header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-02-16 PROC 7

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We don't want to get into a bad habit of starting late. We're already a couple of minutes late.

Good morning, everyone. This is meeting number seven of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs in the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is being held in public.

Our first business today is a presentation from the committee's analyst, Andre Barnes, in connection with our study of initiatives toward a family-friendly or more inclusive House of Commons.

After that, under committee business we will consider recommendations from the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure, which met this morning and has drafted some work for the next month or so for the committee's approval.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

If I might, I want to point out for the benefit of Mr. Lamoureux that if he's looking for a role model and continues to insist on being at these meetings, I just left public accounts where Joyce Murray is the parliamentary secretary and she respectfully sat right to the very end. She did her other work and didn't speak once. It was such fresh oxygen that the committee actually stood on its own two feet, your colleagues, all by themselves. They didn't need to lean on the parliamentary secretary.

I would suggest to the member that if he insists on still coming, he might want to look at the model provided by Madam Murray, who I think showed the kind of respect to the commitment the government has made that, so far, Mr. Lamoureux has failed to live up to.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

I'm now going to turn it over to Andre. He's not a formal witness, so at any time during the presentation people can ask questions. There's no order of questioners or anything. This will be a much more informal discussion.

Andre, you're on.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Committee members will have received a series of documents in the past several weeks that deal with different aspects of family-friendly practices in other jurisdictions. It depends on how the committee would like to proceed. I could begin by going over the document that's called “Family-Friendly Practices In Other Jurisdictions”, because that's the one that covers the most practices abroad. If committee members would like to discuss the parallel chambers in other jurisdictions, we can do that. There's also a document—and I apologize that it was sent out so late; it took a while to do—on Standing Order 31 equivalents in other jurisdictions, and sitting hours and sitting periods in other jurisdictions. That was sent out not too long ago. Members presumably have not had a chance to look at that one.

If the committee would like, I could proceed by going through this document here. Do feel free to interrupt with questions at any point. I might not be able to answer them, but I will come back to you with an answer as soon as possible.

The document covers sitting hours in selected national and provincial jurisdictions. It covers proxy voting, allowing babies on the floor of the House during a sitting, and a last catch-all category of family-friendly policies that covers what's currently in place in Canada's Parliament for parental leave and child care facilities.

To begin with sitting times, changes to a Parliament's sitting times are generally considered to be among the most common family-friendly reforms. As a place to start, it might be helpful to compare Canada's House of Commons sitting hours with other jurisdictions, in particular, the Canadian provincial and territorial legislatures, the U.K. House of Commons, the Australian House of Representatives, and the New Zealand House of Representatives.

In 2016, Canada's House is scheduled to sit 127 days over 26 sitting weeks. The Clerk of the House indicated during his appearance before the committee that generally the House sits 135 days per year. As members are very much aware, the House sits 8 hours on Monday and 4.5 hours on Fridays. By comparison, Canada's House of Commons sits fewer days than the U.K.'s House of Commons, but sits more frequently than Australia's House, New Zealand's House, and every provincial and territorial jurisdiction in Canada.

To get into the details, the U.K.'s House sits 150 days per year over 34 sitting weeks. That compares to 135 days here over 26 sitting weeks. It's worth noting that in the U.K.'s House of Commons, they do not generally sit every Friday. They have designated Fridays. For the calendar year 2015-16 they designated 13 sitting Fridays, and they don't sit on the other Fridays.

(1110)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

That means essentially that half of the weeks are four-day weeks and half of the weeks are five-day weeks.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

In fact, it's less, because it's 13 out of 34.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's a third. Okay.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Exactly.

New Zealand and Australia also sit considerably less than Canada's House of Commons. In 2015 New Zealand's House sat for 90 days over 25 sitting weeks, and Australia's House sat for 68 days over 28 sitting weeks. The reason these jurisdictions sit less than us is that they sit three and four days a week. New Zealand's House sits for three days a week, and Australia's House sits for four days a week. There was a long period when Australia's House, from the 1950s to 1984—

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Sorry to interrupt you, but I have a quick question.

You've indicated that a couple of them currently don't have any Friday sittings. U.K. has some of the Fridays. Is that something that has always existed in those jurisdictions, or were there at one time Friday sittings and they've gone away from them?

That's something that would be especially interesting to hear about.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

The changes in the U.K. appear to have been made piecemeal over time. It started in 1997 and they finally made some changes in 2005, when it was recommended that the House study sitting times. The changes were finally made in 2012. They eliminated Friday sittings between 2012 and 2015

I emailed them to find out more about it, because it must have happened so recently that I couldn't find any information on it. But they did it piecemeal. In the U.K., the House sittings began later and ended later, and they gradually moved them all to earlier.

In Australia and New Zealand, their procedural manuals—their equivalent of O'Brien and Bosc—make it sound like they've sat like that since the beginning. It might not be the most useful comparison because Australia for half of its existence has had three days a week. From 1950 to 1984 it sat three days a week and more recently it sits four days a week. New Zealand only sits three days a week and it made it sound like that's always been the case.

I looked to see if anything said why they didn't sit five days a week and I couldn't find any information on it. It might be something worth asking officials from their jurisdictions.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Where the times have gone up, where they used to sit three or four days and they've gone to five, have they increased the number of hours?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I've found in the provincial jurisdictions that there have been increases. When you decrease, if you remove time from one time.... For example, I think it was British Columbia; it got rid of night sittings and extended the length of the day on the other days to compensate for it. I have not seen a jurisdiction add a sitting day.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Typically the trend is either to decrease the sitting days or weeks, or to rejig so that they're doing it at different times.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

This is what I've found.

Also, perhaps interesting to the committee is that in Scotland when they were designing a parliament in 1999, they decided to make family-friendly sittings—and family-friendly for everyone, for staff and for members—to be one of their principles and priorities. It's something that's on the radar of these different jurisdictions.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I thought maybe I just heard a contradiction. I think you indicated that Australia had at one point sat three days a week and had moved to four. Then I thought maybe you had just indicated the number of sittings.

Did they reduce the number of weeks when they went to four days a week?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

From what I could gather from reading their manual, from around the 1900s, when that jurisdiction began, it was four days a week. Then they went down to three days a week from 1950 to 1984, and then from 1984 to present they went back up to four days a week.

I don't know about the amount. I know about the amount of time that they currently sit, but I'm afraid I don't know much more about it.

(1115)

Mr. Blake Richards:

So they've kind of gone back and forth a little bit.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Yes. Meanwhile New Zealand appears to have sat for three days for a long time.

In comparison with the territorial and provincial jurisdictions, 10 of 13 provincial and territorial jurisdictions do not sit on either Monday or Friday. Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia do not sit on Mondays. Seven do not sit on Fridays: Alberta, British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, and Yukon.

Quebec has an interesting innovation that they put in place in 2009, where they designate certain sitting periods in the year as ordinary hours and other periods as extended hours. I can talk a little bit more about that later. During ordinary hours, the Quebec National Assembly does not sit on Mondays or Fridays.

That's sort of a broad overview of the sitting times and schedules and how Canada's House of Commons compares to other jurisdictions.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I hate to keep interrupting.

The same question, I guess, applies here and to the provinces. You indicated that a number don't sit on Mondays or don't sit on Fridays, and I think there were one or two that were both.

Were any of those places that have adjusted it? In other words, did they have the five-day sittings and then they reduced it?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

The tricky part and difficulty of researching the different jurisdictions just by going on what's online is that they don't tend to have a manual like we do with the O'Brien and Bosc, so you really have to dig around.

I did find that Quebec, British Columbia, and Ontario had made changes recently. Those were changes to compress the week, but they also made up for the time.

I will mention some innovations that might be of interest to the committee that other jurisdictions have put in place. One that came up during the House leader's appearance before the committee was two distinct sitting days on one calendar day.

That happens in British Columbia. They got rid of late-night sittings in 2007 and made up for the hours elsewhere. Then in 2009, they implemented on three of the four sitting days, two distinct sitting days on one day.

So, in other jurisdictions you'll see that there's a break during the day. There are different periods during the day when you look at the schedule. Those are just suspensions. They do not count them officially as different, distinct sitting days, but they do in British Columbia.

That was the only jurisdiction I found that had brought that into place. That is on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday; they have two distinct sitting days.

Interestingly, Quebec, which I mentioned before, devised a schedule with two distinct sitting periods: ordinary hours and extended hours. Ordinary hours begin in February and end at the beginning of May. Extended hours run from late May until the end of June, and from November until December.

The other innovation that might be of note for the committee was in Ontario. The daily sittings were moved to an earlier time. Night sittings were eliminated. Question period was moved to 10:45 each morning. My understanding was that it was formally held during a floating time between 1:45 p.m. and 3 p.m.. It should be noted that the change in time of the sitting period did come into some criticism at that time because it was felt that the opposition could not properly prepare for question period, having been held so early in the morning.

The Chair:

Does anyone still sit at night?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

There are late sittings in a lot of jurisdictions. Australia goes until 9:30 p.m. New Zealand's House of Representatives on Tuesdays and Wednesdays sits from 7:30 p.m. until 10 p.m. The U.K. sits from 2:30 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. on Mondays. So, night sittings still exist in a number of jurisdictions, although all the provinces appear to more or less adjourn by 6 p.m.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

We sit until midnight in June as well in our extended sittings, right?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I did not dig into the possibility of extended sittings. The Standing Orders in the House do provide for extended sittings; on the calendar, there's a little star beside the last two weeks in June, and then around the holidays. I'm not sure if those jurisdictions have that. I can come back to the committee with that.

Those were more or less the highlights, I think, about the sitting hours in the different jurisdictions. Do members have any other questions about that?

I can move on to proxy voting. This innovation exists. It was put in place in 1996 in New Zealand. It allows one member to give their vote to another member to cast it in the chamber for them, so they don't physically have to be present. In New Zealand it did not sound as though they put that innovation in place to make the chamber more family friendly; they just did it to make it more convenient for members. Meanwhile, that was adopted in Australia in 2008. That was put in place to help mothers who are breastfeeding.

There are certain rules, especially in New Zealand, about the use of a proxy vote. It must be signed and dated. It must contain the name of the person authorized to cast the vote on the member's behalf. There's a duration of the proxy. The proxy can be open in nature for all business for an indefinite period of time.

Importantly, a proxy vote in New Zealand can only be exercised if the member issuing the proxy is actually present somewhere in the parliamentary precinct or is attending a select meeting outside of the capital, Wellington, or has been granted a leave of absence by the Speaker. So, there is certainly a very circumscribed use of it.

Meanwhile, in Australia, there was a study conducted by their procedure committee about the use of proxy votes. In 2008, they did put in place a proxy system. The way it works there is that the member may vote by proxy if the member is nursing an infant at the time of the division. The term “nursing an infant” refers to any activity related to the immediate care of an infant. It doesn't necessarily mean breastfeeding, for example; it means immediate care of the infant.

The whips only require the member to state that they are caring for an infant and no further explanation is required. The government members give their vote to the government whip members, and non-government members give their votes to the chief opposition whip members.

That is proxy voting in those two jurisdictions.

(1120)

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

That was in New Zealand, and where was the other?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

It was the House of Representatives in Australia.

I also found out in reading the report.... Only a few days ago the House of Representatives in Australia produced a report which allows for breastfeeding in the chamber, which I'll cover in a second. I read the report, and it does speak about the other jurisdictions that have proxy voting. The Senate in Australia has proxy voting, and a number of other states in Australia do as well.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

The reference is proxy voting. There's no use of technology involved in this. It is just proxy voting.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

It makes it sound like there is a slip of paper involved.

Turning to non-members on the floor during a sitting, by tradition no non-member or no member who is not part of the staff is allowed to be on the floor during a sitting. That means everyone who is not part of that group is considered in our Parliament to be strangers. In other jurisdictions they are known as visitors. The Speaker can ask all visitors and all strangers to leave. In the past this has caused some issues, because on at least three occasions a member has brought a baby into the House during a sitting and technically that is considered to be a stranger.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right now is that a stranger in our House?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

That said, when it last occurred, in either 2010 or 2011, there was a point of order raised about it. The Speaker clarified the position of the House of Commons at present. The Speaker indicated that infants were permitted on the floor of the House provided disruption and disturbance did not occur and the work of the House could proceed uninterrupted. What I gather is that members were taking pictures of the infant last time.

Meanwhile, the Australian House of Representatives has said that breastfeeding is now permitted on the floor of the House. It may be worth noting that 100 out of 150 members of the House in Australia are women, and I gather three cabinet members have recently given birth and four men are expecting children in the short term. The newspaper referred to it as a mini baby boom. The way they changed their Standing Orders was to amend the definition of “visitor” so that it does not include an infant cared for by a member.

In terms of parental leave, in our House, as noted by the Clerk of the House, the pay and benefits package for Canadian MPs does not contain any specific provisions about parental leave. In fact, senators and MPs under the Parliament of Canada Act are docked pay—

(1125)

The Chair:

I just have one question. As it was written in the report, my understanding is that if an MP is away for 20 days and comes back for one day, then the clock starts again. Is that true?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I do not think that's the case. I think it is the total.

The Chair:

Is that the total in a session or in a Parliament?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Yes, it is per session. That reference might be true for senators who under the Constitution need to attend—

The Chair:

Could you check that? I was told by personnel that if you could come back for one day you could start your 20-day—not that I want to be away, but just so the report is accurate....

Thank you.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

There are others. The deductions are written in the report. There are the deductions for senators. There are the deductions for members of Parliament, set out in the Parliament of Canada Act.

The child care facilities for—

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I was looking at the report and it gives the reasons you can be absent and get leave from the Speaker. Being sick is one of them, but if your child is sick and you have to care for your child, that would not currently be considered a reason.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

It's set out in the Parliament of Canada Act, so there isn't a lot of flexibility. It does not include that in the clauses in the Parliament of Canada Act.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

What has been the practice? Do you know?

That would require a legislative change if they were to say that caregiving for children—

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Yes.

For child care facilities for the House, I gather there is no institutional policy for the provision of child care or its expenses for members and their children. Parliament nonetheless has an on-site day care, Children On The Hill. It has spaces for about 34 children ages 1.5 years to 5 years. Priority is given to senators, members of Parliament, employees of the Senate and the House, Library of Parliament employees, members of the press gallery, and employees of the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What is the timing for the day care? How old does a child have to be to get admitted to the day care? What are the rules? What do you have to sign up for? What is the length of time if you are putting your child inside day care? Do you have those details?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I do not, although in a discussion with Mr. Graham prior to the meeting, he mentioned that it ends at five.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't know if it's five, but I know it ends before we do.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I can come back with an answer to that.

The Chair:

Could we get that for the next meeting?

My understanding is that although we're only here a week in, a week out, you can't sign up like that. You have to sign up for the whole month.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I think the minimum is 18 months, so if you have a child less than 18 months old, you can't even use the day care.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Sorry, my understanding of that facility is that it is not a drop-off for a day type of thing. There are spots and then you would...I'm not sure for how long you would get a spot, but I could come back—

The Chair:

Maybe you could give us one page on all the details of that.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Could you also find out if there's a waiting list for the day care?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

My understanding anecdotally from people who use it is that there is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it run by the House of Commons or is it privately run?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I could find that out as well.

I'll move on to the document on the parallel sitting chambers in other jurisdictions.

One is called the Federation Chamber. It was devised in 1994 in Australia's House of Representatives. The United Kingdom devised a parallel chamber called Westminster Hall. Apparently it was modelled on the concept of the Federation Chamber in Australia.

There is a large number of similarities between the two chambers. Both can sit at the same time as the House sits. Both chambers are located conveniently on the parliamentary precinct. Quorum in both chambers is three, although any number of members are able to participate in the debates. It might be worth signalling to the members that in the case of the House of Commons in the U.K., there are 650 members, and from what I've heard, there are about 350 seats. If all members showed up, there would not be room for them. That is a difference between our chamber and their chamber.

Both chambers have their proceedings presided over by a deputy speaker, another chair occupant. The public is allowed to attend both chambers. The proceedings of the chambers are televised. The records of both chambers form part of the official records of either House. No votes can occur in either House. To be more specific, in Westminster Hall a motion comes under discussion and it is written in neutral terms, so no vote is permitted. In the Federation Chamber, for all the items that are referred there, there's supposed to be a consensus about moving them forward. It appears as though the Federation Chamber was called the Main Committee when it was first instituted. In that sense, it appears to operate like a committee. It appears it would put forward a recommendation in a report to the House, and then the House would concur in it. The Federation Chamber can make decisions, but they need to be formally accepted by the House for them to come into force. There's no voting allowed. Everything that would require a vote in the Federation Chamber would be referred back to the House, but it seems that they can move certain items of business forward in the Federation Chamber.

(1130)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Would that be similar to a committee of the whole?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

In the Canadian context, a committee of the whole can vote. It would be somewhat different, because a committee of the whole would resolve into that in the main chamber. Technically, a committee of the whole can call witnesses. I'm not sure about the ability of these different chambers to call witnesses.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

You mentioned the difficulty they have in terms of the number of seats and the number of members. I guess they had a chance back when it burned to make it bigger, and I think it was Winston who said at the time, “No, no, no, we like it the way it is.”

What I didn't hear was that they did it to save time or to.... What was their other reason? It wouldn't just be for the seating. Did they clearly state that their objective was the ability to move more legislation through quickly without losing any of the benefits of our system?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

For the Federation Chamber, what I found was that it is a debating chamber established to provide a parallel forum to the chamber for debate on a restricted range of business. It was clearer when I looked into Westminster Hall that it was to provide a greater opportunity for debate, because there was only so much time in the main chamber, and overflow business was being sent to....

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's what I wanted to get at. Were they deliberately trying to improve their efficiency in terms of how much they could deal with at the same time without giving things up? One could argue that one of the downsides of recognizing two days as one is that legislation can be rammed through, even though it would have met the requirements of an extra day given the fact that it has now been compressed, so you lose something in that kind of process. My assumption was that they were trying to provide a parallel process to save time, and that is clearly their main motive.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

For Westminster Hall, it says that the purpose of Westminster Hall debates is to provide an additional forum for debate, essentially to make more parliamentary time available in the week without extending sitting hours.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I'd never heard of it until it came up here. It's a fascinating concept. I don't know whether it would work for us in any way, but I think it's worth some exploration. Having sat on the government side in another Parliament, House time is precious. I understand there could be an argument from the opposition side, “Let's not go down that road. We want to slow the government down.” But if we remove ourselves from partisanship and look at it structurally, is it in our best interest to have the ability, when we want to, to move things along quicker without trading off some aspect of good democracy?

I would suggest, Chair, and colleagues also, that I find this intriguing. This is my the seventh or eighth Parliament now, and I find this fascinating. I would hope that we would at least give it a chance, kick it around to see if there is something there that could benefit us. There may not be, but I'd sure like an opportunity to explore that. It's a unique concept, and it's not surprising that it came from the mother ship, so thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I want to echo what David just said. I'm truly fascinated by the parallel debating chambers.

I want to ask Mr. Barnes a question with respect to whether by creating these additional forums it puts additional pressure for other matters to creep into the debate process.

My recollection is of a motion that was put forward in Westminster Hall. I believe it was debated in Westminster Hall. I believe that under the British system, regular individuals have the ability to sign online petitions. This was the motion about banning Donald Trump from the United Kingdom. I know that ultimately it was not a votable matter, but I believe it ended up in Westminster Hall, if my recollection is correct. As a function of creating this parallel debating chamber, did you observe that there were subsequent reforms that created new opportunities for additional material—to get back to David's point—to put pressure on legislative time and on the ability to debate the actual substantive bills and motions that were before the House?

(1135)

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I think that the use in either jurisdiction of their parallel chamber is different.

In the case of Westminster Hall, the items that can be referred to Westminster Hall are very scripted in terms of who can send an item to the chamber each day. Mondays are taken up by a new creation of theirs that was studied by procedure and House affairs last session, e-petitions. The e-petitions committee, which is a brand new committee, has the ability to send e-petitions for debate to Westminster Hall. That would have been how that item would have arrived.

On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, my understanding is that it's sort of like the adjournment proceedings that happen here at the House. Those are taken up via some random draw that members sign up for at the Speaker's office in the House to be able to participate in Westminster Hall.

Thursdays are scheduled by a British creation called the backbench committee, which allows backbench members to put forward items of business. Apparently at 35 sittings in a session, the backbench committee can put forward items of business to be considered. Twenty-seven of them have to be in the main chamber and the rest can be in Westminster Hall.

It's very circumscribed what business can be sent there.

From what I gather, for the Federation Chamber it's a little different. It seems as though you can bring bills forward for a second reading. If I read it properly, it says “close examination”. That might be like our clause by clause. You could do that at the Federation Chamber, and if there was consensus to move it forward, you would report it back to the House.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, and then Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Chair, I was just seeing opportunity in the longer term plans, not over the next couple of years. Centre Block is going to close for renovations soon. We're going to move to West Block, make a new chamber there, and then we're going to move back to Centre Block, close West Block so we can take the chamber out. We might save two years by keeping that second chamber as our second chamber 15 years down the road from now.

Another thought I had, just for the sake of argument, is if we were getting rid of Friday sittings, that's four hours of sitting that has to be redistributed. If we put all the second reading PMB stuff into the secondary chamber, more MPs would get a chance to bring a PMB forward. You could actually have two or three a day instead of one a day, and it would only go back to the House for third reading. It might be an efficiency to look at, just for the record.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

To build on where Mr. Graham was, I agree entirely. I had two points to make, and one of them was on rebuilding the House. What a great opportunity if it turns out there is something there that would be useful to us that we've already built. It still costs a little bit of money, but the big money would be spent in terms of infrastructure, heating, cooling, and communications, etc. It's a great point, and I agree entirely.

The other thing I was going to ask was, has the mother ship done a review yet? Have they actually said, “Okay, we've done this for a while.” Do they actually have a review document, and if so, could we get that circulated, please?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Sorry, it's just to give due credit to the Australian chamber, because I made it sound like they didn't.... Westminster Hall is modelled after the Federation Chamber. They are the innovators of this.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The Aussies get the credit. Fair enough; give them their due. All right, thank you.

The Chair:

Where the backbench committee can bring things forward, do they also have opposition days and private members' business where backbenchers can bring forward motions? How often does that...? Is it like us, where they have it every day?

(1140)

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I'm not familiar with their sitting week. I know they have private members' bills. I know that our House is very circumscribed. I keep using the word “circumscribed”. There is a set schedule and a lot of procedures about it, but I can come back to the committee. I'm not sure about supply days either.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Do you know of any countries or any jurisdictions that might have a parallel chamber type of thing that isn't necessarily physical but at different times? For instance, does anywhere have a parallel chamber that would sit on Fridays or evenings when the main chamber is not sitting rather than in a separate space?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Prior to the appearance of the Clerk of the House, I had only heard of Westminster Hall. I had never heard of the Federation Chamber in Australia. I can look around to see what other jurisdictions are doing. I could be mistaken, but I don't believe there are any in the provinces or the territories, and there isn't one in New Zealand so it would have to be in another Commonwealth jurisdiction, maybe, like in India or....

The Chair:

I don't think we have to limit our research to Commonwealth countries, either.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We could also start putting the Senate chamber to good use.

The Chair:

Did you have more?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

That's more or less it, unless the committee had any other questions.

The Chair:

Okay, so the committee has three reports from the researcher. He has just relayed these topics which he's just discussed: the parallel chambers, family-friendly for an inclusive Parliament, and the sitting days report that just came out this morning.

Are there any questions or discussions on any of this?

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We talked a bit about proxy voting. Did you come across any jurisdictions or other provinces that do electronic voting or voting through other technological means?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I can look into that further. There are new chambers that have devolved out of the U.K. House of Commons. I want to say Scotland and Wales; I am pretty sure they have electronic voting, but let me come back to the committee on that.

The Chair:

Congress does, but you have to be there to push the button.

Arnold.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Barnes, I want to ask a question with respect to non-members on the floor of the chamber during a sitting. I think we do have a situation right now with a member of the New Democratic caucus. Is it a function of simply convention? I can't recall if there is an explicit rule in the Standing Orders.

A voice: Standing Order 14.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Oh, it's Standing Order 14 that precludes....

The Chair: Stranger on the floor.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Right, stranger on the floor, and that could be challenged by another member as a breach of a member's privileges. I know we've been turning a bit of a blind eye to it, but I'm simply mindful of the fact that we are increasingly likely to have circumstances as we have right now. Has any jurisdiction ever tackled the issue of strangers on the floor of Parliament at all? I know you mentioned it with respect to the Canadian context, but in your research did you encounter this discussion coming up in any other jurisdiction?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

In terms of any stranger on the floor, are we thinking more specifically of a child—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm specifically thinking of toddlers and children and nursing mothers. That's primarily my concern.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Because there is a big distinction between creating a disturbance.... There is a reason the rule exists. The Australian House of Representatives has recently amended their definition of what constitutes a “visitor” to exclude infants being cared for by a member, because that happened very recently. In reading the newspapers, I see that in the U.K. they've asked members what they think about that. From what I gather, they didn't seem too keen on going down that road themselves. As far as I know, most jurisdictions, by tradition, have that in place.

The issue—and this was mentioned in the report produced by the procedure committee in Australia—is that a lot of jurisdictions turn a blind eye to a toddler on the floor, but it is the right of any member in the House to stand up on a point of order and put the Speaker in the position of having to rule on it at that very moment. It is mentioned in the report that one of the reasons they amended the definition of “visitor” was to save the Speaker from having to be put in that spot.

(1145)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you. That's helpful.

The Chair: Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd also like further clarification on the parental leave and the child care as we have it right now in Parliament, and on comparing that to other jurisdictions. We briefly touched on the fact that we don't have child care leave or leave when the child is sick. For that matter, if one of our members or senators is due to give birth during sitting days and not over the summer, what do they do? What has been done in the past? I don't know.

For one member we have right now in the NDP, I think we all notice that she's having to deal with having a child while serving as a member, and it's quite complicated and difficult. As we discussed, the day care does not accept children under the age of 18 months, so what do parents do when they find themselves in that situation? It was mentioned that New Zealand had a baby boom. I think that currently we have males and females here who are expecting children within this year. We can't keep ignoring this problem. How are we going to deal with it? With younger and younger members serving, we have to look at this now rather than wait until we come across it.

Have you come across any research? What's been done in the past?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I could look into other jurisdictions. For here, I can say what remuneration and pay and benefits are provided for by statute to members. There are a bunch of human resource benefits that members are granted by virtue of being a member and that I'm not privy to; I could discuss that with House of Commons human resources to see what sort of pay and benefits are accorded to members. Some of it I know is certainly set out publicly in statutes. Some of it is like a human resource...it's a job, it's almost a private matter.

But as far as I know, there is no parental leave for members in this scheme, or maternity leave or paternity leave, for that matter.

The Chair:

David, and then Anita.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see by this report that parental leave is only half the battle. If you take a month off from being an MP, your life expectancy as an MP will shorten by more than a month.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: My other comment is in response to Arnold's point about strangers on the floor. As I recall, Sheila Copps was the first MP to have her child with her on the floor of the House of Commons. The order they used to try to stop it was to say that you shouldn't eat on the floor of the House of Commons, which I thought was a rather obscure way of putting it.

What power do we as PROC have to make changes? What are the limits of our own ability to effect change?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

The committee can make any recommendation it would like in a report to the House and ask the House to adopt the report.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can't directly change—

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Oh, I'm sorry. Yes, as the clerk notes, that's within the committee's mandate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what I'm wondering. We can't dictate to the day care that they need to take as many kids that come their way for as many hours we give them, for example.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Under the committee's mandate, PROC does have a special relationship with the Speaker and the Board of Internal Economy whereby it can make recommendations to the Speaker and to the Board of Internal Economy, but those are just recommendations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. So we can also make recommendations broader, like the minister said when he was here, such as more special points and this kind of thing. That can come out of this committee as well. For someone like me, who has a riding of 20,000 square kilometres, just travelling around the riding is a huge burden on the family.

Mr. Andre Barnes: Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: All right.

The Chair:

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I want to pick up on this point about nursing mothers and mothers of infants, or fathers of infants, for that matter, because it's not just about being present for voting. It's about being present for the decision-making and for contributing to debate. I know anecdotally of one jurisdiction where a cabinet minister took a one-month leave of absence when she gave birth, and while she was away, cabinet made a decision in her jurisdiction that she didn't agree with. It's a matter of not being present to be able to have your voice heard.

I'm just speculating here, but in many other areas.... I know that when I was with the United Nations we did all kinds of international conferences with people from five continents by using technology, using video technology and using Skype.

Going back to this parallel chamber, is it possible that you could have a virtual parallel chamber where you could actually give a speech that would be on the record? Because it's a minimum of three people for a quorum, it would actually be quite easy to set up some kind of video conference session. People could be in their constituency, or in the case of mothers with infants, they could be with their infants but still be able to get on the record.

I don't even know if this is something that would be possible technologically, but is this something we could consider? I'm just throwing it out there.

(1150)

Mr. Andre Barnes:

This is a big question that I don't have an answer for.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld: Yes. I'm just throwing it out there.

Mr. Andre Barnes: It gives a person pause. I wouldn't necessarily feel comfortable, knowing all the difficulties and when you consider the traditions of the House and the Standing Orders...you might find that some might say that anything members would like to do is possible. I truly don't know.

The Chair:

Arnold.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I want to follow up on the point that Anita just raised. I want to express my support in principle to the concept—so I can put it on the record—that we look at alternative ways to participate through video conference. I certainly did it in the private sector through video conferencing and through Skype.

I think the real issue that we must be mindful of at the end of the day as parliamentarians—and Mr. Lamoureux raised this with me in an earlier session—is the importance of making sure that we do not act under duress. For example, we could confirm who we are by biometrics or whatever and confirm that we are in fact there, but unless you're actually physically present in the chamber, you don't know, for example, if off camera someone has a gun to your head and is making you say or do something that you don't agree with.

I'm raising that as a theoretical possibility, right? Perhaps the reason the convention exists that we have to be present is to establish the fact that we act freely and independently as members when we're here.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

One of the most important—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's a fundamental tenet of our membership as members.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

One of the most important parts of parliamentary privilege is a member's free access to the parliamentary precinct.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes. I've known of the concept since at least the seventies, that concept of perhaps voting and participating via video conferencing from your constituency, let's say, as an example. Again, it gets back to the issue of duress. Can you be guaranteed that we're free from duress when we're participating? It might be one thing to put your thoughts on the record. Voting might be another issue.

I raise that just so we're mindful of that principle.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll throw the question back to our illustrious analyst.

What ideas do you have to study that we haven't thought about so far?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Of the other items mentioned in a document that a colleague and I prepared about gender-sensitive parliaments, one was harassment policies. A subcommittee of this committee put together a report that ended up turning into a code of conduct for members on sexual harassment. It's appended to the current Standing Orders as of the start of the 42nd Parliament.

As for other items that I've read, having read the IPU report recently, I note that you can get into other more far-reaching ideas. I'll just put forward for the committee's consideration some that I've read about.

In other jurisdictions, there are discussions about the number of women and men chairs, for example, or the chair occupants in the House and whether or not there needs to be some sort of balance—you can make the balance whatever you would like it to be—and about officers of Parliament roles for members as a possibility.

Then, if you wanted to get very far-reaching, the IPU report gets into ways to make Parliament more inclusive, to get more different kinds of members elected. That involves a number of different ideas, but presently those are the purview of individual parties and not necessarily of Parliament.

(1155)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As I specialize in suggesting ideas that haven't been mentioned before, has anybody anywhere that you know of ever considered doing Debates in writing as opposed to orally? That gets rid of all the time limit constraints. We could have a specific issue debated directly in Hansard without having to actually rise in the House to say it.

I know that Kady is going to hate this, but it's food for thought. It's a way of getting in additional debate without additional time.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I could give a historical note on the reason why first reading, second reading, and third reading occur. This is a holdover from the Westminster parliaments from the days of old, when people couldn't read. It was also very expensive to print things. They would read the bills either because members couldn't read or because it was too expensive to give everyone a copy.

This would be going to the far end of that.

The Chair:

Arnold.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Barnes, I want to ask you a quick question about child care spaces with respect to our processing times. It's my understanding that the waiting list is up to two years. How are other jurisdictions dealing with it? I know that in part it's because there are only 34 spaces, but how do other jurisdictions operate? Do other jurisdictions actually have child care spaces? What are their practices?

How do we address that? Is it a functional problem here in that we only have so much space to accommodate children? Do we need a bigger space? What's the challenge that we're facing here in this House of Commons?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I will come back to the committee with an answer to that.

The Chair:

Is there anything else? I think we have a lot of work.

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You mentioned briefly something about officers of Parliament roles for members. What did you mean by that?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Maybe that isn't the best term for it, but for the whip, the House leader, the chair, and the deputy chair, there could be some arrangement made. It could be put into the rules, should members so decide, that there would be some sort of division, or equality, or some sort of balance. That option exists. It came up in the IPU report. I won't take credit for making that up. It's something that came up. In looking at the number of chairs at the time I wrote the paper, I saw that there were only two female chairs at that time—for health and the status of women—out of 24 standing committees.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In terms of going forward, do you have suggestions you're about to make? Are you looking for some? What are your thoughts on going forward?

The Chair:

Well, we're going to get some more reports, but for the subcommittee report, which we'll do next, there were a couple of days set aside for this family-friendly inclusive Parliament for witnesses and further discussion. That's when we would cover it, I would think.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Does that apply to the second chamber concept as well, or do we look at...? It seems to me that you could make an argument that it should have a separate process.

The Chair:

Yes, I think from your previous discussions a few meetings ago you suggested, and I agreed, that we focus on the inclusive family-friendly thing for the first report or we'll never get through it, and the House speakers will go ahead without us. I think yes, we should do that as a separate—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is there merit then in asking the analyst to take a look at some options? There was some discussion about private members. I think it was Mr. Graham who talked about more PMBs being processed.

Could we ask the analyst to take a shot at that? Maybe a blue sky—whatever the current terminology is for these things these days; I've lost track—just take a look at everything we do, and along the lines of Mr. Graham, give us some ideas, just to give us a starting point and see how much time we want to invest in this. It seems to me it's either going to be a great idea that could lead us to major reform that's very positive, or it's going nowhere because it's too radical a change. An early indicator might be helpful.

(1200)

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I will discuss this matter with the experts at House procedural services—they've been super helpful so far—and see what their expert views are on the matter.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Perfect. Thank you.

Thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

We will term that as a second study so we don't get mixed up with the first one.

Jamie.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

I'm going to make a couple of comments on what Mr. Chan was saying about the child care spaces. When my son was born, there was a one-year wait for a child care space. I had to register him before he was born so that he was in the queue. I think this is a bigger issue than just here. Having said that, I'm curious to hear the answer, whether or not it is an issue of space here with the child care or if it's the number of providers. I'm very interested to hear that.

As a comment on how we're talking about voting or delivering reports via Skype or electronic.... I know that in the U.K. you have to be there and press the button, but they have almost 700 members. I think there is something special about standing in your place and voting, or commenting on a bill, or questioning, so I don't want to.... My thought is not to go too far down that road, because I think you lose something. We're elected members; we're here and we're doing our work. There are issues where we can improve things and measures we can take, but I don't want to get too far down the road where we mail things in and have our whips vote for us. I caution against that.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I want to follow up on your point. I take the point that you raised.

Maybe one of the ways we do it depends on the nature of the matter before the House. For example, if it's a confidence matter, you would have to be in the chair. We could describe private member's legislation as one where that might be appropriate. We could create different categories and classes of material that might allow for the use of alternative means of voting, as opposed to saying “yes” or “no.” I don't know if there have ever been discussion papers about those types of situations.

I get the point that you raise. I'm sensitive to our tradition within the Westminster parliamentary tradition, but you know it is the 21st century and we're a vast country. I'm particularly mindful of individuals like our chair who represents a riding that it takes a long time to get to.

The Chair:

I had to get to the airport at 6:30 yesterday morning. I got here at 10 last night. That's how long it takes.

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

On that comment, I think we can separate voting from getting on the record. For instance, if it's a parallel chamber, we were already saying we wouldn't have votes and we wouldn't have quorum. We would possibly do private members' business. That sort of thing could be done using video conference, or some way of recording and getting on the record, but anything that requires voting, or what we traditionally do in the House, would still have to happen here.

I think the two things are completely different concepts, voting by proxy versus the idea of using technology. Somebody could be here with a computer screen on Skype and still participate in the committee, something like that possibly. I'm just throwing that out, blue skying.

The Chair:

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

To follow up on some of those comments, I agree, and I think it is very special to be sitting in the House, to be standing up and voting, or pushing a button and voting or whatever we will do in the future, and actually being present. But I think we're moving away from the reason we're trying to make some of these reforms: to have diverse people with different situations in their lives participate and be a member in the House.

It's equally valuable and important to have those perspectives in the House present as well, using some kind of technological means or not. We're talking about family-friendly politics. There are parents who can't even fathom running, becoming a member, because they currently are having children. We need those perspectives in the House.

For me personally, whether it's for a situation like that, or an elderly or sick aging parent, or a circumstance that doesn't allow for the member to be in the House, I guess it would be up to the House of Commons or administration to figure out whether the reason is valid, at that point, for the member to be missing. I don't want to create a slippery slope where everyone's just taking off and no one's here anymore, but we should note that sometimes there are good reasons for people not being able to be here. Let's still give them a voice and a way to communicate and be present through another means.

I also want to say that you've done a great job presenting a cross-section of different parliaments and the way things are done, but have you come across any opinion pieces or reviews of which parliaments are most effective, even though they've gone through these changes? We just have the facts of what happens where, but are they effective at the end of the day?

We seem to sit more days than any other parliament, with the exception of the U.K. That's in this report. Are we the most effective? We're obviously trying to figure out how, at the end of the day, we can still do our jobs and serve our ridings well. I think it's very important for us to know that perspective as well. Who passes the most private members' bills? Who's passing more legislation and getting stuff done? Let's look at that instead of being so fixated on the number of days, or Fridays, or where the hours are, and whether we have a parallel chamber or not. Who's getting the work done? That's what I want to know.

If there's something that you could forward to us to give us some more information and insight into that, that would be great.

(1205)

The Chair:

I would tentatively say that with the agenda, it might be two or three weeks before we get back to this, so you could also see if there are countries outside of the ones you've studied in the Commonwealth that have anything to add. You have a little bit of time, I think.

Is that good for this morning, on this?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wish our analyst good luck with this.

The Chair:

We'll suspend for a few minutes for lunch. Then we'll come back to the subcommittee report.

(1205)

(1215)

The Chair:

The subcommittee had a good meeting this morning and came up with some recommendations for the next month or six weeks or so. I'd like to go over all of them first before people ask about particular things, because they might be in there. Those of you who don't have them yet can write them down as a draft. Of course, it's always tentative. The committee can always change it as things unfold.

Here's what the subcommittee came up with as a draft and depending on when witnesses come, etc., the timing of this could also change, with the hope that the same items would be in there somewhere.

Let me give a bit of a preamble for anyone who's new. Our committee has to review the conflict of interest rules every five years. It was done last Parliament, but they just picked the low-hanging...I think what Blake said was they picked the fruit that had fallen to the ground. The major things weren't dealt with. There are all sorts of reports and recommendations. There is one technicality. It's a little form I think we should approve, which wouldn't take very long, just because this committee approves forms.

For this reason, we recommend that the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner be invited to appear Thursday this week. On the following Tuesday, February 23, the committee could consider matters relating to committee business and future work on the comprehensive review of the Conflict of Interest Code for Members. We'd take all the reports from the researcher plus what we had asked the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, and come up with either a report or a road map to a report, or whatever we have to do. On Thursday, February 25, it looks as if the minister might be able to appear at that time, so we've set that time aside for the Minister of Democratic Institutions. That is tentative and we might know in the next day or two. The clerk is following up.

Then, if time permits after that, depending on how long the minister is here, we'd have a review of caucus input. As you know, we've instructed the caucuses' whips and House leaders to report through you, so we don't want to leave it too late. While it's fresh in their minds, so they feel they're being listened to, we will take that input in one of our upcoming meetings soon. If there is time at that meeting, that will be done then; otherwise, it will be done soon thereafter.

On the following Tuesday, pursuant to Standing Orders 110 and 111, we would invite the two other federal appointees to the independent advisory board on Senate appointments, and if that only took an hour, then we could carry on. If we didn't get the motion done, the caucus stuff, reporting back from the previous meeting, we could carry on or do that then.

On Thursday, March 10, we would select the second option that the Chief Electoral Officer gave us for providing a briefing. It wouldn't be a regular meeting, but it would be in the regular time slot. The clerk and the Chief Electoral Officer would arrange the room and the meal, etc. It would be on the parliamentary precinct.

Then there will be a constituency work week and after that, on March 22 and March 24, tentatively, depending on whether the other things got done, or other things came up, the committee would then hear witnesses and have discussions on a family-friendly and inclusive Parliament based on further research from the researcher. Also, from now over the next month, if anyone thinks of particular witnesses we should invite, those are the targeted days. We could give them some advance notice.

Does anyone on the subcommittee think I've forgotten anything in that draft outline?

(1220)



Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would just mention, Chair, that I talked to you before the meeting about having a substantive notice of motion. I am still looking for an opportunity, with your guidance, to place that motion. It's not urgent urgent, but the sooner we deal with it the better, I guess.

The Chair:

Right.

We were thinking that if the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner does not take the full two hours, we could at least start it then. If not, then the following Tuesday we would either start or continue it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good, Chair. Thank you.

The Chair:

That's on the understanding it may be a longer than shorter debate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There's an indication that it could be a bit lengthy, yes.

The government is more co-operative than I expected, so I'll remain optimistic that it will be short: they're going to love it and agree and we're fine.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm not sure if this is the appropriate time to discuss it, but I want to inquire about the attendance of the other members of the advisory committee, the two members we're bringing in.

Is it two members?

The Chair:

It's two federal appointments, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Two federal appointments.

Okay, is this the appropriate time to ask about the substance of their appearance? I'm not challenging their timing or anything like that.

The Chair:

Well, it's just what's in the Standing Orders, which we read out several times at the last meeting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well, yes, but I was deeply frustrated at the last meeting at the restraints that were put on me. I couldn't help but notice that they weren't put on anybody else...about sticking exclusively to discussing whether they were qualified. I mean, they really were not applied to anybody other than me. It was deeply frustrating. Frankly, the frustration is not that they weren't applied to others; it was that they were applied at all.

I have no problem with these people's qualifications. It is reasonable to want to ask how they've been conducting their jobs, not to inquire as to the things that have been made secret. I disagree with their being made secret, but that's not the fault of these individuals. However, it is reasonable to want to ask certain questions about the appointment process, the phase one process, which by that point will presumably have been out of their hands in advice sent to the Prime Minister. Those are questions about how many applications they had, what kind of breakdown from different sectors they've had. These are reasonable requests, and to have those shut down would be unreasonable.

My question is, would you shut me down if I asked them questions of that nature?

The Chair:

I'm going to get the standing order again because we can't go against the Standing Orders. It's not in our authority. I'll get the clerk to read what we're allowed to do on these appointments.

Mr. Chan.

(1225)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That was exactly the point I wanted to make, Mr. Chair. It's with respect to the scope of the standing order. Some of the questions that Mr. Reid raised in the previous meeting from my perspective are appropriately raised in a different forum, not necessarily appropriate—

Mr. Scott Reid:

There is no other forum and you know that. This is the only forum and you won't let it happen. That is the point. The point is to shut down any openness by not allowing us to engage in reasonable questions and then blocking any such forum.

Mr. Chan, if you're willing to let it happen, I would be prepared with a motion to bring them back to discuss the actual mandate they had and how they were performing it, and we'll see whether the government goes for that or not. Right now what I hear is the government trying to shut down any openness, any discussion of this process.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I actually had the floor, so I let you have your rant, Mr. Reid.

At the end of the day, from my perspective again—you didn't even let me finish my point—my point is that you can raise the issues in the House of Commons. You challenge the issue of constitutionality. There are other appropriate forums to do that. It is not done here at PROC.

Again my point...and I was going to ask the clerk to read what the standing order says. If you don't like the standing order, I am prepared to allow you to propose an amendment to the standing order. However, we were there to look at the qualifications and abilities of the particular individuals to discharge their particular functions.

I take the other point you were raising with respect to the nature of that function, but with respect to the further substantive issues you were raising with respect to the details of who has applied, how many people have applied, the deadlines, from my perspective that goes beyond the scope of what the standing order permits us to do.

I yield the floor now.

The Chair:

These witnesses would be here under Standing Order 111, which states: (2) The committee, if it should call an appointee or nominee to appear pursuant to section (1) of this Standing Order, shall examine the qualifications and competence of the appointee or nominee to perform the duties of the post to which he or she has been appointed or nominated.

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

On the basis of some of the questions from the last meeting, I don't think it's fair to bring somebody here who is prepared to talk about her qualifications and then talk to her about things that are better questions for the minister. I recall that after that you requested that the minister come. I think there's an opportunity to ask a lot of those similar questions of the appropriate person and that would be the minister. You will have that opportunity.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are they unqualified? [Technical difficulty—Editor] the information? Are we revealing secrets? None of these things are true. The only thing that is true is that we are restricting ourselves unreasonably in order to shut down information that should be made public.

The Chair:

We're not restricting ourselves; the Standing Orders are. Are there any other comments on this?

On the subcommittee report, are there any comments on the suggested agenda going forward? Could I have a motion to approve that?

An hon. member: I so move.

The Chair:

It is seconded by Mr. Christopherson and moved by David.

Is there any discussion? All in favour?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair:

We have a half an hour, so maybe we should move on to your motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you want to go for it?

The Chair:

Do you guys want to do that?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I thought I'd start by reading it and remind everybody where we are. It's a notice of motion: That the Committee adopt the following procedures for in camera business: That any motion to sit in camera should be debatable and amendable, and that the Committee may only meet in camera for the following purposes: To review: (a) wages, salaries, and other employee benefits; (b) contracts and contract negotiations; (c) labour relations and personnel matters; (d) a draft report; (e) briefings concerning national security; and That Minutes of in camera meetings should reflect the results of all votes taken by the Committee while in camera, including how each member votes when a recorded vote is requested.

The only thing I would add, Chair, is that it would be my intention—if I ever got to the point where there was support for this—to add to the last sentence,“that minutes of in camera meetings should reflect the results of all votes taken by the committee while in camera, with the exception of report writing”. As we're going through report writing, and people are moving various clauses and words and ideas in and out, to me that doesn't need to be captured by what I'm putting forward. That's part of the give-and-take of report writing, which is a separate process in and of itself.

That's my motion. If I can, I'll begin giving my rationale for it, Chair.

(1230)

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

Beginning with the issue about debatable and amendable, what has happened in the past—and I know the government's going to tell me they don't see the world that way, and they're going to be wonderful, and they won't do those nasty things. I say , fine, I believe you believe that now, but I also have a good idea where we're going to be. Going down the road, two to three years from now, all those niceties will be forgotten and we'll be into the give-and-take of the day-to-day partisan aspects of what we do.

What would happen is that as soon as the government of the day got in any way uncomfortable with what was going on, they would just throw a motion on the floor to go in camera. Under the rules, you couldn't debate it. You had to go to an immediate vote. There were no criteria to stack up against, in terms of whether or not it was allowed. There was no guideline. You could go in camera. You could just go in camera with no debate, no discussion.

What happened was that the government, whenever it suited them, would just—boom, in a flash—throw out a motion to go in camera. Before anybody even really had a chance to gather their thoughts, it had to go straight to a vote. There's no debate. You can't amend it. Boom, boom, inside three minutes we went from having an interesting, dynamic, public discussion, maybe even a debate about whatever, and all of a sudden, minutes later, we vaporized from the public view and went into this rabbit hole from which we only emerged when we decided.

My first concern is for that.

Chair, I don't know how you want to proceed. At some point I'd be interested in getting an early indication from the government whether they have a willingness to entertain any or part of this. If they did, it could save us a lot of aggravation. I don't know how you want me to proceed. That was the first point. I can move on. I'm in your hands.

The Chair:

Why don't you make all your points and then we'll get the government or the opposition to respond.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, but if I may, just by way of timing, if I can get some interest—I mean, we're sitting right here.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. David Christopherson: Okay, good.

If they're going to agree to things, there's no sense in me taking you for a walk around the world.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: If you're going to agree anyway....

At some point, maybe that would be helpful. I'll outline it, but rest assured, I'm not done on any of these areas. There are lots of things to revisit and talk about, but only if necessary. Since we're all getting along so well, hey, hope springs eternal.

In terms of review, right off the bat, with regard to outlining what committees can or cannot do in camera, for those of us who served on city councils, we're very used to this idea. I remember at the time there was a whole lot of push-back. People were saying, “You know, cabinets get to meet in camera”, completely missing the point, of course. It's a very different dynamic and a whole different procedure when you have built-in opposition and checks and balances. You don't have that at a city council.

One of the first things that happens on a city council when a motion is made is that somebody often tests it to see if indeed the matter falls within the rules for discussing in camera. It should be noted that the media play the biggest check and balance on this, because once a majority on council votes, things move quickly and they just go in camera. The media will grab on to that issue. They'll take it to the press council and other places, and months and months later you'll hear a report come back saying that the council's had its wrist slapped. That's not to mention what can happen to some of the officers who are responsible municipally for some of these things.

Having an outline of exactly what we go in camera for or not makes a lot of sense. Between the first idea, that it can be debatable and amendable, and the second, that the motion has to stand against the criteria for when we go in camera, that alone would remove a lot of the potential abuse just by slowing it down and putting some kind of reference in there. In the past, it didn't matter what we were talking about. If it got awkward or ugly, if the government was getting beaten up on anything, they would just run and hide and they would move that motion. It would happen that instantly. It would be those two things alone—debatable and amendable—and the fact that they have to stack up against certain criteria on what we're allowed to do in there and what we're not.

I won't go into all of the stuff I have to say just now. I'll just do the Coles Notes version in the hope that everybody will agree and you don't have to hear from me. But providing those two key aspects would go a long way toward removing abuse and potential abuse.

The last one is what really makes me crazy. A lot of people don't know this, but as it stands right now, when you're in camera, if anybody moves a motion on committee and we spend an hour debating it, and it loses, you are violating the confidence of the committee; you are actually in breach—it's a serious matter—if you talk about that motion, because it lost. Under the rules, when you're in camera, the only motions you can talk about in public are the ones that are carried. In fact, it's not even written down. It's like it didn't happen. It drives opposition members crazy, because you're trying to initiate certain directions.

I grant you, a lot of it is partisan. So? This is a partisan place. The fact is that initiatives are put forward when you're talking about business. They're usually opposition, because the government gets their buddies to vote for it and it carries. Okay: we all accept that the election happened and you have the control at the end of the day. The government wins ten votes ten times out of ten. Fair enough. But the whole idea is at least allowing the motion that was made to be heard.

By what anti-democratic rule do we hide behind when we say that if Mr. Richards moves a substantive motion in camera about the business we're doing, or about new business, or wants to invite other witnesses, or wants to start a study, all of which is public business and doesn't fall in the categories (a) through (e) that I listed earlier...? If he should do that, currently under the rules, by the time you get out of in camera, it's like the old Soviet Union when you fall out of favour: you look at the pictures from the past, and holy smokes, they are just not there. That's what would happen to that motion. It goes all Soviet. It just disappears as if it never happened.

(1235)



So, you're in camera, and you're left wondering what to do. Do you not bother making the case? Well, you want to make the case. You're going to make the argument. It just eats up a whole lot of time but denies anybody outside that committee room the opportunity.... And believe me—because you will probably see it happen at least once—when I say that if anybody violates the confidence of in camera meetings, that's a big deal. It gets raised in the House. It's a breach, and it's held as such. So this is a big deal, and it has always driven me insane that you can't even talk about it.

I have a lot to say about all of this, but those are the three items. It's 12:40 and I have lots of time to start in, but it would be helpful to me if I could get some kind of feedback from the government, just some indication of where I am vis-à-vis the possibility of this carrying. It won't stop me from making my case, but it certainly could save us a whole lot of time if they were being co-operative.

(1240)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I need you to concede me the floor so I can respond.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fair enough. I just need to make sure the clerk knows I would like the floor again after I'm done so I can stay on the list and not have this close off on me.

I will defer so I can hear from Mr. Chan, Chair.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Chan and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank Mr. Christopherson for his contribution on this point.

The government supports the basic premise of what you're putting forth. We took this position in opposition. As you'll recall, the member for Westmount—Ville Marie in the 41st Parliament spoke with respect to the basic principles attached to this, and our leader introduced a private member's bill with respect to the basic premise in regard to the motion you're putting before this committee today.

The only suggestion I would have on a couple of points with respect to the substantive motion that's before the committee.... First of all, we think some additional items should be considered to expand the list of what we think would be appropriate matters to be in camera, and I'll introduce those in a moment.

The other point we have is on where you talk about how “any motion to sit in camera should be debatable and amendable”. My point is that I'm okay with it being debatable for, let's say, three minutes. I don't see why it needs to be amendable. It's either an up or down vote from my perspective; we either agree to it or we don't agree to it. Because at that point, we're dealing with a prescribed list of items, and only those items can go in camera. We vote it either up or down. It's straight up. Also, I don't want us to take an enormous amount of committee time to make those decisions once we know that we're dealing only with the prescribed list of matters that can go in camera.

Finally, with respect to the last point, which was basically about the minutes of the meeting, from my perspective—again, since we're dealing again with a prescribed list of issues—the result of those votes, because we're only dealing with a prescribed list, should only be recorded with the unanimous consent of the committee, because the only way you go in camera is that you're dealing only with those issues.

I'll give you a couple of amendments that I would suggest. For example, here's how the motion would then read. I would simply delete the provision that says “and amendable”, so it would read instead “That any motion to sit in camera should be debatable for”—I'm going to just propose this—“not more than three minutes”. So you can debate it and get your points out. We're only dealing with these items, okay? Then we'd vote it up or down.

Then I would simply add three other provisions to the list that you've already prescribed. I'm fine with the list you have so far, but I would suggest that these other items would be appropriate as well.

I would add an (f) that would read “for matters of members' privilege”. Again, I think that might be appropriate for us to go in camera on. I would then add a (g) “for the discussion of witness lists”. Again, it might be appropriate to go in camera for whatever reason. I would add an (h) “for any other reason”, because we might forget what that particular reason might happen to be, “on the consent of the entire committee”—so we all have to agree, okay?—“or on the advice of the clerk”. There might be a reason that we haven't thought about it in this list, but it gives us a way out.

An hon. member: That wording...?

Mr. Arnold Chan: Right, on consideration from the advice of the committee....

I'll read it back: “for any other reason with the consent of the whole committee or on consideration of the advice of the clerk”.

There may be reasons we need to go in camera that we haven't thought about in this particular list, but again, it's either that we all agree, or that the clerk raises it, thinking that it might be appropriate for us to do that. Then we'd still have to decide as a body.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Arnold Chan: I would think so—

The Chair:

Okay. You're on the list.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'll defer to Mr. Graham. I'm done.

The Chair:

We have Mr. Graham, Mr. Christopherson, and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's one more thing I want to change, and it's that “the Minutes of in camera meetings should, with unanimous consent of the committee, reflect the results” of all the votes. I don't think it's appropriate that every vote we ever have in camera comes back to the Hansard, but maybe sometimes it will, and I think we should be able to agree to that in camera. That's the suggestion I'd make there.

As you see, we're very much agreed with this in principle. I was there. I was behind you in the third party. I remember watching how it was abused. In principle we agree with this, but we're trying to get it so we don't hit any roadblocks that we really don't want to hit.

(1245)

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, and then Mr. Reid.

Or you might want to hear from Mr. Reid first, because then you'd have more to comment on.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair: Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My comments are brief and technical.

The first is that Mr. Chan's motion says “three minutes”. Do you simply mean that the proposer gives a three-minute rationale and then everybody else simply votes, as opposed to three minutes for each person? You can see the distinction. One involves three minutes. One involves three minutes' time for how many members there are potentially. I'm not sure which one you meant.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

My intention is really that the mover of the motion will have three minutes to put the issue forward. I just want to put a time limit on debating something ad nauseam so we don't eat up valuable committee time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I wasn't asking a question; I was asking for clarification.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's a fair question, and I would be fine with any other member having up to three minutes. Even then that would eat up a significant amount of time, but at least at some point there's closure and we can vote it up or down, because we're dealing with a prescribed list of items, a limited number of items that can go in camera. Not just anything can go in camera.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was the first question and that was helpful. As it's worded now, it sounds to me as though it's three minutes for the mover and then there's the vote.

The second thing I wanted to say is that, traditionally the motion to go in camera or to come out of being in camera are simply reverse mirror images of each other. I'm assuming that is not what you intend here, and that going from being in camera to being in public would not necessarily involve having any three-minute discussion. It might be helpful to state that. Someone simply says, “I think we should go public” and then we have a vote up or down. Is that correct?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have to say, I'm pleasantly surprised. We can work with this. I have a couple of issues too, but I just want to start by being very positive and responding in a positive vein. I think we can get there. If we continue doing it the way we're going here, I think we can get to it. I'm very pleased. These are really good improvements. I might make note that we got this far without Mr. Lamoureux. Not that his comments wouldn't have been entertaining and wonderful, but we did manage to get here without him.

Moving on, I agree with Mr. Reid that the three minutes is a problem. If you just allow the mover of the motion.... Oftentimes it's government. So that won't work, because it eats up all the time. However, you were being fair-minded, so I was going to respond in a fair-minded way. As a former House leader, I also understand that there is an opportunity there for the opposition to again grab the floor and filibuster and hold things up. Not that we can't get there relatively easily if we want to anyway, but I do get the idea that this just opens up one more avenue of potential mischief-making, as the government might see it, and therefore they want a time limit. I think, based on what I heard Mr. Chan say and on what I heard Mr. Reid say, somewhere in there we should be able to find a common....

I'm open. I understand you just don't want it to be another opportunity for the opposition to hijack the agenda, and I get that. Mr. Reid's point is exactly the one that I would make, that in order to give effect to something being debatable it has to be more than just the person who moved it. Let's give some thought to how we can do that. I understand it eats up a little bit of time, but that's just going to be the price we pay.

On “amendable”, I'm flexible. Sometimes there are reasons that you might want to be very specific and say you are going to go in to deal with one particular thing and get out, and by amending that motion you could do that as opposed to blanket going in camera and being able to move any of these other items while we're in there. By allowing it to be amendable, you could give some direction to it, but if that is a particular problem for the government, that's a hill I'm not looking to die on. I will leave you with that thought.

I'm fine personally with the ones you've added. I think they're improvements and I like them. I think they're good. The only one I have a problem with—and I didn't even get the wording exactly—is the one about the clerk giving some kind of ruling—

(1250)

The Chair:

We'll just read it again.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It says, “for any other reason with the consent of the whole committee, or on consideration of the advice of the clerk”.

Mr. David Christopherson:

See, that's it. It says, “or on the consideration”. Does that mean the decision of the committee still has to be unanimous, or are you saying that the clerk gets to make a unilateral declaration?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We added “consideration of the advice”, which means the committee could consider the advice and then say yes or no, so it's the committee and not necessarily the clerk who would decide.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That still takes us back to the unanimity, doesn't it?

The language is a little bumpy, but as long as that's clear and as long as we understand it and it's there in the Hansard, I'm fine with that.

I had amended my own motion regarding “with the exception of report writing”. Did you agree with that? I wrestled with that a bit, but I thought that often there is a lot going there, and things move quickly when you're doing report writing. It just seemed to me that was different from one of us in the opposition trying to put a motion to hold a study on something or to have a particular person be invited and then the government overruling it. That was a different thing in terms of public perception.

To me, Chair, it looks as though we're pretty darn close. It would seem that maybe one of the things we still need to finalize is the time on debate.

You heard my thoughts on “amendable”. I'd appreciate hearing yours. If you decide you'd still rather not have that, I'm fine with it.

The Chair:

We have a speaking list: Mr. Chan, Mr. Graham, and Ms. Vandenbeld.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

To get back to Mr. Christopherson's point about “amendable”, my concern at the end of the day is that we're dealing again with a prescribed list of items. For me, it's a straight vote it up or vote it down. You can always move another motion to deal with it if it gets voted down; I just don't want to have a specific motion indefinitely amended. We either agree or we don't. Done.

On the issue with respect to the report writing, I'm fine with that change. I don't know how other committee members feel, but it makes sense. Again, we want things to work efficiently if we're in that situation. The key is that we have a limited list of items, as opposed to the practice of the previous government where they were using it for all instances to put everything into in camera.

We buy the point. We accept the premise that there should be a prescribed list of matters that would normally be in confidence for obvious reasons. If there's anything else we haven't thought about, that's why we created that reasonable catch-all, but we all have to agree.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham and then Ms. Vandenbeld.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We were talking about the three minutes being per person or for everybody, or so on and so forth. Can we find a way of limiting it so we don't have three minutes per member and then 120 opposition members coming in to do their three minutes each? I want there to be an overall limit on that debate so we can actually get on with our lives. That's my point.

If we can go for, say, three minutes to a maximum of three speakers or something for a minimum of two parties—

An hon. member: To a maximum of [Inaudible—Editor].

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I'd be fine with that. If everyone else is fine with that, I'm fine with that.

An hon. member: It's still not [Inaudible—Editor].

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: It's better than it was.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's just that if you're violating it and I want to make a point, we're now limiting how much time I have to fight for justice.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You will no doubt find a way, David.

The Chair:

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That was the point I wanted to make: maybe three per recognized party.

The Chair:

Before we read the amendment, is there any other debate on this amendment?

These are detailed amendments. Let's go over the amendments to the motion as you understand them. You're the ones who are going to have to type them.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

I will read the motion as if it were amended: That the committee adopt the following procedures for in camera business: That any motion to sit in camera should be debatable for not more than three (3) minutes each for the mover and one (1) speaker from each recognized party—

(1255)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For not more than three minutes each, so we don't have three minutes for us and then a filibuster thereafter.

The Clerk:

“That any motion to sit in camera should be debatable for not more than three minutes each for the mover and one speaker from each recognized party, and that the committee may only meet in camera for the following purposes: to review”—(a), (b), (c), (d), (e), as they appear in the notice of motion—“(f) matters of members' privileges; (g) discussion of witness lists; (h) any other reason with the consent of the whole committee or on consideration of the advice of the clerk; that minutes of in camera meetings should reflect the results of all votes taken by the committee while in camera, including how each member votes, when a recorded vote is requested, with the exception of report writing.”

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It should be “That minutes of in camera meetings should, with the unanimous consent of the committee, reflect the results...”.

The Clerk:

Then the last paragraph would be “That minutes of in camera meetings should, with the unanimous consent of the committee, reflect the results of all votes taken”, etc.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Whoa, could you read that again?

The Clerk:

“That minutes of in camera meetings should, with the unanimous consent of the committee, reflect the results of all votes taken by the committee while in camera”, etc.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Maybe I understand wrong. It sounds to me like the committee votes, and only by unanimous consent do the in camera motions end up public. Whoa, that's not going to cut it, because that leaves us exactly where we were before. The government at will can decide what will be made public and what won't, unless I'm misunderstanding, in which case, help me.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't think it is necessarily appropriate for every vote in camera to be listed. No, the question is if your objective is to have the motions that were defeated appear in Hansard. Is that your objective?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It is that and the ability to speak to them. If I make a motion in camera I'd like the ability to walk outside the room and say that I made that motion and it failed. Right now, if I understand correctly, it takes a unanimous vote of the committee to grant me that right. That's not much different from where we were with the Tories. If the government decides nothing is coming out and there's nothing I can do about it, I'm no further ahead than I was under the old rules. Either I have that right to move a motion, have it recorded in Hansard, and I can talk about it publicly, or I don't. Government maintaining whether I have that right is no different from being denied that right in the last Parliament, save and except by the whim of the government.

It defeats the purpose and it leaves the government in total control over what goes public. My whole point is to remove the government control by saying motions that are in order are allowed to be reported in Hansard and talked about publicly. That's all.

The real politics of it is this. Let's put the cards on the table. Right now the government has the right, no matter what motion comes in, to sit back and almost pay no attention whatsoever. When all the talking is done, they can vote the motion down, and no matter what the politics of it, they never have to defend that they exercised their majority to quash a motion. They never have to defend it because it's never written down and it's against the rules to talk about it.

The Chair:

Okay, David, we're basically at time, and we're going to have to proceed in one of two ways. We could carry on later, or seeing as we have co-operated with almost everything in the motion, we could vote on everything so far—

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I don't want to—no, we're close here. Things are good. I see the government and I'm getting a sense they're still listening and understanding that is an argument. A little time for the government to review that would be helpful. I'm quite prepared to adjourn now and pick this up at the next opportunity we have.

I'd ask the government to think about this last piece, if you would.

(1300)

The Chair:

Okay, the meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Ne prenons pas la mauvaise habitude de commencer en retard. Nous avons déjà deux ou trois minutes de retard.

Bonjour à tous. Bienvenue à la septième réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre dans le cadre de la première session de la 42e législature. Il s'agit d'une réunion publique.

Nous commençons aujourd'hui par un exposé de l'analyste du Comité, Andre Barnes, sur notre étude des initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille et plus inclusive.

Ensuite, dans le cadre des travaux du Comité, nous examinerons les recommandations formulées par le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure, qui s'est réuni ce matin et qui a dressé une liste préliminaire de certains travaux devant nous occuper pendant environ un mois et que le Comité doit approuver.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Si vous me le permettez, je tiens à souligner à M. Lamoureux que, s'il cherche un modèle de comportement et qu'il continue d'insister pour assister aux réunions, je viens de quitter le Comité des comptes publics; Joyce Murray y assume le rôle de secrétaire parlementaire. Elle est restée là, respectueusement, jusqu'à la toute fin. Elle a fait ses autres travaux et n'a pas dit un mot. C'était tellement rafraîchissant de voir le comité voler de ses propres ailes et de voir vos collègues qui se tenaient debout par eux-mêmes. Ils n'ont pas eu besoin de s'appuyer sur la secrétaire parlementaire.

J'aimerais suggérer à mon collègue, s'il insiste pour être là, de prendre pour modèle Mme Murray qui, selon moi, a respecté l'engagement pris par le gouvernement, ce que, jusqu'à présent, M. Lamoureux n'a pas réussi à faire.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Andre. Il ne s'agit pas d'un témoin officiel, alors vous pouvez poser des questions en tout temps durant l'exposé. Il n'y a pas d'ordre des intervenants ou quoi que ce soit. Il s'agira d'une discussion beaucoup plus informelle.

André, allez-y.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du Comité):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, au cours des dernières semaines, nous avons reçu une série de documents sur les différents aspects des pratiques favorables à la famille dans d'autres administrations. Je ne sais pas de quelle façon le Comité tient à procéder. Je peux commencer par passer en revue le document intitulé « Pratiques favorables à la famille dans d'autres pays et provinces », parce que c'est le document qui répertorie le plus de pratiques appliquées à l'étranger. Si le Comité veut discuter des chambres parallèles dans d'autres administrations, nous pouvons aussi le faire. Il y a aussi un document — je suis désolé qu'il ait été envoyé aussi tardivement; il a fallu beaucoup de temps pour le produire — sur les équivalents de l'article 31 du Règlement et les heures de séance au sein d'autres assemblées législatives. Il a été envoyé il n'y a pas très longtemps, et les membres n'ont probablement pas eu l'occasion de l'examiner.

Si le Comité le souhaite, je peux passer en revue ce document maintenant. N'hésitez pas à m'interrompre à tout moment si vous avez des questions. Je ne pourrai peut-être pas y répondre, mais je vous fournirai une réponse le plus rapidement possible.

Le document porte sur les heures de séance dans certaines administrations nationales et provinciales et aborde les questions du vote par procuration et de la présence autorisée de nourrissons dans la Chambre pendant une séance. Il y a aussi une dernière rubrique, qui concerne les autres politiques favorables à la famille et décrit les mesures actuellement en place au sein du Parlement du Canada en matière de congés parentaux et de garde d'enfants.

Commençons par les heures de séance. On considère en général que les modifications apportées aux heures de séance du Parlement sont parmi les réformes propices à la vie familiale les plus courantes. Dans un premier temps, il peut être utile de comparer les heures de séance de la Chambre des communes du Canada avec celles d'autres administrations, et plus précisément les assemblées législatives provinciales et territoriales canadiennes, la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni, la Chambre des représentants de l'Australie et celle de la Nouvelle-Zélande.

En 2016, on prévoit que la Chambre des communes du Canada siégera pendant 127 jours sur une période de 26 semaines de séance. Durant sa comparution devant le Comité, le greffier de la Chambre a mentionné que, en général, la Chambre siège 135 jours par année. Comme les membres le savent très bien, la Chambre siège huit heures le lundi et 4,5 heures le vendredi. En comparaison, la Chambre des communes du Canada siège moins de jours que la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni, mais plus fréquemment que la Chambre de l'Australie, la Chambre de la Nouvelle-Zélande et toutes les administrations provinciales et territoriales canadiennes.

De façon plus détaillée, la Chambre du Royaume-Uni siège 150 jours par année sur une période de 34 semaines de séance. En guise de comparaison, pour notre part, nous siégeons 135 jours sur une période de 26 semaines. Il convient de souligner que la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni ne siège généralement pas tous les vendredis. Elle a désigné des vendredis. Pour l'année civile 2015-2016, elle a désigné 13 vendredis de séance, et les députés ne siègent pas durant les autres.

(1110)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Essentiellement, cela signifie que la moitié des semaines comptent quatre jours, et l'autre moitié, cinq?

M. Andre Barnes:

En fait, c'est moins, puisqu'ils siègent 13 semaines sur 34.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est le tiers. D'accord.

M. Andre Barnes:

Exactement.

La Chambre de la Nouvelle-Zélande et la Chambre de l'Australie siègent aussi beaucoup moins souvent que la Chambre des communes du Canada. En 2015, la Chambre de la Nouvelle-Zélande a siégé pendant 90 jours sur une période de 25 semaines de séance, et la Chambre de l'Australie a siégé pendant 68 jours sur une période de 28 semaines de séance. Ces administrations siègent moins que nous parce qu'elles siègent trois ou quatre jours par semaine. La Chambre de la Nouvelle-Zélande siège trois jours par semaine, et la Chambre de l'Australie, quatre jours par semaine. Durant une très longue période, des années 1950 à 1984, la Chambre de l'Australie...

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Pardonnez-moi de vous interrompre, mais j'ai une brève question à poser.

Vous avez dit que, actuellement, deux ou trois d'entre elles ne siègent pas le vendredi. Au Royaume-Uni, la Chambre siège parfois le vendredi. Est-ce une pratique en place depuis longtemps dans ces administrations, ou bien siégeaient-elles à une époque le vendredi avant d'abandonner cette pratique?

Ce serait très intéressant de le savoir.

M. Andre Barnes:

Les modifications au Royaume-Uni semblent avoir été apportées à la pièce au fil du temps. Tout a commencé en 1997, et les changements ont fini par être apportés en 2005, lorsqu'il a été recommandé que la Chambre examine les heures de séance. Les changements ont finalement été apportés en 2012. Les députés ont éliminé les séances du vendredi de 2012 à 2015.

J'ai envoyé un courriel à des représentants pour en savoir plus. En effet, le changement étant probablement si récent, je n'ai trouvé aucun renseignement à ce sujet. Mais les changements ont été apportés de façon progressive. Au Royaume-Uni, les séances de la Chambre commençaient et se terminaient plus tard, et, graduellement, elles ont commencé plus tôt.

En Australie et en Nouvelle-Zélande, les manuels de procédure — leurs équivalents de l'ouvrage d'O'Brien et Bosc — semblent indiquer qu'ils siègent ainsi depuis le tout début. Ce n'est peut-être pas la comparaison la plus utile parce que, durant la moitié de son existence, la Chambre de l'Australie siégeait trois jours par semaine. De 1950 à 1984, elle siégeait trois jours par semaine; ce n'est que récemment qu'elle a commencé à siéger quatre jours par semaine. En Nouvelle-Zélande, les députés siègent seulement trois jours par semaine, et la documentation donne l'impression que c'est ainsi depuis toujours.

J'ai essayé de trouver de l'information sur la raison pour laquelle elles ne siégeaient pas cinq jours par semaine, et je n'ai rien trouvé. Il serait peut-être utile de le demander à des représentants de ces administrations.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Là où les heures ont augmenté, dans les endroits où il y avait trois ou quatre jours de séance et que le nombre est passé à cinq, le nombre d'heures a-t-il augmenté?

M. Andre Barnes:

Pour ce qui est des administrations provinciales, j'ai constaté des augmentations. Lorsqu'on diminue... si vous retirez du temps d'un... Par exemple — je crois que c'est la Colombie-Britannique —, les députés ont éliminé les séances de soir et prolongé la durée des séances de jour de la semaine pour compenser. Je n'ai découvert aucune administration qui ait ajouté un jour de séance.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Habituellement, la tendance est soit à une diminution du nombre de jours ou de semaines de séances, soit à un remaniement afin que les séances aient lieu à des moments différents.

M. Andre Barnes:

C'est ce que j'ai découvert.

De plus, le Comité aimera peut-être savoir que, en Écosse, où le Parlement a été constitué en 1999, les députés ont décidé de faire du thème des séances propices à la vie de famille — propices à la vie de famille de tous, du personnel et des députés — un de leurs principes et une de leurs priorités. C'est une des choses qui est dans la mire de ces différentes administrations.

M. Blake Richards:

Ne venez-vous pas de vous contredire? Je crois vous avoir entendu dire que, à une époque, l'Australie siégeait trois jours par semaine, pour ensuite passer à quatre. Puis, j'ai pensé que vous aviez peut-être seulement indiqué le nombre de séances.

Les députés ont-ils réduit le nombre de semaines lorsqu'ils ont passé à un horaire de quatre jours par semaine?

M. Andre Barnes:

De ce que j'ai pu tirer du manuel de la Chambre, à partir environ des années 1900 — soit au moment de l'établissement de l'administration —, les députés siégeaient quatre jours par semaine. Puis, ils sont passés à trois jours par semaine de 1950 à 1984, pour ensuite revenir à quatre jours par semaine depuis 1984.

Je n'ai pas d'information sur la quantité. Je sais combien de jours ils siègent actuellement, mais j'ai bien peur de ne pas savoir grand-chose d'autre à ce sujet.

(1115)

M. Blake Richards:

C'est donc dire qu'il y a eu un peu de va-et-vient.

M. Andre Barnes:

Oui. Par contre, en Nouvelle-Zélande, les députés semblent siéger trois jours par semaine depuis longtemps.

Pour ce qui est des comparaisons avec les administrations territoriales et provinciales, 10 des 13 administrations provinciales et territoriales ne siègent pas, soit le lundi, soit le vendredi. Le Québec, le Nouveau-Brunswick et la Nouvelle-Écosse ne siègent pas le lundi. Sept administrations ne siègent pas le vendredi: l'Alberta, la Colombie-Britannique, Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, l'Ontario, l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, la Saskatchewan et le Yukon.

Le Québec a adopté une innovation intéressante en 2009. Les députés ont distingué certaines périodes de séance durant l'année selon qu'elles respectent des heures ordinaires ou des heures prolongées. Je pourrai y revenir un peu plus en détail plus tard. Durant les séances ordinaires, l'Assemblée nationale du Québec ne siège ni le lundi, ni le vendredi.

Voilà donc pour l'aperçu général des heures et des horaires de séances et la façon dont la Chambre des communes du Canada se compare aux autres administrations.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre à nouveau.

J'imagine que la même question doit être posée ici et au sujet des provinces. Vous avez indiqué qu'un certain nombre d'entre elles ne siègent pas le lundi ou ne siègent pas le vendredi, et je crois qu'il y en a une ou deux qui ne siègent ni le lundi, ni le vendredi.

Certaines provinces ont-elles rajusté leur horaire? En d'autres mots, siégeaient-elles pendant cinq jours pour ensuite réduire le nombre de jours de séance?

M. Andre Barnes:

Ce qui est compliqué et difficile lorsqu'on effectue des recherches sur les différentes administrations simplement en consultant l'information en ligne, c'est que les administrations n'ont pas tendance à posséder un manuel comme notre O'Brien et Bosc, alors il faut vraiment creuser.

J'ai découvert que le Québec, la Colombie-Britannique et l'Ontario avaient récemment apporté des changements. Il s'agit de changements qui visaient à comprimer la semaine, mais ils ont aussi compensé le temps perdu.

Je vais maintenant mentionner certaines innovations que d'autres administrations ont mises en place et qui pourraient présenter un intérêt pour le Comité. Une des innovations qui ont été soulevées durant la comparution du leader à la Chambre devant le comité, c'est la tenue de deux jours de séance distincts le même jour civil.

La Colombie-Britannique le fait. Elle a éliminé les séances de fin de soirée en 2007 et a repris les heures ailleurs. Puis, en 2009, elle a intégré deux jours de séance distincts durant trois des quatre jours de séance.

Par conséquent, vous constaterez que, dans d'autres administrations, il y a une pause durant la journée. Si vous regardez l'horaire, vous verrez qu'il y a différentes périodes durant la journée. Il s'agit simplement de périodes de suspension des travaux. Les administrations ne comptent pas officiellement ces journées comme étant différentes, comme étant des jours de séance distincts, sauf en Colombie-Britannique.

D'après mes recherches, c'est la seule administration qui a pris une telle mesure. Le lundi, le mardi et le jeudi, il y a deux jours de séance distincts.

Fait intéressant, le Québec — et je l'ai déjà mentionné — a établi un horaire fondé sur deux périodes de séance distinctes: des heures ordinaires et des heures prolongées. La période des heures ordinaires commence en février et se termine au début de mai. Les heures prolongées ont cours de tard au mois de mai jusqu'à la fin de juin et de novembre jusqu'en décembre.

L'Ontario a été le théâtre d'une autre innovation susceptible d'intéresser le Comité. La province a décidé de commencer les séances quotidiennes plus tôt. Les séances de soir ont été éliminées. La période de questions a été déplacée à 10 h 45 chaque matin. D'après ce que j'en sais, elle avait lieu auparavant à un moment indéterminé entre 13 h 45 et 15 heures. Il convient de souligner que, lorsque l'heure de la séance a changé, il y a eu certaines critiques, parce qu'on estimait que l'opposition ne pouvait pas se préparer de façon appropriée pour la période de questions, qui avait lieu aussi tôt le matin.

Le président:

Y a-t-il encore des administrations qui siègent le soir?

M. Andre Barnes:

Il y a des séances de soir dans beaucoup d'administrations. En Australie, elles durent jusqu'à 21 h 30. Le mardi et le mercredi, la Chambre des représentants de la Nouvelle-Zélande siège de 19 h 30 à 22 heures. Au Royaume-Uni, le lundi, la séance est de 14 h 30 à 22 h 30. Il y a donc encore des séances de soir dans un certain nombre d'administrations, même si toutes les provinces semblent plus ou moins avoir arrêté leurs travaux à 18 heures.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Nous siégeons jusqu'à minuit en juin et durant nos séances prolongées, c'est bien ça?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je n'ai pas approfondi la question des séances prolongées. Le Règlement de la Chambre permet la tenue de séances prolongées. Sur le calendrier, il y a une petite étoile à côté des deux dernières semaines de juin, puis vers les Fêtes. Je ne sais pas si ces administrations font la même chose. Je peux revenir au Comité avec la réponse.

Je crois vous avoir plus ou moins présenté les faits saillants au sujet des heures de séance dans les différentes administrations. Avez-vous d'autres questions à ce sujet?

Je peux passer au vote par procuration. Cette innovation existe. Elle a été mise en place en 1996 en Nouvelle-Zélande. Elle permet à un député de donner son vote à un autre député qui votera dans la Chambre pour lui, de façon à ce qu'il n'ait pas à être présent physiquement. En Nouvelle-Zélande, les députés ne semblent pas avoir mis en place cette innovation afin de rendre la Chambre plus favorable à la famille; ils l'ont simplement fait pour rendre la vie plus facile aux députés. Depuis, la même mesure a été adoptée en Australie en 2008. L'objectif était d'aider les mères qui s'occupent de nourrissons.

Il y a certaines règles à respecter, surtout en Nouvelle-Zélande, lorsqu'il est question de vote par procuration. Un document doit être signé et assorti d'une date. Il doit contenir le nom de la personne autorisée à voter au nom du député. La procuration a une durée de vie. La procuration peut être ouverte et s'appliquer à toutes les affaires pour une période indéfinie.

Fait important, en Nouvelle-Zélande le vote par procuration peut seulement être exercé lorsque le député délivrant la procuration est effectivement présent dans l'enceinte parlementaire, assiste à une réunion d'un comité spécial à l'extérieur de la capitale, Wellington, ou bénéficie d'un congé accordé par le Président. Par conséquent, il y a des circonstances bien précises dans lesquelles le vote par procuration peut être utilisé.

De l'autre côté, en Australie, une étude a été réalisée par le comité des procédures au sujet du recours aux votes par procuration. En 2008, les députés ont mis en place un système de vote par procuration. La procédure prévoit qu'une députée peut voter par procuration si elle prend soin d'un nourrisson au moment de la division. « Prendre soin d'un nourrisson » englobe toutes les activités liées aux soins immédiats prodigués à un enfant. Cela ne signifie pas nécessairement l'allaitement, par exemple. Cela signifie simplement la prestation de soins immédiats aux nourrissons.

Les whips exigent seulement de la députée qu'elle déclare prendre soin d'un enfant. Aucune autre explication n'est requise. Les députés du parti ministériel donnent leur vote aux whips du gouvernement, et les autres, aux whips en chef de l'opposition.

Voilà pour le vote par procuration dans ces deux administrations.

(1120)

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

C'était en Nouvelle-Zélande, et où était l'autre?

M. Andre Barnes:

C'est la Chambre des représentants de l'Australie.

J'ai aussi appris en lisant le rapport... Il y a seulement quelques jours, la Chambre des représentants de l'Australie a produit un rapport qui permet l'allaitement en chambre, sujet que j'aborderai sous peu. J'ai lu le rapport, et il précise que d'autres administrations ont adopté une procédure de vote par procuration. Le Sénat australien a adopté une telle procédure, et un certain nombre d'autres États en Australie aussi.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Il est question de vote par procuration. La procédure ne concerne aucunement l'utilisation des technologies. C'est tout simplement un vote par procuration.

M. Andre Barnes:

On dirait bien qu'il y a un document à remplir.

Passons à la question des non-parlementaires présents à la Chambre pendant une séance. Traditionnellement, aucun non-parlementaire et aucun parlementaire qui ne fait pas partie du personnel ne peuvent se trouver dans la Chambre pendant une séance. Cela signifie que tous ceux qui ne font pas partie de ce groupe sont considérés dans notre Parlement comme des étrangers. Dans d'autres administrations, ils sont considérés comme des visiteurs. Le Président peut demander à tous les visiteurs et tous les étrangers de sortir. Dans le passé, cela a causé certains problèmes, parce que, à au moins trois occasions, un député a apporté un bébé dans la Chambre durant une séance et, techniquement, celui-ci était considéré comme un étranger.

M. Scott Reid:

Actuellement, c'est un étranger dans notre Chambre?

M. Andre Barnes:

Cela dit, la dernière fois que cette situation s'est produite — en 2010 ou en 2011 —, le Règlement a été invoqué. Le Président a précisé la position actuelle de la Chambre des communes. Il a dit que les nourrissons peuvent être présents à la Chambre tant qu'il n'y a pas d'interruption ni de perturbation et que les travaux de la Chambre peuvent se poursuivre de façon continue. Je crois savoir que, la dernière fois, les députés prenaient des photos du nourrisson.

La Chambre des représentants de l'Australie a déclaré que l'allaitement est maintenant permis à la Chambre. Il convient de souligner que 100 des 150 députés de la Chambre en Australie sont des femmes, et je crois savoir que trois membres du Cabinet ont récemment donné naissance à un enfant et que quatre hommes seront bientôt papa. Le journal a qualifié la situation de mini baby-boom. Ils ont modifié le règlement en changeant la définition de « visiteur » afin de ne pas inclure un nourrisson dont prend soin un député.

Pour ce qui est des congés parentaux, dans notre Chambre — comme l'a souligné le greffier de la Chambre —, le système de rémunération et d'avantages sociaux des députés canadiens ne prévoit pas de dispositions précises sur le congé parental. En fait, au titre de la Loi sur le Parlement, les sénateurs et les députés essuient une diminution de salaire...

(1125)

Le président:

Permettez-moi de poser une question. Comme on a pu le lire dans le rapport, je crois comprendre que, si un député s'absente pendant 20 jours et qu'il revient ne serait-ce qu'une journée, le compteur retombe à zéro. C'est exact?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je ne crois pas. Je crois que c'est le total.

Le président:

Est-ce le total au cours d'une session ou une législature?

M. Andre Barnes:

Oui, c'est par session. Ce que vous décrivez s'applique peut-être aux sénateurs, qui, au titre de la Constitution, doivent assister...

Le président:

Vous pourriez vérifier? Des employés m'ont dit que, si on revient une journée, on peut repartir 20 autres jours... Ce n'est pas que je tiens à m'absenter; je veux simplement que le rapport soit exact...

Merci.

M. Andre Barnes:

Il y en a d'autres. Les déductions sont précisées dans le rapport. Il y a des déductions pour les sénateurs. Il y a des déductions pour les députés qui sont définies dans la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

Les installations de garde d'enfants...

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'ai examiné le rapport, qui précise les raisons pour lesquelles on peut s'absenter et obtenir la permission du Président. Être malade est l'une d'elles, mais le besoin de prendre soin d'un enfant malade n'est pas actuellement considéré comme une bonne raison.

M. Andre Barnes:

Les raisons sont définies dans la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, alors il n'y a pas une grande marge de manoeuvre. Cette situation n'est pas incluse dans les clauses de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Quelle a été la pratique? Vous le savez?

Il faudrait modifier la loi pour que les soins prodigués à des enfants...

M. Andre Barnes:

Oui.

Pour ce qui est des installations de garde d'enfants dans la Chambre, je crois savoir qu'il n'y a pas de politique institutionnelle sur la prestation de soins aux enfants ou les dépenses connexes des députés et de leurs enfants. Toutefois, le Parlement du Canada dispose d'une garderie sur place, le Centre préscolaire Les enfants de la Colline. Il peut accueillir environ 34 enfants âgés d'un an et demi à cinq ans. La priorité est accordée aux sénateurs, aux députés et au personnel du Sénat et de la Chambre, à celui de la Bibliothèque du Parlement, aux membres de la tribune de la presse et au personnel du Bureau du commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quelles sont les heures du service de garde? Quel âge un enfant doit-il avoir pour être admis à la garderie? Quelles sont les règles? À quoi faut-il s'inscrire? Quelle est la durée si on envoie un enfant à la garderie? Avez-vous ces renseignements?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je ne les ai pas, même si j'ai appris, en discutant avec M. Graham avant la réunion, que la garderie ferme à 17 heures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne sais pas si c'est à 17 heures, mais je sais que c'est avant que nous ne terminions.

M. Andre Barnes:

Je peux revenir avec une réponse à cette question.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous l'obtenir pour la prochaine réunion?

Je crois savoir que, même si nous sommes seulement ici une semaine sur deux, on ne peut pas s'inscrire à sa guise. Il faut s'inscrire pour le mois entier.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je crois que le minimum est de 18 mois. Par conséquent, si votre enfant a moins de 18 mois, vous ne pouvez même pas utiliser les services de la garderie.

M. Andre Barnes:

Désolé, d'après ce que je sais de l'installation, ce n'est pas un endroit où on peut déposer ponctuellement son enfant pour une journée ou ce genre de choses. Il y a des places, et il faut... Je ne sais pas exactement combien de temps il faut attendre pour avoir une place, mais je peux revenir...

Le président:

Vous pourriez peut-être nous préparer un document d'une page contenant tous les renseignements à ce sujet.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Pourriez-vous aussi déterminer s'il y a une liste d'attente pour la garderie?

M. Andre Barnes:

D'après ce que m'ont dit les gens qui y envoient leurs enfants, il y a une liste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La garderie est-elle exploitée par la Chambre des communes ou par une entité privée?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je pourrais aussi me renseigner à ce sujet.

Je vais passer au document sur les chambres parallèles dans d'autres administrations.

L'une d'elles s'appelle la Chambre de la Fédération. Elle a été créée en 1994 dans la Chambre des représentants de l'Australie. Le Royaume-Uni a créé une chambre parallèle, le Westminster Hall. Apparemment, le Royaume-Uni s'est inspiré du concept de la Chambre de la Fédération de l'Australie.

Il y a un grand nombre de similitudes entre les deux chambres. Les deux peuvent siéger en même temps que la Chambre. Elles sont toutes deux situées de façon pratique dans l'enceinte parlementaire. Le quorum des deux chambres est de trois, même s'il n'y a pas de limite au nombre de membres pouvant participer aux débats. Il convient de souligner que, dans le cas de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni, il y a 650 membres, et, d'après ce que j'ai entendu, il y a environ 350 places. Si tous les membres se présentent, il n'y aurait pas suffisamment de places pour tout le monde. Il y a une différence entre notre Chambre et la leur.

Les séances des deux chambres sont présidées par un vice-président, un autre occupant le fauteuil. Le public peut assister aux travaux des deux chambres. Les débats des chambres sont télévisés. La transcription des débats des deux chambres fait partie des dossiers officiels dans les deux cas. Il n'y a pas de votes dans les deux chambres. Pour être plus précis, dans le Westminster Hall, une motion peut faire l'objet de discussions, mais elle est rédigée en termes neutres, et aucun vote n'est permis. Dans la Chambre de la Fédération, il faut obtenir un consensus pour faire avancer tous les dossiers qui y sont abordés. Il semble que, initialement, la Chambre de la Fédération s'appelait le Comité principal. Par conséquent, elle semble fonctionner comme un comité. Il semble qu'elle peut formuler une recommandation dans un rapport à la Chambre, et que la Chambre peut ensuite y souscrire. La Chambre de la Fédération peut prendre des décisions, mais elles doivent être acceptées officiellement par la Chambre pour entrer en vigueur. Aucun vote n'est permis. Toute question qui exige un vote dans la Chambre de la Fédération doit être renvoyée à la Chambre, mais il semble qu'il soit possible de faire progresser certaines affaires dans la Chambre de la Fédération.

(1130)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Globalement, est-ce semblable à un comité plénier?

M. Andre Barnes:

Dans le contexte canadien, un comité plénier peut voter. Ce serait un peu différent, parce qu'un comité plénier mènerait ses débats dans la chambre principale. Techniquement, un comité plénier peut convoquer des témoins. Je ne sais pas vraiment si ces différentes chambres ont la capacité de convoquer des témoins.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Vous avez mentionné le problème rencontré en ce qui concerne le nombre de places et le nombre de députés. J'imagine qu'ils ont eu l'occasion de construire une salle plus grosse après l'incendie, et je crois que c'est Winston qui, à ce moment-là, a dit: « Non, non, non, nous l'aimons bien ainsi ».

Ce que je ne les ai pas entendu dire, c'est qu'ils l'ont fait pour sauver du temps ou pour... Quelle était l'autre raison? Ce ne serait pas simplement pour le nombre de places. Ont-ils dit clairement que leur objectif était de pouvoir adopter plus de projets de loi plus rapidement sans perdre les avantages liés à notre système?

M. Andre Barnes:

Pour ce qui est de la Chambre de la Fédération, j'ai découvert qu'il s'agissait d'une chambre de débat créée pour fournir une tribune parallèle à la chambre où débattre d'un nombre limité de dossiers. Lorsque je me suis penché sur le dossier du Westminster Hall, il était plus évident que l'objectif était d'offrir plus d'occasions de débattre, parce que le temps est compté dans la chambre principale et que les dossiers supplémentaires étaient envoyés à...

M. David Christopherson:

C'est là où je voulais en venir. Tentaient-ils délibérément d'améliorer l'efficience en ce qui concerne le nombre de dossiers qu'ils peuvent traiter en même temps sans perdre au change? On pourrait faire valoir qu'un des inconvénients liés au fait de reconnaître deux jours comme un seul, c'est que les projets de loi peuvent être adoptés à toute vitesse, même si une journée supplémentaire avait été de mise en raison du fait que le processus a maintenant été comprimé; on perd donc quelque chose dans ce genre de processus. D'après moi, ils essayaient de fournir un processus parallèle pour sauver du temps, et c'était clairement leur principale motivation.

M. Andre Barnes:

Pour ce qui est du Westminster Hall, il est indiqué que l'objectif des débats qui s'y tiennent est de fournir une tribune supplémentaire où débattre, essentiellement pour augmenter les heures hebdomadaires de débats parlementaires sans prolonger les séances.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je n'en avais jamais entendu parler avant que le Comité soulève la question. C'est une notion fascinante. Je ne sais pas si on pourrait l'adopter ici d'une façon ou d'une autre, mais je crois que ça vaut la peine d'y réfléchir. Ayant siégé du côté du gouvernement durant une autre législature, je sais que le temps en Chambre est précieux. Je comprends que l'opposition pourrait dire « N'empruntons pas cette voie, nous voulons ralentir le gouvernement ». Cependant, si nous mettons la partisanerie de côté et que nous examinons la situation d'un point de vue structurel, est-il dans notre intérêt d'avoir la capacité, lorsque nous le voulons, de faire avancer les choses plus rapidement sans perdre au change certains aspects liés à une bonne démocratie?

Je tiens à dire, monsieur le président — et je dis à mes collègues aussi —, que je trouve cette question intrigante. Je suis rendu à ma septième ou ma huitième législature, et je trouve cette idée fascinante. J'espère que nous y réfléchirons et que nous jouerons un peu avec l'idée pour voir si nous ne pourrions pas en tirer certains avantages. Ce ne sera peut-être pas le cas, mais j'aimerais bien avoir l'occasion d'y réfléchir. C'est un concept unique, et il n'est pas surprenant que ça vienne de notre mère-patrie, alors merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Je tiens à me faire l'écho de ce que David vient de dire. Je suis vraiment fasciné par la question des chambres de débat parallèles.

J'aimerais poser une question à M. Barnes pour savoir si la création de ces tribunes supplémentaires a exercé une pression supplémentaire pour que d'autres affaires s'immiscent dans le processus de débat.

Je me souviens d'une motion qui a été proposée dans le Westminster Hall. Je crois que la question y a été débattue. Si je ne m'abuse, dans le cadre du système britannique, des citoyens ordinaires ont la capacité de signer des pétitions en ligne. Il y a eu une motion pour bannir Donald Trump du Royaume-Uni. Je sais que, au bout du compte, cet enjeu ne pouvait pas faire l'objet d'un vote, mais je crois savoir que la question s'est retrouvée à Westminster Hall. Dans le cadre de la création de cette chambre de débat parallèle, avez-vous observé des réformes subséquentes, qui ont créé de nouvelles occasions de débattre de sujets supplémentaires — pour revenir au point formulé par David —, ce qui a pour effet d'exercer une pression sur le temps dont disposent les législateurs et sur la capacité de débattre des projets de loi et des motions d'importance qui se trouvent devant la Chambre?

(1135)

M. Andre Barnes:

Je crois que les deux administrations utilisent ces chambres parallèles différemment.

Dans le cas du Westminster Hall, la nature des dossiers qui peuvent y être référés est très précise quant à savoir qui peut transférer un dossier à la chambre chaque jour. Le lundi est réservé à une nouvelle création des députés qui a été étudiée par les responsables de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, durant la dernière session, les pétitions électroniques. Le comité des pétitions électroniques qui est un tout nouveau comité, a la capacité d'envoyer des pétitions électroniques aux fins d'examen devant le Westminster Hall. C'est ainsi que les dossiers arrivent à cette chambre.

D'après ce que j'en sais, les mardis et les mercredis sont réservés à des genres de débats d'ajournement qui se produisent ici à la Chambre. Les temps de parole sont attribués par tirage au sort, et les députés s'inscrivent auprès du Bureau du président dans la Chambre afin de pouvoir participer aux débats du Westminster Hall.

Les jeudis, le comité des affaires des députés d'arrière-ban, une création britannique, établit les affaires qui seront examinées, cela permet aux députés d'arrière-ban de présenter des affaires. Apparemment, avec 35 séances durant une session, le comité des affaires des députés d'arrière-ban peut proposer des affaires qui seront examinées. Vingt-sept d'entre eux doivent être dans la Chambre principale, et le reste peut être traité à Westminster Hall.

Les dossiers qui peuvent y être abordés sont très délimités.

De ce que j'en sais, les choses sont un peu différentes du côté de la Chambre de la Fédération. Il semble qu'il soit possible d'y présenter les projets de loi pour une deuxième lecture. Si j'ai bien lu, il est question « d'un examen approfondi ». C'est peut-être comme notre étude article par article. Un tel examen peut se faire dans la Chambre de la Fédération, et, s'il y a un consensus pour aller de l'avant, il est possible de faire rapport à la Chambre à ce sujet.

Le président:

M. Graham, puis M. Christopherson.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur le président, j'ai simplement vu une occasion à plus long terme, pas nécessairement au cours des deux ou trois prochaines années. L'édifice du Centre va bientôt fermer pour des rénovations. Nous allons déménager dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et créer une nouvelle chambre là-bas, puis nous allons revenir dans l'édifice du Centre et fermer l'édifice de l'Ouest et en retirer la Chambre. Nous pourrions sauver deux ans en conservant cette deuxième chambre pour en faire notre chambre secondaire dans 15 ans.

J'ai eu une autre idée. Aux fins de la discussion, si nous éliminons les séances du vendredi, il faudra déplacer quatre heures de séance. Si nous transférons toutes les deuxièmes lectures liées aux projets de loi de l'initiative parlementaire à la chambre secondaire, plus de députés auraient l'occasion de présenter de tels projets de loi. Il pourrait y en avoir deux ou trois par jour, plutôt qu'un seul, et on retournerait à la Chambre pour la troisième lecture. Ce pourrait être un gain d'efficience intéressant, je le dis pour le compte rendu.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour poursuivre avec ce que M. Graham a dit, je suis tout à fait d'accord. J'avais deux points à souligner, et l'un d'eux concernait la reconstruction de la Chambre. Quelle excellente occasion ce serait si quelque chose que nous avons déjà construit pouvait nous être utile. Il y aurait quand même des coûts, mais pas les coûts importants liés à l'infrastructure, au chauffage, à la climatisation, aux communications et ainsi de suite. C'est une très bonne idée, et je suis tout à fait d'accord.

L'autre chose que j'allais demander, la mère-patrie a-t-elle déjà procédé à un examen? Les députés se sont-ils dit « D'accord, nous procédons ainsi depuis un certain temps ». Ont-ils produit un rapport d'examen et, dans l'affirmative, pourrait-il être distribué, s'il vous plaît?

M. Andre Barnes:

Désolé, je veux simplement donner le crédit à la Chambre de l'Australie, parce que j'ai donné l'impression qu'elle n'a pas... Le Westminster Hall s'inspire de la Chambre de la Fédération. Ce sont les Australiens qui sont les innovateurs dans ce dossier.

M. David Christopherson:

Les Australiens obtiennent le crédit. Très bien. Rendons à César ce qui revient à César. C'est bien, merci.

Le président:

Lorsque le comité des affaires des députés d'arrière-ban peut présenter des dossiers, y a-t-il aussi des jours pour l'opposition et des jours pour les affaires émanant des députés durant lesquels les députés d'arrière-ban peuvent présenter des motions? À quelle fréquence est-ce que... Est-ce que, comme nous, ils peuvent le faire chaque jour?

(1140)

M. Andre Barnes:

Je ne connais pas bien la semaine de séance de cette administration. Je sais qu'il y a des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Je sais que notre Chambre est très délimitée. J'utilise toujours le mot « délimitée ». Il y a un horaire d'établi et beaucoup de procédures connexes, mais je peux revenir devant le Comité pour fournir davantage de détails. Je ne sais pas non plus exactement ce qui en est des jours désignés.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Connaissez-vous des pays ou des administrations qui possèdent un genre de chambre parallèle qui n'est pas nécessairement un endroit physique, mais dont les séances sont à des heures différentes? Par exemple, y a-t-il, à un endroit, une chambre parallèle qui siège le vendredi ou le soir lorsque la chambre principale ne siège pas plutôt que de le faire dans un local distinct?

M. Andre Barnes:

Avant la comparution du greffier de la Chambre, j'avais seulement entendu parler du Westminster Hall. Je n'avais jamais entendu parler de la Chambre de la Fédération en Australie. Je peux faire des recherches pour voir ce que les autres administrations font. Je me trompe peut-être, mais je ne crois pas qu'il y en ait dans les provinces ou les territoires, et il n'y en a pas en Nouvelle-Zélande, alors ce devrait être dans une autre administration du Commonwealth, peut-être, comme l'Inde ou...

Le président:

Je ne crois pas non plus que nous devrions limiter nos recherches aux pays du Commonwealth.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous pourrions aussi commencer par mettre à profit la salle du Sénat.

Le président:

Vous aviez autre chose à dire?

M. Andre Barnes:

C'est à peu près tout, sauf si le Comité a d'autres questions.

Le président:

D'accord, alors le Comité a reçu trois rapports de l'attaché de recherche. Il vient tout juste de nous présenter et d'analyser ces sujets: les chambres parallèles; les pratiques favorables à la famille pour un Parlement inclusif; et le rapport sur les jours de séance, qui vient de paraître ce matin.

Y a-t-il des questions ou des aspects à aborder relativement à ces sujets?

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous avons un peu parlé du vote par procuration. Avez-vous trouvé des administrations ou d'autres provinces où le vote s'effectue par voie électronique ou par d'autres moyens technologiques?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je peux poursuivre mes recherches à ce sujet. De nouvelles chambres sont issues de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni. Je dirais l'Écosse et le pays de Galles; je suis pas mal certain qu'ils disposent du vote électronique, mais laissez-moi vous revenir à ce sujet.

Le président:

Le Congrès le fait, mais il faut être sur place pour appuyer sur le bouton.

Arnold.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur Barnes, je veux vous poser une question concernant les personnes qui ne sont pas membres et qui se trouvent dans la Chambre durant une séance. Je pense que nous faisons face à une situation, actuellement, dans le cas d'un membre du caucus néodémocrate. S'agit-il d'une fonction ou simplement d'une convention? Je n'arrive pas à me rappeler si le Règlement contient des dispositions explicites à ce sujet.

Une voix: L'article 14 du Règlement.

M. Arnold Chan: Oh, c'est l'article 14 du Règlement qui interdit...

Le président: La présence d'étrangers dans la Chambre.

M. Arnold Chan: Exact, la présence d'étrangers dans la Chambre, et cette présence pourrait être contestée par un autre député en tant qu'atteinte aux privilèges d'un député. Je sais que nous avons un peu fermé les yeux là-dessus, mais je suis simplement conscient du fait que nous sommes de plus en plus susceptibles de nous retrouver dans des situations comme celle à laquelle nous faisons face maintenant. Y a-t-il une administration qui se soit déjà attaquée à la question de la présence d'étrangers au Parlement? Je sais que vous l'avez mentionnée en ce qui a trait au contexte canadien, mais, dans le cadre de votre recherche, avez-vous constaté que cette question avait été abordée dans une autre administration?

M. Andre Barnes:

En ce qui concerne la présence d'étrangers dans la Chambre, pensons-nous plus précisément à un enfant...

M. Arnold Chan:

Je parle précisément des bambins, des enfants et des mères qui allaitent. C'est ma principale préoccupation.

M. Andre Barnes:

Parce qu'il y a une grande distinction entre le fait de créer une perturbation... la règle existe pour une raison. La Chambre des représentants de l'Australie a récemment modifié sa définition de ce qui constitue un « visiteur » afin d'exclure les nourrissons dont une députée prendrait soin, car c'est arrivé très récemment. En lisant les journaux, je vois que, au Royaume-Uni, les députés se sont fait demander ce qu'ils en pensaient. D'après ce que je comprends, ils ne semblent pas trop enclins à emprunter cette voie. À ce que je sache, la plupart des administrations ont traditionnellement mis cette règle en place.

La question — et cela a été mentionné dans le rapport produit par le comité responsable des procédures, en Australie —, c'est qu'un grand nombre d'administrations ferment les yeux sur la présence d'un bambin dans la Chambre, mais que tout député de la Chambre a le droit d'invoquer le Règlement et d'obliger le Président à trancher la question à ce moment même. Dans le rapport, il est mentionné que l'une des raisons pour lesquelles les Australiens ont modifié la définition du terme « visiteur » était d'empêcher le Président de se retrouver dans cette position.

(1145)

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci. C'était utile.

Le président: Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais également obtenir d'autres clarifications concernant le congé parental et le service de garde dont nous disposons actuellement au Parlement, et effectuer une comparaison avec d'autres administrations. Nous avons effleuré brièvement le fait que nous ne disposons pas de congés pour la garde d'enfants et ne pouvons pas partir lorsque l'enfant est malade. D'ailleurs, si l'une de nos députées ou sénatrices doit accoucher durant les jours de séance et pas durant l'été, que doit-elle faire? Qu'est-ce qui a été fait dans le passé? Je ne sais pas.

Dans le cas d'une de nos députées actuelles, au NPD, je pense que nous avons tous remarqué qu'elle doit composer avec le fait d'avoir un enfant tout en étant députée et que c'est assez compliqué et difficile. Comme nous l'avons mentionné, le service de garde n'accepte pas les enfants âgés de moins de 18 mois, alors que doivent faire les parents lorsqu'ils se retrouvent dans cette situation? Il a été mentionné que la Nouvelle-Zélande avait connu un baby-boom. Je pense que, actuellement, nous avons des hommes et des femmes qui attendent des enfants au cours de l'année. Nous ne pourrons pas continuer à faire abstraction de ce problème. Comment allons-nous le régler? Les députés sont de plus en plus jeunes, et nous devons étudier ce problème plutôt que d'attendre qu'il nous tombe dessus.

Avez-vous vu des études à ce sujet? Qu'est-ce qui a été fait dans le passé?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je pourrais faire des recherches sur les autres administrations. Dans notre cas, je peux dire quelle rémunération, quelle paye et quels avantages sociaux sont prévus par la loi pour les députés. Le statut de député confère une foule d'avantages en matière de ressources humaines dont je ne suis pas au courant; je pourrais en discuter avec les responsables des ressources humaines de la Chambre des communes pour voir quel genre de paye et d'avantages sociaux sont accordés aux députés. Je sais que certains de ces renseignements sont certainement prévus dans des lois accessibles au public. Une partie de ces avantages sont comme une ressource humaine... il s'agit d'un emploi, c'est presque une affaire privée.

Mais, à ce que je sache, ce programme ne prévoit aucun congé parental pour les députés, ni congé de maternité ou de paternité, d'ailleurs.

Le président:

David, puis Anita.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En consultant ce rapport, je constate que le congé parental ne représente que la moitié du combat. Si vous prenez un mois de congé de votre poste de député, votre espérance de vie en tant que député sera réduite de plus d'un mois.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Mon autre commentaire est en réaction à la déclaration d'Arnold au sujet des étrangers dans la Chambre. Si je me souviens bien, Sheila Copps a été la première députée à emmener son enfant à la Chambre des communes. La disposition du Règlement qui a été utilisée pour tenter de l'arrêter était la règle selon laquelle on ne devrait pas manger dans la Chambre des communes. Il s'agit, selon moi, d'une façon plutôt obscure de présenter les choses.

Quel pouvoir avons-nous, en tant que Comité responsable de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, d'apporter des changements? Quelles sont les limites de notre propre capacité de changer les choses?

M. Andre Barnes:

Le Comité peut formuler toutes les recommandations qu'il veut dans un rapport adressé à la Chambre et demander à la Chambre d'adopter le rapport.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous ne pouvons pas changer directement...

M. Andre Barnes:

Oh, je suis désolé. Oui, comme le fait remarquer le greffier, cela fait partie du mandat du Comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je me demande. Nous ne pouvons pas dire au service de garde qu'il doit accepter tous les enfants qu'on lui amène pour autant d'heures qu'on les lui confie, par exemple.

M. Andre Barnes:

Selon le mandat du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, le Comité entretient une relation spéciale avec le Président et avec le Bureau de régie interne, et il peut adresser des recommandations au Président et au Bureau de régie interne, mais il s'agit seulement de recommandations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Ainsi, nous pouvons élargir la portée des recommandations, comme l'a mentionné le ministre lorsqu'il était ici, en nous attachant à des aspects plus particuliers et ce genre de choses. Cela pourrait également ressortir du Comité. Pour une personne comme moi, dont la circonscription fait 20 000 kilomètres carrés, le simple fait de voyager dans la circonscription est un énorme fardeau qui pèse sur la famille.

M. Andre Barnes: Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Très bien.

Le président:

Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je veux revenir sur ce qui a été dit au sujet des mères qui allaitent et des mères de nourrissons, ou bien des pères de nourrissons, d'ailleurs, parce qu'il ne s'agit pas seulement d'être présent pour le vote. Il s'agit d'être présent pour le processus décisionnel et pour contribuer au débat. J'ai entendu parler d'une administration où une ministre du Cabinet a pris un congé d'un mois lorsqu'elle a accouché et, pendant son absence, le Cabinet a pris une décision qui relevait de sa compétence avec laquelle elle n'était pas d'accord. Il est question ici de ne pas être présent pour pouvoir donner son avis.

Je lance simplement une hypothèse, mais, dans de nombreux autres domaines... je sais que, quand je travaillais aux Nations Unies, nous participions à toutes sortes de conférences internationales avec des gens des cinq continents à l'aide de technologies, de la technologie vidéo et de Skype.

Pour en revenir à cette chambre parallèle, est-il possible que nous puissions avoir une chambre parallèle virtuelle, où nous pourrions faire un discours qui figurerait au compte rendu? Comme il faut au moins trois personnes pour avoir quorum, il serait en fait très facile d'organiser un genre de séance par vidéoconférence. Les gens pourraient être dans leur circonscription ou, dans le cas des mères de nourrissons, avec leur enfant, mais pourraient tout de même faire figurer leur avis au compte rendu.

Je ne sais même pas si cela serait possible, d'un point de vue technologique, mais est-ce une chose que nous pourrions envisager? C'est simplement une idée que je lance à tout hasard.

(1150)

M. Andre Barnes:

C'est une grande question dont je ne connais pas la réponse.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld: Oui. Je ne fais que la soulever à tout hasard.

M. Andre Barnes: Cela fait réfléchir. Les gens ne se sentiraient pas nécessairement à l'aise, compte tenu de toutes les difficultés, des traditions de la Chambre et des dispositions du Règlement... Mais certaines personnes pourraient dire que les membres ont la possibilité de faire tout ce qu'ils veulent. Je ne sais vraiment pas.

Le président:

Arnold.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je veux poursuivre sur la question qu'Anita vient tout juste de soulever. Je veux affirmer mon soutien en principe du concept — je peux donc le déclarer officiellement — selon lequel nous devrions étudier d'autres façons de participer grâce à la vidéoconférence. Je l'ai certes fait dans le secteur privé grâce à la vidéoconférence et à Skype.

Je pense que, au bout du compte, la vraie question à laquelle nous devons réfléchir, en tant que parlementaires — et M. Lamoureux l'a soulevée auprès de moi lors d'une séance antérieure —, c'est l'importance de s'assurer que nous n'agissons pas sous l'effet de la contrainte. Par exemple, nous pourrions confirmer notre identité par la biométrie ou autre chose, et confirmer notre présence, mais, si nous ne sommes pas effectivement présents à la Chambre, personne ne peut savoir, par exemple, si une personne hors champ pointe un fusil sur notre tête et nous fait dire ou faire quelque chose avec quoi nous ne sommes pas d'accord.

Je soulève cette question en tant que possibilité théorique, n'est-ce pas? Peut-être que la raison de l'existence de la convention selon laquelle nous devons être présents est qu'il faut établir le fait que nous agissons librement et de façon indépendante en tant que député lorsque nous sommes ici.

M. Andre Barnes:

L'un des plus importants...

M. Arnold Chan:

Il s'agit d'un principe fondamental de notre statut de député.

M. Andre Barnes:

Le libre accès des députés à la Cité parlementaire fait partie des plus importants aspects du privilège parlementaire.

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui. Je connais le concept au moins depuis les années 1970, cette possibilité de voter et de participer par vidéoconférence à partir de sa circonscription, disons, par exemple. Encore une fois, revenons sur la question de la contrainte. Est-il possible de garantir que nous sommes libres de toute contrainte lorsque nous participons? C'est peut-être une chose que de consigner ses réflexions au compte rendu. Le vote pourrait être une autre question.

Je soulève cet aspect seulement pour que nous soyons conscients de ce principe.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais renvoyer la question à notre illustre analyste.

Quelles sont les idées que vous devez étudier auxquelles nous n'avons pas encore pensé?

M. Andre Barnes:

Parmi les autres éléments mentionnés dans un document qu'un collègue et moi avons rédigé au sujet des parlements sensibles au genre, il y avait les politiques relatives au harcèlement. Un sous-comité de notre Comité a produit un rapport qui a fini par se transformer en code de conduite pour les membres relativement au harcèlement sexuel. Il a été joint à la version actuelle du Règlement au début de la 42e législature.

Quant aux autres éléments que j'ai lus, comme j'ai récemment lu le rapport de l'Union interparlementaire, je souligne qu'il est possible d'aborder d'autres idées qui vont bien plus loin. Je porterai simplement à l'attention du Comité certaines considérations qui ont été évoquées dans mes lectures.

Dans d'autres administrations, des discussions sont tenues au sujet du nombre de présidentes et de présidents, par exemple, ou de la personne affectée à la présidence de la Chambre et de la nécessité ou de l'inutilité d'atteindre un certain équilibre — vous pouvez définir l'équilibre comme bon vous semble — et au sujet de l'attribution aux membres de rôles d'agents du Parlement. Voilà autant de possibilités.

Ensuite, si vous voulez aller encore plus loin, le rapport de l'Union interparlementaire aborde des façons de rendre le Parlement plus inclusif, de diversifier les types de députés élus. Cela englobe un certain nombre d'idées différentes, mais, actuellement, ces idées relèvent de chaque parti, pas nécessairement du Parlement.

(1155)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme je me spécialise dans la suggestion d'idées qui n'ont pas été mentionnées auparavant, y a-t-il quelqu'un quelque part qui, à votre connaissance, a déjà envisagé de prendre part à des débats par écrit plutôt que de vive voix? Cette possibilité élimine toutes les contraintes liées au temps. Nous pourrions débattre d'une question précise directement dans le hansard sans avoir à nous lever à la Chambre pour le dire.

Je sais que Kady va détester cela, mais il y a là matière à réflexion. C'est une manière d'intégrer des débats supplémentaires sans ajouter de temps.

M. Andre Barnes:

Je pourrais présenter un aperçu historique de la raison pour laquelle ont lieu la première, la deuxième et la troisième lectures. Il s'agit d'une relique des parlements de Westminster, dans l'ancien temps, quand les gens ne savaient pas lire. Par ailleurs, l'impression de documents était très onéreuse. Les gens lisaient les projets de loi, soit parce que les députés ne savaient pas lire, soit parce que cela coûtait trop cher que d'en remettre une copie à tout le monde.

En adoptant une telle façon de faire, nous irions à la limite extrême dans la direction contraire.

Le président:

Arnold.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur Barnes, je veux vous poser une question rapide au sujet des places au service de garde et m'attacher à nos délais de traitement. Je crois comprendre que la liste d'attente va jusqu'à deux ans. Comment les autres administrations composent-elles avec ce problème? Je sais qu'une partie du problème tient au fait qu'il n'y a que 34 places, mais comment les autres administrations fonctionnent-elles? Disposent-elles de places dans un service de garde? Quelles sont leurs pratiques?

Comment pouvons-nous régler ce problème? S'agit-il d'un problème fonctionnel lié au fait que le nombre de places pour répondre aux besoins des enfants est limité? Avons-nous besoin d'un plus grand local? Quel est le défi que nous devons relever, à la Chambre des communes?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je vais me présenter de nouveau devant le Comité pour répondre à cette question.

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose? Je pense que nous avons beaucoup de travail.

Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez mentionné brièvement quelque chose au sujet d'attribuer aux députés des rôles d'agents du Parlement. Qu'entendiez-vous par là?

M. Andre Barnes:

Il ne s'agit peut-être pas du meilleur terme pour décrire ce rôle, mais, pour le whip, le leader parlementaire, le président — et le vice-président —, certaines dispositions pourraient être prises. Si les membres le décidaient, un genre de division — ou d'égalité — ou un genre d'équilibre pourrait être intégré dans les règles. Cette option existe. Elle a été mentionnée dans le rapport de l'Union interparlementaire. Je ne vais pas me vanter de l'avoir inventée. C'est quelque chose qui a été mentionné. Lorsque j'ai examiné le nombre de présidents au moment où j'ai rédigé le document, j'ai constaté qu'il n'y avait que deux femmes — pour la santé et pour la condition féminine — sur 24 comités permanents.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

En ce qui concerne l'avenir, êtes-vous sur le point de formuler des suggestions? Êtes-vous à la recherche de certaines suggestions? Quelles sont vos réflexions pour l'avenir?

Le président:

Eh bien, nous allons obtenir d'autres rapports, mais, en ce qui concerne le rapport du Sous-comité, qui sera notre prochain sujet, deux ou trois journées sont prévues pour entendre des témoins et tenir d'autres discussions au sujet d'un Parlement inclusif et propice à la vie de famille. J'aurais tendance à penser que c'est à ce moment-là que nous aborderions cette question.

M. David Christopherson:

Ce principe s'applique-t-il également au concept de la deuxième chambre, ou bien étudions-nous... il me semble que vous pourriez faire valoir qu'il devrait s'agir d'un processus distinct.

Le président:

Oui, je pense que, lors de discussions précédentes tenues il y a quelques séances, vous aviez proposé — et j'étais d'accord avec vous — que nous mettions l'accent sur le volet inclusif et propice à la vie de famille pour le premier rapport, sans quoi nous n'allions jamais en venir à bout, et que les Présidents de la Chambre allaient poursuivre sans nous. Oui, je pense que nous devrions le faire dans le cadre d'un processus distinct...

M. David Christopherson:

Alors, vaut-il la peine de demander à l'analyste d'étudier certaines options? Certaines discussions ont eu lieu au sujet des simples députés. Je pense que c'est M. Graham, qui a parlé du fait qu'un plus grand nombre de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire étaient traités.

Pourrions-nous demander à l'analyste de vérifier cela? Peut-être un examen tous azimuts — quel que soit le terme actuellement utilisé pour ce genre de choses ces temps-ci; j'ai perdu le fil —, qu'il jette simplement un coup d'œil à tout ce que nous faisons et, dans l'esprit de ce que disait M. Graham, qu'il nous donne des idées, seulement pour nous donner un point de départ. Ensuite, nous verrons combien de temps nous voulons investir là-dedans. Selon moi, soit cela se révélera être une excellente idée qui pourrait nous mener à une réforme majeure qui sera très positive, soit cela ne nous mènera nulle part parce qu'il s'agit d'un changement trop radical. Un indicateur précoce pourrait être utile.

(1200)

M. Andre Barnes:

Je vais discuter de cette question avec les experts des services procéduraux de la Chambre — ils ont été extrêmement serviables, jusqu'ici —, et je verrai quel sera leur point de vue d'expert sur la question.

M. David Christopherson:

Parfait. Merci.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous appellerons cela la deuxième étude afin de ne pas nous mélanger avec la première.

Jamie.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je vais formuler deux ou trois commentaires sur ce que disait M. Chan au sujet des places en service de garde. Quand mon fils est né, le temps d'attente pour obtenir une place en service de garde avait un an. J'ai dû l'inscrire avant sa naissance afin qu'il soit sur la liste d'attente. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un problème plus important qui ne se limite pas au Parlement. Cela dit, je suis curieux d'entendre la réponse pour savoir s'il s'agit d'un problème d'espace au service de garde, ou bien si le problème est lié au nombre de fournisseurs. Je suis très curieux de le découvrir.

Pour commenter notre discussion au sujet du vote ou de la présentation de rapports par Skype ou par voie électronique... je sais que, au Royaume-Uni, il faut être présent pour appuyer sur le bouton, mais il y a près de 700 députés. Selon moi, il y a quelque chose de spécial à se tenir à sa place pour voter, pour commenter un projet de loi ou pour poser des questions, alors je ne veux pas... À mon avis, il ne faut pas aller trop loin dans cette direction, parce que, selon moi, quelque chose se perdrait. Nous sommes des députés; nous sommes là et nous faisons notre travail. Il y a les problèmes où nous pouvons améliorer la situation et des mesures que nous pouvons prendre, mais je ne veux pas aller trop loin dans la direction où nous enverrions nos affaires par courriel et où nos whips voteraient pour nous. Je formule une mise en garde contre cela.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je veux donner suite à votre argument. Je comprends le problème que vous avez soulevé.

Nous pourrions peut-être choisir notre façon de faire en fonction de la nature de l'affaire dont la Chambre est saisie. Par exemple, s'il s'agit d'une affaire de confidentialité, il faudrait être présent pour siéger. Nous pourrions décrire les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire comme des situations où cela serait approprié. Nous pourrions créer diverses catégories et classes de documents à l'égard desquelles il serait acceptable d'utiliser d'autres moyens pour voter, plutôt que de dire « oui » ou « non ». Je ne sais pas si des documents de travail ont déjà été rédigés au sujet de ces types de situations.

Je comprends le problème que vous soulevez. Je ne suis pas insensible à notre tradition parlementaire de Westminster, mais, vous savez, nous sommes au XXIe siècle, et le pays est grand. Je songe particulièrement aux personnes comme notre président, qui représentent une circonscription très éloignée.

Le président:

J'ai dû me rendre à l'aéroport à 6 h 30 hier matin. Je suis arrivé ici à 22 heures hier soir. Voilà combien de temps cela me prend.

Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Au sujet de ce commentaire, je pense que nous pouvons faire une distinction entre le vote et les déclarations officielles. Par exemple, s'il s'agit d'une chambre parallèle, nous disions déjà que nous ne tiendrions pas de vote et qu'il n'y aurait pas quorum. Nous aborderions peut-être des affaires d'initiative parlementaire. Ce genre de choses pourraient être faites par vidéoconférence ou être enregistrées d'une manière ou d'une autre pour figurer au compte rendu, mais tout ce qui exige un vote ou ce que nous faisons habituellement dans la Chambre aurait encore lieu ici.

Selon moi, les deux éléments sont des concepts complètement différents: le vote par procuration par rapport à l'idée d'utiliser la technologie. Une personne pourrait être présente sur un écran d'ordinateur grâce à Skype et pourrait tout de même participer aux délibérations du Comité, peut-être quelque chose comme ça. Je lance cette idée à tout hasard, histoire de faire preuve d'innovation et de créativité.

Le président:

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pour revenir sur certains des commentaires qui ont été formulés, je suis d'accord, et je pense que c'est très spécial que de siéger à la Chambre, de se lever pour voter, d'appuyer sur un bouton pour voter ou quoi que nous fassions dans l'avenir, et d'être effectivement présent. Toutefois, je pense que nous nous éloignons de la raison pour laquelle nous tentons d'entreprendre certaines de ces réformes: afin que diverses personnes dans diverses situations dans leur vie puissent participer aux débats et être membres de la Chambre.

La perspective et la présence de ces personnes dans la Chambre sont tout aussi précieuses et importantes, que ce soit à l'aide d'un certain type de moyens technologiques ou non. Il est question de politiques favorables à la famille. Il y a des parents qui ne peuvent même pas envisager de se présenter, de devenir députés, parce qu'ils ont des enfants actuellement. Nous avons besoin de ces perspectives dans la Chambre.

À mon avis personnel, qu'il s'agisse d'une situation comme celle-là ou d'un parent âgé ou vieillissant et malade, ou bien d'une situation qui ne permet pas aux députés d'être présents à la Chambre, je suppose qu'il reviendrait à la Chambre des communes ou à l'administration de déterminer, à ce stade, si la raison de l'absence du député est valable. Je ne veux pas créer une pente glissante où tout le monde prend congé et où il n'y a plus personne ici, mais nous devrions prendre acte du fait que, parfois, les gens ne peuvent pas être ici pour de bonnes raisons. Donnons-leur tout de même une voix et un autre moyen de communiquer et d'être présents.

Je veux ajouter que vous avez fait un excellent travail pour ce qui est de présenter un échantillon représentatif de divers parlements et de façons de faire, mais êtes-vous tombé sur des documents d'opinion ou des enquêtes établissant quels parlements sont les plus efficaces, même s'ils ont subi ces changements? Nous disposons seulement des faits concernant ce qui se passe et où, mais, au bout du compte, les parlements sont-ils efficaces?

Il semble que notre nombre de jours de séance est plus élevé que celui de tout autre parlement, à l'exception de celui du Royaume-Uni. Cela figure dans ce rapport-ci. Sommes-nous les plus efficaces? Nous tentons évidemment de découvrir comment, au bout du compte, nous pouvons encore faire notre travail et bien servir nos circonscriptions. Je pense qu'il est très important pour nous de connaître cette perspective également. Qui adopte le plus grand nombre de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire? Qui promulgue le plus de lois et accomplit le plus de travail? Étudions cet aspect au lieu de faire une fixation sur le nombre de jours ou de vendredis, ou sur les horaires et sur le fait que nous disposions ou non d'une chambre parallèle. Qui réussit à accomplir son travail? C'est ça que je veux savoir.

Si vous aviez quelque chose à nous transmettre pour nous donner plus de renseignements et nous permettre de se faire une idée à ce sujet, ce serait excellent.

(1205)

Le président:

Pour l'instant, je dirais que, compte tenu du programme, nous ne pourrons peut-être pas revenir sur cette question avant deux ou trois semaines, alors vous pourriez également voir s'il y a des pays, en dehors de ceux que vous avez étudiés dans le Commonwealth, qui ont quelque chose à ajouter. Vous disposez d'un peu de temps, selon moi.

C'est bon pour ce matin, à ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je souhaite bonne chance à notre analyste.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour quelques minutes afin d'aller dîner. Ensuite, nous reviendrons sur le rapport du sous-comité.

(1205)

(1215)

Le président:

Le sous-comité a tenu une bonne séance ce matin et a formulé certaines recommandations pour le prochain mois ou les six prochaines semaines, plus ou moins. Je voudrais commencer par faire un survol de toutes ces recommandations avant que les gens ne posent des questions au sujet d'aspects particuliers, parce que la réponse pourrait figurer dans le document. Ceux qui ne l'ont pas encore reçu pourront inscrire les recommandations sous forme d'ébauche. Bien entendu, il s'agit toujours d'une version provisoire. Le Comité peut toujours la modifier en cours de route.

Voici ce que le sous-comité a formulé comme recommandations provisoires, et, selon le moment où les témoins viendront, et ainsi de suite, le choix du moment de cette séance pourrait également changer, dans l'espoir que les mêmes éléments figureront quelque part dans le document.

Laissez-moi faire un petit préambule pour ceux qui viennent d'arriver. Notre Comité doit passer en revue les règles relatives aux conflits d'intérêts tous les cinq ans. Cet examen a eu lieu lors de la dernière législature, mais seuls les fruits les plus faciles à cueillir... je pense que, au dire de Blake, seuls les fruits qui étaient tombés au sol ont été ramassés. Les éléments majeurs n'ont pas été abordés. Il y a toutes sortes de rapports et de recommandations. Il y a un détail technique. Il s'agit d'un petit formulaire que nous devrions approuver, selon moi, ce qui ne devrait pas prendre beaucoup de temps, tout simplement parce que le présent Comité approuve les formulaires.

C'est pourquoi nous recommandons que la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique soit invitée à comparaître ce jeudi. Le mardi suivant — le 23 février —, le Comité pourrait se pencher sur les affaires liées aux activités et aux travaux à venir du Comité relativement à l'examen complet du Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés. Nous étudierons tous les rapports de l'attaché de recherche, en plus des documents que nous aurons demandés à la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, et nous pourrons soit rédiger un rapport, soit élaborer une feuille de route menant à un rapport, ou faire ce que nous avons à faire. Il semble que la ministre des Institutions démocratiques soit en mesure de se présenter le jeudi 25 février, alors nous avons prévu une période pour elle à ce moment-là. C'est provisoire, et nous pourrons peut-être le confirmer d'ici un jour ou deux. Le greffier fera un suivi.

Ensuite, si le temps le permet, selon la durée de l'intervention de la ministre, nous procéderons à un examen de l'apport du caucus. Comme vous le savez, nous avons donné pour consigne aux whips des caucus et aux leaders à la Chambre de faire rapport par votre entremise, alors nous ne voulons pas remettre ces comptes rendus à trop tard. Nous allons aborder cet apport bientôt, à l'occasion de l'une de nos séances à venir, pendant que c'est encore frais dans leur esprit, afin qu'ils aient l'impression qu'on les écoute. Si nous avons le temps durant cette séance, ce sera fait à ce moment-là; autrement, ça le sera peu après.

Le mardi suivant, conformément aux articles 110 et 111 du Règlement, nous inviterons les deux autres représentants fédéraux nommés au Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat, et, si leur témoignage ne dure qu'une heure, nous pourrons ensuite poursuivre. Si nous n'avons pas réussi à faire adopter la motion, nous pourrons poursuivre notre discussion sur les affaires liées au caucus — faire le suivi de la séance précédente — ou aborder ces sujets à ce moment-là.

Le jeudi 10 mars, nous sélectionnerons la deuxième option que nous a donnée le directeur général des élections pour ce qui est de présenter une séance d'information. Il ne s'agirait pas d'une séance régulière, mais elle serait intégrée à l'horaire régulier. Le greffier et le directeur général des élections s'occuperont de la salle, du repas, et de tout le reste. La séance aura lieu dans la cité parlementaire.

Une semaine de travail dans les circonscriptions se tiendra par la suite, puis les 22 et 24 mars — il s'agit de dates provisoires, selon que nous aurons terminé les autres travaux ou selon les événements qui surviendront —, le Comité entendra des témoins et discutera d'un Parlement inclusif et propice à la vie de famille à la lumière des autres recherches présentées par l'attaché de recherche. Par ailleurs, pour le mois à venir, si quelqu'un pense à des témoins en particulier que nous devrions inviter, il s'agit des jours ciblés. Nous pourrions donner un préavis à ces personnes.

Y a-t-il des membres du sous-comité qui pensent que j'ai oublié quelque chose dans mon survol de l'ébauche?

(1220)



Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je mentionnerais seulement, monsieur le président, que je vous ai parlé, avant la séance, du fait de présenter un avis de motion de fond. Je suis encore à la recherche d'une occasion — avec vos conseils — de proposer cette motion. Elle n'est pas très urgente, mais le plus tôt sera le mieux pour que nous en débattions, je suppose.

Le président:

Effectivement.

Nous nous disions que, si la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique n'utilisait pas les deux heures en entier, nous pourrions au moins amorcer le débat à ce moment-là. Sinon, nous le commencerons ou le poursuivrons le mardi suivant.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien, monsieur le président. Merci.

Le président:

C'est en présumant que le débat sera plus long que court.

M. David Christopherson:

Il y a lieu de croire qu'il pourrait être un peu long, oui.

Le gouvernement est plus coopératif que je l'aurais cru, alors je vais rester optimiste quant à la possibilité qu'il soit court: les représentants du gouvernement vont adorer la motion et l'accepter, et tout ira bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne suis pas certain qu'il s'agisse du bon moment pour aborder cette question, mais je veux m'informer au sujet de la présence des autres membres du comité consultatif, les deux que nous invitons.

S'agit-il de deux membres?

Le président:

Il s'agit de deux représentants du gouvernement fédéral, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Deux nominations fédérales.

D'accord, est-ce le bon moment pour m'enquérir de la substance de leur comparution? Je ne remets pas en question le choix du moment ni quoi que ce soit de ce genre.

Le président:

Eh bien, il s'agit seulement de ce qui figure dans certaines dispositions du Règlement, que nous avons lues plusieurs fois à la dernière séance.

M. Scott Reid:

Eh bien, oui, mais, lors de la dernière séance, j'ai été profondément frustré par les contraintes qui m'ont été imposées. Je n'ai pas pu m'empêcher de remarquer qu'elles n'avaient été imposées à personne d'autre... pour ce qui est de s'en tenir exclusivement au débat concernant leurs qualifications. Je veux dire que ces contraintes n'ont vraiment été appliquées à personne d'autre que moi. C'était profondément frustrant. Bien franchement, la frustration tient non pas au fait qu'elles n'ont pas été appliquées à d'autres, mais au simple fait qu'elles ont été appliquées.

Les qualifications de ces personnes ne me posent aucun problème. Il est raisonnable que je veuille demander comment elles font leur travail, sans poser de question sur les choses qui ont été rendues secrètes. Je ne suis pas d'accord avec le fait qu'elles soient secrètes, mais ce n'est pas la faute de ces personnes. Toutefois, il est raisonnable de vouloir poser certaines questions au sujet du processus de nomination, de la première étape du processus, laquelle, je suppose, n'était plus entre leurs mains et avait été envoyée au premier ministre sous forme de conseils. Il s'agit de questions au sujet du nombre de candidatures qui ont été reçues, du genre de ventilation entre divers secteurs. Il s'agit de demandes raisonnables, et il serait déraisonnable de les interdire.

Ma question est la suivante: m'interdiriez-vous de leur poser des questions de cette nature?

Le président:

Encore une fois, je vais invoquer le Règlement, car je ne peux pas aller à l'encontre du Règlement. Cela n'est pas de notre ressort. Je vais demander au greffier de lire ce que nous avons le droit de faire relativement à ces nominations.

Monsieur Chan.

(1225)

M. Arnold Chan:

C'était exactement là que je voulais en venir, monsieur le président. Cela concerne la portée du Règlement. Certaines des questions que M. Reid a soulevées lors de la séance précédente seraient, de mon point de vue, appropriées sur une tribune différente, pas nécessairement appropriée...

M. Scott Reid:

Il n'y a pas d'autre tribune, et vous le savez. Il s'agit de la seule tribune, et vous ne voulez pas que ces questions soient posées. Voilà le problème. Il s'agit de l'interdiction de toute ouverture, car vous ne nous permettez pas de poser des questions raisonnables, puis bloquez toute tribune de ce genre.

Monsieur Chan, si vous êtes disposé à le faire, je serais prêt à déposer une motion afin de réinviter ces personnes et de discuter du mandat qu'elles avaient et de la façon dont elles le réalisaient, et nous verrons si le gouvernement est d'accord ou non avec cela. Pour l'instant, ce que j'entends, c'est le gouvernement qui tente d'interdire toute ouverture, toute discussion concernant ce processus.

M. Arnold Chan:

En fait, j'avais la parole, mais je vous ai laissé donner votre coup de gueule, monsieur Reid.

Au bout du compte, de mon point de vue, encore une fois — vous ne m'avez même pas laissé terminer —, là où je veux en venir, c'est que vous pouvez soulever les questions à la Chambre des communes. Vous remettez en cause la question de la constitutionnalité. Il y a d'autres tribunes appropriées pour le faire. On ne le fait pas au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Encore une fois, là où je veux en venir... et j'allais demander au greffier de lire la disposition du Règlement. Si vous n'aimez pas le Règlement, je suis prêt à vous permettre de proposer une modification à y apporter. Toutefois, nous étions là pour étudier les qualifications et les capacités de personnes en particulier de s'acquitter de leurs fonctions particulières.

Je comprends l'autre argument que vous avez soulevé en ce qui a trait à la nature de cette fonction, mais, concernant les autres questions de fond que vous avez soulevées relativement aux détails sur les personnes qui ont posé leur candidature, le nombre de personnes qui l'ont fait, les délais, de mon point de vue, cela dépasse la portée de ce que le Règlement nous permet de faire.

Je cède la parole, maintenant.

Le président:

Ces témoins seraient visés par l'article 111 du Règlement, qui est ainsi libellé: (2) Le comité, s'il convoque une personne nommée ou dont on a proposé la nomination conformément au paragraphe (1) du présent article, examine les titres, les qualités et la compétence de l'intéressé et sa capacité d'exécuter les fonctions du poste auquel il a été nommé ou auquel on propose de le nommer.

Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

À la lumière de certaines des questions posées à la dernière séance, je ne pense pas qu'il soit juste de faire venir ici une personne qui est prête à parler de ses qualifications, puis de lui parler de questions qu'il conviendrait mieux de poser à la ministre. Je me rappelle qu'après cela, vous aviez demandé que la ministre vienne. Je pense qu'il est possible de poser beaucoup de questions semblables à la personne appropriée, c'est-à-dire la ministre. Vous aurez cette possibilité.

M. Scott Reid:

Sont-ils sous-qualifiés? [Note de la rédaction: difficultés techniques] l'information? Sommes-nous en train de révéler des secrets? Rien de tout cela n'est vrai. La seule chose qui soit vraie, c'est que nous nous limitons déraisonnablement afin d'interdire la diffusion d'informations qui devraient être rendues publiques.

Le président:

Nous ne nous limitons pas, c'est le Règlement qui le fait. Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires à ce sujet?

Concernant le rapport du sous-comité, y a-t-il des commentaires sur le programme suggéré pour l'avenir? Pourrais-je obtenir une motion afin de l'approuver?

Une voix: J'en fais la proposition.

Le président:

Elle est appuyée par M. Christopherson et proposée par David.

Y a-t-il un débat? Tout le monde approuve?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président:

Nous disposons d'une demi-heure, alors nous devrions peut-être passer à votre motion.

M. David Christopherson:

Voulez-vous faire cela?

Le président:

Voulez-vous le faire?

Des voix: D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je crois que je commencerais par en faire la lecture pour rappeler à tout le monde où nous en sommes. Il s'agit d'un avis de motion: Que le comité adopte les procédures suivantes lorsqu'il s'agit de séances à huis clos: Que toutes les motions qui supposent une séance à huis clos puissent être débattues et modifiées, et que le Comité ne se réunisse à huis clos que dans les cas suivants: Pour examiner des questions touchant: a) les salaires et traitement et les autres avantages sociaux des employés; b) les contrats et la négociation des contrats; c) les relations de travail et les questions d'ordre personnel; d) un rapport provisoire; e) des documents d'information concernant la sécurité nationale; et Que le procès-verbal des séances à huis clos fasse état des résultats de tous les votes tenus pendant des séances à huis clos du Comité, indiquant entre autres comment chacun des membres aura voté lorsqu'un vote par appel nominal a été demandé.

La seule chose que j'ajouterais, monsieur le président, c'est que j'aurais l'intention — si je finissais par avoir un appui à cet égard — d'ajouter ce qui suit à la dernière phrase: « que le procès-verbal des séances à huis clos fasse état des résultats de tous les votes tenus par le Comité pendant une séance à huis clos, sauf pour ce qui concerne la rédaction de rapports. » Pendant la rédaction de rapports, les gens n'arrêtent pas d'ajouter ou de supprimer des clauses, des libellés et des idées, et à mon avis, il ne devrait pas en être question dans ce que je propose. Cela fait partie des concessions inévitables quand il est question de rédaction de rapports, lequel est en soi un processus tout à fait distinct.

Voilà ma motion. Si vous me le permettez, je vais vous présenter mes justifications, monsieur le président.

(1230)

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Commençons par la question de savoir si les motions doivent être débattues et modifiées; dans le passé — je sais bien que les représentants du gouvernement vont me dire qu'ils ne voient pas le monde de cette manière, qu'ils vont être formidables, qu'ils ne feront pas ces choses désagréables. Je leur réponds, c'est parfait, je crois que vous croyez cela aujourd'hui, mais j'ai une bonne idée de la façon dont les choses vont évoluer. D'ici deux ou trois ans, toutes ces gentillesses seront chose du passé, et nous allons être plongés dans les compromis que suppose au jour le jour l'aspect de partisanerie de ce que nous faisons.

Voici ce qui pourrait se passer: dès que le gouvernement en place éprouve un malaise quelconque à l'égard de ce qui se passe, il pourrait tout simplement présenter une motion pour demander une séance à huis clos. Selon le règlement, il serait impossible d'en débattre. Il faudrait tout de suite tenir un vote. Il n'existait pas de critère pour déterminer si cela était ou non permis. Il n'existait pas de ligne directrice. Il était possible de demander une séance à huis clos. Et la séance à huis clos se tenait sans débat ni discussion préalables.

Ce qui se passait, donc, c'est que le gouvernement, dès que cela lui convenait, présentait tout simplement —boum! C'est fait — une motion pour que la séance se poursuive à huis clos. Avant que quiconque ait réellement eu le temps de rassembler ses esprits, il fallait déjà passer au vote. Il n'y avait pas de débat. Il n'était pas question de modifier la motion. Boum! Boum! Il suffisait de trois minutes pour passer d'une discussion publique intéressante et dynamique, ou même d'un débat véritable sur un sujet quelconque, quelques minutes seulement pour disparaître de la vue du public et nous enterrer dans ce terrier de lapin d'où nous n'émergions que lorsque nous l'avions décidé.

C'est ma première préoccupation.

Monsieur le président, je ne sais pas comment vous voulez procéder. J'aimerais à un moment ou un autre que le gouvernement m'indique rapidement s'il désire que les choses se passent encore de cette manière. Si c'est ce qu'il veut, nous nous épargnerions beaucoup d'ennuis. Je ne sais pas comment vous voulez que je procède. C'était mon premier point. Je peux poursuivre. Mon sort est entre vos mains.

Le président:

Vous pourriez très bien présenter tous vos points, après quoi nous laisserons les représentants du gouvernement ou de l'opposition vous répondre.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, mais, si vous me le permettez, pour ce qui est du temps, si ce que je dis suscite de l'intérêt... Ce que je veux dire c'est que nous sommes tous réunis ici.

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. David Christopherson: D'accord, c'est bon.

S'ils vont être d'accord, il n'y a pas lieu pour moi de faire ainsi tout le tour de la question.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Puisque vous serez de toute façon d'accord...

À un moment donné, peut-être que cela sera utile. Je vais en tracer les grandes lignes, mais n'ayez crainte, je n'en ai pas fini ni dans un domaine, ni dans l'autre. Il y a beaucoup de choses à revoir et à débattre, mais seulement si c'est nécessaire. Puisque nous nous entendons si bien, eh bien, l'espoir fait vivre.

En ce qui concerne l'examen, d'entrée de jeu, s'il est question de définir ce que les comités peuvent ou ne peuvent pas faire à huis clos; je dirais à l'intention de ceux d'entre nous qui ont déjà fait partie d'un conseil municipal, c'est une notion que nous connaissons très bien. Je me rappelle qu'à l'époque il y avait beaucoup de résistance. Les gens disaient: « Oui, mais les cabinets peuvent se réunir à huis clos », ce qui était tout à côté à de la question, évidemment. La dynamique est très différente; c'est une procédure tout à fait différente, puisqu'il y a une opposition et tout un système de freins et de contrepoids. Cela n'existe pas dans les conseils municipaux.

L'une des premières choses qui se produisent, dans un conseil municipal, lorsqu'une motion est présentée, c'est que la personne qui la présente le fait seulement pour voir si les règles exigent qu'elle soit abordée à huis clos. Il convient de souligner que les médias jouent un rôle fort important dans le système des freins et contrepoids; en effet, lorsqu'un nombre majoritaire de membres du conseil votent en ce sens, cela va vite, et la séance se poursuit immédiatement à huis clos. Les médias vont sauter sur l'occasion. Ils en aviseront le conseil de presse et en parleront ailleurs et, des mois plus tard, vous allez entendre parler d'un rapport selon lequel le conseil s'est fait taper sur les doigts. Et je ne parle pas de ce qui peut arriver aux fonctionnaires qui sont responsables de ces choses dans une municipalité.

Il est tout à fait logique de déterminer exactement pour quelles raisons nous devons aller à huis clos ou nous en abstenir. De la première proposition, que l'on puisse en débattre et la modifier, à la seconde, que la motion soit traitée à huis clos si elle répond à certains critères, ce simple fait nous éviterait une bonne partie des risques d'abus en ralentissant le processus et en y associant une certaine forme d'indication. Dans le passé, le sujet de discussion importait peu. Si les choses tournaient au vinaigre, si le gouvernement faisait mauvaise figure dans un dossier quelconque, il courait se mettre à l'abri pour faire adopter la motion. Cela se faisait aussi vite que cela. Il y aurait seulement ces deux aspects, la possibilité de discuter d'une motion et de la modifier, et la nécessité que les motions respectent certains critères, et nous saurions ainsi ce que nous pouvons ou ne pouvons pas faire de cette façon.

Je ne dirai pas tout ce que j'aurais voulu dire aujourd'hui. Je vais m'en tenir à l'essentiel dans l'espoir que vous serez tous d'accord et que je pourrai me taire. Mais en acceptant ces deux choses, nous aurions fait beaucoup pour éliminer les problèmes et les abus potentiels.

Le dernier aspect est celui qui me rend vraiment fou. Bien des gens l'ignorent, mais, dans la pratique actuelle, lorsque la séance se déroule à huis clos et que quelqu'un présente au Comité une motion, nous allons passer une heure à en discuter, mais si la motion est rejetée, il y a abus de confiance, il y a réellement violation de la confidentialité — et c'est grave — si vous discutez de cette motion, parce qu'elle a été rejetée. Selon le règlement, quand la séance se déroule à huis clos, vous ne pouvez parler en public que des motions qui ont été adoptées. En fait, cela ne figure nulle part sur papier. C'est comme si rien ne s'était passé. Cela rend fous les membres de l'opposition, car ils essaient d'explorer certaines voies.

Je vous l'accorde, c'est en bonne partie un processus partisan. Et alors? Nous sommes en plein coeur de la partisanerie. Le fait est que des initiatives sont proposées, qu'on discute d'affaires. Elles sont habituellement mises de l'avant par les membres de l'opposition, étant donné que le gouvernement a tous les appuis nécessaires pour que le vote se déroule comme il le veut. D'accord, nous reconnaissons tous qu'il y a eu des élections et qu'au bout du compte, c'est vous qui avez rênes en main. Le gouvernement remporte le vote 10 fois sur 10. C'est de bonne guerre. Mais il est question ici de pouvoir au moins entendre les motions qui sont présentées.

Derrière quel règlement antidémocratique nous cachons-nous lorsque nous disons que, si M. Richards présente une motion importante pendant une séance à huis clos, touchant les affaires du Comité ou de nouvelles affaires, ou s'il veut inviter d'autres témoins, ou encore qu'il veut commencer une étude, tout sujet d'intérêt public qui n'entre dans aucune des catégories a) à e) dont j'ai dressé la liste plus tôt...? S'il pouvait le faire, selon les règles actuelles, lorsque nous pourrions enfin sortir du huis clos, nous nous retrouverions comme dans l'ancienne Union soviétique, comme les gens qui sont tombés en défaveur: ils regardent des photos de l'ancien temps et, surprise, ils n'y figurent plus. Voilà ce qui se passerait avec la motion. Comme en Union soviétique. Elle disparaîtrait, comme si rien ne s'était jamais passé.

(1235)



Vous vous retrouvez donc à huis clos et vous vous demandez ce qu'il convient de faire. Allez-vous prendre la peine de soulever la question? Disons que vous voulez soulever la question. Vous allez présenter vos arguments. Cela prend beaucoup de temps, tout simplement, mais cela empêche quiconque ne participe pas à la séance à huis clos d'avoir la possibilité... Et, croyez-moi — car vous allez le voir de vos propres yeux au moins une fois —, quand je dis que la violation de confidentialité des séances à huis clos est grave, c'est qu'elle est grave. On en fait état devant la Chambre. C'est une violation, et elle est traitée comme telle. C'est donc grave, et ça m'a toujours rendu fou de ne pas même pouvoir en parler.

Je pourrais en dire beaucoup plus à ce sujet, mais il s'agit là des trois aspects. Il est 12 h 40 et il me reste beaucoup de temps, mais il me serait utile d'avoir un peu de commentaires des représentants du gouvernement, une simple indication sur les perspectives que ma proposition soit adoptée. Cela ne m'empêchera pas de vouloir qu'elle le soit, mais, s'ils se montraient coopératifs, nous sauverions certainement beaucoup de temps.

(1240)

M. Arnold Chan:

Il faudrait que vous me cédiez la parole pour que je puisse répondre.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est de bonne guerre. J'aimerais toutefois m'assurer que la greffière sache que j'aimerais reprendre la parole, après mon tour, et que je veux rester sur la liste; je veux pouvoir m'exprimer encore sur ce sujet.

Je vais donc m'arrêter pour entendre M. Chan, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous passons donc la parole à M. Chan, puis ce sera le tour de M. Graham.

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier M. Christopherson de sa contribution à ce sujet.

Le gouvernement appuie le postulat de base de votre proposition. C'est la position que nous avons défendue quand nous étions dans l'opposition. Vous vous en souviendrez, le député de Westmount—Ville Marie avait, au cours de la 41e législature, parlé avec tout le respect voulu des principes de base liés à cette question, et notre chef avait soumis un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire lié au postulat de base de la motion que vous présentez aujourd'hui devant le Comité.

J'aurais une seule suggestion à présenter sur quelques-uns des points qui concernent l'importante motion qui a été soumise au Comité. Pour commencer, nous pensons que certains éléments supplémentaires devraient être ajoutés à la liste de tout ce qui, à notre avis, constituerait des questions qu'il serait approprié de traiter à huis clos, et je vais vous en parler dans quelques instants.

L'autre point que nous voulons soulever a trait à ce que vous dites, le fait que toutes les motions visant à poursuivre une séance à huis clos devraient pouvoir faire l'objet d'une discussion et être modifiées. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que je suis d'accord sur le fait qu'il devrait être possible pour nous d'en discuter, disons pendant trois minutes. Je ne vois pas pourquoi il faudrait que l'on puisse les modifier. À mon avis, le vote est clair; nous sommes d'accord ou nous ne le sommes pas. C'est que, à ce moment-là, nous disposons d'une liste prescrite des éléments qui sont les seuls à justifier une séance à huis clos. On vote pour ou on vote contre. C'est clair. De plus, je ne voudrais pas que le Comité consacre trop de temps à prendre des décisions à ce sujet, une fois que nous aurons en main la liste prescrite des éléments dont nous ne pouvons traiter qu'à huis clos.

Enfin, en ce qui concerne le dernier point, c'est-à-dire, dans le fond, le procès-verbal des réunions, à mon avis — et je le répète, étant donné que nous aurons une liste prescrite de questions  —, le résultat de ces votes, comme il s'agit de la liste prescrite, ne devrait être inscrit qu'avec le consentement unanime des membres du Comité, étant donné que la seule raison pour laquelle nous tenons une séance à huis clos, c'est qu'il est question justement des questions figurant sur la liste prescrite.

J'aimerais vous proposer quelques modifications. Par exemple, voici comment la motion devrait être libellée. L'expression « et modifiées » devrait être supprimée, alors elle se lirait ainsi: « Que toutes les motions qui supposent une séance à huis clos puissent être débattues » — c'est une simple proposition   « pendant au plus trois minutes ». Nous pourrons alors en discuter, et tout le monde pourra faire valoir son point de vue. Il ne s'agit que des éléments de la liste, n'est-ce pas? Nous pourrons ensuite voter, pour ou contre.

Ensuite, j'ajouterais tout simplement trois autres dispositions à la liste des éléments que vous venez de prescrire. Votre liste me convient très bien jusqu'ici, mais j'aimerais ajouter d'autres éléments qui, à mon avis, sont également pertinents.

J'ajouterais le point f) « pour des questions touchant le privilège des députés ». Encore une fois, je crois qu'il serait approprié que nous puissions discuter de cela à huis clos. J'ajouterais ensuite un point g): « pour discuter des listes de témoins. » Encore une fois, je crois qu'il serait approprié que nous discutions à huis clos de cela, peu importe le motif. J'ajouterais le point h): « pour tout autre motif », car il se peut que nous oubliions quel était exactement le motif en question, « sur consentement unanime du comité » — nous devons tous être d'accord, n'est-ce pas? — « ou compte tenu du conseil du greffier ». Il se peut qu'il existe une raison que nous n'avons pas pensé à ajouter à cette liste, et cela nous offre une porte de sortie.

Une voix: Le libellé...?

M. Arnold Chan: En effet, compte tenu des conseils du...

Je vais le relire: « pour tout autre motif, sur consentement unanime du Comité ou compte tenu du conseil du greffier. »

Il y a peut-être des motifs pour lesquels nous devrions nous réunir à huis clos et que nous n'avons pas pensé à ajouter à cette liste, mais, encore une fois, nous devons tous être d'accord, ou encore le greffier le signale, s'il pense qu'il serait approprié que nous agissions ainsi. Nous aurions quand même à prendre une décision en tant que membres d'un comité.

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Arnold Chan: J'aurais tendance à le croire...

Le président:

D'accord, vous êtes inscrit sur la liste.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais laisser ma place à M. Graham. J'ai terminé.

Le président:

Nous avons M. Graham, M. Christopherson et ensuite M. Reid.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a une autre chose que j'aimerais changer; voici: « le procès-verbal des séances à huis clos devrait, avec le consentement unanime du Comité, faire état des résultats » de tous les votes. Je ne crois pas qu'il soit approprié que tous les votes que nous tenons dans des séances à huis clos figurent dans le hansard, mais cela arrivera parfois, et je crois que nous devrions être d'accord pour que cela se fasse pendant les séances à huis clos. Voilà la suggestion que j'aimerais faire.

Comme vous le constatez, nous sommes plutôt d'accord sur le principe. J'étais là. J'étais assis derrière vous, dans le troisième parti. Je me rappelle avoir vu quels abus ont été faits. En principe, nous sommes d'accord avec cela, mais nous essayons de faire en sorte d'éviter tous les obstacles que nous voulons vraiment éviter.

(1245)

Le président:

M. Christopherson, et ensuite M. Reid.

Vous voulez peut-être entendre d'abord M. Reid, vous aurez davantage matière à faire des commentaires.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président: Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Mes commentaires seront brefs et techniques.

Premièrement, dans sa motion, M. Chan parle de « trois minutes ». Voulez-vous dire par là, tout simplement, que la personne qui présente la motion aura trois minutes pour fournir une justification avant qu'un vote se tienne ou voulez-vous dire que tout le monde aura trois minutes pour en parler? Vous voyez la distinction. Dans un cas, c'est trois minutes, dans l'autre cas, c'est trois minutes par personne, peu importe le nombre de députés présents. Je ne suis pas certain de savoir ce que vous voulez dire.

M. Arnold Chan:

Mon intention, en réalité, c'est que la personne qui présente la motion dispose de trois minutes pour exposer l'enjeu. Je voulais tout simplement déterminer une limite, de façon qu'on ne débatte pas d'un sujet ad nauseam en épuisant inutilement le temps précieux dont nous disposons.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne posais pas une question, je demandais des éclaircissements.

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est une bonne question, et je serais d'accord pour que tous les députés disposent de trois minutes. Même là, cela prendra beaucoup de temps, mais au moins, il arrivera un moment où le temps sera épuisé et où nous devrons tenir un vote, étant donné que nous disposons d'une liste prescrite, d'un nombre limité de questions qui justifient un huis clos. Nous ne pouvons pas discuter de n'importe quoi à huis clos.

M. Scott Reid:

C'était ma première question. C'était très utile. De la façon dont elle est présentée à l'heure actuelle, il me semblait que la motion prévoyait trois minutes pour la personne qui présente la motion puis un vote.

La seconde chose que j'aimerais dire concerne le fait que, traditionnellement, la motion visant à tenir un huis clos ou à mettre fin au huis clos est en quelque sorte la même motion, qui a tout simplement été inversée. Je suppose que cela n'entrait pas dans vos intentions, et que, pour mettre fin à un huis clos, pour reprendre la séance en public, il ne serait pas nécessaire d'en discuter pendant trois minutes. Il serait peut-être utile de le dire. Il suffit que quelqu'un dise: « Je crois que nous devrions poursuivre en public », et nous pouvons tenir le vote. Ai-je raison?

M. Arnold Chan:

Vous avez raison.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je dois dire que je suis agréablement surpris. Nous pouvons travailler avec cela. J'ai moi aussi deux ou trois points à soulever, mais j'aimerais commencer en me montrant très positif et en répondant de manière positive. Je crois que nous pouvons y arriver. Si nous continuons à agir comme nous le faisons ici, je crois que nous pourrons y arriver. Je suis très content. Il s'agit vraiment là de bonnes améliorations. Je pourrais noter que nous nous sommes rendus jusqu'ici sans M. Lamoureux. Ce n'est pas que ses commentaires n'auraient pas été plaisants et magnifiques, mais nous avons réussi à nous rendre ici sans lui.

Poursuivons; je suis d'accord avec M. Reid sur le fait que les trois minutes posent un problème. Si vous ne les accordez qu'à la personne qui présente la motion... C'est souvent le gouvernement. C'est pourquoi cela ne fonctionnera pas, parce que cela prendra tout le temps dont nous disposons. Toutefois, vous vous êtes montré objectif, et j'allais donc répondre de manière objective. En tant qu'ancien leader parlementaire, je sais aussi que cela donne à l'opposition l'occasion encore une fois de s'accaparer la parole, de faire de l'obstruction systématique, en faisant durer les choses le plus longtemps possible. Cela ne nous empêcherait pas d'y arriver assez facilement, si nous le voulions, mais j'ai l'impression que cela ne ferait qu'ouvrir une voie de plus qui soit pavée de bonnes intentions, si c'est ainsi que le gouvernement le voit, et c'est pourquoi il pourrait vouloir imposer une limite de temps. Je crois, selon ce que j'ai entendu de la part de M. Chan et aussi de M. Reid, que nous pourrions trouver un terrain d'entente...

Je suis ouvert. Je comprends que vous ne voulez pas que cela donne à l'opposition un autre moyen de chambouler le programme, je le comprends. Le point que M. Reid a soulevé est exactement le point que j'aurais voulu soulever, c'est-à-dire que, si l'on veut savoir si une question doit faire l'objet d'un débat, il faut qu'il y ait plus que la seule personne qui le propose. Réfléchissons donc à la façon dont nous pourrions faire cela. Je sais que cela prend quand même un peu de temps, mais il y a toujours un prix à payer.

Sur la question de la possibilité de modifier une motion, je suis flexible. Il y a parfois des raisons qui vous poussent à être très précis et à dire que vous voulez ne discuter que d'une chose en particulier puis passer à autre chose, et en modifiant une motion, vous pouvez le faire sans avoir à vous isoler à huis clos et vous pouvez aborder tous les autres sujets pendant que vous y êtes. En permettant que la motion soit modifiée, vous pouvez lui donner une certaine orientation, mais, si cela pose un problème particulier pour le gouvernement, je ne vais pas m'y attarder jusqu'à ce que mort s'ensuive. Je vous laisse y réfléchir.

Ce que vous avez ajouté me convient très bien, personnellement. Je crois que ce sont de bonnes améliorations, j'aime ça. Je crois qu'elles sont bien. La seule chose qui me pose problème — et je crois que je n'ai même pas vraiment bien entendu le libellé —, c'est lorsqu'il est question que le greffier applique certaines règles...

(1250)

Le président:

Nous allons tout simplement la relire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On dit: « pour toute autre raison avec le consentement unanime du Comité, ou compte tenu du conseil du greffier »

M. David Christopherson:

Vous voyez, c'est ça. On dit: « ou compte tenu ». Est-ce que cela veut dire que la décision du Comité doit quand même être unanime ou dites-vous que le greffier peut faire une déclaration unilatérale?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Nous avons ajouté « compte tenu du conseil », ce qui veut dire que le Comité peut prendre le conseil en considération et dire oui ou non, et c'est donc le Comité, non pas nécessairement le greffier, qui prend la décision.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela nous ramène donc à l'unanimité, n'est-ce pas?

Le libellé n'est pas encore tout à fait au point, mais, tant que cela est clair et tant que nous le comprenons et qu'il figure dans le hansard, cela me convient.

J'avais modifié ma propre motion en ce qui concerne « à l'exception de la rédaction des rapports ». Étiez-vous d'accord avec cela? Cela m'a donné un peu de fil à retordre, mais j'ai pensé qu'il se passe souvent ici bien des choses et qu'elles se passent vite, lorsque vous êtes en train de rédiger un rapport. Il m'a semblé, tout simplement, que cela ne se passait pas de la même façon quand nous sommes dans l'opposition, que nous essayons de présenter une motion visant à mener une étude sur un sujet quelconque ou à inviter une personne en particulier et que le gouvernement rejette la motion. Ce n'est pas la même chose, pour ce qui est de la perception du public.

À mon avis, monsieur le président, il me semble que nous sommes vraiment très près du but. Il semble que l'une des dernières choses que nous devons parachever, peut-être, c'est la durée du débat.

Vous savez ce que je pense sur la question de la modification. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez. Si vous jugez quand même qu'il faut s'en abstenir, cela me convient.

Le président:

Nous avons une liste d'intervenants: M. Chan, M. Graham, et Mme Vandenbeld.

M. Arnold Chan:

Revenons sur le point soulevé par M. Christopherson, la modification des motions; en fin de compte, ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que nous avons affaire à une liste prescrite de sujets. À mon avis, nous devons tenir un vote, tout simplement, pour ou contre. Si une motion est rejetée, vous avez toujours la possibilité d'en présenter une autre; je veux tout simplement qu'il ne soit plus possible de modifier constamment la même motion. Nous sommes d'accord ou nous ne le sommes pas. Point final.

En ce qui concerne la rédaction des rapports, ce changement me convient parfaitement. Je ne sais pas ce qu'en pensent les autres membres du Comité, mais cela est sensé. Encore une fois, nous voulons que les choses se passent de manière efficace, quand le cas se présente. La clé de l'affaire, c'est que nous disposons d'une liste limitée de sujets, contrairement à la pratique du précédent gouvernement, qui recourait aux séances à huis clos quel que soit le sujet.

Nous sommes d'accord avec ce point-là. Nous sommes d'accord avec le principe selon lequel il faudrait établir une liste précise des questions qui doivent normalement être traitées à huis clos, pour des raisons évidentes. Il y a peut-être des sujets auxquels nous n'avons pas pensé, et c'est pourquoi nous avons créé cette disposition fourre-tout, mais nous devons tous être d'accord.

Le président:

M. Graham, puis Mme Valdenbeld.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous étions en train de parler de la question de savoir s'il s'agissait de trois minutes par personne ou pour tout le monde, et tout ça. Est-il possible de trouver une façon d'imposer une limite qui fera en sorte que ce ne sera pas trois minutes par personne et ensuite pour les 120 membres de l'opposition, qui voudront parler eux aussi trois minutes chacun? J'aimerais qu'il y ait une limite générale de temps, pour le débat, de façon que nous puissions un jour passer à autre chose. Je voulais le souligner.

Si nous pouvions, disons, accorder trois minutes à un maximum de trois intervenants, par exemple, pour au moins deux partis...

Une voix: Pour un maximum de [Note de la rédaction: inaudible].

M. David de Burgh Graham: Ça me conviendrait très bien. Si tout le monde est d'accord, cela me convient parfaitement.

Une voix: Ce n'est quand même pas [Note de la rédaction: inaudible].

M. David de Burgh Graham: Ce serait mieux que c'était.

M. David Christopherson:

Seulement, si vous enfreignez cette règle et que je veux soulever un point, nous sommes en train de limiter le temps dont je disposerais pour le faire en toute justice.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne fait aucun doute que vous y parviendrez, David.

Le président:

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'est ce que je voulais dire: peut-être trois par parti reconnu.

Le président:

Avant que nous ne fassions lecture de l'amendement, quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose d'autre à dire à ce sujet?

Il s'agit d'amendements détaillés. Passons donc en revue les amendements apportés à la motion, de la façon dont nous les comprenons. C'est vous qui aurez la tâche de les rédiger.

La greffière du comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

Je vais lire la motion comme si elle avait été amendée: Que le Comité adopte les procédures suivantes pour les séances à huis clos: Que toute motion visant à poursuivre la séance à huis clos puisse faire l'objet d'une discussion qui ne devra pas durer plus de trois (3) minutes pour la personne qui la présente et pour un (1) intervenant de chaque parti reconnu...

(1255)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pas plus de trois minutes chacun; donc il ne s'agit pas d'avoir trois minutes pour nous suivies d'interventions interminables.

La greffière:

« Que toute motion visant à poursuivre la séance à huis clos puisse faire l'objet d'une discussion d'une durée d'au plus trois minutes pour la personne qui la présente et pour un intervenant de chaque parti reconnu, et que le Comité ne puisse se réunir à huis clos que pour les objectifs suivants: pour examiner » — a), b), c), d), e), comme ces points figurent sur l'avis de motion... « f) questions touchant les privilèges des députés; g) liste des témoins; h) tout autre motif avec le consentement unanime du Comité ou compte tenu du conseil du greffier; que le compte rendu des séances à huis clos fasse état des résultats de tous les votes tenus par le Comité pendant les séances à huis clos, en indiquant le vote de chaque député, lorsqu'un vote par appel nominal est demandé, à l'exception de la rédaction des rapports. »

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faudrait plutôt dire: « que le procès-verbal des séances à huis clos fasse état, avec le consentement unanime du Comité, des résultats... »

La greffière:

Alors, le dernier paragraphe serait celui-ci: « que le procès-verbal des séances à huis clos fasse état, avec le consentement unanime du Comité, des résultats de tous les votes tenus », etc.

M. David Christopherson:

Un instant! Pourriez-vous lire cela de nouveau?

La greffière:

« que le procès-verbal des séances à huis clos fasse état, avec le consentement unanime du Comité, des résultats de tous les votes tenus », etc.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai peut-être mal compris. Il me semble que, une fois que le Comité a voté, ce sera seulement par consentement unanime que les séances à huis clos deviendront publiques. Un instant! Cela ne règle pas le problème, nous sommes exactement au même point qu'avant. Le gouvernement pourra à son gré décider de ce qui devient public et de ce qui ne le devient pas, sauf si j'ai mal compris, auquel cas, aidez-moi.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne crois pas qu'il soit nécessairement pertinent que le résultat de tous les votes tenus à huis clos soit indiqué. Non, la question est de savoir si votre objectif est que les motions qui sont rejetées figurent dans le hansard. Est-ce que c'est là votre objectif?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est cela, et c'est aussi la possibilité d'en discuter. Si je présente une motion pendant une séance à huis clos, j'aimerais qu'il soit possible d'en parler à l'extérieur de cette salle et de dire que j'ai présenté une motion et qu'elle a été rejetée. À l'heure actuelle, si j'ai bien compris, il faut que le Comité tienne un vote et que les résultats soient unanimes pour que j'aie ce droit. Ce n'est pas tellement différent de la situation où nous étions avec les conservateurs. Si le gouvernement décide que rien ne doit filtrer et que je ne peux rien y changer, je ne suis pas plus avancé que lorsque nous devions suivre les anciennes règles. Soit j'ai le droit de présenter une motion et qu'elle soit inscrite dans le hansard, et je peux en parler publiquement, soit je ne le peux pas. Le fait que le gouvernement puisse décider si j'ai ou non ce droit n'est pas tellement différent d'être privé de ce droit, pendant la législature précédente, et tout tient au caprice du gouvernement.

Cela rate la cible et laisse au gouvernement le contrôle complet de ce qui peut être rendu public. Mon objectif principal, c'est d'empêcher que le gouvernement ait le contrôle, en faisant valoir que les motions qui sont recevables peuvent figurer dans le hansard et qu'il est possible d'en parler publiquement. C'est tout.

La véritable politique est la suivante. Jouons cartes sur table. À l'heure actuelle, le gouvernement a le droit, peu importe la motion, de se retirer et, pour ainsi dire, de faire comme si elle n'existait pas. Une fois que tous les intervenants se sont exprimés, le gouvernement peut voter contre la motion, et, peu importe sa portée politique, il n'a jamais à s'expliquer sur le fait qu'il s'est appuyé sur sa majorité pour rejeter une motion. Il n'a jamais à se défendre, car il n'en est jamais question nulle part et qu'il est contraire aux règles d'en parler.

Le président:

D'accord, David, nous arrivons au terme de la séance, et, de deux choses l'une, nous pourrions en reparler plus tard, ou, étant donné que nous semblons nous entendre sur à peu près tous les aspects de la motion, nous pourrions tenir un vote sur ce qui, jusqu'ici...

M. David Christopherson:

Non, je ne veux pas... Non, nous sommes près de nous entendre ici. Tout va bien. Je constate que le gouvernement écoute toujours et qu'il semble comprendre ce dont il est question. Il serait utile de laisser au gouvernement un peu de temps pour qu'il y réfléchisse. Je suis prêt à suspendre les travaux pour y revenir dès que nous en aurons l'occasion.

J'aimerais demander au gouvernement de réfléchir à cette dernière question, si je puis me le permettre.

(1300)

Le président:

D'accord, la séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 16, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.