header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-02-06 INDU 93

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1545)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody. Again, apologies. We had votes, and that's what happens.

We're in meeting number 93 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, and we are continuing our study on broadband connectivity in rural Canada.

With us today, we have, from the Canadian Cable Systems Alliance, Jay Thomson, CEO; and Ian Stevens, board member, chief executive officer of Execulink Telecom.

From the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, we have Christopher Mitchell, director, community broadband networks, by video conference from Minneapolis, Minnesota.

From SSi Micro Ltd., we have Dean Proctor, chief development officer.

Finally, from Xplornet Communications Inc., we have C.J. Prudham, executive vice-president, general counsel; and James Maunder, vice-president, communications and public affairs.

You will each have up to seven minutes to do a quick presentation, and then we'll get into our line of questioning.

We are going to start with Canadian Cable Systems Alliance.

Mr. Thomson, you have the floor.

Mr. Jay Thomson (Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Cable Systems Alliance):

Thank you, and good afternoon, Mr. Chairman and honourable members.

My name is Jay Thomson, and I am the CEO of the Canadian Cable Systems Alliance, or the CCSA. With me today is a member of our board, Ian Stevens, who is also, as mentioned, the CEO of Execulink Telecom based in Woodstock, Ontario, in southwestern Ontario. It's our pleasure to be here today to discuss our recommendations to increase the reach and quality of critical broadband infrastructure in underserved parts of the country.

We are well placed to speak to this issue. CCSA represents more than 110 independent companies providing communications services all over Canada. Our members serve hundreds of thousands of customers in about 1,200 communities, generally outside of large urban markets. Our members connect Canadians who may not otherwise have access to the Internet or TV or telephone services, because they live in areas where the larger players in the industry have not invested. In many rural areas of the country, our members are the only terrestrial providers of these services.

As committee members can see in our written submission, we have a number of concrete recommendations that we believe will help improve broadband connectivity in rural Canada.

In these remarks, I'll highlight three of those recommendations.

First of all, broadband service should be viewed as critical infrastructure that is on par with electricity and roads. The government has made important progress with its $500-million connect to innovate program, but more funding is needed. In today's digital economy, it is vital that the government invest in the country's broadband infrastructure, just as it does for other physical infrastructure deemed critical for the well-being and future of our communities.

It's also important to recognize that Canada's very remote areas are not the only ones that need government investment in their broadband infrastructure. As Ian can attest to, based on his own experience, sparsely populated regions very close to major markets will also often require government intervention to get the broadband services they need.

Our second recommendation is to structure broadband funding programs so as to leverage the resources and networks that local communication service providers have already established. Local providers throughout Canada have tremendous value to add in extending broadband services to rural areas. Because they are on the ground in their communities, it is local service providers who best understand their communities' needs. More importantly, it's local service providers who are the most motivated to provide the connectivity that their communities require to survive and thrive. Why is that? It's because they are members of those communities too.

In order to support smaller local providers in rolling out broadband, the government, in our opinion and recommendation, should adopt a simplified application and reporting process for smaller projects. As successful entrepreneurs, local providers know how to stretch every dollar they might receive from government to achieve the best results. If you overburden their limited administrative resources with lots of complex paperwork, you'll knock them out of the game before they even have a chance to lace up.

The third of our recommendations that we'd like to highlight today is that broadband funding should not just support capital projects but should also help to cover ongoing network operational costs and upgrades. To date, federal funding initiatives have subsidized only direct capital outlays. However, it's equally important to ensure that the networks built with those funds are sustainable.

To that end, funding programs should seek to ensure that backhaul or transport services are available to smaller operators at reasonable, affordable prices. Likewise, funding programs should help defray the ongoing costs of access to support structures such as hydro poles. This hydro pole issue is a very hot topic right now, because the Ontario Energy Board has recently approved huge increases to the pole rates that CCSA's members will have to pay in that province.

For the smaller companies that serve low-density areas, where there are substantially more poles between customers than in urban areas, such increases have a disproportionate negative impact. They create a situation whereby, even with capital funding support, the increased operational costs may foreclose a small company's ability to build a sustainable broadband network.

As such, those kinds of rate increases run directly counter to the government's objectives for its broadband funding programs.

Thank you, Mr. Chair and committee members, for undertaking this important study and for inviting our association to be here with you today. We'd be happy to answer your questions.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Mitchell from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Christopher Mitchell (Director, Community Broadband Networks, Institute for Local Self-Reliance):

Thank you very much, and thank you for the invitation. I'm honoured.

We have a rather unique body of knowledge and study regarding local governments' participation in various investments. My focus is on local government policies around broadband. From the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, I run a program called “community broadband networks”. This came about largely because we felt that the Internet—we recognized this about 12 years ago—was becoming essential for local businesses, local economies, and quality of life issues that communities were concerned about, but local governments had no ability to compel existing providers to meet the needs as they saw them. We were looking at ways in which local governments could ensure that they had the networks they needed, so we focused on a number of different areas.

I should say that it's a somewhat limited number of governments that have done this sort of thing. We're tracking local government networks in the United States and Canada. There are also quite a few in Sweden. I've had a chance to visit with some of them. Other than that, there aren't very many. This is something that is somewhat specialized and unique to certain nations.

One of the things we've been most known for is what local governments are doing in terms of building their own networks. Two common examples that we cite are Wilson in North Carolina and Chattanooga in Tennessee. For the purposes of talking about rural broadband, I wanted to bring them up, because their goal is not only to serve themselves, which they are doing on a city-wide basis, offering gigabit services, very high-reliability networks, and low prices that are competitive. They're really doing a tremendous job by all measures. They also have ambitions to serve their neighbours. They would very much like to serve the rural areas around them, but have been prohibited from doing so by state law.

We do have other states, such as Minnesota, in which we have local governments such as Windom—it's in what I think of as farm country in southwest Minnesota—which has built a network for itself. It's about 4,000 people. They expanded that to serve 10 towns near them and the farm country in between, a model of where local governments that were focused on regional improvement have been able to first serve themselves and then expand to nearby areas.

One of our areas of study is more relevant to rural, and that is the rural electric and telephone co-operatives we have, which have brought telephone and electricity to much of the rural United States. An example that I would cite is a surprise for many people; in North Dakota, the vast majority of the territory is covered with fibre optics. In fact, if you're on a farm in North Dakota, you're far more likely to have high-quality Internet access than if you're in one of the population centres. That was done almost entirely with co-operatives but also with local, independently owned companies that reinvested in their communities because they are local communities, much like Jay Thomson was just discussing in terms of the incentive for locally based entities.

Those are cities that have built their own networks. Those are co-operatives that have built their own networks. Our electric co-operatives are just getting into this. We're tracking 60 electric co-operatives that are offering service to businesses and residents outside of their own purposes for keeping the grid stable. We expect that to be well over 100, and possibly approaching 150 by the end of this year. For comparison purposes, we have about 800 or 900 electric co-operatives in the United States. That's a substantial jump.

The final thing we tend to study in terms of local governments and these co-operative solutions is partnerships. Here again we have something that's directly relevant to Canada. One of the companies that has one of the most promising partnerships is Ting. It's a company run by Canadians and staffed by Canadians, and it operates almost entirely in the United States of America. It has partnered in five different local fibre optic investments, building fibre optic networks. It also has a wireless division that resells wireless service.

In the city of Westminster, Maryland, which I've written a report about, Ting has partnered with the city to bring universal coverage at affordable rates. It's a balanced partnership that we've identified as a model in which both the government and the private sector share in the upside and the downside. We've seen too many things in the United States that are called partnerships where one side really dominates the risks and the other side dominates the benefits. I think that's something to be concerned about. Ting has offered a model for being willing to share in both.

(1555)



The reason I bring them up is that they are interested in finding Canadian cities to work with, so it's directly relevant.

I will note one final thing. In preparing, I was looking at some of the briefs. First of all, there's a lot of very good information on the record. wanted to amplify something, which is the need for both last-mile and middle-mile connectivity.

We have seen programs that have focused too much on a middle mile, or backbone in different parlance, connecting one geography to another geography, rather than distribution fibre, on the mistaken notion that with enough backbone fibre, one will spur investment in last-mile services. In our experience, that does not happen. The economics of last mile are challenging. They are so challenging that having a more robust middle mile does not change them significantly.

I strongly concur with the many people who have stated that we need to be focused on both in order to solve this challenge in rural areas.

I'm hoping to be helpful in answering questions relevant to my background.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move right to SSi Micro.

Mr. Proctor, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Dean Proctor (Chief Development Officer, SSi Micro Ltd.):

Merci beaucoup.

I want to thank the committee for this opportunity to contribute to your study and to discuss plans to improve rural and remote area broadband connectivity.

If I could just take a quick second, I have a very dear friend in the room, Adamee Itorcheak, who I wasn't certain would be here today. Adamee is at the back, and he's the founder of Nunanet Worldwide Communications, the first Internet service provider in Nunavut. He was also a member of the National Broadband Task Force back in 2001, so I know he's extremely interested in the work of the committee.

I'm thrilled that Adamee is here today.

I'll provide a brief overview of SSi and our operations in the north, but my focus is on the policies we believe will sustainably improve connectivity for all of Canada's remote and rural areas. Those policies will let local talent contribute their ingenuity, creating truly Canadian-made and northern-made models that can be exported around the world.

First and foremost, we believe that to deliver attractive and affordable rural and remote area broadband, the policy framework must support developing local talent, which rests on three well-established principles: one is competitive and technological neutrality; two is a focus on funding backbone transport infrastructure; and three is open access for all service providers to the backbone and gateway facilities. I'm happy to say that ISED and the CRTC have already begun to implement many of the needed policy changes since this committee began its work, but more needs to be done. It's increasingly apparent that government and industry must defend the good work and changes already under way.

What is SSi? We were formed and headquartered in Canada's north. We're a family company, launched 28 years ago by Jeff and Stef Philipp. Our roots go further back, to the Snowshoe Inn, from which SSi has its name. The inn was founded 54 years ago by Jeff's parents in the community of Fort Providence in the Northwest Territories.

We specialize in remote area connectivity, we provide broadband, mobile, and other communication services across Canada's north, and we've also carried out projects in Africa, the South Pacific, and Southeast Asia. Our mission is to ensure that all northern communities have access to affordable, high-quality broadband, and to achieve this we've invested heavily in infrastructure and facilities. In 2005, we built and launched the Qiniq network to provide affordable broadband to all 25 communities in Nunavut. Investments by the federal government covered part of the initial cost of satellite transport and infrastructure. Since then we've co-invested over $150 million into Nunavut infrastructure, and we have paid over $10 million to our community service providers. Our local agents were our key to success in each one of our 25 communities.

In September of 2015, we announced a $75-million investment in Nunavut's broadband future, and this includes $35 million from ISED's connecting Canadians program for the purchase of satellite capacity. We've directly committed over $40 million for additional satellite capacity and network-wide upgrades to both the backbone and last-mile infrastructure throughout the territory.

Qiniq, the broadband service, improved the lives of Nunavummiut by providing access to cost-effective broadband. This was previously impossible. Before 2005 most users had no access to broadband infrastructure. With Qiniq, for the first time every Nunavut community had affordable Internet access for the same price, immediately allowing consumers access to the digital age.

Now, with our latest investments, we're delivering another first. As of February 1, just last week, Clyde River and Chesterfield Inlet residents have access to mobile voice and data services for the first time. Until now the vast majority of Nunavut has had no access to mobile services. We've completed the SSi mobile deployment throughout the territory, and all residents will soon benefit from the latest generation 4G LTE technologies—we're doing phased rollouts to the communities—with the same service level and pricing available in every community.

The new 4G LTE system enables high-performance broadband mobile voice and data, telemetry, video conferencing, and more. It's also offering for the first time ever a less expensive and more versatile alternative to the old wireline phone. To make the service unique, we've eliminated long-distance charges between communities, bringing families closer together.

Our company is on the front lines. We know and live daily the positive impact of information technology, and we see the positive impact of our investments for consumers, organizations, and small business in Nunavut. Unfortunately, over the last few years the ever-increasing rates of data transfers, and the corresponding demand for scarce backbone capacity, presented significant challenges to Arctic communication systems.

(1600)



Where once we made great strides to close the gap, we're once again seeing the digital divide deepen between Canada's north and the south of the country.

Investing in better last-mile technology is an essential step to improving rural and remote area connectivity. To be clear, SSi has deployed last-mile infrastructure into every Nunavut community that can deliver the same quality of broadband and mobile service that you can find in downtown Ottawa. My iPhone 6 and iPhone 7 work in each one of the 25 communities as well as they work here.

To ensure that northerners receive the full benefit of these new last-mile technologies, significant additional investments into wholesale backbone capacity are urgently needed. In this regard, December 2016 was a pivotal month for the evolution of telecom policy in Canada. New policies are recognizing that broadband access is essential and they establish major program changes and new initiatives for public investment in broadband backbone infrastructure.

These advances are important, and we believe they need to be recognized, promoted, and protected by this committee. Together these policy initiatives build a path that will let local talent shine by refocusing away from exclusive support to the phone companies, which despite a century or more of public support have failed to deliver broadband to many Canadians in remote and rural areas. The challenge now for all of us, this committee included, is not to repeat or perpetuate past mistakes. If there are to be public investments into rural and remote-area communications infrastructure—and we believe there should be—the investment process must be transparent, and the funded infrastructure needs to be open to all in order to support competition, further investment, innovation, and consumer choice.

On December 15, 2016, ISED launched its connect to innovate program. For the first time, public funds were dedicated to developing open-access backbone networks, to be made available on a wholesale basis. Susan Hart, ISED's director general for the program, spoke before you in November.

SSi wholeheartedly supports the open-backbone approach. When public investment focuses on backbone infrastructure and requires that it be made available on a wholesale basis, it encourages further private investment and innovation in the last mile by companies such as ours. This leads to a choice of technologies, service providers, and opportunities for consumers.

It's important. As SSi has proven in Nunavut and elsewhere, quality local access networks can be built in remote areas, largely due to advances in technology, in particular wireless and IP technologies.

Moving ahead, the CRTC also presented before you in November, not only noting that broadband is now an essential service, but also establishing a significant new fund, the rules of which are still being worked out. But as is often the case, the devil is in the details. We have to ensure policies are enacted as intended, and that inertia and neglect and incumbency do not bring us back to an end-to-end monopoly where incumbent phone companies receive all the public funding, restrict competitor access to their publicly funded networks, and thereby squeeze out further investment and consumer choice.

We'd hope that you would also recognize how the three principles I mentioned earlier are necessary to support that local talent. These principles are competitive and technological neutrality; funding focused on the backbone; and open gateways, meaning that all local service providers must be offered open and affordable access to backbone connectivity.

In summary, though we've come a long way, much still needs to be done to improve remote and rural area connectivity in Canada.

I will cut this short.

(1605)

[Translation]

I would like to thank the committee for the opportunity to make my presentation before you today.

I will be very happy to answer your questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, we're going to move to Xplornet, with Ms. C. J. Prudham.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham (Executive Vice-President, General Counsel, Xplornet Communications Inc.):

Good afternoon. I'm C.J. Prudham, the executive vice-president, general counsel for Xplornet Communications Inc. With me is James Maunder, vice-president of communications and public affairs.

Thank you for the invitation. We are delighted to be here today to participate in the committee's study on rural broadband connectivity. At Xplornet, it's a subject we understand very well. Our business was founded over 10 years ago with a simple mission: to make affordable, high-speed broadband available to every Canadian. This is what drives us.

Xplornet is today the eighth-largest Internet service provider in Canada and the only one in the top 10 exclusively focused on rural Canada. We are truly national, serving over 350,000 households, or over 800,000 Canadians, every day in every province and territory. We want rural Canadians, wherever they choose to live, to be able to affordably connect to what matters.

Therefore, our goal at Xplornet is to deliver the Internet to our rural customers at the same speeds that Canadians receive it in the largest cities. As we announced in 2015, Xplornet will deliver packages with speeds of 100 Mbps by 2020 throughout our service area—double the CRTC's target.

As was noted by others before this committee, Canada's geography requires a diversity of technologies—fibre, fixed wireless, and satellite—to connect the country. All of these technologies can achieve the results.

Canada's population density averages just under four Canadians per square kilometre. Yet today, virtually all Canadians, 99%, have access to Internet connectivity, and that includes 95% of rural Canadians. Canada is ranked fourth in the G20 for per capita broadband connections that exceed 15 megabits per second.

We got here through hard work, innovation, and unprecedented private sector investment. In the last five years alone, Xplornet has invested over $1 billion in its network, focused entirely on bringing better service to rural Canada. No doubt other providers will share their figures.

Now that coverage exists virtually everywhere in Canada, the question becomes how to keep up with consumers' growing needs for speed and data. The introduction of 5G networks and the Internet of things is transforming our everyday lives. In 24 months, the average Canadian household will have between 15 and 20 devices connected to the Internet.

Mr. James Maunder (Vice-President, Communications and Public Affairs, Xplornet Communications Inc.):

So how does rural Canada keep pace? We believe there are three key ingredients to success. The first is private investment. The second is targeted public investment. The third is spectrum.

The first issue, we would submit, is for governments to create the right conditions to allow companies to continue to aggressively invest in their networks. Sometimes this includes governments simply staying out of the way. After all, the goal should be sustainable solutions where networks are economically viable to be able to make continuous private investments that are needed to meet consumers' growing demands. But in certain areas, it will also include targeted public investment. To that end, Xplornet has supported and worked closely with the Government of Canada through its various iterations of funding programs, the first being broadband Canada, the second being the connecting Canadians program, and the third—most recent—being connect to innovate.

Where most companies, including Xplornet, can agree is on the need for a robust backbone network to drive investments and capacity into rural areas. You've heard witnesses today echo that sentiment.

At Xplornet we believe the Government of Canada's connect to innovate program is a great start. Similarly, the details of the CRTC's broadband funding regime, the seeds of which were announced one year ago, are still to be determined, and we await further details on that fund. We think all providers should look forward to clarity and coordination on these programs so that we can accelerate our own investment plans.

Finally, we believe we need consistent and reliable access to wireless spectrum to fuel our networks all across the country in rural Canada. Of course, these policies are determined by Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

We point out that in recent years the explosion of data consumption by Canadians has been the same in rural Canada as it has been in urban Canada. Our rural customer usage across our LTE network doubled in the last year and exceeds over 100 gigabits per month, which is in line with what the CRTC says is the average for all Canadians. Over 60% of that usage is video, which again is in line with the national averages.

While mobile data use has grown significantly, too, the fixed home connection continues to be the workhorse that carries the heavy data uses like Netflix and Apple TV, yet all significant spectrum allocations made in Canada in the last five years have focused on mobile needs. There has not been an allocation designated for fixed wireless broadband. How do we meet growing the needs of consumers if one primary input has not changed?

We strongly believe that there should be a long-term spectrum strategy to allow rural broadband to keep up. Capacity and speed of rural broadband cannot keep pace without additional spectrum.

The cornerstone of this strategy must be a plan that strikes a balance to allow mobile broadband and fixed rural broadband to expand together to meet consumers' needs. One cannot come at the expense of the other. Rural consumers cannot be left behind.

In summary, Xplornet believes three critical factors must be met in order to create the right conditions for rural broadband connectivity.

Governments at all levels must allow the private sector to do what they do best, invest in our networks, driven by consumer demand. Xplornet is proof positive there is a business case for investing in rural Canada.

The second is targeted government investment for fibre transport and backhaul services that can help accelerate broadband deployment in rural areas. This support should be encouraged when it is coordinated and subject to consultation with the private sector.

And finally, rural Canada must be given access to the spectrum it needs to keep pace with urban Canada. It is the oxygen that breathes life into our rural networks.

Thank you again for the invitation to appear here today. We would be pleased to take any questions.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, everyone, for your presentations.

If we keep our questioning tight and our time tight, we should be able to complete a full round.

We're going to start right away with Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have a variety of questions for a variety of you. I'll start very quickly with Mr. Thomson.

With regard to your comments about hydro poles, I just wanted to say thank you for making those comments. We have a project in my riding where the single biggest issue they have is the 46,000 hydro poles they have to inspect, and it's the lion's share of the connect to innovate program, but I don't want to dwell on that too much.

I really want to talk to Chris Mitchell.

I met Will Aycock and Brittany Smith from Wilson, North Carolina recently, and I think you know them. They recommended that I speak to you, so I'm very happy to have the opportunity to do so. Thank you for being here.

You mentioned that a lot of states are making it illegal or effectively illegal to create community broadband. Can you dive a little bit more deeply into that?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

Yes. We've had a strong push ever since the movement for regulation went from a monopoly-style regulation to competition. There's been a fight in most of our states about the role of local governments in that. The records suggest that the federal Congress meant to include local governments as competitors, but since then, some states have decided they'd rather not have that. Fewer than half of our states have limited local governments doing so, but about 20 states have limitations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In North Carolina, what I learned was that it's now illegal, for example, for a new service provider to not make money from the first customer, and this is the kind of tool they're using to limit us. They're not saying you can't do it, but they're throwing up roadblocks. Who is driving these roadblocks?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

It's definitely the large cable and telephone companies. Some of the small cable and telephone companies also have concerns about local governments getting involved, but this legislation is almost always a result of the big ones.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What do you recommend to Canada to avoid that happening?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

I certainly think that the examples we're seeing from Olds and Campbell River suggest that we need to see more freedom for local governments to experiment with this where it's appropriate. In our experience, local governments do not take on this very large, challenging task unless there's a strong need, because a) they'll be voted out, and b), it's a very difficult prospect, and local governments typically have enough problems without trying to take on something new like this.

We don't think it's appropriate to tie local hands at all.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final question for you about Broadband Communities Summit in Texas. Is it useful for us to know about that?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

Yes, I think so. I think it's a wonderful event. There are often Canadians there. I've met many Canadians, specifically from Alberta, over the years there, so it's certainly something that they felt is worthwhile going to.

(1615)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I want to move over to Xplornet for a moment.

You talked about 350,000 households being connected and said that 95% of rural Canadians have a connection available. I don't know a lot of happy Xplornet customers in my riding, so it's nice to have an opportunity to chat with you.

Recently I received an ad in the mail for Xplornet service, which offered me 25 gigabits at 5 megabits per second for $40 for the first six months and then $65 a month after that. If you look at it really carefully, in the fine print it says “up to” 5 megabits, and for $100 a month, “up to” 10 megabits.

Can you tell me the real speeds your customers get today?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

You're speaking to the advertising issue. The reason why the words “up to” appear is quite common amongst most providers. Because the Internet is a shared resource, it's impossible to guarantee it unless you have a dedicated line. Consequently, that's why you frequently will see that choice of language referring to “up to”.

The specific speeds that your average customer receives are dependent upon where they are within the network and which particular platform they're on, etc. We do have all of those statistics, but we have over 2,000 towers, so it's a bit of a broad range.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair for the towers, but I'm talking about the satellite service, which is what we have in my area. There is no tower service available through Xplornet where I am. There is through other WISPs.

The complaints I get from citizens coming to my office—because Internet is the biggest issue in my riding—are that Xplornet will have a 5 megabit or 10 megabit advertised service, and when you test it, on a very good day you might get 1 megabit. I'm wondering if you have any comments on that.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Again, I'd have to know which satellite platform. I'm happy to provide you, as a follow-up matter, with information on the specific beam over your riding. I don't know off the top of my head.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

If your clients go over their quota, do you throttle or do you cut them off? Or do you charge more? How does that work?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

We give the customer the choice. It has been very important to us to allow customers to choose how they control their household expenses.

The choice we give customers is that if they go over their monthly data quota, they can choose to purchase additional data that way. Or if having a fixed price is more important—and this has certainly been surprisingly important to a number of our customers—we do slow down their speed at that point.

It's up to them to choose which one they would prefer.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

You've talked about the thousands of LTE towers thereabouts around the country. How much ground-based service do you now have?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

I'm sorry. I don't understand the question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Xplornet was built on the satellite network, but you're now moving to a WISP style of service in a lot of the country. Can you tell us where you're at with that?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

We've been in business now since the 2004-05 range and we have been, since at least 2007, fifty-fifty between satellite and fixed wireless, and we continue to be today. We're balanced between the two. We're actually quite unique in North America in that sense.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that concentrated in one part of the country?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

No. Actually, we have fixed wireless deployments. The biggest ones are in Ontario and Alberta, but we also obviously have them in Quebec, and we have now added Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and are working on P.E.I., and Manitoba.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough. Thank you.

I have only a few seconds left so I'm going to go very quickly to you, Mr. Proctor. You talked about the fact that your iPhones work in Nunavut in all the different communities up there. Are you also providing cellular service yourself?

Mr. Dean Proctor:

That is a cellular service. It's our network, so we—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How is that working?

Mr. Dean Proctor:

It's working extremely well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't mean that way, but how does it work? You are a cellphone provider up there, as opposed to reselling or repeating the signal for other services.

Mr. Dean Proctor:

We have our own infrastructure. That's right.

Actually, as I said, last Thursday we launched mobile service for the first time, but it's more than just as a WISP: it's actually as a CLEC. A few years ago, we forced open the local market, which I think was the last regulated, protected monopoly in the western world, and we're now a competitor to Northwestel, offering local phone service, but across our own mobile network. Beyond that it's a 4G LTE network, so it's going from 0G to 4G.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm out of time, so thank you very much.

The Chair:

We're going to move to you, Mr. Eglinski. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

I'll start with Mr. Mitchell.

You may be aware that the Canadian government currently maps services to homes through a hexagon model. We usually pick one house to get the access speeds to see if that meets the requirement, but we could have 10 or 12 houses around there that don't meet the same standards. In the United States, what kinds of mapping models do you use?

(1620)

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

We use census blocks, and those are irregular shapes, typically. We have roughly the same approach. If one [Inaudible—Editor has service, then it's considered served. There's an open matter at our Federal Communications Commission regarding whether they should mark whether an area is entirely served or partially served, which would provide an entity that ambiguity in some respect.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You were saying earlier that most of the part of the country you're in is fibre-fed.

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

Most of North Dakota is. I thought that would be more relevant for Saskatchewan and some of the provinces.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

What is the level of service? How many megabytes would you be getting on the average?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

It varies. Roughly half is gigabit, I believe. Others may not offer gigabit, but are gigabit-capable with basic upgrades.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Moving over to Xplornet, Mr. Maunder, I didn't catch all of your comments, but you said something about government and interfering. Is government interfering with the ability of your company to provide service and expand your customer base?

Mr. James Maunder:

What we had identified were three core principles. I'll start at the end and I'll work my way forward. The third is access to spectrum. The second is targeted public funding. The first, as you rightly mentioned, is governments at all levels just getting out of the way of the private sector and allowing it to continually and aggressively expand its network.

The pace of innovation and transformation in the telecommunications sector is quite remarkable. Over the last five years, Xplornet alone has invested in excess of $1 billion in our fixed wireless and satellite network. Other witnesses and other providers will come before you and share with you similar figures. Where the industry was at even five years ago relative to where it's at now demonstrates that the transformation that has taken place from then to now is quite remarkable. The $1-billion investment is what we shared with you; others will do the same.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Well, we are government, and I'm curious to know some of the problems we're causing. Is it bureaucracy load-down, or what?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

If I may, sir.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

We're trying to fix that.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Xplornet is in many respects lucky to be here today. We started out as a very entrepreneurial little company in Woodstock, New Brunswick. We were completely privately funded, and off we went. The CRTC issued what was known as the “deferral account decision”. That decision, which essentially put over $300 million in the hands of Bell Canada to compete with little Xplornet, almost crushed us. We could not raise private capital for 18 months after that event. Essentially, we thought that was the end of us.

We were very fortunate that Bell didn't build out on the proposed schedule. It's well known in the public record that there were significant delays, and that incredible delay was pretty much what saved our company at the beginning. Otherwise, handing over $300 million to compete with what was then a very tiny company would have definitely driven us out. Undoubtedly, if we put too much money into areas where people are already willing to privately invest, we can drive out private money. I'm sure that's not your intention.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Mr. Proctor, when you're in your individual community, how are you feeding it to the residences? Are you doing it by fibre optics, or are you doing everything remotely?

Mr. Dean Proctor:

We use fibre. In the case of Nunavut, it's actually government fibre. The Government of Nunavut is one of our clients, and they have built out their own fibre ring. We're delivering it across their own fibre to their buildings. With consumers, small offices, home offices, it's all wireless. That began back in 2004-05. We built our broadband wireless—it's called WiMAX. We've evolved that to 4G LTE and 2G GSN. It's all wireless. The speeds that come across it are phenomenal, certainly well in excess of the CRTC's 50 down and 10 up objectives. We can deliver much more than that in the last mile; our problem is the backbone.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'm going to go back to you, sir, since I think you're about as rural, as remote, as we can get.

Mr. Dean Proctor:

My Saskatchewan accent is coming out.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Referring to the last mile, broadband technologies, what is the best thing we can do for rural Canada? What are the best systems to use?

(1625)

Mr. Dean Proctor:

It depends on your use. It depends on what you want to be doing. We're obviously advocates of wireless technologies, mobile wireless, 4G LTE, soon to be 5G. If you're talking about an individual connection to a home, to a business, fibre is obviously the cream of the cream, but the question is whether it's practical for all areas.

One of the things we're finding in a lot of the small communities is that with 4G LTE we can deliver well beyond what any individual needs. It's an incredible technology. The answer is that it all depends. That's the classic engineering answer, but it's true. If you're able to deliver fibre, that's great. I would suggest to you, though, that for the vast majority of rural and remote areas, wireless solutions, fixed or mobile—and our preference is mobile—are the best way to go.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

What is the cost comparison for, say, fibre versus what you're doing? Is it a lot more expensive?

Mr. Dean Proctor:

Fibre is much, much more expensive, yes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

I think I've just about used up my time.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, witnesses, for being here.

I'll start with Mr. Mitchell, but I would ask for this to go around.

Obviously the decision in the United States to abandon net neutrality has a significant impact on, I think, even government policy to spend resources to connect and how to connect. There is obviously going to be a change of behaviour and marketing access to people's information now that won't be based on just the net neutrality model. It can, quite frankly, be vulnerable now to a specific type of relationship that is different from what it's had in the past.

I don't expect you have an answer for it, but what does that do for public policy people like me, who believe in net neutrality but who are now faced with—especially here in Canada, because the pipelines and the effect also come from the United States—the defeat of some of the principles? This service has been characterized as being like highways, but the reality is we're now building toll roads to certain destinations.

If you have any comments about that, I'd be interested in hearing them, starting with the U.S. side and Mr. Mitchell, and then the Canadian after that.

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

I'll sum mine up with just two quick thoughts, because it's very deep. The first is that about 100 million Americans can only get broadband Internet access from a large provider that is expected to begin violating network neutrality. So it's of deep concern and we're seeing local governments taking more initiative to think about building their own networks or conditioning the use of certain assets such as conduit upon maintaining a neutral network. States are increasingly making procurement decisions to require neutral networks. If Montana is purchasing a link, it will have to get it from a company that is offering a neutral network.

The second piece is simply that there is push-back, and I don't think we'll see this abandonment of net neutrality last for very long. Whether under this administration or the next one, I suspect we'll see a much larger coalition forming to defend the Internet more broadly. I think that's a welcome change, so that gives me hope for all range of areas.

Mr. Dean Proctor:

Net neutrality is a tough subject. Our company members are Internet pioneers. It would be fun if you actually came and met some of the originals from the company. We're strong believers in the openness of the Net.

There's another way to look at this one as well, though, which is with regard to the control of the content. It's one thing to block certain content or to privilege certain content, but in the case of Canada, where you have one company in particular that is a controller and owner of a large part of the content that could be delivered across the networks, we have to be worried about the other side, which is to make certain that all carriers—we're a carrier—have access to content that may be controlled by other carriers. So I'd flip this one back a bit to the extent that there are restrictions on open access, and we have to make certain that the content itself is available to all providers as well. I'll just throw it in a little different direction.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

I think Xplornet's view has been that we don't own content. We are not overly concerned about that because we respect subsection 27(2) of the Telecommunications Act and believe all carriers should respect subsection 27(2), which deals with this issue, obviously, in Canada.

Consequently, our primary focus continues to be providing the service that allows people their choice of content, if that helps.

(1630)

Mr. Jay Thomson:

We come at this question from an interesting perspective, because our members are Internet providers, but they're also cable television companies and IPTV companies, so they distribute TV programming services. It's a big part of their business.

Most of those programming services are owned by Bell, Rogers, and Quebecor, which are also the biggest ISPs in the country. Our fear is that, absent net neutrality, they would be in a position to favour their own networks over ours for distribution of those services.

Mr. Brian Masse:

There's no doubt, and that's part of the reason for the defence of net neutrality. It really becomes the eye of the beholder as to what's really important content or not.

At any rate, with regard to the next spectrum auction, maybe I'll go in reverse order for responses, if I have time.

How do you feel about the terms and conditions on the spectrum auction that might be more involving the final mile that is asked? It's nice to talk about, and I know the catchphrases in terms of governments staying out of the way and then knowing when to help. It's always told to stay out of the way when the lucrative aspects of business are there in front and the low-hanging fruit. It's asked to get out of the way for that, but then it's always requested to partner for the more difficult aspects. How do you feel about having terms and conditions that might be more specific on the spectrum auction that's coming up?

Maybe I'll go in reverse order, if I have time. Let's start with Mr. Thomson.

Mr. Jay Thomson:

Our members don't have spectrum, generally. They'd like it, but they can't afford it. The licence areas typically are way too large and encompass too many potential customers for our members to be in a position to bid for any of those licensed areas. The auction process is very complex. It's not really designed for the smaller player at all.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That could be written in the terms and conditions, who actually gets—

Mr. Jay Thomson:

We'd certainly like to see that.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Likewise, Xplornet is certainly concerned about the upcoming auctions. As we stated in our presentation, we're concerned that there hasn't been a recognition of the fact that it's needed for rural broadband. On the economics of serving downtown Toronto, Jay is quite right when he speaks to the fact that, the way the map of downtown Toronto is drawn, some of the worst broadband servicing in Canada is actually right around Toronto. It's because the spectrum is trapped in the Toronto licence. If it's worth seven million people in that area, you're buying it to serve the downtown Toronto folks. You're not serving Uxbridge, Stouffville, Milton, or some of those areas.

Yes, we think there needs to be something specific, something addressed to it.

The Chair:

We're out of time, but both of you could give a very quick answer.

Mr. Dean Proctor:

We intervened in favour of the spectrum set-asides for the smaller players, the new entrants. We intervened in favour of a much lower opening price, because that has been a real hurdle for us in past auctions. In outlying areas where it's very difficult to build out a network, the last thing you want to be doing is spending a fortune buying into the spectrum, so we supported that.

The one area where we're probably in agreement with Xplornet and would like to see some adjustments is where one can bid, but also the size of the tiering. Maybe the tiering needs to be adjusted to favour more rural and remote area auctions.

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

I cannot add anything, so please move on.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Bossio for seven minutes.

Mr. Mike Bossio (Hastings—Lennox and Addington, Lib.):

Thank you, everyone, for being here today. This is a great discussion and a lot of valuable information is coming through it.

I'd like to start with Mr. Mitchell. As you know, the CRTC has just created a fund to help fund Internet as an essential service. They're trying to determine how best to utilize those funds. In the U.S., you have something similar, the RUS fund, the rural utilities service fund. You were mentioning that there are 800 to 900 electric co-ops. I believe all these co-ops can access the RUS funds in order to be able to build out the network, including the one there in North Dakota.

(1635)

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

That's right. In North Dakota, it's mostly telephone co-operatives, but that RUS fund is what builds electricity to all of rural America.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

The CRTC funds are going to be essentially the same type of fund. If you had to give advice to the CRTC on how best to implement a fund such as the RUS fund to maximize the impact, what advice would you give them?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

For the various funds that are available, which should also include the connect America fund, the rules are very complex, and as has been stated earlier, unfriendly to local firms on that basis. Larger companies that have many lawyers have much easier access to them. So to the extent that rules can be kept simple, that is important.

A second piece of information that I think is important is not to direct them solely to unserved areas, if you differentiate between unserved and underserved. To have a viable business model, it's important to allow a mixture. If someone is applying for funds, they shouldn't have to only serve the worst, hardest-to-serve areas. They should be able to mix that in with perhaps some higher-density areas or a population centre in the nearby region, rather than solely being able to serve the unserved. That's something we have not done in the United States, whether it's in state or federal programs, because of the power of incumbents to block any ability to use subsidization to compete.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Thank you so much for your help with that.

On spectrum, Jay, you had mentioned that it would be nice to have.

And C.J., you mentioned that it would be nice to be able to use all of it all the time.

I wonder what your thoughts are around dynamic spectrum allocation, where instead of just having focused blocks of spectrum—you have to buy it all, use it all, all the time, you're paying for it every second of the time—you have a dynamic spectrum allocation where you could dynamically reroute the spectrum depending on the needs of the different entities that are willing to rent that spectrum at a given time. That way, you could very quickly turn over spectrum on an ongoing basis.

Can you give me your thoughts on dynamic spectrum allocation?

Mr. Ian Stevens (Chief Executive Officer, Execulink Telecom and Board Member, Canadian Cable Systems Alliance):

I can take that.

I see that as very problematic, trying to coordinate it between all the operators. Perhaps a different thought could be this. When you license spectrum, typically the conditions of licence are that 50% of the population is serviced within a period of time, but there's no requirement for the unserviced area—the area around the outside of Toronto where it's not serviced—that the service provider then must service it. Perhaps you could take that spectrum back and reallocate it out to other operators that would be willing to commit to servicing those areas.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Yes, but the technology does exist now to be able to actually do full-blown dynamic spectrum allocation where you use it when you need it and you pay for it when you need it.

Mr. Ian Stevens:

I can't comment on that.

Perhaps you can.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

We actually have looked into this in some of the matters in the U.S. I think it's Google that actually runs the computer system that would allow it to work in the United States. My understanding is that it has not been a success, and there are a number of operators that are quite unhappy with it, because the way it works essentially is that you can't plan for your peak spectrum. So how do you know how much to invest in your network when you never know how much spectrum you're going to have in order to service your customers?

It creates a real problem. It essentially forces you back to the equivalent of working in the 900 spectrum or the 2400 spectrum, which is unlicensed, because that's effectively what happens. You are contending constantly for spectrum. When it's not there, great, you have no interference and you can continue to operate. The second there's interference from somebody else, all this is doing is essentially, through dynamic spectrum allocation, is saying, “Okay, one of you gets away with not receiving interference; the other one, however, is off the air” because they didn't get that particular item.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Mr. Mitchell, I see you nodding your head. Would you like to make a comment?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

I would just say that I think many of the small providers are hopeful that those bugs will be worked out, because many of the small providers are fighting very hard in a current fight related to that spectrum and whether it's going to be designed in a way that's more accessible to big carriers or small. They view that as being quite important still.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

I know another big issue for the small carriers is the cost of the spectrum, even just to rent it. In the U.S., I think they rent their spectrum at a gigabit. If my memory serves me correctly, it's about $1,650 for 10 years to be able to rent that, whereas in Canada it's $13,000 a year for a 1-gig PoP. Is that the case?

(1640)

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

I'm afraid I don't know how to answer that question.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Okay, I just thought I'd try to get that on the record.

Finally—and unfortunately I'm running out of time and this is a big question—Xplornet gets beat up a lot because you're one of the biggest players in rural areas, and the rural areas are underserved, and you've had to oversubscribe in order to try to meet the huge need, and the fact that you don't have fibre to your PoPs. A lot of times you're doing hops from one antenna to another to another, and you can only have an antenna within a 25-kilometre radius, right? You can't have another one because of interference.

What is the solution to that, that you see?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

You could have sat in our network meetings in terms of how you've done a great job of summarizing it.

The answer from our perspective is investment in the backbone element of it, which is extraordinarily important and why we have been so enthusiastic about the connect to innovate program. As the sheer volume of data increases, there's more and more pressure on the tower. You can try to deal with how you get that last mile to the customer by adding an extra ring of radios or something like that to build the capacity, but then you just have a whole pile more data at the tower. How do you get it back to the Internet connection? That's fundamental.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

But it's not just the backbone piece of it. It's going that mid—

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

It's that middle—

Mr. Mike Bossio:

It's going that mid-level to the access point, because you need it at the PoP.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Exactly.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Every tower needs to have fibre. Correct?

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Lloyd, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you for coming.

My first question is directed to Mr. Thomson.

You alluded to, in your testimony, a number of regulations and costs inhibiting the ability of companies, particularly smaller companies, to be competitive, for example the costs of hydro, the hydro pole legislation. And you alluded to paperwork. Could you elaborate on what government regulations are getting in the way of smaller companies getting into the field?

Mr. Jay Thomson:

The reference I made to paperwork was primarily with respect to the application process for the funding programs. We have a live example of the cost of complying with requirements.

I'll turn it to Ian.

Mr. Ian Stevens:

We were successful with the connecting Canadians project. We had several projects on the go. It took us about 80 man-hours every quarter to do the reporting to get the funding released, and for us, the project was large enough that it made sense. But some of the CCSA members, when they look at smaller projects.... When you're investing 80 man-hours to get your funding back out, you're starting to run an equation. Does it make sense to apply to a funding mechanism when there's that much overhead to maintain it? And that's just on.... During the project there's also a very burdensome application process for projects. Again, you need a certain size of project to make it make sense.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

This question goes more to Xplornet.

Something I've read is that when you have very engaged communities that work together saying they want broadband, and work with private companies and local governments, it seems to be a really successful model of getting broadband into rural areas. Can you describe some situations where Xplornet has been involved with communities to bring in rural broadband?

Mr. James Maunder:

Xplornet has a considerable amount of experience working with governments at all levels on infrastructure projects. A good example is a project that Mr. Bossio would be quite familiar with, and that's our relationship with the Eastern Ontario Regional Network, EORN.

They brand themselves as a novel partnership, and it really is novel in the sense that mayors from the region of eastern Ontario circa 2010 felt that there was a real lack of broadband infrastructure in their part of the province and they banded together. They solicited funding from the federal government. They worked with a number of Internet service providers, Xplornet being one of them, to construct the last-mile infrastructure in the region. My colleague C.J. can speak to some of the details in terms of the number of towers that Xplornet built. It predates my time at the company.

Xplornet was a partner of EORN. Five years later, EORN has a built network, has transferred the ownership of those assets to Xplornet. To this day, Xplornet continues to work with EORN, providing rural broadband service to residents in the region.

(1645)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Mr. Proctor, can you describe the impact of accessibility to broadband in northern communities, such as Nunavut? How is this impacting people's lives?

Mr. Dean Proctor:

That's a wonderful question. I should almost bring Adamee up to answer it.

Imagine a world where school doesn't go far enough. Often kids have to be sent away to finish high school. In a world where there are no banks, no bricks and mortar, in a world where.... As a friend of mine described it, we're not dealing with a remote area, we're dealing with isolation. This breaks down the barriers. These are the roads that cannot be built to these areas. The communication system is, in fact, the way out. It's the way to communicate, to have contact with the rest of the world. It's a way to complete education, to continue education. It's a way to sell as well as to buy merchandise online. It's a way to carry on banking and government services, and it's—something that I'm sure this entire committee is concerned about—digital democracy. It's really been earth-changing.

I saw all this come through back when we were launching broadband 10 or 15 years ago, but we're seeing it again now with the mobile. In each one of the communities, we go through business readiness testing. We have friendly users making sure the network works. Everybody has an obligation to fill out survey reports.

Some of the stories coming in make you want to cry—they really do—just in terms of the joy and the open feeling that people are receiving from having technology. They know full well it exists, they just don't have access to it. A lot of our friendly users already have their own iPhone and they use it when they're down south. We don't have to give them phones; we just give them a SIM card. The thrill that comes out of that is earth changing. It really is. It makes us feel very good to be able to do it.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Baylis.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like to focus a bit more on how we can help the small companies compete, if I understand it, on two fronts. First of all is funding. It has been alluded to that the government is making one program, and the expectation of that program is so heavy that it works great for these big deals, but when it comes down to little chunks, it's a lot of paperwork or it's too complex.

Am I understanding that right? I think both you, Mr. Proctor, and you, Mr. Stevens, spoke about that.

I'll start with you, Mr. Proctor.

Mr. Dean Proctor:

I would echo the concerns over the amount of paperwork. At the same time, I profoundly believe that a recipient of funding needs to disclose what that funding is being used for. I might go a little further and say that it's one thing to report, but it's another thing to make sure those reports are made publicly available. We may need to do a little more on that one. I know that's not what you're looking at on that, but reporting is a necessary requirement for public funding.

I would be much more concerned about what I call a bait and switch. If somebody receives funding to build out an open-access, “available on a wholesale”, backbone network, and then decides they don't want to open it up or they're going to make it too difficult to open up, that's what I'd be worried about.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Has that happened?

Mr. Dean Proctor:

I certainly hope not.

We are concerned that parties are receiving funding under connect to innovate—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That may or may not open up the backbone.

Mr. Dean Proctor:

That may or may not open up the backbone.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's get back to this question.

Mr. Stevens, it's one thing if I have a ton of paperwork and I'm going to get $100 million, but if I have a ton of paperwork and I'm going to get $1,000, somewhere the math doesn't add up.

Is the government putting out programs that are too paper-heavy for small companies to get proper funding?

Mr. Ian Stevens:

I think the connect to innovate program, as Mr. Proctor alluded to, is fairly well balanced in terms of the reporting requirements. When you're getting big funding, it's nice to know that taxpayer dollars are being nicely shepherded.

There's a business case point; it's probably around $75,000 to $100,000. If the totality of all your projects is smaller than that, then it probably doesn't make sense.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

But is it enough for the small people to get involved? That's what I'm asking.

Is it a barrier, or is it fair? Is it balanced right now?

Mr. Jay Thomson:

It has definitely been a barrier—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

In the past.

Mr. Jay Thomson:

—for a number of our members to get to participate in connect to innovate. The paperwork was too complex, and they would have had to hire an outside consultant.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

There are very small companies that just don't have the....

If we're looking for solutions and we want small companies to go after small areas, we need to make sure we make it easy for them to get on board.

(1650)

Mr. Jay Thomson:

That's our message, yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I want to take the same line of thought now to the topic of spectrum.

I'll start with you, C.J.

I understand that the size of the spectrum when it's being sold covers too much. Let's say it encapsulates much more than I need. I can't afford to buy this whole area, and I'm not interested in serving this whole area. Someone else buys it that might have a great city involved, but then all the rest....

Would a solution be to sell spectrum off in smaller chunks, and/or could you also elaborate on the entry price, please?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

There are some great examples from various ridings represented around this table. One that always springs to mind is Beach Corner near Edmonton. Calgary is another example, and the Toronto licence is a great example.

When you look at a Calgary licence, for example, you'll see that it goes all the way to the B.C. border. It's not really Calgary; it's everything to the west of Calgary, all the way to the border. The Toronto licence goes well beyond and covers the entire green space that surrounds that area.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Calgary is a great example. So, I want Calgary. I'm a big player. I buy Calgary and it costs a ton of money. I'm busy with Calgary for the rest of the time, and I don't care anything about going west of the border.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Such as Jasper, Olds, etc.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Whereas, your company or someone else may say that little bit is interesting to them, but they can't get it because it's been sold.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Exactly.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

A solution would be to be cognizant of this when these boundaries for spectrum sales auctions are being done, such that we don't grab an important city with rural....

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

We looked at it a number of years ago and tried to make some suggestions about how you could look at basically the 12 largest cities in Canada and carve those licences a little differently than they are today to take out a lot of the green space.

Quebec City falls into that, and Ottawa also falls into that category.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So if you happen to be around a big city but not in it, you're really in trouble.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Exactly.

That's why I alluded to Milton, which is one of my favourite little problem areas that we've been trying to deal with.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

It's just outside of Toronto.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

They are literally right at the end of the runway of Pearson International Airport. They're up on top of the escarpment. They can see the big city lights and have some of the worst service in the country, because they're in that Toronto licence and there is just no way of serving them.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

The big guys have been too busy working Toronto.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

And are not interested in low density.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Does anybody want to comment on that? Mr. Thomson.

Mr. Jay Thomson:

One of our proposals is a use-it-or-lose-it approach so that after a certain period of time, if—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

What's the time frame?

Mr. Jay Thomson:

I don't necessarily have a time frame for it.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Put a time frame—

Mr. Jay Thomson:

A reasonable time frame to roll out....

Mr. Frank Baylis:

—that if it's not being used within a certain time, we can claw it back.

Mr. Jay Thomson:

Yes, and make it available to other players.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Mr. Bernier, you have five minutes.

Hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

I want to go on, on these questions on spectrum. I'll give you an example. A couple of years ago, Quebecor bought a lot of spectrum and were not using it, so they decided to sell a part of that spectrum and they made a lot of money from it. If spectrum is available for Calgary, as you said, and more than Calgary, and a corporation doesn't want to serve an area other than Calgary, why not offer to buy part of the spectrum? Can you do that? Is it very difficult to do?

Mr. Ian Stevens:

There's a process whereby you could subordinate the licence, which I think you were talking about, which Quebecor did. There have to be willing partners on both sides. Quebecor was willing to do that in many areas, and London's my favourite area. London is well serviced, but I guess the doughnut around the doughnut hole isn't. Bell and Rogers are not willing to service or subordinate those licences to a third party because they have met the condition of licence as it was written when they acquired the spectrum.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

The answer would be to change the rules of the auction. What would be the best for you, to set aside for sure a smaller area or spectrum, as you just said? What would the best rules be to help you buy some spectrum?

Mr. Ian Stevens:

From my perspective, it would be to be able to participate in the auction upfront, but also a horizon perhaps two years afterwards, where if the spectrum is not being used the licensee could be required to give it back, and by requiring to give it back they would also be incented to subordinate it before they had to return it. It could be an effective way to ensure that the spectrum, the scarce commodity that's out there, is being used in the rural areas.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Okay.

Do you have anything to add?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

That would be consistent with our experience too. Likewise we have approached various larger carriers, trying to get some of those doughnuts, shall we say, and there generally isn't a willingness to do so. Their argument is always that we need it for the transportation corridors. That's why we said in our presentation you really have to say there has to be something for fixed connections to the home.

(1655)

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

This committee visited Washington last year. I'm just looking at my notes from Washington.

Mr. Mitchell, when the spectrum was being discussed at that time, there was mention of the Rural Spectrum Accessibility Act of 2017. Also, on harmonizing the spectrum between Canada and the United States, where the 600-megahertz spectrum aligns with Europe so that phones don't roam seamlessly, and the 700-megahertz spectrum is harmonized, which is good for 5G. Are you aware of the Rural Spectrum Accessibility Act of 2017 and how it's working? How do we harmonize between the two countries, so if we're driving a new autonomous car, or we're working with farm equipment, we have some kind of harmonized system between the two countries?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

I'm afraid that when it comes to spectrum policy, I'm much more limited. It's not a good use of your time to listen to me on that.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay, but we have Canadian companies working in the States. Have you heard of any issues between Canada and the States, in how the companies are operating?

Mr. Christopher Mitchell:

No, I have not. I've done extensive business with Ting every time I've called a call centre; it's located outside Toronto. They have an incredible customer service reputation. I think that's in part due to management, and partly due to people. It's been very successful.

I tend to work with the local groups. I'm aware of Ting because they have been very focused on Internet policy more generally.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'm going to share my time with Mr. Bossio. I know he's itching to get into more technology. It's great to have him subbing today.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Forgive me, Mr. Chair, could I answer part of that question?

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Please do.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

I think you raised a very important point there that may have been missed. You spoke about the 600 and 700 harmonization versus some of the higher level spectrums. It is incredibly important at the 600, 700, and 800 level that it be harmonized because of the cross-border potential for interference. We've seen some of that occurring in even the 2500 right now. There's an issue with Sprint in southern Ontario as a result of those issues. That becomes less and less of a factor the higher up you go because of the propagation characteristics.

When you start to get into the spectrums that are more commonly used for rural broadband, like your 3500s up to maybe the 4200 range, your propagation isn't that big. There are going to be very small areas where you need to harmonize along the border as a result.

Unfortunately, Windsor's always probably going to be a bit of a problem, but throughout the rest of the border, you're probably in pretty good shape because of the limited propagation.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great. Thank you very much.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

[Technical difficulty--Editor] in the fact that there is consideration right now that it might be given over to the local sector. I think it would be important for you to comment on the impact that could have on rural broadband.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Yes, we were highly concerned about that. A couple of years back, there was a suggestion that the urban portion of it, which was very liberally defined, would be taken back and converted into mobile. At that precise moment, I can tell you that was a heart-stopping moment for our company that day because it represented 62% of our fixed wireless potentially being shut off.

We all talk about the same thing, about being in those doughnuts around the cities. That's exactly where a lot of the folks in rural are who need the service. You're quite right; if you take that back to make it mobile, we've got nothing to do it.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Just to put emphasis on that, the Toronto bit of Bell Canada's 3500 goes all the way over to my riding in eastern Ontario, east of Belleville, between Belleville and Kingston, so it is a huge area, just to put that into perspective.

Finally, once again, if we can go back to our earlier conversation around microcells and bringing fibre to the PoP, [Inaudible--Editor] what percentage of rural areas, if we go with that model, that network design model, do you think you'd be able to provide with that 50 to 100 megabit download? For example, if you were to look at my riding or any riding in eastern Ontario, because of Beam EORN, because of your experience there, do you think you'd be able to achieve 100% coverage in those areas if you were to go to a microcell and offload from the larger antennas?

(1700)

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Yes, we do believe we can make significant differences by doing that. Over the years we've looked at one of the questions asked about costs. Obviously, the less dense the population, the higher the cost to provide. In places where the densities are generally over four households per square kilometre, you're absolutely talking about situations where fixed wireless would be appropriate. For example, a good chunk of southern Ontario, certain parts of southern Quebec, and huge chunks of Alberta are all in these areas. The answer is yes. As you start to do those sort of new 5G technologies with the microsites, based on our mapping, a very high percentage of the population would be covered.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

And CTI is what tips it over the top for you to be able to justify it financially.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Absolutely, because obviously, the faster the speeds you're offering and the more data that's going through, the bigger the backhaul and backbone you need behind it in order to achieve that.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I feel like I should have doughnuts here or something. I mean, we keep talking about doughnuts.

That will bring our questions to a conclusion. We will suspend for two minutes and then we will go back in camera to discuss future business.

I would like to thank our guests for coming in today and giving us a lot of great information.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1545)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous. Encore une fois, nous vous présentons nos excuses. Nous avons participé aux votes, et c'est ce qui arrive dans ces-là.

Bienvenue à la 93e réunion du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons notre étude sur la connectivité à large bande au Canada rural.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui, de Canadian Cable Systems Alliance, Jay Thomson, directeur général, et Ian Stevens, membre du conseil d'administration, et directeur général de Execulink.

Par vidéoconférence de Minneapolis, au Minnesota, nous accueillons Christopher Mitchell, directeur, Community Broadband Networks de l'Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

De SSi Micro Ltd, nous accueillons Dean Proctor, directeur de l'expansion de l'entreprise.

Enfin, de Xplornet Communications inc., nous accueillons C.J. Prudham, vice-présidente exécutive, avocate générale, et James Maunder, vice-président, Communications et affaires publiques.

Vous aurez chacun jusqu'à sept minutes pour livrer un bref exposé, et nous passerons ensuite aux questions.

Nous entendrons d'abord les témoins de la Canadian Cable Systems Alliance.

Monsieur Thomson, vous avez la parole.

M. Jay Thomson (directeur général, Canadian Cable Systems Alliance):

Merci. Bonjour, monsieur le président et honorables députés.

Je m'appelle Jay Thomson, et je suis directeur général de la Canadian Cable Systems Alliance, ou la CCSA. Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui d'un membre de notre conseil d'administration, Ian Stevens. Comme on l'a mentionné, il est également directeur général de Execulink Telecom, une entreprise située à Woodstock, dans le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario. Nous sommes heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui pour parler de nos recommandations visant à accroître la portée et la qualité de l'infrastructure à large bande, qui est très importante dans les régions mal desservies du pays.

Nous sommes bien placés pour parler de cet enjeu. En effet, la CCSA représente plus de 110 entreprises indépendantes qui fournissent des services de communication d'un bout à l'autre du Canada. Nos membres servent des centaines de milliers de clients dans environ 1 200 collectivités généralement situées à l'extérieur des grands marchés urbains. Nos membres fournissent des connexions à des Canadiens qui n'auraient peut-être pas autrement accès à des services d'Internet, de télévision ou de téléphone, car ils habitent dans des régions où les principaux intervenants de l'industrie n'ont pas investi. Dans de nombreuses régions rurales du pays, nos membres sont les seuls fournisseurs terrestres de ces services.

Comme les membres du Comité peuvent le constater dans notre mémoire écrit, nous avons formulé plusieurs recommandations concrètes qui, selon nous, contribueront à améliorer la connectivité à large bande au Canada rural.

Dans cet exposé, je soulignerai trois de ces recommandations.

Tout d'abord, le service à large bande devrait être considéré comme étant une infrastructure essentielle aussi importante que l'électricité et les routes. Le gouvernement a réalisé d'importants progrès grâce aux 500 millions de dollars qu'il a investis dans son programme Brancher pour innover, mais ce financement doit être accru. Dans l'économie numérique d'aujourd'hui, il est essentiel que le gouvernement investisse dans l'infrastructure à large bande du pays, comme il le fait pour d'autres infrastructures matérielles jugées essentielles pour le bien-être et l'avenir de nos collectivités.

Il est également important de reconnaître que les régions très éloignées du Canada ne sont pas les seules qui ont besoin des investissements du gouvernement dans leur infrastructure à large bande. Comme Ian peut le confirmer par son expérience personnelle, des régions peu densément peuplées situées très près des marchés principaux auront également souvent besoin de l'intervention du gouvernement pour obtenir les services à large bande dont elles ont besoin.

Notre deuxième recommandation vise à structurer les programmes de financement des services à large bande afin de tirer profit de ressources et de réseaux qui ont déjà été établis par des fournisseurs de services de communication locaux. En effet, les fournisseurs locaux de partout au Canada peuvent ajouter une énorme valeur à l'expansion des services à large bande dans les régions rurales. Puisqu'ils travaillent sur le terrain dans leurs collectivités, les fournisseurs de services locaux comprennent mieux que quiconque les besoins de leurs collectivités. Plus important encore, ce sont les fournisseurs de services locaux qui sont le plus motivés à fournir la connectivité dont leurs collectivités ont besoin pour survivre et prospérer. Pourquoi? Parce qu'ils sont aussi membres de ces collectivités.

En vue d'aider les petits fournisseurs locaux à déployer les services à large bande, à notre avis et selon nos recommandations, le gouvernement devrait adopter un processus de demande et de production de rapports simplifié pour les petits projets. Comme ce sont des entrepreneurs prospères, les fournisseurs locaux savent comment exploiter au maximum chaque dollar qu'ils peuvent recevoir du gouvernement et produire les meilleurs résultats. Si vous surchargez leurs ressources administratives limitées de formalités administratives complexes, vous les exclurez du jeu avant même qu'ils aient eu la chance de participer.

La troisième recommandation que nous aimerions souligner aujourd'hui, c'est que le financement des services à large bande ne devrait pas seulement appuyer des projets d'immobilisations, mais qu'il devrait également contribuer à couvrir les coûts d'exploitation continus et les mises à jour du réseau. À ce jour, les initiatives de financement fédérales ont servi à subventionner seulement les dépenses directes en capital. Toutefois, il est tout aussi important de veiller à ce que les réseaux construits à l'aide de ces fonds soient durables.

À cette fin, les programmes de financement devraient veiller à ce que des liaisons terrestres ou des services de transport soient accessibles aux petits exploitants à un prix raisonnable. De la même façon, les programmes de financement devraient aider à payer les coûts continus liés à l'accès à des structures de soutien tels les poteaux électriques. La question des poteaux électriques est un dossier très important en ce moment, car la Commission de l'énergie de l'Ontario a récemment approuvé d'énormes augmentations des tarifs de location de poteaux que les membres de la CCSA devront payer dans cette province.

Pour les plus petites entreprises qui servent des régions à faible densité de population, où le nombre de poteaux entre les clients est beaucoup plus élevé que dans les régions urbaines, de telles augmentations ont des répercussions négatives disproportionnées. En effet, elles créent une situation dans laquelle, même avec un soutien au financement des immobilisations, l'augmentation des coûts d'exploitation pourrait anéantir la capacité d'une petite entreprise de construire un réseau à large bande durable.

Ainsi, ces types d'augmentation des taux vont directement à l'encontre des objectifs du gouvernement dans le cadre de ses programmes de financement des services à large bande.

Merci, monsieur le président et membres du Comité d'entreprendre cette étude importante et d'avoir invité notre association à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui. Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Mitchell, de l'Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Christopher Mitchell (directeur, Community Broadband Networks, Institute for Local Self-Reliance):

Merci beaucoup. Je vous remercie également de l'invitation. C'est un honneur d'être ici.

Nous avons un ensemble unique de connaissances et d'études liées à la participation des gouvernements dans divers investissements. Je me concentre sur les politiques des gouvernements locaux visant les services à large bande. À l'Institute for Local Self-Reliance, à Minneapolis, j'exécute un programme appelé « réseaux communautaires à large bande ». Ce programme a été mis sur pied en grande partie parce que nous avions l'impression qu'Internet — nous avons reconnu cela il y a environ 12 ans — devenait un outil essentiel pour les entreprises et les économies locales et les enjeux liés à la qualité de vie qui préoccupaient les collectivités. Toutefois, les gouvernements locaux n'avaient pas la capacité d'obliger les fournisseurs existants à répondre aux besoins émergents. Nous avons tenté de trouver des façons par lesquelles les gouvernements locaux pourraient veiller à obtenir les réseaux dont ils avaient besoin, et nous nous sommes donc concentrés sur plusieurs volets.

J'aimerais préciser qu'un nombre limité de gouvernements a lancé ce type d'initiative. Nous recensons les réseaux de gouvernements locaux aux États-Unis et au Canada. Il y en a également plusieurs en Suède. J'ai eu la chance de visiter certains d'entre eux. À part ces réseaux, il n'y en a pas beaucoup. C'est une fonction spécialisée qui est unique à certains pays.

Nous sommes notamment connus pour les activités menées par les gouvernements locaux en vue de construire leurs propres réseaux. Nous utilisons souvent les exemples de Wilson, en Caroline du Nord et de Chattanooga, au Tennessee. Dans le cadre de notre conversation sur les services à large bande dans les régions rurales, je tenais à mentionner ces villes, car leur objectif n'est pas seulement de se servir elles-mêmes — en offrant des services en gigaoctets, des réseaux de grande fiabilité et des prix peu élevés et concurrentiels dans toute la ville. Elles font vraiment un excellent travail à tous les égards. Mais elles ont également l'ambition de servir leurs voisins. Elles aimeraient beaucoup servir les régions rurales environnantes, mais les lois de l'État les en empêchent.

D'autres gouvernements locaux font la même chose dans d'autres États, par exemple au Minnesota, où le gouvernement local de Windom — une ville située dans ce que je considère comme étant une région agricole dans le Sud-Ouest du Minnesota — s'est construit son propre réseau. Il sert environ 4 000 personnes. On a élargi ce réseau pour servir 10 villes situées à proximité et la région agricole située au milieu. Dans ce modèle, les gouvernements locaux qui se concentraient sur les améliorations régionales ont été en mesure de se servir eux-mêmes d'abord et d'étendre ensuite leurs activités dans les régions environnantes.

L'un de nos domaines d'étude concerne plus directement les régions rurales: ce sont nos coopératives de téléphone et d'électricité en milieu rural, qui ont amené les services de téléphone et d'électricité dans la plupart des régions rurales des États-Unis. J'aimerais citer un exemple qu'un grand nombre de personnes trouvent surprenant. En effet, au Dakota du Nord, la vaste majorité du territoire est couvert de fibres optiques. En fait, si vous êtes sur une exploitation agricole du Dakota du Nord, vous avez beaucoup plus de chance d'avoir un accès à un réseau Internet de grande qualité que si vous êtes dans l'un des grands centres. Cela a été réalisé presque complètement grâce aux coopératives, mais également à l'aide d'entreprises locales et indépendantes qui ont réinvesti dans leurs collectivités, car elles se trouvent dans ces collectivités, comme Jay Thomson vient tout juste de le dire dans son commentaire sur les incitatifs pour les entités locales.

Ce sont des villes qui ont construit leurs propres réseaux. Ce sont des coopératives qui ont construit leurs propres réseaux. Nos coopératives d'électricité commencent tout juste à participer à ce type d'initiative. Nous recensons 60 coopératives d'électricité qui offrent des services aux entreprises et aux résidants en plus de leurs propres activités pour maintenir la stabilité du réseau. Nous estimons que d'ici la fin de l'année, il y en aura plus d'une centaine, et possiblement près de 150. À des fins de comparaison, il y a de 800 à 900 coopératives d'électricité aux États-Unis. C'est une augmentation importante.

La dernière chose que nous avons tendance à étudier relativement à ces solutions fournies par les gouvernements locaux et les coopératives locales, ce sont les partenariats. Encore une fois, c'est directement lié au Canada. En effet, l'une des entreprises qui a établi l'un des partenariats les plus prometteurs s'appelle Ting. C'est une entreprise dirigée par des Canadiens qui emploie des Canadiens, et elle mène ses activités presque entièrement aux États-Unis. Elle a établi des partenariats dans le cadre de cinq différents investissements locaux liés à la fibre optique, afin de construire des réseaux de fibres optiques. Elle a également une filiale sans fil qui revend des services sans fil.

Ting a établi un partenariat avec la ville de Westminster, au Maryland — j'ai écrit un rapport sur cette ville —, afin de rendre les taux de couverture universelle abordables. Nous croyons qu'il s'agit d'un modèle de partenariat équilibré dans lequel le gouvernement et le secteur privé partagent les avantages et les inconvénients. Aux États-Unis, il y a beaucoup trop de choses qu'on appelle des partenariats, mais dans lesquels l'un des partenaires s'occupe surtout des risques et l'autre récolte les avantages. Je crois qu'il faut se pencher sur cette situation. L'entreprise Ting représente un modèle dans lequel les deux parties partagent les avantages et les inconvénients.

(1555)



Si je les mentionne, c'est parce qu'elles souhaitent trouver des villes canadiennes avec lesquelles travailler, et cela concerne donc directement le Canada.

J'aimerais mentionner une dernière chose. Pendant que je me préparais pour cette réunion, j'ai examiné certains mémoires. Tout d'abord, le compte rendu contient une grande quantité de très bons renseignements. Toutefois, j'aimerais insister sur une chose: les besoins en matière de connectivité du dernier kilomètre et de connectivité intermédiaire.

Certains programmes se sont trop concentrés sur la connectivité intermédiaire ou autrement dit sur le réseau de base, en connectant un lieu géographique à un autre, plutôt que sur la fibre de distribution, en croyant à tort qu'avec suffisamment de fibres de base, on parviendrait à stimuler les investissements pour les services du dernier kilomètre. Selon notre expérience, cela ne se produit pas. En effet, les facteurs économiques du dernier kilomètre sont problématiques. Ils sont tellement problématiques qu'une connectivité intermédiaire renforcée ne change pas grand-chose.

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec les nombreuses personnes qui ont déclaré que nous devions nous concentrer sur ces deux notions afin de relever ce défi dans les régions rurales.

J'espère pouvoir vous être utile en répondant aux questions liées à mon domaine.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant le témoin de SSi Micro.

Monsieur Proctor, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dean Proctor (directeur de l'expansion de l'entreprise, SSi Micro Ltd.):

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais remercier les membres du Comité de me donner l'occasion de contribuer à leur étude et de discuter de plans visant à améliorer la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais prendre quelques secondes pour saluer un très bon ami qui se trouve dans la salle, c'est-à-dire Adamee Itorcheak. Je n'étais pas sûr qu'il serait ici aujourd'hui. Adamee est assis à l'arrière. C'est le fondateur de Nunanet Worldwide Communications, le premier fournisseur de services Internet au Nunavut. Il était également membre du Groupe de travail national sur les services à large bande en 2001; il s'intéresse donc énormément aux travaux du Comité.

Je suis très heureux qu'Adamee soit ici aujourd'hui.

Je vais vous donner un aperçu de SSi et de nos activités dans le Nord, mais je me concentrerai sur les politiques qui, selon nous, amélioreront la connectivité de façon durable dans toutes les régions rurales et éloignées du Canada. Ces politiques permettront aux talents locaux d'utiliser leur ingéniosité, afin de créer des modèles réellement canadiens et nordiques qui peuvent être exportés à l'échelle mondiale.

Tout d'abord, nous croyons que pour fournir des services à large bande attirants et abordables dans les régions rurales et éloignées, le cadre stratégique doit appuyer le développement de talents locaux, ce qui repose sur trois principes bien établis. Tout d'abord, la neutralité concurrentielle et technologique, deuxièmement, le financement de l'infrastructure de transport de base, et troisièmement, un accès ouvert à tous les fournisseurs de services aux installations de base et aux portes d'entrée. Je suis heureux de vous dire que ISDE et le CRTC ont déjà commencé à mettre en oeuvre un grand nombre de changements stratégiques nécessaires depuis que le Comité a lancé ses travaux, mais il reste encore du travail à faire. Il est de plus en plus évident que le gouvernement et l'industrie doivent défendre le bon travail et les changements déjà en cours.

Qu'est-ce que SSi? Nous avons été créés dans le Nord canadien, où se situe notre siège social. Nous sommes une entreprise familiale créée il y a 28 ans par Jeff et Stef Philipp. Nos origines remontent encore plus loin, c'est-à-dire au Snowshoe Inn, d'où SSi tire son nom. Cette auberge a été fondée il y a 54 ans par les parents de Jeff dans la collectivité de Fort Providence, aux Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

Nous nous spécialisons dans la connectivité des régions éloignées, nous fournissons des services à large bande, des services sans fil et d'autres services de communications à l'échelle du Nord canadien. Nous avons également mené des projets en Afrique, dans le Pacifique Sud et en Asie du Sud-Est. Notre mission est de veiller à ce que toutes les collectivités du Nord aient accès à des services à large bande abordables et de grande qualité. Pour y parvenir, nous avons énormément investi dans l'infrastructure et les installations. En 2005, nous avons construit et lancé le réseau Qiniq, afin de fournir des services à large bande abordables aux 25 collectivités du Nunavut. Des investissements effectués par le gouvernement fédéral ont couvert une partie du coût initial du transport par satellite et de l'infrastructure. Depuis ce temps, nous avons co-investi plus de 150 millions de dollars dans l'infrastructure du Nunavut, et nous avons versé plus de 10 millions de dollars à nos fournisseurs de services de la collectivité. Nos agents locaux ont été essentiels à notre réussite dans chacune de nos 25 collectivités.

En septembre 2015, nous avons annoncé des investissements de 75 millions de dollars dans l'avenir des services à large bande au Nunavut, et cela inclut 35 millions de dollars dans le cadre du programme Un Canada branché de ISDE pour l'achat d'une capacité de transmission par satellite. Nous nous sommes directement engagés à verser plus de 40 millions de dollars pour une capacité de transmission par satellite supplémentaire et des mises à jour à l'échelle du réseau dans l'infrastructure de base et dans l'infrastructure du dernier kilomètre sur tout le territoire.

Qiniq, le service à large bande, a amélioré la vie des Nunavummiuts en leur fournissant un accès économique à des services à large bande. C'était impossible auparavant. En effet, avant 2005, la plupart des utilisateurs n'avaient pas accès à l'infrastructure à large bande. Grâce à Qiniq, pour la première fois, chacune des collectivités du Nunavut a accès à des services Internet abordables au même prix, ce qui a immédiatement permis aux consommateurs d'entrer dans l'ère numérique.

Maintenant, grâce à nos derniers investissements, nous réalisons une autre première. En effet, depuis le 1er février, la semaine dernière, les habitants de Clyde River et de Chesterfield Inlet ont accès à des services de transmission de la voix et des données sans fil pour la première fois. Jusqu'à maintenant, dans la plus grande partie du territoire du Nunavut, il n'y avait aucun accès à des services sans fil. Nous avons terminé le déploiement des services sans fil de SSi à l'échelle du territoire, et tous les habitants profiteront bientôt de la dernière génération de technologies 4G LTE — nous la mettons en oeuvre graduellement dans les collectivités —, et ce, au même niveau de service et au même prix que dans toutes les autres collectivités.

Le nouveau système 4G LTE permet d'offrir des services sans fil à large bande de haute performance en matière de transmission de la voix et des données, de télémétrie, de vidéoconférence, etc. Il offre également, pour la toute première fois, une solution de rechange moins dispendieuse et plus polyvalente à l'ancien téléphone fixe. Afin de rendre le service unique, nous avons éliminé les frais interurbains entre les collectivités, ce qui a permis de rapprocher les familles.

Notre entreprise est aux premières lignes. Nous connaissons les répercussions positives des technologies de l'information, et nous les vivons quotidiennement. Nous observons les répercussions positives de nos investissements sur les consommateurs, les organismes et les petites entreprises du Nunavut. Malheureusement, ces dernières années, l'augmentation continuelle des tarifs de transfert des données et la demande correspondante sur la faible capacité de base ont posé des défis importants aux systèmes de communications dans l'Arctique.

(1600)



Alors que nous avons déjà fait d'énormes progrès pour combler l'écart, nous voyons de nouveau le fossé numérique s'élargir entre le nord et le sud du pays.

Afin d'améliorer la connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées, il est essentiel d'investir dans une meilleure technologie du dernier kilomètre. Soyons clairs: SSi a déployé dans toutes les communautés du Nunavut une infrastructure du dernier kilomètre capable d'offrir la même qualité de service mobile et à large bande que l'on retrouve au centre-ville d'Ottawa. Je peux utiliser mes iPhone 6 et iPhone 7 dans chacune de ces 25 communautés aussi bien qu'ici.

Afin que les gens du Nord puissent profiter pleinement de ces nouvelles technologies du dernier kilomètre, il est urgent de faire d'autres investissements importants dans la capacité de base globale. À cet égard, décembre 2016 a été un mois critique dans l'évolution de la politique de télécommunications au Canada. Les nouvelles politiques reconnaissent qu'il est essentiel d'avoir accès à un service à large bande. Aussi, elles introduisent des changements majeurs aux programmes et lancent de nouvelles initiatives d'investissement public dans l'infrastructure à large bande de base.

Ces avancées sont importantes et, à notre avis, il revient au Comité de les reconnaître, de les promouvoir et de les protéger. Ensemble, ces politiques stratégiques tracent la voie qui permettra au talent local de s'illustrer, car elles s'éloignent d'un soutien exclusif aux entreprises de téléphonie qui ont échoué à offrir un service à large bande à de nombreux Canadiens dans des régions rurales et éloignées, et ce, malgré plus d'un centenaire de soutien public. Le défi qui nous attend tous, y compris ce comité, c'est de ne pas répéter les erreurs du passé. S'il faut investir dans les infrastructures de communication des régions rurales et éloignées — et nous croyons que c'est le cas —, le processus d'investissement doit être transparent et l'infrastructure en question doit être accessible à tous afin de soutenir la concurrence, d'encourager plus d'investissement et d'innovation et d'offrir aux consommateurs plus de choix.

Le 15 décembre 2016, ISDE a lancé son programme Brancher pour innover. Pour la première fois, des fonds publics ont été affectés au développement de réseaux libre accès de base accessible au prix de gros. Susan Hart, directrice générale d'ISDE pour le programme, est venue témoigner devant vous en novembre.

SSi appuie sans réserve cette approche libre accès. Lorsque l'investissement public se concentre sur l'infrastructure de base et qu'il est obligatoire que cette infrastructure soit accessible au prix du gros, cela encourage des entreprises du secteur privé comme la nôtre à investir dans le dernier kilomètre et à innover, ce qui permet aux consommateurs d'avoir plus de choix en matière de technologie et de fournisseurs de services.

Et, c'est important. Comme l'a démontré SSi au Nunavut et ailleurs, il est possible de mettre en place des réseaux d'accès locaux de qualité dans les régions éloignées, en grande partie, grâce aux avancées technologiques, notamment les technologies IP et du sans-fil.

Le CRTC est également venu témoigner devant vous en novembre soulignant non seulement que le service à large bande est maintenant un service essentiel, mais annonçant également la création d'un nouveau fonds important dont les règles d'utilisation doivent encore être définies. Mais, comme c'est souvent, le diable est dans les détails. Nous devons nous assurer que les politiques sont mises en oeuvre comme prévu et que l'inertie, la négligence et le mandat ne redonnent pas le monopole total où ce sont les compagnies de téléphonie titulaire qui reçoivent tous les fonds publics, leur permettant de restreindre l'accès de leurs concurrents à leurs réseaux financés par le public, et de limiter l'arrivée de nouveaux investissements et les choix des consommateurs.

Nous espérons que vous reconnaîtrez également que les trois principes que j'ai soulignés plus tôt sont nécessaires pour soutenir le talent local. Ces principes sont: la neutralité technologique; le financement axé sur l'infrastructure de base; et un accès ouvert, de façon à ce que tous les fournisseurs de services locaux puissent offrir un libre accès abordable à la connectivité de base.

En résumé, même si nous avons fait beaucoup de progrès, il reste encore du travail à faire pour améliorer la connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées du Canada.

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

(1605)

[Français]

J'aimerais remercier le Comité de m'avoir donné l'occasion de faire ma présentation devant vous aujourd'hui.

Je serai très heureux de répondre à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Finalement, nous entendrons l'exposé de Mme C.J. Prudham, d'Xplornet.

Mme Christine J. Prudham (vice-présidente exécutive, avocate générale, Xplornet Communications inc.):

Bonjour. Mon nom est C.J. Prudham, vice-présidente exécutive et avocate générale chez Xplornet Communications inc. Je suis accompagnée aujourd'hui de James Maunder, vice-président, Communications et affaires publiques.

Merci de nous avoir invités. Nous sommes heureux de pouvoir participer à cette étude du Comité sur la connectivité à large bande au Canada rural. Chez Xplornet, c'est un sujet que nous comprenons très bien. Notre entreprise a été créée il y a plus de 10 ans avec la mission simple d'offrir à tous les Canadiens un accès abordable à une connexion haute vitesse à large bande. C'est ce qui nous motive.

Aujourd'hui, Xplornet est le huitième fournisseur de services Internet en importance au Canada et le seul dans le top 10 à se concentrer exclusivement sur le Canada rural. Nous sommes vraiment une entreprise nationale. Nous offrons nos services à plus de 350 000 foyers ou plus de 800 000 Canadiens chaque jour dans chaque province et territoire. Ce que nous souhaitons, c'est que tous les Canadiens en milieu rural, peu importe où, aient accès à une connexion abordable.

Chez Xplornet, notre objectif est d'offrir à nos clients en milieu rural un accès Internet dont la vitesse est la même que celle offerte dans les grandes villes canadiennes. Comme nous l'avons annoncé en 2015, d'ici 2020, nous offrirons des forfaits pour une connexion à 100 Mbps sur tout le territoire que nous desservons, soit le double de la cible fixée par le CRTC.

Comme l'ont souligné d'autres témoins avant nous, en raison de la géographie du Canada, il est nécessaire de disposer d'une variété de technologies — fibre, sans fil fixe et satellite — pour brancher le pays. Grâce à toutes ces technologies, nous pouvons y arriver.

La densité moyenne de la population canadienne est d'un peu moins de quatre Canadiens par kilomètre carré. Pourtant, aujourd'hui, 99 % des Canadiens ont accès à une connexion Internet, y compris 95 % des Canadiens en milieu rural. Le Canada pointe au quatrième rang des pays du G20 pour le nombre de connexions à large bande par habitant dont la vitesse dépasse 15 mégabits par seconde.

Nous y sommes parvenus à force de travail, d'innovation et d'investissements sans précédent du secteur public. Au cours des cinq dernières années, Xplornet a investi plus de 1 milliard de dollars dans son réseau, se concentrant uniquement à offrir un meilleur service au Canada rural. Il ne fait aucun doute que d'autres fournisseurs de services vous partageront leurs propres données.

Maintenant que la couverture s'étend pratiquement sur tout le territoire du pays, la question est de savoir comment continuer à répondre aux besoins grandissants des consommateurs en matière de vitesse de connexion et de données. L'introduction de réseaux 5G et de l'Internet des objets transforme notre vie quotidienne. D'ici 24 mois, le foyer canadien moyen aura entre 15 et 20 appareils branchés à Internet.

M. James Maunder (vice-président, Communications et affaires publiques, Xplornet Communications inc.):

Donc, comment faire pour que le Canada rural suive le rythme? À notre avis, il y a trois éléments clés à respecter pour atteindre cet objectif. Premièrement, l'investissement du secteur privé. Deuxièmement, un investissement public ciblé. Troisièmement, le spectre.

À notre avis, le premier enjeu serait que les gouvernements créent des conditions favorables pour permettre aux entreprises de continuer à investir de façon agressive dans leurs réseaux. Parfois, il suffit que les gouvernements se tiennent à l'écart. Après tout, l'objectif devrait être d'offrir des solutions durables là où les réseaux sont économiquement viables afin que les entreprises privées puissent continuer à investir pour répondre aux demandes grandissantes des consommateurs. Mais, dans certaines régions, il faudra également un investissement public ciblé. À cet égard, Xplornet a soutenu le gouvernement du Canada et travaillé en étroite collaboration avec lui par l'entremise de ses divers programmes de financement, soit Large bande Canada, Un Canada branché, et, le plus récent, Brancher pour innover.

Un des points sur lesquels la plupart des entreprises s'entendent, y compris Xplornet, c'est la nécessité d'avoir un réseau de base solide pour encourager l'investissement et le développement d'une capacité dans les régions rurales. D'autres témoins aujourd'hui en ont parlé.

Chez Xplornet, nous croyons que le programme Brancher pour innover du gouvernement du Canada est un excellent point de départ. De même, les détails du régime de financement d'un service à large bande du CRTC, annoncés il y a un an, restent à peaufiner et nous attendons plus de détails au sujet de ce fonds. À notre avis, tous les fournisseurs de services devraient être impatients d'obtenir des précisions concernant ces programmes et la coordination de ceux-ci afin de pouvoir accélérer leurs propres plans d'investissement.

Finalement, nous croyons qu'il est nécessaire d'avoir un accès cohérent et fiable au spectre sans fil afin de nourrir nos réseaux à l'échelle du Canada rural. Bien entendu, ces politiques sont définies par Innovation, Science et Développement économique Canada.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous tenons à souligner qu'au cours des dernières années, l'explosion de la consommation de données est la même dans le Canada rural que dans le Canada urbain. La consommation de données chez nos clients ruraux à l'échelle de notre réseau LTE a doublé au cours de la dernière année et dépasse les 100 gigabits par mois, ce qui correspond aux données du CRTC quant à la consommation moyenne des Canadiens. Plus de 60 % de cette consommation est attribuable au visionnement de vidéos, ce qui, encore une fois, correspond aux moyennes nationales.

Bien que la consommation des données mobiles ait, elle aussi, augmenté de façon importante, la connexion fixe à domicile continue d'être la principale source de consommation pour les services comme Netflix et Apple TV. Pourtant, toutes les attributions de fréquence importantes au Canada au cours des cinq dernières années se sont concentrées sur les besoins en données mobiles. Aucune attribution n'a été faite pour le sans-fil fixe à large bande. Comment peut-on continuer de répondre aux besoins des consommateurs si l'un des principaux facteurs n'a pas été modifié?

Nous croyons fermement qu'une stratégie à long terme en matière de spectre devrait être adoptée afin de permettre au service rural à large bande de suivre le rythme. La capacité et la vitesse de la connexion à large bande en milieu rural ne peuvent suivre le rythme sans un spectre additionnel.

Cette stratégie repose sur un plan qui établit un équilibre entre un élargissement de la large bande mobile et de la large bande rurale fixe afin de répondre aux besoins des consommateurs. L'élargissement de l'un ne peut pas se faire aux dépens de l'autre. Les clients des régions rurales ne peuvent pas être laissés-pour-compte.

En résumé, Xplornet est d'avis que trois facteurs critiques doivent être maîtrisés afin de créer des conditions favorables à une connectivité rurale à large bande.

Tous les ordres de gouvernement doivent permettre au secteur privé de faire ce qu'il fait le mieux, soit investir dans les réseaux en fonction de la demande des consommateurs. Xplornet a prouvé qu'il est avantageux d'investir dans le Canada rural.

Le deuxième critère est un investissement public ciblé dans le transport par fibre et les services de liaison pouvant aider à accélérer le déploiement de la large bande dans les régions rurales. Ce soutien devrait être encouragé lorsqu'il est coordonné et assujetti à la consultation du secteur privé.

Finalement, le Canada rural doit avoir accès au spectre dont il a besoin pour suivre le rythme avec le Canada urbain. C'est ce qui permettra aux réseaux ruraux de demeurer en vie.

Encore une fois, je vous remercie de nous avoir invités à témoigner. Nous serons heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à tous les témoins pour ces exposés.

Si nous restons brefs, nous devrions être en mesure de terminer une série de questions.

Commençons dès maintenant.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai plusieurs questions à poser à plusieurs d'entre vous. Je vais commencer tout de suite en m'adressant à M. Thomson.

Je voulais simplement vous remercier pour les commentaires que vous avez formulés au sujet des poteaux électriques. Nous avons un projet en cours dans ma circonscription et la principale difficulté est l'inspection de 46 000 poteaux électriques. Il s'agit d'un élément important du programme Brancher pour innover. Mais, je ne m'attarderai pas sur le sujet.

Je tiens vraiment à m'entretenir avec Chris Mitchell.

Récemment, j'ai rencontré Will Aycock et Brittany Smith, de Wilson, en Caroline du Nord. Je crois que vous les connaissez. Ils m'ont recommandé de m'adresser à vous. Je suis donc très heureux d'avoir l'occasion de m'entretenir avec vous. Merci d'avoir accepté notre invitation.

Vous dites que beaucoup d'États, il est maintenant illégal de créer un service à large bande communautaire. Pourriez-vous nous donner un peu plus de détails à ce sujet?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Certainement. On note une tendance marquée depuis le passage d'une réglementation monopolistique à une réglementation de concurrence. Il y a eu beaucoup de débats dans la plupart de nos États sur le rôle des administrations locales à ce sujet. Selon les dossiers consultés, le congrès fédéral souhaitait inclure les administrations locales dans le groupe des concurrents, mais, depuis, certains États ont abandonné cette idée. Moins de la moitié de nos États ont limité les administrations locales à cet égard, mais environ 20 États ont imposé des restrictions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce que j'ai appris, c'est qu'en Caroline du Nord, il est maintenant illégal, par exemple, pour un nouveau fournisseur de services de ne faire aucun profit avec son premier client. C'est le genre de tactique utilisée pour imposer des restrictions. On ne dit pas qu'on ne peut pas agir de la sorte, mais des obstacles sont érigés. Qui est derrière ces obstacles?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Il s'agit définitivement des entreprises de téléphonie et de câblodistribution. Certaines petites entreprises de téléphonie et de câblodistribution s'inquiètent également de la participation des administrations locales, mais ce sont presque toujours les grandes entreprises qui sont derrière ce genre de législation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que recommandez-vous au Canada pour éviter cette situation?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Je crois que les exemples d'Olds et de Campbell River montrent qu'il est nécessaire d'accorder plus de liberté aux administrations locales afin qu'elles puissent mener des expériences là où la situation le permet. Selon notre expérience, les administrations locales n'entreprennent pas de tâches aussi grandes et difficiles, à moins que le besoin soit énorme, parce que a) ils ne seront pas réélus, et b) ce genre de projet est très difficile et les administrations locales ont habituellement suffisamment de problèmes à régler sans entreprendre de tels projets.

Nous croyons qu'il est inapproprié de mettre ainsi des bâtons dans les roues des administrations locales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais une dernière question à vous poser au sujet du Broadband Communities Summit, au Texas. Est-ce utile pour nous d'être au courant de cet événement?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Je le crois. Il s'agit d'un événement merveilleux. Il y a souvent des Canadiens qui y participent. Au fil des ans, j'y ai rencontré de nombreux Canadiens, notamment de l'Alberta. C'est donc un événement qui, selon eux, en vaut le déplacement.

(1615)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser aux représentants de Xplornet.

Vous dites que vous offrez vos services dans 350 000 foyers et que 95 p. 100 des Canadiens en milieu rural ont accès à une connexion. Je ne connais pas beaucoup de clients satisfaits de Xplornet dans ma circonscription. Donc, je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion de m'entretenir avec vous.

J'ai reçu récemment dans le courrier un dépliant de Xplornet. On me proposait une offre de 25 gigabits à une vitesse de 5 mégabits par seconde pour 40 $ pour les six premiers mois, et pour 65 $ par mois par la suite. Lorsqu'on lit les petits caractères imprimés, on remarque qu'il est écrit « jusqu'à » 5 mégabits, et que, pour 100 $ par mois, la vitesse est « jusqu'à » 10 mégabits.

Pourriez-vous me dire les vitesses réelles dont profitent vos clients aujourd'hui?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Ce que vous soulevez est une question de marketing. Il est habituel pour la plupart des fournisseurs de services d'utiliser l'expression « jusqu'à » dans leurs publicités. La raison est qu'Internet est une ressource partagée. Il est donc impossible de garantir la vitesse, à moins d'avoir une ligne dédiée à cette connexion. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous utilisons fréquemment l'expression « jusqu'à » pour parler de la vitesse de la connexion.

La vitesse de la connexion du client moyen dépend d'où il se trouve sur le réseau et de la plateforme qu'il utilise, notamment. Nous avons toutes ces statistiques. Nous disposons de plus de 2 000 tours. Donc, c'est assez large.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends en ce qui a trait aux tours, mais je fais référence ici au service par satellite, service qui est offert dans ma région. Xplornet n'a aucune tour ma région. D'autres WISP sont offerts par les tours qui existent.

La plainte que je reçois des citoyens à mon bureau — car, l'accès Internet est le principal enjeu dans ma circonscription —, c'est que Xplornet fait de la publicité pour un service de 5 mégabits ou de 10 mégabits par seconde, mais que, lorsqu'on effectue une vérification de la vitesse de connexion, même lorsque tout va bien, on atteint peut-être une vitesse de 1 mégabit par seconde. Auriez-vous un commentaire à formuler à ce sujet?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Encore une fois, il faudrait que je sache sur quelle plateforme satellite sont ces clients. Je serai heureuse de vous faire parvenir l'information relative au faisceau utilisé dans votre circonscription, car je n'ai pas cette information avec moi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Si vos clients dépassent la consommation qui leur est allouée, est-ce que vous les faites passer au prochain forfait ou vous interrompez leur service? Est-ce que vous leur facturez une somme supplémentaire? Comment fonctionnez-vous?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous laissons le consommateur choisir. C'est très important pour nous d'offrir ce choix à nos clients, afin de les aider à contrôler les dépenses de leur ménage.

Nous leur permettons d'acheter des données supplémentaires s'ils en viennent à dépasser leur limite mensuelle. S'ils préfèrent plutôt avoir un tarif fixe — et étonnamment, beaucoup penchent pour cette option —, nous pouvons alors ralentir le débit de leur connexion.

C'est à eux de choisir la solution qui leur convient.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bien.

Vous avez parlé des milliers de tours que compte votre réseau LTE à l'échelle du pays. Quelle proportion vos services terrestres occupent-ils maintenant?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Je suis désolée, mais je ne comprends pas la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'offre de Xplornet était initialement fondée sur le réseau satellite, mais vous vous tournez de plus en plus vers la technologie sans fil dans diverses régions du pays. Pouvez-vous nous dire où vous en êtes à cet égard?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous sommes en affaires depuis 2004-2005, et depuis 2007 au moins, nos installations sont partagées également entre la technologie satellite et la technologie sans fil fixe. Nous sommes à 50-50. En fait, c'est assez unique en Amérique du Nord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cette offre se concentre dans une région particulière?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Non. Nous déployons notre technologie sans fil fixe un peu partout. Nos plus grandes installations sont en Ontario et en Alberta, mais nous en avons aussi évidemment au Québec, et maintenant en Saskatchewan, au Nouveau-Brunswick et à Terre-Neuve, et nous travaillons sur l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et le Manitoba.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Merci.

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes, alors je vais m'adresser à vous très rapidement, monsieur Proctor. Vous avez dit que vos iPhones fonctionnent au Nunavut et dans toutes les collectivités du Nord. Est-ce que vous offrez aussi la téléphonie cellulaire?

M. Dean Proctor:

Nous avons un réseau de téléphonie cellulaire, alors nous...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et comment cela fonctionne?

M. Dean Proctor:

Cela fonctionne à merveille.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux plutôt savoir comment cela fonctionne, concrètement. Vous avez votre propre réseau cellulaire, ou vous revendez le signal d'autres fournisseurs?

M. Dean Proctor:

Nous avons notre propre infrastructure.

Comme je le disais, nous avons inauguré jeudi dernier notre service mobile. Et, en fait, il ne s'agit pas d'un simple service Internet sans fil, c'est une entreprise de services locaux concurrents. Il y a quelques années, nous avons percé le marché local, qui était probablement le dernier monopole réglementé et protégé du monde occidental. Nous faisons maintenant concurrence à Northwestel en offrant un service de téléphonie locale par l'entremise de notre propre réseau mobile. C'est par ailleurs un réseau 4G LTE; on passe donc de la 0G à la 4G.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé, alors merci beaucoup.

Le président:

La parole est à vous, monsieur Eglinski. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Je vais d'abord m'adresser à M. Mitchell.

Vous savez peut-être que le gouvernement canadien utilise actuellement un modèle hexagonal pour dresser la carte des services résidentiels. Nous choisissons normalement une résidence pour tester la vitesse de connexion et vérifier qu'elle satisfait aux normes, mais il est possible qu'une douzaine de résidences avoisinantes ne bénéficient pas du même accès. Quel est le modèle utilisé aux États-Unis?

(1620)

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Nous avons recours à des îlots de recensement, qui sont généralement de formes irrégulières. Nous avons sensiblement la même approche. Si une [Inaudible] a accès au service, on considère que l'îlot est desservi. La Federal Communications Commission tente actuellement de déterminer s'il serait préférable d'indiquer que les régions sont desservies en tout ou en partie, ce qui permettrait en quelque sorte d'éliminer cette ambiguïté.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous disiez tout à l'heure que dans votre coin de pays, la fibre optique est omniprésente.

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Au Dakota du Nord, oui. J'ai cru que la comparaison serait davantage pertinente pour la Saskatchewan et quelques-unes des autres provinces.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Quel est le niveau de service? De combien de mégaoctets parle-t-on en moyenne?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Cela varie, mais environ la moitié des connexions atteignent un gigaoctet, si je ne me trompe pas. D'autres fournisseurs n'offrent peut-être pas une telle vitesse, mais avec quelques mises à niveau rudimentaires, il est possible d'atteindre un gigaoctet.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question est pour Xplornet. Monsieur Maunder, je n'ai pas entendu tous vos commentaires, mais vous avez parlé d'ingérence gouvernementale. Est-ce que le gouvernement empêche votre entreprise d'offrir des services et d'élargir sa clientèle?

M. James Maunder:

Nous avons relevé trois principes fondamentaux. Je vais commencer par la fin et remonter à la source. Le troisième principe est celui de l'accès au spectre. Le deuxième est le financement public. Et le premier, comme vous l'avez si bien dit, veut que tous les ordres de gouvernement laissent le champ libre au secteur privé pour qu'il puisse élargir activement son réseau, et ce, de façon continue.

Dans le secteur des télécommunications, les choses évoluent très rapidement et les innovations se succèdent à un rythme remarquable. Au cours des cinq dernières années, Xplornet a à elle seule investi plus de 1 milliard de dollars dans son réseau de technologie sans fil fixe et de technologie satellite. D'autres témoins et d'autres fournisseurs viendront sans doute vous faire part de statistiques semblables. Il suffit de comparer l'industrie d'il y a cinq ans à celle d'aujourd'hui pour voir l'énorme transformation qui s'est opérée. Nous avons investi 1 milliard de dollars, et d'autres pourront vous en dire autant.

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est que nous faisons partie du gouvernement, alors je suis curieux de connaître les barrières que pose le secteur public. Faut-il blâmer les lourdeurs bureaucratiques ou quelque chose d'autre?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Nous tentons de remédier à cela.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous nous considérons chanceux à bien des égards de pouvoir représenter Xplornet ici aujourd'hui. Nous avons eu des débuts tout à fait modestes à Woodstock, au Nouveau-Brunswick. Nous avons été entièrement financés par des sources privées, et c'est ainsi que nous avons entrepris l'aventure. Puis, le CRTC a rendu sa décision sur le compte de report. Cette décision, qui a essentiellement remis à Bell Canada plus de 300 millions de dollars pour faire concurrence à la petite entreprise qu'était Xplornet, nous a presque anéantis. Dans la foulée de cette décision, nous n'avons pas pu obtenir de fonds privés pendant 18 mois. Nous avons cru que c'était la fin de notre entreprise.

Par une chance inouïe, Bell n'a pas réussi à respecter le calendrier établi. Ces énormes retards sont de notoriété publique, et c'est essentiellement ce qui a sauvé notre entreprise à ce moment-là. Autrement, jamais notre minuscule entreprise de l'époque n'aurait pu tenir le coup face à un concurrent qui venait d'hériter de 300 millions de dollars. C'est sans surprise que les intérêts privés choisissent d'investir ailleurs quand d'importantes subventions sont accordées dans un secteur. Je suis persuadée que ce n'est pas votre intention.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Monsieur Proctor, quelle technologie utilisez-vous pour desservir votre collectivité? Avez-vous recours à la fibre optique ou à une technologie à distance?

M. Dean Proctor:

Nous utilisons la fibre optique. Au Nunavut, c'est en fait le service gouvernemental de réseau optique. Le gouvernement du Nunavut est un de nos clients, et il a établi son propre réseau optique. Nous acheminons le signal à ses locaux par l'entremise de son propre réseau. Pour ce qui est des consommateurs, des petits bureaux et des bureaux à domicile, tout est sans fil. Ce service remonte à 2004-2005. Nous avons construit notre réseau sans fil à large bande, une technologie qui s'appelle WiMAX. Nous avons depuis adopté les technologies 4G LTE et 2G GSN, encore une fois sans fil. La vitesse atteinte est phénoménale; on surpasse de beaucoup les objectifs de 50 en téléchargement et de 10 en téléversement du CRTC. C'est bien plus rapide encore au dernier kilomètre. Notre problème se situe au niveau de l'épine dorsale.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je vais revenir à vous, monsieur, puisqu'on pourrait difficilement trouver un meilleur représentant des régions rurales et éloignées.

M. Dean Proctor:

Mon accent saskatchewanais refait surface.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Concernant le dernier kilomètre et les technologies à large bande, quelle est la meilleure chose que nous puissions faire pour le Canada rural? Quels sont les meilleurs systèmes à employer?

(1625)

M. Dean Proctor:

Tout dépend de votre utilisation et de ce que vous voulez faire. Nous préconisons évidemment les technologies sans fil et mobiles, le réseau 4G LTE, bientôt le réseau 5G. Si vous parlez d'une connexion individuelle à une demeure ou à une entreprise, bien sûr, la crème est la fibre optique, mais est-ce pratique dans toutes les régions?

Une des choses que nous avons constatées dans de nombreuses petites collectivités, c'est que le réseau 4G LTE nous permet de surpasser les besoins individuels. C'est une technologie incroyable. La réponse est que cela dépend. C'est la réponse typique des ingénieurs, mais c'est vrai. Si vous pouvez fournir la fibre optique, tant mieux. Toutefois, pour la grande majorité des régions rurales et éloignées, nous recommandons les solutions sans fil, fixes ou mobiles — nous préférons les solutions mobiles.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Quelle est la différence de coûts entre, disons, la fibre optique et ce que vous faites? Est-elle beaucoup plus chère?

M. Dean Proctor:

La fibre optique est considérablement plus chère, oui.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Je pense que mon temps de parole est pratiquement écoulé.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci aux témoins de leur présence.

Je vais m'adresser d'abord à M. Mitchell, mais je demanderais à tous de répondre.

D'après moi, il est évident que la décision des États-Unis d'abandonner la neutralité du Net a des répercussions importantes jusque sur les politiques gouvernementales concernant l'affectation des ressources et les décisions relatives à la connectivité. Il y aura manifestement un changement de comportement et un accès commercial aux renseignements personnels qui ne seront plus fondés uniquement sur le modèle de la neutralité du Net. Franchement, on s'expose maintenant à un type précis de relation qui diffère de ce qu'on a connu dans le passé.

Je ne m'attends pas à ce que vous ayez une réponse, mais quelles sont les répercussions pour les responsables des politiques comme moi, qui croient à la neutralité du Net, mais qui se heurtent maintenant — surtout ici au Canada, car les sources et les effets viennent aussi des États-Unis — au rejet de certains de ces principes? On compare ce service aux autoroutes, mais le fait est que nous construisons maintenant des autoroutes à péage pour certaines destinations.

Si vous avez des observations à ce sujet, j'aimerais les entendre, en commençant par le côté américain et M. Mitchell, puis en poursuivant avec le point de vue canadien.

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Je vais résumer ma réponse en deux brèves observations, car c'est un sujet très profond. Premièrement, environ 100 millions d'Américains peuvent seulement obtenir l'accès Internet à large bande d'un grand fournisseur qui, selon les prévisions, commencera bientôt à violer la neutralité du réseau. C'est donc une profonde préoccupation, et des gouvernements municipaux commencent à songer à construire leurs propres réseaux ou à faire du maintien de la neutralité du réseau une condition d'utilisation, par exemple, des services de transmission. Les États fondent de plus en plus leurs décisions relatives à l'approvisionnement sur la neutralité des réseaux. Par exemple, le Montana peut seulement acheter une connexion d'une entreprise qui offre un réseau neutre.

Deuxièmement, l'abandon de la neutralité du Net ne durera probablement pas très longtemps, en raison des réactions négatives qu'il suscite. Que ce soit sous l'administration actuelle ou la suivante, je m'attends à ce qu'une coalition encore plus grande se forme pour défendre Internet de façon plus vaste. D'après moi, c'est un changement positif, et il me donne espoir pour l'ensemble des secteurs.

M. Dean Proctor:

La neutralité du Net est un sujet difficile. Les membres de notre entreprise sont des pionniers d'Internet. Ce serait amusant que vous veniez rencontrer certains de nos membres fondateurs. Nous croyons fermement à l'ouverture d'Internet.

Or, la question peut aussi être envisagée sous un autre angle, celui du contrôle du contenu. C'est une chose de bloquer du contenu ou d'en privilégier, mais au Canada, où une seule entreprise contrôle et possède une grande partie du contenu qui pourrait être offert sur l'ensemble des réseaux, notre préoccupation doit être de veiller à ce que tous les fournisseurs — nous sommes un fournisseur — aient accès au contenu contrôlé par d'autres fournisseurs. Je considérerais donc la question sous l'angle des restrictions sur le libre accès et je dirais que nous devons veiller à ce que tous les fournisseurs aient accès au contenu même. Juste pour vous mettre sur une autre piste.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Xplornet ne se considère pas comme étant propriétaire de contenu. Cela ne nous préoccupe pas tellement, car nous respectons le paragraphe 27(2) de la Loi sur les télécommunications et nous croyons que tous les fournisseurs devraient respecter cette disposition, qui régit cette question, bien entendu, au Canada.

Par conséquent, notre préoccupation principale continue à être de fournir un service qui offre aux gens le contenu de leur choix. Je ne sais pas si ma réponse vous est utile.

(1630)

M. Jay Thomson:

Nous avons un point de vue intéressant sur la question parce que nos membres sont des fournisseurs d'accès Internet, mais ce sont aussi des sociétés de câblodistribution et d'IPTV; ils offrent donc des services de programmation télévisuelle. C'est une grande partie de leurs activités.

La plupart des services de programmation appartiennent à Bell, à Rogers et à Québecor, qui sont aussi les plus grands FAI au Canada. Notre crainte est qu'avec l'abolition de la neutralité du Net, ils pourraient donner la priorité à leurs propres réseaux, au détriment des nôtres, pour la distribution de ces services.

M. Brian Masse:

Cela ne fait aucun doute, et c'est une des raisons pour lesquelles on défend la neutralité du Net. Quel contenu est important devient une question très subjective.

J'aimerais parler maintenant de la prochaine vente aux enchères du spectre. Je vous demanderais peut-être de répondre dans l'ordre inverse, si j'ai assez de temps.

Que pensez-vous des conditions plus précises qui pourraient être imposées relativement au dernier kilomètre durant la prochaine vente aux enchères du spectre? C'est bien d'en parler, et je connais les expressions accrocheuses selon lesquelles les gouvernements doivent se tenir à l'écart, puis savoir quand aider. On dit toujours au gouvernement de se tenir à l'écart quand il est question des aspects lucratifs des affaires et des objectifs facilement atteignables, mais on lui demande sa collaboration pour les aspects plus difficiles. Que pensez-vous d'imposer des conditions plus précises pour la prochaine vente aux enchères du spectre?

Allons dans l'ordre inverse, si j'ai suffisamment de temps. Commençons par M. Thomson.

M. Jay Thomson:

La majorité de nos membres ne sont pas titulaires de licences de spectre. Ils aimeraient en acheter, mais elles sont trop coûteuses. Normalement, les zones sont beaucoup trop grandes et elles comprennent trop de clients potentiels pour que nos membres puissent faire une offre. De plus, la vente aux enchères est très complexe. Le processus n'est pas vraiment conçu pour les petits joueurs.

M. Brian Masse:

On pourrait préciser dans les conditions qui...

M. Jay Thomson:

Cela nous conviendrait certainement.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Xplornet a certainement aussi des préoccupations concernant la prochaine vente aux enchères. Comme nous l'avons dit durant notre exposé, nous sommes préoccupés par l'absence de reconnaissance de la nécessité pour les services à large bande en milieu rural. Sur les aspects économiques de desservir le centre de Toronto, Jay a tout à fait raison lorsqu'il dit qu'en raison de la configuration du centre-ville, les services à large bande offerts autour de Toronto comptent parmi les pires au Canada. C'est parce que les fréquences sont coincées dans la licence de Toronto. Si la valeur de la licence de cette zone équivaut à 7 millions de personnes, vous l'achetez pour desservir les habitants du centre-ville de Toronto. Vous n'assurez pas le service à Uxbridge, à Stouffville, à Milton ou dans les régions voisines.

Oui, nous sommes d'avis qu'il faut des conditions précises à cet égard.

Le président:

Le temps est écoulé, mais vous pouvez tous deux répondre très brièvement.

M. Dean Proctor:

Nous avons appuyé la réservation de fréquences pour les petits joueurs et les nouveaux venus. Nous avons également appuyé la baisse considérable du prix de départ, qui a été un réel obstacle pour nous lors de ventes aux enchères antérieures. Dans les régions éloignées où il est très difficile de développer un réseau, la dernière chose qu'on veut faire, c'est dépenser une fortune pour acheter des fréquences; nous avons donc appuyé cette mesure.

Le point par rapport auquel nous sommes probablement du même avis que les gens de Xplornet, c'est qu'il faudrait modifier les zones pour lesquelles les entreprises peuvent faire une offre, mais aussi la taille des zones. Peut-être faudrait-il ajuster la taille des zones de façon à favoriser la vente aux enchères de fréquences pour les régions rurales et éloignées.

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter; je vous prie donc de poursuivre.

Le président:

Je donne la parole à M. Bossio. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Mike Bossio (Hastings—Lennox and Addington, Lib.):

Merci à tous les témoins de leur présence. Nous avons une bonne discussion, et beaucoup de renseignements utiles en ressortent.

J'aimerais m'adresser d'abord à M. Mitchell. Comme vous le savez, le CRTC vient de créer un fonds visant à aider à financer le service essentiel qu'est Internet. On tente de déterminer quelle est la meilleure façon d'utiliser ce fonds. Vous avez quelque chose de semblable aux États-Unis: le fonds des services publics en milieu rural, ou le fonds du RUS, « Rural Utilities Service ». Vous avez mentionné qu'il y avait entre 800 et 900 coopératives d'électricité. À ma connaissance, toutes ces coopératives peuvent obtenir des fonds du RUS pour développer les réseaux, y compris au Dakota du Nord.

(1635)

M. Christopher Mitchell:

C'est exact. Au Dakota du Nord, ce sont surtout des coopératives de services téléphoniques, mais c'est le fonds du RUS qui permet de fournir de l'électricité dans toutes les régions rurales des États-Unis.

M. Mike Bossio:

Le fonds du CRTC sera essentiellement le même type de fonds. Quels conseils donneriez-vous au CRTC sur la meilleure façon de concevoir un fonds comme celui du RUS de manière à en maximiser les effets?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Les règles des divers fonds actuels, qui comprennent aussi le Connect America Fund, sont très complexes, et comme on l'a dit plus tôt, elles désavantagent les entreprises locales. Les grandes entreprises ayant de nombreux avocats y ont beaucoup plus facilement accès. C'est donc important d'établir des règles simples.

Je trouve aussi important de ne pas diriger les fonds uniquement vers les régions non desservies, si vous différenciez les régions non desservies des régions mal desservies. Pour avoir un modèle d'affaires viable, c'est important de permettre un mélange des deux. Une entreprise qui demande des fonds ne devrait pas être obligée d'offrir des services uniquement aux régions les plus difficiles à desservir. Elle devrait pouvoir combiner de telles régions et des régions plus peuplées ou une agglomération à proximité, plutôt que de devoir se limiter aux régions non desservies. C'est quelque chose que nous n'avons pas fait aux États-Unis, ni dans les programmes étatiques, ni dans les programmes fédéraux, en raison du pouvoir des titulaires d'empêcher d'avoir recours au subventionnement pour faire concurrence.

M. Mike Bossio:

Merci beaucoup pour votre aide.

Concernant les fréquences, Jay, vous avez dit que ce serait bien d'en avoir.

Pour votre part, C.J., vous avez dit que ce serait bien de pouvoir toutes les utiliser, en tout temps.

J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez de l'attribution dynamique des bandes de fréquences. Au lieu d'avoir des blocs de fréquences ciblés — vous achetez tout, vous utilisez tout et vous payez tout, en tout temps —, vous avez la possibilité de réattribuer les fréquences aux différents groupes qui sont prêts à les louer à des moments donnés, selon leurs besoins. Une telle approche permet de redistribuer très rapidement et continuellement les fréquences.

Pouvez-vous me donner votre avis sur l'attribution dynamique des bandes de fréquences?

M. Ian Stevens (directeur général, Execulink Telecom et membre du conseil d'administration, Canadian Cable Systems Alliance):

Je peux répondre à la question.

D'après moi, la coordination entre tous les opérateurs serait très problématique. Il y aurait peut-être une autre solution. Normalement, selon les conditions des licences de spectre, 50 % de la population doit être desservie dans un délai donné, mais rien n'oblige le fournisseur à offrir des services dans la région non desservie — par exemple, la périphérie de Toronto. Vous pourriez reprendre ces fréquences et les réattribuer à des opérateurs qui seraient prêts à s'engager à desservir ces régions.

M. Mike Bossio:

Oui, mais nous avons actuellement la technologie nécessaire pour procéder à l'attribution dynamique des bandes de fréquences, qui permet de les utiliser et de les payer au besoin.

M. Ian Stevens:

Je ne peux rien dire là-dessus.

Vous le pouvez peut-être.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous nous sommes penchés sur ce qui se fait aux États-Unis sur ce plan. Je pense que c'est Google qui fait fonctionner le système informatique qui permettrait de procéder de la sorte aux États-Unis. Je crois comprendre que cette méthode ne fonctionne pas très bien, et que nombre d'opérateurs sont mécontents parce qu'elle ne leur permet pas d'établir des plans en vue de leur utilisation maximale de fréquences. Comment peut-on savoir combien investir dans son réseau lorsqu'on ne sait jamais à combien de fréquences on aura accès pour offrir des services à ses clients?

Cette approche crée un réel problème. En gros, elle oblige à utiliser les bandes 900 MHz ou 2400 MHz, qui ne nécessitent pas de licences, parce que c'est ce qui arrive. Il faut continuellement se battre pour obtenir des fréquences. Lorsqu'il n'y a pas de concurrence, c'est très bien; on peut continuer à fournir ses services. Dès que quelqu'un d'autre intervient, toutefois, le résultat de l'attribution dynamique des bandes de fréquences est qu'un fournisseur poursuit ses activités, tandis que l'autre doit interrompre ses services parce qu'il n'a pas obtenu les fréquences voulues.

M. Mike Bossio:

Monsieur Mitchell, je vous vois hocher la tête. Aimeriez-vous dire quelque chose?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Je dirais simplement que d'après moi, beaucoup de petits fournisseurs espèrent que ces défauts seront corrigés, car nombre d'entre eux jouent un rôle très actif actuellement dans une bataille liée au spectre et à sa conception; sera-t-il conçu de manière à être plus accessible aux petits ou aux grands fournisseurs? C'est encore très important pour eux.

M. Mike Bossio:

Je sais que pour les petits fournisseurs, un autre enjeu important est le coût du spectre, et ce, même pour la location. Je crois savoir qu'aux États-Unis, la location du spectre se fait par giga-octet et, si ma mémoire est bonne, cela représente environ 1 650 $ pour 10 ans, tandis qu'au Canada, on parle de 13 000 $ par année pour un PoP de 1 Go. Est-ce exact?

(1640)

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Je n'ai pas la réponse à cette question, malheureusement.

M. Mike Bossio:

Très bien; je voulais simplement poser la question aux fins du compte rendu.

Enfin — je manque de temps, malheureusement, et c'est une question importante —, Xplornet essuie de nombreuses critiques parce que vous êtes l'un des plus importants joueurs des régions rurales, qui sont mal desservies, parce que vous avez été obligés de faire du surabonnement pour satisfaire aux besoins énormes et parce que vous n'avez pas de connexion de la fibre au PoP. Souvent, vous avez recours à des relais entre plusieurs antennes, et vous ne pouvez avoir qu'une seule antenne dans un rayon de 25 km, c'est bien cela? Vous ne pouvez en avoir d'autres en raison de l'interférence.

Quelle est la solution à cela, à votre avis?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Vous auriez pu siéger aux réunions de notre réseau, car vous avez fait un excellent portrait de la situation.

Pour nous, la réponse est simple: il faut investir dans le réseau de base, ce qui est extrêmement important. C'est d'ailleurs pour cela que le programme Brancher pour innover suscite tant notre enthousiasme. L'accroissement du volume considérable de données exerce une pression croissante sur la tour de télécommunications. On peut essayer de trouver des solutions pour offrir les services du dernier kilomètre aux clients en ajoutant un relais radio supplémentaire ou quelque chose du genre pour accroître la capacité, mais on se trouve simplement à accumuler plus de données à la tour. Comment peut-on renvoyer cela à la connexion Internet? C'est fondamental.

M. Mike Bossio:

Mais il ne s'agit pas seulement du réseau de base, mais de la connectivité...

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

C'est la partie intermédiaire...

M. Mike Bossio:

Cela va de la partie intermédiaire au point d'accès, parce que c'est nécessaire au PoP.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Exactement.

M. Mike Bossio:

Toutes les tours doivent être équipées de fibre. Est-ce exact?

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci d'être venus.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Thomson.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez fait allusion à divers règlements et divers coûts qui nuisent à la compétitivité des entreprises, en particulier les petites entreprises. À titre d'exemple, soulignons les coûts de l'électricité et les règlements sur les poteaux électriques. Vous avez mentionné les formalités administratives. À votre avis, en quoi la réglementation gouvernementale est-elle un frein à l'entrée des petites entreprises dans ce marché?

M. Jay Thomson:

Mon commentaire sur les formalités administratives était essentiellement lié au processus de demande des programmes de financement. Nous avons un exemple concret des coûts associés au respect des exigences.

Je cède la parole à Ian.

M. Ian Stevens:

Nous avons du succès avec le programme Un Canada branché; nous avions lancé plusieurs projets. Chaque trimestre, nous devions consacrer environ 80 heures-personnes à la production de rapports pour le versement du financement. Pour nous, cela ne pose pas problème, étant donné l'ampleur du projet, mais pour certains membres du CCSA, qui avaient de plus petits projets... lorsqu'on doit consacrer 80 heures-personnes pour obtenir du financement, il faut commencer à faire des calculs. Vaut-il la peine de faire une demande de financement lorsque cela entraîne des frais généraux si élevés? Et cela, c'était simplement pour... Il y a également un processus de demande très fastidieux à l'étape de la mise en œuvre du projet. Encore une fois, le projet doit avoir une certaine ampleur pour que cela vaille la peine.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

La question s'adresse davantage à Xplornet.

J'ai lu que l'expansion des services à large bande dans les régions rurales réussit très bien lorsque des communautés très engagées travaillent ensemble pour demander ces services et qu'elles collaborent avec les entreprises privées et l'administration locale. Pouvez-vous donner des exemples de collaboration entre Xplornet et certaines collectivités pour l'offre de services à large bande en milieu rural?

M. James Maunder:

Xplornet a une très grande expérience de la collaboration avec divers ordres de gouvernement pour les projets d'infrastructure. Un bon exemple est un projet que M. Bossio connaît sûrement très bien, un projet auquel nous avons participé: le Réseau régional de l'Est de l'Ontario, ou RREO.

Le réseau se targue d'être un partenariat novateur, ce qui est le cas, en ce sens qu'à l'époque, en 2010, des maires de l'Est de l'Ontario ont constaté l'important manque d'infrastructures de communications à large bande dans leur partie de la province et se sont regroupés pour demander du financement du gouvernement fédéral. Ils ont travaillé avec plusieurs fournisseurs de services Internet, dont Xplornet, pour la construction d'infrastructures du dernier kilomètre dans la région. Ma collègue C.J. pourra vous donner des détails sur les tours construites par Xplornet. C'était avant mon arrivée dans l'entreprise.

Xplornet était un partenaire dans le RREO. Cinq ans plus tard, la propriété du réseau construit du RREO a été transférée à Xplornet. Nous collaborons toujours avec le RREO et nous offrons ainsi des services à large bande aux résidants de la région.

(1645)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Monsieur Proctor, pouvez-vous décrire l'impact que peut avoir l'accès aux services à large bande dans les régions nordiques comme le Nunavut? Quelle incidence cela a-t-il sur la vie des gens?

M. Dean Proctor:

C'est une question formidable. Je devrais peut-être demander à Adamee d'y répondre.

Imaginez un monde où le parcours scolaire ne va pas assez loin. Souvent, les jeunes doivent quitter la région pour terminer leur secondaire. Dans un monde où il n'y a pas de banques, de magasins, dans un monde où... Comme l'a dit un de mes amis, le problème n'est pas tant qu'il s'agit d'une région éloignée, mais plutôt l'isolement. Cette technologie fait tomber les barrières. Dans ces régions, il est impossible de construire des routes. Le réseau de communication devient la voie de sortie. C'est ce qui permet de communiquer, d'être en contact avec le reste du monde. C'est un moyen de terminer ses études, de poursuivre sa formation. On s'en sert pour vendre et pour acheter des marchandises en ligne. Cela permet de faire ces transactions bancaires et d'avoir accès aux services gouvernementaux, en plus d'être — et je suis convaincu que c'est un aspect qui préoccupe tous les membres de ce comité — un outil de démocratie numérique. Cela a vraiment été un vecteur de changement à l'échelle planétaire.

J'ai vu tout cela se produire lorsque nous avons lancé le service à large bande il y a 10 ou 15 ans, et nous le voyons encore maintenant avec les services mobiles. Nous évaluons l'état de préparation opérationnelle dans chacune des collectivités. Des utilisateurs amis s'assurent que le réseau fonctionne. Tous ont l'obligation de remplir des sondages.

On a parfois envie de pleurer en lisant les témoignages qui nous sont envoyés. C'est vraiment émouvant; je pense ici à la joie et à la liberté que ressentent les gens qui ont désormais accès à la technologie. Ils savent que cela existe, mais ils n'y avaient tout simplement pas accès. Beaucoup de nos utilisateurs amis ont déjà leur propre iPhone, qu'ils utilisent lorsqu'ils sont dans le Sud du pays. Ce n'est pas nous qui leur avons fourni; nous leur donnons simplement une carte SIM. Ce qui est si excitant, c'est que cela change complètement la donne, vraiment, et nous sommes extrêmement ravis d'avoir la possibilité de le faire.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Baylis.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais m'attarder davantage sur ce que nous pouvons faire pour aider les entreprises à être concurrentielles, d'après ce que je comprends, sur deux fronts. Le premier est le financement. Il a été mentionné que le gouvernement a établi un programme, mais avec des attentes extrêmement élevées, de sorte qu'il donne d'excellents résultats pour les grands projets, mais que pour les petits projets, il y a trop de formalités administratives ou c'est trop complexe.

Ai-je bien compris? Monsieur Proctor, monsieur Stevens, je crois que vous l'avez mentionné tous les deux.

Je vais commencer avec vous, monsieur Proctor.

M. Dean Proctor:

Je ferais écho aux préoccupations sur la multitude de formalités administratives. En même temps, je suis profondément convaincu qu'un bénéficiaire de financement doit préciser à quoi servira ce financement. Je pourrais m'avancer davantage et dire que la production de rapports est une chose, mais que veiller à leur publication en est une autre. Nous devons en faire un peu plus à cet égard. Je sais que ce n'est pas ce que vous envisagez, mais la production de rapports est une exigence nécessaire pour l'obtention de financement public.

Personnellement, je serais beaucoup plus préoccupé par ce que j'appelle les tactiques d'appât et de substitution, c'est-à-dire par un cas où quelqu'un recevrait du financement pour la construction d'infrastructures de transport de base à accès ouvert, à titre de service de gros, mais déciderait ensuite d'en faire un réseau fermé ou d'en restreindre l'accès.

M. Frank Baylis:

Est-ce déjà arrivé?

M. Dean Proctor:

J'espère que non.

Ce qui nous préoccupe, c'est que des acteurs qui reçoivent du financement dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover...

M. Frank Baylis:

Qu'ils puissent déterminer si le réseau de base sera à accès ouvert ou non.

M. Dean Proctor:

Exactement.

M. Frank Baylis:

Revenons à cette question.

Monsieur Stevens, c'est une chose d'avoir une tonne de paperasse à remplir pour obtenir 100 millions de dollars, mais si j'ai tout cela à remplir pour seulement 1 000 $, il y a quelque chose qui ne fonctionne pas.

La lourdeur administrative des programmes mis en place par le gouvernement empêche-t-elle les petites entreprises à obtenir un financement adéquat?

M. Ian Stevens:

Je pense que le programme Brancher pour innover, auquel M. Proctor a fait allusion, est assez bien équilibré, sur le plan des exigences de production de rapports. Lorsqu'on parle d'un financement important, il est bien de savoir que l'argent des contribuables est géré adéquatement.

Il y a un seuil de rentabilité, probablement autour de 75 000 à 100 000 $. Si la valeur totale de vos projets est inférieure à ce montant, alors cela ne vaut probablement pas la peine.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cependant, est-ce assez pour attirer les petits acteurs? Voilà ma question.

Est-ce un obstacle, ou est-ce équitable? Y a-t-il un équilibre, actuellement?

M. Jay Thomson:

Cela a certainement été un obstacle...

M. Frank Baylis:

Dans le passé.

M. Jay Thomson:

... à la participation de plusieurs de nos membres au programme Brancher pour innover. Les formalités administratives étaient trop complexes, au point de les obliger à faire appel à un consultant externe.

M. Frank Baylis:

Il existe de très petites entreprises qui n'ont tout simplement pas...

Si notre but est de trouver des solutions et d'inciter les petites entreprises à investir les petits marchés, nous devons veiller à leur faciliter la tâche pour qu'elles puissent le faire.

(1650)

M. Jay Thomson:

C'est exactement là notre message.

M. Frank Baylis:

J'aimerais maintenant aborder la question du spectre, dans la même optique.

Je vais commencer avec vous, C.J.

Je crois comprendre que la taille des zones au moment de la vente du spectre est trop grande. Disons que la zone est beaucoup plus grande que ce dont j'ai besoin, que je n'ai pas les moyens d'acquérir les droits sur toute la zone et que je n'ai aucun intérêt à servir tout ce territoire. Cela pourrait inclure une grande ville, alors quelqu'un d'autre en fait l'acquisition, mais dans ce cas, tout le reste...

La vente de spectre en plus petite partie serait-elle une solution? Pourriez-vous aussi parler du prix d'entrée, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Il y a d'excellents exemples dans les diverses circonscriptions que vous représentez. Un des exemples qui me vient toujours à l'esprit est le cas de Beach Corner, près d'Edmonton. Il y a aussi Calgary, et le cas de la licence de Toronto est un excellent exemple.

Prenons le cas d'une licence à Calgary comme exemple. Vous constaterez que cela couvre tout le territoire jusqu'à la frontière de la Colombie-Britannique. Donc, on ne parle pas vraiment de Calgary, mais de tout le territoire à l'ouest de la ville, jusqu'à la frontière. La licence de Toronto s'étend bien au-delà de ce territoire et couvre toute la zone rurale en périphérie.

M. Frank Baylis:

Calgary est un excellent exemple. Donc, disons que je suis un acteur important et que je veux le territoire de Calgary. J'en fais l'acquisition, et cela coûte une fortune. Ensuite, je consacre tout mon temps à Calgary même, et aller à l'ouest de la ville ne m'intéresse absolument pas.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Des endroits comme Jasper, Olds, etc.

M. Frank Baylis:

Par contre, votre entreprise ou une autre pourrait avoir de l'intérêt pour cette petite portion de territoire, mais ne peut l'obtenir parce qu'elle est déjà vendue.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Exactement.

M. Frank Baylis:

Une solution serait de reconnaître ce fait lors de la vente de spectre aux enchères, de façon à ne pas combiner une grande ville et des zones rurales...

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous avons examiné cette question il y a plusieurs années et nous avons essayé de faire des suggestions sur l'approche à adopter pour les 12 plus grandes villes au pays. Il s'agit d'établir, pour les licences, des zones légèrement différentes de ce qu'elles sont aujourd'hui, de façon à réduire les zones rurales.

Les villes de Québec et d'Ottawa sont dans cette catégorie.

M. Frank Baylis:

Donc, si vous êtes en périphérie et non dans les limites d'une grande ville, vous avez un réel problème.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Exactement.

Voilà pourquoi j'ai mentionné Milton, qui est un cas type que nous essayons de régler.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est tout juste à l'extérieur de Toronto.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Ces gens sont littéralement au bout de la piste d'atterrissage de l'aéroport international Pearson, au haut de l'escarpement. Ils peuvent voir les lumières de la grande ville, mais ils ont l'un des pires services au pays, parce qu'ils sont dans le territoire de la licence de Toronto et qu'il nous est impossible de leur offrir des services.

M. Frank Baylis:

Les gros joueurs sont trop occupés à Toronto même.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Oui, et ils n'ont aucun intérêt pour les zones de faible densité.

M. Frank Baylis:

Quelqu'un a un commentaire à ce sujet? Monsieur Thomson.

M. Jay Thomson:

Une de nos propositions était l'adoption d'une approche basée sur le retrait en cas de non-utilisation, pour qu'après un certain temps, si...

M. Frank Baylis:

Combien de temps?

M. Jay Thomson:

Je n'ai pas nécessairement de limite à proposer à cet égard.

M. Frank Baylis:

Proposez une limite...

M. Jay Thomson:

Un délai raisonnable pour la mise en oeuvre...

M. Frank Baylis:

Une limite au-delà de laquelle nous pouvons retirer la licence, en cas de non-utilisation.

M. Jay Thomson:

Oui, et mettre cela à la disposition d'autres joueurs.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur Bernier, vous disposez cinq minutes.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Je veux poursuivre avec les questions de spectre. Je vais vous donner un exemple. Il y a quelques années, Québecor a acheté une grande part du spectre, mais elle ne s'en servait pas, alors elle a décidé d'en vendre une partie et de faire de l'argent. S'il y a du spectre pour Calgary, comme vous le dites, et pour plus que Calgary, mais qu'une société ne veut pas servir un secteur dépassant Calgary, pourquoi ne pas offrir d'acheter une partie du spectre? Pouvez-vous faire cela? Est-ce très difficile à faire?

M. Ian Stevens:

Il existe un processus permettant de subordonner la licence, et c'est ce dont vous parliez, je pense, et ce que Québecor a fait. Il faut des partenaires qui veulent le faire des deux côtés. Québecor était prête à le faire dans de nombreuses régions, et London est ma région préférée. London est bien servie, mais je pense bien que le beigne qui cerne le trou de beigne ne l'est pas. Bell et Rogers ne sont pas disposées à servir cette région ou à subordonner ces licences à un tiers parce que ces entreprises respectent les modalités de la licence telle qu'elle était rédigée quand elles ont acquis le spectre.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

La solution serait de modifier les règles de la vente aux enchères. Qu'est-ce qui serait mieux pour vous? Mettre de côté une plus petite partie du spectre, comme vous venez de le dire? Quelles seraient les meilleures règles pour vous aider à acheter du spectre?

M. Ian Stevens:

D'après moi, ce serait de pouvoir participer à la vente aux enchères dès le début, mais aussi d'avoir un horizon de deux ans par la suite, pour obliger le détenteur de licence à rendre le spectre s'il ne l'utilise pas. Ainsi, il serait encouragé à le subordonner avant de le rendre. Cela pourrait constituer une manière efficace de veiller à ce que le spectre, qui est rare, soit utilisé dans les régions rurales.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

D'accord.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Cela correspond à notre expérience aussi. Nous avons également approché diverses grandes entreprises pour essayer d'obtenir une partie des beignes, si je puis dire, et elles ne sont généralement pas prêtes à le faire. Elles prétendent toujours en avoir besoin pour les corridors de transport. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons indiqué, dans notre exposé, que vous devez vraiment préciser qu'il faut quelque chose pour les connexions fixes au domicile.

(1655)

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Le Comité s'est rendu à Washington l'année dernière. Je regarde mes notes de Washington.

Monsieur Mitchell, quand on a discuté du spectre à ce moment-là, on a mentionné la Rural Spectrum Accessibility Act de 2017. On a aussi parlé de l'harmonisation du spectre entre le Canada et les États-Unis, où le spectre de 600 mégahertz correspond à l'Europe, ce qui fait que l'itinérance ne se fait pas avec continuité, et où le spectre de 700 mégahertz est harmonisé, ce qui est bon pour la 5G. Êtes-vous au fait de la Rural Spectrum Accessibility Act de 2017 et de la façon dont cela fonctionne? Comment pouvons-nous assurer l'harmonisation entre les deux pays de sorte que dans une nouvelle voiture autonome, ou aux commandes d'équipement agricole, nous avons un système harmonisé entre les deux pays?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Je crains fort que pour les questions de politique sur le spectre, mes connaissances soient très limitées. Vous n'utiliserez pas votre temps efficacement si vous m'écoutez parler de cela.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord, mais nous avons des entreprises canadiennes qui travaillent aux États-Unis. Avez-vous entendu parler de problèmes entre le Canada et les États-Unis concernant la façon dont les entreprises fonctionnent?

M. Christopher Mitchell:

Non. J'ai fait beaucoup affaire avec Ting chaque fois que j'ai appelé à un centre d'appel; elle est à l'extérieur de Toronto. Elle a une incroyable réputation concernant le service à la clientèle. Je pense que c'est en partie attribuable à la gestion, et en partie aux gens. Elle a beaucoup de succès.

J'ai tendance à travailler avec les groupes locaux. Je connais Ting parce qu'elle se concentre beaucoup sur la politique visant Internet en général.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Bossio. Il est impatient de plonger dans les questions de technologies. C'est formidable qu'il soit là comme remplaçant aujourd'hui.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Pardonnez-moi, monsieur le président, mais puis-je répondre à une partie de la question?

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous en prie.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Je crois que vous avez soulevé un point très important qu'on a peut-être oublié. Vous avez parlé de l'harmonisation des 600 et des 700 mégahertz, par rapport à certains spectres de plus haut niveau. L'harmonisation est vraiment importante, pour les 600, 700 et 800, à cause du risque d'interférence transfrontalière. Nous voyons des cas même dans les 2 500, en ce moment. Il y a un problème avec Sprint, dans le Sud de l'Ontario, à cause de cela. Plus vous montez, moins c'est problématique en raison des caractéristiques de propagation.

Quand vous vous retrouvez avec les spectres les plus couramment utilisés pour la large bande en régions rurales, comme les 3 500 et, peut-être, les 4 200, la propagation n'est pas si étendue. Il y aura de très petits secteurs où vous devrez faire de l'harmonisation le long de la frontière.

Malheureusement, ce sera probablement toujours un peu problématique à Windsor, mais partout ailleurs sur la frontière, la situation est sans doute assez bonne en raison de la propagation restreinte.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

M. Mike Bossio:

[Difficultés techniques] ... dans le fait qu'on envisage en ce moment même que ce soit transmis au secteur local. Je pense qu'il serait important que vous nous parliez des incidences que cela pourrait avoir sur la large bande en région rurale.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Oui, cela nous a beaucoup préoccupés. Il y a quelques années, quelqu'un a suggéré que la partie urbaine, qui a été définie libéralement, soit reprise et convertie pour le mobile. À ce moment précis, je peux vous dire que nos coeurs se sont arrêtés de battre pendant un moment, car cela représente 62 % de la fermeture du potentiel fixe sans fil de notre entreprise.

Nous parlons tous de la même chose et des beignes autour des villes. C'est exactement là où se trouvent les gens des secteurs ruraux qui ont besoin du service. Vous avez tout à fait raison; si vous prenez cela pour le mobile, nous n'avons rien pour le faire.

M. Mike Bossio:

Juste pour ajouter à cela, la partie des 3 500 de Bell Canada qui couvre Toronto va en fait jusqu'à ma circonscription de l'Est de l'Ontario, à l'est de Belleville, entre Belleville et Kingston. C'est donc un énorme secteur, et cela met les choses en perspective.

Enfin, encore une fois, si nous pouvons revenir à notre conversation antérieure au sujet des microcellules et de la connexion de la fibre au PoP [Inaudible], quel pourcentage des régions rurales, si nous optons pour ce modèle, le modèle de conception de réseaux, pensez-vous que vous pourriez servir avec une vitesse de téléchargement de 50 à 100 mégabits? Par exemple, si vous regardez ma circonscription ou n'importe quelle autre circonscription de l'Est de l'Ontario, en raison de Beam EORN, en raison de votre expérience là-bas, pensez-vous que vous seriez en mesure d'offrir une couverture de 100 % dans ces secteurs si vous optiez pour la microcellule et pour la redirection des signaux d'antennes plus importantes?

(1700)

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Oui, nous croyons que nous pouvons changer énormément les choses de cette façon. Au fil des années, nous nous sommes penchés sur une des questions posées à propos des coûts. De toute évidence, moins la population est dense, plus le service est coûteux à fournir. Dans les endroits où la densité est généralement de plus de quatre ménages par kilomètre carré, vous parlez de situations où le sans-fil fixe est pertinent. Par exemple, une grosse partie du Sud de l'Ontario, certaines parties du Sud du Québec et des parties énormes de l'Alberta correspondent à cela. La réponse est oui. Quand vous vous mettez à faire de nouvelles technologies 5G avec des microsites, d'après nos données cartographiques, un très haut pourcentage de la population serait servi.

M. Mike Bossio:

Et le programme Brancher pour innover est ce qui vous permettrait de justifier cela financièrement.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Absolument, car de toute évidence, plus les vitesses que vous offrez sont élevées et plus de grandes quantités de données sont transmises, plus vous avez besoin de raccordement et d'infrastructure pour réaliser cela.

M. Mike Bossio:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. J'ai le sentiment qu'il nous faudrait des beignes, en ce moment. Nous parlons sans cesse de beignes.

C'est ce qui conclut nos questions. Nous allons nous arrêter deux minutes, puis nous reprendrons à huis clos pour parler de nos travaux futurs.

Je remercie nos témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui nous fournir beaucoup d'excellente information.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 06, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.