header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-06-06 PROC 112

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1825)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good evening. Welcome to the 112th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Our first two panels, we didn't quite get to. We gave them the option of coming back at 8:30 p.m. or sending a written submission. Two are coming back at 8:30 p.m., so we're going to our third panel. We are joined by Vivian Krause, researcher and writer; Gary Rozon, auditor, Gary Rozon CMA Inc.; Talis Brauns, mediation officer, and John Akpata, peace officer, both from the Marijuana Party; and from the Marxist-Leninist Party of Canada, Anna Di Carlo, national leader, national headquarters.

Thank you for making yourselves available to appear.

We will start with you, Ms. Krause. Please make your opening statement.

Ms. Vivian Krause (Researcher and Writer, As an Individual):

Good evening, everyone. Bonsoir, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee. [Translation]

I will make my presentation in English, but I'll be happy to answer your questions in either language afterwards.[English]

Thank you very much for inviting me to join you this evening to contribute to your work in relation to Bill C-76. My understanding is that you are interested in my input with regard to the issue of undue foreign influence in Canadian elections; therefore, I will do my best to speak to that first.

By way of background, perhaps it would be of interest to the committee for me to introduce myself briefly and to sum up why I believe undue foreign influence in our elections is a serious issue not only for our country but also for the sovereignty of our country.

By way of background, I am a Canadian citizen. I'm a resident of North Vancouver. For the last 10 years I have been following the money and the science behind environmental activism and, more recently, behind elections activism. I have done all my work on my own initiative. I am not funded or directed by anyone, and I've written a series of articles that sum up most of my work published in the Financial Post and elsewhere.

As you may be aware from some of the articles I've written, there is a significant extent to which non-Canadian influence had an impact in the 2015 federal election in our country. I reported this extensively to Elections Canada. I would just sum up for you briefly that there are at least three U.S.-based organizations that have claimed credit for having had a significant influence in the 2015 federal election. Two of these are Corporate Ethics International, based in San Francisco, and the Citizen Engagement Laboratory, based in Oakland, California.

How do we know these American organizations influenced the outcome of the 2015 federal election? Well, we know this because they've told us in writing. I'll cite one example.

In the 2015 annual report of the Online Progressive Engagement Network, which is part of the Citizen Engagement Laboratory, its executive director, referring to the year 2015, wrote: We ended the year with...a Canadian campaign that moved the needle during the national election, contributing greatly to the ousting of the conservative Harper government.

That's a written statement by the executive director of a non-Canadian organization. How do they do that? Well, the Citizen Engagement Laboratory has a project called the Online Progressive Engagement Network, OPEN for short, and it had a program called strategic incubation. That program helped to create, launch, and back behind the scenes a Canadian-based organization called Leadnow, based in Vancouver.

Leadnow, with the support of OPEN, ran a “get the vote out” campaign in the 2015 and 2011 federal elections. In the 2015 federal election in particular, they ran a campaign that targeted Conservative incumbents in 29 ridings. In some of these ridings, it stands to reason that this group had an impact. For example, in Winnipeg, in the Elmwood—Transcona riding, where Leadnow had full-time staff for more than a year, as far as I'm aware, the incumbent was defeated by only 61 votes.

Bill C-76 aims to close some of the loopholes that have allowed non-Canadian influence in our federal elections. I understand that a lot of work has gone into the preparation of this bill, and as a Canadian I would like to acknowledge and thank everyone who's worked so hard on it so far. I regret to say, though, that unfortunately I think with the way the bill stands today, what happened in the 2015 election would be able to occur and reoccur. I don't see that this bill has been changed in the ways that would be needed to deter and in fact make illegal what happened in 2015 and keep it from happening again.

Specifically, I would refer the committee to proposed section 282.4 under “Undue influence by foreigners”. It's paragraph 282.4(1)(b) in particular that I think needs some work.

I'll leave it at that as my opening comments, Mr. Chairman, and I would be glad to answer any questions that you may have.

(1830)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That was great.

Now we'll go to Mr. Rozon.

Mr. Gary Rozon (Auditor, Gary Rozon CMA Inc., As an Individual):

I'm Gary Rozon. I'm an independent auditor. I work, obviously, independently. I work with all parties. I think I have a client or two in this room right now. I've been doing this for over 10 years. Before that, I worked at Elections Canada, so I have a perspective of how things work from the inside.

One of the things on which I've always thought the punishment didn't fit the crime is the issue of making people and agents go to court to file extension deadlines.

For those of you who don't know, after an election, for example, you have four months to file. After the four-month deadline, you have to have either filed or asked for an extension from Elections Canada, which is usually always granted. If you are late and you don't have your paperwork in or you didn't file the extension, you have to go to court to get an extension. This is costly, in the $4,000 to $6,000 range. I'm sure that some of you, as members of Parliament, may not even know. You trust your financial agents and your official agents to handle the money, and for the most part, they do a very good job, but sometimes—human nature—it slips. They forget the deadline. They have to go to court, and the costs are in the $5,000 range and more. For some of the major parties that have the cash or the riding associations or the campaigns that can pay this, it's the cost of doing business, but the same rule applies to people running independently who hardly spend any money, or to someone from the smaller parties who might have raised a couple of thousand dollars. For them to be hit with a $4,000 or $5,000 penalty, as I said, the penalty exceeds the crime.

The same applies to the riding associations that had the May 31 deadline. I've been working with them. It's always a rush for those who forgot about the date. If you have new agents, the dates aren't burned into their brain like they are with some of the rest of us who do this all the time.

One way to get around it, I would suggest—and I've suggested it with some of the agents I've been working with for years—is that in the matter of a campaign, where you're getting back 60% of your spending from Elections Canada.... To make round numbers, if you spend $100,000, Elections Canada is going to give you back $60,000. I'll say that you motivate people the best way you can, and for most people, that's money.

I would do away with the court side of things. I would say that if they did four months, they needed an extension, they got it, they got an extra 30 days, and they still couldn't file after a few days, don't send them to court. I would say to take 10% off every month. Instead of 60%, it would be, “No, you missed the extra month and you're now getting 50%. You missed another month? You're now getting 40%.” That paperwork would get filed faster than any court would ever do.

I'm not going to mention names, but I know that one person in this room had to go through that with their riding association. The file went into Elections Canada. The agent didn't know that Elections Canada puts the “dead” in “deadline”, and he thought, “Close enough.”

Everybody is pointing.

Voices: Oh, oh!

(1835)

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

I feel like it's a murder mystery now.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

To be clear, everybody in the room is looking at me.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Let the record show, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Gary Rozon:

That's why I didn't name names.

To me, it's just crazy. In the one case that I'm speaking of, he got the paperwork in. He was in the Elections Canada mailroom, but they flat out refused to open it until they.... He had to go to court. The judge is like, “I went to law school for this?” He got the court order. Then it came to Elections Canada, and they opened it. It just seems like overkill. That's the main thing. It's equal until it gets down to the little guys. They're being asked to pay $4,000 or $5,000, as well. It's overkill. If this ever goes back to Elections Canada, I hope they take advantage of that.

My other totally self-serving item is this. Over the years, we've all seen the indexing of campaign spending limits for elections. We've all seen the indexing of contribution limits, which I'm sure some of you totally appreciate. They have not indexed the Elections Canada subsidy in about 15 years. Every year we are asked/told to do more, and with inflation we're getting less. That ends up going back onto your riding associations and your campaigns, when there is more audit work that has to be done before going to elections.

That's my semi self-serving.... The main thing is that I wish we could do something to keep these kinds of things out of the courts.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Well, thank you.

I can assure you Elections Canada is watching this very closely, so I'm sure they'll give that due consideration.

We'll go to Anna with the Marxist-Leninist Party.

Ms. Anna Di Carlo (National Leader, National Headquarters, Marxist-Leninist Party of Canada):

It's the Marxist-Leninist Party of Canada.

Esteemed members, I'm very happy to be here.

I'll start by saying I'm quite familiar with the election law, and I have been since about 1991 when we had the Spicer and the Lortie commissions, the last time that any really serious study of the electoral law was done.

We also have a lot of experience being on the receiving end of the unfair and undemocratic aspects of the law since 1972, when we started participating in elections.

In our opinion, Bill C-76 is a missed opportunity. It missed the opportunity to uphold democratic principles and to contribute to alleviating the perception we have today that party governments don't have the consent of the governed. It did nothing to address how the electoral process and electoral results themselves don't inspire confidence that a mandate that is supported by the majority of Canadians has actually been achieved.

I'd like to highlight just two problems today, because of the brief amount of time we have. One is the right to an informed vote and the need to have equality of all those who stand for election. The other is the matter of privacy.

The unequal treatment of candidates results from the privileges accorded to the so-called major parties, and it violates the right to an informed vote. We're told that we have political equality because of an even playing field that is supposed to be created by the fact that everybody has to meet the same criteria. For example, everybody has to do exactly the same things to become a candidate. Everybody has to respect the spending limits and so on. On top of this, we're told that public funding mitigates the inequalities we have.

All of this is meaningless when privileges are accorded to some, and the rationale is presented that only the so-called major parties are considered to be contenders for government, and that therefore, only they deserve to be heard. Others are dismissed as being fringe or incidental. This is not democratic by any standard. The only ones who see these arguments and don't see that they're undemocratic are those who are passing laws.

Canadians see it for what it is: a violation of fundamental democratic principles that exacerbates the crisis of credibility and legitimacy of both the electoral law and governments.

I'd like to give just one example of how this time around we could have taken the opportunity to address this problem. For over 17 years now, the Chief Electoral Officer has been recommending that the allocation formula in the law be removed from the privileged status now in the formula that's in the law, and instead that allocation be on an equal basis, particularly the free time. I sit on the advisory committee of Elections Canada, and I attend the broadcast meetings, and this very simple recommendation that the free time should both be increased and allocated equally has been rejected repeatedly for 17 years because, as has been said, it needs to be referred to study.

In the next election, we'll face the same situation in which, first of all, the parties in the House will have the majority of time, and within that, the Liberal Party—the ruling party—will have the lion's share of that time, while the smaller political parties get a token, not to mention all the complications with the airing of it.

The second point I'd like to make relates to privacy. We stand with the Privacy Commissioner in believing that political parties should be subject to the law. We see no reason why they shouldn't. I want to highlight the hypocrisy in this, because even if political parties are subject to the privacy law and PIPEDA, the election law itself, in our opinion, violates the right to privacy.

The election law does not recognize the right to informed consent, in our opinion. In 2006, the Conservative Party, when it was in the vanguard of micro-targeting with its constituent information management system, used the power that it had at that time, although all the parties agreed, to introduce unique, permanent identification numbers for electors, and to introduce bingo cards, the practice of Elections Canada workers that replaces the work that was once done by scrutineers to inform the political parties as to who has voted when. They don't tell them how they voted, but with data analytics, we're very close to that situation.

(1840)



The Conservative Party wanted the ID numbers so as to make data integration and micro-targeting easier. The bingo cards were designed to address the problem of not having enough volunteers, which is a problem that all political parties are facing. In our opinion, again, this violates the principle of informed consent. It is just wrong. Electors should have the right to not have their unique ID numbers handed over to political parties to facilitate uploading their information into elector databases. They should also have the right to opt out of having their names put on the bingo cards, so that parties know whether they've voted or not voted.

Finally, I want to make a different point about these developments. Privacy is one concern, but the significance of this development in campaigning, which involves tracking electors and building profiles about them, is of greater concern to us. In our opinion, it does nothing to raise the level of political discourse in the country. It's not enhancing the involvement of people in the political process. The privacy debate, which is focused on things such as the Cambridge Analytica scandal or Facebook and how it's being used, clouds precisely how micro-targeting is impacting the process and particularly how it relates to political parties fulfilling their purported role of being primary political organizations and being the organizations through which people are involved in debating and discussing the problems facing the society, and in deciding the agenda and policies the society needs.

Our conclusion is that these developments, along with the fact that there hasn't been a serious study of what's going on in the electoral process since 1991-92, requires that we have public deliberations on all the fundamental premises of the electoral process to renew it once again: how mandates are arrived at; how candidates are selected; the use of public funds; and the fact that all people and all members of the polity, regardless of whether or not they belong to a political party, should be treated as equals.

How do we achieve this? Our position is that funding the process should take priority and should replace funding political parties. We think political parties should raise funds from their own members and not be recipients of state funding. So long as state funds are allocated, they have to be allocated on an equal basis. Otherwise, we have a situation where power and privilege are influencing the outcome of elections.

Those are the opening remarks I wanted to make.

(1845)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. You can rest assured that you've brought some views to us that we haven't heard before.

We'll go to Mr. Brauns from the Marijuana Party. Hopefully, we're making you obsolete.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Talis Brauns (Mediation Officer, Marijuana Party):

[Witness speaks in Latvian]

I am Talis Brauns. I am a Canadian Latvian born in Montreal. I have spent half my adult life working on foreign aid projects in eastern Europe on the development of non-governmental society and the acquis communautaire program in the European Commission.

Why am I here today? There was a sad incident in my private life that resulted in a deer tick infection, Lyme disease, and encephalitis that affected my family members. In doing research and in contact with the medical community, I began checking out the possibilities of the cannabis plant.

For the last 10 years, I have studied and actively participated in most of the major marijuana court cases. With the cannabis act, I see big loopholes and I see lots of opportunities for the Marijuana Party, which, by the way, is the most popular party in Canada.

The Chair:

On division.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Talis Brauns:

I'd like to quickly read an article. We are a party of eccentrics. It's kind of like herding cats. We have a full range from orthodox Christians to narco-socialists, and our previous party whip, Marc Boyer , only had a statement of birth and with that he was able to become a candidate and an officer of the Marijuana Party. He did not have a driver's licence. He did not have any bills to his name. His father was a municipal accountant who in World War II served in the Canadian Forces. With the end of the war and the turmoil in the British Empire, the king promised the officer corps that their children would not be liable for the war debt.

At the age of 65, Marc requested his pension and it went from the pension office to the Prime Minister's Office, to the Speaker of the House, and right now I believe it's on Brigadier-General Rob Delaney's desk. He's the Canadian Forces provost marshal.

Another extreme in our party is the futurists. These are computer literates who want to be able to have direct democracy, to be able to vote with their phones, to have electronic online identification as in the Estonian model, which I am aware of and well versed in.

I would like to read a small article. It's called “Persons For Idiots”, “The Tender for Law: Persons for Idiots”, (c) 2014, Rogue Support Inc., under a Creative Commons attribution-noncommercial-noderivs. 3.0 unported licence: All of you reading have, at one point or another, encountered the term “PERSON”. After very little investigation, you are forced to accept the realization that you are not a PERSON, rather you HAVE a PERSON. This distinction is the first “lie of ommission” that you will encounter in the world of the “LEGAL”. THE TENDER FOR LAW axiom “LEGAL=SURETY AND ACCOUNTING” makes navigating “law” a lot simpler, and it’s very easy to spot the lies of ommission/ambiguity. You did not create this PERSON and it has nothing to do with you. THIS ONE FACT is lost on most, and can lead to JOINDER if you are not careful. When asked if you are a PERSON, some of you will answer that you are a NATURAL PERSON. This is a really dumb thing to claim in COURT because you are making several DECLARATIONS by saying so! First, you are DECLARING that you are in their JURISDICTION. Not only are you DECLARING that you are in their JURIDICTION, but you are also DECLARING that you do NOT enjoy LIMITED LIABILITY. This, of course, means you have 100% SURETY. Let me say that again: If you DECLARE in COURT that you are a NATURAL PERSON, you DECLARE that you accept 100% SURETY. NATURAL PERSON = “picking up the tab”. INDIVIDUAL=SURETY

This is something that comes from the futurists. It was penned by someone who has run for public office in the city of Toronto. He has two trust law degrees and for five hours gave me a dressing down, accusing me of being a complete fraud whose attempts to represent the public would not be to the good.

This is my situation.

Thank you for inviting me.

(1850)

The Chair:

Thank you all very much for coming.

Now we will do some rounds of questions from the parties.

We will start with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Ms. Krause, I was very interested in the example you gave. That's why I like doing this exercise of bringing in witnesses, because we get to hear examples we have not heard before.

I know of Leadnow. I don't know about the company in California. You made the statement that they would not be captured under the new bill we're studying here today. In this new bill, however, one of the few things we're attempting to do is to look at partisan activity, election spending, and election surveys, expanding the definition of what they were before. On foreign parties, in the case of the company in California, what specific activities were they involved in with Leadnow? Of those three categories, was there one or all?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Could you remind me of the three categories?

Mr. Scott Simms:

They are election activity—basically events of that nature; specific advertising, whatever form it may be, through whatever media; and of course, election surveys, expending to get information from within.

Can you drill down on how they were involved?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

This is the thing. The way that foreign influence is occurring is by having most of its impact outside of the election period. By the time the writ is dropped, they have accomplished so much.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'll get to that in a moment, but I want to get back to the activity they were doing. I just want to figure out exactly what they were doing, because I know what Leadnow was doing.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I can't tell you exactly what they did during the election period, but I can tell you the types of things that they do.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Leadnow or the company in the U.S.?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

The American organization. It's a charitable organization.

As far as I can tell, this American organization is the parent organization of Leadnow.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, I see.

(1855)

Ms. Vivian Krause:

It's called the Citizen Engagement Laboratory, and it has a program called the Online Progressive Engagement Network.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do they consider themselves as having—pardon the expression—given birth to Leadnow?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

They have a program called strategic incubation. The executive director is an individual named Ben Brandzel. He came to Canada and worked with Leadnow here to help them with the launch. His organization, OPEN, provides a number of types of assistance. I can give you a couple of examples, if you give me a minute.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, absolutely.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

There are a couple things about OPEN. This is the American organization that appears to me to be the parent organization of Leadnow. They say they work seamlessly across borders. They say in writing that they keep a low profile because of the sensitive political implications of their work. They say they provide “special access to best-in-class external resources ranging from video production to management coaching”.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm sorry to cut you off, but I don't have a lot of time. I know I just gave you the time, and I'm now taking it back. I apologize.

They say it's seamless activity they're doing between the two, right? In this bill we're trying to pinpoint, become more transparent, and try to catch right there where they're being directly involved in the election. To me it seems that Leadnow is the one that's being directly involved, and the association with the American organization is really—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I would argue that it's a pretty blurry line between Leadnow and OPEN, because they work seamlessly across borders and because of the type of activity that the American organization provides. It's everything from ghostwriting and video production to coaching, strategic support, training, etc.

Here's another example. After the 2015 federal election, in January 2016, the spokesperson for Leadnow, Amara Possian, who is currently running for office in the Ontario provincial election, travelled to Australia where she was given an award by the American organization for helping to defeat the Conservative Party. That's the type of thing they do. It's right from the get-go, from creating the original organization to continuing....

Then, just to give you another example, Canadian members of Leadnow went to Australia to help on the American campaign in Australia. So it's not just Canada.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm not trying to evade the subject. Don't get me wrong. I'm just short on time, and I'm trying to pinpoint—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

The point I'm trying to make is that they're working behind the scenes—

Mr. Scott Simms:

When you look at the legislation that we're to put in place, where would you go to make that line less blurry? Where would you go to make sure there's a true delineation between what is a foreign entity and its Canadian counterpart?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

That's a very difficult question, but I'll tell you the way I see it.

As I mentioned, it's in proposed paragraph 282.4(1)(b). That paragraph defines a “foreign entity”. It says that you're not allowed to influence elections if you are “a corporation or entity incorporated, formed or otherwise organized outside Canada”. If you were to end it there, then OPEN and all these other groups would be identified as foreign entities.

The trouble is that it goes on to exclude from that any entities that carry on business in Canada or “whose only activity carried on in Canada during an election period consists of doing anything to influence electors during that period”.

In other words, the foreign organization just has to do something—it could be bottle collecting, recycling, anything—so that it's not only conducting election-related activities.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see what you mean.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

It's because of the way that is written that pretty much any organization can be exempt.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm sorry. I wasn't being dismissive of you. I just realized that I'm out of time, but I thank you for that. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair, and thanks to all of you for being here tonight.

I'll pick up with you as well, Ms. Krause. I want to ask some questions of a similar nature, but I want to start with this one, because a number of people, you included, have raised these issues about the last election in particular in terms of the concerns about foreign funding, what that might mean, what kinds of implications there might be if something isn't done to try to deal with what might be a problem out there, and what the implications might be for future elections. There has been a lot of talk about the current election in Ontario, which is going on right now, in terms of what might be happening there.

I might get to that in a second, but I wanted to start with this question: would you say it's possible that foreign funding may have changed the outcome of the last federal election?

(1900)

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Is it possible?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Well, if we do the math, the answer is clearly yes, right? I don't mean for a moment to take away from the efforts of the political party that won, but if you do the math.... Leadnow, for example, takes credit for defeating 26 Conservative incumbents. Well, of course they didn't do that, but as I mentioned, they probably may have had an impact in a few ridings. How many ridings? Well, that depends, but it may have been enough to make the difference between a minority and a majority government.

The important thing to note is that I don't think it's so much.... I wouldn't make that argument, but here's the thing. Basically what they did in the 2015 election was their first crack at it. This was a brand new organization. It was just starting. That's what they accomplished in basically their kindergarten year. What are they going to be able to accomplish in the next election? They managed to engage half a million Canadians. That never would have been possible, I don't think, if they hadn't had the assistance of their American parent organization.

What we have is a system that isn't robust to this sort of outside influence. If we want to deter it, then we need to change our system.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Obviously, when you talk about the kinds of numbers they are bragging about, it would have had an influence. You're right. It's hard to measure whether what they're saying is accurate or not, but I think the one thing we can do is try to determine to what extent there was involvement by foreign funding. You've obviously taken a pretty good look at this. What can you tell us about that? To what extent...? What kinds of numbers are we talking about here?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I'll give you an example.

This organization, Leadnow, claims that it is the brainchild of two university students and a throughly Canadian youth-led movement, but that is not the whole story. The truth is that their original business plan, which I stumbled across on the Internet, had a $16-million budget over 10 years. That's the kind of scope that they set out to work with from the get-go.

I've spoken with the founders of Leadnow, the individuals who refer to themselves as the founders, Adam Shedletzky and Jamie Biggar. They told me that, yes, they had an anonymous donor. I encouraged them. I said, “Look, you guys, you had a significant influence in the election, so how about talking with your anonymous donor and at the very least telling us whether that donor was Canadian or from outside the country?” I said, “At the very least, clear up that question.” No answer was forthcoming.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure, and I think this goes without saying, but I would love to hear your opinion: is this something we should be worried about? I don't mean just that specific instance you're referring to. I mean the fact that there is the ability for people to give potentially unlimited amounts of money from outside of Canada and there's no way to know who the individual or organization might be. Is that something we should be concerned about?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I think the important point or perhaps one of the most important points I could leave with you is that this wasn't done for no reason. This wasn't done because of how Canada has treated aboriginal people or because of how we've treated immigrants. This was done because of oil.

The American charitable foundations that fund the Citizen Engagement Laboratory, in fact created it. It is funded by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the Tides foundation, and other donors who fund an entity called the tar sands campaign.

When this campaign first began 10 years ago, we didn't know what it was about. The motivations of the funders were not clear, but now they are, because the individual who has been directing this campaign for more than a decade, Michael Marx, said, “From the very beginning, the campaign strategy was to land-lock the tar sands so their crude could not reach the international market where it could fetch a high price per barrel.”

That is the campaign that has been funding Leadnow. Leadnow was funded and supported behind the scenes as part of the American-funded campaign to landlock our crude and essentially keep Canada over a barrel.

I think the thing that's significant is that this wasn't done for no reason. It was in fact done for the sake of something that's costing us billions.

(1905)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think the point you're making as well, if I'm not mistaken, is that it wasn't done to try to do anything that would be beneficial or helpful to Canada or Canadians or any group of Canadians, for that matter, but it was simply for the benefit of outside interests.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Yes, it was to defeat the politicians who were in favour of breaking the U.S. monopoly on our oil. That was the reason there was this U.S.-funded involvement in the 2015 federal election.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't have a lot of time left now, but we'll start on it and we can always continue.

You mentioned proposed new section 282.4. That's something I think we should take very seriously and have a look at. We appreciate your raising that with us. What else needs to be changed in order to properly deal with this threat?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I've given that a lot of thought, and I really struggle to give you an easy answer. I don't think there is one. One thing strikes me, and this is quite different from anything that is currently mentioned in the act. I think a question we need to ask ourselves as Canadians is if we agree that it should be legal, lawful, for Canadians to assist, to support the campaign of a foreign country to harm our own country, or in fact, whether that is something that we want to make illegal. Should it be legal or illegal for Canadians to hurt the economy of our own country to the benefit of another country? That's a muddier question.

If we're okay with that being lawful, then we have nothing to do, but if we're not okay with that, then we have some serious work to do.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses.

Do you mean for a Canadian to hurt the economy for other Canadians, like a bitumen spill on the west coast would hurt the Canadian economy probably for other Canadians?

You used to work in the farmed salmon industry, right?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Yes, I have, 15 years ago.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You clearly care about salmon.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Wild salmon in particular, yes, I do.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That would hurt the Canadian economy, wouldn't it? If, say, somebody advocated from outside of Canada to water down Canadian environmental laws, pipeline regulations, for example, that would be a threat to the Canadian economy, certainly the B.C. economy, wouldn't it?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

No, I think that's quite a different issue.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It is? So weakening Canadian environmental laws set to protect things like wild salmon—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

No, hang on. Environmental laws are not an industry. They're the regulation of an industry. You're comparing apples and oranges here.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No. You said we should make it against the law for anyone to help a Canadian do something that would hurt the economy for other Canadians. If somebody advocated with, say, foreign money to weaken Canadian environmental regulations that would put the Canadian economy at greater risk, that would be doing exactly what you just said.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Sir, weakening regulations is not an industry.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I know it's not. The oil industry is an industry.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You've done investigations mostly about so-called progressive groups or left-wing groups. Is that right?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I've also looked into many, all of the right-wing think tanks.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are you okay with their receiving foreign funds?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I think no matter whether...if it's foreign funding, whether it's in industry or in the charitable sector, no matter what point in the political spectrum it's on, it should be disclosed.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So you're okay with right-wing think tanks receiving money if it's disclosed?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I'm actually okay with left-wing think tanks receiving money too, but it should be disclosed. The same rules should apply to everyone, no matter where you fall on the political spectrum.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You said you're not funded by industry.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

No.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You've never taken any speaking fees or anything like that.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

When I say I'm not funded, I say that the work I have done I have never been paid to do. I did it starting in about 2006 and—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Did you work for—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Please let me finish my sentence, sir.

I didn't do any speaking engagements until six years later, so by logic, my work was not funded by industry, seeing that most of it took place before I ever did any sort of speaking.

(1910)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But you take fees from industry and that makes it more—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

You know, sir, in the last month I've spoken in Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, Kitimat, in your riding, and in Victoria, and I haven't been paid for any of it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's okay to answer the question. If you've received speaking fees from the oil and gas sector and from the mining sector—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—that's okay to say.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I'm happy to say it and I'm proud to say it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. It just took a while to get there.

The question is did you worry about the $1.2 million that came from foreign fish farm companies to the B.C. government when it was run by Christy Clark?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Hang on a second here. We're here to talk about Bill C-76.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Absolutely. We're talking about foreign influence.

You said that as a principle, you have a problem with foreign influence on Canadian political actors.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I think it should be disclosed. Even Leadnow is a progressive organization and as such, it has every right to be part of an international network.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So what is it they're not disclosing?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

What is not okay is for it to portray itself exclusively as a thoroughly Canadian youth-led movement when in fact there's more to it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sure.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

It's also part of a U.S. network of organizations that deliberately seek to swing elections.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So if I go to the website of the Fraser Institute, which portrays itself as a uniquely Canadian institution taking three-quarters of a million dollars from the Koch brothers who have expressly said they want more lenient oil and gas regulations in Canada, is that okay?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

The Fraser Institute has disclosed its funding from the Koch brothers, and if Leadnow would do the same, I wouldn't have a problem with that either.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are you suggesting Leadnow doesn't disclose to CRA or to anyone else where their funding comes from?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

They are not a registered charity and therefore they do not need to disclose that to the CRA.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So they don't disclose any of where their funding comes from?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

They didn't until I asked for it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You use strange terms that are—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

If they would disclose it, sir, I wouldn't have a problem with that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Allow me to finish my question.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

—but the problem is they don't disclose—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You asked me not to interrupt you, yet you seem happy to interrupt me.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

—their American funding.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You say things like “do the math”, “they may have”, “they probably”, “they may have had an impact”, “it's reasonable to suggest”. Do you have evidence of these progressive groups having had an impact?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

As I mentioned, in a riding that is lost by 61 votes, where you have a third party organization that takes credit for having swung the riding—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sure.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

—and which had staff full time for more than a year, as I said, I think it stands to reason that they may have had an influence.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You spent time in Kitimat. You'll remember that there was a plebiscite there a while ago on a pipeline. Enbridge, which was sponsored in large part by Chinese oil firms at the time, flew in dozens and dozens of door knockers and leaflets. They bought ads all up and down Highway 16. Hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent, and that was not initially disclosed, to try to sway the voters in Kitimat, B.C. to vote for a pipeline that was in large part sponsored by Chinese oil companies, some of which were owned by the Chinese government.

Can I find the report or the paper you wrote about that foreign influence on Canadian electors?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I don't need to point it out to you. You're telling me about it. Obviously, you read it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see this ambition and this energy for going after people from the progressive side. When there's a clear case of foreign influence in the democratic process here in Canada—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

—which is disclosed for the most part. That's why we know about it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

“For the most part”; that's a generous term.

I find it inconsistent. I like your enthusiasm and your energy for this stuff. It would be really great if you kind of splashed that around to the folks who were pushing for say, oil and gas or pushing for more fish farms in Canadian waters thereby threatening things that you say—and I believe you when you say you care about them. It seems to me if we want to ban foreign influence, which is something that we're trying to put into Bill C-76, we don't get to try to ban it from one side and raise cases from one side. I think it would offer a lot more credibility to this conversation and the discussion if there were some fair treatment of the obvious cases in which foreign actors have played significant roles with enormous amounts of money. The Fraser Institute's budget is $11 million a year. You're concerned about $1.5 million over a 10-year budget and yet something almost tens times that amount draws less concern from you. A little consistency would be good.

Mr. Chair, how am I for time?

The Chair:

Time's up.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, sorry, I had a good question for Mr. Rozon, but I'll come back to it if I have some more time.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

(1915)

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I have a follow-up question for Ms. Krause.

I am on Elections Canada's website right now looking at the declaration by Leadnow. It seems to me that they do declare all their contributions. The unions and the individuals are all listed by name on Elections Canada's website. Their involvement in elections is declared, and those individuals who contribute to them are all listed. They have about 6,791 different individuals, and the total amount seems to indicate that about $55 a person was donated to Leadnow in order for them to engage in advocacy for elections.

I'm just trying to get clarification as to what else you would like to see organizations such as them declare.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Well, you've looked at the list. You won't find the name of the Online Progressive Engagement Network. You won't find the name of the Citizenship Engagement Laboratory on that list. They aren't there. They weren't reported.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Where is the evidence that they have donated?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Sorry, where is the evidence...?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Where is the evidence that they have donated? You've made this insinuation, but I don't understand where it comes from.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

They don't donate. They provide in-kind support, which, of course, would have a dollar value, right?

As I mentioned, my guess is—although I don't know because Leadnow has refused to answer any questions about this—that most of their input, their contribution, and their support related to the 2015 federal election and the 2011 election probably happened outside of the election period. Because these are very well-funded organizations, they can lay the groundwork for influencing an election two, three, or even four years before the election.

That's one of the problems I think we have, that the way the disclosure requirements currently are, these organizations can get around them by getting things done outside of the election period and also by providing the type of support that does not need to be disclosed.

For example, all of the expenses that are related to use of social media, the use of online communication, are not included in the list of costs that need to be included in the disclosure, and in fact, those are the means that Leadnow in particular relied on most heavily. That's one of the reasons those expenses are affected in their disclosure statement.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I don't necessarily disagree that there are other things that need to be explored and looked at in the future. Some would say that this piece of legislation is quite lengthy as it is, and it needs to cover quite a lot of different areas and undo a lot of what is in the Fair Elections Act, which excluded many people from having the opportunity to vote. We are trying to correct that through this legislation and allow that opportunity. It's not to say there can't be further legislation coming in the future that would have a more robust look at some of these issues that we need to explore further.

Would you say that it would be okay to have another piece of legislation coming in the future, or for this committee to study that and provide recommendations, or are you saying that it must be in this piece of legislation?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I would agree with my other colleague on the panel that this act is a missed opportunity if it doesn't address the issues. Here we are, three years away from—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you agree that it would make the act even lengthier?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I don't think it needs to make it more lengthy. It just needs to tighten up some of the changes that are already proposed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Mr. Chair, I am sharing my time with Mr. Simms.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

Ms. Krause, take a break if you wish.

Mr. Rozon, I'll try to make this short. On the administrative penalties that are talked about here in this particular bill, obviously Elections Canada is seeking more compliance here. It's what they've talked about for quite some time.

What is your opinion on the specifics here in the administrative penalties that are served up in this particular legislation?

Mr. Gary Rozon:

Too much stick and not enough carrot. Anyone who is a member here knows that you have financial agents and official agents who run your campaign. As I said, I've worked at elections, and I've worked independently in my own business. They are the oil that keeps this machinery going.

In Elections Canada's mandate, we always want to encourage people to participate in the political process. Sending them to court is not encouraging them.

(1920)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Isn't that what we're doing here, to look at that, but through the pending mechanism? Is that the carrot you're looking for?

Mr. Gary Rozon:

The carrot is the money. Everybody can understand the money. No one says, “I'm going to mess up and forget to file.” If an agent makes an honest mistake, then a financial hit is one thing and going to court is another. It's cumbersome, and for a lot of people just the mere thought of going to court for anything is like saying, “I didn't sign on for this.”

Mr. Scott Simms:

In your opinion, how do you make that less cumbersome then?

Mr. Gary Rozon:

We keep it out of court. We hit you in the pocket. In the case of your election campaign, the longer you are late in filing, it's just less money on the rebate coming back.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Don't you feel legislation is trying to achieve that?

Mr. Gary Rozon:

What gets me is the inequity. Some of you have obviously well-financed campaigns and riding associations, and you can afford the money, but, for example, someone in the Marxist-Leninist Party who missed a deadline and has a $5,000 legal fee, doesn't have $5,000.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I do appreciate that, but what I'm looking at is a situation where.... You're right about the litigious factor of it; there's no doubt about it. What worries me is the fact that this goes on too far, as you say, but the legislation does go to certain areas that can look at, for example, the Marxist-Leninist Party, and work out something that has run afoul of the law or about to run afoul of the law as written in the legislation, and can be worked out through mechanisms that are currently there with the commissioner.

Mr. Gary Rozon:

Agreed.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

The commissioner also has the—

The Chair:

Sorry, but your time is up.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Can I continue our conversation, Ms. Krause? There are a few other things I want to touch on with you.

The first one was that we've heard a little about collusion and the fact that when you have a variety of different groups out there that could work together and coordinate messaging, it might be a way around some of the spending limits and things like that. I wondered if you had any thoughts on that and whether you see that as a problem, and if so, whether you have any suggestions on what we might do about it.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I think there were 12 or 13 organizations all partially funded by the Tides foundation based in San Francisco, which, of course, is the hub of the tar sands campaign to landlock crude from western Canada. They hired a consultant specifically to review the impact of the, and I quote, “coordinated efforts” of the various groups in the federal election.

I drew it to the attention of Elections Canada. They interviewed me as part of an investigation last September, and one of the things I mentioned was that you might want to speak with this consultant. Obviously, if she was hired to evaluate the coordinated efforts of multiple groups in the federal election, then chances are they were coordinated efforts. It would be interesting to speak with that person and find out what the coordinated efforts were and their impact.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That leads into the next question I wanted to ask you. Do you think Elections Canada is doing enough to enforce the laws that we currently have in making sure that this stuff is being investigated and prevented?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I'm glad you raised that because here is what happened. I spent four hours with the investigators from Elections Canada in September, and one of the conclusions I came to at the end is that Elections Canada can't do its job of keeping foreign money out until the charities director at the Canada Revenue Agency does its job of ensuring that there is compliance with the Income Tax Act in enforcing the law with regard to the Income Tax Act.

All we have now is a problem of what I would call shell charities. These are charities that serve no other purpose than to Canadianize and legitimize money from outside Canada. They also serve a variety of other purposes, none of which are charitable, and as far as I can see all have to do with enabling the provision of receipts for tax-receipted donations for a charity that never happened. They're charities that should be shut down by the CRA, and I could give you examples of dozens of them.

Just to give you one example—

(1925)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure, if you can do that very quickly.

Ms. Vivian Krause:

One is called the DI Foundation. That's the name of it. The DI Foundation has only ever done one thing—only ever one thing—and that was to receive money from the Tides Canada foundation, pass it to the Salal Foundation, which then funds the Dogwood Initiative, which is one of the most politically active organizations in Canada. The Dogwood Initiative, by its own admission, is so political that it doesn't qualify as a registered charity, and yet over the years it has been funded by 10 registered charities, including Salal and the Tides Canada foundation.

I would put to you as a committee that the DI Foundation should be closed along with all other shell charities that are legitimizing, Canadianizing, money from outside of Canada. If they are allowed to go on, then Elections Canada really can't do much about their funding.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I wanted to ask you about this. In the bill, there's this new pre-writ period, where there is regulation on foreign funding and things like that of these advocacy groups, and spending limits put on them. That starts on June 30 of a fixed-date election year. Everyone knows that's when it starts, so what you do outside of June 29 is a different story, right?

Do you think that is sufficient that that is still wide open? Also, what about the idea of contribution limits for these third party groups? Similar to what is done for political parties, they make a choice to participate in our elections. Should they then be making the choice to fall under the same kinds of rules as the political parties that have made that choice?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I'll give you a quick answer to your first question. I don't think it would be practical to make the election period long enough to keep out foreign money. Practically speaking, in the case of the previous election, you'd have to make it a two-year period, or something like that. By their very nature, the groups that we saw funding third parties from outside of the country in the previous election are deep-pocketed. These foundations have billions of dollars in assets. They give away billions every year. They have virtually unlimited funding, so they can easily put their money in a year or two in advance.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's a problem, right?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I don't think that lengthening the period is the way to restrict that. I think another approach is needed.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'd like to clarify something, because I think it was misconstrued a little bit.

The Chair:

Okay, do it really quickly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I wanted to say I wasn't necessarily advocating the idea of lengthening that period. What I was asking you was this: do you feel it is going to fix the problem by having this June 30 date?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

No, not at all.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Did you want to respond on the idea of the contribution limits?

The Chair:

No, no, no.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I did ask the question and she didn't have a chance to answer it.

The Chair:

We only have a couple of minutes left.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

Ms. Krause, I appreciate your coming here, and I appreciate your efforts and the work you're doing to keep foreign money from influencing Canadian elections.

I'd like to build on what Mr. Cullen was talking about, that you really only see it on one side of the spectrum. I'd never heard about this before today. There seems to be a website, maybe it's even a newspaper, called Alberta Oil Magazine It seems to be very pro-Alberta oil, based on what I'm looking at. They ran an article entitled, “It's Time for the Energy Industry to Ignore Vivian Krause”. Would you care to comment on that?

Ms. Vivian Krause:

I can tell you, sir, that if I found on the right side of the political spectrum any sort of multi-million-dollar campaign trying to target a specific industry, let alone one of the most economically important industries of our country, I'd have no hesitation in shining a light on it. But I have found no such thing and that is why—

(1930)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Why does this pro-oil industry website, which you would think would want to get rid of eco-terrorists and progressive think tanks, say it's time to ignore—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

Sir, if you'd done a little more reading, you would know the individual who wrote that has said he's funded by the Vancouver Observer, which is in turn funded by the Tides foundation. In other words, he's receiving money as part of...or he has said he has, anyway. His name is Markham Hislop.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I guess everyone's receiving money from somewhere in this relationship, so—

Ms. Vivian Krause:

No, that's not at all the case.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much for your testimony.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, witnesses. We really appreciate your coming.

We will quickly change to our next witness, because we have a vote in 15 minutes and we want to at least hear his opening statement. We're not going to suspend; we're just going to carry right on.

Colleagues, we're pleased to be joined now by our next witness, Marc Chénier, general counsel and senior director, legal services, from the office of the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

Unfortunately, the commissioner was not available, but we're delighted that Mr. Chénier is here. We have lots of interest in the commissioner's role in this bill.

Thank you very much for coming. I'm sure we'll have some good questions. [Translation]

Mr. Marc Chénier (General Counsel and Senior Director, Legal Services, Office of the Commissioner of Canada Elections):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The commissioner has asked me to send his regrets for being unable to attend today's session. I am pleased be here today in the context of your study of Bill C-76.

This bill contains measures that stem from recommendations that were previously made by both the commissioner and others. Among these extremely positive measures, the System of Administrative Monetary Penalties, eliminating the requirement for prior approval in order to lay a charge and the power to ask for a court order to compel witnesses.

In addition to these changes, there are a number of other elements that are of particular interest to us.

First is the return of the commissioner to within the Office of the CEO. This change would be beneficial because our work is closely tied to elections. We would be able to enhance our ability to fulfil our mandate by maintaining better contact with those responsible for the election machinery.[English]

We are happy to see that the important safeguards in Bill C-23 to protect our office's independence have been kept in this bill, including the statement that our investigations be carried out independently, a fixed term for the commissioner with removal only for cause, and his status as deputy head for human resources.

With respect to the third party regime, the commissioner asked that I report that a review of complaints about third party activities during the last general election has been completed, and that we have not found any evidence of illegal collusion, coordination, or foreign influence. However, the narrow regulation of third parties under the current act has limited our examination. Third parties now carry out opinion polls, conduct canvassing activities, and hold events. To date, provided they are carried out independently from parties and candidates, these activities are unregulated. Thus, the bill makes significant progress toward levelling the playing field for electoral participants.

Our office has a few suggestions for improvements. First, the bill would require a third party to identify itself in a tag line on its advertising messages; however, a third party can be a group that is formed only for one election, and its name alone may be meaningless. This is not consistent with the goal of transparency sought by the act, and also causes enforcement difficulties. Some provinces require third parties to provide a telephone number or address in their tag line, and the committee may wish to consider requiring this of third parties.

(1935)

[Translation]

Furthermore, we generally support provisions to provide tools allowing us to deal with new challenges to elections. This includes new offences related to cybercrime and misleading communications, as well as clarifying the offence for foreign inducement and for false statements about candidates and party leaders.

On that last point, I note that the clarifications related to these two provisions of the act are not as broad as what had been endorsed by the committee in its 35th report.[English]

In the case of false statements about candidates and leaders, allegations of criminality and about a few personal characteristics would give rise to the offence. In our view, this is not sufficient to protect the integrity of our elections against false claims that can have a devastating impact on a campaign.

While courts have recognized that false allegations concerning moral turpitude are currently covered, this would be lost if the bill is adopted as is. At a time when false news has become a pressing concern, weakening one of the only provisions that protects our democratic process against false allegations may not be advisable.

With respect to undue influence by foreigners, one of the ways of exerting such influence would be to make a false statement about a candidate or leader. Again, this is much more limited than what the committee had endorsed. The commissioner continues to believe that any false information disseminated by a foreigner purposefully to influence a Canadian election should be prohibited.[Translation]

Finally, I would point out that the commissioner supports the suggested amendments put forward by the acting CEO. In particular, as our office suggested to Elections Canada, a circumvention offence should be added to prohibit attempts to go around the ban on foreign funds being used to finance third-party activities. It is also important that the specific intent element be removed from the cybercrime offence.

Information about the amendments recommended by the commissioner is included in the chart that was distributed to the committee.[English]

In conclusion, there are many useful elements to this bill. The commissioner has asked that I mention that there will nevertheless always be limits to what can be accomplished in some cases. While Canada has agreements with some countries to carry out investigations beyond our borders, there are others with which co-operation will be impossible.

That said, we are working with our government security counterparts to minimize such barriers.[Translation]

I will be pleased to answer your questions.

Thank you. [English]

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

On a point of order, Chair, I'm sorry to interrupt, but I would like some clarification. Initially, we made an offer to some of the witnesses who came earlier to come back at 8:30 or whenever we get back to this. I'd like to confirm whether that's happening.

The Chair:

Two of the witnesses said they would come back. Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I ask which two?

An hon. member: Is that going to make a difference as to whether you come back?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Mr. Turmel and Brian Marlatt are the two who said they'd be back.

The Chair:

Okay. We don't have much time, as we're going to have a vote soon.

Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chénier, for being with us today.

I saw that you were present when the previous panel of witnesses appeared a few minutes ago.

Do you think that Ms. Krause's allegations are credible?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

As I said in my presentation, our investigation is closed. We did not identify any breach of the Canada Elections Act. Currently, the act is mainly focused on election advertising. That said, for all of the other activities a third party might engage in, there is no regulation unless expenses were coordinated with a party or a candidate. In that case, a contribution would be made to that party or candidate. We did not, however, find any proof that there was such a coordination of expenses.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you speak to us briefly about the direct consequences of Bill C-23, following which you no longer reported to Elections Canada but to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada? What were the effects of this change?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

That did not change our work in any way. Our mandate is still the same. We still functioning at arm's length to the CEO, to the director of public prosecutions, and to the government. In that way, things have not changed.

However, there were negative consequences at the administrative level. It has become more difficult to keep up to date with regard to what is happening at Elections Canada. There have been a lot of personnel changes and we lost the contacts we had before among Elections Canada representatives. When we conduct an investigation, it is important to be able to communicate with those contacts to obtain answers quickly. I assume that the fact that we lost those contacts may diminish our ability to react to crisis situations during elections.

(1940)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Was the lack of power to compel witnesses to testify an issue for you?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

We had to interrupt some of the commissioner's investigations because it was impossible to obtain the evidence we needed. In the political world, there are often allegiances. People provide mutual support to each other and that is normal. An example comes to mind: it often happens that employers do not give their employees three hours so that they can go and vote, despite the fact that this is a legal requirement. We get the sense that the employer exerts pressure on the employees to get them to withdraw the charges. The employees are very reluctant to take part in our investigation. If we had that power, that could encourage them to be more open. They would then say that they didn't have a choice, and that a court order forced them to testify.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does Bill C-76 give you the power you need in that context?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

The power to obtain a court order to compel someone to testify is enough.

In fact, the Competition Bureau has a similar power, but it does not need to use it often. The simple fact of suggesting that it will use it encourages people to speak.

This power is a part of our tool kit and could be very useful in the future.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question on a particular case. Yesterday, we spoke to the Conservative Party lawyer, Mr. Arthur Hamilton. I don't know if you heard that discussion. The lawyer of the Conservative Party was present during the Elections Canada testimony about robocalls, but he said that the Conservative Party was not involved in that.

In that case, why would a third lawyer be present at the interviews conducted by the investigators of the Commissioner of Canada Elections?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

I intended to speak about that aspect in my statement, but I had so much to say that I dropped that part.

As for your question on that particular case, unfortunately I cannot speak to the details of an investigation or a complaint we might have received.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Very well.

You suggest we forbid the publication of false statements about a candidate by a foreign entity. How could we enforce that? If someone from outside the country says something against someone in Canada, what can we do about it? It's all well and good to say that that is illegal, but would we have the power to prosecute? Could we send something to INTERPOL? What would happen?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

As I said in my statement, that is certainly a challenge for us. All investigative organizations face this type of challenge on issues of territoriality or extraterritoriality. In certain serious cases, countries come to an agreement to obtain help in investigations that are conducted outside their national borders. It would then be possible to obtain information to conduct an investigation. In certain other cases, it would not be possible. You have only to think of what happened in the United States. Some states may do this kind of thing, but the state does not take part in the investigation. These are challenges.

I note that the bill contains a provision that prohibits collusion that would allow a foreign entity to exercise undue influence. So, if someone in Canada had taken part in such an offence, he could be arrested and charged.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You submitted about 10 amendment proposals. Are there any you would like to address in particular?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

The commissioner believes that the recommendations contained in the 35th report of the committee, which discussed section 91, regarding false statements about candidates and leaders, as well as the provision concerning undue influence by foreign nationals, are the best indication of what could be a problem in a world where false news has become a real and acute problem. He strongly encourages the committee to review the recommendations it made to the House of Commons and to consider whether it would be worthwhile to proceed with those.

(1945)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is up.

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you. Just to be clear, it's still seven minutes?

The Chair:

Yes, but if the bells start, if people agree, we'll try to stay and get in at least one round.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. That's certainly agreeable to me. It would be unfair to get in my seven minutes and then cut off Mr. Cullen at that point, although I know that everybody else in the room would like it.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: I want to start by asking about a suggestion. We don't use the term “moral turpitude” very much. That effectively means, I assume, that someone makes an accusation, falsely, that I'm guilty of a criminal act, or I have the kind of character that would lead me to be a habitual criminal; i.e., Scott Reid may not have committed an axe murder, but he's the kind of guy who probably would if he had the chance. That's what you're talking about, right?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

In the limited jurisprudence we have on the existing section 91 about false statements about candidates, the courts have recognized that it would include such things as allegations about criminality, which the bill does address, but also something else that they call “moral turpitude”. You're right. It is a soft legal concept. It's more recognized in the United States in the immigration context. Even then, in the United States it's very much limited to criminality, so some crimes have a high level of moral turpitude.

In the way it's applied in Canada with respect to section 91, it involves some serious character flaw or something about the character of the person that is problematic and untenable. That's the way the jurisprudence has described it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It has to be about my character and not my fitness for office. Saying that Scott Reid is so unbelievably stupid that he can barely get himself out of bed in the morning, let alone be a member of Parliament, while insulting, would not fall into that category.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That was totally inaccurate.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was just reading from the Liberals' campaign literature from the last election. I'll share it with you after.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Marc Chénier:

I think the courts have been very careful in excluding typical political spin from what is captured by section 91. They require a very high threshold, and it's totally incompatible with the role of an MP.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

As I understand it, you are suggesting we add essentially if we make suggestions about somebody's attitudes, a suggestion that a person is essentially guilty of not exactly hate speech but of having the kinds of attitudes that would lead them to do it: Scott Reid is a racist and a sexist; he fundamentally hates—whatever; fill in the blank. This is where the issue arises.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

I think it would be to that level or it could be even a little higher. I will quote the wording the committee endorsed, “Views or behaviours fundamentally inconsistent with what is generally expected of an elected official, or feelings of hatred, contempt for or deep-rooted prejudice against an identifiable group”.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's what we recommended.

First of all, do you have suggested wording that ought to be used? This is not legislative language. You wouldn't have much time, but if you could get back to us, it would be helpful.

(1950)

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Probably the drafters at Justice would be helpful in that sense. We can definitely look at it and try to suggest something to the committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Looking at that—I'm commenting on our own report— I think two different things are being addressed there. “Views or behaviours fundamentally inconsistent with what is generally expected of an elected official,” is one thought, and “or feelings of hatred, contempt, or deep-rooted prejudice against an identifiable group”....

The first is fuzzier. I have to admit I have some reservations myself about that. The second one is very clear. Seriously, I think in our society that saying someone is a racist is seen as being a greater slight against them than saying they are an axe murderer. It's easier to say, without any proof, that is a more effective way of destroying them. We have some definitions of an “identifiable group” that link back to the Human Rights Act and the Charter of Rights. That strikes me as very clear, and that deals with a very effective kind of potential propaganda to be used. That's the one we should concentrate on.

Thank you very much.

I want to ask you as well about the practicality of trying to implement some of these things. You mentioned provincial models that had been used. You said that some provinces require third parties to provide a telephone number or address for their tag line and that the committee might wish to consider requiring this of third parties. How successful has this been in provincial elections? Have they achieved a high level of compliance, to your knowledge?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

I must confess, I don't have an answer on this.

I'll note, though, that in the Ontario general election that's happening right now, some members might have seen an article online on CBC today saying that there are some unregistered third parties that are carrying out online advertising with names that are generic, that don't really identify the group. People are wondering who these people are. There are no leads in how to start even reaching out to them just to make sure they do register if they have reached the $500 threshold.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I may have missed this and my apologies if I did, but do you have powers with respect to investigating on social media? Is there enough in the bill to allow you those powers if groups...?

We have certain rules around newspapers, so-called traditional media, but very few rules...none, really.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

The provisions of the act as they are drafted apply to online advertising the same way as they apply to any other type of advertising.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In your office, do you feel that you have the expertise and power to trace, for example, as you said, in the Ontario election, a shell group that is promoting some party or ideology?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Yes. There's actually a provision in the act and in the Criminal Code. Our investigators are public officers for the purpose of obtaining search warrants or production orders to advance our investigations.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What do you do with that when it's an ISP address, when it's a foreign-based entity?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Yes. If it's a foreign-based entity, it could raise problems. Again, we might have to resort to an MLAT in order to obtain the information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can you go after the platforms on which these things spread, the social media platforms, for example? If somebody is out...they are foreign-based. You're limited. They're in Russia. You can't go after them.

Is there enough in the act right now to allow you to say to the social media agents that they're spreading misinformation, disinformation, and all of that?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

With respect to social media platforms, we have, and we started that even before the last general election. We've reached out to many of them and received their co-operation in a lot of ways.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it voluntary co-operation right now, or is it under the law?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

It is, but it's also the courts. The British Columbia Court of Appeal relatively recently decided that a Canadian production order could be enforced to obtain information that's kept outside of the country if there's somebody in Canada, a person or an office in Canada, for that group.

In other words, Facebook has an office in Canada, so we can serve our production order to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Facebook Canada.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

—Facebook Canada.

(1955)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

And demand....

Mr. Marc Chénier:

That's right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's interesting because one of the concerns we have is this dark money, foreign influence, and the relatively low obligations of the social media companies, which I would argue are at least as influential as, if not more influential than, traditional media in determining opinions, the use of algorithms, and data mining, which is a thing.

How would things have been different under the investigations you ran in the past, say the robocall scandal, if you had had the ability to compel testimony?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

I think it probably could have helped.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

For sure.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

We do get results. In the robocall case, there was a charge laid. Somebody was convicted.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It was difficult wasn't it?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Yes, it was.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Being able to pull the information and find out how databases were acquired.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Absolutely, yes.

If I may give you another example, there was the Charbonneau commission in Quebec, which looked at political contributions that were made through a straw person.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

They got results really quickly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They are under different rules in Quebec than the rules that you have available to you.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

That's right. They have the power to compel in Quebec.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If you compare the two cases in terms of expediency and in terms of results, you would argue the laws in Quebec that allowed the requirement of testimony...contrast that to the very long—I would say quite drawn out—case with Pierre Poutine and all the rest.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Yes. That's right.

Our investigations take their time because people might not co-operate.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are you comfortable with the amount of privacy or the lack of privacy requirements that political parties have right now in terms of our own information that we've gathered on Canadians, and how secure the information is?

The fact that we don't require consent of Canadians...we are not required to inform Canadians about what information of theirs we have.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

That issue, I guess, is really beyond the scope of our mandate.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The reason I ask it is—I realize it might be a scope issue—that when you go through investigations, the protection of data and how data is managed within the parties becomes very relevant to your investigations.

Is that fair to say?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Yes, that's true. There are ways for us to preserve data. We can ask the court for a preservation order to force—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You can only preserve it if it's there, though.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Sorry?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You can only preserve it if it's still there.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

That's true, yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's very difficult to preserve data when you don't know how it's used or where it's stored. I believe parties can right now store data out of the country in servers, under Canadian law, which I suspect would present a problem for you because then you would need to get orders to go into that other country to get at the servers. Am I following it properly?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

That would be the case, unless there were somebody physically present in Canada who was in control of the information and whom we could serve with—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'll just circle back, because we heard some pretty grand theories about what happened in the last election and about how foreign money swayed us. Can you come back to the conclusions of your investigation of the 2015 election?

Mr. Marc Chénier:

In terms of election advertising? That's the prohibition—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's right.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Last night I think Mr. Hamilton said it was an interpretation on our part that foreign funds could be used for anything other than election advertising, but that's actually the wording of the section in the act. A third party can't use foreign funds to carry out election advertising. That's the limit in the act right now. Looking at that, we found no evidence that this was the case. Third parties in Canada could identify their sources of funding to a large extent. However, again, we didn't have the mandate to look at their other activities that are not—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sure, they are expanded under this law.

Mr. Marc Chénier:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I appreciate it, Chair. I realize that people may want to get in, so I'll cut my time there.

Thank you very much, Mr. Chénier.

The Chair:

Committee members, there are 22 minutes left. I'd like to get your indulgence for a minute.

Here's the budget to date for the witnesses and meals in our study. Are people okay with approving that so the clerk can pay for witnesses' travel and meals? It's just to date; it's not the full study.

Mr. Blake Richards:

He doesn't mean that's the extent of it. We can always add to it.

The Chair:

There will be more.

Do I have unanimous support to approve the first budget?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

(2000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We appreciate that. It's a very important part of this act.

We will suspend. Our witnesses from the first two panels will be back at 8:30, the ones who chose to come back. The others have been given the option to make written submissions if they want.

(2000)

(2035)

The Chair:

Good evening. Welcome back to the 112th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. We're going back to the second of our four panels.

We have with us John C. Turmel, as an individual, and Brian Marlatt, who is communications and policy director from the Progressive Canadian Party.

We are in the middle of another 30-minute prelude to a vote, so as we did last time, we will try and—well, one round will be easier because the NDP aren't coming. We will try to get in one round of questioning at least, even if the bells go, if that's okay with everyone.

We will do opening statements. Mr. Turmel, we will start with yours.

Mr. John Turmel (As an Individual):

As I'm running right now in a Chicoutimi by-election hoping to get in here like you guys, and I'm also running in tomorrow's provincial by-election, and I'm also running for Brantford mayor, that's a hat trick. It's the third hat trick in my career, which is elections 1994, 1995, and 1996. How can I have fun when they say, “super loser fails again”? I'm going to get the guys who beat me to understand what I'm trying to say. To get an invite to come and talk to you guys was an honour.

I did a prepared statement and I will read it to you. Having run more times than you guys, I felt the pains and aggravations a lot more.

The first point is the threshold for auditor. When I first ran federally in 1979—remember Joe Clark won—my accountant was happy with the $250 cap to audit my nil return made easier by a $2,000 threshold on candidate personal expenses before reporting was required. Today, a winner may be challenged for taking a bus to a meeting without declaring the value of the contributed ticket. Get it? You could spend $2,000 on running around and personal stuff and you didn't have to report it in the old days. No auditor.

In Ontario provincial elections, they are doing it wrong. Candidates could sign a declaration avowing no contributions requiring tax credits and did not need an auditor, but to standardize the forms that then require auditors for all candidates with contributions and without, but they paid for the unnecessary auditor. I wasn't paying it. I didn't mind.

However, when my federal accountant retired after 30 years, I used my Ontario accountant and was surprised with a $700 bill, which is reasonable at these rates, when I had only ever paid $250 in the past for 30 years, but the $250 cap left me owing the $450 overage.

I asked the Federal Court to strike the $250 cap that did not keep up with inflation, ever since 1974 unconstitutionally stifling my democratic rights. Justice Phelan ruled I could raise contributions to pay the auditor—not quite political purposes—or save $10 a week from my pension. I appealed it to the Supreme Court, docket number 36937, but it wasn't important enough to be heard.

Now, Ontario has standardized the forms for nominations candidates for parties from no reporting at all to reporting required with an auditor, an unpaid auditor. Any candidate seeking a party nomination must now pay the auditor out of his own pocket, even with a zero return.

Standardize government requirements, sure, but why standardize party requirements? Parties should make their own rules, but the new regulations are now in place to stifle political participation.

An auditor should not be required before a threshold of expenses is reached, which should apply for election candidates too. The Canada Elections Act should not be job creation for accountants.

A famous dictator once said that those who vote don't matter and those who count the votes matter.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Point of order.

(2040)

Mr. John Turmel:

With elections becoming computerized—and I'm an electrical engineer—

The Chair:

Hold on a second.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm having a hard time hearing him. We need some silence.

Mr. John Turmel:

I provided a written one that you will get, once it's translated—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Perfect.

Mr. John Turmel:

—but it's more fun if you can hear me, I'm sure. Thank you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It is so far.

Mr. John Turmel:

A famous dictator once said that those who count the votes matter.

With elections becoming computerized—and I'm an electrical engineer—hacking becomes inevitable, except for no-fraud ballot receipts.

If I can get a receipt for every coffee I buy, why can't I get a receipt for the most important transaction in my democracy? A serial-numbered receipt of my vote without my name lets me check the list of serial numbers and selections published online on election night to verify that my vote was properly registered, and I have proof in hand should those who matter count the votes wrong. No one need ever fear computerized voting again with checkable ballots. That's all you need. I proposed that two years ago, and they haven't moved.

On equitable free time broadcasting, section 9 of the Broadcasting Act used to mandate that free time political broadcast be made available to all parties and rival candidates on an equitable basis, qualitatively and quantitatively. You can imagine the fun I used to have when I was invited to the debates, and the fun my opponents didn't have. In 1986, the Ontario Court of Appeal struck down that right to fair treatment and allowed the media to give all the free time on public airwaves to whom they preferred. This is verified in Turmel v. CRTC 33319 at the Supreme Court of Canada. When Rogers banned me from a debate for wearing my party button, I complained to the top. I got arrested, and they took me away. There it is, proof positive that the TV stations can allocate free time to whomever they want. While Big Brother gets to bias elections by rigging the debates on public airwaves, democracy cannot exist. We have to handle Big Brother.

I didn't mind the rich guys buying as much time as they wanted, but it was the free time I expected a share of, and now I can't get. At the last three debates in Brantford, I was excluded from all three for the first time in my career. That's what democracy has been coming to in Ontario politics. I don't know about the rest of the provinces, but I certainly hope you guys don't let it become like that federally.

I'll go back to section 9. Of course, then there's a problem with debates involving three party leaders. Imagine 10 party leaders. Could you handle that?

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. John Turmel:

How else are you ever going to hear about a new idea? Right now, to be on the debate, you have to be from one of the major parties they see all the time, who you know don't have new ideas.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We appreciate that.

We'd like to welcome the whip here. He's come to monitor the quality of our operations. Thank you.

Mr. Pat Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge, CPC):

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Marlatt, thank you for coming back.

I know we've kept you here about four hours, both of you, so we really appreciate your taking this extra time for us.

Mr. Brian Marlatt (Communications and Policy Director, Progressive Canadian Party):

Thank you to the chair and to the committee for inviting the Progressive Canadian Party to present important evidence, in our view, concerning Bill C-76, the elections modernization act.

The Progressive Canadian Party is a continuation of the tradition in Canadian politics of a Tory party willing “to embrace every person desirous of being counted as a progressive Conservative”, in the words of Sir John A. Macdonald. The PC Party was led, until his recent passing, by the Honourable Sinclair Stevens, who was a minister in the Clark and Mulroney Progressive Conservative governments, and is now led by former PC MP Joe Hueglin.

I'm speaking today as communications and policy chair on the PC Party national council, but I also contributed to the Elections Canada advisory committee of political parties in 2015; again in meetings in 2018, and in fact yesterday; and previously served, before political involvement, as an Elections Canada DRO and Elections BC voting officer and clerk. I hope this experience adds value to our testimony.

Evidence and comments today will be limited largely to implications of Bill C-76 in the context of today's fixed-date election law introduced in 2006, the Fair Elections Act, sometimes described as the voter suppression act by Progressive Canadians, introduced as Bill C-23 in the 41st Parliament, and other proposed electoral reforms that have been part of public discussion of this bill. I welcome questions from the committee in its larger context or details insofar as I may be able to contribute positively to your study of the bill.

As an aside, I will note that because Bill C-76 is important in the evolution of our democracy, vigorous debate in the Senate is likely to follow given the new partisan spirit introduced by appointments in the previous government, which have been moderated but not checked by the new independent advisory committee recommending persons for Senate nomination by the Prime Minister to the Governor General. I have further comments on that. If you wish, we can take care of that in questions.

Change in Westminster parliamentary democracy may be characterized as a balance of continuity and change, of evolutionary trial and error, and at its best when it proceeds by what Renaissance scholar Desiderius Erasmus described as “by little and little”. Unexpected consequences can be moderated, and ill-advised choices mitigated or remedied. Bill C-76 is about evolutionary change. The need for progressive evolutionary parliamentary change is suggested by the 42nd general election.

The 42nd general election of Parliament, on October 19, 2015, well illustrates the need for many of the measures recommended in Bill C-76. The 2015 election was the first one honouring the fixed-date election law. The 41st Parliament had seen the parliamentary opposition in effect neutered by the unavailability of parliamentary responsible government by excesses of party discipline in a majority government and the fixed-date election law.

Omnibus bills and limited debate on controversial legislation, including the Fair Elections Act, became the norm rather than the exception. The last year of the 41st Parliament was reduced, arguably, to a campaign to elect the next parliament. By the end of the session, in June 2015, campaigns and campaign spending by parties and third parties were ramped up before rules applying to writ-period spending came into effect. An almost unprecedented 78-day writ period followed in which party spending limits allowed nationally, and in all 338 riding elections, doubled per candidate. Money became key. The distance between public interest and party interest widened, and concern about Bill C-23 voter suppression grew.

I refer you to “Memo on the Fixed Date Election Law, Money and the Corporate Political Party in 2015, and the implications for Smaller Political Parties, and Independents.” The written copy is appended to this document.

Many of these concerns were anticipated. The Progressive Canadian Party addressed several of these concerns and proposed remedies, which were discussed in a submission solicited by this committee, PROC, in September 2006, when the fixed-date election law was originated as Bill C-16, and in a submission to the Elections Canada Advisory Committee of Political Parties, ACPP, on election advertising, in which the implications of fixed-date elections were discussed. Both documents are available on the EC website or by request from Elections Canada.

Bill C-76 proposes a new pre-writ period in a fixed-date election, beginning June 30, at the end of the session in the year a fixed-date election is to be honoured, and a maximum limit of a 50-day campaign writ period. We cite the following remarks in the PC Party 2015 submission to Elections Canada by way of guidance on ways in which Bill C-76 may be improved:

(2045)

It is widely reported that political parties or candidates are conducting political campaigns well in advance of the writ being dropped to begin the formal election period. At present, there is no limitation on the spending of political parties or candidates outside of the writ period. In other Commonwealth countries, notably the United Kingdom, political advertising outside of the writ period is subject to legislated “long campaign” and “short campaign” limits administered by the Elections Commission.... EC advice and interpretative instruction for the 2015 election is strongly recommended. Advertising activities by the Government of Canada and government departments have included public service announcements of programmes “subject to parliamentary approval.” Such announcements may be deemed partisan advertisements funded by public monies and taxpayer dollars by the agencies contracting to issue such public service announcements because they concern proposals, generally by the governing party of the day, which have not received parliamentary approval.

While this practice is not strictly election advertising in advance of the writ period, the effect is the same. It is recommended that these practices be qualified and that a pre-writ period in the fixed-date election years be extended to mirror long campaign practices administered by the U.K. Elections Commission. This recommendation would apply if the fixed-date election law is not repealed in the interest of protecting the principle of responsible government at the heart of Canadian Westminister Parliamentary democracy.

The Progressive Canadian Party strongly agrees with the intention and certain of the provisions in Bill C-76, which are intended to reverse the outcomes of Bill C-23, the Fair Elections Act, passed in the 41st Parliament, and to see these corrections as part of the continuity, change, and evolution in Parliamentary practice, by which the unintended consequences or error in previous legislation may be mitigated or remedied. In particular, we commend the restored role of Elections Canada and the Chief Electoral Officer in providing public information during elections and measures to ensure that every qualified Canadian may take part in riding elections of a Parliament in Canada.

We recommend restoring the voter identification card issued by EC as acceptable identification of voters at the polls. We note that in other places and countries, requirements for photo ID and other limitations have had the effect of limiting voter participation and have been described as voter suppression in some sources.

The Honourable Sinclair Stevens, speaking for the PC Party national council in 2014, underscored the seriousness of these concerns, stating that: It is the view of the Progressive Canadian Party that Bill C-23, entitled the Fair Elections Act...will betray basic principles of democracy in Canada even if substantially amended. Bill C-23 will deny the right to vote to large numbers of Canadians and as such must be challenged in the courts as unconstitutional...in ways indicated by scholars of Canadian constitutional law and political science published in the national media, Progressive Canadians believe the Fair Elections Act must be rejected as unfair, undemocratic, and deserving of constitutional challenge even in light of amendments which are being recommended by members of the House of Commons and in Senate committee. Bill C-23, the Fair Elections Act is deeply flawed in fundamental ways and for its apparent intent.

The media release from which this is drawn is appended to this document.

Bill C-76 is a welcome remedy for some of the flaws of the Fair Elections Act. We welcome this remedy. Finally, on the margins of debate concerning Bill C-76 can be heard voices calling to revisit the question of electoral reform, which for them means replacing riding-elected MPs in each of Canada's 338 electoral districts according to single-member pluralities or majorities with party proportional representation according to the national or regional party popular vote.

We elect members of Parliament to the Parliament of Canada in riding elections held in each riding separately in a general election of a Parliament when Parliament is dissolved or in by-elections between general elections. We elect members of Parliament, not parties, movements or prime ministers. Party vote, or distributing seats in the House of Commons according to the proportion of votes received by party members nationally, is not relevant.

These facts about Canadian electoral practices are consistent with the constitutional architecture of Canada and with Canadian realities of space and population. Diversity of interest and of opinion, even within party groups, often varies widely in distant parts of Canada. The view in the north, the coasts, the prairies, and the industrial heartland can vary considerably in ways of party discipline, whether formal or as a part of movement politics, yet it is not reflected in party proportional representational systems.

We strongly advise that the debate on Bill C-76 not be distracted by those who purpose to achieve partisan advantage by advocating for systems of party proportionality regardless of the merit of the movement or party view they may represent. Democratic rights and objectives are not achieved, sustained, or protected by changing the system to achieve partisan advantage; they are achieved by the power of persuasion and a willingness to do the hard work of achieving democratic societal consensus.

(2050)



I'd like to thank the committee for taking the time to consider our representation and my remarks. I hope they will help to guide you in meaningful debate and conclusions toward modernization of Canadian elections. There are documents appended to this, which you may find expand upon some of these issues that time here may not have provided for. I thank you again.

The Chair:

Thank you both, as I said, for waiting for about four hours.

As we agreed, we will have one questioner from each party, and then conclude our hearings for the day.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Mr. Turmel, there's a fisherman I know in Newfoundland. I'm from Newfoundland, by the way.

Mr. John Turmel:

I've never run there yet.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

Don't think we're not waiting for it.

Mr. John Turmel:

Call a by-election.

Mr. Scott Simms:

All right, or in my case a bye-bye-election, right?

There's a fisherman in Newfoundland. He owns three boats. I asked him once, “Are you busy?” He said, “I'm busier than a dog who lives in a parking lot full of fire hydrants.” You're a busy man.

I have one question, which has been on my mind since you walked in the door. You're running now concurrently in three elections.

Mr. John Turmel:

For the third time in my career.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right. If you win all three, which one do you do?

Mr. John Turmel:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Well, I had to ask.

Mr. John Turmel:

Yes, People laughed at me when I said I could get elected and retire the next day.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I ain't laughin'. Well, if you run against me, I'm not laughing anymore.

Mr. John Turmel:

All right. If I get elected provincially, I can do something and retire the next day. If I get elected federally, I can do something and retire the next day—and globally, too. For prime minister of the planet, I'm the only declared candidate. What is it? How do I get 20 signatures an hour in Chicoutimi where nobody knows me, so that the media are astounded that I could be signed up in a day? How do I do that?

(2055)

Mr. Scott Simms:

How did you do that?

Mr. John Turmel:

Well, I walked up to people and said, “Have you ever heard of a time bank?” “No.” This software I financed almost 40 years ago allows single unemployed parents to log on what nights they can double-duty babysit each other's kids, and then pay each other with one-hour bills even when they're broke.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Does that allow you to run in three campaigns?

Mr. John Turmel:

Would you sign my paper to let me explain this to the voters?

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'll see your question with a question.

Mr. John Turmel:

They say yes, yes, yes. That's why it's fun for me to run in elections, because the people I explain the time bank system to walk away dazzled. It's easy for me. I don't get on the TV station to explain it to the voters, but the 150 people who signed for me got a personal explanation of why I'm running. I want to get this software installed and then my job is done.

When you have enough money, name me a problem you have left.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, I got problems.

Mr. John Turmel:

Well, no, you don't.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This could take a long time.

Mr. John Turmel:

You don't.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm going to move to Mr. Marlatt for now, but I'll be back to you in second, though, especially if you're running against me. That's fine.

Mr. John Turmel:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Mr. Marlatt, I appreciate the work that has gone into your report here. You're obviously not a fan of Bill C-23, to say the least, and I like what you had to say about not letting us get distracted by things and having us focus on the changes that need to be made, and then down the road we can discuss that even further.

I want to go back to something you said. I didn't quite get the whole thing, but there was something, a recommendation by the U.K. commission. Is that right?

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

The Electoral Commission in the United Kingdom has established a base by which there is a long campaign and a short campaign period of auditing of all expenses by political parties.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right.

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

We are, in Bill C-76, proposing that auditing in a new pre-writ period begin with June 30. This is a period of time that is basically the summer months in advance of the dropping of the writ, a maximum of 50 days before the call of the election. That, I don't think, is sufficient. There is an opportunity for third parties, for political parties themselves, for the government by way of advertising programs that are subject to parliamentary approval—that is to say, if we get elected again—

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's the part I couldn't quite catch at the beginning. What you're advocating for, then, is an extended pre-writ.... You're okay with the pre-writ period concept, obviously.

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

I am with the concept that it needs to be made more effective by making it long enough so that it's not simply, in effect, that when the session ends here in June, the summer months become open season for politics. It's a useful idea to have that period subject to Elections Canada review and so on, but I think, as in the case with the U.K., the longer period also needs to be examined. In the event of a fixed-date election, the last full year of an election cycle is really where we see things being ramped up.

If you think about 2014-15, October 2014 was, in some respects, the beginning of the October 19, 2015, election. There was a huge movement to partisan statements that had very little to do with the public interest and public policy. They had to do, really, with getting ourselves re-elected.

Mr. Scott Simms:

In the context of what? Do you mean here on Parliament Hill or—

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

I think everything that happened—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Everything, all discourse—

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

I think what was happening in the House of Commons and what was happening in the parties outside of Parliament Hill was all targeted toward October 19, 2015.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do you think by expanding the definitions from what was prior—the election activities, the advertising, the election survey information, and the money spent to do all three—is that a very positive advance going forward, given the fact of what encompasses political campaigning?

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

The concept that's driving the notion that June 30 should be the beginning point for Elections Canada auditing of expenses is a good one, but because we see that, in effect, it's beginning well before that, some oversight is required for a longer period. The period, and even the method—the Electoral Commission in the U.K. provides us an example—is worth investigating.

In looking at the implementation of Bill C-76, discussions with the Electoral Commission in the U.K. would be advisable, just as we did with the report of the McGrath Special Committee on Reform of the House of Commons. It's the same concept.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see. I was wondering where the link was going, because I know that was specifically for the House of Commons, not necessarily for.... You're linking it through what the U.K. commission recommends.

This question is for both of you, on identification and the voter information cards. Certainly, Mr. Turmel, you've seen what it looks like.

(2100)

Mr. John Turmel:

No, actually, but anything is good for me. I love ID.

Mr. Scott Simms:

We're now reinstating the voter information card—as a part, but not the only part—as a backstop to identification.

I want to get your thoughts on that, Mr. Marlatt.

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

If you look at my historic past.... Before political involvement, I was a DRO in two federal elections—1993 and 1997. I've acted as a voting clerk and a voting officer with Elections BC, and subsequently in provincial elections, including the last one in 2017.

One of the things they use there, as we always have, was the voter elections card or its provincial equivalent. That, in conjunction with another piece of ID that can be provided—and there are various categories in which that applies—as opposed to insisting upon a kind of identification that some classes of people simply don't have. Sometimes they're students. Sometimes they are people in northern communities or aboriginal people. These people are marginalized. I don't want to press this too hard, but in the United States, where there is an active—at least according to the media—exercise of voter suppression, getting rid of something like the voter identification card seems to have been a key part of what they were doing.

We don't need voter suppression in Canada. We need voter participation. Reinstating this, and public education on the part of the Chief Electoral Officer and Elections Canada, are important things that were removed in Bill C-23 that Bill C-76 proposes to return. I commend that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Before we go on, I want to ask Mr. Turmel, how many elections did you run in and how many did you win?

Mr. John Turmel:

I haven't won any yet.

The Chair:

How many did you run in?

Mr. John Turmel:

I ran in 96, so I lost 92 and won.... The Guelph by-election was called off for the federal election, so that doesn't count as a loss. My loss record is always less than my wins, but the media always mentions “biggest loser”. I am the biggest contestant, too.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, you can question your witness.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

You indicated we had one questioner per party. I think what you meant was one seven-minute slot. Would it be acceptable if I split my time with Mr. Kelly?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You have six minutes to go.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I wanted to ask Mr. Turmel this question. I grew up in Ottawa. You've been a fixture on the Ottawa scene since I can remember, and I'm old. Have you ever been a witness at a parliamentary committee before?

Mr. John Turmel:

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is the first time.

Mr. John Turmel:

Yes, that's why it was such an honour. I'm trying to get in, or have a winner understand what I'm saying. To be invited was nice. You're a bunch of winners.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want you to know that my own experience was that I was invited to testify as a witness before this very committee in March 2000, and I was first elected to the House of Commons in November, so this may be a sign of things to come. That's a true story.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

[Inaudible—Editor] my riding.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You raised the issue of getting some kind of receipt for casting your ballot. While I think you point to a legitimate problem, I want to ask this question. I think there's already a legitimate and effective solution, which is that although your ballot itself is anonymous, when it's torn off, there is what they call a counterfoil on it—a stub. That counterfoil matches up with a number that's left behind with the officer who tore it off and gave it to you when you—

Mr. John Turmel:

Excuse me, are you telling me there are already numbers on the paper? I want a piece of paper with the number; I don't want an online number that they can change.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, it's not online. It's a piece of paper—

Mr. John Turmel:

All right.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—called a counterfoil. It's actually written up in the legislation, but the next time you go in to cast a ballot—are you going to be in Chicoutimi for the election, to cast a ballot?

Mr. John Turmel:

Am I going to what?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you going to be back for the by-election? You can cast a ballot.... I guess you don't have residency, so you can actually...

(2105)

Mr. John Turmel:

No, I live in Brantford and I can vote for mayor, and I live in Brant and I can vote for member of—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, if you're a contestant in a riding—

Mr. John Turmel:

—but not Chicoutimi.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, you don't live there, but if you're a contestant, a candidate, you can vote in the riding. If you go there, you'll have the chance to cast your ballot and see the actual—

Mr. John Turmel:

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What if it's the MP?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You have to be a Hill MP.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm sorry. That'll be the one after.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. John Turmel:

All right, okay. That makes sense, though, doesn't it. Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, you're right. I did not live in my own riding. I lived just a little bit outside at one point, and I was able to vote on that basis, and every other member of my family, too. It was section 10, I think, of the act.

The counterfoil, I believe, serves that purpose.

Mr. John Turmel:

No. How does that reassure me that I can scream alarm if it doesn't match? Who knows about the counterfoil except the guy in the computer room?

Mr. Scott Reid:

It predates computers, actually.

The Chair:

There's one minute left.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know what? This is halfway through, so maybe it's time for me to stop and turn things over to my colleague Mr. Kelly.

Mr. John Turmel:

Oh, that's such a good—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I wanted to say thank you very much. I've been following you since I was knee-high to a grasshopper—

Mr. John Turmel:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—and now I've been able to meet you, so thank you.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Thank you to our witnesses here.

Mr. Turmel, I took it from your presentation—and I appreciate that you were trying to get quite a lot of information into that—that you're rather down on some of the challenges around filing and restrictions on candidates, particularly as an independent candidate. Did I catch that correctly?

Mr. John Turmel:

No, I was talking about not having a threshold or being excluded from free-time political broadcasting. Free-time political broadcasting used to be fair. I never used to complain unless a station didn't let me on. If you look back in the court cases, yes, you'll see that every time they didn't let me on, I complained to the CRTC, then to the courts.

Recently I can't complain because it's legal for them to exclude me. I'd love you to go back to fix that one.

The one I meant was that you need a threshold, because as I say, I could be busted for going to Chicoutimi if I want to file a zero return, because somebody can ask how I paid for the gas. In the old days, I got $2,000 personal expenses, no contributions, but I can buy my bus ticket or my gas to get there.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Okay, you've made it a matter of—

Mr. John Turmel:

Threshold.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

—policy to enable yourself to incur no expenditure and thus not—

Mr. John Turmel:

Yes.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

—have to file and then have the requirement of an audit—

Mr. John Turmel:

That's right. I want to go to the meetings. That's my duty as a candidate, but I'm not knocking on doors, and I should have a threshold before it needs to be audited.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Would you say that it's somewhat onerous and perhaps a barrier to an independent candidate, or a candidate from a small party, for that matter?

Mr. John Turmel:

Yes.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Okay, thank you.

Maybe I have time for just one more question.

In the bill before us, critics of the bill—including me and probably other members of my caucus—have concerns around the issue of third party funding and the ease with which foreign sources of funds are mingled in with third parties and then spent during election campaigns.

Do you have any concern about the way third party funding and third party money impacts elections in Canada?

Mr. John Turmel:

No, I think you're doing well in trying to stamp it out and corral it and make sure it doesn't happen. You can only do so much.

I'm interested in what affects the little candidate who is not going to cheat, but he just doesn't want to have to hire an auditor to do his bus ticket.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

I can certainly identify with that.

The Chair:

We could get Mr. Marlatt to answer that question too.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Certainly, go right ahead.

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

I lost the thread of all that, but I will point out with respect to the matter of free-time election advertising broadcasts, if you check with the Chief Electoral Officer I think you will find that it's not exactly as he described but rather that there is a provision for free-time political advertising for all political parties. It's a finite amount and it could be broadcast at any time of the day. It could be three o'clock in the morning.

Mr. John Turmel:

Why was I arrested and taken away?

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

You can have a chat with the Chief Electoral Officer and examine it.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

I was asking about third parties and the way third parties spend money. A number of third parties, each third party, non-political parties are not candidates for elections but....

(2110)

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

Quite. There are provisions within the Canada Elections Act by which third party spending is regulated. There is provision now for covering pre-writ and writ period and third party election spending, presuming this legislation will pass. However, one of the things that I think should concern us equally is that political parties, the Manning Centre, and the Centre for Policy Alternatives and the Liberals have a similar presence wherein they draw from people outside Canada to direct them as to how their political efforts should be framed in terms of policy and the extent to which they represent Canadian interests. Canadian Westminister parliamentary democracy, I think, is being lost by that. The ways in which questions are phrased and the way we campaign are being directed more around the nature of highly partisan American red and blue state dramatics.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Does it concern you that this bill does nothing to address that foreign funding issue?

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

I don't know that it concerns me. I think it could be in a separate bill going forward.

The Chair:

Thank you.

For our last intervention, Mr. Cannings, you can have seven minutes. We still have 23 minutes until votes.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you both for being here. I regret that I came in late and I missed your presentations, or at least I certainly missed all of yours, Mr. Turmel. It seems I must have missed something quite interesting. I'm not sure what to ask you.

Mr. Marlatt, you don't seem to be a fan of Bill C-23 from the previous Parliament, the Fair Elections Act.

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

No.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm wondering if you could comment for my benefit at least on what you think this present bill achieves in fixing those shortcomings and what [Technical difficulty—Editor]

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

[Technical difficulty—Editor] the role of the Chief Electoral Officer and Elections Canada in educating and presenting information to the public during an election. Those are the two principal ones I referenced here. As far as Bill C-23 is concerned, I should draw to your attention—and you'll find it appended to this document when you see it in the French and English translation which will be available in a couple of days—that on the recommendation of the Honourable Sinclair Stevens we were going to bring a constitutional challenge to Bill C-23 before the Federal Court and the Supreme Court of Canada, costing a retainer of $350,000, we found.

We talked to the Council of Canadians and the Canadian Federation of Students, which felt that Bill C-23 was suppressing their voting opportunities. The answer we got back from the Council of Canadians, frankly, was that they preferred to go through their own lawyers, through a provincial court. I thought of that as nothing more than a photo op, and that's ultimately what it proved to be.

I am pleased that some of the greatest concerns we have about Bill C-23 are being addressed in this legislation. As you consider the bill I hope you will put the two things together and see what further things you feel should be a part of the way you address it, and things that need to be remedied that we've not identified.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Were the court challenges you talked about going to concentrate mainly on the voter suppression aspects of Bill C-23?

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

Principally.

Again, we did not get to the point of having extended conversations with a constitutional lawyer about that, because the thing passed, in terms of time and so forth. We've had another election since then, with a new government being elected, which considered redressing some of these concerns and is doing so.

I will tell you, and I think this is public knowledge, that in the ACPP meetings on June 8 and 9 of 2015, immediately before the last election, one of the key focuses was on how the changes brought by Bill C-23 could be implemented effectively without influencing the election and that there would probably be a statement by the Chief Electoral Officer afterwards, as I recall and understand what he had said at the time.

Does that help with your question?

(2115)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Yes.

I want to go on to some of your comments about the pre-writ period as it's drawn up in this legislation, and also bringing in the third party funding questions.

It's my understanding—I don't have any notes in front of me; I was kind of brought down from the House to fill in here—that the limit for third party funding in that pre-writ period is either $1 million or $1.5 million.

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

I think it was $1.5 million.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Do you think that is too much? Do you think that gives third parties too much influence, to spend that kind of money during the pre-writ period?

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

Well in the scheme of things, it's not a lot of money these days. You can buy a car maybe for half a million dollars.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I know.

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

It really depends on how these things are viewed.

I mean, social media campaigns don't cost a lot, but they're loud, they're vocal, and they're often unrepresentative. That's a form of advertising in a way, but it is not—quote, unquote—“advertising”.

There are things that external movements and groups can do to influence election results unfairly. Today, Bill C-45 is being debated in the Senate. There's a very large lobby, which I think has shaped the debate around the issues that Bill C-45 raises. Is that measured by knowledge and science, or is it measured by how social media and campaigning by people who want to benefit financially from the legalization of marijuana want to represent themselves? Do we do that in an election period, and is that fair representation to Canadians?

Those are questions that I think need to be asked when we look at what third parties actually do in the pre-writ period. However, controls by Elections Canada—“controls” is the wrong word—let's say, administration by Elections Canada, I think is helpful.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Do you have any thoughts on social media and third parties and election campaigns that you would put in legislation, or is just the general worry?

Mr. Brian Marlatt:

Social media advertising is one thing, and that's a paid advertisement. It's knowing where things come from. Obviously if that's coming from another country, let's say, to give a good example, the NRA in the United States, it has had a significant influence on the perception by some people about the rights of gun ownership. That will address legislation that's coming forward. It also addressed the repeal of the long-gun registry, I believe.

What is said there is sometimes true and sometimes it's not. There has to be, it seems to me, some way in which we can have some responsibility for truth telling. How do you do that? That's something for legislators to work out. Mind you, if you want to hire me for a study, I'll be happy to do that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm going to use the prerogative of the chair to give Blake 15 seconds to ask his witness something.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I want to ask Mr. Turmel if he'd ever run for a party leadership, because it sounds like there might be an opportunity. You might want to chat with your neighbour next to you there.

Mr. John Turmel:

Well, in 1993, if you're asking your friend, I was busted running the biggest underground casino in history, with 28 tables on St. Laurent Boulevard. I had to spend a million bucks before they took it away as proceeds of crime. So I founded a political party, the Abolitionist Party, anti-slavery—we're going to get rid of the debt slavery—and ran more candidates than the Greens. Guess what? Running for prime minister got me invited to the UN in 2000 as an NGO. I got invited to do the speech on banking, because they'd heard of LETS, the software of time banking, and, would you believe, the millennium declaration said we're going to restructure the global financial architecture with an alternative time-based currency some day.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. John Turmel:

I've learned to pack the information into a short time.

The Chair: Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll ask you a very short question. Have you ever run to win?

Mr. John Turmel:

I always run to win, but then once I install the software.... Look, Mr. Spock never needed help from the slows to reprogram a central computer and save a planet, and neither do I. Then I can retire.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It may be that you're still using a three and a half inch floppy disk.

(2120)

Mr. John Turmel:

I know. That's how long I've been pushing it.

The Chair:

Committee members, we will reconvene tomorrow at 10 a.m. in the Wellington Building because of the video conference.

To the two of you, thank you for your patience today. I know you came in at 3:30 p.m. or 4:30 p.m., so thank you very much.

Mr. John Turmel:

That was fun.

The Chair:

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1825)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonsoir. Bienvenue à la 112e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Nous n'avons pas eu le temps d'entendre nos deux premiers groupes de témoins et nous leur avons offert la possibilité de revenir à 20 h 30 ou d’envoyer un mémoire. Deux d’entre eux reviendront à 20 h 30. Nous allons donc passer à notre troisième groupe de témoins. Accueillons Vivian Krause, recherchiste et rédactrice; Gary Rozon, vérificateur chez Gary Rozon CMA Inc.; Talis Brauns, agent des services de médiation, et John Akpata, agent de la paix, tous deux du Parti Marijuana; nous avons également avec nous Anna Di Carlo, dirigeante nationale de l'administration centrale du Parti marxiste-léniniste du Canada.

Je vous remercie d’avoir accepté de comparaître.

Nous allons commencer par vous, madame Krause. Veuillez faire votre déclaration préliminaire.

Mme Vivian Krause (recherchiste et rédactrice, à titre personnel):

Bonsoir à tous. Bonsoir, monsieur le président et honorables membres du comité. [Français]

Je vais faire ma présentation en anglais, mais je serai heureuse, par la suite, de répondre à vos questions aussi bien en anglais qu'en français.[Traduction]

Merci beaucoup de m’avoir invitée à me joindre à vous ce soir pour contribuer à vos travaux sur le projet de loi C-76. Je crois savoir que vous voulez connaître mon avis sur la question de l’influence étrangère sur les élections canadiennes. Je vais donc faire de mon mieux pour vous parler d'abord de cela.

À titre d’information, il serait peut-être intéressant pour le Comité que je me présente brièvement et que je résume pourquoi je crois que l’influence étrangère sur nos élections est un grave problème, non seulement pour notre pays, mais aussi pour la souveraineté de notre pays.

À titre d’information, je suis citoyenne canadienne. J'habite à Vancouver-Nord. Depuis 10 ans, je m'intéresse à l’argent et à la science qui accompagnent en coulisses le militantisme écologique et, plus récemment, le militantisme électoral. J’ai fait tout mon travail de ma propre initiative. Je ne suis financée ni dirigée par qui que ce soit, et j’ai publié dans le Financial Post et ailleurs une série d’articles qui résument la plupart de mes travaux.

Si vous avez lu certains de mes articles, vous savez peut-être que l'influence étrangère a eu un impact important sur les élections fédérales de 2015 dans notre pays. J’en ai rendu compte en détail à Élections Canada. En résumé, il y a au moins trois organisations américaines qui se vantent d’avoir eu une influence importante sur les élections fédérales de 2015. Deux d’entre elles sont Corporate Ethics International, dont le siège social se trouve à San Francisco, et le Citizen Engagement Laboratory, dont le siège social se trouve à Oakland, en Californie.

Comment savons-nous que ces organisations américaines ont influencé l'issue des élections fédérales de 2015? Eh bien, nous le savons, parce qu’ils nous l’ont dit par écrit. Je vais vous donner un exemple.

Dans le rapport annuel de 2015 d'Online Progressive Engagement Network, qui fait partie du Citizen Engagement Laboratory, son directeur exécutif écrit: Nous avons terminé l’année avec [...] une campagne canadienne qui a fait bouger les choses pendant les élections nationales, contribuant grandement à l’éviction du gouvernement conservateur Harper.

Il s’agit d’une déclaration écrite du directeur exécutif d’une organisation non canadienne. Comment s’y prennent-ils? Eh bien, le Citizen Engagement Laboratory dirige un projet du nom de Online Progressive Engagement Network. abrégé en OPEN, et il avait un programme dit d'incubation stratégique. Ce programme a contribué à la création, au lancement et au retour dans les coulisses d’un organisme canadien appelé Leadnow, dont le siège social se trouve à Vancouver.

Avec l'appui d'OPEN, Leadnow a mené une campagne pour « faire sortir le vote » aux élections fédérales de 2015 et 2011. À l'occasion notamment des élections fédérales de 2015, cet organisme a mené une campagne visant les titulaires conservateurs de 29 circonscriptions. Dans certaines de ces circonscriptions, il est logique que ce groupe ait eu un impact. Par exemple, à Winnipeg, dans la circonscription d’Elmwood—Transcona, où Leadnow a eu du personnel à temps plein pendant plus d’un an, à ce que je sache, le titulaire n’a été défait que par 61 voix.

Le projet de loi C-76 vise à éliminer certaines des lacunes qui ont permis à des non-Canadiens d’exercer une influence sur nos élections fédérales. Je crois savoir que la rédaction de ce projet de loi a nécessité beaucoup de travail, et je tiens, comme Canadienne, à remercier tous ceux qui ont travaillé si fort jusqu’à maintenant. Cependant, j’ai le regret de dire que, malheureusement, les dispositions actuelles du projet de loi n'empêcheraient pas de se produire et de se reproduire ce qui s'est passé aux élections de 2015. Je ne crois pas que le projet de loi ait été modifié comme il l'aurait fallu pour prévenir et, en fait, rendre illégal ce qui s’est produit en 2015 et empêcher que cela se reproduise.

Plus précisément, je renvoie le Comité à l’article 282.4 proposé, sous la rubrique « Influence indue par des étrangers ». C’est l’alinéa 282.4(1)b) en particulier qui, à mon avis, nécessite un certain travail.

Je vais m’en tenir à cela pour ma déclaration préliminaire, monsieur le président, et je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

(1830)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C’était très intéressant.

C'est au tour de M. Rozon.

M. Gary Rozon (vérificateur, Gary Rozon CMA Inc., à titre personnel):

Je m’appelle Gary Rozon. Je suis vérificateur indépendant. Je travaille évidemment à titre indépendant. Je travaille avec tous les partis. Il me semble que j’ai un ou deux clients ici aujourd'hui. Je fais ce travail depuis plus de 10 ans. Avant cela, j’ai travaillé à Élections Canada, et j’ai donc une idée de la façon dont les choses fonctionnent de l’intérieur.

L'un des cas où, entre autres, j'ai toujours pensé que la sanction n'était pas à la mesure du crime est l'obligation faite aux gens et aux agents de s'adresser aux tribunaux pour obtenir une prorogation.

Pour ceux d’entre vous qui ne le savent pas, après une élection, par exemple, on a quatre mois pour produire sa déclaration. Après le délai de quatre mois, il faut avoir déposé sa déclaration ou demandé une prorogation à Élections Canada, qui est habituellement accordée. Si on est en retard et qu'on n'a pas de documents ou qu'on n’a pas demandé de prorogation, il faut s'adresser aux tribunaux pour l'obtenir. Cela coûte cher, de l’ordre de 4 000 à 6 000 dollars. Je suis sûr que certains d’entre vous, qui êtes pourtant des députés, ne le savent peut-être même pas. Vous faites confiance à vos agents financiers et à vos représentants officiels pour gérer l’argent, et, le plus souvent, ils font du très bon travail, mais parfois — c'est la nature humaine — ça dérape. Ils oublient l’échéance. Ils doivent s’adresser aux tribunaux, et les coûts sont de l’ordre de 5 000 dollars et plus. Pour certains des grands partis qui ont de l’argent ou pour les associations de circonscription ou les campagnes qui peuvent se le permettre, cela fait partie du jeu, mais la même règle s’applique aux gens qui se présentent de façon indépendante et qui ne dépensent presque pas d’argent ou à quelqu’un d'un petit parti qui a peut-être recueilli quelques milliers de dollars. Comme je l’ai dit, quand on sait qu'ils seront frappés d’une amende de 4 000 ou 5 000 dollars, la peine est plus sévère que le crime.

C’est la même chose pour les associations de circonscription qui devaient respecter la date limite du 31 mai. J’ai travaillé avec ces gens. C’est toujours la bousculade pour ceux qui ont oublié la date. Les nouveaux agents n'ont pas les dates gravées dans le cerveau comme elles le sont pour certains d'entre nous qui font cela tout le temps.

L'un des moyens de contourner le problème à mon avis — et je l’ai suggéré à certains des agents avec lesquels je travaille depuis des années — serait, dans le cadre d’une campagne, de récupérer 60 % de vos dépenses... pour vous donner des chiffres ronds, si vous dépensez 100 000 dollars, Élections Canada vous rendra 60 000 dollars. On motive les gens comme on peut, et l'argent est souvent le meilleur moyen.

J’éliminerais l’aspect judiciaire. Je dirais que, au bout de quatre mois, s'ils ont besoin d’une prorogation, qu’ils l’obtiennent et qu'ils ne peuvent toujours pas déposer leurs documents quelques jours après l'échéance, ne les envoyez pas au tribunal. Soustrayez 10 % par mois. Au lieu des 60 %, ce serait: « Eh bien non, vous avez dépassé le délai d'un mois supplémentaire, et maintenant 50 %. Un autre mois encore? Ce sera 40 %. » Ces documents seraient alors déposés plus rapidement que ce que pourrait obtenir n'importe quel tribunal.

Je ne vais pas citer de noms, mais je sais qu’une personne dans cette salle a vécu cela avec son association de circonscription. Le dossier a été transmis à Élections Canada. L’agent ne savait pas qu’Élections Canada appliquait strictement le principe du délai et il s'est dit qu'il n'était pas vraiment en retard.

Tout le monde pointe du doigt.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(1835)

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

J’ai l’impression d'être dans une soirée meurtre et mystère.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Que les choses soient claires, tout le monde dans la salle me regarde.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Que cela figure au compte rendu, monsieur le président.

M. Gary Rozon:

C’est pourquoi je n’ai pas cité de noms.

Pour moi, c’est complètement fou. Dans le cas dont je parle, il a apporté les documents. Il se trouvait dans la salle de courrier d’Élections Canada, mais ils ont carrément refusé de les ouvrir jusqu’à ce... Il a dû aller en cour. Le juge s'est demandé: « Est-ce que j’ai vraiment fait des études de droit pour cela? » Il a obtenu l’ordonnance du tribunal. Et c'est alors que les fonctionnaires d'Élections Canada ont ouvert les documents. Cela semble bien excessif. C'est surtout cela. C’est égalitaire jusqu’à ce qu’on en arrive aux petits joueurs. On leur demande aussi de payer 4 000 ou 5 000 dollars. C’est exagéré. Si jamais cela revient à Élections Canada, j’espère qu’ils en profiteront.

Mon autre question est, tout à fait, intéressée. Au fil des ans, nous avons tous constaté l’indexation des limites de dépenses électorales. Nous avons tous constaté l’indexation des limites de contributions, et je suis sûr que certains d’entre vous en sont très reconnaissants. On n'a pas indexé la subvention d’Élections Canada depuis une quinzaine d’années. Chaque année, on nous demande ou on nous dit de faire plus, et, compte tenu de l’inflation, notre budget s'amenuise. Cela finit par revenir à vos associations de circonscription et à vos campagnes, quand il faut faire plus de travail de vérification avant les élections.

C’est la partie qui est dans mon intérêt... mais ce que j’aimerais surtout, c’est que nous puissions faire quelque chose pour éviter que ce genre de situation finisse devant les tribunaux.

Merci.

Le président:

Eh bien, merci à vous.

Je peux vous assurer qu’Élections Canada suit la situation de très près, et je suis sûr que le ministère tiendra compte de vos remarques.

Nous allons passer à Anna, du Parti marxiste-léniniste.

Mme Anna Di Carlo (dirigeante national, Administration centrale, Parti Marxiste-Léniniste du Canada):

C’est le Parti marxiste-léniniste du Canada.

Honorables députés, je suis très heureuse d’être ici.

Je dirai d'abord que je connais très bien la loi électorale, et ce, depuis 1991 environ, quand nous avons eu les commissions Spicer et Lortie, qui est l'époque à laquelle remonte la dernière étude vraiment sérieuse sur la loi électorale.

Nous sommes également au fait des répercussions des aspects injustes et antidémocratiques de la loi depuis 1972, quand nous avons commencé à participer aux élections.

À notre avis, le projet de loi C-76 est une occasion manquée. On a raté l’occasion de défendre les principes démocratiques et de contribuer à atténuer la perception que nous avons aujourd’hui, à savoir que les gouvernements des partis n’ont pas le consentement des gouvernés. Il ne fait rien pour changer le fait que le processus électoral et les résultats électoraux eux-mêmes ne permettent pas de croire qu’il y a bien un mandat appuyé par la majorité des Canadiens.

J’aimerais souligner seulement deux problèmes aujourd’hui, en raison du peu de temps dont nous disposons. Le premier est le droit à un vote éclairé et la nécessité d’assurer l’égalité de tous ceux qui se présentent aux élections. L’autre question est celle de la protection de la vie privée.

Le traitement inégal des candidats résulte des privilèges accordés à ce qu'on appelle les grands partis et il enfreint le droit à un vote éclairé. On nous dit que nous avons l’égalité politique, parce que les règles du jeu sont équitables et que tout le monde doit remplir les mêmes critères. Par exemple, tout le monde doit faire exactement la même chose pour devenir candidat. Tout le monde doit respecter les limites de dépenses et ainsi de suite. De plus, on nous dit que le financement public atténue les inégalités.

Rien de cela n'a de sens si on accorde des privilèges à certains et qu’on justifie le fait que seuls les soi-disant grands partis peuvent prétendre gouverner et que, par conséquent, seuls ces partis méritent d’être entendus. Les autres sont considérés comme marginaux ou accessoires. Ce n’est absolument pas démocratique à tous égards. Les seuls qui voient ces arguments et qui ne voient pas qu’ils sont antidémocratiques sont ceux qui adoptent les lois.

Les Canadiens le voient pour ce que c'est, c'est-à-dire une violation des principes démocratiques fondamentaux qui exacerbe la crise de crédibilité et de légitimité de la loi électorale et des gouvernements.

J’aimerais donner un exemple de la façon dont nous aurions pu, cette fois-ci, saisir l'occasion de régler ce problème. Depuis maintenant plus de 17 ans, le directeur général des élections recommande que la formule de répartition prévue dans la loi soit retirée du statut privilégié dans la formule prévue dans la loi et que cette répartition soit plutôt égalitaire, en particulier le temps de diffusion gratuit. Je siège au Comité consultatif d’Élections Canada et j’assiste aux réunions sur la radiodiffusion. Cette recommandation très simple, que le temps d’antenne gratuit soit augmenté et réparti également, a été rejetée à maintes reprises depuis 17 ans parce que, comme on l’a dit, il faut la renvoyer pour étude.

Aux prochaines élections, nous nous retrouverons dans la même situation où, tout d’abord, les partis à la Chambre auront la majorité du temps d'antenne et que le Parti libéral — parti au pouvoir — aura la part du lion, tandis que les petits partis politiques auront droit à un temps symbolique, sans parler de toutes les complications qu’il y aura à diffuser leur intervention.

Le deuxième point que j’aimerais soulever concerne la protection de la vie privée. Nous sommes d’accord avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée pour dire que les partis politiques devraient être assujettis à la loi. Il n'y a pas de raison qu'ils ne le soient pas. Je tiens à souligner l’hypocrisie de la situation, car, même si les partis politiques sont assujettis à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, la LPRPDE, elle-même, à notre avis, enfreint le droit à la vie privée.

Nous estimons que la loi électorale ne reconnaît pas le droit au consentement éclairé. En 2006, le Parti conservateur, alors à l’avant-garde du microciblage avec son système de gestion de l’information sur les électeurs, a utilisé le pouvoir qu’il avait à l’époque, quoique tous les partis avaient accepté, d’attribuer des numéros d’identification uniques et permanents aux électeurs et d'utiliser des cartes de bingo, pratique des employés d’Élections Canada qui remplace le travail qui était fait auparavant par des scrutateurs pour informer les partis politiques, qui avait voté quand. Ils ne leur disent pas comment les électeurs ont voté, mais grâce à l’analyse des données, nous en sommes très près.

(1840)



Le Parti conservateur voulait des numéros d’identification pour faciliter l’intégration des données et le microciblage. Les cartes de bingo ont été conçues pour régler le problème du manque de bénévoles, auquel sont confrontés tous les partis politiques. À notre avis, cela va à l’encontre du principe du consentement éclairé. C’est tout simplement inacceptable. Les électeurs devraient avoir le droit de ne pas voir leur numéro d’identification unique transmis aux partis politiques pour faciliter le téléchargement de leurs renseignements dans des bases de données sur les électeurs. Ils devraient également avoir le droit de refuser que leur nom soit inscrit sur les cartes de bingo, qui permettent aux partis de savoir s'ils ont voté ou non.

Enfin, j’aimerais faire valoir un argument différent au sujet de cette évolution. La protection de la vie privée est une préoccupation, mais l’importance de cette évolution dans le déroulement d'une campagne, qui consiste à suivre les électeurs et à établir des profils à leur sujet, nous préoccupe davantage. À notre avis, cela ne fait rien pour élever le niveau du discours politique au pays. Cela n’améliore pas non plus la participation des gens au processus politique. Le débat sur la protection de la vie privée, qui est axé sur des choses comme le scandale Cambridge Analytica ou Facebook et la façon dont il est utilisé, obscurcit précisément la façon dont le microciblage influe sur le processus et, en particulier, la façon dont il est lié au fait que les partis politiques remplissent leur rôle présumé d'organisations politiques primaires et d’organisations par le biais desquelles les gens participent aux débats et aux discussions sur les problèmes auxquels la société est confrontée, et aux décisions concernant le programme et les politiques dont la société a besoin.

Notre conclusion est que cette évolution ainsi que le fait qu’il n’y a pas eu d’étude sérieuse du processus électoral depuis 1991-1992 exigent que nous tenions des délibérations publiques sur toutes les prémisses fondamentales du processus électoral pour le renouveler, encore une fois, et déterminer la façon dont les mandats sont établis et dont les candidats sont choisis, l’utilisation des fonds publics, et le principe selon lequel tout le monde et tous les membres de la gente politique, qu’ils soient membres ou non, d’un parti politique, doivent être mis sur un pied d’égalité.

Comment y parvenir? Nous sommes d'avis que le financement du processus devrait être prioritaire et remplacer le financement des partis politiques. Nous pensons que les partis politiques devraient recueillir des fonds auprès de leurs propres membres et ne pas recevoir de financement de l’État. Tant que des fonds de l’État sont alloués, ils doivent l’être également. Autrement, le pouvoir et les privilèges influencent l'issue des élections.

Voilà ce que je voulais dire à titre préliminaire.

(1845)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Soyez assurée que vous nous avez fait part de points de vue que nous n’avions pas encore entendus.

C'est au tour de M. Brauns, du Parti Marijuana. On peut espérer que vous deveniez désuet.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Talis Brauns (agent des services de médiation, Parti Marijuana):

[Le témoin s’exprime en letton.]

Je m'appelle Talis Brauns. Je suis Canadien d'origine lettone, né à Montréal. J’ai passé la moitié de ma vie adulte à travailler à des projets d’aide étrangère en Europe de l’Est pour le développement de la société civile et dans le cadre du programme Acquis communautaire de la Commission européenne.

Pourquoi suis-je ici aujourd’hui? Il y a eu un triste incident dans ma vie privée qui a causé une infection par une tique de chevreuil, et la maladie de Lyme et l’encéphalite ont touché des membres de ma famille. En faisant de la recherche et en communiquant avec des professionnels de la santé, j’ai commencé à examiner les possibilités de la plante de cannabis.

Au cours des 10 dernières années, j’ai étudié les grandes affaires judiciaires concernant la marijuana et j’ai participé activement à la plupart d'entre elles. Je vois d'importantes lacunes dans la Loi sur le cannabis, mais aussi, au fait, beaucoup de possibilités pour le Parti Marijuana, qui, soit dit en passant, est le parti le plus populaire au Canada.

Le président:

Avec dissidence.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Talis Brauns:

J’aimerais lire rapidement un article. Nous sommes un parti d’excentriques. C’est un peu comme un troupeau de chats. Nous avons une gamme complète de candidats allant des chrétiens orthodoxes aux narcosocialistes, et notre ancien whip, Marc Boyer, n’avait qu’une déclaration de naissance, qui lui a permis de devenir candidat et dirigeant du Parti Marijuana. Il n’avait pas de permis de conduire. Il n’avait pas de projets de loi à son nom. Son père était un comptable municipal qui a servi dans les Forces canadiennes pendant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. La guerre finie, avec les bouleversements dans l’Empire britannique, le roi a promis au corps des officiers que leurs enfants ne seraient pas responsables de la dette de guerre.

À l’âge de 65 ans, Marc a demandé sa pension, qui est passée du bureau des pensions au bureau du premier ministre, à celui du président de la Chambre, et je crois qu’elle est actuellement sur le bureau du brigadier-général Rob Delaney. C’est le grand prévôt des Forces canadiennes.

Les futuristes sont un autre extrême de notre parti. Ce sont des informaticiens qui veulent instaurer la démocratie directe, pouvoir voter avec leur téléphone, avoir une identification électronique en ligne comme dans le modèle estonien, que je connais bien.

J’aimerais lire un petit article. Il s’intitule « Persons For idiots », plus précisément « The Tender for Law: Persons for idiots », publié en 2014 par Rogue Support Inc. en vertu d'un permis non déclaré sous Creative Commons attribution-noncommercial-noderivatives 3.0: Vous avez tous, à un moment ou à un autre, rencontré le terme « PERSONNE » dans vos lectures. Après enquête minimale, vous êtes obligé d’accepter de vous rendre compte que vous n’êtes pas une PERSONNE, mais plutôt que vous avez une PERSONNE. Cette distinction est le premier « mensonge par omission » que vous rencontrerez dans le monde « LÉGAL ». L’axiome « LÉGAL=GARANTIE ET COMPTABILITÉ » simplifie beaucoup la navigation dans l'univers du « droit », et il est très facile de repérer les mensonges par omission et ambiguïtés. Vous n’avez pas créé cette PERSONNE, et elle n’a rien à voir avec vous. CE FAIT est perdu de vue par la plupart des gens, et peut mener à une JONCTION si l'on n'y prend pas garde. Lorsqu’on vous demandera si vous êtes une PERSONNE, certains d’entre vous répondront que vous êtes une PERSONNE NATURELLE. C’est vraiment stupide de faire cette déclaration en COUR parce que vous faites plusieurs DÉCLARATIONS en faisant cela! Premièrement, vous DÉCLAREZ que vous êtes dans leur JURISDICTION. Non seulement vous DÉCLAREZ que vous êtes dans leur JURIDICTION, mais vous DÉCLAREZ également que vous ne jouissez PAS d'une RESPONSABILITÉ LIMITÉE. Cela signifie, bien sûr, que vous avez 100 % RESPONSABLE. Permettez-moi de le répéter: Si vous DÉCLAREZ en COUR que vous êtes une PERSONNE NATURELLE, vous DÉCLAREZ que vous acceptez d'être RESPONSABLE à 100 %. PERSONNE NATURELLE = « Payer la note ». PERSONNE = GARANTIE.

Cela nous vient des futuristes. Cet article a été rédigé par quelqu’un qui s’est porté candidat à une charge publique à la municipalité de Toronto. Il a deux diplômes en droit des fiducies, et, pendant cinq heures, il m’a passé un savon en m’accusant d’être un escroc complet dont les tentatives pour représenter la population ne serviraient pas le bien.

C’est là que j'en suis.

Merci de m’avoir invité.

(1850)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à tous d’être venus.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions des partis.

Commençons par M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Krause, l’exemple que vous avez donné m’a beaucoup intéressé. C’est pourquoi j’aime que l'on convoque des témoins, parce que nous entendons des choses dont on ne nous a pas parlé auparavant.

Je connais Leadnow. Je ne connais pas l’entreprise en Californie. Vous avez dit que l'organisme ne serait pas visé par le nouveau projet de loi que nous étudions aujourd’hui. Pourtant, l’une des quelques choses que nous essayons de faire ici est d’examiner les activités partisanes, les dépenses électorales et les sondages électoraux, en élargissant la définition de ce qu’ils étaient avant. En ce qui concerne les interventions étrangères, dans le cas de l’entreprise californienne, à quelles activités précises ont-elles participé avec Leadnow? Parmi ces trois catégories, y en avait-il une ou toutes?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Pourriez-vous me rappeler les trois catégories?

M. Scott Simms:

Ce sont des activités électorales — essentiellement des événements de cette nature; une publicité précise, quelle qu’en soit la forme, par n’importe quel média; et, bien sûr, les sondages électoraux, et les dépenses engagées pour obtenir de l’information de l’intérieur.

Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage sur leur participation?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Le problème est que l’influence étrangère s'exerce surtout en dehors de la période électorale. Au moment où le bref électoral est émis, ils ont déjà accompli beaucoup de choses.

M. Scott Simms:

J’y viendrai dans un instant, mais j’aimerais revenir sur ce qu’ils faisaient. Je veux simplement savoir exactement ce qu’ils faisaient, parce que je sais ce que faisait Leadnow.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je ne peux pas vous dire exactement ce qu’ils ont fait pendant la période électorale, mais je peux vous dire le genre de choses qu’ils font.

M. Scott Simms:

Leadnow ou l’entreprise américaine?

Mme Vivian Krause:

L’organisation américaine. C’est un organisme de bienfaisance.

Pour autant que je sache, cette organisation américaine est l’organisation mère de Leadnow.

M. Scott Simms:

Oh, je vois.

(1855)

Mme Vivian Krause:

Cela s'appelle Le Citizen Engagement Laboratory, qui a un programme appelé Online Progressive Engagement Network.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce qu'ils considèrent qu'ils ont — excusez l’expression — donné naissance à Leadnow?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Ils ont un programme d’incubation stratégique. Le directeur général est Ben Brandzel. Il est venu au Canada et a travaillé avec Leadnow ici pour faciliter le lancement de l'organisation. Son organisation, OPEN, offre différents types d’aide. Je peux vous donner quelques exemples, si vous m’accordez une minute.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, bien sûr.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Il y a deux ou trois choses au sujet d’OPEN. C’est l’organisation américaine qui me semble être l’organisation mère de Leadnow. Ils disent qu’ils travaillent de façon fluide entre les frontières. Ils disent par écrit qu’ils gardent une faible visibilité en raison des répercussions politiques délicates de leur travail. Ils disent offrir un « accès spécial aux meilleures ressources externes, de la production vidéo à l’accompagnement des cadres ».

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps. Je sais que je viens de vous donner du temps, et je le reprends. Excusez-moi.

Ils disent que c’est une activité fluide entre les deux, n’est-ce pas? Dans ce projet de loi, nous essayons de mettre le doigt sur le problème, d’être plus transparents et de nous assurer qu’ils participent directement aux élections. Il me semble que c’est Leadnow qui est directement impliqué et que l’association avec l’organisation américaine est en fait...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je dirais que la ligne de démarcation entre Leadnow et OPEN est assez floue, parce qu’ils travaillent de façon fluide entre les frontières et en raison du type d’activité que l’organisation américaine offre. Cela va de la rédaction anonyme à la production vidéo en passant par l’accompagnement, le soutien stratégique, la formation, etc.

Voici un autre exemple. Après les élections fédérales de 2015, en janvier 2016, la porte-parole de Leadnow, Amara Possian, qui se porte actuellement candidate aux élections provinciales en Ontario, s’est rendue en Australie, où elle a reçu un prix de l’organisation américaine pour avoir aidé à défaire le Parti conservateur. C’est le genre de choses qu’ils font. Cela va de la création de l’organisation originale à la poursuite de...

Ensuite, pour vous donner un autre exemple, des membres canadiens de Leadnow sont allés en Australie pour participer à la campagne américaine en Australie. Ce n’est donc pas seulement au Canada qu'ils interviennent.

M. Scott Simms:

Je n’essaie pas d’éluder la question. Comprenez-moi bien. Je n’ai que peu de temps, et j’essaie de préciser...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Ce que j’essaie de dire, c’est qu’ils travaillent en coulisse...

M. Scott Simms:

Dans la loi que nous allons mettre en place, comment feriez-vous pour rendre cette ligne moins floue? Que feriez-vous pour vous assurer qu’il y a une véritable ligne de démarcation entre ce qui est une entité étrangère et son homologue canadien?

Mme Vivian Krause:

C’est une question très difficile, mais je vais vous dire comment je vois les choses.

Comme je l’ai dit, c’est à l’alinéa 282.4(1)b) proposé. Cet alinéa définit une « entité étrangère ». Il est dit que vous n’avez pas le droit d’influencer des élections si vous êtes « une personne morale ou une entité constituée, formée ou autrement organisée ailleurs qu’au Canada ». Si on s'arrête là, OPEN et tous ces groupes seraient identifiés comme des entités étrangères.

Le problème, c’est que la loi exclut ensuite toute entité qui exerce des activités au Canada ou « dont la seule activité au Canada pendant une période électorale consiste à faire quoi que ce soit pour influencer les électeurs pendant cette période » qui exercent des activités commerciales au Canada ou « dont les seules activités au Canada consistent, pendant une période électorale, à exercer une influence sur un électeur ».

En d’autres termes, l’organisation étrangère n’a qu’à faire quelque chose — ramasser des bouteilles, faire du recyclage, n’importe quoi — qui ne consiste pas seulement en des activités liées aux élections.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois ce que vous voulez dire.

Mme Vivian Krause:

C’est à cause de la façon dont c’est rédigé que pratiquement n’importe quelle organisation peut être exemptée.

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis désolé. Je n'essayais pas d'écarter la question. Je viens de me rendre compte que mon temps est écoulé, mais je vous remercie. Je vous suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Écoutons maintenant M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous tous d’être ici ce soir.

Je vais poursuivre avec vous également, madame Krause. J’aimerais poser des questions de même nature, mais j’aimerais commencer par celle-ci, parce qu’un certain nombre de personnes, dont vous-même, ont soulevé ces questions au sujet de la dernière élection en particulier au sujet du financement étranger, de ce que cela pourrait signifier, des conséquences éventuelles si rien n’est fait pour essayer de régler ce qui est peut-être un problème et des conséquences pour les élections à venir. On a beaucoup parlé des élections qui se déroulent actuellement en Ontario et de ce qui pourrait se passer.

J’y viendrai peut-être dans un instant, mais je voulais commencer par la question suivante: diriez-vous qu’il est possible que le financement étranger ait changé l'issue des dernières élections fédérales?

(1900)

Mme Vivian Krause:

Est-ce que c'est possible?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Eh bien, si on fait le calcul, la réponse est clairement oui, n’est-ce pas? Je ne veux pas minimiser les efforts du parti politique qui a gagné, mais, si on fait le calcul... Par exemple, Leadnow s’attribue le mérite d’avoir défait 26 députés conservateurs. Évidemment que ce n'est pas eux qui l'ont fait, mais, comme je l’ai dit, ils ont probablement produit un effet dans quelques circonscriptions. Combien? Cela dépend, mais c’était peut-être suffisant pour faire la différence entre un gouvernement minoritaire et un gouvernement majoritaire.

Ce qu’il faut se rappeler, c’est que je ne pense pas que ce soit tellement... Je n’avancerais pas cet argument, mais voici ce qu’il en est. Essentiellement, ce qu’ils ont fait aux élections de 2015 était leur première tentative. C’était une toute nouvelle organisation. Ce n’était qu’un début. C’était comme une année de maternelle. Qu’est-ce qu’ils pourront accomplir aux prochaines élections? Ils ont réussi à mobiliser un demi-million de Canadiens. Cela n’aurait jamais été possible, je ne pense pas, s’ils n’avaient pas eu l’aide de leur organisation mère américaine.

Nous avons un système qui ne résiste pas à ce genre d’influence extérieure. Si nous voulons l'empêcher, nous devons changer notre système.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord.

De toute évidence, selon les chiffres dont ils se vantent, ils ont eu une influence. Vous avez raison. Il est difficile de déterminer si ce qu’ils disent est exact ou non, mais je pense que nous pouvons essayer de déterminer dans quelle mesure il y a eu financement étranger. Vous avez visiblement examiné la question de près. Que pouvez-vous nous dire à ce sujet? Dans quelle mesure...? De quel genre de chiffres parle-t-on ici?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je vais vous donner un exemple.

Cet organisme, Leadnow, prétend que c’est le fruit du travail de deux étudiants universitaires et d’un mouvement de jeunes Canadiens, mais ce n’est pas tout. La vérité, c’est que leur plan d’affaires initial, que j’ai trouvé sur Internet par hasard, prévoyait un budget de 16 millions de dollars sur 10 ans. C’est le genre de portée qu'ils envisageaient au départ.

J’ai parlé avec les fondateurs de Leadnow, les personnes qui se disent les fondateurs, Adam Shedletzky et Jamie Biggar. Ils m’ont dit que oui, ils avaient un donneur anonyme. Je les ai encouragés. Je leur ai dit: « Écoutez, vous avez eu une influence importante sur les élections, et nous aimerions parler avec votre donateur anonyme ou, du moins, savoir s'il est canadien ou étranger? » J’ai dit aussi: « Donnez-nous au moins une réponse à ce sujet. » Je n'ai rien obtenu.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr, et je pense que cela va de soi, mais j’aimerais connaître votre opinion: est-ce qu'on devrait s'en inquiéter? Je ne parle pas seulement de l’exemple précis dont vous parlez. Je veux dire le fait que les gens peuvent donner des montants potentiellement illimités de l’extérieur du Canada et qu’il n’y a aucun moyen de savoir de quelle personne ou organisation cela vient. Est-ce qu'on devrait s'en inquiéter?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je pense que l'important ou l'une des choses importantes à cet égard, c'est de se dire que cela n’a pas été fait sans raison. Cela n’a pas été fait en raison de la façon dont le Canada a traité les Autochtones ou les immigrants. Cela a été fait à cause du pétrole.

Les fondations caritatives américaines qui financent le Citizen Engagement Laboratory, en fait, l’ont créé. Il est financé par le Rockefeller Brothers Fund, la fondation Tides et d’autres donateurs qui financent une entité appelée la campagne des sables bitumineux.

Quand cette campagne a commencé il y a 10 ans, nous ne savions pas de quoi il s’agissait. Les motivations des bailleurs de fonds n’étaient pas claires, mais elles le sont maintenant, parce que la personne qui dirige cette campagne depuis plus d’une décennie, Michael Marx, a dit ceci: « Dès le début, la stratégie de la campagne consistait à bloquer les sables bitumineux afin que leur pétrole brut ne puisse pas atteindre le marché international, où il pourrait se vendre à un prix élevé par baril. »

C’est cette campagne qui a financé Leadnow. Leadnow a reçu du financement et du soutien en coulisse dans le cadre de la campagne financée par les États-Unis pour enclaver notre pétrole brut et, essentiellement, maintenir le Canada en position de faiblesse.

Je pense que ce qui est important, c’est que cela n’a pas été fait sans raison. Cela a été fait pour quelque chose qui nous coûte des milliards de dollars.

(1905)

M. Blake Richards:

Si je ne m’abuse, ce que vous dites également, c’est que cela n’a pas été fait pour essayer de faire quoi que ce soit qui serait bénéfique ou utile pour le Canada, les Canadiens ou n’importe quel groupe de Canadiens, d’ailleurs, mais simplement pour le compte d’intérêts extérieurs.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Oui, c’était pour défaire les politiciens qui étaient favorables à l'idée de briser le monopole américain sur notre pétrole. C’est la raison pour laquelle il y a eu cette participation financée par les États-Unis aux élections fédérales de 2015.

M. Blake Richards:

Il ne me reste pas beaucoup de temps, mais commençons, et nous pourrons toujours continuer.

Vous avez parlé du nouvel article 282.4 proposé. C’est une chose que nous devrions prendre très au sérieux et que nous devrions examiner. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants d’avoir soulevé cette question. Que faut-il changer d’autre pour contrer correctement cette menace?

Mme Vivian Krause:

J’y ai beaucoup réfléchi et j’ai vraiment du mal à vous donner une réponse facile. Je ne pense pas qu’il y en ait une. Ce qui me frappe, et c’est tout à fait différent de tout ce qui est actuellement mentionné dans la loi, c'est qu’il y a une question que nous devons nous poser, nous Canadiens, à savoir si nous sommes d'accord pour dire qu’il devrait être légal et licite pour les Canadiens de soutenir et d’appuyer la campagne d’un pays étranger pour nuire à notre propre pays ou si, en fait, c’est quelque chose que nous voulons rendre illégal. Devrait-il être légal ou illégal que des Canadiens nuisent à l’économie de leur propre pays au profit d’un autre pays? C’est une question plus trouble.

Si nous sommes d’accord pour que ce soit légal, nous n’avons rien à faire, mais si nous ne sommes pas d’accord, nous avons un sérieux travail à faire.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos témoins.

Suggérez-vous qu'un citoyen puisse nuire à l'économie dont dépendent d'autres Canadiens? Par exemple, il est probable qu'un déversement de bitume sur la côte ouest nuirait à l'économie canadienne.

Vous avez déjà travaillé dans l'industrie du saumon d'élevage, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Oui, il y a 15 ans.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il n'y a pas à douter que vous vous souciez du saumon.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Oui. Je me soucie tout particulièrement du saumon sauvage.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voilà qui nuirait à l'économie canadienne, n'est-ce pas? Si, par exemple, quelqu'un venant de l'extérieur du Canada prônait un affaiblissement des lois environnementales canadiennes et des règlements sur les pipelines, cela constituerait une menace pour l'économie canadienne et pour l'économie de la Colombie-Britannique, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Non. Je crois qu'il s'agit là d'un enjeu tout à fait différent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vraiment? C'est donc dire que l'affaiblissement des lois environnementales canadiennes servant à protéger, entre autres, le saumon sauvage...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Un instant. Les lois environnementales ne constituent pas un secteur d'activité en soi, mais bien la réglementation de ce secteur. Vous comparez des pommes et des poires.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non. Vous avez dit que nous devrions interdire à quiconque d'aider un Canadien à commettre une action qui nuirait à l'économie dont dépendent les autres Canadiens. Si, par exemple, quelqu'un utilisait des fonds étrangers pour affaiblir la réglementation canadienne en matière d'environnement, mettant ainsi l'économie canadienne en danger, cela correspondrait précisément à ce dont vous venez de parler.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Monsieur, l'affaiblissement de la réglementation n'est pas un secteur d'activité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je le sais bien, mais le secteur pétrolier en est bel et bien un.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vos enquêtes ont principalement porté sur des groupes dits progressistes ou de gauche, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Vivian Krause:

J'ai aussi examiné de nombreux groupes et même tous les groupes de réflexion de droite.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que le fait qu'ils reçoivent des fonds étrangers est acceptable pour vous?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je crois que peu importe... Lorsqu'il s'agit de financement étranger, que ce soit dans le secteur privé ou dans le secteur de la bienfaisance, qu'il s'agisse d'un groupe de gauche ou de droite, l'on devrait divulguer l'information.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous êtes donc d'accord pour que les groupes de réflexion de droite reçoivent de l'argent à condition qu'ils divulguent cette information?

Mme Vivian Krause:

En fait, je suis d'accord pour que les groupes de réflexion de gauche reçoivent aussi de l'argent, mais cela devrait être divulgué. Les mêmes règles devraient s'appliquer à tout le monde, peu importe où l'on se situe sur l'échiquier politique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez dit ne pas recevoir de fonds du secteur privé.

Mme Vivian Krause:

En effet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous n'avez jamais reçu d'honoraires d'allocution ou d'autres paiements du genre?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Quand je dis que je ne reçois pas de fonds du secteur privé, je dis que je n'ai jamais été payée pour le travail que j'ai fait. J'ai commencé en 2006 environ et...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avez-vous travaillé pour...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Monsieur, laissez-moi finir ma phrase, je vous prie.

Je n'ai prononcé ma première allocution que six ans après avoir amorcé mes activités. Ainsi, en toute logique, mon travail n'était pas financé par le secteur privé, puisque le plus gros de l'effort avait déjà été accompli avant que je ne prenne la parole.

(1910)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cependant, vous acceptez des paiements du secteur privé et cela rend d'autant plus...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Vous savez, monsieur, au cours du dernier mois, j'ai pris la parole à Fort St. John, à Fort Nelson, à Kitimat — dans votre circonscription — ainsi qu'à Victoria et je n'ai reçu aucun paiement pour ces allocutions.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Répondez simplement à la question. Si vous avez reçu des honoraires d'allocution du secteur pétrolier et gazier et du secteur minier...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... vous pouvez le dire.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je suis heureuse et fière de le dire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Il a fallu un certain temps pour obtenir cette réponse.

La question est de savoir si vous vous préoccupez des 1,2 million de dollars que des entreprises de pisciculture étrangères ont versés au gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique lorsque Christy Clark était au pouvoir.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Un instant. Nous sommes ici pour parler du projet de loi C-76.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tout à fait. Nous parlons d'influence étrangère.

Vous avez dit qu'en principe, vous êtes contre l'influence étrangère exercée sur les acteurs de la scène politique canadienne.

Mme Vivian Krause:

À mon avis, cette information devrait être divulguée. Même Leadnow, en qualité d'organisme progressiste, a le droit de faire partie d'un réseau international.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Qu'est-ce donc que l'organisme ne divulgue pas?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Ce qui n'est pas acceptable, c'est le fait que l'organisme se présente comme un mouvement entièrement dirigé par de jeunes Canadiens. Voilà qui ne dit pas tout.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bien sûr.

Mme Vivian Krause:

L'organisme fait également partie d'un réseau d'organismes américains qui cherchent expressément à influencer les résultats des élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si je consulte le site Web de l'Institut Fraser, qui se présente comme un organisme exclusivement canadien recevant trois quarts de million de dollars des frères Koch, lesquels ont dit explicitement vouloir un adoucissement de la réglementation sur les hydrocarbures au Canada, cela vous convient-il?

Mme Vivian Krause:

L'Institut Fraser a divulgué son financement provenant des frères Koch. Si Leadnow faisait de même, je ne trouverais rien à y redire non plus.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Êtes-vous en train de dire que Leadnow ne divulgue pas l'origine de son financement à l'ARC ou à quiconque?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Il ne s'agit pas d'un organisme de bienfaisance enregistré et, par conséquent, il n'y a pas d'obligation de divulgation à l'ARC.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ainsi, l'organisme ne divulgue aucunement ses sources de financement?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Il n'y a eu aucune divulgation avant que j'en fasse la demande.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous utilisez des expressions étranges qui sont...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Monsieur, si la source était divulguée, je ne trouverais rien à y redire...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi de terminer ma question.

Mme Vivian Krause:

... mais l'ennui, c'est que l'organisme ne divulgue pas...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous m'avez demandé de ne pas vous interrompre, mais c'est précisément ce que vous faites.

Mme Vivian Krause:

... son financement provenant des États-Unis.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous employez des expressions comme « faire le calcul », « il est possible qu'ils aient », « probablement », « il se peut qu'ils aient eu une incidence », « on peut supposer ». Avez-vous des preuves que ces groupes progressistes ont eu une incidence?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, dans une circonscription où 61 voix ont fait pencher la balance de l'autre côté et où un organisme tiers s'attribue le mérite d'avoir influencé l'élection...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bien sûr.

Mme Vivian Krause:

... organisme où travaillait du personnel à temps plein pendant plus d'un an, je pense qu'il est raisonnable de penser que cela a pu avoir une incidence.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez passé du temps à Kitimat. Vous vous souviendrez que, il y a quelques années, il y a eu là-bas un plébiscite sur un pipeline. Enbridge, qui à l'époque était commanditée en grande partie par des sociétés pétrolières chinoises, a fait venir des dizaines de personnes pour faire du porte-à-porte et distribuer des dépliants. L'entreprise a acheté des publicités le long de l'autoroute 16. Des centaines de milliers de dollars ont été dépensés pour essayer de convaincre les électeurs de Kitimat, en Colombie-Britannique, de voter pour un pipeline qui était commandité en grande partie par des sociétés pétrolières chinoises, dont certaines appartenaient au gouvernement chinois. Cela n'avait pas été divulgué au départ.

Où se trouve le rapport ou l'article que vous avez rédigé au sujet de l'influence étrangère exercée sur les électeurs canadiens?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je n'ai pas besoin de le trouver pour vous, puisque vous m'en parlez. De toute évidence, vous l'avez lu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je constate que vous faites preuve de beaucoup d'ambition et d'énergie lorsqu'il s'agit de s'en prendre aux progressistes. Lorsqu'il y a un cas d'influence étrangère évident dans le processus démocratique au pays...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Voilà qui a été divulgué en grande partie. C'est pourquoi nous en avons connaissance.

M. Nathan Cullen:

« En grande partie »: vous êtes bien indulgente.

Voilà qui me paraît inconséquent. J'aime votre enthousiasme et votre énergie. Ce serait vraiment bien si vous pouviez passer le mot aux gens qui font la promotion du pétrole, du gaz, ou des piscicultures en eaux canadiennes, menaçant ainsi ce que vous dites défendre — je vous crois lorsque vous dites que cela vous tient à coeur. À mon avis, si nous voulons contrer l'influence étrangère — ce que nous tentons de faire avec le projet de loi C-76 —, nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de travailler pour et contre ce phénomène en même temps. La discussion gagnerait beaucoup en crédibilité si l'on s'occupait de manière juste des cas évidents où des acteurs étrangers ont exercé une influence importante au moyen d'énormes sommes d'argent. Le budget de l'Institut Fraser est de 11 millions de dollars par année. Vous vous préoccupez d'un montant de 1,5 million de dollars sur 10 ans et pourtant, vous faites peu de cas d'une somme presque dix fois plus élevée. Il serait bon de se montrer conséquent.

Monsieur le président, combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, désolé, j'avais une bonne question pour M. Rozon, mais j'y reviendrai s'il me reste du temps.

Le président:

Madame Sahota

(1915)

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J'ai une question complémentaire pour Mme Krause.

Je suis en train de consulter la déclaration de Leadnow sur le site Web d'Élections Canada. Il me semble qu'on y déclare toutes les contributions de l'organisme. On énumère tous les syndicats et les particuliers par leur nom sur le site Web d'Élections Canada. S'il y a eu participation à des élections et s'il y a eu contribution de la part de particuliers, tout cela est déclaré. On dénombre environ 6 791 particuliers qui ont donné en moyenne 55 $ par personne à Leadnow pour les activités de revendication de l'organisme pendant les élections.

J'aimerais que vous me disiez avec précision quelles informations supplémentaires un organisme comme Leadnow devrait, selon vous, déclarer.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Vous avez consulté la liste. Vous y chercheriez en vain le nom du réseau Online Progressive Engagement ou celui de Citizenship Engagement Laboratory. Ils ne sont pas sur la liste. Ils n'ont pas été déclarés.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Où sont les preuves qu'ils ont effectué des dons?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Excusez-moi. Vous demandez où sont les preuves...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Où sont les preuves qu'ils ont effectué des dons? Vous avez laissé entendre qu'ils ont fait des dons, mais je ne vois pas d'où vient cette information.

Mme Vivian Krause:

Ils ne font pas de dons. Ils offrent des contributions en nature, ce qui n'est pas sans valeur pécuniaire, n'est-ce pas?

Leadnow a refusé de répondre à des questions à ce sujet, mais je suppose que — comme je l'ai déjà dit — l'organisme a principalement offert ses contributions et son soutien aux élections fédérales de 2015 et de 2011 en dehors de la période électorale à proprement parler. Comme ce type d'organisme dispose de fonds importants, il est à même de jeter les bases de son influence électorale deux, trois ou même quatre ans avant les élections.

À mon avis, on touche là à l'un des problèmes, à savoir que ces organismes peuvent contourner les exigences actuelles en matière de divulgation en menant des activités en dehors de la période électorale et en fournissant un type de soutien qui n'a pas à être divulgué.

Par exemple, toutes les dépenses liées à l'utilisation des médias sociaux et aux communications en ligne ne font pas partie de la liste des coûts qui doivent être divulgués. Or, ce sont là justement les principaux moyens dont a usé Leadnow. C'est ce qui explique, entre autres, l'état des dépenses dans la déclaration de l'organisme.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je puis être d'accord pour dire qu'il y a d'autres avenues à explorer à l'avenir. D'aucuns diraient que ce projet de loi est plutôt volumineux. Il doit porter sur un grand nombre de domaines et renverser une grande partie des dispositions de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, dispositions qui empêchaient de nombreuses personnes de voter. Nous essayons de corriger la situation au moyen de ce projet de loi. Cela dit, rien n'empêche que d'autres mesures législatives soient adoptées à l'avenir afin d'examiner certaines de ces questions plus avant.

Si un autre projet de loi était présenté plus tard, si le Comité l'étudiait et formulait des recommandations, trouveriez-vous cela acceptable, ou jugez-vous plutôt que ces mesures devraient figurer dans le projet de loi actuel?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Comme mon collègue, je suis d'avis que cette loi sera une occasion ratée si elle échoue à régler les problèmes. Voici donc où nous en sommes, à trois ans de...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Êtes-vous d'accord pour dire que la loi s'en trouverait encore plus allongée?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je ne pense pas que l'on doive l'allonger. Il suffit de resserrer certains des changements déjà proposés.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Monsieur le président, je partagerai mon temps avec M. Simms.

Le président:

C'est à vous.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Madame Krause, prenez une pause si vous le souhaitez.

Monsieur Rozon, je tenterai d'être bref. En ce qui concerne les sanctions administratives dont il est question dans ce projet de loi, il est évident qu'Élections Canada cherche à accroître la conformité, ce qui a été annoncé depuis un certain temps déjà.

Que pensez-vous des sanctions administratives prévues dans ce projet de loi?

M. Gary Rozon:

On utilise trop la menace et pas assez l'incitation. Tous les députés ici présents savent que leur campagne est menée par des agents financiers et des agents officiels. Grâce à eux, c'est une mécanique bien huilée. Comme je l'ai dit, j'ai travaillé aux élections et j'ai aussi travaillé de façon indépendante dans mon entreprise.

Le mandat d'Élections Canada consiste notamment à encourager les gens à participer au processus politique. En les forçant à se présenter au tribunal, on ne les encourage pas.

(1920)

M. Scott Simms:

N'est-ce pas précisément ce que nous proposons au moyen du mécanisme de prolongation? N'est-ce pas là l'incitation que vous appelez de vos voeux?

M. Gary Rozon:

L'incitation, c'est l'argent. Tout le monde comprend l'argent. Personne ne se dit: « Tiens, je vais tout gâcher: je vais oublier de produire ma déclaration. » Si un agent commet une erreur de bonne foi, il peut recevoir une pénalité financière, mais une comparution devant les tribunaux, c'est une autre paire de manches. C'est lourd. Pour bien des gens, la simple pensée d'une comparution devant les tribunaux est rebutante.

M. Scott Simms:

À votre avis, comment faire en sorte que la démarche soit moins lourde?

M. Gary Rozon:

Ne faisons pas appel aux tribunaux. Visons plutôt le portefeuille. Dans le contexte d'une campagne électorale, plus on tarde à produire sa déclaration, plus le remboursement sera maigre.

M. Scott Simms:

N'estimez-vous pas que la loi vise cet objectif?

M. Gary Rozon:

Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est l'iniquité. Certains d'entre vous jouissent d'un bon financement pour leurs campagnes et leurs associations de circonscription. Vous pouvez vous permettre de dépenser de l'argent. En revanche, si une personne du Parti marxiste-léniniste rate une échéance et doit payer des frais juridiques de 5 000 $, elle ne possède pas une telle somme d'argent.

M. Scott Simms:

Je comprends, mais je constate une situation dans laquelle... Il ne fait aucun doute que cela revêt un caractère litigieux; vous avez raison de le dire. Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est que cela va trop loin, comme vous le dites. Cependant, la mesure législative prévoit que l'on examine, par exemple, le Parti marxiste-léniniste et que l'on trouve une solution lorsqu'il y a eu — ou lorsqu'il y aura bientôt — entorse à la loi telle qu'elle est rédigée. Le problème peut être réglé avec l'aide du commissaire grâce aux mécanismes qui existent actuellement.

M. Gary Rozon:

C'est vrai.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Le commissaire a aussi le...

Le président:

Désolé, votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Pouvons-nous poursuivre notre conversation, madame Krause? J'aimerais aborder d'autres questions avec vous.

D'abord, il a été quelque peu question de collusion et du fait qu'il serait possible de contourner les limites de dépenses, entre autres, en utilisant différents groupes qui travaillent ensemble et coordonnent leurs messages. Je me demandais si vous aviez des réflexions à exprimer à ce sujet. Estimez-vous que c'est un problème? Si oui, avez-vous des suggestions à faire pour régler cela?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Il y avait, je crois, 12 ou 13 organismes qui étaient tous financés en partie par la fondation Tides, basée dans la ville de San Francisco, qui est bien sûr la plaque tournante de la campagne contre les sables bitumineux visant à enclaver le pétrole brut de l'Ouest canadien. Ces organismes ont retenu les services d'une experte-conseil expressément chargée d'examiner les répercussions — je cite — des « efforts coordonnés » déployés par les divers groupes lors des élections fédérales.

J'ai porté la chose à l'attention d'Élections Canada, qui m'a interviewé dans le cadre d'une enquête en septembre dernier. J'ai alors mentionné le fait qu'il pourrait être pertinent de s'adresser à cette experte-conseil. De toute évidence, si elle a été embauchée pour évaluer les efforts coordonnés de plusieurs groupes lors des élections fédérales, il y a de fortes chances qu'il y a bien eu des efforts coordonnés. Il serait intéressant de parler avec cette personne pour en savoir plus au sujet de ces efforts coordonnés et de leur impact.

M. Blake Richards:

Voilà qui m'amène à ma prochaine question. Pensez-vous qu'Élections Canada fait ce qu'il se doit pour faire respecter les lois en vigueur afin de veiller à ce que ce genre de situation fasse l'objet d'une enquête et d'éviter que cela ne se reproduise?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je suis heureuse que vous souleviez cette question, qui me permet d'expliquer ce qui s’est passé. J’ai passé quatre heures avec les enquêteurs d’Élections Canada en septembre, et l’une des conclusions auxquelles j’en suis arrivée à la fin, c’est qu’Élections Canada ne peut pas faire son travail qui consiste à garder les fonds étrangers à l’extérieur du pays tant que le directeur des organismes de bienfaisance de l’Agence du revenu du Canada n’aura pas fait son travail pour s’assurer que la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu est observée.

Tout ce qu'il reste à régler maintenant, c’est le problème de ce que j’appellerais les organismes de bienfaisance fictifs. Ce sont des organismes de bienfaisance qui ne servent qu’à « canadianiser » et à légitimer les fonds provenant de l’extérieur du Canada. Ils servent aussi à diverses autres fins, aucune n’étant de bienfaisance et, à mon avis, ils ont tout à voir avec la possibilité d'obtenir pour un organisme qui n'a jamais existé des reçus au titre des dons aux fins de l’impôt. Ce sont des organismes de bienfaisance qui devraient être abolis par l’ARC, et je pourrais vous donner des exemples de dizaines d’entre eux.

Juste pour vous donner un exemple...

(1925)

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr, si vous pouviez le faire très rapidement.

Mme Vivian Krause:

L’un d’eux s’appelle la DI Foundation. C’est son nom. La DI Foundation n’a jamais fait qu’une seule chose, à savoir recevoir de l’argent de la Tides Foundation Canada, le remettre à la Salal Foundation, qui finance ensuite la Dogwood Initiative, l’une des organisations les plus actives sur le plan politique au Canada. La Dogwood Initiative, de son propre aveu, est tellement politique qu’elle n’est pas admissible au titre d'organisme de bienfaisance enregistré et pourtant, elle a été financée au fil des ans par 10 organismes de bienfaisance enregistrés, dont la Salal Foundation et la Tides Canada Foundation.

J'affirmerais devant votre comité que la DI Foundation doit être abolie avec tous les autres organismes de bienfaisance fictifs qui légitiment et « canadianisent » des fonds provenant de l’extérieur du Canada. Si on leur permet de continuer, Élections Canada ne peut pas vraiment faire grand-chose au sujet de leur financement.

M. Blake Richards:

Je voulais vous poser une question à ce sujet. Dans le projet de loi, on trouve cette nouvelle période préélectorale, où il y a une réglementation sur le financement étranger et des éléments comme ces groupes de défense, et les plafonds de dépenses qui leur sont imposés. Cela commence le 30 juin d’une année électorale à date fixe. Tout le monde sait que c’est à ce moment-là que cela commence, alors ce que vous faites en dehors du 29 juin est une toute autre histoire, n’est-ce pas?

Pensez-vous que c’est suffisant pour que cela reste entièrement ouvert? De plus, qu’en est-il des plafonds de contributions pour ces tiers? Comme c’est le cas pour les partis politiques, ils choisissent de participer à nos élections. Devraient-ils alors choisir de se soumettre aux mêmes règles que les partis politiques qui ont fait ce choix?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je vais répondre rapidement à votre première question. Je ne pense pas qu’il serait pratique de prolonger la période électorale pour empêcher l’arrivée de fonds étrangers. En pratique, dans le cas des élections précédentes, il faudrait prévoir une période de deux ans, ou quelque chose du genre. Du fait de leur nature même, les groupes qui ont financé des tierces parties de l’extérieur du pays lors des élections précédentes sont très bien nantis. Ces fondations ont des actifs de plusieurs milliards de dollars. Ils donnent des milliards de dollars chaque année. Ils disposent d’un financement pratiquement illimité, ce qui leur permet de placer facilement leur argent un an ou deux à l’avance.

M. Blake Richards:

C’est un problème, n’est-ce pas?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je ne pense pas que l’allongement de la période soit la bonne façon de restreindre cela. Je pense qu’une autre approche s’impose.

Le président:

D’accord.

M. Blake Richards:

J’aimerais apporter une précision, parce que je crains d'avoir été mal interprété.

Le président:

D’accord, mais très rapidement.

M. Blake Richards:

Je voulais dire que je ne préconisais pas nécessairement une prolongation de cette période. Je demandais simplement si vous croyez que la détermination de la date du 30 juin réglera le problème?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Non, pas du tout.

Le président:

D’accord, merci.

M. Blake Richards:

Vouliez-vous répondre à la question concernant les plafonds de contribution?

Le président:

Non, non, non.

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, j’ai posé la question et elle n’a pas eu l’occasion d’y répondre.

Le président:

Il ne nous reste que quelques minutes.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Krause, je vous remercie d’être venue ici, et je vous suis reconnaissante des efforts que vous déployez pour empêcher des fonds étrangers d’influer sur le résultat des élections canadiennes.

J’aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Cullen, à savoir que vous ne voyez qu’un côté du spectre. Je n’en avais jamais entendu parler avant aujourd’hui. Il semble y avoir un site Web, peut-être même un journal, appelé Alberta Oil Magazine. D’après ce que j’ai sous les yeux, le journal semble très favorable au pétrole albertain. Ils ont publié un article intitulé « It’s Time for the Energy Industry to Ignore Vivian Krause ». Auriez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

Mme Vivian Krause:

Je peux vous dire, monsieur, que si je trouvais du bon côté du spectre politique une sorte de campagne de plusieurs millions de dollars visant un secteur en particulier, et encore plus l’un des secteurs les plus importants sur le plan économique de notre pays, je n’hésiterais pas à faire la lumière sur cette campagne. Mais je n’ai rien trouvé de tel et c’est pourquoi...

(1930)

M. Chris Bittle:

Pourquoi ce site Web pro-industrie pétrolière, qui, selon vous, voudrait se débarrasser des écoterroristes et des groupes de réflexion progressistes, affirme-t-il qu’il est temps d’ignorer...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Monsieur, si vous aviez fait un peu plus de lecture, vous sauriez que la personne qui a écrit cela a dit être financée par le Vancouver Observer, qui est à son tour financé par la Tides Foundation. Autrement dit, il reçoit de l’argent dans le cadre de... du moins, c'est ce qu'il a dit. Il s’appelle Markham Hislop.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je suppose que tout le monde reçoit de l’argent de quelqu'un dans cette relation, alors...

Mme Vivian Krause:

Non, ce n’est pas du tout le cas.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup de votre témoignage.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup aux témoins. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants d’être venus.

Nous allons passer rapidement à notre prochain témoin, car nous devons aller voter dans 15 minutes et nous voulons au moins entendre sa déclaration préliminaire. Nous n’allons pas suspendre la séance; nous allons simplement poursuivre.

Chers collègues, nous avons le plaisir d’accueillir notre prochain témoin, Marc Chénier, avocat général et directeur principal, Services juridiques, du Bureau du Commissaire aux élections fédérales.

Malheureusement, le commissaire n’était pas disponible, mais nous sommes ravis que M. Chénier soit ici. Nous nous intéressons beaucoup au rôle du commissaire dans ce projet de loi.

Merci beaucoup d’être venu. Je suis sûr que nous aurons de bonnes questions. [Français]

Me Marc Chénier (avocat général et directeur principal, Services juridiques, Bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le commissaire m'a demandé de vous faire part de son regret de ne pas être parmi nous aujourd'hui. Pour ma part, je suis heureux de comparaître devant vous dans le cadre de votre étude du projet de loi C-76.

Ce projet de loi contient certaines mesures qui découlent de recommandations faites, entre autres, par le commissaire. Au nombre de ces mesures que nous considérons comme extrêmement positives, mentionnons le Régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires, l'élimination de l'exigence de l'approbation préalable pour porter des accusations, et le pouvoir de demander à un tribunal de contraindre des témoins.

Outre ces changements, d'autres éléments présentent un intérêt particulier pour nous.

Mentionnons d'abord le retour du commissaire au sein du Bureau du directeur général des élections. Il s'agit là d'un changement bénéfique, car notre travail est étroitement lié aux élections. Nous pourrons mieux remplir notre mandat en maintenant un meilleur contact avec les responsables de la mécanique électorale.[Traduction]

Nous sommes heureux de constater que bon nombre des mesures importantes prévues dans le projet de loi C-23 visant à préserver la perception du caractère indépendant de notre Bureau ont été maintenues dans ce projet de loi, lesquelles garantissent notamment l'indépendance de nos enquêtes; la nomination du commissaire pour un mandat fixe, assujettie uniquement à une révocation motivée; et le statut du commissaire à titre d'administrateur général aux fins des ressources humaines.

En ce qui concerne le régime des tiers, le commissaire m'a demandé de souligner que nous avons terminé l'examen des plaintes concernant les activités des tiers pendant la dernière élection générale et nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve de collusion illégale, de coordination, ni d'influence étrangère. Toutefois, la portée étroite des dispositions de la Loi dans sa forme actuelle a limité notre examen. Les tiers réalisent maintenant des sondages d'opinion, font du porte-à-porte et organisent des événements. En ce moment, ces activités ne sont pas réglementées, pour autant qu'elles soient engagées indépendamment d'un parti ou d'un candidat. Les mesures proposées permettront de réaliser des progrès importants en vue d'établir des règles de jeu équitables pour les participants aux élections.

Notre bureau a certaines suggestions pour des améliorations possibles. Premièrement, le projet de loi exigera que les tiers aient l'obligation de s'identifier dans les messages publicitaires en apposant un titre d'appel. Toutefois, un tiers peut être un groupe formé spontanément aux fins d'une élection particulière et son nom pourrait ne pas avoir de signification pour le grand public. Cela est contraire à l'objectif de transparence mis de l'avant par cette disposition et pourrait causer des difficultés quant au contrôle d'application. Certaines provinces exigent que les tiers fournissent un numéro de téléphone ou une adresse postale dans leur titre d'appel. Le Comité pourrait envisager d'obliger les tiers à aussi fournir ces renseignements.

(1935)

[Français]

En outre, nous nous montrons généralement favorables aux dispositions visant à faire face aux nouveaux défis touchant les élections. Ici, je fais notamment allusion aux nouvelles infractions ayant trait à la cybercriminalité et aux communications trompeuses, ainsi qu'à la clarification des infractions relatives à l'interdiction d'incitation par des étrangers et aux fausses déclarations au sujet des candidats et chefs de parti.

Sur ce dernier point, je constate que les clarifications apportées à ces deux dispositions ne sont pas aussi larges que ce qui avait été approuvé par le Comité dans son 35e rapport.[Traduction]

En ce qui concerne les fausses déclarations au sujet des candidats et des chefs de parti, pour qu'une infraction soit commise, il faut que la fausse déclaration porte sur des allégations de criminalité ou caractéristiques personnelles bien définies. À notre avis, cela ne suffit pas pour protéger l'intégrité de nos élections contre les fausses déclarations, lesquelles peuvent avoir des conséquences désastreuses sur une campagne.

En effet, bien que les tribunaux aient reconnu que les fausses déclarations concernant la turpitude morale sont présentement comprises, cet élément serait perdu si le projet de loi était adopté avec son libellé actuel. Alors que le phénomène des « fausses nouvelles » a été identifié comme une préoccupation importante, il n'est pas souhaitable d'affaiblir l'une des seules dispositions de la Loi qui protège nos processus démocratiques contres de telles fausses allégations.

Quant à l'influence indue par des étrangers, une façon d'exercer une telle influence serait de faire ou de publier une fausse déclaration au sujet d'un candidat ou d'un chef de parti. Encore une fois, la portée de cette disposition est bien plus restreinte que ce que le Comité permanent avait approuvé. Le commissaire persiste à croire qu'il faut interdire toute déclaration fausse faite par un étranger pour tenter d'influencer une élection canadienne.[Français]

Je souligne finalement que le commissaire appuie les modifications proposées par le DGE par intérim. En particulier, comme notre bureau l'a suggéré à Élections Canada, une infraction interdisant les tentatives d'esquiver l'interdiction d'utiliser des fonds étrangers pour financer les tiers est nécessaire. Il faudrait aussi supprimer l'élément d'intention spécifique de l'infraction de cybercriminalité.

De l'information sur ces propositions et sur d'autres avancées par le commissaire se trouve dans le tableau qui vous a été distribué.[Traduction]

En conclusion, ce projet de loi contient de nombreux éléments positifs. Le commissaire m'a demandé de souligner qu'il y a néanmoins des limites à ce que nous sommes raisonnablement en mesure d'accomplir dans certains cas. Bien que le Canada ait conclu des ententes avec certains pays afin de mener des enquêtes au-delà de nos frontières, la perspective d'une coopération est complètement irréaliste dans d'autres cas.

Cela dit, nous sommes déterminés à collaborer avec nos homologues du gouvernement en matière de sécurité afin d'aplanir ces obstacles.[Français]

Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais j’aimerais obtenir des éclaircissements. Au début, nous avons offert à certains des témoins qui sont venus plus tôt de revenir à 8 h 30 ou à un autre moment. J’aimerais confirmer si c’est ce qui se passe.

Le président:

Deux des témoins ont dit qu’ils reviendraient. Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je vous demander lesquels?

Un député: Cela fera-t-il une différence pour ce qui est de savoir si vous allez revenir?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

M. Turmel et Brian Marlatt ont dit qu’ils reviendraient.

Le président:

D’accord. Nous n’avons pas beaucoup de temps, car nous allons devoir voter bientôt.

Monsieur Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur Chénier, d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

J'ai vu que vous étiez présent lorsque le dernier groupe de témoins a comparu, il y a quelques minutes.

Croyez-vous que les allégations de Mme Krause soient crédibles?

Me Marc Chénier:

Comme je l'ai indiqué dans ma présentation, notre enquête est terminée. Nous n'avons pas décelé d'infraction à la Loi électorale du Canada. Présentement, la Loi est surtout axée sur la publicité électorale. Cela dit, pour toutes les autres activités qu'un tiers pourrait mener, il n'y a pas de réglementation, sauf s'il y a une coordination des dépenses avec un parti ou un candidat. Dans ce cas, une contribution serait versée à ce parti ou à ce candidat. Or, nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve qu'une telle coordination des dépenses a eu lieu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous nous parler brièvement des conséquences directes qu'a eues le projet de loi C-23, à la suite duquel vous releviez non plus d'Élections Canada, mais bien du Service des poursuites pénales du Canada? Quels ont été les effets nets de ce changement?

Me Marc Chénier:

Cela n'a rien changé à notre travail. Notre mandat est toujours le même. Nous fonctionnons encore de façon indépendante par rapport au DGE, au directeur des poursuites pénales et au gouvernement. En ce sens, les choses n'ont pas changé.

Cependant, il y a eu des incidences négatives sur le plan administratif. Il est devenu plus difficile d'être à jour relativement à ce qui se passe à Élections Canada. Il y a eu beaucoup de roulement de personnel et nous avons perdu les contacts que nous avions auparavant parmi les gens d'Élections Canada. Or, quand nous menons une enquête, il est important de pouvoir recourir à ces contacts pour obtenir des réponses rapidement. Je présume que le fait d'avoir perdu ces contacts pourrait diminuer notre capacité de réagir à des situations de crise durant une période électorale.

(1940)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le manque de pouvoir pour contraindre des personnes à témoigner vous a-t-il causé des problèmes?

Me Marc Chénier:

Nous avons dû interrompre certaines enquêtes menées par le commissaire parce qu'il était impossible d'obtenir la preuve que nous voulions. Dans le monde politique, il y a souvent des allégeances. Les gens se soutiennent mutuellement, et c'est normal. Un exemple me vient en tête: il arrive souvent que des employeurs n'accordent pas trois heures à leurs employés pour qu'ils puissent aller voter, et ce, malgré le fait que ce soit une exigence de la Loi. On a l'impression que l'employeur fait pression sur les employés pour qu'ils laissent tomber les accusations. Les employés sont très réticents à participer à notre enquête. Si nous disposions de ce pouvoir, cela pourrait les inciter à être plus francs. Ils se diraient alors qu'ils n'ont pas le choix, qu'une ordonnance du tribunal les force à témoigner.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le projet de loi C-76 vous offre-t-il le pouvoir dont vous avez besoin dans ce cadre?

Me Marc Chénier:

Le pouvoir prévu d'obtenir une ordonnance de la cour pour contraindre quelqu'un à témoigner est suffisant.

Par ailleurs, le Bureau de la concurrence a un pouvoir semblable, mais il n'a pas besoin de l'utiliser souvent. Le simple fait de suggérer qu'il l'utilisera incite les gens à parler.

Ce pouvoir fait partie de notre boîte à outils et pourrait être très utile à l'avenir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question sur un cas particulier. Hier, nous avons parlé à l'avocat du Parti conservateur, M. Arthur Hamilton. Je ne sais pas si vous avez entendu cette discussion. L'avocat du Parti conservateur était présent pendant les témoignages à Élections Canada au sujet des appels robotisés, mais il a dit que le Parti conservateur n'était pas impliqué là-dedans.

Dans ce cas, pourquoi un tiers avocat serait-il présent aux entrevues menées par les enquêteurs du commissaire aux élections fédérales?

Me Marc Chénier:

Je prévoyais parler de cet aspect dans mon allocution, mais j'en avais tellement à dire que j'ai laissé tomber cette partie.

Quant à votre question sur ce cas particulier, malheureusement, je ne suis pas en mesure de parler des détails d'une enquête ou d'une plainte que nous aurions reçue.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Vous suggérez qu'on interdise la diffusion d'information contre un candidat par une entité étrangère. Comment pourrait-on appliquer cela? Si quelqu'un de l'extérieur disait quelque chose contre quelqu'un au Canada, que pourrait-on y faire? C'est bien beau de dire que c'est illégal, mais aurait-on un pouvoir de poursuite? Enverrait-on quelque chose à INTERPOL? Qu'arriverait-il?

Me Marc Chénier:

Comme je l'ai dit dans mon allocution, c'est certainement un défi pour nous. Tous les organismes d'enquête font face à ce genre de défi quand il s'agit de questions de territorialité ou d'extraterritorialité. Dans certains cas assez sérieux, il y aurait une entente entre pays pour obtenir de l'aide dans les enquêtes qui sont menées à l'extérieur des frontières nationales. Il serait alors possible d'obtenir de l'information pour poursuivre une enquête. Dans certains autres cas, ce ne serait cependant pas possible. Il n'y a qu'à penser à ce qui s'est passé aux États-Unis. Il y a peut-être des États qui font ce genre de choses, alors l'État ne participera pas à l'enquête. Ce sont des défis.

Par ailleurs, je note que le projet de loi contient une disposition qui interdit la collusion qui permettrait à une entité étrangère d'exercer une influence indue. Alors, si un acteur au Canada avait participé à une telle infraction, on pourrait l'arrêter et lancer des poursuites contre lui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez fourni une dizaine de propositions d'amendement. Y en a-t-il dont vous voudriez parler en particulier?

Me Marc Chénier:

Le commissaire est d'avis que les recommandations contenues dans le 35e rapport du Comité qui touchaient l'article 91, lequel porte sur les fausses déclarations à propos des candidats et des chefs, ainsi que celles sur la disposition à propos de l'influence indue par des étrangers, illustrent mieux ce qui pourrait être problématique dans un monde où les fausses nouvelles sont devenues un problème réel et vif. Il encourage fortement le Comité à revoir ce qu'il avait recommandé à la Chambre des communes et de considérer s'il vaudrait la peine de procéder de cette façon.

(1945)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste plus de temps.

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci. Pour que ce soit bien clair, il reste encore sept minutes?

Le président:

Oui, mais si la sonnerie se fait entendre, si tout le monde est d’accord, nous essaierons de rester et de faire au moins un tour.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Cela me convient assurément. Il serait injuste d’utiliser mes sept minutes et de couper ensuite la parole à M. Cullen, même si je sais que tout le monde dans la salle le souhaite.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: J’aimerais commencer par une suggestion. Nous n’employons pas souvent l'expression « turpitude morale ». Cela signifie effectivement, je suppose, que quelqu’un porte une accusation, à tort, selon laquelle je suis coupable d’un acte criminel, ou que j’ai le genre de caractère qui m’amènerait à être un criminel d'habitude; Scott Reid n’a peut-être pas commis de meurtre à la hache, mais c’est le genre de personne qui le ferait probablement s’il en avait la chance. C’est bien de cela que vous parlez, n’est-ce pas?

Me Marc Chénier:

Dans la jurisprudence limitée que nous avons au sujet de l’article 91 concernant les fausses déclarations au sujet des candidats, les tribunaux ont reconnu que cela pourrait inclure des allégations de criminalité, ce dont traite le projet de loi, mais aussi autre chose que l'on appelle « turpitude morale ». Vous avez raison. C’est une notion juridique souple davantage reconnue aux États-Unis dans le contexte de l’immigration. Malgré cela, même aux États-Unis, c’est très restreint à la criminalité, si bien qu'un haut niveau de turpitude morale est associé à certains crimes.

Selon la façon dont l’article 91 est appliqué au Canada, il y a un grave défaut de caractère ou une faille dans le caractère de la personne qui pose un problème et est intenable. C’est décrit tel quel dans la jurisprudence.

M. Scott Reid:

Il faut que ce soit une question de caractère et non d’aptitude à occuper un poste. Même s'il est insultant de dire que Scott Reid est si incroyablement stupide qu’il peut à peine sortir de son lit le matin, et encore moins être député, cela ne relèverait pas de cette catégorie.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’était tout à fait inexact.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Je viens de lire un extrait des documents de campagne électorale des libéraux. Je vous le ferai parvenir plus tard.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Me Marc Chénier:

Les tribunaux ont été très prudents en excluant la propagande politique typique de ce qui est visé par l’article 91. Ils exigent un seuil très élevé, et c’est totalement incompatible avec le rôle d’un député.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord.

Si j’ai bien compris, vous suggérez que nous ajoutions essentiellement, si nous faisons des suppositions au sujet des comportements de quelqu’un, si nous suggérons qu'une personne est essentiellement coupable, non pas de propos haineux, mais d’adopter le genre de comportement qui l’amènerait à avoir de tels propos; Scott Reid est raciste et sexiste; il déteste fondamentalement..., peu importe, ajoutez ce que vous voulez. C’est là que le problème se pose.

Me Marc Chénier:

Ce serait à ce niveau ou cela pourrait même aller plus loin. Je vais citer le libellé approuvé par le Comité, à savoir « des opinions et des comportements fondamentalement inconsistants de ceux généralement attendus d’un élu; ou des sentiments de haine ou de mépris à l’égard de, ou de profonds préjugés à l’encontre d’un groupe identifiable ».

M. Scott Reid:

C’est ce que nous avons recommandé.

Premièrement, avez-vous un libellé à proposer? Ce n’est pas le libellé de la loi. Vous n’auriez pas beaucoup de temps, mais si vous pouviez nous revenir à ce sujet, ce serait utile.

(1950)

Me Marc Chénier:

Les rédacteurs du ministère de la Justice seraient probablement utiles à cet égard. Nous pouvons assurément nous pencher là-dessus et essayer de proposer quelque chose au Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

À la lumière de cela — et je commente maintenant notre propre rapport —, l’on y aborde deux aspects différents. « des opinions et des comportements fondamentalement inconsistants de ceux généralement attendus d’un élu » en est un, et « ou des sentiments de haine ou de mépris à l’égard de, ou de profonds préjugés à l’encontre d’un groupe identifiable »...

Le premier est plus vague. Je dois admettre que j’ai moi-même certaines réserves à ce sujet. Le deuxième est très clair. Sérieusement, je pense que dans notre société, accuser une personne de racisme est considéré comme un plus grand affront que l'accuser d'être un meurtrier à la hache. C'est plus facile à affirmer, sans aucune preuve, et c’est une façon plus efficace de détruire la réputation de quelqu'un. Il existe certaines définitions de « groupe identifiable » qui sont liées à la Loi sur les droits de la personne et à la Charte des droits. Cela me semble très clair, et il s’agit d’une forme très efficace de propagande potentielle à utiliser. C’est là-dessus que nous devrions nous concentrer.

Merci beaucoup.

J’aimerais également vous poser des questions sur l’aspect pratique de la mise en oeuvre de certaines de ces mesures. Vous avez parlé des modèles provinciaux qui ont été utilisés. Vous avez dit que certaines provinces exigent que les tierces parties fournissent un numéro de téléphone ou une adresse pour leur titre d’appel et que le Comité pourrait envisager de l’exiger des tierces parties. Dans quelle mesure cette expérience a-t-elle été concluante aux élections provinciales? À votre connaissance, a-t-on atteint un niveau élevé de conformité?

Me Marc Chénier:

Je dois avouer que je n’ai pas de réponse à cette question.

Je ferai remarquer, cependant, que dans le cadre de l’élection générale qui se déroule actuellement en Ontario, certains députés ont peut-être vu un article en ligne sur CBC aujourd’hui disant qu’il y a des tiers non enregistrés qui font de la publicité en ligne avec des noms génériques, sans vraiment identifier le groupe. Les gens se demandent qui sont ces gens. Il n’y a pas d’indices sur la façon de communiquer avec eux simplement pour s’assurer qu’ils s’inscrivent s’ils ont atteint le seuil de 500 $.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela m’a peut-être échappé et je m’en excuse, mais avez-vous le pouvoir d’enquêter sur les médias sociaux? Le projet de loi prévoit-il suffisamment de pouvoirs pour vous permettre de le faire si des groupes...?

Nous avons certaines règles concernant les journaux, ce qu’on appelle les médias traditionnels, mais très peu... aucune, en réalité.

Me Marc Chénier:

Les dispositions de la loi dans leur état actuel s’appliquent à la publicité en ligne de la même façon qu’à tout autre type de publicité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans votre bureau, estimez-vous avoir l’expertise et le pouvoir de retracer, par exemple, comme vous l’avez dit, pour les élections en Ontario, un groupe fictif qui ferait la promotion d’un parti ou d’une idéologie?

Me Marc Chénier:

Oui. Il y a en fait une disposition dans la loi et dans le Code criminel pour cela. Nos enquêteurs sont des agents publics pouvant obtenir des mandats de perquisition ou des ordonnances de communication pour faire avancer nos enquêtes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Que faites-vous lorsqu’il s’agit d’une adresse de fournisseur de service Internet ou d’une entité étrangère?

Me Marc Chénier:

Oui. S’il s’agit d’une entité étrangère, cela pourrait soulever des problèmes. Encore une fois, il faudra peut-être recourir à un traité d'entraide juridique bilatéral pour obtenir l’information.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvez-vous vous attaquer aux plateformes sur lesquelles ces publicités se propagent, les plateformes de médias sociaux, par exemple? Si quelqu’un est... est basé à l’étranger. Vous êtes limité. S'ils sont en Russie. On ne peut pas les poursuivre.

Y a-t-il suffisamment de dispositions dans la loi à l’heure actuelle pour vous permettre de dire aux agents des médias sociaux qu’ils diffusent de la désinformation, et ce genre de choses?

Me Marc Chénier:

En ce qui concerne les plateformes de médias sociaux, nous l’avons fait, et nous avons commencé avant même les dernières élections générales. Nous avons communiqué avec un grand nombre d’entre eux et obtenu leur collaboration de bien des façons.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce une coopération volontaire ou la loi?

Me Marc Chénier:

C'est le cas, mais il y a aussi les tribunaux. La Cour d’appel de la Colombie-Britannique a décidé récemment qu’une ordonnance de production canadienne pourrait être exécutée pour obtenir des renseignements qui sont conservés à l’extérieur du pays si le groupe en question a un représentant ou un bureau au Canada.

Autrement dit, comme Facebook a un bureau au Canada, nous pouvons lui servir notre ordonnance de production...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Facebook Canada.

Me Marc Chénier:

... Facebook Canada.

(1955)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Et exiger...

Me Marc Chénier:

C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est intéressant parce que l’une de nos préoccupations est l’argent noir, l’influence étrangère et les obligations relativement faibles des entreprises de médias sociaux qui, à mon avis, ont autant d’influence, sinon plus, que les médias traditionnels en ce qui concerne la détermination des opinions, l’utilisation d’algorithmes et l’exploration des données, par exemple.

En quoi les choses auraient-elles été différentes dans le cadre des enquêtes que vous avez menées par le passé, disons le scandale des appels automatisés, si vous aviez eu la capacité de contraindre quelqu’un à témoigner?

Me Marc Chénier:

Je pense que cela aurait probablement été utile.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bien sûr.

Me Marc Chénier:

Nous obtenons des résultats. Dans le cas des appels automatisés, une accusation a été portée. Quelqu’un a été condamné.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’était difficile, n’est-ce pas?

Me Marc Chénier:

Oui, en effet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvoir extraire l’information et découvrir comment les bases de données ont été acquises.

Me Marc Chénier:

Absolument, oui.

Si je peux vous donner un autre exemple, il y a eu la Commission Charbonneau au Québec, qui s’est penchée sur les contributions politiques qui ont été faites par un prête-nom.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui.

Me Marc Chénier:

Elle a obtenu des résultats très rapidement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Au Québec, les règles sont différentes de celles que vous avez.

Me Marc Chénier:

C’est exact. Le pouvoir de contraindre existe au Québec.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si vous comparez les deux cas pour ce qui est de la rapidité et des résultats, vous diriez que les lois du Québec qui permettaient d’exiger un témoignage... contrastent avec la grande lenteur — c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire — dans le cas de Pierre's Poutine et tout le reste.

Me Marc Chénier:

Oui. C’est exact.

Nos enquêtes prennent du temps parce que les gens peuvent ne pas coopérer.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Êtes-vous à l’aise avec le degré de protection de la vie privée ou l’absence d’exigences en matière de protection de la vie privée que les partis politiques ont actuellement en ce qui concerne les renseignements que nous avons recueillis sur les Canadiens, et dans quelle mesure ces renseignements sont-ils protégés?

Le fait que nous n’exigeons pas le consentement des Canadiens... nous ne sommes pas tenus d’informer les Canadiens des renseignements que nous possédons.

Me Marc Chénier:

Je suppose que cette question dépasse la portée de notre mandat.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si je la pose — et je sais que c’est peut-être en dehors de votre mandat — c'est parce, quand vous enquêtez, la protection des données et la façon dont les données sont gérées par les partis deviennent très pertinentes pour vos enquêtes.

Est-ce vrai?

Me Marc Chénier:

Oui, c’est vrai. Nous avons les moyens de préserver les données. Nous pouvons demander au tribunal une ordonnance de préservation pour forcer...

M. Nathan Cullen:

On ne peut les préserver que si elles existent.

Me Marc Chénier:

Pardon?

M. Nathan Cullen:

On ne peut les préserver que si elles sont toujours là.

Me Marc Chénier:

C’est vrai, oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il est très difficile de préserver des données quand on ne sait pas comment et où elles sont stockées. Je crois que les partis peuvent actuellement stocker des données à l’extérieur du pays dans des serveurs, en vertu de la loi canadienne. Je suppose que cela vous poserait un problème parce qu’il faudrait alors obtenir des ordonnances pour entrer dans l’autre pays afin d'accéder aux serveurs. Est-ce que j'ai bien compris?

Me Marc Chénier:

Ce serait le cas, à moins qu’il y ait quelqu’un au Canada qui gère l’information et à qui nous pourrions servir...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais revenir en arrière, parce que nous avons entendu de très grandes théories sur ce qui s’est passé lors des dernières élections et sur la façon dont l’argent étranger nous a influencés. Pouvez-vous revenir sur les conclusions de votre enquête sur l’élection de 2015?

Me Marc Chénier:

En ce qui concerne la publicité électorale? C’est l’interdiction...

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact.

Me Marc Chénier:

Hier soir, je crois que M. Hamilton a dit qu’il s’agissait d’une interprétation de notre part selon laquelle les fonds étrangers pouvaient être utilisés à d’autres fins que la publicité électorale, mais c’est en fait le libellé de l’article de la loi. Un tiers ne peut pas utiliser des fonds étrangers pour faire de la publicité électorale. C’est la limite actuellement prévue par la loi. Nous n’avons trouvé aucune preuve que c’était le cas. Les tierces parties au Canada ont pu démontrer, dans une large mesure, quelles étaient leurs sources de financement. Cependant, encore une fois, nous n’avions pas pour mandat d’examiner leurs autres activités qui ne sont pas...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bien sûr, cette loi élargit cela.

Me Marc Chénier:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant, monsieur le président. Je sais que certains voudront peut-être intervenir, et je vais donc m'arrêter là.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Chénier.

Le président:

Membres du Comité, il reste 22 minutes. Je vous demande de bien vouloir m'accorder une minute.

Voici le budget à ce jour pour les témoins et les repas dans le cadre de notre étude. Êtes-vous d’accord pour que le greffier puisse payer les frais de déplacement et de repas des témoins? Ce n’est qu’à ce jour; ce n’est pas pour l’étude complète.

M. Blake Richards:

Il ne veut pas dire que c’est le montant définitif. Nous pourrons toujours y ajouter quelque chose.

Le président:

Il y en aura d’autres.

Ai-je le consentement unanime pour approuver le premier budget?

Des députés: D'accord.

(2000)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants. C’est un élément très important de cette loi.

Nous allons suspendre la séance. Les témoins des deux premiers groupes seront de retour à 8 h 30, ceux qui ont choisi de revenir. Les autres ont la possibilité de présenter des observations par écrit s’ils le souhaitent.

(2000)

(2035)

Le président:

Bonsoir. Bienvenue à la 112e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous revenons au deuxième groupe de témoins.

Nous accueillons John C. Turmel, à titre personnel, et Brian Marlatt, directeur des communications et des politiques du Parti progressiste-canadien.

Nous sommes en plein milieu d’une autre période de 30 minutes avant le vote. Comme nous l’avons fait la dernière fois, nous allons essayer et... en fait il sera plus facile de faire un tour de questions parce que le NPD ne viendra pas. Nous allons essayer de terminer au moins un tour, même si la sonnerie se fait entendre, si tout le monde est d’accord.

Nous allons entendre les déclarations préliminaires. Monsieur Turmel, nous allons commencer par vous.

M. John Turmel (à titre personnel):

Comme je me présente à une élection partielle, à Chicoutimi, en espérant venir ici comme vous, et que je me présente aussi à l’élection partielle provinciale de demain, en plus de me présenter également à la mairie de Brantford, c’est un tour de chapeau. C’est le troisième de ma carrière, aux élections de 1994, 1995 et 1996. Comment garder ma bonne humeur quand j'entends dire: « super perdant rate de nouveau son coup »? Je vais faire comprendre aux gens qui m’ont battu ce que j’essaie de dire. C’était un honneur de recevoir une invitation à venir vous parler.

J’ai préparé une déclaration que je vais vous lire. Comme j’ai présenté ma candidature plus souvent que vous, j’ai ressenti beaucoup plus les difficultés et les souffrances que cela représente.

Le premier point est le seuil de vérification. Lorsque je me suis présenté pour la première fois aux élections fédérales en 1979 — rappelez-vous que Joe Clark a remporté la victoire —, mon comptable était satisfait du plafond de 250 $ pour vérifier mon rapport de dépenses nul, ce qui a été facilité par un seuil de 2 000 $ pour les dépenses personnelles des candidats avant que le rapport ne soit exigé. Aujourd’hui, un gagnant peut avoir des ennuis pour s'être rendu à une réunion en autobus sans déclarer la valeur du billet. Vous voyez? Par le passé, on pouvait dépenser 2 000 $ pour se promener un peu partout et faire des dépenses personnelles sans avoir besoin de le déclarer. Pas de vérificateur.

L'Ontario fait fausse route pour ses élections provinciales. Les candidats pouvaient signer une déclaration affirmant n'avoir reçu aucune contribution nécessitant des crédits d’impôt et n’avaient pas besoin d’un vérificateur. Pour normaliser les formulaires, l'Ontario exige maintenant des vérificateurs pour tous les candidats qu'ils aient reçu ou non des contributions, mais il paye pour le vérificateur inutile. Je ne payais pas. Cela ne me dérangeait pas.

Cependant, lorsque mon comptable fédéral a pris sa retraite après 30 ans, j’ai eu recours à mon comptable ontarien et j’ai été surpris par une facture de 700 $, ce qui est un tarif raisonnable, alors que je n’avais jamais payé que 250 $ depuis 30 ans. En raison du plafond de 250 $, j'ai dû payer l’excédent de 450 $.

J’ai demandé à la Cour fédérale de supprimer le plafond de 250 $ qui n’a pas suivi l’inflation et qui, depuis 1974, bafoue mes droits démocratiques de façon inconstitutionnelle. Le juge Phelan a statué que je pouvais recueillir des cotisations pour payer le vérificateur — pas tout à fait à des fins politiques — ou économiser 10 $ par semaine sur ma pension. J’ai interjeté appel auprès de la Cour suprême, sous le numéro de dossier 36937, mais ce n’était pas assez important pour être entendu.

Maintenant, l’Ontario a normalisé les formulaires de mise en candidature pour les partis, et est passé de l’absence totale de rapport à l’obligation de faire un rapport vérifié par un vérificateur non rémunéré. Tout candidat à l’investiture d’un parti doit maintenant payer le vérificateur de sa poche, même avec un compte de dépenses nul.

Normaliser les exigences du gouvernement, bien sûr, mais pourquoi normaliser les exigences des partis? Les partis devraient établir leurs propres règles, mais les nouveaux règlements sont maintenant en place pour étouffer la participation politique.

Un vérificateur ne devrait pas être requis avant qu’un seuil de dépenses ne soit atteint, ce qui devrait s’appliquer également aux candidats aux élections. La Loi électorale du Canada ne devrait pas créer des emplois pour les comptables.

Un dictateur célèbre a déjà dit que ce ne sont pas ceux qui votent qui comptent, mais ceux qui comptent les votes.

M. Scott Simms:

J’invoque le Règlement.

(2040)

M. John Turmel:

Avec l’informatisation des élections — et je suis ingénieur électricien...

Le président:

Attendez un instant.

M. Scott Simms:

J’ai de la difficulté à l’entendre. Il faut garder le silence.

M. John Turmel:

J’ai fourni un texte écrit que vous recevrez une fois qu’il aura été traduit...

M. Scott Simms:

Parfait.

M. John Turmel:

... mais c’est plus amusant si vous m’entendez, j’en suis sûr. Merci.

M. Scott Simms:

Jusqu’à maintenant.

M. John Turmel:

Un dictateur célèbre a déjà dit que ce sont ceux qui comptent les votes qui comptent.

Avec l’informatisation des élections — et je suis ingénieur électricien —, le piratage est devenu une réalité, sauf pour les reçus de bulletin de vote qui empêchent la fraude.

Si je peux obtenir un reçu pour chaque café que j’achète, pourquoi n’ai-je pas un reçu pour la transaction la plus importante dans ma démocratie? Un reçu numéroté de mon bulletin de vote sans mon nom me permet de vérifier la liste des numéros de série et des sélections publiés en ligne le soir de l’élection pour vérifier que mon bulletin de vote a été dûment enregistré, et j’ai une preuve en main au cas où ceux qui comptent compteraient mal les votes. Avec des bulletins de vote vérifiables, personne n’aura plus à se méfier d'un système de vote informatisé. C’est tout ce dont vous avez besoin. J’ai proposé cela il y a deux ans, mais rien n’a bougé.

Pour ce qui est de la répartition équitable du temps d'antenne gratuit, l’article 9 de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion exigeait que les émissions politiques gratuites soient mises à la disposition de tous les partis et candidats rivaux de façon équitable sur le plan qualitative et quantitatif. Vous pouvez imaginer le plaisir que j’avais lorsque j’étais invité aux débats, et le plaisir que mes adversaires n’avaient pas. En 1986, la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario a invalidé ce droit à un traitement équitable et a permis aux médias d'accorder tout le temps d'antenne gratuit sur les ondes publiques à qui ils préféraient. Cela est confirmé par l’arrêt Turmel c. CRTC33319, de la Cour suprême du Canada. Lorsque Rogers m’a interdit de participer à un débat parce que je portais le macaron de mon parti, je me suis plaint en haut lieu. J’ai été arrêté, et on m’a emmené. Voilà la preuve que les stations de télévision peuvent accorder du temps gratuit à qui elles veulent. Si Big Brother parvient à biaiser les élections en truquant les débats sur les ondes publiques, la démocratie ne peut exister. Nous devons nous occuper de Big Brother.

Peu m'importait que les riches achètent autant de temps qu’ils le voulaient, mais je m'attendais à avoir une part du temps gratuit, et maintenant je ne peux pas l’obtenir. J'ai été exclus des trois derniers débats à Brantford pour la première fois de ma carrière. Voilà ce qu'est devenue la démocratie en Ontario. Je ne sais pas ce qu’il en est dans les autres provinces, mais j’espère que vous ne laisserez pas le gouvernement fédéral faire la même chose.

Je reviens à l’article 9. Bien sûr, un débat entre trois chefs de parti pose un problème. Imaginez 10 chefs de parti. Pourriez-vous y faire face?

Le président:

D’accord.

M. John Turmel:

Comment allez-vous, autrement, entendre parler d’une nouvelle idée? À l’heure actuelle, pour participer au débat, il faut être membre d’un des grands partis que les citoyens voient tout le temps et qui, vous le savez, n’ont pas de nouvelles idées.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous remercions.

Nous souhaitons la bienvenue au whip. Il est venu pour surveiller la qualité de nos opérations. Merci.

M. Pat Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge, PCC):

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Marlatt, merci d’être revenu.

Comme je sais que nous vous avons gardés ici pendant environ quatre heures, tous les deux, nous vous sommes vraiment reconnaissants de nous consacrer du temps supplémentaire.

M. Brian Marlatt (communications et directeur des politiques, Parti Progressiste Canadien):

Je remercie le président et le Comité d’avoir invité le Parti progressiste-canadien à présenter des témoignages importants concernant le projet de loi C-76, Loi sur la modernisation des élections.

Selon sir John A. Macdonald, le Parti progressiste-canadien est le prolongement de la tradition politique canadienne d’un parti conservateur disposé à « accueillir quiconque désire être considéré comme un progressiste-conservateur ». Le Parti progressiste-conservateur a été dirigé par l’honorable Sinclair Stevens, qui était ministre sous les gouvernements Clark et Mulroney, jusqu'à son décès récent, et il est maintenant dirigé par l’ancien député conservateur, Joe Hueglin.

Je prends la parole aujourd’hui à titre de président des communications et des politiques au Conseil national du Parti progressiste-conservateur, mais j’ai aussi participé au Comité consultatif des partis politiques d’Élections Canada en 2015; encore une fois en 2018, et en fait hier; et j'ai déjà été, avant de m’engager en politique, scrutateur et greffier d’Élections Canada et d’Elections BC. J’espère que cette expérience ajoute de la valeur à mon témoignage.

Mon témoignage et mes observations d’aujourd’hui se limiteront en grande partie aux répercussions du projet de loi C-76 dans le contexte de la loi actuelle sur les élections à date fixe présentée en 2006, de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, parfois décrite comme la Loi sur la suppression de votes par les progressistes-Canadiens, présentée sous le nom de projet de loi C-23 sous la 41e législature et d'autres propositions de réformes électorales dont on a parlé dans le cadre des discussions publiques sur ce projet de loi. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre aux questions du Comité sur le contexte général ou les détails du projet de loi, dans la mesure où je peux apporter une contribution positive à votre étude.

Soit dit en passant, étant donné que le projet de loi C-76 est important pour l’évolution de notre démocratie, un débat vigoureux au Sénat suivra probablement, compte tenu du nouvel esprit partisan qui a été instauré par les nominations au sein du gouvernement précédent, qui ont été modérées, mais non vérifiées, par le nouveau comité consultatif indépendant qui recommande au gouverneur général les nominations au Sénat par le premier ministre. J’ai d’autres commentaires à faire à ce sujet. Si vous le souhaitez, nous pourrons y revenir pendant la période des questions.

Le changement dans la démocratie parlementaire de Westminster peut être décrit comme l'équilibre entre la continuité et le changement, les tâtonnements et les erreurs évolutifs, et il est à son meilleur quand il s'opère petit à petit comme disait Desiderius Erasmus, un érudit de la Renaissance. Les conséquences imprévues peuvent être modérées, et les choix malavisés peuvent être atténués ou corrigés. Le projet de loi C-76 porte sur le changement évolutif. La 42e élection générale a montré la nécessité d’un changement parlementaire progressif et évolutif.

La 42e élection générale du Parlement, le 19 octobre 2015, illustre bien la nécessité d'un grand nombre des mesures recommandées dans le projet de loi C-76. L’élection de 2015 a été la première à mettre en pratique la loi sur les élections à date fixe. Au cours de la 41e législature, l’opposition parlementaire a été neutralisée par l’absence d’un gouvernement parlementaire responsable en raison des excès de discipline de parti dans un gouvernement majoritaire et de la loi sur les élections à date fixe.

Les projets de loi omnibus et le débat limité sur des mesures législatives controversées, y compris la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, sont devenus la norme plutôt que l’exception. On peut soutenir que la dernière année de la 41e législature a été réduite à une campagne pour l’élection de la prochaine législature. À la fin de la session, en juin 2015, les campagnes et les dépenses électorales des partis et des tiers ont été augmentées avant l’entrée en vigueur des règles s’appliquant aux dépenses préélectorales. Cela a été suivi d'une période électorale presque sans précédent de 78 jours au cours de laquelle les limites de dépenses des partis autorisées ont doublé par candidat, à l’échelle nationale, dans les 338 circonscriptions. L’argent est devenu la clé. La distance entre l’intérêt public et l’intérêt des partis s’est élargie, et les inquiétudes au sujet du projet de loi C-23 ont augmenté.

Je vous renvoie à la note de service concernant la Loi sur les élections à date fixe, l’argent et le Parti politique corporatif en 2015, et leurs répercussions pour les petits partis politiques et les indépendants. Son texte est annexé à notre document.

Bon nombre de ces problèmes étaient prévus. Le Parti progressiste-canadien en a abordé un certain nombre et les solutions proposées dans un mémoire que nous avons soumis à la demande de votre Comité, le PROC, en septembre 2006, lorsque la loi sur les élections à date fixe a été adoptée sous le nom de projet de loi C-16. C'était aussi le sujet d'un mémoire présenté au Comité consultatif des partis politiques d’Élections Canada sur la publicité électorale, dans lequel nous avons parlé des répercussions des élections à date fixe. Les deux documents sont disponibles sur le site Web d’Élections Canada ou sur demande à Élections Canada.

Le projet de loi C-76 propose une nouvelle période préélectorale dans le cadre d’une élection à date fixe, à compter du 30 juin, à la fin de la session de l’année où une élection à date fixe doit être tenue, et une période maximale de 50 jours pour la campagne électorale. Nous citons les remarques suivantes tirées du mémoire que le Parti progressiste-conservateur a présenté à Élections Canada en 2015, afin de suggérer des façons d’améliorer le projet de loi C-76:

(2045)

Il a souvent été dit que les partis politiques ou les candidats mènent des campagnes politiques bien avant la délivrance du bref électoral officiel. À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a aucune limite aux dépenses des partis politiques ou des candidats en dehors de la période électorale. Dans d'autres pays du Commonwealth, notamment au Royaume-Uni, la publicité politique en dehors de la période électorale est assujettie à des limites prévues par la loi de « longue campagne » et de « courte campagne » administrées par la Commission électorale... Il est fortement recommandé d'obtenir des conseils et des directives d'interprétation d'Élections Canada en vue des élections de 2015. Les publicités du gouvernement du Canada et des ministères ont inclus des annonces de programmes d'intérêt public « sous réserve de l'approbation du Parlement ». De telles annonces peuvent être jugées des publicités partisanes financées à même les fonds publics et l'argent des contribuables par les organismes qui concluent des marchés pour diffuser de telles annonces d'intérêt public parce qu'elles concernent des propositions, en général de la part du parti au pouvoir, qui n'ont pas reçu l'approbation du Parlement.

Bien qu'il ne s'agisse pas au sens strict de publicité électorale avant la période électorale, l'effet est le même. Il est recommandé de nuancer ces pratiques et de prolonger la période dans le cas des années d'élection à date fixe afin de refléter les pratiques de longue campagne administrées par la Commission électorale du Royaume-Uni. Cette recommandation s'appliquerait si la loi prévoyant des élections à date fixe n'est pas abrogée dans le but de protéger le principe du gouvernement responsable au cœur de la démocratie parlementaire canadienne de Westminster.

Le Parti progressiste canadien est tout à fait d'accord avec l'intention du projet de loi C-76 et de certaines de ses dispositions, qui visent à annuler les résultats du projet de loi C-23, la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, adoptée au cours de la 41e législature, et de voir ces corrections dans le cadre de la continuité, du changement et de l'évolution de la pratique parlementaire en vertu de laquelle les conséquences imprévues ou une erreur dans une loi antérieure peuvent être atténuées ou corrigées. Plus particulièrement, nous saluons le rétablissement du rôle d'Élections Canada et du directeur général des élections en matière d'information publique pendant les élections et de mesures visant à faire en sorte que tous les Canadiens qualifiés puissent participer aux élections parlementaires au Canada.

Nous recommandons le rétablissement de la carte d'identité de l'électeur délivrée par Élections Canada comme pièce d'identité acceptable pour les électeurs au bureau de scrutin. Nous notons que dans d'autres pays, l'obligation de présenter une pièce d'identité avec photo et d'autres restrictions ont eu pour effet de limiter la participation des électeurs et ont été décrites dans certaines sources comme des manœuvres visant à empêcher les électeurs de voter.

L'honorable Sinclair Stevens, s'exprimant au nom du conseil national du Parti progressiste canadien en 2014, a souligné la gravité de ces préoccupations en déclarant: Le Parti progressiste canadien est d'avis que le projet de loi C-23, intitulé Loi sur l'intégrité des élections [...] trahira les principes fondamentaux de la démocratie au Canada, même s'il est substantiellement modifié. Le projet de loi C-23 refusera le droit de vote à un grand nombre de Canadiens et, à ce titre, il doit être contesté devant les tribunaux comme étant inconstitutionnel [...] d'après ce que disent les spécialistes en droit constitutionnel canadien et en science politique publiés dans les médias nationaux. Les Canadiens progressistes croient que la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections doit être rejetée comme étant injuste, antidémocratique et méritant d'être contestée en vertu de la Constitution, même à la lumière des amendements que recommandent les députés de la Chambre des communes et les membres du comité sénatorial. Le projet de loi C-23, la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, comporte des lacunes fondamentales et des lacunes liées à son intention apparente.

Le communiqué de presse dont ce qui précède est tiré est annexé au présent document.

Le projet de loi C-76 est une solution bienvenue pour certaines des lacunes de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Nous nous réjouissons de cette solution. Enfin, en marge du débat sur le projet de loi C-76, on peut entendre des voix qui demandent de revoir la question de la réforme électorale, ce qui signifie pour eux remplacer les députés élus dans chacune des 338 circonscriptions électorales du Canada en fonction de la pluralité ou de la majorité uninominale par une représentation proportionnelle en fonction du vote populaire national ou régional pour les partis.

Nous élisons des députés au Parlement du Canada dans le cadre d'élections de circonscription tenues séparément dans chaque circonscription lors d'élections générales lorsqu'un parlement est dissous ou lors d'élections partielles entre les élections générales. Nous élisons des députés, et non des partis, des mouvements ou des premiers ministres. Le vote pour les partis ou la répartition des sièges à la Chambre des communes en fonction de la proportion de votes reçus par les membres d'un parti à l'échelle nationale n'est pas pertinent.

Ces faits au sujet des pratiques électorales canadiennes sont conformes à l'architecture constitutionnelle du Canada et aux réalités canadiennes de l'espace et de la population. La diversité des intérêts et des opinions, même au sein des partis, varie souvent beaucoup dans les régions éloignées du Canada. Dans le Nord, sur les côtes, dans les Prairies et au cœur industriel du pays, les points de vue peuvent varier considérablement sur le plan de la discipline de parti, qu'elle soit officielle ou qu'elle fasse partie des mouvements politiques. Pourtant, cela ne se reflète pas dans les systèmes de représentation proportionnelle des partis.

Nous recommandons fortement que le débat sur le projet de loi C-76 ne se laisse pas distraire par ceux et celles qui cherchent à obtenir un avantage partisan en préconisant des systèmes de proportionnalité des partis, indépendamment du mérite du mouvement ou de l'opinion du parti qu'ils représentent. Les droits et les objectifs démocratiques ne sont pas atteints, soutenus ou protégés en modifiant le système pour obtenir un avantage partisan; ils sont atteints par le pouvoir de persuasion et la volonté de travailler fort pour parvenir à un consensus social démocratique.

(2050)



Je tiens à remercier le Comité d'avoir pris le temps d'examiner notre témoignage et mes observations. J'espère qu'elles permettront de vous orienter dans un débat constructif et de tirer des conclusions en vue de moderniser les élections canadiennes. Il y a des documents en annexe que vous trouverez peut-être un peu plus étoffés sur certaines de ces questions, ce que le temps imparti ici ne nous a pas permis de faire. Encore une fois, je vous remercie.

Le président:

Comme je l'ai dit, merci à vous deux d'avoir attendu environ quatre heures.

Comme convenu, nous aurons un intervenant de chaque parti, puis nous terminerons nos audiences pour la journée.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Turmel, je connais un pêcheur à Terre-Neuve. Soit dit en passant, je viens de Terre-Neuve.

M. John Turmel:

Je ne m'y suis jamais présenté.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

Ne pensez surtout pas que nous ne l'attendons pas.

M. John Turmel:

Demandez une élection partielle.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Peut-être, dans mon cas, une élection d'au revoir, n'est-ce pas?

Il y a un pêcheur à Terre-Neuve. Il possède trois bateaux. Je lui ai demandé un jour: « Êtes-vous occupé? » Il a répondu: « Je suis plus occupé qu'un chien qui vit dans un stationnement plein de bornes d'incendie. » Vous êtes un homme occupé.

Je me pose une question depuis que vous êtes entré. Vous vous présentez en ce moment dans trois élections.

M. John Turmel:

Pour la troisième fois de ma carrière.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est exact. Si vous l'emportez dans les trois, laquelle acceptez-vous?

M. John Turmel:

D'accord.

M. Scott Simms:

Eh bien, je me devais de la poser.

M. John Turmel:

Oui, les gens ont ri de moi lorsque j'ai dit que je pouvais me faire élire et prendre ma retraite le lendemain.

M. Scott Simms:

Je ne ris pas. Eh bien, si vous vous présentez contre moi, je ne ris plus.

M. John Turmel:

Très bien. Si je suis élu au niveau provincial, je peux faire quelque chose et prendre ma retraite le lendemain. Si je suis élu au niveau fédéral, je peux faire quelque chose et prendre ma retraite le lendemain — et à l'échelle mondiale aussi. En ce qui concerne le poste de premier ministre de la planète, je suis le seul candidat déclaré. Qu'est-ce que c'est? Comment est-ce que j'obtiens 20 signatures à l'heure à Chicoutimi, où personne ne me connaît, de sorte que les médias sont étonnés d'apprendre que je pourrais être inscrit en un seul jour? Comment est-ce que je m'y prends?

(2055)

M. Scott Simms:

Comme vous y êtes-vous pris?

M. John Turmel:

Eh bien, je me suis présenté devant des gens et je leur ai dit: « Avez-vous déjà entendu parler d'une banque de temps? » « Non. » Ce logiciel que j'ai financé il y a près de 40 ans permet aux parents célibataires sans emploi d'inscrire les nuits où ils peuvent garder les enfants de l'autre, puis de se payer mutuellement à l'aide de factures d'une heure, même lorsqu'ils sont sans le sou.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce que cela vous permet de participer à trois campagnes?

M. John Turmel:

Signeriez-vous mon document pour me permettre de l'expliquer aux électeurs?

M. Scott Simms:

Je répondrai à votre question par une question.

M. John Turmel:

Ils disent oui, oui, oui. C'est pourquoi il est amusant pour moi de me présenter à des élections, parce que les gens à qui j'explique le système de la banque de temps sont éblouis. C'est facile pour moi. Je ne passe pas à la télévision pour l'expliquer aux électeurs, mais les 150 personnes qui ont signé pour moi ont eu une explication personnelle des raisons pour lesquelles je me présente. Je veux que ce logiciel soit installé. Alors, mon travail est terminé.

Lorsque vous avez suffisamment d'argent, nommez-moi un problème qu'il vous reste.

M. Scott Simms:

Oh, j'ai des problèmes.

M. John Turmel:

Eh bien, non, vous n'en avez pas.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela pourrait prendre beaucoup de temps.

M. John Turmel:

Vous n'en avez pas.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vais donner la parole à M. Marlatt pour l'instant, mais je reviendrai à vous dans un instant, surtout si vous vous présentez contre moi. Je n'ai pas d'objection.

M. John Turmel:

D'accord.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Marlatt, je suis conscient du travail que vous avez mis dans votre rapport. De toute évidence, vous n'êtes pas un partisan du projet de loi C-23, c'est le moins que l'on puisse dire, d'autant plus que j'aime ce que vous avez dit au sujet de la nécessité de ne pas se laisser distraire par les choses et de se concentrer sur les changements qui doivent être apportés. Plus tard, nous pourrons en discuter davantage.

J'aimerais revenir à une chose que vous avez mentionnée. Je n'ai pas tout compris, mais il y avait une recommandation de la part de la commission britannique. Est-ce exact?

M. Brian Marlatt:

La Commission électorale du Royaume-Uni a établi une base selon laquelle il y a une période d'audit de toutes les dépenses des partis politiques dans le cadre d'une longue campagne et d'une courte campagne.

M. Scott Simms:

Tout à fait.

M. Brian Marlatt:

Dans le projet de loi C-76, nous proposons que l'audit dans le cadre d'une nouvelle période électorale commence le 30 juin. Il s'agit d'une période qui correspond essentiellement aux mois d'été précédant la délivrance d'un bref, soit un maximum de 50 jours avant le déclenchement des élections. Je ne pense pas que ce soit suffisant. Il y a une possibilité pour les tiers partis, pour les partis politiques eux-mêmes, pour le gouvernement par le biais de programmes de publicité qui sont assujettis à l'approbation du Parlement — c'est-à-dire si nous nous faisons réélire...

M. Scott Simms:

C'est la partie que je n'ai pas pu saisir au début. Ce que vous préconisez donc, c'est de prolonger la période préparatoire au scrutin... De toute évidence, vous êtes d'accord avec la période de préparation au scrutin.

M. Brian Marlatt:

À mon avis, il faut rendre ce concept plus efficace en le prolongeant suffisamment pour qu'il ne s'agisse pas simplement, en fait, de faire en sorte que lorsque la session se termine ici en juin, les mois d'été deviennent une saison ouverte pour la politique. Il serait utile de soumettre cette période à l'examen d'Élections Canada, mais je pense qu'il faut aussi, comme dans le cas du Royaume-Uni, examiner la période plus longue. Dans le cas d'une élection à date fixe, c'est dans la dernière année complète d'un cycle électoral que l'on voit les choses se précipiter.

Si vous pensez à 2014-2015, octobre 2014 a été, à certains égards, le début des élections du 19 octobre 2015. Il y a eu un énorme mouvement vers des déclarations partisanes qui avaient très peu à voir avec l'intérêt public et la politique publique. Elles cherchaient vraiment à nous faire réélire.

M. Scott Simms:

Dans quel contexte? Voulez-vous dire ici, sur la Colline du Parlement ou...

M. Brian Marlatt:

Je pense que tout ce qui s'est passé...

M. Scott Simms:

Tout, toute discussion...

M. Brian Marlatt:

Je pense que ce qui se passait à la Chambre des communes et dans les partis à l'extérieur de la Colline du Parlement visait le 19 octobre 2015.

M. Scott Simms:

Pensez-vous qu'en élargissant les définitions de ce qui se faisait auparavant — les activités électorales, la publicité, l'information sur les sondages électoraux et l'argent dépensé pour ces trois activités — est une avancée très positive dorénavant, compte tenu de ce qu'englobe une campagne politique?

M. Brian Marlatt:

Le concept qui sous-tend la notion selon laquelle le 30 juin devrait être le point de départ de la vérification des dépenses par Élections Canada est un bon point de départ, mais parce que nous constatons qu'en fait cela commence bien avant, une certaine surveillance est nécessaire pour une période plus longue. La période, et même la méthode — la Commission électorale du Royaume-Uni nous en donne un exemple —, mérite d'être étudiée.

Pour ce qui est de la mise en œuvre du projet de loi C-76, il serait souhaitable de discuter avec la Commission électorale du Royaume-Uni, comme nous l'avons fait dans le cas du rapport du Comité spécial McGrath sur la réforme de la Chambre des communes. C'est le même concept.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois. Je me demandais où allait le lien, parce que je sais que c'était précisément pour la Chambre des communes, pas nécessairement pour... Vous faites le lien avec les recommandations de la commission britannique.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à vous deux et concerne les cartes d'identité et d'information de l'électeur. Monsieur Turmel, vous avez certainement vu de quoi il s'agit.

(2100)

M. John Turmel:

Non, en fait, mais tout est bon pour moi. J'adore la carte d'identité.

M. Scott Simms:

Nous rétablissons maintenant la carte d'information de l'électeur — comme partie, mais pas la seule partie — comme filet de sécurité pour l'identification.

J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez, monsieur Marlatt.

M. Brian Marlatt:

Si vous regardez mon passé... Avant mon implication en politique, j'ai été scrutateur lors de deux élections fédérales — 1993 et 1997. J'ai été greffier du scrutin et agent électoral à Elections BC, puis aux élections provinciales, y compris la dernière en 2017.

L'une des choses que j'utilise, comme nous l'avons toujours fait, c'est la carte de l'électeur ou son équivalent provincial. Cette carte, de concert avec une autre pièce d'identité qui peut être fournie — et il y a diverses catégories dans lesquelles cela s'applique —, plutôt que d'insister sur une forme d'identification que certaines catégories de personnes n'ont tout simplement pas. Parfois, ce sont des étudiants. Parfois, il s'agit de gens des collectivités nordiques ou d'Autochtones. Ces gens sont marginalisés. Je ne veux pas trop insister là-dessus, mais aux États-Unis, où il y a un exercice actif — du moins selon les médias — de suppression du vote, le fait de se débarrasser d'une chose comme la carte d'identité de l'électeur semble avoir été un élément clé de ce qu'ils faisaient.

Nous n'avons pas besoin d'empêcher les électeurs de voter au Canada. Nous avons besoin d'une participation des électeurs. Rétablir cela et sensibiliser le public de la part du directeur général des élections et d'Élections Canada sont des aspects importants qui ont été supprimés dans le projet de loi C-23, mais que le projet de loi C-76 propose de ramener. Cela mérite nos félicitations.

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de poursuivre, j'aimerais demander à M. Turmel à combien d'élections vous vous êtes présenté et combien de fois vous avez gagné?

M. John Turmel:

Je n'ai pas encore gagné.

Le président:

Combien de fois vous êtes-vous présenté?

M. John Turmel:

Je me suis présenté en 1996, de sorte que j'ai perdu en 1992 et gagné... L'élection partielle dans Guelph a été annulée par le déclenchement des élections fédérales de sorte que cela ne compte pas comme une défaite. Mon bilan de défaites est toujours inférieur à mes victoires, mais les médias mentionnent toujours « le plus grand perdant ». Je suis aussi le plus grand candidat.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous pouvez poser des questions à votre témoin.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Vous avez dit qu'il y avait un intervenant par parti. Je pense que vous vouliez dire une intervention de sept minutes. Serait-il acceptable que je partage mon temps avec M. Kelly?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

M. Blake Richards:

Il vous reste six minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Je voulais poser ma prochaine question à M. Turmel. J'ai grandi à Ottawa. Aussi loin que je me souvienne, vous faites partie du décor d'Ottawa, et je suis vieux. Avez-vous déjà témoigné devant un comité parlementaire?

M. John Turmel:

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est la première fois.

M. John Turmel:

Oui, c'est pourquoi c'était un honneur. J'essaie de me faire entendre ou de faire en sorte qu'un gagnant comprenne ce que je dis. C'était bien d'être invité. Vous êtes un groupe de gagnants.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux simplement que vous sachiez que, d'après mon expérience personnelle, j'ai été invité à témoigner devant votre comité en mars 2000, que j'ai été élu pour la première fois à la Chambre des communes en novembre. Alors, c'est peut-être un signe de ce qui s'en vient. C'est vrai.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

[Inaudible] ma circonscription.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous avez soulevé la question d'obtenir une sorte de reçu pour voter. Bien que je pense que vous souleviez un problème légitime, je tiens à vous poser la question suivante. Je pense qu'il y a déjà une solution légitime et efficace, c'est-à-dire que même si votre bulletin de vote est anonyme, lorsqu'il est déchiré, il y a ce que l'on appelle une vignette — un talon. Cette vignette correspond à un numéro conservé par le scrutateur qui l'a déchiré et qui vous l'a remis lorsque vous...

M. John Turmel:

Excusez-moi, êtes-vous en train de me dire qu'il y a des numéros sur le papier? Je veux un morceau de papier avec le numéro; je ne veux pas un numéro en ligne qu'ils peuvent modifier.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, ce n'est pas en ligne. C'est un morceau de papier...

M. John Turmel:

Très bien.

M. Scott Reid:

... appelé une vignette. En fait, c'est écrit dans la loi, mais la prochaine fois que vous irez voter — serez-vous à Chicoutimi pour l'élection, pour voter?

M. John Turmel:

Est-ce que je vais quoi?

M. Scott Reid:

Allez-vous revenir pour l'élection partielle? Vous pouvez voter... Je suppose que vous n'avez pas de résidence, de sorte que vous pouvez en réalité...

(2105)

M. John Turmel:

Non, j'habite à Brantford et je peux voter pour le poste de maire. J'habite aussi à Brant et je peux voter pour un...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, si vous êtes candidat dans une circonscription...

M. John Turmel:

... mais pas Chicoutimi.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, vous n’habitez pas là, mais si vous êtes un candidat, vous pouvez voter dans la circonscription. Si vous y allez, vous aurez la chance de voter et de voir le véritable...

M. John Turmel:

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

Et si c’est le député?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faut être député sur la Colline.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis désolé. Ce sera le suivant.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. John Turmel:

D’accord. C’est logique, n’est-ce pas? Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, vous avez raison. Je n’habitais pas dans ma propre circonscription. Je vivais un peu à l’extérieur à un certain moment, et j’ai pu voter pour cette raison, moi ainsi que tous les autres membres de ma famille. Je crois que c’était l’article 10 de la loi.

À mon avis, c’est ce à quoi sert le talon.

M. John Turmel:

Non. Comment est-ce que c’est censé me rassurer que je puisse donner l’alarme si le talon ne correspond pas? Qui connaît ce talon, sinon le type qui se trouve dans la salle des ordinateurs?

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, il existait avant les ordinateurs.

Le président:

Il reste une minute.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez quoi? La moitié du temps est écoulé, alors il est peut-être temps de m’arrêter et de céder la parole à mon collègue, M. Kelly.

M. John Turmel:

Oh, c’est tellement une bonne...

M. Scott Reid:

Je tenais à vous remercier infiniment. Je vous suis depuis que je suis haut comme trois pommes...

M. John Turmel:

D'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

... et maintenant, j’ai eu l’occasion de vous rencontrer, alors je vous remercie.

M. Pat Kelly:

Merci à nos témoins.

Monsieur Turmel, j’ai cru comprendre de votre exposé — je suis conscient que vous avez essayé de fournir le plus de renseignements possible — que vous vous attaquiez plutôt à certaines des difficultés entourant le dépôt des documents et les restrictions imposées aux candidats, surtout à votre qualité de candidat indépendant. Ai-je bien compris?

M. John Turmel:

Non, je parlais de l’absence d’un seuil ou de l’exclusion du temps d’antenne gratuit réservé aux candidats. Autrefois, le temps d’antenne gratuit était équitable. Je ne m’en plaignais jamais à moins qu’une station ne m’en laisse pas. Si vous regardez les affaires portées devant les tribunaux, vous verrez que chaque fois que je n’ai pas eu mon temps d’antenne, j’ai déposé une plainte au CRTC puis devant les tribunaux.

Maintenant, je ne peux plus porter plainte, parce que c’est légal pour eux de m’exclure. J’aimerais beaucoup que vous fassiez marche arrière et que vous corrigiez la situation.

Ce dont je parlais, c’est qu’il faut un seuil, parce que, comme je l’ai dit, je pourrais me faire prendre si je vais à Chicoutimi et que je produis une déclaration sans dépenses. Quelqu’un pourrait me demander comment j’ai payé l’essence. Autrefois, je disposais de 2 000 $ de dépenses personnelles, sans contribution. Et, je pouvais acheter mon billet d’autobus ou mon essence pour me rendre où je devais aller.

M. Pat Kelly:

D’accord, vous en avez fait une question de...

M. John Turmel:

Seuil.

M. Pat Kelly:

... de politique afin que vous puissiez ne pas engager de dépenses et donc ne pas...

M. John Turmel:

Oui.

M. Pat Kelly:

... avoir à déposer de document puis être obligé de procéder à une vérification.

M. John Turmel:

C’est juste. Je veux me rendre aux réunions. C’est mon devoir en tant que candidat, mais je ne fais pas de porte-à-porte, et il devrait y avoir un seuil avant que je doive me soumettre à une vérification.

M. Pat Kelly:

Diriez-vous que le processus est un peu lourd et qu’il pourrait peut-être être un obstacle pour un candidat indépendant, ou même un candidat d’un petit parti?

M. John Turmel:

Oui.

M. Pat Kelly:

D'accord, merci.

J’ai peut-être le temps pour une autre question.

Les détracteurs du projet de loi devant nous — dont je fais partie et probablement d’autres membres de mon caucus — s’inquiètent du financement par des tiers et de la facilité avec laquelle les fonds provenant de l’étranger sont mêlés à ceux provenant des tiers puis dépensés pendant les campagnes électorales.

Est-ce que les répercussions des fonds et des capitaux provenant de tiers sur les élections au Canada vous préoccupent?

M. John Turmel:

Non, je pense que vous vous en tirez bien en essayant de les éliminer et de les rassembler et de veiller à ce que ça ne se produise pas. Vous ne pouvez pas faire plus.

Je m’intéresse aux répercussions sur le petit candidat, celui qui ne trichera pas, mais qui ne veut tout simplement pas avoir à retenir les services d’un vérificateur parce qu'il a acheté un billet d’autocar.

M. Pat Kelly:

Je suis bien placé pour comprendre.

Le président:

M. Marlatt pourrait également répondre à cette question.

M. Pat Kelly:

Certainement, allez-y.

M. Brian Marlatt:

J’ai perdu le fil, mais je tiens à mentionner en ce qui concerne la publicité partisane gratuite que si vous demandez au directeur général des élections, je pense que vous constaterez que ce n’est pas exactement sa définition et qu’il y a une disposition sur la publicité partisane gratuite pour tous les partis politiques. Le temps d’antenne est limité et peut être diffusé à n’importe quel moment de la journée. Il pourrait l’être à 3 heures du matin par exemple.

M. John Turmel:

Pourquoi m’a-t-on arrêté et exclu?

M. Brian Marlatt:

Vous pouvez en discuter avec le directeur général des élections et l'interroger à ce sujet.

M. Pat Kelly:

Ma question portait sur les tiers et la façon dont ils dépensent l’argent. Nombre de tiers, chaque tiers, les partis non politiques ne sont pas des candidats aux élections, mais...

(2110)

M. Brian Marlatt:

Tout à fait. Il y a des dispositions dans la Loi électorale du Canada qui régissent les dépenses de tiers. Il y aura une disposition qui couvre la période préélectorale et la période électorale, ainsi que les dépenses électorales de tiers si le projet de loi est adopté. Cependant, l’une des choses qui, à mon avis, devrait nous préoccuper tout autant est que les partis politiques, le Manning Centre, le Centre canadien de politiques alternatives et les libéraux sont dans la même situation, c’est-à-dire qu’ils font appel à des gens à l’extérieur du Canada pour orienter leurs initiatives politiques sur le plan des politiques et le degré de représentation des intérêts canadiens. Je pense que la démocratie parlementaire canadienne de Westminster est en train de se perdre. La façon dont les questions sont formulées et la manière dont nous menons nos campagnes ressemblent davantage à un film américain très partisan où s’opposent le rouge et le bleu.

M. Pat Kelly:

Êtes-vous préoccupé par le fait que ce projet de loi ne règle pas le problème du financement étranger?

M. Brian Marlatt:

Je ne sais pas si cela m’inquiète. Je pense que la question pourrait être traitée dans un projet de loi distinct.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Cannings, vous serez notre dernière intervention. Vous disposez de sept minutes. Il nous reste 23 minutes avant le vote.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci à vous deux d’être ici. Je regrette d’être arrivé en retard et d’avoir raté vos exposés. Du moins, j’ai manqué vos interventions, monsieur Turmel. Il semble que j’ai manqué quelque chose d’assez intéressant. Je ne sais pas trop quoi vous demander.

Monsieur Marlatt, vous ne semblez pas aimer le projet de loi C-23 de la législature précédente, la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections.

M. Brian Marlatt:

Non.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je me demande si vous pourriez me dire au moins ce que fait le projet de loi actuel, selon vous, pour corriger ces lacunes et ce que [Difficultés techniques]

M. Brian Marlatt:

[Difficultés techniques] le rôle que jouent le directeur général des élections et Élections Canada pour éduquer le public et lui fournir des renseignements lors d’une élection. Ce sont les deux principaux points que j’ai mentionnés. Pour ce qui est du projet de loi  C-23, je souhaite attirer votre attention — et vous le trouverez en annexe à ce document, dans la traduction française et anglaise, qui sera distribuée dans quelques jours — sur le fait que, sur la base de la recommandation de l’honorable Sinclair Stevens, nous allions contester la constitutionnalité du projet de loi  C-23 devant la Cour fédérale et la Cour suprême du Canada, ce qui aurait coûté 350 000 $ en honoraires.

Nous avons parlé au Conseil des Canadiens et à la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants, lesquels estiment que le projet de loi C-23 supprime leurs voies. Le Conseil des Canadiens nous a répondu, en toute honnêteté, qu’il préférait passer par ses propres avocats et porter la cause devant un tribunal provincial. J’ai pensé que ce n’était rien de plus qu’une séance de photos, et c’est finalement ce qui s’est avéré.

Je suis heureux que le projet de loi actuel réponde à certaines de nos plus grandes préoccupations au sujet du projet de loi C-23. Lors de votre étude du projet de loi, j’espère que vous les mettrez ensemble pour déterminer ce qui devrait également faire partie de votre approche et ce qui devrait être corrigé et dont nous n’avons pas parlé.

M. Richard Cannings:

Les contestations judiciaires dont vous avez parlé porteront-elles principalement sur les aspects relatifs à la suppression de voix du projet de loi C-23?

M. Brian Marlatt:

Principalement.

Je le répète: nous n’en étions pas à discuter de tous les détails avec un avocat de droit constitutionnel, parce que le projet a été adopté, le temps a passé et ainsi de suite. Depuis, il y a eu une autre élection et un nouveau gouvernement est arrivé au pouvoir, lequel a envisagé de donner suite à certaines de ces préoccupations et c’est ce qu’il fait.

Je peux vous dire — je pense que tout le monde le sait — que les réunions du Comité consultatif des partis politiques les 8 et 9 juin 2015, juste avant les dernières élections, portaient principalement sur la façon dont les changements apportés par le projet de loi C-23 pourraient être mis en œuvre efficacement sans influencer l’élection. On y a également mentionné qu’il y aurait probablement une déclaration du directeur général des élections par la suite, si je me souviens bien et si j’ai bien compris ce qui a été dit à l’époque.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

(2115)

M. Richard Cannings:

Oui.

J’aimerais revenir sur certaines de vos observations au sujet de la période préélectorale comme elle est définie dans ce projet de loi, et aussi sur la question du financement de tiers.

Selon ce que j’en comprends — je n’ai pas mes notes ici puisque j’ai été appelé à quitter la Chambre pour venir remplacer ici —, le plafond du financement provenant de tiers pendant cette période préélectorale est soit 1 ou 1,5 million de dollars.

M. Brian Marlatt:

Je crois que c’était 1,5 million de dollars.

M. Richard Cannings:

Pensez-vous que c’est trop? Pensez-vous que le fait de dépenser autant d’argent permet aux tierces parties d’exercer une trop grande influence pendant la période préélectorale?

M. Brian Marlatt:

Eh bien, tout bien pensé, je ne crois pas que ce soit beaucoup d’argent de nos jours. On peut acheter une voiture pour un demi-million de dollars.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je sais.

M. Brian Marlatt:

Cela dépend vraiment de notre perception.

Je veux dire que les campagnes sur les médias sociaux ne coûtent pas cher, mais elles sont très voyantes et font beaucoup de bruits même si elles ne sont souvent pas représentatives. Elles sont une forme de publicité d’une certaine façon, mais elles ne constituent pas entre guillemets « de la publicité ».

Il y a des choses que les mouvements et les groupes externes peuvent faire pour influencer injustement le résultat des élections. Aujourd’hui, le Sénat examine le projet de loi C-45. Il y a eu une vaste campagne qui, je crois, a orienté le débat entourant les questions soulevées par le projet de loi C-45. Mesure-t-on le montant par les connaissances et la science ou par la façon dont les médias sociaux et ceux qui souhaitent tirer des profits de la légalisation du cannabis souhaitent être représentés? Est-ce que nous le faisons en période électorale et est-ce que c’est une représentation équitable pour les Canadiens?

Nous devons nous poser ces questions lorsque nous examinons ce que font les tiers pendant la période préélectorale. Toutefois, le contrôle exercé par Élections Canada — « contrôle » n’est pas le bon mot — disons, l’administration assurée par Élections Canada est utile, selon moi.

M. Richard Cannings:

Y a-t-il des éléments sur les médias sociaux et les tierces parties, ainsi que les campagnes électorales que vous souhaiteriez ajouter dans la loi ou s’agit-il simplement d’une inquiétude générale?

M. Brian Marlatt:

La publicité sur les médias sociaux est une chose, et c'est une publicité payée. Il s’agit de savoir d’où elle vient. Évidemment, si elle vient d’un autre pays — la NRA aux États-Unis est un bon exemple puisqu’elle a eu une grande influence sur la perception de certains des droits des propriétaires d’armes à feu. Cela touchera des projets de loi à venir. Cela touche également l’abrogation du registre des armes d’épaule, je crois.

Parfois, ce qui est dit est vrai, parfois ce ne l’est pas. Il me semble qu’il devrait y avoir une façon de nous tenir responsables de dire la vérité. Comment procéder? C’est aux législateurs de trouver une solution. Remarquez, si vous voulez m’engager pour une étude, je serai heureux de le faire.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais exercer la prérogative du président pour accorder 15 secondes à Blake pour qu’il pose une question à son témoin.

M. Blake Richards:

J’aimerais demander à M. Turmel s’il a déjà été candidat à la direction d’un parti, parce qu’il semble qu’il y ait une ouverture. Vous devriez peut-être parler à votre voisin.

M. John Turmel:

Eh bien, demandez à votre ami. En 1993, j’ai été arrêté, parce que j’exploitais sur le boulevard Saint-Laurent le plus grand casino clandestin de l’histoire. Il y avait 28 tables. J’ai dû dépenser un million de dollars avant qu’on ne me le retire puisqu’on le considérait comme produits de la criminalité. J’ai donc fondé un parti politique, le Parti abolitionniste, contre l’esclavage — pour nous libérer de la servitude pour dettes — et j’ai présenté plus de candidats que les Verts. Devinez quoi? En me portant candidat au poste de premier ministre, j’ai été invité à l’ONU en 2000 en tant qu’ONG. J’ai été invité à prononcer un discours sur le système bancaire, parce qu’ils avaient entendu parler du système LETS, un logiciel de banque de temps. Pouvez-vous imaginer que la déclaration du millénaire mentionnait que nous allions un jour restructurer l’architecture financière mondiale avec une autre devise basée sur le temps?

Le président:

Merci.

M. John Turmel:

J’ai appris à synthétiser l’information en peu de temps.

Le président: Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais vous poser une très brève question. Vous êtes-vous déjà présenté avec l’objectif de remporter l’élection?

M. John Turmel:

J’essaie toujours de gagner, mais une fois que j’ai installé le logiciel... Prenez M. Spock, il n’a jamais eu besoin d’aide pour reprogrammer un ordinateur central et sauver une planète. Moi non plus. Ensuite, je pourrai prendre ma retraite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est peut-être parce que vous utilisez encore une disquette de trois pouces et demi.

(2120)

M. John Turmel:

Je sais. C’est dire depuis combien de temps je me bats.

Le président:

Chers membres du Comité, nous nous réunirons à nouveau demain à 10 heures dans l’édifice Wellington pour la vidéoconférence.

Je tiens à vous remercier, tous les deux, de votre patience aujourd’hui. Je sais que vous êtes arrivé à 15 h 30 ou 16 h 30, alors merci beaucoup.

M. John Turmel:

C’était amusant.

Le président:

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 06, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.