header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-02-04 PROC 6

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order. Good morning, everyone.

Just so everyone knows, this meeting is televised. This is meeting number 6 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament.

Today, first of all, we're going to examine the order in council appointment of Huguette Labelle to the position of chair of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments. We'll review her qualifications. Second, we will return to our study of the initiatives to make Parliament more inclusive, more friendly, and more efficient, with an informal report from our researcher on what other parliaments around the world do. Last, we will work on our agenda for the next meeting, which we haven't set yet.

The witness is going to make a few statements, and then I will just make a comment before we go to the questioning, unless anyone has anything they want to raise at this time.

Pursuant to Standing Orders 110 and 111, we are examining the order in council appointment of Huguette Labelle to the position of chair of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, as referred to the committee on Friday, January 29, 2016. I welcome the witness.

Thank you for coming on such short notice. This committee seems to be moving so fast that we can't give people very much notice. You only had a day or so, so it's fantastic that you could make it. I started to read your CV this morning. It's as long as the meeting. That's great.

I'm looking forward to hearing from you, and then we'll have some questions from the committee.

Ms. Huguette Labelle (Chair, Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments):

Thank you very much, Chair. It's been quite a long time since I appeared in front of a parliamentary committee, something I used to do quite frequently as a deputy minister, so I'm looking forward to the discussion this morning.

As you know, our mandate is to make non-binding, merit-based recommendations to the Prime Minister for appointments to the Senate.

I would just like to say a few words about my background so that it can perhaps help you with your questions.

As a deputy minister for 19 years, I was able to see the work of Parliament first-hand, because there are many pieces of legislation that come from various departments, as you know. As a deputy minister, you have to follow the process as it goes through the House of Commons and through the Senate, and be able to work, and rework sometimes, with the minister and the Department of Justice, some of the content of that legislation. That is one area where I was able to see first-hand the, let's say, architecture of the Parliament of our country.

I was also brought close to the work of the House and the Senate when I was president of CIDA. Many countries around the world wanted to learn from our own experience here. I'm thinking in particular of South Africa, for example, with which we worked very closely on their constitutional review. They were very interested in our form of federalism but also in how the institutions of the state were working in Canada. They were looking elsewhere, of course, but we were the key supporter to help them learn from the rest of the world, and then, of course, to adapt and make their own decisions at the end.

I'm using South Africa, but there were many other countries that were in the same situation. Especially after 1989 and the fall of the Soviet Union, many countries in central and eastern Europe were also interested in what we were doing. We were able, during that period, to do some twinning with various institutions of our own country to help those countries to think through how they could improve the situation in their own country.

Perhaps the last point I would like to make is that when I was chair of the board of Transparency International, which is an anti-corruption organization, people used to tell me that I would have work for the rest of my life to deal with this issue. However, one has to be an optimist, and we worked very hard in this very important area to try to help countries around the world build the kinds of institutions that could prevent corruption and deal with it when it happens. Also, to ensure that the rule of law works in the countries where corruption is high, we worked on conventions and recommended legislation. Again, there was quite a lot of work in this regard, which I think will be helpful to the work that we need to do at this time.

That's all I'd like to say, Mr. Chair.

(1110)

[Translation]

It will be my pleasure to answer your questions.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I want to make one quick comment before we go to questioning.

I'm hoping this committee will show great leadership and cooperation. It's the first committee meeting, and I hope we continue in this way. Personally, I am focused on two things. One is for this new Parliament to show a good example of respect and appreciation to outside witnesses as they come before us,, whoever they are and on whatever committee, because we appreciate them. The other is that we perform the task that Parliament assigned to us. I'll just read it again. I read it at the end of the last meeting.

This meeting is being held pursuant to Standing Order 111, which states: "The committee, if it should call an appointee or nominee to appear pursuant to section (1) of this Standing Order, shall examine the qualifications and competence of the appointee or nominee to perform the duties of the post to which he or she has been appointed or nominated."

Members may also refer to pages 1011 to 1013 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice.

We will start questioning with Ms. Petitpas Taylor, who will be followed by Mr. Reid. [Translation]

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Ms. Labelle, thank you once again for joining us this morning. We know this meeting was called in a hurry, and we are extremely grateful that you were able to find the time to participate.

I also want to thank you for your contribution to Canada over your entire career. Your resumé is so impressive that we're not sure where to begin.

Finally, I want to thank you for accepting to chair the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments. That's a very important role and, once again, we appreciate you agreeing to chair the board.

We sometimes ask witnesses to tell us about their credentials, qualifications and all accomplishments. They're often a little embarrassed to be putting their resumé on display like that. However, in order for the committee members to get a good understanding of your accomplishments, we would like you to give us a detailed account of your credentials, contributions, and so on.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Thank you, Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

In addition to what I mentioned in my introduction, I was also chair of the Public Service Commission of Canada during my career. Back then, just like today, the law stipulated that our role was to ensure that public service appointments were based on merit. Over those five years, I spent a lot of time making sure we could be proud of our public service. We had a system that enabled us to ensure that the candidates applying for a position met the selection criteria. That helped me realize how important it is to select individuals for important positions based on their merit, their qualifications, their experience and their knowledge. And that is something I wanted to bring up.

I will raise another point. I have also worked closely with the OECD, where I still work. I sit on a committee of the OECD Secretary General where we are trying to figure out what the OECD can do to ensure greater integrity among its members, but also beyond. In fact, the OECD also works closely with developing countries. Its work is not only focused on OECD countries. The committee is tasked with reviewing the work done by the OECD so far in terms of integrity and the fight against corruption, as well as giving the Secretary General relevant recommendations. For instance, we are trying to determine whether the OECD could increase its impact if it moved toward different or additional options.

I will stop here.

(1115)

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Great.

Can you tell us about your studies and university degrees? We know that witnesses are a bit embarrassed to talk about that, but we want to understand properly.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Yes.

I have always thought it was important to continue our studies for as long as possible. In my case, I mostly went to school part time, because I had a family and a job while I was doing my master's degree and my doctorate.

Every department I have worked for has had teams of researchers. Therefore, in order to better understand how those researchers worked, what they did, and to ensure that I had the right people in place, I told myself that I should earn a doctorate. That helped me learn a lot more about research, research methods, statistics, and so on.

That is why I continued my studies. In fact, I did not earn my doctorate until the age of 40, while being the Assistant Deputy Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. That is why I wrote my thesis from 3 a.m. to 6 a.m., but it was done.

I have been a mentor to many young and not-so-young Canadians. I always encourage them to continue their studies, not only because it helps them acquire additional knowledge, but also because it gives them more confidence in themselves and in what they could do in the future.

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

First of all, Madame Labelle, welcome to our committee. It's a pleasure to have you here. I'm very interested to learn more about your mandate and some of the things you're expected to do in that mandate, and to find out exactly how you go about them.

I wanted to ask about phase 1 of the Senate nomination and appointment process, which is under way right now. It was announced on Friday, January 29, at 6:30 p.m. that all applications under this process must be submitted by noon on February 15, at which point your role would kick in. I recognize that you have no role at the moment while the applications are under way.

I have concerns about the constitutionality of the phase 1 process. In particular, I am concerned that the way in which it's structured may result in a compromise of the independence of people being appointed to the Senate unconstitutionally. I wanted to ask you about—

The Chair:

We have a point of order.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, I have some concerns that this goes beyond the premise of today's review of the competency of the witness before us. An examination of the mandate of this independent Senate appointment committee is not within the scope of the particular standing order by which this witness was called.

(1120)

The Chair:

Yes. If Mr. Reid could stay on the competence of the witness, that would be appreciated.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I'm just going to ask that this point of order, which has taken, I think, something in the nature of a minute, not be taken off my time. Is that reasonable?

The Chair:

Yes. It is not being taken off. We stopped the time. You still have about six minutes left.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Here's what I'm wondering about. You are being submitted nomination and application forms, which will, after they have been submitted and filled out, be considered “Protected B”. I'm just wondering whether that means that the names of the nominated individuals and of the agencies will remain confidential and whether you will regard yourself as being bound to not reveal the names of the agencies or organizations that have put forward the nominations. Will that be something which you will not be able to—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, my point of order is on the table, and he's continuing the line of questioning. I think you need to rule on my point of order.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, if you could stay to the qualifications and the competence of the witness to perform this role, that would be appreciated.

We stopped the time again.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Just so I can be clear, Mr. Chair, what I'm doing is trying to deal with the fact that we may have a witness who is being drawn, not through her own fault by any stretch of the imagination, into a process that is unconstitutional and does irreparable harm to the credibility and independence of people appointed to the Senate of Canada. This might be a process that will be kept confidential and secret so that we cannot confirm whether that compromise of independence has occurred. This is due to a process that she is being embroiled in whereby she would be required to treat certain information as secret. That information would be absolutely essential in determining this critical matter of public interest, that is, whether the independence of newly appointed senators has been compromised by means of the nomination process and the tight links that must be formed between the individual making the application and the nominating agency.

This is a process that has never occurred before in our Confederation, and it could well, as I say, violate the requirement that senators not be appointed in a manner that compromises their independence. It's something the Supreme Court is being very strict about. It is of concern to me, and I think it should be a concern to all of us. This is our only chance to ask her before the appointment process is actually over, and at that point the harm will have been done. I think it's reasonable to ask in this form and in this way.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, that is a process question. The committee could look at that process if it so willed, but today's meeting is to look at the qualifications of the witness to perform this role. If you want to pursue process questions, it doesn't mean the committee can't proceed with those in its committee business, but not today. This is just to ask the witness about her qualifications for this particular job.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's my understanding that we would be able to ask the witness any question that is germane. I don't recall having decided that we would only be able to ask her questions that were related to her own competence. That's something, quite frankly, I'm not challenging. I have no qualms about the witness's competence or ability to perform her task. I think Madam Labelle is eminently qualified. What I'm worried about is that she is being drawn into a process that will be unconstitutional and that we will not be able to remedy.

Mr. Chair, if I may go on for a moment here, the critical point here is that we're about to go on break. When the break is over and we come back, it will be February 16, and the nomination process will be closed at that point. It will be of no use to ask her those questions then.

I didn't design this. The government decided to rush it, and we are now limited in a way that we can't correct unless we have a special meeting next week to ask her these questions. It's problematic, to say the least.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, we're operating under a standing order of the House of Commons, which this committee has no authority to change or to expand at this time. If you like, you can to continue with your last five minutes on the qualifications of the candidate, and if you want to discuss those other items.... We have to start the time soon, because other witnesses will lose their time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, are you saying that we are incapable of holding a meeting at which we ask her the kinds of questions I'm trying to ask about the constitutional ramifications of how she performs her job and so on? Is that literally outside the remit of this committee? Are you saying that when we adopted a motion to hold this meeting, the motion forbade the asking of these questions?

That's important, because if it's just that we moved the motion in a certain way that forbade us to ask these questions, then I will seek the consent of the committee to open up the questions so that I may ask her about these critical issues, which really need to be dealt with before February 15th.

The Chair:

I've read this twice to you, Mr. Reid, so you should be aware of this. You've been on the committee before. Standing Order 111 states: If the committee decides to call the appointee or nominee to appear, it is limited by the Standing Orders to examining the individual's qualifications and competence to perform the duties of the office sought.

That's the understanding of all the committee members who are here and the witness who is here. Because our time is going to run out, we're going to have to limit your time, and unless you want to continue asking on the competence of the member—

(1125)

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know—

The Chair:

—we'll go on—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Madam—

The Chair:

—to the next questioner.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Madam Labelle is ostensibly an individual who is independent. That's been emphasized over and over again in the government's statements with regard to her and the panel that she chairs. “Independent” must mean—

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.):

On a point of order—

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm actually on a point of order, Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: No, you're not.

Mr. Scott Reid: Kevin, I am.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

No. You didn't start off by saying “On a point of order”.

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Mr. Chair, sitting back here, it looks more as though Scott is just arguing with the chair.

You raised a point of order. The chair made a determination on that point of order. Now you're choosing to dispute the point of order. You haven't stated “On a new point of order” or anything of this nature.

Let's put this thing into proper context. The Standing Orders allow for the committee to call a witness of this nature. The chair has been very explicit, both at the beginning and now twice to you, in explaining what the standing order allows us to do. It was actually a Liberal member of the committee who moved the motion, believing that the will of the committee was to do exactly what it is the standing order dictates: deal with the competence and qualifications of an appointment.

If you wanted to question the policy aspect—and that's really what you're getting into—it would have been more appropriate to possibly suggest that it be debated in the House or in another forum.

The standing order is very, very clear, and I think we should respect the standing order. Scott, you've been very respectful of the rules in the past. I would suggest we just continue to ask questions related to the standing order.

The Chair:

I have ruled already, Mr. Reid. You have one last chance.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My concern, Mr. Chair, is that we are not respecting the Constitution of Canada, which, because of the tight deadlines in this committee, can only be defended at this meeting. It was after our January 29 meeting that we learned this process would occur and it would be finished on February 15. This is our only opportunity to ask some critical questions about whether or not information will be kept secret from us permanently with regard to whether or not the independence of future senators is being compromised by the nomination process.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, we—

Mr. Scott Reid:

If you shut me down, you are shutting down the only opportunity we have to find the answers to these critical question. We're talking about the independence of a body of the Parliament of Canada. That surely deserves the opportunity to be discussed.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

On the same point of order—

The Chair:

Okay, there will be no more points of order. We're going to move to Mr. Christopherson. The committee has lots of time. If people want to talk about the process, the committee can decide that in committee business, but that's not the grounds for this particular meeting.

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Good. Thank you, Chair.

Thank you again, very much, for your time today. At some point I hope we get to you.

I don't have a lot to say on the qualifications side. I mean, the paper speaks for itself. The only thing that struck me was that when you were going through your regular day-to-day background, you said you really thought you needed a Ph.D. and then you went out and got it, like you buy a shovel over at Canadian Tire. That's impressive. For me, somebody with a grade 9 education, that looms large in terms of your qualifications.

Competency takes us into some other areas. Let me just say, though, Chair, before I get into the area of competency questions, that the little skirmish we just saw between you and Mr. Reid, to me, right from the get-go, is a perfect example of the absolute impossibility of jamming the square peg of appointments into the round hole of democracy. No matter what part of this process we dissect, it's never going to add up because it doesn't work. It doesn't fit in a democracy.

Having said that, and being left with no alternative—and it's a shame, because we could use some real common sense on this whole issue—I want to ask about your thinking, madame, the criteria you use.

You, through the appointment of the Prime Minister, replace what Canadians do during an election, which is to make a merit-based evaluation, usually on the doorstep or on the phone or through an email exchange. We repeat it thousands and thousands of times, trying to convince people that we would meet their merit qualifications as they see them. The cumulative effect of that is that we have an election, and as tough as it is, it's usually very clear. Canadians decided who was merit-based and who wasn't. The beauty of the system is that if they get it wrong, if the Canadian people in a riding feel they got it wrong, then they get a chance in the next election to do something about it.

We don't have that. Once you're a senator and you're appointed, you're there till you're 75, and that's it. I'm wondering what process, what talent, what experience, and what training you are looking for that, in your view, would give Canadians the ideal lawmaker. This isn't just about having a gilded life on the red carpet; it's also a fact that senators make laws. In fact, their vote is worth more than our vote, because there are fewer of them.

What qualifications are you looking for when you're trying to replace the process that Canadians go through on the doorstep? What are you looking for when you're trying to choose a person Canadians would consider to be their ideal lawmaker?

(1130)

The Chair:

Ms. Labelle.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Thank you.

I must tell you that I have had many employees who had grade 9, and they did much better than I did because they had used their own lives to become experienced people.

In terms of the criteria, we have those that are in the Constitution already, which are age, residency, property—

Mr. David Christopherson:

But really, that's not much more than a pulse.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Yes.

Then what we also are looking at, and this is public, is, first of all, people who have a very strong ethical background, extensive knowledge and experience, and hopefully an understanding of the institutions of our country. We're also looking for the identification of people with diversity, be they women or men. We're looking for cultural diversity and linguistic diversity in addition to professional diversity, so that more than the same kinds of professions being recommended. The list is longer, but these are the kinds of criteria we use.

We're also looking at people who are ready to work in the Senate on a non-partisan basis, which is part of the mandate that was given. These are the kinds of things that we're looking at. We look for recognized leadership in the field they are in. We look for people who have been strong in serving their community.

We have quite an extensive list of public criteria, and those criteria are known to everyone who wishes to be considered.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you for that.

Given the fact that there is no built-in structural method of accountability and it's really only now that the media are beginning to ask senators the kinds of questions they ask us on a day-to-day basis—so there is some accountability starting there—what traits are you looking for that would indicate that senators-to-be understand there is some element of accountability in this process somewhere? I mean, it's the greatest lottery win in the entire world. You not only get a beautiful paycheque and pension until you're 75, but you get to make laws. How great is that for a G7 country? What traits are you looking for that would give you the sense that future senators understand there is some element of accountability? It's not there structurally. What would you be looking for in their personalities to give you a sense that they understand there is accountability? Do you believe that's a part of it?

I ask because you didn't mention that as one of your criteria.

(1135)

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Thank you very much.

I think that this is a very important part. It can be demonstrated by the track records of the individuals in what they have done, how they have done it, how they have accomplished the responsibilities they have had in the past. Words take you only so far in this regard, so it is very much the background. It is what they have done and how they have done it, how they have succeeded in demonstrating accountability in the responsibilities they have had in previous positions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I'm sorry. Your time is up.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, on a point of order, Mr. Christopherson asked a number of questions about how Madam Labelle is conducting herself in the role of chair of the advisory committee, which is precisely what I was trying to deal with.

He was permitted to go there, whereas I was not. I agree with letting him go, but the fact is that if you ruled me out of order, he should have been ruled out of order too. He did not ask a single question about Madam Labelle's own qualifications. Therefore, it's clear that you think it's okay to ask questions about how she will conduct herself and how she regards her mandate, which are precisely the kinds of questions that I was seeking to ask.

I assume, therefore, that if we now, on the Conservative side, ask those same questions, you will permit them, and that the Liberals who did not object to Mr. Christopherson's questions will not object to those questions from Conservatives.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid. If you want to use up all the time of the committee, the witness doesn't get any questions.

If it's okay with the committee, since the Conservatives did not get time yet to get their competency questions in, I'm going to move Mr. Richards' five-minute round ahead, and then there will be two Liberal rounds. That's just to give them a chance to get some questions in on the topic of this meeting.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Madam Labelle, I appreciate your being here today. With regard to this process, I think Canadians have a lot of concerns about the fact that there's a lot of information that won't be made available to Canadians. Mr. Reid has raised some questions today that I know are of concern as well.

Certainly the idea that you'll be making recommendations to the Prime Minister that will never be known to the public—and no one will ever know whether the Prime Minister chooses from that list or not—and the secrecy around that are things that I know many Canadians are quite concerned about, so we certainly do appreciate the fact that you are here today so that Canadians can at least have some sense of and confidence in the people who are appointed to this board.

The subject matter we have today indicates that in the transitional process, your advisory board would undertake some consultations with groups, and it lists a number of these. I would like to get a sense of your experience in being able to undertake such consultations.

Obviously, there are a lot of questions around these consultations, such as how they'll be undertaken, whether groups will be approached or whether they'll be able to apply to come forward, under what criteria those groups are going to be chosen, how the board would interact with those groups, and whether those groups will be made public so that people are aware of who they are. I wonder if you can give us some sense as to how that process will be undertaken, how the consultations will be undertaken, and whether the groups will be made public. That will allow us to assess that against your previous experience undertaking similar types of consultations.

The Chair:

Ms. Labelle, you can tell him your qualifications to undertake that process.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Just to be clear, Mr. Chair, are you indicating that the witness will not be allowed to answer my questions about how that process would look?

That's important, because if we have no sense as to what the process of the consultations would look like, what types of consultations are being undertaken, and whether those groups are going to be made public, etc., we have no way of being able to assess the witness's abilities to undertake those processes. If we don't know the description of the job, we cannot assess whether someone can do the job.

The Chair:

The witness can answer what she likes, but she knows she's not compelled to answer questions about anything outside of her competency and qualifications for this job. The witness can go ahead.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Briefly, Mr. Chair, what we do first of all is to put up a website so that it can be available to any Canadian. Second, we have worked very hard through press releases and media advisories to ensure that more and more Canadians and organizations are able to understand and, hopefully, make recommendations and apply.

In terms of the organizations, which was your question, we're reaching out very widely to organizations around the country. We're doing this as we're talking, whether we're talking about business, labour, non-governmental organizations, arts, culture, or development. I could go on; the list is very long. There's law, employment, and so on. We are really reaching out very widely at this time, and we are continuing to do that.

They will be reporting—

(1140)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry to interrupt, but the Chair's indicating that I don't have much time left, and there's something else—

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

I'm sorry, I just want to say that we'll also be reporting on a regular basis, and I would presume that our report would be public.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

It's been made quite clear today that some of the questions that Mr. Reid had, which are very critical questions, have not been allowed. Some of the questions I'm asking, which I believe are very important to be able to assess the qualifications, are not being allowed.

Mr. Chair, I would like to put forward a motion. Given that the committee has called the chair of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments to appear before this committee to examine her qualifications and her competence to perform the duties for this post, to which she has been appointed under Standing Orders 110 and 111, and given that the full process has not been launched or made public, how is the committee to properly be able to question the witness?

Therefore, I would like to move a motion:

That the Committee invite the Minister of Democratic Institutions to appear before it to respond to questions concerning the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments.

In this way we can get a better sense of the process involved and properly assess the qualifications of the individuals on this board. I would ask that the clerk be instructed to invite the Minister of Democratic Institutions to appear before this committee to answer those questions so that we can properly conduct our duties here.

The Chair:

Okay, Mr. Richards, when we get to committee business later, we will.... We're not going to take time from the witness right now.

We'll go on to Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much, Madame Labelle, for taking the time to come here today.

I have looked through your CV. It is incredibly impressive. You have 13 honorary degrees. You've been on numerous advisory boards and have been the chair of a number of organizations, including the WHO, the United Nations, and Transparency International, and there's all of the work that you've done on anti-corruption. I think that's tremendously impressive. I particularly wanted to also note that you were the chair of the board of Algonquin College, which is in my riding of Ottawa West—Nepean, and also of the Ottawa-Carleton United Way, which has done a lot of good work in my riding. I thank you for the tremendous contributions you've made.

This particular position will require a competence to be able to use good judgment, to look at merit-based appointments, and to use the judgment to be able to do that independently. I would like to go through some of your qualifications and background that will allow you to be able to be competent to perform the tasks you will have.

I notice that your understanding of governance is obviously very strong. You've been deputy clerk of the Privy Council and a deputy minister. You were on the board of the International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development, which did a tremendous amount of work until it was disbanded. It was a very effective board that promoted international best practices of good governance. Also, of course, all of the anti-corruption work you've done also goes to your understanding of democracy and of governance.

Could you talk a little bit about how you would be able to use your qualifications, your background, and your expertise in order to do the tasks that we've asked you to undertake?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Thank you very much.

First of all, you raise the position of deputy clerk of the Privy Council. The deputy clerk, of course, works very closely with the committees of Parliament, because in the position of the clerk, you're assisting as the secretary to cabinet in this regard. That, I found, was very useful in giving me an overview of the government as a whole and in getting closer to the institutions of Parliament as well, to the infrastructure of Parliament.

My work at the UN has been ongoing for many years, but more recently, in the last six years, I have been on the board of the UN Global Compact, which is chaired by the Secretary-General and which really has 10 principles that it is trying to promote around the world in working with governments, with business, and with various organizations. They include human rights, labour, development, and the tenth principle on anti-corruption as well.

I'm still working with some of the staff of the UN Global Compact on one aspect, the Business for the Rule of Law framework, which is trying to get businesses around the world to not just live by the minimum standard but to be ready to top it up and be ready to make representations to those governments that are weak and help in the work they can do. That's one aspect of it.

Also, of course, when you chair an organization, you have to look at the overall functioning of that organization, which I've had to do a number of times, not just with Transparency International but with other institutions in Canada and outside the country. I think that has been very helpful to me.

In terms of the laws of our country, when I was in the Privy Council, but also beyond that when I was working with organizations, I was able to see the importance of the privacy law in protecting private information for people.

(1145)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That's wonderful.

I also see that you're a Companion of the Order of Canada and you've received the Order of Ontario. You've also been on the Advisory Council to the Order of Ontario, where you had to make selections, look at people's qualifications and merit, and draw from a wide variety of people with professional backgrounds.

Can you tell us a bit about that?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Yes, thank you.

Also—I'm adding to your question here—when I was deputy minister of the Secretary of State, which is now Heritage, by virtue of the position I automatically sat on the selection advisory body for the Order of Canada. I was there for five years. Basically, what I learned through these two processes and a number of others was very important.

I'm also chairing a panel to select young people from developing countries to study at the master's level in sustainable energy development so that they can go back to their country and deal with that big issue in their own sphere.

You need to ensure you have the broadest information possible about individuals so that you're then able to work as a committee. We have an excellent committee, the advisory board, with Indira Samarasekera, who is the former president of the University of Alberta and a research scientist and engineer. We have also Daniel Jutras, who is dean of the faculty of law at McGill University. Again, he's someone with a tremendous background. Then we have two people for each of the three provinces that we're looking at right now; they are also outstanding people. With these people together, we have the wisdom of more than one individual coming to the table. Each one of us identifies who, from all of these people who have surfaced, these individual candidates, are the top people that we could recommend.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, my colleagues across the room seem to be far more interested in the process than in the phenomenal quality of the candidate before us.

I'd like to go a little bit deeper into these qualifications in understanding the context of the role she's getting herself into here.

How do you, Madam Labelle, see the historical role of the Senate as the House of sober second thought?

(1150)

The Chair:

This is not on your qualifications; it's a point of order. You can relate it to your qualifications, or you can answer whatever you want, but you don't have to.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Perhaps my answer would be that as a deputy minister I of course had to appear before the House of Commons, but I also had to appear before the Senate. I was able to see, as the senators reviewed legislation, how sometimes particular aspects were identified and how they were able to improve the legislation in the long run. It's been mostly through that kind of experience that I've been able to witness the responsibility of the Senate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair. The question does tie into your qualifications in that having experienced the Senate and seen it, you understand the type of person you're looking for. You have the experience needed to have the judgment to do this. I think that was the purpose of the question.

Through your career you've also had to keep a lot of secrets, and I guess when you're hiring somebody in any role you don't want to make public the names of the people you didn't hire. It's sort of bad for them and bad for you. Can you talk about your background in keeping secrets at high levels of government?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

We have to look at conflict of interest here. You also have to go back to the order in council, which means that you are bound to keep the information that is there in front of you. I think it's through those instruments that one learns to keep information that cannot, either because of the privacy legislation or otherwise, be made public.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see that you understand the requirement for privacy for these applicants very clearly.

I'm reading your CV. I'm amused by two words at the very bottom, where I see “January 2016”. I was wondering what the previous months looked like.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: When you started, where did you see your career going? Was helping to guide this country the type of thing you'd hoped to do as you built your career up?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

I started my life in Health Canada and moved on to Indian and Northern Affairs in the Government of Canada. I was able to discover the rest of Canada, discover our country and its people, to a greater extent than what I had known before. Basically, this was an impetus to stay as a public servant for as long as I did. When I left, I could have stayed as a deputy minister, but I had had 19 years in that position, and I felt it was time to leave the space to others and also to give back to the country and to the international community.

You will see that most of what I have done is voluntary. It has not been paid work, and that's fine. That was part of the decision. It also meant that it gave me an opportunity to see our country in a very broad way, through the departments I was responsible for. Before being a deputy minister, I was in Health Canada and in Indian Affairs and Northern Development, and I did a lot volunteer work both outside the country and in Canada.

It was a personal choice, but I felt there were many other Canadians who were also doing the same thing. I think all avenues can contribute to our country, whether you're in business, a member of Parliament, or in a non-governmental organization.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have 20 seconds left.

I note that in your plethora of honorary degrees, you have some that are not from Canada. I was wondering if you had some time to address your international experience, but I think we're out of time. Just tell us a bit more about what you did outside the country.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

About countries—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What you did outside Canada. We'll have to come back to that later.

(1155)

The Chair:

No, I'm sorry. You'll have to answer that later.

Mr. Reid, you have a five-minute round.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question follows on Mr. Christopherson's questions about how, given your previous role in Transparency International, you would treat confidential and secret information, and it follows on Mr. Graham's question on how your experience as a public servant would cause you to treat confidential information.

The nomination forms for senators, filled out by organizations in the phase 1 process, are Protected B once completed. Do you regard this as meaning that you would be unable to reveal not only the content but also the name of the nominating organization for a person who's applied to the Senate, and has been accepted by the Prime Minister, and then placed in the Senate? Would the information regarding who the nominating agency was be something that would itself be protected and be information you would be unable to reveal ex post facto?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

I think there would not be any problem in revealing the names of the organizations that have been consulted as widely as possible. I think if we linked the name with the candidate, then we would get into the privacy issue, because one would have to deal with the name of the individual.

This is one of the things that our committee will need to work at as soon as this first phase is completed and we prepare our report. We will need to work at how to best include what we should include in our report. As I said before, we are consulting very widely at this time. The wider the better, because it makes it possible for more outstanding people to be identified.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I am only referring to the phase 1 process, in which I assume you're not actually consulting. I could be wrong here, but I'm assuming you're not consulting and that you have to wait for organizations to send nominations to you. That doesn't really create a capacity to reach out. I'm not talking about what happens after phase 1. Am I correct that in phase 1 you have to simply wait for the nominations and applications to be submitted to you, and then see if you have two that match up?

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

On a point of order, I think we've been quite fair. There have been a lot of lines of questioning about process, and this one is completely and utterly about process. It is not tied into Ms. Labelle's qualifications or experience at all.

The Chair:

Ms. Labelle, do you have any comments on your qualifications in dealing with protected information?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

I guess I need to go back to my time in the Privy Council and as a deputy minister. We had to respect the laws we have but also respect the individuals. In that context, private information is private and needs to be protected, based on the legislation we now have.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Based on your experience dealing with issues of conflict of interest, how would you determine whether or not someone has effectively had to solicit an organization to support them or has been chosen by an organization because that organization believes this is the person who will best represent that organization's interests in the Senate, a problem that clearly would violate the constitutional injunction that senators be independent? How would you deal with that concern?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

If you look at our website, you will see that the applications do not come only from organizations; there is also a need for three separate reference letters in relation to the candidate. That broadens, I think, the extent of what the individual can bring, and brings us more information in looking at the credentials of the individual. The organization makes the recommendation, but at the same time letters of reference are part of the process.

The Chair:

You have 50 seconds, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I'm not sure I understood that. Are you saying that you can go back to the individual and say, “Please submit additional information; what you submitted in your application form piques our interest, but it's insufficient for us and we require further information”, or does it all have to be submitted at one shot by noon on February 15?

I'm asking about the phase 1 process.

(1200)

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Sure.

The Chair:

You don't have to answer process questions, but answer what you want.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Again, Mr. Chair, the information may not all come at the same time, as long as it is in by the deadline that has been provided. You can get the recommendation, you can get the letter, but then you can get the letters of reference afterward. It doesn't all have to come together in one package, as long as it is completed by the time that's been set.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I just want to clarify how much time I have. I do note that the clock is past 12 o'clock.

The Chair:

We started late, so you have a five-minute round. Hopefully we can get to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Great. Thank you. I appreciate that, Mr. Chair.

I want to echo my colleagues on the government side in terms of first thanking you for appearing before this committee on such short notice. We are all duly impressed by the incredible.... I mean, I couldn't even get past the first paragraph before I started asking myself, “What have I done with my life?”

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Arnold Chan: Like you, I'm an individual who actually got his fourth degree by the time he was 40. I take to heart that learning is a lifelong process. I appreciate that we want to encourage younger individuals to pursue that as part of their own career development.

Madam Labelle, this wasn't necessarily clear when I had the opportunity to review your curriculum vitae, so I'd like you to expand a little bit on your experience as it relates to bicameral parliaments or bicameral institutions. Obviously your experience here with the Parliament of Canada, dealing with the House of Commons and the Senate, is clear. Are there other experiences you bring to the table, through your international work, that you feel contribute to your role and competency to serve on this particular advisory board?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Thank you, sir.

I think it was more as president of CIDA that I had the opportunity to work on and listen to requests regarding issues around the world, because we were working in over 100 countries. Not every request was focused on their parliament, but many were, and sometimes they had to decide how to reconstruct what had become very dysfunctional in their country or sometimes rebuild from close to scratch.

I'm thinking of a number of countries that are still really struggling to see if their parliament can work much better than it does. I'm thinking of countries like Haiti and a number of states that are currently in a failing situation or are fragile. They have worked very hard, but somehow....

That's one aspect of people who were looking to benefit from our experience, and we were always able to match them with a number of countries that had a bicameral system, because that was what they were looking for.

Also, through the OECD and through the European Commission work that I was brought in to do, especially in the last few years, I was able to see how a number of countries that have parliamentary infrastructure similar to ours were asking themselves a number of questions.

I think it is not so much in having focused only on that but also in seeing how those parliaments were able to try to find the best way forward. Some that did not have a bicameral system might have said that it would be better for them to go that way.

I think that's all I can say at this time on that, but that international experience was very useful to me, and a number of G7 or G8 counties, as you know, have bicameral situations.

(1205)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, madam.

How much time do I have, about a minute?

The Chair:

You have one minute.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I wanted to very quickly follow up on whether, in doing part of that review, particularly through your work with the OECD or other institutions, you ever dealt with a situation like the one we have here in Canada, where one of the Houses of Parliament is an elected body and the other one is an appointed body. If so, how did you see that within the frame of democratic legitimacy as you looked at these countries that were facing the particular challenges you just described?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

I don't think, sir, that I can say.... Whether we look at Germany or the United States or Australia or France, they are all in very different time frames, as you know, in terms of what they have and what they are trying to do at this time. The U.K. Parliament is the one I've been closest to. We've looked at it in terms of what they have been doing with their House of Lords, so that's the one I think I'm more familiar with.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll close with Mr. Christopherson with a three-minute round.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I do appreciate the extra effort to make sure the full rounds were completed. Thank you.

Madame, just to come back again to competency, in terms of what you would be thinking about as you have each of these in front of you, my understanding is that a person would have to be recommended by an organization to get their name in the hopper. I'm not 100% sure on that, but if someone could find a way to get put on the list unilaterally, here's my concern. Are you not worried at all, when you think about applying this, that there is the potential for an elite body—and all of us here qualify as elites—to appoint other people through the lens of that elitism, so that we end up with more elites? I say that as a person with a working-class background. Although I've been in electoral politics for over three decades, I'm just from the working class. If my resumé went in to you the first time I was elected, it wouldn't even stay on the table, let alone be considered.

My concern, then, is how you go about selecting candidates that may not even find themselves in front of you. If we use the benefit of democracy, people like me can get elected, because there are certain traits that electors want in a lawmaker. There are a lot of other things. I know there are lots of lawyers and doctors, and that's good, but I'd like somebody in there who knows what it's like to get up every day and have to get their fingernails dirty to make a living.

I'm wondering how we avoid the continuation of the view that the Senate is full of elites—because they are all connected to somebody—and how this process and your thinking and your colleagues' thinking are going to give us a different result. Can you help me understand how you think we can get there?

The Chair:

You have one minute to answer the question.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

Thank you, sir.

I think we're dealing with the first phase of five appointments. After that, when we move into a more regular period, it will be individuals applying. That will give, I think, a very broad capacity, and hopefully it will also give us a broad capacity. As I mentioned before, I think it's very important for diversity to prevail.

Mr. David Christopherson:

But the diversity would be by your definition and that of your colleagues, and that's it. Diversity as defined by Canadians doesn't come into it. Do you not think that's a problem we'll end up with in the Senate, given our trouble in the past?

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

I hope we can demonstrate that when we're talking about diversity, we're also talking about diverse backgrounds as well as individuals from—

Mr. David Christopherson:

But you'd be the one to decide what that mix is. You will decide what Canada looks like in terms of diversity. That small group of people will replace the thinking of all Canadians. How on earth could we possibly end up with a Senate, under that process, that reflects the will of the Canadian people?

The Chair:

This is your last chance. You have 10 seconds left.

Ms. Huguette Labelle:

I think that will be what people witness eventually. I hope our work will demonstrate that we can recommend the kinds of diverse individuals a Senate needs to have. I guess it's once the nominations are made and recommended by the Prime Minister to the Governor General that you'll be able to see whether we've done our work in the way you're talking about, sir.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hope you get it right, because there's no way to get rid of them if you're wrong.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Labelle, for coming on short notice and being here a little bit past 12—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, I would like the witness to hear this before you dismiss her. I just wanted to move a quick motion. We can dispense with the motion afterwards, but I did want her to hear this.

I'd like to move: That the proposed chair of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, being Huguette Labelle, is deemed qualified and competent to perform the duties to which she is being appointed.

I have Ms. Sahota seconding the motion.

The Chair:

That's a standard motion; we'll deal with it after we suspend. Then we'll go to the Library of Parliament report.

(1210)

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you, and we'll thank our library researcher for doing a report. We look forward to hearing from him.

Because he's not a called witness, this will be very informal. As he discusses, if you have a question, we'll just interrupt him while he's talking—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I apologize for interrupting you, sir. I'm just not clear where we are. We had a motion, and then we dropped it, and now we're talking about the next piece of the agenda, so I'm a little unclear.

The Chair:

There are a number of things under committee business. We'll do that, the motions and all of that, after we hear the report.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You say the report. I'm sorry; the analyst was bringing a report for the second part of the meeting.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

But we're not there yet. We're still on the first part of this meeting.

In other words, we had the witness, and there was a motion that flowed from that, and then that's when we broke. Are we in camera now?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Are we in public? Yes. We're still public. Okay, that's what I thought.

You had a break for a moment, as the witness excused herself, and now it seems to me that we should be dealing with the motions in the proper order, or we would say that we're finished with that part of our agenda and we're moving to the second part, in which case we'd pick up at the next meeting where we left off, and that would be the placement of the motions in the proper order.

I'm just a little unclear where we are, Chair.

The Chair:

What's the committee's will on that?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Thinking about what David just finished commenting on, the first part of the meeting's over. The second part was to settle on the agenda. We deal with that, and after that's dealt with we go into new business, at which point in time I understand that there's the potential for a couple of motions. Even Mr. Christopherson had something that he wanted to potentially get on to the table.

In fairness to Mr. Christopherson's comments, I think we should just continue on with the pre-set agenda.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry, Chair, can I ask for another clarification?

The motion that was moved by the government was that this committee—I'm paraphrasing—affirms or agrees with the appointment. Do we have to deal with that motion before we have concluded our business with this witness?

The other question is whether the process of ultimately appointing senators hinges on this committee giving this approval, or is this something that runs parallel to the actual process of them sitting down and doing their work, and what we say is maybe interesting to somebody but doesn't have any role in the trigger point of decision-making?

The Chair:

To answer your second question, if the committee makes a motion—sometimes they do and sometimes they don't—it doesn't have any effect on that. It's just giving feedback from the committee, but it doesn't have any effect on whether the appointment goes ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

The Chair:

As you probably know, after having such a witness in an order in council appointment in the past, sometimes committees have made a motion saying that they had the person before them—

Mr. David Christopherson:

So if that motion failed, it would have no impact on the process?

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Interesting.

Just as a matter of housekeeping, then, when are you suggesting that we would deal with that motion and Mr. Richards' motion?

The Chair:

I think it's up to the committee, but my suggestion would be, in respect of the researcher who's done this work on the report and who was expecting to start at 1 p.m., that we do that and then we do all of those committee business types of things in our next agenda at the end.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. What I would leave you with is just this thought. It sounds as though it doesn't matter whether we pass that motion or not. Fair enough. However, Mr. Richards' motion was critically important, because it spoke to us wanting to have a second step in our process of approval vis-à-vis inviting in the minister to talk about the context of the appointment.

When would that be dealt with? Do you not see us dealing with that now?

Here's the option, Chair, and then I'll shut up. We can deal with that now, as a continuation, because this hour of the meeting is ours to control. It's our staff reporting to us. It's not like we're tying up witnesses or there are timelines that we have to meet.

I would leave with you one suggestion: that there is some merit in at least seeing if we can deal with those two motions to put paid and finished to the file on this witness, but I leave it with you and, obviously, the will of the committee.

(1225)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I would propose that we deal with my motion first, then.

First of all, let me ask the question. Did you receive my motion? You suspended right after I moved it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, obviously, that would be inappropriate. My motion was moved first; therefore, it would be first in the order of precedence.

The Chair:

My preference is, as I said before, to go on with the report. I don't think Mr. Chan's motion is time sensitive, but your motion and a number of other things we have are part of potential committee business, so we have to do that today. I'm not saying we won't do it, but there are a number of other things related to it. We could do that all in the discussion at the end.

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're down to 35 minutes before the end of our meeting. I suppose we could agree to continue on past one o'clock. Failing that, I suggest that we actually deal with motions first, and then with Andre Barnes and his report later.

I apologize, Andre. I guess you're used to our doing stuff like this from previous parliaments.

I would strongly recommend that. There is a matter of urgency here. Of course, unless we create a special meeting, which I'm going to recommend in an amendment to Mr. Richards' motion, it would be impossible for us to meet until after the phase 1 process is completed and all nominations are in, which, as you know, is very important. I say we stay on the motions.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments? The other thing we can do is have a subcommittee meeting. We have a lot of potential agenda items now. Mr. Richards, we have your motion, and then we have the electoral officers item and a few other things.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Mr. Richards, can you provide us with a copy of your actual motion? Did you move the motion already?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I did move the motion, yes.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Can we have the clerk read back the original motion, please?

The Chair:

Madam Clerk, do you want to read the motion back? Do you have it?

Mr. Richards, maybe you could read your motion again.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm glad to do that, certainly.

The motion I would move is: Given that the committee is unable to properly examine the qualifications and competence of the appointees of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments without first knowing the full mandate and process involved for the new Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments; and given that the full details of the transitional and permanent Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments' process have not been made public; that the committee ask the clerk to invite the Minister of Democratic Institutions to appear before the committee to answer questions and give details regarding the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments' process.

The Chair:

Are there further comments on how we proceed at this time?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

On a point of order, I just want the chair's clarification that the matter was in fact moved and seconded.

The Chair:

It doesn't have to be seconded, but it's moved. Whether it was moved then or moved now, it's moved.

Go ahead, Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Mr. Chair, not to make matters more complicated, but all I heard earlier from Mr. Richards was that he would like to move a motion to have the minister appear before a committee. What we just heard was a detailed motion. That's the first time I heard the detailed motion. That's why I'm questioning. Was there in fact a formal movement of that motion? I don't think you can say, “I'm going to move a motion on X”, and then an hour later say, “Let me provide the details of that motion.”

What Mr. Chan had moved was actually the detail of a motion, and the record would clearly demonstrate that to be the case.

The Chair:

I don't want to get into all this arguing about who proposed what and when. There was a lot of preamble, but the motion is that we bring the minister.

What I need to know now is the order in which we want to do things. Do we want to carry on with motions? Do we want to go in camera to do committee business? Do we want to hear the report?

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson

(1230)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, my sense is that somehow we'll manage through the next 30 minutes and do whatever. I think you can see that we desperately need a subcommittee meeting to start getting some of these ducks in order.

There's a little bit of partisanship in some of it, but there's still a whole lot of other work that is non-partisan that we want to get to. I urge you to please call a subcommittee as quickly as possible to help sort out this whole thing. Hopefully, we can make recommendations back to the full committee.

The Chair:

Is the committee in agreement with that?

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On that, before we agree, as long as we don't have the effect of causing Mr. Richards' motion to be shunted off to the subcommittee—

Mr. David Christopherson: No.

Mr. Scott Reid: That wasn't the intention—

Mr. David Christopherson:

You can't do that anyway.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, I think that's a good point now. A subcommittee would be very handy, and I'd like us to move if possible directly to consideration of the motions after that.

The Chair:

Okay. It's agreed that we're going to have a subcommittee.

Now, let's quickly pick a time when the members on the subcommittee.... Are you talking about this week, which is basically the rest of today, or the first day back?

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, I guess common sense would dictate it would probably be the day we get back.

The Chair:

Are people in favour of that? Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Quite frankly, until we actually sort out a time, and that can't happen till we all sit down—

The Chair:

Right, and look at your calendars.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—I'd be prepared, Chair, to see if you could try to work with the other appointees, because there are only a couple of them, to find a time that works.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson: Use your judgment, call the first one, and then see if we can come to an agreement on a regularized time for the subcommittee.

The Chair:

Okay, so we'll likely have a subcommittee meeting on the Monday when we return. We'll figure out a time with the people, and we'll—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I would simply note that we're actually not returning on the Monday. We're returning on the Tuesday—

The Chair:

Oh, sorry—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

—because of Family Day, so we're not scheduled to return on the 15th.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That means we sit the day we come back.

The Chair:

We might see if we can meet before the committee meeting that day.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Otherwise, Chair, we're going to be repeating this same circular discussion.

The Chair:

Okay.

Now, for the rest of this meeting, we could do motions or we can do our report.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As much as I want to get to the report because it's an important matter and we're all trying to get that moved as quickly as possible, I still think that in this case, because that motion flows directly from the witness we just heard, we should probably hear Mr. Richards' motion first. It did come first, and it's germane to the matter that we've had in front of us for most of this meeting. Maybe we'll wrap that up by one o'clock.

It'll put us a little bit behind, but at least we would have completed totally the work of the witness and ensuing motions today, and we can move on to the next meeting instead of bouncing all around. Those are just my thoughts.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments on where we go now?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, my only comment is simply that we have two motions before us on the floor. If we're going to dispense with them, we should try to dispense with both before one o'clock.

The Chair:

Okay. Is the committee in agreement that we'll try to dispense with both motions by one o'clock?

Mr. Scott Reid:

What was that again?

The Chair:

Let's try to dispense with both. I guess we'll have you at our next meeting.

Okay. We have two motions. One was saying that we had the witness and the other was on the committee meeting with the Minister of Democratic Institutions.

Which motion does the committee want to do first?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I would argue that because mine was moved first, it should be dealt with first.

The Chair:

Are there any objections? Okay.

We'll read the motion as the clerk feels that she has been able to collect it: That the Committee invite the Minister of Democratic Institutions to appear before the Committee to respond to questions concerning the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments.

Is there discussion on the motion?

Mr. Lamoureux, and then Mr. Chan.

(1235)

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Yes, Mr. Chair, I do have some questions with regard to that. I thought it was interesting. Through good will, we're trying to work with the opposition. At the last meeting, I sat and observed a member of the Liberal caucus actually move a motion, by using the Standing Orders, our rules, to have an appointment come before us, and everyone seemed to be quite encouraged about it. The Standing Orders provide the details of what we're able to ask and not ask.

This is something, Mr. Richards and Mr. Reid, that you would have known. You guys are not new to this system. I thought the idea of the qualifications and competence had validity. That's what the rule said. That's what we asked them to do. My concern is that we're saying we didn't really want that, and that is what I'm hearing. I'm hearing you didn't really want that, and that what you really wanted was to talk about government policy, government process, and to take an issue and debate it before the PROC committee. If you were to use that same process, you could take a wide variety of different issues and say, “Well, today we want Minister X; tomorrow we want Minister Y”, and where does it end?

I can understand and appreciate that there might have been some frustration on your part in terms of not necessarily getting to ask the types of questions you really wanted to ask, but maybe that should have been raised on Tuesday, when there was a sense of good will and good faith with regard to trying to accommodate an appointment.

We went in good faith, believing that members were genuine in wanting to get a better understanding of the qualifications and the competence. I was actually quite pleased to see that the chair was able to make herself available to come to committee within 48 hours of the board making that decision. The issue of process wasn't being dealt with, and that seemed to be your primary concern. Why did we even call for the chair? Why didn't you just express at the outset that you would rather have the minister? If legislation is referred to our committee or if the House, as a whole, refers an issue to our committee, then there is a lot more validity in calling the minister to appear.

I'm just not clear. Mr. Richards, I would look to you to provide some clarification so that all the committee members understand. Even though I'm not a committee member, I am obviously very interested in getting a better understanding, because maybe it's something we should be taking into consideration on rule changes. We're looking at rule changes. Maybe this is something that's suited to a discussion we should be having. I don't quite understand your motivations. At one time you were leading the committee to believe that all we would do is talk about qualifications and competence of a particular appointment, and then somehow you turned that around to wanting to talk about the process of Senate appointments.

You have many other forums in which that can be done. Today in the House we are debating one of the official opposition's motions. The debate that's taking place on the floor of the House of Commons today could have just as easily been about the Senate. You, and particularly Mr. Reid, have posed numerous questions in question period to the minister you're trying to call before the committee. There are many other forums, and I'm just questioning why it is that, on the surface, 48 hours ago you were suggesting we would like to review the qualifications and the competence of an appointment, and we bought into it. That's the reason we were the ones who actually moved the motion to have her come before the committee. That was a gesture.

We talk about parliamentary reform, and two or three days into it we're already calling a witness. We weren't trying to hide anything. The witness comes and performs, and then right away you're deviating away from competence and qualifications, wanting to pick up a line of questioning that would have been better posed to the minister of democratic reform, quite possibly.

(1240)



I'm beginning to think that maybe this was your original agenda, the original purpose for having the discussion. That's why I think at the very least, if not to me but to committee members, you need to better explain why you even wanted to have this particular appointment come before the committee if your real intent was to talk about process and mandate.

If it was to talk about process and mandate, I would highly recommend that there be, at the very least, some discussions to make it clearer what the committee is being asked to do. That's at the very least. If you couldn't develop that consensus, then there's a responsibility, as an official opposition, to raise the issue. Instead of talking about deficits and whether there was or was not a deficit, we could have been talking about this issue today. If we'd actually had the minister come before the committee, we could have had that discussion then.

My concern is on whether or not you have other intentions. Are there other ministers that you ultimately want to be able to call?

I would appreciate it if you could comment on the real reason you wanted the appointment to be called. Do you not believe there are other ways in which you can achieve your questioning on process?

The Chair:

Do you want to respond, and then go later again?

Mr. Blake Richards: Yes.

The Chair: Okay. Go ahead.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, it sounds as if the parliamentary secretary certainly has a number of questions that he wants to have responses to there, so I'm happy to provide those and I think that's precisely the point. Their government doesn't seem to want to provide answers to questions, and I'm happy to do that.

The bottom line here is that under Standing Orders 110 and 111, this committee has the duty and the ability to have a nominee come before us so that we can examine their qualifications and assess whether they are able to perform the duties of the post they have been appointed to.

In order to be able to assess those qualifications and determine their ability to perform those duties, we must have a good sense of what those are. Because the government has been very secretive in terms of what the process would look like—sure, there has been some detail provided—there is a lot of detail lacking in terms of the consultation process with a variety of different groups, as one example. There are a number of examples.

The problem here is that we have a government that has created this process to appoint senators, which they claim is some kind of a reform to the Senate, but it's a very secretive process. Canadians won't even have any idea at the end of that process whether any of the people who have been selected by this board would even be appointed by the Prime Minister. There will be no way to ever know whether the committee was actually able to perform its duty.

To be able to properly assess this, we have to have a better sense as to what that process is, what those consultations would look like, and what the outcomes would be, because when you look at the permanent phase of the program, you see that it's the board that would be providing recommendations on what that permanent process would look like, and we have no idea what that would look like now.

If we aren't able to assess the board, we really have no way of knowing whether those changes that are being recommended by the board are going to be based on any kind of logic, so we have to actually have a sense as to what this process is and what the process will look like.

If you listened to the questions I had for the chair who was before us today, you'd know I was trying to get some sense as to what that process would look like so that I could assess the ability for the board and the members to be able to do the job, but we weren't able to get any answers because we were told that she couldn't answer that part of the questioning.

There were other members who had questions. Mr. Reid had some very significant and serious questions. If it isn't the job of a committee like ours to be able to have a sense as to whether the Constitution of Canada is being followed in a process the government is trying to set up, I think that's a pretty sad statement about this government. If they are not interested in knowing whether the Constitution is being followed in a process, that's a pretty sad statement. For us to be able to properly assess this, we must have a far better sense of the process, which the government is trying to keep secret.

The question I have for the parliamentary secretary is this: is it the position of this government that this minister shouldn't be responsible for this process to ensure that Canadians have confidence in it? How can they possibly have confidence in the work that's being done if we have no sense as to what the work is supposed to be, and what it will look like, and if it's going to be held secret from Canadians? That's exactly what the government is doing .

To bring the minister here and properly assess the process so we can lay that against the qualifications of the people who are charged with doing that process is the only way we can properly discharge our duties under these two standing orders. That's why it's so vitally important that the Minister of Democratic Institutions appear before this committee. It's so we can properly do our job.

If the government is going to try to prevent us from doing our job as a committee, that's also a pretty sad start on what they would call “real change”.

(1245)

The Chair:

Before I go any further, in a minute we'll have Mr. Lamoureux respond to the question he was just given, and then the order is Mr. Chan, Mr. Reid, Mr. Richards, and Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Reid and Mr. Richards, when it does come back to you, the clerk has pointed out that she's not sure where this would fall in our mandate.

While you have some time while they're talking, would you look at section 108(3), which describes our committee's mandate, to see whether this actually falls in the mandate and just describe to us where it does.

Mr. Lamoureux, could you reply to the question from Mr. Richards?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I appreciate the answer, Blake, I really do, but I think that in good part it's somewhat misguided.

In the type of questions that you're putting on the table, you're raising issues about constitutionality. You're talking about the process. You're talking about the kinds of consultations. These are all questions, and I'm not going to say whether they're good questions or bad questions. That's fine. You're entitled to ask whatever questions you want.

My concern is that we had this discussion 48 hours ago when concern was initially raised by the official opposition in regard to the qualifications of one of the appointees. In a gesture of goodwill, you made reference to the committee doing things differently. It was a committee member—Ruby, was it you, or one of—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I will be very brief on this point of order.

The parliamentary secretary has just indicated that we had expressed concerns about the qualifications of one particular employee. Nobody expressed concerns about the qualifications of any one particular employee. We're simply trying to get a sense as to the qualifications to be able to do the duties that are asked of them. If we cannot be given the information by this government about what those duties are, how can we possibly assess the qualifications?

It's like asking us to do an assessment of someone's ability to do a job without giving us the job description. That's what this government is doing. It's keeping the process a secret, the consultation process a secret, and therefore we cannot properly assess the qualifications. It's not questioning anyone's duty. It's the ability to do the job. We have no way of being able to assess that, because we don't know what qualifications they need, because we don't know what the process is.

The Chair:

I agree with the point of order, so don't touch on the qualifications of the person.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Richards, you—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have a point of order.

While we're dealing with points of order, I want to ask, Chair, if you think this is acceptable in terms of the regular business of this committee.

Mr. Lamoureux is not even a member of this committee. The government members went out of their way to say how grown-up they were, that they were quite capable of leading themselves, and they didn't need Mr. Lamoureux for that. The guy's not even a member of the committee. He represents the government, the PMO. He's leading all the discussions, and the real members of the committee are just sitting there.

Is that regular business to you, Chair? Is that a new era? Do you see anything a little bit amiss here with this kind of dialogue?

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, the official opposition asked Mr. Lamoureux a question, so I can't refuse him that opportunity.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not pointing just to this one question. He's the only one who's been talking all along.

The Chair:

Well, we have a long list, actually, of—

Mr. David Christopherson:

This is ridiculous. This government said they were going to do things differently. This is not different. At least Mr. Lukiwski had the legitimacy and decency to sit in the driver's seat when he was driving. This member is not even a member of the committee, and he's driving the committee.

(1250)

The Chair:

We have a list of five members, so he will finish answering the question.

Mr. David Christopherson:

This is just ridiculous.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Just to do a very quick response to Mr. Christopherson, we had a witness here today. I did not even ask a question. At least four members of the committee asked the question. I wasn't the one who moved the motion to ultimately call upon the witness. I didn't move the motion, David.

Mr. David Christopherson: You did.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: No, I did not. I said a member of the committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry. I thought you said “I move”. I apologize.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

So in good part I'm responding to a question currently. I raised the issue earlier, prior to the question, based on my experiences from the chamber and the committee.

This is what I'd like to go back to, Mr. Chair. There are changes.

Mr. Richards, you raise some valid points, but the points you raise are more on policy and process. If I understand what you were saying in your last statement, you're saying we need to have a better understanding of a number of issues in order to be able to question the qualifications and the competence.

If that is the case, then in all likelihood maybe we should not have called for the appointed individual to come before us, since the official opposition was not actually questioning the qualifications. You were right when you made the statement that you're not questioning the qualifications or assessing whether or not that person's qualified. I think we heard—

Pardon me?

Mr. Blake Richards:

We want to assess the qualifications. It doesn't mean we're questioning them. That's different. That's a very big difference.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

That's right. It's a big difference.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We want to assess the qualifications, not question them.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

And there's nothing wrong with that, and that's the reason the government members on the committee had agreed to it. It's not only that particular member. If you will recall the discussion we had within the last 48 hours, it was about seeing if we could get some of the appointments to come before the committee, and that it would be better to have it Thursday, even if it's one or two, as opposed to waiting the extra period of time so we might be able to get a larger number. That was the compromise.

At the end of the day, once it's all said and done, I think the first hour was fruitful in the sense that it provided members of this committee—as Mr. Chan had put forward in a motion—confidence that the person who's chairing it does have qualifications and does have the competence to do the task that has been asked of her. In regard to the process, well, let's debate that. Let's debate it in the House of Commons. Let's debate it in many different venues. I'm just not convinced this is the venue in which we do that, unless the committee ultimately decides they want to do this.

However, keep in mind that what we do in PROC might have ripple effects that affect other committees. Then you could have other committees saying they want Minister Y or Minister Z. There are occasions when different committees will get those ministers, whether it's the estimates or legislation or something else.

The Chair:

On a point of order, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I get the impression that Mr. Lamoureux, who is not a member of this committee, is engaging in a filibuster designed to take us past our concluding point. I couldn't help notice that you were looking at the clock. You must have the same inquiries. Therefore, I wonder if you could wrap up his comments and let us proceed.

Mr. Chan. I'd be happy to forgo my comments if we can come to a vote on this motion. There are only five minutes left. Alternatively, we could agree to extend the time that we are meeting today in order to provide a more extensive discussion. One way or the other, let us deal with this motion.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, is this on the point of order?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sorry, it's not on the point of order.

The Chair:

Our list is Mr. Chan, Mr. Reid, Mr. Richards, Mr. Christopherson, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Chan.

You were finished, Mr. Lamoureux?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I want to back up quickly because I recognize the time here. The government side is prepared to drop all our comments on this motion before you and bring the matter to a vote, but let us simply note that it's weird that we're in this situation. We're in this situation because your government didn't deal with 22 appointees for over two years, and now, constitutionally, we have to fill those vacancies. Otherwise, at a certain point the Senate simply cannot function.

That issue aside, at the end of the day a constitutional requirement sets this body in the Constitution. It needs to operate. It was getting to the point where it was becoming dysfunctional because the previous government chose not to fill those vacancies.

That issue aside, can I simply ask the clerk to read back the motion again? On this side we're prepared to vote on the motion right now.

(1255)

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

The motion reads: That the committee invite the Minister of Democratic Reform to appear before it to respond to questions concerning the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments.

The Chair:

We have not yet determined whether it fits in the mandate of the committee, but....

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, with regard to the mandate of this committee, which is laid out in Standing Order 108(3)(a): Procedure and House Affairs shall include, in addition to the duties set forth in Standing Order 104, and among other matters:

Then it has a list. The “among other matters” means that we have a mandate that can be interpreted as expanding to include not merely the narrow objects laid out in section 108(3). In other words, there's no problem in hearing from the minister.

I'll just point out, Mr. Chair, that under our Constitution from time immemorial, or at any rate since the development of responsible government both here and in the mother country, all ministers have to report to the House of Commons. The House of Commons has oversight over all of them. The Minister of Democratic Institutions and her predecessor, the Minister of Democratic Reform, always reported to this committee. That's an established practice, so that is the authorization for doing this.

I have a final comment here on a somewhat different subject. It's critical that she be invited here—so this is going to you, since you're in charge of timing—to meet with us during the break week, unless she can meet with us tomorrow, because of the fact that the phase 1 appointment process closes. It's a process that I'm arguing is unconstitutional. I asked her about this in the House of Commons, and she did not answer when I said I thought it was unconstitutional and asked if she had legal advice.

That process closes on family day, on the Monday before we reconvene, so this must be a special meeting. Therefore I am imploring you, as chair of the committee, to set a special time between now and February 15 and not wait for our regularly scheduled meeting, which will be too late. Our regularly scheduled meeting will be on February 16, after that process, which may be unconstitutional, is closed, and after the damage done by following that process has been done.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards, you're up.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'll forego my spot, although I will point out, Mr. Chair, that I really believe it's important for us to deal with this motion and have a vote on it before the conclusion of this meeting. If that requires a little extra time, we should take it.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, in that regard, I have a few things to say—I really do mean a few—but I would like to get them on the record. If we can agree on a small extension, my purpose would be to come to a conclusion and have the votes.

The Chair:

We're at the time when we need a committee decision on whether we're going to extend the meeting.

Are there any comments?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm sorry, but comments on what? I missed the last sentence.

The Chair:

The time is up. Does the committee agree to extend the time? We're past one o'clock now.

(1300)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

For how long?

The Chair:

How long do you suggest, Mr. Christopherson?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I only need five or six minutes. I really don't have a lot. It's just a couple of things that I want to get on the record on the motion, and that's it. I don't know about anybody else. Otherwise, we don't pass motions. It's that simple.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd like to amend it so that the end of the motion concludes with “subject to the availability of the minister”.

The Chair:

You're amending the motion. We have to vote on the time first, though. We're past the time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How about an end time? Availability could be “never”.

A voice: Make it 1:15.

Mr. David Christopherson: No, I mean the availability of the minister.

We're talking about the motion, right?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm talking about the motion. We've already agreed to extend, haven't we?

Mr. David Christopherson: Yes.

The Chair:

You are proposing that the committee extend to 1:15?

A voice: Yes.

An hon. member: We could do it in blocks of a few minutes.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Why are you extending it, David?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Because you, the government, seem to want to get these motions passed today. We in the opposition are not looking to delay that, but it's partly because you took the floor for so long that there's not enough time to get the comments in before one o'clock.

All I'm asking for individually is about four to six minutes, or five minutes, to get my piece on the record, and then I'm ready to vote, but we can't do that if we don't get an extension. I can't speak for my colleagues, but that's where I am. They've already indicated that they are looking to see this come to a vote.

It's up to you. If you want the motion, you have to give us another 15 or 20 minutes. If you don't care, let's adjourn.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Go ahead and start speaking, then.

Mr. Chair, I suspect.... I don't want to speak on behalf of the committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Ha. Why not? You speak on behalf of that half.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

David, you're not—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Go ahead. What's your point?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

You're not being fair, David, on this. It's now past one o'clock—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not being fair? You shouldn't even be here.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Typically, every member has a right to sit in the committee. Every member has a right. Don't try to deprive me—

Mr. David Christopherson: Nobody's buying that. Say it.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux: Mr. Chair, all I'm trying to do is just help facilitate—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, yes, yes, you're a big help.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I appreciate it. Thank you.

If you want to speak for another three or four or five minutes, fine, go ahead. I don't have a problem with that. I don't think any other committee member does.

Talk.

The Chair:

Okay. For now we'll extend for five minutes for Mr. Christopherson to make his comments.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. I appreciate the PMO allowing me to have a few words.

All I wanted to say in support of the motion was that it sounded as though there might have been a compromise in the works, and if there is, that would be excellent. That would mean that the government really is trying to make committee business different.

Here's my point. I'll tell you one of the reasons I would support this idea. I don't always support bringing in a minister, because the politics are such that you could always haul in a minister and play politics with it, but as a rule we do not. I try to be judicial about when I support calling in a minister, because ministers have their own table, the cabinet room, and this is ours, the committee room. However, in this case, given the importance of what's going on, how quickly everything happened, and the fact that there really hasn't been a lot of public discussion, I do.

I stand to be corrected if I'm wrong, but I don't believe there was a motion with a full debate in the House about this whole process. I don't believe there was a bill in the House with a full process that allowed full debate about it, so really, as Mr. Richards pointed out, this thing has been created in the dark, in secrecy. The end result is that the rules have been made public, but there's been no opportunity to have discussions on things such as why it's okay that a small group of people gets to decide what the definition of “diversity” is in Canada and why a small group of Canadians gets to decide whether someone's personality traits are such that they're going to be democratic and accountable or not.

Remember, Chair, that these are fair questions to ask when we're talking about appointing a chamber, each of whose members has more legal weight than each of ours does, because there are fewer of them.

I think it's fair for the official opposition to ask the government to bring in the minister to bring us up to speed. When we say “us”, we know, give or take some of the details, that means the public. Again I come back to the fact that this government said they were going to do things differently—that they were going to be more democratic, more transparent, more accountable—and I will not stop coming back to that fact. It's a reasonable motion to bring in a minister to talk about what the government has done so far, given that we haven't had the other usual opportunities, those being House discussion or committee discussion, to get at those answers.

Therefore, I think there's good reason to think this process here at this committee would serve the public interest. If we had the minister come in, we could ask some of the questions we have and the public has, before even getting into the partisanship aspect. They would just be legitimate questions about the process. We've had no opportunity to do that. I would argue that is legitimately Canadians' right, as well as the right of the opposition, particularly in light of this government's platform that they were going to be different and were going to provide accountability.

I heard Mr. Graham ask a minute ago if we would accept it depending on the minister's availability. That sounded like the beginnings of negotiations, an attempt to listen to what the opposition was saying and to try to accommodate it. I would respond to Mr. Graham that I certainly would be open to that kind of an amendment, as long as there's a deadline on it. Otherwise, guess what? The minister's never available, and therefore the intent of the motion would be negated through passive-aggressive measures.

Therefore, if the government said, “No later than five calendar days after returning” or something—

(1305)

Mr. Scott Reid:

It could even be before the deadline. There's a deadline.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There's a February 15 deadline. Well, so be it. That's their problem, not ours. They created the process. We can't change the calendar. We can only do what we can do. If the government's actually looking for a compromise and looking for a little flexibility about when we would bring the minister....

I don't think you can say this is really a partisan attempt. In light of the fact that there's been so little public discussion, I think in this case you can legitimately make the case that the minister should come in somewhere in our democratic process and give detailed answers about why they did certain things, why they didn't do other things, and what the expectations of the government are. All those things are quite legitimate.

Before I go any further, Chair, I would just ask if Mr. Graham and/or any other members of the government are interested in trying to find a motion that we could all agree on, or whether we're just heading for a majority vote and the rest of it's just smoke and mirrors.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota's next on the list, but we'll let Mr. Graham—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was saying before that I was just seeking clarification from Mr. Graham, but I'll take clarification from Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I must state for the record that we are more than willing to compromise on the government side. We've shown this time and time again since this committee started.

First of all, a few days ago we were asked to bring in the chair of the committee for the advisory board. We did that with very short notice. I believe the official opposition wanted the whole committee to come in. We were more than willing to try to get as many people in as possible.

Today I witnessed that we had the chairman here, and the whole time, barely anybody was listening to her qualifications and her answers.

On the record, I want to state that as I sat here watching this process—I am new to this committee—I found it really interesting that the opposition was so interested in bringing somebody in to question their abilities, but then, when she was here, they didn't care to listen to her abilities. I found that a little bit appalling, actually.

Once again, I'm not opposing what you're saying, and we are more than willing to compromise on this one as well. I just hope that going forward....

We have another witness we were supposed to question today. He's been sitting here all day, prepared to give his answers and prepared to speak today, so we've been showing a lot of compromise.

I think we are ready to vote on this side and to continue to show that we are more than willing to cooperate and make things work on this committee.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, do you want to answer Mr. Christopherson's question?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm certainly willing to compromise. That's why I'm suggesting that we make it subject to the availability of the minister. We can't prescribe when that is.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You can't leave it completely open-ended, David. There has to be some kind of deadline. I mean, suddenly the minister is just never available.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's much more likely to happen if you give a deadline than if you don't.

I moved the motion, but I don't know how to make it go to a vote. Can I put the amendment to a vote?

Mr. David Christopherson:

You can't. What are you doing?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm asking what I can do. Is that fair?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fair, yes, as long as you don't try anything. Asking is fair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

David, this is how we get along. I like it.

The Chair:

Could you repeat the amendment?

I think we're going to have to agree to extend the time some more, because we're past the five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It can't go too much longer, or we'll end up running into tomorrow.

The amendment was simply to add, at the end of the original motion, “subject to the availability of the minister”.

Mr. David Christopherson: That's all well and fine, but I have the floor.

The Chair: Okay, we're back to you.

(1310)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would say we're probably close, but when you leave it to “availability of the minister”....

I just finished dealing, for the better part of 10 years, with a government that played every single game possible. I haven't seen a lot of indication that you will do things a whole lot differently, so I'm sorry: I'm quite prepared to accept that motion as one member of this side, but I have to hear a deadline. There has to be some kind of end to it, rather than just “availability”. Otherwise, the minister miraculously is never available when we're meeting, and as I said, it effectively negates the motion.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Can I speak to this—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I said I would take only a few minutes to make my point. I will do that and let it go.

Madam Sahota was trying to move it along, saying, “We're listening, but now we want to vote.” Well, that's just using their majority, waiting until everybody is finished talking so they can use their majority to shut everything down.

I'll end with this. I think the motion has legitimate value. I think it's quite legitimate. I was very pleased to hear Mr. Graham; it sounded as though they were interested in having the minister in, and we just had to agree on the time frame. It can't quite be the way they're suggesting, but I think it would just take a minor tweak to get a unanimous vote.

I remain optimistic that it will happen, but whether it does or not, I think it has great merit. I'm pleased to support that motion.

C'est tout.

Mr. Arnold Chan: The only point I—

The Chair:

Hold it. You can't speak yet. We have to extend the time. We're out of time again.

Is there agreement to extend the time another five minutes?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay. We're extending another five minutes.

Could you keep the time, Clerk?

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We're prepared to put it to a vote, but the issue for us, on our side, is that we simply need to consult to see when the minister is available.

In terms of the time frame you're talking about, Mr. Richards, we don't know. We're on break next week. It's constituency week, right? We just want the opportunity to go back and actually ask the minister when she is available. We have no issue with the minister appearing. That's why I said I'm prepared to bring this to a vote. We're prepared to bring the minister before this committee, but we have to be able to consult and have her check.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let's come back for a day next week and hold a hearing.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I don't know if she's available.

An hon. member: I drive right through her riding. I'll pick her up.

Mr. Arnold Chan: I yield the floor. The amendment is put.

The Chair:

Is there any more discussion on the amendment, which is subject to the availability of the minister?

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's always subject to the availability of the minister. I've never yet seen, except in the most extraordinary circumstances where there was an attempt to bring down the government over allegations of a contempt of Parliament, a situation in which we were saying we were effectively issuing a writ for the minister to be forced to testify here. In fact, the only time anything like that has ever been done was when we brought in Schreiber. Remember that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's it. It's always subject to availability. We expect her, morally, and she must know this, because I assume this is on CPAC, so she can watch it if she wants to. Someone is monitoring it in her office. She knows that we, on this side, want her here before February 15 and that we'll make ourselves available. I'm confident the government can find enough members to be available, even if the specific individuals here can't be here.

I will be voting against the amendment, but not because I don't think we should try to accommodate her. I do think, however, she should try to accommodate us and allow us to be assured that her process is constitutional before the clock runs out on the 15th. I think she can understand the importance of that.

The Chair:

Is there any more discussion on the amendment?

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It doesn't sound as if the government is going to give the assurance we need so I have two choices: I either take them at their word that the minister will come in, in a timely fashion, or not.

Given that we've done this in public—usually we get screwed over when we're in camera and these things don't come out publicly—at least this time everybody has seen the discussion, and if the minister is still not here weeks later, then we have a lot of grounds to make a case. Therefore, I'm going to trust the government that the minister will make herself available in a timely fashion vis-à-vis our needs too, and we'll be supporting the amendment.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I don't understand why, if it's always subject to her availability, there is any opposition to this amendment.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's simply because while it's subject to her availability, any minister who is unwilling to appear before a committee to deal with the constitutionality of the system that she designed, on a deadline she designed, before that deadline expires, is not formally in contempt of Parliament but is acting contemptuously before Parliament. Morally, she can clear anything off her agenda, aside from some kind of personal health crisis or tragedy in the family, to be here. Therefore, she should darn well make herself available, and I want to make that point by voting against this amendment.

That said, if the government pushes the amendment through, I'll then be voting for the main motion as well, and I'll be asking that we make every effort to get her here next week.

(1315)

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We'll support the amended motion at the end of the day.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can I put the motion?

The Chair:

Do you mean your amendment?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it's the amendment. Thank you.

The Chair:

You've already put the amendment.

I will call the question on the amendment, which says “subject to the availability of the minister”.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now we are on discussion of the motion, as amended.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Just call the question on the motion.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would like a recorded vote, Mr. Chair, if you don't mind.

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote.

(Motion as amended agreed to: yeas 9; nays 0)

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte. Bonjour à tous.

Je signale à tout le monde que cette réunion est télévisée. Il s'agit de la 6e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour la 1re session de la 42e législature.

Aujourd'hui, nous allons tout d'abord examiner la nomination par décret de Huguette Labelle au poste de présidente du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat. Nous examinerons ses qualifications. Ensuite, nous reviendrons à l'étude des initiatives visant à rendre le Parlement plus inclusif, amical et efficace, et nous examinerons un compte rendu informel de notre attaché de recherche sur les pratiques en vigueur dans d'autres Parlements dans le monde. Enfin, nous établirons l'ordre du jour de la prochaine réunion, car il n'a pas encore été fixé.

Le témoin fera quelques déclarations, puis je ferai un commentaire avant de passer aux questions, à moins que quelqu'un n'ait un point à soulever maintenant.

Conformément aux articles 110 et 111, nous examinons maintenant la nomination par décret de Huguette Labelle au poste de présidente du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat, renvoyée au Comité le vendredi 29 janvier 2016. Je souhaite la bienvenue au témoin.

Je vous remercie d'être venue avec si peu de préavis. Il semble que les choses vont tellement vite dans ce Comité que nous n'arrivons pas à donner un très long préavis aux témoins. Nous vous avons avisée il y a un jour à peine, il est donc formidable que vous puissiez être ici. J'ai commencé à lire votre curriculum vitae ce matin. Il est aussi long que cette réunion. C'est excellent.

J'ai hâte de vous écouter. Les membres du Comité auront ensuite quelques questions à vous poser.

Mme Huguette Labelle (présidente, Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Voilà bien longtemps que je n'ai comparu devant un comité parlementaire. Je le faisais assez souvent lorsque j'étais sous-ministre et je me réjouis à l'idée de cette discussion ce matin.

Comme vous le savez, notre mandat consiste à formuler des recommandations non contraignantes et fondées sur le mérite à l'intention du premier ministre en regard des nominations au Sénat.

J'aimerais dire quelques mots à propos de mon parcours, ce qui répondra peut-être à vos questions.

J'ai été sous-ministre pendant 19 ans, ce qui m'a permis de constater le travail effectué par le Parlement puisque, comme vous le savez, bien des mesures législatives proviennent de divers ministères. Le sous-ministre doit suivre le processus législatif à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat, et être en mesure de travailler — parfois même de retravailler — certaines parties de la mesure législative avec le ministre et avec le ministère de la Justice. C'est là que j'ai pu constater de mes propres yeux l'architecture, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi, du Parlement de notre pays.

Je me suis également rapprochée du travail de la Chambre et du Sénat quand j'étais présidente de l'ACDI. De nombreux pays du monde entier voulaient tirer des leçons de notre expérience. Je pense plus particulièrement à l'Afrique du Sud, par exemple, avec laquelle nous avons collaboré très étroitement pour examiner sa Constitution. Les Sud-Africains s'intéressaient de très près à notre forme de fédéralisme, ainsi qu'au fonctionnement des institutions de l'État. Ils s'intéressaient aussi à ce qui se passait ailleurs, bien entendu, mais nous étions le principal partenaire qui les aidait à tirer des leçons du reste du monde, puis à adapter ce qu'ils avaient appris et, au final, prendre leurs propres décisions.

Je cite l'exemple de l'Afrique du Sud, mais de nombreux autres pays sont dans la même situation. Surtout après 1989 et la chute de l'Union soviétique, de nombreux pays d'Europe centrale et d'Europe de l'Est s'intéressaient aussi à notre façon de fonctionner. Pendant cette période, nous avons été en mesure de jumeler diverses institutions canadiennes avec celles de ces pays pour les aider à réfléchir à la manière d'améliorer leur propre situation.

La dernière chose que j'aimerais dire, c'est qu'à l'époque où j'étais présidente du conseil de Transparency International, un organisme de lutte contre la corruption, les gens me disaient que ce problème allait me donner du travail pour le reste de mes jours. Il faut quand même être optimiste, et nous avons travaillé d'arrache-pied dans ce secteur très important pour aider des pays du monde entier à créer des institutions pouvant prévenir la corruption et y faire face quand elle se produit. En outre, nous avons travaillé à des conventions et recommandé des lois afin de garantir l'application de la primauté du droit dans les pays où le degré de corruption est élevé. Je le répète, j'ai fait un travail considérable à cet égard et je crois que cette expérience sera utile pour mener à bien la tâche qui nous est confiée maintenant.

C'est tout ce que j'avais à dire, monsieur le président.

(1110)

[Français]

Ce sera pour moi un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de passer aux questions, j'aimerais faire un bref commentaire.

J'espère que ce Comité fera preuve d'un haut niveau de leadership et de coopération. C'est la première réunion du Comité, et j'espère que nous poursuivrons nos travaux dans la même veine. Personnellement, j'aimerais mettre l'accent sur deux choses en particulier. Premièrement, j'espère que, au cours de cette nouvelle législature, nous ferons preuve de respect et d'appréciation à l'égard des témoins de l'extérieur qui comparaîtront devant les divers comités, car nous leur sommes reconnaissants. Deuxièmement, nous devrons assumer le mandat que le Parlement nous a attribué. Je vais le lire de nouveau. Je l'ai déjà lu à la fin de la dernière réunion.

Cette réunion se déroule conformément à l'article 111 du Règlement, qui se lit comme suit: Le comité, s'il convoque une personne nommée ou dont on a proposé la nomination conformément au paragraphe (1) du présent article, examine les titres, les qualités et la compétence de l'intéressé et sa capacité d'exécuter les fonctions du poste auquel il a été nommé ou auquel on propose de le nommer.

Les membres peuvent également consulter les pages 1011 à 1013 du document intitulé La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes.

Nous allons commencer la période des questions en cédant la parole à Mme Petitpas Taylor, qui sera suivie de M. Reid. [Français]

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Madame Labelle, je vous remercie encore une fois d'être parmi nous ce matin. Nous sommes conscients d'avoir convoqué cette réunion en vitesse, et nous vous sommes énormément reconnaissants d'avoir pu vous libérer.

J'aimerais aussi vous remercier de votre contribution au Canada tout au long de votre carrière. Votre curriculum vitae est si impressionnant qu'on ne sait pas par où commencer.

Finalement, je vous remercie d'avoir accepté de présider le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat. C'est un rôle très important et, encore une fois, nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir accepté de présider ce comité.

Parfois, nous demandons à des témoins de nous dire quels sont leurs diplômes, leurs qualifications et toutes leurs réalisations. Il arrive souvent qu'ils soient un peu gênés d'étaler ainsi leur curriculum vitae. Cependant, afin que les membres du comité aient une bonne compréhension de vos réalisations, nous aimerions que vous nous indiquiez en détail quels sont vos diplômes, vos contributions et tout le reste.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je vous remercie, madame Petitpas Taylor.

Au-delà de ce que j'ai mentionné dans mon introduction, au fil de ma carrière, j'ai aussi été présidente de la Commission de la fonction publique du Canada. À cette époque tout comme aujourd'hui, la loi stipulait que notre rôle était de nous assurer que les nominations de fonctionnaires étaient faites en fonction de leurs mérites. Pendant ces cinq années, j'ai passé beaucoup de temps à m'assurer que nous pouvions être fiers de notre fonction publique. Nous avions un système qui permettait de nous assurer que les candidats qui se présentaient à un poste donné répondaient aux critères de sélection. Cela m'a permis de réaliser l'importance de sélectionner des personnes à des postes importants en fonction de leurs mérites, de leurs qualifications, de leur expérience et de leurs connaissances. C'est un aspect que je voulais soulever.

Je vais soulever un deuxième point. J'ai aussi été amenée à travailler de près avec l'OCDE, où je travaille encore. Je siège à un comité du secrétaire général de l'OCDE pour voir comment l'OCDE peut travailler en vue d'assurer une plus grande intégrité chez ses membres, mais aussi au-delà. En effet, l'OCDE travaille aussi de près avec les pays en voie de développement. Son travail n'est pas seulement orienté vers les pays de l'OCDE. Ce comité est chargé de revoir le travail fait par l'OCDE jusqu'à maintenant en matière d'intégrité et de lutte contre la corruption, ainsi que de donner des recommandations au secrétaire général à cet égard. Par exemple, on cherche à savoir si l'OCDE pourrait augmenter son impact si elle se tournait vers certaines pistes différentes ou supplémentaires.

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

(1115)

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Très bien.

Pouvez-vous nous parler de vos études et diplômes universitaires? Nous savons que les témoins sont un peu gênés de partager ces choses, mais nous voulons en arriver à une bonne compréhension.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Oui.

J'ai toujours pensé qu'il était important de continuer ses études le plus longtemps possible. Dans mon cas, je les ai faites surtout à temps partiel, parce que j'avais une famille et un travail alors que je faisais ma maîtrise et mon doctorat.

Dans tous les ministères où j'ai oeuvré, il y avait des équipes de chercheurs. Or, pour arriver à mieux comprendre comment travaillaient ces chercheurs, ce qu'ils faisaient, et m'assurer d'avoir les bonnes personnes en place, je me suis dit que je devais obtenir un doctorat. Cela m'a permis d'en apprendre beaucoup plus sur la recherche, sur les méthodes de recherche, sur les statistiques et ainsi de suite.

C'est pour ces raisons que j'ai continué mes études. D'ailleurs, j'ai obtenu mon doctorat seulement à l'âge de 40 ans, tout en étant sous-ministre adjointe à Affaires autochtones et Développement du Nord Canada. Par conséquent, j'ai rédigé ma thèse entre trois et six heures du matin, mais ça s'est fait.

D'ailleurs, j'ai servi de mentor à beaucoup de jeunes et moins jeunes Canadiens et Canadiennes. Je les encourage toujours à continuer leurs études, non seulement parce que ça leur donne des connaissances supplémentaires, mais aussi parce que ça leur donne une plus grande confiance en eux-mêmes et relativement à ce qu'ils pourront faire dans l'avenir.

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Labelle, bienvenue au Comité. Je suis très heureux que vous soyez ici aujourd'hui. Je souhaite vivement en apprendre plus au sujet de votre mandat et de certaines des tâches que vous êtes censée réaliser dans le cadre de celui-ci. J'aimerais aussi savoir comment vous vous y prendrez pour faire votre travail.

J'aimerais vous poser des questions au sujet de la phase 1 du processus de nomination au Sénat, qui est en cours à l'heure actuelle. Le vendredi 29 janvier, à 18 h 30, le gouvernement a annoncé que, dans le cadre de ce processus, toutes les demandes doivent être présentées au plus tard à midi, le 15 février. C'est à ce moment-là que vous commencerez à assumer votre rôle. Je crois comprendre que, pendant le processus de réception des demandes, vous n'avez aucun rôle à jouer.

Je me pose des questions sur la constitutionnalité de la phase 1 du processus. Plus particulièrement, je crains que, compte tenu de la façon dont elle est structurée, la phase 1 compromette l'indépendance des personnes nommées au Sénat, ce qui est contraire à la Constitution. J'aimerais vous poser une question au sujet de...

Le président:

Nous avons un rappel au Règlement.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, je crains que cette question dépasse la portée de notre travail ici aujourd'hui, qui consiste à examiner les compétences de la témoin. L'examen du mandat du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations du Sénat ne s'inscrit pas dans la portée de l'article du Règlement en vertu duquel le témoin a été convoqué.

(1120)

Le président:

En effet. Monsieur Reid, nous vous saurions gré de poser des questions sur les compétences du témoin.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je demanderais que ce rappel au Règlement, qui a duré environ une minute, n'empiète pas sur mon temps de parole. Est-ce raisonnable?

Le président:

Oui. Il ne sera pas enlevé de votre temps de parole. Nous avons arrêté le chronomètre. Vous disposez encore d'environ six minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Voici sur quoi je me pose des questions. Vous allez recevoir des formulaires de demande et de nomination qui, une fois remplis et soumis, seront classés au niveau « Protégé B ». Je me demande simplement si cela signifie que les noms des personnes nommées et des organismes resteront confidentiels et si vous pensez être tenue de ne pas divulguer les noms des organismes qui auront présenté les candidatures. Est-ce quelque chose que vous ne pourrez pas...

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, malgré mon rappel au Règlement, le membre continue de poser des questions dans le même sens. Je pense que vous devez rendre une décision sur mon rappel au Règlement.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, je vous saurais gré de vous en tenir aux qualités et aux compétences du témoin, ainsi qu'à sa capacité d'exécuter ses fonctions.

Nous avons encore arrêté le chronomètre.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, permettez-moi d'apporter des précisions. J'essaie de faire ressortir le fait que le témoin, bien qu'il n'y soit absolument pour rien, risque d'être entraîné dans un processus qui est inconstitutionnel et qui causera des torts irréparables à la crédibilité et à l'indépendance des personnes nommées au Sénat du Canada. Comme il se peut que le processus demeure confidentiel et secret, nous ne pourrons pas déterminer si le principe d'indépendance a été enfreint ou non. Le témoin devra se conformer à un processus exigeant qu'il traite certains renseignements sous le sceau du secret. Or, ces renseignements seraient absolument essentiels pour que nous puissions examiner une question cruciale d'intérêt public, à savoir si l'indépendance des nouveaux sénateurs a été compromise par le processus de nomination et les liens étroits qui doivent exister entre les candidats et l'organisme chargé des mises en candidature.

Il s'agit d'un processus inédit au sein de la Confédération canadienne. Comme je l'ai dit, il pourrait fort bien contrevenir à l'exigence voulant que les sénateurs ne soient pas nommés d'une manière qui nuit à leur indépendance. La Cour suprême est très stricte à ce propos. Cette question m'inquiète, et je pense qu'elle devrait aussi inquiéter tous les membres du Comité. C'est la seule occasion qui s'offre à nous de poser des questions au témoin avant la fin du processus de nomination. Une fois ce processus terminé, les torts auront été causés. Je pense qu'il est raisonnable de lui poser des questions à ce sujet au cours de la présente séance.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, il s'agit d'une question concernant le processus. S'il le souhaite, le Comité pourrait étudier ce processus, mais la réunion d'aujourd'hui vise à examiner les compétences du témoin et sa capacité d'exécuter les fonctions qui lui ont été confiées. Plus tard, le Comité pourrait s'intéresser au processus dans le cadre de ses travaux, mais pas aujourd'hui. La réunion d'aujourd'hui vise simplement à poser des questions au témoin sur ses compétences liées aux responsabilités particulières qui lui ont été confiées.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai cru comprendre que nous pourrions poser au témoin toute question jugée pertinente. Je ne me rappelle pas que nous ayons décidé de lui poser des questions uniquement liées à ses compétences. Très franchement, je ne remets pas en question les compétences du témoin. Je n'ai aucun doute quant à ses compétences ou à sa capacité de remplir ses fonctions. Je pense que Mme Labelle est éminemment qualifiée. Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est qu'elle est entraînée dans un processus qui sera jugé inconstitutionnel et que nous ne pourrons pas remédier à la situation.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais ajouter que, ce qui est crucial ici, c'est que la Chambre est sur le point de faire une pause. Nous ne reprendrons nos travaux que le 16 février. À cette date, le processus de nomination sera terminé. Il sera alors inutile de poser ce genre de questions au témoin.

Ce n'est pas moi qui ai conçu le processus. Comme le gouvernement a décidé de précipiter les choses, nous ne pourrons pas corriger le processus à moins de tenir une réunion spéciale la semaine prochaine afin d'interroger le témoin à ce sujet. Le moins qu'on puisse dire, c'est que cela pose problème.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, nous devons nous conformer à un article du Règlement de la Chambre des communes. À l'heure actuelle, le Comité ne peut pas modifier cet article ni en élargir la portée. Si vous le souhaitez, vous pouvez utiliser les cinq minutes qu'il vous reste pour interroger le témoin sur ses compétences. Si vous souhaitez discuter de ces autres questions... Nous devrons bientôt redémarrer le chronomètre pour ne pas empiéter sur le temps de parole des autres témoins.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, êtes-vous en train de dire que nous ne pouvons pas tenir une réunion pour poser au témoin les types de questions que j'essaie de lui poser sur les conséquences constitutionnelles de ses responsabilités et ainsi de suite? Ces questions dépassent-elles vraiment le mandat du Comité? Êtes-vous en train de dire que la motion que nous avons adoptée pour tenir cette réunion nous interdisait de poser des questions de ce genre?

C'est important, car si c'est simplement la façon dont nous avons formulé la motion qui nous interdit de poser des questions de ce genre, je vais demander le consentement du Comité pour que nous puissions interroger le témoin sur ces enjeux essentiels, que nous devons vraiment examiner avant le 15 février.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous devriez être au courant de la situation puisque j'ai déjà lu l'article du Règlement à deux reprises. Vous avez déjà été membre du Comité. Voici ce que prévoit l'article 111 du Règlement: Si un comité décide de faire comparaître la personne nommée ou le candidat à la nomination, les comités sont limités par le Règlement à l’examen des titres, qualités et compétences de l’intéressé et à ses capacités d’exécuter les fonctions du poste convoité.

C'est ainsi que tous les membres du Comité et le témoin voient les choses. Comme notre temps est presque écoulé, nous allons devoir limiter votre temps de parole et, à moins que vous souhaitiez poser des questions sur les compétences de la témoin...

(1125)

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez...

Le président:

... nous allons donner la parole...

M. Scott Reid:

Madame...

Le président:

... au prochain intervenant.

M. Scott Reid:

Il est évident que Mme Labelle est une personne indépendante. Ce fait a été souligné à maintes reprises dans les déclarations du gouvernement à son sujet et à propos du comité qu'elle préside. Par « indépendante », on doit entendre...

M. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg-Nord, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement...

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur Lamoureux, je suis déjà en train d'intervenir au sujet d'un rappel au Règlement.

M. Kevin Lamoureux: Non, ce n'est pas le cas.

M. Scott Reid: Oui, Kevin.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Non. Vous n'avez pas invoqué le Règlement au début de votre intervention.

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux, vous avez la parole.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Monsieur le président, vu d'ici, on dirait que Scott est tout simplement en train d'argumenter avec la présidence.

Vous avez invoqué le Règlement. Le président a rendu sa décision à ce sujet. Maintenant, vous souhaitez contester le rappel au Règlement. Vous n'avez pas dit que vous souleviez un nouveau rappel au Règlement ou quoi que ce soit du genre.

Mettons les choses dans une juste perspective. Le Règlement permet au Comité de convoquer ce genre de témoin. Au début de la réunion, puis à deux reprises, pour votre gouverne, le président a expliqué très clairement ce que le Règlement nous permet de faire. C'est un membre libéral du Comité qui a présenté la motion, croyant que le Comité souhaitait faire exactement ce que prévoit le Règlement, à savoir examiner les compétences et les qualités d'une personne nommée.

Si vous souhaitiez aborder l'aspect politique des choses — et c'est vraiment ce que vous êtes en train de faire —, il aurait été plus approprié de proposer que la question soit débattue à la Chambre ou sur une autre tribune.

L'article du Règlement est très clair, et je pense que nous devrions nous y conformer. Scott, vous avez toujours été très respectueux des règles. Je propose que nous continuions de poser des questions en vertu de l'article du Règlement.

Le président:

J'ai déjà rendu ma décision, monsieur Reid. Je vous accorde une dernière chance.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce qui me préoccupe, monsieur le président, c'est la possibilité que nous ne respections pas la Constitution du Canada. Étant donné les délais serrés auxquels le Comité est assujetti, nous ne pouvons défendre la Constitution qu'au cours de la présente réunion. Ce n'est qu'après notre réunion du 29 janvier que nous avons appris l'existence de ce processus et le fait qu'il prendrait fin le 15 février. Cette réunion est la seule possibilité que nous avons de poser des questions cruciales pour savoir si on gardera secrets à tout jamais des renseignements qui nous permettraient de déterminer si le processus de nomination compromettra ou non l'indépendance des futurs sénateurs.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, nous...

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous m'enlevez la parole, vous allez éliminer la seule possibilité qui s'offre à nous d'obtenir des réponses à ces questions cruciales. On parle ici de l'indépendance d'une entité du Parlement du Canada. Cette question mérite certainement de faire l'objet d'une discussion.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid...

M. Arnold Chan:

J'aimerais intervenir sur le même rappel au Règlement...

Le président:

Bon, il n'y aura pas d'autres rappels au Règlement. Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Christopherson. Le Comité a perdu beaucoup de temps. Si des membres souhaitent discuter du processus, le Comité pourra ajouter cette question à la liste de ses travaux, mais la présente réunion ne porte pas là-dessus.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Parfait. Merci, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, je vous remercie sincèrement de nous consacrer du temps aujourd'hui. J'espère que nous pourrons bientôt nous adresser à vous.

Je n'ai pas grand-chose à dire au sujet des compétences. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que le document est éloquent. La seule chose qui m'a frappé lorsque vous avez parlé de vos antécédents, c'est que vous avez dit que vous estimiez vraiment avoir besoin d'un doctorat, et que par conséquent, vous avez repris les études et l'avez obtenu, comme si c'était aussi simple qu'acheter une pelle au Canadian Tire. C'est impressionnant. Pour moi, qui n'a qu'une 9e année, cela en dit beaucoup sur vos compétences.

La question des compétences nous amène à aborder d'autres aspects. Cela dit, monsieur le président, avant que je commence à poser des questions sur les compétences, permettez-moi de souligner que la petite escarmouche qui vient d'avoir lieu entre M. Reid et vous, dès le départ, me semble être l'exemple qui illustre parfaitement l'impossibilité de réaliser la quadrature du cercle quand il est question de nominations et de démocratie. Quelle que soit la partie du processus que nous analysons, il y aura toujours quelque chose qui cloche, car c'est un concept qui ne fonctionne pas. C'est un concept qui ne cadre pas avec la démocratie.

Cela dit, puisque nous n'avons pas d'autre choix — ce qui est déplorable, car nous aurions pu faire preuve de bon sens à cet égard —, j'aimerais que vous me disiez, madame, ce que vous pensez des critères que vous utilisez.

Vous, madame, qui avez été nommée par le premier ministre, devez remplacer les Canadiens et jouer le rôle qu'ils jouent pendant les élections, soit faire une évaluation qui repose sur le mérite, bien souvent sur le pas d'une porte, au téléphone ou à la suite d'un échange de courriels. Nous répétons la même chose à des milliers de reprises, parce que nous essayons de convaincre les gens que nous possédons les compétences qu'ils recherchent. Ce processus se termine lorsque les élections ont lieu, et aussi difficile cela soit-il, les résultats sont généralement très clairs. Les Canadiens décident qui a les compétences voulues et qui ne les a pas. La beauté de ce système, c'est que si les Canadiens se trompent, si les électeurs d'une circonscription estiment qu'ils se sont trompés, ils ont l'occasion de changer les choses aux prochaines élections.

Or, ce n'est pas ce qui se passe ici. Lorsqu'un sénateur est nommé, il occupe son poste jusqu'à l'âge de 75 ans, c'est tout. Je me demande quel est le processus que vous envisagez pour ces nominations, et quels sont les talents, l'expérience et la formation que vous recherchez et qui, à votre avis, feront en sorte que les personnes choisies seront de parfaits législateurs pour les Canadiens. Le but n'est pas seulement d'offrir à ces gens une belle cage dorée dans la Chambre rouge; la réalité, c'est que les sénateurs doivent aussi légiférer. En fait, leur vote compte plus que le nôtre, car ils sont moins nombreux.

Quelles sont les compétences que vous recherchez lorsque vous essayez de remplacer les Canadiens et le processus qu'ils mènent chez eux? Quelles sont les compétences que vous recherchez lorsque vous essayez de choisir une personne que les Canadiens considéreraient comme le parfait législateur?

(1130)

Le président:

Madame Labelle, vous avez la parole.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Merci.

Je dois vous dire que j'ai eu beaucoup d'employés qui avaient arrêté leurs études après la 9e année, et ils se débrouillaient beaucoup mieux que moi, car ils avaient acquis leur expérience grâce à leur cheminement personnel.

En ce qui concerne les critères, il y a ceux qui figurent déjà dans la Constitution, soit l'âge, le lieu de résidence, la propriété...

M. David Christopherson:

En réalité, ce n'est rien d'autre qu'un point de départ.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Oui.

Nous avons aussi d'autres critères, qui sont publics. Premièrement, les personnes choisies devront posséder un sens de l'éthique solidement ancré, de vastes connaissances et beaucoup d'expérience. Il serait souhaitable qu'elles soient familières avec les institutions de notre pays. Nous souhaitons en outre que ces personnes représentent la diversité, que ce soient tantôt des femmes, tantôt des hommes. Nous recherchons la diversité culturelle, linguistique et professionnelle. Nous voudrions ne pas toujours recommander la nomination de représentants des mêmes professions. La liste des critères se poursuit encore, mais je viens de vous donner un bon exemple de ceux que nous appliquerons.

Nous voulons également nommer des personnes qui sont prêtes à oeuvrer au Sénat de manière non partisane. C'est une partie du mandat qui nous est donné. C'est le genre de personnes que nous allons rechercher. Nous espérons qu'elles compteront parmi les figures de proue de leur domaine et qu'elles se seront distinguées par leurs services rendus à la population.

Nous avons une liste assez longue de critères publics qui sont connus de tous ceux qui souhaitent que leur candidature soit considérée.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Compte tenu de l'absence de mécanisme de reddition de comptes inhérent à la fonction de sénateur, alors que les médias ne font que commencer à poser aux sénateurs le genre de questions qu'ils nous posent quotidiennement — ce qui crée maintenant une certaine obligation de rendre des comptes —, quelles qualités indiqueront, selon vous, qu'un candidat à un poste de sénateur sera conscient de sa responsabilité de rendre des comptes à la population? Je veux dire qu'il est difficile d'imaginer une meilleure loterie. En plus d'un chèque de paye jusqu'à l'âge de 75 ans et d'une pension par la suite, les gagnants du prix peuvent adopter les lois d'un pays du G7. C'est quand même formidable, n'est-ce pas? Quelles qualités rechercherez-vous, parmi les éventuels sénateurs, pour vous assurer qu'ils sont conscients de leur obligation morale de rendre des comptes? Il n'y a pas de mécanisme d'intégré aux structures. Quel trait de personnalité vous indiquera que le candidat est réceptif à l'idée de rendre des comptes? Croyez-vous qu'il faille y prêter attention?

Si je pose la question, c'est que vous avez mentionné des critères, mais pas celui-là.

(1135)

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Merci beaucoup.

Je pense que c'est une qualité très importante. On peut l'observer dans les réalisations d'une personne et dans les chemins qu'elle a empruntés. Il faut voir comment la personne s'est acquittée de ses responsabilités dans le passé. Ce ne sont pas tant les paroles, mais bien les gestes qui comptent. Ce qu'une personne a réalisé, sa manière de s'acquitter de ses responsabilités et les moyens qu'elle a pris pour rendre effectivement des comptes dans ses postes précédents constituent des preuves éloquentes du degré auquel une personne possède cette qualité.

Le président:

Merci.

Je suis désolé. Il ne vous reste plus de temps.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. M. Christopherson a posé plusieurs questions sur la façon dont Mme Labelle s'acquitte de son rôle de présidente du comité consultatif, et c'est précisément cet aspect que j'essayais d'aborder.

Il a eu le droit de poser des questions à ce sujet, mais moi, non. J'ai accepté qu'il continue de poser des questions, mais il n'en demeure pas moins que si vous avez jugé que mes questions étaient irrecevables, vous auriez dû juger que les siennes étaient elles aussi irrecevables. Il n'a pas posé une seule question à Mme Labelle sur les compétences qu'elle possède. Par conséquent, il est évident que vous estimez qu'il est approprié de lui poser des questions sur la façon dont elle se conduira et sur la façon dont elle perçoit son mandat, et c'est précisément le genre de questions que je voulais poser.

Par conséquent, je suppose que si les députés conservateurs décident maintenant de poser les mêmes questions, vous les jugerez recevables, et que si les libéraux ne se sont pas opposés aux questions de M. Christopherson, ils ne verront pas d'inconvénient à ce que les conservateurs posent eux aussi les mêmes questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Reid. Si vous voulez utiliser tout le temps dont le Comité dispose, le témoin n'aura pas le temps de répondre à des questions.

Si les membres du Comité sont d'accord, puisque les conservateurs n'ont pas encore eu le temps de poser des questions sur les compétences, je vais devancer le tour de M. Richards, qui dispose de cinq minutes, et ensuite, les libéraux pourront poser deux séries de questions. Ils auront ainsi l'occasion de poser quelques questions portant sur le sujet de la réunion d'aujourd'hui.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Madame Labelle, je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui. En ce qui concerne le processus, je crois que les Canadiens sont très préoccupés, car beaucoup de renseignements ne leur seront pas communiqués. M. Reid a lui aussi soulevé aujourd'hui certains enjeux qui le préoccupent.

Les recommandations que vous formulerez au premier ministre ne seront jamais dévoilées au public, et personne ne saura jamais si ce dernier se sert ou non de la liste que vous lui fournissez; c'est donc dire que le secret entoure ce processus. Ce sont des aspects qui inquiètent de nombreux Canadiens, et donc, nous sommes très heureux que vous soyez ici aujourd'hui, car ces derniers pourront au moins savoir qui sont les personnes nommées à ce comité consultatif et être en mesure de leur accorder leur confiance.

Les renseignements dont nous disposons aujourd'hui indiquent que dans le cadre du processus de transition, le comité consultatif entreprendra des consultations avec certains groupes, et certains d'entre eux sont nommés. J'aimerais que vous me parliez de votre expérience en ce qui concerne la tenue de consultations de ce type.

De toute évidence, une foule de questions sont soulevées à propos de ces consultations. Comment seront-elles entreprises? Est-ce qu'on s'adressera directement à certains groupes, ou est-ce que les groupes qui le souhaitent pourront manifester leur intérêt? Sur quels critères se fondera-t-on pour choisir ces groupes? Comment le comité consultatif interagira-t-il avec ces groupes? Est-ce que le nom des groupes sera dévoilé publiquement pour que les gens puissent savoir qui ils sont? Je me demande si vous pourriez nous expliquer un peu comment ce processus et ces consultations seront menés et si le nom des groupes sera dévoilé publiquement. Nous pourrons ainsi mieux apprécier votre expérience concernant la tenue de consultations similaires.

Le président:

Madame Labelle, vous pouvez lui expliquer en quoi vous possédez les compétences nécessaires pour entreprendre ce processus.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, ai-je bien compris que le témoin n'aura pas le droit de répondre aux questions que j'ai posées sur le déroulement du processus?

C'est important, car si nous ne savons pas quelle forme prendra le processus de consultation et quel type de consultations seront menées, et si nous ne savons si le nom de ces groupes sera dévoilé publiquement, entre autres, nous ne pourrons pas déterminer si le témoin possède les compétences requises pour entreprendre ces processus. Si nous ne connaissons pas la description d'un emploi, nous ne pouvons pas déterminer si une personne peut s'acquitter des responsabilités qui y sont associées.

Le président:

Le témoin peut répondre à sa convenance, mais elle sait qu'elle n'est pas obligée de répondre aux questions qui ne sont pas liées à ses compétences et à sa capacité de s'acquitter des responsabilités associées à ce poste. Madame, s'il vous plaît, allez-y.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Monsieur le président, je serai brève. Premièrement, nous allons créer un site Web pour que tous les Canadiens puissent avoir accès aux renseignements. Deuxièmement, nous n'avons ménagé aucun effort; nous avons publié des communiqués et des avis aux médias pour que de plus en plus de Canadiens et d'organisations puissent comprendre le processus et, nous l'espérons, faire des recommandations et poser leur candidature.

En ce qui concerne les organisations — c'était votre question —, nous nous adressons à un très grand nombre d'organisations partout au pays. C'est ce que nous faisons à l'heure actuelle; nous communiquons avec des entreprises, des organisations syndicales, des organisations non gouvernementales, des organisations du secteur des arts et de la culture et des organismes de développement. Je pourrais continuer longtemps, car la liste est très longue. Il y a aussi les organismes juridiques et les organismes d'emploi, entre autres. Nous nous adressons à un très grand nombre d'organisations en ce moment, et nous poursuivrons nos efforts en ce sens.

Ils feront rapport...

(1140)

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais le président m'indique qu'il ne me reste plus beaucoup de temps, et il y a autre chose...

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je suis désolée. Je tiens simplement à dire que nous présenterons régulièrement des rapports, et je suppose que ceux-ci seront rendus publics.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je crois qu'il est évident aujourd'hui que certaines questions qui ont été posées par M. Reid, des questions fort importantes, ont été jugées irrecevables. Certaines des questions que je pose, des questions qui, à mon avis, sont essentielles pour nous permettre d'évaluer les compétences, sont jugées irrecevables.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais proposer une motion. Étant donné que le Comité a demandé à la présidente du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations du Sénat de comparaître devant lui pour qu'il puisse examiner ses compétences et déterminer si elle est en mesure de s'acquitter des responsabilités qui lui sont confiées dans le cadre de ce poste, auquel elle a été nommée conformément aux articles 110 et 111 du Règlement, et étant donné que le processus complet n'a pas encore été entrepris ou rendu public, comment le Comité doit-il procéder pour poser des questions au témoin?

Par conséquent, je propose la motion suivante:

Que le comité invite la ministre des Institutions démocratiques à comparaître devant lui pour répondre à des questions portant sur le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat.

Nous pourrons ainsi mieux comprendre le processus et évaluer comme il se doit les compétences des personnes qui siègent à ce comité consultatif. J'aimerais qu'on demande à la greffière d'inviter la ministre des Institutions démocratiques à comparaître devant le Comité pour répondre à ces questions afin que nous puissions nous acquitter comme il se doit des tâches qui nous ont été confiées.

Le président:

D'accord, monsieur Richards, lorsque nous passerons aux affaires du Comité, plus tard, nous... Nous n'allons pas empiéter sur le temps réservé au témoin pour le moment.

Madame Vandenbeld, vous avez la parole.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup, madame Labelle, d'avoir pris le temps de venir témoigner devant nous aujourd'hui.

J'ai examiné votre curriculum vitae, et c'est très impressionnant. Vous détenez 13 grades honorifiques. Vous avez fait partie de plusieurs comités consultatifs et vous avez présidé plusieurs organismes, y compris l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé, les Nations unies et Transparency International. À cela s'ajoute tout votre travail de lutte contre la corruption. Je pense que c'est très impressionnant. Je voudrais souligner également que vous avez présidé le conseil d'administration du Collège algonquin, qui se trouve dans ma circonscription, Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, ainsi que le conseil d'administration de Centraide d'Ottawa-Carleton, qui fait beaucoup de bon travail dans ma circonscription. Je vous remercie pour vos contributions extraordinaires.

Le poste que vous allez occuper nécessite un bon jugement, car vous devrez examiner des candidatures pour recommander des nominations selon le mérite de la personne, en toute indépendance. Si vous permettez, je voudrais passer en revue les qualités et l'expérience que vous possédez et qui vous permettront de vous acquitter avec compétence des tâches qui vous incomberont.

Je remarque que vous connaissez manifestement très bien les affaires de l'État. Vous avez été sous-greffière du Conseil privé et sous-ministre. Vous avez fait partie du conseil d'administration du Centre international des droits de la personne et du développement démocratique, qui a fait de l'excellent travail jusqu'au jour où il a été démantelé. Votre conseil d'administration a très efficacement piloté le centre pour faire la promotion des pratiques exemplaires et de la saine gouvernance à l'échelle internationale. De plus, le travail de lutte anticorruption que vous avez fait témoigne de votre compréhension de la démocratie et de la gouvernance.

Pourriez-vous nous dire un peu comment vous comptez mettre à profit vos qualités, votre expérience et votre expertise pour accomplir les tâches que nous avons décidé de vous confier?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Merci beaucoup.

Premièrement, vous avez parlé de mon poste de sous-greffière du Conseil privé. La personne qui occupe ce poste doit évidemment collaborer très étroitement avec les comités parlementaires, puisque, compte tenu de la sphère de responsabilités du greffier, elle doit aider le secrétaire du Cabinet en ce qui concerne les comités. J'ai pu ainsi me faire une bonne idée du fonctionnement de l'État dans son ensemble et voir de près les institutions qui composent le Parlement, y compris la mécanique sous-jacente.

Mon travail à l'ONU se poursuit depuis de nombreuses années, mais mon apport récent a consisté, au cours des six dernières années, à faire partie du conseil d'administration du Pacte mondial de l'ONU, qui est présidé par le secrétaire général et qui s'efforce de promouvoir 10 principes en collaborant avec les États, les entreprises et diverses organisations. Ces principes portent sur les thèmes des droits de la personne, des normes du travail et du développement. Le dixième principe concerne la lutte contre la corruption.

Je travaille encore sur un volet avec le personnel du Pacte mondial de l'ONU: le cadre de promotion de l'état de droit parmi les entreprises, afin de les persuader, partout dans le monde, de ne pas se contenter du strict minimum de conformité, mais d'être à l'avant-garde de l'établissement de l'état de droit. Elles doivent être prêtes à en faire valoir l'importance auprès des gouvernements qui accusent du retard sur ce plan et elles doivent les aider autant que possible. C'est un volet dont je m'occupe.

En outre, lorsqu'on fait partie des dirigeants d'une organisation, il faut évidemment s'occuper de la faire fonctionner, et c'est ce que j'ai dû faire à maintes reprises non seulement avec Transparency International, mais également avec d'autres organisations au Canada et à l'étranger. Je pense en avoir tiré des enseignements très utiles.

Pour ce qui est des lois de notre pays, lorsque j'ai travaillé au Conseil privé et lorsque j'ai oeuvré au sein de diverses organisations, j'ai pu mesurer l'importance de la législation protégeant les renseignements personnels des gens.

(1145)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'est merveilleux.

Je vois aussi que vous êtes Compagnon de l'Ordre du Canada et que vous avez été décorée de l'Ordre de l'Ontario. Vous avez fait partie du Conseil consultatif de l'Ordre de l'Ontario, où vous avez dû sélectionner des lauréats selon les qualités et le mérite des candidats. Vous avez dû puiser les candidatures dans un vaste bassin de personnes ayant diverses expériences professionnelles.

Pourriez-vous nous en parler un peu?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Oui, merci.

Permettez-moi d'ajouter une dimension à votre question. Lorsque j'étais sous-ministre du Secrétariat d'État, qui est aujourd'hui le ministère du Patrimoine, je siégeais d'office au sein du comité consultatif pour la sélection des lauréats de l'Ordre du Canada. J'ai fait partie de ce comité pendant cinq ans. Ce que j'ai appris en participant à ces deux organes de sélection est très important.

En outre, je préside actuellement un comité qui sélectionne des jeunes gens dans des pays en voie de développement pour qu'ils fassent des études de maîtrise dans le domaine de l'exploitation des énergies renouvelables, de manière à ce qu'une fois de retour dans leur pays, ils puissent s'occuper de ce grand enjeu dans leur sphère d'activité.

Lorsqu'un comité doit sélectionner des personnes, il commence par recueillir la plus grande quantité possible d'information sur elles, de telle sorte qu'il puisse bien faire son travail de sélection. La composition de notre comité consultatif est excellente. Nous pouvons compter sur Indira Samarasekera, ancienne présidente de l'Université de l'Alberta, chercheuse scientifique et ingénieure. Nous pouvons également compter sur Daniel Jutras, qui est le doyen de la Faculté de droit de l'Université McGill. Lui aussi affiche un parcours professionnel remarquable. À ces personnes s'ajoutent deux membres provenant de chacune des trois provinces pour lesquelles il y a présentement des postes à pourvoir au Sénat. La sagesse du comité ne lui viendra donc pas d'une seule personne. Chaque membre du comité choisira, parmi les candidatures qui auront été portées à notre connaissance, les personnes qu'il jugera les plus aptes à remplir les fonctions de sénateur et dont nous devrions recommander la nomination.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, mes collègues d'en face semblent s'intéresser davantage aux modalités qu'aux qualités phénoménales de la candidate qui nous est présentée.

Je voudrais faire ressortir davantage ces qualités de la candidate en lui demandant de se prononcer sur le contexte dans lequel elle devra jouer son futur rôle.

Madame Labelle, comment voyez-vous le rôle historique du Sénat, à titre de Chambre de second examen objectif?

(1150)

Le président:

La question ne porte pas sur vos qualités. Je tiens à vous le préciser conformément au Règlement. Vous pouvez faire un lien avec vos qualités ou vous pouvez répondre autre chose, mais vous n'êtes pas obligée de répondre.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je dirais qu'à titre de sous-ministre, j'ai dû évidemment comparaître devant des comités des Communes, mais également devant des comités du Sénat. J'ai pu voir les sénateurs à l'oeuvre, dans leur étude des projets de loi. Parfois, ils ont été capables de cerner des éléments particuliers d'un projet de loi qui nécessitait des amendements. Ils ont amélioré le projet de loi en fin de compte. C'est ainsi que j'ai pu être témoin du travail responsable du Sénat.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bien. La question avait un lien avec vos qualités puisque votre expérience antérieure au Sénat vous permet de savoir quel genre de personnes aurait le physique de l'emploi. Vous avez l'expérience nécessaire pour faire preuve d'un bon jugement dans les fonctions qui vous attendent. Je pense que c'était le but de ma question.

Par ailleurs, au cours de votre carrière, vous avez dû garder beaucoup de secrets, et je crois que, lorsqu'on a choisi une personne pour occuper un poste, il ne faut pas dévoiler les noms des candidats qui n'ont pas été retenus. Ce n'est bon ni pour eux ni pour les gens qui font le choix. Pourriez-vous nous parler de l'expérience que vous avez acquise, dans les échelons supérieurs de l'État, pour ce qui est de garder des secrets.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Il faut se soucier du danger de conflit d'intérêts et songer au décret qui doit être adopté. L'information qui ne doit pas en faire partie ne doit pas être divulguée. Je crois que c'est au moyen d'instruments de ce genre que l'on apprend à ne pas divulguer de l'information, soit à cause de la législation protégeant la vie privée, soit pour une autre raison.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois que vous comprenez très clairement la nécessité de maintenir la confidentialité des candidatures.

Je regarde votre curriculum vitae et j'y vois deux mots qui me font sourire au bas complètement. Il est écrit « janvier 2016 ». Je demande de quoi avait l'air l'édition du mois précédent.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Lorsque vous avez commencé à travailler, dans votre jeunesse, quels objectifs de carrière aviez-vous? Espériez-vous pouvoir un jour compter parmi les personnes qui guident notre pays?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

J'ai commencé ma carrière dans l'administration fédérale à Santé Canada, puis j'ai travaillé au ministère des Affaires indiennes et du Nord canadien. J'ai pu découvrir le reste du Canada. J'ai fait la découverte de notre pays et de son peuple. J'ai appris à les connaître davantage. C'est ce qui m'a motivé à poursuivre aussi longtemps ma carrière de fonctionnaire. Lorsque je suis partie, j'aurais pu demeurer sous-ministre, mais cela faisait 19 ans que j'occupais le même poste, et je me suis dit qu'il était temps de laisser la place à d'autres. Je voulais également faire profiter mon pays et la communauté internationale de mes compétences.

Vous constaterez que, dans la plupart des cas, mon travail a été bénévole. Je n'étais pas payée, et c'était parfait ainsi. J'ai pris cette décision en toute connaissance de cause. J'ai eu par ailleurs l'occasion de voir du pays, vu les responsabilités qui m'incombaient dans divers ministères. Avant d'être sous-ministre, j'ai travaillé à Santé Canada et au ministère des Affaires indiennes et du Nord canadien. Parallèlement, j'ai fait beaucoup de bénévolat à l'étranger et au Canada.

C'est un choix personnel que j'ai fait, mais je pense que beaucoup d'autres Canadiens ont fait de même. Je crois que nous pouvons apporter quelque chose à notre pays dans tous les domaines d'activité, que ce soit dans le monde des affaires, en tant que député au Parlement ou au sein d'une organisation non gouvernementale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste 20 secondes.

Je constate que, parmi votre longue série de grades honorifiques, certains vous ont été décernés à l'étranger. Je voulais vous demander de nous parler de votre expérience internationale, mais je crois qu'il ne nous reste plus de temps. Dites-nous simplement un peu ce que vous avez fait à l'étranger.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Au sujet des pays...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce que vous avez fait à l'extérieur du Canada. Nous y reviendrons plus tard.

(1155)

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais vous devrez répondre à cette question plus tard.

Monsieur Reid, je vous cède la parole pour cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question fait suite aux questions de M. Christopherson sur le traitement que vous sauriez réserver à l'information confidentielle ou secrète, vu votre rôle antérieur au sein de Transparency International. Elle fait suite également à la question de M. Graham sur l'utilité de votre expérience de fonctionnaire dans le traitement de l'information confidentielle.

Une fois remplis par les organismes lors de la première étape, les formulaires de mise en candidature des sénateurs devront être considérés comme des documents ayant la cote « protégé B ». Considérez-vous que cette cote vous empêchera de révéler non seulement le contenu du formulaire, mais également l'identité de l'organisme ayant parrainé la candidature d'une personne, une fois que cette personne aura été choisie par le premier ministre et nommée au Sénat? L'information sur l'organisme devrait-elle être protégée et ne pas être révélée une fois la sélection terminée?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je pense qu'il serait possible de faire connaître largement les noms des organismes qui ont été consultés. Cependant, il me semble qu'en liant le nom d'un organisme à une candidature, on violerait les règles de confidentialité puisqu'il faudrait forcément nommer la personne.

C'est l'une des questions sur lesquelles notre comité devra se pencher dès que la première étape sera terminée et que nous en serons à préparer notre rapport. Nous devrons déterminer ce qu'il convient le mieux d'inclure dans notre rapport. Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, nous effectuons une consultation très large à l'heure actuelle. Plus nous étendrons notre consultation, plus nous avons des chances de trouver des candidats remarquables.

M. Scott Reid:

Je parle seulement de la première étape, au cours de laquelle je suppose que vous ne faites pas de consultation. J'ai peut-être tort, mais je tiens pour acquis que vous ne procédez à aucune consultation tant que les organismes ne vous ont pas envoyé leurs candidatures. Vous n'en êtes pas encore au stade de la consultation. Je ne parle pas de ce qui se produit après la première étape. Ai-je raison de dire que, lors de la première étape, vous devez simplement attendre que les candidatures vous soient soumises, puis vous devez déterminer quelles sont les personnes ayant présenté leur candidature et ayant aussi été proposées comme candidat par un organisme?

Le président:

Oui, madame Sahota?

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement, car je crois que nous avons été plus qu'équitables. Une bonne partie des questions ont porté sur le processus, et celle-là ne porte sur rien d'autre que le processus. Elle n'a rien à voir avec les compétences ou l'expérience de Mme Labelle.

Le président:

Madame Labelle, avez-vous quelque chose à dire au sujet des compétences vous permettant de traiter de l'information protégée?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

J'imagine que c'est comme à l'époque où je faisais partie du Conseil privé ou que j'étais sous-ministre. Nous devions respecter la loi, mais les individus aussi. Dans ce contexte, les renseignements personnels sont personnels, ce qui veut dire, selon la loi telle qu'elle est écrite actuellement, qu'ils doivent être protégés.

M. Scott Reid:

Selon l'expérience que vous avez des questions liées aux conflits d'intérêts, comment allez-vous déterminer si une personne a effectivement sollicité un organisme pour qu'il l'appuie ou si elle a plutôt été choisie par ce même organisme parce qu'il estime qu'elle est la mieux placée pour représenter ses intérêts au Sénat? Car ce problème entrerait en contradiction directe avec l'injonction constitutionnelle voulant que les sénateurs soient indépendants. Comment allez-vous faire?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Si vous regardez notre site Web, vous constaterez que les candidatures ne sont pas appuyées que par des organismes; chacune d'elles doit être accompagnée de trois lettres de référence distinctes. Voilà qui, à mes yeux, nous permet de mieux apprécier l'apport potentiel de chaque candidat et nous donne une meilleure perspective quant à ses acquis et compétences. Au départ, les candidatures sont présentées par un organisme, mais les lettres de référence font aussi partie du processus.

Le président:

Il vous reste 50 secondes, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Je ne suis pas sûr d'avoir bien saisi. Êtes-vous en train de dire que vous pouvez vous adresser à un candidat et lui demander, sous prétexte que le contenu de son dossier de candidature a piqué votre intérêt, de vous fournir des renseignements supplémentaires parce que l'information dont vous disposez n'est pas suffisante et que vous aimeriez en savoir plus, ou est-ce plutôt que toute l'information pertinente doit vous parvenir d'un seul coup et avant midi le 15 février?

Je parle de la première phase du processus.

(1200)

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Évidemment.

Le président:

Vous n'êtes pas obligée de répondre aux questions portant sur le processus, mais vous pouvez répondre si vous le voulez.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je le répète, monsieur le président: l'information sur les candidats n'a pas à nous être acheminée d'un seul coup, tant qu'elle nous est communiquée avant la date butoir établie. On peut très bien recevoir la recommandation et la lettre en premier, puis les lettres de référence par la suite. Tout n'est pas obligé de nous être envoyé dans un seul paquet, tant que le délai est respecté.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

À vous la parole, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais juste que vous confirmiez de combien de temps je dispose, car je vois qu'il est passé midi.

Le président:

Nous avons commencé en retard, ce qui veut dire que vous avez droit à cinq minutes. Espérons que nous pourrons ensuite entendre M. Christopherson.

M. Arnold Chan:

Excellent. Merci, monsieur le président, c'est très gentil.

Comme mes collègues libéraux, j'aimerais d'abord vous remercier d'avoir accepté de comparaître à si bref préavis. Nous sommes tous rudement impressionnés par l'incroyable... Je veux dire, j'avais à peine lu le premier paragraphe que je me demandais déjà ce que j'avais bien pu faire de ma vie.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Arnold Chan: Comme vous, j'ai obtenu mon quatrième diplôme à l'âge de 40 ans. Je suis de ceux qui croient que l'apprentissage est un processus qui s'étend sur toute une vie. Je me réjouis de voir qu'on pousse les jeunes à intégrer l'apprentissage à leur cheminement de carrière.

Madame Labelle, l'information ne ressortait pas clairement à la lecture de votre curriculum vitae, alors j'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus sur votre expérience concernant les institutions et les parlements bicaméraux. Bon, on connaît tous votre expérience en lien avec le Parlement du Canada, c'est-à-dire avec la Chambre des communes et le Sénat. Mais votre expérience s'étend-elle à d'autres institutions du genre? Avez-vous vécu des choses, pendant que vous travailliez à l'étranger, qui pourraient vous aider à jouer votre rôle et renforcer vos compétences au sein du comité consultatif?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je vous remercie.

C'est surtout lorsque j'étais à la présidence de l'ACDI que j'ai pu m'intéresser à ce qui se faisait ailleurs, parce que nous étions présents dans plus d'une centaine de pays. Pas toutes les demandes avaient trait au Parlement local, mais il y en avait quand même pas mal, et il arrivait parfois que les gens devaient trouver le moyen de rebâtir une institution devenue complètement dysfonctionnelle. Il arrivait même qu'ils soient obligés de repartir à zéro ou presque.

Un grand nombre de pays se demandent encore si leur Parlement ne pourrait pas être plus efficace qu'il ne l'est à l'heure actuelle. Je pense entre autres à Haïti et à divers autres États qui sont proches de la déroute ou qui sont en tout cas très fragiles. Ils ont travaillé fort, mais d'une certaine façon...

C'est l'un des aspects de notre expérience qui intéressaient les gens. Et nous pouvions toujours les jumeler à un certain nombre de pays fonctionnant selon un système bicaméral, parce que c'est ce qu'ils recherchaient.

De plus, mon passage à l'OCDE et à la Commission européenne, surtout les dernières années, m'a permis de constater qu'un certain nombre de pays ayant une infrastructure parlementaire similaire à la nôtre se posaient eux aussi pas mal de questions.

Sans aller jusqu'à dire qu'ils en faisaient une fixation, ils cherchaient le meilleur moyen d'assurer l'avenir de leur Parlement. Certains, dont le régime n'était pas bicaméral, croyaient que c'était la voie qu'ils devraient suivre.

C'est tout ce que je peux dire là-dessus pour le moment, même si j'ajouterais que cette expérience internationale m'a été très utile. Un certain nombre de pays du G7 ou du G8 ont un système bicaméral, comme vous le savez aussi bien que moi.

(1205)

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci, madame.

Combien me reste-t-il de temps? Environ une minute?

Le président:

Une minute, oui.

M. Arnold Chan:

Brièvement, alors: dans le cadre de cet examen, que ce soit à l'OCDE ou ailleurs, avez-vous déjà vu une situation semblable à celle du Canada, où les membres de l'une des Chambres du Parlement sont élus et que ceux de l'autre Chambre sont nommés? Si oui, quelle était leur légitimité démocratique, selon vous, notamment dans les pays que vous venez juste de décrire?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je ne crois pas pouvoir affirmer... Que l'on regarde l'Allemagne, les États-Unis, l'Australie ou la France, ils ont tous des échéanciers très différents, comme vous le savez, qu'il s'agisse de leurs acquis ou des objectifs qu'ils poursuivent actuellement. Le Parlement britannique est celui qui m'est le plus familier. Nous nous sommes intéressés au sort réservé à la Chambre des lords, alors c'est celle que je connais le mieux.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons terminer avec M. Christopherson, qui disposera de trois minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous sais gré, monsieur le président, de faire des efforts pour que nous puissions nous rendre au bout des séries de questions.

Madame Labelle, j'aimerais revenir sur la question des compétences et sur ce que sera votre réflexion lorsque vous aurez à choisir parmi tous ces gens. Je crois comprendre que les candidats devront être recommandés par un organisme. Je n'en suis pas totalement sûr, mais qu'arriverait-il si une personne trouvait le moyen que son nom se retrouve sur la liste de manière unilatérale? Vous demandez-vous parfois, quand vous pensez à tout cela, qu'il se pourrait qu'un groupe d'élites — un terme qui s'applique à tout le monde ici présent — propose des candidats qui feraient eux aussi partie de l'élite, ce qui veut dire qu'on se retrouverait avec encore plus d'élites? Je pose la question parce que je viens de la classe ouvrière. Même si je suis en politique depuis plus de 30 ans, je suis le même gars de la classe ouvrière. Si on vous présentait mon curriculum vitae d'avant mon entrée en politique, vous ne prendriez même pas le temps de le lire, encore moins de l'étudier.

Voici ce qui me tracasse, donc: comment allez-vous choisir des candidats dont le dossier aurait pu ne jamais se retrouver devant vous? Prenons l'exemple de la démocratie: les gens comme moi peuvent espérer se faire élire, parce que les électeurs recherchent certains traits de caractère chez les législateurs. Mais beaucoup d'autres facteurs entrent en ligne de compte. Je sais qu'il y a beaucoup d'avocats et de médecins, et c'est très bien ainsi, mais personnellement, je veux qu'un candidat sache ce que c'est que de se lever tous les jours et d'avoir à gagner sa croûte à la sueur de son front.

J'essaie de voir comment nous pourrions éviter de perpétuer l'image voulant que le Sénat est rempli d'élites qui ne sont là que parce qu'ils connaissent quelqu'un qui a de l'influence, et en quoi le nouveau processus et le fruit de vos réflexions, à vous et à vos collègues, va y changer quoi que ce soit. Pouvez-vous m'aider à comprendre comment, à votre avis, cela peut être possible?

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute pour répondre.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Merci, monsieur.

Je crois qu'on parle ici de la première phase, qui donnera lieu à cinq nominations. Par la suite, lorsque les choses commenceront à se tasser, les gens poseront eux-mêmes leur candidature. À mon sens, cela devrait nous donner le choix parmi un vaste éventail de gens, et espérons que cela renforcera aussi nos capacités. Comme je le disais plus tôt, la diversité doit primer sur tout le reste.

M. David Christopherson:

Sauf que c'est vous et vos collègues qui allez la définir, cette diversité. La vision que les Canadiens ont de la diversité ne sera pas prise en compte. Ne craignez-vous pas que ce problème ne se reflète au Sénat, quand on sait tout le mal qu'on a eu jusqu'ici?

Mme Huguette Labelle:

J'espère que nous pourrons prouver que, lorsqu'il est question de diversité, cela suppose aussi des candidats de tous les horizons et des gens...

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, mais c'est vous qui allez décider quel est l'équilibre à atteindre. C'est vous qui allez décider à quoi ressemble la diversité canadienne. Votre petit groupe va se substituer à la réflexion de la population canadienne. Comment peut-on espérer qu'un tel processus puisse faire en sorte que la composition du Sénat reflète la volonté des Canadiens?

Le président:

C'est votre dernière chance: il vous reste 10 secondes.

Mme Huguette Labelle:

Je crois que les gens vont finir par le constater eux-mêmes. Je peux seulement espérer que nous réussirons à montrer aux gens que nous sommes capables de recommander des candidatures répondant à l'impératif de diversité du Sénat. J'imagine que c'est seulement lorsque les nominations seront annoncées et que le premier ministre fera ses recommandations au gouverneur général que vous serez à même de juger si nous avons fait notre travail comme vous le dites.

(1210)

Le président:

Merci...

M. David Christopherson:

Vous êtes mieux de ne pas vous tromper, parce qu'après, il n'y aura plus moyen de se débarrasser d'eux.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci encore, madame Labelle, d'avoir accepté notre invitation à si court préavis et d'être restée un peu après midi...

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais que le témoin entende ce qui suit avant que vous ne la laissiez partir. Il s'agit d'une très brève motion. Nous pourrons nous prononcer plus tard, mais j'aimerais qu'elle m'entende la proposer.

Je propose: Que la personne nommée pour le poste de présidente du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations du Sénat, Huguette Labelle, soit réputée qualifiée et compétente pour exécuter les fonctions du poste.

Mme Sahota accepte de me donner son appui.

Le président:

La motion est recevable; nous y reviendrons à la reprise de la séance. Nous passerons ensuite au rapport de la Bibliothèque du Parlement.

(1210)

(1220)

Le président:

Merci, et merci aussi à notre analyste de la bibliothèque pour son rapport. Nous sommes impatients d'entendre ce qu'il a à dire.

Comme il ne s'agit pas d'un témoin à proprement parler, nous allons procéder de manière très informelle et lui poserons nos questions pendant qu'il parle...

M. David Christopherson:

Je m'excuse de vous interrompre, monsieur le président. Je ne suis pas certain de savoir où nous en sommes. Une motion a été proposée, mais le sujet n'a pas été abordé de nouveau, et nous voilà déjà au prochain point de l'ordre du jour. Je voudrais juste comprendre.

Le président:

Il y a un certain nombre d'éléments sous la rubrique « affaires du comité ». Nous y reviendrons, ainsi qu'aux motions, après avoir étudié le rapport.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous parlez du rapport. Pardon, mais je croyais que l'analyste devait présenter son rapport à la deuxième partie de la séance.

Le président:

C'est exact.

M. David Christopherson:

Mais nous ne sommes pas encore rendus là. Nous en sommes encore à la première partie.

Autrement dit, nous avons entendu le témoin, puis une motion a été proposée, et la séance a été interrompue. Sommes-nous à huis clos, présentement?

Le président:

Non.

M. David Christopherson:

La séance est publique? Oui, nous siégeons encore en public. C'est ce que je pensais.

Vous avez suspendu la séance un bref instant, le témoin nous a quittés, et il me semble que nous devrions maintenant étudier les motions selon la séquence habituelle. Nous pourrions aussi décider que ce point-là de l'ordre du jour est terminé et que nous passons à la deuxième partie de la séance, auquel cas nous reprendrions, à la prochaine séance, là où nous nous sommes interrompus, c'est-à-dire à l'inscription des motions à l'ordre du jour.

J'essaie seulement de comprendre où nous en sommes, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Qu'en pense le Comité?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Si on se fie à ce que David vient de dire, la première partie de la séance est terminée. La deuxième devait porter sur l'ordre du jour. Une fois que c'est fait, nous pouvons entamer un nouveau sujet, et c'est à ce moment-là, selon moi, que le Comité pourra étudier quelques motions. Même M. Christopherson souhaitait proposer quelque chose, si je ne m'abuse.

Pour être juste à l'égard de M. Christopherson, je crois que nous devrions suivre l'ordre du jour tel qu'il a été établi.

M. David Christopherson:

Pardonnez-moi, monsieur le président, mais puis-je obtenir une autre précision?

La motion proposée par le gouvernement disait que le Comité — je paraphrase — devait confirmer ou agréer la nomination. Devions-nous nous prononcer à ce sujet avant d'en avoir fini avec le témoin?

J'aimerais aussi savoir si le processus de nomination des sénateurs doit être approuvé par notre Comité ou s'il s'agit d'un processus parallèle qui n'empêche pas les membres du Comité consultatif de faire leur travail, et notre opinion sur le sujet, même si elle risque d'intéresser quelqu'un, quelque part, n'est pas nécessaire à la prise de décisions.

Le président:

Pour répondre à la deuxième question, que le Comité adopte ou non une motion — il le fait parfois, mais pas toujours — n'aura aucune incidence sur la suite des choses. C'est une façon pour le Comité de faire connaître son point de vue, mais il n'y a aucune incidence sur la nomination en tant que telle.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous savez probablement qu'il est parfois arrivé que, après avoir entendu un tel témoin aux fins d'une nomination par décret, le Comité présente une motion disant qu'il a entendu le témoin...

M. David Christopherson:

Alors, si cette motion était rejetée, cela n'aurait aucun effet sur le processus.

Le président:

C'est exact.

M. David Christopherson:

Intéressant.

Dans ce cas, juste pour clarifier la procédure, quand proposeriez-vous que nous examinions cette motion et celle de M. Richards?

Le président:

Je crois que la décision revient au Comité, mais, étant donné que le chercheur qui a travaillé à l'élaboration du rapport s'attendait à commencer son témoignage à 13 heures, je proposerais que nous réglions cette question d'abord pour finalement passer aux autres questions à l'ordre du jour du Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. J'aimerais seulement faire l'observation suivante. Le fait d'adopter ou non la motion semble être sans conséquence, et c'est très bien. Cependant, M. Richards a présenté une motion extrêmement importante, puisqu'elle tend à affirmer que nous voulons ajouter à notre processus d'approbation une deuxième étape qui consiste à inviter la ministre à parler des circonstances entourant la nomination.

Quand nous pencherions-nous sur cette question? Ne pensez-vous pas que nous devrions régler cela maintenant?

Voici ce que je propose, monsieur le président, et ensuite je me tairai. Nous pourrions poursuivre en réglant cette question maintenant, puisque c'est à nous de décider de la façon dont nous allons employer cette heure. C'est notre personnel qui nous rend des comptes. Ce n'est pas comme si nous retenions des témoins contre leur gré ou comme si nous avions des délais à respecter.

J'aimerais conclure en disant qu'il serait bon de déterminer au moins si nous pouvons examiner ces deux motions afin d'en finir avec ce témoin, mais je m'en remets à vous et, évidemment, à la volonté du Comité.

(1225)

M. Arnold Chan:

Dans ce cas, je propose que nous examinions ma motion d'abord.

J'aurais d'abord une question à poser. Avez-vous reçu ma motion? Vous avez suspendu la séance juste après que je l'aie présentée.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, ce serait, bien sûr, inapproprié, puisque j'ai présenté ma motion en premier. Par conséquent, ma motion devrait avoir la préséance.

Le président:

Comme je l'ai dit précédemment, je préfère passer au rapport. Je ne crois pas qu'il soit urgent d'examiner la motion de M. Chan, mais votre motion ainsi qu'un certain nombre d'autres éléments font partie des questions sur lesquelles le Comité peut se pencher, alors nous devons régler cela aujourd'hui. Je ne suis pas en train de dire que nous n'allons pas nous pencher là-dessus, mais il y a d'autres questions connexes à régler. Nous pourrions nous pencher sur tout cela lors de la discussion à la fin de la séance.

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Il nous reste 35 minutes avant la fin de notre séance. Je suppose que nous pourrions tous convenir de poursuivre nos travaux après 13 heures. Sinon, je propose que nous commencions par examiner les motions, et que nous nous penchions ensuite sur le rapport d'Andre Barnes.

Je suis désolé, Andre. Je suppose que vous avez l'habitude de nous voir faire ce genre de choses depuis les législatures précédentes.

Je recommande fortement que nous procédions ainsi. Il y a urgence. Évidemment, à moins de prévoir une séance spéciale, ce que je vais recommander par voie d'amendement à la motion de M. Richards, il serait impossible de nous réunir avant que la première étape du processus soit terminée et que toutes les nominations aient été soumises; comme vous le savez, c'est une étape très importante. Je recommande que nous continuions d'examiner les motions.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres observations? L'autre possibilité serait d'organiser une séance en sous-comité. Il y a maintenant bien des questions que nous pourrions inscrire à l'ordre du jour. Monsieur Richards, il y a votre motion, puis la question des fonctionnaires électoraux ainsi que quelques autres questions.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Monsieur, Richards, pouvez-vous nous fournir une copie de votre motion? Avez-vous déjà présenté la motion?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, j'ai présenté la motion.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pourrions-nous demander à la greffière de relire la première version de la motion?

Le président:

Madame la greffière, voudriez-vous relire la motion? Est-ce que vous l'avez?

Monsieur Richards, peut-être que vous pourriez relire votre motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Certainement, j'en serais ravi.

Voici ma motion: Étant donné que le comité n'est pas en mesure d'évaluer les qualifications et les compétences des personnes nommées au Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat sans d'abord connaître tous les détails sur le mandat et la procédure qui seront mis en oeuvre par ce nouveau comité, et qu'on n'a pas encore révélé tous les détails sur la procédure que le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat suivra sous sa forme provisoire et sous sa forme permanente, le Comité devrait demander à la greffière d'inviter la ministre des Institutions démocratiques à comparaître devant lui pour qu'elle réponde à des questions et qu'elle fournissent des détails sur la procédure qui sera suivie par le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres observations sur la façon dont nous allons procéder à partir de maintenant?

M. Arnold Chan:

J'invoque le Règlement. J'aimerais seulement que le président confirme que la motion a été présentée et appuyée.

Le président:

Elle n'a pas à être appuyée, mais elle a été présentée. Que la présentation ait eu lieu auparavant ou qu'elle ait lieu maintenant, nous sommes saisis de la motion.

Allez-y, monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Monsieur le président, je ne veux pas compliquer les choses encore davantage, mais, plus tôt, j'ai seulement entendu M. Richards dire qu'il aimerait présenter une motion tendant à faire comparaître la ministre devant un comité. Ce que nous venons d'entendre est une motion détaillée. Or, c'est la première fois que j'entends la version détaillée de la motion, d'où ma question. Cette motion a-t-elle été formellement présentée? Je ne pense pas qu'un député puisse dire qu'il va présenter une motion sur une question donnée pour ensuite dire, une heure plus tard, qu'il souhaite donner la version détaillée de cette motion.

M. Chan a présenté une motion détaillée, et le compte rendu le démontrerait clairement.

Le président:

Je ne tiens pas à débattre de qui a proposé quoi et à quel moment. Il y a eu un long préambule, mais la motion vise à faire comparaître la ministre.

Ce que je dois savoir maintenant, c'est l'ordre dans lequel nous voudrions faire les choses. Devrions-nous continuer d'examiner les motions, poursuivre nos travaux à huis clos, ou prendre connaissance du rapport?

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

(1230)

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je crois que, peu importe ce que nous réussirons à faire au cours des 30 prochaines minutes, il est évident que nous avons un urgent besoin de nous réunir en sous-comité afin de commencer à mettre un peu d'ordre dans nos affaires.

Il y a quelques questions partisanes, mais il nous reste encore beaucoup de travail non partisan à faire. Je vous exhorte à organiser une séance en sous-comité le plus vite possible afin que nous puissions mettre de l'ordre dans tout cela. J'espère que nous pourrons ensuite soumettre des recommandations à l'ensemble du Comité.

Le président:

Le Comité est-il d'accord?

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

À ce sujet, avant que nous nous entendions sur la marche à suivre, j'espère que la motion de M. Richards ne sera pas renvoyée à ce sous-comité...

M. David Christopherson: Non.

M. Scott Reid: Ce n'était pas l'intention...

M. David Christopherson:

On ne peut pas faire cela de toute façon.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, je pense que c'est une bonne idée. Une étude en sous-comité serait très utile, et j'aimerais ensuite, si possible, que nous passions directement à l'étude des motions.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous convenons de tenir une séance en sous-comité.

Maintenant, choisissons rapidement le moment où les membres du sous-comité... Est-ce que vous proposez de tenir cette séance cette semaine, ce qui revient essentiellement à dire qu'elle aurait lieu aujourd'hui, ou le premier jour au retour de la pause?

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, je suppose qu'il serait plus judicieux de le faire le jour de notre retour de la pause.

Le président:

Sommes-nous d'accord? D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

À vrai dire, d'ici à ce que nous établissions une période, et nous ne pouvons pas le faire avant que chacun d'entre nous détermine...

Le président:

Vous devez consulter votre calendrier, en effet.

M. David Christopherson:

... je serais prêt, monsieur le président, à vous laisser consulter les autres personnes nominées — puisqu'elles ne sont pas nombreuses — afin de déterminer une période qui leur convient.

Le président: D'accord.

M. David Christopherson: Fiez-vous à votre jugement, consultez la première personne et essayez de déterminer si nous pouvons nous entendre sur la période précise à laquelle la séance du sous-comité aura lieu.

Le président:

D'accord. Dans ce cas, la séance du sous-comité aura probablement lieu à notre retour, lundi. Nous consulterons les personnes concernées pour déterminer quand la séance aura lieu, et nous...

M. Arnold Chan:

Je tiens seulement à préciser que nous ne reviendrons pas lundi, mais mardi...

Le président:

Oh, pardon...

M. Arnold Chan:

... en raison du jour de la famille. Notre retour n'est donc pas prévu pour le 15.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors nous allons siéger le jour de notre retour.

Le président:

Nous pourrions voir si nous serions en mesure de nous réunir avant la séance du Comité qui aura lieu ce jour-là.

M. David Christopherson:

Sinon, monsieur le président, nous ne ferons que reprendre cette discussion sans arrêt.

Le président:

D'accord.

Dans ce cas, pour le reste de la séance, nous pourrions nous pencher sur les motions ou sur le rapport.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Même si j'aimerais que nous passions au rapport parce que c'est une question importante que nous voudrions tous régler le plus rapidement possible, je crois néanmoins que, puisque cette motion découle directement de la comparution du témoin que nous venons d'entendre, nous devrions probablement nous pencher d'abord sur la motion de M. Richards. Elle a été présentée en premier, et elle est directement liée à la question que nous avons étudiée pendant presque toute la séance. Nous parviendrons peut-être à régler cette question d'ici 13 heures.

Cela nous retardera un peu, mais nous serions au moins en mesure de boucler dès aujourd'hui tout le travail entourant la comparution du témoin et les motions qui en découlent, et nous pourrons alors passer à ce qui était prévu pour la prochaine séance au lieu de passer d'un dossier à un autre. Ce n'est que mon opinion.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres observations sur ce que nous devrions faire maintenant?

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais seulement dire que, comme nous sommes saisis de deux motions, si nous voulons en disposer, nous devrions essayer de le faire avant 13 heures.

Le président:

D'accord. Le Comité convient-il que nous devrions essayer de disposer des deux motions d'ici 13 heures?

M. Scott Reid:

De quoi était-il question, encore?

Le président:

Essayons de disposer des deux motions. Je suppose que nous allons vous entendre à la prochaine séance.

D'accord. Nous sommes saisis de deux motions. L'une tend à dire que nous avons entendu le témoin, tandis que l'autre tend à ce que le Comité entende la ministre des Institutions démocratiques.

De quelle motion le Comité souhaite-t-il disposer en premier?

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je dirais que nous devrions d'abord nous pencher sur ma motion, puisqu'elle a été présentée en premier.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des objections? D'accord.

Nous allons lire la motion, selon ce que la greffière en a saisi: Que le Comité invite la ministre des Institutions démocratiques à comparaître devant lui afin qu'elle réponde à des questions sur le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat.

Y a-t-il des interventions à propos de la motion?

Nous allons passer à M. Lamoureux, puis ce sera au tour de M. Chan.

(1235)

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Oui, monsieur le président, j'ai effectivement des questions à poser à ce sujet. J'ai trouvé cela intéressant. Nous posons des gestes de bonne foi dans l'espoir de travailler avec l'opposition. À la dernière réunion, j'ai observé un membre du caucus libéral invoquer une disposition du Règlement afin d'inviter une personne qui a été nommée à comparaître devant le Comité; tout le monde semblait favorable à l'initiative. Le Règlement précise les questions que nous pouvons poser.

C'est quelque chose que vous auriez dû savoir, monsieur Richards et monsieur Reid. Vous avez une certaine expérience. Je trouvais sensé de vouloir poser des questions au sujet des qualifications et compétences. C'est ce que disent les règles. C'est ce que nous leur avons demandé. Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est qu'on semble prétendre que ce n'était pas vraiment notre intention. Ce que j'entends, c'est qu'on voulait plutôt parler de politique gouvernementale et des processus en vigueur, qu'on voulait saisir le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de la question. On pourrait vraisemblablement se prévaloir du même processus dans toutes sortes de circonstances différentes pour exiger que tel ou tel ministre comparaisse devant le Comité. Où est-ce que ça finit?

Je comprends bien que le fait de ne pas pouvoir poser le genre de questions que vous auriez aimé poser ait pu susciter chez vous une certaine frustration, dans quel cas il aurait été préférable d'en parler mardi dernier, lorsque tout le monde faisait preuve de bonne volonté et était disposé à faire certaines concessions de bonne foi en vue d'accueillir la personne en question.

Nous agissions de bonne foi, pensant que les membres voulaient jeter plus de lumière sur la question des qualifications et des compétences. C'est avec plaisir que j'ai appris que la présidente était disposée à se mettre à la disposition du Comité dans les 48 heures de l'annonce de la décision. Pourquoi même inviter la présidente à comparaître? On ne s'attaquait pas à la question du processus, ce qui semblait être votre préoccupation principale. Pourquoi avoir même invité la présidente à comparaître? Pourquoi ne pas avoir indiqué d'emblée qu'on préférait parler à la ministre? Il est bien plus sensé d'inviter une ministre à comparaître dans le cadre de l'étude d'un projet de loi ou d'une question renvoyée par le comité plénier de la Chambre.

Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre. Je m'attends à ce que vous éclairiez la lanterne des membres du Comité. Même si je n'en suis pas un, la question m'intéresse aussi car il se pourrait que nous voulions modifier cet aspect du Règlement à l'avenir. On envisage certaines modifications au Règlement. Peut-être la question mériterait-elle d'être approfondie. Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre vos motivations. D'abord, vous laissiez entendre au Comité que nous nous intéresserions seulement aux qualifications et aux compétences d'une personne nommée, mais vous avez ensuite fait volte-face, prétendant vouloir parler du processus de nomination des sénateurs.

C'est une discussion qu'il conviendrait d'élucider dans d'autres circonstances. Aujourd'hui, la Chambre est saisie d'une motion de l'opposition officielle. Le débat qui se déroule à la Chambre des communes aurait très bien pu porter sur le Sénat. Vous, mais surtout M. Reid, avez posé maintes questions à la ministre que vous voulez convoquer devant le Comité. Il y a bien d'autres circonstances dans lesquelles interroger la ministre en question, c'est la raison qui m'amène à me demander pourquoi, il y a 48 heures, vous sembliez vouloir que le Comité se penche sur les qualifications et compétences d'une personne nommée à un poste; et dire que nous vous avons cru sur parole. C'est pour cette raison que nous avons présenté la motion invitant la ministre à comparaître. C'était un geste symbolique.

Deux ou trois jours à peine après le début de notre étude en matière de réforme des institutions parlementaires, nous invitons un témoin à comparaître. Nous ne cherchons pas à cacher quoi que ce soit. Dès le témoignage commencé, vous vous écartez de la question des compétences et qualifications, préférant plutôt poser des questions qu'il aurait été éventuellement préférable d'adresser à la ministre de la réforme démocratique.

(1240)



Je commence à croire que c'était d'entrée de jeu la raison pour laquelle vous vouliez tenir la discussion. C'est pourquoi j'estime que vous devez une explication, si non à moi alors aux membres du Comité, sur la raison pour laquelle vous vouliez même que la personne nommée comparaisse devant le Comité si votre intention était d'aborder la question du processus et du mandat.

Si votre intention était de parler de processus et du mandat, je recommanderais à tout le moins que l'on en discute afin de clarifier ce qu'on demande au Comité de faire. Ce serait la moindre des choses. Si vous avez du mal à obtenir le consensus, il est de votre devoir, en tant que membre de l'opposition officielle, de soulever la question. Nous aurions pu ainsi en discuter au lieu de débattre de l'existence ou non d'un déficit. Si la ministre avait comparu devant le Comité, peut-être aurions-nous pu nous attaquer à la question.

Mon souci, c'est de savoir si vous avez des motifs cachés. Y a-t-il d'autres ministres que vous aimeriez appeler à comparaître?

J'aimerais que vous fassiez la lumière sur la vraie raison pour laquelle vous vouliez appeler la personne nommée à comparaître. Ne pensez-vous pas qu'il y a d'autres moyens d'obtenir des réponses au sujet du processus?

Le président:

Voulez-vous répondre et reprendre plus tard?

M. Blake Richards: Oui.

Le président: D'accord. Allez-y.

M. Blake Richards:

Il semble effectivement que le secrétaire parlementaire soit en quête de réponses; il me fera plaisir de les lui fournir, est c'est justement là la question. Son gouvernement ne semble pas vouloir répondre aux questions, mais pour ma part, je me ferai un plaisir de répondre aux siennes.

Essentiellement, en vertu des articles 110 et 111 du Règlement, le Comité a le devoir et la compétence d'exiger la comparution d'un candidat dont la nomination a été retenue afin d'évaluer ses qualifications et déterminer s'il sera capable de s'acquitter des tâches du poste auquel il a été nommé.

Avant de pouvoir évaluer ces qualifications et déterminer si la personne en question est capable d'exécuter ses fonctions, il faut savoir ce qu'elles sont. Le gouvernement est déterminé à garder secret le processus qu'il envisage; bon, d'accord, il a révélé certains détails, mais nous disposons encore de très peu d'information sur les groupes qui seraient consultés, par exemple. Il y a bien d'autres exemples encore.

Le problème, c'est que sous prétexte de procéder à la réforme du Sénat, le gouvernement a mis sur pied un processus de nomination des sénateurs sans en révéler aucun détail. Les Canadiens n'ont pas la moindre idée si les personnes retenues par le Comité sont celles qui seront nommées par le premier ministre. Il n'y aura aucun moyen de savoir si le Comité a fait son travail.

Avant de procéder à une évaluation en bonne et due forme, il faut se faire une meilleure idée du processus, des consultations et des résultats de celles-ci, car si l'on s'en tient à la phase permanente du programme, on constate que c'est le Comité qui formulerait des recommandations sur la structure du processus permanent, dont nous n'avons actuellement pas la moindre idée.

Dans l'impossibilité d'évaluer le Comité, il nous est également impossible de savoir si les modifications recommandées par le Comité seront sensées, c'est pourquoi nous devons nous faire une idée du processus, autant actuel que proposé.

Si vous aviez écouté les questions que je réservais à la présidente aujourd'hui, vous sauriez que je voulais me faire une idée de la forme que prendrait le processus afin d'évaluer la capacité du Comité et de ses membres de s'acquitter de leurs fonctions, mais ces questions sont restées sans réponse car on nous a dit qu'elle ne pouvait répondre à ces questions-là.

Je n'étais pas le seul membre à avoir des questions. M. Reid avait lui aussi des questions sérieuses et importantes à poser. S'il n'incombe pas à un comité comme le nôtre de chercher à déterminer si un processus proposé par le gouvernement respecte la Constitution du Canada, cela brosse un portrait plutôt lamentable du gouvernement. Ce serait effectivement assez lamentable de la part des membres du gouvernement de ne pas s'intéresser à savoir si leur processus respecte la Constitution. Afin de pouvoir procéder à une évaluation en bonne et due forme, il faut d'abord que nous ayons une bien meilleure idée du processus que le gouvernement s'efforce de garder secret.

Ma question pour le secrétaire parlementaire est la suivante: est-ce la position du gouvernement que la ministre ne devrait pas se tenir responsable du processus pour renforcer la confiance des Canadiens? Comment peut-on s'attendre à ce que notre travail jouisse de la confiance des Canadiens s'il est censé être réalisé à leur insu et s'il n'y aucun moyen pour nous de savoir ni ce que ce travail est censé être, ni à quoi ressemblera le produit final? C'est exactement ce que fait le gouvernement.

La seule façon pour nous de respecter les articles en question du Règlement est de convoquer la ministre à comparaître devant nous afin que nous puissions évaluer en bonne et due forme le processus et donc les qualifications des personnes concernées. C'est pour cette raison qu'il est absolument capital que la ministre des Institutions démocratiques comparaisse devant le Comité. Nous pourrons ainsi faire notre travail.

Si le gouvernement compte nous empêcher de faire notre travail en tant que comité, c'est une bien mauvaise façon d'entamer ce que ses membres appellent de « vrais changements ».

(1245)

Le président:

Avant de poursuivre, M. Lamoureux aura l'occasion dans quelques instants de répondre à la question qu'on vient de lui poser, puis la parole ira à M. Chan, à M. Reid, puis à M. Richards et M. Christopherson.

Monsieur Reid, monsieur Richards, la greffière m'a fait remarquer qu'elle ignore quel passage de notre mandat serait concerné.

Pendant que d'autres membres ont la parole, je vous invite à vous familiariser avec le paragraphe 108(3), qui décrit le mandat de notre Comité, afin de déterminer si vos questions relèvent de notre mandat, et à préciser de quelles sections de ce mandat elles relèvent.

Monsieur Lamoureux, pourriez-vous répondre à la question de M. Richards?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

J'apprécie votre réponse, Blake, vraiment, mais je pense que vous faites fausse route à maints égards.

Les questions que vous posez ont rapport à la Constitution. Vous parlez de processus. Vous parlez de types de consultations. Loin de moi de me prononcer sur l'intérêt de ces questions. Je le reconnais. Vous avez le droit de poser les questions que vous voulez.

Ce qui me chicote, c'est que nous sommes déjà passés par là il y a 48 heures lorsque l'opposition officielle a pour la première fois soulevé des questions au sujet des qualifications de certaines personnes. Agissant de bonne foi, vous avez évoqué une différente façon de faire les choses au comité. C'est un membre du Comité — était-ce vous, Ruby, ou bien...

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque rapidement le Règlement.

Le secrétaire parlementaire vient de dire que nous exprimions des réserves au sujet des qualifications d'un employé en particulier. Personne n'a exprimé de réserve au sujet des qualifications d'un employé en particulier. Nous cherchons seulement à nous faire une idée des qualifications nécessaires pour s'acquitter des fonctions du poste. Si nous ne pouvons obtenir d'information de la part du gouvernement au sujet de ce que sont ces fonctions, comment pouvons-nous commencer à évaluer les qualifications?

C'est comme si on nous demandait d'évaluer la capacité d'une personne de faire un travail sans savoir ce qu'est ce travail. C'est ce que fait le gouvernement. Il garde le processus secret, tout comme le processus de consultations, ce qui nous empêche d'évaluer les qualifications en bonne et due forme. Nous ne remettons personne en question. Nous voulons savoir si on pourra s'acquitter des fonctions du poste. Impossible pour nous de le savoir, cependant, parce que nous ignorons quelles qualifications les titulaires sont censés avoir car nous ignorons quel est le processus.

Le président:

Je conviens avec vous sur votre rappel au Règlement; tâchez donc de ne pas aborder la question des qualifications.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Richards, vous...

M. David Christopherson:

J'invoque le Règlement.

À propos de rappels au Règlement, monsieur le président, j'aimerais savoir si vous pensez qu'il est acceptable pour le Comité d'effectuer ses travaux de la sorte.

M. Lamoureux n'est même pas membre du Comité. Les membres ministériels du Comité ont affirmé à maintes reprises qu'ils pouvaient jouer dans la cour des grands, qu'ils pouvaient se diriger eux-mêmes, qu'ils n'avaient pas besoin que M. Lamoureux leur vienne en aide. Il n'est même pas membre du Comité. Il représente le gouvernement, le Cabinet du premier ministre. Il dirige le débat et les vrais membres du Comité se contentent de rester assis.

C'est en cela que consistent les affaires normales du Comité, monsieur le président? Entamons-nous une nouvelle ère? Ne trouvez-vous pas qu'il y a quelque chose qui cloche dans ce genre d'échange?

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, l'opposition officielle a posé une question à M. Lamoureux; je ne peux la priver d'une réponse.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne parle pas seulement de la question en cours. C'est le seul qui parle depuis le début.

Le président:

En fait, nous avons une longue liste de...

M. David Christopherson:

C'est ridicule. Et le gouvernement affirmait son intention de s'y prendre différemment. Rien n'a changé. Au moins M. Lukiwski, lui, avait la légitimité et la décence de se mettre au volant lorsqu'il conduisait. Le député en question n'est même par membre du Comité, mais c'est lui qui conduit ses travaux.

(1250)

Le président:

Il y a cinq membres sur la liste des interventions, laissons donc le député finir de répondre.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est tout simplement ridicule.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais rapidement répondre aux préoccupations de M. Christopherson: un témoin a comparu devant le Comité aujourd'hui. Je ne lui ai posé aucune question. Au moins quatre membres du Comité lui ont posé des questions. Ce n'est pas moi qui ai présenté la motion voulant inviter le témoin à comparaître.

M. David Christopherson: Faux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux: C'est vrai. J'ai dit un membre du Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Désolé. Je pensais vous avoir entendu dire « je propose ». Mes excuses.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

En grande partie, je réponds à la question posée. Lorsque j'ai soulevé la chose plus tôt, avant que la question ne soit posée, je me fondais sur mon expérience au Comité et à la Chambre.

C'est à cela que j'aimerais revenir, monsieur le président. Il y a eu des changements.

Monsieur Richards, vous soulevez des points valables, mais ils portent davantage sur la politique et les processus. Si je comprends ce que vous disiez lors de votre dernière intervention, vous voulez vous faire une meilleure idée d'un certain nombre de choses afin de pouvoir remettre en question les qualifications et compétences d'une personne retenue à un poste.

Si c'est le cas, peut-être avons-nous eu tort d'inviter la personne nommée à comparaître devant nous puisque l'opposition officielle ne remettait pas vraiment en question ses qualifications. Vous aviez raison d'affirmer que vous ne remettiez en question ni les qualifications de la personne en question, ni son aptitude à s'acquitter de ses fonctions. Je pense que nous avons entendu...

Excusez-moi?

M. Blake Richards:

Nous voulons évaluer les qualifications. Ce qui ne veut pas dire pour autant que nous les remettons en question. Ce n'est pas la même chose. Il y a une très grande différence.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

C'est vrai. C'est une grande différence.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous voulons évaluer les qualifications, pas les remettre en question.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Et il n'y a rien de mal là-dedans, c'est justement pourquoi les membres ministériels du Comité étaient d'accord. Ce n'est pas seulement le membre en question. Vous vous souviendrez de la discussion que nous avons eue dans les deux derniers jours à propos de la possibilité d'inviter des personnes nommées à comparaître devant le Comité; nous trouvions qu'il était préférable de les inviter jeudi même s'il aurait été possible d'en inviter en plus grand nombre si nous attendions plus longtemps. C'est le compromis auquel nous sommes arrivés.

Au bout du compte, je pense que la première heure des discussions a porté fruit, car elle a rassuré les membres du Comité du fait que la présidente a les qualifications et les compétences nécessaires pour s'acquitter des tâches qui lui ont été confiées, conformément à la motion qu'avait présentée M. Chan. Pour ce qui est du processus, débattons-en. Débattons-en à la Chambre des communes. Débattons-en dans toutes sortes de circonstances différentes. Il demeure que je ne suis pas convaincu que le Comité est le meilleur endroit pour le faire, à moins que le Comité ne décide de vouloir s'attaquer à la question.

Tâchons de ne pas oublier, cependant, que les travaux du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre ont d'éventuelles répercussions sur les autres comités. Il se pourrait ensuite que d'autres comités veuillent inviter tel ou tel ministre à comparaître. Il y a des circonstances dans lesquelles des ministres comparaissent devant les comités, notamment lorsqu'il est question de budgets ou de projets de loi.

Le président:

M. Reid invoque le Règlement.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai l'impression que M. Lamoureux, qui n'est pas membre du Comité, se livre à une tactique dilatoire dans le but d'épuiser le temps que nous avons. Je ne pouvais m'empêcher de remarquer que vous ne lâchez pas l'horloge des yeux. Vous devez avoir les mêmes questions. Je me demande donc si vous ne pourriez pas en venir à bout de son intervention afin que nous puissions reprendre nos travaux.

Monsieur Chan, je me ferai un plaisir de m'abstenir de parler si la motion pouvait être mise aux voix. Il reste seulement cinq minutes. Nous pourrions également nous entendre pour prolonger la durée de la réunion d'aujourd'hui afin de pouvoir approfondir la discussion. D'une façon ou d'une autre, finissons-en avec cette motion.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, invoquez-vous le Règlement?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Excusez-moi, je n'invoque pas le Règlement.

Le président:

Figurent sur la liste M. Chan, M. Reid, M. Richards, M. Christopherson et Mme Sahota.

Monsieur Chan.

Vous aviez terminé, monsieur Lamoureux?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je sais que le temps presse, mais j'aimerais rapidement revenir sur certaines questions. Les membres ministériels sont disposés à ne pas intervenir dans le débat sur la motion et à soumettre celle-ci aux voix, mais j'aimerais prendre quelques instants pour faire remarquer combien la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons est étrange. Nous sommes ici parce que votre gouvernement a négligé ces 22 nominations pendant plus de deux ans, et nous avons maintenant l'obligation constitutionnelle de combler ces sièges vacants. Sans cela, le Sénat en viendrait à un point où il ne pourrait plus fonctionner.

Cela dit, au bout du compte le Sénat est enchâssé dans la Constitution. Il faut qu'il puisse fonctionner. On en venait au point où son fonctionnement était perturbé par la décision du précédent gouvernement de ne pas combler les sièges vacants.

Cela dit, pourrais-je demander à la greffière de nous relire la motion? De ce côté-ci, nous sommes disposés à voter immédiatement.

(1255)

La greffière du comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

La motion dit: Que le Comité invite la ministre de la Réforme démocratique à comparaître devant lui afin qu'elle réponde à des questions sur le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat.

Le président:

Nous n'avons pas encore déterminé si cela relève du mandat du Comité, mais...

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Monsieur le président, le mandat de notre comité est précisé à l'alinéa 108(3)a) du Règlement, qui dit: [...] celui du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, en plus des fonctions énoncées à l'article 104 du Règlement, comprend notamment:

Puis, vient une liste. Par « notamment », on entend qu'on peut interpréter le mandat du Comité comme étant plus large que les simples éléments précisés au paragraphe 108(3). Autrement dit, la comparution de la ministre ne pose aucun problème.

Je fais simplement remarquer, monsieur le président, que depuis toujours — du moins depuis la création des premiers gouvernements devant rendre des comptes, autant ici que dans la mère patrie —, la Constitution exige que tous les ministres rendent des comptes à la Chambre des communes. L'ensemble du Cabinet est soumis à la surveillance de la Chambre des communes. La ministre des Institutions démocratiques et son prédécesseur, le ministre de la Réforme démocratique, ont toujours rendu des comptes au présent Comité. La pratique établie autorise le Comité à procéder de la sorte

J'ai une dernière observation à faire sur un sujet distinct. Il est essentiel que la ministre comparaisse devant nous — c'est à vous que je m'adresse puisque c'est vous qui réglez le calendrier — durant la pause, à moins qu'elle puisse venir demain, étant donné la date limite des nominations de la phase 1. Il s'agit d'un processus selon moi inconstitutionnel. À la Chambre des communes, je lui ai demandé si elle pensait qu'il était inconstitutionnel et lui ai demandé son avis juridique, mais elle n'a pas répondu à la question.

Le processus prend fin le lundi avant la reprise des travaux, le jour de la Famille, il faudra donc tenir une réunion spéciale. C'est pourquoi je vous exhorte à vous prévaloir de votre autorité en tant que président du Comité pour fixer une réunion spéciale entre aujourd'hui et le 15 février plutôt que d'attendre la prochaine réunion prévue du Comité, qui sera trop tard. Notre prochaine réunion est prévue le 16 février, après la fin du processus potentiellement inconstitutionnel, après que le mal ait été fait.

Le président:

La parole est à vous, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vais passer mon tour, monsieur le président, mais je tiens néanmoins à faire remarquer que j'estime qu'il est important pour nous d'en finir avec la motion et de la mettre aux voix avant la fin de la séance. S'il faut prolonger la réunion pour ce faire, soit.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai quelques observations à faire à cet égard, monsieur le président — seulement quelques-unes, c'est promis —, et j'aimerais qu'elles figurent au compte rendu. Si tout le monde peut s'entendre pour que la séance soit prolongée, je préconise que l'on mette un terme au débat sur la motion et que l'on passe au vote.

Le président:

Nous en sommes au point où le Comité doit décider de prolonger la séance ou non.

Y a-t-il des observations?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Veuillez m'excuser, des observations à quel sujet? Je n'ai pas entendu la dernière phrase.

Le président:

La réunion tire à sa fin. Le Comité accepte-t-il de prolonger ses travaux? Il est déjà passé 13 heures.

(1300)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pendant combien de temps?

Le président:

Qu'en pensez-vous, monsieur Christopherson?

M. David Christopherson:

Cinq ou six minutes, rien de plus. Je n'ai vraiment pas grand-chose à dire. J'ai quelques observations à consigner au compte rendu, c'est tout. J'ignore si d'autres membres ont autre chose à dire. Autrement, les motions ne sont pas mises aux voix. C'est aussi simple que cela.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais proposer un amendement à la fin de la motion afin qu'elle dise « selon la disponibilité de la ministre ».

Le président:

Vous amendez la motion. Il faut d'abord que nous votions sur le temps. Notre temps de travail est écoulé.

M. David Christopherson:

Et une date limite, peut-être? Il se peut que la ministre ne soit jamais disponible.

Une voix: Disons 13 h 15.

M. David Christopherson: Je parlais de la disponibilité de la ministre.

On parle bien de la motion, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle effectivement de la motion. Nous avons déjà accepté de prolonger la séance, non?

M. David Christopherson: Oui.

Le président:

Vous proposez que le Comité prolonge sa séance à 13 h 15?

Une voix: Oui.

Une voix: On pourrait s'y prendre en blocs de cinq minutes.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Pourquoi prolongez-vous la séance, David?

M. David Christopherson:

Parce que le gouvernement que vous représentez semble vouloir que ces motions soient adoptées aujourd'hui. L'opposition ne cherche pas à faire de l'obstruction, mais c'est en partie parce que vous avez pris la parole pendant si longtemps que nous n'avons pas le temps d'entendre toutes les observations avant la fin prévue des travaux.

Tout ce que je demande, c'est qu'on m'accorde à moi, personnellement, de quatre à six minutes, disons cinq minutes, afin de consigner certaines observations au compte rendu; je serai ensuite disposé à passer aux voix, ce qui est impossible sans demander de prolongation. Sans parler pour mes collègues, voilà la situation en ce qui me concerne. Ils ont déjà fait savoir qu'ils veulent que les motions soient mises aux voix.

À vous de décider. Si vous voulez que la motion soit adoptée, vous allez devoir nous accorder 15 ou 20 minutes de plus. Si ça vous est égal, ajournons donc.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Commencez à parler, alors.

Monsieur le président, je pense... Je ne veux pas parler au nom du Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Ha! Et pourquoi pas? Vous parlez au nom de la moitié de ses membres.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

David, vous êtes...

M. David Christopherson:

Allez-y. Où voulez-vous en venir?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Vous êtes injuste sur cette question, David. Il est déjà passé 13 heures...

M. David Christopherson:

C'est moi qui suis injuste? Vous ne devriez même pas être ici.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Tous les députés ont le droit de siéger au Comité. C'est le droit de tous les députés. N'essayez même pas de me priver...

M. David Christopherson: Personne n'est dupe. Dites-le.

M. Kevin Lamoureux: Monsieur le président, tout ce que j'essaye de faire, c'est faciliter...

M. David Christopherson:

Mais oui, bien sûr, vous êtes d'une aide indispensable.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Merci.

Si vous voulez parler pendant encore trois, quatre, voire cinq minutes, soit. Je ne vois rien de mal à cela. Aucun autre membre du Comité non plus.

Allez, parlez.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons prendre cinq minutes de plus pour que M. Christopherson puisse faire ses commentaires.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci. Je remercie le Cabinet du premier ministre de me permettre de dire quelques mots.

Tout ce que je voulais dire, pour appuyer la motion, c'est qu'on semble vouloir faire un compromis. Si c'était le cas, ce serait excellent. Cela signifierait que le gouvernement tente vraiment de changer la façon de faire des comités.

Voici où je veux en venir. Je vais vous dire pourquoi j'appuie cette idée. Je n'appuie pas toujours l'idée d'inviter un ministre à témoigner, parce qu'on pourrait vouloir faire des manoeuvres politiques, mais en règle générale, nous ne faisons pas cela. J'essaie de faire un choix judicieux quant à l'intervention d'un ministre, parce que les ministres ont leur propre tribune, la salle du cabinet, et ici c'est la nôtre, la salle de comité. Toutefois, dans le cas présent, étant donné l'importance du processus et la vitesse à laquelle tout s'est produit, et puisqu'il n'y a pas eu beaucoup de discussions publiques à ce sujet, j'appuie une telle intervention.

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais je ne crois pas qu'une motion ait été présentée et débattue en Chambre sur ce processus. Je ne crois pas qu'on ait présenté un projet de loi à la Chambre, associé à un processus complet permettant un débat en profondeur. Donc, comme l'a fait valoir M. Richards, on a créé ce processus dans le noir, en secret. Le résultat final est que les règles ont été rendues publiques, mais il n'y a eu aucune occasion de discuter de certains points, comme pourquoi un petit groupe de personnes a le droit de décider de la définition de la « diversité » au Canada et pourquoi un petit groupe de Canadiens peut décider que les traits de personnalité d'une personne font d'elle un choix démocratique et responsable ou non.

N'oubliez pas, monsieur le président, que ce sont des questions raisonnables à poser lorsqu'on parle de créer une chambre, dont chacun des membres a un poids juridique supérieur au nôtre, parce qu'ils sont moins nombreux.

Je crois qu'il est juste que l'opposition officielle demande au gouvernement d'inviter la ministre pour qu'elle nous mette au courant de la situation. Lorsque je dis « nous », je parle de la population. Je reviens à ce que le gouvernement a dit: qu'il allait faire les choses autrement — qu'il allait être plus démocratique, plus transparent, plus responsable — et je reviendrai toujours à ce point. C'est une mesure raisonnable que d'inviter un ministre à parler des réalisations du gouvernement jusqu'à présent, puisque nous n'avons pas eu l'occasion d'en discuter à la Chambre ou en comité.

Je crois donc que nous avons de bonnes raisons de penser que ce processus servira les intérêts du public. Si la ministre témoignait devant nous, nous pourrions lui poser nos questions et celles de la population, avant même de parler de partisanerie. Des questions légitimes au sujet du processus. Nous n'avons pas eu l'occasion de le faire. Je dirais qu'il s'agit d'un droit légitime des Canadiens, comme d'un droit de l'opposition, surtout que dans sa plateforme, le gouvernement dit qu'il va faire les choses différemment et qu'il va rendre des comptes.

J'ai entendu M. Graham demander il y a une minute si nous accepterions que la rencontre se fasse selon la disponibilité de la ministre. On dirait le début de négociations, une tentative d'écouter ce que l'opposition a à dire et de répondre à ses demandes. Je réponds à M. Graham que je serais certainement ouvert à un tel amendement, à condition qu'il soit associé à une date limite. Sinon, vous savez quoi? La ministre ne sera jamais disponible et la motion sera ainsi rejetée à cause de mesures passives.

Par conséquent, si le gouvernement disait: « Au plus tard cinq jours civils après la reprise  » ou quelque chose...

(1305)

M. Scott Reid:

Cela pourrait même être avant la date limite. Il y en a une.

M. David Christopherson:

La date limite est le 15 février. Eh bien soit. C'est leur problème, pas le nôtre. Ils ont créé le processus. Nous ne pouvons pas modifier le calendrier. Nous pouvons seulement faire notre possible. Si le gouvernement veut vraiment faire un compromis et veut faire preuve d'un peu de souplesse quant au moment de rencontrer la ministre...

Je ne crois pas qu'on puisse dire qu'il s'agit d'une tentative partisane. Comme il y a eu si peu de discussion publique, je crois que dans ce cas, on peut à juste titre faire valoir que la ministre devrait intervenir à un certain point dans notre processus démocratique pour nous dire pourquoi le gouvernement a fait certains choix et quelles sont ses attentes. Ces demandes sont légitimes.

Avant de poursuivre, monsieur le président, j'aimerais savoir si M. Graham et les autres députés ministériels souhaitent vraiment trouver une motion que nous pourrions tous appuyer ou s'ils visent seulement un vote majoritaire, le reste n'étant que de la poudre aux yeux.

Le président:

Mme Sahota est la prochaine sur la liste, mais nous allons laisser M. Graham...

M. David Christopherson:

Je disais que je voulais seulement des explications de la part de M. Graham, mais je prendrai celles de Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à préciser que nous sommes tout à fait disposés à faire des compromis. Nous l'avons montré à maintes reprises depuis le début du Comité.

Tout d'abord, il y a quelques jours, on nous a demandé d'inviter la présidente du comité consultatif, ce que nous avons fait rapidement. Je crois que l'opposition officielle voulait voir tous les membres du Comité. Nous étions tout à fait disposés à tenter de réunir le plus de personnes possible.

Aujourd'hui, la présidente était ici et presque personne ne l'écoutait.

En regardant cela — je suis nouvelle au Comité —, j'ai constaté que les membres de l'opposition souhaitaient ardemment recevoir la présidente pour remettre en question ses capacités, mais que lorsqu'elle était là, ils ne prenaient même pas la peine d'écouter ce qu'elle avait à dire. Je trouve cela déplorable, en fait.

Je le répète: je ne m'oppose pas à ce que vous dites et nous sommes plus que disposés à faire des compromis. J'espère seulement qu'à l'avenir...

Nous devions interroger un autre témoin aujourd'hui. Il est resté ici toute la journée et était prêt à vous parler. Nous avons fait beaucoup de compromis.

Je crois que nous sommes prêts à voter de ce côté-ci de la Chambre. Nous continuerons de prouver que nous sommes tout à fait disposés à coopérer et à faire avancer les choses pour le Comité.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, voulez-vous répondre à la question de M. Christopherson?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis certainement prêt à faire des compromis. C'est pourquoi je suggère que ce soit selon la disponibilité de la ministre. Nous ne pouvons pas savoir quand elle sera disponible.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous ne pouvez pas laisser la porte grande ouverte, David. Il doit y avoir une échéance. Je veux dire, la ministre pourrait tout à coup n'être jamais disponible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a beaucoup plus de chances que cela arrive si vous fixez une date limite que si vous n'en fixez pas une.

J'ai présenté la motion, mais je ne sais pas comment faire pour qu'on passe au vote. Est-ce qu'on peut mettre l'amendement aux voix?

M. David Christopherson:

Non. Qu'est-ce que vous faites?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je demande ce que je peux faire. Est-ce que c'est raisonnable?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est raisonnable, pourvu que vous ne tentiez rien. Vous pouvez poser une question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aime qu'on puisse s'entendre, David.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous répéter l'amendement?

Je crois que nous allons devoir prendre encore plus de temps, parce que nous avons dépassé les cinq minutes prévues.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On ne peut pas continuer comme cela trop longtemps, sinon on sera encore ici demain.

L'amendement visait seulement à ajouter, à la fin de la motion, « selon la disponibilité de la ministre ».

M. David Christopherson: C'est bien beau, mais c'est moi qui ai la parole.

Le président: D'accord, vous pouvez continuer.

(1310)

M. David Christopherson:

Je dirais que nous y sommes presque, mais si nous laissons cela à la discrétion de la ministre...

Je viens tout juste de finir, après 10 ans, de négocier avec un gouvernement qui a essayé tous les trucs imaginables. Je ne vois rien qui m'indique que vous allez faire les choses autrement, donc vous m'excuserez: je suis prêt à accepter la motion, mais il me faut une échéance. Il doit y avoir une date limite. On ne peut pas se fier uniquement à la disponibilité de la ministre. Elle pourrait, par hasard, ne jamais être disponible lorsque nous nous réunissons et, comme je l'ai dit, cela entraînerait le rejet de la motion.

M. Arnold Chan:

Est-ce que je peux prendre la parole sur ce...

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai dit que je ne prendrais que quelques minutes pour faire valoir mon point. Je vais le faire puis j'aurai terminé.

Mme Sahota a tenté d'accélérer les choses en disant: « Nous vous écoutons, mais nous voulons voter.  » Eh bien, cela veut seulement dire qu'ils veulent utiliser leur majorité, attendre que tout le monde ait fini de parler pour ensuite tout rejeter.

Je vais terminer ainsi. Je crois que la motion est tout à fait légitime. J'ai aimé ce qu'a dit M. Graham. Son parti semblait prêt à recevoir la ministre et il faudrait seulement s'entendre sur une échéance. Ce n'est pas exactement ce qu'il propose, mais je crois qu'on pourrait obtenir un vote unanime si on apportait cette petite modification.

Je suis convaincu que cela va arriver, mais que ce soit le cas ou non, je crois que la motion a beaucoup de mérite. Je suis heureux d'appuyer la motion.

C'est tout.

M. Arnold Chan: La seule chose que je...

Le président:

Attendez. Vous ne pouvez pas parler pour l'instant. Nous devons prolonger la période de temps. Nous manquons encore de temps.

Y a-t-il consentement unanime pour prolonger la période de cinq autres minutes?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: D'accord. Nous ajoutons cinq autres minutes.

Pouvez-vous comptabiliser le temps, madame la greffière?

Monsieur Chan, vous avez la parole.

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous sommes prêts à soumettre la motion à un vote, mais nous devons seulement consulter la ministre pour connaître ses disponibilités.

En ce qui a trait à l'échéance dont vous parlez, monsieur Richards, nous ne le savons pas. C'est la relâche cette semaine. Les députés passent la semaine dans leur circonscription, n'est-ce pas? Nous voulons seulement pouvoir demander à la ministre quelles sont ses disponibilités. Nous n'avons aucun problème à la recevoir. C'est pourquoi j'ai dit que j'étais prêt à soumettre la question au vote. Nous sommes prêts à recevoir la ministre, mais nous devons pouvoir la consulter afin qu'elle vérifie ses disponibilités.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous nous réunirons une journée la semaine prochaine pour tenir une audience.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je ne sais pas si elle est disponible.

Une voix: Je passe par sa circonscription. J'irai la chercher.

M. Arnold Chan: J'ai terminé. L'amendement est proposé.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres discussions au sujet de l'amendement, qui dit: « selon la disponibilité de la ministre »?

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est toujours selon la disponibilité des ministres. Je n'ai jamais été témoin — sauf dans les circonstances les plus extraordinaires, lorsqu'on a tenté de renverser le gouvernement en raison d'allégations d'outrage au Parlement — d'une situation où l'on parlait d'émettre un bref pour forcer un ministre à témoigner devant nous. En fait, la seule fois où c'est arrivé, c'est avec M. Schreiber. Vous vous en souvenez?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est cela. C'est toujours selon la disponibilité des ministres. Nous nous attendons, moralement, à ce qu'elle témoigne devant nous et elle doit le savoir, parce que je présume que nos réunions sont diffusées sur CPAC, alors elle peut les regarder si elle le souhaite. Quelqu'un nous surveille dans son bureau. Elle sait que nous voulons la recevoir ici avant le 15 février et que nous nous rendrons disponibles pour elle. Je suis convaincu que le gouvernement peut trouver suffisamment de députés disponibles, même si les membres ici présents ne peuvent l'être.

Je vote contre l'amendement, mais pas parce que je ne veux pas accommoder la ministre. Je crois toutefois qu'elle devrait elle aussi tenter de nous accommoder et de nous convaincre que son processus est constitutionnel avant la date butoir du 15 février. Je crois qu'elle peut comprendre l'importance de le faire.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres discussions au sujet de l'amendement?

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne crois pas que le gouvernement nous donnera l'assurance dont nous avons besoin, alors j'ai deux choix: soit je les crois sur parole quand ils disent que la ministre viendra bientôt, soit je ne les crois pas.

Comme nous avons débattu de cette question en public — habituellement, on se fait avoir quand on se réunit à huis clos et que ce n'est pas dit publiquement — et que tout le monde a entendu la discussion, nous pourrons plaider notre cause si la ministre ne s'est toujours pas présentée dans quelques semaines. Par conséquent, je vais faire confiance au gouvernement et le croire quand il dit que la ministre se rendra disponible en temps opportun, en fonction de nos besoins également, et je vais appuyer l'amendement.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, vous avez la parole.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je ne comprends pas pourquoi on s'oppose à cet amendement si c'est toujours selon la disponibilité de la ministre.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est seulement que, bien qu'elle puisse témoigner selon ses disponibilités, si la ministre souhaite se soustraire à son témoignage devant le Comité pour traiter de la constitutionnalité du système qu'elle a mis en place, selon un échéancier qu'elle a établi, elle ne commettra pas formellement un outrage au Parlement, mais agira de façon méprisante envers le Parlement. Sur le plan moral, elle peut libérer du temps à son agenda pour venir ici, sauf si elle a de graves problèmes de santé ou si un événement tragique se produit dans sa famille. Par conséquent, elle ferait mieux de se rendre disponible et je tiens à faire valoir ce point en votant contre l'amendement.

Cela étant dit, si le gouvernement adopte l'amendement, alors je voterai pour la motion principale également et je demanderai à ce qu'on fasse tout en notre possible pour voir la ministre ici la semaine prochaine.

(1315)

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Au bout du compte, nous allons appuyer la motion modifiée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que je peux proposer la motion?

Le président:

Vous voulez dire l'amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, l'amendement. Merci.

Le président:

Vous avez déjà proposé l'amendement.

Je vais mettre aux voix l'amendement, qui dit: « selon la disponibilité de la ministre ».

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant au débat sur la motion modifiée.

M. Scott Reid:

Demandez seulement un vote sur la motion.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des interventions?

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais qu'on fasse un vote par appel nominal, monsieur le président, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient.

Le président:

Nous allons tenir un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion modifiée est adoptée par 9 voix contre 0.)

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 04, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.