header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-02-18 PROC 8

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome, everyone.

Good morning. This is meeting number 8 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is being held in public. Today we're going to have a briefing from the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Mary Dawson.

Mary, you must be very popular, I haven't seen this room so full in a long while. I know Kady O'Malley is very excited that you're here. She'll have lots to tweet.

With Mary is Martine Richard, general counsel and acting director of investigations; Lyne Robinson-Dalpé, director of advisory and compliance; and Marie Danielle Vachon, director of policy, research, and communication.

Seeing as there is so much interest in the room, basically this committee is responsible for a mandatory five-year review of the conflict of interest code. We just did that a year ago, but we didn't do everything. We just picked the low-hanging fruit, so there may be other things that we may want to do. We're going to have that discussion next Tuesday after we hear this presentation. Next Tuesday we will discuss what the committee wants to do on this topic or amendments we want to make, if anything.

I would ask the committee members, before I forget, to come prepared to rubber-stamp the three forms that are already in place that we talked about before. Make sure you take a look at them so we don't have to have a long discussion because they're already being used and approved by Parliament, and we don't want to change our procedure of approving such forms.

With that, unless any of the committee members want to do anything else, you are all very welcome. Thank you for coming on short notice. We seem to ask everyone on short notice while we're getting organized. We appreciate your bringing your technical staff who will be able to answer some questions. The committee is always very creative in its questions, so it is great that we have a whole team here. You're on, and we'll be flexible with your presentation time because I know you have a lot of things that you could tell us.

Ms. Mary Dawson (Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner):

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Mr. Chair and honourable members of the committee, I am pleased to have this opportunity to appear before you, and I thank you for inviting me.[English]

I was going to introduce my team here, but you've introduced them already. I'll mention that these are my senior management team members, and I'll mention the one who's not here today because she's just left on holidays, Denise Benoit, who's the head of corporate.

I will briefly explain my role and mandate as Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, review my past interactions with the committee, and outline my hopes and expectations for a productive relationship going forward.

As Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, I administer two conflict of interest regimes: the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons and the Conflict of Interest Act for public office holders. These two regimes seek to prevent conflicts from arising between the public duties of elected and appointed officials, and private interests.

The members' code and the act have similar but not identical provisions. This can be confusing, particularly in the case of members who are also ministers or parliamentary secretaries, and therefore subject to both regimes. I've recommended that Parliament consider ways in which the members' code and the act might be harmonized where possible in order to ensure consistency of language and processes.

The members' code is part of the Standing Orders of the House of Commons, the permanent written rules under which the House regulates its proceedings. It includes rules on avoiding conflict of interest, processes for the confidential disclosure of information to the commissioner, procedures for making members' summary information and other statements public, an advisory role for the commissioner, and a process for investigating alleged contraventions of the rules by members.

My staff and I review confidential reports of assets, liabilities, and activities. We maintain a public registry of publicly declarable information and investigate and report on cases of alleged non-compliance. You're in the process or have finished that first phase of your initial reporting. Our primary goal is prevention, by assisting members and public office holders to comply with the conflict of interest regimes.

An explicit educational role for the commissioner is set out in section 32 of the members' code. My staff and I undertake a number of outreach activities to inform and educate members about their obligations under the members' code and how to comply. We maintain regular contact with members and provide confidential advice on specific matters. We review with them each year their confidential disclosures and public declarations. We make formal presentations to party caucuses, and we prepare written material, such as backgrounders, fact sheets, and advisory options.

In enforcing the members' code I'm empowered to conduct formal investigations called “inquiries”. In my inquiry reports I can recommend sanctions, but it's up to the House of Commons to decide if any measures should be taken against a member for failure to comply with the members' code. Those reports are made public without any approvals by Parliament or the government.

The members' code has been amended a number of times since it was adopted by the House of Commons in April 2004. In 2007 an interpretation section was added, the reporting deadline for gifts was extended to 60 days, and there were several changes to the disclosure statement provisions. In 2008 an exemption was introduced as a result of an inquiry report of mine so that members would not be considered to be furthering their own private interests or those of another person if the matter in question consisted of being a party to any legal action relating to actions of the member as an MP. That was the issue of libel chill that some of you might remember. In 2009 the gift rules were amended in consultation with this committee and myself.

Most recently, in 2015, the code was amended in several areas. Among the changes the disclosure threshold for gifts was lowered from $500 to $200, consistent with the threshold for public office holders, the threshold for reporting sponsored travel costs paid by third parties was also set at $200, and deadlines were introduced for members to sign their disclosure summary and complete the annual review process. All of these changes related to recommendations I had made during the last five-year review.

(1110)



Section 33 of the members' code requires the committee to conduct a comprehensive review of its provisions and operation every five years. The amendments made to the members' code in 2007 resulted from the first of the five-year reviews.

The second review was launched in 2012 and I provided the committee with a written submission and appeared before it to discuss my recommendations in May of that year. The committee suspended its study soon afterwards and began a new review almost three years later, in February 2015. I provided a new written submission at the committee's request and again appeared before it.

In June of 2015, the committee presented a report to the House of Commons concluding that review. The House concurred in the report later that month, and the committee's recommended amendments came into effect on October 20, the day after the federal election. They reflect, in whole or in part, 10 of the recommendations that I made to the committee, and I was delighted to see this. I note that the code is generally working quite well, but I also note that I made 13 other recommendations and would be pleased to discuss them should the committee choose to proceed with a comprehensive review of the members' code, which was expressly recommended in the June report.

The House also concurred in a new form entitled, “Request for an Inquiry”, which I had submitted to the committee for approval in 2010. I had to do that because section 30 of the members' code requires that I obtain the committee's approval for all forms and guidelines, and I felt it was very important that we have a form for members to request an inquiry.

Generally, the approval requirement has hampered my efforts to help members comply with their obligations. I cannot issue any guidelines or forms under the members' code. A notable example is guidelines in relation to gifts, an area that appears to cause a lot of confusion and prompts many questions from members.

In contrast, no approval of guidelines or forms is required under the Conflict of Interest Act for public office holders. I have issued several guidelines under the act, quite a number, actually, and public office holders have told me they appreciate having these tools. I have raised this concern with the committee in the past and asked it to consider whether there is really a need for the committee to approve any guidelines and forms that I may develop under the members' code.

In the meantime, when the members' code was amended by the House of Commons last June, a number of consequential and editorial changes were required to reflect the amended language of the code in the existing forms. Normally, I would have sought the committee's approval of the revised forms, but there was no time. The House rose very soon after the amendments were made, and then Parliament was dissolved in early August for the election.

The committee is mandated under the Standing Orders of the House of Commons to review and report on all matters relating to the members' code, and it has sought my input in recommending amendments to the House of Commons. I have appeared before the committee since becoming commissioner, although not very often. In the early years of my mandate I was invited to discuss with the committee two of my annual reports, but I have not been given the opportunity to do so since 2010. The only other occasions on which I was invited to interact with the committee was in the context of the five-year review of the members' code initiated in 2012, and I appeared a second time in 2015.

I look forward to a productive working relationship with the committee. I must say I am encouraged by the fact that the committee wished to meet with me so early in the new Parliament, even if it was on short notice.

(1115)

[Translation]

Mr. Chair, in closing, I wish to assure the committee that I and my office are available to provide any information that it may require about any matters related to the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons.

I thank the committee again for inviting me to appear before you today. I will now be happy to answer any questions you may have. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Just before we go to questions, you mentioned that when we recently adopted 11 of your recommendations, there were 13 we didn't. Right?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Ten, it was 10 and 13.

The Chair:

Thirteen that we didn't...?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes.

The Chair:

Would it be possible, before our Tuesday meeting, for you to send us those 13 recommendations in a priority list of what you think is most important?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Okay.

The Chair:

That's just in case we address that, because that's what we're going to discuss on Tuesday.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I would be pleased to do that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Who's going first? Mr. Graham.

(1120)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Ms. Dawson. I first wanted to say that my adviser is Karine McNeely from your office. She has been fantastic. I wanted to shout out to her. It's been great. When I send a question, I get a quick and clear answer. It's been helpful to have that guidance as I try to figure out what on earth my responsibilities are.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Thank you. We do encourage people to call.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We do and I've had my staff call when I've had questions, such as, “I don't know if I should do this. Ask Karen. She'll figure it out.” It's appreciated.

In your view, what obligations or processes under the code are the most complicated or potentially misunderstood by members?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's gifts, constantly gifts. It is such a problematic area.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

For others, none spring to mind as being problematic like that. It's overwhelmingly at the forefront of problems and that's the one that springs to my mind.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kinds of problems have you had with non-compliance and what kinds of enforcement actions have been taken in the past?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I have no idea the extent to which gifts are being reported to me, so all I can use as my guidelines are the ones that are reported.

I issued a report under the act about a year ago. That brought many more questions to the fore. That report had to do with someone who left office and went and worked with.... It was the Bonner report. It was about taking a post-employment position with someone who had been a lobbyist. It drew attention to our rules. Where questions arose were with respect to receptions and the whole question of gifts.

I've always that said if you receive a dinner, that is a gift. Of course, if you receive a bouquet of flowers, that's a gift. Everything's a gift. Then the question becomes, is it acceptable? There is a lot of confusion between acceptability and reportability to begin with. A lot of people align the two and think if it's not reportable, it's acceptable. That message seems to get lost constantly.

I'm pleased to see the reporting threshold has come down to $200, because now we'll see the ones between $200 and $500.

I put forward a number of possibilities over the years as to how we could handle this. Just to give you a bit of history, when you guys made those amendments in 2010 or 2011 the rules were different. The rules said if you were given a gift that had anything to do with your job then you had to refuse it. Those rules were being totally ignored. It was like they didn't exist, and I was troubled by the hypocrisy of it all. I said we should at least look at putting out some realistic rule on gifts that people could then accept and not ignore. What happened was that we took the same rule that was in the act for the public officer holders and mirrored it in the code. It's much easier to receive a gift as a member than it is to receive a gift as a minister because there are a lot more potential conflict situations.

I'm giving you a diatribe on gifts. I hope this is okay.

One area where you can't receive gifts is if you are sitting on a committee voting on a particular matter and the person who is the stakeholder takes you to a big, fancy dinner or gives you tickets to something.

I'm just explaining the gifts, but the area that gets the most attention by people complaining about the gift rules are these receptions that seem to take place on the Hill.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As I understand it, if I accept that piece of sushi then they can't lobby me, so it's immunity, right?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

If you accept—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Mary Dawson: Well, I suppose you could look at it that way, except I wouldn't go so far as a little shrimp or something. I've been before committees where they said, “How many shrimp will it take to make an offence?”

I said, “Look, you are being silly.” I've said that a normal courtesy cup of coffee is okay, unless it is drilled into the person every day.

You have to look at this with a little bit of common sense. It took me a couple of years to find out there were all these receptions on the Hill because nobody ever reports them. Generally speaking, for members, they are probably okay because if you're walking by and getting a glass of wine or something I'm not going to complain about that. But what I do have problems with is a significant spread being put out targeting the people who are the problem. I know there have been a number of misapprehensions about exactly what we're saying in my office. It gets a little complicated because the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying is putting out guidelines that interface to some extent with my rules.

I may as well beat my horse here. There is a problem between the Lobbying Act, the members' code, and the act, in that the same terminology is used to mean something different. In my act, a public office holder is a minister, a parliamentary secretary, a Governor in Council appointee, or ministerial staff. In the Lobbying Act, the term “public office holder” is used to mean a whole bunch more people, including members. When statements are being made under the Lobbying Act or under my act, they are talking about different people.

Anyway, that's one of my hobby horses.

(1125)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

I think I am well past my time, so thanks for that.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Sorry, I went on.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you.

I want to pursue the idea of gifts as well, specifically in relation to the idea of events, receptions, information sessions, meetings, galas, whatever, the whole list of things that we all attend in the course of our jobs. I'm sure everybody in this room sitting around the table on both sides would say that those are important aspects of our job, important duties as members of Parliament, to meet with people, to hear information, to gather feedback, to meet with constituents, to speak at events, and a variety of things like that.

I'm still struggling a bit with some of the testimony and answers we had last time you were at committee in trying to determine what we can attend and what we can't, what is considered a gift and what is considered part of our official duties. I have a few questions. I hope I'll have time to get to them all.

I wonder if you could you give us some kind of clarification. When you were here last time you indicated that you were recommending that we make the code explicitly exclude events where all members have been invited. That raises a few questions for me. The first one is: how do we, as members of Parliament, know or determine what the invitation list was for an event? Were all members of Parliament invited? How are we to know?

That works well if it's an event taking place here in Ottawa or in the national capital region but it doesn't work so well when it's an event in our own constituency or in our region. If it's an event in one's own constituency is it then acceptable to attend if, say, the local municipal councillors and the local provincial elected members have been invited?

More broadly than that—I'll use Mr. Christopherson's example—if all the politicians in the Hamilton area had been invited, or in my case, if all the politicians in the Calgary area had been invited, would that make it acceptable?

It's really difficult for us to know when, where, and how to determine that. Could you give me some clarification?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

As far as I'm concerned, if it's constituency activities that's fine, unless it's some company that's looking for a particular bill from you that targets you specifically for that. But if you're invited to the Catholic brothers something or other, or the Jehovah's Witnesses something or other, there is no problem going there at all.

There was a time when I first came into this office where some of the members thought they had to pay every time they went to one of these fairs, and so forth, and I said, “No, don't worry about that because you're representing your constituency and they're not looking for anything in particular from you.” Those things are fine. That is your constituency.

Sometimes, for example—and it usually happens under the act rather than the code—the Prime Minister might be invited to this, that, and the other thing to represent Canada. There is a whole representational role that's carved out. I don't know if that helps.

(1130)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm sorry, let me stop you there.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes. Keep grilling; that's fine.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I only have limited time, obviously. I apologize for it.

I still find it grey there.

What is the barrier? How do we, as members of Parliament, determine what kind of event is acceptable and, I guess, when it is considered a gift?

Often, for example, in our ridings we might be asked to attend a charity function. The organizers obviously want you as a member of Parliament to attend, because you're someone who has some recognition and is well thought of in the community, generally—or hopefully. We like to think we're well thought of in the community, anyway. So they'll ask you to come to bring greetings or speak at the event or maybe help with the auctioning of their—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That is not a problem unless that particular charity at that particular time is seeking support.

I sent an advisory out a couple of years ago in a case when the Falun Gong sent tickets to their performances at the NAC, which would be in the order of $100 or something. At the same time, they were making representations for support.

That's the test. Is there something that they're looking for from you?

Mr. Blake Richards:

So as long as there's nothing that they're asking of you as a member of Parliament...?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, because you are prominent members within a community—

Mr. Blake Richards:

If the charity, for example, were to be seeking government funding for a new building or something, then that would be unacceptable?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It would be unacceptable for the minister who was involved in deciding on the funding. It might be unacceptable for the committee members, if there were a bill before the House or something.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So the determination is really whether you specifically have a decision-making point in something that this organization is seeking.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's right.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What about reporting it as a gift? For example, you're attending that charity function and the ticket price is more than $200. They provided you a ticket because they'd like you there as a prominent member in the community to provide support to their—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's the same test, but then you need to report your ticket.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You'd have to report the ticket, so it's considered a gift.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's acceptable, but you must report it.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes. But why are they giving you a gift worth more than $200? It always troubles me when these charities blanket the Hill with these gifts. What the heck are they spending...?

Mr. Blake Richards:

No. I'm not talking about a gift. I'm saying that if you're attending, as I outlined earlier, in your role as a member of Parliament....

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, and they thank you for going....

Mr. Blake Richards:

If they're asking you to be there and you're not paying for a ticket, but the tickets are more than $200, then you must report that as a gift—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, you have to report it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—even though you're attending in an official...?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

You report it, yes. That gives some transparency to what's going on.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess I'm a little troubled that this would be considered a gift, because it's really part of our role as a member of Parliament. But if you're saying that's the case, I guess my question would be that if we felt as a committee that we wanted to recommend changes so that we would better clarify—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It would depend on whether it was in your constituency, probably. Each case....

Unfortunately, it is a grey area. There's no way of getting around it. You have to determine, first of all, whether it's a gift, and a gift is anything given to you that you don't pay for, basically.

Mr. Blake Richards:

May I just...?

The Chair:

Go ahead. Make it really short.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I appreciate it. This is just a quick follow-up.

It almost sounds to me as though we're presented with the case that every time we were invited to an event, we'd have to come to check with your office to determine whether it's acceptable or not. Is there a way you could suggest that we could write the code so that this would be better clarified, which would then not require a member of Parliament to come to check with you every single time they're attending an event?

Can you suggest how we might write the code to be very clear about what's acceptable and what's not?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

My guidelines under the act, I think, are quite good. I've never been able to get guidelines.... I sort of gave up because of the requirement for this committee to approve stuff. But I think if I had the power, I could put my mind to it and get a guideline out.

I've had letters coming in from lobbyists and I've promised them that I'm going to get an advisory out, which I consider that I can do on my own, around some of these gifts. But you know, there's a whole bunch of different, random questions that go in different directions.

I should just point out one thing, though. If you're there representing your community, I would consider that a protocol gift, and there is an exception for protocol gifts. But it's still a gift. There's a difference between reporting and acceptability.

I think it's not a bad thing, if you're getting value.... I mean, most of these things in your community would not require a ticket of $200, I would think. It's not as though there's a plethora of these things. I agree that it's not 100% easy, but the reason it's not easy is that it depends on the individual receiving it and the relationship with the giver. You have to look at the specific cases.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you, Madam Dawson, and your staff for being here today. We have been around and around on this stuff all along. I arrived the year this all started and I have to say it's about as clear now as it was then.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

The easy answer is you can receive no gifts, but I don't think you want to go there. There is a solution. Sorry.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Not a problem. Just a macro and then I'll get into a couple of micros. You opened with—and I've heard it consistently and we've dealt with it here at this committee—where we have the act and the code and the fact that they're not the same, but then we also have the lobby commissioner, as you mentioned. Has there ever been any attempt or thought between you and the lobby commissioner, or anybody else on that side of it, to look at a joint report that makes recommendations that would help clarify that?

It would be for ease of use, rather than us dealing with the individual silos and trying to identify where they overlap, what language would be best, if there's a conflicting language, which one to recommend, or how to outline the arguments for and against each. It seems to me it would be a lot easier if you folks as agents of Parliament sat down—because you have the expertise. You know what you're talking about because you deal with it every day. We deal with all kinds of things all day.

Has there been any thought to that or is there a particular reason why we couldn't approach it that way?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

We've both appeared at same meetings where we're on a panel and had a discussion about things.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I recall those meetings, it just helped to point out the problems. I was looking at in terms of the solution side. Could you come in with a joint report that makes recommendations, or can you not do that because you're silo-bound by your separate pieces of legislation?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

One of the problems is that we're dealing with a different group. We're not dealing with the same group of people, and the rules can't be the same when you're not dealing with the same group of people. I understand your instinct. I don't think we have necessarily the same bottom line, and the trouble is we each have our own authority. I take your suggestion and it would be a good thing. The only people that the lobbying commissioner is concerned about are lobbyists. I'm concerned about a much broader group of people: stakeholders.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In fairness you're the one who raised the fact that we have overlapping jurisdictions, and that it would be helpful if we could separate those out. We've tried it from our end, and you can see how effective we've been in 12 years. I'm trying to find a different approach.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I think it might help if the two offices were together, but that's for the future.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You realize you have a whole bunch of people in the lobby commissioner's office all jumping up and down right now saying, “What the heck?”

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's one solution. It's not a final solution.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In one way it makes a lot of sense. If there are problems with overlapping, let's get it into one document where the language and the references are meant to be constant.

(1140)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Lobbying used to be covered under the previous administration of the Conflict of Interest Act, but it was only the registration. What's different now is that there's this guideline capacity for the lobbying commissioner to make, and that wasn't there before.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Just to pursue this a little further, we're just kind of blue-skying right now, but would that be something the two commissioners would be prepared to look at? If there's an efficiency to be made.... Nobody wants to lose anything. We spent a lot of time on these things, and in many ways these are the defining differences of a modern mature democracy versus some of the emerging ones that many of us are involved in, and the struggles they face. They are nice problems to have.

Is there the capacity to make that recommendation? Is it something we should look at? We're always interested in efficiencies on all sides of the House.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

You're members of Parliament. I think you can make whatever recommendations you want to make.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was looking for something that had some substance before we do it though.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

The ethics committee made that recommendation at one point.

Mr. David Christopherson:

They did...?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, and that's been in the wind off and on.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Maybe we should pick up on that thread, Mr. Chair. I'll leave that with you for now, but maybe that's something we want to look at. We keep doing the same thing over and over. Einstein would be so disappointed because we keep getting the same outcome, and we look for different ones. Maybe we should reach out and find some of that. New Parliament, big change, maybe this is the opportunity to get our arms around this and seize the moment. How's my time, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. I'll leave that, I think, unless there was more to it you wanted to go to.

I'll come back to the gifts again, because it's the most confusing thing. I'm pleased to hear, and I've heard you say consistently, that on the constituency side it's not as big an issue. That doesn't mean it can't be, but in Hamilton I don't go to a lot of galas at which the price is more than $200. It happens from time to time, but really not that often.

Even when I was on city council, in more than 30 years in elected office, I don't think I've ever had to report anything involving any serious money. There were one or two items that crossed the line and triggered the reporting, but for the most part in the ridings it doesn't....

Now, here you get into a different ball game. We've talked about some of the issues: the receptions that are unclear, what is a protocol gift versus what isn't, and acceptability versus reportability. But the thing we haven't talked about, just to confuse it even more.... My friend Mr. Reid and I spent a fair bit of time...and I'm looking forward to his seven minutes on this because he spent a lot of time and was involved, I believe, in the original legislation. I just happened to arrive but he was actually part of the homework, so I defer often to his corporate history on a lot of these things.

But the stuff that comes in.... I'll walk into my Hill office on a Monday, having been in my riding, and there will be something sitting on my chair. There will be a letter and there will be some little, I don't know, key chain or a fob of some sort, a baseball cap, and a letter saying, “Hi. How are you? We are the”...whoever.

Recently we had one from the insurance bureau. I think they sent a little winter kit. I don't know the price. I'm thinking 50 bucks maybe, give or take, if that. I sent it back, based on the last meetings we had with you, because I just fear the media is going to be coming around saying they're just curious as to who followed what she said. I shipped it all back.

But you're going to hear Mr. Reid talk about the fact that sometimes it costs us more money to find out who to send it to, spend the time of staff who spent time already unpacking it and getting it ready for me when I arrived, only to have me turn around and say ship it out. There's all that time.

Sometimes you're not sure. Mr. Reid was looking for permission just to throw it out, which is an answer here, but what a waste. Really, it's like throwing 50 bucks times 338 just completely out the window, and then there's no benefit gained by somebody who might use it.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No. You could accept those. As long as that insurance bureau or whoever the heck it was who gave you the gift wasn't looking for a decision from you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that, but what happens—

The Chair:

David, we're way over your time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sorry. Okay.

The Chair:

We can get back to it, though, unless you want to go really quickly to finish this up.

Mr. David Christopherson:

With your permission, I'll just follow up on it and stop as soon as you tell me, obviously.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're getting the benefit of those who have been around. The media are also here, so if there are any mistakes, let me make them, rather than any of you. Yeah, I know how this goes, “Go ahead, Dave. Sure, talk away about all these gifts.” It's great subject fodder to be involved in.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: Here is the thing. What happens is that the insurance bureau will do a lobby day, or certainly, for instance, the firefighters—and we get both the firefighters themselves and the chiefs—will give a gift, as well as the insurance bureau. Here's the thing. When they arrive, the sophisticated ones usually have two or three points and they keep it to that. They keep it simple. They come year after year making the same arguments, trying to get their issues on the agenda of the opposition, who then become the government and put pressure on the government, etc.

When you say to me, as long as they're not lobbying you for anything, I know—

(1145)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's as long as they're not a stakeholder, not “lobbying”. That's a much broader term.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, but they're a stakeholder. They're representing brokers.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Right, but there are many stakeholders who aren't under the Lobbying Act. There are those cut-offs.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. Now we get to speak to simplicity. Do my staff have to have a card with which they vet all of this? We're looking for simplicity. We want to make sure nothing is wrong; that's a given. But there's waste right now and this is what throws me. Using the firefighters as an example, they always send along a key chain, a fob, a baseball cap. They do that kind of stuff.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's fine.

Mr. David Christopherson:

But they always come with their three asks—I think of the chiefs in particular—on public safety issues. They're not benefiting personally from what they're asking for, but they want certain legislation brought in that they believe would improve the fire safety of Canadians in their homes and where we work and where we're in public.

How do I separate a constant...? I know the three points, because they've been meeting with me for over a decade. I know their points, so when I see something that comes from them I can make the connection, which probably eliminates 80% of what comes in the door.

Help me.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Is there any bill or any consideration by the government that is brought forward?

Mr. David Christopherson:

There are budget bills. Budget bills can contain a lot of little goodies for anybody, so if they happen to say, “We like the budget and we hope you will support it”, which of course as the opposition we're unlikely to, does that constitute it, because that's a big thing?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No. It has to be more obvious than that I think.

Lyne reminds me that there was a case where people came to us and asked us about some gifts the insurance people were giving at some point, and they had a matter before the House. That's why we said you couldn't do it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

When you say a matter before the House, one of those three points would have to be in a bill or at a committee. What about a minister who says they are thinking of going that way, but they haven't yet?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Do you want to say a word or two?

Ms. Lyne Robinson-Dalpé (Director, Advisory and Compliance, Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner):

Essentially, if there is a bill before the House or changes in legislation or if somebody is appearing in front of committee to make changes to legislation or a project bill, at that point in time we would determine that the organization could not provide you with a gift.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The closer you are to that decision point, then the more acute this becomes.

Ms. Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

Exactly. Going back to the insurance brokers' association, a few years back members had come to us and asked, “Can we accept this gift?” because they all had received blankets or.... Actually it wasn't that case, it was that they were doing promotions—

Mr. David Christopherson:

They did the purple blankets and then they stopped.

Ms. Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

At that point we said they couldn't, the reason being that there was a piece of legislation they were pushing in the House in committee. We had said at that point that members sitting on that committee should not be accepting those gifts from the insurance brokers.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right. Now that's a high level of organization to the extent that there are a lot of moving parts to this place. Most of us focus on the things that we're...so you do run the risk that you wouldn't know there was a private member's bill.

Ms. Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

Again, if you're not sitting around the table, if you're not in the committee, that would—

Mr. David Christopherson:

But we would be in the House ultimately.

Ms. Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

The House is more general. It's all MPs, at which point we would say that it's more committee focused. Committee members cannot accept, but others can accept.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Alright. I'll defer. I'll yield the floor now, but I would say to Mr. Reid that it sounds a little more definitive than we've had in the past. It makes me wish I hadn't sent back that winter kit now if I get stuck on the highway. Well, it has gone back. I wanted to be safe.

Thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

We're going to carry on.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Can I make one more observation?

In the case where you have to send stuff back, there could be a system whereby you dumped it somewhere that was known and they could come and collect it or something.

I've heard this problem from a number of people who didn't know what to do with the stuff and they didn't want to spend the money to get it back. It seems to me that's a problem that could find a solution somehow.

(1150)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Just before we go on to the last seven-minute round, you mentioned hesitancy in doing your guidelines because we have to approve them. I think you would find goodwill in the committee here. As chair of the agenda committee, any guideline you gave us we would deal with fairly quickly. I wouldn't let that hold you up.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Okay. Around 2010 I put something in, and that's the thing that finally got approved in 2015 in June by that particular committee. I stopped drafting these things at that point. I thought, what's the point?

The Chair:

I didn't hear any objections from the committee, so I think we would try to move quickly on your guidelines.

Ms. Vandenbeld, you have seven minutes.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

I'm going to share my time with Ms. Sahota.

Before I get to my question, and following up on what Mr. Christopherson was saying, what about regifting? For instance I'm always approached by organizations asking, “Can you give something to our silent auction?” If I took the gifts we got and gave them to these charities, would that be me receiving the gift or just collecting them and giving them away?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's you receiving the gift. I've been express on that. Yes. I mean you have received it and then you're deciding what to do with it. Sorry.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That clarifies that.

The other question I have is about those 13 recommendations you mentioned at the outset. There were 23. There were 10 included in the report and 13 that were not included in the report. I've heard you also saying a number of things, and I think what I'm hearing is that you recommended some things along the way, for instance, consistency with the Lobbying Act, and between the act and the code, and then the guidelines and things.

Was that included in those 13 recommendations that didn't get included?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I didn't make any reference to the Lobbying Act. Some of these issues have come up recently, actually. With respect to the act and the code, that was one of them.

It was a soft recommendation, because I said just do what you can. I understand that the members really don't want the code to be an act and they don't want to get the government involved in any way with the stuff that goes on in the House. There are all sorts of issues there. But certainly there's nothing wrong with making the words say the same thing. Making the same words with the same procedures would help.

You know, it's not too bad now. There have been a number of movements over the last five or six years, one way or another, to make them more similar, such as in the case of gifts.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Do you have any idea why those 13 recommendations were not accepted? Are they substantive? Are they things that we could potentially—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I'm astounded that they managed to do 10, to tell you the truth. I was just blown over, but delighted.

I think it was just because they only had so much time, but I don't know. I wasn't there. In fact, after I appeared, and I think there was one other person from B.C. who appeared, they all went in camera. I've no idea what the discussions were, but I think that probably they chose them because they thought they were either important or easy, low-hanging fruit.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

But there would be nothing precluding this committee from looking at those recommendations again, would there?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No. That was the recommendation of the last committee.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Are there others since then that you would put forward?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I would have to think about it, but I rather shot my bolt with the 23 that are there. I had something like 100 when I made my recommendations concerning the act.

Two of them were very complicated ones, and they're technical amendments. There are problems with the way that certain sections were drafted. Two of my recommendations are really a set of recommendations, and I've redrafted them. I've given you drafts to consider—I used to be a legislative drafter, as a matter of fact—to replace the way the sections are organized, because they're either organized in a confusing way or there are some inconsistencies that need to be fixed up. If you dove into those.... They are technical but they're really not terribly substantive.

There are a few that are more substantive, and there a couple of general ones. For example, I said, “For heaven's sake, why don't you think about doing a code about political behaviour?” But I also said that I'm probably not the appropriate person to monitor that particular code.

There are one or like that, too, but there are certainly enough of them to look at.

(1155)

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

As my colleague Anita just mentioned, out of the 13.... I know we're going to be getting the list, but since we have you here today I'd like your opinion on the matter. What would be a priority from the ones that were missed?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

For one thing, the act deals with furthering the private interests of relatives and friends. The code only deals with furthering your own private interests. There are about three or four sections in there that I think should.... I mean, why the heck should you be able to further the private interests of your relatives and friends? That's not covered in the code.

On the business about the receptions, I said you might want to make a special rule about the receptions and have that as a carve-out in the gifts, if indeed they're all going on. Basically, I don't find most receptions problematic anyway, the ones that are open to everybody, but if it were stated in the code, it might comfort some people.

Applying an acceptability test to sponsored travel is a bit of a delicate one. That was a big foofaraw about five or six years ago. CBC tried to make something of it and they had a big scandal. But it sort of fizzled because members observed that if you couldn't accept those gifts, then you would never get to travel anywhere—which is pretty feeble, but on the other hand, there it is.

The fact of the matter is that a lot of money is spent by people on the outside, and there's no acceptability test at all as to whether you can accept this travel or hospitality from people. Often it's given by countries.

Concerning prohibiting personal solicitation of funds by members, in the act there's a prohibition against personally going out and soliciting funds. I think that would be a good one.

Then there are the two sets that I mentioned. One is the disclosure provisions, which just need to be cleaned up and for which I've given you drafts.

I'd like you to stop having to make me come here to get my guidelines and forms approved, especially the forms. What happened last June was that there were three forms that had to be fixed, because you changed the level of gifts from $500 to $200 for the sponsored travel and they were wrong. There was no time to get them to this committee, because they came into force as soon as the election was over, the day after.

Nobody was sitting then, so there was no way I could bring it anywhere. I thought the only thing I could do was write a letter to the clerk and say that I had done it and see what you can do about it. But those three.... If you want to, you could get rid of that particular issue to approve those forms. I don't see why I have to come here to get my forms approved, frankly, nor my guidelines, for that matter. It's very unusual that I have to. I leave that with you as another one.

Do you want me to keep going? I'm just seeing these things on my list.

Sanctions for failing to meet reporting deadlines is a tough one, because I think the legal analysis would be that only Parliament can impose penalties on MPs. I think that's probably a no go, and I more or less mentioned that.

Inquiries is the other area that, unlike disclosure, has inconsistencies—between the English and French, to begin with—and other drafting issues.

I have probably skipped some here, but....

I don't expressly have the power to summon witnesses or compel documents, and I should. I've never had anybody not give them to me when I've asked for them, but there should be that power. I ran into trouble in one investigation when I looked for documents from the House of Commons and they said I couldn't have them unless they were sent first to the member who was under investigation. When I received the documents, they weren't the same. I had happened to get some of those documents from elsewhere as well, and there had been deletions. That's a problem.

I talked about producing a single annual report to Parliament. I don't care so much about that one anymore, because I have it organized so that I can do both of them. I have two reports due at exactly the same time, one under the act and one under the code. It would be somewhat convenient to put them together, but I don't care very much about that one now.

(1200)



Then there's that little kicker there of a code of conduct to address partisan and personal conduct of members. You've done a bit of work on the harassment thing now, but it is pretty damning on the behaviour of parliamentarians when some of their behaviour gets media attention. What the heck? It's not good for the reputation of the institution.

I comment on that, but those are two that probably would be outside of my domain.

That's an example. Those are most of them.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Before we go to the five-minute round, maybe we'll suspend for five minutes so that anyone who wants to can get food.

Members, after the five minutes I'll throw it open to anyone in the room.

(1200)

(1205)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

We'll call the meeting back to order. I'll momentarily fill in for the chair here and allow him the chance to have a quick break.

We're now going to the next round of questioning. Mr. Reid has the floor, and I believe it's for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

To start, Mr. Vice-Chair, I'm hoping you will use the same timing device for my five minutes that the chair used for Mr. Christopherson's eight minutes. That would be most helpful.

Let me start by saying to the commissioner that having dealt with your office, now as a member of Parliament with my own reporting for a number of years and also as a member of this committee for a decade, I appreciate your professionalism. It's always nice to deal with an office that's as professional as the one you run. It's much appreciated.

(1210)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My impression has always been and continues to be that the problems that arise deal not with the way in which you've administered the code, but rather with the way in which the code was written. I think to some degree it was written in haste when it was designed. There are some problems that have gradually been ironed out, but in particular I think they still exist vis-à-vis section 14 of the code, which deals with gifts. That's the area you mentioned that's problematic. I was going to ask if you have your copy of the code because I'm going to suggest some ideas that might be helpful in resolving some of this.

I believe there's a problem because subsection 14(1) of the code is to some degree in contradiction to subsection 14(3) of the code. Subsection 14(3) states that gifts are reportable if they have a value of $200 or more, but subsection 14(1) reads, and I'll quote: Neither a Member nor any member of a Member’s family shall accept, directly or indirectly, any gift or other benefit, except compensation authorized by law, that might reasonably be seen to have been given to influence the Member in the exercise of a duty or function of his or her office.

It seems to me that part—might reasonably be understood to have been given in expectation—is saying that what is important if I receive a gift is not how I'll act, but how someone assumes that the person who gave the gift to me thought I would act. It's entirely conceivable that someone would give me a gift that's under $200, which may have been intended to who knows how affect me but that is not realistically, plausibly going to have that effect.

I wonder if we could resolve part of the gift problem by adding something that says this. It would be a subsection that would go after subsection 14(3). It would have the number subsection 14(3.1) possibly, and it would say, “For greater certainly, a gift or other benefit that does not require disclosure under subsection 14(3) shall be deemed not to be capable of influencing the member in the exercise of a duty or function of his or her office.”

Would that to some degree accomplish dealing with problems with that?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No. That's the old conflation of the reporting with the acceptability. That wouldn't help me at all. You could put that in and that's what the law would be, but then what you would have done is established a limit of $200, under which we wouldn't be looking at the acceptability at all.

The other thing I should say is that it's not a question of whether it's in your eyes or the donor's eyes, it's in an independent third party's eyes as to whether it's reasonable.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll just repeat it. It reads, “that might reasonably be seen to have been given to influence the Member”. This is the difference. That might reasonably be seen to be capable of influencing the member is a different thing.

I would argue, Commissioner, that it is implausible, given how much we're paid, that a gift under $200 could influence our behaviour.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's the traditional argument, that nobody's going to buy me for $200. I get that argument all the time.

These are your laws, your rules. You can make them whatever you want. I have suggested in the past that you make it so that you don't have to report, say, under $35 or $50, or something like that? I think that's a more reasonable level than $200. That would be a bit better, from your point of view, than no gifts at all. Then you could conflate the two ideas of reportability and acceptability, which is what you're trying to do with your amendment, I think.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I am trying to put them together. The word “conflate”, to me, is value—

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Mr. Reid, the time is up, but if you're going to wrap up your last question....

Ms. Mary Dawson:

This is a very important point. It's constant, this point.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me, I'm trying to merge the two. I'm saying that I think it is reportable, or else it is not conceivably something that should be regarded as potentially influencing our actions. I think the two should be the same and I would maintain the reason is that....

We can set the number low...$200. I argued in favour at the committee of going from $500 to $200. I always said that $500, in the eyes of the public, does seem like a level at which someone could possibly be influenced. I'm not sure that it's realistic, but it's something where I can see a reasonable person thinking that it could influence my actions.

But I repeat, it's whether someone thought they could influence my actions, and they may have been thinking that in a way that was not reasonable. The fact that a reasonable person thought that they'd thought it, in their unreasonableness—

(1215)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

You're getting to your bottom line in a much more complicated way than you need to. There's a much more direct way of getting to your bottom line than what you're suggesting. You don't need all of those subsections, you can just say that any gift under $200 is acceptable and reportable. That's not the rule at the moment. You could maybe make some kind of an argument....

I don't agree with you that when you read subsection 14(1), it's in the eyes of the donor. It's that it's reasonable to be seen that way by the man on the Clapham omnibus. Legally, it's by the reasonable man. You could add those words if you wanted, to make it clear in that direction, but—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would you say then, “that might reasonably be seen to have the potential to influence the member”? That is different. That talks about what a reasonable person would think, as opposed to whether the donor, who may not be reasonable in their expectations, made that assumption.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

An easier way of doing it is—

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

I'll let you finish and answer the question, Ms. Dawson, but then I will cut it off there. I think I've been more than reasonable. We'll then move to the next questioner.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

You could just add the words, “it can reasonably be seen by a reasonable person to have been”, if that's where you want to go but that's not where you want to go. You want to raise the limit of acceptability. That's why I made that proposal a couple of years ago. It was just in desperation.

Why don't you conflate the two of them? I'm sorry if that's a negative word. If you put the two levels together, the reportability and acceptability, maybe you should take it down from $200 to $50, or $35 or something, which I thought was reasonable, because below that, it's just a token.

It depends on what you want to do with it, but you can't hide what you're doing with a bunch of fancy words. You can do it quite directly.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you. Now we'll move over to Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you, Ms. Dawson. I want to echo some of the comments that your staff at the office have been tremendous. I know that our office has been calling a lot and asking a lot of questions, and they're very patient with us. Thank you for that, and please pass the message along to Karine.

I have one quick question. You talked earlier about an acceptability test for travel when it comes to countries, or being invited to travel in those countries. Could you speak to me a bit more about an acceptability test and what types of questions we should be asking? I'd like to get a bit more clarification there.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes. Say that somebody was a constant stakeholder of yours and gave you a trip to the States to some fancy resort. We had a case like that about five years ago. It was one of the caucuses. The members were offered a trip to some fancy resort for a week. That was sponsored travel. They were flown down there and given a meal. I would say that was not very acceptable. That's when I learned about caucuses. It took me a couple of years to discover that there were these caucuses doing these things. They used to call them all-party caucuses.

Quite often it's international countries. It's countries that are looking for support from Canada. The big ones are Israel and Taiwan. Just about every year you can see it in the list of sponsored travel. The question is why MPs are accepting gifts of travel from other countries. A decision has been taken and I think it's probably not going to change. MPs like to get these chances to go abroad to see these countries, so they're not going to put an acceptability test onto sponsored travel. But I'm suggesting that they think about it and that maybe they should have an acceptability test.

I've raised this before and I didn't get a very good reception. That's what I'm talking about. It just seems odd. For example, it's interesting because it's carved out that it's not a gift under the code. Where I see it is in the case of ministers and parliamentary secretaries, because it is a gift under the act. Then you get the whole question of whether it's an acceptable gift, but I can't apply that acceptability test to members under the code, because it's carved out of the gift rules.

It just works in a different way. It's rather a question of whether parliamentarians really want to give up these goodies.

(1220)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

The member still has about two minutes.

Mr. Chan?

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I can jump in.

I want to echo my appreciation as well, along with that of all other committee members, for the professionalism of your staff. As a member who came in through a by-election I'm obviously familiar with the basic premise, but compliance becomes a real problem, especially when you're new and are not familiar with the rules.

I want to get back into your recommendation. One thing I read in your report was that it seemed you had some frustration with respect to your ability to appear before this committee and to have your annual report tabled and have an opportunity to present it.

Would it be helpful to you if we were to amend the Standing Orders or create some kind of mechanism to have you automatically appear?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's up to you. What was noteworthy is the length of time that I was never invited to appear. It was three or four years that went by. Of course, I go to ETHI at least once or twice a year, because they do my estimates. You guys don't do my estimates. They also oversee, to some extent, though not the same way you do, the Conflict of Interest Act, so there's a different relationship.

It's just noteworthy that this committee has not invited me to come for a number of years.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Is there a particular time frame that you would look at? Your requirements are to report by March 31 of each year.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

The logical time would be after my annual report.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Should it be within 90 days? Then perhaps there could be an automated clause such that, if we haven't called you, you would appear at the next meeting within a set time frame.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes. My report goes out in June, so it would probably be the following fall.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It might be 120 days from then, if you haven't been called, because we don't sit over the summer, or some reasonable period of time by which you would be called. It should certainly be before your next annual report is due. That's something for us to consider.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's not my proposal, but it seems to me that it's sensible to invite me from time to time.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

All right, thank you. We certainly have always found your visits—this is the second one since I've been on the committee—informational. We appreciate them.

We're now going to go back to Mr. Reid, who has five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Again I'm on gifts. In subsection 14(1), it says, “Neither a Member nor any member of a Member’s family shall accept”—that is not my wording, it's the wording in the rules—“any gift or other benefit”. You've taken the position in the past that in the case of certain gifts that have been sent to all MPs, we should all send them back. When you were here before I raised the problem that I was not in a position to do it because I'd taken it and thrown it in the garbage, which I suppose would mean technical non-compliance with the code.

Does it seem reasonable to you that we could rewrite that part of the code to say there are a number of ways of getting rid of it? Sending it back is one option, sending it to you is another option, throwing it in the garbage is the third option, and, I don't know, crushing it with a hammer is the fourth option. It's basically not accepting it, but doing it in a way that doesn't involve us having to guess every time something comes in whether or not we are dealing with a certain number. As was the case with that particular gift of alternative health care supplements, most of us have no idea about their value. It's value to me was zero.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I was surprised that you would throw it in the garbage because it's not good to throw away pills into the garbage, but anyway it was interesting about that particular gift. We looked at the contents of that particular package and it was worth over $100. There was a significant cost to that stuff. I agree, but usually a gift is not going to be unacceptable to an MP. That's the other thing about it. It's just when there's something going on. Like a pharmaceutical may well be unacceptable, I suppose, because maybe they're looking for a particular bill or something in a committee or something, but generally—

Yes, go ahead.

(1225)

Ms. Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

It's important to review the documentation that comes with it. If there's a cover letter that asks for support on a bill or something like that, that is an indication the gift is most likely not acceptable.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

The marijuana that was sent to all the Liberals this Christmas was the classic one. That was bad on two fronts. First of all, they were considering making marijuana legal, and the letter that covered it said, “Here's some marijuana, make our bill legal”, or whatever. The second thing that was wrong with it, was that it was illegal for heaven's sake. It had to be gotten rid of.

There are some solutions to that particular problem. I would suggest a central place in the building to dump them, as long as they're reported as being dumped. Then the donors can know that's where they can get them back if they want them. There are solutions. I certainly don't want you each to have to mail them back.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have one last thing. There had been a considerable amount of discussion in the committee in the last Parliament around the issue of going to events, and whether or not this triggers a violation of the code unless one pays. I gather it was a meaningful financial problem. This is not true for me. I'm in a rural constituency. There are no expensive events in rural constituencies of this sort, where you have to pay $200 or $300 to get in. This occurs in urban areas. It was raised by one of our colleagues, who said, “Look, I go because I have to. I would prefer to stay home if I had a choice, and now I have to pay on top of this”.

Keeping that thought in mind, I wonder whether we couldn't make it clear in subsection 14.(1.1) that we are trying to distinguish the admission to the event itself, and say, in that case, that's set aside as a...but food and drink are okay. What I'm trying to do here is to distinguish between events that are typically sporting events, where there's a high admission cost—and that's something where it's reasonable to expect the person should have to pay for it themselves—and other kinds of events, such as going to various cultural community annual fundraising dinners, where there's a high ticket price, as essentially a way of supporting this or that community.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

The test is always whether it could reasonably be seen to have been given to influence you. Normally it's okay to attend these events, but when it's a gala or something you're invited to, then you have to figure out who is giving you the ticket to go, if it's an expensive event. Those kinds of things come up from time to time.

This subsection 14(1.1) is still underneath the rubric of whether it could reasonably be seen.... It's usually the case where some stakeholder gives somebody a ticket to go to some event. It's a charitable event, but it's the stakeholder giving them the ticket. It's not the charitable event that's giving them the ticket.

I've had discussions with the National Arts Centre, for example. The NAC has this system whereby they issue VIP invitations to certain prominent people. That's all right, because they are not looking for something from the government. As I say, these cases usually come up in the act, not the code, but occasionally they can come up in the code as well. Those invitations from the charitable event people themselves, or the non-stakeholder event.... It's when a stakeholder buys a ticket to the NAC and invites somebody that there's sometimes a problem.

But really, don't worry about your constituencies very much at all, because you're meant to be visible out there.

(1230)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

Next we have Mr. Chan for five minutes.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, Mr. Vice-Chair.

I want to follow up on Mr. Reid's point, because I do come from an urban environment where sometimes I'm probably at that threshold, where I attend.... I come from a particular community background where I really go to an endless array of.... I just came off Chinese New Year. I don't know how many events I did. It's not like I feel that there's some material benefit there. I literally am running from one event to another to deliver a speech, or in some cases I'm just sitting there, but I do that as part of the discharge of my function.

Ms. Mary Dawson: Right.

Mr. Arnold Chan: I don't necessarily see that as a problem at all.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's not a problem at all. Unless—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

The question is whether there's a disclosure requirement. That's my question.

I'll give you an example of one. The Prime Minister recently attended the Dragon Ball. That is not a cheap ticket. I was sitting at the table of, let's say, a large financial institution. Originally, they invited me, and I said, “I can't accept that.” Subsequently, I was invited by the organizers of the event, and I ended up getting seated at the same table of that large financial institution. I didn't know whether they were lobbying the government or not. Do I have a disclosure requirement? That's where I'm scratching my head.

Ms. Mary Dawson: Yes, the value of the ticket.

Mr. Arnold Chan: I do have a disclosure requirement—

Ms. Mary Dawson: Yes, you do.

Mr. Arnold Chan: —even though it's a charity and it's raising money for older people. This is the Yee Hong Community Wellness Foundation and there was a significant amount of monies to obviously—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

But that's part of the transparency principle. Basically, it's so they can see who in the heck is inviting you where.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I know that I'm being invited because I'm a community member of this particular community.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, but there's nothing wrong with it.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Right. I don't see that there's an issue of attendance.

Yet, I had another instance where your office was helpful. I was invited by, let me simply say, a large educational institution to attend a board of trade function in Toronto. The ticket was over the $200 threshold. Your office advised me to decline the ticket, which I did and I did not attend, although the subject matter of that particular talk was of significant interest to me. Then I had to ask myself if I was prepared to shell out the $500 to attend.

These are the environments for which, as a parliamentarian, I find it very helpful to be informed about the issues writ large, as opposed to being lobbied about a particular specific issue. That's what I struggle with as a member. What is appropriate? What is not appropriate? Your office is helpful, but I'm not sure that I'm appropriately discharging my function in regard to having a broader view of issues out there and a broader view of the world when it comes to the issue of sponsored travel.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I'd be interested to go back and see what that case is. We'll take a look.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I also think of specific instances of gifts. Again, I come from a Chinese community. Chinese New Year is about red packets. I get a lot of red packets.

Most of them are chocolates and so forth, but occasionally there's money in them. To refuse this, from my cultural perspective, is an insult, but then I actually take a look and see how much is actually in them. If I'm getting it from a family member, that's part of a normal cultural practice.

Ms. Mary Dawson: That's okay.

Mr. Arnold Chan: That's no problem. That's easy for me. Where it gets a little more interesting is that I wonder if maybe I got that because I'm an MP. In which case, I do try to refuse, but I get into a really difficult situation—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

You don't necessarily have to refuse. You just need to report if it's over $200.

Mr. Arnold Chan: I see. Okay.

Ms. Mary Dawson You don't need to refuse. Most of things.... That's where there's that distinction between reporting and refusing. It is tempting to suggest that you collapse the two, but then it has to be quite a low level, I think, like in the order of $35.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

For example, I don't feel that if mom and dad send me a red packet over the $200 figure, I need to report it. I think not, but maybe I do.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No. It's not related to your position.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's not related to my position.

Ms. Mary Dawson: No.

Mr. Arnold Chan: It's just our practice as a family member, right?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's right.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

For me, that is not—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's expressly excepted.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's an express exclusion.

Ms. Mary Dawson: Yes.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Okay. That's helpful. I'm just trying to clarify the circumstances.

I certainly get instances, for example, of.... Again, I would view it under the protocol in regard to a provision where I'm meeting, let's say, with another order of government, or more importantly, with a different government that makes representations and brings a gift. Again, to refuse would be a breach of diplomatic protocol. I'd take it, but if I think it's a little too pricey, I tend to just regift it. But then do I have a disclosure requirement? I think I do.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, you do.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Okay. That's helpful.

Ms. Mary Dawson: Also, if you have nothing to worry about, why not disclose it? What's wrong with disclosing it, basically?

(1235)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay. Thank you.

We finally came in just a little smidge under time on one of the rounds of questioning today, which is great. Not by much, though—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: It's a gift to the chair.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards): Do I have to disclose it? That's the question. Mr. Graham says it's a gift to the chair, so now I wonder if I have to disclose it.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards): We have one final person on our list today, and that's Mr. Masse.

Welcome to the committee. You're subbing in. You have three minutes for some questions.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I apologize for filling in at the last minute here. I might have questions that have already been answered, so I apologize in advance for that.

This is my 14th year in the House. Following this discretion and disclosure has been kind of like following a squirrel. It's been all over the map, and it's been very difficult.

I'm wondering about this. Have you ever shadowed an MP for a day in terms of what their day is like on the Hill here?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay. I suggest that might be a good example, because one of the reasons is that I'm back as critic on industry, or innovation, science and technology, which is a very important file that gets a lot of lobbying activity. I was listening with interest to the comments with regard to receptions and the uncertainties related to them.

I hate receptions. I can't stand them. I have to go to so many rubber-chicken dinners when I'm at home, and I have a young family. They're now 15 and 11. But I have to do sometimes seven a night. Up on the Hill here, I'm equally busy, and the receptions are sometimes the only time between House duty, committee, speaking in the House of Commons, and meeting with people in my office, so that what it comes down to, if you actually want to meet on an issue, is that then you do it at a reception, because it's absolutely impossible to meet. Otherwise, you don't.

Can I get clarification on what can be discussed at a reception and what can be provided at a reception under the rules you're proposing?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's not so much what can be discussed but.... I mean, you can go to these receptions because they're without charge, I guess, and the gift is the food, right?

Mr. Brian Masse: Yes.

Ms. Mary Dawson: Normally there's not a problem there, unless they're putting on a banquet of some kind. Normally it would be finger food and stuff, right?

Mr. Brian Masse: Yes.

Ms. Mary Dawson: Yes, so you can go in and graze, and we don't see that as a problem.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I hate doing them, to be honest with you. It's just not part of my.... I shouldn't say I hate doing them, but I would rather meet with people and discuss an issue in private, but sometimes you don't.

By the way, there are sometimes small gifts provided on the way out. They probably have a value of $10 or so.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

We exclude tokens. We would have that in our guidelines, if we could have them. That would be excluded.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Also, in terms of disclosure for the $200 limit, I've forgotten this. I should know this, but I don't. When was that established?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

The $200? Just this June.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Prior to that, there was nothing or...?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It was $500.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It was $500. That's right.

What's the time frame in which you do actually have to disclose that?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's 60 days.

Mr. Brian Masse:

See, some of the stuff I haven't even gotten to at that time....

What's going to happen next year with the $200? Is it to be reviewed? Is it to be evaluated? Does it go with the rate of inflation?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No, it's sitting there unless you change it, until Parliament changes it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay. So it comes back—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's one of the issues you may look at, because it looks like you'll probably be looking at gifts.

A decision was just taken to put the limit at $200. This is for reporting, not for acceptability. The more difficult issues revolve around reporting and acceptability and the different levels, different thresholds.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Is this legislation to be reviewed in three years?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's not legislation; it's a code.

Mr. Brian Masse: Oh, it's a code. Sorry.

Ms. Mary Dawson: It's reviewed every five years.

Mr. Brian Masse:

The $200 limit would be put in place for five years.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Unless you decide to change it.

You missed the front end of this, when I said that there have been changes made over the years that weren't connected with the five-year review. You can make a change any time you want, if you can get it through Parliament.

Mr. Brian Masse:

All right.

Those are all my questions. Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

That's all for the round of formal questioning.

I do have a little committee business at the end, but if any of your helpers or senior managers would like to say anything, they can.

You probably don't get this kind of chance to speak to Parliament. Do you have any issues? No.

Mary, did you want to make some closing remarks? We'll be looking to you for a list before Tuesday of, minimally, your 13 things we didn't cover and anything else you want to add. If they could be in order of priority, that would be very helpful.

(1240)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Okay. What I'll do is get them out of the computer and put them in some kind of order. I don't have a huge amount of time, but I'll do something and get you a document.

So that's by Monday...?

The Chair: Yes.

Ms. Mary Dawson: I'll get that to the clerk.

Thank you very much. I appreciate the time and I appreciate the attentive listening and the questions.

The Chair:

Does anyone have one last burning question they wanted to ask? No.

Thank you very much. Perhaps you could just stay outside the room for a minute, because I'm sure committee members have individual issues they'd like to talk to you about.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Sure. I'll hang around for a bit.

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll take a short break.

(1240)

(1245)

The Chair:

Members, we have some committee business.

The good news is that last meeting we did a great schedule for the next six weeks or so. The bad news is that I think we have to make some adjustments to it.

Before we do that, for the members who don't know, the clerk has given me some feedback on Mr. Christopherson's motion, that it may be more complicated than we think. Not today, but sometime when we're doing his motion, we will ask for her advice on the procedural ramifications of that motion. The wording may not be clear. Mr. Christopherson is quite aware of that and is quite happy with that.

I'd now like the clerk to report on the response from the minister about coming next Thursday.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

Thank you, Chair.

The committee at its last meeting had set aside time next Thursday, February 25, for the appearance of the Minister of Democratic Institutions. Earlier this morning I heard from the minister's office that although she had planned to attend, she now has notice of cabinet meetings that conflict with the scheduling of the committee's meeting. They have deferred and have said they would be in touch at a later date.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm highly disappointed. That's really completely unacceptable.

Fine, if she legitimately has something that's conflicting with that date, then propose another date. I think it's been two weeks since the request was made. I think it's highly unreasonable that the minister can't give us a date.

It seems to me as though we have a minister here who's trying to avoid coming before this committee and being accountable for decisions she's making. That's really problematic and really troublesome, and I certainly expect that she will get us a date as ASAP.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We could apply for Tuesday of next week.

The Chair:

On Tuesday we're going to do conflict of interest. Now that we've heard from the commissioner and now that we know that the last committee recommended we do something, we're going to decide on Tuesday whether or not we do anything and what that's going to be.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Here's my suggestion, Mr. Chair. We now know that Thursday's available, so let's move the conflict of interest code to Thursday and invite the minister to come here on Tuesday, and we'll just hold that spot open for her. In the event she can make it, we'll have our meeting. If not or if she's unable to make it for some other reason, then we'll just get a free day or have a chance to discuss the future agenda or something like that.

The Chair:

I agree with half of your suggestion, that we'll invite her for Tuesday. But I was thinking for Thursday, because it's vacant now, we would invite the Senate appointees on the Senate selection committee to come Thursday, because that would give them a week's notice.

While we're on that topic, because neither of them is in Ottawa, maybe one of them couldn't quite make it personally and would prefer to do a video conference. Personally, I am fine with that technically, but that would require us to go to one of the other buildings that has that technology.

I know some committees say they aren't overly interested in those people, but we might as well decide in advance. If the person cannot make it in person, do you want to move the committee to another room for that particular meeting? There's no problem moving, but it's up to the committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If we can, we should try to do it. It doesn't make sense to not have them simply because we can't go over to a building.

The Chair:

Is that okay with everyone?

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let's go for Promenade over 1 Wellington.

The Chair:

Your choice is the Promenade or Valour Building over Sussex or whatever that place is by the Chateau Laurier.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, over in Siberia.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The advantage is that it's almost in your riding.

The Chair:

On these two points, is it okay that we invite them for next Thursday? We will also invite the minister for Tuesday. If the minister declines, we'll go ahead with our discussion on conflict of interest. Is that okay with everyone? We'll move the committee meeting if they need a video conference.

(1250)

Mr. Blake Richards:

The only thing I would add to that is that if the minister is not available to come on Tuesday we should demand that she choose a day when she will come, and have none of this playing around. It seems to me as though she's just trying to stall and delay here. Let's get her to give us a date that she is available on if she isn't available on Tuesday.

Frankly, she should do everything she can to make herself available Tuesday. As I think I mentioned in the subcommittee meeting, I'm aware that after we requested that she appear, there was a Senate committee that requested that she appear, and she is appearing there on the 24th. That proves she is able to actually set a date. It really seems to me that we have a minister here who's trying to avoid being accountable before a House committee, and we cannot let that be acceptable. We must press to make sure that the minister is here. This is a process taking place as we speak, and it needs to be dealt with. We can't let this drag on and on.

The Chair:

We'll tell the clerk, when she's inviting the minister, that we would be highly displeased if the minister did not appear soon.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We also need to receive some alternate dates. We can't have this “we'll let you know at a later date” kind of stuff. Let's have a date.

The Chair:

We can't direct a minister, but we can say we'd be pretty displeased if she didn't appear.

Mr. Blake Richards:

And she should provide us a date.

The Chair:

Just to summarize, we're going to invite the minister for Tuesday; if she cannot come, we're going to go on with the conflict of interest code. Thursday, we will have the two other federal appointments on the Senate recommendation committee. We will be in the Promenade building if we need to do a video conference.

Before you get to that, Arnold, I have one other thing to say.

I would suggest, if we all agree, that if we do conflict of interest on Tuesday that it be in camera since we will be having a lot of discussion on the lengthy report, and in the last committee, all of that was done in camera. That's why the conflict commissioner didn't know what it was we were discussing and so the committee felt that there were those things.

If we are discussing something that was in camera before, we're not at liberty to reveal it publicly anyway, so to allow us to discuss that, I think we should probably suggest that meeting at least start in camera.

Mr. Reid and Mr. Masse.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The obvious problem is that Mr. Christopherson has very strong feelings, but he's not here right now. So I'd just.... I don't know.

I'll let Mr. Masse try to deal with that one.

Mr. Brian Masse:

My understanding is that we're not bound by previous parliamentary action. This is a new Parliament.

It sounds to me like you've proven the case for why it shouldn't be in camera, because you had interested parties that were not aware of this. I would hesitate on that. You've brought up a point where obviously the testimony today—I'm sorry I wasn't here for all of it—was influenced by a lack of knowledge because of going in camera.

I would suggest caution to that.

The Chair:

To the clerk, when they went in camera for whatever it was, those members who were at that meeting could not say what happened because it was in camera. As this is a new Parliament, can we now say publicly what happened?

A voice: No. It's 30 years.

The Chair: Okay, so it's 30 years.

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You don't have to discuss what previously took place, and you can't under those rules. But you're not bound by those rules anymore, what they did. This committee is a creature of its own and is not bound by the previous Parliament's committee, by any means. That includes studies and a whole series of things.

I would just suggest that it would compound the injury that took place today by following those practices that obviously caused some problems.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments?

It just means that we might be reinventing the wheel with some things they discussed, but the stuff we brought up today, that's already public.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually think it makes sense to be in camera for the purpose of reviewing evidence that was discussed, or discussions that took place, and proposals that were made in the last Parliament. Once we're in camera, we can figure out whether any of that stuff can be dealt with publicly.

Having said that, I suggest we start the meeting in public and then go in camera if there is consent to do so. I suspect a reasonable argument can be made for going in camera, and then we'll get there, but I just think it would be politically smoother.

This is not my own agenda. This is Mr. Christopherson's agenda. I just think that would be the best way of getting there.

(1255)

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I was going to echo that. I was going to suggest that's the way we proceed, as was suggested by Mr. Reid.

If you recall the amendments I proposed to Mr. Christopherson's motion, one of the additional items was members' privileges. Technically, changes to the conflict of interest code directly affect members' privileges. I think we should have those discussions in camera, but in fairness to Mr. Christopherson, we should give him the opportunity to put his position on the record first. Is that fair?

An hon. member: That's fair.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll start out in public and then if the committee feels so, we'll go in camera.

Is that what we've decided? Is that what we're agreeing on?

Some hon. members: Yes.

The Chair: Okay.

I have one more item, but on all those things we've just discussed, is there anything more? No.

We have set aside the two meetings after the March working constituency week to bring forward witnesses on ”family friendly”. Just to give people enough warning, if anyone has already thought of witnesses they want, it would be helpful to let us know now.

Mr. Masse, I know the NDP has one.

If you could let the clerk know this, we can start inviting people for those weeks.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, can we just clarify which weeks? Are you referring to March 8 and 10, or are you talking about March 22 and 24?

The Chair:

It's March 22 and 24.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Right now, from a scheduling perspective—I can just clarify with Blake—we still have a blank for March 8, right?

Mr. Blake Richards:

You know, I recall us having set something that would fit in there. I know that one portion of it was committee business. I do not recall what the other part was, off the top of my head. I don't have my binder with me.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

As I recall, March 10 was the Chief Electoral Officer's report.

The Chair:

March 8 was going to be the Senate people, but now....

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay, so if we're moving them up, March 8 would now be blank.

The Chair:

Yes. We could move that to family friendly witnesses.

I think that's also the week we're doing the caucus reports. Or when are we doing that...?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

May I suggest that caucus reports be either next Thursday or the following Tuesday, with at least the opportunity for all of the caucuses to have their feedback from next Wednesday?

The Chair:

Is the Tuesday you're talking about March 8?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No. Originally I had it down for February 25, but we had Minister Monsef, the Minister of Democratic Institutions, available for next Thursday. Now that she's not available—

The Chair:

We have the Senate appointees coming.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

—we have the Senate appointees coming. I might suggest one hour for the Senate appointees.

Or is there a particular feeling with respect to that?

An hon. member: One hour, I think, at this point....

The Chair:

Yes, and we have then one hour for caucus reports.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Then one hour caucus reports....

The Chair: That would be great.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Is that fair?

An. hon member: It seems reasonable.

The Chair:

Okay. That's good.

These witnesses, whose names you're giving me right now, we will ask for March 22.

Mr. Arnold Chan: No, for March 8.

The Chair: On March 8 we're doing caucus reports.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I thought we were doing caucus reports on February 25. One hour for the Senate witnesses and one hour for the caucus reports.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

If we have to spill over, we can just—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry; I'll throw a monkey wrench into this.

I thought you were referring to March 8 as well when you talked about caucus reports. I would suggest that probably February 25 might be a little too soon for the caucus reports.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Okay.

The Chair:

Right. Okay.

Yes, we do only need one hour there. Maybe we'll be getting back into Mr. Christopherson's motion at that time.

An hon. member: Okay.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I had a motion on the table too, about Madam Labelle.

The Chair:

Okay.

On Tuesday, we have the minister or conflict of interest; and then on Thursday, Senate appointees for one hour, Mr. Christopherson's motion, and Mr. Chan's motion. Then there's a working week in the ridings.

The week after that, we are at Tuesday, March 8. We will do caucus reports, reporting back to this committee. I don't think that will take two hours. We could invite a couple of witnesses for the second hour. I know the NDP has one. We could maybe set a deadline for people to provide us with a witness list for that meeting and for the other two later in March.

Why don't we say that by the end of that meeting on March 8 there be a deadline for proposing witnesses for March 22 and 24?

(1300)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I do not have a specific suggestion for witnesses. I have a suggestion that our long-suffering analyst look into someone for us.

One of the issues that has come up is the issue of child care facilities. To me, as we're changing buildings and then changing back, the issue of where architecturally you would put some of the stuff to make the environment more friendly for new parents, moms in particular, could be relevant. Perhaps it would be helpful to find someone who could comment on whether we'll be dealing with this as we go over to the West Block and whether we can deal with it in the plans for when we come back.

The Chair:

Along that line, I think someone would like the day care manager as a witness, because we had so many questions about day care.

An hon. member: [Inaudible--Editor] and a few more.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Yes, there are a few. Some are fairly obvious.

The Chair:

Okay.

Yes, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, there's another natural thing to do in terms of witnesses. Obviously our analyst provided us with a great report, where he indicated a number of other jurisdictions that have made some changes specifically to their House schedules. Even just generally he's shown us good examples that are good cross-references with ours. I know that the provincial ones specifically were Ontario and B.C., and I believe Quebec was the third one.

Our analyst also provided us with some information on a number of other Commonwealth countries. Particularly where they've made changes to their sitting hours or sitting days, their officials would be obvious witnesses for us, I would think. I would also suggest that we maybe ask our analyst to suggest some other witnesses that he feels would be beneficial for us.

The Chair:

Hold on a minute. We'll brainstorm two things.

First of all, we'll definitely direct the analysts to do that and come up with some names. For the ones we have today, I'll get a list right now and then we'll see how many of those we could accommodate on March 8 and which ones we will punt to March 22.

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I have a quick suggestion. Pierre Parent from human resources is involved in this and would understand some of the logistics that are necessary.

The Chair:

House of Commons human resources? What's his last name?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, House of Commons, it's Pierre Parent.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Just for clarity, Mr. Chair, you were indicating that any suggestions for witnesses that we as members have would be brought for March 8?

The Chair:

The number.... It looks like we have more than we need—

Mr. Blake Richards:

What I'm saying is that you're saying additional suggestions for future witnesses should be brought by March 8.

The Chair:

By March 8, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Is that what you were suggesting?

The Chair:

Yes.

Anita, and then David.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

If we are looking for witnesses quickly, there's Equal Voice, a multipartisan organization about women in politics. I think that's one. Nancy Peckford is the executive director.

For international witnesses, certainly, there's Julie Ballington, who did all the work on family-friendly parliaments with the IPU, the Inter-Parliamentary Union. She's now with UN Women and based in New York.

I'll suggest and put forward a number of names, but these are just in case we're looking at some people quickly.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was just going to note that we're discussing witness lists on the record, and I think it's something that we agreed we would want to discuss in camera.

The Chair:

Okay, but we have enough here so that we can make a decision for March 8. I'm not going to go in camera for a couple of minutes here, because I don't think these are controversial.

We have five potentials. I don't think we can handle all of these on March 8, so we'll put some of them off. I'll give you the five, and then you suggest to me which we would use in the second hour on March 8: Pierre, from human resources; Public Works, as Mr. Reid said, on the design of the buildings, like where a day care, etc., would be; Equal Voice, and IPU in New York; and the day care. I think a high priority would be whoever can make decisions on the day care management.

Mr. Richards.

(1305)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would suggest that where you're going accurately fits with what I saw in committee. There were a lot of questions about that, so obviously if we were to talk to a couple of people, one would be the day care manager, the person who runs the day care. The other one would be, as Mr. Reid suggested, someone who could give us a little information about how we could make sure that we're structuring the changes being made to the buildings to suit that kind of thing, since that seemed to be a topic that gathered a lot of interest from the members of the committee at the first meeting.

We've had suggestions from other parties, so probably until all the parties have had a chance to put witnesses in, we would probably hold off on those witnesses, right? Then all parties have the opportunity to suggest their witnesses. In the meantime, the analysts could come forward with some suggestions as well, including some of those other jurisdictions. I think that would probably be a good way to proceed on March 8. I think that makes sense.

The Chair:

Okay, so how's this for a plan? On March 8, if we can get them, the second hour would be someone from Public Works, someone who has authority over the design of the buildings, and the day care, someone who has authority over the day care.

Then we would punt these to the end-of-March meetings: Pierre Parent, Equal Voice, Julie Ballington, the ones the clerk comes up with from other jurisdictions, plus the witnesses from any of the committee members as presented to us before March 8. Is that understandable for everyone?

Mr. Blake Richards:

The only qualification I would make, Mr. Chair, is that obviously we as a committee will want to determine how many meetings we want and how many witnesses we want to hear.

Once we've done that and all parties have put forward their witnesses, we'll have to determine which ones we'll include, to be able to fit into the scope and time frame that we're putting on it.

Rather than indicate that we're hearing from those witnesses.... It's not that I'm voicing objections to them, necessarily, it's just that obviously we wouldn't want to make a determination as to, once we've decided how many we'll see, which ones are a priority.

The Chair:

I didn't mean to suggest we would hear them. I meant to suggest we'll add them all to the list. They may come. It's a very good point. We have to winnow down that list. We can't go on forever.

We'll get a big list for March 8. Then we'll decide the number of meetings, as you've said. Then we'll figure out how many of those witnesses we can bring.

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I would like to add a name to the front end of the list, not the forefront, but during the process of transition, Christine Moore might be appropriate. That's up to the committee but I just thought that name should be put somewhere in the placement.

The Chair:

To be on that March 8 list.

Mr. Chan, was there anyone else?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I was simply going to make a suggestion on the total number, but we could discuss that at the next meeting.

The Chair:

It's probably easier once we—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Would it be 15 to 20? When we see the whole list we'll have a chance.

The Chair:

Once we have the list it will be easier to decide.

Anything else?

Thank you. The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tout le monde.

Bonjour. Nous entamons la 8e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre en cette première session de la 42e législature. Pour cette séance publique, nous accueillons la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, Mary Dawson, qui va nous faire un exposé.

On dirait que vous êtes très populaire, Mary, parce qu'il y a longtemps que je n'ai pas vu une salle aussi pleine. Kady O'Malley est sûrement emballée par votre présence qui va lui donner maintes occasions de gazouiller.

Mme Dawson est accompagnée de Martine Richard, avocate générale et directrice, Rapports et enquêtes, de Lyne Robinson-Dalpé, directrice, Conseils et conformité, et de Marie Danielle Vachon, directrice, Politiques, recherches et communications.

Je profite de l'intérêt que suscite cette séance pour préciser que notre Comité est chargé d'effectuer l'examen quinquennal obligatoire du code sur les conflits d'intérêts. Nous nous sommes livrés à un exercice semblable il y a un an, mais de façon incomplète, car nous nous sommes limités aux aspects les plus évidents; nous voudrons peut-être intervenir sur d'autres points cette fois-ci. C'est ce dont nous parlerons mardi prochain après cet exposé pour déterminer ce que le Comité veut faire à ce sujet ou ce qu'il pourrait vouloir modifier.

Avant d'oublier, j'invite mes collègues du Comité à se tenir prêts à approuver trois formulaires qui sont déjà utilisés et dont nous avons parlé. Veuillez les examiner d'avance pour que nous ne passions pas beaucoup de temps sur ces trois documents qui, comme je le disais, existent déjà et qui ont été approuvés par le Parlement. Il n'est pas question de modifier notre procédure d'approbation pour de tels formulaires.

Sur ce, à moins que des membres du Comité n'aient quoi que ce soit d'autre à ajouter, je vous souhaite à tous la bienvenue. Merci beaucoup d'avoir répondu à notre invitation à si peu de préavis. On dirait que, dans cette phase d'organisation, tout le monde est invité à la dernière minute. Nous apprécions que vous vous soyez fait accompagner de votre personnel technique qui pourra répondre à certaines de nos questions. Le Comité fait toujours preuve de beaucoup de créativité dans ses questions et il est donc heureux que vous soyez accompagnée de toute votre équipe. La parole est à vous et nous ne serons pas trop stricts dans le temps alloué à votre exposé parce que nous savons que vous avez beaucoup de choses à nous dire.

Mme Mary Dawson (commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, Commissariat aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique):

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur le président, honorables membres du comité, c'est un plaisir de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui. Je vous remercie de m'avoir invitée.[Traduction]

J'allais vous présenter les membres de mon équipe, mais vous l'avez déjà fait. Permettez-moi simplement de vous dire qu'il s'agit là de mes cadres supérieurs et qu'une d'elles est absente parce qu'elle vient juste de partir en vacances, Denise Benoit, qui est directrice de la gestion corporative.

Je vous expliquerai brièvement mon rôle et mon mandat de commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, je récapitulerai mes interactions antérieures avec le Comité et je vous donnerai un aperçu de mes espoirs et de mes attentes pour maintenir des relations productives.

En ma qualité de commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, j'applique deux régimes de conflits d'intérêts, le Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés et la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts pour les titulaires de charge publique. Ces deux régimes visent à prévenir les situations de conflits d'intérêts entre les fonctions officielles des représentants élus et nommés et leurs intérêts personnels.

Le Code des députés et la Loi comportent des dispositions semblables, mais non identiques. Cela peut porter à confusion, particulièrement dans le cas des députés qui sont également ministres et par conséquent, visés par les deux régimes. J'ai recommandé que le Parlement étudie des moyens d'harmoniser, si possible, le Code des députés et la Loi afin d'assurer l'uniformité des formulations et des processus.

Le Code des députés est annexé au Règlement de la Chambre des communes, qui constitue les règles écrites régissant les travaux de la Chambre. Il comporte des règles pour éviter les conflits d'intérêts, des processus à suivre pour divulguer des renseignements confidentiels à la commissaire, des procédures afin de rendre publics les sommaires des députés, le rôle consultatif de la commissaire et un mécanisme d'enquête sur les contraventions alléguées aux régimes par les députés.

Mon personnel et moi-même examinons les rapports confidentiels des titulaires sur leurs biens, leurs dettes et leurs activités, nous tenons un registre public sur les renseignements à déclaration obligatoire, outre que nous faisons enquête et produisons des rapports sur les cas de non-conformité alléguée. C'est cet aspect sur lequel vous vous penchez ou vous êtes penchés dans la première phase de votre étude. Notre but premier est la prévention: nous cherchons donc à aider les députés et les titulaires de charge publique à se conformer au Code et à la Loi.

L'article 32 du Code des députés confère au commissaire un rôle éducatif explicite. Mon personnel et moi-même menons diverses activités de sensibilisation et d'information des députés au sujet de leurs obligations en vertu du Code qui les régit et de la façon de s'y conformer. Nous communiquons régulièrement avec eux et leur fournissons des conseils confidentiels sur des sujets précis. Avec eux, chaque année, nous examinons les renseignements confidentiels qu'ils ont déclarés et leurs déclarations publiques. Nous donnons des exposés officiels aux caucus des partis et préparons des documents, par exemple des fiches d'information et des avis consultatifs.

Aux fins de l'application du Code des députés, j'ai le pouvoir de mener ce que nous appelons des « enquêtes » officielles. Dans mes rapports d'enquête, je peux recommander l'adoption de sanctions, mais il appartient à la Chambre des communes de déterminer si des mesures doivent être prises à l'encontre d'un député qui ne s'est pas conformé au Code des députés. Ces rapports sont rendus publics sans l'approbation du Parlement ou du gouvernement.

Le Code des députés a été modifié à diverses reprises depuis son adoption par la Chambre des communes en avril 2004. En 2007, un article d'interprétation a été ajouté, l'échéance de déclaration des cadeaux a été portée à 60 jours et les dispositions relatives à la déclaration ont été modifiées. En 2008, une modification a été apportée à la suite d'une enquête menée par mon bureau afin de préciser que le fait, pour un député, « d'être partie à une action en justice » est exclu de la définition d'« intérêt personnel » applicable au député ou à une autre personne. C'était la question de la crainte de poursuites en diffamation dont vous vous souvenez peut-être. En 2009, la règle sur les cadeaux a été modifiée en consultation avec ce comité et mon bureau.

Tout récemment, en 2015, le Code des députés a subi plusieurs modifications, notamment: le seuil de déclaration des cadeaux a été abaissé de 500 $ à 200 $, soit le même que celui s'appliquant aux titulaires de charge publique, le seuil de déclaration des déplacements parrainés a été fixé également à 200 $ et des échéances ont été incluses pour les processus de conformité initiale d'examen annuel. Tous ces changements découlent de recommandations que j'avais formulées lors du dernier examen quinquennal.

(1110)



En vertu de l'article 33 du Code des députés, le Comité doit, tous les cinq ans, effectuer un examen exhaustif de ses dispositions et de son fonctionnement. Les modifications apportées au Code en 2007 découlaient du premier examen quinquennal.

Le deuxième examen a été lancé en 2012. J'ai remis au Comité un mémoire et j'ai témoigné pour discuter de mes recommandations en mai de la même année. Le Comité a suspendu son étude peu de temps après et a amorcé un nouvel examen en février 2015. À la demande du Comité, j'ai soumis un autre mémoire et j'ai témoigné de nouveau.

En juin 2015, le Comité a déposé à la Chambre des communes un rapport qui concluait cet examen. La Chambre a donné son aval au rapport plus tard au cours de ce mois et les modifications recommandées par le Comité sont entrées en vigueur le 20 octobre, le lendemain de l'élection fédérale. Ces modifications reflètent, en totalité ou en partie, 10 des recommandations que j'ai formulées au Comité, ce que j'ai été ravie de constater. Je remarque que le Code des députés fonctionne très bien en général, mais aussi que j'ai émis 13 autres recommandations, et je serai heureuse de vous en faire part si le Comité décide de procéder à un examen exhaustif du Code des députés, comme le recommande le rapport de juin.

La Chambre a également approuvé un nouveau formulaire intitulé « Demande d'enquête », que j'avais soumis à l'approbation du Comité en 2010. J'ai dû procéder ainsi parce que l'article 30 du Code des députés exige que j'obtienne l'approbation du Comité pour l'ensemble des formulaires et des directives et j'estimais qu'il était important de mettre un formulaire à la disposition des députés qui souhaitent faire une demande d'enquête.

De manière générale, l'obligation de demander l'approbation a entravé mes efforts visant à aider les députés à se conformer à leurs obligations. Sans approbation préalable, je ne peux publier de directive en vertu du Code des députés, notamment en ce qui a trait aux cadeaux, un sujet qui semble susciter beaucoup de confusion et soulever de nombreuses questions de la part des députés.

Par contre, en vertu de la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts, il n'est pas nécessaire d'obtenir l'approbation du Comité pour les directives ou les formulaires. J'en ai donc publié plusieurs, et les titulaires de charge publique ont dit apprécier l'existence de ces outils. J'ai transmis cette préoccupation au Comité par le passé et lui ai demandé s'il était vraiment nécessaire qu'il approuve les directives et formulaires que je pourrais préparer en vertu du Code des députés.

D'un autre côté, quand la Chambre des communes a modifié le Code des députés en juin dernier, il est apparu nécessaire d'apporter un certain nombre de modifications corrélatives et rédactionnelles pour que les formulaires existants soient conformes aux modifications. Habituellement, j'aurais demandé l'approbation des formulaires révisés au Comité, mais la Chambre a ajourné ses travaux très peu de temps après et le Parlement a été dissous au début d'août en raison de l'élection.

En vertu du Règlement de la Chambre des communes, le Comité a pour mandat d'examiner, pour en faire rapport, toute question relative au Code des députés. Il a demandé mon avis afin de recommander des modifications à la Chambre des communes. Certes, j'ai témoigné devant le Comité depuis que je suis commissaire, mais très peu souvent. Dans les premières années de mon mandat, j'ai été invitée à discuter avec le Comité de deux de mes rapports annuels, mais je n'ai pas été réinvitée depuis 2010. Les seules autres occasions où j'ai été invitée à interagir avec le Comité s'inscrivaient dans le contexte de l'examen quinquennal du Code des députés amorcé en 2012. J'ai comparu une deuxième fois en 2015.

J'espère établir une relation productive avec le Comité et je dois dire que le fait que le Comité ait souhaité me rencontrer, bien qu'à très court préavis, si tôt dans cette nouvelle législature m'encourage.

(1115)

[Français]

Monsieur le président, en terminant, je souhaite assurer le comité que le Commissariat et moi-même sommes disposés à vous fournir tous les renseignements dont vous aurez besoin, le cas échéant, sur toute question liée au Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés.

Je vous remercie encore une fois de m'avoir invitée aujourd'hui. Maintenant, si vous avez des questions, je serai heureuse d'y répondre. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de passer aux questions, vous avez mentionné que nous avons récemment adopté 11 de vos recommandations et qu'il y en a 13 autres que nous n'avons pas retenues. C'est cela?

Mme Mary Dawson:

En fait 10, j'ai parlé de 10 et 13.

Le président:

Treize que nous n'avons pas...?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Effectivement.

Le président:

Vous serait-il possible avant notre rencontre de mardi de nous envoyer ces 13 recommandations classées par ordre de priorité en fonction de celles que vous jugez les plus importantes?

Mme Mary Dawson:

D'accord.

Le président:

C'est au cas où nous voudrions en parler parce que nous allons aborder la question mardi.

Mme Mary Dawson:

J'en serais ravie.

Le président:

Merci.

Qui commence? Monsieur Graham.

(1120)

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame Dawson. Permettez-moi tout d'abord de préciser que celle qui me conseille à votre bureau est Karine McNeely. Elle est fantastique. Je tenais à le dire haut et fort. C'est merveilleux de travailler avec elle. Quand je lui envoie une question, j'obtiens une réponse claire et rapide. Je me réjouis de bénéficier de ses conseils et j'en suis venu à me demander quelles responsabilités il m'incombe au juste.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Merci, nous incitons les gens à nous appeler.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Effectivement et mon personnel appelle quand on nous soumet des questions du genre: « Je ne sais pas si je devrais faire ceci ou cela »; la réponse est « demandez à Karen, elle trouvera une solution ». C'est très apprécié.

Selon vous, quelles obligations ou quels processus en vertu du Code sont les plus difficiles à comprendre pour les députés?

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est la question des cadeaux, toujours celle des cadeaux. C'est tellement problématique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fort bien.

Mme Mary Dawson:

À part ça, je ne vois rien d'autre qui soit aussi problématique. La question des cadeaux domine l'ensemble des problèmes constatés, ce qui m'y fait penser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À quel genre de problèmes vous êtes-vous heurtée pour ce qui est du respect de la politique et du genre de mesures d'exécution que vous avez dû prendre dans le passé?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je ne sais pas dans quelle mesure tous les cadeaux me sont déclarés et je ne peux donc que partir des cas que je connais.

Il y a un an environ, j'ai produit un rapport en vertu de la Loi qui a soulevé énormément de questions. Il concernait un titulaire de charge publique qui avait quitté ses fonctions pour aller travailler... Il s'agit du rapport Bonner. L'intéressé avait accepté, après son emploi, un poste dans une firme de lobbyistes. J'en ai profité pour attirer l'attention sur nos règles. Des questions s'étaient posées à propos des réceptions et des cadeaux.

Je dis depuis toujours qu'un dîner est un cadeau. Évidemment, si vous recevez un bouquet de fleurs, c'est aussi un cadeau; tout est un cadeau. La question est donc de savoir si le cadeau est acceptable. Il règne une grande confusion entre ce qui est acceptable et ce qui doit être déclaré. Beaucoup se disent que si ce n'est pas déclarable, c'est acceptable. On dirait que le message ne passe pas.

Je suis heureuse de constater que les seuils de déclaration ont été ramenés à 200 $, parce que nous allons maintenant nous pencher sur les cas se trouvant dans la fourchette des 200 à 500 $.

Au fil des ans, j'ai émis un certain nombre de pistes de solution pour s'attaquer à ce problème. Histoire de vous resituer en contexte, quand votre comité a apporté des amendements en 2010 ou en 2011, les règles étaient différentes. Elles précisaient que, si l'on recevait un cadeau en lien avec votre emploi, vous deviez le refuser. Eh bien, ces règles ont été bafouées. C'est un peu comme si elles n'avaient jamais existé et j'ai été troublée par l'hypocrisie qui régnait alors. J'avais dit que nous devrions envisager d'adopter des règles plus réalistes relativement aux cadeaux afin que les gens puissent en accepter et ne pas passer outre ce qui leur était imposé. C'est alors que nous avons repris dans le Code à peu près les mêmes règles que celles contenues dans la Loi à propos des titulaires de charge publique. Un député est beaucoup plus susceptible de recevoir un cadeau qu'un ministre, parce qu'il se retrouve plus souvent en situation de conflit d'intérêts.

Voilà que je viens de me lancer dans une diatribe contre les cadeaux. J'espère que vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient.

Il y a une situation où les cadeaux ne sont pas acceptables, celle d'un député siégeant à un comité appelé à voter sur une question particulière et qui se fait inviter à un repas raffiné ou se fait offrir des billets pour un spectacle ou autre par une partie prenante.

Je vous parle de cadeaux, mais il faut préciser que ceux qui se plaignent des règles concernant cette question, parlent surtout des réceptions qui se déroulent sur la Colline.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, si j'accepte ce morceau de sushi, je ne peux plus faire l'objet de manoeuvres de lobbying, c'est cela?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Si vous acceptez...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Mary Dawson: Vous pouvez toujours envisager la chose sous cet angle, si ce n'est qu'il ne faut pas ramener tout ça au niveau d'une seule crevette. J'ai comparu devant de nombreux comités où les députés m'ont demandé: « Combien de crevettes pourrais-je accepter avant d'être en infraction? »

Je leur ai dit: « Là, vous n'y êtes plus du tout. » Il n'y a rien de mal à se faire offrir une tasse de café à moins que ce ne soit tous les jours.

Il faut aborder tout cela avec un brin de logique. Il m'a d'ailleurs fallu deux ou trois ans pour découvrir qu'il y avait toutes ces réceptions sur la Colline parlementaire, puisqu'elles ne sont pas déclarées. En règle générale, je ne vois aucun problème dans le cas des députés qui vont prendre un verre de vin ou une bouchée, sans plus. En revanche, ce qui est problématique, c'est l'incroyable prévalence du phénomène constatée chez les personnes qui font problème. Je sais qu'on a souvent mal compris la position précise de mon bureau à ce sujet. C'est d'autant plus compliqué que le commissariat au lobbying émet des lignes directrices qui, dans une certaine mesure, recoupent mes propres règles.

Je suis sans doute en train de m'en prendre à des moulins à vent, mais le problème découle du fait que, dans la Loi sur le lobbying, dans le Code des députés et dans la loi me régissant, les mêmes termes ont des significations différentes. Dans la loi qui me régit, un titulaire de charge publique est un ministre, un secrétaire parlementaire, une personne nommée par le gouverneur en conseil ou un membre d'un cabinet ministériel. Dans la Loi sur le lobbying, l'expression « titulaire de charge publique » est d'application beaucoup plus large et inclut les députés. Ainsi, selon qu'il s'agisse de la Loi sur le lobbying ou de la loi qui me régit, on parle de personnes différentes.

De toute façon, c'est là un de mes dadas.

(1125)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je l'ai bien compris.

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé alors je vous remercie.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Excusez-moi, poursuivez.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci.

Je voudrais également discuter de cette question des cadeaux, plus précisément en ce qui a trait aux événements, réceptions, séances d'information, réunions, galas et toutes les autres manifestations auxquelles nous assistons tous dans le cadre de nos fonctions. Je suis sûr que tous ceux présents ici aujourd'hui, des deux côtés de la table, seraient d'accord pour dire que prendre contact avec les gens, obtenir de l'information, recueillir des rétroactions, rencontrer nos commettants, prendre la parole à diverses manifestations et exercer d'autres activités de ce genre sont d'importants aspects de notre travail, de nos fonctions de député.

J'ai encore de la difficulté avec certains des témoignages et des réponses que nous avons entendus à votre dernière comparution devant le Comité pour ce qui est de faire la part entre les activités auxquelles nous pouvons assister et celles auxquelles nous devons nous abstenir d'assister, entre ce qui est considéré comme un cadeau et ce qui est considéré comme une partie de nos fonctions officielles. J'ai quelques questions à ce sujet et j'espère avoir le temps de toutes les poser.

Pourriez-vous nous donner quelques éclaircissements? À votre dernière comparution ici, vous nous recommandiez de modifier le Code de manière à exclure explicitement les manifestations auxquelles tous les députés étaient invités. À mes yeux, cela pose quelques difficultés, la première étant de savoir comment nous pourrions, en tant que députés, connaître la liste des invités à telle ou telle manifestation. Tous les députés ont-ils été invités? Comment pouvons-nous le savoir?

À la rigueur, cela pourrait aller s'il s'agit d'une manifestation qui se tient à Ottawa ou dans la région de la capitale nationale, mais qu'en serait-il si elle a lieu dans notre propre circonscription ou région. Dans un tel cas, serait-il acceptable d'y assister si les conseillers municipaux et les députés provinciaux locaux ont été invités?

De façon plus générale — je reprends l'exemple de M. Christopherson —, si tous les politiciens de la région de Hamilton ont été invités ou, pour ce qui me concerne, de la région de Calgary, l'invitation devient-elle alors acceptable?

Il nous est réellement difficile de savoir, quant au moment et au lieu de l'activité, comment trancher la question. Pourriez-vous éclaircir ce point?

Mme Mary Dawson:

À mon sens, lorsqu'il s'agit d'activités dans la circonscription, il n'y a pas de problème, sauf si c'est quelque entreprise qui cherche à faire adopter un projet de loi particulier qui vous approche précisément dans ce but. Autrement, si vous êtes invité à une activité quelconque d'un ordre de frères catholiques ou des Témoins de Jéhovah, il n'y a aucun problème à accepter l'invitation.

À l'époque où j'ai assumé mes présentes fonctions, certains députés pensaient qu'ils avaient à débourser chaque fois qu'ils assistaient à l'une de ces foires ou autres activités du genre. Je leur ai dit que ce n'était pas le cas, qu'ils ne devaient pas s'en inquiéter parce qu'ils représentaient leurs commettants, lesquels ne cherchaient pas à obtenir quelque avantage particulier. Ces activités ne posent pas problème; il s'agit de leur circonscription électorale.

À l'occasion — cela relève ordinairement de la Loi plutôt que du Code —, le premier ministre est invité à représenter le Canada à tel ou tel événement. Il s'agit là d'un rôle de représentation qui est bien délimité. Je ne sais pas si cela vous aide.

(1130)

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompre.

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est bon. Allez-y de vos questions.

M. Blake Richards:

Je m'en excuse, mais mon temps de parole est limité.

Je trouve qu'il subsiste une zone grise.

Où est la limite? Comment faisons-nous, en tant que députés, pour déterminer quel genre d'invitation est acceptable et aussi, je suppose, qu'est-ce qui est considéré comme un cadeau?

Par exemple, on nous demande souvent, dans notre circonscription, d'assister à une activité d'une oeuvre de bienfaisance. De toute évidence, les organisateurs souhaitent la présence du député, parce qu'il jouit d'une certaine stature dans la communauté et y est généralement apprécié, du moins c'est à espérer. Quoi qu'il en soit, nous aimons penser que nous sommes bien appréciés dans la communauté. Ainsi, nous sommes invités à ces activités pour saluer l'assistance, prononcer une allocution ou peut-être participer à une vente aux enchères…

Mme Mary Dawson:

Cela ne pose pas problème à moins qu'il s'agisse d'une œuvre de bienfaisance qui, à ce moment particulier, cherche un soutien de votre part.

J'ai envoyé un avis il y a quelques années lorsque le Falun Gong avait fait parvenir des billets, d'une valeur de l'ordre de 100 $, pour son spectacle au CNA. À ce moment-là, il faisait aussi des démarches en vue d'obtenir un soutien.

Voilà le critère. Y a-t-il quelque chose qu'on cherche à obtenir de vous?

M. Blake Richards:

Ainsi, si on ne nous demande rien en tant que députés…?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, parce que vous êtes des membres en vue de votre communauté…

M. Blake Richards:

Si l'œuvre de bienfaisance, par exemple, était en quête de fonds publics en vue de la construction d'un nouvel immeuble ou autre chose du genre, ce serait alors inacceptable?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Ce serait inacceptable pour le ministre qui participe à la décision de financement et peut-être pour les membres du comité si un projet de loi s'y rapportant avait été déposé à la Chambre ou s'il y avait quelque autre situation du genre.

M. Blake Richards:

Il s'agit donc de déterminer si j'ai réellement un rôle décisionnel dans une démarche faite par l'organisme en question.

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Pourquoi ne pas le déclarer comme cadeau? Par exemple, si j'assiste à une soirée-bénéfice pour lequel le prix du billet est supérieur à 200 $. Mon billet m'a été donné parce que les organisateurs souhaitent la présence d'un membre de la communauté bien en vue pour apporter un soutien à leur…

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le critère est le même, mais vous devez déclarer votre billet comme cadeau.

M. Blake Richards:

Il faudrait déclarer le billet; il est donc considéré comme un cadeau.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Je peux l'accepter, mais je dois le déclarer.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui. Mais pourquoi vous offre-t-on un cadeau de plus de 200 $? Cela me trouble toujours quand des organismes de bienfaisance font pleuvoir ces cadeaux sur la Colline du Parlement. Pourquoi diable dépensent-ils…?

M. Blake Richards:

Non, je ne parle pas d'un cadeau. Je dis que si j'y assiste, comme je l'ai expliqué plus tôt, en tant que député…

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, et ils vous remercient de votre présence…

M. Blake Richards:

S'ils me demandent d'y être et que je n'achète pas mon billet, qui coûte plus de 200 $, je dois le déclarer comme cadeau...

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, vous devez le déclarer.

M. Blake Richards:

... même si j'y assiste en ma qualité de député…?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Vous devez le déclarer, oui. Cela apporte une certaine transparence à tout ce qui se passe.

M. Blake Richards:

Je dirais que je suis quelque peu troublé que cela puisse être considéré comme un cadeau parce que ça fait vraiment partie de notre rôle de député. Mais si vous dites que tel est le cas, j'imagine que ma question porterait sur les changements à apporter si le Comité décidait de recommandations pour clarifier…

Mme Mary Dawson:

Cela dépendrait probablement du lieu où se tient l'activité en question, dans votre circonscription ou non. Chaque cas…

Malheureusement, il y a une zone grise. Il n'y a pas moyen de l'éviter. Vous devez déterminer, tout d'abord, s'il s'agit d'un cadeau, un cadeau étant essentiellement n'importe quoi qui vous est donné sans paiement de votre part.

M. Blake Richards:

Puis-je…?

Le président:

D'accord, mais très rapidement.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je l'apprécie grandement. J'ai une courte question de suivi.

J'ai presque l'impression que le cas se présente chaque fois que nous recevons une invitation, qu'il nous faudrait vérifier auprès du commissariat pour décider si nous pouvons l'accepter ou non. Voyez-vous quelque chose que nous pourrions intégrer dans le Code afin de clarifier la situation, de manière à éviter que les députés aient à vous consulter chaque fois qu'ils sont invités à assister à une manifestation?

Pourriez-vous suggérer comment nous pourrions modifier le Code pour qu'il énonce très clairement ce qui est acceptable et ce qui ne l'est pas?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Les directives que je formule aux termes de la Loi sont, je pense, assez bonnes. Je n'ai jamais réussi à établir des directives… J'y ai plutôt renoncé à cause de l'exigence d'en faire approuver la teneur par ce comité. Mais je pense que si j'étais habilité à le faire, je pourrais m'y mettre et établir une directive.

J'ai reçu des lettres de lobbyistes et je leur ai promis que j'allais publier un avis au sujet de certains de ces cadeaux, chose que j'estime pouvoir faire sans en référer au Comité. Mais, vous savez, il y a toutes sortes de questions, aussi différentes qu'imprévues, qui vont dans diverses directions.

Je voudrais cependant signaler un point. Si vous assistez à une activité en tant que représentant de votre communauté, je serais d'avis qu'il s'agit alors d'un cadeau protocolaire. Or, une exception a été établie pour les cadeaux protocolaires, mais ils sont quand même des cadeaux. Il existe une différence entre l'obligation de déclaration et l'acceptabilité.

Ce n'est pas une mauvaise chose, si vous obtenez une valeur… Ce que je veux dire c'est que la plupart de ces activités dans votre communauté n'exigent pas, je pense, l'achat de billets à 200 $. Ce n'est pas comme si de telles activités existaient à foison. Je conviens que la situation n'est pas claire à 100 %, et la raison de cette incertitude dépend de la personne qui reçoit le cadeau et de sa relation avec celui qui le fait. Il faut examiner les particularités de chaque cas.

(1135)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Merci également à vous, madame Dawson, et aux membres de votre personnel qui sont ici aujourd'hui. Nous tournons autour de ces questions depuis longtemps. Je suis arrivé ici l'année où tout cela a commencé, et je dois avouer que les choses sont aujourd'hui à peu près aussi claires qu'elles l'étaient au début.

Mme Mary Dawson:

La réponse simple, c'est que vous ne pouvez pas recevoir de cadeaux, mais je ne pense pas que vous voulez pousser cela plus loin. C'est une solution. Excusez-moi.

M. David Christopherson:

Pas de problème. J'aurais une question principale, puis quelques questions secondaires. D'entrée de jeu — je l'entends constamment et nous devons composer avec cela au Comité —, vous avez mentionné qu'il y a la Loi et le Code et qu'ils ne sont pas identiques, et que nous avons aussi la commissaire au lobbying. Y a-t-il eu entre vous-même et la commissaire au lobbying, ou toute autre personne qui s'occupe de lobbying, des démarches ou des projets visant à explorer la possibilité de produire un rapport conjoint contenant des recommandations qui aideraient à clarifier ces questions?

Le but visé serait de faciliter la compréhension de ces questions, plutôt qu'avoir à composer avec des secteurs cloisonnés et à tâcher de déterminer où il y a chevauchement, quel libellé serait préférable en cas de divergence, lequel serait à recommander ou quels arguments militent en faveur de l'un ou l'autre. Il me semble que les choses seraient grandement facilitées si vous deux, en tant qu'agentes du Parlement, cherchiez à vous entendre sur ce point, parce que c'est vous qui avez les compétences voulues. Vous connaissez ces questions parce que vous avez à vous en occuper tous les jours. Quant à nous, nous avons à traiter de toutes sortes de différentes questions tous les jours.

Avez-vous exploré cette possibilité ou existe-t-il quelque raison qui empêcherait une telle approche?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Toutes les deux nous avons assisté aux mêmes réunions où nous avons discuté de ces choses.

M. David Christopherson:

Si j'ai bonne mémoire de ces réunions, elles ont simplement permis de signaler les problèmes. Je cherche plutôt du côté des solutions. Est-il possible pour vous de présenter un rapport conjoint assorti de recommandations ou est-ce que vos rôles respectifs sont cloisonnés par les textes législatifs distincts qui définissent vos fonctions?

Mme Mary Dawson:

L'un des problèmes réside dans le fait que nous avons affaire avec des groupes différents. Nous ne sommes pas en présence du même groupe de personnes, et les règles qui s'appliquent ne peuvent donc pas être les mêmes. Je saisis votre intuition. Le but que nous visons n'est pas, je pense, nécessairement le même, et cela tient à ce que des pouvoirs nous sont conférés en propre. Je prends note de votre suggestion et je reconnais que ce serait une bonne chose. Les seuls gens dont s'occupe la commissaire au lobbying sont les lobbyistes. Pour ma part, je m'occupe d'un groupe beaucoup plus large: les parties prenantes.

M. David Christopherson:

En toute justice, il faut dire que c'est vous qui avez soulevé le problème du chevauchement des compétences et il nous serait utile de pouvoir faire la part des choses. Nous avons tenté de le faire de notre côté, et vous-même pouvez bien constater combien nous avons été efficaces depuis 12 ans. Je cherche une approche différente.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je pense qu'il serait peut-être utile de fusionner les deux commissariats, mais c'est pour l'avenir.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous vous rendez compte qu'il y a beaucoup de gens au Commissariat au lobbying qui s'énervent et disent en ce moment: « Que diable! »

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est une solution. Ce n'est pas une solution définitive.

M. David Christopherson:

D'une certaine façon, c'est une solution très sensée. S'il y a des problèmes de chevauchement, parlons-en dans un seul document où il y a uniformité des termes et des renvois.

(1140)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le lobbying était auparavant régi par la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts, mais il n'était alors question que d'enregistrement. La différence aujourd'hui est que la commissaire au lobbying est habilitée à établir des directives, ce qui n'était pas le cas auparavant.

M. David Christopherson:

Je voudrais pousser cette idée un peu plus loin. Je sais que nous sommes actuellement dans le domaine des hypothèses, mais est-ce quelque chose que les deux commissaires seraient disposées à examiner? S'il y a un gain d'efficience à réaliser... Personne ne veut rien perdre. Nous avons consacré beaucoup de temps à ces questions qui, à bien des égards, sont les différences qui définissent une démocratie moderne arrivée à maturité, par opposition à certaines en émergence dans lesquelles beaucoup d'entre nous sommes engagés, ainsi que dans les difficultés auxquelles elles sont confrontées. Au fond, ce sont des problèmes agréables que nous avons.

La capacité de formuler cette recommandation existe-t-elle? Est-ce quelque chose que nous devrions envisager? Nous sommes, des deux côtés de la Chambre, toujours intéressés à réaliser des gains d'efficience.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Vous êtes des députés. Je pense que vous pouvez faire les recommandations qu'il vous plaît de faire.

M. David Christopherson:

Je cherche quelque chose qui aurait une certaine substance avant d'aller de l'avant.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le comité de l'éthique a formulé une recommandation à un certain moment.

M. David Christopherson:

Ah! oui…?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, et elle a été ballottée depuis dans différents sens.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous devrions peut-être poursuivre cette question, monsieur le président. Je vous laisse la décision, mais c'est peut-être quelque chose que nous voudrons examiner. Einstein serait très déçu de nous voir toujours aboutir au même résultat et sans cesse en chercher un différent. Peut-être devons-nous sortir des sentiers battus pour en trouver un. Nouvelle législature, grands changements, peut-être est-ce l'occasion d'embrasser ce problème. Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci. Je ne m'attarderai pas sur cette question, à moins que vous n'ayez quelque chose à ajouter.

Je reviens à la question des cadeaux, parce qu'elle est très confuse. Je suis heureux d'entendre et de vous l'entendre répéter que, lorsqu'il s'agit d'une activité dans la circonscription, ce n'est pas un gros problème. Cela ne signifie pas qu'elle ne peut pas l'être, mais, pour ma part, à Hamilton, j'assiste à peu de galas dont le billet coûte plus de 200 $. Ça peut arriver de temps à autre, mais c'est vraiment rare.

Même quand je siégeais au conseil municipal, je ne pense pas avoir eu, dans plus de 30 ans, à déclarer quoi que ce soit où le montant d'argent était élevé. Il y a bien eu quelques cadeaux qui dépassaient le seuil et devaient donc être déclarés, mais, dans les circonscriptions, il y en a peu…

Nous sommes maintenant dans une autre ligue. Nous avons discuté de certains problèmes: les réceptions qui ne sont pas claires, les cadeaux protocolaires et ceux qui ne le sont pas, l'acceptabilité par opposition à l'obligation de déclaration. Mais ce dont nous n'avons pas parlé, juste pour rendre les choses plus confuses… Mon ami M. Reid et moi-même avons passé beaucoup de temps… et j'ai hâte à son intervention de sept minutes parce qu'il a consacré beaucoup de temps et a participé, je crois, à la formulation du texte de loi initial. Quand je suis arrivé, c'est lui qui faisait réellement le travail de fond, et je m'incline donc devant sa mémoire des antécédents de beaucoup de ces questions.

Mais toutes ces choses qui nous arrivent… Quand j'entre à mon bureau lundi, après un séjour dans ma circonscription, il arrive que je trouve quelque objet posé sur mon fauteuil. Il y aura un petit quelque chose — disons un porte-clés ou une breloque quelconque ou une casquette de baseball — sur mon fauteuil, accompagné d'une lettre qui dit: « Bonjour. Comment allez-vous? Nous sommes telle ou telle organisation… »

Tout récemment, il s'agissait d'une compagnie d'assurances. Je crois qu'elle m'a envoyé une petite trousse d'hiver. Je n'en connais pas le prix, mais je pense qu'elle valait peut-être, au plus, une cinquantaine de dollars. Me fondant sur les dernières rencontres que nous avons eues avec vous, je l'ai retournée, car je crains que les médias ne viennent, par curiosité, vérifier si j'ai donné suite à ce que vous disiez. J'ai donc renvoyé le tout.

Mais vous allez entendre M. Reid parler de ce que ça coûte de retourner ces cadeaux, du temps que mon personnel consacre à les déballer et à les préparer avant mon arrivée, pour ensuite se faire dire de les remballer et de les retourner à l'expéditeur. Il y a tout ce temps à prendre en considération.

Il y parfois de l'incertitude. M. Reid cherchait à obtenir la permission de jeter simplement ces cadeaux, ce qui constituerait une solution, mais aussi un réel gaspillage. En fait, c'est comme si on demande à chacun des 338 députés de jeter 50 $ par la fenêtre sans que quiconque puisse s'en servir, même ceux qui en auraient besoin.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non. Vous pouvez accepter ce genre de cadeau du bureau d'assurance ou de quiconque à condition que l'on ne cherche pas à obtenir une décision de votre part en échange.

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends, mais ce qui arrive...

Le président:

David, vous avez largement dépassé votre temps.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis désolé. Bon.

Le président:

Nous pourrons y revenir plus tard, à moins que vous ne vouliez conclure très rapidement.

M. David Christopherson:

Si vous le permettez, je vais poursuivre et je m'arrêterai dès que vous me ferez signe.

Le président:

Bien.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous avez l'avantage de faire affaire à des gens qui sont passés par là. Les médias sont là, eux aussi, alors s'il faut faire des erreurs, laissez-moi les faire, moi, plutôt que l'un de vous. Oui, je sais ce que vous pensez: « Vas-y, Dave, cause toujours sur tous ces cadeaux ». C'est un excellent sujet de débat.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Le problème est le suivant. Le bureau d'assurance organise une journée de lobbying ou encore les pompiers, par exemple — et on a les pompiers eux-mêmes et les chefs des services d'incendie —, et ils vont faire un don, tout comme le bureau d'assurance. Quand ils arrivent, les plus malins s'en tiennent à deux ou trois points qui leur tiennent à coeur. Les choses restent simples. Ils reviennent chaque année avec les mêmes arguments en essayant de faire valoir leurs demandes auprès de l'opposition, qui deviendra ensuite le gouvernement et sur lequel ils pourront faire pression, etc.

Quand vous me dites qu'à condition qu'ils ne font pas du lobbying pour obtenir quelque chose de vous, je sais...

(1145)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Du moment qu'ils ne sont pas une partie prenante et qu'ils ne font pas de « lobbying ». Ce terme a un sens beaucoup large.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, mais ce sont des parties prenantes. Ils représentent des courtiers.

Mme Mary Dawson:

En effet, mais beaucoup ne sont pas visés par la Loi sur le lobbying. Il existe des seuils.

M. David Christopherson:

Bon. Parlons de simplicité. Mon personnel doit-il passer tout cela au crible? Nous recherchons la simplicité. Nous tenons à ne rien faire d'irrégulier, certes. Mais il y a actuellement du gaspillage et c'est ce qui me gêne. Pour revenir à l'exemple des pompiers, ils envoient toujours un porte-clés, une breloque, une casquette de baseball. C’est ce qu’ils font d’habitude.

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est bien.

M. David Christopherson:

Mais ils viennent toujours avec leurs trois requêtes habituelles — je songe surtout aux chefs des services d'incendie — sur des questions de sécurité publique. Ce qu'ils demandent n'est pas dans leur intérêt personnel, mais ils veulent une loi qui, selon eux, devrait aider les Canadiens à mieux prévenir les incendies à la maison, au travail et dans les lieux publics.

Comment séparer une constante...? Je connais leurs trois arguments, car nous avons eu des rencontres depuis plus de 10 ans. Je les connais bien de sorte que quand ils nous envoient quelque chose, je fais le lien, ce qui élimine probablement 80 % de ce qui arrive.

Aidez-moi.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le gouvernement a-t-il déposé un projet de loi ou a-t-il l'intention d'en proposer un?

M. David Christopherson:

Il y a les projets de loi d'exécution du budget, qui peuvent contenir beaucoup de bonnes petites choses. S’ils nous disent qu'ils aiment le budget et qu'ils espèrent avoir notre soutien, ce que nous ne leur accorderons sans doute pas en tant qu'opposition, est-ce que cela constitue un cadeau, car c’est important?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non. Il faudrait que ce soit plus évident que cela, je pense.

Lyne me rappelle le cas de gens qui sont venus nous poser des questions sur des cadeaux que les assurances étaient en train de distribuer alors même que la Chambre était saisie d'une question les concernant. Voilà pourquoi nous avons dit que ce n'était pas possible.

M. David Christopherson:

Quand vous dites que la Chambre était saisie d'une question, un de ces trois points devrait se trouver dans un projet de loi ou à l'étude par un comité. Qu'en est-il d'un ministre qui dit qu'il songe à agir dans ce sens, mais qui ne l'a pas encore fait?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Voulez-vous dire un mot ou deux?

Mme Lyne Robinson-Dalpé (directrice, Conseils et conformité, Commissariat aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique):

Si la Chambre étudie un projet de loi ou si des changements sont apportés à une loi ou si quelqu'un comparaît devant un comité pour apporter des modifications à une loi ou un projet de loi, nous déciderions à ce moment-là que l'organisation intéressée ne peut pas vous faire de cadeau.

M. David Christopherson:

Plus vous approchez du moment de la décision, plus les choses s'aiguisent.

Mme Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

Tout à fait. En revenant à l'Association des courtiers d'assurance, il y a quelques années, des députés nous ont demandé s'ils pouvaient accepter les couvertures dont on leur avait fait cadeau... Non, ce n'était pas vraiment cette affaire, c'est arrivé pendant une campagne de promotion...

M. David Christopherson:

Ils ont fait cadeau de couvertures mauves et puis plus rien.

Mme Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

À ce moment-là, nous avions dit aux députés qu'ils ne pouvaient pas accepter en raison du projet de loi qu'ils cherchaient à faire adopter par la Chambre en comité plénier. Nous avons dit que les députés siégeant au comité en question ne devaient pas accepter ces cadeaux des courtiers.

M. David Christopherson:

Bon. Voilà qui parle pour un niveau d'organisation très élevé dans la mesure où il y a de nombreux éléments en ces lieux. La plupart d'entre nous nous concentrons sur ce que nous... de sorte que l’on court le risque d'ignorer l'existence d'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire.

Mme Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

Je répète que si vous ne siégez pas à la table, si vous ne faites pas partie du comité, cela...

M. David Christopherson:

Mais nous nous retrouverions dans la Chambre en fin de compte.

Mme Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

La Chambre, c'est plus général. Il n'y a que des députés, ce qui nous fait dire que le problème concerne davantage les comités. Les députés qui font partie d'un comité ne peuvent pas accepter de cadeaux, mais les autres le peuvent.

M. David Christopherson:

Bon, je vais céder la parole aux autres, mais je voudrais dire à M. Reid que cela semble un peu plus définitif que ce que nous avons eu par le passé. Je regrette presque d'avoir renvoyé cette trousse d'urgence pour l'hiver, car je pourrais bien rester coincé sur l'autoroute. Bon, c'est fait, c'est parti. Je ne voulais pas courir de risque.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous poursuivons.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Vous permettez que j'ajoute une remarque?

Quand vous avez des cadeaux à renvoyer, il pourrait y avoir un système permettant de déposer ces articles dans un endroit connu de tous pour qu’on vienne éventuellement les ramasser.

Plusieurs personnes m'ont parlé de ce problème, c'est-à-dire ne pas savoir que faire de ces articles, mais sans vouloir dépenser de l'argent pour les renvoyer. Il me semble que ce problème pourrait être réglé d'une façon ou d'une autre.

(1150)

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de passer à notre dernière série de sept minutes, vous avez dit hésiter à rédiger vos lignes directrices parce que nous devons les approuver. Je pense que vous allez trouver de la bonne volonté parmi nous. En ma qualité de président du Comité, je vous assure que nous nous occuperons assez rapidement de toute ligne directrice que vous nous donnerez. Je ne m'inquiéterais pas à votre place.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Bien. Vers 2010, j'avais rédigé quelque chose qui a été approuvé finalement en juin 2015 par le comité en question. C'est alors que j'ai renoncé à rédiger ce genre de choses en me demandant à quoi cela pouvait servir.

Le président:

Comme je n'ai pas entendu d'objections de la part du Comité, je pense que nous pourrions agir rapidement au sujet de vos lignes directrices.

Madame Vandenbeld, vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je vais partager mon temps avec Mme Sahota.

Avant de vous poser ma question et en revenant sur ce que M. Christopherson a dit, qu'en est-il du recyclage des cadeaux? Par exemple, il arrive souvent que des organismes me demandent si j'ai quelque chose à offrir pour une vente aux enchères. Si j'accepte les cadeaux pour les offrir ensuite à ces organismes de bienfaisance, est-ce que cela veut dire que je reçois le cadeau ou que je ne fais que l'obtenir pour le donner à quelqu'un d'autre?

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est vous qui recevez le cadeau. J'ai été très claire à cet égard. Oui. Vous l'avez reçu et ensuite vous décidez ce que vous voulez en faire. Désolée.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D’accord.

Mon autre question concerne les 13 recommandations dont vous avez parlé au début. Il y en avait 23. Il y en avait 10 dans le rapport et 13 qui n’y figuraient pas. Je vous ai entendu parler d’un certain nombre de questions et il me semble que vous avez recommandé un certain nombre de choses, par exemple la conformité à la Loi sur le lobbying et l’harmonisation entre la Loi et le Code, ainsi que les lignes directrices et autres.

Cela faisait-il partie des 13 recommandations qui n’étaient pas incluses?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je n’ai pas parlé de la Loi sur le lobbying. Certaines de ces questions ont surgi récemment en fait, notamment en ce qui concerne la Loi et le Code.

C’était une recommandation flexible, car je vous ai simplement dit de faire ce que vous pouvez. Je comprends que les députés ne veulent pas vraiment que le Code soit une loi et que le gouvernement se mêle de ce qui se passe à la Chambre. Tout cela pose toutes sortes de questions. Mais il n’y a certainement rien de mal à faire dire la même chose aux mots. Il serait utile que les mêmes mots correspondent aux mêmes procédures.

En fait, ce n’est pas si mal actuellement. Des initiatives ont été prises au cours des cinq ou six dernières années, d’une manière ou d’une autre, pour les harmoniser, comme dans le cas des dons.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Savez-vous pourquoi ces 13 recommandations n’ont pas été retenues? Sont-elles fondamentales? Y a-t-il des choses que nous pourrions...

Mme Mary Dawson:

À vrai dire, je suis très étonnée qu’ils aient réussi à en faire 10. J’ai été sidérée, mais ravie.

Je pense que c’est peut-être parce qu’ils manquaient de temps, mais je n’en suis pas sûre. Je n’étais pas là. De fait, après ma comparution et celle d’une autre personne de la Colombie-Britannique, je crois, ils se sont réunis à huis clos. Je n’ai aucune idée de la teneur des discussions, mais je crois qu’ils les ont choisies parce qu’ils les ont jugées importantes ou comme solution de facilité.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Mais rien n’empêcherait le Comité d’étudier de nouveau ces recommandations, n’est-ce pas?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non. C’était la recommandation du dernier comité.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Y en a-t-il d’autres que vous aimeriez proposer?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Il faudrait que j’y réfléchisse, mais je pense avoir rempli ma mission avec les 23 qui sont ici. J’en avais une centaine lorsque j’ai présenté mes recommandations concernant la Loi.

Deux étaient très compliquées et portent sur des amendements de forme. Le libellé de certains articles pose des problèmes. Deux de mes recommandations sont en réalité un ensemble de recommandations et je les ai réécrites. Je vous en ai donné des ébauches que vous pouvez étudier — en fait, j’ai déjà été légiste — pour modifier l’organisation des articles, soit parce qu'ils sont mal organisés soit parce qu’ils comportent des incohérences auxquelles il faut remédier. Si vous les étudiez... Ce sont des questions de forme et elles n'ont rien de vraiment fondamental.

Quelques-unes sont plus fondamentales et deux ou trois autres sont de nature générale. Par exemple, j’ai dit « Pourquoi ne pensez-vous donc pas à rédiger un code sur le comportement en politique? » Mais j’ai dit aussi que je ne suis probablement pas la personne la mieux placée pour surveiller ce code.

Il y en a une ou deux de ce genre aussi, mais il y en a certainement suffisamment à examiner.

(1155)

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Comme ma collègue Anita l’a dit, sur les 13... Je sais que nous allons avoir la liste, mais puisque vous êtes ici aujourd’hui, j’aimerais avoir votre opinion sur cette question. Quelle serait la priorité à donner à celles qui manquaient?

Mme Mary Dawson:

D’abord, la Loi porte sur le fait de favoriser les intérêts personnels des parents et amis. Le Code ne porte que sur vos propres intérêts personnels. Je pense qu'il y a trois ou quatre articles qui devraient... Pourquoi en effet devrait-on pouvoir favoriser les intérêts personnels des parents et amis? Le Code n’en parle pas.

Au sujet des réceptions, j'ai dit que vous voudriez peut-être adopter une règle spéciale qui serait intégrée à la question des dons, à supposer que ce soit un problème. Je ne pense pas que la plupart des réceptions soient problématiques, du moins celles qui sont ouvertes à tous, mais si elles étaient mentionnées dans le Code, ce serait plus rassurant pour certains.

L'application d'un critère d'acceptabilité pour les déplacements parrainés est une question un peu délicate. Cela a créé bien des remous il y a environ cinq ou six ans. La SRC a essayé d'en faire une histoire et il y a eu un grand scandale. Mais la chose n'a pas fait long feu parce que les députés ont fait valoir que si l’on ne peut pas accepter ces dons, on n’irait jamais nulle part. Ce n'est pas un argument de poids, mais un argument tout de même.

Le fait est que des gens de l’extérieur dépensent beaucoup d’argent et qu’il n’existe aucun critère d’acceptabilité pour savoir si on peut accepter tel ou tel déplacement ou marque d’hospitalité. Ce sont souvent des pays qui les offrent.

S’agissant de l’interdiction faite aux députés de solliciter des fonds, la Loi interdit de solliciter des fonds personnellement. Je pense que ce serait une bonne recommandation.

Il y a ensuite les deux ensembles dont j’ai parlé. L’un est la disposition sur la déclaration, qui doit être révisée et dont je vous ai donné une ébauche.

J’aimerais que vous cessiez de me faire venir ici pour obtenir que mes lignes directrices et formulaires soient approuvés, en particulier les formulaires. En juin dernier, trois formulaires devaient être revus parce que vous aviez modifié le niveau des dons de 500 à 200 $ pour les déplacements parrainés et que les montants n’avaient pas été corrigés. Il n'y avait pas assez de temps pour les apporter au Comité, car elles sont entrées en vigueur aussitôt après les élections, le lendemain même.

Personne ne siégeait à ce moment-là et je ne pouvais les remettre à personne. J’ai pensé que la seule chose à faire était d’écrire une lettre à la greffière pour dire que je les avais modifiées et voir ce que vous pouviez faire à ce sujet. Mais ces trois... Si vous le voulez, vous pouvez vous débarrasser de ce problème d'approbation des formulaires. Franchement, je ne vois pas pourquoi je dois venir ici pour obtenir l’approbation de mes formulaires, ni de mes lignes directrices non plus, d'ailleurs. Il est très rare que je doive le faire. Je vous laisse réfléchir à cette question également.

Voulez-vous que je continue? Je passe à travers ce que je vois sur ma liste.

La question des sanctions relatives au non-respect des dates limites de déclaration est compliquée, car je pense qu’une analyse juridique montrerait que seul le Parlement peut imposer des sanctions aux députés. Je pense que c’est probablement impossible et je l’ai plus ou moins mentionné.

Les enquêtes constituent un autre sujet qui, contrairement aux déclarations, comporte des incohérences — entre l’anglais et le français, pour commencer — et d’autres problèmes rédactionnels.

J’en ai probablement oublié, mais...

Je n'ai pas le pouvoir de convoquer des témoins ou d'exiger la production de documents, et je devrais l’avoir. Personne n’a refusé de me les donner lorsque je les ai demandés, mais je devrais avoir ce pouvoir. J’ai eu des problèmes au cours d’une enquête lorsque j’ai demandé des documents à la Chambre des Communes et que l’on m’a répondu que je ne pourrais pas les avoir avant qu’ils ne soient d’abord envoyés au député faisant l’objet de l’enquête. Lorsque je les ai reçus, ils étaient différents. J’avais réussi à obtenir une partie de ces documents d’une autre source et j’ai constaté que des parties avaient été supprimées. C’est un problème.

J’avais parlé de la production d’un seul rapport annuel au Parlement. Cette question n’a plus autant d’importance, car j’ai pris des dispositions pour pouvoir faire les deux. Je dois rendre deux rapports exactement au même moment, l’un en vertu de la Loi et l’autre en vertu du Code. Ce serait plus pratique de les mettre ensemble, mais cela ne me préoccupe plus tellement.

(1200)



Et puis il y a ce petit problème du code de conduite concernant la conduite partisane et personnelle des députés. Vous avez déjà un peu travaillé sur le harcèlement, mais ce n’est pas très bon pour l’image des députés quand ces comportements attirent l’attention des médias. Ce n’est certainement pas bon pour la réputation de l’institution.

J’en parle, mais ces deux sujets seraient probablement en dehors de ma compétence.

C’est un exemple. Voilà l’essentiel.

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de passer à la série de questions de cinq minutes, nous allons suspendre la séance pendant cinq minutes pour permettre à ceux qui le veulent d’aller manger.

Mesdames, messieurs, après les cinq minutes, je vous donnerai la parole.

(1200)

(1205)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous reprenons la séance. Je remplacerai le président pendant un petit moment pour lui laisser une petite pause.

Nous passons donc à la série de questions suivante. M. Reid a la parole, pendant cinq minutes, je crois.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

D’abord, monsieur le vice-président, j’espère que vous utiliserez pour mes cinq minutes le même chronomètre que celui que le président a utilisé pour les huit minutes de M. Christopherson. Ce serait très utile.

Je dirai d’abord à la commissaire qu’ayant interagi avec votre commissariat, à titre de député qui présente des déclarations depuis des années et aussi à titre de membre du Comité depuis une décennie, j’apprécie votre professionnalisme. C’est toujours agréable de faire affaire avec un organisme aussi professionnel que celui que vous dirigez. C’est très apprécié.

(1210)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

J’ai encore et toujours l’impression que les problèmes ne tiennent pas tant à la manière dont vous avez administré le code qu’à la manière dont le code a été rédigé. Je pense qu’au départ, il a été rédigé un peu à la hâte. Quelques problèmes ont été résolus graduellement, mais il en reste encore, notamment au sujet de l’article 14 du code, qui porte sur les cadeaux. C’est la disposition problématique, selon vous. Je me demande si vous avez votre exemplaire du code, parce que je vais suggérer quelques pistes de solution à ce problème.

Je crois qu’il y a un problème parce que le paragraphe 14(1) du code contredit un peu le paragraphe 14(3). Le paragraphe 14(3) prévoit qu’il faut déclarer les cadeaux d’une valeur de 200 $ ou plus, mais le paragraphe 14(1) prévoit, et je cite: Le député ou un membre de sa famille ne peut accepter, même indirectement, de cadeaux ou d’autres avantages, sauf s’il s’agit d’une rétribution autorisée par la loi, qu’on pourrait raisonnablement donner à penser qu’ils ont été donnés pour influencer le député dans l’exercice de sa charge de député.

Il me semble que l’expression « qu’on pourrait raisonnablement donner à penser qu’ils ont été donnés pour influencer le député » signifie que ce qui importe lorsque je reçois un cadeau n’est pas comment j’agirai, mais comment quelqu’un suppose que la personne qui m’a donné le cadeau espérait m’influencer. Il est tout à fait concevable qu’une personne qui me donne un cadeau d’une valeur de moins de 200 $ ait l’intention de m’influencer d’une façon ou d’une autre, mais il n’est pas réaliste ou plausible qu’un tel cadeau ait cet effet.

Je me demande si nous pourrions résoudre une partie du problème des cadeaux en ajoutant un autre paragraphe après le paragraphe 14(3). Il porterait le numéro 14(3.1) et pourrait se lire comme suit: « Il est entendu qu’un cadeau ou autre avantage qui n’a pas à être déclaré aux termes du paragraphe 14(3) est réputé ne pas pouvoir influencer le député dans l’exercice de sa charge ».

Est-ce que cela aiderait à résoudre le problème?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non. On mélange encore la déclaration et l’acceptabilité. Cela ne m’aiderait pas du tout. Vous pourriez ajouter cette disposition et ce serait la règle, mais ce que vous auriez fait, c’est établir un seuil de 200 $, au-dessous duquel nous n’examinerions pas du tout l’acceptabilité.

J’ajoute que ce n’est pas à vous ni au donateur mais bien à une tierce partie indépendante de déterminer si c’est raisonnable.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais me répéter. La disposition actuelle est « qu’on pourrait raisonnablement donner à penser qu’ils ont été donnés pour influencer le député ». C’est la différence. Donner raisonnablement à penser que le cadeau peut influencer le député est une autre chose.

Je soutiens, commissaire, qu’il n’est pas plausible, compte tenu de notre rémunération, qu’un cadeau de moins de 200 $ puisse influencer notre comportement.

Mme Mary Dawson:

C’est l’argument classique que personne ne peut se faire acheter pour 200 $. Je l’entends tous les jours.

Ce sont vos lois, vos règles. Vous pouvez décider ce que vous voulez. J’ai suggéré par le passé d’établir des règles faisant en sorte que vous n’ayez pas à déclarer des cadeaux de moins de 35 $ ou 50 $ par exemple. Je pense que ce serait plus raisonnable que 200 $. Ce serait un peu mieux, de votre point de vue, que pas de cadeaux du tout. Alors, vous pourriez mélanger l’obligation de déclaration et l’acceptabilité, comme vous essayez de le faire avec votre modification, je crois.

M. Scott Reid:

J’essaie de les faire converger. À mon avis, parler de mélange…

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Monsieur Reid, votre temps est écoulé, mais si vous résumez brièvement votre dernière question...

Mme Mary Dawson:

C’est un point très important. Il revient constamment.

M. Scott Reid:

Pardonnez-moi, mais j’essaie de fusionner les deux. Je dis qu’il faut le déclarer, ou alors ce n’est pas un cadeau qui peut vraisemblablement donner à penser qu’il pourrait nous influencer. Je pense que les deux devraient être la même chose et je dirais qu’il en est ainsi parce que…

Nous pouvons fixer un montant peu élevé... 200 $. J’ai proposé au Comité d’abaisser le seuil de 500 $ à 200 $. J’ai toujours soutenu que 500 $, aux yeux du public, semble être un niveau susceptible d’influencer quelqu’un. Je ne suis pas certain que ce soit vrai en réalité, mais je peux comprendre qu’une personne raisonnable pense que cela pourrait m’influencer.

Mais je le répète, il s’agit de savoir si quelqu’un pense pouvoir m’influencer et je pense d’une manière non raisonnable. Le fait qu’une personne raisonnable s’imagine à tort que…

(1215)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Vous arrivez à vos fins d’une manière bien plus compliquée que ce qui est nécessaire. Il y a une façon beaucoup plus directe de parvenir au résultat que vous souhaitez. Vous n’avez pas besoin de tous ces paragraphes. Vous pouvez dire simplement qu’un don de moins de 200 $ est acceptable et qu’il faut le déclarer. Ce n’est pas la règle actuellement. Vous pourriez soutenir…

Je ne suis pas d’accord avec vous que le paragraphe 14(1) porte sur ce qui est raisonnable aux yeux du donateur. Il porte sur ce qui est raisonnable pour Monsieur-Tout-le-monde, autrement dit, une personne raisonnable. Vous pourriez ajouter ces mots, si vous le voulez, pour indiquer clairement la direction, mais…

M. Scott Reid:

Vous diriez alors « qui pourraient raisonnablement donner à penser qu’ils ont le potentiel d’influencer le membre »? C’est différent. Ce qui importerait alors serait ce que penserait une personne raisonnable plutôt que si le donateur, qui avait peut-être des attentes déraisonnables, a fait cette supposition.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Une façon plus simple d’y parvenir est…

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Je vais vous laisser terminer votre réponse, madame Dawson, mais ce sera tout. Je pense avoir été plus que raisonnable. Nous passerons ensuite au prochain membre.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Vous pourriez dire simplement « qui pourraient raisonnablement donner à penser à une personne raisonnable qu’ils ont été donnés », si c’est ce que vous vouliez, mais ce n’est pas ce que vous voulez. Vous voulez relever le seuil de l’acceptabilité. C’est pour cette raison que j’ai fait cette proposition il y a quelques années, en désespoir de cause.

Pourquoi ne pas mélanger les deux? Je suis désolée si le terme « mélange » vous a paru négatif. Si vous mettez les deux aspects ensemble, l’obligation de déclaration et l’acceptabilité, vous devriez peut-être abaisser le seuil de 200 $ à 50 $ ou 35 $ par exemple, ce qui me paraissait raisonnable, parce qu’au-dessous de ce montant, c’est juste symbolique.

Tout dépend de ce que vous voulez en faire, mais vous ne pouvez pas masquer ce que vous faites avec une litanie de belles paroles. Vous pouvez y aller assez directement.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci. Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci, madame Dawson. Je vous félicite moi aussi pour le travail formidable qu’effectue le personnel de votre commissariat. Je sais que notre bureau appelle souvent et pose de nombreuses questions. Le personnel est très patient avec nous. Je vous en remercie, et passez le message à Karine.

J’ai une brève question. Vous avez évoqué un peu plus tôt un critère d’acceptabilité pour les déplacements à l’étranger ou les invitations à l’étranger. Pouvez-vous m’en dire un peu plus à ce sujet et m’indiquer quels types de questions nous devrions poser? J’aimerais avoir des éclaircissements.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui. Supposons qu’une des parties intéressées avec lesquelles vous interagissez constamment vous offre un voyage dans un centre de villégiature de luxe aux États-Unis. Nous avons eu une situation de ce genre il y a environ cinq ans. C’était l’un de ces caucus. On a offert à des députés un séjour d’une semaine dans un centre de villégiature de luxe. C’était un déplacement parrainé. Le billet d’avion et les repas étaient payés. Je dirais que ce n’est pas très acceptable. C’est à ce moment-là que j’ai entendu parler des caucus. Il m’a fallu quelques années avant de découvrir que des caucus agissaient ainsi. Ils appelaient cela des caucus multipartites.

Assez souvent, l’invitation vient de pays étrangers, des pays qui cherchent à obtenir un appui du Canada. Les principaux sont Israël et Taïwan. On le voit presque tous les ans dans la liste des déplacements parrainés. La question est si les députés acceptent des déplacements offerts par d’autres pays. Une décision a été prise et je pense qu’elle ne changera probablement pas. Les députés aiment avoir ces occasions d’aller à l’étranger pour voir ces pays, alors ils n’établiront pas de critère d’acceptabilité pour les déplacements parrainés. Mais je suggère qu’ils y réfléchissent et je pense qu’ils devraient peut-être établir un tel critère.

J’ai déjà soulevé cette question, et l’accueil n’a pas été très favorable. C’est de cela qu’il s’agit. Cela paraît étrange. Par exemple, c’est intéressant parce que ce n’est pas un cadeau en vertu du code. Je le vois dans le cas des ministres et des secrétaires parlementaires, parce que c’est un cadeau en vertu de la loi. On peut se demander si c’est un cadeau acceptable, mais je ne peux pas appliquer de critère d’acceptabilité aux députés en vertu du code, parce que c’est exclu dans les règles sur les cadeaux.

C’est simplement une autre forme de travail. Il s’agit plutôt de savoir si les parlementaires veulent vraiment renoncer à ces bonbons.

(1220)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Le membre a encore deux minutes environ.

Monsieur Chan?

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Je peux prendre le relais.

Je tiens à exprimer, moi aussi, ma gratitude, ainsi que celle de tous les autres membres du Comité, pour le professionnalisme de votre personnel. Ayant été élu député lors d’une élection complémentaire, je comprends évidemment la prémisse de base, mais la conformité devient un réel problème, surtout quand on est nouveau et qu’on ne connaît pas les règles.

J’aimerais revenir à votre recommandation. J’ai semblé déceler dans votre rapport un peu de frustration quant à votre capacité de témoigner devant notre Comité, de déposer votre rapport annuel et de pouvoir le présenter.

Serait-il utile de modifier le Règlement ou de créer un mécanisme pour que vous témoigniez systématiquement?

Mme Mary Dawson:

À vous de décider. Ce qui était remarquable, c’est la longue période pendant laquelle on ne m’a jamais invitée à témoigner. Trois ou quatre années ont passé. Évidemment, je vais au comité ETHI au moins une ou deux fois par année, parce qu’il examine mon budget. Vous n’examinez pas mon budget. Ils surveillent aussi, dans une certaine mesure mais pas de la même façon que vous, l’application de la Loi sur les conflits d’intérêts, alors la relation est différente.

Je constate simplement que votre comité ne m’a pas invitée depuis plusieurs années.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pensez-vous à un échéancier en particulier? Vous devez présenter un rapport le 31 mars de chaque année.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Logiquement, le bon moment serait après mon rapport annuel.

M. Arnold Chan:

Dans un délai de 90 jours? Il pourrait peut-être y avoir une disposition automatique, prévoyant que si nous ne vous avons pas convoquée, vous témoigneriez à la prochaine réunion après un délai fixé à l’avance.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui. Mon rapport paraîtra en juin, alors ce serait probablement l’automne suivant.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ce pourrait être 120 jours plus tard, si nous ne vous avons pas convoquée, parce que nous ne siégeons pas l’été, ou dans un délai raisonnable. Ce devrait certainement être avant le dépôt de votre prochain rapport annuel. C’est quelque chose que nous devrions examiner.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Ce n’est pas ma proposition, mais il me semble raisonnable de m’inviter de temps en temps.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Très bien, merci. Nous avons toujours trouvé vos visites instructives. C’est votre seconde visite depuis que je siège au Comité. Nous les apprécions.

Nous revenons maintenant à M. Reid, qui a cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je reviens aux cadeaux. Le paragraphe 14(1), « Le député ou un membre de sa famille ne peut accepter » — et je cite les règles — « de cadeaux ou d’autres avantages ». Par le passé, vous avez adopté la position que nous devrions tous renvoyer certains cadeaux qui ont été envoyés aux députés. Lorsque vous êtes venue ici, j’ai indiqué que je ne pouvais pas le faire parce que je les avais jetés à la poubelle, ce qui, je suppose, signifie une non-conformité technique avec le code.

Vous paraît-il raisonnable que nous reformulions cette partie du code afin d’indiquer qu’il y a diverses façons de s’en débarrasser? Retourner les cadeaux est une option, vous les remettre en est une autre, les jeter à la poubelle est la troisième et peut-être que les écraser avec un marteau en est une quatrième. Cela revient à ne pas les accepter, mais sans être obligés à chaque fois de deviner si la valeur dépasse un certain montant. En ce qui concerne les suppléments médicinaux, la plupart d’entre nous n’ont aucune idée de leur valeur. Pour moi, la valeur était nulle.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je suis surprise que vous les ayez jetés à la poubelle, parce que ce n’est pas bien de jeter des comprimés à la poubelle, mais ce cadeau était intéressant. Nous avons examiné le contenu de ce colis et déterminé qu’il valait plus de 100 $. Le coût de ces produits n’était pas dérisoire. Je suis d’accord, mais habituellement, un député ne trouve pas un cadeau inacceptable. Voilà l’autre aspect. Mais une question connexe peut être examinée. Ainsi, un produit pharmaceutique peut être inacceptable, je suppose, parce que les députés examinent un projet de loi en particulier ou une question dans un comité ou autre chose, mais en règle générale…

Oui, allez-y.

(1225)

Mme Lyne Robinson-Dalpé:

Il est important de lire les documents qui viennent avec le cadeau. S’il y a une lettre d’accompagnement qui demande d’appuyer un projet de loi ou quelque chose du genre, c’est une indication que le cadeau n’est probablement pas acceptable.

Mme Mary Dawson:

La marijuana qui a été envoyée à tous les libéraux à Noël en est un bel exemple. C’était maladroit sur deux plans. Premièrement, les députés envisageaient de légaliser la marijuana, et la lettre d’accompagnement disait quelque chose comme: Voici de la marijuana, adoptez le projet de loi. La deuxième chose qui clochait, c’est que c’était illégal, bon sang! Il a fallu s’en débarrasser.

Il y a quelques solutions à ce problème particulier. Je suggérerais un endroit central dans l’immeuble où les jeter, à condition de déclarer qu’ils sont jetés à cet endroit. Les donateurs peuvent alors savoir que c’est là qu’ils peuvent récupérer les cadeaux s’ils le veulent. Il y a des solutions. Je ne veux certainement pas que chacun de vous doive les renvoyer par la poste.

M. Scott Reid:

Un dernier point. Il y a eu de nombreuses discussions au Comité lors de la dernière législature sur l’acceptation d’invitations à participer à des événements. On s’est demandé si cela ne contrevenait pas au code, à moins de payer. Si je comprends bien, c’était un problème financier important. Ce n’est pas le cas pour moi. Je représente une circonscription rurale. Il n’y a pas dans les circonscriptions rurales d’événements coûteux de ce genre, des événements où il faut payer 200 $ ou 300 $ pour y participer. Mais il y en a dans les régions urbaines. Le problème a été soulevé par l’un de nos collègues qui disait qu’il y allait parce qu’il n’avait pas le choix. Il préférerait rester à la maison s’il avait le choix et, en plus, il devait payer.

Dans cette veine, je me demande si nous ne pourrions pas indiquer clairement dans le paragraphe 14.(1.1) que nous essayons de faire la distinction entre le prix d’entrée à l’événement proprement dit, qui serait exclu, et les aliments et boissons, qui seraient permis. Ce que j’essaie de faire ici, c’est une distinction entre des événements, habituellement de nature sportive, où le prix d’entrée est élevé — et il est raisonnable de s’attendre à ce que le député en assume le coût — et d’autres types d’événements, comme des repas annuels de levées de fonds pour des organismes communautaires culturels, qui sont essentiellement une façon d’appuyer tel ou tel groupe.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Il s'agit toujours de se demander si quelqu'un pourrait raisonnablement penser que ce cadeau ou avantage a été donné pour vous influencer. Il est normalement tout à fait acceptable d'assister à ces événements, mais lorsqu'il s'agit d'un gala ou d'une réunion à laquelle vous avez été invité, il faut alors se demander qui vous a remis le billet d'entrée, et quel est le prix de ce billet. Cela se produit de temps en temps.

Ce paragraphe 14(1.1) figure encore dans la partie qui traite des éléments qui pourraient raisonnablement donner à penser... C'est habituellement le cas lorsqu'un intéressé donne à quelqu'un un billet pour assister à un spectacle. Ce peut être un événement-bénéfice mais c'est l'intéressé qui lui remet le billet d'entrée. Ce n'est pas l'événement-bénéfice qui lui donne le billet d'entrée.

J'ai eu des discussions à ce sujet avec le Centre national des Arts, par exemple. Le CNA a l'habitude d'envoyer des invitations VIP à certaines personnes connues. Cela est tout à fait acceptable, parce que le Centre ne cherche pas à obtenir quoi que ce soit du gouvernement. Comme je l'ai dit, ces cas relèvent habituellement de la loi et non pas du code mais il peut arriver quand même qu'ils relèvent également du code. Ces invitations qui sont données par les personnes qui organisent l'événement-bénéfice ou l'événement auquel ne participe pas un intéressé... c'est lorsqu'un intéressé achète un billet du CNA et en fait cadeau à quelqu'un que cela soulève parfois un problème.

Mais en réalité, vous ne devriez pas trop vous inquiéter de ce que peuvent penser vos électeurs, parce qu'il est normal que l'on vous voie à ce genre d'événement.

(1230)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Chan pour cinq minutes.

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci, monsieur le vice-président.

J'aimerais poursuivre sur le sujet abordé par M. Reid, parce que je viens d'un environnement urbain où il m'arrive probablement parfois de frôler ce seuil, et il y a des cas où j'assiste... Je viens d'un certain secteur de la collectivité où je reçois sans cesse des... Je viens juste de participer au Nouvel An chinois. Je ne sais pas à combien d'événements j'ai assisté. Ce n'est pas que je pense en retirer des avantages concrets. Je cours d'un événement à un autre pour faire une allocution, et dans certains cas, je ne fais qu'assister à la réception, mais je fais tout cela dans le cadre de l'exécution de mes fonctions.

Mme Mary Dawson: Tout à fait.

M. Arnold Chan: Je ne crois pas que cela soulève vraiment un problème.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Ce n'est vraiment pas un problème. À moins que...

M. Arnold Chan:

Je me demande si cela entraîne une obligation en matière de divulgation. C'est là ma question.

Je vais vous donner un exemple. Le premier ministre a récemment assisté au Bal du dragon. Le billet d'entrée coûte assez cher. J'étais assis à la table, disons, d'une institution financière importante. Au départ, des représentants de cette institution m'avaient invité et je leur avais répondu que je ne pouvais pas accepter leur invitation. Par la suite, j'ai été invité par les organisateurs de l'événement et j'ai finalement été placé à la table de cette institution financière importante. Je ne sais pas si ses représentants font du lobbying auprès du gouvernement. Suis-je tenu de faire une divulgation? C'est ce que je me demande.

Mme Mary Dawson: Oui, la valeur du billet.

M. Arnold Chan: Je suis tenu de divulguer...

Mme Mary Dawson: Oui, effectivement.

M. Arnold Chan: ... même si c'est une oeuvre charitable qui lève des fonds pour les personnes âgées. C'est la Yee Hong Community Wellness Foundation et elle reçoit des sommes importantes qui sont manifestement...

Mme Mary Dawson:

Mais cela fait partie du principe de la transparence. Essentiellement, le but est d'indiquer publiquement qui vous a invité réellement à un événement.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je sais que l'on m'invite parce que je suis un membre de la communauté que constitue ce groupe particulier.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, mais il n'y a pas de mal à ça.

M. Arnold Chan:

Bien sûr. Je ne pense pas que ma participation soulève un problème.

Pourtant, il y a eu un autre cas pour lequel votre bureau m'a été d'une grande utilité. J'ai été invité, je dirais simplement, par un grand établissement d'enseignement, à assister à une réception organisée par la chambre de commerce de Toronto. Le billet avait une valeur supérieure au seuil de 200 $. Votre bureau m'a conseillé de refuser le billet, ce que j'ai fait et je n'ai pas assisté à cette réception, même si le sujet de l'allocution m'intéressait beaucoup. J'ai donc été amené à me demander si j'étais prêt à dépenser 500 $ pour y assister.

Ce sont là des événements qui, pour moi en tant que député, m'aident beaucoup à connaître les grandes questions d'actualité au lieu de faire l'objet d'activités de lobbyisme au sujet d'une question particulière. C'est ce que j'ai du mal à comprendre en tant que député. Qu'est-ce qui est approprié? Qu'est-ce qui ne l'est pas? Votre bureau m'a été très utile, mais je ne suis pas certain que j'exécute mes fonctions de façon appropriée pour ce qui est d'avoir une vue des grandes questions et une vue générale du monde lorsqu'il s'agit de déplacements parrainés.

Mme Mary Dawson:

J'aimerais bien revenir sur cette question et voir quelle est exactement la situation. Nous regarderons tout cela.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je pense également à des cadeaux précis. Encore une fois, j'appartiens à la communauté chinoise. Le Nouvel An chinois est marqué par la remise de boîtes rouges. Je reçois beaucoup de boîtes rouges.

La plupart de ces boîtes contiennent du chocolat et des choses de ce genre mais il arrive qu'il y ait de l'argent. Refuser une boîte de ce genre serait insultant, de mon point de vue culturel, alors je regarde exactement combien d'argent il s'y trouve. Si cela provient de ma famille, cela fait partie d'une coutume culturelle normale.

Mme Mary Dawson: C'est acceptable.

M. Arnold Chan: Ce n'est pas un problème. Cela est facile pour moi. Je dois par contre me demander si j'ai obtenu cet argent parce que je suis député. Si c'est le cas, j'essaie de refuser mais cela me place dans une situation vraiment délicate...

Mme Mary Dawson:

Vous n'êtes pas vraiment obligé de refuser. Vous êtes simplement tenu de le déclarer si le montant est supérieur à 200 $.

M. Arnold Chan: Je vois. Très bien.

Mme Mary Dawson: Vous n'êtes pas obligé de refuser. La plupart des choses... c'est là qu'il faut faire la différence entre déclarer et refuser. Il est tentant de suggérer qu'il conviendrait de regrouper ces deux choses, mais alors il faudrait que le seuil soit très faible, à mon avis, un seuil d'environ 35 $.

M. Arnold Chan:

Par exemple, je ne pense pas que, si mes parents m'envoient une boîte rouge dont la valeur est supérieure à 200 $, il faut que je le déclare. Je ne le pense pas, mais peut-être devrais-je le faire.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non. Ce n'est pas relié à votre poste.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ce n'est pas relié à mon poste.

Mme Mary Dawson: Non.

M. Arnold Chan: C'est simplement une coutume familiale, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est exact.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je pense que ce n'est pas...

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est une exception prévue expressément.

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est une exclusion prévue expressément.

Mme Mary Dawson: Oui.

M. Arnold Chan: Très bien. Voilà qui est utile. J'essayais simplement d'éclaircir la situation.

Je pourrais bien sûr vous fournir des exemples, par exemple, de... Encore une fois, je considère ce genre de choses par rapport au protocole et au cas où je rencontre, disons, les représentants d'un autre palier de gouvernement, ou plus important encore, ceux d'un autre gouvernement qui me transmettent des demandes et apportent un cadeau. Là encore, refuser ce cadeau reviendrait à violer le protocole diplomatique. Je l'accepte mais si je pense que le cadeau a une valeur trop élevée, j'ai tendance à tout simplement le donner à quelqu'un d'autre. Mais suis-je tenu de divulguer ce cadeau? Je pense que c'est le cas.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, effectivement.

M. Arnold Chan: Très bien. Voilà qui est utile.

Mme Mary Dawson: De toute façon, si cela ne vous inquiète pas du tout, pourquoi ne pas le divulguer? En quoi une telle divulgation pourrait avoir un effet négatif, essentiellement?

(1235)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Très bien. Merci.

Nous avons finalement réussi à ne pas épuiser complètement le temps alloué à un de nos tours de questions aujourd'hui, ce qui est une excellente chose. Nous n'avons toutefois pas beaucoup économisé de temps...

M. David de Burgh Graham: C'est un cadeau pour le président.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards): Dois-je le divulguer? C'est là la question. M. Graham affirme qu'il s'agit d'un cadeau donné au président; c'est pourquoi je me demande si je dois le divulguer.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards): Nous avons une dernière personne qui figure sur notre liste d'aujourd'hui, et c'est M. Masse. 

Bienvenue au Comité. Vous êtes remplaçant. Vous avez trois minutes pour poser des questions.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous demande de m'excuser d'être un remplaçant de dernière minute. Je vais peut-être poser des questions auxquelles on a déjà répondu et je vous demande à l'avance de bien vouloir m'en excuser.

Cela fait 14 ans que je siège à la Chambre. Vouloir suivre l'évolution de la question de ce pouvoir discrétionnaire et de la divulgation, c'est un peu comme pourchasser un écureuil: cela va dans tous les sens et ce n'est pas partie facile.

Voici ce sur quoi je m'interroge. N'avez-vous jamais suivi un député pendant une journée pour savoir ce qu'il faisait au cours d'une journée sur la Colline?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non.

M. Brian Masse:

Très bien. Je pense que c'est peut-être un bon exemple parce qu'une des raisons en est que je suis de nouveau critique en matière d'industrie, ou d'innovation, de science et de technologie, un dossier très important qui est la cible de nombreuses activités de lobbying. J'ai écouté avec beaucoup d'intérêt les commentaires formulés à l'égard des réceptions et des incertitudes qui entouraient ces activités.

Je n'aime vraiment pas les réceptions. Je ne les supporte pas. Lorsque je suis dans ma région, je dois assister à tant de repas où l'on sert du poulet caoutchouteux — parfois jusqu'à sept en une soirée —, et j'ai de jeunes enfants, qui ont maintenant 15 et 11 ans. Lorsque je suis sur la Colline, je suis tout aussi occupé, et les réceptions sont parfois le seul moment entre les activités de la Chambre, le Comité, les discours à la Chambre des communes, et les réunions avec les personnes dans mon bureau, où en fin de compte, la personne qui veut vraiment me parler d'une question, doit le faire pendant la réception, parce que je n'ai absolument pas le temps de la rencontrer ailleurs. C'est la seule façon de le faire.

Pourriez-vous préciser les sujets qu'il est possible d'aborder au cours d'une réception et ce qui peut être dit au cours d'une telle réception avec les règles que vous proposez?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Il ne s'agit pas vraiment de savoir de quoi l'on peut parler... Vous pouvez assister à ces réceptions parce qu'elles sont gratuites, je pense, et que le cadeau est en fait la nourriture qui est offerte, est-ce bien cela?

M. Brian Masse: Oui.

Mme Mary Dawson: Normalement, cela ne pose aucun problème, à moins que ce soit un genre de banquet. Mais c'est habituellement de la nourriture que l'on mange avec les doigts, n'est-ce pas?

M. Brian Masse: Oui.

Mme Mary Dawson: Alors vous pouvez y assister et vous remplir la panse, et nous estimons que cela ne cause aucun problème.

M. Brian Masse:

Je n'aime vraiment pas assister à ces réceptions, je vous le dis franchement. Cela ne fait vraiment pas partie de... Je ne devrais pas dire que j'ai ces réceptions en horreur, mais je préférerais rencontrer ces gens et parler en privé des sujets qui les intéressent, mais il arrive que cela ne soit pas possible.

Je mentionne en passant qu'il arrive que l'on vous remette de petits cadeaux à la sortie. Ce sont des cadeaux qui valent probablement autour de 10 $.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Les cadeaux symboliques ne comptent pas. Cela devrait figurer dans nos lignes directrices, lorsque nous en aurons. Ces choses seraient exclues.

M. Brian Masse:

Il y a la question de la divulgation au-delà de la limite de 200 $, j'avais oublié cet aspect. Je devrais le savoir mais je ne le sais pas. À quel moment cette divulgation a-t-elle été exigée?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le montant de 200 $? En juin dernier.

M. Brian Masse:

Avant cela, il n'y avait rien ou...?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le montant était de 500 $.

M. Brian Masse:

De 500 $. C'est exact.

Dans quel délai faut-il concrètement divulguer ce genre de choses?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Dans les soixante jours.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est qu'il y a des choses dont je n'ai pas pu encore m'occuper...

Que se passera-t-il l'année prochaine avec ce montant de 200 $? Va-t-on le réviser? Va-t-on l'évaluer? Tient-il compte de l'inflation?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non, il ne sera pas modifié à moins que vous ne le fassiez, à moins que le Parlement le fasse.

M. Brian Masse:

Très bien. Nous en revenons donc à...

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est peut-être une des questions que vous allez examiner, parce que je crois que vous allez probablement étudier la question des cadeaux.

Il a été décidé il n'y a pas longtemps de fixer cette limite à 200 $. Il s'agit de l'obligation de divulguer un cadeau et non pas de son acceptabilité. Les questions les plus délicates concernent la divulgation et l'acceptabilité, ainsi que les différents niveaux, les différents seuils.

M. Brian Masse:

Cette loi fera-t-elle l'objet d'un examen dans trois ans?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Ce n'est pas une loi; c'est un code.

M. Brian Masse: Oh, un code. Excusez-moi.

Mme Mary Dawson: Il est révisé tous les cinq ans.

M. Brian Masse:

La limite de 200 $ a donc été fixée pour cinq ans.

Mme Mary Dawson:

À moins que vous ne décidiez de la modifier.

Vous n'avez pas assisté au début de cette discussion, et vous ne m'avez pas entendu dire qu'on avait apporté des changements au code qui n'étaient pas reliés à l'examen quinquennal. Vous pouvez modifier le code à n'importe quel moment, si vous pouvez amener le Parlement le faire.

M. Brian Masse:

Très bien.

C'était là les questions que je voulais poser. Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Voilà qui termine notre tour de questions formel.

J'aimerais aborder une petite question administrative à la fin de la séance, mais si l'un de vos assistants ou membres de la haute direction aimerait dire quelque chose, il peut le faire.

Vous n'aurez sans doute pas très souvent la possibilité de vous adresser au Parlement. Avez-vous des sujets à aborder? Non.

Mary, voulez-vous faire quelques remarques en conclusion? Nous aimerions bien recevoir avant mardi la liste des 13 aspects au moins que nous n'avons pas couverts ainsi qu'une mention de toute question que vous aimeriez ajouter. Si ces éléments pouvaient être classés par ordre de priorité, cela nous serait fort utile.

(1240)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Très bien. Je vais les sortir de l'ordinateur et trouver le moyen de les classer. Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps à y consacrer, mais je vais faire quelque chose et vous fournir un document.

Il faut que vous le receviez lundi...?

Le président: Oui.

Mme Mary Dawson: Je le transmettrai à la greffière.

Je vous remercie. J'apprécie le temps que vous avez consacré à ces questions, ainsi que l'écoute attentive que vous leur avez accordée ainsi que vos questions.

Le président:

Y a-t-il quelqu'un qui aimerait poser une dernière question brûlante? Non.

Merci beaucoup. Je vous invite à demeurer quelques minutes à l'extérieur de la salle parce que je suis certain que les membres du Comité aimeraient sans doute vous parler de questions personnelles.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Bien sûr. Je vais rester un moment.

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons faire une courte pause.

(1240)

(1245)

Le président:

Mesdames et messieurs, il nous faut examiner les travaux futurs du comité.

La bonne nouvelle est qu'au cours de la dernière réunion, nous avons élaboré un excellent calendrier qui couvre les six prochaines semaines environ. La mauvaise nouvelle est que je crains que nous soyons obligés de le modifier.

Avant de le faire, je dirais, à l'intention des membres du Comité qui ne le savent pas, que la greffière m'a transmis quelques commentaires touchant la motion de M. Christopherson et qu'il semblerait que cela soit plus compliqué que nous le pensons. Nous lui demanderons son avis, pas aujourd'hui, mais lorsque nous étudierons cette motion, sur les ramifications procédurales de cette motion. La formulation n'est peut-être pas très claire. M. Christopherson en est très conscient et il est tout à fait satisfait de cette façon de procéder.

J'aimerais maintenant que la greffière nous communique la réponse que nous a donnée la ministre au sujet de sa venue jeudi prochain.

La greffière du comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Au cours de la dernière séance, le Comité avait réservé une partie du jeudi 25 février prochain pour la comparution de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Des membres du cabinet de la ministre m'ont dit ce matin qu'elle avait effectivement prévu d'assister à cette réunion même qu'elle vient d'apprendre qu'il y aura des réunions du cabinet qui créent un conflit avec le moment choisi pour assister à la séance du Comité. Ils ont donc remis cette comparution et ils ont dit qu'ils communiqueraient de nouveau avec nous plus tard.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis très déçu. Cela me paraît tout à fait inacceptable.

Très bien, si elle a vraiment un conflit avec cette date, alors proposons-lui une autre date. Je pense que nous avons présenté cette demande il y a plus de deux semaines. Il me paraît tout à fait déraisonnable que la ministre ne puisse nous proposer une date.

On dirait que la ministre essaie d'éviter de comparaître devant le Comité et d'expliquer les décisions qu'elle a prises. C'est un problème grave et troublant et j'espère qu'elle va nous proposer une date le plus tôt possible.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous pourrions proposer le mardi de la semaine prochaine.

Le président:

Mardi, nous allons examiner les conflits d'intérêts. Maintenant que nous avons entendu la commissaire et que nous savons que le comité précédent avait recommandé que certaines mesures soient prises, nous allons décider mardi si nous allons faire quelque chose et, si c'est le cas, ce que nous ferons.

M. Scott Reid:

Voilà ce que je propose, monsieur le président. Nous savons maintenant qu'il n'y a rien de prévu pour jeudi; nous pourrions donc placer le code sur les conflits d'intérêts jeudi et inviter la ministre à comparaître mardi, en lui réservant cette date. Au cas où elle ne pourrait pas venir, nous tiendrons notre séance. Si ce n'est pas le cas ou si elle ne peut venir pour une autre raison, nous aurons simplement un jour de libre ou la possibilité de parler de nos activités futures ou de choses du genre.

Le président:

Je souscris en partie à votre suggestion, à savoir que nous l'invitions mardi. Mais je pensais à jeudi, parce qu'il est libre maintenant, et que nous devrions inviter les personnes nommées au comité de sélection du Sénat à venir jeudi, parce que cela leur donnerait une semaine d'avis.

Pendant que nous y sommes, étant donné qu'aucun d'entre eux ne se trouve à Ottawa, il est possible que l'un d'entre eux ne puisse pas venir et préfère comparaître par vidéoconférence. Personnellement, cela ne me dérange pas en principe, mais il faudrait que nous allions dans un des autres édifices qui possèdent la technologie nécessaire.

Je sais qu'il y a des comités qui ont déclaré ne pas être très intéressés à entendre ces personnes, mais nous pourrions quand même nous décider à l'avance. Si la personne en question ne peut assister en personne à la séance, voulez-vous proposer que le Comité utilise une autre salle pour cette réunion; cela ne soulève aucun problème, mais c'est au Comité d'en décider.

M. Scott Reid:

Si cela est possible, nous devions essayer de le faire. Il serait stupide de ne pas pouvoir entendre ces témoins parce que nous ne voulons pas nous rendre dans un autre édifice pour le faire.

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord?

Très bien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Allons dans l'édifice Promenade au 1 Wellington.

Le président:

Vous proposez l'édifice Promenade ou Valour sur Sussex ou celui qui est à côté du Château Laurier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, là-bas en Sibérie.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela est commode pour vous parce que cet édifice est pratiquement situé dans votre circonscription.

Le président:

Sur ces deux questions, acceptez-vous que nous les invitions jeudi prochain? Nous allons également inviter la ministre mardi. Si la ministre refuse, nous aurons notre discussion sur les conflits d'intérêt. Cela convient-il à tout le monde? Nous déplacerons la séance du Comité s'il faut procéder par vidéoconférence.

(1250)

M. Blake Richards:

J'aimerais toutefois ajouter que, si la ministre ne peut venir mardi, nous devrions exiger qu'elle choisisse la date de sa comparution et qu'elle cesse de tergiverser. On dirait qu'elle essaie simplement d'empêcher cette réunion et de la retarder. Qu'elle nous donne une date à laquelle elle sera disponible si elle ne peut venir mardi.

Franchement, elle devrait faire tout ce qu'elle peut pour être disponible mardi. Je crois l'avoir mentionné au cours de la séance du sous-comité mais je sais qu'après que nous lui ayons demandé de comparaître, il y a eu un comité du Sénat qui lui a demandé de comparaître et elle se rendra au Sénat le 24. Cela montre qu'elle est effectivement en mesure de fixer une date. Il semble vraiment que la ministre essaie d'éviter d'avoir à rendre des comptes devant un comité de la Chambre et nous ne pouvons pas accepter ce genre d'attitude. Nous devons la presser de comparaître. C'est un processus qui se déroule en ce moment et il faut nous en occuper. Nous ne pouvons pas laisser traîner les choses.

Le président:

Nous dirons à la greffière que, lorsqu'elle invitera la ministre, nous serions extrêmement mécontents si la ministre ne comparaissait pas rapidement.

M. Blake Richards:

Il faudrait également qu'elle nous fournisse d'autres dates. Nous ne pouvons accepter qu'elle nous dise « Nous vous ferons savoir plus tard ce qu'il en est », ce genre de choses. Il faut fixer une date.

Le président:

Nous ne pouvons pas donner d'ordre à une ministre mais nous pouvons lui dire que nous serons extrêmement mécontents si elle ne comparaît pas.

M. Blake Richards:

Et elle devrait nous fournir une date.

Le président:

Résumons, nous allons inviter la ministre mardi; si elle ne peut venir, nous allons examiner le code régissant les conflits d'intérêt. Jeudi, nous allons étudier les deux autres nominations fédérales touchant le comité de sélection du Sénat. Nous siégerons dans l'édifice de la Promenade si nous devons tenir une vidéoconférence.

Avant que vous abordiez cette question, Arnold, j'aimerais dire autre chose.

Je propose, si nous sommes tous d'accord, que, si nous examinons les conflits d'intérêt mardi, que nous siégions à huis clos parce que nous allons longuement examiner un rapport volumineux et que le dernier comité avait fait tout cela à huis clos. C'est la raison pour laquelle la commissaire aux conflits ne connaissait pas le sujet de notre discussion et c'est pourquoi le Comité a estimé qu'il fallait aborder ces sujets.

Si nous allons parler d'un sujet qui a été examiné à huis clos auparavant, nous n'avons pas la latitude d'en parler publiquement de toute façon, de sorte que, pour pouvoir examiner ce sujet, nous serons probablement obligés de proposer que la séance se tienne, au début du moins, à huis clos.

Monsieur Reid et monsieur Masse.

M. Scott Reid:

Il est évident que le problème tient au fait que M. Christopherson a des idées très nettes sur cette question mais il n'est pas ici en ce moment. De sorte que... je ne sais pas.

Je vais laisser M. Masse aborder cette question.

M. Brian Masse:

Je crois savoir que nous ne sommes pas liés par les décisions parlementaires antérieures. C'est une nouvelle législature.

Il me semble que vous avez démontré pourquoi il ne faudrait pas siéger à huis clos, parce qu'il y avait des parties intéressées qui n'étaient pas au courant. Je serais réticent à prendre une telle décision. Vous avez fait remarquer que les témoignages que nous avons entendus aujourd'hui — je suis désolé de n'avoir pas assisté à toute la séance — ont été influencés par un manque de connaissance parce que nous avions siégé à huis clos.

Je pense qu'il faudrait agir avec prudence dans ce domaine.

Le président:

À la greffière, lorsqu'ils ont siégé à huis clos pour quelque raison que ce soit, les membres du comité qui ont assisté à cette séance ne pouvaient pas dire ce dont ils avaient parlé parce qu'ils avaient siégé à huis clos. Étant donné qu'il s'agit d'une nouvelle législature, pouvons-nous maintenant parler publiquement de ce qui s'est passé?

Une voix: Non. Il faut attendre 30 ans.

Le président: Très bien, 30 ans.

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse:

Il n'est pas nécessaire de parler de ce qui a été fait auparavant et cela n'est pas possible avec ces règles. Mais nous ne sommes pas liés par ces règles, par ce qu'ils ont fait. Le Comité est une entité indépendante et il n'est pas lié ce qu'a fait un autre comité du Parlement. Cela comprend les études et toute une série de choses.

Je dirais que, si nous décidions d'adopter ces pratiques qui ont causé de toute évidence certains problèmes, nous ne ferions qu'aggraver les choses.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Cela veut dire simplement que nous risquons peut-être de réinventer la roue en parlant de choses qu'ils ont examinées, mais les questions qui ont été abordées aujourd'hui sont déjà publiques.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense en fait qu'il serait bon de siéger à huis clos pour examiner les témoignages qui ont été commentés, ou les discussions qui ont eu lieu, ou les propositions qui ont été présentées au cours de la dernière législature. Lorsque nous siégerons à huis clos, nous pourrons alors décider si certains aspects peuvent être examinés en séance publique.

Cela dit, je propose que nous commencions par tenir une séance publique et de siéger ensuite à huis clos si les membres du Comité y consentent. Je pense qu'il y a de bons arguments qui justifieraient une séance à huis clos mais nous aborderons cette question plus tard; je pense simplement que cela serait politiquement plus acceptable.

Ce ne sont pas des aspects qui m'intéressent personnellement. Ce sont ceux qui intéressent M. Christopherson. Je pense simplement que ce serait la meilleure façon de procéder.

(1255)

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais me faire l'écho de ce commentaire. J'allais suggérer que c'était la bonne façon de procéder, à savoir ce qu'a proposé M. Reid.

Si vous vous souvenez des amendements à la motion de M. Christopherson que j'ai proposés, un des éléments supplémentaires concernait les privilèges des députés. Techniquement, les changements apportés au code régissant les conflits d'intérêt touchent directement les privilèges des députés. Je pense que nous devrions aborder ces questions à huis clos, mais pour être juste envers M. Christopherson, nous devrions d'abord lui donner la possibilité de consigner ses arguments au procès-verbal. Cela vous paraît-il raisonnable?

Une voix: C'est raisonnable.

Le président:

Très bien. Nous allons commencer par siéger en public et si le Comité le souhaite, nous siégerons ensuite à huis clos.

Est-ce bien ce que nous avons décidé? Sommes-nous tous d'accord là-dessus?

Des voix: Oui.

Le président: Très bien.

J'ai un dernier sujet mais pour ce qui est des choses que nous venons d'aborder, voulez-vous ajouter quoi que ce soit? Non.

Nous avons réservé les deux séances qui vont suivre la semaine de relâche du mois de mars pour faire comparaître des témoins sur la question des services « adaptés aux besoins des familles ». Si nous voulons avertir ces personnes suffisamment à l'avance, et si quelqu'un a déjà pensé aux témoins qu'il aimerait entendre, il serait utile que nous le sachions.

Monsieur Masse, je sais que le NPD en a un.

Si vous pouvez le mentionner à la greffière, nous pourrions commencer à inviter des gens qui viendraient au cours de ces semaines.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, pouvons-nous préciser de quelles semaines il s'agit? Faites-vous référence à la semaine des 8 et 10 mars ou à celle des 22 et 24 mars?

Le président:

Ce sont les 22 et 24 mars.

M. Arnold Chan:

À l'heure actuelle, du point de vue du calendrier — je vais préciser cela avec Blake — nous n'avons rien de prévu pour le 8 mars, est-ce exact?

M. Blake Richards:

Vous savez, je me souviens que nous avions prévu d'examiner quelque chose ce jour-là. Je sais qu'un aspect de cette question était de nature administrative. Je ne me souviens pas quel était l'autre aspect, en ce moment. Je n'ai pas mon classeur avec moi.

M. Arnold Chan:

D'après ce dont je me souviens, le 10 mars devait être consacré au rapport du directeur général des élections.

Le président:

Le 8 mars devait porter sur les gens du Sénat, mais maintenant...

M. Arnold Chan:

Très bien, si nous avançons cette rencontre, le 8 mars serait alors libre.

Le président:

Oui. Nous pourrions convoquer alors les témoins sur les services adaptés aux familles.

Je pense que c'est également la semaine au cours de laquelle nous examinons les rapports des caucus. Ou quelle est la date prévue pour le faire...?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je propose que les rapports des caucus soient examinés soit jeudi prochain soit le jeudi suivant, pour que tous les caucus aient au moins la possibilité d'entendre les commentaires qui ressortiront des séances de mercredi prochain.

Le président:

Le mardi dont vous parlez, est-ce bien le 8 mars?

M. Arnold Chan:

Non. À l'origine, cela a été prévu pour le 25 février, mais nous avons entendu la ministre Monsef, la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, qui était disponible jeudi prochain. Maintenant que nous savons qu'elle ne peut venir...

Le président:

Nous allons également entendre les personnes nommées par le Sénat.

M. Arnold Chan:

... nous allons entendre les personnes nommées par le Sénat. Puis-je proposer une heure pour les personnes nommées par le Sénat?

Oui y a-t-il des choses particulières à prendre en compte à ce sujet?

Une voix: Une heure, je pense, pour le moment...

Le président:

Oui et nous disposerons alors d'une heure pour les rapports des caucus.

M. Arnold Chan:

Alors une heure pour les rapports des caucus...

Le président: Cela serait très bien.

M. Arnold Chan: Est-ce raisonnable?

Une voix: Cela semble raisonnable.

Le président:

Très bien. Parfait.

Les témoins dont vous me fournissez les noms en ce moment seront invités le 22 mars.

M. Arnold Chan: Non, le 8 mars.

Le président: Le 8 mars, nous examinons les rapports des caucus.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je pensais que nous allions examiner les rapports des caucus le 25 février. Une heure pour les témoins du Sénat et une heure pour les rapports des caucus.

Le président:

Fort bien.

M. Arnold Chan:

Si nous devons dépasser l'horaire, nous pourrons simplement...

M. Blake Richards:

Désolé; je crois que mon intervention va semer la pagaille dans cette discussion.

Je pensais aussi que vous parliez du 8 mars lorsque vous avez parlé des rapports des caucus. Je pense qu'il serait quelque peu prématuré d'examiner les rapports des caucus le 25 février.

M. Arnold Chan: Très bien.

Le président:

Très bien. D'accord.

Oui, nous n'avons besoin que d'une heure. Nous pourrons peut-être revenir à la motion de M. Christopherson à ce moment-là.

Une voix: D'accord.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais également présenter une motion, au sujet de Mme Labelle.

Le président:

Très bien.

Mardi, nous aurons la ministre ou nous étudierons les conflits d'intérêt; ensuite, jeudi, nous consacrerons une heure aux personnes nommées par le Sénat, à la motion de M. Christopherson et à celle de M. Chan. Il y aura ensuite la semaine de relâche dans les circonscriptions.

La semaine suivante, ce sera le mardi 8 mars. Nous examinerons les rapports des caucus, et en ferons rapport au Comité. Je ne pense pas que cela prendra deux heures. Nous pourrions inviter quelques témoins pour la deuxième heure. Je sais que le NPD souhaite en convoquer un. Nous pourrions peut-être fixer une date limite pour ce qui est de fournir une liste de témoins pour cette réunion et pour les deux qui suivront au courant du mois de mars.

Pourquoi ne pas fixer à la fin de la réunion du 8 mars la limite pour proposer des témoins qui seraient entendus les 22 et 24 mars?

(1300)

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'ai pas de suggestion précise à faire pour les témoins. Je propose que notre souffre-douleur préféré, notre analyste, trouve quelqu'un pour nous.

La question des locaux de la garderie a été soulevée. À mon avis, nous changeons d'édifice et nous en changerons à nouveau et il faudrait nous demander où il conviendrait de placer ces services pour que l'environnement soit plus convivial pour les nouveaux parents, pour les mères en particulier. Il sera peut-être utile de trouver quelqu'un qui pourrait nous dire si nous allons examiner cette question quand nous passerons à l'édifice de l'Ouest et si nous pouvons l'examiner au cours des séances que nous allons tenir après notre retour.

Le président:

Dans cet ordre d'idées, je crois qu'un de nos membres aimerait entendre comme témoin le directeur de la garderie, parce que nous nous sommes posé beaucoup de questions à ce sujet.

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible] et quelques autres.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Oui, il y en a un certain nombre. Certaines questions sont assez évidentes.

Le président:

Très bien.

Oui, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, il y a une autre mesure naturelle que nous prenons dans le cas des témoins. Bien évidemment, notre analyste nous a fourni un excellent rapport, dans lequel il mentionne qu'un certain nombre de gouvernements ont modifié pour cette raison le calendrier des séances de leur Chambre. Même d'une façon générale, il nous a fourni d'excellents exemples qui ont des correspondances utiles avec notre situation. Je sais qu'il a mentionné des exemples provinciaux et qu'il y avait l'Ontario, la C.-B. et je crois que le Québec était la troisième province.

Notre analyste nous a également fourni des renseignements sur certains États du Commonwealth. En particulier, les représentants des pays qui ont modifié leurs heures ou leurs jours de séance pourraient être des témoins très utiles, à mon avis. Je propose également que nous demandions à notre analyste de suggérer d'autres témoins qui pourraient nous être utiles.

Le président:

Un instant. Nous allons lancer une discussion sur deux sujets.

Premièrement, nous allons effectivement demander à nos analystes d'effectuer ce travail et de nous fournir quelques noms. Pour ceux que nous avons aujourd'hui, je vais dresser une liste immédiatement et nous verrons ensuite combien nous pourrons en entendre le 8 mars et quels sont ceux que nous pourrons remettre au 22 mars.

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse:

J'ai une brève suggestion. Pierre Parent des ressources humaines travaille sur ce sujet et saurait quels sont les aspects logistiques qu'il conviendrait d'aborder.

Le président:

Les ressources humaines de la Chambre des communes? Quel est son nom de famille?

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, la Chambre des communes, c'est Pierre Parent.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Blake Richards:

Une précision, monsieur le président, vous avez mentionné que le nom des témoins que les membres souhaiteraient convoquer devrait être fourni le 8 mars?

Le président:

Le nombre... il semble que nous en ayons plus que ce dont nous avons besoin...

M. Blake Richards:

Je dis simplement que vous avez déclaré que le nom des témoins supplémentaires qui pourraient être proposés devrait être remis le 8 mars.

Le président:

Oui, le 8 mars.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce bien ce que vous proposez?

Le président:

Oui.

Anita et ensuite David.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Si nous cherchons à trouver rapidement des témoins, il y a Equal Voice, un organisme multipartie qui s'occupe des femmes en politique. Je pense que c'est là un organisme intéressant. Nancy Peckford en est la directrice administrative.

Pour les témoins de l'extérieur, il y a, bien sûr, Julie Ballington, qui a fait beaucoup de travail sur les parlements adaptés aux besoins des familles au sein de l'UIP, l'Union interparlementaire. Elle fait maintenant partie de l'organisme des Femmes de l'ONU et elle travaille à New York.

Je vais proposer un certain nombre de noms mais c'est simplement pour le cas où nous voudrions entendre quelques personnes rapidement.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais simplement faire remarquer que nous sommes en train de parler de listes de témoins à entendre en séance publique et je pensais que nous avions convenu de parler de ces choses à huis clos.

Le président:

Oui, mais nous en avons suffisamment ici pour prendre une décision au sujet du 8 mars. Je ne vais pas demander le huis clos pour quelques minutes, parce que je ne pense pas que ces aspects soient controversés.

Nous avons cinq témoins possibles. Je ne pense pas que nous puissions les entendre tous le 8 mars, nous allons donc devoir en reporter quelques-uns. Je vais vous mentionner les cinq et vous me proposerez ceux que nous pourrions entendre au cours de la deuxième heure de notre séance du 8 mars. Pierre, des ressources humaines; Travaux publics, comme l'a mentionné M. Reid, au sujet de la conception des édifices, notamment l'emplacement retenu pour une garderie; Equal Voice et UIP de New York; et le service de garderie. Je pense qu'il faudrait accorder une grande priorité à la personne qui prend des décisions au sujet de la gestion de la garderie.

Monsieur Richards.

(1305)

M. Blake Richards:

Je dirais que ce dont vous parlez correspond tout à fait à ce que j'ai constaté au cours de la séance du Comité. Il y a eu beaucoup de questions sur ces sujets de sorte que, bien évidemment, si nous devions parler à un petit nombre de personnes, l'une d'entre elles devrait être le directeur du service de garderie, la personne qui s'en occupe. L'autre serait, comme l'a proposé M. Reid, une personne qui serait à même de nous fournir quelques renseignements sur la façon de veiller à ce que les changements structurels apportés aux édifices soient adaptés à ce genre de choses, puisque ce sujet semble avoir suscité beaucoup d'intérêt de la part des membres du Comité au cours de la première séance.

Nous avons eu des suggestions des autres partis et nous devrions sans doute attendre d'avoir reçu les propositions de tous les partis avant d'arrêter la liste des témoins. Tous les partis auront ainsi eu la possibilité de proposer des témoins. Entre-temps, les analystes pourraient nous faire aussi quelques suggestions, notamment celles qui touchent d'autres gouvernements. Cela me paraît être une bonne façon de faire pour le 8 mars. Cela me paraît raisonnable.

Le président:

Très bien, que pensez-vous alors de cette proposition? Le 8 mars, si nous pouvons les obtenir, nous pourrions consacrer la deuxième heure à un représentant de Travaux publics, à quelqu'un qui décide de la conception des édifices, et au service de garderie, à une personne qui gère le service de garderie.

Nous pourrions alors reporter les autres témoins aux séances de la fin du mois de mars: Pierre Parent, Equal Voice, Julie Ballington, et ceux que la greffière pourrait trouver dans d'autres pays, plus les témoins que les membres du comité nous auraient présentés avant le 8 mars. Est-ce que cela est clair pour tout le monde?

M. Blake Richards:

La seule réserve que je ferais, monsieur le président, est que c'est bien évidemment au Comité de décider du nombre des séances que nous voulons tenir à ce sujet ainsi que du nombre des témoins que nous voulons entendre.

Lorsque cela sera fait, que tous les partis auront proposé leurs témoins, nous devrons décider quels sont ceux que nous retiendrons, quels sont ceux qui pourront s'intégrer à notre calendrier et aux sujets proposés.

Plutôt que de dire que nous allons entendre ces témoins... Ce n'est pas que je veuille m'y opposer, mais il me paraît évident que nous ne voulons pas décider, une fois le nombre de témoins déterminé, quels seront ceux qui auront la priorité.

Le président:

Je ne voulais pas dire que nous allions les entendre. Je voulais simplement qu'ils soient tous ajoutés à la liste. Ils viendront peut-être. C'est une excellente remarque. Nous allons devoir élaguer cette liste. Nous ne pouvons pas nous éterniser sur ce sujet.

Nous allons dresser une longue liste pour le 8 mars. Nous déciderons ensuite du nombre des séances à tenir, comme vous l'avez dit. Nous allons ensuite déterminer quel sera le nombre des témoins que nous pourrons convoquer.

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse:

J'aimerais ajouter un nom au début de la liste, peut-être pas au tout premier rang, mais au cours du processus de transition, je pense qu'il serait utile de convoquer Christine Moore. C'est au Comité d'en décider mais je pensais simplement qu'il serait bon de mentionner ce nom dans cette liste.

Le président:

Il figurera sur la liste du 8 mars.

Monsieur Chan, y a-t-il quelqu'un d'autre?

M. Arnold Chan:

J'allais simplement faire une suggestion au sujet du nombre total mais nous pourrons en parler au cours de la prochaine séance.

Le président:

Cela serait sans doute plus facile lorsque nous...

M. Arnold Chan:

Allons-nous en convoquer entre 15 et 20? Lorsque nous verrons la liste complète, nous pourrons alors prendre des décisions.

Le président:

Lorsque nous aurons la liste, il sera alors plus facile de prendre des décisions.

Autre chose?

Merci. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 18, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.