header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-12-13 PROC 139

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1250)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome back to the 139th meeting. We just want to close up on a few informal and hopefully fun things for the last words in the year 2018.

One is that the committee is excited and should be complimented that, because of its work, indigenous languages have started to be used officially in the House. On page 24,766 of the Commons Debates, the Honourable Hunter Tootoo, member for Nunavut, made a short statement in Inuktitut that's in Hansard in the symbols of Inuktitut. That's the first time. It's great to have that on the record.

Also, while we're doing closing Christmas statements, I want to apologize to Mr. Reid, who suggested a few weeks ago—which I totally agreed with and wanted to do—that we have another one of our informal dinners to discuss the future of the committee. Unfortunately, I never organized it. As I said when I came to Parliament at the beginning, my bias is to actually accomplish things, and I think those types of meetings lead us to think about concrete achievements that we can do, like the item I just mentioned. We have a lot of talent on this committee.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

With that in mind, the next opportunity we'll have to do this would be in the new year and in the new House. There is a restaurant there. Am I right?

The Chair:

Yes. It's smaller, one third the size, but yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, but it's big enough for us, especially if we get a reservation in early. Thinking of that, if it's agreeable to members, why don't we consider having an informal meeting of the members? We're back on the Monday, I assume. Would the Tuesday night be...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Or we could have an informal luncheon at our old committee spot that Thursday.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

We should probably do it before the debate about this document, or everyone may not be there.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

Or after, I suppose....

Mr. David Christopherson:

Maybe both: one at the front and one at the back....

The Chair:

Let's leave it a little flexible, but I'll try to organize something.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. It would be really a super idea, I think.

If I might say this, just as a thought, what I had in mind was this. As we approach the end of a parliamentary term—it's a fairly predictable ending time—we could find our agenda jammed up with material that is hard to get through entirely. Alternatively, we could find ourselves with unexpected amounts of free space, which could be used for some items that are not on the public's radar screen. We could do some useful low-key work there that is probably achievable by means of consensus, but sometimes some prep work is required, and if we haven't thought about that in advance, we might miss our chance. That's really where I think the kind of business that could be discussed at that meeting might go.

The Chair:

Just to throw some totally irrelevant information into the situation using my prerogative as chair—this will be discussed at the dinner—I've mentioned before that all the northern nations in the world now have electronic voting in their parliaments as an option. I learned this morning from the clerk that they've checked the United States. Of the 100 legislatures in the United States, something in the order of 90 out of 100 have electronic voting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that the upper or the lower Houses in all the states?

The Chair:

It's lower and upper.

Mr. Christopherson, go ahead.

(1255)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'd like to build on Mr. Reid's idea.

Again, it stems from Mr. Simms' comments at our previous meeting about Centre Block and that whole second chamber idea. That has to start somewhere. Right now it's in the past. We refer to discussions we had about it and the interest that some of us had in seeing that as a welcome addition, possibly, to our current parliamentary process. Maybe in the times that Mr. Reid is identifying, this could be one of the things that we start doing, some of that work to help inform the next Parliament, which will be tasked with making some decisions about what will happen with the temporary chamber we're about to move into.

To repeat myself, it makes that discussion current. Even if we just issued a report that said we've talked about it and here are some thoughts, that would put it on the political radar and it would be there so it wouldn't get lost. I really think that's probably one of the biggest potential changes that could find agreement, in my humble opinion, in future parliaments. There could be room for that kind of a major reform, which would be significant. They would only do it if it was possible, and we've talked about the benefits of it. We haven't looked at all the pitfalls, which there are bound to be, too.

All of that is to say that I like Mr. Reid's idea, and if we have time, let's do some work that otherwise we wouldn't have the opportunity to do. We're all that much more experienced now at the end of this Parliament. For some people, it's the end of their first parliament. For others, it's polishing up after a number of parliaments. We're all stronger and, I'd like to think, smarter and more experienced now. It's that kind of a discussion. It's non-partisan and shouldn't, in any way, affect the silly season that we're going to be in as we get into the pre-election time. All that is to add my voice that maybe that is one of those unique ideas or special ideas we could look at that would be planting a seed for future parliaments. It would be to talk about that second chamber and how we might be able to advance opportunities for, especially, private members to have more time, more say, and more priority.

Thanks.

The Chair:

I'll take that advice and that input, not only to the dinner for this committee but also to the subcommittee on agenda.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair:

I just want to go around the table before we leave, because it's Christmas.

Mr. Nater and I already made some closing comments. I'll go around if anyone else wants to say anything, not only to wrap up this year but to wrap up the three years we've had together. We've never done that, so if anyone wants to make any comments, go ahead.

I did have a suggested motion that we see the clock at June, but I won't follow up on that.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We'll start with Stephanie, and then anyone who wants to make any closing remarks before the holidays.

Stephanie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Merry Christmas. Happy new year. Happy Hanukkah. Happy Kwanza.

See you next year.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm already looking forward to our dinner in the new year. Actually, I'm quite excited that the first experience of the new restaurant will be in the company of you guys. That will be nice.

The Chair:

Is there anything else?

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Mr. Chair, I'll just repeat my earlier comments that I made in camera.

Thank you for your leadership on this committee and the flexibility that you've shown to this committee over the past year that I've been on it, or barely a year. I appreciate that.

I appreciate working with the members of this committee.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

First off, of course, I want to wish everyone a happy and safe holiday.

I'm probably a bit more emotional than most because I love this room and I love this committee. Some of the finest parliamentarians who have served have been on this committee. I love the non-partisan nature of what we do. I've been around so long now that I have no interest at all in getting a headline because I took a political shot at somebody. That holds no stimulation at all anymore.

What excites me, at the end of almost 35 years in elected office, happens when from our disparate positions we actually work together for a common cause and find compromises and common ground so we can issue reports and recommendations that we all agree on. I find that stimulating. I find that exciting.

A lot of that has happened in this room, because this is the only committee that has exactly the same time period. We don't move. We always meet at the same time, and we meet in the same room, except when we're doing big, big things, when we go to the big rooms. I guess it's about the intimacy of the room. This is one of the smallest rooms.

I'm being a little scattered, but that's just the effect of the emotions. On a personal note, 2018 has been the most tragic year of my life personally, combined with some exciting things, so there are a lot of mixed emotions.

Anyway, on a selfish note, I was mentioning to my wife the other day that I feel quite honoured that when I leave this place the emotions I feel will be shared by everyone, because you're all going through that now as we leave this building and move on. It's kind of nice that there's that shared emotion of “goodbye” to our parliamentary home for a while, rather than just one lone member not running again and having that feeling of “Gee, I'll never be back here.” There's safety in numbers. I kind of like that.

I just want to mention, too, if I may, while I have the floor, that on the issue of aboriginal languages what's really exciting, too, is that when our successors or some of you return to this place when it reopens, that won't be a big deal. It will be just the way we do business. Isn't that beautiful, to be part of something new that needs to be done to strengthen the Confederation and knowing, the way this place operates and the way Canadians are, that a decade or so hence it's not going to be a big deal but just the way we do things? There are so many areas of positiveness in which this Parliament plays a role, even on the international stage.

I'll wrap up, or I'll just keep going on forever, but I just want to say how much I get out of being in these meetings and how much respect I have for all of you and for the amazing staff we have who let us do this. I'm looking around the room at all the staff, including the security people who are outside, ready to take a bullet for us if they need to, and that's not an exaggeration for those of us who were here in 2014.

Special thanks to you, Chair. You've been an outstanding chair. You have a very unique approach to chairing that is very effective. Mr. Preston was like that. You felt that shadow as you took the chair because Mr. Preston was so widely regarded, but I can say, having served with him, that you have met that standard as best you can and exceeded it even. It has been a real honour to serve on a committee with you at the helm.

I wish you all a happy holiday.

Thanks.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

(1300)

The Chair:

Thank you, David.

Before I forget, I also want to congratulate our staff, as you have. It was in my notes to do that. I think we actually have the best clerk and researchers of all the committees.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: They have really kept us out of trouble—that's for sure—and they always have the answers we need. Also, we get the stuff in advance, so it doesn't lead to a lot of wasted time in committee, because the answers are already there. We really appreciate that.

We also appreciate that we have the best food of any committee.

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much.

It's tough to follow David after such an eloquent response, so on what is possibly my final intervention in this place, I simply want to say thank you and merry Christmas to all of you, and all the best and much happiness in 2019.

The Chair:

Madame Lapointe, go ahead. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

I obviously agree with all these glowing comments. We're certainly leaving this place with some nostalgia.

I want to thank everyone. I want to wish you a merry Christmas and happy holidays. I hope that you have a beautiful, healthy and peaceful 2019. Continue to hope that we'll find peace and work hard.

I want to thank you all for always being here to help us. I really enjoyed being here with you. [English]

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thanks.

I thought this was kind of silly at the beginning, but now, halfway through, I'm like, “Oh, it's so wonderful that we're doing this.”

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota: I'm glad we have the opportunity to share our thoughts. It has been quite emotional to be leaving this building, even though I've only been here three years; I can't imagine what it's like for those who have been here for years and decades before me. This building has a lot of history. It will be nice to see it restored and see it get the love and care it probably needs. I think that's the positive part of it. I just wish it weren't closed for so long.

I look forward to the new year and working with all of you in the new building, in West Block.

This committee was also something unexpected for me. When I was first appointed to it three years ago, I thought, “Wow. What did I do to deserve this?” Now I say, “Wow! What did I really do to deserve this?”

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota: I think it's been fantastic. It's been a great learning experience. Working with all of you has been the best part.

Thank you. Merry Christmas.

The Chair: David, go ahead.

(1305)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

David, in our very first interaction at this committee, at the very beginning of the first Parliament, you made some derisive comment that the rookies had no experience in this place. I asked you then if you meant to tell me that Tyler had no experience—because I'd sat next to him for a long time—and you got upset at me. So our relationship didn't start off very well.

But it's been a huge privilege for me to sit with really interesting people. We've built really good bonds on this committee. I think that's not overstating it.

Scott, I love saying this: I used to watch you on TV, and it's fun to work with you—David, a little less.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: More fun to work, a little less on TV....

I love this committee. It's a lot of fun. It's one that has no value in the riding, none. Nobody in the riding gives a flying F what we do at PROC, but it is the most fascinating work you can do on the Hill. This is where we see what's going on.

That reminds me that we have a lot of unresolved issues, as we learned on Tuesday, with the reconstruction of this place. I'm really hoping we stay on top of that and come back to it a couple of times a year. Where are we at? Where are we going? Is it where we want to be going? The PPS is another really fascinating one. I never thought we'd be dealing with it the way we have been for the last three years. I hope we don't drop that bone either.

All of that is to say that it's been a lot of fun working with you. This is probably the last committee meeting to take place in this room as we know it, possibly ever. Who knows what it will look like when we come back? It might be the bar—again, we don't know.

Thank you. Happy holidays, and we'll see you at lunch in West Block.

The Chair:

Just before I go to Mr. Simms, I want to follow up on one of your comments.

I definitely intend to have another meeting like Tuesday's before this Parliament is over. We will not leave it until the next Parliament. It's very important; MPs want their input. I think you made that point clear. We have to make sure we stay on top of that.

Mr. Simms, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

My name is Scott. I'm a Leo.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms: You know, there are people around us here, and I mean literally around us, whom I think we should thank as well. They're the people who sit behind us. They put on a brave face when we say something stupid, and they are delighted when we say something smart. Either way, usually the smart stuff comes from them, and usually the stupid stuff comes from my knee-jerk reactions, more than anything else.

Thank you, staff, for doing that. I say that with the utmost reverence toward staff, because they're the blocks that support us.

To my current staff, Courtney, thank you.

To my former staff, David, thank you.

The fact that he's still sitting here blows my mind. It blows everyone's mind, I guess.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Your turn is coming.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I came here with David in 2004, and there was a steep learning curve. Thanks to people like David Christopherson, that learning curve smoothed itself out after a while.

I say that collectively, for the entire class of 2004, including the former Speaker and current leader of the Conservative Party. He and I have had some great conversations. I learned from him as much as anybody else who came in then. I came in with no political experience. People like Mr. Christopherson had that experience.

I won't repeat the eloquence you just put out there, because I'd just do it an injustice, so I'll leave it at that. Thank you, David, for your kind words.

Thank you, everybody. Merry Festivus to everybody.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

David, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Talking about things that we have to deal with, from the very first meeting I said that I wanted the people at the mikes to have name tags. I really hope we can deal with this before the next Parliament, so that Andrew, Andre and Michaela have name tags. Any clerks and analysts who are here and can be in Hansard should be identifiable to members at the table. That's very important to me.

You guys are part of the committee. You're not elected members, but without you, this committee goes no place.

I think it's important that we ultimately deal with that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Following up on that, do the researchers want to...?

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

We're good. Thank you, though.

The Chair: Mr. Clerk, go ahead.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

I think maybe I can speak for Andre and Michaela as well and say that we have tremendous respect for all of you. We're happy to help out however we can. It's a very enjoyable experience for us to work on this committee.

Merry Christmas.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Finally, as we're allowed to have witnesses, I'm wondering if the people who may have been here the longest have any comments.

Mel, Tyler, or Kelly, you could set a precedent and actually speak.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

(1310)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let the record show that Tyler's turning red.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

No?

A voice: No. I'm good. Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can that go on the record?

An hon. member: That sounds like “Wrap it up.”

The Chair:

Thank you, all.

I have an appreciation for everyone. It's a great committee. Everyone worked together on some difficult issues that you wouldn't imagine you could come to a compromise on. I really appreciate all your work. Hopefully, we can accomplish something, with so much talent, in the next six months.

Thank you and merry Christmas.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1250)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à la 139e séance. Nous voulons simplement conclure sur quelques thèmes non officiels et, je l’espère, amusants pour bien terminer l'année 2018.

Le premier est que le Comité est très heureux que, grâce à son travail, les langues autochtones soient maintenant utilisées de façon officielle à la Chambre, ce pour quoi il devrait être félicité. À la page 24 766 des Débats de la Chambre des communes, l'hon. Hunter Tootoo, député du Nunavut, a fait une brève déclaration en inuktitut qui figure dans le hansard avec les symboles de l’inuktitut. C’est la première fois. C’est formidable que cela figure au compte rendu.

De plus, pendant que nous en sommes aux déclarations finales d'avant Noël, je tiens à m’excuser auprès de M. Reid, qui a suggéré il y a quelques semaines — ce avec quoi j’étais tout à fait d’accord et que je voulais faire — que nous tenions un autre de nos dîners informels pour discuter de l’avenir du Comité. Malheureusement, je ne l’ai jamais organisé. Comme je l’ai dit à mon arrivée au Parlement, j'aime accomplir des choses et je pense que ce genre de réunion nous amène à réfléchir à des thèmes qui donnent lieu à des réalisations concrètes, comme celle que je viens de mentionner. Nous avons beaucoup de talent, comme comité.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Cela dit, la prochaine occasion que nous aurons de le faire sera au cours de la nouvelle année et à la nouvelle Chambre. Il y a un restaurant là-bas, pas vrai?

Le président:

Oui. Il est plus petit, un tiers de la taille, mais oui.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vrai, mais il est assez grand pour nous, surtout si nous réservons tôt. Si les membres du Comité sont d’accord, pourquoi ne pas envisager de tenir une réunion informelle des membres? Nous sommes de retour le lundi, je suppose. Est-ce que le mardi soir serait...?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Ou nous pourrions dîner sans cérémonie à notre ancien lieu de réunion ce jeudi-là.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Nous devrions probablement le faire avant de débattre de ce document, sinon tout le monde n’y sera peut-être pas.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Ou après, je suppose...

M. David Christopherson:

Peut-être les deux: un avant et l'autre après...

Le président:

Laissons-nous un peu de latitude, mais je vais essayer d’organiser quelque chose.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. C'est vraiment une excellente idée, à mon avis.

Permettez-moi de dire ceci, en guise de simple réflexion. À l’approche de la fin d’une législature — c’est une période de conclusion assez prévisible —, nous risquons de nous retrouver coincés avec du matériel difficile à faire passer intégralement. Ou encore, nous pourrions nous retrouver avec des moments libres inespérés, qui pourraient être utilisés pour traiter de certains sujets qui ne figurent pas sur l’écran radar du public. Nous pourrions faire un travail de base utile, qu'il serait possible de conclure par consensus, mais il faut parfois faire un travail de préparation et si nous n’avons consacré aucune réflexion au sujet à l’avance, nous risquons de rater notre chance. Je pense que c'est le genre de chose dont nous pourrions discuter lors de cette réunion.

Le président:

Simplement pour ajouter de l’information tout à fait non pertinente, en utilisant ma prérogative de président — on en discutera au dîner —, j’ai déjà mentionné que toutes les nations nordiques du monde peuvent maintenant voter par mode électronique dans leur parlement. J’ai appris ce matin de la greffière qu’on avait vérifié aux États-Unis. Sur les 100 assemblées législatives des États-Unis, environ 90 % ont le vote électronique.

M. Scott Reid:

S’agit-il de la Chambre haute ou de la Chambre basse dans tous ces États?

Le président:

La basse autant que la haute.

Monsieur Christopherson, allez-y.

(1255)

M. David Christopherson:

J’aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Reid.

Encore une fois, cela découle des commentaires de M. Simms à notre dernière réunion au sujet de l’édifice du Centre et de toute cette idée de deuxième Chambre. Il faut commencer quelque part. À l’heure actuelle, c’est chose du passé. Nous parlons des discussions que nous avons eues à ce sujet et de l’intérêt que certains d’entre nous ont manifesté à l’égard de cet ajout à notre processus parlementaire actuel. Peut-être que dans les moments que mentionne M. Reid, nous pourrions commencer à nous intéresser à cela, à entreprendre une partie de ce travail afin d'éclairer la prochaine législature, qui sera chargée de prendre des décisions sur le sort qui sera réservé à la Chambre temporaire dans laquelle nous nous apprêtons à nous installer.

Je le répète, cette discussion est d’actualité. Même si nous avons publié un rapport indiquant que nous en avons parlé et que nous avons quelques idées à ce sujet, cela mettrait la question sur le radar politique et elle serait consignée, donc elle ne se perdrait pas. Je pense que c’est probablement l’un des changements les plus importants qui pourrait faire l’objet d’un consensus, à mon humble avis, dans les futures législatures. Il pourrait y avoir de la place pour ce genre de réforme majeure, qui serait importante. On ne la réaliserait que si elle était possible et nous avons discuté de ses avantages. Mais nous n’avons pas examiné tous les pièges, qui sont inévitables, eux aussi.

Tout cela pour dire que j’aime l’idée de M. Reid et que, s’il nous reste du temps, nous pourrions accomplir un travail que nous n’aurions pas l’occasion de réaliser autrement. Nous avons beaucoup plus d’expérience maintenant, à la fin de cette législature. Pour certains, c’est la fin de la première législature. Pour d’autres, c’est le perfectionnement que rend possible l'expérience de plusieurs législatures. Nous sommes tous plus forts et, j’ose le croire, plus intelligents et plus expérimentés maintenant. C’est de ce genre de discussion dont il s'agit. Elle est non partisane et elle ne devrait d’aucune façon affecter la folle saison dans laquelle nous allons nous retrouver en cette période préélectorale. Tout cela pour ajouter ma voix au concert et dire qu’il s’agit peut-être de l’une de ces idées toutes spéciales que nous pourrions examiner et qui jetteraient les bases d'un futur travail dans les législatures à venir. Il s’agirait de parler de cette deuxième Chambre et de la façon dont nous pourrions fournir l'occasion, surtout pour les simples députés, de disposer de plus de temps, d'avoir voix au chapitre et un meilleur sens des priorités.

Merci.

Le président:

Je suivrai ces conseils, non seulement pour le dîner du Comité, mais aussi pour le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président:

J’aimerais faire un tour de table avant de partir, parce que c’est Noël.

M. Nater et moi-même avons déjà fait quelques observations finales. Je vais faire un tour de table pour voir si quelqu’un d’autre veut ajouter quelque chose, non seulement pour conclure l'année, mais aussi pour conclure les trois années que nous avons passées ensemble. Nous n’avons jamais fait cela, alors si quelqu’un veut s'exprimer, c'est le moment.

J’ai proposé une motion pour que nous passions directement au mois de juin, mais je ne vais pas y donner suite.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Nous allons commencer par Stephanie, après quoi nous entendrons quiconque a des observations pour conclure avant les Fêtes.

Stephanie, vous avez la parole.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Joyeux Noël. Bonne année! Bonne Hanouka! Joyeux Kwanzaa.

À l’an prochain.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

J’ai déjà hâte à notre dîner de la nouvelle année. En fait, je suis très heureux que ma première visite au nouveau restaurant se fasse en votre compagnie. Ce sera bien.

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose?

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je vais simplement répéter ce que j’ai dit plus tôt à huis clos.

Je vous remercie de votre leadership au sein de ce comité et de la souplesse dont vous avez fait preuve depuis que j'y participe, c'est-à-dire à peine un an. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Je suis heureux de travailler avec les membres du Comité.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, allez-y.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Tout d’abord, bien sûr, je souhaite à tout le monde de joyeuses Fêtes en toute sécurité.

Je suis probablement un peu plus émotif que la plupart d’entre vous parce que j’aime cette salle et que j'adore ce comité. Certains des meilleurs parlementaires ont siégé à ce comité. J’adore la nature non partisane de ce que nous faisons. Je suis ici depuis tellement longtemps que je n’ai aucun intérêt à faire les manchettes pour avoir attaqué quelqu'un politiquement. Cela n'a plus aucun intérêt pour moi.

Ce qui me motive, après près de 35 ans comme élu, c’est qu'à partir de nos positions très différentes, nous réussissions à travailler ensemble pour une cause commune et à trouver des compromis et un terrain d’entente pour publier des rapports et des recommandations sur lesquels nous sommes tous d’accord. Je trouve cela stimulant. Je trouve cela enthousiasmant.

Beaucoup de choses se sont passées dans cette salle, parce que c’est le seul comité qui a un horaire fixe. Rien ne bouge. Nous nous réunissons toujours à la même heure et dans la même salle, sauf lorsque nous faisons de très grandes choses et qu'alors, nous allions dans les grandes salles. Je suppose que cela a à voir avec l'intimité de cette salle. C’est l’une des plus petites.

Tout ceci est un peu disparate, mais c’est simplement l’effet des émotions. Sur une note plus personnelle, 2018 a été l’année la plus tragique de ma vie, même si j'ai aussi vécu des choses passionnantes, alors je ressens une certaine ambivalence.

Quoi qu’il en soit, sur une note égoïste, j’ai dit à ma femme l’autre jour que je me sentais très honoré de voir que, lorsque je quitterai cet endroit, les émotions que je ressens seront partagées par tout le monde, parce que vous les ressentirez aussi au moment de quitter cet édifice et de passer à autre chose. C’est quand même bien de vivre cette émotion de façon collective au moment de dire « adieu » à notre foyer parlementaire pendant un certain temps, plutôt que de devoir le vivre comme un seul député qui ne se présentera plus et qui est ému parce qu'il sait qu'il ne reviendra plus. Le nombre procure une certaine sécurité. Cela fait du bien.

Je tiens aussi à mentionner, si vous me le permettez, pendant que j’ai la parole, que sur la question des langues autochtones, ce qui est vraiment emballant, c’est que lorsque nos successeurs ou certains d’entre vous reviendront ici au moment de la réouverture, ce ne sera rien d'extraordinaire. Ce sera simplement notre façon normale de fonctionner. N’est-ce pas merveilleux d'avoir participé à la mise en oeuvre de quelque chose de nouveau, quelque chose qui devait être fait pour renforcer la Confédération, et de savoir, connaissant le fonctionnement de cet endroit et connaissant les Canadiens, que dans une dizaine d’années, ce ne sera rien de vraiment exceptionnel, juste la façon normale de faire les choses? Il y a tellement de choses positives pour lesquelles le Parlement joue un rôle, même sur la scène internationale.

Je vais conclure, sinon je vais continuer indéfiniment, mais je tiens à exprimer à quel point nos réunions sont importantes à mes yeux et à quel point j’ai du respect pour vous tous et pour le personnel extraordinaire qui nous permet d'accomplir tout cela. Mon regard fait le tour de la salle et je vois tous les employés, y compris les agents de sécurité qui sont à l’extérieur, prêts à prendre une balle pour nous s'il le faut — et ce n’est pas une exagération pour ceux d’entre nous qui étaient ici en 2014.

Merci tout particulièrement à vous, monsieur le président. Vous avez été un président exceptionnel. Vous avez une approche très particulière à la présidence qui est très efficace. M. Preston était comme ça lui aussi. Vous avez sûrement senti son ombre lorsque vous avez pris ce fauteuil, car M. Preston était très hautement considéré. Je peux dire, pour avoir servi avec lui, que vous avez respecté cette norme du mieux que vous l'avez pu et que vous l’avez même dépassée. Ce fut un véritable honneur de siéger à un comité à vos côtés.

Je vous souhaite à tous de joyeuses Fêtes.

Merci.

Des députés: Bravo!

(1300)

Le président:

Merci, David.

Avant d’oublier, je tiens aussi à féliciter notre personnel, comme vous l’avez fait. C’était dans mes notes. Je pense que nous avons en effet le meilleur greffier et les meilleurs recherchistes de tous les comités.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Ils nous ont vraiment gardés de tout danger — ça, c'est certain — et ils ont toujours les réponses dont nous avons besoin. De plus, nous recevons les documents à l’avance, ce qui nous évite de perdre du temps en comité, car les réponses sont déjà là. Nous leur en sommes tous très reconnaissants.

Nous sommes également heureux d’avoir les meilleurs repas de tous les comités.

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Il est difficile de parler après David, qui l'a fait de façon si éloquente, alors pour ce qui est peut-être ma dernière intervention ici, je veux simplement vous remercier et vous souhaiter un joyeux Noël, et tout le bonheur possible en 2019.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe, allez-y. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Je suis évidemment d'accord sur ces commentaires très élogieux. C'est sûr que nous quittons cet endroit avec une certaine nostalgie.

Je vous remercie tous. Je vous souhaite un Joyeux Noël, de joyeuses Fêtes et une année 2019 remplie de belles choses, de santé et de paix. Continuez d'espérer que nous allons trouver la paix et à travailler fort.

Je vous remercie tous de toujours être là pour nous aider. J'ai beaucoup aimé être ici avec vous. [Traduction]

Le président:

Madame Sahota, allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Je trouvais tout cela un peu ridicule au début, mais maintenant, à mi-chemin, je me dis: « Oh, n'est-ce pas merveilleux que nous fassions cela? ».

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruby Sahota: Je suis heureuse que nous ayons l’occasion de vous faire part de nos réflexions. C'est très émouvant de quitter cet édifice, même si je ne suis ici que depuis trois ans. Je ne peux pas imaginer ce que vivent ceux qui sont ici depuis des années et des décennies. Cet édifice a beaucoup d’histoire. Ce sera bien de le voir restauré et de le voir recevoir l’amour et les soins dont il a probablement besoin. Je pense que c’est l’aspect positif. J’aimerais tant qu’on n'ait pas à le fermer aussi longtemps.

J’ai hâte au début de la nouvelle année pour travailler avec vous tous dans le nouvel édifice, l’édifice de l’Ouest.

Ce comité était également inattendu pour moi. Lorsque j’y ai été nommée pour la première fois, il y a trois ans, je me suis dit: « Wow. Qu’est-ce que j’ai fait pour mériter cela? » Maintenant, je dis: « Wow! Qu’est-ce que j’ai fait, vraiment, pour mériter cela? »

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruby Sahota: Cela a été fantastique. Cela a été une expérience très enrichissante. Le plus beau de tout cela a été de travailler avec vous tous.

Merci. Joyeux Noël.

Le président: David, allez-y.

(1305)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

David, lors de notre toute première interaction dans le cadre de ce comité, au tout début de la première législature, vous avez fait des commentaires moqueurs sur les nouveaux venus qui n’avaient pas d’expérience ici. Je vous ai alors demandé si vous vouliez me dire que Tyler n’avait pas d’expérience — parce que j’étais assis à côté de lui depuis longtemps — et vous vous êtes fâché contre moi. Notre relation n’a donc pas très bien commencé.

Mais ce fut un immense privilège pour moi de siéger avec des gens vraiment intéressants. Nous avons établi de très bonnes relations au sein de ce comité. Je ne crois pas que ce soit exagéré.

Scott, j’adore dire que je vous regardais à la télévision et que c’est chouette de travailler avec vous — avec David, un peu moins.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Il est plus agréable de travailler avec lui, pour ce qui est de la télé, un peu moins...

J’adore ce comité. On s'y amuse beaucoup. Il ne représente rien pour ma circonscription. Personne dans cette circonscription n'a la moindre idée de ce que nous faisons au Comité de la procédure, mais c’est le travail le plus fascinant que l'on puisse avoir sur la Colline. C’est ici que l'on peut voir ce qui se passe.

Cela me rappelle que beaucoup de problèmes demeurent non résolus, comme nous l’avons appris mardi, en ce qui a trait à la reconstruction de cet endroit. J’espère vraiment que nous garderons contact et que nous y reviendrons quelques fois par année. Où en sommes-nous? Où allons-nous? Est-ce là où nous voulons aller? Le SPP est un autre exemple vraiment fascinant. Je n’aurais jamais pensé que nous nous en occuperions comme nous l'avons fait au cours des trois dernières années. J’espère que nous ne l'abandonnerons pas non plus.

Tout cela pour dire qu'il a été vraiment génial de travailler avec vous. Il s’agit probablement de la dernière réunion du Comité à avoir lieu dans cette salle, telle que nous la connaissons. Qui sait à quoi elle ressemblera à notre retour? Ce sera peut-être le bar — encore une fois, nous l'ignorons.

Merci. Joyeuses Fêtes et nous nous reverrons pour dîner dans l’édifice de l’Ouest.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à M. Simms, j’aimerais revenir sur une de vos observations.

J’ai certainement l’intention d’avoir une autre réunion comme celle de mardi avant la fin de cette législature. Nous ne l'abandonnerons pas avant la prochaine législature. C’est très important: les députés veulent avoir leur mot à dire. Je pense que vous l’avez dit clairement. Nous devons nous assurer de rester au fait de la situation.

Monsieur Simms, allez-y.

M. Scott Simms:

Je m’appelle Scott. Je suis Lion.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms: Vous savez, il y a des gens autour de nous, et je veux dire littéralement autour de nous, que nous devrions remercier également. Ce sont les gens qui sont assis derrière nous. Ils nous montrent un visage courageux lorsque nous disons quelque chose de stupide, et ils sont ravis lorsque nous disons quelque chose d’intelligent. D’une façon ou d’une autre, les trucs intelligents viennent souvent d’eux, et habituellement les trucs stupides sont le fruit de mes réactions instinctives, plus que de quoi que ce soit d’autre.

Merci au personnel de veiller sur nous. Je dis cela avec le plus grand respect pour les employés, car ils sont pour nous de solides appuis.

Merci à mon employée actuelle, Courtney.

Merci à mon ancien employé, David.

Le fait qu’il soit encore assis ici me renverse. Je suppose que tout le monde est renversé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Votre tour s’en vient.

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis arrivé ici avec David en 2004, et le processus d’apprentissage a été vraiment ardu. C'est grâce à des personnes comme David Christopherson qu'il est devenu plus facile, après un certain temps.

Cela vaut pour tous collectivement, pour toute la classe de 2004, y compris l’ancien Président et actuel chef du Parti conservateur. Lui et moi avons eu d’excellentes conversations. J'ai beaucoup appris de lui, comme tous ceux qui sont arrivés à cette époque. Je suis arrivé sans expérience politique. Des gens comme M. Christopherson avaient cette expérience.

Je ne reproduirai pas l’éloquence dont vous venez de faire preuve, car je ne serais pas à la hauteur, alors je m’en tiendrai là. Merci, David, de vos bons mots.

Merci à tous. Joyeux temps des Fêtes à tous.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

David, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parlant de choses dont nous devons nous occuper, dès la première réunion, j’ai mentionné le souhait que les gens qui s'expriment au micro aient des porte-noms. J’espère vraiment que nous pourrons régler cette question avant la prochaine législature, afin qu’Andrew, Andre et Michaela aient des porte-noms. Tous les greffiers et analystes qui sont ici et qui peuvent figurer dans le hansard devraient pouvoir être identifiés par les membres du Comité. C’est très important pour moi.

Vous faites partie du Comité. Vous n’êtes pas des députés élus, mais sans vous, ce comité ne fonctionnerait pas.

Je pense qu’il est important que nous réglions enfin ce problème.

Merci.

Le président:

Dans la même veine, les chercheurs veulent-ils...?

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du Comité):

Ça va aller. Merci, cependant.

Le président: Monsieur le greffier, allez-y.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Je pense que je peux aussi parler au nom d’Andre et de Michaela et dire que nous avons énormément de respect pour vous tous. Nous sommes heureux d’aider dans la mesure de nos capacités. C’est une expérience très agréable pour nous de travailler au sein de ce comité.

Joyeux Noël.

Le président:

Merci.

Enfin, comme nous avons le droit d’entendre des témoins, je me demande si les personnes qui sont ici depuis le plus longtemps ont quelque chose à dire.

Mel, Tyler ou Kelly, vous pourriez créer un précédent et prendre la parole.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

(1310)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que le compte rendu indique que Tyler est en train de rougir.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Non?

Une voix: Non. Ça va, merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela peut-il figurer au compte rendu?

Un député: C'est peut-être le moment de conclure.

Le président:

Merci à tous.

Je vous estime tous. C’est un excellent comité. Tout le monde a travaillé ensemble sur des questions difficiles, des questions sur lesquelles personne n'aurait cru qu'il était possible de s'entendre. Je vous suis vraiment reconnaissant pour tout votre travail. Avec autant de personnes compétentes, j'espère que nous arriverons à accomplir quelque chose au cours des six prochains mois.

Merci et joyeux Noël.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 13, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.