header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-06-07 PROC 113

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1005)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome to meeting 113 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This morning we continue our study of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We are pleased to be joined by Leslie Seidle, Research Director from the Institute for Research on Public Policy; Nicolas Lavellée, Strategic Adviser, from Citoyenneté jeunesse; and Michael Morden, Research Director from the Samara Centre for Democracy.

Thank you for being here this morning.

I'll now turn the floor over to Mr. Seidle for his opening comments.

Dr. Leslie Seidle (Research Director, Institute for Research on Public Policy, As an Individual):

Thank you, Chair and committee, for the opportunity to come before you today.

You have a huge bill in front of you. I'm going to dig down or at least somewhat down in one area, the limits on the spending by third parties prior to and during the official election period. This is an area on which I've done research in the past and recently did a fairly large comparative report. It's also one of the major issues that were addressed in the early nineties by the Royal Commission on Electoral Reform and Party Financing, often known as the Lortie commission, on which I served as senior research coordinator.

I'll start with the third party limits during the writ period.

At present, the limit on advertising expenses for a third party nationally is $214,350, of which no more than $4,287 can be spent in a particular riding. The bill you have in front of you will expand the scope of spending, subject to limits, to include partisan activity expenses and election survey expenses, in addition to the advertising expenses that have been covered since 2000. In consequence, the limits have been raised considerably according to the backgrounder that was released when the bill was tabled. The new national limit on third party spending is estimated at around $500,000 for 2019. The level that's printed in the bill, $350,000, is adjusted for inflation from 2000, not from now. I find it reasonable to expand the scope of third party limits because the additional activities, such as surveys, are linked to, and indeed may even support, third party election advertising. The level of the new limits also seems reasonable to me.

There's a related amendment that limits the writ period to 50 days, and this will mean that, for political parties and candidates, a pro-rated increase of the third party limits will no longer be possible. I support this move. The pro-rated-limits provision that was brought in under the previous government was a very odd piece of public policy, and dropping it is definitely a good step, not just for third parties but obviously also for parties and candidates.

I'll now turn to the pre-writ spending limits for third parties.

Before commenting on the scope and level of these limits, I want to say a few words about the rationale for this move and the experience in some other jurisdictions.

On the rationale, the government has decided that spending limits for candidates and parties will be extended to the pre-writ period. I think it's fair to say that this is consistent with Canada's long experience with party and candidate spending limits, which date from 1974, and also with the broad public support for such limits. The new third party limits will apply as of June 30 in an election year, along with candidate and party limits, so they will cover a period of almost four months.

As members know, there's a fairly widely held view that to be effective, limits on party and candidate spending need to be paired with limits on third party spending. They're seen as complementary and, in a sense, mutually supportive. Indeed, the Supreme Court in the 2004 Harper decision stated that third party election spending limits are necessary to protect the integrity of the financing regime applicable to candidates and parties. If party and candidate limits are introduced for the pre-writ period, if that decision has been taken, it follows logically that third party spending or at least some aspects of that spending should also be subject to limits, otherwise that linkage, that complementarity, that exists during the election period will not apply.

Other jurisdictions have taken similar steps. In the U.K., there have been pre-writ spending limits for parties, candidates, and third parties since 2000. They're quite long. They apply for an entire year, give or take a few days depending on when the election is held. In Ontario, pre-writ limits for the three entities were introduced in 2016. They are applying in the election that's ending today, and the period there is six months. In your bill, it's somewhat shorter. It's close to four months. I find the duration in Bill C-76 to be reasonable.

As for the scope, the new limits will cover three areas: partisan activities, partisan advertising, and election surveys. This may appear analogous to the expanded scope of the election limits, but there's an important difference to be noted.

Unlike the definition of election advertising, partisan advertising does not include advertising messages that take a position on an issue with which a party or person is associated. You have, in the copy of my notes, the two definitions appended at the end. This means that if a third party sponsors advertising on an important public policy issue, but the messages do not promote or oppose a registered party or candidate, the cost of such advertising will not count against the pre-writ spending limit for the third party.

To illustrate this, here are a couple of examples of advertising that a third party might sponsor: Message A: Marijuana can harm your children's health, so don't vote Liberal. Message B: The Trudeau Liberal government legalized marijuana, which can harm your children's health.

Based on my reading of Bill C-76, third party spending on the first message would be subject to a limit, but spending on the second message—The Trudeau government legalized marijuana, which can harm your children's health—would not be because there's no promotion of voting for Liberals or against Liberals. This is often referred to as “issue advertising”.

If that kind of a message were sponsored during the official election period, it would count against the third party limit. There's a policy difference between the pre-writ limits and the election limits for third parties.

I'll finish on the question of the level of permitted spending.

The pre-writ limits on third party spending are estimated at about $1 million nationally, and $10,000 in a single electoral district. Third parties' national pre-limit will thus be twice their election limit, and two-thirds of what registered parties will be allowed to spend in the pre-writ period. For the parties, it's estimated at $1.5 million.

Moreover, in light of the difference between the definitions of advertising expenses that I just explained, the pre-writ limits for third parties will cover a narrower range of activities than their election limits, so they have additional room. The spending on issue advertising is not subject to limit. In light of what I just said, I am not convinced it is necessary to set the pre-spending limits for third parties at such a high level.

(1010)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mr. Lavallée. [Translation]

Mr. Nicolas Lavallée (Strategic Advisor, Citoyenneté jeunesse):

Hello, Mr. Chair, members of parliament, dear members of the committee.

My name is Nicolas Lavallée. I am a Strategic Advisor with Citoyenneté jeunesse, formerly known as the Table de concertation des forums jeunesse régionaux du Québec. It was under that name that we appeared before this committee in the spring of 2014.

The core mandate of regional youth forums is to encourage the civic participation of youth and to serve as an advisor on youth matters. Various projects of these youth forums are funded by Quebec's youth secretariat and Quebec's ministry of immigration, diversity and inclusion. For provincial and municipal elections, we have also had various financial partners, including Élections Québec.

We also work with Élections Québec to conduct an election simulation exercise in Quebec called “Voters in training”, which was developed by one of our members, the Forum jeunesse de l'île de Montréal. The youth forums conduct activities year round to increase young people's interest in politics and their sense of competency. For example, we offer activities and workshops on politics for young people. During an election period, we reach out to young voters on the ground to encourage them to exercise their right to vote and to tell them about the different voting procedures.

I will now tell you a bit about civic education and its impact on the youth vote.

In the last federal election, just 57.1% of young Canadians aged 18 to 24 voted, and just 57.4% of young Canadians aged 25 to 35 voted. That is about 10 percentage points below the overall voter turnout of 68.3% for that election. So it is essential for us to get young people out to vote since studies show that a young person who votes as soon as they are of age to do so is very likely to continue voting throughout their life. Getting young people to vote is ultimately a way of getting the whole population to vote.

Why do young people not vote? There are two types of factors at play. Essentially, there are motivational factors, such as interest in politics and knowledge, and voting access factors, such as registration on lists, lack of proper identification, and ignorance of voting procedures. The 2015 National Youth Survey, which measured the relative importance of all factors in the decision to vote, also identified both motivational and access factors.

We need to conduct civic education activities because they are effective. In the fall of 2016, Elections Canada also commissioned an independent evaluation of the Student Vote program. The study showed that the Student Vote program has a positive impact on the many factors involved in electoral participation. In particular, the program increases knowledge of and interest in politics, and also strengthens the view that voting is a civic duty.

If these campaigns are effective for grade school and high school students, they are of course also effective for young people who have just become eligible to vote. It is precisely that age group that needs more information and public education. So we are very excited to see that Bill C-76 would once again allow Elections Canada and the chief electoral officer to act independently to address factors relating to motivation to vote and access to voting. Campaigns for the general public also play an important role and help create healthy social pressure to vote.

Research has also shown that people are sensitive to those around them when it comes time to vote. Young people are especially influenced by their family, their peers, and society. Following the general elections in Quebec in 2014, Élections Québec had an evaluation done of its own voting promotion campaigns, which found that 75% of the population studied had seen the ads.

Finally, here are a few recommendations.

We think it is possible and desirable to once again address the motivational and voting access obstacles.

First, we recommend that the new wording of subclauses 18(1) and 18(2) of the bill be adopted. That would once again allow the chief electoral officer to conduct campaigns focused more on motivation or information, at his discretion, with full independence and, of course, without any restrictions.

Secondly, we support initiatives to increase voter participation, especially among young people. Citoyenneté jeunesse is very interested in measures such as creating a registry of future voters and extending the opening hours of advance polling stations.

Finally, we also ask that education remains at the core of Elections Canada's activities, whether through its own initiatives or by providing funding for other organizations, which are obviously non-partisan and whose mandate is civic education. Promoting the vote and democracy, whether through friends, family members, teachers, peers, and so on, is essential in order to prevent youth voter turnout from plummeting.

(1015)



To turn the tide, society has to work as a whole and play a role, especially Elections Canada, which is responsible for conducting elections and has a great deal of expertise in this area.

I sincerely hope that this bill will be passed and that all the parties can agree to work together to strengthen the health of the country's democracy.

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We appreciate this. We always want to have youth involvement, so that's great.

Now we have Michael Morden.

Mr. Michael Morden (Research Director, Samara Centre for Democracy):

Chair, thank you very much for the opportunity to address this committee.

My name is Michael Morden and I'm the Research Director of the Samara Centre for Democracy. Samara is an independent, non-partisan charity that is dedicated to strengthening Canadian democracy through research and programming. Samara welcomes this effort to comprehensively refresh our elections law. This is a significant bill for Canada's democracy as it touches the democratic process itself. We think it deserves time and close scrutiny in Parliament, and a sincere effort to find cross-partisan consensus wherever possible.

Due to the length of the bill, I will also contain our analysis to the elements that touch most closely on Samara's past research, particularly related to voter participation and electoral accessibility, with a very brief note in closing on the parties.

First, on methods of voter identification, we suggest the following as a guiding principle: that the greatest priority be given to permitting as broad and flexible a range of methods for voters to identify themselves as possible, and where potential accuracy or administrative problems may exist, Elections Canada should exhaust other options first before addressing those problems before closing off possible, valid methods of identification. Therefore, we support restoring vouching and enabling the use of voter information cards as valid methods of establishing voter eligibility, in the latter instance with additional ID.

Second, we also support expanding the mandate of the Chief Electoral Officer to provide non-partisan public education on Canadian democracy, which addresses not just how to vote, but also why to vote, not just in classrooms, but beyond classrooms. Elections Canada is uniquely placed to fulfill this role as one of the few well-funded, non-partisan organizations focused on Canadian democracy. Following the example of most other electoral agencies in the country, Elections Canada should be empowered to advertise and educate both during and also between elections, making use of partnerships with community organizations, and contributing to building our capacity in the area of civic education, civic literacy.

Third, regarding young voters, a register of future voters could be very useful for preparing and engaging young people, but this is likely only the case if it's paired with enthusiastic programming. There is research evidence to suggest, looking at other jurisdictions, that where young voter preregistration has been introduced and promoted, it can result in an increase in voter turnout in the 18 to 24 age bracket. The research differs on the magnitude of that change, but they generally find a statistically significant improvement. However, when we're just dealing with the text of the legislation here, I think it should be noted in passing that it could have resourcing implications that can touch on the work of this committee. It's simply creating a system of pre-registry itself; it should not be expected to have significant effects. Pre-registry can be effective, but again experience from other jurisdictions suggests this is only true if it's paired with strong engagement efforts and energetic promotion.

We are happy to see that many of the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations are reflected in Bill C-76. I also want to briefly highlight an exception. This bill does not adopt a suggestion that the law be amended to permit holding election day on a weekend. I'm aware that this is something the committee has discussed as well. We think the idea may be worth again exploring. It's true that there's not systematic evidence to suggest that moving to weekend voting necessarily results in increased turnout. There are other immediate benefits as described by the Chief Electoral Officer, like making it easier to hire election workers, and having a wider selection of possible poll locations.

We also think it's possible that weekend voting could support higher turnout if it's one piece of a broader state and society partnership to change how we experience elections to make elections more social, more festive, and community-based.

One amendment this committee could consider would be to change the law to permit, but not require or prescribe, a weekend polling day. This could initially apply only to by-elections. In other words, the law could be amended to allow for experimentation such as holding a set of by-elections on a Saturday or Sunday. That experience could then help inform Parliament whether or not to move the polling day for general elections.

(1020)



Finally, just briefly, on political parties, we believe it is important that the Chief Electoral Officer be given the power to compel receipts from parties. This is a power that provincial electoral agencies hold. It's a long-standing oversight. We support correcting this, and in fact, we think we should be asking for increasingly greater transparency in how parties spend the money that taxpayers reimburse.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Committee, the bells are ringing. There will be a vote at 11 o'clock, and we have another panel.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

It must be earlier than 11:00.

The Chair:

It's at 10:50, but we'd be back here by 11:00.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

By 11:15.

The Chair:

There are 27 minutes left. We have another full panel at 11:00, so what does the committee...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Two minutes each?

The Chair:

Two minutes for each question for each party?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't know how much that accomplishes, but let's try.

The Chair:

Okay, each party has two minutes.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

First of all, obviously, I'll be quick.

Mr. Seidle, thank you for coming in. You bring quite a bit of experience to this, even going back to the Lortie commission, which always interests me. You said limiting the writ period to 50 days was a positive measure for you. Some of the opposition we get from that in this bill is that it's a little bit too restrictive. Maybe it should be up to whatever it was. Last election, it was around two months. Prior to that, it was much shorter. Do you really feel that legislating—prescribing—the 50-day writ period is reasonable?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

One could debate about whether it should be 50 or 55 or 49. The principle that I disagree with was allowing the governing party to prolong the election campaign based on its own decision. The principle that we've held to since 1974 is that of a relatively level playing field. If you have the authority to extend the election campaign, and you happen to have a lot more money than your competitors do, you are, through that decision, potentially creating an advantage for yourself.

Money doesn't buy elections, and we saw in 2015 that the party with the most money was not re-elected, but it's not consistent with the principle of the level playing field to allow the government to simply extend. It was quite a bit longer than two months, as I recall. Somebody around the table should know how many days it was exactly.

Mr. Scott Simms:

For me, it was two years.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms: I mean, that's beside the point.

In saying that, the pre-writ period also has some limitations put on it, and some people were opposed to that in that pre-writ period. I would assume, by extension, that you would feel there should be limitations over that as well, because of the wealth of some of the parties over the others.

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

Well, yes. If you're going to limit the pre-writ spending, analogous with election spending, it needs to be during a defined period. The decision has been made that says “as of June 30 in the year of the election”, so it will vary by a few days depending upon when the election actually falls. I find that to be more reasonable than in Ontario, which is six months, and certainly more reasonable than in the U.K. There's been an examination of the law in the U.K. by Lord Hodgson. He found in his research that many of the interest groups and others felt the regulatory burden was too heavy with a year limit. The government in the U.K. hasn't acted to shorten it yet, but it is part of the debate there.

(1025)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Could I make a brief comment?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'll be very brief. I apologize to the other gentlemen. I didn't get to you today due to time.

Mr. Morden from Samara, thank you for joining us today. You recently put out a survey to all members of Parliament. I'm bringing that up because I want all members of Parliament to please fill that out. It's very important. Thank you for providing that in your organization.

The Chair:

The survey was created by the all-party caucus on democratic reform, so we put it forward. I have put mine in.

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

Mr. Seidle, I'll start with you. I'll ask you to give me, rather than a rationale, just a number. You mentioned pre-writ spending limits, and you thought they were too generous. What should that number be?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I don't have a figure to put in front of you today. I think it could be reduced by at least a third. I find there is a discrepancy between political parties and third parties; political parties have just 50% more room in the pre-writ period compared to third parties.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, I appreciate the brevity as well.

In terms of the pre-writ spending limit period for the third parties, you have both made comments on that. Mr. Seidle, you made comments on that here. Samara, you've made comments on this as well in terms of third parties. I want to ask you both, and I guess I'll start with you, Mr. Morden. In Mr. Seidle's opening remarks, he mentioned that in the U.K., they have had pre-writ spending limits for about a year. In Ontario, they have pre-writ spending limits from about six months. Ours are essentially two months or less prior to the election.

Based on some of the comments that Samara has made in the past, there are certainly concerns about the money being spent pre-writ. You've even indicated that many third parties were actually spending a lot of money pre-writ, and then nothing, or essentially nothing, so they didn't have to register during the election. It shows they were just using the pre-writ period as a way around it. I wanted to get your thoughts on whether that “two months or less” period is enough, and if not, what time there should be for pre-writ spending limits.

Mr. Morden, and then Mr. Seidle.

Mr. Michael Morden:

The short answer is that there's no period that wouldn't be a little bit arbitrary. I don't think it's entirely reasonable, but I would not be opposed to a compromise that extended the pre-writ period somewhat and found some middle ground between the way the law is drafted now and the Ontario provincial law, for example.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

Mr. Seidle.

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I indicated that I'm comfortable with the duration of the present limits. There's an issue that needs to be borne in mind, which is that, if you were to extend it further backwards, you risk running into a parliamentary session. That was an issue when British Columbia tried to bring in some limits about 10 years ago. They said that could create a chill while the legislature was in session. In other words, members would be making speeches, talking to the media, but third parties would be prevented from undertaking any direct advertising during that period. I think that the drafting of the bill must have taken that into account.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry, I don't mean to interrupt, but I have to, I guess.

You mention Ontario as one of your examples, when they have a six-month period. Do you see that as problematic, what they're doing in Ontario?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I'm not aware that it's created huge problems in Ontario. Some of that will come out during the election. I haven't been following the Ontario—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Might it be good for us to hear from people who have been involved in the Ontario election and get their experiences from it before we make a final decision on what we do?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

Of course.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

I apologize to the witnesses. This is not how we like to have conversations about such important bills as ones that affect our democracy.

Mr. Morden, you said this bill deserves time and close scrutiny. It's not the fault of anyone sitting around this table, but it's very unlikely this bill is going to get time and close scrutiny.

You support the bill broadly, but it's big. It's 350 pages. Do you think there's any notion of pushing forward some of the things that you support—say, the voter identification, the use of vouching—as a separate piece while these more complex things take longer—third party, misinformation, disinformation, social media, foreign influence, and some of the more complex things that have been introduced on top of the original bill that was introduced 18 months ago?

(1030)

Mr. Michael Morden:

I think it's a reasonable suggestion. I think ideally we would have taken on some of those elements and spent some time with.... In other words, each element, in part because they don't have a direct relationship to one another, has to be scrutinized in one shot. We had to limit our analysis precisely because we didn't have the capacity to go through the whole thing.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We're having a shared experience then.

Mr. Michael Morden:

I think we are, so I'm sympathetic. I would imagine most agree that ideally there would be more time to permit that scrutiny while also meeting the other prerogative of being ready for GE 2019.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let me pass that to you, Mr. Seidle. There are many elements of this bill. You focused on one, which raises some interesting questions about what would be caught and what wouldn't be caught in terms of—not a loophole—simply phrasing of a question between a third party. I don't have the answer to that question. I'm not sure the government does either. In terms of this legislation, we're a couple of weeks from the end of the spring sitting of Parliament. We're still not out of committee. What would your advice be to the committee members in terms of getting this right, something that's obviously so important?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I don't think the committee is being given sufficient time to study such an enormously complex bill. There are some areas in the bill that I haven't commented on, such as trying to prevent foreign funding of third parties and the whole area of trying to prevent hacking and interference in the actual vote. That's not an area of my expertise. This is a new public policy area. I've seen the list of witnesses for this week, and I don't see anybody I recognize as an expert on that area.

Yes, I think the amount of time you're being given isn't sufficient.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The consideration, then, is that we've known about some things in this bill—the vouching and such have been at least public knowledge for some time—but there's a whole section of the bill that is brand new to us as parliamentarians. The committee is going to have to deliberate as to how we handle this and not make mistakes with something so delicate.

Thank you, Chair. I know we have to get to votes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

On the security part, we had CSE here this week.

There are 17 minutes left to vote, so we will come back as quickly as possible and we'll have a full committee at 11:00.



(1110)

The Chair:

Good morning. Welcome back to the 113th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For our second panel today, we are pleased to be joined by Elizabeth Dubois, Assistant Professor, Department of Communications, University of Ottawa; Cara Zwibel, Director, Fundamental Freedoms Program, Canadian Civil Liberties Association; and Chris Roberts, National Director, Social and Economic Policy Department, Canadian Labour Congress.

Thank you all for being available for us today. Maybe we will start with Professor Dubois with your opening statement and then we'll just go along the table.

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois (Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Ottawa, As an Individual):

Perfect. Thank you for having me. I am happy to be here, speaking on Bill C-76 today. As mentioned, I am a professor at the University of Ottawa, in the communication department, and my research focuses on how people access and share political information and specifically, the role of digital media, social media platforms, and search engines, for example, in that process. An example here is a report that Dr. Fenwick McKelvey, who is at Concordia University, and I wrote, which is the first, and I believe only, report on the state of political bots in Canada, which was part of the University of Oxford's computational propaganda project.

Today, I want to draw your attention to three key aspects of Bill C-76 in my opening remarks. They are computational approaches to voter suppression, technology and platform companies, and political party privacy policies.

First up, based on evidence from recent elections and referenda internationally, we know that individuals and groups are experimenting with computationally supported tactics for political communication with the electorate. This could lead to voter suppression.

These techniques might include creating automated social media accounts, which we call bots. They are non-human. They could include creating fake accounts or troll accounts, which are run by humans, but aren't necessarily representative of actual voters. They could be targeted advertisement strategies which involve quickly removing ads, so they are very hard to track.

By using computational approaches and automation, it is possible to amplify and spread information very quickly. It is also possible to dampen messages and suppress ideas. This can be used for obvious and explicit forms of voter suppression, such as telling people to go to the wrong polling place. One could imagine a bot-driven version of the robocall scandal. It could also be used for more covert forms of suppression, such as creating an environment of distrust in the electoral system or encouraging political apathy. This could be done via a chatbot, for example. Emerging forms of artificial intelligence become pretty important when we're thinking about securing the integrity of our elections.

Notably, most research currently considers the role of political bots on social media alone, but increasingly, tools such as WhatsApp and other instant messaging applications are being employed. Voter suppression in these contexts is even harder to track, trace, and then enforce our existing laws.

This is clearly against the spirit of the law, but not explicitly addressed. Nor are there adequate mechanisms in place to prevent or identify these practices. A requirement to register use of automated techniques, which would also include emerging artificial intelligence approaches for communicating with the electorate, would be a very valuable addition to this legislation.

I would like to note that I say register and not ban. I believe there are valuable and legitimate uses of automated techniques for communicating with the electorate that should not necessarily be discouraged.

Second, considering the role of platforms, such as major social media companies and search engines, I think there could be better direction within Bill C-76. The bill requires organizations to not knowingly sell election advertisements to foreign entities, which of course will affect platform companies. However, beyond that, the bill ignores the substantial role platforms play when it comes to enforcing many aspects of Canadian election laws.

For example, the low cost of online advertisement and the ability to micro-target means that hundreds of versions of advertisements can be delivered throughout various Internet platforms. They are hard to track and therefore, it can be difficult to establish if and when illegal activities are happening, such as voter suppression or advertisement spend which exceeds spending limits, is purchased by foreign entities or is purchased by unregistered third parties.

Having been confronted with this problem elsewhere, for example, in the U.S., platform companies are starting to create advertisement transparency tools which are useful, but this is voluntary and could be changed at any moment, if it's not required legally.

This poses significant risk to Canadian elections because platforms make decisions in an international and commercial context, which does not necessarily align with the needs of Canada's democracy.

Finally, Bill C-76 requires political parties to make a privacy statement about protecting information of individuals. This proposed legislation does not include any form of audit or verification that the policy is adequate, ethical, or being followed. There are no penalties for non-compliance. There are no provisions that permit Canadians to request their data be corrected or deleted, which is the case in many other jurisdictions.

(1115)



It is certainly fair to say that this issue is much broader than elections. The fact that political parties are not covered by PIPEDA or other privacy constraints, and the fact that elections are fundamental to the functioning of our democracy mean it's an issue that I don't think we can ignore. It needs to be discussed further, in the context of this bill.

Ultimately, I think there are useful aspects in this bill, but there are also substantial concerns regarding such things as computational approaches to voter suppression, the role of technology companies and platforms, and privacy, which I hope will be considered in more detail.

Thank you for your time and I look forward to questions.

The Chair:

Thank you. That was very helpful and interesting information.

Now we'll go to Ms. Zwibel from the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.

Ms. Cara Zwibel (Director, Fundamental Freedoms Program, Canadian Civil Liberties Association):

Good morning, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. Thank you for inviting me to speak with you this morning on behalf of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, or CCLA.

I know my time this morning is short so I want to highlight CCLA's two primary concerns with respect to Bill C-76. The first relates to political advertising, particularly the restrictions on third party advertising. The second concerns political parties' treatment of personal information.

With respect to political advertising, we wish to highlight that what the legislation currently does, and what the bill would continue to do, is place significant restrictions on political speech, speech that is considered to lie at the very core of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms' protection of freedom of expression. We appreciate and take seriously the concern that wealth should not be translated into the ability to dominate political discourse. However, we have not seen any evidence that justifies or even purports to justify the restrictions that are placed on third party advertising, or that would justify the distinctions that this bill makes between different types of political expression and different political actors.

We are aware that the act's third party spending limits were upheld by a majority of the Supreme Court of Canada in the Harper case. In our view, however, the majority of the court was wrong in that case. The evidence before the court could not justify the significant restrictions placed on third party advertising. As the dissenting judges in that case noted: The law at issue sets advertising spending limits for citizens—called third parties—at such low levels that they cannot effectively communicate with their fellow citizens on election issues during an election campaign. The practical effect is that effective communication during the writ period is confined to registered political parties and their candidates.

The dissenters pointed out that the spending limit was less than what it would cost to run a full page ad for a single day in national newspapers. Even with the increase in spending limits brought in by this bill, it's not clear if third party actors would have an effective voice in an election campaign. In our view, this is a serious infringement of charter rights that can only be justified with clear and compelling evidence. To date, we have yet to see or hear any of that evidence.

The bill also restricts political parties in the pre-writ period, only in terms of their partisan advertising, while the restrictions on third parties are much broader. Again, it's not clear on what basis this distinction has been drawn or how it can be justified.

At a more general level, CCLA has concerns about the value and practicality of differentiating between partisan and election advertising, or more generally, attempting to limit issue-based advocacy when an issue is one with which a “registered party or candidate is associated”.

The U.S. Supreme Court has noted that what separates issue advocacy and political advocacy is a line in the sand drawn on a windy day. By continuing to restrict issue-based advocacy, the limits on third party advertising may simply serve to unduly narrow the parameters of public debate around government policy or proposed policy options, rather than limit the kind of expression that we're trying to limit here, that which influences or aims to improperly influence elections.

We also question why spending limits are set out in legislation set by the individuals and parties who stand to benefit from restricting voices that may be critical of them. We urge the committee to consider, either in the context of this bill or in a future study, whether an independent body should be established to address the question of spending limits for third parties and political parties and candidates.

The second issue I'd like to address is Bill C-76's provisions aimed at empowering parties to better protect the privacy of Canadians.

Put simply, this scheme proposed by the bill is inadequate. It contains no meaningful privacy protections and no independent oversight of how the parties protect personal information or consequences for failing to do so. In light of what we are beginning to understand about the information that can be harnessed from social media and other tools and used by political parties to engage in micro-targeting of voters, the failure to truly address the privacy issue in this bill is disappointing, to say the least.

I'm aware that the committee has heard about this issue from a number of witnesses in the last few days, so I won't belabour the point. I'll simply state that the CCLA is in general agreement with the amendments proposed by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Finally, CCLA wishes to note its support for portions of the bill that reverse some of the negative changes that were made when Parliament passed the so-called Fair Elections Act. We welcome the provisions that allow for the use of voter information cards, the return of vouching, as well as the loosening of restrictions on the educational activities of the Chief Electoral Officer. We also welcome the reform that will allow Canadian citizens who reside abroad to participate in federal elections.

I look forward to answering your questions. Thank you for having me this morning.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we go to Chris Roberts from the Canadian Labour Congress.

Mr. Chris Roberts (National Director, Social and Economic Policy Department, Canadian Labour Congress):

Mr. Chair and committee members, good morning and thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today.

I am here on behalf of the Canadian Labour Congress, Canada's largest labour central. The CLC is the voice on national and international issues for three million working people in Canada. It brings together 55 national and international unions, 12 provincial and territorial federations of labour, and over 100 local labour councils.

The Canadian Labour Congress broadly supports Bill C-76. In particular, the CLC is supportive of the measures in the bill to ensure a fair, accessible, and inclusive voting process. We strongly support the bill's measures to improve access for voters with physical disabilities and to include child care and expenses related to a disability in a candidate's expenses.

Bill C-76 restores the ability of the Chief Electoral Officer to authorize the notice of confirmation of registration, the voter information card, as identification. This is a welcome step in our view. We also support the restoration of the ability of the Chief Electoral Officer to undertake public education and information programs to promote awareness of the electoral process among the voting public, especially groups facing barriers to access.

Bill C-76 reintroduces the option of vouching for the identity and residence of an elector, a step that we support. We agree, however, with Monsieur Mayrand that the option of vouching should be extended to staff in long-term care facilities and nursing homes, even when the staff person is not an elector in the same polling division.

I want to turn now to the bill's ramifications for third parties, such as unions and labour organizations.

Bill C-76 introduces significant additional requirements for third parties participating in elections. Under the bill, reporting requirements on third parties will become more extensive than for other participants in the electoral process.

During and between elections, unions and labour centrals engage with their members and with Canadians about issues that are important to working people. This education and engagement is vital to the informed and effective participation of working people in civic life and democratic debate.

We appreciate the fact that subclause 222(3) of Bill C-76 excludes from the definition of “partisan activity” the act of taking a position on issues that parties and candidates may be associated with. This is in the pre-writ period. Nevertheless, we urge the committee to carefully evaluate the additional restrictions and reporting requirements in Bill C-76 to ensure that the ability of labour organizations to engage with members and the public on workers' issues is not impeded.

A leading concern of the CLC is that if and when Bill C-76 is enacted, Elections Canada will issue an updated handbook for third parties that establishes the identical interpretative guidance for pre-writ partisan activity and partisan advertising over the Internet, as Elections Canada established for Internet election advertising during the writ period.

This established that Internet-based messaging during the writ period is only election advertising if there is a placement cost, that is, the cost of purchasing the advertising space. If there is no placement cost, then social media, email, and own-website messaging do not fall within the definition of election advertising. We hope and expect that Elections Canada will apply the same definition to pre-writ messaging. This is especially important now that, effectively, the period between elections—from polling day of the previous general election all the way up to the current pre-writ period—will be subject to regulation and reporting requirements.

With that, honourable members, I'll conclude my remarks.

Thank you very much for your attention.

(1125)

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

Now we'll do some rounds of questioning, starting with Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My first set of questions goes to Professor Dubois.

I'm fascinated by your presentation. I think it's something we're all thinking a lot about, with the recent elections that have occurred around the world.

I'm interested in the computational approaches that you talked about. How much do you think those approaches are currently being used in provincial elections or federal elections that we've had in North America?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

When we're talking about computational approaches, I'm going to be specific and talk about political bots for the moment. Political bots are automated social media accounts. They're also automated accounts that could exist on instant messaging apps or through other communication technologies.

Right now we know there was substantial use of those bots in the U.S. election. A report written by Sam Woolley, who is based at the University of Oxford, showed some concrete evidence. In the report that Fenwick McKelvey and I wrote about the state of bots in Canada, we also saw examples of political bots during the 2015 federal election. We've started doing some initial work during the election that's happening in Ontario today. Those results are not confirmed yet, and we still have some more analysis to do, but there definitely are examples of automation being used. Not all of that automation is necessarily for voter suppression tactics or for things that we necessarily would be uncomfortable with in the election.

An example is most media companies use automated approaches to send out tweets and Instagram posts and Facebook messages all at the same time rather than one individual typing on each of these different platforms. That's the form of computational political messaging that we're pretty okay with. It is very difficult to say exactly how much to measure in a quantitative way. Voter suppression exists because it is very hidden and hard to trace so I can't give you specific numbers.

(1130)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Targeted messaging, for instance, stuff we're more familiar with at least at the political level as representatives, when you're putting out posts and messaging you can target it to certain populations, but you can also prohibit certain populations, demographics, from seeing it. What are your thoughts on that? Is that a form of voter suppression?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

This depends on our understanding of voter suppression. I'm not a lawyer so I can't talk specifically to what should or shouldn't count in one jurisdiction or another. What constitutes voter suppression in different countries or even provinces can vary. Certainly in the U.S. there have been examples of choosing not to show housing advertisements to specific cultural populations, which was deemed to be illegal in the U.S. housing context, because it was thought of as racially discriminatory. We see examples where that targeting and choice not to target specific individuals is legally not permissible. Then I think more broadly about the kind of voter engagement we want to have and the idea of citizens being equally able to participate in their electoral system if certain groups of people are systematically not being invited into the communication, not being given information by the candidates who are running in their area. That is potentially very problematic.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This legislation does prohibit foreign spending in our elections and also any collusion between third parties here and foreign actors. Do you think that is a good step?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

I think it's a good step, but it's also important to recognize that it's very hard to trace, and without support and collaboration with the platform companies that are often used as the distribution mechanism here it's very difficult to ensure that those steps are going to be sufficient.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We have some of those platforms coming before us later on this evening. What kinds of supports and co-operation would you like to see with those companies going forward?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

Some things are already under way with those companies, for example, creating new advertising transparency tools, which is really wonderful. These companies often make themselves available to Elections Canada, to candidates if they encounter some sort of problem during an election campaign. The problem is these are voluntary at the moment, and without a requirement that they continue to do things that serve the Canadian public and Canadian democracy, they could change their mind, and we would be stuck with whatever changes make sense for their international business needs.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How do you think we can better prohibit the distribution of fake news? This legislation does take a look at that a little bit, and it also makes sure that people are not misleading the public through any type of a source. Do you think that's a good step forward?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

The idea of dealing with disinformation—I'm going to use that word because I think the term “fake news” has become politicized in a way that is no longer useful in terms of the evidence that I can actually speak to from an academic perspective—is, I think, a lot broader than the election context specifically, which is largely why I've just spoken specifically about voter suppression tactics and the role that disinformation can play there.

The ideas put forward in the bill about not being able to mislead seem, from my understanding, to be specifically about your not being able to pretend to be a candidate. You can't act as though you are speaking for a party when you're not. That's not the same as the larger voter suppression issue.

(1135)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate you all being here.

I'll start with you, Mr. Roberts. You're here on behalf of the Canadian Labour Congress. It seems as though your group has been pretty involved in elections and in the lead-up to elections, in the last election in particular, I think. How much did your organization spend on election-related advertising in the lead-up to the 2015 election, in the pre-writ period?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

In the pre-writ period, which didn't exist in 20...?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, there was no legislative pre-writ period, but, of course, prior to that, we all referred to the period before the election as the pre-writ period, so, let's say, in the last six months before the election.

Mr. Chris Roberts:

As I tried to convey, the CLC drastically underspends legislated limits for the election period typically. We're engaged in issue-based discussion and conversation with members and with Canadians. I will just tell you that we didn't come close to the number.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure, but can you give us a ballpark figure of how much you would have spent on advertising in the pre-writ period?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

I can't, but I can provide it to the committee.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Can you provide that, yes?

Mr. Chris Roberts: Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards: I know you have a number of affiliate organizations. I would assume that there are some—well, I wouldn't even assume. Certainly some of your affiliate organizations have said outright that there was some coordination of messaging and working together on certain campaigns around the election advertising. So if you take into account the spending of some of your affiliate organizations, is that something you could make available to us as well, how much organizations like the Ontario Federation of Labour and others spent?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

Certainly the provincial and territorial federations of labour, which are part of the CLC, would fall under the single umbrella of the CLC, so that would be included in any umbrella number.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so you would have that.

Mr. Chris Roberts:

As far as affiliate unions, unions affiliated with the CLC, go, you'd want to ask them—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, we can do that. Hopefully we'll have the time to do that, if the government allows it.

You spent $300,000 on advertising during the 2015 election. Can you give us some sense as to what type of advertising was done, what kinds of campaigns were conducted with those dollars?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

The CLC typically runs a campaign called “Better Choices” in which we focus on specific issues. In 2015, the issues were retirement security, child care, and things like that, issues fundamental to our members and, we believe, to working people. We try to generate a conversation on the issues and not on which party to support. The CLC doesn't tell members, doesn't purport to tell members which party to vote for.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The advertising that you do wouldn't include anything that would promote or oppose any political party or candidate?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

Under Bill C-23, the Fair Elections Act, advertising with respect to issues that are associated with a party is regulated under those provisions. So, yes, in law, they do fall under that definition, but we certainly don't aim at them in partisan terms. We discuss the substantive issues.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, but you said that the Ontario Federation of Labour and others like them are part of your advertising and whatnot during the federal elections. On September 1, 2015, they indicated that, and I will quote from the press release they put out, “The Ontario Federation of Labour is working with the Canadian Labour Congress”—and it mentions other people they are working with—“to defeat the Harper Conservatives and elect an NDP Government during the October 19, 2015 federal election.”

To me, it sounds as though they are certainly indicating that there was some effort being made to promote a certain political party and oppose another one. Is that inaccurate?

(1140)

Mr. Chris Roberts:

I work for the Canadian Labour Congress, not for the Ontario Federation of Labour.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure. They are saying they worked with the Canadian Labour Congress.

Mr. Chris Roberts:

All I can tell you is that the CLC has an approach to general elections where we focus on the issues. That's what we want to talk about. Absolutely, we leave it for members to decide which party of the day best represents their interests on those issues.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure, but they did indicate they were working with the Canadian Labour Congress to do just that, to say they were opposing one political party and supporting another. You may want to have a discussion with them about that, if that's not your policy and intention to do that.

Your funding, in terms of the funding that you utilize, that $300,000 and other election-related activities and pre-writ activities related to elections, where does that come from? Is that strictly from the dues of members, or are there other sources of funding that you receive?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

The only funding to support the work of the Canadian Labour Congress comes from affiliated unions, which in turn derive from members' dues, absolutely. I would just remind you that's protected by the Supreme Court decision in Lavigne and in law in Canada, which understands the advocacy and issue campaigns of the labour movement as being part of its associational role as collective bargaining agents for—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, but it's your understanding, though, that the money that's coming in from your affiliated organizations is strictly and 100% derived from membership dues, or to your knowledge, would there be any other sources of funding?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

I don't know the answer to that. I just know that the CLC derives its funding base from a per capita amount charged on the basis of membership to affiliated unions.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would you know if those affiliated organizations ever received any foreign funding? Would you know the answer to that?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

As most people who know about the labour movement in Canada already realize, there are international unions that are present in Canada and that played a role, historically, in the formation of unions in Canada. Many Canadian affiliate unions of the Canadian Labour Congress are headquartered in the United States. I am not sure if that's what you're referring to.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would those members get a say in how their dues are spent on election advertising?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

Absolutely. The Canadian Labour Congress is arguably the largest democratically member owned and operated organization in Canada.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If members didn't want their dues to go towards this campaign to defeat a certain government and promote another one, they would have a right to have that money spent in other ways?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

Absolutely. They have multiple opportunities, all through the year in the election cycle, to participate along with their co-workers in the organizational life of their unions to shape the policy direction and the issues and the parties they support.

We definitely support that kind of democratic engagement.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's good to know.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's quite enlightened. We don't do that here in Parliament, where voters might not want to buy a bunch of fighter jets, but they're buying them anyway.

This is a really interesting panel. I'm not going to have enough time, so I'll try to keep things short.

I'll start with you, Professor Dubois. If you had Facebook and Twitter in front of you, what would be your first point of contention with how they're operating right now, in terms of their vigilance as the platform for sometimes nefarious activities?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

There is discussion from these companies, often, that it's very difficult to identify voter suppression or other disinformation tactics. Frankly, we dealt with spam, and we can deal with other forms of content that we don't want to have on the platform.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This may be hard to be empirical about, but in terms of influencing a Canadian voter's mind today, between the so-called traditional media—print, radio, television, and social media—certainly social media has grown. Are they now equivalent? Would you suggest that they've perhaps become even more significant in terms of how Canadians consume their news and hear about different stories, say in the Ontario election or the upcoming federal one? In that ratio between listening to the evening news, driving and hearing it on the radio, and what they're getting on their phones and computers, do we have any evidence as to how influential those platforms have become, in the minds of voters?

(1145)

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

One of the problems is that we don't have strong, consistent data in Canada about Canadian Internet use because the StatsCan survey was cut. From other countries that are similar, we know that—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it still cut? Is it still not being done?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

There's going to be a new round of it, I believe, next year. I'm not sure. You'll have to check with StatsCan. It's unclear how much detail—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We're safe to say they're significant. I'm just thinking that if you put an ad in The Globe and Mail, under Elections Canada laws, you have to say who funded it, and you have to keep a registry of that ad.

If you post one of these flash ads on Facebook or Twitter, which are driven by an algorithm, to certain micro-targeted voters, there's no reporting at all. We don't know where the money came from for the ad. We don't have any record of the ad unless you grab a screen capture of it. Should it be the equivalent?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

Whether or not they're equivalent in terms of their influence on people—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Reporting.

I'm sorry. A better question is, “Should they have the same rules applied to them?”

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

Right. In terms of advertising online, they should. It should be made technically possible through the platform's interface to say when an advertisement has been bought by a campaign, and to make it clear why you're being sent that message and who has decided to target it at you. Does that...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think so. Facebook has been in a lot of trouble with bots and Cambridge Analytica. Have they fully cleaned up their act now? Is it a secure platform? Could there be another version of Cambridge Analytica out there plotting to figure out another loophole in their system?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

The idea of absolute security with any technology is not one that we are ever going to reach but getting closer is the best we can do. I think that because of the public pressure Facebook has been facing, they are taking steps, but not because of Canadian laws. At the end of the day, that means if pressure is put on them by other jurisdictions or by commercial interests, they won't necessarily continue that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Bill C-76 is an opportunity to put that pressure on.

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are we taking that opportunity right now under the bill?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

No.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Ms. Zwibel, I want to put something to you as a suggestion. You want third parties to have the capacity to have more speech and more ability to be engaged on issue campaigns or involved in the election. If they have that influence, should they also be given a responsibility to report that is similar to how political parties have to report in terms of financing, spending limits, and all of the things that we have to do as political actors?

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

I haven't said that I think third parties necessarily need higher limits. What I said was that I don't see the evidence for the existing limits.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh.

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

I don't understand where these numbers come from, and I don't understand where some of the distinction—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It is the same as where the last numbers came from.

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

Again, I'm not exactly sure where those come from, but given that we have at least some members of the Supreme Court of Canada saying that those numbers are so low that they effectively amount to a monopoly by political parties and candidates, I think that's something that needs to be addressed.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let me step back for a moment, Professor Dubois, in terms of privacy. Ms. Zwibel, you may comment as well if we can get a moment.

There is no audit, no verification, and non-effective controls of privacy on political parties. Why do you think that is? What's so special about us?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

Political parties have a responsibility to connect with the electorate, and because they are not necessarily driven by commercial interests, the argument has been that privacy laws should be considered differently given those different contexts.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, yet we have those restrictions on political parties in B.C., the province I live in. Things seem to be working out.

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

In the EU, with GDPR, there is evidence to suggest that the idea of data protection should be extended across the different contexts in which your data could be collected, tracked, and used.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The consequences are real: on our democracy, on decisions, on Brexit, on the last U.S. election. Do people care?

People are exposing all sorts of private personal information on Facebook all the time. So what if political parties collect a lot of data and know a lot about the voter? Maybe it makes political parties smarter.

(1150)

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

People care, but they're constantly having to trade their own data for the things that they need. In terms of political parties being able to make valuable use of this data, I think that's true. I think there's a lot of value to political parties being able to understand the electorate through the kinds of interactions they have on the Internet. However, citizens also deserve the ability to understand how that's working and what data is being collected about them, and, importantly, to have a door open so that they can correct that information when it's wrong. It can unfairly harm certain groups of people in ways that I don't think should be built in to our electoral system.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Suppression.

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

It can be suppression, or intentionally excluding certain voters who are maybe less likely to vote for you, so not worth your time.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Understood.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we will go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, chair.

I have some quick questions for the three of you based on what I've heard thus far. I'll go to Mr. Roberts first.

You have been talking about the paradigm you're in, prior to C-76 and prior to C-23, and I've seen a lot of the issue campaigning you have done from the CLC. I have been involved in it, as a matter of fact, not just because I'm left of centre, but because I've liked quite a bit of it.

If you notice now, we're shifting things here towards election activity, election advertising, and election surveys. The middle one, election advertising, I get. It's the other two, the activity and the surveying information you get from the activities you do. What do you do in your organization that would be captured under those two headlines?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

As I understand it, the definition of partisan activity is now regulated, insofar as it promotes or opposes the candidacy or election of a particular party or candidate, but not insofar as it's speaking to an issue with which that party or candidate is associated. There is some attempt to carve out the issue-focused political work that might be considered political activity but not partisan activity, if you follow me.

With respect to survey undertakings, as I understand it, the focus is on election surveys that are used to inform decisions that are partisan in nature, subsequently.

Our primary concern is to preserve the space to engage on the issues, while understanding and appreciating the need to regulate political partisan spending. I want to quickly flag here what I think is, ironically, the largest concern that we should all have with respect to the undue influence and unbalanced influence in political life and discourse. That is the increasing inequality of income and wealth that leads to a concentration of economic and political power amongst groups that can then sway voters on democratic debate and elections. One only need look at the United States.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Are you talking about general organizations or are you talking about political parties?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

I'm talking mainly about third parties in political life.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Your concern is that the richer ones cannot be captured by what we're trying to do here, when it comes to third party spending?

Mr. Chris Roberts:

All of what I just said was to underscore our position that we understand and appreciate the need to regulate third party political engagement.

Mr. Scott Simms:

As long as we don't get into the issue-based activities that you do.

(1155)

Mr. Chris Roberts:

That there is as much space preserved as possible for that kind of political engagement....

Mr. Scott Simms:

Are you getting the space here? Just between you and me, of course.

Mr. Chris Roberts:

From the CLC's perspective, there are things to appreciate in the bill. I do think the committee does need to look at and very carefully reflect on the amount of space provided.

In terms of the spending limits, the CLC doesn't typically come close to the spending restrictions, but there are a lot of reporting requirements which really are far more extensive than other participants in the process.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm glad you ended with spending limits, because that leads me to my question for Ms. Zwibel about the spending limits.

I'm sorry if I'm paraphrasing this wrong, but you talked about the arbitrary nature by which these limits are imposed. We have heard a lot of evidence that Mr. Roberts just gave, which is that we don't get close to those limits. What's your reaction to that?

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

It's true that some groups don't get close to those limits.

Mr. Scott Simms:

For us, so far, it is most groups. Go ahead.

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

We've been living with these limits for over a decade now, so it's hard to know what would happen if there was more space. Look at the Harper case and some of the facts that the dissent put forward. I mentioned one, that you couldn't run a single-day ad in national newspapers. With the constituency limit, you couldn't actually send out a bulk mailing to everyone in certain constituencies. Those are the kinds of metrics I think we need to be looking at when we're trying to set some of these limits.

I appreciate that there are concerns about groups that may coordinate, or that there's the potential for third parties to overtake the space that political parties operate, but I think right now the balance is too much in the other direction. Political parties and candidates are able to dominate the discussion, and there isn't that effective space for third parties. The definition that incorporates this issue-based advocacy is problematic, and I think it's problematic not just for those who need to be governed by it but also for those who need to enforce it. To expect the Chief Electoral Officer to understand what issues are on the table for every candidate and party—that's a pretty significant undertaking.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I think I see what you're getting at. I wanted to ask a follow-up, but I can't right now. I don't have a lot of time left.

Professor Dubois.... Is it Dr. Dubois?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It's Dr. Dubois. Okay.

Mr. Cullen stole my question. I shouldn't say he stole it, because he was thinking as I was thinking that if Facebook and Twitter were in front of you, what would you ask them? I remember from years ago, whether it was back in the 1990s or the early 2000s, this term called “truthiness”. It's a fact but it's only half the story, which later becomes the full story to some people. How do you police that?

For me, that was the biggest problem I had to deal with as a politician. When people come to me now with Facebook and say, “How dare you think this”, I'm like, “Well, no, I don't.” Then I'm asked, “But is this true”, and I have to say, “Yes, that's true, but...”, and it goes from there. The manipulation of the story scares me, and the proliferation of this.

As a general question, what do we say to a social media platform that to me seems to be shrugging their shoulders as if it's just a buyer beware kind of thing?

Dr. Elizabeth Dubois:

I think it's important to recognize that there are things that are kind of on the periphery. Is this appropriate or not? Is this legal or not? Then there are things that are very clearly not appropriate and not legal.

I think the question of what is socially acceptable or morally acceptable is an existential one that probably goes beyond the discussion of this bill. Questions of things like voter suppression and telling people things that are blatantly untrue are very clearly not in line with what should happen in an election process. These companies need to recognize that even if the solving-all-the-problems idea is not a switch they can flip right now, they can build in, reasonably quickly, approaches to dealing with the things that are obviously and blatantly against the law.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Our last intervenor is Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Is it a five-minute intervention at this point?

(1200)

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll start by taking a tiny bit of issue with my colleague Scott. I think this will actually be useful.

I interpret the term “truthiness” as meaning not part of the truth that leads in the wrong direction, but rather the presentation of something that is, while not factually true, morally true; that is, it ought to be true. If you disagree with that ought statement, then you are reduced in your moral stature.

It's a way of shifting a debate from the left hemisphere of the brain to the right hemisphere of the brain as a way of mixing up your audience.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right. It's like negative billing.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's not a bad example. Yes, that's right: military intelligence, and so on.

Anyway, I throw that out there because I actually think there is a problem with that.

Ms. Zwibel, the minority opinion reference you referred to is Harper v. AG Canada. Is that right?

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

How many justices were there? Do you remember?

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

There were three.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Three, so it was almost a majority.

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

It was a six-to-three decision.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It was not a panel of the whole court. Okay.

Did they use the term “monopoly of parties”? You made reference to the term “monopoly”.

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

Yes, I'm not sure. I don't have the decision with me, unfortunately, but I think they do use that term in reference to the ability of parties and candidates to monopolize the discourse during an election because of the way the spending limits are set.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It raises a perspective that we haven't taken on this committee, which is the notion...we assume you're trying to create a level playing field from the prospective parties, which is why we spend so much time discussing the relative merits of setting up a debates commission that might exclude the Green Party or the Bloc. We heard yesterday that one of Canada's numerous communist parties was complaining about the fact that they would be excluded.

The other perspective the minority was presenting was that strictly speaking, elections don't belong to the parties even though they're the ones contesting them; rather, they belong to the public. I guess third parties are, in essence, groups of public-spirited citizens regardless of how they're financed, and all those other questions, who are trying to tell us to do this, do that, and they have as much of a legitimate space in there as political parties do.

Does that animate what they're saying?

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

Yes, that's the idea, that third parties are just citizens who are trying to get out there and tell their fellow citizens what they think about during the election, and while recognizing that there may well be a need to make sure we don't...I don't think anyone wants to turn us into what we see south of the border, where money very clearly leads the way. We need to be careful about how we impose those restrictions, and base them on some evidence.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This gets to the fundamental problem. I can see where the court is going, and as a civil libertarian myself, I have a lot of sympathy for that idea.

The trouble is I don't know how we avoid getting to where we are south of the border, once we say we're removing restrictions on third parties spending as much as they want, and I also don't see how we avoid certain things. I'm not sure we'd want to avoid this; I merely throw this out as things it would be hard to avoid, things like money being used for demotivation of certain groups of voters or demonization of candidates. I'm not talking about making things up, saying that so-and-so is an axe murderer or a pedophile. I'm talking about discouraging people by saying that Doug Ford is the scariest human being they've ever seen; my goodness, they can't let him be Premier of Ontario or take his name out and drop in Andrea Horwath's and say the same thing. I don't see how you avoid that.

Is there a way out of that conundrum, or in the end are we forced to choose between Scylla on the one side and Charybdis on the other? I throw that back to you for comment.

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

I don't want to suggest that it's an easy thing to solve. Our concern is that we've tipped the balance in the wrong direction and that's not to say that we should open the doors and say there are no limits, but we have to look carefully at what those limits are and what they mean. I point to the dissent because to me it's compelling when you look at a limit for a riding or a constituency and say you couldn't send mail to everyone in this constituency with this number.

To me that means the number is probably too low, which we were discussing recently in our office. The spending limits are set out in the legislation and then they're indexed to inflation. You've just been discussing having an independent commission on debates. You may not want to do this, but it may be that just like electoral boundaries, setting these spending limits shouldn't be done by sitting members of Parliament, but by those outside the system who can take a look at the media landscape, what it costs, what the trends are, and see where those limits should be set.

(1205)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you aware of any example of a place that has this kind of limit set independently?

Ms. Cara Zwibel:

I don't have an example. We discussed this yesterday in the office. It struck me that it's comparable in some ways to the fact that we do this with electoral boundaries because there's a vested interest, obviously.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know all about that. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you all for coming. It's been very helpful for our study.

We'll quickly go to our next panel.



The Chair:

Welcome back to the 113th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For our final panel we are joined by Paul G. Thomas, Professor Emeritus, Political Studies at the University of Manitoba, who is appearing by video conference from Winnipeg; Glenn Cheriton, President of Commoners' Publishing; and from the Green Party of Canada, Jean-Luc Cooke, Member of Council, National Office.

Thank you all for being here. Now I'll turn the floor over to Professor Thomas for his opening statement.

Dr. Paul Thomas (Professor Emeritus, Political Studies, University of Manitoba, As an Individual):

Thank you very much. I have submitted a brief to the committee, and it has been translated and circulated. I will try to stay strictly within the five-minute limit and make five brief points in five minutes so the chair doesn't have to bring down the guillotine on me.

The first point, and an integrating theme of my brief to the committee, is that Bill C-76 is an excellent illustration of how technical and complicated election law has become in response to changing social, technological, and political activities within Canada and elsewhere. Under those conditions, Elections Canada needs a very diverse and flexible set of policy tools in order to plan for and execute elections. In other words, unlike the traditional Canada Elections Act, which is very detailed and prescriptive, we need a future act that grants broader authority to the professionals within Elections Canada. Bill C-76 goes some way in this direction. It grants the CEO of Elections Canada more authority to conduct the operations of the election, it grants the commissioner administrative monetary penalties, and it makes use of written interpretations and opinions, and so on.

Second, overall, this bill is worthwhile. I endorse it in general terms. I endorse the features that are brought forward from Bill C-33 that made changes to the more problematic features of the so-called Fair Elections Act. I like some of the new features that are included within the bill, such as the creation of a pre-writ period ceiling on party and advocacy advertising, tags on all advertising, and so on.

Then I shift in my brief to three concerns I have. The greatest disappointment for me is the failure to bring political parties under the provisions of the privacy acts in Canada and to provide a route to address privacy concerns through the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. This bill essentially says that the parties will be left to regulate themselves with respect to privacy practices. Not my preferred one, but a second-best solution would require the Privacy Commissioner, not Elections Canada, to give the parties' privacy policies and practices a Good Housekeeping seal of approval. On the second part of that concern, another option I would suggest is that annually the parties publish online a statement of what has gone on with respect to their privacy activities, including the education of their members and staff, and so on, on any privacy complaints that have come up.

My fourth point has to do with the flow of foreign money and foreign influence into Canadian elections. As I read the bill, and I'm not a lawyer, there appears to be a loophole in the bill that allows for the commingling of foreign and domestic funds, including the support to advocacy groups, third parties as they're called in the bill. I don't see any easy fix to this problem through legislation or regulation, but I note the provision in the bill for a prohibition on collusion. It may be over time, through the operation of the collusion clause, that precedents will develop that will restrict but probably not eliminate completely the potential for foreign influence in Canadian elections.

My fifth point and final concern has to do with the pre-writ period beginning on June 30. The point I'm making there in the brief is the need to align the timing of restrictions on partisan and advocacy advertising with the ban on government advertising that currently flows out of an administrative policy statement. It is not based on legislation. That ban requires the ads to stop 90 days before voting day. The two periods should be aligned so that you set up a situation where the government is, in effect, in a caretaker situation and any benefit that might come to the governing party from government advertising would be eliminated.

My final observation is that this bill should have been proceeded with much earlier, or an earlier version of a bill, perhaps. It has been left late.

(1210)



I know the professionals at Elections Canada do their utmost to execute the provisions of the bill, but we have to get into the habit of treating these deadlines for planning an election more seriously.

Thank you very much. I look forward to questions.

The Chair:

That was perfect timing too. Thank you.

Now we'll go to Glen Cheriton, President of Commoners' Publishing.

Mr. Glenn Cheriton (President, Commoners' Publishing):

Thank you for this opportunity.

My presentation here is based on a complaint I made a number of years ago to Elections Canada with regard to involvement of Elections Canada and their staff in a publication which was put on their website and otherwise distributed. It's dated December 2005, so it occurred during a federal election campaign. It says that the document was prepared with the support of Elections Canada, and it has a list of the staff at Elections Canada who were involved in this publication.

My complaint is that it's talking about women's political equality, and I'm hoping to make this relevant to the current bill. One of the things they were asking for in this is a change of legislation and policy so that, under certain circumstances, men would be banned from running as members of Parliament. Elections Canada looked into my complaint, the actions of their staff, and the posting of this during an election campaign. They decided that this question, this issue, had not arisen during the election campaign, and had no relevance to this. In my opinion, it has been raised in every election campaign.

They also said that this was merely editorializing during an election campaign by Elections Canada staff and that there's no reason why they shouldn't be able to do it. Bringing this into relevance to the current bill, it seems to me that if Elections Canada is going to be deciding who is in the rules, then you have to have some mechanism for ensuring that Elections Canada and their staff also follow the rules.

I should point out that I attempted a number of years ago to make this exact presentation to this committee. I was told by five members of Parliament that I was right, that this was not the thing that Elections Canada should be doing, and that this was a violation of the law, the Canada Elections Act. I was also told that they would not present me in front of the committee because they feared that Elections Canada would pull their right to run in the next election.

It seems to me that I largely support these provisions of this bill. My concerns are, in this case, that you have Government of Canada money, through Status of Women, going into this publication, and money from Elections Canada going into supporting this issue, and yet these people are deciding themselves as to whether they're in violation of the rules.

This, I agree, is a bit of a conundrum. I'm certainly concerned about foreign money. My thinking is that the Government of Canada money, and Elections Canada money and staff, also should be considered as foreign money, and should not be used to influence elections and issues that are raised during that election.

Thank you.

(1215)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Jean-Luc Cooke from the Green Party of Canada, who is a Member of the National Council.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke (Member of Council, National Office, Green Party of Canada):

I want to thank the committee for the opportunity to address the bill. The Green Party of Canada is especially grateful for the time allotted to prepare for this appearance.

A good portion of this bill is not so much modernization but rather restoration of the Canada Elections Act pre-Harper, which is mostly good, but the central promise of no longer voting in a first past the post system is unfortunately absent. I will not be obtuse. This is a clear promise, clearly and unapologetically broken.

In consultations across the country, the majority of Canadians favoured reform and a form of proportional representation. It is regrettable that a government without a popular mandate gets to continue perpetuating a system that silences the voices of Canadians who are not represented in a so-called representative democracy.

Some important modernization changes have been taken, though, but the Green Party of Canada wonders whether the government has given Elections Canada sufficient time to update their technologies, their administrative processes, and to put in place training programs. After all, a quarter of a million Canadians work the polls on a general election. We are 15 months away from the 43rd general election and nothing has been put into law.

Improvements that are of particular note are the use of voter information cards as a piece of valid ID. This should speed up the voting process and improve accessibility. Allowing young people, 16- and 17-year-olds, to register is a good first step toward having them vote. Studies show that engagement in the voting process at an early age translates to lifelong voting behaviour. The Green Party commends you here, and would like to draw your attention to Ms. May's private member's Bill C-401.

This being said, there are two items I want to underscore as being insufficient.

First, the privacy provisions are inadequate. Political parties possess enormous amounts of data and personal information on Canadians, and they are currently exempt from most of the provisions under the Privacy Act. Moreover, in a day and age where politically motivated hacking is no longer a possibility but a reality, it is imperative that the parties work together to ensure that their information is safe. The big political parties, if hacked, could compromise the electoral system as a whole. Our democracy is run on trust and the big parties are currently the weakest link.

The Green Party urges the parties to coordinate their efforts informally, and that Bill C-76 contain provisions that are in keeping with Canada's Privacy Act.

Second, more needs to be done in curbing the influence of money in politics. Returning the per-vote allowance would lessen the influence of donors on politicians, and be more cost-efficient than the current 75% tax credit system. We all know the distorted effect that money and donors have on American democracy. So, at all costs, we should be avoiding these excesses that we see south of the border.

The Green Party suggests that we redefine the pre-writ period as starting the day after an election and ending when the writ is dropped in the following general election. Spending limits during this redefined pre-writ period should remain the same as they are and be indexed to inflation. Redefining this reflects the realities of what some have called the permanent campaign. There are only two periods in political advertising in reality, writ and pre-writ.

We need to set limits to the election process to avoid excesses, but also to ensure that citizens, political parties, and lawmakers alike focus on the business of good, democratic governance, and not being constantly distracted by the demands and, sometimes, fanfare of politics.

Thanks.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

We'll go to Mr. Simms for the first round of questions.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Cooke, first of all, thanks for coming. Just a point of clarification, Bill C-401, is that the lowering of the voting age to 16? Is that the bill you're speaking of?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. You just mentioned Bill C-401, and I'm not sure if you mentioned it to the other side. I just wanted to put that on the record.

When it comes to the preregistration of young people, there's a second element, too, which is getting people involved in Elections Canada, working with Elections Canada under the age of 18. How do you feel about that?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

We exist in a society with many different ages of majority. You need to be 16 years old before you can drive a car; 16 years old before you can enlist in the reserves; but 18 years before you can drink or vote. I find it an interesting dichotomy where you need to be older to be able to drink and vote than you do to enlist, to potentially fight and die in the name of your country.

These ages should probably be aligned just in principle. If you're old enough to vote, it makes sense that you're old enough to participate in the back-end mechanics of the electoral process. Participating and working with Elections Canada seems to make sense to me, if you're old enough to vote.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The concept of the pre-writ period is something that your party agrees with, but you think it should be following that election; that's when the pre-writ period starts, the day after polling.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Right. It becomes a classification question.

The bill, as it currently presents, presents that there are three different times that election spending can fall into: writ, pre-writ, and none of the above. It seems to make sense to us that there should be only two categorizations: when a writ is dropped—basically during the writ period—and when it's not.

If there are no spending limits outside of—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Obviously, you feel that the spending limit should be adjusted as such.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Well, on the amount of the spending limit, we can look at formulations. This becomes a bit more of the minutiae. In non-writ periods there should be a spending limit, and perhaps that spending limit should be adjusted to reflect the entire period outside of the writ period. This becomes more of a question of equations and formulas rather than principles. If there are no spending limits at all outside of a pre-writ period or a writ period, then that presents an opportunity for distortion of justice.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's for the much larger parties, you're saying.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

It's for the much larger parties or third party interest groups.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right, and those rules should be concurrent.

Do you feel that the laws regarding third party should be more in line with those regarding the candidates, the actual participants, the parties, the contestants?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I think it would be simpler not only for the voters but also for parties and everyone acting in an election process and exercising their right to express their opinions, if everyone had the same dates in mind, and everyone was operating from the same calendar. From this certain date—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do you mean with the same limits as well?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

On the question on limits, I'll defer to this panel, because from what I understand, and I'm not a constitutional expert, there are constitutional considerations for third party groups or individuals expressing their points of view versus the case for political parties, so—

(1225)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Should they be treated differently?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I am not a constitutional expert but from what I understand, there are implications for third party groups in that regard.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. Thank you.

Professor Thomas—is it Professor or Doctor Thomas?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Professor is fine.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Professor Thomas, thank you for your input. I just want to get your comments on the identification aspect of the upcoming election, or any election for that matter, of course, being the charter right that it is.

A lot of people would say that you need to produce a certain amount of ID that's acceptable in this day, and since most people have this type of ID, that should be acceptable, but should we provide more latitude for people who want to exercise their right to vote?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Yes, I like the idea of restoring the use of the VIC for purposes of voter identification at the polls, and I like the idea of vouching. I haven't seen persuasive evidence—I've seen almost no evidence—that people impersonate other voters or vote more than once. The studies done both here and elsewhere suggest that is not a widespread problem.

I think the whole premise should be to try to facilitate access to the polls and encourage people to get out to vote. It's the one democratic participation activity in which the majority of Canadians participate, and we should do our utmost to make it more supportive of that activity.

I like the idea, for example, of pre-registering young voters. In the United States, in those states where they've adopted such a practice, turnout rates in elections have gone up anywhere between 5% and 15%, and in—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is that in all jurisdictions or just in the United States?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

That's in the United States. I think there are 15 states in which they have registration of young adults who are approaching the age to vote, and that's brought an increase in that voting segment of the population at the next election. People get into the habit of not voting. It's a bad habit to encourage.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes. One of our former witnesses stated that the issue of preregistration should be accompanied by a more vigorous campaign by Elections Canada to promote to young voters. How do you feel about that?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

The provision in the Fair Elections Act that narrowed considerably the mandate of the CEO to engage in outreach and educational activities was wrong, in my opinion.

There is a line that needs to be drawn. You can't try to target your appeals to particular segments of the voting populations—groups that might be described as marginal—and encourage them alone to get out to vote. It's not about the predisposition or the motivation to vote; it's about making them informed about the importance of voting as an activity within a healthy democracy.

Mr. Scott Simms:

You think a caveat should be built into it, or maybe “caveat” is the wrong word, but certainly for Elections Canada, they must understand the point that they must not micro-target a particular part of the population when they do advocacy to encourage people to vote.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

This debate was actually taken up in the U.K. when I did a background study for Elections Canada, and they tried to draw that line. It's not a bright line; it's a blurred line between encouraging the motivation to vote and informing people so they'd be inclined to vote.

It's across the board. In some cases, it may take more effort to reach certain marginal groups that historically have not turned out in great numbers. You don't exclude those groups and you may have to go to some extra effort, but it is a tricky area where the CEO and other leaders at Elections Canada have to be careful that they're not accused of a bias in encouraging some groups to come forward to vote when historically they have not been active.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you all for being here, or virtually here.

Mr. Cooke, I'll start with you. You made a statement at the very beginning of your opening remarks that I believe was dripping with sarcasm. Unfortunately, when the Hansard is viewed, sarcasm doesn't show up, so I want to give you a chance to make sure, if it was sarcasm, to clarify that, because it's obviously important. It does change the meaning of what you said.

You made the statement that you were especially appreciative of the amount of time you'd had to prepare for this. I assume that was a sarcastic statement.

(1230)

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

It was a tongue-in-cheek bit of sarcasm. Obviously, I am here. I feel well enough prepared for the questions you'll ask, so let's continue.

Mr. Blake Richards:

For the record, when were you actually asked to come for today?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I myself was brought into the loop a little over 28 hours ago.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The question that flows from that is, at this point, at least, we're hoping that certainly the government is going to allow more time for this to be looked at properly and actually hear from Canadians who need to be heard from, and so on, and do this properly. At this point in time, they're trying to consider this week, the one week of study that's being done here, enough to hear properly on a bill of this magnitude. Would you agree? Do you think that's enough time, or do you think there needs to be more time taken to look at something this serious and important?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

In my area of work, which is more private sector than public, there's always a question of risk versus reward. Is the risk of further delaying the execution of this bill worth the reward of ironing out some of the kinks or problems within the bill itself?

The Green Party of Canada would rather see this bill in force for the next general election than it not in force with modification. Yes, there are many things we would like to see that would be better. There are problems with this bill that need to be kept in mind.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Having heard you say that, I understand your position, although my understanding is that Elections Canada is already putting together a plan to implement this. Trying to force this through in a matter of a week or two as compared to taking the time that's necessary probably doesn't really prevent it from being in place for the next election as a result of that, and you've mentioned yourself here that you do think there are some concerns in it that need to be addressed.

Wouldn't it be incumbent upon us to take some time to do that, if Elections Canada actually is putting together an implementation plan and could get this in place?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Again, it becomes risk-reward. If some of the modifications don't require huge administrative overhaul within Elections Canada, I would say that statement is accurate. If it requires significant changes to how Elections Canada is operating and the assumptions they're running on today, I would say the risk is not appropriate.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thank you.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Unfortunately, the burden of that decision falls on you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, of course.

Professor Thomas, you mentioned in your opening remarks, in talking about the pre-writ period, something on which I certainly agree with you: the idea you mentioned of the need to look at harmonizing the period of time in which there is a ban on government advertising with the same period of time that there are restrictions put on the political parties.

I wonder what your thoughts are, though, under that same principle, on the idea of looking at ministerial travel as well. Obviously you can see, when we're talking about travel of ministers or the prime minister in that time, maybe they're making government announcements, which could be intended to entice voters to support them because of something they're announcing or highlighting that they've done as a government. We've seen that in byelections with this government already.

What are your thoughts on that? Should that be restricted in the same period of time, as well?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Yes. The U.K. has gone with the idea of a caretaker period, where, as you approach election day, the government has to stop certain types of activities that may work to their partisan advantage. There may be a whole host of things. Travel may be among them, especially if travel involves high-profile announcements that redound to the credit of the prime minister and so on.

We worked hard to try and create a more equal playing field when the government controls the public service and the spending authority that comes with it, and so on.

I think we're going to codify more and more of these rules. We will have to go down a list of possible things that might or might not be able to happen during that period. You can't go back too far. Going back to June 30, some people have said that all you're going to do with that deadline is create a binge of advertising before that date, so let's go back further; let's go back, like the U.K. says, a year. Well, that's too long to put the government on hold, where it can't put out messages. I know there are provisions for emergency messages from government and advertising from government, but it's a tricky balancing act here.

This balance in the bill is not quite right. It shouldn't create this interval of time where the government has the advantage.

(1235)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate that.

The other thing I want to touch on with you briefly is something I wanted to ask one of our witnesses earlier, but we were cut off when the government forced a vote. It was a group that represents youth, Citoyenneté jeunesse, and I had wanted to ask them about ID. You mentioned ID as well, so I will ask you the question.

This is with respect to the educational components of Elections Canada. One of the things I think they haven't done a very good job of, and I would like to see them do a better job of—but I wanted to see if you would share my opinion—is informing people of the logistics of voting. In other words, there are a lot of different IDs that are available. You're advocating bringing back the idea of a voter information card, but there are 39 forms that exist now. I think a lot of people aren't aware of what the options are and maybe show up at the polls without one of those pieces because they don't realize they need to bring it.

I'm wondering what your thoughts are on this, because even the Canadian Federation of Students indicated to us when they were here recently that they had to engage in a campaign themselves to inform young people about these options. I guess they felt Elections Canada wasn't doing a good enough job.

Do you think Elections Canada could do a better job of informing people about the options they have available to them?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I think the professionals at Elections Canada would be the first to admit they can improve in that area, and they are making plans to do that in the next election. Voting locations on campus preceded by advertising and making people aware of the requirements to cast a vote, all of that has to go on. We know at that point in the life of a young adult, they are distracted by lots of other things, so it's important to make an extra effort to get out there.

Elections Canada did that, with some considerable effect in the last election, in indigenous communities where previously they were under-represented in terms of their messaging about the importance of voting.

I concur with your general principle. I also think Elections Canada is probably on top of it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we will go to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair. Thank you to the witnesses here and to our friend from Manitoba.

I will start with you, Professor Thomas. I'm getting a theme with this bill. When we talk to experts and folks from different fields, there are two clear aspects of the bill.

One is fixing some of what I would call “damage done” by the previous government in terms of enfranchisement, allowing the voter ID cards, allowing vouching, and whatnot. All of that was introduced 18 months ago in a bill.

The second part of the bill is more ambitious, I suppose, in trying to deal with things like third party financing, foreign influence, social media, and those kinds of components.

Have I described the legislation satisfactorily, in your mind?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Yes. I think the bill that arose out of the previous election and former CEO Marc Mayrand's report could have been dealt with a long time ago. The government's management of this file has been very poor, in my opinion. If that sits on the Order Paper for 18 months, it says something about the commitment of the government to get this moving ahead, and we have had the holdup with the appointment of a permanent CEO.

I think it's unfortunate now. We have a 350-page document and we're trying to understand all the provisions and the intersections and interactions of those provisions. It's very tricky to read. I do my best. I used the search engine on my PDF to try and find the parts I really need to know something about. It's not an easy task, and I label myself some kind of expert.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We do, too.

I'm starting to believe that, as my grandmother used to say, a lack of planning on your part doesn't make for a crisis on mine. I was eight years old at the time, but she had a point that still stays with me today when I look at this bill. With days to study it, virtually every committee meeting we've had has been interrupted by votes. We've rarely gone through an entire cycle, yet I, too, am supporting some of what you've said here. I'm in support of some of what I'll call the enfranchisement pieces of the bill.

There are a number of questions outstanding, particularly around privacy, the loophole you talked about in commingling, and some of the pre-writ conversations we've had as to whether they're fair between the government and non-government parties.

I'm wondering if the bill needs to be split. I'm wondering if we need to expedite the pieces that there has been some dispute about but more of a consensus around—the Bill C-33 components. There have been a lot of questions about the second part, the third party, the commingling loophole, and the lack of privacy restrictions of parties. What do you think of that suggestion?

(1240)

Dr. Paul Thomas:

We're trying to do a great deal in this bill. Traditionally, reform to election law has been done incrementally, ideally on the basis of as much all-party consensus as possible.

In recent years, we've had partisan entanglements over election law reforms, because maybe we've tried to do too much, too sweeping changes, and so on. Also maybe something to think about is whether this committee, which does a number of good things—I really admire the membership of this committee for the work they do. Maybe election law is something that should be put out to a special committee in those years after the Chief Electoral Officer files his annual report.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I only hesitate because Ms. Sahota, Mr. Reid, and I sat on one of those special committees, and we spent a lot of time and money. There were some results, but not many, as Mr. Cooke has pointed out.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Yes, I know, but that—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm running out of time. I'm not keeping this tight enough.

You see this is a restoration bill, Mr. Cooke, in part. The inadequacy around privacy.... The threat is that if this bill goes ahead as written, unamended—with respect to the lack of consent, oversight, and verification, which was once described by a former chief electoral officer as the wild west—we just don't have any rules around privacy and how parties handle the personal information of Canadians.

Do we pass this bill with those provisions as they are right now? How can we assure Canadians that their data is acquired and held with any type of security?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

In June 2011, the Conservative Party of Canada was hacked. Their donor database, with addresses and email addresses, was exposed. This has happened—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Was this the robocall scandal?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

No, this is the “hash brown” scandal. I'm trying to remember the name of the hacker. It's something unpronounceable.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

This has happened. I work in engineering. The saying goes that everything has a mean time to failure. Everything will eventually break. That means the security of your party's systems, my party's systems, and all the party systems will eventually be broken into. It's just a matter of statistics. What are the procedures in place to make sure that all our parties are adhering to the best standards? I think the answer is that the Privacy Commissioner needs to have mandates to go in and review us.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think it was you—I'll say it's you for now—who offered something novel, where there would be some sort of gold seal, or a seal of approval from the Privacy Commissioner, that would work with each party vying for seats in an election. At some point prior to election day—prior to the writ, hopefully—we would be able to say, “I've worked with the Green Party. I've worked with the Liberals. I've worked with the Conservatives. Here's the grade. These folks will handle your data securely and safely.”

I would imagine for some voters, at least, that would be a factor in how they cast their vote.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

In almost every other organization that voters and Canadians interact with that have to meet privacy laws, there are privacy risk assessments. An external auditor would come in and say, “Here are some deficiencies that we'd like you to address. Here are some others that we think are adequate.” A lead time is given for that organization to meet those requirements. This is how the banks, telephone companies, everyone deals with private data.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The government has argued that those were different. They were special.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Most Canadians don't see it that way.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What? I'm hurt by that assessment.

I put the same question to you. There are aspects of this bill that you've agreed with, what I'll call the enfranchisement components. There are others that either have problems, or raise more questions than we have answers to right now. What do you think the government should do with this bill, with days left on the spring calendar, and with Elections Canada saying they needed a bill passed by May 1?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

The time allocation approach is unfortunate.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: It sure is.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke: As you said, planning.... If this were started further ahead, if the electoral reform special committee had produced better results, perhaps people would feel better. Again it's risk-reward. I would say we need to have this passed—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—really soon.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

The whole thing? It's a tough decision. I'll withhold my comment on that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

Who do we have next here? Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You were talking about technology a few minutes ago. Basically, I was in technology before as well. What are the limits of the role of technology in elections, in your view?

(1245)

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I'll speak as a voter, not only as a member of a political party. Technology is useful because we want to have results quickly and things done efficiently, but the maintaining of the paper ballot is also vital. If ever there's any doubt, any question, into the legitimacy of any election, Canadians want to know there's a paper trail and that everyone and their grandmother can connect the dots and actually count up the results. I think that is vital.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Especially your grandmother....

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke: Especially my grandmother....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I forget who it was, but I think a couple of you mentioned it. We were talking about lowering the voting age as opposed to just the registration age. Is that something you're interested in seeing?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Yes. Elizabeth May has put forward a private member's bill to do precisely that. We see it as very useful. Think back to when you were 16 years old, about to graduate from high school before the next federal election. To cast your vote that first time, before you left home, before you found a career or went off and had an education, perhaps in another town, to be part of the democratic process ahead of that, would incentivize you just psychologically, while you were at university or settling into your first apartment, to go and vote again. I think that would be vital.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think I had already done three campaigns by the time I was 16, so I can relate to that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

David, you're special.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, I watched CPAC as soon as it came on the air when I was a teenager, so there you go.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As I said, you're special.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we reduce the voting age, if we were to go down that road, should the age of candidates also be reduced?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I think it's actually in the Constitution, if I'm not incorrect, that anyone who is eligible to vote is eligible to run.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So we'd be fine with lowering the candidate age to 16 as well at that point or—

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I can't see disconnecting them as being just.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Is 16 the right age?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

What is the right age is a difficult question to ask. I imagine some of us would say sarcastically that we know full-grown adults who perhaps shouldn't vote because they have not gone through the effort to get informed on the electoral process. You can't write a test to pass whether or not someone should be eligible to vote. We have to pick an age, and if we pick an age where someone's old enough to enlist in the reserves, in the military, and drive a vehicle that could kill somebody, I think they've shown enough maturity that they should be able to vote.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One would hope in any case.

We also talked about curbing the influence of money in elections, which I agree with, quite frankly. It's a little frustrating to me, and I've said this in PMB debate before, that somebody who gives $100 and doesn't have any income pays $100, and somebody who gives $100 and has a lot of income gets $25. It's another problem to solve in a PMB somewhere I suspect.

When I talk to colleagues about our putting fundraising limits, I always get these questions. What about volunteers? How do we limit volunteers? How do you quantify that?

How do we quantify it?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Personally, I think quantifying volunteering is not in the interests of democracy, let alone putting a limit on how much personal time someone wants to put into an election. If you really have to break it down, there are theories of economics that say the only currency that matters is time, because that's the one thing we all have an equal amount of. If a political party has more volunteers, then ostensibly it's because they are able to motivate more people to their cause. That is the true test of someone who has the support of the people who are electing them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you ever—and this is for all three witnesses—witnessed voter fraud to do with VICs, voter information cards?

Mr. Glenn Cheriton:

I would have to say I have.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you describe it for us?

Mr. Glenn Cheriton:

I was a DRO and saw people coming in with voter identification cards, and on subsequent requests for further identification it was clear they were a different person. In some cases they were eligible to vote; in other cases it was a problem, shall we say.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How often did you see this?

Mr. Glenn Cheriton:

It was quite rare. I think the greater problem was more confusion, that people were voting at the wrong place or there were problems in getting them to vote. This was a pretty minor problem, but it has happened. I've seen it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it a big enough problem that 160,000 people should lose the right to vote to protect it?

(1250)

Mr. Glenn Cheriton:

That's deeply ironic because the other point I was making with Elections Canada was that they had failed to look into the largest loss of the right to vote, which was 170,000 Canadian men during the unemployment relief camps, and they were not putting that in their history.

I think you should err on the side of participation. Yes, I would like to include that, but the problem I have is the deferential inclusion of some groups and the exclusion, the ignoring, of others. If you're concerned about the 160,000, you should also be concerned about the 170,000 who lost the right to vote, in my opinion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When was that?

Mr. Glenn Cheriton:

This was between 1930 and 1936. Because they were put into unemployment relief camps they lost their right to vote. Essentially, they were under military command so they lost their right to medical care. If you look at Canada's social services you can see all these things—unemployment relief, worker's compensation, wages for work—and they were looking for the right to vote.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I only have a few seconds left. Who else didn't have the right to vote in 1936?

Mr. Glenn Cheriton:

Natives, women in Quebec....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are these examples relevant to the current act?

Mr. Glenn Cheriton:

They are relevant in the sense of losing the right to vote, and I believe you raised that issue. Part of the reason I think we should learn from the past is so we don't repeat the mistakes of the past.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So we don't take away the right to vote of 170,000 people today. I agree with that. Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

We will now move to Mr. Reid for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Before I ask any questions, I want to make a little editorial.

The fundamental issue that relates to people being able to vote without identification, the various mechanisms that have been provided, such as the use of the voter information card and so on, all comes down to the question ultimately of whether people have the right to vote. Some people turn up with ID—I've done it myself—who sometimes don't have time to get back. Sometimes, maybe in rarer cases, they don't have ID and you don't want to deprive those people of the right to vote. On the other hand, if enough people turn up to vote fraudulently, then you can have everybody in that riding effectively deprived of their franchise. That is not a small thing. The pretense that we don't have, and have not had, fraudulent voting in the country is just laughable.

I know when we were debating this stuff during the last minority government, I was contacted by the wife of a Liberal candidate, a former Liberal MP from downtown Toronto, who argued that her husband had been effectively deprived of his elected office due to fraudulent NDP voting. Was that true? I don't know, but it was plausible enough that she was willing to say this to me. These things have to be taken seriously.

There is a way it could be resolved. I suggested it to the minister. It's practised in other countries, including respectable democracies like the United States of America, and that is provisional balloting. You vote when you don't have ID. I'd say, “I am Scott Reid.” They'd take my word for it. They'd put my ballot into an anonymizing envelope, just like a vote that's been cast by mail. That gets dropped into a second envelope, which I'd sign. Later on they'd verify whether or not I really am who I said I was. We add up those ballots, if it's necessary, because the number of ballots outweighs the number of the margin of victory.

I merely throw that out. That would resolve this entire problem. It didn't make it into the bill, and I regret that.

However, I have a separate question on an entirely different issue for you, Mr. Cooke. It is on the question of the leaders' debates. As you know, a debates commission is being set up, not under this bill or indeed under any bill, but under government auspices. There is a very good chance that it will set up leaders' debates from which the leader of your party will be excluded. Alternatively, they may include the leader of your party then cut off someone else, such as the leader of the Bloc. This creates an inherent problem.

I have no clever solution for the problem of the fact that there's no clear division between the major parties and the parties that are not major. Can I get your thoughts on that?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

We've discussed through this bill and through many bills prior all the different rules around elections: spending, advertising, whether the government can advertise, third parties, and political parties, yet still there are no rules on governing the leaders debate. All of us can recognize that the leaders debate is possibly the most pivotal moment in any writ period, but it is not governed by election law. This is a curiosity to the point of...it's almost absurd, really.

The Green Party would like to see some rule, any rule, saying who should be at the leaders debates.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I guess you don't mean literally any rule because it's easy to imagine a rule that says we cut off the line after the three major parties and the Greens are out, or maybe you do accept that. I don't want to put words in your mouth.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I think the Green Party would be satisfied with any rule that was clear. Let's say the rule was that a political party has to have at least 5% of the national vote to be at the next leaders debate. I think the Green Party would be prepared to accept that because now that 5% becomes the high-water mark we need to reach.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What was the per cent you got?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

The last time? I can't recall.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know why I'm asking that, right?

This is one of the fundamental problems we had. In the Figueroa case before the Supreme Court, Mr. Figueroa was challenging a law which said that you had to have contested a certain number of seats in the last election in order to qualify for certain rights in this election, which of course was designed to freeze out new parties that had widespread support. It was introduced by the Chrétien government after the Reform Party and the Bloc Québécois came out of nowhere. It was clearly meant to ensure that couldn't happen again.

The court ruled, I think rightly, that trying to quash populist movements like the Reform Party and the Bloc Québécois is unconstitutional, a violation of section 3. Do you see what I'm getting at? Isn't the 5% number based on the previous election also essentially saying that preferences that haven't been expressed for four years are somehow less worthy than preferences that are four years old or more?

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Yes and no. Let's say the criteria was 2%. By the way, the Green Party would still be the last party that meets that criteria.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

I think even at 1% we'd still be the only one to qualify.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's the Bloc.

Mr. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Right, my apologies.

I think it has to be fair that some kind of criteria should be established, and I think that democracy and an electoral system need to be resilient enough to say if there is a movement or a party that is coming forward that is getting a lot of populist interest...that to go from zero to a national leaders debate within less than one election cycle, is probably not healthy for our democracy, but within less than two election cycles, so step it back. Let's say we call it the Purple Party. It gets 4% somehow in the next federal election, then by the next leaders debate after that, they would potentially have a seat at the leaders debate. I think that would be reasonable.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't agree with you, but I did ask for your opinion, so thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

We'll finish off with Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to begin by thanking each of you for your time and your testimony today.

Professor Thomas, I'm going to begin with you. I appreciate your compliment to the work of the procedure and House affairs committee. I'm not looking for more compliments but to just to make you aware about our work with respect to elections, the CEO did appear before this committee with his report, and we spent 22 meetings with that report. Each meeting is an average of two hours.

In addition to that, we'll have had by the end of this week, by my calculations, about 30 hours of testimony. The last two days have been a little more difficult because we've had votes, which is just a function of this place. I just wanted to let you know of the time that we've spent on this.

You mentioned the comment, and it came out in the CEO's report with respect to some of the changes that have been made in this legislation. The VIC and the vouching are two, as well as the preregistration of young voters, both of which I believe you support. You see them as good.

Are there other provisions in this bill that you are also very pleased to see and that you think are important to implement before the next election?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Yes. If you read my brief, you'll see that my compliments go beyond simply what I have said today.

I recognize that you did an extensive review and three reports and heard from the acting CEO and maybe Mr. Mayrand before that, so I know you've studied this. That's why I thought the work shouldn't be swamped by the late arrival of this bill. It has complicated things; we should have had action before this. That's my opinion.

Yes, there are other things in the bill that I like. I like the fact that the commissioner is now being moved back inside the administrative framework of Elections Canada. I mentioned already the educational mandate that the CEO should have. That's important work to do to create a healthy and vibrant democracy.

There are lots of other things. There are lots of nuts and bolts of election management that go into this bill. One thing I'm saying in my main theme is that we have to move away from the tradition of highly detailed, prescriptive legislation. In this dynamic world we live in, when we have these technological changes and changing political practice, we have to give more autonomy and scope to improvise on the part of Elections Canada—as I said, a diverse toolkit of instruments that they can use.

I like the idea, for example, that no longer are you going to have to take someone who violates elections spending rules to court. That costs time and money. We have to find a better way. We have compliance agreements now. Now there's this whole toolkit that has to be built up.

When I did studies in the past, I noted that the U.K. election commissioner has far more authority to engage in the management of this process. You're doing, as I said, a number of good things in this bill in that direction, such as being able to hire half the staff before the date closes when the parties can nominate returning officers. That's a step forward, especially in today's context.

Yes, we're going in the right direction. I just think that longer term there needs to be a broad grant of statutory authority and delegated regulatory power. That's where the modern election agency needs to be.

(1300)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Mr. Chair, do we have a copy of this report? I don't have the paper in front of me.

The Chair:

Do you mean of his report?

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Yes. We have to get it back from translation, but I expect it back very shortly.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

Mr. Thomas, just so that you know, we don't have your submission in front of us. We're waiting for translation.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

It will help cure your insomnia.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I was very interested in your comments with respect to targeting. I know it's difficult, but I wonder whether you can give me a little bit of clarification on it.

You spoke about the importance of having certain groups, for example, young people and those with disabilities. We want to encourage voter participation and turnout, but you also cautioned against this targeting. There's not much time left now. Could you briefly summarize how you would bridge this and get increased voter participation without going so far as to target in terms that you think are not acceptable?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I didn't say that very well. Let me clarify.

Elections Canada can't get into the business of exhorting people to get out and vote. They can tell them what the requirements for voting are, how to vote, and the convenience factor about alternative ways of voting, such as voting from the home, for example. I think a missing ingredient in this bill is enabling long-term care facility staff to vouch for residents within their facilities. That kind of thing goes on, and it has to.

I think Elections Canada would entangle itself in controversy if it said that its job is to bring up the turnout among young Canadians. Political parties will see that as favouring some parties and not others. It therefore has to be across the board, but as I said, the logistics of doing it will take some extra effort with some segments of the voting population.

It's a tricky line to draw.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

This was another great panel. Thank you all for coming and providing some new perspectives for us. We really appreciate it.

Turning to committee business, right after QP we have three panels. The first two have four witnesses each, and the last panel, from 5:30 to 6:30, is with Twitter and Facebook, which is very exciting.

Then we don't have anything for Monday on the schedule at the moment. We have to do some committee business some time, so I could suggest Monday afternoon, if no one has any other suggestions, because Nathan can't be here Monday morning.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Not right now, though, because I have a school waiting for me in Centre Block. I don't want to do it right now.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have a school waiting for me, too.

An hon. member: Are there going to be votes?

(1305)

The Chair:

Not that I know of.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I was told that there were votes coming up after QP. Maybe I got that wrong.

The Chair:

At 3:30, we're back here for three panels.

In this room, right, Mr. Clerk?

The Clerk:

No. We're in Room 430.

The Chair:

We're in another room in this building when we come back.

Scott, Monday afternoon for committee business...?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sure.

The Chair:

On Monday afternoon after QP, we will have committee business.

We're in Room 430 this afternoon.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1005)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à la 113e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Nous poursuivons ce matin notre étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir M. Leslie Seidle, directeur de recherche à l'Institut de recherche en politiques publiques; M. Nicolas Lavallée, conseiller stratégique de l'organisme Citoyenneté jeunesse, ainsi que M. Michael Morden, directeur de recherche au Centre Samara pour la démocratie.

Nous vous remercions d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui.

Sans plus attendre, j'invite M. Seidle à nous présenter ses remarques préliminaires.

M. Leslie Seidle (directeur de recherche, Institut de recherche en politiques publiques, à titre personnel):

Je voudrais tout d'abord vous remercier, monsieur le président, messieurs, mesdames, de me donner la possibilité de me présenter devant vous aujourd'hui.

Le projet de loi à l'étude est énorme, mais mon exposé portera essentiellement sur les dispositions qui limitent les dépenses des tiers pendant et avant la période électorale officielle. C'est un domaine auquel je m'intéresse depuis longtemps et, récemment, j'ai produit un rapport sur des recherches comparatives approfondies. Il s'agit aussi de l'une des principales questions qu'a abordées au début des années 1990 la Commission royale sur la réforme électorale et le financement des partis, souvent appelée la Commission Lortie, dont, j'étais le coordonnateur principal des recherches.

Je commencerai par l'instauration de plafonds aux dépenses des tiers pendant la période électorale.

À l'heure actuelle, le plafond des dépenses publicitaires des tiers à l'échelle nationale est fixé à 214 350 $, dont pas plus de 4 287 $ peuvent être dépensés dans une circonscription électorale donnée. Le projet de loi C-76 augmentera le plafond des dépenses des tiers, sous réserve d'une limite, pour ajouter les dépenses pour les activités partisanes et les dépenses pour les sondages électoraux aux dépenses publicitaires autorisées depuis 2000. Par conséquent, les plafonds ont été considérablement relevés. C'est l'un des constats du document d'information qui accompagnait le dépôt du projet de loi. Le nouveau plafond national pour les dépenses des tiers est estimé à 500 000 $ pour 2019. Le niveau stipulé dans le projet de loi, soit 350 000 $, sera rajusté en fonction de l'inflation à compter de 2000, et non d'aujourd'hui. À mon avis, il est raisonnable de relever les plafonds imposés aux tiers dans la mesure où les activités supplémentaires — les sondages, par exemple — sont associées à leur publicité électorale, ou la soutiennent. Le niveau des nouveaux plafonds me semble aussi raisonnable.

Une modification corollaire limite la période électorale à 50 jours. Pour les partis politiques et les candidats, cela signifiera qu'une augmentation proportionnelle des plafonds imposés aux tiers ne sera plus possible. Je soutiens cette initiative. La disposition relative aux plafonds proportionnels adoptée par le gouvernement précédent découle d'une politique publique assez curieuse, et son abrogation est une très bonne chose, pas seulement pour les tiers, mais aussi pour les partis et leurs candidats, bien entendu.

J'en viens maintenant aux nouveaux plafonds des dépenses des tiers pendant la période préélectorale.

Avant de livrer mes commentaires sur la portée et le niveau de ces plafonds, j'aimerais dire quelques mots sur la raison d'être de cette mesure et sur l'expérience d'autres pays.

Afin d'établir des règles du jeu équitables, le gouvernement a décidé que ces plafonds devraient être appliqués en période préélectorale. Vous serez certainement d'accord avec moi que c'est conforme à la longue expérience du Canada en ce qui concerne le plafonnement des dépenses électorales des partis et des candidats depuis 1974, qui fait largement consensus au sein de la population. Les nouveaux plafonds s'appliqueront à partir du 30 juin d'une année électorale, de même que ceux visant les dépenses des candidats et des partis. Ils couvriront donc une période de presque quatre mois.

Comme les députés le savent, une opinion assez répandue veut que, pour être efficaces, les plafonds imposés aux partis et aux candidats doivent se conjuguer à l'imposition de limites aux dépenses des tiers. Ces mesures sont perçues comme étant complémentaires et, en un sens, comme se renforçant mutuellement. En effet, la Cour suprême du Canada, dans sa décision Harper de 2004, a déclaré qu'un plafonnement des dépenses électorales des tiers est nécessaire pour protéger l'intégrité du régime de financement applicable aux candidats et aux partis. Si un plafonnement des dépenses des partis et des candidats est mis en place pendant la période préélectorale, il s'ensuit que les dépenses des tiers, ou du moins certains aspects de ces dépenses, devraient également être soumises à des limites. Autrement, on irait à l'encontre du principe de connexité ou de complémentarité qui s'applique pendant la période électorale.

D'autres pays ont pris des mesures semblables. Au Royaume-Uni, le plafonnement des dépenses des partis, des candidats et des tiers en période préélectorale a été mis en place en 2000. Les plafonds s'appliquent pendant une assez longue période, soit un an plus ou moins quelques jours, selon la date choisie pour le vote. En 2016, l'Ontario a instauré des plafonds en période préélectorale pour les trois entités. Ils ont pris effet six mois avant l'émission du bref électoral annonçant l'élection générale qui s'est terminée aujourd'hui. La période prévue au projet de loi C-76 est quand même un peu plus courte, soit près de quatre mois. C'est à mon avis tout à fait raisonnable.

Pour ce qui est de leur champ d'application, ces nouveaux plafonds des dépenses viseront les activités partisanes, la publicité partisane et les sondages électoraux. Bien que leur champ d'application semble comparable à celui des plafonds des dépenses des tiers en période électorale, il faut noter une différence importante.

Contrairement à la publicité électorale, la définition de publicité partisane ne comprend pas les messages publicitaires qui prennent position sur une question à laquelle est associé un parti ou un candidat. J'ai inclus les deux définitions en annexe de la version écrite de mon exposé. Cela signifie que si un tiers commandite une publicité sur une importante question de politique publique, mais que le message ne favorise ni ne contrecarre un parti enregistré ou un candidat, le coût de cette publicité ne compte pas dans le calcul des dépenses préélectorales du tiers en question.

Je vais donner deux exemples de messages publicitaires que pourrait commanditer un tiers pour illustrer ce point. Le message A pourrait être « La marijuana peut nuire à la santé de vos enfants. Ne votez pas pour les libéraux », et le message B « La légalisation de la marijuana par le gouvernement libéral de M. Trudeau peut nuire à la santé de vos enfants ».

Selon mon interprétation du projet de loi C-76, les dépenses de publicité du tiers pour le message A seraient soumises à une limite. En revanche, les dépenses pour le message B, « La légalisation de la marijuana par le gouvernement libéral de M. Trudeau peut nuire à la santé de vos enfants », ne le seraient pas, parce qu'il n'invite ni ne dissuade les électeurs à voter pour les libéraux. C'est ce que l'on appelle souvent la « publicité thématique ».

Le financement de ce type de message pendant la période électorale officielle compterait dans le calcul du plafond des dépenses d'un tiers. La politique diffère selon que ce plafond est imposé pendant la période préélectorale ou la période électorale.

Mon dernier sujet a trait au niveau des dépenses autorisées.

Les plafonds des tiers pendant la période préélectorale sont estimés à environ 1 million de dollars à l'échelle nationale, et à 10 000 $ dans une circonscription électorale donnée. Le plafond national des dépenses des tiers sera donc deux fois celui des dépenses électorales et correspondra aux deux tiers de ce que les partis politiques enregistrés seront autorisés à dépenser en période préélectorale, soit environ 1,5 million de dollars.

De surcroît, à la lumière des différences dans les définitions de dépenses de publicité que je viens d'expliquer, les plafonds des tiers pendant la période préélectorale portent sur une gamme d'activités plus restreinte que les plafonds pendant la période électorale. Les dépenses liées à la publicité thématique ne seraient donc pas assujetties aux plafonds. Je ne suis pas convaincu qu'il faille en période préélectorale appliquer des plafonds de dépenses aussi généreux pour les tiers.

(1010)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Lavallée. [Français]

M. Nicolas Lavallée (conseiller stratégique, Citoyenneté jeunesse):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les députés, chers membres du comité, bonjour.

Je me présente. Je m'appelle Nicolas Lavallée. Je suis conseiller stratégique à Citoyenneté jeunesse. Citoyenneté jeunesse était anciennement connue sous le nom de la Table de concertation des forums jeunesse régionaux du Québec, vocable sous lequel nous avons témoigné devant ce même comité au printemps 2014.

Les forums jeunesse régionaux ont notamment le mandat de favoriser la participation citoyenne des jeunes et d'exercer un rôle-conseil en matière de jeunesse. Ces forums jeunesse sont financés pour divers projets par le Secrétariat à la jeunesse du Québec, le ministère de l'Immigration, de la Diversité et de l'Inclusion du Québec. Pour ce qui est des élections provinciales et municipales, nous avons également eu divers partenariats financiers, notamment avec Élections Québec.

Nous collaborons également avec Élections Québec à déployer une simulation électorale sur le territoire québécois, nommée « Électeurs en herbe », qui a d'ailleurs été mise sur pied par l'un de nos membres, le Forum jeunesse de l'île de Montréal. Les forums jeunesse mènent des actions toute l'année pour augmenter, chez les jeunes, l'intérêt envers la politique ainsi que le sentiment de compétence. Par exemple, nous offrons des activités et des ateliers pour les jeunes sur la politique. En période électorale, nous allons à la rencontre des jeunes électeurs sur le terrain, afin de les inciter à exercer leur droit de vote et de les informer des différentes modalités de vote.

Je vais vous parler un peu d'éducation à la citoyenneté et de son impact sur le vote des jeunes.

Aux dernières élections fédérales, seulement 57,1 % des jeunes Canadiens de 18 à 24 ans ont voté, et seulement 57,4 % des jeunes Canadiens de 25 à 35 ans ont voté. Cela constitue un retard d'un peu plus de 10 points de pourcentage par rapport au taux de participation électorale à la même élection, soit 68,3 %. Il est donc primordial de travailler à faire voter les jeunes, puisque les études démontrent qu'un jeune qui vote dès qu'il a le droit de le faire a de fortes chances de conserver cette habitude tout au long de sa vie. Travailler à faire voter les jeunes, finalement, c'est travailler à faire voter toute la population.

Pourquoi les jeunes s'abstiennent-ils de voter? Il y a deux types de facteurs. Principalement, ce sont les facteurs motivationnels, comme l'intérêt pour la politique et les connaissances, et les facteurs d'accès au vote, comme l'inscription sur des listes, l'absence de pièces d'identité ou l'ignorance des modalités de vote. L'Enquête nationale auprès des jeunes de 2015, qui mesurait le poids relatif de tous les facteurs dans la décision de voter, a d'ailleurs conclu qu'autant les obstacles motivationnels que les obstacles d'accès étaient en cause.

On doit mener des actions d'éducation à la citoyenneté, parce que ces actions sont efficaces. À l'automne 2016, Élections Canada a d'ailleurs commandé une évaluation externe du programme Vote étudiant. L'étude montre que le programme Vote étudiant a une incidence positive sur les nombreux facteurs associés à la participation électorale. Le programme augmente notamment les connaissances de la politique et l'intérêt pour celle-ci et fait également augmenter la perception que le vote est une responsabilité civique.

Or, si ces campagnes sont bonnes pour les jeunes d'âge scolaire primaire et secondaire, elles le sont bien évidemment pour les jeunes ayant nouvellement le droit de vote. C'est précisément le groupe d'âge ayant besoin de davantage d'informations et d'éducation populaire. Nous sommes donc très enthousiastes de voir que le projet de loi C-76 propose de permettre à nouveau à Élections Canada et au directeur général des élections d'agir en toute indépendance, à la fois sur les facteurs motivationnels du vote et sur les facteurs d'accès au vote. Les campagnes « grand public » de promotion du vote jouent également un rôle important et contribuent à la création d'une saine pression sociale en faveur du vote.

Grâce à la recherche, on sait également que les gens sont sensibles à leur entourage quand vient le temps de décider de voter. Les jeunes sont particulièrement sensibles à cette influence de leur famille, de leurs pairs ou de la société. D'ailleurs, à la suite des élections générales de 2014 au Québec, Élections Québec a fait évaluer ses propres campagnes de promotion de vote, et 75 % de la population à l'étude avaient pris connaissance de ces publicités.

Finalement, voici quelques recommandations.

Nous croyons qu'il est possible et souhaitable de travailler à nouveau à la fois sur les obstacles motivationnels et les obstacles d'accès au vote.

Premièrement, nous recommandons l'adoption de la nouvelle formulation des paragraphes 18(1) et 18(2) du projet de loi. Ainsi, le directeur général des élections retrouverait enfin sa marge de manoeuvre pour mener des campagnes axées davantage sur la motivation ou sur l'information, à son choix, en toute indépendance et, bien évidemment, sans contrainte.

Deuxièmement, nous voyons d'un bon oeil les initiatives visant l'augmentation de la participation électorale, spécifiquement celle des jeunes. Citoyenneté jeunesse s'intéresse grandement à des mesures comme la mise sur pied d'un registre des futurs électeurs ou le prolongement des heures d'ouverture des bureaux de vote par anticipation.

Finalement, nous demandons également que l'éducation demeure au coeur des interventions d'Élections Canada, que ce soit par des projets menés par l'organisme lui-même ou encore par le financement d'autres organisations, évidemment non partisanes et vouées à l'éducation à la citoyenneté. La valorisation du vote et de la démocratie, que ce soit par les amis, les membres de la famille, les enseignants, les pairs, et le reste, est primordiale pour éviter de voir le taux de participation des jeunes au vote tomber en chute libre.

(1015)



Pour renverser la vapeur, toute la société doit s'unir et jouer un rôle, particulièrement Élections Canada, qui est l'institution en charge de l'organisation du vote, mais qui détient aussi une large expertise à ce sujet.

J'espère sincèrement qu'il sera possible d'adopter ce projet de loi et que tous les partis pourront s'entendre pour travailler ensemble à la santé démocratique du pays.

Je vous remercie beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous apprécions votre initiative. L'engagement des jeunes nous tient beaucoup à coeur. C'est excellent.

Nous écouterons ensuite M. Michael Morden.

M. Michael Morden (directeur de recherche, Le centre Samara pour la démocratie):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de me donner cette possibilité de prendre la parole devant le Comité.

Je m'appelle Michael Morden et je suis directeur de recherche au Centre Samara pour la démocratie. Le Centre Samara est un organisme de bienfaisance non partisan qui s'est donné pour mission de renforcer la démocratie canadienne par la recherche et l'élaboration de programmes. Nous saluons les efforts actuels pour renouveler en profondeur les lois électorales. Le projet de loi à l'étude revêt une grande importance pour la démocratie canadienne, car il touche au processus même de la démocratie. Cette mesure mérite que le Parlement lui accorde toute l'attention et tout le temps voulus, en faisant montre d'une volonté sincère d'en arriver à un consensus multipartite dans la mesure du possible.

Étant donné l'ampleur du projet de loi, je vais me concentrer sur les éléments qui sont les plus étroitement liés aux travaux récents du Centre Samara sur la participation des électeurs et l'accessibilité du processus électoral. Pour terminer, je ferai quelques commentaires brefs sur les partis.

En premier lieu, sur la question de l'identification des électeurs, nous suggérons de suivre le principe fondamental suivant: l'important est d'offrir un éventail le plus large et le plus souple possible de modalités d'identification. Dans les cas où l'exactitude des renseignements ou leur administration risquent de poser problème, Élections Canada devrait épuiser toutes les solutions possibles avant de renoncer à une méthode d'identification par ailleurs parfaitement envisageable et légitime. C'est pourquoi nous approuvons le rétablissement de méthodes légitimes comme le recours à un répondant ou les cartes d'information de l'électeur pour établir l'admissibilité à voter, moyennant la présentation d'une autre pièce d'identité dans ce dernier cas.

En deuxième lieu, nous sommes favorables à l'élargissement du mandat d'éducation populaire non partisane du directeur général des élections sur la démocratie canadienne. Il pourra ainsi donner de l'information sur le processus électoral et les raisons pour lesquelles il faut voter non seulement aux élèves, mais aussi au reste de la population. Ce rôle échoit naturellement à Élections Canada, l'un des très rares organismes non partisans et suffisamment subventionnés qui s'intéressent à la démocratie canadienne. À l'instar de la plupart des autres organismes électoraux du pays, Élections Canada devrait pouvoir faire de la publicité et de l'éducation durant et entre les campagnes électorales et, en partenariat avec les organismes communautaires, contribuer à renforcer nos capacités en matière d'éducation et de compétences civiques.

Notre troisième point a trait au vote des jeunes. Nous sommes convaincus de l'utilité d'un registre des futurs électeurs comme outil de formation et de mobilisation, mais uniquement s'il est assorti d'une programmation énergique. Selon des recherches menées dans divers pays, il semble que l'instauration et la promotion d'un mécanisme de préinscription des jeunes électeurs entraînent une hausse de la participation des 18 à 24 ans. Les résultats varient quant à l'ampleur de cette hausse, mais tous indiquent une amélioration statistiquement importante. Cependant, même si je suis conscient que votre étude porte exclusivement sur le libellé du projet de loi, je précise au passage que la question des ressources pourrait échoir à l'ordre du jour du Comité. Le projet de loi prévoit essentiellement l'établissement d'un mécanisme de préinscription, qui en soi ne fera pas une grande différence. L'expérience des autres pays nous montre en effet qu'un tel mécanisme pourra être efficace seulement s'il est soutenu par des efforts considérables de mobilisation et une promotion dynamique.

Nous avons été ravis de constater que bon nombre des recommandations du directeur général des élections ont été prises en compte dans le projet de loi C-76. Toutefois, et je tiens à souligner cette exception, le projet de loi ne donne pas suite à la proposition de modifier la législation afin d'autoriser la tenue du scrutin la fin de semaine. Je sais que c'est un sujet dont le Comité a discuté, mais nous pensons qu'il faut y revenir. Certes, le lien entre la tenue du scrutin un jour de fin de semaine et la hausse de participation n'a pas été démontré de manière systématique, mais cette option offre d'autres avantages directs qui ont été relevés par le directeur général des élections. Notamment, il serait plus facile de recruter du personnel électoral et le choix d'emplacements pour les bureaux de scrutin serait plus vaste.

À notre avis, la tenue d'un scrutin la fin de semaine favorisera une participation accrue si ce changement s'inscrit dans une initiative plus large, menée conjointement par l'État et la société pour faire de notre expérience électorale un événement plus social, plus festif et plus communautaire.

Le Comité pourrait envisager de modifier la loi pour autoriser, et non imposer, la tenue du scrutin la fin de semaine. Pour commencer, la modification pourrait s'appliquer uniquement aux élections complémentaires, pour en explorer la faisabilité. Par exemple, en guise d'expérience, le Parlement pourrait tenir une élection complémentaire un samedi ou un dimanche, et décider ensuite, à partir des résultats, s'il y a lieu ou non d'étendre la modification aux élections générales.

(1020)



En dernier lieu, j'aimerais dire quelques mots au sujet des partis politiques. Il nous apparaît important que le directeur général des élections puisse exiger que les partis lui remettent des reçus. Les organismes électoraux des provinces ont ce pouvoir. C'est une lacune du régime fédéral qu'il aurait fallu corriger depuis longtemps, et nous croyons que ce temps est venu. En fait, nous devrions réclamer davantage de transparence relativement aux dépenses qui sont remboursées aux partis à même les poches des contribuables.

Merci.

Le président:

Nous vous remercions.

J'entends la sonnerie. Les membres du Comité devront se rendre voter à 11 heures. Nous accueillerons ensuite un autre groupe de témoins.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je crois que le vote aura lieu avant 11 heures.

Le président:

Oui. Le vote aura lieu à 10 h 50, mais nous devrions être de retour à 11 heures.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Avant 11 h 15.

Le président:

Il nous reste 27 minutes. Nous recevrons un autre groupe complet de témoins à 11 heures. Que pensez-vous, chers collègues...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Deux minutes chacun?

Le président:

Vous voulez dire deux minutes de questions pour chaque parti?

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne sais pas si ce sera efficace, mais nous pouvons essayer.

Le président:

Très bien. Chaque parti dispose de deux minutes.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Inutile de préciser que je serai bref.

Monsieur Seidle, je vous remercie d'être venu à notre rencontre. Vous avez une longue expérience de ces questions, qui remonte même jusqu'à la Commission Lortie. C'est assez impressionnant. Vous êtes d'accord pour que la période électorale soit limitée à 50 jours. Parmi les critiques qui nous ont été exprimées au sujet de cette disposition se trouve son caractère un peu trop restrictif. Pourquoi ne pas conserver la même période qu'avant? La dernière période électorale a duré deux mois environ, mais elle a été beaucoup plus courte lors de l'élection précédente. Est-il vraiment raisonnable d'inscrire dans la loi — ce qui revient à imposer — que la période électorale est limitée à 50 jours?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Peu importe qu'elle soit limitée à 50, 55 ou 49 jours. En fait, je m'oppose à la permission qui est donnée au parti au pouvoir de décider, unilatéralement, que la campagne électorale sera plus longue. Depuis 1974, nous défendons le principe de l'équité des règles. Si un parti a le pouvoir de prolonger la campagne électorale et qu'il s'avère que ses coffres sont mieux remplis que ceux de ses adversaires, alors on pourrait dire qu'il a pris une décision qui lui donne un avantage sur les autres.

L'argent n'est pas toujours synonyme de victoire, comme l'a appris à ses dépens le parti qui a perdu en 2015 même s'il était le mieux nanti. Néanmoins, le principe de l'équité n'est pas respecté quand le gouvernement peut décider de prolonger la période électorale. Si je me souviens bien, la dernière campagne a duré un peu plus de deux mois. J'imagine que quelqu'un ici pourrait nous dire le nombre exact de jours.

M. Scott Simms:

En tout cas, cela m'a paru deux ans.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms: En fait, là n'est pas la question.

Cela dit, la limitation de la période préélectorale a aussi fait réagir certains observateurs. Si j'extrapole, j'imagine que vous êtes également favorable à la limitation de la période préélectorale pour que les partis les plus riches ne soient pas trop avantagés.

M. Leslie Seidle:

Oui, effectivement. Si les dépenses préélectorales sont plafonnées, au même titre que les dépenses électorales, alors la période visée doit aussi être limitée. Comme les plafonds s'appliqueront à compter du 30 juin d'une année électorale, la durée variera de quelques jours, dépendant de la date du scrutin. C'est plus raisonnable selon moi que ce qui se fait en Ontario, qui a fixé la limite à six mois, et assurément plus qu'au Royaume-Uni. Selon une analyse du cadre législatif britannique réalisée par Lord Hodgson, beaucoup de groupes de pression et d'autres intervenants ont indiqué qu'une limite d'un an leur imposait un fardeau réglementaire beaucoup trop lourd. Le gouvernement n'a pas encore pris de décision, mais l'abrègement de la période préélectorale fait actuellement débat au Royaume-Uni.

(1025)

M. Scott Simms:

Ai-je le temps pour une brève remarque?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

Je serai très bref. Je présente mes excuses aux autres témoins. Je n'ai pas le temps de vous poser des questions.

Je vous remercie, monsieur Morden, d'être venu nous présenter le point de vue du Centre Samara. Vous avez récemment mené un sondage auprès des députés. J'en profite pour inviter tous mes collègues à y répondre. C'est très important. Merci à votre organisme pour ce travail.

Le président:

Le sondage émane du caucus multipartite sur la réforme démocratique, et c'est pourquoi nous en parlons. J'ai moi-même rempli et remis mon questionnaire.

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Monsieur Seidle, je vais commencer avec vous. J'aimerais que vous me donniez des chiffres plutôt que des justifications. Vous avez dit que les plafonds fixés aux dépenses préélectorales étaient trop généreux. Pouvez-vous nous proposer des chiffres précis?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Je ne peux pas vous donner de chiffres précis, mais je crois que les plafonds devraient être abaissés du tiers au moins. Selon moi, il y a une incohérence entre les plafonds imposés aux partis politiques et aux tiers. Les partis politiques ont seulement 50 % plus de jeu durant la période préélectorale que les tiers.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci pour votre effort de concision. Je l'apprécie.

Vous avez tous les deux fait des remarques sur la période d'application des plafonds aux dépenses préélectorales des tiers. Monsieur Seidle, vous en avez parlé, et le représentant du Centre Samara a également commenté les plafonds imposés aux tiers. Ma question s'adressera à vous deux, en commençant par M. Morden. Dans son exposé, M. Seidle a mentionné qu'au Royaume-Uni, le plafonnement des dépenses préélectorales est en vigueur pendant un  an environ, et que cette période est de six mois en Ontario. Pour ce qui est du fédéral, l'application commence deux mois environ avant la date de l'élection.

Si j'en juge par les observations précédentes du Centre Samara, il est clair que les dépenses effectuées durant les périodes préélectorales soulèvent des préoccupations. Vous avez même affirmé que beaucoup de tiers dépensent énormément d'argent durant cette période, mais plus rien ou à peu près rien après pour ne pas avoir à déclarer leurs dépenses durant la campagne électorale. Autrement dit, ils profitent de la période préélectorale pour déjouer les règles. Pensez-vous que cette période de deux mois est suffisante et, si ce n'est pas le cas, quelle devrait être selon vous la période d'application des plafonds aux dépenses préélectorales?

M. Morden, puis M. Seidle.

M. Michael Morden:

La réponse courte est que la fixation d'une limite est toujours un peu arbitraire. Je ne crois pas que c'est tout à fait raisonnable, mais je ne serais pas en défaveur d'un compromis qui prolongerait un peu la période préélectorale. Par exemple, la durée pourrait se situer quelque part entre celle qui est proposée dans le projet de loi et celle qui a été adoptée en Ontario.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Monsieur Seidle.

M. Leslie Seidle:

J'ai dit déjà que je suis assez d'accord avec la durée proposée dans le projet de loi. Il faut garder une chose à l'esprit: si la période d'application commence avant, elle risque d'empiéter sur la session parlementaire. C'est un problème que la Colombie-Britannique a dû prendre en compte lorsqu'elle a voulu fixer des limites il y a une dizaine d'années. En fait, il faut éviter de créer un climat de méfiance, ce qui serait inévitable si les députés peuvent faire des discours et parler aux médias alors qu'il serait interdit aux tiers de faire de la publicité directe. Je pense que les législateurs ont pris ce risque en considération dans cette partie du projet de loi.

M. Blake Richards:

Désolé, mais je dois vous interrompre.

Dans vos exemples, vous avez cité l'Ontario, où la période d'application est de six mois. Est-ce que cette limite a créé des problèmes dans cette province?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Je n'ai jamais entendu parler de gros problèmes en Ontario. Si c'est le cas, je suis certain qu'ils ont été soulevés pendant la campagne électorale. Je n'ai pas vraiment suivi la campagne ontarienne...

M. Blake Richards:

Croyez-vous que nous devrions inviter des personnes qui ont participé à l'élection en Ontario et qui pourraient nous expliquer comment cela s'est passé avant que nous prenions une décision?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Évidemment.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à présenter nos excuses aux témoins. Nous n'avons pas pour habitude de bousculer les échanges sur un projet de loi aussi important pour notre démocratie.

Monsieur Morden, vous avez souligné que le projet de loi méritait qu'on lui consacre l'attention et le temps voulus. Personne ici n'est à blâmer, mais il est certain que ce ne sera pas le cas pour le projet de loi à l'étude.

Vous vous dites favorable à l'ensemble du projet de loi, mais il est énorme. Il fait 350 pages. Selon vous, devrions-nous traiter à part certains des éléments que vous appuyez, comme les cartes d'information des électeurs ou le recours à des répondants, et accorder le temps voulu aux aspects plus complexes comme l'intervention des tiers, la désinformation, les médias sociaux, les influences étrangères et d'autres éléments complexes qui se sont greffés au projet de loi original depuis sa présentation, il y a 18 mois?

(1030)

M. Michael Morden:

Je crois que ce serait très logique. Idéalement, nous aurions pris certains éléments et nous aurions pris le temps... Ce que je veux dire, c'est que les différents éléments, notamment parce qu'ils ne sont pas directement interreliés, doivent être examinés isolément. Nous avons dû restreindre notre analyse précisément parce que nous n'avions pas les ressources requises pour examiner la totalité du projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Apparemment, nous sommes logés à la même enseigne.

M. Michael Morden:

J'ai bien peur que oui, et je compatis. J'imagine que la plupart d'entre nous auraient aimé avoir plus de temps pour faire une étude rigoureuse, sans pour autant négliger l'autre objectif, c'est-à-dire être fin prêts pour les élections générales de 2019.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me tourne maintenant vers vous, monsieur Seidle. Le projet de loi est très touffu, et vous avez choisi de vous concentrer sur un élément, qui soulève d'intéressantes questions sur ce qui pourra être couvert ou non — je ne parle pas d'une lacune — simple question de formulation d'une question d'un tiers. Je n'ai pas de réponse à cette question, et le gouvernement n'en a pas non plus, je crois. Pour ce qui concerne le projet de loi, il reste quelques semaines avant la clôture de la session parlementaire du printemps, et l'étude du Comité n'est pas terminée. Selon vous, que devons-nous faire pour mener à bien ce dossier d'une extrême importance?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Je ne crois pas que le Comité ait suffisamment de temps pour étudier un projet de loi aussi énorme et complexe. Je n'ai pas commenté certains volets, par exemple l'interdiction des dépenses de tiers étrangers et la question très complexe de la lutte contre le piratage et l'ingérence dans le déroulement du vote lui-même. Ce n'est pas mon domaine d'expertise, et c'est surtout un nouveau domaine en matière de politiques publiques. J'ai consulté la liste des témoins que vous rencontrez cette semaine, et je n'y ai vu personne qui soit un spécialiste de ces questions.

Pour répondre à votre question, je ne crois pas que le temps qui vous est imparti soit suffisant.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si je comprends bien, nous connaissons bien certaines parties du projet de loi — le recours à des répondants, par exemple, et le public aussi en entend parler depuis un certain temps —, mais tout un pan du projet de loi est tout à fait nouveau pour les parlementaires. Le Comité devra réfléchir à une manière d'aborder ces questions pour éviter de commettre des erreurs dans un domaine aussi sensible.

Merci, monsieur le président. Je sais que nous devons aller voter.

Le président:

Merci.

Pour ce qui est des questions de sécurité, nous avons accueilli les représentants du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications cette semaine.

Il reste 17 minutes avant le vote. Nous serons de retour aussi vite que possible et nous reprendrons les travaux à 11 heures, avec tous les membres du Comité.



(1110)

Le président:

Bonjour. Je vous souhaite de nouveau la bienvenue à la 113e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Notre second groupe de témoins sera formé de Mme Elizabeth Dubois, professeure adjointe au sein du Département de communication de l'Université d'Ottawa; de Mme Cara Zwibel, directrice du programme des libertés fondamentales de l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles, ainsi que de M. Chris Roberts, directeur national des Services des politiques sociales et économiques du Congrès du travail du Canada. Nous sommes ravis de vous accueillir.

Nous vous remercions de nous consacrer votre temps. Je propose de faire un tour de table des témoins, en commençant par Mme Dubois.

Mme Elizabeth Dubois (professeure adjointe, Département de communication, Université d'Ottawa, à titre personnel):

Très bien. Merci de m'accueillir parmi vous. Je suis heureuse de l'occasion qui m'est donnée de discuter du projet de loi C-76. Comme il a été annoncé, j'enseigne au Département de communication de l'Université d'Ottawa, et je mène des recherches sur la manière dont les gens accèdent à l'information politique et la partagent. Plus particulièrement, j'étudie le rôle des médias numériques, des plates-formes des médias sociaux et des moteurs de recherche dans ce processus. J'ai notamment cosigné un rapport avec M. Fenwick McKelvey, de l'Université Concordia, qui à ma connaissance a été le premier à traiter de l'utilisation de robots politiques au Canada. Cette recherche a été réalisée dans le cadre du projet de l'Université Oxford sur la propagande informatique.

Je voudrais aujourd'hui attirer votre attention sur trois aspects liés au projet de loi C-76, soit les stratagèmes informatiques pour museler les électeurs, les sociétés technologiques et les sociétés plates-formes, ainsi que les politiques des partis politiques en matière de protection des renseignements personnels.

Selon des données probantes recueillies sur des élections et des référendums tenus ailleurs dans le monde ces dernières années, des individus et des groupes ont expérimenté toutes sortes de tactiques pour automatiser leurs communications politiques avec l'électorat.

Au nombre des techniques utilisées se trouve la création automatisée de comptes de médias sociaux, que nous appelons des robots, ou bots en anglais. Ce ne sont pas des humains, mais plutôt des comptes fictifs ou de trolls gérés par des humains, mais qui ne correspondent pas forcément à des électeurs réels. Il peut s'agir également de stratégies de publicité ciblée dans le cadre desquelles les annonces sont supprimées rapidement, et dont la trace est donc très difficile à suivre.

Les approches informatiques et l'automatisation permettent de développer et de diffuser l'information à la vitesse de l'éclair. Elles sont utilisées pour atténuer la force d'un message ou démolir des idées. Elles offrent un moyen évident et explicite de museler les électeurs, ne serait-ce qu'en les dirigeant vers le mauvais bureau de scrutin. Il est facile d'imaginer un autre scandale des appels automatisés pilotés par des robots politiques. Ces approches peuvent aussi être employées pour perturber le vote de manière plus subtile, par exemple en créant un climat de méfiance à l'égard du système électoral ou en encourageant l'apathie politique au moyen d'assistants virtuels ou d'autres robots du genre. Il est très important de comprendre les nouvelles formes d'intelligence artificielle si nous voulons préserver l'intégrité de notre système électoral.

Actuellement, la plupart des recherches portent sur le rôle des robots politiques dans les médias sociaux, mais nous réalisons que des applications de messagerie instantanée comme WhatsApp sont de plus en plus utilisées. En pareil contexte, il s'avère extrêmement difficile d'assurer la surveillance des stratagèmes informatiques de muselage des électeurs, de récupérer des données et, au bout du compte, de faire appliquer les lois.

Ces activités violent manifestement l'esprit de la loi, mais elles ne sont pas explicitement encadrées. Il n'existe pas de mécanisme de prévention ou de dépistage digne de ce nom. Il serait certainement très indiqué d'inclure dans le projet de loi une obligation d'enregistrer toute utilisation de techniques automatisées, y compris le recours à de nouvelles méthodes d'intelligence artificielle pour communiquer avec l'électorat.

Je souligne que j'ai parlé d'enregistrement, et non d'interdiction. Il ne faut pas décourager les utilisations très efficaces et tout à fait licites des méthodes automatisées de communication avec l'électorat.

Par ailleurs, étant donné le rôle joué par les sociétés plates-formes comme celles qui administrent les principaux médias sociaux et moteurs de recherche, je crois que le projet de loi C-76 pourrait leur donner des directives plus claires. Le projet de loi interdit aux organismes de vendre sciemment des espaces de publicité électorale à des tiers étrangers, ce qui de toute évidence touchera les sociétés plates-formes, mais c'est tout. Il ne contient aucune disposition pour encadrer l'influence majeure que peuvent avoir ces sociétés sur l'application des nombreuses facettes des lois électorales canadiennes.

Par exemple, en raison du faible coût de la publicité en ligne et de la possibilité de microcibler les destinataires, des centaines de versions d'un message publicitaire peuvent être diffusées sur diverses plates-formes Web. Le suivi de ces messages est extrêmement difficile, autant qu'il est difficile de dépister les activités illicites comme les opérations de musalage des électeurs ou l'achat par des tiers non enregistrés d'espaces publicitaires excédant le plafond des dépenses et, s'il y en a eu, à quel moment elles ont eu lieu.

Aux prises avec le même problème ailleurs dans le monde, et notamment aux États-Unis, les sociétés plates-formes ont commencé à concevoir de très intéressants outils de transparence publicitaire. Cela dit, elles le font de leur plein gré et peuvent rebrousser chemin si aucune disposition législative ne les oblige à les utiliser.

Le risque pour le système électoral canadien est réel puisque les sociétés plates-formes prennent des décisions commerciales de portée internationale qui ne tiennent pas forcément compte des besoins de la démocratie canadienne.

En dernier lieu, le projet de loi C-76 oblige les partis politiques à faire une déclaration relative à la protection des renseignements personnels. Toutefois, il ne prévoit aucun mécanisme qui permettra de contrôler ou de vérifier que leur politique est adéquate, éthique et qu'elle est appliquée. Aucune sanction n'est prévue en cas de non-conformité. Aucune disposition ne permettra aux Canadiens de demander la correction ou la suppression de leurs renseignements, ce qui est le cas dans beaucoup d'autres administrations.

(1115)



Je ne crois pas exagérer en affirmant que c'est un sujet qui déborde largement le système électoral. Sachant que les partis politiques ne sont pas assujettis à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques et à aucun autre mécanisme de protection des renseignements personnels, et sachant que le processus électoral représente un rouage fondamental de notre démocratie, nous ne pouvons pas nous payer le luxe d'ignorer ce sujet. Il doit faire l'objet d'un examen approfondi dans le cadre de la présente étude.

J'aimerais souligner en terminant que malgré l'utilité indéniable de certains aspects du projet de loi, j'estime qu'il comporte des lacunes flagrantes pour ce qui concerne les stratagèmes informatiques pour museler les électeurs, le rôle des sociétés technologiques et plates-formes, et la protection des renseignements personnels. J'espère que ces aspects feront l'objet d'une réflexion plus poussée.

Je vous remercie du temps que vous m'avez accordé. J'attends vos questions avec impatience.

Le président:

Merci. Votre exposé était très utile et fort éclairant.

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Zwibel, de l'Assocation canadienne des libertés civiles.

Mme Cara Zwibel (directrice, programme des libertés fondamentales, Association canadienne des libertés civiles):

Bonjour, monsieur le président, bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Merci de m'avoir invitée à prendre la parole devant vous au nom de l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles, ou ACLC.

Je sais que mon temps de parole est limité, et je me concentrerai donc sur deux éléments du projet de loi C-76 que les membres de l'ACLC estiment particulièrement préoccupants. Le premier a trait à la publicité politique, et notamment aux plafonds imposés aux dépenses publicitaires des tiers. Le second touche le traitement des renseignements personnels par les partis politiques.

Nous tenons tout d'abord à souligner que pour ce qui concerne la publicité politique, l'effet de la loi existante, que perpétue le projet de loi, est de restreindre passablement le discours politique, qui se trouve au coeur de la liberté d'expression garantie par la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Nous comprenons et nous prenons au sérieux les craintes que la richesse devienne un instrument de contrôle du débat politique. Cependant, nous n'avons vu ni preuve ni indice qui justifie les plafonds fixés aux dépenses publicitaires des tiers ou les distinctions que fait le projet de loi entre les différents types d'expression politique et intervenants politiques.

Nous savons que dans l'arrêt Harper, une majorité de juges de la Cour suprême du Canada a confirmé les plafonds imposés par la loi sur les dépenses engagées par des tiers. À notre avis, cette majorité a commis une erreur. La preuve dont la Cour a été saisie ne justifiait aucunement de limiter de manière aussi importante les dépenses publicitaires de tiers. Je vous fais lecture d'un passage des motifs des juges dissidents: Les dispositions litigieuses fixent, à l'égard des dépenses publicitaires engagées par les citoyens — appelés des tiers —, des plafonds si bas que ces tiers ne peuvent discuter efficacement des enjeux électoraux avec leurs concitoyens pendant les campagnes électorales. Concrètement, ces mesures signifient que seuls les partis enregistrés et leurs candidats peuvent communiquer efficacement leur message pendant la période électorale, puisqu'ils jouissent de plafonds beaucoup plus élevés.

Les juges dissidents soulignent que les dépenses autorisées ne couvrent même pas le coût pour une journée d'annonce pleine page dans les journaux nationaux. Malgré la hausse des plafonds annoncée dans le projet de loi, les tiers sont loin d'avoir l'assurance de pouvoir s'exprimer concrètement au cours d'une campagne électorale. Nous y voyons une grave atteinte aux droits garantis par la Charte, que seuls des éléments de preuve clairs et convaincants peuvent justifier. À ce jour, nous n'avons rien vu ni rien entendu qui pourrait s'en approcher.

Le projet de loi établit des plafonds qui s'appliquent seulement aux dépenses relatives à la publicité partisane des partis politiques durant la période préélectorale, mais ceux qui sont imposés aux tiers ratissent beaucoup plus large. Là encore, il est difficile de comprendre les fondements ou les justifications de cette distinction.

Dans une perspective plus globale, l'ACLC s'interroge sur l'intérêt et la faisabilité d'une distinction entre la publicité partisane et électorale ou, plus généralement, des tentatives pour restreindre la publicité thématique prenant position sur une question à laquelle un « parti enregistré ou un candidat est associé ».

La Cour suprême des États-Unis a fait valoir que la ligne de démarcation entre la publicité thématique et la publicité politique est tracée dans le sable un jour de grand vent. La restriction continue de la publicité thématique risque d'encarcaner le débat public sur les politiques du gouvernement ou les options stratégiques qu'il propose, mais elle n'aura aucun effet sur les discours qui posent le réel problème, ceux qui influencent ou cherchent à influencer indûment le processus électoral.

Nous nous demandons également s'il est juste que les dispositions législatives régissant le plafonnement des dépenses soient adoptées par des personnes et des partis qui ont tout intérêt à museler leurs opposants. Nous invitons le Comité à réfléchir, que ce soit dans le cadre de la présente étude ou d'une étude ultérieure, à la possibilité de créer une entité indépendante pour examiner les questions liées au plafonnement des dépenses des tiers, des partis politiques et des candidats.

J'aimerais parler en deuxième lieur des dispositions du projet de loi C-76 visant à renforcer la capacité des partis politiques à protéger les renseignements personnels des Canadiens.

En clair, le régime proposé par le projet de loi est inadéquat. Il ne prévoit aucune garantie réelle de protection des renseignements personnels, aucun mécanisme indépendant de surveillance des mesures adoptées par les partis pour assurer cette protection, et aucune pénalité en cas de manquement. Étant donné ce que nous savons maintenant à propos des données recueillies par les médias sociaux et d'autres outils du genre, et de l'exploitation qu'en font les partis politiques pour faire du microciblage des électeurs, l'absence de mesures tangibles pour protéger les renseignements personnels dans ce projet de loi a de quoi décevoir, et le mot est faible.

Je sais que le sujet a été soulevé par quelques témoins ces derniers jours, alors je n'insiste pas. Je me contenterai de dire que l'ACLC approuve dans l'ensemble les amendements proposés par le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada.

En dernier lieu, je tiens à souligner l'appui de l'ACLC aux dispositions du projet de loi qui annulent les modifications néfastes que le Parlement a apportées en adoptant la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Nous sommes favorables aux dispositions qui autorisent l'utilisation des cartes d'information de l'électeur, qui rétablissent le recours à un répondant et qui élargissent le mandat d'éducation du directeur général des élections. Nous sommes également ravis de la réforme portant sur la participation de citoyens canadiens résidant à l'étranger aux élections fédérales.

Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions. Merci de me recevoir ce matin.

(1120)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je passe maintenant la parole à M. Chris Roberts, représentant le Congrès du travail du Canada.

M. Chris Roberts (directeur national, Services des politiques sociales et économiques, Congrès du travail du Canada):

Bonjour, monsieur le président, et bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de comparaître devant le Comité.

Je représente le Congrès du travail du Canada, ou CTC, la plus importante centrale syndicale du pays. Le CTC est le porte-voix de 3 millions de travailleurs canadiens sur diverses questions nationales et internationales. Il réunit 55 syndicats nationaux et internationaux, 12 fédérations de travail provinciales et territoriales, ainsi que plus de 100 conseils du travail locaux.

Le CTC appuie en bonne partie le projet de loi C-76, et plus particulièrement les dispositions visant à assurer un processus électoral juste, accessible et inclusif. Nous accordons un soutien sans réserve aux mesures proposées pour améliorer l'accès des électeurs qui ont des déficiences physiques, et pour inclure les frais de garde d'enfants et les dépenses liées à une déficience dans les dépenses remboursées aux candidats.

Le projet de loi C-76 rétablit la capacité du directeur général des élections à autoriser l'utilisation de l'avis de confirmation d'inscription, ou carte d'information de l'électeur, comme pièce d'identité. Nous saluons ce pas en avant. Nous sommes, tout aussi, favorables au rétablissement de la capacité du directeur général des élections de proposer des programmes d'éducation et d'information populaires visant à sensibiliser les électeurs au processus électoral, et tout particulièrement aux personnes dont l'accès est compliqué par différents obstacles.

Le projet de loi C-76 rétablit la possibilité qui était offerte auparavant de recourir à un répondant aux fins de l'établissement de l'identité et de la résidence d'un électeur, et nous approuvons cette mesure. Cependant, à l'instar de M. Mayrand, nous pensons qu'il faut en étendre l'application au personnel des établissements de soins de longue durée et des résidences pour personnes âgées, même si un employé n'est pas un électeur inscrit dans la même section de vote.

J'aimerais maintenant parler des dispositions du projet de loi qui concernent les tiers, et notamment les syndicats et les organisations de travailleurs.

Le projet de loi C-76 instaure des exigences additionnelles importantes pour les tiers participant au processus électoral. S'il est adopté, ils devront se conformer à des obligations de déclaration plus larges que celles auxquelles seront tenus les autres intervenants.

Pendant et entre les élections, les organisations syndicales offrent à leurs membres et à la population canadienne un espace de réflexion et d'échange sur les enjeux importants pour les travailleurs. Ce travail essentiel d'éducation et de mobilisation favorise une participation éclairée et efficace des travailleurs à la vie civique et au débat démocratique.

Nous nous réjouissons de constater que le paragraphe 222(3) du projet de loi C-76 exclut de la définition d'une « activité partisane » la prise de position sur une question à laquelle un parti ou un candidat peut être associé durant la période préélectorale. Néanmoins, nous demandons au Comité d'étudier attentivement les autres restrictions et obligations de déclaration prévues au projet de loi C-76, et de s'assurer qu'elles ne compromettent pas le travail que font les organisations syndicales pour engager le débat avec leurs membres et le public autour des questions touchant les travailleurs.

Si le projet de loi C-76 est adopté, l'un des principaux chevaux de bataille du CTC sera d'obtenir qu'Élections Canada publie une mise à jour de son guide à l'intention des tiers qui énoncera des directives d'interprétation identiques des définitions d'activité ou de publicité partisane sur Internet durant la période préélectorale et de la publicité électorale sur Internet durant la période électorale.

Selon cette interprétation, les messages diffusés sur Internet pendant la période électorale sont réputés concerner les élections seulement si des frais sont associés au passage du message, c'est-à-dire s'il a fallu payer pour acheter un espace publicitaire. Si c'est gratuit, alors les messages diffusés dans les médias sociaux, par courriel ou sur le site Web d'un organisme n'entrent pas dans la définition de « publicité électorale ». À notre avis, Élections Canada doit appliquer la même définition aux messages diffusés en période préélectorale. Ce sera d'autant plus important si la réglementation et les obligations de déclaration s'appliquent à la période entre deux élections, c'est-à-dire entre la date d'un scrutin et le début de la période préélectorale des élections suivantes.

Je conclus là-dessus, mesdames et messieurs.

Merci énormément de votre attention.

(1125)

Le président:

Merci à vous tous.

Nous entamons maintenant la période des questions. Madame Sahota, à vous l'honneur.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma première série de questions s'adressera à Mme Dubois.

Votre exposé m'a fascinée. Je ne crois pas être la seule à avoir beaucoup réfléchi à ce sujet en raison des événements qui ont entouré diverses élections dans le monde.

Je m'intéresse aux approches informatiques dont vous avez parlé. D'après vous, dans quelle mesure ont-elles été utilisées dans le cadre d'élections provinciales ou fédérales, et de façon générale en Amérique du Nord?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Pour ce qui concerne les approches informatiques, si vous me le permettez, je vais me limiter aux robots politiques. En fait, ce sont des comptes de médias sociaux automatisés, ou des comptes automatisés créés avec des applications de messagerie instantanée ou d'autres technologies de communication.

Actuellement, nous savons que ces robots ont été beaucoup utilisés aux dernières élections américaines. Le rapport de Sam Woolley, chercheur de l'Université Oxford, en donne des preuves concrètes. Dans le rapport que j'ai cosigné avec Fenwick McKelvey sur la situation des robots au Canada, nous donnons aussi des exemples d'utilisation des robots politiques durant la campagne électorale fédérale de 2015. Nous avons amorcé des recherches sur les élections en cours en Ontario, mais les données recueillies n'ont pas encore été validées et nous n'avons pas terminé nos analyses. Toutefois, je peux vous certifier que des procédés automatisés ont été employés. L'automatisation ne sert pas uniquement à museler les électeurs ou pour d'autres types d'interventions dans les élections que vous et moi ne verrions pas d'un bon oeil.

Par exemple, la plupart des sociétés de médias recourent à des méthodes automatisées pour diffuser des gazouillis ou des billets sur Instagram et Facebook en simultané. C'est beaucoup plus rapide que de les saisir sur chacune des plateformes. Les messages politiques automatisés transmis de cette façon ne nous inquiètent pas vraiment. Cependant, il serait extrêmement difficile de faire une évaluation quantitative. Les opérations de muselage des électeurs sont possibles, parce qu'elles sont clandestines et difficiles à surveiller. Il m'est donc impossible de donner des chiffres précis.

(1130)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les messages ciblés, notamment, ou les procédés qui nous sont plus familiers à nous qui représentons la branche politique... Il est possible de cibler les destinataires de nos billets et de nos messages, mais on peut aussi bloquer l'accès à certains groupes en fonction de telle ou telle caractéristique démographique, par exemple. Quel est votre point de vue à ce sujet? Est-ce une forme de muselage des électeurs?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Tout dépend de ce que vous entendez par muselage des électeurs. Comme je ne suis pas avocate, je ne peux pas vraiment dire ce qui est permis ou non à un endroit ou un autre. Chaque pays, et même chaque province, a sa propre définition. Aux États-Unis, il y a eu des cas évidents où des annonces de logement n'étaient pas diffusées à des groupes culturels ciblés. Ces pratiques du secteur immobilier ont été jugées illégales, parce qu'elles constituaient de la discrimination fondée sur la race. Il existe d'autres exemples de méthodes de ciblage et d'exclusion de certains groupes bien précis qui ne sont pas légalement admissibles. Dans une perspective plus globale, si nous réfléchissons à nos objectifs en matière de participation électorale et d'accès égal des citoyens au système électoral, il est clair que nous ne pouvons pas permettre que des groupes soient systématiquement exclus du débat et ne reçoivent pas d'information des candidats en lice dans leur secteur. Ces pratiques pourraient s'avérer très problématiques.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le projet de loi interdit à des tiers étrangers d'engager des dépenses de publicité électorale et toute collusion entre des tiers d'ici et des intervenants se trouvant à l'étranger. Est-ce un pas dans la bonne direction?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Oui, je crois que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction, mais il ne faut pas oublier que la surveillance de ces pratiques est extrêmement compliquée. Si rien n'est mis en place pour garantir le soutien et la collaboration des sociétés plateformes qui assurent le plus souvent la diffusion, il serait étonnant que ces mesures suffisent.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous discuterons avec des représentants de quelques-unes de ces plateformes dans le courant de la journée. Selon vous, quel type de mécanismes de soutien et de coopération de ces sociétés faudrait-il mettre en place?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Les choses ont déjà commencé à bouger du côté de ces sociétés, comme la création d'outils axés sur la transparence de la publicité que je trouve extraordinaire. Ces sociétés collaborent volontiers avec Élections Canada et des candidats pour trouver des solutions aux problèmes rencontrés durant une campagne électorale. Le hic est que cette collaboration est volontaire et que, si on ne les oblige pas à poursuivre leurs efforts pour servir l'intérêt public et la démocratie au Canada, elles peuvent changer d'avis du jour au lendemain et se limiter à faire des changements qui correspondent à leurs besoins commerciaux sur les marchés mondiaux.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comment pouvons-nous renforcer la lutte contre la propagation de fausses nouvelles? Le projet de loi propose quelques mesures timides, et il prévoit aussi des mesures pour empêcher que le public soit induit en erreur par quelque moyen que ce soit. Là encore, y voyez-vous un pas dans la bonne direction?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

La lutte contre la désinformation — un terme que je préfère à « fausses nouvelles », une expression qui a été récupérée par les politiciens d'une manière qui lui enlève toute valeur probante et toute utilité, du point de vue de la recherche — est beaucoup plus large que le cadre électoral. C'est en grande partie pourquoi j'ai parlé très spécifiquement des stratagèmes de muselage des électeurs et du rôle que peut y jouer la désinformation.

Selon ce que j'en comprends, l'objectif des dispositions du projet de loi sur les déclarations trompeuses semble être d'empêcher quiconque de se faire faussement passer pour un candidat. Autrement dit, il est interdit de dire que l'on s'exprime au nom d'un parti si ce n'est pas le cas. Il ne faut pas confondre avec l'enjeu plus vaste des stratagèmes de muselage des électeurs.

(1135)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards, nous vous écoutons.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'être ici.

Je vais commencer avec vous, monsieur Roberts. Vous représentez le Congrès du travail du Canada. Votre groupe, si je ne me trompe pas, a été très actif lors des élections et durant les périodes préélectorales, et notamment durant les dernières élections. Combien d'argent le CTC a-t-il dépensé pour faire de la publicité durant la période qui a précédé l'élection de 2015, ou la période préélectorale?

M. Chris Roberts:

Il n'y avait pas de période préélectorale en 20...

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, vous avez raison, le concept de période préélectorale n'était pas inscrit dans une loi, mais nous disions quand même « période préélectorale » pour désigner la période précédant l'élection. Si vous préférez, combien avez-vous dépensé pendant les six mois qui ont précédé l'élection?

M. Chris Roberts:

Comme j'ai tenté de vous l'expliquer, le CTC dépense beaucoup moins que ce que la loi lui permet durant les périodes électorales. Nous animons des débats et des conversations sur divers thèmes avec nos membres et la population canadienne. Tout ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que nos dépenses sont largement en deçà des plafonds.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, mais pouvez-vous nous donner des chiffres approximatifs concernant vos dépenses publicitaires durant la période préélectorale?

M. Chris Roberts:

Non, je n'ai pas ces chiffres en main, mais je pourrai les transmettre au Comité.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous pourrez nous les transmettre?

M. Chris Roberts: Oui.

M. Blake Richards: Je sais que plusieurs organismes sont affiliés au Congrès. Je crois qu'il existe — en fait, je ne crois pas, je le sais. Certains de vos organismes affiliés ont confirmé qu'ils coordonnaient la diffusion de certains messages et qu'ils menaient des campagnes publicitaires conjointes durant les élections. Pouvez-vous nous transmettre des chiffres qui incluent les dépenses de certains de vos organismes affiliés? Par exemple, pourriez-vous nous dire combien d'argent des organismes comme la Fédération du travail de l'Ontario et d'autres ont dépensés?

M. Chris Roberts:

Assurément. Les dépenses des fédérations provinciales qui font partie du CTC seront incluses dans le montant global que nous vous transmettrons pour le CTC. Nous vous donnerons des chiffres globaux.

M. Blake Richards:

Donc, vous avez ces chiffres.

M. Chris Roberts:

Pour ce qui concerne les organisations syndicales affiliées au CTC, il faudra leur demander...

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, nous pouvons le leur demander. J'espère que nous aurons le temps — j'espère que le gouvernement nous accordera suffisamment de temps.

Vos dépenses publicitaires s'élevaient à 300 000 $ pour l'élection de 2015. Pouvez-vous nous décrire, dans les grandes lignes, le genre de messages qui ont été diffusés et les campagnes publicitaires qui ont été menées avec cet argent?

M. Chris Roberts:

Le CTC lance régulièrement des campagnes appelées « Les meilleurs choix » dans lesquels nous mettons l’accent sur des thèmes précis. Ceux abordés au cours de cette année-là étaient la sécurité de la retraite, la garde des enfants, et d’autres de même nature. Ce sont des sujets de la plus haute importance pour nos membres et, nous en sommes convaincus, pour les gens qui travaillent. Nous essayons avec ces campagnes de lancer des débats sur des sujets d’actualité et non pas de leur dire pour quel parti ils devraient voter. Le CTC ne dit pas, et ne prétend pas dire à ses membres pour quel parti voter.

M. Blake Richards:

Cette publicité ne fait donc en aucune façon la promotion d’un parti politique ou d’un candidat, pas plus qu’elle ne les combat.

M. Chris Roberts:

Le projet de loi  C-23, la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, précise que ces dispositions s’appliquent à la publicité sur des questions qui concernent les partis politiques. Donc oui, en application de la loi, elles relèvent de cette définition, mais nous faisons bien attention à ne pas les aborder en termes partisans. Nous discutons des questions de fond.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien, mais vous nous avez dit que la Fédération du travail de l’Ontario, la FTO, et d’autres organismes du même genre sont associés à vos publicités et à vos autres activités pendant les élections fédérales. Le 1er septembre 2015, la Fédération a indiqué dans un communiqué de presse, que j’ai sous les yeux, qu’elle collabore avec le Congrès du travail du Canada, et avec d’autres entités, pour battre les conservateurs de Harper et pour élire un gouvernement NPD lors de l’élection fédérale du 19 octobre 2015.

Il me semble bien qu’on veuille faire là la promotion d’un parti politique donné et s’opposer à un autre. Aurais-je mal compris?

(1140)

M. Chris Roberts:

Je travaille pour le Congrès du travail du Canada, et non pas pour la Fédération du travail de l’Ontario.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord, mais la FTO dit bien collaborer avec le Congrès du travail du Canada.

M. Chris Roberts:

Tout ce que je peux vous dire est que le CTC aborde les élections générales en lançant la discussion sur un certain nombre de sujets. C’est de ceux-ci que nous voulons discuter. Nous laissons ensuite nos membres décider par eux-mêmes quel est le parti qui, sur ces questions, défend le mieux leurs intérêts.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, mais la FTP précise qu’elle collabore avec le CTC précisément dans ce but puisqu’elle s’oppose à un parti politique et en appuie un autre. Vous voudrez peut-être en discuter avec elle si vous n’avez pas la même politique ni les mêmes intentions.

D’où vient votre financement, j’entends par là les fonds que vous utilisez, ces 300 000 $, et le financement des autres activités électorales et préélectorales? Vient-il uniquement des cotisations de vos membres ou recevez-vous des fonds d’autres sources?

M. Chris Roberts:

Le financement du Congrès du travail du Canada est assuré intégralement par les fonds que lui versent ses syndicats affiliés, qui proviennent eux-mêmes des cotisations payées par les membres de ces syndicats. Je me permets de vous rappeler que dans sa décision Lavigne c. Syndicat des employés de la fonction publique de l’Ontario, et dans Law c. Canada, la Cour suprême a convenu que les campagnes de défense d’intérêts et traitant d’autres sujets thématiques du mouvement syndical relèvent bien de leur rôle associationnel d’agent de négociation collective des…

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, vous croyez donc savoir que l’argent qui vient de vos organisations affiliées provient en totalité et uniquement des cotisations des membres ou, à votre connaissance, pourrait-il provenir d’autres sources?

M. Chris Roberts:

Je ne suis pas en mesure de répondre à cette question. Tout ce que je sais est que le Congrès du travail du Canada tire l’essentiel de son financement des montants facturés aux syndicats affiliés en fonction du nombre de leurs membres.

M. Blake Richards:

Si ces organismes affiliés devaient eux-mêmes recevoir des fonds d’autres sources, le sauriez-vous? Savez-vous ce qu’il en est?

M. Chris Roberts:

Comme la plupart des gens qui connaissent le mouvement syndical au Canada le savent déjà, il y a des syndicats internationaux qui sont présents dans notre pays et qui ont joué, par le passé, un rôle dans la création des syndicats canadiens. Nombre des syndicats canadiens affiliés au Congrès du travail du Canada ont leur siège aux États-Unis. Je ne sais pas si c’est de cela que vous voulez parler.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que ces membres ont leur mot à dire sur la façon dont leurs cotisations sont dépensées en publicités électorales?

M. Chris Roberts:

Tout à fait. On peut prétendre que, dans notre pays, le Congrès du travail du Canada est la plus importante organisation démocratique appartenant à ses membres et gérée par eux.

M. Blake Richards:

Si les membres ne veulent pas que leurs cotisations servent à financer cette campagne pour battre un parti donné et en promouvoir un autre, auraient-ils le droit d’exiger que leur argent soit dépensé autrement?

M. Chris Roberts:

Tout à fait. Ils ont de nombreuses occasions, tout au long de l’année pendant un cycle électorale, de participer avec leurs collègues à la vie organisationnelle de leur syndicat pour définir les orientations et les questions de politique à débattre et pour désigner les partis qu’ils appuieront.

Nous sommes tout à fait partisans de ce type d’implication démocratique.

M. Blake Richards:

C’est une bonne chose à savoir.

Le président:

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est tout à fait éclairant. Nous ne procédons pas de cette façon au Parlement, puisqu’il se peut que nous ne voulions pas voter en faveur de l’achat d’une série d’avions de combat, mais qu’ils les achètent quand même.

Nous avons là un groupe de témoins vraiment intéressant. Comme je ne vais pas disposer de tout le temps voulu, je vais essayer de faire court.

Permettez-moi de commencer avec vous, madame Dubois. Si vous aviez accès maintenant aux dirigeants de Facebook et de Twitter, quel serait le premier point de désaccord sur leur mode de fonctionnement actuel dont vous voudriez leur faire part? Je pense ici précisément à leur manque de vigilance envers les activités abominables que l’on voit parfois sur leurs plateformes.

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Ces entreprises prétendent qu’il est souvent très difficile de détecter les tactiques de suppression du vote ou de désinformation. En toute franchise, nous savons faire face aux pourriels et nous pouvons nous attaquer à d’autres formes de contenus que nous ne voulons pas voir sur notre plateforme.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce sont des questions sur lesquelles il peut s’avérer difficile d’être empirique. On peut cependant convenir que, de nos jours, un électeur canadien peut être influencé par ce qu’on appelle les médias traditionnels, comme la presse imprimée, la radio et la télévision, mais aussi de plus en plus par les médias sociaux. Ces diverses influences sont-elles maintenant équivalentes? Seriez-vous d’avis que les médias sociaux jouent maintenant un rôle encore plus important dans la façon dont les Canadiens prennent connaissance de leurs nouvelles ou des différentes histoires qui sont sorties pendant la campagne électorale ontarienne ou encore qui sortiront pendant la campagne électorale fédérale à venir? Disposez-vous de chiffres sur les influences exercées sur les électeurs par les nouvelles écoutées chez eux le soir, par celles qu’ils entendent à la radio en conduisant, ou encore par celles qu’ils découvrent sur leur téléphone ou sur leur ordinateur?

(1145)

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

L’un des problèmes est que nous ne disposons pas de données fiables et cohérentes sur l’utilisation d’Internet au Canada parce que l’Enquête canadienne sur l’utilisation d’Internet de Statistique Canada a été abandonnée. En nous fiant à ce qui se passe dans d’autres pays similaires, nous pouvons en déduire que…

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cette enquête n’a toujours pas été reprise?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Je crois savoir qu’elle sera administrée à nouveau l’an prochain, mais je n’en suis pas certain. Vous auriez intérêt à vérifier auprès de Statistique Canada. On ne sait pas non plus avec certitude quel sera son niveau de détail.

M. Nathan Cullen:

On peut dire sans se tromper que l’influence des médias sociaux est importante. Si vous publiez une annonce dans le Globe and Mail, la législation relevant d’Élections Canada vous oblige à indiquer qui a financé sa parution et vous devez tenir un registre détaillant l’utilisation qui en est faite.

Si vous affichez l’une de ces annonces flash sur Facebook ou sur Twitter, dont l’apparition est commandée par des algorithmes, pour cibler un microgroupe d’électeurs, vous n’êtes pas tenus de produire un rapport. Nous ne savons donc pas qui finance cette annonce et nous n’avons non plus aucune trace de celle-ci, sauf si nous en avons fait une capture d’écran. Son influence devrait-elle être équivalente?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Que l’influence qu’elle exerce ou non sur les personnes soit équivalente…

M. Nathan Cullen:

Obligation de produire des rapports.

Je vous prie de m’excuser. Il vaudrait mieux se demander si: « les mêmes règles devraient-elles s’appliquer à ce type d’annonces? »

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

D’accord. Dans le cas des publicités en ligne, elles devraient être soumises aux mêmes règles. L’interface des plateformes devrait permettre d’obtenir ces données. C’est une question purement technique. Il faudrait donc, lors de la diffusion d’une publicité électorale, l’accompagner de la mention précisant qu’il s’agit bien d’une publicité électorale et indiquant quel est le parti qui vous cible avec celle-ci. Est-ce que cela…?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je crois que oui. L’emploi de robots et le dossier Cambridge Analytica ont fait plonger Facebook en eaux troubles. Ont-ils maintenant mis de l’ordre dans leurs affaires? Leur plateforme est-elle sécuritaire? Pourrait-il y avoir encore un autre cas du type Cambridge Analytica avec une entreprise tentant de profiter d’une autre faille dans leur système?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Peu importe la technologie, il faut nous faire à l’idée que la sécurité absolue n’existe pas et que le mieux que nous pouvons faire est de faire de notre mieux. Je crois que ce sont les pressions publiques subies par Facebook qui l’ont amenée à prendre des mesures, et non pas la législation canadienne. Cela signifie que si d’autres administrations ou des intérêts commerciaux exercent des pressions sur eux, il se pourrait qu’ils décident de changer de comportement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le projet de loi C-76 donne l’occasion d’exercer de telles pressions.

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Profitons-nous actuellement de cette possibilité en application du projet de loi?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Non.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Très bien.

Madame Zwibel, j’aimerais vous faire une suggestion. Vous voudriez que les tierces parties puissent davantage faire part de leurs opinions et s’impliquer plus avant dans les campagnes thématiques ou dans les activités électorales. Si elles pouvaient le faire, devraient-elles également être tenues de faire rapport dans les mêmes termes que les partis politiques sur leur financement, sur les plafonds de leurs dépenses et sur toutes les autres exigences qui s’appliquent aux acteurs politiques?

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Je n’ai pas dit croire que les tierces parties devraient disposer de plafonds de dépenses plus élevés, mais plutôt que je ne vois pas la preuve du respect des plafonds actuels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ah, d’accord.

Mme Cara Zwibel:

J’ignore d’où viennent ces chiffres et je ne saisis pas très bien certaines des distinctions entre…

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils proviennent de la même source que les précédents.

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Une fois encore, je ne sais pas très bien d’où ils proviennent, mais comme au moins quelques juges de la Cour suprême du Canada estiment que ces chiffres sont si faibles que cela revient dans les faits à un monopole des partis politiques et des candidats aux élections, c’est une question qu’il faut aborder.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi, madame Dubois, de faire pendant un instant un retour en arrière sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Madame Zwibel, vos commentaires seront aussi les bienvenus si nous disposons d’assez de temps.

La protection des renseignements personnels par les partis politiques ne fait l’objet d’aucune vérification ni d’aucune forme de contrôle efficace. À vos yeux, à quoi cela tient-il? Qu’avons-nous de si spécial?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Les partis politiques se doivent de communiquer avec les électeurs, mais comme ils n’obéissent pas nécessairement à des intérêts commerciaux, on a estimé que, dans leur cas, les règles touchant à la protection des renseignements personnels devraient s’appliquer différemment étant donné leur spécificité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Très bien, mais en Colombie-Britannique, la province dans laquelle je vis, ces restrictions s’appliquent aux partis politiques et cela ne semble pas poser de problème.

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Dans l’Union européenne, avec l’entrée en vigueur du Règlement général sur la protection des données, le GDPR, certains éléments portent à croire que la protection des données devrait être élargie à tous les contextes dans lesquels vos données peuvent être recueillies, suivies et utilisées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Les conséquences sont bien réelles sur notre démocratie, sur nos décisions, sur le Brexit, sur la dernière élection aux États-Unis. Cela préoccupe-t-il les gens?

Ils divulguent en permanence quantité de renseignements personnels privés sur Facebook. Quel est le problème si les partis politiques recueillent quantité de données et en apprennent davantage sur leurs électeurs? Cela les rendra peut-être plus intelligents.

(1150)

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Les gens s’en préoccupent, mais ils doivent constamment communiquer leurs données personnelles pour obtenir les choses dont ils ont besoin. Je pense effectivement que les partis politiques pourraient faire une utilisation intelligente de ces données. J’en suis convaincue. Il serait avantageux pour eux de mieux connaître leur électorat grâce aux divers types d’interactions qu’ils peuvent avoir avec lui sur Internet. Toutefois, les citoyens méritent de comprendre ce qui se passe, et quelles sont les données recueillies sur eux et, plus important encore, ils doivent pouvoir accéder à leurs renseignements personnels pour pouvoir les corriger en cas d’erreurs. De telles erreurs peuvent nuire de façon injuste à certains groupes de personnes au point que je ne crois pas que notre système électoral devrait permettre l’assouplissement de ces règles sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La suppression des votes!

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Il est possible de les supprimer, ou d’exclure intentionnellement certains électeurs dont vous savez qu’ils ont peu de chances de voter pour vous, et il n’y a donc pas d’intérêt pour vous à leur consacrer de votre temps.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’ai compris.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

J’ai quelques questions à poser rapidement à vous trois qui découlent de ce que j’ai entendu jusqu’ici. La première s’adresse à M. Roberts.

Vous nous avez parlé des difficultés auxquelles vous faisiez face au CTC avant les projets de loi C-76 et C-23, et j’ai connu moi-même quantité des mêmes difficultés. Elles m’ont concerné, pas seulement parce que je me situe à la gauche du centre, mais parce que ces activités me plaisaient plutôt.

Vous constaterez maintenant que nous en venons aux activités électorales, aux publicités électorales et aux sondages électoraux. Je n’ai pas de problème à comprendre ce qu’on entend par publicités électorales, mais il n’en est pas de même dans le cas des activités électorales et des sondages électoraux. Que faites-vous au sein de votre organisme qui relèverait de ces deux catégories?

M. Chris Roberts:

À ce que je crois savoir, l’activité partisane, qui est maintenant réglementée, implique de promouvoir la candidature ou l’élection d’un parti ou d’un candidat donné, ou au contraire de s’y opposer. Jusqu’à maintenant, le fait de parler d’une question à laquelle ce parti ou ce candidat serait associé ne relève pas de l’activité partisane. Certains tentent de faire la distinction entre le travail politique sur des thèmes donnés qui pourraient être considérés comme une activité politique, mais pas comme une activité partisane, si vous me suivez.

En ce qui concerne les sondages, à ce je crois savoir, l’accent est mis sur les sondages électoraux servant à éclairer par la suite des décisions de nature partisane.

Ce qui nous intéresse avant tout est de conserver la liberté de nous impliquer dans les discussions thématiques, tout en reconnaissant et en comprenant la nécessité de réglementer les dépenses politiques partisanes. J’en profite pour vous signaler rapidement ce qui, de façon ironique, est la plus importante préoccupation que nous devrions avoir concernant les influences indues et partiales qui s’exercent sur la vie et les discours politiques. Il s’agit de l’inégalité croissante des revenus et de la richesse qui aboutit à une concentration du pouvoir économique et politique dans les mains de groupes ayant les moyens d’influencer les électeurs lors des débats et des élections démocratiques. Il suffit de voir ce qui s’est passé aux États-Unis.

M. Scott Simms:

Entendez-vous par là des organismes à vocation générale ou des partis politiques?

M. Chris Roberts:

Je pense essentiellement à des tierces parties qui s’impliquent dans la vie politique.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous craignez donc que les plus riches ne soient pas soumis aux règles que nous tentons d’adopter ici au sujet des dépenses des tierces parties?

M. Chris Roberts:

C’était une façon pour moi d’insister sur le fait que nous comprenons la nécessité de réglementer l’implication politique des tierces parties.

M. Scott Simms:

Tant que nous ne touchons pas aux activités thématiques auxquels vous vous adonnez.

(1155)

M. Chris Roberts:

Et que nous conservions autant de liberté de manœuvre que possible pour ce type d’implication politique.

M. Scott Simms:

Disposez-vous maintenant de cette liberté de manœuvre? Votre réponse restera, bien évidemment, entre vous et moi.

M. Chris Roberts:

Du point de vue du CTC, il y a des éléments qui nous conviennent dans ce projet de loi. Je suis d’avis que votre comité doit étudier la marge de manœuvre dont nous disposons en la matière et y réfléchir très attentivement.

En ce qui concerne le plafond des dépenses, celles du CTC en sont très loin, mais il y a quantité d’obligations de rapports qui sont beaucoup plus exigeantes que pour d’autres participants au processus.

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis ravi que vous en ayez terminé avec les plafonds de dépenses, parce que cela me permet de poser ma question à Mme Zwibel sur ceux-ci.

J’espère ne pas vous paraphraser trop mal, mais vous nous avez parlé de la façon arbitraire dont ces plafonds sont imposés. M. Roberts nous a donné quantité de raisons pour ne pas trop nous attarder à ces plafonds de dépenses. Quelle réaction cela vous inspire-t-il?

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Il est tout à fait exact que certains groupes sont loin d’atteindre ces plafonds de dépenses.

M. Scott Simms:

À ce que nous avons entendu jusqu’à maintenant, il s’agit de la plupart des groupes. Veuillez continuer, je vous prie.

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Cela fait maintenant plus d’une décennie que ces plafonds de dépenses nous sont imposés, et il est donc difficile d’avoir une idée de ce qui se passerait si nous disposions d’une plus grande marge de manœuvre. Reportez-vous au cas Harper c. Canada, et consultez certains des arguments présentés par les dissidents. J’en rappelle un, soit que vous ne pourriez pas publier dans un journal de portée nationale une annonce valide un seul jour. Dans les limites de votre circonscription, vous ne pourriez effectivement pas faire des envois en nombre à toutes les personnes de certaines circonscriptions. Ce sont là les types de mesures sur lesquels nous devons nous pencher quand nous essayons de définir certains de ces plafonds.

Je sais fort bien que nous pouvons être préoccupés par des groupes ayant les moyens de coordonner des activités, ou par la possibilité que des tierces parties remplissent l’espace qui est naturellement celui des partis politiques, mais je crois que, actuellement, la balance penche trop dans l’autre sens. Les partis politiques et les candidats à des élections sont en mesure de dominer la discussion, et il ne reste pas réellement d’espace pour les tierces parties. La définition qui couvre la défense des questions thématiques pose problème, et pas seulement à ceux qui doivent être régis par celle-ci, mais également à ceux qui doivent veiller à son respect. Permettre au directeur général des élections de bien comprendre les questions qui dominent l’actualité de chaque candidat et de chaque partie supposerait un travail considérable.

M. Scott Simms:

Je crois avoir saisi où vous voulez en arriver. J’avais une autre question à vous poser dans le prolongement de celle-ci, mais je ne dispose pas d’assez de temps.

Je m’adresse maintenant à Mme Dubois…

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

… professeure adjointe à l’Université d’Ottawa.

M. Cullen m’a volé ma question. Je ne devrais pas dire qu’il l’a volée parce que nous pensions tous deux la même chose: si des représentants de Facebook et de Twitter se tenaient devant vous, que leur demanderiez-vous? Je me souviens qu’il y a quelques années, dans les années 1990 ou au début des années 2000, on utilisait en anglais le terme « truthiness » pour désigner une notion ou une réalité que l’on souhaitait être vraie. C’est un fait, mais ce n’est que la moitié de l’histoire, qui est par la suite devenue l’histoire complète pour certaines personnes. Comment empêcher cela?

Pour moi, c’était le problème le plus important que j’ai dû affronter comme politicien. Lorsque des gens viennent maintenant à moi sur Facebook et me disent « Comment pouvez-vous penser cela? ». Je leur réponds quelque chose comme « Eh bien, non, je ne le pense pas. », et on me demande ensuite « Mais est-ce vrai ? » et je dois leur répondre, « Oui, c’est exact, mais… ». Tout part de là. La manipulation de l’histoire me fait peur, tout comme la prolifération de ces faussetés.

Et voilà une question de nature générale: que disons-nous à une plateforme de médias sociaux sur laquelle les gens me semblent hausser les épaules comme s’il s’agissait tout simplement d’un avertissement à un acheteur?

Mme Elizabeth Dubois:

J’estime qu’il est important d’admettre qu’il y a des choses qui se trouvent en quelque sorte à la périphérie. Est-ce une bonne chose ou non? Est-ce légal ou non? Et puis il y a des choses qui manifestement ne sont pas bonnes, qui ne sont pas légales.

Je crois que la question de savoir ce qui est socialement ou moralement acceptable est une question existentielle qui va probablement au-delà de la discussion de ce projet de loi. S’efforcer d’empêcher des gens de voter et raconter des choses manifestement erronées ne devrait pas être permis dans le déroulement d’un processus électoral. Ces entreprises doivent convenir qu’il n’existe pas de baguette magique pour résoudre d’un seul coup tous les problèmes, mais elles peuvent élaborer assez rapidement des approches pour s’attaquer aux interventions qui sont à l’évidence interdites par la loi.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Notre dernier intervenant est M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

À cette étape de notre réunion, je dispose bien de cinq minutes?

(1200)

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais commencer par contredire un peu mon collègue Reid parce que je crois que cela sera utile.

Pour moi, le terme « truthiness » s’applique non à une chose qui n’est pas vraie et qui conduit dans la mauvaise direction, mais plutôt à la présentation de quelque chose qui, sans être exact au sens factuel ni moralement vrai, devrait être vrai. Si vous ne partagez pas ce point de vue, n’êtes pas d’accord avec cette obligation, votre stature morale est alors entachée.

C’est une façon de déplacer un débat de l’hémisphère gauche du cerveau vers l’hémisphère droit de façon à confondre votre auditoire.

M. Scott Simms:

D’accord. C’est comme une facturation négative.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n’est pas un mauvais exemple. Oui, c’est exact: les renseignements militaires, etc.

De toute façon, j’ai abordé cette question maintenant parce que je pense qu’elle pose un problème.

Madame Zwibel, si je ne me trompe, l’avis minoritaire auquel vous avait fait allusion se trouve dans Harper c. Canada (Procureur général). Est-ce bien cela?

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Combien de juges ont exprimé leur dissidence dans ce cas-ci ? Vous en souvenez-vous ?

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Il y en a eu trois.

M. Scott Reid:

Trois. C’était donc pratiquement une majorité.

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Ce fut une décision de six contre trois.

M. Scott Reid:

Tous les juges de la Cour suprême ne siégeaient donc pas. Très bien.

Ont-ils utilisé l’expression « monopole des partis »? Vous avez évoqué le terme de « monopole ».

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Je n’en suis pas sûre. Malheureusement, je n’ai pas la décision sous les yeux, mais je crois qu’ils ont utilisé cette expression au sujet de la capacité des partis politiques et des candidats à monopoliser la conversation pendant une élection en profitant de la façon dont les plafonds de dépenses sont fixés.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela met en évidence un point de vue que nous n’avons pas retenu à ce comité, soit la notion que… nous faisons l’hypothèse que nous, des quatre partis qui peuvent prétendre au pouvoir, tentons de les positionner sur un pied d’égalité. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous consacrons autant de temps à discuter des mérites relatifs d’une commission des débats qui pourraient exclure le Parti Vert et le Bloc québécois. On nous a prévenus hier que l’un des nombreux partis communistes du Canada se plaignait d’une telle exclusion.

L’autre point de vue minoritaire qui nous a été exposé est que, au sens strict, les élections n’appartiennent pas aux partis politiques même si ce sont eux qui les contestent, mais plutôt au public. J’imagine que les tierces parties sont, indépendamment de leur mode de financement et de tous ses volets, essentiellement composées de groupes de citoyens dévoués à la chose publique, qui tentent de nous dire de faire ceci, de faire cela, et qui occupent un espace tout aussi légitime que celui des partis politiques.

Cela éclaire-t-il leur argumentation?

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Oui, c’est bien l’idée, à savoir que les tierces parties sont simplement des citoyens qui essaient de prendre la parole pour dire à leurs concitoyens ce qu’ils pensent pendant la campagne électorale et, tout en convenant qu’il pourrait se révéler tout à fait nécessaire de veiller à ce que nous ne fassions pas… Je ne crois pas que quiconque veuille que chez nous, comme chez nos moyens du Sud, l’argent soit manifestement roi. Nous devons veiller à la façon d’imposer ces restrictions et les justifier par des éléments de preuve.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela nous amène au problème fondamental. Je comprends les choix faits par le tribunal et, étant moi-même un défenseur des libertés civiles, c’est une idée qui suscite beaucoup de sympathie chez moi.

Le problème est que je ne vois pas très bien, si nous éliminons les plafonds de dépenses des tierces parties comme elles le veulent, comment éviter de reproduire chez nous les conséquences diverses que nous décriions au sud de la frontière. Je ne vois pas non plus comment nous pourrions éviter certains autres problèmes. Je ne suis pas convaincu que ce soit ce que nous voulions. Je ne fais que mentionner des problèmes qui seraient durs à éviter, comme dans le cas des fonds consacrés à démotiver certains groupes d’électeurs ou démoniser des candidats. Je ne parle pas ici d’élucubrations, comme de prétendre qu’une personne est un meurtrier en série ou un pédophile. Je parle de décourager des gens de voter en affirmant que Doug Ford est la personne la plus effrayante que j’ai jamais rencontrée et qu’il est hors de question qu’il devienne premier ministre de l’Ontario, ou en disant la même chose d’Andrea Horwath. Je ne sais pas très bien comment éviter ce type d’élucubrations.

Existe-t-il une façon de se sortir de ce dilemme ou, au bout du compte, sommes-nous contraints de choisir entre Charybde et Scylla? Qu’en pensez-vous?

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Je ne veux pas laisser croire qu’il s’agit là d’un problème facile à résoudre. Ce qui nous préoccupe est que nous avons fait pencher la balance du mauvais côté, et cela ne veut pas dire qu’il faudrait maintenant supprimer complètement les plafonds de dépenses. Il nous faut examiner soigneusement ces plafonds et analyser leurs justifications. J’attire votre attention sur l’opinion des dissidents, parce que nous faisons sans l’ombre d’un doute face à un problème, lorsque le plafond des dépenses dans une circonscription ne vous permet pas d’adresser des courriels à tous les électeurs de celle-ci.

À mes yeux, cela signifie probablement, après en avoir discuté récemment au sein de notre organisation, que le plafond est trop bas. Ces plafonds de dépenses sont définis dans la législation et leur montant est indexé sur le taux d’inflation. Vous venez tout juste de parler de la mise en place d’une commission indépendante sur les débats. Peut-être ne retiendrez-vous pas cette suggestion, mais il se peut qu’on se retrouve dans la même situation que pour la délimitation des circonscriptions, et qu’il faille recourir à des personnes de l’extérieur, qui aient une vision d’ensemble de la situation des médias, des coûts d’une campagne, des tendances, et qui puissent fixer le plafond des dépenses dans chaque circonscription.

(1205)

Le président:

Je vous remercie. Nous vous écoutons, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Avez-vous des exemples de cas dans lesquels ces plafonds sont définis de façon indépendante?

Mme Cara Zwibel:

Je n’en ai pas. Nous en avons discuté hier dans les locaux de l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles. Ce qui m’a frappé est qu’un tel processus pourrait se comparer, dans une certaine mesure, à celui de la délimitation des circonscriptions électorales, parce qu’il susciterait manifestement un réel intérêt.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis pleinement au courant. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous d’être venus aujourd’hui. Vos témoignages se sont avérés très utiles pour notre étude.

Nous allons maintenant passer rapidement à notre prochain groupe de témoins.



Le président:

Je vous souhaite à nouveau la bienvenue à cette 113e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Les derniers témoins que nous entendrons aujourd’hui sont M. Paul G. Thomas, professeur émérite, Études politiques, University of Manitoba, qui comparaît de Winnipeg par vidéoconférence, M. Glenn Cheriton, président de Commoners' Publishing, et M. Jean-Luc Cooke, membre du conseil du Bureau central du Parti vert du Canada.

Merci à tous de votre présence. Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Thomas qui va nous faire part de sa déclaration liminaire.

M. Paul Thomas (professeur émérite, Études politiques, University of Manitoba, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup. J’ai transmis à votre greffier un mémoire qui a été traduit en français et dont les deux versions vous ont été remises. Je vais tenter de m’en tenir strictement aux cinq minutes dont je dispose pour formuler cinq brefs commentaires. Si j’y parviens, cela évitera au président de devoir m’interrompre.

Mon premier commentaire, qui permet d’intégrer mon mémoire aux autres témoignages entendus par le Comité est que ce projet de loi C-76 illustre très bien à quel point la loi électorale est devenue spécialisée, technique et compliquée en réponse aux transformations rapides et souvent imprévisibles de la société, de la technologie et du processus politique, au Canada comme ailleurs. Dans ces conditions, Élections Canada a besoin d’une trousse d’instruments de politique diversifiés et souples pour planifier et administrer le processus électoral. En d’autres termes, à la différence des dispositions de la Loi électorale du Canada en vigueur actuellement, qui sont très précises et très normatives, la future loi devra conférer davantage de pouvoir aux professionnels œuvrant à Élections Canada. Le projet de loi C-76 va en partie dans cette direction. Il accorde au directeur général des élections davantage de pouvoirs pour mener les activités d’une élection, imposer des pénalités administratives pécuniaires, et s’appuyer sur les interprétations et les opinions formulées par écrit, etc.

Mon second commentaire est que, dans l’ensemble, ce projet de loi est salutaire. J’appuie donc, dans les grandes lignes, ses dispositions mises de l’avant par le projet de loi C-33 qui révisent les dispositions plus problématiques de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections. J’aime certaines des nouvelles dispositions figurant dans ce projet de loi, comme l’imposition d’un plafond des dépenses aux partis politiques pendant la période préélectorale, y compris pour les publicités d’opinion, l’obligation d’apposer des étiquettes sur toutes les publicités pour identifier la source, etc.

Dans mon mémoire, j’aborde ensuite mes trois préoccupations. Ce qui me désole le plus est que les partis politiques ne soient pas soumis aux dispositions de la législation canadienne sur la protection des renseignements personnels et de retenir, en cas de préoccupations en la matière, le recours au Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée. Pour l’essentiel, ce projet de loi confirme qu’il incombe aux partis politiques de se réglementer eux-mêmes en la matière. Ce n’est pas la solution que je préfère, mais la meilleure solution de remplacement serait d’exiger du Commissariat, et non pas d’Élections Canada, qu’il approuve les politiques et les pratiques des partis politiques dans ce domaine. En ce qui concerne le second volet de mes préoccupations, je proposerai que, chaque année, les partis politiques publient une déclaration en ligne de leurs activités dans ce domaine de la protection des renseignements personnels, en précisant les activités de formation du personnel mises en place, etc., en réponse aux plaintes formulées en matière de renseignements personnels.

Mon quatrième commentaire porte sur les flux de fonds et d’influences provenant de l’étranger s’immisçant dans les élections canadiennes. Lorsque j’ai lu le projet de loi, et je ne suis pas avocat, il m’a semblé que celui-ci laissait place à une échappatoire autorisant l’amalgame des fonds canadiens et étrangers, y compris dans les cas d’appui à certains groupes de défense, ou tierces parties comme elles sont nommées dans le projet de loi. Je ne crois pas que la législation ou la réglementation puissent fournir des solutions simples à ce problème, mais j’ai noté l’interdiction de la collusion inscrite dans le texte. Il se peut qu’il faille laisser le temps à ces dispositions sur la collusion de s’appliquer pour disposer d’une forme de jurisprudence qui limitera, sans probablement l’éliminer complètement, la possibilité que des influences étrangères s’exercent sur les élections canadiennes.

Mon cinquième et dernier commentaire concerne la période préélectorale commençant le 30 juin. J’explique dans mon mémoire qu’il faudrait que le projet de loi fasse correspondre les calendriers des restrictions imposées aux publicités partisanes et d’opinions à l’interdiction de la publicité gouvernementale sous forme d’énoncés de politiques administratives. Cette opinion ne s’appuie pas sur la législation. Cela reviendrait à interdire la publication d’annonces publicitaires dans les 90 jours précédant le jour de l’élection. Les deux périodes devraient être harmonisées afin de mettre en place une situation dans laquelle le gouvernement serait, effectivement, responsable de la situation alors que tous les avantages dont le parti politique au pouvoir pourrait profiter du fait des publicités gouvernementales seraient éliminés.

Mon dernier commentaire est que ce projet de loi aurait dû être déposé beaucoup plus tôt, ou peut-être qu’il aurait fallu déposer une version antérieure à celle-ci. Les choses ont trop tardé.

(1210)



Je sais que le personnel d’Élections Canada, très professionnel, va faire tout son possible pour appliquer les dispositions du projet de loi, mais il faut que nous prenions l’habitude de traiter plus sérieusement les délais de planification d’une élection.

Je vous remercie de votre attention et je me ferais un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Vous avez parfaitement respecté le temps qui vous était imparti. Je vous remercie.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Glen Cheriton, président de Commoners' Publishing.

M. Glenn Cheriton (président, Commoners' Publishing):

Je vous remercie de cette occasion de m’adresser à vous.

Mon exposé repose sur une plainte que j’ai formulée il y a de nombreuses années à Élections Canada concernant son implication et celle de son personnel dans une publication mise en ligne sur son site Web et distribuée par d’autres moyens. Elle est datée de décembre 2005, et cela s’est donc produit pendant une campagne électorale fédérale. On y lit que le document a été préparé avec l’appui d’Élections Canada, et on y trouve une liste de membres du personnel de cette entité qui ont été impliqués dans la préparation de cette publication.

Ma plainte est motivée par le fait que cette publication traite de l’égalité politique des femmes, et j’aimerais que ce thème soit intégré à ce projet de loi. L’une des choses qu’on y souhaitait était une modification de la législation et de la politique afin que, dans certaines circonstances, les hommes ne puissent tenter de se faire élire au Parlement. Élections Canada a étudié ma plainte, ce que son personnel a fait, et ce qui a été affiché pendant la campagne électorale. Ses représentants ont estimé que cette question ne s’était pas présentée pendant la campagne électorale et que ma plainte n’était donc pas pertinente. À mon avis, cette question qui s’est posée lors de chaque campagne électorale.

Ils ont également estimé qu’il s’agissait là simplement d’une interprétation du personnel d’Élections Canada pendant une campagne électorale et qu’il n’y avait pas de raison de leur interdire de la communiquer. Pour revenir à cette question dans le cadre du projet de loi qui nous est soumis, il me semble que si Élections Canada se voit confier le pouvoir de décider qui respecte les règles, il faudrait aussi disposer de certains mécanismes pour s’assurer qu’Élections Canada et son personnel respectent également les règles en question.

Je dois vous signaler que j’ai tenté il y a de nombreuses années de présenter exactement le même exposé à ce comité. Cinq députés m’ont dit que j’avais raison, qu’il n’appartenait pas à Élections Canada de faire ce genre de choses, et qu’il s’agissait là d’une violation de la Loi électorale du Canada. Ces députés m’ont dit par contre qu’ils n’allaient pas m’inviter à prendre la parole devant le Comité, parce qu’ils craignaient qu’Élections Canada leur retire le droit de se présenter à l’élection suivante.

À mes yeux, j’appuie dans une large mesure les dispositions de ce projet de loi. Ce qui me préoccupe dans ce cas-ci est que les fonds du gouvernement du Canada, par l’intermédiaire de Condition féminine Canada, servent à cette publication et que l’argent d’Élections Canada est utilisé pour la défense de l’égalité politique des femmes, alors que ces gens décident eux-mêmes s’ils contreviennent ou non aux règles.

Je reconnais que c’est là pour moi une énigme. Je suis certainement préoccupé par l’argent étranger. Je suis enclin à penser que l’argent du gouvernement du Canada, et l’argent et le personnel d’Élections Canada devrait être considérés comme de l’argent étranger et ne devrait pas servir à influencer les élections ni à agir sur les questions soulevées pendant une élection fédérale.

Je vous remercie.

(1215)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Jean-Luc Cooke, membre du conseil, Bureau central du Parti vert du Canada.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke (membre du conseil, Bureau central, Le Parti Vert du Canada):

Je tiens à remercier le Comité de cette occasion de traiter de ce projet de loi. Le Parti vert du Canada est particulièrement reconnaissant du temps que vous lui avez accordé pour préparer cette comparution.

Une bonne partie de ce projet de loi n’est pas tant une modernisation qu’un retour à la Loi électorale du Canada d’avant l’ère Harper, ce qui est pour l’essentiel une bonne chose, mais la promesse centrale de cesser de tenir un scrutin uninominal à un tour est malheureusement absente. Ce n’est pas que je sois obtus, mais c’était manifestement une promesse ferme qui n’a pas été tenue, sans que le gouvernement s’en excuse.

Lors de consultations à travers le pays, la majorité des Canadiens était en faveur d’une réforme et d’une forme de représentation proportionnelle. Je trouve regrettable qu’un gouvernement, sans en avoir le mandat de la population, continue à perpétuer un système qui étouffe les voix des Canadiens qui ne sont pas représentés dans une démocratie dite représentative.

Le Parti vert du Canada convient que certains volets importants de la modernisation ont été retenus, mais il se demande si le gouvernement a accordé suffisamment de temps à Élections Canada pour mettre à jour ses technologies, ses modalités administratives, et pour instaurer des programmes de formation. Après tout, un quart de millions de Canadiens travaillent dans les bureaux de vote lors d’une élection générale. Nous sommes à 15 mois de la 43e élection générale et rien à cet effet ne figure dans la loi.

On peut citer, parmi les améliorations dignes de mention, le recours aux cartes d’information des électeurs qui pourront désormais servir de pièces d’identité valides. Cela devrait accélérer le déroulement du vote et améliorer l’accessibilité. Le fait de permettre aux jeunes de 16 et de 17 ans de s’inscrire est une première étape bienvenue pour les amener à voter. Les études révèlent que l’implication dans le processus électoral à un jeune âge agit sur le comportement électoral pendant toute la vie de la personne. Le Parti vert vous félicite ce sujet et aimerait attirer votre attention sur le projet de loi C-401 d’initiative parlementaire de Mme May.

Cela dit, je veux aborder deux aspects du projet de loi qui manque de dents.

Tout d’abord, les dispositions sur la protection des renseignements personnels sont inadaptées. Les partis politiques possèdent d’énormes quantités de données et de renseignements personnels sur les Canadiens, ils sont actuellement dispensés du respect de la plupart des dispositions de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. De plus, à une époque à laquelle le piratage motivé par des intérêts politiques n’est plus une possibilité, mais une réalité, il faut absolument que les partis collaborent pour s’assurer que les renseignements personnels dont il dispose sont protégés. Les grands partis politiques, s’ils étaient piratés, pourraient compromettre l’ensemble du système électoral. Notre démocratie repose sur la confiance et les grands partis sont actuellement le maillon faible.

Le Parti vert incitait énergiquement les partis politiques à coordonner de façon informelle leurs efforts, et le projet de loi C-76 comporte des dispositions conformes à celles de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels du Canada.

En second lieu, il faut en faire davantage pour amoindrir l’influence de l’argent dans le domaine de la politique. Revenir à l’allocation par vote réduirait l’influence des donateurs sur les politiciens et serait plus rentable que le système actuel de crédit d’impôt de 75 %. Nous savons tous que l’argent et les donateurs ont des effets de distorsion sur la démocratie américaine. Nous devrions donc, quel qu’en soit le prix, éviter ces excès que nous pouvons observer au sud de la frontière.

Le Parti vert propose de redéfinir la période préélectorale, qui commencerait au lendemain d’une élection et se terminerait lors de la publication du bref de l’élection générale suivante. Pendant cette période préélectorale ainsi redéfinie, les plafonds de dépenses devraient rester à leur niveau actuel en étant simplement indexés pour tenir compte de l’inflation. Cette redéfinition de la période préélectorale correspond à la réalité que certains ont appelée la campagne permanente. Dans les faits, il n’y a que deux périodes en matière de publicité politique, la période préélectorale et la période électorale.

Il faut que nous imposions des limites au processus électoral pour éviter les excès, mais également pour nous assurer que les citoyens, les partis politiques et les législateurs mettent l’accent sur la recherche d’une bonne gouvernance démocratique, sans être constamment distraits par les demandes et même parfois, par les fanfares des politiciens.

Je vous remercie.

(1220)

Le président:

Merci à tous.

Je donne la parole à M. Simms pour le premier tour de questions.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Tout d’abord, monsieur Cooke, je vous remercie d’être ici. Pouvez-vous me dire pour commencer si le projet de loi C-401, qui abaisse à 16 ans l’âge de voter, est bien le texte dont vous parlez?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Tout à fait.

M. Scott Simms:

Bien. Vous venez de mentionner le projet de loi C-401, et je n’étais pas sûr que vous l’ayez indiqué de l’autre côté. Je voulais simplement que ce soit précisé pour le compte rendu.

En ce qui concerne la préinscription des jeunes, il y a un deuxième facteur à prendre en considération, qui est de les encourager à travailler pour Élections Canada, même avant d’avoir 18 ans. Qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Nous vivons dans une société où il y a beaucoup d’âges de majorité différents. Il faut avoir 16 ans pour avoir le droit de conduire une voiture ou pour faire partie de la réserve, mais 18 ans pour avoir le droit de consommer de l’alcool ou de voter. Je trouve bizarre qu’il faille être plus âgé pour pouvoir consommer de l’alcool et voter que pour pouvoir se battre et donner sa vie pour son pays.

Ces seuils devraient probablement être uniformisés, ne serait-ce que par principe. Si on a l’âge requis pour voter, on devrait logiquement avoir l’âge requis pour participer à l’organisation du processus électoral. Il me semble tout à fait logique qu’on puisse travailler pour Élections Canada si on a l’âge requis pour voter.

M. Scott Simms:

Le concept de période préélectorale est un concept qu’approuve votre parti, mais vous pensez que ça devrait commencer dès la fin d’une élection. D’après vous, la période préélectorale démarre dès qu’une élection est terminée, dès le lendemain.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Exact. C’est une question de définition.

Selon le libellé actuel du projet de loi, il y a trois périodes différentes pour les dépenses électorales: après le dépôt du bref, avant le dépôt du bref et à tout autre moment. À mes yeux, il serait plus cohérent de n’avoir que deux périodes: après le dépôt du bref d’élection — c’est à dire la période électorale — et le reste du temps.

S’il n’y a pas de limite aux dépenses faites en dehors de…

M. Scott Simms:

Évidemment, vous pensez que la limite des dépenses devrait être ajustée en conséquence.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

En ce qui concerne la limite des dépenses, on peut envisager différentes formulations, et c’est là qu’on entre dans les détails. En dehors de la période du bref d’élection, il devrait y avoir une limite des dépenses, qui devrait peut-être être ajustée pour tenir compte de toute cette période. Ça devient plus une question d’équations et de formules que de principes. S’il n’y a pas de limite des dépenses en dehors d’une période préélectorale ou d’une période électorale, il y a un risque d’injustice.

M. Scott Simms:

C’est pour les grands partis, selon vous.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

C’est pour les très grands partis ou les tierces parties, les groupes d’intérêt.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, et ces règles devraient être concordantes.

Croyez-vous que les règles qui concernent les tierces parties devraient mieux concorder avec celles qui s’appliquent aux candidats, aux participants, aux partis politiques?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Ce serait beaucoup plus simple, non seulement pour les électeurs, mais aussi pour les partis et pour quiconque participe au processus électoral ou souhaite se prévaloir de son droit d’exprimer une opinion, si tout le monde avait les mêmes dates et pouvait se fier au même calendrier. À partir de telle ou telle date…

M. Scott Simms:

Voulez-vous dire qu’on devrait aussi avoir les mêmes limites?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

S’agissant des limites, je me rangerai derrière la décision de votre comité car, si j’ai bien compris, et je ne suis pas constitutionnaliste, il y a des questions constitutionnelles en jeu lorsque des tierces parties et des particuliers veulent exprimer leur opinion, ce qui ne s’applique pas aux partis politiques; donc…

(1225)

M. Scott Simms:

Devrait-on les traiter différemment?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Je ne suis pas constitutionnaliste, mais je crois bien que cela aurait des répercussions sur les tierces parties.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Merci.

Professeur Thomas — Est-ce professeur Thomas ou M. Thomas?

M. Paul Thomas:

Professeur me convient.

M. Scott Simms:

Professeur Thomas, merci de votre contribution. Je voudrais avoir votre opinion sur la question de l’identification pour la prochaine élection, ou n’importe quelle élection, en fait, étant donné ce que dit la Charte.

Pour beaucoup de gens, il faut présenter une pièce d’identité couramment acceptée, et, étant donné que la plupart des gens possèdent ce type de pièce d’identité, ce devrait être acceptable, mais devrions-nous offrir plus de latitude aux gens qui veulent exercer leur droit de vote?

M. Paul Thomas:

Oui, j’aime bien l’idée de rétablir la carte d’information de l’électeur qui permet de s’identifier au bureau de vote, et j’aime bien aussi le système du répondant. Je n’ai vu aucune preuve convaincante — et pratiquement pas de preuve du tout — que des gens essaient de se faire passer pour d’autres ou essaient de voter plus d’une fois. Les études réalisées ici et ailleurs montrent que ce n’est pas un problème fréquent.

Je pense que l’objectif essentiel devrait être de faciliter l’accès au vote et d’encourager les gens à voter. C’est l’activité démocratique la plus importante à laquelle participent la plupart des Canadiens, et nous devrions faire le maximum pour en faciliter l’accès.

J’aime bien l’idée, par exemple, de la préinscription des jeunes électeurs. Aux États Unis, on a constaté une hausse de 5 à 15 % des taux de participation dans les États qui ont adopté cette pratique, et dans…

M. Scott Simms:

Dans tous les pays ou seulement aux États-Unis?

M. Paul Thomas:

Je parle des États-Unis. Je pense qu’il y a 15 États dans lesquels on permet aux jeunes de s’inscrire lorsqu’ils approchent de l’âge requis, et cela a entraîné une hausse du taux de participation dans ce segment de population. Les gens s’habituent à ne pas voter, et c’est une mauvaise habitude qu’il ne faut pas encourager.

M. Scott Simms:

En effet. L’un de nos témoins précédents a dit que la préinscription devrait s’accompagner d’une campagne de promotion plus vigoureuse d’Élections Canada auprès des jeunes. Qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Paul Thomas:

La disposition de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections qui réduisait considérablement le mandat du DGE concernant les activités de promotion et d’éducation du public était une erreur, à mon avis.

Il faut tracer la ligne quelque part. On ne peut pas s’adresser qu’à des segments particuliers de l’électorat — des groupes qu’on pourrait dire marginaux — afin de n’encourager que ceux-là à aller voter. Il ne s’agit pas de la prédisposition ou de la motivation à voter, il s’agit de les sensibiliser à l’importance du vote dans une saine démocratie.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous croyez qu’il faudrait inclure une mise en garde, même si ce n’est peut-être pas la bonne expression, pour qu’Élections Canada comprenne qu’elle ne peut pas cibler un microsegment de la population quand elle entreprend une activité pour encourager les gens à voter.

M. Paul Thomas:

Ce débat s’est engagé au Royaume-Uni au moment où j’y réalisais une étude pour Élections Canada, et les autorités ont essayé de tracer cette ligne. Mais la ligne n’est pas très nette, voire assez floue, entre renforcer le désir de voter et informer les gens pour qu’ils aient envie de voter.

C’est général. Dans certains cas, il faut peut-être déployer plus d’efforts pour informer certains groupes marginaux qui ne votent traditionnellement pas en grand nombre. On ne peut pas exclure ces groupes, et il faut faire plus d’efforts, mais il faut que le DGE et Élections Canada soient très prudents afin de ne pas être accusés de partisanerie politique en encourageant à voter certains groupes qui ne sont traditionnellement pas très actifs électoralement.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci à tous d’être ici, en personne ou virtuellement.

Monsieur Cooke, je commence par vous. Vous avez fait, au début de votre déclaration liminaire, une remarque qui m’a semblé très sarcastique. Malheureusement, quand on lira le compte rendu du débat, on ne s’en rendra pas compte, et je voudrais donc vous donner la possibilité de préciser votre pensée car ce sarcasme change à l’évidence le sens de ce que vous avez dit.

Vous avez dit avoir particulièrement apprécié tout le temps que vous avez eu pour préparer votre témoignage. Je suppose que c’était sarcastique.

(1230)

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

C’était un peu sarcastique. Évidemment, si je suis ici, c’est parce que je pense m’être assez bien préparé pour pouvoir répondre à vos questions. Alors, allons-y.

M. Blake Richards:

Pour que ce soit clair, quand vous a-t-on demandé de venir témoigner aujourd’hui?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Personnellement, on m’a contacté il y a un peu plus de 28 heures.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce que je peux en conclure, c’est que nous espérons que le gouvernement nous donnera plus de temps pour étudier correctement ce projet de loi et permettre réellement aux Canadiens qui doivent être entendus de s’exprimer à son sujet. Pour le moment, le gouvernement n’a prévu que cette semaine pour étudier ce projet de loi, et il estime que c’est suffisant pour un texte de cette importance. Êtes-vous d’accord? Pensez-vous que c’est suffisant, pensez-vous qu’on devrait consacrer plus de temps à l’examen d’un texte aussi sérieux et aussi important?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Dans mon domaine, qui touche plus le secteur privé que le secteur public, on doit toujours peser le risque par rapport au bénéfice. Est-ce que le risque de prolonger notre examen de ce projet de loi vaut le bénéfice de corriger certains de ses défauts ou problèmes éventuels?

Le Parti vert du Canada préférerait que ce projet de loi soit en vigueur pour les prochaines élections, mais avec des modifications. Il y a beaucoup de choses qu’on pourrait améliorer, et des problèmes qu’on ne peut pas négliger.

M. Blake Richards:

Après avoir entendu votre réponse, je comprends votre position, mais je sais qu’Élections Canada prépare déjà la mise en oeuvre de cette loi. Essayer de forcer l’adoption de ce texte en une semaine ou deux au lieu de prendre le temps nécessaire pour l’étudier n’empêchera probablement pas qu’il soit en vigueur pour les prochaines élections, et vous venez bien de dire qu’il y a à votre avis certains problèmes à régler.

Ne nous incombe-t-il pas de prendre le temps nécessaire pour les régler, même si Élections Canada prépare déjà un plan de mise en oeuvre?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Comme je l’ai dit, il faut évaluer le risque par rapport au bénéfice. Si certaines modifications n’exigent pas de changements administratifs à grande échelle à Élections Canada, je dirai que vous avez raison. Par contre, s’il faut apporter des changements profonds à la manière dont Élections Canada fonctionne, et aux principes qui soustendent son action, je dirai que le risque n’est pas approprié.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Mais c’est à vous que revient la décision.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr.

Professeur Thomas, vous avez fait dans votre déclaration liminaire une remarque que je partage totalement au sujet de la période préélectorale. Cela concerne la nécessité de faire concorder la période durant laquelle la publicité gouvernementale est interdite et la période durant laquelle des restrictions sont imposées aux partis politiques.

Selon le même principe, j’aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez d’imposer aussi des restrictions aux déplacements ministériels. Évidemment, on voit bien, quand on parle des déplacements que font les ministres ou le premier ministre durant cette période pour faire des annonces gouvernementales, que cela peut avoir pour objectif d’inciter les électeurs à les appuyer, ce que nous avons déjà pu constater avec le gouvernement actuel à l’occasion d’élections partielles.

Qu’en pensez-vous? Devrait-il y avoir aussi des restrictions à ce sujet durant la même période?

M. Paul Thomas:

Oui. Au Royaume-Uni, on a ce que l’on appelle une période de transition durant laquelle, à mesure qu’on approche du jour des élections, le gouvernement doit cesser certaines activités qui pourraient lui donner un avantage électoral. Cela peut s’appliquer à beaucoup de choses, et les déplacements peuvent en faire partie s’ils sont destinés à faire des annonces très médiatisées qui seront créditées au premier ministre, etc.

Nous avons déployé beaucoup d’efforts pour mettre tous les concurrents sur un pied d’égalité, même si le gouvernement contrôle la fonction publique et détient le pouvoir de dépenser qui va avec, etc.

Je pense que nous allons codifier de plus en plus ces règles. Nous allons devoir dresser la liste des choses qu’on peut faire ou qu’on ne doit pas faire durant cette période. On ne peut pas remonter trop loin dans le temps. Pour en revenir à la date du 30 juin, d’aucuns prétendent que cela va engendrer une orgie de publicité avant cette date et qu’il faut donc remonter plus loin en arrière; remontons donc un an en arrière, comme ils le font au Royaume-Uni. À mon avis, on ne peut pas suspendre l’action gouvernementale pendant aussi longtemps en empêchant le gouvernement de diffuser ses messages. Je sais qu’il y a des dispositions pour les messages d’urgence et pour la publicité, mais ce qu’il faut, c’est trouver un juste équilibre.

L’équilibre proposé dans ce projet de loi n’est pas idéal. On ne devrait pas avoir cet intervalle de temps durant lequel le gouvernement a l’avantage.

(1235)

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous comprends.

J’aimerais maintenant aborder brièvement une autre question que je souhaitais également poser à un témoin précédent, mais notre séance a été interrompue parce que le gouvernement a forcé la tenue d’un vote. Nous entendions le témoignage d’un groupe représentant les jeunes, Citoyenneté jeunesse, et je voulais interroger ses représentants sur les pièces d’identité. Comme vous en avez parlé vous aussi, je vais vous poser la question.

Cela concerne les activités d’éducation d’Élections Canada. L’une des choses que l’agence ne fait pas très bien et qu’elle devrait mieux faire — je voudrais savoir si vous partagez mon opinion —, c’est informer les gens sur la logistique du vote. Autrement dit, il existe toutes sortes de pièces d’identité différentes. Vous recommandez le rétablissement de la carte d’information de l’électeur, mais il existe actuellement 39 formules différentes. Je crois que beaucoup de gens ne connaissent pas les différentes options et risquent de se présenter au bureau de vote sans avoir l’un de ces documents parce qu’ils ne savent pas qu’ils en auront besoin.

J’aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez car, même la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants nous a dit, quand elle a comparu devant le comité récemment, qu’elle avait dû lancer elle-même une campagne pour informer les jeunes sur ces options. Je suppose que cela voulait dire qu’à son avis, Élections Canada ne fait pas un assez bon travail.

Croyez-vous qu’Élections Canada pourrait faire un meilleur travail pour informer les gens sur les options dont ils disposent?

M. Paul Thomas:

Je crois que les professionnels qui travaillent à Élections Canada seraient les premiers à admettre qu’ils pourraient mieux faire dans ce domaine, et je sais qu’ils font des plans là-dessus pour les prochaines élections. Il faut continuer à ouvrir des bureaux de vote sur les campus et à mener des campagnes de publicité pour expliquer aux gens ce qu’ils doivent faire pour voter. Nous savons bien qu’à cette étape de leur vie, les jeunes adultes pensent à beaucoup d’autres de choses, et il est donc important de faire un effort supplémentaire pour les inciter à voter.

Élections Canada l’a fait avec beaucoup de succès, lors des dernières élections, dans des communautés autochtones où elle avait auparavant diffusé relativement moins de messages au sujet de la nécessité de voter.

Je partage le principe général que vous avez énoncé. Je pense aussi qu’Élections Canada en est parfaitement consciente.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

C’est maintenant au tour de M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie les témoins qui sont ici et notre ami du Manitoba.

Je commence par vous, professeur Thomas. Le thème général de ce projet de loi m’apparaît de plus en plus clairement. Quand nous parlons à des spécialistes de différents domaines, nous voyons bien qu’il répond à deux objectifs.

Le premier consiste à réparer les dommages causés par le gouvernement précédent en supprimant la carte d’information de l’électeur, le système de répondant, etc. Tout cela a été présenté il y a 18 mois dans un projet de loi.

Le deuxième objectif est plus ambitieux, je suppose, car il s’agit de s’attaquer à des choses telles que le financement par des tierces parties, l’influence étrangère, les médias sociaux, etc.

Cette description du projet de loi vous semble-t-elle correcte?

M. Paul Thomas:

Oui. Je pense que le projet de loi découle de la dernière élection et qu’il y a longtemps qu’on aurait pu examiner le rapport de l’ancien DGE, Marc Mayrand. Le gouvernement a très mal géré ce dossier, à mon avis, et le fait que le projet de loi ait langui au Feuilleton pendant 18 mois montre bien qu’il n’était pas très déterminé à aller de l’avant, sans compter tout le temps qu’il a fallu pour nommer un DGE permanent.

Tout cela est regrettable. Nous avons maintenant un document de 350 pages dont nous essayons de comprendre toutes les dispositions avec leurs recoupements et leurs interactions. C’est très difficile à décortiquer. J’ai fait de mon mieux en utilisant le moteur de recherche de mon PDF pour essayer de repérer les parties que j’ai vraiment besoin de connaître en détail, mais cela n’a pas été facile, et pourtant je peux dire que je suis un spécialiste en la matière.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Même chose pour nous.

Je commence à croire que ma grand-mère avait raison quand elle me disait que mon imprévoyance ne l’empêchait pas de dormir. J’avais huit ans à l’époque. Ce qu’elle me disait alors résonne encore en moi aujourd’hui quand j’examine ce projet de loi. Alors que nous n’avons que quelques jours pour l’étudier, pratiquement toutes nos réunions ont été interrompues par des votes. Nous avons rarement pu tenir une réunion sans être interrompus. Pourtant, je partage certaines de vos remarques sur ce que j’appelle les dispositions qui facilitent l’exercice du droit de vote.

Il y encore plusieurs questions à régler, en ce qui concerne notamment la protection des renseignements personnels, l’échappatoire dont vous avez parlé au sujet de l’amalgame et la question de savoir si les restrictions prévues pendant la période préélectorale mettent le parti gouvernemental et les partis d’opposition sur un pied d’égalité.

Je me demande s’il ne faudrait pas scinder le projet de loi de façon à pouvoir adopter rapidement les éléments qui, malgré certaines contestations, font l’objet d’un consensus — je veux parler des éléments du projet de loi C-33. On a posé beaucoup de questions au sujet de la deuxième moitié du document: les tierces parties, l’échappatoire de l’amalgame et le fait qu’on n’impose pas assez de restrictions aux partis pour protéger les renseignements personnels. Que pensez-vous de cette suggestion?

(1240)

M. Paul Thomas:

On essaie de faire beaucoup de choses dans ce projet de loi. Jusqu’à présent, quand on réformait la loi électorale, on le faisait progressivement, idéalement sur la base du consensus le plus large possible des partis.

Ces dernières années, il y a eu des controverses partisanes sur ces réformes, peut-être parce qu’on a essayé de faire trop de choses en même temps, d’apporter des changements trop radicaux. Une chose que pourrait envisager votre comité, qui fait pas mal de bonnes choses — j’admire vraiment le travail que vous faites —, c’est confier la réforme de la loi électorale à un comité spécial après le dépôt du rapport annuel du directeur général des élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si j’hésite, c’est parce que Mme Sahota, M. Reid et moi-même avons fait partie de ce genre de comité spécial, qui a nécessité beaucoup de temps et d’argent. Cela a donné quelques résultats, mais pas beaucoup, comme l’a indiqué M. Cooke.

M. Paul Thomas:

Oui, je sais, mais ce…

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais bientôt manquer de temps. Je devrais surveiller ça de plus près.

Voyez-vous, monsieur Cooke, ce texte est en partie un projet de loi de restauration. Le problème qu’on a avec les renseignements personnels... Ce projet de loi risque d’être adopté tel, sans aucune modification — et pourtant, en ce qui concerne l’absence de consentement, de supervision et de vérification, ce qu’un ancien directeur général des élections avait qualifié de Far-West —, nous n’avons tout simplement pas de règles pour protéger les renseignements personnels ni pour régir la façon dont les partis peuvent utiliser les renseignements personnels des Canadiens.

Devrions-nous adopter ce projet de loi sous sa forme actuelle? Comment pouvons-nous donner aux Canadiens l’assurance que leurs données personnelles seront recueillies et conservées en toute sécurité?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

En juin 2011, la base de données du Parti conservateur du Canada a été piratée, avec les noms et adresses personnelles et électroniques de ses donateurs. Cela s’est produit…

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous parlez du scandale des appels automatisés?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Non, c’est ce qu’on a appelé en anglais le scandale des « pommes de terre sautées avec lesquelles le premier ministre s’était étouffé ». Je ne me souviens plus du nom du pirate. C’était un nom impossible à prononcer.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Exact.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Cela s’est produit. Je travaille en ingénierie où l’on dit toujours qu’après un temps plus ou moins long, tout système finit par tomber en panne. Ça veut dire que la sécurité des systèmes de votre parti, de mon parti ou de n’importe quel parti n’empêchera pas qu’il y aura un jour un piratage. C’est simplement une question de statistique. Quelles sont les procédures mises en place pour s’assurer que tous les partis appliquent les normes les plus élevées? La réponse à cela est à mon avis de donner au Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée le pouvoir d’intervenir et d’examiner nos systèmes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je crois que c’est vous — je vais dire que c’est vous pour le moment — qui avez proposé quelque chose de nouveau, une sorte de sceau d’or qui serait délivré par le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée à tous les partis présentant des candidats aux élections. Un peu avant le jour de l’élection — avant le dépôt du bref, idéalement —, le commissariat pourrait dire: « j’ai travaillé avec les Verts, j’ai travaillé avec les libéraux, j’ai travaillé avec les conservateurs, et voici les résultats: ces gens-là utiliseront vos données en toute sécurité ».

Je suppose que c’est un facteur que certains électeurs, au moins, prendraient en considération avant de voter.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Dans pratiquement toute organisation avec laquelle les électeurs et les Canadiens interagissent et qui doit respecter les lois sur la protection de la vie privée, il y a un risque. Un vérificateur externe pourrait venir faire une évaluation et dire: « Voici certaines lacunes que vous devriez combler. Pour le reste, nous pensons que ça va bien ». L’organisation aurait alors un certain délai pour combler ces lacunes. C’est comme ça que les banques, les sociétés de téléphonie et toutes les entreprises gèrent les données personnelles.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le gouvernement prétend que ces cas sont différents et que le sien est spécial.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Ce n’est pas ce que pensent la plupart des Canadiens.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quoi? Vous me faites de la peine.

Je vous repose la même question. Il y a certains aspects de ce projet de loi que vous approuvez, ceux qui visent à faciliter l’exercice du droit de vote, pour ainsi dire. Il y en a d’autres qui posent des problèmes ou qui suscitent des questions qui n’ont pas encore obtenu de réponses. D’après vous, que devrait faire le gouvernement avec ce projet de loi, étant donné qu’il ne reste que quelques jours de session et qu’Élections Canada dit avoir besoin que le projet de loi soit adopté d’ici au 1er mai?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

La méthode d’attribution du temps est regrettable.

M. Nathan Cullen: Absolument.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke: Comme vous le disiez, la planification... Si cela avait commencé plus tôt, si le comité spécial sur la réforme électorale avait produit de meilleurs résultats, la situation serait peut-être meilleure. Encore une fois, il faut peser les risques et les bénéfices. Je dirai qu’il faudrait que cela soit adopté…

M. Nathan Cullen:

... très bientôt.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

La totalité du projet de loi? C’est difficile à dire. Je m’abstiendrai de répondre pour le moment.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Qui sera le suivant? Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous parliez de technologie il y a quelques minutes. J’ai travaillé moi aussi dans le secteur de la technologie auparavant. Quelles sont les limites du rôle de la technologie dans les élections, selon vous?

(1245)

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Pour vous répondre, je vais mettre ma casquette d’électeur en plus de celle de membre d’un parti politique. La technologie est utile parce que nous voulons connaître les résultats rapidement et faire les choses de façon efficace, mais il faut aussi absolument préserver le bulletin papier. S’il y a le moindre doute sur la légitimité d’une élection, les Canadiens veulent avoir une trace écrite, être capables de faire des rapprochements et pouvoir envoyer leur propre grand-mère dépouiller le scrutin. C’est essentiel.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Surtout votre grand-mère…

M. Jean-Luc Cooke: Surtout ma grand-mère…

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’un de vous a parlé de quelque chose, mais je ne sais plus lequel. Nous parlions d’abaisser l’âge pour voter, plutôt que d’abaisser simplement l’âge pour s’inscrire. Est-ce que vous y seriez favorable?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Oui. Elizabeth May a justement présenté un projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire à cette fin. Ce serait très utile. Souvenez-vous quand vous aviez 16 ans, que vous alliez finir l’école secondaire juste avant les prochaines élections fédérales. Je pense que si vous exercez pour la première fois votre droit de vote avant de quitter le foyer familial pour aller poursuivre des études ou une carrière dans une autre ville, que vous vous initiez ainsi au processus démocratique avant de partir, vous êtes mieux en mesure, psychologiquement, de continuer à exercer votre droit de vote une fois que vous êtes à l’université ou que vous vous installez dans votre premier appartement. Je pense que c’est très important.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends tout à fait ce que vous voulez dire, car, à 16 ans, j’avais déjà fait trois campagnes électorales.

M. Nathan Cullen:

David, vous êtes spécial.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous savez, j’ai commencé à regarder CPAC dès sa création, et j’étais alors adolescent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je disais bien que vous étiez spécial.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous décidons d’abaisser l’âge pour voter, devrions-nous en faire autant pour l’âge des candidats?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

À moins que je ne me trompe, je crois que la Constitution dispose que quiconque est habilité à voter est aussi habilité à être candidat.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, nous pouvons aussi abaisser l’âge des candidats à 16 ans ou...

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Ce ne serait pas juste d’avoir des âges différents.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En effet.

Est-ce que 16 ans est le bon âge?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

C’est une question difficile. Certains d’entre nous seraient sans doute prêts à faire remarquer, non sans ironie, qu’il y a des adultes qui ne devraient pas avoir le droit de voter parce qu’ils n’ont pas fait l’effort de se renseigner sur le processus électoral. Mais vous ne pouvez pas administrer un test aux gens pour déterminer s’ils ont le droit de voter. Il faut bien fixer une limite d’âge, et il me semble qu’une personne qui a l’âge pour s’enrôler dans la réserve, entrer dans les forces armées, ou conduire un véhicule susceptible de tuer quelqu’un, a aussi la maturité nécessaire pour voter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En tout cas, il faut l’espérer.

Nous avons également parlé de la nécessité de réduire l’influence de l’argent dans le processus électoral, ce que j’approuve tout à fait. Je trouve frustrant, et je l’ai déjà dit au cours de débats sur des initiatives parlementaires, que quelqu’un qui fait un don de 100 $ mais n’a pas de revenus paie vraiment 100 $, alors que quelqu’un qui fait un don de 100 $ mais a d’importants revenus reçoit un remboursement de 25 $. Je suppose que c’est un problème qu’il faudra régler par voie d’initiative parlementaire.

Quand je parle à mes collègues d’imposer des limites au financement électoral, ils me posent toujours les questions suivantes: Que fait-on avec les bénévoles? Comment peut-on leur fixer des limites?

Comment peut-on limiter le travail des bénévoles?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Personnellement, je ne pense pas qu’on puisse limiter le travail des bénévoles, ce serait contraire aux intérêts de la démocratie, sans compter qu’on ne peut pas limiter le temps et l’énergie que quelqu’un veut investir dans une élection. Si vous voulez vraiment comptabiliser tout ça, je vous dirai que selon certaines théories économiques, la seule monnaie qui compte, c’est le temps, parce que c’est la chose dont nous disposons tous en quantité égale. Si un parti politique attire davantage de bénévoles, c’est manifestement parce qu’il réussit à rallier davantage de personnes à sa cause. C’est le test ultime pour quelqu’un qui veut se faire élire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous déjà été témoins — et je m’adresse à vous trois — d’usages frauduleux de la carte d’information de l’électeur?

M. Glenn Cheriton:

Je dois dire que oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous nous dire comment ça se passe?

M. Glenn Cheriton:

J’étais scrutateur et j’ai vu des gens arriver avec des cartes d’identification. Je leur ai demandé d’autres pièces d’identité et j’ai constaté que ce n’étaient pas les mêmes personnes. Dans certains cas, ils avaient le droit de voter, mais dans d’autres cas, il y avait un problème, dirons-nous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de fois cela vous est-il arrivé?

M. Glenn Cheriton:

Assez rarement. Le problème vient surtout de la confusion, parce que les gens ne votent pas au bon endroit ou parce qu’ils ont des difficultés à se rendre au bureau de vote. J’ai vu très peu de cas d’usage frauduleux de la carte d’identification de l’électeur, mais c’est arrivé quand même.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que c’est un problème suffisamment important pour que, par souci de prudence, on prive 160 000 personnes du droit de voter?

(1250)

M. Glenn Cheriton:

C’est d’autant plus cocasse que je faisais remarquer à Élections Canada qu’ils avaient négligé de prendre en compte, dans leur historique, le cas le plus important de privation du droit de vote qui se soit produit, à savoir les 170 000 Canadiens qui ont été envoyés, à une certaine époque, dans des camps de secours pour les chômeurs.

Je pense que, même au risque de se tromper, il vaut toujours mieux privilégier la participation. Oui, je préférerais que ce soit inclus, mais je crains que certains groupes soient inclus par déférence et que d’autres soient systématiquement exclus. À mon avis, si vous vous préoccupez pour les 160 000, vous devriez également vous préoccuper pour les 170 000 qui n’ont pas eu le droit de voter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’était à quelle époque?

M. Glenn Cheriton:

Ça s’est passé entre 1930 et 1936. Comme ils avaient été placés dans des camps de secours pour les chômeurs, ils ont perdu leur droit de vote. Et comme ils étaient sous commandement militaire, ils n’avaient plus accès aux soins de santé. Si vous lisez l’historique des services sociaux au Canada, vous saurez tout sur les camps de secours pour les chômeurs, l’indemnisation des accidents du travail, les conditions salariales, et ces gens-là voulaient avoir le droit de voter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes. Qui d’autre n’avait pas le droit de vote en 1936?

M. Glenn Cheriton:

Les Autochtones, les femmes au Québec…

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ces exemples sont-ils pertinents à la loi actuelle?

M. Glenn Cheriton:

Ils sont pertinents dans la mesure où on parle de privation du droit de vote, et c’est vous qui avez soulevé le problème. Si nous devons tirer des enseignements du passé, c’est en partie pour ne pas répéter les mêmes erreurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, il ne faut pas priver aujourd’hui du droit de vote ces 170 000 personnes. Je suis d’accord avec vous. Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Je vais maintenant donner la parole à M. Reid, pour cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Avant de poser mes questions, j’aimerais faire un bref commentaire.

Quand on parle des cas où les gens peuvent voter sans pièce d’identité, des mécanismes qui ont été mis en place comme la carte d’information de l’électeur, cela nous ramène à la question fondamentale de savoir comment déterminer si les gens ont le droit de voter. Certaines personnes se présentent, et ça m’est arrivé, avec une pièce d’identité, mais elles n’ont pas le temps de revenir. Dans d’autres cas, peut-être plus rares, elles n’ont même pas de pièce d’identité, mais vous ne voulez pas empêcher quelqu’un d’exercer son droit de vote. D’un autre côté, si trop de personnes votent de façon frauduleuse, ce sont tous les électeurs de la circonscription qui risquent d’être privés de leur droit de vote. Ce n’est pas rien. Alors quand on prétend qu’il n’y a jamais eu de votes frauduleux au Canada, c’est tout simplement ridicule.

Lorsque nous discutions de ce problème à l’époque du dernier gouvernement minoritaire, je me souviens d’avoir été contacté par l’épouse d’un candidat libéral, l’ancien député libéral du centre-ville de Toronto, car elle prétendait que son mari avait perdu les élections à cause de votes NPD frauduleux. Est-ce que c’était vrai? Je n’en sais rien, mais c’était suffisamment plausible pour qu’elle m’en parle. Il faut prendre cela très au sérieux.

Il y a une solution, et je l’ai proposée à la ministre. C’est ce qu’on fait dans d’autres pays, y compris dans des démocraties tout à fait respectables comme les États-Unis d’Amérique. Je veux parler du vote provisoire. Vous pouvez voter même si vous n’avez pas de pièce d’identité. Je me présente et je dis que je m’appelle Scott Reid. Le scrutateur me croit sur parole. Il glisse mon bulletin dans une enveloppe anonyme, comme pour un vote postal, avant de le glisser dans une deuxième enveloppe, que je signe. Après, ils vérifient si je suis bien la personne que je prétends être. Par la suite, ils font le total de ces bulletins, si c’est nécessaire, au cas où leur nombre soit supérieur à la marge du candidat vainqueur.

Ce n’est qu’une suggestion, qui permettrait de régler tout le problème. Je regrette qu’elle n’ait pas été retenue dans le projet de loi.

Mais la question que je voulais poser porte sur un tout autre sujet, monsieur Cooke. C’est celui du débat des chefs. Comme vous le savez, une commission responsable des débats va être mise sur pied, non pas au titre de ce projet de loi ou d’un autre, mais sous la houlette du gouvernement. Il est fort probable que la formule retenue pour les débats des chefs exclura la cheffe de votre parti. Ou sinon, ce sera quelqu’un d’autre qui sera exclu, peut-être le chef du Bloc. Cela pose un problème fondamental.

Je n’ai pas de solution à proposer au problème que pose l’absence d’une ligne de démarcation claire entre les grands partis et les autres. Qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Dans le cadre de ce projet de loi, et de bien d’autres auparavant, nous avons discuté de toutes les règles qui s’appliquent aux élections: les dépenses, la publicité, le droit du gouvernement de faire de la publicité, les tierces parties, les partis politiques, mais il n’y a toujours pas de règles pour les débats des chefs. Tout le monde s’entend pour dire que le débat des chefs est le moment décisif d’une campagne électorale, et pourtant, il n’est assujetti à aucune règle électorale. C’est tellement curieux que c’en est presque absurde, franchement.

Le Parti vert aimerait qu’une règle définisse qui a le droit de participer au débat des chefs.

(1255)

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne pense pas que vous aimeriez vraiment avoir une règle, car il est très facile d’en imaginer une qui limiterait le débat aux trois grands partis, si bien que les Verts seraient exclus, à moins que cette option vous soit acceptable. Je ne veux pas vous faire dire ce que vous n’avez pas dit.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Le Parti vert est prêt à accepter n’importe quelle règle qui soit claire. Supposons que la règle exige que, pour participer au débat, un parti politique doit avoir recueilli au moins 5 % des votes aux élections nationales précédentes. Je pense que le Parti vert serait prêt à accepter cela, car il saurait que c’est l’objectif qu’il lui faut atteindre.

M. Scott Reid:

Quel pourcentage avez-vous recueilli?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

La dernière fois? Je ne m’en souviens pas.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez pourquoi je pose la question, n’est-ce pas?

C’est l’un des grands problèmes que nous avons eus. Dans l’affaire Figueroa dont a été saisie la Cour suprême, M. Figueroa contestait une loi selon laquelle un parti devait avoir présenté des candidats dans un certain nombre de circonscriptions aux élections précédentes pour pouvoir obtenir certains droits aux élections suivantes, ce qui avait bien sûr pour objectif d’écarter les nouveaux partis qui ralliaient un électorat important. La loi avait été présentée par le gouvernement chrétien, après le succès soudain du Parti réformiste et du Bloc québécois aux élections. Le gouvernement voulait manifestement s’assurer que cela ne se reproduirait pas.

La cour a statué, à juste titre je pense, qu’il était anticonstitutionnel d’essayer d’étouffer des mouvements populistes comme le Parti réformiste et le Bloc québécois, que cela allait à l’encontre de l’article 3 de la Constitution. Vous voyez où je veux en venir? Si vous fixez un pourcentage des votes recueillis aux élections précédentes, cela veut dire que les préférences qui n’ont pas été exprimées pendant quatre ans valent en quelque sorte moins que les préférences qui ont été exprimées il y a quatre ans ou plus. Qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Oui et non. Supposons que le critère soit de 2 %. Soit dit en passant, le Parti vert serait toujours le dernier parti à répondre à ce critère.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Je pense que, même à 1 %, nous serions encore le seul parti à se qualifier.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a le Bloc aussi.

M. Jean-Luc Cooke:

Oui, vous avez raison.

Je pense qu’il serait souhaitable de fixer un pourcentage. À mon avis, la démocratie et le système électoral sont suffisamment solides pour que, si un nouveau mouvement ou parti populiste suscite beaucoup d’intérêt dans la population... sans aller jusqu’à l’inclure dans un débat des chefs à la première élection, car ce ne serait sans doute pas très sain sur le plan démocratique, on puisse envisager de l’inclure à la deuxième élection. Il s’agit simplement de remonter un peu plus loin en arrière. Autrement dit, appelons-le le Parti pourpre et supposons qu’il recueille 4 % des voix aux prochaines élections fédérales. Dans ce cas-là, il pourra être représenté au débat des chefs qui aura lieu pour les élections suivantes. Je pense que ce serait une solution raisonnable.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne suis pas d’accord avec vous, mais je vous ai demandé votre avis et je vous en remercie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Reid.

Nous allons terminer cette période de questions avec Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais commencer par vous remercier tous les trois d’avoir pris le temps de venir témoigner aujourd’hui.

Professeur Thomas, je vais commencer par vous. Je vous remercie des compliments que vous nous avez faits au sujet du travail accompli par le comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Je ne cherche pas à en avoir d’autres, mais je voudrais simplement vous dire que nous avons beaucoup travaillé la question dont nous discutons aujourd’hui. Le directeur général des élections est venu nous présenter son rapport, et nous avons consacré 22 réunions à l’examen de ce rapport, à raison de deux heures en moyenne par réunion.

Et d’ici la fin de cette semaine, nous aurons entendu, si mes calculs sont bons, une trentaine d’heures de témoignages. Les deux dernières journées ont été un peu plus difficiles parce que nous avons eu des votes, mais c’est pour ça que nous sommes ici. Je voulais simplement vous donner une idée du temps que nous avons consacré à toute cette question.

Vous avez dit une chose, et le directeur général des élections en a parlé dans son rapport à propos de certains des changements proposés dans ce projet de loi. Parmi ces changements, il y a la carte d’information de l’électeur et le répondant, ainsi que la préinscription des jeunes électeurs, et je crois que vous êtes favorable à ces mesures.

Y a-t-il d’autres dispositions du projet de loi qui retiennent particulièrement votre faveur et dont il vous semble important qu’elles soient mises en place avant les prochaines élections?

M. Paul Thomas:

Oui. Si vous vous reportez à mon mémoire, vous verrez que mes compliments vont bien au-delà de ce que j’ai dit aujourd’hui.

Je sais que vous avez fait une étude approfondie de toute la question, que vous avez publié trois rapports et que vous avez entendu le directeur général des élections par intérim, et peut-être M. Mayrand avant lui, donc je sais pertinemment que vous avez bien étudié la question. C’est la raison pour laquelle je pense que votre travail ne devrait pas être anéanti par la présentation tardive du projet de loi. Cela a compliqué les choses, car des mesures auraient dû être prises avant ce projet de loi. C’est ce que je pense.

Oui, il y a d’autres dispositions du projet de loi qui me plaisent tout particulièrement. Par exemple, le fait que le commissaire soit maintenant replacé dans le cadre administratif d’Élections Canada. J’ai déjà parlé du mandat éducatif qui sera donné au directeur général des élections. C’est important si l’on veut avoir une démocratie saine et dynamique.

Il y a aussi bien d’autres choses. Le projet de loi contient toutes sortes de détails sur la gestion des élections. Comme je le dis souvent, nous devrions nous éloigner de la tradition et élaborer des lois moins détaillées et moins prescriptives. Étant donné le monde dynamique dans lequel nous vivons, nous devrions accorder à Élections Canada davantage d’autonomie et de champ d’action pour s’adapter aux changements technologiques et aux nouvelles pratiques politiques, et lui donner en quelque sorte une panoplie d’instruments à utiliser, le cas échéant.

Par exemple, j’aime bien l’idée qu’on ne soit plus obligé de poursuivre devant un tribunal celui qui enfreint les règles sur les dépenses électorales, car cela coûte du temps et de l’argent. Il faut trouver une meilleure solution. Nous avons la procédure des transactions, maintenant. Et il va falloir élaborer toute cette panoplie d’instruments dont je viens de parler.

Quand j’ai fait des études là-dessus, j’ai constaté que le commissaire britannique aux élections avait beaucoup plus de pouvoirs en ce qui concerne la gestion des élections. Comme je l’ai dit, ce projet de loi propose un certain nombre de choses qui vont dans ce sens, comme l’embauche de la moitié du personnel avant la fin de la période pendant laquelle les partis peuvent proposer des directeurs du scrutin. C’est un pas dans la bonne direction, surtout dans le contexte actuel.

Donc oui, nous allons dans la bonne direction. Mais je pense qu’à plus long terme, il faudrait déléguer davantage de pouvoirs statutaires et de pouvoirs de réglementation. C’est ce dont a besoin un organisme électoral moderne.

(1300)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Monsieur le président, avons-nous un exemplaire de ce rapport? Je n’en ai pas ici.

Le président:

Vous voulez parler de son rapport?

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Oui, il est actuellement en cours de traduction, mais nous devrions le recevoir très prochainement.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien.

Monsieur Thomas, nous n’avons pas votre mémoire devant les yeux, car il est en cours de traduction.

M. Paul Thomas:

Ce sera un bon remède à vos insomnies.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Ce que vous dites au sujet du ciblage des électeurs m’a particulièrement intéressée. Je sais que c’est une question difficile, mais pourriez-vous me donner des précisions?

Vous avez dit combien il est important de faire participer certains groupes, par exemple les jeunes et les personnes handicapées, et bien sûr, nous voulons encourager la participation des électeurs. Mais vous nous mettez en garde contre ce genre de ciblage. Il ne reste plus beaucoup de temps, mais pourriez-vous nous dire comment on pourrait augmenter la participation des électeurs sans aller jusqu’à cibler certains groupes, ce que vous dénoncez?

M. Paul Thomas:

Je ne me suis pas très bien exprimé, je vais essayer d’être plus clair.

Élections Canada ne peut pas jouer le rôle de rabatteur d’électeurs. Il peut leur dire quels sont les critères à respecter pour pouvoir voter, comment ils peuvent voter, et quelles sont les modalités possibles, comme le vote à domicile, par exemple. Je crois que ce qu’il manque dans ce projet de loi, c’est la possibilité pour les employés des établissements de soins à long terme d’être les répondants des résidents, à l’intérieur de ces établissements. C’est pourtant ce qui se fait et c’est normal.

Je crois qu’Élections Canada prêterait le flanc à la controverse s’il jugeait de son mandat d’augmenter le taux de participation des jeunes Canadiens. Les partis politiques ne manqueraient pas d’interpréter cela comme du favoritisme à l’égard d’un parti et pas d’un autre. Il faut donc que cela se fasse pour tous les groupes démographiques, mais comme je l’ai dit, certains groupes nécessiteront des efforts particuliers pour ce qui est de la logistique.

La ligne de démarcation est très floue.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Encore une fois, nous avons eu une excellente discussion avec des témoins très intéressants. Merci à tous d’être venus et de nous avoir présenté de nouveaux points de vue.

Pour en revenir à notre programme de travail, je vous rappelle qu’après la période des questions, nous entendrons trois groupes de témoins. Les deux premiers seront composés de quatre témoins chacun, et le dernier, qui comparaîtra de 17 h 30 à 18 h 30, sera composé de représentants de Twitter et de Facebook, ce qui promet d’être animé.

Pour le moment, nous n’avons rien de prévu pour lundi. Comme nous avons des affaires courantes à régler, je vous propose de le faire lundi après-midi, à moins que vous ayez une autre suggestion, parce que Nathan n’est pas disponible lundi matin.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tout de suite, ce n’est pas possible, car j’ai une école qui m’attend à l’Édifice du centre. Je ne peux pas rester.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Moi aussi, j’ai une école qui m’attend.

Un député: Va-t-il y avoir des votes?

(1305)

Le président:

Pas que je sache.

M. Nathan Cullen:

On m’a dit qu’il y aurait des votes après la période des questions. J’ai peut-être mal compris.

Le président:

À 15 h 30, nous nous retrouverons donc ici avec les trois groupes de témoins.

Dans cette même salle, n’est-ce pas, monsieur le greffier?

Le greffier:

Non, ce sera dans la salle 430.

Le président:

Nous nous retrouverons donc dans une autre salle de ce même édifice.

Scott, lundi après-midi pour régler certaines affaires courantes...

M. Scott Simms:

Volontiers.

Le président:

Lundi après-midi, après la période des questions, nous nous réunirons pour régler certaines affaires courantes.

Nous nous retrouverons tout à l’heure dans la salle 430.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 07, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.