header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-05-03 PROC 18

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. This is meeting number 18 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is being held in public.

Our business today is the order of reference from the House, of April 19, 2016, concerning premature disclosure of the contents of Bill C-14. At the last meeting, the committee decided to invite the law clerk and parliamentary counsel to appear. As it turns out, he's willing to appear, but he's not available this week.

The Library of Parliament and the clerk in the House of Commons procedural services agreed to do a report for us on the background and history, the types of things the law clerk would have provided. We can look at that and determine what, if any, further action we need on the privilege.

Members using their iPad will find the briefing note with the documents for today's meeting. There are a few paper copies for anyone who didn't bring it. The clerk and the analyst are prepared to speak to this briefing note and answer questions. During the second hour we'll do committee business, including any follow up from that. We can also confirm the items we have on the upcoming agenda.

Just before we start, everyone's seen this paper we're discussing. Does anyone have any objections to us giving this to Kady O'Malley? It seems like most of this stuff is public anyway. It's just historical.

Does anyone want to make friends or enemies with Kady O'Malley?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: So there are no objections?

Okay. We'll give it to the fancy sunglasses back there in the corner.

Does the clerk want to make any introductory statements on this report?

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

Thank you, Chair.

If the committee would like, we can begin with a short chronology of the events in the House that gave rise to the order of reference to the committee, go on to a brief explanation of the specific privilege in question, do a brief summary of two similar cases that came before the committee some years ago, and then perhaps give members a sense of options going forward.

When a public bill is going to be introduced in the House, it has to be put on notice. On April 12 notice was given for the introduction of Bill C-14, the assisted-dying legislation. That same day The Globe and Mail published an article containing specific elements about the bill, and referenced a source familiar with the legislation, a person who was not authorized to speak publicly about it.

The next night, April 13, The National on CBC TV had similar details about the bill, and the source again was not identified. On April 14 the bill was introduced in the House, given first reading, and became a public document at that point.

On that same day, April 14, the official opposition House leader rose on a question of privilege regarding the premature disclosure of the contents of Bill C-14. In his intervention, he stated that the details about the bill that had been disclosed in The Globe and Mail article went beyond journalistic speculation, and that they matched the contents of the bill.

Following his intervention, the chief government whip rose and stated that the government takes any breach of privilege very seriously, and that no person had been authorized to discuss the contents of the bill prior to its introduction. He gave an unreserved apology, and committed to ensuring that no further such incidents would occur in the future.

The Speaker ruled on the question of privilege on April 19, and decided that the question raised by the opposition House leader constituted a prima facie, or at first sight, breach of privilege.

As per the standard practice, the member who had raised the question of privilege was then invited to move a motion to send the matter to this committee for further study and consideration.

The House adopted the motion on April 19, and this then became the order of reference before the committee today.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The parliamentary privilege in this particular case that has been infringed upon is that essentially there's a well-established practice and accepted convention that the House of Commons has the right of first access to the text of bills it will consider.

What does that mean? Precise legislative information cannot be distributed to the public before being made accessible to members. Members have a right to this information in order to perform their parliamentary functions. It also reflects the practice that the House plays a pre-eminent role in the legislative affairs of the country. So in practice that means, once notice of a bill is given, the text of that bill is confidential.

Speakers have ruled, and this committee has reported, that when precise legislative information is made available to the public and not to members, it impedes, obstructs, and disadvantages members. So this is what the Speaker would have ruled most recently.

I would note, though, that a practice does exist of a courtesy copy being given to opposition critics of the bill just so they are able to study it before it's introduced in the House.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

This is on the understanding that they themselves are now bound by the same secrecy as the minister.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Yes. Precisely.

Two similar questions of privilege arose, both of them in 2001: one in the spring of 2001, one in the fall of 2001. I can give a brief summary of the matters, the rulings, and how the committee dealt with those particular cases of privilege.

In spring of 2001 the member from Provencher rose on a question of privilege regarding a departmental briefing on a justice bill. The department was going to give a confidential briefing to members of the press only, which is contrary to the practice of members being invited to these lock-ups. The bill had not been introduced at the time but was on notice. The other issue was that the lock-up that was supposed to occur did not occur, and that members of the media left the confidential lock-up and began phoning the member from Provencher to ask him about his opinion on a bill that he had not been briefed on and had not seen.

The Speaker ruled that this was a prima facie contempt of the House, and stated that once a bill is placed on notice, confidentiality about its contents was necessary—as I spoke about before—because of the pre-eminent role “which the House plays and must play in the legislative affairs of the nation”. The Speaker further stated that, “to deny to members information concerning business that is about to come before the House, while at the same time providing such information to media that will likely be questioning members about that business, is a situation that the Chair cannot condone”.

That matter was referred to a predecessor version of procedure and House affairs. The committee held four meetings on the matter. For witnesses, the committee heard from the member who raised the question of privilege, the minister who sponsored the bill, and departmental officials about departmental policies regarding pre-introduction of bills. The committee also heard from the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk of the House regarding the House's processes for government bills prior to introduction, and it heard from a representative of PCO concerning policies regarding the preparation and introduction of government bills.

The committee did report back to the House on the matter. The report concluded that a breach of privilege had occurred, but did not recommend any sanctions because the minister had apologized for the incident and had taken corrective actions. The committee did have one main recommendation, and that was that all government departments follow the lead of the Department of Justice and adopt a standard policy that no briefings or briefing materials be provided with respect to a bill on notice until it is introduced in the House, with the notable exception of the lock-down held for the budget and other major parliamentary announcements. The committee also requested that by the fall, the Privy Council Office table, through a minister, revised guidelines on dealing with bills prior to their introduction.

That is the case that occurred in the spring.

There was later a case in the fall, which was fairly similar to the one that occurred recently. Notice was given for Bill C-36, an anti-terrorism act. Notice was given on Friday. The bill was introduced on Monday. On Saturday, an article that mentioned the contents of the bill appeared in the National Post. The Speaker ruled that this, again, constituted a prima facie breach of privilege of the House, and noted that this was very similar to the incident that had occurred in the spring.

Again the matter was referred to this committee. For witnesses, the committee heard from the member who raised the question of privilege, the minister sponsoring the bill, departmental officials about the preparation of the bill, and representatives from the Privy Council Office concerning the process and policies regarding the preparation and introduction of government bills and security reviews of information leaks. In the report, the committee concluded that, based on the available evidence, it could not find that a contempt had been committed.

The PCO hired Deloitte &Touche to do a study to find out who had committed the leak, and they interviewed some several hundred staff members to find out who had, in fact, spoken with reporters. Nine admitted to speaking to reporters but indicated that they had not divulged any confidential material to the reporters.

(1110)



The report did note that the official from the Privy Council Office had indicated that for the most part the details that were divulged in the National Post article were public information, with the exception of a few bits of information.

When the committee decided that no contempt had occurred, the members of the opposition did add a dissenting opinion to the report, and the basis of it was those few pieces of information that could potentially have been confidential, but there was no way to know, and the staff at the department at the time had said that they had not divulged any confidential information. They concluded that it might have been journalistic speculation that allowed the journalist to come up with those few missing pieces of information.

Those are the two most relevant cases of privilege similar to the one that was ruled on most recently.

(1115)

The Chair:

Are there any questions?

Oh, do you have more?

The Clerk: Yes, briefly.

The Chair: Go ahead.

The Clerk:

This is the final part as far as the presentation goes this morning.

Moving forward now, the committee has an order of reference from the House to investigate this privilege matter. When the committee does so, it approaches it in the same way as it does any other study that it may choose to undertake. It may look at its schedule and decide what priority to assign to this matter, how many meetings it wishes to devote to it, if it wishes to call witnesses, and which witnesses they should be. The members have heard what was done in past similar cases, and it's open to the committee to do likewise or to do it differently.

If the committee is going to report to the House on the matter, it can indicate whether or not it believes that a breach of privilege has occurred. The report can include recommendations or not. It's important to note that the committee itself does not have any power to punish. Only the House can do this.

The report, like any other committee report, may have dissenting or supplementary opinions appended to it. The report may be sufficient to put an end to the matter, and no further action may be recommended to the House by the committee. On the other hand, the committee may recommend that the Speaker take some action or that some administrative action be taken.

Finally, as with other committee reports, it's open to any member of the House to move a motion of concurrence in the committee report.

That's about all I have.

The Chair:

Does the committee have to do a report?

The Clerk:

No. It's a decision of the committee, but I have to say that the practice has been that reports have been made to the House following an order of reference.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would like to ask a question relating to your very helpful summary. The report would be numbered in the usual way. It would be the xth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Concurrence would occur in the usual way. You could have concurrence if there were all-party consent by means of a unanimous motion, I'm assuming. Or is it always done by means of a vote?

The Clerk: Well—

Mr. Scott Reid: As I say, it has no meaning unless it's concurred in. Am I right? There is no power unless....

The Clerk:

Well, recommendations can still be followed up on. It's not a requirement.

Mr. Scott Reid:

But only followed up on informally with advice to the Speaker as to how he ought to act? Any actual sanction would require concurrence. Am I not correct?

The Clerk:

Well, for a committee's recommendation to the Speaker, or wherever it has power to make recommendations, ordinarily they are taken seriously.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sure.

The Clerk:

A concurrence motion is a debatable motion, if that's the channel it's going through, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

The Chair:

I think Scott is asking whether we need to do the concurrence for the Speaker to take action.

The Clerk:

I don't think it has been a feature of many of the reports on privilege matters.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

In terms of having any kind of use as a precedent, we've set out two precedents, and I don't know if they were cited because they are reports that had actually subsequently been concurred in or if in fact a concurrence vote took place...?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

There were other similar incidents where the Speaker had found...it was to do with bills that were on notice and the information about them had been divulged, but they were not sent to the committee.

There was one instance fairly recently. The member from St. Paul's had posted some information about a private member's bill and had unreservedly apologized for doing so. The Speaker ruled that it was a case of privilege but that no further action needed to be taken because an apology was given to the House.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

I had a question, Andre, relating to the examples you cited from 2001. We keep throwing more and more work at you, so for that reason I want to be cautious in what I'm about to say.

Would it make sense to look at other parliaments in other provinces or other places such as Westminster for similar types of precedents that have occurred since that time? The reason I ask is that we would not, in our most relevant precedents from here, have any references to those subsequent rulings that might relate to circumstances that are similar. Of course, media dynamics have changed a lot since 2001; hence, I can imagine the source of these problems being something that is novel, that might not have existed technologically in 2001. I'm not sure that's the case—we don't know yet—but it's certainly conceivable.

I don't want to impose this work on you, but I'll just leave the thought in your head that it might be relevant.

(1120)

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I think that in these cases of privilege, it is a very good idea to check out other jurisdictions. I can think of another case of privilege, which I don't need to bring up, where it was very informative to look at the House of Commons in Australia and the U.K. They had gone through a case that was even more similar to the one we found as compared with the Canadian precedent, so I'll look into it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

The Clerk:

I have just a small precision about concurrence. Yes, very often committee reports are concurred in by unanimous consent on the same day they have been presented, but there is also the other channel of putting a concurrence motion on the order paper.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You didn't imply this, but I'm going to now suggest an implication. If we can achieve a report on which there is unanimous consent, we are likely to be able to achieve that secondary objective of having unanimous consent in the House as opposed to disagreeing with each other. That would seem to make sense.

Actually, that wasn't a question to you; that was what strikes me as an observation. I was looking for comment only in the event I were to say something outrageously wrong, in which case you could correct me.

The Chair:

The interesting thing is that in this Parliament on the unanimous consent, we have the Bloc and the Green Party who don't always co-operate.

Are there other questions, comments, or directions on how to proceed?

Mr. Julian, welcome to the committee.

Mr. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NDP):

Thank you for your welcome.

I am here for only another 20 minutes, unfortunately. Don Davies will be replacing me.

The Chair:

So you're just going to talk for 20 minutes?

Mr. Peter Julian:

No, no, I won't do a filibuster today.

I am intrigued by the background we've been given by the analyst and the clerk. It seems to me this is a very serious breach, and it should be taken seriously and treated seriously. I'm sure all members of the committee feel the same way.

The structure of some of the previous considerations of this type of premature disclosure is something I find important. When we talk about the minister, the department being involved, the Clerk of the House, and the PCO, I think these are all important witnesses we should consider, and we should have that discussion around this table.

The fact that there have been investigations in the past as well is something we should take very seriously. I don't believe we know at this point whether the department undertook an investigation or whether we've identified the person who leaked the information to journalists. That certainly hasn't come out so far. If an investigation has been launched, it would, I think, be germane for us to know about it.

We should be looking to see what the follow-up has been at the departmental level. That will then help to shape the recommendations we bring forward. I'd like to put on the table that the types of past discussions this committee has engaged in around similar types of violations of parliamentary privilege should be the model we use this time around in approaching this issue.

The Chair:

Are there other comments?

Mr. Chan and then Mr. Richards.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I want to thank my colleagues on the other side for their interventions.

The reason I suggested at the last committee meeting that we bring the law clerk in—and I thank the analyst for his report to give us some background—is that I wanted to delve a bit more carefully, notwithstanding the finding by the Speaker of a prima facie case of a breach of members' privilege.

I'm not yet convinced that we in fact do have a breach of members' privilege. I've tried to look at The Globe and Mail article carefully, and I don't necessarily see evidence—at least in the article—that the reporter in question actually had a copy of the bill, which would be a breach of our privileges. Maybe someone did do something, and brief somebody out of turn in terms of the content of the bill, but it mostly talks about things that are not found in the bill as opposed to what was actually in the bill.

I go back, for example, to the reference in the paper by the analyst, looking at similar questions of privileges referred to committee, specifically about the example he cited from the member from Provencher from March of.... Sorry, I have the wrong one. I mean the Speaker's ruling of 2010 dealing with the member from Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre about the premature disclosure of a private member's bill, where that had been disclosed on the member's website, which was then, of course, determined to be a breach of members' privileges.

I wanted to probe that a little bit more. Let's say I'm bringing in something under the Criminal Code dealing with the current private member's bill that's dealing with impaired driving. I say that I'm bringing in a private member's bill on the Criminal Code, but I'm not dealing with murder and I'm not dealing with consecutive sentencing. Would that be a breach of members' privileges when I don't disclose the actual contents of the bill that is before the House?

That's really my point here. In fact, was there actual significant...? Was the person actually reporting details of the substantive matters that were actually in Bill C-14 when it was introduced into the House on April 14?

(1125)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you.

I think when we're looking at questions such as this, the information we've been given is very helpful. Obviously, because of the precedent in the two cases we've seen previously, in 2001 it looked as if there was a very similar path that was followed in looking into it. I suggest that we really should use that as a helpful guide.

I would suggest that we would obviously want to bring in some witnesses who would be similar in nature to those we saw at that time. I think the clerk would be a good starting point to give us some background, as well, but I also think that obviously the member who raised—

The Chair:

Do you mean the law clerk?

Mr. Blake Richards:

The law clerk would be helpful as well. I believe the Clerk of the House might be helpful as well as the law clerk.

The Chair:

So the Clerk of the House.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I also think it would be helpful to have the member who obviously raised the question of privilege. The minister should be called to appear, as well as department officials and the Privy Council Office. Those would all be good witnesses for us to have. The precedent is there from the other cases.

I also believe that, when we're talking about privilege, it should really be given first priority. We should begin with this at our next meeting and make this our highest priority. In the past it looks as if it's taken four or five meetings. I think we would probably want to devote a similar amount of time to it.

That is my suggestion, that we take that precedent we have from the other two cases we've looked at here as a guide, and those would be some of the witnesses I would suggest.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments?

Go ahead, Mr. Julian.

Mr. Peter Julian:

I should mention, Mr. Chair, that I really admire your tie. I don't know why. I just find it very, very appealing.

The Chair:

I thought you would.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Peter Julian:

I don't disagree with Mr. Richards, but at the same time, I know there are some other important—

Mr. Scott Reid:

He wants to have you say that again.

Mr. Peter Julian:

It's on the record. This is public. Kady's going to tweet it out.

Mr. Scott Reid:

He's calling his mom right now.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Peter Julian:

So to know what the other priorities are of this committee.... Granted, I am only a temporary member of this committee, and happy to be here. But I do agree that it requires a substantive response from the committee. There are a number of other priorities, including establishing the family-friendly House of Commons, that are part of the work plan.

I just wanted to get a sense from the clerk as to what is before this committee now, because I do believe this should be dealt with substantively, and hopefully as a high priority. I'm not sure it could be the highest priority if there were other elements that need to be looked at by this committee.

The Chair:

Do you have this?

Mr. Peter Julian:

I do, yes.

The Chair:

This is the schedule for the next few weeks, with open spots on it, too.

Okay. If everyone looks at this list, there are two additions to it. This just came out this morning, but there are two things that aren't on it.

Do you want to tell us what those are?

(1130)

The Clerk:

Members can see that the month of May is filling up. The informal briefing from Elections Canada has been rescheduled to May 12, and in the remainder of the meetings there are spare hours on May 5, May 10, and May 19. But now we have two positive responses from legislative assemblies who will appear in connection with the family-friendly study.

So two of those three spare hours will be gone if the committee agrees to hear those witnesses then.

The Chair:

Sorry, which are those witnesses again?

The Clerk:

They're from two of the legislative assemblies.

The Chair:

In Canada?

The Clerk:

Yes.

The Chair:

And for Australia or New Zealand, we're still looking at the late-night one, the evening one.

The Clerk:

Correct. Those would not be in the eleven-to-one time slot.

The Chair:

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Without diminishing the importance of this privilege motion, we've done a lot of work on the family-friendly study. It's something we've heard a number of witnesses on, and I know the committee had hoped that we would be able to have a report back to Parliament before we rose in June. I just would ask that we take that into consideration, because a number of us have done a lot of work on it.

The Chair:

There's always the option to have extra meetings, too.

Mr. Reid and then Mr. Chan.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With regard to—

The Chair:

Well, June is empty on the schedule, except for looking at the interim report if it's drafted as we presently planned during our constituency week.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry, the interim report is on family-friendly?

The Chair:

Yes, on family-friendly.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have a suggestion with regard to family-friendly. When the minister was here, I asked him and he agreed that if we had agreement on some points and not others he would be happy, or any rate he would be okay, with our proceeding in a piecemeal manner dealing with the issues, the low-hanging fruit, the things that we had consensus on; and setting others aside until later. Maybe we can do everything, but I wouldn't want to sacrifice the time devoted to a matter of privilege in order to try to attain agreement on things that we aren't yet agreeing on as opposed to severing off the things we can agree on, especially anything that involves any administrative follow-through for potential implementation in the autumn.

The Chair:

I think the idea of—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Then we could have that done and then deal with other things as time goes on. That's just a suggestion.

The Chair:

I think the fact that the June report would be interim is exactly for the reason you just said: it would be the low-hanging fruit and the things we could agree on.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm sorry, I misunderstood. It's not like we're saying we're so far but we're not going to.... We actually could say that these are the things we actually agree on, and we're now sending them off so that the House can approve of those things.

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid: Okay. I misunderstood.

Thanks. That's great.

The Chair:

That was my sense of the interim report, because there were some really big items that obviously we can't agree on right away.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm just simply going to echo what Mr. Julian had to say. I recognize the importance of dealing with this in a relatively expeditious manner. I'm really just following on Ms. Vandenbeld's comments. Particularly when we're dealing with potential witnesses from other legislatures that have circumscribed available time in order to meet with this committee, we don't want to put that off somehow, just given how difficult it is to schedule it.

If we can at least stick to those ones, then we can use what available open times are coming up in June to deal with this. If we have time in between we can talk about it, and we can get the clerk to squeeze it into whatever hour we can squeeze it into. But I don't want to get off the time track that we're proposing to get the interim report on family-friendly back to the House.

The Chair:

Are there any comments?

Maybe we could start looking at the schedule and putting in things.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

One other point I want to raise is that although I note the comment Mr. Richards made about one of the past investigations having taken about five sitting days of the committee, the other one only took about two, so it depends on how efficient we want to be. Right now we don't have a lot of evidence of a lot of anything, other than these two alleged media reports.

I think we can do this a little bit more efficiently, hopefully, than taking five committee sitting days.

(1135)

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I have to echo my colleague's comments. I too would like to get that interim report out. We've done a lot of work on it.

I think we could take a look at this matter quickly. From the article that is the main base of the evidence we have right now, we can't really see any particular contents of the bill, which is what we're supposed to be looking at, or precise legislative information, and that's exactly what the library has told us is the determining factor of whether a breach has been committed.

Since the article itself is quite vague in that regard, I don't think it's going to take us...or I don't think we should spend 10 meetings on this matter. I know it is important, but in the evidence that we have in front of us so far, we don't have much content.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards and Mr. Julian.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I hope I'm not hearing, and I'm not saying I do, the government saying that they don't take a matter of privilege seriously. I hope I'm not hearing that.

I understand that we have another thing that we're dealing with, and there's nobody here who doesn't want to try to deal with it. But we have a matter of privilege, and that's a very serious thing. We need to take it seriously.

Can we talk about some witnesses who have been difficult to schedule and maybe work them in as part of this? Yes, of course; that can be discussed. But what we need to understand is that this should be dealt with, and we should make sure that we're dealing with it before we rise for the summer, certainly. I think it should be the highest priority.

In terms of the number of meetings, I'm hearing, yes, we need to deal with it as quickly as we can. Well, you know, we need to take it as seriously as it needs to be taken. Should we waste time on something? No, of course not; nobody would ever suggest that. But if you look at the witnesses we probably need to have here, I don't see how we would hear those particular witnesses in less than about three meetings. Then you have to have some time to look at a potential report.

So I think you're looking at probably four meetings here. I don't see how we would need any fewer than that. Maybe you could get away with doing it in three, but I think we need to give it the seriousness it's due. A matter of privilege is a very serious thing and it needs to be taken that way. I hope I'm not hearing the government saying otherwise. This does need to be a priority.

Everyone appreciates the work that has been put into family-friendly and wants to make sure that it is given consideration as well, but this is a serious matter, and it needs to be taken as such.

The Chair:

Mr. Julian.

Mr. Peter Julian:

I find myself agreeing with Mr. Richards again. I'm going to have to wash my face with cold water.

Voices: Oh, oh!

A voice: A floor-crossing issue.

Mr. Peter Julian: No, I don't think that's ever going to happen.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Peter Julian: I do agree that this has to be taken seriously. The Speaker has ruled that the premature disclosure of the content of Bill C-14 impeded the ability of all members to perform their parliamentary function. We can't minimize what has been a decision of the Speaker of the House.

To have at least the same thoroughness that we've seen from previous questions of privilege of this nature is important, and that would mean probably at least four meetings; there's no doubt about that. I think that for putting together the witness list, in looking again at previous cases we can see the pattern: the department, the minister, is called in; the member who raised the point of privilege is; as well as potentially the law clerk. Those are all important witnesses to bring forward.

The area in which I think we're coming to some consensus is in agreeing that we'd be doing this as a committee after the family-friendly study is completed. I sense from the other parties that this is the direction we're going in. We have a good sense of a time line: we have a June calendar that is empty, which should allow us to schedule the number of meetings that takes this with the seriousness with which the Speaker has referred it to this committee.

The Chair:

I don't think anyone would want this to go past the summer. It has to be finished before the summer break, for sure.

Ms. Vandenbeld was next, and then Mr. Graham.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

Just on Mr. Richards' point, we're taking this very, very seriously, and we absolutely want to do this as a priority.

If you look at the calendar, my comments are coming from the fact that we're at May 3. We have two and a half meetings scheduled of witnesses in order to give the drafting instructions on May 19 on the family-friendly study.

If you look at the calendar, you see that there are nine empty meetings after that point. Then, of course, there's also the possibility of doing extra meetings.

So there is time, I think, to be able to do both. In order to have the drafting instructions by the 19th.... We're almost there with this report; we have only two and a half scheduled meetings left. I think we can do both: we can finish the witnesses for the interim report on family-friendly and still give the due amount of attention and seriousness to the motion on privilege.

(1140)

The Chair:

This is remembering that at least one June meeting would be looking at the interim report, and that of the hours available before the instructions on May 19 there are two open hours at the moment, but there are also two legislatures that have agreed to appear before us; we just haven't told them the times yet.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I don't think anybody here doesn't take privilege very seriously, but I think the very first step, as we discussed last meeting, is to get the law clerk here and establish whether or not there actually was a breach of privilege, before we invite everybody. If there is clearly one, then we'll have that long conversation, but let's establish that privilege was actually breached before we decide the who and the how.

I don't think we've gotten to that point yet, because as Mr. Chan mentioned, the articles mentioned what is not in the bill, not what is in the bill. I'm not clear that there was a breach of privilege there. Let's get the law clerk in here to discuss what's going on and then decide how to proceed from there.

The Chair:

Except that the Speaker has already ruled that there is a prima facie case—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's a prima facie case; there's an “appearance of”.

The Chair:

—and we have to investigate it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The prima facie case is that there is an “appearance of”. Let's get the law clerk in here to break it down and see whether there actually is one in order to see how to investigate further. That's my take.

The Chair:

I think everyone is agreed that the law clerk should come, so....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Yes, but I think before we call more witnesses, let's start with that.

The Chair: Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Just so the law clerk, who no doubt is paying attention, knows this, a technical description of what is meant by “appearance of” would be helpful. Obviously law clerks can't present new evidence, but law clerks can explain how the rules work.

With regard to the schedule, I may be wrong here, but I'm just looking at this, and according to the schedule just handed out to us, we have some blank spots. I just went down it: May 5 from twelve to one o'clock; May 10 from eleven to twelve o'clock; on May 19 there's an hour, possibly, although I think drafting instructions in an hour might be optimistic.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Likewise, the 31st is just a deadline.

We have potentially five spots. I realize that other things may fill them in, but these witnesses, the law clerk and so on, are very available, so we have the option of slotting them in.

What I'm getting at is that I think we're imagining a scheduling conflict that is not.... I think we're imagining a worst-case scenario. I think we'd probably do a good job of getting these things done in tandem, simply because the privilege stuff lends itself to having holes in the schedule, given the availability of witnesses.

The Chair:

So we could have the law clerk on the 5th?

Oh, he's not available this week. Sorry.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What about the 10th?

The Chair:

We also have the two provincial legislatures that have agreed. We can put them both in an hour, probably. If they're available, maybe we could have them on the 5th, and have the law clerk on the 10th.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Richards was suggesting the Clerk of the House, or the Deputy Clerk of the House, because the law clerk deals with law, and the Clerk of the House deals with—

The Chair:

Okay.

Well, why don't we bring them both, if they're available?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll ask them both, if they're available.

Tentatively we would ask the two provincial legislatures this Thursday. It's short notice, but we'll see if they're available. They'll be on the TV. Then, on the 10th, we'll have the clerk and the law clerk in that open hour.

Is anyone opposed to that?

No? Good. That's subject to availability, of course.

Mr. Reid made the good point that we also have the 31st, which is totally open, when we get to that date.

(1145)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would also suggest, given our experience with the Minister of Democratic Institutions and how difficult it seemed to be for her schedule to be cleared up to come before this committee—we've made numerous requests, where we haven't even been able to get the government to agree to have her come at all—I would suggest that we want to give the justice minister, in case she has the same kind of scheduling conflict as the Minister of Democratic Institutions seems to have, as much notice as possible that we do require her appearance here. Then we can make sure that gets scheduled in the time we have available to the committee as well. We don't want to have the same problems arise.

The Chair:

He's basically suggesting we give the justice minister notice.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's so that we can determine her available dates and make sure there's not a scheduling conflict for each and every meeting, as there has been with some ministers in the past.

The Chair:

Is anyone opposed to that? We'll get the clerk to contact the justice minister.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm fine with it, but whether we decide to call her or not, I still think we should have the law clerk here first and get established what the baseline is on members' privileges. Agreed?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have to establish the question that we want answered before we ask people.

The Chair:

This is good what you've done, I think, because that'll be the end of the witnesses for family-friendly. We'll start on privilege, we'll get some direction from the clerk and the law clerk, and then we'll fill in the blanks from there. We'll get this all done before the summer, for sure. If we have to do extra meetings, I think we should do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: You don't want to sit in July?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: No, not in July—for those who have a 14-hour commute to get here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: It's only if we meet in the Yukon, right?

The Chair: Yes. If we're meeting in July, it's in the Yukon.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Sold.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Is there anything else on this?

We do have a bit of committee business. We have a motion, for one thing

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes, I did table a motion. Would you like me to read that, or have the clerk read that into the record?

The Chair:

Is that okay? Yes.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Was it circulated?

Mr. Scott Reid:

It was your motion?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would you mind repeating it?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Sure, I can read it. I have it in front of me.

The Chair:

I think everyone has a copy.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Everyone has it. I'll read it into the record, as follows: That, in relation to Orders of Reference from the House respecting Bills, (a) the Clerk of the Committee shall, upon the Committee receiving such an Order of Reference, write to each Member who is not a member of a caucus represented on the Committee to invite those Members to file with the Clerk of the Committee, in both official languages, any amendments to the Bill, which is the subject of the said Order, which they would suggest that the Committee consider; (b) suggested amendments filed, pursuant to paragraph (a), at least 48 hours prior to the start of clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill to which the amendments relate shall be deemed to be proposed during the said consideration, provided that the Committee may, by motion, vary this deadline in respect of a given Bill; and (c) during the clause-by-clause consideration of a Bill, the Chair shall allow a Member who filed suggested amendments, pursuant to paragraph (a), an opportunity to make brief representations in support of them.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Before we go any further, I want to welcome Don Davies to the committee.

Mr. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NDP):

Thank you.

The Chair:

I know you'll find it very enjoyable here.

Just don't eat the salmon sandwiches.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Don Davies: Thanks for the tip.

The Chair: Mr. Chan's motion has been tabled. You all got it in the mail. I think it's gone to all the committees.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

This is a motion that was similar to one passed in the previous Parliament. At the end of the day, we want to have an orderly process, particularly for those who are not part of a recognized caucus, to get their substantive amendments on the record so we can proceed to deal with government business in an orderly way.

The Chair:

Is there any debate on the motion?

I will call the question.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Do we have some more committee business?

I take it we can't.... Well, it wouldn't be respectful to do Mr. Christopherson's motion, because he's not here.

Mr. Chan.

(1150)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I know that Mr. Christopherson is not available, so I want to put it on the record that we're continuing our conversations. I think we're very close to a resolution, but I want to give Mr. Christopherson the opportunity to come up with language that satisfies his concerns and satisfies mine. I want to thank him for that.

Unfortunately, he's just not available today, and I won't be available on Thursday. But we'll find some opportunity to dispense with this, hopefully in the near future.

The Chair:

Is there any other business before the committee?

Just as a reminder, we're having an informal, not-official dinner meeting tonight to discuss the proposed guidelines for gifts for members of Parliament. We can sort that out and get something together that we can bring quickly to the next committee so it doesn't take a lot of time. That's at 7 o'clock in the parliamentary restaurant.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you're still sitting at 8:30, I can join you.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Madam Clerk, did we dispose of the Speaker's motion with respect to emergency powers yet?

The Chair:

Oh, no, we didn't.

Did you bring your report, Mr. Reid?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I took it to our House leader, and—

The Chair:

Oh, sorry. I can report on this.

Mr. Scott Reid:

He got back to you?

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid: That's right; I twisted his arm to speak to you directly.

The Chair:

Mr. Scheer had some suggested changes to the Speaker's suggested procedures. I called Mr. Scheer and asked him if he could get together with the Speaker to see if they could come up with something they both agreed on. Hopefully they can, and we'll bring that to the committee and everyone can see it: sunny days.

Mr. Scott Reid:

When we come back with that one, might I make a suggestion? I'm making it in part because Mr. Christopherson isn't here, and he has concerns about when we go in camera and when we don't. That might be a good meeting at which to be dealing with it in camera.

It just strikes me that from the nature of it, and the fact that you have a recommendation made by the Speaker, I don't think we should be criticizing or commenting publicly on something from the Speaker unless we've had a chance to discuss it in camera. I think it's a more respectful approach.

But I don't want to have us lock into that without Mr. Christopherson giving his say-so, because he is concerned about the misuse of in camera.

The Chair:

That's a good point. We can talk to him about that.

Do you have anything, Mr. Chan?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I agree.

The Chair:

Okay.

Is there anything else?

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

I just want to double-check that the meeting tonight is in room 601.

The Chair:

It's room 601 in the parliamentary restaurant at 7 o'clock.

Is there any other business?

Very good work, members. I think we're working co-operatively and very productively. Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. La présente réunion est la 18e du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de la 1re session de la 42e législature. Elle se déroulera en public.

Nous avons à nous pencher aujourd'hui sur l'ordre de renvoi reçu de la Chambre le 19 avril 2016, concernant la divulgation prématurée de la teneur du projet de loi C-14. À sa dernière réunion, le Comité a décidé d'inviter le légiste et conseiller parlementaire à comparaître. Celui-ci y est tout disposé, mais il n'a pas pu se libérer cette semaine.

La Bibliothèque du Parlement et les Services de la procédure de la Chambre des communes ont accepté de rédiger à notre intention un rapport décrivant le contexte et l'historique, le genre de renseignements que le légiste nous aurait donnés. Nous pourrons étudier ce rapport, puis décider quelle suite nous devons éventuellement donner à cette question de privilège.

Les membres du Comité qui utilisent leur iPad y trouveront la note d'information et les documents se rapportant à la réunion d'aujourd'hui. Pour ceux d'entre vous qui ne l'ont pas apporté, il y a quelques copies imprimées à votre disposition. La greffière et l'analyste sont disposés à présenter cette note d'information et à répondre aux questions. Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous nous pencherons sur les travaux du Comité, y compris, au besoin, le suivi à donner à la question de privilège. Nous pourrons également confirmer les points à inscrire au prochain ordre du jour.

Avant de commencer, je veux m'assurer que tous ont vu le document en question. Y a-t-il quelqu'un qui s'oppose à ce que je le remette à Kady O'Malley? Il me semble que, pour l'essentiel, l'information qu'il contient est du domaine public, de toute façon. C'est simplement d'ordre historique.

Y en a-t-il qui veulent se faire une amie ou une ennemie de Kady O'Malley?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Il n'y a donc pas d'objections?

D'accord, nous le remettrons à la dame aux belles lunettes de soleil dans le coin là-bas.

La greffière aurait-elle des remarques introductives à faire sur ce rapport?

La greffière du Comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Avec la permission du Comité, je ferai d'abord la chronologie rapide des événements en Chambre qui sont à l'origine de l'ordre de renvoi au Comité, après quoi, brièvement, j'expliquerai le privilège particulier dont il est question et résumerai deux cas similaires dont le Comité a été saisi il y a déjà plusieurs années, puis je terminerai peut-être en donnant aux membres du Comité un aperçu des options qui se présentent.

Le dépôt d'un projet de loi d'intérêt public à la Chambre des communes doit être précédé de la présentation d'un avis. Le 12 avril 2016, un avis a été présenté pour le dépôt du projet de loi C-14, qui porte sur l'aide médicale à mourir. Le jour même, le Globe and Mail publiait un article faisant état d'éléments précis du projet de loi et citait une source connaissant bien le texte, une personne qui n'était pas autorisée à en parler publiquement.

Le lendemain soir, le 13 avril, The National de la CBC diffusait des renseignements semblables sur le projet de loi, en citant, dans ce cas également, une source non identifiée. Le 14 avril, le projet de loi a été déposé à la Chambre et est passé en première lecture. À partir de ce moment, il devenait un document public.

Le même jour, le 14 avril, le leader de l'opposition officielle à la Chambre a soulevé une question de privilège au sujet de la divulgation prématurée de la teneur du projet de loi C-14. Dans son intervention, il a fait valoir que les renseignements sur le projet de loi C-14 contenus dans l'article du Globe and Mail allaient au-delà de simples spéculations journalistiques et concordaient avec le contenu du projet de loi.

En réponse à son intervention, le whip en chef du gouvernement a pris la parole pour déclarer que le gouvernement prenait au sérieux toute atteinte au privilège parlementaire et que personne n'avait été autorisé à discuter du projet de loi avant son dépôt. Il a ensuite présenté sans réserve ses excuses et s'est engagé à prendre des mesures pour empêcher qu'une telle situation ne se reproduise.

Le 19 avril, le Président de la Chambre a statué que le cas soulevé par le leader de l'opposition officielle à la Chambre constituait, à première vue, une atteinte au privilège parlementaire.

Conformément à la pratique établie, le député ayant soulevé la question de privilège a été invité à proposer une motion pour que la question soit renvoyée au Comité aux fins d'examen.

Le 19 avril, la Chambre adoptait la motion, qui est ainsi devenue l'ordre de renvoi dont le Comité est saisi aujourd'hui.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du Comité):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Dans ce cas particulier, le privilège parlementaire qui a été enfreint tient essentiellement au fait qu'une pratique bien établie et une convention admise réservent à la Chambre le droit de prendre connaissance en premier du texte des projets de loi qu'elle étudiera.

Qu'est-ce que cela signifie? Cela signifie que des renseignements précis sur les projets de loi ne peuvent être rendus publics avant que les députés n'aient pu en prendre connaissance. Les députés ont droit à ces renseignements afin d'être en mesure d'accomplir leurs fonctions parlementaires. Cela reflète aussi le rôle capital que la Chambre joue dans les affaires législatives du pays. Cela signifie donc, en pratique, qu'après la présentation de l'avis de dépôt d'un projet de loi, le texte de ce projet de loi demeure confidentiel.

Selon les décisions d'anciens Présidents et de rapports de ce comité, le fait de faire connaître au public, mais non aux députés, des renseignements précis sur un projet de loi entrave et désavantage les députés. C'est donc en ce sens qu'aurait décidé récemment le Président.

Je signale cependant la pratique existante de remettre, par courtoisie, une copie du projet aux porte-parole de l'opposition pour qu'ils puissent l'étudier avant son dépôt à la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Étant compris que ceux-ci sont alors tenus au secret comme l'est le ministre.

M. Andre Barnes:

Oui, précisément.

Deux questions de privilège semblables avaient été soulevées en 2001, l'une au printemps, l'autre à l'automne. Je peux faire un résumé de ces affaires, des décisions auxquelles elles ont donné lieu et de la façon dont le Comité les a traitées.

Au printemps de 2001, le député de Provencher a soulevé la question de privilège concernant une séance d'information sur un projet de loi du ministère de la Justice. Le ministère prévoyait tenir une séance d'information confidentielle réservée à des représentants de la presse, ce qui allait à l'encontre de la pratique d'inviter les députés à ces réunions à huis clos. À ce moment-là, un avis de dépôt avait été présenté, mais le projet de loi n'avait pas été déposé à la Chambre. L'autre problème, c'est que le huis clos qui devait être imposé ne l'a pas été, si bien que des représentants des médias, à la sortie de la séance confidentielle, ont téléphoné au député de Provencher pour connaître son opinion sur le projet de loi, alors qu'il ne l'avait jamais vu et qu'il n'avait reçu aucune information à son sujet.

Le Président a statué que l'incident constituait, à première vue, un outrage à la Chambre et a déclaré que, lorsqu'un projet de loi est placé au Feuilleton, il est nécessaire — comme je l'ai dit plus tôt — de protéger la confidentialité de son contenu « en raison du rôle capital que la Chambre joue, et doit jouer, dans les affaires du pays ». Il a poursuivi en déclarant que le fait de « ne pas fournir aux députés des informations sur une affaire dont la Chambre doit être saisie, tout en les fournissant à des journalistes qui les interrogeront vraisemblablement sur cette question, est une situation que la présidence ne saurait tolérer ».

L'affaire avait été renvoyée à un comité prédécesseur du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui a tenu quatre réunions pour étudier la question. Il a entendu le témoignage du député qui avait soulevé la question de privilège, du ministre qui avait parrainé le projet de loi et de représentants ministériels au sujet des politiques du ministère concernant l'avant-dépôt des projets de loi, ainsi que du greffier et du greffier adjoint de la Chambre au sujet des processus de la Chambre s'appliquant aux projets de loi du gouvernement avant leur dépôt et d'un représentant du Bureau du Conseil privé au sujet des politiques visant la rédaction et le dépôt des projets de loi émanant du gouvernement.

Le Comité a présenté son rapport à la Chambre sur cette affaire dans lequel il concluait qu'il y avait effectivement eu atteinte au privilège, mais il ne recommandait aucune sanction compte tenu du fait que le ministre avait présenté ses excuses et que des mesures correctives avaient été appliquées. Le Comité formulait cependant une grande recommandation, à savoir que tous les ministères devraient suivre l'exemple du ministère de la Justice et adopter la pratique de s'abstenir de tenir des séances d'information et de distribuer des documents concernant un projet de loi inscrit au Feuilleton avant le dépôt de celui-ci à la Chambre, à l'exception des séances à huis clos tenues pour les budgets et autres annonces parlementaires importantes. Le Comité demandait également que, avant l'automne, le Bureau du Conseil privé dépose, par l'intermédiaire d'un ministre, de nouvelles lignes directrices sur le traitement des projets de loi avant leur dépôt.

Voilà pour l'affaire survenue au printemps.

Il y a eu un autre cas l'automne de la même année, assez similaire à celui qui est survenu récemment. L'avis de dépôt avait été présenté pour le projet de loi C-36, qui prévoyait des mesures antiterroristes. L'avis avait été donné vendredi et le projet de loi avait été déposé le lundi suivant. Dans l'édition de samedi du National Post paraissait un article faisant état du contenu du projet de loi. Dans ce cas également, le Président a statué qu'il y avait, à première vue, atteinte au privilège de la Chambre et a signalé que l'incident était très semblable à celui survenu au printemps.

L'affaire a également été renvoyée au Comité. Celui-ci a entendu le témoignage du député qui avait soulevé la question de privilège, du ministre qui avait parrainé le projet de loi, de représentants ministériels au sujet de la rédaction du projet de loi et de représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé concernant le processus et les politiques encadrant la rédaction et le dépôt des projets de loi émanant du gouvernement et l'examen de sécurité sur les fuites d'information. Dans son rapport, le Comité a conclu que, selon les éléments de preuve recueillis, il ne pouvait affirmer qu'il y avait eu outrage à la Chambre.

Le Bureau du Conseil privé a ensuite fait appel à la firme Deloitte & Touche pour mener une enquête destinée à découvrir l'auteur de la fuite. Plusieurs centaines d'employés ont été questionnés afin de déterminer qui avait parlé à des journalistes. Neuf d'entre eux ont reconnu avoir parlé à des journalistes, mais ont nié leur avoir communiqué le moindre renseignement confidentiel.

(1110)



Le rapport a signalé que le représentant du Bureau du Conseil privé avait indiqué que la plupart des renseignements détaillés figurant dans l'article du National Post étaient du domaine public, exception faite de quelques bribes d'information.

Le Comité ayant déterminé qu'il n'y avait pas eu outrage, les députés de l'opposition ont inséré une opinion dissidente dans le rapport, fondée sur le fait que c'était ces quelques bribes d'information qui pouvaient éventuellement être confidentielles, mais il n'y avait pas moyen de le savoir et les employés alors au ministère avaient affirmé n'avoir pas divulgué de renseignements confidentiels. Ils ont conclu que c'était peut-être par spéculation journalistique que le journaliste avait réussi à trouver ces quelques bribes d'information qui manquaient.

Ce sont les deux affaires les plus pertinentes de privilège parlementaire, semblables à celle qui a été décidée récemment.

(1115)

Le président:

Y a-t-il des questions?

Oh, vous avez quelque chose à ajouter?

La greffière: Oui, rapidement.

Le président: Allez-y.

La greffière:

J'en suis à la dernière partie de mon exposé de ce matin.

Considérant la suite, le Comité est saisi d'un ordre de renvoi de la Chambre d'enquêter sur cette question de privilège. Lorsque le Comité entreprend ce travail, il l'aborde de la même façon que pour toute autre étude qu'il décide de mener. Il peut examiner son calendrier et déterminer le degré de priorité à y accorder, le nombre de réunions à y consacrer, l'utilité d'entendre des témoins et quels témoins faire comparaître. Les membres du Comité ont été informés de ce qui s'est fait dans le passé dans des cas similaires, et le Comité est libre de procéder pareillement ou différemment.

Si le Comité présente un rapport à la Chambre sur cette question, il pourra indiquer si, à son avis, il y a eu ou non atteinte au privilège. Le rapport pourra inclure ou non des recommandations. Il importe de signaler que le Comité ne peut imposer de sanctions. Seule la Chambre peut le faire.

Le rapport, comme tout autre produit par le Comité, peut comprendre des d'opinions dissidentes ou complémentaires. Il se peut que le rapport suffise à régler la question, auquel cas le Comité ne recommandera aucune autre mesure à la Chambre. Par ailleurs, il est également possible que le rapport recommande au Président de prendre des mesures ou que des mesures administratives soient appliquées.

Enfin, comme pour d'autres rapports de comité, un député peut présenter, sur avis, une motion d'adoption du rapport.

Voilà à peu près tout ce que j'ai à dire.

Le président:

Le Comité est-il tenu de présenter un rapport?

La greffière:

Non. C'est une décision qui revient au Comité, mais je dois dire que la pratique a été de présenter un rapport à la Chambre quand il y a eu un ordre de renvoi.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aurais une question à poser à la suite de votre résumé des plus utiles. Le rapport serait numéroté de la façon habituelle, soit le Xe rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. L'adoption se ferait selon la procédure habituelle. Il y aurait adoption s'il y avait consentement de tous les partis par le truchement d'une motion adoptée à l'unanimité, je suppose. Ou se fait-elle toujours au moyen d'un vote?

La greffière: Eh bien…

M. Scott Reid: Comme je dis, cela n'aurait aucune valeur s'il n'y avait pas adoption. Ai-je raison? Il n'y a pas de pouvoir à moins que…

La greffière:

Eh bien, les recommandations peuvent quand même être suivies. Ce n'est pas une exigence.

M. Scott Reid:

Mais suivies seulement de façon informelle, au moyen d'un avis au Président sur les mesures qu'il devrait prendre? Toute sanction réelle exigerait l'adoption. N'ai-je pas raison?

La greffière:

Eh bien, dans le cas d'une recommandation du Comité au Président, ou sur des questions où il a le pouvoir de formuler des recommandations, c'est ordinairement pris au sérieux.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien sûr.

La greffière:

Une motion d'adoption est une motion sujette à débat, si c'est cette voie qu'il faut emprunter, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Le président:

Je pense que ce que Scott cherche à savoir, c'est s'il faut nécessairement qu'il y ait adoption avant que le Président prenne des mesures.

La greffière:

Je ne pense pas que cela ait été un élément dans beaucoup des rapports portant sur une question de privilège.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Pour ce qui est de cas pouvant servir de précédent, nous avons fait état de deux précédents, et je ne sais pas s'ils ont été cités parce qu'il s'agissait de rapports qui avaient été effectivement adoptés par la suite ou même s'ils ont fait l'objet d'un vote d'adoption…?

M. Andre Barnes:

Il y a eu d'autres incidents similaires où le Président a conclu… ils concernaient des projets de loi pour lesquels l'avis de dépôt avait été donné et au sujet desquels des renseignements avaient été divulgués, mais ils n'ont pas fait l'objet d'un renvoi au Comité.

Un cas s'est produit assez récemment. La députée de St. Paul's avait publié de l'information au sujet d'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire et s'était excusée sans réserve de l'avoir fait. Le Président avait déterminé qu'il s'agissait bien d'une question de privilège, mais qu'aucune autre mesure ne s'imposait, vu les excuses présentées à la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

J'ai une question, Andre, concernant les exemples de 2001 que vous avez cités. Je sais que nous ne cessons de vous surcharger de travail, et c'est pourquoi je tâcherai d'être prudent dans ce que je dirai.

Est-ce que ce serait une bonne idée de regarder du côté du parlement des provinces ou d'ailleurs, à Westminster par exemple, pour voir s'il y a des précédents depuis cette époque? La raison qui me pousse à le demander, c'est que nous n'aurions pas, dans les précédents les plus pertinents d'ici, de renvois aux décisions subséquentes qui pourraient s'appliquer à des circonstances qui sont similaires. Il va sans dire que la dynamique médiatique a beaucoup changé depuis 2001. Par conséquent, je suppose que la source de ces problèmes est quelque chose de plutôt nouveau, que, les possibilités technologiques n'existaient peut-être pas en 2001. Je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit le cas — nous ne le savons pas encore —, mais c'est certainement concevable.

Je ne veux pas vous imposer ce travail, mais simplement semer dans votre esprit l'idée que cela pourrait être pertinent.

(1120)

M. Andre Barnes:

Je pense, dans les affaires de privilège parlementaire, que c'est une très bonne idée de vérifier ce qui s'est fait ailleurs. Il me vient à l'esprit un autre cas, que je n'ai pas à retracer ici, où il a été très utile de prendre connaissance d'affaires survenues aux parlements d'Australie et du Royaume-Uni, qui avaient eu à traiter d'un cas ressemblant encore plus, comparativement au précédent canadien, à celui qui nous occupait. Je vais donc faire cette vérification.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Allez-y.

La greffière:

J'ai une petite précision à apporter au sujet de l'adoption. Oui, il arrive souvent que les rapports de comité soient adoptés par consentement unanime le jour même où ils sont présentés, mais il y a aussi l'autre voie, qui est d'inscrire une motion d'adoption au Feuilleton.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous ne l'avez pas exprimée, mais je vais maintenant suggérer une implication de nos travaux. Si nous arrivons à produire un rapport sans dissidence, plutôt que de nous mettre en désaccord entre nous, nous serons vraisemblablement capables d'atteindre l'objectif secondaire d'obtenir le consentement unanime à la Chambre. Cela me semble logique.

Ce n'était pas vraiment une question que je vous adressais; je voulais faire une observation sur ce qui me frappe. Je cherchais à obtenir un commentaire seulement dans l'éventualité où je disais quelque chose de complètement erroné, auquel cas vous auriez pu me corriger.

Le président:

Un point à retenir lorsqu'il est question de consentement unanime, c'est la présence dans cette législature, du Bloc et du Parti vert, qui ne coopèrent pas toujours.

Y a-t-il d'autres questions, commentaires ou instructions quant à la façon de procéder?

Monsieur Julian, bienvenu au Comité.

M. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NPD):

Merci de votre accueil.

Malheureusement, je ne serai ici que pour une autre vingtaine de minutes. Don Davies me remplacera.

Le président:

Vous allez donc parler pendant 20 minutes?

M. Peter Julian:

Non, non, je ne ferai pas d'obstruction aujourd'hui.

Je suis intrigué par certains points de l'historique fait par l'analyste et la greffière. Il me semble qu'il s'agit d'une atteinte très sérieuse et qu'elle devrait être traitée très sérieusement. Je suis sûr que tous les membres du Comité sont du même avis.

La façon dont ont été structurés certains des examens précédents de divulgation prématurée de cette nature est une chose que je trouve importante. Lorsque nous parlons du ministre, du ministère en cause, du greffier de la Chambre et du Bureau du Conseil privé, je pense que ce sont tous d'importants témoins que nous devrions envisager de faire comparaître et que nous devrions en discuter à cette table.

Le fait qu'il y ait eu des enquêtes dans le passé est également à prendre avec beaucoup de sérieux. Je ne crois pas que nous sachions à l'heure actuelle si le ministère a entrepris une enquête ou si la personne à l'origine de cette fuite d'information aux journalistes a été identifiée. Cela n'a certainement pas été porté à notre attention jusqu'ici. Si une enquête a été lancée, il serait, je pense, pertinent pour nous de le savoir.

Nous devrions tâcher de voir quel a été le suivi au niveau ministériel. Cela nous aidera à formuler nos recommandations. Je veux affirmer ici que le genre de discussions que le Comité a tenues dans le passé concernant des atteintes au privilège parlementaire de cette nature devraient nous servir de modèle dans notre approche de l'affaire qui nous occupe actuellement.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Je cède la parole à M. Chan, puis à M. Richards.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Je tiens à remercier mes collègues de l'autre côté pour leurs interventions.

La raison qui m'a amené, à la dernière réunion du Comité, à proposer de faire venir le légiste — et je remercie l'analyste d'avoir rédigé son rapport afin de nous donner des renseignements de base —, c'est que je voulais examiner la question d'un peu plus près, malgré le constat fait par le Président qu'il y avait, à première vue, atteinte au privilège des députés.

Je ne suis toujours pas convaincu qu'il y a eu effectivement atteinte au privilège des députés. Je me suis livré à une lecture attentive de l'article du Globe and Mail et je n'y vois rien qui montre forcément — du moins d'après la teneur de l'article — que le journaliste en question avait en fait une copie du projet de loi, ce qui aurait constitué une atteinte à nos privilèges. Il y a peut-être eu quelqu'un qui a pris quelque initiative, qui a donné à tort quelque information quant à la teneur du projet de loi, mais l'article porte surtout sur des points qui ne figurent pas dans le projet de loi, par opposition à ce qui s'y trouve réellement.

Je reviens, par exemple, à la mention faite dans le document de l'analyste concernant des questions de privilège renvoyées au Comité, plus précisément à l'exemple qu'il a cité du député de Provencher, qui remonte à mars… Pardon, je me suis trompé d'exemple. Je veux parler plutôt de la décision du Président en 2010 portant sur une question de divulgation prématurée d'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire soulevée par le député de Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, affaire où il y avait eu divulgation sur le site Web d'un autre député, ce qui avait été, bien entendu, jugé être une atteinte au privilège des députés.

Je voudrais creuser un peu plus profondément. Supposons que je propose une disposition quelconque à ajouter au Code criminel par la voie d'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire visant l'ivresse au volant. Je fais savoir que je présente un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire modifiant le Code criminel, mais qu'il ne porte pas sur les meurtres ou sur les peines consécutives. Est-ce que je porte atteinte au privilège des députés si je ne divulgue pas le contenu réel du projet de loi avant son dépôt à la Chambre?

Voilà l'essentiel du point que je soulève. Dans les faits, y a-t-il vraiment eu divulgation importante…? La personne rapportait-elle réellement le détail de dispositions de fond figurant effectivement dans le projet de loi C-14 lorsqu'il a été déposé à la Chambre le 14 avril?

(1125)

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci.

Je pense que, dans l'examen de questions comme celle qui nous occupe, l'information qui nous a été communiquée est très utile. De toute évidence, d'après les deux précédents de 2001 portés à notre connaissance, il semble qu'une approche très similaire a été adoptée pour l'examen des questions. Je suis d'avis qu'il nous serait utile de nous en inspirer.

Je crois qu'il va sans dire que nous voudrons entendre certains témoins, comme ceux qui ont comparu à l'époque. Je pense qu'il serait bon que, d'entrée de jeu, le greffier nous donne également des renseignements de fond, mais je pense aussi que, manifestement, le député qui a soulevé…

Le président:

Vous voulez dire le légiste?

M. Blake Richards:

Le légiste également. Je crois que le greffier de la Chambre pourrait nous aider, ainsi que le légiste.

Le président:

Le greffier de la Chambre, donc.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pense aussi qu'il serait utile d'entendre le député qui a soulevé la question de privilège. Le ministre devrait être appelé à comparaître, ainsi que des représentants du ministère et du Bureau du Conseil privé. Ce sont tous des témoins qu'il serait utile de faire comparaître. Les précédents sont là.

Je crois aussi, lorsqu'il s'agit de privilège parlementaire, que la question devrait être au premier rang de nos priorités. Nous devrions l'aborder dès notre prochaine réunion et en faire notre toute première priorité. Il semble que dans le passé, la discussion sur ces questions s'est échelonnée sur quatre ou cinq réunions. Je pense que nous voudrons probablement consacrer à peu près autant de temps à celle-ci.

Voici ce que je propose: de nous guider sur les deux précédents qui ont été portés à notre attention et de faire comparaître, parmi nos témoins, ceux que j'ai indiqués.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Allez-y, monsieur Julian.

M. Peter Julian:

Je dois vous dire, monsieur le président, que je suis en admiration devant votre cravate. Je ne sais pas pourquoi. C'est simplement que je la trouve tout à fait ravissante.

Le président:

J'ai bien pensé que ce serait le cas.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Peter Julian:

Je ne suis pas en désaccord avec M. Richards, mais je sais par ailleurs qu'il y a d'autres importantes…

M. Scott Reid:

Il veut vous l'entendre dire de nouveau.

M. Peter Julian:

C'est dans le compte rendu. C'est public. Kady en fera un gazouillis.

M. Scott Reid:

Il téléphone à sa maman en ce moment.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Peter Julian:

Revenons aux autres priorités du Comité… D'accord, je ne suis que membre provisoire du Comité et je suis heureux d'être ici. Mais je suis d'avis que la question dont nous sommes saisis nécessite, de la part du Comité, une réponse sur le fond. Il y a bon nombre d'autres priorités, notamment les initiatives pour favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille, qui font partie du plan de travail.

Je voulais simplement obtenir de la greffière un aperçu des travaux du Comité qui sont actuellement prévus, parce que je crois que cette question de privilège devrait être examinée de façon approfondie et, je l'espère, en tant que haute priorité. Je ne suis pas sûr qu'elle sera la première priorité si d'autres dossiers sont à étudier par le Comité.

Le président:

Avez-vous ce document?

M. Peter Julian:

Oui, je l'ai.

Le président:

C'est le calendrier de nos travaux pour les quelques prochaines semaines, et vous y verrez quelques plages libres.

Bon. Cette liste que vous regardez tous est incomplète. Elle a été reçue tout juste ce matin, mais il y a quand même deux choses qui n'y figurent pas.

Voulez-vous nous dire de quoi il s'agit?

(1130)

La greffière:

Les membres peuvent constater que le mois de mai se remplit. La séance d'information informelle d'Élections Canada a été reportée au 12 mai et, pour ce qui est des autres réunions, il y a des plages horaires libres les 5, 10 et 19 mai. Mais nous avons maintenant reçu deux réponses positives de la part d'assemblées législatives, dont les représentants témoigneront relativement à l'étude sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille.

Ainsi, deux de ces trois plages libres disparaîtront si le Comité décide d'entendre ces témoins ces jours-là.

Le président:

Pardon, dites-moi encore de quels témoins il s'agit?

La greffière:

Ce sont les représentants des deux assemblées législatives.

Le président:

Au Canada?

La greffière:

Oui.

Le président:

Quant à ceux de l'Australie ou de la Nouvelle-Zélande, nous envisageons toujours la plage horaire tard en soirée.

La greffière:

C'est exact. Ce serait la plage qui va de 23 heures à 1 heure.

Le président:

Anita, c'est à vous.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Sans vouloir minimiser l'importance de cette question de privilège, nous avons accompli beaucoup de travail sur l'étude des initiatives pour favoriser une Chambre propice à la vie de famille. Nous avons entendu beaucoup de témoins à ce sujet, et je sais que le Comité espérait être en mesure de présenter un rapport à la Chambre avant la fin de la session en juin. Je demanderais simplement que cela soit pris en considération, parce que bon nombre d'entre nous y ont mis beaucoup d'efforts.

Le président:

Il y a toujours l'option de tenir des réunions supplémentaire.

Je cède la parole à M. Reid et ensuite à M. Chan.

M. Scott Reid:

En ce qui concerne…

Le président:

Eh bien, le calendrier du mois de juin est vierge, exception faite de l'étude du rapport d'étape, pourvu qu'il soit rédigé tel que prévu actuellement pendant la semaine de visite dans nos circonscriptions.

M. Scott Reid:

Mes excuses. S'agit-il du rapport d'étape sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille?

Le président:

Oui, sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai une proposition à faire concernant l'étude sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille. Quand le ministre était ici, il a convenu, en réponse à ma question, que, si nous nous entendions sur certains points et non sur d'autres, il serait heureux, ou à tout le moins pas mécontent, de nous voir procéder à la pièce, réglant les questions, les points faisant consensus, cueillant les fruits à portée de la main pour ainsi dire, et remettre les autres à plus tard. Peut-être que nous réussirons à tout faire, mais je ne voudrais pas sacrifier le temps à consacrer à la question de privilège dans le but de tâcher d'en arriver à un accord sur les points qui accrochent, alors que nous pourrions ne retenir que ceux sur lesquels nous sommes d'accord, en particulier tous ceux qui comportent un suivi administratif de leur mise en œuvre éventuelle à l'automne.

Le président:

Je pense que l'idée de…

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait alors cela d'accompli et nous pourrions nous pencher sur les autres points par la suite. Ce n'est qu'une proposition.

Le président:

Je pense que le rapport de juin sera un rapport d'étape qui tient justement au motif que vous invoquez. Il s'agirait de cueillir les fruits à portée de la main et de retenir les points sur lesquels nous pouvons nous entendre.

M. Scott Reid:

Je m'excuse, j'ai mal compris. Ce n'est pas comme si nous étions très éloignés les uns des autres, mais que nous allions persister… En réalité, nous pourrions dire que nous sommes d'accord sur tels et tels points et que nous les envoyons à la Chambre pour les faire approuver.

Le président: Oui.

M. Scott Reid: D'accord. J'avais mal compris.

Merci. C'est excellent.

Le président:

C'est ce que j'ai compris du rapport d'étape, parce qu'il subsiste des points vraiment majeurs au sujet desquels, de toute évidence, nous ne pouvons pas nous mettre d'accord dans l'immédiat.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais simplement prendre le relais de M. Julian. Je reconnais l'importance de traiter la question de privilège de manière relativement rapide. En fait, je ne fais que donner suite aux propos de Mme Vandenbeld. Je pense, en particulier en ce qui concerne les témoins éventuels représentant d'autres assemblées législatives qui ont aménagé leur horaire en vue de rencontrer le Comité, que nous ne voudrions pas reporter leur comparution, ne serait-ce qu'en raison des difficultés de trouver du temps libre dans le calendrier.

Si nous pouvions au moins nous en tenir à ce qui a été fixé pour ceux-là, nous pourrions utiliser les plages horaires libres en juin pour étudier la question de privilège. D'ici là, si le temps le permet, nous pourrions en discuter en demandant à la greffière de tirer parti autant que possible de toute plage horaire qui se trouverait libre. Mais je ne voudrais pas que l'on déroge à l'échéancier proposé pour la présentation à la Chambre du rapport d'étape sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Nous devrions peut-être commencer à regarder le calendrier et à fixer des dates.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'ai un autre point à soulever. Tout en prenant note de l'observation faite par M. Richards au sujet d'une des enquêtes précédentes qui avait exigé cinq réunions du Comité, je ferai remarquer que l'autre n'en a pris que deux. Cela dépend donc de l'efficacité avec laquelle nous voudrons travailler. Pour le moment, nous ne disposons pas de beaucoup d'éléments de preuve sur quoi que ce soit, mis à part les deux prétendus reportages.

Je pense, j'espère, que nous pouvons nous montrer un peu plus efficaces et nous éviter d'avoir à siéger cinq jours.

(1135)

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je ne puis que reprendre les propos de mon collègue. Moi aussi j'aimerais voir ce rapport d'étape terminé. Nous y avons mis beaucoup de travail.

Je pense que nous pouvons décider de la question de privilège rapidement. Dans l'article de presse qui est, pour le moment, le principal élément de preuve dont nous disposons, nous ne pouvons vraiment pas y trouver des éléments particuliers contenus dans le projet de loi, ce qui est ce sur quoi nous sommes censés nous pencher, ni de renseignements précis sur le projet de loi, ce qui est exactement ce que le recherchiste de la Bibliothèque nous a dit être le facteur déterminant s'il y a eu ou non atteinte au privilège.

L'article lui-même étant passablement vague à cet égard, je ne pense pas que cela nous prendra… ou je ne pense pas que nous devrions consacrer 10 réunions à cette affaire. Je sais bien qu'elle est importante, mais parmi les éléments de preuve portés à notre attention jusqu'à présent, il n'y a pas grand-chose.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Richards et ensuite à M. Julian.

M. Blake Richards:

J'espère que je n'ai pas entendu, et je ne dis pas l'avoir entendu, que le gouvernement dit ne pas prendre au sérieux une question de privilège. J'espère que ce n'est pas cela que j'entends.

Je comprends que nous devons nous occuper d'autres affaires et qu'il n'y a personne ici qui voudrait ne pas s'en occuper. Mais nous sommes saisis d'une question de privilège, ce qui est une chose très sérieuse. Nous devons la traiter avec sérieux.

Pourrions-nous parler de certains témoins pour lesquels il a été difficile de trouver du temps dans le calendrier et peut-être des moyens de faciliter leur comparution? Oui, bien sûr. Cela peut se discuter. Mais ce que nous devons comprendre, c'est que cette question doit être examinée et que nous devons nous assurer de le faire certainement avant le congé d'été. Je pense que cette question doit être la première des priorités.

Pour ce qui est du nombre de réunions, j'entends que nous devons, eh oui, expédier cette affaire le plus rapidement possible. Vous savez, il nous faut plutôt la traiter avec tout le sérieux qu'elle mérite. Devrions-nous gaspiller du temps sur quoi que ce soit? Bien sûr que non. Personne n'oserait le prétendre. Mais compte tenu des témoins que nous devrons probablement faire comparaître ici, je ne vois pas comment nous arriverions à entendre leurs témoignages en moins de trois réunions, environ. Et puis, il faudra prévoir du temps pour nous pencher sur le rapport éventuel.

Aussi, je pense qu'il nous faudra probablement quatre réunions. Je ne vois pas comment nous pourrions accomplir notre travail en moins de trois réunions. Peut-être serait-il possible de nous en tirer avec trois, mais j'estime qu'il faut quand même y mettre tout le sérieux voulu. Une question de privilège est une affaire très sérieuse et elle doit être traitée comme telle. J'espère ne pas entendre le gouvernement parler autrement. Cette question doit être prioritaire.

Tous apprécient hautement les efforts qui ont été consacrés à l'étude sur les initiatives favorisant la vie de famille et veulent s'assurer qu'elle est prise en considération également, mais la question de privilège est très sérieuse et doit être tenue pour telle.

Le président:

Monsieur Julian.

M. Peter Julian:

Je me trouve à être de nouveau en accord avec M. Richards. Je vais devoir me passer la figure à l'eau froide.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Une voix: Un changement de camp en perspective.

M. Peter Julian: Non, je ne pense pas que cela puisse arriver.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Peter Julian: Je suis d'accord pour dire que cette question doit être prise au sérieux. Le Président a conclu que la divulgation prématurée du contenu du projet de loi C-14 avait nui à tous les députés dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions parlementaires. Nous ne pouvons minimiser l'importance de la décision du Président de la Chambre.

Il importe que cette question bénéficie d'un examen aussi approfondi que les précédentes questions de privilège de cette nature, et pour cela il faudra probablement au moins quatre réunions; cela ne fait aucun doute. Je pense qu'en composant la liste de témoins, regardant de nouveau les affaires précédentes, nous constatons une certaine constante: sont appelés à comparaître des représentants du ministère, le ministre, le député à l'origine de la question de privilège et, éventuellement, le légiste. Ce sont tous d'importants témoins à faire comparaître.

Un point sur lequel un certain consensus, il me semble, est en train de se forger, est que nous aborderons l'examen de cette question en tant que comité après l'achèvement de l'étude sur les initiatives favorisant la vie de famille. À observer les autres partis, j'ai le sentiment que c'est dans cette direction que nous allons. Nous avons une bonne idée du temps disponible. Le calendrier de juin est vierge, ce qui nous permettra d'y prévoir le nombre de réunions nécessaires pour nous pencher sur cette question avec le sérieux que le Président lui a donné lorsqu'il l'a renvoyée au Comité.

Le président:

Je pense qu'il n'y a personne qui veut que cela aille au-delà de l'été. Le tout doit être terminé certainement avant le congé d'été.

Mme Vandenbeld est la prochaine à prendre la parole et ce sera ensuite à M. Graham.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

Juste pour revenir sur le point soulevé par M. Richards, je veux affirmer que nous considérons cette question très, très sérieusement et que nous tenons absolument à la traiter de façon prioritaire.

Si vous jetez un coup d'oeil au calendrier, vous verrez que nous sommes aujourd'hui le 3 mai. Il nous reste deux séances et demie pour entendre les témoignages en prévision des directives de rédaction que nous devons donner le 19 mai pour l'étude sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille.

Toujours dans le calendrier, vous verrez qu'après cette date il y a neuf plages horaires qui sont libres. Et puis il y a, bien entendu, la possibilité de tenir des réunions supplémentaires.

Il y a donc suffisamment de temps, je pense, pour mener à terme les deux dossiers. Pour avoir les directives de rédaction d'ici le 19… Nous en sommes presque rendus là avec ce rapport; il ne nous reste que deux séances et demie prévues au calendrier. J'estime que nous pouvons accomplir les deux tâches: entendre les derniers témoignages en vue de la rédaction du rapport d'étape sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille et examiner la question de privilège avec toute l'attention et tout le sérieux qu'elle exige.

(1140)

Le président:

Il ne faut pas oublier qu'au moins une des réunions en juin sera consacrée à l'examen du rapport d'étape et que, du temps disponible avant de donner les instructions le 19 mai, il y a deux heures qui sont libres pour le moment. Cependant, il y a aussi les représentants de deux assemblées législatives qui ont accepté de témoigner devant nous, mais dont la date de comparution n'a pas encore été fixée.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je crois qu'il n'y a personne ici qui ne prenne pas la question de privilège très au sérieux, mais je suis d'avis que la toute première étape, comme nous en avons discuté à la dernière réunion, devrait être de faire venir ici le légiste et d'établir s'il y a effectivement eu, oui ou non, atteinte au privilège avant de convoquer les autres témoins. S'il y a manifestement eu atteinte, nous aurons alors la longue discussion qui s'impose, mais confirmons d'abord la réalité de l'atteinte au privilège avant de décider qui appeler et comment procéder.

Je ne pense pas que nous en soyons à ce point puisque, comme M. Chan l'a mentionné, les reportages faisaient état de ce qui ne figurait pas dans le projet de loi, non pas de ce qui y était. Je ne suis pas sûr qu'il y avait là atteinte au privilège. Faisons venir le légiste afin de discuter de ce qui se passe et décidons ensuite comment nous allons procéder à partir de là.

Le président:

Sauf que le Président a déjà statué qu'il y avait, à première vue…

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Justement, à première vue. Donc « une apparence de ».

Le président:

… atteinte et que nous devons examiner la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le constat à première vue, c'est qu'il y avait « une apparence de ». Faisons venir le légiste pour aller au fond des choses et déterminer s'il y a réellement eu atteinte au privilège et, le cas échéant, comment nous devrions mener notre enquête. Voilà ma position.

Le président:

Je pense que tous s'accordent pour dire que le légiste devrait venir pour…

M. David de Burgh Graham: Oui, mais moi je pense qu'il devrait venir avant que nous convoquions d'autres témoins. Commençons par lui.

Le président: Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Un petit mot à l'intention du légiste, qui est sans doute à l'écoute, pour qu'il sache qu'une description technique du sens de l'expression « une apparence de » serait utile. Il va sans dire que le légiste ne peut pas produire une preuve, mais il peut expliquer les modalités d'application des règles.

Pour ce qui est du calendrier, je constate, quoique je puisse me tromper, en consultant le calendrier qui vient de nous être remis qu'il y a des plages horaires libres: le 5 mai, de midi à 13 heures; le 10 mai, de 11 heures à midi; le 19 mai, une heure peut-être, bien que cela me paraisse optimiste d'espérer rédiger les directives en une heure.

Le président:

En effet.

M. Scott Reid:

Pareillement pour le 31, qui n'est qu'une date butoir.

Nous avons donc, éventuellement, cinq plages horaires libres. Je suis conscient que d'autres activités pourraient bien en réduire le nombre, mais ces témoins, le légiste et les autres ont une grande disponibilité, si bien que nous pouvons les caser assez aisément dans les plages horaires.

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que nous supposons, il me semble, des difficultés dans le calendrier qui ne sont pas… Je pense que nous travaillons à partir du scénario le plus défavorable. Je suis d'avis que nous réussirons probablement assez bien à mener ces activités de front, du simple fait que l'examen de la question de privilège se prête à des réaménagements dans le calendrier, vu la disponibilité des témoins.

Le président:

Nous pourrions donc faire venir le légiste le 5 mai?

Oh! j'ai oublié qu'il n'est pas libre cette semaine. Mes excuses.

M. Scott Reid:

Qu'en est-il du 10?

Le président:

Nous avons aussi les représentants des deux assemblées législatives provinciales qui ont accepté notre invitation. Leurs témoignages ne prendront probablement pas plus d'une heure. S'ils sont disponibles, nous pourrions peut-être les entendre le 5 mai et le légiste le 10 mai.

M. Scott Reid:

M. Richards proposait la présence du greffier de la Chambre, ou du sous-greffier, parce que le légiste traite de questions de droit, tandis que le greffier de la Chambre traite de…

Le président:

Bien.

Pourquoi alors ne pas les faire venir tous deux, s'ils peuvent se libérer?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Le président:

Bien. Nous les inviterons tous deux, s'ils sont libres.

Ainsi, nous pourrions envisager provisoirement d'inviter les représentants des deux assemblées législatives provinciales à témoigner jeudi prochain. C'est court comme avis, mais nous verrons s'ils sont disponibles. Leur comparution se ferait par téléconférence. Puis, le 10 mai, ce serait au tour du greffier et du légiste dans la plage horaire qui est libre.

Y a-t-il des objections à cela?

Non? Bien. Évidemment, tout ça dépend de la disponibilité des gens.

M. Reid a soulevé un bon point en faisant remarquer que le 31 est complètement libre.

(1145)

M. Blake Richards:

Étant donné notre expérience avec la ministre des Institutions démocratiques et les difficultés que cela semble poser pour elle de réaménager son emploi du temps afin de se libérer pour comparaître devant le Comité — malgré nos nombreuses demandes, nous n'avons même pas pu obtenir que le gouvernement accepte de la laisser venir ici —, je ferais également valoir que nous aurions tout intérêt à convoquer aussi longtemps que possible à l'avance la ministre de la Justice, au cas où elle aurait des contraintes d'emploi du temps semblables à celles que la ministre des Institutions démocratiques semble avoir. Nous pourrions alors nous assurer de prévoir sa comparution pendant le temps dont dispose le Comité. Nous ne voulons pas que les mêmes problèmes surviennent.

Le président:

Ce que vous proposez, au fond, c'est de signifier un avis de comparution à la ministre de la Justice.

M. Blake Richards:

Il s'agit de voir quels jours elle sera disponible et de nous assurer ainsi qu'un conflit d'horaire ne surgira pas à chaque réunion, comme cela a été le cas avec certains ministres dans le passé.

Le président:

Y a-t-il quelqu'un qui s'y oppose? Nous demanderons à la greffière de communiquer avec la ministre de la Justice.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ça ne me dérange pas, mais que nous décidions ou non de la faire comparaître, je pense néanmoins qu'il faut d'abord faire venir le légiste et établir quelle est la ligne de référence en matière de privilèges des députés. N'êtes-vous pas d'accord?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous devons déterminer la question à laquelle il faut répondre avant d'appeler les gens à comparaître.

Le président:

Ce que vous avez fait est utile, je pense, parce que nous achèverons d'entendre les témoignages dans le cadre de l'étude sur les initiatives pour favoriser la vie de famille. Nous pourrons ensuite aborder la question de privilège, tirer profit des conseils donnés par le greffier et le légiste, puis remplir les vides à partir de là. Nous réussirons, j'en suis sûr, à accomplir tout ça avant l'été. Au besoin, nous tiendrons des réunions supplémentaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Vous ne voulez quand même pas siéger en juillet?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Non, pas en juillet, pas pour ceux qui ont à se taper un trajet de 14 heures pour se rendre ici.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Seulement si nous siégeons au Yukon, n'est-ce pas?

Le président: C'est ça, oui. Si nous tenons une réunion en juillet, ce sera au Yukon.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Je suis preneur.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Y a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet?

Nous avons quelques affaires du Comité dont il faut nous occuper, entre autres une motion qui a été présentée.

M. Arnold Chan:

En effet, j'ai présenté une motion. Voulez-vous que je la lise ou que la greffière la lise pour le compte rendu?

Le président:

Est-ce correct? Oui.

M. Arnold Chan:

A-t-elle été distribuée?

M. Scott Reid:

C'était votre motion?

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Auriez-vous l'obligeance de la répéter?

M. Arnold Chan:

Bien sûr, je peux en faire la lecture. Je l'ai devant les yeux.

Le président:

Je pense que tous en ont une copie.

M. Arnold Chan:

Tous l'ont reçue. J'en fais la lecture pour le compte rendu. Que, relativement aux ordres de renvoi reçus de la Chambre et se rapportant à des projets de loi, (a) le greffier du Comité, lorsque celui-ci reçoit un tel ordre de renvoi, écrive à chaque député qui n'est pas membre d'un caucus représenté au Comité pour l'inviter à soumettre au greffier du comité dans les deux langues officielles, les amendements proposés au projet de loi qui fait l'objet dudit ordre de renvoi qu'il propose que le Comité étudie; (b) les amendements déposés, conformément à l'alinéa a), au moins 48 heures avant le début de l'étude article par article du projet de loi auquel ces amendements sont proposés soient réputés être proposés au cours de ladite étude à condition que le Comité puisse, en présentant une motion, modifier cette échéance à l'égard d'un projet de loi; (c) au cours de l'étude article par article d'un projet de loi, le président permette à un député qui a présenté ses amendements conformément à l'alinéa a) de faire de brèves observations pour les appuyer.

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de poursuivre, je veux souhaiter à Don Davies la bienvenue au Comité.

M. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NPD):

Merci.

Le président:

Je suis sûr que vous vous plairez ici.

Faites attention à ne pas manger les sandwichs au saumon.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Don Davies: Merci du conseil.

Le président: La motion de M. Chan a été déposée. Vous l'avez tous reçue par la poste. Je crois qu'elle a été transmise à tous les comités.

M. Arnold Chan:

Cette motion est similaire à celle adoptée par la législature précédente. Ce que nous voulons en fin de compte, c'est avoir en place un processus ordonné, en particulier pour les députés qui ne sont pas membres d'un caucus reconnu leur permettant de présenter leurs amendements de fond, afin de pouvoir faire avancer les travaux législatifs de façon ordonnée.

Le président:

Y a-t-il lieu de débattre la motion?

Nous passerons donc au vote.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Y a-t-il d'autres affaires du Comité dont il faut nous occuper?

Je suppose que nous ne pouvons… Ce serait irrespectueux de passer à la motion de M. Christopherson en son absence.

Monsieur Chan.

(1150)

M. Arnold Chan:

Je sais que M. Christopherson n'est pas disponible, et je tiens donc à dire, pour le compte rendu, que nous poursuivons nos conversations. Je pense que nous sommes très près de nous entendre, mais je veux donner à M. Christopherson l'occasion de produire un texte qui réponde à ses préoccupations et aux miennes. Je l'en remercie à l'avance.

Malheureusement, il n'a pas pu se libérer aujourd'hui et je ne serai pas libre jeudi. Mais nous trouverons bientôt, nous espérons, l'occasion d'aboutir.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres affaires du Comité à régler?

Je rappelle que nous aurons ce soir un dîner-réunion informel, non officiel, pour discuter des lignes directrices proposées en matière de cadeaux aux députés. Il s'agira de débroussailler le terrain et d'élaborer quelque chose à présenter sans tarder à la prochaine réunion du Comité, de manière à ne pas prendre trop de temps. C'est à 19 heures au restaurant du Parlement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous êtes toujours en séance à 20 h 30, je pourrai me joindre à vous.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Madame la greffière, nous sommes-nous prononcés sur la motion du Président relative aux pouvoirs d'urgence?

Le président:

Oh! non, pas encore.

Avez-vous apporté votre rapport, monsieur Reid?

M. Scott Reid:

Je l'ai présenté à notre leader à la Chambre et…

Le président:

Oh! pardon. Je peux faire rapport là-dessus.

M. Scott Reid:

Il vous a parlé?

Le président: Oui.

M. Scott Reid: C'est vrai; j'ai dû lui tordre le bras pour qu'il vous parle directement.

Le président:

M. Scheer souhaite apporter certaines modifications aux procédures proposées par le Président. J'ai téléphoné à M. Scheer et lui ai demandé de rencontrer le Président pour qu'ensemble ils puissent trouver un terrain d'entente. Nous espérons qu'il en sera ainsi et que nous serons en mesure de présenter leur texte au Comité, où tous pourront en prendre connaissance. Soyons optimistes.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourrais-je faire une proposition sur la façon de procéder lorsque nous en serons là? Je la fais en partie parce que M. Christopherson est absent et qu'il se préoccupe de l'utilisation que nous faisons du huis clos. Ce serait une occasion bien justifiée de nous réunir à huis clos.

En effet, il me paraît évident, étant donné la nature du débat et le fait qu'il s'agisse d'une recommandation formulée par le Président, que nous ne devrions pas critiquer ou commenter publiquement une position adoptée par le Président à moins d'avoir pu en discuter à huis clos. J'estime que c'est une approche plus respectueuse.

Mais je ne voudrais pas que nous arrêtions définitivement notre position à cet égard sans que M. Christopherson ait eu son mot à dire, vu ses inquiétudes au sujet de l'abus du huis clos.

Le président:

Voilà un bon point. Nous pouvons lui en parler.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter, monsieur Chan?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis d'accord.

Le président:

Bien.

Y a-t-il autre chose?

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Je veux simplement confirmer que la réunion de ce soir se tiendra dans la salle 601.

Le président:

C'est bien ça, la salle 601 du restaurant du Parlement, à 19 heures.

Y a-t-il d'autres points à discuter?

Je vous remercie de votre très bon travail. Je constate avec plaisir l'esprit de coopération et le souci d'efficacité qui caractérisent nos activités. Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 03, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.