header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-06-07 PROC 114

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good afternoon, and welcome to the 114th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, as we continue our study of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We are pleased to be joined by David Moscrop, who is appearing as an individual by video conference from Seoul, South Korea, and I don't know what time it is there; Sherri Hadskey, the Commissioner of Elections, Louisiana Secretary of State, who is appearing by video conference from Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Victoria Henry, digital rights campaigner from OpenMedia Engagement Network, who is appearing by video conference from Vancouver; and Sébastien Corriveau,[Translation]

leader of the Rhinoceros Party, who is also appearing by video conference from St-Donat-de-Rimouski, Quebec.[English]

Thank you all for making yourselves available.

I just want to say something I'd forgotten to say. We have made the clerk's job quite interesting over this study so far, so I think we should really give our appreciation to the clerk and his huge staff for getting all these witnesses on short notice.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: It's been a mammoth job, and you've done—

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I think it's 4:30 in the morning in Seoul, South Korea. I think it's 8:30 in the morning in New Zealand.

The Chair:

It's 4:30 in the morning in Seoul, South Korea.

Maybe we'll have David go first.

You each have an opening statement, but David, seeing as it is 4:30 in the morning there in South Korea, you could go first.

Mr. David Moscrop (As an Individual):

Thank you.

The Chair:

The floor is yours. Can you hear us?

Mr. David Moscrop:

Yes, I can.

Well, good morning from Seoul, South Korea, and thank you for the invitation to appear before the committee.

I just left Vancouver the other day, so I was closer to a much nicer time zone, but I am so pleased to be here. I know there is a lot to cover, so I'll get right to it.

The goals of any election legislation should be to protect the procedural integrity of how we choose our representatives during and outside the writ period, and to support a vibrant, diverse, egalitarian, and inclusive public sphere in which citizens can make informed political decisions.

With those ends in mind, I am pleased to see that this bill introduces a few measures that facilitate those goals, including stricter spending limits and regulations on third parties, as well as constraints that further constrain foreign actors. I think these measures will help level the playing field.

As others have testified, the limits are more than reasonable, although I would argue that it might be good to extend the pre-writ period covered under the legislation to perhaps as long as a year if the goal is to curb the permanent campaign.

I am also pleased that changes introduced by the Fair Elections Act are being amended or removed. The Chief Electoral Officer should be able to play an active role of promoting elections and educating citizens.

Also, because elections should be as successful as possible, I am excited and encouraged to see that vouching is reinstated, the use of a voter card as identification is brought back, and certain restrictions on limitations for voting for Canadians overseas or living abroad have been removed as well. That will free up a little bit of capacity for folks to turn out.

I think the bill is weaker when it comes to encouraging turnout vis-à-vis younger Canadians. A voluntary registry for those approaching voting age is fine, and I support that, but I think the voting age should be lowered to 16, full stop. Sixteen-year-olds have plenty of capacity, and the idea that we could get people voting younger and forming that habit earlier in life, I think, is a good one. However, if we really want to get serious about turnout I think we should think about mandatory voting.

Finally, on the weaker side, I think the privacy provisions in this bill don't go far enough. A policy for parties that they make public is fine, but when was the last time you read the terms of service on any service you signed up for? That is often inadequate. Parties should be run under stricter privacy legislation. There should be regular auditing of data and strict enforcement of privacy standards, and someone with some teeth who can do that.

I'll wrap up really quickly. Elections must be accessible and fair, but more importantly, folks must believe that they are accessible and fair. This bill takes some encouraging steps toward that end, but it could go further and probably should, especially in light of growing concerns about the sustained decline in voter turnout, as well as data rights and privacy.

Thank you.

(1535)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Sherri Hadskey, Commissioner of Elections for Louisiana.

Ms. Sherri Hadskey (Commissioner of Elections, Louisiana Secretary of State):

Hi, it's nice to be with you. I'm honoured to be able to speak with you today.

Louisiana has such a unique election system. I believe we have more elections than any state in the United States. You were speaking about voter fatigue, and that is a big problem in Louisiana. Generally we have four scheduled elections a year, but we always end up with special elections, and it's the ripple effect. A senator runs in the fall, wins a different seat, and that opens the first seat. Our legislature would like these people to be seated for each legislative session, so a special election is called, and we're looking for a better turnout for those types of elections.

We too are trying to find things to prevent voter fatigue and trying to get good turnout consistently. We have an 87% registration number, which is amazing. I'm so proud of that, but to have only 16% turnout in a [Inaudible—Editor] election cycle is saddening, because with the registration that we have, we would like to have the turnout match.

I'd love to be able to provide the answers to any questions you may have, and I'm just happy to be here.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We're happy you're here too.

Now we'll go on to Victoria Henry from OpenMedia Engagement Network.

Ms. Victoria Henry (Digital Rights Campaigner, Open Media Engagement Network):

Hi there. Thanks so much for having me here to discuss this issue.

I'm Victoria Henry. I'm a digital rights campaigner specializing in privacy issues with OpenMedia, which is a community-based organization committed to keeping the Internet open, affordable, and free of surveillance. The revelations stemming from the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook scandal have highlighted the extent to which our privacy laws are failing to protect the privacy of ordinary people in Canada and how this can influence elections.

While Bill C-76 makes some positive steps to protect the integrity of elections and safeguard our democracy, the omission of political parties from privacy legislation is a concerning gap, and that's the issue I'd like to talk about today.

People around the world are increasingly concerned, of course, about how their personal information is gathered, used, and stored. More than 10,000 people in Canada have recently signed on to a letter asking for reform of our privacy laws. The key demand in that letter is for Canada's political parties to be subject to federal privacy laws.

The existing privacy exemptions for political parties have left many Canadians convinced that the current system is not working in our best interests. We need guarantees that our government's political interests will not take precedent over our privacy and our security.

A national online omnibus survey conducted from May 7 to May 14 of this year revealed that a large majority—72% of Canadians—supported changing the law so that political parties follow the same privacy rules as private companies. In fact, only 3% support the status quo policy of fewer restrictions for political parties. This polling also showed that support for extending PIPEDA to political parties has broad support from partisans of all stripes. I can provide the full polling results, as well as the letter from Canadians, to the committee members with my notes.

These views are supported by the Privacy Commissioner of Canada in his testimony to this committee. The commissioner stated that information about our political views is highly sensitive and therefore worthy of privacy protection. Because of this, simply asking political parties to have their own privacy policies without defining the standards that must be applied is not enough.

For example, the standards set by Bill C-76 do not include measures such as limiting collection of personal information to what is required; obtaining consent when collecting, using, or disclosing personal information; or collecting information by fair and lawful means. Because of this, the Privacy Commissioner calls for internationally recognized privacy principles, not policies defined by parties, to be included in domestic law, and for an independent third party to have the authority to verify compliance. We support this call as well as the recommended amendments put forward by the commissioner's office.

The recent scandal clearly demonstrates how weak privacy safeguards can have serious effects that go beyond the commercial realm. With federal elections due in 2019, we need to safeguard our democracy and protect against undue influence stemming from online privacy violations. Many ministers have indicated that they're willing to strengthen our privacy laws. The status quo is at odds with the wishes of most people in Canada, whose confidence in our political processes is undermined by the singling out of political parties when it comes to privacy.

On behalf of the vast majority of people in Canada who support stronger privacy rules for political parties, I'm asking you today to strengthen the protection of our democratic institutions and to make these changes now.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Sébastien Corriveau, of the Rhinoceros Party. Bienvenu.

An hon. member: We can't hear him.

The Chair: We can't hear you. Hold on a second.

Mr. Sébastien Corriveau (Leader, Rhinoceros Party):

No, it's me. I'm stupid. I forgot my button.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Okay. Allons-y.

Mr. Sébastien Corriveau:

Okay. Take up your headphones. I will speak French also.

Ladies and gentlewomen, please turn on your cellphone and play Candy Crush; call your husband; reheat your dinner; text your lawyer; take a nap; take an emergency exit; close your eyes and stop listening: here comes the Dealer of the Rhinoceros Party of Canada. Hello.

Mr. Chairman, the Honourable Larry Bagnell, do you know that you used to be my member of Parliament? That was for three months in the summer of 2009, when I spent my summer in Whitehorse.

Dear committee, merci for welcoming me ici and now.[Translation]

This is my first time appearing before a parliamentary committee and I think it is very appropriate to invite the leader of the Rhinoceros Party. Thank you. The members of the party and I do have good ideas at times. [English]It's always great to share them with you.[Translation]

I would like to draw your attention to the public funding of political parties.[English]There is nothing about it in this bill. That was removed. The public funding of political parties was removed by the Stephen Harper government because he does not believe in corruption inside political parties.[Translation]

It was Pierre Elliott Trudeau who established public funding for political parties in 1974. The purpose was to fight corruption in political parties and in the awarding of public works contracts. Abolished by Mr. Mulroney, the public funding system was reinstated by Jean Chrétien after the sponsorship scandal.[English]I would like it back.

The Prime Minister of Canada lied to Canadians when he said 2015 would be the last election with the first-past-the-post electoral system.

(1545)



Our nation still has an archaic electoral system inherited from when Great Britain was our overlord, MPs listened to their local populations, and political parties had no party line that it was mandatory to follow.

In 2008, the Green Party of Canada received almost one million votes, yet they had no elected MPs—zero, nobody. At the same time, the Conservatives got 5.2 million votes, which is only five times more votes, and they elected 143 members of Parliament.

You call Canada a democracy? How cute. Five members of Parliament were elected with less than 30% of the vote, 69 members of Parliament were elected with less than 40% of the vote, and, 60% of the members of Parliament—206 MPs—were elected with less than 50% of the votes in their ridings.

Bill C-76 is off the track: you forgot to talk about what really matters in our democracy.

I agree that we have to make sure no interest groups will buy advertisements right before the election. You are right when you say that no other countries should interfere in our electoral process—except Russia: I would like money from Russia.

You can't tell me that you lack time to implement an electoral reform that is right—and right now.[Translation]

I know that is not true, however. You have decided to set aside this change. When the time came, you decided not to go ahead with it. It is the same as with climate change: one day we will wake up and it will be too late.[English]

I know that the only thing I can really change today by coming here is the public funding of political parties. Let me end with that.[Translation]

In the report of the Special Committee on Electoral Report tabled in December 2016, entitled “Strengthening Democracy in Canada: Principles, Process and Public Engagement for Electoral Reform”, the committee recommended in chapter 7, section G — g like government — that the per-vote subsidy and funding of political parties be reinstated.

It had been eliminated in 2015.

That same report states that: “ [...] the current system of individual donations to political parties is less equal, as donations vary greatly between Canadians of different socio-economic levels.”

Public funding makes Canadians feel that their vote counts.

Appearing before the committee, Ms. Melanee Thomas stated: [...] internationally, most countries do have some form of public financing. It's broadly seen to be a good thing, because the political party is a key institution linking representative institutions and the voting public.

Jean-Pierre Kingsley, the former chief electoral officer of Canada, recommends that it be reinstated.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you, everyone, for being here and for your wise counsel.

We'll start the round of questioning with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, they say that one of the best things you can do is to always be transparent, and I always strive for transparency. Mea culpa to all my colleagues. I'd just like to put my cards on the table: from 1989 to 1991, I was one of the chief organizers for the Rhinoceros Party of Canada.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Floor-crosser.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

Actually, if you recall, under the old guard Rhinoceros, 1990 was their last election, under Bryan Gold, if our guest can remember that, but probably not. He's a bit young. I ran that campaign. We came last, by the way. I've since crossed the floor, and things have been better since then.

That being said, Mr. Corriveau, you talked about many things, but can we go to Bill C-76 for just one moment? You believe in the limitations that we're putting on for third parties to get involved. By how many rubles would limitations be in your world?

Mr. Sébastien Corriveau: How many rubles?

Mr. Scott Simms: Yes. You mentioned that you'd like to get Russian money. I just thought I'd....

Mr. Sébastien Corriveau:

Oh, yes. Well, maybe in Bitcoin, because it may be harder for Elections Canada to track.

Mr. Scott Simms:

There you go. All right.

It's good to see you again, by the way. It's good to see the old gang.

I want to turn my questions now to the State of Louisiana and to you, Ms. Hadskey. You've been involved in elections for some time. I understand that you have a pre-register list for people below the age of 18. Is that correct?

(1550)

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do you care to comment on the success—or not—of that particular program?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

It's fairly new. It has been successful. In terms of the people who register, if they're 17 years old and they're going to turn 18 prior to the election, they are allowed to vote. The students seem to really like that.

The other thing we have is that we allow them to work as a commissioner at the age of 17 if they want to learn about the election process and get involved. Especially when certain schools offer credit hours for time served as an elections commissioner in learning the process, it's really a great thing.

The earlier you can get people involved, the better. In our state, the younger generation does not turn out nearly as much as the older generation. We really push hard to get the younger generation out to vote. It's difficult.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Does the state elections commission provide a campaign how younger people can be involved and register? Do you have a marketing plan?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

We do. In the State of Louisiana there are 64 parishes. Each parish's clerk of court offers training. We have an outreach program that goes into schools.

The great thing, and my favourite part, which I've done since I was 19 years old—I've been in elections since I was 19, and I'm 53, by the way, so that makes it a long time—is a program through which our voting equipment is allowed to be used in all the schools if they request it. We go in and conduct their homecoming queen election or their whatever type of election. They get hands-on time with the voting equipment.

While we're there, we go over registration information with them. We cover just what you're talking about: the fact that you can register earlier than 18 years of age and things like that. It really does help.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I congratulate you on your proactivity. That sounds really good.

On that issue again, I should say that this is new for us, as it is relatively new for you. Are there any problems you're having that we should be aware of if we're implementing this particular program?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

I can't think of one problem that we've had. I really can't. It's been a great tool in helping people to get out there, register, be involved, and turn out to vote. Anything we can do to try to help with that is a great thing.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you so much.

As you know, in our legislation that we're proposing here, we are looking at stricter conditions for third party influence. I have more of a general question on American politics. We're used to seeing American television and seeing a lot of involvement from third parties, or “super PACs”, political action committees; I think that's the common term. Do you in your state do anything to curb the influence of third parties? Is there any type of legislation that you have in place?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

I don't know if you know, but we don't have party primaries. Did you know that? In Louisiana, everyone qualifies, no matter what party they are in, and then we have a primary election and a general election. It's not, I don't think, as in—

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's right. You have a runoff. Is that correct? You have two elections in case...right?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

That's right. Whoever wants to qualify for the primary does qualify. We run our election, and the top two people there go into the general one.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The top two do. Okay, and certainly there are no low limitations on involvement of third parties or anything else.

How about the parties themselves? Are there any limitations within what we call a “writ period”? At the time when the election is drawing near, do you have any type of limitations for donations to individual candidates?

(1555)

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

In Louisiana, we have a separate division—it's not part of my department—with regard to campaign finance. It's called the Office of Campaign Finance. That is how all of the rules and guidelines are provided to each candidate when they qualify in the state, and they have to abide by all of those rules and guidelines.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much to all of you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Are you anxious to question some of your witnesses?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

Mr. Simms was able to save me a bit of time, Ms. Hadskey, because he asked some of the questions that I wanted to ask in regard to your pre-18 voter registration, but I still have a couple of questions on that, so I'll start there.

At what age do you start collecting those? Is there a certain age at which they qualify to be on that list?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

Yes. It's 16.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's 16. Okay. It's voluntary? In other words, would it be because the young person has asked to be on the list? How does that work?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

It's if they would like to be. Let's say your parent went in to register, you went with them, and you wanted to be put on the list. You'd fill out your information with the office of the registrar of voters. Each parish has a registrar of voters.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It sounds as though maybe there was parental involvement or parental consent involved in that, or is it just a young person signing up?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

It's just the young person signing up. You don't need to have a parent or guardian with you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What's done to ensure the privacy of that information? Is it provided to political parties at all?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

No. They're not added to our.... We have a system called the ERIN system. It's our voter registration system. You're not added to the ERIN system until the date when you are actually eligible to vote. In terms of documentation, if somebody asks for a commercial list of voters that they can send flyers to, or that they pay for or something like that, your name is never provided if you're under the age of 18.

Mr. Blake Richards:

How long has this been in existence?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

I think it's only been for two years. I'd have to get back to you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's been roughly two years. Have you had any issues at all? There's been an election during that time, right? There would have been at least one election during that time.

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

Sure. To our knowledge, we haven't had any problems or issues. There's been nothing like that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's almost like you read my mind. That's exactly what I was wondering: whether you had any kind of problem with the data being accidentally leaked before it should have been and added to the other part of the list.

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

No, because if they're not added into the ERIN system for that, then they can't possibly be.... They couldn't even accidentally do it. It's a completely separate registration.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thank you.

Next I'll go to Ms. Henry, from the OpenMedia Engagement Network.

I first have a couple of background questions about your organization. Where do you get your funding? Is it from donations, individual donations? What's your source of funding?

Ms. Victoria Henry:

The majority of our funding comes from individual donations from Canadians. When we do seek out or accept donations outside of that, it's for projects specifically in other countries, or where there's a cross-border issue, for example, such as our campaign around border privacy or privacy of digital devices crossing the border from one country to another.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Understood. I's largely individual Canadians, then. Would they give small amounts, typically, or make larger donations?

Ms. Victoria Henry:

We receive some project funding from foundations and so on, but unfortunately most of our donations are quite small. We're always looking to get bigger ones.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, that's not atypical for most organizations, including us as political parties. You just have to find a lot of small ones, right?

I think you mentioned that when you do some work in other countries, there may be some foreign funds for those types of activities. Is that what you were saying?

Ms. Victoria Henry:

It's for projects specific to that country—for example, work that we might be doing in the EU.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You were registered as a third party in the last election, so that money was not utilized for those purposes? Was it strictly for these other purposes?

Ms. Victoria Henry:

Exactly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

You did spend, I think, $18,000 on advertising in the last election. Can you tell me what those ads would have consisted of? What type of advertising would that have been, and what type of messaging?

(1600)

Ms. Victoria Henry:

I'll have to give you that information later. It's not my area of expertise.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would you mind providing that to the committee? Perhaps you could give us some indication of what it was spent on and the types of messaging.

Ms. Victoria Henry:

No problem.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

This may not be your area, but I'll ask you because it is part of this bill. There are changes regarding third party funding. What are your thoughts on that? Particularly, should we go further to discourage or prevent the use of foreign funding through third parties in our elections?

Ms. Victoria Henry:

More can always be done. Whether it happens through this process or through another is another good question. One of the things we've been working on as an organization, alongside many other civil society organizations and privacy experts, is reforms to privacy laws themselves. For example, with PIPEDA we have a lack of enforcement ability. Let's say there is a corporation or company that is not obeying those privacy laws; the Privacy Commissioner lacks the ability to issue fines or force compliance with them.

We could be looking at many other ways to give more teeth to our laws in order to prevent third party or foreign influence.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let me just ask you this, quite simply: do you believe we should not allow any foreign funding to be part of our elections?

Ms. Victoria Henry:

I think there will always be issues, such as the issues we deal with, that cross borders. I'm not an expert in this area. I'm here mainly to represent the views of ordinary people in Canada. Obviously, it's a big area of concern for them. As to where that line in the sand would be drawn, I couldn't quite answer you now.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

To my friend Mr. Corriveau from the Rhinoceros Party, I can't say I was ever an organizer for your party like my friend across the way, but there were probably a couple of elections where certainly, if there had been a candidate on the ballot, I might have considered voting for you.

A voice: There you go.

Mr. Blake Richards: Just out of curiosity, you mentioned in your opening that you are the leader and also the “dealer” of the Rhinoceros Party. What the heck does that mean?

Mr. Sébastien Corriveau:

For Elections Canada, I am the leader of the party, but honestly I'm more like a dealer of the party. I think more leaders of political parties in Ottawa should act like dealers.

You know, last week I was not thrown out of my party, so.... I think it's a good way to be.

Mr. Blake Richards:

All right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. [Translation]

Mr. Cullen, you have the floor.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Very quickly, Mr. Corriveau, I have to say that of the policies you folks put forward in a previous iteration, one of my favourites—maybe it was Mr. Simms' brainchild—was to run a waterslide from the top of the Rockies to Toronto and have free admission for every Canadian.

You should note that the Liberals have an Infrastructure Bank—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: —and we should never say never. They just bought a really old pipeline, so who knows? Anything is possible.

Ms. Hadskey, a few of us as parliamentarians were able to participate as observers in your last federal election. A few of us visited Baton Rouge. I'd like to say, first, “Go,Tigers”, and second, if you registered people at the football game, between yourselves and Alabama you probably would have boosted your numbers even further.

What is the youth participation rate like in Louisiana? I may have missed this, and if so I apologize. I'm wondering about the 18-to-25 age group, or however you categorize the youth vote in Louisiana.

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

The youth vote is much lower. I mean, it's drastically lower. I would say that overall our youth vote is probably around 20%. It's really rough. We try, try, try to get people to go out and vote, and it's difficult.

For clarification, the law for the people who are 16 was passed in our 2015 legislative session, so it's been active for three years.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It would be helpful to the committee, if there is anyone who's preceded you in this, to know whether there's been any empirical evidence of increased turnout. There are many factors as to why people do and don't vote. We had a significant youth bump in our last election despite—actually, I would argue—some of the changes that have been made. There are many factors, but it would be good if there were any empirical evidence connecting something like a registry to people coming out to vote at a younger age.

(1605)

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

Do you mean for registration, the 16—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the early voter registration, and then correlating that to turnout as the young person enters the voting age and years beyond.

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

We may be able to track that. I could look at that for you.

An idea would be to ask, actually, the person who was the commissioner prior to me. I took office in August of last year, but I've been in elections since in 1986. I asked the person who was in place before me whether she knew of any types of questions, problems, concerns, or anything like that. She said the only thing she would stress would be that if the person did register at 16, and then they were going to turn 18, we have a 30-day close of books, so if they were going to turn 18 in the middle of early voting or something like that, you would need to address that with your registrar of electors to allow them to vote, making certain that they understood.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, that's good. That's very helpful.

Mr. Moscrop, I want to turn to you for a moment. I apologize. I came late to committee today and I missed your presentation, but I will see it later.

I want a perspective from you. We're going to have Facebook and Twitter in a little bit later. I was reading your dissertation summary, and I don't understand it because it's far too sophisticated for me: “Can we be autonomous deliberative citizens? Towards answering that question I examine the ways non-consciously processed stimuli and a-rational cognitive processes affect citizen deliberation in liberal democracies.” Yes, it's obvious to everybody else except me.

My question to you, Mr. Moscrop, is do you think there is some obligation on the part of the social media agents, the companies—particularly Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter—in terms of who pays for the ads and the actual content being displayed, the way there is for traditional media?

Mr. David Moscrop:

Yes.

Part of the issue is that the speed, reach, and volume of advertising material and all kinds of other materials are such that you can start to microtarget. You can start to A/B test at a mass level. You basically have all the tools you need to manipulate people, really quite easily, and it's perfectly legal to do so. It's seen as just advertising, but with a certain amount of volume and with a certain amount of sophistication, it becomes very easy to effectively manipulate people by tailoring specific ads and—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I apologize. Could the same thing be said of political parties, then, which also collect a large amount of data and increasingly are using microtargeting as an approach, in a benevolent way, to influence voters interested in certain issues?

There is also the propensity, in a more malicious way, to subvert certain voters, suppress certain voters, target them with messages that turn them away from issues that they might be more interested in. Do political parties have a responsibility in terms of the management of our own data?

Mr. David Moscrop:

They do, very much so. I'm actually quite concerned about that. Part of the issue is that if voter turnout is low and you have this digital media capacity, then all of a sudden microtargeting becomes even more powerful.

You mentioned voter suppression. If our elections become about just how we're going to balance our mobilization and suppression tactics to try to get the right people out and the wrong people to stay home, which you could try to do with digital media—you know, through misleading statements, for instance, or the spread of misinformation or disinformation—then all of a sudden you have an awful lot of power at your fingertips. It's easier to use and it's cheaper to use.

I think that part of the issue is that there are different advertising rates for social media versus, say, for broadcast or print. That's a serious issue that also needs to be considered. Part of what you get to do with social media, digital media, is leverage cheap cost and quite an extensive reach to try to move voters one way or the other.

I'll make a quick distinction. We talk about persuasion versus manipulation. There's a big debate on what the difference is. I say that manipulation is that if you knew better, you would be upset or you would make a different decision. That's manipulation. There's a deliberate attempt to either mislead or misdirect you. If you'd known better, and if you'd been more rational—I'd say rational and autonomous—you'd make a different decision.

This is the scary thing: it's very easy to leverage digital media to try to manipulate people.

(1610)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. Thank you very much for that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'll welcome Ms. Romanado to the committee, and it's your turn to ask some questions.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

Thank you so much. I was on the Special Committee on Electoral Reform with some of my colleagues here today, so it's a treat to be back together again.

An hon. member: We're going on the road.

Ms. Sherry Romanado: We're going on the road, 2.0.

My first question is for Ms. Hadskey. You mentioned in your testimony that you have four elections every year in addition to special elections, and that you're having a problem with voter fatigue and voter turnout.

My colleague Mr. Cullen talked a little about the participation rate for 18- to 25-year-olds, and you mentioned 20%. What is the participation rate in general in your elections? Are we talking above 50%? What are we talking about in terms of voter turnout?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

For a presidential or gubernatorial, we'll have between 40% and 60%, or something like that, depending on what's on the ballot. In general, with the spring election cycle.... This past spring we had a 12% turnout. It was very low. That is propositions, municipals, and things like that. For this fall's congressional election, we expect a heavier turnout. We expect it to be somewhere between 50% and 60%.

It's important to point out that Louisiana has a four-year cycle. You have the presidential, the gubernatorial, the congressional, and then you have a down year. Last year, 2017, was our down year. When I'm trying to look at all of the statistics, I always have to keep that in my thought process on the whole.

I'm sure you'll all agree with me that some of our heaviest turnout has a lot to do with who is running in the race and how well they are known and things like that. I do see an upside to that when you're looking at statistics.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

In terms of your outreach program, I love the idea of using the technology in schools, for voting for your prom queen and so on, to familiarize youth with the process.

What efforts are you making in terms of outreach for voters who are not in that 18-to-24, 16-to-18 category? I don't know what the population is in the state of Louisiana, but unless there's a huge boom of youth, I'm assuming you have a big voter pool of people who are above the age of 25 and not coming out to vote for whatever reason. What outreach efforts are you making to increase that voter turnout?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

I'm the elections commissioner, but I'd love to be the outreach director. That's one of my favourite things.

A little while ago, we started doing union elections, a state police election, or anything that is what we call a private election to get people to use the equipment. While you're there doing these services, you can also provide voter registration information and other information. It's a good way to allow people to see the equipment and remember about voting.

We have a GeauxVote app that we're very proud of. It's an app on your phone, and there are push notifications on it reminding you that an election day is coming up. That has had great, great response. We love it. You can go on there, look at where you're registered to vote, and check to make sure your polling place is at the right location. You can get a sample ballot on that app, and you can review it before you go to the polls.

We truly have an incredible outreach department. We do a voter registration week and an outreach week, when we try to get more people involved in that direction. Of course, when you look at.... I've turned machines over three times in this state, meaning new equipment. It's critical to get out there and get people to use and feel comfortable with the machines and that type of thing. We're doing everything we can.

(1615)

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

Thank you.

My next question, if I have a few seconds left, is for Mr. Moscrop.

You talked a little bit about fake news and digital threats. I sit on the Standing Committee for National Defence, and we've done some interesting studies on hybrid warfare, fake news, Russia's attempts to infiltrate with fake news in Crimea in the Ukraine, and a lot of the misinformation campaigns that you're referring to. We've heard recently in the news here in Canada the likelihood of misinformation campaigns occurring in the next federal election.

Do you feel that Bill C-76 adequately prepares us for this new reality that we are facing? As you said, this generation wants news quickly. My own mother will call me up and say she that saw something on Facebook and that it must be true.

What do we do? People want information. They want it quickly. They're looking at sources online that maybe can't be verified, so what can we be doing, and does this piece of legislation move far enough in that regard?

Mr. David Moscrop:

I try to be an optimist. It is 5:16 in the morning here in Seoul, so it's particularly difficult.

The problem at a global level is epistemic. There's just a ton of information, and it's moving very quickly. We have evolved for a very different sort of environment from an environment in which information is flying at us from all over the place all the time and we can't process it or reflect on it.

On top of that, this being a partisan-charged environment where people have incentives to use that information to try to mislead, the troubles are going to be extremely difficult and increasingly difficult, especially as the technology gets better. We're now seeing deep fakes, the ability to fake video. It's very convincing and very terrifying, as far as I'm concerned. That's going to be a global problem that's going to be difficult to deal with.

To the extent that [Technical difficulty--Editor] deals with this, it's going to be through limiting money and through limiting foreign activity. The way to choke it off to the extent that it's possible is to try to get to the source of what's driving it, and that's often money. Keep in mind that a lot of this is being driven by profit. Some of it's driven by political ends or ideological ends, but a lot of it is just profit. We all know that the Macedonian teens in the U.S. election ran fake news websites from their basements because it paid better than anything else, but for a long time they were doing it on both sides. They started to switch and did more for the right-wing Republicans because the money was better. It was about the money.

I think the thing we can do in the here and now is figure out the broader epistemic concerns about how we train better citizens and how we produce capacity for digital media and trusted sources. How we protect the news environment so that we have trusted sources in new and traditional media is to find a way to limit the money, and this is a good start, but there is a bigger issue, as I've just indicated, which is how we protect the news media so that people have a reliable source and a gatekeeper. That is a discussion we need to have as well.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Now we'll go on to Mr. Reid. You have five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you very much.

I'll start with Mr. Moscrop.

When I see discussions of fake news as a new thing, my reaction tends to be that fake news seems really old to me. It was, after all, 1898 when William Randolph Hearst was able to convince Americans they should go to war with Spain by arguing that the USS Maine had blown up in Havana harbour thanks to Spanish sabotage. The Onion has been milking that story for a long time.

It seems to me that the difference today, speaking epidemiologically, is that it's easier to get a meme out there, and also the falsification occurs more quickly. It seems to me that fake news is more virulent now than it was in 1898, but also the realization that it's fake occurs more quickly, causing us to be hyperaware of the fact that it's out there.

Obviously that changes the environment, but I'm not sure how it changes the policy response. Can I ask for some commentary on that, given that we are trying to develop policy to deal with this more virulent and more rapidly disproved fake news?

Mr. David Moscrop:

Yes, you're right. Propaganda and misleading information have been around as long as politics has been around. The difference is the speed, the reach, the volume, and the ease at which it can deployed. That's unprecedented.

When we talk about these hacks, the thing that's being hacked is the human brain, for the most part. People are trying to capture the human brain and direct it.

How do we provide people with more reliable information that they can trust? Part of that is structurally protecting media. That's not just legacy media; it's also making sure there's space for new media, that people have these trusted sources they can go to and know they are legitimate. That part involves some degree of transparency, so that when something is posted online, there's some very easy indication that it's trustworthy or verified.

We discussed this a little in a project I'm working on: red, yellow, or green on a story. The problem—and I don't have an immediate answer to this—is who does the verifications? This is the broader epistemic problem. If part of the issue is that we need stuff we can trust, who decides what's trustworthy? That used to be the news media, and they were the gatekeepers. Now that's all fallen apart. To some extent that's good news, because you want the stuff democratized, but we just haven't figured out what an alternative model would look like. The best structural answer I have is we need to protect the media.

In microanswers, you might want to at least have a discussion about how social media posts that can be controlled by Facebook, Twitter, or whomever could bear some sort of marking or system to identify them as trustworthy.

(1620)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think to some degree elections are typically determined not by the best-informed voters, who as a rule are also the ones who are most firmly committed to one or another of the camps. They've thought things through and they have recognized that they are a principled Conservative, a socialist, or whatever it happens to be, and therefore they have a home. Those are low-involvement voters.

It strikes me that those who are intensely involved voters essentially look to certain people to curate the news. They have the editorialists they trust. They have ways of filtering things.

This is the greatest issue for the low-involvement people. The difference is that the low-involvement or the low-awareness people then make decisions that ultimately decide whether party X or party Y winds up winning the election.

Would you agree that those are the people about whom we need be the most concerned? That said, do you have any ideas on how to deal with that? It seems they're the hardest people to reach with the inoculation, essentially.

Mr. David Moscrop:

Yes. I would go back to heuristics. It doesn't matter how educated, sophisticated, or experienced we are; every one of us uses mental shortcuts to make political decisions.

Some research from the United States from a few years ago suggests that when it comes to, say, motivated reasoning and rationalization, we think we're making our own rational decisions, but we're really rationalizing. Low-information voters do it, but sophisticated voters sometimes do it as well. The difference is that they do it with ideology and a more sophisticated story. It is a problem that cuts across groups, although you are right that there is more susceptibility with lower-information voters.

What's interesting is that those folks often rely on their family or friends to get political signals. One of the interesting things about Facebook and Twitter is that people are getting a lot of information, but the stuff that seems to be having a huge impact is that their Uncle Larry posted this thing, and they trust and like him. He's a lot like them, so they're going to do this. Then a lot of those heuristics have moved to family and friends, especially on Facebook.

How do we start a virtuous cycle or a positive cycle in which the stuff people share is informed? When we talk about this stuff, we think of it as a demand and supply problem. There's a demand for nonsense and good information. There's a supply of nonsense and good information. How do we encourage the supply and demand to link up and for that information to be better?

Part of it is making sure the environment is filled on the supply side. We're going to supply-side epistemic economics here. The supply side is good stuff. You want as much good reliable information as you can get on the supply side to try to drown out and provide choice for those who want something better than fake news, misleading news, or tabloid trash.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll finish up with Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to each of you for your time and testimony today.

Ms. Hadskey, I sense your passion for outreach, and for me youth engagement and involvement are very important. I'm pleased that this legislation has a number of initiatives. The education mandate has been brought back to the Chief Electoral Officer, so that's important. Then we've talked a little about early registration of voters.

Because you have some experience in this, I'd like to tap into your expertise, and that may help us moving forward. I was interested to hear you talk about bringing the equipment into the schools and having elections take place in the schools using the equipment. Am I understanding that the technology is grabbing the students? How does that transfer to getting youth more involved in the actual voting that takes place outside the school?

(1625)

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

It's very interesting. I have actually done so many of these elections. In a presidential year especially, the kids hear their parents and everybody talking about the election, and they feel as if they are a part of it when they're not voting for just something to do with their school or something to do with their class and putting a piece of paper in a box. They feel that they are allowed to do something that only 18-year-olds can do. Their faces lights up when they get to do something that they feel is a privilege or is something interesting. When we bring the machines in and they are actually looking at their name or the school name or the school colours, it's just really intriguing to them.

When we're dealing with high schools, most of the senior classes automatically, right then and there, start filling out registration cards. If they haven't done it already, they're going to grab these cards right there in the schools.

In Louisiana we also have, in the month of January, a special private election called the Louisiana Young Readers' Choice Election. The libraries have a state-wide program through which they let the kids pick the books they like the best, and they all participate. At the end, they have all of the results. They get to see the results tapes. It's uniquely getting children and young adults involved in the elections process before they turn 18. It really is a good thing.

I believe that the turnout we get.... Now, we also do private elections in universities, so if the university has its student president election or something like that, we will offer our services for those elections as well.

We're a top-down system, meaning we program our own voting machines and we work on our own voting machines, so programming the elections is not a problem. If it is for an educational purpose, there is no charge. There is no service fee, nothing. We do this to help the state get out there and get people to vote.

I really do believe it's a great program.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, it sounds fantastic.

With respect to the schools it's offered to, you just offer the service, and then does the school call you and that's how the participation happens?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

The registrars and clerks in each parish of the State of Louisiana are very well aware of this service. Sometimes the entities get in contact with the registrar or clerk of court, or sometimes they'll call us directly. It's on our website. We list it on our website, and then if you would like a private election or if you would like to conduct election visits, this is who you contact. We get the information and provide all of the machines.

We keep a lot of information back—how many people we registered while we were there, or how many people actually touched the voting machines—and we turn that over to the legislature every year, showing how many people we touched to [Inaudible—Editor].

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What is the percentage? What would you say is the percentage of students who participate in the vote and then follow up with the registration? Can you guess? Is it 50%? Is it 80%?

Ms. Sherri Hadskey:

I would say that with the high schools, at the end of the election, that's a big part of it. Everybody sits down at the table and fills out their voter registration card, so I do believe that it's a huge influence with the high schools.

For the younger kids, they know when January comes around that they're going to get to vote. The reason I know this from both sides of the fence is that my sons both attended a school where they allowed the voting machines to come in, and they were really excited and proud about it and they talked about it in the weeks leading up.

I believe they do get a large number of registrations as a result of this program.

(1630)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you all, David Moscrop, Sébastien Corriveau, Sherri Hadskey, and Victoria Henry. It was a very enlightening panel. It was great. Thank you very much for taking the time out to help our committee work.

We'll suspend while we change witnesses.

(1630)

(1635)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

I call the meeting back to order.

We have our next panel here. It's my understanding we are having a little technical difficulty with the individual we have appearing from New Zealand, but we're going to work on that. In the meantime, we will introduce our other witnesses and let them have their opening remarks.

In fact, maybe we have a couple witnesses by video conference. At least at this point, we have in front of us, from the Public Service Alliance of Canada, Chris Aylward and Morna Ballantyne. We will start with you.

We have our other witnesses planned, all by video conference: Leonid Sirota from Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand; Pippa Norris of Harvard, who is appearing from Massachusetts; and Angela Nagy, the former CEO of the Kelowna—Lake Country Green Party of Canada, who is appearing from beautiful Kelowna, British Columbia.

We will start with those we have in person, and then we will go from there.

Public Service Alliance of Canada, I'm not sure who's giving your opening remarks, but we will turn it over to you and let you sort that out.

Mr. Chris Aylward (National President, Public Service Alliance of Canada):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to the committee for allowing us to appear today.

The Public Service Alliance of Canada represents 180,000 members. We are the largest union in the federal public service.

Bill C-76 proposes extensive changes that have a significant impact on our democratic process. We strongly support the amendments in the bill that will remove barriers to voting and make it more accessible.

My comments will focus on changes related to third parties.

Our usual election activity is to inform our members about issues and encourage them to exercise their political rights and to vote. We do this by communicating with them in a number of ways, including advertising. During the last federal election and in a number of previous elections, the Public Service Alliance of Canada registered as a third party.

Bill C-76 has not changed the definition of third party election advertising; however, the definition curtails our right to represent our members' interests during an election period. Messages we transmit that can be received or seen by the public, such as information posted on bulletin boards or included in flyers, are considered to be election advertising if they take a position on an issue that a registered party or candidate is associated with or if the message opposes a registered party.

I challenge you to think of an issue that affects Canadians and our members that cannot be associated with a party, leader, or candidate at some time or another. The vast majority of our members are employed by the federal government and by federal agencies controlled or regulated by the government, and we take on issues associated with registered parties on an ongoing basis. It is our role and responsibility to advance their interests and concerns, and our right to do so has been upheld by the courts.

The existing restrictions on third party advertising, the proposed changes to the election period, and the introduction of new pre-election periods deny our legitimate advocacy role. This is particularly crucial when governments attempt to prevent our members from speaking out on issues and to restrict their political rights and activities because they are government employees.

During the last federal election period, we were in the middle of bargaining with Treasury Board for approximately 100,000 members. When we demonstrated against the government's proposals, Elections Canada advised us that the messages on our picket signs and banners might be considered election advertising under the Elections Act. They were seen as transmitting a message to the public during an election period that could be seen as opposing a registered party or speaking out on an issue associated with a registered party—in this case, the previous governing party.

Bill C-76 proposes to extend similar although not identical restrictions during a new pre-election period. The difference is that advertising during the pre-election period excludes messages that take a position on an issue associated with political parties and their candidates or leaders; however, the restrictions could still be interpreted to put limits on what we can say publicly about positions being taken by our government employers.

I refer you to the landmark 1991 Supreme Court case of Lavigne and the Ontario Public Service Employees Union. In that decision, the court affirmed the interconnected nature of political activity and union interests, or democratic unionism. The court said that many political activities, “be they concerned with the environment, tax policy, day-care or feminism, can be construed as related to the larger environment in which unions must represent their members”. Note that the court said “must represent their members” in this “larger environment”.

We are also concerned about the unnecessary burden the proposed legislation would put on unions to track and report all advertising expenses between elections. PSAC is a large organization, with 15 relatively autonomous components and over 1,000 locals; however, the third party provision treats us as a single entity. We would now be required to monitor all those parts in order to report expenses related to messages to the public amounting to $10,000 or more between an election and the pre-election period.

(1640)



In conclusion, we ask the committee to review the proposed sections on third party advertising very carefully before proceeding with the bill so as not to affect the legitimate rights of unions to speak out on behalf of their members. We also ask you to consider splitting the bill and moving quickly to deal with the sections where there is general agreement and support, such as the sections that were originally contained in Bill C-33, and spend more time assessing the changes proposed by Bill C-76 before making other adjustments to the federal elections process.

Thank you for your time.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you very much.

We'll go next to Ms. Norris, a professor of government relations and laureate fellow from the University of Sydney, and a lecturer in comparative politics at Harvard.

We'll turn to you, Ms. Norris.

Dr. Pippa Norris (Professor of Government Relations and Laureate Fellow, University of Sydney, McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics, Harvard, Director of the Electoral Integrity Project, As an Individual):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. Thank you for the invitation.

First, I very much welcome the legislation. I think trying to modernize electoral administration, expand participation, and regulate third parties is really critical for any sort of electoral integrity. I speak also with my hat on as the director of the electoral integrity project.

The things that are proposed—for example, allowing child care expenses, expanding access for voters with disabilities, modernizing the processes, and in particular restricting foreign influence—are all very positive steps. That being said, I'd like to make three points, essentially about things that could potentially be strengthened or that aren't necessarily highlighted in this bill.

First, of course, is the legal framework. There's no reference to major forms of electoral reform, including things like the mixed member proportional system, which is under discussion in the referendum in British Columbia. Of course, there's no reference at all to legal gender quotas, although currently Canada has a quarter of the Parliament female, which is about average worldwide. New Zealand has 38%, the U.K. has 30%, and so on. Those are two issues that I think are still on the agenda and that need to be addressed.

The second issue is about cybersecurity threats. I do think this helps by, in particular, trying to eliminate foreign influences and making campaign spending more transparent on advertising, but when we look at what has been revealed by the Department of Homeland Security in the United States, we find that this bill doesn't address some of the key issues that are real threats to every western democracy, including Germany, France, the U.K., and Canada. In the United States, for example, the cybersecurity of official records, including, for example, the electoral register, was targeted in 21 states. In five states, Russian hackers are reported to have actually gotten in, looked around, and downloaded files. All we need is that sort of cybersecurity breach in even one or two computers in Elections Canada, or in any of the provinces, and immediately the credibility and legitimacy of the election comes into question, and you end up with great disputes. Maybe the Communications Security Establishment is already doing a tremendous job of looking into this, but perhaps some other legislation or initiation before 2019 is really in order.

Of course, it's not just about the official records of registration. It's not so much the paper ballots, which can be validated. It's the electronic records of states and provincial offices, of course cybersecurity of political parties, and of course regulating bots on social media, which are not addressed in this bill. It's not just the advertising but also the systematic ways in which Russia has tried to influence, through social media, divisions in American society, divisions in Brexit, and divisions in other countries in Europe. All of those are very difficult issues to address because of freedom of expression, but they are things that obviously the government and Elections Canada should put high on its agenda.

The last point is about participation. Again, I think the ideas here are very important. For example, making sure that people who are younger are on the potential register for future elections and expanding accommodation for all persons with disabilities are both important. However, I think we still need some innovative suggestions. Remember, the participation in the last Canadian election was 68.5%. That's higher than in the United States, but amongst most countries we're talking about participation around 75%, or 80% in some European countries. Of course, in Australia we're talking about over 90%. Thinking about other ways to make voting more convenient while preserving security would, again, be a very welcome thing to add.

None of the things that I've suggested can be done before the next 2019 election. It's urgent to get this bill passed, and I recognize that. In future, though, to think about the electoral framework by law, to think about the security threats, and to think about further forms of participation would really strengthen, I think, and go along with the ideas that have been embodied in this report.

Thank you very much for the chance to give some thoughts on the bill.

(1645)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Great. Thank you very much.

We'll now move to Ms. Nagy from Kelowna, former CEO of the Kelowna-Lake Country Green Party of Canada.

You have the floor now for your opening remarks.

Ms. Angela Nagy (Former Chief Executive Officer, Kelowna - Lake Country, Green Party of Canada, As an Individual):

Thank you, and good afternoon. As the CEO of the Kelowna federal Green Party electoral district association, I served here in Kelowna from 2006 to 2015 and was subsequently the chief financial officer of the EDA in 2015 before resigning following the 2015 general election.

I'm pleased to see many of the proposed amendments to the Canada Elections Act, as they address some serious concerns that I raised before, during, and after the 2015 general election, which ultimately led to several complaints being filed with the commissioner of Canada elections. Although not a complainant myself, I provided evidence as part of the investigation that ultimately led to finding Dan Ryder guilty of contravening the Elections Act, for which he entered into a subsequent compliance agreement on May 4, 2018.

Dan Ryder was found to have contravened subsection 363(1) of the act by making a contribution to a candidate while ineligible to do so. This was a result of Green Party signs being purchased and used to support the Liberal Party candidate in the Kelowna—Lake Country riding, which I will explain in a moment. However, I continue to have significant concerns that paragraph 482(b) and potentially other sections of the act and other Canadian laws were violated. Paragraph 482(b) states that every person is guilty of an offence who “by any pretence or contrivance...induces a person to vote or refrain from voting or to vote or refrain from voting for a particular candidate at an election.”

I have evidence to support that indeed voters were suppressed and induced to vote or refrain from voting for a particular candidate in the 2015 general election due to a misinformation campaign that Dan Ryder and the local Liberal Party campaign knowingly started and continued to spread beginning in July 2015, in order to confuse voters and influence the outcome of the 2015 election.

I would like to take this opportunity to walk the committee through a condensed timeline of events and statement of facts that support this concern. In March 2015, Dan Ryder and his wife, Zena Ryder, took out memberships in the Green Party. Shortly after, as CEO of the local EDA, I began receiving correspondence from both of them regarding the idea that they had for electoral fusion or co-operation between the Green Party and the Liberal Party to defeat the Conservative candidate in the upcoming election.

Several months later, a nomination contest was held and the Ryders' straw man candidate, Gary Adams, was nominated based on a platform that he would withdraw from the race and publicly endorse and support the Liberal candidate in the name of the Green Party, with the public commitment to the membership of the Green Party in advance of the vote at the nomination meeting that he would seek approval from the Green Party of Canada prior to undertaking such an approach. This commitment was made after concerns were raised that this approach would be contrary to the constitution of the Green Party of Canada. Unfortunately, regardless of this commitment, the so-called co-operation agreement was officially announced to the media immediately following the nomination meeting, and from then on, a misinformation campaign ensued.

Ultimately, it was found that such an approach was indeed contrary to the constitution of the Green Party of Canada, and the Green Party of Canada disapproved of any endorsement of another candidate or party. Through extensive consultation and discussion, a compromise agreement was struck between the Green Party of Canada, the Kelowna—Lake Country Electoral District Association, the candidate, and his campaign team.

This agreement included the following provisions: The candidate would withdraw. There would be no Green Party support in any overt or official way for any other party or candidate. Any communications about this compromise would be jointly drafted, shared, and approved. No money would be spent by the EDA and no Green Party of Canada resources would be used in furtherance of another party's candidate. Unfortunately, every aspect of this agreement was disregarded. One hundred generic Green Party signs were ordered and positioned next to Liberal Party signs along major roads and on private properties to demonstrate some form of partnership. Several of these signs were used during public Liberal campaign events, photo ops, and “Burma shaving” to demonstrate some kind of official support by the Green Party for the Liberal Party candidate.

Several public statements were also made suggesting that there was indeed an ongoing partnership between the two candidates and parties. Ultimately, I would argue that these statements were fraudulent and intended to mislead or suppress voters. In McEwing v. Canada in 2013, the Federal Court concluded: In the context of the Act as a whole, the object of the Act and the ordinary and grammatical meaning of fraud, it is sufficient to show that a false representation has been made in an attempt to prevent electors from exercising their right to vote for the candidate of their choice:

What I have always been against from the very beginning of this issue is the perversion and manipulation of our electoral process and our democracy.

(1650)



The Green Party of Canada has already made changes to its bylaws to prevent this kind of thing from ever happening again, and I strongly support clause 323 which amends section 481 of the act, which would help to prevent confusion amongst voters through the use of misleading information and material and would support the further strengthening and clarification of the language in this amendment.

To quote the remarks made by Mr. Marc Mayrand,, Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, on March 29, 2012, to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs at the House of Commons, “These are very serious matters that strike at the integrity of our democratic process. If they are not addressed and responded to, they risk undermining an essential ingredient of a healthy democracy, namely the trust that electors have in the electoral process.”

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you for your opening remarks.

Colleagues, we're still having trouble, it appears, connecting to our other witness by video conference. I'm not holding out a lot of hope at this point, but they're going to continue to try.

I'll move us to our rounds of questioning, and if some miracle occurs and we're able to make the connection, we'll go to that witness at the first opportunity. If not, what we'll have to do is, if there is a future opportunity, we would maybe offer it and/or ask for a written brief from the potential witness. Hopefully, we'll get our miracle, but if not, that's what we'll do.

We'll move now to our rounds of questioning. Up first, I have Ms. Romanado for seven minutes.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses for being here today.

My first question is for Ms. Nagy. Your testimony has been received, and from what I understand—I'm looking at a copy of the commissioner of Canada elections' compliance report in front of me—the compliance agreement was between Elections Canada and Dan Ryder, the official agent for the 2015 Green candidate.

I understand the compliance agreement clearly indicates that what occurred was deemed unintentional on the part of Mr. Ryder in his use of Green Party signs, and that, despite a complaint that a thorough investigation of almost two years by Elections Canada was undertaken.... I'm referring to information from the Canada elections commissioner to Mr. Ryder that in the end, the commissioner decided that the allegations were not supported by the available evidence and that, at that point in time, considerable resources had been expended already on the investigation. The commissioner felt that there was no reason to pursue this and that this person went into a compliance agreement with Elections Canada with regard to this.

I also understand that, based on the information that I have, you were aware of this agreement that had been very well communicated to the Green Party members in advance of the writ being dropped in August. The MOU signed by the Green Party membership regarding the agreement between the Liberal Party candidate as well as the Green Party candidate was something that was communicated very extensively to people. People were aware of the fact that this agreement had been put in place.

Even though you had some concerns, you yourself had, based on an email of September 14, 2015 to the Kelowna Green board, asked Elections Canada to confirm in writing if having generic GPC signs out with Liberal signs, given the underlying MOU, could get you in any hot water if any party wanted to charge you with inadvertently supporting the Liberal Party's campaign.

He had already clarified, as I believe someone did to you, that it was fine from Elections Canada's perspective if Liberal and Green signs appeared together because of our unique situation. I want to be extra sure that we can push back against criticism.

From what I understand, Elections Canada had communicated that this was fine by them, and maybe the rules need to be tweaked based on what happened, but at that time, from what I understand, you were instructed that it was fine to have both Green Party signs and Liberal Party signs at an event.

Subsequent to the election and a complaint, it was decided that a compliance agreement would be put in place and that it will be looked at going forward. Maybe that's the point of your testimony here today, to look into that, whether or not in such an agreement be put in place if it were to occur again in a subsequent election.

I wanted to clarify the record to make sure that we all understood that.

My next question is for Professor Norris.

Professor Norris, you talked about issues that you think we should address in Bill C-76. You talked about the legal framework, including mixed member proportional, gender quotas, cybersecurity threats, and participation.

Out of those that you talked about, in terms of Bill C-76, what would be the priority? We just heard from a previous panel, and cybersecurity is obviously something we're hearing a lot about right now. Obviously we all want higher participation rate, and I think in Australia, if I remember correctly, it's mandatory voting. Obviously, with mandatory voting, 90% is fantastic.

(1655)

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, it just shows that one in 10 didn't obey the law.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

When I say mandatory voting is at 90% I'm happy it's higher than 60% here in Canada. Let me correct that.

I know the electoral reform committee came back with not putting in mandatory voting, so that might not be possible in our case. With respect to the other two issues you asked us to address, what would your recommendation be?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Witnesses, if you're asked a question by the members, you don't need my permission to answer. Feel free to go ahead. I'll let you know when your time is up.

Dr. Pippa Norris:

Thank you.

Those are three different issues. Electoral reform is an incredibly difficult process and cannot be implemented anyway in the time you have before 2019. That's an issue I wanted to peg for future debate in Parliament and to think it through. Participation is a very long-term process, and I think some of the initiatives here, for example, allowing Elections Canada and the commissioner to engage in civic education and civic information is absolutely vital. I'm really pleased that's been restored.

One threat that I think absolutely has to be addressed is cybersecurity and fake news, one of the issues that we all know is being debated widely. For example, Germany very recently passed new legislation that made it the responsibility of the major social media platforms to monitor what was going on and where they were able to detect examples of Russian influence in particular. Social bots can be detected through technology to make sure that the media platforms are responsible for that and that they would be fined if, for example, they found instances of hate speech or other things. We know how divisive that was. The Russians essentially seeded information into the American campaign on both sides.

A lot of that information fuelled racial hatred either from those who claimed that the police were responsible or those who claimed the African American community was responsible. It's an incredibly difficult issue to monitor effectively but I think that's a danger for Canada as well. We don't want social intolerance, lack of social trust, and Canadian democracy to be polarized by foreign messages that aren't simply advertising.

As I read the bill, advertising for third parties, partisan advertising, is covered but these other forms of information communications aren't necessarily being covered, and that I would think Elections Canada or the broadcast regulators or other agencies should look into very hard.

(1700)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you very much.

We'll now move to Mr. McCauley for seven minutes for our next round of questioning.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Welcome, everyone.

Ms. Nagy, I wanted to explore a bit more about the compliance or the issues you ran into. Could you tell me a bit more of your thoughts about the interparty collusion that happened in the last election?

Ms. Angela Nagy:

The main concern I have is that there was no endorsement of the memorandum of understanding by any official party, the members of the party in advance of the vote that saw Gary Adams nominated as our candidate. A commitment was made to the members at the nomination meeting that this concept of partnership and co-operation would be undertaken only with the consent of the Green Party of Canada.

Ultimately, after several months of negotiation and discussion, it was determined and agreed to by all parties that there would be no formal endorsement of any other candidate or any other party, but that continued to happen regardless of that agreement and commitment undertaken by all parties. Ultimately, that led to voters being confused, misled about what had happened and what was going on. They were led to believe there was a partnership between the Green Party of Canada and the Liberal Party when there was not.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Do you believe it was unintentional, as commented on?

Ms. Angela Nagy:

What may have been unintentional—and I agree—we both sought clarification from Elections Canada....

I raised several times that I believed we were contravening sections of the act, and I was disappointed when the feedback from Elections Canada was that the concept of using these signs was so interesting and they said you can use the signs. The fact that $700 or $800 was spent on 100 signs may have been an unintentional mistake that did not mean to contravene the Elections Act. This misinformation campaign to make it look like there was a partnership between the Green Party and the Liberal Party was 100% intentional and had been planned—

(1705)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

The spending oversight was unintentional. The actual campaigning was—

Ms. Angela Nagy:

Misleading of voters.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay.

Do you think the issue needs to be addressed better by Elections Canada, or the act strengthened on this matter?

Ms. Angela Nagy:

I was really excited to see clause 323 proposing to amend section 481 of the Canada Elections Act around misleading publications. That essentially refers to any form of communication that could mislead voters and that contains false statements. There were numerous false statements and numerous documents, including the use of the Green Party signs, that were strategically used to confuse and mislead voters.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Right.

Do you think the compliance agreement is strong enough?

Ms. Angela Nagy:

I don't. I actually believe that upon further investigation, it could be found that voters were misled.

What I understand from the letter I received from the commissioner of Canada elections was that a complaint regarding a violation of paragraph 482(b) would be difficult to prove, because it would require some form of an inquiry or a survey of voters to determine if voters indeed were confused about what was going on.

I believe that Elections Canada should investigate that further and determine if voters were confused. I have evidence, and I have witnesses who have raised concerns with me that they believed there was a partnership, and that influenced how they voted.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Great, thanks very much.

Mr. Aylward, welcome.

I was teasing him earlier. I've been trying to track him down for two years to talk about Phoenix. Here you are in front of me, so I'd like to go to Phoenix now. No, I'm just kidding.

Congratulations on your election as president. I'm hoping you didn't use Russian influence to win that role.

PSAC spent about $390,000, I think it was, on the last election. A very small amount of it was an offset for, I think, labour in kind. The large amount, I think, was advertising goods. Do you have a breakdown of that?

Mr. Chris Aylward:

I don't have an exact breakdown in front of me, but with respect to the $390,000, you're right. It was just a little over $390,000. A lot of it was spent on paying an external company—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I saw that: Uppercut.

Mr. Chris Aylward:

—to create materials and to place ads, which included billboards, and radio spots obviously. We created a micro-website as well, with videos, downloadable posters, and action letters, etc., for our members to use.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I want to go back to Phoenix, because my life seems to revolve around Phoenix. Obviously, it's a big issue right now, and we've heard comments that it might be an election issue.

How do you think Bill C-76 is going to affect PSAC's ability to communicate to its members about, say, Phoenix being an election issue?

Mr. Chris Aylward:

That's part of the presentation. What we can do is going to be limited under what's being proposed in the bill. We believe that it's not only our democratic right but our responsibility to be able to communicate to our members, many of whom—approximately 140,000 of the 180,000 we represent—are federal public sector workers.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay, thanks.

I'm running out of time, so I'm going to pop over to Ms. Norris.

What do you think is the best way to stop foreign meddling in elections? We've seen, for example, the U.S. Treasury investigating Russia, and money going into Tides foundation, which has found its way into Canada. We have interference on two different fronts.

What's the best way to prevent this?

Dr. Pippa Norris:

Thinking about foreign influence comes through many different mechanisms. Some of that is really the provisions that are going to be here on things like campaign spending and making sure there are regulations on third parties, if money is being challenged through third parties. It's often the case that you get other forms of influence coming in, as well as disinformation campaigns that are spread by Canadians or spread by Americans, which are seeded by international organizations, particularly Russia in the case of some of the most recent issues.

I don't think any government has a golden rule as to how you can address this, but we're certainly starting to learn. The European Union quite recently has produced a major report looking into this, involving cybersecurity experts and also people who are experts in political communication as well as people who are interested in campaigning, and they give some recommendations about how they think they need to protect European Union countries from these sorts of influences.

Similarly, the Department of Homeland Security came out in February with its report. I think we can learn from it. What you need is really a consortium of some of the best practices that are developing in campaigns across western democracies, as everyone is confronted with this issue. I think also the evidence suggests that the problem is not so much the vote, because of the influence of social media or direct attempts at hacking that have really turned the vote in some of the states in America. The problem is actually about social tolerance and the broader messages that these sorts of activities involve and the fact that the news becomes not credible, so you also don't believe public broadcasting and newspapers because of the climate of fake news that is so much surrounding you through social media.

The short answer is to learn from some of the other government reports. I'm very happy to send the committee the links to some of these that have recently come out from the European Commission and from others.

(1710)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thanks very much.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

You mentioned the links. If you want to share those with the committee, you can provide those to our clerk, and they can be distributed to the committee that way.

We have had a great occurrence happen that we have been able to.... It was a miracle, in my words. I guess I was a little too pessimistic. I don't predict well, apparently. I won't even tell anyone who I chose to win the election in Ontario today.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The Rhinoceros Party.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

We'll see if another miracle occurs. Two miracles in one day might be too much to hope for, but we certainly did receive one.

We now have with us Leonid Sirota, lecturer at Auckland University of Technology. We've finally been able to patch him in. We'll go to his opening remarks now, and we still will have an opportunity for at least one round of questioning by each party.

Mr. Sirota, your opportunity is now.

Mr. Leonid Sirota (Lecturer, Auckland University of Technology, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee. I'm terribly sorry for whatever has happened here. Thanks for having me.

I will start by commenting on one thing that Bill C-76 does, which is to lift restrictions on Canadians who are voting overseas, abroad, like me. Maybe this is special pleading on my part, but I will be happy to answer questions on why I think it's constitutionally a very commendable thing to do.

I will focus on the ways in which Bill C-76 continues or, indeed, increases some restrictions in Canadian election law on freedom of expression. Freedom of expression is central to the elections, and the elections are central to freedom of expression. This connection was recognized a long time ago by Canadian courts, well before the charter. F.R. Scott, the great constitutional scholar, once wrote that as long as the word “parliament” is in the Constitution, we have a bill of rights. That was the case before the charter, and yet no debate in Canadian society is as regulated as the one that occurs during election campaigns. Some of these regulations are important and necessary, some not so much.

I will focus on three particular restrictions on freedom of expression in Bill C-76.

The first of those is the definition of “election advertising”. The bill continues from the existing Canada Elections Act. The problem I see with it is that the exemptions it provides for communications from individuals and groups apply both to individuals and groups so long as communications are through traditional media, newspaper editorials, and that sort of thing, but so far as the Internet is concerned, only personal communications by individuals are exempted from the definition of “election advertising” and not the communications of groups. I see no good reason for that distinction. I see no good reason that, for example, the president of a union can tweet under his or her own name, but not under the institutional account of that union. I see, again, no reason for this difference. I think the definition should be amended to be technologically neutral.

The second point is the pre-campaign communications that Bill C-76 would restrict. Those restrictions are not in the current Canada Elections Act. In the Harper case, where the Supreme Court upheld restrictions on third party communications during election campaigns, the court said that one reason restriction was acceptable in a free and democratic society is that political speech is not restricted except during election campaigns.

While some people have said the absence of regulations on pre-campaign communications is a loophole that needs to be closed, in my view, it's actually an important constitutional safeguard that must be preserved. The British Columbia Court of Appeal considered restrictions on pre-campaign communications twice, and both times said they were unconstitutional. Now, the laws at issue were not exactly the same as Bill C-76—they were broader—so I'm not making a prediction on how the Supreme Court would rule on what's in Bill C-76, but at least there is a non-trivial chance that Bill C-76 is unconstitutional.

More importantly, the issue is one of principle. The problem that restrictions on pre-campaign communications are supposed to address is not called a “three-month campaign”. It's called a “permanent campaign”. The problem is that three months will not be enough to remedy the so-called issue with a permanent campaign. My concern is that Bill C-76 is a first step on the road to long-term and perhaps permanent restrictions on political communications in Canada, and it's not a road that we want to walk.

The final point I want to address is the restrictions on third party communications, both before and during the campaign. The Supreme Court has upheld what's in the Canada Elections Act now, but that's just the constitutional baseline. That doesn't mean Parliament cannot be more protective of freedom of expression than the Supreme Court. It's important to remember who third parties are. It's a term of art in election law, but what does it mean? It just means civil society. It means individuals. It means unions. It means groups. It might mean the scary rich, but in the Canadian experience, for the most part, third parties that want to communicate during elections are mostly unions.

(1715)



Some people, like Professor Tom Flanagan, have said, “Great. We want to curb those people's freedom of expression.” I actually happen to agree with Professor Flanagan's dim view of unions. I don't agree with his view of freedom of expression. I think that whether or not we like people, they should be free to communicate.

The caps on third party spending in the Canada Elections Act now and those that will be under Bill C-76 are very low. They are less than 2% of what political parties are allowed to spend.

By comparison, in New Zealand, which is actually ranked higher in the transparency international corruption rankings than Canada is—it pains me as a Canadian, but there it is—the spending caps are at about 7.5%. This is a less restrictive regime. It's still a very low cap. There is no danger that third parties will interfere with communications by political parties themselves, but it's a more permissive regime than the one under Bill C-76.

The last thing I will note, also in relation to third parties, are the thresholds. For registration it is $500. As soon as you spend $500, you're required to register. Once you spend $10,000, you're required to submit to auditing. These rules are bound to be a deterrent to freedom of expression. They are very low thresholds. There is no reasonable chance that somebody spending $500, or even $10,000, is going to swing an election. They, as I said, are deterrents to public participation. These should be raised.

I will give you the figures by way of comparison. In New Zealand, the registration threshold is at about $12,000 Canadian. The reporting threshold for expenses, not auditing but just the report, must be filed once you spend about $90,000 Canadian. The electoral commission can require an audit, but nobody is obliged to submit to one.

Again, New Zealand does not seem to have a huge political corruption problem. It would be an example to at least consider it, maybe hopefully follow, in providing more room for members of a civil society to express this.

Thank you. I'm looking forward to your questions.

(1720)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you very much.

We'll now return to our rounds of questioning.

Mr. Cullen, for seven minutes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aylward, did you want to react to Mr. Sirota's comment that he might not like unions, but he believes in your freedom to speak?

Mr. Chris Aylward:

I don't share the dim view, obviously, on unions.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That wasn't part of your election campaign?

Mr. Chris Aylward:

No, it wasn't.

I certainly share the view that we shouldn't be restricted on our freedom to speak, and to speak on behalf of our members.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Give me the scenario you're worried about.

To take that issue, Phoenix is, was, and sounds like it might even continue to be a big issue for a while. You go into the next campaign. You write to your members and say something about Phoenix; you share something on social media or your members, then, organize to have some sort of conversation with candidates about Phoenix.

Are you worried that your speech will be restricted to raise an issue-based campaign, under this bill as it's currently drawn up?

Mr. Chris Aylward:

Yes, and I'm going to refer this to Ms. Ballantyne.

Ms. Morna Ballantyne (Special Assistant to the National President, Public Service Alliance of Canada):

There's an issue of principle involved, but there are also issues of practicality.

If this law were enforced right now, first of all, we would have to try to interpret what is political activity, partisan activity, and what is partisan advertising. There's also the issue of surveys. If this law were passed, we would have to start tracking now all the activity that we're engaged in that might be considered at a later date to be partisan advertising or partisan activity.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see. That, I assume, would have a chill effect on—

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

It has a huge chill effect, and we saw that in the 2015 election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How did you see that?

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

What we got originally was a fair amount of confusion, first of all, on the point that was made about whether or not transmission of messages through the Internet or through social media was, in fact, advertising. It took a long time to get an interpretation. I don't know if it stands, because it's not in this bill, but the interpretation was that it wasn't advertising. For an amount of time we just stopped communicating in that way, because we were concerned it would be deemed to be advertising.

Our concern wasn't so much the financial limits, because—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the interpretation of it.

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

It's the interpretation, and it's the chill, it's the tracking, and it's the fear of being in non-conformity with the law and what the consequences would be if we were found to have violated the law.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The risk is not worth any potential benefit in being found out—

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the chill effect on freedom of speech.

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

Yes, especially when we got an interpretation that if we were to hold a rally.... Remember, we were in collective bargaining. A major issue, as we know, was sick leave. This was an issue that was clearly identified with a political party, but so were other political parties talking about the issue. We would have had to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Even the holding of a rally—

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

We couldn't have picket signs. We couldn't have banners that mentioned our main message and our main demand. Remember, we're a public sector union, and we are constantly making demands of governments. It's impossible to separate the issue of government from political parties: that is who government is.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's interesting. There's that crossover between what is government and what is a political party, and the ability to simply raise an issue, whether it's sick leave, as it was in this case, or a Phoenix issue, or, on an oil company's behalf, energy issues. The crossover between what is an issue against or countering the government and what has now become a partisan activity—

Ms. Morna Ballantyne: That's right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: —is blurry enough that you think it would chill civil society or all third parties from speaking up.

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

We can't speak on behalf of all civil society—

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Well, from your perspective—

Ms. Morna Ballantyne: —but I can tell you and testify that it had a chill effect on our activity as a union representing and negotiating on behalf of members.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I appreciate that.

Professor Norris, I have a question for you. Would your suggestion be that we move towards the German model with respect to accountability for Facebook and other social media platforms in terms of their responsibility, their culpability, in spreading disinformation?

Dr. Pippa Norris:

I think it's a really important thing to look at the best practice, which is still developing and is still very new, and to look at it in terms of what the private sector is doing. For example, Facebook has many more employees in trying to monitor its own activities. For Twitter, ditto. New rules in terms of transparency and privacy have also been really critical for this, but it's really about trying to learn from different governments to see what can be best confronted—

(1725)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

One of the questions that we're also talking about here is in terms of participation, and not just the participation of voters but also the diversity of those who seek to represent voters. A very good aspect of this bill is that child care costs, as I think you mentioned, can now be used as an election expense. You've also written about trying to get more women in particular into the system, which is what this primarily directed towards, I would estimate, but not necessarily.

I'll quote you here. You've said: There’s a strong association between the type of electoral system adopted and the representation of women. Proportional representation electoral systems tend to have twice as many women in parliament than those that use first-past-the-post or single member plurality....

If you were forced to choose between provisions that exist within Bill C-76 and provisions that would, say, bring in the government's promise and bring in a more proportional system, and if the only lens you were looking through was greater diversity for our 75%-male-dominated Parliament, which would you choose?

Dr. Pippa Norris:

Fortunately, it isn't a trade-off, as you know.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, good, You'd do both.

Dr. Pippa Norris:

If you get more women and more minorities so that the Parliament looks more like Canada, that actually expands participation as well.

As you know, I started off with the two provisions, which really would both expand representation, one of which is electoral reform towards a mixed-member proportional system, which many other countries have now moved towards. It retains the virtues of first past the post and the constituency service, but mixes it with a proportional outcome. The second is legal gender quotas, which have been implemented in a hundred countries around world. Canada always used to be very positive in terms of female representation, but it has lagged behind. It's had fits and starts.

Both of those legal changes would be good, but you couldn't implement them by the 2019 election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Ms. Nagy, I was reflecting as you were telling your story about what happened in Kelowna. I was trying to recall when I saw signs being grabbed, and I saw it when I was an observer at the federal Liberal selection of Stéphane Dion as leader. People were grabbing other leadership signs and sticking them together to suggest that Bob Rae and Michael Ignatieff had formed a coalition, and other people were ripping the signs back from them.

Maybe what you observed was just a long tradition—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: —within a party to try to represent something that wasn't true through the simple usage of sign placement. It was quite amazing to watch. It was Liberal-on-Liberal violence and it was breathtaking.

I don't mean to diminish what you saw in Kelowna, but perhaps you'll take some comfort in knowing that it wasn't just done against the Green Party. Maybe there are equal-opportunity abusers of signs.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Mr. Cullen's time is up, Ms. Nagy, but if you do have a very brief response, feel free to respond. Make it brief, please.

Ms. Angela Nagy:

Sure thing.

I do think it is a legitimate concern that in any riding or election, another party or candidate could use another party's signs or logo to suggest a partnership that doesn't exist in order to intentionally confuse voters.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you. I appreciate your keeping it brief.

We have two questioners left. We'll have Mr. Graham for two minutes and then Mr. Reid for the last two minutes. That will wrap up this panel.

Mr. Graham, the floor is yours.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Ms. Nagy, with regard to the investigation of the Green Party's activities in Kelowna—Lake Country in 2015, the investigation is closed and no findings were made against any of the parties. Is that correct?

Ms. Angela Nagy:

That is not correct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What findings were made against somebody else, and what investigation remains open?

Ms. Angela Nagy:

The investigation is closed, but Dan Ryder was found to be in contravention of subsection 363(1) of the act.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That was deemed unintentional. The investigation is closed and the file is finished. If you have additional evidence, why was it not provided at that time?

Ms. Angela Nagy:

Well, the letter I received from the election commissioner stated that the additional concern that had been raised by other complainants regarding inducing an individual from voting or to refrain from voting for another candidate would be difficult to prove. It doesn't mean it did not happen. It just stated that it would be difficult to prove.

I still have grave concerns with that, because “difficult to prove” and “factual” are two very different things.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see.

Mr. Aylward, I have a question for you. On December 3, 2012, I was in Ottawa as a staffer at the time, and I saw a plane flying around Ottawa with a great big sign behind it saying, “Stephen Harper nous deteste”. Do you remember this incident?

Mr. Chris Aylward:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you tell us a little bit more about that and what it cost PSAC? What happened to that airplane?

Mr. Chris Aylward:

I can tell you what happened to the airplane. The airplane was basically taken down as a result of a request.

(1730)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You shot down a plane over Ottawa?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Chris Aylward:

No. It landed safely in Ottawa as a result of a request to land the plane.

As to exactly what that cost us, I don't know just off the top of my head. It was in the air for a short period of time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would you consider that third party advertising pre-writ?

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

Do you mean legally?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm asking for your opinion.

Ms. Morna Ballantyne:

Under the existing law, it would depend on when the plane was flying—seriously—and it would seem that it would also depend on the exact wording of the banner behind it.

The other comment I would make, just to get back to some of the practicalities—I think as a committee you have a responsibility to figure out how this act could actually work—is the example of the PSAC. It's a very large organization, and decisions are made by different components with respect to how to represent their members and how to engage in political activity that would represent their members. A lot of these decisions don't get made centrally, and yet under the Elections Act we have a central responsibility to be able to track and report under this legislation between elections. That's one of our challenges.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

We'll turn to Mr. Reid for our final two minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I have two questions, or possibly only one, for Professor Sirota.

First of all, Leonid, it's good to see you again. I want to dwell on what I think is the central theme of what you're drawing attention to, which is that there are a number of restrictions on Canadians' charter rights contained in Bill C-76. You mentioned voting by Canadians overseas and how this deals with a charter challenge that's under way right now.

I'll just observe that there are still Canadian citizens living overseas who will be exempted from voting. For those who were born overseas, I'm not sure that from a constitutional point of view I see the distinction that their charter rights are somehow inferior to those of their parents. I guess if you argue that the section 3 right to vote is subsidiary to or limited by section 1, then you can make that argument, but I don't think that's the direction in which the Supreme Court has been heading, given that it allows prisoners to vote and so on.

More substantially, I think you raised a really interesting point. If we are fighting against the idea that there is a permanent campaign, and we want to say as a society that we don't want there to be a permanent campaign, then, I think you're implying, we start heading down a slippery slope in saying that we have to restrict political speech further and further out from the actual election date versus the writ period. Then it's this pre-writ period that starts on June 30 that will inevitably be found inadequate after zillions of dollars get spent in the next election prior to June 30, and then we will see further restrictions.

Is there a danger that we're heading in the direction of seeing substantial restrictions on freedom of speech, or is that too much fearmongering?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Before you begin, Mr. Sirota, I'd ask that you try to keep it brief, because we have reached the end of the time for the panel here. Please give a response, but a fairly brief one, if you can.

Mr. Leonid Sirota:

On the first question, I think it's a good point.

On the second question, yes, I think that's major. Now, whoever wants to do [Technical difficulty—Editor] is up to you and your colleagues in Canadian [Technical difficulty—Editor] in Parliament bringing forward, and also [Technical difficulty—Editor] putting an end to it at some point. I don't know where that point might be, so I think it's primarily your responsibility. Calls are made already to June 30 and up [Technical difficulty—Editor] and yes, I don't know as a matter of principle, [Technical difficulty—Editor] expression [Technical difficulty—Editor]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay, thank you very much.

Thank you to all of our witnesses for being here.

Mr. Sirota, we apologize that things didn't quite work out so that you could be here for the whole thing, but we're glad we were able to have you join us.

Thank you to all of you for your contribution.

We'll suspend briefly to set up for the next panel.

(1730)

(1735)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

I call the meeting back to order.

We have our final panel of witnesses for today.

We are joined by Kevin Chan, who is head of public policy at Facebook. He is with us in the room.

By video conference, from Washington D.C., we have Michele Austin, who is the head of government, public policy and philanthropy at Twitter Canada; and Carlos Monje, director of public policy from Twitter. We are happy to have you both here.

Before we turn to the opening statements, I will mention that we have a couple of items here from Mr. Chan. We have his opening statement, with portions of it in each official language, but it is not translated so that we have the whole statement in both official languages.

If we want to distribute that, and also pass around a letter that he would like to have distributed that he received from the office of the commissioner of Canada elections, which is only in one official language, we would have to have unanimous consent.

Do we have unanimous consent?

An hon. member: No.

The Chair: There is not unanimous consent, so I will not be distributing that.

We will turn the floor over to Mr. Chan for his opening remarks.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Who said no?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, I didn't see.

There is nothing on our witnesses—

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Mr. Chan, never mind the confusion in the room, the floor is yours.

Mr. Kevin Chan (Global Director and Head of Public Policy, Facebook Canada, Facebook Inc.):

Thank you very much.

Mr. Chair and members of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, thank you for the invitation to appear before you today. My name is Kevin Chan, and I am the head of public policy for Facebook Canada.

I want to begin by acknowledging the importance of the subject at hand today, the integrity of our elections.

Facebook stands for bringing us closer together and building community, creating a healthy environment for civic engagement. It is crucial to our mission as a company. We know that a service that fosters inclusive, informative, and civically engaged communities is critically important to the people who use Facebook. [Translation]

I want to point out that we know how vital a platform Facebook is for your respective political parties and leaders in engaging citizens, and that it is an important means of communication that Canadians use to contact you directly. The Prime Minister used Facebook Live last week to announce Canada's new tariffs on the United States.

The leader of the opposition recently took part in a question and answer session with Canadians via Facebook, and the NDP leader live-streamed on Facebook his speech at the recent Kinder Morgan rally on Parliament Hill.

We recognize that Facebook is an important tool for civic engagement and that is why we take our responsibility to election integrity on our platforms so seriously.[English]

In Canada, we understand the degree to which Facebook is a key platform for your respective political parties and leaders as well as an important way for Canadians to engage directly with you. The Prime Minister used Facebook Live last week to announce Canada's new tariffs on the United States. The Leader of the Opposition recently engaged in a Q and A session directly with Canadians on Facebook. As well, the leader of the NDP live-streamed his speech at the recent Kinder Morgan rally on Parliament Hill.

We recognize that Facebook is an important tool for civic engagement, and that is why we take our responsibility for election integrity on our platform so seriously. We have been engaged on the issue of election integrity in Canada for many years. Following the last federal election in 2015, the Office of the Commissioner of Canada Elections noted that Facebook's “cooperation and swift action on a number of key files helped us to quickly resolve a number of issues and ultimately ensure compliance with the Canada Elections Act”. It is our full intention to be equally vigilant in the next federal election in 2019. As referenced by the chair, a copy of the entire letter from the Office of the Commissioner of Canada Elections to Facebook has been sent to the committee for your consideration.

As you may know, the Communications Security Establishment published last year a report outlining various cyber-threats to the next federal election and identified two areas that Facebook sees a role in addressing: one, cybersecurity—the hacking into the online accounts of candidates and political parties; and two, the spreading of misinformation online.

In response, we launched last fall our Canadian election integrity initiative, which consists of the following five elements. First, to address cybersecurity, one, we launched a Facebook “Cyber Hygiene Guide” created specifically for Canadian politicians and political parties. It provides key information for how everyone who is administering a political figure or party's Facebook presence can help keep their accounts and pages secure. Second, we are offering cyber-hygiene training to all of the federal political parties. Third, we launched a new cyber-threat email line for federal politicians and political parties. This email line is a direct pipe into our security team at Facebook and will help enable quick response for compromised pages or accounts. Fourth, to address misinformation online, we have partnered with MediaSmarts, Canada's centre for digital and media literacy on a two-year project to develop thinking, resources, and public service announcements on how to spot misinformation online. This initiative, which we are calling “reality check”, includes lesson plans, interactive online missions, and videos and guides that will promote the idea that verifying information is an essential life and citizenship skill. Fifth, we launched our ads transparency test, called “view ads” here in Canada last November. This test, which is ongoing, allows anybody in Canada to view all ads a page is running, even if they are not in the intended audience. All advertisers on Facebook are subject to “view ads”, but we recognize that it is an important part of our civic engagement efforts. Candidates running for office and organizations engaged in political advertising should be held accountable for what they say to citizens, and this feature gives people the chance to see all the things a candidate or organization is saying to everyone. This is a higher level of ads transparency than currently exists for any type of advertising online or offline.

The “Cyber Hygiene Guide” and more information about these five initiatives can be found at facebookcanadianelectionintegrityinitiative.com. I have also circulated copies of the “Cyber Hygiene Guide” to this committee for your consideration. This is only phase one of our Canadian election integrity initiative, and we intend to launch additional measures to address cybersecurity and misinformation online in the lead-up to the 2019 federal election.

I want to also share with you some measures we have taken in advance of the Ontario election happening today. We conducted outreach to all Ontario candidate page administrators, sharing best practices to keep their accounts secure and ensuring that they have access to our cyber-threats crisis line. We sent an in-app notification to all Ontario candidate page administrators, which appeared at the top of their feed, reminding them to turn on two-factor authentication, and we launched a new MediaSmarts “reality check” public service announcement focused on how to access the validity of information online during a campaign. This video, which has been running since May 3, has been viewed more than 680,000 times. We will be rolling out similar initiatives for other provincial elections in Canada in the months to come.

With respect to Bill C-76, the elections modernization act, it is legislation that is about a broad range of election issues, many beyond the scope of Facebook. Bill C-76 does include a provision to require organizations selling advertising space to not knowingly accept elections advertisements from foreign entities. We support this provision.

(1740)



Thank you again for the opportunity to appear before you today, and I will be pleased to answer your questions.

(1745)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you, Mr. Chan.

I will mention to the committee that with regard to the letter that I referred to, which we didn't have unanimous consent for, the clerk will have it translated for us and when it is translated, we'll distribute it. Obviously, it won't be today.

We'll now turn to Mr. Monje for opening remarks.

Mr. Carlos Monje (Director of Public Policy, Twitter - United States and Canada, Twitter Inc.):

Thank you, Chair, for the invitation to appear today and for the opportunity to share our perspective.

My name is Carlos Monje. I'm the director of policy and philanthropy for Canada and the United States. With me is Ms. Michele Austin, the head of government, public policy, and philanthropy at Twitter Canada.

I apologize that we are not able to be with you today, though I was pleased to travel to Ottawa in January to brief Elections Canada and the Office of the Minister of Democratic Institutions on Twitter's approach to information quality, generally, and ads transparency, specifically.

Twitter connects people to what's happening around the world. One of the reasons people come to Twitter is that it is the best place to engage with and learn from political leaders and policy advocates. Twitter works with political parties across Canada to connect them with users, including through advertising.

We are committed to increasing transparency for all ads on Twitter, including political ads. In late 2017, we announced first steps in a series of changes on our platform to further promote freedom of expression, privacy, and transparency. Specifically, Twitter has launched a program to dramatically increase ads transparency. In addition to providing additional transparency for all advertising on the platform, we are piloting an effort in the United States to protect the integrity of our platform and our users by imposing additional eligibility restrictions and certification requirements on all advertisers who wish to purchase political ads.

We're going to increase awareness of paid political messaging by appending a visual badge on the face of paid political communications to make it clear when users see or engage with the political ad.

We're going to include disclaimer information regardless of the method of advertising—whether that's text, graphics, video, or a combination of those—in the most technologically practical way, and we're launching a political ads transparency centre that will provide users with additional details regarding the targeting demographics of each political campaign ad and the organization that funded it.

Once we have analyzed our U.S. experience with this pilot, and have made the necessary refinements, we will launch it to other markets, including Canada. There are ways in which digital communications are functionally and technologically different from ads placed on other media, including television, radio, and airplanes, as we heard in the panel beforehand.

We offer self-service to give advertisers control over what products they want to use on our platform and who sees them. Advertisers also create their own content. Often advertisers will use multiple advertising tools on the platform, using media like video or creating an emoji. Advertisers will often want to manage more than one @ handle associated with their brand. They want to work with multiple internal team members, with partners, with agencies, or with clients who also have access to that account. Advertisers often want to update or change content quickly as the campaign unfolds in real time.

Twitter supports the intentions of Bill C-76, the election modernization act. Twitter supports efforts to provide clear rules to advertisers who wish to purchase paid political communications on digital media and devices.

We ask the committee for some clarity, specifically around two clauses in the bill—clauses 282.4 and 491.2—which regulate how ads are sold and how the new rules will be enforced. These concerns include how “intent” and “knowingly” will be measured and proven with regard to hosting ads, how Elections Canada will enforce these changes, how suspicious activity will be reported, the ability of Elections Canada to act in real time, and misidentifying accounts of real users and how that will be remedied.

Twitter will need more time to complete our due diligence on the proposed changes and on how the platform will comply with them to host advertising, including by political parties.

In conclusion, Twitter is dedicated to and proud of our users' and advertisers' rights to speak freely. We also believe that giving users more context about political advertising is key to a healthier democratic debate. We look forward to continuing our work to improve our services and to working with you.

We look forward to your questions.

Thank you.

(1750)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you very much.

We will go right to those questions.

We'll start with Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

I think, as for all of us around the table, that mine is a bit of a conflicted experience, because we're probably all on Facebook and Twitter and we see them as effective tools to communicate with our constituents—I've even communicated with them today, regarding questions that were answered on my posts—but there's a very dark side to both of your platforms and I don't know that either of your organizations has really done much to combat that.

I'll give an example—and I don't mean to focus on Facebook, because Twitter is just as complicit.

It's an experience that happened to me. I had a small group of white supremacists protesting outside of my office, but just a few of them. I made the mistake of calling them white supremacists on Facebook and the white supremacist community came down on me. I searched through the organizer's Facebook page and I came across a post he had. I don't want to mention the MP's name because I don't want to bring them into this debate. I know Facebook has received a copy of this ad and you gave me the glossy handbook of what to do with offensive content.

The ad had a picture of the MP, identified that MP as an immigrant, and this individual said, “Canadian sniper takes out a target at 3 km. No one can put a bullet in this douche canoes head? Seriously come on people”. I clicked on that—someone calling on the assassination of an elected Canadian member of Parliament—and said that this really is offensive and that in the wide frame of what is free speech, clearly this is on the other side. I got a message back that, “This didn't violate our community standards”. Then I sent it to the minister's office because I know the minister's office is in communication with Facebook, and that message continued.

If that doesn't violate the community standards of your organization, Mr. Chan, how can we trust you to engage in any of these promises that you're going to assist in preserving our democracy? It just seems that making as much money as possible is the goal, which is fine—that's what corporations do—but there doesn't seem to be any accountability back to the people that a newspaper would have or another organization would have.

I'll open the floor to you. It's not translated, and I know you've received a copy of it, but could you comment on this and about how we can trust your organization?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you for the question, sir. I have to admit, since you didn't refer to it, I don't know specifically which piece of content this is, but if it is the one I'm thinking of, I believe you'll discover that it's no longer on the platform.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's no longer on the platform. Is it because I'm a member of Parliament who's brought it through the minister's office, who has then brought it to your attention? No one has that level of access.

Following this—

Mr. Kevin Chan: So I—

Mr. Chris Bittle: Sorry. Let me finish.

Following that, as it didn't violate community standards, when the death threats started against me on your platform, I didn't bother reporting them. I reported them to the RCMP and corporate security, but why bother going through that exercise? If a call for assassination isn't a violation, why should I bother reporting the death threats to me? Both organizations are difficult platforms to regulate, and there doesn't seem to be a great deal of assistance. I know, Mr. Chan, that you have a plan to come up with a plan in phase two, before the next election, but where does that leave us? It's a very frightening thing. We've seen the results in Britain and in the United States, and see how divisive politics is becoming in all of our countries and the potential for foreign actors to be using that. I need more answers than, “We're going to come up with a plan”.

(1755)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

May I, sir?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes, please.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

With all due respect, I think what I just went through in my opening statement is more than just a plan. We are actually implementing things on the platform, including “view ads”. When it was launched in November as a product whereby anybody can see all the ads that are running on Facebook, it didn't exist anywhere else in the world.

The Canadian election integrity initiative is not a plan. It, in fact, is implemented. We have done the same thing in Ontario— but let me return to that in a moment.

To answer your specific question, now that I have a copy of this in front of me, my understanding is that this content is no longer on Facebook. With respect to general content on Facebook, we are governed by a set of community standards that are universal in nature, and you can read up on that at facebook.com/communitystandards. The standards actually do, in fact, prohibit hate speech and bullying. They also prohibit things like the glorification or the promotion of violence and terrorism and things like that.

What I would say to you, sir, is that when people are actually confronted with content that may be in violation of the community standards...in fact it's designed so that anybody can report this stuff to Facebook. I would actually respectfully disagree that it's not who you know; it's actually just being able to report these things. That's the whole point of having a global platform. If they violate the community standards, then they violate the standards, and the content will be taken down. That's actually how it works.

I would say, more broadly speaking—and I think you alluded to it, sir—that the challenge with a distribution platform, obviously, is that we want to be very careful about giving people the opportunity to express themselves, to have a platform that is for all voices and yet be mindful of the frameworks of our community standards that will indicate or set aside certain things that are not permitted on the platform.

I understand that is, certainly in our experience, challenging. I think in terms of the people's ability to express themselves, it is very rarely black and white. I think there are a lot of grey zones. I think you're absolutely right that in terms of the enforcement of our community standards, that is a challenging enterprise. We have committed to hiring. We'll have 20,000 people, by the end of this year, on the team working on security issues like the ones you mentioned.

I would also say that we have deployed, already, in actuality, artificial intelligence technology to be able to better detect prohibited content and remove it at scale without human review. Obviously there is ongoing progress that needs to be made. I would never say that we are perfect, but we do take this very seriously. I just want to make sure that you and other members of the committee understand that we do take this very seriously and we've already invested significantly in these efforts.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you very much.

We'll now move to Mr. McCauley for seven minutes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thanks.

Welcome, everyone.

Mr. Chan, CBC ran an article, I think yesterday or even today, talking about 24 unregistered groups advertising on Facebook for the Ontario election, targeting parties and targeting candidates as well. These ads can obviously have an effect on the outcome of the election. I'm just wondering what Facebook is doing to co-operate with Elections Ontario regarding this.

It's funny, because I wrote up my question earlier today, and then I just got a note that anti-Doug Ford ads are actually going on today during the blackout on Facebook.

What are you doing with Elections Ontario? How are you coordinating with them to address this issue?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I would just say, sir, in general, that we do have relationships and open communication channels with electoral commissions around the world and in Canada—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

But, besides relationships, what are you doing actively to co-operate to address this issue?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

To the extent that we receive requests from public authorities, such as Elections Ontario, about content on Facebook—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Have they contacted you regarding the article?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

To my knowledge, we have not received anything from Elections Ontario.

(1800)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Really?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Yes, sir.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

That's interesting.

Do you wait for them to reach out to you? I'm sure you've seen the article on CBC. Do you wait for Elections Ontario or Elections Canada to contact you, or do you proactively address these issues?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We do proactively address these issues. I want to be a bit careful because it's not really my.... I'm not the expert.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

No, and I realize it's a large company, and you're not physically taking things out.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Well, no, and I would also say I'm not specifically the expert on election law in Ontario. I'm sure you have read it, as I have, with interest, as well. I think further down there is a bit of an explanation for how advertising should work in the election in Ontario, and how and what obligations are on third parties to register—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Right, and Elections Ontario has made a statement claiming these ads are not allowed, yet they're still popping up. That's why my question is, how are you co-operating? How are you working to ensure people are not putting up ads when they're not allowed?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Again, sir, I can get into specifically some of the new initiatives we're piloting in the United States, but, generally, as we have done—including at the time when the Commissioner of Canada Elections and Facebook Canada did work for the 2015 election—we obviously respond to investigative requests from public authorities.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay. Do you keep a copy of all these ads somewhere and a database of who's buying these ads?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

As I mentioned in my opening statement, we do have a new ad transparency feature, which, again, up until very recently was available only in Canada, in which individuals can see all the ads that are running, not just political ads, but all the ads that are running on Facebook in Canada at any given time.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Do you keep a database of these ads?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

In the United States in time for the mid-term Congressional—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I don't mean in the States. I mean up here.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Well, if I may, sir, I just want to give you a bit of a preamble.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I'm short on time, so I'd prefer to skip the preamble. Do you keep a copy of the ads that are being targeted up here?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Our intention is to roll out the archiving of ads around the world.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay. How do you proactively ensure that election ads being purchased and used in Canada are not being paid for by foreign actors?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We are piloting a project, sir, in the United States, because there is an election coming up.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Yes, I realize that, but if you're piloting it there, when will it be rolled out up here?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

These measures will be rolled out around the world. Like “view ads”, it was initially launched in Canada first so that we can understand how it works and get feedback from stakeholders. Then we can implement it globally. We are taking the same approach for the things that we are piloting in the United States. The way it works, sir, is that to understand and authenticate the individuals in question who are running advertisements, we require them to upload a government-issued ID. We then send an actual letter with a code to the residential address that they have provided. They use the code to authenticate their address and their identity. Then they need to also indicate on behalf of which organization they are running ads before they can even run a political ad. This is something, again, that doesn't exist anywhere else on the Internet. We just launched it a few weeks ago in the United States. We intend to roll it out around the world in due course.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

When will you do that in Canada, though? When you say in due course, do you mean six months or two years? Do you have any idea?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I would not, sir, presume to be able to give you at this time a definitive date, but our intention is to indeed roll it out around the world.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Let me ask you just a quick question that's a bit off topic. It's about government advertising on Facebook. When people click on it, is any of the data there susceptible to people skimming off it to target...?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Do you mean people who are advertising on Facebook?

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

No, I mean for government advertising on Facebook.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Oh, for government advertising, I don't believe so. No, sir.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

No? Okay.

Michele and—sorry, I forget your name, sir—Carlos—sorry—we've been ignoring you.

I have similar questions if you've been watching for Facebook. What is Twitter doing specifically to block trolls or block foreign advertising on Twitter for Canadian elections?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

The challenges we face are extremely similar to Facebook's, but our platforms are substantially different. The effort to address misinformation and disinformation has to be multi-faceted and has to be focused on our being good at what we're good at, which is trying to stop manipulation of our platform and identify places where people are using malicious automation—the bots and trolls that you discussed—to try to hijack the conversation and kick people off the facts or what matters. It's about reducing visibility of that noise so the signal can go through.

Twitter is essentially a different platform from Facebook or YouTube in that the way people have conversations is organized around hashtags. We try to identify the credible voices on our platform—the eyewitnesses, politicians, journalists, experts—and make sure their voices carry further, and that their signal can break through the noise.

When it comes to things on the ad transparency centre, we are piloting a project that is for us, as a tech company, focused on at-scale on our platform. When we are dealing with 500 million tweets a day, trying to figure out the signal from the noise, to validate who is advertising and who is paying for it is a very analog process. It's a very high-touch process in which we, like Facebook, are requiring you, if you are registered with the Federal Election Commission in the U.S.—and I imagine there are similar circumstances in Canada—to give us that number so we can send you a paper form that you put into the platform that says you are an American. If you aren't registered and you're just excited about whatever election you're dealing with....

(1805)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

You're out of time. If you want to briefly wrap up what you are saying....

Mr. Carlos Monje:

If you aren't registered, we have a very high-touch process and we'll send you a notarized form and you'll have to go to a notary. Then you'll have to give us a copy of your passport that validates that you are who you say you are and that you're a national. That will allow you to advertise on the platform.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thanks.

We'll move to Mr. Cullen now for the next seven minutes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses for being here.

You can sense from the committee's questions the urgency with which we wanted to speak with both of your organizations. You're the face of this conversation in lots of ways. This committee is under quite a bit of time pressure, so hearing from you before terminating our study was important, and I'm glad you were able to make the time to be here.

When Facebook testified previously about Cambridge Analytica in front of a House committee, they noted that an app they used had been installed 272 times, but that 621,889 Canadians may have been affected. Does that sound about right to you, Mr. Chan?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I believe so, although I don't have the numbers in front of me.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I assume Facebook notified those Canadians that they had been affected?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Yes, sir, we did.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What is the recourse for those Canadians who had their data mined in this way, which we can say was certainly improper and probably illegal?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I'm not exactly sure what terms to use that would be accurate, but I think it is absolutely an abuse of our terms and conditions and our app policy. It is obviously under investigation in Canada by the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I want to turn to Twitter for a moment in terms of buying ads. I have your form here. We printed it for my sake.

Does a human at Twitter see my application to buy an ad?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

It depends on how much money you spend. If you're a political advertiser, though, we have to have a human look at your form.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How much do you have to spend? What is the cut-off before a human puts eyeballs on an application to put an ad on your site?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

A little more is involved than I can say in a headline, but essentially, if you're a political advertiser, you're going to have to fill out the form and get certified, and that's a very high-touch process that involves human—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry. Could we just define what a political advertiser is? I understand political parties, but how do you define it?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

For a political ad, we're starting from the point—and it's not the end point where we would like to end up—that a political ad is advertising that mentions a candidate.

The industry is aiming for—and we're working with government experts, with academia, with partners, and also with MediaSmarts in Canada—how you identify and actually action an issue. Where is the line between a political issue ad versus a company that wants to talk about women's empowerment or gay rights issues? They're important issues, but they may not be political.

(1810)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does this bill allow you to understand what a political ad is?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

I think there is a degree of clarity in the language about what is and what is not.

In my conversations with Elections Canada, in January, I asked them, because I understood that it has been a standing law in Canada that indirectly advocating on behalf of a candidate is a very hard standard to apply.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How many users a day, approximately, do you have in Canada?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

We have 330 million monthly users worldwide. We'd have to get back to you, sir, on the exact number of users.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Would it be several million?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

I would say it would be at least that, yes. Canada is a very large market for us.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Facebook would have how many daily users?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Daily, I don't have the stat, but monthly, it's 23 million.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That is 23 million a month?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Correct. That's unique individuals.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Both of those numbers far exceed what we call traditional media—newspapers, print—and they even exceed the numbers for television.

We have a series of rules that we've developed over time for those traditional media outlets when it comes to political advertising. Do you think the same rules should be applied to social media networks through this legislation as are applied to other news outlets, which both of you are? You're certainly platforms for news. More Canadians get news from Facebook and Twitter than they do from any other series of websites.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

Speaking on behalf of Twitter, we do embrace the idea that our users should know who is paying for the advertising, especially when it comes in the political context.

In the conversations we've had, and in how we are communicating with governments around the world, we recognize that the online environment is different and that, for instance, Twitter is a character-limited platform. It used to be that we had 140 characters. Just recently it was bumped up to 280. Your standard political disclosure language is hard to squeeze in there.

The other complications are often very short videos.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Here is my challenge. If anyone wants to see what hate speech looks like, I'd invite them to Jagmeet Singh's Twitter feed. Whenever he posts, you can just follow on down and give it about six or seven posts, and that's true for many diversity-seeking politicians in Canada.

You would never see that in the pages of The Globe and Mail or The New York Times in response to a story about a public figure, yet I can go on Facebook, or I can go on your site, and I just wonder why there is not equivalency in terms of the discourse and dialogue.

You guys have such powerful platforms. All of us around this table use them. We enjoy the exchange we can have with constituents, which is different from anything we've ever seen before. But the sheer volume of ads and conversations that are going through your sites on which there are no human eyes placed whatsoever....

We can narrowly define political ads if you want, but I'm not talking about those. I'm talking about the stuff Chris talked about. I'm talking about somebody posting false information about where you vote and can't vote, and just straight out lies, not even necessarily to push against one candidate, but just to disrupt people's faith in the process of democracy. That exists on both of your platforms. Up until this point, and I'd say up until the Cambridge Analytica scandal, most of your users were unaware of how dangerous this stuff is in the wrong hands.

I'm not sure that either company, and the many companies you own.... I'm looking at the size, particularly of Facebook with 2.1 billion monthly active users, and 1.5 billion daily mobile users. Messenger has 1.2 billion users. WhatsApp has 1.1. billion. Instagram has 700 million more.

CNN reports that you have 83 million fake profiles on Facebook right now, and I don't know if you even have the ability to do what we're asking under this legislation, and I think we actually need to do more than what we're asking under this legislation.

Again, should the rules apply that apply right now to current media in Canada, that we need to know the source of the ad and whether it was foreign or domestic, and should all of those ads be attainable somewhere for Canadians to put their eyes on?

I'll start with Twitter and then Facebook.

(1815)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

I'll have to ask that the answers be extremely brief because we are over time. You'll have to keep it very brief.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Could you say that again? Sorry, I missed it, Michele.

Ms. Michele Austin (Head, Government, Public Policy, Twitter Canada, Twitter Inc.):

Yes, we should be able to see all of those things. The kind of behaviour you are describing is not acceptable. We're very aware of that. We are working very hard on the health and behaviour of the platform to improve that. A violation of the terms of service that you're speaking of is something that we want to hear about, that users can file tickets and cases about, and that we are acting on in a much more aggressive way than previously.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I will say a few things, if I may, Mr. Chair.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Please try to keep it very brief.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll actually let you go into my time. I'm interested in hearing the answer.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

There you go, then.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you, sir.

One of the cornerstones of being on Facebook is actually our authentic identity policy, which you may be aware of. If you're a private user of Facebook, you'll know that typically a Kevin Chan or a Michele Austin or a Nathan Cullen would in fact be themselves on Facebook. We think that is actually the best way, the best first cut at trying to address this issue of being accountable for what you say. In most other places on the Internet, it's like the old New Yorker cartoon, where they say, “On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog”—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You have 83 million fake accounts.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I am not familiar with that number, but I would say that in our community standards, our transparency report that was just released, for Q1, we disabled about 583 million fake accounts, most within minutes of registration. The reason we're able to do that before any individual can actually find and report a fake account is that we're using artificial intelligence technology, a lot of which comes from the pioneering research in Canada. That is actually how we're able to apply machine learning and pattern recognition to identify fake accounts as they are registered on the platform.

I have one broader thing for the committee to consider. I think we were slow to identify the challenges emerging from the U.S. presidential election. I've said it before and I would like to reiterate that. When you look at subsequent elections in countries around the world—in France, in Italy, in the special election in Alabama, in the Irish referendum—these are places where we have applied the election integrity artificial intelligence tools against things like fake accounts. I'm pleased to say that while we're not perfect—and I would never say that—the phenomenon of fake accounts has not had a material impact on those elections.

I think we are getting better. I would never say that we're perfect, but we continue to refine our ability to proactively detect fake accounts and take them down. Again, I point you to the German election, for which independent studies confirmed that fake accounts did not play a role in the outcome.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll jump in here because I'm losing my time. It's been borrowed.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

You do have four and a half minutes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

I'm still seeing, especially on Twitter, that you get followed by the person without the photograph, tom@tom36472942—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, he follows me, too.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes, exactly.

I guess I'm troubled. In terms of James Comey, I don't know what type of credibility he has, but he does know a thing or two about security and issues involving elections. He was in Canada recently and he said Canada is at risk. Again—and I think Mr. Cullen brought it up—it's not necessarily the political ads, and maybe next time around you guys will be great at fixing things like the Macedonian sitting in the basement. I went back to the page that I talked to Mr. Chan about. He mentioned that particular content wasn't up there, but there was the Prime Minister with his hand open and a Nazi flag on his hand. There was a post about Liberals in Britain wanting to turn Buckingham Palace into a mosque. This is the type of mean production that gets out there, and that is meant to divide us. It's on both sides, and I see it on both sides. It's not just a right-wing thing. It's not just a left-wing thing. You guys are going to be at the forefront of this. As a lawmaker and as a regulator, this frightens me, because you guys are so difficult to regulate due to your uniqueness.

I don't know. Can you comment on that? Are we going to be in a good place for 2019, given that there are experts telling us we should be worried?

(1820)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

It's hard to know. Sometimes I stare at the screen, and I'm not really sure who should go first or who should go second.

I will address the substantive on this challenge of addressing misinformation online in a moment, but I think it is incumbent on all of us to be very wary of—and I'm sure that's not what you intend, sir—what others may interpret as potentially some form of censorship of what people can say. I think that's something that we're very mindful of. We have taken an approach on misinformation that's a little bit different. I'm not sure that we want to be watching over our users—and I don't think users would want that—to be able to say that we authorize them to say this and we don't authorize them to say something else.

What we do is ensure that we are reducing the spread of misinformation on Facebook. We do this in three ways, three ways that I think are important when we try to understand what we've learned from the past few years.

The first thing, as it turns out, is that the majority of pages and fake accounts that are set up are actually motivated by economic incentives. These are people who create a kind of website somewhere. They have very little content—probably very poor, low-quality content, probably spammy content. They plaster the site with ads, and then they share links on platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and any other social media platform. It's clickbait, so it's designed to get you to see a very salacious headline and click through. As soon as you click through to the website, they monetize.

We've done a number of things to ensure that they can no longer do that. First, we are using artificial intelligence to identify sites that are actually of this nature, and we downrank them or prevent certain content from being shared as spam.

We are also ensuring that you can't spoof domains on our website. If you are pretending to sound like a legitimate website very close to The Globe and Mail or The New York Times, that is no longer possible using our technical measures. We are also ensuring that from a technical standpoint you're no longer able to use Facebook ads to monetize on your website.

The second thing we're doing is for the fake accounts that are set up to sow division, as you say, or to be mischievous in nature and that are not financially motivated. We are using artificial intelligence to identify patterns about these fake accounts and then take them down. As I said earlier, in Q1 we disabled about 583 million fake accounts. In the lead-up to the French and German elections, we took down tens of thousands of accounts that we proactively detected as being fake.

Then, of course, the last thing I should really stress which is very important in this is that we are putting in tremendous resources, and we are already implementing all these measures directly on the platform. I would say, of course, that at the end of the day the final and ultimate backstop is to ensure that when people do come across certain content online, whether it's on Facebook or anywhere else online, they have the critical digital literacy skills to understand that this stuff may actually not be authentic or high-quality information. That's where the partnerships that we have, such as with MediaSmarts on digital news literacy, are hoping to make an effort. I think public awareness campaigns are actually quite important. That would be the first element of what we're trying to do.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Monje, I'll give you a chance to respond as well.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

The way you phrased that question means you understand the complexity of it.

I echo a lot of what Kevin just said, that we have similar approaches but very different platforms. I think what Twitter brings to our fight against disinformation, against efforts to manipulate the platform, and against efforts to distract people is to look at the signals and the behaviour first, and the content second. We operate in more than 100 countries, and in many more than 100 languages. We have to get smarter about how we use our machine learning, our artificial intelligence, to spot trouble before it kicks up and really causes challenges.

I think there are certain areas that are more black and white than the issues you guys have been focused on today. Terrorism is a great example. When we started putting our anti-spam technology towards the fight against terrorism, we were taking down 25% of accounts before anybody else told us about them. Today that number is 94%. We've taken down 1.2 million accounts since the middle of 2015 when we started using those tools. We've gotten to the point now where 75% of terrorist accounts, when we take them down, haven't been able to tweet once. Instead of content, they're saying, “Go do jihad”. They're coming in from places we've already seen. They're using email addresses or IP addresses that we know of. They're following people who we know are bad folks.

I'm using that as an example of how when it's black and white it's easy, or it's easier. Another example of a black and white issue is child sexual exploitation. There's no good-use case on our platform for child sexual exploitation. Abuse is harder. Misinformation is a lot harder, but that doesn't mean that we're stopping. We are really taking a harder look at the signals that indicate an abusive interaction. such as when something isn't being liked, whether you're talking about it in English, French, or Swahili, and whether you're talking about contextual cues that we wouldn't be able to understand.

On the issue of disinformation in particular, we're doing a lot of the things that Kevin described. An important approach that we're taking in general, and one that we're very excited about, is trying to figure out how we measure these issues in such a way that our engineers can aim at them. Jack Dorsey, our CEO, announced an effort he's calling the health of the conversation on the platform. That circles around four issues. Do we agree on what the facts are, or are fake facts driving the conversation? Do we agree on what's important, or is distraction taking us away from the important issues? Are we open to alternative ideas? This means is there receptivity or toxicity? That's the opposite of it. Then, are we exposed to different ideas, different perspectives? I think we're already pretty healthy about that on Twitter. If you say that cats are better than dogs, you're going to hear about it from your friends and from others.

We've gone out to researchers around the world and said tell us how we can measure; tell us what data we have and what data we need, and then we can measure our policy changes, our enforcement changes, against those.

Right now, we measure the health of the company on very understandable things. How many people do we have? How many monthly users do we have? How much time are they spending on the platform? How many advertisers do we have and how much are they spending? Those are important things for the bottom line for Wall Street. For the health of the conversation on Twitter, which is why people come to Twitter, it's to have a conversation with the world and figure out what's happening.

If we can get those numbers right, we can measure changes. We can do A/B testing against it, and we think we have the best engineers anywhere. We think if we give them a target to aim at, we can get to these really, really, really difficult gnarly issues that have a lot of black, white, and grey in between.

(1825)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

We're pretty well getting to the end of our time, but we did start a few minutes late, so I'm going to allow just one more round. It will be five minutes with Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I just want to say—and this is not a question, but a statement—that I think any reasonable legislator expects the best efforts from groups like Facebook and Twitter, as opposed to perfection. In the interest of collective humility for members of this committee, I think that the Government of Canada is, after all, the organization that brought the world Canada Post, the Phoenix system, and the long-gun registry, so perhaps expecting perfection from others.... Canada Post had its annual Christmas mail strikes back in the 1970s and 1980s, for those of us with long memories. Perhaps expecting perfection from others is not entirely reasonable. What is reasonable is expecting best efforts.

My impression is that the fundamental problem you guys face is that you're in a kind of arms race with regard to artificial intelligence. You're trying to develop AIs to spot issues that are being generated by AIs themselves, with the purpose of fooling real people. Just a few days ago, I had the chance to sit down with my 23-year-old stepson and his girlfriend, who were watching a fascinating documentary about how people are trying to cause advertisers to be fooled into thinking that they are hitting real eyeballs by creating fake videos to maximize the number of hits when the name Spiderman or Elsa is clicked on. There were some other names, too—some very interesting video names like Spiderman, Elsa, Superman, and on it goes.

What I'm getting at is that there is a desire to stay ahead, but I don't think it's reasonable at all to expect one to go beyond and achieve a zero level. Is that unreasonable, or is it the case that there are some places where you can achieve perfection in blocking these things?

(1830)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

You're right that the threats are always evolving. As I mentioned a moment ago, I think we were slow as a company to spot the new types of threats that emerged out of the U.S. presidential election. Since then, we have spent significant resources and significant time, and have hired—we're doubling our security team—to try to address these things.

AI is going to play a huge role in that. At scale, with 23 million people, and 2.2 billion people around the world using our service, you're right that if everybody posts just one time a day, that is, by definition, 2.2 billion pieces of content. AI will allow us to use automation to identify bad actors.

You're absolutely right that we cannot guarantee 100% accuracy. It goes the other way, too, sir. I think what you're alluding to is that we want to be very careful about the false positive scenario, in which you accidentally take down things that are legitimate content and that don't violate community standards. We do have to be very careful about that.

I do want to assure you—and we have said this in other places as well—that while we are certainly dedicating a lot of resources, staff, and time to addressing these concerns that we know about, we are obviously also looking ahead to identify threats that we think are emerging, to get ahead of this, so that we are on top as electoral events happen around the world.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

For our guests from Twitter, rather than giving a second answer to the same question, you made reference to clause 282.4 of the legislation, titled “Undue influence by foreigners”. You had a proposal, but it wasn't exactly clear to me what it is you're proposing. Could you run through that again?

Ms. Michele Austin:

Yes. That's the section that says where you do not knowingly allow foreign advertisers to advertise. The question is around the definition of “knowingly”. Our concern is with regard to how that will be interpreted and how that will be enforced in real time.

If you're talking about documentaries, Mr. Reid, there's an excellent one called Abacus: Small Enough to Jail, which talks about how, during the financial crisis, a small Chinese bank in New York was jailed because it was the most accessible, rather than the big banks. Our concern is that someone is misidentified or falsely identified, or that something has not been flagged for us in an appropriate way. Therefore, we end up having to defend the actions of some Turkish spam army in Canada, which seems unreasonable.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

If I could only add, going back to your previous.... You're 100% right. We're not going to be 100%. We have to keep on fighting the new fights, not just fighting the old fights. It is in our financial interest to get this right. It is in our bottom line interest to make sure that, when you come to Twitter and you click on an ad, it's who it says it is. We want to be in a position to be actively looking for this stuff and taking it down. In our conversations with governments around the world, it's important to understand having a safe harbour for good faith efforts to police the platform and do it well.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

Thank you to all three of our witnesses for being here today and for the thoroughness of your responses. We appreciate that. That does bring this meeting to a close.

We'll reconvene on Monday at—

(1835)

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

I just want to get clarity that Mr. Chan mentioned there are 23 million unique Facebook users per month. Is that in Canada?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

That's correct.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

I just wanted to clarify that. Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

We will reconvene on Monday at 3:30.

With that, the meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 114e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, alors que nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d’autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d’autres textes législatifs

Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir David Moscrop, qui comparaît à titre personnel par vidéoconférence depuis Séoul, en Corée du Sud, je ne sais pas quelle heure il est là-bas; Sherri Hadskey, commissaire des élections, Louisiana Secretary of State, témoigne par vidéoconférence de Baton Rouge, en Louisiane; Victoria Henry, responsable de la campagne pour les droits numériques d’Open Media Engagement Network, qui comparaît par vidéoconférence de Vancouver; et Sébastien Corriveau,[Français] chef du Parti Rhinocéros, qui est aussi avec nous par vidéoconférence depuis St-Donat-de-Rimouski, au Québec.[Traduction]

Je vous remercie tous de votre disponibilité.

Je veux simplement rattraper un oubli. Nous avons rendu le travail du greffier très intéressant jusqu’à présent, alors je pense que nous devrions vraiment remercier le greffier et son personnel formidable d’avoir convoqué tous ces témoins avec des préavis si courts.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: C’est un travail colossal et vous l'avez...

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je crois qu’il est 4 h 30 du matin à Séoul, en Corée du Sud et qu'il est 8 h 30 en Nouvelle-Zélande.

Le président:

Il est 4 h 30 du matin à Séoul, en Corée du Sud.

David pourrait peut-être commencer.

Vous avez chacun une déclaration préliminaire à prononcer, mais David, comme il est 4 h 30 en Corée du Sud, vous pouvez peut-être commencer.

M. David Moscrop (à titre personnel):

Merci.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole. Nous entendez-vous?

M. David Moscrop:

Oui.

Bonjour, de Séoul, en Corée du Sud, et merci de m’avoir invité à comparaître devant le Comité.

J’ai quitté Vancouver l’autre jour, alors j’étais beaucoup plus près du fuseau horaire, mais je suis très heureux d’être ici. Je sais qu’il y a beaucoup de sujets à aborder, alors je vais aller droit au but.

Les objectifs de toute loi électorale devraient être de protéger l’intégrité de la procédure qui détermine la façon dont nous choisissons nos représentants pendant et hors de la période électorale, mais aussi de soutenir une sphère publique dynamique, diversifiée, égalitaire et inclusive dans laquelle les citoyens peuvent prendre des décisions politiques éclairées.

Dans cette optique, je suis heureux de voir que le projet de loi propose quelques mesures permettant d'atteindre plus facilement ces objectifs, notamment des limites de dépenses et des règlements plus stricts pour les tiers, ainsi que des contraintes supplémentaires pour les acteurs étrangers. Je pense que ces mesures contribueront à uniformiser les règles du jeu.

Comme d’autres témoins l’ont dit, les limites sont plus que raisonnables, mais je dirais qu’il serait peut-être bon d'étendre à un an la période préélectorale couverte par la loi si l’objectif est de modérer la campagne permanente.

Je suis également heureux que les changements apportés par la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections soient modifiés ou supprimés. Le directeur général des élections devrait pouvoir jouer un rôle actif dans la promotion des élections et l’éducation des citoyens.

De plus, comme les élections devraient être aussi fructueuses que possible, je suis enthousiaste et optimiste de voir que le recours à un répondant est rétabli, que l’utilisation d’une carte d’électeur comme pièce d’identité est rétablie et que certaines restrictions relatives au droit de vote des Canadiens à l’étranger ou vivant à l’étranger ont également été supprimées. Cela donnera un peu plus de liberté aux gens pour aller voter.

Je pense que le projet de loi est plus faible lorsqu’il s’agit d’encourager la participation des jeunes Canadiens. Un registre volontaire pour les personnes qui approchent de l’âge de voter est une bonne chose et je soutiens cette idée, mais je pense que l’âge de voter devrait être abaissé à 16 ans, un point c’est tout. Les jeunes de 16 ans ont les capacités nécessaires et je crois que c'est une bonne idée d'amener les gens à voter plus jeunes et à prendre cette habitude plus tôt dans la vie. Cependant, si nous voulons vraiment prendre au sérieux la question de la participation, je pense que nous devrions songer au vote obligatoire.

Enfin, sur les aspects que je trouve plus faibles, je pense que les dispositions du projet de loi au sujet de la protection des renseignements personnels ne vont pas assez loin. C’est bien d’avoir une politique que les partis doivent rendre publique, mais quand avez-vous lu pour la dernière fois les conditions de service d'une offre à laquelle vous avez souscrit? C’est souvent insuffisant. Les partis devraient être régis par des lois plus strictes en matière de protection de la vie privée. Il devrait y avoir une vérification régulière des données et une application stricte des normes de protection de la vie privée et quelqu’un qui soit suffisamment armé pour le faire.

Je vais conclure très rapidement. Les élections doivent être accessibles et équitables, mais surtout, les gens doivent croire qu’elles sont accessibles et équitables. Ce projet de loi contient des mesures encourageantes à cet égard, mais il pourrait aller plus loin et devrait probablement aller plus loin, surtout à la lumière des préoccupations croissantes concernant la baisse soutenue du taux de participation électorale, ainsi que le droit à la protection des données et de la vie privée.

Merci.

(1535)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Sherri Hadskey, commissaire des élections de la Louisiane.

Mme Sherri Hadskey (commissaire des élections, Louisiana Secretary of State):

Bonjour, je suis heureuse d’être parmi vous. Je suis honorée de pouvoir m’adresser à vous aujourd’hui.

La Louisiane a un système électoral unique en son genre. Je crois que nous avons plus d’élections que n’importe quel autre État américain. Vous parliez de la fatigue des électeurs et c’est un gros problème en Louisiane. En général, nous avons quatre élections prévues chaque année, mais nous nous retrouvons toujours avec des élections spéciales et c’est l’effet d’entraînement. Un sénateur se présente à l’automne, gagne un autre siège que celui qu'il occupait et libère le premier siège. Notre assemblée législative souhaite que ces personnes occupent un siège pour chaque session législative, de sorte qu’une élection spéciale est déclenchée, nous cherchons donc à obtenir un meilleur taux de participation pour ce genre d’élections.

Nous essayons nous aussi de trouver des moyens de prévenir la fatigue des électeurs et d’obtenir systématiquement un bon taux de participation. Nous avons un taux d’inscription de 87 %, ce qui est remarquable. Je suis très fière de cela, mais il est regrettable de n'avoir que 16 % de participation à un cycle électoral [Inaudible], parce que nous aimerions que le taux de participation reflète le taux d'inscription.

J’aimerais beaucoup pouvoir répondre à vos questions et je suis ravie d’être ici.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes heureux que vous soyez ici également.

Nous passons maintenant à Victoria Henry, d’Open Media Engagement Network.

Mme Victoria Henry (responsable de la campagne pour les droits numériques, Open Media Engagement Network):

Bonjour. Merci beaucoup de m’avoir invitée à venir discuter de cette question.

Je m’appelle Victoria Henry. Je suis une militante des droits numériques spécialisée dans les questions de protection de la vie privée pour Open Media, un organisme communautaire qui travaille à garder Internet ouvert, abordable et sans surveillance. Les révélations découlant du scandale Cambridge Analytica et Facebook ont montré à quel point nos lois sur la protection de la vie privée ne protègent pas la vie privée des Canadiens ordinaires et comment cela peut influencer les élections.

Même si le projet de loi C-76 prévoit des mesures que nous jugeons positives pour protéger l’intégrité des élections et protéger notre démocratie, l’omission des partis politiques dans la législation sur la protection de la vie privée est une lacune préoccupante et c’est la question dont j’aimerais parler aujourd’hui.

Partout dans le monde, les gens sont de plus en plus préoccupés, c'est évident, par la façon dont leurs renseignements personnels sont recueillis, utilisés et stockés. Plus de 10 000 Canadiens ont récemment signé une lettre demandant une réforme de nos lois sur la protection de la vie privée. La principale exigence de cette lettre est que les partis politiques du Canada soient assujettis aux lois fédérales sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

Les exemptions actuelles en matière de protection de la vie privée pour les partis politiques ont convaincu de nombreux Canadiens qu'aujourd'hui le système ne sert pas nos intérêts. Nous avons besoin de garanties que les intérêts politiques de notre gouvernement n’auront pas préséance sur notre vie privée et notre sécurité.

Un sondage omnibus national en ligne mené du 7 au 14 mai dernier a révélé qu’une grande majorité — 72 % des Canadiens — était en faveur d’une modification de la loi afin que les partis politiques respectent les mêmes règles de protection de la vie privée que les entreprises privées. En fait, seulement 3 % appuient la politique du statu quo et le maintien des restrictions limitées imposées actuellement aux partis politiques. Ce sondage a également révélé que les partisans de tous les partis politiques appuient l’application de la LPRPDE aux partis politiques. Je peux fournir les résultats complets du sondage, ainsi que la lettre des Canadiens, aux membres du Comité, en même temps que mes notes.

Ces opinions ont été appuyées par le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada lors son témoignage devant le Comité. Le commissaire a déclaré que l’information sur nos opinions politiques est très sensible et qu’elle mérite donc une protection de la vie privée. Pour cette raison, il ne suffit pas de demander aux partis politiques d’avoir leurs propres politiques en matière de protection de la vie privée sans définir les normes à appliquer.

Par exemple, les normes établies par le projet de loi C-76 ne comprennent pas de mesures visant à limiter la collecte de renseignements personnels à ce qui est nécessaire; à obtenir le consentement lors de la collecte, de l’utilisation ou de la communication de renseignements personnels; ou à faire en sorte que la collecte de renseignements soit faite par des moyens justes et légaux. Pour cette raison, le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée demande que les principes de protection de la vie privée reconnus à l’échelle internationale et non les politiques définies par les partis, soient inclus dans le droit national et qu’une tierce partie indépendante ait le pouvoir de vérifier la conformité. Nous appuyons cet appel ainsi que les modifications recommandées par le bureau du commissaire.

Le récent scandale montre clairement à quel point de faibles mesures de protection de la vie privée peuvent avoir des effets graves qui vont au-delà du domaine commercial. Comme les élections fédérales doivent avoir lieu en 2019, nous devons protéger notre démocratie et nous protéger d’influences indues découlant de violations de la vie privée en ligne. De nombreux ministres se sont dits prêts à renforcer nos lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Le statu quo va à l’encontre des souhaits de la plupart des Canadiens, dont la confiance dans nos processus politiques est minée par le fait que les partis politiques sont pointés du doigt en matière de protection de la vie privée.

Au nom de la vaste majorité des Canadiens qui sont favorables à l'adoption de règles plus strictes en matière de protection de la vie privée pour les partis politiques, je vous demande aujourd’hui de renforcer la protection de nos institutions démocratiques et d’apporter ces changements dès maintenant.

Merci.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Sébastien Corriveau, du Parti Rhinocéros. Bienvenue.

Un député: Nous ne l'entendons pas.

Le président: Nous ne vous entendons pas. Attendez un instant.

M. Sébastien Corriveau (chef, Parti Rhinocéros):

Non, c’est moi. Je suis stupide. J’ai oublié mon bouton.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

D’accord. Allons-y.

M. Sébastien Corriveau:

D’accord. Prenez vos écouteurs. Je vais parler français aussi.

Mesdames, mesdemoiselles, allumez votre téléphone cellulaire et jouez à Candy Crush; appelez votre mari; réchauffez votre dîner; textez votre avocat; faites une sieste; prenez une sortie de secours; fermez les yeux et arrêtez d’écouter: voici le dealer du Parti Rhinocéros du Canada. Bonjour.

Monsieur le président, l’honorable Larry Bagnell, savez-vous que vous avez déjà été mon député? C’était pendant trois mois à l’été 2009, lorsque j’ai passé l'été à Whitehorse.

Chers membres du Comité, merci de m’accueillir ici.[Français]

C'est la première fois que je comparais devant un comité parlementaire, et je trouve qu'il est très pertinent d'inviter le chef du Parti rhinocéros. Je vous en remercie. Les membres du parti et moi-même avons parfois de bonnes idées.[Traduction]C’est toujours un plaisir de les partager avec vous.[Français]

J'aimerais attirer votre attention sur le financement public des partis politiques.[Traduction]Il n’y a rien à ce sujet dans ce projet de loi. Cela a été supprimé. Le financement public des partis politiques a été supprimé par le gouvernement de Stephen Harper parce qu’il ne croit pas à la corruption au sein des partis politiques.[Français]

Le financement public des partis politiques a été instauré au Canada par M. Pierre Elliott Trudeau en 1974. Cela servait à contrer la corruption dans les partis politiques et dans l'attribution de contrats de travaux publics. Aboli par M. Mulroney, le système de financement public a été ramené par M. Jean Chrétien après le scandale des commandites.[Traduction]J’aimerais que cela soit rétabli.

Le premier ministre du Canada a menti aux Canadiens lorsqu’il a dit que les élections de 2015 seraient les dernières à avoir un système uninominal majoritaire à un tour.

(1545)



Notre pays a encore un système électoral archaïque hérité de l’époque où la Grande-Bretagne était notre suzerain, où les députés écoutaient la population locale et où les partis politiques n’avaient aucune ligne de parti obligatoire.

En 2008, le Parti vert du Canada a obtenu près d’un million de votes, mais il n'a eu aucun député — zéro, personne. En même temps, les conservateurs ont reçu 5,2 millions de votes, soit seulement 5 fois plus et ils ont obtenu143 députés.

Vous dites que le Canada est une démocratie? Comme c’est mignon. Cinq députés ont été élus avec moins de 30 % des voix, 69 ont été élus avec moins de 40 % des voix et 60 % des députés — 206 députés — ont été élus avec moins de 50 % des voix dans leurs circonscriptions.

Le projet de loi C-76 est déconnecté de la réalité : vous avez oublié de parler de ce qui compte vraiment dans notre démocratie.

Je suis d’accord pour dire qu’il faut s’assurer qu’aucun groupe d’intérêt n’achète de publicité juste avant les élections. Vous avez raison de dire qu’aucun autre pays ne devrait s’immiscer dans notre processus électoral, sauf la Russie: j’aimerais recevoir de l’argent de la Russie.

Vous ne pouvez pas me dire que vous manquez de temps pour mettre en oeuvre une réforme électorale qui soit juste —, et ce, dès maintenant.[Français]

Cependant, je sais que cela n'est pas vrai. Vous avez décidé de mettre ce changement de côté. Vous avez décidé de ne pas le faire lorsque c'était le temps de le faire. C'est comme pour ce qui a trait aux changements climatiques: un jour nous allons nous réveiller et il sera trop tard.[Traduction]

Je sais que la seule chose que je peux vraiment changer en venant ici aujourd’hui, c’est le financement public des partis politiques. Je termine là-dessus.[Français]

Dans le rapport intitulé « Renforcer la démocratie au Canada: principes, processus et mobilisation citoyenne en vue d'une réforme électorale », qui a été préparé par le Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale et déposé en décembre 2016, le comité recommande, à la section G — g comme gouvernement — du chapitre 7, de rétablir l'allocation par vote et le financement des partis politiques.

Cela avait été éliminé en 2015.

Dans ce même document, on peut lire: « [...] le système actuel de dons de particuliers aux partis politiques était plus inégal étant donné que les dons des Canadiens de différents groupes socioéconomiques varient considérablement. »

Le financement public donne aux Canadiens le sentiment que leur vote compte.

Mme Melanee Thomas a témoigné devant le Comité et a dit: [...] à l'échelle internationale, on constate que la plupart des pays ont une forme ou une autre de financement public. On pense généralement que c'est une bonne chose, parce que les partis politiques sont une institution fondamentale reliant les institutions représentatives et les électeurs [...]

Jean-Pierre Kingsley, ancien directeur général d'Élections Canada, recommande le retour de cette mesure.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous de votre présence et de vos sages conseils.

Nous allons commencer la série de questions avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, il est dit que l’une des meilleures choses que l’on puisse faire est d’être toujours transparent et je m’efforce de l'être. Mea culpa auprès de tous mes collègues. J’aimerais simplement mettre mes cartes sur la table; de 1989 à 1991, j’ai été l’un des principaux organisateurs du Parti Rhinocéros du Canada.

M. Blake Richards:

Transfuge.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

En fait, si vous vous rappelez, 1990 a été la dernière élection à laquelle à participé l'ancienne mouture du Parti Rhinocéros, sous l'égide de Bryan Gold, si notre invité s'en souvient, mais probablement pas. Il est un peu jeune. J’ai mené cette campagne. Soit dit en passant, nous sommes arrivés les derniers. J’ai changé de parti et depuis les choses se sont améliorées.

Cela dit, monsieur Corriveau, vous avez parlé de beaucoup de choses, mais pouvons-nous passer un instant au projet de loi C-76? Vous souscrivez aux limites que nous imposons aux tierces parties. À combien de roubles se chiffreraient les limites dans votre monde?

M. Sébastien Corriveau: Combien de roubles?

M. Scott Simms: Oui. Vous avez dit que vous aimeriez obtenir de l’argent de la Russie. Je pensais simplement...

M. Sébastien Corriveau:

Oh, oui. Eh bien, peut-être plutôt en Bitcoin, parce que c’est sans doute plus difficile pour Élections Canada d'en faire le suivi.

M. Scott Simms:

Voilà. Très bien.

Soit dit en passant, je suis heureux de vous revoir. Il est bon de revoir les vieux compagnons.

Mes questions s’adressent maintenant à la représentante de l’État de la Louisiane et à vous, madame Hadskey. Vous participez aux élections depuis un certain temps. Je crois comprendre que vous avez une liste de préinscription pour les personnes de moins de 18 ans. Est-ce exact?

(1550)

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

C’est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Avez-vous des commentaires à faire sur la réussite — ou non — de ce programme en particulier?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

C’est assez nouveau. Il a été couronné de succès. Pour ce qui est des gens qui s’inscrivent, s’ils ont 17 ans et qu’ils vont avoir 18 ans avant l’élection, ils ont le droit de voter. Les étudiants semblent vraiment apprécier cela.

Par ailleurs nous leur permettons de travailler comme commissaire à l’âge de 17 ans s’ils veulent se renseigner sur le processus électoral et y participer. Surtout lorsque certaines écoles offrent des heures-crédit pour le temps passé comme commissaire aux élections pour apprendre le processus, c’est vraiment une excellente chose.

Plus tôt on peut faire participer les gens, mieux c’est. Dans notre État, la jeune génération vote beaucoup moins que la vieille génération. Nous faisons beaucoup d'efforts pour inciter la jeune génération à voter. C’est difficile.

M. Scott Simms:

La commission électorale de l’État fait-elle campagne sur la façon dont les jeunes peuvent participer et s’inscrire? Avez-vous un plan de marketing?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Oui. Dans l’État de la Louisiane, il y a 64 paroisses. Le greffier de chaque paroisse offre une formation. Nous avons un programme de sensibilisation dans les écoles.

Ce qu’il y a de formidable, ce que je préfère et que je fais depuis l’âge de 19 ans — je participe aux élections depuis l’âge de 19 ans, j’ai 53 ans, soit dit en passant, ce qui fait une longue période —, c’est un programme grâce auquel notre matériel électoral peut être utilisé dans toutes les écoles si elles en font la demande. Nous nous y rendons et organisons l'élection de la reine de l'école ou tout autre type d’élection. Les enfants se familiarisent avec le matériel qui sert à voter.

Lors de nos visites, nous informons les élèves sur les renseignements nécessaires à l'inscription sur les listes électorales. Nous traitons précisément de ce dont vous parlez: la possibilité de s'inscrire avant l’âge de 18 ans et ce genre de choses. C’est vraiment utile.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous félicite de votre volontarisme. Cela semble très bien.

Pour revenir à cette question, je dois dire que c’est nouveau pour nous, tout comme c’est relativement nouveau pour vous. Avez-vous des problèmes dont nous devrions avoir connaissance si nous mettons en oeuvre ce programme?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Aucun problème ne me vient à l'esprit. Aucun. C’est un excellent outil pour aider les gens à s’inscrire, à participer et à aller voter. Tout ce que nous pouvons faire pour aider est excellent.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup.

Comme vous le savez, dans le projet de loi que nous proposons ici, nous envisageons des conditions plus strictes pour encadrer l’influence des tiers. J’ai une question plus générale sur la politique américaine. Nous avons l’habitude de voir la télévision américaine et de voir beaucoup d’interventions de tierces parties, ou « super PAC », les comités d’action politique; je pense que c’est le terme courant. Dans votre État, faites-vous quelque chose pour réduire l’influence des tiers? Y a-t-il des lois en place?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Je ne sais pas si vous le savez, mais nous n’avons pas de primaires de parti. Le saviez-vous? En Louisiane, tout le monde peut se présenter, peu importe le parti auquel il appartient, il y a ensuite des élections primaires et des élections générales. Ce n’est pas, je pense, comme...

M. Scott Simms:

C’est exact. Vous avez un deuxième tour de scrutin. N'est-ce pas? Vous avez deux élections au cas où... Est-ce bien cela?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

C’est exact. Quiconque veut participer à l'élection primaire peut le faire. Les élections ont lieu et les deux personnes qui arrivent en tête participent à l’élection générale.

M. Scott Simms:

Les deux premiers participent. D’accord et il n’y a certainement pas de limites à la participation de tiers ou de quoi que ce soit d’autre.

Qu’en est-il des partis eux-mêmes? Y a-t-il des limites durant ce que nous appelons la « période électorale »? À l’approche de l’élection, avez-vous des limites concernant les dons aux candidats?

(1555)

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

En Louisiane, nous avons une division distincte — qui ne fait pas partie de mon ministère — qui traite du financement des campagnes. Il s’agit du Bureau de financement des campagnes électorales. C’est ainsi que toutes les règles et lignes directrices sont fournies à chaque candidat lorsqu’il se présente dans l’État et il doit les respecter.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup à vous tous.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Avez-vous hâte d’interroger certains témoins?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

M. Simms m’a permis de gagner un peu de temps, madame Hadskey, parce qu’il a posé certaines des questions que je voulais poser au sujet de l’inscription des électeurs avant 18 ans, mais j’ai encore quelques questions à ce sujet, alors je vais commencer par là.

À quel âge commencez-vous à faire ces inscriptions? Y a-t-il un âge minimum pour être inscrit sur cette liste?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Oui. C’est 16 ans.

M. Blake Richards:

C’est 16 ans. D’accord. Cela repose-t-il sur le volontariat? Autrement dit, le jeune doit-il demander à être inscrit sur la liste? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Il est inscrit s’il le souhaite. Disons que ses parents vont s’inscrire et qu'il les accompagne s'il veut s'inscrire lui aussi. Il fournit ses informations au bureau d'inscription des électeurs. Chaque paroisse a un registre des électeurs.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela semble indiquer la participation des parents ou leur consentement, ou est-ce seulement le jeune qui s’inscrit?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

C’est seulement le jeune qui s’inscrit. Il n'a pas besoin d’être accompagné d’un parent ou d’un tuteur.

M. Blake Richards:

Que fait-on pour assurer la confidentialité de ces renseignements? Sont-ils fournis aux partis politiques?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Non. Ils ne sont pas ajoutés à notre... Nous avons un système appelé ERIN. C’est notre système d’inscription des électeurs. Vous n’êtes pas ajouté au système ERIN avant la date à laquelle vous avez effectivement le droit de voter. Pour ce qui est des informations, si quelqu’un demande une liste d’électeurs à des fins commerciales pour envoyer des dépliants, une liste pour laquelle il paie ou quelque chose du genre, votre nom n’est jamais fourni si vous avez moins de 18 ans.

M. Blake Richards:

Depuis combien de temps cela existe-t-il?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Je pense que c’est seulement depuis deux ans. Il faudrait que je vous confirme cela plus tard.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela fait environ deux ans. Avez-vous eu des problèmes? Il y a eu des élections pendant cette période, n’est-ce pas? Il y a eu au moins une élection pendant cette période.

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Bien sûr. À notre connaissance, nous n’avons pas eu de problèmes. Rien de tel.

M. Blake Richards:

C’est presque comme si vous lisiez dans mes pensées. C’est exactement ce que je me demandais, c’est-à-dire si vous aviez des problèmes de données qui auraient pu être accidentellement divulguées avant la date prévue et ajoutées à l’autre partie de la liste.

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Non, parce que si elles ne sont pas ajoutées au système ERIN pour être partagées, alors elles ne peuvent pas être... Cela ne peut pas se produire accidentellement. Il s’agit d’une inscription complètement distincte.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Merci.

Je vais maintenant donner la parole à Mme Henry, d'Open Media Engagement Network.

J’ai d’abord quelques questions d’ordre général au sujet de votre organisation. Où obtenez-vous votre financement? S’agit-il de dons, de dons de particuliers? Quelle est votre source de financement?

Mme Victoria Henry:

La majorité de notre financement provient de dons de particuliers canadiens. Lorsque nous cherchons ou acceptons des dons à l’extérieur de ce cadre, c’est pour des projets qui se déroulent dans d’autres pays, ou lorsqu’il y a un enjeu transfrontalier, par exemple, comme notre campagne sur les aspects transfrontaliers de la protection de la vie privée, notamment en lien avec les appareils numériques qui traversent la frontière d’un pays à l’autre.

M. Blake Richards:

J’ai compris. Il s'agit donc en grande partie de Canadiens. Donnent-ils de petits montants, habituellement, ou font-ils des dons plus importants?

Mme Victoria Henry:

Nous recevons des fonds pour des projets de la part de fondations et ainsi de suite, mais malheureusement, la plupart des dons que nous recevons sont assez modestes. Nous cherchons toujours à en avoir de plus importants.

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, ce n’est pas différent de la plupart des organisations, y compris nous, partis politiques. Il vous suffit de trouver beaucoup de petits dons, n’est-ce pas?

Je crois que vous avez indiqué que lorsque vous travaillez dans d’autres pays, il peut y avoir des fonds étrangers pour ce genre d’activités. Est-ce bien ce que vous disiez?

Mme Victoria Henry:

C’est pour des projets propres à ces pays, par exemple pour le travail que nous pourrions faire dans l’Union européenne.

M. Blake Richards:

Votre organisme a été enregistré comme tierce partie lors des dernières élections, donc cet argent n’a pas été utilisé à ces fins? Était-ce strictement à ces autres fins?

Mme Victoria Henry:

Exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord.

Vous avez dépensé, je crois, 18 000 $ en publicité lors de la dernière élection. Pouvez-vous me dire en quoi consistaient ces publicités? De quel genre de publicité s'agissait-il et quel type de message y était véhiculé?

(1600)

Mme Victoria Henry:

Il faudra que je vous transmette cette information plus tard. Ce n’est pas mon domaine d’expertise.

M. Blake Richards:

Pourriez-vous fournir cette information au comité? Vous pourriez peut-être nous donner une idée de ce à quoi cet argent a servi et des types de messages qui ont été envoyés.

Mme Victoria Henry:

Pas de problème.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Ce n’est peut-être pas votre domaine, mais je vais vous poser la question parce que cela fait partie du projet de loi. Il y a des changements concernant le financement par des tiers. Qu’en pensez-vous? Plus précisément, devrions-nous aller plus loin pour décourager ou empêcher l’utilisation de fonds étrangers par des tiers lors de nos élections?

Mme Victoria Henry:

On peut toujours faire plus. Qu'il faille le faire dans le cadre de ce processus ou d’un autre, voilà encore une bonne question. L’une des choses sur lesquelles nous travaillons en qualité d’organisme, aux côtés de nombreux autres organismes de la société civile et d'experts en protection de la vie privée, c’est la réforme des lois sur la protection de la vie privée elles-mêmes. Par exemple, la LPRPDE manque de capacité à faire respecter la loi. Disons qu’une société ou une entreprise ne respecte pas ces lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels; le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée n’a pas la capacité d’infliger des amendes ou d'imposer une mise en conformité.

Nous pourrions envisager de nombreuses autres façons de renforcer les sanctions prévues par nos lois afin d’empêcher l’influence de tiers ou d’étrangers.

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de vous poser une question très simple: croyez-vous que nous devrions interdire toute participation financière venant de l'étranger à nos élections?

Mme Victoria Henry:

Je pense qu’il y aura toujours des problèmes, comme ceux dont nous nous occupons, qui traversent les frontières. Je ne suis pas une experte en la matière. Je suis ici principalement pour représenter le point de vue des gens ordinaires au Canada. De toute évidence, c’est une grande source de préoccupation pour eux. Pour ce qui est de savoir où il faut tracer cette ligne, je ne peux pas vraiment vous répondre maintenant.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je m’adresse à mon ami, M. Corriveau, du Parti Rhinocéros. Je ne peux pas prétendre avoir participé à l'organisation de votre parti comme mon ami d’en face, mais il y a probablement eu quelques élections où, si un de vos candidats avait été sur le bulletin de vote, j’aurais pu envisager de voter pour lui.

Une voix: Et voilà.

M. Blake Richards : Par simple curiosité, vous avez dit dans votre déclaration préliminaire que vous êtes le leader et le « dealer » du Parti Rhinocéros. Qu’est-ce que cela peut bien vouloir dire?

M. Sébastien Corriveau:

Pour Élections Canada, je suis le leader du parti, mais honnêtement, je suis plutôt un dealer du parti. Je pense qu’un plus grand nombre de chefs de partis politiques à Ottawa devraient agir comme des dealers.

Vous savez, la semaine dernière, je n’ai pas été expulsé de mon parti, alors... Je pense que c’est une bonne façon de faire.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. [Français]

Monsieur Cullen, vous avez la parole.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Très rapidement, monsieur Corriveau, je dois dire que parmi les politiques que vous avez mises en avant dans une précédente mouture, l’une de mes préférées — peut-être était-ce l’idée de M. Simms — était de faire courir une glissade d’eau du sommet des Rocheuses jusqu'à Toronto, dont l’entrée serait gratuite pour tous les Canadiens.

Notez que les libéraux ont une Banque de l’infrastructure...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: ... et nous ne devrions jamais dire jamais. Ils viennent d’acheter un très vieux pipeline, alors qui sait? Tout est possible.

Madame Hadskey, quelques-uns d’entre nous, en qualité de parlementaires, ont pu participer à titre d’observateurs à vos dernières élections fédérales. Certains d’entre nous ont visité Baton Rouge. J’aimerais dire, premièrement, « Allez, Tigers » et deuxièmement, si vous aviez inscrit les gens présents au match de football opposant la Louisiane à l’Alabama, vous auriez probablement augmenté encore plus vos chiffres.

Quel est le taux de participation des jeunes en Louisiane? Cela m’a peut-être échappé et si c’est le cas, je m’en excuse. Je m’interroge au sujet de la tranche d’âge de 18 à 25 ans, ou quelle que soit la manière dont vous classez le vote des jeunes en Louisiane.

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Le taux de participation des jeunes est beaucoup plus faible. Je veux dire, extrêmement faible. Je dirais que, dans l’ensemble, le taux de participation des jeunes est probablement d’environ 20 %. C’est vraiment difficile. Nous essayons d’amener les gens à aller voter, mais c’est difficile.

À titre de précision, la loi pour les jeunes de 16 ans a été adoptée au cours de notre session législative de 2015. Elle est donc en vigueur depuis trois ans.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il serait utile au comité, si quelqu’un vous a précédé, de savoir s’il y a des données empiriques indiquant une augmentation de la participation. Il y a de nombreux facteurs qui expliquent pourquoi les gens votent et ne votent pas. Il y a eu une forte augmentation de la participation des jeunes lors de nos dernières élections, malgré — en fait, je dirais — certains des changements qui ont été apportés. Il y a de nombreux facteurs, mais il serait bon qu’il y ait des données empiriques établissant un lien, par exemple, entre un registre et les gens qui viennent voter à un plus jeune âge.

(1605)

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Vous voulez dire pour l’inscription, les 16...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je parle de l’inscription précoce des électeurs, puis d'établir une corrélation avec le taux de participation lorsque les jeunes atteignent l’âge de voter et au cours des années suivantes.

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Nous pourrons peut-être en faire le suivi. Je pourrais étudier la question.

Il faudrait demander à la personne qui était commissaire avant moi. J'occupe ce poste depuis août dernier, mais je participe aux campagnes électorales depuis 1986. J’ai demandé à la personne qui était en poste avant moi si elle avait connaissance de problèmes, de préoccupations ou de quoi que ce soit de ce genre. Elle a répondu que la seule chose sur laquelle elle insisterait, c’est que si une personne qui s'est inscrite à 16 ans est ensuite sur le point d'avoir 18 ans, il y a une fermeture des registres pendant 30 jours, de sorte que si elle devait avoir 18 ans en plein milieu du vote anticipé ou quelque chose du genre, il faut régler cela au niveau du registre pour lui permettre de voter, en s'assurant que la personne a bien compris.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord, c’est bien. C’est très utile.

Monsieur Moscrop, j’aimerais m’adresser à vous un instant. Je m’excuse. Je suis arrivé en retard au comité aujourd’hui et j’ai manqué votre présentation, mais je la verrai plus tard.

J’aimerais connaître votre point de vue. Des représentants de Facebook et Twitter vont témoigner tout à l'heure. Je lisais le résumé de votre mémoire et je ne le comprends pas parce que c’est beaucoup trop sophistiqué pour moi: « Pouvons-nous être des citoyens délibératifs autonomes? Pour répondre à cette question, j’examine les façons dont les stimuli et les processus cognitifs rationnels inconscients affectent la délibération citoyenne dans les démocraties libérales. » Oui, c’est évident pour tout le monde sauf moi.

Monsieur Moscrop, croyez-vous que les acteurs des médias sociaux, les entreprises — en particulier Facebook, Instagram et Twitter — ont des responsabilités quant aux acheteurs de publicités et de contenu, comme c’est le cas pour les médias traditionnels?

M. David Moscrop:

Oui.

Le problème tient en partie au fait que la vitesse, la portée et le volume du matériel publicitaire et de toutes sortes d’autres documents sont tels qu’on peut commencer à faire du microciblage. Vous pouvez commencer à faire des essais sur un très grand nombre de personnes. Vous avez en gros tous les outils dont vous avez besoin pour manipuler les gens, très facilement, et c’est parfaitement légal de le faire. C’est considéré comme de la publicité, mais avec un certain volume et un certain degré de sophistication, il devient très facile de manipuler efficacement les gens en adaptant les publicités de façon précise et...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je m’excuse. Pourrait-on dire la même chose des partis politiques, qui recueillent aussi beaucoup de données et qui utilisent de plus en plus le microciblage comme approche, de façon bienveillante, pour influencer les électeurs qui s’intéressent à certaines questions?

Il y a aussi la propension, de façon plus malveillante, à subvertir certains électeurs, à en supprimer certains des listes électorales, à les cibler avec des messages qui les détournent des questions qui sont susceptibles de les intéresser. Les partis politiques ont-ils une responsabilité quant à la gestion de leurs propres données?

M. David Moscrop:

Oui, une grande responsabilité. En fait, cela m’inquiète beaucoup. Une partie du problème, c’est que si la participation électorale est faible et que vous avez cette capacité d'agir par le biais des médias numériques, le microciblage devient soudain encore plus puissant.

Vous avez parlé d’empêcher les électeurs de voter. Si nos élections reposent uniquement sur la façon dont nous allons équilibrer nos tactiques de mobilisation et d'élimination pour essayer de faire en sorte que les bonnes personnes aillent voter et que les mauvaises personnes restent à la maison, ce que vous pourriez essayer de faire en utilisant les médias numériques — vous savez, par des déclarations trompeuses, par exemple, ou la diffusion de fausses informations ou par la désinformation —, alors tout à coup, vous avez énormément de pouvoir au bout des doigts. C’est plus facile et moins cher à utiliser.

Je pense que le problème vient en partie du fait que les prix de la publicité sont différents dans les médias sociaux et, disons, dans la radiodiffusion ou la presse écrite. C’est un problème grave qu’il faut également prendre en considération. Avec les médias sociaux, les médias numériques, il est notamment possible de tirer parti de leurs coûts peu élevés et de leur vaste portée pour essayer de faire changer d'avis les électeurs d’une façon ou d’une autre.

Je vais faire une petite distinction. Nous parlons de persuasion et de manipulation. Il y a un grand débat sur la différence entre les deux. Selon moi, la manipulation, c’est lorsque, si vous étiez mieux informé, vous seriez contrarié ou vous prendriez une décision différente. C’est de la manipulation. On tente délibérément de vous induire en erreur. Si vous aviez été plus rationnel — je dirais rationnel et autonome —, vous auriez pris une décision différente.

C’est ce qui fait peur: il est très facile de tirer parti des médias numériques pour essayer de manipuler les gens.

(1610)

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à Mme Romanado et c’est à votre tour de poser des questions.

Mme Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup. J’ai siégé au Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale avec certains de mes collègues ici présents, alors c’est un plaisir de les retrouver.

Un député: Nous sommes en chemin.

Mme Sherry Romanado: Nous sommes en chemin, 2.0.

Ma première question s’adresse à Mme Hadskey. Vous avez dit dans votre témoignage que vous organisez quatre élections chaque année en plus des élections spéciales et que vous avez un problème de fatigue et de participation électorale.

Mon collègue, M. Cullen, a parlé un peu du taux de participation des jeunes de 18 à 25 ans et vous avez prononcé le chiffre de 20 %. Quel est le taux de participation général à vos élections? Est-il supérieur à 50 %? Où en êtes-vous en matière de participation électorale?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Pour une élection présidentielle ou l'élection d'un gouverneur, la participation est entre 40 et 60 % ou quelque chose d'approchant, selon qui se présente. En général, avec le cycle électoral du printemps... Au printemps dernier, le taux de participation a été de 12 %. C’était très bas. Ce sont des propositions, des élections municipales et des choses de ce genre. Pour les élections au Congrès de cet automne, nous nous attendons à un taux de participation plus élevé, entre 50 et 60 %.

Il est important de souligner que la Louisiane a un cycle de quatre ans. Il y a l'élection présidentielle, l'élection d'un gouverneur, les élections au Congrès, puis il y a une année creuse. L’année dernière, 2017, a été notre année creuse. Lorsque j’essaie d’examiner toutes les statistiques, je dois toujours garder cela à l'esprit.

Je suis sûr que vous serez tous d’accord avec moi pour dire que notre taux de participation le plus élevé est en grande partie attribuable aux candidats, à leur notoriété et ce genre de choses. J’y vois un avantage quand on regarde les statistiques.

Mme Sherry Romanado:

À propos de votre programme de sensibilisation, j’adore l’idée d’utiliser la technologie dans les écoles, de voter pour la reine du bal, par exemple, pour amener les jeunes à se familiariser avec le processus.

Quels efforts faites-vous pour rejoindre les électeurs qui ne font pas partie de la catégorie des 18 à 24 ans et des 16 à 18 ans? J'ignore à combien s'élève la population de la Louisiane, mais, à moins d'une augmentation phénoménale du nombre de jeunes, je suppose que vous avez un grand bassin d’électeurs de plus de 25 ans qui ne vont pas voter pour une raison ou une autre. Quels efforts de sensibilisation faites-vous pour accroître la participation électorale?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Je suis la commissaire aux élections, mais j’aimerais beaucoup diriger les activités de sensibilisation. C’est l’un de mes domaines préférés.

Il y a quelque temps, nous avons commencé à organiser des élections syndicales, des élections pour la police de l'État ou tout ce que nous appelons des élections privées pour inciter les gens à utiliser l’équipement. En offrant ces services, nous en profitons pour fournir aussi des renseignements divers, notamment sur l’inscription des électeurs. Cela aide les gens à se familiariser avec l’équipement et à ne pas oublier de voter.

Nous avons une application, GeauxVote, dont nous sommes très fiers. C’est une application sur téléphone, et elle communique des avis poussés pour rappeler que le jour des élections approche. La réaction a été excellente. Nous adorons cette application. On la consulte pour savoir où on est inscrit pour voter et vérifier où se trouve son bureau de scrutin. On peut voir un modèle de bulletin de vote et l’examiner avant d’aller voter.

Nous avons vraiment un incroyable service de sensibilisation. Nous organisons une semaine d’inscription des électeurs et une semaine de sensibilisation pour essayer de stimuler la participation. Bien sûr, quand on regarde... J’ai renouvelé les machines trois fois dans cet État. Il est essentiel d’amener les gens à se familiariser avec les machines et à se sentir à l’aise avec ce genre de technique. Nous faisons tout notre possible.

(1615)

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question, s’il me reste quelques secondes, s’adresse à M. Moscrop.

Vous avez dit un mot des fausses nouvelles et de la menace numérique. Je siège au Comité permanent de la défense nationale, qui a réalisé des études intéressantes sur la guerre hybride, les fausses nouvelles, les tentatives de la Russie de s’infiltrer par de fausses nouvelles sur la Crimée et l'Ukraine et un grand nombre des campagnes de désinformation dont vous parlez. Récemment, aux informations au Canada, il a été question de la probabilité de campagnes de désinformation aux prochaines élections fédérales.

Le projet de loi C-76 nous prépare-t-il adéquatement à cette nouvelle réalité ? Comme vous l’avez dit, la génération actuelle veut être informée rapidement. Ma propre mère m’appelle pour me dire qu’elle a vu telle ou telle chose sur Facebook et que cela doit être vrai.

Que faut-il faire? Les gens veulent de l’information. Ils la veulent rapidement. Ils consultent des sources en ligne qui ne peuvent peut-être pas être vérifiées. Que pouvons-nous faire? Le projet de loi à l'étude va-t-il assez loin à cet égard?

M. David Moscrop:

J’essaie d’être optimiste. Il est 5 h 16 du matin ici, à Séoul, alors c’est particulièrement difficile.

Le problème au niveau mondial est d'ordre épistémique. Il y a une tonne d’information et elle change très rapidement. Nous avons évolué pour nous adapter à un environnement très différent de celui où il y a de l’information partout qui arrive constamment de tous les côtés, et nous n'avons le temps ni de la traiter ni d'y réfléchir.

De plus, étant donné qu’il s’agit d’un contexte marqué par l'esprit de parti où chacun est porté à utiliser l'information pour tenter d’induire les gens en erreur, les problèmes vont être extrêmement difficiles et de plus en plus ardus, surtout à mesure que la technologie s’améliore. Nous voyons maintenant des « deep fakes », c'est-à-dire de fausses vidéos. Ces vidéos sont très convaincantes et cela me semble absolument terrifiant. Ce sera un problème mondial auquel il sera difficile de faire face.

Dans la mesure où [Difficultés techniques] traite de cette question, ce sera en limitant les fonds et en restreignant l’activité étrangère. La façon de réprimer ces activités, dans la mesure du possible, c’est de frapper à la source, et c’est souvent une question d’argent. Il ne faut pas oublier qu’une grande partie de cette activité est motivée par l'appât du gain. Certains sont motivés par des objectifs politiques ou idéologiques, mais, dans une large mesure, c'est une question de profit. Nous savons tous que des adolescents macédoniens qui se sont ingérés dans les élections aux États-Unis en animant à partir de leur sous-sol des sites Web qui diffusaient de fausses nouvelles ont agi de la sorte parce que cela leur rapportait plus que toute autre activité. Pendant longtemps, ils ont été actifs dans les deux camps, mais ils ont commencé à privilégier les républicains de droite parce que c'était plus payant. C'était une question d’argent.

Ce que nous pouvons faire ici et maintenant, c’est comprendre les préoccupations épistémiques plus larges au sujet de la formation des citoyens et de la création d'une capacité pour les médias numériques et les sources fiables. Pour protéger le milieu de l’information de façon à avoir des sources fiables dans les médias classiques et nouveaux est de trouver une façon de limiter les fonds. C'est un bon début, mais il y a une question plus importante, comme je viens de le dire, soit la protection des médias d’information afin que les gens aient une source fiable et une surveillance. C’est, là aussi, une discussion qui s'impose.

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Reid. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais commencer par M. Moscrop.

Lorsque j'entends des gens dire que les fausses nouvelles sont un phénomène nouveau, j'ai tendance à réagir en disant que, pour moi, c'est vraiment de l'histoire ancienne. Après tout, c’est en 1898 que William Randolph Hearst a réussi à convaincre les Américains de faire la guerre à l’Espagne en prétendant que le USS Maine avait explosé dans le port de La Havane à cause d'un sabotage espagnol. The Onion traite de cette histoire depuis longtemps.

La différence, aujourd’hui, me semble-t-il, du point de vue épidémiologique, c’est qu’il est plus facile de publier un mème et que la falsification se fait plus rapidement. Les fausses nouvelles me semblent plus virulentes aujourd’hui qu’elles ne l’étaient en 1898, mais on prend aussi plus vite conscience qu'il s'agit d'une falsification, ce qui nous permet d'être hyperconscients du phénomène.

De toute évidence, cela change l’environnement, mais je ne vois pas très bien ce que cela peut changer à la réponse stratégique. Pouvez-vous nous livrer votre pensée à ce sujet, étant donné que nous essayons d’élaborer une politique pour lutter contre ces fausses nouvelles plus virulentes et plus rapidement réfutées?

M. David Moscrop:

Oui, vous avez raison. La propagande et l’information trompeuse existent depuis aussi longtemps que la politique. La différence, c’est la vitesse, la portée, le volume et la facilité de déploiement. C’est sans précédent.

Les pirates dont il est question ici s'attaquent au cerveau humain, pour la plupart. Ils essaient de s'en emparer et de le diriger.

Comment pouvons-nous fournir aux gens des renseignements plus fiables et dignes de confiance? Il faut notamment assurer une protection structurelle aux médias. Il ne s’agit pas seulement des médias traditionnels. Il faut aussi s’assurer qu’il y a de la place pour les nouveaux médias, que les gens ont accès à ces sources de confiance et qu’ils savent qu’ils sont légitimes. Cela suppose un certain degré de transparence, de sorte que lorsqu'une information est affichée en ligne, il y ait une indication très facile qui permet de savoir si elle est sûre ou vérifiée.

Nous en avons discuté un peu dans un projet auquel je travaille: un code de couleurs — rouge, jaune ou vert — qui serait accolé à l'information. Le problème, et je n’ai pas de réponse immédiate, c’est de savoir qui doit faire les vérifications. Voilà le problème épistémique plus vaste. Si une partie du problème est que nous avons besoin d'informations dignes de confiance, à qui appartient-il de décider de ce qui est digne de confiance? Autrefois, les médias d’information s'en chargeaient, et ils étaient les gardiens de la véracité des faits. Maintenant, tout s’est effondré. Dans une certaine mesure, c’est une bonne nouvelle, si on se soucie de démocratisation, mais nous n’avons tout simplement pas trouvé de modèle de rechange. Ma meilleure réponse structurelle, c’est qu’il faut protéger les médias.

Dans les microréponses, vous voudrez peut-être au moins discuter de la façon dont les messages sur les médias sociaux qui peuvent être contrôlés par Facebook, Twitter ou qui que ce soit d’autre pourraient porter une marque ou un code quelconque pour les identifier comme dignes de confiance.

(1620)

M. Scott Reid:

Dans une certaine mesure, l'issue des élections n'est généralement pas déterminée par les électeurs les mieux informés, qui sont en règle générale aussi ceux qui sont le plus fermement engagés envers l’un ou l’autre des camps. Ils ont mûrement réfléchi et ont reconnu qu’ils sont conservateurs, socialistes ou autres et qu’ils ont donc un port d'attache. Ce sont des électeurs peu actifs.

Ce qui me frappe, c’est que les électeurs qui s’engagent intensément se tournent vers certaines personnes pour gérer l'information. Ils ont des éditorialistes en qui ils ont confiance. Ils ont des moyens de filtrer les choses.

C’est le plus gros problème pour les personnes peu engagées. La différence, c’est que les personnes peu engagées ou peu sensibilisées prennent des décisions qui, au bout du compte, déterminent si le parti X ou le parti Y finit par gagner les élections.

Êtes-vous d’accord pour dire que ce sont ces gens-là qui doivent nous préoccuper le plus? Cela dit, avez-vous des idées sur la façon de régler ce problème? Il semble que ce sont les personnes les plus difficiles à atteindre pour leur offrir une protection, en fin de compte.

M. David Moscrop:

Oui. Je reviens à l’heuristique. Peu importe à quel point nous sommes instruits, éclairés ou expérimentés; chacun d’entre nous utilise des raccourcis mentaux pour prendre des décisions de nature politique.

Certaines recherches réalisées aux États-Unis il y a quelques années donnent à penser que lorsqu’il s’agit, disons, de raisonnement motivé et de rationalisation, nous pensons prendre nos propres décisions rationnelles, mais nous sommes vraiment en train de rationaliser. Les électeurs mal informés le font, mais les électeurs avertis le font parfois aussi. La différence, c’est qu’ils le font avec une idéologie et une histoire plus élaborée. Le problème touche tous les groupes, bien que vous ayez raison de dire que les électeurs les moins bien informés sont plus vulnérables.

Chose curieuse, ces gens comptent souvent sur leur famille ou leurs amis pour recevoir les messages politiques. L’un des aspects intéressants de Facebook et de Twitter, c’est que les gens reçoivent beaucoup d’information, mais ce qui semble avoir un impact énorme, c’est que leur oncle Larry, par exemple, a affiché telle chose, et ils lui font confiance et l’aiment. Il ressemble beaucoup à eux, alors ils vont faire comme lui. Ensuite, beaucoup de ces démarches heuristiques se sont rapprochées de la famille et des amis, surtout sur Facebook.

Comment amorcer un cycle vertueux ou un cycle positif dans lequel les informations que les gens se transmettent sont fondées? Nous nous représentons la chose comme un problème d’offre et de demande. Il y a une demande d'absurdités et de bons renseignements. Il y a toute une offre d’absurdités et de bonnes informations. Comment pouvons-nous encourager le lien entre l’offre et la demande et améliorer cette information?

Il faut notamment s’assurer qu'il y a abondance du côté de l’offre. Nous allons parler de l’économie épistémique de l’offre. L’offre est une bonne chose. Vous voulez obtenir le plus de renseignements fiables possible du côté de l’offre pour essayer de noyer le reste et offrir un choix à ceux qui veulent quelque chose de mieux que des fausses nouvelles, des nouvelles trompeuses ou l'information infecte des tabloïdes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons terminer avec Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à chacun d’entre vous d’avoir pris le temps de venir témoigner aujourd’hui.

Madame Hadskey, j’ai l’impression que votre passion pour la sensibilisation, et ma passion à moi pour l’engagement et la participation des jeunes sont très importantes. Je suis heureux que le projet de loi comporte un certain nombre d’initiatives. Le mandat en matière d’éducation a été redonné au directeur général des élections. C'est donc important. Ensuite, nous avons parlé un peu de l’inscription précoce des électeurs.

Comme vous avez une certaine expérience dans ce domaine, je voudrais profiter de vos compétences, qui pourraient nous aider à aller de l’avant. J’ai trouvé intéressant que vous parliez de l'utilisation de l’équipement et de la tenue d’élections dans les écoles. Dois-je comprendre que la technologie attire les élèves? Comment cela se répercute-t-il sur la participation des jeunes au vote à l’extérieur de l’école?

(1625)

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Très intéressant. En fait, j’ai participé à un grand nombre de ces élections. Au cours d’une année d'élection présidentielle en particulier, les enfants entendent leurs parents et tout le monde parler de l’élection, et ils ont l’impression d’en faire partie lorsqu’ils ne votent pas seulement pour quelque chose qui concerne leur école ou leur classe et qu’ils mettent un bout de papier dans une boîte. Ils estiment avoir le droit de faire quelque chose que seuls les jeunes de 18 ans peuvent faire. Leur visage s’illumine lorsqu’ils ont l’occasion de faire quelque chose qu’ils estiment être un privilège ou quelque chose d’intéressant. Lorsque nous faisons venir les machines et qu’elles vérifient leur nom, le nom de l’école ou les couleurs de l’école, cela les intrigue vraiment.

Dans les écoles secondaires, la plupart des classes supérieures commencent automatiquement à remplir des cartes d’inscription. Si elles ne sont pas déjà remplies, les élèves s'en emparent dans les écoles.

En Louisiane, nous avons également, en janvier, une élection privée spéciale appelée le Louisiana Young Readers' Choice Election. Les bibliothèques ont un programme à l’échelle de l’État dans le cadre duquel elles permettent aux enfants de choisir les livres qu’ils préfèrent. Les élèves participent tous. À la fin, on leur communique tous les résultats. Ils peuvent voir les enregistrements des résultats. Il s’agit uniquement de faire participer les enfants et les jeunes adultes au processus électoral avant qu’ils n'atteignent l’âge de 18 ans. C’est vraiment une bonne chose.

Le taux de participation que nous obtenons... Maintenant, nous tenons aussi des élections privées dans les universités, de sorte que, si l’université tient son élection de président étudiant ou quelque chose du genre, nous offrirons nos services pour ces élections également.

Notre système est imposé d'en haut, en ce sens que nous programmons nos propres machines à voter et que nous travaillons sur nos propres machines à voter. La programmation des élections ne pose pas de problème. Si c’est à des fins éducatives, il n’y a pas de frais. Il n’y a pas de frais de service, rien. Nous le faisons pour aider l’État à inciter les gens à voter.

Je crois vraiment que c’est un excellent programme.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, il semble fantastique.

Et les écoles auxquelles le service est offert, vous vous contentez de proposer le service, quitte à ce qu'elles vous appellent ensuite? C'est ainsi que se concrétise la participation?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Les registraires et les greffiers de chaque paroisse de l’État de la Louisiane connaissent très bien ce service. Parfois, les entités communiquent avec le registraire ou le greffier, ou parfois, elles nous appellent directement. Tout se trouve sur notre site Web. La liste y est, puis celui qui veut une élection privée ou qui veut faire des visites électorales, il voit avec qui il doit communiquer. Nous obtenons l’information et nous fournissons toutes les machines.

Nous conservons beaucoup d’information — le nombre de personnes inscrites pendant que nous étions là, ou le nombre de personnes qui ont effectivement touché aux machines à voter — et nous remettons cela à l’Assemblée législative chaque année, pour montrer combien de personnes nous avons rejointes [Inaudible].

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Quel est le pourcentage? Selon vous, quel est le pourcentage des étudiants qui participent au vote et qui font ensuite le suivi avec l’inscription? Pouvez-vous deviner? Est-ce 50 %? Est-ce 80 %?

Mme Sherri Hadskey:

Je dirais que dans les écoles secondaires, à la fin des élections, c’est un élément important. Tout le monde s’assoit à la table et remplit sa carte d’inscription des électeurs, alors je crois que le programme a une influence énorme dans ces écoles.

Quant aux plus jeunes, ils savent qu’en janvier, ils auront le droit de voter. Je connais les deux points de vue, car mes fils ont tous les deux fréquenté une école qui a admis les machines à voter. Ils en ont été très enthousiastes et fiers et ils en parlaient pendant les semaines qui ont précédé.

Je crois qu’on obtient un grand nombre d’inscriptions grâce à ce programme.

(1630)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D’accord. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci à tous, David Moscrop, Sébastien Corriveau, Sherri Hadskey et Victoria Henry. Votre groupe nous a appris beaucoup de choses. C’était formidable. Merci beaucoup d’avoir pris le temps de venir nous aider dans nos travaux.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour que les témoins suivants puissent prendre place.

(1630)

(1635)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

La séance reprend.

Nous accueillons notre prochain groupe de témoins. Je crois comprendre que nous avons des difficultés techniques avec le témoin qui comparaît depuis la Nouvelle-Zélande, mais nous allons tâcher de régler le problème. Entretemps, nous allons présenter nos autres témoins et les laisser faire leur déclaration d'ouverture.

En fait, nous entendrons peut-être un ou deux témoins par vidéoconférence. Au moins, pour l'instant, nous avons ici même, de l’Alliance de la fonction publique du Canada, Chris Aylward et Morna Ballantyne. Nous allons commencer par vous.

Nous avons prévu d’entendre nos autres témoins par vidéoconférence: Leonid Sirota, de l’Auckland University of Technology, en Nouvelle-Zélande; Pippa Norris, de Harvard, qui comparaît au Massachusetts; Angela Nagy, ancienne présidente-directrice générale de l'association du Parti vert dans Kelowna—Lake Country, qui vient de la magnifique ville de Kelowna, en Colombie-Britannique.

Nous commencerons par ceux qui sont présents en personne, puis nous poursuivrons.

Je ne sais pas qui va faire la déclaration d'ouverture de l’Alliance de la fonction publique du Canada, mais nous allons vous céder la parole et vous laisser le soin de décider.

M. Chris Aylward (président national, Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci au Comité de nous permettre de comparaître aujourd’hui.

L’Alliance de la fonction publique du Canada représente 180 000 membres. Nous sommes le plus grand syndicat de la fonction publique fédérale.

Le projet de loi C-76 propose de vastes modifications qui ont des répercussions importantes sur le processus démocratique. Nous appuyons fermement les modifications proposées dans le projet de loi qui élimineront les obstacles au vote et qui le rendront plus accessible.

Mes observations porteront sur les modifications relatives aux tiers.

Notre activité électorale habituelle consiste à informer nos membres des enjeux et à les encourager à exercer leurs droits politiques et à voter. Nous le faisons en communiquant avec eux de diverses façons, y compris par la publicité. Lors des dernières élections fédérales et d’un certain nombre d’élections précédentes, l’Alliance de la fonction publique du Canada s’est enregistrée comme tiers.

Le projet de loi C-76 n’a pas modifié la définition de publicité électorale par des tiers, mais cette définition limite notre droit de représenter les intérêts de nos membres en période électorale. Les messages que nous diffusons et qui peuvent être reçus ou vus par le public, comme les renseignements affichés sur les tableaux d’affichage ou inclus dans les circulaires, sont considérés comme de la publicité électorale s’ils font état d'une position sur une question à laquelle un parti enregistré ou un candidat est associé ou si le message s’oppose à un parti enregistré.

Je vous mets au défi de trouver un enjeu qui touche les Canadiens et nos membres et qui ne peut être associé à un parti, à un chef ou à un candidat à un moment ou à un autre. La grande majorité de nos membres travaillent pour le gouvernement fédéral et pour des organismes fédéraux contrôlés ou régis par le gouvernement, et nous nous occupons régulièrement des questions liées aux partis enregistrés. C’est notre rôle et notre responsabilité de promouvoir leurs intérêts et de faire valoir leurs préoccupations, et notre droit de le faire a été confirmé par les tribunaux.

Les restrictions actuelles sur la publicité par des tiers, les changements proposés à la période électorale et l’introduction de nouvelles périodes préélectorales nous empêchent de jouer notre rôle légitime de défenseur des droits de nos membres. C’est particulièrement important lorsque les gouvernements tentent de les empêcher de s’exprimer sur certaines questions et de restreindre leurs droits et leurs activités politiques parce qu’ils sont au service de l'État.

Lors des dernières élections fédérales, nous étions au beau milieu de négociations avec le Conseil du Trésor pour environ 100 000 membres. Lorsque nous avons manifesté contre les propositions du gouvernement, Élections Canada nous a informés que les messages sur nos pancartes et nos bannières pourraient être considérés comme de la publicité électorale aux termes de la Loi électorale. Ils étaient perçus comme transmettant un message au public pendant une période électorale et pouvaient être interprétés comme une manifestation d'opposition à un parti enregistré ou l'expression d'une position sur un enjeu lié à un parti enregistré, en l'occurrence le parti alors au pouvoir.

Le projet de loi C-76 propose d’étendre des restrictions semblables, mais non identiques, à la nouvelle période préélectorale. La différence, c’est que la publicité pendant la période préélectorale exclut les messages qui prennent position sur des enjeux liés aux partis politiques et à leurs candidats ou leurs chefs. Ces restrictions pourraient toutefois encore être interprétées de façon à limiter ce que nous pouvons dire publiquement au sujet des positions prises par nos employeurs du secteur public.

Je vous renvoie à l’arrêt clé rendu en 1991 par la Cour suprême dans l’affaire Lavigne et le Syndicat des employés de la fonction publique de l’Ontario. Dans cette décision, la Cour a affirmé les liens qui existent entre l’activité politique et les intérêts syndicaux, ou le syndicalisme démocratique. Elle a dit que nombre d'activités politiques « qu'elles se rattachent à l'environnement, à la politique fiscale, aux garderies ou au féminisme, peuvent être considérées comme liées au cadre plus général à l'intérieur duquel les syndicats doivent représenter leurs membres ». À noter qu'elle a dit: « doivent représenter leurs membres » et « cadre plus général ».

Nous sommes également préoccupés par le fardeau inutile que le projet de loi imposerait aux syndicats pour faire le suivi et la déclaration de toutes les dépenses de publicité entre les élections. L’AFPC est une grande organisation qui regroupe 15 composantes relativement autonomes et plus de 1 000 sections locales. Pourtant, la disposition sur les tiers la traite comme une entité unique. Nous serions maintenant tenus de surveiller toutes ces composantes afin de faire rapport des dépenses liées aux messages au public dont le coût est de 10 000 $ ou plus pendant les élections et la période préélectorale.

(1640)



En conclusion, nous demandons au Comité d’examiner très attentivement les dispositions proposées sur la publicité par des tiers avant d’aller de l’avant avec le projet de loi afin de ne pas porter atteinte au droit légitime des syndicats de s’exprimer au nom de leurs membres. Nous vous demandons également d’envisager de scinder le projet de loi et d’agir rapidement pour adopter des articles qui font l’objet d’un consensus et recueillent un appui général, comme les articles qui figuraient initialement dans le projet de loi C-33, et de consacrer plus de temps à l'étude des autres modifications proposées dans le projet de loi C-76

Merci d'avoir pris le temps de nous écouter.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Norris, professeure de relations gouvernementales et chargée de cours lauréate à l’Université de Sydney, et conférencière en politique comparée à Harvard.

À vous, madame Norris.

Mme Pippa Norris (professeure des relations gouvernementales et chargée de cours lauréate, University of Sydney, conférencière McGuire en politique comparée, Harvard, directrice du Electoral Integrity Project, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie de m'avoir invitée.

Tout d’abord, j’accueille très favorablement le projet de loi. Il est vraiment essentiel à toute forme d’intégrité électorale d'essayer de moderniser l’administration électorale, d’accroître la participation et de réglementer les tiers. Je m'exprime aussi à titre de directrice aussi d'un projet portant sur l'intégrité électorale.

Les mesures proposées — par exemple, l’autorisation des frais de garde d’enfants, l’élargissement de l’accès pour les électeurs handicapés, la modernisation des processus et, en particulier, la restriction de l’influence étrangère — sont autant de mesures très constructives. Cela dit, je ferai valoir trois points essentiellement au sujet d'éléments qui pourraient être renforcés ou qui ne sont pas nécessairement mis en évidence dans le projet de loi.

Il y a d’abord, bien sûr, le cadre législatif. Il n’y est pas fait mention des principales formes de réforme électorale, notamment le système de représentation proportionnelle mixte, qui fait l’objet de discussions dans le cadre du référendum en Colombie-Britannique. Bien sûr, il n’est aucunement question non plus de quotas fixés par voie législative pour assurer la représentation des deux sexes, bien qu’à l’heure actuelle, le Canada compte un quart de femmes au Parlement, ce qui est à peu près la moyenne mondiale. La Nouvelle-Zélande en a 38 %, le Royaume-Uni, 30 % et ainsi de suite. Ce sont deux questions qui, à mon avis, sont toujours d'actualité et auxquelles il faut s'attaquer.

Le deuxième enjeu est celui des menaces à la cybersécurité. Cela est utile, notamment parce qu'on tente d’éliminer les influences étrangères et de rendre les dépenses électorales plus transparentes en matière de publicité, mais lorsque nous examinons ce qui a été révélé par le département de la Sécurité intérieure des États-Unis, nous constatons que le projet de loi laisse de côté certains des principaux problèmes qui menacent réellement toutes les démocraties occidentales, dont celles de l’Allemagne, de la France, du Royaume-Uni et du Canada. Aux États-Unis, par exemple, la cybersécurité des documents officiels, y compris, par exemple, le registre électoral, a été ciblée dans 21 États. Dans cinq États, on rapporte que des pirates russes sont entrés dans les systèmes, ont regardé et ont téléchargé des fichiers. Tout ce dont nous avons besoin, c’est de ce genre d’atteinte à la cybersécurité dans un ou deux ordinateurs d’Élections Canada ou de n’importe quelle autre province pour que, immédiatement, la crédibilité et la légitimité des élections soient remises en question, et vous vous retrouvez aux prises avec de profonds différends. Peut-être que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications fait déjà un travail extraordinaire sur ce plan, mais peut-être qu’une autre loi ou un autre projet de loi avant 2019 s’impose vraiment.

Bien sûr, il ne s’agit pas seulement des dossiers officiels d’enregistrement. Ce ne sont pas tant les bulletins de vote papier, qui peuvent être validés. Il s’agit des fichiers électroniques des États et des bureaux provinciaux, de la cybersécurité des partis politiques, bien entendu, et, évidemment, de la réglementation des robots sur les médias sociaux. Le projet de loi n'en dit pas un mot. Il ne s’agit pas seulement de la publicité, mais aussi des moyens systématiques dont la Russie s'est servie, par l'entremise des médias sociaux, pour jouer sur les dissensions dans la société américaine, les dissensions au sujet du Brexit et les dissensions dans d’autres pays d’Europe. Toutes ces questions sont très difficiles à régler, car il faut préserver la liberté d’expression, mais ce sont des questions que le gouvernement et Élections Canada devraient placer au premier rang de leurs priorités.

Le dernier point concerne la participation. Là encore, les idées sont très importantes. Par exemple, il importe de veiller à ce que les jeunes soient inscrits pour les prochaines élections et d’élargir les mesures d’adaptation pour toutes les personnes handicapées. Nous avons encore besoin d'idées novatrices. Il ne faut pas oublier que la participation, aux dernières élections canadiennes, a été de 68,5 %. C’est plus élevé qu’aux États-Unis, mais dans la plupart des pays, la participation est d’environ 75, voire de 80 % dans certains pays européens. Bien sûr, l'Australie dépasse les 90 %. Il serait très utile de songer à d’autres façons de rendre le vote plus pratique tout en préservant la sécurité.

Rien de ce que j'ai proposé n'est réalisable avant les prochaines élections de 2019. Il est urgent d’adopter le projet de loi, et je le reconnais. À l’avenir, cependant, une réflexion sur le cadre électoral défini par voie législative, sur les menaces à la sécurité et sur d’autres formes de participation renforcerait vraiment les idées exprimées ici et irait dans le même sens.

Merci beaucoup de m'avoir donné l’occasion de vous faire part de mes réflexions sur le projet de loi.

(1645)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Très bien. Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Nagy, de Kelowna, ancienne PDG du Parti vert du Canada dans la circonscription de Kelowna-Lake Country.

Vous avez maintenant la parole pour votre déclaration d'ouverture.

Mme Angela Nagy (ancienne chef de la direction, Kelowna - Lake Country, Parti Vert du Canada, à titre personnel):

Merci et bon après-midi. À titre de chef de la direction de l’association de circonscription du Parti vert fédéral à Kelowna, j’ai travaillé ici, à Kelowna, de 2006 à 2015 et j’ai ensuite été directrice financière de l’association en 2015 avant de démissionner après les élections générales de 2015.

Je suis heureuse de voir que bon nombre des modifications proposées à la Loi électorale du Canada répondent à de graves préoccupations que j’ai soulevées avant, pendant et après les élections générales de 2015 et qui ont abouti au dépôt de plusieurs plaintes auprès du commissaire aux élections fédérales. Même si je ne suis pas moi-même partie, j’ai fourni des éléments de preuve dans le cadre de l’enquête qui a finalement mené à la conclusion que Dan Ryder avait contrevenu à la Loi électorale, ce pourquoi il a conclu une transaction le 4 mai 2018.

Dan Ryder a été reconnu coupable d’avoir contrevenu au paragraphe 363(1) de la loi en versant une contribution à un candidat alors qu’il n’avait pas le droit de le faire. C’est le résultat de l’achat de pancartes du Parti vert et de leur utilisation pour appuyer le candidat du Parti libéral dans la circonscription de Kelowna—Lake Country, ce que je vais expliquer dans un instant. Toutefois, je suis toujours préoccupée par le fait que l’alinéa 482b) et peut-être d’autres articles de la Loi électorale et d’autres lois canadiennes ont été violés. L’alinéa 482b) dispose: « Commet une infraction quiconque [...] incite une autre personne à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter ou à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter pour un candidat donné par quelque prétexte ou ruse. »

J’ai des preuves que des électeurs ont été incités à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter pour un candidat en particulier lors des élections générales de 2015 en raison d’une campagne de désinformation que Dan Ryder et la campagne locale du Parti libéral ont sciemment lancée et poursuivie à partir de juillet 2015, afin de semer la confusion chez les électeurs et d’influencer le résultat des élections de 2015.

Je voudrais profiter de l’occasion pour passer en revue avec le Comité une rapide chronologie et un énoncé des faits qui justifient cette préoccupation. En mars 2015, Dan Ryder et sa femme, Zena Ryder, ont adhéré au Parti vert. Peu de temps après, à titre de chef de la direction de l’association de circonscription, j’ai commencé à recevoir de la correspondance de ces deux personnes proposant une fusion ou une collaboration entre le Parti vert et le Parti libéral pour défaire le candidat conservateur aux élections suivantes.

Plusieurs mois plus tard, une course à l’investiture a eu lieu et le candidat fantoche des Ryder, Gary Adams, a été nommé en proposant un programme selon lequel il se retirerait de la course et appuierait publiquement le candidat libéral au nom du Parti vert, avec l’engagement officiel envers les membres du Parti vert, avant le vote à l’assemblée d’investiture, de demander l’approbation du Parti vert du Canada avant d’entreprendre une telle démarche. Cet engagement a été pris parce que certains craignaient que cette approche ne soit contraire à la constitution du Parti vert du Canada. Malheureusement, sans égard à cet engagement, le prétendu accord de coopération a été annoncé officiellement aux médias immédiatement après l'assemblée d'investiture et une campagne de désinformation a suivi.

En fin de compte, il a été conclu qu’une telle approche était en fait contraire à la constitution du Parti vert du Canada, et celui-ci a désapprouvé tout appui pour un autre candidat ou parti. À la suite de longues consultations et discussions, un accord de compromis a été conclu entre le Parti vert du Canada, l’Association de circonscription de Kelowna—Lake Country, le candidat et son équipe de campagne.

Cette entente comprenait les dispositions suivantes : le candidat se retirerait. Il n’y aurait pas d’appui officiel ou officiel du Parti vert pour un autre parti ou candidat. Toute communication au sujet de ce compromis serait rédigée, partagée et approuvée conjointement. Aucune somme ne serait dépensée par l’association de circonscription et aucune ressource du Parti vert du Canada ne serait utilisée pour aider le candidat d’un autre parti. Malheureusement, il n'a été tenu compte d'aucun des éléments de cette entente. Cent pancartes génériques du Parti vert ont été commandées et placées à côté des pancartes du Parti libéral le long des grandes routes et sur des propriétés privées pour montrer qu'il y avait une forme de partenariat. Plusieurs de ces pancartes ont été utilisées lors d’événements publics de la campagne libérale, de séances de photos et dans l'affichage le long des routes pour faire croire à une certaine forme d’appui officiel du Parti vert au candidat du Parti libéral.

Plusieurs déclarations publiques laissaient également entendre qu’il y avait effectivement un partenariat soutenu entre les deux candidats et les partis. Au bout du compte, je dirais que ces déclarations étaient frauduleuses et visaient à tromper des électeurs ou à les empêcher de voter. Dans l’affaire McEwing c. Canada, en 2013, la Cour fédérale a conclu ce qui suit : Dans le contexte de l’ensemble de la Loi, de l’objet qu’elle vise et du sens ordinaire et grammatical du mot fraude, il suffit de démontrer qu’une allégation mensongère a été faite et visait à empêcher les électeurs d’exercer le droit qu’ils avaient de voter pour le candidat de leur choix.

Ce à quoi je me suis toujours opposée depuis le tout début, c’est la perversion et la manipulation de notre processus électoral et de notre démocratie.

(1650)



Le Parti vert du Canada a déjà apporté des modifications à ses règlements administratifs pour empêcher que ce genre de chose ne se reproduise, et j’appuie fermement l’article 323, qui modifie l’article 481 de la Loi. Il aiderait à prévenir la confusion chez les électeurs par l'utilisation de renseignements et de documents trompeurs, et contribuerait au renforcement et à la clarification du libellé de cette modification.

M. Marc Mayrand, directeur général des élections du Canada, a tenu les propos suivants le 29 mars 2012 devant le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre: « Ce sont là des questions très sérieuses qui menacent l'intégrité de notre processus démocratique. Si nous les laissons sans réponse, elles risquent de porter atteinte à un élément essentiel d'une saine démocratie, soit la confiance des électeurs à l'égard du processus électoral. »

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci de votre déclaration d'ouverture.

Chers collègues, il semble que nous ayons encore du mal à communiquer avec notre autre témoin par vidéoconférence. Je n’ai pas beaucoup d’espoir pour l’instant, mais les techniciens vont continuer à essayer.

Je vais passer aux questions, et si un miracle se produit et que nous sommes en mesure d'établir la liaison, nous donnerons la parole à ce témoin à la première occasion. Sinon, nous pourrions peut-être lui offrir un autre créneau, s’il y en a un, ou lui proposer de présenter un mémoire. J'espère que le miracle se produira, mais sinon, c’est ce que nous ferons.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions. Madame Romanado, vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos témoins d’être ici aujourd’hui.

Ma première question s’adresse à Mme Nagy. Votre témoignage a été reçu et d’après ce que je comprends — j’ai devant moi une copie du rapport de conformité du commissaire aux élections fédérales —l’entente de conformité a été conclue entre Élections Canada et Dan Ryder, l’agent officiel du candidat du Parti vert en 2015.

Je comprends que l’entente de conformité indique clairement que ce qui s’est produit a été jugé non intentionnel de la part de M. Ryder lorsqu’il a utilisé les pancartes du Parti vert et que, malgré une plainte selon laquelle une enquête approfondie de près de deux ans par Élections Canada a été entreprise... Je me reporte aux renseignements que le commissaire aux élections fédérales a transmis à M. Ryder, selon lesquels, au bout du compte, le commissaire a décidé que les preuves disponibles n’appuient pas les allégations et que, à ce moment-là, des ressources considérables avaient déjà été consacrées à l’enquête. Le commissaire a estimé qu’il n’y avait aucune raison de poursuivre cette affaire et que cette personne avait conclu une entente de conformité avec Élections Canada à cet égard.

Je comprends également que, d’après les renseignements dont je dispose, vous étiez au courant de cette entente qui avait été très bien communiquée aux membres du Parti vert avant l’émission du bref électoral en août. Le protocole signé par les membres du Parti vert concernant l’entente entre le candidat du Parti libéral et le candidat du Parti vert a été très largement communiqué aux gens. Les gens savaient que cette entente avait été mise en place.

Même si vous aviez quelques préoccupations, vous avez, à la suite d’un courriel envoyé le 14 septembre 2015 aux directeurs du Parti vert de Kelowna, demandé à Élections Canada de confirmer par écrit si le fait d’avoir des pancartes génériques du PVC avec des pancartes libérales, compte tenu du protocole d’entente sous-jacent, pouvait vous mettre dans l’eau chaude, dans le cas où un parti voudrait vous accuser d’avoir appuyé par inadvertance la campagne du Parti libéral.

Il avait déjà précisé, comme quelqu’un vous l’a fait, je crois, qu’il était acceptable, du point de vue d’Élections Canada, que des affiches libérales et vertes apparaissent ensemble en raison de notre situation unique. Je veux vraiment m’assurer que nous pourrons résister aux critiques.

D’après ce que j’ai compris, Élections Canada a indiqué qu’il n’y avait pas de problème et qu’il faudrait peut-être modifier les règles en fonction de ce qui s’est passé, mais à ce moment-là, d’après ce que je comprends, on vous a dit qu’il était acceptable d’avoir des affiches du Parti vert et du Parti libéral lors d’un événement.

À la suite des élections et du dépôt d’une plainte, on a décidé de mettre en place un accord de conformité et de l’examiner à l’avenir. C’est peut-être l’objet de votre témoignage ici aujourd’hui, de vous pencher sur cette question, à savoir si un tel accord devrait être mis en place ou non si cela devait se reproduire lors d’élections ultérieures.

Je voulais apporter une précision au compte rendu pour m’assurer que nous comprenions tous cela.

Ma prochaine question s’adresse à la professeure Norris.

Professeure Norris, vous avez parlé de questions que nous devrions, à votre avis, aborder dans le projet de loi C-76. Vous avez parlé du cadre juridique, y compris la représentation proportionnelle mixte, les quotas fondés sur le sexe, les menaces à la cybersécurité et la participation.

Parmi les questions dont vous avez parlé, en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-76, quelle serait la priorité? Nous venons d’entendre un groupe de témoins et la cybersécurité est évidemment un sujet dont on parle beaucoup ces jours-ci. Évidemment, nous voulons tous un taux de participation plus élevé, et je pense qu’en Australie, si je me souviens bien, le vote est obligatoire. Évidemment, avec le vote obligatoire, un taux de participation de 90 % est fantastique.

(1655)

M. Scott Reid:

Non, cela montre seulement qu’une personne sur 10 n’a pas respecté la loi.

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Quand je dis que le taux de participation est à 90 % en raison du vote obligatoire, je suis heureuse qu’il soit supérieur au 60 % qu’obtient le Canada. Permettez-moi de corriger cela.

Je sais que le comité sur la réforme électorale est revenu avec l’idée de ne pas imposer le vote obligatoire, alors ce ne serait peut-être pas possible dans notre cas. Quant aux deux autres questions que vous nous avez demandé d’aborder, quelle serait votre recommandation?

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Mesdames et messieurs les témoins, si les membres du Comité vous posent une question, vous n’avez pas besoin de ma permission pour y répondre. Sentez-vous libre d’aller de l’avant. Je vous ferai signe lorsque votre temps sera écoulé.

Mme Pippa Norris:

Merci.

Il s’agit de trois enjeux différents. La réforme électorale est un processus extrêmement difficile et elle ne peut pas être mise en oeuvre de toute façon avant 2019. C’est une question que je voulais aborder dans le cadre d’un débat futur au Parlement. La participation est un processus à très long terme, et je pense que certaines des initiatives prisent ici, par exemple, permettre à Élections Canada et au commissaire de participer à l’éducation civique et à l’information civique est absolument essentiel. Je suis très heureuse que ce programme ait été rétabli.

Il y a une menace à laquelle il faut absolument s’attaquer, à mon avis, et c’est la cybersécurité et les fausses nouvelles. Nous savons tous que cette question fait l’objet d’un vaste débat. Par exemple, l’Allemagne a adopté très récemment une nouvelle loi en vertu de laquelle les principales plateformes de médias sociaux ont la responsabilité de surveiller ce qui se passe et de détecter des exemples d’influence russe en particulier. Les robots sociaux peuvent être détectés grâce à la technologie pour veiller à ce que les plateformes médiatiques en soient responsables et qu’elles soient mises à l’amende si, par exemple, elles trouvaient des cas de discours haineux ou d’autres choses. Nous savons à quel point cela a semé la discorde. Les Russes ont essentiellement semé de l’information dans la campagne américaine des deux côtés.

Beaucoup de ces renseignements ont alimenté la haine raciale, soit de la part de ceux qui prétendaient que la police était responsable, soit de ceux qui prétendaient que la communauté afro-américaine était responsable. C’est une question extrêmement difficile à surveiller efficacement, mais je pense que cela pose aussi un danger pour le Canada. Nous ne voulons pas que l’intolérance sociale, le manque de confiance sociale et la démocratie canadienne soient polarisés par des messages étrangers qui ne sont pas de la simple publicité.

D’après ce que je lis dans le projet de loi, la publicité par des tiers, la publicité partisane, est couverte, mais ces autres formes de communication ne sont pas nécessairement couvertes, et je pense qu’Élections Canada, les organismes de réglementation de la radiodiffusion ou d’autres organismes devraient examiner cela de très près.

(1700)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. McCauley, pour sept minutes, pour notre prochaine série de questions.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Bienvenue à tous.

Madame Nagy, j’aimerais approfondir un peu la question de la conformité ou des problèmes que vous avez rencontrés. Pourriez-vous me dire ce que vous pensez de la collusion qui a eu lieu entre des partis lors de la dernière élection?

Mme Angela Nagy:

Ce qui me préoccupe surtout, c’est que le protocole d’entente n’a pas été entériné par un parti officiel, c’est-à-dire les membres du parti avant le vote qui a mené à l’investiture de Gary Adams comme candidat de notre formation. Lors de l’assemblée de mise en candidature, on s’est engagé envers les membres à ce que ce concept de partenariat et de coopération ne soit appliqué qu’avec le consentement du Parti vert du Canada.

Au bout du compte, après plusieurs mois de négociations et de discussions, tous les partis ont décidé et convenu qu’il n’y aurait pas d’appui formel d’un autre candidat ou d’un autre parti, mais cela a continué, peu importe l’entente et l’engagement pris par tous les partis. Au bout du compte, les électeurs ont été confus et trompés au sujet de ce qui s’était passé et de ce qui se passait. On leur a fait croire qu’il y avait un partenariat entre le Parti vert du Canada et le Parti libéral alors qu’il n’y en avait pas.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Croyez-vous que c’était involontaire, comme on l’a dit?

Mme Angela Nagy:

Ce qui a pu être involontaire — et je suis d’accord — nous avons tous les deux demandé des éclaircissements auprès d’Élections Canada...

J’ai mentionné à plusieurs reprises que je croyais que nous contrevenions à des articles de la loi, et j’ai été déçu quand Élections Canada m’a dit que le concept de l’utilisation de ces pancartes était très intéressant et qu’on pouvait les utiliser. Le fait qu’on ait dépensé 700 $ ou 800 $ pour 100 pancartes peut avoir été une erreur et qu’on ne voulait pas aller à l’encontre de la Loi électorale. Cette campagne de désinformation visant à donner l’impression qu’il y avait un partenariat entre le Parti vert et le Parti libéral était entièrement intentionnelle et avait été planifiée...

(1705)

M. Kelly McCauley:

La surveillance des dépenses n’était pas intentionnelle. La véritable campagne était...

Mme Angela Nagy:

Pour jeter de la poudre aux yeux des électeurs.

M. Kelly McCauley:

D’accord.

Pensez-vous qu’Élections Canada doit mieux aborder cette question ou que la loi doit être renforcée à cet égard?

Mme Angela Nagy:

J’ai été très heureuse de voir que l’article 323 propose de modifier l’alinéa 481 de la Loi électorale du Canada concernant les publications trompeuses. Il s’agit essentiellement de toute forme de communication qui pourrait induire les électeurs en erreur et qui contient de fausses déclarations. Il y a eu de nombreuses fausses déclarations et de nombreux documents, y compris l’utilisation stratégique des pancartes du Parti vert pour semer la confusion et induire les électeurs en erreur.

M. Kelly McCauley:

C’est exact.

Pensez-vous que l’accord de conformité est suffisamment solide?

Mme Angela Nagy:

Non. En fait, je crois qu’un examen plus poussé pourrait révéler que les électeurs ont été induits en erreur.

Ce que je comprends de la lettre que j’ai reçue du commissaire aux élections fédérales, c’est qu’une plainte concernant une violation de l’alinéa 482b) serait difficile à prouver, parce qu’il faudrait une forme quelconque d’enquête ou de sondage auprès des électeurs pour déterminer s’ils étaient effectivement confus au sujet de ce qui se passait.

Je crois qu’Élections Canada devrait enquêter davantage et déterminer si les électeurs étaient confus. J’ai des preuves et des témoins m’ont dit qu’ils croyaient qu’il y avait un partenariat et que cela avait influencé leur vote.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Excellent, merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aylward, bienvenue.

Je le taquinais tout à l’heure. J’essaie de le retrouver depuis deux ans pour parler de Phénix. Vous êtes ici devant moi, alors j’aimerais maintenant passer à Phénix. Non, je plaisante.

Félicitations pour votre élection à la présidence. J’espère que vous n’avez pas utilisé l’influence russe pour gagner ce poste.

L’AFPC a dépensé environ 390 000 $, je crois, lors des dernières élections. Une très petite partie était, je crois, sous forme de main-d’oeuvre en nature. Je crois que le gros montant était consacré à la publicité. Avez-vous une ventilation des chiffres?

M. Chris Aylward:

Je n’ai pas la ventilation exacte sous les yeux, mais en ce qui concerne les 390 000 $, vous avez raison. C’était un peu plus de 390 000 $. Un large montant a été versé à une entreprise externe...

M. Kelly McCauley:

J’ai vu cela: Uppercut.

M. Chris Aylward:

— pour créer du matériel et faire de la publicité, y compris des panneaux publicitaires et des annonces à la radio, évidemment. Nous avons aussi créé un microsite Web, avec des vidéos, des affiches téléchargeables, des lettres d’action, etc., que nos membres pouvaient utiliser.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je veux revenir à Phénix, parce que ma vie semble tourner autour de Phénix. De toute évidence, c’est un enjeu important à l’heure actuelle, et nous avons entendu dire que cela pourrait être un enjeu électoral.

Selon vous, quel impact le projet de loi C-76 aura-t-il sur la capacité de l’AFPC de communiquer avec ses membres au sujet, par exemple, de Phénix, en tant qu’enjeu électoral?

M. Chris Aylward:

Cela fait partie de l’exposé. Le projet de loi limitera ce que nous pourrons faire. Nous croyons que communiquer avec nos membres est non seulement notre droit démocratique, mais aussi notre responsabilité. Bon nombre d’entre eux — environ 140 000 des 180 000 membres que nous représentons — sont des travailleurs du secteur public fédéral.

M. Kelly McCauley:

D’accord, merci.

Je vais manquer de temps et je vais donc céder la parole à Mme Norris.

Selon vous, quelle est la meilleure façon de mettre fin à l’ingérence étrangère dans les élections? Nous avons vu, par exemple, le Trésor américain enquêter sur la Russie et l’argent investi dans la fondation Tides s’est retrouvé au Canada. Il y a de l’ingérence sur deux fronts différents.

Quelle est la meilleure façon de prévenir cela?

Mme Pippa Norris:

La réflexion sur l’influence étrangère passe par de nombreux mécanismes différents. Certaines de ces dispositions concernent des choses comme les dépenses électorales et le besoin d’assurer qu’il y a des règlements pour les tiers, si les tiers acheminent de l’argent. Il arrive souvent que d’autres formes d’influence se manifestent, de même que des campagnes de désinformation qui sont organisées par des Canadiens ou des Américains, qui sont semées par des organisations internationales, en particulier la Russie dans le cas de certains des problèmes les plus récents.

À mon avis, aucun gouvernement ne dispose d’une règle d’or pour régler ce problème, mais nous commençons certainement à apprendre des choses. L’Union européenne a récemment produit un rapport important sur cette question, auquel ont participé des experts en cybersécurité et en communication politique ainsi que des gens qui s’intéressent aux campagnes; elle formule des recommandations sur la façon dont elle croit devoir protéger les pays de l’Union européenne contre ce genre d’influence.

De même, le département de la Sécurité intérieure a publié son rapport en février. Je pense que nous pouvons en tirer des leçons. Ce qu’il faut, c’est un ensemble de certaines des pratiques exemplaires qui se développent dans le cadre des campagnes dans les démocraties occidentales, car tout le monde est confronté à ce problème. Je pense également que les données probantes indiquent que le problème n’est pas tant le vote, en raison de l’influence des médias sociaux ou des tentatives directes de piratage qui ont vraiment transformé le vote dans certains États américains. Le problème porte en fait sur la tolérance sociale et les messages plus généraux que comportent ces types d’activités et le fait que les nouvelles ne sont plus crédibles, de sorte qu’on ne croit pas non plus la radiodiffusion publique et les journaux en raison du climat de fausses nouvelles que créent les médias sociaux dans une large mesure.

En bref, il faut tirer des leçons de certains des autres rapports gouvernementaux. Je serai très heureuse de faire parvenir au Comité les liens vers certains des documents qui ont été publiés récemment par la Commission européenne et d’autres.

(1710)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci beaucoup.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Vous avez parlé des liens. Si vous voulez les communiquer au Comité, vous pouvez les faire parvenir à notre greffier, qui pourra les distribuer aux membres.

Une grande chose est arrivée et nous avons pu la... À mon avis, il s’agit d’un miracle. J’ai été un peu trop pessimiste, je crois. Apparemment, je ne fais pas de bonnes prévisions. Je ne dirai même pas quel parti j’ai choisi en espérant qu’il gagne les élections en Ontario aujourd’hui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le Parti rhinocéros.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous verrons si un autre miracle se produit. Deux miracles en une journée, c’est peut-être trop espérer, mais nous en avons certainement eu un.

Nous accueillons maintenant Leonid Sirota, professeur à l’Université de technologie d’Auckland. Nous avons enfin réussi à l’inviter. Nous allons maintenant entendre sa déclaration préliminaire et chaque parti aura encore l’occasion de poser au moins une série de questions.

Monsieur Sirota, c’est maintenant votre tour.

M. Leonid Sirota (conférencier, Auckland University of Technology, à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président et membres du Comité. Je suis terriblement désolé de ce qui s’est passé ici. Merci de m’avoir invité.

Je commencerai par parler d’une chose que fait le projet de loi C-76, c’est-à-dire lever les contraintes imposées aux Canadiens qui votent à l’étranger, comme moi. C’est peut-être un plaidoyer spécial de ma part, mais je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à des questions sur les raisons pour lesquelles je pense que c’est une chose très louable sur le plan constitutionnel.

Je vais me concentrer sur la façon dont le projet de loi C-76 maintient ou, en fait, augmente certaines restrictions à la liberté d’expression dans la loi électorale canadienne. La liberté d’expression est au cœur des élections, et les élections sont au centre de la liberté d’expression. Ce lien a été reconnu il y a longtemps par les tribunaux canadiens, bien avant la Charte. F.R. Scott, le grand constitutionnaliste, a déjà écrit que tant que le mot « Parlement » est dans la Constitution, nous avons une déclaration des droits. C’était le cas avant la Charte, et pourtant, aucun débat dans la société canadienne n’est aussi réglementé que celui qui a lieu pendant les campagnes électorales. Certains de ces règlements sont importants et nécessaires, d’autres moins.

Je vais me concentrer sur trois restrictions particulières à la liberté d’expression dans le projet de loi C-76.

La première est la définition de « publicité électorale ». Le projet de loi découle de l’actuelle Loi électorale du Canada. Le problème que je vois, c’est que les exemptions prévues pour les communications de particuliers et de groupes s’appliquent tant aux particuliers qu’aux groupes, pourvu que les communications se fassent par l’entremise des médias traditionnels, des éditoriaux de journaux, etc. Toutefois, pour ce qui est d’Internet, seules les communications personnelles des particuliers sont exemptées de la définition de « publicité électorale » et non pas les communications de groupes. Je ne vois aucune raison valable de faire cette distinction. Je ne vois pas pourquoi, par exemple, le président d’un syndicat pourrait envoyer un gazouillis sous son propre nom, mais pas sous le compte institutionnel de ce syndicat. Encore une fois, je ne vois aucune raison de faire cette différence. Je pense qu’il faudrait modifier la définition pour qu’elle soit neutre sur le plan technologique.

Le deuxième point concerne les communications préélectorales que le projet de loi C-76 limiterait. Ces restrictions ne figurent pas dans l’actuelle Loi électorale du Canada. Dans l’affaire Harper, où la Cour suprême a confirmé les restrictions imposées aux communications par des tiers pendant les campagnes électorales, elle a dit que l’une des raisons pour lesquelles une restriction était acceptable dans une société libre et démocratique, c’est que le discours politique n’est pas restreint sauf pendant les campagnes électorales.

Certains ont dit que l’absence de réglementation sur les communications préélectorales est une échappatoire qu’il faut éliminer, mais à mon avis, c’est en fait une importante garantie constitutionnelle qui doit être préservée. La Cour d’appel de la Colombie-Britannique s’est penchée deux fois sur la question des restrictions sur les communications préélectorales; à deux reprises, elle a dit qu’elles étaient inconstitutionnelles. Les lois en cause n’étaient pas exactement les mêmes que celles dont fait état le projet de loi C-76 — elles étaient plus générales — alors je ne fais pas de prédiction sur la façon dont la Cour suprême se prononcerait sur le contenu du projet de loi C-76, mais il y a au moins une possibilité non négligeable que le projet de loi C-76 soit inconstitutionnel.

Plus important encore, il s’agit d’une question de principe. Le problème que les restrictions sur les communications préélectorales sont censées régler ne porte pas sur les « campagnes de trois mois ». Il porte sur ce qu’on appelle les « campagnes permanentes ». Le problème, c’est que trois mois ne suffiront pas pour régler la question des campagnes permanentes. Ce qui me préoccupe, c’est que le projet de loi C-76 est un premier pas vers des restrictions à long terme et peut-être permanentes des communications politiques au Canada et ce n’est pas une voie que nous voulons emprunter.

Le dernier point que je veux aborder est celui des restrictions sur les communications par des tiers, avant et pendant la campagne. La Cour suprême a confirmé les dispositions qui se trouvent actuellement dans la Loi électorale du Canada, mais ce n’est que le fondement constitutionnel. Cela ne veut pas dire que le Parlement ne peut pas protéger davantage la liberté d’expression que la Cour suprême. Il est important de se rappeler qui sont les tierces parties. C’est un terme consacré dans la loi électorale, mais qu’est-ce que cela signifie? Cela signifie simplement la société civile. Il s’agit de personnes, de syndicats, de groupes. Cela peut vouloir dire les riches personnes effrayantes, mais dans le contexte canadien, la plupart des tiers qui veulent communiquer pendant les élections sont des syndicats.

(1715)



Certains commentateurs, comme Tom Flanagan, ont dit: « Parfait. Nous voulons réduire la liberté d’expression de ces personnes. » Il se trouve que je partage la vision négative de M. Flanagan à l'égard des syndicats. Je ne partage pas son point de vue sur la liberté d’expression. Que nous aimions ou non les gens, ils devraient être libres de communiquer.

Les plafonds de dépenses des tiers prévus dans la Loi électorale du Canada et dans le projet de loi C-76 sont très bas. Ils représentent moins de 2 % de ce que les partis politiques sont autorisés à dépenser.

À titre de comparaison, en Nouvelle-Zélande, qui surpasse le Canada dans le classement de la corruption de Transparency International — cela me fait mal en tant que Canadienne, mais c’est ainsi —, les plafonds de dépenses sont d’environ 7,5 %. C’est un régime moins restrictif. C’est encore un plafond très bas. Il n’y a aucun risque que des tiers s’ingèrent dans les communications des partis politiques, mais il s’agit d’un régime plus permissif que celui du projet de loi C-76.

La dernière chose que je mentionnerai, également en ce qui concerne les tiers, ce sont les seuils. Pour l’enregistrement, c’est 500 $. Dès que vous dépensez 500 $, vous devez vous inscrire. Une fois que vous avez dépensé 10 000 $, vous devez vous soumettre à une vérification. Ces règles ont forcément un effet dissuasif sur la liberté d’expression. Ce sont des seuils très bas. Il n’y a aucune chance raisonnable que quelqu’un qui dépense 500 $, ou même 10 000 $, va changer le résultat des élections. Comme je l’ai dit, ces seuils ont un effet dissuasif sur la participation du public. Il faudrait les relever.

Je vais vous donner des chiffres comparatifs. En Nouvelle-Zélande, le seuil d’enregistrement est d’environ 12 000 $ canadiens. Quant au seuil pour la déclaration des dépenses, non pas la vérification, mais seulement le rapport, vous devez produire votre compte de dépenses s'il atteint le chiffre d'environ 90 000 $. La commission électorale peut exiger une vérification, mais personne n’est obligé de s’y soumettre.

Encore une fois, la Nouvelle-Zélande ne semble pas avoir un énorme problème de corruption politique. Ce serait un exemple à prendre en considération, et peut-être même à suivre, pour donner aux membres de la société civile davantage de chances de s'exprimer.

Merci. J’ai hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(1720)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci beaucoup.

Nous revenons maintenant à nos tours de questions.

Monsieur Cullen, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aylward, voulez-vous réagir au commentaire de M. Sirota selon lequel il n’aime peut-être pas les syndicats, mais il croit à votre liberté de parole?

M. Chris Aylward:

Je ne partage évidemment pas cette opinion négative des syndicats.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela ne faisait pas partie de votre campagne électorale?

M. Chris Aylward:

Non, ce n’était pas le cas.

Je suis tout à fait d’accord pour dire qu'il ne faudrait pas limiter notre liberté de nous exprimer et de parler au nom de nos membres.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Parlez-moi du scénario qui vous inquiète.

Pour ce qui est de Phénix, c'est, c'était et cela semble même continuer d’être un gros problème pour un certain temps. On passe à la prochaine campagne. Vous écrivez à vos membres et dites quelque chose au sujet de Phénix; vous partagez quelque chose sur les médias sociaux ou avec vos membres, puis vous organisez un dialogue avec les candidats au sujet de Phénix.

Craignez-vous que ce projet de loi tel, qu’il est actuellement rédigé, limite votre liberté de lancer une campagne axée sur des enjeux?

M. Chris Aylward:

Oui, et je vais demander à Mme Ballantyne de répondre.

Mme Morna Ballantyne (adjointe spéciale à la président national, Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada):

C’est une question de principe, mais il y a aussi des questions d’ordre pratique.

Si cette loi était appliquée dès maintenant, il faudrait d’abord essayer d’interpréter ce qu’est une activité politique, une activité partisane et une publicité partisane. Il y a aussi la question des sondages. Si cette loi était adoptée, nous devrions commencer à faire le suivi de toutes les activités auxquelles nous participons et qui pourraient être considérées ultérieurement comme de la publicité partisane ou des activités partisanes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. Je suppose que cela aurait un effet dissuasif sur...

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

Cela a un effet paralysant énorme, comme nous l’avons vu lors des élections de 2015.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comment avez-vous vu cela?

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

Au départ, il y a eu beaucoup de confusion, tout d’abord, sur la question de savoir si la transmission de messages par Internet ou par les médias sociaux était en fait de la publicité. Il a fallu beaucoup de temps pour obtenir une interprétation. Je ne sais pas si c’est encore valide, parce que ce n’est pas dans ce projet de loi, mais l’interprétation a été que ce n’était pas de la publicité. Pendant un certain temps, nous avons cessé de communiquer de cette façon, parce que nous craignions que ce soit considéré comme de la publicité.

Ce qui nous préoccupait, ce n’était pas tant les limites financières, parce que...

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est l’interprétation.

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

C’est l’interprétation, c’est la paralysie, c’est le suivi, et c’est la crainte de ne pas être en conformité avec la loi et de ce que seraient les conséquences si nous étions reconnus coupables d’avoir violé la loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous n'auriez aucun avantage à prendre le risque...

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

Absolument.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est l’effet paralysant sur la liberté d’expression.

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

Oui, surtout après avoir obtenu une interprétation selon laquelle si nous tenions un rassemblement... N’oubliez pas que nous étions en pleine négociation collective. Comme vous le savez, les congés de maladie constituaient un enjeu majeur. Un parti politique était clairement associé à cet enjeu, mais les autres partis en parlaient aussi. Il nous aurait fallu...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Même la tenue d’un rassemblement...

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

Nous ne pouvions pas avoir de pancartes de piquetage. Nous ne pouvions pas avoir des bannières mentionnant notre message principal et notre principale revendication. N’oubliez pas que nous sommes un syndicat du secteur public et que nous adressons constamment des revendications aux gouvernements. Il est impossible de faire la distinction entre le gouvernement et les partis politiques: c'est ce qui constitue le gouvernement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est intéressant. Il y a ce chevauchement entre ce qu’est le gouvernement et ce qu’est un parti politique, et la capacité de simplement soulever une question, qu’il s’agisse de congés de maladie, comme c’était le cas, d’un problème lié à Phénix ou, au nom d’une société pétrolière, de questions énergétiques. Le chevauchement entre la contestation contre le gouvernement et ce qui devient une activité partisane...

Mme Morna Ballantyne: C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen: ... est assez flou pour que vous pensiez que cela empêcherait la société civile ou tous les tiers de s’exprimer.

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

Nous ne pouvons pas parler au nom de toute la société civile...

M. Nathan Cullen: Eh bien, de votre point de vue...

Mme Morna Ballantyne: ... mais je peux vous dire et témoigner que cela a eu un effet paralysant sur nos activités en tant que syndicat représentant ses membres et négociant en leur nom.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vous remercie.

Madame Norris, j’ai une question pour vous. Proposeriez-vous que nous adoptions le modèle allemand en responsabilisant Facebook et les autres plateformes de médias sociaux en ce qui concerne leur responsabilité, leur culpabilité, pour ce qui est de répandre la désinformation?

Mme Pippa Norris:

Je crois vraiment important d’examiner les pratiques exemplaires, qui sont en cours de développement et qui sont encore très nouvelles, et de les examiner dans le contexte de ce que fait le secteur privé. Par exemple, Facebook a beaucoup plus d’employés qui essaient de surveiller ses propres activités. Même chose pour Twitter. De nouvelles règles en matière de transparence et de protection de la vie privée ont également joué un rôle essentiel à cet égard, mais il s’agit vraiment de voir ce que font les différents gouvernements pour trouver les meilleures solutions...

(1725)

M. Nathan Cullen:

L’une des questions dont nous parlons également ici est la participation, et pas seulement la participation des électeurs, mais aussi la diversité de ceux qui cherchent à représenter les électeurs. Un très bon aspect de ce projet de loi, c’est que les frais de garde d’enfants, comme vous l’avez mentionné, je crois, peuvent maintenant être utilisés comme dépenses électorales. Vous avez également écrit qu'il fallait essayer d’attirer davantage de femmes dans le système, ce qui est, selon moi, l’objectif principal, mais pas nécessairement.

Je vais vous citer. Vous avez dit: Il y a une forte association entre le type de système électoral adopté et la représentation des femmes. Les systèmes électoraux de représentation proportionnelle ont tendance à envoyer deux fois plus de femmes au Parlement que le système uninominal majoritaire à un tour ou la pluralité uninominale...

Si vous étiez obligée de choisir entre les dispositions qui existent dans le projet de loi C-76 et des dispositions qui, disons, permettraient au gouvernement de tenir sa promesse et d’instaurer un système plus proportionnel, et si votre seul objectif était d'assurer une plus grande diversité dans notre Parlement à majorité masculine de 75 %, lesquelles choisiriez-vous?

Mme Pippa Norris:

Heureusement, l'un ne remplace pas l'autre, comme vous le savez.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, vous feriez les deux.

Mme Pippa Norris:

Si vous augmentez le nombre de femmes et de membres des minorités pour que le Parlement ressemble davantage au Canada, cela augmente également la participation.

Comme vous le savez, j’ai commencé par les deux dispositions qui élargiraient vraiment la représentation, dont l’une est une réforme électorale en faveur d'un système proportionnel mixte, vers lequel beaucoup d’autres pays se sont maintenant tournés. Ce système offre les mêmes avantages que le scrutin uninominal majoritaire à un tour et le travail en circonscription, mais il y ajoute un résultat proportionnel. Deuxièmement, il y a les quotas légaux de genre, qui ont été mis en oeuvre dans une centaine de pays dans le monde. Le Canada a toujours été très positif en ce qui concerne la représentation des femmes, mais elle a pris du retard. Elle progresse par à coups.

Ces deux modifications législatives seraient bonnes, mais on ne pourrait pas les mettre en oeuvre avant l’élection de 2019.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Madame Nagy, je réfléchissais à votre histoire au sujet de Kelowna. J’essayais de me rappeler quand j’ai vu arracher des pancartes lorsque j’étais observateur lors de l'investiture de Stéphane Dion comme chef du parti libéral fédéral. Des gens saisissaient les pancartes des autres candidats et les collaient ensemble pour donner à penser que Bob Rae et Michael Ignatieff avaient formé une coalition et que les autres arrachaient leurs pancartes.

Peut-être que ce que vous avez observé n’était qu’une longue tradition...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: ... à l’intérieur d’un parti pour essayer de représenter quelque chose qui n’était pas vrai par le simple recours à l’affichage. C’était assez incroyable à voir. Cette violence entre libéraux était vraiment sidérante.

Je ne veux pas minimiser ce que vous avez vu à Kelowna, mais vous serez peut-être rassurée de savoir que cela n’a pas été fait seulement contre le Parti vert. Il y a peut-être égalité des chances sur ce plan-là.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Le temps de M. Cullen est écoulé, madame Nagy, mais si vous pouvez répondre très brièvement, n’hésitez pas à le faire, s’il vous plaît.

Mme Angela Nagy:

Bien sûr.

Je crois légitime de craindre que, dans n’importe quelle circonscription ou élection, un autre parti ou candidat puisse utiliser les pancartes ou le logo d’un autre parti pour suggérer un partenariat qui n’existe pas afin de semer la confusion chez les électeurs.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci. Je vous remercie d’avoir été brève.

Il reste deux intervenants. Nous allons entendre M. Graham pour deux minutes, puis M. Reid pour les deux dernières minutes. Cela mettra fin à la séance.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Madame Nagy, en ce qui concerne l’enquête sur les activités du Parti vert dans Kelowna—Lake Country en 2015, l’enquête est terminée et aucune conclusion n’a été tirée à l’égard de l’un ou l’autre des partis. Est-ce exact?

Mme Angela Nagy:

Ce n’est pas exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelles conclusions ont été tirées contre quelqu’un d’autre et quelle enquête reste ouverte?

Mme Angela Nagy:

L’enquête est terminée, mais Dan Ryder a été jugé en contravention du paragraphe 363(1) de la loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Son acte a été jugé non intentionnel. L’enquête est terminée et le dossier est clos. Si vous avez des preuves supplémentaires, pourquoi ne les avez-vous pas fournies à ce moment-là?

Mme Angela Nagy:

Eh bien, la lettre que j’ai reçue du commissaire aux élections indiquait que la préoccupation supplémentaire soulevée par d’autres plaignants concernant l’incitation d’une personne à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter pour un autre candidat serait difficile à prouver. Cela ne veut pas dire que cela ne s’est pas produit. Le commissaire a seulement dit que ce serait difficile à prouver.

J’ai encore de sérieuses réserves à ce sujet, parce que « difficile à prouver » et « factuel » sont deux choses très différentes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois.

Monsieur Aylward, j’ai une question pour vous. Le 3 décembre 2012, j’étais à Ottawa en tant que membre du personnel à l’époque, et j’ai vu un avion qui survolait Ottawa en tirant une grande banderole où on lisait « Stephen Harper nous déteste ». Vous souvenez-vous de cet incident?

M. Chris Aylward:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet et nous dire ce que cela a coûté à l’AFPC? Qu’est-il advenu de cet avion?

M. Chris Aylward:

Je peux vous dire ce qui est arrivé à l’avion. L’avion a été descendu à la suite d’une demande.

(1730)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez abattu un avion au-dessus d’Ottawa?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Chris Aylward:

Non. L’avion a atterri en toute sécurité à Ottawa à la suite d’une demande d’atterrissage.

Quant à ce que cela nous a coûté exactement, je ne peux pas vous le dire de mémoire. L'avion n'est pas resté longtemps dans les airs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Considéreriez-vous que c'est de la publicité faite par des tiers pendant la période préélectorale?

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

Voulez-vous dire aux termes de la loi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous demande votre opinion.

Mme Morna Ballantyne:

En vertu de la loi actuelle, cela dépend du moment où l’avion vole — sérieusement — et il semble que cela dépende aussi du libellé exact de la banderole.

Pour revenir à certains aspects pratiques — je pense que le Comité a la responsabilité de déterminer comment cette loi pourrait fonctionner — je reprendrai l’exemple de l’AFPC. C’est une très grande organisation, et les décisions sont prises par ses différentes composantes quant à la façon de représenter ses membres et de s’engager dans des activités politiques qui les représentent. Bon nombre de ces décisions ne sont pas centralisées, et pourtant, en vertu de la Loi électorale, nous avons la responsabilité, au niveau central, de faire le suivi et de faire rapport en vertu de cette loi entre les élections. C’est l’une de nos difficultés.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Nous allons passer à M. Reid pour les deux dernières minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

J’ai deux questions, ou peut-être une seule, pour M. Sirota.

Tout d’abord, Leonid, je suis heureux de vous revoir. J’aimerais m’attarder sur ce qui, à mon avis, est le thème central sur lequel vous attirez l’attention, à savoir que le projet de loi C-76 impose un certain nombre de restrictions des droits garantis par la Charte aux Canadiens. Vous avez parlé du vote des Canadiens à l’étranger et de la façon dont cela répond à une contestation en vertu de la Charte qui est en cours.

Je ferai simplement remarquer qu’il y a encore des citoyens canadiens qui vivent à l’étranger et qui n'auront pas le droit de voter. Pour ceux qui sont nés à l’étranger, je ne suis pas sûr, du point de vue constitutionnel, de voir pourquoi leurs droits garantis par la Charte seraient inférieurs à ceux de leurs parents. Je suppose que si vous soutenez que le droit de vote prévu à l’article 3 est subordonné ou limité par l’article 1, vous pouvez faire valoir cet argument, mais je ne pense pas que ce soit l’orientation que la Cour suprême a prise, étant donné qu’elle permet aux prisonniers de voter et ainsi de suite.

Plus important encore, je pense que vous avez soulevé une question très intéressante. Si nous nous opposons à l’idée d’une campagne permanente et que nous voulons dire, en tant que société, que nous ne voulons pas d’une campagne permanente, à mon avis, vous laissez entendre que nous nous engageons sur une pente glissante en disant que nous devons restreindre le discours politique de plus en plus tôt avant la date des élections et pas seulement pendant la période électorale. Ensuite, quand on aura dépensé énormément d'argent avant le 30 juin, aux prochaines élections, la période préélectorale qui commence à cette date sera inévitablement jugée insuffisante et nous verrons apparaître d’autres restrictions.

Y a-t-il un risque que nous nous dirigions vers des restrictions substantielles de la liberté d’expression, ou est-ce trop alarmiste?

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC)):

Avant que vous ne commenciez, monsieur Sirota, je vous demanderais d’essayer d’être bref, parce que le temps de parole du groupe est écoulé. Veuillez répondre, mais assez brièvement, si vous le pouvez.

M. Leonid Sirota:

Pour répondre à la première question, je pense que c’est un bon argument.

Pour ce qui est de la deuxième question, oui, je pense que c’est très important. Maintenant, peu importe qui veut faire [Difficultés techniques], c’est à vous et à vos collègues du Parlement canadien [Difficultés techniques] d'y mettre fin à un moment donné. Je ne sais pas à quel moment cela pourrait être et c'est donc à vous d'en décider. Des appels sont faits déjà pour le 30 juin et par la suite Difficultés techniques] et, oui, je ne sais pas en matière de principe, [Difficultés techniques] l’expression [Difficultés techniques].

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC)):

D’accord, merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous nos témoins de leur participation.

Monsieur Sirota, nous nous excusons du fait que les choses n’ont pas bien fonctionné pour que vous puissiez être là pendant toute la séance, mais nous sommes heureux que vous ayez pu vous joindre à nous.

Je vous remercie tous de votre contribution.

Nous allons suspendre brièvement la séance pour nous préparer à accueillir le prochain groupe de témoins.

(1730)

(1735)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous reprenons la séance.

Nous accueillons notre dernier groupe de témoins pour aujourd'hui.

Kevin Chan, chef de la politique publique à Facebook, se joint à nous. Il est dans la salle.

Par vidéoconférence, de Washington, nous aurons Michele Austin, chef du service gouvernement, politique publique et philanthropie à Twitter Canada; et Carlos Monje, directeur de la politique officielle de Twitter. C'est avec plaisir que nous vous accueillons tous les deux.

Avant de passer aux déclarations préliminaires, je mentionnerai que M. Chan a soumis quelques documents. Nous avons sa déclaration préliminaire, dont certaines parties sont dans les deux langues officielles, mais elle n'est pas traduite, si bien que nous avons l'ensemble de la déclaration dans les deux langues officielles.

Pour distribuer ce document, et aussi faire circuler une lettre que M. Chan a reçue du bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales, qui est dans une seule langue officielle, et que M. Chan aimerait faire distribuer, il nous faudrait le consentement unanime.

Avons-nous le consentement unanime?

Un député: Non.

Le président: Comme il n'y a pas consentement unanime, je ne la distribuerai pas.

Donnons maintenant la parole à M. Chan pour sa déclaration préliminaire.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Qui a dit non?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Désolé, je n'ai pas vu.

Il n'y a rien sur nos témoins...

Le vice-président (Monsieur Blake Richards):

Monsieur Chan, ne faites pas de cas de la confusion qui règne dans la salle. Vous avez la parole.

M. Kevin Chan (directeur mondial et chef de la politique publique, Facebook Canada, Facebook Inc.):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui. Je m'appelle Kevin Chan et je suis le chef de la politique publique de Facebook Canada.

Je voudrais d'abord reconnaître l'importance du sujet à l'étude aujourd'hui, l'intégrité électorale.

Facebook est là pour rapprocher et bâtir une communauté et créer un milieu sain pour l'engagement civique. C'est essentiel à notre mission d'entreprise. Nous savons qu'un service favorisant l'inclusion, l'information et l'engagement civique revêt une importance capitale pour les utilisateurs de Facebook.[Français]

Je veux souligner le fait que nous comprenons à quel point Facebook est une plateforme clé pour l'engagement civique de vos partis politiques et chefs respectifs, et qu'il s'agit d'un moyen important employé par les citoyens canadiens pour communiquer directement avec vous. Le premier ministre a utilisé Facebook en direct la semaine dernière pour annoncer les nouveaux tarifs du Canada aux États-Unis.

Le chef de l'opposition a récemment participé directement à une séance de questions et réponses avec les Canadiens sur Facebook, et le chef du NPD a diffusé le discours qu'il a prononcé récemment pour la manifestation dirigée contre Kinder Morgan sur la Colline du Parlement en direct sur Facebook.

Nous reconnaissons que Facebook est un outil important pour l'engagement civique et c'est pourquoi nous prenons notre responsabilité envers l'intégrité électorale sur nos plateformes tant au sérieux.[Traduction]

Au Canada, nous comprenons à quel point Facebook est une plateforme clé pour vos partis et dirigeants politiques respectifs, et un moyen important pour les Canadiens de communiquer directement avec vous. La semaine dernière, le premier ministre a utilisé Facebook Live pour annoncer les nouveaux droits de douane que le Canada imposera aux États-Unis. Le chef de l’opposition s'est prêté récemment à une séance de questions et réponses directement avec les Canadiens sur Facebook. De même, le chef du Nouveau Parti démocratique a diffusé en continu et en direct le discours qu'il a prononcé lors du récent rassemblement contre Kinder Morgan sur la Colline du Parlement.

Nous savons que Facebook est un outil important pour l'engagement civique, et c'est pourquoi nous prenons très au sérieux notre responsabilité à l'égard de l'intégrité électorale dans notre plateforme. Nous nous intéressons depuis de nombreuses années à la question de l'intégrité électorale au Canada. Après les dernières élections fédérales de 2015, le bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales a fait remarquer que « la collaboration et l'intervention rapide de Facebook dans divers dossiers clés nous ont aidés à résoudre rapidement plusieurs problèmes et, au bout du compte, à faire respecter de la Loi électorale du Canada ». Nous avons tout à fait l'intention d'être aussi vigilants aux prochaines élections fédérales en 2019. Comme le président l'a mentionné, une copie de la lettre que le bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales a adressée à Facebook a été transmise au Comité pour examen.

Comme vous le savez peut-être, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications a publié l'an dernier un rapport décrivant diverses cybermenaces pour les prochaines élections fédérales, en cernant deux domaines où Facebook se reconnaît un rôle à jouer: premièrement, la cybersécurité — le piratage des comptes en ligne des candidats et des partis politiques; et, deuxièmement, la désinformation en ligne.

Nous avons réagi en lançant l'automne dernier notre initiative canadienne pour l'intégrité électorale, qui comprend les cinq éléments suivants: premièrement, pour la cybersécurité, nous avons lancé le « Guide d'hygiène informatique » de Facebook, qui s'adresse spécifiquement aux politiciens et aux partis politiques canadiens. On y trouve des renseignements clés sur la façon dont tous les administrateurs de la présence Facebook d'une personnalité ou d'un parti politique peuvent contribuer à protéger les comptes et les pages. Deuxièmement, nous offrons une formation en cybersécurité à tous les partis politiques fédéraux. Troisièmement, nous avons lancé une nouvelle ligne courriel à utiliser en cas de cybermenaces à l'intention des politiciens et des partis politiques fédéraux. Cette ligne courriel est un canal d'accès direct à notre équipe de sécurité Facebook; elle permettra une intervention rapide pour les pages ou les comptes compromis. Quatrièmement, pour combattre la désinformation en ligne, nous avons mis sur pied un partenariat avec HabiloMédias, le centre canadien d'éducation numérique et médiatique, dans le cadre d'un projet biennal visant à élaborer des idées, des ressources et des messages d'intérêt public sur la façon de reconnaître la désinformation en ligne. L'initiative, que nous appelons « Au-delà des faits » comprend des plans de leçon, des missions interactives en ligne, ainsi que des vidéos et des guides pour promouvoir l'idée selon laquelle la vérification de l'information est une compétence essentielle dans la vie et une affaire de civisme. Cinquièmement, nous avons lancé notre test de transparence de la publicité, soit la fonction « voir les publicités », au Canada en novembre dernier. Ce test, qui est continu, permet à toute personne au Canada de voir toutes les publicités diffusées sur une page, même si cette personne ne fait pas partie de la clientèle cible. Tous les annonceurs sur Facebook sont assujettis au visionnement des publicités, mais nous reconnaissons que c'est un volet important de notre effort d'engagement civique. Les candidats aux élections et les organisations qui s'occupent des publicités politiques devraient être tenus responsables de ce qu'ils disent aux électeurs, et cette fonction permet à tous de voir tout ce qu'un candidat ou une organisation dit à tout le monde. C'est un niveau de transparence plus élevé que celui qui existe déjà pour tous les types de publicité, en ligne ou hors ligne.

Le « Guide d'hygiène informatique » et de plus amples renseignements sur ces cinq initiatives se trouvent à facebookcanadianelectionintegrityinitiative.com. J'ai également distribué le « Guide d'hygiène informatique » au Comité pour examen. Ce n'est que la phase un de notre initiative canadienne pour l'intégrité électorale, et nous avons l'intention de lancer d'autres mesures pour favoriser la cybersécurité et réprimer la désinformation en ligne d'ici les élections fédérales de 2019.

Je voudrais également vous faire part de certaines mesures que nous avons prises avant les élections d'aujourd'hui en Ontario. Nous avons mené des activités de sensibilisation auprès de tous les administrateurs des pages des candidats de l'Ontario, afin de leur faire part des pratiques exemplaires à suivre pour protéger leurs comptes et veiller à avoir accès à la ligne téléphonique à utiliser en cas de cybermenaces. Nous avons envoyé un avis dans l'application à tous les administrateurs des pages des candidats en Ontario; cet avis, qui apparaissait en haut de leur fil, leur rappelait d'activer l'authentification à deux facteurs. Et nous avons lancé un nouveau message « Au-delà des faits » d'HabiloMédias axé sur la façon d'évaluer la validité de l'information en ligne pendant la campagne. La vidéo, qui est diffusée depuis le 3 mai, a été vue plus de 680 000 fois. Nous lancerons des initiatives semblables pour d'autres élections provinciales au Canada dans les prochains mois.

Quant au projet de loi C-76, la Loi sur la modernisation des élections, il concerne un large éventail de questions électorales, dont un grand nombre échappent à la compétence de Facebook. Le projet de loi C-76 comporte une disposition obligeant les organisations qui vendent de l'espace publicitaire à ne pas accepter sciemment les annonces électorales d'entités étrangères. Nous appuyons cette disposition.

(1740)



Je vous remercie encore une fois de m'avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître devant votre comité, et je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1745)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci, monsieur Chan.

Je signale au Comité que, pour ce qui est de la lettre dont j'ai parlé, pour laquelle nous n'avons pas eu le consentement unanime, le greffier la fera traduire, après quoi nous la distribuerons. Évidemment, ce ne sera pas aujourd'hui.

Nous allons maintenant donner la parole à M. Monje pour sa déclaration préliminaire.

M. Carlos Monje (directeur de la politique officielle, Twitter - États-Unis et Canada, Twitter inc.):

Merci, monsieur le président, de m'avoir invité à comparaître et de me donner l'occasion de vous exposer notre point de vue.

Je m'appelle Carlos Monje. Je suis le directeur de la politique et de la philanthropie pour le Canada et les États-Unis. Je suis accompagné de Mme Michele Austin, chef du service gouvernement, politiques publiques et philanthropie à Twitter Canada.

Je vous prie de m'excuser de ne pouvoir être parmi vous aujourd'hui, mais j'ai eu le plaisir de me rendre à Ottawa en janvier pour informer Élections Canada et le cabinet de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques de l'approche de Twitter en matière de qualité de l'information, en général, et de transparence des publicités, en particulier.

Twitter informe les personnes de ce qui se passe dans le monde. L'une des raisons pour lesquelles on le consulte est qu'il est le meilleur endroit où communiquer avec les dirigeants politiques et les défenseurs des politiques et en apprendre davantage. Twitter travaille avec les partis politiques de tout le Canada pour les mettre en contact avec les utilisateurs, notamment par la publicité.

Nous sommes déterminés à accroître la transparence de toutes les publicités diffusées sur Twitter, y compris les publicités politiques. À la fin de 2017, nous avons annoncé les premières étapes d'une série de changements sur notre plateforme pour faciliter la promotion de la liberté d'expression, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de la transparence. Plus précisément, Twitter a lancé un programme destiné à accroître sensiblement la transparence des publicités. En plus d'accroître la transparence de toutes les publicités sur la plateforme, nous menons aux États-Unis un projet pilote qui vise à protéger l'intégrité de notre plateforme et de nos utilisateurs en imposant de nouvelles restrictions d'admissibilité et exigences de certification à tous les annonceurs qui désirent acheter des publicités politiques.

Nous allons accroître la sensibilisation aux messages politiques payés en annexant un insigne visuel dans les communications politiques payées pour être bien clairs lorsque les utilisateurs voient l'annonce politique ou s'y intéressent.

Nous allons inclure des avis de non-responsabilité, indépendamment de la méthode de publicité — qu'il s'agisse de texte, d'éléments graphiques, de vidéos ou d'une combinaison de tout cela — de la façon la plus technologiquement pratique, et nous lançons un centre de transparence de la publicité politique qui fournira aux utilisateurs de nouveaux détails permettant un ciblage démographique pour chaque annonce de la campagne politique et pour l'organisation qui l'aura financée.

Après l'analyse de notre expérience de ce projet pilote aux États-Unis, et lorsque nous aurons apporté les rajustements nécessaires, nous le lancerons sur d'autres marchés, y compris le Canada. Il y a des façons dont les communications numériques sont fonctionnellement et technologiquement différentes de la publicité diffusée dans d'autres médias, tels la télévision, la radio et les avions, comme nous l'avons déjà appris du groupe de témoins.

Nous offrons le libre-service pour permettre aux annonceurs de contrôler les produits qu'ils veulent utiliser sur notre plateforme et de contrôler qui les voit. Les annonceurs créent aussi leur propre contenu. Souvent, les annonceurs utilisent plusieurs outils de publicité sur la plateforme, en utilisant des médias comme les vidéos ou en créant un emoji. Il n'est pas rare que les annonceurs gèrent plus d'un pseudo pour leur marque. Ils veulent pouvoir mobiliser plusieurs membres de leur équipe et collaborer avec des partenaires, des agences ou des clients ayant accès à ces divers comptes. Ils souhaitent pouvoir mettre à jour ou modifier rapidement le contenu de leur plateforme.

Twitter appuie les intentions du projet de loi C-76, la Loi sur la modernisation des élections. Twitter appuie les efforts visant à imposer des règles claires aux annonceurs qui souhaitent acheter des communications politiques payées sur les médias et les appareils numériques.

Nous demandons au Comité de clarifier certaines choses, dans deux articles du projet de loi en particulier — les articles 282.4 et 491.2 — qui régissent les modalités de vente des publicités et la façon d'appliquer les nouvelles règles. Ces préoccupations portent notamment sur la façon dont les mots « intention » et « sciemment » seront mesurés et prouvés dans le cas de l'hébergement d'annonces publicitaires, sur la façon dont Élections Canada appliquera ces changements, sur la façon dont les activités suspectes seront signalées, sur la capacité d'Élections Canada d'agir en temps réel, et sur l'identification erronée des comptes des vrais utilisateurs et la façon de la corriger.

Twitter aura besoin de plus de temps pour son exercice de diligence raisonnable au sujet des changements proposés et de la façon dont la plateforme s'y conformera pour héberger la publicité, y compris celle des partis politiques.

En conclusion, Twitter respecte la liberté d'expression de ses utilisateurs et de ses annonceurs, et en est fière. Nous croyons également que la mise en contexte de la publicité politique est la clé d'un débat démocratique plus sain. Nous nous réjouissons à la perspective de poursuivre notre travail pour améliorer nos services et de travailler avec vous.

Nous attendons vos questions avec plaisir.

Merci.

(1750)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer directement à ces questions.

Commençons par M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je pense, comme nous tous autour de la table, que mon expérience est un peu conflictuelle, car nous sommes probablement tous sur Facebook et Twitter, que nous considérons comme des outils efficaces de communication avec nos électeurs — j'ai même communiqué avec eux aujourd'hui au sujet de questions qui ont leur réponse dans mes messages —, mais il y a un côté très sombre dans vos deux plateformes et je ne sais pas si l'une ou l'autre de vos organisations a vraiment fait grand-chose pour lutter contre cela.

Je vous donne un exemple — et je ne veux pas me concentrer sur Facebook, parce que Twitter n'est pas mieux.

C'est une expérience que j'ai vécue. Un petit groupe de suprémacistes blancs — quelques-uns seulement — manifestaient à l'entrée de mon bureau. J'ai commis l'erreur de les appeler suprémacistes blancs sur Facebook et la communauté des suprémacistes blancs m'est tombée dessus. J'ai fait une recherche sur la page Facebook de l'organisateur et suis tombé sur un de ses articles. Je ne veux pas nommer le député parce que je ne veux pas l'entraîner dans ce débat. Je sais que Facebook a reçu une copie de cette annonce et vous m'avez remis le livre sur papier glacé qui explique ce qu'il faut faire des contenus offensants.

L'annonce montrait une photo du député, qu'elle disait être un immigrant, et ce type-là a dit: « Un tireur d'élite canadien atteint sa cible à 3 km. Mais personne ne peut loger une balle dans la tête de ce connard? Soyons sérieux, les gars ». J'ai cliqué là-dessus — quelqu'un réclamait l'assassinat d'un parlementaire canadien — et j'ai dit que c'était vraiment offensant et que, dans le grand contexte de la liberté d'expression, cela dépassait les bornes. J'ai eu comme réponse: « Cela ne viole pas nos normes communautaires ». J'ai alors transmis l'échange au niveau du ministre, car je sais que la ministre est en communication avec Facebook, et le message est passé.

Si cela ne viole pas les normes communautaires de votre organisation, monsieur Chan, comment pouvons-nous vous croire lorsque vous dites que vous allez nous aider à préserver notre démocratie? Je crois que l'objectif est la meilleure rentabilité possible, ce qui est louable — n'est-ce pas ce que recherchent les sociétés? — mais il ne semble pas y avoir la même obligation de rendre des comptes que dans le cas d'un journal ou d'une autre organisation.

Je vous cède la parole. La lettre n'est pas traduite, et je sais que vous en avez reçu une copie, mais pourriez-vous nous expliquer comment nous pouvons faire confiance à votre organisation?

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci de votre question, monsieur. Je dois admettre que je ne sais pas exactement de quel contenu vous parlez, puisque vous ne l'avez pas dit. Si c'est celui auquel je pense, je crois que vous allez découvrir qu'il n'est plus sur la plateforme.

M. Chris Bittle:

Il n'est plus sur la plateforme. Est-ce parce que je suis un député qui vous a signalé le problème par l'entremise du cabinet du ministre? Personne n'a ce niveau d'accès.

Après cela...

M. Kevin Chan: Donc, je...

M. Chris Bittle: Désolé. Laissez-moi finir.

Après cela, comme cela ne violait pas les normes communautaires, lorsque j'ai commencé à recevoir des menaces de mort sur votre plateforme, je n'ai pas essayé de les signaler. Je m'en suis plaint à la GRC et à la sécurité générale, mais pourquoi me donner le mal de faire cet exercice? Si un appel à l'assassinat n'est pas une violation, pourquoi devrais-je me donner la peine de signaler les menaces dont je suis la cible? Les deux organisations sont des plateformes difficiles à réglementer, et il ne semble pas y avoir beaucoup d'aide. Je sais, monsieur Chan, que vous préparez un plan pour la phase deux, avant les prochaines élections, mais où cela nous mène-t-il? C'est effrayant. Nous avons vu les résultats en Grande-Bretagne et aux États-Unis, et nous voyons à quel point la politique est en train de semer la discorde dans tous nos pays et comment des agents étrangers pourraient s'en servir. J'ai besoin d'une meilleure réponse que: « Nous allons préparer un plan ».

(1755)

M. Kevin Chan:

Puis-je répondre, monsieur?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui, je vous prie.

M. Kevin Chan:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je pense que ce que je viens de décrire dans ma déclaration préliminaire est plus qu’un simple plan. Nous sommes en train d'introduire des éléments concrets sur la plateforme, y compris des visuels publicitaires. Lorsque nous l'avons lancé en novembre comme un produit qui permet à quiconque de voir toutes les publicités diffusées sur Facebook, il n’existait rien de comparable ailleurs dans le monde.

L’Initiative canadienne pour l’intégrité électorale n’est pas un plan, mais une réalité. Nous la mettons en oeuvre tout comme nous avons fait en Ontario — j’y reviendrai d'ailleurs dans un instant.

Pour répondre à votre question, maintenant que j’ai une copie devant moi, je crois comprendre que ce contenu n’est plus sur Facebook. En ce qui concerne le contenu général sur Facebook, nous nous régissons par un ensemble de normes collectives de nature universelle, dont vous pouvez prendre connaissance à facebook.com/communitystandards. Ces normes interdisent les propos haineux et l’intimidation. Elles interdisent aussi la glorification ou la promotion de la violence et du terrorisme.

Ce que je vous dirais, monsieur, c’est que lorsque les gens sont confrontés à un contenu qui pourrait être contraire aux normes collectives... le système est en fait conçu pour que n’importe qui puisse signaler ce genre de situation à Facebook. Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je ne suis pas d’accord. Il ne s'agit pas de qui on connaît ou on ne connaît pas, mais simplement de pouvoir signaler ces choses. C’est la raison d’être d’une plateforme mondiale. Si on enfreint la normativité collective, les normes sont enfreintes, et le contenu sera retiré. C’est ainsi que ça fonctionne.

Je dirais, de façon plus générale — et je pense que vous y avez fait allusion, monsieur —, que le défi avec une plateforme de distribution, évidemment, c’est que nous voulons être très prudents à l'heure de donner aux gens la possibilité de s’exprimer, avoir une plateforme qui convienne à toutes les voix, tout en étant conscients des normes collectives qui permettront le signalement et le dépistage de certains propos interdits sur la plateforme.

D’après notre expérience, c’est certainement un défi. Quant à la capacité des gens de s’exprimer, c’est très rarement noir ou blanc. Je pense qu’il y a beaucoup de zones grises, et vous avez tout à fait raison de dire que l’application des normes collectives est une entreprise difficile. Nous nous sommes engagés à embaucher. D’ici la fin de l’année, 20 000 personnes feront partie de l’équipe chargée des questions de sécurité comme celles que vous avez mentionnées.

J'ajouterais que nous avons déjà déployé la technologie de l’intelligence artificielle pour être en mesure de mieux détecter le contenu interdit et de l’éliminer à grande échelle sans intervention humaine. De toute évidence, il y a des progrès à faire. Je ne dirais jamais que nous sommes parfaits, mais nous prenons cela très au sérieux. Je veux simplement m’assurer que vous et vos collègues du Comité comprenez que nous prenons cette question très au sérieux et que nous avons déjà investi des sommes considérables dans ces efforts.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. McCauley, pour sept minutes.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Bienvenue à tous.

Monsieur Chan, Radio-Canada a publié un article, hier ou même aujourd’hui, je crois, au sujet de 24 groupes non enregistrés qui faisaient de la publicité sur Facebook pour les élections en Ontario, ciblant les partis ainsi que les candidats. Ces publicités peuvent évidemment avoir un effet sur le résultat des élections. Je me demande ce que Facebook fait pour coopérer avec Élections Ontario à cet égard.

C’est drôle, parce que j’ai préparé ma question plus tôt aujourd’hui, et je viens de recevoir une note disant que des publicités dénigrant Doug Ford sont en train d'être diffusées sur Facebook en cet instant-même, en pleine période d’interdiction de publicité.

Que faites-vous avec Élections Ontario? Comment coordonnez-vous vos efforts pour régler ce problème?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je dirais simplement, monsieur, en général, que nous avons des relations et des voies de communication ouvertes avec les commissions électorales partout dans le monde et au Canada.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Mais, outre les relations, que faites-vous activement pour collaborer à la résolution de ce problème?

M. Kevin Chan:

Dans la mesure où nous recevons des demandes d’autorités publiques, comme Élections Ontario, au sujet du contenu sur Facebook...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Vous a-t-on contacté au sujet de l’article?

M. Kevin Chan:

À ma connaissance, nous n’avons rien reçu d’Élections Ontario.

(1800)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Vraiment?

M. Kevin Chan:

Oui, monsieur.

M. Kelly McCauley:

C’est intéressant.

Attendez-vous à ce qu’ils vous contactent? Je suis sûr que vous avez lu l’article de Radio-Canada. Attendez-vous qu’Élections Ontario ou Élections Canada communique avec vous, ou prenez-vous les devants pour aborder ces problèmes?

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous abordons ces questions de façon proactive. Je préfère me montrer prudent, car ce n’est pas vraiment mon... Je ne suis pas expert en la matière.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Non, et je me rends bien compte qu’il s’agit d’une grande entreprise et que ce ne sont pas des choses matérielles que vous retirez.

M. Kevin Chan:

Eh bien, non, et je dirais aussi que je ne suis pas précisément un expert en droit électoral de l'Ontario. Je suis sûr que vous l’avez lu, comme moi, avec intérêt également. Je pense que plus loin, on explique un peu comment la publicité devrait fonctionner pendant les élections en Ontario, et quelles sont les obligations des tiers de s’inscrire.

M. Kelly McCauley:

C’est exact, et Élections Ontario a déclaré que ces publicités ne sont pas autorisées. Pourtant, elles continuent à surgir, d'où ma question suivante: comment coopérez-vous? Comment veillez-vous à ce que les gens s'abstiennent de diffuser des publicités lorsque c'est interdit?

M. Kevin Chan:

Encore une fois, monsieur, je peux parler de certaines nouvelles initiatives que nous mettons à l’essai aux États-Unis, mais, de façon générale, il va de soi que nous répondons aux demandes d'enquête des autorités publiques, comme nous l’avons fait — par exemple, quand le Commissaire aux élections fédérales et Facebook Canada ont travaillé pour les élections de 2015.

M. Kelly McCauley:

D’accord. Gardez-vous une copie de toutes ces publicités quelque part et une base de données indiquant qui les achète?

M. Kevin Chan:

Comme je l’ai mentionné dans ma déclaration préliminaire, nous avons une nouvelle fonction de transparence de la publicité, qui jusqu’à tout récemment n’était disponible qu’au Canada, et dans laquelle les gens peuvent voir toutes les publicités qui circulent, pas seulement les publicités politiques, mais toutes les publicités qui sont diffusées sur Facebook au Canada en tout temps.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Tenez-vous une base de données de ces publicités?

M. Kevin Chan:

Aux États-Unis à temps pour les élections de mi-mandat au Congrès...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je ne parle pas des États-Unis. Je veux dire ici.

M. Kevin Chan:

Eh bien, si vous me le permettez, monsieur, j’aimerais faire un petit préambule.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Comme je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps, je préfère m'en passer. Gardez-vous une copie des publicités qui sont ciblées ici?

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous avons l’intention de mettre en place progressivement l’archivage des publicités partout dans le monde.

M. Kelly McCauley:

D’accord. Comment faites-vous pour vous assurer proactivement que les publicités électorales achetées et utilisées au Canada ne sont pas payées par des acteurs étrangers?

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous menons un projet pilote aux États-Unis, monsieur, parce qu’il y aura bientôt des élections.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Oui, je le sais, mais si c’est un projet pilote, quand sera-t-il mis en oeuvre ici?

M. Kevin Chan:

Ces mesures seront progressivement mises en oeuvre partout dans le monde. Tout comme pour les visuels publicitaires, le projet a d’abord été lancé au Canada pour que nous puissions comprendre comment il fonctionne et obtenir la rétroaction des intervenants. Ensuite, nous pourrons le mettre en oeuvre à l’échelle mondiale. Nous adoptons la même approche pour les projets pilotes aux États-Unis. La façon dont cela fonctionne, monsieur, c’est que pour savoir qui sont les personnes qui font de la publicité et vérifier leur identité, nous les obligeons à télécharger une pièce d’identité émise par le gouvernement. Nous envoyons ensuite une lettre avec un code à l’adresse résidentielle fournie. La personne utilise ce code pour authentifier son adresse et son identité. Ensuite, elle doit aussi indiquer au nom de quelle organisation elle diffus des annonces avant même de pouvoir faire de la publicité politique. C’est quelque chose qui n’existe nulle part ailleurs sur Internet. Nous l’avons lancé il y a quelques semaines aux États-Unis et nous avons l’intention de le déployer partout dans le monde en temps et lieu.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Quand le ferez-vous au Canada, cependant? Quand vous dites en temps et lieu, voulez-vous dire six mois ou deux ans? En avez-vous une idée?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je ne prétends pas pouvoir vous donner une date définitive, monsieur, mais nous avons l’intention de le faire partout dans le monde.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Permettez-moi de vous poser une brève question qui s'écarte un peu du sujet. Il s’agit de la publicité gouvernementale sur Facebook. Lorsque les gens cliquent dessus, les données risquent-elles d'être récupérées pour cibler...?

M. Kevin Chan:

Parlez-vous des gens qui font de la publicité sur Facebook?

M. Kelly McCauley:

Non, je parle de la publicité gouvernementale sur Facebook.

M. Kevin Chan:

Oh, pour la publicité gouvernementale, je ne le crois pas. Non, monsieur.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Non? D’accord.

Michele et — excusez-moi, j’ai oublié votre nom, monsieur — Carlos —, excusez-moi, nous ne vous avons pas écoutés.

J’ai des questions semblables à celles que nous avons posées à Facebook, si vous avez suivi. Que fait Twitter précisément pour bloquer les trolls ou la publicité étrangère pour les élections canadiennes?

M. Carlos Monje:

Les défis que nous devons relever sont extrêmement semblables à ceux de Facebook, mais nos plateformes sont foncièrement différentes. Les efforts visant à contrer la mésinformation et la désinformation doivent être multidimensionnels et se concentrer pour bien faire ce que nous faisons de mieux, c’est-à-dire essayer de mettre fin à la manipulation de notre plateforme en localisant les foyers de l’automatisation malveillante — les robots et les trolls dont vous avez parlé — qui tentent de détourner la conversation et de distraire les gens des faits qui comptent. Il s’agit de réduire la visibilité de ce bruit pour que le signal puisse passer.

Twitter est essentiellement une plateforme différente de Facebook ou YouTube du moment que les échanges sont organisés autour de hashtags. Nous nous efforçons de reconnaître les voix crédibles sur notre plateforme — témoins oculaires, politiciens, journalistes, experts — et de faire en sorte que leurs voix se fassent entendre et que leur signal puisse se frayer passage parmi le bruit.

En ce qui concerne le centre de transparence de la publicité, nous pilotons un projet à grande échelle sur notre plateforme, ce qui est énorme pour une société de technologie comme la nôtre. Quand on parle de 500 millions de tweets par jour, essayer de séparer le signal du bruit, de valider qui fait de la publicité et qui paie pour cela, c’est un processus très analogique. Il s’agit d’un processus à fort contenu humain dans le cadre duquel, à l'instar de Facebook, nous exigeons le numéro d'inscription auprès de la Federal Election Commission aux États-Unis — et j’imagine qu’il en est tout autant au Canada — afin de transmettre à l'intéressé un formulaire papier qui sera affiché sur la plateforme pour montrer qu'il s'agit bien d'un citoyen américain. Quant aux gens tout simplement emballés par une élection sans être enregistrés...

(1805)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Votre temps est écoulé. Si vous voulez résumer brièvement...

M. Carlos Monje:

Si la personne n'est pas enregistrée, nous lui envoyons un formulaire qu'elle devra faire authentifier par un notaire et nous remettre, assorti d'une copie de son passeport comme preuve de son identité et de sa citoyenneté. Ces démarches lui permettront de faire de la publicité sur la plateforme.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Cullen pour les sept prochaines minutes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos témoins de leur présence.

D’après les questions du Comité, vous comprendrez à quel point il nous pressait de discuter avec vos deux organisations. Vous êtes le visage humain de ce dialogue à bien des égards. Le Comité travaille contre la montre, et il était important de vous entendre avant de mettre fin à notre étude. Je suis donc heureux que vous ayez pu prendre le temps de venir témoigner.

Lorsque Facebook a témoigné précédemment au sujet de Cambridge Analytica devant un comité de la Chambre, ses représentants ont mentionné qu’une application qu’ils avaient utilisée avait été installée 272 fois, mais que 621 889 Canadiens avaient peut-être été touchés. Cela vous semble-t-il juste, monsieur Chan?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je crois que oui, mais je n’ai pas les chiffres devant moi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suppose que Facebook a avisé ces Canadiens qu’ils avaient été touchés?

M. Kevin Chan:

Oui, monsieur, nous l’avons fait.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quel est le recours pour les Canadiens dont les données ont été extraites de cette façon, ce qui est certainement inapproprié et probablement illégal?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je ne sais comment le définir avec exactitude, mais je pense que c’est un abus flagrant de nos modalités et de notre politique en matière d’applications. De toute évidence, le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada enquête sur cette affaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’aimerais parler un instant de Twitter pour ce qui est de l’achat de publicités. J’ai votre formulaire ici. On l'a imprimé exprès pour moi.

Chez Twitter, est-ce un être humain qui va vérifier ma demande d’achat d’une publicité?

M. Carlos Monje:

Cela dépend de l’argent que vous dépensez. Si vous êtes un publicitaire politique, votre formulaire doit être examiné par un oeil humain.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Combien faut-il dépenser? Quel est le seuil avant que ce soit un être humain qui doive vérifier de ses yeux une demande pour afficher une annonce sur votre site?

M. Carlos Monje:

Je ne saurais vous l'expliquer en deux mots, car c'est un peu plus compliqué qu'il ne paraît, mais essentiellement, si vous êtes un publicitaire politique, vous allez devoir remplir le formulaire et le faire authentifier. La démarche n'a rien d'automatique. Elle se déroule à un niveau éminemment humain.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Désolé. Pourrions-nous simplement définir ce qu’est un publicitaire politique? Je comprends les partis politiques, mais comment les définissez-vous?

M. Carlos Monje:

A priori — et nous ne voudrions certainement pas que ce soit a posteriori —, une annonce politique est une publicité qui mentionne un candidat.

L’industrie vise — et nous travaillons avec des experts gouvernementaux, des universitaires, des partenaires et HabiloMédias au Canada — la façon de cerner un problème et de l’aborder. Où est la ligne de démarcation entre une publicité à caractère politique et une entreprise qui veut parler de l’autonomisation des femmes ou des droits des homosexuels? Ce sont des enjeux importants, mais ils ne sont pas nécessairement de nature politique.

(1810)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce projet de loi permet-il de comprendre ce qu’est une publicité politique?

M. Carlos Monje:

Je pense qu’il y a une certaine clarté dans le libellé au sujet de ce qui l'est et de ce qui ne l’est pas.

Au cours de mes conversations avec Élections Canada, en janvier, je leur ai posé la question, parce que j’ai cru comprendre qu’il était légalement établi que défendre indirectement un candidat au Canada est une norme très difficile à appliquer.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Combien y a-t-il d’utilisateurs par jour, environ, au Canada?

M. Carlos Monje:

Nous avons 330 millions d’utilisateurs mensuels dans le monde. Il faudrait que nous vous revenions avec les chiffres exacts, monsieur.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce plusieurs millions?

M. Carlos Monje:

Je dirais que ce serait au moins cela, oui. Le Canada est un marché très important pour nous.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Combien y aurait-il d’utilisateurs quotidiens sur Facebook?

M. Kevin Chan:

Chaque jour, je n’ai pas les statistiques, mais chaque mois, c’est 23 millions.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est 23 millions par mois?

M. Kevin Chan:

C’est exact. Nous parlons du nombre de particuliers.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ces deux chiffres dépassent de loin ce que nous appelons les médias traditionnels — les journaux, la presse écrite — et ils dépassent même les chiffres pour la télévision.

Nous avons une série de règles que nous avons établies au fil du temps pour ces médias traditionnels en matière de publicité politique. Pensez-vous que ce projet de loi devrait appliquer aux réseaux sociaux les mêmes règles qui s’appliquent aux autres médias d’information, dont vous faites partie tous les deux? Vous êtes certainement une plateforme pour les nouvelles. Plus de Canadiens reçoivent leurs nouvelles de Facebook et de Twitter par rapport à d'autres sites Web.

M. Carlos Monje:

En parlant au nom de Twitter, nous souscrivons à l’idée que nos utilisateurs devraient savoir qui paie la publicité, surtout dans le contexte politique.

Dans les entretiens que nous avons eus et dans la façon dont nous communiquons avec les gouvernements du monde entier, nous reconnaissons que l’environnement en ligne est différent. Par exemple, Twitter est une plateforme où le nombre de caractères est limité. Auparavant, le nombre était limité à 140 caractères, et ce n'est que tout récemment, qu'il a été porté à 280. Il est difficile de faire rentrer tout un discours politique en si peu d'espace.

Des vidéos trop courtes ne font souvent que compliquer les choses.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est là mon problème. Si quelqu’un veut voir à quoi ressemble un discours haineux, je l’invite à consulter le fil Twitter de Jagmeet Singh. Chaque fois qu’il affiche quelque chose, vous pouvez simplement suivre les commentaires d'environ six ou sept personnes, et c’est vrai pour de nombreux politiciens favorables à diversité au Canada.

On ne verrait jamais ce genre de réponse à une personnalité publique dans les pages du Globe and Mail ou du New York Times, et pourtant je peux aller sur Facebook ou sur votre site, et je me demande pourquoi il n’y a pas d’équivalent dans le discours et le dialogue.

Vous avez des plateformes si puissantes. Nous tous, autour de cette table, les utilisons. Nous apprécions les échanges que nous pouvons avoir avec nos électeurs, et c'est différent de tout ce que nous avons vu auparavant. Mais le simple nombre de publicités et de conversations qui circulent sur vos sites et que personne ne voit...

On peut définir étroitement les publicités politiques si vous voulez, mais ce n'est pas de celles-là que je parle. Je parle de ce dont Chris a parlé. Je parle de quelqu’un qui affiche de faux renseignements sur le lieu où l'on vote ou ne peut pas voter et qui ment carrément, pas nécessairement pour contrer un candidat, mais simplement pour ébranler la confiance des gens dans le processus démocratique. Cela existe sur vos deux plateformes. Jusqu’à présent, et je dirais jusqu’au scandale de Cambridge Analytica, la plupart de vos utilisateurs ne savaient pas à quel point ce pouvoir est dangereux quand il tombe dans de mauvaises mains.

Je ne suis pas sûr que l’une ou l’autre compagnie, et les nombreuses compagnies que vous possédez... Je regarde la taille, en particulier de Facebook avec ses 2,1 milliards d’utilisateurs actifs chaque mois et 1,5 milliard d’utilisateurs quotidiens de téléphones mobiles. Messenger compte 1,2 milliard d’utilisateurs. WhatsApp en a 1,1 milliard. Instagram, 700 millions de plus.

Selon CNN, vous avez 83 millions de faux profils sur Facebook en ce moment, et je ne sais même pas si vous avez la capacité de faire ce que nous demandons en vertu de cette loi. Je pense qu'il faut, en réalité, faire plus que ce que nous demandons en vertu de cette loi.

Je vous le redemande: est-ce que les règles qui s’appliquent actuellement aux médias actuels au Canada devraient s’appliquer, c’est-à-dire que nous devrions connaître la source de la publicité et savoir si elle a été diffusée à l’étranger ou au Canada, et est-ce que toutes ces publicités devraient être accessibles quelque part pour que les Canadiens puissent les voir?

Je vais commencer par Twitter, puis nous parlerons de Facebook.

(1815)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Je vais vous demander de répondre très brièvement parce que nous avons dépassé le temps prévu. Veuillez être très bref.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourriez-vous répéter? Désolé, je n'ai pas entendu, Michele.

Mme Michele Austin (chef, gouvernement, politique publique, Twitter Canada, Twitter inc.):

Oui, nous devrions être en mesure de voir toutes ces choses. Le genre de comportement que vous décrivez n’est pas acceptable. Nous en sommes très conscients. Nous travaillons très fort pour améliorer la santé et le comportement de la plateforme. La violation des conditions de service dont vous parlez est une chose dont nous voulons entendre parler. Il faut que les utilisateurs puissent déposer des demandes de contravention et des plaintes et que nous agissions de façon beaucoup plus vigoureuse qu’auparavant.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je voudrais dire quelques mots, si vous le permettez, monsieur le président.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Je vous prie d’être très bref.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vais vous laisser utiliser mon temps de parole. J’aimerais entendre la réponse.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Très bien.

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci, monsieur.

L’une des grandes raisons de notre présence sur Facebook est, en fait, notre politique d’identité authentique, que vous connaissez peut-être. Si vous êtes un utilisateur privé de Facebook, vous savez que, en principe, un Kevin Chan, un Michele Austin ou un Nathan Cullen sont eux-mêmes sur Facebook. Nous pensons que c’est en fait la meilleure façon, le premier moyen de régler le problème de la responsabilité de ses propres paroles. Dans la plupart des autres endroits sur Internet, c’est comme le dessin humoristique du New Yorker, qui dit: « Sur Internet, personne ne sait que vous êtes un chien »....

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez 83 millions de faux comptes.

M. Kevin Chan:

Ce chiffre ne me dit rien, mais je dirais que, compte tenu des normes de notre communauté, notre rapport sur la transparence qui vient d’être publié indique que, pour le premier trimestre, nous avons désactivé environ 583 millions de faux comptes, la plupart dans les quelques minutes de l’inscription. La raison pour laquelle nous sommes en mesure de le faire avant qu’une personne puisse trouver et signaler un faux compte, c’est que nous utilisons la technologie de l’intelligence artificielle, dont une grande partie provient de la recherche de pointe au Canada. C’est ainsi que nous sommes en mesure d’appliquer l’apprentissage machine et la reconnaissance des formes pour identifier les faux comptes créés sur la plateforme.

J’ai une question plus générale à soumettre au Comité. Je pense que nous avons été lents à identifier les défis qui émergeaient de l’élection présidentielle américaine. Je l’ai déjà dit et je tiens à le répéter. Voyez les élections qui ont suivi dans d’autres pays du monde — en France, en Italie, en Alabama à l'occasion de l'élection spéciale, dans le cadre d référendum irlandais —, ce sont des endroits où nous avons appliqué les outils de l’intelligence artificielle à l’intégrité électorale pour lutter contre des choses comme les faux comptes. Je suis heureux de dire que même si nous ne sommes pas parfaits — et je ne dirais jamais cela —, le phénomène des faux comptes n’a pas eu d’effet important sur ces élections.

Je pense que nous nous améliorons. Je ne dirais jamais que nous sommes parfaits, mais nous continuons de perfectionner notre capacité à détecter de façon proactive les faux comptes et de les éliminer. Je vous renvoie à l’élection allemande, au sujet de laquelle des études indépendantes ont confirmé que les faux comptes n’ont pas joué de rôle dans le résultat.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vais intervenir ici, parce que je suis en train de perdre mon temps de parole. Il a été emprunté.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Il vous reste quatre minutes et demie.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Je vois encore, surtout sur Twitter, que vous êtes suivi par la personne qui n’a pas la photo, tom@tom 36472942...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, il me suit aussi.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui, exactement.

Je dois dire que cela m'inquiète. Quant à James Comey, je ne sais pas quel genre de crédibilité il a, mais il sait une ou deux choses au sujet de la sécurité et des questions entourant les élections. Il était au Canada récemment et il a dit que le Canada était en danger. Encore une fois — et je pense que M. Cullen en a parlé —, il ne s'agit pas nécessairement des publicités politiques, et peut-être que, la prochaine fois, vous arriverez très bien à réparer des choses comme le Macédonien dans le sous-sol. Je suis retourné à la page dont j’ai parlé à M. Chan. Il a dit que ce contenu n’était pas là, mais il y avait le premier ministre avec drapeau nazi sur sa main ouverte. Il y avait un article sur les libéraux en Grande-Bretagne qui voulaient transformer le palais de Buckingham en mosquée. C’est le genre d'annonce lamentable qui est diffusée et qui est censée nous diviser. C’est du pareil au même des deux côtés. Ce n’est pas seulement une question de droite ou de gauche. Vous allez être à l’avant-garde. Comme législateur et comme responsable d'un organisme de réglementation, cela me fait peur, parce que vous êtes tellement difficiles à réglementer en raison de votre caractère unique.

Je ne sais pas. Qu'en pensez-vous? Serons-nous en position favorable pour 2019, quand des experts nous poussent à être inquiets?

(1820)

M. Kevin Chan:

C’est difficile à savoir. Parfois, je regarde fixement l’écran et je ne sais pas vraiment qui devrait commencer ou qui devrait passer après.

Je vais parler dans un instant du défi que pose la désinformation en ligne, mais je pense qu’il nous incombe à tous de nous méfier — et je suis sûr que ce n’est pas ce que vous voulez, monsieur — de ce que d’autres pourraient interpréter comme une forme de censure de ce que les gens peuvent dire. Je pense que c’est quelque chose dont nous sommes très conscients. Nous avons adopté une approche un peu différente en matière de désinformation. Je ne suis pas sûr que nous voulions surveiller nos utilisateurs — et je ne pense pas que les utilisateurs le voudraient — pour pouvoir dire que nous les autorisons à dire ceci, mais pas cela.

Ce que nous faisons, c’est prendre des mesures pour réduire la propagation de la désinformation sur Facebook. Nous le faisons de trois façons, trois façons qui me semblent importantes quand nous essayons de comprendre ce que nous avons appris au cours des dernières années.

La première chose, c’est que la majorité des pages et des faux comptes sont en fait motivés par des incitatifs économiques. Ce sont des gens qui créent une sorte de site Web quelque part. Ils ont très peu de contenu — probablement très mauvais, de qualité médiocre, probablement un contenu de type pourriel. Ils remplissent le site d'annonces, puis ils partagent des liens sur des plateformes comme Twitter, Facebook et toute autre plateforme de médias sociaux. C’est un piège à clic, et il est donc conçu pour vous faire voir un titre très licencieux et vous inciter à cliquer dessus. Dès que vous cliquez sur le site Web, les annonces sont monétisées.

Nous avons pris un certain nombre de mesures pour nous assurer qu’ils ne puissent plus le faire. Premièrement, nous utilisons l’intelligence artificielle pour identifier les sites de cette nature, puis nous les déclassons ou nous empêchons que certains contenus soient partagés sous forme de pourriels.

Nous veillons également à ce qu'il ne soit pas possible d'usurper des domaines dans notre site Web. Si un site se présente comme un site Web légitime très proche de celui du Globe and Mail ou du New York Times, ce n'est plus possible à l'aide de nos mesures techniques. Nous veillons également à ce qu'il ne soit plus possible, du point de vue technique, d'utiliser des annonces Facebook pour monétiser un site Web.

Nous prenons également des mesures à l'égard des faux comptes créés pour semer la division, comme vous dites, ou dont les objectifs sont malveillants et non pas monétaires. Nous utilisons l’intelligence artificielle pour identifier les formes de ces faux comptes et les supprimer. Comme je l’ai dit tout à l'heure, nous avons désactivé environ 583 millions de faux comptes au cours du premier trimestre. Avant les élections en France et en Allemagne, nous avons supprimé des dizaines de milliers de comptes que nous avions détectés proactivement.

Ensuite, bien sûr, la dernière chose que je tiens à souligner et qui est très importante, c’est que nous investissons des ressources énormes et que nous mettons déjà en oeuvre toutes ces mesures directement sur la plateforme. J'ajouterais, bien sûr, que, au bout du compte, le dernier et ultime filet de sécurité est de s’assurer que, quand les gens découvrent certains contenus en ligne, sur Facebook ou ailleurs, ils aient les compétences essentielles en littératie numérique pour comprendre que ces contenus ne sont peut-être pas authentiques ou de grande qualité. C’est là que les partenariats que nous avons, par exemple avec HabiloMédias, en matière de nouvelles numériques, devraient donner des résultats. Je pense que les campagnes de sensibilisation du public sont très importantes. Ce serait le premier élément de ce que nous essayons de faire.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci, monsieur Chan.

Monsieur Monje, je vais vous donner l’occasion de répondre également.

M. Carlos Monje:

La façon dont vous avez formulé cette question signifie que vous en comprenez complexité.

Je ferai écho à une grande partie de ce que Kevin vient de dire. Nous avons des approches semblables, mais des plateformes très différentes. Je pense que ce que Twitter apporte à notre lutte contre la désinformation, contre les manipulations de la plateforme et contre les efforts pour détourner l'attention des gens, est que vérifions d'abord les signaux et le comportement, puis le contenu. Nous exerçons nos activités dans plus de 100 pays et dans plus de 100 langues. Nous devons utiliser plus intelligemment notre apprentissage machine, notre intelligence artificielle, pour détecter les problèmes avant qu’ils ne commencent et qu’ils causent vraiment des difficultés.

Je pense qu’il y a certains aspects qui sont plus distinctifs que les questions sur lesquelles vous vous êtes penchés aujourd’hui. Le terrorisme est un excellent exemple. Quand nous avons commencé à utiliser notre technologie anti-pourriel pour lutter contre le terrorisme, nous avons supprimé 25 % des comptes avant que quiconque ne nous en parle. Aujourd’hui, c’est 94 %. Nous avons supprimé 1,2 million de comptes depuis le milieu de 2015, quand nous avons commencé à utiliser ces outils. Nous en sommes maintenant au point où 75 % des comptes de terroristes, une fois supprimés, n’ont pas pu envoyer un seul gazouillis. Au lieu de fournir du contenu, ils disent: « Allez faire le djihad ». Ils viennent d’endroits que nous avons déjà vus. Ils utilisent des adresses de courriel ou des adresses IP que nous connaissons. Ils suivent des gens que nous savons dangereux.

J’utilise cet exemple pour montrer que c’est facile quand c’est noir et blanc. L’exploitation sexuelle des enfants est un autre cas noir et blanc. Il n’y a pas de cas d’exploitation sexuelle des enfants sur notre plateforme. La violence, c'est déjà plus difficile. Il beaucoup plus difficile de voir clair, mais cela ne veut pas dire que nous arrêtons. Nous examinons vraiment de plus près les signaux qui indiquent une interaction abusive, par exemple, quand quelque chose n’est pas aimé, que ce soit exprimé en anglais, en français ou en swahili et qu'il s'agisse ou non de signes contextuels que nous ne pourrions pas comprendre.

En ce qui concerne la désinformation en particulier, nous prenons beaucoup de mesures semblables à ce que Kevin a décrit. L'une de ces mesures générales, qui nous enthousiasme beaucoup, consiste à essayer de trouver des moyens de mesurer ces problèmes pour que nos ingénieurs puissent s'y attaquer. Jack Dorsey, notre PDG, a annoncé une mesure qu’il appelle la santé de la conversation sur la plateforme. Cela tourne autour de quatre questions. Sommes-nous d’accord sur les faits, ou est-ce que ce sont des faits erronés qui sont à l’origine de la conversation? Sommes-nous d’accord sur ce qui est important ou est-ce que nous sommes distraits des questions importantes? Sommes-nous ouverts à d’autres idées? Autrement dit, y a-t-il réceptivité ou toxicité? C’est le contraire. Ensuite, sommes-nous exposés à des idées différentes, à des perspectives différentes? Je pense que nous sommes déjà en assez bonne santé à ce sujet sur Twitter. Si vous dites que les chats sont meilleurs que les chiens, vous allez obtenir des réactions de la part de vos amis et d'autres personnes.

Nous nous sommes adressés à des chercheurs de partout dans le monde pour leur demander de nous dire comment mesurer: dites-nous quelles sont les données dont nous disposons et quelles sont les données dont nous avons besoin, après quoi nous pourrons mesurer nos changements de politique, nos changements d’application de la loi, en fonction de ces données.

À l’heure actuelle, nous mesurons la santé de l’entreprise à partir de choses très compréhensibles. Combien de personnes avons-nous? Combien d’utilisateurs mensuels avons-nous? Combien de temps passent-ils sur la plateforme? Combien d’annonceurs avons-nous et combien dépensent-ils? Ce sont des choses importantes pour Wall Street. Pour la santé de la conversation sur Twitter, qui est la raison pour laquelle les gens viennent sur Twitter, ce qui compte, c'est d'avoir une conversation avec le monde et de comprendre ce qui se passe.

Si nous pouvons obtenir les chiffres dont nous avons besoin, nous pourrons mesurer les changements. Nous pouvons faire un banc d'essai en fonction de ces données et nous estimons avoir les meilleurs ingénieurs au monde. Si nous leur donnons une cible à viser, nous pourrons nous attaquer à ces problèmes très, très, très difficiles et complexes, tout en noir, blanc et nuances de gris.

(1825)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Notre temps est presque écoulé, mais, comme nous avons commencé avec quelques minutes de retard, je vais permettre une autre série de questions. Monsieur Reid, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je veux simplement dire — et ce n’est pas une question, mais une déclaration — que je pense que tout législateur raisonnable s’attend à ce que des groupes comme Facebook et Twitter fassent de leur mieux, plutôt que l'impossible. Dans l’intérêt de l’humilité collective des membres du Comité, je pense que le gouvernement du Canada est, après tout, l’organisme qui a produit Postes Canada, le système Phénix et le registre des armes d’épaule. Peut-être qu’il ne devrait pas s’attendre à la perfection de la part d'autrui... Postes Canada a connu ses grèves annuelles du courrier de Noël dans les années 1970 et 1980, pour ceux d’entre nous qui ont la mémoire longue. Il n’est peut-être pas tout à fait raisonnable de s’attendre à de la perfection de la part d'autrui. Ce qui est raisonnable, c’est de s’attendre à de meilleurs efforts.

J’ai l’impression que le problème fondamental auquel vous faites face est que vous êtes dans une sorte de course aux armements en ce qui concerne l’intelligence artificielle. Vous essayez de la développer pour repérer les problèmes qu'elle produit dans le but de tromper de vraies personnes. Il y a quelques jours à peine, je me trouvais en compagnie de mon beau-fils de 23 ans et sa petite amie, qui regardaient un documentaire fascinant sur la façon dont les gens essaient de faire croire aux annonceurs qu’ils s'adressent à de vrais yeux en créant de fausses vidéos pour maximiser le nombre de clics sur le nom Spiderman ou d'Elsa. Il y avait aussi d’autres noms — des noms vidéo très intéressants comme Spiderman, Elsa, Superman, et ainsi de suite.

Ce que je veux dire, c’est qu’il y a une volonté de rester à la tête du peloton, mais je ne pense pas qu’il soit raisonnable de s’attendre à ce qu’on aille au-delà et qu’on atteigne le degré zéro. Est-ce déraisonnable ou est-il vrai qu'il est possible, dans certains cas, d'atteindre la perfection en bloquant ces choses?

(1830)

M. Kevin Chan:

Vous avez raison de dire que les menaces évoluent constamment. Comme je l’ai dit tout à l’heure, je pense que notre entreprise a été lente à repérer les nouveaux types de menaces qui se sont révélées à la suite des élections présidentielles américaines. Depuis, nous avons consacré beaucoup de temps et de ressources et nous avons embauché du personnel — nous doublons notre équipe de sécurité — pour essayer de régler ces problèmes.

L’IA va jouer un rôle énorme à cet égard. À grande échelle, avec 23 millions de personnes, et 2,2 milliards d'utilisateurs dans le monde, vous avez raison de dire que, si tout le monde affiche un article ne serait-ce qu'une fois par jour, cela donne nécessairement 2,2 milliards d'éléments de contenu. L’intelligence artificielle nous permettra d’utiliser l’automatisation pour identifier les mauvais joueurs.

Vous avez tout à fait raison de dire que nous ne pouvons pas garantir 100 % d'efficacité. Cela va dans l'autre sens aussi, monsieur. Je pense que ce à quoi vous faites allusion, c’est que nous voulons être très prudents concernant les scénarios faussement positifs et que nous devons éviter de supprimer accidentellement des contenus légitimes qui ne contreviennent pas aux normes communautaires. Nous devons être très prudents à ce sujet.

Je tiens à vous assurer — et nous l’avons dit à d’autres tribunes également — que, même si nous consacrons beaucoup de ressources, de personnel et de temps à répondre aux préoccupations dont nous sommes informés, nous regardons également vers l’avenir pour circonscrire les menaces qui, à notre avis, sont en train d'émerger, afin d’être à l’avant-garde des événements électoraux partout dans le monde.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Pour nos invités de Twitter, plutôt que de répondre une deuxième fois à la même question, vous avez fait allusion à l’article 282.4 du projet de loi, intitulé « Influence indue par des étrangers ». Vous aviez une proposition, mais je n’ai pas très bien compris ce que vous proposiez. Pourriez-vous revenir là-dessus?

Mme Michele Austin:

Oui. C’est l’article qui concerne le fait de permettre sciemment à des annonceurs étrangers de faire de la publicité. La question porte sur la définition de « sciemment ». Ce qui nous préoccupe, c’est la façon dont cela sera interprété et appliqué en temps réel.

Si vous parlez de documentaires, monsieur Reid, il y en a un excellent qui s’appelle Abacus, Small Enough to Jail, qui explique comment, pendant la crise financière, une petite banque chinoise de New York a été condamnée parce qu’elle était la plus accessible, plutôt que les grandes banques. Ce qui nous préoccupe, c’est qu’une personne soit mal identifiée ou faussement identifiée ou que quelque chose ne nous ait pas été signalé de façon appropriée. Et nous finissons par devoir défendre les actions d’une armée turque de pourriels au Canada, ce qui semble déraisonnable.

M. Carlos Monje:

Si vous me permettez d’ajouter quelque chose, pour revenir à votre précédent... Vous avez tout à fait raison. Nous n'arriverons pas à 100 %. Nous devons continuer à lutter contre les nouvelles formes de menace, pas seulement les anciennes. Nous avons intérêt, financièrement parlant, à bien faire les choses. Nous avons fondamentalement intérêt à veiller à ce que, quand vous allez sur Twitter et que vous cliquez sur une annonce, il s'agit bien de ce que cela prétend être. Nous voulons être en mesure de chercher activement ces choses et de les supprimer. Dans nos conversations avec les gouvernements du monde entier, il est important de comprendre qu’on a besoin d'un refuge pour les efforts de bonne foi visant à surveiller la plateforme et à bien le faire.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Je remercie nos trois témoins de leur présence aujourd’hui et de la rigueur de leurs réponses. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants. Voilà qui met fin à la réunion.

Nous reprendrons nos travaux lundi à...

(1835)

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Je veux simplement demander une précision. M. Chan a dit qu’il y a 23 millions d’utilisateurs distincts de Facebook par mois. Est-ce au Canada?

M. Kevin Chan:

Oui, c'est cela.

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Je voulais simplement le préciser. Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous reprendrons nos travaux lundi à 15 h 30.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 07, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.