header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-05-17 PROC 22

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1805)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We are in session. Thank you, everyone, for coming and all the House of Commons staff for being here late. Thanks to our friends from Australia for being here early. We're trying to get going here.

What time is it there?

Mr. David Elder (Clerk of the House, Australia House of Representatives):

It's 8:00 Wednesday morning.

The Chair:

Good evening. This is Meeting No. 22 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is held in public and is televised.

This is our second meeting of the day. The committee agreed to meet outside its usual time in order to accommodate our witnesses, who are appearing by video conference at 8:00 a.m. in Australia, and from New Zealand in our second hour. This meeting is part of our study of initiatives towards a more efficient and inclusive House.

Our first panel is from the House of Representatives of the Parliament of Australia. We have David Elder, Clerk of the House, and James Catchpole, Serjeant-at-Arms.

I invite the clerk to make his opening statement, and then we'll have some questions and answers.

The floor is yours.

Mr. David Elder:

Thank you, Chair. Good morning to you from Australia, and good evening to you in Canada.

My colleague James Catchpole and I have prepared for the committee a few notes on the matters we think you're covering in your proceedings. I didn't propose to make anything much in the way of an opening statement. We're just happy to respond to questions the committee might have.

In the Australian Parliament, particularly in the House of Representatives, we've taken a number of procedural initiatives that I think are very significant. Perhaps they put us at the leading edge of what's been done procedurally in the way of catering to women in a parliamentary jurisdiction. We have a range of more practical initiatives, which I'm sure are of great assistance to women or men who might have young children.

I think we have quite a good story to tell about some of the things that have been done here, and I'm happy to elaborate on those in response to any questions the committee might have.

The Chair:

We're trying to study ways to make Parliament more inclusive of all groups, to make it more efficient, more friendly. So you could talk about hours of sitting, the number of days you sit in a year, what days you have votes, maternity leave, child care, or anything else that would make Parliament more efficient and inclusive.

What we'll do is turn it over to each member of the committee.

We're going to start with David Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

This morning we had a very interesting conversation with your counterparts in England. They talked with great enthusiasm about the model they got from Australia on the secondary chamber. This is something we've all learned about in this study. I don't think any of us had ever heard of it before. I was wondering if you could give us a bit of background on it from your perspective as the initiators of this brilliant concept and tell us what we can learn from you about it.

Mr. David Elder:

Our second chamber, which is now called the Federation Chamber, commenced in 1994. I suppose the background to the initiative was that there seemed to be a lot of pressure on the time in the House, and it was not unusual for government to be, as we call it, “guillotining legislation” through the House, simply because there wasn't sufficient time for the House to be able to consider it. The whole thought behind what we now call the Federation Chamber, which is effectively a second chamber of the House of Representatives, is that it could run in parallel with the sittings of the House and consider, on reference from the House, a number of matters that would otherwise be considered and debated in the House of Representatives.

For example, the bread and butter of the Federation Chamber is the consideration of government legislation. Instead of the House of Representatives—the main chamber—having to consider all the bills that the government introduces, there is a Federation Chamber that runs at much the same sitting times as the House and can consider bills up until the very final stages.

The Federation Chamber is not an initiator of items of business and is not a completer of any items of business. It receives items of business from the House. It fully considers them, returns them to the House, and then the House finalizes the process. For example, with government legislation, all the bills will be introduced in the House and all of them will have their final third reading back in the House, but the whole middle bit, the consideration both of a second-reading debate as well as what you would call the committee stage of debate, can all happen in the Federation Chamber.

It's very interesting. If you look at the statistics since 1994, the Federation Chamber when it was first established met for around 15% of the time of the House. At one stage in the last Parliament that went up to about 50% of the time of the House. It has perhaps fallen away to the more traditional level of around 30%. As you can see, that's 30% that would otherwise need to have been occupied by the House and is now being occupied by a chamber running in parallel. It's had a hugely significant impact on the way the House can do its business.

(1810)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Australia is a rather geographically similar country to ours. Could you just give a bit of background on how MPs get back and forth in Australia, and how often in the year they have to do that? How does that impact your schedule?

Mr. David Elder:

Sure. Obviously, the Parliament is based in Canberra, and as you say, Australia, like Canada, is a very big place. Members do a lot of travelling within their own constituencies and some of them have huge constituencies, just as I'm sure there are some huge constituencies in Canada. For example, most of the Northern Territory is one of the constituencies. Two-thirds of Western Australia is another one. They're absolutely huge.

Of course, those members also need to travel to Canberra. We sit about 18 to 20 weeks a year. We tend to sit in two-week blocks at a time, and then there will be a one- or two-week break between those blocks of sittings. We have three longer breaks during the year, which might be six-week breaks.

To be very frank, when members come to Canberra, they want to maximize the time that they can spend on parliamentary business while they're here so that they can get back as soon as they can to their constituencies, where, let's face it, a lot of the real and very important work for them has to happen. We currently have an election going on here in Australia, and that's what it's all about. It's all about being re-elected by your constituents, so you want to pay a fair bit of attention to them.

That's pretty much the context. Members travel to Canberra. They'll travel for the two weeks of sittings. Some members who come from great distances might stay for the duration of the two weeks, but many will return to their constituencies over the weekend between the two sitting weeks.

The House sits from Monday to Thursday. We finish at about 5 p.m. on Thursday, which enables quite a lot of members to get back to their constituencies on Thursday evening. Then they usually travel back to Canberra on Sunday afternoon for sittings on the Monday.

That's the general sort of pattern of travel. There is a lot of travel for all our members because, as you know, it is a vast country. But members are very keen, and the whole sitting pattern has been built around concentrating their time in Canberra and doing as much as they can, rather than having, say, more sitting days dispersed throughout the calendar.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. That's a good background start.

I know I don't have a lot of time. I have one last question before I hand it over to Ms. Vandenbeld, if there's time left.

There's a concept you have I don't think anybody else in the world has, and I'd love it if you could explain it to our committee. Could you please explain “double dissolution”?

Mr. David Elder:

A very long explanation would be needed. The shortened version is that it's a mechanism for resolving differences between the two Houses, the Senate and the House of Representatives, where the Senate has failed to pass legislation on two occasions that the House of Representatives has initiated. It's a mechanism by which those sorts of deadlocks and disagreements between the Houses can be resolved. They're resolved by means of a general election, and unusually it's a general election for the full composition of both Houses. Usually for our Senate, there's only a half-Senate election. At each election period, only half the Senate is re-elected, but with a double dissolution the full Senate is dissolved and there's an election for the full Senate. That's the difference between our two election patterns, and that's quite a novelty for you in Canada, where you don't have an elected upper house.

(1815)

The Chair:

Thank you, David.

Okay, we're going to move on to Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, gentlemen, for being with us this morning.

Just to build on what you had mentioned regarding Friday sittings, are you able to tell us why Fridays are no longer in the sitting schedule? Why was that taken away?

Mr. David Elder:

I think it was related to what I've said about the demands that members have. We had a brief experiment a number of years ago with the reintroduction of Friday sittings, but it only lasted one sitting Friday. It was best described as probably a complete debacle. It had nothing to do with the fact it was a Friday, but there were other factors involved. Members do like to return to their constituencies for the weekend. Finishing at 5 p.m. on Thursday is convenient to enable them when travelling to Queensland, and South Australia, and even Western Australia. The Western Australian members can get back to Perth from Canberra on that Thursday evening. I don't think there's any great stomach for Friday sittings any longer, because they don't enable members to get back to where they think their real work is, and that is back in their constituencies.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's interesting.

What would be the composition, if you could guess...? I'm guessing by the schedule you just pointed out, and what you said in your last statements, there wouldn't be a lot of MPs bringing their families to the capital.

Mr. David Elder:

Sometimes they do. Female members with very young children will be bringing their children to Canberra, because they're still breastfeeding those very young children. During school holidays, if our sittings happen to coincide with school holidays, you'll see probably more families of members in Canberra. There are some entitlements of members that do enable them to bring their families to Canberra for those sitting weeks. They can be funded at the taxpayers' expense to come to Canberra, so they can be with the member. Generally speaking, members would tend not to bring their families to Canberra, with those exceptions I've indicated.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

For those that do, what kind of services are offered in the capital for those with children, such as day care and that kind of thing?

Mr. David Elder:

I might get my colleague, James Catchpole, to respond to that. He's the Serjeant-at-Arms and the nuts-and-bolts person who looks after all the welfare of members and so on.

Mr. James Catchpole (Serjeant-at-Arms, Australia House of Representatives):

There is a child care centre on site at Parliament House that's open to all members and senators, and also to building occupants. It's provided by a private child care service that's contracted to our department of parliamentary services. That's open essentially year-round, and members bring their children there. We also have several breastfeeding rooms for nursing mothers in the building. We also have family rooms in the building where people can bring their children. We have small playpen areas, TVs, and entertainment for young children and babies. Cots are available.

The commonwealth car service, called COMCAR, is a car and driver service. They have baby seats and baby harnesses, so that members can bring their children to and from parliament. Of course, members can keep their children in their suites.

(1820)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

In terms of Fridays, you said that when you brought Fridays back for one sitting it was a bit of a debacle. What did you mean by that?

Mr. David Elder:

There was a particular context to it.

It was going to be a purely private members' business day, so there was not going to be a question period as there usually is on a sitting day. The then prime minister and other ministers made it clear that they wouldn't necessarily be there for those sittings, and they didn't need to be because the focus was going to be on private members' business.

The then opposition chose to effectively completely disrupt the day. They were opposed to the idea. It was introduced without their support, and so the day was completely disrupted. Because it was private members' business, we had arrangements, for example, so that no votes or divisions could take place on that day. That meant that the chair had no way of dealing with disorder because they couldn't name members and have them excluded from the House on a vote of the House.

It actually just descended into chaos. That would be a fair description of what happened. There were no more Friday sittings after that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

You said the opposition was against it because the Friday sittings were brought in against their will.

Did I hear that correctly?

Mr. David Elder:

That's correct. Yes.

The Chair:

It's a cautionary tale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Obviously with private members' business, there's a little difference with ours. We have question period and a few other things on Friday. It would be a little different.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

Twenty seconds.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I don't know if I should pull a Christopherson or not. I'll leave it for now. I was going to ask a few more questions.

Thank you very much for your input. I greatly appreciate it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have Ms. Malcolmson.

Welcome to the committee.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP):

Thank you, Chair. I appreciate the opportunity.

Thank you to the witnesses.

In noting the length of your sitting days, on Monday and Tuesday you sit until 9:30, and Wednesday you sit until 8 o'clock at night.

We have a concern around families of elected members of Parliament here who want to be home to put their kids to bed. It also impacts on our staff as well. It's not very family friendly when we're working so late and asking our staff to be with us.

Can you comment a bit on the impact around the length of the sitting day and whether you've been able to make any accommodation, both for employed staff and elected members?

Mr. David Elder:

Just as a bit of background, there has been a lot of debate and a lot of discussion over quite a long time about the length of sitting hours and sitting days. At one stage we were finishing at 8 p.m. because of this focus on family-friendly hours, and that did last and was quite effective for a while. In fact, going back in time, the House used to sit till 11 p.m., so the reduction to 8 p.m. was obviously very, very welcome. I think the 9 p.m. finish is a bit of a compromise between where we used to be a number of years ago and where we got to in response to this concept of family-friendly hours.

It does relate a little bit to the point that I made about members just wanting, when they're here in Canberra, to get the Canberra business done as effectively as possible. For example, if shorter hours meant that we would then sit on Friday, I think you'd probably find that most members would prefer to be sitting the slightly longer hours and then not have to sit on the Friday to make up the additional hours. It's all a bit of a compromise.

I think the current sitting hours are probably quite a good balance, and they do seem to work quite effectively for members. Don't forget that in terms of members, we only have four members who are actually local members. There are only four members who represent the Canberra area, and those are two senators and two members, so there aren't a lot of members who need to go home and put their children to bed, if you like. Obviously, women who are bringing very young children have issues with the longer hours. I'm not exactly sure what sorts of arrangements they make.

In terms of staff, again, the days are very long. That is true. There aren't really any breaks because we don't have any formal meal breaks in those sitting hours, either, so it does mean a long day for staff. We try to ensure that staff are able to get a break at various times during the day. The 9:30, at least, is a reasonable compromise, I think, much better than 11 p.m., which I think it is starting to get a bit late. These things are all a bit of a compromise. The government, clearly, has a certain number of hours they want the House to sit each week, and then you try to squeeze that into four days and work out how best that's done.

(1825)

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

What percentage of women do you have elected right now? How many of them actually have young children? Is there any perception or measure that the length of your sitting hours are actually keeping women and women with young families out of standing for elected office in the first place?

Mr. David Elder:

Well, the proportion of women in the House of Representatives is around 25%, and it's been around that figure now for a number of years. It climbed up from a much lower level and now it's plateaued at about 25% to 30%. We're just going through an election, so I don't know what the makeup will be in the new Parliament. In the last couple of years, we've probably had half a dozen women, I think, who've had children. That's quite a reasonable proportion of the number of women who are in the House of Representatives. Quite a lot of them are younger women and they are of child-bearing age.

Is it a deterrent? I can't really answer that. My perception is that the women who do have young children are coping well. There's a range of mechanisms that seem to assist them to cope well with the arrangement, and they seem to be perfectly satisfied. For example, we have an election coming, and none of those women are amongst the people who are not recontesting at this next election, so that would suggest that things have been sufficiently satisfactory for them to continue on.

I couldn't really comment particularly well on the impact of that on women generally.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Your day care service for your parliamentarians, does that have a sort of drop-in capability? Do you have any limitations on the ages of children or how flexible the arrangements are for the parents?

Mr. James Catchpole:

The child care centre will take children from six weeks to five years. Although some children, particularly of staff members in the building, will be there reasonably long term, there is the capacity for people to drop their children there on an ad hoc basis, which is what would suit members most, and it's [Technical difficulty—Editor] building.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Excellent. That's good news.

Can you give us any sense of the take-up on your vote-by-proxy provisions for parents of infants?

Mr. David Elder:

At various times it would be used by all those female members who are breastfeeding children. They wouldn't use it, for example, for every division. Sometimes they'll appear for a vote, but at other times they'll give their proxy vote to their whip.

I should emphasize two things about the proxy vote. The member does need to be in Canberra and they do need to be in Parliament House to be able to exercise it. It can't be done remotely. You can't be back in your electorate exercising your proxy vote. Similarly, you can't be at your residence here in Canberra and exercising your proxy vote; you need to be in Parliament House.

It is used very regularly by the women with breastfeeding children.

(1830)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go on to Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much for answering our questions.

The idea of the Federation Chamber, the parallel chamber, has come up a number of times in our committee.

We had the U.K. Parliament speaking to us this morning. They talked about the fact that the parallel chamber there, Westminster Hall, is much more flexible. It's in a horseshoe, ministers attend regularly, and there's much more to-and-fro because of the nature of the speeches.

Can you tell us how it works in Australia?

Mr. David Elder:

It's works in a very similar way. It is a much more informal chamber than the House of Representatives. It's a much smaller chamber. Even though all members are members of the Federation Chamber—in other words, all members can attend—we only provide seats for about 38 members in there, because generally there's only going to be a fairly small number of members there.

Certainly, it's a much more intimate chamber and much more confined. It is in a horseshoe shape, but members in fact can sit anywhere in the chamber. They don't have to sit on the usual sorts of opposing sides if they don't wish to do so. Ministers do attend. They'll attend for the final stages of bills. They'll attend for the committee stages of bills. It's meant to be a much more informal way of proceeding than the House. It operates on the same rules as the House, but it's just much more intimate and much more informal.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You've said that they sit in a horseshoe and can sit anywhere, but do they? Do members from different parties actually sit side by side?

Mr. David Elder:

No. Unfortunately, they're terrible creatures of habit, so they do sit on their respective sides. Even our independent non-aligned members will sit somewhere in the middle. I think old habits die hard.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Is there a set time for the speeches? Is there a question and answer period?

Mr. David Elder:

There is a set time for speeches. As I said, the rules for the Federation Chamber are really the same as the rules for the House. The speech time limits are the same as the speech time limits for similar sorts of presentations or similar sorts of business matters that operate in the House.

Question time only happens in the House of Representatives. There's no question period up in the Federation Chamber, but in the committee stages of a bill, for example, that might take the form of a question and answer format between a minister and other members.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You mentioned both the popularity of the Federation Chamber and the unpopularity of the Fridays. Do you think there's a correlation, in that having that parallel chamber made it easier to sit four days a week because there was that additional time for government business?

Mr. David Elder:

Well, I think there's no question about that, and at the moment, we're not utilizing the full capabilities of the Federation Chamber. It's meeting about 30% of the time that the House does. Potentially, it could meet 100% of the time. It can meet any time that the House itself is meeting. It can't meet when the House is not meeting. It can't meet before or after the House has finished.

Potentially, there's considerably more time we could use for the Federation Chamber, so the fact that it's not being used suggests that there's not really any need for, say, a Friday sitting. We could easily accommodate that by having more sittings of the Federation Chamber.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

When is private members' business taken care of? I understand that the Federation Chamber is primarily government business. Does it also do other things?

Mr. David Elder:

It does do private members' business. Monday is our private members' business day. Part of that happens in the main chamber, so there are two hours of private members' business in the main chamber, and then there are two and a half hours in the Federation Chamber, also on that Monday. So it certainly does do private members' business, but it doesn't exclusively do that; some of that is available also in the House of Representatives. In fact, in the last Parliament, I think, we had about eight hours of private members' business, and quite a lot of that was done in fact in the Federation Chamber. We've actually reduced the amount of private members' business in this most recent Parliament.

(1835)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

I think Mr. Graham has a very short question that he'd like to ask.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just wanted to clarify one point from earlier on. It sounded like you're saying the House sits two weeks on and two weeks off. Is that correct?

Mr. David Elder:

That tends to be the usual pattern, but at times there might only be a week's break. At other times we might sit one week, break for a week, and then sit for two weeks, but broadly speaking, the pattern is two weeks on and two weeks off. That's the broad pattern, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What are the longest consecutive weeks you'll generally sit? Right now we're about to have a run of four weeks, for example.

Mr. David Elder:

Really we would tend to only sit in two-week blocks. It would be very unusual; maybe at the end of a year we might have an additional week of sittings, or an initial few days of sittings, but I can't recall when we last sat for four weeks in a row. It would be a very long time ago.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm going to break a whole series of precedents here and share my time with the chair.

The Chair:

I'm just going to ask a question David Christopherson would ask. You said you have provisions for families to travel. Here and in the U.K. some members with families don't travel because they don't want to appear in the public that it looks like they're spending a lot of money. Are you confident on how yours works?

Mr. David Elder:

Very similarly. It has at various times attracted controversy, and there have been comments at times about some aspects of what they call family reunion travel, and we had a whole range of travel issues that came out last year, and this was amongst those, this family reunion travel. It doesn't seem to create a lot of controversy if it's in fact used to bring family members to Canberra. It is able to be used to take family members to other locations, and I think that's what's caused the controversy. But no, I think members are very sensitive to the use of taxpayers' funds for those purposes, so I think they're very conscious of the need to make sure that this passes the test of public perception as to how that is used.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I wanted to just take a step back. You had indicated that you sat 18 to 20 weeks of the year, and generally two weeks at a time, and Monday to Thursday. You mentioned the Friday debacle. I don't think we ever did hear the actual sitting times on the Mondays through Thursdays. Could you give me an indication of the sitting hours on the Mondays through Thursdays?

Mr. David Elder:

Sure. Monday is 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m; Tuesday is 12 noon to 9:30 p.m., Wednesday is 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Thursday is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Those sittings are continuous. There are no formal meal breaks, but I should say that on the Mondays and Tuesdays, between the hours of 6:30 and 8, there are no divisions or quorums able to be called in the House which means that members can actually leave the building to have a break and have a meal between 6:30 and 8 on those two days.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It looks like you're sitting in the neighbourhood of about 40 sitting hours in a week, typically. What about question period? What time of day is your question period, and what length of time does your question period run for?

(1840)

Mr. David Elder:

Question time happens each day at 2:00 p.m. and lasts for an hour and ten minutes, so it goes on until 3:10 p.m.

Mr. Blake Richards:

When you previously looked at sitting hours, did you look at your question period with a view to changing anything?

Mr. David Elder:

Question period has happened at various times over history. It used to happen first up whenever the House would meet. It used to be at 3:00 p.m. It has been at 2:00 p.m. now for some considerable time.

Certainly, there's discussion at various times about whether it should be at a different time of the day, but we all become creatures of habit, so I think 2:00 p.m. is probably a fairly settled time now. I don't know that there's any great desire or intention to move it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's the same here. We have ours at the same time. I think it has generally worked pretty well for us here.

It looks like your question period is a little longer than ours. That probably compensates for having one less day of question period. You said it has been 2:00 p.m. for some time so I suspect you probably can't comment on why 2:00 p.m. was chosen. If it has been there for some time, I suspect you weren't part of those discussions, but maybe you would be aware of why it was chosen.

Mr. David Elder:

It's probably one of those things that gets lost in the mists of time. I suspect it was considered to be the most convenient time. I'm not sure whether there were any discussions about the time. It has been 2:00 p.m. for quite a long time now.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Fair enough.

On the Federation Chamber, I want to make sure I was correct about this. It sounded like you were saying that the second reading debates and committee stage occurred in that chamber for all legislation. Was that accurate, or are there certain pieces of legislation that are chosen, and if so, why?

Mr. David Elder:

It is only some of the legislation. What we're getting is a sharing of the burden of the House between the Main Chamber and the Federation Chamber. Only certain pieces of legislation are referred to the Federation Chamber. It needs to be done by co-operation, so they tend to be the less controversial matters that might be debated. There is a variety of mechanisms in the operation of the Federation Chamber. This means if there's not co-operation about what's being debated, it's quite easy for an opposition member, or any member, to bring the proceedings to a halt. There have been deliberate efforts to make sure it is a co-operative chamber.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Who determines what are the less controversial matters? Is it the Speaker making this decision, or is there a committee of Parliament that makes it? Who decides when something is uncontroversial enough to be in the Federation Chamber?

Mr. David Elder:

It's not the Speaker, and we don't have a business committee that operates in the House, so it would be discussions and negotiations between the Leader of the House and usually the Manager of Opposition Business. The Leader of the House would say to the opposition that there are certain items he would like to see debated in the Federation Chamber. The opposition would say they're happy with this, that, and the other, and those would be the matters that would be debated.

If there's not agreement, there is a range of mechanisms to bring the Federation Chamber to a halt—withdrawing the quorum and a range of other things. It really needs to be done by co-operation. Something like 20% to 30% of the House's legislation would be debated in the Federation Chamber.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Good morning to the two of you, and thank you for joining us so early in the morning.

As you're both aware, this committee is looking at creating some policies to ensure that our Parliament is more family-friendly and more inclusive. We truly appreciate your feedback and your candour in answering our questions.

First and foremost, I'd like to know what brought about the changes in your parliament? What was the motivation to bring about the changes that you brought forward?

(1845)

Mr. David Elder:

In terms of the procedural changes, I think there was a clear recognition there was an increasing number of women of child-bearing age, and there were genuine issues for them in addressing the balancing of the needs of looking after their children, with the fulfilling of their obligations as parliamentarians. I think the initiative for the proxy voting, which was introduced in 2009, was very much a recognition that it was important they be able to be seen to participate as fully in proceedings as was possible, whilst being able to continue to breastfeed and look after their young infants.

It is a powerful mechanism, because it means a member doesn't attend in the House for a vote, but has their vote recorded as though they had been attending in the House. That proxy voting is a powerful mechanism, and that's deliberately why it was introduced.

The more recent measure we've introduced, which is to allow them to take their infants into the chamber and for them to be not identified as a stranger—as was the old term—is a further development to say members might need this bit of additional flexibility to deal with whatever particular circumstances they might have. If they have a young family member with them, and suddenly there is a division called, they do have that option to take the infant in with them.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

How many infants would be brought into the House at any given time?

Mr. David Elder:

That provision was introduced earlier this year, and it hasn't yet been used. I wonder how much it will end up being used. I don't know what the House of Commons is like, but the House of Representatives chamber, particularly during divisions, is not exactly a child-friendly environment. It's noisy, and lots of things are happening, so I suspect members would probably prefer not to be taking their young children in there. They do have that option, and I think that's the value of the measure the House has introduced.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Do you have any policy or provisions with respect to parental leave for your parliamentarians?

Mr. David Elder:

There isn't any provision for parental leave. Members are entitled to receive their salaries and allowances as long as they continue to be members. For example, if they go on holidays, or they become ill and take time off, they continue to be paid their salaries and entitlements. They don't need to apply formally for any recreation leave or sick leave. Similarly, they don't apply formally for maternity leave. There is no formal system for that, and they continue to receive their salaries and entitlements.

Members do seek leave from the House for the period that they might be absent from the House, and that's a formal resolution of the House to give a member leave for, say, maternity purposes or paternity purposes, or because the person is ill, or whatever the particular issue is that a member might have. That means a member is not then obliged to be attending the House at the times the House is sitting.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

What would be the average age of your female parliamentarians?

Mr. David Elder:

I wouldn't know, off the top of my head. We do have quite a number of younger female members now, who are in that child-bearing age, but then we also have a number of older female members. I don't know. I haven't done the figures, I'm sorry. We could certainly look at that and provide the committee with information if you'd like.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

That would be great.

My other question is, out of your younger parliamentarians, would they be on their first term or their second term? Have they gone through one election, or two elections?

Mr. David Elder:

Some of them would be on their first terms, and others would be on second or third terms. It would vary. Some of them are quite experienced members. As I said earlier, the interesting point is, all of those members are recontesting this current election, so that would suggest some way or other they are dealing in a satisfactory way with all the issues they have to handle in balancing young children and their lives as parliamentarians.

(1850)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Great.

In the feedback that you've received from the parliamentarians with the changes that you have brought about....

Is my time up?

The Chair:

Yes.

We're going to go to Mr. Schmale, but just before we do, I want a clarification on something you said near the beginning. You talked about cars having baby seats.

Which cars are these? Is there a pool of cars for everyone? How does that work?

Mr. James Catchpole:

There is. There's a fleet of cars based in Canberra. Members of Parliament are entitled to a vehicle, a driver and car, while in Canberra, mainly to get them to and from the airport, or to get them to wherever they're staying overnight.

It's a fleet of cars called COMCAR, which are provided by the government. They have some, what we would call “people movers”, that can take more than three or four people. They have access to child care seats. We have some stored here at Parliament House, so when a member wishes to book a vehicle, they claim that they need a child seat and that will be provided.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

To go over your typical day on a Thursday, what would the calendar look like? You said that question period is at two o'clock, but how does the rest of the day shape up?

Mr. David Elder:

We start off at 9 a.m., and we run with government business from 9 a.m. through to 1:30 p.m.

We then have quite an innovative procedure, which is called “90-second statements”. Between 1:30 and 2:00, members can make a very short 90-second statement on any subject of their choice or interest. That's a very lively and very interesting session. That's a good lead-in to question period, which happens at 2:00 p.m. Question period will run through until about ten past three.

Then each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, we have a matter of public importance, which is debated for an hour. That's usually a matter that's raised by the opposition, so between say ten past three and ten past four we'll have that matter of public importance. Then from ten past four until 4:30, we have another brief period of government business, whether it be legislation or other government matters.

Then from 4:30 to 5:00 p.m., we have an adjournment debate, and that's an opportunity for private members to raise matters for a period of five minutes.

That's how a typical Thursday would pan out.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I just want to say that any time that the opposition raises an issue, I think that's of utmost public importance.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jamie Schmale: Ninety seconds for member statements? That's pretty impressive. That must be quite the story that goes on.

In terms of attendance, as the day goes along on a Thursday, would it thin out, or would it stay strong right to the end?

Mr. David Elder:

It would tend to stay fairly strong right until, say, 4:30.

When the House goes on to the adjournment debate, you'll often see members starting to leave. There could be divisions in the House right up until 4:30, so members are very conscious of that. They pretty much stay around until probably 4:30, and then you'll hear them starting to depart after that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

In terms of when you said that you went back to Fridays and then it went away, what was the public's reaction? I recognize that there is a difference between what we have on a Friday compared to what you had, which was just private members' business.

Mr. David Elder:

It only happened for one day, so it was a new arrangement that was introduced. The House used to sit on Fridays going back historically. There were Friday sittings, and then they changed it to this Monday to Thursday pattern. That was very much built around the members being able to return to their constituencies in good time.

I wouldn't necessarily say that the idea of Friday sittings would never be revisited. It could well be revisited by a government or a Parliament in the future. If it did so, I think it would have to be a balanced day. I think it would have to be more of a standard day rather than just focusing on private members' business.

I do think there's a very strong urge by members to get back in a timely way to their constituencies. Certainly finishing on that Thursday afternoon enables them very much to do that, which wouldn't be possible with the Friday sittings.

(1855)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Right.

Jumping to the day care question that I touched on last time, are the hours flexible? I think what we heard from the delegations we had before is that the hours weren't flexible enough to match the time the House is sitting. Judging that it's pretty late, you go to 9:30 p.m. or 8 p.m., that's probably pretty late for a young child anyway, but in time if a situation did happen that child care is needed in the evening, is it provided or offered?

Mr. David Elder:

The child care centre does stay open until 9 o'clock at night on parliamentary sitting days. It goes from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. on a sitting day, and it goes from 8 a.m. until 6 o'clock in the evening on a normal non-sitting day. It is open and members can leave their children there if they wish.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

For the hours of the House, are those fixed times or do you tend to have extended hours as well when there are debates late into the night? Sometimes we have emergency debates or other debates that may go until midnight. Is that the case in your Parliament as well?

Mr. David Elder:

Very fortunately, one feature of the hours that we have now is that we very rarely have later sittings. They certainly do happen but they're quite unusual. They could be as rare as only one or two times a year now. It's really quite unusual for us to sit beyond those standard sitting times. Part of the reason for that is that we do have the flexibility of the second chamber, to be able to move some business and take some pressure off the House. It's quite unusual for there to be late sittings. If there are, we might go through until 11 o'clock or midnight. It's very unusual to have extremely late sittings these days.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The times that you mention are quite fixed then.

Mr. David Elder:

Yes. The times I mentioned are fixed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How about voting? What time of day does voting take place? Can it take place any time of the day, or is there some kind of pattern, routine, or predictability to that as well?

Mr. David Elder:

No, there isn't any predictability. It can take place at any time and, frankly, it does take place at any time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I want to go back to Fridays. You said they were removed historically.

Can you give me a time frame for that, or was it so long ago that you're not aware of it?

Mr. David Elder:

It was a very long time ago. It might be 30 years. It's a very long time. I'd have to go back and check. I'm happy to do that, but it would be a very long time ago.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Has there ever been any talk about those times and whether there was any kind of negative public opinion surrounding the taking away of the Friday sittings? I know you mentioned previously that you did it with members being able to serve their constituencies and be able to get back. But was there initially a negative perception to that, or were people very happy that members were going to be in their ridings?

Mr. David Elder:

An important issue is that the House didn't lose any sitting time as a result of eliminating the Friday sittings, because they sat earlier. For example, at that time we didn't meet until 2 p.m. on individual days. Now we meet at 10 a.m. on Mondays, we meet at 12 noon on Tuesdays, and we meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesdays and Thursdays. All those hours that the House was sitting on a Friday were absorbed into longer hours on the other four days.

The answer is...I don't know. I'm not sure I was really around at the time the Friday sittings disappeared. I can't recall that there was any particular reaction because it wasn't as though the House was sitting fewer hours.

(1900)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What takes place on the day that you start at noon? What takes place before that? Is there anything going on? Is that why you're starting that day at noon?

Mr. David Elder:

The reason we start at noon on the Tuesday is that it's in the morning when the political parties will have their meetings. Typically, the parties will have their party meetings on that morning prior to the House sitting.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are members usually starting their day quite early every day, regardless of what time the House actually starts sitting?

Mr. David Elder:

That's right. Typically members would be here at seven, 7:30, or eight o'clock.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you so much for your answers. They were quite direct. I appreciate that.

The Chair:

Ms. Malcolmson, you have three minutes.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

I'll come back to the question of who you have elected to your Parliament. I was looking at the international rankings and New Zealand ranks 39th on the number of women they have been able to get into Parliament right now. Australia's ranking is 56th and 61st is Canada's, so you're doing better than us, but we're also at the 25% so it's not a huge surge.

Can you talk a little more about whether you've done any inquiries about what might be keeping women out of running for office? I appreciate your saying that you are encouraged by the take-up, that women who did get themselves to Parliament who have children are willing to run again. That's good.

We're curious about what is keeping women from even considering running, whether they have aging parents and have a disproportionate load around looking after them, or whether they have young children, or are considering having a family. As parliamentarians, are you doing that inquiry around barriers to even standing for office in the first place?

Mr. David Elder:

We're not doing it, but it is a very interesting phenomenon that, first, the level of female representation does seem to have plateaued around that 25% to 30% mark and, second, that Australia's rankings have fallen significantly over the last 15 years. I think we were up there at about 20th. Now we're down, as you said, at 56th or whatever.

That's a very unfortunate thing. I don't know the explanation. We haven't done any particular investigation. I might have a variety of theories but I don't know that I'd express them because they are personal theories about what might be happening. It's very unfortunate that we're seeing the plateauing rather than the continuing increase, and that Australia's ranking is falling significantly.

The Chair:

Thank you very much to our witnesses for being there early in the morning. This was very helpful. You have unique things that we might look at using. I'm sure our clerk will be in contact with you to get any more details or for you to ask us any questions.

Mr. David Elder:

Thank you, Chair, and yes, please, if there are any other queries or follow-ups, please be in contact, and we'll be only too happy to help.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm not going to suspend. While we change the screens, I have some good news on our committee business. A couple of hours ago I talked to Mr. Scheer about the standing order that the Speaker had proposed to us. Remember he had some concerns—but with the wrong paragraph. It was one of the paragraphs on routine business we weren't changing, so that's why it didn't fit with the emergency. He has no concern.

You all have this. I'm just going to pass it out again. The only paragraph that is different in this is proposed paragraph (b). Proposed paragraphs (a) and (c) are the routine stuff that was there before. They were in one paragraph in the existing standing orders; now with the proposal they are in two. The emergency one is in the middle, so just those six lines on page 3 are new.

(1905)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

In the case, Mr. Chair, of the appendices, New Zealand and Australia dealt with the same matter. Is that correct?

The Chair:

Yes.

The six lines that are being changed are proposed paragraph (b); that gives the Speaker more flexibility when we have an emergency similar to the one we had, or any other emergency.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would it be acceptable to you, Mr. Chair? I was sitting right behind you and Andrew Scheer. I won't say I went to lengths, but I tried not to eavesdrop. As a result, I didn't hear the details of what you were saying.

Would it just be okay if we get confirmation and then deal with this on Thursday?

The Chair:

Yes. I'll tell you what his problem was. It was in the first paragraph, where it said “earlier”. It's not related to the emergency at all, but he thought “earlier” didn't apply to the emergency because when they had to call back, it was later. Then, when I pointed out to him that the first paragraph has nothing to do with the emergency....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. I do recall his raising that concern.

The Chair:

We'll just be one minute.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor] to Scheer again?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll chat with him at our caucus tomorrow. Maybe we can deal with this on Thursday. Assuming it's as straightforward as that, we probably can all just agree to report our recommendation.

The Chair:

Sure.

Thursday, hopefully, in very short order we could sneak this in. We could have an emergency any time, so it would be good to have it in place.

I'd now like welcome David Wilson, the Clerk of the New Zealand House of Representatives. We thank you for getting up so early in the morning. I know it will be very interesting for us. We're finding that the parliaments in the Commonwealth all have different, interesting variations. The committee's very anxious to hear how it works in New Zealand. We're trying to improve ours so that it's more inclusive, more efficient, with better sitting times or days, and family friendly for kids, for young mothers, child care—all these types of things. We're very interested.

You could make an opening statement for as long as you like, and then we'll go to questions around the table.

Mr. David Wilson (Clerk of the House, New Zealand House of Representatives):

Thanks very much, Mr. Chair.

Good morning from New Zealand. I didn't get up particularly early, it's 11 o'clock in the morning here.

Just to begin, the issue of improving work-life balance for members and staff has been focused on in New Zealand, and I'm aware that it's been an issue also in Australia and the United Kingdom. I think it's become more acute, in New Zealand anyway, because the average age of members has tended to decrease over the last 20 or 30 years, and there's an increasing number becoming parents while they're members. There have been two in fairly recent times in New Zealand. That brings often a few challenges. I also employ quite a lot of staff in their twenties to forties, and about two-thirds of them are women, so parental leave is relatively common for staff. That's a little bit easier to cover by secondments, which opens up opportunities for their colleagues, but it's not so easy for MPs.

I thought it might be useful if I set out the sitting calendar of New Zealand, a little bit about how the Parliament works, and particularly how it takes votes, because that has been a topic of particular interest when thinking about the absence of members caring for young children.

In New Zealand the House sits for 31 weeks of the year. It sits on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday each of those afternoons and also 7:30 until 10 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday night. The House sits for 17 hours each week in a normal week. Parliamentary committees meet on the mornings when the House sits. It's very rare for our House to sit at any times other than those 17 hours per week for 31 weeks. It doesn't normally sit during school holidays, and the House takes a long break over the Christmas period, which is of course our summer.

In terms of voting in the House, almost all votes in the New Zealand Parliament are a party vote rather than the traditional division that we see in a lot of Westminster parliaments. A party vote is conducted by the Clerk of the House reading out the names of each party, and the party whip then casts all of the votes for their party. I would call out, for example, “New Zealand National”, and the whip would say “59 votes in favour” or “59 votes against”. I call out “New Zealand Labour” and it's “32 votes in favour” or “32 votes against”. That makes voting very fast. It's a change that we made in 1996 when we moved to a proportional representation system and a break with the old two-party first past the post system that we had.

One of the features of the party vote is that members don't have to come to the chamber to vote. Their whip or another representative of the party can do it for them. That removes a lot of the demands on members, particularly those with young children or other dependants, to necessarily be in the House late at night and be available to attend to vote.

One of the other features that's important, when you think about this in the New Zealand context, is that parties may have up to 25% of their members absent from the precinct and still cast their full allocation of party votes. In other words, 25% of votes can be cast by proxy by members who are absent from the parliamentary precinct. That can also assist members who have to be absent for a variety of reasons.

A few of the other terms of reference that the committee listed and I thought I might cover are around day care facilities. In New Zealand there is a crèche on the parliamentary grounds, but it doesn't work all of the hours that the House sits. It closes at 6 p.m. There is a room near the debating chamber for feeding children, heating bottles, changing nappies, and general care of young children.

In New Zealand there is no parental leave entitlement in law for members of Parliament because they're not employees; however, since about five years ago, the Speaker has been given in our Standing Orders the ability to grant leave to members either for personal reasons or for illness, and he's done that on a couple of occasions with members who have had babies. That's one way that a member can effectively have parental leave on pay and not be required to attend the House in that period.

(1910)



Political parties may also give a member leave, and they're able to do that through their 25% proxy allowance for voting, which means they can have a few members away and still vote with their full numbers in the House.

We've given some thought to technology and how it might help Parliament, particularly parliamentary committees, to work more effectively and efficiently. This prompts the question of whether members should be required to work such late hours or travel so much. One change we've implemented in the last few years is an electronic committee system that allows members to work from any digital device, anywhere in the country that they can access the Internet.

We use video conferences fairly frequently to reduce committee travel, but we're not considering having sittings or committee meetings by video conference. Members have decided that having to sit together as a team, understanding the risks of confidentiality in committee proceedings, and being sure about who's present to vote are more important than the flexibility that video conferencing might allow. In fact, a few years ago, the House legislated to require members' attendance, and if they were absent without leave, for their pay to be docked accordingly. If anything, in recent years the Parliament has reinforced the idea that members should be present unless they have leave.

As an employer, I allow staff to work flexible hours, to work remotely, to take leave, and still have holidays. For some staff, there is a requirement: they're here when the House sits or they travel with committees, which may be outside normal work hours. This is part of the employment conditions of staff, and they know about all this when they go to work. Members also know those things, but it doesn't mean it remains static. We think about other things we might do to assist.

We've given some thought in New Zealand to the idea of a parallel or an alternate debating chamber, like the Federation Chamber in Australia. We don't currently have a second chamber. We legislated to abolish the Legislative Council in 1950. Though this is a different proposal, the idea of a parallel rather than an upper chamber, there's not been great enthusiasm for it in New Zealand.

One reason is that there is quite a small number of members—121. It's difficult, with all of their other commitments, to stretch to sitting in another chamber concurrently. It's possible that the quality of debate would be diminished in that chamber, as members were rostered to take a turn there, then to return to the main chamber and take a turn there.

It's also not being felt as necessary because almost all of our debates in New Zealand have a fixed time frame of about two hours. An initiative has been introduced, our extended sittings, which are primarily being used as a way to create additional sitting hours, usually on a Wednesday or Thursday morning, to deal with non-controversial business. It's quite different from urgency. A bill under urgency is agreed on unanimously by the business committee, which is a committee of all members of the House. It takes bills through only one stage at a time rather than the multiple stages. It must finish by 1 p.m. on a sitting day.

This deadline has been very successful in progressing business that there's general agreement about across the House, and it's there to address a reduction in the use of urgency. The flow and effect of that has been that urgency often will take the House into sitting on a Friday, later at night, or into weekends. These extended sittings have been a pretty successful substitute for urgency.

Finally, I have a few miscellaneous comments related to making your Parliament more efficient or inclusive. The first point I'd make is that democracy isn't particularly efficient, and parliaments are not very efficient, either. They spend a lot of time scrutinizing the executive. That's an important democratic function. Certainly, we should look for efficiency where we can, but I don't think it should be the driver in this area.

One of our former members has recently called for shorter sitting hours, for the possibility of temporary replacement of members while they're on parental leave, or even the possibility of job-sharing among members. There is a news article she wrote that covers all those things, which I would be happy to share with the committee if they would like to see it.

(1915)



The Scottish Parliament, as I understand it, sits business hours, and that seems to work successfully there. I believe that in Sweden they allow temporary replacement of members, but I think only for ministers when they join the cabinet.

As I mentioned, the second chamber idea has been discussed in New Zealand, but not currently supported.

I think that in our situation, the mixed-member proportional electoral system has created a more diverse Parliament, and that is likely to continue to increase demand for better, different, and more flexible working conditions, as the group of people who become members of Parliament is more diverse, perhaps, from those who traditionally sought election 20 or 30 years ago.

I think our use of the business committee as a cross-party committee that operates by unanimity has really enabled parties to agree to timetables to allow them to spend time on what matters to them, so the opposition can spend an appropriate amount of time setting out its alternate views against things it doesn't support, but when there is general agreement, it has allowed the House to save quite a lot of time and progress non-controversial or widely supported legislation pretty quickly.

I think the combination of that sort of agreement about House business and the ability to cast proxy votes—and generally there being no requirement for particular members to be in the House—has meant that some of the challenges that other parliaments have faced perhaps haven't arisen here to such a great degree, but it is still very much a work in progress.

That brings to an end my opening statement. I would be happy to take questions from members.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you very much. That is very interesting.

We will start with Mr. Lightbound.

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I will share my time with Ms. Sahota.

Thank you, Mr. Wilson, for being here.

I am particularly interested in proxy voting. We have discussed it with your counterpart from the U.K., and from Australia as well, in a way, and you touched upon it in your presentation.

In the U.K., they have a system called “nodding through”, which is a very limited form of proxy voting. In Australia, I gather, it is limited to situations where the member is breastfeeding. In Canada, we don't have proxy voting.

You mentioned that 25% of the members can use proxy voting. Is it limited in any way in terms of what circumstances would make it so that a member can avail himself of proxy voting? Does the member have to be ill? Are there reasons why you could avail yourself?

(1920)

Mr. David Wilson:

Perhaps I should have been a bit clearer. It is possible for one member of a party to cast all of the party votes while he is the only member of that party who is present in the chamber, but 75% of the rest of the members of that party must be within the parliamentary precinct; 25% of the members can be anywhere at all, outside of the precinct. The reasons they are away are a matter between them and their party.

It could be for anything at all. Quite often, it is to attend other business, outside of Wellington, particularly for ministers. It doesn't have to be for illness, child care, or any particular reason that is specified in any rules. It really is up to the party to agree that a member be absent.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

Are there procedural safeguards? How concretely does it operate?

Mr. David Wilson:

It is very much operated on a trust basis—the word of a whip that they have all of their members present and are able to pass the full number of votes as available to them. The Parliament is always seen very seriously and it probably would be treated as contempt, if a whip did pass votes they were not entitled to. That has happened only once, in my memory, and the party concerned realized that fact before anybody else did, drew the House's attention to it, and actually changed the vote by one as a result.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

Thank you.

I will give my time to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I am also going to follow up on my colleague's questions on proxy voting, because I find it quite interesting.

Have there been any problems with proxy voting in the past, and if so, how did you correct those problems? I am still not quite sure about what the procedure is—whether the member has to sign something off or whether it is just a private agreement between them and their party as to which way they are going to vote. Situations of duress have been discussed in our committee, and there other concerns we have been discussing around proxy voting. Have those come up there?

Mr. David Wilson:

They have been discussed, and some concerns have arisen. It's assumed that for party votes, the party whip is entitled to cast all of the votes available to the party. At least they know that some members are absent, so they don't need specific permission from members for every vote to cast their vote. If a member wants to cast a vote differently from rest of their party, they then do give written instruction to the whip to do that on their behalf or they might attend the chamber and do it themselves.

In other situations sometimes there have been errors with proxy votes. Particularly in some instances large parties, if they have a written proxy from another party, will cast the votes for them as well. In New Zealand we have two parties that have only one member each, and another party that has only two members. Those small parties are in coalition with the main governing party. Sometimes they'll give their proxies to the whip of that party if they are absent, and occasionally there's been an error made in the casting of those votes and, when that's been realized, usually by the small party telling the government whip, then they both come to the House and correct their vote.

It's not been tremendously problematic, and I think members have seen that it takes about a minute to cast a vote, and they can spend more time debating and less time voting. When we do have a traditional division, which we do on conscience issues maybe once or twice a year, it seems to take about 10 minutes to call the members to the House and then get them to vote. Members generally prefer this method.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

For the members who are in the House, what is the process of voting? Do they stand and vote or is there technology involved?

(1925)

Mr. David Wilson:

They stand and vote. The Clerk calls out the name of the party while standing. The whip then stands and casts a number of votes and says whether they're in favour of the question, against it, or abstaining, and the Clerk then records those and hands them to the Speaker to announce.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's similar to our system here where we individually stand and vote. Has there been any discussion about any technological updates that could be made to make that process faster?

Mr. David Wilson:

We've thought about it. There are seven parties in the House at the moment. It takes a few seconds for each of them to cast their vote, and it would be possible to use technology for it. At the moment I think the feeling has been that there's a preference for parties to actually stand and give voice to their vote so that anyone who's watching or listening can hear how they voted. There have not been a great number of errors with voting, either casting them or adding them up. There's not a huge number of members to work with, either. I think at the moment, members are—and I certainly am—quite happy with the voice voting that we use.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay I'll pass that over.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll just take that 30 seconds because I have a very quick question for you. Can you tell us about the allocated seats for the Maori people?

Mr. David Wilson:

Indigenous Maori in New Zealand have had the option of one of two electoral rolls. There's the general electoral roll and the Maori roll, and there are a number of Maori seats throughout the country. The number will increase or decrease with the movement in that population. It's increasing and it has been for years now because there's a higher birth rate amongst Maori than other New Zealanders. So only people of Maori descent may vote or stand for election for those seats, and they were introduced very early in the New Zealand Parliament's history as a way of ensuring representation from Maori. There have been calls in recent years to abolish them primarily on the basis that there are actually a disproportionate number of Maori MPs in the House. There are more MPs of Maori descent than there are Maori in the general population... No party really seems to be willing to be the one that abolishes them, so I imagine they are here for the time being.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you very much for joining us today. We do appreciate your comments.

Just to clarify, I'm having trouble getting my head around this about the proxy voting and having very few people in the chamber at the time of a vote. As a legislator, I can't image anything more important than actually being in the chamber to cast your vote. Can you explain this a bit more? I'm just having trouble with this.

Mr. David Wilson:

Many members of the New Zealand public share your discomfort with that. It's possible for the full Parliament to vote with only one representative of each party in the chamber. There are usually a few more than that at times when votes are conducted, but it's certainly far from full. It was a difficult transition for members to make around the mid-1990s when this change was made. Many of our members now, 20 years on, haven't known any other system.

With the variety of other obligations that they have, and a system with a very strong party discipline as well, which has been one of the results of the move to our proportional representation system, it would be very rare for backbenchers, for example, to vote contrary to their party, what you might see in some larger parliaments, in parliaments where members are all directly elected and therefore perhaps not so dependent on their party to have their seat.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It boggles my mind that, as you said, you could have just the leaders of the parties in there and nobody else. I find that very interesting and confusing because I think if you're elected to do this job, although travel is involved and you're away from your family and we all kind of deal with it in our own way, that is a big part of the job. That is the job to stand in your place and vote, and if you just mail it in, so to speak, I just can't imagine. Maybe it's just me. I don't know.

In terms of proxy voting—I apologize if you have already done it and I missed it—what would be the reason for casting your proxy vote? Apparently you can do it regardless. Again, I'm just trying to get my head around this.

(1930)

Mr. David Wilson:

The party whip is considered to have the ability to cast all votes for their party without a specific proxy from individual members, and if a member wants to vote differently from their party then they would instruct that whip that way, although in that instance they'd be quite likely to go to the chamber and cast their own vote.

The reasons for their absence and the 25% allowance of members who are able to be away from the parliamentary precinct is a matter between the whip and the members of their party. There are not specific reasons provided for in Standing Orders for those matters. Really it is whether the whip will permit them to go, and so they do have to convince the whip. When I talked to the government whip he said everybody except the Prime Minister has to give him reasons for being away. Those reasons are really up to him, and I think it's so that he can weigh up competing requests for absence.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I guess it would be a very civil vote. They just high-five at the end of it and be on their way.

Mr. David Wilson:

But vote.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

What was it like in the previous system before you went to proportional? What was the voting like then? Was it the same stand in your place until everyone gets counted?

Mr. David Wilson:

No, we would ring the division bells, call all members to the chamber, and they had seven minutes to get there and then they would be locked and they would go out in the lobbies to vote as we would have seen at Westminister. That seemed to take about two minutes for the vote.

As I say, the change was made in 1996. With an increase in the number of parties, and an understanding parties may vote different ways on different questions, it's not guaranteed one side will always oppose everything and the other side will always support it.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Would there be less chance of a free vote for MPs now?

Mr. David Wilson:

The number of times they truly have free votes has probably not changed. There are issues in New Zealand that have been identified as conscience issues, really just by convention and tradition, things such as alcohol laws, same-sex marriage, abortion, gambling regulation, are issues on which members have been given a free vote by tradition and they continue to exercise that. In those circumstances where we have a true free vote, members are still called to the chamber with the bells and vote by going into the lobbies, and they will almost certainly not do that along party lines.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

But otherwise it's by party discipline, and you get the nod from above and you're told to vote one way, or proxy it in.

Mr. David Wilson:

Yes, you are. Occasionally members do other things. We had a vote on the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement last week in the House. The major opposition party is opposed to it. One of the members, a former trade minister who began the negotiations on it when in government, actually voted contrary to his party, with the understanding that he was going to do that. He voted with the government in that instance.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm sorry, I did get off track in terms of the family-friendly initiatives. I just thought it was a little interesting how you had it set up, so I do appreciate the answers. It allows me to better understand. Still, in terms of voting, I think as a legislator, that's your job. It's a large part of your job. It's a privilege to stand in your place and vote, and I couldn't imagine just telling the whip or the party leader, “This is the way I'm voting, and I'll be having lunch”, or something. Anyway, thank you very much for your time.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Ms. Malcolmson.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

As we are embarking on a democratic reform process in Canada, it's encouraging to me to look at the numbers, Australia's percentage of women in Parliament. I note that the Inter-Parliamentary Union says the top seven major democracies, that are at the top of electing women as a high percentage, are all proportional representation governments. New Zealand is one of them. That's encouraging to me. It follows for me also that, if you have a family-friendly Parliament, you are attracting more women in. If they are feeling supported, then they are more likely to put themselves on the ballot.

I want to track a little bit more some of the things you said in your opening comments around your set-up, because it went fast. How late do you sit in the evening? How late into the night ordinarily is your Parliament in session?

(1935)

Mr. David Wilson:

We sit until 10 p.m.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

You sit until 10, okay.

Mr. David Wilson:

That's on Tuesday and Wednesday nights.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Two nights a week it's until 10. All right.

We've been expressing some concerns that, both for staff as well as for parents of young children, this can be a limiting factor as it interferes with their family life back at home. Is that a conversation you're having within your Parliament as well?

Mr. David Wilson:

It's a conversation that, yes, certainly members with young children have raised. It's not so much a conversation that's happened around staff. I think that's because they've come into an employment relationship where they've acknowledged that this is something they'll have to do. It affects a relatively small number of staff. We probably have perhaps 10 Hansard staff and three or four clerks working on a night, so it does affect a relatively small number of people. But I'm conscious that this lack of time with family is something that might affect people's decisions to be involved in that sort of work, and it will also affect members' willingness to be involved.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Can you tell us more about your child care availability for parliamentarians? What ages of children? Are parliamentarians able to bring their kids without committing full time?

Mr. David Wilson:

I don't have all the details of the parliamentary crèche. There is one within the parliamentary campus, and although anyone is able to go there, the true preference of its role is for children of members and staff of Parliament. It has quite a long waiting list. It takes children from a very young age. I couldn't say exactly what the start is, but I would think it's about six months, through until the time they're able to start school, which is five years of age.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Is that something you'd be able to provide to the clerk, just a confirmation about how young the children are and whether parents are able to drop in just for a couple of days a week?

Mr. David Wilson:

Yes, I can, and sorry, I forgot about that part of your question. I believe that's the case, and that would be normal in most child care centres in New Zealand, but I'll check those two things and provide the information to the clerk.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Thanks. That's something that we're finding is a problem for parliamentarians, so that would be helpful for us to have something to compare to.

Can you talk a little bit more about your electronic participation function? Clarify again for what types of parliamentary functions electronic participation is possible, and also talk a little bit about how much it's been taken up and how successful it's been.

Mr. David Wilson:

Sure. It's still a requirement if a parliamentary committee wants to meet that the members must be there in person. They have no ability to take part by video conference or teleconference, but the committees do make use of video conference in the way that you are now to meet with people remotely around New Zealand, which is a very small country in comparison to Canada, but still occupies quite a lot of time to travel.

It's much more rare for committees now to travel to other centres unless they receive a very large number of public submissions and would like to be seen to be taking those views on board. Otherwise, they use video conferencing extensively to reduce travel time.

Generally speaking, committees meet on the same days that the House is sitting, although not at the same time, and so the members are usually all together in Wellington, in any case.

They have to be here in person to participate, but all of the documents that members might use, particularly for committees, are available to them electronically anywhere and on any device they use, provided they have an Internet connection.

(1940)

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

But they aren't able to participate in any parliamentary debate, or voting, or committee attendance electronically.

Mr. David Wilson:

No, they're not. They must be present either in the committee room or in the precinct, in the case of the House, in order to vote or to speak.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

That's interesting. Thanks.

What's the longest your Parliament sits at any given time? We just heard from our Australian counterparts that a two-week straight session would be the longest. We have four weeks at a time in some cases. What's the New Zealand experience?

Mr. David Wilson:

The usual experience would be to have three sitting weeks. The House would sit Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of each week.

We have a four-week sitting period starting next week which will include the budget. The budget's usually delivered around the end of May each year, and that would be the time the House would probably sit for the most weeks, and potentially also for the greatest number of hours.

I mentioned earlier that extended sittings have to a large degree replaced the use of urgency, but during the budget, particularly if there are measures that might be going to increase a tax or an excise on something, often that will be passed under urgency as soon as the budget's delivered. That would be one of the occasions where the House may well sit from Thursday into Thursday night, possibly into Friday, or even into Saturday, but it's really just about the only time of the year that would happen.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Thanks.

My final question is, has New Zealand ever wished that it had a Senate? This has nothing to do with family. I'm following my neighbour's lead.

Mr. David Wilson:

We had one until 1950, at least a sort of council, it was called, and it was abolished by the members of the Legislative Council in 1950.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Has anybody ever expressed deep regret over that?

Mr. David Wilson:

No. Certainly not the public....

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Thank you.

Those are all my questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I apologize if you already said this because I heard you say it goes until 10 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. What about the other days of the week?

Mr. David Wilson:

On a Thursday, the House sits from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m., which are the same afternoon sitting hours it does the other days, but it doesn't sit on Thursday night usually. The House doesn't sit on a Monday or a Friday in a normal week either. It could and it will, if it sits under urgency, but generally it doesn't.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You said there were some special hours that could be added in the mornings on Tuesdays and Wednesdays if there was a need.

Mr. David Wilson:

That's correct. It's what's called an extended sitting, which is an initiative that was introduced only a few years ago in response to a concern about the amount that urgency was used to pass legislation through multiple stages, or even to enact it.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Are those extended sittings at the initiative of the government? Is that on consensus? How do you determine to go into an extended sitting?

Mr. David Wilson:

There are two ways of doing it. The usual way is by near unanimity on the Business Committee. The vast majority of members will give agreement, and the Speaker will judge if there is near unanimity. It's possible for the government to go into an extended sitting on a government motion, but it's quite reluctant to do that because generally the business that is dealt with under extended sittings is something that most or all parties agree to. It's been used also exclusively for passing the Treaty of Waitangi settlement bills, which are about redressing indigenous Maori grievances over land confiscation in the 1870s. There's wide political support for doing that, and so parties generally all consent to do it, and that's been a very useful way of progressing that legislation that has wide agreement and that's not controversial for the majority of people.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

I may have misheard, but you said something about all debates having a fixed time frame of two hours. Can you explain that?

(1945)

Mr. David Wilson:

Debates on a first, second, or third reading of a bill are limited to two hours. Twelve members will get a call of a maximum of 10 minutes each. They're able to share those calls, and in some cases the party might take two five-minutes calls instead. The maximum time for those debates is two hours. The committee of the whole House stage, where a bill is debated and considered in detail between the second and third readings, doesn't have a time limit. That one can run for a significant period of time, as members debate the details of the legislation. With that exception, virtually everything else has some sort of time limit specified in the Standing Orders. Some of those limits are quite long. The budget debate, for example, has a time limit of 13 hours. The debate on the address from the throne at the beginning of Parliament I think is 15 hours. While some of those time limits are quite long, they do give members certainty over when something is going to occur and how long it will take.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

What about the timing of the votes? Are the votes also as predictable?

Mr. David Wilson:

They're fairly predictable in that they'll always occur at the end of the debate. Some debates do progress more quickly, although they have a maximum time limit, say, of two hours. If it's something there's general agreement on, it may only take an hour and a half. There will always be a whip from each party present in the House ready to vote at any time. The only exception, as I said, would be those very small parties of just one or two members who are not able to maintain a continuous presence in the House.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

What about private members' business, how many hours are allotted to that?

Mr. David Wilson:

One Wednesday every fortnight is for members' business. That will be for consideration primarily of members' bills every two weeks.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

Mr. David Wilson:

All members who are not ministers are able to introduce bills, and they'll be debated every second Wednesday effectively. The only thing that would interrupt that would be the delivery of the budget. If that was to occur in a week where it would be a members' day, then the members' day would wait until the following week.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You referred to a Business Committee. Is this a committee of all parties? Is it similar to our Board of Internal Economy? What is the purpose of the Business Committee?

Mr. David Wilson:

It is a committee of all parties. Every party is entitled to have one member on it, regardless of their size. Unlike most of our committees, which would have specified members named as members of the committee, this one doesn't, and any one member of a party is able to attend. Usually it will be a senior member or a whip from each party. The government Leader of the House will attend as well and talk about House business. It's chaired by the Speaker, and it makes decisions about the agenda for the House, the Order Paper, and timetabling. It has all parties present, and sometimes I'll use it to discuss possible procedural changes and try out innovations in the House. It meets every week at the start of the same week, and it operates on the basis of near unanimity. The Speaker will judge if he has almost every party in agreement, which means the large parties. If they disagree with something, that near unanimity won't be achieved.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate your being here with us.

We've picked up bits and pieces of this as we've gone through it, but I want to make sure I've got it all straight here. Let me ask you to run through it all again, or for the first time in some cases.

What is the number of sitting weeks in your parliament?

Mr. David Wilson:

There are 31 through the year.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

Are those spread out over the course of the entire year?

Mr. David Wilson:

That's right. It's usually in blocks of three weeks at a time. Sometimes there is a four-week block. There's a large break in December and all of January, which is the New Zealand summer.

(1950)

Mr. Blake Richards:

You said you sit Tuesdays through Thursdays, generally. Was I correct when I heard on Tuesdays and Wednesdays it's from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m., and then on Thursday it's from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.?

Mr. David Wilson:

That's correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What about question period? What time of day does that happen and for how long?

Mr. David Wilson:

Questions are held at 2 p.m. as soon as the House sits each day. There are 12 questions to ministers. It usually lasts about an hour, but it doesn't have a time limit. There are rules that questions must be short, just long enough to ask a question, and the answer is also supposed to be brief. It's sufficient to ask for parts of the member's question, but no longer. It's not an exchange of speeches or points of view. It is a short question, just a couple of lines of text, followed by an answer, and then the member has the ability to ask supplementary questions following the primary answer.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. It's 12 questions with a supplementary, so that's 24 questions all together with the supplementals. Is that correct?

Mr. David Wilson:

No. They can have multiple supplementary questions. A party has a weekly allocation of supplementaries that is allocated proportional to their size in the House.

Mr. Blake Richards:

There's been a bit of a discussion about members with young children. How many members do you have right now with young children? That would be with young children who would be nursing, mainly, but maybe for those with young children under the age of five or six, as well.

Would you know?

Mr. David Wilson:

I would have to estimate.

I know of two with children who are nursing at the moment. I would guess around half of the members have children who are still dependent on them.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Particularly for members who have children, and who are nursing, what sort of accommodations are made there for them?

Mr. David Wilson:

There's a room next to the debating chamber that has been designated as a parent's room for members where they're able to feed or change their children. They can have a bassinet or a cot in there for the child to sleep in. It is used particularly with members. Members can also have a family member, or a staff member, who can go into that room and look after the child while they're speaking in the chamber. It's used usually while a member is speaking—at least they want to be—because the rest of the time they're not required to be in the chamber because of the proxy voting.

Mr. Blake Richards:

A few of my colleagues have done this, so I'm going to stray a little off topic.

I noticed in doing a bit of reading prior to your appearance here that fairly recently your Prime Minister had been thrown out of your Parliament for the day, I believe it was. Upon reading further, I understood that it wasn't the first time that it had happened. I don't think it was the same Prime Minister. I'm curious about that.

I recently had raised a point of order regarding our Prime Minister and some of the behaviour we saw from him during question period. He wasn't thrown out of Parliament. In fact, I will give him credit, his behaviour since the time I made the point of order has improved, so that was a positive thing, and I hope it will stay that way.

I'm curious as to what precipitated the Prime Minister being thrown out of Parliament. It must have been quite a situation.

David Wilson:

Yes, and you're right; I think most Prime Ministers sitting for a reasonable period of time in New Zealand would have been thrown out of the chamber at least once.

In fact, the current Prime Minister, since he's been Prime Minister, which has now been eight years, hasn't been made to leave the chamber. Before that, when he was an opposition member, he did go out a few times. In this instance, he was required to leave because Standing Orders say that when the Speaker is on his feet and calling for order, members must sit down and be quiet. The day before that, the Speaker had warned him about the same thing. He tends to get up, turn his back to the Speaker and then address the rest of the chamber. Sometimes when the Speaker is on his feet, the Prime Minister says that he can't see him. He did that three days in a row. He had been warned the day before, and the Speaker did that for the same reason he would ask any other member to leave, which was just defying the Chair.

(1955)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you very much. I appreciate your diligence on that.

The Chair:

That will help our family-friendly Parliament. Anyone who is not family friendly will be thrown out.

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I don't have a lot of questions.

Your opening statement is among the most thorough we've had yet at this committee. I must congratulate you for putting the word “nappies” in Canadian Hansard for the first time. I checked quickly and it's never been said here in the House before.

You talked about proportional being used in New Zealand, and I can only imagine how having two types of MPs has interesting impacts on family and riding relationships. As I understand it, in New Zealand, it's an MMP system, so some MPs are elected in ridings and some are on lists. How does that affect how much time they spend in Parliament versus in their ridings? For that matter, what do list MPs consider to be their ridings?

David Wilson:

That's a good question.

Every list member would consider themselves to have a riding or an electorate, though they're not directly elected by it; they're elected by the nation at large. All of them will stay in office in some part of the country, which would usually be where they live, and so most cities and towns will have two members' offices, the first being that of the electorate or riding, of the person who holds that seat, and the second being that of the list MP who is based in that area.

The only requirement is that the second member make it clear to everybody on their signage and business cards, etc. that they are a list MP based in a certain area and they are not the MP for that area. Both kinds of members would spend the same amount of time in Wellington, and, I would think, the same amount of time in their offices out in the rest of the country.

There's really no difference in what they can do, or how they would behave and go about business in Wellington. I think list members in particular have acted to minimize their difference out in the population at large as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

From a technical point of view, when MPs in New Zealand are travelling back and forth to Wellington from their ridings, how is that accounted for? For example, here we can bring our family, our dependants, but each one takes a travel point and we have a limited number of travel points. How does it work in New Zealand?

David Wilson:

The members themselves are free to travel as much as they like within New Zealand. That is bought and paid for, for them, by the parliamentary service. They're entitled to bring their family members to Wellington a certain number of times a year. I'll have to check that number and let you know what it is. I think it's about 10 times a year, but I might be wrong about that, so I'll check it. They are able to bring them, but there's a limit on the number of times they can do that without paying for it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

New Zealand is a two-island country, so I'm guessing most MPs come by aircraft, rather than by any other means. What's the breakdown?

David Wilson:

That's correct. Seventy-five per cent of the population live in the North Island, well into the southern point of that island, so the vast majority of members also live there, and they do fly. Auckland is the most popular city, with a quarter of the country's population, so it has a large number of MPs, and almost all of them, except perhaps eight to 10 members based in Wellington, would fly in, and then the locally based ones would drive.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many members are there in the New Zealand Parliament, and how many are constituency versus list? Because of the way the lists are topped up, is it consistent from one election to the next?

Mr. David Wilson:

At the moment there are 121 members in the House and the number does vary slightly because the list does top up those numbers. We are a party. Perhaps one is a seat but one is a very small share of the total national vote. So we had 122. We currently have 121. It's possible, but very unlikely to have less than 120. The mix is 70 elected MPs, 50 list MPs.

(2000)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned earlier that anyone who's not a minister can put forward a private member's bill. Does New Zealand have parliamentary secretaries to ministers, and if so, can they submit bills, PMBs?

Mr. David Wilson:

At the moment there's only one. There's a parliamentary undersecretary, as they're called, and that's even lower than a parliamentary secretary. That person is able to submit bills. He is not considered a minister so he is not able to ask questions at question time or introduce legislation in his own right but he can introduce members' bills, and in fact he has.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate your answers. I'm out of time. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're officially over the question time, but does anyone have one last question?

Go ahead.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Thank you, Chair.

I want to come back to electing women in parliament, which is good for families, and also proportional representation. I got to travel to Norway a few years ago where they rank 15th in the world for the number of women elected to Parliament. Forty per cent of their Parliament is female, and they also elect using proportional representation. The observation that I had from the embassy representatives who had organized our delegation was expressed so diplomatically. They said, “We've seen your parliaments and legislatures in Canada, provincially and federally, and ours is nothing like yours.”

So I'm curious—your prime minister being turfed from the House notwithstanding—about the decorum and the sense of co-operation within your Parliament. Because we hear that the perception that you have to be thick-skinned in order to stand for office is something that may dissuade either women from standing, from being willing to put themselves forward, or parliamentarians, in general, who have small children or sensitive family members.

Do you have any comments on the tone and how that affects recruitment?

Mr. David Wilson:

Yes, I would imagine that would have some effect on the willingness of some people to seek election, or of their families to want them to be involved in it. At question time, certainly, it's very loud and confrontational, and much more so from members in the chamber than for people who can hear a broadcast of it because only one microphone is live from the broadcast. But when you're in the room, I know from my own experience, it's very loud and there's quite a lot of calling back and forth across the chamber.

I think the sense would be that would have some effect here, that members do need to be quite thick-skinned, and I think parties would generally agree with that.

The Green Party, which only has list MPs, has a policy of having 50% male and 50% female membership on their list, so they alternate. They do have a gender-balanced party in the House. No other party of a larger size does have that, and I think the total representation of women at the moment is around 33%, 34%. It has stayed that way for quite a long time, and I suppose the feeling members have had is that the party list is the way to address that, that parties wanting to appeal to the widest possible electorate will ensure that all voters are well represented on the list. I don't think that has been a reality, though, because while it may be true in theory, if you elect people who are actually willing to put themselves forward and you think are good candidates, then that theory probably isn't going to achieve the results you might want.

The Chair:

Thank you.

The very last question from our family-friendly study this year is from Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you very much.

When you made changes to your voting system, was that done unilaterally by the party in power or was it done by a referendum consulting the people?

Mr. David Wilson:

It was neither of those options. It was done unanimously by all parties in the House, and they do a review in every three-year Parliament of all Parliament's rules and make quite frequent adjustments to them, but it's always done unanimously, with the party realizing they're not going to be the government forever.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for taking this time out of the morning there in New Zealand. I'm sure you can be back and forth with our clerk if either of you have any questions. We really appreciate this. It's been very helpful.

(2005)

Mr. David Wilson:

You're welcome. We're pleased to speak to you.

The Chair:

We stand adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1805)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. Merci à tous d’être là et à tout le personnel de la Chambre des communes d’être arrivé en retard. Merci également à nos amis australiens, qui sont arrivés tôt. Nous essayons de démarrer les travaux.

Quelle heure est-il chez vous?

M. David Elder (Greffier de la Chambre, Chambre des représentants d'Australie):

Il est 8 heures et nous sommes mercredi matin.

Le président:

Bonsoir. La présente séance est la 22e du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour cette 1re session de la 42e législature. La réunion est publique et télédiffusée.

C’est notre deuxième séance de la journée. Le Comité a convenu de se réunir en dehors de son horaire habituel afin de permettre à nos témoins d’être présents par vidéoconférence, à 8 heures — les premiers témoins sont en Australie, et celui que nous entendrons en deuxième heure est en Nouvelle-Zélande. Cette séance fait partie de l’étude que nous menons sur les initiatives susceptibles d’améliorer l’efficacité et le caractère inclusif de la Chambre.

Les témoins de notre premier groupe appartiennent à la Chambre des représentants de l’Australie. Il s’agit de David Elder, greffier, et de James Catchpole, sergent d’armes.

J’invite le greffier à livrer sa déclaration liminaire, ce qui sera suivi d’une période de questions.

La parole est à vous.

M. David Elder:

Merci. Bonjour à vous depuis l’Australie, et bonsoir aux gens du Canada.

Mon collègue, James Catchpole, et moi avons préparé quelques notes à l’intention du Comité au sujet des questions sur lesquelles vous vous penchez. Je ne me suis pas astreint à préparer quoi que ce soit comme déclaration liminaire. Nous serons tout simplement heureux de répondre aux questions que le Comité pourrait avoir.

Au Parlement australien, notamment à la Chambre des représentants, nous avons adopté une série d’initiatives procédurales qui ont, selon moi, beaucoup d’importance. Ces initiatives nous placent peut-être à l'avant-garde de ce qui se fait en matière de procédures pour pourvoir aux besoins des femmes dans la sphère parlementaire. Nous avons aussi une gamme d'initiatives pratiques qui, j'en suis convaincu, sont d'une grande aide aux hommes ou aux femmes qui pourraient avoir de jeunes enfants.

Je crois que nous avons passablement de choses intéressantes à raconter sur ce qui se fait ici, et je serai heureux d'en parler plus longuement en répondant à vos questions.

Le président:

Nous tentons d'examiner des façons d'améliorer le caractère inclusif du Parlement, de le rendre plus efficace et mieux adapté aux besoins de ceux qui y travaillent. Alors vous pourriez parler des heures de séances, du nombre de jours par année il faut siéger, des jours choisis pour la tenue des votes, des congés de maternité, des soins de garde ou de toute autre chose qui pourrait rendre le Parlement plus efficace et plus inclusif qu'il ne l'est.

Ce que nous allons faire, c'est que nous allons donner la parole à chacun des membres du Comité.

Nous allons commencer par David Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Ce matin, nous avons eu une conversation très intéressante avec vos homologues de l'Angleterre. Ils nous ont parlé avec beaucoup d'enthousiasme du modèle australien qui les a inspirés, celui de la chambre secondaire. C'est quelque chose dont nous avons tous pris connaissance au cours de la présente étude. Je crois qu'aucun de nous n'en avait entendu parler auparavant. Pouvez-vous nous dire comment les initiateurs de ce brillant concept en sont arrivés là et nous dire ce que nous devrions savoir à ce sujet?

M. David Elder:

Notre deuxième chambre, qui est désormais appelée la Chambre de la Fédération, a vu le jour en 1994. Pour ce qui est de l'historique, je présume qu'il y avait, à l'époque, beaucoup de pression concernant le temps passé en Chambre, et que ce n'était pas inhabituel pour le gouvernement de se trouver coincé. Il devait recourir à ce que nous appelions des projets de loi « guillotines », tout simplement parce qu'il n'y avait pas suffisamment de temps à la Chambre pour suivre le processus de traitement normal. Le concept sous-jacent de ce que nous appelons maintenant la Chambre de la Fédération — qui est effectivement une deuxième chambre pour la Chambre des représentants — est qu'elle pouvait fonctionner en parallèle avec les séances de la Chambre et se pencher, à la demande de la Chambre, sur un certain nombre d'aspects qui, autrement, auraient dû être examinés et débattus à la Chambre des représentants.

Par exemple, le gros du travail de la Chambre de la Fédération est l'examen des projets de loi émanant du gouvernement. Au lieu de demander à la Chambre des représentants — qui est la chambre principale — d'examiner tous les projets de loi que le gouvernement propose, nous demandons à la Chambre de la Fédération, qui siège à peu près aux mêmes heures que la Chambre principale, d'examiner les projets de loi jusqu'aux toutes dernières étapes.

La Chambre de la Fédération n'est pas l'initiatrice des questions dont elle doit débattre et sa fonction n'est pas de terminer ce qui a été commencé ailleurs. C'est la Chambre qui lui donne son programme. La deuxième chambre fait l'examen complet des affaires qui lui sont soumises et les renvoie à la Chambre, qui met la touche finale au processus. Par exemple, la troisième lecture de tous les projets de loi émanant du gouvernement sans exception se fera à la Chambre des représentants, mais tout ce qui doit se passer au milieu — la tenue du débat en deuxième lecture et tout ce que vous désigneriez comme l'étude en comité — peut se dérouler à la Chambre de la Fédération.

C'est très intéressant. Les statistiques accumulées depuis 1994 indiquent qu'au début, le temps où la Chambre de la Fédération se réunissait correspondait à environ 15 % de la période d'activité de la Chambre des représentants. Au cours de la dernière législature, cette proportion a grimpé à environ 50 %. Depuis, elle est peut-être redescendue à sa valeur normale d'environ 30 %. Comme vous pouvez le voir, il s'agit d'un 30 % qui aurait autrement nécessité le travail de la Chambre principale et qui peut désormais être pris en charge par une chambre fonctionnant en parallèle. Cette façon de faire a une incidence énorme sur le déroulement des affaires de la Chambre.

(1810)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Sur le plan géographique, l'Australie ressemble passablement au Canada. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de ce que font les députés pour se promener d'un bout à l'autre du pays, et nous dire combien de fois par année ils sont appelés à faire le trajet? Quelle incidence cela a-t-il sur votre horaire?

M. David Elder:

Bien sûr. Évidemment, le Parlement se trouve à Canberra et, comme vous le dites, l'Australie, comme le Canada, est un pays très vaste. Les députés effectuent beaucoup de déplacements à l'intérieur de leur circonscription et certaines de ces circonscriptions sont très étendues, ce qui, j'en suis convaincu, est aussi le cas de certaines des vôtres. Par exemple, la majeure partie du Territoire du Nord est une circonscription à lui seul. Le deux tiers de l'Australie-Occidentale en est une autre. Elles sont tout simplement énormes.

Bien entendu, ces députés doivent aussi se rendre à Canberra. Nous siégeons approximativement de 18 à 20 semaines par an. Nous avons tendance à siéger par blocs de deux semaines, et ces blocs sont entrecoupés de pauses d'une ou deux semaines. L'année est ponctuée de trois plus longues, qui peuvent durer jusqu'à six semaines.

Pour dire vrai, lorsque les députés se rendent à Canberra, ils veulent maximiser le temps qu'ils peuvent consacrer aux affaires parlementaires afin de pouvoir retourner le plus tôt possible dans leur circonscription, c'est-à-dire — reconnaissons-le — là où doit se faire le gros du travail, le travail très important qui leur incombe. Nous sommes présentement en période d'élection, et tout se joue là. Vous devez vous faire réélire par les gens de votre circonscription, alors vous devez leur accorder beaucoup d'attention.

Voilà pour le contexte. Les députés doivent se rendre à Canberra. Ils se déplacent pour les blocs de deux semaines. Certains députés qui viennent de très loin restent jusqu'à la fin des deux semaines, mais nombre d'entre eux rentrent dans leur circonscription durant le week-end précédant la deuxième semaine.

La Chambre siège du lundi au jeudi. Le jeudi, nous terminons aux alentours de 17 heures, ce qui permet à une bonne partie des députés de rentrer dans leur circonscription le jeudi soir. Puis, ils regagnent habituellement Canberra le dimanche après-midi afin d'être prêts à siéger lundi.

Voilà, en gros, les déplacements habituels des députés. Tous les membres doivent voyager énormément, car, comme vous le savez, le pays est vaste. Mais les députés sont très assidus, et l'horaire des séances a été établi pour optimiser le temps qu'ils passent à Canberra et leur permettre d'en faire le plus possible, ce qui n'aurait pas été le cas si les jours de séance avaient été éparpillés d'un bout à l'autre du calendrier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Voilà une bonne mise en contexte.

Je sais que je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. J'ai une question avant de passer la parole à Mme Vandenbeld, s'il reste du temps.

Vous avez un concept qui, je le crois, n'existe nulle part ailleurs, et j'aimerais que vous l'expliquiez au Comité. Pouvez-vous nous dire en quoi consiste la « double dissolution »?

M. David Elder:

Il me faudrait beaucoup de temps pour tout expliquer. La version courte est qu'il s'agit d'un mécanisme qui permet de résoudre les différends entre les deux chambres — c'est-à-dire entre le Sénat et la Chambre des représentants —, différends qui se sont produits à deux occasions alors que le Sénat s'est refusé d'adopter un projet de loi que la Chambre des représentants avait proposé. C'est un mécanisme qui permet de résoudre les impasses et les désaccords de ce type entre les deux chambres. Ces différends sont résolus au moyen d'une élection générale et, exceptionnellement, c'est une élection générale qui concerne la composition des deux chambres au grand complet. Pour le Sénat, l'élection vise habituellement la moitié de l'assemblée. Lors des élections, seulement la moitié du Sénat est réélu, mais avec une double dissolution, c'est le Sénat en entier qui est dissolu et l'élection porte sur tous les sièges de cette assemblée. Voilà la différence entre nos deux régimes électoraux, et c'est toute une nouveauté pour vous, au Canada, puisque les membres de votre Chambre haute ne sont pas élus.

(1815)

Le président:

Merci, David.

Très bien. Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, messieurs, d'être avec nous ce matin.

J'aimerais revenir sur ce que vous avez dit au sujet des séances du vendredi. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi vous avez renoncé à siéger les vendredis? Pourquoi les vendredis ont-ils été supprimés du calendrier?

M. David Elder:

Je crois que cela a à voir avec ce que je disais au sujet des demandes qui incombent aux députés. Il y a quelques années, nous avons tenté de remettre les vendredis à l'horaire, mais nous n'avons siégé qu'un seul vendredi. Le terme « gâchis total » est probablement celui qui décrirait le mieux cette expérience. Cela n'avait rien à voir avec le fait que c'était un vendredi. D'autres facteurs sont entrés en ligne de compte. Les députés tiennent vraiment à se rendre dans leur circonscription pour le week-end. Le fait de terminer les travaux à 17 heures le jeudi leur permet de regagner le Queensland ou l'Australie-Méridionale, voire l'Australie-Occidentale. Les députés de l'Australie-Occidentale peuvent se rendre à Perth depuis Canberra dans la soirée de jeudi. Je crois que les gens n'ont plus beaucoup d'intérêt pour les séances du vendredi, car elles ne permettent pas aux députés de retourner là où ils estiment que le vrai travail doit se faire, c'est-à-dire dans leur circonscription.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Voilà qui est intéressant.

Quelle est la composition, si vous pouviez nous donner une idée... Étant donné l'horaire que vous avez décrit et ce que vous venez de dire, je présume que les députés sont peu nombreux à faire venir leur famille dans la capitale.

M. David Elder:

Il leur arrive de le faire. Les femmes députées qui ont de très jeunes enfants les amènent avec elles à Canberra, car elles leur donnent encore le sein. Lorsque nos séances coïncident avec des congés scolaires, il y a un plus grand nombre de députés avec leur famille à Canberra. Les députés ont certains privilèges qui leur permettent d'amener leur famille à Canberra durant ces semaines de séance où il y a des congés scolaires. Une famille peut recevoir une subvention du Trésor public pour venir à Canberra et tenir compagnie à un député ou à une députée. De façon générale, les députés ont tendance à ne pas amener leur famille avec eux, sauf dans le cas des exceptions que je viens de mentionner.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pour ceux qui le font, quels services sont offerts dans la capitale à l'intention des enfants, comme des garderies et d'autres choses de ce type?

M. David Elder:

Je vais demander à mon collègue, James Catchpole, de répondre à cela. Il est sergent d'armes et il est le spécialiste en ce qui concerne le bien-être des députés et toutes les choses connexes.

M. James Catchpole (sergent d'armes, Chambre des représentants d'Australie):

Il y a une garderie au Parlement. Elle est ouverte aux enfants de tous les députés et de tous les sénateurs, ainsi qu'à ceux des occupants de l'immeuble. On y trouve un service de garde privé dont le contrat est octroyé à notre ministère des Services parlementaires. Le service fonctionne durant toute l'année ou à peu près, et les députés y amènent leurs enfants. Nous avons aussi plusieurs salles prévues pour les mères qui allaitent. Toujours sur place, nous avons des salles familiales où les gens peuvent amener leurs enfants. Il y a des petits parcs de jeu, des téléviseurs et du divertissement à l'intention des jeunes enfants et des bébés. Les prix varient.

Le service de voitures communautaires, appelé COMCAR, est un service de voiture avec chauffeur. Les voitures sont équipées de sièges pour bébé et de harnais pour bébé, afin que les députés puissent se rendre au Parlement avec leurs enfants et en revenir. Bien entendu, les députés peuvent choisir de laisser leurs enfants là où ils séjournent.

(1820)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Vous avez dit que le retour des séances du vendredi avait été un peu un gâchis. Qu'avez-vous voulu dire?

M. David Elder:

Lorsque cela s'est produit, il y avait un contexte particulier.

L'intention était d'avoir une séance qui ne porterait que sur les affaires émanant des députés, alors il n'y avait aucune période de questions, comme c'est le cas lors des séances habituelles. Puis le premier ministre et d'autres ministres ont clairement fait savoir qu'ils n'allaient pas nécessairement prendre part à ces séances, et qu'ils n'avaient pas besoin d'y être puisqu'elles allaient mettre l'accent sur les affaires émanant des députés.

L'opposition de l'époque a alors choisi de perturber la séance. Elle était contre cette idée. La journée avait été ajoutée sans leur soutien, alors la séance a été mise sens dessus dessous. Par exemple, comme la séance allait porter sur les affaires émanant des députés, nous avions pris des dispositions pour qu'il n'y ait ni vote ni dissension cette journée-là, ce qui signifie que le président n'avait aucun moyen de remédier au désordre, puisqu'il ne pouvait nommer aucun député et les faire exclure de la Chambre par l'intermédiaire d'un vote.

En fait, la journée a tourné au chaos. Je crois que c'est une bonne façon de décrire ce qui s'est passé. Il n'y a plus eu de séance du vendredi après cela.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Vous avez dit que l'opposition était contre les séances du vendredi parce qu'elles avaient été ajoutées contre leur volonté.

Ai-je bien entendu?

M. David Elder:

C'est exact. Oui.

Le président:

C'est un exemple à ne pas suivre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Bien sûr, en ce qui concerne les affaires émanant des députés, nous ne fonctionnons pas exactement de la même façon que vous. Les vendredis, il y a une période de questions et quelques autres sujets. Ce serait un peu différent.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vingt secondes.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je ne sais pas si je devrais faire un « Christopherson » de moi ou non. Je vais laisser faire pour l'instant. Je me demandais si j'allais poser quelques autres questions.

Merci beaucoup de votre contribution. Je l'apprécie grandement.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons Mme Malcolmson.

Soyez la bienvenue au Comité.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président, de me donner l'occasion de prendre la parole.

Je remercie également tous nos témoins.

En examinant la durée de vos jours de séance, je constate que le lundi et le mardi, vous siégez jusqu'à 21 h 30 et le mercredi, jusqu'à 20 heures.

Nous nous soucions de la vie de famille de nos députés élus qui souhaitent être présents à la maison à l'heure du coucher de leurs enfants. Cela vaut également pour les membres de notre personnel. Travailler si tard et obliger notre personnel à demeurer avec nous, ce n'est pas très propice à la vie de famille.

Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu de l'impact de la durée de vos jours de séance? Avez-vous réussi à trouver des aménagements, tant pour le personnel que pour les députés?

M. David Elder:

Pour placer les choses dans leur contexte, je dois vous dire que nous avons longuement débattu de la durée des jours de séance. À un moment donné, nous terminions à 20 heures afin de faciliter la vie de famille; cet horaire a été maintenu et s'est avéré assez efficace durant un certain temps. En fait, à une époque, la chambre avait l'habitude de siéger jusqu'à 23 heures. Le changement d'horaire pour 20 heures a donc été très très apprécié. Je pense que la décision de lever la séance à 21 heures est une sorte de compromis entre l'ancien horaire en vigueur il y a quelques années et celui que nous avons aujourd'hui pour faciliter la vie de famille.

Cela rappelle un peu le point que j'ai soulevé tout à l'heure au sujet des députés qui souhaitent tout simplement, lorsqu'ils sont ici à Canberra, faire leur travail le plus efficacement possible. Par exemple, si l'adoption d'un horaire allégé nous obligeait à siéger le vendredi, la plupart des députés vous diraient qu'ils préfèrent siéger un peu plus longtemps pour ne pas avoir à siéger le vendredi pour rattraper les heures coupées. C'est une sorte de compromis.

Je pense que l'horaire actuel est assez équilibré et semble faire l'affaire des députés. N'oubliez pas que nous avons seulement quatre parlementaires de la région. Il n'y en a que quatre de la région de Canberra, soit deux sénateurs et deux députés. Ils ne sont donc pas nombreux à pouvoir rentrer à la maison pour mettre leurs enfants au lit. De toute évidence, les mères de très jeunes enfants les prennent avec elles lorsque nous avons des débats qui se prolongent. Je ne sais pas quels arrangements elles ont pris.

Les journées du personnel sont aussi très longues. C'est vrai. Comme nous n'avons pas pauses officielles pour les repas durant les séances, les journées sont donc très longues pour le personnel. Nous essayons de faire en sorte que les employés puissent avoir des pauses à différents moments de la journée. La levée de la séance à 21 h 30 est un compromis raisonnable, je pense, de loin préférable à 23 heures, ce qui est un peu tard. C'est un ensemble de compromis. Il est clair que le gouvernement souhaite que la chambre siège un certain nombre d'heures par semaine et nous essayons de trouver le meilleur moyen de caser ces heures en quatre jours.

(1825)

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Quel est le pourcentage des femmes élues en ce moment? Combien d'entre elles ont de jeunes enfants? A-t-on la perception que les longues heures de séance empêchent les femmes et les mères de jeunes enfants de présenter leur candidature à une fonction élective?

M. David Elder:

Le pourcentage de femmes à la Chambre des représentants est d'environ 25 % depuis déjà un bon nombre d'années. Il est parti d'un niveau assez bas pour plafonner autour de 25 à 30 %. Nous sommes en campagne électorale, je ne sais donc pas quelle sera la composition du nouveau parlement. Ces dernières années, je pense que six ou sept députées avaient des enfants. C'est un pourcentage raisonnable du nombre de femmes siégeant à la Chambre des représentants. Bon nombre d'entre elles sont en âge d'avoir des enfants.

Les conditions de travail sont-elles dissuasives? Je ne peux répondre à cette question. J'ai l'impression que les mères de jeunes enfants se débrouillent bien. Nous avons toute une gamme de mécanismes qui semblent leur convenir et elles semblent tout à fait satisfaites. Par exemple, nous allons bientôt avoir une élection, et toutes ces députées ont décidé de se représenter. On peut donc supposer que les conditions de travail leur semblent assez satisfaisantes pour les inciter à continuer.

Je ne suis pas en mesure de dire quel est l'impact sur les femmes en général.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Les parlementaires ont accès à un service de garde d'enfants. Peuvent-ils y laisser leurs enfants à l'occasion seulement? Y a-t-il une limite d'âge pour les enfants et ce service offre-t-il une certaine souplesse aux parents?

M. James Catchpole:

Le service de garde accepte les enfants âgés de six semaines à cinq ans. Bien que certains enfants, en particulier ceux du personnel qui travaille dans l'édifice, sont inscrits pour une durée raisonnablement longue, les parents peuvent y laisser leurs enfants de façon occasionnelle, ce qui convient davantage aux députés. La garderie se trouve dans l'immeuble.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Excellent. C'est une bonne nouvelle.

Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée du taux d'utilisation de votre système de vote par procuration par des mères de nourrissons?

M. David Elder:

À un moment ou l'autre, toutes les députées qui allaitent un nourrisson y ont recours. Elles ne l'utilisent pas pour chaque vote. Parfois elles sont présentes pour le vote et parfois elles donnent une procuration à leur whip.

J'aimerais souligner deux choses au sujet du vote par procuration. Pour exercer son droit de vote par procuration, la députée doit être à Canberra, dans l'édifice du Parlement. Elle ne peut l'exercer à distance. Si vous êtes dans votre circonscription, vous ne pouvez voter par procuration. De la même manière, vous ne pouvez voter par procuration lorsque vous vous trouvez à votre résidence de Canberra; vous devez être présente dans l'édifice du Parlement.

Les députées qui allaitent un nourrisson y ont fréquemment recours.

(1830)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Vandenbeld, c'est à vous.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup de répondre à nos questions.

L'idée de la Chambre de la Fédération, la chambre parallèle, a été évoquée à plusieurs reprises au sein de notre comité.

Nous avons entendu des représentants du parlement britannique ce matin. Ils nous ont dit que, chez eux, la chambre parallèle, Westminster Hall, est beaucoup plus flexible. Elle est disposée en forme de fer à cheval, les ministres y sont souvent présents et les échanges y sont très directs en raison de la nature des interventions.

Pouvez-vous nous dire comment cela fonctionne en Australie?

M. David Elder:

Elle fonctionne de manière très similaire. Cette chambre est beaucoup plus informelle que la Chambre des représentants. Même si tous les députés sont membres de la Chambre de la Fédération — autrement dit, tous les députés peuvent assister aux délibérations — il n'y a que 38 sièges parce qu'en général, les députés y participent en moins grand nombre.

Certes, c'est une chambre beaucoup plus intime et plus petite. Elle est disposée en forme de fer à cheval, mais les députés peuvent s'asseoir où ils veulent. Ils ne sont pas tenus de prendre place en face des députés du parti opposé. Les ministres viennent participer aux dernières étapes de l'étude des projets de loi, de même aux étapes de l'étude en comité. La procédure y est beaucoup plus informelle qu'à la chambre. Elle est cependant régie par les mêmes règles. C'est simplement un endroit beaucoup plus intime et informel.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez dit que les tables sont agencées en forme de fer à cheval et que vous pouvez prendre place n'importe où. Des députés de différents partis se placent-ils côte à côte?

M. David Elder:

Non. Malheureusement, ils ont leurs habitudes, ils prennent donc place de leur côté respectif. Même nos députés indépendants s'assoient quelque part au milieu. Je pense que les vieilles habitudes ont la vie dure.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

La durée des interventions est-elle limitée? Y a-t-il une période de questions?

M. David Elder:

La durée des interventions est limitée. Comme je l'ai dit, les règles qui s'appliquent à la Chambre de la Fédération sont les mêmes que celles de la chambre. La durée des interventions est la même qu'à la chambre pour des interventions de nature similaire ou pour l'étude d'affaires similaires.

La période des questions n'a lieu qu'à la Chambre des représentants. Il n'y en a pas à la Chambre de la Fédération, mais les étapes de l'étude d'un projet de loi en comité, par exemple, peuvent se faire sous forme de questions et de réponses entre un ministre et les députés.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez parlé de la popularité de la Chambre de la Fédération et de l'impopularité des vendredis. Selon vous, faut-il y voir une corrélation, dans le sens où la chambre parallèle facilite la semaine des quatre jours en dégageant du temps pour l'examen des ordres émanant du gouvernement?

M. David Elder:

Bien, je pense que cela ne fait pas de doute et, en ce moment, la Chambre de la Fédération n'est pas utilisée à sa pleine capacité. Elle siège pendant environ 30 % du temps de séance de la chambre. Elle pourrait siéger 100 % du temps. Elle peut être convoquée à tout moment pendant que la chambre siège, mais pas lorsque la chambre ne siège pas. Elle ne peut donc se réunir avant ou après la session à la chambre.

Nous pourrions utiliser la Chambre de la Fédération beaucoup plus souvent. Cette sous-utilisation donne donc à penser qu'il n'est pas vraiment nécessaire de siéger le vendredi, par exemple. Nous pourrions facilement avoir deux séances de plus à la Chambre de la Fédération.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

À quel moment les affaires émanant des députés sont-elles traitées? Je crois comprendre que la Chambre de la Fédération traite surtout les ordres émanant du gouvernement? Est-ce qu'on y traite d'autres questions?

M. David Elder:

Les affaires émanant des députés y sont traitées. Le lundi est la journée consacrée à ces affaires. Deux heures y sont consacrées à la chambre principale, et deux heures et demie à la Chambre de la Fédération, le même lundi. Oui, la chambre parallèle se penche sur les affaires émanant des députés, mais pas exclusivement; leur examen a lieu en partie à la Chambre des représentants. En fait, au cours de la dernière législature, je pense que nous avons consacré environ huit heures aux affaires émanant des députés, et leur examen s'est en grande partie déroulé à la Chambre de la Fédération. Nous avons réduit le volume des affaires émanant des députés au cours de cette dernière législature.

(1835)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

Je pense que M. Graham a une très brève question à poser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je voulais seulement clarifier un point que nous avons déjà soulevé. Si j'ai bien compris, vous avez dit que la chambre siège deux semaines, puis fait ensuite relâche les deux semaines suivantes. Est-ce bien cela?

M. David Elder:

C'est le calendrier habituel, mais parfois nous n'avons qu'une semaine de relâche. Il nous arrive aussi d'avoir une semaine de séance, une semaine de relâche, puis deux semaines de séance, mais en général, nous suivons le calendrier de deux semaines de séance et deux semaines de relâche. C'est le calendrier normal, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle est votre plus longue période consécutive de séance, en général? Nous, par exemple, nous avons des périodes de quatre semaines consécutives.

M. David Elder:

Chez nous, ce sont généralement des périodes de deux semaines. Il peut nous arriver, exceptionnellement, peut-être à la fin de l'année, de siéger une semaine de plus, ou quelques jours de plus, mais je n'ai pas souvenir d'avoir siégé quatre semaines d'affilée. Peut-être il y a très longtemps.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais déroger à toute une série de précédents et partager mon temps avec le président.

Le président:

Je vais simplement poser une question que David Christopherson poserait. Vous avez dit que vous avez des dispositions autorisant les déplacements familiaux. Ici et au Royaume-Uni, certains députés évitent de se déplacer en famille parce qu'ils ne veulent pas donner à la population l'impression qu'ils dépensent beaucoup d'argent. Quelles sont les dispositions à cet égard chez vous?

M. David Elder:

Très similaires. Elles ont parfois soulevé la controverse et certains aspects, par exemple les voyages pour réunion familiale, ont suscité beaucoup de commentaires. L'an dernier, nous avons eu un lot de problèmes concernant les voyages, notamment ces voyages pour réunion familiale. Il n'y a pas beaucoup de critiques lorsque les dispositions sont utilisées pour faire venir des membres de la famille à Canberra. Elles peuvent cependant être utilisées pour emmener des membres de la famille à d'autres endroits et je pense que c'est cela qui a suscité la controverse. Je crois que les députés sont très soucieux de ne pas utiliser l'argent des contribuables à ces fins, et ils savent qu'ils doivent s'assurer que le but du voyage résistera à l'épreuve de la perception publique.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Richard.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir un peu en arrière. Vous avez dit que vous siégez entre 18 et 20 semaines par année, généralement par période de deux semaines, du lundi au jeudi. Vous avez parlé de la débâcle du vendredi. Je ne crois pas vous avoir entendu parler des heures de séance du lundi au jeudi. Pouvez-vous me donner une idée des heures de séance du lundi au jeudi?

M. David Elder:

Bien sûr. Le lundi, nous siégeons de 10 heures à 21 h 30; le mardi, de 12 heures à 21 h 30, le mercredi, de 9 heures à 20 heures et le jeudi de 9 heures à 17 heures. Sans interruption. Nous n'avons pas de pauses officielles pour les repas, mais je dois dire que les lundis et les mardis, entre 18 h 30 et 20 heures, aucun vote ni quorum n'est requis à la chambre. Ces deux jours-là, les députés peuvent donc sortir de l'édifice, entre 18 h 30 et 20 heures, pour prendre leur repas.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous semblez donc siéger une quarantaine d'heures par semaine, en général. Qu'en est-il de la période des questions? À quelle heure a-t-elle lieu et combien de temps dure-t-elle?

(1840)

M. David Elder:

La période des questions a lieu tous les jours à 14 heures et dure 1 heure et 10 minutes, donc jusqu'à 15 h 10.

M. Blake Richards:

Quand vous avez regardé les heures de séance, avez-vous envisagé de modifier quoi que ce soit?

M. David Elder:

L'horaire de la période des questions a évolué dans le temps. Avant, elle avait lieu tout de suite, dès que la chambre se réunissait. Il fut un temps où elle avait lieu à 15 heures. Cela fait maintenant longtemps qu'elle a lieu à 14 heures.

Bien sûr, on parle de temps en temps de modifier cet horaire, mais nous avons nos petites habitudes, donc je crois que 14 heures est désormais l'horaire établi. Je ne crois pas que nous ayons ni l'intention ni l'envie de le changer.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est pareil ici. Nos séances se déroulent au même moment. Je trouve que cela a plutôt bien fonctionné pour nous.

On dirait que votre période des questions est un peu plus longue que la nôtre. Cela vient probablement compenser le fait que vous siégez une journée de moins. Vous dites que cela fait longtemps que la séance a lieu à 14 heures, donc, je suppose que vous ne savez pas pourquoi cet horaire a été choisi au départ. Vous n'étiez pas là, je pense, à l'époque de cette discussion, mais peut-être avez-vous une idée sur la question?

M. David Elder:

Cela fait sans doute partie des choses qui se perdent dans la nuit des temps. J'imagine que cet horaire a été jugé le plus pratique. Je ne suis pas certain qu'il y ait eu des débats à l'époque. Cela fait longtemps que les séances ont lieu à 14 heures.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Pour ce qui est de la Chambre de la Fédération, je veux m'assurer d'avoir bien compris, soit que les débats en seconde lecture et à l'étape de l'étude en comité ont lieu dans cette chambre, pour toutes les lois. Est-ce le cas ou certaines lois sont-elles choisies et si c'est le cas, pourquoi?

M. David Elder:

Ce n'est qu'une partie des lois. Nous partageons la charge de travail de la chambre entre la chambre principale et la Chambre de la Fédération. Une partie des lois seulement est soumise à la Chambre de la Fédération. Il faut que cela soit fait en coopération et ce sont donc généralement les sujets les moins controversés qui y sont débattus. Il y a plusieurs mécanismes qui interviennent dans le fonctionnement de la Chambre de la Fédération. Cela signifie que s'il n'y a pas de coopération autour de ce qui est débattu, il est assez facile pour un membre de l'opposition, ou pour n'importe quel député, de faire arrêter les procédures. Il y a eu des efforts délibérés pour garantir le caractère coopératif des travaux au niveau de cette chambre.

M. Blake Richards:

Qui décide quels sont les sujets les moins controversés. Est-ce le président ou est-ce un comité parlementaire? Qui décide qu'un sujet est suffisamment consensuel pour être soumis à la Chambre de la Fédération?

M. David Elder:

Ce n'est pas le président et nous n'avons pas de comité des travaux de la chambre, donc il y a des discussions et des négociations entre le président de la chambre et l'administrateur des activités de l'opposition. Le président de la chambre annonce à l'opposition qu'il y a certains éléments qu'il aimerait voir débattus dans la Chambre de la Fédération. L'opposition déclare qu'elle est d'accord avec ceci ou cela et ces sujets sont ensuite débattus.

S'il n'y a pas d'accord, il y a une série de mécanismes pour bloquer la Chambre de la Fédération — comme s'affranchir du quorum et d'autres mesures. Il faut vraiment que cela soit fait en coopération. Quelque 20 à 30 % des lois de la chambre sont débattues dans la Chambre de la Fédération.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Bonjour à tous les deux et merci de nous avoir rejoint de si bon matin.

Comme vous le savez tous les deux, ce comité tente de créer des politiques pour faire en sorte que notre parlement soit plus propice à la vie de famille et soit plus inclusif. Nous apprécions beaucoup votre contribution et votre franchise.

Tout d'abord, je voudrais savoir ce qui a provoqué des changements dans votre parlement. Quelles motivations ont présidé aux changements dont vous avez parlé?

(1845)

M. David Elder:

Pour ce qui est des changements de procédures, je crois qu'on a d'abord véritablement reconnu que le nombre de femmes en âge d'avoir des enfants a nettement augmenté et que celles-ci avaient de la difficulté à trouver un équilibre entre la nécessité de s'occuper de leurs enfants et leurs obligations parlementaires. Je crois que l'initiative de vote par procuration, qui a été introduite en 2009, était en grande partie une reconnaissance du fait qu'il était important qu'elles soient visibles pour pouvoir participer aussi pleinement que possible aux débats tout en étant en mesure de continuer à allaiter et de s'occuper de jeunes enfants.

C'est un mécanisme puissant, car cela signifie qu'un député n'est pas présent à la chambre pour un vote, mais que son vote est enregistré comme s'il y était. Le vote par procuration est un mécanisme puissant et c'est précisément pour cela qu'il a été mis en place.

Les mesures les plus récentes que nous avons mises en place, comme autoriser les députées à se présenter en chambre avec leurs nourrissons sans que ceux-ci soient identifiés comme des étrangers — comme le disait l'ancienne dénomination — vont encore plus loin et affirment que les députés peuvent avoir besoin de cette souplesse supplémentaire pour faire face à des circonstances particulières. Si une députée est accompagnée par un jeune membre de sa famille et qu'il y a soudain une mise aux voix, elle a alors la possibilité d'emmener son nourrisson avec elle.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Combien de nourrissons se retrouvent ainsi à la chambre en général?

M. David Elder:

Cette disposition a été introduite au début de l'année et n'a pas encore été appliquée. Je me demande si elle le sera beaucoup. Je ne sais pas comment ça se passe chez vous, mais la Chambre des représentants, en particulier pendant les votes dissidents, ne constitue pas un environnement tellement propice aux enfants. C'est bruyant, il y a beaucoup d'activité et je suppose que les députés préfèrent probablement ne pas y emmener leurs enfants. Cela étant, ils en ont la possibilité et je crois que c'est tout l'intérêt de la mesure adoptée par la chambre.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Avez-vous des politiques ou des dispositions au sujet du congé parental pour vos parlementaires?

M. David Elder:

Il n'y a pas de dispositions pour le congé parental. Les députés ont le droit de percevoir leur salaire tant qu'ils sont députés. Par exemple s'ils prennent des vacances ou s'ils tombent malades et prennent un congé, ils continuent de percevoir leur salaire et de bénéficier de leurs droits. Ils n'ont pas besoin de faire une demande formelle de vacances ou d'arrêt maladie. De la même façon, ils n'ont pas besoin de faire de demande formelle pour un congé de maternité. Il n'y a pas de système formel pour cela et ils continuent de percevoir leur salaire et de bénéficier de leurs droits.

Les députés font une demande de congé auprès de la chambre pour leur période d'absence et il y a une résolution formelle de la chambre pour donner un congé à un député pour, disons, des raisons de maternité ou parce la personne est malade ou pour toute raison que peut avoir un député. Cela veut dire que le député n'est alors pas obligé de siéger à la chambre pendant les périodes de séance.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Quel est l'âge moyen de vos députées?

M. David Elder:

Je ne pourrais vous le dire a priori. Nous avons un certain nombre de jeunes femmes maintenant, qui sont en âge d'avoir des enfants, mais il y a aussi un certain nombre de femmes plus âgées. Je ne sais pas. Je n'ai pas regardé les chiffres. Je suis désolé. Nous pouvons tout à fait regarder cela et fournir ces informations au comité si vous le souhaitez.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Oui, ça serait bien.

Mon autre question est la suivante, vos jeunes parlementaires en sont-elles à leur premier mandat ou leur deuxième? Ont-elles été élues une fois, ou deux?

M. David Elder:

Certaines en sont à leur premier mandat et d'autres à leur deuxième ou troisième mandat. Cela dépend. Certaines sont assez expérimentées. Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, ce qui est intéressant c'est que toutes ces députées se sont présentées à nouveau à l'élection actuelle, donc cela indique que, d'une manière ou d'une autre, elles arrivent à gérer de façon satisfaisante tous les problèmes qu'elles rencontrent pour équilibrer leur vie parlementaire et leur vie de famille avec des jeunes enfants.

(1850)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Formidable.

Dans les réactions des parlementaires vis-à-vis des changements que vous avez introduits concernant...

Mon temps est-il épuisé?

Le président:

Oui.

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Schmale, mais, auparavant, je voudrais une précision sur ce que vous avez dit au début. Vous avez parlé de voitures équipées de sièges pour bébé.

De quelles voitures s'agit-il? Y a-t-il un parc de voitures pour tout le monde? Comment ça marche?

M. James Catchpole:

Oui. Il y a une flotte de voitures basée à Canberra. Les députés ont droit à un véhicule, à une voiture avec chauffeur, lorsqu'ils sont à Canberra, principalement pour faire des allers-retours entre la ville et l'aéroport ou pour se faire déposer là où ils passent la nuit.

C'est un parc de voitures qui s'appelle COMCAR et qui est fourni par le gouvernement. Il y en a, qui servent à une forme de transport collectif et qui emmènent plus de trois ou quatre personnes. Des sièges de bébé sont disponibles. Nous en avons au parlement donc, quand un député veut réserver un véhicule, il indique qu'il a besoin d'un siège de bébé et nous lui fournissons.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Venons-en à votre journée type du jeudi, comment se présente votre calendrier? Vous nous avez dit que votre période de questions a lieu à 14 heures, mais à quoi ressemble le reste de la journée?

M. David Elder:

Nous commençons à 9 heures et nous traitons des affaires gouvernementales jusqu'à 13 h 30.

Nous avons ensuite une procédure assez nouvelle qui est consacrée à des déclarations de 90 secondes. Autrement dit, entre 13 h 30 et 14 heures, les députés peuvent faire une déclaration très courte, de 90 secondes, sur n'importe quel sujet de leur choix. C'est un moment très vivant et très intéressant. C'est une bonne introduction à la séance des questions qui a lieu à 14 heures. Elle dure jusqu'à 15 h 10 environ.

Ensuite, chaque mardi, mercredi et jeudi nous débattons d'une question d'intérêt public pendant une heure. C'est généralement une question soulevée par l'opposition et, entre disons 15 h 10 et 16 h 10, nous traitons de cette question d'intérêt public. Ensuite de 16 h 10 à 16 h 30 nous avons une courte séance d'affaires gouvernementales, qu'il s'agisse de législation ou d'autres affaires gouvernementales.

Ensuite de 16 h 30 à 17 heures, nous avons un débat d'ajournement et c'est l'occasion de soulever des questions d'initiative parlementaire ou chaque intervenant a cinq minutes.

Voilà comment se déroule un jeudi typique.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je veux simplement dire que, chaque fois que l'opposition soulève une question, j'estime qu'elle va être d'une importance primordiale.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Jamie Schmale: Quatre-vingt-dix secondes pour des déclarations de députés? C'est assez impressionnant. Ça doit être quelque chose.

S'agissant d'assiduité, je suppose qu'à mesure que la journée du jeudi avance, il doit y avoir de moins en moins de monde, ou bien la fréquentation reste-t-elle forte jusqu'à la fin?

M. David Elder:

L'assiduité est assez bonne jusqu'aux environs de 16 h 30.

Lorsque la chambre passe au débat d'ajournement, les députés commencent à s'éclipser. Il peut y avoir des votes à la chambre jusqu'à 16 h 30, les députés en sont très conscients. Ils restent en général jusqu'à cette heure-là, puis on les voit se diriger vers la porte.

M. Jamie Schmale:

À propos de ce que vous avez dit sur le fait que vous aviez décidé de siéger de nouveau les vendredis et que, ensuite, vous ne l'avez plus fait, comment la population a-t-elle réagi? Je reconnais qu'il y a une différence entre ce que nous faisons le vendredi et ce que vous faisiez, c'est à dire simplement des initiatives parlementaires.

M. David Elder:

Cela ne s'est produit que pour une journée, c'était une nouvelle disposition. Historiquement la chambre siégeait le vendredi. Nous siégions le vendredi, puis nous sommes passés du lundi au jeudi. Il était essentiellement question de permettre aux députés de passer plus de temps dans leurs circonscriptions.

Je ne dirais peut-être pas que l'idée des séances du vendredi ne sera jamais remise sur la table. Cela pourrait très bien être remis sur la table par un futur gouvernement ou un futur parlement. Si c'était le cas, je pense qu'il faudrait que cela soit une journée équilibrée. Il faudrait que ce soit une journée plus normale plutôt que de la réserver aux initiatives parlementaires

Je crois que les députés ont très envie de retourner rapidement dans leurs circonscriptions. Il est clair que le fait de terminer le jeudi après-midi le leur permet, ce qui ne serait pas le cas avec des séances le vendredi.

(1855)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Bien.

Pour en revenir à la question de la garderie que j'ai évoquée la dernière fois, les horaires sont-ils souples? Je crois que les délégations que nous avons reçues précédemment nous ont dit que les horaires n'étaient pas assez souples pour correspondre aux heures de séance de la chambre. C'est assez tard, car vous siégez jusqu'à 20 heures ou 21 h 30, c'est probablement de toute façon un peu tard pour un jeune enfant, mais si une telle situation se produisait et que la garderie soit nécessaire le soir, est-elle ouverte?

M. David Elder:

La garderie reste ouverte jusqu'à 21 heures les jours de séance parlementaire. Elle est ouverte de 7 h 30 à 21 heures les jours de séance et de 8 heures à 18 heures les jours normaux sans séance. Elle est ouverte et les députés peuvent y laisser leurs enfants s'ils le souhaitent.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Concernant les horaires de la chambre, est-ce que ce sont des horaires fixes ou est-ce que vous avez tendance à avoir aussi des horaires étendus, quand les débats se prolongent tard le soir? Nous avons parfois des débats en urgence ou d'autres débats qui peuvent durer jusqu'à minuit. Est-ce aussi le cas dans votre parlement?

M. David Elder:

Nous sommes très privilégiés d'avoir le temps dont nous disposons, puisque nous siégeons rarement aussi tard. Nous le faisons parfois, mais c'est assez inhabituel. Aujourd'hui, cela se produit aussi peu souvent qu'une ou deux fois par année. Il est vraiment très inhabituel pour nous de siéger après l'heure habituelle de fin de séance. C'est notamment dû au fait que nous bénéficions de la seconde chambre, qui nous donne la souplesse voulue pour déplacer certains dossiers et alléger la charge de travail à la Chambre. Il est très inhabituel que nous siégions aussi tard. Quand c'est le cas, nous pouvons le faire jusqu'à 23 heures ou minuit. Il est aujourd'hui très rare que nous siégions extrêmement tard.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les heures que vous avez mentionnées sont donc assez fixes.

M. David Elder:

Oui, elles le sont.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Qu'en est-il du vote? À quelle heure passez-vous au vote? Le vote peut-il avoir lieu à n'importe quelle heure du jour, ou y a-t-il un ordre ou un horaire quelconque, ou encore une certaine prévisibilité dans tout cela?

M. David Elder:

Non, il n'y a rien de prévisible. Le vote peut avoir lieu à tout moment de la journée et, franchement, il a effectivement lieu n'importe quand.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais revenir à la question des séances du vendredi. Vous avez dit qu'elles ont été supprimées il y a longtemps.

Pourriez-vous me donner une idée du moment où cette décision a été prise, ou cela fait-il trop longtemps pour que vous le sachiez.

M. David Elder:

Cela fait très longtemps. Peut-être 30 ans. Il y a très longtemps qu'on a pris cette décision. Il faudrait que je vérifie. Je serais ravi de le faire, mais oui, ça fait très longtemps.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous déjà discuté de l'époque à laquelle on siégeait le vendredi pour savoir si la suppression des séances du vendredi avait provoqué une réaction négative dans la population? Vous avez mentionné précédemment que vous en avez débattu avec des députés et que certains d'entre eux ont dit que cela leur permettait de servir leur circonscription et d'y retourner. Cela dit, cette décision a-t-elle été mal perçue initialement, ou les électeurs ont-ils été très heureux de voir leur représentant revenir dans leur circonscription?

M. David Elder:

Il importe de souligner que la suppression des séances du vendredi n'a pas entraîné de diminution du nombre d'heures dans la session, puisque les séances commencent plus tôt. Par exemple, à l'époque, nous ne nous réunissions pas avant 14 heures chaque jour. Aujourd'hui, nous commençons à 10 heures les lundis, à midi les mardis et à 9 heures les mercredis et les jeudis. Toutes les heures pendant lesquelles les députés siégeaient le vendredi ont été réparties sur l'horaire des quatre autres jours.

En fait, je l'ignore. Je ne suis pas certain, je n'étais pas là quand les séances du vendredi ont été supprimées. Je ne pense pas que cette décision ait suscité une réaction particulière, puisque les heures de la session n'ont pas diminué.

(1900)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Que se passe-t-il le jour où vous vous réunissez à midi? Qu'est-ce qui se passe avant cette heure? Y a-t-il quoi que ce soit au programme? Est-ce pour cette raison que vous commencez à midi.

M. David Elder:

La raison pour laquelle nous commençons à midi les mardis, c'est qu'en matinée, les partis tiennent leur caucus. Ils le font en général, les mardis en matinée avant la séance à la Chambre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les députés commencent-ils leur journée assez tôt chaque matin, sans égard à l'heure prévue de la séance?

M. David Elder:

Oui, en effet. Les députés arrivent généralement à 7 h 30 ou 8 heures.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci beaucoup pour vos réponses. Elles étaient plutôt directes, et je vous en remercie.

Le président:

Monsieur Malcolmson, les trois prochaines minutes sont à vous.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

J'aimerais revenir sur la question de la composition de votre parlement. J'examinais les classements internationaux, et la Nouvelle-Zélande se situe au 39e rang pour ce qui est du nombre de femmes élues au Parlement néo-zélandais. L'Australie se classe au 56e  rang et le Canada, au 61e  rang. Vous vous en tirez donc mieux que nous, mais nous comptons tout de même 25 % de femmes députées, alors nous avons déjà fait un bon bout de chemin.

Pourriez-vous nous dire si vous avez enquêté sur les facteurs susceptibles d'empêcher les femmes de briguer un siège? Je suis heureuse de vous entendre dire que vous êtes encouragé par cette tendance, que les femmes parlementaires qui ont des enfants envisagent de briguer des seconds mandats. C'est une bonne nouvelle.

Nous sommes curieux de savoir ce qui empêche les femmes de se porter candidates en premier lieu, comme le fait qu'elles assument une responsabilité disproportionnée dans l'apport de soins à leurs parents vieillissants, qu'elles aient de jeunes enfants ou qu'elles envisagent de fonder une famille. En tant que parlementaires, enquêtez-vous sur les facteurs qui empêchent les femmes d'envisager cette carrière?

M. David Elder:

Nous n'enquêtons pas sur la question, mais il est très intéressant, d'une part, que le taux de représentation des femmes semble maintenant stagner à 25 % ou à 30 %, et que, d'autre part, le taux en Australie accuse une baisse marquée depuis 15 ans. Je crois que nous nous classions alors au 20e rang. Nous sommes maintenant, comme vous l'avez dit, au 56e rang ou quelque chose comme ça.

C'est très dommage. Je n'en connais pas la raison. Nous n'avons pas réalisé d'étude particulière. Je pourrais avancer plusieurs hypothèses, mais je ne sais pas si je veux vous en faire part, car ce sont des hypothèses personnelles sur ce qui peut être en train de se passer. Il est très dommage que nous ayons atteint un plateau plutôt que de continuer à grimper dans les classements et de voir l'Australie poursuivre sa dégringolade.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à nos témoins d'être parmi nous si tôt ce matin. Votre participation nous est très utile. Vous avez quelque chose d'unique dont nous pourrions nous inspirer. Je suis certain que notre greffier communiquera avec vous pour obtenir des détails additionnels, et vous pourrez communiquer avec lui si vous avez des questions.

M. David Elder:

Merci, monsieur le président, et oui, si vous avez d'autres questions, n'hésitez pas à communiquer avec nous, et nous serons plus que ravis de vous aider.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je ne suspendrai pas la séance. Pendant que nous changeons les écrans, j'aimerais vous faire part de quelques bonnes nouvelles au sujet des dossiers étudiés par notre comité. Il y a quelques heures, je me suis entretenu avec M. Sheer au sujet de l'ordre permanent que lui et le Président de la Chambre nous avaient proposé. Souvenez-vous qu'il entretenait certaines inquiétudes, mais au sujet du mauvais paragraphe. C'était un paragraphe sur les travaux courants que nous n'allions pas modifier de toute façon, alors c'est pourquoi il n'y a pas eu d'urgence. Il ne s'en fait pas.

Vous avez tous ce document. Je vais vous refaire passer. Le seul paragraphe qui ait changé est le paragraphe b). Les paragraphes a) et c) concernent les éléments de cuisine interne et n'ont pas changé. Ils étaient réunis en un seul paragraphe, dans les ordres permanents existants, alors que dans l'ordre permanent proposé, ils sont répartis dans deux paragraphes. Celui qui est urgent est au milieu, alors seules les six lignes sur la page 3 sont nouvelles.

(1905)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, dans le cas des annexes, la Nouvelle-Zélande et l'Australie traitent aussi de la même question. Est-ce exact?

Le président:

Oui.

Les six lignes qui ont été modifiées constituent le paragraphe b) proposé. Le Président de la Chambre a ainsi plus de souplesse quand survient une urgence semblable à celle qui s'est présentée ou toute forme d'urgence.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela vous convient-il, monsieur le président? J'étais assis juste derrière vous et Andrew Sheer. Je ne dirais pas que je me suis vraiment donné beaucoup de mal, mais je ne voulais vous espionner. Je n'ai donc pas compris tout ce que vous avez dit.

Seriez-vous d'accord pour que nous obtenions une confirmation et que nous nous occupions de la question jeudi prochain?

Le président:

Oui. Je vais vous expliquer ce qui l'inquiétait. C'était dans le premier paragraphe qui disait « earlier ». Cela n'a rien à voir avec l'urgence, mais il pensait qu'« earlier » ne s'appliquait pas à l'urgence. C'est plutôt que le rappel est intervenu plus tard. Quand je lui ai fait remarquer que le premier paragraphe n'avait rien à voir avec l'urgence...

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact. Je me souviens qu'il a soulevé cette question.

Le président:

Nous ne prendrons qu'une minute.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[ Note de la rédaction: inaudible] de nouveau à M. Sheer?

M. Scott Reid:

Je lui en parlerai à l'occasion de notre caucus demain. Peut-être pourrons-nous régler la question jeudi. Si ce n'est pas plus compliqué que cela, nous pouvons sans doute nous entendre pour reporter à plus tard notre recommandation.

Le président:

Certainement.

Espérons que jeudi, nous pourrons rapidement régler cette question. Une urgence pourrait survenir à tout moment, alors ce serait utile de tout mettre en place dans cette éventualité.

Je tiens maintenant à souhaiter la bienvenue à David Wilson, greffier de la Chambre des représentants de la Nouvelle-Zélande. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de vous être levé si tôt ce matin. Il sera très intéressant pour nous d'entendre votre témoignage. Nous trouvons que les parlements des pays du Commonwealth présentent tous des caractéristiques intéressantes. Les membres du comité ont très hâte de savoir comment fonctionne le Parlement néo-zélandais. Nous tentons d'améliorer notre façon de procéder afin d'être plus inclusifs et plus efficaces, d'avoir de meilleurs horaires, des horaires qui conviennent à la vie familiale, aux jeunes mères, aux horaires des garderies — à ce genre de choses. Cela nous intéresse énormément.

Prenez le temps qu'il vous faut pour faire vos remarques liminaires, puis nous passerons aux questions.

M. David Wilson (Greffier de la Chambre, Chambre des représentants de la Nouvelle-Zélande):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous dis bonjour depuis la Nouvelle-Zélande. Je ne me suis pas levé particulièrement tôt. Il est 11 heures ici.

Pour commencer, la Nouvelle-Zélande s'efforce depuis un certain temps d'améliorer l'équilibre entre le travail et la vie personnelle pour les députés et les membres du personnel, et je suis conscient que la question suscite aussi de l'intérêt en Australie et au Royaume-Uni. Je crois qu'elle est d'ailleurs devenue plus préoccupante, du moins en Nouvelle-Zélande, parce que l'âge moyen des députés tend à diminuer depuis 20 ou 30 ans et que de plus en plus de députés deviennent parents au cours de leur mandat. Deux le sont devenus assez récemment en Nouvelle-Zélande. Cela s'accompagne souvent de certains défis. Aussi, un grand nombre de membres du personnel sont dans la vingtaine, la trentaine ou la quarantaine, et les deux tiers d'entre eux environ sont des femmes. Il est donc relativement commun qu'ils partent en congé parental. Ils sont un peu plus faciles à remplacer par un employé en détachement, mais dans le cas des députés, ce n'est pas aussi simple.

Je pensais qu'il serait utile de présenter le calendrier des séances en Nouvelle-Zélande, de parler un peu du fonctionnement du Parlement néo-zélandais et, plus particulièrement, de la façon dont nous procédons au vote, parce que cette question a suscité beaucoup d'intérêt, surtout compte tenu de l'absence des députés devant s'occuper de jeunes enfants.

En Nouvelle-Zélande, la Chambre siège 31 semaines par an. Elle siège les mardis, les mercredis et les jeudis en après-midi, ainsi que les mardis et les mercredis de 17 h 30 à 22 heures. La Chambre siège habituellement 17 heures pas semaine. Les comités parlementaires se réunissent les matins où siège la Chambre. Il est très rare que la Chambre siège en dehors de ces 17 heures au cours des 31 semaines de la session. Elle ne siège pas les jours de congé scolaire et fait une longue pause pendant la période de Noël, laquelle a lieu dans la saison estivale.

Pour ce qui est du vote, presque tous les votes pris au Parlement néo-zélandais sont des votes de parti et non des votes conventionnels comme ceux que l'on voit dans de nombreux pays fonctionnant selon le régime de Westminster. Un vote de parti est mené par le greffier de la Chambre, qui énonce les noms de chaque parti, puis le whip exerce le droit de vote au nom de tous les membres de son parti. Par exemple, je dirais « New Zealand National », puis le whip répondrait « 59 votes pour » ou « 59 votes contre ». Je nommerais ensuite le parti « New Zealand Labour », et le whip dirait « 32 votes pour » ou « 32 votes contre ». Cela accélère grandement le vote. Nous avons décidé de procéder ainsi en 1996, quand nous sommes passés à un système de représentation proportionnelle et avons rompu avec l'ancien système majoritaire uninominal bipartite.

L'une des caractéristiques du vote de parti est que les membres n'ont pas à être présents à la Chambre pour exercer leur droit de vote. Leur whip ou un autre représentant de leur parti peut voter en leur nom. Cela allège considérablement les demandes imposées aux députés, en particulier ceux qui ont de jeunes enfants ou des personnes à charge; ils ne sont donc pas contraints d'être présents à la Chambre tard le soir pour participer au vote.

Une autre caractéristique importante du Parlement néo-zélandais est que le parti peut exercer le droit de vote de tous ses membres même quand 25 % d'entre eux sont absents de l'enceinte parlementaire. Autrement dit, 25 % des voix peuvent être exprimées par procuration. Cela confère plus de souplesse aux députés qui sont appelés à s'absenter pour diverses raisons.

Parmi les autres questions énumérées par le comité, j'aimerais aborder celle des garderies. En Nouvelle-Zélande, il y a une garderie dans l'enceinte parlementaire, mais celle-ci n'est pas toujours ouverte quand la Chambre siège. Elle ferme à 18 heures. Il y a une pièce adjacente à la chambre où se tiennent les débats, où il est possible d'allaiter, de faire chauffer les biberons, de changer les couches, bref, de prendre soin des enfants.

En Nouvelle-Zélande, la loi ne prévoit pas de congé parental pour les députés, puisque ces derniers ne sont pas des employés. Cela dit, depuis cinq ans environ, le Président de la chambre s'est vu confier, dans nos ordres permanents, la capacité d'accorder un congé aux députés pour cause de raisons personnelles ou de maladie, et il a déjà accordé un congé à quelques députés qui sont devenus parents. C'est l'un de moyens par lesquels un député peut bénéficier d'un congé parental rémunéré et être exempté de siéger à la Chambre pendant cette période.

(1910)



Les partis peuvent aussi accorder un congé à un député grâce aux 25 % de votes par procuration qui sont permis. Les partis peuvent ainsi se passer de quelques députés tout en continuant d'exercer le droit de vote de tous les membres de leur formation.

Nous avons réfléchi aux technologies et à la façon dont elles pourraient aider le Parlement et, plus particulièrement, les comités parlementaires, à mener leurs travaux de façon plus efficace. La question est de savoir s'il faudrait exiger des membres qu'ils travaillent si tard et se déplacent autant dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions. Au cours des dernières années, nous avons notamment mis sur pied un système électronique pour les comités qui permet aux membres de travailler à partir d'un appareil numérique, où qu'ils se trouvent au pays, du moment qu'ils aient accès à une connexion internet.

Nous recourons assez fréquemment à la vidéoconférence pour réduire les déplacements des membres des comités, mais nous n'envisageons pas d'utiliser cette technologie pour les séances des députés ou les réunions des comités. Les députés ont convenu qu'il était plus important pour eux de se réunir en équipe, de prendre en compte les risques à la confidentialité que posent les travaux des comités et de vérifier qui sera présent au vote que de jouir de la souplesse qu'offre la vidéoconférence. En fait, il y a quelques années, la Chambre a légiféré pour rendre obligatoire la présence des députés et pour réduire leur traitement en cas d'absences injustifiées. Au cours des dernières années, le Parlement a renforcé l'idée que les députés doivent être présents à la Chambre à moins qu'ils ne soient en congé.

En tant qu'employeur, je permets aux membres du personnel d'avoir un horaire souple, de travailler à distance, de prendre un congé et d'avoir des vacances. Certains employés sont contraints à une exigence: ils doivent être présents dans l'enceinte parlementaire quand la Chambre siège et ils accompagnent les comités dans leurs déplacements, qui peuvent se dérouler en dehors des heures de travail conventionnelles. Cela fait partie des conditions d'emploi des membres du personnel et ces derniers le savent fort bien quand ils se présentent au travail. Les députés le savent également, mais cela ne signifie pas qu'il n'y a jamais de changements. Nous pensons à d'autres façons dont nous pourrions les aider.

En Nouvelle-Zélande, nous avons réfléchi à la possibilité d'une chambre parallèle, comme la Federation Chamber en Australie. Nous n'avons pas de seconde chambre à l'heure actuelle. Nous avons aboli le conseil législatif en 1950. Bien qu'il s'agisse d'une proposition différente, d'une chambre parallèle et non d'une chambre haute, celle-ci n'a pas suscité beaucoup d'enthousiasme en Nouvelle-Zélande.

Cela s'explique notamment parce qu'il y a très peu de députés. Il est difficile pour eux, compte tenu de tous leurs autres engagements, de siéger en plus dans une autre chambre. Il est possible que cela mine la qualité des débats dans cette chambre parallèle, puisque les députés seraient appelés à y siéger, puis à siéger à la Chambre principale.

On a aussi l'impression qu'une chambre parallèle n'est pas nécessaire, car la majorité des débats en Nouvelle-Zélande ont une durée fixe d'environ deux heures. Nous avons adopté les séances prolongées afin d'ajouter des heures à la session, habituellement un mercredi ou un jeudi matin, pour traiter des questions non controversées. C'est très différent d'une urgence. Un projet de loi en contexte d'urgence est adopté à l'unanimité en comité plénier qui réunit donc tous les députés. Ce comité fait progresser les projets de loi d'une seule étape à la fois et doit avoir terminé au plus tard à 13 heures.

Cette limite dans le temps s'est avérée très efficace pour faire avancer les dossiers qui font consensus à la Chambre, de même qu'à réduire les recours aux débats d'urgence. L'urgence contraint souvent la Chambre à siéger les vendredis, tard le soir et les fins de semaine. Ces séances prolongées permettent donc d'éviter ces situations.

Enfin, j'ai quelques observations à faire sur la façon de rendre le Parlement plus efficace et plus inclusif. J'aimerais d'abord indiquer que la démocratie n'est pas un régime particulièrement efficace et que les parlements ne le sont pas vraiment non plus. Ils prennent un temps considérable à contrôler ce que fait l'exécutif. C'est une fonction importante en démocratie. Il conviendrait bien sûr d'améliorer l'efficacité là où c'est possible, mais nous ne pensons pas que c'est cela le plus important.

L'une de nos anciennes députées a demandé que les heures de la session soient réduites, qu'il soit possible de remplacer temporairement des députés lorsqu'ils sont en congé parental, et même qu'il soit possible de répartir la tâche entre députés. Elle a d'ailleurs rédigé un article dans lequel elle aborde toutes ces questions, et je serais ravi de le transmettre aux membres de votre comité, s'ils le souhaitent.

(1915)



Je crois savoir que le Parlement écossais siège pendant les heures ouvrables normales et que cela semble donner de bons résultats là-bas. Je crois qu'en Suède on autorise le remplacement temporaire des députés, mais je pense que c'est seulement pour les ministres lorsqu'ils sont nommés au Cabinet.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, la Nouvelle-Zélande a examiné l'idée d'une deuxième chambre, mais ne l'a pas retenue pour le moment.

Je pense que, dans notre situation, un système électoral reposant sur une représentation proportionnelle mixte a créé un Parlement plus diversifié et que cela continuera probablement d'augmenter la demande de conditions de travail meilleures, différentes et plus souples, car les parlementaires d'aujourd'hui constituent un groupe plus diversifié, peut-être, que ceux qui se faisaient élire il y a 20 ou 30 ans.

Je pense que notre recours à un comité des travaux de la Chambre, où tous les partis sont représentés et qui décide à l'unanimité, a permis aux partis de se mettre d'accord sur des échéanciers pour étudier les questions qui les intéressent. L'opposition a donc suffisamment de temps pour exprimer son opinion quand elle n'est pas d'accord sur certaines choses, mais quand tout le monde est d'accord, cela permet à la Chambre de gagner beaucoup de temps et de faire progresser assez rapidement les lois non controversées ou ralliant beaucoup d'appuis.

À mon avis, ce genre d'entente au sujet des travaux de la Chambre et la possibilité de voter par procuration — en général, les députés n'ont pas l'obligation d'être à la Chambre — nous ont permis, dans une large mesure, d'éviter certains des problèmes auxquels les autres parlements ont été confrontés, mais tout n'est pas encore réglé.

Cela m'amène à la fin de ma déclaration préliminaire. Je me ferais un plaisir de répondre aux questions des membres du comité.

Le président:

Très bien, merci beaucoup. C'est très intéressant.

Nous allons commencer par M. Lightbound.

M. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais partager mon temps avec Mme Sahota.

Merci, monsieur Wilson, de vous joindre à nous.

Je m'intéresse particulièrement au vote par procuration. Nous en avons discuté avec votre homologue du Royaume-Uni et également celui de l'Australie, d'une certaine façon, et vous en avez fait mention dans votre déclaration.

Au Royaume-Uni, il y a le système appelé « nodding through », qui est une forme très limitée de vote par procuration. En Australie, cela s'applique seulement dans le cas où la députée allaite son bébé. Au Canada, nous n'avons pas le vote par procuration.

Vous avez mentionné que 25 % des députés peuvent recourir au vote par procuration. Les circonstances dans lesquelles un député peut se prévaloir de cette forme de vote sont-elles limitées? Le député doit-il être malade? Y a-t-il des raisons pour lesquelles vous pouvez vous en prévaloir?

(1920)

David Wilson:

J'aurais peut-être dû être un peu plus clair. Un député peut voter au nom de tous les membres de son parti s'il est le seul député de ce parti présent à la Chambre, mais il faut que 75 % des autres députés de son parti se trouvent dans l'enceinte du Parlement; 25 % des députés du parti peuvent se trouver n'importe où ailleurs, à l'extérieur du Parlement. La raison de leur absence ne regarde qu'eux-mêmes et leur parti.

Cela pourrait être pour n'importe quelle raison. Souvent, c'est pour s'acquitter d'autres responsabilités, à l'extérieur de Wellington, surtout dans le cas des ministres. Il n'est pas obligatoire d'être malade, d'avoir à s'occuper d'un enfant ou d'invoquer toute autre raison spécifiée dans le Règlement. C'est au parti qu'il revient d'accepter ou non l'absence d'un député.

M. Joël Lightbound:

Y a-t-il des mesures de sauvegarde du point de vue de la procédure? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il concrètement?

David Wilson:

C'est basé largement sur la confiance, sur la parole d'un whip affirmant que tous les députés sont présents et ont le droit de participer au vote. Le Parlement est toujours pris très au sérieux et si un whip enregistrait des voix auxquelles son parti n'a pas droit, ce serait probablement considéré comme un outrage au Parlement. Ce n'est arrivé qu'une seule fois, si je me souviens bien, mais le parti en question s'en est rendu compte avant tout le monde, a signalé l'erreur à la Chambre et a réduit le résultat du vote par une voix.

M. Joël Lightbound:

Merci.

Je vais donner mon temps à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vais également faire suite aux questions de mon collègue au sujet du vote par procuration, car je trouve cela très intéressant.

Le vote par procuration a-t-il posé des problèmes par le passé et, dans l'affirmative, comment avez-vous corrigé ces problèmes? Je ne vois pas encore très bien quelle est la procédure — si le député doit signer quelque chose ou s'il s'agit seulement d'une entente entre lui et son parti quant à la façon dont il va voter. Nous avons parlé au comité des situations de coercition et des autres problèmes que soulève le vote par procuration. Ces problèmes se sont-ils posés chez vous?

David Wilson:

Il y a eu des discussions à ce sujet et certaines craintes ont été émises. On part du principe que le whip du parti a le droit de voter au nom de tous les membres du parti. Au moins, on sait que certains d'entre eux sont absents et il n'est donc pas nécessaire d'obtenir la permission des députés pour chaque vote. Si un député désire voter autrement que le reste de son parti, il donne des instructions par écrit au whip pour qu'il le fasse en son nom, ou encore, il peut aller voter lui-même à la Chambre.

Il est parfois arrivé que des votes par procuration donnent lieu à des erreurs. Dans certains cas, si les grands partis ont reçu une procuration d'un autre parti, ils votent également pour lui. En Nouvelle-Zélande, nous avons deux partis qui n'ont qu'un seul député chacun et un autre qui n'en a que deux. Ces petits partis forment une coalition avec le parti au pouvoir. Ils donnent parfois leur procuration au whip de ce parti s'ils doivent s'absenter et il est déjà arrivé qu'une erreur soit commise au moment du vote. Lorsqu'on s'en rend compte, généralement quand le petit parti le signale au whip du gouvernement, les deux partis vont corriger leur vote à la Chambre.

Cela n'a pas été une grande source de problèmes. Les députés ont vu qu'il fallait environ une minute pour voter et qu'ils pouvaient consacrer plus de temps à débattre et moins à voter. Lorsque nous procédons à un vote traditionnel, ce que nous faisons pour les questions posant un cas de conscience, peut-être une ou deux fois par année, il faut une dizaine de minutes pour convoquer les députés à la Chambre et ensuite les faire voter. En général, les députés préfèrent cette méthode.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pour les députés qui sont à la Chambre, comment se déroule le vote? Se lèvent-ils pour voter ou est-ce un vote électronique?

(1925)

David Wilson:

Ils se lèvent pour voter. Le greffier se met debout et appelle le nom du parti. Le whip se lève alors, annonce le nombre de voix pour et contre, et le nombre d'abstentions, le greffier enregistre le compte des voix et le remet au Président qui en fait l'annonce.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est comme notre système où chacun se lève pour voter. Avez-vous parlé des moyens technologiques qui pourraient accélérer ce processus?

David Wilson:

Nous y avons réfléchi. Il y a actuellement sept partis à la Chambre. Chacun d'eux met quelques secondes à voter et il serait possible de recourir à la technologie. Pour le moment, je pense que les partis préfèrent se lever pour voter à haute voix afin que tous ceux qui les regardent ou les écoutent puissent savoir comment ils ont voté. Les votes et le décompte des voix n'ont pas donné lieu à beaucoup d'erreurs. Le nombre de députés n'est pas non plus énorme. Je pense que pour le moment, les députés — et moi en tout cas — sont assez satisfaits du mode de vote oral que nous utilisons.

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Très bien, je vais m'arrêter là.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais seulement prendre ces 30 secondes, car j'ai une question très brève à vous poser. Pouvez-vous nous parler des sièges attribués aux Maoris?

David Wilson:

Les Maoris autochtones de la Nouvelle-Zélande ont le choix entre deux listes électorales. Il y a la liste électorale générale et la liste maorie, et un certain nombre de sièges sont réservés aux Maoris pour l'ensemble du pays. Leur nombre augmente ou diminue en fonction des mouvements de cette population. Il augmente maintenant depuis des années parce que le taux de natalité est plus élevé chez les Maoris que chez les autres Néo-Zélandais. Seuls les gens d'ascendance maorie peuvent voter ou présenter leur candidature pour ces sièges et cela a été mis en place très tôt dans l'histoire du Parlement de la Nouvelle-Zélande afin d'assurer la représentation des Maoris. Ces dernières années, l'abolition de ces sièges a été réclamée, surtout parce qu'il y a un nombre disproportionné des députés maoris à la Chambre. Il y a plus de députés d'ascendance maorie que de Maoris dans l'ensemble de la population… Comme aucun parti ne semble vouloir être celui qui abolira ces sièges, je suppose qu'ils vont rester là pour le moment.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci beaucoup de vous joindre à nous aujourd'hui. Nous apprécions vos observations.

J'ai du mal à concevoir le vote par procuration et le fait qu'il y ait très peu de personnes à la Chambre au moment d'un vote. En tant que législateur, je ne peux imaginer rien de plus important que d'être présent à la Chambre pour voter. Pourriez-vous nous en parler un peu plus? J'ai du mal à concevoir cela.

David Wilson:

De nombreux membres du public de la Nouvelle-Zélande partagent votre malaise. L'ensemble du Parlement peut voter avec un seul représentant de chaque parti présent dans la Chambre. Il y en a généralement un peu plus lorsqu'un vote a lieu, mais la Chambre est certainement loin d'être pleine. Les députés ont eu de la difficulté à faire la transition au milieu des années 1990 lorsque ce changement a été apporté. Maintenant, 20 ans plus tard, un grand nombre de nos députés n'ont connu aucun autre système.

Compte tenu des diverses autres obligations qui sont les leurs et d'un système où la discipline des partis est également très forte, ce qui a été l'un des résultats de l'adoption de notre système de représentation proportionnelle, il est très rare que des députés d'arrière-ban, par exemple, votent à l'opposé de leur parti, ce qui peut se voir dans des parlements plus grands, où les députés sont tous élus et ne dépendent peut-être donc pas autant de leur parti pour avoir un siège.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je trouve sidérant qu'il se pourrait, comme vous l'avez dit, que seuls les chefs de parti soient présents et personne d'autre. Je trouve cela très intéressant et difficile à comprendre parce que si vous êtes élu pour faire ce travail, même s'il faut voyager et s'éloigner de sa famille comme c'est notre cas à tous, cela représente une partie importante de la fonction. Se lever pour voter fait partie de notre rôle et si vous vous contentez d'envoyer votre vote par écrit, pour ainsi dire, j'ai du mal à le concevoir. C'est peut-être seulement moi. Je ne sais pas.

Pour ce qui est du vote par procuration — si vous en avez déjà parlé, veuillez m'excuser — quelles sont les raisons de voter par procuration? Apparemment, vous pouvez le faire, quel que soit le motif. Encore une fois, j'essaie de comprendre.

(1930)

David Wilson:

Le whip du parti est censé pouvoir voter pour tous les membres de son parti sans que ces derniers ne lui donnent des procurations, et si un député désire voter autrement que son parti, il donne des instructions en ce sens au whip. Néanmoins, en pareil cas, il va probablement se rendre lui-même à la Chambre pour voter.

Les raisons de l'absence des députés et pour lesquelles 25 % des députés peuvent s'éloigner de l'enceinte du Parlement regardent uniquement le whip et les membres de son parti. Aucune raison précise n'est prévue dans le Règlement de la Chambre. Il suffit que le whip autorise les députés à partir et ils doivent donc le convaincre. Lorsque j'ai parlé au whip du gouvernement, il a dit que tout le monde, sauf le premier ministre, doit lui faire connaître ses raisons de s'absenter. C'est à lui d'en juger et c'est probablement, je pense, parce qu'en cas de demandes d'absence concurrentes, il doit pouvoir les évaluer.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suppose que c'est un vote très civilisé. Les députés se contentent de se taper la main à la fin et ils s'en vont.

David Wilson:

Mais ils votent.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Comment cela se passait-il dans l'ancien système, avant que vous ne passiez à la représentation proportionnelle? À quoi ressemblait le vote? Chacun votait debout, à sa place, jusqu'à ce que toutes les voix soient comptées?

David Wilson:

Non, nous faisions retentir la sonnerie pour appeler au vote, tous les députés étaient convoqués à la Chambre, ils avaient sept minutes pour s'y rendre, la porte de la Chambre était alors fermée et ils allaient voter dans les couloirs comme à Westminster. Le vote durait alors environ deux minutes.

Comme je l'ai dit, le changement a été apporté en 1996. Comme le nombre de partis a augmenté et que les partis peuvent voter de différentes façons sur les différentes questions, rien ne garantit qu'un côté s'opposera toujours à tout tandis que l'autre sera toujours d'accord.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Les députés ont-ils moins la possibilité de voter librement, maintenant?

David Wilson:

Le nombre de fois où ils ont vraiment la possibilité de voter librement n'a probablement pas changé. En Nouvelle-Zélande, il y a des questions considérées comme des cas de conscience, par convention ou par tradition, des choses comme les lois sur l'alcool, le mariage entre personnes du même sexe, l'avortement, la réglementation des jeux et paris, sont des questions sur lesquelles les députés ont traditionnellement pu voter librement et ils continuent de le faire. Dans les cas où nous avons un vote vraiment libre, les députés sont quand même convoqués à la Chambre par la sonnerie et votent dans les couloirs et ce n'est probablement pas en suivant la ligne du parti.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Autrement, ils sont soumis à la discipline du parti, ils reçoivent un signal des hautes instances qui leur dit comment voter ou ils votent par procuration.

David Wilson:

En effet. Les députés font parfois autre chose. La semaine dernière, nous avons eu un vote à la Chambre sur l'accord de Partenariat transpacifique. Le principal parti d'opposition est contre. Un de ses membres, un ancien ministre du Commerce qui a entamé les négociations à ce sujet lorsqu'il était au gouvernement, a voté à l'encontre de son parti, étant entendu que c'est ce qu'il allait faire. Il a voté avec le gouvernement dans ce cas-ci.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Désolé, mais je me suis éloigné des initiatives propices à la vie de famille. J'ai trouvé assez intéressante la façon dont vous avez organisé cela et j'apprécie donc vos réponses. Cela me permet de mieux comprendre. Néanmoins, pour ce qui est de voter, j'estime que c'est votre fonction en tant que législateur. C'est une grande partie de votre rôle. C'est un privilège de se lever pour voter et je ne peux m'imaginer en train de dire au whip ou au chef du parti: « Voilà comment je veux voter, je m'en vais déjeuner » ou quelque chose de ce genre. Quoi qu'il en soit, merci de nous consacrer du temps.

Le président:

Merci.

Allez-y, madame Malcolmson.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Comme nous entamons un processus de réforme démocratique au Canada, je trouve encourageant de voir les chiffres, le pourcentage de femmes qui siègent au Parlement australien. Je remarque que selon l'Union interparlementaire, les sept plus grandes démocraties, qui ont le plus haut pourcentage de femmes élues, sont toutes des gouvernements à représentation proportionnelle. La Nouvelle-Zélande en fait partie. Je trouve cela encourageant. J'en conclus aussi que si vous avez un Parlement pro-famille, vous attirez plus de femmes. Si elles se sentent soutenues, elles ont tendance à présenter leur candidature.

Je voudrais revenir un peu sur certaines des choses que vous avez dites dans votre déclaration préliminaire au sujet de votre horaire, car c'est allé très vite. Jusqu'à quelle heure le soir siégez-vous? Jusqu'à quelle heure du soir votre Parlement siège-t-il habituellement?

(1935)

David Wilson:

Nous siégeons jusqu'à 22 heures.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Vous siégez jusqu'à 22 heures, très bien.

David Wilson:

C'est les mardis et jeudis soirs.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Deux soirs par semaine, c'est jusqu'à 22 heures. Très bien.

Nous craignons que ce soit un obstacle pour le personnel ainsi que pour les parents de jeunes enfants, car cela perturbe la vie des familles. Est-ce un sujet que vous abordez également au sein de votre Parlement?

David Wilson:

C'est un sujet que certains députés ayant des jeunes enfants ont certainement soulevé. Ce n'est pas vraiment un sujet de conversation pour ce qui est du personnel. C'est, je pense, parce que les employés ont accepté de faire ce travail en sachant ce qui les attendait. Cela touche un nombre relativement restreint d'employés. Nous avons probablement une dizaine d'employés qui travaillent au hansard et trois ou quatre qui travaillent le soir, ce qui veut dire que cela touche un nombre relativement limité de personnes. Néanmoins, je suis conscient du fait que le manque de temps passé avec la famille peut influer sur la décision des gens de faire ce genre de travail, et cela influe aussi sur le désir des députés de se lancer en politique.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus au sujet des services de garderie à la disposition des parlementaires? Quel est l'âge des enfants? Les parlementaires peuvent-ils confier leurs enfants à la garderie à temps partiel seulement?

M. David Wilson:

Je n'ai pas tous les détails concernant la garderie parlementaire. Il y en a une dans l'enceinte du Parlement et même si elle est ouverte à tous, elle s'adresse de préférence aux enfants des députés et du personnel du Parlement. Elle a une liste d'attente assez longue. Elle accepte les enfants à partir d'un très jeune âge. Je ne pourrais pas vous dire exactement quel âge, mais je pense que c'est environ six mois, jusqu'à ce qu'ils aient l'âge d'aller à l'école, c'est-à-dire cinq ans.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Pourriez-vous fournir ce renseignement à la greffière, juste pour confirmer quel est l'âge des enfants et si les parents peuvent les confier à la garderie seulement deux jours par semaine?

M. David Wilson:

Oui, je peux le faire et désolé, j'ai oublié cette partie de votre question. Je crois que c'est le cas et que c'est normal dans la plupart des garderies de Nouvelle-Zélande, mais je vais vérifier ces deux choses et fournir ces renseignements à la greffière.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Merci. Nous constatons que cela pose un problème aux parlementaires et il nous serait donc utile d'avoir une base de comparaison.

Pourriez-vous nous parler un peu plus de votre système de participation électronique? Pourriez-vous de nouveau préciser quelles sont les fonctions parlementaires pour lesquelles une participation électronique est possible et nous parler un peu de la mesure dans laquelle c'est appliqué et avec quel succès?

M. David Wilson:

Certainement. Si un comité parlementaire veut se réunir, ses membres doivent toujours être présents en personne. Ils ne peuvent pas participer par vidéoconférence ou téléconférence, néanmoins, le comité peut se servir de la vidéoconférence, comme vous le faites maintenant, pour rencontrer, à distance, des gens qui se trouvent dans d'autres régions de la Nouvelle-Zélande, qui est un très petit pays par rapport au Canada, mais où les déplacements prennent quand même beaucoup de temps.

Il est maintenant beaucoup plus rare que les comités se rendent dans d'autres villes, sauf s'ils reçoivent un très grand nombre de mémoires du public et tiennent à montrer qu'ils tiennent compte de ces opinions. Autrement, ils se servent énormément des vidéoconférences afin de réduire le temps consacré aux déplacements.

En général, les comités se réunissent les mêmes jours que ceux où la Chambre siège, mais ce n'est pas en même temps. Leurs membres sont donc généralement tous présents à Wellington.

Ils doivent être présents, en personne, pour participer aux comités, mais tous les documents que les députés pourraient utiliser, surtout pour les comités, sont à leur disposition électroniquement, n'importe où, sur tout appareil de leur choix, pourvu qu'ils aient une connexion Internet.

(1940)

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Mais ils ne peuvent pas participer à un débat parlementaire ou voter ou participer aux comités par des moyens électroniques.

M. David Wilson:

Non. Ils doivent être présents soit dans la salle de comité, soit dans l'enceinte du Parlement, dans le cas de la Chambre, pour pouvoir voter ou prendre la parole.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

C'est intéressant. Merci.

Quelle est la durée de la période la plus longue pendant laquelle vous siégez? Nous venons d'entendre nos homologues australiens dire qu'ils ne siègent pas plus de deux semaines à la fois. Nous siégeons pendant quatre semaines à la fois dans certains cas. Qu'en est-il en Nouvelle-Zélande?

M. David Wilson:

En général, nous siégeons pendant trois semaines d'affilée. La Chambre siège le mardi, le mercredi et le jeudi de chaque semaine.

À compter de la semaine prochaine, nous siégerons pendant quatre semaines, ce qui inclura le budget. Le budget est généralement présenté vers la fin mai, chaque année, et c'est probablement à ce moment-là que la Chambre siège le plus longtemps et peut-être aussi pendant le plus grand nombre d'heures.

J'ai mentionné tout à l'heure que les séances prolongées ont, dans une certaine mesure, remplacé les travaux urgents, mais pendant l'étude du budget, surtout s'il y a des mesures augmentant un impôt ou une taxe d'accise, cela fait souvent l'objet d'une motion d'urgence dès la présentation du budget. C'est une des occasions où la Chambre peut siéger et éventuellement jusqu'au vendredi ou même jusqu'au samedi, mais c'est à peu près le seul moment de l'année où cela arrive.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Merci.

Comme dernière question, je voudrais savoir si la Nouvelle-Zélande a jamais souhaité avoir un Sénat? Cela n'a rien à voir avec la famille. Je suis l'exemple de mon voisin.

M. David Wilson:

Nous en avons eu un jusqu'en 1950, du moins une sorte de conseil, mais il a été aboli par les membres du Conseil législatif, en 1950.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Quelqu'un a-t-il exprimé des profonds regrets à ce sujet?

M. David Wilson:

Non. Certainement pas le public…

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Merci.

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Excusez-moi si vous en avez déjà parlé, car je vous ai entendu dire que les séances duraient jusqu'à 22 heures le mardi et le mercredi. Qu'en est-il des autres jours de la semaine?

M. David Wilson:

Le jeudi, la Chambre siège de 14 heures à 18 heures comme c'est le cas les autres jours, mais elle ne siège généralement pas le jeudi soir. La Chambre ne siège pas le lundi et le vendredi au cours d'une semaine normale. Elle pourrait le faire s'il y avait urgence, mais ce n'est généralement pas le cas.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez dit que des heures spéciales pourraient être ajoutées le mardi et le mercredi matin si c'était nécessaire.

M. David Wilson:

C'est exact. C'est ce qu'on appelle les séances prolongées, une initiative mise en place il y a seulement quelques années parce qu'on invoquait trop souvent l'urgence pour faire franchir les étapes à une loi ou même pour l'adopter.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Les séances sont-elles prolongées à l'initiative du gouvernement? Cela fait-il l'objet d'un consensus? Comment décidez-vous de prolonger les séances?

M. David Wilson:

Il y a deux façons de le faire. D'habitude, c'est par accord quasi unanime au Comité des travaux de la Chambre. La majorité des membres du comité donnent leur accord et le président voit s'il y a quasi-unanimité. Le gouvernement peut prolonger les séances au moyen d'une motion, mais il hésite à le faire parce que généralement, les travaux qui font l'objet de séances prolongées ont l'appui de la plupart des partis. On s'en est aussi servi exclusivement pour adopter les projets de loi sur le règlement du Traité de Waitangi, qui visent à régler les griefs des Maoris autochtones au sujet de la confiscation de leurs terres dans les années 1870. Cela fait l'objet d'un large appui politique, les partis sont généralement tous d'accord et les heures prolongées ont été très utiles pour faire avancer cette loi qui bénéficie d'un large appui et qui n'est pas controversée pour la plupart des gens.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

J'ai peut-être mal entendu, mais vous avez dit que la durée de tous les débats était limitée à deux heures. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer cela?

(1945)

M. David Wilson:

Les débats en première, deuxième et troisième lecture sur un projet de loi sont limités à deux heures. Douze députés sont appelés à y participer et disposent d'un maximum de 10 minutes chacun. Ils peuvent partager ce temps de parole et, dans certains cas, le parti peut le diviser en deux périodes de cinq minutes. La durée maximum de ces débats est de deux heures. Il n'y a pas de limite de temps pour l'étape du comité plénier où le projet de loi est débattu et étudié en détail, entre la deuxième et la troisième lecture. Cette étape peut durer assez longtemps, car les députés débattent des détails de la loi. Pour pratiquement tout le reste, le Règlement prévoit une limite de temps. Certaines de ces limites sont assez longues. Pour le débat sur le budget, par exemple, la limite de temps est de 13 heures. Je pense qu'elle est de 15 heures pour le débat sur le discours du Trône, au début de la législature. Même si certaines de ces limites sont assez longues, elles permettent aux députés de savoir avec certitude quand les travaux auront lieu et quelle sera leur durée.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Qu'en est-il du moment où les votes ont lieu? Les votes sont-ils également prévisibles?

M. David Wilson:

Ils sont assez prévisibles en ce sens qu'ils ont toujours lieu à la fin du débat. Certains débats avancent plus rapidement même si leur durée est limitée à deux heures, par exemple. Si c'est un sujet sur lequel les partis sont d'accord, cela peut ne prendre qu'une heure et demie. Un whip de chaque parti est toujours présent à la Chambre, prêt à voter en tout temps. Les seuls à faire exception à la règle sont les très petits partis qui n'ont qu'un ou deux députés et qui ne peuvent pas maintenir une présence continue à la Chambre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Et les mesures d'initiative parlementaire, combien d'heures y consacrez-vous?

M. David Wilson:

Un mercredi par quinzaine est réservé aux initiatives parlementaires. C'est principalement pour examiner les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire, toutes les deux semaines.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

M. David Wilson:

Tous les députés qui ne sont pas ministres peuvent présenter des projets de loi qui seront débattus un mercredi sur deux. La seule chose qui puisse bouleverser ce calendrier est la présentation du budget. Si elle a lieu au cours d'une semaine où il y a une journée réservée aux initiatives parlementaires, cette journée est reportée à la semaine suivante.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez fait mention d'un Comité des travaux de la Chambre. Est-ce un comité de tous les partis? Est-ce comme notre Bureau de régie interne? Quelle est la mission du Comité des travaux de la Chambre?

M. David Wilson:

C'est un comité de tous les partis. Chaque parti a le droit d'y avoir un représentant, quelle que soit sa taille. Contrairement à la plupart de nos comités dont les membres sont expressément nommés, n'importe quel membre d'un parti peut participer à ce comité-ci. Il s'agit généralement d'un membre influent ou du whip de chaque parti. Le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre y participe également pour parler des travaux de la Chambre. Ce comité est présidé par le président de la Chambre et décide du programme de la Chambre, du Feuilleton et du calendrier. Tous les partis sont présents et je m'en sers parfois pour discuter de changements éventuels à la procédure ou d'innovations qui pourraient être apportées à la Chambre. Le comité se réunit au début de chaque semaine et prend ses décisions à la quasi-unanimité. Le président juge si presque tous les partis sont d'accord, du moins les grands partis. S'ils ne sont pas d'accord, il n'y a pas quasi-unanimité.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'apprécie votre présence parmi nous.

J'ai noté un certain nombre de choses pendant que nous parlions, mais je veux être sûr d'avoir bien compris. Permettez-moi de poser de nouveau les mêmes questions ou des nouvelles questions dans certains cas.

Pendant combien de semaines votre Parlement siège-t-il?

M. David Wilson:

Il y a 31 semaines de session au cours de l'année.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien.

Sont-elles réparties sur l'ensemble de l'année?

M. David Wilson:

Oui. C'est généralement par périodes de trois semaines à la fois. Il y a parfois une période de quatre semaines. Nous faisons une longue pause en décembre et pendant tout le mois de janvier, qui correspond à l'été en Nouvelle-Zélande.

(1950)

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez dit que vous siégez généralement du mardi au jeudi. Ai-je bien entendu que le mardi et mercredi, c'est de 14 heures à 22 heures et le jeudi, de 14 heures à 18 heures?

M. David Wilson:

C'est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Et la période des questions? À quel moment de la journée a-t-elle lieu et quelle est sa durée?

M. David Wilson:

Les questions commencent à 14 heures, dès l'ouverture de la Chambre, chaque jour. Douze questions sont posées aux ministres. Cela dure généralement environ une heure, mais il n'y a pas de limite de temps. Le Règlement exige que les questions soient brèves, juste assez longues pour être posées et la réponse est également censée être brève. Sa durée doit suffire à répondre aux différents éléments de la question du député, mais pas plus. Ce n'est pas un échange de discours ou d'opinions. Ce doit être une brève question, juste deux lignes de texte, suivie d'une réponse, après quoi le député a la possibilité de poser les questions supplémentaires à la suite de la première réponse.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. C'est 12 questions et une question supplémentaire, ce qui donne 24 questions avec les questions supplémentaires, n'est-ce pas?

M. David Wilson:

Non. Il peut y avoir de multiples questions supplémentaires. Un parti a droit, chaque semaine, à un nombre de questions proportionnel à sa représentation à la Chambre.

M. Blake Richards:

On a parlé un peu des parlementaires ayant des jeunes enfants. Combien avez-vous actuellement de députées ayant des jeunes enfants? Je veux parler des jeunes enfants allaités par leur mère, principalement, mais peut-être aussi des enfants âgés de moins de cinq ou six ans.

Le savez-vous?

M. David Wilson:

Ce serait un chiffre estimatif.

Je connais deux députées qui allaitent leurs enfants actuellement. Je suppose qu'environ la moitié des députées ont des enfants qui ont encore besoin d'elles.

M. Blake Richards:

Quelles dispositions sont prévues pour les députées qui ont des enfants et qui allaitent?

M. David Wilson:

À côté de la chambre où ont lieu les débats, il y a une pièce qui a été conçue pour permettre aux députées de nourrir ou de changer leurs enfants. Elles peuvent y installer un moïse ou un berceau où l'enfant peut dormir. Cette pièce sert surtout aux députées. Elles peuvent aussi demander à un membre de leur famille ou du personnel d'aller dans cette pièce pour s'occuper de l'enfant pendant qu'elles prennent la parole à la Chambre. Cette pièce sert généralement pendant qu'une députée fait une déclaration — ou du moins compte en faire une — parce que le reste du temps, il n'est pas nécessaire d'être présent à la Chambre grâce au vote par procuration.

M. Blake Richards:

Comme plusieurs de mes collègues l'ont fait, je vais m'écarter un peu du sujet.

J'ai appris, par les lectures que j'ai faites avant votre comparution, que votre premier ministre avait été récemment mis à la porte du Parlement pour la journée, je crois. En lisant plus loin, j'ai compris que ce n'était pas la première fois. Je ne pense pas que c'était le même premier ministre. Cela m'intrigue.

J'ai récemment invoqué le Règlement au sujet de notre premier ministre et de son comportement au cours de la période des questions. Il n'a pas été mis à la porte du Parlement. En fait, je dois reconnaître que son comportement s'est amélioré depuis que j'ai invoqué le Règlement. Cela a donc eu un effet positif et j'espère qu'il sera durable.

Je suis curieux de connaître la raison pour laquelle le premier ministre a été mis à la porte du Parlement. Ce devait être grave.

M. David Wilson:

Oui, et vous avez raison; je pense que la plupart des premiers ministres qui ont siégé assez longtemps en Nouvelle-Zélande se sont fait jeter dehors de la Chambre au moins une fois.

En fait, depuis qu'il est en poste, c'est-à-dire maintenant depuis huit ans, le premier ministre actuel n'a pas été mis à la porte de la Chambre. Avant cela, quand il siégeait dans l'opposition, il s'est fait jeter dehors à plusieurs reprises. Il a dû partir, parce que le Règlement stipule que lorsque le président se lève pour rappeler à l'ordre, le député doit s'asseoir et se taire. La veille, le Président l'avait averti à ce sujet. Il a tendance à se lever, à tourner le dos au Président et à s'adresser au reste de la Chambre. Parfois, quand le Président se lève, le premier ministre dit qu'il ne peut pas le voir. Il a fait cela trois jours de suite. Il avait été averti la veille et le Président l'a fait sortir pour la même raison qu'il aurait fait sortir n'importe quel autre député, c'est-à-dire pour avoir défié la présidence.

(1955)

M. Blake Richards:

Merci beaucoup. J'apprécie votre diligence à cet égard.

Le président:

Cela aidera notre parlement propice à la famille. Quiconque n'est pas pro-famille sera mis à la porte.

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de questions à poser.

Votre déclaration préliminaire était l'une des plus approfondies que nous ayons entendues à ce comité. Je dois vous féliciter d'avoir fait inscrire le mot « couches » pour la première fois dans le hansard canadien. J'ai vérifié rapidement et cela n'a encore jamais été dit à la Chambre.

Vous avez parlé de la représentation proportionnelle en Nouvelle-Zélande et je peux seulement imaginer les répercussions intéressantes que le fait d'avoir deux catégories de députés peut avoir sur les relations avec la famille et la circonscription. Si je comprends bien, en Nouvelle-Zélande, vous avez un système de représentation proportionnelle mixte, ce qui veut dire que certains députés sont élus dans les circonscriptions et d'autres sur les listes des partis. Comment cela influe-t-il sur le temps qu'ils passent au Parlement plutôt que dans leurs circonscriptions? Qu'est-ce que les députés des listes des partis considèrent comme leurs circonscriptions?

M. David Wilson:

C'est une bonne question.

Chaque député de la liste considère qu'il a une circonscription ou un électorat même s'il a été élu par l'ensemble des électeurs du pays. Chacun d'eux a un bureau dans une région du pays qui est généralement celle où il réside. La plupart des villes ont donc deux bureaux de députés, le premier étant celui de l'électorat ou de la circonscription de la personne qui détient le siège et le deuxième, celui du député de la liste qui réside dans ce secteur.

La seule exigence est que ce deuxième député doit préciser, dans ses enseignes et cartes d'affaires, etc., qu'il est un député de la liste résidant dans un certain secteur et non pas le député de la circonscription. Les deux types de députés passent autant de temps l'un que l'autre à Wellington et, je suppose, dans leurs bureaux ailleurs dans le pays.

Il n'y a pas vraiment de différence en ce qui concerne ce qu'ils peuvent faire à Wellington. Je pense que les députés de la liste se sont particulièrement efforcés de minimiser la différence aux yeux de l'ensemble de la population.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En pratique, quand les députés de Nouvelle-Zélande font l'aller-retour entre Wellington et leurs circonscriptions, comment est-ce comptabilisé? Par exemple, ici, nous pouvons faire venir notre famille, nos personnes à charge, mais cela nous coûte un point de déplacement pour chacune d'elles et nous avons un nombre limité de points. Comment cela fonctionne-t-il en Nouvelle-Zélande?

M. David Wilson:

Les députés sont libres de voyager autant qu'ils le veulent en Nouvelle-Zélande. Leurs billets sont achetés et payés par le service parlementaire. Ils ont le droit de faire venir les membres de leur famille à Wellington un certain nombre de fois chaque année. Il faudrait que je vérifie ce nombre et je vous le ferai savoir. Je pense que c'est une dizaine de fois par année, mais je me trompe peut-être, alors je vais vérifier. Ils ont le droit de les faire venir, mais le nombre de fois où ils peuvent le faire sans payer est limité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La Nouvelle-Zélande est un pays formé de deux îles et je suppose donc que la plupart des députés viennent par avion plutôt que par d'autres moyens. Quelle est la répartition?

M. David Wilson:

C'est exact. Comme 75 % des habitants vivent dans l'Île du Nord, surtout au sud de cette île, la majorité des députés vivent également là et viennent par avion. Auckland est la ville la plus peuplée et compte le quart de la population du pays, si bien qu'un grand nombre de députés, presque la totalité, sauf peut-être huit à dix, qui résident à Wellington, viennent par avion tandis que les autres viennent par la route.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de députés y a-t-il au Parlement de la Nouvelle-Zélande et comment se répartissent-ils entre les circonscriptions et les listes? Étant donné que le vote de liste sert à compléter la représentation, le nombre des députés est-il le même d'une élection à l'autre?

M. David Wilson:

Pour le moment, il y a 121 députés à la Chambre et leur nombre varie légèrement parce que le vote de liste complète le nombre de sièges. Dans un parti, un siège peut représenter une très faible proportion du vote national total. Nous avions donc 122 députés. Nous en avons actuellement 121. Il serait possible, mais très peu probable, d'avoir moins de 120 députés. La répartition est de 70 députés élus et 50 députés de liste.

(2000)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné tout à l'heure que tout député qui n'est pas ministre peut présenter un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. En Nouvelle-Zélande, les ministres ont-ils des secrétaires parlementaires et dans l'affirmative, peuvent-ils soumettre des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire?

M. David Wilson:

Pour le moment, il n'y en a qu'un seul. Il porte le nom de sous-secrétaire parlementaire et c'est un niveau en dessous de celui de secrétaire parlementaire. Il peut soumettre des projets de loi. Il n'est pas considéré comme un ministre, et ne peut donc pas poser des questions lors de la période des questions ou déposer un projet de loi, mais il peut présenter des projets de loi d'initiative privée, et il l'a d'ailleurs fait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'apprécie vos réponses. Mon temps est épuisé. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons officiellement terminé la période de questions, mais quelqu'un désire-t-il poser une dernière question?

Allez-y.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je voudrais revenir sur l'élection des femmes au Parlement, ce qui est bien pour les familles, de même que pour la représentation proportionnelle. Il y a quelques années, je suis allée en Norvège qui se classe au 15e rang dans le monde pour le nombre de femmes élues au Parlement. Les Norvégiens ont un Parlement composé à 40 % de femmes et ils ont également un système de représentation proportionnelle. Les représentants de l'ambassade qui avaient organisé notre délégation m'ont fait une observation en des termes très diplomatiques. Ils m'ont dit: « Nous avons vu votre parlement et vos assemblées législatives au Canada, au niveau provincial et fédéral, et les nôtres sont très différents des vôtres. »

Même si votre premier ministre s'est fait mettre à la porte de la Chambre, je suis curieuse d'en savoir plus au sujet du décorum et de la coopération au sein de votre Parlement. D'après ce que nous avons entendu dire, si les gens ont l'impression qu'il faut avoir la couenne dure pour se porter candidat, cela peut en dissuader les femmes ou les parlementaires en général qui ont des jeunes enfants ou des membres de leur famille trop sensibles.

Pourriez-vous nous parler du ton des débats et de ses conséquences sur le recrutement?

M. David Wilson:

Oui, je suppose que cela a une certaine influence sur le désir des gens de se faire élire et l'encouragement de leur famille à le faire. La période des questions est certainement très bruyante et conflictuelle, et cela davantage pour les députés présents en Chambre que pour ceux qui entendent la radiodiffusion des débats, car un seul micro est ouvert. Néanmoins, quand vous êtes dans la salle, je sais par expérience que les gens parlent fort et s'interpellent beaucoup de part et d'autre de la Chambre.

Cela a sans doute un certain effet et donne à penser que les députés ont besoin d'avoir la couenne dure. Je pense que les partis sont généralement d'accord sur ce point.

Le Parti vert, qui compte seulement des députés de liste, a pour politique d'avoir 50 % de députés du sexe masculin et 50 % du sexe féminin, et leur accorde donc la même place. Ce parti a une représentation équilibrée entre les sexes à la Chambre. Aucun autre grand parti n'a cela et je pense que la représentation totale des femmes, à l'heure actuelle, est d'environ 33 % ou 34 %. Ce pourcentage est le même depuis assez longtemps. Les députés ont, je suppose, l'impression que la liste de parti est le moyen d'assurer un équilibre, que les partis désireux de rejoindre l'électorat le plus large possible veilleront à ce que tous les électeurs soient bien représentés dans la liste. Je ne pense pas, néanmoins, que telle a été la réalité, car même si c'est peut-être vrai en théorie, si vous élisez des gens prêts à se porter candidats et si vous pensez que ce sont des bons candidats, cette théorie ne donnera probablement pas les résultats escomptés.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Schmale va poser la toute dernière question de notre étude de cette année sur les initiatives propices à la famille.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci beaucoup.

Quand vous avez modifié votre système de scrutin, cela a-t-il été fait unilatéralement par le parti au pouvoir ou à l'issue d'un référendum auprès de la population?

M. David Wilson:

Ni l'un ni l'autre. Tous les partis à la Chambre ont convenu de le faire et tous les trois ans, ils réexaminent toutes les règles du Parlement et leur apportent des changements assez souvent, mais c'est toujours à l'unanimité, car les partis se rendent compte qu'ils ne seront pas au pouvoir éternellement.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d'avoir pris le temps de nous parler ce matin, à partir de la Nouvelle-Zélande. Je suis sûr que vous pourrez communiquer avec notre greffière si vous avez, l'un ou l'autre, des questions à poser. Nous apprécions vraiment votre participation. Elle nous a été très utile.

(2005)

M. David Wilson:

C'était avec plaisir. Nous avons été très contents de vous parler.

Le président:

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 17, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.