have knowledge or a skill in Gaelic, of whom around about half have written ability, and around about half have spoken ability.

(1145)

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Yes.

Ms. Linda Orton:

So, yes, it's about 1% of the population who have some ability to speak, and it's about half of that who can actually read Gaelic as well. The numbers are very small. UNESCO classifies it as an endangered language.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

In Ireland, assuming that everybody really does have the language ability that they claim—people can be generous in interpreting their own language ability, and that may be true of your Norwegian-speaking minister as well, I don't know—I'd have a one-in-four chance of being understood by an average member of the Dáil. That would be much less true of the Scottish Parliament, where you'd essentially have a one-in-fifty chance of being understood by a typical member there.

I assume the speakers are both from the Outer Hebrides—the members of the Parliament who are Gaelic speakers?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

One is from the Outer Hebrides; the other is from the Highlands.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right.

Your electoral system is different from the one we have. This may be an unfair question, so if you can't answer it, just say so.

Has this appeared to have had any impact on the selection of candidates? Are they more or less likely to get people who are Gaelic speakers being put forward by their parties than would otherwise be the case, or has anyone indicated that this is the case as they select their list of candidates?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Gosh, not that I am aware of, no.

Ms. Linda Orton:

Not that I am aware of either.

Ms. Ruth Connelly:

We don't think so.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's a fair answer.

Our goal here in Canada is to try to find a way of incorporating our indigenous languages, languages spoken by the people who were native here before Europeans arrived. They all had spoken languages. None of them had written languages before Europeans arrived. One of the consequences of the fact that you often had a language group spoken over a wide geographic area that was settled by different groups of Europeans was that different writing systems were adopted for the same language group. This is a big issue for the Cree speakers, for example. The Cree are spread across an area the size of western Europe, and they have two writing systems, the Latin alphabet versus something called syllabics.

Of course, Gaelic has a long written history, going back to the Middle Ages. Is there consensus for a single form of written Gaelic?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Yes, there is, I think. I know that there is more of an issue with vocabulary, but there doesn't seem to have been any difficulty with establishing a writing system, certainly one that everybody who works with us on Gaelic can agree on. I'm not aware that there have been any problems with that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I raise this because you talked about oral testimony and you talked about someone submitting their remarks in writing in English for the benefit of the translator. Do you ever get written testimony in Gaelic?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

Well, I'm not sure about Gaelic, but I think it is possible for witnesses to submit written evidence to committees in any language they like, and it will be translated.

That already happens, doesn't it?

Ms. Linda Orton:

Yes, and the translation in English would be part of the record, not the original language.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. But presumably the original document would stay as part of the journals of the committee, if somebody absolutely had to go back to confirm the accuracy of translation.

Ms. Linda Orton:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, That makes sense.

I think I'm just about out of time.

Mr. Chairman, if there's a possibility of a third round, I might ask to come back.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We'll certainly add you to the list, if that possibility comes up, and I think it may.

Mr. Simms, we'll move to you next.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Mr. Williams, interpreters of course have to go through a lot of barriers, as far as certification goes and as far as your council is concerned. With the level of expertise of interpreters and translators, the wages are fairly high. Is there a pan-national organization or union, one that exists for the entire nation?

(1150)

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

No.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What you're saying, then, is that there is a myriad of organizations that tie the interpreters together; is that correct?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

That's right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

And is this...I can't say collective bargaining, but do they negotiate, in a way, for the rates that are—?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

That's right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

They do, whether for the courts individually—?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

Yes that's a good example. The ministry of the Attorney General of Ontario has different rates for community interpreters. In B.C., the ministry of the Attorney General has established a higher rate for certified legal interpreters and a lower rate for legal interpreters who are not certified.

Mr. Scott Simms:

So there are several levels of this, based on proficiency.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

There are two levels, based on certification or non-certification.

Mr. Scott Simms:

So it's not based on experience but on certification.

Can the certification vary from province to province?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

In that particular case, in B.C. the certification is provided by our provincial affiliate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Now predominantly, of course, in this country when we talk about certifications or rate of pay or collective agreements, to the degree they exist, it's always based on the English-French paradigm.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What is the situation regarding indigenous languages? Does this area fall under the same form, or is there something different for this when it comes to certification or rate of pay?

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

For interpreters, it's all based on the length of the speech or the length of the dialogue; we're not counting words anymore, if that's what you're getting at. I'm not sure whether....

Mr. Scott Simms:

I guess what I'm asking is whether the paradigm by which interpreters exist, when it comes to certification, primarily, is the same for those who put themselves forward as indigenous language interpreters.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

It's the same paradigm, because they'll be working from or into their language.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Our study is based on seeing how we can incorporate more indigenous languages into our Parliament. They will follow, then, the same rate of pay and the same levels of certification and so on and so forth as interpreters putting themselves forward as English-French translators.

Mr. Malcolm Williams:

I would expect that to be the case. Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's all I wanted to know.

I have a genuine interest here, because, of course, there is a very small part of the population of Canada with indigenous languages.

For our friends in Scotland, I understand that there is what I'll call a dialect called “Shetlandic”. Is that correct?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruth Connelly:

What place did you hear that about?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Pardon me?

Ms. Ruth Connelly:

I'm sorry. We had to mute you for a minute, because our division bell was going off calling members to vote.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's all right; I am muted often. It's okay.

Ms. Ruth Connelly:

I was just asking what place you had heard that about. We'll need to check that one, I think.

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

People in Shetland do speak a pretty...is it a dialect? I'm not sure. It's certainly very broad—

Mr. Scott Simms:

It's used in poetry a lot, I understand.

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

It is, and it's very broad. It has a very specific vocabulary. Much of it is quite related to Norwegian and Scandinavian languages, because there's a lot of Scandinavian influence, and obviously—

Mr. Scott Simms:

The similarities are there. As I mentioned to Mr. Williams about indigenous languages being very small, obviously 1% of the population speaking in Gaelic is a very, very small portion of the population. If I said to you that I want to speak in Shetland when I stand up in the House, how do you make accommodations despite the size of the population that speaks that language?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

I think if someone spoke in Shetland, it would be a bit like someone speaking in Scots or Doric or something like that. It would simply be included in the record because it is very close to English. It's not sufficiently different. You're going to get different spellings and you're going to get odd vocabulary words that are unusual, but fundamentally, if you speak English, you can understand Shetland, so it's not that radically different.

There's a range of languages in Scotland that we just include and people can use as and when they want. The Shetland dialect would be one; Scots is another; Doric is another.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Where I come from in Newfoundland, sometimes we need interpretation, so I have an affinity with the Shetland people.

(1155)

Ms. Ruth Connelly:

I have a brother-in-law who's a Shetlander. I understand him.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Good, and I'm glad you understood me. Thank you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Simms, and leave it to you to say what everyone's thinking, I suppose.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We'll go back to Mr. Reid for a final round of questioning.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much. My ex-wife was from Newfoundland and we also had a language barrier between us.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This is getting worse.

Mr. Scott Reid:

While you were talking, Mr. Simms, I was looking up the Shetland dialect. It turns out there's a radio station that broadcasts in it, at least according to Wikipedia. I did not know this until just now.

I wanted to ask about the two-week delay in terms of getting an interpreter. I can see why that's true for Norwegian or for a number of European languages. Is that also true for the Gaelic interpreter, as well?

Ms. Linda Orton:

Yes, that would be preferred, just because there are only four or five Gaelic interpreters who we can use, so it's really to guarantee their availability.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I can see why that's preferred and I can see how, with a committee meeting like this, where you were scheduled a significant amount of time in advance, if one of you had wanted to demonstrate how the whole thing works by means of having one of those interpreters, it all would have worked.

Obviously when you're dealing with the proceedings of the House itself, that would be a very different story. Debates move around for other.... Unless you're very different from the way we operate, it's hard to tell a day in advance for sure that you'll be debating this or that subject, and then things happen. To use a contemporary example from our own House, someone just passed away—one of our members, yesterday—and there were a number of tributes to that individual. Had it been a situation in which it would have been appropriate to use the Gaelic language for something like that, would you be able to accommodate that on short notice, or would that not be possible?

Ms. Linda Orton:

We would do our best to accommodate it. Whether it's possible depends on the availability of interpreters, and that's always the case because we don't hire interpreters within the Parliament itself.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. The two-week lead time, is that based in part on the assumption that the individual, the interpreter, will actually be physically present in the Parliament?

Ms. Linda Orton:

Yes, it would be.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If you went to a remote interpretation model, which is one of the things we've been discussing here in Canada.... You do find that some of our indigenous languages are relatively easy to accommodate within the capital. I know the name doesn't mean anything to you, but Inuktitut is a widely spoken indigenous language. Ottawa has an easy air link to Nunavut. It's a different story if you get one of the west coast indigenous languages, where people live 3,000 kilometres away.

I wanted to ask if you have you looked at the possibility of remote interpretation.

Ms. Linda Orton:

If the interpreters were located remotely, then, yes, I'm sure we would, but at the moment most of the interpreters are in Glasgow, so it doesn't particularly follow. When we have a meeting that's more remote, we would take the interpreters with us, as the MSPs would travel to the venue.

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

We also have an extra requirement of interpreters in that, once the meeting is over and they're done with interpreting, we bring them back to actually transcribe the Gaelic for us, because in Hansard we actually have, or we will shortly have, only one fluent Gaelic speaker. The interpreters actually do the Gaelic transcription for us, too.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want to be clear about that, because this is another issue that's come up here. We have talked about the need to have the written record reflect what was said, but our assumption has been that the written record in English and in French, which is our other official language, would record that which was spoken originally in Inuktitut or Cree or Coast Salish, or whatever it happens to be. I assume your Hansard similarly is in English? You don't have a Gaelic version?

Ms. Bronwyn Brady:

It is. We don't do a Gaelic translation of it, but we include the Gaelic in the running line of the Hansard, if you like. When somebody speaks Gaelic, we put the Gaelic in first, and then we'll put the interpretation in after that so it's all included.

Sorry, I think our lights have just gone off because we haven't been moving.

(1200)

Mr. Scott Reid:

We can hear you, though. We can no longer see you, but we can hear you.

Mr. Scott Reid: I hate to say this, but it reminds me of Scottish weather from when I was there. You could hear people, but not always see them.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruth Connelly:

It's exactly like that. The vagaries of a Scottish day we're putting it down to.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much. Once again, all my time is used up, and I really appreciate the evidence you've given today. Thank you.

The Chair:

I'd like to thank our witnesses very much. This has been a very interesting addition to our study, from our last witnesses.

Malcolm, thank you as well.

I would just remind members that we will meet on Tuesday and we'll do e-petitions. The Clerk of the House will be here in the first hour, and in the second hour we'll do our report on this, or give instructions to the drafters, so we have to think about that.

On May 23, even though we're going to do the report, we will get the clerk of the Northern Territory legislative assembly. Remember that was going to be in the evening, and David suggested it be on the Wednesday because there are usually votes on Wednesday, so we're already here. That's May 23 in the evening. Is that okay with everyone? If there are any additions to the report from that, we would just throw them in. Okay?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay.

The subcommittee on sexual harassment will probably be finished on Tuesday, so that report has to come to us.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je veux souhaiter la bienvenue à Bob Zimmer. Je profite d'ailleurs de mon autorité de président pour vous demander à tous de joindre les rangs du caucus des amants du plein air qu'il préside.

Nous poursuivons ce matin notre étude de l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Malcolm Williams, coprésident de la Commission d'agrément du Conseil des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes du Canada.

Nous avons également le plaisir de pouvoir parler via vidéoconférence avec trois représentantes du Parlement écossais à Édimbourg: Ruth Connelly, chef de la radiodiffusion; Linda Orton, chef de l'information publique et des ressources; et Bronwyn Brady, sous-éditrice, compte rendu officiel.

Le Parlement du Royaume-Uni ne souhaitait pas témoigner par vidéoconférence; il va nous faire parvenir un mémoire écrit sur l'utilisation du gallois.

Mardi prochain, nous allons consacrer la première heure de notre séance à l'étude des pétitions électroniques. Au cours de l'heure suivante, nous élaborerons nos directives de rédaction pour le projet de rapport sur l'utilisation des langues autochtones à la Chambre. Il est possible que nous ayons également en main le rapport du sous-comité sur l'examen du code de conduite pour les députés.

Nous allons maintenant laisser la parole à nos témoins.

Nous allons commencer avec Mme Brady du Parlement écossais. Merci d'avoir pris le temps de comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui.

Mme Bronwyn Brady (sous-éditrice, compte rendu officiel, Parlement écossais):

C'est avec grand plaisir que nous le faisons. Merci de votre invitation.

J'ai pensé que nous pourrions d'abord situer l'utilisation du gaélique au Parlement écossais dans son contexte social et politique. Tout a commencé avec l'adoption de la Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act en 2005. Cette loi visait à établir un organisme qui aurait pour mandat d'obtenir le statut de langue officielle pour la langue gaélique en Écosse et de veiller à ce qu'elle soit respectée de la même façon que la langue anglaise. Cet organisme doit notamment préparer un plan national pour la langue gaélique; obliger certaines autorités publiques à préparer et publier, dans le cadre de leurs fonctions, des plans pour la langue gaélique, et à maintenir et mettre en oeuvre ces plans; et établir des lignes directrices pour l'enseignement du gaélique.

Cet organisme est le Bòrd na Gàidhlig. Il prend l'initiative de définir les mesures qui sont susceptibles selon lui de favoriser l'utilisation, l'enseignement et la promotion de la langue gaélique.

Le Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body est l'autorité publique désignée dans la loi sur la langue gaélique de 2005. Le Parlement a donc le devoir de préparer son propre plan pour la langue gaélique. Nous venons d'ailleurs de soumettre au Bòrd na Gàidhlig la plus récente version de ce plan qui explique comment nous allons utiliser le gaélique dans notre approche communautaire; appuyer les députés et leur personnel pour qu'ils puissent acquérir la confiance nécessaire pour parler le gaélique; et intégrer le gaélique à la structure de pensée du Parlement.

C'est le directeur en charge de la sensibilisation des collectivités qui est le principal responsable de la mise en oeuvre de ce plan. De plus, deux personnes ont été désignées pour favoriser l'utilisation du gaélique au Parlement et dans le cadre des activités communautaires.

Nous évoluons donc dans un environnement où l'on est déterminé à favoriser l'utilisation de la langue gaélique. Ce n'est toutefois pas un phénomène nouveau qui se manifeste seulement depuis l'adoption de la loi de 2005. Le règlement établi au moment de la création du Parlement écossais en 1999 prévoit que celui-ci doit normalement mener ses activités en anglais, mais que les députés peuvent parler en gaélique écossais ou en n'importe quelle autre langue avec l'accord du président de séance.

Ces mesures réglementaires sont soutenues par la politique linguistique du Parlement qui fournit des précisions sur la façon dont nous devons mener à bien nos ambitions de promotion de l'utilisation du gaélique dans les travaux parlementaires. Plus récemment, le Parlement a fait un pas de plus en adoptant la British Sign Language (Scotland) Act de 2015 qui impose des obligations similaires au Parlement quant à la promotion de l'utilisation de la langue des signes britannique.

Linda Orton, qui est la directrice de l'information et des ressources publiques, peut vous parler de notre politique linguistique et de notre contrat d'interprétation. Ruth Connelly, qui est notre directrice de la diffusion, peut vous entretenir des services que nous devons offrir, notamment pour ce qui est des installations techniques, pour permettre des travaux parlementaires multilingues. Si vous avez des questions concernant notre compte rendu officiel, notre hansard en quelque sorte, qui inclut le gaélique, je serai ravie d'y répondre.

Je vous remercie.

(1105)

Le président:

Merci.

Est-ce que vos deux collègues ont quelque chose à ajouter?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Pas pour l'instant.

Le président:

D'accord, merci.

C'est à vous, monsieur Williams. Vous pourrez peut-être profiter de l'occasion pour nous expliquer le mandat de votre organisation.

M. Malcolm Williams (co-président de la Commission d’agrément, Conseil des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes du Canada):

C'est exactement ce que je comptais faire.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme on vous l'a déjà indiqué, je suis coprésident de la Commission d'agrément du Conseil des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes du Canada (CTTIC). Vous aurez donc compris que nous avons un processus d'examen dans le cadre de notre mandat principal qui consiste en l'agrément des langagiers.

Le CTTIC est l'organisme national regroupant les associations professionnelles de sept provinces: la Colombie-Britannique, l'Alberta, la Saskatchewan, le Manitoba, l'Ontario, le Nouveau-Brunswick et la Nouvelle-Écosse. L'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador n'ont pas d'associations professionnelles des traducteurs et interprètes, et les territoires non plus. Il y avait une association professionnelle au Nunavut il y a quelques années mais, à notre connaissance, elle n'existe plus. Nous avons parlé à des représentants du gouvernement du Nunavut concernant l'agrément des traducteurs et interprètes en inuktitut, mais il s'agit de discussions très préliminaires.

Comme la réglementation des professions relève des provinces, ce sont nos sept affiliés provinciaux qui sont responsables de l'agrément des professionnels de la langue, et non pas de leurs entreprises. Nous attestons de leurs compétences professionnelles comme traducteurs, pour les communications écrites interlinguistiques; comme interprètes, pour les communications verbales interlinguistiques; et comme terminologues. Il s'agit de nous assurer que l'intérêt public est bien servi. Les interprètes peuvent obtenir l'agrément à titre d'interprètes de conférence, communautaires, médicaux ou juridiques. L'agrément permet d'offrir l'assurance raisonnable que le langagier va faire un travail de qualité.

Quatre associations provinciales — celles de la Colombie-Britannique, de l'Ontario, du Québec et du Nouveau-Brunswick — confèrent le titre réservé de membre agréé en vertu de leurs lois provinciales respectives. Ainsi, seuls les membres en bonne et due forme de ces associations peuvent prétendre être des professionnels « agréés ». En vertu d'un accord de réciprocité, l'agrément est transférable d'une province à l'autre. Ainsi, un membre agréé de l'Association des traducteurs et interprètes de l'Ontario peut demander à devenir membre de l'association de la Colombie-Britannique sans avoir à repasser un examen. Il faut toutefois noter que les associations provinciales n'ont pas compétence exclusive sur la profession. Au Canada, n'importe quel individu ou groupe peut devenir fournisseur de services de traduction ou d'interprétation. En conséquence, les traducteurs et interprètes sont nombreux à ne pas voir les avantages de l'agrément. Il faut aussi savoir que différents organismes au pays proposent l'agrément professionnel des langagiers, et que de nombreux employeurs administrent leurs propres examens de recrutement.

Je vais maintenant vous donner un aperçu de l'interprétation des conférences. Les interprètes de conférence travaillent généralement dans une cabine insonorisée — comme celle qu'il y a ici — pour offrir des services d'interprétation en simultané, c'est-à-dire qu'il y a un très court délai entre les paroles prononcées et l'interprétation elle-même. Ils travaillent principalement à l'occasion de conférences et lors des délibérations des assemblées législatives. Je pourrais vous citer à ce titre l'exemple des parlements du Canada, du Nouveau-Brunswick et du Manitoba. Il s'agit d'interpréter depuis la langue A, celle du locuteur, vers la langue B, celle d'une partie ou de la totalité des participants à une assemblée, une réunion ou une conférence.

Les interprètes travaillant pour le Parlement, nos collègues ici présents, sont très bien formés. On exige maintenant une maîtrise en interprétation de conférence de l'Université d'Ottawa, de l'Université York ou d'un programme universitaire reconnu à l'étranger. La plupart des diplômés ont aussi un baccalauréat en traduction. Tous les interprètes de conférence travaillant à l'Assemblée législative du Manitoba ont reçu l'agrément de l'association professionnelle de cette province.

J'aimerais vous dire quelques mots de la maîtrise en interprétation de conférence. L'Université d'Ottawa offre un programme intensif de maîtrise qui s'étale sur une période de 10 mois à temps plein. Il vise à former des interprètes pouvant travailler dans les deux langues officielles. Il n'y a pas de cours pour l'interprétation en langue étrangère ou en langue autochtone. Ce n'est pas pour rien que le programme est aussi exigeant. Il y a d'abord le fait que les clients — vous-mêmes, au Parlement, et les autres institutions fédérales — sont bien en vue et que toute erreur peut donc porter à conséquence. De plus, l'interprète offre un produit fini en ce sens qu'il lui est impossible de le réviser, de le corriger ou de le peaufiner de quelque manière que ce soit avant que l'auditeur ne reçoive le message.

(1110)



Parlons maintenant de l'interprétation communautaire et médicale, une spécialité d'un genre différent. Les interprètes communautaires voient à ce que des locuteurs de langues différentes puissent se comprendre. Très souvent, ils vont interpréter de la langue A vers la langue B, et vice versa, pour une même conversation. L'interprétation peut être offerte dans le contexte des interactions dans les services sociaux, le milieu de l'éducation, le secteur de la santé ou le système judiciaire. Parmi les exemples courants, on peut citer les rendez-vous médicaux des familles d'immigrants, les rencontres de parents d'enfants immigrants avec le personnel de l'école, les visites de travailleurs sociaux, les discussions entre les professionnels de la santé et des aînés ou des personnes handicapées, les rencontres au centre communautaire concernant le logement pour les familles ou les services pour les femmes immigrantes, et les rencontres entre avocats et revendicateurs du statut de réfugié. L'interprète communautaire et médical est là pour écouter ce que le client ou le fournisseur de services a à dire et transmettre l'information ou la question à son interlocuteur.

Contrairement à l'interprète de conférence, l'interprète communautaire est visible et participe aux échanges. Comme je l'indiquais précédemment, ces professionnels spécialisés peuvent être officiellement reconnus par la province à titre d'interprètes communautaires ou médicaux agréés. Cependant, comme vous avez pu le constater à la lumière des exemples d'affectation que je vous ai donnés, les interprètes communautaires doivent toujours connaître les grands principes de fonctionnement de différents domaines spécialisés et la terminologie qui y est utilisée.

En Ontario, de nombreux interprètes suivent des cours en terminologie juridique et médicale qui sont offerts par les collèges communautaires et par la dizaine d'organismes composant le réseau ontarien de services d'interprétation. Ces organismes sont autorisés par le ministère ontarien de la Citoyenneté. En Colombie-Britannique, l'Université Simon Fraser offre une formation en interprétation médicale pour plusieurs langues asiatiques, et certains cabinets privés d'interprétation dispensent une formation d'appoint qui facilite l'obtention de l'agrément. Il faut savoir qu'un diplôme universitaire n'est pas requis pour être interprète communautaire et médical, mais la plupart de ceux qui travaillent dans le secteur de la santé en détiennent effectivement un.

Il y a d'autres organismes d'accréditation et d'agrément. L'Ontario Council on Community Interpreting voit à l'agrément des interprètes communautaires. L'organisation Services d'interprétation culturelle pour nos communautés, qui est basée à Ottawa, assure l'agrément des interprètes médicaux pour plus de 60 langues, mais aucune langue autochtone. Des collèges communautaires comme le Collège Humber, à Toronto, offrent un certificat en interprétation.

Enfin, nos affiliés provinciaux s'occupent des examens et de l'agrément des différents professionnels en interprétation judiciaire. Généralement installé près du juge, l'interprète judiciaire traduit les questions, les réponses, les témoignages et les autres déclarations faites devant les tribunaux provinciaux. Le CTTIC et ses affiliés offrent l'accréditation en interprétation judiciaire. Le ministère du Procureur général de l'Ontario fait passer des examens pour l'accréditation des interprètes judiciaires dont il a besoin. Pour sa part, le ministère du Procureur général de la Colombie-Britannique encourage les interprètes judiciaires à obtenir l'accréditation requise par l'entremise de notre affilié provincial.

En Ontario, la formation en interprétation judiciaire est offerte par plusieurs organismes. En Colombie-Britannique, c'est encore une fois l'Université Simon Fraser qui dispense ces cours, tout comme notre affilié provincial.

Je voudrais vous dire quelques mots en terminant sur nos procédures d'agrément à proprement parler. Pour pouvoir demander à obtenir l'accréditation en traduction ou en interprétation auprès d'une association provinciale — l'un de nos affiliés —, un candidat doit pouvoir faire valoir des études suffisantes, un diplôme en traduction ou en langues modernes dans la plupart des cas, combinées à deux années d'expérience professionnelle, ou encore cinq années d'expérience professionnelle.`

Il y a deux avenues principales pour accéder à l'agrément, soit l'examen et l'étude sur dossier. Par souci d'uniformité et d'efficience, l'organisme national, le CTTIC, tient des examens d'agrément annuels en traduction, en interprétation communautaire, en interprétation médicale et en interprétation judiciaire. Les examens de traduction sont offerts pour de nombreuses combinaisons de langues, à partir de l'anglais et du français, et vers ces deux langues. Les examens en interprétation communautaire, médicale et judiciaire sont offerts dans une dizaine de combinaisons de langues. Il n'existe pas d'examen pour une combinaison incluant une langue autochtone.

Le processus d'agrément sur dossier permet d'éviter les examens. Les candidats doivent faire la preuve de leur expérience, indiquer le nombre de mots traduits ou d'années d'interprétation, et fournir des échantillons de leur travail et des références. À titre d'exemple, pour être admissible à l'agrément à titre d'interprète de conférence au Nouveau-Brunswick, il faut avoir travaillé à temps plein pendant cinq ans comme interprète de conférence, ou pendant deux ans si l'on détient également une maîtrise en la matière. Il y a une autre façon pour les interprètes de conférence d'obtenir l'agrément professionnel. Ils peuvent passer l'examen d'accréditation pour les interprètes pigistes du Bureau de la traduction au gouvernement fédéral.

(1115)



Merci.

Le président:

Mahsi cho. Gunalcheesh.

Nous passons maintenant aux questions des membres du Comité en commençant avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Madame Brady, il y a une chose importante que je tiens à vous dire. L'an dernier, j'ai eu l'honneur de visiter le Parlement écossais à Holyrood. J'ai beaucoup apprécié l'expérience. C'est un édifice magnifique et très bien adapté. Nous aurions bien des enseignements à en tirer quant au fonctionnement d'un Parlement moderne, notamment du point de vue des langues. Ils ont même eu la gentillesse de me remettre une épinglette écossaise. Je ne sais pas si cela va me valoir certaines faveurs, mais je pensais simplement...

Le président:

Vous risquez de manquer de temps.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est l'histoire de ma vie, monsieur le président.

Je veux revenir à certains éléments que vous avez mentionnés dans votre exposé.

Vous avez indiqué vouloir appuyer les députés écossais et leur personnel afin qu'ils puissent acquérir la confiance nécessaire pour parler le gaélique, et intégrer le gaélique à la structure de pensée du Parlement. Vous tenez vraiment à ce qu'ils puissent non seulement parler cette langue, mais aussi l'apprendre. Vous désirez lui faire une place au coeur des délibérations.

Comment vous y prenez-vous? Supposons que je sois l'un de vos députés et que j'apprenne le gaélique. Est-ce que je dois prévenir quelqu'un à l'avance pour pouvoir prendre la parole dans cette langue au Parlement?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Oui.

Il n'y a actuellement qu'un nombre restreint de députés qui parlent le gaélique. Nous leur demandons de nous avertir avant de prendre la parole dans cette langue, car nous voulons leur offrir les services appropriés. Il faut nous assurer d'avoir des interprètes sur place ainsi que des gens capables de faire la transcription en gaélique.

M. Scott Simms:

Il est nécessaire de vous prévenir chaque fois que l'on veut parler en gaélique, ou peut-on simplement le faire librement en pouvant s'attendre à ce qu'il y ait de l'interprétation vers l'anglais?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Ce n'est pas possible, car nous n'avons pas d'interprète en permanence. Si un député souhaite faire une intervention assez longue en gaélique, nous lui demandons de nous en aviser afin que nous puissions prendre les dispositions nécessaires à l'interprétation. En effet, dans l'état actuel des choses, faire une allocution en gaélique, c'est un peu comme parler tout seul.

(1120)



De temps à autre, un député va prononcer une phrase en gaélique. Cela ne nous pose pas de problème. Pour nous assurer qu'il puisse participer à part entière aux débats, nous demandons toutefois un préavis, car nous devons alors faire appel à des ressources dont nous n'avons pas souvent besoin. Il serait superflu de garder des interprètes disponibles pour tous les débats.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est donc peu fréquent.

J'ai une dernière question pour vous dans la même veine. Je cite l'article 7.1.1 de votre règlement: « Le Parlement doit normalement mener ses activités en anglais, mais les députés peuvent parler en gaélique écossais ou en n'importe quelle autre langue avec l'accord du président de séance. »

Y a-t-il des restrictions à ce sujet ou est-ce vraiment n'importe quelle autre langue? Puis-je appeler quelqu'un pour lui dire que je veux faire mon allocution en espagnol?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Oui, c'est possible. Il n'y a pas si longtemps, une de nos ministres a fait une allocution en norvégien. Elle venait tout juste d'apprendre cette langue et voulait nous faire la démonstration de ses capacités. C'est donc vraiment n'importe quelle langue.

Dans ces cas-là également, un préavis est nécessaire, car si nous ne trouvons pas un interprète pour la langue en question, nous devrons aviser le député que personne ne comprendra ce qu'il a à dire. En théorie, il n'y a toutefois effectivement aucune restriction quant à la langue.

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai l'impression que l'on prend les grands moyens pour encourager les gens à parler le gaélique.

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Tout à fait.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Williams, il y a plusieurs années déjà que je participe à des travaux à l'Assemblée parlementaire du Conseil de l'Europe. J'ai noté qu'un choix de sept langues y est offert à ceux qui ont besoin de services d'interprétation.

Si je ne m'abuse, on utilise là-bas deux langues relais. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer ce concept? De toute évidence, il est plus facile de faire la traduction lorsque l'une des langues est plus courante, mais peut-on aller jusqu'à dire qu'il y a des langues relais et des langues principales?

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est effectivement ce qu'on fait avec les langues principales. On peut ainsi passer du slovène à l'anglais, puis de l'anglais à une autre langue...

M. Scott Simms:

Désolé de devoir vous interrompre, mais j'ai très peu de temps à ma disposition.

Revenons à la situation au Canada. Comment procéderait-on pour faire l'interprétation entre plusieurs langues, y compris le cri et d'autres dialectes?

M. Malcolm Williams:

On pourrait transposer le modèle européen, si c'est bien ce que vous voulez savoir.

M. Scott Simms:

Les langues relais seraient le français et l'anglais?

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est bien cela.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, et pour y arriver, il faudrait... J'arrive difficilement à voir comment cela fonctionnerait, et c'est sans doute parce que je ne suis pas moi-même interprète.

M. Malcolm Williams:

Moi non plus, soit dit en passant.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, mais vous comprenez certes mieux que moi comment ces choses-là peuvent se dérouler. Je pense à cette conférence qui a été tenue l'autre jour dans le Nord du Québec. Si vous deviez y travailler, comment cela fonctionnerait-il pour nous? Considérons les choses dans cette optique...

M. Malcolm Williams:

Les interprètes seraient dans des cabines séparées et insonorisées. Si une personne devait s'exprimer en cri, par exemple, l'interprète vers l'anglais ferait son travail dans sa propre cabine, et son interprétation en anglais serait ensuite traduite en français par l'interprète dans l'autre cabine.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. L'interprétation se ferait directement vers l'anglais, si c'était la langue relais.

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Ai-je raison de présumer que l'anglais est une langue relais très utilisée partout dans le monde?

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est la langue la plus utilisée.

M. Scott Simms:

Ce serait donc la principale langue utilisée. Est-ce que le français est considéré comme une langue relais, ou y a-t-il simplement dédoublement...?

M. Malcolm Williams:

En Europe, on utilise assurément le français comme langue relais, et l'allemand également.

M. Scott Simms:

Les compétences des interprètes revêtent une grande importance...

Le président:

Il vous reste cinq secondes.

M. Scott Simms:

Je veux remercier nos témoins qui comparaissent par vidéoconférence. Je suis content d'avoir pu vous parler. Merci encore pour l'épinglette.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Mes questions sont assez similaires, donc M. Simms obtiendra peut-être sa réponse. On ne sait jamais.

Monsieur Williams, peut-être l'avez-vous déjà dit, mais combien y a-t-il d'interprètes membres de vos associations régionales? Je ne sais plus si vous l'avez mentionné.

(1125)

M. Malcolm Williams:

Cela varie. Je peux vous donner les totaux. L'association de la Colombie-Britannique compte 400 membres, celle de l'Ontario 700, celle du Nouveau-Brunswick 250. Je dirais qu'entre le cinquième et le quart de ces membres sont des interprètes de toutes sortes.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. C'est là où je rejoindrai la question potentielle de mon collègue sur les qualifications.

Vous avez mentionné certaines qualifications requises pour l'agrément. Vous avez dit qu'il fallait généralement détenir un diplôme et posséder de deux à cinq années d'expérience.

M. Malcolm Williams: C'est juste.

M. Blake Richards: Comment les interprètes acquièrent-ils de l'expérience, généralement, et à quelles autres qualifications peut-on s'attendre, en général?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Normalement, pour l'agrément, nous nous attendons à ce que les candidats nous soumettent la liste des mandats qu'ils ont reçus au cours du nombre d'années ciblé: où avez-vous fait votre...

M. Blake Richards:

Il faut préciser le type de travail aussi.

M. Malcolm Williams: Oui.

M. Blake Richards: Pour pouvoir faire le travail attendu des membres de vos associations, il faut évidemment réussir à acquérir de l'expérience autrement. Quel genre d'expérience les gens ont-ils habituellement?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Les candidats doivent nous indiquer quel genre de mandat ils ont réalisé. Je vous ai déjà donné une longue liste d'exemples pour les interprètes communautaires. Il y a les visites chez le médecin et les consultations avec des travailleurs sociaux.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. C'est donc le genre de travail requis pour acquérir de l'expérience, il ne suffit pas de...

M. Malcolm Williams:

Exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien.

M. Malcolm Williams:

Je m'excuse de vous interrompre, mais comme je l'ai dit, l'agrément n'est pas obligatoire au Canada. C'est un atout, mais ce n'est pas une obligation.

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends.

Combien y a-t-il d'interprètes au sein de votre association qui travaillent en langue autochtone? Quel serait leur pourcentage ou leur nombre?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Il n'y en a aucun.

M. Blake Richards:

Aucun? D'accord.

Pouvez-vous me donner une idée de la proportion des différents types de mandat? Vous en avez donné différents exemples, comme l'interprétation judiciaire. Pouvez-vous me donner une meilleure idée de la proportion du travail dans le domaine de la santé, par exemple, par rapport aux mandats gouvernementaux ou judiciaires?

M. Malcolm Williams:

J'hésite à vous donner un pourcentage, mais une partie importante des mandats concerne les soins de santé et les visites chez le médecin, puis il y en a aussi beaucoup qui viennent de familles immigrantes ou réfugiées qui doivent consulter des avocats.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce serait donc les deux principales catégories, vous en êtes assez certain. Je sais que vous hésitez à me donner un pourcentage, mais s'agit-il de la majorité des mandats? Est-ce que plus de 50 % des mandats entrent dans ces deux catégories?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Ces deux catégories doivent comprendre environ 40 % des mandats, mais ce n'est vraiment qu'une approximation, et cela ne vaut que pour les interprètes communautaires et médicaux. Je ne parle pas ici de l'interprétation de conférence.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne devrais peut-être pas vous poser cette question, puisqu'il n'y a pas d'interprète autochtone membre de votre association, mais vous semblez tout de même connaître le domaine, donc j'aimerais vous demander si vous savez si les proportions seraient comparables pour les interprètes en langue autochtone. Si vous n'êtes pas en mesure de me répondre, c'est correct.

M. Malcolm Williams:

Comme je savais que je participerais à cette réunion, notre représentant du Manitoba a fait quelques recherches. Il m'a fait part de ses découvertes il y a deux jours et m'a informé que les services d'interprétation communautaire et médicale en langue autochtone, au Manitoba, relèvent d'un organisme du nom de Santé autochtone. Les principales langues d'interprétation y sont le cri et l'ojibwa, donc il s'agit surtout d'interprétation communautaire. Il m'a aussi appris que le Nunavut administre un centre pour les Inuits ayant besoin de soins de santé à Winnipeg. Ce centre offre des services d'interprétation en inuktitut.

M. Blake Richards:

Savez-vous quel pourcentage des interprètes y travaillant offrent leurs services dans le domaine médical?

(1130)

M. Malcolm Williams:

Non, je n'ai pas de chiffres à ce sujet.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Il y a évidemment toutes sortes de méthodes d'interprétation: l'interprétation à partir d'une langue relais, l'interprétation à distance et toutes sortes d'autres choses. Je sais que les interprètes ne considèrent généralement pas ces situations idéales, évidemment, mais j'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez pour déterminer si nous devrions ou non envisager la chose et pourquoi.

M. Malcolm Williams:

Ce n'est pas l'idéal, mais pourquoi ne pas envisager la chose? L'interprétation à distance gagne en popularité.

M. Blake Richards:

Quelles seraient les difficultés associées, selon vous?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Je reviens toujours à la même question, qui va au-delà de l'aspect technique, c'est-à-dire à l'agrément lui-même. Comment peut-on garantir une interprétation de qualité? C'est la question qu'il faut se poser.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. Je voulais aussi interroger nos témoins du Parlement écossais, mais comme il ne me reste que 45 secondes, je n'aurai même pas le temps de mettre la table.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Saganash, s'il vous plaît.

M. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président et merci à nos témoins.

J'aimerais m'adresser d'abord aux représentants du Parlement écossais. Je souhaitais poser la même question que M. Simms sur la règle 7.1.1. donc j'ai obtenu ma réponse.

Mon autre question porte sur les préavis exigés. Combien de temps à l'avance doivent-ils être donnés? Vingt-quatre heures? Quarante-huit heures?

Mme Linda Orton (chef de l'information publique et des ressources, Parlement écossais):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Linda Orton. Je suis chef de l'information publique et des ressources, et il est de mon ressort de trouver des interprètes.

Nous avons recours aux services d'un sous-contractant externe, qui a accès à des professionnels dans toutes les langues que nous voulons. De manière générale, nous aimons être avisés des besoins deux semaines à l'avance, j'en ai bien peur. Nous avons vraiment besoin d'en être avisés très à l'avance, en fait.

M. Romeo Saganash:

D'accord. Merci.

Monsieur Williams, j'ai écouté votre énumération des associations provinciales affiliées. Y en a-t-il une au Québec?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Non, celle du Québec ne fait pas partie de notre...

M. Romeo Saganash:

Y a-t-il une raison particulière à cela?

M. Malcolm Williams:

L'ordre du Québec faisait partie de notre conseil jusqu'en 2011, après quoi il a décidé de faire cavalier seul. Ce serait à ses représentants de vous expliquer pourquoi.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Très bien.

Vous avez également parlé des exigences qui s'appliquent pour l'agrément dans les diverses provinces pour les interprètes et les traducteurs. Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada nous a informés ce mardi du fait qu'il a une liste de 100 interprètes autochtones pouvant offrir des services dans une vingtaine de langues. Recommanderiez-vous que ces personnes deviennent membres de votre conseil?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Ce serait fantastique si vous pouviez les encourager à le faire, oui.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Devraient-ils s'astreindre aux mêmes exigences d'agrément que les autres membres de votre conseil?

M. Malcolm Williams:

L'agrément se ferait soit par examen, soit sur analyse de dossier. Nous pourrions accorder l'agrément aux interprètes qui cumulent un certain nombre d'années d'expérience et qui peuvent nous donner des références.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Cette question a-t-elle fait partie de vos discussions avec le Nunavut?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Nous n'en sommes pas encore là, nous n'en sommes qu'au tout, tout début de discussion. Je leur ai fait parvenir une description de notre procédure d'agrément, et j'attends toujours une réponse de leur part.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Ce serait sûrement souhaitable.

M. Malcolm Williams:

Je le pense.

Ce que j'essayais de vous dire, c'est qu'il y a une pléthore d'organismes qui agréent les professionnels langagiers. Il devrait y avoir une quelconque forme d'harmonisation.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Très bien.

C'est tout pour moi, monsieur le président.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Passons à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Madame Orton, vous avez dit qu'il fallait donner un préavis de deux semaines pour pouvoir utiliser la langue gaélique à la Chambre. Je présume que cela s'applique à toutes les langues autres que l'anglais?

(1135)

Mme Linda Orton:

De manière générale, oui. C'est préférable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel est le problème? Pourquoi faut-il tant de temps? Est-ce parce qu'il manque d'interprètes qualifiés? Qu'est-ce qui cause ces longs délais?

Mme Linda Orton:

Essentiellement. En tout cas, c'est la situation pour la gaélique. Il n'y a que quatre ou cinq interprètes à qui nous pouvons faire appel pour le gaélique, donc il est toujours avisé d'essayer de réserver leurs services à l'avance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il d'autres langues ou dialectes en Écosse qui sont utilisés à la Chambre?

Mme Linda Orton:

La langue la plus souvent utilisée en ce moment est la langue des signes britannique. Nous sommes en train de préparer un plan pour les services en langue des signes britannique, afin d'en favoriser l'usage et de susciter l'engagement de la communauté d'utilisateurs. Il est probable que le recours à la langue des signes britannique augmente à la Chambre. À l'heure actuelle, il y a plus d'interprètes en langue des signes qu'en gaélique à la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce programme, semble-t-il, va avoir un effet positif sur l'emploi du gaélique ou les gens sont-ils réticents à l'utiliser en raison des longs délais?

Mme Linda Orton:

Je ne crois pas que ce soit le problème. Je pense que le problème vient peut-être plutôt du fait qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup de députés qui parlent couramment le gaélique. Il n'y en a que deux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Deux: c'est assez peu.

Mme Linda Orton: Effectivement.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Je comprends. Nous sommes confrontés au même genre de situation pour ce qui est du nombre de personnes qui parlent les langues autochtones, mais c'est le problème de l'oeuf et de la poule: peut-être que si l'on offrait des services dans ces langues, il y aurait plus de personnes qui les parleraient à la Chambre.

Quoi qu'il en soit, je vous remercie. J'aimerais m'adresser à M. Williams quelques minutes. Je vous reparlerai peut-être si j'en ai le temps.

Nous avons parlé un peu de l'emploi d'une langue relais. Si l'on se rappelle un peu l'arrivée des services de traduction sur Internet, quand on traduisait quelque chose d'une langue à l'autre, puis qu'on le retraduisait vers la langue d'origine, le message était souvent totalement différent. Quelles sont les difficultés sur le plan de la fiabilité lorsqu'on utilise une langue relais?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Ce sont exactement les mêmes difficultés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si l'on traduit quelque chose de l'anglais au français, puis qu'on le retraduit en anglais, le message sera-t-il très différent?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Encore une fois, tout dépend de la qualité de l'interprète.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je peux comprendre.

Beaucoup d'interprètes m'ont dit que s'ils devaient avoir mon approbation pour obtenir leur agrément, ils ne seraient pas agréés. Je tiens à le souligner pour le compte rendu.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: On nous a proposé de remettre une traduction écrite aux interprètes afin qu'ils la lisent pour le compte rendu lorsqu'une personne utilise une langue ne pouvant pas être traduite de manière efficace autrement. On nous a dit que cela posait un problème éthique. Avez-vous des codes d'éthique ou des règles dont vous pourriez nous faire part?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Chaque association provinciale a son propre code d'éthique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Serait-il possible pour vous de nous les faire parvenir, si vous pouvez mettre la main dessus?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Je peux vous faire parvenir les liens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie.

Je poserai une autre question aux témoins de l'Écosse quelques instants.

Vous avez mentionné qu'il n'y avait que deux personnes parlant le gaélique au Parlement et que quelqu'un s'était déjà exprimé en norvégien. Quelles autres langues ont déjà été utilisées et quand est-ce arrivé pour la première fois?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Il y a beaucoup de langues qui sont utilisées à la Chambre. Quand une langue est utilisée et qu'elle ne figure pas parmi nos langues d'interprétation, qu'elle ne peut donc pas être inscrite au compte rendu, nous y inscrivons l'interprétation en anglais. Nous avons déjà reçu des témoins qui se sont exprimés en tchèque, en allemand et en français, et il y a des députés qui ont déjà fait de petites allocutions dans d'autres langues. Cela arrive assez souvent lors des débats tenus à la Journée européenne des langues, où tout le monde sort ses phrases favorites dans une autre langue et qu'elles sont toutes consignées au compte rendu.

L'éventail des langues utilisées à la Chambre depuis le début est très vaste. L'une des toutes premières expériences que nous avons vécues remonte au début des années 2000, où nous avons étudié un projet de loi sur l'éducation qui était très pertinent pour la langue gaélique, et beaucoup de témoins ont alors utilisé le gaélique. En fait, c'est surtout devant les comités que le gaélique est utilisé, quand les témoins viennent présenter des témoignages. Il y a alors de l'interprétation et bien sûr, l'interprétation figure au compte rendu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La Chambre et les comités ont-ils une infrastructure de traduction permanente ou installez-vous des cabines temporaires à la demande?

(1140)

Mme Ruth Connelly (chef de la radiodiffusion, Parlement écossais):

Nous avons deux cabines doubles permanentes, dans lesquelles deux interprètes peuvent travailler. Il y a six salles de comité au Parlement écossais, donc six comités peuvent siéger simultanément. Les deux plus grandes salles de comité, les salles 1 et 2, contiennent également deux cabines doubles, qui sont utilisées.

En fait, nous offrons des services d'interprétation assez souvent, parce que la présidence reçoit souvent des visiteurs d'autres pays dans la tribune des dignitaires, pendant la période des questions au premier ministre, par exemple, donc nous travaillons souvent avec des interprètes. Le cas échéant, la délégation en visite est accompagnée de ses propres interprètes, et Linda n'a pas besoin de réserver des services d'interprètes, mais nous utilisons très souvent ces cabines.

Je suis d'accord avec M. Williams au sujet du travail à distance pour les interprètes. Ils n'aiment pas cela, mais nous avons eu l'occasion de tenter la chose lors de certains événements où de nombreuses langues étaient utilisées. Nous avons alors installé 12 cabines dans une autre pièce, puis avons fourni la vidéo aux interprètes dans leurs différentes cabines. Nous leur avons fourni chacun un écran séparé, afin qu'ils puissent voir ce qui se passe, parce que les interprètes n'aiment pas ne pas voir clairement la personne qui parle et ne travaillent pas seulement avec l'audio non plus. C'est un travail tellement intensif et stressant qu'il est préférable qu'ils se trouvent dans la même pièce que la personne qu'ils interprètent ou juste à côté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand une personne souhaite s'exprimer dans une langue pour laquelle vous ne pouvez pas offrir de services d'interprétation rapidement, accepteriez-vous qu'elle fournisse une traduction écrite en anglais de ce qu'elle a l'intention de dire, que quelqu'un pourra lire de la cabine?

Mme Ruth Connelly:

Bronwyn pourra peut-être mieux répondre que moi à cette question, mais je pense que la réponse est oui.

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Oui, je pense que oui, surtout si c'est le souhait d'un député, par exemple. En fait, c'est exactement ce qui s'est passé quand un ministre a décidé de faire une partie de son allocution en norvégien. Il nous a remis un texte en norvégien et un texte en anglais, et c'est ce que nous avons utilisé. Oui, nous l'avons déjà fait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qui lirait la traduction pour le compte rendu? Serait-ce le personnel du ministre? Y aurait-il quelqu'un dont le travail consisterait à lire la déclaration traduite ou serait-ce un interprète officiel qui le ferait?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Il y avait eu de l'interprétation à ce moment-là, mais je dois dire que pour le hansard, nous avons utilisé ce que le ministre nous a donné.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Si quelqu'un souhaitait s'exprimer dans une langue inattendue à la Chambre et pour laquelle vous ne pourriez évidemment pas fournir de services d'interprétation, y aurait-il tout de même une traduction dans le hansard?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Si quelqu'un veut utiliser une langue pour laquelle nous n'arrivons pas à trouver d'interprète ou s'il ne compte pas faire une longue allocution de 10 minutes, mais seulement dire quelques paragraphes ou quelques phrases, nous l'encouragerons à utiliser la langue en question, puis à ajouter « voici ce que je viens de dire en anglais ». C'est la façon dont nous contournons le problème.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais si la personne ne le fait pas, vous ne chercherez pas activement quelqu'un qui parle la langue en question pour la traduire en anglais.

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous donnerons maintenant la parole à M. Reid pour cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Nous avons actuellement cinq minutes par tour?

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Oui, nous avons cinq minutes par tour, mais si vous avez besoin d'un peu plus de temps, il y a quelques personnes qui n'ont pas utilisé tout leur temps de parole au début, donc j'imagine que ce ne sera pas un problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

J'aimerais m'adresser à nos amis écossais.

D'abord et avant tout, je vous souhaite la bienvenue et je vous remercie d'être restés si tard pour nous parler.

Je ne sais pas si vous voyez les noms de nos circonscriptions, mais je représente la circonscription de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston. Comme vous vous en douterez en entendant le nom Lanark, c'est une colonie écossaise. Je vis dans la ville de Perth, si bien que je suis très attaché à notre langue ancestrale.

Je tiens à vous poser une question, pour commencer, pour avoir une idée du nombre de personnes qui ont besoin de ces services et qui parlent la langue. Si l'on compare la situation de l'Écosse à celle de son voisin le plus proche, l'Irlande, on voit qu'il y a environ 57 000 personnes dont la langue maternelle est le gaélique en Écosse et environ 75 000 en Irlande. Cependant, en Irlande, en raison du programme d'éducation qui est appliqué, et il y a aussi environ 1,8 million de personnes qui peuvent l'utiliser comme langue seconde, à tout le moins en principe, selon les données du recensement.

Y a-t-il quelque chose de semblable en Écosse ou le nombre de personnes qui ont le gaélique comme langue seconde y est-il beaucoup moindre?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Avez-vous des chiffres à ce sujet, Linda?

Mme Linda Orton:

Je ne les ai pas avec moi, mais il y a environ 80 000 personnes qui ont des compétences en gaélique; environ la moitié d'entre elles peuvent l'écrire, l'autre moitié pouvant seulement le parler.

(1145)

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Oui.

Mme Linda Orton:

Bref, effectivement, c'est environ 1 % de la population qui peut le parler, et environ la moitié de ces personnes peuvent aussi le lire. Ce sont des chiffres très bas. L'UNESCO considère qu'il s'agit d'une langue en péril.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

En Irlande, si tout le monde possède vraiment les compétences linguistiques déclarées — parce que les gens sont parfois généreux lorsqu'ils jugent de leurs propres compétences linguistiques, et ce pourrait être la même chose pour votre ministre qui parle le norvégien, je ne le sais pas —, j'aurais une chance sur quatre d'être compris par le député moyen du Dáil. Ce serait beaucoup moins vrai au Parlement écossais, où j'aurais essentiellement une chance sur 50 d'être compris par les députés.

Je présume que les deux députés qui parlent le gaélique viennent tous deux des Hébrides occidentales?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

L'un d'eux vient des Hébrides occidentales, et l'autre des Highlands.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

Le système électoral est différent du nôtre. La question pourrait être injuste; je vous prie de me le dire si vous ne pouvez y répondre.

Cela a-t-il semblé avoir une incidence quelconque sur le choix des candidats? Les partis sont-ils plus ou moins susceptibles de présenter des candidats d'expression gaélique que ce ne serait le cas autrement, où a-t-on indiqué l'avoir fait sciemment pendant la préparation de la liste des candidats?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Ma foi, non! Pas à ma connaissance.

Mme Linda Orton:

Pas à ma connaissance non plus.

Mme Ruth Connelly:

Nous ne croyons pas, non.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

Au Canada, nous voulons trouver une façon d'intégrer les langues autochtones, les langues des peuples qui étaient établis ici avant l'arrivée des Européens. Il s'agissait uniquement de langues parlées; avant l'arrivée des Européens, aucun de ces peuples n'avait un système d'écriture. L'un des problèmes fréquents est l'adoption de divers systèmes d'écriture par les locuteurs d'une même langue répartis sur un vaste territoire colonisé par diverses nations européennes. C'est un enjeu important pour les Cris, par exemple, qui sont répartis sur un territoire de la taille de l'Europe de l'Ouest. Ils ont deux systèmes d'écriture: l'alphabet latin et l'écriture syllabique.

Quant au gaélique, il y a évidemment une longue histoire écrite qui remonte au Moyen Âge. Y a-t-il consensus sur une forme unique de gaélique écrit?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Je dirais que oui. Je sais que le vocabulaire pose davantage problème, mais il n'a pas semblé difficile d'établir un système d'écriture, du moins sous une forme qui convient à tous ceux qui travaillent avec le gaélique. À ma connaissance, cela n'a pas posé problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pose la question parce que vous avez parlé de témoignages oraux et aux gens qui fournissent la version anglaise écrite de leurs déclarations aux interprètes. Recevez-vous parfois des déclarations écrites en gaélique?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Eh bien, je ne sais pas ce qu'il en est pour le gaélique, mais je pense que les témoins peuvent fournir aux comités la version écrite de leur déclaration dans la langue de leur choix, et elle sera traduite.

Cela se fait déjà, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Linda Orton:

Oui; toutefois, c'est la version anglaise qui figurera au compte rendu et non la version originale.

M. Scott Reid:

Exactement. On peut toutefois penser que le document original sera conservé dans les journaux du Comité, au cas où l'on voudrait absolument vérifier l'exactitude de la traduction.

Mme Linda Orton:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien; cela semble logique.

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais intervenir de nouveau, si nous avons la possibilité de faire un troisième tour.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous allons ajouter votre nom sur la liste, au cas. Je pense que c'est possible.

Monsieur Simms, la parole est à vous.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Williams, les interprètes doivent évidemment franchir diverses étapes, notamment le processus d'agrément auprès de votre conseil. Les salaires des interprètes et des traducteurs sont assez élevés, étant donné leur expertise. Y a-t-il un organisme ou un syndicat national, pour l'ensemble du pays?

(1150)

M. Malcolm Williams:

Non.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous dites que les interprètes sont représentés par divers organismes, c'est cela?

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Et est-ce... Sans parler de négociations collectives, ils se trouvent d'une certaine façon à négocier leur rémunération?

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est ce qu'ils font, tant pour chaque tribunal...

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est un bon exemple. Le ministère du Procureur général de l'Ontario a divers taux pour les interprètes communautaires, tandis que le ministère du Procureur général de la Colombie-Britannique offre un taux plus élevé pour les interprètes juridiques agréés et une rémunération plus faible pour les interprètes juridiques non agréés.

M. Scott Simms:

Il y a donc divers taux de rémunération, selon la compétence.

M. Malcolm Williams:

Il y a deux niveaux, selon que l'interprète est agréé ou non.

M. Scott Simms:

Donc, ce n'est pas lié à l'expérience, mais à l'agrément.

L'agrément peut-il varier d'une province à l'autre?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Dans le cas de la Colombie-Britannique, l'agrément relève de l'organisme provincial membre.

M. Scott Simms:

De façon générale, au pays, lorsqu'on parle d'agrément, de taux de rémunération ou d'accords collectifs, dans la mesure où ils existent, c'est toujours en fonction de la paire anglais-français.

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Qu'en est-il des langues autochtones? La situation est-elle identique, ou procède-t-on autrement pour l'agrément ou la rémunération?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Pour les interprètes, cela dépend de la longueur du discours ou de la durée de la discussion. Cela ne fonctionne plus selon le compte de mots, si c'est à cela que vous voulez en venir. Je ne sais pas si...

M. Scott Simms:

Essentiellement, je cherche à savoir si les critères pour l'agrément d'un interprète sont identiques pour ceux qui se présentent comme interprètes en langues autochtones.

M. Malcolm Williams:

C'est la même chose, car ils travailleront dans leur langue, dans un sens ou dans l'autre.

M. Scott Simms:

Notre étude porte sur l'utilisation accrue des langues autochtones dans les délibérations au Parlement. Pour ces interprètes, la rémunération et l'agrément requis seront-ils les mêmes que pour les interprètes anglais-français?

M. Malcolm Williams:

Je m'attends à ce que ce soit le cas, en effet.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est tout ce que je voulais savoir.

J'ai un véritable intérêt pour ces questions, étant donné qu'une petite partie de la population canadienne parle une langue autochtone.

Je m'adresse maintenant à nos amis d'Écosse. Je crois comprendre qu'il y a un dialecte appelé le shetlandic. Est-ce exact?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruth Connelly:

Où avez-vous entendu parler de cela?

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous demande pardon?

Mme Ruth Connelly:

Je suis désolée; nous avons dû vous mettre en sourdine pour une minute, car la sonnerie d'appel au vote s'est fait entendre.

M. Scott Simms:

Il n'y a pas de souci; cela m'arrive souvent. Il n'y a pas problème.

Mme Ruth Connelly:

Je vous demandais seulement où vous en avez entendu parler. Il faudrait qu'on vérifie, à mon avis.

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Les habitants des îles Shetland parlent en effet une belle... Est-ce un dialecte? Je n'en suis pas sûre, mais c'est certainement très vaste...

M. Scott Simms:

Je crois comprendre que son usage est fréquent en poésie.

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

En effet, et c'est très étendu. Le vocabulaire est très précis. Il y a un lien important avec le norvégien et les langues scandinaves, en raison de l'importante influence scandinave et, évidemment...

M. Scott Simms:

Il y a des similitudes. Dans ma discussion avec M. Williams, j'ai mentionné le petit pourcentage que représentent les langues autochtones, et lorsqu'on dit que le gaélique est parlé par 1 % de la population, c'est un pourcentage extrêmement petit. Si je vous disais que j'avais l'intention de parler le shetlandic à la Chambre, quelles mesures pourriez-vous prendre, malgré le nombre restreint de locuteurs?

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

À mon avis, si quelqu'un employait cette langue, ce serait comparable à l'utilisation du scots ou du doric, par exemple. Ce serait simplement intégré au compte rendu, étant donné la proximité avec l'anglais. La différence n'est pas assez importante. L'orthographe peut varier, et certains mots de vocabulaire seraient plutôt inhabituels, mais fondamentalement, le locuteur anglophone peut comprendre le shetlandic, car ce n'est pas radicalement différent.

Il y a en Écosse une grande variété de langues que nous pourrions simplement intégrer. Les gens sont libres de les utiliser quand bon leur semble. Le dialecte des îles Shetland est du nombre, comme le scots et le doric.

M. Scott Simms:

Je viens de Terre-Neuve, et on a parfois besoin d'un interprète. J'ai donc une certaine affinité avec les gens des îles Shetland.

(1155)

Mme Ruth Connelly:

J'ai un beau-frère shetlandais et je le comprends.

M. Scott Simms:

Très bien; je suis ravi que vous compreniez. Merci.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur Simms. Je suppose que vous avez dit tout haut ce que tout le monde pense tout bas.

M. Scott Simms:

Exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous revenons à M. Reid pour la dernière série de questions.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup. Mon ex-femme venait de Terre-Neuve et nous avions aussi un problème de communication.

M. Scott Simms:

La situation dégénère.

M. Scott Reid:

Pendant votre intervention, monsieur Simms, j'ai fait une recherche sur le dialecte des îles Shetland. Il se trouve qu'une station de radio diffuse des émissions dans cette langue, du moins selon Wikipédia. Je n'étais pas au courant avant aujourd'hui.

Je voulais parler de l'avis de deux semaines pour l'obtention des services d'un interprète. Je peux comprendre qu'il puisse en être ainsi pour le norvégien ou diverses langues européennes, mais est-ce aussi le cas pour les interprètes en langue gaélique?

Mme Linda Orton:

Oui, ce serait préférable, étant donné qu'il n'y a que quatre ou cinq interprètes pour cette langue. Nous voulons simplement nous assurer qu'ils sont disponibles.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends pourquoi ce serait préférable, et je suis conscient que cela aurait été possible pendant la réunion du Comité, si l'un d'entre vous avait décidé de faire une démonstration avec l'aide d'un interprète, étant donné que votre comparution était prévue depuis longtemps.

Ce serait évidemment complètement différent dans le cas des délibérations à la Chambre, étant donné la nature des débats... À moins que votre fonctionnement soit très différent du nôtre, il est difficile de savoir d'avance sur quoi porteront les débats, et c'est sans compter les imprévus. Je vais prendre un exemple récent survenu à notre propre Chambre des communes. C'était hier; un de nos députés est décédé, et plusieurs discours ont été prononcés en son hommage. Si l'utilisation de la langue gaélique avait été pertinente dans cette situation, seriez-vous en mesure d'offrir ce service à court préavis, ou serait-ce impossible?

Mme Linda Orton:

Nous ferions de notre mieux pour offrir ce service, mais cela dépend de la disponibilité des interprètes. Cela fonctionne toujours ainsi, car le Parlement n'a pas d'interprètes permanents.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Le préavis de deux semaines est-il nécessaire, en partie, parce que l'interprète doit être présent au Parlement?

Mme Linda Orton:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous passiez à l'interprétation à distance, un modèle que nous envisageons au Canada... On constate qu'il serait assez facile d'offrir un service pour certaines langues autochtones, ici dans la capitale. Je sais que le nom n'évoquera rien pour vous, mais l'inuktitut est une langue autochtone répandue. Il y a une liaison aérienne régulière entre Ottawa et le Nunavut. C'est autre chose dans le cas des langues autochtones de la côte ouest, car ces gens sont à 3 000 kilomètres d'ici.

Je voulais savoir si vous avez envisagé le recours à l'interprétation à distance.

Mme Linda Orton:

Je suis certaine que nous pourrions offrir ce service si les interprètes travaillaient à distance, mais pour le moment, la plupart des interprètes sont à Glasgow. Donc, ce n'est pas particulièrement pertinent. Lorsque nous tenons une réunion dans un endroit plus éloigné, les interprètes viennent avec nous, à l'instar des députés qui se déplacent pour l'événement.

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

Outre le travail d'interprétation, nous demandons également, après la réunion, aux interprètes de faire la transcription des passages en gaélique dans le hansard, car nous avons actuellement — ou plutôt nous aurons sous peu — une seule personne parlant couramment le gaélique. Donc, les interprètes se chargent aussi de la transcription en gaélique pour nous.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux simplement m'assurer d'avoir bien compris, car c'est un autre enjeu qui a été soulevé. Nous avons parlé de la nécessité que le compte rendu écrit reflète ce qui a été dit, mais on partait toujours de l'hypothèse que l'on consignerait dans les versions anglaise et française du compte rendu, nos deux langues officielles, les propos initialement tenus en inuktitut, en cri, en langue des Salish de la côte, etc. Je présume que votre hansard est en anglais et que vous n'avez pas de version gaélique.

Mme Bronwyn Brady:

En effet. Il n'est pas traduit en gaélique, mais les propos tenus dans cette langue sont intégrés dans le corps du texte du hansard. Lorsqu'une personne parle en gaélique, nous mettons ce passage en premier, suivi de l'interprétation, de façon à ce que tout soit inclus.

Je suis désolée, les lumières viennent de s'éteindre, parce que nous ne bougions pas.

(1200)

M. Scott Reid:

Nous pouvons toutefois vous entendre. Nous ne vous voyons plus, mais nous vous entendons.

M. Scott Reid: Je suis désolé de le dire, mais cela me rappelle la météo lorsque je suis allé en Écosse. On pouvait entendre les gens, mais on ne pouvait pas toujours les voir.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Mme Ruth Connelly:

C'est exactement comme cela. Ce sont les aléas d'une journée écossaise typique.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup. Mon temps est écoulé, encore une fois, et je vous suis extrêmement reconnaissant de votre témoignage d'aujourd'hui. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à tous nos témoins. Vous êtes les derniers, et vous nous avez fourni des renseignements fort utiles pour notre étude.

Merci à vous aussi, Malcolm.

Chers collègues, je veux simplement vous rappeler que notre prochaine réunion aura lieu mardi, et que nous ferons l'examen du système de pétitions électroniques. Le greffier de la Chambre des communes sera ici au cours de la première heure. Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous préparerons notre rapport, ou nous donnerons des instructions aux rédacteurs. Nous devons donc garder cela à l'esprit.

Le 23 mai, même si nous préparerons notre rapport, nous accueillerons le greffier de l'Assemblée législative du Territoire du Nord. Je vous rappelle que la réunion devait avoir lieu le soir et que David a suggéré de déplacer cela au mercredi, car nous serons déjà sur place pour la tenue de votes. Ce serait donc dans la soirée du 23 mai. Cela convient-il à tout le monde? Si nous avons des ajouts à faire au rapport par la suite, nous pourrions le faire à ce moment-là. Cela vous convient-il?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Très bien.

Le sous-comité chargé d'étudier le problème du harcèlement sexuel aura probablement terminé ses travaux mardi, et nous serons saisis de son rapport.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 03, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.