header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-03-20 PROC 93

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 93rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Pursuant to the committee's mandate to review and report on the procedures and practices of the House and its committees, today we are beginning a study on the potential use of indigenous languages in the proceedings of the House of Commons.

Members will recall that on June 20, 2017, the Speaker ruled on a question of privilege, which had been raised at a previous sitting by the member for Winnipeg Centre, regarding simultaneous interpretation services available to members who use indigenous languages in the House. Although the Speaker did not find that a prima facie case of privilege existed, he did suggest that the committee consider studying the matter.

To this end, we are pleased to be joined by Charles Robert, Clerk of the House of Commons, and André Gagnon, deputy clerk, procedure.

Thank you both for being here.

Just so the committee knows, for the technical questions on this, Public Services and Procurement Canada provides these services—both translation and the document. We'll have them later as a witness and they can answer further technical questions after we get proposals from our witnesses. We have quite a list of witnesses that the parties have submitted, so it should be very interesting hearing from them.

We'll go to you, Mr. Clerk, for your opening comments. Thank you for coming. I know you're very busy, so we really appreciate your being here today.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I am delighted to be here with you, and I would like to thank the committee for inviting me to appear today to speak on the use of indigenous languages in the House of Commons.

The right of members to speak in the House in either French or English has been guaranteed by section 133 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Simultaneous interpretation was introduced in the House in January 1959, allowing all members to listen to every word spoken in the chamber in either French or English.

Over the years, various members have also addressed the House in languages other than English or French. This has prompted questions as to how these interventions could be understood for the benefit of all members of the House and those listening at home. Such interventions have often been limited to a few words, and most have occurred in statements by members.

Although simultaneous interpretation into English or French on the floor of the House is not available in these instances, a note is made in the Debates to explain that the member spoke in another language. If a translated version of the remarks made during statements by members is provided to the parliamentary publications directorate, that will also be documented. As an example, the Debates would state, “Member spoke in Cree and provided the following translation”, which is then accompanied by the text of the statement.[Translation]

Members have also chosen to speak in another language at other times. This has occurred during debate on a bill, a motion, or even during oral questions. When a member speaks in a language other than English or French, outside of statements by members, the Debates simply note which language was spoken, without including a translation of the remarks, as follows: "[Member spoke in Cree.]".

To facilitate understanding of what is being said in the chamber, the speaker has generally encouraged members using another languages to repeat the remarks in one of the official languages so they can be interpreted. This ensures that their interventions are fully reflected in the Debates.

In response to the question of privilege raised by the member for Winnipeg-Centre, Mr. Ouellette, Speaker Regan reiterated on June 20, 2017, that: [...] given the House's current limited technical and physical capacity for interpretation, if members want to ensure that the comments they make in a language other than French or English can be understood by those who are following the proceedings and are part of the official record in the Debates, an extra step is required. Specifically, members need to repeat their comments in one of the two official languages so that our interpreters can provide the appropriate interpretation and so that they may be fully captured in the Debates. By doing so, all members of the House and the public will be able to benefit from the rich value of these interventions.

Admittedly, going beyond this and expanding support for the use of other languages does raise significant considerations involving technical and physical capacity, linguistic expertise, and information technology requirements; these, of course, would need to be thoroughly assessed.[English]

While other jurisdictions have some experience upon which you could draw, it will be important to recognize the uniqueness of each context in order to understand the real possibilities for the House of Commons. The recent experience in the Senate is worth noting. The practical challenges it experienced are likely similar to the types the House would face in attempting to support the use of other languages in our proceedings, such as the issue of securing the services of qualified interpreters and addressing the logistical and technical limitations.

Whatever decisions the House makes on including other languages in its proceedings, I can assure you that the administration will do all it can to support you in your discussions and to implement your decisions.

With that, I would be pleased to answer any questions you may have, with the assistance of André Gagnon.

(1110)

[Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you.[English]

Masi cho. Gunalchéesh. Sóga senlá.

Just so the committee knows, we'll have as witnesses a number of MPs who are indigenous. We'll have a number of senators. We'll have a number of translation organizations and a number of legislatures in Canada and from around the world that use different languages. So we'll see different models.

We'll go to the first round of questioning.

Mr. Graham, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you both for being here.

First, members are, by their very nature, considered honourable, so what precludes members today from providing translation to the translation booth to read into the record at that time? As I recall, when the member for Winnipeg Centre started, he had intended to do that, namely, provide the English and French text to the translation booths and then not read it in that language.

Mr. André Gagnon (Deputy Clerk, Procedure):

If you recall, Mr. Graham, that situation arises when members make some statements in the House. They provide the text for Hansard, but not for interpretation.

I think you would be in a good position to ask that question of our interpretation services, but our understanding is that they are not able to qualify or at least identify the quality of the translation provided at that time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's my point. The members are considered honourable, so we have to assume that what they are providing is in fact correct. Would that be correct?

Mr. André Gagnon:

That could be a decision of the House, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see. Okay.

You mentioned at the end of your remarks the Senate's experience. Can you talk a bit more about your perspective on the Senate's experience, given that you were certainly there for it?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes. In fact, I was responsible for the experiment. I was the principal clerk of chamber operations at the time. The Senate had made an agreement that it would experiment with the use of Inuktitut. We had senators who spoke that language, and there was a recognition that we should respect their home language, their maternal language, and allow it to be used in the chamber.

Under the program that was used, we requested that we be given advance notice. The reason for that was not to discourage them but actually to work with the interpretation services to identify someone who would be available in Ottawa to provide the translation from Inuktitut into English. We did not have the capacity to do Inuktitut into French.

It was used on various occasions by Senator Willie Adams and Senator Charlie Watt. They did use it. In the sense that they were encouraged to use their language, it was reasonably successful, but it always required considerable preparation and advance notice. If we were not able to secure the services of an interpreter, we had to either delay the intervention or explain to the senator that we couldn't provide the interpretation that we had hoped.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that it could only be done into English. Could it not have been done through relay translation to get it into French?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes, but that presents a challenge of its own, which I think the interpreters could explain. There is always a loss when you go from one language to another. It's like, I guess, Plato's cave: it becomes more and more of a shadow. If you go from Inuktitut to English, and then French from the English, there is a double remove.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said there was a notice period to get it. What was the notice period?

Mr. Charles Robert:

At the time, we originally asked for five days. Again, it was because we needed that lead time to secure the availability of an interpreter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How hard is it to find those interpreters? Are there companies in the area that provide interpreters on call? For example, if we were to make this more institutionalized, could we have, with 24 hours’ notice, any of a set series of languages available?

Mr. Charles Robert:

My suspicion would be that it would be a lot easier for commonly spoken foreign languages. I'm not sure how difficult it might be—or how easy it would be, to give it a more positive spin—for the aboriginal languages. I think for the ones that are popularly spoken it's likely that it would be easier. We had difficulty, actually, with Inuktitut, not necessarily because there is a dearth of members who speak the language, but they just don't happen to live in Ottawa.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair. I guess, with modern technology, could we not do the translation from a remote site?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's certainly a consideration.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Logistically, are we capable of easily looking at having an additional interpreter in the chamber, in the new chamber in the West Block, or in the future chamber in Centre Block?

Mr. Charles Robert:

André may know more about this than I do, but I do think that the new chamber in the West Block will be more accommodating than the current one. As I see it, the interpreters' booths look like telephone booths at the corner of the chamber. These don't look very commodious, and I suspect that the interpreters don't really like them, it but they put up with it. If they had to squeeze in somebody else, I think they would start talking about the Black Hole of Calcutta.

Voices: Oh, oh!

(1115)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would the West Block have additional telephone booths?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes. There will be a third, additional booth for the House of Commons, for the chamber. The booth would not be situated in the assembly in the same way the two others are today, but yes there will be. As for committees, the solution to that would be like what we are doing today, which is to have additional booths in the room.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You mentioned earlier that translation is to be provided for Hansard. That's already the case, right?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, only if you have the interpreter. The Hansard would not necessarily reflect the language itself. In the English version of Hansard, or the French version, you would maintain the integrity of English and French. You would just simply note that the member spoke in a third language. Only in the audio feed would you actually hear, I suspect, the third language.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Now, Hansard itself isn't technically published until Parliament dissolves, right? The final version is published at the end of the Parliament...?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's an edited version. There is the daily issue that comes out.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it realistic that the edited version not be translated by the member speaking, but that any time an indigenous language is spoken—and I would limit it to indigenous languages spoken in the House—it is properly translated by a professional translator within the context of Hansard, as opposed to being provided? Is that realistic or is that crazy?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I'll let André speak to it, but I suspect that if the House decided to do that, they would have to live with the possibility of a delay in the issuance of the Hansard.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's why I asked about the publication at the end of the Parliament.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's a good question, Mr. Graham. As you are aware, when we're talking about S.O. 31s, statements by members, the individual makes a statement, and it stays on the record and then can be added later on.

The difficulty comes—and it's up to the committee to decide what they would want to do with that—when you're in question period, let's say, or during debate, and an individual makes a statement in a language that is not known by the other individual or cannot be interpreted immediately. You are stuck in a kind of void.

Imagine the situation afterward, where this intervention would be included in the Debates, let's say, afterward or days after. It's hard to see how in the Debates there would be continuity between the intervention by the member and other member, who did not respond at all during questions and comments to the comments being made, because that member was not in a position to answer. That's why there was, through the years, from the interpretation services and Hansard, a practice of mostly doing it through statements by members.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I think I'm out of time.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Maybe I can start by going back to how things are handled in the Senate. I think I'm right in saying that the standing orders of the Senate have actually been rewritten to specifically allow the use of Inuktitut under certain constrained circumstances. I think that's correct.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think you are right.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Not other indigenous languages?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Not for the moment, no.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The approach you adopted then was to say essentially that we'll respond as the demand is made. I gather that would be the simplest way of summing this up.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Actually, at the time there were other aboriginal senators who spoke languages other than Inuktitut. We had one senator who spoke Salish and another senator who spoke Montagnais. This was an experiment. There was a pilot project. There was an agreement to just see how we could handle this. Again, because of the technology and the space limitations, we wanted to see whether or not we could actually cope with this on the Senate side.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

You described having some difficulties finding translators to translate to and from Inuktitut. I guess it was just from Inuktitut, not into Inuktitut. Is that correct?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's right. It was from Inuktitut into English. I don't believe we ever experimented the other way around because, in fact, the senators were comfortable in English and so it was not really necessary.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. Ottawa is the place where planes fly back and forth to Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, and, therefore, all things considered as Canadian cities go, we have a wider supply of Inuktitut speakers here than one would encounter elsewhere in the country. When you talk about a language like Salish, I'm going to guess that is not so true.

(1120)

Mr. Charles Robert:

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Nor is it for a number of other languages. I do wonder about the kinds of practical considerations we're going to have. On the one hand, it sounds to me as though you were able to move forward in the Senate with the Inuktitut pilot project because you had the consent of the Montagnais and Salish speaker. They didn't say it seemed unfair to them. They understood that we were experimenting with something that does not create a hierarchy of languages.

The question I'm asking essentially boils down to—and maybe this is an unfair question to ask someone in your position—how do we avoid creating the kind of hierarchy in which the more widely spoken languages and those that have the advantage of being “local”—and I say that with quotation marks around it, but you get the point...? How do we avoid that sort of thing?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think there you'd have to actually work with the interpretation services and develop some kind of idea or appreciation of the availability of people who might be willing to provide the interpretation service in a specific language. As Mr. Graham pointed out, there's always the possibility of trying to do it from a remote location. That presents its own challenges, but it may reduce the notice time that we experienced in the Senate if the interpretation services say that it is in fact a viable option.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Mr. Reid, if I can add something, I was going through my notes, and one of the assemblies in Canada has identified, I think, nine aboriginal languages, and they have decided to do a rotation such that they have one language per week.

The Chair:

That's NWT.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's the Northwest Territories, yes. They have only three official languages in Nunavut—French, English, and Inuktitut.

The Chair:

They also have the Inuit languages, of which there are two, actually.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right.

The Chair:

That's four all together.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What is the situation in Yukon?

The Chair:

They're not official languages, but they do make provisions. It's in the research report that you have there. Everyone got a report of what occurs in other legislatures, and in Yukon there's some provision, but it's not an official language. It hasn't been used very much. [Translation]

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have a question regarding the two official languages.

If English is used as an intermediary when translating Inuktitut into French, does that not create a situation in which the two official languages are not given equal importance?

In this example, would English not be seen as a bit more important than French?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Indeed, I addressed that in answering Mr. Graham's question. Yes, that is a risk, but you would really have to ask the interpreters how great a risk it is and how it could be managed. [English]

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was going to make one other comment here. It's a comment rather than a question. On the use of relay languages, I thought your analogy to Plato's cave was interesting. You're more academic than I am. I thought it was like the child's telephone game, in which you go around a circle, or like the use of Google Translate to go back and forth in the same language. The story is that someone took Dorothy Parker's famous rhyme, “Men seldom make passes at girls who wear glasses”, and translated it into some language—I think Portuguese—and then back to English and it said, “Ships carrying men don't stop at icebergs carrying women”, or something like that.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: I think that is a legitimate issue.

The other thing that occurs to me is that as a practical matter, if you're trying to engage in debate— as opposed to someone delivering an S.O. 31—it seems to me that once you get involved in a relay language, it's no longer possible to have simultaneous translation. You have something like a delay. Occasionally when I've chaired hearings at the international human rights subcommittee, we've had someone speaking a non-official language such as Farsi or something like that, and it has slowed things down very considerably. Have you given any thought as to how to deal with that particular practical issue?

(1125)

Mr. Charles Robert:

In fact, that it is a real issue, but I think the ones who would be best able to guide you in how it might be successfully addressed would be the interpreters themselves. They're the ones who actually live the experience of trying to work with the languages and provide to members the very best service possible. I know that when the issue was being addressed on the Senate side, we had to take into account their preferences as best we could, even though André has said that in the new chamber the location for the third language interpretation will be—I'll use Mr. Graham's language—a remote site. Interpreters hate that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Mr. Charles Robert:

They don't feel they can provide the best service when they're caught up in that situation. They will make the best of the environment they're offered, but they will give you fair warning that they will not be able to do as best they might.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mentioning the word “time”, the relay, that takes more time. We have to think of the timing considerations, in what we come up with.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thanks, Chair.

Thank you both for being here.

This is an exciting project, I must say. I've been really looking forward to this. Canada is still an unfinished work, a work in progress, and this is part of nation-building. Certainly it reflects a lot of the importance of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's report, and I mention this because the government is committed to implementing every single one of those recommendations.

I want to underscore that on page 321, under “Language and culture”, in number 14, the commission called upon the federal government to enact an aboriginal languages act that would incorporate certain principles, including the following: i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them.... iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation.... v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages.

This is interesting, and I just throw it out to colleagues. This may be a jumping-off point to address this promise, since I consider nation-building to be a file that we all own and have as a priority. In 15, the commission's report states: We call upon the federal government to appoint, in consultation with Aboriginal groups, an Aboriginal Languages Commissioner. The commissioner should help promote Aboriginal languages and report on the adequacy of federal funding of Aboriginal-languages initiatives.

There may be an opportunity to use this as a segue into that promise, given its obvious connections.

Having said all of that, I don't have a lot of questions. I appreciate that we need to start with your framework, but I would be interested, notwithstanding your remarks here, to know what you would consider to be the biggest administrative challenge we would face as members wanting to bring this about. What's the biggest one?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think I alluded to it. It's the notion of unintended consequences that might come about from a good-faith effort to bring in third languages. We're speaking in the context of aboriginal languages, Mr. Christopherson, and that's why you feel there's a need to recognize them. It's part of the Canadian identity and needs to be promoted. But there are other senators and members who might want to speak another language, and if we open the door, they should have the same right. There should be no real discrimination from that point of view.

The challenge comes when you are not able to find an interpreter who can work in French and an interpreter who can work in English. For the third language you need two people if you want to make sure that you're not jeopardizing, as Mr. Reid pointed out, the possibility of treatment with respect to the relay of the languages and the delay.

I don't think it's an insurmountable challenge, but I think this committee would be overlooking something that could potentially be a serious issue if you didn't look to address it and be conscious of it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. I would assume that there are probably some lessons to be learned from other nations that have gone through this.

(1130)

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes. I remember once watching a program on the European Parliament and the 28 languages that are used there. The interpreters were having a hell of a time finding somebody who could do Danish into Greek. They found everything else, but that combination presented some difficulties. In the end, I think there were something like 500 combinations. Actually, for the European Parliament, it is the single largest budget item in its operations.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I've been to a European Council meeting as a delegate and the whole perimeter of the council chamber is filled with interpreters.

Mr. Charles Robert:

What makes it successful is that they are trying to find everyone who can move into each language without a relay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's good, Chair. Anything else I have would probably be for other witnesses.

Thanks very much, and good job.

The Chair:

Could you explain the technicality of the department that does all this translation you're referring to? Do you hire them? Does that come under your budget?

Mr. Charles Robert:

There is no budget, at least when I was working on it in the Senate. I assume it's the same in the House. We have a memorandum of understanding, and they provide service. They will translate a gazillion words a year; they will produce so many pages. It's almost as if you're renting a car. You try to estimate how much mileage you're going to use so you avoid extra payments. You work with them so they have an understanding. If they really require this much for translation, we have to hire this much in the way of staff. We have to budget for it accordingly. Those are the parameters of the memorandum of understanding that we establish with that division of Public Works.

The Chair:

That comes under their estimates.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

The Chair:

Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you for being here today.

Did I hear correctly that the West Block does have an additional booth, but it's not in the chamber?

Mr. André Gagnon:

For the chamber, yes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Where is the booth?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I don't have that detail. Sorry.

There is no direct view from the booth into the House. Probably a screen would be organized on which the person would see the individual talking in the House.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Why was that booth created and when was the decision made that this booth would be created?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I don't have that information. We can provide that to you.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I suspect it would have been some time ago, because I think Public Works as well as the administration of the House are aware of members' interest in exploring the use of additional languages besides English and French.

There was the evidence of what was going on in the Senate. In the same way the Senate has delayed televising its proceedings, perhaps the Senate jumped the gun with respect to the House in using third languages as a matter of routine.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

So you foresaw this and this is why we've accommodated with the extra booth, but whatever shape it takes is yet to be determined. We at least have it there.

Mr. Charles Robert:

That would be my guess.

Mr. André Gagnon:

There have also been occasions, as you may recall, when international figures address the House. Those individuals commonly and frequently spoke in another language.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to the problems and challenges that you faced in the Senate, that's good experience for us to have for you to answer questions today for us.

You talked about having this service available and the problem of maybe not being able to get the service on time. How is that handled in the Senate? For example, if someone were scheduled to speak and all of a sudden you couldn't get the interpretation, and that person had to be bumped, how did that play out?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Because it was experimental and an initiative done in good faith, the senators who were involved were understanding and co-operative. The real problem also comes from the fact that when we're dealing in French and English, we're dealing with highly trained, qualified individuals. Because French and English are the official languages, the training available for the work of interpretation and translation is provided through courses offered at universities. Are we sure the same sorts of services would be available to train interpreters to a high standard in the 40-some aboriginal languages that are spoken in Canada?

(1135)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Has the House taken any steps to determine whether those resources are there?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I think that would basically be through Public Works rather than through us.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

Mr. Charles Robert:

If I recall my history correctly, when Canada made a greater commitment to official languages, the federal government supported the establishment of training and courses, through funding to universities, to provide proper interpretation training.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

With respect to the language that you decided upon in the Senate, you said that was based on the indigenous language that was spoken by—

Mr. Charles Robert:

We had two senators who were from the north who spoke Inuktitut, Senator Watt and Senator Adams.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

If the House of Commons were looking at something, what would you suggest, having now gone through that experience with those two senators, about the model that we would adopt with respect to which languages?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think you would want to do the preliminary work through negotiations with Public Services and Procurement Canada to determine who is available, and work out the modalities. We know that Mr. Ouellette has a real keen desire to speak in Cree. I suppose he would certainly be someone you would want to approach. There may be others who would like to use a third language. They don't need to be just indigenous, presumably. You could, I suppose, canvass them and see what's feasible and what makes sense.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, so we could canvass the MPs to determine what languages they would like to speak in the House, indigenous languages specifically, in this case.

I appreciate the comment about the mileage and the car. Can you give us an idea of the cost with respect to the Senate's trial on this? What was the cost?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I don't recall actually seeing the cost, because we were under the mileage limit. We just negotiated that.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I see.

Mr. Charles Robert:

The cost was actually borne by the department, and because it had a commitment to provide the service, the negotiations were always fruitful, always moving in the same direction: how do we understand each other, to be able to meet your needs and provide a quality of service that is acceptable to us as a department?

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to our moving forward with this, what suggestions would you offer? One of the comments you made that is interesting to me is that the senators understood that this was a trial and so they were very accommodating. For the House of Commons, what suggestions would you make with respect to our moving forward in this regard?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think you will come to an understanding of what your real options are once you start to explore with others. You'll have an idea from the members themselves how passionate they are in their desire to speak their maternal language. You will know from the department what its capacities are right now to provide them and how they might be able to be developed in the future, if that's the direction the House insists on taking. You will be able to work out, I suppose, a time frame that actually accommodates the needs of those members.

I would suggest to you that what is being considered is a very forward proposition that is meant to demonstrate clear respect. If it is to be meaningful, it has to be done correctly, and you have to properly explore what resources are available to you to put this in place.

As I mentioned at the close of my remarks, we in the administration are determined to provide you with the support that is available to us. If it is going to be implemented, like you, we would like to make sure it is successful.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's the priority: ensuring that if we do this we do it right.

(1140)

Mr. Charles Robert:

Let me be more candid. We don't want another Phoenix.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Whoa.

The Chair:

We'll go on to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Again, thank you to Mr. Gagnon and Mr. Robert for joining us this morning. It's always nice to have our clerk staff here to provide some feedback.

I want to very briefly follow up on Ms. Tassi's question about the capacity of members in the House to speak in an indigenous language. I know we have a fairly strong understanding of which members speak the two official languages. Am I to assume that we don't have a complete understanding of which members or how many members may speak indigenous languages at the current point in time?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I suspect that the only real way we know this, because we don't ask the question, is when the members themselves insist on speaking that language.

Mr. John Nater:

Very good.

I want to go back a bit. We talked about remote translation. That's something our interpreters are not keen on, and certainly I think there would be some unique challenges with that as well. However, I want to go a step further and talk about parliamentary privilege as it might apply to a remote facility providing these interpretations. This is something Mr. Bosc, in the past, has spoken to this committee about. I was hoping you could provide some background or some insight on how you see parliamentary privilege applying in a case where you have a remote site, perhaps within the parliamentary precinct but more likely beyond, whether privilege would still apply in those cases.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's an interesting question.

You could probably argue that because of the fact the individual is performing duties directly related to House business, that would be directly protected by parliamentary privilege. In the same way, when this committee travels, if it is outside the Ottawa precinct and travelling anywhere in Canada, privilege applies.

Mr. John Nater:

Very good.

With the assumption by the Senate that you would interpret Inuktitut into English, but the challenge would be with the direct interpretation, English into French, within the House of Commons would it be acceptable under the Official Languages Act to have interpretation only to one or the other of the official languages?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's a determination for you to make. You would find out whether you're ranging outside your comfort zone from the discussions you have with the interpreters who would provide you the service and can tell you how much is lost, and whether you're comfortable with that threshold.

I'm not qualified, and I don't think André is either, so we should not venture into it. We've done our job in raising the matter and bringing it to your attention so that you're at least aware of it.

Mr. John Nater:

I was on the official languages committee for about a year and a half. Hearing from the professionals in the interpretation industry, I know they do set themselves a very high standard.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

From the experience here, I am always remarkably impressed with how well they interpret the stream of consciousness that sometimes spouts from our mouths, so I really appreciate that.

Mr. André Gagnon:

And the speed at which Mr. Graham speaks, as well.

Mr. John Nater:

That has to be a speed-reading record for our friends in the interpretation booth. I do appreciate that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're waiting for computer interpretation.

Mr. John Nater:

I have two brief questions left.

First, in terms of any recommendations this committee might make, you mentioned that you would like to see an ability to implement them as best you can. Would it be something you'd be willing to come back to the committee for, towards the end of our study, perhaps to hear some of the suggestions we might have at that point and how they might be implemented in the—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Certainly. In fact, we would work with the clerk and the analysts to make sure that we follow the deliberations. The more time we have to understand what direction you might want to explore, the better able we will be to assist in informing you about how we could successfully implement your proposals.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, I have one brief question. It's slightly off topic, so please stop me if I go too far. It's more of a request.

When we move to the new West Block, I understand there's currently a committee within the House administration looking at how to preserve some of the ceremonial functions when we end up in different buildings. The poor Black Rod might have to jump on his bicycle to come to the House of Commons. I understand there is a group looking at that and I just question whether at some point in the future we could have an update on how some of these ceremonial functions might be preserved when we move.

Mr. Charles Robert:

That in fact is an initiative that also belongs to the government, not just the administration. The ceremony for the Speech from the Throne, the royal assent, and telling the House to find themselves a speaker are all ceremonies that really have some sort of control through the executive and the crown prerogative. Whatever we might propose should really be done in concert with the executive. I would suggest that you talking to them would probably be a useful exercise.

(1145)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

Your testimony has been quite useful, particularly the point in your opening remarks that we haven't had both official languages, French and English, all along in the House of Commons either, that there was a transition period in 1959. Obviously you weren't around then, but have you read about or do you have information on that transition? The way we operate today, did that happen from the first day we started providing interpretation, or was there a learning curve? Was there a transition period where we improved?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I can describe it to you because I have actually bumped into pages in the Debates before 1959, when it was only in English and only in French. If you didn't speak the other language or understand it, it was basically tough luck, because the way section 133 was interpreted, you can work in either language, but if there is no translation or interpretation, there's no principal violation of the guarantee that you can work in either language.

The period of friction that I was reading through was basically at the time around World War I when Canada was very keen on participating and doing its bit in the war effort, and bills were coming into the House and the Senate, and they were available only in one language. Well, the French senators, the French MPs, those of that language, were furious. They were actually being deprived of their capacity to function as parliamentarians because they could not see the draft legislation in their language.

That was an issue, and I assume that it would have been an issue from 1867 through to 1959. Everyone, I suspect, was really quite grateful that technology had advanced so far that we could actually allow for simultaneous translation in practice, and I think that was in some sense how, as a parliament, we actually fulfilled the intent of section 133 more completely.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But at that point, you stated that the federal government had provided funds for training for interpreters, because, I'm assuming, there probably weren't people qualified to the standard that we require of them to interpret in both languages.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes, and I think it was the policy of the government to demonstrate support for official bilingualism that prompted it to recognize that if we are going to rely on interpreters, they have to be properly trained.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There was probably a rough period when they were trying to transition into languages. I respect the fact that we want to do it right and to make sure that we have a good quality, but I think we have to be realistic. In order to give our first languages respect, and by trying to elevate them to this level and bring those languages to the House of Commons, we're going to have a rough patch, again, in trying to get it to that point where it functions as well as it does today. But I think the funding—

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think that's a real risk, and that's why I think your conversations with the interpretation service will be so important.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In our brief, from going through the records, we were given a few different languages that have been used in the House to date. In your experience have you had people come up to you with a request to speak in other, different indigenous languages that we have not heard about as yet in the House?

Mr. Charles Robert:

No, not personally.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I have had experiences, not with indigenous languages, but with foreign languages and working with interpreters who either do the relay, as Mr. Reid mentioned, or who do it simultaneously. It does have an impact on how you conduct meetings when you can't do it simultaneously.

I think that's where, speaking about the relay from English into French, it becomes a bit of an issue.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Starting off, it's my understanding that it probably would not occur that frequently. You had mentioned something about others also having a right to speak in languages that are not indigenous to this land.

Why do you feel that way?

(1150)

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's because, based on the experience that I've had in the Senate, there are some senators who are very proud of their cultural heritage and who want to show that pride by speaking in their language. I suspect that would arise also in the House. We applaud ourselves quite rightly for being a multicultural society, the great mosaic that seems to know how to work together. Well, if we want to demonstrate that, it may very well be that the House will recognize the right of members to speak not only the two official languages, but also other languages that are spoken in this country.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

We'll now go on to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I'm just going to go back to something that has been talked about a fair bit, your experience with the Senate. I don't think I heard responses to any of the questions I'll ask.

My first question is in regard to the arrangement that was made for Inuktitut translation. I think there was notice required for that. Is that correct? How long was it? Was it five days?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It was five days, because I remember.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Can you recall how often that was put into use?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Honestly, you could count it on the fingers of one hand.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Largely, I would say, it was because it was so difficult. Who knows; it might become easier if the demand becomes greater.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure.

Mr. Charles Robert:

If the demand is greater, then trying to put in place the infrastructure that supports that program becomes easier. There's a greater justification for it. To the extent that it is marginal, you'll have problems identifying interpreters who would be willing to do the work on relatively short notice, to perform a service that might only last for 15 minutes, tops.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Right.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Those are issues that I think have a practical consequence.

Mr. Blake Richards:

When you say “difficult”, you're referring to finding available interpreters when there are a very few times that it's requested. Is that what's making it difficult?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That was one element of it. There may be other factors involved that you could explore with the interpretation service.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

You said you could count them on one hand. What types of interventions would those have been? Would you remember? Were they statements, or tributes, or a question of speeches?

Mr. Charles Robert:

There was one item I remember that was an extensive speech. I think it had to do with a bill that the member was proposing to deal with the heavy cost of bringing food up north. I think Mr. Bagnell would have experience about how expensive it can be.

There was a bill that was looking for some sort of tax relief for the benefit of the inhabitants of the northern regions. The member was quite willing...because he was speaking to his own people about what he was trying to do for them.

That's one vague recollection I have.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So that was an entire speech, or a large portion of it.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It was a good chunk of his speech.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's the only one you can recall that would have been of that nature.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, as I said, the occasions were relatively infrequent. There were some that would have been used for statements, but this one, as I recall, was a substantive intervention in an aboriginal language.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In that case, if you can recall, and in any of the other few cases that existed, was prepared text provided in advance, or was it required to be?

Mr. Charles Robert:

There was prepared text available to us. He provided it to us in English. We were able to make sure that there was a translation in French. At that point, we didn't have to do relay. The moment we had both languages available, when the member was speaking, we would try to coordinate it so it was understood in both languages. That is one of the reasons that having an extensive notice period is useful if we want to avoid that problem.

(1155)

Mr. Blake Richards:

As far as you can recall, was there ever an instance where a relay was needed and text wasn't provided?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Was that in most of the cases then?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I would have to review it. I would have to speak to people who have a better memory than I do.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What you're indicating, though, is that having the text prepared in advance sounds like it's quite helpful to ensuring timeliness, because if you're talking about doing a relay, then there's more time being consumed.

Mr. Charles Robert:

In fact—

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's also about the quality of the interpretation.

Mr. Charles Robert:

In fact, you could avoid a relay if you were given a text that said this is the English of what is going to be said in Inuktitut.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Exactly.

Mr. Charles Robert:

If you had the time, you could translate it.

The translation is a different class of work than interpretation. Interpretation is simultaneous. You're hearing it at the same time you're speaking it. The level of concentration is far greater. If you're basically working with having an opportunity to write the text from English into French, then you're not really interpreting; you're simply reading.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Exactly.

I agree with you completely. I could never imagine being an interpreter. It amazes me that they can be listening and speaking. It astounds me.

That was what I was getting at. I think your answer is that it is certainly much easier, from both the perspective of the quality of the translation or interpretation and also of the use of time, if the text can be provided in advance. That's something we might want to consider when we're making any decisions about this. That would maybe be a requirement, I guess was what I was asking.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, to constantly be putting a positive spin on this, I would suspect that, if the infrastructure is properly built, then the time frame for the notice may be squeezed. No one would feel then that they were being shortchanged, in terms of the ambitions you have to introduce additional languages other than French and English.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In your current role, or in setting up that arrangement in the Senate, in preparation for this study, have you had any interactions with other jurisdictions that have had this multiple language interpretation? If you have, can you share with us any information?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The only one was when I spoke to the secretary general of the European Parliament, who explained what a challenge it is. He has 10,000 employees and they move. They go from Strasbourg to Brussels, and it's a huge operation. However, they seem to be successful at it, because they're not working in just two official languages and an additional language, but they're dealing with 28.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I guess one of the ramifications people talked about was that if they're speaking that language—let's say Inuktitut—in a place where there are a lot of people who speak Inuktitut in Canada and they're the audience, then there will be ramifications for a channel like CPAC, so that those people can hear that speech.

Thank you very much. We appreciate your coming here. We're going to suspend for a minute to get the translation set up in Cree. If anyone wants to speak to you, I'm sure you'll be here for a couple of minutes.

(1155)

(1205)

The Chair:

Drin gwiinzih shalakat. Good afternoon, and welcome back to the 93rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study on the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

We'll hear from Romeo Saganash, MP for Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou. For members' information, Mr. Saganash will be delivering his opening remarks in Cree. For today's meeting, we have arranged to have simultaneous interpretation of Cree into English and French. We'll have the clerk explain to you a little technicality of how that will work.

Mr. Clerk.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

In the interpretation system, channel 0 will be the floor language, so when someone is speaking in Cree, you'll be able to hear it on the floor channel at 0. The interpreter will be interpreting from Cree into English, and then our interpreters will be interpreting from the English translation into French on channel 2.

The Chair:

Mr. Saganash, thank you for coming. We appreciate your being here and look forward to hearing your comments.

Mr. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NDP) (Interpretation):

Thank you.

I want to thank you all for inviting me to bring my thoughts here while you're working on this and trying to bring other languages to be spoken here at these meetings.

I would also like to say that I'm really happy that I'm here to be able to put forward my thoughts on this.

I want to let you guys know that I will be speaking English sometimes on some of the things that I will be talking about. Maybe you won't understand if I share it all in Cree, but what I will talk about is the Constitution. That's what I'll be talking in English about, when I start talking about the Constitution and the way we look at it.

I know that this was talked about in the past. One of the things I want to discuss is this. I know that it can be easy to bring people here so that our people can speak their native language, and I can help you guys. I really expect the Cree language will be able to be spoken. I would always tell you guys ahead of time what I would be talking about. I can tell you guys about what I think, and I think that it's easy.

Can you hear Priscilla interpreting in the background? I want to thank her. She's here helping us today.

I know that I don't have much time to talk to you guys, but I will try to talk about what I need to talk about here.

I really think that you will help people, especially aboriginal people, to be able to speak their language. It really helps us to speak our native language. You probably know that before they took me, before I was sent over here, there was no title for someone to be working in what I am doing right now. There was no title as to how we were going to be called, for what you'd call a member of Parliament. We tried to find a name for us. Today I can say that we call them “the people who speak on our behalf, on their behalf”. That's what they call me, and this is what I bring, my word, here in Ottawa, and that's what I did. We didn't have that. You guys had speakers, but we didn't have that. Now we call that “the boss of words”.

That's how we can help each other—by allowing aboriginal people to speak their language. I really think we look at the Constitution too much. We should look at section 16 of part I the Constitution, but it's not the only one we should be looking at. We should also be looking at sections 22, 25, 26, and 34. Those are all the ones that we should all look at equally so we can understand where they came from, about my knowledge, about how I'm able to speak my language.

(1210)



Mr. Chair, I have read some of the stuff the Senate has done in the past with respect to the feasibility of achieving what I've been proposing since I got elected to this place in 2011. Is it feasible? In my view, it's a resounding yes.

As I said in Cree, those who wish to speak their indigenous language can provide advance notices as to whether it's going to be a question, a statement, or a speech in the House. The notice may change to that effect. Development of a bank of interpreters like Priscilla in the back is easy. That should be developed jointly with the member of Parliament. There are known interpreters up in my riding, many of them who do speak Cree. I think it's a matter of resolving the technology and the space required. I don't know if any of you have visited one of the cubicles of the interpreters in the House of Commons. They're pretty small. It wouldn't be possible today because of that.

I also did mention in my opening remarks that the recognition of my right to speak Cree in the House of Commons will benefit all indigenous languages. If we are serious about recognition of rights in this country then we need to do that. I'll come to the constitutional aspects in a while.

Protection and preservation of indigenous languages is one thing, but there's also the development aspect of indigenous languages when we do recognize the right of indigenous people to speak their language in the House of Commons. I gave two examples there. We didn't have a word in Cree for member of Parliament until I got elected and we had to develop that exactly.

I explained to elders what a member of Parliament does. They suggested a couple of words and we came up with yimstimagesu, “He or she who speaks on your behalf”. We did the same for the Speaker.

I know that my time is flying by, but I did want to touch on certain aspects. We seem to be focused too much on section 16 of part I of our Constitution, which recognizes the two official languages of this country and the House of Commons. We need to read section 16 jointly with sections 22, 25, 26 and, of course, section 35 of the Constitution of Canada. I think if you combine and read along with other sections there is a definite constitutional right for me to do so in the House of Commons.

Added to that, since our Constitution, UNDRIP, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, was adopted in 2007 by the UN General Assembly. Section 13.2 of the UN declaration states:

States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected and also to ensure that indigenous peoples can understand and be understood in political, legal and administrative proceedings, where necessary through the provision of interpretation or by other appropriate means.

I think under UNDRIP there is an article that pertains to that. I think the present government has committed to the UN declaration and implementing it, including, to a certain extent, article 5 as well.

The TRC also recommended to the government, in call to action 13, the following:

We call upon the federal government to acknowledge that Aboriginal rights include Aboriginal language rights.

That's call to action 13. I believe that the present government also endorsed all 94 calls to action. I think this committee needs to refer to both of those.

That's our framework, Mr. Chair.

(1215)



I listened closely to the presentations of the clerks just a while ago. I raised these constitutional issues and fundamental rights issues because I don't want to be told as an indigenous person, “Yes, we will allow you to speak your language; yes, we will give you permission to speak your language in the House of Commons.” That's charity. I don't want charity. I want my rights to be recognized and respected in that place. I've always stood up for those rights, and I will continue to do so.

One other aspect that needs to be mentioned is that in the most important decision by the Supreme Court in June of 2014, the Tsilhqot'in case, the Supreme Court talked about human rights with respect to indigenous peoples for the first time. The Supreme Court said in its decision that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in part I of the Constitution and section 35 in part II of the Constitution are sister provisions. In that sense, we need to look at my right to speak Cree in the House of Commons as a constitutional and human right.

I don't know if I have much time, Mr. Chair, but....

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Romeo Saganash (Interpretation):

As I close, I want to let you all know that I'm really happy to see that this is being worked on. It's something that indigenous people have been looking forward to, and it's something that we've always looked forward to—being able to speak my language to you. It's something that we've waited for for a long time. I really think that we all said that we would work together—calling it reconciliation—to have a good relationship.

There is a word in our language for that. We've had it, and we've always done that in the past: to always look at you and to be able to work with you. When I first started working with you, I really tried to work closely and openly with you. That's how I want to continue this working relationship. I want to have a good working relationship with each and every one of you, and for you to be able to acknowledge me while I speak my language every time I stand up when we meet. I always want to be able to know that I'm able to speak my indigenous language, and I want to thank you.

(1220)

The Chair:

Merci. Mahsi cho. Gunalchéesh. That's a very historic first speech in these historic hearings. We really look forward to this movement towards reconciliation as you described.

We'll go on to our first questioner, Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Saganash, thank you very much.

I'm going to start by asking you about the word that you used that you essentially created on your arrival to describe what it is that you do as a member of Parliament. Could you spell that for me, please?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

If you can write by sound, I can.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, can you say it one more time?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It's yimstimagesu.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, I'm going to try that again later.

The reason I say this is that, if it's okay, I'd like to use that at some point on my letterhead because it sparks a conversation. Then I can tell your story. In what year were you first elected?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It was 2011.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Exactly. Imagine, in 2011 we didn't have a word for that in your language, which is really a fundamental democratic principle that existed with us, even preceding 1867. I find it absolutely stunning. I'll confer with you again later on.

One of the things that all members of Parliament can do ad nauseam—it's what we all have in common—is to brag about our ridings. We can go days on end talking about how wonderful they is. I'm going to ask you about yours.

In your riding, Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, what community do you live in?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I live in Waswanipi.

Mr. Scott Simms:

In that community, can you give me a demographic breakdown of who speaks the language and who doesn't? How prolific is it in your area?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It's an important question that. When the Truth and Reconciliation Commission refers to aboriginal rights, which includes language rights, I think they are right on that. For a long time, we did not agree with the content of section 35, and the concept of aboriginal rights was so vague. Nowadays, there is certain agreement on certain things that are contained in section 35, including self-government.

We are fortunate in the Cree world to have signed the first modern treaty in this country in 1975, the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, which recognizes a decree to develop curriculum in Cree. All of our kids, for the first four years of their schooling, are taught in Cree, which makes it possible for over 90% of the Cree to still speak their language today.

Mr. Scott Simms:

In interactions with the outside world, if you're going outside of your community and you're representing them in a place like this, to what extent do they get information in the Cree language right now?

(1225)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It's very common now.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Even all of the deliberations of the Cree Nation Government are in Cree. In a lot of our interactions with Quebec, Hydro-Québec or other institutions, they take the time to translate documents into Cree, which is important for our elders. My mom, who just turned 89 on International Women's Day, only speaks Cree. Most of the elders only speak Cree, which helps as well. That's how we managed to develop these words. That's why preservation and revitalization are important, but development of language is also important along with this.

Mr. Scott Simms:

We all have this thing called a householder, and for anybody listening outside, that's that pamphlet you get once every four months from your member of Parliament.

When you send out yours, what languages do you send them out in ?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I've used all of the five major languages that are spoken in my riding: Inuktitut, Cree, Algonquin, French, and English.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's quite stunning, actually, stunningly good, mind you, because I want to ask you—

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

That's why I got re-elected.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Pardon?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

That's why I got re-elected in spite of you.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

Well, congratulations.

He stumps me again.

Do you get any friction? How long is the process to do that? Do you have trouble with the translation part?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

No.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It seems logical, then, to do this through translation here from an audio perspective. Certainly it would be a logical next step.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

That's the easy part.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's the easy part, yes, but yet it doesn't really exist in format.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

That's what I said in Cree. We've been waiting for this for a long time, for the last 150 years. I think it should have happened long before. In New Zealand, it happened in the late 1800s.

Mr. Scott Simms:

With the Maori.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

The Maori. The first Maori elected to Parliament in New Zealand only spoke Maori.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm going to turn to David Graham because he has a question, I think, that talks about the next step.

You're on the spot.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, apparently.

What's the stepped approach that you see? How do we build towards where we need to be? Obviously we're not going to have all indigenous languages translated in both directions starting tomorrow, so what is the stepped process that you would see?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I don't think it will be that difficult. There are some 50 indigenous languages still spoken in this country. Today we have about 10 indigenous MPs. I don't think all of them speak their language—fluently at least. My colleague Georgina speaks her language fluently. It won't be that massive an entrance of indigenous MPs, although I wish there were. I wish there were more of us in the House of Commons. I think it's going to be easy.

I haven't visited the West Block and seen how it's going to look in terms of the technology there, or if that would be possible when we move there, but we shouldn't be afraid of the fact that there are still 52 indigenous languages spoken. That's why I'm suggesting that for indigenous people who wish to speak their language in the House of Commons, the collaboration will always be there.

We know there are many interpreters. I know the ones who can interpret from Cree to English and from Cree to French. Those interpreters exist, and we know all of them, so that part needs to be developed jointly with the MPs.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you. Meegwetch.

Now we'll go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

I appreciate your being here, too.

I have several questions, but I'll start with this. You mentioned in your opening remarks—and I might be paraphrasing them slightly—that you would always tell us ahead of time when you were looking to use your Cree language. I guess that lines up pretty well with what you said back in June, when this question of privilege came up, which led us essentially to where we are now. You said that you had tried to negotiate a solution where there would be 24 hours' or maybe 48 hours' notice to allow for an interpreter to be arranged.

Is that your feeling on this? Do you think the best approach would be to provide some kind of advance notice that would allow for an interpreter to be arranged for a pre-determined time?

(1230)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I think the principle is the notice, and from there we have to determine how much time is required. If the interpreters are way up in James Bay or Nunavik, there are travel costs and travel time involved. If they're in Ottawa, then that's another story, but those are the kinds of considerations that need to be looked at.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I just wanted to make sure you were comfortable with that—

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

The principle of notice is the element here.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Can you just tell me a little bit more about the Cree language? Is Cree your mother tongue?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think there are a number of different dialects. That's not necessarily the correct terminology, but is that accurate? Do you know how many there are?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I think it's a question that's been brought forward by anthropologists and ethnologists. I spent 23 years at the UN, negotiating the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and whenever we were meeting with the Canadian delegation and did not want them to understand us, my brother from Alberta—Wilton Littlechild, who is Cree—and I would speak in Cree. He would perfectly understand what I was saying and I would perfectly understand what he was saying. He supposedly speaks Plains Cree, but there is not much difference.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so that might answer my next question. Would there ever be a need for interpretation between the different dialects of Cree? It sounds like you're saying probably that wouldn't be required.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Well, I think that's a privilege that belongs to the MP.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so there is no real definite answer to that question?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Maybe you can tell me a little bit about your experiences in your constituency. This has been touched on a little bit, but how often do you communicate with your constituents in Cree? What about other indigenous languages? Do you utilize those, whether it be in spoken or in written communications, or things like that?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

In any Cree meeting, assembly, or speech, I use Cree entirely. Mind you, when the Innu or Algonquin or Tkemec speak, I can understand more than half of what they're saying.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So that works well.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

They have the same Algonquian roots.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That obviously works well in personal communication. It may be face-to-face meetings, maybe even small town halls and things like that. What about your communications such as websites, householders, and things like that? Do you offer those in multiple languages?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

No, just the householders and ten percenters.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Have you had to use interpretation or translation services in your riding-level communications, whether written or in town hall meetings or things like that?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

In what way?

Mr. Blake Richards:

In your constituency, for example in a town hall meeting.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Amazingly, even though the Inuit have been our neighbours for thousands of years, the Cree language and Inuktitut are very different. In fact, there isn't one word in Inuktitut that has crossed over to Cree, and there isn't one Cree word that has crossed over to Inuktitut. They're the two solitudes of the north.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In other words, what you're telling me is that you probably have had to use interpretation and translation services.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

In that case, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Has that worked pretty well?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That leads me to my next question, and you touched on it a little bit earlier. What's your understanding in terms of the number of interpreters that are available to translate from Cree into English and French? Are you aware of what the numbers would be and whether those individuals you're aware of would meet the translation bureau standards and qualifications that are expected?

(1235)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

The availability of interpreters is pretty good. Not the Cree Nation Government, but the Cree regional James Bay government, is a regional government structure where half of the membership is Cree and the other half is the non-indigenous communities in the riding. That's the regional government in northern Quebec. In their proceedings and deliberations, there's simultaneous Cree, French, and English translation. The services are there and are easily accessible. In fact, I suggest you communicate with that regional government to talk about the service and how it works.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So you don't have any concern, then, about the issue that has come up a couple of times already, namely the idea that there may be a limited number of trained interpreters for the translation into French directly, so there wouldn't be a need for the relay interpretation?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You don't feel this would be an issue?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

No, absolutely not.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Good. Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I just forgot to mention that we couldn't get a room that was televised and that's why APTN have their camera here.

I'll just ask the committee a question before I forget. One of the reporters has asked for a copy of the report that the researcher did of the various jurisdictions. Does anyone have a problem with our allowing that?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Good. Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair, and I want to thank my colleague Romeo for coming in today.

I've been serving in Parliaments since 1990, provincially and federally, and although we're all equal, I have found that in every Parliament there are those among us who rise above. It's because of who they are and the gravitas their personality brings forward. Two of the people who I've served with and who I think come under that heading are Mr. Irwin Cotler and Mr. Ed Broadbent.

Romeo, I want to say that I add you to that, and I consider myself to be very honoured to serve at a time when you are here, because of your important role in building our nation, in giving life to our Constitution, and in doing it in a way that's so classy—I can't think of another word—and so elegant almost, and yet the forcefulness behind your passion is so clear.

Having said that, colleagues, I debated whether I wanted to say this or not, but I think I need to. As much as a successful outcome would be seen as a positive part of continuing to build our nation, I think we have to recognize, based on what our friend and colleague Romeo has said this morning, that the cost of failure is so great that failure is not an option.

We started this by asking “is it time?” and “how could we do it?”, and it was sort of notional, but having now started down this road and having laid out in front the historical implications of how important this is to many of our fellow Canadians, to then fail in this endeavour would mean that our time and our Parliament that we serve in have done more damage than harm, because we started out to do the right thing and failed. I will just say I personally feel that now that we've set down this course we have to succeed. We have to find a way to send the message to our fellow Canadians that we are serious about giving them their rights in a way that is respectful and about acknowledging the rights they have.

That's just to say that usually we do things that would be nice to do, but if they don't work, well, you know, we'll come back at it another time in another Parliament. We don't have that option. We really, really need to make this work, and I have a sense that we will.

I'm like my voting brother, Mr. Simms—that's inside baseball and I don't expect anybody else to get it—on the 150 years. I'm having some trouble getting around the fact that there wasn't even a word for member of Parliament. Now, is that because we weren't electing enough people for this to become an issue? Is it because there was such a disconnect that there was no need for it?

Can you help me just understand a little, Romeo, how we could get to the point? I'm like Scotty: 150 years to come up with a word that describes what a member of Parliament does, given that it's the foundation of our constitutional democracy...? Help me understand, Romeo. How did we get here?

(1240)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Well, it's for all of the reasons you've mentioned. It's also the fact that there was never a Cree from northern Quebec elected to Parliament—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

—so this was the first occasion to come up with a word.

In my career, I ended up in the Hockey Hall of Fame, and that wasn't because of my abilities as a hockey player, although I played hockey. Back in the 1980s when I was in law school, I had a second job as a radio host—in Cree. There was a project to do the play-by-play of a hockey game between the Montreal Canadiens and the Quebec Nordiques, and I participated in that project. One of the things we needed to do was to come up with words for “puck”—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Romeo Saganash: —and “referee”. Those were the kinds of things that did not exist. I carried that on throughout my career and did the same for legal terminology, and now I'm doing it for parliamentary business. It was a nice occasion to sit down with elders and explain what I do as a member of Parliament. Once they understood the concept, they proposed a couple of words. I think the best one was yimstimagesu.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On leaving this, were there other indigenous languages that had or have the same issue?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I wouldn't know.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, thanks. That just struck me.

You mentioned the example of New Zealand in your remarks, and of course we have the examples of NWT and Yukon. Are those examples that you would ask us to look at as potential models, or do you have others that you would suggest we look at in detail, particularly as we grapple with the fundamentals here?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

What I can do, Mr. Chair, is send you not only a written brief of my presentation and some references but also suggestions of other models you could look at.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That would be really helpful.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I think that would be important.

When I was coming back, I tried to find a case law or jurisprudence with respect to the interpretation of section 22 of the Constitution, because it does refer to other languages besides English and French. I haven't found jurisprudence about that yet, but I'll continue looking because, as I said, we need to read section 22 along with sections 25, 26, and 35 of our Constitution to determine that this right that I'm talking about, to speak Cree in Parliament, is a constitutional right. It is a human right as well, and I think that's where we need to go in moving forward with this question.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks.

I'll say one last thing, and I don't expect you to have an answer to this, but you may know something about it, given the interpretation.

I think that at some point, Chair and colleagues, we're going to need to take a look at where we're going to be in the very near future in terms of simultaneous interpretation as it relates to AI. I don't know about others here, but I'm sure you're doing the same, reading and trying to get a sense of where things are and what the issues are that we need to grapple with.

There are those who suggest that within a very short period of time, AI will be such that you could actually almost have an earpiece and be talking to someone and have instantaneous interpretation. Are you familiar with this at all?

No? Okay. But I think it is something that we need to look at, because parliaments will exist for a long time and AI is going to have a major impact.

Romeo, thank you again, sir. I hope that we can call upon you at any time as we continue our deliberations.

(1245)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Sure.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Thank you.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Meegwetch.

Now we'll go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you for being here today, Mr. Saganash. I appreciate all the work you've being doing. I think we're truly blessed to have you as a member of Parliament so that you can help us forward this agenda and move towards a move inclusive Parliament.

After the testimony that we had from the clerk, I can't help but feel that in this case I would hate for perfect to become the enemy of the good. We're trying to progress, and we're trying to make sure that you who have the right to speak in your native language get to exercise that right and that others who have come before you or will come after you also get to do the same.

You were saying that there are about 10 members of Parliament currently who may or may not fluently speak an indigenous language. What languages are those?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

There's certainly Dene. My colleague, MP Jolibois speaks her language, which is Dene. When Robert-Falcon Ouellette spoke Cree, that led us to this room today. He spoke in five Cree dialects.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What are the most spoken indigenous languages today?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Cree.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Cree is the most spoken?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

There is Cree in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, North Dakota, and Montana.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. I was just sitting here thinking also—

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

That's about 450,000 people.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—that there have also been witnesses before committees and other members of Parliament who have served throughout the years who may not have English or French as their first language. Therefore, sometimes in speaking those languages, they make mistakes. Sometimes we have to understand through context what they are trying to say, so the accuracy we were talking about earlier, which we may lose through a relay.

I'm sure those people are sometimes silenced, but we wouldn't want to silence people who don't speak English or French as their first language. If we are not able to find anyone to interpret certain languages, but have to rely on relaying the language into French or into English, would you say that is still satisfactory for us to move forward with this? Could we just accept that loss of maybe a couple of words that we'll then be able to figure out in the context of the whole speech as given?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Having recognized what you just said, if we do recognize that, I think it's a problem that we can deal with. Let's say my mom got elected in 2019. She only speaks Cree. With her budget as an MP, she could certainly hire her boy to translate. Well, she wouldn't be allowed to do that, but I could certainly help her write in English what she would tell me.

She's one of the better Cree speakers in our world. I spoke that language for the first seven years of my life, before being taken away to a residential school, and she taught me that language. That's why, although they tried to take away my language in the residential school for 10 years, the roots of my spoken language, my spoken Cree, were so strong. It was because of her. That's why it never disappeared.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are there any official training classes for Cree, or is it all passed down through the family?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Absolutely there are. There's even an application for it right now. I know of two applications that you can look up and download. You can type in any English word or French word, and—

(1250)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are there training classes for interpreters?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Really. Okay.

There must be some languages that they don't have training for. I feel like sometimes we're trying to put the cart before the horse. Perhaps if we were to allow for these languages to be spoken, and the need for translation to be there that quickly, we would get to a point where people would be interested in taking formal classes. We would figure out a way to get to the perfect eventually. That's basically what I'm trying to get at.

In closing, I just want to return to what my colleague David Graham was kind of asking about. In our first step, what do you feel, as an advocate for your language, would be a satisfactory place to start? I think simultaneous translation would be great. AI might be able to help down the road, but at this step and this juncture, what do you think would be satisfactory for us to start?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I think the first immediate step is to make sure that the space and the technology exist in the House, in Parliament, to allow for that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kind of technology?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I would have preferred Priscilla being in that room rather than being at the back—that kind of thing.

I want to add one thing about indigenous languages, following your comments. I've attended Assembly of First Nations meetings over the last 30 years. I've seen standing ovations for politicians many times in those assemblies. The biggest one I ever saw was when the Prime Minister announced that there would be an indigenous languages act. He got a rousing standing ovation for that announcement.

So if you're serious about protecting and revitalizing indigenous languages in this country, well, let's move forward. I don't know what the content of Minister Joly's legislation will be. Much to my surprise, I haven't been consulted on the preparation or development of the legislation, unfortunately. I don't know if what we're trying to do here could be included in that legislation. I don't know. I haven't seen what's in the works at that end.

I'm hoping that we can deliver on this, because it's dangerous to abuse the trust of people. I think we're at a period of time, after 150 years, when we're no longer allowed to abuse the trust of indigenous peoples.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you. Nakurmiik.

Mr. Nater, please.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Just following up on the indigenous languages legislation, do you have any idea, or have you been given any notice, of when that legislation might be forthcoming?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I have no idea. As I said, I haven't been consulted. I have seen what Senator Joyal is proposing. That's basically programs and so on. If we want something meaningful, then we need to include meaningful stuff in it. But I haven't been consulted, so—

Mr. John Nater:

You'd be ready and willing to offer—

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Of course.

Mr. John Nater:

—as well as I'm sure other members of Parliament, and certainly across the country. I appreciate that.

You talked earlier about creating words for hockey and things like that, and words for Parliament as well. Is there a formalized process in which some of these words are created or is it a traditional practice with community members and elders, or is it an as needed type of thing? How does the language develop? Is it developed naturally or is there a process as well?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Our institutions are the elders; they're the speakers. I think that's the main area or source for the development of language. It takes time because you need to sit down with them, explain what you want in a word, explain the concept. Once they get it, they sometimes come up with four or five words that would fit. It's up to them to determine exactly which is better.

(1255)

Mr. John Nater:

It's within the community.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

It's a collaborative, I guess. I find that fascinating.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

We had a Cree language commission for some time, but it doesn't exist anymore.

Mr. John Nater:

Would the people who were involved with that still be active, so that we could potentially hear from them as future witnesses?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I think so, yes.

Mr. John Nater:

That's excellent.

That leads into my next question. You mentioned that the Cree Nation Government deliberates almost entirely, if not entirely, in Cree. Are there translation services for that into either English or French, or is it exclusively done in Cree?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

That's the reason the Cree language is so strong today, because all of our deliberations are in Cree. The younger generation is compelled to maintain that language because of that. Only the regional government, which is composed of 11 Cree and 11 non-Crees, translates English, French, and Cree.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, they're not on our list of potential witnesses right now, but perhaps that's a group we could consider inviting in future.

I want to conclude by thanking you for joining us and for your comment earlier about attempting to have your language taken away from you during the terrible residential schools in our history and for advocating and being a voice for the language. I think it's very meaningful.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

After 10 years in residential school, I promised myself two things: One was to go back into the bush, which I did for two years. The other was that I was determined to reconcile with the people who put me away for 10 years, and this is another attempt at doing that. Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In my family my great-grandfather is known to have spoken Cree and Ojibwa as well as English and French. He wasn't indigenous. It was the language of trade at the time. It was a bit of a shock. Growing up I learned that it was perfectly normal a few generations ago for the white man to learn these languages, and I can only presume it was deliberately lost.

I think that what you're bringing forward is very important and I'm completely sold on the need to get there. But the first thing I want to focus on is the logistics. How we do it, until Douglas Adams gets his dream of giving the Babel fish to all of us?

On that basis, what's a reasonable notification period? How much time is needed? You talked at the beginning about being perfectly fine with notifying the House about your intent to speak in a different language.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It depends on where the interpreters are. That's the complicated variable here. If I have a question tomorrow morning, giving notice to you today is perfectly fine.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think the right to speak exists already. We want to find the right to be understood, which I think is the more important one. I think we ought to make that distinction.

Earlier, I mentioned to the clerks—I don't know if you were here in the room at the time—that I believe it's important that when someone speaks in an indigenous language in the House—and I think this should apply to all indigenous languages—that Hansard eventually can translate that and have an affirmative record without your having to provide it to them. I think that's reasonable.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It should at least be when it's printed at the end of the Parliament. I don't know if you agree with that comment or how you see the written records.

Do you have comments to add to that?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It wouldn't be available in the next 24 hours—that's for sure—but it's doable easily.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We note in this room right now that we have translation from Cree, but not to Cree. Is that part of this? Are we getting all proceedings of the House? Does that apply at committee as well? Is it from and to, or just from? How do you see that?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

That's a choice we will need to consider. In order to accommodate the House of Commons, I wouldn't ask for English to Cree translation. In terms of give and take, I will allow that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We mentioned there are 56 or so languages in the country. Which ones do we look at including? Which ones do we not look at including? Where do you draw those lines?

(1300)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I don't think there should be any exclusion. My constitutional right to speak applies in the very same manner to every other language in this country.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

I want to see if I got this right when I say yimstimagesu.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I have it here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

He has it even better.

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sorry to steal your time.

Priscilla was kind enough to give me the spelling and the pronunciation if anybody wants to write this down. It's yimstimagesu.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Yes, yimstimagesu.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. So it's pronounced, “yum-shta-ma-jeh-suu”.

Thank you, Priscilla.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do I have any time left?

The Chair:

Not really, but go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

First, what about remote interpretation? Would that be something you would consider acceptable? If we couldn't get somebody here, could we do a remote interpretation?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Yes, if it's possible.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

The second thing is probably hard to envision. The day you're able to stand up in the House of Commons and speak in Cree and have that interpreted, what is it going to feel like for you and your constituents, while you represent them?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It won't be only me.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It will be for all indigenous people. It will be all for Canadians as a matter of fact, all of us. This is going to be a victory for all of us, not just me.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Mr. Romeo Saganash: In that sense, it's going to be, of course, a historic moment, but I think it's going to be a victory for Canada.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Very good. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chair, just before you bring us to a conclusion, there was a reference to the Cree Language Commission. Could I just ask the researchers to give us a little background on that? That may prove helpful.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, yimstimagesu, for coming here.

I also thank Priscilla Bossum, the interpreter, for coming today. This is historic translation.

Thank you to all the committee members for this excellent exercise.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. Bonjour et bienvenue à cette 93e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Conformément au mandat du Comité, soit examiner les procédures et pratiques de la Chambre et de ses comités et en faire rapport, nous amorçons aujourd'hui une étude sur l'utilisation potentielle des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Les membres se souviendront que le 20 juin 2017, le Président a tranché sur une question de privilège soulevée lors de la séance précédente par le député de Winnipeg-Centre concernant les services d'interprétation simultanée offerts aux députés qui ont recours aux langues autochtones à la Chambre. Même si le Président a jugé qu'à première vue la question de privilège n'était pas fondée, il a proposé que le Comité étudie la possibilité d'étudier la question.

À cette fin, nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre des communes, et André Gagnon, sous-greffier, Procédure.

Merci à vous deux d'avoir accepté notre invitation.

À titre de précision technique, c'est Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada qui fournit ces services, à la fois la traduction et la documentation. Nous accueillerons plus tard des représentants du ministère qui pourront répondre aux questions techniques qu'auront les membres après avoir entendu les témoignages. Les parties ont fourni une liste importante de témoins. Donc, les discussions devraient être très intéressantes.

Monsieur le greffier, nous vous laissons la parole pour votre exposé. Merci d'avoir accepté notre invitation. Je sais que vous aurez un horaire chargé. Donc, nous vous sommes très reconnaissants d'avoir accepté de comparaître aujourd'hui.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui et je tiens à remercier le Comité de m'avoir invité à comparaître pour parler de l'utilisation des langues autochtones à la Chambre des communes.

Le droit des députés de s'adresser à la Chambre en français ou en anglais est garanti par l'article 133 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867. L'interprétation simultanée existe à la Chambre depuis janvier 1959 et permet à tous les députés de comprendre ce qui est dit à la Chambre des communes, que ce soit en français ou en anglais.

Au fil des ans, divers députés se sont aussi adressés à la Chambre dans d'autres langues. La question s'est alors posée à savoir comment ces interventions pourraient être comprises de l'ensemble des députés de la Chambre et des gens dans leurs foyers. La plupart du temps, ces interventions se sont limitées à quelques mots prononcés dans le cadre des Déclarations de députés.

Même si l'interprétation simultanée en anglais ou en français sur le parquet de la Chambre ne peut être offerte dans ces cas, une note est ajoutée dans les Débats pour expliquer que le député a parlé dans une autre langue. Si une version traduite des remarques est fournie à la Direction des publications parlementaires pendant les Déclarations de députés, celle-ci sera également consignée. Par exemple, on lira dans les Débats: « Le député s'exprime en cri et fournit le texte suivant: », suivi du texte traduit de la déclaration.[Français]

Des députés ont choisi de parler une autre langue à d'autres moments, notamment pendant le débat sur un projet de loi ou sur une motion, ou même pendant les questions orales. Lorsqu'un député parle dans une langue autre que l'anglais ou le français, en dehors des déclarations des députés, on ajoute une note dans les Débats de la Chambre des communes indiquant la langue, sans ajouter la traduction, de la façon suivante: « [Le député s'exprime en cri.] ».

Pour faciliter la compréhension de tout ce qui est dit à la Chambre, le Président encourage généralement les députés à répéter leurs observations dans l'une des deux langues officielles, afin qu'elles soient traduites par les interprètes. Ainsi, les interventions sont consignées dans les Débats de la Chambre des communes.

En réponse à une question de privilège soulevée par le député de Winnipeg-Centre M. Ouellette, le Président Regan a réitéré, le 20 juin 2017, que: [...] étant donné que les moyens techniques et l'espace nécessaires à l'interprétation sont limités, les députés qui souhaitent que leurs interventions prononcées dans une autre langue que le français ou l'anglais soient comprises par ceux qui suivent les délibérations et qu'elles soient consignées dans les Débats de la Chambre des communes doivent faire un effort supplémentaire. Plus précisément, les députés doivent répéter leurs observations dans l'une ou l'autre des deux langues officielles, afin que les interprètes puissent les traduire et que les observations soient consignées dans les Débats de la Chambre des communes dans leur intégralité. Ainsi, tous les députés et les membres du public pourront pleinement apprécier la richesse de ces interventions.

Je reconnais qu'aller plus loin et appuyer davantage l'usage d'autres langues soulèvent des considérations importantes du point de vue de la capacité technique et physique, de l'expertise linguistique et des besoins en informatique, qu'il faudrait bien entendu étudier à fond.[Traduction]

Nous pourrions certes nous inspirer de l'expérience d'autres assemblées législatives, mais il est important de reconnaître le caractère unique de chaque contexte afin de comprendre les possibilités réelles pour la Chambre des communes. Il convient de souligner la récente expérience du Sénat, puisque les défis pratiques sont probablement semblables à ceux auxquels la Chambre serait confrontée si elle décidait d'appuyer l'utilisation d'autres langues dans ses délibérations, notamment l'embauche d'interprètes qualifiés, sans compter les limites logistiques et techniques.

Peu importe la décision relative à l'inclusion d'autres langues dans les délibérations de la Chambre, l'Administration fera le nécessaire pour vous aider dans vos discussions et mettre en oeuvre vos décisions.

Cela dit, je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions avec l'aide d'André Gagnon.

(1110)

[Français]

Le président:

Merci.[Traduction]

Masi cho. Gunalchéesh. Sóga senlá.

Je tiens à préciser aux membres du Comité que plusieurs députés et sénateurs viendront témoigner. Nous accueillerons également plusieurs organisations de traduction et assemblées législatives du Canada et de partout dans le monde qui utilisent des langues différentes. Donc, nous serons exposés à différents modèles.

Nous allons maintenant amorcer notre première série de questions.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci à vous deux d'avoir accepté notre invitation.

Je dirais premièrement que de par leur nature, les députés sont considérés comme des gens honorables. Donc, qu'est-ce qui les empêche de fournir une traduction aux interprètes que ceux-ci pourraient utiliser le moment venu? Si je ne m'abuse, lorsque le député de Winnipeg Centre a amorcé son intervention, c'était son intention, soit de fournir le texte en anglais et en français aux interprètes, mais il n'allait pas s'exprimer dans l'une de ces langues.

M. André Gagnon (sous-greffier, Procédure):

Vous vous souviendrez, monsieur Graham, que ce genre de situation survient lorsque des députés font une déclaration à la Chambre. Ils fournissent le texte pour le hansard, mais pas aux fins d'interprétation.

Vous pourrez certainement poser la question aux services d'interprétation, mais, selon ce que nous avons pu comprendre, les interprètes ne sont pas en mesure de qualifier ou, à tout le moins, de définir la qualité de l'interprétation qui leur est fournie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je veux dire. Les députés sont considérés comme des gens honorables. Donc, nous pouvons présumer que le texte qu'ils fournissent est en réalité exact. N'est-ce pas?

M. André Gagnon:

Ce serait à la Chambre d'en décider.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois. D'accord.

Vous avez parlé, vers la fin de votre exposé, de l'expérience du Sénat. Pourriez-vous nous fournir un peu plus de détail sur votre point de vue par rapport à l'expérience du Sénat, puisque, j'imagine, vous y avez participé?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui. D'ailleurs, c'est moi qui étais responsable de cette expérience. À l'époque, j'étais le greffier principal de la Chambre et de la procédure. Le Sénat a convenu de mener une expérience et d'utiliser l'Inuktitut. Des sénateurs s'exprimaient dans cette langue et il a été reconnu que nous devrions respecter leur langue maternelle et leur permettre de l'utiliser au Sénat.

Dans le cadre de ce programme, nous avons demandé aux sénateurs de fournir un préavis. Le but n'était pas de les décourager, mais de travailler avec les services d'interprétation afin de trouver quelqu'un, à Ottawa, capable de fournir l'interprétation de l'Inuktitut vers l'anglais. Nous n'avions pas cette capacité vers le français.

Les sénateurs Willie Adams et Charlie Watt se sont prévalus de cette option. En ce sens qu'on les a encouragés à utiliser leur langue, l'expérience a été raisonnablement réussie, mais l'exercice demandait toujours beaucoup de préparation et un long préavis. Si nous n'étions pas en mesure de retenir les services d'un interprète, soit l'intervention était repoussée, soit nous expliquions aux sénateurs concernés que nous ne pouvions pas fournir le service d'interprétation espéré.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous dites que ce service ne pouvait être offert que vers l'anglais. N'aurait-il pas été possible de fournir une interprétation à relais vers le français?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, mais cela représente un défi en soi que les interprètes pourront vous expliquer. Lorsque l'on passe d'une langue à l'autre, il y a toujours une perte. C'est une peu, disons, comme la caverne de Plato: elle devient de moins en moins profonde. Si vous passez de l'Inuktitut vers l'anglais, puis vers le français, cette perte est deux fois plus importante.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous dites qu'il y avait une période de préavis. Quelle était-elle?

M. Charles Robert:

À l'époque, nous avions demandé un préavis de cinq jours. Encore une fois, c'est parce que nous devions retenir les services de l'interprète.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans quelle mesure est-ce difficile de trouver ces interprètes? Y a-t-il des entreprises dans la région qui fournissent des interprètes sur appel? Par exemple, si nous devions institutionnaliser ces services, pourrions-nous obtenir en l'espace de 24 heures des interprètes dans une variété de langues?

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois que ce serait beaucoup plus facile s'il s'agissait de langues étrangères couramment parlées. J'ignore à quel point il serait difficile — ou même facile, pour adopter une perspective plus positive — de trouver des interprètes dans des langues autochtones. Il est plus probable que ce soit plus facile avec les langues populaires. En fait, nous avons eu de la difficulté à trouver des interprètes pour l'inuktitut, pas nécessairement en raison du peu de députés qui s'expriment dans la langue, mais simplement parce qu'ils n'habitent pas à Ottawa.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Avec la technologie d'aujourd'hui, ne serait-il pas possible d'interpréter à distance?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est certainement une option à étudier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Sur le plan de la logistique, serait-il facile d'ajouter un interprète à la Chambre, dans la nouvelle Chambre du bloc de l'Ouest ou dans la future Chambre dans l'édifice du Centre?

M. Charles Robert:

André aurait peut-être plus d'information à vous fournir à ce sujet, mais je crois qu'il y aura plus de souplesse à cet égard dans la nouvelle Chambre de l'édifice de l'Ouest que dans la Chambre actuelle. À mon avis, les cabines d'interprétation sont comme des cabines téléphoniques placées dans le coin de la Chambre. Elles ne me paraissent pas très spacieuses. Je ne crois pas que les interprètes les aiment beaucoup, mais ils les tolèrent. Si l'on devait ajouter une autre personne dans la cabine, je crois que l'on commencerait à parler du trou noir de Calcutta.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(1115)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y aura-t-il des cabines supplémentaires dans la Chambre de l'édifice de l'Ouest?

M. André Gagnon:

Oui. Il y aura une troisième cabine dans la Chambre des communes, pour les délibérations de la Chambre. Elle ne sera pas située dans la pièce comme les deux autres, mais, oui, il y aura une troisième cabine. Pour les comités, nous aurons recours à la même solution que nous utilisons aujourd'hui, soit d'avoir des cabines supplémentaires dans la pièce.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit plus tôt que la traduction est fournie aux fins du Hansard. Cette pratique existe déjà, n'est-ce pas?

M. Charles Robert:

Seulement s'il y a un interprète pour la langue concernée. La langue étrangère parlée ne figurera pas nécessairement dans le Hansard. L'intégrité de l'anglais et du français serait maintenue dans la version correspondante du Hansard. Il y aurait simplement une note pour signifier qu'un député s'est exprimé dans une troisième langue. Je crois que la troisième langue serait entendue uniquement dans l'audio des délibérations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Maintenant, si je ne m'abuse, le Hansard lui-même n'est pas techniquement publié avant que le Parlement soit dissous, n'est-ce pas? La version définitive est publiée à la fin...?

M. Charles Robert:

Il s'agit de la version éditée. Une version quotidienne est publiée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-il réaliste de penser que la version éditée ne serait pas traduite par le député qui s'exprime, mais qu'à tout moment où un député s'exprime dans une langue autochtone — et ceci serait limité aux langues autochtones parlées à la Chambre —, un traducteur professionnel se chargerait de traduire les propos du député pour le Hansard, plutôt que de demander au député concerné de fournir une traduction? Est-ce réaliste?

M. Charles Robert:

Je vais laisser André vous en parler, mais je présume que si la Chambre a pris cette décision, elle devra vivre avec la possibilité d'un retard dans la publication du hansard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai posé la question sur la publication en fin de session.

M. André Gagnon:

C'est une bonne question, monsieur Graham. Comme vous le savez, lorsque nous discutons des déclarations aux termes de l'article 31, des déclarations de députés, l'intervenant fait une déclaration, qui est consignée au compte rendu et qui peut être ajoutée subséquemment.

Le problème — et il appartient au Comité de décider de ce qu'il veut faire —, c'est si, pendant la période des questions, par exemple, ou durant un débat, une personne fait une déclaration dans une langue qui n'est pas connue de l'autre personne ou qui ne peut pas être interprétée immédiatement. Vous êtes alors dans un trou noir en quelque sorte.

Imaginez ce qui se passe par la suite, où cette intervention serait incluse dans les Débats par après ou quelques jours plus tard. Il est difficile de voir comment, dans les Débats, il y aurait une continuité entre l'intervention faite par le député et l'autre député, qui n'a pas répondu du tout aux observations formulées, parce qu'il n'était pas en mesure de le faire. C'est pourquoi, au fil des ans, aux services d'interprétation et au hansard, on le fait principalement dans les déclarations des députés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je pense qu'il ne me reste plus de temps.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je peux, peut-être, commencer par revenir à la façon dont on règle les affaires au Sénat. Je pense que j'ai raison de dire que le Règlement du Sénat a été reformulé précisément pour autoriser l'utilisation de l'inuktitut dans certaines circonstances restreintes. Je pense que c'est exact.

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois que vous avez raison.

M. Scott Reid:

Aucune autre langue autochtone?

M. Charles Robert:

Pas pour le moment, non.

M. Scott Reid:

L'approche que vous avez adoptée était essentiellement de dire que nous interviendrons lorsque la demande est faite. J'imagine que c'est la façon la plus facile de résumer la situation.

M. Charles Robert:

En fait, il y avait à l'époque d'autres sénateurs autochtones qui parlaient des langues autres que l'inuktitut. Nous avions un sénateur qui parlait le salish et un autre qui parlait le montagnais. C'était une expérience. Il y avait un projet pilote. Il y avait une entente pour voir comment nous pourrions gérer cette situation. Là encore, en raison de la technologie et des contraintes d'espace, nous voulions voir si nous pourrions ou non gérer cette situation au Sénat.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit avoir du mal à trouver des traducteurs pour traduire vers l'inuktitut et de l'inuktitut vers une autre langue. J'imagine que c'était seulement de l'inuktitut vers une autre langue. N'est-ce pas?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est exact. C'était de l'inuktitut vers l'anglais. Je ne crois pas que nous ayons eu du mal à trouver une personne pour traduire vers l'inuktitut, car les sénateurs maîtrisaient l'anglais, alors ce n'était pas vraiment nécessaire.

M. Scott Reid:

Exactement. Ottawa est l'endroit où il y a des vols aller-retour en partance et à destination d'Iqaluit, la capitale du Nunavut et, par conséquent, si l'on compare aux villes canadiennes, nous avons un bassin beaucoup plus important de personnes qui parlent l'inuktitut ici qu'ailleurs au pays. Lorsque vous parlez une langue comme le salish, j'imagine que ce n'est pas autant le cas.

(1120)

M. Charles Robert:

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

Et il en va de même pour de nombreuses autres langues. Je m'interroge au sujet des considérations pratiques que nous devrons prendre en compte. D'une part, il me semble que vous étiez en mesure de présenter au Sénat le projet pilote sur l'inuktitut, car vous aviez le consentement des gens qui parlent le montagnais et le salish. Ils n'ont pas dit que ce projet semblait inéquitable pour eux. Ils comprenaient que nous mettions à l'essai un projet qui ne crée pas une hiérarchie parmi les langues.

La question que je veux poser essentiellement — et c'est peut-être une question injuste à poser à une personne qui occupe ce poste — est la suivante: comment pouvons-nous éviter de créer cette hiérarchie où les langues les plus couramment parlées et celles qui sont « locales », et j'ouvre les guillemets ici, mais vous comprenez ce que je veux dire...? Comment évitons-nous cette hiérarchie?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que vous devez collaborer avec les services d'interprétation et vous faire une idée de la disponibilité des personnes qui pourraient être disposées à offrir des services d'interprétation dans une langue donnée. Comme M. Graham l'a souligné, il y a toujours la possibilité d'essayer de le faire à partir d'un emplacement éloigné. Cette solution présente son lot de défis, mais elle peut réduire la période de préavis que nous avions au Sénat si les services d'interprétation disent que c'est une option viable.

M. André Gagnon:

Monsieur Reid, si je peux ajouter quelque chose, je passais en revue mes notes, et l'une des assemblées au Canada a relevé, je pense, neuf langues autochtones, et elle a décidé de faire une rotation pour que ce soit une langue par semaine.

Le président:

C'est dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, oui. Ils ont trois langues officielles au Nunavut: le français, l'anglais et l'inuktitut.

Le président:

Ils ont également les langues inuites; il y en a deux en fait.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, c'est exact.

Le président:

C'est quatre au total.

M. Scott Reid:

Quelle est la situation au Yukon?

Le président:

Ce ne sont pas des langues officielles, mais le territoire prend des dispositions. C'est dans le rapport de recherche que vous avez. Tout le monde a reçu un rapport qui décrit la situation dans d'autres instances, et au Yukon, il y a des dispositions, mais ce n'est pas une langue officielle. Elle n'est pas très utilisée. [Français]

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais poser une autre question à propos des deux langues officielles.

Si l'anglais est utilisé comme langue intermédiaire lorsqu'on traduit de l'inuktitut en français, ne créons-nous pas une situation où on n'accorde pas la même importance aux deux langues officielles?

Dans ce cas, l'anglais ne sera-t-il pas vu comme étant un peu supérieur au français?

M. Charles Robert:

Justement, j'ai parlé de cette possibilité quand j'ai répondu à la question de M. Graham. Oui, il y a là un risque, mais ce sont vraiment les interprètes qui peuvent vous informer de l'importance de ce risque et de la façon dont il peut être géré. [Traduction]

M. Scott Reid:

J'allais faire une dernière observation. C'est plus une observation qu'une question. En ce qui concerne les langues relais, j'ai trouvé votre analogie avec la caverne de Platon intéressante. Vous êtes plus érudit que moi. Je croyais que c'était davantage comme le jeu du téléphone auquel se prêtent les enfants, où ils sont tous assis en cercle, ou comme l'utilisation de Google Translate pour passer d'une langue à une autre. Quelqu'un a utilisé la rime célèbre de Dorothy Parker, « Les hommes draguent rarement les filles qui portent des lunettes » et l'a traduite à l'aide de cet outil — en portugais, je crois —, pour ensuite la retraduire en anglais, ce qui a donné ceci: « Les navires qui transportent des hommes n'arrêtent pas aux icebergs qui transportent des femmes. »

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Je pense que c'est une question légitime.

Il y a aussi la question pratique où, si vous vous lancez dans un débat — par opposition à une déclaration d'un député en vertu de l'article 31 du Règlement —, si une langue relais est utilisée, il n'est alors plus possible d'avoir une interprétation simultanée. Il y aura un délai. À l'occasion, lorsque j'ai présidé des audiences au Sous-comité des droits internationaux de la personne, lorsque nous avions un témoin qui s'adressait à nous dans une langue non officielle comme le farsi, cela ralentissait énormément le processus. Avez-vous songé à la façon de gérer cette question pratique particulière?

(1125)

M. Charles Robert:

En fait, c'est un véritable problème, mais je pense que ceux qui pourraient vous éclairer le mieux à ce sujet seraient les interprètes. Ce sont eux qui doivent essayer de travailler avec les langues et d'offrir aux députés le meilleur service possible. Je sais que lorsque la question était à l'étude au Sénat, nous avons pris en considération leurs préférences du mieux que nous le pouvions, même si André a dit qu'à l'emplacement de la nouvelle chambre, l'interprétation de la troisième langue — et je vais utiliser les termes de M. Graham — se fera à partir d'un site éloigné. Les interprètes détestent cela.

M. Scott Reid:

Absolument.

M. Charles Robert:

Ils n'ont pas l'impression qu'ils peuvent offrir le meilleur service possible lorsqu'ils sont dans cette situation. Ils tireront le meilleur parti possible de l'environnement qu'on leur offre, mais ils vous avertiront qu'ils ne pourront pas faire du mieux qu'ils peuvent.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

On mentionne le mot « temps » pour communiquer le message; il faut plus de temps. Nous devons penser au temps nécessaire dans la solution que nous adopterons.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous deux d'être ici.

Je dois dire que c'est un projet intéressant. J'avais très hâte de l'examiner. Le Canada est encore un travail inachevé, un travail en cours, et cela fait partie de l'édification du pays. Cela en dit long sur l'importance du rapport de la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation, et je le mentionne, car le gouvernement est résolu à mettre en oeuvre chacune de ces recommandations.

Je tiens à souligner qu'à la page 321, sous la rubrique « Langue et culture », au numéro 14, la commission exhorte le gouvernement fédéral à adopter une loi sur les langues autochtones qui incorpore les principes suivants: i. les langues autochtones représentent une composante fondamentale et valorisée de la culture et de la société canadiennes, et il y a urgence de les préserver [...] iii. le gouvernement fédéral a la responsabilité de fournir des fonds suffisants pour la revitalisation et la préservation des langues autochtones [...] v. le financement accordé pour les besoins des initiatives liées aux langues autochtones doit refléter la diversité de ces langues.

C'est intéressant, et je vais en saisir mes collègues. Ce peut être un point de départ pour aborder cette promesse, puisque je considère l'édification du pays comme étant un dossier qui doit être prioritaire pour nous tous. Au numéro 15, la commission déclare ceci dans son rapport: Nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral de nommer, à la suite de consultations avec les groupes autochtones, un commissaire aux langues autochtones. Plus précisément, nous demandons que ce commissaire soit chargé de contribuer à la promotion des langues autochtones et de présenter des comptes rendus sur l'efficacité du financement fédéral destiné aux initiatives liées aux langues autochtones.

Il serait peut-être possible d'utiliser ces requêtes pour commencer à respecter cette promesse, puisqu'il y a évidemment des liens.

Cela étant dit, je n'ai pas beaucoup de questions. Je sais que nous devons commencer à élaborer votre cadre, mais j'aimerais savoir, en dépit des remarques que vous avez faites, ce que vous estimez être le plus gros défi administratif pour les députés qui veulent créer ce cadre. Quel est le plus grand défi?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que j'y ai fait allusion. C'est le concept des conséquences imprévues qui risque d'être considéré comme étant un effort de bonne foi d'incorporer une troisième langue. Nous parlons dans le contexte des langues autochtones, monsieur Christopherson, et c'est la raison pour laquelle il faut les reconnaître. Elles font partie de l'identité canadienne et il faut en faire la promotion. Mais il y a d'autres sénateurs et membres qui voudraient peut-être parler dans une autre langue, et si nous ouvrons la porte, ils devraient avoir le même droit. Il ne devrait y avoir aucune discrimination.

Le problème, c'est lorsqu'on n'arrive pas à trouver un interprète qui peut travailler en français ou un interprète qui peut travailler en anglais. Pour incorporer la troisième langue, il faut avoir deux personnes si vous voulez vous assurer de ne pas compromettre, comme M. Reid l'a signalé, la communication du message et le temps de traitement.

Je ne pense pas que ce soit un défi insurmontable, mais je pense que ce comité pourrait négliger un élément qui pourrait devenir un problème grave s'il ne se penche pas sur cette situation et n'en prend pas conscience.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Je présume qu'il y a probablement des leçons à tirer d'autres pays qui sont passés par là.

(1130)

M. Charles Robert:

Oui. Je me rappelle avoir écouté une émission sur le Parlement européen et sur les 28 langues qui sont utilisées en Europe. Les interprètes avaient beaucoup de difficulté à trouver une personne qui pouvait traduire du danois vers le grec. Ils ont trouvé des interprètes pour toutes les autres langues, mais cette combinaison était problématique. Au final, je pense qu'il y avait quelque 500 combinaisons. En fait, pour le Parlement européen, c'est le poste de dépenses le plus important du budget dans le cadre de ses activités.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai assisté à une réunion du Conseil européen en tant que délégué, et le périmètre de la chambre du conseil est rempli d'interprètes.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est possible, car il réussit à trouver des interprètes qui peuvent traduire dans toutes les langues sans intermédiaire.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bien, monsieur le président. Toute autre question que je pourrais avoir sera destinée aux autres témoins.

Merci beaucoup, et bon travail.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous expliquer les détails techniques que doit régler le ministère qui s'occupe de ces services de traduction? Embauchez-vous les interprètes? Ces dépenses sont-elles prévues dans votre budget?

M. Charles Robert:

Il n'y a pas de budget, à tout le moins, pas lorsque je travaillais à ce dossier au Sénat. J'imagine qu'il en va de même à la Chambre. Nous avons un protocole d'entente, et les interprètes offrent le service. Ils traduisent un nombre incalculable de mots par année; ils produisent de nombreuses pages. C'est comme lorsque vous louez une voiture. Vous essayez d'évaluer le kilométrage que vous ferez pour éviter les paiements supplémentaires. Vous travaillez avec eux pour qu'ils puissent comprendre. S'ils doivent traduire tant de mots, nous devons embaucher tant d'interprètes. Nous devons établir le budget en conséquence. Ce sont les paramètres du protocole d'entente que nous établissons avec cette division de Travaux publics.

Le président:

C'est tiré de son budget.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

Le président:

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

Ai-je bien compris que l'édifice de l'Ouest a une cabine supplémentaire, mais qu'elle ne se trouve pas dans la chambre?

M. André Gagnon:

Pour la chambre, oui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Où est la cabine?

M. André Gagnon:

Je suis désolé; je n'ai pas cette information.

La cabine ne donne pas directement sur la Chambre. On installera probablement un écran pour permettre aux gens de voir la personne qui s'exprime à la Chambre.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Pourquoi a-t-on décidé d'aménager cette cabine, et quand cette décision a-t-elle été prise?

M. André Gagnon:

Je ne le sais pas, mais nous pouvons trouver la réponse pour vous.

M. Charles Robert:

Cela fait un certain temps, à mon avis. Je pense que les gens de Travaux publics et de l'Administration de la Chambre sont au courant de l'intérêt des députés pour l'utilisation d'autres langues que l'anglais et le français.

On a tenu compte de ce qui se passait au Sénat, où la télédiffusion des délibérations a été retardée. Le Sénat a peut-être agi plus rapidement que la Chambre pour permettre l'utilisation régulière de langues tierces.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Donc, vous avez prévu le coup et c'est pourquoi on a prévu l'aménagement d'une cabine supplémentaire, mais dont les détails restent à déterminer. Nous avons au moins prévu l'emplacement.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est ce que je pense.

M. André Gagnon:

Vous vous souvenez peut-être que dans le passé, des personnalités internationales ont prononcé un discours à la Chambre, et qu'il est arrivé fréquemment qu'ils parlent une langue tierce.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

En ce qui concerne les problèmes et les défis que vous avez connus au Sénat, il s'agit d'une bonne expérience qui vous permet de répondre à nos questions aujourd'hui.

Vous avez parlé d'offrir ce service, mais en évoquant la possibilité qu'il ne puisse être offert à temps. Que fait-on au Sénat dans de tels cas? Par exemple, une personne doit prononcer un discours et vous apprenez soudainement que l'interprétation ne peut être offerte. Cette personne devrait-elle céder son tour? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il?

M. Charles Robert:

C'était un projet pilote, une initiative menée de bonne foi. Les sénateurs qui ont participé ont collaboré et fait preuve de compréhension. Le véritable problème se trouve ailleurs. Dans le cas du français et de l'anglais, nous comptons sur un effectif hautement qualifié et compétent. Le français et l'anglais sont les langues officielles; la formation en interprétation et en traduction dans ces langues se fait à l'université. Sommes-nous certains qu'une formation de haut niveau pourra aussi être offerte pour former des interprètes dans les quelque 40 langues autochtones parlées au pays?

(1135)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

La Chambre a-t-elle cherché à savoir si ces ressources existent?

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, cela relève essentiellement de Travaux publics et non de nous.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien.

M. Charles Robert:

Je me rappelle bien l'histoire, lorsque le pays a pris un engagement accru à l'égard des langues officielles, le gouvernement fédéral a appuyé l'établissement de programmes de formation en interprétation adéquats par l'intermédiaire du financement des universités.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien.

En ce qui concerne la langue qui a été choisie pour le Sénat, vous avez indiqué que c'était la langue autochtone parlée par...

M. Charles Robert:

Nous avions deux sénateurs du Nord qui parlaient l'inuktitut, les sénateurs Watt et Adams.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Étant donné votre expérience avec ces deux sénateurs, quel modèle nous recommanderiez-vous pour le choix des langues si la Chambre des communes souhaitait agir en ce sens?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que vous devrez d'abord discuter avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada pour connaître l'effectif disponible et définir les modalités. Nous savons que M. Ouellette souhaite vraiment avoir l'occasion de parler en cri. Vous voudrez certainement le consulter. D'autres pourraient vouloir utiliser une langue tierce, pas nécessairement une langue autochtone. Vous pourriez examiner la question pour voir ce qui est réalisable et sensé.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien. Donc, nous pourrions faire un sondage auprès des députés pour savoir quelle langue ils souhaiteraient utiliser à la Chambre. On s'entend que nous parlons ici de langues autochtones.

J'ai aimé votre analogie avec le kilométrage d'une voiture. Pouvez-vous nous donner un ordre de grandeur des coûts de l'essai réalisé au Sénat? Combien cela a-t-il coûté?

M. Charles Robert:

Je ne me rappelle pas avoir vu le montant des coûts, car nous n'avons pas dépassé la limite établie par négociation.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

M. Charles Robert:

En fait, les coûts sont assumés par le ministère et, puisqu'il s'était engagé à offrir le service, les négociations ont toujours été fructueuses et tournées vers le même objectif. Il s'agissait d'avoir une compréhension mutuelle, de satisfaire aux besoins et de fournir une qualité de service acceptable pour le ministère.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Quelles seraient vos recommandations, si nous choisissions d'aller de l'avant? J'ai trouvé intéressant que vous souligniez la grande souplesse dont les sénateurs ont fait preuve, étant donné qu'il s'agissait d'un essai. Quelles seraient vos suggestions pour la Chambre des communes, si nous choisissions d'aller de l'avant?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que vous aurez une bonne idée des options qui s'offrent réellement à vous après avoir discuté avec d'autres. Par exemple, les députés pourront vous dire à quel point ils tiennent à s'exprimer dans leur langue maternelle, et le ministère pourra vous informer de ses capacités actuelles pour fournir ces services et des perspectives d'avenir à cet égard, si la Chambre souhaite vraiment aller dans cette direction. Je suppose que vous pourriez établir un calendrier pour tenir compte des besoins de ces députés.

Je vous dirais que la solution que l'on examine actuellement est une proposition très progressiste qui vise à refléter un respect manifeste. Cette solution doit être significative et doit être mise en oeuvre correctement. Vous devez examiner avec soin quelles ressources vous sont offertes pour mettre cela en place.

Comme je l'ai mentionné à la fin de mon exposé, le personnel de l'Administration est déterminé à vous offrir toute l'aide possible. Si cela doit être mis en oeuvre, nous souhaitons, comme vous, que ce soit une réussite.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

La priorité est donc de veiller à faire les choses correctement.

(1140)

M. Charles Robert:

Permettez-moi d'être encore plus direct: nous ne voulons pas d'un autre Phénix.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh!

Le président:

Nous passons à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Gagnon, monsieur Robert, merci encore d'être avec nous ce matin. C'est toujours un plaisir d'accueillir le personnel du greffier pour obtenir des observations.

J'aimerais revenir brièvement sur une question de Mme Tassi sur la capacité des députés de parler une langue autochtone. Je sais que nous savons très bien quels députés peuvent parler les deux langues officielles. Dois-je supposer que nous ne savons pas vraiment, actuellement, quels députés — ou combien — peuvent parler une langue autochtone?

M. Charles Robert:

Puisque nous ne posons pas la question, je dirais que notre seule façon de le savoir, c'est lorsqu'un député insiste pour parler une langue donnée.

M. John Nater:

Très bien.

J'aimerais revenir quelque peu en arrière. Nous avons parlé de l'interprétation à distance. Cela ne plaît pas vraiment à nos interprètes, et je suis certain que cela s'accompagnerait de difficultés uniques. J'aimerais toutefois pousser la réflexion plus loin et parler de la question du privilège parlementaire, qui pourrait s'appliquer aux installations offrant des services d'interprétation à distance. M. Bosc a d'ailleurs abordé ce sujet au Comité dans le passé. J'espérais que vous pourriez nous fournir un contexte ou des observations sur l'application du privilège parlementaire pour un site à distance, site qui pourrait être dans la Cité parlementaire ou ailleurs, plus probablement. Le privilège parlementaire s'appliquerait-il toujours dans de tels cas?

M. André Gagnon:

C'est une question intéressante.

Étant donné que ces fonctions sont directement liées aux affaires de la Chambre, on pourrait faire valoir qu'elles seraient protégées par le privilège parlementaire. Lorsque le Comité se déplace à l'extérieur de la Cité parlementaire, à l'extérieur d'Ottawa, et se réunit ailleurs au pays, le privilège s'applique.

M. John Nater:

Très bien.

Partant de l'idée que le Sénat demande un service d'interprétation de l'inuktitut à l'anglais, on peut supposer que la difficulté serait liée à l'interprétation simultanée de l'anglais au français, à la Chambre des communes. Aux termes de la Loi sur les langues officielles, serait-il acceptable que l'interprétation se fasse uniquement vers l'une ou l'autre des deux langues officielles?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est à vous d'en décider. Vous pourriez consulter les interprètes chargés d'offrir ce service pour connaître le pourcentage perdu. Il vous reviendrait alors de déterminer si vous sortez de votre zone de confort et si le seuil vous semble acceptable ou non.

Je ne suis pas qualifié, et je ne pense pas qu'André le soit non plus. Nous préférons donc nous abstenir de répondre. Nous avons fait notre travail en soulevant la question et en attirant votre attention là-dessus.

M. John Nater:

J'ai siégé au Comité des langues officielles pendant environ un an et demi. D'après ce que j'ai entendu des interprètes professionnels, je sais qu'ils s'imposent des normes très élevées.

M. Charles Robert:

En effet.

M. John Nater:

Si je me fie à mon expérience ici, je suis toujours extrêmement impressionné de voir à quel point ils réussissent à interpréter les pensées que nous exprimons parfois maladroitement, et je leur en suis vraiment reconnaissant.

M. André Gagnon:

Il y a aussi la vitesse à laquelle M. Graham parle.

M. John Nater:

Nos amis interprètes battent certainement des records de vitesse de lecture. Je leur en suis reconnaissant.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous attendons l'interprétation par ordinateur.

M. John Nater:

Il me reste deux petites questions.

La première porte sur les recommandations que pourrait faire le Comité. Vous avez indiqué que vous aimeriez avoir la capacité de les mettre en oeuvre le mieux possible. À cet égard, seriez-vous prêts à revenir au Comité, vers la fin de notre étude, pour entendre certaines suggestions que nous aurions à ce moment-là et nous dire comment elles pourraient être mises en oeuvre dans...

M. Charles Robert:

Avec plaisir. En fait, nous travaillerons avec le greffier et les analystes pour veiller à faire un suivi des délibérations. Plus nous aurons le temps de prendre connaissance de votre orientation, mieux nous serons en mesure de vous renseigner sur la façon dont nous pourrions mettre en oeuvre vos propositions.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j'ai une petite question qui est légèrement hors sujet. Je vous demanderais donc de m'arrêter si je vais trop loin. C'est davantage une demande.

Concernant le déménagement dans le nouvel édifice de l'Ouest, je crois comprendre qu'un comité de l'Administration de la Chambre étudie actuellement la façon de préserver certaines fonctions protocolaires lorsque nous serons répartis dans divers édifices. Le pauvre huissier du bâton noir devra peut-être enfourcher son vélo pour venir à la Chambre des communes. Je crois comprendre qu'un groupe est chargé d'étudier cet aspect. Je me demande simplement si nous aurons une mise à jour, un moment donné, sur les mesures qui seront prises pour préserver les fonctions protocolaires après le déménagement.

M. Charles Robert:

Je précise que cette initiative ne concerne pas seulement l'Administration de la Chambre. Le gouvernement y participe aussi. La cérémonie du discours du Trône, la sanction royale, et l'invitation faite aux députés d'élire le Président de la Chambre sont toutes des fonctions relevant en quelque sorte du pouvoir exécutif et de la prérogative de la Couronne. Toute proposition que nous pourrions avoir devrait essentiellement être faite en collaboration avec le pouvoir exécutif. Il vous serait probablement utile de discuter avec les gens en poste.

(1145)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Votre témoignage a été très utile. Je pense en particulier à ce que vous avez indiqué, dans votre exposé, concernant le fait que l'interprétation dans les deux langues officielles, le français et l'anglais, n'a pas toujours été offerte à la Chambre des communes, et qu'il y a eu une période de transition en 1959. Vous n'étiez pas là à l'époque, évidemment, mais avez-vous lu à ce sujet, ou avez-vous des informations sur cette transition? Lorsque le service d'interprétation a été lancé, cela fonctionnait-il comme aujourd'hui, ou a-t-il fallu tirer des leçons? Y a-t-il eu une période de transition pour améliorer le service?

M. Charles Robert:

Je peux vous en parler, car j'ai eu l'occasion de lire des pages du hansard d'avant 1959, où tout n'était qu'en anglais ou en français. Essentiellement, si une personne ne parlait ou ne comprenait pas l'autre langue, c'était tant pis, car selon la façon dont on interprétait l'article 133, on pouvait employer l'une ou l'autre langue. Or, si aucun service de traduction ou d'interprétation n'était offert, rien ne garantissait le droit de travailler dans l'une ou l'autre langue.

Les passages que j'ai lus portaient sur les tensions qui ont eu lieu avant l'entrée du Canada dans la Première Guerre mondiale. Le Canada souhaitait ardemment participer et contribuer à l'effort de guerre, et les projets de loi présentés à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat n'étaient présentés que dans une langue. Eh bien, les sénateurs francophones, les députés francophones — tous les francophones — étaient furieux. Concrètement, on les empêchait de jouer leur rôle de parlementaires parce qu'ils ne pouvaient pas consulter les projets de loi dans leur langue.

C'était un problème, et j'imagine qu'il en a été ainsi de 1867 à 1959. À mon avis, tous devaient être heureux de constater que la technologie avait assez progressé pour qu'on puisse offrir des services d'interprétation simultanée. Je pense que c'est ce qui a permis au Parlement de mieux atteindre les objectifs de l'article 133.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez toutefois indiqué que le gouvernement fédéral avait financé la formation des interprètes; je suppose que c'était probablement parce qu'on n'avait pas assez de personnel qualifié selon les normes que nous exigeons pour faire l'interprétation dans les deux langues.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui et je crois que c'est avec sa politique visant à favoriser le bilinguisme officiel que le gouvernement a reconnu qu'il fallait que les interprètes soient bien formés.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y a probablement eu une période difficile lorsqu'on tentait de faire la transition vers d'autres langues. Je comprends qu'on veuille bien faire les choses, mais je crois qu'il faut être réaliste. Si l'on veut respecter nos premières langues et les élever à ce niveau pour qu'elles soient utilisées dans la Chambre des communes, nous allons traverser une période difficile avant que les choses se passent aussi bien qu'elles se passent aujourd'hui. Mais je crois que le financement...

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois qu'il s'agit d'un risque réel et c'est pourquoi les échanges avec le service d'interprétation sont si importants.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

En fouillant nos dossiers, on a trouvé quelques exemples de langues qui ont été utilisées dans la Chambre des communes jusqu'à maintenant. Au cours de votre carrière, est-ce que des gens vous ont demandé de pouvoir s'exprimer dans d'autres langues autochtones, que nous n'avons pas encore entendues à la Chambre?

M. Charles Robert:

Non, pas à moi personnellement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est arrivé non pas pour des langues autochtones, mais pour des langues étrangères. Nous avons travaillé avec des interprètes relais, comme l'a dit M. Reid, ou qui faisaient une interprétation simultanée. Lorsqu'il est impossible d'avoir une interprétation simultanée, cela a une incidence sur le déroulement des réunions.

Je crois que c'est cela qui devient un peu problématique, lorsqu'on parle de faire le relai de l'anglais au français.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Selon ce que je comprends, cela n'arriverait pas très souvent. Vous avez dit que d'autres personnes avaient le droit de s'exprimer dans une langue non autochtone.

Pourquoi êtes-vous de cet avis?

(1150)

M. Charles Robert:

Je sais que certains sénateurs sont très fiers de leur héritage culturel; ils veulent s'exprimer dans leur langue. Je crois que cela pourrait également se produire à la Chambre. Nous nous félicitons — à juste titre — d'être une société multiculturelle; nous formons une belle mosaïque qui travaille dans l'harmonie. Eh bien, si nous voulons le prouver, il se peut que la Chambre reconnaisse le droit des députés de s'exprimer non seulement dans les deux langues officielles, mais aussi dans d'autres langues parlées au pays.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Richards. Allez-y, monsieur.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais revenir à un sujet dont on a beaucoup parlé: votre expérience au Sénat. Je ne crois pas vous avoir entendu répondre aux questions que je vais poser.

Ma première question a trait à l'entente qui a été conclue en vue de l'interprétation de l'inuktitut. Je crois qu'il fallait émettre un avis pour cela. Est-ce exact? Quel est le délai associé à cela? Cinq jours?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est cinq jours; je m'en souviens.

M. Blake Richards:

Savez-vous à combien de reprises on y a eu recours?

M. Charles Robert:

Honnêtement, on pourrait les compter sur les doigts d'une main.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

M. Charles Robert:

Je dirais que c'est surtout parce que c'était très difficile. Qui sait, ce sera peut-être plus facile s'il y a plus de demandes.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien sûr.

M. Charles Robert:

Si la demande est plus importante, alors il sera plus facile de mettre en place l'infrastructure à l'appui du programme. Ce sera plus facile à justifier. Dans la mesure où la demande est marginale, on aura de la difficulté à trouver des interprètes qui seront prêts à faire le travail à court préavis et à offrir un service qui ne durera que 15 minutes, tout au plus.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

M. Charles Robert:

Ce sont les enjeux qui entraînent des conséquences pratiques, à mon avis.

M. Blake Richards:

Lorsque vous parlez de difficultés, vous faites référence à la difficulté de trouver des interprètes disponibles alors que les demandes sont rares. Est-ce que c'est cela qui rend la chose difficile?

M. Charles Robert:

En partie, oui. Le service d'interprétation pourrait peut-être vous parler d'autres facteurs.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit que vous pouviez compter le nombre de demandes sur les doigts d'une main. De quels types d'interventions s'agissait-il? Vous en souvenez-vous? Est-ce que c'était des déclarations, des hommages, des discours?

M. Charles Robert:

Je me souviens d'un cas, c'était un long discours. Je crois que c'était pour un projet de loi présenté par un député en vue de traiter du coût de l'acheminement des denrées dans le Nord. Je crois que M. Bagnell sait à quel point cela coûte cher.

Le projet de loi visait une sorte d'allégement fiscal pour les habitants des régions nordiques. Le député était très motivé... parce qu'il parlait à son peuple de ce qu'il voulait faire pour lui.

C'est un de mes souvenirs, mais c'est vague.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que c'était tout le discours ou une bonne partie du discours?

M. Charles Robert:

C'était une bonne partie de son discours.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est le seul exemple de cette nature qui vous vient en tête.

M. Charles Robert:

Comme je l'ai dit, les occasions étaient assez rares. On s'est exprimé dans d'autres langues pour des déclarations, mais dans ce cas en particulier, je me souviens qu'il s'agissait d'une longue intervention en langue autochtone.

M. Blake Richards:

Dans ce cas-ci, si vous vous en souvenez, et dans les quelques autres cas, avait-on fourni un texte à l'avance? Est-ce que c'était une exigence?

M. Charles Robert:

Nous avions reçu le texte à l'avance, en anglais. Nous l'avons fait traduire en français. Nous n'avons donc pas eu besoin de relais. Comme nous avions la traduction dans les deux langues, nous avons réussi à suivre le discours du député. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles une longue période de préavis est utile pour éviter ce problème.

(1155)

M. Blake Richards:

Selon votre souvenir, est-il déjà arrivé qu'on n'ait pas fourni de texte à l'avance et que les services d'interprètes relais soient nécessaires?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que c'était dans la plupart des cas?

M. Charles Robert:

Il faudrait que je revoie les dossiers et que je parle à des gens qui ont une meilleure mémoire que moi.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce que vous dites, toutefois, c'est qu'il est très utile de produire le texte à l'avance pour assurer la ponctualité du service, parce que le relais prend plus de temps.

M. Charles Robert:

En fait...

M. Blake Richards:

Il faut aussi penser à la qualité de l'interprétation.

M. Charles Robert:

En fait, on pourrait s'éviter le relais en obtenant une version anglaise de ce qui se dira en inuktitut.

M. Blake Richards:

Exactement.

M. Charles Robert:

Si l'on avait le temps, on pourrait le traduire.

Le travail de traduction diffère de celui d'interprétation, qui se fait en simultané. Les interprètes doivent écouter dans une langue et parler dans une autre en même temps. Cela demande beaucoup plus de concentration. Si l'on veut avoir la possibilité de traduire un texte de l'anglais au français, alors on ne parle pas d'interprétation, mais bien d'une lecture.

M. Blake Richards:

Exactement.

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous. Je ne sais pas comment font les interprètes. Leur capacité d'écouter et de parler en même temps me fascine.

C'est là où je voulais en venir. Je crois que ce que vous dites, c'est qu'il est beaucoup plus facile, tant pour la qualité de la traduction ou de l'interprétation que pour l'utilisation efficace du temps, d'avoir le texte à l'avance. Il faudra peut-être prendre cela en compte lorsque nous prendrons des décisions. On pourrait peut-être en faire une exigence.

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, je vais faire preuve de positivisme et vous dire que si l'infrastructure est appropriée, alors le délai de préavis pourra être plus court. Ainsi, les gens ne se sentiront pas floués lorsqu'ils voudront s'exprimer dans une autre langue que l'anglais ou le français.

M. Blake Richards:

Selon votre rôle actuel, dans le cadre de l'élaboration de l'accord au Sénat ou de la préparation de cette étude, avez-vous parlé à d'autres administrations qui offrent des services d'interprétation dans plusieurs langues? Si oui, pouvez-vous nous en parler?

M. Charles Robert:

La seule personne à qui j'ai parlé, c'est le secrétaire général du Parlement européen, qui a dit que c'était tout un défi. Il a 10 000 employés, qui se déplacent entre Strasbourg et Bruxelles. C'est toute une opération. Ils semblent toutefois bien réussir, parce qu'ils ne travaillent pas seulement dans deux langues officielles plus une, mais bien dans 28 langues.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

Ce que les gens ont fait valoir, aussi, c'est que si l'on parle une langue — disons l'inuktitut — dans un lieu où bon nombre de gens la parlent au Canada et qu'il y a un public, alors cela aura une incidence pour une chaîne comme CPAC; les gens pourront entendre ce discours.

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous remercions de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. Nous allons suspendre les travaux un instant afin que les interprètes du cri puissent s'installer. Si quelqu'un souhaite vous parler, je suis certain que vous allez rester ici quelques minutes.

(1155)

(1205)

Le président:

Drin gwiinzih shalakat. Bonjour. Nous reprenons la 93e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous allons poursuivre notre étude sur l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Nous allons entendre Romeo Saganash, député d'Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou. À titre informatif, M. Saganash prononcera son discours préliminaire en cri. Pour la réunion d'aujourd'hui, nous avons prévu une interprétation simultanée en anglais et en français. Le greffier va vous expliquer le fonctionnement technique.

Allez-y, monsieur le greffier.

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Dans le système d'interprétation, le canal 0 correspond à la langue du parquet. Ainsi, lorsqu'une personne s'exprimera en cri, vous pourrez l'entendre à ce canal. L'interprète effectuera l'interprétation du cri à l'anglais et nos interprètes se chargeront de l'interprétation de l'anglais au français, que vous pourrez entendre au canal 2.

Le président:

Monsieur Saganash, nous vous remercions de votre présence. Nous sommes heureux de vous recevoir et avons hâte d'entendre vos commentaires.

M. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NPD):

Merci.

Je vous remercie tous de m'avoir invité à vous faire part de mes idées alors que vous étudiez la question et que vous tentez d'intégrer d'autres langues à vos réunions.

Je suis aussi très heureux de pouvoir me prononcer sur le sujet.

Je tiens à vous dire que je parlerai en anglais de temps à autre lorsque j'aborderai certaines questions. Vous ne comprendrez peut-être pas si je parle uniquement en cri. Ainsi, lorsque je parlerai de la Constitution, je m'adresserai à vous en anglais.

Je sais que nous en avons déjà parlé dans le passé. J'aimerais discuter d'une chose: je sais qu'on peut facilement faire venir des gens ici pour que nos peuples puissent s'exprimer dans leur langue autochtone et je peux vous aider à cet égard. Je sais que nous pourrons nous exprimer en cri. Je vous avise toujours à l'avance des sujets que je vais aborder. Je peux vous donner mon avis et je crois que c'est facile.

Pouvez-vous entendre l'interprétation de Priscilla en arrière-plan? Je tiens à la remercier. Elle est ici pour nous aider aujourd'hui.

Je sais que je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps pour vous parler, mais je vais essayer d'aborder les sujets essentiels.

Je crois vraiment que vous allez aider les gens, surtout les Autochtones, en leur permettant de parler dans leur langue. Cela nous aide beaucoup. Vous savez probablement qu'avant qu'on ne m'envoie ici, il n'y avait pas de titre pour les gens qui font mon travail. On ne savait pas quel titre donner à ce que vous appelez un député. Nous avons tenté de trouver un nom. Aujourd'hui, je peux vous dire que nous les appelons « les gens qui parlent en notre nom, en leur nom. » C'est ainsi qu'on m'appelle et c'est ce que je fais ici à Ottawa. Nous n'avions pas cela avant. Vous aviez des représentants, mais nous n'en avions pas. Maintenant, nous avons ce qu'on appelle le « patron des mots ».

C'est comme cela qu'on peut s'entraider... en permettant aux Autochtones de s'exprimer dans leur langue. Je crois que nous nous attardons trop à la Constitution. Il faut tenir compte de l'article 16 de la partie I de la Constitution, mais ce n'est pas la seule disposition à étudier. Il faut aussi tenir compte des articles 22, 25, 26 et 34, de façon tout aussi importante, afin de comprendre d'où nous venons, quelles sont nos connaissances et comment nous pouvons parler notre langue.

(1210)



Monsieur le président, j'ai lu des choses que le Sénat a faites dans le passé concernant la faisabilité de ce que je propose depuis mon élection en 2011. Est-ce faisable? D'après moi, ce l'est, absolument.

Comme je l'ai dit en cri, ceux qui souhaitent parler leur langue autochtone peuvent le faire savoir à l'avance, que ce soit pour poser une question, faire une déclaration ou prononcer un discours. L'avis peut être adapté en conséquence. Créer un bassin d'interprètes comme Priscilla est facile. Cela devrait se faire de concert avec le député. Il y a des interprètes connus dans ma circonscription, dont un bon nombre parle le cri. Je crois qu'il s'agit de résoudre les questions de technologie et d'espace requis. Je ne sais pas s'il y en a parmi vous qui ont visité les cubicules que les interprètes utilisent à la Chambre des communes. Ils sont très petits. Ce ne serait pas possible aujourd'hui, à cause de cela.

J'ai aussi mentionné dans ma déclaration que la reconnaissance de mon droit de parler le cri à la Chambre des communes sera bénéfique pour toutes les langues autochtones. Si nous tenons vraiment à reconnaître les droits, dans ce pays, nous devons le faire. Je vais parler de l'aspect constitutionnel tout à l'heure.

La protection et la préservation des langues autochtones sont une chose, mais il y a aussi l'aspect du développement des langues autochtones, une fois qu'on reconnaît le droit des Autochtones de parler leur langue à la Chambre des communes. J'ai donné deux exemples. Nous n'avions pas de mot en cri pour désigner un député jusqu'à ce que je me fasse élire, et il a fallu en concevoir un.

J'ai expliqué aux anciens ce qu'un député fait. Ils ont suggéré quelques mots, et nous avons opté pour yimstimagesu, qui signifie « celui ou celle qui parle en notre nom ». Nous avons fait de même avec « Président ».

Je sais que mon temps passe rapidement, mais je voulais vraiment parler de certains aspects particuliers. Nous semblons nous concentrer trop sur l'article 16 de la partie I de notre Constitution, qui reconnaît les deux langues officielles du Canada et de la Chambre des communes. Nous devons lire l'article 16 en parallèle avec les articles 22, 25, 26 et, bien sûr, 35 de la Constitution du Canada. Je crois que si vous faites cela, vous constaterez que j'ai manifestement le droit constitutionnel de le faire à la Chambre des communes.

En plus de cela, depuis notre Constitution, la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, la DNUDPA, a été adoptée en 2007 par l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies, et on peut y lire, à l'article 13.2:

Les États prennent des mesures efficaces pour protéger ce droit et faire en sorte que les peuples autochtones puissent comprendre et être compris dans les procédures politiques, juridiques et administratives, en fournissant, si nécessaire, des services d'interprétation ou d'autres moyens appropriés.

D'après moi, il y a dans la DNUDPA un article pertinent. Je crois que le gouvernement actuel s'est engagé à respecter cette déclaration et à la mettre en oeuvre, ce qui comprend, dans une certaine mesure, l'article 5 également.

La Commission de vérité et de réconciliation a également recommandé ce qui suit au gouvernement, dans l'appel à l'action 13:

Nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral de reconnaître que les droits des Autochtones comprennent les droits linguistiques autochtones.

C'est l'appel à l'action 13. Je crois que le gouvernement actuel a approuvé les 94 appels à l'action. Je crois que le Comité doit se pencher sur ces deux choses.

C'est le cadre que nous voulions présenter, monsieur le président.

(1215)



J'ai écouté attentivement les exposés des greffiers. J'ai soulevé ces enjeux constitutionnels et ces droits constitutionnels, car je ne veux pas qu'on me dise, parce que je suis autochtone: « Oui, nous allons vous permettre de parler votre langue; oui, nous allons vous donner la permission de parler votre langue à la Chambre des communes. » C'est de la charité, et je n'en veux pas. Je veux qu'on reconnaisse et qu'on respecte mes droits dans ce lieu. J'ai toujours défendu ces droits, et je vais continuer de le faire.

Il y a un autre aspect qu'il faut mentionner, et c'est que dans son arrêt le plus important, rendu en juin 2014, l'arrêt Tsilhqot'in, la Cour suprême a parlé pour la première fois des droits de la personne dans le contexte des peuples autochtones. La Cour suprême a dit, dans cette décision, que la Charte des droits et libertés formant la partie I de la Constitution et l'article 35 de la partie II de la Constitution sont apparentées. Il faut donc voir mon droit de parler le cri à la Chambre des communes comme un droit constitutionnel et un droit de la personne.

Je ne sais pas s'il me reste beaucoup de temps, monsieur le président, mais...

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Romeo Saganash (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Pour terminer, je tiens à vous dire à tous que je suis vraiment content de voir qu'on travaille à cela. C'est une chose que les Autochtones espèrent, et ce, depuis toujours — que je puisse vous parler dans ma langue. Nous attendons cela depuis longtemps. Je crois que nous avons tous dit que nous travaillerions ensemble à entretenir de bonnes relations, et nous avons appelé cela la réconciliation.

Il y a un mot dans notre langue pour cela. Nous l'avions, et nous avons toujours fait cela dans le passé: le désir de pouvoir travailler avec vous. Quand j'ai commencé à travailler avec vous, j'ai vraiment essayé de le faire de façon étroite et ouverte. C'est ainsi que je veux poursuivre cette relation de travail. Je veux une bonne relation de travail avec chacun de vous, et je veux que vous soyez capable de m'entendre quand je vous parle dans ma langue, chaque fois que je me lève, lors de nos réunions. Je veux toujours savoir que je peux parler ma langue autochtone, et je vous remercie.

(1220)

Le président:

Merci. Mahsi cho.Gunalchéesh. C'est un premier discours historique, dans le cadre d'audiences historiques. Nous nous réjouissons d'avance de cette évolution vers la réconciliation, comme vous l'avez décrit.

Nous allons laisser la parole à notre premier intervenant, M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Saganash, merci beaucoup.

Je vais commencer par vous interroger sur le mot que vous avez utilisé et que vous avez en fait créé à votre arrivée pour décrire ce que vous faites à titre de député. Pouvez-vous l'épeler pour moi, je vous prie?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Si vous pouvez écrire au son, je peux.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Pouvez-vous le répéter une autre fois?

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est yimstimagesu.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Je vais ressayer plus tard.

La raison pour laquelle je dis cela est que, si c'est correct, j'aimerais utiliser cela sur mon papier à en-tête parce que cela lance une conversation. Je peux alors relater votre histoire. En quelle année avez-vous été élu pour la première fois?

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'était en 2011.

M. Scott Simms:

Exactement. Imaginez qu'en 2011, il n'y avait pas de mot pour désigner cela dans votre langue, alors que c'est un principe démocratique fondamental qui existe pour nous depuis même avant 1867. Je trouve cela tout à fait renversant. Je vais vous consulter de nouveau là-dessus ultérieurement.

L'une des choses que tous les députés peuvent faire ad nauseam — nous avons tous cela en commun —, c'est nous vanter de nos circonscriptions. Nous pouvons passer des jours à dire à quel point elles sont magnifiques. Je vais vous demander de me parler de la vôtre.

Dans quelle collectivité de votre circonscription d'Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou vivez-vous?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je vis à Waswanipi.

M. Scott Simms:

Pouvez-vous me faire une ventilation des gens selon ceux qui parlent la langue et ceux qui ne la parlent pas, dans cette collectivité? Dans quelle mesure est-elle utilisée dans votre secteur?

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est une question importante. Quand la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation parle des droits des Autochtones, ce qui comprend les droits linguistiques, je pense qu'elle a raison à ce sujet. Longtemps, nous n'étions pas d'accord avec la teneur de l'article 35, et le concept des droits autochtones était si vague. De nos jours, on s'entend dans une certaine mesure sur certaines choses qui sont prévues à l'article 35, notamment sur l'autonomie gouvernementale.

Nous, les Cris, avons la chance d'avoir signé le premier traité moderne du pays, en 1975, la Convention de la Baie James et du Nord québécois, qui prévoit un décret visant l'élaboration de programmes d'enseignement en cri. Tous nos enfants, pendant leurs quatre premières années à l'école, profitent d'un enseignement en cri, et c'est grâce à cela que plus de 90 % des Cris parlent toujours leur langue aujourd'hui.

M. Scott Simms:

Dans vos interactions avec le monde extérieur, si vous sortez de votre collectivité et que vous les représentez dans des endroits comme celui-ci, dans quelle mesure obtiennent-ils de l'information en langue crie, en ce moment?

(1225)

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est très courant, maintenant.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Tous les débats du gouvernement de la nation crie se tiennent en cri. Dans beaucoup de nos rapports avec le Québec, avec Hydro-Québec ou avec d'autres institutions, ils prennent le temps de traduire les documents en cri, ce qui est important pour nos aînés. Ma mère, qui vient d'avoir 89 ans — lors de la Journée internationale des femmes —, ne parle que le cri. La plupart de nos aînés ne parlent que le cri, ce qui aide également. C'est ainsi que nous avons pu créer ces mots. C'est pourquoi la préservation et la revitalisation sont importantes, mais le développement de la langue est aussi important, parallèlement à cela.

M. Scott Simms:

Nous avons tous des bulletins parlementaires. Pour ceux qui nous écoutent, c'est le dépliant que vous recevez tous les quatre mois de votre député.

Dans quelle langue envoyez-vous vos bulletins parlementaires?

M. Romeo Saganash:

J'utilise les cinq principales langues parlées dans ma circonscription: l'inuktitut, le cri, l'algonquin, le français et l'anglais.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est vraiment étonnant. En fait, c'est formidable, car je veux vous demander...

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est ce qui m'a valu d'être réélu.

M. Scott Simms:

Pardon?

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est ce qui m'a valu d'être réélu malgré vous.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Scott Simms:

Eh bien, félicitations.

Encore une fois, je me suis fait coller.

Avez-vous des frictions? Combien faut-il de temps pour faire cela? Avez-vous de la difficulté avec la traduction?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Non.

M. Scott Simms:

Il semble logique, alors, d'utiliser l'interprétation des débats qui se fait ici. Ce serait une prochaine étape logique.

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est la partie facile.

M. Scott Simms:

En effet, mais cela n'existe pas vraiment.

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est ce que j'ai dit en cri. Nous attendons cela depuis très longtemps; depuis 150 ans. Je pense que cela aurait dû se faire bien avant. En Nouvelle-Zélande, cela s'est fait vers la fin des années 1800.

M. Scott Simms:

Avec les Maoris.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Les Maoris, oui. Le premier Maori élu au Parlement de la Nouvelle-Zélande ne parlait que le maori.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vais céder la parole à David Graham, car il a une question qui porte, je crois, sur la prochaine étape.

C'est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, apparemment.

Quelle approche progressive envisagez-vous? Comment procédons-nous pour nous rendre là où nous devrions être? De toute évidence, nous ne commencerons pas dès demain à offrir des services d'interprétation de toutes les langues autochtones dans les deux sens. Quelle approche progressive envisagez-vous?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je ne crois pas que ce sera si difficile. Il y a quelque 50 langues autochtones toujours parlées au pays. En ce moment, nous avons environ 10 députés autochtones. Je ne crois pas qu'ils parlent tous leur langue — pas couramment, du moins. Ma collègue Georgina parle couramment sa langue. Il n'y aura pas un afflux massif de députés autochtones, même si je le souhaite. J'aimerais que nous soyons plus nombreux à la Chambre des communes. Je crois que ce sera facile.

Je n'ai pas visité l'édifice de l'Ouest. Je ne sais donc pas de quoi cela a l'air du point de vue de la technologie et je ne sais pas si ce sera possible quand nous y déménagerons, mais nous ne devrions pas avoir peur parce qu'il y a toujours 52 langues autochtones parlées. C'est la raison pour laquelle je dis que la collaboration sera toujours là pour les Autochtones qui souhaitent parler leur langue à la Chambre des communes.

Nous savons qu'il y a de nombreux interprètes. Je connais ceux qui sont capables de faire l'interprétation du cri à l'anglais et du cri au français. Ces interprètes existent, et nous les connaissons tous. Il faut donc développer cela de concert avec les députés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci. Meegwetch.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je suis également ravi de votre présence.

J'ai plusieurs questions, mais je vais commencer par ceci. Vous avez dit dans votre déclaration liminaire — et je paraphrase un peu — que vous nous le diriez toujours à l'avance si vous alliez parler en cri. Je pense que cela correspond assez bien à ce que vous avez dit en juin, quand la question de privilège a fait surface, ce qui nous a essentiellement amenés au point où nous en sommes maintenant. Vous avez dit que vous aviez essayé de négocier une solution selon laquelle il y aurait un avis de 24 heures ou de 48 heures, pour qu'il soit possible de retenir les services d'un interprète.

Est-ce bien ce que vous pensez de cela? Trouvez-vous que la meilleure façon serait de donner un avis qui permettrait qu'on retienne les services d'un interprète pour un moment prédéterminé?

(1230)

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je crois que le principe, c'est l'avis, et que nous devons de là déterminer le temps qu'il faut. Si les interprètes sont à la baie James ou au Nunavik, il faut penser aux frais de déplacement et au temps qu'il faut pour le déplacement. S'ils sont à Ottawa, c'est une autre histoire. C'est le genre de facteurs à tenir en compte.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Je voulais simplement m'assurer que vous êtes à l'aise avec cela...

M. Romeo Saganash:

Le principe de l'avis est l'élément important.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Pouvez-vous m'en dire un peu plus sur la langue crie? Est-ce que le cri est votre langue maternelle?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois qu'il y a divers dialectes. Ce n'est peut-être pas le bon terme, mais est-ce juste? Savez-vous combien il y en a?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je crois que c'est une question qui a été soulevée par des anthropologues et des ethnologues. J'ai passé 23 ans aux Nations unies, à négocier la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, et chaque fois que nous rencontrions les membres de la délégation canadienne et que nous ne voulions pas qu'ils nous comprennent, mon frère de l'Alberta — Wilton Littlechild, qui est cri — et moi parlions en cri entre nous. Il me comprenait parfaitement, et je le comprenais parfaitement. Il parlait supposément le cri des Plaines, mais il n'y avait pas grand différence.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Cela répond peut-être à ma prochaine question. Est-ce qu'il pourrait être nécessaire d'avoir des services d'interprétation pour les différentes formes du cri? D'après ce que vous dites, ce ne serait pas nécessaire.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Eh bien, je pense que c'est un privilège qui appartient au député.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Il n'y a donc pas de réponse définitive là-dessus?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Vous pourriez m'en dire un peu sur vos expériences dans votre circonscription. On en a parlé un peu, mais à quelle fréquence communiquez-vous en cri avec vos électeurs? Qu'en est-il des autres langues autochtones? Les utilisez-vous aussi, dans vos communications orales ou écrites, par exemple?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Peu importe que je participe à une réunion ou une assemblée, ou que je prononce un discours, j'utilise le cri. Remarquez que, quand les Innus, les Algonquins ou les Attikameks parlent, je peux comprendre plus de la moitié de ce qu'ils disent.

M. Blake Richards:

Donc, cela fonctionne bien.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Ils ont les mêmes racines algonquines.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela fonctionne manifestement bien pour les communications personnelles. Cela convient pour les réunions en personne, et peut-être même pour les petites séances de discussion ouverte. Qu'en est-il des communications sur les sites Web, dans les bulletins parlementaires et ce genre de choses? Est-ce que vous faites traduire tout cela en diverses langues?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Non. Seulement les bulletins parlementaires et les dix-pour-cent.

M. Blake Richards:

Avez-vous eu besoin d'utiliser des services d'interprétation ou de traduction dans vos communications à l'échelle de votre circonscription, que ce soit pour des communications écrites ou pour des séances de discussion ouverte, par exemple?

M. Romeo Saganash:

De quelle façon?

M. Blake Richards:

Dans votre circonscription, par exemple dans une assemblée publique.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Étonnamment, même si les Inuits sont nos voisins depuis des milliers d'années, le cri et l'inuktitut diffèrent beaucoup. En fait, le cri n'a pas adopté un seul mot inuktitut, et l'inverse est aussi vrai. Ce sont les deux solitudes du Nord.

M. Blake Richards:

Autrement dit, vous me dites que vous avez probablement eu besoin de services d'interprétation et de traduction.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Dans ce cas-ci, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que cela a bien fonctionné?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Oui, parfaitement bien.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela me mène à ma prochaine question, et vous avez abordé un peu le sujet plus tôt. D'après vous, combien y a-t-il d'interprètes qui peuvent traduire du cri vers l'anglais et le français? Avez-vous une idée du nombre et savez-vous si les personnes que vous connaissez pourraient satisfaire les normes et les critères du Bureau de la traduction?

(1235)

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il y a beaucoup d'interprètes. Le gouvernement régional cri de la baie James, pas le gouvernement de la nation crie, est structuré de manière à ce que la moitié des représentants soient cris et à ce que l'autre moitié soit issue des collectivités non autochtones de la circonscription. C'est le gouvernement régional dans le Nord du Québec. Dans les délibérations, la traduction simultanée se fait en cri, en français et en anglais. Les services existent et sont faciles d'accès. En fait, je vous suggère de communiquer avec ce gouvernement régional pour parler des services offerts et de la façon dont cela fonctionne.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous n'êtes donc pas préoccupé par le problème dont on a déjà parlé à quelques reprises, à savoir l'idée qu'il pourrait y avoir un nombre limité d'interprètes pour assurer la traduction directe en français et éviter ainsi une interprétation à relais, n'est-ce pas?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous ne pensez pas que cela pourrait être un problème.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Non, pas du tout.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

J'ai juste oublié de mentionner que nous n'avons pas pu avoir une salle équipée pour la télédiffusion et que c'est la raison pour laquelle il y a une caméra de la chaîne APTN.

Je vais juste poser une question au Comité avant d'oublier. L'un des journalistes a demandé un exemplaire du rapport de recherche sur les différentes administrations. Quelqu'un y voit-il une objection?

Des députés: Non.

Le président: Bien. Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président, et je tiens également à remercier mon collègue Romeo d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je siège à des Parlements depuis 1990, tant à l'échelle provinciale que fédérale, et bien que nous soyons tous égaux, j'ai constaté que dans chaque Parlement, certaines personnes se démarquent. C'est à cause de qui elles sont et du sérieux qu'elles dégagent. M. Irwin Cotler et M. Ed Broadbent sont deux personnes avec qui j'ai siégé qui tombent dans cette catégorie.

Romeo, je tiens à dire que vous en faites partie, et je suis très honoré de siéger en même temps que vous compte tenu du rôle important que vous jouez dans l'édification de notre pays, pour donner vie à la Constitution — et avec classe, à défaut de penser à un autre mot, et quasi-élégance. La force qui sous-tend votre passion est manifeste.

Cela dit, chers collègues, je me suis demandé si je devais aborder la question, mais je pense que oui. Même si le succès de nos démarches est perçu comme un aspect positif pour poursuivre l'édification de notre pays, je crois que nous devons reconnaître, d'après ce que notre ami et collègue Romeo a dit ce matin, que le coût d'un échec est si élevé que ce n'est pas une option.

Nous avons commencé nos délibérations en nous demandant si le moment était venu et comment nous pourrions procéder, et c'était un peu théorique, mais maintenant que nous nous sommes engagés dans cette voie et que nous avons énoncé les considérations historiques de l'importance de cette question pour beaucoup de nos concitoyens, l'échec de nos démarches signifierait que les efforts que nous déployons au Parlement feraient plus de tort que de mal, car nos bonnes intentions initiales se traduiraient par un échec. Je vais juste dire que je pense que maintenant que nous nous sommes engagés dans cette voie, nous devons réussir. Nous devons trouver un moyen de faire comprendre à nos concitoyens que nous sommes sérieux pour ce qui est de leur donner des droits d'une manière respectueuse et de reconnaître ceux qu'ils ont déjà.

Tout cela pour dire que nous faisons habituellement des choses qui seraient bien et que si cela ne fonctionne pas, eh bien, vous savez, nous y reviendrons dans une autre législature. Nous n'avons pas cette option. Nous devons vraiment faire en sorte que cela fonctionne, et j'ai l'impression que ce sera le cas.

Je suis comme mon compagnon de vote, M. Simms — seuls les initiés pourraient comprendre — à propos des 150 années qui se sont écoulées. J'ai de la difficulté à me faire à l'idée qu'il n'y avait même pas de mot pour rendre le terme « député ». Était-ce à défaut d'élire assez de personnes pour que cela devienne un problème? Est-ce à cause d'un fossé que le besoin ne se faisait pas sentir?

Pouvez-vous juste m'aider à comprendre un peu, Romeo, comment nous pourrions en arriver au fait? Je suis comme Scotty: 150 ans pour trouver un mot qui décrit ce que fait un député, puisque c'est la base de notre démocratie constitutionnelle... Aidez-moi à comprendre, Romeo. Comment en sommes-nous arrivés là?

(1240)

M. Romeo Saganash:

Eh bien, c'est pour toutes les raisons que vous avez mentionnées. C'est aussi parce qu'aucun Cri du Nord du Québec n'avait été élu au Parlement...

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois.

M. Romeo Saganash:

... et c'était donc la première occasion de trouver un mot.

Au cours de ma carrière, j'ai été intronisé au Temple de la renommée du hockey, et ce n'est pas grâce à mes talents de joueur de hockey, même si je jouais. Dans les années 1980, quand j'étais à la faculté de droit, j'avais un deuxième emploi en tant qu'animateur de radio, en cri. J'ai participé à un projet qui visait à commenter un match entre les Canadiens de Montréal et les Nordiques de Québec. L'une des choses que nous avons dû faire, c'est trouver un mot pour « rondelle »...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Romeo Saganash: ... et « arbitre ». C'est le genre de mots qui n'existaient pas. J'ai continué tout au long de ma carrière en faisant la même chose pour la terminologie juridique, et je le fais maintenant pour les travaux parlementaires. C'était une belle occasion de s'asseoir avec les aînés et d'expliquer ce que je fais en tant que député. Après avoir compris le concept, ils ont proposé quelques mots. Je pense que le meilleur était yimstimagesu.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour terminer, y a-t-il d'autres langues autochtones qui avaient ou qui ont les mêmes lacunes?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je ne saurais dire.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois, merci. Cela m'a frappé.

Vous avez donné l'exemple de la Nouvelle-Zélande dans vos observations, et nous avons évidemment celui des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et du Yukon. Nous recommanderiez-vous de prendre ces exemples comme modèles, ou en avez-vous d'autres que nous devrions examiner en détail, plus particulièrement alors que nous nous penchons sur les principes fondamentaux?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Ce que je peux faire, monsieur le président, c'est ajouter à mon mémoire, qui contient mon exposé et des références, des propositions d'autres modèles que vous pourriez examiner.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela serait très utile.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je pense que ce serait important.

À mon retour, j'ai essayé de trouver une jurisprudence sur l'interprétation de l'article 22 de la Constitution, car il fait allusion à d'autres langues, mis à part l'anglais et le français. Je n'en ai pas encore trouvé, mais je continue de chercher, car, comme je l'ai dit, nous devons lire l'article 22 en même temps que les articles 25, 26 et 35 de la Constitution afin de déterminer si le droit dont je parle, c'est-à-dire s'exprimer en cri au Parlement, est un droit constitutionnel. C'est également un droit de la personne, et je pense que nous devons donner suite au dossier en procédant ainsi.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Je vais dire une dernière chose, et je ne m'attends pas à obtenir une réponse, mais vous êtes peut-être au courant, vu l'interprétation.

Je pense qu'à un certain point, monsieur le président, chers collègues, nous devrons nous pencher sur le rôle de l'intelligence artificielle, dans un très proche avenir, pour assurer une traduction simultanée. Je ne sais pas ce qu'en pensent les autres personnes présentes, mais je suis certain que vous en faites autant, que vous lisez et que vous essayez de comprendre où en sont les choses et quels sont les problèmes auxquels nous devons nous attaquer.

Il y a ceux qui laissent entendre que l'intelligence artificielle pourra très bientôt permettre d'écouter instantanément à l'aide d'une oreillette les propos d'un interlocuteur. Avez-vous la moindre idée de ce qu'il en est?

Non? Je vois. Mais je pense que c'est une chose sur laquelle nous devons nous pencher, car les Parlements continueront d'exister pendant longtemps et l'intelligence artificielle aura une grande incidence.

Romeo, merci encore, monsieur. J'espère que nous pourrons vous convoquer à tous moments à mesure que nous poursuivons nos délibérations.

(1245)

M. Romeo Saganash:

Bien sûr.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Meegwetch.

Nous allons maintenant entendre Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci de votre présence, monsieur Saganash. Je vous suis reconnaissante de tout le travail que vous faites. Je pense que nous sommes véritablement choyés de vous avoir comme député pour nous aider à faire avancer ce dossier et à rendre le Parlement plus inclusif.

Après le témoignage du greffier, je ne peux pas m'empêcher de penser que je détesterais, dans ce cas-ci, que la perfection devienne l'ennemi du bien. Nous essayons de progresser, et nous essayons de vous donner le droit de parler dans votre langue maternelle, de permettre aux personnes qui vous ont précédé ou qui vous succéderont d'en faire autant.

Vous dites qu'il pourrait y avoir actuellement environ 10 députés qui parlent couramment une langue autochtone. Quelles sont ces langues?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il y a sans aucun doute le déné, que parle ma collègue, la députée Jolibois. C'est également à cause de l'intervention en cri de Robert-Falcon Ouellette que nous sommes ici aujourd'hui. Il s'est exprimé en cinq dialectes cris.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quelles sont les langues autochtones les plus parlées de nos jours?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Le cri.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous dites que le cri est la langue la plus parlée.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Le cri est parlé au Québec, en Ontario, au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan, en Alberta, au Dakota du Nord et au Montana.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vois. Je me disais justement aussi...

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il y a environ 450 000 locuteurs.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... qu'il y a également des témoins des comités et d'autres députés qui ont siégé au fil des ans pour qui l'anglais ou le français n'est peut-être pas la première langue. Il arrive donc parfois qu'ils fassent des erreurs lorsqu'ils s'expriment. Nous devons parfois nous fier au contexte pour comprendre ce qu'ils essaient de dire. Il arrive donc que l'exactitude dont nous parlions plus tôt en souffre lorsque nous recourons à des interprètes relais.

Je suis certaine que ces personnes sont parfois réduites au silence, mais nous ne voulons pourtant pas réduire au silence ceux dont l'anglais ou le français n'est pas la première langue. Lorsque nous ne trouvons aucun interprète pour certaines langues, nous devons relayer ces langues en passant par le français ou l'anglais. Diriez-vous que c'est encore acceptable pour nous de procéder ainsi? Ne pourrions-nous pas tout simplement accepter la perte de peut-être quelques mots et nous servir du contexte pour comprendre l'ensemble du discours?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Dans la mesure où nous reconnaissons le problème, je pense que nous pouvons le gérer. Disons que ma mère se fait élire en 2019. Elle parle seulement cri. Grâce à son budget de députée, elle pourrait certainement engager son fils comme traducteur. Eh bien, elle ne serait pas autorisée à le faire, mais je pourrais certainement l'aider à écrire en anglais ce qu'elle me dit.

Elle compte parmi les meilleurs locuteurs du cri au monde. J'ai parlé cette langue pendant les sept premières années de ma vie, avant de me retrouver dans un pensionnat. C'est elle qui m'a appris le cri. C'est la raison pour laquelle, même si on a essayé de me faire oublier ma langue pendant 10 ans au pensionnat, les racines de ma langue parlée, mon cri parlé, sont si fortes. C'est à cause d'elle. C'est la raison pour laquelle je ne l'ai pas oublié.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Y a-t-il des cours officiels de cri, ou la langue est-elle transmise par la famille?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il y en a certainement. Il y a même maintenant des applications. J'en connais deux qu'on peut télécharger. On peut saisir n'importe quel mot anglais ou français, et...

(1250)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Y a-t-il des cours d'interprétation?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vraiment. Bien.

Il doit forcément y avoir des langues pour lesquelles aucun cours n'est offert. J'ai parfois l'impression que nous essayons de mettre la charrue devant les boeufs. Peut-être que si nous autorisions les gens à parler ces langues, ce qui rendrait immédiat le besoin de traduction, nous arriverions au point où les gens seraient intéressés par des cours en bonne et due forme. Nous finirions éventuellement par trouver la solution parfaite. C'est essentiellement là que je veux en venir.

Pour terminer, je veux juste revenir à ce que mon collègue David Graham semblait demander. Comme première étape, qu'est-ce qui constituerait selon vous, en tant que défenseur de votre langue, un point de départ satisfaisant? Je pense que la traduction simultanée serait formidable. L'intelligence artificielle pourrait être utile plus tard, mais à ce stade-ci et dans le contexte actuel, qu'est-ce qui constituerait selon vous un point de départ satisfaisant?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je pense que la première mesure à prendre consiste à s'assurer que la Chambre, le Parlement, possède l'espace et la technologie nécessaires à cette fin.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quel genre de technologie?

M. Romeo Saganash:

J'aurais par exemple préféré que Priscilla soit dans la pièce plutôt qu'au fond — ce genre de chose.

Je veux ajouter une chose à propos des langues autochtones, pour donner suite à vos observations. J'assiste à des réunions de l'Assemblée des Premières Nations depuis 30 ans. J'y ai souvent vu des politiciens recevoir une ovation, mais la plus importante est celle qui a été offerte au premier ministre lorsqu'il a annoncé qu'il y aurait une loi sur les langues autochtones. Il a eu droit à une chaleureuse ovation.

Donc, si vous voulez sérieusement protéger et revitaliser les langues autochtones au pays, eh bien, allons-y. Je ne sais pas en quoi consistera la mesure législative de la ministre Joly. À ma grande surprise, je n'ai pas été consulté au sujet de la préparation ou de l'élaboration de la loi, malheureusement. Je ne sais donc pas si ce que nous faisons ici pourrait en faire partie. Je l'ignore. Je n'ai pas vu ce qui se prépare.

J'espère que nous pourrons aller de l'avant, car il est dangereux de tromper la confiance des gens. Je pense que de nos jours, après 150 ans, nous ne pouvons plus tromper la confiance des peuples autochtones.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci. Nakurmiik.

Monsieur Nater, s'il vous plaît.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour revenir à la loi sur les langues autochtones, savez-vous quand on peut s'y attendre? Vous a-t-on donné un préavis?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je n'en ai aucune idée. Comme je le disais, je n'ai pas été consulté. J'ai vu la proposition du sénateur Joyal. Elle porte essentiellement sur les programmes. Pour que la loi ait un réel impact, il faut y inclure des choses qui comptent réellement. Mais je n'ai pas été consulté, alors...

M. John Nater:

Vous seriez prêt à y contribuer...

M. Romeo Saganash:

Bien sûr.

M. John Nater:

... comme d'autres députés, de même que des intervenants de partout au pays, j'en suis sûr. Ce serait bienvenue.

Vous avez parlé tantôt de créer des mots pour le monde du hockey, entre autres, et pour le Parlement. Y a-t-il un processus officiel entourant la création de ces mots, ou s'agit-il d'une pratique traditionnelle des membres et des aînés de la collectivité? Ou ces mots sont-ils créés en cas de nécessité? Comment la langue évolue-t-elle? S'agit-il d'une évolution naturelle ou plutôt d'un processus encadré?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Nos aînés sont nos institutions; ils sont nos porte-parole. C'est généralement par eux que la langue évolue. C'est long, parce qu'il faut s'asseoir avec eux, leur expliquer ce qu'on cherche, ce que le terme doit représenter. Quand ils sont certains d'avoir bien compris, ils peuvent proposer jusqu'à quatre ou cinq mots, et c'est à eux de déterminer celui qui convient le mieux.

(1255)

M. John Nater:

Cela se décide à l'intérieur de la collectivité.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

C'est un processus de collaboration, j'imagine. C'est fascinant.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Nous avons eu un comité sur la langue crie pendant un certain temps, mais plus maintenant.

M. John Nater:

Est-ce que les anciens membres du comité sont toujours actifs? Nous pourrions peut-être leur demander de témoigner devant le Comité.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je crois que oui.

M. John Nater:

Excellent.

Cela m'amène à ma prochaine question. Vous avez dit que les délibérations du gouvernement de la nation crie se déroulent entièrement, ou presque, en langue crie? Les délibérations sont-elles traduites en français ou en anglais, ou est-ce que cela se passe exclusivement en cri?

M. Romeo Saganash:

C'est ce qui fait que la langue crie est si vivante encore aujourd'hui, parce que toutes nos délibérations sont en cri. Cela encourage la nouvelle génération à maintenir la langue. Seules les délibérations du gouvernement régional, composé de 11 Cris et de 11 non-Cris, sont traduites en français, en anglais et en cri.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, ils ne sont pas sur notre liste de témoins potentiels pour le moment, mais ce sera à envisager.

Je veux terminer en vous remerciant pour votre présence et votre éloquent témoignage. On a tenté de vous arracher à votre langue pendant cette terrible époque de notre histoire qui a été marquée par les pensionnats indiens. Merci de vous faire le défenseur et le porte-parole de cette langue aujourd'hui.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Après avoir passé 10 ans au pensionnat, je me suis promis de faire deux choses: retourner vivre en forêt, ce que j'ai fait pendant deux ans; et me réconcilier avec les gens qui m'ont fait interner pendant 10 ans, et c'est une autre façon pour moi d'y arriver. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon arrière-grand-père parlait cri et ojibwa, de même qu'anglais et français. Il n'était pas autochtone. C'était la langue du commerce à l'époque. Ce fut un choc pour moi d'apprendre, encore jeune, qu'il était parfaitement normal pour l'homme blanc de parler ces langues il y a quelques générations. Je ne peux que présumer que cela s'est perdu par choix.

Votre proposition est d'une grande importance, et je suis tout à fait vendu à l'idée. Mais je m'intéresse d'abord au côté logistique. Comment y arriver, en attendant que le rêve de Douglas Adams se réalise et que nous ayons tous un poisson de Babel dans l'oreille?

À quoi ressemblerait donc un préavis raisonnable? Vous avez dit en début de séance que vous étiez totalement disposé à aviser la Chambre de votre intention de vous exprimer dans une autre langue.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Tout dépend de l'emplacement des interprètes. C'est ce qui complique un peu les choses. Si j'avais une question pour demain matin, il suffirait de vous en informer aujourd'hui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que le droit de parole est déjà assuré. Nous voulons respecter le droit d'être compris, qui est encore plus important, selon moi. Je crois qu'il faut faire la distinction.

Je ne sais pas si vous étiez dans la salle à ce moment-là, mais j'ai mentionné tout à l'heure aux greffiers qu'il est important que les interventions faites à la Chambre en langue autochtone — quelle qu'elle soit — puissent être traduites et publiées dans le hansard, sans que vous ayez à fournir cette traduction. Je crois que c'est une attente raisonnable.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faudrait à tout le moins avoir la traduction avant l'impression du hansard en fin de législature. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes d'accord avec moi, ni ce que vous pensez des registres écrits.

Avez-vous des commentaires à formuler à ce sujet?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il faudrait évidemment attendre plus de 24 heures, mais c'est certainement faisable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À noter qu'en ce moment, nous avons accès à l'interprétation du cri, mais pas vers le cri. Est-ce que cela en ferait aussi partie? Est-ce que cela comprendrait toutes les délibérations de la Chambre, y compris celles des comités? Est-ce que la traduction se ferait dans les deux sens? Comment envisagez-vous cela?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Ce sera un choix à faire. Pour aider la Chambre des communes, je n'exigerais pas qu'on traduise de l'anglais au cri. C'est un compromis que je suis prêt à faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme nous l'avons mentionné, il y a quelque 56 langues autochtones au pays. Lesquelles devrions-nous inclure? Lesquelles pourraient être exclues? Comment faire cette détermination?

(1300)

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je ne crois pas qu'il faille en exclure. Mon droit de parole constitutionnel a autant de valeur que celui de tout autre Canadien, peu importe sa langue.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez raison.

Je veux savoir comment je me débrouille: yimstimagesu.

M. Scott Simms:

Je l'ai ici.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est meilleur que moi.

Allez-y.

M. Scott Simms:

Désolé de voler votre temps.

Priscilla a eu la gentillesse de l'épeler pour moi et de me donner la prononciation. Si vous voulez prendre des notes, c'est yimstimagesu.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Oui, yimstimagesu.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Alors, on le prononce « yum-shta-ma-jeh-suu ».

Merci, Priscilla.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ai-je encore du temps?

Le président:

Pas vraiment, mais allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'abord, que pensez-vous de l'interprétation à distance? Est-ce une solution qui vous paraît acceptable? S'il est impossible d'avoir un interprète sur place, est-ce que cela pourrait se faire à distance?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Oui, si c'est possible.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

La deuxième chose est probablement plus difficile à imaginer. Le jour où vous pourrez vous lever à la Chambre des communes et vous exprimer en cri, avec interprétation, qu'allez-vous ressentir, vous et les citoyens que vous représentez?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Ce ne sera pas que pour moi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Ce sera pour tous les Autochtones. Ce sera pour tous les Canadiens, en fait, nous tous. Ce sera une victoire pour nous tous, pas seulement pour moi.

Des députés: Bravo!

M. Romeo Saganash: En ce sens, il s'agira bien sûr d'un moment historique, mais ce sera une victoire pour le Canada.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien, merci.

Le président:

Merci.

David.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, juste avant que vous ne leviez la séance, j'aimerais revenir au comité sur la langue crie dont il a été question. Pourrais-je demander aux analystes de nous donner un peu de contexte à ce sujet? Cela pourrait nous être utile.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, yimstimagesu, d'avoir été des nôtres.

Je remercie également Priscilla Bossum, l'interprète, de s'être déplacée aujourd'hui. C'est une traduction historique.

Merci à tous les membres du Comité pour leur excellent travail.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on March 20, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.