header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-03-22 PROC 94

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1110)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good morning, and welcome to the 94th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Today we're continuing our study on the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

Just before we do that, though, I want to quickly do some committee business. Next Thursday, when we normally meet, is now on a Friday schedule, and that would be during question period, so my assumption is we may want to postpone that meeting. Is anyone opposed to that?

Some hon. members: No.

The Chair: The second thing is I have a letter here from Mr. Christopherson that I will just read out for the record. I just wanted to send a quick note to you and our committee colleagues to say that I have thoroughly enjoyed my time on PROC and I will miss the opportunity to work with such a passionate and dedicated group of MPs. I am proud of the work we have accomplished, and although committee members didn't always see eye to eye, we always remained respectful of each other and did our best to find common ground. PROC is really a special committee and I know you will all continue to do great work on behalf of all parliamentarians and Canadians. I would like to give a special thanks to you, Larry, for your excellent work as Chair. Following in the footsteps of Joe Preston was never going to be easy but you have matched his stature and are an important part of our committee's success. And of course, I would like to give a big thanks to our staff and analysts whose professionalism and expertise always make us look smarter than we sometimes are. Thank you again and best of luck to the committee on your future work. Sincerely, David Christopherson, MP Hamilton Centre

Today's first witness is Ms. Georgina Jolibois, member of Parliament for Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River. Ms. Jolibois will deliver her opening statement in Dene, and once again we have made arrangements for interpretation into both official languages.

Welcome to our committee, Ms. Jolibois. You may now proceed with your opening statement. Thank you very much for coming. Mahsi cho.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, NDP) (Interpretation):

Thank you. I'm glad to be here.

This morning is a nice day. Sitting here together, I'm happy to be here. I'm thankful to the House committee. Thank you for allowing me to speak my language. I'm thankful to the people on this committee for the opportunity to speak my language.

The reason I'm sitting here speaking my language is that when we're sitting there in the House of Commons, I'm not allowed to speak my Dene language. I speak English and I don't speak French.

What I want to talk about is where I'm from and my culture and my job, I want to talk to you about that.

I was born in La Loche, Saskatchewan. My parents brought me up with my Dene culture. That's why I am a Dene person.

I'm here to ask you to let Dene be spoken in the House of Commons. That's why I'm here. I'm thankful for that with all my heart.

It's difficult to speak my Dene language with my Liberal colleagues or MP Romeo Saganash.

When we come to Ottawa, the way I live is different from when I go back to my community. I was mayor of the community of La Loche for 12 years. I was there for a long time, helping out the community of La Loche. I did a lot of work for my community.

In 2015, I entered politics to be an MP for Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River. I was voted in to be here today. I'm a member from the La Loche community, a Dene person. Living in La Loche, my community, we spoke Dene, living our culture. We are surrounded by media, TV. The CBC channel was introduced in 1979. Other than that, there was nothing. We learned O Canada through the CBC.

Through my culture, my grandparents taught me to live my traditional life—fishing, snaring rabbits, setting a fishnet. We survived on that. It's our source of food.

I graduated from high school, from grade 12, in La Loche. I spoke Dene all the time with my colleagues. Becoming an adult, I learned English. When I graduated from high school, I went to university. I relocated to Saskatoon. I moved to a larger centre and from there I learned to speak more English. I'm still learning to speak English, and I'm proud to be a speaker of the English language too.

(1115)



Where I'm located, there are people who speak the Cree language, the Michif language, and also the Dene language. When I get back to my community, we speak the Dene language all the time. There are quite a few speakers of that language in our area in what we call northern Saskatchewan. Fond du Lac, Black Lake, and Hatchet Lake are Dene communities. Patuanak, Dillon, and Turnor Lake are also Dene communities.

There are also Dene people out in Manitoba. In Alberta, we have Dene people living close to Saskatchewan. In the area of the Northwest Territories, there are also Dene people.

This is a big deal, and I'm thankful that we're sitting here together and talking about it—not just me, but all together—with people to look at us and for children to understand and to watch us, to say that this is what've we've done, and also, in terms of the education system, to say that this is what we're asking and what we're doing for our language. It's difficult.

What I'm talking about is that when I was elected as an MP, when I first tried tried to get elected to the House of Commons, they asked me to speak Dene at the House of Commons. That's what they told me. That's why it's still with me today. It's because I'm a member now. Recently I became a member, and I remember that once the people asked me to speak Dene in Parliament.

The person who is speaking the Dene language is here. We grew up together in the same community. We both speak Dene and we both speak English. The person who sits here understands English, and he's quite a ways from home.

There are a lot of people, I guess, who know Dene. I won't be the only person here in the House of Commons. There are a lot of Dene people, young people. If they want to be an MP in the future, if they get on the ballot, they might win. To give them an opportunity is why I'm asking for this. It's for the future, for our Dene people to look at us and to be proud of us for what we're doing.

Sometimes we don't all agree. We were at the educational institutions to talk about the Dene language. If we do this together, in Canada here, there are a lot of us here—not only Dene people, but also people speaking the Cree language. There are a lot of aboriginal people in Canada. There are a lot of aboriginal people in the provinces, in Newfoundland and the Northwest Territories, and in Nunavut and Yukon. There are also a lot of aboriginal people in B.C. They all think about speaking their languages and about talking about their languages in Canada.

I'm a member, and I'm a Canadian citizen from La Loche, Saskatchewan. I remember the way my grandparents taught us a long time ago and what they used to say. One of them was a chief.

(1120)



They always told us to remember where you're from based on your language. If you have the opportunity to speak Dene, you speak Dene. That's why, in Canada.... I can speak in English after this.

If we make a commitment, we can really try hard to do it for the younger generation, even the adults. We can speak to them and tell them to have a strong mind, a strong heart, and to remember where they're from. That's the way we'll be in Canada. We are here together, being proud and working together.

Aboriginals also speak their Michif language. When Louis Riel was here, he probably thought the same way too. They give us the opportunity to get something. People say to ask politicians for something, so they can get something from them, but I think we can do this together.

The interpreter is from my community. He went to school, and there's not only him. There are a lot of people in our community who can speak and translate Dene. There's Allan Adam and also Cheryl Herman.

If we get together, we can do this together, and also for you too. I'm happy to be here with you. I'll say it again. In Canada, I know that it's not easy to ask for the opportunity to speak the Dene language. It's not just me. We have to find a way to do it. That's why I'm asking you today.

Thank you very much. This is an opportunity for you to ask questions.

The Chair:

Meegwetch.

I want to also welcome Kennedy Stewart to our committee today, as well as the interpreter in Dene.

Thank you very much. It's great to have you here. It's an exciting second historic day of our meetings.

We're going to make sure that each party at least gets a chance, but can you be generous in sharing your times if there are other members in your party who want to speak?

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

(1125)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you for being here. Thank you for bringing this to our attention the way you have. I really appreciate it.

As I mentioned to our colleague Mr. Saganash two days ago, I think, the right to speak already exists, but the much more important right is the right to be understood, and I think that's a right that we have to address, and it's a very important study in that regard.

One thing we learned that I think took all of us by surprise was that in Cree, there is no word for MP. I heard in the translation that you kept saying “MP” in Dene. Is there a word in Dene for MP that is not English?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

The way we speak and understand our language, the way I'm talking to you right now, is through observation. Sometimes it's difficult to translate. When we say “MP”, the way we talk about it is as a part of government, the top government, the person who's in charge of paperwork.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Technical difficulty—Editor]

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

[Technical difficulty—Editor]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One of the quirks of our system is that when my mike is on, I don't hear the translation anymore. I'll have to make sure it gets turned off properly.

Can you give me a sense of the current population in the country whose first language is Dene? Are there any kind of numbers?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

In my community of La Loche, I'm proud of our children learning to speak English. It's easy for them to learn English, but in our community the kids are still speaking Dene the children on the reservation still speak Dene. Up in the Northwest Territories, Alberta, and Manitoba, there are Dene people. They still speak the Dene language in their communities. At least 5,000 people still speak Dene in that area.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

In your view, what is the process we need to be following? What steps are necessary to ensure that languages that are to be spoken in the House are properly supported? How do you see it working? What ideas do you have to propose?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

Today, among the members of the committee, I'm the only MP who speaks Dene. To speak our language, to translate it, to talk about it, they're here. I think it will be easy to speak our languages in the House of Commons. I think it will be easy to speak Dene in Parliament. In Saskatchewan, Dene speakers can be elected and can speak my language. We have done this before. To do this will be easier.

The way I see it, the people who are working at the House of Commons are going to see what you have done in this committee, what has been done in research. They will look at what people have done before and say, “We can do this in the House of Commons too.”

(1130)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In terms of languages—because there are a lot of indigenous languages in the country, not three or four—what is reasonable? Should any language be available for translation by request? Over the long term, how do you see it? How many languages should be available, and how should we do it?

For the moment, at the start, is it reasonable for you that a notice period is given in order to ensure that a translator is available for your particular speech intervention in question period or whenever it is, and should the translation be bidirectional?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

What do you mean by “bidirectional”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right now we have a fourth channel on our listening system. If you go to channel 4, it says “Den” for Dene, but I don't think anybody is translating in the other direction right now. I'm using that as an example.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

I'm here, yes, but it's not just me. It's also the person who's going to interpret for me. We need to ask for that ahead of time, to get it ready and arrange for the person who's going to interpret for me to come over here to Ottawa from Saskatchewan to prepare for that. In the future, in the 2019 election, whoever is elected will come here, so there might be a Dene person here. It might be difficult to speak Dene if we're still working on this Dene interpretation, but in the future it might be easier with technology, and not only in the Dene language. There might be two to 10 Dene speakers sitting here with us. In the future it might be easier for this to happen.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When you arrived as a member of Parliament, did anybody in your orientation ask you what languages you spoke besides English and French?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

No. Nobody asked me. I speak English. It's easy for me to speak English. Some people think I only speak English. When I had the opportunity, when I got elected, I spoke Dene with the NDP people I work with.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chairman, is it seven-minute rounds this time?

The Chair:

Yes, but share it if you have to, because we may not get back to you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We may not have a second round. Okay, I'll try to reflect that.

I want to say that although I didn't know it at the time, my first experience with the Dene language was back in the mid-eighties when I was helping to organize something called the student commonwealth conference. High school kids would fly into Ottawa from all over Canada to have a simulated commonwealth heads of government meeting. We got to host a couple of kids from Fond du Lac for a little while. All I remember is that they were nice kids, and now they'd be middle-aged people like me. Anyway, that was my first experience.

I want to start with some questions about understanding the language itself, and part of this is my own natural curiosity. There are, of course, many aboriginal languages in Canada. Some have a very small number of speakers and are considered by UNESCO to be endangered. It has a ranking for whether a certain language is endangered, ranging from vulnerable to definitely endangered to severely endangered to critically endangered. Other ones, it seems to me, are in a position such that their long-term viability is very high.

I want to ask as a starting point whether you think the Dene language is endangered, or is it likely, demographically, to survive in the future?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

The way I think about it is that I'm proud when I go back to my community in northern Saskatchewan, either in Fond du Lac, Black Lake, Hatchet Lake, or La Loche, and in surrounding communities like Dillon, Patuanak, and Cold Lake, Alberta, too. Children, adults, or whoever are strong English speakers. To speak our language in the far north, people write in their language, but how can we maintain that? We're fighting really hard to do that.

The way I think about it for the future, when we're living for a long period of time, we're going to keep our language alive.

(1135)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry about the delay. That's the translation.

I took a look at the Wikipedia articles. I consulted Wikipedia, and first of all I typed in “Dene language”. It sent me to “Chipewyan”.

What is the distinction between Dene and Chipewyan?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

I am a Dene Tsuut'ina person. When we speak about who we are, we say “Dene Tsuut'ina”. Chipewyan, the Cree people, gave us the Chipewyan name. Historically, where the Dene people were living, they were using pointed hats. It came from the way that we were dressed. We don't use the word “Chipewyan”. We say Dene.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I get the impression that historically that happens a lot. When the Europeans arrived, they asked the people they had already met who those people were over there, and then they adopted the word that was given from one outside group about another group.

It sounds like that's what happened here.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

With the people who came over, Hudson's Bay Company people and also the priests and French people, some of our language is in French. We adopted some words in French, like bread. We also say beaucoup. That's the way we learned our language. The priests who stayed with us and lived with us learned how to speak Dene, and they spoke Dene with us.

It's not like that anymore. When they come from their country, some of the priests or missionaries use their first language, and then they learn how to speak Dene. The priest who is currently in La Loche is a speaker of the Dene language. Our bishop is also a Dene speaker. He does services in our Dene language too. The people in the schools are also speakers of Dene. That's the way we speak our language together and understand it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have one last question. I think I have been using up all the time for my party here.

I have one last question that relates very specifically to having a translator for yourself. I'm going to ask this, if I get the chance, to our next witness as well.

I don't know if this is true with Dene, but some languages have within them different dialects that are to some degree mutually comprehensible, to some degree not mutually comprehensible. That's true with any language—English, French, German. I don't know if it's true of Dene. Given that you have been elected as a member of Parliament, ought we to try, if we're attempting to create translation facilities, to rely upon you to be able to identify where the pool of translators is who will be most helpful in allowing translation for parliamentary proceedings when you're speaking Dene?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

I think it's easy, because there are a lot of people who can speak our Dene language to interpret for us. There's one right here now.

The way that we keep our language is to be strong about it. We speak English pretty well, and we also speak Dene pretty well, not only in Saskatchewan but among people from Manitoba and the Northwest Territories. Alberta is the same too, I think.

In terms of what you're asking me, we understand two dialects, the “t” dialect and the “k” dialect. For me as a Dene, I use the “t” dialect. From the far north, there is a “k” dialect. When we say, “Let's go”, we use the “t” language, and in the far north they use the “k” dialect. There are differences in saying the words in Dene.

(1140)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mahsi cho.

Mr. Stewart is next.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby South, NDP):

Thank you. Thanks for presenting and thank you for the welcome.

I grew up in rural Nova Scotia, and until I was about 14 I had kind of a one-nation concept of what Canada was. I was taught that John A. Macdonald somehow failed to have a unitary style of government and that we've had some compromise. Then through the sovereignty association referendum and the Constitution talks in 1982, I developed what was kind of a standard two nations concept of what Canada was.

It wasn't until 1993, with Meech Lake, when I was back at university, that I was introduced to the idea of a three nations concept of what Canada was, and I think I definitely subscribe to that now. It was an evolution in my thinking, and I think what you're presenting here today is what a three nations concept of Canada looks like in practical terms.

For example, in translation in the House, we have English and French readily available, and that reinforces the idea of two nations, but when we talk about a three nations concept—the third nation, of course, being very many nations of indigenous origin—how do we accommodate that? How do we reflect that in our institutions? I think that's why these discussions are so important. It's because that's what we're doing here. We're discussing how to have a Parliament where we talk about our future and how that would come through in our day-to-day activities here.

Therefore, I really thank you for this experience today. It is fulfilling what I hope we can achieve as a country.

I have a question to you. How do you see this proceeding, and how likely do you think it is that we'll actually achieve this equal recognition of founders of Canada?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

Thank you for asking me that question. I think about this a lot, the way I'm going to speak Dene in the House of Commons. I'm an MP, and you are MPs here too. It's different when I speak my language. Some people speak English and French. Where I come from, in my community, the way we think about it—the way we grew up as indigenous people, Dene people, Métis people, people who are living in the north—is we say we are the first people. We grew up here. We lived here.

When you say “up to three nations”, I'll tell you the way we think about it. I think there should be four nations, the way I think about it. There are the people who came over here and are living here, people who will be working here. When we say “coast to coast” from Newfoundland to B.C., we help out the people who come over, and some people learn English and are recognized as Canadian citizens to give them the opportunity. For them, I consider that a third nation.

As Dene people and Métis people, there are a lot of us here. From our origins by being here, if we count that in, it would be difficult. When we speak, we say “nation to nation”. The way I think about it, the way we think about it, for the Denesuline and the Cree language, we're always put to the back of the land. From now, sitting here, sitting in front, we want to work together for young people. From where? Indigenous people say that, even from the far north. Even the Métis people say to fight for that. That's the way I think about it.

(1145)

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Great. Time's short here, and I'm just wondering if there are other things you'd like to add that perhaps you haven't been able to say yet, things that you've reflected on through the questions, or something that perhaps you weren't able to cover in your initial speech.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Interpretation):

I'll say it again. Things are easy nowadays. Sitting here together, using technology, we learned a lot from that, talking about it from wherever we're staying. Because of that, speaking the Dene language in Parliament and having an interpreter position created—we have a lot of money, a lot of funds, for that. A lot of money is flowing to do things together, so I think it will be done, but we have to make a mental commitment to help each other out. If we don't think that way, I think we'll move a step backwards.

We talk about constitutional rights in English. We're asking for that.

The Chair:

Are there any more questions from any members of the committee?

I'd like to thank you very much. I'd also like to thank your Dene interpreter, Julius Park. Mahsi cho. I think this is a very historic meeting, the first meeting we've ever had in Dene, interpreted on Parliament Hill, so you're part of history. Thank you very much. I think you sense the goodwill on this committee to proceed on this.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

We'll suspend to change interpreters.

(1145)

(1150)

The Chair:

Good morning.

Welcome back to the 94th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs on the day after the anniversary of our filibuster.

For scheduling, the witnesses for the meeting we were going to have next Thursday will be at the first meeting after Easter.

Our second witness today is Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette, the member for Winnipeg Centre, who really initiated this whole process.

Committee members will recall that the Speaker's ruling of June 20, 2017, was in response to his question of privilege concerning the use of indigenous languages in the House.

Thank you for being here, Mr. Ouellette, and starting this process. It's my understanding you'll be delivering your opening statement in Cree. As was the case at our last meeting, we've arranged simultaneous translation in Cree.

Thank you very much. This is very exciting and historic, and you may proceed.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre, Lib.)(Interpretation):

Hello, my friends, my relations. It is good to see you today.

We have lost our languages. Please help us. I have walked a long pathway.

Long ago, in the winter, I walked about while I was on this cold land. I visited 41 first nations communities. I met so many Cree, my relatives: the Dakota, the Oji-Cree, the Plains Ojibwe or Saulteaux, the Métis, the French people. I heard them, the people, wish for their children to have flourishing lives.

In this great structure, you have money. In the beginning, I was told my work has started for all Canadians. We must all work collectively together, since Canada has written the promises and how processes unfold.

We are related. If things have not happened right, we will change things. Help me. Help me to respect one another.

Treaties are about respect and brotherhood. Indigenous peoples have always had treaties. The Cree and the Blackfoot made treaties using common sense. There was to be no fighting in the winter, as it was too cold and not good to move women, children, and aged populations from their homes to different locations at this time.

If one tribe made war, they sought out the other chief and explained the reason they were making war. Quite often it was that the young warriors had too much energy and were bothering the whole camp. The old people knew that the best way to do things was to send them off to war against the enemy they knew. The two chiefs would talk, and one would be given time to move the women and children and old people. It worked for them, and later in peacetime they would talk about it.

The creation stories we tell about Weysakechak are about treaty. Those world treaties are about water, earth, air, fire, and of course the Great Spirit.

For instance, when a child is born, the mother's water breaks, and this signals that the child is to be born. He then gets his first breath of precious, sacred air, and he is a live human being. He's then wrapped in the warm hide and fur of an animal and enjoys the warmth of the fire and the life-giving milk of his mother. Soon he is playing with the other children outside on their own land, which happens to be Canada.

When the Creator finished creating the land, sea, and air creatures, he called everyone forward and told them to ask for the gifts they wanted to have for themselves, and thus he made treaties with all life on earth. Many of them asked to serve mankind, but they were warned about mankind and what he would be like as the best and worst of all creation. They accepted and understood his warnings. For their understanding and sacrifices, they were granted a place in the hereafter. They would and should be honoured by man in ceremony, which indigenous peoples still do to this day.

It is for these teachings that we respect air, fire, and water in a sacred way. They are included in all our prayers and ceremonies. It is a good way to live.

We all have our own languages, understandings, and ceremonies. As indigenous peoples, we respect the earth and all the children of the feathered, furred, scaled, two-legged, four-legged, and winged citizens. We know mankind is the only creation that breaks treaties continuously. The others have never broken their sacred treaty with us.

(1155)



By our own common sense, we must pray for the earth and all who dwell here. For over a hundred years, we have signed treaties between our different peoples and countries. The original idea was not about subservience, but rather respect.

Languages must be used to be useful. They must be used by our children in schools, in the homes, and in the rest of society. Our languages must be on TV so that we can see and understand why, where, and when, and see what is happening in our Parliament. It is important to have language.

I saw a written sign on the entrance to a graveyard in Lac la Ronge in northern Saskatchewan. It said, “If we could not as brothers live, let us here as brothers lie”.

Man is represented by fire. Interestingly enough, women are represented by water. With just a single word or a single glance, she can destroy or elevate us. Personally, I would rather be a brother to my fellow mankind than perish in a dirty flood of prejudice, jealousy, anger, and fear.

Language can convey respect and meaning. It represents culture and it defines who we are, our self-identity. It is about learning, education, and knowledge.

Elder Winston Wuttunee asked me to talk about how language is important and related to our belief structure. There are four elements—water, air, land, and fire. Language is related to these four elements. When you take a word in Cree and break it down, there are additional meanings within that word.

Let us take water as an example. Water is women, life, connection to all of creation. It is beauty itself.

Let us look at air. There's fresh air and dirty air. It all has an impact on how healthy we are. It is life, breath. Animals fly in air. We need good air to be healthy.

Let's look at land. We live and we die. When we die, we become the land, and the land is our relatives. It feeds the grasses. It feeds the bison. It feeds us. It is us.

Think upon fire. Fire is also life. It keeps us warm—to cook, to survive. It cleans the land. It is also men. It works best with water.

Let us take one word of the Cree language, nikamoun, which means “to sing”. Nika means “in front”, and moun means “to eat”. Nikamoun, therefore, means “to be fed song”, as it is. If you break it down further, it could mean “to be fed food by the one in front”. This could also be the Creator. To take it a bit further, it means “whoever is in front is feeding us”. This is where the greed for money becomes our sustenance. This has quickly become a starvation diet for us all—nature and mankind too. Do we have the responsibility and the ability to respond, to learn and save ourselves, our children, our mankind, and our world?

Without language, who are we as individuals? We become without a past, unable to understand the thoughts of the past, unable to understand our ancestors in ceremony. They in turn are unable to understand us when we can't communicate in our own language.

Our modern Parliament has a role to play in helping indigenous peoples. You can add to the scales of justice, ensuring that our Canadian languages, our indigenous languages, do not become museum pieces relegated to the back of anthropological shelves on linguistics but are living, alive, and adapting to a modern world—yet they must always remain spiritually connected to the past.

I dream of a moment when the Canadian state, which has for too long tried to ignore and terminate these languages, is part of the process in Parliament of breathing life into our common languages.

Tapwe. Thank you very much.

(1200)

The Chair:

Thank you for your eloquence. It's a very historic moment here, starting this process.

We'll now go to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Ouellette, thank you for being here and for bringing this forward in the House. It is entirely to your credit that we're having this study. I want to make sure that's very clearly on the record.

That said, I'd like to know about the process you went through that brought you to bring a point of privilege in the first place. Can you tell us what happened, what steps were taken, who you contacted, and how we got here?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Thank you very much.

On May 4, I rose in the House of Commons on an S. O. 31. It was an important issue because there was violence occurring against indigenous women in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Some had been killed and burned alive, set afire during parties, by people who did not respect women. In order to have perhaps a deeper impact—because a lot of politicians will raise these issues, but sometimes we're ignored and not everyone hears the message—I wanted to make sure that the people who needed to hear it most, especially some young men, would hear that message, so I decided to speak in Cree.

I expected when I wrote the little one-minute speech that it would be translated in the House that I would have the simple courtesy of one minute to be able to express that language so that all people could understand what I was saying. Unfortunately, the interpretive and translation services were not able to provide that service because we can't do it under the current Standing Orders. I understand. Bureaucracy has a way of functioning and working, and bureaucracy is important, but at the same time it's important for that message to get out.

I was dismayed when other MPs could not understand what I was saying, nor were my words recorded within the Hansard. I have spoken many times in Cree in the House, and it's not even an accurate representation of some of the speeches. It simply says the member has spoken in Cree. I might have spoken for over a minute—two, three, four minutes—in Cree, but no one knows what I said.

I brought this issue up as a point of privilege to the Speaker a few weeks after that. I spoke to a number of lawyers and people involved in language issues across Canada, especially people involved in francophone language issues for minority linguistic rights across Canada, learning from them about some of the processes that they had gone through and trying to find out what would relate to indigenous peoples.

I believe one of our colleagues spoke previously to section 35 of the Constitution Act, which states: “The existing aboriginal and treaty rights of the aboriginal peoples of Canada are hereby recognized and affirmed.”

A friend of mine, Karen Drake, has written about this extensively. She believes that they do fall within this provision. Some people have even launched a constitutional challenge, arguing that not only does the federal government have a negative obligation not to stifle aboriginal languages or to simply just ignore them but that it has a positive obligation to provide the resources necessary for the revitalization of those languages.

I could go on perhaps in another section. I don't want to take up all of your time.

(1205)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one more question and then I will pass it to Mr. Simms, who has questions as well.

In the process of what you went through, did you offer to provide translated text to the translation booth that they could then read into the record as you spoke?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Of course. I provided English, French, and Cree versions, lined up within a chart so that it was very easy to follow. Unfortunately, although it was said that as members we are all honourable, they had to have the assurance—because it is a very professional organization and it does need to have a very high standard in interpretive services—that what I said was accurately represented. They needed assurance that if I had said something a little different, it would be recorded as such in either English or French to make sure that it was proper parliamentary language and also that it was an accurate representation of what was said.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They were saying “spoke in Cree” is more accurate than what you actually said.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Thank you.

The Chair:

Before we go to Mr. Simms, to follow up on that, we're not having the four provinces because they don't do translation, but one of those provinces puts in their Hansard “translation as provided by the member”, so if it's not accurate, that would be your problem. People would know that it's your translation. That's the way they've handled that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Translating for Hansard should be reasonable, because you can translate after the fact.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

It's something to consider for our Standing Orders, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much, Robert. This was really good. I enjoyed that. You were as eloquent as always.

We were just talking about the House, the parliamentary precinct. I want to talk about your riding. This is the same questioning I had for Mr. Saganash when he was here. He brought in an absolutely startling fact, which was that there was no word for “member of Parliament” in Cree until he showed up in 2011. In translation, it's “someone who represents”. They use those words. I find that astonishing. I would like you to comment on Mr. Saganash's situation.

Also, how do you communicate with your community, your riding, householders, social media? How do you do that in the languages?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Mr. Saganash had an excellent point. One of the issues I faced when I arrived here on Parliament Hill was that there was no word for “MP” in the dialect in the west, so after much consultation with a number of elders and going back to some linguists at universities, the term otapapistamâkew was chosen—

(1210)

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's totally different from what he told us.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

That's one who represents or speaks on behalf of others.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. It's the same concept.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

It's the same concept, yes. It's otapapistamâkew. It's a wonderful word, but it was difficult. Even when I arrived I wanted to have that title on my door, and I spent a long time, probably about one year, arguing with the House of Commons administration about whether I was allowed to have that one Cree word with English and French—MP, député, otapapistamâkew—at the same time, and I'm not allowed. My staff held my hand back from taking a marker to write it on the sign, but I will wait for the process to come to a conclusion.

Mr. Scott Simms:

My constituents do that to mine all the time, so go for it.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

About 22% of my riding is indigenous, composed of many different nations. I have Oji-Cree, Dakota, Michif Métis, French Métis—many different groups from across Canada. I have Inuit people as well, but I also represent Filipinos. Generally we work in English.

For me, the issue that we need to look at is that the state has a certain role to play, and if Parliament is to be representative of people in this country and about what we are as Canadians and what we want to be, then all languages that are native or indigenous to this land should have the opportunity of being heard in the House at some point, if it's required by an MP.

It's important because if people can't see themselves in the institutions of the state, then why should they be part of or participate in that state? I still hear many elders say they are not Canadian citizens because indigenous peoples only received the right to vote in the 1960s. It's still very difficult to convince people in many first nations communities that the state, Canada, is here for them and that we all work for everyone, because they don't believe that yet. They don't see it.

This is why I say Parliament does have this role to play in trying to demonstrate in a most symbolic way that we are all in this together.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards is next.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks. Welcome.

Going to your question of privilege and how it all came to be, obviously I know the basis of it, but in preparing that question of privilege and thinking about it and making a decision to come forward with it, did you reach out to other members for discussions about that, either before the question of privilege was raised or with anyone afterwards in arguing it with other members before the ruling was made by the Speaker? Can you maybe just walk me through what kinds of conversations or discussions you might have had?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

I had a conversation with some members and the House leader's office to find out some of the procedures I could use, as I'm a new MP. I could have submitted it to a committee, but obviously some committees are sometimes very busy. I understand that you have an awful lot of work to do. Would you have the time to study it? At what point would I gain enough support?

I thought it was important for me to raise in the House because it was one of absolute privilege, I believe, about being understood. If I speak in the House, I expect to be understood by others, by my fellow MPs, because otherwise it negates what I'm saying. It's as if I'm not even there. It's like dead silence or a black hole of time and words, and no one understands what I say, and if you can't debate me, whatever our ideologies are or whatever our different ideas are, then that would serve no purpose. It's important that I have the ability to be understood.

I learned that the Senate has been doing this for a number of years, that other legislatures in Canada have been doing this, that there were other legislatures in the history of Canada that have been doing this. When you read the parliamentary procedures, you learn that there is a strong history and tradition about how we conduct ourselves in our legislature, and if other Parliaments can do this, like the Manitoba legislature in the 1870s, I don't understand why we can't do this here in the Canadian Parliament, which has access to a large number of resources.

I'm not asking for a billion dollars or even a million dollars. I'm asking for a few translators to have the opportunity to come when it's appropriate and when it's needed to offer translation.

(1215)

Mr. Blake Richards:

You mentioned the Senate and the process that they have in place. What's your knowledge and understanding of it? Was that the type of approach you were looking for in the House of Commons, or what is your position on that?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

The Senate uses translation once in a while, as required. It was actually Senator Charlie Watt—who is not quite retired, or perhaps he has retired—who fought for this around 10 years ago. He spent a considerable amount of his own resources. One issue they faced was around dialects. We all speak a bit of a different language, and we don't have a central state structure. As we know, indigenous nations in Canada do not have a central state structure. There is no central indigenous government with an Académie française that everybody can consult to find out the correct word. [Translation]

How is French supposed to be spoken? That institution determines that we speak it in a certain way. We speak French. The right word is “ordinateur”, not “computer”.[English]

They decide what the words are. They decide what the word for “MP” is. Perhaps Monsieur Saganash's word and way of saying it is better than otapapistamâkew. Perhaps it's his word we should be using, or perhaps my word is the better word, but if you don't have the resources of the state, a central government helping people, working in collaboration, allowing people to come together, and the experts who actually come up with these terms, then these languages will die. Indigenous languages are actually dying in this country.

I heard the previous witness say that perhaps they are endangered. They are all endangered. Cree is endangered. It's one of the most spoken languages on the prairies, and the statistics do not tell the entire story. Statistics Canada, I believe, gets the wrong thing, because people feel an awful lot of shame because they can't speak their language. I don't speak the language very well. I feel an awful lot of shame about that. My parents didn't teach me, and my grandparents refused to teach me, saying, “It's not useful. You don't need it. It's going to cause lots of problems.”

There are also a lot of people who say, “What makes me a man? What makes me an indigenous man?” When I go to ceremonies and I can't understand what's being said all the time, what does that do inside? I sing the songs and I have to think, yes, that word means this, and what does that word mean? If you have to translate for other people, then they have say, “Well, you're pronouncing that word wrong.” Your ancestors can't understand what you're saying; you're asking for their help, but they can't understand you.

In Parliament, the role that I see—my dream, actually—is that in fact perhaps we're not going to be able to save every language out there—let's be realistic—but maybe we can save Inuktitut, maybe Cree, maybe Dene, maybe Anishinaabemowin, maybe four, five, or 10 languages. There are others that are so far gone that the critical mass of speakers is just not there in society to even offer the professional translation services and interpretive services that would be required in a large institution like Parliament.

This is what is needed.

Sorry. I don't mean to take up all your time.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I have a colleague here who wants to get a question in. Would that be okay, Mr. Chair? I have one more question, but would it be okay to allow Mr. Reid...? It might need a little extra time.

The Chair:

Okay. Sure, go ahead.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

I dream of the day when an indigenous grandmother can turn on the TV at home and not have to watch an English-language program with her grandchildren that she's trying to look after. Instead she can turn on CPAC and watch the great debates of Parliament, because there are great debates that go on every day in our legislature. She would be able to hear it in Cree, to hear it on a channel in Inuktitut, in Dene, and watch those debates and be informed about what's going on in our public institutions. She can feel proud that they can hear their language there. The little children will be able to hear it in the background and say, “That language is important. I should try to speak that language.”

(1220)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

I think I have a better understanding of where your position is now. It ties into the next question I wanted to ask.

I know when the Speaker made his ruling, Mr. Saganash indicated—I think it was to the CBC—that he had been working to try to negotiate a solution. From what I've heard from you today, it sounds like your goal is maybe different from what I had understood it to be, and it's not simply about having some interpretation provided.

I asked you about the Senate model. It is actually a broader goal than that: it's to make sure that you're preserving some of the languages and encouraging their use elsewhere as well.

I just wanted to know whether you were aware of the negotiation that was taking place that Mr. Saganash referred to. What do you know about that, and what are your thoughts on that?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

I don't specifically know too much, but I will say is that everything has to start somewhat small. I can't expect tomorrow that we have a full interpretive service and linguistic service with 10 Cree linguists who understand every dialect at the snap of the fingers, but what I'm hoping is we build something over time. I know there have been indigenous MPs who have been in the Conservative Party who are Cree, and who have been in the Liberal Party, and even the NDP. I'm hoping that as more indigenous MPs become elected over time, it builds up. I hope that the more we use it, the more there becomes the opportunity. We're using it maybe 1% of the time, then 5%, 10%, and it becomes something more casual and we become used to it. Then it doesn't count as something that's exotic or different or strange, but something about which people then say that maybe we need to offer this on TV or online on its own little channel. These are things that build up over time.

What I'm hoping is we take our time to actually do it properly, to lay an excellent foundation, because I really do want to save these languages. We are nearing the end. This is it for indigenous languages.

I meet people who come into my office all the time. They say they speak Cree, and I start speaking with them a little. They can't carry on a conversation, yet they say they speak Cree. They want to speak it, and they understand it. The grandparents can speak it and understand it. Their children can only understand it, and our kids can't do any of it.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the indulgence.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the indulgence.

As a fellow vest wearer, I have to start by saying how envious I am of that amazing vest you're wearing.

A really long time ago, 25 years ago, I wrote a book on languages in Canada. It was dealing with official languages, not with aboriginal languages. One of the things that really sank in to me was how remarkably little government measures are able to assist languages to survive and prosper, or alternatively, how they can crush out a language that has vitality. There are many examples one can look at, and an obvious one for me is the attempt of my own...

My ancestors come from Ireland on one side. There are attempts to save the Gaelic language. They made it the official language of the country and they still have great difficulty in overcoming this problem. It's an interesting story to look at.

I'll throw out one of the things I observed with languages for you to think about. It may not be a good idea, but one of the things to think about is that a language that is divided into many subsidiary dialects within the language seems to have less ability to survive. Looking at a European example of this, I look at the fourth official language of Switzerland, which is Romansh. The Romansh romance language is divided into three dialects, which seems to have greatly weakened its ability to survive. In other areas they've tried to make the languages more homogeneous, and within the language itself that involves a certain amount of internal compromise.

I'm wondering whether if that second route was chosen it would help with the survival of the Cree language, which I gather has significant internal distinctions. I simply ask that question to hear what you think about that. [Translation]

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

I agree with that.

If you go to France, you can see that the Langue d'oc still exists. It is a kind of dialect, but it is a different language that includes a lot of French words. But ensuring the very survival of the language is extremely difficult.[English]

You're right, it is very difficult, but I think the great thing about a centralized state that we have, a federation, is that there are the resources of the state to allow the linguists to sit down together to come up with the common terms.

The great thing about Parliament is that we deal with everything. We have debates about everything. We talk about transportation, about security. We talk about health. Do those terms always exist? Are they always the same? If they're not, it's going to force people, the experts, to sit down somewhere and decide on the term that we want to use. Then it's going to take the education system, with Indigenous Services, to make sure these words get out to the communities and the schools and that the teachers in the schools use them.

Then if also we know that there is employment for interpreters, the universities will have the opportunity to end up training people to a professional standard to offer those services. I used to have a program at the University of Manitoba. I was a program director there in the aboriginal focus programs, as a university professor, and one of our certificates, combined with Red River College, was aboriginal languages, but we couldn't run the program because we didn't really have any jobs for people to go to, because there was no need. We don't need Cree.

However, I think if there was an opportunity, people might take up that language and be a language defender, a language warrior, and go out there and promote it and use it every day, and use it at home and in their workplace. We all know what Quebec did in the 1960s. It was quite incredible. They went from having....

(1225)

[Translation]

No French was spoken on the island of Montreal. A lot of people did not like Bill 101, but it still forced the state and the businesses to recognize that speaking French was important.

I lived in Quebec City for 13 years and I understand the mentality. Language structures our thoughts. It is incredible. When I speak French, I think completely differently than when I speak English or Cree. It is really fascinating. If we lose the indigenous languages, we will never get them back.

Words can describe important things. At one point in the year, a flower can be different, although technically it is the same flower. But the word used to describe it may vary with the time of year. The elements that make it up can be useful to a physician at some points of the year but not others. We would lose all that knowledge of the elders because young people do not understand all those words.

Something has to be done, but no one is doing anything. That's why this is historic.[English]

It's historic because you have the opportunity of doing something that no one else has done before. We always talk about the importance of language, but no one actually takes any action in this country. There are very few resources. Everyone says, “Well, you know, maybe we'll write a little children's book here, a little children's book there, with a couple of Cree words and a couple of French words and a couple of English words, so maybe people may understand what's going on”, but it's not enough. We need the state. We need the instruments of the state to help, because it is an important and symbolic way of supporting and making sure that some of these languages survive. Not all of them will, I kid you not, but at least a few will, and that's your importance here. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you.[English]

Go ahead, Mr. Stewart.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you very much, Dr. Ouellette. You give me a lot to think about, and about my own identity too.

I'm a Canadian. I believe in intrinsic equality, and I think that's reflected in our constitution, but what you're making me think about is that I thought forever of indigenous languages as your language. Now I'm thinking of it as my language; I just don't speak it. Since it's my language and I don't speak it, perhaps I should try to protect it.

That's really the value of what you're doing here. You're providing Canadians with a chance to reflect on who they are and what it means to be Canadian, that Canadians are people who speak indigenous languages, and they're part of that discussion. The state should reflect that, because that's what the state does. It's directed by the Constitution. It's directed by the will of the citizens. I think you're spot-on and I really support what you're doing here, as I have told Mr. Saganash as well.

I support investing in this, and I really like your idea of a CPAC channel. I think I'd probably watch that one, because as a Canadian I'd like to learn that language that is mine but that I just don't speak.

You talked about your elders who don't feel Canadian. They don't know that they've invented a word for MP now because you represent them. I think that's what Canada has to mean in the future if we're going to move ahead.

Could you elaborate on what you think are the first steps we have to take to recognize what you've expressed as your dream?

(1230)

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Well, obviously, you have to come up with a report to make a recommendation to the House. That's the important thing.

Then you need to submit it to a vote in some form of motion to the chamber, as in 1956, when they decided to have simultaneous translation or interpretation of the French and English languages in Parliament, and make sure that when we sit in the new West Block chamber, the people's House, the opportunity exists for interpretive services there.

Then the interpretive services need to get to work to convene tables where linguists in Cree, for instance, from across Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba, northern Ontario, and even Quebec sit down to see what the common terms are. If someone decides to say “health care”, how do we say it?[Translation]

What is an MP?[English]

How are we going to say it? How are we going to write it out? Are we going to use syllabics or are we going to use something else? Let them come up with a solution. That's, I think, the first step, and we must take the time to get it right.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Could I ask if you think we should try it with one language first? Do you think that would be acceptable, almost as a pilot to see if we can move it through? Do you think that would be too offensive to others to do it that way?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Well, I'm not sure if there.... I'm sure I'm going to have a bunch of emails and texts from people who speak various languages, but if you look at the Michif language, the Métis language, there are very few speakers left. There are a couple. It's on its last legs, with 500 speakers. Many are very elderly. I'm not sure they have the time. Some might have the time to come up with some terms.

I think we really need to find a couple of languages—maybe three or four—and start to blaze the path with them. I would suggest Cree, Inuktitut, Dene, and Anishinaabemowin or Ojibwa, which is a common term used to describe Anishinaabemowin, to kind of blaze that path.

Then after that, as more MPs also become elected, that would serve as an incentive to people to become involved in the political process, to hear their voices in Parliament, to hear their language in Parliament. Someone might think, “We need a Salish speaker in Parliament. We want to hear the Salish language. Maybe we should become involved in the political process and get one of our people elected to the Conservatives, the NDP, the Green Party, the Liberals—pick a party.”

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you.

The narrative you're suggesting is perhaps a four-language pilot?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

I'm suggesting four, yes.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Then what would be the first step we'd do with those? I know you started to touch on it, but perhaps you could elaborate a little more.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Well, I think you'd need to get a group of linguists together to sit down and come up with the terms. Then do some practice runs to find out how it would sound and how much it is requested.

Obviously we have a little bit of a practice run going here. I tried to do something here today. I spoke in French and in English, and I ensured that the gentleman was hopefully doing translation into Cree at the same time, and listening to the French translation into English and then into Cree, trying to find a way of coordinating that. These are the things that are going to have to start at some point, or could start.

It's up to you. Obviously I don't want to presage your—

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Could I ask you one more question?

You're saying we have to narrow it to perhaps four languages to begin with. Could we start with a certain procedure, such as the S. O. 31s, and try it out through that, or would you suggest we have to do a much broader swath of interpretive...?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

If someone is going to speak in Cree, I think they should probably come up with the speech a little bit beforehand as well. They'd sit down with some of the interpreters and perhaps a linguist and say, “What are the terms you would like to use? What is an appropriate term if I said this and then talked about this? What would you be able to say? Would you understand what I'm saying?” Give some appropriate lead time to people to have those discussions, because it is brand new and it's not been done, and take the time to get it right.

(1235)

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay. Thank you.

Do I still have some time? Okay.

I'd like to be at the first speech. If you give us a little leeway, we can all sit there and listen, which would be great—and respond, I would hope.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Yes, an S. O. 31 sounds interesting.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay. You're suggesting an S. O. 31 and an advance lead on a speech for a government bill or something. You'd be able to say, “I will speak next week to this”, or something like that.

Do you have any other suggestions for how we might practically try this?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

I think you have to give a certain.... I think the Senate right now has a nice system, the 48 hours' notice. Obviously interpreter services still have to compile a list of approved interpreters who can offer this service and who are around to offer this service.

You also want it to be cost-effective in some way. It's good to fly people in from different parts of the country for a few moments, but you want it to be done in a way that is also good on the public purse. This is not a....

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Perhaps we could have a question period when we use all indigenous languages to ask the Prime Minister a question—which he knows well in advance, of course.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Perhaps someday. You never know. That might be very interesting. Take the dream even further.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

As you said, in different languages it's different. The people of the Arctic have a whole bunch of different words for “snow” in Inuktitut. It's not a simple procedure, but you've opened a very important discussion for this nation, and we really appreciate it.

We also appreciate your interpreter, Darren Okemaysim. Mahsi cho. Meegwetch.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

He's from Beardy's and Okemasis First Nation, and from the First Nations University in Saskatchewan.

The Chair:

He's from Beardy's and Okemasis First Nation and the First Nations University. Great. Thank you for being here on this historic day. Meegwetch.

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

[Member speaks in Cree]

The Chair:

Do you have any closing remarks?

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

I just appreciate everything that you're doing.

I must say you probably didn't expect to be dealing with this at the PROC committee, and I apologize for that. I appreciate the Speaker trying to find a path forward for it. You know there were lots of things I could have done. I could have challenged the Speaker's ruling and tried to push a vote in the House, which would have been dramatic and perhaps burned a lot of bridges at the same time.

I really appreciate all of you and the work that you're doing in trying to help make this country a very inclusive and better place for all of us.

Thank you very much.

[Member speaks in Cree]

The Chair:

And reconciled.

Merci. We will suspend for a minute while we change witnesses.

(1235)

(1240)

[Translation]

The Chair:

Good afternoon and welcome. We now resume the 94th meeting of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This afternoon, we are going to examine Bill C-377, An Act to change the name of the electoral district of Châteauguay—Lacolle. The sponsor of the bill, and the hon. member for Châteauguay—Lacolle, Brenda Shanahan, is with us today.

Thank you for joining us. After your presentation, there will be a period for questions from members of the committee. Thereafter, the committee will study the bill clause by clause.

Mrs. Shanahan now has the floor for her presentation.

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan (Châteauguay—Lacolle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Thank you, Chair.

Let me just say that as a first-time member of Parliament, it's been my honour to serve as an official member on—I was just counting—four committees to date, including my current one, but this is the first time that I am appearing as a witness. It's really a thrill. Thank you so much.

Of course, it's about my private member's bill, Bill C-377, An Act to change the name of the electoral district of Châteauguay—Lacolle to...well, you'll soon find out. We've got to keep a little suspense here.[Translation]

Today marks an important milestone in my first initiative after my election, to change the name of our riding from Châteauguay—Lacolle to Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville. I have undertaken this initiative at my constituents' request.

The reason behind the initiative is that the name Châteauguay—Lacolle is inaccurate. If you consult the map of our constituency that you have before you, you will see Châteauguay. On the border to the south, you will also see that the municipality of Lacolle is located outside the constituency of Châteauguay—Lacolle.

I have a theory to explain why the commission chose the name at one time. The fact remains that, for people who live in Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, which is a completely different municipality, there is a major difference between Lacolle and Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle. The municipality located in our territory is Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle. That municipality has its own history, its own institutions and its own raison d'être.

Even before I took office, the residents of Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle had talked to me about this concern, and I pledged to do whatever I had to do to remedy the situation. It is not easy when one is new in politics, given that one doesn't know the system through and through. Nevertheless, I did my research. With that in mind, I am honoured to present my private member's bill for study in committee.

As if it were not enough that the name “Lacolle“ is being erroneously used to designate Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, we have also noticed several times that, even today, for the constituents of both ridings, the name Châteauguay—Lacolle leads to confusion. It also creates misunderstandings for certain stakeholders. The names “Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle” and “Lacolle” are often used interchangeably by various stakeholders, including the national media. This is mainly because the Lacolle border crossing, Quebec's busiest crossing into the United States, is located in Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, not in Lacolle.

Many citizens of Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle have told me that they do not like the name Châteauguay—Lacolle. It hurts their municipal pride and their sense of belonging. We can all understand that.

After much thought and many conversations with citizens and stakeholders in the region, the name Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville emerged as a logical and meaningful choice for a number of reasons.

First, Les Jardins-de-Napierville is the name of a regional county municipality that includes nine of our 15 municipalities. Yes, there are 15 municipalities in my constituency and nine of them are in the RCM of Les Jardins-de-Napierville.

Second, all citizens could identify with the name Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville because the residents of Châteauguay and the five surrounding municipalities in the northwest of the riding can identify with the Greater Châteauguay area. The municipalities of Mercier, Léry and Saint-Isidore are in that Greater Châteauguay area.

Third, the RCM of Les Jardins-de-Napierville is the most important region in Quebec for vegetable production. Vegetables—such as lettuce, carrots, and onions of all kinds—grow very well there. That makes it relatively well-known.

(1245)



Lastly, the name “Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville” is a good representation of the semi-urban, semi-rural nature of our riding.

I must remind you that I am sponsoring this bill for my constituents. A petition calling on the House of Commons to make Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville the new name of our riding is also circulating in the region. People are happy that I am already working on the project.

The petition already has several hundred signatures, including those of the mayors of Napierville, Saint-Cyprien-de-Napierville, and the neighbouring towns.

As elected officials, those mayors are happy to support my initiative on behalf of their citizens, as are my colleagues from the neighbouring ridings: Jean Rioux, MP for Saint-Jean, who is also happy that Lacolle is in his constituency, Anne Minh-Thu Quach, MP for Salaberry—Suroît, and my colleague Jean-Claude Poissant, MP for La Prairie.

As indicated in my bill, Châteaguay—Lacolle was created in 2013, following the redistribution that came into effect with the dissolution of the 41st Parliament in 2015. The current riding was formed from the former ridings of Châteauguay—Saint-Constant and Beauharnois—Salaberry.

Those who were here during the last Parliament may well know and understand the system much better than I do. That said, it seems that the Quebec electoral boundaries commission made an error in naming the new federal riding in the province of Quebec. The fact that Lacolle was already in the constituency of Saint-Jean at the time of the last redistribution probably went unnoticed.[English]

I'm now going to get to the more technical part. The committee has heard my reasons for changing the name of my riding. Let me outline a bit how name changes for federal ridings come about in the first place, and the criteria that any name change must meet.

First of all, given the practice of reviewing electoral district boundaries every 10 years following a new national census, Elections Canada provides the 10 provincial electoral boundaries commissions with guidelines on riding name conventions and best practices.

While Elections Canada will enact any name changes legislated by Parliament, there are practical and technical issues, such as the limited capacity of databases, that must be considered. Thus, riding names must be limited to 50 characters. That may come as a surprise to my colleagues, because we certainly have some with quite interesting and long names. As long as it's 50 characters or less—including hyphens, dashes, and spaces—it meets the criterion. That's so they can fit it onto databases and maps and so on.

“Chateauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville”, I'm happy to report, has 38 characters, including hyphens, dashes, and spaces.

As well, the names selected for ridings should reflect the character of Canada and be clear and unambiguous, and I believe that these criteria are met in the bill, as the names refer to a municipality and an MRC region.

A distinction must also be made, in the spelling of names, between hyphens and dashes. Hyphens are used to link parts of geographical names, whereas dashes are used to unite two or more distinct geographical names. This convention has been respected: a dash is used to separate “Châteauguay” and “Les Jardins-de-Napierville”, with the hyphens in “Les Jardins-de-Napierville”.

On the map, we see that Châteauguay and Les Jardins-de-Napierville are two geographical names that correspond almost entirely to the territory and also conform to the reading of the map from left to right. That's for simplicity and clarity and to respect the geographical locations.

Moreover, the name of an electoral district must be unique, meaning the components of the name are to be used only once, which is indeed the case for the elements of the two names in question.

The guidelines also contain negative characteristics to be avoided, and this is also the case with the name that we have chosen. For example, the name of a riding should be clear in both English and French and, as much as possible, be acceptable without translation into the other official language, so that you don't have multiple versions of multiple translations of the name.

(1250)



The other characteristic to be avoided is the use of cardinal points, such as east or west. You may think, “It seems to me that we do have some names using those cardinal points”, but again let me remind you that Parliament is the ultimate authority in passing these name changes. The guidelines say it is to be avoided because of clumsy translation.

Lastly, the use of actual names of provinces, personal names, and names that are imprecise or contrived from non-geographical sources is also to be avoided.

I think I've raised all the relevant arguments for requiring the name change as proposed by my private member's bill, Bill C-377, as well as demonstrated how the new name respects the guidelines as laid out by Elections Canada.

I'm honoured to have the trust of my constituents in ensuring that a wrong will be righted. I'm confident that the bill will find the support of all my colleagues for our new name, Chateauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville.

I'm now delighted to take your questions. Thank you. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you.

I am going to give each party three minutes.[English]

Hopefully they won't use all that time.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Brenda.

My riding has a lot more than 50 characters in it, but the title is shorter than that. Also, I'm sure we'll all agree, except for a couple of people, that this Bill C-377 is far better than the previous Bill C-377.

I have a couple of quick questions.

Who was your predecessor, and why did they not object to the name change at that time?

When the last redistribution happened, I was working for the member for Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, who might be in the room at this time. They wanted to change the name to Bay d'Espoir—Central—Notre Dame, which in French is Bay d'Espoir—Central—Notre Dame, which is another whole issue. We petitioned the committee at the time—I think it was PROC—and it was changed.

Why wasn't it done at the original change in 2013? Do you know?

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan:

We did our research. It's all available, of course. The commission reports are available online, as well as some of the discussion that happened in Parliament.

There are two things. My new riding was created from two other ridings. The initial report from the commission for Quebec suggested the new name change to Châteauguay—Lacolle. They list it there with all the other name changes, and there are no other comments. However, the second report indeed addresses interventions, consultations, and comments that had come from the public and from MPs about the changes. That report also lists in detail all the different suggestions that were made. They accept some and reject others.

If I just take as an example the riding beside mine, originally the commission had recommended “Salaberry”. Clearly the MP at the time...or consultations were done or citizens spoke up, and they had the name changed to Salaberry—Suroît. I don't have the reasons, but that's an example.

However, in the case of Châteauguay—Lacolle, there's no evidence that any intervention was done.

(1255)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds left.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's okay. I can use that time.

You mentioned that you discussed it with your mayors. Is there any opposition? Does anybody in your riding say this is a terrible idea?

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan:

Absolutely not. For sure, people were floating a few ideas, such as basically just every municipality. Everyone thought, “Well, it should be Châteauguay—Saint-Urbain,” and so on. That was a great topic of conversation and continues to be so.

The first mayor that I spoke with about this was Jacques Délisle, the mayor of Napierville at the time. He suggested Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville. I was floating that around the region, and it's neither here nor there, but he died very suddenly, still a young man. He died playing basketball. Because of the fact that Jacques had suggested the name, people liked it. It really reinforced that name choice.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. My time is up.

What was his name?

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan:

Jacques Délisle was the mayor who died.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater is next.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Madame Shanahan, for joining us as well.

I'm just curious about what made you decide to go ahead with this bill, rather than your original motion M-125 on financial literacy. I understand you have a background in the banking industry and social work. It seems that financial literacy would have been a logical one to go ahead with, especially considering there is a parallel process going on right now with the House leaders in terms of a unanimous consent motion to change multiple riding names.

Was there intervention from anyone encouraging you to not go ahead with the financial literacy motion and instead go with this? I'm just curious about why that decision was made.

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan:

That's an excellent question, because, of course, I had a whole reflection period to go through.

First of all, you have to find out about how one presents a private member's bill and the lottery and where you are in the lottery and how long it takes. I'm number 86. Does that mean I'm only going to show up in three years or I'm going to show up in 86 days? I had no idea.

I had to get my head around that. Naturally a subject like financial literacy is something I've been working on for many years, so I had a lot of ideas about what I wanted to do there, but then there was this thing that was more than a request: it was to right that wrong. That's really what my constituents were telling me.[Translation]

That had to change. They were asking me what was going on in Ottawa and emphasizing that Lacolle was next door.[English]

I think all of us can understand. It's like saying Lacolle is the border crossing. It's like saying that if you have a riding named Pearson, you live at Pearson airport. It is not the case.

So I had that compelling me. I did my research. How could we get about doing that? This is the kind of thing I was learning about. Yes, it could be done as an omnibus bill, and I was learning about omnibus bills. Apparently people don't like to use them. To me, they're a tool. Whatever is a tool, I say great, that's fine, but I was still hearing a lot from my constituents, and I was learning more about how Parliament operates. It was getting later and later. I was concerned with the timing. I could see how things work, how things can be delayed. Other priorities can arise. We would not have what I understood was sort of my soft deadline, which is royal assent by January 2019, so that the name would be effective for the elections in 2019.

I had to make a very tough decision, but I think any one of us here would understand. What do you go for? Do you go with your own personal thing that you want to do, or do you go with what your citizens are asking you to do? I had to make that decision.

There are other ways to work on financial literacy, and I'm certainly continuing to do that.

Mr. John Nater:

I don't see any reason why this won't pass through the House. Do you have a sponsor in the Senate when it gets to the Senate?

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan:

I don't know how much I can say about that. I've certainly been talking to senators. In Quebec we have senators who are actually attributed to different regions, so naturally there's an interest there.

The Chair:

Mr. Stewart is next.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

I don't have much to say, other than you're obviously a quick study, because your presentation here is excellent. I think this should go through. It makes logical sense to me. I congratulate you on a successful presentation.

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan:

Thank you very much, Mr. Stewart.

The Chair:

Is the committee ready for clause-by-clause consideration?

Shall clause 1 carry?

(Clause 1 agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the title carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the bill carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the chair report the bill?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Congratulations.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1110)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 94e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons aujourd’hui notre étude sur l’utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Néanmoins, je voudrais d'abord parler brièvement des travaux du Comité. Jeudi prochain, comme la Chambre suivra l'horaire du vendredi, ce qui nous ferait siéger pendant la période des questions, je suppose que nous voudrons peut-être reporter cette réunion. Quelqu’un s’y oppose-t-il?

Des voix: Non.

Le président: Deuxièmement, j’ai ici une lettre de M. Christopherson que je vais lire pour le compte rendu. Je tenais simplement à vous adresser une brève note, à vous et à nos collègues du Comité, pour vous dire que j’ai beaucoup apprécié le temps que j’ai passé au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre et que l’occasion de travailler avec un groupe de députés aussi passionnés et dévoués me manquera beaucoup. Je suis fier du travail que nous avons accompli, et bien que les membres du Comité n’étaient pas toujours d'accord, nous avons toujours fait de notre mieux pour trouver un terrain d’entente. Le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre est vraiment un comité spécial et je sais que vous continuerez tous de faire un excellent travail au nom de tous les parlementaires et des Canadiens. Je tiens à vous remercier tout particulièrement, Larry, pour votre excellent travail en tant que président. Il n’était pas facile de succéder à Joe Preston, mais vous avez été à la hauteur et vous contribuez largement au succès de notre comité. Et bien sûr, je tiens à remercier notre personnel et nos analystes dont le professionnalisme et les connaissances nous font toujours paraître plus intelligents que nous le sommes parfois. Merci encore une fois et bonne chance au Comité pour ses travaux futurs. Sincèrement, David Christopherson, député Centre Hamilton

Le premier témoin d’aujourd’hui est Mme Georgina Jolibois, députée de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill. Mme Jolibois va faire sa déclaration d’ouverture en déné, et nous avons, encore une fois, pris des dispositions pour l’interprétation dans les deux langues officielles.

Bienvenue à notre comité, madame Jolibois. Vous pouvez maintenant faire votre déclaration préliminaire. Merci beaucoup d’être venue. Mahsi cho.

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill, NPD) (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Merci. Je suis heureuse d’être ici.

Ce matin, c’est une belle journée. Je suis heureuse d’être ici parmi vous. Je remercie le Comité de la Chambre. Merci de me permettre de parler ma langue. Je remercie les membres du Comité de m’avoir donné l’occasion de parler ma langue.

Si je m'exprime ici dans ma langue, c’est que lorsque nous siégeons à la Chambre des communes, je n’ai pas le droit de parler ma langue dénée. Je parle anglais et je ne parle pas français.

Ce dont je veux vous parler, c’est d’où je viens, de ma culture et de mon travail.

Je suis née à La Loche, en Saskatchewan. Mes parents m’ont élevée dans ma culture dénée. C’est pourquoi je suis une Dénée.

Je suis ici pour vous demander d'autoriser l'usage de la langue déné à la Chambre des communes. C’est pourquoi je suis ici. Je vous en suis très reconnaissante.

Il m'est difficile de parler ma langue déné avec mes collègues libéraux ou le député Romeo Saganash.

Lorsque je viens à Ottawa, je ne vis pas de la même façon que lorsque je retourne dans ma collectivité. J’ai été maire de La Loche pendant 12 ans. J’ai été là pendant longtemps pour aider la collectivité de La Loche. J’ai beaucoup travaillé pour ma collectivité.

En 2015, je suis entrée en politique pour être députée de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill. J’ai été élue pour être ici aujourd’hui. Je suis membre de la communauté dénée de La Loche. À La Loche, ma collectivité, nous parlons le déné, nous vivons notre culture. Nous sommes entourés de médias, de télévision. Nous recevons la chaîne CBC depuis 1979. À part cela, il n’y avait rien. Nous avons appris Ô Canada en écoutant CBC.

Dans le cadre de ma culture, mes grands-parents m’ont enseigné notre mode de vie traditionnel, c’est-à-dire à pêcher, à piéger des lapins, à poser un filet de pêche. Nous avons survécu grâce à cela. C’est notre source de nourriture.

J’ai obtenu mon diplôme d’études secondaires, de 12e année, à La Loche. J’ai toujours parlé le déné avec mes camarades de classe. À l'âge adulte, j’ai appris l’anglais. Une fois mon diplôme d’études secondaires en poche, je suis allée à l’université. J’ai déménagé à Saskatoon. En vivant dans une grande ville, j’ai appris à parler davantage l’anglais. Je poursuis mon apprentissage de l'anglais, et je suis également fière de parler cette langue.

(1115)



Là où je vis, il y a des gens qui parlent la langue crie, la langue michif et la langue dénée. Quand je retourne dans ma collectivité, nous parlons constamment la langue dénée. Il y a pas mal de gens qui parlent cette langue dans notre région, dans ce que nous appelons le nord de la Saskatchewan. Fond du Lac, Black Lake et Hatchet Lake sont des collectivités dénées. Patuanak, Dillon et Turnor Lake sont également des collectivités dénées.

Il y a aussi des Dénés au Manitoba. En Alberta, il y a des Dénés qui vivent près de la Saskatchewan. Dans la région des Territoires du Nord-Ouest, il y a aussi des Dénés.

C’est très important, et je suis heureuse que nous soyons réunis ici pour en parler — pas seulement moi, mais tous ensemble — avec des gens qui nous regardent, pour que les enfants nous comprennent et nous regardent, pour dire que c’est ce que nous avons fait, et aussi, en ce qui concerne le système d’éducation, pour dire que c’est ce que nous demandons et ce que nous faisons pour notre langue. C’est difficile.

Ce que je veux dire, c’est que lorsque j’ai été élue députée, lorsque je me suis présentée, pour la première fois, aux élections à la Chambre des communes, les gens m'ont demandé de parler le déné à la Chambre des communes. C’est ce qu’ils m’ont dit. C’est pourquoi cela me tient toujours à coeur aujourd’hui. C’est parce que je suis maintenant une députée. Je le suis depuis peu de temps et je n'ai pas oublié que les électeurs m’ont demandé de parler le déné au Parlement.

La personne qui parle la langue dénée est ici. Nous avons grandi ensemble dans la même collectivité. Nous parlons tous les deux le déné et l’anglais. La personne qui est assise ici comprend l’anglais, et elle se trouve bien loin de chez elle.

Je suppose que beaucoup de gens connaissent les Dénés. Je ne serai pas la seule Dénée à la Chambre des communes. Il y a beaucoup de Dénés, de jeunes. S’ils veulent devenir députés à l’avenir, s’ils sont inscrits sur le bulletin de vote, ils pourraient gagner. C’est pour leur donner une chance que je fais cette demande. C’est pour l’avenir, pour que nos Dénés nous regardent et soient fiers de ce que nous faisons.

Il arrive parfois que nous ne soyons pas tous d’accord. Nous sommes allés dans les établissements d’enseignement pour parler de la langue dénée. Si nous le faisons ensemble, ici au Canada, nous sommes nombreux — pas seulement les Dénés, mais aussi les gens qui parlent la langue crie. Il y a beaucoup d’Autochtones au Canada. Il y a beaucoup d’Autochtones dans les provinces, à Terre-Neuve et dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, ainsi qu’au Nunavut et au Yukon. Il y a aussi beaucoup d’Autochtones en Colombie-Britannique. Ils souhaitent tous parler leur langue et parler de leur langue au Canada.

Je suis une députée et une citoyenne canadienne de La Loche, en Saskatchewan. Je me souviens de ce que mes grands-parents nous ont enseigné il y a longtemps et de ce qu’ils disaient. L’un d’eux était un chef.

(1120)



Ils nous ont toujours dit de ne pas oublier que la langue que nous parlons définit qui nous sommes. Si vous avez l’occasion de parler le déné, vous parlez le déné. C’est pourquoi, au Canada... Je pourrai vous parler en anglais après cela.

Si nous prenons un engagement, nous pourrons vraiment faire tout notre possible pour la jeune génération, et même pour les adultes. Nous pouvons leur parler pour leur dire d’avoir un esprit fort, un coeur fort, et de se rappeler d’où ils viennent. C’est ainsi que nous serons au Canada. Nous sommes ici ensemble, nous sommes fiers et nous travaillons ensemble.

Les Autochtones parlent aussi la langue michif. Louis Riel pensait probablement la même chose. C'est l’occasion pour nous d’obtenir quelque chose. Les gens disent que pour obtenir quelque chose des élus, il faut le leur demander, mais je pense que nous pouvons faire cela ensemble.

L’interprète vient de ma collectivité. Il est allé à l’école, et il n’y a pas que lui. Il y a beaucoup de gens dans notre collectivité qui peuvent parler et traduire le déné. Il y a Allan Adam et Cheryl Herman.

Si nous joignons nos efforts, nous pouvons le faire ensemble, et c'est aussi dans votre intérêt. Je suis heureuse d’être ici avec vous. Je vais le répéter. Au Canada, je sais qu’il n’est pas facile de demander la possibilité de parler la langue des Dénés. Ce n’est pas seulement moi. Nous devons trouver une façon d'y arriver. C’est pourquoi je soulève la question aujourd’hui.

Merci beaucoup. Je suis prête à répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Meegwetch.

Je souhaite également la bienvenue à Kennedy Stewart et à l’interprète de la langue dénée.

Merci beaucoup. C’est un plaisir de vous accueillir. Cette deuxième journée marquera l'histoire de nos réunions.

Nous allons veiller à ce que chaque parti ait au moins droit à un tour, mais pouvez-vous faire preuve de générosité en partageant votre temps de parole si d’autres membres de votre parti désirent intervenir?

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

(1125)

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci d’être ici. Merci d’avoir porté cette question à notre attention comme vous l’avez fait. Je l’apprécie beaucoup.

Comme je l’ai dit à notre collègue, M. Saganash, il y a deux jours, je crois, le droit de parole existe déjà, mais le plus important est le droit d’être compris. C'est, je pense, un droit que nous devons aborder, et notre étude est très importante à cet égard.

Une chose que nous avons apprise et qui nous a tous étonnés, c’est qu’en cri, il n’y a pas de mot pour député. J’ai entendu dire dans l'interprétation que vous continuiez à dire « député » en déné. Y a-t-il un mot autre qu'anglais, en déné, pour désigner un député?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

La façon dont nous parlons et comprenons notre langue, la façon dont je vous parle en ce moment, c’est par observation. Parfois, c’est difficile à traduire. Lorsque nous parlons d'un « député », nous parlons de quelqu'un qui fait partie du gouvernement, des hautes instances gouvernementales ou d'une personne qui s’occupe de formalités administratives.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Note de la rédaction: difficultés techniques]

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

[Note de la rédaction: difficultés techniques]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’une des particularités de notre système, c’est que lorsque mon micro est allumé, je n’entends plus l'interprétation. Je vais devoir m’assurer qu’il est bien éteint.

Pouvez-vous me donner une idée de la population du pays dont la langue maternelle est le déné? Y a-t-il des chiffres?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Dans ma collectivité de La Loche, je suis fier que nos enfants apprennent à parler anglais. C’est facile pour eux d’apprendre l’anglais, mais dans notre collectivité, les enfants qui sont dans la réserve parlent encore le déné. Dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, en Alberta et au Manitoba, il y a des Dénés. Ils parlent encore la langue dénée dans leurs communautés. Au moins 5 000 personnes parlent encore le déné dans cette région.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Selon vous, quel est le processus que nous devons suivre? Quelles mesures sont nécessaires pour s’assurer que les langues qui doivent être parlées à la Chambre sont bien soutenues? Qu'envisagez-vous? Quelles idées avez-vous à proposer?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Aujourd’hui, je suis la seule à parler le déné parmi les députés ici présents. Des gens sont là pour que nous puissions parler notre langue, la traduire, en parler. Je pense qu’il sera facile de parler nos langues à la Chambre des communes. Je pense qu’il sera facile de parler le déné au Parlement. En Saskatchewan, les Dénés peuvent être élus et parler ma langue. Nous l’avons déjà fait. Ce sera plus facile.

D’après moi, les gens qui travaillent à la Chambre des communes vont voir ce que vous avez fait dans ce comité, les recherches sur le sujet. Ils examineront ce qui a déjà été accompli et diront: « C'est également réalisable à la Chambre des communes. »

(1130)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En ce qui concerne les langues — parce qu’il y a beaucoup de langues autochtones au pays, pas trois ou quatre — qu’est-ce qui serait raisonnable? L'interprétation de n'importe quelle langue devrait-elle être disponible sur demande? À long terme, comment voyez-vous cela? Combien de langues devraient être disponibles, et comment devrions-nous procéder?

Pour le moment, au début, jugez-vous raisonnable de devoir donner un préavis pour s'assurer qu’un interprète sera disponible quand vous interviendrez pendant la période des questions ou à tout autre moment, et l'interprétation devrait-elle être bidirectionnelle?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Qu’entendez-vous par « bidirectionnelle »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À l’heure actuelle, nous avons une quatrième chaîne sur notre système d’écoute. Si vous passez au canal 4, il est écrit « Den » pour le déné, mais je ne crois pas que quelqu’un interprète dans l’autre sens en ce moment. C’est juste un exemple.

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Je suis ici, oui, mais il n'y a pas que moi. Il y a aussi la personne qui va m’interpréter. Nous devons demander ce service à l’avance et prendre les dispositions nécessaires pour que la personne qui va m’interpréter fasse le voyage de la Saskatchewan à Ottawa. À l’avenir, lors des élections de 2019, quiconque sera élu viendra au Parlement et il y aura peut-être un Déné ici. Il pourrait être difficile de parler le déné si la question de l'interprétation en déné n'est pas encore réglée. Néanmoins, ce sera peut-être plus facile à l'avenir grâce à la technologie, et pas seulement pour la langue dénée. Il y aura peut-être deux ou dix Dénés qui siégerons ici. À l’avenir, ce sera peut-être plus facile.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque vous êtes arrivée comme députée, quelqu’un vous a-t-il demandé, lors des séances d'orientation, quelles langues vous parliez à part l’anglais et le français?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Non. Personne ne m’a posé la question. Je parle anglais. C’est facile pour moi de parler anglais. Certains pensent que je ne parle que l’anglais. Lorsque j’en ai eu l’occasion, lorsque j’ai été élue, j’ai parlé le déné avec les néo-démocrates avec qui je travaille.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, cette fois-ci, est-ce un tour de sept minutes?

Le président:

Oui, mais partagez-le si nécessaire, car nous ne reviendrons peut-être pas à vous.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous n’aurons peut-être pas un deuxième tour. Très bien, je vais essayer d’en tenir compte.

Je tiens à dire que, même si je ne le savais pas à l’époque, ma première expérience avec la langue dénée remonte au milieu des années 1980 lorsque j’ai aidé à organiser ce qu’on appelle la conférence du Commonwealth étudiant. Des élèves du secondaire en provenance des quatre coins du pays sont venus en avion à Ottawa pour assister à une réunion simulée des chefs de gouvernement du Commonwealth. Nous avons accueilli quelques enfants de Fond du Lac pendant un certain temps. Je me souviens seulement que ces enfants étaient très gentils et que ce sont maintenant des gens d’âge mûr comme moi. Quoi qu’il en soit, c’était ma première expérience.

J’aimerais commencer par quelques questions sur la compréhension de la langue. C'est en partie parce que je suis d'un naturel curieux. Bien sûr, il y a beaucoup de langues autochtones au Canada. Certaines ont un très petit nombre de locuteurs et sont considérées par l’UNESCO comme étant en danger. Il y a un classement pour déterminer si une langue donnée est en danger, allant de vulnérable à sérieusement en danger, en passant par gravement en danger. D’autres, me semble-t-il, sont dans une position telle que leur viabilité à long terme est très solide.

J’aimerais savoir si vous pensez que la langue dénée est menacée ou si elle a de bonnes chances de survivre compte tenu de la démographie?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Je vous dirais que j'éprouve de la fierté quand je retourne dans ma communauté du nord de la Saskatchewan, que ce soit à Fond du Lac, à Black Lake, à Hatchet Lake ou à La Loche, et dans les collectivités avoisinantes comme Dillon, Patuanak et Cold Lake, en Alberta. Les enfants, les adultes, tout le monde parle bien l'anglais. Nous parlons notre langue dans le Grand Nord, les gens écrivent dans leur langue, mais comment pouvons-nous préserver cela? Nous nous battons très fort pour cela.

Quant à la façon dont j'envisage l'avenir, je pense que tant que nous vivrons, nous garderons notre langue vivante.

(1135)

M. Scott Reid:

Désolé du retard. C’est à cause de l'interprétation.

J’ai jeté un coup d'oeil sur les articles de Wikipedia. J’ai consulté Wikipedia et j’ai d’abord tapé « Dene language ». Cela m’a renvoyé à « Chipewyan ».

Quelle est la distinction entre les Dénés et les Chipewyans?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Je suis une personne dénée Tsuut’ina. Lorsque nous parlons de nous, nous disons que nous sommes des « Dénés Tsuut’ina ». Le peuple cri nous a donné le nom Chipewyan. Par le passé, là où vivaient les Dénés, ils portaient des chapeaux pointus. Cela vient de la façon dont nous étions habillés. Nous n’utilisons pas le mot « Chipewyan ». Nous parlons des Dénés.

M. Scott Reid:

J’ai l’impression que cela s'est produit souvent au cours de l'histoire. Lorsque les Européens sont arrivés, ils ont demandé aux gens qu’ils avaient déjà rencontrés qui étaient ces autres gens là-bas, puis ils ont adopté le nom qui a été donné par un groupe de l’extérieur au sujet d’un autre groupe.

On dirait bien que c’est ce qui s’est passé.

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Avec la venue des gens de la Compagnie de la Baie d’Hudson, des prêtres et des francophones, une partie de notre langue est en français. Nous avons adopté des mots français, par exemple pour le pain. Nous disons aussi « beaucoup ». C’est ainsi que nous avons appris notre langue. Les prêtres qui sont restés avec nous et qui ont vécu avec nous ont appris à parler le déné, et ils ont parlé avec nous.

Ce n’est plus le cas. Lorsqu’ils viennent de leur pays, certains prêtres ou missionnaires utilisent leur première langue, puis ils apprennent à parler le déné. Le prêtre qui se trouve actuellement à La Loche parle la langue dénée. Notre évêque parle aussi le déné. Il offre également des services dans notre langue. Le personnel scolaire parle aussi le déné. C’est ainsi que nous parlons notre langue ensemble et que nous la comprenons.

M. Scott Reid:

J’ai une dernière question. Je pense avoir utilisé tout le temps de parole de mon parti.

J’ai une dernière question qui porte précisément sur la présence d’un interprète. Si j’en ai l’occasion, je vais poser la question suivante à notre prochain témoin.

Je ne sais pas si c’est vrai pour les Dénés, mais certaines langues comprennent des dialectes différents qui sont, dans une certaine mesure, mutuellement compréhensibles, ou qui ne le sont pas. C’est vrai dans n’importe quelle langue — anglais, français, allemand. Je ne sais pas si c’est vrai pour les Dénés. Étant donné que vous avez été élue députée, si nous essayons de créer des installations d'interprétation, devrions-nous nous en remettre à vous pour trouver une équipe d'interprètes et déterminer qui pourra le mieux interpréter les délibérations parlementaires lorsque vous parlerez en langue dénée?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Je pense que c’est facile, parce qu’il y a beaucoup de personnes qui peuvent parler notre langue dénée et l'interpréter pour nous. Il y en a une ici.

Nous conservons notre langue en tenant à la parler. Nous parlons bien l’anglais et le déné, non seulement en Saskatchewan, mais aussi au Manitoba et dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest. Je pense que c’est la même chose en Alberta.

Pour répondre à votre question, nous comprenons deux dialectes, le dialecte « t » et le dialecte « k ». En tant que Dénée, j’utilise le dialecte « t ». Dans le Grand Nord, il y a un dialecte « k ». Lorsque nous disons « allons », nous utilisons le mot « t », et dans le Grand Nord, on utilise le dialecte « k ». Il y a des différences dans la façon de dire les mots en déné.

(1140)

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Mahsi cho.

C’est au tour de M. Stewart.

M. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby-Sud, NPD):

Merci. Merci de votre exposé et merci de votre accueil.

J’ai grandi dans une région rurale de la Nouvelle-Écosse, et jusqu’à l’âge de 14 ans, j’avais une sorte de concept de nation unique du Canada. On m’a dit que John A. Macdonald n’a pas réussi à avoir un gouvernement unitaire et que nous avons fait des compromis. Puis, dans le contexte du référendum sur la souveraineté-association et des pourparlers constitutionnels, en 1982, je me suis rangé à l'idée d'un Canada formé de deux nations.

Ce n’est qu’en 1993, avec le lac Meech, lors de mon retour à l’université, que j’ai été initié à l’idée d’un Canada formé de trois nations, et je pense que je souscris entièrement à ce principe maintenant. Mes idées ont évolué et ce que vous nous présentez aujourd’hui représente concrètement le concept des trois nations du Canada.

Par exemple, à la Chambre, nous disposons de l’interprétation en anglais et en français, ce qui renforce l’idée de deux nations, mais quand on parle d’un concept de trois nations — la troisième nation étant, bien sûr, constituée de nombreuses nations autochtones —, comment pouvons-nous répondre à cela? Comment pouvons-nous refléter ce concept dans nos institutions? C'est pourquoi ces discussions sont si importantes. C’est parce que c’est ce que nous faisons ici. Nous discutons de la façon d’avoir un Parlement où nous parlons de notre avenir et de la façon dont cela se refléterait dans nos activités quotidiennes.

Je vous remercie donc vivement de l'expérience que nous faisons ici aujourd'hui. Cela nous permet de voir ce que nous pourrons accomplir, je l'espère, en tant que pays.

J’ai une question pour vous. Comment voyez-vous les choses, et dans quelle mesure croyez-vous que nous obtiendrons une reconnaissance égale des fondateurs du Canada?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Merci de me poser cette question. Je pense beaucoup à cela, à la façon dont je vais parler le déné à la Chambre des communes. Je suis une députée, et vous êtes également des députés. C’est différent quand je parle ma langue. Certaines personnes parlent anglais et français. D’où je viens, dans ma collectivité, nous considérons — étant donné la façon dont nous avons grandi en tant qu’Autochtones, en tant que peuple déné, en tant que peuple métis, en tant que gens qui vivent dans le Nord — que nous sommes le premier peuple. Nous avons grandi ici. Nous avons vécu ici.

Lorsque vous parlez de trois nations, je vais vous dire ce que nous en pensons. Il devrait y avoir quatre nations, selon moi. Il y a des gens qui sont venus ici et qui vivent ici, des gens qui vont travailler ici. Lorsque nous disons « d’un océan à l’autre » de Terre-Neuve à la Colombie-Britannique, nous aidons les gens qui viennent ici, certains apprennent l’anglais et on leur accorde la citoyenneté canadienne pour leur donner la chance de vivre ici. Je considère qu’ils forment une troisième nation.

Il y a beaucoup de Dénés et de Métis ici. Il serait difficile de tenir compte de nos origines. Lorsque nous parlons, nous disons « de nation à nation ». La façon dont je vois les choses, dont nous les voyons, c'est que pour le déné et la langue crie, nous sommes toujours relégués à l’arrière-plan. Dorénavant, assis ici, à l'avant, nous voulons travailler ensemble pour les jeunes. De quelle origine? C'est ce que disent les Autochtones, même ceux du Grand Nord. Même les Métis disent qu'il faut se battre pour cela. C’est ainsi que je vois les choses.

(1145)

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Excellent. Nous n’avons pas beaucoup de temps, mais je me demande s’il y a d’autres choses que vous n’avez peut-être pas encore pu dire, des choses auxquelles les questions vous ont fait penser, ou un sujet que vous n’avez peut-être pas pu aborder dans votre exposé préliminaire.

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Je vais le répéter. Les choses sont faciles de nos jours. En nous réunissant, en utilisant la technologie, nous avons beaucoup appris en en discutant quelque soit l'endroit où nous nous trouvions. Pour cette raison, en parlant le déné au Parlement et en créant un poste d’interprète — nous avons beaucoup d’argent pour cela... Beaucoup d’argent circule pour faire les choses ensemble, alors je pense que ce sera fait, mais nous devons prendre l'engagement mental de nous aider mutuellement. Si nous ne pensons pas de cette façon, je crois que nous ferons un pas en arrière.

Nous parlons des droits constitutionnels en anglais. C’est ce que nous demandons.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres questions de la part des membres du Comité?

Je vous remercie beaucoup. J’aimerais aussi remercier votre interprète déné, Julius Park. Mahsi cho. Je pense que c’est une réunion très historique, la première que nous ayons eue en déné, interprétée sur la Colline du Parlement, et vous faites donc partie de l’histoire. Merci beaucoup. Je pense que vous sentez la bonne volonté du Comité pour aller de l’avant.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Merci beaucoup. Je l’apprécie.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour changer d’interprète.

(1145)

(1150)

Le président:

Bonjour.

Bienvenue à la 94e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, au lendemain de l’anniversaire de notre obstruction.

Pour ce qui est de l’horaire, les témoins que nous devions entendre jeudi prochain seront présents à notre première réunion après Pâques.

Notre deuxième témoin d'aujourd’hui est M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette, député de Winnipeg-Centre, qui a vraiment lancé tout ce processus.

Comme les membres du Comité s'en souviendront, la décision que le président a rendue le 20 juin 2017 répondait à sa question de privilège concernant l’utilisation des langues autochtones à la Chambre.

Merci d’être ici, monsieur Ouellette, et d’avoir lancé ce processus. Je crois comprendre que vous allez faire votre déclaration préliminaire en langue crie. Comme lors de notre dernière réunion, nous avons organisé l'interprétation simultanée en cri.

Merci beaucoup. C’est très intéressant et historique, et la parole est à vous.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette (Winnipeg-Centre, Lib.) (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Bonjour, mes amis, ma grande famille. Je suis heureux de vous voir aujourd’hui.

Nous avons perdu nos langues. Veuillez nous aider. J’ai fait un long parcours.

Il y a longtemps, en hiver, je me suis promené sur les terres glacées. J’ai visité 41 collectivités des Premières Nations. J’ai rencontré tant de Cris, mes proches, les Dakotas, les Oji-Cris, les Ojibway des Plaines ou les Saulteaux, les Métis, les Français. Je les ai entendus, les gens, souhaiter à leurs enfants une vie florissante.

Dans cette grande structure, vous avez de l’argent. Au début, on m’a dit que mon travail avait commencé pour tous les Canadiens. Nous devons tous travailler ensemble puisque le Canada a rédigé les promesses et le déroulement des processus.

Nous sommes liés. Si les choses ne se sont pas bien passées, nous allons les changer. Aidez-moi. Aidez-moi à faire en sorte que nous nous respections mutuellement.

Les traités sont une question de respect et de fraternité. Les peuples autochtones ont toujours eu des traités. Les Cris et les Pieds-Noirs ont conclu des traités en se servent de leur bon sens. Il ne devait pas y avoir de combats en hiver, car il faisait trop froid et il n’était pas bon de déplacer les femmes, les enfants et les personnes âgées de leur foyer pendant cette période.

Si une tribu faisait la guerre, elle allait voir l’autre chef pour lui expliquer pourquoi elle faisait la guerre. Très souvent, les jeunes guerriers avaient trop d’énergie et dérangeaient tout le camp. Les vieux savaient que la meilleure solution était de les envoyer en guerre contre l’ennemi qu’ils connaissaient. Les deux chefs parlaient, et l’un d’eux obtenait un délai pour déplacer les femmes, les enfants et les personnes âgées. Cela fonctionnait pour eux, et plus tard, en temps de paix, ils en parlaient.

Les histoires que nous racontons au sujet de la création, de Weysakechak, concernent des traités. Ces traités universels portent sur l’eau, la terre, l’air, le feu et, bien sûr, le Grand Esprit.

Par exemple, lorsqu’un enfant naît, les eaux de la mère se rompent, ce qui indique que l’enfant va naître. Il reçoit ensuite sa première bouffée d’air précieux et sacré, et il est un être humain vivant. Il est ensuite enveloppé dans la peau et la fourrure chaudes d’un animal et bénéficie de la chaleur du feu et du lait vivifiant de sa mère. Bientôt, les autres enfants jouent avec lui, à l’extérieur, dans leur propre territoire, qui est le Canada.

Lorsque le Créateur a fini de créer la terre, la mer et l’air, il a appelé toutes ses créatures pour leur demander quels dons elles souhaitaient recevoir. Il a ainsi conclu des traités avec toute la vie sur terre. De nombreuses créatures ont demandé de servir l’humanité, mais il les a averties que l’humanité serait le meilleur et le pire de toute la création. Elles ont accepté et compris ses avertissements. En remerciement de leur compréhension et de leurs sacrifices, elles ont obtenu une place dans l'au-delà. L'homme devait les honorer lors de cérémonies, ce que les peuples autochtones font encore aujourd’hui.

C’est en raison de ces enseignements que nous respectons l’air, le feu et l’eau de façon sacrée. Ils sont inclus dans toutes nos prières et nos cérémonies. C’est une bonne façon de vivre.

Nous avons tous nos langues, nos connaissances et nos cérémonies. En tant que peuples autochtones, nous respectons la terre et tous les enfants de ses citoyens à plumes, à fourrure, à écailles, à deux pattes, à quatre pattes et à ailes. Nous savons que l’humain est la seule créature qui viole continuellement les traités. Les autres n’ont jamais violé leur traité sacré avec nous.

(1155)



Le bon sens nous commande de prier pour la terre et pour tous ceux qui y habitent. Depuis plus d’un siècle, nous avons signé des traités entre nos différents peuples et pays. À l’origine, l’idée n’était pas l'asservissement, mais le respect.

Les langues doivent être utilisées pour être utiles. Elles doivent être parlées par nos enfants à l’école, à la maison et dans le reste de la société. Nos langues doivent être diffusées à la télévision pour que nous puissions voir et comprendre le pourquoi et le comment, et voir ce qui se passe dans notre Parlement. Il est important d’avoir une langue.

J’ai vu une affiche à l’entrée d’un cimetière au lac La Ronge, dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan. Elle disait: « Si nous n'avons pas pu vivre comme des frères, reposons ici comme des frères. »

L’homme est représenté par le feu. Fait intéressant, les femmes sont représentées par l’eau. Avec un seul mot ou un seul regard, l'eau peut nous détruire ou nous élever. Personnellement, je préférerais être le frère des autres êtres humains que de mourir dans un déluge de préjugés, de jalousie, de colère et de peur.

La langue peut transmettre le respect et la signification. Elle représente la culture et elle définit qui nous sommes, notre identité. C’est une question d’apprentissage, d’éducation et de savoir.

L’aîné Winston Wuttunee m’a demandé de parler de l’importance de la langue et de son lien avec nos croyances. Il y a quatre éléments: l’eau, l’air, la terre et le feu. La langue est liée à ces quatre éléments. Si vous prenez un mot en cri et le décomposez, il y a d’autres significations dans ce mot.

Prenons l’exemple de l’eau. L’eau, c’est la femme, la vie, le lien avec toute la création. C’est la beauté même.

Prenons l’air. Il y a de l’air frais et de l’air sale. Tout cela a une incidence sur notre santé. C’est la vie, le souffle. Les animaux volent dans l’air. Nous avons besoin d’air pur pour être en bonne santé.

Prenons la terre. Nous vivons et nous mourons. Lorsque nous mourons, nous devenons la terre, et la terre, ce sont nos parents. Elle nourrit les graminées. Elle nourrit le bison. Elle nous nourrit. C’est nous.

Réfléchissez au feu. Le feu, c’est aussi la vie. Il nous garde au chaud — pour cuisiner, pour survivre. Il nettoie les terres. C'est aussi l'homme. Il fonctionne mieux avec l’eau.

Prenons un mot de la langue crie, nikamoun, qui signifie « chanter ». Nika veut dire « devant » et moun veut dire « manger ». Nikamoun signifie donc « être nourri de chants ». Si vous poussez plus loin l'analyse, cela pourrait signifier « être nourri par celui qui est devant nous ». Cela pourrait aussi être le Créateur. En allant encore plus loin, cela veut dire « quiconque est devant nous nous nourrit ». C'est là que l'avidité pour l'argent devient notre mode de subsistance. C'est rapidement devenu un régime de famine pour nous tous, la nature et l’humanité aussi. Avons-nous la responsabilité et la capacité de réagir, d’apprendre et de nous sauver, nous-mêmes, nos enfants, notre humanité et notre monde?

Sans la langue, quelles personnes sommes-nous? Nous devenons sans passé, incapables de comprendre les pensées du passé, incapables de comprendre nos ancêtres lors des cérémonies. Eux-mêmes sont incapables de nous comprendre quand nous ne pouvons pas communiquer dans notre langue.

Notre Parlement moderne a un rôle à jouer pour aider les peuples autochtones. Vous pouvez renforcer la balance de la justice en veillant à ce que nos langues canadiennes, nos langues autochtones, ne deviennent pas des pièces de musée reléguées à l’arrière des tablettes anthropologiques sur la linguistique, mais qu’elles soient vivantes et adaptées à un monde moderne, en demeurant toujours liées spirituellement au passé.

Je rêve du jour où l’État canadien, qui tente depuis trop longtemps d’ignorer ces langues et d'y mettre fin, fera partie du processus parlementaire visant à insuffler la vie dans nos langues communes.

Tapwe. Merci beaucoup.

(1200)

Le président:

Merci de votre éloquence. C’est un moment historique, le début de ce processus.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur Ouellette, merci d’être ici et d’avoir soulevé cette question à la Chambre. C’est entièrement grâce à vous que nous avons cette étude. Je veux m’assurer que cela figure très clairement au compte rendu.

Cela dit, j’aimerais savoir comment vous avez procédé pour soulever une question de privilège. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qui s’est passé, quelles mesures ont été prises, avec qui vous avez communiqué et comment nous en sommes arrivés là?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Merci beaucoup.

Le 4 mai, j’ai pris la parole à la Chambre des communes au sujet de l’article 31 du Règlement. Il s'agissait d'un enjeu important, puisque les femmes autochtones en Saskatchewan et au Manitoba étaient victimes de violence. Certaines ont été tuées et brûlés vives, transformées en torche humaine pendant une fête par des gens sans aucun respect pour les femmes. Afin d'avoir peut-être un impact plus profond — parce que beaucoup de politiciens vont aborder cette question, mais que parfois on ne prête pas attention à nos propos et que le message ne se rend pas à tout le monde —, je veux m'assurer que le message soit entendu par ceux qui ont le plus besoin de l'entendre, en particulier certains jeunes hommes, et j'ai donc décidé de m'adresser en cri.

Quand j'ai rédigé le court discours d'une minute, je m'attendais à ce qu'il soit traduit à la Chambre, que je puisse bénéficier de la simple courtoisie de pouvoir m'exprimer pendant une minute dans cette langue afin que tous puissent comprendre ce que j'avais à dire. Malheureusement, les services d'interprétation et de traduction n'ont pas été en mesure d'offrir ce service, car conformément à la version en vigueur du Règlement, nous ne pouvons le faire. Je comprends, la bureaucratie a une façon de fonctionner et la bureaucratie est importante, mais en même temps, il importe que ce message soit diffusé.

J'ai été consterné de constater que les autres députés ne pouvaient comprendre ce que je disais et que mes propos n'ont pas été consignés dans le hansard. J'ai souvent parlé en cri dans cette enceinte et il n'y a même pas une représentation fidèle de certains des discours. Il est simplement mentionné que le député s'est adressé en cri. J'ai peut-être parlé en cri pendant plus d'une minute — deux, trois ou quatre— et personne ne sait ce que j'ai dit.

Quelques semaines plus tard, j’ai soulevé cette question de privilège auprès du Président. Je me suis entretenu avec des avocats et des personnes s'occupant de questions linguistiques partout au pays; ils m'ont parlé de certains des processus qu'ils avaient examinés et j'ai tenté de trouver ce qui avait un lien avec les peuples autochtones.

Je crois qu’un de nos collègues a déjà parlé de l’article 35 de la Loi constitutionnelle selon lequel « Les droits existants — ancestraux ou issus de traités — des peuples autochtones du Canada sont reconnus et confirmés. »

Une de mes amies, Karen Drake, a beaucoup écrit à ce sujet. Elle pense que ces langues sont visées par cette disposition. Certaines personnes ont même contesté la constitutionnalité, soutenant que non seulement le gouvernement fédéral a une obligation négative de ne pas étouffer les langues autochtones ou de simplement les ignorer, mais qu’il a une obligation positive de fournir les ressources nécessaires pour les revitaliser.

Je pourrais peut-être continuer avec un autre article. Je ne veux pas prendre tout votre temps.

(1205)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une autre question et après je céderai la parole à M. Simms qui a, lui aussi, des questions à poser.

Dans le cadre de votre démarche, avez-vous offert de fournir un texte traduit à la cabine d'interprétation afin que les interprètes puissent lire vos propos au fur et à mesure?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Bien sûr. J'ai remis une version en anglais, en français et en cri côte à côte dans un tableau pour en faciliter la lecture. Malheureusement, même s'il a été dit qu'à titre de député, nous sommes tous honorables, les responsables de ces services devaient avoir l'assurance — car il s'agit d'une organisation très professionnelle et qu'elle doit appliquer une norme fort élevée dans les services d'interprétation — que mes propos étaient fidèlement représentés. Ils devaient obtenir l'assurance que si j'avais dit quelque chose un peu différemment, ce serait consigné dans la version en anglais ou dans celle en français pour veiller à ce que ce soit conforme au langage parlementaire et que cela témoignait fidèlement de mes propos.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils disaient que « l'intervenant a parlé en cri » est plus exact que ce vous avez vraiment dit.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Merci.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à M. Simms et pour poursuivre dans la même veine, nous n'avons pas les quatre provinces parce qu'elles ne traduisent pas les documents, mais dans le hansard de l'une de ces provinces, il est écrit « traduction fournie par le député »; donc, si ce n'est pas exact, c'est votre problème. Les gens sauraient qu'il s'agit de votre traduction. Voilà comment les services ont réglé la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La traduction figurant dans le hansard devrait être raisonnable, car elle se fait après-coup.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Il faudrait en tenir compte dans notre Règlement, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup, Robert. C'était très bien. J'ai apprécié. Vous avez été fidèle à vos habitudes, éloquent.

Nous parlions justement de la Chambre, de la Cité parlementaire. Je veux parler de votre circonscription. J'ai posé la même question à M. Saganash lorsqu’il était ici. Il a en fait souligné quelque chose d'absolument étonnant, à savoir que le mot « député » n'existait pas en cri jusqu'à ce qu'il se présente en 2011. En traduction, c'est « quelqu'un qui représente ». Ce sont les mots utilisés, ce qui est, à mon avis, incroyable. J'aimerais que vous commentiez la situation de M. Saganash.

De plus, comment communiquez-vous avec les membres de votre collectivité et de votre circonscription, dans les bulletins parlementaires et avec les médias sociaux? Comment vous y prenez-vous avec les langues?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

M. Saganash a soulevé un excellent point. Lorsque je suis arrivé ici, sur la Colline du Parlement, j’ai été confronté au fait que le mot « député » dans le dialecte de l’Ouest n'existait pas, de sorte qu’après avoir consulté certains aînés et certains linguistes universitaires, le terme otapapistamâkew a été choisi...

(1210)

M. Scott Simms:

C'est totalement différent de ce qu'il nous a dit.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Il s'agit d'une personne qui en représente d'autres ou qui parle en leur nom.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. C'est le même concept.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

C'est le même concept, tout à fait. Otapapistamâkew, c'est un beau mot, mais la partie n'était pas gagnée d'avance. Même quand je suis arrivé sur place, j'ai voulu que ce titre soit affiché sur ma porte et j'ai passé beaucoup de temps, probablement près d'un  an, à discuter avec l'Administration de la Chambre des communes pour déterminer si j'avais le droit d'inscrire ainsi côte à côte — MP, député, otapapistamâkew, et je n'en ai pas le droit. Mes collaborateurs ont dû me retenir à deux mains pour ne pas m'emparer d'un marqueur et l'inscrire moi-même, mais je vais attendre l'issue du processus.

M. Scott Simms:

Mes électeurs agissent toujours ainsi avec moi, alors allez-y.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Dans ma circonscription, 22 % des électeurs sont Autochtones de diverses nations. Il y a les Oji-Cris, les Dakotas, les Métis michifs, les Métis français — de nombreux groupes différents de partout au Canada. Il y a aussi des Inuits, mais je représente également des Philippins. En général, nous travaillons en anglais.

À mon avis, le problème que nous devons examiner, c’est que l’État a un certain rôle à jouer, et si le Parlement doit représenter les gens de notre pays et ce que nous sommes en notre qualité de Canadiens, et ce que nous voulons être, alors toutes les langues autochtones de notre pays devraient avoir la possibilité de se faire entendre à la Chambre à un moment donné, si un député l’exige.

C'est important, parce que si les gens ne peuvent se voir dans les institutions de l'État, pourquoi alors voudraient-ils faire partie de cet État ou y participer? Des aînés me disent encore qu'ils ne sont pas des citoyens canadiens, car le droit de vote n'a été accordé aux peuples autochtones que dans les années 1960. Aujourd'hui encore, il est très difficile de convaincre beaucoup de membres des Premières Nations que l'État, le Canada, est là pour eux et que nous travaillons tous pour tout le monde, car ils n'y croient pas. Ils ne le voient pas.

C’est pourquoi je dis que le Parlement a un rôle à jouer pour démontrer de façon très symbolique que nous sommes tous dans le même bateau.

Le président:

C'est au tour de M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci. Bienvenue.

Pour ce qui est de votre question de privilège et de la façon dont elle a été soulevée, je sais évidemment sur quoi elle repose, mais en préparant cette question de privilège et en y réfléchissant et en prenant une décision à ce sujet, avez-vous communiqué avec les autres députés pour en discuter avant qu'elle ne soit soulevée ou après avec quiconque avant que la décision ne soit rendue par le Président? Pourriez-vous m’expliquer le genre de conversations ou de discussions que vous avez eues?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Je me suis entretenu avec certains députés et avec des représentants du bureau du leader à la Chambre pour savoir comment je pourrais m'y prendre puisque je suis un nouveau député. J'aurais pu soumettre la question à un comité, mais de toute évidence, certains comités sont parfois très occupés. Je comprends que vous avez beaucoup de pain sur la planche. Auriez-vous le temps d'étudier la question? À quel moment aurais-je suffisamment d’appui?

J’ai pensé qu’il était important que je soulève la question à la Chambre parce qu'à mon avis, pouvoir être compris est un privilège absolu. Si je prends la parole ici, je m’attends à être compris par les autres, par mes collègues députés, car autrement, cela annule ce que je dis. C’est comme si je n’étais même pas là. C’est comme un silence mort ou un trou noir de temps et de mots et personne ne comprend ce que je dis et vous ne pouvez débattre de mes propos, peu importe ce que sont nos idéologies ou les idées différentes que nous avons; cela ne servirait à rien. Il est important que je puisse être compris.

J'ai appris que le Sénat le fait depuis quelques années, que d'autres assemblées législatives au Canada aussi et qu'il y en a eu d'autres dans l'histoire du Canada. En lisant les procédures parlementaires, on apprend qu’il y a une longue tradition sur la façon dont nous nous comportons dans notre assemblée législative, et si d’autres parlements peuvent le faire, comme l’Assemblée législative du Manitoba dans les années 1870, je ne comprends pas pourquoi c'est impossible, au Parlement canadien, qui a accès à une foule de ressources.

Je ne réclame pas des milliards, voire même un million, de dollars. Je demande la présence de quelques interprètes quand il y a lieu et quand c'est nécessaire pour traduire.

(1215)

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez parlé du Sénat et du processus en place. À quel point connaissez-vous ce processus et le comprenez-vous? Est-ce le genre d’approche que vous souhaitiez à la Chambre des communes ou quelle est votre position à ce sujet?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Le Sénat a recours à l'interprétation de temps en temps, au besoin. En fait, c’est le sénateur Charlie Watt — qui n'est pas tout à fait à la retraite ou peut-être l'est-il — qui s’est battu pour cela il y a une dizaine d’années. Il y a consacré beaucoup de ses propres ressources. L'un des problèmes concernait les dialectes. Nous parlons tous une langue un peu différente, et nous n’avons pas de structure d’État central. Comme nous le savons, les nations autochtones du Canada n’ont pas de structure centrale. Il n’y a pas de gouvernement autochtone central avec une Académie française que tout le monde peut consulter pour trouver le mot juste.[Français]

Comment doit-on parler la langue française? Cette institution détermine qu'on la parle de telle façon. On parle français. Le bon mot est « ordinateur », et pas « computer ».[Traduction]

Ils décident des mots. Ils décident du mot « député ». Le mot de M. Saganash et la façon de le prononcer sont peut-être mieux qu'otapapistamâkew. Nous devrions peut-être utiliser son mot ou peut-être que le mien est mieux, mais sans les ressources de l'État, sans un gouvernement central qui aide les gens, qui collabore et qui permet aux gens de se réunir et sans les spécialistes qui trouvent les termes, bien, ces langues vont s'éteindre. En fait, ici au Canada, les langues autochtones se meurent.

J’ai entendu le témoin précédent dire qu'elles sont peut-être en danger. Elles sont toutes menacées. La langue crie est menacée. C'est l'une des langues les plus parlées dans les Prairies et les statistiques ne disent pas tout. À mon avis, Statistique Canada a tout faux parce que les gens ont beaucoup honte de ne pas parler leur langue. Je ne la parle pas très bien. J'ai très honte de cela. Mes parents ne me l'ont pas enseignée et mes grands-parents ont refusé de le faire, prétendant qu'elle n'était pas utile, que je n'en avais pas besoin et que cela viendrait avec son lot de problèmes.

Beaucoup aussi s'interrogent. Qu'est-ce qui fait de moi un homme? Qu'est-ce qui fait de moi un homme autochtone? Quand j'assiste aux cérémonies et que je ne comprends absolument rien, qu'est-ce que cela me fait à l'intérieur? Je chante et je dois réfléchir au sens du mot. Si vous traduisez pour d'autres, on vous dit que vous prononcez mal les mots. Les ancêtres ne sont pas en mesure de comprendre ce que vous dites; vous réclamez leur aide, mais ils ne peuvent vous comprendre.

Quant au rôle du Parlement — mon rêve en fait —, entendons-nous, nous ne sommes peut-être pas en mesure de sauver toutes les langues — soyons réalistes —, mais nous pouvons peut-être sauver l’inuktitut, peut-être le cri, peut-être le déné, peut-être l’anishinaabemowin, peut-être 4, 5 ou 10 langues. Il y en d'autres qui sont disparues depuis si longtemps que la société ne compte pas la masse critique des personnes qui les parlent pour offrir des services professionnels de traduction et d'interprétation qui seraient requis dans une grande institution comme le Parlement.

C'est ce qui est nécessaire.

Désolé, je ne veux pas abuser de votre temps.

M. Blake Richards:

J’ai ici un collègue qui veut poser une question. Cela vous convient-il, monsieur le président? J’ai une autre question, mais serait-il acceptable de permettre à M. Reid...? Il faudra peut-être prévoir un peu plus de temps.

Le président:

D'accord. Bien sûr, allez-y.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Je rêve du jour où une grand-mère autochtone pourra allumer la télévision à la maison sans avoir à regarder une émission en anglais avec ses petits-enfants dont elle essaie de s’occuper. Au lieu de cela, elle pourrait regarder CPAC et les grands débats du Parlement, parce qu’il y a de grands débats qui se déroulent tous les jours dans notre assemblée législative. Elle pourrait l’entendre en cri, l’entendre sur un canal en inuktitut, en déné, et suivre ces débats et être informée de ce qui se passe dans nos institutions publiques. Elle pourrait être fière du fait que ses petits-enfants puissent y entendre leur langue. Ils pourraient entendre les propos en arrière-plan et penser que cette langue est importante et qu'ils devraient essayer d'apprendre à la parler.

(1220)

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

Je crois avoir une meilleure idée de votre position actuelle. Cela nous ramène à la question suivante que je voulais poser.

Je sais que lorsque le Président a rendu sa décision, M. Saganash a indiqué — je crois que c’était à Radio-Canada — qu’il s’efforçait de négocier une solution. D'après votre intervention aujourd'hui, il semble que votre objectif soit différent de ce que j'avais cru comprendre et qu'il ne s'agit pas simplement d'avoir des services d'interprétation.

Je vous ai interrogé au sujet du modèle du Sénat. Il s’agit en fait d’un objectif plus vaste, c’est-à-dire de veiller à préserver certaines langues et à en encourager l'utilisation ailleurs.

Je veux simplement savoir si vous êtes au courant des négociations en cours auxquelles M. Saganash a fait allusion. Que savez-vous à ce sujet, et que pensez-vous de cela?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Je n'en sais pas trop à ce sujet, mais je dirais que tout doit commencer modestement. Je ne peux pas m’attendre à ce que nous ayons demain un service d’interprétation et un service linguistique complet avec 10 linguistes cris qui comprendront chaque dialecte en un clin d'oeil, mais j'espère que nous allons bâtir quelque chose avec le temps. Je sais qu'il y a eu des députés autochtones du Parti conservateur qui sont cris et qu'il y en a eu au Parti libéral et même au NPD. J'espère qu’avec le temps, plus de députés autochtones seront élus et qu'une réalité s'installe. J'espère que plus nous utiliserons cette langue, plus il y aura de possibilités. Nous l'utilisons peut-être 1 % du temps, puis ce pourcentage passera à 5 et 10 %, et elle deviendra plus courante et nous nous y habituerons. Elle ne sera plus quelque chose d'exotique, de différent ou d'étrange et les gens penseront qu'il faudrait peut-être lui faire une place à l'écran, en ligne sur son propre petit canal. Ces choses cumulent avec le temps.

J’espère que nous nous attarderons pour le faire correctement, pour jeter d’excellentes bases, parce que je veux vraiment sauver ces langues. Les langues autochtones sont en voie d'extinction. C'est la triste réalité.

Je rencontre constamment des gens à mon bureau. Ils disent parler le cri, et je commence donc à leur parler en cri un peu. Ils ne peuvent soutenir une conversation et pourtant ils disent parler le cri. Ils veulent parler la langue et ils la comprennent. Les grands-parents peuvent la parler et la comprennent. Leurs enfants ne peuvent que la comprendre et nos enfants ne peuvent ni la comprendre ni la parler.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci de votre indulgence, monsieur le président.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président, de votre indulgence.

Portant comme vous le gilet, je me dois avant tout de vous dire à quel point je suis envieux de votre étonnant gilet.

Il y a de cela très longtemps, il y a 25 ans, j’ai écrit un livre sur les langues au Canada. Il traitait des langues officielles pas des langues autochtones. L’une des choses dont je me suis persuadé, c’est que si les mesures gouvernementales ne sont d'aucune utilité ou presque pour aider les langues à survivre et prospérer, elles peuvent en revanche écraser une langue qui a de la vitalité. Les exemples ne manquent pas, à commencer par celui, évident pour moi, de la tentative de mon propre...

Mes ancêtres, d'une lignée, viennent d’Irlande. On s'y efforce de sauvegarder le gaélique. On en a fait la langue officielle du pays et l'on continue de se débattre avec ce problème. C’est une histoire intéressante à examiner.

Je livrerai à votre considération une de mes observations sur les langues. Elle vaut ce qu'elle vaut, mais il semblerait qu’une langue qui se subdivise en de nombreux dialectes secondaires semble avoir moins de capacité de survivre. Prenons, par exemple, en Europe, la quatrième langue officielle de la Suisse, le romanche. Le romanche se subdivise en trois dialectes, ce qui semble avoir grandement affaibli sa capacité de survivre. Ailleurs, on a essayé de rendre les langues plus homogènes, et au sein de la langue elle-même, cela suppose un certain compromis interne.

Je me demande si le choix de cette deuxième voie contribuerait à la survie de la langue crie, qui, je crois, présente d’importantes distinctions internes. Je pose simplement cette question pour savoir ce que vous en pensez. [Français]

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Je suis d'accord là-dessus.

Si vous allez en France, vous pourrez constater que la langue d'oc existe toujours. C'est un genre de dialecte, mais c'est une langue différente, qui comporte beaucoup de mots français. Or il est extrêmement difficile d'assurer la survie même de cette langue.[Traduction]

Vous avez raison, c’est très difficile, mais je pense qu’un État centralisé comme le nôtre, une fédération, a ceci de bien qu’il dispose des ressources pour réunir les linguistes chargés de recenser les termes communs.

Le Parlement a ceci de bien que l'on y traite de tout. On y débat de tout. De transport, de sécurité. Ou encore de santé. Ces termes existent-ils toujours? Sont-ils toujours les mêmes? Si ce n’est pas le cas, les gens, les experts, se verront obligés de se réunir quelque part et décider du terme que nous voulons utiliser. Après quoi, c'est au système d’éducation, avec les services aux Autochtones, de s’assurer que ces mots sont transmis aux collectivités et aux écoles et que les enseignants des écoles les utilisent.

Ensuite, si on sait qu’il y a de l’emploi pour les interprètes, les universités ont la possibilité de former des gens selon les normes professionnelles pour offrir ces services. J’avais un programme à l’Université du Manitoba. J’étais directeur de programme dans le cadre des programmes axés sur les Autochtones, en tant que professeur d’université, et l’un de nos certificats, en combinaison avec le Collège de la rivière Rouge, portait sur les langues autochtones, mais nous n'avons pas pu gérer le programme faute d'avoir des débouchés à offrir aux gens, parce qu’il n’y avait pas de besoin. Nous n’avons pas besoin du cri.

Je pense néanmoins que s’il existait un débouché, on verrait sans doute des gens se mettre à utiliser cette langue et devenir des défenseurs, des guerriers de la langue, et aller en faire la promotion et l’utiliser tous les jours, à la maison et dans leur lieu de travail. Nous savons tous ce que le Québec a fait dans les années 1960. C’était assez incroyable. On y est passé de...

(1225)

[Français]

On ne parlait pas français sur l'île de Montréal. Beaucoup de gens n'aiment pas la loi 101, mais celle-ci a quand même forcé l'État et les sociétés à considérer que parler français était important.

J'ai vécu 13 ans à Québec, et je comprends la mentalité. La langue structure nos pensées. C'est incroyable. Quand je parle français, je pense complètement différemment que lorsque je parle anglais ou cri. C'est extrêmement fascinant. Si nous perdons les langues autochtones, nous ne les retrouverons jamais.

Les mots peuvent décrire des choses importantes. Une fleur, à un certain moment de l'année, peut être différente, alors que techniquement c'est la même fleur, mais le mot pour la désigner variera selon le moment de l'année. Les éléments qui la composent peuvent être utiles à un médecin à certain moment de l'année, mais pas à d'autres. Nous perdrions toutes ces connaissances des aînés, car les jeunes ne comprennent pas tous ces mots.

Il faut que quelqu'un fasse quelque chose, mais personne ne fait rien. C'est pour cette raison que c'est historique.[Traduction]

C’est historique parce que la possibilité se présente de faire quelque chose que personne d’autre n’a fait auparavant. On parle toujours de l’importance de la langue, mais personne ne prend de mesures concrètes dans notre pays. Il y a très peu de ressources. Tout le monde dit: « Eh bien, vous savez, on publiera peut-être un petit livre pour enfants par-ci, par-là, avec quelques mots en cri et quelques mots en français et en anglais, pour que les gens comprennent peut-être ce qui se passe », mais ce n’est pas suffisant. Nous avons besoin de l’État. Nous avons besoin des instruments de l’État pour aider, parce que c’est une façon importante et symbolique de soutenir ces langues et d'assurer la survie de certaines. Toutes ne survivront pas, pourquoi se leurrer? mais au moins quelques-unes le feront, d'où votre importance. [Français]

Le président:

Je vous remercie.[Traduction]

Allez-y, monsieur Stewart.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Ouellette. Vous me donnez abondante matière à réflexion, sur ma propre identité notamment.

Je suis Canadien. Je crois en l’égalité intrinsèque, et cela se reflète, je pense, dans notre constitution, mais vous me faites prendre conscience du fait que j’ai toujours pensé que les langues autochtones sont votre langue. Maintenant, je pense que c’est ma langue; simplement, je ne la parle pas. Comme c’est ma langue et que je ne la parle pas, je devrais peut-être essayer de la protéger.

En cela réside la valeur de ce que vous faites ici. Vous donnez aux Canadiens l’occasion de réfléchir à ce qu’ils sont, à ce que cela signifie d’être Canadiens, au fait que les Canadiens sont des gens qui parlent les langues autochtones et qu'ils sont partie prenante à cette discussion. L’État devrait refléter cela, parce que c’est là sa fonction. Sa conduite lui est dictée par la Constitution. Par la volonté des citoyens. Je pense que vous avez raison et j’appuie pleinement ce que vous faites ici, comme je l’ai dit à M. Saganash également.

J’appuie l’investissement dans ce domaine et j’aime beaucoup votre idée d’une chaîne CPAC. Je la regarderais probablement parce qu’en tant que Canadien, j’aimerais apprendre cette langue qui est la mienne, mais que simplement je ne parle pas.

Vous avez parlé de vos aînés qui ne se sentent pas canadiens. Ils ne savent pas qu’ils ont inventé un mot pour député maintenant parce que vous les représentez. Je pense que c’est ce que le Canada devra vouloir dire à l’avenir si nous voulons aller de l’avant.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage sur les premières mesures que nous devons prendre en vue de la réalisation de ce que vous avez dit être votre rêve?

(1230)

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Vous devez bien sûr présenter un rapport pour faire une recommandation à la Chambre. L'important c’est ça.

Ensuite, vous devez le mettre aux voix sous la forme d'une motion à la Chambre, comme en 1956, lorsqu’il a été décidé d’avoir la traduction simultanée ou interprétation en français et en anglais au Parlement, et veiller à ce que, lorsque nous siégeons dans la nouvelle Chambre de l’édifice de l’Ouest, la Chambre du peuple, les services d’interprétation y soient offerts.

Ensuite, les services d’interprétation doivent se mettre au travail pour réunir des linguistes spécialistes du cri, par exemple, de la Saskatchewan, de l’Alberta, du Manitoba, du Nord de l’Ontario et même du Québec, chargés d'établir une terminologie commune. Si quelqu’un décide de dire « soins de santé », par quoi le rendre?[Français]

Qu'est-ce qu'un député?[Traduction]

Comment le dire? Comment l’écrire? Au moyen du système syllabique ou d'autre chose? À eux de trouver une solution. C’est, je pense, la première étape, et nous devons prendre le temps de bien faire les choses.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Que pensez-vous de l'idée d’essayer d'abord avec une seule langue? Un peu comme un projet pilote pour voir s'il est possible d'avancer? Cela vous paraît acceptable ou trop offensant pour les autres?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Eh bien, je ne sais pas s’il y a... Je suis sûr que j’aurai un tas de courriels et de textes de personnes qui parlent diverses langues, mais prenez la langue michif, la langue métisse, il reste très peu de personnes qui la parlent. Une poignée. Ses jours sont comptés, avec ses 500 locuteurs. Beaucoup sont très âgés. Je ne suis pas certain qu’ils aient le temps. Certains auront peut-être le temps de trouver des termes.

Je pense qu'il nous faut commencer à tracer la voie avec quelques langues — trois ou quatre peut-être. Je suggère le cri, l'inuktitut, le déné et l'anishinaabemowin ou l'ojibwa, terme couramment utilisé pour décrire l'anishinaabemowin, pour frayer la voie.

Par la suite, à mesure qu’un plus grand nombre de députés seront élus, les gens auront envie de participer au processus politique, d'entendre leur voix et d'entendre leur langue au Parlement. On en viendra à se dire: « Il nous faut un porte-parole des Salish au Parlement. On veut y entendre parler la langue salish. Peut-être devrions-nous participer au processus politique et faire élire l’un des nôtres comme député des conservateurs, du NPD, du Parti vert, des libéraux — à vous de choisir. »

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Merci.

Vous envisagez un projet pilote avec quatre langues?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Je propose quatre, oui.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Quelle serait alors la première étape à suivre? Je sais que vous avez commencé à en parler, mais vous pourriez peut-être nous en dire un peu plus.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Eh bien, je pense qu’il faudrait réunir un groupe de linguistes pour établir la terminologie. Puis, faire quelques essais pour voir ce que ça donne et si ça répond à un besoin.

De toute évidence, nous avons une sorte d'essai en cours ici. J’ai essayé de faire quelque chose ici aujourd’hui. J’ai parlé en français et en anglais, et j’ai veillé à ce que ce monsieur fasse la traduction en cri en même temps, et j'ai écouté la traduction du français en anglais, puis en cri, en cherchant le moyen de coordonner cela. C'est ce qui devra démarrer à un moment donné, ou qui pourrait démarrer.

C’est à vous de décider. De toute évidence, je ne veux pas présumer de votre...

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Puis-je vous poser une autre question?

Vous dites que nous devons peut-être nous limiter à quatre langues pour commencer. On pourrait commencer par une certaine procédure, comme l’article 31 du Règlement, et faire l'essai tout au long de celle-ci, ou diriez-vous que nous devons faire un essai beaucoup plus large d'interprétation...?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Si quelqu’un veut prendre la parole en cri, je pense que le discours devrait être fourni un peu à l'avance. Il faudrait prévoir une réunion entre l'orateur et certains interprètes et peut-être un linguiste autour de questions telles que: « Quels sont les termes que vous aimeriez utiliser? Qu’est-ce qui convient si je dis cela et que j’en parle ensuite? Que pourriez-vous dire? Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire? » Et donner aux gens un délai approprié pour tenir ces discussions, parce que c’est tout nouveau et que cela n’a jamais été fait, et prendre le temps de bien faire les choses.

(1235)

M. Kennedy Stewart:

D’accord. Merci.

Il me reste un peu de temps? D’accord.

J’aimerais assister au premier discours. Si vous nous donnez un peu de marge, nous pouvons tous venir et écouter, ce qui serait formidable — et répondre, je l’espère.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Oui, l'article 31 du Règlement semble intéressant.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

D’accord. Vous proposez un essai sur l’article 31 du Règlement avec présentation préalable d’un discours sur un projet de loi du gouvernement ou quelque chose du genre. Vous pourriez dire: « Je parlerai de ceci la semaine prochaine », ou quelque chose du genre.

Avez-vous d’autres suggestions à faire sur le plan pratique?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Je pense qu’il faut donner un certain... Le système actuel du Sénat me semble bon, le préavis de 48 heures. Bien sûr, les services d’interprétation doivent encore dresser une liste des interprètes autorisés qui peuvent offrir ce service et qui sont disponibles pour l’offrir.

On veut aussi que le service soit efficace en termes de coût. C’est bien de faire venir des gens de différentes régions du pays par avion pour quelques instants, mais cela doit se faire au moindre coût pour le Trésor public. Ce n’est pas...

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Nous pourrions peut-être avoir une période de questions lorsque nous utiliserons toutes les langues autochtones pour poser au premier ministre une question — qu’il connaît bien à l’avance, bien sûr.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Un jour, peut-être. Sait-on jamais. Ce pourrait être très intéressant. Pousser le rêve plus loin encore.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Comme vous l’avez dit, c’est différent dans différentes langues. Les gens de l’Arctique ont toutes sortes de mots différents pour « neige » en inuktitut. Ce n’est pas une procédure simple, mais vous avez ouvert une discussion très importante pour notre pays, et nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants.

Nous apprécions également votre interprète, Darren Okemaysim. Mahsi cho. Meegwetch.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

Il représente la Première Nation de Beardy et d’Okemasis, et l’Université des Premières Nations de la Saskatchewan.

Le président:

Il vient de la Première Nation de Beardy et d’Okemasis et de l’Université des Premières Nations. Excellent. Merci d’être ici en cette journée historique. Meegwetch.

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

[Le député s’exprime en cri]

Le président:

Avez-vous des observations finales?

M. Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

J’apprécie tout simplement tout ce que vous faites.

Je dois dire que vous ne vous attendiez probablement pas à traiter de cette question au comité de la procédure et je m’en excuse. Je remercie le Président d’essayer de défricher la voie. Vous savez que j’aurais pu faire beaucoup de choses. J’aurais pu contester la décision du Président de la Chambre et tenter de forcer la tenue d’un vote à la Chambre, ce qui aurait été du meilleur effet et aurait peut-être brûlé bien des ponts du même coup.

Je vous suis très reconnaissant du travail que vous accomplissez pour faire de notre pays un endroit très inclusif et meilleur pour nous tous.

Merci beaucoup.

[Le député s’exprime en cri]

Le président:

Et réconcilié.

Merci. Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant une minute pour permettre aux nouveaux témoins de s’installer.

(1235)

(1240)

[Français]

Le président:

Bonjour et bienvenue. Nous reprenons la 94e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cet après-midi, nous allons étudier le projet de loi C-377, Loi visant à changer le nom de la circonscription électorale de Châteauguay—Lacolle. Mme Brenda Shanahan, qui parraine le projet de loi et qui est la députée de Châteauguay—Lacolle, est présente aujourd'hui.

Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous. Après votre présentation, il y aura une période de questions à laquelle participeront les membres du Comité. Par la suite, le Comité fera l'étude, article par article, du projet de loi.

Je cède maintenant la parole à Mme Shanahan, qui va nous livrer sa présentation.

Mme Brenda Shanahan (Châteauguay—Lacolle, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Merci, monsieur le président.

Permettez-moi simplement de dire qu’en tant que députée élue pour la première fois, j’ai eu l’honneur de siéger officiellement à — je faisais le compte — quatre comités jusqu’à maintenant, y compris celui que je préside actuellement, mais c’est la première fois que je comparais à titre de témoin. C’est vraiment un plaisir. Merci beaucoup.

Bien sûr, il s’agit de mon projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C-377, Loi visant à changer le nom de la circonscription électorale de Châteauguay—Lacolle pour... eh bien, vous le saurez bientôt. Nous ménagerons le suspense pour l'instant.[Français]

Ce jour marque une étape importante de la première démarche que j'ai entreprise à la suite de mon élection, à savoir changer le nom de notre circonscription de Châteauguay—Lacolle pour lui donner celui de Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville. C'est une démarche que j'ai entreprise à la demande de mes concitoyens.

La raison qui a motivé cette initiative est que le nom de Châteauguay—Lacolle est inexact. Si vous consultez la carte géographique de notre circonscription, qui se trouve devant vous, vous verrez Châteauguay. Vous verrez aussi au sud, à la frontière, que la municipalité de Lacolle se trouve à l'extérieur de la circonscription de Châteauguay—Lacolle.

J'ai une hypothèse quant à la raison pour laquelle la commission a choisi ce nom à l'époque. Il reste que pour les gens demeurant à Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, qui est une tout autre municipalité, il y a une différence importante entre Lacolle et Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle. C'est la municipalité de Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle qui est située sur notre territoire. Cette municipalité a sa propre histoire, ses propres institutions et sa propre raison d'être.

Avant même mon entrée en fonction, les résidants de Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle m'ont fait part de cette préoccupation, et je me suis engagée à faire les démarches nécessaires pour y répondre. Ce n'est pas facile quand on est nouveau en politique, étant donné qu'on ne connaît pas tout le système. J'ai néanmoins fait mes recherches. C'est dans cet esprit que j'ai l'honneur de présenter mon projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire à l'étape de l'étude en comité.

Comme s'il ne suffisait pas que le nom « Lacolle » soit utilisé à tort pour désigner Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, nous avons remarqué à plusieurs reprises qu'encore aujourd'hui, chez les citoyens des deux circonscriptions, le nom Châteauguay—Lacolle portait à confusion. Cet état de choses est à l'origine d'erreurs de compréhension chez certains intervenants. Divers acteurs, dont les médias nationaux, confondent souvent les noms « Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle » et « Lacolle ». Cela s'explique surtout par le fait que la douane de Lacolle, qui est le point de passage vers les États-Unis le plus achalandé au Québec, est située dans les limites de Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, et non de Lacolle.

Bon nombre de résidants de Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle m'ont fait part de leur insatisfaction concernant le nom Châteauguay—Lacolle. Il atteint leur fierté de leur municipalité et nuit à leur sentiment d'appartenance. Nous pouvons tous les comprendre.

Après plusieurs discussions et réflexions avec des citoyens ainsi qu'avec des intervenants de la région, le nom Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville est apparu comme un choix logique et significatif, et ce, pour plusieurs raisons.

Premièrement, la municipalité régionale de comté des Jardins-de-Napierville regroupe 9 de nos 15 municipalités. Il y a en effet 15 municipalités dans ma circonscription, dont 9 se trouvent dans la MRC des Jardins-de-Napierville.

Deuxièmement, tous les citoyens pourraient se reconnaître dans le nom de Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville car les résidants de Châteauguay et des cinq municipalités environnantes, qui sont situées au nord-ouest de la circonscription, peuvent s'identifier à la région du Grand Châteauguay. Les municipalités de Mercier, de Léry et de Saint-Isidore se trouvent dans le regroupement du Grand Châteauguay.

Troisièmement, la MRC des Jardins-de-Napierville est la première région en importance au Québec pour la production maraîchère. Les légumes — la laitue, les carottes et les oignons de toutes sortes, par exemple — y sont très bons. Cela lui donne une certaine notoriété.

(1245)



Finalement, le nom « Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville » représente bien le caractère semi-urbain et semi-rural de notre circonscription.

Je dois rappeler que je parraine ce projet de loi au nom de mes concitoyens. Une pétition demandant à la Chambre des communes de donner à notre circonscription le nouveau nom de « Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville » circule d'ailleurs présentement dans la région. Bien sûr, les gens se réjouissent du fait que je travaille déjà à ce projet.

La pétition compte déjà plusieurs centaines de signatures, notamment celle des maires de Napierville, de Saint-Cyprien-de-Napierville et des municipalités avoisinantes.

En leur qualité d’élus, ces maires sont heureux de soutenir ma démarche au nom de leurs concitoyens, tout comme mes collègues des circonscriptions voisines, M. Jean Rioux, qui est député de Saint-Jean et qui est d'ailleurs heureux que Lacolle soit dans sa circonscription; Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach, qui est députée de Salaberry—Suroît; et mon collègue Jean-Claude Poissant, qui est député de La Prairie.

Tel que consigné dans mon projet de loi, Châteauguay—Lacolle a été créée en 2013 à la suite du redécoupage électoral qui est entré en vigueur lors de la dissolution de la 41e législature, en 2015. La circonscription actuelle a été formée à partir des anciennes circonscriptions de Châteauguay—Saint-Constant et de Beauharnois—Salaberry.

Ceux qui étaient présents lors de la dernière législature connaissent et comprennent peut-être le système beaucoup mieux que moi. Cela dit, il semble qu’une erreur ait été commise à la Commission de délimitation des circonscriptions électorales fédérales pour la province de Québec lors du choix du nom de la nouvelle circonscription. Le fait que Lacolle se situait déjà dans la circonscription de Saint-Jean lors du redécoupage précédent n'a probablement pas été relevé.[Traduction]

J'en viens à la partie plus technique. J'ai expliqué au Comité pour quelles raisons je demande le changement de nom de ma circonscription. Permettez-moi de vous donner un aperçu des modalités de changement de nom des circonscriptions fédérales et des critères à respecter en la matière.

Tout d’abord, compte tenu de la pratique qui consiste à revoir les limites des circonscriptions électorales tous les 10 ans à la suite d’un nouveau recensement national, Élections Canada fournit aux 10 commissions provinciales de délimitation des circonscriptions électorales des lignes directrices sur les bonnes pratiques et les conventions d'affectation de nom.

Bien qu'Élections Canada adopte tout changement de nom voté par le Parlement, il lui faut tenir compte de considérations pratiques et techniques, comme la capacité limitée des bases de données. Ainsi, les noms de circonscription ne doivent pas dépasser 50 caractères. Cela surprendra peut-être mes collègues, parce que nous avons certainement des noms assez intéressants et longs. Pour autant qu'ils comptent 50 caractères ou moins — traits d’union, tirets et espaces compris —, cela répond au critère. C’est pour qu'on puisse les insérer dans des bases de données, des cartes et ainsi de suite.

J’ai le plaisir de vous signaler que « Chateauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville » compte 38 caractères, traits d’union, tirets et espaces compris.

De plus, les noms choisis pour les circonscriptions doivent refléter le caractère du Canada et être clairs et sans ambiguïté, et je crois que ces critères sont respectés dans le projet de loi, puisque les noms désignent une municipalité et une région de la MRC.

Il faut aussi faire une distinction, dans l’orthographe des noms, entre les traits d’union et les tirets. Les premiers servent à lier les parties des noms géographiques, tandis que les tirets servent à unir deux noms géographiques distincts ou davantage. Cette convention a été respectée, on utilise un tiret pour séparer « Châteauguay » et « Les Jardins-de-Napierville », et les traits d’union dans « Les Jardins-de-Napierville ».

Sur la carte, on voit que Châteauguay et Les Jardins-de-Napierville sont deux dénominations géographiques qui correspondent presque entièrement au territoire et également à la lecture de la carte de gauche à droite. C’est par souci de simplicité et de clarté et pour respecter les emplacements géographiques.

De plus, le nom d’une circonscription électorale doit être unique, ce qui veut dire que ses composantes ne peuvent être utilisées qu’une seule fois, ce qui est effectivement le cas pour les éléments des deux noms en question.

Les lignes directrices énoncent aussi des caractéristiques négatives à éviter, ce dont tient compte également le nom que nous avons choisi. Par exemple, le nom d’une circonscription doit être clair tant en anglais qu'en français et, dans la mesure du possible, être acceptable sans traduction dans l’autre langue officielle, afin d'éviter les dénominations multiples en traduction.

(1250)



L’autre caractéristique à éviter est l’utilisation de points cardinaux, comme est ou ouest. Vous vous direz peut-être: « Il me semble que nous avons des noms qui les utilisent », quoi qu'il en soit, je vous rappelle que le dernier mot sur les changements de nom revient au Parlement. Les lignes directrices disent qu’il faut l’éviter, la traduction en étant malaisée.

Enfin, il convient d'éviter l'emploi des noms des provinces, de noms de personnes et de noms imprécis ou inventés à partir de sources non géographiques.

Je pense avoir abordé tous les arguments pertinents relatifs à la demande de changement de nom présentée dans mon projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C-377, et avoir montré que le nouveau nom est conforme aux lignes directrices établies par Élections Canada.

Je suis honorée que mes électeurs me confient la tâche de redresser une erreur. Je suis convaincue que tous mes collègues appuieront le projet de loi pour l'adoption de notre nouveau nom, Chateauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville.

C'est avec grand plaisir que je répondrai maintenant à vos questions. Merci. [Français]

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Je vais accorder trois minutes à chaque parti.[Traduction]

J’espère qu’ils n’utiliseront pas tout ce temps.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, Brenda.

Ma circonscription compte beaucoup plus de 50 caractères, mais le titre est plus court. De plus, je suis sûr que nous sommes tous, hormis quelques uns, d’accord pour dire que le nouveau projet de loi C-377 est bien meilleur que l’ancien.

J’ai deux ou trois petites questions.

Qui était votre prédécesseur et pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas eu d'opposition au changement de nom à ce moment-là?

Lors du dernier redécoupage, je travaillais pour le député de Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, qui se trouve peut-être dans la salle à ce moment-ci. On voulait changer le nom de Bay d’Espoir—Central—Notre Dame, qui en français est Bay d’Espoir—Central—Notre Dame, ce qui est une autre histoire. Nous avons présenté la demande au comité à l’époque — c’était le comité de la procédure, je crois — et le nom a été modifié.

Pourquoi ne l’a-t-on pas fait lors du changement initial en 2013? Le savez-vous?

Mme Brenda Shanahan:

Nous avons fait nos recherches. Tout est disponible, bien sûr. Les rapports de la commission sont disponibles en ligne, ainsi que certaines des discussions qui ont eu lieu au Parlement.

Il y a deux choses. Ma nouvelle circonscription a été créée à partir de deux autres. Le rapport initial de la Commission pour le Québec suggérait d'adopter le nom de Châteauguay—Lacolle. Il l’indique dans la liste avec tous les autres changements de nom, sans autre commentaire. Le deuxième rapport toutefois couvre effectivement les interventions, les consultations et les commentaires du public et des députés au sujet des changements. Il énumère également en détail toutes les suggestions qui ont été faites. Il en accepte certaines et en rejette d’autres.

Prenons l’exemple de la circonscription voisine de la mienne. À l’origine, la commission avait recommandé « Salaberry ». Il est clair que le député à l’époque... ou des consultations ont eu lieu ou des citoyens ont pris la parole et on a changé le nom pour Salaberry—Suroît. Je ne sais pas pour quelles raisons, mais c’est un exemple.

Cependant, dans le cas de Châteauguay—Lacolle, il n’y a aucune trace d'intervention.

(1255)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord.

Le président:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ça va. Je peux en faire usage.

Vous avez mentionné en avoir discuté avec vos maires. Y a-t-il eu opposition? Quelqu’un dans votre circonscription qui dise que c’est une idée exécrable?

Mme Brenda Shanahan:

Absolument pas. Bien sûr, les gens ont lancé quelques idées, comme toutes les municipalités. Tout le monde s’est dit: « Eh bien, ce devrait être Châteauguay—Saint-Urbain », et ainsi de suite. C’était et cela reste un excellent sujet de conversation.

Le premier maire avec qui j’en ai parlé était Jacques Délisle, le maire de Napierville à l’époque. Il suggérait Châteauguay—Les Jardins-de-Napierville. Je sondais les gens de la région, mais avant qu'une tendance ne se dessine, voici qu'il meurt soudainement, dans la fleur de l'âge. Il est mort en jouant au basketball. Parce que Jacques avait suggéré le nom, les gens l’aimaient. Cela a vraiment renforcé ce choix de nom.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Mon temps de parole est épuisé.

Quel était son nom?

Mme Brenda Shanahan:

Jacques Délisle est le maire qui est décédé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

C’est au tour de M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous aussi, madame Shanahan, d’être parmi nous.

Je me demande simplement ce qui vous a poussé à aller de l’avant avec ce projet de loi, plutôt que votre motion originale M-125 sur la littératie financière. Je crois savoir que vous avez de l'expérience dans le secteur bancaire et le travail social. Il pouvait sembler logique d’aller de l’avant avec la littératie financière, surtout si l’on tient compte du processus parallèle en cours avec les leaders à la Chambre concernant une motion de consentement unanime visant à modifier le nom de plusieurs circonscriptions.

Est-ce que quelqu’un vous a encouragé à renoncer à cette motion sur la littératie financière pour défendre celle-ci? Je me demande simplement pourquoi cette décision a été prise.

Mme Brenda Shanahan:

C’est une excellente question, parce que, bien sûr, j’ai dû y réfléchir longtemps.

Tout d’abord, vous devez vous informer sur la façon de présenter un projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire et sur la loterie, où vous en êtes dans la loterie et combien de temps cela prend. J'ai le numéro 86. Est-ce que cela veut dire que je ne me présenterai que dans 3 ans ou dans 86 jours? Je n'en avais aucune idée.

J’ai dû assimiler cela. Naturellement, cela fait des années que je travaille sur un sujet comme la littératie financière, alors j’avais beaucoup d’idées sur ce que je voulais faire là-bas, mais il y a eu cette chose qui était plus qu’une demande, c’était de réparer cette erreur. C’est vraiment ce que mes électeurs me disaient.[Français]

Il fallait changer cela. Ils me demandaient ce qui se passait à Ottawa et soulignaient que Lacolle était à côté.[Traduction]

Je pense que nous pouvons tous comprendre. C’est comme dire que Lacolle est le poste frontalier. C’est comme dire que si vous avez une circonscription qui s’appelle Pearson, vous vivez à l’aéroport Pearson. Ce n’est pas le cas.

J’ai donc trouvé cela convaincant. J’ai fait mes recherches. Comment s'y prendre pour faire cela? C’est le genre de choses que j’ai apprises. Oui, cela pourrait se faire sous forme de projet de loi omnibus et j’en ai appris davantage sur les projets de loi omnibus. Apparemment, les gens n’aiment pas les utiliser. Pour moi, c’est un outil. Quel que soit l’outil, je dis que c’est bien, mais mes électeurs continuaient de me presser, et j’en apprenais davantage sur le fonctionnement du Parlement. Le temps continuait de passer. Le calendrier me préoccupait. Je commençais à voir comment marchent les choses, ce qui peut les retarder. D’autres priorités peuvent surgir. Nous n’aurions pas pu respecter l'échéance qui m'avait été plus ou moins fixée, de janvier 2019 pour la sanction royale, de sorte que le nom soit en vigueur pour les élections de 2019.

J’ai dû prendre une décision très difficile, mais je pense que tout le monde ici le comprendrait. Quel objectif poursuivre? Votre propre objectif personnel ou celui que vos concitoyens vous assignent? J’ai dû prendre cette décision.

Il y a d’autres façons de travailler sur la littératie financière, et je continue bien sûr de le faire.

M. John Nater:

Je ne vois aucune raison pour que cette mesure ne soit pas adoptée par la Chambre. Avez-vous un parrain au Sénat lorsqu’elle arrive au Sénat?

Mme Brenda Shanahan:

Je ne sais pas ce que je peux dire à ce sujet. J’ai certainement parlé aux sénateurs. Au Québec, nous avons des sénateurs qui sont en fait attribués à différentes régions, alors naturellement, cela suscite un intérêt.

Le président:

C’est au tour de M. Stewart.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je n’ai pas grand-chose à dire, sauf que manifestement vous apprenez vite, parce que votre exposé est excellent. Je pense que cela devrait être adopté. Cela me semble logique. Je vous félicite pour votre exposé réussi.

Mme Brenda Shanahan:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Stewart.

Le président:

Le Comité est-il prêt pour l’étude article par article?

L’article 1 est-il adopté?

(L’article 1 est adopté)

Le président: Le titre est-il adopté?

Des voix: D’accord.

Le président: Le projet de loi est-il adopté?

Des voix:D’accord.

Le président: Le président doit-il faire rapport du projet de loi?

Des voix:D'accord.

Le président: Félicitations.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on March 22, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.