header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-10-05 PROC 72

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good morning, everyone. Welcome to the 72nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being held in public. Today we are continuing our study of Bill C-50, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing).

Our witness during today's first hour is Duff Conacher, co-founder of Democracy Watch and chair of the Money in Politics Coalition.

Thank you for being here, Mr. Conacher. You have 10 minutes for your opening statement. The floor is yours.

Mr. Duff Conacher (Co-Founder, Democracy Watch):

Thank you very much, Chair.

To members of the committee, thank you for this opportunity to present to you today on Bill C-50. As mentioned, I am co-founder and coordinator of Democracy Watch and chair of the Money in Politics Coalition, which is made up of 50 organizations with a total membership of 3.5 million Canadians.

The coalition has been advocating changes to the federal and provincial political finance systems now since 1999, and is calling for changes to Bill C-50 to stop cash for access and the influence of big money in federal politics.

The bill, I believe, based on the framework, in that it addresses contributions in some sections and others, can be amended by the committee and sent back to the House, and should be, to make changes to ensure that wealthy individuals cannot use money as a means of unethical influence over politicians or parties, and also to stop the funnelling of donations, which has happened in every jurisdiction in Canada that has banned corporate or union donations but that has maintained much too high a donation limit, such as at the federal level.

The $3,100 a year to a party and its riding associations is much more than an average voter can afford. That amount violates the fundamental democratic principle of one person, one vote. It allows people with money, who can afford to make that maximum donation, to use money as a means of influence.

To think that anyone who is donating the maximum does not get some kind of return on that is naive, based on what we've seen in the past across Canada with various fundraising scandals. Even if it is simply an invitation to a Laurier Club event, that is access that you can only buy, and is therefore undemocratic and fundamentally unethical.

Sports referees can't take gifts from players, so why are politicians continuing to allow themselves, as the referees of what is in the public interest, to essentially be influenced by large gifts of money, property, or services, up to $3,100 annually, in terms of what can be given to a party or a riding association?

The coalition and the more than 11,000 voters who have signed the petition on change.org are calling for changes that will stop big money in federal politics and stop cash for access. These are to lower the donation limit to $100, as in Quebec; strengthen enforcement and penalties for violations; and only bring back per-vote funding or some kind of matching public funding such as Quebec has if the parties can actually prove, and candidates can actually prove, that they need this public financing in order to prosper financially.

These are the major changes that we are calling for.

As well, loans should be limited to the same amount as donations. If donations are limited but loans are unlimited, then federally regulated financial institutions can use loans to essentially buy influence with the parties. Yes, they have to give those loans on the same terms as they loan to anyone else, but giving a loan to a candidate or a party helps the candidate or party.

Clinical psychologists have tested thousands of people across the world, and found in every case that even small gifts have influence on decision-making. One of the best-documented areas is with doctors and prescriptions, even with doctors receiving free samples from drug companies that they don't use themselves but can pass on to their patients. It doesn't save the doctor any money at all, but just giving free samples to doctors has been shown through clinical testing to influence their prescribing decisions, although the doctors deny it across the board.

To think that donations do not have an influence over any politician or party official is to pretend they are not human. Humans across the world have been tested by clinical psychologists in double-blind studies, and it's been found that even small gifts influence everybody.

(1105)



That's why the solution, the way to stop the influence, is to limit the donation that can be given annually to an amount that an average voter across the country can afford, and that's $100. That's what Quebec has done. It's a world-leading system. The public financing is too high. It doesn't have to be as high as it is. In terms of the donation limit, the fact that a donation above $50 has to be routed through Elections Quebec ensures that funnelling cannot happen and that people are only giving their own money and only giving no more than an average voter can afford.

The too-high donation limit federally also facilitates funnelling, which has been seen at the federal level with SNC-Lavalin. In Quebec, finally Elections Quebec did its job in 2011 and looked back five years and did an audit of donations. It had banned corporate and union donations in the late seventies and there had always been rumours that corporations were funnelling donations through their executives and their family members and through employees and their family members. Elections Quebec finally did an audit in 2011 after the corruption scandal broke there, and they found $12.8 million in donations that had likely been funnelled from businesses through their executives and family members. That was $12.8 million over a five-year period.

Funnelling is happening at the federal level. Elections Canada promised to do an audit four years ago. It hasn't done it yet. If they do, they will find it. It's been found in Toronto and it's been found in every jurisdiction that's banned corporate and union donations but left a donation limit that is too high and that facilitates funnelling, as the federal donation limit does. With the $3,100 limit, you get 10 executives and their spouses to each give $3,100, and boom, you've given $62,000 to a party.

That's big money. That has big influence, and the only way to stop it is to lower the donation limit.

Democracy Watch has filed complaints about the fundraising events held last year and in years past with the Commissioner of Lobbying. We're hoping that the Commissioner of Lobbying at least will stop lobbyists who are registered or should be registered from participating in such events, but Bill C-50, despite making the events transparent, is not going to stop cash for access. MPs will still be allowed to do the events. The staff of cabinet ministers can be at events without it even being disclosed under Bill C-50, so there's not even transparency about a senior government official being at an event, only people who are candidates or party leaders or cabinet ministers. The bill will not stop cash for access. It will not stop the influence of big money.

There is a problem with big money. I will give you just one example of an analysis that Democracy Watch did. It was very difficult to do because of the way Elections Canada discloses the donations, but I did a ton of number-crunching and I determined that in 2015 the federal Liberals received almost 23% of their donations from just over 4% of wealthy donors, who gave $1,100 or more to the party. To do that analysis of what happens at the riding association level is not impossible, but it would take months and months, because Elections Canada doesn't consolidate any of those figures. That's just donations to the party: 23% of the party's money came in from donations from just 4% of wealthy individuals who could afford to give $1,100 or more. That's a cash-for-access system. Those people at the time would have been invited to a Laurier Club event, possibly other events. I'm quite sure if the Access to Information Act were to be extended to ministers' officers, we would find that they get their calls returned more quickly than others, get meetings more quickly than others, get access to staff and senior government officials more quickly than others across the board. We don't have the kind of transparency that would prove that. I hope we will get it through Bill C-58, as the Liberals promised to extend the act to ministers' offices, or through the changes to the Lobbying Act, which has to be reviewed this year.

Within the framework of Bill C-50, I believe it's completely within order under the parliamentary rules for you to make these changes to Bill C-50, because the bill mentions contributions and all the other areas I've talked about.

I have not made a written submission to you today, but there is a news release up today on Democracy Watch's website that will be translated and distributed by the clerk, so you will have all the details.

I welcome any of your questions. Thank you very much.

(1110)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Conacher.

Now we'll go to a round of questions of seven minutes each, and we'll start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Conacher, for being here. I appreciate it.

I think I'm the only Quebecker at the table, so when you talk about Quebec, I'm actually familiar with it, and it's a very interesting system.

I want your thoughts. You said that the line should be at $100, but that small gifts have an influence, however big they are, so why $100? Can you compare it to other jurisdictions as well?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

You could go to a system that is entirely public financing, but I believe that parties should be encouraged to reach out to voters and hear their concerns in order to prosper financially. That's why I believe the public financing in Quebec is too high. It provides the parties with much more than just a base of funding.

The conversation about public financing should start with how much parties actually need to operate across a jurisdiction. The overall answer is that they don't need any more than what their opponents have. Instead, what's happened in Ontario and now in B.C. and in Quebec is they just assumed they needed the same amount of money that they had at the time that they changed the law and put in public financing to make sure that any drop in donations as a result of limiting donations would be replaced by public financing. That's not where the conversation should start. There could be a report by the Auditor General or Elections Canada on how much parties actually need to reach people. Then you determine if you even need public financing.

If you're going to have a donation limit, it should be an amount an average voter can afford. Yes, small gifts can have influence, but if thousands of people from various viewpoints and perspectives are each giving $100, their influence cancels each other out. The current system has 4% of Liberal donors giving 23% of the money. They're going to have more influence than those who give $100 because they're giving a huge portion and are much more valuable to the party as donors. That's what you need to eliminate, and you can do that with a $100 donation limit.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In my riding, my biggest donors are myself and my wife, so I suppose I have undue influence on myself.

How do you see the structure of public financing? What structure works?

We've often heard about per-vote financing as an idea. The trouble with it, in my view, is that how I voted in 2015 may not reflect who I support in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019.

What kind of structure do you see?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I favour Democracy Watch's position and the coalition's position, which is that the matching funding that Quebec has is a better way to go. The matching funding should be higher in Quebec and the per-vote funding lower. Per-vote funding is fine as long as it's just a base amount that's being given. It's proportional, so it makes it more fair for the parties that don't win as many seats as they should based on the percentage of votes they receive, and that's an important thing.

One of the biggest public subsidies to the parties is that our first-past-the-post system gives some parties more seats than they deserve. Each one of those politicians who's elected gets $450,000 in public money each year. That's a huge public subsidy. The per-vote subsidy at least is democratic because it's based on votes that are received, the actual percentage of votes the party receives, so if a party doesn't get as many seats as it should based on percentage of votes, at least it gets that money.

Matching funding is better, though, because it would go up and down each year based on how much the party raised. You can also do it for candidates, but you can't do the per-vote funding for candidates. It would be unfair to anyone challenging an incumbent.

Quebec has both. It could also be on a sliding scale, as in Quebec. Quebec has a higher amount of matching funding for the first $100,000 that you raise, or $10,000 that you raise as a candidate, and that helps level the playing field as well. Someone may have a lot of donors who can only afford to donate $50 in Quebec; let's say that person has 1,000 donors, so they only raise $50,000, but the first $10,000 is matched at a 2:1 ratio, so they get another $20,000. If someone has 1,000 donors but they each can afford to give $100, they could raise $100,000, but the matching makes it a bit more even because the one ends up with $70,000 and the proportion isn't as much out of whack.

That's why I favour matching funding, it goes up and down each year as well for the parties. If the party breaks all its promises and loses a ton of support, it won't get the matching funding.

(1115)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When we had per-vote funding, there was a 2% threshold below which you didn't get any funding. Do you think that's appropriate?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, I agree with a threshold for the funding, and if the system was changed to a proportional representation voting system, having the threshold would also be appropriate. I think that you should have a certain percentage of support in order to be able to tap into that funding. The Supreme Court of Canada ruled in the challenge that the 2% threshold was constitutional.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you have these thresholds, how does it affect independent candidates, independent MPs, and so forth?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

In Quebec, they have matching funding for independent candidates. At the candidate level, there isn't a threshold in Quebec. If you run as an independent, you'll get the matching funding for what you raise for your campaign. That also levels the playing field much more for independent candidates, who are discriminated against currently in the Canada Elections Act. They cannot raise money between elections, as riding associations are allowed to for the next campaign, so the matching funding helps. Removing that prohibition on raising money before the writ is dropped from an independent candidate is also something that should be changed to make the system more fair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Should, in your view, donations be tax deductible? If so, should they be refundable or non-refundable? How do you do that? In Quebec, they're not.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, Quebec eliminated that because of the $100 donation limit. Currently the tax deductions favour those who can give more as well, and there's a huge taxpayer subsidy that exists. The per-vote funding subsidy from taxpayers meant that you had to vote for a party before you get back some of the taxes you pay, and everyone pays some taxes. Even if they don't pay income taxes, they're paying product and service taxes. That ensured that you had to vote for the party before it would get your two dollars. It was only two dollars. No one's money went to any party he or she didn't support. It was a fallacy that this ever happened, because everyone pays more than two dollars in taxes annually. It was democratically structured. The current subsidy is not democratically structured; it favours wealthy donors.

The Chair:

Thank you, David.

Mr. Nater, you have seven minutes.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I want to begin by apologizing for my tardiness. I was enjoying a very exciting race outside in front of the Hill and didn't quite make it here in time.

I appreciate the opportunity to meet with you, Mr. Conacher, and I apologize to you, as well, for missing the initial couple of minutes of your opening comments. If I ask any questions that you've already covered, just direct me back to the blues, and I can read them.

In your comments, you mentioned in passing the Laurier Club and Laurier Club events. As you would be aware, the legislation specifically exempts donor appreciation events that are held at a party convention. This raises the question of whether people will be encouraged to donate the maximum amount to the party by, in this case, attending a Laurier Club event at a party convention where the Prime Minister or where ministers would likely attend, and not have to report.

Do you see that as a challenge with the legislation?

(1120)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Very much so. In that way and in many other ways, this bill does not stop cash for access. Staff of cabinet ministers are not even covered. They're often important people for somebody to be able to see at an event, connect with and have a chance to corner and lobby a bit.

It's not a bill that's stopping cash for access; it's making a bit of it a little more transparent.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that.

As I was walking in, you suggested as well that any loans should be at the same level as donation limits. In that case, you suggested a $100 limit was acceptable. It would probably make a loan more or less irrelevant if it's at a $100 limit.

Is that where you are going? Should loans effectively be somewhat irrelevant?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, the only way that Democracy Watch thinks that loans should be allowed is if you set up a public fund and the loans come from a public fund. The current taxpayer subsidy on donations is essentially a public fund, so replace it with something that replaces loans that are given by federally regulated financial institutions so that when a party gets a $30-million loan for an election, it has to be on the same terms as a $30-million loan to anyone else.

That kind of loan would be a huge favour that a bank has now done for a party that will have a finance minister who makes decisions about the Bank Act if that party wins. Wow. It seems a pretty blatant conflict of interest to me. Why would you leave that loophole open? It's a big-money loophole.

Mr. John Nater:

You would envision some kind of entity, whether it's administered by a government corporation or something, having a pot of money that a candidate or a party could then potentially borrow from in the campaign period—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

—and the federal banks.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, but very publicly, and it would be disclosed. All donations should be disclosed before people vote. That's another big flaw in our system. I didn't go into all the details of every single one of the 11 changes that we're calling for, but all donations should be disclosed before people vote so that they know who's bankrolling the party.

Mr. John Nater:

Would you mind elaborating on that? What time frame do you think would be ideal for disclosure of names of donors, or in this case attendees at a regulated event?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Thankfully we have a perfect working model at the federal level with leadership candidates. Coming up to an election is the real problem area, because although quarterly donations are disclosed by the parties, an election can take place in between that, and people don't see the donations made during the election campaign.

However, party leadership candidates have to do that right up to a few days before the vote. Then we also have a working model for real-time disclosure in Ontario, whereby donations are up within 10 days and those kinds of details, such as whether they came through any kind of event, can be included .

Mr. John Nater:

You mentioned as well—and I'm not as familiar with the Quebec system as some of my colleagues may be, but I'd like you to elaborate on donations over $50 having to be done through Elections Quebec. Would you mind elaborating on that and how you might potentially see that happening at the federal level through Elections Canada? Could that system be mirrored?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, there is another way to deal with it, and I'll mention it in a second, but Quebec essentially decided that even with the $100 donation limit, one person from a big business with thousands of employees could walk into the party offices and say these thousand cheques are from their employees, wink, wink. Maybe the party would report it, but to prevent that situation, a donation over $50 goes to Elections Quebec, which verifies it is from the person giving it and not someone giving it on another person's behalf, and then Elections Quebec forwards it to the party.

The other way to deal with that problem is to do what's done in the U.S., which is to require key identifiers of a donor to be part of what's disclosed. In this way, if you suddenly saw in the quarterly donations, or in real-time donations as in the Ontario disclosure, that 1,000 people had all given $100 on the same day from this company, that would be a suspicious pattern that Elections Canada could quickly audit.

The Elections Quebec system is slightly better because executives and their spouses and their dependants could all have different last names. It can be difficult to track funnelling, and it's just better to limit it to $100. You don't have to worry about funnelling so much, but an extra step to ensure it never occurs should be part of a democratic and ethical system.

(1125)

Mr. John Nater:

I only have a minute left.

Very briefly, you touched tangentially on the Ontario system, in which all politicians are forbidden from attending fundraising activities. That's not recommended in the bill.

What are your thoughts on that?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Ontario has gone too far, although not with their donation limit. If you have a $100 donation limit, then any event that you hold is a democratic event because an average voter can afford to go, so there would be no problem with MPs or cabinet ministers having events. To make any money, they are going to be large and public, and having the disclosure of the events is a good idea to attract fundraising.

There should also be disclosure of who organizes any event, because that is the new game when donations are limited. It is about what's called “the bundler” in colloquial terms coming out of the U.S. That's someone who is able to get 200 people in the room who will give the maximum. Lobbyists are supposedly prohibited from doing that, but because the lobbying commissioner does no audits, it's very likely happening many times at the federal level. Only a few people have been caught.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go on to Mr. Christopherson for seven minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you very much, Chair.

Thank you very much for being here, Mr. Conacher.

First, as you're one of the premier grassroots organizations, was there any consultation with your organization on the development of Bill C-50?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

No.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Not at all, before or after—nothing. That's interesting.

You raised a lot of interesting issues. I find it interesting too that you didn't spend a lot of time focusing on the details of Bill C-50. Is that because you just don't think it's making that much difference, and so you kept your comments at the macro level where you thought they would make a difference, or did you just run out of time?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

No, it's just a bit more transparency. That's all. There aren't really any effective limits on cash for access or big money. The government is apparently looking at political finance and it seems a bit more focused on third parties more generally, but I'm appealing to the Liberal members to push their minister to address the whole system in whatever bill comes next, not just third-party spending, because the whole system is unethical and undemocratic and allows for cash for access and undue and unethical influence by the wealthy.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

I'll stay where you have gone, because I agree with you that this bill really doesn't do a whole lot. The government is trying to make it seem as though they're addressing the issue, and they aren't.

I want to go through some of the issues you raised. You mentioned the $128 million in funnelling and you thought that if there was an audit done in Canada, we would turn up similar dollars. Could you expand on that for me, please?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes. Just to give Quebec a bit more credit, it was $12.8 million in funnelling, not $128 million.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry, I didn't see the decimal point there. It's $12.8 million.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It's $12.8 million over a five-year period, so it's a significant sum. It was what they thought was likely funnelled, because they identified executives giving the maximum, near the same time, from several businesses. The report is on their website. You can see the details.

Elections Canada, in response to some issues with that and other things at the federal level with some suspected funnelling in one riding in Quebec, was asked by the CBC whether they were looking in the same way. That was back in 2013, because the Elections Quebec audit had come out. Elections Canada said, “Yes, we're doing an audit as well of the 2011 election.” First of all, that's not far enough back. Elections Quebec went five years back. This was in 2013. They should have gone back at least through the 2008 election as well. That's just looking at the election period; why aren't they also looking in between elections?

Those databases can be crunched pretty easily these days. It's all up there online. Why isn't Elections Quebec looking into who is giving the maximum? Just start with $1,000 and above; look at all those people and see who they are. I haven't seen anything now in four years from them. I don't know whether they're doing it. I hope they are doing it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

For something similar to take place federally, did you mention Elections Canada or the Auditor General? Where did you go in terms of how you thought we could tackle this federally, if we wanted to?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Elections Canada said they were going to do it in 2013. Here we are, four years later. We saw the compliance agreement with SNC-Lavalin over what they found with them from 2004 to 2011. It's hard for me to believe that only one company has done this in the period since corporate and union donations were banned on January 1, 2007. Possibly unions have done it as well. It was mostly businesses in Quebec that were doing it, but also a few unions.

Quebec had a $2,000 limit, so it was a little easier to funnel a bit more money. If you're looking back, you see that we started with a $1,000 limit, which was essentially $2,000 in terms of what you put through a riding association as well annually. Now it's up to $3,100, and I don't know where that audit is. You have to ask Elections Canada. They're the ones who said they were going to do it. If you do an audit and you don't find anything, you still issue a report saying you haven't found anything, but four years later, there's nothing.

(1130)

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's interesting.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

The CBC article from 2013 in which the Elections Canada spokesperson is saying they were doing this is linked in the news release that I've submitted to the committee today.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Hopefully that's something we can follow up, because that's what we do.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

They should go back to 2007. Even better would be 2004, when corporate and union donations were limited to $1,000 annually. That was effectively a ban. The audit should look at that whole period. Elections Quebec waited from the late 1970s until 2011 to finally do an audit, and what did they find? Funnelling. Why would Elections Canada wait 30 years, as Elections Quebec did?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It does raise the question. Nobody suspects any corruption on the part of Elections Canada—at least I don't, and I don't know anybody who does—so it really does pose the question, “How come?” We'd be interested in knowing the answer.

Similar to that, you went on to talk about bundling. Are you suggesting that's their full-time job and that's how they're skirting the law—that by giving of their time to do it full time, they can organize maximum donations and events? Could you expand on that for me, please?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Under the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct—it used to be rule 8 and now it's rules 6 to 10—someone who should be registered but is illegally avoiding registration is not allowed to organize a fundraising event. This would hold even in cases of an unregistered lobbyist being on the board of a business or an organization, and we hope this standard will continue to be upheld by the lobbying commission.

We have received complaints about the Apotex chairman regarding the Morneau event that occurred in November 2016, and also about the event he held at his house in August 2015 for a Liberal candidate and Justin Trudeau, before Mr. Trudeau became Prime Minister. We've also received a complaint about another board member associated with a company called Clearwater Seafoods who held an event in August 2014 for the Liberals. We don't know exactly where the lobbying commissioner is going to draw the line. We hope, however, she's going to say that if you're on a board or in any way affiliated with an organization lobbying the government, even if you're not the registered lobbyist, you cannot help with an event or do anything significant for anyone who is being lobbied by the company. We'll see. Hopefully, that line is drawn.

If you're not a registered lobbyist or affiliated with anyone but you want to have influence within the party, if the lobbying commissioner doesn't uphold a strict standard, even lobbyists who are not registered in the lobbyist registry could become board members of companies that lobby the government and be allowed to participate in these events. I'm sure this is going on. As a lobbyist, if you can get 20 people in the room who are each going to give $3,100 to the party at that event, you are going to get your calls answered. You're a bundler, you're valuable to the party, and from that cash you will get access.

I will have more news on this topic very soon. It will be related to something that I think occurred last year, when bundlers were given a huge favour and access based on the fact that they were bundlers.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you, Duff, and thank you, David.

Now we'll go on to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm finding your testimony very interesting. It's not something that I haven't already thought about, but being a candidate and having run for office now, I might think a little differently.

You mentioned that this piece of legislation creates more transparency. Do you agree with that?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you think this is a step in the right direction? Is it a step forward?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It's a tiny baby step, yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

The acting Chief Electoral Officer was here earlier this week, and he thinks the existing legislation and the reporting rules now in place make a good balance. He thought it was a step in the right direction for transparency.

My question to you relates to our discussion about civic engagement and how some people who cannot spend time volunteering often make up for this by donating money. Do you think that reducing the amount that can be donated could be reducing some people's right to civic engagement?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

If the amount that they can give is more than an average voter can afford, it's an undemocratic and unethical system right away. It violates the fundamental principle of one person, one vote. It's like saying if a person doesn't have as much time to volunteer for a party, they should have more votes on election day, a whole bunch more. We would never allow that. Why would we allow it with money?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Earlier you stated that psychological studies have demonstrated that when a doctor receives free samples from a pharmaceutical company, it changes the way the doctor feels about that brand. Would you not say that about free services such as volunteering or door-knocking? Couldn't a candidate or an MP feel more favouritism towards the person who volunteered for them?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, and the position of Democracy Watch and the coalitions is that volunteer labour should be tracked and disclosed. That's important, because another way that funnelling occurs is by giving people time off from their work, pretending they're not paid for the time off, and then paying them with a Christmas bonus for taking that time off and going out and helping a party or a candidate. Let's start with tracking volunteer labour, which is easy to do. A campaign knows its volunteers, so let's just put the volunteers up on a website as part of disclosure. The definition of “contribution” in the Canada Elections Act is money, property, or services. Volunteering is a kind of service.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

From my experience in my campaign, the majority of my volunteers and door-knockers were kids under 18. I don't know how people would feel about disclosing the names of children on sites already aligning them with a certain party over another. These kids have a future. They don't know what career they may want to get into. This could impact a lot of options for them in the future. They are just trying to figure it out, get involved, and see how they feel about a certain party. They may not even think they are NDP, Liberal, or whatever, but they want to get involved and learn more.

Although it seems as if you're solving one problem at the extreme end, some of these rules may be creating a lot of deterrents for people wanting to get involved at the grassroots level. I think—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Just to respond to that, essentially what you just said was that governments or others would discriminate in hiring, I suppose, and other issues based on which political party you volunteered with. You are saying that the Public Service Commission of Canada, and across the country, is not—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think a lot of people are hesitant to be labelled with a certain party if they want to be seen as non-partisan in any job in the future—of course.

Also, I don't know a whole lot about—

(1140)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Okay, but they are making a donation—

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, I have a point of order.

Mr. Conacher hasn't interrupted any other members of the committee during their questioning. Perhaps he could be directed to wait for the end of the question before he interrupts.

The Chair:

Let's just carry on.

You have a minute and 15 seconds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have one specific question.

You mentioned somewhere that the more a person donates, the more benefit they get for tax credits. Could you clarify that? The way I understand it, the most you get is when you make that middle amount, about the $400 mark. You get more in return for that. As your donation gets higher, the percentage of credit that you get back is less, according to Elections Canada.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

That's true, but to get the maximum deduction, you have to donate the maximum amount. You are benefiting from being able to make that maximum donation. You can't get it unless you make that donation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can you educate me a bit more about Quebec? When did they change their laws to make it the $100 donation that you think is ideal?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

That was in 2013, after Elections Quebec disclosed its audit, which showed that $12.8 million was likely funnelled between 2006 and 2011.

They also had, of course, a huge corruption scandal, much of it rooted in the political donation system at the time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Has there been any examination of whether money is still being funnelled, at that lower amount? Have corruption and influence stopped in Quebec?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It can't legally be funnelled anymore. They've made.... The federal system legalizes funnelling and makes it very simple to do, because it's so wide open. Elections Quebec and the police in Quebec have not charged many of the people who gave that $12.8 million. They can't. They go to the executive and say, “Was that your money? Did you decide to donate it?” They say yes, and the head of the corporation says yes as well. You can't charge anyone, because you need intent in order to charge them for a violation of the donation limit.

It has been made effectively illegal now in Quebec, because you can give only $100, and if you give more than $50, it's routed through Elections Quebec. It would be almost impossible to funnel a donation in Quebec now without getting caught.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Now we'll go into the five-minute round. We'll start with Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks for being here. This is a related topic, but one I would love to have your comments and thoughts on.

You mentioned your ideas about the changes that you would like to see made to donation limits and things like that. There's already some concern out there about third parties working with, or allegedly working with, political parties to oppose another political party or a particular candidate, and things like that.

I wonder if lowering those limits might increase that sort of activity. Even since the election, we've seen organizations that are working with political parties or things like that. One example that comes to mind is the news reports from July about this organization called the Council of Canadian Innovators, which was set up in November 2015, right after the Liberal government was elected. In fact, I think it was a week after the government was sworn in that it was set up.

It has four full-time staffers currently, as of July, three of whom were former Liberal staffers. One was a former EA to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, another had been the Minister of Foreign Affairs' campaign manager, and their director of communications had been a spokesperson for Ontario Liberal cabinet ministers. In their fundraising letter that was sent out, they indicated that they would offer monthly meetings with the chief of staff to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change in return for a $10,000 donation. That was one of the rewards you received.

Since then, apparently the minister's office felt that was something they wanted to correct. Actually, the chief of staff hadn't met with them monthly; he had only met with them three times since October 2016 up until July of this year. They said they needed to correct that so that it only indicates regular meetings rather than monthly meetings, which I'm not really sure solves any kind of problem that exists.

I want to hear your thoughts on this idea of organizations connected with a political party using those connections to fundraise for their organization and advocate for things that would align with the government or that particular political party.

Would you see that as another version of cash for access? I certainly would say it appears to me as something unethical and sleazy. Would you agree with that characterization? If so, what would you suggest be done to try to prevent those kinds of things from occurring?

(1145)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Democracy Watch filed complaints with the federal Ethics Commissioner and the Commissioner of Lobbying about the Council of Canadian Innovators' appeal to its members, and also its lobbying activities overall.

They're registered to lobby Chrystia Freeland's department. They haven't lobbied her directly. Our position is that rule 6 of the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct means that if you are lobbying one of her staff or senior officials, you're lobbying her, because they're going to report what you said to her.

We filed a complaint saying that they are not allowed to do that. They can't be, because a co-manager of Chrystia Freeland's 2015 campaign is the executive director of the Council of Canadian Innovators.

If the Commissioner of Lobbying allows that, then that's what every lobbyist who might have helped a party or a candidate during the 2015 election will start doing: they won't lobby the person they worked for, they'll lobby their staff. That would just make the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct a huge loophole. It would be meaningless.

We're hoping the Commissioner of Lobbying will make the right ruling, which is that you can't lobby a minister indirectly and say you're not lobbying the person you worked for and helped get elected. Yes, you are. Why would you lobby the senior official if they're not going to tell the minister what you said?

On the Ethics Commissioner side, the Ethics Commissioner has sent back a ruling to us. We're questioning her, because she didn't even look at some of the facts of the situation and the issue of whether preferential treatment is being given.

You had also asked us about third parties. Generally Democracy Watch and the coalition's position is—and this is what the government is apparently looking at for another bill—that third parties should be limited in their spending for a longer period than just the election period campaign. B.C. has just limited it to 60 days before the writ is dropped, so it's essentially 90 to 100 days before election day. That's appropriate. B.C. is also—

The Chair:

You're over time, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I had a follow-up to that question, but I guess I don't have the time right now.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Bittle now.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

Thank you, Mr. Conacher, for coming to appear before us today.

Democracy Watch is similar to a political party in that it relies on individual donations as its sole source of funding, correct?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, that's right.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I notice on your website that there are different options that are similar to what political parties offer, in that someone can choose a different donation amount from $5 a month up to $100 a month. Are you more likely to answer the phone call of an individual who's donating $100 a month to your organization than someone who's donating $5 a month?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes, sure. I'm human.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Okay. That's fair

In the case of an individual such as Dan Aykroyd, who makes up half of your advisory committee and is a wealthy individual, you're far more likely to pick up the phone and answer his call than that of another member of your organization.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

He hasn't donated in quite a long time—he lends his name—but yes, I think if Dan Aykroyd called, for a whole bunch of reasons I would take the call.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I guess if a ghostbuster is calling, you pick up the phone. That's fair.

In terms of your proposals, have you estimated what the additional costs to the federal government would be to enact what you're recommending?

(1150)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

The $100 donation limit would cost nothing.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

No, I appreciate that, but what would the costs be in terms of all of the other items?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

If public financing were put in—and again, we think the case has to be made for it as well—our proposal is to start with a $100 donation limit and see where the parties are at after a year. I think you'd find they were just fine. Some of them will be suffering, but only because they don't have a lot of supporters, which is a democratic way to be suffering under a political donation system that's democratic.

In terms of strengthening the enforcement and disclosure, the disclosure is already being done. I mentioned the Elections Canada audit. They don't have that much to do in between elections other than take in your annual returns and sometimes run a by-election. I'm not sure why they haven't been able, in the last four years, to complete this audit that they promised to do in 2013. I don't see any extra costs there at all.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

On one of the issues, perhaps I don't quite understand how it's going to work out. We're all dealing with volunteers who are working at different speeds and not necessarily at our campaign offices nine to five throughout the week so in terms of donations being disclosed before the election, how can that be done realistically on the ground by volunteers for the candidates, especially in parties that perhaps aren't the major parties, parties that aren't in government and have much smaller organizations? Again, how much would Elections Canada have to expand to meet that need to get that information out before the election?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I don't think very much at all.

I appreciate that for some candidates it would be difficult, but leadership candidates do a disclosure every month leading up to the final week. If it were just one disclosure that had to be prepared a week before election day through an Internet system, this is what the Internet is for. You would just upload a comma-delimited file, and it would appear on Election Canada's website. It would be illegal for it not to be accurate. Elections Canada wouldn't have to do any verifying. They're still verifying some returns from 2015 from the parties, so that verification takes a long time, but just putting it up so that people could search it is not difficult.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In an ideal world, would there then be a ban on donations in the last week of the campaign so that individuals could have this information? How would this work in actuality?

Mr. Duff Conacher:

In the leadership race, if you were to get more than $10,000 in that last week, then you'd have to do one final disclosure. You could do the same thing for candidates. You're talking about $100 donation limits, so if they're not getting significant amounts in, the disclosure wouldn't have to happen. You could even have a threshold for the overall disclosure, so that if you didn't raise a certain amount, you wouldn't even have to do the disclosure at all. You might just disclose the number of donors you have, not the names, etc.

I don't think it's a problem.

The Chair:

Now we'll go on to Mr. Richards for five minutes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess we'll carry on from where we left off before.

I want to let you finish where you were at, and I had a follow-up question that came to mind as you were speaking.

Before we do that, you commented on the lobbying side of it in terms of lobbying a staffer who would then obviously report on the conversation to their boss, the minister. I don't disagree with you, but I want to ask specifically about the portion of it that appeared to be cash for access, this idea that they were offering meetings, regular or monthly or however they want to term it, with a chief of staff to a minister in return for cash for their organization. It's cash for access basically done a different way. It's not the political party, but it's an association that certainly, at least from all appearances, one could argue is affiliated with or closely related to the party, given the staff, and even putting that aside, this is a member of a minister's staff offering access to the government to an organization for cash. I'd like to hear your thoughts on whether you think it's inappropriate, and also on what we can do to prevent those kinds of things.

(1155)

Mr. Duff Conacher:

I didn't mention this in my complaint to the Commissioner of Lobbying, but I think I should follow up on it in that there is a requirement under the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct to lobby in a way that meets the highest ethical standards. I think sending out a letter like that would not meet the standard of that principle set out in the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct. Since CCI is registered to lobby the federal government, they have to follow those principles and all the rules in the code.

That's the way to stop it. You can't be offering the flip side of cash for access where you have the access and you want cash. If you make it explicit and say that you can guarantee something, you're into the Criminal Code's influence-peddling section. I think the lobbyists' code is there as a non-criminal civil ethics code way of stopping that, and the commissioner should rule on that issue in this situation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In terms of the third-party stuff, you were mentioning B.C. I'll let you finish your thoughts that you had there, if you can remember where you were going with it at that time. I think you said you thought that they were extending the reporting period out to 60 or 90 days prior to the election. I don't know, and maybe you won't either, whether B.C. has fixed election dates—

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—because obviously the challenge there federally would be that if everyone knows when the dates are going to be, they also know the period of 60 or 90 days before the election, and therefore they could make sure everything came in prior to that.

Do you see that being a problem, and how would you see a way around that? I'll let you finish your thoughts.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

It's a limit on ad spending during that 90-day period. Democracy Watch and the coalition's position is that a four- to six-month period is entirely appropriate. They're doing three months, and extending that even further is entirely appropriate.

What B.C. has done is that if you make a contribution to a third party that's going to be used—this is in the proposed bill, Bill 3—for government advertising, then it is limited to the limit they're setting on individual donations of $1,200, and it has to be designated as a donation for government advertising. Someone can donate a larger amount—a foundation can give grants to an organization or an individual can give a larger amount than $1,200—but that donation cannot be used in the advertising campaign that the third party might do.

Democracy Watch and the coalition agree with that limit. As well, it should be lower than $1,200. It should be $100, in the same way that you would limit candidates to receiving $100. Third parties could get huge grants from foundations for their programming, but in the case of election ads, they would have to get them in donations of $100 at a time.

It will be interesting to see whether that limit is challenged in B.C. when it's enacted, but in principle, it's democratic and ethical to limit the donations by third parties to those advertising campaigns.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Are you saying that you're okay with unlimited contributions coming in if they're not for advertising, or are you thinking that they should be restricted on other types of spending as well, because that's—

The Chair:

Please give a very short answer. Your time is up.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Democracy Watch's proposal is that in between elections, there would be disclosure of how much each lobbyist or lobby group is spending on their campaigns. This is something we've proposed now for 24 years to the federal government.

When we see that disclosure, if we see that one side or another on any issue has millions and the other side just has thousands or hundreds, then we can see whether that's a problem and we need to actually limit donations in between elections.

In limiting them leading up to an election, it's entirely appropriate to start with that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Conacher, for coming. You've provided some very interesting ideas. We certainly appreciate it. It was very helpful for our study.

Mr. Duff Conacher:

Thank you for the opportunity, and I wish you luck in your deliberations.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll suspend while we change witnesses here.

(1155)

(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 72nd meeting of the Standing Committee of Procedure and House Affairs, where we are currently studying Bill C-50, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act in relation to political financing.

Our witness in the second hour is Jean-Pierre Kingsley, Canada's former Chief Electoral Officer from 1990 to 2007, certainly an icon in Canadian elections history. I'm sure people who have been here a long time, such as David and Scott, know you well from previous meetings and previous topics.

We're very excited to have you here today. We look forward to your opening comments. [Translation]

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley (Former Chief Electoral Officer, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I will need only five or six minutes for my opening remarks. The first part will be in French.[English]

The second part will be in English. I will switch only once, except for question period, obviously, if there is one.[Translation]

I always begin my remarks by saying what a privilege it is to appear before you. You represent the Canadian people, and it has always been a tremendous honour for me to serve Canadians through members of Parliament.

I believe this is the committee's 72nd meeting, Mr. Chair, and I would venture to say that I am the person who has appeared before this committee the most since 1990. I may be mistaken, but it may be worth checking.

This bill concerns two important elements. I think that any bill amending the Canada Elections Act, by its very nature, is significant since it is separate from any other piece of legislation.

My comments are based on my understanding, in other words, my interpretation, of the bill. When I would prepare for a meeting like this, I would always keep in mind the important involvement of my staff and all the work they did leading up to my appearance before the committee. Today, I am here alone, so I will be raising questions rather than providing answers or feedback.

I took note of some of the comments that were made in the media, the minister's opening remarks, and the statements of the acting Chief Electoral Officer. I also noted the document of so-called technical amendments the acting Chief Electoral Officer had submitted as an attachment. I was surprised to learn that such consultation had not taken place prior to the document being submitted.

In the past, during most of my tenure as Chief Electoral Officer, I would be given a copy of the bill so that similar technical amendments could be considered beforehand, even though the committee might not agree with them going forward. Nevertheless, there was some initial awareness.[English]

Money in politics is the toughest topic in the world concerning democracy—not only in elections, but concerning democracy. Canada's system, as was mentioned by the minister, is effectively second to none. The reputation is there. However, most unfortunately, the number of followers is few and far between. It is the toughest topic.

Canada has succeeded over the last 15 or 20 years in coming out with a regime that, in my mind, is exemplary. Therefore, the changes that are contemplated must always weigh the value of the change versus how it would impact on the Charter of Rights, the right to be a candidate, the right to contribute, freedom of speech, and freedom of association. It is against that background that I always make my comments before you.

I will be commenting more with respect to the first aspect of the bill. It deals with the timely, or more timely, reporting on fundraising events. I was wondering why would this not occur during an election period. Why is this an exception? If there is a time when people really need to know who is contributing, it is during the election period. We don't have this reporting now. This bill would prevent that from happening at this critical moment in the existence of a democracy.

Why is there an exclusion for individuals from reporting? Why are 18-year-olds not reportable as attendees or contributors? Under the present law, the name of a Canadian who is under 18 years of age appears if the person makes a contribution. There is no exception by age. There is an exception if you're not a Canadian, obviously, and if you're not a Canadian, you can attend but you cannot contribute.

(1210)



Part of the reasoning of the bill is to make it known who is attending as well as who is contributing, so I don't think that excluding them automatically is necessarily a good idea.

I would also make a comment about the staff of the person organizing it. There are staff members in the Canadian political system who are exceedingly important, and their attendance at an event carries weight unto itself. So the automatic exclusion of those persons from being named, I think, turns us away from the purpose of the statute.

What I'm really saying is that we should be following the rules concerning donations from those under 18 years of age. You can have a six-year-old making a contribution in Canada. There was this debate at one time, because there was an exception for a family making contributions which effectively made the family exceed the limit but not the individuals. I was asked at the time whether there should be a law against this, and I said no, because we have to be careful about how much we put into the statute or the regulation, and we have to let people come to their own conclusion if they find out that a six-year-old contributed.

As I read the bill, there are persons or entities who would be organizing events beyond the existing ones under the Canada Elections Act. These are all the different agents of parties and local riding associations. I'm asking the question quite honestly: Who would these people be? They would be people who support either the party or a particular candidate or an existing member of Parliament. If this is to occur then it has to occur with the knowledge beforehand of that public office holder—I did not see that in the bill, although maybe it is in there—and not after the fact, with a person having organized something for us—thank God—and having done half the organization and spent half the money. We cannot have that. We must follow the rules about who can spend monies under the Canada Elections Act.

What it raised in my mind was a question of whether there is a tie-in lacking about third parties here, someone out there, an entity. What is an entity beyond the entities under the statute? If it's an individual, is that person effectively engaging in what we would call a third-party activity? Is any advertising taking place before the other entities come in? There are anti-collusion measures under the statute. I don't know if this ties in to the third-party regime, but one also considers, as we saw, that foreign monies can get into third parties under the present statute. I thought I would raise this as a concern. It may not be valid in terms of what the bill says, but it lit a light.

The $1,000 penalty for a summary conviction, I found to be low. The entities that would be charged are entities—parties, etc.— that effectively have money or should pay more for that. I don't think there's anything left that's a penalty of $1,000 under the statute. I think we got rid of that in the 1990s and maybe early 2000s, so I was surprised when I saw that. I said we're certainly not talking about a deterrent. The deterrent of course is the summary conviction, but still there should be a penalty. I know that the monies will be forfeited that were gathered at a wrongfully held or a wrongfully reported event, but still I found it odd that it was so low as a penalty.

What this bill raises with me, by the way—I was alluding to this in my earlier remarks—is the whole issue of the timeliness of reporting contributions. Of course, there are expenditures here, but reporting contributions.... There are regimes in different parts of the world where the reporting has to be quasi-automatic. Within 24 hours, the candidate and the party have to report, and it's published on websites so that people know who's contributing as the event is unfolding.

(1215)



I will admit that the limit of $1,550 right now is a very reasonable one and should not lead one to suspect that an individual is trying to do something wrong by contributing that. There are relationships that are made when firms, or partners of firms, or people working with the same organizations, all participate in an event. This bill will help us to understand those better, so that's good.

With respect to the definition aspect—and this is going to be my last comment—and the separate reporting for leadership and nomination contests, this is the way the statute has been interpreted, and I suspect that putting that in the bill is meant for greater certainty.

Those were my introductory remarks, Mr. Chairman.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your very interesting points.

Now, we will go to a seven-minute round and we'll start with Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Kingsley, for being here today. It's very nice to meet you. Thank you for your presentation.

The purpose of this bill was to increase openness and transparency with respect to political fundraising events. Do you believe that this bill does that?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

It does increase transparency and openness.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Also, this goes further toward broadening the application to include nomination and leadership bids. Can you comment on that? Is that important? Is it a good thing that we are now applying the rules to those situations as well?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

This approach is called a sunshine approach in the nomenclature, which is to say don't try to prevent it from happening; try to get the sun to shine on it. You let the sun shine on it by letting people know. If you're not going to prevent it, letting people know is always a good thing, because then they can make up their own minds.

Extending it to all those players is a good thing, of course.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

What's your feeling with respect to the figure of over $200? Do you think that's the right figure?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

It has been in the statute to make a contribution of over $200—a net contribution, so if you remove the price of the meal and whatever else is included in organizing an event, then it's more than $200. I find it reasonable. I wasn't prepared to comment on that, but I will comment. I didn't have a problem with it when it came in, and I'm glad it's not indexed, because it's a reasonable amount.

(1220)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I'm interested in the list of exclusions, in terms of your comments on the list of those who are excluded from having to record their names. You mentioned age, and I have a concern with respect to your comments on age. As a young girl, I was taken to many political fundraisers. My mother took me, because she was very involved. As a mother, I don't know that I would want my daughter's or son's name showing up on a list simply because I was there with them. As a mother, I don't know that I'm comfortable with that.

I can understand if a donation is made, since that's a different act or gesture. However, if I have my son or daughter, who is four years old, with me, and I am bringing them to a political fundraiser because I want to be with them and I want to introduce them to this group or whatever, do you not see that there's some concern with just opening it up and saying that attendees of any age have to be included on the list?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Certainly, in terms of a contribution, the statute should apply, even if the person is not attending, which can occur. So in the particular circumstance you have described, I can see that it would be reasonable to simply state your name and the fact that there were one or two underage family members, but not the names.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I see.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

To indicate that there were family members with you, who were less than 18 years of age, and the number of them, would be a reasonable compromise here.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Why do you think it's important that the family member is noted or mentioned? Why is it important that I decided to bring my son or daughter who is four years old?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Well, not all of them are going to be four years old. Some of them are going to be 16. Some of them are going to be 17. So maybe we should make the age lower. Maybe it should be age seven and under. You see what I'm saying. If there's going to be an exception, I would rather it be possible for people to inquire about what happened. The person would say, “well, they were my four-year-old daughter and my five-year-old son”, end of story. However, it could be that they're not family members. They could be attending with someone who is not a family member.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

In that case, you mean an aunt or uncle.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Or you could have a business associate who brings in another person, the son or daughter of someone else.

If it's sunshine we want, then we have to make a decision about how far we go. It would be important to release that information, without naming if you don't want the name to appear.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I understand that you're trying to limit the number of exclusions, but a suggestion came up previously in our discussions about a personal support worker. Would you be comfortable if a personal support worker was included in the list of exclusions? It currently is not there, but it has been suggested that it be added.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Yes, if this is the main occupation of the personal support worker and obviously if they did not make a contribution beyond $200.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to staff members and what you're suggesting, how would you obtain your objective without taking away staff members from the exemption list?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

That's not easy, but I would certainly say chiefs of staff of the Prime Minister or ministers, senior assistants, senior policy assistants, and things like that.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

So you're saying it should specifically list certain positions.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

That's right.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

You mentioned the $1,000 penalty as being low. The other issue that has come up is the money returned. The money returned for non-compliance is the full cost. It's not the net profit. Do you have any comments on that?

For example, if I'm running a fundraiser and I'm charging $100 a ticket but the event is costing me $50, if I'm not in compliance, I have to submit the whole $100.

(1225)

The Chair:

Keep the answer very short, please.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

If I had my druthers, I would say the penalty is double what you picked up, end of story, so that we would have a real deterrent to this occurring, to people not following the law. There has to be something major and important about not following the Canada Elections Act in terms of penalties associated with those infractions.

The whole issue is a level playing field, and you can't have people fooling around with it. There are other sections of the statute that say the penalty is double: double this, double that.

I know I'm not going to make many friends by saying it, but it should be double what you picked up.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid for a seven-minute round.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

That's actually an interesting suggestion. The minister has invited us to come back to her with suggested amendments, and perhaps the double number might be one we'd put in there, so thank you for that.

You talk about the importance of a deterrent actually having a deterrent effect. Politics being what it is, money that is available to me prior to the writ is more valuable than money that I have to pay back in some form of penalty after the writ, for reasons that are obvious. I can't spend money I don't have. When it's a fundraiser taking place now, a couple of years before a writ, presumably if we are in some respect non-compliant, if it's a fundraiser for me and I'm present, and I'm the leader of a party, and all those things that are required, and then it turns out that we've been in violation of the statute, we'd pay back a penalty that, as you suggest, is double the amount. That's presumably the process.

That's assuming the process is not very slow and that it all occurs between now and writ 2019. However, for an event in the election writ period, it would be a different story. There are other transgressions that occur during writ periods. There must be some other way of dealing with them. I'd be interested in your thoughts on how to deal with that.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

During an election, the commissioner can investigate a matter that is ongoing when it's brought to his or her attention and can then obtain a cease and desist order against the people who are committing it on the basis that if they stop doing it right now, we will not be proceeding against them. This happens during an election. You can also have a chief electoral officer say that, but without having the right to say, “I will not be doing anything further.”

You can also do something else, which has not been prevalent. I can't remember it happening. You can go to court and obtain an injunction if you're the commissioner. That has not happened very often.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have some experience with that. My second nomination in 2004 was halted due to an injunction from somebody who felt that he had been wrongly excluded from being able to participate in the nominations. We had to reschedule it after a court had a chance to look at the details of the case, and it decided that his case was not valid, so I know how that works. The bigger problem was that we had to figure out whether it was actually a new contest or the same contest continuing, for expenditure reasons. That was a lively story, which you may recall from the recesses of your memory. You were the CEO at the time.

What strikes me about what you suggested about cease and desist orders, or indeed any action, is that the Chief Electoral Officer can act only if the Chief Electoral Officer is actually aware of what's happening. The after-the-fact reporting mechanism this statute contemplates for writ period events would seem to preclude that possibility. Effectively, public oversight would be blind during that period and until after the electoral event was actually over.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I agree. That's what I was saying. This whole bill raises the question of the timeliness of all reporting of all contributions during the campaign.

One could say, with respect to political parties that have representation in the House, that this applies; for others, because they don't have the same resource base, perhaps it does not. There can be a cut-off. We're dealing with very sophisticated computer systems now. You can transmit this stuff so instantaneously, it's amazing that we're not doing it now, frankly, even for candidates of parties that are represented in the House.

(1230)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Essentially, it would be fairly easy, then, to put an amendment into the bill that would remove the exclusion for writ periods.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I don't know how easy it would be politically, but I leave that up to you. Technically, yes, it would be an amendment to the statute.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

You had an interesting way of phrasing this. In the very beginning of your remarks, you described this as being the “more timely” disclosure of information, which suggests to me that you are of the view that most of this information is available anyway. Is that what you were trying to get at, or were you trying to get at something else?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I was trying to get at something else, which is the fact that we will now know earlier who's participating in those fundraisers than we knew previously from a quarterly report or, during an election, six months after, or, if it was a candidate, four months after. That's when we would find out. It's going to be more timely under this statute, but it will not be as timely as I think it should be, which is what I was alluding to.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I don't know if the committee wants to break into song first, but it will be Mr. Christopherson's last input at this time.

[Members sang Happy Birthday]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, I thought I was being fired.

Thank you very much, colleagues. That's very generous of you. I just wish they didn't come around so quickly.

Thank you very much, Mr. Kingsley. It's good to see you again. It's been quite a while now. I want to underscore not the contribution you made when you were in the position but the fact that you have consistently, since then, gone out of your way to bring your expertise here. You continue to be an amazing public servant. We appreciate everything you've done. Thank you so much.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Thank you very much.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I want to start off, if I can, following up on what Mr. Reid said, which I thought was a very poignant point, about how it means a lot more to him as a candidate, and therefore to all of us, to get the money sooner rather than later.

I hate to do this to you, but maybe I'll just take advantage of it being my birthday, and you'll allow me a little latitude.

I want to tell you a joke. It actually belongs—to give attribution—to Bud Wildman, who, as any of you would know, was a former Ontario cabinet minister with a huge personality, an amazing guy.

He tells this story—I'll do the accent but I can't do it justice; he did a much better job—about Huey Long back in, I think, the 1920s or 1930s, give or take a couple of decades. He was a governor, and ethics wasn't exactly his long suit. The story goes, or at least the joke goes, that Huey was meeting with a whole lot of his big contributors and he said to them, basically, you can give me a lotta money right now and get a nice big piece of the pie, or you can give me the money a little closer to the election and get a smaller piece of the pie, or you can give me the money after the election and get good government. I like that joke. I've always liked that joke.

I can't do it justice, Bud, but there you are; you live in infamy through your jokes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's actually a remarkable southern accent. That's a Louisiana accent. Well done.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. You're one of my more learned colleagues, so I take that as high praise. Thank you.

To get a little more serious here, you were asked a question by a government member as to whether or not this provided any increase to transparency, and you answered that it does. My question to you is, does it do it sufficiently?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I would have to say that it stands on its own right now. I've indicated to you what I think could be areas for improvement so that transparency would be enhanced, and I've indicated the exception rules. I've indicted what is happening. Who are these people who can organize these events? They're not named; it says individuals and entities, so what are we talking about? That one's not clear to me, so all these things need to be clarified so that we have a clear idea and Canadians can then make up their own minds about what's going on.

(1235)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

You're the second one to raise this issue of not just ministers and decision-makers but also their staff being there. As a former Ontario cabinet minister, I can tell you that the influence of the chief of staff and the senior policy people you mentioned is huge.

Most ministers are not experts in every area that they're making decisions on, and they rely on advice: professional advice, technical advice, and political advice. At the end of the day, often the last meeting you have is with your own personal staff as you're making a final determination. I just wonder if there were any other titles or anything else that you want to expand on, because the question has come up before—and it's a legitimate issue, I think—as to whether t you can have effective lobbying by only meeting with the minister.

I would say, in terms of the impact of meeting directly with the minister versus with the staffer, that you might even get more attention out of the staffer, because most politicians are thinking 16 different things at once, especially if they're at an event and looking here and there, whereas the staffer tends to be more focused. I think it's a really important area that's being overlooked, and any further expansion of your thoughts would be helpful, sir.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

It may also be helpful to review the statute on lobbying, and see what it says about these office-holders. I can't remember offhand, but they may delineate office-holders for whom reports must be provided by people who have access to them. That may be helpful as well.

I was also thinking of executive assistants, and I'm not thinking only of ministers. I'm thinking of leaders of parties as well. It may be that the chief finance critic of a party is also someone whose staff has importance. It may seem as though that goes a long way, but then it's much easier if you make it such that all these things have to be reported anyway, in an exceedingly timely fashion, within a day or two and shared automatically from one web to another. Then the Chief Electoral Officer wouldn't have to go look at the Conservative Party website to find out if an event was held; he or she would automatically be given that information and could act accordingly—immediately—to ensure that people were following the law.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We've had that suggestion too. That's something else we should look at.

In my final minute, I'll just add my voice on the idea of increasing the fine. I suspect there may be room where we can find common ground. You're right. In terms of trying to influence politics, if you're playing with this amount of money and you skew the rules, especially deliberately, 1,000 bucks in that game is the price of doing business; it's not a deterrent.

I'll just end by saying thank you again, sir. It's always good to see you. I hope you're enjoying your well-deserved retirement.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I am very much so. That's why I'm here.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you. I'm sure Mr. Christopherson voices the sentiments of all the committee for your great public service over your career and for your retirement.

We'll now go to Mr. Graham for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Kingsley, it's a pleasure to be speaking with a francophone witness. It doesn't happen often here, so this gives me a chance to speak French.

I have followed you since you became Chief Electoral Officer, when I was nine years old. You've been a part of my political life since the very beginning, so I thank you for that.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

That's deeply touching. Thank you very much.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

During your opening remarks, you said that money and politics was a tough topic to discuss. There is no doubt about that.

What alternatives to money in politics do you see? Do you see any?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I see not a one, and that's why I have always preferred reasonable rules when it comes to political financing.

I was never a fan of lowering the contribution limit to $100. I don't think that's reasonable. Some balance and a certain amount of public support are necessary. Achieving total financing fairness is impossible. Some parties, and even candidates, will always receive more support than others. That's the nature of the beast.

The limit is not what needs changing. Instead, what we need to do is set the limit at a level that prevents excessive financing. That was a hugely important consideration in the Canada Elections Act when very significant measures were taken to impose these limits on spending and contributions, and do away with corporate, union, and association contributions. Today, only individuals, in other words, Canadians, can make a financial contribution to a party during an election. That's a crucial piece of our legislation.

(1240)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When you took office in 1990, where did Canada's election financing legislation stand?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

There wasn't any.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There weren't any limits or rules?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

No. Some banks would donate $50,000 or $60,000. It depended on the party. If the party was in power, it would receive $50,000, and the opposition party would get $30,000. Do you see what I mean? They would play both sides and make sure to provide at least some support. All of that ended in about 2004. [English]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Not to everyone; to everyone they thought they were going to get into power.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: I'm not good at that. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was per vote subsidies.[English]

You were in power at that time.

It's a qualifier.[Translation]

No doubt, you had numerous conversations with other governments, internationally speaking.

Canada is often said to have an excellent system. Are there other countries with models we should follow?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Yes. I can give you an example of one country that is important to us: Great Britain.

We shouldn't copy everything Great Britain does, because its contribution limit is, in fact, excessive. However, in Great Britain, airtime during election campaigns is free for all parties. That means parties can reduce their spending by 50% to 60% during a campaign, considering how much they currently spend on airtime. The need to fundraise diminishes accordingly.

That's one thing that comes to mind from a financing standpoint, but it's just about the only measure in Great Britain that we should endeavour to replicate.

Other countries do it as well. We don't feel as close to them culturally speaking, though, so their experience may not seem as relevant to our situation. I opted to use Great Britain as an example because it would be hard to argue that it isn't comparable to Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It seems to me that Great Britain's spending limit is in effect between elections, not just during the election period.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

It applies broadly and is a measure that the federal government should consider. Canada adopted fixed election date legislation, but thus far, adherence to the legislation has generally been the exception, rather than the rule. That has had a warping effect on political financing. Third parties can actually go right up until the day the election is called. We saw the result of that during the last election: it created a system that many felt was wrong.

I think Canada should consider the fixed date elections measure and decide that the election period covers the six months leading up to the election; in other words, all the financing provisions would apply retroactively for a period of six months prior to the election being called. The limit would apply to that period, and third parties would have to register from that point on.

I've never been in favour of the legislation because it goes against what our parliamentary system is meant to be about. Nevertheless, since it does exist, we should make sure that, in terms of financing, the measures around spending limits and the rules governing third parties are still meaningful.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's interesting.

I'm going to switch gears now.

You talked about the people to whom Bill C-50 should apply: ministers' agents, opposition leaders, and third parties. Who are all the people you think the bill should apply to?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

The bill should apply to anyone who helps organize or finance a fundraising event for a candidate or party.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Who would have to be invited to the event in order for it to be subject to Bill C-50?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Forgive me, but I didn't understand the question.

(1245)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Currently, it applies to ministers, opposition leaders, and third parties. Is that sufficient?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Now I see what you're getting at.

I think that could work to start. Then we could see how things go. I wouldn't want to take it too far right off the bat.

I see the Canada Elections Act as a dynamic statute. We need to exercise care before changing the financing provisions. We shouldn't move too far towards one extreme because it could create distortions. We've created something that holds up quite well, comparatively speaking, and is more or less equivalent.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You brought up adequate financial penalties. You said that $1,000 was too low and that the amount should be doubled.

From your experience as Chief Electoral Officer, which penalties would you say worked and which ones had no effect?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

That's a tough question to answer.

There was a very significant bill dealing with penalties because they had become so ridiculous that people knew they were useless. The penalties meant nothing.

I simply said that the penalties should be severe and equivalent to what used to apply when other provisions of the Canada Elections Act were violated, under the version passed in 2006, if I'm not mistaken. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Now we'll go to a five-minute round, and we'll start with Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here.

I don't know if you've been following any of the other meetings that we've held on this topic. In questioning, my colleague Mr. Nater discovered a couple of things that would be considered fairly large loopholes—ones you could drive a bus through, essentially. I just want to run the two scenarios by you and get your thoughts on them, as well as—if the committee feels it appropriate to try to find ways to amend the legislation to fix those lapses—how we might approach those. You'd be able to provide some advice on that, I'm sure.

The two scenarios he identified were as follows. The first is in relation to the notice period. It's a five-day period, but this loophole was identified. Let's say the Prime Minister was going to be attending a function and didn't seem to know he would be there until maybe an hour or two beforehand, and that change was suddenly made. That takes away that notice to the public, but it would still comply with the law because after the five-day period it could be amended without any real consequence, I guess. What could we do about that?

The other scenario is this idea of the $200 limit. What would stop the Prime Minister from attending an event where the ticket price was $199 and then later on, at the event, everyone who attended just happened to give another $1,351, so they ended up giving the maximum contribution? They were not required to do that to attend the event, but they all somehow just happened to do it.

I suppose there is a possibility you could actually mix those two things, and it would be even more of a loophole.

I want to hear your thoughts on whether you see those things being problematic, and if we were looking to try to fix those loopholes, what we would do to fix them.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

With respect to the first one—and this is after a few months of reflection—the notice should indicate who the officials are who will be in attendance and whether the Prime Minister will be there. If not, if the head of a party or the minister's name is not on the notice, then they cannot attend.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's as simple as that. There couldn't be a last-minute change. It would just be that if they're not on there at a certain point in time.... Is five days reasonable, or do you think it should be longer than five days?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I'm willing to see what five days gives us in terms of a system. I'm willing to see what that gives us. It's a lot better than what exists.

(1250)

Mr. Blake Richards:

What you'd say is five days, though after that five days, there could be no additions.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Yes. Making it five days means that people should have a very definite idea about who will be attending. I don't mean the attendees; I mean which functionaries, which ministers, or which party leaders or whoever. That would be part of the notice. Then the media would perk up and say that the finance minister or someone else is going to be there, and that would make people twig.

With respect to the $199 and the $1,350, that's the kind of finagling that will get caught because of the reporting requirements regarding money. If it were to be instantaneous or quasi-instantaneous, as I've said, then it would be caught automatically and immediately. It'll be caught over time now, and obviously the price paid will be after the fact, which is not desirable. I don't know if there's a solution.

Mr. Blake Richards:

But I don't think there would be anything illegal about it, right? It wouldn't be prevented. We would know certainly that it's the case if someone did the work to do the linkage, but there's nothing that could be done right now to prevent someone. This law wouldn't prevent that. It would still be lawful.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I'm agreeing with you, and I'm also saying I don't know what the solution is.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I found a solution to the first one, but I didn't find a solution to the second one.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate that, and if you do happen to think of something at a later date, say some night you're not able to sleep or something, we'd be happy to hear it. Send us a—

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I'll give you a call the moment I'm not able to sleep. Have I got that right?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Blake Richards:

You know what? Odds are that would probably be the case for me, too.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now go on to Mr. Bittle for five minutes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

You said that, to your mind, you weren't going to make any friends if the appropriate penalty for the party was double the contribution, but you also questioned whether the appropriate penalty on summary conviction for the individual should be higher than $1,000. Is there an appropriate penalty that you have in mind?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Yes, I'm thinking $5,000 for an individual candidate, something that makes the person think that there is a price for breaking the law. I don't think $1,000 quite does it, frankly. I think $5,000 starts people thinking, especially if they also have to remit double the amount of money that comes from the association, but something should be tied to the individual as well.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Is that in keeping with other provisions in the act?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

The $5,000 is. I don't remember them all, by the way, but I do remember that $5,000 for certain infractions.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You mentioned that you had an opportunity to look through the technical changes, and you expressed some concerns about how they came about. In terms of the changes themselves, are you supportive of them? Do they seem reasonable to you? What are your thoughts on those changes?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I proposed additions to those changes, but those changes are okay, yes.

Insofar as technical amendments are concerned, I really left those up to Stéphane Perrault to handle, because I really don't have the staff to go through all of this in detail.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

With regard to donations being made available instantaneously or in a very rapid turnaround, in my experience in a campaign, when you have a limited window—and I guess in most campaigns—it'll be about $100,000 per riding depending on the size of the riding, you can have only so many paid staff. My financial agent had a full-time job and he came when he could.

A lot of people still like to donate by cheque and don't trust the Internet, so cheques pile up and may get deposited only every few days or so. Maybe 10 years from now everyone will be donating online, and it will become easier, but in the current climate, especially if you have a Liberal candidate in rural Alberta who may have a very small organization or similarly a Conservative candidate in downtown Toronto, it's not equal. I don't know how we can get that quick turnaround, especially at the local level, in terms of donating.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Let's start with the parties, and then see how far and how fast we want to progress to individual candidacies. There's no reason why any party represented in the House of Commons shouldn't be under the obligation to do that.

(1255)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I really have nothing further at this point.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go on to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you again, Mr. Kingsley, for joining us.

I have just a couple of brief questions, so I probably won't use my full five minutes. I do want to go back very briefly to the 18-year-old limit for reporting of names, because that was something that jumped out at me as well when the minister was here, and she didn't actually address it. I suppose I probably made a bit of a joke at the time, saying it should be the Joe Volpe rule, and so she may have glanced over the issue. I would appreciate your comments on the name of an attendee, who may be 16 or 17 years old, at an event being reported. I think it does generally make sense. I accept Ms. Tassi's comment about a three-year-old. I have a three-year-old and a one-year-old, and they join me at most community events because that's what we do as a family. However, I do think the distinction between a 17-year-old and a newborn or a child should be made.

Is that something you might be able to come to the committee with something in writing on, maybe some wording that could amend legislation?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I'll take it under consideration and get in touch with the chair.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I appreciate the invitation to do that, to think more about this.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Richards commented on a couple of the scenarios that have been raised in the past. The only other scenario was about the notice period, if notice was put out five days in advance but it had already been sold out; for example, if there was an event with the Prime Minister or with the minister at $1,500, but by the time it was posted online the obligatory five days in advance, it was already sold out.

Do you see a way the legislation could address situations like that, in which something is posted and it's publicly available but people can't actually buy a ticket because it's sold out?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I don't think I can, no. This is where you're dealing with something in the law: this is the step, and at that step you do this, and under that step you don't do it. You cannot have flexible steps all the time. It makes it impossible to run anything. Five days is it. At least you get to know who's going to be there with the suggestion that I made earlier. If it were already known, at least it would be known at the same time that the people would have known that the Prime Minister, the Minister of Finance, the Leader of the Opposition, the finance critic, or the leader of the...whatever, would be in attendance. I'm not focusing on primarily one office-holder here.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Something we haven't discussed much is media presence. We haven't talked a lot about media being present there. We're talking about all these people showing up and underhanded things happening, but I think that's probably something that is creating even more—furthering, I guess—transparency: when we allow people with cameras and recorders to be at the event.

What do you think about that step being taken in the legislation?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

I'm in favour of that. If the media wish to attend, I certainly think they should be able to attend and to record what is happening, or at least write down what is happening. I'm not sure that I agree that they should be able to take actual footage. If that's in the statute, that's in the statute, but I personally didn't see that in the bill.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think having five days' notice has now allowed media to be aware of these events that once used to take place—

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

That's very favourable; that's very good. They can decide if they want to be in attendance or not.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

At our last meeting, we talked a fair bit about there not being a required amount listed ahead of time, but there being a pass-the-hat type of thing and some kind of influence at the event to donate a recommended amount. What do you think about that? Should that be captured under this legislation, or should it just be the required amount?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Well, pass-the-hat events are already under the statute. They're allowed, and I don't see a need to amend that. It's very hard to visualize a political party organizing a major financial event and saying, “under $200 and we'll have all of these outstanding figures from the party attending.” I guess it could happen. I'm not sure that it needs to be caught under the legislation.

(1300)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You have already mentioned that you are not in favour of lowering the amount to $100. The main point of our last guest here today, from Democracy Watch, was that we should be following the amendments made in Quebec and that we should lower it to $100. He also made claims that even volunteerism and doctors receiving free samples.... Everything causes a human being to be influenced and to act favourably toward one person rather than another because the person has done something for them.

I just want your general opinion about how we, as a good, democratic country and as people who want to be ahead of the curve on stamping out corruption and be seen as having a fair, transparent system, reach that balance. We need volunteers, and we need people to contribute to political parties but at the same time we don't want there to be undue influence on decisions being made.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

We found it: $1,550. It's a reasonable amount. You could have said $2,000 and I would have said yes, that's okay. I don't think that members of Parliament as a group can be influenced by a $1,500 contribution.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I don't think that either, but now we've been told that.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

That's why I don't agree with the need to reduce it. If it were $50,000, that would be something else, but $1,500, to my mind, does not do it, because you need so many $1,500 contributions.

The concern one would have about $1,500 would be about a particular group of people agreeing among themselves, who have a particular interest to bring forward, and they bunch up. They are effectively buying the table, 10 seats, for $15,000. When we see this, this is where it grates the spirit and it grates how Canadians feel about money in politics.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

My experience has been that you're also going to have a group of $15,000 on the other side of it giving their opinion as well, so you end up having challenges with any policy, because you always have people with diverse opinions throughout your riding and even your donors will have diverse opinions on any given matter.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ruby.

Thank you very much for being here today. You always have some very creative ideas for us, and we really appreciate that.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

It was a pleasure. Thank you very much for the opportunity.

The Chair:

Have a good week, committee.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bonjour à tous et bienvenue à cette 72e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons en séance publique notre étude du projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada (financement politique).

Pour la première heure de notre réunion, nous accueillons M. Duff Conacher, cofondateur de Démocratie en surveillance et président de la coalition Money in Politics.

Merci d'être des nôtres, monsieur Conacher. Vous avez 10 minutes pour votre déclaration préliminaire. Vous avez la parole.

M. Duff Conacher (co-fondateur, Démocratie en surveillance):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les membres du comité de me donner l'occasion de prendre la parole aujourd'hui concernant le projet de loi C-50. Comme on vient de l'indiquer, je suis cofondateur et coordonnateur de Démocratie en surveillance et président de la coalition Money in Politics, un regroupement de 50 organisations comptant 3,5 millions de membres au Canada.

Depuis 1999, la coalition réclame des changements aux règles fédérales et provinciales en matière de financement politique. Elle exhorte maintenant les parlementaires à apporter des modifications au projet de loi C-50 pour mettre fin à l'accès privilégié et à l'influence exercée par les plus fortunés sur la politique fédérale.

Selon moi, la structure du projet de loi, dont différents articles traitent des contributions, autorise le Comité à y apporter des amendements avant de le renvoyer à la Chambre. C'est d'ailleurs ce que votre comité devrait faire. De tels changements sont nécessaires pour empêcher les mieux nantis d'exercer une influence contraire à l'éthique sur les politiciens ou les partis, ainsi que pour proscrire l'utilisation de prête-noms, un phénomène observable dans tous les endroits au Canada où l'on a interdit les dons des entreprises et des syndicats tout en maintenant une limite de dons beaucoup trop élevée, comme c'est le cas à l'échelon fédéral.

Le plafond annuel de 3 100 $ pour les dons à un parti ou à une association de circonscription n'est nettement pas à la portée de l'électeur moyen. Ce maximum contrevient au principe « une personne, un vote » qui est le fondement de notre démocratie. Il permet aux plus fortunés, ceux qui peuvent faire le don maximal, de se servir de leur argent pour exercer une influence.

Il faut être naïf pour croire qu'une personne qui donne le maximum permis n'obtient pas une faveur quelconque en retour. C'est ce que nous avons pu constater par le passé lorsque des scandales liés au financement électoral ont touché différentes régions du Canada. Même une simple invitation à une activité au Club Laurier procure un accès privilégié que l'on peut seulement acheter, ce qui est contraire aux principes de la démocratie et de l'éthique.

Dans les sports, les arbitres ne peuvent pas accepter les cadeaux offerts par les joueurs. On peut se demander pourquoi les politiciens, qui sont censés jouer un rôle d'arbitre lorsqu'ils se penchent sur les questions d'intérêt public, continuent de permettre que l'on puisse les influencer en versant à un parti ou à une association de circonscription de l'argent, des biens ou des services dont la valeur peut atteindre 3 100 $ par année.

La coalition joint sa voix à celles des quelque 11 000 électeurs qui ont signé une pétition sur Change.org afin de réclamer que des changements soient apportés pour contrer l'influence des plus fortunés sur la politique fédérale et mettre fin à l'accès privilégié dont ils peuvent bénéficier. Il faut notamment abaisser le plafond des dons à 100 $, comme c'est le cas au Québec; renforcer les mesures coercitives et les pénalités imposées à ceux qui ne se conforment pas aux règles; et restaurer le système de financement par vote reçu ou une formule de dons de contrepartie provenant de fonds publics, comme celle utilisée au Québec, uniquement pour les partis et les candidats qui arrivent à prouver que leur viabilité financière en dépend.

Ce sont donc les principaux changements que nous vous prions d'apporter.

En outre, il faudrait que les limites de don s'appliquent également pour les prêts. Si les dons sont plafonnés pendant que les prêts sont illimités, les institutions financières sous réglementation fédérale peuvent se servir des prêts pour acquérir en quelque sorte de l'influence auprès des partis. Il est vrai qu'elles doivent consentir ces prêts suivant les mêmes conditions que pour tous leurs autres clients, mais il reste quand même que chaque prêt accordé sert la cause du candidat ou du parti qui en bénéficie.

Des psychologues cliniciens ont mené des études auprès de milliers de personnes partout dans le monde pour découvrir que même le plus petit des cadeaux avait, dans tous les cas, une influence sur la prise de décisions. Le dossier des médecins et des prescriptions est l'un des plus documentés à cet égard. Même si les médecins n'utilisent pas eux-mêmes les échantillons reçus des entreprises pharmaceutiques qu'ils refilent plutôt à leurs patients, et même si l'exercice ne leur rapporte rien du point de vue financier, il a été établi que le simple fait de recevoir ces échantillons gratuits influe sur les décisions prises par les médecins au moment d'établir leurs ordonnances, bien que les médecins eux-mêmes ne cessent de prétendre le contraire.

Si l'on croit que les dons n'ont pas d'influence sur un politicien ou un responsable de parti, c'est comme si l'on considérait qu'ils ne sont pas des êtres humains. Partout dans le monde, des psychologues ont mené des études à double insu pour constater que même le plus modeste des dons peut exercer une influence sur chacun d'entre nous.

(1105)



C'est la raison pour laquelle il faut, pour mettre un frein à cette influence, limiter les dons annuels à un montant que le Canadien moyen peut se permettre de payer, soit 100 $. C'est ce que le Québec a fait pour devenir un chef de file mondial en la matière. Le financement public est à un niveau inutilement élevé. Comme Élections Québec doit suivre le parcours des dons supérieurs à 50 $, la canalisation du financement au moyen de prête-noms devient impossible. Chacun donne seulement son propre argent sans dépasser ce qu'un électeur moyen peut se permettre.

À l'échelon fédéral, le plafond de dons trop élevé facilite en outre la canalisation du financement comme on a pu le voir avec SCN-Lavalin. Élections Québec a finalement fait son travail en 2011 en remontant cinq ans en arrière pour procéder à une vérification des dons. À la suite de l'interdiction des dons des entreprises et des syndicats à la fin des années 1970, il y avait des rumeurs incessantes à l'effet que les entreprises canalisaient leurs dons en utilisant comme prête-noms leurs cadres, leurs employés et les membres de leur famille. Élections Québec a donc finalement effectué une vérification en 2011 dans la foulée du scandale de corruption. On a ainsi découvert que des dons totalisant 12,8 millions de dollars auraient vraisemblablement été versés par des cadres et leurs proches au nom de leur entreprise. Il s'agit de 12,8 millions de dollars sur une période de cinq ans.

Ce stratagème de canalisation est utilisé à l'échelon fédéral. Élections Canada s'est engagé à mener une vérification il y a quatre ans. Rien n'a encore été fait. Si une telle vérification est effectivement réalisée, on découvrira des cas semblables. C'est ce qu'on a pu observer à Toronto comme partout ailleurs où l'on a interdit les dons des entreprises et des syndicats en laissant toutefois une limite de dons trop élevée qui favorise le recours à des prête-noms comme c'est le cas au fédéral. Avec le plafond en vigueur, vous demandez à 10 cadres et leurs conjoints de donner chacun 3 100 $, et vous vous retrouvez avec un beau don de 62 000 $ pour un parti.

C'est beaucoup d'argent et tout autant d'influence, et la réduction de la limite des dons est la seule façon de rectifier le tir.

Démocratie en surveillance a déposé des plaintes auprès de la commissaire au lobbying au sujet d'activités de financement tenues l'an dernier et les années précédentes. Nous espérons que la commissaire pourra tout au moins empêcher les lobbyistes qui sont enregistrés ou qui devraient l'être de participer à de telles activités. Même s'il contribue à accroître la transparence des activités semblables, le projet de loi C-50 ne mettra pas fin à l'accès privilégié pour ceux qui sont capables de payer. Les députés pourront toujours organiser des activités de la sorte. Les employés des cabinets des ministres pourront y assister sans même que leur présence ne doive être déclarée en application du projet de loi C-50, et il en va de même des hauts fonctionnaires du gouvernement. La transparence vise uniquement les candidats, les chefs de parti et les ministres eux-mêmes. Le projet de loi ne sonnera pas le glas de l'accès privilégié et de l'influence exercée par les mieux nantis.

Cette influence est problématique. À ce sujet, je peux vous donner l'exemple d'une analyse menée par Démocratie en surveillance. Vu la façon dont Élections Canada déclare les dons, c'était loin d'être chose facile. J'ai dû faire des tonnes de calculs pour en arriver à déterminer que près de 23 % des dons faits au Parti libéral du Canada en 2015 provenaient d'un peu plus de 4 % de donateurs fortunés ayant versé 1 100 $ ou plus. Il est envisageable d'effectuer une analyse semblable au niveau des associations de circonscription, mais cela exigerait de nombreux mois de travail parce qu'Élections Canada n'effectue pas une consolidation de ces chiffres. On parle donc uniquement de dons à un parti qui provenaient dans une proportion de 23 % de seulement 4 % d'individus fortunés pouvant se permettre de donner 1 100 $ ou plus. C'est un régime d'accès privilégié pour ceux qui ont la capacité de payer. Ce sont ces donateurs que l'on va inviter à une activité au club Laurier, et peut-être aussi ailleurs. Je suis persuadé que si l'application de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information était étendue aux cabinets des ministres, nous verrions que ces gens-là peuvent obtenir plus rapidement un retour d'appel, un rendez-vous ou l'accès à un haut fonctionnaire. Notre régime actuel n'est pas suffisamment transparent pour nous permettre de le prouver. J'espère que l'on pourra faire le nécessaire au moyen de projet de loi C-58 pour donner suite à l'engagement pris par les libéraux d'étendre l'application de la loi aux cabinets des ministres, ou via des modifications à la Loi sur le lobbying dont l'examen est prévu pour cette année.

Je crois que les règles parlementaires ne vous empêchent aucunement d'apporter les modifications nécessaires au projet de loi C-50 étant donné la façon dont on y traite des contributions et de tous ces autres aspects que j'ai abordés.

Je n'ai pas rédigé de mémoire à votre intention, mais un communiqué qui est diffusé aujourd'hui sur le site Web de Démocratie en surveillance sera traduit pour que votre greffier puisse vous en distribuer des copies. Vous y trouverez tous les détails pertinents.

Je serai ravi de répondre à toutes vos questions. Merci beaucoup.

(1110)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Conacher.

Nous passons maintenant à la série de questions à sept minutes. Nous commençons par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci d'être ici, monsieur Conacher. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Je pense être le seul Québécois à la table. Donc, lorsque vous parlez du Québec, je le connais très bien et c'est un système très intéressant.

J'aimerais avoir vos observations. Vous avez indiqué que la limite devrait être de 100 $, mais que même le plus petit des cadeaux a une influence; donc, pourquoi 100 $? Pouvez-vous également faire une comparaison avec d'autres administrations?

M. Duff Conacher:

Vous pourriez opter pour un financement entièrement public, mais je crois que les partis devraient être encouragés à établir des liens avec les électeurs et à entendre leurs préoccupations afin de prospérer financièrement. Voilà pourquoi je considère que le financement public du Québec est trop élevé. Il offre aux partis beaucoup plus qu'un simple financement de base.

Le point de départ du débat sur le financement public devrait être le montant dont les partis ont vraiment besoin pour mener leurs activités dans une administration donnée. Essentiellement, la réponse est qu'ils n'ont pas besoin de plus d'argent que leurs adversaires. Au lieu de cela, ce qui s'est produit en Ontario et qu'on voit maintenant en Colombie-Britannique et au Québec, c'est qu'ils sont simplement partis de l'hypothèse selon laquelle ils avaient besoin du même montant que celui dont ils disposaient au moment où ils ont modifié la loi et instauré un régime de financement public pour veiller à ce que toute baisse des dons découlant de la limite de dons soit compensée par du financement public. Ce n'est pas là qu'il faut commencer. On pourrait demander au vérificateur général ou à Élections Canada de préparer un rapport sur les sommes dont les partis ont véritablement besoin pour communiquer avec les gens. On pourra ensuite déterminer si un financement public est réellement nécessaire.

Si vous décidez d'établir une limite de dons, elle devrait être fonction de la capacité de payer de l'électeur moyen. Certes, les petits cadeaux peuvent avoir une influence, mais si des milliers de personnes ayant des points de vue et des opinions différents donnent 100 $ chacun, leur influence s'annule. Dans le système actuel, 23 % des dons faits au Parti libéral provenaient de 4 % de donateurs. Ces gens auront une plus grande influence que ceux qui donnent 100 $, étant donné qu'ils fournissent une proportion considérable du financement et que ce sont des donateurs plus importants pour le parti. Voilà ce qu'il faut éliminer, et vous pouvez y arriver en établissant une contribution maximale de 100 $.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ma circonscription, ma femme et moi sommes mes plus importants donateurs; je suppose donc que j'ai une influence indue sur moi-même.

Selon vous, quelle devrait être la structure du financement public? Quel genre de structure donne des résultats?

On nous présente souvent le système de financement par vote reçu comme une solution. Le problème que cela pose, à mon avis, c'est que le parti pour lequel j'ai voté en 2015 pourrait ne pas être celui que j'appuierai en 2016, 2017, 2018 ou 2019.

Quel genre de structure entrevoyez-vous?

M. Duff Conacher:

Je suis favorable à la position de Démocratie en surveillance et de la coalition, qui est que le financement de contrepartie adopté au Québec est la meilleure solution. Au Québec, le financement de contrepartie devrait être plus élevé, tandis que le financement par vote devrait être plus faible. Le financement par vote ne pose pas problème, tant qu'il demeure simplement un montant de base. Il est proportionnel, de sorte qu'il est plus équitable pour les partis qui ne remportent pas autant de sièges que ce qu'ils auraient obtenu en fonction du pourcentage de voix, et c'est un aspect important.

Dans notre système uninominal majoritaire à un tour, certains partis remportent plus de sièges que ce qu'ils devraient avoir, ce qui en fait une des plus importantes subventions publiques aux partis, car chaque élu reçoit annuellement 450 000 $ de fonds publics. C'est énorme. La subvention par vote a au moins l'avantage d'être démocratique, parce qu'elle est fondée sur le nombre de votes reçus — le pourcentage réel des votes obtenus par un parti —, ce qui signifie qu'un parti qui n'a pas remporté autant de sièges que ce qu'il aurait obtenu en fonction du pourcentage du vote reçoit au moins ces fonds.

Toutefois, le financement de contrepartie est un meilleur système, car le montant varie d'année en année, selon le montant recueilli par le parti. Vous pouvez aussi l'offrir aux candidats, ce qui n'est pas possible avec le financement par vote. Ce serait injuste pour les candidats qui se présenteraient contre un député sortant.

Le Québec a les deux. Cela pourrait aussi être à échelle variable, comme au Québec, qui offre un financement de contrepartie plus élevé pour les premiers 100 000 $ recueillis — ou 10 000 $ pour un candidat —, ce qui contribue également à uniformiser les règles du jeu. Au Québec, un candidat peut avoir beaucoup de donateurs qui ne peuvent donner que 50 $. Disons que cette personne a 1 000 donateurs; elle recueille donc seulement 50 000 $, mais les premiers 10 000 $ sont égalés dans une proportion de deux pour un, ce qui représente 20 000 $ supplémentaires. Un deuxième candidat ayant 1 000 donateurs pouvant toutefois donner 100 $ chacun peut recueillir 100 000 $. Or, le financement de contrepartie contribue à égaliser les choses, parce que le premier se retrouve avec 70 000 $, de sorte que ce n'est plus aussi disproportionné.

Voilà pourquoi je suis favorable au financement de contrepartie; il varie également d'année en année pour les partis. Donc, si le parti ne respecte pas ses promesses et perd énormément d'appuis, il ne recevra pas de financement de contrepartie.

(1115)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque nous avions le financement par vote, il y avait un seuil de 2 % en deçà duquel aucun financement n'était offert. Est-ce acceptable, selon vous?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, je souscris à l'idée d'imposer un seuil pour le financement, et si le système actuel était remplacé par un mode de scrutin de représentation proportionnel, un seuil serait tout aussi acceptable. Je pense qu'il faut avoir un certain pourcentage d'appui pour avoir droit à ce financement. Lorsque cela a été contesté, la Cour suprême du Canada a statué que le seuil de 2 % était constitutionnel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle incidence ces seuils ont-ils sur les candidats indépendants, les députés indépendants, etc.?

M. Duff Conacher:

Le Québec offre un financement de contrepartie aux candidats indépendants, et n'a aucun seuil pour les candidats. Si vous vous présentez comme candidat indépendant, vous obtiendrez du financement de contrepartie pour les dons recueillis pendant votre campagne. Cela permet également d'égaliser davantage les règles du jeu pour les candidats indépendants, qui sont actuellement visés par des dispositions discriminatoires dans la Loi électorale du Canada. Il leur est interdit de recueillir des fonds entre les élections, en prévision de la campagne électorale suivante, tandis que les associations de circonscriptions le peuvent. Donc, le financement de contrepartie est utile. La levée de l'interdiction de recueillir des fonds avant le déclenchement d'élections visant les candidats indépendants contribuerait également à rendre le système plus équitable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À votre avis, les dons devraient-ils être déductibles d'impôt? Si oui, devraient-ils être remboursables ou non remboursables? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il? Au Québec, ils ne le sont pas.

M. Duff Conacher:

Cela a été éliminé au Québec en raison du plafond de 100 $ pour les dons. Actuellement, les déductions d'impôt favorisent aussi ceux qui peuvent donner un montant plus élevé, ce qui représente une subvention publique considérable. L'allocation par vote, une subvention des contribuables, signifiait que vous deviez voter pour un parti avant de récupérer une partie des taxes que vous aviez payées. Tout le monde paie des taxes; les gens ne paient peut-être pas d'impôt sur le revenu, mais ils paient des taxes sur les produits et services. Cela visait à s'assurer qu'une personne a vraiment voté pour un parti avant qu'elle puisse récupérer ses deux dollars. C'était seulement deux dollars. Les sommes versées par les gens allaient uniquement au parti qu'ils avaient appuyé. Il était illusoire de penser que cela puisse se faire, parce que tout le monde paie plus de deux dollars de taxes par année. C'était structuré démocratiquement, contrairement à la subvention actuelle, qui favorise les donateurs fortunés.

Le président:

Merci, David.

Monsieur Nater, vous avez sept minutes.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je tiens d'abord à présenter mes excuses pour mon retard. J'assistais à une course très enlevante devant la Colline et je n'ai pu arriver ici à temps.

Monsieur Conacher, je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion de vous rencontrer et je tiens également à vous présenter mes excuses pour avoir manqué les deux ou trois premières minutes de votre exposé. Si je pose des questions auxquelles vous avez déjà répondu, je vous prie de m'inviter à lire les bleus.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé du Club Laurier et des activités qui s'y déroulent. Comme vous le savez sans doute, la mesure législative comporte une exemption précise sur les activités de reconnaissance des donateurs qui ont lieu lors du congrès d'un parti. La question se pose alors de savoir si les gens seront incités à verser la contribution maximale au parti, mais sans la déclarer, en participant, dans le cas qui nous occupe, à une activité du Club Laurier organisée dans le cadre du congrès du parti où le premier ministre ou des ministres sont susceptibles d'être présents.

À votre avis, cet aspect du projet de loi pose-t-il problème?

(1120)

M. Duff Conacher:

Tout à fait. Cette disposition du projet de loi — et beaucoup d'autres — ne permet aucunement d'éliminer l'accès privilégié en échange de dons. Le personnel des ministres n'est même pas couvert, même si ce sont des gens qu'il peut être important de rencontrer lors d'une activité afin de discuter, d'exercer des pressions ou de faire un peu de lobbying.

Le projet de loi ne vise pas à mettre un terme à l'accès privilégié en échange de dons; il vise seulement à accroître la transparence.

M. John Nater:

Je comprends.

Lorsque je suis arrivé, vous suggériez également qu'il faudrait que les limites de don s'appliquent également pour les prêts. Dans ce cas, vous avez laissé entendre qu'une limite de 100 $ serait acceptable, ce qui signifie que ce plafond rendrait les prêts plus ou moins pertinents.

Est-ce que vous proposez? Les prêts devraient-ils effectivement perdre de leur pertinence?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. Démocratie en surveillance considère que les prêts devraient seulement être autorisés lorsqu'ils proviennent d'un fonds public créé à cette fin. L'actuelle subvention des contribuables pour les dons est essentiellement un fonds public. Il s'agit donc de modifier cela afin de remplacer le mécanisme de prêts provenant des institutions financières sous réglementation fédérale pour qu'un parti qui obtient un prêt de 30 millions de dollars pour une élection soit assujetti aux mêmes conditions que toute autre personne qui emprunterait cette somme.

Pour une institution bancaire, accorder un prêt de cette nature revient à rendre un grand service à un parti qui comptera dans ses rangs, s'il remporte les élections, le ministre des Finances, c'est-à-dire la personne qui prend les décisions relatives à la Loi sur les banques. C'est stupéfiant; à mon avis, il semble y avoir là un conflit d'intérêts flagrant. Pourquoi voudriez-vous maintenir cette échappatoire? Elle favorise les grands donateurs.

M. John Nater:

Pensez-vous à la création d'une entité quelconque qui relèverait d'une société d'État, par exemple, et qui disposerait de fonds pouvant servir à consentir un prêt à un candidat ou à un parti à l'occasion d'une campagne électorale?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

Et les institutions financières fédérales.

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, mais avec un caractère très public; ce serait divulgué. Tous les dons devraient être divulgués avant la tenue de l'élection. Il s'agit d'une autre importante lacune de notre système. Je n'ai pas parlé des 11 modifications que nous demandons de façon détaillée, mais tous les dons devraient être divulgués avant que les gens votent pour qu'ils sachent qui finance les partis.

M. John Nater:

Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet? À votre avis, quel serait le moment idéal pour divulguer les noms des donateurs ou, dans ce cas, de ceux qui participent aux activités réglementées?

M. Duff Conacher:

Nous avons heureusement un modèle parfaitement fonctionnel à l'échelle fédérale, celui utilisé pour les candidats à la direction d'un parti. L'aspect qui pose le plus problème, c'est la période qui précède une élection, car même si les partis présentent un rapport trimestriel sur les dons qu'ils ont reçus, il est possible qu'une élection ait lieu entre la publication de deux rapports, et la population ne peut prendre connaissance des dons qui ont été faits pendant la campagne électorale.

Or, les candidats à la direction des partis sont tenus de le faire, et ce, jusqu'à quelques jours avant la tenue du vote. À cela s'ajoute le modèle fonctionnel de la divulgation en temps réel utilisé en Ontario, où les informations relatives aux dons sont divulguées dans les 10 jours. Cela peut être accompagné de détails, comme les circonstances dans lesquelles les dons ont été reçus.

M. John Nater:

Vous avez aussi mentionné... Je ne connais pas le modèle québécois aussi bien que certains de mes collègues, mais j'aimerais que vous me donniez plus de détails sur le suivi que fait Élections Québec pour les dons supérieurs à 50 $. Pourriez-vous parler davantage de cet aspect et nous dire, selon vous, comment cela pourrait fonctionner à l'échelle fédérale par l'intermédiaire d'Élections Canada? Pourrait-on imiter ce modèle?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. Il y a une autre façon de régler le problème, et j'y reviendrai dans quelques instants. Cela dit, le Québec a essentiellement déterminé que même avec un plafond de 100 $ pour les dons, le représentant d'une grande entreprise comptant des milliers d'employés pourrait se présenter au bureau d'un parti avec 1 000 chèques et affirmer, sur un ton complaisant, que ce sont des dons des employés. Le parti pourrait le signaler, mais pour empêcher cette situation, tout don supérieur à 50 $ est envoyé à Élections Québec, qui vérifie s'il provient vraiment de cette personne ou s'il s'agit d'un prête-nom. Élections Québec transmet ensuite le don au parti.

L'autre façon de régler le problème est de s'inspirer du modèle américain. On exige que les données qui sont divulguées soient accompagnées d'indicateurs clés au sujet des donateurs. Ainsi, si l'examen des rapports trimestriels sur les dons ou les données du système de divulgation en temps réel de l'Ontario révélaient une tendance douteuse — comme 1 000 employés d'une entreprise qui font chacun un don de 100 $ le même jour —, Élections Canada pourrait alors intervenir rapidement et faire une vérification.

Le système d'Élections Québec est légèrement meilleur, puisqu'un dirigeant d'entreprise, sa conjointe et leurs enfants à charge peuvent avoir des noms de famille différents. Faire un suivi de la canalisation du financement peut être difficile; il est donc préférable d'imposer un plafond de 100 $. La canalisation du financement suscite alors moins de préoccupations, mais un système démocratique et éthique devrait comprendre des mesures supplémentaires pour veiller à ce que cela n'arrive jamais.

(1125)

M. John Nater:

Il me reste seulement une minute.

Je serai bref. Vous avez parlé accessoirement du système de l'Ontario, qui interdit aux politiciens de participer à des activités de financement. Cette mesure ne figure pas dans le projet de loi.

Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Duff Conacher:

L'Ontario est allé trop loin, mais pas en ce qui concerne la limite de dons. Avec un plafond de 100 $, toute activité que vous organiserez sera une activité démocratique, parce que l'électeur moyen peut se permettre d'y assister. Dans ce contexte, l'organisation d'activités par des députés ou des ministres ne posera pas problème. Pour recueillir des fonds, ils devront organiser des événements importants et publics, et la publicité entourant ces événements est une excellente façon d'attirer des donateurs.

La divulgation devrait aussi viser les organisateurs d'événements, car c'est un nouvel élément qui entre en jeu dans un régime où les dons sont limités. Le problème, ce sont ceux qu'on surnomme les « regroupeurs », un terme qui vient des États-Unis et qui désigne des gens capables de réunir dans une seule pièce 200 donateurs pouvant donner le montant maximal. Cette pratique est supposément interdite aux lobbyistes, mais puisque le commissaire au lobbying ne fait aucune vérification, il est fort probable que ce soit fréquent à l'échelle fédérale. Seulement quelques personnes se sont fait prendre.

Le président:

Merci.

Je cède la parole à M. Christopherson. Vous disposez de sept minutes, monsieur.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de votre présence, monsieur Conacher.

Tout d'abord, comme vous faites partie des principaux organismes communautaires, vous a-t-on consulté au sujet de l'élaboration du projet de loi C-50?

M. Duff Conacher:

Non.

M. David Christopherson:

Pas du tout, ni avant ni après... rien. C'est intéressant.

Vous avez soulevé de nombreux bons points. Ce que je trouve intéressant aussi, c'est que vous n'avez pas passé beaucoup de temps sur les détails du projet de loi C-50. Est-ce parce que vous croyez qu'il ne permettra pas de changer les choses et que vous préférez faire des commentaires de macro-niveau ou est-ce tout simplement parce que vous avez manqué de temps?

M. Duff Conacher:

Non, c'est tout simplement une question de transparence. C'est tout. Il n'y a pas vraiment de limite à l'accès privilégié ou aux dons importants. Le gouvernernement semble étudier les finances politiques et semble se concentrer sur les tiers de façon générale, mais je demande aux députés libéraux d'inciter leur ministre à se pencher sur l'ensemble du système dans le prochain projet de loi — quel qu'il soit —, et non seulement sur les dépenses des tiers, parce que c'est tout le système qui est contraire à l'éthique et à la démocratie, et qui permet un accès privilégié ainsi qu'une influence indue et non éthique de la part des riches.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Je vais poursuivre sur cette lancée, parce que je suis du même avis que vous: le projet de loi n'accomplit pas grand-chose. Le gouvernement tente de nous faire croire qu'il aborde la question, mais il ne le fait pas.

J'aimerais parler de quelques-uns des enjeux que vous avez soulevés. Vous avez parlé de versements de 128 millions de dollars. Selon vous, une vérification au Canada permettrait de faire le même genre de découverte. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer cela plus en détail?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui. À la défense du Québec, il s'agissait de versements de 12,8 millions de dollars et non de 128 millions de dollars.

M. David Christopherson:

Pardon, je n'avais pas vu le signe décimal. C'est 12,8 millions de dollars.

M. Duff Conacher:

C'est 12,8 millions de dollars sur cinq ans; c'est donc une somme considérable. C'est le montant qui a probablement été versé. On a désigné les dirigeants de plusieurs entreprises qui avaient donné le maximum au cours de la même période. Vous pouvez consulter le rapport sur leur site Web et voir tous les détails.

En raison des problèmes connexes et d'autres problèmes à l'échelon fédéral — étant donné les versements présumés à une circonscription du Québec —, la CBC a demandé à Élections Canada s'il allait faire la même chose. C'était en 2013, alors que la vérification d'Élections Québec venait d'être publiée. Élections Canada a répondu qu'il effectuait une vérification relative aux élections de 2011. Tout d'abord, on ne remonte pas assez loin dans le temps. La vérification d'Élections Québec visait les cinq années précédentes. C'était en 2013. On aurait dû reculer au moins jusqu'aux élections de 2008. On examine seulement la période électorale; pourquoi ne pas aussi examiner la période entre les élections?

On peut facilement avoir accès à ces bases de données. Tout est en ligne. Pourquoi Élections Québec ne vérifie-t-il pas les dons maximums? On pourrait vérifier les dons de 1 000 $ et plus; voir qui sont ces gens. Je n'ai rien vu depuis les quatre dernières années. Je ne sais pas si on procède à une vérification. Je l'espère.

M. David Christopherson:

Avez-vous dit qu'un exercice similaire à l'échelon fédéral relèverait d'Élections Canada ou du vérificateur général? Comment pourrait-on s'attaquer à la question à l'échelon fédéral, si c'est ce qu'on veut faire?

M. Duff Conacher:

Élections Canada a dit qu'il allait le faire en 2013. Cela fait maintenant quatre ans. Il y a eu une entente de conformité avec SNC-Lavalin au sujet de ce qu'on avait découvert pour la période de 2004 à 2011. J'ai du mal à croire qu'une seule entreprise ait fait cela depuis l'interdiction des dons des sociétés et des syndicats le 1er janvier 2007. Les syndicats l'ont peut-être fait aussi. Au Québec, c'était surtout des entreprises, mais aussi quelques syndicats.

Au Québec, la limite était de 2 000 $; c'était donc un peu plus facile de verser plus d'argent. Nous avions commencé par une limite de 1 000 $, ce qui correspond à 2 000 $ par année si l'on tient compte de l'argent versé aux associations de comté. La limite est maintenant de 3 100 $ et je ne sais pas ce qui se passe avec la vérification. Il faudrait demander à Élections Canada. C'est lui qui a dit qu'il allait le faire. Si l'on ne trouve rien à l'issue d'une vérification, on publie tout de même un rapport pour en faire état, mais quatre ans plus tard, il n'y a toujours rien.

(1130)

M. David Christopherson:

C'est intéressant.

M. Duff Conacher:

Vous trouverez, dans le communiqué de presse que j'ai transmis au Comité, un lien vers l'article de 2013 de la CBC, dans lequel un représentant d'Élections Canada avait dit qu'on procéderait à une vérification.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. J'espère qu'on pourra y faire suite; cela fait partie de notre travail.

M. Duff Conacher:

Il faudrait remonter en 2007. Ce serait encore mieux de remonter en 2004, lorsque la limite pour les dons des entreprises et des syndicats était fixée à 1 000 $ par année. C'était une interdiction, dans les faits. La vérification devrait porter sur l'ensemble de cette période. Élections Québec a attendu de 1970 à 2011 avant de faire une vérification et qu'a-t-il découvert? Des versements. Pourquoi Élections Canada attendrait-il 30 ans comme l'a fait Élections Québec?

M. David Christopherson:

Il faut se poser la question. Personne ne soupçonne Élections Canada de corruption — du moins, ce n'est pas mon cas et je ne connais personne qui a de tels soupçons —, alors la question qu'on se pose c'est: « Pourquoi? » Il serait intéressant d'avoir la réponse.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, vous avez parlé de regroupement. Est-ce que vous suggérez qu'il s'agit d'un emploi à temps plein et que c'est de cette façon que ces gens enfreignent la loi... qu'en donnant tout leur temps, ils peuvent recueillir le maximum de dons et organiser des événements? Pourriez-vous nous donner des explications à ce sujet?

M. Duff Conacher:

En vertu du Code de déontologie des lobbyistes — avant, c'était la règle 8; aujourd'hui, ce sont les règles 6 à 10 —, une personne qui devrait être enregistrée, mais qui évite de façon illégale de s'enregistrer n'a pas le droit d'organiser une activité de financement. C'est vrai même dans le cas d'un lobbyiste non enregistré qui siège au conseil d'une société ou d'une organisation, et nous espérons que la Commission du lobbying continuera d'appliquer cette norme.

Nous avons reçu des plaintes au sujet du président d'Apotex et d'une activité de M. Morneau de novembre 2016, et aussi au sujet d'un événement tenu dans sa maison en août 2015 pour un candidat libéral et pour Justin Trudeau, avant qu'il ne devienne premier ministre. Nous avons aussi reçu une plainte au sujet d'un autre membre du conseil associé à une entreprise nommée Clearwater Seafoods, qui a tenu un événement pour les libéraux en août 2014. Nous ne savons pas exactement où la commissaire au lobbying fixera la limite. Nous espérons toutefois qu'elle dira ceci: si vous siégez à un conseil ou si vous êtes affilié d'une façon ou d'une autre avec une organisation qui fait du lobbying auprès du gouvernement — même si vous n'êtes pas un lobbyiste enregistré —, alors vous ne pouvez aider à l'organisation d'aucun événement ni faire quoi que ce soit d'important pour une personne qui est visée par le lobbying de l'entreprise. Cela reste à voir. J'espère que c'est là qu'on établira la limite.

Si vous n'êtes pas un lobbyiste enregistré ou que vous n'êtes pas affilié à qui que ce soit, mais que vous souhaitez exercer une influence sur le parti... si la commissaire au lobbying n'établit pas une norme stricte, même les lobbyistes qui ne sont pas enregistrés pourraient siéger au conseil d'entreprises qui font du lobbying auprès du gouvernement et pourraient participer à ces événements. Je suis certain que c'est ce qui se passe. En tant que lobbyiste, si vous réunissez 20 personnes dans une salle, qui donneront chacun 3 100 $ au parti dans le cadre d'un événement, je peux vous garantir qu'on répondra à vos appels. Vous êtes un « regroupeur », vous êtes précieux pour le parti, et cet argent vous donnera accès au parti.

Je pourrai vous donner plus de renseignements sur ce sujet très bientôt. L'année dernière, des « regroupeurs » ont eu droit à une énorme faveur et à un accès privilégié à titre de remerciement.

(1135)

Le président:

Merci, Duff et merci, David.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Sahota. Allez-y, madame.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai trouvé votre témoignage très intéressant. J'avais déjà songé à la question, mais comme j'ai été candidate aux élections, je vois maintenant les choses un peu différemment.

Vous avez dit que cette mesure législative permettrait d'accroître la transparence. C'est exact?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Croyez-vous qu'il s'agisse d'un pas dans la bonne direction? Est-ce un pas en avant?

M. Duff Conacher:

Un tout petit pas, oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Le directeur général des élections par intérim était ici plus tôt cette semaine et il croit que la loi existante et les règles en matière de déclaration permettent d'atteindre un bon équilibre. Il croit qu'il s'agit d'un pas dans la bonne direction, pour la transparence.

Ma question a trait à notre discussion au sujet de la participation civique et à la façon dont certaines personnes, qui n'ont pas le temps de faire du bénévolat, compensent cela en donnant de l'argent. Croyez-vous qu'en réduisant le montant maximal des dons, on pourrait restreindre le droit de certaines personnes à la participation civique?

M. Duff Conacher:

Si le montant que ces personnes peuvent donner est plus élevé que ce que la moyenne des électeurs peut se permettre, alors c'est un système antidémocratique et contraire à l'éthique dès le départ. Cela contrevient au principe fondamental d'une personne, une voix. C'est comme si on disait qu'une personne qui n'a pas le temps de faire du bénévolat pour un parti avait droit à plus de votes le jour des élections... beaucoup plus de votes. On ne permettrait jamais une telle chose. Pourquoi le permettrait-on pour l'argent?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez dit plus tôt que les études psychologiques avaient démontré que lorsqu'un médecin recevait des échantillons gratuits d'une société pharmaceutique, cela changeait le rapport de ce médecin avec la marque. Ne diriez-vous pas la même chose pour les services gratuits comme le bénévolat ou le porte-à-porte? Un candidat ou un député ne pourrait-il pas faire preuve de favoritisme envers une personne qui a fait du bénévolat pour lui?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, et selon Démocratie en surveillance et d'autres coalitions, le bénévolat devrait être compilé et divulgué. C'est important, parce que le versement se fait notamment de la façon suivante: on donne congé aux gens en prétendant qu'ils ne sont pas payés, mais on leur remet une prime de Noël pour les remercier d'avoir pris du temps pour aider un parti ou un candidat. Il faudrait d'abord effectuer un suivi du bénévolat; ce serait facile à faire. Les responsables d'une campagne connaissent leurs bénévoles. Il suffirait d'en dresser la liste sur un site Web, à des fins de divulgation. La définition du terme « contribution » dans la Loi électorale du Canada vise l'argent, les biens et les services. Le bénévolat est une forme de service.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Selon mon expérience de campagne, la majorité des bénévoles et des gens qui font du porte-à-porte sont des jeunes de moins de 18 ans. Je ne sais pas si les parents aimeraient que le nom de leur enfant soit communiqué sur un site qui les associe à un certain parti. Ces jeunes ont un avenir. Ils ne savent pas à quoi ressemblera leur carrière. Cela pourrait avoir une incidence sur leurs possibilités d'avenir. Ils tentent seulement de comprendre les choses, de prendre part à un mouvement et de forger leur opinion au sujet d'un parti. Ils ne savent peut-être même pas s'ils sont néo-démocrates, libéraux ou autre, mais ils veulent participer à la campagne et en apprendre davantage.

Bien qu'il semble que vous régliez un problème à l'extrémité du spectre, certaines de ces règles pourraient décourager les gens de participer à l'échelle communautaire. Je crois...

M. Duff Conacher:

Pour répondre à cela, ce que vous dites essentiellement, c'est que les gouvernements ou d'autres discrimineraient les gens dans le cadre d'une embauche, je suppose, et qu'il pourrait y avoir d'autres problèmes associés au bénévolat pour un parti politique en particulier. Vous dites que la Commission de la fonction publique du Canada et que partout au pays...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que les gens hésitent à s'afficher avec un certain parti s'ils veulent être perçus comme étant non partisans pour obtenir un emploi dans le futur... bien sûr.

De plus, je ne connais pas beaucoup...

(1140)

M. Duff Conacher:

D'accord, mais ils font un don...

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement.

M. Conacher n'a interrompu aucun autre membre du Comité pendant la période de questions. On pourrait peut-être lui demander d'attendre la fin de la question avant de répondre.

Le président:

Nous allons poursuivre.

Il vous reste une minute quinze.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais poser une question précise.

Vous avez dit quelque part que plus une personne donnait, plus elle bénéficiait de crédits d'impôt. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer cela? Selon ce que je comprends, le maximum est associé au montant médian de 400 $. C'est celui qui vous donne le plus en retour. Si vous donnez plus d'argent, le pourcentage de crédit est inférieur, selon Élections Canada.

M. Duff Conacher:

C'est vrai, mais pour obtenir la déduction maximale, vous devez donner le montant maximal. Vous profitez du fait que vous êtes capable de donner le montant maximal. Vous n'obtiendrez pas de crédit si vous ne faites pas de don.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvez-vous m'en dire un peu plus sur le Québec? Quand la province a-t-elle modifié ses lois pour établir le montant maximal à 100 $, que vous jugez idéal?

M. Duff Conacher:

C'était en 2013, après qu'Élections Québec ait publié sa vérification, qui montrait qu'on avait probablement versé 12,8 millions de dollars entre 2006 et 2011.

Il y a aussi eu un énorme scandale de corruption, qui avait surtout trait au système de dons politiques.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce qu'on sait si les versements se font toujours, dans une moindre mesure? Est-ce qu'on a mis fin à la corruption et à l'influence au Québec?

M. Duff Conacher:

On ne peut plus le faire légalement. On a fait... Le système fédéral légalise le versement de fonds et le rend très simple, parce que tout est fait ouvertement. Au Québec, la police et Élections Québec n'ont pas accusé la plupart des personnes qui ont donné ces 12,8 millions de dollars. Ils ne peuvent pas. Ils demandent aux cadres si c'était leur argent et si c'est eux qui ont décidé de le donner. Ils répondent oui, tout comme les dirigeants de ces sociétés. On ne peut accuser personne, parce qu'il faut qu'il y ait eu une certaine intention pour les accuser d'avoir enfreint la limite des dons.

On a interdit les versements au Québec, parce que le don maximal est maintenant de 100 $. Si vous donnez plus de 50 $, ce don passe par Élections Québec. Il serait presque impossible de faire des versements au Québec sans se faire prendre.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Nous passons maintenant aux questions de cinq minutes. Monsieur Richards, nous allons commencer avec vous.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci d'être ici. C'est un sujet connexe, mais j'aimerais entendre vos observations et vos idées.

Vous avez mentionné vos idées sur les changements que vous aimeriez que l'on apporte aux limites de dons notamment. On s'inquiète déjà à propos des tierces parties qui travaillent, ou qui travaillent supposément, avec des partis politiques pour s'opposer à un autre parti politique ou à un candidat, par exemple.

Je me demande si la réduction de ces limites pourrait augmenter ce type d'activités. Même depuis les élections, nous avons vu des organisations qui travaillent avec des partis politiques. Un exemple qui me vient à l'esprit est les reportages de juillet à propos de cet organisme du nom de Council of Canadian Innovators, qui a été créé en novembre 2015, juste après l'élection du gouvernement libéral. Je pense qu'il a été mis sur pied une semaine après que le gouvernement a été assermenté.

Il compte quatre employés à temps plein, depuis juillet, dont trois sont d'anciens libéraux. Un était un ancien adjoint exécutif du ministère des Affaires étrangères, un a été le directeur de campagne du ministre des Affaires étrangères, et son directeur des communications a été le porte-parole du cabinet des ministres libéraux de l'Ontario. Dans sa lettre de sollicitation de fonds qu'il a envoyé, il signalait qu'il offrirait des rencontres mensuelles avec le chef du cabinet du ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique en échange d'un don de 10 000 $. C'était l'une des récompenses que vous receviez.

Depuis, le bureau du ministre a jugé que c'était une pratique qu'il voulait corriger. En fait, le chef du cabinet ne le rencontrait pas tous les mois; il l'a plutôt rencontré trois fois entre octobre 2016 et juillet de cette année. Il a fait savoir qu'il devait corriger cela pour parler de réunions régulières plutôt que de réunions mensuelles, ce qui, d'après moi, ne règle pas vraiment le problème.

Je veux entendre ce que vous avez à dire sur ces organismes qui sont liés à un parti politique qui utilisent ces liens pour amasser des fonds et promouvoir des idées qui correspondent aux priorités du gouvernement ou du parti politique.

Selon vous, n'est-ce pas une autre version de financement donnant un accès privilégié? Cette pratique me semble certainement contraire à l'éthique et louche. N'êtes-vous pas d'accord? Le cas échéant, que suggéreriez-vous de faire pour essayer de prévenir ces situations?

(1145)

M. Duff Conacher:

Démocratie en surveillance a déposé des plaintes auprès de la commissaire à l'éthique et de la commissaire au lobbying à propos de l'appel du Council of Canadian Innovators à ses membres et de ses activités de lobbying de façon générale.

C'est l'organisme enregistré pour faire du lobbying pour le ministère de Chrystia Freeland. Il n'a pas fait de lobbying pour elle directement. Nous sommes d'avis que la règle 6 du Code de déontologie des lobbyistes signifie que si vous faites du lobbying pour l'un de ses employés ou hauts fonctionnaires, vous faites du lobbying pour elle, car ils lui rapporteront ce que vous avez dit.

Nous avons déposé une plainte dans laquelle nous soutenons que cette pratique n'est pas permise. C'est contraire à l'éthique car le codirecteur de la campagne de 2015 de Chrystia Freeland est le directeur exécutif du Council of Canadian Innovators.

Si la commissaire au lobbying permet cela, alors c'est ce que tous les lobbyistes qui ont peut-être aidé un parti ou un candidat durant les élections de 2015 commenceront à faire: ils ne feront pas du lobbying pour la personne pour laquelle ils travaillent, mais ils le feront pour son personnel. Il y aurait alors une énorme échappatoire dans le Code de déontologie des lobbyistes. Il serait inutile.

Nous espérons que la commissaire au lobbying prendra la décision appropriée, à savoir que l'on ne peut pas faire du lobbying pour un ministère de façon indirecte et dire que l'on ne fait pas de lobbying pour la personne pour laquelle on travaillait et que l'on a aidée à se faire élire. Oui, c'est ce que vous faites. Pourquoi feriez-vous du lobbying pour le haut fonctionnaire s'il ne communiquera pas au ministre ce que vous avez dit?

La commissaire à l'éthique nous a renvoyé une décision. Nous l'avons interrogée, mais elle n'a même pas examiné certains faits de la situation et la question de savoir si un traitement préférentiel est accordé.

Vous nous avez également posé des questions sur les tierces parties. Généralement, la position de Démocratie en surveillance et de la coalition est — et le gouvernement envisage apparemment de présenter un nouveau projet de loi à ce sujet — que les tierces parties devraient être limitées dans les dépenses pendant une période plus longue que seulement la période de la campagne électorale. La Colombie-Britannique vient de limiter la période à 60 jours avant la délivrance des brefs, soit essentiellement de 90 à 100 jours avant le jour des élections. C'est approprié. La Colombie-Britannique est également...

Le président:

Vous avez dépassé votre temps de parole, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

J'avais une question complémentaire, mais j'imagine que je n'ai pas le temps de la poser.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci, monsieur Conacher, de comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui.

Démocratie en surveillance ressemble à un parti politique car elle compte sur les dons des particuliers comme unique source de financement, n'est-ce pas?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, c'est exact.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je remarque sur votre site Web qu'il y a différentes options qui sont semblables à ce que les partis politiques offrent, à savoir que les gens peuvent choisir de verser de 5 $ à 100 $ par mois. Êtes-vous plus enclins de répondre à l'appel téléphonique d'une personne qui donne 100 $ par mois à votre organisation qu'à une personne qui donne 5 $ par mois?

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui, bien entendu. Je suis humain.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord. C'est de bonne guerre.

Dans le cas d'une personne comme Dan Aykroyd, qui constitue la moitié de votre comité consultatif et qui est fortuné, vous seriez beaucoup plus enclin de répondre à son appel qu'à celui d'un autre membre de votre organisation.

M. Duff Conacher:

Il n'a pas fait de don depuis longtemps — il prête son nom —, mais oui, je pense que si Dan Aykroyd appelait, je répondrais pour toutes sortes de raisons.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'imagine que si un enquêteur fiscal vous appelait, vous répondriez. C'est de bonne guerre.

Pour ce qui est de vos propositions, avez-vous évalué quels seraient les coûts additionnels que le gouvernement fédéral devrait assumer pour mettre en oeuvre ce que vous recommandez?

(1150)

M. Duff Conacher:

La limite de dons de 100 $ ne coûterait rien.

M. Chris Bittle:

Non, je le sais, mais quels seraient les coûts de tous les autres éléments?

M. Duff Conacher:

Si le financement public était inclus — et je répète que nous devons faire valoir des arguments dans ce cas-ci également —, notre proposition consiste à commencer avec une limite de 100 $ et à examiner la situation des partis année après année. Je pense que vous constaterez qu'ils se portent bien. Certains éprouveront des difficultés, mais seulement parce qu'ils ont peu de partisans, ce qui est une façon démocratique dans le cadre d'un système de contributions politiques démocratique.

Pour ce qui est de renforcer l'application et la divulgation, on communique déjà les renseignements. J'ai mentionné la vérification effectuée par des fonctionnaires d'Élections Canada. Ils n'ont pas grand-chose à faire entre les élections, mis à part recevoir vos rapports annuels et mener parfois une élection partielle. Je ne sais pas trop pourquoi ils n'ont pas été en mesure, au cours des quatre dernières années, de terminer cette vérification qu'ils ont promis de faire en 2013. Je ne vois pas de coûts additionnels.

M. Chris Bittle:

En ce qui concerne l'un des enjeux, je ne comprends pas très bien comment les choses fonctionneront. Nous traitons tous avec des bénévoles qui travaillent à des rythmes différents et pas nécessairement à nos bureaux de campagne de neuf à cinq tout au long de la semaine. Donc, pour ce qui est des dons qui sont divulgués avant les élections, comment les bénévoles peuvent-ils de façon réaliste s'acquitter de cette tâche pour les candidats, surtout dans des partis qui ne sont peut-être pas de grands partis, des partis qui ne sont pas au pouvoir et qui sont beaucoup plus petits? Là encore, dans quelle mesure Élections Canada devrait-elle augmenter ses ressources pour satisfaire à l'exigence de communiquer ces renseignements avant les élections?

M. Duff Conacher:

Je ne pense pas que ce serait beaucoup.

Je comprends que pour certains candidats, ce serait difficile, mais les candidats à la direction divulguent des renseignements tous les mois avant la dernière semaine. Si ce n'était qu'une seule fois une semaine avant le jour des élections par Internet, eh bien, c'est ce à quoi sert Internet. Vous téléchargeriez un fichier de données séparées par des virgules qui s'afficherait sur le site d'Élections Canada. Il serait illégal de ne pas saisir des données exactes. Élections Canada n'aurait pas à vérifier. L'organisme vérifie certains rapports de 2015 des partis, alors cette vérification prend beaucoup de temps, mais il ne serait pas difficile de les télécharger pour que les gens puissent les consulter.

M. Chris Bittle:

Dans un monde idéal, y aurait-il une interdiction sur les dons versés durant la dernière semaine de la campagne pour que les gens puissent avoir ces renseignements? Comment cela fonctionnerait-il?

M. Duff Conacher:

Dans la course à la direction, si vous receviez plus de 10 000 $ durant la dernière semaine, alors vous auriez à communiquer ce renseignement une dernière fois. Vous pourriez faire la même chose pour les candidats. Vous parlez d'une limite de 100 $, alors s'ils ne reçoivent pas de dons importants, il ne serait pas nécessaire de le divulguer. Vous pourriez même fixer un seuil de manière à ce que si vous n'avez pas amassé un montant donné, vous ne seriez pas tenu de divulguer le montant. Vous pourriez divulguer le nombre de donateurs, pas les noms.

Je ne pense pas que ce soit un problème.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Richards, pour cinq minutes.

M. Blake Richards:

J'imagine que nous allons reprendre là où nous en étions dans la discussion.

Je veux vous laisser terminer vos remarques, puis j'aurai une question complémentaire qui m'est venue à l'esprit lorsque vous parliez.

Mais avant, vous avez commenté le lobbying d'un employé qui rapporterait évidemment la conversation à son patron, au ministre. Je ne suis pas en désaccord avec vous, mais je veux vous interroger plus précisément sur ce qui semble être le financement donnant un accès privilégié, l'idée de tenir des rencontres, régulières, mensuelles ou peu importe, avec un chef de cabinet d'un ministre en contrepartie de contributions versées à leur organisation. C'est du financement donnant un accès privilégié essentiellement utilisé d'une manière différente. Ce n'est pas le parti politique, mais une association qui, à tout le moins selon toute vraisemblance, pourrait soutenir être affiliée ou étroitement liée au parti, à ses employés. Et même si l'on met cela de côté, il s'agit d'un membre du personnel d'un ministre qui offre à une organisation un accès au gouvernement en contrepartie de contributions. J'aimerais savoir si vous pensez que c'est une pratique inappropriée et j'aimerais entendre vos idées sur ce que nous pouvons faire pour l'empêcher.

(1155)

M. Duff Conacher:

Je n'ai pas mentionné cela dans la plainte que j'ai déposée à la commissaire au lobbying, mais je pense que je devrais assurer un suivi et signaler qu'une exigence est prévue dans le Code de déontologie des lobbyistes voulant que le lobbying doit être fait de manière à respecter les normes d'éthique les plus rigoureuses. Depuis que l'ICC est enregistrée pour faire du lobbying auprès du gouvernement fédéral, elle doit respecter ces principes et toutes les règles prévues dans le code.

C'est la façon de mettre fin à cette pratique. On ne peut pas avoir une situation où en échange de fonds, on offre un accès privilégié. Si vous précisez que vous pouvez offrir une garantie, alors la section sur le trafic d'influence du Code criminel s'applique. Je pense que le Code de déontologie des lobbyistes existe en tant que que code civil non pénal en matière d'éthique pour mettre fin à ces pratiques, et la commissaire devrait rendre une décision sur ce problème.

M. Blake Richards:

En ce qui concerne les tierces partis, vous avez mentionné la Colombie-Britannique. Je vais vous laisser terminer vos remarques, si vous vous rappelez là où vous vouliez en venir. Si je ne m'abuse, vous avez dit que la période de déclaration serait prolongée de 60 à 90 jours avant les élections. Je ne sais pas, et peut-être ne le savez-vous pas non plus, si la Colombie-Britannique a des élections à date fixe...

M. Duff Conacher:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

... car le problème ici au fédéral serait que si tout le monde connaît les dates, alors tout le monde connaît la période de 60 ou de 90 jours avant les élections et pourrait s'assurer que les renseignements sont divulgués avant.

Est-ce un problème, selon vous, et y voyez-vous une solution? Je vais vous laisser conclure vos remarques.

M. Duff Conacher:

C'est une limite sur les dépenses publicitaires durant cette période de 90 jours. La position de Démocratie en surveillance et de la coalition est qu'une période de quatre à six mois est tout à fait appropriée. C'est trois mois actuellement, et il est tout à fait approprié de prolonger la période.

Ce que la Colombie-Britannique a fait est que si vous faites une contribution à une tierce partie qui l'utilisera — c'est prévu dans le projet de loi 3 — pour des annonces publicitaires gouvernementales, la limite fixée pour les dons par des particuliers est de 1 200 $ et doit être désignée comme étant un don pour la publicité gouvernementale. Une personne peut verser un montant plus élevé — une fondation qui verse des subventions à une organisation ou à un particulier peut donner plus de 1 200 $ —, mais ce don ne peut pas servir à la campagne publicitaire que la tierce partie pourrait mener.

Démocratie en surveillance et la coalition approuvent cette limite. De plus, elle devrait être inférieure à 1 200 $. Ce devrait être 100 $, comme vous limitez les candidats à recevoir 100 $. Les tierces parties pourraient recevoir des subventions importantes de fondations pour leurs programmes, mais dans le cas des publicités électorales, elles ne pourraient verser que 100 $ à la fois.

Il sera intéressant de voir si cette limite sera contestée en Colombie-Britannique lorsqu'elle sera mise en oeuvre, mais en principe, il est démocratique et conforme à l'éthique de limiter les dons versés par les tierces parties à ces campagnes publicitaires.

M. Blake Richards:

Êtes-vous en train de dire que vous approuvez les contributions illimitées si elles ne servent pas à des fins publicitaires, ou pensez-vous qu'elles devraient être limitées pour d'autres types de dépenses également, car c'est...

Le président:

Veuillez répondre brièvement, s'il vous plaît. Votre temps de parole est écoulé.

M. Duff Conacher:

Démocratie en surveillance propose qu'entre deux élections, tous les lobbyistes ou groupes de lobbyistes devraient divulguer combien ils ont dépensé pour leurs campagnes. C'est ce que nous proposons au gouvernement fédéral de faire depuis maintenant 24 ans.

Lorsque ces renseignements nous sont communiqués, si nous voyons qu'un parti a des millions de dollars et qu'un autre n'a que des centaines ou des milliers de dollars, alors nous pouvons déterminer si c'est un problème et nous devons alors limiter les dons entre les élections.

Il est tout à fait approprié de commencer par cette limite avant les élections.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Conacher, de votre présence ici. Vous avez présenté des idées très intéressantes. Nous vous en sommes certainement reconnaissants. C'était très utile pour notre étude.

M. Duff Conacher:

Merci de m'avoir donné cette occasion, et je vous souhaite bonne chance dans vos délibérations.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons suspendre nos travaux pendant que nous accueillons de nouveaux témoins.

(1155)

(1205)

Le président:

Bienvenue à nouveau à la 72e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous étudions actuellement le projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada en ce qui concerne le financement politique.

Notre témoin pour la deuxième heure est Jean-Pierre Kingsley, l'ancien directeur général des élections qui a été en poste de 1990 à 2007, certainement une icône dans l'histoire des élections canadiennes. Je suis certain que les gens qui sont ici depuis longtemps, comme David et Scott, vous connaissent bien en raison de rencontres et de discussions antérieures.

Nous sommes très heureux de vous avoir parmi nous aujourd'hui. Nous avons hâte d'entendre vos déclarations liminaires. [Français]

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley (ancien directeur général des élections, à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma déclaration préliminaire ne prendra que de cinq à six minutes. La première partie sera en français.[Traduction]

Je ferai la deuxième partie de mon exposé en anglais. Je changerai de langue une seule fois, sauf, évidemment, au cours de la période des questions, s'il y en a une.[Français]

Je commence toujours un témoignage en disant que c'est un privilège de comparaître devant vous. En effet, vous représentez le peuple canadien et cela a toujours été pour moi un grand honneur de servir le peuple canadien par le truchement des députés.

Sauf erreur, il s'agit de votre 72e réunion, monsieur le président, et j'ose croire que je suis la personne qui a témoigné le plus souvent devant ce comité depuis 1990. Peut-être que je me trompe, mais cela vaudrait peut-être la peine d'être vérifié.

Ce projet de loi touche deux aspects importants. Je crois que tout projet de loi qui modifie la Loi électorale du Canada, de par sa nature, est important, puisqu'il fait l'objet d'un projet séparé de toute autre loi.

Les commentaires que je vais faire sont en fonction de mon entendement, c'est-à-dire de ma lecture du projet de loi. Quand je me prépare en prévision d'une réunion comme celle-ci, je me rappelle toute l'importance de la participation de mes collaborateurs et de tout le travail qu'ils effectuaient avant que je me présente devant vous. Aujourd'hui, je me présente seul. Alors, je vais soulever des questions, plutôt que d'offrir des réponses ou de fournir des commentaires.

J'ai pris note de quelques commentaires qui ont été formulés dans les médias, de ce que la ministre a dit dans son allocution d'ouverture ainsi que des propos du directeur général des élections par intérim. J'ai remarqué aussi que ce dernier avait joint un document contenant des amendements qu'il appelait techniques. J'ai été surpris de constater que cette consultation n'avait pas eu lieu avant que ce document soit déposé.

Précédemment, durant la plus grande partie du temps où j'étais directeur général des élections, le texte du projet de loi était transmis au directeur général des élections afin que des amendements techniques comme ceux-là puissent être débattus d'abord, quitte à ce que le Comité ne soit pas d'accord par la suite. Cependant, il y avait une prise de connaissance préliminaire.[Traduction]

L'argent en politique est le sujet le plus difficile à aborder, non seulement en ce qui a trait aux élections, mais aussi en ce qui a trait à la démocratie. Comme l'a souligné la ministre, le système canadien est sans égal. Sa réputation parle d'elle-même. Toutefois, malheureusement, le nombre de partisans est peu élevé. C'est le sujet le plus difficile à aborder.

À mon avis, au cours des 15 ou 20 dernières années, le Canada a réussi à mettre en place un système exemplaire. Par conséquent, il faut toujours évaluer la valeur des changements proposés par rapport à l'impact qu'auraient ces changements sur la Charte des droits, le droit à se présenter comme candidat, le droit d'apporter une contribution, la liberté d'expression et la liberté d'association. C'est avec ce contexte comme toile de fond que je vous présenterai mes commentaires.

Je me prononcerai davantage sur le premier aspect du projet de loi qui porte sur la production opportune ou plus opportune de rapports sur les activités de financement. Je me demande pourquoi cela ne s'applique pas lors d'une période électorale. Pourquoi s'agit-il d'une exception? S'il y a une période où les citoyens doivent vraiment savoir qui sont les donateurs, c'est bien au cours d'une période électorale. Pour le moment, ce régime de production de rapports n'est pas en vigueur. En vertu de cette mesure législative, cette production de rapports au cours d'une période essentielle à la démocratie n'aurait pas lieu.

Pourquoi certaines personnes sont-elles exclues des rapports? Pourquoi le nom des participants ou donateurs de 18 ans ne peut pas être inclus dans les rapports? En vertu de la loi actuelle, le nom d'un donateur canadien de moins de 18 ans doit figurer dans le rapport. Il n'y a aucune exception en fonction de l'âge. Évidemment, il y a une exception pour les participants qui ne sont pas Canadiens, puisqu'ils ne peuvent pas être donateurs.

(1210)



Une partie du raisonnement derrière ce projet de loi est de rendre public le nom des participants et des donateurs. Par conséquent, je ne crois pas qu'il s'agisse nécessairement d'une bonne idée qu'ils soient automatiquement exclus.

J'aimerais également formuler un commentaire au sujet du personnel de la personne qui organise l'activité. Certains membres du personnel sont excessivement importants au sein du système politique canadien et leur seule présence à une activité a du poids. Donc, à mon avis, le fait d'exclure automatiquement leur nom des rapports va à l'encontre de l'objet de la loi.

Ce que je dis, c'est que, pour les personnes de moins de 18 ans, nous devrions respecter les règles relatives aux contributions. Au Canada, un jeune de six ans peut faire une contribution. Il y a déjà eu un débat sur la question, car une exception avait été accordée à une famille dont les contributions les faisaient passer au-delà de la limite familiale, mais pas des limites individuelles. On m'a demandé à l'époque s'il ne devrait pas y avoir une loi pour empêcher ce genre de situation. J'ai répondu que non, car nous devons faire preuve de prudence par rapport à ce que l'on inclut dans les lois ou règlements. Si les gens apprennent qu'un jeune de six ans a fait une contribution, nous devons les laisser tirer leurs propres conclusions.

Selon ma lecture du projet de loi, outre ceux qui figurent dans la Loi électorale du Canada, d'autres personnes ou entités pourraient organiser des activités, notamment les agents de partis et associations de circonscription. Je me demande honnêtement qui ces personnes et entités pourraient bien être. Il s'agirait de personnes qui appuient soit le parti, soit un candidat en particulier, soit un député. Dans un tel cas, le titulaire de la charge publique doit le savoir d'avance — je n'ai rien vu dans le projet de loi à ce sujet, quoique je l'ai peut-être manqué — et non après coup, une fois que quelqu'un a organisé pour nous une activité — Dieu merci —, qu'elle a fait la moitié du travail et dépensé la moitié des fonds. Nous devons éviter ce genre de situation. Nous devons suivre les règles relativement à qui peut dépenser l'argent en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Je me suis demandé si l'on avait omis un lien avec des tierces parties ou une entité. Outre les entités qui figurent dans la Loi, qu'est-ce une entité? S'il s'agit d'une personne, participe-t-elle à ce que l'on appelle une activité de tierce partie? Est-ce que des publicités sont organisées avant que les autres entités n'entrent en jeu? La Loi prévoit des mesures anticollusion. J'ignore s'il y a un lien avec les tiers, mais, comme nous l'avons constaté, il faut également tenir compte du fait qu'en vertu de la Loi actuelle, des fonds étrangers peuvent être acheminés à des tiers. Je crois qu'il est important de le souligner. J'ai cru bon de le souligner à titre de préoccupation. Ma préoccupation n'est peut-être pas justifiée aux termes du projet de loi, mais cela m'a fait réfléchir.

À mon avis, l'amende de 1 000 $ pour une déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire est peu élevée. Les entités qui se feraient imposer cette amende — par exemple, les partis — ont les moyens de la payer et devraient donc être assujettis à une amende plus élevée. Je crois qu'il n'existe plus d'amendes de 1 000 $ dans la Loi. Elles ont toutes été éliminées dans les années 1990 ou au début des années 2000. J'ai donc été surpris de voir cette amende dans le projet de loi. Il ne s'agit certainement pas à mon avis de moyen de dissuasion; le moyen de dissuasion, c'est la déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire. Je crois, toutefois, qu'il devrait tout de même y avoir une amende. Je sais que les fonds recueillis seront confisqués si l'activité ou le rapport ne sont pas conformes, mais j'ai trouvé étrange de voir une amende si peu élevée.

Ce projet de loi soulève pour moi une question — et j'y ai fait allusion plus tôt —, soit la production en temps opportun de rapports sur les contributions. Évidemment, il y a des dépenses, mais la production de rapports sur les contributions.... Dans d'autres pays, la production de tels rapports est quasi automatique. Le candidat et le parti doivent rédiger un rapport à l'intérieur de 24 heures et le publier sur le Web afin que les gens puissent savoir qui sont les donateurs.

(1215)



Je considère comme très raisonnable la limite de 1 550 $. Une telle contribution ne devrait pas soulever de doute. Lorsque des entreprises, des partenaires d'entreprises ou des gens travaillant pour la même organisation participent à une activité, il se crée des relations. Ce projet de loi nous aiderait à mieux comprendre ces relations, ce qui est une bonne chose.

En ce qui a trait à la définition — et je vais terminer avec ce point — et la production de rapports distincts lorsqu'il s'agit de courses à la direction et à l'investiture, c'est ainsi que la Loi a été interprétée et j'imagine que cette définition a été incluse dans le projet de loi à des fins de précision.

Monsieur le président, ceci met fin à mon exposé.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup pour ces points très intéressants.

Nous allons maintenant amorcer notre première série de questions. Les intervenants disposeront de sept minutes chacun. Madame Tassi, vous avez la parole.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Kingsley, d'avoir accepté notre invitation. Je suis très heureuse de faire votre connaissance. Merci pour cet exposé.

L'objet de ce projet de loi est d'accroître l'ouverture et la transparence en ce qui a trait aux activités de financement politique. À votre avis, ce projet de loi atteint-il cet objectif?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Il permet d'accroître la transparence et l'ouverture.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Cette mesure législative propose également d'élargir l'application des règles afin d'inclure les courses à l'investiture et à la direction. Qu'en pensez-vous? Est-ce important? Est-ce une bonne chose que ces règles s'appliquent également à ces courses?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'est ce qu'on appelle dans la nomenclature une approche phare. L'idée n'est pas de tenter d'empêcher la tenue de ce genre d'activités, mais bien de les mettre en lumière. On les met en lumière en informant les gens. Si l'on choisit de ne pas empêcher la tenue de ces activités, c'est toujours une bonne chose d'informer les gens, car cela leur permet de formuler leur propre opinion.

Bien entendu, je crois que c'est une bonne chose que tous ces autres intervenants soient inclus.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Que pensez-vous de la valeur totale supérieure à 200 $ pour les contributions? Est-ce un bon montant?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

La Loi aborde déjà la question des contributions de plus de 200 $ — une contribution nette, car si l'on tient compte du prix du repas et des autres frais associés à l'organisation de l'activité, c'est plus de 200 $. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une limite raisonnable. Je n'étais pas prêt à me prononcer sur la question, mais je vais le faire. Ce montant ne me posait aucun problème lorsqu'il a été adopté et je suis heureux qu'il n'ait pas été indexé, car il s'agit d'un montant raisonnable.

(1220)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

J'aimerais parler de la liste d'exclusion, la liste de ceux qui ne sont pas tenus de s'enregistrer. Vous avez formulé un commentaire sur le critère de l'âge et cela m'inquiète. En tant que jeune fille, j'ai participé à de nombreuses activités politiques. Ma mère m'amenait avec elle, car elle était très active dans le milieu. En tant que mère, je ne voudrais pas que le nom de ma fille ou de mon fils figure sur une liste simplement parce qu'ils m'accompagnaient. C'est une chose qui me mettrait mal à l'aise.

Je peux comprendre s'il y a eu une cotisation; c'est différent. Toutefois, si mon fils ou ma fille, qui a quatre ans, m'accompagnent à une activité de financement politique parce que je veux être avec eux et que je souhaite les présenter à un groupe en particulier, par exemple, ne croyez-vous pas qu'il soit inquiétant que le nom de tous les participants, peu importe leur âge, soit inscrit sur la liste?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Lorsqu'il y a une contribution, la Loi devrait s'appliquer, même si le donateur n'est pas présent à l'activité, ce qui est possible. Dans l'exemple que vous donnez, je crois qu'il serait raisonnable de simplement donner votre nom et de préciser que vous êtes accompagnée d'un ou de deux membres de votre famille d'âge mineur, mais sans dévoiler leurs noms.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vois.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je crois qu'il s'agirait d'un compromis raisonnable de souligner que vous êtes accompagnée de membres de votre famille d'âge mineur et combien ils étaient.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Pourquoi, selon vous, est-ce important que le nom des membres de la famille soit enregistré? Pourquoi est-ce important si je décide d'amener avec moi mon fils ou ma fille de quatre ans?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Parce qu'ils n'auront pas tous quatre ans. Certains auront 16 ou 17 ans. Peut-être devrait-on modifier à la baisse le critère de l'âge et le fixer à sept ans et moins. Vous voyez ce que je veux dire? Si l'on est pour accorder une exception, je préférerais qu'il soit possible pour les gens de se renseigner sur ce qui s'est passé. Les participants devraient pouvoir dire, par exemple: « Il s'agissait de ma fille de quatre ans et de mon garçon de cinq ans. » C'est tout. Mais, il est possible qu'il ne s'agisse pas de membres de la famille. Ils accompagnent peut-être quelqu'un qui n'est pas un membre de la famille.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Vous voulez dire, une tante ou un oncle?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Ou un associé qui a amené avec lui le fils ou la fille de quelqu'un d'autre.

Si l'on souhaite mettre quelque chose en lumière, nous devons décider jusqu'où nous voulons aller. Il serait important de publier cette information sans être tenu de dévoiler le nom, si c'est ce que vous souhaitez.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je comprends que vous souhaitez limiter le nombre d'exclusions, mais quelqu'un a formulé une suggestion dans le cadre de nos discussions sur les préposés au service de soutien à la personne. Seriez-vous à l'aise avec l'idée que les préposés au service de soutien à la personne soient ajoutés à la liste d'exclusions? Pour le moment, ils ne le sont pas, mais c'est ce qui a été proposé.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Oui, s'il s'agit de leur principale occupation et, évidemment, s'ils n'ont pas fait une contribution de plus de 200 $.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

En ce qui a trait aux membres du personnel et à votre proposition en ce qui les concerne, comment atteindre l'objectif que vous proposez sans retirer les membres du personnel de la liste d'exclusions?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'est difficile, mais je crois que les chefs de cabinet du premier ministre ou des ministres, les adjoints principaux et les adjoints politiques principaux, notamment, ne devraient pas figurer sur cette liste.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Donc, vous dites que la liste devrait préciser les postes exclus.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'est exact.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Vous dites que l'amende de 1 000 $ est peu élevée. L'autre problème qui a été soulevé concerne les fonds retournés. En cas de non-conformité, ce sont tous les fonds qui devraient être retournés, et non le profit net. Auriez-vous un commentaire à formuler à ce sujet?

Par exemple, si j'organise une activité de financement et que je demande 100 $ le billet, mais que l'activité m'en coûte 50 $ le billet, si l'activité est jugée non-confirme, je dois rembourser toute la somme, soit 100 $ le billet.

(1225)

Le président:

Brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

S'il n'en tenait qu'à moi, je dirais que l'amende devrait être le double de ce que vous avez recueilli. Ainsi, il s'agirait d'un moyen réel de dissuasion qui pousserait les gens à respecter la loi. Toute infraction à la Loi électorale du Canada doit être assujettie à des amendes salées.

C'est une question d'uniformisation des règles. On ne peut permettre aux gens de faire ce qu'ils veulent. D'autres articles de la Loi proposent des amendes doubles selon le cas.

Je sais que je ne me ferai pas d'amis en disant ceci, mais l'amende devrait être le double des fonds recueillis.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

C'est intéressant comme suggestion. La ministre nous a invités à proposer des amendements et peut-être qu'une amende double fera partie de ces propositions. Je vous en remercie.

Vous dites qu'il est important qu'un moyen de dissuasion soit efficace. La politique étant ce qu'elle est, pour des raisons évidentes, les fonds à ma disposition avant les élections sont plus utiles que les sommes que j'aurai à verser en amende après les élections. Je ne peux pas dépenser de l'argent que je n'ai pas. Disons qu'il s'agit d'une activité de financement qui a lieu quelques années avant une élection. S'il s'agit d'une activité organisée pour moi, que je suis présent, que je suis le chef du parti, et que tous les autres critères sont respectés, mais qu'il s'avère que nous avons enfreint la Loi, nous aurions à verser une amende qui serait, comme vous le proposez, le double de la somme recueillie. Je présume que c'est la façon dont les choses se dérouleraient.

Tout cela est en supposant que le processus n'est pas très lent et que tout cela se produit entre aujourd'hui et les élections de 2019. Toutefois, c'est une tout autre histoire si une activité est organisée pendant la période électorale. D'autres infractions sont commises pendant les périodes électorales. Il doit y avoir une façon de traiter ces infractions. J'aimerais connaître votre opinion à ce sujet.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Pendant la période électorale, le commissaire peut mener une enquête sur toutes les questions portées à son attention et obtenir une ordonnance d'interdiction contre la personne concernée leur faisant savoir que s'ils cessent leurs activités, aucune procédure ne sera intentée contre eux. Ce sont des choses qui se produisent pendant les élections. Un directeur général des élections peut également dire cela sans avoir le droit de dire qu'il n'intentera aucune procédure.

Il existe une autre option qui est rarement utilisée. Je ne me souviens pas d'une fois où elle a été utilisée. Le commissaire peut se présenter devant un tribunal et demander une injonction. Mais, cela se fait rarement.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai une certaine expérience là-dedans. Ma deuxième nomination, en 2004, a été interrompue à cause d'une injonction provenant de quelqu'un qui avait l'impression d'avoir injustement été exclu du processus. Nous avons dû reporter le processus jusqu'à ce qu'un tribunal examine les détails du dossier et rejette les arguments. Je sais donc comment cela fonctionne. Le plus gros problème, c'est que sur le plan des dépenses, nous avons dû déterminer s'il s'agissait d'un nouveau concours ou du même concours qui se poursuivait. En cherchant dans les recoins de votre mémoire, vous vous rappellerez peut-être que le débat était animé. À l'époque, vous étiez directeur général des élections.

Ce qui me frappe dans ce que vous proposez concernant les ordonnances de cessation et d'abstention, ou toute mesure prise à cet égard, c'est que le directeur général des élections peut seulement intervenir s'il est au courant de ce qui se passe. Le mécanisme de déclaration subséquente qui est envisagé dans ce projet de loi pour les activités menées pendant la période électorale ne semble pas tenir compte de cette possibilité. Cette période, qui se poursuit jusqu'à ce que l'activité électorale prenne fin, échapperait effectivement au mécanisme de surveillance du public.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je suis d'accord. C'est ce que je disais. L'ensemble du projet de loi soulève la question des délais de déclaration de toutes les contributions reçues pendant la campagne.

On pourrait dire que cela s'applique aux partis politiques représentés à la Chambre, alors que ce n'est peut-être pas le cas pour les autres, qui n'ont pas les mêmes ressources. Il peut y avoir une échéance. Nous avons maintenant des systèmes informatiques très sophistiqués. On peut transférer ces choses instantanément. C'est étonnant que nous ne le fassions pas encore, pour être franc, même pas pour les candidats de partis représentés à la Chambre.

(1230)

M. Scott Reid:

Il serait alors essentiellement plutôt simple d'amender le projet de loi pour éliminer l'exclusion des périodes électorales.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je ne sais pas à quel point ce serait simple sur le plan politique, mais je m'en remets à vous. Techniquement, il s'agirait en effet d'un amendement au projet de loi.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien.

Vous l'avez formulé de manière intéressante. Au début de votre déclaration liminaire, vous l'avez décrit comme une divulgation plus rapide de renseignements, ce qui me laisse croire que vous estimez que la plupart de ces renseignements sont disponibles de toute façon. Est-ce là que vous vouliez en venir, ou à quelque chose d'autre?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je voulais en venir à autre chose, soit le fait que saurons dorénavant plus rapidement qui participe à ces activités de financement, plutôt que d'en être informés dans un rapport trimestriel ou six mois plus tard en période électorale, ou dans le cas d'un candidat, quatre mois plus tard. Nous serions mis au courant dans ces délais. Ce sera plus rapide grâce à cette loi, mais pas aussi rapide que ce devrait l'être selon moi, et c'est ce à quoi je faisais allusion.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Je ne sais pas si les membres du Comité veulent d'abord chanter, mais ce sera la dernière intervention de M. Christopherson pour l'instant.

[Les députés chantent Joyeux anniversaire.]

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, je pensais que j'étais congédié.

Merci beaucoup, chers collègues. C'est très généreux de votre part. J'aimerais juste fêter mon anniversaire moins souvent.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Kingsley. Je suis heureux de vous avoir revu. Cela remontait à pas mal longtemps. Je veux souligner non seulement la contribution que vous avez apportée lorsque vous occupiez le poste, mais aussi le fait que vous ne ménagez jamais vos efforts pour nous faire profiter de votre expertise. Vous continuez de servir admirablement bien la population. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de tout ce que vous avez accompli. Merci beaucoup.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Merci beaucoup.

M. David Christopherson:

Je veux commencer, si vous le permettez, en donnant suite à ce que M. Reid a dit — c'était très émouvant selon moi —, à savoir que c'est beaucoup plus utile pour lui en tant que candidat, et donc pour nous tous, de recevoir l'argent le plus tôt possible.

Je regrette de vous imposer ce qui suit, mais je vais peut-être profiter de mon anniversaire et vous demandez de m'accorder une petite marge de manoeuvre.

Je veux vous conter une blague. Elle est à vrai dire de Bud Wildman — aussi bien le nommer — qui, comme vous le savez, est un ancien ministre ontarien et un type formidable doté d'une personnalité exceptionnelle.

Il raconte — je vais imiter l'accent, mais il était beaucoup plus doué — l'histoire de Huey Long, qui remonte, je crois, aux années 1920 ou 1930, à quelques décennies près. Il était gouverneur, et l'éthique n'était pas exactement son fort. Dans l'histoire, ou du moins la blague, Huey rencontre un grand nombre de ses principaux contributeurs et leur dit essentiellement qu'ils peuvent lui donner une somme importante maintenant et obtenir une belle part du gâteau, lui donner l'argent un peu plus près des élections et obtenir une plus petite part du gâteau, ou lui donner l'argent après les élections pour avoir un bon gouvernement. J'aime cette blague. Je l'ai toujours aimée.

Je ne la raconte pas bien, Bud, mais vous devrez dorénavant vivre dans l'opprobre à cause de vos blagues.

M. Scott Reid:

À vrai dire, c'est un excellent accent du Sud. C'est un accent louisianais. Bravo.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci. Vous comptez parmi mes collègues les plus érudits, et c'est donc très flatteur pour moi. Merci.

Mais revenons aux choses un peu plus sérieuses. Un député vous a demandé si cela se traduit ou non par une transparence accrue, et vous avez répondu que c'est le cas. Pensez-vous que c'est suffisant?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je dois dire que cela vole maintenant de ses propres ailes. Je vous ai fait part de ce qui pourrait être amélioré selon moi pour accroître la transparence, et j'ai mentionné les règles d'exception. J'ai parlé de ce qui se passe. Qui sont les personnes qui organisent ces activités? On ne les nomme pas; il est question de particuliers et d'entités. De quoi alors parlons-nous? Cet aspect n'est pas clair pour moi. Il faut donc éclaircir tout cela pour que nous sachions bien à quoi nous en tenir et pour que les Canadiens puissent se faire une opinion de ce qui se passe.

(1235)

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Vous êtes la deuxième personne qui mentionne que ce ne sont pas seulement les ministres et les décideurs qui sont présents, mais aussi les membres de leur personnel. En tant qu'ancien ministre ontarien, je peux vous dire que l'influence du chef de cabinet et des hauts responsables des politiques est énorme.

La plupart des ministres ne sont pas experts dans tous les domaines où ils prennent des décisions, et ils se fient aux conseils qu'on leur donne: des conseils professionnels, techniques et politiques. Au bout du compte, c'est souvent lors d'une dernière réunion avec les membres de leur personnel que les décisions sont prises. Je me demande juste si vous voulez en dire davantage sur d'autres titres ou sur autres choses, car on s'est déjà demandé — et je crois que c'est une question légitime — si le lobbying peut être efficace lorsqu'on rencontre seulement le ministre.

S'il fallait choisir entre une rencontre directe avec le ministre ou son personnel, je dirais qu'on peut peut-être même obtenir plus d'attention de la part du personnel, car la plupart des politiciens pensent à 16 choses différentes en même temps, surtout lorsqu'ils participent à une activité et regarde ici et là, tandis que les membres du personnel ont tendance à être plus concentrés. Je pense que c'est un aspect très important qui a été négligé, et tout ce que vous pouvez ajouter à cet sujet serait utile, monsieur.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Il pourrait également être utile de revoir la Loi sur le lobbying, et de voir ce qu'elle dit sur ces titulaires de charge publique. Cela ne me vient pas à l'esprit, mais on détermine peut-être quels titulaires doivent produire des rapports en fonction des gens qui les entourent. Cela pourrait également être utile.

Je pensais également aux adjoints administratifs, et pas seulement à ceux des ministres, car il y a également les chefs de parti. Il est possible que le personnel du principal porte-parole en matière de finances d'un parti ait de l'importance. Cela semble aller loin, mais c'est beaucoup plus simple d'exiger la déclaration de toutes ces choses, et extrêmement rapidement, dans un délai d'un ou deux jours, de manière à ce que l'information soit transmise automatiquement d'un réseau à l'autre. Le directeur général des élections n'aurait donc pas à consulter le site Web du Parti conservateur pour voir si une activité a eu lieu, car il recevrait automatiquement l'information et pourrait prendre — immédiatement — les mesures qui s'imposent pour s'assurer du respect de la loi.

M. David Christopherson:

Quelqu'un d'autre nous l'a proposé. C'est un autre point sur lequel nous devrions nous pencher.

Pendant ma dernière minute, je vais moi aussi parler de l'idée d'augmenter l'amende. Je soupçonne que nous pouvons trouver un terrain d'entente. Vous avez raison. Pour ce qui est d'essayer d'influencer des politiques, quand on a ce montant d'argent à notre disposition et qu'on manipule les règles du jeu, surtout de manière délibérée, 1 000 dollars est le prix à payer pour faire des affaires; ce n'est pas dissuasif.

Je vais terminer en vous remerciant de nouveau, monsieur. C'est toujours bon de vous voir. J'espère que vous profitez de votre retraite bien méritée.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

J'en profite beaucoup. C'est pour cela que je suis ici.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Merci. Je suis certain que M. Christopherson exprime les sentiments de tous les membres du Comité au sujet de votre retraite et du grand service que vous avez rendu en tant que fonctionnaire.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Graham, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Kingsley, cela me fait plaisir de parler à un témoin francophone. Cela n'arrive pas souvent, ici. Cela me donne l'occasion de parler français.

Je suis votre parcours depuis vos débuts dans le poste de directeur général des élections, alors que j'avais 9 ans. Vous avez fait partie de ma vie politique dès le début et je vous en remercie.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Ce que vous dites me touche profondément. Merci beaucoup.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au début, vous avez dit que l'argent en politique était un sujet difficile à aborder. C'est clair.

Quelles solutions de rechange voyez-vous à l'argent en politique? En voyez-vous?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je n'en vois absolument pas, et c'est pourquoi j'ai toujours favorisé des règles raisonnables concernant le financement politique.

Je n'ai jamais appuyé le fait d'abaisser à 100 $ le maximum d'une contribution. Je ne considère pas cela comme raisonnable. Il faut un équilibre, et il faut qu'il y ait un certain soutien public. On n'aura jamais la parfaite équité en matière de financement. Il y aura toujours des partis ou encore des candidats ou des candidates qui obtiendront plus de soutien que d'autres. C'est la nature même de la bête.

Ce n'est pas le plancher qu'il faut modifier; il faut plutôt instaurer un plafond qui empêche le financement excessif. Cela a été un élément de la plus grande importance dans la Loi électorale du Canada lorsque, de façon très significative, on a imposé ces plafonds pour les dépenses et pour les contributions et qu'on a aboli les contributions des sociétés, des syndicats et des associations. Maintenant, seulement les individus, les Canadiens, peuvent contribuer au financement d'un parti lors d'une élection. C'est un élément primordial de notre loi.

(1240)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand vous êtes entré en poste, en 1990, quel était l'état des lois canadiennes concernant le financement électoral?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Il n'y en avait pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n'y avait pas de limites ni de règles?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Non. Il y avait des banques qui donnaient 50 000 $ ou 60 000 $. Cela dépendait du parti. Si le parti était au pouvoir, il recevait 50 000 $, et celui dans l'opposition recevait 30 000 $. Vous voyez ce que je veux dire? On jouait sur les deux plans et on s'assurait d'offrir quand même un soutien. Tout cela est disparu vers 2004. [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson:

Le soutien n'était pas offert à tout le monde, mais plutôt à tous ceux qu'on estimait en mesure de prendre le pouvoir.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je ne suis pas doué. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'étaient des subventions par vote.[Traduction]

Vous étiez alors au pouvoir.

C'était un critère d'admissibilité.[Français]

Vous avez sûrement eu beaucoup d'échanges avec les autres gouvernements, sur le plan international.

On dit souvent que nous avons un très bon système. Avez-vous des exemples d'autres pays dont nous devrions nous inspirer?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Oui. Je peux vous parler de l'exemple d'un pays qui nous est cher: la Grande-Bretagne.

Nous ne devrions pas nous inspirer de tout ce que la Grande-Bretagne fait, car le plafond des contributions est excessif, en effet. Toutefois, en Grande-Bretagne, le temps d'antenne durant les campagnes électorales est gratuit pour les partis. Cela veut dire qu'on pourrait réduire de 50 à 60 % les dépenses des partis durant une campagne électorale, compte tenu du montant qui est consacré présentement au temps d'antenne. Cela veut dire que le besoin de recueillir de l'argent diminuerait en conséquence.

C'est une chose qui me vient à l'esprit, en ce qui concerne l'argent. Toutefois, c'est à peu près la seule mesure de la Grande-Bretagne que nous devrions tenter d'imiter.

D'autres pays le font aussi. Cependant, nous sentons qu'ils sont moins près de nous culturellement, alors nous avons l'impression que ce n'est peut-être pas aussi pertinent. J'ai décidé de me servir de l'exemple de la Grande-Bretagne parce qu'il est difficile de dire que ce pays ne nous ressemble pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En Grande-Bretagne, il me semble qu'il y a une limite des dépenses qui est appliquée d'une élection à l'autre, et pas seulement durant la période électorale.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'est étendu complètement et c'est quelque chose qui devrait être considéré par le gouvernement fédéral. Une loi sur les élections à date fixe a été adoptée au Canada, mais jusqu'à maintenant, le plus souvent, cette loi a été observée par exception. Cela a faussé la donne concernant le financement politique. De fait, les tiers partis peuvent aller jusqu'au jour où l'élection est déclenchée. On a vu ce que cela a donné à la dernière élection. Cela a créé un système que plusieurs personnes ont jugé incorrect.

Je crois qu'on devait considérer la mesure des élections à date fixe et décider que la période électorale inclut les six mois précédant l'élection, c'est-à-dire que toutes les dispositions financières s'appliqueraient rétroactivement pour une période de six mois avant le déclenchement de l'élection. Le plafond couvrirait cette période et les tiers partis devraient s'inscrire à partir de ce moment.

Je n'ai jamais été en faveur de cette loi, parce qu'elle va à l'encontre de l'esprit de notre système parlementaire. Toutefois, puisqu'elle existe, on devrait faire en sorte, sur le plan du financement, que les mesures touchant le plafond des dépenses et les règles concernant les tiers partis aient encore un sens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est intéressant.

Je vais changer de sujet.

Vous avez parlé des personnes qui devraient être couvertes par le projet de loi C-50. Il est question des agents ministériels, des leaders de l'opposition et des tiers partis. À votre avis, quelle serait la liste complète des gens devant être couverts par ce projet de loi?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Le projet de loi devrait couvrir toute personne qui participe à l'organisation ou au financement d'un événement de collecte de fonds au profit d'un candidat ou d'une candidate ou encore d'un parti.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour que ce soit un événement couvert par le projet de loi C-50, qui devrait y être invité?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je m'excuse, mais je n'ai pas compris la question.

(1245)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Actuellement, les ministres, les leaders de l'opposition et les tiers partis sont inclus. Est-ce adéquat?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je comprends maintenant le sens de votre question.

Je dirais que cela pourrait aller pour commencer. Ensuite, on pourra voir. Je ne voudrais pas qu'on aille trop loin dès le début.

Je crois que la Loi électorale du Canada est une loi évolutive. Il faut faire attention avant de modifier les dispositions financières. Il ne faudrait pas aller trop loin dans une direction, parce que cela risque de fausser la donne. Nous avons établi quelque chose qui se compare très bien et qui s'équivaut.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé des pénalités financières appropriées. À votre avis, 1 000 $, ce n'est pas grand-chose, mais le double du montant serait intéressant.

Selon votre expérience en tant que DGE, quelles pénalités fonctionnaient et lesquelles n'avaient aucun effet?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Il est difficile de répondre à cela.

Il y a déjà eu un projet de loi très important concernant les pénalités, parce qu'elles étaient devenues tellement ridicules que les gens savaient qu'elles n'avaient aucun effet. Les pénalités ne valaient rien.

J'ai tout simplement proposé que les pénalités soient graves et équivalentes à ce qui existait déjà en cas d'infraction à d'autres dispositions de la Loi électorale du Canada, qui a été adoptée en 2006, si je me souviens bien. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Nous allons maintenant entamer une série de questions de cinq minutes, en commençant par M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être ici.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez suivi les autres réunions que nous avons consacrées au sujet. En posant des questions, mon collègue, M. Nater, a découvert certaines choses qui pourraient être considérées comme des échappatoires plutôt importantes — on ne peut essentiellement pas les manquer. Je veux juste vous présenter les deux scénarios et savoir ce que vous en pensez. De plus, si le Comité estime qu'il convient d'essayer de trouver des façons de modifier la loi pour remédier à ces lacunes, j'aimerais savoir comment nous pourrions procéder. Vous pouvez certainement donner des conseils là-dessus.

Voici les deux scénarios qu'il a cernés. Le premier se rapporte à la période d'avis, qui est de cinq jours, mais on a trouvé une échappatoire. Disons que le premier ministre doit participer à une réception, mais qu'il n'était pas au courant une ou deux heures avant, car son horaire a subitement changé. Du coup, le public n'en est pas avisé, mais la loi serait tout de même respectée étant donné que l'avis pourrait être modifié sans grande conséquence après la période de cinq jours, je suppose. Que pouvons-nous faire à ce sujet?

L'autre scénario se rapporte à l'idée d'un plafond de 200 $. Qu'est-ce qui empêcherait le premier ministre de participer à une activité pour laquelle le billet coûte 199 $ et où toutes les personnes présentes donnent ensuite un autre montant de 1 351 $, ce qui revient à donner la contribution maximale? Elles n'étaient pas tenues de le faire, mais elles ont tout bonnement eu la même idée.

Je suppose qu'il est possible de tirer parti des deux, ce qui représenterait encore plus une échappatoire.

Je veux savoir si vous pensez que ces choses sont problématiques, et que recommanderiez-vous pour que nous puissions, si nous le souhaitons, essayer d'éliminer ces échappatoires?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Pour ce qui est du premier scénario — et j'y ai réfléchi quelques mois —, l'avis devrait donner le nom des personnes qui seront présentes, y compris le nom du premier ministre. Si le nom du chef d'un parti ou du premier ministre ne figure pas sur l'avis, il ne pourrait alors pas se présenter.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est aussi simple que cela. Il ne pourrait pas y avoir de changement de dernière minute. Si leur nom n'est tout simplement pas inscrit à un moment donné... Le délai de cinq jours est-il raisonnable, ou pensez-vous qu'il devrait être plus long?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je suis prêt à voir ce que cinq jours nous donnent dans ce genre de système. Je suis prêt à voir ce que cela nous donne. C'est beaucoup mieux que ce que nous avons actuellement.

(1250)

M. Blake Richards:

Quand vous dites cinq jours, cela signifie qu'aucun nom ne pourrait être ajouté par la suite.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Oui. Un délai de cinq jours signifierait que les gens devront savoir très exactement qui sera présent. Je ne parle pas des participants, mais plutôt des fonctionnaires, des ministres, des chefs de parti et ainsi de suite. Cela serait inscrit sur l'avis. Les médias flaireraient ensuite l'affaire et diraient que le ministre des Finances ou quelqu'un d'autre sera présent, ce qui ferait réagir les gens.

À propos des montants de 199 $ et de 1 350 $, c'est le genre de manigances qui retiendraient l'attention compte tenu des exigences en matière de déclaration des contributions. Si la déclaration était instantanée ou quasi instantanée, comme je l'ai dit, cela retiendrait l'attention automatiquement et immédiatement. À l'heure actuelle, on s'en rend compte avec le temps, et on paye évidemment le prix après les faits, ce qui n'est pas souhaitable. Je ne sais pas s'il y a une solution.

M. Blake Richards:

Mais je ne pense pas que ce serait illégal, n'est-ce pas? On ne pourrait pas l'empêcher. Nous saurions sans aucun doute que c'est le cas si quelqu'un s'efforce d'établir le lien, mais rien ne pourrait être fait sur-le-champ pour empêcher quelqu'un d'agir ainsi. Cette loi ne préviendrait pas ce genre de situation. Ce serait encore légal.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je suis d'accord avec vous, mais je dis également que je ne connais pas la solution.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vois.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

J'ai trouvé une solution au premier scénario, mais pas au deuxième.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant, et si vous pensez à quelque chose plus tard, comme une nuit où vous n'arrivez pas à dormir ou une autre fois, nous serions heureux de l'entendre. Envoyez-nous un...

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je vais vous appeler lorsque je n'arriverai pas à dormir. Ai-je bien compris?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Blake Richards:

Vous savez, il y a de fortes chances que je ne dorme pas plus.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Bittle, pour cinq minutes.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

Vous avez dit que vous ne pensez pas vous faire d'amis si l'amende qui est imposée au parti est le double de la contribution, mais vous avez également demandé si l'amende imposée à la personne par procédure sommaire devrait être supérieure à 1 000 $. Avez-vous une amende convenable à l'esprit?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Oui, je pense qu'elle devrait être de 5 000 $ par candidat, pour que la personne sache qu'il y a un prix à enfreindre la loi. Pour être franc, je ne pense pas qu'un montant de 1 000 $ soit suffisant. Je pense qu'un montant de 5 000 $ commence à faire réfléchir les gens, surtout s'ils doivent remettre le double du montant qui provient de l'association, mais la personne doit également être visée.

M. Chris Bittle:

Est-ce conforme aux autres dispositions de la loi?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'est le cas de la somme de 5 000 $. D'ailleurs, je ne me souviens pas de toutes les dispositions, mais je sais qu'un montant de 5 000 $ était prévu pour certaines infractions.

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous avez dit avoir eu l'occasion d'examiner les modifications de forme, et avez exprimé des réserves sur la manière dont elles ont été formulées. Êtes-vous d'accord sur les changements eux-mêmes? Vous semblent-ils raisonnables? Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

J'ai proposé des ajouts à ces modifications, mais les changements sont acceptables.

Pour ce qui est des modifications de forme, je m'en suis vraiment remis à Stéphane Perrault, car je n'ai pas assez de personnel pour les examiner en détail.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'aimerais parler des dons accessibles instantanément ou très vite. D'après mon expérience en campagne électorale, le temps est limité, comme c'est probablement le cas dans la plupart des campagnes. On parle d'environ 100 000 $ par circonscription, selon la taille de celle-ci, de sorte qu'on peut avoir une quantité limitée d'employés rémunérés. Mon agent financier avait un emploi à temps plein et se présentait lorsqu'il le pouvait.

Bien des gens préfèrent encore faire des dons par chèque et ne font pas confiance à Internet, de sorte que les chèques s'accumulent et sont déposés tous les deux ou trois jours. Ce sera peut-être plus facile d'ici 10 ans, lorsque tout le monde fera des dons en ligne. Mais pour l'instant, la situation d'un candidat libéral d'une région rurale de l'Alberta ayant une organisation très modeste n'équivaut pas à celle d'un candidat conservateur du centre-ville de Toronto. J'ignore comment nous pourrions traiter les dons aussi vite, surtout à l'échelle locale.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Commençons par les partis, puis voyons dans quelle mesure et à quelle vitesse nous souhaitons aller jusqu'aux candidats. Aucune raison n'explique pourquoi des partis représentés à la Chambre des communes ne devraient pas être tenus de le faire.

(1255)

M. Chris Bittle:

Je n'ai vraiment rien d'autre à ajouter pour l'instant.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant écouter M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Kingsley, je vous remercie encore de vous joindre à nous.

J'ai simplement deux ou trois petites questions, de sorte que je n'utiliserai probablement pas la totalité de mes cinq minutes. J'aimerais très brièvement revenir à la limite de 18 ans relative aux noms à inclure dans le rapport, une disposition qui m'avait frappée aussi lorsque la ministre était ici, mais dont elle n'a pas vraiment parlé. Je suppose que j'en avais parlé à la blague à ce moment, en disant que la disposition devrait être rebaptisée en l'honneur de Joe Volpe. Elle n'y a donc peut-être pas porté attention. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez d'inclure dans le rapport le nom d'un participant à un événement qui aurait peut-être 16 ou 17 ans. Je pense que ce serait généralement logique. Je comprends la remarque de Mme Tassi à propos d'un enfant de trois ans. J'ai moi-même des enfants de trois et de neuf ans, qui m'accompagnent à la plupart des événements communautaires, car c'est ce que nous faisons en famille. Je pense toutefois qu'il convient de faire une distinction entre un jeune de 17 ans et un nouveau-né ou un enfant.

Pourriez-vous faire parvenir votre réponse par écrit au Comité, et peut-être nous soumettre un libellé pour modifier le projet de loi?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je vais y réfléchir, puis j'enverrai la réponse au président.

M. John Nater:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je vous remercie de m'inviter à y songer davantage.

M. John Nater:

M. Richards a abordé deux ou trois scénarios qui ont déjà été mentionnés. Le seul autre scénario portait sur la période d'avis, dans le cas où les renseignements sur une activité sont affichés cinq jours à l'avance alors que tous les billets sont déjà vendus. Prenons l'exemple d'un événement en compagnie du premier ministre ou du ministre qui coûte 1 500 $, mais dont tous les billets sont déjà vendus au moment de le publier obligatoirement en ligne pendant les cinq jours précédents.

À votre avis, le projet de loi pourrait-il s'appliquer à ce genre de situation, où les renseignements sur une activité sont diffusés publiquement même si les gens ne peuvent plus vraiment acheter de billet puisqu'ils sont tous vendus?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Non, je ne pense pas. Il faut appliquer la loi telle qu'elle est. Une disposition est prévue: une fois à cette étape, il faut faire ceci et éviter de faire cela. Les dispositions ne peuvent pas toujours être souples, sans quoi il serait impossible de réaliser quoi que ce soit. C'est cinq jours, un point c'est tout. Grâce à ma proposition de tout à l'heure, vous pourrez au moins savoir qui sera présent. Si l'événement est déjà connu, on saura au moins en même temps que le premier ministre, le ministre des Finances, le chef de l'opposition, le porte-parole en matière de finances ou le chef de quoi que ce soit seront présents. Je ne m'attarde à aucun titulaire de charge publique en particulier ici.

M. John Nater:

D'accord.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous n'avons pas beaucoup parlé de la présence des médias. Il n'en a pas beaucoup été question. Nous discutons de tous ces gens qui se présentent et des choses sournoises qui se produisent, mais je pense qu'une chose favorise et renforce la transparence, c'est-à-dire lorsque nous permettons à des gens dotés de caméras et d'enregistreurs d'assister à l'activité.

Que pensez-vous du fait d'aller dans cette voie avec le projet de loi?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Je suis d'accord. Si les médias souhaitent assister à l'événement, je pense bien sûr qu'ils devraient pouvoir le faire et enregistrer ce qui s'y passe, ou du moins le consigner par écrit. Je ne suis pas nécessairement d'accord sur le fait qu'ils doivent pouvoir filmer une séquence vidéo. Si la loi le permet, qu'il en soit ainsi, mais je n'ai rien vu de tel dans le projet de loi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pense que l'avis de cinq jours permet désormais aux médias d'être au courant de ces événements qui étaient auparavant…

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'est une très bonne chose; c'est excellent. Ils peuvent maintenant choisir d'être présents ou non.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Lors de notre dernière séance, nous avons beaucoup parlé de l'absence de divulgation préalable du montant demandé. Or, on passe le chapeau pour recueillir des fonds et on incite en quelque sorte les gens présents à donner un montant donné. Qu'en pensez-vous? Le projet de loi devrait-il inclure ce volet, ou devrait-il se limiter au montant exigé?

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

En fait, les événements où l'on passe le chapeau sont déjà prévus à la loi. Ils sont permis, et je ne vois pas pourquoi cette disposition serait modifiée. Il est très difficile d'envisager qu'un parti politique organisant une activité financière majeure limite les dons à 200 $, alors que des personnalités remarquables du parti seront présentes. J'imagine que c'est possible. Je ne suis pas certain que cela doit figurer à la loi.

(1300)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez déjà dit ne pas être en faveur d'abaisser la contribution maximale à 100 $. L'argument principal de notre témoin précédent de Démocratie en surveillance, c'est que nous devrions reprendre les modifications réalisées au Québec et diminuer la limite à 100 $. Il a également fait valoir que même les bénévoles et les médecins qui reçoivent des échantillons gratuits… Tout peut influencer un être humain à agir favorablement à l'égard d'une personne plutôt qu'une autre, si cette personne a fait quelque chose pour lui.

J'aimerais juste connaître votre opinion générale sur la façon dont nous pouvons atteindre cet équilibre, en tant que bon pays démocratique et peuple qui souhaite être à l'avant-garde de la lutte contre la corruption, puis avoir un système considéré comme juste et transparent. Nous avons besoin de bénévoles et de personnes qui contribuent aux partis politiques, mais parallèlement, nous voulons éviter toute influence indue sur les décisions prises.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

Nous l'avons trouvé: c'est 1 550 $. C'est une somme raisonnable. Vous auriez pu dire 2 000 $, et j'aurais trouvé cela acceptable aussi. Je doute que les députés puissent être influencés par une contribution de 1 500 $.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je ne le crois pas non plus, mais c'est ce qu'on nous a dit.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'est pour cette raison que je ne suis pas d'accord sur le besoin de réduire le montant. Je n'aurais pas le même discours si c'était 50 000 $, mais je ne trouve pas que ce soit justifié pour 1 500 $, car nous avons besoin de nombreuses contributions de 1 500 $.

Ce qui peut inquiéter certaines personnes dans le cas d'une limite de 1 500 $, c'est une situation où un groupe donné ayant un intérêt à faire valoir se concerte et se regroupe. Il peut alors acheter une table de 10 sièges pour 15 000 $. Lorsque nous voyons ce genre de chose, nous savons que c'est ce qui agace les Canadiens lorsqu'il est question d'argent en politique.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Selon mon expérience, il y aura aussi un groupe ayant donné 15 000 $ qui fait valoir l'envers de la médaille. Par conséquent, toute politique est remise en question, car il y a toujours des gens aux opinions divergentes au sein de la circonscription, et même parmi les donateurs, quel que soit l'enjeu.

Le président:

Merci, Ruby.

Je vous remercie infiniment d'avoir été ici aujourd'hui. Vous avez toujours des idées très créatives à nous soumettre, et nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants.

M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley:

C'était un plaisir. Merci beaucoup de m'avoir donné cette chance.

Le président:

Je souhaite une bonne semaine aux membres du Comité.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 05, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.