header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-02-28 SMEM 13

Subcommittee on Private Members' Business of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1605)

[English]

The Chair (Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.)):

I call to order the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for our 13th meeting.

Everybody has in front of them the items we are going to go through today to approve. I'll ask David, our analyst, to provide comments on anything he would like to state with respect to these items.

Mr. David Groves (Committee Researcher):

I'm happy to speak on any of the bills or motions if anyone has any questions.

The one I noted that I thought the committee might want to discuss is Bill C-385, an act to amend the Navigation Protection Act.

The criterion this year around votability is whether it concerns a question that is currently on the Order Paper or the Notice Paper as an item of government business. The item of government business is Bill C-69, An Act to enact the Impact Assessment Act and the Canadian Energy Regulator Act, to amend the Navigation Protection Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

The question at issue is the Navigation Protection Act. The NPA is an act that regulates, among other things, the development or maintenance of works or obstructions that might affect the navigation of navigable waters across Canada. Under the current version of the NPA, protections are provided only to navigable waters that are on the schedule.

Bill C-385, the item before the committee, amends the NPA to add a number of lakes and rivers to that schedule, so it extends those protections to those lakes and rivers specifically. The government bill, Bill C-69, was introduced earlier this month, on February 8, and makes significant amendments to the NPA. It renames it the Canadian Navigable Waters Act and, under the CNWA, the regime around protecting navigable waters from obstructions and works changes considerably. In particular, it expands the protections that were previously granted in the schedule to any lake, river, or body of water that meets the definition of “navigable water”.

There is a distinction between the types of protections offered, based on the type of work, and there remains a schedule on the act. There remains something of a difference between lakes and rivers on this schedule and navigable waters generally.

I can get into that if you would like, but suffice it to say that both Bill C-385 and Bill C-69 extend protections currently provided by the NPA to the lakes and rivers named in the private member's bill. They do so in different ways and would ultimately provide slightly different levels of protection. The issue that arises is whether they concern the same question. I'm happy to provide my assessment on that question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Yes, please.

Mr. David Groves:

Okay. My assessment is that in fact they do concern the same question or a similar enough question. They are essentially.... I'll go through it very briefly.

This provision is a little vague, but I interpret the criteria to cover three situations. The first is where a bill is duplicative: where a government bill and a private member's bill seek to achieve the same goal and they do it in the same way. That's not the case here.

The second is where the bill is redundant: where the two bills seek to achieve the same goal but achieve it in different ways. I would argue that this is the case here.

The third is where the bill is contradictory: where the two bills seek to achieve opposite goals and, if both were passed, they would be in conflict. It would be difficult or impossible for them to operate at the same time.

In this case, I would suggest that there is a strong argument to be made that the government bill renders the private member's bill redundant. Though they do it in different ways, both seek to provide navigation protection to the lakes and rivers outlined in the private member's bill. This is not a perfect case of redundancy, since, as I mentioned before, the substance of the bills does not completely overlap, though I would argue that it's very, very close.

My assessment would be that in this situation the criteria allow for a small margin of difference between the two bills. For that reason, I would argue that the degree of overlap here is so substantial that the criterion of non-votability applies.

I realize that this was quite dense. I'm happy to take questions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

David, nothing you say is dense.

Mr. David Groves:

That's the nicest thing anyone has said to me today.

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP):

Could I speak to this, please?

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Rachel Blaney:

I have had conversations with Wayne Stetski with regard to Bill C-385.

I believe this is absolutely clear. I agree with your analysis that this is not necessarily the best step forward for him. I think we are happy to have this voted non-votable so that he can move forward with some other bills that he already has.

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Has anything ever gone to non-votable with a unanimous consent before?

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

It must be the first time. Is it?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be neat to set a precedent today.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see the arguments both ways. On balance, David's explanation makes a lot of sense, and I'm happy to comply with Rachel's request.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, do you agree?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With the rest of the bills, I don't think I have any problems. If the others don't, either, we can pass them all as they are.

(1610)

The Chair:

Okay.

The motion reads: That Bill C-385, An Act to amend the Navigation Protection Act (certain lakes and rivers in British Columbia), be designated as a non-votable item.

David moves this.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Bill C-385 is deemed non-votable.

The next motion is as follows: That the Subcommittee present a report listing the remaining items that it has determined should not be designated non-votable and recommending that they be considered by the House.

David moves this.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: That's it.

We are adjourned.

Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1605)

[Traduction]

La présidente (Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte cette 13e réunion du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Vous avez tous devant vous la liste des choses que nous allons devoir approuver aujourd'hui. Je vais demander à David, notre analyste, de nous fournir les explications qu'il croit important de nous donner sur ces différents sujets.

M. David Groves (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Je serai heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions concernant les projets de loi et les motions à l'ordre du jour.

Celui au sujet duquel j'ai pensé que le Comité voudra discuter, c'est le projet de loi C-385, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la protection de la navigation.

Le critère de votabilité qu'il convient d'appliquer cette année consiste à déterminer si le projet de loi porte sur des questions inscrites présentement au Feuilleton ou au Feuilleton des avis à titre d’affaires émanant du gouvernement. L'affaire du gouvernement est le projet de loi C-69, Loi édictant la Loi sur l’évaluation d’impact et la Loi sur la Régie canadienne de l’énergie, modifiant la Loi sur la protection de la navigation et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d’autres lois.

La question porte sur la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. Cette loi encadre entre autres l'aménagement ou l'entretien d'ouvrages ou d'obstacles susceptibles d'avoir une incidence sur la navigation dans les eaux navigables de l'ensemble du Canada. Les protections fournies aux termes de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation actuelle ne s'appliquent qu'aux eaux navigables qui figurent en annexe.

Le projet de loi C-385 dont le Comité est saisi modifie la Loi sur la protection de la navigation pour que soient ajoutés à cette annexe un certain nombre de lacs et de rivières, ce qui aura comme résultat d'étendre les protections prévues aux termes de cette loi à ces lacs et rivières. Le projet de loi émanant du gouvernement, le projet de loi C-69, a été présenté plus tôt ce mois-ci — le 8 février —, et il propose des changements significatifs à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, qu'il renomme Loi sur les eaux navigables canadiennes. Les modifications proposées transforment considérablement le régime établi par cette loi pour protéger les eaux navigables d'obstacles ou d'ouvrages. Notamment, la loi modifiée étendra les protections réservées pour l'instant aux plans d'eau qui figurent en annexe à tous les lacs, toutes les rivières et tous les plans d'eau qui correspondent à la définition d’« eaux navigables ».

Des distinctions sont apportées au sujet des types de protection offerts en fonction des types de travaux, et la loi conserve son annexe. Une différence subsiste entre les lacs et rivières qui sont inscrits dans cette annexe et les eaux navigables en général.

Si vous le voulez, je peux vous donner des précisions à ce sujet, mais ce qu'il convient de retenir ici, c'est que le projet de loi C-385 et le projet de loi C-69 étendent les protections actuellement offertes aux termes de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation aux lacs et rivières énumérés dans le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Ils le font un peu différemment et le niveau de protection résultant ne sera pas tout à fait le même. La difficulté consiste à établir si les deux projets de loi portent sur la même question. Je serai heureux de vous donner mon avis à ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Oui, nous vous écoutons.

M. David Groves:

D'accord. J'en suis venu à la conclusion qu'ils portaient effectivement sur la même question ou du moins, sur des questions suffisamment similaires. Essentiellement, ils sont... Je vais donner une brève explication.

Cette disposition est un peu vague, mais je vais interpréter le critère de manière à couvrir trois situations. La première, c'est lorsqu'il y a double emploi, c'est-à-dire lorsqu'un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement et un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire visent le même objectif et proposent les mêmes moyens pour y arriver, ce qui n'est pas le cas ici.

La deuxième situation, c'est lorsqu'un projet de loi est redondant par rapport à un autre, ce qui arrive lorsque deux projets de loi visent le même objectif, mais proposent des moyens différents pour y arriver, ce qui semble être le cas qui nous occupe.

La troisième situation, c'est lorsque les deux projets de loi sont contradictoires. Cela se produit lorsque deux projets de loi visent des objectifs opposés, et que l'adoption de l'un et de l'autre risque de donner lieu à des contradictions, ce qui rendrait la mise en application simultanée difficile, voire impossible.

Dans le cas qui nous intéresse, je crois que l'on pourrait aisément soutenir que le projet de loi émanant du gouvernement rend redondant le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Bien que chacun le fasse à sa façon, les deux projets de loi visent à protéger la navigation sur les lacs et les rivières énumérés dans le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Il ne s'agit pas d'un cas parfait de redondance puisque, comme je l'ai dit, les deux projets de loi ne se chevauchent pas sur toute la ligne, bien que les similitudes soient assurément très grandes.

Je suis d'avis que, dans cette situation, le critère permet de faire une mince distinction entre les projets de loi. Pour cette raison, je dirais que l'ampleur du chevauchement est telle que le critère de non votabilité s'applique.

Je m'aperçois que mon exposé a pu sembler très dense. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

David, vous ne dites jamais rien de dense.

M. David Groves:

C'est la chose la plus gentille qu'on m'ait dite aujourd'hui.

Mme Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NPD):

Puis-je parler de cela, s'il vous plaît?

La présidente:

Oui, nous vous écoutons.

Mme Rachel Blaney:

J'ai parlé du projet de loi C-385 avec M. Wayne Stetski.

Je crois que cela est tout à fait limpide. Je suis d'accord avec votre analyse: ceci n'est pas nécessairement la meilleure chose à faire pour lui. Je crois que nous serons heureux de voter cela non votable afin qu'il puisse aller de l'avant avec certains de ses autres projets.

Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-on déjà arrivé à un « verdict » unanime de non-votablité?

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Ce doit être la première fois, non?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce serait chic de créer un précédent aujourd'hui.

La présidente:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les arguments fonctionnent sur les deux fronts. Tout bien considéré, l'explication de David est pleine de bon sens et je serai heureux de me rallier à la demande de Rachel.

La présidente:

Monsieur Schmale, êtes-vous d'accord?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, je suis d'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour les autres projets de loi, je ne vois pas de problèmes. Si personne d'autre n'en voit, nous pouvons les adopter tels quels.

(1610)

La présidente:

D'accord.

La motion se lit comme suit: Que le projet de loi C-385, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la protection de la navigation (lacs et rivières de la Colombie-Britannique), soit désigné comme mesure ne pouvant pas faire l’objet d’un vote.

David en fait la proposition.

(La motion est adoptée.)

La présidente: Le projet de loi C-385 est désigné non votable.

La motion suivante se lit comme suit: Que le Sous-comité présente un rapport énumérant les affaires restantes qui, selon lui, ne devraient pas être désignées non votables et recommandant à la Chambre de les examiner.

David en fait la proposition.

(La motion est adoptée.)

La présidente: Voilà qui est fait.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 28, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.