header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-06-09 PROC 27

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1155)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We're in public, so the media knows the cameras have to leave. It is televised, though, so you'll have access to it.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Why don't we just wait until the actual appointed beginning time? I just thought it was a good idea to gavel to get the media out of here, but let's give the minister and Mr. Christopherson the time they need.

The Chair:

I'm going to read the mechanics so it's out of the way.

Good afternoon. We are in the 27th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This part of the meeting is televised.

We are resuming our study of the question of privilege related to the premature disclosure of the contents of Bill C-14.

Mr. Reid had asked a question of the researcher on similar types of cases in New Zealand, the U.K., and Australia. The quick answers, unless you want to hear them from the researcher, are that Australia hasn't answered yet, and New Zealand and the U.K. do not have similar provisions. It's totally different. He's going to send you a briefing note with the details of that, if that's okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you. That's very helpful.

The Chair:

I want to be exemplary in starting on time, which is not yet. It's in two minutes.

We have a couple of special guests coming, so I'll just say who they are now so it doesn't take up committee time. Two of our colleagues who retired in 2011 are sort of icons of Parliament.

Derek Lee will be here. He wrote a book, The Power of Parliamentary Houses to Send for Persons, Records and Papers. That's kind of interesting. He was almost the dean of the House. Except for Mr. Plamondon, he would have been the dean of the House when he left. He's also, I think, the only member of Parliament in history who sat on a committee for 20 years straight, the scrutiny of regulations committee. He has lots of background, there.

Also here is Paul Szabo. If you remember, he spoke more times in Parliament than any other member for the years he was here.

There are very interesting former members here in the audience today.

I would like to welcome our witness, the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada.

Thank you very much for coming. I know all ministries are very busy, so we really appreciate this.

Without further ado, I invite the minister to make her opening statement of 10 minutes, and then we'll proceed to questioning.

(1200)

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada):

Thank you to all honourable members here for the opportunity to appear before committee to address the alleged breach of privilege with respect to Bill C-14, a matter that I take incredibly seriously.

First, I'd like to speak to various measures and policies that are followed by my department and my exempt staff to protect legislation prior to its introduction. I want to be very clear that none of my staff nor any of my officials were involved in any alleged leaks in this matter. Second, I want to highlight that the drafting of legislation spanned several departments and agencies. Third, I'll turn briefly to the article in question.

To begin, I can assure my honourable colleagues that my department and my exempt staff take the safeguarding of information regarding the contents of all bills intended for introduction very seriously, and they adhere to all relevant policies and procedures.

My departmental officials, through my deputy minister, are instructed to follow all precautions as outlined in “A Drafter's Guide to Cabinet Documents” and the policy on security of cabinet confidences, both of which can be found on the Privy Council Office website. According to the PCO policy on security of cabinet confidences, draft bills, with the exception of versions used for public consultation, upon agreement of cabinet, are deemed confidence of the Queen's Privy Council. These documents must be marked, handled, and safeguarded accordingly. Documents may only be handled by those with valid security clearance at the appropriate level, and a valid need to know the information to perform their duties. Restricted access to cabinet confidences extends to all stages of drafting.

The following individuals are considered to have a need to know status: employees who are responsible for developing policy and for developing proposals for the minister; ministerial and departmental personnel supporting a minister on a particular policy proposal or issue that is the subject of cabinet discussion; central agency employees who help advance policies and proposals brought forward by departments of sponsoring minister; and legal advisers providing advice relating to a policy proposal or issue that is the subject of a cabinet discussion.

As per PCO policy, these individuals are required to use appropriate means, including IT systems, to prepare, store, and transmit cabinet confidences; mark cabinet confidence information at the appropriate level of sensitivity, and with the caption “Confidence of the Queen's Privy Council” on every page of the document; handle such information in restricted access areas; use security equipment and procedures approved for the level of sensitivity of the information to transport, transmit, store, and dispose of cabinet confidences on paper or in electronic format; ensure that the information is not discussed with, viewed, or overheard by unauthorized individuals; and refrain from discussing such information on cellular telephones or wireless devices, unless approved security means are used.

All my departmental officials who worked on this draft legislation, as well as all of my exempt staff, had valid security clearance at appropriate levels.

As a general practice, any security incident involving cabinet confidences, however slight, must be immediately reported to the responsible departmental security officer. This would include unauthorized disclosures, loss, theft, transmission, and discussion over non-secure channels, unaccounted documents, and other actual or suspected compromises. The departmental security officer, in turn, must immediately report the incident to the PCO security operations division. Unless directed otherwise by PCO, the departmental security officer is expected to conduct an initial administrative inquiry to determine what happened and to identify corrective action.

Generally, an inquiry would include an examination of the circumstances surrounding the incident; if possible, the source of the unauthorized disclosure; the adequacy of the departmental procedures for the protection of sensitive information; an assessment of injury to the national interest arising from the compromise; and an outline of corrective measures that have been or will be put in place to minimize the risk of similar occurrences in the future.

(1205)



The Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet, after consultation with the appropriate department heads, may involve the RCMP. The RCMP will then determine if there is sufficient grounds to investigate. Where appropriate, department heads are responsible for applying sanctions.

Let me be clear. I have spoken with my deputy minister and I can assure you that my department follows all necessary precautions. In this particular matter, I can assure you that no breach of information nor evidence of such a breach was reported from departmental staff, and therefore, no internal inquiry was initiated.

Further, I can personally assure you that I spoke to all of my exempt staff about this matter, and none of them were involved in any breach of information. I believe and trust my departmental officials and my staff, and I take them at their word.

Second, honourable colleagues, it's worth remembering that this sensitive piece of legislation was not crafted by the Department of Justice alone. My department worked closely and collaboratively with officials in other departments, and my exempt staff worked with their counterparts in other offices.

Further, as per PCO guidelines, drafts of memorandums to cabinet containing specific policy recommendations were shared with central agencies and other departments and agencies to solicit feedback and to address any potential concerns from various policy perspectives. As the Minister of Justice, I certainly cannot speak on behalf of other departments or agencies.

Third, I want to briefly address the article in question. As you know, on April 12, 2016, public notice was given for the introduction of Bill C-14 in two day's time. Like my honourable colleagues, I was dismayed to learn that the article was published in The Globe and Mail that same day and made reference to specific aspects of the bill, mainly what would not be included in the legislation, and to a source familiar with the legislation who was not authorized to publicly speak about the bill.

Let me be clear. I did not know the identity of the source at that time, nor do I know it sitting here today.

What I can offer, honourable colleagues, is that the few details about the bill in this article are not entirely accurate, and this inconsistency between the bill and the article may be relevant to your investigation.

Specifically, the article begins by stating that the bill will exclude those who only experience mental suffering, such as people with psychiatric conditions. While it is the case that those who suffer from mental illness alone may not be likely in practical terms to qualify for medical assistance in dying, pursuant to the eligibility criteria set out in Bill C-14 as it was originally drafted and tabled in the House, the proposed legislation in no way categorically excludes such individuals. It is possible, although unlikely, that someone who only experiences mental suffering could meet all of the eligibility criteria, and therefore be able to obtain medical assistance in dying under the proposed scheme.

It is also worth noting that the article mostly speaks to what will not be in Bill C-14 and does not disclose major elements of the bill. For example, it does not address items like the eligibility criteria, the safeguards, and the monitoring regime proposed in the legislation.

Finally, I would highlight that I'm quoted toward the end of the article referring to various principles that our government sought to balance with this legislation, but of course, refusing to go into any detail about its contents.

In conclusion, honourable colleagues, let me assure you that my department, my staff, and I take this issue incredibly seriously. All matters of privilege implicate the foundational principles of our constitutional democracy, and so I commend you on the work you are doing, and I am happy to participate and take questions.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

We'll go to the first round of questioning. Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair. I may be sharing my time with Ms. Sahota.

Thank you, Minister. Our study here is based on a finding of a prima facie case of breach of privilege by the Speaker, which, as we all know, refers to...at first glance, at first appearance, that there may have been a breach here.

You mentioned in your opening remarks that the article that is the basis of this motion contains inaccuracies about the bill. It did not obviously contain the bill itself. The title of our study refers to the premature disclosure of the contents in Bill C-14 on a prima facie basis.

In your view, Minister, were the contents of Bill C-14, in fact, prematurely disclosed?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Thank you for the question, and again, thank you for the study that you're undertaking.

As I said in my remarks, there were some aspects in the article that was written on the 12th that reflected some of the excluded parts of Bill C-14, those being mature minors, advance directives or requests, and persons suffering from mental illness alone. What the article reflected mostly was what was not included in the legislation. As I commented, the specific provisions in terms of eligibility, safeguards, and monitoring weren't mentioned in the article.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So the bill itself was not really disclosed, as far as you can tell.

In your study, you also mentioned the department security officers. Now, this is something I'm not familiar with. I've never been in such a department. Can you tell us a bit more about who they are and when you'd talk to them and about what, and what their powers are in terms of department security officers?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Certainly.

We have within the Department of Justice security officers who, upon my coming into this position, and certainly with my exempt staff and departmental staff, have gone through the necessary security measures in all different forms in terms of documents of a secure nature that have different levels of categorization and the requirements to ensure that those are kept protected and secret. They go through procedures in terms of where those documents can be read, how those documents should be carried, and the responsibilities that one has in terms of the security clearance that they have. They make it very clear to me and the exempt staff, as well as departmental officials in terms of what the responsibilities are upon receiving a specific level of security clearance.

In this case, as I said in my remarks when the article was brought to my attention, and certainly when it was made public in the House of Commons, I immediately acted and asked my staff and advised my deputy to do the same with the public servants to ask and ensure that we were not the source of any breach and that we followed and complied with the strict instructions that were provided by security departmental officials.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Minister, thank you so much for making yourself available and being here before this committee today.

I'd like to talk a bit more about the psychiatric condition that you were referring to that was mentioned in The Globe and Mail article. Correct me if I'm wrong, but you stated that they didn't really get it right, that the description that was in the article was in fact not an element of the bill. Could you get into that more specifically?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Certainly. Thank you for the question.

The article that we're talking about said that the bill will exclude those who only experience mental suffering, such as people with psychiatric conditions, and this was according to that source familiar with the legislation.

I'm pleased to speak about Bill C-14 and the eligibility criteria that we have put into the legislation. The eligibility criteria does not necessarily exclude people suffering from mental illness or psychiatric conditions, but it contains a number of criteria that need to be met and circumstances in terms of the individual patient's situation and health concerns that need to be read in a comprehensive way. A person who has medical conditions, including a psychiatric condition or a mental illness, is not precluded from qualifying to meet the eligibility criteria in medical assistance in dying. A person who's suffering from a mental illness or a psychiatric condition alone would have more difficulty in qualifying. The reality in what we've done in the legislation is to look through amendments, and otherwise that we ensure that we study mental illness and we learn the risks and the benefits with respect to that, and that study in the proposed legislation has a commencement timeline of six months.

(1215)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Would the people who worked on writing this piece of legislation within your department and the various other departments have been familiar with that element of the bill? Would it be accurate to say that somebody who has worked on this legislation that was privy to this confidential material would be properly able to explain...that source would have the proper information, if it was in fact somebody from within the department?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

The Department of Justice, as I mentioned, does not develop legislation in isolation. There are many other departments and agencies that would have been involved in some fashion and had some access to the documents, to the draft legislation, because of the need and the reality of different departments contributing toward its development and the public policy framework around it.

People have varying degrees of access to it and differing levels of investment of time, in terms of its development. However, everyone who had access to the draft legislation or the development documents for the legislation would have had, and did have, the appropriate security clearances, and understood the necessities around ensuring that those security clearances and the responsibilities that go with them were followed.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Now we will go to Mr. Reid for a seven-minute round.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here in what is probably the busiest month, possibly one of the busiest weeks, of your life. We appreciate it.

I want to start by dealing with two things.

The first is what the Speaker said in his ruling when he sent this to us. He was talking about the difference between this issue and that of a former case where a private member's bill was released before its time, and whether a privilege issue is there. He said that, at that time, with the private member's bill, “no doubt existed as to the provenance of the leak”. Thereby, he directed us to the fundamental issue here, which is establishing the provenance of this leak.

Now let me read from The Globe and Mail. It says: The Liberal government is set to introduce its much-anticipated physician-assisted-dying law on Thursday, a bill that will exclude those who only experience mental suffering, such as people with psychiatric conditions, according to a source familiar with the legislation. The bill also won’t allow for advance consent, a request to end one’s life in the future, for those suffering with debilitating conditions such as dementia. In addition, there will be no exceptions for “mature minors” who have not yet reached 18 but wish to end their own lives. Those three issues, however, will be alluded to in the legislation for further study, according to the source, who is not authorized to speak publicly about the bill.

You made two assertions. One is that only negative information is included. That is not strictly true. That these issues “will be alluded to in the legislation for further study” is positive information about what is in the bill. You also say that the leak is incorrect in some of its information. I have to say that, with regard to the issue of incorrectness, this could well be a result of the journalist, Laura Stone, making a transcription error in an interview, so it may not actually be the source who was incorrect.

Additionally, with regard to only negative information being included, first of all, it is not, strictly speaking, a true statement. Second, I would submit to you that disclosure of what is not in a bill actually implies a greater comprehension of the complete content of the bill than merely being able to point to individual pictures that are in the bill, which could have resulted from somebody who was familiar only with a part of that legislation. It would suggest that, if the government is sincere in its search for the provenance, the source of the leak, it ought to be looking at someone who is familiar with the entire text of the bill.

Let me ask you this question. I apologize for being so direct, but I am sure you will appreciate why I need to do this. Are you the source of the leak?

(1220)

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I appreciate the question, because it gives me the opportunity to be crystal clear. I do not know the source of the leak. I did not know, when the article came out, where the leak came from. It was of tremendous concern to me that somebody had information about a fundamental piece of legislation that I was going to be introducing. Today, as I sit here, I do not have any idea of the source of the leak.

I am confident, however, that my—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to be very clear. I gave you that question so that you could make that clear. I appreciate that.

You mentioned there were other departments involved. The ones that come to my mind—and I'm asking you if I have the whole list here—are the Department of Justice, obviously, the Department of Health, the Prime Minister's Office, and the Privy Council Office. Would there be additional departments, or is that the complete list of where the leak could have come from?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I'll answer the question, but I'm not inferring in my answer that I have any idea where the leak came from.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It wasn't meant to draw that inference.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

In developing the legislation, certainly the Department of Justice was involved and engaged with many other departments and agencies. You're correct in saying that those included Health Canada. Certainly, on such a transformative piece of legislation, the Prime Minister's Office was aware of the contents of the legislation.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you aware if the other departments have engaged in a similar sort of process to the one you described in confirming where the leak could have come from? In other words, has there been an investigation in any of the departments to your knowledge? Perhaps you don't know that, but I will just ask that question.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I can speak with confidence on behalf of my department. There is no evidence of a breach with respect to my department. I'm confident that the breach did not occur within my department. I can't speak on behalf of any other department.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Fair enough. I think the answer is that you just don't know about the other departments' internal investigations.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I feel confident in speaking about things that I have direct control over.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's fantastic and that's very much appreciated.

I want to ask this question. As I say, I think that any incorrect information, and it would be frankly a very slight technical error, can be explained by the journalist's misunderstanding of what would have been a verbal conversation. It's also possible, and only you would know this, that the wording as described in Laura Stone's article in The Globe and Mail is consistent with an earlier draft of the bill.

If our goal is to search for the provenance, the source of the leak, then it is not inconceivable that it could be someone who had access to an earlier draft. I'm asking you now, is the information inconsistent in the ways that you described with the current wording of the bill, or the bill as it was released, but consistent with an earlier draft? If so, we can narrow our search to individuals who had access to that version of the bill, but not the final version.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

You've mentioned the reporter a number of times, and potentially, it was a technical error in terms of the reporting. I can't say one way or the other in that regard. The draft of the bill as it was introduced, and every previous draft, however different, if they were different at all, is subject to the same confidences of the Queen's Privy Council and the same procedures. Whether it was the final bill that was introduced, or previous iterations of that bill, they are subject to those same security realities. I am confident that we followed all security measures.

(1225)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want to say thank you. I really do appreciate your taking the time in what really is a busy time, and being as helpful as you've been. Thank you.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

If I could, Mr. Chair, I want to thank the member for the thoughtful nature in which he engaged with his constituents around Bill C-14.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In case you were wondering, we had a constituency referendum, and 67% of my constituents voted in favour of Bill C-14, on what I thought was an objectively worded question. So there you are.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson for seven minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I hate to break up this mutual admiration society going on here, but we have a bit of a study we have to conduct.

I want to thank you also, Minister, especially for accommodating us during our time. We had opened up to meet with you at any time that would fit your schedule, and you were good enough to meet during one of our regular meeting times. We do appreciate that and thank you very much for being here.

Do you believe there was a leak? I think that has kind of been asked about, but was there a leak?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I recognize and think about the timeline. Our notice paper went up with respect to the introduction of our bill, and there were reflections around the legislation in the article that we're talking about. Whether or not that was a significant and substantive correct guess or not, all I know, and what I'm confident of, is that if in fact it was a leak, it was certainly not from the Department of Justice.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That poses some interesting questions. You started out almost dissecting the information that was out there and it led me to think you were suggesting there wasn't a leak. Even now you're a little less than straight up about whether or not there was a leak. I'll give you another opportunity. Can you tell me straight up, do you believe there was a leak or not, ma'am?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I like to consider myself as always being straight up in the answers that I provide.

There is obviously some information that the reporter gained access to. I can't and won't hypothesize about how she was able to do that. What I have done, and what I will continue to do, is to fundamentally respect the principles of our constitutional democracy and my responsibility to ensure that I abide by those principles, and recognize that this breach that has occurred and the reason for your study is a very serious matter.

I look forward to the results of your thoughtful discussions.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Great. I'm not a lawyer, the furthest thing from it, but to me, “leak” and “breach” are close enough. If there's no leak, we shouldn't even be meeting. Somebody should be making the case that it's a wild goose chase. The fact that you're willing to say there was a breach means that we do have something here.

The last time we talked about this, for a very brief time, your chief government whip was in the room—not at the table, but in the room. I alluded to that. I asked whether the government had initiated an internal investigation from the get-go. I know you asked some questions, but was there what you would call an investigation? Did you turn to your deputy and say, “I want this investigated and I would like a report”?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I appreciate the question. Upon being made aware of the article, and hearing what transpired later on in the House of Commons, as you can appreciate, I was pretty busy that day introducing the legislation and had many events surrounding it in terms of media avails and briefings for members and senators. Upon learning of the breach, leak, whatever we want to call it—

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're getting there.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

—I did contact and asked my exempt staff if they knew anything about this. I was assured that they did not. I also contacted my deputy, who said the same.

There is no evidence of a breach coming from my department. By virtue of the lack of evidence, no investigation was done beyond what we did in terms of engaging with our staff.

(1230)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is that sufficient, though? The reason there's an investigation is it suggests something a little wider and further. You talked to the people who were around you. I used to be a provincial minister, so I know the kind of people who are around you on a day-to-day basis. But that's not the same as formally starting an investigation and asking for a report on it. Is there a reason you didn't go to that level? All your descriptive words have been “tremendous concern” and recognize the breach/leak as something that matters. Is there a reason, ma'am, that you didn't ask for a formal investigation, recognized that this very day could happen?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Absolutely. I have the utmost confidence and belief in my exempt staff, my deputy, and the public servants who work in the Department of Justice. They show the utmost of professionalism, and recognize the seriousness of ensuring that we maintain confidences and that confidential documents and security levels be adhered to. In this case, there was no evidence to necessitate an investigation, as I described in my remarks.

Mr. David Christopherson:

All right. There are protocols for the release of bills, given the importance of making sure that Parliament hears it first, which is a right and a privilege of members of Parliament. The previous government, upon finding out there had been a leak, amended the protocol. I'm curious as to whether you're still following that same amended protocol from the previous government or whether you have a new one.

I went into cabinet after the government had been formed, so I wasn't there for the immediate hand-off of the previous government. I don't have any personal experience in this regard, so I'm just asking because I don't know. The protocol, were you using the last amended version that the previous government had as a policy—and that's not a criticism, it's just a question—or did your government come in and rewrite it for your own policy steps and guidelines for introducing legislation?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Thank you for the question.

The Chair: Just briefly, Minister.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould: As I stated in my remarks, we followed the drafter's guide to cabinet documents and we followed the policy on the security of cabinet confidences. Both are located on the Privy Council Office website and are certainly accessible to determine the dates on which those were brought in.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor will be sharing with Ms. Vandenbeld for a seven-minute round.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you so much, Minister, for joining us this morning. As you are aware, PROC has been asked to investigate this matter. Part of our job is to collect as much information and facts as possible, so we appreciate your taking the time to meet with us this afternoon.

As my first question, Minister, do you feel you took the security matter seriously when you became aware of this potential situation?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Absolutely. When I became aware of this, as I stated, it concerned me greatly. It compelled me to almost immediately call my exempt staff, to engage with my deputy, to ask the question of whether we knew anything about it, to follow the procedures, and to confirm that my staff and departmental officials were not involved and followed all procedures.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Okay. Thank you.

You indicated that you immediately acted when you became aware. Can you elaborate and give more detail on what steps were taken with respect to that?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Sure. I became aware of this discussion, the article, the breach of privilege that was talked about, in the House of Commons after I came back from a press conference around Bill C-14. I was in the House and heard the chief government whip speak. Like every member of this committee and all members in the House of Commons, I take privilege very seriously, so it was a concern to me, absolutely.

At that point, I engaged in discussions over BlackBerry, called my staff in my office, spoke with all members of my exempt staff who have the security clearance to view cabinet documents, and also spoke with my deputy minister, whom I advised of the situation. He of course had already read the article. We ensured, through our conversations with exempt staff and our departmental officials, that this was a serious concern, but we confirmed that we had followed all security measures as articulated in the policies that the Privy Council Office has.

(1235)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

When you talk about, quote-unquote, exempt staff, what process do they go through to become exempt?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

There's a hiring process certainly in all the ministers' offices. The hiring process is not necessarily the same within all ministers' offices, in terms of how many people won interviews, but there's an interview process.

When somebody is made an offer of a position, that person is subject to the rules that are in place with respect to the Privy Council Office. They're subject to quite extensive security clearances in order to achieve whatever level of security clearance they're deemed appropriate to have. They're obliged through that process to follow all of the measures that are in place around confidences in terms of documents, memorandums to cabinet, development of policy papers, and the like. There's a substantive security clearance that ministers' office staff or exempt staff have to go through.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

Did you report a possible security breach to the security department?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I did not report to the departmental security department for the reason that there was no evidence that the breach had occurred within my department or within my ministerial office.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Okay. Thank you.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister, for being here today and for taking this matter so seriously.

I'd like to go back to some of the things you said about the article itself.

First, there was inaccurate information in the article, and in fact you talked about inconsistencies. With all due respect to my colleague Mr. Reid, I think when you're talking about something as important as the eligibility criteria, it's not likely there was a transcription error, so what was in the bill and what was in the article were actually not the same.

Second, the article focused more on what was not in the bill as opposed to what was in the bill. Even then, I think I heard you say that it was very much around the general principles.

In terms of what you called a “correct guess”, is this information that could easily have been inferred from things that were already public or things that had been shared during the consultation process, prior to the notice period and the tabling of the legislation? This was general enough information that it doesn't prove that anyone who wasn't supposed to actually had the text of the bill.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Thank you for the question. My answer to that is that it's a possibility. Certainly, the article talks about exclusions from the bill. It speaks to mental suffering, mature minors, and advance consent. Those are controversial issues. They were certainly issues that were substantively discussed in the special joint committee report. I don't think it's beyond the realm of possibility that one would think that any piece of proposed legislation might make reference to those issues. That's my answer right now.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Your department has very strict protocols. You outlined some of those. There was never any breach that was reported to you by your department. Can you elaborate on that?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Certainly.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Nobody in your department came to you and said, “I left it in a taxicab.” There was never anything reported in terms of any potential security breach.

(1240)

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

There was never anything reported. If there had been something like a lost document or some sort of breach of security protocols, those would have been reported immediately to my deputy, and through my deputy, to me. I never received any report.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now go to Mr. Richards for a five-minute round.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

You seem to somewhat dispute the potential regarding the one part of the bill that was leaked or potentially leaked, as the person indicated, with regard to mental suffering, and I think that's a matter for dispute. That's a matter of opinion, I think. Many people who are opposed to the bill would argue that maybe actually, in practice, that is something that is excluded from the bill. We won't dwell on that, because it seems to me as though you do indicate that you believe some of these other things certainly are excluded from the bill, and the person who has made these assertions was correct that these things are excluded.

I get a sense that the fact that there is a potential leak here is something that upsets you. I'm getting that sense from your testimony and from your answers today. Is that accurate?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Of course. I think a breach of privilege should impact all members of Parliament as a serious concern, and I appreciate the efforts that you're all undertaking in this regard.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Good, and I appreciate that. I do appreciate that you're taking this seriously and that you're trying to be as direct as you can with your responses.

Based on that, I would assume that if there was a leak—and to me it seems as though there has been one—that you would want to see that source discovered and you would want to see that issue addressed. Is that correct?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I think everybody wants to uncover the information if, in fact, there was a leak.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You would, obviously, desire that this committee do everything it can and make every effort it possibly can to discover the source of that leak. Is that correct?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I think this committee is undertaking a study to do just that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You would agree it's an important goal.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't have time to go into the details of the investigation that was done in your office. I wish I did. You have mentioned a number of times you believe quite confidently that the source of the leak was not within your office or within your department.

You have mentioned there were other departments and agencies that had access to the contents of the bill. You mentioned specifically the Department of Health and the Prime Minister's Office as being two potential places that would have access to the bill.

It would seem fairly obvious to me that the next steps for us would be to ask people in the Prime Minister's Office, and probably the Minister of Health's office what has been done and whether there have been similar investigations done, as you weren't aware whether that was the case. We should determine whether there have been similar investigations done by the department and the minister's office at Health Canada and also the Prime Minister's Office. That would seem to be the next logical step for us to follow.

It would seem the most likely source would be the communications staff in the Prime Minister's Office, or maybe the communications staff in the Minister of Health's office. Could you give us some sense as to who those individuals might be so we would know who we should be calling? We have to have some sense as to how we would conduct an investigation into the Prime Minister's Office and their handling of the contents, and also with your colleague, the Minister of Health, and her office. Can you give us any sense as to who we might call?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Maybe I could repeat some of what I said in that this piece of legislation wasn't drafted by the Department of Justice alone. My department, and I'll be very clear on this, worked closely and collaboratively with other departments, and my exempt staff worked closely with their counterparts.

As per PCO guidelines, drafts of memorandums to cabinet containing specific policy recommendations were shared with central agencies—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm sorry to interrupt you, but I'm limited on time here.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

—and other departments and agencies to solicit feedback, and all of those individuals have secret or beyond secret clearance.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's understood, but I'm limited in time. We have to get some sense. You're indicating clearly that you believe it was not in your office that this occurred, and so it must have occurred either from the PMO or the Minister of Health's office. We need to have some sense as to who we would need to call.

Would you know how many staff? Who would have had access to these documents in the Prime Minister's Office for example?

(1245)

The Chair:

In 20 seconds.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Given the references in terms of the departments that were involved in the development of this legislation, there's a substantial number of people who were involved. Given the magnitude and the transformative nature of this legislation, of course the Prime Minister's office saw the legislation, so there are many people that saw it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you. It would seem that the next step would be to call officials from the Prime Minister's Office and the Department of Health.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Lightbound, for a five-minute round.

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

I first want to thank you, Madam Minister, for being here. I think all issues of privilege ought to be taken seriously. We certainly take that seriously here, and we appreciate the rigour you bring to this committee and your presence.

The first thing I want to ask you is regarding the procedures, especially as they pertain to draft legislation and the directives of the Privy Council Office, because you went quickly on them. I noted that you talked about the mark it has to have.

I'd like you to elaborate on those policies, especially as they concern draft legislation.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

There are different levels of security that are assigned to documents. Documents that go to cabinet, memorandums to cabinet, are subject to the confidence of the Queen's Privy Council.

In terms of the development of legislation, as I indicated in my remarks, people that are considered involved and that have security clearances would be employees that are responsible for the developing of the policy and the proposal, in this case to myself as the minister, the ministerial department, and department staff, and personnel that support me in terms of making particular policy choices, central agency employees who advance the policies and the proposals brought forward by departments of supporting ministers, and legal advisers providing advice on the policy on the proposals and the issues that are subject to cabinet discussion.

All of those documents that contribute toward that are marked as subject to the confidence of the Queen's Privy Council and are secret documents. In order to review and participate in those documents, you have to have a high level of security clearance.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

It's fair to say that based on your inquiries with your exempt staff and your deputy minister, all of these procedures were followed by your department.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Yes, 100%.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

Based on that inquiry you've made, there is no breach in the chain of possession, so to speak.

It's clear that a material copy of the bill could not have ended up in the wrong hands, because those policies were followed and there was no evidence of a leak, let's say, a lost USB key or whatnot.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

That's correct.

There was no evidence of that, and individuals are obliged to come forward and disclose that if in fact that were to ever happen.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

Okay.

My other question is that the policy you've just described to us is applicable across all departments. All ministers or departments are subject to that PCO policy.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Every department and staff and departmental officials are subject to those policies.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

My last question comes back to the article. I read the article, and I've read it a couple of times in the course of our study. It seems to me that anyone who would have paid attention to a lot of the comments that were made by the government regarding the protection of vulnerable people could have inferred that those exclusions would be somewhere in the bill, especially if you consider the experience of the Quebec National Assembly, in that those exclusions are in the Quebec bill as well on assistance in dying.

Would it not be possible that this could have been an educated guess as well, that protection of the vulnerable would necessarily include or could include those elements that we see in the article? I would like to have your take on that.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

It's a possibility that it was an educated guess.

There were substantive discussions that had transpired over the course of many months from the special joint committee to recommendations made by the provincial-territorial panel and the external federal panel on medical physician-assisted dying at the time.

The answer to the question is that it's possible.

(1250)

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

That concludes my questions.

The Chair:

Okay.

We've finished early, so we'll go on for a five-minute round. Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Minister, with regard to your response to Mr. Lightbound's question a moment ago, am I to understand that you were saying that the information contained in The Globe and Mail article would have been known to members of one or more external panels that you had named?

There were two external panels that you made reference to just a moment ago.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

In my response to Mr. Lightbound's question on whether it is possible that somebody could have made an educated guess that there were these items that would have been considered in the legislation, I spoke about the special joint committee. The point I was making, perhaps very inarticulately, was that there have been some substantive conversations about physician-assisted dying, medical assistance in dying, and more controversial issues, whether the immature minor, advance directives, or persons suffering from mental illness, that were considered in many different reports, including the report of the special joint committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I must say, while this is not conclusive, the wording used in Ms. Stone's article suggests that it would have been a narrower circle of people. I'll just read what it says again: Those three issues...will be alluded to in the legislation for further study, according to the source, who is not authorized to speak publicly about the bill.

Although, obviously Ms. Stone would have taken care to keep the identity of her source confidential, to me it does suggest somebody who's somewhere inside one of the departmental apparatus. I'm not sure what the plural is, apparati? At any rate, it suggests somebody within one of the departments of government as opposed to an external panel. That's just my sense.

I want to go back to this question. The kind of person who's likely to leak something, if it is a deliberate leak, and this does seem to me like a deliberate leak, is someone who's involved in communications. You must have information as to where these documents were circulated, the later drafts of the bill, the summary of the bill, because this could have come from the legislative summary.

Do you have information as to which people in the PMO would have seen that, or do we need to go to the PMO to ask the question as to which people in that department would have had access to either the bill itself or to the summary draft of the bill?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Leaving aside your lead-up to the question, as I said, with a substantive piece of legislation such as this one, not only the Department of Justice but other departments involved in the production of the legislation, central agencies, and certainly because of the magnitude of this piece of legislation, the Prime Minister's Office would certainly have been privy to this proposed legislation.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

All of them would obviously have the appropriate levels of security to be able to review such documents.

Mr. Scott Reid:

But it's not an infinite list. We're trying to narrow it down to get to the problem of the issue.

Would you be able to get back to us, perhaps in writing, with a list of all the individuals who were informed of it, or at the very least, the departments that were in the loop and those that were not with regard to either the law itself or the legislative summary?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I appreciate the question. I'm not trying to prevent getting at the source of the details or being in any way obstructive to the question. As the Minister of Justice, I have 4,500 employees working in the department.

Mr. Scott Reid:

But they didn't all see it, obviously.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

They didn't all see it, but I imagine that we can all appreciate a piece of proposed legislation that requires approval—

Mr. Scott Reid:

There is a list of those to whom any confidential document is circulated. You have to recall those copies. At any stage, there would be a record of those to whom it was circulated, both in your department and in others.

(1255)

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I can speak to having confidence in my department. I know people have access and what level of security access they have. Certainly our department has departments within it that are responsible for particular aspects of the Department of Justice and the role that I play as minister, and I recognize that my individual exempt staff have responsibilities as well. I know who was involved in medical assistance in dying and have canvassed all the staff in following the appropriate security measures.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Now we'll go to Ms. Sahota for a five-minute round. She'll be sharing with Mr. Graham.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you, Minister. I appreciate your being clear on the topic of members' privilege here today. Could I clarify some other things with you?

We're talking about whether there was a breach of a member's privilege and whether the article or what was contained in the article rises to that definition of a breach of a member's privilege. I'd like to get your opinion on whether you think there was a premature disclosure of Bill C-14.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Nothing has come to my attention that there was premature disclosure of Bill C-14, and my department in no way, shape, or form would disclose such a sensitive piece of legislation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

I'll be sharing my time with David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. It's nice to be back.

In the last meeting when you were not here, we discussed the 41st Parliament a good deal, where a large number of government bills were discussed at great length by the ministers themselves and it was in the press. At no time did a breach of privilege ever even come to be discussed.

I'll give you a chance to react to things like the Fair Elections Act, having the quote in the paper, the ability to move the commissioner of Elections Canada where the investigators work from Elections Canada and set it up as a separate office. All kinds of very detailed descriptions were not considered a breach of privilege because the bill wasn't released.

Do you see any similarities with this and the previous practices? Do you seen any comparisons?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

There may be comparisons. Reflecting on this particular circumstance with respect to this proposed piece of legislation, the conversation of physician- assisted dying, medical assistance in dying in the context of the proposed legislation, Bill C-14 , has been a conversation that we've been having in an expansive way at least for the last seven months.

The special joint committee has been having that conversation and I as the minister who has been tasked to work on this legislation has been involved as much as I can in the development of the legislation, sharing information with Canadians about the thoughts that were being put into the legislation, ensuring that we do our part, hearing as many voices as we can to find balance in personal autonomy and the protection of the vulnerable.

These are words that I have used in advance of the tabling of the legislation and continue to use today, although now that the legislation has been tabled, I can go into detail about how we found and sought to find that balance in Bill C-14. I have been speaking to that balance all along.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're down to about a minute and a half left in this meeting.

The Chair:

Yes, you won't have your full time. There's only a minute left.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just to wrap this up, our study is very specific in referring to the premature disclosure of the bill. From what I can see, and from answers to my colleagues' questions, there was no premature disclosure of the bill, so where do you see this matter going? Where can we go further with this, if anywhere?

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

I certainly wouldn't impart on this honourable committee what the next steps would be, but what I would like to do, given that the time is running out, is assure this committee that breaches of privilege are taken and should be taken incredibly seriously, and all individuals who had access to Bill C-14 and its developmental documents have the necessary security clearances. We have the substantial policies of the Privy Council Office that ensure we abide by the security provisions to ensure that confidential documents remain in the confidence of the Queen's Privy Council. I'm confident that those were followed across the board.

(1300)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. Thank you for appearing today.

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, on a point of order, we're dealing with a question of privilege, but is it not fair to say that, given some of the testimony from the minister, we may also be dealing with someone who has broken their oath? The minister alluded a number of times to people being under oath in terms of the level of secret or above secret. She mentioned it two or three times. Does that not suggest this isn't maybe just a question of a breach of members' rights, but someone has violated their secrecy oath?

The Chair:

I think we can discuss that in the future.

Our time is up, but bring that up.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1155)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Nous sommes en public, et les médias savent maintenant que les caméras doivent sortir. Toutefois, la séance est télévisée; vous y aurez donc accès.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Pourquoi n'attendons-nous pas jusqu'à l'heure de début fixée? J'ai simplement pensé que ce serait une bonne idée de donner un petit coup de marteau pour sortir les médias d'ici, mais accordons à la ministre et à M. Christopherson le temps dont ils ont besoin.

Le président:

Je vais lire les détails pratiques pour qu'on puisse s'en débarrasser.

Bon après-midi. Nous entreprenons la 27e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour la première session de la 42e législature. Cette portion de la réunion est télévisée.

Nous poursuivons notre étude de la question de privilège concernant la divulgation prématurée de la teneur du projet de loi C-14.

M. Reid a demandé au chercheur s'il y avait des cas semblables en Nouvelle-Zélande, au Royaume-Uni et en Australie. La réponse rapide est, à moins que vous ne vouliez l'entendre de la bouche du chercheur, que l'Australie n'a pas encore répondu et que la Nouvelle-Zélande et le Royaume-Uni n'ont pas de dispositions semblables. C'est tout à fait différent. Il va vous envoyer, si vous êtes d'accord, une note d'information avec tous les détails.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci. C'est très utile.

Le président:

Je voudrais être exemplaire en commençant exactement à l'heure prévue, mais celle-ci ne sera que dans deux minutes.

Nous avons deux invités spéciaux aujourd'hui, et je vais vous dire tout de suite qui ils sont pour ne pas empiéter sur le temps de comité: deux de nos collègues qui ont pris leur retraite en 2011 et sont en quelque sorte des vedettes du Parlement.

Derek Lee sera là. Il a écrit un livre, The Power of Parliamentary Houses to Send for Persons, Records and Papers. C'est plutôt intéressant. Il a presque été le doyen de la Chambre. Sans M. Plamondon, il aurait été doyen de la Chambre quand il a pris sa retraite. Il est aussi, je crois bien, le seul député de l'histoire ayant siégé à un comité pendant 20 ans de suite, le comité d'examen de la réglementation. Ses antécédents dans le domaine sont considérables.

Nous avons aussi Paul Szabo. Vous vous rappelez peut-être qu'il a pris la parole au Parlement plus que tout autre député pendant les années où il y était.

Des anciens députés très intéressants sont donc dans l'auditoire aujourd'hui.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à notre témoin, l’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould, ministre de la Justice et procureure générale du Canada.

Merci d'être venue aujourd'hui. Je sais que tous les ministères sont très occupés; nous apprécions donc beaucoup votre présence.

Sans plus attendre, j'invite la ministre à faire sa déclaration préliminaire de 10 minutes, puis nous passerons aux questions.

(1200)

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould (ministre de la Justice et procureure générale du Canada):

Je remercie tous les honorables députés de m'avoir accordé cette occasion de comparaître devant le Comité pour parler de l'atteinte au privilège alléguée relative au projet de loi C-14, une question que je prends incroyablement au sérieux.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais parler des diverses mesures et politiques que mon ministère et mon personnel exonéré suivent pour protéger les textes législatifs avant leur présentation. Je tiens à dire très clairement que personne parmi mon personnel ou mes fonctionnaires n'a été impliqué dans toute fuite alléguée à cet égard. Deuxièmement, je précise que l'élaboration de cette mesure législative a été partagée entre plusieurs ministères et organismes. Troisièmement, je parlerai brièvement de l'article en question.

Pour commencer, je vous assure, chers collègues, que mon ministère et mon personnel exonéré prennent très au sérieux la protection des renseignements contenus dans tous les projets de loi devant être déposés, et qu'ils respectent rigoureusement toutes les politiques et procédures pertinentes.

Les fonctionnaires de mon ministère reçoivent l'ordre, par le truchement de mon sous-ministre, de suivre toutes les précautions décrites dans le Guide de rédaction des documents du Cabinet et la politique en matière de sécurité des documents confidentiels du Cabinet, qui se trouvent tous deux sur le site Web du Bureau du Conseil privé. Selon la politique du BCP sur la sécurité des documents confidentiels du Cabinet, les ébauches de projet de loi, à l'exception des versions utilisées pour la consultation publique, avec l'accord du Cabinet, sont considérés être des documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine. Ces documents doivent être marqués, manipulés et protégés en conséquence. Les documents ne peuvent être manipulés que par les personnes qui possèdent la cote de sécurité appropriée valide, et qui ont un besoin réel de connaître les renseignements pour pouvoir s'acquitter de leurs fonctions. Les restrictions d'accès aux documents confidentiels du Cabinet sont en vigueur à toutes les étapes de l'élaboration de l'ébauche.

Les personnes suivantes sont considérées comme ayant le besoin de connaître: les employés chargés de l'élaboration de politiques et de l'élaboration de propositions pour le ministre; le personnel ministériel qui appuie un ministre au sujet d'une proposition ou d'une question particulière de politique qui fait l'objet d'un débat au Cabinet; les employés des organismes centraux qui aident à faire avancer les politiques et les propositions mises de l'avant par les ministères des ministres parrains; enfin, les conseillers juridiques prodiguant des conseils au sujet d'une proposition ou d'une question de politique qui fait l'objet d'un débat au Cabinet.

Conformément à la politique du BCP, ces personnes sont tenues d'utiliser les moyens approuvés, y compris les systèmes de TI, pour préparer, conserver et transmettre les documents du Cabinet; marquer les documents confidentiels du Cabinet du niveau de confidentialité approprié, avec la mention « Documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine » sur toutes les pages du document; manipuler les renseignements en question dans une zone d'accès restreint; utiliser du matériel de sécurité et suivre les procédures approuvées pour le niveau de confidentialité de l'information pour ce qui est de transporter, de transmettre, de conserver et de supprimer des documents du Cabinet imprimés ou en format électronique; voir à ce que l'information ne soit pas abordée avec des personnes non autorisées ni vue ou entendue par de telles personnes; enfin, éviter de parler de l'information en question au moyen d'un téléphone cellulaire ou de tout autre dispositif mobile sans fil, à moins qu'un moyen sûr et autorisé ne soit utilisé.

Tous les fonctionnaires de mon ministère qui ont travaillé à cet avant-projet de loi, ainsi que tous les membres de mon personnel exonéré détenaient la cote de sécurité valide du niveau approprié.

En règle générale, tout incident de sécurité touchant les documents confidentiels du Cabinet, aussi bénin soit-il, doit être immédiatement signalé à l'agent de sécurité ministériel concerné. Cela concerne la divulgation non autorisée, la perte, le vol, la transmission, ainsi que les conversations par des voies non sécurisées, les documents disparus et les autres situations de compromis réelles, ou soupçonnées. L'agent de sécurité ministériel, pour sa part, doit immédiatement signaler l'incident à la Division des opérations de la sécurité du BCP. Sauf indication contraire du BCP, l'agent de sécurité ministériel est supposé mener une enquête administrative initiale pour déterminer ce qui est arrivé et déterminer les mesures à prendre.

En général, une enquête comprend un examen des circonstances de l'incident; si possible, la source de la divulgation non autorisée; l'adéquation des procédures du ministère pour la protection des renseignements confidentiels; une évaluation de la mesure dans laquelle l'atteinte à l'intégrité risque de causer un préjudice sérieux à l'intérêt national; et une description sommaire des mesures correctrices qui ont été ou seront mises en place pour minimiser le risque de voir se répéter de telles circonstances à l'avenir.

(1205)



Le greffier du Conseil privé et le secrétaire du Cabinet, après avoir consulté les chefs de service concernés, peuvent faire appel à la GRC. La GRC détermine alors si une enquête s'impose. S'il y a lieu, les chefs de service sont responsables de l'application des sanctions.

Permettez-moi d'être très clair. J'ai parlé avec mon sous-ministre et je peux vous assurer que mon ministère suit toutes les mesures de précaution nécessaires. Dans ce cas particulier, je peux vous assurer qu'aucune violation de la confidentialité des renseignements, ni indice d'une telle violation n'ont été signalés par le personnel ministériel et que, par conséquent, aucune enquête interne n'a été lancée.

Qui plus est, je peux personnellement vous assurer avoir parlé à tous les membres de mon personnel exonéré au sujet de cette question et qu'aucun d'entre eux n'a participé à une violation quelconque de la confidentialité des renseignements. Je crois les fonctionnaires de mon ministère et mon personnel, j'ai confiance en eux et je les crois sur parole.

Deuxièmement, chers collègues, il ne faut pas oublier que le ministère de la Justice n'était pas le seul à travailler à l'élaboration de cette mesure législative délicate. Mon ministère a travaillé en collaboration étroite avec les fonctionnaires d'autres ministères, et mon personnel exonéré a travaillé avec ses homologues dans d'autres bureaux.

De plus, conformément aux lignes directrices du BCP, on a partagé les ébauches de mémoires au Cabinet contenant des recommandations précises en matière de politique avec les organismes centraux et d'autres ministères et organismes pour en obtenir le point de vue et régler toute préoccupation éventuelle de divers points de vue politiques. En tant que ministre de la Justice, je ne peux certainement pas parler au nom des autres ministères ou organismes.

Troisièmement, je veux parler brièvement de l'article en question. Comme vous le savez, le 12 avril 2016, l'avis public visant le dépôt du projet de loi C-14 deux jours plus tard a été donné. Tout comme mes collègues, j'ai été sidérée d'apprendre que l'article était publié dans le Globe and Mail le jour même et mentionnait des aspects précis du projet de loi, principalement ceux qu'il ne comprendrait pas, citant une source qui connaît bien le texte législatif et qui n'est pas autorisée à en parler publiquement.

Je serai claire. Je ne connaissais pas l'identité de cette source à ce moment-là, pas plus que je ne la connais aujourd'hui.

Tout ce que je peux vous dire, chers collègues, c'est que les quelques détails concernant le projet de loi mentionnés dans cet article ne sont pas entièrement exacts, et ces différences entre le projet de loi et l'article peuvent être pertinentes pour votre enquête.

En particulier, l'article commence en déclarant que le projet de loi exclura ceux qui ne souffrent que d'affections mentales, comme les gens ayant une maladie psychiatrique. Bien qu'il soit vrai que les personnes qui ne souffrent que d'une maladie mentale puissent ne pas être admissibles, pratiquement parlant, à l'aide médicale à mourir, conformément aux critères d'admissibilité établis dans le projet de loi C-14 dans sa formulation initiale déposé à la Chambre, la mesure législative proposée n'exclut nullement ces personnes de façon catégorique. Il est possible, quoique peu probable, qu'une personne ayant une maladie mentale puisse répondre à tous les critères d'admissibilité et, partant, puisse être en mesure d'obtenir une aide médicale à mourir dans le cadre du projet proposé.

Il y a lieu également de noter que l'article parle principalement de ce qui ne sera pas inclus dans le projet de loi C-14, et ne révèle pas les éléments principaux du projet de loi. Par exemple, il ne soulève pas les points comme les critères d'admissibilité, les mesures de sauvegarde et le régime de surveillance proposé dans le texte législatif.

Enfin, je vous fais remarquer que, selon l'article, j'aurais parlé des divers principes que notre gouvernement a cherché à équilibrer dans ce projet de loi, mais que j'aurais, bien sûr, refusé d'entrer dans les détails du contenu.

En conclusion, chers collègues, permettez-moi de vous assurer que mon ministère, mon personnel et moi-même prenons cette question très au sérieux. Toutes les questions d'atteinte au privilège touchent les principes fondamentaux de notre démocratie constitutionnelle, et je vous félicite du travail que vous faites; je suis heureuse de participer et de répondre aux questions.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1210)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Nous passons au premier tour de questions. Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Il est possible que je partage mon temps avec Mme Sahota.

Merci, madame la ministre. Notre étude ici est fondée sur une décision du Président selon laquelle, de prime abord, il y a eu atteinte au privilège; autrement dit, à première vue, il est possible qu'il y ait eu atteinte au privilège ici.

Vous avez mentionné dans votre déclaration préliminaire que l'article à l'origine de cette motion contient des inexactitudes au sujet du projet de loi. Il n'a manifestement pas cité le projet de loi lui-même. Le titre de notre étude parle de la divulgation prématurée de la teneur du projet de loi C-14, de prime abord.

À votre avis, madame la ministre, la teneur du projet de loi C-14 a-t-elle été divulguée prématurément?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Merci pour cette question, et une fois de plus, merci pour l'étude que vous entreprenez.

Comme je l'ai dit précédemment, dans l'article publié le 12, certains aspects se rapportaient à quelques-unes des parties du projet de loi C-14 portant sur les exclusions, soit les demandes faites par les mineurs matures, les directives ou demandes anticipées et les personnes dont la seule condition médicale invoquée est la maladie mentale. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, les dispositions précises en matière d'admissibilité, de mesures de sauvegarde et de surveillance n'ont pas été mentionnées dans l'article.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À votre connaissance, donc, le projet de loi lui-même n'a pas été vraiment divulgué.

Dans votre étude, vous mentionnez également les agents de sécurité ministériels. Je ne sais pas vraiment de quoi il s'agit. Je n'ai jamais évolué dans un tel ministère. Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu plus de ces personnes, nous dire qui elles sont, les circonstances dans lesquelles on s'adresse à elles, à quel sujet, et quels sont leurs pouvoirs à titre d'agents de sécurité ministériels?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Certainement.

Nous avons au ministère de la Justice des agents de sécurité qui, à mon arrivée en poste et certainement avec mon personnel exonéré et mon personnel ministériel, ont passé en revue toutes les mesures de sécurité nécessaires, sous toutes leurs formes, en ce qui concerne les documents de nature secrète qui ont différents niveaux de sécurité et d'exigences en vue de leur protection et du maintien de leur caractère secret. Ils expliquent les procédures, c'est-à-dire où ces documents peuvent être lus, comment ces documents peuvent être transportés et quelles sont les responsabilités qu'on a au niveau de la cote de sécurité qui leur est attribuée. Ils nous expliquent très clairement, à moi-même, au personnel exonéré ainsi qu'aux fonctionnaires du ministère, les responsabilités qui accompagnent l'obtention d'une cote de sécurité d'un niveau particulier.

Dans le cas présent, comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, quand l'article m'a été signalé, et certainement quand il a été déclaré publiquement à la Chambre des communes, j'ai agi immédiatement et demandé à mon personnel — et conseillé à mon sous-ministre d'en faire de même avec les fonctionnaires — de vérifier et de s'assurer que nous n'étions pas la source d'une fuite quelconque et que nous avons suivi et respecté les instructions rigoureuses que nous ont communiquées les agents de sécurité ministériels.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Madame la ministre, merci de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais parler un peu plus des affections psychiatriques qui, d'après ce que vous avez dit, ont été mentionnées dans l'article du Globe and Mail. J'ai peut-être mal entendu, mais vous avez dit que l'auteur n'a pas dit les choses tout à fait correctement, que la description dans l'article n'était pas, de fait, un élément du projet de loi. Pouvez-vous nous parler plus spécifiquement de cela?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Certainement. Merci pour cette question.

L'article en question déclare que le projet de loi exclura les personnes souffrant de maladie mentale, comme les personnes ayant une affection psychiatrique, et cela selon cette source connaissant bien le texte législatif.

Je suis heureuse de parler du projet de loi C-14 et des critères d'admissibilité que nous avons intégrés dans le texte. Les critères d'admissibilité n'excluent pas nécessairement les personnes souffrant d'une maladie mentale ou d'une affection psychiatrique; ce sont plutôt un certain nombre de critères qui doivent être respectés et de circonstances entourant la situation individuelle du patient et ses problèmes de santé qui doivent être interprétés d'une façon globale. Une personne qui a des problèmes médicaux, y compris une affection psychiatrique ou une maladie mentale, n'est pas empêchée de répondre aux critères d'admissibilité à l'aide médicale à mourir. Une personne souffrant d'une maladie mentale ou d'une affection psychiatrique seulement aurait plus de difficulté à être admise. Ce que nous avons fait en réalité pour le projet de loi, c'est d'examiner les modificatifs, nous assurant par ailleurs que nous tenons compte des maladies mentales et que nous nous informons sur les risques et les avantages à ce sujet; la présente étude de la mesure législative proposée a un échéancier de six mois.

(1215)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les personnes qui ont travaillé à la rédaction de ce texte législatif dans votre ministère et dans les autres ministères étaient-elles au courant de cet élément du projet de loi? Aurait-on raison de dire qu'une personne qui a travaillé à ce texte législatif et a été dans le secret de sa teneur serait capable d'expliquer correctement... que la source en question aurait les renseignements pertinents, si c'était de fait quelqu'un de votre ministère?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Comme je l'ai précisé, le ministère de la Justice n'élabore pas des lois à lui seul. De nombreux autres ministères et organismes ont participé d'une façon ou d'une autre et ont eu accès aux documents, à l'avant-projet de loi, en raison des besoins et de la réalité des différents ministères contribuant à son élaboration et au cadre stratégique public qui l'entoure.

Différentes personnes ont différents degrés d'accès, et durant des périodes de diverses longueurs pour l'élaboration. Toutefois, toutes les personnes qui ont eu accès à l'avant-projet de loi ou à ses documents d'élaboration auraient eu, et avaient les cotes de sécurité appropriées et comprenaient la nécessité de respecter ces cotes de sécurité et des responsabilités qui les accompagnent.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Reid qui commence un tour de sept minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre, d'être ici aujourd'hui alors que c'est probablement le mois le plus occupé, peut-être même une des semaines les plus occupées de votre vie. Nous l'apprécions.

Je commencerai par deux choses.

La première concerne ce que le Président a dit dans sa décision quand il nous a saisis de ce dossier. Il parlait de la différence entre cette affaire et une affaire antérieure dans laquelle un projet de loi émanant des députés a été révélé prématurément, et de savoir s'il s'agissait ici d'une question de privilège. Il a déclaré qu'à l'époque, dans le cas du projet de loi émanant d'une députée, « il n'y avait [...] aucun doute quant à la source de la fuite. » Par conséquent, il nous a orientés vers la question fondamentale ici, soit identifier la source de cette fuite.

Permettez-moi maintenant de vous lire un passage du Globe and Mail: Le gouvernement libéral doit présenter jeudi le très attendu projet de loi sur l'aide médicale à mourir. Selon une source qui connaît bien le texte législatif, celui-ci ne s'appliquera pas aux personnes dont les souffrances sont uniquement mentales, par exemple, les personnes atteintes de troubles psychiatriques. Le projet de loi ne permet pas non plus le consentement préalable, c'est-à-dire qu'il ne permet pas que des personnes souffrant de maladies débilitantes comme la démence demandent à l'avance de mettre fin à leurs jours. En outre, il n'y aura pas d'exceptions pour les « mineurs matures », les moins de 18 ans qui voudraient mourir. Cependant, le projet de loi fera allusion à ces questions pour qu'elles fassent l'objet d'autres études, selon la source qui n'est pas autorisée à parler publiquement du texte législatif.

Vous avez fait deux assertions. La première, que seuls des renseignements négatifs ont été mentionnés. Cela, à strictement parler, n'est pas vrai. La mention que le projet de loi fera allusion à ces questions pour qu'elles fassent l'objet d'autres études constitue un renseignement positif au sujet de la teneur du projet de loi. Vous dites également que la fuite est erronée au niveau de certains renseignements. Je dois mentionner que, en ce qui concerne la question d'inexactitude, celle-ci pourrait très bien provenir du fait que la journaliste, Laura Stone, a commis une erreur de transcription dans une entrevue; il est donc possible que ce ne soit pas la source elle-même qui était dans l'erreur.

De plus, en ce qui concerne le fait que seuls des renseignements négatifs étaient inclus, tout d'abord, cela n'est pas, à strictement parler, une déclaration véridique. Deuxièmement, je vous dirai que la divulgation de ce qui ne fait pas partie d'un projet de loi laisse supposer une compréhension de la teneur entière du projet de loi plus vaste que la simple capacité de mentionner des points ici et là du contenu du projet de loi, ce qui aurait pu provenir d'une personne qui ne connaît qu'une partie du texte législatif. Cela laisse entendre que, si le gouvernement est sincère dans son désir de trouver la provenance, la source de la fuite, il devrait chercher une personne qui connaît le texte entier du projet de loi.

Permettez-moi de vous poser cette question. Je m'excuse d'être si direct, mais je suis sûr que vous comprendrez pourquoi j'ai besoin de l'être. Êtes-vous la source de la fuite?

(1220)

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

J'apprécie la question, parce qu'elle m'offre l'occasion d'être claire comme de l'eau de roche. Je ne sais pas qui est la source de la fuite. Quand l'article est paru, je ne savais pas qui en était la source. J'étais complètement sidérée à l'idée que quelqu'un disposait de renseignements au sujet d'un texte législatif fondamental que j'allais présenter. Aujourd'hui, ici devant vous, je n'ai aucune idée de la source de la fuite.

J'ai confiance, toutefois, que mes...

M. Scott Reid:

Je tiens à être très clair. Je vous ai posé cette question pour que vous puissiez être vous-même très claire. Je l'apprécie.

Vous avez mentionné que d'autres ministères étaient en cause. Ceux qui me viennent à l'esprit — et je vous demande si vous avez une liste complète ici — sont le ministère de la Justice, manifestement, le ministère de la Santé, le Cabinet du premier ministre et le Bureau du Conseil privé. Y aurait-il d'autres ministères, ou est-ce là la liste complète des points qui pourraient être à l'origine de la fuite?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je vais répondre à la question, mais je ne sous-entends nullement dans la réponse que j'ai une idée quelconque de la source de la fuite.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'avais nullement l'intention de tirer cette conclusion par ma question.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Dans l'élaboration du texte législatif, le ministère de la Justice était, manifestement, actif et engagé avec de nombreux autres ministères et organismes. Vous avez raison quand vous dites que ceux-ci comprenaient Santé Canada. Aussi, avec un texte législatif aussi transformateur, le Cabinet du premier ministre était aussi, assurément, au courant de la teneur du projet de loi.

M. Scott Reid:

Savez-vous si d'autres ministères ont entrepris, comme vous l'avez décrit, un processus visant à confirmer l'origine de la fuite? En d'autres termes, savez-vous si une enquête a été menée dans n'importe lequel des ministères? Vous ne le savez peut-être pas, mais je pose simplement la question.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je peux me prononcer avec assurance au nom de mon ministère. Il n'y a aucune preuve de violation dans mon ministère. Je suis convaincue que la fuite ne provient pas de mon ministère. Je ne peux pas parler au nom des autres ministères.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Je crois que vous me dites dans votre réponse que vous n'êtes simplement pas au courant d'enquêtes internes dans d'autres ministères.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je peux parler avec assurance de choses qui relèvent directement de moi.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est fantastique, et très apprécié.

Laissez-moi vous poser une question. Comme je l'ai dit, je crois que tout renseignement erroné, et cela serait franchement une erreur technique très légère, pourrait être expliqué par le fait que la journaliste aurait pu avoir mal interprété une conversation verbale. Il est possible également, et vous seule le saurez, que la formulation dans l'article de Laura Stone dans le Globe and Mail correspond à une ébauche antérieure du projet de loi.

Nous avons pour objectif de trouver la source de la fuite; il n'est donc pas inconcevable que celle-ci pourrait être une personne qui avait accès à une ébauche antérieure. Je vous demande donc maintenant: est-ce que les renseignements ne concordent pas exactement comme vous l'avez décrit à la formulation du projet de loi, ou du projet de loi tel qu'il a été publié, ou concordent-ils à une ébauche antérieure? Le cas échéant, cela pourrait nous permettre de limiter notre recherche à des personnes qui avaient accès à cette version du projet de loi, mais pas à la version définitive.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Vous avez mentionné la journaliste à plus d'une reprise et il n'est pas impossible que c'était une erreur technique à ce niveau. Je ne le sais pas. L'ébauche du projet de loi tel qu'il a été présenté, et chacune des ébauches antérieures, aussi différentes soient-elles, le cas échéant, sont assujetties au même degré et aux mêmes procédures de confidentialité des documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine. Qu'il s'agisse du projet de loi définitif qui a été présenté ou des versions antérieures de ce projet de loi, tous ces documents sont assujettis aux mêmes mesures de sécurité. Je suis convaincue que nous avons respecté toutes les mesures de sécurité.

(1225)

M. Scott Reid:

Permettez-moi de vous remercier. J'apprécie beaucoup le fait que vous ayez pris le temps de venir pendant une période qui est très occupée et d'avoir été aussi aimable que vous l'avez été. Merci.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, j'aimerais remercier le député de la considération avec laquelle il a traité le sujet du projet de loi C-14 avec ses électeurs.

M. Scott Reid:

Au cas où vous vous poseriez la question, nous avons tenu un référendum dans ma circonscription, et 67 % de mes électeurs ont voté en faveur du projet de loi C-14, en réponse à une question qui, à mon avis, était formulée de façon objective. Voilà ce qu'il en est.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Christopherson, à vous la parole pendant sept minutes.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Sans vouloir mettre fin à ce festival d'admiration mutuelle, j'aimerais attirer votre attention sur le fait que nous avons une étude à mener.

J'aimerais moi aussi vous remercier, madame la ministre, surtout pour avoir été si conciliante à l'égard de notre horaire. Nous avions fait en sorte de pouvoir vous rencontrer à n'importe quel moment qui conviendrait à votre calendrier, et vous avez été très aimable en venant nous rencontrer au cours d'une de nos réunions normales. Nous l'apprécions grandement et nous vous remercions de votre présence.

Croyez-vous qu'il y ait eu une fuite? Je crois que c'est une question qui a été posée en quelque sorte, mais y a-t-il eu effectivement fuite?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je pense ici à la suite des événements. Notre avis est paru dans le Feuilleton au sujet de la présentation de notre projet de loi, et il y a eu des observations sur la mesure législative dans l'article en question. Qu'il s'agisse ou non de choses importantes et substantielles que la journaliste a estimées correctement, tout ce que je sais et dont je suis sûre, c'est que s'il y a eu effectivement fuite, celle-ci ne provient certainement pas du ministère de la Justice.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela soulève certaines questions intéressantes. Vous avez commencé en décortiquant presque les renseignements existants et cela m'a amené à penser que vous laissez entendre qu'il n'y a pas eu de fuite. Même maintenant, vous ne répondez pas vraiment directement à la question à savoir s'il y a eu fuite ou non. Je vais vous offrir une autre occasion. Pouvez-vous me dire carrément, madame, si à votre avis, il y a eu fuite ou non?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Il me semble que je suis toujours directe dans mes réponses.

De toute évidence, la journaliste a eu accès à certains renseignements. Je ne sais pas et ne devinerai pas comment elle a pu faire cela. Ce que j'ai fait et ce que je continuerai à faire, c'est de respecter fondamentalement les principes de notre démocratie constitutionnelle et de m'acquitter de ma responsabilité de veiller à respecter ces principes; je reconnais également que la violation de la confidentialité qui a eu lieu et qui est le motif de votre étude est une question très grave.

J'ai hâte d'entendre les résultats de vos discussions éclairées.

M. David Christopherson:

Bon, je ne suis pas un avocat, je suis très loin de l'être, mais à mon sens, « fuite » et « violation de la confidentialité » sont très proches. S'il n'y a pas eu de fuite, nous ne devrions même pas nous rencontrer. Quelqu'un devrait déclarer que c'est une démarche futile. Le simple fait que vous êtes disposée à dire qu'il y a eu violation de la confidentialité signifie qu'il y a là quelque chose.

La dernière fois que nous avons parlé de cela, pendant très peu de temps, votre whip en chef du gouvernement était dans la salle — pas à la table, mais dans la salle. J'y ai fait allusion. J'ai demandé si le gouvernement avait lancé une enquête interne dès le départ. Je sais que vous avez posé quelques questions, mais y a-t-il eu ce qu'on pourrait qualifier d'enquête? Vous êtes-vous tournée vers votre sous-ministre en disant « Je veux qu'une enquête soit menée à ce sujet, et je veux recevoir un rapport »?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

J'apprécie la question. Quand j'ai été informée de l'article et que j'ai entendu ce qui est arrivé plus tard à la Chambre des communes, comme vous pouvez vous en douter, j'ai été très occupée cette journée-là au dépôt du projet de loi et j'ai eu de nombreuses choses à faire en ce qui concerne les exigences des médias et la présentation de renseignements aux députés et aux sénateurs. Dès que j'ai été informée de la violation de la confidentialité, de la fuite, quelle que soit la façon dont vous voulez l'appeler...

M. David Christopherson:

On y arrive.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

... j'ai communiqué avec mon personnel exonéré et lui ai demandé s'il était au courant de quoi que ce soit à cet égard. On m'a assurée qu'il n'en savait rien. J'ai aussi communiqué avec mon sous-ministre, qui a dit la même chose.

Il n'y a aucune preuve de violation de la confidentialité venant de mon ministère. En l'absence de preuve, nous n'avons procédé à aucune enquête autre que ces communications avec notre personnel.

(1230)

M. David Christopherson:

Mais cela suffit-il? La raison pour laquelle une enquête a lieu laisse entendre qu'il y a quelque chose de plus étendu et de plus élaboré. Vous avez parlé aux personnes qui vous entourent. J'ai déjà été un ministre provincial, et je sais donc qui sont les gens qui vous entourent tous les jours. Toutefois, ce n'est pas la même chose que lancer officiellement une enquête et demander un rapport sur celle-ci. Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle vous n'avez pas été jusque-là? Tous vos termes descriptifs étaient de l'ordre de « très grande préoccupation », et reconnaissaient que la violation de la confidentialité ou la fuite est quelque chose de grave. Y a-t-il une raison, madame, pour laquelle vous n'avez pas exigé une enquête officielle, reconnaissant qu'une situation comme aujourd'hui pourrait arriver?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Absolument. J'accorde la plus grande confiance à mon personnel exonéré, à mon sous-ministre et aux fonctionnaires qui travaillent au ministère de la Justice. Ils font preuve d'un professionnalisme extrême, et reconnaissent à quel point il est important de veiller à ce que nous protégions les documents confidentiels et à ce que la confidentialité et les niveaux de sécurité soient respectés. Dans le cas présent, il n'y avait aucune preuve nécessitant une enquête, comme je l'ai précisé dans mes observations.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Il y a des protocoles à suivre pour la publication des projets de loi, compte tenu de l'importance de faire en sorte que le Parlement soit le premier à les entendre, ce qui est un droit et un privilège des députés. Le gouvernement précédent, après avoir découvert qu'il y avait eu une fuite, a modifié le protocole. Je suis curieux de savoir si vous suivez encore le protocole modifié par le gouvernement précédent, ou si vous avez un nouveau protocole.

J'ai accédé à mon poste après que le gouvernement ait été formé, et donc je n'étais pas présent au moment où le gouvernement précédent a transmis les rênes. Je n'ai aucune expérience personnelle à cet égard, ce qui explique pourquoi je pose la question. Ce n'est pas une critique, simplement une question: suiviez-vous la version modifiée de l'ancien protocole que le gouvernement avait établie comme politique, ou votre gouvernement est-il intervenu et l'a réécrit comme politique, démarche et ligne directrice qui vous sont propres pour la présentation du projet de loi?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Merci de cette question.

Le président: Très brièvement, madame la ministre.

L'hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould: Comme je l'ai mentionné dans mes observations, nous avons suivi le guide de rédaction des documents du Cabinet, et nous avons suivi la politique sur la sécurité des documents confidentiels du Cabinet. Ces deux documents se trouvent sur le site Web du Bureau du Conseil privé, et sont certainement accessibles si l'on veut déterminer leur date d'entrée en vigueur.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Petitpas Taylor, vous partagerez sept minutes avec Mme Vandenbeld.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci

Merci, madame la ministre, de vous joindre à nous ce matin. Comme vous le savez, notre comité a reçu l'ordre de faire enquête sur cette question. Une partie de notre travail consiste à recueillir autant de renseignements et de faits que possible, et nous vous sommes donc reconnaissants d'avoir pris le temps de nous rencontrer cet après-midi.

Comme première question, madame la ministre, je vous demanderai: avez-vous pris la question de sécurité au sérieux quand vous avez pris connaissance de cette situation potentielle?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Absolument. Quand j'ai pris conscience de la situation, comme je l'ai déjà dit, j'en ai été grandement préoccupée. J'ai été poussée à appeler presque immédiatement mon personnel exonéré, à communiquer avec mon sous-ministre et à demander si nous savions quelque chose à ce sujet et de suivre les procédures pour confirmer que mon personnel et les fonctionnaires du ministère n'étaient pas impliqués et avaient suivi toutes les procédures.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Très bien. Merci.

Vous avez dit que vous avez agi immédiatement quand vous avez pris conscience de la situation. Pouvez-vous me parler plus en détail des mesures que vous avez prises à cet égard?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Bien sûr. J'ai pris connaissance de cette discussion, de l'article, de l'atteinte au privilège dont il était question, à la Chambre des communes en revenant d'une conférence de presse sur le projet de loi C-14. J'étais à la Chambre quand j'ai entendu le whip en chef du gouvernement parler. Comme tous les membres de ce comité et tous les députés à la Chambre des communes, je prends très au sérieux la question du privilège, et donc cela m'a inquiétée, absolument.

À ce stade, j'ai commencé à échanger des messages par BlackBerry, à appeler mon personnel à mon bureau, à parler avec tous les membres de mon personnel exonéré détenant la cote de sécurité leur permettant de voir les documents du Cabinet, et j'ai aussi parlé avec mon sous-ministre que j'ai informé de la situation. Il avait, bien sûr, déjà lu l'article. Nous avons confirmé, par le truchement de nos conversations avec le personnel exonéré et nos fonctionnaires ministériels, qu'il s'agissait d'une préoccupation grave, mais nous avons confirmé aussi que nous avions suivi toutes les mesures de sécurité énoncées dans les politiques du Bureau du Conseil privé.

(1235)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Parlant du personnel exonéré, quel est le processus auquel il est soumis pour devenir exonéré?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Un processus d'embauche est certainement en vigueur dans tous les bureaux de ministre. Le processus d'embauche n'est pas forcément le même dans tous les bureaux de ministre, en ce qui concerne le nombre de personnes à qui des entrevues sont accordées, mais il y a un processus d'entrevues.

Quand on offre un poste à une personne, cette personne est assujettie aux règles du Bureau du Conseil privé. Elle fait l'objet d'un contrôle de sécurité très exhaustif afin d'obtenir la cote de sécurité qui a été jugée appropriée pour elle. Cette personne est obligée, par le truchement de ce processus, de respecter toutes les mesures en vigueur au sujet de la confidentialité, sur le plan des documents, des mémoires au Cabinet, des documents d'élaboration de politiques, et ce genre de choses. Il y a un contrôle de sécurité rigoureux que le personnel du bureau du ministre ou le personnel exonéré doit subir.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Avez-vous signalé au service de sécurité une atteinte éventuelle à la sécurité?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je n'ai rien signalé au service de sécurité ministériel pour la simple raison qu'il n'y avait aucun indice démontrant que l'atteinte à la sécurité s'était produite au sein de mon ministère ou de mon bureau ministériel.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Bon. Merci.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, pour votre présence ici aujourd'hui et pour prendre cette question tellement au sérieux.

J'aimerais revenir à certaines des choses que vous avez dites au sujet de l'article lui-même.

Tout d'abord, l'article contenait des renseignements erronés et, de fait, vous avez parlé d'incohérences. Malgré tout mon respect envers mon collègue, M. Reid, je crois que quand on parle d'une chose aussi importante que les critères d'admissibilité, il est peu probable qu'il y ait eu erreur de transcription; par conséquent, ce qui était dans le projet de loi et ce qui était dans l'article n'étaient pas la même chose.

Deuxièmement, l'article parlait davantage de ce qui ne figurait pas dans le projet de loi, par opposition à ce qui y figure. Même là, j'ai cru vous entendre dire que cela portait principalement sur des principes très généraux.

En ce qui concerne ce que vous appelez « des choses que la journaliste a estimées correctement », ces renseignements peuvent-ils avoir été aisément déduits de choses qui étaient déjà publiques ou de choses qui avaient été dites durant le processus de consultation, avant la période d'avis et le dépôt du projet de loi? Ces renseignements étaient tellement généraux que rien ne prouve que quelqu'un qui n'était pas censé l'avoir avait en fait le texte du projet de loi.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Merci de cette question. C'est une possibilité. Assurément, l'article parle des exclusions du projet de loi. Il parle des souffrances mentales, des mineurs matures et du consentement anticipé. Ce sont là des questions qui prêtent à controverse. Ce sont certainement des questions dont il est longuement question dans le rapport du comité mixte spécial. À mon avis, il n'est pas impossible qu'on puisse supposer que tout texte législatif proposé puisse soulever ces questions. C'est tout ce que je peux vous répondre maintenant.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Votre ministère a des protocoles très rigoureux. Vous en avez décrit quelques-uns. Il n'y a jamais eu de violation de la confidentialité que votre ministère vous a signalée. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage à ce sujet?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Certainement.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Personne dans votre ministère n'est venu vous dire « Je l'ai oublié dans un taxi ». Rien ne vous a jamais été signalé au niveau d'une violation potentielle de la sécurité.

(1240)

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Jamais rien n'a été signalé. S'il y avait eu quelque chose comme un document perdu ou une violation quelconque des protocoles de sécurité, cela aurait été signalé immédiatement à mon sous-ministre et à moi, et par le truchement de celui-ci. Je n'ai jamais reçu de rapport.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Richards, c'est votre tour, pendant cinq minutes.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Vous semblez contester en quelque sorte le fait que la partie du projet de loi concernant les souffrances mentales a été révélée ou possiblement révélée, d'après cette personne. À mon avis, il y a là matière à controverse; c'est une question d'opinion. Plusieurs des personnes qui s'opposent au projet de loi diraient qu'effectivement, en pratique, c'est quelque chose qui a été exclu du projet de loi. Nous ne nous attarderons pas là-dessus, car il me semble que vous avez déclaré estimer que certaines des autres choses sont assurément exclues du projet de loi, et la personne qui a fait ces assertions avait raison de dire que ces choses étaient exclues.

J'ai l'impression que le fait même d'une fuite éventuelle est ce qui vous perturbe. Je retire cette impression de votre témoignage et de vos réponses aujourd'hui. Ai-je raison?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Bien sûr. Je crois qu'une atteinte au privilège devrait être considérée par tous les députés comme un grave motif de préoccupation, et j'apprécie les efforts que vous consacrez tous à cet égard.

M. Blake Richards:

Bon, et j'apprécie cela. J'apprécie que vous preniez la situation au sérieux et que vous tentiez d'être aussi directe que vous le pouvez dans vos réponses.

Cela étant, je suppose que s'il y avait fuite — et il me semble qu'il y en a effectivement eu une —, vous voudriez que la source soit découverte et que le problème soit réglé, n'est-ce pas?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je crois que tout le monde veut découvrir cette information si, de fait, il y a eu fuite.

M. Blake Richards:

De toute évidence, vous souhaiteriez que ce comité fasse son possible pour découvrir la source de cette fuite, n'est-ce pas?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je crois que ce comité entreprend une étude à cette fin justement.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous convenez que c'est un but important.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Blake Richards:

Je n'ai pas le temps d'entrer dans les détails de l'enquête qui a été menée dans votre bureau. J'aurais aimé pouvoir le faire. Vous avez mentionné à plusieurs reprises être convaincue que la source de la fuite n'est pas dans votre bureau ni dans votre ministère.

Vous dites que d'autres ministères et organismes avaient accès au contenu du projet de loi. Vous avez mentionné en particulier le ministère de la Santé et le Cabinet du premier ministre, qui seraient deux milieux éventuels ayant eu accès au projet de loi.

Il me semble assez évident que la prochaine étape pour nous serait de demander au Cabinet du premier ministre et probablement au bureau de la ministre de la Santé ce qui a été fait et si des enquêtes semblables ont été effectuées, étant donné que vous ne saviez pas si c'était le cas. Nous devrions déterminer s'il y a eu des enquêtes semblables effectuées par le ministère et le bureau de la ministre à Santé Canada, et au Cabinet du premier ministre. Il me semble que ce serait la prochaine étape logique pour nous.

Il me semble que la source la plus probable serait le personnel des communications du Cabinet du premier ministre, ou peut-être le personnel des communications du bureau de la ministre de la Santé. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de l'identité de ces personnes pour que nous sachions qui appeler? Il nous faut avoir une certaine idée de la façon d'aborder une enquête au Cabinet du premier ministre et déterminer la façon dont ils ont traité le contenu, ainsi qu'auprès de votre collègue, la ministre de la Santé et son bureau. Pouvez-vous nous dire qui nous pourrions appeler?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je précise de nouveau que le ministère de la Justice n'a pas élaboré seul ce texte législatif. Mon ministère, et je serai très claire là-dessus, a collaboré étroitement avec d'autres ministères, et mon personnel exonéré a travaillé étroitement avec ses homologues.

Conformément aux lignes directrices du BCP, les ébauches de mémoire au Cabinet contenant des recommandations précises sur des politiques étaient partagées avec les organismes centraux...

M. Blake Richards:

Excusez-moi de vous interrompre, mais j'ai peu de temps.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

... et d'autres ministères et organismes pour obtenir leur rétroaction, et toutes ces personnes avaient la cote de sécurité Secret ou une cote supérieure.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai bien compris cela, mais j'ai peu de temps. Nous voulons avoir une certaine orientation. Vous avez déclaré clairement ne pas croire que la fuite provient de votre bureau, et elle doit donc provenir soit du CPM, soit du bureau de la ministre de la Santé. Nous voulons avoir une idée de qui appeler.

Savez-vous combien de membres du personnel? Qui aurait accès à ces documents au Cabinet du premier ministre, par exemple?

(1245)

Le président:

En 20 secondes.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Compte tenu des références sur le plan des ministères qui ont participé à l'élaboration de ce texte législatif, le nombre des personnes qui ont participé est très élevé. Étant donné l'ampleur et la nature transformatrice de ce projet de loi, le Cabinet du premier ministre a vu, bien sûr, le texte; il y a donc de nombreuses personnes qui l'ont vu.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci. Il semblerait que la prochaine étape pour nous consisterait à appeler les fonctionnaires du Cabinet du premier ministre et du ministère de la Santé.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Lightbound, c'est votre tour; vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

J'aimerais tout d'abord vous remercier, madame la ministre, de votre présence. Je crois que toutes les questions de privilège doivent être prises au sérieux. Nous les prenons certainement au sérieux ici, et nous apprécions la rigueur que vous apportez à ce comité, de même que votre présence.

La première chose que j'aimerais vous demander concerne les procédures, surtout en ce qui a trait à l'avant-projet de loi et aux directives du Bureau du Conseil privé, parce que vous êtes passée très vite là-dessus. J'ai remarqué que vous avez parlé de la marque que les documents doivent porter.

J'aimerais que vous m'en disiez davantage au sujet de ces politiques, surtout en ce qui a trait à un avant-projet de loi.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Il y a différents niveaux de sécurité qui sont attribués aux documents. Les documents qui vont au Cabinet, les mémoires au Cabinet sont des documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine.

Quant à l'élaboration d'un texte législatif, comme je l'ai précisé dans mes observations, les personnes participantes, et qui ont les cotes de sécurité, seraient les employés responsables de l'élaboration de la politique et de la proposition, dans le cas présent à moi, en tant que ministre, le ministère, le personnel ministériel et le personnel qui m'appuie dans les choix de politique particuliers, les employés des organismes centraux qui font avancer les politiques et les propositions présentées par les services qui appuient les ministres, ainsi que les conseillers juridiques qui prodiguent des conseils sur les politiques, les propositions et les questions qui sont matière à débat au Cabinet.

Tous ces documents sont marqués comme étant des documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine, et sont des documents secrets. Pour pouvoir passer en revue ces documents et participer à leur élaboration, il faut avoir une cote de sécurité élevée.

M. Joël Lightbound:

On peut supposer que, d'après ce que vous avez demandé à votre personnel exonéré et à votre sous-ministre, toutes ces procédures ont été suivies à votre ministère.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Oui, à 100 %.

M. Joël Lightbound:

D'après cette enquête que vous avez menée, il n'y a pas eu de coupure dans la chaîne de possession, pour ainsi dire.

Il est clair qu'une copie matérielle du projet de loi n'aurait pas pu finir entre de mauvaises mains, parce que ces politiques ont été suivies et qu'il n'y a eu aucune preuve de fuite, comme, par exemple, une clé USB égarée, ou quelque chose du genre.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

C'est exact.

Il n'y avait aucune preuve de cela et, de fait, les personnes sont tenues de le déclarer si cela devait arriver.

M. Joël Lightbound:

Bon.

Mon autre question porte sur le fait que la politique que vous venez de nous décrire s'applique à tous les ministères. Tous les ministres ou ministères sont assujettis à cette politique du BCP.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Tous les ministères, leur personnel et leurs fonctionnaires sont assujettis à ces politiques.

M. Joël Lightbound:

Ma dernière question revient à l'article. J'ai lu l'article, et je l'ai relu une ou deux fois dans le cadre de notre étude. Il me semble que n'importe qui ayant écouté attentivement les nombreux commentaires faits par le gouvernement au sujet de la protection des personnes vulnérables pourrait avoir déduit que ces exclusions seraient mentionnées dans le projet de loi, surtout si l'on tient compte de l'expérience de l'Assemblée législative du Québec, étant donné que ces exclusions figurent également dans le projet de loi du Québec sur l'aide à mourir.

Ne serait-il pas possible que cela ait été une estimation éclairée également, que la protection des personnes vulnérables comprendrait forcément ou pourrait comprendre les éléments que nous voyons dans l'article? J'aimerais avoir votre opinion là-dessus.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Il est possible que cela ait été une estimation éclairée.

À l'époque, le comité mixte spécial a tenu de nombreuses discussions approfondies au cours de nombreux mois pour les recommandations faites par le groupe consultatif provincial-territorial et le comité externe du gouvernement fédéral sur l'aide médicale à mourir.

La réponse à la question est que cela est possible.

(1250)

M. Joël Lightbound:

C'est tout pour mes questions.

Le président:

Très bien.

Nous avons fini plus tôt; nous poursuivrons donc avec un tour de cinq minutes. M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Madame la ministre, en ce qui concerne votre réponse à la question de M. Lightbound il y a un moment, dois-je comprendre que vous dites que les renseignements contenus dans l'article du Globe and Mail auraient été connus par les membres d'un ou de plusieurs des groupes consultatifs externes que vous avez nommés?

Vous venez de faire allusion à deux groupes consultatifs externes.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

En répondant à la question de M. Lightbound sur la possibilité que quelqu'un puisse avoir déduit que ces points seraient mentionnés dans le projet de loi, j'ai parlé d'un comité mixte spécial. Je voulais simplement faire ressortir, peut-être pas très efficacement, le fait qu'il y a eu un grand nombre de débats au sujet de l'aide médicale à mourir et d'autres questions controversées, qu'il s'agisse des mineurs immatures, des directives précoces ou des personnes souffrant de maladie mentale, qui ont été prises en compte dans de nombreux rapports différents, y compris le rapport du comité mixte spécial.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est bien.

Je dois dire que, bien que cela ne soit pas concluant, la formulation de l'article de Mme Stone permet de supposer qu'il s'agit d'un plus petit cercle de personnes. Je vais vous lire cela de nouveau: [L]e projet de loi fera allusion à ces questions pour qu'elles fassent l'objet d'autres études, selon la source qui n'est pas autorisée à parler publiquement du texte législatif.

Bien que, de toute évidence, Mme Stone ait pris soin de garder confidentielle l'identité de sa source, il me semble que c'est quelqu'un se trouvant quelque part à l'intérieur de l'appareil ministériel. En tout cas, cela laisse supposer qu'il s'agit de quelqu'un de l'un des ministères plutôt que d'un groupe consultatif externe. C'est mon impression.

J'aimerais revenir sur cette question. Le genre de personne susceptible de laisser fuir quelque chose, si c'est une fuite délibérée, ce qui semble être le cas, est une personne du milieu des communications. Vous devez savoir où ces documents ont été diffusés, les dernières ébauches du projet de loi, le sommaire du projet de loi, parce que cette information pourrait provenir du sommaire du texte législatif.

Savez-vous qui au CPM aurait vu ces documents, ou devons-nous nous adresser directement au CPM pour demander qui dans ce service aurait eu accès soit au projet de loi lui-même, soit au sommaire de l'ébauche du projet de loi?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Laissant de côté votre introduction à la question, je répète qu'avec un projet de loi aussi important que celui-ci, ce n'est pas seulement le ministère de la Justice, mais aussi d'autres ministères qui ont participé à la production du texte législatif, des organismes centraux et, compte tenu de l'ampleur de ce projet de loi, certainement le Cabinet du premier ministre.

M. Scott Reid:

En effet.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Toutes ces personnes auraient détenu, manifestement, les cotes de sécurité appropriées leur permettant de passer en revue ces documents.

M. Scott Reid:

Mais ce n'est pas une liste infinie. Nous essayons de resserrer le champ de recherche pour arriver au coeur de la question.

Serez-vous en mesure de nous revenir, peut-être par écrit, avec une liste de toutes les personnes qui étaient au courant, ou tout du moins des ministères qui étaient dans le coup et de ceux qui ne l'étaient pas, en ce qui concerne le projet de loi lui-même ou le sommaire législatif?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

J'apprécie la question. Je n'essaie pas d'éviter qu'on arrive à la source des détails, ou de faire obstacle de quelque façon que ce soit à la question. En tant que ministre de la Justice, j'ai 4 500 employés qui travaillent dans le ministère.

M. Scott Reid:

Mais ils ne l'ont pas tous vu, de toute évidence.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Ils ne l'ont pas tous vu, mais j'imagine que nous pouvons tous apprécier qu'une mesure législative proposée nécessitant l'approbation...

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a une liste de diffusion comprenant le nom des personnes à qui des documents confidentiels ont été envoyés. Vous devez vous souvenir de ces copies. Il y aurait, à n'importe quel stade, une piste de ceux à qui les documents ont été communiqués, tant dans votre ministère que dans les autres.

(1255)

Le président:

Vous avez 20 secondes.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je peux affirmer que j'ai confiance en mon ministère. Je connais les personnes qui ont accès et à quel niveau de sécurité se situe leur accès. Assurément, notre ministère compte des services qui sont responsables d'aspects particuliers du ministère de la Justice et de mon rôle de ministre, et je reconnais que les membres individuels de mon personnel exonéré ont des responsabilités également. Je sais qui a participé à l'aide à mourir, et j'ai fait le tour de tout le personnel pour déterminer que les mesures de sécurité appropriées ont été suivies.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota pour un tour de cinq minutes qu'elle partagera avec M. Graham.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci, madame la ministre. J'apprécie votre candeur quant au sujet du privilège des députés. Puis-je vous demander quelques éclaircissements?

Il s'agit de déterminer s'il y a eu atteinte au privilège des députés et si l'article ou les points contenus dans l'article correspondent à la définition d'atteinte au privilège des députés. Y a-t-il eu d'après vous divulgation prématurée de la teneur du projet de loi C-14?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je ne vois rien qui semble indiquer qu'il y a eu divulgation prématurée de la teneur du projet de loi C-14, et mon ministère ne divulguerait jamais, d'aucune façon que ce soit, une mesure législative si délicate.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Je partage mon temps avec David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. C'est bon d'être de retour.

Au cours de la dernière réunion quand vous n'étiez pas là, nous avons beaucoup parlé de la 41e législature, où un nombre élevé de projets de loi ont été discutés en long et en large par les ministres eux-mêmes, et cela était dans la presse. À aucun moment, la question de l'atteinte au privilège n'a été soulevée.

Je vais vous donner l'occasion de réagir à des choses comme la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, la citation dans le journal, la possibilité de déplacer le commissaire aux élections fédérales de là où les enquêteurs travaillent à Élections Canada, et de l'installer dans un bureau distinct. Toutes sortes de descriptions détaillées n'ont pas été considérées comme une atteinte au privilège parce que le projet de loi n'avait pas été rendu public.

Voyez-vous des similitudes entre ceux-ci et les pratiques antérieures? Voyez-vous des aspects comparables?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Il peut y avoir des aspects comparables. En ce qui concerne les circonstances particulières entourant la mesure législative proposée en question, le dialogue sur l'aide médicale à la mort, l'aide médicale à mourir dans le contexte de la loi proposée, le projet de loi C-14, a été un dialogue très approndi qui s'est déroulé pendant les sept derniers mois.

Le comité mixte spécial a tenu ce débat, et en tant que ministre à qui la tâche de travailler à cette mesure législative a été confiée, j'ai participé autant que possible à l'élaboration du texte législatif, partageant des renseignements avec les Canadiens au sujet des idées qui seraient intégrées dans la loi proposée, veillant à ce que nous fassions notre devoir, soit entendre autant de voix que possible pour atteindre un équilibre entre l'autonomie personnelle et la protection des personnes vulnérables.

Ce sont là des mots que j'ai utilisés avant le dépôt du projet de loi et que je continue à utiliser aujourd'hui, bien que le projet de loi ait été déposé et que je puisse entrer davantage dans les détails sur la façon dont nous avons recherché et trouvé cet équilibre pour le projet de loi C-14. Je parle de cet équilibre depuis le début.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne nous reste plus qu'une minute et demi de séance.

Le président:

Oui, vous ne disposerez pas de tout le temps qui vous est accordé. Il ne reste plus qu'une minute.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour récapituler, notre étude est très précise en citant la divulgation prématurée du projet de loi. D'après ce que je peux voir, et à partir de vos réponses aux questions de mes collègues, il n'y a pas eu de divulgation prématurée du projet de loi; où va donc aller cette question d'après vous? Que pouvons-nous faire de plus, le cas échéant?

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Je n'oserai certainement pas dire à cet honorable comité quelles étapes subséquentes suivre, mais compte tenu du temps qui court, je tiens à assurer aux membres du comité que l'atteinte au privilège est une chose qui est prise et devrait être prise extrêmement au sérieux, et que toutes les personnes qui ont eu accès au projet de loi C-14 et à ses documents d'élaboration détenaient les cotes de sécurité requises. Nous avons les politiques exhaustives du Bureau du Conseil privé, qui veillent à ce que nous respections les dispositions de sécurité pour que les documents confidentiels demeurent des documents confidentiels du Conseil privé de la Reine. Je suis convaincue que toutes ces mesures ont été respectées par tout le monde.

(1300)

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre. Merci de votre présence aujourd'hui.

L’hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement; nous traitons d'une question de privilège, mais n'est-il pas juste également de dire que, compte tenu du témoignage de la ministre, il est possible que nous soyons en train de traiter le cas d'une personne qui a manqué à son serment? La ministre a fait allusion plusieurs fois à des personnes sous serment en ce qui concerne la cote de sécurité Secret ou une cote supérieure. Elle l'a mentionné deux ou trois fois. Cela ne laisse-t-il pas entendre qu'il pourrait s'agir non pas simplement de la question d'atteinte au privilège des députés, mais aussi du cas d'une personne qui a rompu son serment du secret?

Le président:

Je pense que nous pourrons en parler à l'avenir.

Nous n’avons plus de temps maintenant, mais soulevez la question.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on June 09, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.