header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-10-04 PROC 32

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good morning. Welcome to the 32nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs of the first session of the 42nd Parliament.

Today we begin our study of the Chief Electoral Officer’s report, entitled “An Electoral Framework for the 21st Century: Recommendations from the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada Following the 42nd General Election”.

I would like to remind members that today's meeting is being televised. Allow me to introduce our witnesses.

From Elections Canada we have Marc Mayrand, Chief Electoral Officer; Stéphane Perrault, associate chief electoral officer; and Michel Roussel, deputy chief electoral officer, electoral events.

In case there are any journalists listening and for the public, I will set the context. It is that after an election, the Chief Electoral Officer for Canada does a report, and in the report there are recommendations. Those recommendations come to this committee. Traditionally, this committee goes through the report. There are well over 70 recommendations. Apparently, it took 25 meetings the last time, so it's a lot of work. Then that goes as a recommendation to the government to implement, and often much of it gets implemented into legislation.

Just so people are not confused, this is totally separate from the electoral reform committee. There's another committee making proposals and going across the country at the moment. A number of members of this committee are on that committee. It is looking at revising the electoral system to have another voting method.

This particular report is on the technicalities of the voting, such as how you appoint poll clerks, how you do ridings, whether you have electronic voting, and all the technicalities that would fit into any system of Parliament.

After we have the opening remarks, we'll go into the regular round of questioning. The Conservatives would prefer that. Each party should pick who's going to speak first for their round of questioning.

Welcome back, Mr. Mayrand. I know this is your last report. We've enjoyed having you here many times. You've stimulated us with a lot of good new ideas. I know there's a lot in this report. It will take us a lot of meetings, but it'll improve the electoral process in a modernized and vastly changing world. Whatever system we're going to have in place, the technicalities that I know you're proposing would fit in all those systems. We want to make sure that voting is fair and that everyone can vote as easily as possible. I know you have lots of recommendations to that effect, and we look forward to hearing from you.

Mr. Marc Mayrand (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and good morning.

I am very pleased to be here today to present my recommendations for improving the administration of the Canada Elections Act. The changes proposed in the report aim at building a more modern and inclusive electoral framework. I believe these amendments are essential to bring the Canada Elections Act into the 21st century, irrespective of any change to the voting system.

The report comprises two parts. The first part, consisting of two chapters, is a narrative that describes what I see as the most important recommendations and their objectives. The second part contains three tables of amendments. Table A covers the recommendations discussed in the narrative; table B offers additional substantive recommendations that would improve the administration of the act; and table C lists a series of minor or technical amendments.

I have structured it in this way to facilitate your work, given the number of recommendations contained in the report. I would urge you to concentrate your immediate attention on the narrative, as it covers the most pressing issues. You may even wish to consider reporting on this series of amendments before any other.

I believe we are at a critical point in the administration of Canadian elections. If we do not act to modernize several core aspects of our electoral process, I fear we will fail to meet Canadians' expectations in 2019.

Elections Canada is committed to an ambitious modernization agenda that aims to leverage technology to improve election delivery and services. Legislative changes must be in place well in advance of the 2019 election for us to fully realize these improvements for the benefit of Canadians.

The recommendations I have made to modernize the act are inspired by three main themes. The first is accessibility and inclusiveness, the second is flexibility and effectiveness, and the third is fairness and integrity. Before I address these three themes, however, I would like to make a general observation about the Canada Elections Act.

It is well known that many components of the act are anchored in the 19th century, when the first elections in Canada took place. While it has served us well over these many long years, it is clear from recent experiences that the electoral process set out in the act is showing signs of strain. It many respects it has failed to keep up with the times.

The Canada Elections Act is not a law that lends itself well to technology, for instance. It provides little opportunity to scale voting services to meet local and changing needs. It also fails to provide the flexibility required to improve the working conditions of election officers or the flow of voters at polling stations. This was obvious in the last election, with significant lineups at advance polls.

On the regulatory side, the political finance regime has expanded dramatically in scope and complexity over the last decade, and yet its requirements are still mostly met by volunteers. If these volunteers contravene the act, they may face criminal prosecution, as this remains the only form of sanction. This is out of step with modern regulatory regimes.

It is time to bring the act into the 21st century. It is possible to do so without losing any of the essential safeguards that protect electoral integrity and fairness.

A key theme that you will see reflected in many of the recommendations in my report is accessibility and inclusiveness. These concepts underlie Canadians' ability to exercise their constitutionally guaranteed rights to vote and be a candidate.

Of particular concern to me is access for voters with disabilities. Canada has ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which guarantees people with disabilities the right to fully and actively participate in political life. While we have made significant strides in Canada in recent years, more still needs to be done.

My report contains several recommendations aimed at removing barriers to the full electoral participation of voters with disabilities. Among them is my suggestion that Parliament provide a clear directive and a simplified approval process for Elections Canada to conduct pilot projects on voting technologies that would benefit voters with disabilities.

(1110)



Many of these voters rely on technology as a necessity, not just as a convenience, in their daily lives. We need to explore ways to give these voters better opportunities to vote independently and in secret.

I have also recommended that parties and candidates receive a higher level of reimbursement for campaign expenses they incur to accommodate voters with disabilities, such as providing closed-caption videos or hosting events at accessible locations with sign language interpretation. This measure would give Canadians with disabilities more opportunities to participate in political life.

Another important group in terms of accessibility and inclusiveness is young electors, who are often hard to reach. Although the National Register of Electors includes 93% of Canadian electors overall, the average coverage of electors aged 18 to 24 is only 72%. Allowing young electors to pre-register with Elections Canada so that their registration activates on their 18th birthday would greatly improve the quality of the voter list for this demographic. Once they turn 18, these young electors would receive a voter information card during an election, telling when and where to vote and bringing them into the electoral process.

I also recommend that the voter information card be accepted as proof of address at the poll, not as a stand-alone document, but together with another piece of identification. Youth, as well as other groups such as seniors and aboriginal voters, continue to experience difficulties in proving where they live when they go to vote. Allowing the voter information card to be used as proof of address, along with a second document establishing their identity, would increase access to voting for a number of electors.

A final recommendation that I want to highlight under the theme of accessibility is moving the vote from Monday to a weekend day, either Saturday or Sunday. This would benefit a large number of voters who would not have to fit voting into their busy workday. Weekend voting would also make it easier to recruit election officers and allow us to use more schools and public buildings as polling places.

(1115)

[Translation]

The second theme I would like to address is flexibility and effectiveness in election administration. Long line-ups in the last election, particularly at advance polls, frustrated a lot of voters. This was especially true when voters arrived at their polling place and were told they had to wait in line for service at a specific table, when election officers at other tables seemed to be free.

Many voters, especially youth, were surprised to see election officers striking their names off a paper list with a pencil, with no computer or technology in sight. The act is very prescriptive as to who does what, when, on which form and in what manner at any given polling station. And the polling station is, by definition, the precise table at which each individual elector is assigned to vote. This is why voters are required to line up at one table, even when others are free.

I have recommended changes to allow for efficient voting operations that are scalable to local demand; take advantage of technology; and, as a result, are less labour-intensive. Specifically, I recommend that while the act should continue to prescribe functions at polling places, the activities and the distribution of labour among staff at a site should take place according to instructions from the Chief Electoral Officer, instructions that are moreover public and known long in advance.

Other amendments are needed so that voters may vote at any table in the school gym, for example, rather than only at one place where their name is on the list. Providing election officers with a searchable voter database, as opposed to paper lists, would ensure that the controls prescribed by the act remain intact.

From a voter's standpoint, these changes would result in faster service in a more modern and efficient environment. And there would be two other positive outcomes. With the ability to assign tasks in a more flexible manner, working conditions for election officers would improve. Also, with a more efficient process in place, Elections Canada would be able to fully leverage the benefits of technology to electronically manage not only the voters list but other forms and documents at the polls. Computerization, when well implemented, is a proven method of reducing record-keeping errors. It would contribute to increasing the confidence Canadians have in the integrity of voting operations. In addition, I recommend that returning officers be given more flexibility in hiring election workers. As you know, running an election is a massive undertaking; it requires some 285,000 people to be hired in a very short time frame.

Over the last decade, returning officers have had difficulty finding enough qualified and eligible people to work. It would help if the act's barriers to the timely hiring of the best people for the job could be removed.

Currently, returning officers are precluded from filling many key positions until they have considered names submitted by the candidates and political parties who came first and second in the last election. While parties and candidates should continue to be encouraged to submit names of capable workers, returning officers should be able to fill these positions from any source as soon as the writs are issued.

A final theme touched on by many recommendations in my report is fairness and integrity. This theme is particularly relevant with respect to the political finance regime. The 42nd general election was one of the longest in Canadian history. Although the election date is now fixed under Canadian law, the start of the election period is not. This creates uncertainty for political participants and allows the governing party to determine the spending cap, which is now adjusted to the length of the election. Providing a maximum length for general elections would help to reduce this uncertainty and increase fairness for all involved.

Another consideration is the complexity of the political finance regime, which has increased dramatically over the last 10 years. The official agents of candidates are volunteers who work hard to meet the myriad of reporting and other requirements that are imposed under the act. While a subsidy is provided to auditors for their work, nothing is provided to official·agents. Granting official agents a modest subsidy for their work would recognize the importance of what they do. Tying the subsidy to certain requirements, such as filing returns within deadlines and participating in Elections Canada training sessions, would also improve the quality and timeliness of returns. This measure would promote transparency and encourage compliance with the regulatory regime.

It is also important to uphold compliance by means that are effective and proportionate. Currently, non-compliance is addressed using a criminal process model, where those who contravene the act's provisions are investigated by the commissioner of Canada Elections and, if appropriate, charged with an offence. They are then tried in the criminal courts.

This is a sensible process for the most serious offenders. It is slow, however, and carries a significant stigma. Many contraventions of the act do not merit such a heavy-handed approach. Several federal and provincial regulatory regimes now use a more streamlined approach for regulatory offences, which is to impose an administrative monetary penalty or AMP. Implementing an AMP regime would help to encourage compliance, furthering the important goals of transparency and fairness.

As well, allowing the Chief Electoral Officer to administer an AMP regime would permit the commissioner to concentrate on investigating the most significant offences under the act. To successfully pursue offenders, the commissioner has made it clear that he needs a number of additional tools, and I am therefore recommending them in my report. These tools include the power to compel testimony in the investigation of election offences, with attendant safeguards, as required by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

(1120)



You may wish to ask the commissioner to appear before you to present his views on recommendations that touch on his enforcement responsibility. I also suggest that you invite the broadcasting arbitrator, who has statutory responsibilities linked to the broadcasting regime.

Mr. Chair, this completes my overview of the key themes and recommendations in my report. I strongly believe that federal election administration has reached a tipping point, and that action is required now to ensure we can continue to meet electors' expectations.

Lastly, changes will have to be in place well in advance of the next election for my successor to deliver an event that is inclusive, fair, and responsive to the needs of Canadians.

I am well aware of the number of recommendations that are being submitted to the committee and of the scope of those recommendations.[English]

I want to stress that my staff remains available at any time to assist the committee in its work. It's also available to individual members who wish to receive a more detailed briefing on any aspects of the recommendations.

If I may, considering the scope of the report and the risk of disruption by extraneous events that could happen at any time and would take precedence over your study, I would suggest that the committee organize its review around the two chapters in the narrative, paying particular attention to table A. We would be happy to offer a technical briefing to the committee before it starts work on chapter 1 regarding the electoral process.

Upon conclusion of your review of chapter 1, I would suggest that you consider inviting the commissioner, the broadcasting arbitrator, and probably also representatives of the CRTC, as these three organizations play a role in the administration of our regime. Consideration could be given to staging reports, given the very tight agenda that exists. As various phases of the work are completed, it might be helpful to advise the government of your views on the recommendations so it can proceed as quickly as possible in designing a proper response.

I will leave that with you, Mr. Chair, but, again, rest assured that we are available to assist in any way possible in your work.

Thank you.

(1125)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Those were some very important recommendations.

The last time we did this, you provided staff for a lot of the meetings to help us through the technicalities. Are you prepared to do that?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Absolutely, yes.

The Chair:

Okay, great.

David, I explained at the beginning that this happens after every election. He presented us with three reports. We're basically dealing with the third one, which has the recommendations. It's totally separate from the electoral reform committee that a lot of you are on, which is another process. We're dealing with the technicalities of the election that will fit under any system we adopt.

We'll go to the discussions, and the first person is Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you for your presentation, for this very comprehensive report, and for returning to the committee once again.

I am pleased to see that you're talking about inclusiveness and accessibility and breaking down the barriers to people voting. I'm pleased to see the pre-registration for persons with disabilities and young people.

With respect to the voter ID cards, I know many of us saw that there were people—indigenous people, seniors, people who don't have a driver's licence, people experiencing homelessness, and some of the most vulnerable in our population—who weren't able to vote because they weren't able to use the voter information cards.

Do you have statistics or evidence or anything that would show the extent to which this impacted voter turnout in the last election and how this kind of a change would actually help?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We have evidence from the labour force survey conducted by Statistics Canada in October, right after the election. It showed that roughly 170,000 electors did not vote because of issues regarding their ability to establish their identity, mostly for lack of an address. It's interesting, because in that survey it also shows that 50,000 of that 170,000 showed up at the polls and were turned away for that reason.

That's the evidence we have at this point. We know from past experience that it has been useful for specific groups to rely on the voter information card to establish their address.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Of course, 170,000 is quite a significant number of people, especially those who were actually turned away.

Would allowing Elections Canada to go back to public information or public education programs be included? What kinds of programs do you propose, and would you be targeting that at some of these groups who face barriers in order to vote?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There is a recommendation in the report that seeks to expand our education mandate, which is currently limited to those under the voting age. I think there are groups of eligible electors who face particular barriers whom we need to reach, particularly during the election but also between elections, to understand better what their needs are and how we can help overcome the barriers they face when voting, so there is a recommendation to that effect in the recommendation report.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

In addition to barriers to voting, there are also barriers that prevent people from becoming candidates, and of course access to financing, access to money, is typically one of these barriers, particularly for women and for other groups. Would your proposals to shorten the length of an election campaign, or at least not go to the length that we have had and also to add additional monetary sanctions, lead to more enforcement? Do you think that would lead to candidates being able to run, even if they don't have access to the money networks?

(1130)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I think there are two elements there.

The regime for the administrative penalty is designed to ensure better compliance, and better compliance not for the sake of compliance but for the sake of ensuring transparency and consistency in the administration of the law.

With regard to financial barriers that candidates may face, you will see in the second part of the report, in the second chapter, some recommendations regarding, for example, child care expense claims and expense claims related to disabilities, so we would recommend that the act create some incentives, again by reducing those barriers.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Right now enforcement takes a very long time. I can think of cases in which a member sat for another six years before being charged or convicted. Do you think this option of being able to impose financial penalties for those infractions that are not of a criminal nature would speed up the compliance process and allow these things to go more quickly?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I think it would. That's one of the reasons for such a regime. I think it would be much quicker than relying on the criminal system, because we're talking here about an essentially administrative process. It involves elements of due process, of course, but it would be much quicker than a traditional criminal court process.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

My last question has to do with voting on weekends. I know that in the past there's been a proposal that if we vote on Mondays, we would have that be a national holiday so that people could go to the polls and participate in the election. We all know there are a number of volunteers who come out after five o'clock, and people vote after five o'clock because of their work schedules, but there are also a lot of people with precarious work schedules and other commitments on weekends, such as family commitments. From other jurisdictions or in your experience, is there anything aside from the advance polls and the high turnout at the advance polls, that would show that the turnout would be higher if we moved it to a weekend day?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

First of all, there's the evidence over the last two general elections, in 2011 and 2015. For those elections we had advance polls, in one case on an Easter weekend and in the latest example on a Thanksgiving weekend. On both occasions we saw a record turnout for advance polls, and significant increases.

For the first time, we also had voting at advance polls on a Sunday in the last election, and roughly 25% of the turnout was due to that Sunday voting.

Again it's early evidence, but there is evidence that electors appreciate the convenience of being able to vote on a weekend or even on a statutory holiday. That's for sure.

Whether there is.... I'm sorry. I lost part of your question.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It was about making it a national holiday.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Well, that's an option that I leave to your consideration. I didn't put it formally in the report, but it's certainly an option. Some countries have a statutory holiday.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

None.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Could you mention which countries have voting on weekends? I think it's in your report.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There are 80 countries around the world. About a dozen of them have it on Saturday and the rest on Sunday. I could provide the list to the committee.

The Chair:

Yes, it would be good if you would provide that.

Mr. Reid is next.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Mayrand.

I'm the only member of this committee—I think I'm right in saying this—who has been on this committee throughout the entire term of your service, and that gives me a chance to thank you for what has seemed to me to be a uniformly dedicated, competent, and conscientious period of service. I am grateful. I know that the other members of the committee feel exactly the same way I do.

I have to say that I'm very sad to see you depart. I've always enjoyed the thoroughness with which you respond, and in particular how you respond in your follow-ups when we ask you to provide us with additional material and documentation. Having dealt with many officers of Parliament, I think you are the most conscientious person I've encountered in that respect.

I wanted to ask you this, given that this is the last time you'll be appearing before this committee. On the other committee I sit on, the electoral reform committee, we will not have a chance to invite you back, given that our dance card is completely full. We have two meetings a day some days and we don't have any more space for witnesses, so this it it. I wanted to ask you, first of all, if you would be willing to come back in the future—once you've moved on to other challenges in life, as Mr. Kingsley has done—to provide expert testimony, particularly with regard to this particular report you've developed, which is unlikely to be dealt with within a year, but also with other matters.

(1135)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Of course, I'd be happy to do so if the committee wishes to invite me again as a private citizen. Who knows? You may get different views.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

It also allows a bit more freedom. I recognize that there are some formal constraints on you that you've been very careful to honour, in addition to those that are provided just by your careful nature; those might be removed, and that would be valuable to us.

I want to ask some questions that relate to several things, first of all to testimony you gave before the electoral reform committee last July. Second, there are the items that you did mention briefly—or the general subject matter, at any rate—in your report on the 42nd election.

At that time in July, I and a number of other members of the committee asked about the feasibility of conducting a referendum on electoral reform, given the tight timeline and the potential for redistribution under some of the models that are proposed, and so on. You submitted a very thorough response.

Those who say that a referendum cannot take place on electoral reform, as opposed to those who say it should not take place, have tended to provide a couple of arguments, one of which is that Elections Canada is not in a position to administer a referendum administratively. You responded a bit to that back in July. I am hoping that I'll be able to find out whether that is in fact the case or not the case.

Back in July, you stated in response to a question from me: I can confirm with the committee that we've started to develop contingency plans, trying to identify what would need to be done. You pointed out, of course, that a referendum has not been held since 1992, and said: We've started to identify work that need[s] to be pursued to—

Have you made further progress in that regard?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We have advanced our contingencies in that regard. We haven't done any public activities to suggest that we are actually getting ready, so that's why I insisted at the time—and would insist again today—that we needed six months' notice.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There are several procurement activities, for example, that need to take place.

Otherwise, we continue to refine what I call a contingency plan, describing in more detail what needs to be done if we were to run a referendum—by the spring, I guess.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. You mentioned in response to a question from Gérard Deltell at that meeting that you “would need to redo all the training manuals for elections staff” and you mentioned that this is necessary in order “to train the 255,000 Canadians who...administer elections”—I assume a similar number for referenda—and you estimated that “about 15 computer systems would need to be adapted”. Have you been able to do any work in that regard?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Again, we have just identified the tasks to be performed, but we have not actually started to carry out those tasks.

First we need to update the regulation under the Referendum Act. That's the very first thing that needs to be done, because that sets out the specific tasks and the variances that exist with the normal conduct of an election. Bringing that regulation up to date would be the top priority for Elections Canada. It has been done once in the last 10 years, so it needs to be revised, updated, and tabled before Parliament.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You in fact did an update to one aspect of the act: you drafted the regulations, which were then approved by order in council in 2010.

How much time would be required for you to do a similar update, if you were asked? Could you do so proactively?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We would need to have it in place very early on, when the notice is given, because it's a key instrument that determines what will go into the manuals for the training of poll officials.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Also, there's a tariff of fees which appears not to have been updated since 1992. I went through the act, and it appears to me that under subsection 542(1) of the act, it is done on your recommendation. The Governor in Council makes the actual regulation, but I gather that they are not empowered to do so unless you make a recommendation.

Would you be in a position simply to incorporate the fees that exist under the Canada Elections Act for those purposes, or would it require more than that?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Given the time, I think that would be the likely approach. To the extent that the tasks are similar under an election or a referendum, we would propose the same tariff. Again, unless there are changes to the Referendum Act, it would be carried very much in the same framework as an election, so it would make sense to use the same tariff.

(1140)

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson is next.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you for your presentation, Mr. Mayrand.

I would just like to correct my friend Scott Reid. There are actually two of us who have served under the full tenure of Mr. Mayrand. However, the distinction is that while Mr. Reid is prepared to give you thanks and he formed government on your watch, I'm prepared to give you thanks and we never won a damn thing under your watch. It just goes to show you that I'm still here, but that wasn't the plan. We were going to be over there.

You've done a fantastic job, and I hope that the House—and I'm sure we will, Mr. Chair—get an opportunity to thank you properly.

As someone who has been here for all of your time and who has done at least six or seven international election observation missions in other countries, in emerging democracies around the world, I can tell colleagues and Canadians how blessed we are to have someone of your calibre, your professionalism, and your international renown and respect at the head of our elections. We're proud of our election system, no matter what some governments try to do to it. You've just been a class act, sir, all the way through. I thank you very much for your service to our country on behalf of our citizens.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I want to mention—and I said this in camera, but I don't think I'm divulging anything—that I enjoy this exercise. It's a long, tedious exercise, but I have to say that I enjoy it. As someone who's been in public life now for over three decades, the Punch and Judy show, for those who might get that reference, gets old quick.

What is exciting and stimulating, I find, is when all of us set aside our party membership card and focus on one effort and on problem-solving. Given that the nature of our election laws is about making sure it's fair, it's not a partisan exercise. We bring our personal partisan experience, but in the main, the process involves all of us trying to make sure that we have a process that is as fair as possible to all the parties and all the candidates, one that all citizens get to participate in. It's challenging, and I find it very stimulating.

Given the group I've gotten to know on this committee, I look forward to a very stimulating exercise in trying to improve our system and keep as fair as it can possibly be.

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You've used three minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Good. Thanks.

There are two items I wanted to raise. I'm so glad to see the VIC in there, the voter identification card, given what we went through in the last round, struggling to keep this thing alive. Let me say again that the lie was put out that the thing couldn't be trusted, yet we had evidence, time after time after time from experts, that it is arguably the most up-to-date piece of information that Canadians can have in terms of their current address. It has actually accessed all the major database centres in the country—the health centres, the drivers' licensing, income tax. It was frustrating as heck going around the last time and having this argument that there were problems with it, when the reality is it's one of the most up-to-date and accurate pieces of information we can have.

I'm so glad you're bringing that back. It confused people in the last election, and I submit it was meant to be that way. I say that straight up. A lot of that stuff was meant to slow things down, cause frustration, and make people either stay home or go home. I'm so glad that we're back, hopefully, on a more positive track.

There's one question I wanted to ask. I looked a couple of times and I didn't see it. Another one of the bugaboos that's in our current law is that all the federal parties, mine included, can submit their subsidy requests—$50 million and $60 million comes to mind—with no receipts required.

I'm assuming we're going to close that loophole somewhere, Mr. Mayrand.

(1145)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes, there is a recommendation. I'm not sure if it's in chapter 2 or...but there is a recommendation.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I thought so. I couldn't find it. It also links with the issue of—just cut me off, Chair, when my time comes, as I know you'll do.

It's compelling testimony. Again, you can take an investigation only so far, but if you tell the police—and as a former solicitor general I know a bit about this too—that at the end of the day they can't force and compel, or the courts compel, to get the testimony, how far are you really going to get in an investigation?

We saw evidence, time and time again, of people who refused to be interviewed, refused to give answers, and there was no ability on the part of our officials to compel them to give that testimony.

Again, simple things like receipts to back up requests for tens of millions of dollars of taxpayer money seem to me to be something we should fix. If there's an investigation going on, there needs to be the ability to compel testimony. That's something I hope we close off and improve.

I want to mention too that I liked your idea of the interim reports. This can go on awhile. As I said, it's tedious and it can go on for a while. There may be merit, Chair, in looking at breaking it off into chunks that we could then forward to the government, hopefully for their consideration or to put before the House, and then on to the government for their consideration to start putting it into legislation.

I think that's our goal. Rather than wait for the whole thing, all or nothing, let's get what we can in chunks and pieces, get it enacted, and then at the same time keep working here.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to this exercise. I want to end where I began in thanking you sincerely, sir, for all that you've done for Canada. It has made a difference. Thank you.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

I'm sure the committee agrees with all the commendations of all the members of the committee. Thank you.

Following up on David's last point, though, I think you have broken it into logical pieces for the committee to do. Can you repeat what those separations are in your report?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Basically, there is what we call the narrative, which consists of two chapters. One deals with the electoral process, and that's where you will find the recommendations around modernization, inclusiveness, accessibility. The second chapter of the narrative deals with the regulatory regime, mainly political financing. That's where you will find the provisions that deal with various aspects, and I would point out that broadcasting needs to be updated, as well as the power of the commissioners and the administrative penalty regime that we propose.

Table B sets out a number of substantive recommendations that I believe deserve your attention, your consideration, and your study, but did not necessarily fit easily in part A.

The third table you'll find is table C, which is basically a list of technical minor amendments that are more meant for the PCO and drafters at the justice department. My view is that there are no substantive policy issues involved, but we need to harmonize language sometimes or clarify a point here and there. However, there's no substantive policy impact, I would say.

The Chair:

Could we do an interim report on the recommendations in table A?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes.

The Chair:

And give it to the government, and then do another one on table B?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes.

The Chair:

And the last one's administrative.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes.

The Chair:

That makes sense. Okay.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham, please, for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

First, I want to thank you for being here and for the work you have done during your term. We are very proud of it.

In recommendation A2, you suggest using electronic lists that would enable voters to vote at any polling station in a single polling place. Why limit that to polling stations and not make it possible to vote anywhere in the district?

(1150)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Theoretically, the electronic list that we are proposing would include the electoral list of the entire country, which would be available at every polling station. We are recommending to the committee that we be able to organize voting differently. Instead of doing it at a specific table, it could be done any of the tables in a polling place. In fact, when a voter appeared with her voter information card, a barcode could be scanned and automatically make the connection with the electronic electoral list. As the voter progressed through the process, her name would be struck and she would be registered as having received a ballot or having voted, depending on the stage she had reached.

The advantage of that, apart from book-keeping, would be to accelerate the process. The voter would go to the first free table. This is somewhat comparable to the model of a bank branch. The model we currently have is obsolete. There are not a lot of places today where you are required to wait at a single cash that is half-prepared to receive you.

We therefore recommend, for the moment, that this flexibility be permitted at polling places. We could definitely go further. The experts will be able to inform you further in future discussions. We could definitely allow voters to go to any place in a district, or even in the country, but I believe that raises issues that should be discussed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could there be a note on paper, which would be printed as we go along, if only to verify a software error or to serve as proof?

For example, when I went up to the scrutineer and gave him my name, it would be permanently printed.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Printing is always a possibility. I will take this opportunity to emphasize that we are not talking about electronic voting. We keep the paper ballot at this stage.

We could consider another element. As voters' names are struck off and the voters have voted, the information would be available to candidates on a portal. They could consult it to determine exactly who has voted and at what time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So there would be no more bingo cards.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There would be no more bingo cards, but rather an electronic system that would be accessible by means of a PIN. Obviously, controls are necessary. It would therefore be possible for candidates to have real-time access to what is going on in the polling places throughout the district.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also recommend that there be a list of citizens 16 years of age and over who have a driver's licence.

I am curious. Why are you limiting yourself to a list of citizens 16 years of age and over and not proposing a list of all citizens from birth? You could obtain all birth certificates, and when people reached the required voting age, their names would already be on the list.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We do not have access to that data at this time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That is a philosophical question. I am curious.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I will give you some background. Our main suppliers, whether it be the Canada Revenue Agency or the motor vehicle bureaux, have data on young people 16 and 17 years of age who have begun to work or drive. A few years ago, that data was forwarded to us, but at some point somebody checked the privacy rules and told us to drop the practice. We were not authorized to gather that data.

We recommend that we have access to that data and that young people 16 and 17 years of age also the actively entered in the registry. That could be combined with a civic education program in schools. We should ensure that, when they reach voting age, young people are automatically informed of their polling place and receive all the information that is provided during an election.

We think that could considerably improve the services offered to young people.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In recommendation A31, you suggest that subsidies be paid to official agents rather than to auditors.

(1155)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I do not think I understood the question.

A voice: What do you think of the mechanism for financial agents?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There is already an expense reimbursement mechanism. There is another mechanism for auditors who receive the subsidy when the audit report is submitted. We would use virtually the same mechanism for official agents. However, that would be subject to a condition: that the report be prepared on time and that it be complete.

We also propose to make the subsidy subject to the condition that the official agent has completed the training offered for his position. On those conditions, he would receive the subsidy, which would vary based on the amount of expenses and revenues during the campaign.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am going to ask one final question because I have virtually no time left.

What advice would you give your successor? [English]

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I think he will get plenty of advice.

What I've tried to do throughout my term has been to really focus on viewing everything from the perspective of electors.

There are two main considerations: I think the electors have to be at the centre of anything we do, and we need to have the greatest consideration of fairness for all. I think if you keep to those two things, you cannot do too much wrong. With a few other tips, you could do very well. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Mr. Maynard. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Now we're on to Mr. Reid for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

First of all, my apologies to Mr. Christopherson. I can't imagine how as memorable an experience as serving 10 years with him on the committee slipped my mind.

Mr. David Christopherson: Not in committee, in the House.

Mr. Scott Reid: Oh, in the House. Okay, fair enough. That's memorable too, actually.

Mr. Mayrand, I wanted to return to something you said in your testimony before the electoral reform committee back in July.

You indicated in your opening statement at that time, “I note that the government has committed to having legislation in May 2017, which I am comfortable with.”

I wanted to ask you what you mean by this. You can see why this is important as the House tries to move forward to deal with the legislation. Do you mean by this that as long as the legislation is completed, no further amendments are possible, which in practice means it's through both the House and the Senate and has royal assent, or at least that it's through the House and it's unlikely to be amended by the Senate, or do you mean something less? We have the broad parameters. We know now it's MMP and not STV.

I'll let you try to respond to that.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Again, depending on what comes out, certainly my preference is that the bill would advance through committee, have been reviewed and discussed, be at least at the report stage, and hopefully have received third reading in the House.

We need certainty. Depending on the scope of the changes—and they may be very significant—we need a degree of certainty. It may not be absolute certainty, but we need a certain degree of certainty so that we can embark on the preparation, which cannot be delayed unduly.

Mr. Scott Reid:

One of the problems that has become evident from witness testimony at the elections reform committee has been that certain kinds of changes to the system—I don't want to suggest all of them, but certain kinds—would potentially have to go before the Supreme Court for a reference.

For example, if you increased the number of seats in the House as a way of achieving some kind of additional list system—there have been suggestions to add, for example, 15% to the House—that might affect the proportionate representation of the provinces, which is guaranteed under section 53, if I'm not mistaken, of the Constitution Act, 1867, and you'd want to be sure before you proceeded that it was acceptable. Therefore, it is conceivable that you'd have a situation in which you would need to submit a reference case to the Supreme Court, and they would obviously take some time to respond back.

If this were layered on top of your attempts when you conceivably could start making changes and you then discovered they couldn't go forward, I don't need you to tell me this would be a problem, but the question is, how much of a problem? Is it a catastrophic problem, or is it something that could still be sorted out?

(1200)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

It may lead to some costs, as we say in the jargon, in the sense that we have to rely on a proposal to do anything, and the best proposal would be what has been submitted to Parliament and, hopefully, endorsed at third reading, let's say, in our scenario. We would have to begin some work and advance the work that absolutely needs to be done if we want to be able to run the new system in 2019.

It's nothing new. We see from time to time that legislation is disputed on the basis of constitutional challenges. We saw that with citizens abroad in the last election, and there were even cases on the ID requirements. In those situations, we have to be ready for a possible scenario that may result from a court ruling. We need to take that contingency into consideration.

It did happen for citizens residing abroad. In the first instance, the court did rule in a certain way. We made changes to respect the court ruling, and suddenly the court of appeal, just before the election, changed course and reversed the decision, so we had to revert back.

I'm not sure how else we can deal with those situations. We need to be ready and agile enough to adjust quickly if events suddenly occur.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't have enough time. I'll come back in the third round with additional questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor, go ahead, please. [Translation]

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you for being here with us today and for answering our questions. We very much appreciate it.

You mentioned in your report that computerization could be an essential tool for reducing errors and that it would help increase the confidence Canadians have in the integrity of voting operations.

How much time would it take to implement the computer system?

Could it be in operation for the next election?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

If the recommendations are approved and the government adopts these measures and amends the act accordingly, the system could be in operation for the next election. That is our objective.

We feel that computerizing the procedures would help greatly reduce the amount of paper used in polling stations. It would also have the effect of simplifying election workers' duties. There is no justification for complex forms when we can use smart forms that prevent anyone from moving on to the next stage of the questionnaire if he or she has not understood the previous question.

This is the kind of system we want to establish to ensure better record- and file-keeping in the polling stations. Those files would then be electronic.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I was a new candidate in the last election, and I found the amount of paper we received at the office inconceivable. So I am very pleased to learn we are headed in that direction.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

As you will see as well, with regard to the nomination of candidates, we also recommend that a significant amount of that kind information should be put online.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I am glad to hear that too.[English]

Perhaps just to reiterate some of Mr. Christopherson's comments, I was really pleased to see that one of the recommendations was to reverse the ban on using voter information cards as a form of identification.

Could you perhaps outline or elaborate on the importance of the voter information card and could you describe how its use as identification could impact some groups of Canadians—perhaps Canadians in remote areas, people who are in long-term care facilities, or even our indigenous communities?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

The voter information card is the main instrument through which electors find out when the election is, when they can vote, and where they go to vote. It's an essential document that is sent across the country to each and every elector who is registered.

With regard to identification requirements, we find that there are groups of people who are more challenged when it comes time to prove their address—which is a requirement, I should mention, that is very exceptional around the world. There are very few jurisdictions that have a requirement to establish address. Even in Canada, there are only two or maybe three provinces, three jurisdictions, that require it. The federal level is the only one that does not accept either a note or the voter card as an alternative to proof of address. We are the only ones in that regard.

It is particularly significant for aboriginals living on-reserve who do not have an address. In many cases, there is no addressing system there, yet often we will have visited those reserves, knocked on doors, and registered those people, so we know where they live.

It's similar with seniors, and with the demographic trends and the aging of our population, I think the problem is going to get larger, not smaller. We have many seniors who live in seniors' homes where, again, we do enumeration and leave a form with them telling them we've seen them and they are registered, yet those people often don't have documents with them. They've been left with their family members or those who take care of them. We've seen incidents of people not being allowed to vote because they did not have any of the documents authorized under the legislation. Allowing the VIC—the voter information card—or the form we leave with seniors as a piece of ID establishing their address would help resolve that problem.

I would also point out, because it is something I care about greatly, that it's important to recognize that most seniors have voted all their lives. Voting is important to them, and very often it's the one act they can do on their own, depending on their stage in life. I think the solution that relies on attestation does not respect the dignity of our seniors. Again, I think having that document, which is issued by an official authority, would be more respectful of their dignity.

(1205)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

None.

Mr. Reid, go ahead, please.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you again.

The analogy that came to my mind during your last response to a question from me was that if a plane doesn't have enough fuel to either return to its original point or get to its destination, it hits a point of no return. I'm really asking if such a thing is imaginable in the situation of starting to work toward a new system in the context of dealing with a reference to establish the constitutional validity of the new model. I am emphasizing this primarily in connection with models that involve adding ridings to provinces, although it could come up in other situations as well. Under such a scenario, is there a point of no return at which you have a problem—you can't simply abort the landing and return to your point of origin, which is, of course, first past the post?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I think I've mentioned on several occasions that we need at least two years. Two years back from 2019 brings us to 2017, as I have indicated. I rely on the commitment of the government to introduce and have legislation in place by, I believe, next spring. After June 2017, I think my successor will get very anxious and nervous about being able to conduct an election under a significantly changed system.

Again, there is still time, but the time is short, without a doubt.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Obviously, all the questions I've raised regarding a Supreme Court reference as to constitutionality apply to a referendum as well, because the real problem from your perspective is having certainty as to which direction to start travelling in.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes, and again, I indicated in previous testimony that a referendum would have to be held essentially no later than the end of next spring. We're talking about June of next year, 2017, at the latest. In order to get there, for Elections Canada to get ready, we need six months' notice. Again, it's very tight, but we're still within the timelines.

A critical milestone for me will be the report from your committee. That would give us a sense of the consensus on the type of system that's being considered, so at least we can prepare some contingencies and start thinking more clearly about what the scenarios are.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I appreciate that. One of the problems we have is that the minister came before our committee the day after you attended, and she was asked directly by Elizabeth May whether, if the committee makes a recommendation, the cabinet will follow that recommendation as to a system, and the minister's response was, “We'll take it into consideration.”

Therefore the practical difficulty we have is that unless the government alters its position and says it will accept the committee's recommendation, you won't be certain as to which direction we're going in until the actual draft legislation is produced, which, as I understand it, would be taking place no earlier than when the House resumes sitting on the last day of January or the first day of February, something like that.

I think that is actually the conundrum that you're likely to face, unless the cabinet proactively indicates prior to December 1 that they will accept the recommendation of the committee, full stop.

(1210)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

You're absolutely right, I think, but the committee and the reaction of the government to the report of the committee will at least be indicative of future direction. Right now, I don't know, and we don't have any.... If there is a system that's being contemplated seriously, an alternative system, at least we can start doing some contingency around it and begin to understand what it actually means in terms of delivery, but at this point there's too much on the table. It would be a useless effort, in my mind.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have no more time, except once again to say, speaking personally this time, how much I appreciate your outstanding service over the past decade. Thank you very much.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Just before we go to the next questioner, do the witnesses need a washroom break or coffee or anything?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I'll get a bit of water.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Chan, please, for five minutes.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I was going to suggest that we take a break. I know you've gone a solid hour. It's up to you, David. I think the last two on the speakers list are you and me. I think I have the last five-minute round, and you have three minutes. I just want to give members of the committee an opportunity to go grab lunch. If you want to just keep plowing through until one o'clock, I'm good either way.

The Chair:

Actually, we're just going to 12:45 p.m., because we have committee business.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

At 12:45 p.m. we're doing committee business. Scott, how do you want to do this? Do you want just keep going?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll go along with whatever the majority wants.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

If our witnesses are fine with continuing straight through to 12:45, then we shall do so. Let's carry on, then.

I wanted to simply chime in along with all of my other colleagues and say, Mr. Mayrand, and to your colleagues from Elections Canada, thank you for all of your work and for your service these past nine years as the Chief Electoral Officer. I think that this report and the other two reports you tabled are a testament to your service to our country, and I want to thank you as well.

As I went through this report, I was particularly heartened by the recommendations and suggestions. I think the report reflects the point you made that at the heart of it, it is about fairness for electors and for Canadian citizens. I personally have very little that I couldn't endorse in terms of moving forward.

I do have one very specific pet project related to electoral district associations, and it was referred to in your report. I just wanted to probe you briefly on that particular point.

I support the previous decision to bring EDAs under greater scrutiny under the Elections Act. I do have some problems with the way it's currently administered or the way in which sanctions are applied, and I just want your thoughts on that. I agree that there needs to be greater transparency, and the current system, I think, does achieve that, but my concern is that sometimes what actually goes on within EDAs and the sanctions that are potentially applied to them may not in fact match.

Let me give you a situation that happens within political parties, and I'm sure my colleagues can see that the situation could arise. Sometimes the transition between candidates or between riding associations is not an easy one, to put it diplomatically. Sometimes the requirement to actually file the EDA's returns is not within the control of the new riding association, yet the sanctions that are applied right now could include deregistration of the riding association—essentially penalizing the individuals currently in control of the riding association—or the loss of the ability to issue tax receipts. These sanctions apply to the riding association, as opposed to the individuals who were actually in control and who would have had information about the activities of, let's say, a previous riding association.

Do you think there is still a gap in terms of how that reporting takes place and how sanctions would be applied?

(1215)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

That matter would deserve a much longer discussion than we can have in this forum.

There are still offences, under the act, for those individuals involved. As I mentioned, these are criminal offences, so this is not the most suitable forum. This committee could look at the legislation to see whether there's a need to reinforce the statutory responsibility of the officers in charge of the EDAs at the time.

The act considers that unless you deregister the EDA, the same entity continues, from the perspective of the legislation and from the perspective of transparency of the financial transactions. It's the same entity, and the act does not distinguish whether there is a new board or new management at the EDA.

The best way, in those cases, may be—and I say this with great caution—to deregister the association, but you still need to file a final report of that association and register anew.

It is a problem in the system. The fact that it relies very significantly on volunteers, I think, is a big factor in all of this. We could look at ways of making it a little bit more effective and fair.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I think the suggestions and other provisions dealing with giving you greater powers so that this could be done not just through criminal enforcement but through sanctions, including fines or something like that, might at least provide you greater flexibility and at the same time give Canadians confidence regarding the transparency of reporting.

I'm struggling with a particular situation of not being able to get my hands on certain decisions of a previous electoral district association. My association is under a compulsory requirement to file for transactions over which I had no control and about which I have no details, yet I bear the consequence of the way the act is currently set up.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

It's the association, indirectly.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I just simply table that point.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Chan.

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson, for three minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

I have just two things. I wanted to mention, on providing a subsidy to the official agents who complete Elections Canada training and file the returns, that this is a growing job. I'm so glad that you're starting to concentrate on that.

Tyler Crosby, behind me here, my staffer, was my campaign manager. For all intents and purposes, nobody worked harder than he did, hopefully with the exception of me. Nobody worked harder than he did. I have to tell you, for the chief financial officer after the campaign it is flat out, and no one sees it. It's a thankless job, and if you make a mistake, the seat is on the line. It's huge.

Richard MacKinnon is my guy now. We can't give him a subsidy, but I can give him a shout-out and tell him thanks. Every one of us has someone like that who gives a big part of their life, and quite frankly they have to be really competent, high-functioning people who get it. It's not child's play, so I'm really glad to see you moving on that one.

The last thing I wanted to mention was that notwithstanding the fact that we're seeing more and more evidence that referendums are not necessarily the magic elixir for every question in front of a democratic nation, we should at least have a referendum that works if we need it, but right now we are not in any kind of condition, really, to conduct a modern referendum.

A lot of work was done—and Mr. Reid, of course, was here then—during the minority governments. We spent a lot of time doing good work on referendums and on prorogation, for instance.

I just want to mention to colleagues that if we do start to look the Referendum Act, rather than reinvent the wheel, there's an awful lot of that good basic foundational work from constitutional experts and other people like Mr. Mayrand. It's there and available.

If anybody thinks right now that we can just pull a referendum off the shelf and have a state-of-the-art fair referendum process that works, that person is mistaken. I will just leave that with the committee.

Maybe we can hear your thoughts on how much work is needed for it to to be state of the art and to have something that would reflect the kind of referendum process we would like to have.

(1220)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

It certainly needs an update, just to reflect all the changes over the last decade and a bit more, since 1992, that have occurred in the electoral process itself and in the electoral legislation. The two are closely interdependent.

The other question for this committee to consider—and it's not for Elections Canada—is whether in this modern age there are alternatives to how we run a referendum. I understand that in B.C. they run plebiscites by mail. I understand that in P.E.I. next month they will be running a plebiscite online and by phone. There's nothing about those modern alternatives that's available under our federal statutes, which causes a significant cost to a federal referendum.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, sir.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Okay, we've finished two rounds. I'm just going to open it up to any committee members who have any further questions.

Go ahead, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I wanted to follow up on another matter. It's with respect to costs.

A lot of the proposals that you've put in here.... I'll give one example. It's extending the voting hours at advance polls, moving it earlier, from, let's say, noon to nine o'clock. One thing is that doesn't give me a sense—and I guess this would be tabled through your estimates—of what the potential incremental costs would be for each of the particular proposals that you have within all these changes.

As I said, I think most of these changes are really good, but I think it's also fair and transparent to Canadians to have a sense of what those incremental costs might be, just so that we have a sense of their potential impact.

That was one question. There's a second question I want to table quickly, and this wasn't covered in your report. Given that you've been administering this act now for nearly a decade—and of course the changes took place before you became Chief Electoral Officer—I wanted to get your thoughts on the consequences of the elimination of the voter enumeration system and the establishment of the permanent voters lists.

I think your report indirectly deals with some of the challenges, such as new voter registration, particularly for those who are turning 18, and of course new Canadians, particularly those who may not be filing income taxes or those without fixed addresses.

I wanted to get your thoughts in terms of the efficacy of the current system and the participation rates of those under the new permanent voters list as opposed to.... Because on occasion you get complaints from voters that there used to be voter enumeration in every election. I recognize it was a very expensive system, but by the same token, there was confidence that the people who lived in your electoral district were picked up in that enumeration process and could exercise their franchise and there was a lot less uncertainty as to whether you were on the voters list.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There is certainly a range views on that issue. I can speak of our experience.

First of all, we need to not forget that we still do enumeration during an election campaign. We do it in a targeted fashion, in neighbourhoods with high mobility and all these things. We do targeted revision on reserves, for example. There is still a form of enumeration taking place for exactly the reasons you mentioned—people are highly mobile or hard to reach—so we do enumeration there.

One of the reasons—and think my colleagues across the country at the provincial level would agree—is that it's increasingly difficult to reach out to people through enumeration. We often knock at doors, but nobody answers. People are busy. They have different schedules. It's a challenge to recruit workers to do that kind of work. Even StatsCan is moving away from those surveys. The other thing—and it's unfortunate—is that in many cases, we can't find staff, for security reasons, who would go into certain neighbourhoods, yet they're probably the neighbourhoods that would most benefit.

As an alternative, we have the permanent register. What we did last time around also was launch our online registration service. That allows any Canadian at any time, at their convenience, to add themselves to the register or change their address, for example, if they've just moved recently.

Of course, looking at it from a cost perspective, the national register as a permanent list is much cheaper than enumeration. Yes, we lose contact with electors. Perhaps one way to offset that is to beef up the civic education program that exists.

I just want to take up one point. You inquired about the cost, which is absolutely legitimate. Of course, many of those recommendations don't bring any additional costs. Some of them bring extra costs, of course; an example is opening advance polls for longer periods of time. We estimate it's probably $500,000 an hour to have those polls open. With what we're proposing, we're talking about $6 million per election.

Civic education, registering youth at 16 or 17, would also have a cost. It's very preliminary, but we estimate that it's between $5 million and $10 million. We estimate that the first round would be more expensive. When the system stabilized, it would be a regular program, and the costs would come down. These would be the larger cost increases caused by those recommendations.

Of course, I can't speak for modernization. Now technology at the poll will be something else, but until we have devised a system, it would be premature to talk about it.

(1225)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have a couple of questions related to recommendations 21 through 24, which is maximum length for an election period, allowing appointment of returning officers from outside the riding, and so forth.

My question is, why do we limit preparation of hiring to the writ period? Could we not have that all set up in the weeks and months leading up to an election, now that we know when the elections are going to take place?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

If we have certainty about the election period, that would make it easier. There are some staff. Returning officers' key staff are trained before the writ is issued, of course. The 285,000, however, we can hardly train much in advance because they need to know when they will be available and if they are available, but the earlier the better. That's why we put in those recommendations to not wait until the night before advance polls open to train people, which happens too often.

The other advantage of what we're proposing is that we would be able to specialize the task for poll officials so that their curriculum of learning would be somewhat narrower than what they have now. Hopefully, that will help them perform their functions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the same spirit, knowing the elections are going to take place on a specific date, aside from legislation that introduces changes, what is stopping us from sending out our overseas ballots months ahead of time and having that whole process stretched out to make it much easier for overseas voters to participate?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

They can register. They have to register, and normally in the year of an election we will contact citizens overseas and issue pamphlets inviting them to register. That's the first thing they have to do. When the election is called, we issue the ballot kits. We do a bit of work prior to the writ, but again, not enough of them are registered.

(1230)

The Chair:

But your recommendation is that they can pull the forms off now electronically, so they don't have to wait to get them in the mail. That's a recommendation.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes. In fact, the changes we're recommending are that they could download the ballot electronically and send it back to us with their own envelopes. Rather than having to wait to receive a kit from Elections Canada, they could save that time. They could register online, download their ballot, and send it back according to the procedure that has been described on the site.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Mayrand, you talked about the use of one polling station to vote at any table, and in the recommendation you mentioned the need to perhaps put the poll numbers on the back of the votes. Would that be at print time, or when the RO signs the back of the vote, would he then also write the poll number? How do you see that?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We would have to look into that in more detail. This thing is suggested as a way to ensure that we continue to have poll-by-poll results.

One of the downsides of allowing people to move around, in terms of voting, is that you may not get as granular a result as candidates and parties like to have. An option to proceed ahead and preserve the poll-by-poll result would be to ensure that the ballots indicate the poll with the ballot.

Another way also is to use scanners. If the committee agrees, we would be ready to do a technical briefing on these aspects of modernization. We've done one with political parties recently. It went quite well, and I think it would inform your discussion as you start looking at the recommendations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You were talking also about the ability to do pilot projects. If you wanted to do a pilot project, what is the process that you'd have to go through, in brief?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Currently?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. In the next by-election, if you have some that are coming and you wanted to try these things, what would be the process to make it happen?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There are two types of pilot, just to be clear: one that involves a change to the Elections Act and one that does not involve a change to the Elections Act.

I'll give you the best example. Opening a special ballot office on campuses across the country did not require changes to the act, but we did a pilot on it in the last election.

If the pilot requires a change to the act, we need to present a business case, a proposal to this committee, and get your approval to proceed. We need to redraft the legislation to reflect what the pilot will be about, and understandably we will report to the committee afterward.

I would also have to run the same process in the Senate. You can appreciate that two committees looking at the same proposal may have different views, different requirements, understandably, and also may have very different timelines. That's why I'm saying we're just talking about a pilot to test something. In my view, the approval of this committee should be sufficient for testing a change.

Right now, in fact, there's another tier. If it deals with electronic voting, it requires not only two committees' approval, but the whole of Parliament to approve the pilot, so by the time we'd be ready to run the pilot, the election would be gone. There's a practical consideration that we're putting forward.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much for your comments today. They're greatly appreciated.

I have a point of clarification. We talked a few moments ago about potentially moving election day from Monday to possibly a weekend, and maybe this is where the clarification comes in.

Given the fact that advance polls take place usually over the weekend and offer flexibility of hours, and we had almost 70% voter turnout nationally in 2015, was this more to help with the hiring of competent staff? What was the objective of that?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There are three considerations.

There's the ease of recruiting qualified people to do the work. It would be easier on a weekend.

There's also having access to facilities. Right now the challenge for returning officers to secure schools for voting is tremendous. Increasingly school boards, for reasons of security, will not allow voting procedures to take place during a school day. One option to deal with this is to move it to Saturday or Sunday.

The other thing is that there is evidence that of the electors who did not vote—we're talking eight million who did not vote in the last election—about 50% pointed out that it was due to everyday life issues they were facing on voting day. Many of them were suggesting that they had a conflict with their work schedule. We think these electors would have been able to vote. We're talking about a population of probably around a million electors who would benefit directly from that measure.

These are the three reasons we're pursuing this change.

(1235)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you.

Your recommendation A17 is about potentially removing the signature requirement, which would keep the process moving along in long lines. I guess in order to do that, you would have to use, as you pointed out here, the bar code scanner. I find that even today you still have to sign for certain things, so I think one more check—

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Oh, yes. That's a very valid point. This is for electors who are properly registered and who show up at the advance poll with their ID and their voter information card.

Mr. Jamie Schmale: Okay.

Mr. Marc Mayrand: If you're not registered or if you need to change your registration, you would still have to sign the traditional forms that in those cases you have to fill in. It's really to deal with the mainstream electors who come with their ID and voter information cards and are at the right place. Currently you have to search the paper registry. You have to enter into a book, by hand, the name and the address, and you have to have it signed. If it takes two minutes and you have 10 or 15 electors in line, you're already 30 minutes late.

I think that's the purpose of this recommendation.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor is next, and then Mr. Kang.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I have a quick question.

It's hard to believe that last year at this time we were in full election mode, working very hard, all of us. We also remember that it was a 78-day campaign. Can you describe the consequences, if any, of extended election periods like the one we experienced last year?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I can certainly speak for Elections Canada. I won't speak for candidates and campaigns.

The main challenge, which I'm sure you faced as well with your volunteers, was retaining people on board for twice the normal length of a campaign. Many ROs, returning officers, faced that challenge. We had people who could not be available for the extra month. That kind of thing changes all your preparation, your training, your readiness.

Another very concrete example is that we constantly monitor or maintain an inventory of sites across the country. Normally we're looking for sites available for about 36 to 40 days. Suddenly, with 78 days needed, landlords were not willing to enter into those leases. You had to either renegotiate or find another place. That happened to a large extent.

These are not insignificant administrative impacts. Most importantly, it did delay the opening up of offices across the country, and it did, in a way, deny some services to electors that they are entitled to from the moment the writ was dropped. That's why I'm advocating for more certainty.

The Chair:

The last questioner is Mr. Kang.

Mr. Darshan Singh Kang (Calgary Skyview, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Sir, do we know how many Canadians overseas are eligible to vote in elections?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We have a register of citizens residing abroad. I would have to look up the figures again, but it's roughly 5,000 Canadians residing abroad. There is an estimate of the population of Canadians abroad that runs over a million, but as I said, very few are registered.

(1240)

Mr. Darshan Singh Kang:

If all of those other one million registered, then they would be eligible to vote.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

They would have to register and they would have to have been away from Canada for less than five years. That's the current status of the law. If they've been away for more than five years or haven't resumed residence in Canada, they can no longer vote. I say that with a caveat, because the matter is before the courts. The Supreme Court will be hearing it next winter, in February or something like that.

Mr. Darshan Singh Kang:

Okay.

When you talk about mail-in ballots, they could be prone to abuse if one family member mails in ballots for the whole family. What kind of checks and balances do you think should be in place to stop that abuse?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We have checks and balances to ensure that these are properly qualified electors, but I will not deny that this is an unsupervised voting process. We rely on the honesty and the good faith of Canadians.

We have also a system that provides a criminal offence for this type of interference with voting, and we also are relatively easy to reach if someone wants to bring to our attention, or the commissioner's attention, any irregularities with regard to voting.

Mr. Darshan Singh Kang:

Yes, I know it would be based on an honour system, but by the time we find out, it would probably be too late to charge anybody with an offence.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

That's already the system in place. Whether you print your ballot or you get it by mail, the issue will be the same. The system assumes that those who rely on voting by mail will do it as independently and secretly as all other electors. I'm sorry to say that I don't know how we can allow those people to vote otherwise. It's a compromise we have to make.

Mr. Darshan Singh Kang:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I will excuse our witnesses again, on behalf of Parliament and the committee. I think we owe a great deal of debt to you for a great job done over the years in keeping our democracy strong. On behalf of all of us, thank you, Mr. Mayrand.

Voices: Hear, hear!

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

It has been a true honour for me to serve you all for these many years. Some of you may have found that it was too long, but it was a pleasure, and it gave me a unique perspective on the type of work that is done here. I've always tried to bring to this committee the information that you needed as members to do the daunting task of reviewing legislation or reviewing reports, such as the one we discussed today.

I saw my role as making sure that you had all the information you needed to do your work. I also stayed away from providing any views or opinions that would indicate any tilt toward any political views.

I truly enjoyed my time with this committee. I always took the work seriously, and it was a pleasure and an eye-opener to see how parliamentarians.... I think Canadians should see more often how parliamentarians, despite what we see in the media, manage to work together to do what they think is best for the citizens in this country. It's not an easy task, and I don't necessarily envy you.

I'll be glad to go back to my civilian life and find again my right to vote, which I abandoned 10 years ago. When I vote in 2019, you know that I will be looking to see how modernized we've become.

Thank you very much. Merci beaucoup.

Voices: Hear, hear!

The Chair:

I'll leave a couple of minutes for people to talk to the witnesses informally, and then we will clear the room, please. We'll go in camera for 10 minutes of committee business. Thank you.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 32e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de cette première session de la 42e législature.

Aujourd'hui, nous amorçons notre étude du rapport publié par le directeur général des élections portant sur l'élection générale et qui est intitulé Un régime électoral pour le 21e siècle: Recommandations du directeur général des élections du Canada à la suite de la 42e élection générale.

J'aimerais rappeler aux députés que la séance d'aujourd'hui est télévisée. Permettez-moi maintenant de présenter nos témoins.

Tout d'abord, M. Marc Mayrand, directeur général des élections d'Élections Canada est ici présent; tout comme M. Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections délégué; et M. Michel Roussel, sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins.

J'aimerais avant tout établir le contexte au cas où il y aurait des journalistes à l'écoute, ainsi que pour le public. Après une élection, le directeur général des élections du Canada publie un rapport. Dans ce dernier figurent des recommandations. Celles-ci sont présentées à ce comité. Traditionnellement, nous examinons le rapport. En effet, il y figure plus de 70 recommandations. Apparemment, la dernière fois, il a fallu 25 séances pour en effectuer l'examen complet. Cela représente donc beaucoup de travail. Puis, nous recommandons au gouvernement de le mettre en oeuvre, ce qui est souvent fait sous forme de loi.

Par conséquent, afin d'éviter toute confusion, la présente séance ne constitue pas une séance du Comité sur la réforme électorale. Un autre comité effectue des propositions et parcourt le pays en ce moment. Un certain nombre des députés siégeant au sein du présent comité siègent au sein de ce comité-là. On y étudie la possibilité de revoir le système électoral afin d'instaurer une autre mode de scrutin.

Le présent rapport porte sur les détails techniques du vote, comme la façon dont on nomme les scrutateurs, la façon dont on établit les circonscriptions, si on tient un vote électronique, ainsi que tous les détails techniques qui s'intégreraient à tout régime parlementaire.

Après les observations préliminaires, nous amorcerons le tour régulier de questions. Les députés du Parti conservateur préfèrent que nous fonctionnions ainsi. Chaque parti devra choisir qui prendra la parole en premier pour son tour de questions.

Soyez le bienvenu, monsieur Mayrand. Je sais qu'il s'agit de votre dernier rapport. Nous avons été heureux de vous accueillir ici à de nombreuses reprises. Vous nous avez beaucoup stimulés avec beaucoup de bonnes nouvelles idées. Je sais que ce rapport est volumineux. Il faudra beaucoup de séances pour l'examiner, mais il permettra d'améliorer le processus électoral dans un monde moderne et en grande évolution. Peu importe le mode électoral que nous instaurerons, les détails techniques que vous proposez s'intégreront à tous les modes. Nous souhaitons nous assurer que le scrutin est juste et que nous puissions tous voter le plus aisément possible. Je sais que vous avez un grand nombre de recommandations à cet effet, et nous sommes impatients de les entendre.

M. Marc Mayrand (directeur général des élections, Élections Canada):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Tout d'abord, bonjour.

Je suis très heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui afin de présenter mes recommandations pour l'amélioration de l'administration de la Loi électorale du Canada. Les changements proposés dans le rapport visent à établir un régime électoral plus moderne et inclusif. Je crois que ces modifications sont essentielles si nous voulons faire passer la Loi électorale du Canada au XXIe siècle, peu importe les changements que l'on apportera au mode de scrutin.

Le rapport comporte deux sections. La première est constituée de deux chapitres. Il s'agit d'un exposé des faits qui décrit ce qui, selon moi, constitue les plus importantes recommandations et leurs objectifs. La deuxième contient trois tableaux de modifications. Le tableau A porte sur les recommandations dont on a discuté dans l'exposé des faits; le tableau B offre des recommandations substantives additionnelles qui amélioreraient l'administration de la Loi; et le tableau C énonce une série de modifications mineures ou techniques.

J'ai structuré le rapport de cette façon afin de faciliter votre travail, étant donné le nombre élevé de recommandations qu'il contient. Je vous incite à concentrer votre attention immédiate sur l'exposé des faits, puisqu'il aborde les enjeux les plus pressants. Vous devriez même songer à faire rapport sur cette série de modifications avant toute autre.

Je crois que nous nous trouvons à un point tournant de l'administration des élections canadiennes. Si nous n'agissons pas afin de moderniser plusieurs aspects fondamentaux de notre processus électoral, je crains que nous ne soyons pas en mesure de respecter les attentes des Canadiens en 2019.

Élections Canada s'engage à instaurer un programme de modernisation ambitieux qui vise à tirer profit de la technologie afin d'améliorer la prestation de l'élection et les services connexes. Les modifications législatives doivent être mises en place bien avant l'élection de 2019 afin de pleinement appliquer ces améliorations au bénéfice des Canadiens.

Mes recommandations visant la modernisation de la loi sont inspirées par trois principaux thèmes. Le premier fait référence à l'accessibilité et à l'inclusivité; le deuxième, à la souplesse et à l'efficacité; et le troisième a trait à l'équité et à l'intégrité. Avant de les aborder, j'aimerais présenter une observation générale au sujet de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Nous savons bien qu'un grand nombre de ses composantes sont ancrées dans le XIXe siècle, moment où les premières élections ont eu lieu au Canada. Même si elle nous a bien servi au fil des années, il ressort de nos récentes expériences que le processus électoral prévu par la Loi affiche des signes d'essoufflement. À bien des égards, il ne parvient plus à rester dans le coup.

Par exemple, la Loi électorale du Canada n'est pas une loi qui se marie bien avec la technologie. Elle offre peu de possibilités de modifier l'envergure des services de vote en fonction des besoins locaux et en évolution. Elle ne parvient pas non plus à fournir la souplesse requise pour améliorer les conditions de travail des fonctionnaires électoraux ou le débit d'électeurs aux bureaux de vote. Ce fait était particulièrement évident lors de la dernière élection, lorsqu'on pense aux temps d'attente importants aux bureaux de vote par anticipation.

Sur le plan réglementaire, le régime de financement électoral s'est élargi de façon draconienne en ampleur et en complexité au cours de la dernière décennie. Toutefois, ses exigences sont principalement encore satisfaites par des bénévoles. Si ces bénévoles contreviennent à la Loi, ils peuvent faire l'objet d'accusations au criminel, étant donné qu'il s'agit de la seule forme de sanction. Cela va à contre-courant des régimes réglementaires modernes.

Il est temps de modifier la loi afin de l'adapter au XXIe siècle. Il est possible de le faire sans perdre de mesures de protection essentielles qui protègent l'intégrité et l'équité électorales.

Un thème clé qui ressort de nombre des recommandations de mon rapport a trait à l'accessibilité et à l'inclusivité. Ces concepts sont sous-jacents à la capacité des Canadiens d'exercer leur droit de vote garanti constitutionnellement et de se porter candidat.

Je m'inquiète particulièrement de l'accès pour les électeurs handicapés. Le Canada a ratifié la convention des Nations unies relative aux droits des personnes handicapées qui garantit aux personnes handicapées le droit de participer pleinement et activement à la vie politique. Même si nous avons accompli des progrès notables au Canada au cours des dernières années, il en reste beaucoup à faire.

Mon rapport contient plusieurs recommandations visant à éliminer les obstacles pour une participation électorale complète des électeurs handicapés. Parmi celles-ci, je suggère que le Parlement fournissent une directive claire et un processus d'approbation simplifié pour qu'Élections Canada puisse mener des projets pilotes sur les technologies permettant de voter dont les électeurs handicapés pourraient bénéficier.

(1110)



Bon nombre d'entre eux se fient à la technologie, car elle leur est essentielle. Il ne s'agit pas d'une simple commodité, mais d'une nécessité de la vie quotidienne.

J'ai également suggéré que les partis et les candidats reçoivent un remboursement plus élevé pour les dépenses électorales qu'ils engagent afin d'accommoder les électeurs handicapés, notamment en fournissant des vidéos avec sous-titres codés ou en tenant des événements à des endroits accessibles avec des services d'interprétation visuelle. Cette mesure accorderait aux Canadiens handicapés plus de possibilités de participer à la vie politique.

Les jeunes électeurs constituent un autre groupe important sur le plan de l'accessibilité et de l'inclusivité. En effet, ils sont souvent difficiles à atteindre. Même si le Registre national des électeurs contient 93 % des électeurs canadiens, la couverture moyenne des électeurs âgés de 18 à 24 ans atteint uniquement 72 %. Permettre aux jeunes électeurs de se pré-enregistrer avec Élections Canada afin que leur enregistrement s'active lors de leur 18e anniversaire améliorerait grandement la qualité de la liste électorale pour ce groupe démographique. Lorsqu'ils auront 18 ans, ces jeunes électeurs recevront ainsi une carte d'information de l'électeur durant une élection, qui leur dira où et quand voter et les intégrera au processus électoral.

Je suggère également que la carte d'information de l'électeur soit acceptée à titre de preuve d'adresse au bureau de vote, non à titre de document autonome, mais accompagné d'une autre pièce d'identité. Les jeunes ainsi que d'autres groupes comme les aînés et les électeurs autochtones, continuent de vivre des difficultés au moment de prouver où ils habitent lorsqu'ils vont voter. Permettre d'utiliser la carte d'information de l'électeur à titre de preuve d'adresse, en compagnie d'un deuxième document établissant l'identité, augmenterait l'accès au vote pour un certain nombre d'électeurs.

Une recommandation finale que je souhaite souligner sous le thème de l'accessibilité serait le déplacement du vote du lundi à un jour de fin de semaine, soit le samedi ou le dimanche. Un grand nombre d'électeurs pourrait en profiter étant donné qu'ils n'auraient pas à intégrer le scrutin à une journée déjà chargée. Le vote de fin de semaine permettrait également de plus facilement recruter des fonctionnaires électoraux et nous donnerait accès à plus d'écoles et d'édifices publics pouvant être utilisés à titre de bureau de scrutin.

(1115)

[Français]

Le deuxième thème que j'aimerais aborder est la flexibilité et l'efficacité de l'administration des élections. Les longues files d'attente que nous avons connues à la dernière élection, particulièrement aux bureaux de vote par anticipation, ont généré de la frustration chez beaucoup d'électeurs. C'était notamment le cas lorsque, à leur arrivée au lieu du scrutin, les électeurs étaient dirigés vers une table en particulier et devaient attendre en ligne pour se faire servir alors qu'à d'autres tables les fonctionnaires électoraux étaient inoccupés.

Plusieurs électeurs, particulièrement des jeunes, ont été étonnés de voir les fonctionnaires électoraux biffer leur nom au crayon sur une liste papier, sans ordinateur ni technologie en vue. La loi est très prescriptive quant à l'exécution des tâches à un bureau de scrutin. Elle indique qui fait quoi, à quel moment, au moyen de quel formulaire et de quelle manière. Le bureau de scrutin est, par définition, la table bien précise attribuée à chacun des électeurs pour voter. C'est pour cette raison que les électeurs doivent attendre en ligne à une table, même si d'autres sont libres.

Je recommande des modifications qui permettront des opérations de vote efficaces, qui s'adapteront à la demande locale, qui tireront profit de la technologie et qui, par conséquent, seront moins laborieuses. Je recommande notamment que les fonctions exercées aux bureaux de scrutin demeurent prescrites par la loi, mais que les activités et la répartition des tâches entre les travailleurs à un lieu de scrutin donné soient faites conformément aux instructions du directeur général des élections, instructions qui sont, par ailleurs, publiques et connues longtemps à l'avance.

D'autres modifications à la loi sont nécessaires pour que les électeurs puissent voter à n'importe quelle table dans le gymnase d'une école au lieu de voter à l'unique bureau qui détient la liste papier partielle où figure leur nom. Mettre à la disposition des fonctionnaires électoraux une liste électronique universelle veillerait au respect des contrôles prévus par la loi.

Du point de vue de l'électeur, ces changements se traduiraient par un service plus rapide dans un environnement plus moderne et plus efficace. À cela s'ajouteraient deux autres effets positifs; la capacité de répartir les tâches avec plus de flexibilité créerait de meilleures conditions de travail pour les fonctionnaires électoraux; de plus, en mettant en place un processus plus efficace, Élections Canada pourrait tirer pleinement profit des avantages de la technologie et traiter électroniquement non seulement la liste électorale, mais aussi d'autres formulaires et documents aux bureaux de scrutin. L'informatisation, lorsqu'elle est bien menée, est une méthode éprouvée de réduction des erreurs de tenue de dossiers; elle contribuerait à accroître la confiance des Canadiens dans l'intégrité des opérations de vote. En outre, je recommande d'accorder une plus grande flexibilité aux directeurs du scrutin pour le recrutement des travailleurs électoraux. Comme vous le savez, la conduite d'une élection est une immense entreprise qui exige l'embauche de quelque 285 000 personnes dans un délai très court.

Au cours de la dernière décennie, les directeurs du scrutin ont eu du mal à recruter assez de candidats qualifiés et admissibles. Il serait donc utile d'éliminer les dispositions de la loi qui font obstacle à l'embauche rapide des personnes les mieux qualifiées pour les postes à pourvoir.

À l'heure actuelle, les directeurs du scrutin ne peuvent pourvoir de nombreux postes importants sans d'abord avoir examiné les candidatures soumises par les candidats et les partis politiques qui se sont classés en première et deuxième position lors de la dernière élection. Tout en continuant d'inviter les partis et les candidats à soumettre la candidature de travailleurs qualifiés, les directeurs du scrutin devraient être en mesure de pourvoir ces postes, dès la délivrance du bref, à partir d'autres sources.

L'équité et l'intégrité forment le dernier thème qu'évoquent bon nombre de mes recommandations. Ces questions sont particulièrement pertinentes dans le cas du régime de financement politique. La 42e élection générale fut l'une des plus longues de l'histoire du Canada. Bien que la date de l'élection soit maintenant fixée aux termes de la législation canadienne, ce n'est pas le cas du déclenchement de la période électorale. Cette situation crée de l'incertitude chez les entités politiques et permet au parti au pouvoir de déterminer le plafond des dépenses, maintenant établi en fonction de la durée de l'élection. L'imposition d'une durée maximale des élections générales réduirait cette incertitude et assurerait une plus grande équité pour tous.

Le régime de financement politique, dont la complexité s'est énormément accrue au cours des 10 dernières années, est un autre facteur à prendre en considération. Les agents officiels des candidats sont des bénévoles qui travaillent fort pour satisfaire aux innombrables exigences prescrites par la loi, notamment en matière de production de rapports. Or, si une allocation est versée aux vérificateurs pour leur travail, rien n'est prévu pour les agents officiels. Le versement d'une modique allocation aux agents officiels permettrait de souligner l'importance de leur travail. Assujettir cette allocation à certaines exigences, comme le dépôt de rapports dans les délais prescrits et la participation aux séances de formation d'Élections Canada, améliorerait également la qualité des rapports et le respect des délais. Cette mesure favoriserait la transparence et la conformité au régime de réglementation.

Il importe aussi d'accroître la conformité par des mesures efficaces et adéquates. À l'heure actuelle, les cas de non-conformité sont traités au moyen d'un modèle de régime pénal selon lequel ceux qui enfreignent les dispositions de la loi font l'objet d'une enquête par le commissaire aux élections fédérales et, s'il y a lieu, sont accusés d'une infraction, puis jugés devant un tribunal criminel.

Ce processus est adéquat pour les contrevenants qui commettent les infractions les plus graves. Par contre, il est lent et coûteux, et il entraîne une stigmatisation. De nombreuses infractions à la loi ne justifient pas une approche aussi sévère. Plusieurs régimes de réglementation provinciaux et fédéraux prévoient maintenant une approche simplifiée pour les infractions à la loi, soit l'imposition de sanctions administratives pécuniaires. La mise en oeuvre d'un tel régime de sanctions administratives favoriserait la conformité, tout en contribuant à l'atteinte des importants objectifs de transparence et d'équité.

De plus, autoriser le directeur général des élections à administrer un régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires permettrait au commissaire de concentrer ses efforts sur les cas d'infraction les plus graves. Le commissaire a clairement indiqué que, pour assurer la poursuite des contrevenants, il aurait besoin d'outils supplémentaires. C'est pourquoi je les recommande dans mon rapport. Parmi ces outils, mentionnons le pouvoir de contraindre une personne à témoigner dans le cadre de ses enquêtes sur les infractions électorales, tout en respectant les garanties prévues par la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés.

(1120)



Je crois qu'il vous serait utile de demander au commissaire de comparaître devant vous pour vous présenter son point de vue sur les recommandations touchant ses responsabilités en matière d'application de la loi. Je vous suggère également d'inviter l'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion, qui assume les responsabilités législatives touchant le régime de radiodiffusion.

Monsieur le président, cela termine mon aperçu des principaux thèmes et recommandations de mon rapport. Je suis fermement convaincu que l'administration électorale fédérale a atteint un point critique et qu'il faut agir maintenant pour continuer de satisfaire les attentes des électeurs.

Enfin, des modifications devront être en vigueur bien avant la prochaine élection, de sorte que mon successeur puisse conduire un scrutin équitable, inclusif et adapté aux besoins des Canadiens.

Je suis bien conscient du volume de recommandations qui sont soumises à l'attention du Comité et de l'ampleur de ces recommandations.[Traduction]

Je veux souligner le fait que mon personnel reste à votre disposition en tout temps pour vous aider dans le cadre de vos travaux. Il est également mis à la disposition des députés qui souhaitent obtenir un compte rendu plus détaillé de tout aspect connexe aux recommandations.

Si je puis me le permettre, étant donné la portée du rapport et le risque d'interruptions causées par des événements externes qui pourraient se produire en tout temps et avoir préséance sur votre temps, je vous suggérerais d'organiser votre examen autour des deux chapitres de l'exposé des faits, en portant une attention particulière au tableau A. Nous serions heureux d'offrir un compte rendu technique au comité avant qu'il amorce ses travaux connexes au chapitre 1, qui porte sur le processus électoral.

Après votre examen du chapitre 1, je vous suggérerais d'inviter la commission électorale, l'arbitre en matière de radiodiffusion et probablement également des représentants du CRTC, étant donné que ces trois organisations jouent un rôle dans le cadre de l'administration de notre régime. On devrait accorder une attention aux rapports sur la tenue des élections, étant donné l'ordre du jour très chargé. Au fur et à mesure où de la réalisation des différentes étapes des travaux, il pourrait être utile de révéler au gouvernement votre perspective au sujet des recommandations afin qu'il puisse le plus rapidement possible formuler une réponse appropriée.

Je vous laisserai le soin de décider du mode à suivre, monsieur le président, mais une fois de plus, soyez assuré que nous sommes à votre disposition pour vous aider comme nous le pourrons.

Je vous remercie.

(1125)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Voilà des recommandations très importantes.

La dernière fois que nous avons effectué ce processus, vous avez prévu du personnel pour une grande partie des séances afin de nous aider à naviguer les détails techniques. Êtes-vous encore disposé à le faire?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui, absolument.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est parfait,

David, j'ai expliqué au tout début que cela se produit à chaque élection. On nous présente trois rapports. Notre travail porte principalement sur l'analyse du troisième, qui comporte les recommandations. C'est totalement distinct du Comité sur la réforme électorale, au sein duquel un grand nombre d'entre vous siègent, et qui constitue un autre processus. Nous gérons les détails techniques de l'élection qui s'intègrent à tout système que nous adoptons.

Nous amorcerons maintenant les discussions. La première personne à prendre la parole sera Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je vous remercie de votre présentation, de ce rapport très exhaustif et de votre présence devant le comité une fois de plus.

Je suis heureuse de voir que vous parlez de l'inclusivité et de l'accessibilité, ainsi que de l'élimination des obstacles retenant les gens de voter. Je suis également heureuse de constater que vous parlez du pré-enregistrement des personnes handicapées et des jeunes.

En ce qui a trait aux cartes d'information de l'électeur, je sais que beaucoup d'entre nous ont observé qu'il y a des autochtones, des aînés, et d'autres personnes qui n'ont pas de permis de conduire, ainsi que des itinérants et certains membres les plus vulnérables de notre population qui n'ont pas été en mesure de voter parce qu'ils n'ont pas été en mesure d'utiliser la carte d'information de l'électeur.

Avez-vous des statistiques, des données, ou tout autre renseignement, qui viendraient illustrer la mesure dans laquelle cela a eu un impact sur le taux de participation lors de la dernière élection et comment ce type de changement aiderait?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous disposons de données issues de l'Enquête sur la population active menée par Statistique Canada en octobre, immédiatement après l'élection. Elles indiquent qu'environ 170 000 électeurs n'ont pas voté à cause de problèmes connexes à leur capacité d'établir leur identité, et ce, principalement en raison d'un manque de preuve d'adresse. C'est intéressant, parce que dans cette enquête, on constate également que 50 000 d'entre eux se sont présentés au bureau de vote et ont été refusés pour cette raison.

Il s'agit des données que nous avons à ce stade. Nous savons d'expérience qu'il nous a été utile pour des groupes précis d'électeurs de nous fier à la carte d'information de l'électeur afin d'établir l'adresse.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Bien sûr, 170 000 personnes, c'est énorme, surtout si l'on tient compte de ceux qui ont été refusés.

Devrait-on permettre à Élections Canada de se lancer à nouveau dans des programmes d'information ou d'éducation publique? Quels types de programmes proposeriez-vous, et cibleriez-vous certains des groupes qui se heurtent à des obstacles au moment de voter?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous avons formulé une recommandation dans le rapport qui vise à élargir notre mandat connexe à l'éducation, qui est actuellement limité à ceux qui n'ont pas encore l'âge de voter. Je pense qu'il y a des groupes d'électeurs admissibles qui se mesurent à des obstacles et que nous devons atteindre, particulièrement durant l'élection, mais également entre les élections, afin de mieux comprendre la nature de leurs besoins et comment nous pouvons aider à surmonter les obstacles auxquels ils se mesurent au moment de voter. Par conséquent, il y a une recommandation à cet effet dans le rapport.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

En plus des obstacles au vote, il y a également d'autres obstacles qui empêchent les gens de porter leur candidature. Bien évidemment, l'accès au financement ou à l'argent figure généralement parmi ceux-là, particulièrement pour les femmes et les autres groupes. Vos propositions de raccourcir la durée de la campagne électorale, ou au moins de la rendre moins longue que celle que nous venons de vivre, et également d'ajouter des sanctions pécuniaires additionnelles, mèneraient-elles à plus de cas d'application de la loi? Pensez-vous que cela inciterait les gens à porter leur candidature, même s'ils n'ont pas accès à des réseaux financiers?

(1130)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je pense que nous abordons ici deux thèmes.

Le régime de sanctions administratives est conçu afin d'assurer une meilleure conformité, non seulement pour le simple respect de la conformité, mais également pour le respect de la transparence et de la constance dans le cadre de l'administration de la loi.

En ce qui a trait aux obstacles financiers auxquels se mesurent les candidats, vous constaterez dans la deuxième partie du rapport, dans le chapitre deux, certaines recommandations connexes, par exemple, aux demandes de déduction pour frais de garde et aux demandes de déduction connexes à un handicap. Par conséquent, nous suggérons que la loi crée des mesures incitatives, à nouveau, afin de réduire ces obstacles.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Présentement, l'application de la loi prend beaucoup de temps. Je pense à un cas où un député a siégé pendant six autres années avant d'être inculpé ou condamné. Pensez-vous que l'option d'imposer des pénalités financières pour les infractions qui ne sont pas de nature criminelle accélérerait le processus de conformité et permettrait à ce genre de situation de se régler plus rapidement?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je pense que oui. C’est en fait l’une des raisons qui justifient l’adoption du régime. Je crois que le processus serait beaucoup plus rapide que le système pénal puisque nous parlons ici d’un processus qui est essentiellement administratif. Il faudrait bien entendu assurer une application régulière de la loi, mais le processus serait beaucoup plus rapide que si l’affaire était portée devant un tribunal criminel.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ma dernière question porte sur la tenue des élections pendant la fin de semaine. Je sais que dans le passé, il avait été suggéré que, si les élections sont un lundi, il faudrait en faire un jour férié pour que les gens puissent aller voter. Nous savons que de nombreux bénévoles arrivent après 17 heures et que les gens vont aux bureaux de vote également après 17 heures en raison de leur horaire de travail. Cependant, beaucoup de gens ont un horaire d’emploi précaire et d’autres obligations pendant la fin de semaine, notamment avec leur famille. Selon l’expérience d’autres pays et votre expérience personnelle, outre le vote par anticipation et le taux élevé de participation au vote par anticipation, avons-nous d’autres éléments qui indiquent que le taux de participation serait plus élevé si les élections étaient tenues la fin de semaine?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Tout d’abord, nous en avons eu la preuve au cours des deux dernières élections générales, en 2011 puis en 2015. Lors de ces élections, nous avons tenu un vote par anticipation la fin de semaine de Pâques la première fois et la fin de semaine de l’Action de grâce la dernière fois. Les deux fois, nous avons obtenu un taux de participation record au vote par anticipation et avons noté une augmentation considérable de la participation.

Pour la première fois, nous avons tenu une journée de vote par anticipation un dimanche lors de la dernière élection. Près de 25 % des électeurs qui ont voté par anticipation avaient voté ce jour-là.

Il ne s’agit là que de premières indications, mais cela prouve que les électeurs apprécient la possibilité de voter la fin de semaine ou un jour férié. C’est évident.

En ce qui concerne... Je suis désolé. J'ai manqué une partie de votre question.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Elle portait sur la possibilité de faire du jour du scrutin un jour férié.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Eh bien, c’est une possibilité que je vais vous laisser examiner. Je ne l’ai pas ajoutée dans le rapport, mais c’est certainement une option. Certains pays en ont fait un jour férié.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Pourriez-vous me dire quels pays tiennent leur scrutin pendant la fin de semaine? Je pense que c’est dans votre rapport.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a 80 pays qui le font. Une douzaine le font le samedi et le reste le dimanche. Je pourrais remettre la liste au Comité.

Le président:

Oui, ce serait bien si vous le pouviez.

La parole est maintenant à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci, Monsieur Mayrand.

Je suis le seul membre du Comité, si je ne me trompe pas, qui a siégé à ce Comité pendant toute la durée de votre mandat. Je tenais à vous remercier d’avoir été si dévoué, compétent et consciencieux pendant tout ce temps. Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Je sais que d’autres membres du Comité partagent mon avis.

Je dois admettre que je suis très triste de vous voir partir. Vous répondiez toujours avec beaucoup de minutie, surtout lorsque vous faisiez un suivi lorsque nous vous demandions de nous fournir plus de renseignements ou de documents. J’ai travaillé avec beaucoup d’agents du Parlement et je crois que vous êtes la personne la plus consciencieuse que j’ai rencontrée.

Je voulais vous poser une question puisque c’est la dernière fois que vous témoignerez devant ce Comité. Je siège également au Comité sur la réforme électorale et je crois que nous ne pourrons vous y inviter de nouveau comme notre carnet de bal est déjà plein. Nous avons parfois deux réunions par jour et il ne reste plus de temps pour ajouter des témoins. Je voulais vous demander tout d’abord si, lorsque vous aurez commencé à relever d’autres défis comme M. Kingsley, vous seriez prêt à revenir témoigner comme expert, particulièrement au sujet du rapport que vous avez produit et auquel nous ne pourrons probablement pas donner suite cette année, mais également sur d’autres sujets.

(1135)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Bien sûr, je serai heureux de le faire si le Comité m’invite à titre de citoyen. Qui sait? Vous pourriez avoir un différent son de cloche.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Vous auriez également un peu plus de liberté. Je reconnais que votre mandat et votre rigueur vous imposent certaines contraintes que vous prenez bien soin de respecter. Il pourrait nous être utile que vous n'y soyez plus soumis.

Je voulais vous poser quelques questions sur plusieurs points, mais tout d’abord, sur votre témoignage devant le Comité sur la réforme électorale en juillet dernier. Ensuite, sur certains points que vous avez abordés brièvement — en tout cas, en général — dans votre rapport sur la 42e élection.

En juillet, plusieurs membres du Comité et moi vous avons demandé s’il était faisable de tenir un référendum sur la réforme électorale compte tenu notamment des délais serrés et de la redistribution des circonscriptions qui devra être faite pour certains des modèles proposés. Vous nous aviez fourni une réponse complète.

Ceux qui disent qu’on ne pourrait pas tenir de référendum sur la réforme électorale, contrairement à ceux qui pensent qu’il ne faut pas le faire, ont tendance à présenter deux ou trois arguments, dont celui qu’Élections Canada n’a pas les ressources administratives pour s’occuper d’un référendum. Vous aviez répondu un peu à cet argument en juillet. J’aimerais savoir si c’est vraiment le cas.

En juillet, vous aviez répondu à ma question en disant: Je peux confirmer au Comité que nous avons commencé à élaborer des solutions d'urgence pour déterminer ce qu’il faudra faire. Bien entendu, vous aviez fait remarquer que le dernier référendum avait eu lieu en 1992. Vous aviez ajouté: Nous avons commencé à déterminer les choses à faire.

Avez-vous progressé dans ce dossier?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nos solutions d'urgence progressent. Nous n’avons mené aucune activité publique qui laisse croire que nous nous préparons. Voilà pourquoi j’ai insisté à ce moment-là et j’insisterai aujourd’hui sur le fait que nous avons besoin d’un préavis de six mois.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Par exemple, nous devrons mener plusieurs activités d’approvisionnement.

Dans l’intervalle, nous continuerons de peaufiner ce que j’appellerais notre plan d'urgence afin de décrire plus en détail les choses à faire si nous devions procéder à un référendum d’ici le printemps, je suppose.

M. Scott Reid:

Exact. Vous aviez répondu à une question de Gérard Deltell lors de cette réunion en disant que vous devriez refaire tous les manuels de formation à l’intention du personnel électoral et que cela serait nécessaire pour former les 255 000 Canadiens qui administrent les élections. Je suppose que le même nombre de personnes seront nécessaires pour un référendum. Vous aviez également estimé qu’une quinzaine d’ordinateurs devraient être adaptés. Avez-vous progressé dans ce dossier?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je répète que nous avons seulement déterminé ce qu’il fallait faire, mais que nous ne sommes pas encore mis en action.

Nous devons tout d’abord modifier le règlement associé à la Loi référendaire. C’est la première chose à faire, parce que ce règlement prévoit les différentes tâches à accomplir et les différences avec la façon normale de mener une élection. La priorité d’Élections Canada sera de mettre à jour ce règlement. Le règlement n’a été mis à jour qu’une seule fois au cours des dix dernières années et il doit être revu, mis à jour et déposé au Parlement.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous avez en fait modifié un aspect de la Loi: vous avez rédigé la réglementation qui a ensuite été approuvée par décret en 2010.

Combien de temps vous faudra-t-il pour faire un travail similaire, si vous aviez à le faire? Pourriez-vous le faire de façon proactive?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous devrions adopter le règlement très rapidement, dès que l’avis sera donné, puisqu’il s’agit d’un instrument crucial qui nous permettra de déterminer les éléments à inclure dans les manuels de formation à l’intention du personnel de scrutin.

M. Scott Reid:

Aussi, il semble que le tarif des honoraires n’ait pas été mis à jour depuis 1992. J’ai passé en revue la Loi et il semble que selon le paragraphe 542(1) ce doit être fait suivant votre recommandation. Le gouverneur en conseil prend le règlement, mais je crois comprendre qu’il n’est autorisé à le faire que si vous le recommandez.

Pourriez-vous simplement incorporer les honoraires prévus dans la Loi électorale du Canada ou devez-vous respecter une autre procédure?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Compte tenu des délais, je pense que ce serait probablement l’approche à adopter. Considérant que les tâches sont similaires lors des élections et lors d’un référendum, nous proposerions les mêmes honoraires. Sauf si la Loi référendaire est modifiée, le cadre du référendum serait le même que celui des élections. Il serait donc logique d’appliquer les mêmes honoraires.

(1140)

Le président:

La parole est maintenant à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président et merci, monsieur Mayrand pour votre intervention.

Permettez-moi de corriger mon ami Scott Reid. Nous sommes deux à avoir siégé pendant tout le mandat de M. Mayrand. Par contre, la différence est que M. Reid vous remercie en tant que membre du gouvernement au pouvoir pendant votre mandat tandis que moi, je souhaite le faire, même si mon parti n’a jamais remporté d’élections pendant votre mandat. Comme quoi, je suis toujours ici, même si ce n’était pas notre intention. Un jour, nous passerons de l’autre côté.

Vous avez fait un travail formidable. Je suis certain que nous le ferons monsieur le président, mais j’espère que la Chambre aura la chance de vous remercier convenablement.

J’ai siégé pendant tout votre mandat et j’ai participé à au moins six ou sept missions d’observation électorales dans des démocraties émergentes partout dans le monde. Je peux donc dire à mes collègues et aux Canadiens que nous sommes très chanceux d’avoir quelqu’un de votre calibre, d’aussi professionnel, réputé et respecté à l’étranger pour diriger nos élections. Nous sommes fiers de notre système électoral, peu importe si certains gouvernements tentent de le changer. Vous avez fait preuve d’une grande classe, monsieur, tout au long de votre mandat. Je tiens à vous remercier sincèrement au nom de tous les citoyens d’avoir été au service de votre pays.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Comme j’ai déjà dit en huis clos, je ne crois rien divulguer, je tiens à souligner que je trouve cet exercice très intéressant. Bien qu’il soit long et très fastidieux, je dois admettre que je l’apprécie. Les affaires publiques font maintenant partie de ma vie depuis une trentaine d’années. Je dois admettre qu’on se lasse rapidement du théâtre de marionnettes.

Je trouve particulièrement intéressants et stimulants ces moments où nous mettons notre carte de membre d’un parti de côté et travaillons ensemble à régler un problème. Nos lois électorales visent fondamentalement à faire en sorte que les élections soient justes et non partisanes. Nous puisons bien entendu dans notre expérience personnelle partisane, mais le principal est que nous sommes obligés de voir à ce que le processus soit aussi juste que possible pour tous les partis et tous les candidats et que tous les citoyens puissent y participer. C’est un défi de taille, mais je le trouve très stimulant.

J’ai appris à connaître les membres de ce Comité et je suis impatient de poursuivre cet exercice très stimulant et de tenter d’améliorer notre système et de faire en sorte qu’il soit aussi juste que possible.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vous avez pris trois minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Bien. Merci.

J’aimerais attirer votre attention sur deux points. Je suis heureux qu’on fasse mention de la carte d’information de l’électeur compte tenu du mal que nous avons eu au cours de la dernière élection à la conserver. Permettez-moi de répéter que l’on a menti en disant que la carte n’était pas fiable. Des experts nous ont fourni des preuves d’une fois à l’autre que c’était sans doute le moyen d’identification le plus à jour pour prouver l’adresse actuelle des Canadiens. La carte est basée sur les renseignements de toutes les grandes bases de données au pays: les centres de santé, les permis de conduire et les impôts sur le revenu. C’était vraiment frustrant d’entendre certains dire qu’il y avait des problèmes avec la carte lors des dernières élections alors que c’est en réalité une des façons d’identifier les électeurs les plus à jour et les plus précises.

Je suis donc ravi de voir que vous en tenez compte. Ces remarques ont entraîné une certaine confusion lors des dernières élections et je crois que c’était délibéré. Je le dis franchement. Beaucoup des propos de ce genre visaient à ralentir le processus, à causer des frustrations et à inciter les gens à rester ou à rentrer à la maison. Je suis très content que nous nous engagions sur une voie plus positive.

J’aimerais vous poser une question. J’ai vérifié à quelques reprises et je n’ai pas trouvé la réponse. Un autre épouvantail est que, selon la loi actuelle, tous les partis politiques fédéraux, incluant le mien, peuvent présenter des demandes de subvention pouvant aller jusqu’à 50 et 60 millions de dollars sans présenter de reçus.

Je suppose que nous allons un jour corriger cette lacune, monsieur Mayrand.

(1145)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui, il y a une recommandation à ce sujet. Je ne sais plus si c’est au chapitre 2 ou ailleurs... mais il y a une recommandation.

M. David Christopherson:

C’est ce que je pensais. Toutefois, je ne l’ai pas trouvée. J’aimerais également faire un lien avec la question de... Monsieur le président, je suis certain que vous m’interromprez lorsque mon temps sera terminé.

Ce témoignage est captivant. Vous pouvez procéder à une enquête jusqu’à un certain point. Cependant, sauf si vous saisissez les policiers ou un tribunal de l’affaire, vous ne pouvez obliger les parties à témoigner. En tant qu’ancien solliciteur général, je sais de quoi je parle. Alors, jusqu’où pourriez-vous aller dans votre enquête?

Nous avons vu à maintes reprises des gens refuser qu’on leur pose des questions et les fonctionnaires n’avaient aucun pouvoir pour les obliger à témoigner.

Une chose simple comme exiger un reçu pour justifier des demandes pour des subventions de dizaines de millions de dollars provenant des contribuables devrait selon moi être requise. Si une enquête est menée, il faudrait pouvoir obliger les parties à témoigner. J’espère que nous pourrons régler et améliorer cet aspect.

J’aimerais également mentionner que j’aime votre idée de rapports intermédiaires. Je pourrais continuer longtemps. Comme je l’ai mentionné, c’est un exercice fastidieux qui pourrait durer longtemps. Il pourrait être utile, monsieur le président, de présenter nos conclusions par segment au gouvernement pour que ce dernier puisse examiner un segment à la fois ou le présenter à la Chambre pour que le gouvernement puisse envisager un projet de loi.

Je pense que c’est là notre objectif. Plutôt que d’attendre que tout le processus soit terminé, présentons des segments pour que des dispositions soient promulguées et poursuivons nos travaux dans l’intervalle.

Peu importe ce que nous ferons, je suis impatient de continuer cet exercice. Je terminerai mon intervention en vous remerciant sincèrement une fois de plus pour tout ce que vous avez fait pour le Canada. Vous nous avez permis d’accomplir des progrès. Merci.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je suis convaincu que le Comité est d'accord avec tous les éloges de l'ensemble de ses membres. Merci.

Pour faire suite au dernier point soulevé par David, je crois que vous avez réussi à distinguer les éléments en une suite logique pour les membres du comité. Pouvez-vous répéter quelles sont les divisions que vous présentez dans votre rapport?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Essentiellement, il y a l'exposé des faits en deux chapitres. Un chapitre porte sur le processus électoral, et on y présente les recommandations visant la modernisation, l'inclusivité et l'accessibilité. Le deuxième chapitre de l'exposé porte sur le régime de réglementation, surtout sur le financement politique. C'est dans ce chapitre que figurent les dispositions relatives à divers aspects et je tiens à préciser que la question de la diffusion doit être mise à jour ainsi que le pouvoir des commissaires et le régime de sanctions administratives que nous proposons.

Le tableau B dresse plusieurs importantes recommandations qui, selon moi, méritent que vous vous y attardiez, en preniez connaissance et l'examiniez, mais elles ne s'intégraient pas nécessairement bien à la partie A.

Le tableau C est le troisième tableau et dresse principalement une liste de modifications mineures d'ordre technique qui s'adresse davantage au BCP et aux rédacteurs au ministère de la Justice. À mon avis, il n'y a aucune question de politique majeure visée, mais nous devons parfois harmoniser le libellé ou préciser une question ici et là. Cependant, je dirais qu'il n'y a aucune grande incidence de nature politique.

Le président:

Pourrions-nous produire un rapport provisoire en tenant compte des recommandations au tableau A?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui.

Le président:

Et le remettre au gouvernement et puis un autre rapport sur le tableau B?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui.

Le président:

Et le dernier rapport de nature administrative.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui.

Le président:

Cela me paraît sensé. Bien.

Je vous en prie M. Graham, vous avez la parole pendant sept minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

D'abord, je vous remercie de votre présence et de votre travail durant votre mandat. Nous en sommes très fiers.

À la recommandation A2, vous suggérez l'utilisation de listes électroniques permettant de voter à n'importe quel bureau de scrutin d'un même lieu de votation, lors d'une élection. Pourquoi limiter cela aux bureaux de scrutin et ne pas permettre de voter n'importe où dans la circonscription?

(1150)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Théoriquement, la liste électronique que nous proposons comprendrait la liste électorale de tout le pays, qui serait disponible à chacune des stations de vote. Nous recommandons au Comité de pouvoir organiser le vote différemment. Au lieu de le faire à une table spécifique, il pourrait se faire parmi toutes les tables qui se trouvent dans un lieu de votation. En fait, quand un électeur se présenterait avec sa carte d'information de l'électeur, un code à barres pourrait être lu et faire automatiquement le lien avec la liste électorale électronique. Au fur et à mesure que l'électeur progresserait à l'intérieur du processus, son nom serait rayé et il serait inscrit comme ayant reçu un bulletin de vote ou ayant voté, selon l'étape à laquelle il en serait.

L'avantage de cela, outre la tenue de livres, serait d'accélérer le processus. L'électeur pourrait se diriger vers la première table qui se libérerait. C'est un peu comparable au modèle d'une succursale bancaire. Le modèle que nous avons actuellement est assez désuet. Il n'y a pas beaucoup d'endroits de nos jours où vous devez nécessairement attendre à une seule caisse à demi prête à vous recevoir.

Nous recommandons donc, pour l'instant, de permettre cette flexibilité dans les lieux de votation. C'est sûr que nous pourrions aller plus loin. Au cours des discussions à venir, les experts pourront vous informer davantage. Nous pourrions certainement permettre à un électeur de se présenter à n'importe quel endroit dans une circonscription, ou même au pays, mais je crois que cela soulève des enjeux dont il faudrait discuter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'il pourrait y avoir une mention sur papier, qui serait imprimée au fur et à mesure, ne serait-ce que pour vérifier une erreur du logiciel ou pour servir de preuve?

Par exemple, lorsque je me présenterais devant le scrutateur et que je lui donnerais mon nom, il serait imprimé de façon permanente.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a toujours la possibilité de faire une impression. J'en profite pour souligner que nous ne parlons pas de vote électronique. Nous conservons le bulletin de vote sur papier à cette étape.

Nous pourrions envisager un autre élément. Au fur et à mesure que le nom des électeurs serait rayé et qu'ils auraient voté, l'information serait disponible aux candidats sur un portail. Ils pourraient la consulter pour savoir exactement qui a voté et à quelle heure.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, il n'y aurait plus de cartes de bingo.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il n'y aurait plus de cartes de bingo, mais un système électronique qui serait accessible à l'aide un NIP. Évidemment, il faut qu'il y ait des contrôles. Il serait donc possible, pour les candidats, d'avoir accès, en temps réel, à ce qui se passe dans les lieux de scrutin, et ce, dans toute la circonscription.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous recommandez également qu'il y ait une liste des citoyens âgés de 16 ans et plus qui détiennent un permis de conduire.

Je suis curieux. Pourquoi vous limitez-vous à une liste de citoyens âgés de plus de 16 ans et ne proposez-vous pas une liste de tous les citoyens à partir de leur naissance? Vous pourriez obtenir tous les certificats de naissance, et lorsque les gens atteindraient l'âge requis pour voter, leur nom serait déjà sur la liste.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous n'avons pas accès à ces données pour l'instant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une question philosophique. Je suis curieux.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je vais vous mettre en contexte. Nos principaux fournisseurs, que ce soit l'Agence du revenu du Canada ou les bureaux de véhicules-moteurs, ont des données sur les jeunes âgés de 16 et 17 ans qui ont commencé à travailler ou à conduire. Il y a quelques années, ces données nous étaient acheminées, mais, à un certain moment, il y a eu une vérification des règles concernant la vie privée et on nous a dit d'abandonner cette pratique. Nous n'étions pas autorisés à recueillir ces données.

Nous recommandons non seulement de pouvoir avoir accès à ces données, mais également d'inscrire activement les jeunes de 16 et 17 ans au registre. Cela pourrait être combiné à un programme d'éducation civique dans les écoles. Il faudrait faire en sorte que, lorsqu'ils atteignent l'âge de voter, les jeunes soient automatiquement informés de leur lieu de scrutin et qu'ils reçoivent tous les renseignements fournis durant une élection.

Nous croyons que cela pourrait améliorer considérablement les services offerts aux jeunes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans la recommandation A31, vous suggérez des allocations aux agents officiels plutôt qu'aux vérificateurs. Comment voyez-vous la mécanique de ce changement?

(1155)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je ne pense pas avoir compris la question.

Une voix: Comment voit-on la mécanique pour le paiement des agents financiers?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a déjà un mécanisme de remboursement des dépenses. Il y a un autre mécanisme pour ce qui est des vérificateurs qui reçoivent un subside lorsque le rapport de vérification est soumis. Nous utiliserions sensiblement le même mécanisme pour les agents officiels. Toutefois, ce serait assujetti à une certaine condition: que le rapport soit produit à temps et qu'il soit complet.

Nous proposons aussi d'assujettir le subside au fait que l'agent officiel ait suivi la formation qui est offerte pour sa fonction. À ces conditions, il recevrait le subside, qui varierait en fonction du montant de la dépense et de la recette dans la campagne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais poser une dernière question, car il ne me reste presque plus de temps.

Quels conseils donneriez-vous à votre successeur? [Traduction]

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je crois qu'il obtiendra une mine de conseils.

J'ai essayé pendant tout mon mandat de mettre véritablement l'accent sur le point de vue des électeurs.

Il faut considérer deux facteurs: je crois que les électeurs doivent être au coeur de notre exercice et nous devons accorder la plus grande considération à l'équité pour tous. Je crois que si vous vous en tenez à ces deux facteurs, il ne peut pas y avoir trop de dommages. Grâce à quelques autres conseils, vous pourriez bien vous en sortir. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, monsieur Mayrand. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, M. Graham.

Et nous cédons maintenant la parole à M. Reid pendant cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens premièrement à transmettre mes excuses à M. Christopherson. Je ne peux m'imaginer comment j'ai pu oublier cette expérience mémorable des dix années passées en sa compagnie au comité.

M. David Christopherson: Non pas en comité, mais à la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid: Oh, à la Chambre. Très bien, c'est juste. C'est également mémorable.

M. Mayrand, je voudrais revenir sur un point que vous avez mentionné lors de votre témoignage devant le Comité sur la réforme électorale en juillet dernier.

Vous avez indiqué dans votre déclaration préliminaire à ce moment-là que le gouvernement s'est engagé à adopter une loi en mai 2017 et que vous étiez à l'aise avec cette idée.

Je veux vous demander ce que vous entendez par là. Vous pouvez vous imaginer pourquoi cette question est importante puisque la Chambre essaie d'aller de l'avant pour adopter cette loi. Voulez-vous dire que pourvu que le processus législatif soit mené à terme, aucune autre modification n'est possible, ce qui se traduit, dans la pratique, par le fait que le projet de loi est débattu à la Chambre et au Sénat et puis il y a sanction royale ou, du moins, le projet de loi est débattu à la Chambre et il est peu probable que le Sénat apporte des changements ou voulez-vous dire autre chose de moindre? Nous connaissons les grands paramètres. Nous savons maintenant qu'il s'agit de la représentation proportionnelle mixte et non du vote unique transférable.

Je vais vous laisser essayer de répondre à cette question.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Encore là, en fonction du résultat, je préférerais que le projet de loi soit étudié en comité, examiné et discuté, du moins à l'étape du rapport, et ce, dans l'espoir que le projet de loi soit débattu en troisième lecture à la Chambre.

Nous avons besoin de certitude. En fonction de la portée des changements, et ils pourraient être très nombreux, un niveau de certitude s'impose. La certitude peut ne pas être absolue, mais il nous en faut un certain degré de sorte que nous puissions amorcer les préparatifs, qui ne peuvent pas être retardés indûment.

M. Scott Reid:

L'un des problèmes qui est apparu évident à la lumière du témoignage des témoins devant le Comité sur la réforme électorale a été que certains types de changements au système — je ne les suggère pas tous, mais certains types — devraient peut-être faire l'objet d'un renvoi à la Cour suprême.

En outre, si l'on augmente le nombre de sièges à la Chambre en vue d'atteindre une certaine forme de système de liste supplémentaire — on a suggéré, par exemple, un ajout de 15 % à la Chambre — ce qui pourrait avoir une incidence sur la représentation proportionnelle des provinces qui est prévue à l'article 53, si je ne m'abuse, de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867 et vous voudriez vous assurer avant d'aller de l'avant que cette situation est acceptable. Par conséquent, il est concevable d'avoir à faire face à une situation dans laquelle vous devrez renvoyer l'affaire devant la Cour suprême et il faudrait évidemment compter un certain temps afin d'obtenir une réponse.

Si cela s'ajoutait à vos tentatives au moment où vous vous apprêtiez à apporter des changements et puis vous découvriez qu'on ne pouvait pas aller de l'avant, il s'agirait bien évidemment d'un problème, mais la question est de savoir à quel point le problème serait grave? Est-ce un problème catastrophique ou pourrions-nous quand même le régler?

(1200)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Cela pourrait engendrer certains coûts, comme nous l'affirmons dans le jargon, en ce sens qu'il nous faut compter sur une proposition pour faire quoi que ce soit, et la meilleure proposition serait ce qui a été présenté au Parlement, en espérant qu'elle soit acceptée en troisième lecture, et ce, d'après notre scénario envisagé. Nous aurions à amorcer une partie du travail et à faire évoluer le travail qui s'impose si nous voulons être en mesure d'utiliser le nouveau système en 2019.

Il n'y a rien de neuf. Nous observons de temps à autre qu'une loi est contestée pour un motif constitutionnel. Cela s'est produit avec les citoyens à l'étranger lors de la dernière élection et il y a même eu des cas où l'on a exigé des pièces d'identité. Dans ces situations, nous devons nous préparer à faire face à un scénario qui pourrait découler d'une décision de la cour. Nous devons tenir compte de cette éventualité.

Cela est arrivé pour des citoyens résidant à l'étranger. Dans un premier cas, le tribunal a tranché d'une certaine façon. Nous avons apporté des changements pour respecter la décision de la cour et subitement la cour d'appel, tout juste avant le scrutin, a changé de cap et a renversé la décision et nous avons alors dû faire marche arrière.

Je ne suis pas certain de la façon dont nous pourrions gérer ces situations autrement. Nous devons être prêts et assez polyvalents pour rajuster rapidement le tir si des événements se produisent subitement.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne dispose pas de suffisamment de temps. Je reviendrai à la troisième série avec d'autres questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Je vous en prie madame Petitpas, allez-y. [Français]

L’honorable Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui et de répondre à nos questions. Nous l'apprécions énormément.

Vous avez mentionné dans votre rapport que l'informatisation pourrait être un outil essentiel pour réduire les erreurs et qu'elle contribuerait à accroître la confiance des Canadiens quant à l'intégrité des activités de vote.

Combien de temps faudrait-il pour mettre en oeuvre le système informatique?

Pourrait-il être en fonction pour la prochaine élection?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Si les recommandations sont acceptées et que le gouvernement adopte ces dispositions et modifie la loi en conséquence, le système pourra en effet être en fonction pour la prochaine élection. C'est notre objectif.

Nous estimons que l'automatisation des procédures permettrait de réduire de beaucoup la quantité de papier dans les bureaux de scrutin. Cela aurait aussi comme effet de simplifier les tâches des travailleurs électoraux. Rien ne justifie que des formulaires soient aussi complexes alors qu'il est possible de recourir à des formulaires intelligents, qui empêchent de passer à l'étape suivante d'un questionnaire si on n'a pas répondu à la question précédente.

C'est ce genre de système que nous voulons établir pour assurer une meilleure tenue de livres et de dossiers dans les bureaux de scrutin. Ces dossiers seraient dorénavant électroniques.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

J'étais une nouvelle candidate lors de la dernière élection. Or je trouvais inimaginable la quantité de paperasse que nous recevions au bureau. Je suis donc très heureuse d'apprendre que nous allons dans cette direction.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Vous allez voir aussi que, pour ce qui est de la mise en candidature des candidats, il y a des recommandations visant à augmenter de façon significative la mise en ligne de ce genre d'information.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Je suis heureuse de cela également. [Traduction]

Je souhaite simplement répéter certains des commentaires de M. Christopherson, j'ai vraiment eu le plaisir de remarquer que l'une des recommandations portait sur le fait de renverser l'interdiction d'utiliser les cartes d'information de l'électeur en guise de mesure d'identification.

Pourriez-vous peut-être énoncer ou préciser l'importance de la carte d'information de l'électeur et pourriez-vous décrire comment le fait d'y recourir pour identifier un électeur pourrait avoir des retombées sur certains groupes de Canadiens — peut-être des Canadiens dans des régions éloignées, des gens dans des établissements de soins de longue durée ou même des membres de nos communautés autochtones?

M. Marc Mayrand:

La carte d'information de l'électeur représente le principal instrument permettant aux électeurs de connaître la date du scrutin, le moment où ils peuvent voter et là où ils peuvent se rendre pour voter. Ce document essentiel est acheminé aux quatre coins du pays à chaque électeur qui est inscrit.

Quant à l'identification obligatoire, nous constatons qu'il y a des groupes de personnes qui doivent surmonter plus d'obstacles au moment de devoir fournir une preuve de leur adresse — ce qui représente une obligation, dois-je le mentionner, qui est très exceptionnelle sur la scène mondiale. On compte très peu d'administrations qui obligent à confirmer une adresse. Même au Canada, on compte seulement deux ou peut-être trois provinces, trois compétences, qui l'exigent. L'administration fédérale est la seule qui n'accepte pas de note ni de carte de l'électeur comme solution de rechange à la preuve d'une adresse. Nous sommes l'exception à cet égard.

Cette mesure est particulièrement marquante pour les Autochtones dans une réserve qui n'ont pas d'adresse. Dans bien des cas, il n'y a pas de système d'établissement des adresses là-bas, mais nous nous sommes souvent rendus dans ces réserves, avons cogné aux portes et inscrit ces personnes, alors nous savons où elles vivent.

C'est la même situation pour les aînés et, en raison des tendances démographiques et du vieillissement de la population, je crois que le problème va s'amplifier, non pas diminuer. Il y a de nombreux aînés dans un foyer et, là encore, nous assurons le recensement et leur laissons un formulaire leur indiquant que nous leur avons rendu visite et qu'ils sont inscrits, or ces personnes souvent n'ont pas de documents en main. Les aînés sont laissés aux bons soins des membres de leur famille ou des aidants. Nous avons été témoins d'incidents où les personnes n'ont pas été autorisées à voter, car elles n'avaient pas en main les documents autorisés aux termes de la Loi. Le fait d'autoriser la carte d'information de l'électeur ou le formulaire que nous déposons chez les aînés comme pièce d'identité visant à établir leur adresse contribuerait à résoudre ce problème.

Je tiens à préciser, car il s'agit d'un point auquel j'accorde une grande attention, qu'il est important de souligner que la plupart des aînés ont voté toute leur vie. Le droit de vote est important pour eux et, bien souvent, c'est un geste qu'ils peuvent poser eux-mêmes, et ce, en fonction d'où ils en sont dans leur stade de vie. Je crois que la solution qui repose sur l'attestation ne respecte pas leur dignité. Encore une fois, je crois que la possession de ce document, qui est délivré par une autorité officielle, contribuerait à un plus grand respect de celle-ci.

(1205)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Je dispose de combien de temps?

Le président:

Votre temps s'est écoulé.

Je vous en prie monsieur Reid, à vous la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Encore une fois merci.

Une analogie m'est venue à l'esprit lors de votre dernière réponse à ma question: si un avion n'a pas assez de carburant pour revenir à son point initial ou se rendre à destination, il franchit un point de non-retour. Je me questionne réellement à savoir si une telle chose est imaginable du fait de mettre sur pied un nouveau système en tenant compte de la possibilité de faire face à un renvoi afin d'établir la validité constitutionnelle du nouveau modèle. Je mets l'accent sur cette question principalement en lien avec les modèles qui supposent l'ajout de circonscriptions aux provinces bien que cela puisse se produire également dans d'autres situations. Dans un tel scénario, existe-t-il un point de non-retour qui suscite un problème — on ne peut tout simplement pas interrompre l'atterrissage et revenir au point initial et il s'agit là bien entendu du système uninominal majoritaire à un tour?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je crois l'avoir mentionné à plusieurs reprises que le délai minimal est de deux ans. Deux ans à partir de 2019, cela nous reporte à 2017 comme je l'ai indiqué. Je compte sur l'engagement du gouvernement pour présenter et adopter une loi d'ici, je crois, au printemps prochain. Après juin 2017, j'imagine que mon successeur aura beaucoup de mal à pouvoir mener une élection à la lumière d'un système qui a été grandement modifié.

Encore là, il reste encore du temps, mais il est compté, sans l'ombre d'un doute.

M. Scott Reid:

Évidemment, toutes les questions que j'ai soulevées au sujet d'un renvoi à la Cour suprême quant à la constitutionnalité s'appliquent également à la question de référendum, car le problème réel de votre point de vue vise à savoir avec certitude la voie que l'on entend prendre.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui et aussi comme je l'ai indiqué dans un précédent témoignage un référendum devrait être tenu essentiellement au plus tard à la fin du printemps prochain. Il est donc question de juin de l'an prochain, en 2017, au plus tard. Pour s'y préparer, Élections Canada doit obtenir un préavis de six mois. Encore là, le délai est très serré, mais nous pourrons quand même respecter les délais impartis.

Une étape cruciale sera franchie lorsque j'aurai obtenu le rapport de votre Comité. Il nous permettrait de nous faire une idée du consensus qui se dégage au sujet du type de système qui est envisagé, alors au moins nous pourrons nous préparer à faire face à certains imprévus et commencer à réfléchir plus clairement aux scénarios qui se présentent.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends cela. L'un des problèmes que nous devons affronter, c'est que la ministre a comparu devant notre comité le jour suivant votre participation et Elizabeth May lui a demandé directement, advenant que le Comité formule une recommandation, si le Cabinet respecterait cette recommandation sur l'adoption d'un système et la ministre a répondu que l'on en tiendra compte.

Par conséquent, la difficulté sur le plan pratique, c'est qu'à moins que le gouvernement modifie sa position et affirme qu'il acceptera la recommandation du Comité, vous n'aurez pas de garantie à savoir quelle direction nous emprunterons jusqu'à ce que le projet de loi soit rédigé et, je crois comprendre, que cela aurait lieu au plus tôt au moment où la Chambre reprendra ses travaux le dernier jour de janvier ou le premier jour de février, ou quelque chose du genre.

Je crois qu'il s'agit de la difficulté à laquelle vous pouvez vous attendre à faire face à moins que le Cabinet indique de façon proactive, avant le 1er  décembre, que la recommandation du Comité sera acceptée, point à la ligne.

(1210)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Vous avez tout à fait raison, je crois, mais le Comité et la réaction du gouvernement face à son rapport seront du moins une indication de la direction qui sera prise. Actuellement, je ne sais pas et nous n'avons pas... Si un système est envisagé sérieusement, un système de rechange, nous pouvons au moins commencer à nous préparer à certaines éventualités et à comprendre ce que cela signifie dans les faits en matière d'exécution, mais, à ce moment-ci, il y a trop de questions à régler en même temps. À mon avis, cet effort serait inutile.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'ai plus de temps à ma disposition, sauf pour souligner encore une fois, mais cette fois-ci sur une note personnelle, à quel point votre contribution au cours de la dernière décennie a été exceptionnelle. Merci beaucoup.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Avant de passer à la prochaine personne qui posera des questions, les témoins ont-ils besoin d'une pause?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il me faut un peu d'eau.

Le président:

Je vous en prie allez-y, monsieur Chan, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

J'allais suggérer de prendre une pause. Je sais qu'une bonne heure s'est écoulée. Libre à vous, David. Je crois que vous et moi sommes les derniers témoins à parler. Je crois que je dispose des cinq dernières minutes et, vous, vous disposez de trois minutes. Je veux simplement accorder aux membres du Comité l'occasion d'aller chercher leur repas. Si vous voulez continuer jusqu'à une heure, cela me va aussi.

Le président:

En fait, nous allons terminer à 12 h 45, car nous devons traiter des activités du Comité.

M. Arnold Chan:

À 12 h 45, nous traiterons des activités du Comité. Scott, comment voulez-vous faire ça? Voulez-vous simplement continuer?

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais me rallier aux désirs de la majorité.

M. Arnold Chan:

Si nos témoins sont d'accord de poursuivre sans interruption jusqu'à 12 h 45, alors nous procéderons ainsi. Continuons, alors.

Je voulais simplement rejoindre tous mes autres collègues et vous dire merci, monsieur Mayrand, à vous ainsi qu'à vos collègues d'Élections Canada, pour l'ensemble de vos travaux et votre service ces neuf dernières années au poste de directeur général des élections. Je pense que ce rapport et les deux autres rapports que vous avez déposés témoignent de votre service rendu à notre pays, et je tiens à vous remercier également.

Lorsque j'ai parcouru ce rapport, j'ai été particulièrement encouragé par les recommandations et suggestions Je pense que le rapport reflète le point que vous avez fait valoir, à savoir que, par essence, c'est une question d'équité pour les électeurs et pour les citoyens canadiens. Personnellement, il y a très peu de choses que je ne pourrais approuver pour aller de l'avant.

J'ai un projet favori très précis en rapport avec des associations de circonscription, et il a été mentionné dans votre rapport. Je voulais juste vous interroger brièvement sur ce point particulier.

Je soutiens la décision précédente de soumettre les associations de circonscription à un contrôle plus approfondi, en vertu de la Loi électorale. La façon dont elle est gérée actuellement et la manière dont les sanctions sont appliquées me posent certains problèmes, et j'aimerais simplement avoir votre avis à ce sujet. Je conçois qu'une plus grande transparence est nécessaire, et selon moi, le système actuel permet cette transparence, mais ce qui m'inquiète c'est que, parfois, ce qui se passe vraiment au sein des associations de circonscription et les sanctions qui leur sont potentiellement infligées ne correspondent pas nécessairement.

Permettez-moi d'évoquer une situation qui se produit au sein des partis politiques, et je suis certain que mes collègues peuvent voir que la situation pourrait survenir. Parfois, la transition entre des candidats ou entre des associations de circonscription n'est pas un processus facile, pour utiliser un langage diplomatique. Parfois, l'exigence relative à la production réelle des déclarations des associations de circonscription échappe au contrôle de la nouvelle association de circonscription, pourtant les sanctions appliquées à l'heure actuelle pourraient comprendre la radiation de l'association de circonscription — ce qui pénalise essentiellement les personnes actuellement responsables de l'association — ou la perte de la capacité à délivrer des reçus à des fins fiscales. Ces sanctions s'appliquent à l'association de circonscription, plutôt qu'aux personnes réellement responsables qui auraient reçu des renseignements au sujet des activités d'une association de circonscription précédente, disons.

Pensez-vous qu'il y a toujours un fossé entre la manière dont les rapports sont produits et la manière dont les sanctions sont appliquées?

(1215)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Cette question mériterait une discussion bien plus longue que celle que nous pouvons nous permettre dans ce forum.

Il y a toujours des infractions, en vertu de la Loi, pour ces personnes concernées. Comme je l'ai mentionné, ces infractions sont des actes criminels, donc ce forum n'est pas le plus adapté. Ce comité pourrait examiner la législation en vue de déterminer s'il est nécessaire de renforcer la responsabilité statutaire des agents responsables des associations de circonscription à ce moment-là.

La Loi considère qu'à moins de radier l'association de circonscription, la même entité se poursuit, du point de vue de la loi et du point de vue de la transparence des transactions financières. Il s'agit de la même entité, et la Loi ne peut pas établir s'il y a un nouveau conseil ou une nouvelle direction à l'association de circonscription.

Dans ces cas-là, la meilleure façon serait peut-être — et je dis cela avec une grande prudence — de radier l'association, mais vous devez toutefois produire un rapport final pour cette association et enregistrer une nouvelle association.

C'est là une faille du système. Je pense que le fait qu'il dépende en très grande partie de bénévoles est un facteur important dans tout cela. Nous pourrions envisager des façons de rehausser un petit peu l'efficacité et l'équité de ce système.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je crois que les suggestions et autres dispositions traitant du renforcement de vos pouvoirs, dans le but que ceux-ci s'étendent non seulement à l'application des peines, mais également aux sanctions, y compris les amendes ou quelque chose comme ça, pourraient au moins vous accorder davantage de flexibilité et, en parallèle, donner confiance aux Canadiens concernant la transparence des rapports.

Je suis aux prises avec une situation particulière, celle de ne pas être en mesure de mettre la main sur certaines décisions d'une association de circonscription précédente. Mon association est assujettie à une condition obligatoire de produire un rapport pour les transactions sur lesquelles je n'avais aucun contrôle et pour lesquelles je ne possède aucun détail; pourtant, je supporte la conséquence de la structure actuelle de la Loi.

M. Marc Mayrand:

C'est l'association, indirectement.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je soulève simplement ce point.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Chan.

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson, vous avez trois minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai juste deux choses à dire. Je voulais indiquer, au sujet de l'octroi d'une subvention aux agents officiels qui suivent la formation d'Élections Canada et produisent les déclarations, qu'il s'agit d'un emploi en croissance. Je suis tellement heureux que vous commenciez à vous concentrer là-dessus.

Tyler Crosby, derrière moi ici, est un membre de mon personnel et il était mon directeur de campagne. À tous égards, personne n'a travaillé aussi dur que lui, à part moi, je l'espère. Personne n'a travaillé aussi dur que lui. Je dois vous le dire, car après la campagne, le directeur financier travaille d'arrache-pied, et personne ne le remarque. C'est un travail ingrat, et si vous commettez une erreur, vous vous retrouvez sur la sellette. C'est extrême.

Richard MacKinnon est mon homme maintenant. Nous ne pouvons pas lui donner une subvention, mais je peux lui faire honneur et lui dire merci. Chacun d'entre nous a quelqu'un comme ça qui joue un rôle important dans sa vie, et franchement, ces personnes doivent être des personnes de haut niveau vraiment compétentes qui comprennent de quoi il retourne. Ce n'est pas un jeu d'enfant, donc je suis vraiment content de vous voir avancer sur cette question.

La dernière chose que je voulais souligner, c'est que malgré le fait qu'il soit de plus en plus évident que les référendums ne constituent pas nécessairement l'élixir magique pour chaque question devant une nation démocratique, nous devrions au moins organiser un référendum qui fonctionne si nous en avons besoin, mais pour l'instant, nous ne sommes vraiment pas en état de mener un référendum moderne.

D'importants travaux ont été réalisés — et M. Reid, bien sûr, était ici à ce moment-là — au cours des gouvernements minoritaires. Nous avons consacré énormément de temps à faire du bon travail, dans le domaine des référendums et de la prorogation par exemple.

Je souhaite simplement mentionner à mes collègues que si nous commençons à examiner la Loi référendaire au lieu de réinventer la roue, il existe un nombre impressionnant de ces bons travaux fondamentaux et essentiels réalisés par des spécialistes du droit constitutionnel et d'autres personnes telles que M. Mayrand. Ils existent et ils sont disponibles.

Si quelqu'un pense en ce moment que nous pouvons tout simplement repousser un référendum aux calendes grecques et disposer d'un processus de référendum équitable et moderne qui fonctionne, cette personne se trompe. Je vais laisser cela entre les mains du Comité.

Peut-être serait-il bon de connaître votre opinion au sujet de la quantité de travaux nécessaire pour que ledit processus soit à la pointe du progrès et possède des éléments qui refléteraient le type de processus de référendum que nous aimerions avoir.

(1220)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il est clair que le processus doit être mis à jour, ne serait-ce que pour tenir compte de l'ensemble des changements survenus dans le processus électoral en lui-même, ainsi que dans la législation électorale, au cours des quelque 10 dernières années, depuis 1992. Ces deux éléments sont étroitement liés.

L'autre question qui doit être prise en considération par ce comité — et ce n'est pas pour Élections Canada —, c'est de savoir si dans cette ère moderne, il existe des variantes dans la manière dont nous menons un référendum. Je crois comprendre qu'en Colombie-Britannique, on dirige des plébiscites par courrier. J'entends dire qu'à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, le mois prochain, on va mener un plébiscite en ligne et par téléphone. Aucune de ces solutions de rechange modernes n'est disponible en vertu de nos lois fédérales, ce qui entraîne un coût important pour un référendum fédéral.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Bon, nous avons terminé deux séries. Je vais juste permettre aux membres du Comité de poser des questions supplémentaires, s'ils en ont.

Allez-y, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je voulais effectuer un suivi sur une autre affaire. Cela concerne les coûts.

Un grand nombre des propositions présentées ici... Je vais vous donner un exemple. Ces propositions prolongent les heures d'ouverture des bureaux de vote par anticipation, en les déplaçant plus tôt, disons de midi à 21 heures. Cela ne me permet pas de me faire une idée des coûts différentiels potentiels pour chacune des propositions en particulier que vous avez dans le cadre de tous ces changements — et je suppose que les chiffres seront déposés lors de vos estimations.

Comme je l'ai dit, je pense que la majorité de ces changements sont vraiment bons, mais je pense qu'il est également juste et transparent que les Canadiens aient un aperçu des coûts différentiels probables, juste pour avoir une idée de leur incidence potentielle.

C'était une question. J'ai une deuxième question à soumettre rapidement, et elle n'a pas été abordée dans votre rapport. Étant donné que vous gérez cette loi depuis près de 10 ans maintenant — et, bien évidemment, les changements ont eu lieu avant que vous deveniez directeur général des élections —, je voulais avoir votre avis au sujet des conséquences de l'élimination du système de recensement électoral et de l'établissement des listes électorales permanentes.

Je pense que votre rapport vise indirectement certains des défis, notamment l'inscription de nouveaux électeurs, tout particulièrement ceux qui atteignent l'âge de 18 ans, et bien sûr les nouveaux Canadiens, surtout ceux qui ne produisent peut-être pas de déclaration de revenus ou ceux qui n'ont pas d'adresse fixe.

Je souhaitais obtenir votre opinion par rapport à l'efficacité du système actuel et aux taux de participation des personnes visées par la nouvelle liste électorale permanente, par opposition... Car, à l'occasion, vous recevez des plaintes d'électeurs sur le fait qu'il existait auparavant un recensement électoral lors de chaque élection. Je dois admettre que ce système était très coûteux, mais dans la même veine, cette raison permettait d'être confiant sur le fait que les personnes qui vivaient dans votre circonscription se retrouvaient dans ce processus de comptage et pouvaient se prévaloir de leur droit de vote, et il y avait beaucoup moins d'incertitudes concernant la question de savoir si l'on figurait sur la liste électorale.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a sans aucun doute un large éventail d'opinions sur cette question. Je peux le dire par expérience.

Avant tout, nous ne devons pas oublier que nous réalisons toujours un recensement au cours d'une campagne électorale. Nous le faisons de façon ciblée, dans les quartiers où la mobilité est élevée, etc. Nous effectuons une révision ciblée des réserves, par exemple. Un certaine forme de recensement a encore lieu pour les raisons exactes que vous avez mentionnées — les personnes très mobiles ou difficiles à atteindre —, donc nous effectuons un recensement à cet endroit.

L'une des raisons — et je pense que mes collègues à l'échelle nationale seraient d'accord avec moi — est qu'il est de plus en plus difficile de rejoindre des personnes par l'entremise du recensement. Nous frappons souvent à la porte, mais personne ne répond. Les gens sont occupés. Ils ont des horaires différents. C'est difficile de recruter des employés pour réaliser ce type de travail. Même Statistique Canada abandonne ces sondages. L'autre facteur — et c'est regrettable — est que dans bien des cas, nous ne pouvons pas trouver de personnel, pour des raisons de sécurité, qui se rendrait dans certains quartiers, pourtant ce sont probablement les quartiers auxquels cela profiterait le plus.

Comme solution de rechange, nous avons le registre permanent. Ce que nous avons fait la dernière fois, c'était le lancement de notre service d'enregistrement en ligne. Ce service permet à n'importe quel Canadien, en tout temps, et à sa meilleure convenance, de s'ajouter au registre ou de modifier son adresse, par exemple, s'il ou elle vient de déménager récemment.

Évidemment, en examinant la question des coûts, le registre national à titre de liste permanente est beaucoup moins coûteux qu'un recensement. Oui, nous perdons le contact avec les électeurs. Peut-être qu'un mode de compensation est de consolider le programme d'éducation civique existant.

Je voudrais revenir sur un point. Vous vous êtes renseigné au sujet du coût, ce qui est tout à fait légitime. Bien sûr, bon nombre de ces recommandations n'entraînent pas de coûts supplémentaires. Certaines d'entre elles engendrent des coûts supplémentaires, c'est évident; par exemple, on ouvre des bureaux de vote par anticipation pendant des périodes plus longues. Nous estimons que l'ouverture de ces bureaux coûte probablement 500 000 $ par heure. Avec ce que nous proposons, on parle d'environ 6 millions de dollars par élection.

L'éducation civique, enregistrant les jeunes à 16 ou 17 ans, aurait également un coût. L'évaluation est très préliminaire, mais nous estimons que ce coût sera compris entre 5 et 10 millions de dollars. Nous estimons que le premier tour sera plus coûteux. Lorsque le système se sera stabilisé, le programme sera régulier, et les coûts diminueront. Il s'agirait des plus importantes augmentations de coût causées par ces recommandations.

Naturellement, je ne peux pas me prononcer concernant la modernisation. Maintenant, concernant la technologie au scrutin, ce sera autre chose, mais tant que nous n'aurons pas conçu un système, il serait prématuré d'en parler.

(1225)

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'ai quelques questions en lien avec les recommandations 21 à 24, qui visent la durée maximale d'une période d'élection, la nomination de directeurs de scrutin venant de l'extérieur de la circonscription, et ainsi de suite.

Ma question est la suivante: pourquoi limitons-nous la préparation de l'embauche à la période électorale? Ne pourrions-nous pas tout organiser dans les semaines et mois précédant une élection, maintenant que nous savons à quel moment les élections vont avoir lieu?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Si nous sommes certains de la période d'élection, cela facilitera la tâche. Il y a quelques membres du personnel. Les principaux employés des directeurs de scrutin sont formés avant la délivrance du bref, cela va de soi. Cependant, nous pouvons à peine former les 285 000 employés à l'avance, car ils doivent savoir à quel moment ils seront disponibles et s'ils seront disponibles, mais le plus tôt sera le mieux. C'est pourquoi nous indiquons dans ces recommandations qu'il ne faut pas attendre la nuit précédant l'ouverture des bureaux de vote pour former des personnes, car cela arrive bien trop souvent.

L'autre avantage que nous proposons, c'est que nous serions en mesure de spécialiser la tâche pour les membres du personnel de scrutin, afin que leur programme d'apprentissage puisse être un peu plus étroit que ce dont ils disposent à présent. Il ne nous reste plus qu'à espérer que cela les aidera à remplir leurs fonctions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le même esprit, en sachant que les élections vont avoir lieu à une date précise, hormis la législation qui introduit des changements, qu'est-ce qui nous empêche d'envoyer nos bulletins de vote à l'étranger plusieurs mois à l'avance et d'étendre la totalité de ce processus en vue de faciliter grandement la participation des électeurs outre-mer?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Ils peuvent s'enregistrer. Ils doivent s'enregistrer, et normalement, au cours de l'année d'une élection, nous communiquerons avec les citoyens outre-mer et nous leur enverrons des brochures pour les inviter à s'inscrire. C'est la première chose qu'ils doivent faire. Lorsque l'élection est déclenchée, nous distribuons les trousses de vote. Nous travaillons un peu avant le scrutin, mais une fois encore, le nombre de personnes inscrites est insuffisant.

(1230)

Le président:

Toutefois, vous suggérez qu'ils puissent obtenir les formulaires électroniquement, maintenant, pour qu'ils n'aient pas besoin d'attendre de les recevoir par la poste. Il s'agit d'une recommandation.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui. En fait, les changements que nous suggérons sont qu'ils puissent télécharger les bulletins par voie électronique et nous les retourner avec leurs propres enveloppes. Au lieu de devoir attendre de recevoir leur trousse d'Élections Canada, ils pourraient gagner du temps. Ils pourraient s'inscrire en ligne, télécharger leur bulletin de vote et le retourner selon la procédure décrite sur le site Web.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Mayrand, vous avez parlé de l'utilisation d'un bureau de scrutin pour voter à n'importe quelle table, et dans la recommandation, vous avez mentionné la nécessité de peut-être indiquer le numéro de bureau de vote au verso du bulletin de vote. Est-ce que cela se ferait au moment de l'impression ou lorsque le directeur de scrutin signerait l'endos du bulletin de vote, inscrirait-il également le numéro de bureau de vote? Comment voyez-vous cela?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il faudrait examiner la question de manière plus détaillée. Ce moyen est suggéré afin de s'assurer que nous continuons de recevoir les résultats par bureau de scrutin.

L'un des inconvénients de permettre aux gens de se déplacer, en termes de vote, est que vous ne pouvez pas obtenir de résultats aussi détaillés que ceux que les candidats et les partis souhaitent recevoir. Une option permettant d'aller de l'avant et de préserver les résultats par bureau de scrutin serait de s'assurer que les bulletins de vote indiquent le bureau de scrutin avec le bulletin de vote.

Une autre façon est aussi d'utiliser les scanneurs. Si le Comité est d'accord, nous serions prêts à présenter une séance d'information technique sur ces aspects de la modernisation. Nous en avons fait une pour les partis politiques récemment. Cela s'est assez bien déroulé, et je pense que cela guiderait vos discussions alors que vous commencez à étudier les recommandations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous parliez également de la capacité de lancer des projets pilotes. Brièvement, si vous vouliez en lancer un, par quel processus devriez-vous passer?

M. Marc Mayrand:

En ce moment?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Lors de la prochaine élection partielle, s'il y en avait prochainement et que vous souhaitiez essayer cela, quel serait le processus pour y arriver?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Pour être clair, il existe deux types de projets pilotes: un qui implique une modification à la Loi électorale et un qui n'implique pas sa modification.

Je vais vous donner le meilleur exemple. L'ouverture d'un bureau de scrutin spécial sur les campus partout au pays n'a pas exigé l'apport de modification à la Loi, mais nous avons lancé un projet pilote à ces endroits lors de la dernière élection.

Si le projet pilote nécessite une modification de la Loi, nous avons besoin de présenter un dossier d'analyse, une proposition à ce comité, en plus d'obtenir votre approbation afin de poursuivre. Nous avons besoin de reformuler la législation pour qu'elle tienne compte de l'essence du projet pilote, et évidemment, nous faisons rapport au Comité par la suite.

Je devrais également procéder de la même manière avec le Sénat. Vous comprendrez que deux comités étudiant la même proposition peuvent avoir des points de vue différents, des besoins différents, naturellement, et peuvent également avoir des délais très différents. C'est pourquoi je dis que nous ne parlons que d'un projet pilote pour mettre une idée à l'essai. À mon avis, l'approbation de ce comité devrait être suffisante pour mettre un changement à l'essai.

En ce moment, en fait, il y a un autre volet. Si cela a trait au vote électronique, l'approbation du projet pilote requiert non seulement l'approbation des deux comités, mais de l'ensemble du Parlement. Donc, par le temps où nous serions prêts à le lancer, l'élection aurait déjà eu lieu. Nous proposons par conséquent une considération pratique.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Allez-y, monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je vous remercie beaucoup de vos commentaires aujourd'hui. Ils sont grandement appréciés.

J'ai besoin d'un petit éclaircissement. Nous avons parlé il y a quelques instants du déplacement potentiel du jour de l'élection du lundi à un jour de la fin de semaine, et c'est peut-être là où je souhaiterais un éclaircissement.

Compte tenu du fait que le vote par anticipation a lieu habituellement pendant la fin de semaine et qu'il offre des heures flexibles, et que nous avons eu un taux de participation de près de 70 % à l'échelle nationale en 2015, était-ce davantage pour soutenir l'embauche de personnel compétent? Quel en était l'objectif?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a trois considérations.

Il y a la facilité de recruter des personnes qualifiées pour faire le travail.

Il y a aussi le fait d'avoir accès aux installations. A l'heure actuelle, le défi des directeurs du scrutin pour sécuriser les écoles pour le vote est énorme. Pour des raisons de sécurité, de plus en plus de conseils scolaires ne permettront pas que les procédures de vote aient lieu lors d'une journée d'école. Une option pour traiter cette question est de déplacer l'élection au samedi ou au dimanche.

L'autre chose est qu'il semble que parmi les électeurs qui n'ont pas voté — nous parlons de huit millions de personnes qui n'ont pas voté à la dernière élection —, environ 50 % d'entre eux ont souligné que c'était à cause de tous les problèmes quotidiens auxquels ils font face lors du jour du scrutin. Beaucoup d'entre eux ont laissé entendre qu'il y avait un conflit avec leur horaire de travail. Nous pensons que ces électeurs auraient été en mesure de voter. Nous parlons d'une population représentant probablement autour d'un million d'électeurs qui pourrait bénéficier directement de cette mesure.

Ce sont les trois raisons pour lesquelles nous proposons ce changement.

(1235)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie.

Votre recommandation A17 porte sur la potentielle élimination de l’exigence relative de signature, qui permettrait d'assurer la bonne marche du processus en cas de longues files d'attente. Je pense que pour ce faire, vous auriez à utiliser, comme vous l'avez rappelé ici, le scanneur de codes à barres. Je trouve que même aujourd'hui, vous devez encore signer pour certaines choses, je pense donc qu'une vérification de plus...

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oh, oui. C'est un point très valable. Cela s'applique aux électeurs qui sont correctement inscrits et qui se présentent au bureau de vote par anticipation, avec leur carte d'identité et leur carte d’information de l’électeur.

M. Jamie Schmale: D'accord

M. Marc Mayrand: Si vous n'êtes pas inscrit ou si vous avez besoin de modifier votre inscription, vous devriez signer les formulaires traditionnels que vous avez à remplir dans ces cas. Cela sert vraiment à gérer les cas de l'électeur moyen qui se présente avec sa carte d'identité et sa carte d'information de l'électeur et qui est au bon endroit. Présentement, vous devez chercher dans la version papier du registre. Vous devez écrire le nom et l'adresse dans un livre, à la main et vous devez le faire signer. Si cela prend deux minutes et vous avez 10 ou 15 électeurs en ligne, vous avez déjà 30 minutes de retard.

Je pense que c'est l'objectif de cette recommandation.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie,

Mme Petitpas Taylor est la suivante, puis M. Kang.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

J'ai une question rapide.

Il est difficile de croire que l'année dernière, à pareille date, nous étions en pleine campagne électorale, travaillant tous très fort. Nous nous rappelons également que c'était une campagne de 78 jours. Pouvez-vous décrire les conséquences, le cas échéant, des périodes électorales prolongées comme celle que nous avons connue l'année dernière?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je peux certainement parler pour Élections Canada. Je ne parlerai pas pour les candidats et les campagnes.

Le principal défi, auquel vous avez sans aucun doute dû faire face avec vos bénévoles, a été de retenir des gens impliqués dans une campagne deux fois plus longue qu'à la normale. De nombreux directeurs du scrutin ont dû faire face à ce défi. Il y avait des gens qui ne pouvaient pas être disponibles pour le mois supplémentaire. Ce genre de chose change toute notre préparation, notre formation, notre niveau de préparation.

Un autre exemple très concret est que nous surveillons ou maintenons un inventaire de sites partout au pays en permanence. Normalement, nous sommes à la recherche de sites disponibles pendant environ 36 à 40 jours. Soudainement, avec des besoins pendant 78 jours, les propriétaires n'étaient pas prêts à conclure ces baux. Nous avons eu à renégocier ou à trouver un autre endroit. Cela s'est produit dans une grande mesure.

Ces impacts administratifs ne sont pas négligeables. Plus important encore, cela a retardé l'ouverture des bureaux partout au pays, et cela a entraîné, d'une certaine manière, la privation de certains services auxquels les électeurs ont droit à partir du moment où le bref électoral a été émis. C'est pourquoi je suis en faveur d'une plus grande certitude.

Le président:

Le dernier intervenant est M. Kang.

M. Darshan Singh Kang (Calgary Skyview, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Monsieur, savons-nous combien de Canadiens à l'étranger ont le droit de voter aux élections?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous avons un registre des citoyens résidant à l'étranger. Il faudrait que je vérifie les chiffres encore une fois, mais on parle d'environ 5 000 Canadiens résidant à l'étranger. Il y a une estimation de la population de Canadiens à l'étranger qui se chiffre à plus d'un million, mais comme je l'ai dit, très peu d'entre eux sont inscrits.

(1240)

M. Darshan Singh Kang:

Si tous les autres parmi ce million étaient inscrits, ils auraient alors le droit de vote.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Ils devraient s'inscrire et ils devraient être à l'extérieur du Canada depuis moins de cinq ans. C'est ce que prévoit actuellement la Loi. S'ils ont été absents pendant plus de cinq ans ou s'ils ne sont pas revenus au Canada pour y résider, ils ne peuvent plus voter. Je dis cela avec une réserve, parce que l'affaire est devant les tribunaux. La Cour suprême l'entendra l'hiver prochain, en février ou quelque chose comme ça.

M. Darshan Singh Kang:

D'accord.

Quand vous parlez de scrutin postal, il pourrait se prêter à des abus si un membre de la famille envoie les bulletins de vote pour l'ensemble de la famille. Selon vous, quels types de contrôles et de recoupements devraient être en place pour empêcher ces abus?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous avons des contrôles et des recoupements pour nous assurer que ces gens sont habiles à voter, mais je ne vais pas nier qu'il s'agit d'un processus de vote sans surveillance. Nous comptons sur l'honnêteté et la bonne foi des Canadiens.

Nous avons également un système qui prévoit une infraction pénale pour ce type d'ingérence avec le vote, et nous sommes aussi relativement faciles à contacter si quelqu'un veut porter à notre attention ou à l'attention du commissaire certaines irrégularités en ce qui concerne le vote.

M. Darshan Singh Kang:

Oui, je sais qu'il serait basé sur un système d'honneur, mais au moment où nous prendrons connaissance des infractions, il sera probablement trop tard pour accuser quelqu'un.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il s'agit déjà du système en place. Que vous imprimiez votre bulletin de vote ou que vous l'obteniez par la poste, le problème sera le même. Le système suppose que ceux qui comptent sur le vote par la poste le feront aussi indépendamment et aussi secrètement que tous les autres électeurs. Je suis désolé de dire que je ne sais pas comment nous pouvons permettre à ces gens de voter autrement. C'est un compromis que nous devons faire.

M. Darshan Singh Kang:

D'accord. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Je vais demander aux témoins de se retirer encore une fois, au nom du Parlement et du Comité. Je crois que nous vous devons beaucoup pour un excellent travail accompli au fil des années pour garder notre démocratie forte. En notre nom à tous, je vous remercie, monsieur Mayrand.

Des voix: Bravo, bravo!

M. Marc Mayrand:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Cela a été un véritable honneur pour moi de vous servir durant ces nombreuses années. Certains d'entre vous ont peut-être trouvé que c'était trop long, mais c'était un plaisir, et cela m'a donné une perspective unique sur le type de travail qui se fait ici. J'ai toujours essayé de soumettre à ce comité les renseignements dont vous aviez besoin en tant que députés pour effectuer la lourde tâche de l'examen de la législation ou l'examen des rapports, comme celui dont nous avons discuté aujourd'hui.

Mon rôle consistait à m'assurer que vous aviez toutes les informations dont vous aviez besoin pour faire votre travail. Je me suis également abstenu de fournir des points de vue ou des opinions qui pourraient indiquer un penchant vers toutes positions politiques.

J'ai vraiment apprécié le temps passé avec ce comité. J'ai toujours pris le travail au sérieux, et c'était un plaisir et une révélation de voir comment les parlementaires... Je pense que les Canadiens devraient voir plus souvent la façon dont les parlementaires, en dépit de ce que nous voyons dans les médias, parviennent à travailler ensemble pour faire ce qu'ils pensent être le mieux pour les citoyens de ce pays. Ce n'est pas une tâche facile, et je ne vous envie pas nécessairement.

Je serai heureux de revenir à ma vie civile et de retrouver mon droit de vote, auquel j'ai renoncé il y a 10 ans. Lorsque je voterai en 2019, vous savez que je vérifierai afin de savoir à quel point nous serons devenus modernisés.

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Des voix : Bravo, bravo!

Le président:

Je vous laisse quelques minutes pour que vous puissiez parler aux témoins de manière informelle, puis nous allons leur demander de quitter la salle, s'il vous plaît. Nous passerons à huis clos pour 10 minutes de travaux du Comité. Je vous remercie.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on October 04, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.