header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-02-27 PROC 91

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1140)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome to the 91st meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. The first part of this meeting is being held in public today. Pursuant to Standing Order 81(6), we are studying the interim estimates for 2018-19: vote 1 under the House of Commons, vote 1 under Parliamentary Protective Service, and vote 1 under the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer.

Members will recall that in June 2017 the House made a number of provisional changes to Standing Order 81. As it currently stands, these changes will be in effect for the duration of the 42nd Parliament. Of note for the purposes of today's meeting is that “interim supply” was replaced by “interim estimates”. They're treated in the same manner as other sets of estimates, including being referred to and studied by committees.

For this reason, we will be pleased to have with us shortly the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House of Commons, joined by Charles Robert, Clerk of the House of Commons; Michel Patrice, deputy clerk of administration; and Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer. Accompanying the Speaker from the Parliamentary Protective Service are Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy, director, and Robert Graham, administration and personnel officer.

I just want to quickly do one piece of business before we go on. The subcommittee had a couple of witnesses who we have to have a budget to pay for. The subcommittee approved a budget of $2,750. We just have to reaffirm that approval.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Good.

While we're waiting for the Speaker, I'll just remind you that on Thursday we will go over the report, which you've all received, on the debates commissioner. Then on the first day back after the two constituency weeks we will be looking at the use of indigenous languages, as scheduled. Tentatively in the first hour we would have Charles Robert, Clerk of the House, and senior officials from the House of Commons, and in the second hour we would have the first of the three MPs we've invited, Romeo Saganash. We will have a translator for him into East Cree. Then in the second hour on Thursday of that week tentatively we would have Georgina Jolibois, member of Parliament, for the first 45 minutes, and in the second 45 minutes we would have Robert-Falcon Ouellette, member of Parliament. In the last half hour we would have Bill C-377 with Brenda Shanahan and clause by clause on that, which is just changing the name of the riding, as you all know.

Are there any comments on that schedule?

John.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Is there a reason we're having all three of the MPs on different panels rather than on the same panel?

The Chair:

Yes. If you don't have them separately and they want translation—two haven't asked yet—it costs extra money because you need an extra translation booth.

Mr. John Nater:

I knew there must have been a reason there.

The Chair:

Is there anything else? That's what we will go with.

If it's okay with the committee, after the first questions there are some questions similar to what we were asking before related to PPS and human resources that we'd like to do in camera. Right at the end we would go in camera to do those security questions.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I probably missed this part, Mr. Chair, but what's the plan? Do we shorten the meeting?

The Chair:

We'll do the House and PPS right now and then after that we'll have the Chief Electoral Officer, but just a shorter time.

Mr. Blake Richards:

How much time are we going to have for each, then?

The Chair:

Half of what's left.

Mr. Blake Richards:

When will you cut off the current panel, then?

The Chair:

Unless people want to stay later, we can cut it off between 20 and 25 after.

Let's go to the Speaker for his opening comments.

It's great to have you here, and thank you very much. We have to move quickly because of the votes. [Translation]

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair and committee members.

Thank you for welcoming us here today. I am pleased to appear before you to present the 2018-19 interim estimates and address the funding required to maintain and enhance the administration's support to members of Parliament and to the institution.

I am joined today by the executive management team from the House administration: Charles Robert, clerk of the House of Commons, Michel Patrice, deputy clerk of Administration, and Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer.

(1145)

[English]

I will also be presenting the interim estimates for the PPS, and so I am accompanied by Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy, director of PPS, and Robert Graham, the service’s administration and personnel officer.

As a result of an amendment to the Standing Orders, the interim estimates must now be tabled. This will provide Parliament with the information it needs to align the federal budget and the estimates.

The 2018–19 interim estimates include an overview of spending requirements for the first three months of the fiscal year, with a comparison to the 2017–18 estimates, as well as the proposed schedules to the first appropriation bill.

The House of Commons’ interim estimates, as tabled in the House, total approximately $87 million.

Further to the tabling of the main estimates in the House, I anticipate that we will meet again in the spring, at which time I will provide an overview of the year-over-year changes, as has been the practice in previous years.

Today, I'll cover the main themes of the House’s requests for funding and priorities. The operating budget for the House covers members’ and House officers’ budgets and expenditures, committees, House participation in parliamentary diplomacy, and funding for the House administration.[Translation]

The House administration's first priority is to support members in their work as parliamentarians, focusing on service-delivery excellence and ongoing modernization.

Key initiatives include the digital strategy on modernizing the delivery of parliamentary information and the implementation of the new constituency connectivity service for constituency offices, new householder formats in support of members' communications with their constituents, and optimized food services in the Parliamentary Precinct.[English]

The renewal of our physical spaces and services provided within them is another key priority for the House administration. Public Services and Procurement Canada, the House of Commons, the team of builders and architects and senior officials are overseeing a number of large-scale projects, most notably the reopening of the restored West Block and the closure of Centre Block.

Upon the completion of the restoration of West Block, there will be massive planning required to move critical activities and accommodations from Centre Block to West Block while ensuring that Parliament continues to function seamlessly.

The operation, support, maintenance, and life-cycle management of equipment and connectivity elements in buildings are closely linked to the long-term vision and plan. Those key elements are essential to the implementation of a mobile work environment for members and the administration. The expected outcome is that heritage buildings are protected but refurbished with modernized technological infrastructure, a bit like this one has been.[Translation]

The House of Commons and its security partners continue to collaborate on an enhanced emergency management and security approach. The institution's collective vision is the result of ongoing security awareness and education efforts.

The various groups responsible for security on the Hill and in satellite offices work together to prevent, respond to and manage disruptive events. They also build communication and awareness with all stakeholders around new physical and IT security approaches.

In keeping with evolving cybersecurity threats and information technology developments, it is imperative that the House be equipped with a robust cybersecurity infrastructure and a renewed IT security policy.

These are the current House administration priorities in support of members and the institution.

(1150)

[English]

I will now turn to the interim estimates for the PPS. The PPS is requesting access to $20.7 million in these interim estimates, which will cover regular operations and the continuation of the external video surveillance improvement project over the first three months of the fiscal year 2018-19.

Regular operations include employee salaries and operational funding required to maintain our current service levels. The external video surveillance improvement project will introduce technical upgrades to existing infrastructure and ensure better coverage of the parliamentary precinct. Funding for this project was previously set aside in the fiscal framework by the RCMP and was recently allocated to the PPS.

Following the tabling of the 2018–19 main estimates, the PPS will return and explain the changes from the 2017–18 main estimates.

Mr. Chairman, this concludes my presentation. My team and I would be happy to answer any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

What I plan to do is one round of seven minutes for each party. For the last round, Mr. Christopherson's, we'll go in camera. You can split up your rounds between your members any way you want to.

We'll start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

First of all, for PPS, can I get a breakdown of which aspects the $20.7 million goes to, of what goes where?

Mr. Robert Graham (Administration and Personnel Officer, Parliamentary Protective Service):

Of the $20.7 million, $17.3 million is for operations and $3.4 million is allocated to the camera project that the Speaker mentioned.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Of that operational money, how much goes to front line officers and how much to management? Can you divide it between front-line officers, management, and supplies?

Mr. Robert Graham:

I don't have the specific breakdown, but I do know that 80% of our FT count is operations, front line staff. I can return with the specifics, but it's approximately 80% of that $17.3 million.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would appreciate that. Thank you.

I have a quick question for you. Is there any attempt being made to look at ways of identifying RCMP officers seconded to the PPS as PPS officers?

Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy (Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

I'm not sure I understand the question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right now, RCMP on the Hill are part of PPS, but they're also part of the RCMP, so they show up in RCMP uniform. I'm wondering if there's any attempt—we've discussed this before—of having a PPS patch or something to identify that an RCMP officer on the Hill is PPS versus somebody from off the Hill who is not.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

There has been no discussion on that up to this point. For the RCMP members who are assigned to our force division, they're assigned in support of PPS. They're a support service to PPS, wearing the RCMP uniform as per the policies of the RCMP. There has been no discussion in terms of changing that uniform in any fashion. To my knowledge, it's not been raised with the RCMP.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we now fully staffed in terms of front-line officers at PPS?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

We're pretty close.

Mr. Robert Graham:

We currently have 46 operational vacancies, which is a reduction from last year. We also have a training course and plans to fill those in the coming months.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many RCMP officers are assigned to the Hill?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

We were 110-ish, but I can get you the exact number.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that number constant or is it trending up or down?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

No, it's constant right now. However, as I mentioned to this committee during my last appearance here, we are looking at possibilities to reduce that footprint. There has been some interest already for this potential. It's still a conceptual piece. However, I would suggest that in the short term what you will see while we're waiting for the LTVP and the move from Centre Block is no change.

In the longer term, we are considering a reduction, potentially, of RCMP who are doing protective functions such as the static posts externally and replacing them with front-line PPS personnel. That is the long-term goal at this point: to start phase one of that reduction by exchanging RCMP and moving...so the marked RCMP vehicles will no longer be on post and you'll see a PPS presence instead.

(1155)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I appreciate that.

I have one final question for PPS before I move to on further topics. With respect to privilege in the chamber, if the Sergeant-at-Arms issues an order to lock the doors and PPS operations says “don't lock the doors”, which order will be followed?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

That's an interesting question. It depends on the situation.

If PPS determines that there is a serious threat to security of having those.... I'm not sure I understand the question entirely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm just trying to figure out lines of authority because inside the chamber the Sergeant-at-Arms is king, under the direction of the Speaker.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

That's correct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the Sergeant-at-Arms indicates to the officers in the galleries to lock the doors, and operations says to do a somewhat different activity, will the Sergeant-at-Arms take precedence inside the chamber?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

That's a good question. It's not been discussed at my level, l but I can certainly have the discussion with my operations officer. I don't see that there would be a conflict. If there is something going on, generally our response would be to lock those doors. Unless there is some reason that we need to evacuate and we need to evacuate right now, I would not expect to ever see a countermanding of the Sergeant-at-Arms' direction.

That being said, the Sergeant-at-Arms might not have the information of what's happening outside the chamber, in which case—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Lock the doors.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

All that being said, it's an interesting hypothetical, but unless there is a serious threat to life and limb, I see no reason why we would countermand the need to lock those doors.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough. Thank you.

Moving on to the West Block, I'm particularly interested in this. It's a great point of pride in my riding that all the windows in the West Block, except in the roof, were made in my riding, in my hometown of Sainte-Agathe. I just want to put that on the record.

Are we on track to move into West Block this year?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Let me hand it over to the deputy clerk.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The project is underway. We're putting up all of our resources and Public Works and Procurement Canada is working collaboratively to put in all the required resources with the hope that we're going to be transitioning into the West Block in the fall of 2018 as planned.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does it make sense to move in the fall of 2018 and then having one final short sitting before the election, or would it make more sense to do it in 2019 when there are quite a few more months to do it, and we wouldn't have to move a second time afterwards?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Let's just say that if we are able to achieve it by the fall of 2018, it would be good for Parliament and the parliamentary precinct buildings, because we have the Centre Block to also get into working shape and to modernize.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think I mentioned, when I last appeared here, the mild concern I have about the condition of Centre Block, the fact that we have ancient—and maybe ancient is the wrong word—but certainly old water pipes, wiring, etc., and I am anxious to get that work under way for the preservation of that important building and not to have our work interrupted or moved somewhere else before West Block is ready, because of a leak, for example, as I mentioned last time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Public Works once said it could be kept until 2017, so thank you for that.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

In fact at some point, the Board of Internal Economy will have to make the decision, probably over the next couple of months.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

I'm out of time.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Speaker, can you speak as quickly as Mr. Graham when you answer Blake's question so he can get as many questions in as possible?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

How did you know I had so many questions, Mr. Chair? It sounds as though you read my mind.

My questions might be best directed to Mr. Robert, but I'll let you decide that for yourself.

There has been some talk that there has been a senior officer in the Privy Council Office, which is obviously the department that supports the Prime Minister and the government House leader, who has been seconded to the House administration for the purposes of working on a rewrite of the Standing Orders.

I wonder if you can confirm for me that there is a PCO employee working there with that assignment currently.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

Yes, it's true. The individual has been brought over. I don't know what rank he holds within the Privy Council Office, but he is a Privy Council Office employee.

He was brought over initially as part of an exchange between Procedural Services and PCO. That was modified to be just PCO, at their request, and he was brought over, as you point out, to work on a possible revision of the Standing Orders.

(1200)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I wonder if you could maybe fill us in a bit on what that Standing Orders rewrite is about. Normally those kinds of things, obviously, would go through this committee, and I think especially in light of the debacle we saw last year with the government's attempts to rewrite the Standing Orders without the consent of all the opposition parties, it's something that I am quite surprised and obviously disappointed to hear. I'm sure it will be shared among many of my colleagues in the opposition that there seems to be this new backdoor effort under way to now change those Standing Orders. I wonder if you could fill us in a bit on what that Standing Orders rewrite is about.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's not so much to change the Standing Orders, and the exercise was undertaken at my initiative. I had discussed this with various staff of the different parties represented in the House of Commons. The purpose is, for me anyway, personally, to understand the Standing Orders because I find them to be written in a rather complex fashion.

The commitment that I had made is that there would be no change to the Standing Orders; that the purpose would be simply to make them more user-friendly, and to institute tools that would allow the members using the Standing Orders to appreciate the interrelationships among some of the Standing Orders to others. For example, there are practices that indicate that the leader of the government or certain individuals may have unlimited time in speaking, but that's not universally true. The idea would be to explain, when you're looking at the standing order, where, immediately after you see that yes, you have unlimited time, underneath it you would actually have listed when you don't have unlimited time. When a member's looking at the Standing Orders, they can appreciate, is this circumstance applicable? Do I have unlimited time, or am I limited in time to five, 10, 15, whatever number of minutes there might be in the opportunity to speak? It's meant as an aid, and again, understanding completely that no changes are being recommended through this exercise.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You're confirming it's your intention, at least, that this is simply to rewrite and clarify language, not make any changes to the Standing Orders.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Absolutely.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Also, I think there's been some discussion about the establishment of a new deputy clerk's office. I'm wondering if that office's budget is reflected in the estimates before us.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It is.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It is. Okay.

I wonder if you could tell me—I haven't seen any major problems in the way things are operating around here, but you're obviously more inside on seeing that than I am. I'm wondering if you could tell us a little bit about the motivation for that change, adding a new deputy clerk.

Mr. Charles Robert:

As I explained to the Speaker and also to the Board of Internal Economy when the proposal was accepted, the idea is to have somebody capable of supervising all the intricate operations that are part of corporate services, that are designed to assist you as members. In the same way that we have a deputy clerk over procedure, managing the operations there for the purposes of providing the documents and staffing of committees and all the other parliamentary operations, it seemed to me that it was equally logical to have a position created of deputy clerk of administration who would be responsible for providing the same kind of oversight.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. In my recollection, previous deputy clerks have always been appointed by the Governor in Council. Who made the—

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's been true since about the 1990s, and it's not statutory, which is one reason that the deputy clerk was stripped of the GIC component and made a direct appointee.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so who made this appointment decision, this particular decision?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Which one?

Mr. Blake Richards:

For the new deputy clerk.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I did.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You did. Okay.

Was there some kind of competition?

Mr. Charles Robert:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

No, so how was that decision made?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The decision was mine because I knew that, coming in as clerk, it would be important to have an operation that was as good as it possibly could be to assist the members in fulfilling their parliamentary duties. As you will recognize, certainly before the board, the topics that are generally discussed deal with the supports that are given to the members by way of technology, travel points, offices, contracts for employees—all of that. In order to make sure that I would be as well-served as I thought I needed to be, I decided that I would appoint somebody as the deputy clerk of administration.

(1205)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. There's also been a rumour that the House administration is going to be assigning a procedural clerk to work in the government House leader's office.

Mr. Charles Robert:

That was part of the original proposal that was worked out with Privy Council, but Privy Council declined to take the offer.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, and was that offer made to all the various parties' House leaders' offices, or just the government House leader's office?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I would certainly be open to considering the possibility of assigning such proceduralists if the House leaders across the board decided it would serve their purposes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now go in camera. Yes...?

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

On a point of order, Chair, I have two things quickly.

One, if we're going in camera, I want to mention that the subject matter is the HR issues that we've talked about before. With consultations with colleagues, we've agreed that it's probably best to do that in camera.

However, before I do all of my time, I'd like to ask one question in public first.

The Chair:

Sure, go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

I just want to follow up with my friend's questions on the Standing Order thing. I want to clarify, because it was kind of jarring.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You start talking Standing Orders, and I mean the House owns the orders, not the Clerk's department.

I'm curious as to the end result of this process that we will see.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, as I explained to the executive assistants of all the House leaders, the purpose was initially to help me understand the Standing Orders, because I don't find that they're particularly user-friendly.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I heard that.

Mr. Charles Robert:

The idea would be to provide them in simpler language, rearrange them so the order is a bit more logical, under the absolute guarantee that no changes would be made and no product would be finalized without the approval of the procedure and House affairs committee.

I quite agree with you. I don't own these Standing Orders, these are yours.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Mr. Charles Robert:

We're going to be going into a new parliament, presumably in two or three years, or whenever the next election. There is an opportunity for the members to discuss the Standing Orders. If in the meantime, through negotiations and shared information, the House leaders recognize there might be some value in rewriting the Standing Orders, again I underline, not for the purposes of changing them but for the purposes of them making more user-friendly, etc., it seemed to me that this would be a worthwhile project.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

Let me be clear though. There would not be one period changed without a report coming to PROC, without everything going through PROC, correct?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's correct.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. I thought so, but I wanted to nail that down. We don't want any surprises, at least as few as possible.

With that, Chair, my other questions would be in camera.

The Chair:

I'll let Mr. Reid do a short intervention here.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I just want to ask the question. There are annotated Standing Orders. They haven't been republished in many years.

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would that not be a good starting place? You don't need anyone's approval to do that, and that would give a very clear indication of the kinds of confusion that exist. Further annotations could—

Mr. Charles Robert:

I guess the issue is that the annotated commentary is attached to the structure of the Standing Orders as they currently exist. The idea perhaps would be to work—for your approval in the end—a revised Standing Orders version, and then use that as the vehicle to consider either a new annotated Standing Orders edition, the third, or to begin the work on a possible fourth edition of the manual.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

We should keep in mind, of course, that the annotated Standing Orders were there before the manual was first begun and it kind of replaced them. However, there's no question that I thought it was a very useful tool.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I agree. It's a really useful tool.

The Chair:

We will suspend for a minute to go in camera.

If anyone who's not allowed to be here could leave, that would be great.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

(1205)

(1225)



[Public proceedings resume] [Translation]

The Chair:

Good afternoon. Welcome to the 91st meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This afternoon, we are continuing our study on the Interim Estimates 2018-19.

Our witnesses from Elections Canada are Stéphane Perrault, Acting Chief Electoral Officer, Michel Roussel, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer with Electoral Events and Innovation, and Hughes St-Pierre, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer with Internal Services.

Thank you for being here.

I will give the floor to Mr. Perrault for his presentation.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Acting Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I welcome this opportunity to appear before the committee today to present Election Canada's 2018-19 interim estimates as well as to update members on the status of our preparations for the 2019 general election.

Today, the committee is voting on Election Canada's interim supply, which totals $7.7 million. This represents the salaries of some 350 indeterminate positions for the first quarter of the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2018. It does not include any of the agency's other expenditures, which are funded from a statutory appropriation.

In addition to supporting Parliament in its review of legislative changes, you will recall from my appearance on the Main Estimates last spring that Elections Canada has been pursuing two strategic priorities since the last general election.

Our first priority is to modernize our electoral services through a range of initiatives such as the introduction of electronic poll books to improve the process at the polls, and other projects regarding services to voters and political entities. I will come back to that in a moment.

The second strategic priority relates to the replacement and improvement of key infrastructure assets that are required for the delivery of elections, such as our data centres, IT networks, telecommunications services and the pay system for poll workers.

To be ready for the next general election, we need to have completed our transformation projects by September 2018 in order to begin integrated testing of all IT-enabled projects, which would enable us to reach a state of complete preparation in the spring of 2019. This timeline means that final decisions about the scope of our transformation projects have already been made, or will be, in the next few months. In this regard, I would like to briefly highlight the progress made on key improvement initiatives.

First, I am pleased to report that a company was selected last fall through a rigorous procurement process to provide electronic poll books at the next election. This will allow us to automate a number of record-keeping transactions at the polls. Ballots will continue to be marked and counted by hand.

For the next general election, electronic poll books will be deployed in some 225 electoral districts for advance polls only, which can be done under the current legislation. Deployment of this technology in advance polls will address the most critical challenges experienced in the last general election in terms of wait times in urban and semi-urban districts. The use of electronic poll books at ordinary polls will be considered only after the next general election, if changes are made to the legislation. In rural areas, where the main challenge for voters is the travel distance to the polls, returning officers will be provided with new IT tools to inform the creation of polling divisions and improve the proximity of polling places to electors.

We are also working on the first release of an online portal for political entities. Our objective through this service is that parties, candidates and official agents will be able to complete and file various documents online, including nomination papers, if so enabled by legislation change. We have engaged the Advisory Committee of Political Parties throughout the development of this project and, I would add, of all projects involving services to constituents or political entities.

Other key projects related to voting services include the expansion of voting on campus opportunities from 40 post-secondary institutions to some 110, close to triple the number. This matter had interested committee members last spring. This summer, returning officers will be reaching out to university and college administrations to make the necessary arrangements. In spring 2018, returning officers will also begin working with remote Indigenous communities to improve registration and voting services.

(1230)

[English]

We have also made significant progress in renewing infrastructure systems and services.

In December, the agency selected a new data-hosting service provider to support many of the systems used to deliver electoral services, as the current contract expires later this calendar year. A schedule is being finalized to ensure a seamless transition to the new Canadian hosting site.

As well, by the end of summer 2018, the agency will have finalized the development of a new system and processes for its various contact centres, in order to provide Canadians, election workers, and political entities with more timely and relevant information.

This spring, we will also complete the procurement of field telecommunications services for local offices and will have updated a key component of the system to pay poll workers.

Finally, the agency is making progress in renewing the system used by political entities to file financial returns electronically, in order to provide additional capabilities and make it more convenient to users.

As the agency enters the final phase of its preparations for the next general election, I see two main challenges ahead.

The first relates to cybersecurity and the broader issue of disinformation. The Communications Security Establishment estimates that multiple groups will very likely deploy cyber-capabilities in an attempt to influence the democratic process during the 2019 federal election. In response, Elections Canada is taking a number of steps to further strengthen its security posture. For example, the security design of our IT network has been improved, and our new data-hosting services will offer a range of additional protections. The agency is also commissioning an independent audit of its security controls, which should be completed this spring.

Upgrading the agency's technological infrastructure to meet the requirements of the new security environment, however, requires considerable investments. The incremental costs required to improve and maintain this infrastructure are funded through our statutory appropriation. These costs will be reflected in the agency's expenditures, beginning this fiscal year.

With respect to the broader issue of disinformation, we are working with the Commissioner of Canada Elections, and our integrity program is keeping abreast of developments. Our main role in this area is ensuring that Canadians have the correct information on where, when, and how to register and vote.

The second challenge for the agency relates to the implementation of legislative changes as we get closer to the general election. At this time, two bills introducing changes to the Canada Elections Act remain before Parliament, and the introduction of further reform, as indicated by the government, is expected. We remain hopeful that it will include several of the important changes this committee has recommended.

Having said that, the window of opportunity to implement major changes in time for the next general election is rapidly closing. We will continue to support parliamentarians as they examine new electoral legislation, and to inform them of the impacts of the changes and the timelines for the implementation. As always, we will keep in mind the imperative of ensuring that processes, systems, and training necessary for the delivery of the election are well tested and ready to be deployed without risk to the election.

In conclusion, Mr. Chair, I am pleased to report that Elections Canada is progressing as planned on its improvements and is now entering the final phase of preparations for the next general election.

Thank you.

(1235)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. You've done a lot of great work and made great changes. It's exciting.

I'm going to do the same as was done with the last witnesses. We'll have seven minutes for each party. Split it up as you will. At the end of the meeting, if anyone wants five minutes to go in camera to talk about security, we can. We might want to discuss some of the things you just raised in camera, if there are questions.

We'll start with the Liberals, for seven minutes.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I had some security questions, but obviously I'll wait now in light of that.

On electronic poll books, I understand what you're saying when it comes to the urban mechanism, but you then talked about the rural efficiencies you're hoping to achieve. Could you explain that again to me? I may interrupt you—and I apologize in advance—but what rural efficiencies are you talking about, again?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In rural areas we see fewer lineups at the polls. Of a greater concern is the travel distance to the polling places. In many cases, the drawing of the polling divisions, at the last election was not adequate, so we've sought ways to improve that.

One of the ways we're improving that is by starting to identify potential polling places and then drafting the boundaries around them, rather than drafting polling divisions and then trying to find a polling place in there. We're reversing the process.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right. What you're doing then, is it based on distance? Would you say to someone, “You live here, so you should go there”?

The reason I ask is that in my opinion, it's better to have divisions for certain towns where they find their hub of activity. This is going to sound really crass, but basically, put it next to Walmart and it would work a lot better, quite frankly. It's as simple as that, sorry. Or a Giant Tiger, whatever you want to use. I'd find that more efficient. Don't you feel the same way?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's a valid point. There are two things. One is distance, and it's not the only factor. What we're introducing here in terms of distance is technology that enables a calculation of the travel distance, not as the crow flies, but driving distance. I know Mr. Reid had issues in his riding at the last election. This is the kind of technology that will help resolve that as well as the process of reversion that we're starting with polling places. However, we have a new policy that will be published soon and we've engaged the ACPP on that.

Proximity is one factor, but there are others. Familiarity is one. Convenience is another one. There are several other factors. In your example it may be that the location chosen is not the closest geographically to every median driving distance but it is in fact most convenient because of where people go.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is that driven by the returning officer? Would they be the arbiter as to where it should be?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct. They will start this spring well in advance of the election. That's a new change that we're introducing. They will start identifying potential polling places based on all kinds of criteria, including accessibility. From that they will start working on the polling divisions. It's going to be an ongoing piece of work starting this spring.

(1240)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, I think that's a great idea because I think the returning officer in each of the ridings certainly should have the final say as to where these polls and divisions should be. No offence, but—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

Mr. Scott Simms:

—looking at a map doesn't give you an indication of the dynamic of how people vote and where they vote, and so on and so forth.

The rest I'm going to hand to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was going to go down the same line. In 2015 my largest poll was about the size of the greater Toronto area. I'm just curious. What is the distance that you are going to be looking for? What's the limit that you will ask an elector to go?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'll ask Michel to speak to that point because he's responsible for that area.

Mr. Michel Roussel (Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Electoral Events and Innovation, Elections Canada):

In terms of the guidelines that will be provided to returning officers when they design the service areas, we expect that 95% of the addresses will be located in urban settings within 10 kilometres of their advance voting locations, and in rural areas within 30 kilometres of their advance voting locations. For the election day polling locations, we would expect the target of 95% of ordinary election day polling locations would be within five kilometres of electors' addresses in urban settings and 15 kilometres in rural areas. This is a guideline. Returning officers, as we said earlier, have the final say. The principle that we ask returning officers to apply is that of reasonable distance for electors to go vote in advance or on election day.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One of the concerns we've had in the past, when we've discussed addresses, is accessibility requirements often cut out huge chunks of rural areas. Are we going to see more exemptions for that kind of thing to allow it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think it's important to keep in mind that we are legally bound to ensure, wherever possible, accessible polling locations. However, in many cases there are options and there are other considerations than accessibility for the choice of polling locations. There is not a clear-cut answer to your question, unfortunately.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I do have more questions but I think I'll save them for the in camera portion.

The Chair:

Marc Serré.

Mr. Marc Serré (Nickel Belt, Lib.):

With regard to the polling locations, I just wanted to ask about resources for cities and towns that have been amalgamated. For example, Greater Sudbury has been amalgamated since 2001, but still in 2015 there are five Main Streets and the addresses are still mixed up, the polling is still mixed up. Still to this day it's very frustrating to try to get to, I would say, the right individuals. I've talked to the DRO and mentioned that and it's still not resolved. There are other amalgamated cities across Canada, I'm assuming, and this has been happening since 2001. Something needs to be happening on that. That's greatly appreciated.

Mr. Michel Roussel:

Unfortunately, this is an issue we are aware of, particularly in northern Ontario. One of the advantages of taking an early look at the electoral maps is that returning officers will raise those issues with us and we should be able to find remedial solutions to those cases.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I noticed in your presentation you talked a little bit about cybersecurity. I would like to leave a little bit of time, as I know my colleague, Mr. Reid, does have a question about that.

On a related matter, when we talk about cybersecurity one of the things we're talking about is the potential for foreign influence in our elections through those kinds of channels. The other area that I think leaves a lot of room for foreign interference in our elections is one that isn't talked about a lot currently but needs to be. I know that at the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, Mr. Côté, the Commissioner of Canada Elections, indicated his office had received a significant number of complaints about third parties for both the 2011 and 2015 elections. This has become such an issue that it may see some third parties so significantly involved in some ridings that it may result in unfair electoral outcomes. Further to that, he also stated that he thinks it's time for Parliament to re-examine the third party regime to ensure a level playing field is maintained.

Do you agree with this? What are your thoughts on this?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

As you recall, there are two main problems for the current regime. One is the scope of regulated activities. Right now, the regime in the Canada Elections Act limits the expenses of third parties in terms of election advertising expenses only. That does not capture a range of activities such as "get out the vote", canvassing, or other activities that may be campaigning in nature. The first question is to what extent should we look at expanding the scope of the regime.

The second question is in terms of revenue. Right now, only revenues obtained for the purpose of election advertising are regulated by these third parties. The act does not regulate the use of general revenue and through general revenue a lot of third parties have all kinds of funding coming to them for various reasons. To the extent that they can use their general revenue to fund their campaign activities, even currently regulated activities, then through that we can see some foreign money coming in. Both aspects need to be looked into. I know that this is something the committees conserved when they reviewed the recommendations report. We provided some suggestions to the committee, which it has endorsed. I, of course, support those recommendations.

(1245)

Mr. Blake Richards:

The other issue, and certainly the commissioner had indicated previously that he was confirming this as well, is one of the challenges is that contributions that are received more than six months before an election campaign can't be looked at in that regard. Obviously, with a fixed election date that becomes something that's very easy for a third party to manage and say, look, make sure your contributions are in six and a half months before the election. That then allows, obviously, unlimited use of foreign funds for everything besides advertising.

What are your thoughts on that? Do you think that might actually have the ability to impact elections?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

I do agree that we need to remove that six-month limitation in the Canada Elections Act for the regulation of revenues to third parties. We've supported that and I personally support that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

I'll turn it over to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Thank you to our witnesses as well.

I have a question regarding cybersecurity, but before I do that, I just want to follow up on the comments from Mr. Graham and Mr. Simms regarding the issue of people having unreasonable driving distances, particularly to advance polls. I did indeed have a problem in the last election with one particular part of my constituency where people who live in a place called Port Elmsley had to drive 45 minutes in each direction, passing a number of other advance polling stations.

First of all, when we raised the issue, Elections Canada was very businesslike about correcting that situation. Second, I think the solution you're proposing is exactly the right one, so thank you for that. Starting by working out driving distances is clearly the logical way of handling it.

With regard to the issue of the problem of finding accessible locations, which ultimately is the issue, my understanding is that Elections Canada is under a court order, effectively, to only allow certain locations. This has the unintended consequence of eliminating a lot of public buildings that are accessible—and I think it's in five different ways—meaning that they become frequently inaccessible to everybody, disabled and fully able together.

The only way to solve that over a court order is legislation. If we think it's enough of a problem, then we'd have to suggest a legislative proposal. We could all understand how that could be cast as being against the rights of disabled people, so you'd have to be very thoughtful about how to do it. There would have to be multipartisan support for anything of that sort. I think that's a good understanding of the situation there.

Finally, there's a question I want to raise about cybersecurity. The issue that concerns me— should concern you is a better way of putting it—is this: during an election, the most effective way of causing disruption would be to cause people to inadvertently give up their right to vote by sending them to the wrong location, by announcing that they should go to this location or that location rather than the real location, that polling times had been changed, or something else like that.

It's a modern version of the old theme where you'd announce that so-and-so had withdrawn his or her candidacy, but it wasn't true. I think it would be given out by people purporting to be Elections Canada. It would be given out retail as opposed to wholesale, making it hard to trace these things. That would be the way that would be logical if you were a foreign power trying to disrupt an election and make it uncertain who had won. I think that's what you should be protecting against. How you do that I have no idea, but that's where the danger lies, frankly.

(1250)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

You raised a number of interesting and important points.

On the first one, I do want to remind the committee that there are recommendations we made regarding the expansion of transfer certificates for people with disabilities. If we have that, in that way we'll introduce some flexibility into the system to provide those with disabilities access to other polling locations.

On the point of sending people to the wrong place or at the wrong time, of course, that is at the heart of our mandate. Our concern there is making sure that Canadians know where to get the right information. One thing I have asked my team to work on for the next election is having a repository available online, on our website, of all of our public communications, our advertisements, and our social media. If somebody sees something that they're not quite sure comes from Elections Canada, they would be able to verify against our website whether, in fact, it is from Elections Canada or not. There would be a public record to check against. That's one administrative measure.

There are provisions that were introduced in 2014 in the act that prohibit and create an offence for impersonation. Of course, unfortunately, that's after the fact, and that's the role of the commissioner to enforce. Administratively, we do have a key role to play in making sure people have access to the right information, and if they're not sure, they can verify there.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I agree some detailed questions that are best asked and answered in camera, but there are some general questions, I think, that can be asked. For instance, I know a little bit about security from past life, and I would imagine that you're working with the national security agencies, which is where our state-of-the-art best efforts would be. We also know that we do very little completely independently of our allies, particularly the U.S. It's reported today -I just want to know if this applies- that the President of the United States has still not given an absolute direction to the security forces of the U.S. to take whatever action necessary. That straight up order has not yet been given, as I'm reading in the news today.

I'm wondering, if they haven't issued that order and their national security apparatus isn't seized of the issue formally on direction from the commander in chief, how much is there for our security agencies to tap into if they're not doing anything. In other words, I doubt we would do it alone. We would want to do it in concert. We're allies. We have common international opponents. Therefore I would think we would do things in concert if they don't have that order and aren't moving forward, where does that leave us? Is that a huge problem for us, that the U.S. has not engaged in their own cyber problems in the way the world would kind of expect on their own cyber problems, and how does that relate to us, given the overlap of our security apparatus with theirs?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are a couple of elements to answer. It's not just going to be a full answer. We have been working very closely with the communications Security Establishment. First, they provide, standards that we need to meet. Second they assist us in the procurement of technology, and they do supply-chain integrity for us. We know we're buying from trusted partners. Third, they provide advice. We've included aspects in our procurement, whether it's the poll books we're going to use at the polls or the hosting services, they've advised us on including certain requirements in the RFP, which are some of the costs that I referred to. We're getting the advice from the real experts, Communications Security Establishment, and we're also having a third party come in and do an independent audit, so we're being very careful about that.

I've asked to start engaging with our partners in Canada: CSIS, the RCMP, PCO, I expect meetings to occur very shortly where we will begin a conversation leading up to the next election. We do that at every election. This election is a bit different than others perhaps because of the experience around the world. But we go through scenarios and explore roles and responsibilities and the interventions that may be required. We should be starting this in the coming months.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. I'll follow up, but I think the details of that should be best in camera.

I have one last question, Chair, before we go in camera.

In your report, you mentioned two bills outstanding in Parliament. You can't answer this but I'm going to take the opportunity, since we have a gaggle of parliamentary secretaries today, which Mr. Bittle was good enough to give me a heads-up on. Since we are blessed with such power concentrated in this one little committee today, perhaps one of them can give us the assurance that, notwithstanding the politics of the House and everything, the government's intent is that this legislation will be passed in a timely enough fashion for Elections Canada to act on.

(1255)

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Thank you for that Mr. Christopherson. I have to apologize. I was deep in thought on a previous point you had made and missed your final point. Were you talking about—

Mr. David Christopherson:

You were sleeping again through my comments again.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

I was enjoying thinking about your prior comments. Which piece specifically are you talking about?

Mr. David Christopherson:

The report this morning says there are two bills. I'm trying to think of the numbers. I think one of them—

An hon. member: It's Bill C-33.

Mr. David Christopherson: Thanks, Bill C-33, and there's another one. Anyway, those two bills have been through us, but they're waiting. They need them passed, and I'm just asking if we can get some assurance from the government that they're going to be made law so that Elections Canada can act, because time is running out.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

You can predict the answer. Of course, we want to move them as quickly as we can to get them both in place for the next election, but many variables are beyond our control. This committee is one of them.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think they're already past this committee. They haven't even been to this committee. Bill C-33 has got a lot of the big changes. Is this going to be a problem, Chair? I'll leave it open ended, but I've got to tell you there's going to be hell to pay if we went through all that work and Elections Canada is raring to go and that legislation doesn't get through Parliament. You can blame the opposition all you want; you're the majority government; you control the House; you control everything. I'm a little disappointed that one of you isn't confident enough in your own government's ability to pass legislation so you'd give us that assurance today.

The Chair:

Mr. Miller.

Mr. Marc Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs, Lib.):

I can guarantee that I'll wield the immense power that I hold within government to move this forward.

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, well it's funny until it doesn't get done and then it's not so funny.

The Chair:

Before we go in camera, and so we don't have to come back in public, can we do the votes that we have to do on the estimates?

We'll do the votes 1 for the House, for Elections Canada, and PPS. HOUSE OF COMMONS ç Vote 1—Program Expenditures..........$86,751,081

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ELECTORAL OFFICER ç Vote 1—Program Expenditures..........$7,692,230

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE ç Vote 1—Program Expenditures..........$20,700,000

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report the votes of the interim estimates to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

We'll go in camera quickly. Don't leave your seats.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1140)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à la 91e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La première partie de la réunion d'aujourd'hui est publique. Conformément au paragraphe 81(6) du Règlement, nous étudions le Budget provisoire des dépenses 2018-2019: crédit 1 sous la rubrique Chambre des communes, crédit 1 sous la rubrique Bureau du directeur général des élections et crédit 1 sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire.

Les députés se souviendront qu'en juin 2017, la Chambre a apporté diverses modifications provisoires à l'article 81 du Règlement. Nous savons que ces modifications seront en vigueur pendant toute la durée de la 42e législature. Soulignons que la raison d'être de la réunion d'aujourd'hui découle du remplacement de « crédits provisoires » par « budget provisoire des dépenses ». Donc, ce budget est traité comme tout autre budget des dépenses, ce qui englobe son renvoi et son examen par les comités.

Par conséquent, nous aurons bientôt le plaisir d'accueillir l'honorable Geoff Regan, le Président de la Chambre des communes. Il sera accompagné de M. Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre des communes, de M. Michel Patrice, sous-greffier à l'Administration et de M. Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances. Le Président sera aussi accompagné de représentants du Service de protection parlementaire, soit la surintendante principale et directrice, Mme Jane MacLatchy, et M. Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel.

Avant que nous poursuivions, j'aimerais régler un petit point. Le sous-comité doit avoir un budget pour les frais des témoins qu'il a accueillis; il a approuvé un budget de 2 750 $. Le Comité doit simplement confirmer l'approbation.

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Bien.

Pendant que nous attendons le Président, j'aimerais simplement rappeler que jeudi, nous examinerons le rapport sur le commissaire chargé des débats, rapport que vous avez tous reçu. Ensuite, à notre première réunion après les deux semaines consacrées aux circonscriptions, nous examinerons comme prévu la question de l'utilisation des langues autochtones. Pour le moment, nous prévoyons d'accueillir au cours de la première heure M. Charles Robert — le greffier la Chambre — et des cadres supérieurs de la Chambre des communes. Pendant la deuxième heure, nous accueillerions le premier des trois députés que nous avons invités, M. Romeo Saganash; un interprète sera sur place pour l'interprétation en langue crie. Ensuite, lors de la deuxième heure de la réunion du jeudi de cette semaine-là, nous accueillerions la députée Georgina Jolibois pour les 45 premières minutes, puis le député Robert-Falcon Ouellette pour la deuxième tranche de 45 minutes. Les 30 dernières minutes seraient consacrées au projet de loi C-377. Nous accueillerions Mme Brenda Shanahan, puis nous procéderions à l'étude article par article. Il s'agit simplement de modifier le nom de la circonscription, comme vous le savez tous.

Y a-t-il des commentaires concernant l'horaire?

John.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Y a-t-il une raison particulière pour laquelle nous n'accueillons pas les trois députés en même temps?

Le président:

Oui. Si nous ne les accueillons pas séparément et qu'ils veulent tous un interprète — deux d'entre eux n'en ont pas encore fait la demande —, cela entraîne des coûts supplémentaires parce qu'il faut ouvrir une autre cabine d'interprétation.

M. John Nater:

J'étais certain qu'il devait y avoir une explication.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires? Nous procéderons donc ainsi.

Si cela vous convient, nous aimerions passer à huis clos après la première série de questions pour des questions semblables à celles que nous avons déjà posées concernant le SPP et les ressources humaines. Donc, à la fin, nous passerions à huis clos pour ces questions liées à la sécurité.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

J'ai probablement manqué cette partie, monsieur le président, mais quel est le plan? La réunion sera-t-elle écourtée?

Le président:

Nous allons entendre les représentants de la Chambre et du SPP maintenant, puis nous passerons au directeur général des élections, mais pendant moins longtemps.

M. Blake Richards:

Dans ce cas, combien de temps aurons-nous pour chacun d'entre eux?

Le président:

La moitié du temps restant.

M. Blake Richards:

Quand mettrez-vous fin à la partie de ce groupe de témoins?

Le président:

À moins qu'on veuille rester plus tard, cela pourrait être autour de 20 ou 25 après l'heure.

Nous allons maintenant entendre le Président de la Chambre.

Nous sommes enchantés de vous accueillir. Merci beaucoup. Nous devons procéder sans tarder en raison des votes. [Français]

L'hon. Geoff Regan (président de la Chambre des communes):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président, membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie de nous accueillir parmi vous aujourd'hui. Je suis heureux de comparaître devant vous pour présenter le Budget provisoire des dépenses de 2018-2019 et parler du financement requis pour maintenir et améliorer le soutien offert par l'Administration aux députés et à l'institution.

L'équipe de la haute direction de l'Administration de la Chambre m'accompagne aujourd'hui. Il s'agit de M. Charles Robert, qui est le greffier de la Chambre des communes, de M. Michel Patrice, qui est le sous-greffier à l'Administration, et de M. Daniel Paquette, qui est le dirigeant principal des finances.

(1145)

[Traduction]

Je présenterai également le Budget provisoire des dépenses pour le Service de protection parlementaire, alors m’accompagnent aussi Jane MacLatchy, directrice du SPP, et Robert Graham, l’agent administratif et du personnel du SPP.

Par suite d’une modification apportée au Règlement de la Chambre, le Budget provisoire des dépenses doit dorénavant être déposé. Cette mesure fournira au Parlement les renseignements nécessaires pour assurer l’harmonisation du budget fédéral et du budget des dépenses.

Le Budget provisoire des dépenses de 2018-2019 comprend un aperçu des exigences en matière de dépenses pour les trois premiers mois de l’exercice et une comparaison avec le Budget des dépenses de 2017-2018, ainsi que les calendriers proposés relativement au premier projet de loi de crédits.

Le Budget provisoire des dépenses de la Chambre des communes, tel qu’il a été déposé en Chambre, s’élève à environ 87 millions de dollars.

Par suite du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses en Chambre, je m’attends à ce que nous nous réunissions de nouveau au printemps. Je vous présenterai alors un survol des changements d’une année à l’autre, comme ce fut le cas par le passé.

Aujourd’hui, je présenterai les principaux thèmes des demandes de financement de la Chambre des communes et ses priorités. Le budget de fonctionnement de la Chambre couvre les budgets et les dépenses des députés et des agents supérieurs de la Chambre; les comités; la participation de la Chambre dans le cadre de la diplomatie parlementaire; et le financement pour l'Administration de la Chambre.[Français]

La priorité absolue de l'Administration de la Chambre consiste à soutenir les députés dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions à titre de parlementaires, et ce, en mettant l'accent sur l'excellence de la prestation de services et la modernisation continue.

Parmi les principales initiatives, notons la stratégie numérique pour la modernisation de la diffusion de l'information parlementaire et la mise en oeuvre du nouveau Service de connectivité des circonscriptions pour les bureaux de circonscription; les nouveaux formats pour les envois collectifs à l'appui des communications des députés avec leurs électeurs; et l'optimisation des services de restauration dans la Cité parlementaire.[Traduction]

Le renouvellement de nos espaces physiques et des services qui y sont offerts constitue une autre priorité clé pour l’Administration de la Chambre. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, la Chambre des communes et l’équipe de constructeurs et d’architectes, et la haute direction gouvernent de nombreux projets d’envergure, notamment la réouverture de l’édifice de l’Ouest restauré et la fermeture de l’édifice du Centre.

L’achèvement de la restauration de l’édifice de l’Ouest nécessitera une planification extraordinaire pour déménager les activités et les installations essentielles de l’édifice du Centre à l’édifice de l’Ouest, tout en permettant au Parlement de poursuivre ses opérations sans heurts.

Le fonctionnement, le soutien, l’entretien et la gestion du cycle de vie de l’équipement et des éléments de connectivité dans les édifices sont étroitement liés à la Vision et au plan à long terme. Ces éléments clés sont essentiels à la mise en oeuvre d’un environnement de travail mobile pour les députés et l’Administration. Le résultat prévu est que les édifices patrimoniaux soient protégés, mais aussi qu’ils soient restaurés et dotés d’une infrastructure technologique modernisée, comme ce fut le cas pour cet édifice.[Français]

La Chambre des communes et ses partenaires de la sécurité continuent à mettre l'accent sur une démarche améliorée en matière de gestion des urgences et de sécurité. La vision collective de l'institution est le fruit d'efforts continus de sensibilisation et d'éducation en matière de sécurité.

Les divers groupes chargés d'assurer la sécurité sur la Colline et dans les bureaux satellites collaborent en vue de la prévention, de l'intervention et de la gestion d'événements perturbateurs. Ils se consacrent aussi à des activités de communication et de sensibilisation auprès de tous les intervenants en ce qui concerne de nouvelles démarches pour la sécurité physique et celle des TI.

Afin de continuer à répondre aux nouvelles menaces à la cybersécurité et à l'évolution constante des technologies de l'information, il est impératif que la Chambre se dote d'une infrastructure robuste en cybersécurité et d'une politique renouvelée en matière de sécurité des TI.

Voilà les priorités actuelles de l'Administration de la Chambre en ce qui concerne le soutien offert aux députés et à l'institution.

(1150)

[Traduction]

Je passe maintenant au Budget provisoire des dépenses du Service de protection parlementaire. Le Service de protection parlementaire demande l’accès à 20,7 millions de dollars dans ce Budget provisoire des dépenses, qui couvriront les opérations courantes et la poursuite du projet d’amélioration de la surveillance par vidéo externe au cours des trois premiers mois de l’exercice 2018-2019.

Les opérations régulières comprennent les salaires des employés et le financement opérationnel requis pour maintenir nos niveaux de service actuels. Le projet d’amélioration du système de surveillance externe par vidéo apportera des améliorations techniques à l’infrastructure existante et assurera une meilleure couverture de la Cité parlementaire. Le financement de ce projet était auparavant réservé dans le cadre financier par la GRC et a été récemment attribué au SPP.

Par suite du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019, le Service de protection parlementaire reviendra expliquer les changements par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses de 2017-2018.

Monsieur le président, je termine ici ma présentation. Mon équipe et moi sommes heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Voici comment cela va fonctionner: il y aura une série de sept minutes pour chaque parti et, monsieur Christophersen, la dernière sera à huis clos. Chaque parti est libre de répartir le temps de parole entre les députés comme il l'entend.

Nous allons commencer avec M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

La première question s'adresse au SPP; j'aimerais avoir la répartition pour les 20,7 millions de dollars.

M. Robert Graham (officier responsable de l’administration et du personnel, Service de protection parlementaire):

Les 20,7 millions de dollars sont répartis comme suit: 17,3 millions pour les opérations et 3,4 millions pour le projet de caméras dont le Président de la Chambre a parlé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle part des fonds destinés aux opérations est réservée aux agents de première ligne et combien à la gestion? Pouvez-vous nous donner la répartition entre les agents de première ligne, la gestion et les fournitures?

M. Robert Graham:

Je n'ai pas la répartition exacte, mais je sais que le personnel des opérations — les agents de première ligne — représente 80 % de notre effectif à temps plein. Je peux vous fournir des données plus précises ultérieurement, mais c'est environ 80 % des 17,3 millions de dollars.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en serais reconnaissant. Merci.

J'ai une petite question pour vous. A-t-on étudié les moyens pour que les agents de la GRC en détachement au SPP soient identifiés comme des agents du SPP?

Surintendant principal Jane MacLatchy (directrice, Service de protection parlementaire):

Je ne suis pas certaine de comprendre la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Actuellement, les agents de la GRC en détachement sur la Colline du Parlement font partie du SPP, mais aussi de la GRC; ils portent leur uniforme de la GRC. Nous avons discuté de cette question auparavant. Je me demande si on a examiné la possibilité d'avoir un écusson du SPP, par exemple, pour différencier les agents de la GRC qui travaillent au sein du SPP sur la Colline du Parlement de ceux de l'extérieur.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Cela n'a pas fait l'objet de discussions jusqu'à maintenant. Les membres de la GRC détachés à notre division ont pour mandat d'appuyer le SPP. Ils offrent un service d'appui au SPP vêtus de leur uniforme de la GRC, conformément aux politiques de la GRC. La modification de l'uniforme n'a pas fait l'objet de discussions. À ma connaissance, la question n'a pas été soulevée auprès de la GRC.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'effectif d'agents de première ligne du SPP est-il complet actuellement?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Presque.

M. Robert Graham:

On compte actuellement 46 postes vacants aux opérations, ce qui est moins que l'an dernier. Nous avons aussi une formation et des plans pour doter ces postes dans les prochains mois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien d'agents de la GRC sont détachés sur la Colline du Parlement?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Environ 110, mais je peux vous fournir le chiffre exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce stable, ou y a-t-il une tendance à la hausse ou à la baisse?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Non; l'effectif est stable, actuellement. Toutefois, comme je l'ai indiqué au Comité lors de ma dernière comparution, nous examinons les possibilités de le réduire, et cela suscite déjà un certain intérêt, mais cela demeure théorique. Je dirais cependant qu'à court terme, vous ne verrez aucun changement d'ici la mise en oeuvre de la VPLT et le déménagement de l'édifice du Centre.

À plus long terme, nous étudions la possibilité de réduire le nombre d'agents de la GRC qui assurent des fonctions de protection, notamment les postes statiques externes, pour les remplacer par des agents de première ligne du SPP. Pour le moment, l'objectif à long terme est d'entreprendre la première étape de la réduction, soit remplacer la GRC et déplacer... Donc, les véhicules de la GRC ne seraient plus en poste; la présence visible serait exercée par le SPP.

(1155)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien; je vous remercie.

Avant de passer à d'autres sujets, j'ai une dernière question pour le SPP. Par rapport au privilège de la Chambre, si le sergent d'armes ordonne de verrouiller les portes et que les agents du SPP disent le contraire, quel ordre devrait être suivi?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est une question intéressante. Cela dépend de la situation.

Si le SPP détermine que cela représente une grave menace pour la sécurité... Je ne suis pas certaine de bien comprendre la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'essaie simplement de comprendre les rapports hiérarchiques, parce que dans l'enceinte de la Chambre, le sergent d'armes est roi et maître, sous la direction du Président de la Chambre.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si le sergent d'armes ordonne aux agents des tribunes de verrouiller les portes et que les agents des opérations donnent un ordre différent, l'ordre du sergent d'armes aura-t-il préséance dans l'enceinte de la Chambre?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est une bonne question. Cela n'a pas été discuté à mon échelon, mais je peux certainement en discuter avec l'officier responsable des opérations. Je ne vois pas en quoi cela pourrait poser problème, car en général, en cas d'incident, notre réaction serait de verrouiller ces portes. Je ne vois pas pourquoi on irait à l'encontre des ordres du sergent d'armes, à moins que quelque chose nous oblige à ordonner une évacuation immédiate.

Cela dit, le sergent d'armes pourrait ne pas être au courant de tout ce qui se passe à l'extérieur de la Chambre, auquel cas...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Verrouillez les portes.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Cela étant dit, c'est une question hypothétique intéressante, mais sauf en cas de danger imminent de blessures graves ou de mort, je ne vois pas pourquoi nous ne respecterions pas l'ordre de verrouiller les portes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Merci.

Parlons maintenant de l'édifice de l'Ouest, un aspect qui m'intéresse particulièrement. Dans ma circonscription, la population est extrêmement fière que toutes les fenêtres de l'édifice de l'Ouest, à l'exception de celles du toit, aient été fabriquées dans la circonscription, dans ma ville natale de Sainte-Agathe. Je tenais simplement à le préciser, aux fins du compte rendu.

Déménagerons-nous dans l'édifice de l'Ouest cette année, comme prévu?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais laisser au sous-greffier le soin de répondre.

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration):

Merci, monsieur le Président.

Le projet est en cours. Nous y consacrons toutes nos ressources; Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada collabore pour mobiliser toutes les ressources nécessaires pour que le déménagement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest puisse se faire à l'automne 2018, comme prévu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-il logique de déménager à l'automne 2018, puis d'avoir une dernière courte session avant les élections, ou serait-il plus logique d'aller de l'avant en 2019, alors que nous aurions plusieurs mois supplémentaires pour le faire, sans qu'on ait à déménager une deuxième fois?

M. Michel Patrice:

Disons simplement que si nous parvenons à le faire à l'automne 2018, ce serait préférable pour le Parlement et les immeubles de la Cité parlementaire, car nous devons aussi rénover et moderniser l'édifice du Centre.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je crois avoir mentionné, lors de ma dernière comparution au Comité, mes faibles préoccupations sur l'état de l'édifice de l'Ouest et les anciens... Ce n'est peut-être pas le bon mot; la tuyauterie et le filage, notamment, sont vieillissants, et j'ai hâte que les travaux débutent afin de préserver cet important immeuble. Je veux aussi éviter que nous soyons interrompus dans notre travail ou que nous devions déménager avant que l'édifice de l'Ouest ne soit prêt, par exemple en raison d'une fuite, comme je l'ai mentionné la dernière fois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les gens de Travaux publics ont déjà dit que cela pourrait être maintenu jusqu'en 2017, alors je vous remercie.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

En fait, le Bureau de régie interne va devoir prendre la décision, probablement d'ici deux mois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends. Merci.

Mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur le Président de la Chambre, pouvez-vous parler aussi rapidement que M. Graham, quand vous répondez à la question de Blake, de sorte qu'il puisse poser autant de questions que possible?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Comment savez-vous que j'ai tant de questions, monsieur le président? On dirait que vous lisez dans mes pensées.

Il vaudrait peut-être mieux que j'adresse mes questions à M. Robert, mais je vais vous laisser décider.

On dit qu'un cadre supérieur du Bureau du Conseil privé — évidemment, le ministère qui soutient le premier ministre et le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre — a été détaché à l'Administration de la Chambre pour travailler au remaniement du Règlement.

Je me demande si vous pouvez me confirmer qu'un employé du BCP s'acquitte de cette tâche en ce moment.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

C'est bien le cas. On est allé chercher cette personne. Je ne sais pas quel rang cet employé occupe au Bureau du Conseil privé, mais c'est en effet un employé du Bureau du Conseil privé.

On est initialement allé le chercher dans le cadre d'un échange entre les Services de la procédure et le BCP. Il y a eu une modification et c'est seulement l'employé du BCP, à la demande du BCP, qui a été détaché, comme vous l'avez dit, pour travailler à une possible révision du Règlement.

(1200)

M. Blake Richards:

Je me demande si vous pourriez nous renseigner, un peu, sur ce que comporte cette refonte du Règlement. Normalement, c'est le genre de chose qui passerait manifestement par ce comité, et avec la débâcle de l'année passée, quand le gouvernement a cherché à réécrire le Règlement sans le consentement de tous les partis de l'opposition, je trouve très surprenant et, manifestement, décevant d'entendre cela. Je suis convaincu que bon nombre de mes collègues de l'opposition apprendront qu'on semble passer par la porte de derrière pour modifier le Règlement. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous en dire, un peu plus, sur cette refonte du Règlement.

M. Charles Robert:

Ce n'est pas tant pour modifier le Règlement, et c'est un exercice qui a été entrepris à ma demande. J'en avais discuté avec plusieurs membres du personnel des divers partis représentés à la Chambre des communes. L'objectif, pour moi du moins, personnellement, est de comprendre le Règlement, car je trouve qu'il est rédigé d'une manière très complexe.

L'engagement que j'ai pris, c'est qu'aucun changement ne soit apporté au Règlement; le but serait de simplement le rendre plus convivial et de créer des outils qui permettraient aux députés qui se servent du Règlement de comprendre les liens entre certains articles du Règlement. Par exemple, selon les pratiques, le leader du gouvernement ou certaines personnes auraient un temps de parole illimité, mais ce n'est pas la règle générale. L'idée serait d'expliquer, quand vous voyez qu'en effet, votre temps de parole est illimité, qu'il y a des cas où vous n'avez pas un temps de parole illimité. Un député pourrait regarder le Règlement et déterminer si telle ou telle circonstance s'applique. Est-ce que j'ai un temps de parole illimité, ou suis-je limité à 5, 10 ou 15 minutes, peu importe le temps de parole donné? Le but est d'aider et, comme je l'ai dit, soyez assurés qu'aucun changement n'est recommandé dans le cadre de cet exercice.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous confirmez que votre intention — du moins — est de simplement reformuler et clarifier le libellé, et non d'apporter des changements au Règlement.

M. Charles Robert:

Absolument.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Je crois aussi qu'il y a eu des discussions au sujet de l'établissement du bureau d'un nouveau sous-greffier. Je me demande si le budget de ce bureau est inclus dans le budget que nous avons sous les yeux.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui. D'accord.

J'aimerais que vous me disiez... je n'ai pas vu de gros problèmes concernant la façon dont les choses fonctionnent ici, mais vous êtes manifestement plus impliqué et pouvez mieux voir cela que moi. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous parler un peu de la motivation derrière ce changement, soit l'ajout d'un nouveau sous-greffier.

M. Charles Robert:

Comme je l'ai expliqué au Président de la Chambre ainsi qu'au Bureau de régie interne quand la proposition a été acceptée, l'idée est d'avoir une personne capable de superviser toutes les opérations complexes qui font partie des services corporatifs et qui sont là pour vous aider à titre de députés. Tout comme nous avons un sous-greffier pour la procédure, qui gère les opérations relatives aux documents et aux ressources humaines à fournir aux comités ainsi que toutes les autres opérations de nature parlementaire, il me semblait également logique d'avoir aussi un poste de sous-greffier de l'Administration qui serait responsable d'assurer le même genre de surveillance.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. De mémoire, les sous-greffiers ont toujours été nommés par décret. Qui a pris la...

M. Charles Robert:

C'est en effet le cas depuis les années 1990 environ, mais ce n'est pas réglementaire, et c'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles on a décidé de ne plus soumettre le poste de sous-greffier à une nomination par décret de sorte qu'il s'agisse maintenant d'une nomination directe.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Qui donc a pris la décision relative à cette nomination en particulier?

M. Charles Robert:

Laquelle?

M. Blake Richards:

Pour le nouveau sous-greffier.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est moi.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est vous. D'accord.

Est-ce qu'il y a eu un quelconque concours?

M. Charles Robert:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

Non. Donc, comment la décision a-t-elle été prise?

M. Charles Robert:

En gros, j'ai pris la décision parce que je savais, en tant que greffier, qu'il serait important d'avoir le meilleur fonctionnement possible pour aider les députés à s'acquitter de leurs fonctions parlementaires. Vous reconnaîtrez que, devant le Bureau, du moins, les discussions portent généralement sur les mesures de soutien offertes aux députés sur le plan des technologies, des points de voyage, des bureaux, des contrats relatifs aux employés, et ainsi de suite. Je voulais avoir la certitude d'être aussi bien servi que je pensais avoir besoin de l'être, et j'ai décidé que je nommerais quelqu'un au poste de sous-greffier de l'Administration.

(1205)

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Il y a aussi des rumeurs voulant que l'Administration de la Chambre s'apprête à affecter un greffier à la procédure au bureau du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes.

M. Charles Robert:

Cela faisait partie de la proposition initiale conçue avec le Conseil privé, mais le Conseil privé a refusé l'offre.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Et est-ce que cette offre a été faite aux bureaux des leaders de tous les partis à la Chambre, ou seulement au bureau du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre?

M. Charles Robert:

Je serais certainement prêt à envisager la possibilité d'affecter de tels spécialistes de la procédure si tous les leaders à la Chambre estimaient que cela servirait leurs fins.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons poursuivre à huis clos. Oui...?

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. J'ai deux petites choses.

Premièrement, si nous poursuivons à huis clos, je tiens à mentionner que ce sera pour discuter des questions de ressources humaines dont nous avons parlé précédemment. Après consultation des collègues, nous avons convenu qu'il valait probablement mieux le faire à huis clos.

Cependant, avant d'utiliser tout mon temps, j'aimerais poser une question en public.

Le président:

Bien sûr. Allez-y.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Je veux simplement revenir sur la question que mon ami a soulevée concernant le Règlement. Je veux seulement éclaircir certains points qui nous ont étonnés.

M. Charles Robert:

D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous vous mettez à parler du Règlement, et d'après moi, le Règlement appartient à la Chambre et non au bureau du greffier.

Je suis curieux du résultat final que ce processus donnera.

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, comme je l'ai expliqué aux adjoints exécutifs de tous les leaders à la Chambre, le but était initialement de m'aider à comprendre le Règlement, car je ne le trouve pas particulièrement convivial.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai entendu cela.

M. Charles Robert:

L'idée serait de le présenter dans un langage plus simple et de le réorganiser pour que l'ordre des choses soit plus logique, avec l'absolue garantie qu'aucun changement n'y serait apporté et qu'aucun produit ne serait finalisé sans l'approbation du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Je suis, tout à fait, d'accord avec vous. Le Règlement ne m'appartient pas. Il vous appartient.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

M. Charles Robert:

Nous aurons une nouvelle législature, vraisemblablement dans deux ou trois ans, ou à la suite des prochaines élections. C'est l'occasion, pour les députés, de discuter du Règlement. Si dans l'intervalle, par la négociation et la diffusion d'information, les leaders à la Chambre reconnaissent qu'il pourrait être bon de réécrire le Règlement — et je souligne de nouveau que ce n'est pas pour le changer, mais pour le rendre plus convivial —, il me semble que ce serait un projet valable.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie de votre explication.

Soyons clairs, cependant. Pas une virgule ne serait touchée sans un rapport au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre? Tout passera par le PROC, n'est-ce pas?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est juste.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. C'est ce que je pensais, mais je voulais vraiment m'en assurer. Nous ne voulons pas de surprises; ou le moins de surprises possible.

Sur ce, monsieur le président, je poserai mes autres questions à huis clos.

Le président:

Je vais laisser M. Reid intervenir brièvement.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je veux seulement poser une question. Le Règlement est annoté. Il y a de nombreuses années qu'il n'a pas été publié de nouveau.

M. Charles Robert:

En effet.

M. Scott Reid:

Ne serait-ce pas un bon point de départ? Vous n'avez pas besoin de l'approbation de quiconque pour le faire, et cela ferait ressortir très clairement les types de confusion qui existent. Des annotations additionnelles pourraient...

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense bien que le problème est que les commentaires annotés sont joints à la structure du Règlement actuel. L'idée serait peut-être de travailler à une version révisée du Règlement — qui serait soumise à votre approbation, à la fin —, puis de l'utiliser comme véhicule pour envisager une nouvelle édition du Règlement annoté, la troisième, ou pour entreprendre le travail requis pour une quatrième édition.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Bien sûr, il faut garder en tête que le Règlement annoté était là avant qu'on commence à rédiger le manuel, mais que celui-ci l'a remplacé, en quelque sorte. Cependant, je trouvais évidemment que c'était un outil très utile.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d'accord. C'est vraiment un outil utile.

Le président:

Nous allons nous arrêter une minute pour poursuivre à huis clos.

Je demanderais, à quiconque n'a pas l'autorisation d'être dans la salle, de partir.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

(1205)

(1225)



[La séance publique reprend.] [Français]

Le président:

Bonjour, je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 91e réunion du Comité parlementaire de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cet après-midi, nous poursuivons notre étude du Budget provisoire des dépenses 2018-2019.

Nos témoins provenant d'Élections Canada sont M. Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections par intérim, M. Michel Roussel, sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovation et M. Hughes St-Pierre, sous-directeur général des élections, Services internes.

Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à M. Perreault pour sa présentation.

M. Stéphane Perrault (directeur général des élections par intérim, Élections Canada):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux de comparaître aujourd'hui devant le Comité pour présenter le Budget provisoire des dépenses 2018-2019 d'Élections Canada et aussi pour faire le point sur nos préparatifs en vue de l'élection générale de 2019.

Aujourd'hui, le Comité se prononcera sur les crédits provisoires d'Élections Canada, soit 7,7 millions de dollars, qui représentent les salaires d'environ 350 occupants de postes permanents pour le premier trimestre de l'exercice financier commençant le 1er avril 2018. Ce montant ne couvre aucune des autres dépenses de l'organisme, qui sont financées par une autorisation législative.

Comme je l'ai mentionné lors de ma comparution sur le Budget principal des dépenses, le printemps dernier, Élections Canada se consacre à deux priorités stratégiques depuis la dernière élection générale, en plus, évidemment, d'appuyer le Parlement et le Comité dans son étude des changements législatifs.

Notre priorité est de moderniser nos services électoraux par une série d'initiatives telles que l'introduction — vous vous en rappellerez —, de cahiers de scrutin électroniques pour améliorer les processus aux bureaux de scrutin et d'autres projets liés aux services aux électeurs et aux entités politiques. J'y reviendrai dans un instant.

En deuxième lieu, nous voulons remplacer et améliorer les biens d'infrastructure essentiels à la conduite des élections, comme nos centres de données, nos réseaux informatiques, nos services de télécommunications et le système de rémunération des préposés au scrutin.

Pour être prêts à mener la prochaine élection générale, nous devons achever nos projets de transformation d'ici septembre 2018, afin de commencer les essais intégrés de tous les projets reposant sur la TI, la technologie de l'information, ce qui va nous permettre d'avoir atteint un état de préparation complet au printemps 2019. Cet échéancier signifie que les décisions finales concernant la portée de nos projets de transformation ont déjà été prises, ou le seront dans les tout prochains mois. À cet égard, j'aimerais vous parler brièvement de l'avancement de nos principales initiatives d'amélioration.

D'abord, je suis heureux d'annoncer que nous avons sélectionné, l'automne dernier, au terme d'un processus d'approvisionnement rigoureux, l'entreprise qui fournira les cahiers de scrutin électroniques pour la prochaine élection. Ces cahiers permettront d'automatiser un certain nombre d'opérations de tenue des documents aux bureaux de vote. Vous le savez, les bulletins continueront d'être remplis et comptés manuellement.

Pour la prochaine élection générale, les cahiers de scrutin électroniques seront déployés dans quelque 225 circonscriptions pour le vote par anticipation seulement, ce que permet la loi actuelle. L'utilisation de cette technologie aux bureaux de vote par anticipation va répondre au problème qui a été le plus important lors de la dernière élection générale, à savoir les files d'attente dans les circonscriptions urbaines et semi-urbaines. L'utilisation de cahiers de scrutin électroniques aux bureaux de scrutin ordinaires sera uniquement envisagée après la prochaine élection générale, dans la mesure où des changements sont apportés à la loi. Dans les régions rurales, où la principale difficulté pour les électeurs est la distance à parcourir pour aller voter, les directeurs du scrutin bénéficieront de nouveaux outils informatiques pour établir les sections de vote et rapprocher les lieux de vote des électeurs.

De plus, nous sommes en train de concevoir un nouveau portail en ligne pour les entités politiques. Nous voulons ainsi permettre aux partis, aux candidats et aux agents officiels de remplir et de soumettre en ligne divers documents, y compris les actes de candidature, si des modifications à la loi sont apportées. Nous avons consulté le Comité consultatif des partis politiques tout au long de ce projet et, j'ajouterais, de tous les projets qui concernent les services aux électeurs ou aux entités politiques.

Parmi les autres projets importants qui touchent les services électoraux, je note que nous ferons passer de 40 à environ 110, soit près du triple, le nombre d'établissements post-secondaires où il sera possible de voter. Cette question avait intéressé les membres du Comité, au printemps dernier. Cet été, les directeurs du scrutin communiqueront avec les administrations de collèges et d'universités pour prendre les dispositions nécessaires. Au printemps 2018, les directeurs de scrutin commenceront aussi à travailler avec les communautés autochtones en régions éloignées pour y améliorer les services d'inscription et de vote.

(1230)

[Traduction]

Nous avons également fait des progrès importants au chapitre du renouvellement de l’infrastructure, des systèmes et des services.

En décembre, nous avons sélectionné un nouveau fournisseur de services d’hébergement de données qui prendra en charge de nombreux systèmes utilisés pour la prestation des services électoraux, car le contrat actuel arrivera à échéance au cours de l’année civile. Un échéancier est en voie d’être finalisé pour assurer une transition harmonieuse vers le nouveau site d’hébergement canadien.

De plus, d’ici la fin de l’été 2018, nous aurons mis au point un nouveau système et de nouveaux processus pour nos divers centres de contact, afin de fournir plus rapidement des renseignements utiles aux Canadiens, aux travailleurs électoraux et aux entités politiques.

Au printemps, nous terminerons également le processus d’approvisionnement pour les services de télécommunication dans les bureaux locaux, et nous aurons mis à jour une composante clé du système utilisé pour la rémunération des préposés au scrutin.

Enfin, nous progressons aussi dans les travaux de renouvellement du système utilisé par les entités politiques pour le dépôt électronique des rapports financiers. Notre objectif est d’ajouter des fonctions au système et de le rendre plus convivial pour les usagers.

Alors que l’organisme entame les derniers préparatifs pour la prochaine élection générale, j’entrevois deux grands défis.

Le premier concerne la cybersécurité et le problème plus vaste de la désinformation. Selon le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, plusieurs groupes tenteront fort probablement d’influencer, par des moyens informatiques, le processus démocratique durant l’élection générale de 2019. Par conséquent, Élections Canada prend plusieurs mesures pour renforcer sa posture de sécurité. Par exemple, la structure de notre réseau informatique a été améliorée et notre nouveau fournisseur de services d’hébergement de données offrira une série de mesures de protection additionnelles. De plus, l’organisme fera faire une vérification indépendante de ses contrôles de sécurité des TI, qui devrait être complétée au printemps.

La mise à niveau de l’infrastructure technologique de l’organisme pour répondre au nouvel environnement de sécurité requiert cependant des investissements importants. Les dépenses supplémentaires requises pour améliorer et maintenir cette infrastructure sont financées par notre autorisation législative. Elles figureront parmi les dépenses de l’organisme à compter de l’exercice en cours.

Pour ce qui est de la question plus vaste de la désinformation, nous collaborons avec le commissaire aux élections fédérales, et les responsables de notre programme d’intégrité suivent l’évolution de la situation. Notre principal rôle à cet égard est de nous assurer que les Canadiens disposent de renseignements exacts sur les lieux, les dates et les méthodes d’inscription et de vote.

Le second défi pour l’agence concerne la mise en oeuvre des modifications législatives à l’approche de l’élection générale. À l’heure actuelle, deux projets de loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada demeurent à l’étude au Parlement, et d’autres mesures de réforme devraient être déposées, comme l’a indiqué le gouvernement. Nous espérons qu’elles incluront plusieurs des changements importants recommandés par le Comité.

Cela dit, la période favorable à la mise en oeuvre de changements majeurs à temps pour la prochaine élection générale s’écoule rapidement. Nous continuerons d’appuyer les parlementaires dans leur étude des nouvelles mesures législatives, pour les informer des répercussions des modifications et des délais requis pour leur mise en oeuvre. Comme toujours, nous gardons à l’esprit l’importance de soumettre à des tests complets les processus, les systèmes et la formation nécessaires à la conduite de l’élection et de veiller à ce qu’ils soient déployés sans risque pour le bon déroulement de l’élection.

Pour conclure, monsieur le président, je suis heureux de dire que nos activités d’amélioration progressent comme prévu, et que nous amorçons maintenant la dernière étape des préparatifs pour la prochaine élection générale.

Merci.

(1235)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Vous avez fait beaucoup de travail et réalisé d'excellents changements. C'est emballant.

Je vais faire la même chose que pour les derniers témoins. Chaque parti a sept minutes. Répartissez ce temps comme bon vous semble. À la fin de la séance, si quelqu'un veut cinq minutes pour passer à huis clos et parler de sécurité, nous pouvons le faire. Il se peut que nous souhaitions discuter à huis clos de certaines des choses que vous venez de soulever, s'il y a des questions.

Commençons par les libéraux, qui ont sept minutes.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'avais des questions au sujet de la sécurité, alors je vais manifestement attendre pour les poser.

En ce qui concerne les cahiers de scrutin électroniques, je comprends ce que vous dites concernant le mécanisme urbain, mais vous avez ensuite parlé de l'efficacité que vous espérez améliorer dans les régions rurales. Pouvez-vous m'expliquer cela de nouveau, je vous prie? Il se peut que je vous interrompe — et je vous fais mes excuses à l'avance —, mais de quels gains d'efficacité parlez-vous, pour les régions rurales?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Dans les régions rurales, nous voyons moins de files d'attente aux bureaux de scrutin. Nous nous préoccupons d'avantage de la distance à parcourir pour se rendre au bureau de scrutin. Dans bien des cas, la façon dont la section de vote est déterminée, lors des dernières élections, n'était pas adéquate. Nous avons donc cherché des manières d'améliorer cela.

Pour ce faire notamment, nous commençons par déterminer les bureaux de scrutin possibles, puis nous traçons les limites autour de chacun, plutôt que d'établir les sections de vote pour ensuite trouver un bureau de scrutin. Nous inversons le processus.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Ce que vous faites, donc, c'est... Cela se fonde sur la distance, et vous dites aux gens: « Vous vivez ici, alors vous devez aller là. » C'est ça?

Je vous pose la question parceque, d'après moi, il vaut mieux pour certaines municipalités placer le bureau de scrutin là où se déroule l'essentiel des activités. Cela peut sembler vraiment crasse, mais placez le bureau de scrutin à côté du Walmart, et cela va bien mieux fonctionner, franchement. Désolé, mais c'est aussi simple que cela. Ou à côté d'un Tigre Géant, peu importe. Je trouve que ce serait plus efficace. N'êtes-vous pas d'accord?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est un bon argument. Il y a deux choses. L'une est la distance, mais ce n'est pas le seul facteur. Ce que nous instaurons pour ce qui est de la distance, c'est une technologie qui nous permet de calculer la distance à parcourir, et non la distance à vol d'oiseau; elle calcule la distance en voiture. Je sais que M. Reid avait des problèmes dans sa circonscription aux dernières élections. C'est le type de technologie qui vous aidera à résoudre ces problèmes pendant que nous entamons le processus de réversion des bureaux de scrutin. Cependant, nous avons une nouvelle politique qui sera rendue publique bientôt et nous avons fait appel à l'ACPP à cet égard.

La proximité est un facteur, mais il y en a d'autres. La familiarité en est un aussi. Le caractère pratique en est un autre. Il y a plusieurs autres facteurs. Dans votre exemple, l'emplacement choisi peut ne pas être le plus près sur le plan géographique à une distance en voiture médiane, mais c'est celui qui est le plus pratique pour les gens.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce déterminé par le directeur de scrutin? Les directeurs de scrutin décident-ils de l'emplacement?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact. Le processus sera entamé au printemps avant les élections. C'est un nouveau changement que nous apportons. Les directeurs de scrutin commenceront à cibler les bureaux de scrutin potentiels en tenant compte de toutes sortes de critères, dont l'accessibilité. À partir de là, ils commenceront à se pencher sur les sections de vote. Ce sera un travail soutenu à partir de ce printemps.

(1240)

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, c'est une excellente idée car je pense que le directeur de scrutin de chacune des circonscriptions devrait avoir le dernier mot sur l'emplacement des bureaux et des sections de scrutin. Sans vouloir vous offenser...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tout à fait.

M. Scott Simms:

... une carte ne vous permet pas d'établir la façon dont les gens votent, où ils vont voter, etc.

Je vais laisser le soin à M. Graham de vous expliquer le reste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'allais poursuivre dans le même ordre d'idées. En 2015, la plus grosse section de vote était à peu près de la taille de la région du Grand Toronto. J'aimerais donc savoir, par curiosité, la distance que vous voulez. Quelle est la distance maximale que vous demanderez aux électeurs de parcourir?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je vais demander à Michel de vous parler de cette question car il est responsable de ce secteur.

M. Michel Roussel (sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovation, Élections Canada):

En ce qui concerne les lignes directrices qui seront remises aux directeurs de scrutin lorsqu'ils délimitent les zones de service, nous nous attendons à ce que dans les centres urbains, 95 % des adresses seront situées à 10 kilomètres des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation et, dans les régions rurales, à 30 kilomètres des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation. Pour les bureaux de scrutin le jour des élections, nous nous attendons à ce que 95 % des bureaux de scrutin ordinaires soient situés dans un rayon de cinq kilomètres de l'adresse des électeurs dans les centres urbains et dans un rayon de 15 kilomètres, dans les régions rurales. C'est une ligne directrice. Comme nous l'avons dit plus tôt, les directeurs de scrutin ont le dernier mot. Le principe que nous demandons aux directeurs de scrutin d'appliquer est de trouver un emplacement situé à une distance raisonnable pour permettre aux électeurs de voter par anticipation ou le jour des élections.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'une des préoccupations que nous avions dans le passé, lorsque nous discutions des adresses, c'est que les critères d'accessibilité excluent de larges portions des régions rurales. Y aura-t-il plus d'exemptions à cet égard?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense qu'il ne faut pas oublier que nous sommes légalement tenus de nous assurer, dans la mesure du possible, que les bureaux de scrutin sont accessibles. Cependant, dans bien des cas, il y a des options et d'autres facteurs à considérer que l'accessibilité dans les choix des bureaux de scrutin. Il n'y a malheureusement pas de réponse claire à votre question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai plus de questions, mais je pense que je vais attendre de les poser pendant la partie à huis clos de la réunion.

Le président:

Marc Serré.

M. Marc Serré (Nickel Belt, Lib.):

En ce qui concerne les bureaux de scrutin, je voulais seulement poser des questions sur les ressources pour les villes qui ont été fusionnées. Par exemple, le Grand Sudbury est fusionné depuis 2001, mais en 2015, il y avait encore cinq rues Main et les adresses étaient mélangées, et les bureaux de scrutin l'étaient aussi. Encore aujourd'hui, il est très frustrant de réussir à communiquer avec les bonnes personnes. J'ai parlé au directeur du scrutin adjoint et je lui ai mentionné que le problème n'est toujours pas résolu. Il y a d'autres villes fusionnées au Canada, je présume, et cette situation dure depuis 2001. Des mesures doivent être prises à cet égard. Ce serait grandement apprécié.

M. Michel Roussel:

Malheureusement, c'est un problème dont nous sommes conscients, et particulièrement dans le Nord de l'Ontario. L'un des avantages d'examiner tôt les cartes électorales, c'est que les directeurs de scrutin nous feront part de ces problèmes et nous devrions être en mesure de trouver des solutions.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai remarqué dans votre exposé que vous avez brièvement abordé la question de la cybersécurité. J'aimerais laisser un peu de temps, car je sais que mon collègue, M. Reid, a une question à poser à ce sujet.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, lorsque nous parlons de cybersécurité, nous discutons entre autres de la possibilité d'une influence étrangère sur nos élections par l'entremise de ces types de filières. L'autre secteur où il y a un grand risque d'ingérence étrangère dans nos élections n'est pas un sujet dont on parle beaucoup à l'heure actuelle, mais on doit l'examiner. Je sais qu'au Comité sénatorial permanent des affaires juridiques et constitutionnelles, M. Côté, le commissaire aux élections fédérales, a fait savoir que son bureau avait reçu un grand nombre de plaintes à propos d'ingérence de tierces parties dans les élections de 2011 et de 2015. C'est un problème de taille où des tiers interviennent tellement dans certaines circonscriptions que ce problème peut donner lieu à des résultats électoraux injustes. Il a également dit qu'il est temps que le Parlement revoit son régime des tiers pour veiller à ce que les règles du jeu soient équitables.

Êtes-vous d'accord avec lui? Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

Comme vous vous souvenez sans doute, il y a deux principaux problèmes dans le régime actuel. L'un est la portée des activités réglementées. À l'heure actuelle, le régime prévu dans la Loi électorale du Canada limite les dépenses des tiers à des dépenses de publicité électorale. Ces dépenses ne couvrent pas un éventail d'activités, notamment celles pour inciter les gens à aller voter, le porte-à-porte ou d'autres activités pour faire la promotion d'un candidat. Premièrement, nous devons nous demander dans quelle mesure nous voulons élargir la portée du régime.

Deuxièmement, nous devons penser aux revenus. À l'heure actuelle, seulement les revenus obtenus pour la publicité électorale sont régis par ces tierces parties. La loi ne régit pas l'utilisation de revenus généraux, et un grand nombre de tierces parties ont toutes sortes de financement qu'elles reçoivent pour diverses raisons. Elles peuvent utiliser leurs revenus généraux pour financer leurs activités de campagne, même les activités qui sont régies à l'heure actuelle, et nous pouvons voir que des fonds étrangers arrivent. Ces deux aspects doivent être étudiés. Je sais que les comités ont retenu ces questions lorsquìls ont étudié les recommandations du rapport. Nous avons formulé quelques suggestions au Comité, qu'il a approuvées. J'appuie évidemment ces recommandations.

(1245)

M. Blake Richards:

L'autre problème, et le commissaire a dit dans le passé qu'il confirmait l'existence de ce problème , c'est que les contributions qui sont reçues plus de six mois avant une campagne électorale peuvent faire l'objet d'un examen. De toute évidence, avec des élections à date fixe, une tierce partie peut très facilement gérer ces contributions et dire à ces sources de financement de verser leurs contributions six mois et demi avant les élections. Ainsi, elles peuvent utiliser de façon illimitée des fonds étrangers pour toutes sortes d'activités autres que la publicité.

Quelle est votre opinion à ce sujet? Pensez-vous que cette pratique pourrait avoir une incidence sur les élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

Je conviens que nous devons retirer la limite de six mois dans la Loi électorale du Canada pour réglementer les revenus versés aux tierces parties. Nous sommes en faveur de cette recommandation, et je l'appuie personnellement.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Merci à nos témoins également.

J'ai une question concernant la cybersécurité, mais avant, je veux seulement revenir sur les observations de M. Graham et de M. Simms concernant le problème où des gens doivent parcourir des distances en voiture déraisonnables, et plus particulièrement pour se rendre aux bureaux de scrutin par anticipation. J'ai effectivement eu un problème aux dernières élections avec un secteur particulier de ma circonscription où les gens qui vivent dans une ville connue sous le nom de Port Elmsley devaient conduire 45 minutes pour se rendre aux bureaux de scrutin par anticipation.

Premièrement, lorsque nous avons soulevé la question, Élections Canada a fait preuve d'un grand professionnalisme pour corriger la situation. Deuxièmement, je pense que la solution que vous proposez est exactement celle qui s'impose, alors je vous en remercie. Le fait de commencer par modifier les distances en voiture est clairement la solution logique pour résoudre le problème.

Pour ce qui est de trouver des endroits accessibles, qui est le problème en bout de ligne, je crois comprendre qu'Élections Canada fait l'objet d'une ordonnance du tribunal et ne peut autoriser que certains emplacements. C'est la conséquence imprévue de l'élimination d'un grand nombre d'immeubles publics qui sont accessibles — et je pense que cette conséquence se manifeste de cinq façons différentes —, c'est-à-dire qu'ils deviennent souvent inaccessibles à tous, tant aux personnes handicapées qu'aux personnes pleinement aptes.

La seule façon de résoudre le problème causé par cette ordonnance du tribunal est par voie législative. Si nous pensons que le problème est suffisamment important, nous devrions suggérer une proposition législative. Nous pourrions tous comprendre comment ce pourrait être considéré comme allant à l'encontre des droits des personnes handicapées, alors il faut mûrement réfléchir à la façon de procéder. Il faudrait un appui multipartite. Je pense que l'on comprend bien la situation.

Enfin, je veux soulever une question à propos de la cybersécurité. Ce qui me préoccupe — ou ce qui devrait vous préoccuper plutôt —, c'est qu'en période électorale, la façon la plus efficace de provoquer des perturbations serait de trouver un moyen que les gens renoncent involontairement à leur droit de vote en leur communiquant des renseignements erronés concernant l'adresse, l'emplacement, les dates, etc.

C'est une version moderne d'une situation survenue dans le passé où l'on annonçait qu'un candidat s'était retiré de la course, mais ce n'était pas vrai. Je pense que ces faux renseignements seraient communiqués par des gens qui prétendent travailler pour Élections Canada. Ces renseignements seraient transmis à des groupes ciblés plutôt qu'à grande échelle, si bien qu'il serait difficile de retracer les fautifs. Ce serait la façon logique qu'utiliserait une puissance étrangère pour perturber des élections et faire régner un climat d'incertitude entourant le vainqueur des élections. Je pense que vous devriez vous protéger contre ces situations. Je ne sais pas comment vous pouvez y parvenir, mais bien franchement, c'est le danger.

(1250)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Vous avez soulevé un certain nombre de points intéressants et importants.

En ce qui concerne le premier, je veux rappeler au Comité que nous avons formulé des recommandations concernant l'expansion des certificats de transfert aux personnes handicapées. Ce faisant, on introduirait une certaine flexibilité dans le système pour offrir aux personnes handicapées un accès à d'autres bureaux de scrutin.

Quant à votre argument selon lequel des gens ont été induits en erreur quant à l'endroit ou l'heure, c'est bien entendu au coeur de notre mandat. Nous veillons à ce que les Canadiens sachent où obtenir les bons renseignements. J'ai demandé à mon équipe de travailler, en prévision des prochaines élections, à la création d'un registre accessible en ligne, sur notre site Web, et d'afficher toutes nos communications publiques, nos publicités et nos messages sur les médias sociaux. Si quelqu'un voit un message et qu'il n'est pas certain qu'il provient d'Élections Canada, il peut vérifier sur notre site Web. Il y aurait un registre public pour effectuer ces vérifications. C'est une mesure administrative que nous pouvons prendre.

Des dispositions ont été introduites dans la loi en 2014 qui interdisent l'usurpation d'identité et créent une infraction à cet égard. Malheureusement, c'est après coup, et c'est le rôle du commissaire de faire appliquer la loi. Sur le plan administratif, nous avons un rôle important à jouer pour nous assurer que les gens ont accès aux bons renseignements et, s'ils ne sont pas certains, ils peuvent vérifier sur le site Web.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je reconnais qu'il est préférable de poser certaines questions plus détaillées à huis clos, mais je pense cependant que l'on peut poser certaines questions générales. Par exemple, j'ai oeuvré un peu dans le secteur de la sécurité dans mon ancienne vie, et j'imagine que vous travaillez avec les organismes de sécurité nationale où nous menons nos initiatives les plus perfectionnées. Nous savons aussi que nous prenons très peu de mesures de façon complètement indépendante de nos alliés, et je pense plus particulièrement aux États-Unis. On l'a mentionné aujourd'hui, et je veux seulement savoir si c'est le cas. On a rapporté aujourd'hui que le président des États-Unis n'a pas encore donné des directives claires aux forces de sécurité pour qu'elles prennent les mesures qui s'imposent. Cette directive claire n'a pas encore été donnée, d'après ce que je lis dans les nouvelles aujourd'hui.

Je me demande si cette directive n'a pas été émise et si l'appareil de sécurité nationale n'est pas saisi de la question officiellement parce que le commandant en chef en a décidé ainsi, et dans quelle mesure nos organismes de sécurité peuvent-ils intervenir si rien n'est fait? Autrement dit, je doute que nous ferions cavaliers seuls. Nous voudrions prendre des mesures de manière concertée. Nous sommes des alliés. Nous avons des opposants internationaux communs. Par conséquent, je suppose que nous travaillons de manière concertée avec les États-Unis s'ils n'ont pas cette directive et ne vont pas de l'avant. Qu'en est-il de nous? Est-ce un problème de taille pour nous que les États-Unis n'interviennent pas autant que le reste du monde s'attend d'eux pour régler leurs problèmes de cybersécurité, et quelle incidence cela a-t-il sur nous compte tenu du chevauchement de notre appareil de sécurité avec le leur?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a quelques questions auxquelles je peux répondre. Je ne pourrai pas vous donner une réponse complète. Nous travaillons très étroitement avec le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Il fournit des normes que nous devons respecter. Deuxièmement, il nous aide avec l'acquisition de produits technologiques et assure des services d'intégrité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement pour nous. Nous savons que nous achetons des produits de partenaires dignes de confiance. Troisièmement, ils nous donnent des conseils. Nous avons inclus des aspects dans notre processus d'approvisionnement.. Que ce soit les registres de scrutin que nous allons utiliser ou les services d'accueil, ils nous conseillent sur l'inclusion de certaines exigences dans la DP, à savoir certains des coûts auxquels j'ai fait référence. Nous obtenons des conseils de véritables experts du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, et nous avons également un tiers qui fait une vérification indépendante. Nous faisons très attention à cet égard.

J'ai demandé à ce que nous commencions à travailler avec nos partenaires au Canada: le SCRS, la GRC et le BCP. Je m'àttends à ce que des réunions aient lieu peu de temps après que nous entamerons une conversation en prévision des prochaines élections. Nous le faisons à toutes les élections. Ces élections sont un peu différentes que d'autres peut-être en raison des expériences vécues un peu partout dans le monde. Mais nous passons en revue des scénarios et explorons les rôles et les responsabilités et les interventions pouvant être requises. Nous devrions commencer à le faire dans les prochains mois.

M. David Christopherson:

Bien. Je vais poursuivre, mais je pense qu'il serait préférable de fournir les détails durant la partie à huis clos de la réunion.

J'ai une dernière question, monsieur le président, avant que nous passions à huis clos.

Dans votre rapport, vous avez mentionné deux projets de loi à l'étude au Parlement. Vous ne pouvez pas répondre à cette question, mais je vais saisir l'occasion de la poser, puisque nous avons un groupe de secrétaires parlementaires parmi nous aujourd'hui, et M. Bittle a eu la gentillesse de m'en prévenir. Puisque nous avons la chance d'avoir autant de personnes d'influence à ce comité aujourd'hui, l'une d'elles peut peut-être nous assurer que, abstraction faite des politiques de la Chambre et de tout le reste, l'intention du gouvernement consiste à ce que cette mesure législative soit adoptée assez rapidement pour permettre à Élections Canada d'intervenir.

(1255)

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur Christopherson. Je dois vous présenter des excuses. J'étais absorbé dans mes pensées sur ce que vous aviez dit et je n'ai pas compris ce que vous venez de dire. Parliez-vous...

M. David Christopherson:

Vous dormiez encore.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Je prenais plaisir à réfléchir à ce que vous aviez dit. De quoi, précisément, parlez-vous?

M. David Christopherson:

D'après le rapport de ce matin, il y a deux projets de loi, dont j'essaie de me rappeler les numéros et je pense que l'un d'eux...

Un député: Le C-33.

M. David Christopherson: Merci. Le projet de loi C-33, et l'autre. De toute façon, ils sont passés par ici, mais ils sont sur une voie d'attente. Il faut les adopter, et je demande seulement si nous pouvons obtenir du gouvernement l'assurance qu'ils seront édictés pour qu'Élections Canada puisse agir. Nous n'avons plus beaucoup de temps.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Vous connaissez la réponse. Bien sûr, nous voulons les adopter rapidement pour qu'ils soient en vigueur avant les prochaines élections, mais beaucoup de variables échappent à notre volonté, notre comité notamment.

M. David Christopherson:

Je pense qu'ils sont derrière nous. Nous n'en avons même pas été saisis. Le projet de loi C-33 a subi beaucoup de changements importants. Est-ce que ça posera un problème, monsieur le président? Pas besoin de répondre tout de suite, mais je dois vous dire que ça coûtera cher à quelqu'un si nous nous sommes donnés tout ce travail, qu'Élections Canada est impatiente d'agir et que les projets de loi sont bloqués au Parlement. Vous pouvez incriminer l'opposition tant que vous voulez; vous êtes le gouvernement, vous êtes majoritaire; vous contrôlez la Chambre; vous contrôlez tout. Je suis un peu déçu que l'un d'entre vous n'ait pas assez confiance dans la capacité de son propre gouvernement d'adopter des lois, pour donner aujourd'hui l'assurance que nous demandons.

Le président:

Monsieur Miller.

M. Marc Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs, Lib.):

Je peux garantir que j'exercerai l'immense pouvoir que je tiens au gouvernement pour débloquer le dossier.

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, on peut en rire tant qu'il n'est pas trop tard. Ensuite, ce n'est pas si drôle.

Le président:

Avant de poursuivre la séance à huis clos et pour ne pas devoir reprendre la séance publique, pouvons-nous mettre aux voix les crédits dont nous sommes saisis dans le budget des dépenses?

Il s'agit des crédits 1 sous les rubriques « Chambre des communes », « Bureau du directeur général des élections » et « Service de protection parlementaire ». CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de programme..........86 751 081 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) BUREAU DU DIRECTEUR GÉNÉRAL DES ÉLECTIONS ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de programme..........7 692 230 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de programme..........20 700 000 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Dois-je faire rapport des crédits à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le huis clos commence incessamment. Restez à vos places.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 27, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.