header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-10-03 PROC 71

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[Translation]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Hello everyone.

Welcome to the 71st meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This is a public meeting.

Today we are continuing our study of Bill C-50, An Act to Amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing).

The two witnesses are from Elections Canada: Stéphane Perrault, acting Chief Electoral Officer, and Ms. Anne Lawson, general counsel and senior director, legal services. Thank you for being here.

I will now give the floor to Mr. Perrault so he can give his presentation. [English]

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Acting Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm happy to be here today to speak to Bill C-50. I will try to keep my remarks brief to leave as much time as possible for questions from the members.

Bill C-50 has two main elements, both related to political financing. The first element is a new regime for reporting on certain fundraising events. The second element is more technical and relates to correcting a long-standing problem regarding the regulation of leadership and nomination campaign expenses and contributions. I will speak to each aspect in my remarks, but will focus primarily on the first component of Bill C-50.

I have also distributed a table containing a few technical amendments for the committee's consideration for the better administration of the proposed provisions in this bill.

The first element in Bill C-50 is a new regime for reporting on regulated fundraising events. The requirements for disclosing information and reporting apply only to certain fundraisers. To fall within the scope of the bill, a fundraiser will need to have all of the following three elements. First, it must be organized for the benefit of a party represented in the House of Commons or one of its affiliated political entities. Second, the fundraiser must be attended by a leader, a leadership contestant, or a cabinet minister. Third, it must be attended by at least one person who has contributed over $200 or who has paid an amount of over $200, part of which includes a contribution, as a condition for attending the fundraiser event.

In this regard, I note that the bill offers a calibrated approach. Not all parties will be subject to the new requirements and I believe that is a good thing. Similarly, the rules will not apply to all fundraising activities, but only those for which a minimum amount is charged to attend and where key decision-makers are also present.

There is also an important exception for party conventions, including leadership conventions, except where a fundraising activity takes place within the convention. The convention itself is exempted, but if there's a fundraiser that meets all the conditions within the convention, then that is caught by the new rules. Again, this reflects a concern to achieve a proper balance and I think it is wise.

However, I note that donor appreciation events held at party conventions will be exempted from the proposed rules. I understand that this reflects a concern with regard to the fluidity of attendance at such events and practical difficulties in applying the rules. This is something that the committee may wish to examine.

In order to improve transparency, Bill C-50 provides for two types of disclosure to be made with respect to regulated fundraising events. First, a notice of such events must be prominently posted on a party’s website at least five days prior to the event. Second, a report must be provided by the party. Even if the fundraiser is made for the benefit of affiliated entities, it is the party that must provide the report to the Chief Electoral Officer within 30 days of the fundraiser. This report must include details of the fundraiser, including the names and partial addresses of attendees, and the names of any organizers of the event. There are some exceptions to protect the privacy of people working at the event or underage persons who may be attending.

These disclosures would vary during a general election. Notice of a regulated fundraising event would not be required and a single report for all fundraising events held during a general election would be due to the CEO within 60 days after polling day. In practice, this may prove to be a tight timeline. There are clauses for extensions, but I think that we’ll see over time whether that 60-day period is a good balance.

Generally speaking, the bill increases the transparency of political fundraising, which is one of the main goals of the Canada Elections Act. It does so without imposing an unnecessary burden on the smaller parties that are not represented in the House of Commons or for fundraising events that do not involve key decision-makers.

(1105)

[Translation]

That said, I am proposing a number of minor and technical amendments to improve the administration of Bill C-50.

First, as parties are required to publish notices on their website of fundraisers covered by Bill C-50, I would propose that parties be required to also notify Elections Canada of such a publication. This will assist Elections Canada in administering the Act and in ensuring that the reports to be submitted 30 days later are indeed submitted.

Second, so that the bill more closely mirrors current authorities in the Canada Elections Act for other reports, I am recommending that the CEO be permitted to request, in writing, substantive corrections and revisions to reports submitted after a regulated fundraising event.

Consideration should also be given to adding an offence for filing a false, misleading, or incomplete report so as to bring this bill in with other components of the existing regime for financial returns.

I will now turn briefly to the second element of Bill C-50, which deals with the definitions of leadership and nomination campaign expenses in the Canada Elections Act.

This aspect of the bill responds to a recommendation made by Elections Canada and recently unanimously endorsed by this committee. The purpose of this change is to ensure that all expenses and contributions made in relation to leadership and nomination contests are regulated.

Not surprisingly, Elections Canada supports these proposed changes. The current definitions are not aligned with the goals of the act and are difficult for both nomination and leadership contestants to understand and comply with.

There is, however, an amendment that is contained in our table of amendments and that I would recommend be made to this part of the bill. It is essentially meant to ensure that only expenses and contributions in relation to leadership and nomination campaigns are captured by the new definitions and by the rules on expenses and contributions.

I would say, respectfully, that there was an unintended broadening of the definition and that the wording of the definition needs to be clarified.

That is all I have to say. Thank you.

I would of course be pleased to answer any questions the committee members may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Bittle, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.[English]

Thank you for being here today.

Could you describe for us our current political financing regime and how it's regarded worldwide?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I've had the pleasure of speaking across different jurisdictions in Canada and abroad about our political financing regime. I've never said it was perfect, but I do honestly believe it is one of the better calibrated regimes that I've seen. I certainly would not envy any other regime taken as a whole.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In your report after the election you made a recommendation that there be administrative and monetary penalties regimes in order to help with enforcement. Would such a regime help with the enforcement of the provisions in Bill C-50?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's a very good point. The rules that we have here today for review by this committee are a good example of what I call a regulatory regime. This is not the stuff of criminal law.

Certainly I would hope that if there was a regime for administrative monetary penalties, this regime would apply to these kinds of rules, because these are exactly the types of rules that AMPs, as we call them, are best suited to assist in ensuring compliance.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'm sorry I didn't have much time to go over the chart that you provided, but on that point on the criminal law, in terms of clause 9 and your recommendations there, offences could also be added requiring intent. For curiosity's sake, are there offences within the Canada Elections Act that require proof of intent, which is more of a criminal standard rather than a regulatory standard that only requires the guilty act rather than the guilty mind?

(1110)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

For most of the political financing rules in the act when there's a requirement or a prohibition, there's both an offence created that we call a negligence offence or a due diligence offence, which does not require intent but only requires that the person exercise due diligence, but there is also a parallel offence in many cases requiring intent. So depending on the circumstances and the nature of the conduct, then either may be used.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Just out of curiosity, have there ever been any successful prosecutions that you're aware of of individuals who showed intent?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I would have to go back, but I believe that's the case, yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Many fundraisers offer a chance to buy a table's worth of tickets. In that case, some donors may donate much more than the single ticket price. However, in that practice, they have actually purchased a number of tickets and could invite a number of guests. For example, there could be a $50 fundraiser where donors are invited to buy a table for $500. Based on your reading of Bill C-50, would that option, the option to buy 10 tickets for $500, trigger the new regime, assuming a designated politician was in attendance?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

As long as part of the $500 includes a contribution, so assuming the benefit received is not the full amount, then it would trigger the new rules. All participants present would be disclosed as part of the regime, not only the purchaser of the tickets.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Bill C-50 contains a number of exemptions to the reporting requirements, predominantly for those who are executing the fundraising event. However, it's not clear if a personal support worker for an attendee would also be exempted if they attended in the course of their employment. Would you support an exemption for people like a personal support worker who may be present at the fundraiser in support of someone who has paid to attend, so in terms of an accessibility piece?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that would make sense, of course. I would support that.

I just want to come back to my first answer, because I may have misled the committee. I'm thankful for—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

There was no intent, I'm sure, to go back to the original....

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The trigger is having been required to pay at least $200, so I believe in terms of the tickets, independent of the number of tickets bought, if buying at least one ticket of over $200 is required, then that would be caught. But if the amount of the ticket that is required to attend is under $200, or is $200 and less, then it would not be triggered.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In terms of the personal support worker, that's a...?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It seems like a very reasonable element to add to the bill, yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Okay.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Sorry, when you did your correction, did that change the table of $500?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, exactly. With a table of $500, if it's 10 tickets of $50, none of the tickets in order to attend are over $200, so my reading is that this would not trigger.... If any of the tickets are more than $200, then that would trigger the application of the rules.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to our witnesses today.

I want to follow up on that last point. Multiple tables can be sold for $500, but as long as the requirement was $50 per ticket, it would not trigger the reporting premise. The prime minister could attend a $50-ticket event and multiple people could buy $500 tables, but it would not trigger the requirements then?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct. My understanding is this bill is meant to capture situations where, in order to attend one of these events where a key decision-maker is present, at least one person who's attending has had to pay over $200.

Mr. John Nater:

Would you recommend a change? In your learned opinion, would you want to see a change that the dollar value be added if someone pays over $200?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's for the committee to consider. I don't have a strong view on that. I think the purpose of the bill is to deal with situations where there's a concern over privileged access, and whether one of those situations, as you describe, that is currently not captured falls into that category, I think is something for the members to consider.

(1115)

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

I want to follow up on one of your recommendations, and that is the notification to Elections Canada, as well as being published on a website. It's more of a comment, but I think that is a worthwhile suggestion. It makes sense that if Elections Canada is going to be regulating this there should be some notification requirement.

I want to follow up a little more on the five-day notification on a party's website. I brought this up when the minister was here last week. I'm thinking of a situation in which a long-standing event has been planned, tickets are over $200, but no individual who would trigger reporting requirements—the prime minister, a minister—is initially attending, and then, within that five-day period, whether it's two days in advance or one day in advance, a guest is added, and it could be the prime minister or a minister, within that short period of time.

How would you envision the act applying in that case? What would be the advertising requirements? How would that work, in your opinion?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

From memory, I think that in a situation like that, any organizer of the event becoming aware of the presence of one of the, let's call them, key decision-makers who triggers the application of the rules, should give notice to the party so that the party, immediately upon receiving notice, may make any adjustments to the notice, or publish a notice as required.

Mr. John Nater:

Would you recommend any changes to that to deal with that in a different way, or do you think that's adequate, that simply within perhaps hours the changes are made online?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

As I read the rules, I think they're adequate to deal with the situation. If there's a concern that I have not seen, then I am happy to hear about it. But it seems that there is flexibility there to deal with those situations.

Mr. John Nater:

What about a situation in which an advertisement is sent out with simply the potential for special guests attending, with no names attached to it, and then those special guests are confirmed closer to the date? Do you see any way that the act would apply in that case? The implication is made that a minister or prime minister is attending, but no names are associated with that. Would that trigger any reporting requirements to pre-publish that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think if the party or the organizer are aware, even though the identity of the person is not yet known, but they're aware that, let's call it, a decision-maker, is going to be present and advertise that as a component of the event, the party should provide the notice.

Mr. John Nater:

In any situation where there is a strong likelihood or a strong potential that the prime minister or a minister is likely to attend, there should be some kind of notification given.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly I think it would be prudent to do so.

Mr. John Nater:

In a situation where the ticket price is under $200, let's say $150, and the prime minister or a minister is present at those events, would it be within the rules that further donations could be solicited at the event? It's $150 to attend the event, but then at the event there's a representative of the Laurier Club, for example, encouraging a maximum donation at that event. Would that be permissible within the current provisions of Bill C-50?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

This bill does not seek to capture a situation where there is not a precondition of payment to enter. As I said, I think it's designed to capture what I would describe as “privileged access”, access that is limited to people who pay a meaningful amount. If there is not a requirement to make that contribution as a condition for attending, even though attendees may be encouraged to make contributions when they are there, then this is not meant to be captured within the purview of this bill.

Mr. John Nater:

So there would be no reporting to Parliament after that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There would be the reporting of the contributions as always, according to the normal rules.

Mr. John Nater:

How would you foresee a situation in which there was an event, let's say a relatively small event, 10 people, and afterwards it came out that all 10 of those people made the maximum donation? In keeping with the spirit of disclosure, would you see any potential revisions that should be made to capture those situations, where there is no requirement but nonetheless every single person who attended made the maximum donation, or a large contribution?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think disclosure is achieved already in terms of who's making contributions. What this adds is disclosure on the context around which such contributions are made.

Again, I think that would shift the purpose of the bill. I'm not saying this is a good or a bad thing, but the purpose of the bill is to aim only at the situation where there's a prior condition of making a certain contribution for attending.

(1120)

Mr. John Nater:

I want to go back to one of the comments made by Mr. Bittle about misleading, false, and inaccurate reporting. As you see it right now, there is no provision within the act that would prevent a party or a riding association from simply filing a false report. There's nothing preventing that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

There's a provision for failure to report. At some point, if it's so patently false, it may amount to a failure to report, but we get into shades of grey. I think other provisions in the act dealing with other kinds of financial reports make that distinction. First, there's an obligation to file, with an associated penalty if you don't file. Second, there's a separate obligation for the timeline. That's a recommendation that's in the table, to separate the obligation to file from the timeline. Third, there is a prohibition on providing false or misleading information.

I think it is preferable to separate all three, from a compliance and enforcement point of view. But in this case, only the first two are in the bill, actually. There is nothing about false and misleading information in this bill.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you very much. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Nater.

Mr. Christopherson, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Great, thank you, Chair.

Thank you very much for being here again. We do this so often, it's almost beginning to feel like family.

My apologies to the committee for being late. I have public accounts back to back during this sitting. I was in another building, so physically it was impossible for me to get here, but I'll do my best going forward.

I want to pick up where Mr. Nater was asking questions, because I thought that was an interesting line of thinking.

I probably need some edification on your part. I noticed that you're being very narrow, and I assume that's because this is a very narrow application. The idea is that if you know ahead of time that the minister of finance is going to be there, that's a draw card for you and you're going to pony up the money. This is meant to capture that so there is some kind of accountability.

However, Mr. Nater raised a very interesting scenario. There is no guest that is published, but there is a wink-wink, nod-nod that it would be worth your while to come by. Then they show up and lo and behold, coincidentally everybody there makes a maximum contribution. This is all Mr. Nater's thinking. I'm not taking credit for any of his thinking, but I'm chasing it down a bit.

What is to prevent that from happening? My understanding is that at that point, because it wasn't privileged access in any way, it would just be the usual reporting mechanism. It wouldn't be reported as an event that would normally come under the rubric of this subject.

I will leave that with you. Help me out.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Well, I think it depends on the facts.

The way you were aligning it was more of a situation where everybody knows that in fact the minister is going to be there but it's not laid out explicitly. That's a deceitful scenario. In that case, I would think that the party would be under the obligation to be truthful about that and make the disclosure, make the announcement in a transparent way.

That's a different scenario from an event where everybody is invited, whether or not they pay—and that's the second scenario that I think Mr. Nater was referring to—and they happen to meet a minister or a leader and they make a contribution. In that case, anybody is invited to be there and it's not an issue of privileged access.

I'm not sure exactly which scenario you were dealing with.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not either. That's why I'm asking you. That's why we have you here, to ask these kinds of questions.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In the case where a party intends to bring in a minister and suggests so in half words, I think certainly that is a scenario in which the party would need to disclose the relevant information ahead of time. That is captured by this bill.

What is not captured by—

Ms. Anne Lawson (General Counsel and Senior Director, Legal Services, Elections Canada):

[Inaudible—Editor] the minister and the ticket price—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

And the ticket price, of course.

What is not captured by this bill is when there is no prior condition to attend in terms of paying. That is a deliberate policy choice, because that defines the nature of this legislation.

(1125)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, it's getting us partway there.

All right, let me ask this question. Were you consulted on the development of Bill C-50?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We did have information that was made available simply to look at our planning assumptions, but there was no consultation in terms of whether this was a good or bad proposition. That is perfectly normal in the course of these kinds of legislation.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, it's normal if you're going back to the last Parliament, but it's not so much normal if you go back in the history of how this thing should be done.

On privileged access—this subject matter—are you aware of how this regime would compare to any other existing regimes in terms of its effectiveness?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The only one I know of that I can compare it to is the Ontario provincial regime. I understand that the committee may be hearing from Mr. Essensa.

The Ontario regime is much stricter. Whether or not that's a desirable thing I think is for the committee to consider. In the Ontario example, there's an outright prohibition on attendance. My understanding is that's for any candidate, member of Parliament, or a leader. That is very sweeping. Even independent candidates are prohibited from attending any fundraiser where there's an entry price, and there are no thresholds. It's sweeping in its scope, and it's quite restrictive in the nature of the fundraisers.

I understand there's a bill being considered, Bill 152, to exempt party conventions, which were not exempted. Any time you have party conventions and they have contributions, then party leaders are not allowed to attend. I think Mr. Essensa can better inform the committee on the problems that this causes.

That's why I think when I made my remarks, I said that this bill is carefully calibrated. I think it's based on some experience in the Ontario context.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You use those words and we'll use other words, but I hear what you're saying. You're doing your job exactly the way you should do it.

In terms of that comparison, are there any international comparisons?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Not that I'm aware of. We have one of the strictest regimes internationally in terms of contributions and spending. This is a very restrictive regime. When you travel and you speak to other jurisdictions, or when they come to visit, they're always surprised at the extent of the restrictions we have on fundraising and expenses.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Listen, I've done election observation missions in—I'm not going to name it—a country where the election commission takes out ads to wish the president a happy birthday. There is a wide, vast gap in terms of these regimes.

Chair, how much time do I have? It can't be much.

The Chair:

You have three seconds.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I have, like, none. I'll save it for the next round.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, s'il vous plaît.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I must build on the opposite extreme from Mr. Nater's point earlier. If you're having an event, you're organizing an event, and you announce that the minister of something-or-other is going to come, or a leadership event candidate is going to come, and it then goes forward, but that person never shows up, is it captured?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Well, it's certainly captured in terms of the notice. I think, after the fact, if the event is cancelled, effectively—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, the event happens, but the guy just doesn't show up.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Well, it's no longer a regulated event within the meaning of the bill, so my instinctive reaction—and I'd have to look at it carefully—is that, if it doesn't meet any of the conditions, no matter what the notice said, then there would not be a requirement to report. Of course, all the contributions would be reported afterwards.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right.

If a leadership race is finished—for example, we saw one finish yesterday or two days ago—but a candidate still has debt, that defeated candidate who is having the event is still technically a leadership candidate. Is he captured in this even though his leadership race is over?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

If there is a fundraiser that meets the three conditions, then it would be captured if it's organized for the benefit of an affiliated political entity, and a leadership contestant is one of them. It would be caught by the proposed rules, on the assumption that this bill were enforced, of course, in your scenario.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Should anyone else be captured who hasn't been captured in this bill?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Not that I can foresee, no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So the opposition finance critic is out. You're lucky.

This is just an edge case, because I've been doing a lot of edge cases. Just for the sake of argument, let's say I'm having a fundraiser in my riding, and an opposition leader happens to live in my riding, as was the case until two days ago, and he happened to show up at my event. Would that be captured? That is somebody who meets the requirements, but he isn't in my party.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's an interesting hypothetical. I think the spirit of that legislation—and, again, I would examine the words carefully—is that it would not be captured even though technically the words “leadership contestant” are not restricted to the leader of the party hosting the event.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, fair enough.

You mentioned that you would like us to revisit the exemptions for a convention. Do you want to go into any more depth on that? What would you like to see us discuss?

(1130)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think members of the committee have a better sense than I do in terms of the practical realities of these conventions and the fluidity of attendance. I note that the act contemplates that, if there's a ticketed fundraiser within a convention that it has captured, it meets those definitions. I'm not sure why the practical considerations that go into the donor appreciation event don't go the same way with the fundraiser. That's one thing.

I also don't know if in practice it may be difficult to distinguish between a donor appreciation event and a fundraiser. If somebody wanting to take part in a donor appreciation event that is held every year at the annual party convention makes a large contribution, say, the full maximum amount, a week prior to the convention, is that a donor appreciation event or is that a condition, a payment, to attend a meeting?

I'm assuming good faith here, of course, but there may be situations where it's not perfectly clear how to distinguish one from the other. I think the committee, with the experience of its members, would be better positioned to look into that and see whether the lines are drawn at the right place.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In my campaign, my most successful fundraising event was a pay-what-you-can-afford event. I have a very poor riding, and it was pay what you can afford. There was no price set to it. Some people paid $20 and some people paid $400, and I had somebody who would now be captured at that event. Now, because I have no price, the moment somebody has paid $200, does it become captured, even though it wasn't a condition?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No, it only becomes captured if it's a prior condition for attending. If one is required to pay over $200, then everything is captured. If people happen to be there who have made contributions, but were not required to do so, then it is not captured.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You had suggested a number of amendments. Do you want to expand further on any of these amendments to provide clarity? At some point we have to actually turn these into amendment drafts, which aren't phrased like this.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Mr. Chair, I'm quite happy to do that. I have Madam Lawson here to assist as well. I know that there is perhaps more time. If the committee wants to go through each of these one by one, then we can do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have almost two minutes.

You could start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The first is one that I mentioned in my introduction. It's a prior notice to Elections Canada. We don't look on websites every day to see if notices come up. If we received a report 30 days later, we'd have to go back in time and verify whether there was proper notice. We also would not be in a position to encourage or remind the party that it has an obligation to file a report. If we have the notice at the same time, then we can work with the party to make sure either that they file or that they get the extension that they need because they can't meet the timeline. I think it would be of great assistance. As I said, it could be simply an electronic email proving notice to Elections Canada. That's the first recommendation.

The second is in a situation where organizers who are not the party come to realize that the information they provided to the party is not accurate; it's missing names of attendees, for example. There is currently no obligation on them to inform the party of any change so that the party can make the corresponding change to the report. This amendment would ensure that anybody who is involved in the organization who becomes aware of any change in the information to be provided in the report passes on the information to the party, and that the party then makes the correction to the report.

The Chair:

Okay, I think we'll stop there. I know you have three more amendments, but I'm sure we'll get to them somewhere along here.

We'll go now to Mr. Richards.

(1135)

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I have two questions. The first relates to one of the two glaring loopholes that Mr. Nater has identified. The first loophole he identified clearly is the minimum five days' notice. For example, it's not advertised that the prime minister is going to be attending until maybe they make an amendment two hours before the event or something. The other one, of course, is this idea that there's no ticket price, but you show up and of course everybody is expected to give the $1,550 maximum donation. Now the prime minister can attend an event for which there isn't a $1,500 ticket price, but there is, if you know what I mean. You've already indicated to us that this would certainly be possible under this legislation.

The first of those glaring loopholes is the one I want to ask about.

Should the committee feel that it's appropriate to make an amendment so that it would be absolutely required—whether it's five days or whatever the minimum notice we would determine would be reasonable—that following that time you couldn't, for example, add the attendance of the prime minister or some other minister two hours prior to the event? How would the committee go about making that amendment?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

These are good points. I would differentiate the two. I think the first one is perhaps more properly aligned with the spirit of this bill. I think if it were to be amended to make sure that if there's no announcement of a minister or key decision-maker or a leader of a party, then that person could not attend unless it's set back five days and there's a notice. That, I think, would be within the scope and spirit of this piece of legislation.

The second scenario is somewhat different. This is a scenario where any ordinary Canadian, whether they have money or not, can attend; however, at that event some will make contributions, and in some cases, significant contributions. Now, whether or not that's a concern goes to the whole issue of contribution limits, but this is not a matter dealing with restricted access to key decision-makers. In that scenario anybody could have access to those decision-makers.

It's less a loophole than an issue definition problem, whereas the first one falls within the scope of this bill and perhaps could be corrected.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The reason I chose to ask about the first one is I recognized the second one, although I will predict that we'll see fundraisers where the prime minister is in attendance where every person who is there is giving $1,550; they just weren't required to in order to attend.

Having said that, I recognize that I don't think there's a way to change that. I think that's just there. It will probably exist, but it shows why this legislation won't fix the problem. I don't think it can be amended. I think the first problem could be. You've identified how that might be possible, and I appreciate your doing that.

Let me ask you about the one amendment. It's more to try to understand it because I'm not sure. I'm reading the analysis on your sheet. It's the one about the leadership and nomination contest expenses. I'm trying to understand what you're trying to accomplish with it. When I read the analysis it indicates that it's talking about registered parties and candidates as different from nomination or leadership contestants. It's talking about one entity spending money to promote another so they can get around the expenses.

The Chair:

Blake, which one of the five—

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's the last one.

What I'm understanding there is, it's almost sounding as if this would be intended to deal with where a party or a registered candidate was promoting a nomination contestant or a leadership contestant, which I find a fairly unlikely scenario. Is that what you're trying to deal with, or am I misunderstanding this?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's the reverse scenario. It's not a factual problem, I think it's a drafting problem. If you look at proposed section 476.02, it's for a nomination contest. It's mirrored in the leadership contest definition. The definition proposes that it capture, and I'll only read excerpts, any cost that “was incurred for or that was received as a non-monetary contribution“...“used to directly promote or oppose a registered party, its leader, a nomination contestant or a candidate during a nomination contest”.

This is not a nomination contest expense. The only one that's relevant here is the expense incurred to promote the nomination contestant.

(1140)

Mr. Blake Richards:

What you're indicating here is this may be a way for a candidate to spend an extra 20% to get around the expenditure limit during an election campaign. Say a by-election was called and the nomination fell within the electoral period and therefore they could spend to promote themselves to the general public because they're the only nomination contestant. This would allow them to spend additional money over and above any of the other candidates in the election. Is that what you're getting at?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Not quite. What I'm getting at is that the definition captures all kinds of expenditures that have nothing to do with either a leadership contest or a nomination contest, which we're not intending to capture.

We would not read it that way. The definition was just borrowed from other provisions of the act. For clarity's sake, we would interpret this narrowly. I would recommend that we remove references to irrelevant entities.

A leadership campaign expense is a campaign expense that was incurred in relation to the leadership contest, not some other entity or event. Similarly for a nomination contest....

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Ms. Tassi for five minutes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you again for your presence here today.

Getting back to the previous comment that you made with your second recommendation, is there some timing you would suggest with respect to that notice coming to Elections Canada?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The notice given to Elections Canada should be made no later than at the same time the notice is put on the website.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

If it's five days then it's five days, or whatever the case may be.

I'm pleased to hear you say that you refer to the purpose of this legislation, which relates to privileged access. We know this is the driving force behind it. You believe it's carefully calibrated. Do you think this legislation fulfills the purpose it was intended for?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think you'll be hearing from the Commissioner of Lobbying and the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner. They may have separate views on that.

From my point of view, this is a bill that relates to political financing activities, but not as they impact on the fairness of the electoral process. They are not about the level playing field. They are not about fairness of the electoral process. They are about concerns over perceptions of privileged access to decision-makers.

This is somewhat outside the general scope of the Elections Act. It's caught here because these concerns arise in the context of fundraising events, so it's quite proper that it be in there, but from my point of view, as an administrator concerned with electoral fairness, it improves somewhat transparency. It is calibrated, and I can administer this, although I have some minor improvements that could be made.

From a conflict of interest or ethics point of view, this is something more for other witnesses to speak to.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right, but essentially with respect to privileged access, this meets that objective.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It captures a number of key decision-makers, and it doesn't capture, by contrast, what I've spoken about in other jurisdictions. It doesn't capture people who are not key decision-makers, so, yes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to the exemptions that are listed, and we heard the question previously raised with respect to the PSW, in terms of those who are required to be listed, do you think that exemption list is full?

Is there anyone there who you think should be exempted who doesn't currently appear on that list? PSW is perhaps one that you considered. Is there anyone to whom you would automatically extend that list?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

When I looked at the list, it seemed complete to me. A point was made about adding...and I think it's a good point, but I do not see anything else missing.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

At the beginning of your comments you talked about the application of this bill with amounts of $200 and over, and that it would not apply to all parties. With respect to all parties specifically, you thought that was a good thing. Can you expand on the $200 amount, and the second point about not applying to all parties?

(1145)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's not $200 but over $200, which mirrors the contribution disclosure rule even though, in this case, it may not be a full contribution as long as a portion of that is a contribution. If you are buying an over-$200 ticket, let's say that $75 of that is a meal benefit that you buy. The rest is a contribution that would be caught even though the contribution portion is less than $200. That's one thing.

The other thing is about the parties that are not captured. It is important in the act to strive to calibrate the regime to the realities of different parties. In the recommendations we made to this committee, and to Parliament, we have tried to reduce, for example, the number of mandatory audits for small campaigns.

A one-size-fits-all approach to all campaigns and all parties is not always appropriate or warranted, and this is a good example. Parties that are not represented in the House of Commons, even though they may well be one day, at this point probably should be exempted from these rules.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Getting back to the example of the table, if someone pays $500 for a table and it is $50 per ticket, does that $500 contribution still show up in Elections Canada as a contribution, so that person is actually named as a $500 contributor?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The person who buys the table will be making a contribution minus any personal benefits that he or she directly receives from attending, so the value of his or her meal, but not the others. With respect to that contribution, in this case I would assume most of the $500 would be reported as part of the regular reporting on contributions either through the quarterly reports that parties file or the annual reports, and whether or not it's caught by the regime there.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Perfect.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Tassi.

Mr. Reid, for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

First of all, thank you to both of our witnesses for being here today.

I want to clarify the $200 limit, because there are two ways of slicing this. It's only a penny difference, but I want to ask. If I contribute $200, does that have to be reported or is it required to be $200.01 in order to get reported? We keep on talking about over $200, so the question is, is the dividing line $200 or is it—

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The penny makes the difference. The reporting rules currently in the act for reporting the name and address of the contributors are contributions made over $200 in the aggregate. If in a year you make several contributions, and at the end of the day you've made in the calendar year more than $200 in contributions, then your name and address will be reported.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If you choose to seek the nomination in the riding of Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, for the sake of argument, and I'm an enthusiastic supporter of you and I write you a cheque for $200 at an event you're at, that will not be reported. There's no requirement for that. It has to be $200.01 to be reported, to be clear.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct. That's true of every threshold. There's always the penny over that threshold, whatever the threshold is.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I only wanted to make sure, because we had a discussion here with the minister last week where she referred to $199.99, as if that was the dividing point. I wanted to make sure I have the number right. I can just state as a matter of fact that trying to slice things that way will leave a trail that will be embarrassing, but if $200 versus $200.01 is the dividing point, then it's actually fairly easy to create an event where you sell $200 tickets. I just wanted to be clear about that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It is more than $200, which is the same threshold in the act for contribution disclosure. Even though in this case the amount of the contribution may in fact be less than $200, it's the price of the ticket.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

I got the other point you made. That was a good point to make. I appreciate that. But it's helpful for us all, I think, to understand that the division is between $200 and $200.01.

I wanted to make an editorial comment, if I could. You're welcome to comment or not comment on my comment, but this is meant for the benefit of everybody else on the committee, and for the minister, if she's listening.

In its zeal to be all-inclusive, the government has dealt with the problem that actually was the problem we had here. Chinese billionaires are buying tickets to get access to the Prime Minister of the country. That was the issue: cash for access to people who have direct executive power. Those dinners are now covered by this legislation. So, too, are those dinners covered for opposition leaders who are contestants for the leadership of a party, both parties in and out of power. Had the law gone into effect a little earlier, Jagmeet Singh would have been covered, for example, and the other contestants for the NDP leadership, as well as people who are contestants for nominations.

I will just state the obvious. In the scenario I gave in which you are running for the nomination for one of the parties in the riding of Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, an event you hold is now covered. The chances that a Chinese billionaire is going to buy a ticket seem unlikely. What I'm wondering about are where we're mostly likely to see non-compliance, where people are contestants for nominations, unless I've misunderstood something. Is this not likely going to result in a lot of technical non-compliance with a law where there's no actual problem in any meaningful sense? Are we not simply creating a large administrative burden for the agency and for people who are local volunteers, enthusiasts, partisan supporters, without the requisite expertise to always understand what the law requires of them?

(1150)

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds if you want to respond.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry about that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

On your editorial comment, I want to clarify that the fundraising events that are captured would include a fundraising event that is held for the benefit of the nominee in Lanark, in your scenario, as long as the leader of the party, or interim leader of the party, or leadership contestant, would be present. It's not sufficient for the nomination contestant to be present. It has to be one of the leaders, or if it's not a member of cabinet, aspiring leaders of the party.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to ask a more general question. You were saying that we currently have one of the more strict regimes in the world when it comes to fundraising goals. Do you think that this piece of legislation adequately addresses some of the holes we may have had in our fundraising rules? Do you think we need it to go further and be more strict?

There's a lot of talk about people just showing up at fundraisers and wanting to give all this money and saying, “Here, take it”, even though it's not a requirement for getting in. This is not my experience. When I throw a fundraiser, even if it is $200, I'm usually chasing people around for months afterwards. Sometimes there are a few who it's a year later before they get their cheques in. My experience has been, whether there's a minister there or not, you have to chase people around for a long time. People are not just willingly giving money. It's tough, and it's a part of the political reality that you have to fundraise. It's not my favourite part of this job, but in order to succeed and carry on serving people, it's a reality we all have to face.

Do you think this piece of legislation takes that into account and reaches a balance, or do you think we perhaps should have gone as far as Ontario's legislation? If we do make the rules that strict, could we have a whole bunch of other unintended consequences, where people are finding other means of doing things that perhaps create other problems?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Fundamentally that's a policy question as to how far you want to go. It's not for me to speak to that. The purpose of this bill is not to limit fundraising activities. It's not to restrict the amounts people can give. It does not deal with the fairness of the electoral process, including the level playing field in terms of the capacity to raise funds or receive money from groups or individuals. Individuals in Canada can only give up to a certain amount. That is not affected by this bill.

This bill is really about fundraising activities that raise a concern or create a perception of privilege and access. It's a bit remote from the main goals of the Elections Act, in terms of a level playing field and the fairness of the electoral process. I understand why it's in the Elections Act, because it takes place in the context of fundraising activities, but how far you want to go is really a policy question for members of this committee.

What I would say is that you have to be careful not to over-regulate unintentionally. This bill is carefully drafted. It avoids some of the traps we've seen elsewhere, such as catching a party convention that was not intended to be caught. It's for members of this committee to look at the policy and see whether it should go further. From my point of view, this is not a bill about the fairness of the electoral process. I would say only that it increases transparency, that it's calibrated, and that I can administer this piece of legislation, with some improvements. I think that's the limit of my words on the matter.

(1155)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you feel that it increases transparency?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It certainly does increase transparency, yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

I know I'm going towards a policy question. Ontario changed its fundraising rules recently. This came up in our last meeting. I was interested in knowing your opinion on whether that was a good road to go down. Maybe you can't even answer that, but we were discussing whether there are events you could still have where only a certain list of people get invited. It could be donors who have already donated $1,500, $300, or some other amount. Then you have events where the invitee list is made up only of people who have previously contributed a certain amount. The entry price would not be listed, because you don't have to pay to come to this particular event, but you're only invited to it if you've already donated a certain amount in that calendar year or whatever. Is that something that would still be seen as problematic? Do you think the Ontario legislation solves the problem of not having cash-for-access events, as people have been putting it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I just want to make clear here in a scenario where you would invite only people who have contributed over a certain amount, in this case over $200, that would, generally speaking, be caught by this bill.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This bill would catch that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct. If a prior condition for attending the event is having made a contribution of more than $200, so that includes a donor appreciation event, it would be caught, unless the donor appreciation event is held during a party convention. There it is exempted.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. If the pre-condition is that in the calendar year at some point you would have to have donated a certain amount, then this legislation catches that.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, for the last contributor.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

I'm a little disappointed we didn't get a chance to hear the other three recommendations—

The Chair:

Sorry, Mr. Christopherson. With the committee's indulgence, I'll let him do that at the end.

Mr. David Christopherson:

After 12? Okay.

The Chair:

Yes, if the committee agrees.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Then I'll just ask one quick question and let you get to that.

Going back to the first recommendation on the five days, we've had some discussion about it, but another aspect of this is you don't plan a fundraiser in five days. If you do, it's going to fail. There is lots of preparation. As one way to solve this, in addition to letting you know directly, wouldn't it make sense to give a little more time?

I don't know how far you can go in commenting on this, because I know you are very careful about the technical interpretation and not getting into the “our” politics of it, so I respect if you can't go where I would hope you do. But by extending it for more than five days, you then give everybody an opportunity to actually see it. To make it five days and say that we're doing this so it is transparent, and we're even putting in the legislation, in the regulations, that it has to be prominent—whatever that might mean—on the website.... But with five days, you'd pretty much have to have somebody whose daily duty it is to monitor from a political point of view. You would have to do the same sort of thing.

Wouldn't one answer to this be to just make that time frame longer, a little more realistic? This looks like they want to be able to say, “Look, we have a new provision”, but in reality it doesn't change anything in the real world.

What are your thoughts on that?.

(1200)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I only would link that to the previous comment that was made about a minister being able to come more or less at the last minute, so the longer the notice is, the more likely it is that you'll be caught in a situation where there is uncertainty in terms of who is going to be participating. You have to look at the two issues together, and if you want to be strict about making sure that all the events are caught, then you'll have to consider what is a reasonable timeline. I won't draw a line for that for the committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I'll just contribute the rest of my time to the review of the final three amendments.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Is it okay with the committee that we go a little over time so that the witness can elaborate a bit on his recommended changes to the act?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Mr. Perrault.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Thank you.

We have covered the first two, and I am down at the third one with respect to the new provision, 384.5. This is something I did address in my opening remarks. There may be situations where there is a missing element in the report and the CEO should have the authority to request formally a change to the report to be made. This is something that exists for all the other reports that are in the Canada Elections Act, I believe, and does not exist for this one. It's a very technical amendment.

The next one is regarding offences—and again we spoke to that one—for filing a false and misleading.... There is a requirement to file within a certain timeline, but there is no separate offence for filing a false or misleading return either by way of negligence or deliberately. This is something that exists again for other provisions to the act dealing with reports, and I believe there should be one here as well.

The next one is again on the timeline of reporting. It combines the obligation to file currently in the bill with the obligation to file in a specific timeline, and if you look at the other provisions of the act on filing, it separates the two. There is an obligation that each and every one of you had as a candidate to file a report, and then there is a separate obligation to file that report within a separate timeline. So, if you do file but you happen to file late, then that is addressed specifically. By combining the two, it may be a bit more difficult in terms of enforcement.

Again, this is a great example. The point was raised that if we have administrative monetary penalties, then that should be the way to deal with it, but we should separate the obligation to file from the timing obligation.

The last one is the one we discussed regarding the definition of leadership and nomination campaign expenses, which if you look at the language of the clauses in the bill, carry with them references to parties, promotion of parties and candidates and other entities that have nothing to do with nomination contests or leadership contests, and I would recommend this be made cleaner. Certainly, I would interpret those provisions as referring specifically to expenses in relation to the nomination contest or the leadership contest, as the case may be, and not these other expenses.

The Chair:

Is that okay for committee members?

Thank you very much, witnesses, for coming today. This has been very helpful and I'm sure we'll see you again.

Could the committee members just stay for a minute. We have one housekeeping thing to do in camera

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Français]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 71e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette réunion est publique.

Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada en ce qui concerne le financement politique.

Les deux témoins sont d'Élections Canada: M. Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections par intérim, et Me Anne Lawson, avocate générale et directrice principale, Services juridiques. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à M. Perrault pour qu'il fasse sa présentation. [Traduction]

M. Stéphane Perrault (directeur général des élections par intérim, Élections Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui pour vous parler du projet de loi C-50. Je vais essayer de faire en sorte que mes remarques soient brèves afin de laisser le plus de temps possible pour les questions des députés.

Le projet de loi C-50 comporte deux grands volets, tous deux liés au financement de la politique. Le premier de ces volets est un nouveau régime de rapport portant sur certains événements de collecte de fonds. Le deuxième volet est plus technique et il vise à corriger un problème qui existe depuis longtemps dans la réglementation des dépenses de campagne d'investiture et de campagne à la direction, ainsi que des contributions versées à de telles campagnes. J'aborderai ces deux sujets dans mes observations, mais je concentrerai surtout sur le premier volet du projet de loi C-50.

Je vous ai également fait distribuer un tableau contenant quelques amendements d'ordre technique que le Comité doit examiner afin de mieux administrer les dispositions proposées dans ce projet de loi.

Le premier volet du projet de loi C-50 est donc le nouveau régime de production de rapport sur les activités de financement réglementé. Les exigences de divulgation et de production de rapport s'appliquent seulement à certaines activités de financement. Pour tomber sous le coup du projet de loi, une activité de financement doit répondre aux trois critères suivants: premièrement, elle doit être organisée au profit d'un parti représenté à la Chambre des communes ou de l'une de ses entités politiques affiliées. Deuxièmement, il faut que le chef du parti, un candidat à la direction ou un ministre assiste à l'activité de financement. Troisièmement, il faut qu'au moins une personne ait fait une contribution supérieure à 200 $ ou ait payé un montant de plus de 200 $ incluant une contribution pour assister à l'activité de financement.

À cet égard, je note que le projet de loi est soigneusement calibré. Toutes les parties ne seront pas astreintes aux nouvelles exigences et je crois que c'est une bonne chose. De la même manière, ce ne sont pas toutes les activités de financement qui seront visées, mais uniquement celles pour lesquelles un montant minimal est exigé et auxquelles participent des décideurs clés.

On a également prévu une importante exception pour ce qui est des congrès de parti politique, y compris des congrès à la direction, si ce n'est en ce qui a trait à des activités de financement qui se dérouleront à l'intérieur d'un congrès. Le congrès lui-même est exempté, mais si, dans le cadre de cette activité, il se déroule une activité de financement répondant à toutes les conditions, les nouvelles règles s'appliqueront. Encore une fois, cela reflète un souci de trouver un juste équilibre et je pense que c'est sage.

Par ailleurs, les activités de reconnaissance des donateurs qui sont organisées dans le cadre d'un congrès d'un parti politique seront exemptées. Je comprends que cela reflète une préoccupation quant à la fluidité des présences lors de telles activités et de la difficulté d'appliquer les règles. C'est peut-être une question sur laquelle le Comité voudra se pencher.

Afin d'améliorer la transparence, le projet de loi C-50 prévoit la communication de renseignements sur les activités de financement réglementées. Dans un premier temps, le parti doit annoncer la tenue d'une telle activité à un endroit bien en vue de son site Web, pendant les cinq jours qui précèdent l'activité. Dans un deuxième temps, le parti doit soumettre un rapport au directeur général des élections dans les 30 jours suivant l'activité de financement. Ce rapport devra fournir des renseignements précis sur l'activité, comme le nom et l'adresse partielle des participants, ainsi que les noms des organisateurs. Des exceptions sont prévues pour protéger la vie privée des personnes travaillant à l'événement ou des mineurs susceptibles d'être présents.

Les renseignements à communiquer ne seront pas les mêmes en période d'élections générales. En effet, il ne sera pas nécessaire d'annoncer les activités de financement réglementées, et un seul rapport portant sur toutes les activités de financement tenues en période électorale devra être soumis au DGE dans les 60 jours suivant le jour de l'élection.

Dans la pratique, ce délai peut s'avérer serré. Le projet de loi accroît la transparence du financement politique, ce qui est conforme aux objectifs de la Loi électorale du Canada, et il le fait tout en faisant en sorte de ne pas imposer un fardeau démesuré pour les plus petits partis qui ne sont pas représentés à la Chambre des communes, ou pour les activités de financement dans lesquelles n'interviennent pas des décideurs clés.

(1105)

[Français]

Cela dit, j'ai un certain nombre d'amendements mineurs et techniques à proposer pour améliorer l'application du projet de loi C-50.

Tout d'abord, comme les partis sont tenus d'annoncer à l'avance sur leur site Web les activités de financement visées par le projet de loi C-50, je propose qu'ils soient aussi tenus, en même temps, d'aviser Élections Canada de la publication des renseignements. Il sera ainsi plus facile pour Élections Canada d'appliquer la Loi électorale du Canada et de s'assurer que les rapports qui doivent être soumis 30 jours après le seront effectivement.

Ensuite, afin que le projet de loi reflète mieux les pouvoirs conférés par la Loi électorale du Canada en ce qui a trait aux autres rapports, je recommande que le DGE soit autorisé à demander par écrit que soient apportées des corrections ou des modifications de fond aux rapports soumis après une activité de financement réglementée.

Il faudrait également considérer la possibilité de créer une infraction pour le fait de soumettre un rapport erroné, trompeur ou incomplet, encore une fois afin d'harmoniser le projet de loi avec d'autres dispositions concernant les rapports financiers qui figurent déjà dans la Loi électorale du Canada.

Je parlerai maintenant brièvement du deuxième volet du projet de loi C-50, qui concerne les définitions de « dépense de campagne d'investiture » et de « dépense de campagne à la direction » dans la Loi électorale du Canada.

Ce volet du projet de loi donne suite à une recommandation faite par Élections Canada, qui a été récemment acceptée à l'unanimité par votre comité. Les changements proposés réglementeraient toutes les dépenses et toutes les contributions relatives à des courses à l'investiture et à des courses à la direction.

Sans surprise, Élections Canada appuie les changements proposés. Les définitions actuelles ne respectent pas l'esprit de la Loi et elles sont difficiles à comprendre et à respecter par les candidats, tant ceux à l'investiture qu'à la direction.

Cependant, il y a un amendement inclus dans le tableau que je recommanderais d'apporter à cette partie du projet de loi. Cet amendement ferait en sorte que seules les dépenses et les contributions qui sont spécifiquement relatives à des campagnes d'investiture et à des campagnes à la direction soient visées par la définition ainsi que par les règles sur les dépenses et les contributions.

Avec respect, je crois qu'il y a eu un élargissement qui n'était pas souhaité dans la définition et il faudrait resserrer la rédaction de la définition.

Cela complète mes remarques. Je vous remercie.

Évidemment, je suis disponible pour répondre aux questions des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Monsieur Bittle, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président[Traduction]

Merci de vous être déplacé aujourd'hui.

Pouvez-vous nous décrire notre actuel régime concernant le financement politique et nous dire comment il est perçu dans le monde?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J'ai eu le plaisir de parler de notre régime de financement politique dans différents pays et dans différentes provinces au Canada. Je n'ai jamais dit qu'il était parfait, mais je crois sincèrement que c'est l'un des régimes les mieux calibrés que j'ai eu l'occasion de voir. Je n'envierais certainement aucun autre régime pris dans son ensemble.

M. Chris Bittle:

Dans votre rapport après l'élection, vous avez recommandé l'application d'un régime de sanctions administratives et pécuniaires pour faciliter l'application de la loi. Un tel régime aiderait-il à faire respecter les dispositions du projet de loi C-50?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Voilà une très bonne remarque. Les règles que nous examinons aujourd'hui devant le Comité sont un bon exemple de ce que j'appelle un régime de réglementation. Ce n'est pas du droit pénal.

J'espère bien sûr que, s'il y avait un régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires, celui-ci s'appliquerait à de telles règles, car ce sont exactement les règles pour lesquelles les SPA, comme nous les appelons, sont les plus aptes à favoriser la conformité.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je regrette de n'avoir pas eu beaucoup de temps pour examiner le tableau que vous nous avez fourni, mais sur ce point de droit pénal, en ce qui concerne l'article 9 et vos recommandations, nous pourrions aussi ajouter les infractions exigeant l'existence d'une intention coupable. Par curiosité, pouvez-vous me dire s'il existe des infractions à la Loi électorale du Canada exigeant la preuve d'une intention coupable, ce qui est davantage une norme pénale qu'une norme réglementaire exigeant simplement que l'acte soit coupable, sans égard à l'intention?

(1110)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour la plupart des règles de financement politique contenues dans la loi, quand il existe une exigence ou une interdiction, il y a à la fois infraction — que l'on qualifie de négligence ou d'infraction de diligence raisonnable n'exigeant pas une intention, mais simplement la preuve d'une diligence raisonnable — et une infraction parallèle qui, dans de nombreux cas, exige qu'il y ait intention. Donc, selon les circonstances et la nature du comportement, l'un ou l'autre de ces deux cas de figure peut s'appliquer.

M. Chris Bittle:

Par curiosité, avez-vous entendu parler de poursuites fructueuses de personnes ayant fait preuve d'une intention?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il faudrait que je remonte dans le temps, mais je crois qu'il y en a eu.

M. Chris Bittle:

De nombreux collecteurs de fonds offrent la possibilité d'acheter des billets pour une table. Dans ce cas, certains donateurs peuvent contribuer beaucoup plus que le prix d'un simple billet. Cependant, le cas échéant, ils se trouvent à acheter un certain nombre de billets et à inviter éventuellement plus d'une personne. Par exemple, il pourrait s'agir d'une campagne de financement à 50 $ la tête, mais où les donneurs sont invités à acheter une table pour 500 $. D'après ce que vous avez lu dans le projet de loi C-50, est-ce que cette option, soit celle d'acheter 10 billets pour 500 $, déclencherait le nouveau régime, à supposer qu'un politicien désigné soit présent?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tant qu'une partie de la somme de 500 $ comprend une cotisation, si l'on suppose que la prestation offerte ne correspond pas au montant total, les nouvelles règles s'enclencheraient. Le nom de tous les participants présents devrait être divulgué dans le cadre du régime et pas seulement celui de l'acheteur des billets.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le projet de loi C-50 prévoit un certain nombre d'exemptions aux exigences de déclaration, surtout pour ceux qui organisent l'activité de financement. Cependant, il n'est pas clair si un travailleur de soutien personnel pour un participant serait également exempté s'il était présent dans le cadre de son emploi. Seriez-vous favorable à une exemption pour les travailleurs de soutien, par exemple, qui pourraient être présents à la collecte de fonds afin d'aider une personne ayant payé pour assister à cette collecte, afin que celle-ci ait accès à l'événement?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que cela serait logique, évidemment. Je suis d'accord.

Permettez-moi de revenir sur ma première réponse, car j'ai peut-être induit le Comité en erreur. Je vous suis reconnaissant...

M. Chris Bittle:

Je suis sûr que l'intention n'était pas de revenir à l'original...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le déclencheur correspond à la nécessité de payer au moins 200 $ et je pense que, sans égard au nombre de billets achetés, si un seul de ces billets coûte plus de 200 $, nous nous retrouvons dans le cas de figure visé. Cependant, si le prix du billet pour assister à l'événement est inférieur à 200 $ ou s'il est de 200 $ et moins, le régime ne s'enclenchera pas.

M. Chris Bittle:

Pour ce qui est de l'assistant personnel, c'est...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est un élément très raisonnable, à ajouter au projet de loi, effectivement.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Excusez-moi, votre correctif s'applique-t-il à la table de 500 $?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, précisément. Avec une table de 500 $, composée de 10 personnes à 50 $ chacune, aucun des billets en question ne coûte plus de 200 $. Si un billet, en revanche, coûte plus de 200 $, à ce moment-là les règles s'appliquent.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à nos témoins.

Je tiens à revenir sur le dernier point. Il est possible de vendre plusieurs tables pour 500 $ chacune, mais tant qu'on ne dépasse pas 50 $ par billet, il n'est pas nécessaire de déclarer l'événement dans le cadre de la loi. Le premier ministre pourrait assister à une activité à 50 $ par personne et plusieurs pourraient acheter des tables de 500 $, mais à ce moment-là, les exigences ne s'appliqueraient pas. C'est cela?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact. Je crois comprendre que ce projet de loi vise à saisir les situations où, pour assister à l'un de ces événements où un décideur clé est présent, au moins une des personnes présentes doit avoir payé plus de 200 $.

M. John Nater:

Recommanderiez-vous un changement? Réflexion faite, souhaiteriez-vous que le seuil soit haussé dès que quelqu'un paie plus de 200 $?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je dirais qu'il appartient au Comité de trancher. Je n'ai pas de point de vue très arrêté en la matière et je pense que le projet de loi vise à régler les situations où l'accès privilégié peut être préoccupant, et à déterminer si l'une de ces situations, comme vous le décrivez, qui n'est actuellement pas prise en compte, relève de cette catégorie.

(1115)

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Je vais reprendre l'une de vos recommandations, soit l'avis à fournir à Élection Canada et la publication sur un site Web. Je vais davantage formuler un commentaire, mais je pense que c'est là une suggestion valable. Il est logique que, si Élection Canada veut réglementer cet aspect, il y ait obligation de notification.

J'aimerais revenir un peu plus longuement sur l'avis de cinq jours devant être publié sur le site Web d'un parti. J'en ai parlé la semaine dernière, quand le ministre était ici. Je pense à une situation où l'on a prévu un événement de longue date, où les billets coûtent plus de 200 $, mais où aucun invité ne déclencherait l'obligation de faire rapport — comme le premier ministre, un ministre ou autre — parce que personne ne serait prévu à l'origine. Supposons maintenant que, dans les cinq jours précédant l'événement, disons deux jours ou un jour avant, une personnalité soit ajoutée à la dernière minute, encore une fois le premier ministre ou un ministre.

Dans quelle mesure la loi s'appliquerait-elle dans un tel cas? Quelles seraient les exigences en matière de publicité? Comment cela fonctionnerait-il, à votre avis?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

De mémoire, je pense que dans une telle situation, tout organisateur de l'événement prenant connaissance de la présence d'un des principaux décideurs à l'origine du déclenchement des règles devrait donner avis à la partie concernée afin que celle-ci, dès réception de cet avis, puisse apporter des ajustements à l'avis ou publier un avis au besoin.

M. John Nater:

Recommanderiez-vous des changements pour régler le problème autrement ou pensez-vous que c'est suffisant, c'est-à-dire qu'en quelques heures seulement, des changements seront apportés en ligne?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À la lecture des règles, je dirais qu'elles conviennent pour faire face à ce genre de situation. S'il y a quelque chose de préoccupant que je n'ai pas vu, je serais heureux qu'on m'en parle. Il me semble qu'il y ait là une certaine souplesse pour faire face à ces situations.

M. John Nater:

Qu'en est-il d'une situation où une publicité est envoyée et où l'on indique simplement que des invités spéciaux pourraient assister à l'événement, sans qu'aucun nom ne soit fourni et que les invités spéciaux ne soient confirmés que près de la date? Pensez-vous que la loi s'appliquerait dans un tel cas? On laisserait entendre que le premier ministre ou un ministre pourrait être présent, mais aucun nom n'est mentionné. Cela déclencherait-il la nécessité de faire rapport pour la publication préalable?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que si le parti ou l'organisateur sont au courant, même si l'identité de la personne n'est pas encore connue, mais qu'ils savent qu'un décideur sera présent et qu'ils annoncent cette présence comme un élément de l'événement, le parti devrait donner un avis.

M. John Nater:

Dans les situations où il est très probable ou très possible que le premier ministre ou un ministre assiste à l'événement, il faudrait donner une sorte d'avis.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tout à fait, et je pense qu'il serait prudent de le faire.

M. John Nater:

Supposons que le prix du billet soit inférieur à 200 $, disons 150 $, et que le premier ministre ou un ministre soit présent à l'événement. Les règles permettraient-elles que l'on sollicite d'autres dons lors du même événement? On paierait 150 $ pour assister à l'événement, mais il pourrait avoir un représentant du Club Laurier, par exemple, qui encouragerait le versement d'un don maximal lors de l'événement. Cela serait-il permis en vertu des dispositions actuelles du projet de loi C-50?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce projet de loi ne vise pas à traiter des situations où il n'est pas exigé de verser un droit d'entrée. Comme je le disais, je crois qu'il est plutôt conçu pour saisir ce que je qualifierais les cas d'« accès privilégié », d'accès limité aux personnes payant un montant important. Si l'on n'exige pas que les participants versent ce genre de contribution, même si on les encourage à le faire une fois dans la salle, ce cas de figure n'est pas visé par la loi.

M. John Nater:

Il n'y aurait donc pas de rapport au Parlement après un tel événement.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y aurait toujours un compte rendu sur les contributions, comme d'habitude, selon les règles habituelles.

M. John Nater:

Comment couvrir les cas où, après la tenue d'un événement relativement petit, disons de 10 personnes, on découvre que ces 10 participants ont versé le don maximal? Conformément à l'esprit de la divulgation, y aurait-il lieu de réviser le rapport pour tenir compte de ce genre de situation, où la déclaration n'est pas exigée, mais où tous les participants ont fait le don maximal ou ont versé une contribution importante?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que la divulgation se fait déjà dans le cas des personnes faisant des contributions. On se trouve ici à ajouter la divulgation du contexte dans lequel ces contributions sont faites.

Encore une fois, je pense que cela risquerait de changer l'objet du projet de loi. Je ne dis pas que c'est une bonne ou une mauvaise chose, mais le projet de loi n'est destiné qu'à viser la situation où il existe une condition préalable à l'obtention d'une certaine contribution pour pouvoir participer à l'événement.

(1120)

M. John Nater:

J'en reviens à l'un des commentaires de M. Bittle au sujet des déclarations fausses, trompeuses ou inexactes. Comme vous le voyez à l'heure actuelle, aucune disposition de la loi n'empêche un parti ou une association de circonscription de simplement produire un faux rapport. Rien ne l'empêche.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact.

Il existe une disposition qui traite des défauts de déclaration. À un moment donné, si la déclaration est manifestement fausse, cela peut équivaloir à un défaut de déclaration, mais nous sommes alors dans les nuances de gris. Je pense que d'autres dispositions de la loi portant sur d'autres types de rapports financiers font cette distinction. Premièrement, il y a l'obligation de produire un rapport et une pénalité est imposée en cas de non production. Deuxièmement, il y a une obligation distincte concernant la chronologie. C'est une recommandation qui se trouve dans le tableau, soit de faire la part entre l'obligation de produire un rapport et celle de respecter un échéancier. Troisièmement, il est interdit de fournir des renseignements faux ou trompeurs.

Je pense qu'il est préférable de séparer les trois aspects, du point de vue de la conformité et de l'application. Cependant, dans ce cas, seuls les deux premiers aspects sont inclus dans le projet de loi. Il n'y a rien, dans ce texte, qui porte sur des renseignements faux ou trompeurs.

M. John Nater:

Merci beaucoup. [Français]

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Nater.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Excellent, merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de votre présence encore une fois. Nous commençons presque à nous sentir comme une famille tellement nous faisons cela souvent.

Mes excuses au Comité pour mon retard. J'ai des réunions consécutives des comptes publics pendant cette séance. J'étais dans un autre édifice et il m'était physiquement impossible d'arriver plus tôt, mais je ferai quand même de mon mieux.

Les questions de M. Nater traduisaient une façon de penser des plus intéressantes, et je voudrais y revenir.

J'ai probablement besoin de vos lumières. J'ai remarqué que vous êtes très rigoureux et je suppose que c'est parce que c'est une application très rigoureuse. L'idée est que, si la présence du ministre des Finances est connue d'avance, on a intérêt à y être et à sortir son argent. Il s'agit de couvrir cela, dans l'intérêt d'une certaine reddition de comptes.

Mais M. Nater a soulevé un scénario très intéressant. Il n'y a pas de liste officielle d'invités, mais il y a des sourires en coin et des clins d'oeil complices pour vous dire que vous auriez intérêt à être là. Puis les invités arrivent et, miracle et surprise, par coïncidence, tout le monde verse la contribution maximale. C'est tout le raisonnement de M. Nater. Je ne prends aucun crédit pour son raisonnement, mais je le développe un peu.

Qu'est-ce qui empêchera cela? Si je comprends bien, à ce stade-là, parce qu'il ne s'agissait en rien d'un accès privilégié, seul le mécanisme habituel de remise d'un rapport serait déclenché. Cela ne serait pas déclaré comme une activité entrant normalement dans la rubrique de ce sujet.

Je vous soumets cela. Aidez-moi à comprendre.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Eh bien, je pense que cela dépend des faits.

Vous avez présenté la chose davantage comme un cas où chacun sait que le ministre sera là, sans que cela soit dit explicitement. C'est un scénario trompeur. En l'occurrence, je dirais que le parti aurait l'obligation d'être honnête à ce sujet et de faire la divulgation, de faire une annonce transparente.

Le scénario n'est pas le même que pour une activité à laquelle tous sont invités, même ceux qui ne paient pas — et c'est le deuxième scénario auquel M. Nater faisait sans doute allusion — et tombent sur un ministre ou un chef et font une contribution. En l'occurrence, tout le monde est invité; ce n'est pas une question d'accès privilégié.

Je ne sais pas trop au juste quel scénario vous évoquiez.

M. David Christopherson:

Moi non plus. C'est pourquoi je vous pose la question. C'est pour cela que nous vous avons invité, pour avoir réponse à ces questions.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Lorsqu'un parti a l'intention de faire venir un ministre et le fait savoir à mots couverts, j'estime que c'est certainement un scénario où le parti devrait divulguer d'avance les renseignements pertinents. C'est couvert par le projet de loi.

Ce qui ne l'est pas...

Mme Anne Lawson (avocate générale et directrice principale, Services juridiques, Élections Canada):

[Inaudible]... le ministre et le prix du billet...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Et le prix du billet, bien sûr.

Mais le projet de loi ne couvre pas le cas où il n'y a pas de condition préalable au sujet d'un paiement. C'est un choix de politique délibéré, parce que cela définit la nature de ce projet de loi.

(1125)

M. David Christopherson:

Parfait, nous avançons.

Très bien, permettez-moi la question que voici. Avez-vous été consulté pour l'élaboration du projet de loi C-50?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous avons utilisé l'information communiquée pour analyser nos hypothèses de planification, mais il n'y a pas eu de consultation pour savoir si la proposition était bonne ou mauvaise. C'est parfaitement normal dans ce genre d'initiative législative.

M. David Christopherson:

Ma foi, c'est normal si vous songez à la dernière législature, mais ce n'est pas si normal dans le contexte de la façon de faire ces choses dans le passé.

Au sujet de l'accès privilégié — la substance — savez-vous comment l'efficacité de ce régime se comparerait à celle des autres régimes existants?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le seul avec lequel je saurais faire la comparaison est le régime provincial de l'Ontario. Je crois savoir que votre comité entendra peut-être M. Essensa.

Le régime ontarien est beaucoup plus strict. Est-il désirable ou pas? C'est à votre comité d'en juger. L'Ontario impose une interdiction absolue de participation. Selon ce que je crois savoir, cela vise tout candidat, député ou chef. On ratisse très large. Même les candidats indépendants n'ont pas droit d'assister à une activité de financement s'il y a un prix d'entrée, et s'il n'y a pas de seuils. La portée est très vaste, et c'est très restrictif pour ce qui est de la nature des activités de financement.

Je crois savoir qu'un projet de loi à l'étude, le 152, vise à exempter les congrès de parti, qui ne l'étaient pas jusqu'ici. Chaque fois qu'il y a un congrès de parti et qu'il y a des contributions à verser, alors les chefs de parti n'ont pas le droit d'assister. Je pense que M. Essensa saura mieux vous expliquer les problèmes que cela pose.

C'est pourquoi j'ai dit dans mes remarques que les mots de ce projet de loi sont soigneusement choisis. Je pense que c'est fondé sur une certaine expérience du contexte ontarien.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous utilisez ces mots-là, et nous en utiliserons d'autres, mais je comprends ce que vous dites. Vous faites votre travail exactement comme vous le devez.

Quant à cette comparaison, y a-t-il des comparaisons internationales?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pas que je sache. Nous avons un des régimes les plus sévères au monde pour ce qui est des contributions et des dépenses. Il est très restrictif. Lorsque nous prenons la parole à l'étranger, ou lorsque nous recevons des visiteurs étrangers, nos interlocuteurs sont toujours surpris de l'étendue des restrictions que nous appliquons au financement et aux dépenses.

M. David Christopherson:

Écoutez bien, j'ai participé à des missions d'observation d'élections — dans un pays que je ne nommerai pas — où la commission électorale fait paraître de la publicité pour souhaiter un bon anniversaire au président. L'écart entre ces régimes est très large.

Monsieur le président, combien de temps me reste-t-il? Pas beaucoup, je suppose.

Le président:

Vous avez trois secondes.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, pour ainsi dire rien. Je garde ma question pour la prochaine ronde.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je dois reprendre de l'autre extrême le raisonnement de M. Nater. Si vous organisez une activité et que vous annoncez que le ministre de telle ou telle chose va être là, ou qu'un candidat dans une campagne à la direction sera là, et que cette personne ne se montre jamais, est-ce couvert?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ma foi, c'est certainement couvert pour l'avis. Après coup, si l'activité est annulée, effectivement...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, l'activité a lieu, mais le gars ne se pointe pas.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Eh bien, ce n'est plus une activité réglementée au sens du projet de loi, et ma réaction instinctive — et je devrai me pencher attentivement là-dessus — est que, si elle ne satisfait pas à l'une des conditions, peu importe ce que l'avis indiquait, il ne serait pas obligatoire de produire un rapport. Bien sûr, toutes les contributions seraient déclarées par la suite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est cela.

Si la course à la direction est terminée — par exemple, nous en avons vu une prendre fin hier ou avant-hier — mais qu'un candidat a encore des dettes, le candidat défait qui tient l'activité est toujours techniquement candidat à la direction. Est-il couvert, même si sa course à la direction est terminée?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

Toute activité de financement qui répondrait aux trois conditions serait couverte si elle est organisée au profit d'une entité politique affiliée, comme un candidat à la direction. L'activité serait couverte par les règles proposées, si tant est que le projet de loi est appliqué, bien sûr, dans votre scénario.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Faudrait-il couvrir quelqu'un d'autre qui ne l'est pas déjà dans ce projet de loi?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pas que je puisse prévoir, non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc le porte-parole de l'opposition pour les finances est exclu. Vous avez de la chance.

Ce n'est qu'un cas limite, car j'ai fait une foule de cas limites. Par exemple, disons que j'ai une activité de financement dans ma circonscription, et qu'un chef de l'opposition habite dans ma circonscription, comme c'était le cas jusqu'avant-hier, et qu'il se pointe à mon activité. Cela serait-il couvert? Il répond aux exigences, mais il n'est pas de mon parti.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Question hypothétique intéressante. Je pense que, dans l'esprit de la loi — et encore une fois je pèserais mes mots avec grand soin — cela ne serait pas couvert, même si techniquement, les mots « candidat à la direction » ne désignent pas exclusivement le chef du parti qui tient l'activité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien, cela se comprend.

Vous avez mentionné que vous aimeriez que nous revenions sur les exemptions pour un congrès. Pourriez-vous expliciter votre pensée à ce sujet? De quoi aimeriez-vous que nous discutions?

(1130)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Les membres du Comité ont probablement une meilleure idée que moi des réalités pratiques de ces congrès et de la fluidité de la participation. Je note que la loi prévoit que, si une activité de financement avec vente de billets dans le cadre d'un congrès est couverte, cette activité répond à ces définitions. Je ne vois pas trop pourquoi les considérations pratiques d'une activité d'appréciation des donateurs ne sont pas traitées de la même façon que l'activité de financement. Voilà une première chose.

Je ne sais pas non plus si, dans la pratique, il peut être difficile de distinguer entre une activité d'appréciation des donateurs et une activité de financement. Si quelqu'un désirant participer à une activité d'appréciation des donateurs qui a lieu chaque année au congrès annuel du parti fait une importante contribution — disons du montant maximal permis — une semaine avant le congrès, est-ce là une activité d'appréciation des donateurs ou est-ce une condition, un paiement, pour assister à une assemblée?

Je ne mets pas en question la bonne foi ici, bien sûr, mais il pourrait y avoir des situations où la distinction entre les deux n'est pas parfaitement claire. Selon moi, avec l'expérience de ses membres, le Comité serait mieux placé pour se pencher là-dessus et voir si les lignes sont tirées à la bonne place.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ma campagne, l'activité de financement qui a rapporté le plus a été une activité où les participants ont payé selon leurs moyens. Ma circonscription est très pauvre et chacun a payé selon ses moyens. Il n'était pas proposé de prix. Certaines personnes ont payé 20 $ et d'autres 400 $. Nous avions donc une personne qui allait être couverte. Puisqu'il n'était pas annoncé de prix, à partir du moment où quelqu'un a versé 200 $, l'activité était-elle couverte, même si ce n'était pas une condition?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, elle n'est couverte que s'il s'agit d'une condition préalable pour y assister. Si quelqu'un est tenu de payer plus de 200 $, alors tout est couvert. S'il se trouve que des personnes ont fait des contributions sans y être tenues, cela n'est pas couvert.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Vous aviez proposé un certain nombre d'amendements. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus long sur certains de ces amendements pour nous éclairer? À un certain point, nous devons les transformer en projets d'amendement, qui ne sont pas formulés de la même façon.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Monsieur le président, je suis très heureux de le faire. Je suis accompagné de Me Lawson ici, qui pourra m'aider également. Je sais que nous avons peut-être plus de temps. Si le Comité veut les étudier un par un, nous pourrons le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De combien de temps est-ce que je dispose encore?

Le président:

Vous avez presque deux minutes.

Vous pourriez commencer par M. Graham.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le premier est celui que j'ai mentionné dans mon introduction. Il s'agit d'un avis préalable à Élections Canada. Nous ne consultons pas tous les jours les sites Web pour surveiller les nouveaux avis. Si nous avons reçu un rapport 30 jours après, nous devrions revenir en arrière et vérifier que l'avis exigé a été donné. Nous ne serions pas non plus en mesure de rappeler au parti qu'il est tenu de produire un rapport. Si nous avons l'avis en même temps, alors nous pouvons travailler avec le parti pour être sûrs soit qu'il produira le rapport, soit qu'il obtiendra une prorogation du délai dont il a besoin pour se conformer. Je pense que ce serait très utile. Comme je l'ai dit, il pourrait s'agir d'un simple courriel pour prouver que l'avis a été envoyé à Élections Canada. C'est ma première recommandation.

La deuxième concerne le cas où les organisateurs qui ne sont pas du parti se rendent compte que les renseignements qu'ils ont fournis au parti ne sont pas exacts; par exemple, ils ne comprennent pas les noms des personnes présentes. Actuellement, ils ne sont pas tenus d'informer le parti de quelque changement que ce soit, pour que le parti puisse modifier son rapport en conséquence. Cet amendement donnerait la certitude que toute personne oeuvrant au sein de l'organisation qui est au courant d'un changement des renseignements à fournir dans le rapport communiquera ces renseignements au parti, et que le parti modifiera ensuite le rapport.

Le président:

Très bien, je pense que nous nous arrêterons là. Je sais que vous avez trois autres amendements, mais je suis sûr que nous y arriverons bien à un moment donné.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Richards.

(1135)

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai deux questions. La première se rapporte à l'une des deux échappatoires flagrantes sur lesquelles M. Nater a mis le doigt. La première échappatoire qu'il a signalée est, bien sûr, le préavis minimal de cinq jours. Par exemple, la présence du premier ministre n'est pas annoncée avant, disons, qu'il y ait une modification deux heures avant l'activité ou quelque chose du genre. L'autre, bien sûr, est cette idée qu'il n'y a pas de prix d'admission, mais qu'on s'attend que chaque participant fasse le don maximal de 1 550 $. Certes, le premier ministre peut assister à une activité pour laquelle il n'y a pas de billet à 1 500 $, alors qu'il y en a quand même un, si vous voyez ce que je veux dire. Vous nous avez déjà indiqué que cela serait certainement possible en vertu de ce projet de loi.

C'est sur la première de ces échappatoires flagrantes que je voudrais vous interroger.

Le Comité devrait-il considérer qu'il y a lieu d'adopter un amendement pour rendre absolument obligatoire — qu'il s'agisse d'un préavis de cinq jours ou du préavis minimal que nous estimerions raisonnable — pour interdire, donc, après ce délai, d'ajouter la présence du premier ministre ou d'un autre ministre deux heures avant l'activité? Comment le Comité pourrait-il s'y prendre pour apporter cet amendement?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Bonnes questions. J'établirais une différence entre les deux. Selon moi, la première question est peut-être plus correctement alignée sur l'esprit du projet de loi. S'il fallait le modifier pour interdire toute annonce d'un ministre ou d'un décideur clé ou d'un chef de parti, alors cette personne ne pourrait pas se pointer à moins que l'activité ne soit reportée de cinq jours et qu'il y ait un avis. Voilà, je pense, qui serait conforme à la portée et à l'esprit de cette mesure.

Le deuxième scénario est légèrement différent. Dans ce scénario, tout Canadien ordinaire, qu'il ait l'argent nécessaire ou pas, peut assister à l'activité; mais à cette activité, certains feront des contributions, et parfois des contributions considérables. Cela pose-t-il ou pas un problème? Voilà qui rejoint ou pas toute la question des limites de contribution, mais ce n'est pas une question de restriction d'accès aux décideurs clés. Dans ce scénario, n'importe qui pourrait avoir accès à ces décideurs.

Ce n'est pas tant une échappatoire qu'un problème de définition des enjeux; dans le premier cas, c'est une échappatoire qui entre dans la portée du projet de loi, et il y aurait peut-être possibilité de la corriger.

M. Blake Richards:

La raison pour laquelle j'ai posé ma question au sujet du premier cas est que j'ai reconnu le deuxième, sauf que je prédirai que nous verrons des activités de financement où le premier ministre est présent et où chaque participant donne 1 550 $; ils ne sont tout simplement pas tenus de le faire pour y assister.

Cela dit, je reconnais qu'il n'est pas possible de changer cela, à mon avis. C'est comme cela. Cela existera probablement, et cela illustre pourquoi ce projet de loi ne réglera pas le problème. Je ne pense pas qu'un amendement soit possible. Peut-être pour régler le premier problème, oui. Vous avez indiqué comment cela pourrait être possible, et je vous en sais gré.

Permettez-moi une question au sujet de l'amendement. Je cherche surtout à le comprendre, mais je ne suis pas sûr. Je lis l'analyse que vous avez distribuée. C'est le passage au sujet des dépenses de campagne à la direction et de course à l'investiture. J'essaie de comprendre ce que vous voulez accomplir. Je vois que l'analyse traite des partis et des candidats enregistrés, qui sont différents des candidats à l'investiture ou à la direction. Elle traite d'une entité qui dépense des fonds pour en promouvoir une autre afin de contourner la règle sur les dépenses.

Le président:

Blake, lequel des cinq...

M. Blake Richards:

C'est la dernière question.

Si je comprends bien, c'est un peu comme si l'intention était que cela s'appliquerait au cas où un parti ou un candidat enregistré favorisait un candidat à l'investiture ou un candidat à la direction, ce qui est un scénario à mon sens très peu probable. Est-ce bien ce que vous visez, ou suis-je dans l'erreur à ce sujet?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est le scénario inverse. Ce n'est pas un problème factuel, mais plutôt un problème de rédaction. Prenez le projet d'article 476.02, à propos d'une course à l'investiture. En calquant la définition d'une course à la direction, il propose de désigner comme dépenses — je ne lirai que des passages — les « frais engagés » ou les « contributions non monétaires apportées »... « pourvu qu'elles servent à favoriser ou à contrecarrer directement un parti enregistré, son chef, un candidat à l'investiture ou un candidat pendant une course à l'investiture ».

Or, ce ne sont pas des dépenses de course à l'investiture. La seule justifiée ici est la dépense engagée pour favoriser le candidat à l'investiture.

(1140)

M. Blake Richards:

Autrement dit, cela pourrait permettre à un candidat de dépenser 20 % de plus pour contourner la limite de dépenses durant une campagne électorale. Supposons qu'une élection complémentaire soit déclenchée et que l'investiture ait lieu durant la période électorale. Quelqu'un qui serait seul candidat à l'investiture d'un parti pourrait dépenser pour se promouvoir auprès de la population plus d'argent que les autres candidats à l'élection? Est-ce là que vous voulez en venir?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pas tout à fait. Là où je veux en venir est que la définition s'applique à toutes sortes de dépenses qui n'ont rien à voir avec une course à la direction ou une course à l'investiture, ce que nous ne voulons pas.

Nous ne ferions pas cette interprétation-là. La définition a juste été empruntée à d'autres dispositions de la Loi électorale. Par souci de clarté, nous l'interpréterions au sens strict. Je recommanderais d'enlever toute mention des entités politiques qui n'ont aucun rapport.

Une dépense de campagne à la direction est une dépense qui a été engagée en rapport avec la course à la direction, non pas avec quelque autre entité ou activité. De même, une dépense de course à l'investiture...

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

À votre tour, madame Tassi. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Perrault, merci encore une fois de votre présence.

Pour revenir au commentaire précédent au sujet de votre deuxième recommandation, les partis devraient aviser Élections Canada combien de temps avec la tenue d'une activité de financement?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Élections Canada devrait être avisé en même temps que l'avis est affiché dans le site Web.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Si c'est cinq jours, donc c'est cinq jours, ou quelque intervalle que ce soit.

Je suis heureuse de vous entendre parler de l'esprit de la loi, en ce qui concerne l'accès privilégié. Nous savons tous que c'est la raison première de ce projet de loi. Vous dites qu'il est soigneusement calibré. Pensez-vous qu'il atteint son but?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le commissaire au lobbying et le commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique auront sans doute des avis différents du mien.

De mon point de vue, c'est un projet de loi qui se rapporte aux activités de financement politique, mais non à leur incidence sur l'équité du processus électoral. Il ne s'agit pas ici de l'équité des règles du jeu. Il s'agit des préoccupations suscitées par les apparences d'accès privilégié aux décideurs.

C'est quelque chose qui échappe à la portée générale de la Loi électorale. On y remédie ici parce que ces préoccupations surgissent dans le contexte des activités de financement politique, alors c'est bien qu'on en dispose dans cette même loi. De mon point de vue d'administrateur soucieux de justice électorale, ce projet de loi procure plus de transparence. Il est calibré et je peux travailler avec, bien que j'apporterais quelques légères améliorations.

En matière d'éthique ou de conflits d'intérêts, il appartient à d'autres témoins de se prononcer.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord, mais en ce qui concerne essentiellement l'accès privilégié, il atteint son but.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il vise un certain nombre de décideurs clés; il ne vise pas, par contre, ceux dont j'ai parlé dans d'autres entités politiques. Il ne vise pas des gens qui ne sont pas des décideurs clés, alors la réponse est oui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Nous avons entendu la question tantôt au sujet des préposés aux services de soutien à la personne, pour savoir qui doit figurer ou non dans la liste des personnes présentes à l'activité de financement. Pensez-vous que la liste des exemptions est complète?

Y a-t-il quelqu'un encore à votre avis qui devrait être exempté et qui n'est pas mentionné? Les aides personnels, peut-être? Y a-t-il quelqu'un d'autre qui devrait figurer automatiquement?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Lorsque j'ai examiné la liste, elle m'a paru complète. On a parlé d'ajouter... et je pense que c'est une bonne idée, mais je ne vois pas qui d'autre.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Au début de votre intervention, vous avez parlé de l'application du projet de loi aux contributions de 200 $ et plus en précisant que cela ne toucherait pas tous les partis. Vous trouviez que c'était une bonne chose. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage sur ce montant de 200 $ et sur le fait que tous les partis ne sont pas visés?

(1145)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce n'est pas 200 $, mais plus de 200 $, comme dans la règle de divulgation des contributions même si, dans ce cas, il se peut que ce ne soit pas une pleine contribution, pourvu qu'une partie du montant soit une contribution. Si vous achetez par exemple un billet à plus de 200 $, mais qu'il donne droit à un repas de 75 $, le reste est une contribution à déclarer même si elle est inférieure à 200 $. Voilà pour le premier point.

Le second point est celui des partis qui ne sont pas visés. Il est important d'essayer de calibrer le régime en fonction des réalités des différents partis. Dans les recommandations que nous avons faites au Comité et au Parlement, nous avons essayé de réduire, par exemple, le nombre de vérifications pour les campagnes de moindre envergure.

Il n'est pas toujours bon ni justifié d'appliquer une formule unique à toutes les campagnes et à tous les partis et en voici un bon exemple. Les partis qui ne sont pas représentés aux Communes, même s'ils le seront un jour, devraient pour le moment échapper à la règle.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Pour reprendre l'exemple de la table, si quelqu'un paie 500 $ pour une table et que le billet est de 50 $, est-ce que ce versement de 500 $ apparaît encore chez Élections Canada comme une contribution, avec cette personne identifiée par son nom comme donateur de 500 $?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

La personne qui achète la table fait une contribution dont on soustrait le montant de tout avantage personnel qu'elle reçoit directement du fait de sa présence, en l'occurrence la valeur de son repas, mais pas les autres. Je suppose que dans ce cas, la plus grande partie des 500 $ serait déclarée dans les comptes rendus périodiques des contributions financières, soit les rapports trimestriels que les partis déposent ou les rapports annuels, peu importe que ce soit ou non visé par le régime envisagé ici.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Parfait.

Le président:

Merci, madame Tassi.

Monsieur Reid, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Tout d'abord, merci à nos deux témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je veux tirer au clair la limite de 200 $, parce qu'il y a deux façons de trancher. C'est une différence d'un cent seulement, mais je tiens à demander. Si je verse 200 $, faut-il le déclarer ou bien cela commence à 200,01 $? On parle toujours de plus de 200 $, alors ma question est la suivante: est-ce que la ligne de démarcation est à 200 $ ou bien...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le cent fait toute la différence. Les règles actuelles exigent qu'on communique le nom et l'adresse des personnes dont les contributions excèdent 200 $ en tout. Si vous faites plusieurs contributions au cours d'une année et qu'à la fin elles dépassent le seuil de 200 $, alors votre nom et votre adresse doivent figurer dans le rapport.

M. Scott Reid:

Supposons que vous décidez de briguer l'investiture dans la circonscription de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston et que je moi, un fervent partisan, je vous fais un chèque de 200 $ lors d'une activité, mon nom ne figurera pas dans un rapport. Il faut que ce soit 200,01 $ pour être déclaré, n'est-ce pas?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Exact. Il en va de même pour tous les seuils. Il y a toujours le cent qui franchit le seuil, quel qu'il soit.

M. Scott Reid:

Je voulais m'en assurer, parce que nous avons eu cette discussion avec la ministre la semaine dernière où elle parlait de 199,99 $ comme si c'était la ligne de démarcation. Je voulais m'assurer du nombre exact. J'avoue que le fait d'essayer de trancher de cette façon laissera une trace qui risque d'être gênante, mais si la ligne de démarcation est entre 200 $ et 200,01 $, il est assez facile d'organiser une activité à 200 $ le billet. Je voulais que ce soit bien clair.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est plus de 200 $, soit le même seuil fixé par la Loi pour la divulgation des contributions. Même si dans ce cas, le montant de la contribution peut en fait être inférieur à 200 $, c'est le prix du billet.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

J'ai compris l'autre précision que vous avez apportée. Il fallait le faire et je vous en remercie. Mais il nous est utile à tous, je pense, de comprendre que la démarcation est entre 200 $ et 200,01 $.

J'aimerais faire un commentaire, si vous permettez. Libre à vous de le commenter à votre tour, mais je le fais pour le bien de tous les membres du Comité et de la ministre, si elle est à l'écoute.

Dans son empressement à pourvoir à tout, le gouvernement s'est occupé du problème qui était en fait celui que nous avions ici. Des milliardaires achètent des billets pour avoir accès au premier ministre du pays. C'était là tout le problème: monnayer l'accès au pouvoir exécutif direct. Ces dîners sont maintenant visés par le projet de loi, comme ils le sont aussi pour les leaders de l'opposition qui se présentent à la direction d'un parti; on vise donc tant le parti au pouvoir que les partis d'opposition. Si ce projet de loi avait été adopté un peu plus tôt, il se serait appliqué à Jagmeet Singh, par exemple, et aux autres candidats à la direction du NPD, ainsi qu'aux candidats aux investitures.

Je vais juste énoncer l'évidence. Dans le scénario que je vous ai donné, où vous briguez l'investiture de l'un des partis dans la circonscription de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, toute activité de financement que vous organisez tombe maintenant sous le coup du projet de loi. Les chances qu'un milliardaire chinois achète un billet paraissent invraisemblables. Je me demande où nous aurons le plus de chances de voir des manquements à la loi, lorsque des personnes se présenteront à des investitures, à moins que quelque chose m'ait échappé. Ne risque-t-il pas d'y avoir beaucoup de manquements techniques à la loi alors qu'il n'y a pas réellement de problème digne de ce nom? Ne sommes-nous pas en train de créer un gros fardeau administratif pour Élections Canada et pour tous les bénévoles, les partisans, les militants des campagnes locales qui ne sont pas toujours en mesure de comprendre les exigences de la loi?

(1150)

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes si vous voulez.

M. Scott Reid:

Désolé.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À propos de votre commentaire, je tiens à préciser que les activités de financement visées par le projet de loi comprendraient celle tenue au profit de votre candidat dans Lanark, selon votre scénario, pourvu que soient présents le chef du parti, le chef intérimaire du parti ou le candidat à la direction. Il ne suffit pas que le candidat à l'investiture soit présent. Il faut que ce soit un des chefs, ou si ce n'est pas un membre du Cabinet, un des aspirants à la direction du parti.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais poser une question plus générale. Vous disiez que nous avons actuellement un des régimes les plus stricts au monde en matière de financement politique. Croyez-vous que ce projet de loi colmate bien les brèches qui s'ouvraient peut-être dans nos règles de financement? Devrions-nous aller plus loin, être plus stricts encore?

On parle volontiers de gens qui se pointent aux activités de financement et qui offrent tout bonnement de l'argent en disant: « Voici, prenez-le », même si ce n'est pas une condition d'admission. Ce n'est pas ce que je vis, moi. Lorsque j'organise une activité, même à 200 $, je cours habituellement après les gens pendant des mois, parfois jusqu'à un an, avant d'encaisser leur chèque. D'après mon expérience personnelle, qu'il y ait ou non un ministre sur place, il faut courtiser longtemps les donateurs. Les gens ne donnent pas de l'argent volontiers. Il faut travailler fort pour en amasser, cela fait partie de notre réalité politique. Ce n'est pas ce que j'aime le plus de mon travail, mais si nous voulons réussir et continuer de servir la population, nous devons accepter cette réalité.

Pensez-vous que ce projet de loi en tient compte et qu'il établit un équilibre, ou plutôt que nous devrions aller aussi loin que la loi ontarienne? Si nous rendons les règles aussi strictes, ne risquons-nous pas de provoquer une flopée de conséquences imprévues, que les gens trouvent d'autres façons d'agir qui créeront peut-être d'autres problèmes?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il s'agit essentiellement de déterminer jusqu'où vous voulez aller. Il ne m'appartient pas de me prononcer là-dessus. L'objet du projet de loi n'est pas de limiter les activités de financement, ni de plafonner les montants qu'on peut donner. L'enjeu ici n'est pas l'équité du processus électoral, ou l'égalité des chances dans la capacité de lever des fonds ou de percevoir de l'argent chez des groupes ou des particuliers. Les particuliers au Canada ne peuvent donner plus qu'un certain montant. Ce projet de loi n'y change rien.

Il vise en réalité à encadrer les activités de financement qui suscitent un malaise ou qui créent des apparences d'accès privilégié. Il s'éloigne un peu des grands objectifs de la Loi électorale, qui sont l'égalité des chances et l'équité du processus électoral. Je comprends pourquoi il touche la Loi électorale, en raison des activités de financement, mais c'est à vous de déterminer jusqu'où aller.

Je vous dirais par contre de faire attention à ne pas réglementer à outrance. Le projet de loi est rédigé avec soin. Il évite certains pièges que nous avons vus ailleurs, comme d'englober sans le vouloir un congrès de parti. C'est à votre comité qu'il appartient d'examiner le principe et de voir s'il y a lieu de pousser plus loin. De mon point de vue, ce projet de loi ne concerne pas l'équité du processus électoral. Je dirai seulement qu'il accroît la transparence, qu'il est calibré et que je peux travailler avec, moyennant quelques améliorations. C'est ici que s'arrêtent mes compétences.

(1155)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous trouvez qu'il accroît la transparence?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, absolument.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Je sais que je m'en vais vers une question de politique. L'Ontario a changé récemment ses règles de financement. Nous en avons parlé à notre dernière réunion. J'étais intéressée de savoir si, à votre avis, c'était une bonne voie à emprunter. Peut-être que vous n'avez pas de réponse à cela non plus, mais nous nous demandions s'il y avait toujours moyen d'organiser des activités où sont invités seulement les gens d'une certaine liste, celle des donateurs rendus à 1 500 $ par exemple, à 300 $ ou à quelque autre montant. Le prix d'admission ne serait pas indiqué, vu que vous n'auriez pas à payer pour entrer. Vous n'êtes invité que si vous avez atteint tel ou tel montant de contributions durant l'année civile. Pensez-vous que ce serait encore vu comme une source de problèmes? Pensez-vous que la loi de l'Ontario règle le problème en interdisant les activités où se monnaye l'accès aux décideurs?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je veux juste préciser que dans un scénario comme celui-ci, où vous invitez seulement des gens ayant contribué au-delà d'un certain montant, dans ce cas au-delà de 200 $, normalement, le projet de loi s'appliquerait.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ce serait dans la portée du projet de loi.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Exact. Si une condition préalable pour assister à l'activité est d'avoir fait une contribution de plus de 200 $, donc cela inclut une activité de reconnaissance des donateurs, oui, ce serait dans la portée du projet de loi, à moins que l'activité de reconnaissance n'ait lieu durant un congrès du parti, auquel cas elle serait exemptée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Si la condition préalable est qu'à un moment donné durant l'année civile, vous ayez versé un certain montant, alors vous êtes visé par ce projet de loi.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tout à fait.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous êtes notre dernier intervenant.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Je suis un peu déçu que nous n'ayons pas pu entendre les trois autres recommandations...

Le président:

Désolé, monsieur Christopherson. Avec la permission du Comité, j'inviterai le témoin à le faire à la fin.

M. David Christopherson:

Après 12 heures? D'accord.

Le président:

Oui, si le Comité y consent.

M. David Christopherson:

Alors je ne poserai qu'une seule question rapidement et vous pourrez y venir.

À propos de la première recommandation concernant les cinq jours d'avis — nous en avons discuté un peu —, un autre aspect à considérer est qu'on n'organise pas une activité de financement en cinq jours, sinon elle est vouée à l'échec. Il faut compter beaucoup de préparatifs. Un moyen d'y remédier, en plus de vous en aviser directement, ne serait-il pas de prévoir un peu plus de temps?

Je ne sais pas quelle latitude vous avez pour commenter, puisque vous faites bien attention de vous en tenir à l'interprétation technique et d'éviter d'entrer dans « notre » jeu politique, aussi je comprendrai tout à fait si vous ne me suivez pas là où j'aimerais vous amener. Mais en prévoyant plus de cinq jours d'annonce, vous donneriez à tout le monde la chance d'en prendre connaissance. En mettant cela à cinq jours et en disant que nous le faisons pour la transparence... nous disons même dans la loi, dans les règlements, que l'annonce doit être bien en vue — peu importe ce qu'on entend par là — dans le site Web... À cinq jours, on a intérêt d'un point de vue politique à confier à quelqu'un la tâche quotidienne de surveiller les sites Web. Élections Canada aussi d'ailleurs.

Ne serait-il pas plus réaliste d'allonger la période d'annonce obligatoire? Actuellement, c'est comme si on voulait être capable de dire: « Regardez, nous avons une nouvelle clause », alors que cela ne change rien dans la réalité.

Comment réagissez-vous à cela?

(1200)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne peux que faire le lien avec le commentaire entendu au sujet d'un ministre qui pourrait venir plus ou moins à la dernière minute. Plus vous annoncez l'activité à l'avance, plus vous risquez de vous retrouver dans une situation où on ne saura pas trop qui sera en mesure d'y participer. Il faut regarder les deux choses ensemble et si vous voulez être sûrs qu'aucune activité ne vous échappe, alors à vous de décider ce qui est une période d'avis raisonnable. Je ne tracerai pas la ligne pour le Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je cède le temps qui me reste à l'examen des trois derniers amendements.

Merci.

Le président:

Le Comité consent-il à ce que nous prenions un peu plus de temps pour que le témoin puisse élaborer un peu sur les changements qu'il recommande?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Monsieur Perrault.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Merci.

Nous avons vu les deux premiers; j'en viens au troisième, qui concerne le nouvel article 384.5. J'en ai parlé dans mon discours d'ouverture. Il peut arriver qu'il manque un élément dans un rapport et le directeur général des élections devrait être habilité à demander officiellement que le rapport soit modifié en conséquence. C'est ainsi que cela fonctionne pour tous les autres rapports prévus par la Loi électorale, je crois, mais celui-ci échappe à la règle. Il s'agit d'un amendement purement technique.

Le suivant concerne les infractions — nous en avons parlé aussi — consistant à déposer un rapport erroné et trompeur... On exige que le rapport soit déposé dans un temps prescrit, mais aucune infraction n'est prévue expressément pour la production d'un rapport erroné ou trompeur, faite par négligence ou de propos délibéré. Encore là, la Loi le prévoit dans ses dispositions sur les rapports qu'elle exige; il faudrait juste que ce soit le cas ici aussi.

Le suivant concerne à nouveau l'échéancier. On combine l'obligation de déposer un rapport, déjà prévue dans le projet de loi, avec celle de le déposer dans un temps déterminé. Les autres dispositions de la Loi à ce sujet séparent ces deux notions. Il y a d'une part l'obligation que vous avez tous eue de déposer un rapport lorsque vous avez été candidats, puis il y a d'autre part celle de le faire dans un temps donné. Si vous déposez votre rapport, mais que vous le faites en retard, alors c'est traité de façon distincte. Si les deux obligations sont réunies, il peut être un peu plus difficile d'appliquer la Loi.

Encore une fois, voici un très bon exemple d'agissements qui pourraient faire l'objet des peines pécuniaires administratives dont il a été question plus tôt, mais il faudrait séparer l'obligation de produire un rapport et celle de le faire à temps.

Le dernier est celui dont nous avons discuté concernant la définition des dépenses de campagne à la direction et de campagne d'investiture. D'après le libellé des articles du projet de loi, il est question de promouvoir des partis, des candidats et d'autres entités politiques qui n'ont rien à voir avec les courses à l'investiture ou à la direction. Je recommanderais de faire le ménage là-dedans. Chose certaine, j'interpréterais ces dispositions comme visant expressément les dépenses liées à la course à l'investiture ou à la direction, selon le cas, et non pas ces autres dépenses.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité sont-ils satisfaits?

Merci beaucoup, chers témoins, d'être venus aujourd'hui. Votre concours nous est précieux et je suis certain que nous vous reverrons.

Je demanderais au Comité de rester encore une minute. Nous avons une question d'ordre administratif à traiter à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 03, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.