header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-05-08 PROC 102

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome back, David.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you. I would like to thank everybody for their responses, the cards and the flowers. It was much appreciated.

The Chair:

We missed you.

Good morning, and welcome to the 102nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is in public.

We have some guests. We have the petitions committee from the Moroccan government, and the head of the delegation, Ms. Halima. Welcome very much. It's great. We would never have expected a petitions committee from Morocco to be here today as we discuss petitions. It's very exciting. We don't have a petitions committee ourselves. That's very interesting.

Before we resume our consideration of the email system, we'll proceed to the election of the second vice-chair. I'll turn it over to the clerk to run the election.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Pursuant to Standing Order 106(2), the second vice-chair must be a member of an opposition party other than the official opposition. I'm now prepared to take motions for second vice-chair.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I nominate Mr. Christopherson.

The Clerk:

It has been moved by Mr. Nater that Mr. Christopherson be elected as second vice-chair of the committee.

Is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt the motion?

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

It is.

(Motion agreed to)

The Clerk:

I declare the motion carried and Mr. David Christopherson duly elected as second vice-chair.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Congratulations. That was a hard-fought campaign.

With respect to the committee's review of the e-petitions system of the House of Commons, members will recall that we first met on this subject on November 7. At the time, we asked the Clerk to provide us with a list of issues to consider, which members received on April 10.

You have two documents: one is on those potential options from the House, and the other is suggested recommendations from Project Naval Distinction. To assist us, it's great to have Charles Robert, Clerk of the House; and André Gagnon, Deputy Clerk, Procedure. I know you are very busy. Thank you for being here.

The provisional Standing Orders governing e-petitions that came into effect at the beginning of this Parliament remain provisional until such time as the report from this committee is concurred in by the House. Hopefully, we can do that report today

Monsieur Robert, it would be great to have some comments from you to open our discussion.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the invitation to again address the committee in its review of the House of Commons e-petition system. As you can see, and as you mentioned, I am accompanied by André Gagnon, the Deputy Clerk of Procedure. He and I, mostly he, are prepared to answer questions following the presentation.

At my last appearance, members raised a number of issues about e-petitions, as well as paper petitions, and the ways to enhance processes for both. The committee asked me to highlight aspects of current systems that could be considered as part of its review.

We have compiled a list of these in the document that has been shared with the committee. They are based on concerns raised by members and by the public over the past two years. Please note that these are not meant to be an exhaustive list of options. Members may wish to raise other issues or proposals, which the administration of course would be responsive to. For example, there may be a desire to have the rules for electronic and paper petitions more closely mirror each other.

However, for the purposes of today's presentation, I wish to focus on four areas where enhancements were identified in the case of e-petitions, and two areas identified for paper petitions.

(1110)

[Translation]

The first issue with e-petitions has to do with the timeline for signatures. Standing Order 36(2.2) provides that each e-petition is open for signature for 120 days. This can impede the use of an e-petition to raise time-sensitive matters quickly.

To address this, the committee could agree to shorten the deadline to 60 or 90 days or to provide greater flexibility to petitioners in selecting a deadline. For example, they could be asked to choose from several options with the possibility of extending the chosen deadline if needed. Alternatively, petitioners could be given the option of closing the e-petition to signatures once the threshold has been reached. In all cases I have mentioned, Standing Order 36 would need to be modified.

The second issue has to do with the number of signatures required. Again, Standing Order 36 states that an e-petition must have 500 signatures to be certified; for paper petitions, it is 25 signatures. To date, approximately 70% of published e-petitions meet this 500-signature requirement.

The committee may wish to maintain the 500-signature minimum or consider adjusting the threshold to allow the certification of more petitions. Some lower number could be selected all the way down to 25 that would match the minimum for paper petitions. Any adjustment would require a change to Standing Order 36.[English]

The third issue has to do with the requirement that an e-petition be supported by five individuals. This stipulation was instituted as a filter to limit frivolous or offensive petitions. The obligation to have five supporters has led to some other problems. These include mistakes in the email addresses, or one of the potential supporters not responding in a timely way.

In cases where a petition includes the names of only five potential supporters out of a possible 10, some e-petitions have been unable to proceed further when one individual did not respond, or was later found to be ineligible. Should the supporter requirement be retained, there are certainly technical improvements that could be made to the system to provide users greater flexibility and to avoid some of the issues described.

However, in light of the additional burden this places on petitioners, as well as the role that members themselves play in the process, the committee could decide that the requirement for support from five individuals is an unnecessary step, and instead allow e-petitions to be submitted directly to members. This would not require a change to the Standing Orders.

The last issue dealing with e-petitions is the use of the term “sponsor” in relation to members. It was suggested that the term may be misleading and could be perceived as support for the petition. The role of members in the process could be made clearer by changing the term “sponsor” to something more neutral, like “presenter”. This new term would reflect the fact that members are simply agreeing to allow the petition to proceed and are willing to present it to the House if, and when, it is certified.[Translation]

In the report that led to the creation of the e-petitions system, the committee expressed a desire that both paper and electronic petitions, along with the government's responses, be available electronically. Given the volume of paper petitions, this was not possible in the initial phase of the project. We believe that paper and electronic petitions, as well as the government's responses, could be available electronically in the near future.

It is important to stress that in order to implement this next phase, the House administration would continue to work in close collaboration with the Privy Council Office, which is responsible for coordinating the government's response to petitions.

Preliminary discussions with PCO have revealed a number of issues. First, given the resources and effort that would be needed to support two different formats of petitions, allowing responses to be tabled only in an electronic format would allow for a more efficient process. The responses would be available to members more quickly and shared more easily. It would also have a positive environmental impact, considering the paper generated by the hundreds of responses presented each year.

(1115)

[English]

This change in practice would also be a useful pilot project toward greater use of electronic tabling and dissemination of sessional papers, including answers to written questions. In light of this, if members wish to move in this direction, further negotiations would be required with the Privy Council Office to develop a system that would allow for the secure electronic tabling of fully accessible documents.

Last, in terms of paper petitions, there continue to be some rules and practices that some regard as unduly restrictive. For example, there are rules about images and logos, address formats, and the size of paper used. If the committee wishes to allow for more paper petitions to be certified and presented to the House, it could agree to simplify some of these rules.

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for this opportunity to speak to you about this subject, and André and I would now be prepared to respond to any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

How I would propose we proceed is to go through on an open format, going through each of these recommendations to see what the committee's thoughts are on the practicality of what we're recommending. It's good that we have the witnesses here.

Is that procedure okay with people?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay, let's go to the document you've all received. The first one is related to the days that a petition is potentially open.

Does someone want to open the discussion?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I don't know the way to go about this, but on 120 days, I understand your point about it, that it's untimely. Couldn't the sponsoring or representing MP or whoever is creating it specify how long it is? If they don't make the signature threshold, it's not qualified in any case. So if they say “30 days”, then so be it. Is that feasible?

Mr. André Gagnon (Deputy Clerk, Procedure):

It's really up to the members of the committee to determine how that number of days could be determined or identified. Among those things, it would be for the member to identify the number of days that would be required, or for the petitioner to determine how many days could be useful.

At the same time, there could be other possibilities. Let's say a petitioner identifies 30 days and there are 445 signatures after 30 days. Could there be a possibility of getting an extension, for instance, to 60 days, or things like that? These are a part of the possibilities that exist.

There is importance to having a deadline, however, and it really has to do with the personal information gathered. The fact is that when you have a deadline, the petition will be closed at that point, and eventually all of the information related to it will be disposed of. That's the important part of having a deadline for petitions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, so you could say that if you have achieved your 500 signatures within 30 days it can be closed. The moment it achieves its 500 signatures under 120 days, by 30 days it could be closed, and at 120 days, if you're not there, then it's disqualified.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Exactly.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is everybody okay with that, or do you have other ideas?

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I'm not certain I understand exactly what you're suggesting. You're saying that it closes when it reaches the threshold?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If somebody makes it in less than 120 days, as a choice, when you get to your 30 days and you have 500 signatures, then you can close it. Or when it gets to 500 signatures, it's closed after 30 days, if it's punctual and they want it to be timely. Otherwise it's left at the standard 120 days.

I'm just throwing that idea out.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm still not certain or clear about it. I have no trouble with someone's having the ability to choose their deadline, but there needs to be a deadline, because I think people build campaigns around these things. To say that when it reaches a certain threshold of signatures, no matter what the deadline is...that wouldn't be something I would see as desirable or acceptable. I think people build campaigns around these things, so if it's unpredictable and they don't know when it will end, I think that's not an advisable thing. If we're going to allow people to make a choice, whether it be 120 days or some other number, or we could set a multiple choice—

(1120)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And then they could sign it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—of 90 days, 60 days, 120 days or whatever, and maybe there are three different options, but there still needs to be a deadline that everyone knows so they can build their campaigns around it and stuff like that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

The Chair:

So you're recommending number two, basically?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not suggesting that we need to do that. I don't see any issue with what we've been doing, but if we're going to make a change, it certainly still has to be built around a deadline. I'm just saying that if there is going to be a change, then I would oppose the idea of not having deadlines.

I don't see an issue with what we have now, but I would be comfortable and okay with people having an option of choosing other deadlines as long as the deadline is known by everyone up front.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could have two choices: 30 days if it's urgent and 120 days for everything else, and be done with it. If you want to make it 30 days, that is your choice and that is the end of it.

I'd be fine with that if you are.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, as long as everyone knows the deadline and people.... You're right, if you chose 30 days, and that was a bad choice in the end, well—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That was their choice.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That was their choice, yes.

The Chair:

The clerk also suggested the possibility of extending that deadline if a signature threshold isn't reached. You're not in favour of that?

Mr. Blake Richards:

No, I think there need to be deadlines. That's the key.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm with Blake on that.

The Chair:

You're giving them a choice of 30 days or 120 days.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are two choices: A and B, 30 days or 120 days. If you're in a hurry, you have 30 days. Otherwise 120 days is the standard.

David.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, then Mr. Bittle.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I'm fine.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Is it feasible to allow the individual the choice of having a drop-down view? Do we have to say 30 or 120 days, or could it be a drop-down and you could pick 30, 60, 90, or 120 days, but I agree with Blake that either way, there should be a deadline, and if we're saying 30 or 120 days, why not have all four options, depending on the individual.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Blake's point is it has a fixed amount of time, and I'm fine with that.

The Chair:

Is that okay, Blake?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, my key is that there needs to be a fixed time, and it can't be flexible. Once you've chosen it, you've chosen it, and I'm comfortable with whatever the choices are made.

The Chair:

Okay, it looks as if the committee is recommending that as part of number two, the petitioner be able to chose from 20, 60, 90, or 120 days, but after that there is no option to extend.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In giving those choices, is there any significant extra administrative burden or extra cost added? If there is, would it be significantly different if there were two choices compared to four choices, for example?

Mr. André Gagnon:

It's essentially a technical question, so whether you add two or four will not make a difference. The costs associated with it would be exactly the same.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Do you foresee there being any significant extra cost or administrative burden from a choice situation?

Mr. André Gagnon:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

No. Okay.

The Chair:

Good, we have the first recommendation.

I'm going to open discussion on number two, the issue of signatures.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

First, maintaining 500 signatures for electronic petitions and 25 for paper petitions is reasonable. I don't see any reason to change it.

The Chair:

Anyone else?

David, do you have any comment? No.

Is the committee good with that? We'll leave it as is.

On the issue of needing five supporters for the petition to be able to go ahead, I'm surprised that 11% don't make it. I would have thought that if it were very clear up front that you needed five names, you wouldn't get any without five names.

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm just trying to make sure I understand the concern here. Obviously, I haven't been involved in trying to set up one of these, but I know there is a requirement for them to have some support, which makes sense. They must have five people. What do they do to get that support? Do they email these people and ask them to sign the petition? How does this work? If it's a requirement to have five, I get the concern about maybe their choosing five people and one of them turns out to be ineligible, but can they choose 20 or 30 people and as long as they have five send it back? How does that work exactly? I'm a little unclear about that.

(1125)

Mr. André Gagnon:

When the petitioner creates the account and identifies some supporters, they can identify up to 10 individuals. We're not that aware of how they interact with those individuals beforehand, but clearly, individuals are identified. In some cases people just identify five, and maybe one of them is not exactly as good a Facebook friend as you thought they were and will not be support the petition. That's where some difficulties arise.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That could just be a situation where they don't really have five supporters and they just take a flyer on five people, but in the cases where someone has taken the maximum they are allowed and said, here are 10 people, can you give us a sense of the rate of those not being the five? In my mind, if we're giving people the ability to say there are 10 people and they're choosing not to take that, it's really their own fault.

Mr. André Gagnon:

It's a good indication that things are problematic. I don't think it's a big problem—I'm just checking with Jeremy on that.

It's not a big problem when, let's say, you put 10 names there. It's usually not an issue then. It's really when you only put five and the email address of one of the five is not correct. Now you're getting into trouble.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It sounds like this is really not a problem. In terms of the actual requirements themselves there's not a problem. It's people choosing not to take advantage of what's available to them that is the problem. If that's the case, that's your own mistake, not a problem with the requirements. That's what I'm seeing here, so maybe there's no need to change this.

The Chair:

Mr. Saini.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

Are there any criteria for these five people? Do they have to be permanent residents or citizens?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's the same as for any petition. They either have to be a resident or a Canadian citizen.

Mr. Raj Saini:

So either-or.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Raj Saini:

If they put the five people's names down, do you verify that? What's the verification process for the individual?

Mr. André Gagnon:

It's the same verification process as for regular petitioners. We just verify that they are eligible. It's not exactly the same as the information being shared regarding the petitioner. It's a bit more for a petitioner.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Okay.

The Chair:

I don't like the suggestion that members would have to check all these requirements on petitions. We have enough things to do, so it's good that you're doing that, to make sure a petition is eligible.

Is it the sense of committee members to leave things the way they are?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. I'm good with that.

The Chair:

Okay.

We'll move to the issue of sponsors.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I agree with the idea that....

The Chair:

I brought this issue up, I think. I agree with that, to change the name from “sponsor” to “presenter”, because “sponsor” suggests that you're actually supporting a petition, whereas if you're just presenting it in Parliament like a paper petition you're just presenting it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I've never heard anybody get up in the House and say, “I disagree with this petition, Mr. Speaker.”

The Chair:

So that's okay? People agree with changing the term “sponsor” to “presenter”?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Now we are dealing with the issue of publishing paper petitions. I understand that the two options the clerk is suggesting here are....

What do you do with paper petitions right now once the government's made its recommendation?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Once the government has responded to the petition, its response is tabled in the House and is available for consultation.

Mr. Charles Robert:

As a paper copy....

The Chair:

I'm not sure I've noticed. Sometimes I have a hard time figuring out who is presenting the petition. Is there a person who is responsible, someone whom you tell that the answer has been tabled in the House?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Clearly, the process that has been followed for e-petitions has been much easier to establish because, from the beginning, you have a sense of who, through the email addresses, has signed the petition. We have provided from the beginning an indication to those individuals, first, when the initial petition is tabled, and second, when the response to that petition is tabled by the government.

That type of information is gathered for e-petitions, but it's not the same for paper petitions.

(1130)

The Chair:

What you're proposing is that once the government responds to a paper petition or an e-petition, it goes on the electronic database, but the presenter or the person who organized the petition wouldn't even know that.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes.

The Chair:

They would have to figure it out.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's always the difficulty with paper petitions. You need the person to have either signed or started the petition; you need to follow the process in the House. By doing what is proposed here, which is essentially to put the content of a petition on the website, have it translated into both official languages, and then when that petition is being responded to by the government, have that text of the government's response, you would take it a step further in at least sharing information following the tabling of that petition in the House.

As you can imagine, trying to sort out the addresses, email addresses or postal codes of different individuals who have signed the paper petition, would take too much of an effort for the results at the end of the day. With paper petitions, it is hard to get back to the petitioners directly in the same way we are doing it for e-petitions.

At least this proposal is going a step further to share the information following the tabling of government's response, but also following the tabling of the petition in the first place.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I just want to step back a little bit. I think it was Mr. Simms, in a previous Parliament, who moved a motion regarding sessional papers being published online. I understand that the library committee met recently on this and that there have been some challenges.

Would those challenges be similar to what we face with this? Would you be able to elaborate a little bit on what those might be?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I'm not really very good at this: I'm challenged by a fountain pen.

Converting a paper petition into an electronic format would be a challenging process, especially because there are so many paper petitions that are presented. You saw the stats in the paper. Normally, it's 1,500 per session. This is a large volume to deal with.

The proposal that we are suggesting is that the responses be available uniquely in electronic format. That would make a lot of the information more accessible.

The problem there is that the response of the government to a petition belongs to the Privy Council Office, not to us, so the burden falls on them to make, if they are willing, the responses to paper petitions electronically available.

Mr. John Nater:

I just want to clarify, as well, that our privilege as a Parliament to publish papers would allow us to publish a scanned copy or other types of formats that may not always be in perfect condition. We have the privilege of doing so.

Mr. André Gagnon:

I think what is behind your question is this: how do we make available information that is tabled in the House, either paper responses to paper petitions, other responses, or government responses to committee reports, or agencies that table a report in the House through a minister? The objective is to make this accessible and available to the largest number of people. The question then becomes, “How accessible do you make it?”

Scanned copies have been, I would say, an interim measure throughout the years, but clearly have not offered all of the benefit that is expected from documents tabled in the House. For instance, those documents need to be easily accessible to people who have difficulty accessing, reading, or hearing audio documents.

Scanned copies are clearly far away from meeting those exigencies. That's why in the discussions that we have already started with the Privy Council Office with regard to petitions—which clearly form a smaller portion of all documents tabled in the House—we have already set ourselves very high standards regarding the accessibility of the documents, because that's part of the new reality that we are working with. I think it's a commitment that the House of Commons has decided to meet.

(1135)

Mr. John Nater:

I have a different topic now.

We had our colleague Diane Finley's example earlier—I guess it was in the fall—of paper size. I think it was that ledger size paper wasn't legal.

The Chair:

Sorry, Mr. Nater. That's a later recommendation.

Mr. John Nater:

Do we have it in there?

The Chair:

Yes, it's in there.

Mr. John Nater: I will come back to that then.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Out of order.

The Chair:

Out of order.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Saini.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Mr. Gagnon, can you help me with the procedure here? Somebody gives you a paper petition, and there are 25 signatures on it. The 25 signatures each have an address and pertinent information for each person who signed that petition. Does somebody physically go through and check the addresses: who they are, and if they are legitimate or not?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Let's say Mr. Saini signs a petition. No, not Mr. Saini because he cannot sign a petition. Well, he can sign a petition, but we won't count his name.

Let's say that people sign a petition. We won't check each of the names listed to see if that person really lives on that street or in that city mentioned. That will not be done.

What we do is a thorough check to see if all of the information that is gathered on the piece of paper seems to make sense. We don't do that for all of them. Let's say there are 2,000 signatures on the paper petition. We go through the first 25. For the petition to be certified, except for the content and all of those things, in terms of numbers it's 25. We make sure that at least 25 signed, and a bit more, are—

Mr. Raj Saini:

What do you do with the e-petitions, then, that have 500 signatures?

Mr. André Gagnon:

It's about the same—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Process.

Mr. André Gagnon:

—process for the e-petitions. That said, there are further requirements that have been identified by the committee—for instance, the IP address. Clearly, the IP address cannot be from the Government of Canada. That's an example of it. Those are easy things to do.

As you are aware, an email address is like any other address found on a paper petition.

Mr. Raj Saini:

When the response is tabled by the government, how does that information get to the people who have signed a paper petition?

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's why I made a reference to the e-petition. The e-petition is fairly easy because we have it in our database. It's a database in the House of Commons, not on the government website. Let's say that Mr. Christopherson tabled a petition in the House—Mr. Christopherson has no access to the information. When a response to an e-petition is tabled in the House, it's easy to refer to or inform the individual who has signed the petition. As for the paper petition, the information is published in the Debates and in the Journals of the House of Commons.

Also, let's say the member is quite active in collecting signatures or having a direct link with those who are petitioning Parliament. That member could get back to those individuals and say that this is a response the government has tabled regarding their petition.

Mr. Raj Saini:

For efficiency's sake, when somebody organizes the paper petition, would it be better if that one person's name were on it who could disseminate that information to everybody else? Would that be a more efficient process?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Do you mean the private citizen that would be—

Mr. Raj Saini:

For paper petitions.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That person could take it upon themselves to do that. That said, you can imagine that person would be gathering information on different individuals who signed the paper petition. That could raise other questions regarding the nature of the information gathered and would remove from the House of Commons the responsibility regarding protection of private information.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I am understanding the question a bit differently. I'm a bit lost in what you're actually asking for.

If the government gives a response to a paper petition as a paper document, the only thing that's noted in the Journals, or possibly the Debates, is the fact that this was actually done. It becomes a sessional paper. In the old days, sessional papers were printed as companion volumes to the Journals, but that was at the end of the session. Unless you actually knew when a response or a sessional paper was deposited in the House, there was no easy way for you to find it or make a request for it. When it was a paper version then, you had actually had to wait until it was published. We used to publish volumes and volumes of sessional papers as part of the journals process.

If you're talking about who finds out when a response to a petition has been tabled in the House, you actually have to do a search. Then you find out that it's been done, but you don't necessarily have access to the response. You have to make a request to have access to the response.

If it's done electronically, all you have to do is to go to the petitions section on the House of Commons website and access it. The process of searching is a lot easier. The information that you want will be found, as opposed to there simply being an indication that something that you're looking for has been done, without actually providing you the information that you want. That's why going through the electronic format will provide tremendous advantages to those who are petitioners and want to know how the government is reacting to this.

(1140)

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I want to follow up on both the electronic information and the paper petitions. We're hearing a lot lately about protection of personal information and things like that.

I'm curious as to what safeguards are in place to protect data that would have come in online, and also the hard-copy form, because there is information there as well. How many people within the House administration have access to this information? Is there anyone outside of the House administration who has access to any of this information? In the long term, what is done with the information, particularly email addresses and phone numbers? How is that disposed of when the time comes?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Mr. Nater, that is a good question. It was one of the main issues in the last Parliament, when the question of e-petitions came up.

The reason is that a lot of information is gathered when you sign a petition, in the sense that there can be a lot of people signing that petition electronically. No one from outside the organization has access to the information that is gathered for the e-petition system. As a member of Parliament, you would have access to basic information from the petitioner, because if you are being asked to sponsor or present a petition, you may want to contact that person to see what that person wants to do, what their motivations are, and all of those things. That is normal, and the individual will agree that this information can be provided to the member of Parliament.

As for the rest of the information, we might identify that 74 individuals came from Nova Scotia, or from different provinces or territories, but that's the only information that is made public. As for internal matters, we have a set of procedural clerks and individuals who work directly on the petitions, but as you can imagine, they are professionals who respect all of the information protocol that we have established.

We keep that information until the electronic petition has been answered and the government response tabled in the House, because we need to send a response back to those who have petitioned Parliament. Shortly afterwards, and in a regular manner, the information is completely eliminated.

The Chair:

On a paper petition, the MP and their staff have the actual petition and the names, signatures, and addresses of people who signed it.

The proposal before us is that all petitions, both paper and electronic, would now be put on the Parliament of Canada website, along with both the description of the petition—which wasn't available before on paper—and the government response. That's what you're saying would be most effective.

Mr. André Gagnon:

We're already working with the Privy Council Office on this, and clearly if this committee is supportive of that idea—without having a specific time frame, because we have not been able to identify that as of now—we will pursue our discussions with the Privy Council Office to make sure that all of that information can be shared as widely as possible.

(1145)

The Chair:

Is that okay with the committee? All electronic and paper petitions, plus the responses, would be on the electronic website. That's the only way the petitioner or the presenter would have access to it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In public.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It sounds like we're hearing that the PCO is pretty involved in this, and that is where challenges could be in this. Maybe we should bring them in and hear from them.

The Chair:

André.

Mr. André Gagnon:

The exchanges we've had so far with the Privy Council Office have been very supportive and highly positive on this one. It's really a discussion of a technical nature to make sure that whenever there is a transfer of information between the Privy Council Office and the government, that information is made accessible in the best way possible. It's all of those things, as well as the gathering of information.

As you can imagine, it's also a question of volume. A lot of paper petitions are being tabled in the House. They are usually tabled in only one language, so we need to have them translated. It's the same thing for the response. Those are the types of things we are actively looking at with the Privy Council Office.

The Chair:

We could recommend it, and if there's a problem we could—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess my suggestion would still remain, though. If some of the challenges are faced there, it might be good to hear what exactly their thoughts are.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Having heard from the witnesses here, I don't know that it's worth extending the study. That's my thought on things.

The Chair:

We could always call them in if there's a problem.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess we're being asked to make a recommendation, and obviously there's some information they might have that would help us to determine whether we're making the right recommendation. I don't know why we wouldn't do that up front rather than wait and see if there's a problem. To me, why create a problem if we're not certain?

Mr. Charles Robert:

We seem to have dealt with point one of the options, but is there also a decision about point two, that you would permit the government to table responses to petitions only in electronic format?

The Chair:

We were just discussing that, but Mr. Richards was saying that we might want to have PCO in to see whether there are problems with that recommendation.

Mr. Charles Robert:

For the Privy Council dealing with a response, I don't think there would be any problem. The only thing that really matters is processing the paper petitions; but that's as paper petitions, not as responses.

Mr. Blake Richards:

My thoughts on this are that if we're talking about an option, it's one thing. If we start to say it can only be done that way, then I think it's even more necessary that we would hear from them.

If we're talking about an option, it's a different story. I still think it would be good to hear from them, but an option at least allows some flexibility.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you're permitting the government to table responses to petitions only in electronic format, you're permitting them. That's giving them an option. I don't see any problem.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We're talking about two different things here. There was the option, and then the idea was raised that it would be the only way it could be done. That would be a different thing. If it's an option, it's less of a concern.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let's keep the options open.

Mr. Charles Robert:

The purpose of the presentation was to point out that the electronic format has tremendous advantages in terms of accessibility. The paper format is becoming, in comparison, a restrictive document. It is less accessible. It exists basically as a copy that's filed away, whereas having a document that's on a website is, in fact, if you like, a much more democratic kind of document in terms of its being accessible.

If the idea is to have a paper copy that is pretty well going to be a unique document unless its copied from paper to paper, I'm not sure that there's really.... It's really up to you, but it's a curiosity to wonder if it's somehow another curbing of the rights of members or the options that are available to you. Even as an electronic document, you can print it.

(1150)

The Chair:

Is there anything that would be added by bringing in the Privy Council Office?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Only if co-operation broke down, but I don't see that happening.

Mr. Raj Saini:

I think it's pretty clear.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, it's clear.

The Chair:

Is the committee basically in agreement in recommending both one and two under this section?

Mr. Blake Richards:

What's two?

The Chair:

Do you have the document? It says, “Permit the government to table responses...in electronic format.”

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Permitting the government response.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Permitting it, yes, rather than requiring.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll turn to rules for paper petitions. This goes back to the point Mr. Nater was making, so I'll let him open the discussion.

Mr. John Nater:

It was really just a question. What challenges would be presented if we allowed leger-sized paper or other paper, not legal or letter-sized paper?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I don't think the challenge is significant, but sometimes petitions come in the form of postcards—I've seen that—and they've sometimes come in sheets. Who knows, they could even come on some sort of huge roll. I've seen one petition that a member tried to bring in with a wheelbarrow just to demonstrate how many signatures had been brought in, but I didn't really get a chance to look at what the format was. There are other things they might want to use, just to demonstrate the kind of companies or whatever that are supporting it; they could use logos, other trademarks, symbols, or anything of that sort, and the question really is that in the past that's always been forbidden. Now do you want to open it up and just simply become a little bit more relaxed about it? It would be the same with paper size.

The Chair:

Let's go through each of these. There are three different items here: first of all, a) would we allow non-offensive, non-partisan images or logos to appear on the page or on the reverse of a petition?

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

My thinking on this is what is the need to have these things on there? Are we going to start going down a road that we don't want to go down? Then someone has to determine what's non-offensive and non-partisan. Is there really some need to have logos on a petition? I can't imagine what it is. That just creates a task that I think is.... I wouldn't want to be put in a place of having to make those decisions about what's non-partisan, what's non-offensive, when there's really no need to have it on there. If there were some reason to have a logo on there, that would be different.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I totally agree with Blake. I do not see any reason to have logos on the petitions. Logos or companies having their logos on petitions is the last thing I need to have, especially when you're putting the petitions on the Internet. No, it's not what we're here for. I think it's appropriate not to have logos and such on petitions.

The Chair:

Is that the sense of the committee?

Okay, we won't allow logos.

Second, or b), is a requirement to have any address format that clearly establishes the city, town or village where the signatories reside.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As opposed to what?

The Chair:

André can confirm this, but I think sometimes people might not use the exact format that the government has.

Do you want to comment on that one, André?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The idea here is essentially to ensure that whenever there is a signatory, a person who signs a paper petition, the amount of information that's needed to identify the individual is enlarged a bit to make sure that that petition can be counted amongst the 25 names. It's that simple.

The Chair:

It's if someone does something slightly different from the official format but the information is still there. In the past, I think they've been rejected.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Basically what we're getting at here, is let's say someone is filling this thing out and right now you must have your town, your province, your postal code listed. Let's say they put “John Smith, 123 Jones Street, Toronto”, and then they put their postal code and they forgot to put Ontario. Now you can say, that's pretty obvious where this person is and you're able to verify it, rather than say, “Well, it doesn't have Ontario, so we can't go with it.”

Is that basically what we're talking about here?

(1155)

Mr. André Gagnon:

We're trying to remove technicalities. That's what we're trying to remove.

Maybe Jeremy, you have something to add.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc (Principal Clerk, Chamber Business and Parliamentary Publications):

The way the requirements are written, there are certain address combinations that are allowed and others that aren't. So if you filled it out and, as you say, indicated Toronto but not the province, we know Toronto is in Ontario, but if it doesn't have the province, that's not one of the allowed combinations. So that wouldn't be counted.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It really just makes it easier for people who maybe forget to put in one little part of it in. You still have to be comfortable that you can verify it, but that's really what we're trying to do, just to make it easier for people.

The Chair:

Just for the minutes, that was Jeremy LeBlanc from the Clerk's office.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That makes sense.

The Chair:

Are people okay with that?

Now we're on c), the use of varying paper sizes.

Do one of the clerks want to comment on that? What's practicable and what's not?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I think Ms. Finley essentially brought that to our attention in a very direct way, in the sense of when you have individuals who are signing a petition that is exactly of the same type as the petition on an 8 x 11 piece of paper, but is in a different format. For different reasons—and I think Ms. Finley had good reasons for that—many people want to have more space to sign, bigger letters on the piece of paper. This is essentially to accommodate those types of situations.

The Chair:

So is the wording in c) okay?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was just going to suggest that you have a limit on the size of the paper so that you won't have a 400 foot scroll come in. Call it something like anything that could reasonably scanned. That would be the standard I'd recommend. If you can reasonably scan it, it's fine. I don't care if it's A4 or letter size. If you can scan it, it's fine.

Personally, I don't have a problem with postcards being accepted. I don't know what my colleagues think. We get a lot of postcards, why can't they be counted as petitions? If you get 25 postcards with the same message and same signature, what difference does it make if it's one or ten on a page. That's my thought on that.

Mr. André Gagnon:

The postcards, most of the time, are written in different formats, so even the content, the text that would be there, could not be counted as a petition. That has been the case in the past.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That disqualifies them for other reasons, but if it's in the correct format and it calls on the House to do something without a logo and it's one signature per page, I don't have a problem with that. That's all I'm saying.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Okay.

Mr. Charles Robert:

If it's without a logo, that might be a catch.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's up to them.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's up to the committee to decide.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there any other thoughts?

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, you're shaking your head.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, I'm shaking it both ways. I'm on the fence on that one. If there's a postcard with one name per page, all of a sudden it could be the wheelbarrow situation, where you're bringing in a stack, and it is becoming a bit of a stunt type of thing. We don't necessarily want to go down that route.

I think especially when it's presented as being in an accessible format, in a larger size with a larger font, which was Ms. Finley's argument.... I think the wording in here—“usual size” or something like that—allows for flexibility and perhaps some encouragement in terms of the larger size. Personally—and again there could be other input—I just wonder if the postcard format would get us into a stunt type of scenario.

The Chair:

So if someone had a paper postcard and they had a thousand postcards, the member would have to present that pile when they presented the petition in the House, right?

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The point about the images that was raised by the Clerk, I think, is an important one. How many postcards don't have some kind of logo or image on them? It's not like they go out as just a plain piece of paper. That's not too likely to happen. So I think it is actually an important point. I'm also a little bit torn on the idea, but I think you're going to run into the problem anyway with the images and the logos and stuff like that. It may be better just to avoid that problem by just not having it.

The Chair:

You mean not having postcards?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Exactly. I'm torn, but that, to me, is probably where you'd end up having a problem anyway.

(1200)

The Chair:

So the committee seems a little ambivalent on postcards?

You're voting for it?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Ambivalent is a good word for it.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

It's just a question of clarity. Typically postcards are made of a bit thicker paper. When we're determining usual size, would that preclude the card stock format type of thing from being used, rather than the regular petition paper that we are using now?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

The requirement usually has to do with the size rather than the format of paper. I think if someone had an 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of cardstock, that would still be acceptable.

Mr. John Nater:

It would be? Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there a limit to the thickness you'll accept? What if somebody shows up with an 8 1/2 by 11 brick of wood attached to a tub? What would happen?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

What would happen?

Mr. John Nater:

It's still paper.

The Chair:

What's the decision on postcards?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's no consensus to keep them, so don't make them.

The Chair:

There's no consensus, so we won't allow them? At least we could. Okay.

On part c), we just have to qualify the varying sizes of paper a bit. And you suggested they be scannable?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They should be reasonably scannable. If you can put them in a machine that can scan them all, and that's fine. If you have to get a special piece of equipment because it's 74 by 16, then it's probably not so useful.

Mr. André Gagnon:

I'm just worried that maybe there is somewhere somehow a major giant scanner that we could refer to.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what the “reasonable” part is for.

Mr. Charles Robert:

We could come back to you and actually give you a more specific proposal about what the maximum size would be, if that would be helpful.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you could give us minimum and maximum sizes and we could be done with that, I wouldn't mind. But if somebody shows up with something that is A4, don't reject it. It's not that different, right?

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I agree with what the Clerk just said. I think there needs to be a minimum and a maximum size, because if the issue is to say that something is reasonably scannable, then the person who is now creating the petition won't know until they've submitted it whether it's acceptable or not. They need some indication as to minimum and maximum sizes, and if they know those, then they can ensure they comply with them.

Is that something you can come back to us on to say “Here are a minimum and a maximum we feel comfortable with” and then we can decide whether that's...?

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I assume that, as a practical matter, scannable is going to mean it can be fed into a document scanner automatically once the staples are taken out. So I'm going to assume that means in practice 8 1/2 by 11 or 8 1/2 by 14 and nothing else. Maybe we can take metric sizes like A4. I don't know how likely it is that we're going to get those. You'd have to buy your paper overseas. It seems to me that having just those two sizes would be the simplest thing, and that's going to include most....

Mr. André Gagnon:

If I remember well, Ms. Finley, if we can take that example...I think it was 11 by 17 inches.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Can you scan 11 by 17?

Mr. André Gagnon:

It goes into a photocopier, so I suspect that it can be scanned.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that would be reasonable, in that case.

The Chair:

Why don't we leave it. I see that you all approve.

The clerk will present that and put it into the recommendation to the researcher, for a maximum and a minimum.

We also have these seven recommendations from Project Naval Distinction.

Does everyone have this document?

It's an organization called Project Naval Distinction. The clerk sent you all a copy of those recommendations.

The first one was—the problem they're raising is that if the member doesn't present it, then it could be a problem for the petitioners. A member could be obstructionist or disorganized, then just not present it. They're suggesting that there should be a timeline and if the member doesn't present it by that time, then it should be opened up for another member to choose to present it.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

(1205)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When you create an electronic petition, a member has to have sponsored it from the get-go, right? At that point, they're making an implicit commitment to present it.

How often does it happen that a petition has come through, but then nobody wanted to present it? Do we have an idea?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Is that for an e-petition?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Really, it's not that often.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

From the statistics we have, there are about 60 petitions that have been certified and not yet presented. Maybe they were just certified last week—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Out of how many?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

That would be out of over 250 that have been certified.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If that is since the start of this Parliament, then it's a quarter.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

As to how many of them were certified a couple of weeks ago versus those certified months and months ago, I couldn't tell you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I suppose I'll have to check with the clerk of petitions.

The Chair:

If a member has signed up to be the presenter, but then doesn't present it, do the petitioners have any option? Can they get another presenter?

Mr. André Gagnon:

No.

The Chair:

No.

Yes, Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I can understand where a petitioner might have a frustration, if a member has signed up to be a sponsor—now we're going to call them a “presenter”, I guess—and they don't present these things. I can see where the frustration would be for a petitioner, but I guess it would be incumbent upon them to maybe have a discussion with that member of Parliament and ask, “Are you comfortable with this and are you going to be able to present it in a timely fashion?”

I think that when you start getting into requiring a member.... What if they're travelling with a committee for three weeks or something?

How would we actually enforce it anyway? Are we going to kick a member out of the House because they didn't present a petition?

I think it's a little unworkable.

Perhaps it's incumbent upon the person who's creating a petition to have a good discussion with that MP and make sure that they're going to present it for them, before they ask them to be a presenter.

The Chair:

If they don't, should there be an option for that petitioner to go and get another presenter?

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd be inclined to think so.

Let's say that our late colleague Gord Brown had been on the verge of presenting a petition and was suddenly unable to because he passed away. I'm not sure what happens in a situation like that. It seems reasonable that someone else should be able to pick up the slack, in that particular situation.

The Chair:

Yes, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have no problem with the petition being transferrable, but I do have a big problem with any system that requires a member to speak in the House at any time or do something in the House that is against the independence of the member.

The Chair:

So, Clerk, I don't think there is any appetite to force a person to present it, but do you see an option for allowing someone else to present it? Is that a possibility?

Mr. André Gagnon:

This happens regularly in the House in the sense that paper petitions are sometimes provided to one member of Parliament. That member even has it certified, and it is given back to the member of Parliament. Then it's another member who presents the petition in the House. You can anticipate that could also happen in regard to e-petitions.

The Chair:

I thought you just said that wasn't allowed.

Mr. André Gagnon:

No, it's not allowed electronically in the system to change...because of the rules that you have. But you can be a sponsor, and afterwards, another member can table the petition.

The Chair:

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Maybe my question is now irrelevant. It sounds to me as if this isn't an issue. In terms of the scenario that Mr. Reid raised here, in the situation where someone ceases to be a member for whatever reason, is there not a way already to have the petition—

Mr. André Gagnon:

The petition has been certified and can be presented by someone else.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so it sounds as if we don't have an issue here.

The Chair:

Okay, there is no issue there.

The second one, that it requires a sponsor only once the petition has been certified....

Mr. André Gagnon:

I think it's been taken care of by the discussion you just had.

The Chair:

Okay.

So, the third is to change the electronic interface page to allow a bulleted list of two.... I don't even know what this one is about. Does anyone understand this one? It is to change the electronic interface of the petition submission page to allow a bulleted list under the “To” section, similar to what is in place for the “Whereas” section.

(1210)

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know how it goes. You might say “Whereas poverty is widespread in Canada; whereas children are frequently....”, and you just drop the bullets off and then say “Therefore, we call on the Government of Canada to enact remedial measures to work with the provinces” and so on. I think that's the point they are getting at.

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

It's flexibility in formatting. That's all.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, the other guess is that it is going to different agencies, for example, to the House of Commons, to the Senate, to the Department of Foreign Affairs, to a minister, as opposed to the sensible suggestion you came up with.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm not sure, actually. You're saying it would call upon the Minister of Agriculture to do this, the Minister of Finance to do that. Is that what you mean?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

When you fill out the form for an electronic petition, you choose to whom the petition is addressed, to the House of Commons or a minister or a department.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh, right.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

But you're able to make one choice only. I think what the folks here are suggesting is that you be able to address your petition to more than one of the choices, as opposed to specific recommendations to more than one.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, I've got it.

The Chair:

Right now, can you do that, make it that someone do this and do that? Can you do more than one thing?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

In the form that you fill out for an electronic petition, you are able to choose only one person to whom you address it.

The Chair:

I meant the different actions. Can you ask more than one action, as Mr. Reid was suggesting? You can already?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Yes. In terms of the relief sought, if you will, you can have multiple reliefs.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You just answered my question, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That was my question exactly. I was pretty certain you could already ask for more than one thing to be done.

The Chair:

Okay. Do people want them to be able to address it to more than one organization or not? That's what these people are suggesting.

Mr. Charles Robert:

In terms of dealing with petitions, the House of Commons has control only through the Standing Orders to oblige the government to prepare a response. If it goes to a government department and it doesn't go to the House of Common, well clearly, it's not for you. But if it goes to another department as well as to you, the department may or may not care. And because it does do that, it doesn't give you, as the House, some additional responsibility or obligation, nor does it impose anything on the government. The government's obligation to respond to a petition is due only to the fact that under the Standing Orders, there is a requirement to do it when it goes to the House of Commons. If it goes anywhere else....

I think what we see here is perhaps a misunderstanding of the process on the part of this applicant.

The Chair:

Okay, so this isn't necessary.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I don't think so.

The Chair:

Okay, agreed.

Fourth is to create a portal for members through which they can view petitions, sorted with subject words, and reach out to the petition drafter should they wish to offer a person...one that doesn't have a sponsor. But so far, the rules are that they have to have a sponsor. And they're going to be relatively accessible under this new system, right, where they're all on electronically? So this probably isn't necessary.

Mr. André Gagnon:

I'm not exactly sure I understand the recommendation to start with. Essentially, what I see here is that members of Parliament could choose individuals who would like to present petitions. I think it goes along the lines of the discussion that is initiated by proposal number 1, which is that maybe this group was in a situation where their petition was not presented as rapidly as they thought from the first part. Essentially what they are proposing here is a mechanism by which members of Parliament who are very keen on presenting a petition on subject A would be able to get to petitioners and say, “I'm really looking forward to tabling such a petition. Can I be your sponsor?” It's changing the nature of the relationship, really.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

As I read this, I have a different reading of it. If you notice the part in brackets, it says, “one which does not have a sponsor at that time”. In order for it to be up, it has to have a sponsor.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Exactly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think they're talking about here where they haven't been able to find an MP sponsor, and they don't want to go through the effort of trying to track one down, so they're hoping an MP is going to go and find them. I think that's what this is about.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's exactly right.

(1215)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think that's probably a little bit of an unrealistic hope. As much as I understand why they would want to do it, I mean, go do your legwork, right?

The Chair:

Okay. Is the committee in agreement with that?

Number 5 is to better highlight privacy protections. Is that highlighted up front when people are doing petitions?

Mr. André Gagnon:

That information is shared. The guarantees are indicated on the website, and we are, in fact, very proud of what we are doing.

The Chair:

Are they on the form?

Mr. André Gagnon:

If the person has the sense that it was not highlighted enough, we can take a look at the website again and ask, “How can we make it even clearer for those who are signing a petition, starting a petition, or supporting a petition to make sure that they are fully aware of the guarantees that we're offering regarding privacy of information?”

The Chair:

When they go in electronically, if I ask to my friend to sign this petition, they go into the House of Commons electronically, they find a petition, and they go to sign, do they see right there that their information is protected?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The information is readily accessible, yes.

The Chair:

Without them searching all around?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I'm not sure of the level of detail that's provided there.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

In the various guides that are available on the website, there is a section that deals with data management and explains the privacy protections that exist. It's part of the guide. I think it's probably also part of the terms and conditions that people affirm that they have read before signing. Of course, everyone reads the terms and conditions before checking that box.

The Chair:

Can we just leave this as a friendly suggestion to make sure that, up front, confidentiality is evident?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You essentially addressed my question, but I think I'll do a follow-up on it. In order to do more than what we have now, in order to comply with this and do more, the stuff they'll certainly read before they agree, what could you imagine that looking like, and what kind of expense would there be in doing that? If someone already has the ability to know this information, what do we do to make it more evident? There's got to be some cost to that, I would assume.

Mr. André Gagnon:

I think that's indicated in here, and again, I'm maybe not sure of understanding the proposal, but essentially what is indicated here is making sure that everyone is aware that their privacy is protected. Maybe our messaging is not exactly as it should be in terms of informing individuals that we are very strict on preserving privacy information. That is maybe what we're alluding to here.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm feeling like we already do it, but what you're saying is maybe you think we could change some of the language so people understand it better.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, well, if it's as simple as that, I have no issue with that.

The Chair:

Okay, we are on number 6. This is a fairly major potential change: Consider creating thresholds, similar to the e-petition system in the United Kingdom, whereby e-petitions which receive large amounts of signatures are entitled to a debate in the House of Commons.

I think it's what, half a million or something in the United Kingdom? Then there's a mandatory debate in the House of Commons.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

It's 100,000.

The Chair:

So it would be something like a take-note debate, for instance.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Presumably, but again, that's a decision that's entirely yours.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I think this process has a significant potential to be hijacked by groups with the money to do so, and I think it could potentially become a ridiculous process. I don't support that.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If there is public interest in a particular debate, we already have methods to do that through emergency debates and take-note debates, so I don't think it's necessary to put it in this system. If the House leaders want to get together and create a debate, that can happen already.

The Chair:

So everyone is opposed so far. The committee is opposed

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: The last one is number seven: Allow petition drafters to suggest or select from a list of subject keywords...that will be applied to their petition, rather than having them assigned, as they are a key feature for attracting unsolicited signatures.

Mr. Gagnon, do you have a comment on this?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes.

All of the titles that are given to petitions are done by professionals, who identify the content but also make sure that the way this content is identified is also identified in a similar fashion in the Debates of the House, in the committee proceedings. Also, when the responses to petitions are tabled, they are using that title.

For research purposes, or for individuals who are interested in the subject matter, it is much easier to find that information. Also, as you can imagine, the idea is to make sure that the titles that are used are not highly partisan in the way they are presented. What we're talking about here is a public petition, and clearly you want to stay away from highly partisan words or controversial words.

(1220)

Mr. Charles Robert:

To build on what André just said, I think there is a question here of losing control over an element of our own website. I'm not sure that there is a particular advantage in letting the drafters of a petition select the key words that somehow we might be obliged to assign to our website so that people can search using that terminology.

The Chair:

Under the system we just approved, where paper petitions and electronic petitions will be online, if someone put in the word “softwood lumber”, would they get all the paper and electronic petitions? Would they be able to search that way?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I'm not sure I can go into the details. The answer to that is yes, but usually what is identified is not only the general topic, but other data that is associated with that word. That's the usefulness and the preciseness of the system that has been put in place, so you can do research that can guide you to the information you are looking for.

As you can imagine, if individuals would want to identify the precise name of the petition, you could lose some of those elements.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I did two things in preparation for this intervention.

One was that I considered the situation we face in my own experience, with my family's business, in designing a website and trying to steer people in certain directions. You have people going to our website and trying to find out about women's summer blouses. They have a colour range, age range, and size range that they're interested in, and it's an inherently difficult task to not either flood them with every blouse, or alternatively make it too narrow. If it's too narrow it leaves out.... It is not an easy task. I'll just observe that first.

We aren't the only ones who struggle with this; everybody who is marketing online has this problem. I wouldn't want to give the Clerk's staff the challenge of figuring out something that people who have lots of money and a strong financial incentive haven't yet been able to figure out. That's one thought.

The second thing I did was that I went to my own petitions. There are two that I've sponsored, E-48 and E-1457, and I looked up the key words. I think I'm right that these are the key words that would trigger my finding one of these two petitions. There are six key words. One of these was on having a referendum prior to any change in the electoral system, and the second one was on a national day of solidarity for victims of anti-religious bigotry and violence.

It looks to me that what you have as the key words are, number one, “electoral reform”; number two, “M-153”, which is a reference to a motion, and that is referenced in any petition; number three is “national day of solidarity for victims of anti-religious bigotry and violence”, which is effectively the header of that motion; number four is “referenda”; number five is “religious discrimination”; and number six is “victims”.

In each case, it's these key words, and then it says “results one”. I assume that means that if I type in any of these things, I'd be led only to this particular petition.

Is that correct?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I think that's the case.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

It could also be any other petition that has those. You may have multiple petitions and different results, one for each of these, but I assume only one petition has these.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In this case, it says one result for each of them. Can I assume only one petition has these?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

If you click on the keyword and it only brings back one petition, it's the only one that has that keyword.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The obvious way of building a fuller set of keywords is to retain each keyword, or sometimes a key phrase in practice, and then as new related petitions come along over time, as much as possible, try to stick with the existing keywords as a way of developing a universe of keywords that grows organically. I think that would be the best way of doing it.

My petition on the day of solidarity is going to expire in about a week and it hasn't set off an avalanche of responses, to put it mildly. It could be that in the future someone else will come along with a petition worded somewhat differently. It would be reasonable for a user who's thinking of signing up to look at that petition to find out if there was a previous one that was worded somewhat differently. It would lead to a more informed user prior to their attaching their signature to something. Just as a suggestion, if you could retain that universe and use it for future tags on petitions, I think that would be helpful.

(1225)

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think that's one of the reasons we prefer to work with professional indexers, people who understand the nature of the work. Building a network of phrases that alludes to a similar topic allows for a more profitable search than just using such a specific, tight terminology that if you don't actually use it, you can't find it. It's the same sort of thing as if I spell “co-operate”, “co-op” or “coop”; I can find some, but I won't find all.

I think that's what André was pointing to. We have indexers who are basically trying to unify the approach taken to all of the parliamentary documents we produce to make sure that outsiders or insiders who want to access specific information end up with the best results.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

As a continuation on that, one of these called for a referendum prior to changing the electoral system. If someone types in “referenda”, I'm assuming what should happen is that the plural or the singular leads to the same thought.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes, if you wanted to use “plebiscite”, it should be findable too.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, okay.

The Chair:

You are saying we already have professionals indexing—

Mr. Charles Robert:

There is a service that does that work for us.

The Chair:

So if any new petition comes in, they would have the keywords and stuff, professionally, as opposed to letting someone else hijack the system and pick their own keywords.

So we should stay with that, Mr. Graham?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I was going to say that I think the clerk's office is sufficiently empowered to take care of this, that no recommendation is needed, and that I think we can put this one to bed.

The Chair:

I think that's all of the recommendations. We've made about half a dozen of them, and I would recommend that the clerk, for our report, just list those recommendations, clear them with the witnesses, and then bring them back to the committee. It shouldn't take us 10 minutes to make sure of what we said, and we'll then present this report to the House and the electronic petition system would become official.

Is that okay with committee members?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Witnesses, thank you very much. This is great work, and we will suspend and go into camera for committee business on the use of indigenous languages in the House.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour!

Bon retour parmi nous, David.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci. Je voudrais remercier tous ceux qui m'ont répondu, qui m'ont envoyé des cartes ou des fleurs. J'ai été très touché.

Le président:

Vous nous avez manqué.

Bonjour à nouveau, et bienvenue à la 102e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La réunion est publique.

Nous avons des invités. Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir le comité des pétitions du gouvernement marocain, dont la chef de la délégation est Mme Halima. Bienvenue. C'est extraordinaire. Il ne nous serait jamais venu à l'idée que le comité des pétitions du Maroc puisse être des nôtres alors que nous discutons justement du thème des pétitions. C'est très excitant. Nous n'avons pas de comité des pétitions au Canada, et nous trouvons l'idée très intéressante.

Avant de reprendre notre examen du système électronique, nous devons élire un second vice-président. Je passe les rênes au greffier pour la tenue du scrutin.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Conformément au paragraphe 106(2) du Règlement, le second vice-président doit représenter un parti d'opposition autre que l'opposition officielle. Vous pouvez me soumettre vos propositions pour le poste de second vice-président.

Allez-y monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Je propose M. Christopherson.

Le greffier:

Il est proposé par M. Nater que M. Christopherson soit élu second vice-président du Comité.

Plaît-il au Comité d'adopter cette motion?

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le greffier:

Je déclare la motion adoptée et M. David Christopherson dûment élu second vice-président du Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le président:

Félicitations. C'était une dure bataille.

Relativement à notre examen du système de pétitions électroniques de la Chambre des communes, vous vous rappelez sans doute que notre première réunion sur ce thème remonte au 7 novembre. Nous avions alors demandé au greffier de nous fournir une liste de questions à examiner. Il nous l'a transmise le 10 avril.

Vous avez en main les deux documents suivants: le premier porte sur les options offertes à la Chambre, et l'autre énonce les recommandations du Projet Distinction Navale. Pour nous aider, nous avons la chance de compter parmi nous le greffier de la Chambre des Communes, Charles Robert, ainsi que son collègue, André Gagnon, sous-greffier, Procédure. Je sais que vous êtes très occupé. Merci de vous être déplacés.

Les dispositions du Règlement régissant les pétitions électroniques, adoptées provisoirement au début de la présente législature, resteront provisoires jusqu'à l'adoption du rapport du Comité par la Chambre. J'espère que nous pourrons rédiger ce rapport aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Robert, vos remarques liminaires serviront d'introduction à nos délibérations. Nous sommes tout ouïe.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de m'avoir de nouveau invité à m'adresser au Comité dans le cadre de son examen du système de pétitions électroniques de la Chambre des communes. Comme vous pouvez le constater, et comme vous l'avez mentionné, je suis accompagné d'André Gagnon, sous-greffier, Procédure. Nous serons prêts, M. Gagnon et moi, mais plutôt lui, à répondre à vos questions à la suite de mes observations.

Lors de ma dernière comparution, les membres ont soulevé un certain nombre de questions à propos des pétitions électroniques, des pétitions papier et des façons d'améliorer les processus dans les deux cas. Le Comité m'a demandé de souligner des aspects des systèmes actuels qu'il pourrait examiner dans le cadre de son étude.

Dans le document qui a été remis au Comité, nous avons dressé une liste de ces aspects. Ils reposent sur les inquiétudes soulevées par les membres et le public au cours des deux dernières années. Veuillez prendre note qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une liste exhaustive des options. Les membres souhaiteront peut-être soulever d'autres questions ou présenter d'autres propositions, dont l'Administration tiendra compte, bien entendu. Par exemple, il est possible qu'on veuille harmoniser davantage les règles régissant les pétitions électroniques et les pétitions papier.

Cependant, aux fins de la présentation d'aujourd'hui, je me concentrerai sur quatre éléments des pétitions électroniques auxquels des améliorations pourraient être apportées, puis je me pencherai sur deux aspects des pétitions papier.

(1110)

[Français]

Le premier problème lié aux pétitions électroniques concerne le délai de signature. Selon le paragraphe 36(2.2) du Règlement, chaque pétition électronique est « ouverte pour signature pendant 120 jours », ce qui peut poser des problèmes si on souhaite utiliser une pétition électronique pour soulever rapidement des questions urgentes.

Pour corriger ce problème, le Comité pourrait accepter de raccourcir le délai pour le faire passer à 60 ou 90 jours, ou d'accorder une certaine souplesse aux pétitionnaires dans l'établissement du délai. Par exemple, on pourrait leur demander de choisir parmi plusieurs options et leur permettre de prolonger l'échéance choisie au besoin. On pourrait aussi offrir aux pétitionnaires l'option de mettre un terme à la campagne de signature dès que le seuil est atteint. Dans tous les cas que j'ai mentionnés, l'article 36 du Règlement devrait être modifié.

Le deuxième problème concerne le nombre requis de signatures. De fait, l'article 36 du Règlement prévoit qu'une pétition électronique doit compter 500 signatures afin d'être certifiée. Pour les pétitions papier, le seuil est de 25 signatures. Jusqu'à maintenant, environ 70 % des pétitions électroniques publiées ont atteint le seuil des 500 signatures.

Le Comité pourrait maintenir un minimum de 500 signatures ou envisager de modifier le seuil pour faire en sorte que davantage de pétitions soient certifiées. Un nombre de signatures moins élevé pourrait être fixé et ce nombre pourrait même être de 25, ce qui correspondrait au minimum dans le cas des pétitions papier. Toute modification nécessiterait aussi une modification de l'article 36 du Règlement.[Traduction]

Le troisième problème relatif à la pétition électronique concerne l'obligation d'obtenir l'appui de cinq personnes. Cette exigence a été adoptée dans le but de limiter les pétitions frivoles ou offensantes, mais elle a engendré d'autres problèmes. En effet, il peut arriver qu'une erreur se glisse dans les adresses électroniques, ou que l'une des personnes devant appuyer la pétition ne réponde pas dans les délais.

Dans les cas où des pétitions comprennent les noms de 5 appuyeurs seulement sur une possibilité de 10, certaines pétitions électroniques se sont arrêtées lorsqu'une personne ne répondait pas ou lorsqu'il s'avérait par la suite que l'une des personnes n'était pas habilitée à donner son appui. Si l'exigence relative aux appuyeurs est maintenue, il y a sans contredit des améliorations techniques qui pourraient être apportées au système pour offrir plus de souplesse aux utilisateurs et pour régler certains des problèmes décrits précédemment.

Toutefois, compte tenu du fardeau additionnel que cela représente pour les pétitionnaires, et du rôle que les députés eux-mêmes jouent dans le processus, le Comité pourrait décider que l'obligation de recueillir l'appui de cinq personnes constitue une mesure inutile et il pourrait permettre que les pétitions électroniques soient soumises directement aux députés. Un tel changement ne nécessiterait pas de modification au Règlement.

Le dernier problème relatif aux pétitions électroniques concerne l'utilisation du terme « parrain » s'appliquant aux députés. On a fait valoir que le terme pourrait être trompeur et donner à penser qu'il implique un appui à la pétition. Le rôle des députés dans le processus pourrait être précisé en remplaçant le terme « parrain » par un terme plus neutre, comme « présentateur ». Ce terme indiquerait que le député ne fait qu'accepter que la pétition suive son cours et qu'il est disposé à la présenter à la Chambre dès lors qu'elle aura été certifiée.[Français]

Dans le rapport ayant donné lieu à la création du système de pétitions électroniques, le Comité avait exprimé le souhait que les pétitions papier et les pétitions électroniques, accompagnées des réponses du gouvernement, soient disponibles par voie électronique. Compte tenu du volume des pétitions papier, cela n'a pas été possible au cours de la phase initiale du projet. Nous croyons toutefois que les pétitions électroniques et les pétitions papier, de même que les réponses du gouvernement, pourraient être disponibles en version électronique dans un proche avenir.

Il est important de souligner que, pour mettre cette prochaine phase en oeuvre, l'Administration de la Chambre pourrait continuer de travailler en étroite collaboration avec le Bureau du Conseil privé, qui est responsable de coordonner les réponses du gouvernement aux pétitions.

Les discussions préliminaires avec le Bureau du Conseil privé ont révélé un certain nombre d'enjeux. Tout d'abord, étant donné les ressources et le travail qu'implique la gestion des deux formats de pétitions, le fait d'exiger que les réponses soient présentées en format électronique seulement favoriserait l'efficacité du processus. Les réponses seraient mises à la disposition des députés plus rapidement et leur diffusion s'en trouverait simplifiée. Cette façon de faire aurait aussi des effets positifs pour l'environnement, compte tenu de la quantité de papier requise pour les centaines de pétitions présentées chaque année.

(1115)

[Traduction]

Ce changement constituerait en outre un projet pilote utile pour une utilisation plus généralisée du dépôt et de la diffusion électroniques des documents parlementaires, y compris les réponses aux questions écrites. Dans ce contexte, si les membres souhaitent poursuivre dans cette direction, il faudrait amorcer des négociations plus poussées avec le Bureau du Conseil privé pour concevoir un système sûr qui permettrait de déposer électroniquement des documents entièrement accessibles.

Enfin, en ce qui concerne les pétitions papier, des règles et des pratiques que certains jugent indûment restrictives sont toujours en vigueur, notamment les règles régissant les images et les logos, la présentation des adresses et le format du papier. Si le Comité souhaite faire en sorte que plus de pétitions papier soient certifiées et présentées à la Chambre, il pourrait accepter de simplifier certaines de ces règles.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de nous donner l'occasion de discuter de ce sujet avec vous. André et moi, nous répondrons avec plaisir à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous propose une discussion ouverte sur chacune des recommandations, durant laquelle vous pourrez donner vos avis sur la faisabilité des recommandations du Comité. Heureusement, nous pourrons compter sur l'aide de nos témoins.

Êtes-vous d'accord pour que nous procédions de cette façon?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Bien. Je vous invite à vous reporter au document que nous avons tous reçu. La première option a trait au nombre de jours durant lesquels une pétition reste ouverte.

Qui veut commencer?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je ne sais pas trop par où commencer. Si j'ai bien compris votre argument, un délai de 120 jours n'est pas assez rapide. Pourquoi ne pas donner la possibilité au député parrain ou présentateur, ou à quiconque crée la pétition, de préciser un nombre de jours? Si le seuil de signatures n'est pas atteint, la pétition ne sera pas certifiée de toute façon. Si le délai proposé est 30 jours, va pour 30 jours. Serait-ce faisable?

M. André Gagnon (sous-greffier, Procédure):

Ce sont les membres du Comité qui détermineront la manière dont le délai sera fixé ou proposé. Par exemple, il pourrait revenir au Comité d'établir le nombre de jours requis, ou au pétitionnaire de proposer le nombre de jours nécessaires selon lui.

Ce ne sont pas les seules options possibles cependant. Par exemple, si un pétitionnaire ayant choisi un délai de 30 jours a recueilli seulement 445 signatures au terme de cette période, pourrait-on lui accorder une prolongation jusqu'à 60 jours ou quelque chose du genre? C'est l'une des possibilités envisageables.

Il est important de fixer un délai parce que des renseignements personnels sont recueillis. Quand l'échéance est atteinte, la pétition est fermée et, après un certain temps, toutes les données qui s'y rapportent sont éliminées. C'est une raison importante de fixer un délai pour les pétitions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends. Il serait donc possible de donner le choix à un pétitionnaire de fermer une pétition si 500 signatures ont été recueillies après 30 jours. Si le seuil des 500 signatures est atteint avant l'échéance de 120 jours, disons après 30 jours, une pétition pourrait être fermée. En revanche, si le seuil n'est pas atteint après 120 jours, la pétition ne serait pas certifiée.

M. André Gagnon:

Exactement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que vous êtes tous d'accord avec la proposition, ou avez-vous d'autres suggestions?

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je ne suis pas certain de bien comprendre votre proposition. Proposez-vous de fermer la pétition dès que le seuil des signatures est atteint?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si le seuil est atteint avant 120 jours, le pétitionnaire pourrait avoir le choix de fermer la pétition après 30 jours s'il a obtenu les 500 signatures requises. Autrement dit, si les 500 signatures sont recueillies après 30 jours, une pétition pourrait être fermée si elle concerne une question ponctuelle et que le pétitionnaire veut que les choses aillent vite. Autrement, le délai normal de 120 jours serait maintenu.

Je lance l'idée, tout simplement.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est loin d'être clair pour moi. Je n'ai aucune difficulté avec l'idée d'offrir la possibilité de choisir un délai, mais il faut qu'il y en ait un. Ce peut être un élément clé de campagne. Si, après l'atteinte du seuil de signatures, sans égard au délai… Je ne crois pas que ce serait souhaitable ou acceptable. Des campagnes sont construites autour de ce genre de paramètres. Si le délai n'est pas précisé et qu'il est impossible de savoir quand une pétition sera fermée, je ne vois pas l'intérêt. Nous pouvons offrir un choix, que ce soit un délai de 120 jours ou un autre, ou un nombre fixe d'options...

(1120)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour signer une pétition.

M. Blake Richards:

… disons 90, 60, 120 jours, peu importe... Un choix entre trois options peut être offert mais, si c'est le cas, il faudra quand même fixer un délai qui sera connu de tous pour que les personnes concernées puissent construire leur campagne, entre autres, autour de cette date.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tout à fait.

Le président:

Si je comprends bien, vous recommandez l'option numéro 2?

M. Blake Richards:

Non, je ne dis pas que c'est ce qu'il faut faire. En fait, je ne vois pas le problème avec la manière actuelle de fonctionner, mais si nous la modifions, il faut impérativement maintenir l'obligation de fixer un délai. C'est le plus important à mes yeux. Si nous recommandons une modification qui ne prévoit pas l'établissement d'un délai, je m'y opposerai.

Je ne vois pas le problème avec le fonctionnement actuel, mais je ne serais pas contre l'idée de donner le choix entre divers délais, pourvu que celui qui est choisi soit connu de tous à l'avance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions offrir deux choix: un délai de 30 jours si c'est une question urgente, ou de 120 jours dans tous les autres cas, un point c'est tout. Si les pétitionnaires optent pour la fermeture de leur pétition après 30 jours, ce sera leur choix, et il sera définitif.

Si vous faites cette proposition, je ne m'y opposerai pas.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, si le délai est connu et que tous... Vous avez raison, si un délai de 30 jours a été choisi et que, en fin de compte, ce n'était pas un bon choix...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est le choix qui aura été fait.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est le choix qui aura été fait, exactement.

Le président:

Le greffier a aussi proposé la possibilité de prolonger le délai si le seuil de signatures n'est pas atteint. Vous n'êtes pas d'accord avec cette proposition?

M. Blake Richards:

Non. Selon moi, il faut que le délai soit connu. C'est la clé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis d'accord avec Blake sur ce point.

Le président:

Vous donneriez le choix entre 30 ou 120 jours?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y aurait 2 choix, soit A ou B, 30 ou 120 jours. Si la question est urgente, un délai de 30 jours est offert. Autrement, un délai de 120 jours serait la norme.

David.

Le président:

M. Christopherson, puis M. Bittle

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Serait-il possible d'offrir un choix sous forme de liste déroulante? Devons-nous absolument imposer un délai de 30 ou de 120 jours? Pourquoi ne pas proposer une liste déroulante qui permettrait d'opter pour un délai de 30, 60, 90 ou 120 jours? Cela dit, et je me range du côté de Blake à ce sujet, il faut qu'il y ait un délai. Si nous proposons un choix entre 30 ou 120 jours — pourquoi pas une liste de 4 options, qui répondrait mieux aux besoins de chacun?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Blake est d'avis qu'il faut que le délai soit précisé, et je suis d'accord avec lui.

Le président:

Est-ce exact, Blake?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui. Selon moi, il est important que le délai soit fixe. Il ne peut pas être variable. Une fois que le délai a été choisi, il ne doit pas être modifiable. Pour ce qui est des options proposées, je n'ai pas vraiment d'opinion.

Le président:

Si j'ai bien compris, le Comité recommande l'option 2, en y incluant la possibilité pour le pétitionnaire de choisir un délai de 20, 60, 90 ou 120 jours, sans prolongation.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que l'offre de ces options alourdira le fardeau administratif ou augmentera les coûts? Et dans l'affirmative, la différence sera-t-elle importante entre l'offre de deux ou de quatre options, par exemple?

M. André Gagnon:

C'est une question essentiellement technique. Que vous ajoutiez deux ou quatre options, cela ne fera pas de différence. Les coûts seront exactement les mêmes.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Et selon vous, l'offre de plusieurs options entraînera-t-elle des coûts ou un fardeau administratif supplémentaires?

M. André Gagnon:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

Non? Alors c'est parfait.

Le président:

Très bien, nous avons une première recommandation.

Nous passerons donc à la deuxième question, portant sur les signatures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tout d'abord, il serait raisonnable de maintenir un nombre minimal de 500 signatures pour les pétitions électroniques, et de 25 pour les pétitions sur papier. Je ne vois aucune raison de modifier cette exigence.

Le président:

Quelqu'un d'autre?

David, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter? Non.

Le Comité est-il d'accord? L'exigence sera maintenue telle quelle.

Concernant l'obligation d'obtenir l'appui de 5 personnes pour qu'une pétition chemine, je suis étonné d'apprendre que 11 % des pétitions ne passent pas cette étape. J'aurais pensé que s'il est très clair dès le départ qu'il faut obtenir l'appui de cinq personnes, aucune pétition ne serait présentée en l'absence de ce soutien.

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Je veux seulement m'assurer que je comprends bien de quoi il est question. De toute évidence, je n'ai jamais tenté de présenter une pétition, mais je suis au courant qu'il faut des appuyeurs, ce qui est tout à fait logique. Il faut trouver cinq personnes qui appuient la pétition. Comment ces appuis sont-ils obtenus? Les pétitionnaires envoient-ils des courriels pour solliciter des signatures? Comment cela se passe-t-il? Si cinq appuyeurs sont exigés, arrive-t-il que les pétitionnaires se bornent à en proposer cinq et que, parmi eux, certains ne soient pas habilités à donner leur appui? Peuvent-ils proposer 20 ou 30 personnes, pourvu qu'ils obtiennent l'appui d'au moins 5 d'entre elles? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il au juste? J'ai un peu de mal à comprendre.

(1125)

M. André Gagnon:

Quand un pétitionnaire crée un compte et inscrit les noms des appuyeurs, il peut en désigner 10 en tout. Nous ne savons pas vraiment comment ils entrent en communication avec ces appuyeurs pressentis, mais ils n'ont pas le choix d'identifier ces personnes. Dans certains cas, les pétitionnaires nomment seulement cinq appuyeurs, et il peut arriver que l'un d'entre eux ne soit pas un aussi bon ami Facebook qu'ils pensaient et qu'il n'accorde pas son appui à leur pétition. Des complications peuvent surgir dans ces cas.

M. Blake Richards:

Il arrive sans doute qu'un pétitionnaire qui n'a pas trouvé cinq appuyeurs joue d'audace en nommant cinq personnes au hasard. Cependant, dans le cas de ceux qui identifient le nombre maximal, soit 10... Pouvez-vous nous donner un taux approximatif de pétitions qui ne récoltent pas l'appui d'au moins cinq personnes? À mon avis, si les pétitionnaires ont la possibilité d'identifier 10 personnes et qu'ils ne le font pas, ils n'ont qu'eux-mêmes à blâmer.

M. André Gagnon:

C'est une bonne indication que quelque chose ne va pas. Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait de problème réel de ce côté, mais je dois vérifier auprès de Jeremy.

Habituellement, si un pétitionnaire a identifié 10 personnes, il n'y a aucun problème. Le problème se pose quand un pétitionnaire a inscrit seulement cinq noms et qu'il a fait une erreur dans une adresse électronique, par exemple. C'est le genre de choses qui peuvent entraîner des complications.

M. Blake Richards:

Apparemment, il n'y a pas vraiment de problème. Les exigences ne semblent pas vraiment en cause. Ce sont les utilisateurs qui ne se prévalent pas des options offertes qui se mettent en porte-à-faux. Dans ces cas, ils doivent assumer leur erreur. Le problème ne vient pas des exigences. C'est le constat que je fais, qui me porte à croire qu'aucune modification n'est nécessaire.

Le président:

Monsieur Saini.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Les cinq appuyeurs proposés doivent-ils remplir certains critères? Doivent-ils être des résidents permanents ou des citoyens?

M. Charles Robert:

La même règle s'applique à toutes les pétitions. Les appuyeurs doivent être des résidents ou des citoyens canadiens.

M. Raj Saini:

L'un ou l'autre.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est juste.

M. Raj Saini:

Si cinq noms sont proposés, faites-vous des vérifications? Quel est le processus de vérification pour ces personnes?

M. André Gagnon:

Le processus de vérification est le même que pour les pétitionnaires en général. Nous vérifions uniquement qu'ils sont habilités à donner leur appui. Toutefois, les renseignements communiqués ne sont pas exactement les mêmes que pour les pétitionnaires. Il y en a un peu plus pour ceux-ci.

M. Raj Saini:

D'accord.

Le président:

Je n'aimerais pas imposer aux députés l'obligation de vérifier que toutes les exigences liées aux pétitions sont remplies. Nous avons suffisamment de travail. C'est une bonne chose que vous fassiez les vérifications nécessaires pour garantir l'admissibilité des pétitions.

Messieurs, êtes-vous d'accord pour que les exigences restent en l'état?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je suis d'accord.

Le président:

Bien.

Nous passons à la question des parrains.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis d'accord avec l'idée que...

Le président:

C'est moi qui ai soulevé la question, je crois. Je suis d'accord pour que le terme « parrain » soit remplacé par le terme « présentateur ». Le terme « parrain » donne à croire que quelqu'un approuve une pétition, alors qu'il peut tout simplement avoir l'intention de la présenter au Parlement, au même titre qu'une pétition sur papier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai jamais vu quelqu'un se lever en Chambre et dire: « Je ne suis pas d'accord avec la pétition, monsieur le président ».

Le président:

Vous êtes alors d'accord pour que le terme « parrain » soit remplacé par le terme « présentateur », n'est-ce pas?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Nous en sommes maintenant à la question de la publication des pétitions sur papier. Je comprends que les deux options proposées par le greffier...

Actuellement, qu'advient-il des pétitions sur papier après que le gouvernement a formulé une recommandation?

M. André Gagnon:

Une fois que le gouvernement a répondu à une pétition, sa réponse est déposée à la Chambre à des fins de consultation.

M. Charles Robert:

La copie papier...

Le président:

Je crois que je n'ai jamais remarqué. J'ai beaucoup de peine parfois à déterminer qui est le présentateur de la pétition. Y a-t-il un responsable? À qui peut-on annoncer qu'une réponse a été déposée à la Chambre?

M. André Gagnon:

Il est clair qu'il a été beaucoup plus facile d'établir un processus pour les pétitions électroniques. D'entrée de jeu, il est possible de savoir qui sont les signataires puisque nous avons les adresses électroniques. Nous pouvons transmettre de l'information à ces personnes dès le début, lorsque la pétition initiale est déposée et, ensuite, lorsque le gouvernement y a répondu.

Ces renseignements sont recueillis pour les pétitions électroniques, mais ce n'est pas le cas pour les pétitions sur papier.

(1130)

Le président:

Vous proposez que la réponse du gouvernement à une pétition sur papier ou électronique soit versée à une banque de données électronique, sans que le présentateur ou la personne qui a organisé la pétition le sache.

M. André Gagnon:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Cette personne devrait trouver elle-même cette information.

M. André Gagnon:

C'est une difficulté récurrente avec les pétitions sur papier. Il faut que la personne ait signé ou lancé la pétition; c'est le processus de la Chambre. Essentiellement, nous proposons de diffuser le contenu des pétitions sur le site Web, de les faire traduire dans les deux langues officielles et, une fois que le gouvernement a déposé sa réponse, de franchir un pas de plus — à tout le moins, de l'information serait diffusée concernant les pétitions présentées à la Chambre.

Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, le tri des adresses, des adresses électroniques ou des codes postaux des signataires d'une pétition sur papier représente un effort colossal par rapport aux résultats obtenus. Il est beaucoup plus difficile de communiquer directement avec les pétitionnaires dans le cas d'une pétition sur papier que dans celui d'une pétition électronique.

Nous proposons de franchir un pas de plus en diffusant de l'information après le dépôt des réponses du gouvernement, mais également après le dépôt de la pétition elle-même.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Si vous me le permettez, je vais revenir un peu en arrière. Je crois que c'est M. Simms, dans le cadre d'une législature précédente, qui a présenté une motion au sujet de la publication en ligne des documents parlementaires. Je crois que le comité de la bibliothèque a tenu une réunion à ce sujet récemment et que des difficultés ont été soulevées.

S'agit-il des mêmes difficultés que celles dont nous discutons? Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet?

M. Charles Robert:

Ce n'est pas mon point fort. J'ai de la peine à utiliser une plume.

La conversion des pétitions sur papier au format électronique n'est pas aisée, notamment parce qu'elles sont si nombreuses. Vous avez vu les statistiques dans le journal. En temps normal, on parle de 1 500 pétitions par session. Cela fait beaucoup de papier à traiter.

Nous proposons de publier seulement la version électronique des réponses, de sorte à rendre une partie beaucoup plus importante de l'information accessible.

Le problème, c'est que les réponses du gouvernement aux pétitions relèvent du Bureau du Conseil privé, pas de nous. Il lui appartient donc de décider de diffuser ou non la version électronique des réponses aux pétitions sur papier.

M. John Nater:

Je précise que le Parlement a le privilège de publier des copies numérisées ou d'autres types de formats de documents qui ne sont pas toujours en parfait état. Nous avons ce privilège.

M. André Gagnon:

En fait, si je ne me trompe pas, votre question porte sur l'accessibilité à l'information présentée à la Chambre, que ce soit les réponses sur papier aux pétitions sur papier ou d'autres réponses, les réponses du gouvernement aux rapports des comités, ou les rapports des organismes qui sont déposés à la Chambre par l'intermédiaire d'un ministre. L'objectif est de rendre cette information accessible et utilisable par le plus grand nombre de personnes possible. Ensuite, il reste à déterminer dans quelle mesure cette information doit être rendue accessible.

Je dirais que les copies numérisées représentent une mesure provisoire qui a perduré au fil des années, mais qui est loin d'avoir permis aux utilisateurs de tirer parti de toutes les possibilités offertes par les documents déposés à la Chambre. Par exemple, ces documents devraient être facilement consultables par les personnes qui ont de la difficulté à y accéder, à les lire ou à écouter les documents sonores.

De toute évidence, les copies numérisées ne remplissent pas ces exigences, loin de là. C'est pourquoi, dans les pourparlers que nous avons entamés avec le Bureau du Conseil privé concernant les pétitions — qui évidemment représentent une petite partie des documents déposés à la Chambre —, nous avons déjà établi des normes très strictes en matière d'accessibilité. Ces considérations font partie intégrante de la nouvelle réalité de notre travail. Je crois que la Chambre des communes a pris l'engagement d'être à la hauteur de ces exigences.

(1135)

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais aborder un autre sujet.

Notre collègue, Diane Finley, a cité l'exemple — je pense que c'était à l'automne —, du format des documents sur papier. Si je me souviens bien, elle faisait référence au fait que le format registre n'était pas admissible.

Le président:

Désolé de vous interrompre, monsieur Nater, mais nous discuterons de cette recommandation plus tard.

M. John Nater:

Est-ce qu'il en est question dans le document?

Le président:

Oui, c'est dans le document.

M. John Nater: D'accord. J'y reviendrai.

M. Chris Bittle:

Hors sujet.

Le président:

Hors sujet.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Saini.

M. Raj Saini:

Monsieur Gagnon, j'aimerais faire appel à vos lumières en ce qui concerne la procédure. Supposons que quelqu'un présente une pétition sur papier portant 25 signatures. Chaque signature est accompagnée d'une adresse et de renseignements pertinents sur le signataire. Est-ce que les adresses sont vérifiées manuellement, ainsi que l'identité de ces personnes et leur légitimité?

M. André Gagnon:

Supposons que M. Saini signe une pétition. Non, pas M. Saini… il n'est pas habilité à signer une pétition. En fait, il peut la signer, mais son nom ne sera pas compté.

Supposons que des personnes signent une pétition. Nous n'allons pas vérifier que chaque signataire demeure vraiment à l'adresse ou dans la ville indiquée. Nous ne faisons pas ce genre de vérifications.

En revanche, nous vérifions soigneusement si toute l'information consignée sur la feuille semble valable. Nous ne procédons pas à des vérifications pour chaque signataire. Si une pétition sur papier porte 2 000 signatures, nous vérifions les 25 premières. Pour que la pétition soit certifiée, sans tenir compte du contenu et des autres éléments, il faut 25 signatures. Nous vérifions qu'elle a été signée par 25 personnes au moins, et un peu plus...

M. Raj Saini:

Comment procédez-vous pour les pétitions électroniques, qui doivent contenir 500 signatures?

M. André Gagnon:

C'est plus ou moins le même...

M. Charles Robert:

Processus.

M. André Gagnon:

... processus pour les pétitions électroniques. Cela dit, le Comité a établi d'autres exigences, liées notamment aux adresses IP. De toute évidence, les adresses IP du gouvernement fédéral sont rejetées d'office. C'est un exemple. Ces vérifications sont simples.

Comme vous le savez déjà, une adresse électronique équivaut à toute autre adresse figurant sur une pétition sur papier.

M. Raj Saini:

Lorsque le gouvernement dépose une réponse, comment l'information est-elle transmise aux signataires d'une pétition sur papier?

M. André Gagnon:

C'est pourquoi j'ai parlé des pétitions électroniques. C'est relativement facile dans le cas des pétitions électroniques parce qu'elles sont versées dans notre base de données. Cette base de données se trouve sur le site Web de la Chambre des communes, pas sur celui du gouvernement. Supposons que M. Christopherson a déposé une pétition à la Chambre. Il n'aurait pas accès à l'information. Quand une réponse à une pétition électronique est déposée à la Chambre, il est facile de retrouver les signataires ou de leur transmettre de l'information. Pour ce qui concerne les pétitions sur papier, l'information est publiée dans les Débats et Journaux de la Chambre des communes.

Maintenant, prenons le cas d'un député qui se démène pour recueillir des signatures ou pour joindre directement une personne qui a présenté une pétition au Parlement. Ce député pourrait communiquer avec ces personnes et leur transmettre la réponse déposée par le gouvernement à la suite de leur pétition.

M. Raj Saini:

Du point de vue de l'efficience, si quelqu'un présente une pétition sur papier, ne serait-il pas plus efficace de demander à cette personne de transmettre l'information à tous les signataires? Ne serait-ce pas un processus plus efficient?

M. André Gagnon:

Pensez-vous à un citoyen ordinaire qui pourrait...

M. Raj Saini:

Dans le cas des pétitions sur papier.

M. André Gagnon:

Rien n'empêche cette personne de jouer ce rôle. Cela dit, n'oubliez pas que cette personne recueillerait des renseignements sur autrui, soit les signataires de la pétition papier. Cela soulèverait des questions quant à la nature des renseignements recueillis et la Chambre se dégagerait alors de la responsabilité qui lui incombe d'assurer la protection des renseignements personnels.

M. Charles Robert:

J'ai une interprétation un peu différente de la question. En fait, j'ai un peu de mal à saisir ce que vous voulez savoir au juste.

Si le gouvernement dépose un document sur papier contenant sa réponse à une pétition sur papier, il sera consigné aux Journaux, et possiblement aux Débats, que le dépôt a eu lieu, et rien d'autre. La réponse devient un document parlementaire. Autrefois, les documents parlementaires étaient imprimés sous forme de volumes complémentaires des Journaux, mais seulement à la fin des sessions. À moins de connaître la date exacte du dépôt d'une réponse ou d'un document parlementaire à la Chambre, il était très difficile de le retracer ou de soumettre une demande à son égard. Il fallait attendre la publication des versions papier. Auparavant, des volumes et des volumes de documents parlementaires étaient publiés dans le cadre du processus des Journaux.

Si vous vous demandez qui peut savoir quand la réponse à une pétition a été déposée à la Chambre, la réponse est qu'il faut faire une recherche. Cette recherche permet de savoir si le dépôt a été fait ou non, mais elle ne donne pas automatiquement accès à la réponse. Il faut soumettre une demande pour avoir accès à la réponse.

Si la pétition est électronique, il suffit de consulter la section des pétitions du site Web de la Chambre des Communes pour y avoir accès. La recherche est mille fois plus facile et permet de trouver l'information cherchée. C'est beaucoup mieux que de se faire dire que, effectivement, une action a été posée, sans pouvoir obtenir l'information demandée. De là les énormes avantages d'une conversion au format électronique pour les pétitionnaires qui veulent connaître la réaction du gouvernement à leurs demandes.

(1140)

M. Raj Saini:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je voudrais poursuivre la discussion sur l'information électronique et les pétitions sur papier. Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler dernièrement de la protection des renseignements personnels et de tout ce qui en découle.

Je suis curieux de savoir si des mesures ont été mises en place pour protéger les données recueillies en ligne, mais également sur les versions papier, parce qu'il s'agit aussi d'information à protéger. Combien de personnes ont accès à ces données au sein de l'Administration de la Chambre? Sont-elles accessibles à d'autres personnes à l'extérieur de l'Administration? Qu'advient-il de ces données après un certain temps, et notamment des adresses électroniques ou des numéros de téléphone? Comment sont-elles éliminées le moment venu?

M. André Gagnon:

C'est une excellente question, monsieur Nater. C'est un sujet qui a été longuement débattu lors de la précédente législature, quand la question des pétitions électroniques a été soulevée.

En fait, les signatures apposées sur une pétition représentent une quantité importante de données, et notamment si la pétition est signée par voie électronique. Personne de l'extérieur n'a accès aux données recueillies par le système des pétitions électroniques. Les députés ont accès aux renseignements de base sur les pétitionnaires parce qu'ils peuvent être sollicités pour parrainer ou présenter une pétition et qu'ils doivent être en mesure de communiquer avec la personne responsable pour connaître la nature exacte de la demande, ses motivations, et ainsi de suite. C'est normal, et cette personne doit donner son accord pour que l'information soit communiquée à un député.

Pour ce qui est des autres données, nous pouvons établir que 74 personnes habitent en Nouvelle-Écosse ou ailleurs au Canada, mais ce sont les seules données publiées. Concernant les affaires internes, nous avons une équipe de greffiers à la procédure et d'autres employés dont le travail est directement lié aux pétitions. Inutile de vous dire que ce sont des professionnels qui suivent à la lettre notre protocole en matière de traitement de l'information.

Nous conservons les données jusqu'à ce que le gouvernement ait répondu à la pétition électronique et que cette réponse ait été déposée à la Chambre, parce que nous devons transmettre cette réponse aux personnes qui ont soumis une pétition au Parlement. Peu de temps après, conformément à la procédure établie, les données sont entièrement éliminées.

Le président:

Dans le cas des pétitions sur papier, les députés et leur personnel ont en main le document de la pétition, les noms, les signatures et les adresses des signataires.

Selon la proposition à l'étude, toute l'information sur les pétitions, qu'elles soient sur papier ou électroniques, serait diffusée sur le site Web du Parlement du Canada, y compris une description — qui n'était pas disponible avant pour les pétitions sur papier — et la réponse du gouvernement. Selon vous, c'est ce qui serait le plus efficace.

M. André Gagnon:

Nous travaillons déjà avec le Bureau du Conseil privé sur ce projet. Si le Comité appuie notre proposition — sans fixer d'échéance ferme parce que nous ne savons pas combien de temps il faudra —, nous poursuivrons évidemment notre collaboration avec le Bureau pour assurer une diffusion la plus large possible de toute cette information.

(1145)

Le président:

Le Comité est-il d'accord pour que les pétitions sur papier et électroniques, de même que les réponses à celles-ci, soient diffusées sur le site Web? C'est le seul moyen d'assurer que les pétitionnaires et les présentateurs y auront accès.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une diffusion publique.

Le président:

Tout à fait.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Apparemment, le Bureau du Conseil privé joue un rôle très important dans le processus, et c'est de là que les principales difficultés pourraient venir. Y aurait-il lieu de faire venir des représentants du Bureau pour en discuter avec eux?

Le président:

André.

M. André Gagnon:

Jusqu'ici, nos échanges avec le Bureau du Conseil privé ont été très encourageants et très positifs. Ces discussions sont plutôt d'ordre technique. Elles visent à faciliter l'accès, dans toute la mesure possible, aux données transférées entre le Bureau et le gouvernement. Nous discutons de ce genre de choses, mais aussi de la collecte de données.

Bien entendu, il faut aussi tenir compte des volumes. Beaucoup de pétitions sur papier sont déposées à la Chambre. La plupart du temps, il s'agit de documents unilingues, que nous devons faire traduire. C'est la même chose pour les réponses. Nous étudions activement ces questions avec le Bureau du Conseil privé.

Le président:

Nous pourrions soumettre cette recommandation, et s'il y a un problème...

M. Blake Richards:

J'imagine que ma proposition tient toujours. Si une partie des difficultés concerne le Bureau du Conseil privé, il serait sans doute utile d'en discuter directement avec ses représentants.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Après avoir entendu les témoins, je ne pense pas qu'il vaille la peine de prolonger l'étude. C'est mon point de vue.

Le président:

Nous pourrions toujours les appeler, en cas de problème.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pense que l'on nous demande de formuler une recommandation, et évidemment, ils pourraient posséder des renseignements susceptibles de nous aider à déterminer si notre recommandation est la bonne. Je ne vois pas pourquoi nous ne le ferions pas dès maintenant plutôt que d'attendre de voir s'il y aura un problème. Je me demande pourquoi risquer de créer un problème si nous ne sommes pas certains?

M. Charles Robert:

Il semble que nous ayons abordé la première des deux options, mais ne faut-il pas prendre aussi une décision sur le point deux selon lequel le gouvernement serait autorisé à déposer les réponses aux pétitions en format électronique seulement?

Le président:

Nous étions justement en train d'en parler, mais M. Richards disait que nous devrions peut-être inviter le Bureau du Conseil privé afin de déterminer si cette recommandation pourrait entraîner des problèmes.

M. Charles Robert:

En ce qui concerne le Conseil privé et le traitement des réponses, je ne vois pas pourquoi il y aurait des problèmes. La seule chose qui importe vraiment, c'est le traitement des pétitions sur papier; mais il s'agit des pétitions sur papier, et non des réponses.

M. Blake Richards:

Selon moi, si nous parlons d'une option, c'est une chose. Si nous commençons à dire qu'il n'y a qu'une seule façon de faire les choses, dans ce cas, il est encore plus important à mon avis d'entendre ce que le Bureau du Conseil privé aurait à dire à ce sujet.

Mais s'il s'agit d'une option, c'est une tout autre histoire. Je continue de penser que ce serait utile d'entendre le Bureau du Conseil privé, mais du moins, avec une option, nous disposons d'une certaine souplesse.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous autorisez le gouvernement à déposer des réponses aux pétitions en format électronique seulement, vous l'y autorisez, point. C'est ce que j'appelle leur donner une option. Je ne vois pas où est le problème.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous parlons de deux choses complètement différentes ici. Au début, il s'agissait d'une option, puis on a soulevé l'idée que ce serait la seule manière de procéder. C'est différent. S'il s'agit d'une option, c'est moins préoccupant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ne fermons pas la porte aux options.

M. Charles Robert:

Le but de l'exposé était de montrer que le format électronique comporte d'énormes avantages sur le plan de l'accessibilité. Le format papier devient, par comparaison, plus restrictif. Il est moins accessible. Il existe essentiellement comme une copie qui a été classée quelque part, tandis qu'un document mis en ligne est, si vous voulez, beaucoup plus démocratique sur le plan de l'accessibilité.

Si le but est d'utiliser un document sur papier qui est appelé à être un document unique, à moins qu'il ne soit reproduit, je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit vraiment... La décision vous appartient, mais je suis curieux de savoir s'il ne s'agit pas d'un autre moyen de restreindre les droits des députés ou les options qui vous sont offertes. Même avec un document électronique, il est toujours possible de l'imprimer.

(1150)

Le président:

Est-ce que cela apporterait quelque chose de demander au Bureau du Conseil privé de venir témoigner?

M. Charles Robert:

Seulement s'il y avait une rupture de la collaboration, mais je ne vois pas pourquoi cela se produirait.

M. Raj Saini:

Je pense que c'est très clair.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, c'est clair.

Le président:

Est-ce que le Comité est d'accord essentiellement pour recommander les deux options dans cette section?

M. Blake Richards:

Quelle est la deuxième option?

Le président:

Avez-vous le document? Il se lit comme suit, « Autoriser le gouvernement à déposer ses réponses aux pétitions en format électronique seulement. »

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Autoriser le gouvernement.

M. Blake Richards:

L'autoriser, oui, plutôt que d'exiger qu'il le fasse.

Le président:

Bon, nous allons maintenant examiner les règles concernant les pétitions sur papier. Il faut revenir au point que faisait valoir M. Nater, aussi laissons-le ouvrir la discussion.

M. John Nater:

En réalité, il s'agissait seulement d'une question. Quelles pourraient être les difficultés si on autorisait l'utilisation du papier de format registre ou de toute autre dimension, autre que du papier de format ministre ou format commercial?

M. Charles Robert:

Je ne pense pas que les difficultés soient importantes, mais il arrive parfois que les pétitions soient présentées sous la forme de cartes postales — j'en ai vues — et parfois, elles arrivent en feuilles. Qui sait, elles pourraient même être présentées sous la forme d'un énorme rouleau. J'ai déjà vu un député tenter d'apporter une pétition avec une brouette, ne serait-ce que pour montrer la quantité de signatures qui avait été recueillie, mais je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de voir le format de la pétition. Les pétitionnaires pourraient vouloir utiliser d'autres choses encore, ne serait-ce que pour montrer le genre d'entreprises ou d'entités qui les soutiennent; ils pourraient se servir de logos, de marques de commerce, de symboles, ou de quoi que ce soit du même genre, et la vraie question est que dans le passé, cela a toujours été interdit. Alors est-ce que nous voulons nous montrer plus ouverts et un peu plus détendus à ce sujet? Il en irait de même avec le format du papier.

Le président:

Voyons voir ces options. Il y en a trois: premièrement, autoriser a) la présence d'images et de logos neutres et non offensants au recto ou au verso de la pétition?

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Mon opinion à ce sujet est la suivante: quel besoin avons-nous de logos ou d'images sur les pétitions? Allons-nous nous engager sur un terrain sur lequel nous n'avons aucune envie de nous aventurer? Il faudra ensuite que quelqu'un détermine ce qui constitue une image ou un logo neutre et non offensant. Faut-il vraiment qu'il y ait des logos sur une pétition? J'ai du mal à l'imaginer. Cela revient à créer une tâche qui, selon moi... Je ne voudrais pas me retrouver dans la position d'avoir à décider de ce qui est neutre, non offensant, alors que je ne vois vraiment pas l'utilité de ces éléments sur les pétitions. Si on avait une raison quelconque de vouloir apposer un logo, alors ce serait différent.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis entièrement d'accord avec Blake. Je ne vois aucune raison qui justifie la présence de logos sur les pétitions. Les logos, ou les entreprises affichant leur logo sur les pétitions sont bien la dernière chose dont j'ai besoin, surtout si on a l'intention de mettre ces pétitions en ligne. Non, ce n'est pas notre raison d'être ici. Je pense qu'il est approprié d'interdire les logos et ainsi de suite sur les pétitions.

Le président:

Est-ce que c'est le sentiment général des membres du Comité?

Très bien, nous n'autoriserons pas les logos.

Deuxièmement, ou b) l'utilisation de tout format d'adresse qui établit clairement la ville ou le village où résident les signataires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plutôt que quoi?

Le président:

André pourra nous le confirmer, mais je pense que les gens n'utilisent pas toujours le format exact recommandé par le gouvernement.

Aimeriez-vous faire un commentaire à ce sujet, André?

M. André Gagnon:

Le but est essentiellement de s'assurer que le signataire, la personne qui signe une pétition, a fourni suffisamment de renseignements pour qu'on puisse l'identifier, cette option est assouplie un peu pour s'assurer que la pétition pourra être certifiée et que l'on comptera les 25 signatures. C'est simple.

Le président:

C'est pour couvrir l'éventualité où une personne utiliserait un format légèrement différent du format officiel, mais qui comporterait néanmoins tous les renseignements requis. Je pense que dans le passé, ces pétitions étaient rejetées.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Voici, essentiellement, ce que l'on tente de faire ici. Disons qu'une personne veut remplir une pétition, et qu'elle doit indiquer le nom de sa ville, de sa province et son code postal. Disons qu'elle a écrit « Jean Tremblay, 123 rue Papineau, Montréal » et qu'elle a ensuite indiqué son code postal, mais qu'elle a oublié d'inscrire Québec. Vous pourriez trouver que c'est assez facile de déterminer la province dans laquelle réside cette personne, et de le vérifier, plutôt que de dire, « Bon, la province n'est pas indiquée, alors nous devons la rejeter ».

Est-ce bien de cela qu'il s'agit?

(1155)

M. André Gagnon:

Nous essayons d'éliminer les détails techniques. C'est cela le but de l'exercice.

Aimeriez ajouter quelque chose, Jeremy?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc (greffier principal, Travaux de la Chambre et Publications parlementaires):

D'après la manière dont les exigences ont été rédigées, certains formats d'adresse sont permis, et d'autres non. Donc, si vous aviez rempli la pétition et que vous aviez indiqué Montréal, mais pas la province, même si nous savons que Montréal se trouve au Québec, selon les exigences, le format d'adresse n'a pas été respecté. Aussi, cette signature ne sera pas comptée.

M. Blake Richards:

Il s'agit seulement de faciliter les choses pour les personnes qui pourraient oublier d'indiquer une petite partie de l'adresse. Il faut néanmoins disposer de suffisamment de renseignements pour identifier le signataire, mais notre but est vraiment de simplifier les choses.

Le président:

Pour le compte rendu, vous venez d'entendre Jeremy LeBlanc, du bureau du greffier.

M. Blake Richards:

Ça se tient.

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord?

Maintenant, nous sommes arrivés à c), l'utilisation de papier de divers formats.

Est-ce que l'un des greffiers souhaite formuler des commentaires à ce sujet? Sur ce qui est praticable ou non?

M. André Gagnon:

Je pense que Mme Finley nous avait soumis ce point de façon très directe, en nous donnant l'exemple de personnes qui signent une pétition, qui est exactement du même genre que la pétition sur une feuille de papier de 8 x 11, mais présentée selon un format différent. Pour diverses raisons — et je suppose que Mme Finley en avait de bonnes — bien des gens souhaitent avoir plus de place pour signer, pour inscrire leur signature en plus grosses lettres sur la feuille de papier. C'est essentiellement pour s'adapter à ce genre de situations.

Le président:

Donc, est-ce que la formulation du point c) est correcte?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je m'apprêtais justement à suggérer de limiter le format du papier afin d'éviter que l'on dépose un rouleau de 400 pieds. Nous pourrions dire n'importe quel format que l'on peut raisonnablement numériser. Ce serait la norme que je recommanderais. Si vous pouvez raisonnablement numériser le document, c'est parfait. Peu importe que le format du papier soit A4 ou le format lettre. Si vous pouvez numériser le document, c'est parfait.

Personnellement, je n'ai rien contre les cartes postales. Je me demande ce qu'en pensent mes collègues. Nous recevons beaucoup de cartes postales, pourquoi ne pourrait-on pas les compter comme des pétitions? Si vous recevez 25 cartes postales avec le même message et la même signature, quelle différence cela fait-il qu'il y en ait une seule ou dix sur la même page. C'est mon opinion.

M. André Gagnon:

La plupart du temps les cartes postales sont rédigées selon des formats différents, de sorte que même le contenu, c'est-à-dire le texte qui devrait s'y trouver, ne peut être compté comme une pétition. Cela s'est déjà vu dans le passé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela les disqualifie pour d'autres raisons, mais si elles sont présentées dans le bon format, et si elles servent à demander à la Chambre de faire quelque chose, sans la présence d'un logo, et que l'on trouve une signature par page, je n'ai aucun problème avec cela. C'est tout ce que j'en dis.

M. André Gagnon:

Très bien.

M. Charles Robert:

S'il n'y a pas de logo, c'est peut-être là le hic.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est leur problème.

M. André Gagnon:

Mais il revient au comité de décider.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous d'autres commentaires à formuler?

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous secouez la tête.

M. John Nater:

Oui, en effet, je la secoue, des deux côtés. Je suis ambivalent sur ce point. S'il s'agit d'une carte postale avec un nom par page, on risque de se retrouver avec l'exemple de la brouette, c'est-à-dire avec une montagne de cartes, et cela risque de devenir une sorte de manoeuvre ou de coup d'éclat. Nous ne voulons probablement pas nous engager dans cette voie.

Je pense, particulièrement, lorsqu'elles sont présentées dans un format accessible, de plus grande taille et avec une plus grande police, ce qui était l'argument avancé par Mme Finley... Je pense que le libellé — « format conventionnel » ou quelque chose du genre — laisse une certaine marge de manoeuvre et constitue peut-être un certain encouragement à utiliser les formats plus grands. En ce qui me concerne — et encore une fois, les avis peuvent varier — je me demande si l'autorisation d'utiliser le format carte postale n'ouvre pas la porte à des scénarios du genre coup d'éclat.

Le président:

Donc, si quelqu'un a signé une carte postale sur papier, et s'il a accumulé mille cartes postales, le député devrait présenter toute la pile lorsque vient le moment de déposer la pétition à la Chambre, est-ce exact?

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Le point qui a été souligné par le greffier au sujet des images est important, à mon avis. Combien de cartes postales sont dépourvues d'une sorte de logo ou d'image? Habituellement, ce ne sont pas des feuilles de papier ordinaires. Il y a peu de chances pour que cela arrive. Donc, je pense que c'est en fait un point important. Je suis, moi aussi, un peu tiraillé sur cette question, mais je pense que l'on va au-devant de problèmes de toute façon si on accepte les images et les logos, et autres choses de ce genre. Il serait peut-être préférable d'éviter ce problème en les interdisant tout simplement.

Le président:

Vous voulez dire, interdire les cartes postales?

M. Blake Richards:

Exactement. Je me sens un peu tiraillé à ce sujet, mais je pense que l'on finirait par avoir des problèmes de toute façon.

(1200)

Le président:

Donc, le Comité semble un peu ambivalent en ce qui concerne les cartes postales?

Souhaitez-vous prendre le vote à ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ambivalent est le mot juste.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Simplement pour bien clarifier les choses. Habituellement, les cartes postales sont faites d'un papier un peu plus épais. Pour déterminer le format de grandeur normale, est-ce que cela exclut l'utilisation de papier cartonné, plutôt que du papier ordinaire que nous utilisons actuellement pour les pétitions?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Normalement, les exigences portent sur la dimension plutôt que sur le format du papier. Je pense que si une personne utilisait un papier cartonné de 8 1/2 sur 11, ce serait toujours acceptable.

M. John Nater:

Ce serait acceptable? D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que l'on imposera une limite à l'épaisseur de papier acceptée? Que se passera-t-il si une personne se présente avec une brique en bois de 8 1/2 sur 11 attachée à une cuve? Que fera-t-on?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Que fera-t-on?

M. John Nater:

C'est encore du papier.

Le président:

Quelle est la décision concernant les cartes postales?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Elles ne font pas l'unanimité, alors interdisons-les.

Le président:

Il n'y a pas de consensus, alors on les interdit? Au moins nous pouvions le faire. Très bien.

Pour le point c), il faudrait décrire un peu mieux les divers formats de papier. Avez-vous suggéré que les documents devaient pouvoir être numérisés?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils devraient raisonnablement pouvoir être numérisés. Si on peut les mettre dans une machine en vue de les numériser, dans ce cas, pas de problème. S'il faut utiliser un appareil spécial parce que le document mesure 74 par 16, dans ce cas, ce n'est peut-être pas tellement utile.

M. André Gagnon:

Je m'inquiète seulement à l'idée que quelqu'un quelque part évoque l'existence d'un scanner géant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai précisé « raisonnablement ».

M. Charles Robert:

Nous pourrions vous revenir avec une proposition plus précise sur la taille maximale de la pétition, si vous pensez que ce pourrait être utile.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, si vous pouviez nous fournir les tailles minimales et maximales, et que nous puissions en finir avec cela, ce serait avec joie. Mais si quelqu'un se présente avec un format A4, il ne faudrait pas le rejeter. Ce n'est pas très différent, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis d'accord avec ce que le greffier vient de dire. Je pense qu'il faut préciser une taille minimale et maximale, parce que si on se contente d'indiquer qu'il doit s'agir d'un format que l'on peut raisonnablement numériser, la personne qui est en train de créer la pétition ne saura pas, tant qu'elle ne l'aura pas déposée, si elle est acceptable ou non. Il faut fournir des indications quant à la taille minimale et maximale, et ces données étant connues, les gens pourront s'y conformer.

Est-ce quelque chose que vous pourriez nous fournir, par exemple, « Voici les dimensions minimales et maximales qui nous semblent acceptables », et ensuite nous pourrions décider si... ?

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je suppose que par numérisable, on entend le fait que le document puisse être introduit dans un scanner de document automatiquement, une fois les agrafes enlevées. Donc, je suppose qu'en pratique cela correspond à des feuilles qui mesurent 8 1/2 sur 11 ou 8 1/2 sur 14, et rien d'autre. Peut-être que nous pourrions utiliser les mesures métriques, comme le format A4. Je pense qu'il est très peu vraisemblable que l'on nous présente d'autres formats de papier. Ces formats doivent être achetés à l'étranger. Il me semble qu'en indiquant seulement ces deux formats, on simplifierait les choses au maximum, et que cela devrait inclure la majorité des...

M. André Gagnon:

Si je me souviens bien, d'après Mme Finley, si nous pouvons prendre cet exemple... je pense qu'il s'agissait d'une feuille de 11 pouces sur 17.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-il possible de numériser une feuille de 11 sur 17?

M. André Gagnon:

On peut l'introduire dans une photocopieuse, donc je suppose qu'on peut aussi la numériser.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, ce serait raisonnable, dans ce cas.

Le président:

Pourquoi ne pas laisser cela. Je vois que nous sommes tous d'accord.

Le greffier s'occupera de présenter cela et de l'inclure à la recommandation destinée à l'attaché de recherche, en ce qui concerne les dimensions minimales et maximales.

Nous devons aussi examiner les sept recommandations de Projet Distinction Navale.

Est-ce que tout le monde a le document?

Il s'agit d'un organisme appelé Projet Distinction Navale. Le greffier vous a transmis une copie de ces recommandations.

La première — le problème que l'organisme soulève tourne autour de l'idée que si un député ne présente pas la pétition, cela risque de nuire aux pétitionnaires. Un député pourrait être obstructionniste ou désorganisé, et décider tout simplement de ne pas présenter la pétition. L'organisme suggère d'imposer un délai, et si le député ne présente pas la pétition dans le délai prévu, celle-ci devrait être remise en circulation afin qu'un autre député puisse décider de la présenter.

Je vous en prie, monsieur Graham.

(1205)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au moment de créer une pétition électronique, il faut d'emblée qu'un député ait accepté de la parrainer, n'est-ce pas? Et à ce moment-là, il prend implicitement l'engagement de la présenter.

Pouvez-vous me dire combien de fois une pétition ayant été certifiée n'a pas été présentée par la suite parce que personne ne s'en est occupé? En avons-nous une idée?

M. André Gagnon:

Est-ce que cela concerne une pétition électronique?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

M. André Gagnon:

Vraiment, cela n'arrive pas très souvent.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

D'après nos statistiques, environ 60 pétitions ont été certifiées, mais n'ont pas encore été présentées. Peut-être ont-elles été certifiées la semaine dernière seulement...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sur combien?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Sur plus de 250 pétitions ayant été certifiées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si ces chiffres visent la période depuis le début de la présente législature, il s'agit d'un trimestre.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Pour ce qui est de préciser combien parmi elles ont été certifiées il y a deux ou trois semaines plutôt que depuis des mois, je ne pourrais pas vous dire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suppose que je devrai vérifier auprès du greffier des pétitions.

Le président:

Si un député s'est engagé à agir comme présentateur, mais qu'il ne présente pas la pétition par la suite, est-ce que les pétitionnaires ont d'autres recours? Peuvent-ils s'adresser à un autre présentateur?

M. André Gagnon:

Non.

Le président:

Non.

Oui, Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Je peux comprendre la frustration d'un pétitionnaire si un député a accepté d'être le parrain de sa pétition — maintenant, nous allons plutôt parler de « présentateur », je pense — et qu'en fin de compte, il ne la présente pas. Je comprends sa frustration, mais je pense qu'il lui incombe de discuter avec le député et de lui demander s'il est à l'aise avec la pétition, et s'il a l'intention de la présenter en temps opportun.

À mon avis, lorsque l'on envisage de demander à un député de... Que se passera-t-il si le député doit partir pendant trois semaines avec un comité ou pour autre chose?

Comment pourrions-nous faire appliquer la présentation de la pétition? Est-ce que nous allons expulser un député de la Chambre parce qu'il n'a pas présenté une pétition?

Je pense que ce serait un peu difficile à gérer.

Peut-être que finalement il incombe à l'auteur de la pétition d'avoir une bonne discussion avec ce député pour s'assurer qu'il va effectivement la présenter pour lui, avant de lui demander d'être son présentateur.

Le président:

S'il ne la présente pas, est-ce que le pétitionnaire a un recours et est-ce qu'il peut s'adresser à un autre député pour lui demander d'être son présentateur?

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je serais enclin à penser que oui.

Prenons l'exemple de feu notre collègue Gord Brown et disons qu'il était sur le point de présenter une pétition, mais qu'il a été empêché de le faire parce qu'il est décédé. J'ignore ce qui se passe dans une telle situation. Il me semble qu'il serait raisonnable que quelqu'un d'autre puisse prendre le relais, dans un cas semblable.

Le président:

Oui, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai aucune objection à ce que la présentation de la pétition soit transférable, mais en revanche, je suis très défavorable à tout système qui obligerait un député à prendre la parole en Chambre ou à faire quoi que ce soit en Chambre qui aille à l'encontre de son autonomie.

Le président:

Alors, monsieur le greffier, je ne constate aucun intérêt pour obliger quelqu'un à présenter une pétition, mais est-ce que vous entrevoyez une possibilité pour que quelqu'un d'autre puisse en faire la présentation? Existe-t-il une possibilité à cet effet?

M. André Gagnon:

Cela se produit régulièrement à la Chambre, en ce sens que les pétitions sur papier sont parfois remises à un député. Le député en question s'occupe de les faire certifier, et les pétitions lui sont remises ensuite. Puis, c'est un autre député qui présente la pétition à la Chambre. On peut s'attendre à ce que cela puisse aussi se produire pour les pétitions électroniques.

Le président:

J'ai cru vous entendre dire que ce n'était pas permis.

M. André Gagnon:

Ce n'est effectivement pas permis, par voie électronique, dans le système, de changer de présentateur..., et ce, en raison du règlement existant. Mais il est toujours possible d'agir comme parrain, et par la suite, de demander à un autre député de déposer la pétition.

Le président:

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Peut-être que ma question n'a plus sa raison d'être. Il me semble que ce n'est pas un problème. Dans le cadre du scénario évoqué par M. Reid, c'est-à-dire dans le cas où une personne cesserait d'être député pour une raison quelconque, est-ce qu'il n'existe pas déjà un moyen de faire en sorte que la pétition...

M. André Gagnon:

La pétition a été certifiée, et peut être présentée par quelqu'un d'autre.

M. Blake Richards:

Bon, très bien, donc il semble que le problème est inexistant.

Le président:

En effet, le problème est inexistant.

Dans le deuxième cas, celui où il faut trouver un parrain après que la pétition a été certifiée...

M. André Gagnon:

Je pense que le problème a été réglé au cours de la discussion que nous venons tout juste d'avoir.

Le président:

Très bien.

Donc, la troisième recommandation vise à changer l'interface électronique de la page de soumission des pétitions afin de permettre une liste à puces dans la section « À »... Je ne comprends même pas de quoi il est question. Est-ce que quelqu'un comprend cette recommandation? Il s'agit de changer l'interface électronique de la page de soumission des pétitions afin de permettre une liste à puces dans la section « À » analogue à celle qui figure dans la section « Considérant que ».

(1210)

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez comment on formule ces pétitions. Vous pourriez dire « Considérant que la pauvreté est répandue au Canada; considérant que les enfants sont fréquemment... », puis vous laissez tomber les puces et vous déclarez, « Par conséquent, nous demandons au gouvernement du Canada de prendre des mesures correctives et de travailler avec les provinces », et ainsi de suite. Je pense que c'est à cela qu'ils veulent en venir.

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Il s'agit d'ajouter un peu de souplesse dans la mise en page. C'est tout.

M. Charles Robert:

Eh bien, l'autre possibilité, c'est que la pétition s'adresse à différents organismes, par exemple à la Chambre des communes, au Sénat, au ministère des Affaires étrangères, à un ministre, contrairement au cas que vous venez brillamment de suggérer.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne suis pas sûr, en fait. Vous dites que la pétition demanderait au ministre de l'Agriculture, ou au ministre des Finances de faire quelque chose. Est-ce bien cela que vous voulez dire?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Lorsque vous remplissez le formulaire d'une pétition électronique, vous choisissez à qui la pétition est adressée, que ce soit à la Chambre des communes, à un ministre ou à un ministère.

M. Scott Reid:

Oh, oui bien sûr.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Mais vous ne pouvez faire qu'un seul choix. Je pense que les témoins suggèrent ici que l'on offre la possibilité d'adresser la pétition à plus d'un destinataire, plutôt que de formuler des recommandations précises et de n'offrir qu'un choix.

M. Scott Reid:

Ça va, j'ai compris.

Le président:

Actuellement, est-ce possible de le faire, c'est-à-dire d'indiquer que l'on demande à quelqu'un de faire ceci et cela? Peut-on faire plus d'une chose?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Dans le formulaire à remplir pour présenter une pétition électronique, vous ne pouvez choisir qu'un seul destinataire à qui l'adresser.

Le président:

Je veux parler des différentes mesures. Pouvez-vous demander que plus d'une mesure soit prise, comme le suggérait M. Reid? Vous le pouvez déjà?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Oui. En ce qui concerne les mesures visant à réparer un tort, si vous voulez, vous pouvez en demander plusieurs.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous venez de répondre à ma question, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est exactement la question que je voulais poser. J'étais pas mal sûr que l'on pouvait déjà demander que plus d'une mesure soit prise.

Le président:

D'accord. Est-ce que les gens veulent avoir la possibilité d'adresser leur pétition à plus d'un destinataire ou pas? C'est ce que ces témoins laissent entendre.

M. Charles Robert:

Pour ce qui est du traitement des pétitions, la Chambre des communes n'a compétence qu'au titre du Règlement pour obliger le gouvernement à préparer une réponse. Si la pétition est adressée à un ministère et non à la Chambre des communes, eh bien, de toute évidence, elle ne vous concerne pas. Mais si elle est adressée à un autre ministère et à vous aussi, il se peut que le ministère en tienne compte ou pas. Et parce qu'il agit ainsi, cela n'entraîne pas pour vous, à titre de député de la Chambre, de responsabilité ou d'obligation additionnelle, et n'en impose pas non plus au gouvernement. Selon le Règlement, le gouvernement doit déposer une réponse à la Chambre seulement lorsqu'une pétition est présentée à la Chambre des communes. Si elle est adressée à un autre destinataire...

Je pense que cet exemple montre que ce demandeur ne comprend peut-être pas bien le processus.

Le président:

Très bien, donc ce n'est pas nécessaire.

M. Charles Robert:

Je ne pense pas.

Le président:

D'accord, bien compris.

La quatrième recommandation vise à créer un portail pour les députés qui leur permettrait de consulter les pétitions, triées par mots-clés, et de communiquer avec le rédacteur d'une pétition s'ils souhaitent présenter une pétition... qui est sans parrain. Mais, jusqu'à maintenant, selon le règlement, une pétition doit avoir un parrain. Et elles seront relativement accessibles avec le nouveau système, n'est-ce pas, lorsqu'elles seront toutes électroniques? Donc, cette recommandation n'est probablement pas utile.

M. André Gagnon:

Je ne suis pas sûr de bien comprendre cette recommandation, pour commencer. Essentiellement, ce que je vois ici, c'est que les députés pourraient choisir les personnes parmi celles qui souhaitent présenter une pétition. Je pense que cela s'inscrit dans le cadre de la discussion que nous avons eue pour la première proposition, selon laquelle ce groupe s'est retrouvé dans la situation où sa pétition n'a pas été présentée aussi rapidement qu'il l'avait souhaité par son premier parrain. Finalement, ce que l'on propose ici, c'est un mécanisme qui permettrait aux députés qui sont très désireux de présenter une pétition sur le sujet A de s'adresser directement aux pétitionnaires et de leur dire, « J'aimerais beaucoup déposer cette pétition. Puis-je agir comme présentateur? » Cela revient vraiment à changer la nature de la relation.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Maintenant que je la lis, je la comprends autrement. Si vous regardez la partie entre guillemets, elle se lit comme suit, « qui est sans parrain à ce moment-là ». Mais pour que la pétition soit déposée, il faut qu'elle ait un parrain.

M. André Gagnon:

Exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pense qu'ils veulent dire que dans le cas où ils auraient été incapables de trouver un député pour présenter leur pétition, et s'ils ne veulent pas faire les démarches pour s'en trouver un, ils espèrent qu'avec ce mécanisme, un député va les contacter lui-même. Je pense que c'est cela qu'ils veulent dire.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui, tout à fait.

(1215)

M. Blake Richards:

À mon sens, c'est un peu irréaliste. Même si je comprends bien à quoi ils veulent en venir, ne trouvez-vous pas qu'ils devraient faire les démarches eux-mêmes?

Le président:

Bon. Est-ce que le Comité est d'accord avec ça?

Le numéro 5 vise à mieux faire ressortir les mesures de protection des renseignements personnels. Est-ce que ces mesures de protection ne sont pas indiquées d'emblée lorsque les citoyens veulent présenter une pétition?

M. André Gagnon:

Ces renseignements sont partagés. Les garanties sont indiquées sur le site Web et, de fait, nous sommes vraiment très fiers de ce que nous accomplissons.

Le président:

Est-ce qu'elles figurent sur le formulaire?

M. André Gagnon:

Si la personne a l'impression que ces garanties ne sont pas suffisamment explicites, nous pouvons regarder le site Web et nous poser la question suivante, « Comment pourrions-nous faire en sorte qu'il soit encore plus clair pour les personnes souhaitant signer une pétition, démarrer une pétition ou appuyer une pétition, qu'elles bénéficient de garanties en matière de protection des renseignements personnels, et comment pourrions-nous nous assurer qu'elles ont bien compris ces garanties? »

Le président:

Lorsque les pétitions sont présentées par voie électronique, si je demande à un ami de signer cette pétition, il doit ouvrir une session sur le site de la Chambre des communes, trouver la pétition, et aller la signer, mais est-ce qu'il peut voir directement que ses renseignements personnels sont protégés?

M. André Gagnon:

Cette information est directement accessible, en effet.

Le président:

Sans avoir à effectuer une recherche poussée?

M. André Gagnon:

Je ne suis pas certain du niveau de détail qui est fourni dans le formulaire.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Dans les divers guides qui sont offerts sur le site Web, on trouve une section qui porte sur la gestion des données et qui explique les garanties offertes pour les renseignements personnels. Cela fait partie du guide. Je pense que cela fait aussi partie des conditions d'utilisation que les personnes doivent lire et approuver avant de signer. Bien entendu, tout le monde lit les conditions d'utilisation avant de cocher cette case.

Le président:

Pourrions-nous seulement conserver cette recommandation à titre de suggestion amicale afin de nous assurer que, d'emblée, la protection des renseignements personnels est évidente?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous venez de répondre à ma question, mais je pense que j'aimerais faire un suivi. Afin de faire davantage que ce que nous avons fait jusqu'ici, et de nous conformer aux exigences et d'aller même au-delà de celles-ci, notamment des conditions que les personnes doivent avoir lues avant d'accepter, à quoi pourraient bien ressembler ces garanties additionnelles, et quel serait le coût de leur ajout? Si une personne a déjà la possibilité de connaître ces renseignements, que pouvons-nous faire de plus pour les rendre encore plus évidents? Je suppose que cela risque d'entraîner des coûts.

M. André Gagnon:

Je pense que c'est bien indiqué ici, et je le répète, je ne suis pas sûr de bien comprendre la proposition, mais essentiellement, ce qui est indiqué ici, c'est que l'on devrait mieux faire ressortir dès le départ que les renseignements personnels sont protégés. Peut-être que notre message n'est pas formulé exactement comme il devrait l'être pour informer les gens que nous sommes très stricts sur le plan de la protection des renseignements personnels. Peut-être que c'est à cela que l'on veut faire allusion ici.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai l'impression que nous le faisons déjà, mais vous semblez suggérer que nous pourrions peut-être modifier la formulation afin que les gens comprennent mieux que leurs renseignements ne sont pas publiés.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Bon, si c'est aussi simple que vous le dites, je n'ai aucune objection.

Le président:

Très bien, nous arrivons au point 6. Il s'agit d'une modification assez importante : Envisager de créer des seuils, à l'instar du système de pétitions électroniques du Royaume- Uni, où les pétitions électroniques qui obtiennent un grand nombre de signatures peuvent être débattues à la Chambre des communes.

Au Royaume-Uni, pour faire l'objet d'un débat à la Chambre des communes, je pense qu'une pétition doit avoir obtenu autour d'un demi-million de signatures?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Elle doit en obtenir 100 000.

Le président:

Donc, cette proposition pourrait faire l'objet d'un débat exploratoire, par exemple.

M. Charles Robert:

Probablement, mais encore une fois, la décision vous appartient.

Le président:

M. Bittle, et ensuite, M. Graham.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je pense que ce processus est susceptible d'être détourné par des groupes possédant les moyens financiers de le faire, et que cela risque de devenir un processus ridicule. Je suis contre.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il est dans l'intérêt public de tenir un débat particulier, nous possédons déjà les moyens de le faire grâce aux débats d'urgence et aux débats exploratoires, aussi je ne vois pas l'utilité d'intégrer cette proposition dans le système. Si les leaders parlementaires souhaitent se réunir pour débattre d'une question, ils sont déjà en mesure de le faire.

Le président:

Donc, jusqu'à maintenant, tout le monde est contre. Le Comité est contre.

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président:La dernière recommandation, est la septième : Permettre aux rédacteurs de pétitions de suggérer ou de choisir, à partir d'une liste, des mots clés (balises) à appliquer à leur pétition au lieu de se les voir attribuer, puisque ces derniers sont déterminants pour attirer des signatures non sollicitées.

Monsieur Gagnon, aimeriez-vous faire un commentaire sur cette proposition?

M. André Gagnon:

Oui.

Tous les titres qui sont attribués aux pétitions le sont par des professionnels qui en analysent le contenu, mais qui s'assurent aussi de l'uniformité du titre dans les Débats de la Chambre et dans les délibérations des comités. Aussi, lorsque les réponses aux pétitions sont déposées, ils utilisent le même titre.

Pour les fins de la recherche, ou pour les personnes qui s'intéressent au sujet, il est ainsi beaucoup plus facile de repérer l'information. Aussi, comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, le but est de s'assurer que les titres utilisés sont présentés de manière assez neutre. Il est question d'une pétition publique, et de toute évidence, il faut éviter l'utilisation de mots controversés ou entachés de partisanerie.

(1220)

M. Charles Robert:

Pour renchérir sur ce que vient de dire André, je pense que la question importante est le risque de perdre le contrôle sur un élément de notre propre site Web. Je ne suis pas convaincu que laisser les rédacteurs d'une pétition sélectionner les mots-clés comporte un avantage particulier, puisque d'une certaine manière nous pourrions être obligés de les utiliser dans notre site Web pour que les gens puissent faire une recherche en utilisant cette terminologie.

Le président:

D'après le système que nous venons tout juste d'approuver, selon lequel les pétitions sur papier et les pétitions électroniques seront mises en ligne, si quelqu'un saisit les mots « bois d'oeuvre », est-ce que la recherche affichera toutes les pétitions sur papier et électroniques présentées sur le sujet? Est-ce que les citoyens pourront effectuer une recherche en procédant de cette manière?

M. André Gagnon:

Je ne suis pas sûr de pouvoir entrer dans les détails. La réponse à votre question est oui, mais habituellement ce qui est déterminé, ce n'est pas seulement le sujet général, mais aussi d'autres données qui sont associées à ce mot. C'est d'ailleurs l'utilité et la précision du système qui a été mis en place, afin que nous puissions effectuer une recherche qui nous guide vers les renseignements que nous cherchons.

Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, si des personnes voulaient indiquer un nom précis dans leur pétition, on pourrait perdre certains de ces éléments.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai fait deux choses pour me préparer à cette intervention.

Premièrement, j'ai étudié la situation en m'inspirant de ma propre expérience, avec l'entreprise de ma famille, ainsi qu'avec la conception d'un site Web et en essayant d'orienter les gens dans certaines directions. Des clients se rendent sur notre site Web parce qu'ils sont à la recherche de blouses d'été pour femmes. Ils ont en tête une certaine gamme de couleurs, une tranche d'âge, et une gamme de tailles qui les intéresse, et c'est une tâche difficile en soi que d'éviter de les submerger avec tout l'inventaire de blouses, ou alors de trop restreindre l'éventail présenté. Si l'éventail est trop limité, il laisse... Ce n'est pas une mince affaire. C'était ma première observation.

Nous ne sommes pas les seuls à jongler avec ce dilemme; de fait, tous ceux qui font du marketing en ligne éprouvent ce problème. Je ne voudrais pas confier au personnel du greffier la tâche de résoudre une question que d'autres, dotés de moyens financiers importants et d'une motivation financière sérieuse, ont échoué à résoudre. C'est une réflexion.

La deuxième chose que j'ai faite, c'est d'aller voir mes propres pétitions. J'en ai parrainé deux, E-48 et E-1457, et j'ai regardé les mots-clés. Je ne pense pas me tromper en affirmant que ces mots-clés me permettraient de trouver l'une de ces deux pétitions. Il y en a six. L'une de ces pétitions portait sur la possibilité de tenir un référendum avant toute réforme électorale, et la deuxième visait à créer une journée nationale de la solidarité avec les victimes d'actes de violence et d'intolérance antireligieuse.

Il me semble que les mots-clés sont, un, réforme électorale »; et deux, « M-153 » qui est la référence à une motion qui est citée dans toutes les pétitions; trois, « journée nationale de la solidarité avec les victimes d'actes de violence et d'intolérance antireligieuse », qui se trouve être effectivement le titre de cette motion; quatre, « référendums »; cinq, discrimination fondée sur la religion »; et six, « victimes ».

Dans chacun des cas, ce sont ces mots-clés qui apparaissent, puis le « résultat 1 ». Je suppose que cela signifie que si je saisis n'importe lequel de ces mots-clés, j'obtiendrai seulement cette pétition en particulier.

Est-ce exact?

M. André Gagnon:

Oui, je pense que c'est exact.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Mais il pourrait aussi s'agir de toute autre pétition comportant les mêmes mots-clés. Il existe de nombreuses pétitions et de nombreux résultats différents, un pour chacun de ces mots-clés, mais je suppose qu'une seule pétition correspond à tous ces mots-clés.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, le système affiche un résultat pour chacun d'eux. Puis-je supposer qu'une seule pétition correspond à ces mots-clés?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Si vous cliquez sur le mot-clé, et qu'une seule pétition s'affiche, cela signifie qu'elle est la seule avec ce mot-clé.

M. Scott Reid:

Le moyen évident de créer un ensemble plus large de mots-clés consiste à retenir tous les mots-clés, ou parfois, une expression clé, et ensuite, à mesure que de nouvelles pétitions connexes voient le jour, dans la mesure du possible, s'en tenir aux mots-clés existants comme moyen d'élaborer un univers de mots-clés qui grandit de façon organique. Je pense que ce serait le meilleur moyen d'y arriver.

Ma pétition sur le jour de la solidarité va expirer dans environ une semaine, et elle n'a pas suscité une avalanche de réponses, pour dire les choses sobrement. Il se pourrait que dans le futur, quelqu'un présente une pétition formulée différemment. Il serait raisonnable de la part d'un utilisateur qui envisage de s'inscrire de consulter cette pétition pour voir s'il n'en existerait pas une qui aurait été formulée un peu différemment. Cela permettrait à l'utilisateur d'être mieux renseigné avant d'apposer sa signature sur quoi que ce soit. Ce n'est qu'une suggestion, si on pouvait conserver cet univers et s'en servir pour attribuer des mots-clés à de futures pétitions, je pense que ce pourrait être utile.

(1225)

M. Charles Robert:

C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous préférons travailler avec des indexeurs professionnels qui comprennent bien la nature du travail. Construire un réseau d'expressions qui font allusion à un sujet semblable permet d'effectuer une recherche plus rentable que si on se concentre sur une terminologie tellement stricte et spécifique qu'elle restreint les résultats et empêche parfois de trouver ce que l'on cherche. C'est un peu la même chose que si je saisis les mots « coopérer », « co-op » ou « coop », j'obtiendrai certains résultats, mais pas tous.

Je pense que c'est à cela qu'André voulait faire référence. Nous utilisons des indexeurs qui s'efforcent finalement d'uniformiser la méthode utilisée pour tous les documents parlementaires que nous produisons afin que les gens de l'extérieur, ou de l'intérieur, qui souhaitent consulter certains renseignements obtiennent les meilleurs résultats possible.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vois.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, l'une de ces pétitions demandait la tenue d'un référendum avant de procéder à une réforme du système électoral. Si quelqu'un tape « référendums », je suppose que peu importe si le mot est au singulier ou au pluriel, le résultat devrait être le même.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, vous pourriez aussi utiliser « plébiscite », et obtenir le même résultat.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

Le président:

Vous dites que nous avons déjà des professionnels qui s'occupent de l'indexage...

M. Charles Robert:

Effectivement, un service effectue ce travail pour nous.

Le président:

Donc, si une nouvelle pétition voit le jour, ce sont eux qui, à titre de professionnels, détermineront les mots-clés et ce genre de choses, plutôt que de laisser quelqu'un détourner le système et choisir lui-même ses propres mots-clés.

Donc, nous devrions en rester là, monsieur Graham?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, j'allais dire que le bureau du greffier détient les pouvoirs nécessaires pour s'occuper de cette question, qu'aucune recommandation n'est requise, et que je pense que ce point est réglé.

Le président:

Je pense que nous avons vu toutes les recommandations. Nous en avons examiné une bonne demi-douzaine, et je recommanderais au greffier, pour notre rapport, de simplement en établir la liste, d'obtenir l'approbation des témoins, et d'en saisir de nouveau le Comité. Il ne devrait pas nous falloir plus de 10 minutes pour vérifier ce que nous avons dit, et nous pourrons ensuite présenter ce rapport à la Chambre, et le système de pétitions électronique deviendra officiel.

Est-ce que les membres du Comité sont d'accord?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président:Messieurs les témoins, je vous remercie beaucoup. Nous avons fait du bon travail, et nous allons suspendre la séance et poursuivre à huis clos avec l'étude du Comité sur l'utilisation des langues autochtones à la Chambre des communes.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 08, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.